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Sample records for hispanic americans baseline

  1. The Hispanic Americans Baseline Alcohol Survey (HABLAS): Rates and predictors of DUI across Hispanic national groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caetano, Raul; Ramisetty-Mikler, Suhasini; Rodriguez, Lori A

    2008-03-01

    This paper examines rates of self-reported driving under the influence (DUI) of alcohol and 12-month and lifetime DUI arrest rates among Mexican Americans, Puerto Ricans, Cuban Americans and South/Central Americans in the U.S. population. Using a multistage cluster sample design, a total of 5224 individuals 18 years of age and older were selected from the household population in five metropolitan areas of the U.S.: Miami, New York, Philadelphia, Houston and Los Angeles. The survey weighted response rate was 76%. Among men, 21% of Mexican Americans, 19.9% of South/Central Americans, 11.6% of Puerto Ricans and 6.9% of Cuban Americans reported DUI. Rates were lower among women, ranging from 9.7% for Mexican Americans to 1.3% for Cuban Americans. Mexican American men had the highest 12-month arrest rate (1.6%) and the highest lifetime arrest rate (11.2%). Drinkers who reported DUI were heavier drinkers than those not reporting DUI according to a variety of indicators. However, most DUI incidents involved non-alcohol-dependent drivers. Mexican Americans and South Central/Americans, men, younger drivers, those with less than high school education, those with higher income and higher alcohol consumption were more likely to report DUI and DUI arrests. These findings show that Hispanic national groups in the U.S. are diverse regarding drinking and DUI-related experiences.

  2. The Hispanic Americans Baseline Alcohol Survey (HABLAS): the association between acculturation, birthplace and alcohol consumption across Hispanic national groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaeth, Patrice A C; Caetano, Raul; Rodriguez, Lori A

    2012-09-01

    Acculturation to U.S. society has been associated with an increase in drinking and binge drinking among Hispanics. This paper examines the association between acculturation and three drinking-related outcomes: average number of drinks consumed, binge drinking, and drinking 12 drinks or more in a single day in four major Hispanic national groups. The 2006 Hispanic Americans Baseline Alcohol Survey used a multistage cluster sample design to interview 5224 adult Hispanics (18+ years) in five selected U.S. metropolitan areas: Miami, New York, Philadelphia, Houston, and Los Angeles. The four national groups interviewed were: Puerto Ricans, Cuban Americans, Mexican Americans, and South/Central Americans. The survey response rate was 76%. Data on drinking behavior were collected and the analyses include bivariate and multivariate regression techniques. Multivariate analysis did not show an association between acculturation and volume of drinking, binge drinking, or drinking 12 or more drinks in a single day among men. Acculturation stress, however, was associated with drinking 12 or more in a day among men. Among women, high acculturation was associated with a higher volume of drinking, and it also interacted with national group to increase the likelihood of binge drinking. Acculturation does not have a homogeneous effect on drinking across gender and Hispanic national groups. The results confirm that acculturation has a more consistent association with increased drinking and binge drinking among women than among men. The effect of acculturation is therefore gender-specific. This heterogeneity across Hispanic national groups must be considered in future research, treatment, and prevention efforts.

  3. The Hispanic Americans Baseline Alcohol Survey (HABLAS): The association between acculturation, birthplace and alcohol consumption across Hispanic national groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaeth, Patrice A.C.; Caetano, Raul; Rodriguez, Lori A.

    2012-01-01

    Acculturation to U.S. society has been associated with an increase in drinking and binge drinking among Hispanics. This paper examines the association between acculturation and three drinking-related outcomes: average number of drinks consumed, binge drinking, and drinking 12 drinks or more in a single day in four major Hispanic national groups. The 2006 Hispanic Americans Baseline Alcohol Survey used a multistage cluster sample design to interview 5224 adult Hispanics (18+ years) in five selected U.S. metropolitan areas: Miami, New York, Philadelphia, Houston, and Los Angeles. The four national groups interviewed were: Puerto Ricans, Cuban Americans, Mexican Americans, and South/Central Americans. The survey response rate was 76%. Data on drinking behavior were collected and the analyses include bivariate and multivariate regression techniques. Multivariate analysis did not show an association between acculturation and volume of drinking, binge drinking, or drinking 12 or more drinks in a single day among men. Acculturation stress, however, was associated with drinking 12 or more in a day among men. Among women, high acculturation was associated with a higher volume of drinking, and it also interacted with national group to increase the likelihood of binge drinking. Acculturation does not have a homogeneous effect on drinking across gender and Hispanic national groups. The results confirm that acculturation has a more consistent association with increased drinking and binge drinking among women than among men. The effect of acculturation is therefore gender-specific. This heterogeneity across Hispanic national groups must be considered in future research, treatment, and prevention efforts. PMID:22613057

  4. The Hispanic Americans Baseline Alcohol Survey (HABLAS): Rates and predictors of DUI across Hispanic national groups

    OpenAIRE

    Caetano, Raul; RAMISETTY-MIKLER, SUHASINI; Rodriguez, Lori A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines rates of self-reported driving under the influence (DUI) of alcohol and 12 month and lifetime DUI arrest rates among Mexican Americans, Puerto Ricans, Cuban Americans and South/Central Americans in the U.S. population. Using a multistage cluster sample design, a total of 5,224 individuals 18 years of age and older were selected from the household population in five metropolitan areas of the U.S.: Miami, New York, Philadelphia, Houston and Los Angeles. The survey weighted r...

  5. Asthma and Hispanic Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Data > Minority Population Profiles > Hispanic/Latino > Asthma Asthma and Hispanic Americans In 2014, 2.1 million Hispanics reported that they currently have asthma. Puerto Rican Americans have almost twice the asthma ...

  6. Fetal hemoglobin levels in African American and Hispanic children with sickle cell disease at baseline and in response to hydroxyurea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ender, Katherine L; Lee, Margaret T; Sheth, Sujit; Licursi, Maureen; Crotty, Jennifer; Barral, Sandra; Green, Nancy S

    2011-10-01

    The degree of fetal hemoglobin (HbF) expression is a major determinant of phenotypic severity of sickle cell disease (SCD). Genetic regulation of HbF production is complex and can vary among ethnic groups. The pediatric sickle cell population at our institution is approximately half Hispanic, nearly all from the Dominican Republic. Hydroxyurea (HU) is the only Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drug to ameliorate symptoms of SCD. We retrospectively compared baseline and HU-induced percent HbF (%HbF) in African American (AA) and Hispanic (H) patients aged 4 to 21 years with homozygous Sickle hemoglobin or HbSβ(0)Thalassemia. No significant differences were detected in average baseline %HbF between AA (N=48) and H (N=58) patients (P=0.63). In the subset of children taking HU who reached maximum tolerated dose (MTD), no differences were found between the ethnic groups in laboratory response to drug, measured by %HbF at MTD (P=0.28), the increase in %HbF (P=0.31) or mean red cell volume (MCV) (P=0.93), or the MTD of HU (P=0.95). Regulation of HbF at baseline and in response to HU are comparable between Hispanics and African Americans at our center. If generalizable, our results support combining these 2 groups in future clinical and translational analyses focused on HbF and response to HU in this ethnically mixed patient population.

  7. Obesity and Hispanic Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Data > Minority Population Profiles > Hispanic/Latino > Obesity Obesity and Hispanic Americans Among Mexican American women, 77 ... ss6304.pdf [PDF | 3.38MB] HEALTH IMPACT OF OBESITY More than 80 percent of people with type ...

  8. Profile: Hispanic/Latino Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the United States: 2011 [PDF | 1.1MB] Overview of Race and Hispanic Origin: 2010 [PDF | 1.9MB] Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2015 [PDF | 1.6MB] Income and Poverty in the United States: 2015 [PDF | 3.1MB] ...

  9. Science Is "Ciencia": Meeting the Needs of Hispanic American Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakow, Steven J.; Bermudez, Andrea B.

    1993-01-01

    Reviews some of the factors known to influence the achievement and retention of Hispanic Americans in technologically related fields. Discusses directions in which research should focus to meet the needs of Hispanic-American students. (PR)

  10. Science Is "Ciencia": Meeting the Needs of Hispanic American Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakow, Steven J.; Bermudez, Andrea B.

    1993-01-01

    Reviews some of the factors known to influence the achievement and retention of Hispanic Americans in technologically related fields. Discusses directions in which research should focus to meet the needs of Hispanic-American students. (PR)

  11. A Language Challenge to the Hispanic American.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nino, Miguel A.

    The Hispanic-American, because he or she is bilingual and bicultural, could play an important role in the future economic development of the United States. Declines in steel, automotive, and electronics industries due to foreign competition and market saturation have caused industrial displacement and unemployment. The Maquiladora or Twin Plant…

  12. Friendships Influence Hispanic Students' Implicit Attitudes toward White Non-Hispanics Relative to African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aberson, Christopher L.; Porter, Michael K.; Gaffney, Amber M.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the role of Hispanic students' friendships with White non-Hispanics (n-Hs) and African Americans (AAs) in predicting implicit and explicit prejudices toward these groups. Participants (N = 73) completed implicit and explicit attitude measures and a friendship questionnaire. Friendships were associated with implicit attitudes…

  13. Friendships Influence Hispanic Students' Implicit Attitudes toward White Non-Hispanics Relative to African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aberson, Christopher L.; Porter, Michael K.; Gaffney, Amber M.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the role of Hispanic students' friendships with White non-Hispanics (n-Hs) and African Americans (AAs) in predicting implicit and explicit prejudices toward these groups. Participants (N = 73) completed implicit and explicit attitude measures and a friendship questionnaire. Friendships were associated with implicit attitudes…

  14. A Progress Report to the Secretary of Education from the President's Advisory Commission on Educational Excellence for Hispanic Americans. White House Initiative on Educational Excellence for Hispanic Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florez, John; And Others

    The President's Advisory Commission on Educational Excellence for Hispanic Americans was established by the 1990 Executive Order 12729 to advise the Secretary of Education on how to promote quality education for Hispanic Americans. The Commission is also responsible for providing advice to the Secretary on the progress of Hispanic Americans toward…

  15. Bilingualism (Ancestral Language Maintenance) among Native American, Vietnamese American, and Hispanic American College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wharry, Cheryl

    1993-01-01

    A survey of 21 Hispanic, 22 Native American, and 10 Vietnamese American college students found that adoption or maintenance of ancestral language was related to attitudes toward ancestral language, beliefs about parental attitudes, and integrative motivation (toward family and ancestral ethnic group). There were significant differences by gender…

  16. Managerial Concerns and Hispanic Culture in the American Workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cellini, Alva V.

    With changing social and economic realities, certain cultural differences in the management of Hispanic workers must be accepted and accommodated in the American workplace, where the scientific approach to management is the general rule. The scientific view of management is hardly accepted by Latin Americans whose management philosophy is more…

  17. Features of hepatocellular carcinoma in Hispanics differ from African Americans and non-Hispanic Whites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venepalli, Neeta K; Modayil, Mary V; Berg, Stephanie A; Nair, Tad D; Parepally, Mayur; Rajaram, Priyanka; Gaba, Ron C; Bui, James T; Huang, Yue; Cotler, Scott J

    2017-01-01

    AIM To compare features of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in Hispanics to those of African Americans and Whites. METHODS Patients treated for HCC at an urban tertiary medical center from 2005 to 2011 were identified from a tumor registry. Data were collected retrospectively, including demographics, comorbidities, liver disease characteristics, tumor parameters, treatment, and survival (OS) outcomes. OS analyses were performed using Kaplan-Meier method. RESULTS One hundred and ninety-five patients with HCC were identified: 80.5% were male, and 22% were age 65 or older. Mean age at HCC diagnosis was 59.7 ± 9.8 years. Sixty-one point five percent of patients had Medicare or Medicaid; 4.1% were uninsured. Compared to African American (31.2%) and White (46.2%) patients, Hispanic patients (22.6%) were more likely to have diabetes (P = 0.0019), hyperlipidemia (P = 0.0001), nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) (P = 0.0021), end stage renal disease (P = 0.0057), and less likely to have hepatitis C virus (P encephalopathy (P = 0.0087). Hispanic patients with HCC had shorter OS than the other racial groups (P = 0.020), despite similarities in HCC parameters and treatment. CONCLUSION In conclusion, Hispanic patients with HCC have higher incidence of modifiable metabolic risk factors including NASH, and shorter OS than African American and White patients.

  18. Allusions to Culture and Religion in Hispanic American Children's Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavell, Judy A.

    2011-01-01

    Allusions to culture and religion frequently appear in Hispanic American children's literature. These allusions resonate with those who share the culture and help those students connect with the book. These same allusions inform those who are not of the culture and broaden their understanding. This paper will provide examples of such allusions…

  19. Hispanic American Psychocultural Dispositions Relevant to Personnel Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-07-01

    money/dinero respect/respecto advancement/avance dignity/dignidad education/ educacion ACHIEVEMENT MOTIVATION LEADERSHIP VALUES duty/obi lgac ion boss...8217 C .. . i i,...* ,.D.’a _e,_.. ~ ... -0 , • " " EDUCATION/ EDUCACION The Mexican group from El Paso ranked the highest with regard to the subjective...are more personal. As discussed next, the more traditional Hispanic Americans are inclined to think of AUTHORITY in the context of more formal and

  20. Periodontal disease in Hispanic Americans with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, M John; Potter, Richard M; Blodgett, Janet; Ebersole, Jeffrey L

    2008-04-01

    Diabetes is a major risk factor for the development of periodontal disease in certain populations. The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is increased in Hispanic Americans, but its impact on the extent and severity of periodontal disease in this population has not been determined. Sixty-three Hispanic Americans, aged 33 to 72 years, from South Texas were grouped based on the presence or absence of type 2 diabetes. Past medical histories, including smoking, were obtained. Periodontal status was evaluated by measuring probing depth (PD), clinical attachment level (CAL), plaque, bleeding on probing, visual gingival inflammation, and calculus. Type 2 diabetes was associated frequently with major medical complications in this population. Diabetes was associated with significantly more calculus formation and tooth loss and an increased extent and severity of periodontitis. Subjects with diabetes had nearly three times the mean CAL and frequency of PD >6 mm than subjects without diabetes and nearly twice the frequency of moderate to advanced attachment loss (> or =3 mm). Smoking and diabetes had significant independent effects on mean CAL and the frequency of deep pockets. Diabetes and smoking combined were associated with a significantly higher frequency of sites with CAL > or =3 mm compared to healthy non-smokers, healthy smokers, and non-smokers with diabetes. Hispanic Americans with type 2 diabetes had more supra- and subgingival calculus, an increased extent and severity of periodontal destruction, and an increased frequency of tooth loss due to periodontitis. An additive/synergistic contribution of type 2 diabetes and smoking for increasing the extent of periodontal disease was observed.

  1. Documenting Nursing and Medical Students' Stereotypes about Hispanic and American Indian Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean, Meghan G; Focella, Elizabeth S; Covarrubias, Rebecca; Stone, Jeff; Moskowitz, Gordon B; Badger, Terry A

    2014-10-01

    Hispanic Americans and American Indians face significant health disparities compared with White Americans. Research suggests that stereotyping of minority patients by members of the medical community is an important antecedent of race and ethnicity-based health disparities. This work has primarily focused on physicians' perceptions, however, and little research has examined the stereotypes healthcare personnel associate with Hispanic and American Indian patients. The present study assesses: 1) the health-related stereotypes both nursing and medical students hold about Hispanic and American Indian patients, and 2) nursing and medical students' motivation to treat Hispanic and American Indian patients in an unbiased manner. Participants completed a questionnaire assessing their awareness of stereotypes that healthcare professionals associate with Hispanic and American Indian patients then completed measures of their motivation to treat Hispanics and American Indians in an unbiased manner. Despite being highly motivated to treat Hispanic and American Indian individuals fairly, the majority of participants reported awareness of stereotypes associating these patient groups with noncompliance, risky health behavior, and difficulty understanding and/or communicating health-related information. This research provides direct evidence for negative health-related stereotypes associated with two understudied minority patient groups-Hispanics and American Indians-among both nursing and medical personnel.

  2. Lactose intolerance and health disparities among African Americans and Hispanic Americans: an updated consensus statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Rahn K; Fileti, Cecelia Pozo; Keith, Jeanette; Tropez-Sims, Susanne; Price, Winston; Allison-Ottey, Sharon Denise

    2013-01-01

    Dairy foods contribute nine essential nutrients to the diet including calcium, potassium and vitamin D; nutrients identified by the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans as being "of public health concern" within the U.S. population. Milk and milk product intake is associated with better diet quality and has been associated with a reduced risk of chronic diseases or conditions including hypertension, cardiovascular disease, metabolic syndrome, Type 2 Diabetes and osteoporosis. Some research also indicates dairy food intake may be linked to reduced body fat, when accompanied by energy-restriction. On average, both African Americans and Hispanic Americans consume less than the recommended levels of dairy foods, and perceived or actual lactose intolerance can be a primary reason for limiting or avoiding dairy intake. True lactose intolerance prevalence is not known because healthcare providers do not routinely measure for it, and no standardized assessment method exists. Avoiding dairy may lead to shortfalls of essential nutrients and increased susceptibility to chronic disease. This updated Consensus Statement aims to provide the most current information about lactose intolerance and health, with specific relevance to the African American and Hispanic American communities. Topics covered include diagnostic considerations, actual and recommended dairy food intake and levels of consumption of key dairy nutrients among African Americans and Hispanic Americans; prevalence of self-reported lactose intolerance among various racial/ethnic groups; the association between dairy food intake, lactose intolerance and chronic disease; and research-based management recommendations for those with lactose intolerance.

  3. A prospective cohort study of modifiable risk factors for gestational diabetes among Hispanic women: design and baseline characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasan-Taber, Lisa; Fortner, Renée Turzanski; Gollenberg, Audra; Buonnaccorsi, John; Dole, Nancy; Markenson, Glenn

    2010-01-01

    Women diagnosed with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) are at high risk for future diabetes, with rates of GDM consistently higher in Hispanic than non-Hispanic white women. Currently recognized risk factors for GDM are absent in up to half of affected women, and studies addressing modifiable risk factors for GDM in Hispanic women are sparse. Proyecto Buena Salud is an ongoing prospective cohort study of Hispanic women in Massachusetts designed to assess physical activity, psychosocial stress, and GDM risk. Bilingual interviewers recruit prenatal care patients early in pregnancy and assess activity, trait anxiety, perceived stress, and depressive symptoms using validated questionnaires. Baseline characteristics of the first 632 participants are presented. Women were predominantly young (69% Buena Salud represents a high-risk population of pregnant Hispanic women who are predominantly inactive, with higher levels of perceived stress, trait anxiety, and depressive symptoms compared to predominantly non-Hispanic white cohorts studied earlier. Therefore, Proyecto Buena Salud provides a unique opportunity to prospectively evaluate modifiable risk factors for GDM. Findings will inform prenatal behavioral intervention programs designed to address modifiable GDM risk factors.

  4. Adapting a program to inform African American and Hispanic American women about cancer clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadler, Georgia Robins; Gonzalez, Jenny; Mumman, Manpreet; Cullen, Lisa; Lahousse, Sheila F; Malcarne, Vanessa; Conde, Viridiana; Riley, Natasha

    2010-06-01

    The dearth of evidence-based clinical trial education programs may contribute to the under-representation of African American and Hispanic American women in cancer research studies. This study used focus group-derived data from 80 women distributed among eight Spanish- and English-language focus groups. These data guided the researchers' adaptation and refinement of the National Cancer Institute's various clinical trials education programs into a program that was specifically focused on meeting the information needs of minority women and addressing the barriers to study participation that they perceived. A "sisterhood" theme was adopted and woven throughout the presentation.

  5. FastStats: Health of Black or African American non-Hispanic Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health of Black or African American non-Hispanic Population Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Data are ... Source: Summary Health Statistics Tables for the U.S. Population: National Health Interview Survey, 2015, Table P-1c [ ...

  6. An exploratory study of responses to low-dose lithium in African Americans and Hispanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez Arnold, Jodi; Salcedo, Stephanie; Ketter, Terrence A; Calabrese, Joseph R; Rabideau, Dustin J; Nierenberg, Andrew A; Bazan, Melissa; Leon, Andrew C; Friedman, Edward S; Iosifescu, Dan; Sylvia, Louisa G; Ostacher, Michael; Thase, Michael; Reilly-Harrington, Noreen A; Bowden, Charles L

    2015-06-01

    Few prospective studies examine the impact of ethnicity or race on outcomes with lithium for bipolar disorder. This exploratory study examines differences in lithium response and treatment outcomes in Hispanics, African Americans, and non-Hispanic whites with bipolar disorder in the Lithium Treatment Moderate Dose Use Study (LiTMUS). LiTMUS was a six-site randomized controlled trial of low-dose lithium added to optimized treatment (OPT; personalized, evidence-based pharmacotherapy) vs. OPT alone in outpatients with bipolar disorder. Of 283 participants, 47 African Americans, 39 Hispanics, and 175 non-Hispanic whites were examined. We predicted minority groups would have more negative medication attitudes and higher attrition rates, but better clinical outcomes. African Americans in the lithium group improved more on depression and life functioning compared to whites over the 6 month study. African Americans in the OPT only group had marginal improvement on depression symptoms. For Hispanics, satisfaction with life did not significantly improve in the OPT only group, in contrast to whites and African Americans who improved over time on all measures. Attitudes toward medications did not differ across ethnic/racial groups. African Americans show some greater improvements with lithium than non-Hispanic whites, and Hispanics showed more consistent improvements in the lithium group. The impact of low-dose lithium should be studied in a larger sample as there may be particular benefit for African Americans and Hispanics. Given that the control group (regardless of ethnicity/race) had significant improvements, optimized treatment may be beneficial for any ethnic group. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. An Exploratory Study of Responses to Low-Dose Lithium in African Americans and Hispanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Jodi Gonzalez; Salcedo, Stephanie; Ketter, Terrence A.; Calabrese, Joseph R.; Rabideau, Dustin J.; Nierenberg, Andrew A.; Bazan, Melissa; Leon, Andrew C.; Friedman, Edward S.; Iosifescu, Dan; Sylvia, Louisa G.; Ostacher, Michael; Thase, Michael; Reilly-Harrington, Noreen A.; Bowden, Charles L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Few prospective studies examine the impact of ethnicity or race on outcomes with lithium for bipolar disorder. This exploratory study examines differences in lithium response and treatment outcomes in Hispanics, African Americans, and non-Hispanic Whites with bipolar disorder in the Lithium Treatment Moderate Dose Use Study (LiTMUS). Methods LiTMUS was a six-site randomized controlled trial of low-dose lithium added to optimized treatment (OPT; personalized, evidence-based pharmacotherapy) versus OPT alone in outpatients with bipolar disorder. Of 283 participants, 47 African Americans, 39 Hispanics, and 175 non-Hispanic whites were examined. We predicted minority groups would have more negative medication attitudes and higher attrition rates, but better clinical outcomes. Results African Americans in the lithium group improved more on depression and life functioning compared to whites over the 6 month study. African Americans in the OPT only group had marginal improvement on depression symptoms. For Hispanics, satisfaction with life did not significantly improve in the OPT only group, in contrast to whites and African Americans who improved over time on all measures. Attitudes toward medications did not differ across ethnic/racial groups. Conclusions African Americans show some greater improvements with lithium than non-Hispanic whites, and Hispanics showed more consistent improvements in the lithium group. The impact of low-dose lithium should be studied in a larger sample as there may be particular benefit for African Americans and Hispanics. Given that the control group (regardless of ethnicity/race) had significant improvements, optimized treatment may be beneficial for any ethnic group. PMID:25827507

  8. Gender Distrust and Intimate Unions among Low-Income Hispanic and African-American Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estacion, Angela; Cherlin, Andrew

    2010-04-01

    We investigate levels of generalized distrust of men among low-income African American, Mexican, Puerto Rican, Dominican, and non-Hispanic white women in a three-city survey. The results reveal substantial variation. We find Hispanics' overall levels of distrust to be higher than levels for either African Americans or whites. Among Hispanics, however, Dominicans are the most distrusting group followed by Puerto Ricans; whereas Mexicans report levels of distrust that are comparable to African Americans and non-Hispanic whites. Married women are less distrusting than cohabiting women who, in turn, are less distrusting than non-cohabiting women. Nevertheless, distrust is not a significant predictor of a woman's total number of lifetime marital and cohabiting relationships; and distrust only marginally predicts a woman's desire to be in a steady relationship. We suggest that studies of trust in this population should focus more on attitudes displayed in specific encounters than on overall, generalized attitudes about gender distrust.

  9. An intervention to address interpersonal violence among low-income midwestern Hispanic-American teens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enriquez, Maithe; Kelly, Patricia J; Cheng, An-Lin; Hunter, Jennifer; Mendez, Eduardo

    2012-04-01

    This paper reports pilot testing of "Familias En Nuestra Escuela", an in-school interpersonal violence prevention intervention targeting Hispanic-American teens. The intervention, based on the hypothesis that the preservation and reinforcement of Hispanic cultural values can serve as a protective factor against violence, focused on the enhancement of ethnic pride. Researchers formed a partnership with a midwestern Hispanic community to test the feasibility, receptivity and preliminary impact of the intervention in a pre/post test, no control group design. Participants were low-income, predominantly first-generation Hispanic-American freshmen and sophomore students from one Hispanic-serving high school. Findings revealed a statistically significant increase in the intervention's mediator, ethic pride. Changes in the desired direction occurred on measures of perceptions of self-efficacy for self-control, couple violence, and gender attitudes. The incidence of physical fighting and dating violence behaviors decreased over the course of an academic school year. Results provide preliminary evidence for the use of interventions based on ethnic and cultural pride as a violence prevention strategy among Hispanic-American teens, especially those who are first generation Americans.

  10. Functional limitations and nativity status among older Arab, Asian, black, Hispanic, and white Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallo, Florence J; Booza, Jason; Nguyen, Norma D

    2015-04-01

    To examine the association between nativity status (foreign and US-born) by race/ethnicity (Arab, Asian, black, Hispanic, white) on having a functional limitation. We used American Community Survey data (2001-2007; n = 1,964,777; 65+ years) and estimated odds ratios (95% confidence intervals). In the crude model, foreign-born Blacks and Arabs were more likely, while Asians and Hispanics were less likely to report having a functional limitation compared to white. In the fully adjusted model, Blacks, Hispanics, and Asians were less likely, while Arabs were more likely to report having a functional limitation. In the crude model, US-born Blacks and Hispanics were more likely, while Asians and Arabs were less likely to report having a functional limitation compared to whites. Policies and programs tailored to foreign-born Arab Americans may help prevent or delay the onset of disability, especially when initiated shortly after their arrival to the US.

  11. Fun & Fit, Phase I: A Program for Overweight African American and Hispanic American Children from Low-Income Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meaney, Karen S.; Hart, Melanie A.; Griffin, L. Kent

    2009-01-01

    Fun & Fit is a program designed to create positive physical activity experiences and to promote healthy lifestyle choices among overweight children from low-income African American and Hispanic American families. The program is a collaborative project between Texas Tech University and the Lubbock Independent School District funded through a…

  12. Instructional Strategies and Best Practices to Narrow the Mathematics Achievement Gaps between African American, Hispanic, and European American Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolden, Felicia Mickles

    2012-01-01

    A persistent mathematics achievement gap between African American, Hispanic, and European American students at one elementary school was the focus of this investigation. The research questions of this single site case study involved understanding why an achievement gap exists, and to identify the instructional strategies and best practices used to…

  13. Association of TCF7L2 gene polymorphisms with reduced acute insulin response in Hispanic Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Nicholette D; Lehtinen, Allison B; Langefeld, Carl D; Campbell, Joel K; Haffner, Steven M; Norris, Jill M; Bergman, Richard N; Goodarzi, Mark O; Rotter, Jerome I; Bowden, Donald W

    2008-01-01

    Genetic variation at the transcription factor 7-like 2 locus has been linked to type 2 diabetes in predominantly European-derived populations. The biological basis of these associations remains to be determined. The objective of this study was to evaluate previously associated variants for association with measures of glucose homeostasis in Hispanic-Americans and African-Americans and determine the biological mechanism(s) through which these variants exert their effect. This study was the Insulin Resistance Atherosclerosis Family Study (IRAS-FS). The IRAS-FS is a community-based study of Hispanic-Americans (San Antonio, TX, and San Luis Valley, CO) and African-Americans (Los Angeles, CA). A total of 1040 Hispanic-American and 500 African-American individuals from the IRAS-FS formed the basis of this study. MAIN OUTCOMES MEASURES(S): The primary glucose homeostasis phenotypes of interest in this study were derived from the frequently sampled iv glucose tolerance test and include insulin sensitivity, acute insulin response, and disposition index. In Hispanic-Americans, significant evidence of association was observed between single-nucleotide polymorphisms rs7903146 and rs112255372 with reduced insulin secretion as measured by acute insulin response and adjusted for the degree of insulin sensitivity (P = 0.032 and 0.036, respectively). Other quantitative measures, e.g. insulin sensitivity or disposition index, were not associated with the single nucleotide polymorphisms examined. In African-Americans there was no evidence of association observed. These results suggest that transcription factor 7-like 2 variants could play a role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes in the Hispanic-American population through a mechanism involving insulin secretion.

  14. Attachment, Acculturation, and Psychosomatic Complaints among Hispanic American University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chiachih D. C.; Scalise, Dominick A.; Barajas-Munoz, I. Alejandro; Julio, Kathy; Gomez, Ayleen

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated adult attachment and acculturation frameworks of reported psychosomatic complaints related to perceived discrimination among a sample of Latino/Hispanic university students (N = 160). The model supported by the data suggests that attachment anxiety, acculturation toward the dominant cultural norms, and adherence to…

  15. Attachment, Acculturation, and Psychosomatic Complaints among Hispanic American University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chiachih D. C.; Scalise, Dominick A.; Barajas-Munoz, I. Alejandro; Julio, Kathy; Gomez, Ayleen

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated adult attachment and acculturation frameworks of reported psychosomatic complaints related to perceived discrimination among a sample of Latino/Hispanic university students (N = 160). The model supported by the data suggests that attachment anxiety, acculturation toward the dominant cultural norms, and adherence to…

  16. The Status of Hispanic American Students in Science: Attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Constance L.; Rakow, Steven J.

    1985-01-01

    Examines attitudes toward science classes and teachers; science as a career; and value of science among elementary, junior and senior high Hispanic students in participating National Assessment of Educational Progress schools over three years. Compares attitudes of White and Black students. Results show increase in positive attitudes of minority…

  17. Diary days needed to estimate activity among older African-American and Hispanic women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eason, Karen E; Masse, Louise C; Kelder, Steven H; Tortolero, Susan R

    2002-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate variation in energy expenditure among older African-American and Hispanic female workers and nonworkers, and identify the number of days of diary self-report necessary to reliably estimate activity. 227 women (111 African-American, 116 Hispanic) from the Women On The Move study completed a 7-d diary and were used in the analysis for this study (mean age 49.3 yr, SD = 7.0; mean weight 77.0 kg, SD = 17.6 kg; mean BMI 30, SD = 6.5). Kcal per day for total activity and specific types of activity were calculated for each subject and used in generalizability analyses. Results indicated that 11 d of activity are needed to reliably estimate total activity for African-American nonworkers and 8 d for Hispanic nonworkers. For workers, 12 d of activity are needed to reliably estimate total activity for African-Americans and 14 d are required for Hispanics. Days of diary self-report required by activity type for African-Americans range from 6 to 48 for nonworkers and from 6 to 30 for workers. For Hispanics, days of diary self-report required by activity type range from 8 to 111 for nonworkers and 7 to 42 for workers. The results of this study indicate the need for more than 7 d of diary self-report to achieve reliable estimates of total activity in older African-American and Hispanic women. The study also found that certain types of activity could be reliably estimated in less than 7 d. However, when there is less variability in the measure/behavior, the reliability is expected to be less and more measurement days are needed to achieve a desired level of reliability.

  18. Comparison of reflux esophagitis and its complications between African Americans and non-Hispanic whites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kenneth J Vega; Sian Chisholm; M Mazen Jamal

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To determine the effect of ethnicity on the severity of reflux esophagitis (RE) and its complications. METHODS: A retrospective search of the endoscopy database at the University of Florida Health Science Center/Jacksonville for all cases of reflux esophagitis and its complications from January 1 to March 31, 2001 was performed. Inclusion criteria were endoscopic evidence of esophagitis using the LA classification, reflux related complications and self-reported ethnicity. The data obtained included esophagitis grade, presence of a hiatal hernia, esophageal ulcer, stricture and Barrett's esophagus, and endoscopy indication. RESULTS: The search identified 259 patients with RE or its complications, of which 171 were non-Hispanic whites and 88 were African Americans. The mean ages and male/female ratios were similar in the two groups. RE grade, esophageal ulcer, stricture and hiatal hernia frequency were likewise similar in the groups. Barrett's esophagus was present more often in non-Hispanic whites than in African Americans (15.8% vs 4.5%; P < 0.01). Heartburn was a more frequent indication for endoscopy in non-Hispanic whites with erosive esophagitis than in African Americans (28.1% vs 7.9%; P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Distribution of RE grade and frequency of reflux-related esophageal ulcer, stricture and reflux-related esophageal ulcer, stricture and hiatal hernia are similar in non-Hispanic whites and African Americans. Heartburn was more frequently and nausea/vomiting less frequently reported as the primary endoscopic indication in non-Hispanic whites compared with African Americans with erosive esophagitis or its complications. African Americans have a decreased prevalence of Barrett's esophagus compared with non-Hispanic whites.

  19. Chronic Disease and Depression Among Hispanic Americans: Reconceptualizing the Masculine Self.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Isabella; Corvin, Jaime A

    2016-11-01

    Hispanic Americans are the fastest growing minority group in the United States. They face a distinct set of health challenges, resulting in persistent health disparities. Chronic disease self-management programs hold promise in addressing individual-level, behavioral risks factors, such as dietary habits and physical activity patterns. In light of the unique barriers Hispanic men face, including low participation in evidence-based health intervention research, this article argues for a gendered perspective when approaching Hispanic men's physical and mental health needs. Through the analysis of data collected from male-only focus groups (N = 3, n = 15) with Hispanic Americans in west central Florida, this study identified that masculine identity is influenced by chronic disease and comorbid depression status. Diagnosis with a chronic disease and/or depression is accompanied by lifestyle adaptations, activity restrictions, and changes in income and health care demands that can undermine traditional notions of Hispanic masculinity. Consequently, masculine identity is associated with self-management strategies in complex ways. Public health interventions aimed at addressing comorbid chronic disease and depression among Hispanic men must take into consideration the role of gender identity and relevant conceptualizations of masculinity in order to better serve this underserved and understudied population. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Mexican Americans Receive Less Intensive Stroke Rehabilitation Than Non-Hispanic Whites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenstern, Lewis B; Sais, Emma; Fuentes, Michael; Ifejika, Nneka L; Jiang, Xiaqing; Horn, Susan D; Case, Erin; Lisabeth, Lynda D

    2017-06-01

    Mexican Americans (MAs) have worse neurological, functional, and cognitive outcomes after stroke. Stroke rehabilitation is important for good outcome. In a population-based study, we sought to determine whether allocation of stroke rehabilitation services differed by ethnicity. Patients with stroke were identified as part of the Brain Attack Surveillance in Corpus Christi (BASIC) project, TX, USA. Cases were validated by physicians using source documentation. Patients were followed prospectively for 3 months after stroke to determine rehabilitation services and transitions. Descriptive statistics were used to depict the study population. Continuous baseline variables were compared using 2 sample t tests or Wilcoxon rank-sum tests by ethnicity. Categorical baseline variables were compared using χ(2) tests. Ethnic comparisons of rehabilitation services were compared using χ(2) tests, Fisher's exact tests, and logistic regression. Seventy-two subjects (50 MA and 22 non-Hispanic white [NHW]) were followed. Mean age, NHW-69 (SD 13), MA-66 (SD 11) years, sex (NHW 55% male, MA 50% male) and median presenting National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale did not differ significantly. There were no ethnic differences among the proportion of patients who were sent home without any rehabilitation services (P=0.9). Among those who received rehabilitation, NHWs were more likely to get inpatient rehabilitation (73%) compared with MAs (30%), P=0.016. MAs (51%) were much more likely to receive home rehabilitation services compared with NHWs (0%) (P=0.0017). In this population-based study, MAs were more likely to receive home-based rehabilitation, whereas NHWs were more likely to get inpatient rehabilitation. This disparity may, in part, explain the worse stroke outcome in MAs. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Association of Baseline Depressive Symptoms with Prevalent and Incident Pre-Hypertension and Hypertension in Postmenopausal Hispanic Women: Results from the Women's Health Initiative.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth E Zambrana

    Full Text Available Depression and depressive symptoms are risk factors for hypertension (HTN and cardiovascular disease (CVD. Hispanic women have higher rates of depressive symptoms compared to other racial/ethnic groups yet few studies have investigated its association with incident prehypertension and hypertension among postmenopausal Hispanic women. This study aims to assess if an association exists between baseline depression and incident hypertension at 3 years follow-up among postmenopausal Hispanic women.Prospective cohort study, Women's Health Initiative (WHI, included 4,680 Hispanic women who participated in the observational and clinical trial studies at baseline and at third-year follow-up. Baseline current depressive symptoms and past depression history were measured as well as important correlates of depression-social support, optimism, life events and caregiving. Multinomial logistic regression was used to estimate prevalent and incident prehypertension and hypertension in relation to depressive symptoms.Prevalence of current baseline depression ranged from 26% to 28% by hypertension category and education moderated these rates. In age-adjusted models, women with depression were more likely to be hypertensive (OR = 1.25; 95% CI 1.04-1.51, although results were attenuated when adjusting for covariates. Depression at baseline in normotensive Hispanic women was associated with incident hypertension at year 3 follow-up (OR = 1.74; 95% CI 1.10-2.74 after adjustment for insurance and behavioral factors. However, further adjustment for clinical covariates attenuated the association. Analyses of psychosocial variables correlated with depression but did not alter findings. Low rates of antidepressant medication usage were also reported.In the largest longitudinal study to date of older Hispanic women which included physiologic, behavioral and psychosocial moderators of depression, there was no association between baseline depressive symptoms and prevalent nor

  2. Multiple Measures of Physical Activity, Dietary Habits and Weight Status in African American and Hispanic or Latina Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mama, Scherezade K.; Medina, Ashley V.; Reese-Smith, Jacqueline Y.; Banda, Jorge A.; Layne, Charles S.; Baxter, Meggin; O’Connor, Daniel P.; McNeill, Lorna; Estabrooks, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Compared measures of physical activity and dietary habits used in the Health Is Power (HIP) study, and described the associations of physical activity and dietary habits among African American and Hispanic or Latino women, adjusted for weight status. Cross-sectional baseline data were compared for community dwelling, healthy African American (N = 262) and Hispanic or Latina women (N = 148) who participated in HIP. Physical activity was measured using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) long form, the Check And Line Questionnaire (CALQ) log and accelerometry. Dietary habits were measured using NCI 24-h recall screeners, vegetable and fruit (VF) logs and the NCI Diet History Questionnaire (DHQ). Differences in physical activity and dietary habits were assessed using simultaneous 2 (ethnicity) × 3 (weight status) ANCOVAs adjusted for age and socioeconomic status. Women (M age = 44.4 ± 10.9 years) were obese (M = 34.0 ± 9.7 kg/m2), did not meet physical activity guidelines as measured by accelerometry (M = 19.4 ± 19.1 min MVPA/day) and ate few VF (M = 2.8 ± 2.7 servings/day). DHQ variables differed by weight status. IPAQ was associated with CALQ, and CALQ with accelerometry (P < .05). IPAQ was not associated with accelerometry. Regardless of ethnicity, normal weight women did more physical activity, reported more VF consumption, and consumed more fat calories than overweight and obese women (Ps < .05). African American women did more MVPA than Hispanic or Latino women (P < .001). Relationships between behaviors and weight status suggest accelerometry and DHQ are preferable, regardless of ethnicity; and studies may capture different domains of physical activity and dietary habits depending on measure used. PMID:21519867

  3. Considerations Influencing Hispanic-American Mothers' Intergenerational Language Practices with Their Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niles, Gloria Y.

    2013-01-01

    Using basic qualitative research methodology, the purpose for this dissertation study was to explore the language, social and learning considerations and subsequent actions taken by eight, bilingual, Hispanic-American mothers of children with autism between the ages of four and eight-years-old regarding speaking Spanish, English or both languages…

  4. Influence of Mentoring on African American and Hispanic Males in High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jacqueline A.

    2016-01-01

    The mixed method research study was designed to evaluate the effects on a mentoring initiative on 40 African American and Hispanic males in an urban high school. The study took place over a three-month period in a traditional public school with 2,000 students. Data collection methods used included individual interview with student mentees, surveys…

  5. Patient Characteristics and Treatment Outcomes for African American, Hispanic, and White Adolescents in DATOS-A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rounds-Bryant, Jennifer L.; Staab, Jennifer

    2001-01-01

    Compared background, pre-treatment characteristics, and post-treatment outcomes of African American, Hispanic, and white adolescent substance abusers participating in the Drug Abuse Treatment Outcome Studies for Adolescents (DATOS-A). Found that patients were similar with respect to basic pre-treatment demographics. Compared to white adolescents,…

  6. Peer Victimization and Social-Psychological Adjustment in Hispanic and African-American Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storch, Eric A.; Nock, Matthew K.; Masia-Warner, Carrie; Barlas, Mitchell E.

    2003-01-01

    We examined the relation of overt and relational victimization to depressive symptoms, fear of negative evaluation (FNE), social avoidance, and loneliness in a sample of Hispanic and African-American children. The Social Experience Questionnaire, Children's Depression Inventory, Social Anxiety Scale for Children--Revised, and Asher Loneliness…

  7. Food frequency intakes and sociodemographic factors of elderly Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic whites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomew, A M; Young, E A; Martin, H W; Hazuda, H P

    1990-12-01

    A food frequency survey of 254 low-income, elderly (aged 60 to 96), free-living Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic whites was conducted as part of a larger study of the adjustment and health of older persons residing in a San Antonio barrio. Weekly intakes of selected foods were determined using the food frequency questionnaire from the Hispanic Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. We used t-tests to determine significance of difference in frequency of food consumption by ethnicity. The variance in consumption of selected foods was estimated with multiple regression analysis for the independent variables marital status, age, sex, education level, income, birthplace, and ethnicity. Ethnicity was the major variable influencing food intake. There were significant differences (p less than or equal to .05) between ethnic groups: Mexican Americans consumed eggs, poultry, legumes, organ meats, avocados/olives, flour tortillas, and sugar more frequently than non-Hispanic whites; they also used saturated fats in cooking more frequently than non-Hispanic whites; and they consumed skim milk, ice cream/ice milk, beef, all fruits or juices, all vegetables, breads, and oil/margarine less frequently than non-Hispanic whites. The results suggest that ethnicity plays a major role in predicting dietary patterns.

  8. Pitfalls in communication with Hispanic and African-American patients: do translators help or harm?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, T R

    1992-11-01

    The Martin Luther King County General Hospital, Los Angeles, California, provides services for an equal number of Hispanics (most are recent immigrants from Mexico) and African Americans who have lived in the community since before the Watts riot in 1965. The hospital is staffed by a large percentage of foreign-trained doctors and other personnel who speak some English, but suffer from a lack of understanding of the Hispanic as well as the African-American patients. Very few trained interpreters are provided for the Spanish-speaking population, and no interpreters are provided for African Americans. A 100-question survey on common African-American expressions was conducted in the Department of Family Medicine, as well as an opinion poll to determine if adequate understanding existed between patients and providers. The data revealed that native African-American providers understood significantly more African-American expressions than foreign, white, and Hispanic providers. The opinion poll also revealed inadequate translation of medical complaints from patients through interpreters. In addition, the poll found that diagnoses and instructions were not adequately related to the patients. Furthermore, it was felt that trained interpreters should be provided for all patients who presented communication problems.

  9. Contemporary American Success Stories: Famous People of Hispanic Heritage. Volume I. A Mitchell Lane Multicultural Biography Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvis, Barbara J.

    This series presents biographical sketches of famous Americans of Hispanic descent. The biographies in the projected eight volume series for elementary school children represent the diversity of Hispanic heritage in the United States. Those featured are contemporary figures with national origins in the United States or Latin America, with careers…

  10. Clinical Characteristics of Pediatric-Onset and Adult-Onset Multiple Sclerosis in Hispanic Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langille, Megan M; Islam, Talat; Burnett, Margaret; Amezcua, Lilyana

    2016-07-01

    Multiple sclerosis can affect pediatric patients. Our aim was to compare characteristics between pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis and adult-onset multiple sclerosis in Hispanic Americans. This was a cross-sectional analysis of 363 Hispanic American multiple scleroses cases; demographic and clinical characteristics were analyzed. A total of 110 Hispanic patients presented with multiple sclerosis before age 18 and 253 as adult multiple sclerosis. The most common presenting symptoms for both was optic neuritis. Polyfocal symptoms, seizures, and cognitive symptoms at presentation were more prevalent in pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis (P ≤ .001). Transverse myelitis was more frequent in adult-onset multiple sclerosis (P ≤ .001). Using multivariable analysis, pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis (adjusted odds ratio, 0.3OR 95% confidence interval 0.16-0.71, P = .004) and being US born (adjusted odds ratio, 0.553, 95% confidence interval 0.3-1.03, P = .006) were less likely to have severe ambulatory disability. Results suggest that pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis and adult-onset multiple sclerosis in Hispanics have differences that could be important for treatment and prognosis.

  11. Family eating and physical activity practices among African American, Filipino American, and Hispanic American families: Implications for developing obesity prevention programs

    OpenAIRE

    Luz Sobong Porter

    2017-01-01

    Overweight and obesity among children and adults is well-documented as an escalating problem. The purpose of this study is to determine the blood pressure, self-esteem, and eating and physical activity practices among African Americans, Filipino Americans, and Hispanic Americans; and project implications for development of childhood obesity prevention programs. This descriptive study was conducted in a convenience sample of 110 mothers recruited in health clinics and community centers located...

  12. CUBAN AMERICANS HAVE THE HIGHEST RATES OF PERIPHERAL ARTERIAL DISEASE IN DIVERSE HISPANIC/LATINO COMMUNITIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Matthew A.; Gonzalez, Franklyn; Raij, Leopoldo; Kaplan, Robert; Ostfeld, Robert J.; Pattany, Maria S.; Heiss, Gerardo; Criqui, Michael H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Since Hispanic ethnicity in the United States is heterogeneous, the purpose of this study was to determine the epidemiology of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) within US Hispanic/Latino groups defined by national background. Methods 9,648 men and women over the age of 45 years enrolled in the Hispanic Community Health Study – Study of Latinos (HCHS-SOL) included in this analysis. The ankle brachial index (ABI) was computed as the higher of the posterior tibial and dorsalis pedis systolic blood pressures (SBP) for each leg divided by the higher brachial artery SBP. The index ABI was the higher of the two. An ABI ≤ 0.90 was criterion for the presence of PAD. Results The mean age was 56 years and 55% were female. Overall, the prevalence of an ABI ≤ 0.90 (PAD), 0.90 to 0.99 (borderline), 1.0 to 1.39 (normal) and ≥ 1.40 (high) was 5.7, 19.3, 72.5 and 2.6%, respectively. After multivariable adjustment for PAD risk factors, and compared to Mexicans, Cubans had nearly a 3-fold higher odds for PAD (OR: 2.9, 95% CI: 1.9 – 4.4). The odds of PAD for the other Hispanic/Latino groups ranged from 1.2 to 1.8. Although males had over a 3-fold higher odds of an ABI ≥ 1.40 (3.6, 2.0 – 6.5), the odds did not differ significantly by Hispanic/Latino background. Conclusions Compared to Mexican Americans, all other Hispanic/Latino background groups have a significantly higher odds of having PAD, with the odds being nearly 3-fold higher among Cubans. PMID:26141696

  13. SNPs and breast cancer risk prediction for African American and Hispanic women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allman, Richard; Dite, Gillian S; Hopper, John L; Gordon, Ora; Starlard-Davenport, Athena; Chlebowski, Rowan; Kooperberg, Charles

    2015-12-01

    For African American or Hispanic women, the extent to which clinical breast cancer risk prediction models are improved by including information on susceptibility single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) is unknown, even though these women comprise increasing proportions of the US population and represent a large proportion of the world's population. We studied 7539 African American and 3363 Hispanic women from the Women's Health Initiative. The age-adjusted 5-year risks from the BCRAT and IBIS risk prediction models were measured and combined with a risk score based on >70 independent susceptibility SNPs. Logistic regression, adjusting for age group, was used to estimate risk associations with log-transformed age-adjusted 5-year risks. Discrimination was measured by the odds ratio (OR) per standard deviation (SD) and the area under the receiver operator curve (AUC). When considered alone, the ORs for African American women were 1.28 for BCRAT, and 1.04 for IBIS. When combined with the SNP risk score (OR 1.23), the corresponding ORs were 1.39 and 1.22. For Hispanic women the corresponding ORs were 1.25 for BCRAT, and 1.15 for IBIS. When combined with the SNP risk score (OR 1.39), the corresponding ORs were 1.48 and 1.42. There was no evidence that any of the combined models were not well calibrated. Including information on known breast cancer susceptibility loci provides approximately 10 and 19% improvement in risk prediction using BCRAT for African Americans and Hispanics, respectively. The corresponding figures for IBIS are approximately 18 and 26%, respectively.

  14. Risk factors for cardiovascular mortality in Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic whites. San Antonio Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, B D; Stern, M P; Haffner, S M; Hazuda, H P; Patterson, J K

    1990-03-01

    A lower cardiovascular mortality in Mexican-American men than in non-Hispanic white men has been consistently observed. In contrast, no such ethnic difference has been observed in women. To determine whether this sex-ethnicity interaction in mortality is matched by a corresponding sex-ethnicity interaction in cardiovascular risk factors, the authors compared risk factors between 3,301 Mexican Americans and 1,877 non-Hispanic whites from the San Antonio Heart Study, a population-based study of cardiovascular disease and diabetes conducted in San Antonio, Texas (1979-1988). In both men and women, triglycerides, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, and body mass index (weight (kg)/height (m)2) were higher and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol was lower in Mexican Americans than in non-Hispanic whites. Although Mexican-American men were more likely than non-Hispanic white men to be smokers, Mexican Americans of both sexes smoked, on average, fewer cigarettes per day than non-Hispanic whites. Cardiovascular risk scores, which were constructed from Framingham Study risk equations to summarize the combined effect of multiple risk factors, were higher in Mexican Americans than in non-Hispanic whites of both sexes. The cardiovascular risk profile was less favorable for both Mexican Americans who grew up in Mexico and Mexican Americans who grew up in San Antonio. Although it is possible that in their younger years Mexican Americans had a more favorable cardiovascular risk profile, these results may also indicate that some protective factor, either genetic or life-style, is present in Mexican-American males but absent in non-Hispanic white males.

  15. Intergenerational Transmission of the Effects of Acculturation on Health in Hispanic Americans: A Fetal Programming Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Molly; Entringer, Sonja; Buss, Claudia; DeHaene, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    We propose a transdisciplinary, life span framework for examining the underlying cause of the observed intergenerational decline in health among Hispanic Americans. We focus on acculturation, and we posit that acculturation-related processes in first-generation Hispanic immigrant mothers may affect the intrauterine development of an unborn child, via the process of fetal programming, to produce phenotypic effects that may alter the susceptibility for noncommunicable chronic diseases. In this manner, an intergenerational cascade of perpetuation may become established. Our framework may shed light on the biological, behavioral, and social causes of intergenerational cycles of vulnerability among immigrant minority groups, with public health and policy implications for primary prevention and intervention. PMID:25905831

  16. Sleep apnea risk among Mexican American and non-Hispanic white stroke survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skolarus, Lesli E.; Lisabeth, Lynda D.; Morgenstern, Lewis B.; Burgin, William; Brown, Devin L.

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose Sleep apnea is a modifiable independent stroke risk factor and is associated with poor stroke outcomes. Mexican Americans have a higher incidence of stroke than non-Hispanic whites. In a biethnic community, we sought to determine the frequency of screening, testing and treatment of sleep apnea among stroke survivors, and to compare self-perceived risk of sleep apnea with actual risk. Methods A survey was mailed to ischemic stroke survivors in the Brain Attack Surveillance in Corpus Christi (BASIC) project. The survey included the validated sleep apnea screening tool, the Berlin questionnaire, and queried the frequency of sleep apnea screening by symptoms, formal sleep testing, and treatment. Self-perceived risk and actual high risk of sleep apnea were compared using McNemar’s test. Results Of the 193 respondents (49% response rate), 54% were Mexican American. Forty-eight percent of respondents had a high risk of sleep apnea based on the Berlin questionnaire, while only 19% thought they were likely to have sleep apnea (p<0.01). There was no difference in proportion of respondents at high risk of sleep apnea between Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic whites (48% vs. 51%, p=0.73). Less than 20% of respondents had undergone sleep apnea screening, testing or treatment. Conclusions Stroke survivors perceive their risk of sleep apnea to be lower than their actual risk. Despite a significant proportion of both Mexican American and non-Hispanic white stroke survivors at high risk of sleep apnea, few undergo symptom screening, testing or treatment. Both stroke survivors and physicians may benefit from educational interventions. PMID:22156693

  17. The Role of Ethnicity in Mexican American and Non-Hispanic White Students' Experience of Sexual Harassment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, Lisa K.; Gilbert, Lucia Albino

    2012-01-01

    This study explored dimensions of a social phenomenon not often investigated among Mexican American college students, namely sexual harassment. Mexican American (n = 261) and non-Hispanic White female students (n = 111) from three southwestern universities responded to scales assessing experiences of sexually harassing behaviors, harassment…

  18. Stress, coping, and health: a comparison of Mexican immigrants, Mexican-Americans, and non-Hispanic whites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Tillman; Galves, Al; Dickinson, L Miriam; Perez, Maria de Jesus Diaz

    2005-07-01

    Mexican immigrants, Mexican-Americans, and non-Hispanic white Americans all face different stressors. Stress-coping strategies may vary for each group as well. We compared relationships among perceived stress, stress-coping strategies, and health-related quality of life (HRQL) in a rural sample of Mexican citizens living in the United States, Mexican-Americans, and non-Hispanic whites. Health-related quality of life and stress-coping styles varied among the three groups. Mexican citizens reported significantly better physical functioning than did non-Hispanic whites or Mexican-Americans. Mexican-Americans reported significantly better mental health functioning than did non-Hispanic whites or Mexican citizens. Mexican citizens were more likely to use positive reframing, denial, and religion, and less likely to use substance abuse and self-distraction, as stress-coping strategies. Stress-coping style may be a potentially modifiable predictor of physical and mental HRQL, and may account for part of the Hispanic health paradox.

  19. Sociodemographic Factors, Acculturation, and Nutrition Management among Hispanic American Adults with Self-reported Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Yilin Xu; Simonsen, Neal; Chen, Liwei; Zhang, L U; Scribner, Richard; Tseng, Tung-Sung

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to examine whether sociodemographic factors and acculturation affect achievement of selected American Diabetes Association (ADA) nutrition therapy recommendations among Hispanics with diabetes. Cross-sectional data for Hispanics with diabetes in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2003-2010 were used. Achievements of the ADA recommendation for five nutrition components were examined (i.e., daily intake of saturated fat, cholesterol, sodium, and fiber, and daily servings of alcohol). Acculturation measurement derived from language use, country of birth, and length of residence in the U.S. Logistic regressions were performed. Only 49% of Hispanics with diabetes met three or more recommended criteria. Male gender and younger age (≤45) predicted poor recommendation adherence. More acculturated individuals had around 50% lower odds to achieve saturated fat [OR 0.5, CI 0.2-0.7], fiber [OR 0.5, CI 0.2-0.9], sodium [OR 0.5, CI 0.3-0.9] and cholesterol intake [OR 0.5, CI 0.3-0.8] recommendations than their less acculturated counterparts.

  20. Food Acculturation Drives Dietary Differences among Mexicans, Mexican Americans, and Non-Hispanic Whites123

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Our aim was to examine the effects of food acculturation on Mexican Americans’ (MA) diets, taking the Mexican diet as reference. We used nationally representative samples of children (2–11 y) and female adolescents and adults (12–49 y) from the Mexican National Nutrition Survey 1999 and NHANES 1999–2006 to compare the diets of Mexicans (n = 5678), MA born in Mexico (MAMX) (n = 1488), MA born in the United States (MAUS) (n = 3654), and non-Hispanic white Americans (NH-White) (n = 5473). One 24...

  1. Hispanic Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Disease Control and Prevention reported that the suicide rate for all Hispanic Americans was 5.24 per ... males and females • Hispanic adolescents may also experience stress with ... help because they feel that suicide should be dealt with by the family or ...

  2. Effects of a cognitive dissonance-based eating disorder prevention program are similar for Asian American, Hispanic, and White participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Rosalía; Marchand, Erica; Ng, Janet; Stice, Eric

    2008-11-01

    This study explored the effects of participating in a dissonance-based eating disorder prevention program on changes in thin ideal internalization, body dissatisfaction, and eating symptoms among White, Asian American, and Hispanic participants. Participants were (n = 394), 13 to 20-year-old adolescent girls and young women who reported being White (n = 311), Hispanic/Latina (n = 61), or Asian-American/Hawaiian/Pacific Islander (n = 33). The current study used data drawn from the pre- and post assessments of an efficacy trial and an effectiveness trial of this eating disorder prevention program. The intervention reduced disordered eating behaviors and eating disorder risk factors for all three ethnic groups at post-intervention assessment; there was no evidence of significantly stronger effects in any particular ethnic group. Results suggest that a cognitive dissonance-based prevention program for eating disorders may be equally effective for Asian American, Hispanic, and White adolescent women.

  3. Predictors of retention among African American and Hispanic older adult research participants in the Well Elderly 2 randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Mike; Jackson, Jeanne; Mandel, Deborah; Blanchard, Jeanine; Holguin, Jess; Lai, Mei-Ying; Marterella, Abbey; Vigen, Cheryl; Gleason, Sarah; Lam, Claudia; Azen, Stan; Clark, Florence

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to document predictors of long-term retention among minority participants in the Well Elderly 2 Study, a randomized controlled trial of a lifestyle intervention for community-dwelling older adults. The primary sample included 149 African American and 92 Hispanic men and women aged 60 to 95 years, recruited at senior activity centers and senior residences. Chi-square and logistic regression procedures were undertaken to examine study-based, psychosocial and health-related predictors of retention at 18 months following study entry. For both African Americans and Hispanics, intervention adherence was the strongest predictor. Retention was also related to high active coping and average (vs. high or low) levels of activity participation among African Americans and high social network strength among Hispanics. The results suggest that improved knowledge of the predictors of retention among minority elders can spawn new retention strategies that can be applied at individual, subgroup, and sample-wide levels.

  4. School Characteristics and Experiences of African American, Hispanic/Latino, and Native American Youth in Rural Communities: Relation to Educational Aspirations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvin, Matthew J.; Byun, Soo-yong; Meece, Judith L.; Reed, Karla S.; Farmer, Thomas W.

    2016-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to examine differences in the school characteristics and experiences of African American, Hispanic/Latino, and Native American youth in rural high schools as well as their relation to educational aspirations. We also investigated the characteristics and experiences of students and their families given that…

  5. A Factor Analytic Study of the Loneliness and Social Dissatisfaction Scale in a Sample of African-American and Hispanic-American Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagner, Daniel M.; Storch, Eric A.; Roberti, Jonathan W.

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated the psychometric properties of the Loneliness and Social Dissatisfaction Scale (LSDS) in a sample of African-American and Hispanic-American children. Participants were a non-clinical sample (N = 186) of children ages 11 to 13 in the fifth and sixth grades in a school in the Metropolitan New York area. Confirmatory factor…

  6. Perceptions about organ donation among African American, Hispanic, and white high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quick, Brian L; Lavoie, Nicole R; Scott, Allison M; Bosch, Dave; Morgan, Susan E

    2012-07-01

    We applied the Health Belief Model (HBM) to better understand perceptions of organ donation among African American, Hispanic, and White high school students. We conducted 14 focus groups with 18-year-old students to identify strategies to reach this audience when promoting the First-Person Consent Registry (FPCR) for organ donation. We found that African American, Hispanic, and White high school students are largely unaware of the need for organ donors, and are unfamiliar with how to join the FPCR. Participants identified more barriers to joining the FPCR than benefits. Two aspects of self-efficacy emerged related to joining the FPCR: decisional and task efficacy. Overall, few differences were found with respect to organ donation myths across the three ethnic groups. The results are discussed, with an emphasis on how the findings compare and contrast with previous organ donation research. We focus on message design and dissemination strategies for practitioners targeting 18-year-old high school students with organ donation promotional materials.

  7. Age of dementia diagnosis in community dwelling bilingual and monolingual Hispanic Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, Deborah M; Gasquoine, Philip G; Weimer, Amy A

    2015-05-01

    Bilingualism has been reported to delay the age of retrospective report of first symptom in dementia. This study determined if the age of clinically diagnosed Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia occurred later for bilingual than monolingual, immigrant and U.S. born, Hispanic Americans. It involved a secondary analysis of the subset of 81 bi/monolingual dementia cases identified at yearly follow-up (1998 through 2008) using neuropsychological test results and objective diagnostic criteria from the Sacramento Area Latino Study on Aging that involved a random sampling of community dwelling Hispanic Americans (N = 1789). Age of dementia diagnosis was analyzed in a 2 × 2 (bi/monolingualism × immigrant/U.S. born) ANOVA that space revealed both main effects and the interaction were non-significant. Mean age of dementia diagnosis was descriptively (but not significantly) higher in the monolingual (M = 81.10 years) than the bilingual (M = 79.31) group. Overall, bilingual dementia cases were significantly better educated than monolinguals, but U.S. born bilinguals and monolinguals did not differ significantly in education. Delays in dementia symptomatology pertaining to bilingualism are less likely to be found in studies: (a) that use age of clinical diagnosis vs. retrospective report of first dementia symptom as the dependent variable; and (b) involve clinical cases derived from community samples rather than referrals to specialist memory clinics.

  8. Language of administration and neuropsychological test performance in neurologically intact Hispanic American bilingual adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasquoine, Philip Gerard; Croyle, Kristin L; Cavazos-Gonzalez, Cynthia; Sandoval, Omar

    2007-11-01

    This study compared the performance of Hispanic American bilingual adults on Spanish and English language versions of a neuropsychological test battery. Language achievement test scores were used to divide 36 bilingual, neurologically intact, Hispanic Americans from south Texas into Spanish-dominant, balanced, and English-dominant bilingual groups. They were administered the eight subtests of the Bateria Neuropsicologica and the Matrix Reasoning subtest of the WAIS-III in Spanish and English. Half the participants were tested in Spanish first. Balanced bilinguals showed no significant differences in test scores between Spanish and English language administrations. Spanish and/or English dominant bilinguals showed significant effects of language of administration on tests with higher language compared to visual perceptual weighting (Woodcock-Munoz Language Survey-Revised, Letter Fluency, Story Memory, and Stroop Color and Word Test). Scores on tests with higher visual-perceptual weighting (Matrix Reasoning, Figure Memory, Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, and Spatial Span), were not significantly affected by language of administration, nor were scores on the Spanish/California Verbal Learning Test, and Digit Span. A problem was encountered in comparing false positive rates in each language, as Spanish norms fell below English norms, resulting in a much higher false positive rate in English across all bilingual groupings. Use of a comparison standard (picture vocabulary score) reduced false positive rates in both languages, but the higher false positive rate in English persisted.

  9. Using monolingual neuropsychological test norms with bilingual Hispanic americans: application of an individual comparison standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasquoine, Philip Gerard; Gonzalez, Cassandra Dayanira

    2012-05-01

    Conventional neuropsychological norms developed for monolinguals likely overestimate normal performance in bilinguals on language but not visual-perceptual format tests. This was studied by comparing neuropsychological false-positive rates using the 50th percentile of conventional norms and individual comparison standards (Picture Vocabulary or Matrix Reasoning scores) as estimates of preexisting neuropsychological skill level against the number expected from the normal distribution for a consecutive sample of 56 neurologically intact, bilingual, Hispanic Americans. Participants were tested in separate sessions in Spanish and English in the counterbalanced order on La Bateria Neuropsicologica and the original English language tests on which this battery was based. For language format measures, repeated-measures multivariate analysis of variance showed that individual estimates of preexisting skill level in English generated the mean number of false positives most approximate to that expected from the normal distribution, whereas the 50th percentile of conventional English language norms did the same for visual-perceptual format measures. When using conventional Spanish or English monolingual norms for language format neuropsychological measures with bilingual Hispanic Americans, individual estimates of preexisting skill level are recommended over the 50th percentile.

  10. Multiculturalism as a dimension of school climate: the impact on the academic achievement of Asian American and Hispanic youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Janet; Le, Thao N

    2010-10-01

    Multiculturalism constitutes an important element of school climate, but the relation between perceived multiculturalism and academic achievement has not been widely studied. This study examined the influence of students' perceptions of school support for multiculturalism on academic achievement among 280 Asian American and Hispanic youth, including ethnic identity and ethnocultural empathy as potential mediators. Results of structural equation modeling revealed that perceived multiculturalism was significantly positively related to ethnocultural empathy for Asian Americans and Hispanics, and that ethnocultural empathy, in turn, was predictive of academic achievement for Hispanics only. Results of bootstrapping to test for mediation effects revealed ethnocultural empathy to be a salient mediator for Hispanic youth. Although ethnic identity did not mediate the link between multiculturalism and academic achievement, ethnic identity was significantly predictive of achievement for Hispanics. On the whole, these findings suggest that fostering a school climate supportive of multiculturalism may improve empathy toward ethnic out-groups. Furthermore, schools that promote compassion and tolerance for diverse ethnic groups may achieve better academic outcomes among Hispanic youth.

  11. Skills-Based, Interactive Computer Interventions to Prevent HIV Infection Among African-American and Hispanic Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schinke, Steven P; Orlandi, Mario A

    1990-01-01

    The spread of the acquired immunodeficiency virus (AIDS) virus, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, is increasingly evident. Despite the attention that HIV infection has received, few effective prevention strategies have been developed. The present paper reviews the epidemiology of AIDS among African-American and Hispanic adolescents. From epidemiological data, the authors argue for preventive approaches to reduce the risks of HIV transmission among African-American and Hispanic adolescents. Emphasizing culturally sensitive prevention strategies, the authors describe an intervention for these adolescents that combines skills-based and interactive computer approaches.

  12. The mediating role of maternal warmth in the associations between harsh parental practices and externalizing and internalizing behaviors in Hispanic American, African American, and European American families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Elif Dede; Roopnarine, Jaipaul L

    2015-07-01

    Using data from the add-on 5-year cohort of In-Home Longitudinal Study of preschool aged Children of the Fragile Families and Child Well-Being Study (FFCWS), we examined the mediating role of maternal warmth in the associations between positive and harsh maternal practices and children's externalizing and internalizing behaviors. The sample consisted of 1,922 low-income Hispanic American, African American, and European American families. For European Americans, the links between maternal psychological aggression and hostility and children's externalizing behaviors were direct. Similarly, for Hispanic Americans, the links between maternal psychological aggression, physical assault, and hostility and externalizing behaviors were direct, as was the link between maternal physical assault and internalizing behaviors. For African Americans, maternal warmth partially mediated the links between maternal hostility and physical assault and externalizing behaviors. However, the associations between psychological aggression and externalizing and internalizing behaviors were direct. The data are discussed with respect to similarities in cultural pathways of influence between harsh maternal treatment and children's behavioral difficulties across ethnic groups.

  13. Family eating and physical activity practices among African American, Filipino American, and Hispanic American families: Implications for developing obesity prevention programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz Sobong Porter

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Overweight and obesity among children and adults is well-documented as an escalating problem. The purpose of this study is to determine the blood pressure, self-esteem, and eating and physical activity practices among African Americans, Filipino Americans, and Hispanic Americans; and project implications for development of childhood obesity prevention programs. This descriptive study was conducted in a convenience sample of 110 mothers recruited in health clinics and community centers located in Southeast Florida: 19% African Americans, 26% Filipino Americans, and 55% Hispanic Americans. The data, collected via self-administered questionnaires and a guided interview (Family Eating and Activity Habits Questionnaire, Rosenberg’s Self-Esteem Scale, Background Information Questionnaire, were analyzed via descriptive and inferential statistics with findings significant at p < .05. Results revealed differences and similarities in eating and activity practices between Filipinos and Blacks or Hispanics. Blood pressure and self-esteem did not differ by ethnicity; however, overweight mothers tended to have overweight children. The results point clearly to the importance of the mothers’ role modeling in eating and physical activity practices of families, reflecting the influence of mothers’ behaviors in children’s healthy behaviors, albeit family health. Given that mothers own physical exercise and eating habits could influence their children’s physical activity levels and food choices, a parental advice strategy could be disseminated directly to parents by health professionals. Study findings may raise public awareness of the increasing prevalence and consequences of overweight and obesity in children and adolescents, particularly among vulnerable ethnic groups. The findings provide a database for nurse practitioners and other health service providers for the development of culturally sensitive focused public health education programs to prevent

  14. The Role of Machismo and the Hispanic Family in the Etiology and Treatment of Alcoholism in Hispanic American Males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panitz, Daniel R.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Discusses alcohol abuse among Hispanic males of Mexican and Puerto Rican origin and the cultural and familial factors which both enable alocholism and serve as tools in overcoming it. The positive ideals of machismo may be enlisted in family therapy through supportive rather than reconstructive therapies. (Author/JAC)

  15. The Role of Machismo and the Hispanic Family in the Etiology and Treatment of Alcoholism in Hispanic American Males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panitz, Daniel R.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Discusses alcohol abuse among Hispanic males of Mexican and Puerto Rican origin and the cultural and familial factors which both enable alocholism and serve as tools in overcoming it. The positive ideals of machismo may be enlisted in family therapy through supportive rather than reconstructive therapies. (Author/JAC)

  16. Cross-cultural study of idioms of distress among Spanish nationals and Hispanic American migrants: susto, nervios and ataque de nervios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durà-Vilà, Glòria; Hodes, Matthew

    2012-10-01

    Susto (fright), nervios (nerves) and ataque de nervios (attack of nerves) are idioms of distress widely experienced amongst Hispanic Americans, often associated with psychiatric disorders. This study explores understanding of these idioms of distress and attitudes to help seeking amongst indigenous Spanish and Hispanic American residents in Spain. A population survey was undertaken in four adult education centres in Spain. Hypothetical case vignettes of individuals suffering from the idioms of distress were used to investigate understanding and help seeking by a Spanish sample compared with Hispanic American migrants to Spain. 350 questionnaires were obtained (94.6% response rate). The idioms ataque de nervios and nervios were recognised by the majority of the Spanish group but by significantly more of the Hispanic American migrants. However, susto was infrequently recognised by the Spanish group but it was recognised by half of the Hispanic Americans. Hispanic Americans were also more likely to recommend consultation with a psychiatrist/psychologist than Spanish respondents for ataque de nervios and nervios. The Spanish group were more likely to recommend non-medical sources of support such as relatives and priest than Hispanic Americans. Hispanic Americans, more recently arrived, did not show greater recognition of the three idioms than those who have been in Spain longer. Regression analysis showed that being Hispanic American and having lower educational attainment was associated with greater use of susto. The study suggests that people hold multiple models of distress and disorder. This may influence clinical presentations and help seeking behaviour in Spanish as well as Hispanic American populations.

  17. It "Ain't" Always So: Sixth Graders' Interpretations of Hispanic-American Stories with Universal Themes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Peggy S.

    2005-01-01

    This article examines the responses of eight sixth grade students discussing four realistic fiction Hispanic-American multicultural stories with universal themes by Gary Soto in peer-led literature discussion groups. The results indicate the importance of a reader's sociocultural frame--class, race, and gender, on their interpretation of…

  18. Ecological Predictors of Disciplinary Style and Child Abuse Potential in a Hispanic and Anglo-American Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Christina M.

    2008-01-01

    Recent attention to multicultural issues has sparked recognition that parenting is also a culturally construed phenomenon. The present study involved a diverse sample of 90 Anglo-American and Hispanic parents examining predictors based on distal/proximal levels as conceptualized in the ecological model. The study examined background…

  19. Native American and Hispanic Students: Recruitment, Enrollment, Retention and Graduation Trends; Institutional Performance Measures and Targets; Institutional Action Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    New Mexico Higher Education Department, 2005

    2005-01-01

    New Mexicans of Native American and Hispanic ancestry participate less often and less successfully in the higher education system than do other groups. This fact has been demonstrated repeatedly in various studies and is exacerbated by a cycle of poverty, inadequate academic and financial preparation for college, and other issues related to…

  20. Famous People of Hispanic Heritage. Contemporary American Success Stories, Volume IX. A Mitchell Lane Multicultural Biography Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Melanie; Marvis, Barbara J.; Menard, Valerie

    Biographies in this series represent the diversity of Hispanic heritage in the United States. Those featured are contemporary figures whose national origins range from Argentina to the United States, and whose careers and contributions cover many aspects of American life. Each person profiled is a positive role model, not only for people of…

  1. Famous People of Hispanic Heritage. Contemporary American Success Stories, Volume VIII. A Mitchell Lane Multicultural Biography Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menard, Valerie; Cole, Melanie

    Biographies in this series represent the diversity of Hispanic heritage in the United States. Those featured are contemporary figures whose national origins range from Argentina to the United States, and whose careers and contributions cover many aspects of American life. Each person profiled is a positive role model, not only for people of…

  2. Enrichment in Pre-Kindergarten Life Predicts Initiation of Cigarette Smoking in Asian American and Hispanic/Latino Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xinguang; Weiss, Jie Wu

    2007-01-01

    The risk of tobacco use during adolescence may be traced back to early childhood, the time when a child is most vulnerable to environmental influence. We examined daily-life enrichment during pre-kindergarten period as a predictor of initiation of cigarette smoking among Asian American and Hispanic/Latino children during adolescence. Survey data…

  3. Ecological Predictors of Disciplinary Style and Child Abuse Potential in a Hispanic and Anglo-American Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Christina M.

    2008-01-01

    Recent attention to multicultural issues has sparked recognition that parenting is also a culturally construed phenomenon. The present study involved a diverse sample of 90 Anglo-American and Hispanic parents examining predictors based on distal/proximal levels as conceptualized in the ecological model. The study examined background…

  4. It "Ain't" Always So: Sixth Graders' Interpretations of Hispanic-American Stories with Universal Themes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Peggy S.

    2005-01-01

    This article examines the responses of eight sixth grade students discussing four realistic fiction Hispanic-American multicultural stories with universal themes by Gary Soto in peer-led literature discussion groups. The results indicate the importance of a reader's sociocultural frame--class, race, and gender, on their interpretation of…

  5. Importance of Religion and Spirituality in the Lives of African Americans, Caribbean Blacks and Non-Hispanic Whites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Robert Joseph; Chatters, Linda M.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the importance of spirituality and religion in daily life (i.e., only religion, only spirituality, both religion and spirituality, and neither religion nor spirituality) among a nationally representative sample of African Americans, Caribbean Blacks and non-Hispanic Whites. A majority in each group felt they were both important…

  6. Cognitive Flexibility and Planning Skills as Predictors of Social-Academic Resilience in Hispanic-American Elementary School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Hispanic-American students have the highest high school drop-out rate and as a group are considered to be at-risk for academic failure due to issues of poverty, immigration, language barriers, discrimination, and acculturative stress. This study empirically tested the extent to which cognitive flexibility and planning skills predicted…

  7. Aníbal Bascuñán and Hispanic American Administrative Thinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Guerrero Orozco

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the administrative thinking of Aníbal Bascuñán Valdés, derived from the analysis of his book Elementos de Ciencia de la Administración Pública (1963. It highlights the value of Bascuñán to the intellectual history of the discipline, for being the first Hispanic American thinker who without hesitation supported the autonomous status of public administration and for conceiving it as scientific knowledge under an ontic approach, where his being is endowed with an identity and able to develop principles. It is concluded that the work of Bascuñán is one of the most developed within the discipline during the 1960s,above all because it considers public administration as an autonomous science and social science.

  8. Why do teens smoke? American Indian and Hispanic adolescents' perspectives on functional values and addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero, Gilbert; Davis, Sally

    2002-12-01

    Tobacco use by the young is one of the greatest public health concerns in the United States and is targeted by a number of prevention and control programs. A fuller understanding of the social and cultural values that youths attach to smoking is important in achieving focused, effective prevention strategies. Drawing on data collected through individual and focus group interviews, this article examines reasons that Hispanic and American Indian youths give to explain their smoking. The analysis presented here focuses on two interrelated sets of reasons: the functional values of tobacco use (including mood management, peer influences, and image maintenance) and addiction. This article concludes with a discussion of the implications these data may have for prevention and cessation programs aimed at youth and outlines ideas for an anthropological research agenda on youth and tobacco.

  9. Mortality differences between elderly Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic whites in San Antonio, Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espino, D V; Parra, E O; Kriehbiel, R

    1994-06-01

    To identify differences in causes of death between elderly Mexican Americans (MA) and non-Hispanic whites (NHW). Retrospective death certificate review. Elderly Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic Whites age 65 and over who died in Bexar County, Texas during 1989. Data obtained from chart review included age, sex, race/ethnicity, and cause of death. Age-adjusted and cause-specific mortality rates, odds ratios (OR), and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. Mexican Americans were at greater risk of dying in nine of the thirty causes of death examined. The mortality rates of MA subjects were higher than those of NHW from death caused by diabetes (OR = 3.19, CI = 2.27-4.49), renal failure (OR = 2.06, CI = 1.44-2.94), congestive heart failure (OR = 1.50, CI = 1.44-2.94), and multiple systemic diseases (OR = 2.59, CI = 1.89-3.57). Among the male subjects, MA had a greater risk than NHW of dying from myocardial infarction (OR = 1.83, CI = 1.15-2.90), coronary disease (OR = 1.37, CI = 1.07-1.75) and septicemia/pyuria (OR = 2.12, CI = 1.09-4.10). Among female subjects, MA had a greater likelihood of dying from cirrhosis (OR = 3.03, CI = 1.00-9.29). For only one of the causes of death was the risk lower among MA than NHW: MA female subjects had a lesser chance of dying from the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) than NHW females (OR = 0.36, CI = 0.18-0.72). Mexican American elders have a greater risk of dying from non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus and renal failure than their NHW counterparts. Elderly MA men have a greater risk of dying from cardiovascular disease than their NHW counterparts. Mexican American women may have a greater risk of dying from cirrhosis, but a lower risk of dying from complications of COPD. Finally, death from ill defined causes, such as multiple systemic diseases, may be a major under-acknowledged cause of death among older MA.

  10. Patterns of hospital use, family history and co-existing conditions among urban African-American and Hispanic-American children with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipton, R B

    1996-10-01

    Little information is available about insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) when it occurs among US minorities. The incidence of IDDM among African-American and Hispanic children Diabetes among the first degree relatives of children from both ethnic groups was common, and the most frequently listed co-morbid conditions were asthma and obesity. The risk for IDDM in Chicago is among the highest for both African-origin and Hispanic children worldwide. The prevalence of asthma and obesity parallels the high prevalence of these conditions among non-diabetic children in Chicago. The ongoing epidemic of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) among African-Americans and US Hispanics is likely to be the reason for the large number of minority IDDM patients who have a first-degree relative with diabetes.

  11. Access, use and completion of a brief disaster mental health intervention among Hispanics, African-Americans and Whites affected by Hurricane Ike

    OpenAIRE

    Price, Matthew; Davidson, Tatiana M.; Andrews, Jeannette O.; Ruggiero, Kenneth J.

    2013-01-01

    African-Americans and Hispanics are disproportionally affected by disasters. We evaluated differences in the use and completion of a web-based mental health intervention, Disaster Recovery Web (DRW), by White, African-American and Hispanic adults in the aftermath of Hurricane Ike. Approximately one year after the hurricane, a telephone survey was carried out with adults from Galveston and Chambers counties. A total of 1249 adults participated in the survey (80% White, 14% African-American and...

  12. Assessment of family functioning in Caucasian and Hispanic Americans: reliability, validity, and factor structure of the Family Assessment Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarons, Gregory A; McDonald, Elizabeth J; Connelly, Cynthia D; Newton, Rae R

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the factor structure, reliability, and validity of the Family Assessment Device (FAD) among a national sample of Caucasian and Hispanic American families receiving public sector mental health services. A confirmatory factor analysis conducted to test model fit yielded equivocal findings. With few exceptions, indices of model fit, reliability, and validity were poorer for Hispanic Americans compared with Caucasian Americans. Contrary to our expectation, an exploratory factor analysis did not result in a better fitting model of family functioning. Without stronger evidence supporting a reformulation of the FAD, we recommend against such a course of action. Findings highlight the need for additional research on the role of culture in measurement of family functioning.

  13. Genetic Associations with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Traits in Hispanic/Latino Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cade, Brian E; Chen, Han; Stilp, Adrienne M; Gleason, Kevin J; Sofer, Tamar; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia; Arens, Raanan; Bell, Graeme I; Below, Jennifer E; Bjonnes, Andrew C; Chun, Sung; Conomos, Matthew P; Evans, Daniel S; Johnson, W Craig; Frazier-Wood, Alexis C; Lane, Jacqueline M; Larkin, Emma K; Loredo, Jose S; Post, Wendy S; Ramos, Alberto R; Rice, Ken; Rotter, Jerome I; Shah, Neomi A; Stone, Katie L; Taylor, Kent D; Thornton, Timothy A; Tranah, Gregory J; Wang, Chaolong; Zee, Phyllis C; Hanis, Craig L; Sunyaev, Shamil R; Patel, Sanjay R; Laurie, Cathy C; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Saxena, Richa; Lin, Xihong; Redline, Susan

    2016-10-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea is a common disorder associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and premature mortality. Although there is strong clinical and epidemiologic evidence supporting the importance of genetic factors in influencing obstructive sleep apnea, its genetic basis is still largely unknown. Prior genetic studies focused on traits defined using the apnea-hypopnea index, which contains limited information on potentially important genetically determined physiologic factors, such as propensity for hypoxemia and respiratory arousability. To define novel obstructive sleep apnea genetic risk loci for obstructive sleep apnea, we conducted genome-wide association studies of quantitative traits in Hispanic/Latino Americans from three cohorts. Genome-wide data from as many as 12,558 participants in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos, Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis, and Starr County Health Studies population-based cohorts were metaanalyzed for association with the apnea-hypopnea index, average oxygen saturation during sleep, and average respiratory event duration. Two novel loci were identified at genome-level significance (rs11691765, GPR83, P = 1.90 × 10(-8) for the apnea-hypopnea index, and rs35424364; C6ORF183/CCDC162P, P = 4.88 × 10(-8) for respiratory event duration) and seven additional loci were identified with suggestive significance (P < 5 × 10(-7)). Secondary sex-stratified analyses also identified one significant and several suggestive associations. Multiple loci overlapped genes with biologic plausibility. These are the first genome-level significant findings reported for obstructive sleep apnea-related physiologic traits in any population. These findings identify novel associations in inflammatory, hypoxia signaling, and sleep pathways.

  14. Predictors of unprotected sex among young sexually active African American, Hispanic, and White MSM: the importance of ethnicity and culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Jacob C; Fernández, M Isabel; Harper, Gary W; Hidalgo, Marco A; Jamil, Omar B; Torres, Rodrigo Sebastián

    2008-05-01

    Despite the recognized need for culturally tailored HIV prevention interventions for gay, bisexual, and questioning youth, few studies have examined if predictors of unprotected sex vary for youth from different ethnic groups. This study reports on a sample of 189 gay, bisexual, and questioning youth (age 15-22) from three racial/ethnic backgrounds (African American, Hispanic, and White) recruited in Chicago, IL and Miami-Dade and Broward Counties, Florida. For African American youth, being in a long-term relationship, having been kicked out of the home for having sex with men, and younger age at initiation of sexual behavior were associated with unprotected sex. For Hispanic youth, higher ethnic identification and older age at initiation of sexual behavior were associated with unprotected sex. For White youth, no predictors were associated with unprotected sex. Our findings point to the importance of understanding the varying predictors of unprotected sex and integrating them into tailored prevention interventions.

  15. Reliability and validity of the Perceived Stress Scale-10 in Hispanic Americans with English or Spanish language preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baik, Sharon H; Fox, Rina S; Mills, Sarah D; Roesch, Scott C; Sadler, Georgia Robins; Klonoff, Elizabeth A; Malcarne, Vanessa L

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the psychometric properties of the Perceived Stress Scale-10 among 436 community-dwelling Hispanic Americans with English or Spanish language preference. Multigroup confirmatory factor analysis examined the factorial invariance of the Perceived Stress Scale-10 across language groups. Results supported a two-factor model (negative, positive) with equivalent response patterns and item intercepts but different factor covariances across languages. Internal consistency reliability of the Perceived Stress Scale-10 total and subscale scores was good in both language groups. Convergent validity was supported by expected relationships of Perceived Stress Scale-10 scores to measures of anxiety and depression. These results support the use of the Perceived Stress Scale-10 among Hispanic Americans.

  16. Prevalence and treatment of eating disorders among Hispanics/Latino Americans in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Marisol; Ohrt, Tara K; Hoek, Hans W

    2016-11-01

    We reviewed the recent literature on prevalence rates, and application of evidence-based treatments for eating disorders among Hispanics/Latinos residing in the United States. Lifetime prevalence rates of anorexia nervosa are lower among Hispanic/Latinos than non-Hispanic Whites. There are comparable rates of bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder (BED) among Hispanic/Latinos and non-Hispanic Whites. BED is the most common eating disorder among Hispanic/Latinos. Evidence-based treatments have begun to be implemented with Hispanics/Latinos. The core concepts of cognitive behavioral therapy for bulimia nervosa and BED apply to this population. Culture-specific adaptations include strengthening the collectivistic framework within an individualistic treatment, psychoeducation of immediate and extended family, and adjustment of meal plans that incorporated cultural foods. There are more similarities than differences in the prevalence of eating disorders across Hispanics/Latinos and non-Hispanic Whites. However, the social context such as immigration status and acculturation is important to consider in the development of eating disorders. In addition, the Westernization of Latin America may change the future relationship of immigration status and development of eating disorder within the United States. Overall, cultural adaptations of evidence-based treatments involved the inclusion of family within treatment, acculturation-related issues, and managing family conflicts that arise because of the changes in eating patterns.

  17. The psychometric properties of the generalized anxiety disorder-7 scale in Hispanic Americans with English or Spanish language preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Sarah D; Fox, Rina S; Malcarne, Vanessa L; Roesch, Scott C; Champagne, Brian R; Sadler, Georgia Robins

    2014-07-01

    The Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 scale (GAD-7) is a self-report questionnaire that is widely used to screen for anxiety. The GAD-7 has been translated into numerous languages, including Spanish. Previous studies evaluating the structural validity of the English and Spanish versions indicate a unidimensional factor structure in both languages. However, the psychometric properties of the Spanish language version have yet to be evaluated in samples outside of Spain, and the measure has not been tested for use among Hispanic Americans. This study evaluated the reliability, structural validity, and convergent validity of the English and Spanish language versions of the GAD-7 for Hispanic Americans in the United States. A community sample of 436 Hispanic Americans with an English (n = 210) or Spanish (n = 226) language preference completed the GAD-7. Multiple-group confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used to examine the goodness-of-fit of the unidimensional factor structure of the GAD-7 across language-preference groups. Results from the multiple-group CFA indicated a similar unidimensional factor structure with equivalent response patterns and item intercepts, but different variances, across language-preference groups. Internal consistency was good for both English and Spanish language-preference groups. The GAD-7 also evidenced good convergent validity as demonstrated by significant correlations in expected directions with the Perceived Stress Scale, the Patient Health Questionnaire-9, and the Physical Health domain of the World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF assessment. The unidimensional GAD-7 is suitable for use among Hispanic Americans with an English or Spanish language preference.

  18. End-of-life communication: ethnic differences between Korean American and non-Hispanic White older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Eunjeong; Lee, Jaehoon

    2009-10-01

    This study examined ethnic differences in end-of-life communication between Korean American and non-Hispanic White older adults using the Health Belief Model as a conceptual framework. A cross-sectional design was employed to survey 217 community-dwelling older adults (112 Korean Americans and 105 Non-Hispanic Whites). Half of the participants had never held end-of-life discussions with significant others. Non-Hispanic Whites were more likely to engage in end-of-life communication than Korean Americans, but the ethnicity effect was not evident in a multivariate analysis. Only participants' knowledge, perceived barriers, perceived severity, and experience of illness significantly predicted the likelihood of the end-of-life communication. Higher knowledge, stronger beliefs about the perceived severity and barriers, and greater experience of illness were related to having end-of-life communication. Knowledge and health beliefs play an important role in end-of-life communication which differs by ethnicity. Culturally competent health care practitioners need to consider ethnic variation in advance care planning.

  19. Predictors of Retention Among African American and Hispanic Older Adult Research Participants in the Well Elderly 2 Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Mike; Jackson, Jeanne; Mandel, Deborah; Blanchard, Jeanine; Holguin, Jess; Lai, Mei-Ying; Marterella, Abbey; Vigen, Cheryl; Gleason, Sarah; Lam, Claudia; Azen, Stan; Clark, Florence

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to document predictors of long-term retention among minority participants in the Well Elderly 2 Study, a randomized controlled trial of a lifestyle intervention for community-dwelling older adults. The primary sample included 149 African American and 92 Hispanic men and women aged 60–95 years, recruited at senior activity centers and senior residences. Chi-square and logistic regression procedures were undertaken to examine study-based, psychosocial, and health-related predictors of retention at 18 months following study entry. For both African Americans and Hispanics, intervention adherence was the strongest predictor. Retention was also related to high active coping and average (vs. high or low) levels of activity participation among African Americans and high social network strength among Hispanics. The results suggest that improved knowledge of the predictors of retention among minority elders can spawn new retention strategies that can be applied at individual, subgroup, and sample-wide levels. PMID:24652865

  20. Rates and factors associated with falls in older European Americans, Afro-Caribbeans, African-Americans, and Hispanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vieira ER

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Edgar Ramos Vieira,1,2 Ruth Tappen,3 Gabriella Engstrom,3 Bruno R da Costa11Department of Physical Therapy, 2Department of Neuroscience, Florida International University, Miami, FL, USA; 3Christine E. Lynn College of Nursing, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL, USAPurpose: To evaluate rates and factors associated with older adult falls in different ethnic groups.Participants and methods: Information on demographics, medical and falls history, and pain and physical activity levels was collected from 550 community-dwelling older adults (75±9 years old, 222 European Americans, 109 Afro-Caribbeans, 106 African-Americans, and 113 Hispanics.Results: Taking medications for anxiety (risk ratio [RR] =1.4, 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.1–2.0, having incontinence (RR =1.4, 95% CI =1.1–1.8, P=0.013, back pain (RR =1.4, 95% CI =1.0–1.8, feet swelling (RR =1.3, 95% CI =1.1–1.7, and age ≥75 years (RR =1.3, 95% CI =1.0–1.6 were associated with falls. The associations were stronger for Afro-Caribbeans, but they presented approximately 40% lower prevalence of falls than the other groups.Conclusion: Taking anxiety medication, incontinence, back pain, feet swelling, and age ≥75 years were associated with falls, and Afro-Caribbeans presented lower prevalence of falls. These findings need to be taken into consideration in clinical interventions in aging.Keywords: ethnicity, falls, risks, community dwelling, older adults

  1. Prevalence and treatment of eating disorders among Hispanics/Latino Americans in the United States

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perez, Marisol; Ohrt, Tara K.; Hoek, Hans W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of reviewWe reviewed the recent literature on prevalence rates, and application of evidence-based treatments for eating disorders among Hispanics/Latinos residing in the United States.Recent findingsLifetime prevalence rates of anorexia nervosa are lower among Hispanic/Latinos than non-Hispa

  2. All-cause and cardiovascular mortality among Mexican-American and non-Hispanic White older participants in the San Antonio Heart Study- evidence against the "Hispanic paradox"

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hunt, Kelly J; Resendez, Roy G; Williams, Ken; Haffner, Steve M; Stern, Michael P; Hazuda, Helen P

    2003-01-01

    The observation that Hispanics have lower all-cause and cardiovascular mortality rates despite increased rates of diabetes and obesity and lower socioeconomic status has been termed the "Hispanic paradox...

  3. Evaluation of an mHealth Medication Regimen Self-Management Program for African American and Hispanic Uncontrolled Hypertensives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Tatiana M; McGillicuddy, John; Mueller, Martina; Brunner-Jackson, Brenda; Favella, April; Anderson, Ashley; Torres, Magaly; Ruggiero, Kenneth J; Treiber, Frank A

    2015-11-17

    African Americans and Hispanics have disproportionate rates of uncontrolled essential hypertension (EH) compared to Non-Hispanic Whites. Medication non-adherence (MNA) is the leading modifiable behavior to improved blood pressure (BP) control. The Smartphone Medication Adherence Stops Hypertension (SMASH) program was developed using a patient-centered, theory-guided, iterative design process. Electronic medication trays provided reminder signals, and Short Message Service [SMS] messaging reminded subjects to monitor BP with Bluetooth-enabled monitors. Motivational and reinforcement text messages were sent to participants based upon levels of adherence. Thirty-eight African-American (18) and Hispanic (20) uncontrolled hypertensives completed clinic-based anthropometric and resting BP evaluations prior to randomization, and again at months 1, 3 and 6. Generalized linear mixed modeling (GLMM) revealed statistically significant time-by-treatment interactions (p evidence that efficacious mHealth, chronic disease, medical regimen, self-management programs can be developed following principles of patient-centered, theory-guided design.

  4. Seatbelt Use Among American Indians/Alaska Natives and Non-Hispanic Whites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Andrea N.; Patel, Kushang V.; Guralnik, Jack M.

    2009-01-01

    Background Accidents (including motor vehicle accidents) are a leading cause of death among American Indians/Alaskan Natives (AI/AN). The purpose of this study was to examine geographic variation and the existence of a seatbelt law on seatbelt use among AI/AN and non-Hispanic Whites (NHW). Methods Self-reported seatbelt behavior data from the 1997 and 2002 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) were analyzed in 2006–2007 and were restricted to AI/AN (n=4,310 for 2002, and n=1,758 for 1997) and NHW (n=193,617 for 2002, and n=108,551 for 1997) aged 18 years and older. Results Seatbelt non-use varied significantly across geographic regions for both AI/AN and NHW. For example, AI/AN living in the Northern Plains [odds ratio (OR)=12.4 (95% confidence interval (CI): 6.5, 23.7)] and Alaska [OR=10.3 (95%CI: 5.3, 19.9)] had significantly higher seatbelt non-use compared to AI/AN living in the West. In addition, compared to those residing in urban areas, those living in rural areas were 60% more likely in NHW and 2.6 times more likely in AI/AN not to wear a seatbelt. Both AI/AN and NHW living in states without primary seatbelt laws were approximately twice as likely to report seatbelt non-use in 2002 as those living in states with primary laws. In states with primary laws enacted between 1997 and 2002, AI/AN experienced greater decline in seatbelt non-use than NHW. Conclusions Seatbelt use among AI/AN and NHW varied significantly by region and urban-rural residency in 2002. Primary seatbelt laws appear to help reduce regional and racial disparities in seatbelt non-use. PMID:17826579

  5. Condom use by Hispanic and African-American adolescent girls who use hormonal contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roye, C F

    1998-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine condom use by teens who use hormonal contraceptives [i.e., Depo-Provera, Norplant, or oral contraceptives (OCs)]. This is a cross-sectional study of 578 Hispanic and African-American female adolescents between the ages of 12 and 21 years who came to a reproductive health care clinic. A paper-and-pencil questionnaire which addressed sexual behaviors, sexual history, and communication about sexuality was distributed to adolescent girls attending the clinic. Several important analyses included only those who had been sexually active in the last 4 weeks (n = 452). Adolescents who used OCs [odds ratio (OR) 1.7], long-acting agents (i.e., Depo-Provera or Norplant) (OR 1.6), were less likely to have used a condom in the last 4 weeks than teens whose only method of birth control was condoms. Only those teens who had previously been diagnosed with a sexually transmitted disease (STD) were more likely to have used a condom (OR .67 for not using a condom). Overall, condom use by teens in this sample was low, with only 19% reporting that they "always" use a condom, and 47% of the teens who had been sexually active in the last 4 weeks reporting that they had not used a condom at least once during that time. This study provides data which suggest that adolescent girls who use hormonal contraceptives are less likely to use condoms than other sexually active teens. Therefore, when prescribing hormonal contraception to prevent pregnancy, clinicians must provide appropriate counseling to mitigate against the potential to increase the risk of STDs.

  6. Descriptive drinking norms in Native American and non-Hispanic White college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagler, Kylee J; Pearson, Matthew R; Venner, Kamilla L; Greenfield, Brenna L

    2017-09-01

    College students tend to overestimate how much their peers drink, which is associated with higher personal alcohol use. However, research has not yet examined if this phenomenon holds true among Native American (NA) college students. This study examined associations between descriptive norms and alcohol use/consequences in a sample of NA and non-Hispanic White (NHW) college students. NA (n=147, 78.6% female) and NHW (n=246, 67.8% female) undergraduates completed an online survey. NAs NHWs showed similar descriptive norms such that the "typical college student," "typical NA student," and "typical NHW student" were perceived to drink more than "best friends." "Best friends" descriptive norms (i.e., estimations of how many drinks per week were consumed by participants' best friends) were the most robust predictors of alcohol use/consequences. Effect size estimates of the associations between drinking norms and participants' alcohol use were consistently positive and ranged from r=0.25 to r=0.51 across the four reference groups. Negative binomial hurdle models revealed that all descriptive norms tended to predict drinking, and "best friends" drinking norms predicted alcohol consequences. Apart from one interaction effect, likely due to familywise error rate, these associations were not qualified by interactions with racial/ethnic group. We found similar patterns between NAs and NHWs both in the pattern of descriptive norms across reference groups and in the strength of associations between descriptive norms and alcohol use/consequences. Although these results suggest that descriptive norms operate similarly among NAs as other college students, additional research is needed to identify whether other norms (e.g., injunctive norms) operate similarly across NA and NHW students. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Post-traumatic Stress and Trauma-Related Subjective Distress: Comparisons Among Hispanics, African-Americans, and Whites with Severe Mental Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hare, Thomas; Shen, Ce; Sherrer, Margaret V

    2017-02-06

    We tested the hypothesis with a sample of community mental health clients (N = 132) that Hispanic clients would report significantly greater post-traumatic stress symptoms than African-American or white clients when controlling for gender, psychiatric symptoms of SMI, and subjective distress from six of the most commonly reported trauma in the SMI literature. Results supported our main hypothesis: being self-identified as Hispanic was significantly associated with greater post-traumatic stress symptoms. Subjective distress from having been sexually abused along with being "Hispanic" were the only two significant variables left in the equation. Limitations of this study include its modest sample size.

  8. The Challenges of Change. A Report from the Aspen Institute Seminar on Hispanic Americans and the Business Community (Aspen, Colorado, July 27-30, 1997).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Georgianna; Nicolau, Siobhan

    This report from the 1997 Aspen Institute seminar concerns how demographic changes in American will affect Hispanic Americans' role in the business community. Section 1, "Lashes: Back, Front, and Sideways" (Harold Hodgkinson), describes pervasive national pessimism over demographic change and documents universal backlash to that change among all…

  9. Acculturation and Plasma Fatty Acid Concentrations in Hispanic and Chinese-American Adults: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassandra S Diep

    Full Text Available Acculturation to the U.S. is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, but the etiologic pathways are not fully understood. Plasma fatty acid levels exhibit ethnic differences and are emerging as biomarkers and predictors of cardiovascular disease risk. Thus, plasma fatty acids may represent one pathway underlying the association between acculturation and cardiovascular disease. We investigated the cross-sectional relationship between acculturation and plasma phospholipid fatty acids in a diverse sample of Hispanic- and Chinese-American adults.Participants included 377 Mexican, 320 non-Mexican Hispanic, and 712 Chinese adults from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis, who had full plasma phospholipid assays and acculturation information. Acculturation was determined from three proxy measures: nativity, language spoken at home, and years in the U.S., with possible scores ranging from 0 (least acculturated to 5 (most acculturated points. α-Linolenic acid, linoleic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, docosahexaenoic acid, and arachidonic acid were measured in fasting plasma. Linear regression models were conducted in race/ethnicity-stratified analyses, with acculturation as the predictor and plasma phospholipid fatty acids as the outcome variables. We ran secondary analyses to examine associations between acculturation and dietary fatty acids for comparison. Covariates included age, gender, education, and income. Contrary to our hypothesis, no statistically significant associations were detected between acculturation and plasma phospholipid fatty acids for Chinese, non-Mexican Hispanic, or Mexican participants. However, acculturation was related to dietary total n-6 fatty acids and dietary n-3/n-6 ratios in expected directions for Mexican, non-Mexican Hispanic, and combined Hispanic participants. In Chinese individuals, acculturation was unexpectedly associated with lower arachidonic acid intake.Absence of associations between

  10. Acculturation and Plasma Fatty Acid Concentrations in Hispanic and Chinese-American Adults: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diep, Cassandra S; Lemaitre, Rozenn N; Chen, Tzu-An; Baranowski, Tom; Lutsey, Pamela L; Manichaikul, Ani W; Rich, Stephen S; St-Jules, David E; Steffen, Brian T; Tsai, Michael Y; Siscovick, David S; Frazier-Wood, Alexis C

    2016-01-01

    Acculturation to the U.S. is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, but the etiologic pathways are not fully understood. Plasma fatty acid levels exhibit ethnic differences and are emerging as biomarkers and predictors of cardiovascular disease risk. Thus, plasma fatty acids may represent one pathway underlying the association between acculturation and cardiovascular disease. We investigated the cross-sectional relationship between acculturation and plasma phospholipid fatty acids in a diverse sample of Hispanic- and Chinese-American adults. Participants included 377 Mexican, 320 non-Mexican Hispanic, and 712 Chinese adults from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis, who had full plasma phospholipid assays and acculturation information. Acculturation was determined from three proxy measures: nativity, language spoken at home, and years in the U.S., with possible scores ranging from 0 (least acculturated) to 5 (most acculturated) points. α-Linolenic acid, linoleic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, docosahexaenoic acid, and arachidonic acid were measured in fasting plasma. Linear regression models were conducted in race/ethnicity-stratified analyses, with acculturation as the predictor and plasma phospholipid fatty acids as the outcome variables. We ran secondary analyses to examine associations between acculturation and dietary fatty acids for comparison. Covariates included age, gender, education, and income. Contrary to our hypothesis, no statistically significant associations were detected between acculturation and plasma phospholipid fatty acids for Chinese, non-Mexican Hispanic, or Mexican participants. However, acculturation was related to dietary total n-6 fatty acids and dietary n-3/n-6 ratios in expected directions for Mexican, non-Mexican Hispanic, and combined Hispanic participants. In Chinese individuals, acculturation was unexpectedly associated with lower arachidonic acid intake. Absence of associations between acculturation and

  11. Obesity is associated with breast cancer in African-American women but not Hispanic women in South Los Angeles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkissyan, Marianna; Wu, Yanyuan; Vadgama, Jaydutt V

    2011-08-15

    Obesity is considered a risk factor for breast cancer. Modifying life styles that reduce obesity offers the potential for prevention and improved outcomes from cancer. The effects of obesity and breast cancer among African-American women and Hispanic women have been explored in a limited number of studies. The objective of the current study was to investigate the association of obesity with breast cancer in a minority cohort. This was a cross-sectional study of 471 African-American and Hispanic women with and without breast cancer in South Los Angeles. Data regarding body mass index (BMI) and clinical factors were obtained by medical record abstraction. Data were assessed using logistic regression with multivariate analysis. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was used to assess disease-free survival. Women with breast cancer were more likely to be obese (BMI >30 kg/m(2)) than women without breast cancer (odds ratio [OR], 2.0; P = .01). There was a significant association of being overweight or obese and breast cancer among postmenopausal women (OR, 2.3 [P = .03] and 2.9 [P association between obesity and breast cancer was significant only among African-American women (OR, 2.70; P association between obesity and later disease stage at diagnosis (P = .06). An association also was observed between higher BMI (for cutoff points of both 30 kg/m(2) and 28 kg/m(2)) and poorer disease-free survival (P = .045 and P = .019, respectively). The current data suggested an association between obesity and breast cancer, especially among postmenopausal women and most significantly in the African-American cohort. Copyright © 2011 American Cancer Society.

  12. Hispanics and Heart Disease, Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Hispanics and Heart Disease, Stroke Updated:Aug 30,2016 Heart disease is the No. 1 killer for all Americans and stroke is the fifth leading cause of death. Hispanics ...

  13. Evaluation of an mHealth Medication Regimen Self-Management Program for African American and Hispanic Uncontrolled Hypertensives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana M. Davidson

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available African Americans and Hispanics have disproportionate rates of uncontrolled essential hypertension (EH compared to Non-Hispanic Whites. Medication non-adherence (MNA is the leading modifiable behavior to improved blood pressure (BP control. The Smartphone Medication Adherence Stops Hypertension (SMASH program was developed using a patient-centered, theory-guided, iterative design process. Electronic medication trays provided reminder signals, and Short Message Service [SMS] messaging reminded subjects to monitor BP with Bluetooth-enabled monitors. Motivational and reinforcement text messages were sent to participants based upon levels of adherence. Thirty-eight African-American (18 and Hispanic (20 uncontrolled hypertensives completed clinic-based anthropometric and resting BP evaluations prior to randomization, and again at months 1, 3 and 6. Generalized linear mixed modeling (GLMM revealed statistically significant time-by-treatment interactions (p < 0.0001 indicating significant reductions in resting systolic blood pressure (SBP and diastolic blood pressure (DBP for the SMASH group vs. the standard care (SC control group across all time points. 70.6% of SMASH subjects vs. 15.8% of the SC group reached BP control (< 140/90 mmH at month 1 (p < 0.001. At month 6, 94.4% of the SMASH vs. 41.2% of the SC group exhibited controlled BP (p < 0.003. Our findings provide encouraging evidence that efficacious mHealth, chronic disease, medical regimen, self-management programs can be developed following principles of patient-centered, theory-guided design.

  14. Losing Ground: Science and Engineering Graduate Education of Black and Hispanic Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcom, Shirley M.; Van Horne, Virginia V.; Gaddy, Catherine D.; George, Yolanda S.

    This study examined the effects of court challenges to affirmative action policies on the admission of black and Hispanic students to selective science and engineering (S&E) graduate programs. Data were gathered from a sample of 76 major research universities in regard to the application, admission, and enrollment of U.S. citizens and permanent…

  15. Children’s Environmental Health Disparities: Hispanic and Latino American Children and Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racial and ethnic minorities and poor children may be exposed to more pollution and thereby more health risks. Puerto Rican children have the highest rates of asthma at 20, out of an overall 8 of Hispanic children. You can take protective actions.

  16. Project Exchange, Proyecto Intercambio: A Guide to Exploring Hispanic and North American Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Maria L.; Zanger, Virginia Vogel

    Based on a successful high school student exchange program, a curriculum was designed to bring together Hispanic students learning English and Anglo students learning Spanish for intercultural experiences. The flexible curriculum includes over 40 activities that students can participate in while meeting together once a week for either a brief…

  17. Project Exchange, Proyecto Intercambio: A Guide to Exploring Hispanic and North American Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Maria L.; Zanger, Virginia Vogel

    Based on a successful high school student exchange program, a curriculum was designed to bring together Hispanic students learning English and Anglo students learning Spanish for intercultural experiences. The flexible curriculum includes over 40 activities that students can participate in while meeting together once a week for either a brief…

  18. The Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori Remains High in African American and Hispanic Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Theresa; Ramsey, David; Graham, David; Shaib, Yasser; Shiota, Seiji; Velez, Maria; Cole, Rhonda; Anand, Bhupinderjit; Vela, Marcelo; El-Serag, Hashem B

    2015-08-01

    Helicobacter pylori in the United States has been declining in the 1990s albeit less so among blacks and Hispanics. As the socioeconomic status of racial groups has evolved, it remains unclear whether the prevalence or the racial and ethnic disparities in the prevalence of H. pylori have changed. This is a cross-sectional study from a Veteran Affairs center among patients aged 40-80 years old who underwent a study esophagogastroduodenoscopy with gastric biopsies, which were cultured for H. pylori irrespective of findings on histopathology. Positive H. pylori was defined as positive culture or histopathology (stained organism combined with active gastritis). We calculated age-, race-, and birth cohort-specific H. pylori prevalence rates and examined predictors of H. pylori infection in logistic regression models. We analyzed data on 1200 patients; most (92.8%) were men and non-Hispanic white (59.9%) or black (28.9%). H. pylori was positive in 347 (28.9%) and was highest among black males aged 50-59 (53.3%; 44.0-62.4%), followed by Hispanic males aged 60-69 (48.1%; 34.2-62.2%), and lowest in non-Hispanic white males aged 40-49 (8.2%; 2.7-20.5%). In multivariate analysis, age group 50-59 was significantly associated with H. pylori (adjusted odds ratio (OR), 2.32; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.21-4.45) compared with those aged 40-49, and with black race (adjusted OR, 2.57; 95% CI, 1.83-3.60) and Hispanic ethnicity (adjusted OR, 3.01; 95% CI, 1.70-5.34) compared with non-Hispanic white. Irrespective of age group, patients born during 1960-1969 had a lower risk of H. pylori (adjusted OR, 0.45; 95% CI, 0.22-0.96) compared to those born in 1930-1939. Those with some college education were less likely to have H. pylori compared to those with no college education (adjusted OR 0.51; 95% CI, 0.37-0.69). Among veterans, the prevalence of active H. pylori remains high (28.9%) with even higher rates in blacks and Hispanics with lower education levels. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons

  19. Depressive symptoms and carotid intima-media thickness in South American Hispanics: results from the PREVENCION study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirinos, Diana A; Medina-Lezama, Josefina; Salinas-Najarro, Belissa; Arguelles, William; Llabre, Maria M; Schneiderman, Neil; Paz-Manrique, Roberto; Bolanos, Juan F; Khan, Zubair; Chirinos, Julio A

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to: (1) examine the relationship between depressive symptoms and subclinical atherosclerosis, measured by carotid intima-media thickness (IMT); and, (2) Determine the moderating effect of gender in this relationship among South American Hispanics. We studied 496 adults enrolled in the population-based PREVENCION study. Carotid IMT was measured with high-resolution ultrasonography. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Mean carotid IMT was 0.66 mm. (SD = 0.17) and mean depression score was 5.6 (SD = 3.5). Depressive symptoms were not associated with carotid IMT (β = 0.04, p = 0.222) in multivariate analyses. A significant moderating effect of gender was found (β for interaction = 0.10, p = 0.030), resulting from a significant association between depressive symptoms and carotid IMT in men but not women. Depressive symptoms were associated with subclinical atherosclerosis in South American Hispanic men but not women after controlling for demographic characteristics and traditional cardiovascular risk factors.

  20. Depression, Stress and Body Fat are Associated with Binge Eating in a Community Sample of African American and Hispanic Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamus-Leach, Heather J.; Wilson, Penny L.; O’Connor, Daniel P.; Rhode, Paula C.; Mama, Scherezade K.; Lee, Rebecca E.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships among depressive symptoms, stress and severity of binge eating symptoms in a community sample of African American and Hispanic or Latina women. Method Women (African American n=127, Hispanic or Latina n=44) completed measures of body composition, stress, depression, and binge eating. Results Scores on a depressive symptom scale indicated that 24.0% of participants exhibited clinically significant levels of depressive symptoms. Mean binge eating scores were below the threshold for clinically diagnosed binge eating (12.99±7.90). Mean stressful event scores were 25.86±14.26 and the average stress impact score was 78.36±55.43. Linear regression models found that body composition, stress impact score, and being classified as having clinically significant levels of depression, were associated with severity of binge eating symptoms. Conclusion Higher levels of percent body fat, a CES-D score ≥16 and higher WSI-Impact scores were associated with greater severity of binge eating symptoms. PMID:23760851

  1. Quantifying the extent of North American mammal extinction relative to the pre-anthropogenic baseline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, Marc A; Barnosky, Anthony D; Graham, Russell W

    2009-12-16

    Earth has experienced five major extinction events in the past 450 million years. Many scientists suggest we are now witnessing a sixth, driven by human impacts. However, it has been difficult to quantify the real extent of the current extinction episode, either for a given taxonomic group at the continental scale or for the worldwide biota, largely because comparisons of pre-anthropogenic and anthropogenic biodiversity baselines have been unavailable. Here, we compute those baselines for mammals of temperate North America, using a sampling-standardized rich fossil record to reconstruct species-area relationships for a series of time slices ranging from 30 million to 500 years ago. We show that shortly after humans first arrived in North America, mammalian diversity dropped to become at least 15%-42% too low compared to the "normal" diversity baseline that had existed for millions of years. While the Holocene reduction in North American mammal diversity has long been recognized qualitatively, our results provide a quantitative measure that clarifies how significant the diversity reduction actually was. If mass extinctions are defined as loss of at least 75% of species on a global scale, our data suggest that North American mammals had already progressed one-fifth to more than halfway (depending on biogeographic province) towards that benchmark, even before industrialized society began to affect them. Data currently are not available to make similar quantitative estimates for other continents, but qualitative declines in Holocene mammal diversity are also widely recognized in South America, Eurasia, and Australia. Extending our methodology to mammals in these areas, as well as to other taxa where possible, would provide a reasonable way to assess the magnitude of global extinction, the biodiversity impact of extinctions of currently threatened species, and the efficacy of conservation efforts into the future.

  2. Quantifying the extent of North American mammal extinction relative to the pre-anthropogenic baseline.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc A Carrasco

    Full Text Available Earth has experienced five major extinction events in the past 450 million years. Many scientists suggest we are now witnessing a sixth, driven by human impacts. However, it has been difficult to quantify the real extent of the current extinction episode, either for a given taxonomic group at the continental scale or for the worldwide biota, largely because comparisons of pre-anthropogenic and anthropogenic biodiversity baselines have been unavailable. Here, we compute those baselines for mammals of temperate North America, using a sampling-standardized rich fossil record to reconstruct species-area relationships for a series of time slices ranging from 30 million to 500 years ago. We show that shortly after humans first arrived in North America, mammalian diversity dropped to become at least 15%-42% too low compared to the "normal" diversity baseline that had existed for millions of years. While the Holocene reduction in North American mammal diversity has long been recognized qualitatively, our results provide a quantitative measure that clarifies how significant the diversity reduction actually was. If mass extinctions are defined as loss of at least 75% of species on a global scale, our data suggest that North American mammals had already progressed one-fifth to more than halfway (depending on biogeographic province towards that benchmark, even before industrialized society began to affect them. Data currently are not available to make similar quantitative estimates for other continents, but qualitative declines in Holocene mammal diversity are also widely recognized in South America, Eurasia, and Australia. Extending our methodology to mammals in these areas, as well as to other taxa where possible, would provide a reasonable way to assess the magnitude of global extinction, the biodiversity impact of extinctions of currently threatened species, and the efficacy of conservation efforts into the future.

  3. Hispanic rhinoplasty in the United States, with emphasis on the Mexican American nose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Rollin K

    2003-07-01

    Because an increasing number of Hispanic patients are seeking nasal surgical treatment, a critical analysis of 25 consecutive Hispanic rhinoplasties was performed. After a review of the patient data and preoperative photographs, a new classification was developed, based on the type of deformity rather than geographical origins (as previously used). A treatment paradigm is offered for each type of deformity. Type I involves a high radix, a high dorsum, and a nearly normal tip and is often referred to as a Castilian nose. Treatment consists of a closed functional reduction rhinoplasty, with dorsal reduction and minor tip changes. Type II involves a low radix, a normal dorsum, and a dependent tip and is a new designation. Treatment consists of a finesse rhinoplasty with a radix graft, minimal dorsal changes, use of a columellar strut for support, and open tip suturing. Type III involves a broad base, thick skin, and a wide tip deformity, with its worst expression in the mestizo nose. Treatment consists of a balanced rhinoplasty with minimal dorsal alteration but maximal lobular reduction and an open-structure tip graft. The following conclusions with respect to Hispanic rhinoplasty in the United States are important: (1) an enormous anatomical diversity of deformities is present, in contrast to Asian and black noses; (2) three distinct types of deformities have been identified, each of which requires a different surgical approach; (3) a wide variety of surgical techniques are necessary, in contrast to other ethnic noses; (4) conservative dorsal reduction is essential for type II and III noses; and (5) limitations imposed by the skin envelope are far less than presupposed, and the results are better than generally recognized. As the Hispanic population grows and becomes more prosperous, plastic surgeons in the United States can expect to encounter an increasing number of Hispanic patients requesting rhinoplasty.

  4. The American Cancer Society's Cancer Prevention Study 3 (CPS-3): Recruitment, study design, and baseline characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Alpa V; Jacobs, Eric J; Dudas, Daniela M; Briggs, Peter J; Lichtman, Cari J; Bain, Elizabeth B; Stevens, Victoria L; McCullough, Marjorie L; Teras, Lauren R; Campbell, Peter T; Gaudet, Mia M; Kirkland, Elizabeth G; Rittase, Melissa H; Joiner, Nance; Diver, W Ryan; Hildebrand, Janet S; Yaw, Nancy C; Gapstur, Susan M

    2017-06-01

    Prospective cohort studies contribute importantly to understanding the role of lifestyle, genetic, and other factors in chronic disease etiology. The American Cancer Society (ACS) recruited a new prospective cohort study, Cancer Prevention Study 3 (CPS-3), between 2006 and 2013 from 35 states and Puerto Rico. Enrollment took place primarily at ACS community events and at community enrollment "drives." At enrollment sites, participants completed a brief survey that included an informed consent, identifying information necessary for follow-up, and key exposure information. They also provided a waist measure and a nonfasting blood sample. Most participants also completed a more comprehensive baseline survey at home that included extensive medical, lifestyle, and other information. Participants will be followed for incident cancers through linkage with state cancer registries and for cause-specific mortality through linkage with the National Death Index. In total, 303,682 participants were enrolled. Of these, 254,650 completed the baseline survey and are considered "fully" enrolled; they will be sent repeat surveys periodically for at least the next 20 years to update exposure information. The remaining participants (n = 49,032) will not be asked to update exposure information but will be followed for outcomes. Twenty-three percent of participants were men, 17.3% reported a race or ethnicity other than "white," and the median age at enrollment was 47 years. CPS-3 will be a valuable resource for studies of cancer and other outcomes because of its size; its diversity with respect to age, ethnicity, and geography; and the availability of blood samples and detailed questionnaire information collected over time. Cancer 2017;123:2014-2024. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  5. Home Availability and the Impact of Weekly Stressful Events Are Associated with Fruit and Vegetable Intake among African American and Hispanic/Latina Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledoux, Tracey A; Mama, Scherezade K; O'Connor, Daniel P; Adamus, Heather; Fraser, Margaret L; Lee, Rebecca E

    2012-01-01

    Background. Mediating and moderating variables may interfere with the association between neighborhood availability of grocery stores (NAG) and supermarkets (NAS) and fruit and vegetable (FV) intake. Objective. The purpose of this study was to test mediation of home availability of FV (HAFV) and moderation of impact of weekly stressful events (IWSE) on the association between NAG and NAS with FV consumption among African American (AA) and Hispanic/Latina (HL) women. Methods. Three hundred nine AA and HL, 25-60 year old women in the Health Is Power (HIP) randomized controlled trial completed validated measures of HAFV, IWSE, and FV intake at baseline. Trained field assessors coded NAG and NAS. Institutional Review Board approval was obtained. Results. NAG and NAS were not associated with FV intake or HAFV, so HAFV was not a mediator. HAFV (std. Beta = .29, P moderator. Conclusion. Increasing HAFV and decreasing the IWSE should increase FV consumption. The extent to which the neighborhood environment is related to the home food environment and diet, and the mechanisms for the association between IWSE and diet should be examined in future research.

  6. Home Availability and the Impact of Weekly Stressful Events Are Associated with Fruit and Vegetable Intake among African American and Hispanic/Latina Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracey A. Ledoux

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Mediating and moderating variables may interfere with the association between neighborhood availability of grocery stores (NAG and supermarkets (NAS and fruit and vegetable (FV intake. Objective. The purpose of this study was to test mediation of home availability of FV (HAFV and moderation of impact of weekly stressful events (IWSE on the association between NAG and NAS with FV consumption among African American (AA and Hispanic/Latina (HL women. Methods. Three hundred nine AA and HL, 25–60 year old women in the Health Is Power (HIP randomized controlled trial completed validated measures of HAFV, IWSE, and FV intake at baseline. Trained field assessors coded NAG and NAS. Institutional Review Board approval was obtained. Results. NAG and NAS were not associated with FV intake or HAFV, so HAFV was not a mediator. HAFV (std. Beta = .29, P<0.001 and IWSE (std. Beta = .17; P<0.05 were related to FV intake (R2  =0.17; P<0.001, but IWSE was not a moderator. Conclusion. Increasing HAFV and decreasing the IWSE should increase FV consumption. The extent to which the neighborhood environment is related to the home food environment and diet, and the mechanisms for the association between IWSE and diet should be examined in future research.

  7. Hispanic Business Agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coca-Cola USA, Atlanta, GA.

    This is a corporate policy statement of the Hispanic business agenda of Coca Cola USA, and the results of a community survey conducted to inform that agenda. The statement outlines several areas of company policy as they relate to Hispanic Americans. These areas include regional marketing, promotion, and community relations strategies, a…

  8. Knowledge about type 2 diabetes risk and prevention of African-American and Hispanic adults and adolescents with family history of type 2 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this study was to assess type 2 diabetes knowledge, perceptions, risk factor awareness, and prevention practices among African-American and Hispanic families with a history of diabetes. Ninth and tenth grade Houston area students who had a parent who spoke English or Spanish and had a...

  9. African Americans & Hispanics among Physics & Astronomy Faculty: Results from the 2012 Survey of Physics & Astronomy Degree-Granting Departments. Focus On

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivie, Rachel; Anderson, Garrett; White, Susan

    2014-01-01

    The United States is becoming more and more diverse, but the representation of some minority groups in physics and astronomy lags behind. Although 13% of the US population is African American or black, and 17% is Hispanic (US Census), the representation of these two groups in physics and astronomy is much lower. For this reason, African Americans…

  10. Ethnic differences in the home food environment and parental food practices among families of low income Hispanic and African-American preschoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    The family and home environment are important in shaping the dietary patterns of children, yet research among low-income, minority groups is limited. We examined ethnic differences in the home food environment and parental practices among 706 low-income African-American and Hispanic families of pre...

  11. Ethnic differences in the home food environment and parental food practices among families of low-income Hispanic and African-American preschoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    The family and home environment are important in shaping the dietary patterns of children, yet research among low-income, minority groups is limited. We examined ethnic differences in the home food environment and parental practices among 706 low-income, African-American and Hispanic families of pre...

  12. Dating Violence Perpetration and/or Victimization and Associated Sexual Risk Behaviors among a Sample of Inner-City African American and Hispanic Adolescent Females

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alleyne-Green, Binta; Coleman-Cowger, Victoria H.; Henry, David B.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the prevalence of physical and psychological dating violence victimization and perpetration reported by inner-city African American and Hispanic adolescent girls as well as associated risky sexual behaviors among this population. Participants in this study were 10th- and 11th-grade female students from seven…

  13. Depressive Symptoms Are More Strongly Related to Executive Functioning and Episodic Memory Among African American compared with Non-Hispanic White Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahodne, Laura B.; Nowinski, Cindy J.; Gershon, Richard C.; Manly, Jennifer J.

    2014-01-01

    We examined whether the reserve capacity model can be extended to cognitive outcomes among older African Americans. Two hundred and ninety-two non-Hispanic Whites and 37 African Americans over age 54 participated in the normative study for the NIH Toolbox for the Assessment of Neurological and Behavioral Function. Multiple-group path analysis showed that associations between depressive symptoms and cognition differed by race, independent of age, education, reading level, income, health, and recruitment site. Depressive symptoms were associated with slowed processing speed among Whites and worse task-switching, inhibition, and episodic memory among African Americans. African Americans may be more vulnerable to negative effects of depression on cognition than non-Hispanic Whites. Further research is needed to explicate the psychological and neurobiological underpinnings of this greater vulnerability. PMID:25280795

  14. Trends and changes in the system of higher education in the United States for African-Americans and Hispanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nattie Golubov

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Using a wide variety of statistical sources, particularly those created by government agencies in the United States of America (USA, this article offers a descriptive overview of the insertion of ethnic and racial minorities in the USA higher education system. This process illustrates more profound and general changes within USA society, which have a specific though not exclusive origin in the social transformations that began in the 1960’s and were consolidated in the 1970’s. These changes gave rise to a new polítical, social and cultural space for African-Americans, who waged a powerful battle to gain political and civil rights, which were then extended to the Hispanic population.

  15. Contemporary American Success Stories: Famous People of Hispanic Heritage. Volume VI. A Mitchell Lane Multicultral Biography Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997

    The term "Hispanic" is an umbrella term that encompasses people from many nationalities, all races, and many social and cultural groups. Hispanics are also collectively called Latinos. The biographies in this series represent the diversity of Hispanic heritage in the United States. The people featured are contemporary figures of…

  16. Contemporary American Success Stories: Famous People of Hispanic Heritage. Volume V. A Mitchell Lane Multicultral Biography Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvis, Barbara J.

    The term "Hispanic" is an umbrella term that encompasses people from many nationalities, all races, and many social and cultural groups. Hispanics are also collectively called Latinos. The biographies in this series represent the diversity of Hispanic heritage in the United States. The people featured are contemporary figures of…

  17. Contemporary American Success Stories: Famous People of Hispanic Heritage. Volume IV. A Mitchell Lane Multicultral Biography Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvis, Barbara J.

    The term "Hispanic" is an umbrella term that encompasses people from many nationalities, all races, and many social and cultural groups. Hispanics are also collectively called Latinos. The biographies in this series represent the diversity of Hispanic heritage in the United States. The people featured are contemporary figures of…

  18. Vitamin D Receptor Gene Polymorphisms and Prognosis of Breast Cancer among African-American and Hispanic Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Dhruva K.; Wu, Yanyuan; Sarkissyan, Marianna; Sarkissyan, Suren; Chen, Zujian; Shang, Xiying; Ong, May; Heber, David; Koeffler, H. Phillip; Vadgama, Jaydutt V.

    2013-01-01

    Background Vitamin D plays a role in cancer development and acts through the vitamin D receptor (VDR). Although African-Americans have the lowest levels of serum vitamin D, there is a dearth of information on VDR gene polymorphisms and breast cancer among African-Americans and Hispanics. This study examines whether VDR gene polymorphisms are associated with breast cancer in these cohorts. Methods Blood was collected from 232 breast cancer patients (Cases) and 349 non-cancer subjects (Controls). Genotyping for four polymorphic variants of VDR (FokI, BsmI, TaqI and ApaI) was performed using the PCR-RFLP method. Results An increased association of the VDR-Fok1 f allele with breast cancer was observed in African-Americans (OR = 1.9, p = 0.07). Furthermore, the FbTA, FbtA and fbtA haplotypes were associated with breast cancer among African-Americans (pLatinas were more likely to have the VDR-ApaI alleles (Aa or aa) (p = 0.008). The VDR-ApaI aa genotype was significantly associated with poorly-differentiated breast tumors (p = 0.04) in combined Cases. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed decreased 5-year disease-free-survival (DFS) in breast cancer patients who had the VDR-Fok1 FF genotype (pLatinas. The VDR-FokI FF genotype is linked with poor prognosis in African-American women with breast cancer. PMID:23554871

  19. Pediatric Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: the Rise of a Lethal Disease Among Mexican American Hispanic Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancourt-Garcia, Monica M; Arguelles, Armando; Montes, Jorge; Hernandez, Ambrosio; Singh, Manish; Forse, R Armour

    2017-01-01

    Hispanic children of Mexican origin have a high incidence of NAFLD. Susceptibility has been linked to a combination of factors including an increasing epidemic of obesity in children and adolescents, an allele substitution in the PNPLA3 gene that reduces hepatic lipid catabolism, and an altered microbiome that may increase hepatic endotoxins. The combination of NAFLD and portal vein toxins secondary to an indigenous gut microbiome appear to lead to the early occurrence of NASH, which progresses to cirrhosis and early hepatocellular carcinoma. Early detection and treatment of hepatic changes are needed. Given the success of gastric bypass in reducing body weight, modifying the gut microbiome, and improving NAFLD/NASH in adults, a trial of gastric bypass in predisposed pediatric candidates should be undertaken.

  20. Clinical and pathological characteristics of Hispanic BRCA-associated breast cancers in the American-Mexican border city of El Paso, TX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahleh, Zeina; Otoukesh, Salman; Dwivedi, Alok Kumar; Mallawaarachchi, Indika; Sanchez, Luis; Saldivar, J Salvador; Cataneda, Kayla; Heydarian, Rosalinda

    2015-01-01

    Hispanics in El Paso, TX, a large American-Mexican border city constitute 85% of the population. Limited cancer research has been conducted in this population. We sought to study the prevalence of BRCA mutations among Hispanic patients of Mexican origin, identify reported Mexican founder or recurrent mutations, and study the breast cancer characteristics in mutation carriers. Hispanic women of Mexican descent with a personal history of breast cancer, who presented consecutively for genetic cancer risk assessment, were enrolled in an Institutional Review Board-approved registry and underwent BRCA testing based on national guidelines. The characteristics of tumors and patients with positive BRCA mutation were analyzed. 88 patients were screened; 18 patients (20%) were BRCA carriers. Among BRCA carriers, 72% were diagnosed with breast cancer at younger than 50 years, 61% had "Triple negative disease". BRCA carriers had a significantly higher Body Mass Index (BMI) than non-carriers. Thirteen patients had BRCA1 mutations and five had BRCA2 mutations. A total of 17 deleterious BRCA Mutations were observed. Seven have been previously reported as specific genes from Mexico as country of origin. Five new mutations in BRCA carriers of Mexican descent were identified. Hispanic breast cancer patients of Mexican origin present at a younger age, and have predominantly triple negative tumors and high BMI. We identified 5 new mutations not reported previously in Hispanic BRCA carriers of Mexican descent. Interestingly, 41% of BRCA mutations identified have been reported as recurrent mutations in Hispanic individuals from Mexico as the country of origin. A more cost-effective approach to initial screening of Hispanic individuals based on country of origin is desirable and would potentially decrease the number of cases requiring complete sequencing.

  1. The counseling african americans to control hypertension (caatch trial: baseline demographic, clinical, psychosocial, and behavioral characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diaz-Gloster Marleny

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Effectiveness of combined physician and patient-level interventions for blood pressure (BP control in low-income, hypertensive African Americans with multiple co-morbid conditions remains largely untested in community-based primary care practices. Demographic, clinical, psychosocial, and behavioral characteristics of participants in the Counseling African American to Control Hypertension (CAATCH Trial are described. CAATCH evaluates the effectiveness of a multi-level, multi-component, evidence-based intervention compared with usual care (UC in improving BP control among poorly controlled hypertensive African Americans who receive primary care in Community Health Centers (CHCs. Methods Participants included 1,039 hypertensive African Americans receiving care in 30 CHCs in the New York Metropolitan area. Baseline data on participant demographic, clinical (e.g., BP, anti-hypertensive medications, psychosocial (e.g., depression, medication adherence, self-efficacy, and behavioral (e.g., exercise, diet characteristics were gathered through direct observation, chart review, and interview. Results The sample was primarily female (71.6%, middle-aged (mean age = 56.9 ± 12.1 years, high school educated (62.4%, low-income (72.4% reporting less than $20,000/year income, and received Medicaid (35.9% or Medicare (12.6%. Mean systolic and diastolic BP were 150.7 ± 16.7 mm Hg and 91.0 ± 10.6 mm Hg, respectively. Participants were prescribed an average of 2.5 ± 1.9 antihypertensive medications; 54.8% were on a diuretic; 33.8% were on a beta blocker; 41.9% were on calcium channel blockers; 64.8% were on angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs. One-quarter (25.6% of the sample had resistant hypertension; one-half (55.7% reported medication non-adherence. Most (79.7% reported one or more co-morbid medical conditions. The majority of the patients had a Charlson Co-morbidity score ≥ 2. Diabetes

  2. Variations in Social Network Type Membership Among Older African Americans, Caribbean Blacks, and Non-Hispanic Whites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Ann W

    2017-07-01

    This study examined race differences in the probability of belonging to a specific social network typology of family, friends, and church members. Samples of African Americans, Caribbean blacks, and non-Hispanic whites aged 55+ were drawn from the National Survey of American Life. Typology indicators related to social integration and negative interactions with family, friendship, and church networks were used. Latent class analysis was used to identify typologies, and latent class multinomial logistic regression was used to assess the influence of race, and interactions between race and age, and race and education on typology membership. Four network typologies were identified: optimal (high social integration, low negative interaction), family-centered (high social integration within primarily the extended family network, low negative interaction), strained (low social integration, high negative interaction), and ambivalent (high social integration and high negative interaction). Findings for race and age and race and education interactions indicated that the effects of education and age on typology membership varied by race. Overall, the findings demonstrate how race interacts with age and education to influence the probability of belonging to particular network types. A better understanding of the influence of race, education, and age on social network typologies will inform future research and theoretical developments in this area.

  3. Difference in Association of Obesity With Prostate Cancer Risk Between US African American and Non-Hispanic White Men in the Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrington, Wendy E; Schenk, Jeannette M; Etzioni, Ruth; Arnold, Kathryn B; Neuhouser, Marian L; Thompson, Ian M; Lucia, M Scott; Kristal, Alan R

    2015-06-01

    African American men have the highest rates of prostate cancer incidence and mortality in the United States. Understanding underlying reasons for this disparity could identify preventive interventions important to African American men. To determine whether the association of obesity with prostate cancer risk differs between African American and non-Hispanic white men and whether obesity modifies the excess risk associated with African American race. Prospective study of 3398 African American and 22,673 non-Hispanic white men who participated in the Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (2001-2011) with present analyses completed in 2014. Total, low-grade (Gleason score prostate cancer incidence. With a median (interquartile range) follow-up of 5.6 (1.8) years, there were 270, 148, and 88 cases of total, low-, and high-grade prostate cancers among African American men and a corresponding 1453, 898, and 441 cases in non-Hispanic white men, respectively. Although not associated with risk among non-Hispanic white men, BMI was positively associated with an increase in risk among African American men (BMI, prostate cancer risk within non-Hispanic white men (BMI, prostate cancer in both non-Hispanic white men (BMI, Obesity is more strongly associated with increased prostate cancer risk among African American than non-Hispanic white men and reducing obesity among African American men could reduce the racial disparity in cancer incidence. Additional research is needed to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the differential effects of obesity in African American and non-Hispanic white men.

  4. Emissions from pre-Hispanic metallurgy in the South American atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vleeschouwer, François; Vanneste, Heleen; Mauquoy, Dmitri; Piotrowska, Natalia; Torrejón, Fernando; Roland, Thomas; Stein, Ariel; Le Roux, Gaël

    2014-01-01

    Metallurgical activities have been undertaken in northern South America (NSA) for millennia. However, it is still unknown how far atmospheric emissions from these activities have been transported. Since the timing of metallurgical activities is currently estimated from scarce archaeological discoveries, the availability of reliable and continuous records to refine the timing of past metal deposition in South America is essential, as it provides an alternative to discontinuous archives, as well as evidence for global trace metal transport. We show in a peat record from Tierra del Fuego that anthropogenic metals likely have been emitted into the atmosphere and transported from NSA to southern South America (SSA) over the last 4200 yrs. These findings are supported by modern time back-trajectories from NSA to SSA. We further show that apparent anthropogenic Cu and Sb emissions predate any archaeological evidence for metallurgical activities. Lead and Sn were also emitted into the atmosphere as by-products of Inca and Spanish metallurgy, whereas local coal-gold rushes and the industrial revolution contributed to local contamination. We suggest that the onset of pre-Hispanic metallurgical activities is earlier than previously reported from archaeological records and that atmospheric emissions of metals were transported from NSA to SSA.

  5. Emissions from pre-Hispanic metallurgy in the South American atmosphere.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François De Vleeschouwer

    Full Text Available Metallurgical activities have been undertaken in northern South America (NSA for millennia. However, it is still unknown how far atmospheric emissions from these activities have been transported. Since the timing of metallurgical activities is currently estimated from scarce archaeological discoveries, the availability of reliable and continuous records to refine the timing of past metal deposition in South America is essential, as it provides an alternative to discontinuous archives, as well as evidence for global trace metal transport. We show in a peat record from Tierra del Fuego that anthropogenic metals likely have been emitted into the atmosphere and transported from NSA to southern South America (SSA over the last 4200 yrs. These findings are supported by modern time back-trajectories from NSA to SSA. We further show that apparent anthropogenic Cu and Sb emissions predate any archaeological evidence for metallurgical activities. Lead and Sn were also emitted into the atmosphere as by-products of Inca and Spanish metallurgy, whereas local coal-gold rushes and the industrial revolution contributed to local contamination. We suggest that the onset of pre-Hispanic metallurgical activities is earlier than previously reported from archaeological records and that atmospheric emissions of metals were transported from NSA to SSA.

  6. Loneliness among very old Mexican Americans: findings from the Hispanic Established Populations Epidemiologic Studies of the Elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerst-Emerson, Kerstin; Shovali, Tamar E; Markides, Kyriakos S

    2014-01-01

    Increasing numbers of researchers are finding that loneliness is a significant risk factor for morbidity and mortality, and several variables have been found to be closely related to the experience of loneliness among elders. However, much of the research has focused on the general older population, with no research to date focusing on minority populations. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence and the correlates of loneliness among a community-dwelling older Mexican American population. This study used a three-item loneliness scale to determine the prevalence of loneliness. Pearson's correlation and linear regression analyses were used to determine the cross-sectional association between sociodemographic, interpersonal relationship and health variables with the scale. Data used came from the most recent wave (2011) of the Hispanic Established Populations for the Epidemiological Study of the Elderly (H-EPESE). A total of 873 Mexican Americans completed the loneliness scale. The age range was from 80 to 102, with a majority (65%) female. The mean score on the scale was 4.05 (range 3-9), indicating relatively low levels of loneliness. Regression results indicate that depressive symptoms, cognitive status, and living alone were significantly associated with higher loneliness scores. Being married and having a confidante were significantly associated with lower loneliness. Age, number of close relatives and frequency of contact were not associated with loneliness. Findings suggest that among community-dwelling Mexican American older adults, loneliness has multiple determinants. Loneliness is a significant public health topic and clinicians should be aware of the various factors that can affect loneliness.

  7. A Comprehensive Analysis of Common and Rare Variants to Identify Adiposity Loci in Hispanic Americans: The IRAS Family Study (IRASFS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan Gao

    Full Text Available Obesity is growing epidemic affecting 35% of adults in the United States. Previous genome-wide association studies (GWAS have identified numerous loci associated with obesity. However, the majority of studies have been completed in Caucasians focusing on total body measures of adiposity. Here we report the results from genome-wide and exome chip association studies focusing on total body measures of adiposity including body mass index (BMI, percent body fat (PBF and measures of fat deposition including waist circumference (WAIST, waist-hip ratio (WHR, subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT, and visceral adipose tissue (VAT in Hispanic Americans (nmax = 1263 from the Insulin Resistance Atherosclerosis Family Study (IRASFS. Five SNPs from two novel loci attained genome-wide significance (P<5.00x10-8 in IRASFS. A missense SNP in the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 gene (IDH1 was associated with WAIST (rs34218846, MAF = 6.8%, PDOM = 1.62x10-8. This protein is postulated to play an important role in fat and cholesterol biosynthesis as demonstrated in cell and knock-out animal models. Four correlated intronic SNPs in the Zinc finger, GRF-type containing 1 gene (ZGRF1; SNP rs1471880, MAF = 48.1%, PDOM = 1.00x10-8 were strongly associated with WHR. The exact biological function of ZGRF1 and the connection with adiposity remains unclear. SNPs with p-values less than 5.00x10-6 from IRASFS were selected for replication. Meta-analysis was computed across seven independent Hispanic-American cohorts (nmax = 4156 and the strongest signal was rs1471880 (PDOM = 8.38x10-6 in ZGRF1 with WAIST. In conclusion, a genome-wide and exome chip association study was conducted that identified two novel loci (IDH1 and ZGRF1 associated with adiposity. While replication efforts were inconclusive, when taken together with the known biology, IDH1 and ZGRF1 warrant further evaluation.

  8. "That spirit, that thing inside". Using qualitative research techniques to produce a recruitment film for Hispanic/Latino and American Indian students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Bronwynne C

    2003-01-01

    This article reports on the use of qualitative research methodology in producing a 23-minute recruitment film to attract Hispanic/Latino and American Indian students into a baccalaureate nursing program. The research question addressed in this pilot project was, "What is the meaning of the educational experience to Hispanic/Latino and American Indian nurses in the Yakima Valley of south central Washington State?" The conceptual development of the project, recruitment of interview participants, generation of interview protocol, data collection, and analysis are described and correlated to accepted qualitative research elements. Themes and patterns identified in participant interviews, the "findings" of the project, were used during the postproduction phase as guides for the story that unfolds in the film, which addresses the experience of being a nurse of color.

  9. Liver fat has a stronger association with risk factors for type 2 diabetes in African-American compared with Hispanic adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderete, Tanya L; Toledo-Corral, Claudia M; Desai, Preeya; Weigensberg, Marc J; Goran, Michael I

    2013-09-01

    Although overweight and obese African-Americans (AAs) have less visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and liver fat (LF) than Hispanics, they have a similar risk for type 2 diabetes. We examined ethnic differences in the association between VAT and LF with risk factors for type 2 diabetes to help explain this paradox. We conducted a cross-sectional study in an academic pediatric care facility. Subjects were overweight and obese AA (n = 131; 15.5 ± 3.3 years old) and Hispanic adolescents (n = 227; 14.7 ± 3.0 years old). Outcome measures included insulin sensitivity (SI), acute insulin response (AIR), and disposition index (DI) by frequently sampled i.v. glucose tolerance test and minimal modeling. LF, not VAT, was inversely associated with SI, and the effect of high LF compared with low was more pronounced in AAs (P(interaction) < .05). In Hispanics, high LF was associated with a 24% lower SI (P < .01) and a 31% increase in AIR (P < .01) and was not associated with DI (P = .35). In AAs, high LF was associated with a 49% lower SI (P < .001), was not associated with an increase in AIR (P = .25), and was associated with a 42% lower DI (P < .01), indicating failure of compensatory insulin secretion/clearance in response to insulin resistance. Prediabetes changed the relationship between high/low LF and DI in Hispanics (P(interaction) = .002) but not AAs such that prediabetic Hispanics with high LF had a 43% lower DI (P = .03) with no difference in those without prediabetes (P = .06). LF has a stronger effect on SI compared with VAT. Our results suggest that the impact of high LF on poor β-cell compensation is more pronounced in AAs. In Hispanics, the combination of high LF and prediabetes contributes to poor β-cell compensation.

  10. A Model to Predict Retention and Attrition of Hispanic-Americans in the Navy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-10-01

    Frame of Reference. Institute of Comparative Social and Cultural Studies, Inc., 1978. Teske , R. H. C., Jr., & Nelson, B. An analysis of differential...assimilation rates among middle-class Mexican-Americans. Sociological Quarterly, 1976, 17, 2, 218-235. Teske , R. H. C., Jr., & Nelson, B. H

  11. Food group intake patterns and nutrient intake vary across low-income Hispanic and African American preschool children in Atlanta: a cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvo Deborah

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The food group intake patterns of low income Hispanic and African American preschool children are not well documented. The aim of this study was to perform a food group intake analysis of low income minority preschool children and evaluate how macronutrient and micronutrient intake compares to Dietary Reference Intakes (DRI. Methods A cross sectional study design using three-day food diaries analyzed by dietary analysis software (Nutrient Database System for Research was used. Children were recruited from well-child clinics at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta at Hughes Spalding and North Dekalb Grady Satellite Clinic, Atlanta, GA. Low-income, African American and Hispanic preschool age children (n = 291 were enrolled. A total of 105 completed and returned the 3-day food diaries. Chi-squared tests were used to assess demographic variables. The mean percentage of intake per day of specific food groups and sub-groups were obtained (servings of given food group/total daily servings. Food intake data and proportion of children meeting DRIs for macro- and micronutrients were stratified by race/ethnicity, nutritional status, and caloric intake, and were compared using t-tests. Regression models controlling for age, BMI and sex were obtained to assess the effect of total caloric intake upon the proportional intake of each studied food group. Results The mean age of African American children was 2.24 ± 1.07 years and Hispanic children 2.84 ± 1.12 years. African Americans consumed more kcal/kg/day than Hispanics (124.7 ± 51 vs. 96.9 ± 33, p  Conclusions Food group intake patterns among low-income children differ by ethnic group. There is a need for more research to guide program design and target nutritional interventions for this population.

  12. Evaluation of an HIV prevention intervention for African Americans and Hispanics: findings from the VOICES/VOCES Community-based Organization Behavioral Outcomes Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Holly H; Patel-Larson, A; Green, K; Shapatava, E; Uhl, G; Kalayil, E J; Moore, A; Williams, W; Chen, B

    2011-11-01

    There is limited knowledge about whether the delivery of evidence-based, HIV prevention interventions in 'real world' settings will produce outcomes similar to efficacy trial outcomes. In this study, we describe longitudinal changes in sexual risk outcomes among African American and Hispanic participants in the Video Opportunities for Innovative Condom Education and Safer Sex (VOICES/VOCES) program at four CDC-funded agencies. VOICES/VOCES was delivered to 922 high-risk individuals in a variety of community settings such as substance abuse treatment centers, housing complex centers, private residences, shelters, clinics, and colleges. Significant risk reductions were consistently observed at 30- and 120-days post-intervention for all outcome measures (e.g., unprotected sex, self-reported STD infection). Risk reductions were strongest for African American participants, although Hispanic participants also reported reducing their risky behaviors. These results suggest that, over a decade after the first diffusion of VOICES/VOCES across the U.S. by CDC, this intervention remains an effective tool for reducing HIV risk behaviors among high-risk African American and Hispanic individuals.

  13. Ethnic differences in the home food environment and parental food practices among families of low-income Hispanic and African-American preschoolers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skala, Katherine; Chuang, Ru-Jye; Evans, Alexandra; Hedberg, Ann-Marie; Dave, Jayna; Sharma, Shreela

    2012-12-01

    The family and home environment are important in shaping the dietary patterns of children, yet research among low-income, minority groups is limited. We examined ethnic differences in the home food environment and parental practices among 706 low-income, African-American and Hispanic families of preschoolers. Questionnaires measured the access and availability of various foods in the home, parental practices, and meal consumption behaviors. Mixed model logistic regression and ANCOVA were used to assess ethnic differences. Unhealthy foods were available for both groups. Hispanic families were more likely to have fresh vegetables (AOR = 2.9, P ≤ 0.001), fruit (AOR = 2.0, P = 0.004), and soda available (AOR = 1.40, P = 0.001) compared to African-Americans. African-Americans families were more likely to restrict (AOR = 0.63, P ≤ 0.001) and reward with dessert (AOR = 0.69, P ≤ 0.001). Hispanic families consumed more family meals together (P = 0.003) and less meals in front of the television (P ≤ 0.006). Health promotion interventions should consider the behavioral differences between ethnicities.

  14. "Attached at the umbilicus": barriers to educational success for Hispanic/Latino and American Indian nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Bronwynne C

    2008-01-01

    Hispanic/Latino and American Indian students receiving services from a 3-year Nursing Workforce Diversity Grant called ALCANCE responded every semester to a semistructured interview protocol about their program experiences. Eighteen Anglo student volunteers also participated in one such interview. Comparison of the transcribed interview sets using methods outlined by (Miles, M. Huberman, A. (1994). Qualitative data analysis (2nd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.) revealed differences in perceptions of (1) potential occupations other than nursing, (2) barriers to educational success, (3) welcome and peer relationships, (4) service to family and community after graduation, and (5) fear of academic failure. ALCANCE students were less likely than the Anglo students to (1) come from well-educated families, (2) view their future in terms of a profession, (3) rely on friends in preference to their family, and (4) complain about curricular issues. They were more likely to recognize issues of power and privilege, and they also worried more about academic failure and their family and community obligations than Anglo students did. A "caring curriculum" could be used as a framework for establishing communities with an ever-developing understanding of culture among faculty and students. Faculty development in cultural issues is the foundation for such a caring curriculum because if faculty do not understand such differences, the curriculum cannot change.

  15. Dietary goal attainment measures and psychosocial factors among Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic whites with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs Early, Kathaleen; Armstrong Shultz, Jill; Evans, Marc; Corbett, Cynthia F; Nicholson Butkus, Sue; Massey, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes education programs need improved measures of goal setting for dietary control of diabetes. Additionally, measures of patient experiences with dietary goal setting are needed to better prepare patients for diabetes self-management. Measures of dietary goals and strategies were investigated via survey of 100 Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic whites with type 2 diabetes at a community clinic. Analyses tested novel goal measures as stages of change and goal attainment with a food plan compared to a traditional measure of food plan adherence. Ethnic groups varied in some reported experiences with goal setting education and goal attainment, but did not differ in most clinical characteristics of diabetes. Results indicated that different measures of goal setting vary in their psychosocial predictors, suggesting changes in how health care providers use and monitor goal setting for patients. At the time this research was conducted, Dr. Briggs Early was a doctoral candidate in the Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition at Washington State University. She is currently an Assistant Professor of Biochemistry and Nutrition at Pacific Northwest University of Health Sciences - College of Osteopathic Medicine, and a certified diabetes educator, and insulin pump trainer in Yakima, Washington.

  16. Mental Health and the Elderly: Issues in Service Delivery to the American Indian and the Hispanic Communities. Part II. Hearing before the Select Committee on Aging. House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, Second Session (Denver, Colorado).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Select Committee on Aging.

    This field hearing by the House Select Committee on Aging produced testimony on the mental health problems and service delivery needs of American Indian and Hispanic American elderly. A director of research and two American Indian advocates: (1) pointed out the high rate of depression among Indian elderly due to physical impairments and deprived…

  17. Famous People of Hispanic Heritage. Contemporary American Success Stories, Volume VII. A Mitchell Lane Multicultural Biography Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvis, Barbara; Cole, Melanie; Cantu, Tony

    The term "Hispanic" is an umbrella term that encompasses people from many nationalities, all races, and many social and cultural groups. Biographies in this series represent the diversity of Hispanic heritage in the United States. Those featured are contemporary figures whose national origins range from Argentina to the United States,…

  18. Twenty-Two Hispanic Leaders Discuss Poverty: Results from the Hispanic Leaders Study. Final Version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz, Julia Teresa

    This study examines the perceptions of 22 national Hispanic American leaders about poverty among Hispanics. Eleven of the leaders were Mexican American; five were Puerto Rican; four were Cuban American; one was Central American; and one was South American. Twelve of the leaders were heads of public interest organizations; six were members of…

  19. Twenty-Two Hispanic Leaders Discuss Poverty: Results from the Hispanic Leaders Study. Final Version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz, Julia Teresa

    This study examines the perceptions of 22 national Hispanic American leaders about poverty among Hispanics. Eleven of the leaders were Mexican American; five were Puerto Rican; four were Cuban American; one was Central American; and one was South American. Twelve of the leaders were heads of public interest organizations; six were members of…

  20. Status of cardiovascular disease and stroke in Hispanics/Latinos in the United States: a science advisory from the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Carlos J; Allison, Matthew; Daviglus, Martha L; Isasi, Carmen R; Keller, Colleen; Leira, Enrique C; Palaniappan, Latha; Piña, Ileana L; Ramirez, Sarah M; Rodriguez, Beatriz; Sims, Mario

    2014-08-12

    This American Heart Association (AHA) scientific statement provides a comprehensive overview of current evidence on the burden cardiovascular disease (CVD) among Hispanics in the United States. Hispanics are the largest minority ethnic group in the United States, and their health is vital to the public health of the nation and to achieving the AHA's 2020 goals. This statement describes the CVD epidemiology and related personal beliefs and the social and health issues of US Hispanics, and it identifies potential prevention and treatment opportunities. The intended audience for this statement includes healthcare professionals, researchers, and policy makers. Writing group members were nominated by the AHA's Manuscript Oversight Committee and represent a broad range of expertise in relation to Hispanic individuals and CVD. The writers used a general framework outlined by the committee chair to produce a comprehensive literature review that summarizes existing evidence, indicate gaps in current knowledge, and formulate recommendations. Only English-language studies were reviewed, with PubMed/MEDLINE as our primary resource, as well as the Cochrane Library Reviews, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the US Census data as secondary resources. Inductive methods and descriptive studies that focused on CVD outcomes incidence, prevalence, treatment response, and risks were included. Because of the wide scope of these topics, members of the writing committee were responsible for drafting individual sections selected by the chair of the writing committee, and the group chair assembled the complete statement. The conclusions of this statement are the views of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official view of the AHA. All members of the writing group had the opportunity to comment on the initial drafts and approved the final version of this document. The manuscript underwent extensive AHA internal peer review before consideration and approval by the

  1. Recent breast cancer trends among Asian/Pacific Islander, Hispanic, and African-American women in the US: changes by tumor subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausauer, Amelia K; Keegan, Theresa H M; Chang, Ellen T; Clarke, Christina A

    2007-01-01

    Recently, unprecedented drops in breast cancer incidence have been reported for populations of mostly White European descent. Incidence patterns in non-White racial/ethnic groups are less described. Therefore, we examined population-based breast cancer incidence trends separately for US Asian/Pacific Islander, Hispanic, African-American, and non-Hispanic White women by etiologically relevant tumor subtype characteristics, including hormone receptor status, histology, size, and in situ behavior. We obtained breast cancer data from 13 Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) cancer registries to calculate age-adjusted incidence rates and trends, stratified by race/ethnicity and tumor subtype for the period 1992-2004. Detailed analyses were limited to women 50 years old or older. Joinpoint regression was used to assess incidence trends by annual quarter of diagnosis. Between 2001 and 2004, incidence rates of invasive breast cancer in women 50 years old or older declined appreciably among Asians/Pacific Islanders (-8.5%) and Hispanics (-2.9%) and were stable in African-Americans (+0.5%), reductions substantially lower than those observed among non-Hispanic Whites (-14.3%). In Asian/Pacific Islander women, perceptible but statistically nonsignificant decreases were observed for hormone receptor-positive, lobular, and small tumors only. Rates of hormone receptor-negative tumors increased among African-Americans (26.1%) and Hispanics (26.9%) during 2001-2004. Incidence trends in most groups, except African-American women, peaked between 1999 and mid-2002. Rates of in situ cancer remained stable in all groups. Recently reported reductions in breast cancer incidence varied considerably by race/ethnicity. These patterns are consistent with documented racial/ethnic differences in the prevalence and discontinuation of hormone therapy (HT) after July 2002 but do not correspond as well to patterns of mammography use in these groups. The data presented in this analysis

  2. The counseling african americans to control hypertension (caatch) trial: baseline demographic, clinical, psychosocial, and behavioral characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Diaz-Gloster Marleny; Cassells Andrea; Tobin Jonathan N; Fernandez Senaida; Kalida Chamanara; Ogedegbe Gbenga

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Effectiveness of combined physician and patient-level interventions for blood pressure (BP) control in low-income, hypertensive African Americans with multiple co-morbid conditions remains largely untested in community-based primary care practices. Demographic, clinical, psychosocial, and behavioral characteristics of participants in the Counseling African American to Control Hypertension (CAATCH) Trial are described. CAATCH evaluates the effectiveness of a multi-level, mu...

  3. Triple negative breast tumors in African-American and Hispanic/Latina women are high in CD44+, low in CD24+, and have loss of PTEN.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanyuan Wu

    Full Text Available African-American women have higher mortality from breast cancer than other ethnic groups. The association between poor survival and differences with tumor phenotypes is not well understood. The purpose of this study is to assess the clinical significance of (1 Stem cell-like markers CD44 and CD24; (2 PI3K/Akt pathway associated targets PTEN, activation of Akt, and FOXO1; and (3 the Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-I and IGF binding protein-3 (IGFBP3 in different breast cancer subtypes, and compare the differences between African-American and Hispanic/Latina women who have similar social-economic-status.A total of N=318 African-American and Hispanic/Latina women, with clinically-annotated information within the inclusion criteria were included. Formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissues from these patients were tested for the different markers using immunohistochemistry techniques. Kaplan-Meier survival-curves and Cox-regression analyses were used to assess Relative Risk and Disease-Free-Survival (DFS.The triple-negative-breast-cancer (TNBC receptor-subtype was more prevalent among premenopausal women, and the Hormonal Receptor (HR positive subtype was most common overall. TNBC tumors were more likely to have loss of PTEN, express high Ki67, and have increased CD44+/CD24- expression. TNBC was also associated with higher plasma-IGF-I levels. HR-/HER2+ tumors showed high pAkt, decreased FOXO1, and high CD24+ expression. The loss of PTEN impacted DFS significantly in African Americans, but not in Hispanics/Latinas after adjusted for treatment and other tumor pathological factors. The CD44+/CD24- and CD24+/CD44- phenotypes decreased DFS, but were not independent predictors for DFS. HER2-positive and TNBC type of cancers continued to exhibit significant decrease in DFS after adjusting for the selected biomarkers and treatment.TNBC incidence is high among African-American and Hispanic/Latino women residing in South Los Angeles. Our study also shows for

  4. Relationship of fruit, vegetable, and fat consumption to binge eating symptoms in African American and Hispanic or Latina women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Penny L; O'Connor, Daniel P; Kaplan, Charles D; Bode, Sharon; Mama, Scherezade K; Lee, Rebecca E

    2012-04-01

    African American (AA) and Hispanic or Latina (HL) women have the highest rates of overweight and obesity of any gender and ethnic groups. Binge eating disorder (BED) is the most common eating disorder in the United States and is linked to overweight and obesity. Traditional treatments for BED may not be appropriate or viable for AA and HL women, because they are less likely than whites to seek treatment for psychological conditions and may have less access to healthcare. Improving dietary habits in those with BED or subthreshold BED may reduce binge eating symptoms. The current study investigated the association of fruit, vegetable, and fat consumption to binge eating symptoms in AA and HL women. AA and HL women in the Health Is Power (HIP) study (N=283) reported fruit and vegetable intake, fat intake, and binge eating symptoms. Women were middle aged (M=45.8 years, SD=9.2) and obese (M BMI=34.5 kg/m(2), SD=7.5). Greater fat consumption was correlated with lower fruit and vegetable consumption (r(s)=-0.159, p<0.01). Higher BMI (r(s)=0.209, p<0.01), and greater fat consumption (r(s)=0.227, p<0.05) were correlated with increased binge eating symptoms. Multiple regression analysis demonstrated that for HL women (β=0.130, p=0.024), higher BMI (β=0.148, p=0.012), and greater fat consumption (β=0.196, p=0.001) were associated with increased binge eating symptoms (R(2)=0.086, F(3,278)=8.715, p<0.001). Findings suggest there may be a relationship between fat consumption and binge eating symptoms, warranting further study to determine whether improving dietary habits may serve as a treatment for BED in AA and HL women.

  5. [Influence of personal, professional and cross-national factors in burnout syndrome in Hispanic Americans and Spanish health workers (2007)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grau Martín, Armand; Flichtentrei, Daniel; Suñer, Rosa; Prats, María; Braga, Florencia

    2009-01-01

    Burnout syndrome is related to cultural and individual factors. The aim of this study was to compare the frequency of burnout and the scores for its three components with the perceptions and the demographic and professional characteristics of the workers. Burnout syndrome was studied in 11,530 Hispanic Americans and Spanish healthcare professionals (51% male, mean age 41.7 years). The Maslach Burnout Inventory and a previously drawn up questionnaire were administered online from the Intramed website from December 2006 to September 2007. Associations were tested using multiple logistic regression. The frequency of burnout in professionals resident in Spain was 14.9%, in Argentina 14.4%, and in Uruguay 7.9% whereas professionals in Mexico, Ecuador, Peru, Columbia, Uruguay, Guatemala and El Salvador presented frequencies of burnout of between 2.5% and 5.9%. By professions, doctors had a prevalence of burnout of 12.1%, nurses 7.2%, and dentists, psychologists and nutritionists of <6%. Amongst doctors, burnout predominated amongst doctors working in emergency departments (17%) and internal medicine departments (15.5%) whereas anaesthetists and dermatologists had the lowest prevalence (5% and 5.3%, respectively). Older age (OR=0.96), having children (OR=0.93), the perception of feeling valued (OR=0.53), optimism (OR=0.80), job satisfaction (OR=0.80), and satisfaction with salary (OR=0.91) are variables which protect against burnout. The expression of burnout varies among nations and professions. Age (older age), having children, the perception of feeling valued, optimism, job satisfaction and satisfaction with salary are protective variables of burnout.

  6. Characteristics of Mexican American Elders Admitted to Skilled Nursing Facilities in the United States: Data from the Hispanic EPESE Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espino, David V.; Angel, Jaqueline L.; Wood, Robert C.; Finely, M. Rosina; Ye, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of the current study is to describe the factors associated with Mexican American elders who have spent time in a SNF compared to those who have not in the Southwestern United States. Design Data were collected on the Mexican American elders who reported a SNF stay within 10 years of baseline. Participants A probability sample of 3050 Mexican American elders from five Southwestern states followed from 1993 to 2005 were examined. Measures Variables examined included socio-demographics, language of interview, disabilities with Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADLs), Activities of Daily Living (ADLs), selfreported health, cognitive status and depression. Results A total of 78 (3.9%) out of 2020 subjects resided in SNF’s. Using univariate analyses older age, English-language interview, poorer cognitive status, and functional disabilities were independently associated with Skilled Nursing Facility (SNF) admissions. Logistic regression analyses controlling for age reveal that SNF patients were older (OR =1.08, p=0.001), have an ADL disability (OR=4.94, p<0.001), scored in the Geriatric Depression Scale depressed range (OR=2.72, p=0.001) and were more likely to interview in English (OR=1.95, p=0.042), when compared to community counterparts. Conclusions Mexican American elders resided in a SNF at some point in the previous ten years were older and more likely to be functionally impaired. They also were more likely to prefer English as their primary language indicating they were more likely to agree to a SNF stay than their Spanish speaking counterparts. PMID:23352979

  7. Fatalistic Cancer Beliefs and Information Seeking in Formerly Incarcerated African-American and Hispanic Men: Implications for Cancer Health Communication and Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valera, Pamela; Lian, Zi; Brotzman, Laura; Reid, Andrea

    2017-03-03

    African-American and Hispanic men are disproportionately affected by cancer experiencing higher rates of cancer-related morbidity and mortality for many cancers (but not all). These challenges may be magnified for a subpopulation of African-American and Hispanic men who have been incarcerated. A survey assessing demographics, incarceration experience, psychosocial, behavioral, and cancer health information seeking was administered to 230 previously incarcerated men aged 35 years and older. Data analysis was performed to assess the association between fatalism, perceived susceptibility, and health information seeking in this population. This study revealed the following: the majority of the participants (68.7%) held the fatalistic belief: "When I think of cancer, I automatically think of death." Second, the fatalistic belief, "There's not much you can do to lower your chances of getting cancer," is more prevalent among those who perceived a higher risk of developing cancer. Third, older participants (those between 55 and 70 years old) and widowed are less likely to think of death when they think of cancer. In addition, those who use the Internet to look for health or medical information (i.e., engaging in health information seeking) are less likely to agree with the fatalistic belief: "It seems like everything causes cancer." Given the high incidence of certain cancers among African-American and Hispanic men and the vulnerability of those involved in the criminal justice system, our findings highlight the importance of understanding perceived susceptibility to cancer, fatalistic beliefs about cancer, and information seeking in formerly incarcerated men.

  8. Adipose tissue 11βHSD1 gene expression, βcell function and ectopic fat in obese African Americans versus Hispanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyllenhammer, Lauren E; Alderete, Tanya L; Mahurka, Swapna; Allayee, Hooman; Goran, Michael I

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the contribution of subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) 11βHSD1 to obese African Americans' (AA) elevated metabolic risk, despite a protective obesity phenotype of reduced visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and hepatic fat fraction (HFF) relative to obese Hispanics with similar metabolic risk. Obese AA and Hispanic adults (N = 36(16AA); BMI 35.2 ± 0.6 kg/m(2) , 18-25y) participated, with VAT, SAT, and HFF measured by MRI, SAT gene expression measured by HT-12 microarray and insulin sensitivity (SI), disposition index (DI) by IVGTT. Multiple linear regression examined relationships/interactions of ethnicity and 11βHSD1 expression on outcomes (covariates: age, sex, total fat mass), with standardized β (stβ) reported. SAT 11βHSD1 expression significantly associated with insulin parameters and this varied by ethnicity (Pinteraction 0.1). After controlling for HFF, 11βHSD1 associations with metabolic risk in AA became nonsignificant. These results suggested that in AA and not Hispanics, SAT 11βHSD1 is associated with SI and DI, and may be mediated by HFF. Copyright © 2013 The Obesity Society.

  9. Rising morbidity and mortality in midlife among white non-Hispanic Americans in the 21st century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Anne; Deaton, Angus

    2015-01-01

    This paper documents a marked increase in the all-cause mortality of middle-aged white non-Hispanic men and women in the United States between 1999 and 2013. This change reversed decades of progress in mortality and was unique to the United States; no other rich country saw a similar turnaround. The midlife mortality reversal was confined to white non-Hispanics; black non-Hispanics and Hispanics at midlife, and those aged 65 and above in every racial and ethnic group, continued to see mortality rates fall. This increase for whites was largely accounted for by increasing death rates from drug and alcohol poisonings, suicide, and chronic liver diseases and cirrhosis. Although all education groups saw increases in mortality from suicide and poisonings, and an overall increase in external cause mortality, those with less education saw the most marked increases. Rising midlife mortality rates of white non-Hispanics were paralleled by increases in midlife morbidity. Self-reported declines in health, mental health, and ability to conduct activities of daily living, and increases in chronic pain and inability to work, as well as clinically measured deteriorations in liver function, all point to growing distress in this population. We comment on potential economic causes and consequences of this deterioration. PMID:26575631

  10. Health status of Hispanic elders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassford, T L

    1995-02-01

    Hispanic elders living in the United States compose a rapidly increasing population. They are underinsured and more likely to be living in poverty. Health care is hindered in this population by lower access to health services and less use of preventive services. Barriers to access are primarily socioeconomic. Acculturation exerts an effect, primarily through its association with language skills, employment, and education. Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality for Hispanics, who have a higher prevalence of risk factors for cardiovascular disease, such as diabetes mellitus, obesity, and hyperlipidemia. Although neoplasia is the second most frequent cause of death among Hispanics, as it is in whites who are not Hispanic, Hispanics have an overall lower cancer rate. Cancer rates are increasing, however. Non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in the Hispanic population, affecting nearly a quarter of adult Puerto Ricans and Mexican Americans. Although higher prevalence of obesity in the Hispanic population accounts for some of this difference, some data suggest the possibility of a genetic component as well. Assessment of psychological health in Hispanic elders is impeded by the lack of instruments designed for this population. Distress is often expressed as somatic symptoms. Values traditional to Hispanic culture, such as respeto, allocentrism, and familialism, are important to US Hispanic elders, many of whom were born in rural Mexico. Our knowledge of determinants of healthy aging in this population is still preliminary, but rapidly expanding, in part, because of increased attention to ethnicity in health reporting.

  11. The College Health and Wellness Study: baseline correlates of overweight among African Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary, Tiffany L; Gross, Susan M; Browne, Dorothy C; LaVeist, Thomas A

    2006-03-01

    Overweight and obesity are epidemic in the United States, particularly among minority populations. This epidemic contributes to the development of chronic conditions that occur later in life such as type 2 diabetes and hypertension. Therefore, it is important to identify factors associated with the development of obesity during young adulthood. We conducted a cross-sectional survey among students graduating from a Historically Black College or University (HBCU) in the Mid-Atlantic region. Participants were 392 predominantly African American seniors graduating in the spring of 2003. Data were collected using a self-administered paper and pencil questionnaire which focused on weight, weight management activities, individual and familial weight history, and health status indicators. Participants were on average 24 +/- 5 years of age and 69% female; over 90% identified as African American or Black. According to NIH guidelines, about 30% of males and 28% of females were considered overweight, 12% of males and 7% of females were considered obese, and 7% of males and females were considered extremely obese. Significant correlates of being more overweight were being married, having children, lower socio-economic status, weight-loss attempts, personal and family history of overweight, and poorer health status. These data suggest that among this sample, the prevalence of overweight and obesity is similar to other populations of young African American adults. Familial factors such as socio-economic status and family weight history were important correlates of overweight. Overweight is a significant problem in this population, and these data should be useful for developing weight loss interventions aimed at young adults.

  12. Design, baseline characteristics, and retention of African American light smokers into a randomized trial involving biological data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okuyemi Kolawole S

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background African Americans experience significant tobacco-related health disparities despite the fact that over half of African American smokers are light smokers (use ≤10 cigarettes per day. African Americans have been under-represented in smoking cessation research, and few studies have evaluated treatment for light smokers. This paper describes the study design, measures, and baseline characteristics from Kick It at Swope III (KIS-III, the first treatment study of bupropion for African American light smokers. Methods Five hundred forty African American light smokers were randomly assigned to receive bupropion (150mg bid (n = 270 or placebo (n = 270 for 7 weeks. All participants received written materials and health education counseling. Participants responded to survey items and provided blood samples for evaluation of phenotype and genotype of CYP2A6 and CYP2B6 enzymes involved in nicotine and bupropion metabolism. Primary outcome was cotinine-verified 7-day point prevalence smoking abstinence at Week 26 follow-up. Results Of 2,628 individuals screened, 540 were eligible, consented, and randomized to treatment. Participants had a mean age of 46.5 years and 66.1% were women. Participants smoked an average of 8.0 cigarettes per day, had a mean exhaled carbon monoxide of 16.4ppm (range 1-55 and a mean serum cotinine of 275.8ng/ml. The mean Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence was 3.2, and 72.2% of participants smoked within 30 minutes of waking. The average number of quit attempts in the past year was 3.7 and 24.2% reported using pharmacotherapy in their most recent quit attempt. Motivation and confidence to quit were high. Conclusion KIS-III is the first study designed to examine both nicotine and bupropion metabolism, evaluating CYP2A6 and CYP2B6 phenotype and genotype in conjunction with psychosocial factors, in the context of treatment of African American light smokers. Of 1629 smokers screened for study participation, only

  13. Perspectives on prevention of type 2 diabetes after gestational diabetes: a qualitative study of Hispanic, African-American and White women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Joyce W; Foster, Krys E; Pumarino, Javiera; Ackermann, Ronald T; Peaceman, Alan M; Cameron, Kenzie A

    2015-07-01

    Women with gestational diabetes (GDM) have a fivefold higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Furthermore, Hispanic and African-American women are disproportionately affected by GDM, but their views on prevention of T2DM after gestational diabetes are largely unknown. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 23 women (8 Hispanic, 8 African-American, 7 non-Hispanic White) from two academic clinics in Chicago, IL. Interview questions elicited perspectives on prevention of T2DM; the interview protocol was developed based on the Health Belief Model. Two investigators applied template analysis to identify emergent themes. Women conceptualized risk for T2DM based on family history, health behaviors, and personal history of GDM. A subgroup of women expressed uncertainty about how GDM influences risk for T2DM. Women who described a strong link between GDM and T2DM often viewed the diagnosis as a cue to action for behavior change. T2DM was widely viewed as a severe condition, and desire to avoid T2DM was an important motivator for behavior change. Children represented both a key motivator and critical barrier to behavior change. Women viewed preventive care as important to alert them to potential health concerns. Identified themes were congruent across racial/ethnic groups. Diagnosis with GDM presents a potent opportunity for engaging women in behavior change. To fully harness the potential influence of this diagnosis, healthcare providers should more clearly link the diagnosis of GDM with risk for future T2DM, leverage women's focus on their children to motivate behavior change, and provide support with behavior change during healthcare visits in the postpartum period and beyond.

  14. Inventing the Hispanic Psyche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavans, Ilan

    1992-01-01

    Many Latin American authors have undertaken cultural criticism designed to explain the psyche of the Hispanic countries. Carlos Fuentes, in "The Buried Mirror: Reflections on Spain and the New World," presents another example of the obsessive need to interpret Latin America to the rest of the world. (SLD)

  15. Inventing the Hispanic Psyche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavans, Ilan

    1992-01-01

    Many Latin American authors have undertaken cultural criticism designed to explain the psyche of the Hispanic countries. Carlos Fuentes, in "The Buried Mirror: Reflections on Spain and the New World," presents another example of the obsessive need to interpret Latin America to the rest of the world. (SLD)

  16. The Family Spirit trial for American Indian teen mothers and their children: CBPR rationale, design, methods and baseline characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullany, Britta; Barlow, Allison; Neault, Nicole; Billy, Trudy; Jones, Tanya; Tortice, Iralene; Lorenzo, Sherilynn; Powers, Julia; Lake, Kristin; Reid, Raymond; Walkup, John

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the rationale, design, methods and baseline results of the Family Spirit trial. The goal of the trial is to evaluate the impact of the paraprofessional-delivered "Family Spirit" home-visiting intervention to reduce health and behavioral risks for American Indian teen mothers and their children. A community based participatory research (CBPR) process shaped the design of the current randomized controlled trial of the Family Spirit intervention. Between 2006 and 2008, 322 pregnant teens were randomized to receive the Family Spirit intervention plus Optimized Standard Care, or Optimized Standard Care alone. The Family Spirit intervention is a 43-session home-visiting curriculum administered by American Indian paraprofessionals to teen mothers from 28 weeks gestation until the baby's third birthday. A mixed methods assessment administered at nine intervals measures intervention impact on parental competence, mother's and children's social, emotional and behavioral risks for drug use, and maladaptive functioning. Participants are young (mean age = 18.1 years), predominantly primiparous, unmarried, and challenged by poverty, residential instability and low educational attainment. Lifetime and pregnancy drug use were ~2-4 times higher and ~5-6 times higher, respectively, than US All Races. Baseline characteristics were evenly distributed between groups, except for higher lifetime cigarette use and depressive symptoms among intervention mothers. If study aims are achieved, the public health field will have new evidence supporting multi-generational prevention of behavioral health disparities affecting young American Indian families and the utility of indigenous paraprofessional interventionists in under-resourced communities.

  17. Contemporary American Success Stories: Famous People of Hispanic Heritage. Volume II. A Mitchell Lane Multicultural Biography Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvis, Barbara J.

    The biographies in this projected eight volume series for elementary school children represent the diversity of Hispanic heritage in the United States. Those featured are contemporary figures with national origins in the United States or Latin America, with careers that cover many aspects of contemporary life. Every person profiled in the series…

  18. Contemporary American Success Stories: Famous People of Hispanic Heritage. Volume III. A Mitchell Lane Multicultural Biography Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvis, Barbara J.

    The biographies in this projected eight volume series for elementary school children represent the diversity of Hispanic heritage in the United States. Those featured are contemporary figures with national origins in the United States or Latin America, with careers that cover many aspects of contemporary life. Every person profiled in the series…

  19. Racial and ethnic differences in the treatment of seriously ill patients: a comparison of African-American, Caucasian and Hispanic veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Ursula K; McCullough, Laurence B; Beyth, Rebecca J; Wray, Nelda P; Kunik, Mark E; Morgan, Robert O

    2008-09-01

    No national data exist regarding racial/ethnic differences in the use of interventions for patients at the end of life. To test whether among 3 cohorts of hospitalized seriously ill veterans with cancer, noncancer or dementia the use of common life-sustaining treatments differed significantly by race/ethnicity. Retrospective cohort study during fiscal years 1991-2002. Hospitalized veterans >55 years, defined clinically as at high-risk for 6-month mortality, not by decedent data. Utilization patterns by race/ethnicity for 5 life-sustaining therapies. Logistic regression models evaluated differences among Caucasians, African Americans and Hispanics, controlling for age, disease severity and clustering of patients within Veterans Affairs (VA) medical centers. Among 166,059 veterans, both differences and commonalities across diagnostic cohorts were found. African Americans received more or the same amount of end-of-life treatments across disease cohorts, except for less resuscitation [OR = 0.84 (0.77-0.92), p = 0.002] and mechanical ventilation [OR = 0.89 (0.85-0.94), p Hispanics were 36% (cancer) to 55% (noncancer) to 88% (dementia) more likely to receive transfusions than Caucasians (p evidence-based standards for end-of-life care, these differences may or may not constitute disparities.

  20. Confirmatory factor analysis and measurement invariance of the Child Feeding Questionnaire in low-income Hispanic and African-American mothers with preschool-age children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Angela; Vijayasiri, Ganga; Fitzgibbon, Marian L; Schiffer, Linda A; Campbell, Richard T

    2015-07-01

    Validation work of the Child Feeding Questionnaire (CFQ) in low-income minority samples suggests a need for further conceptual refinement of this instrument. Using confirmatory factor analysis, this study evaluated 5- and 6-factor models on a large sample of African-American and Hispanic mothers with preschool-age children (n = 962). The 5-factor model included: 'perceived responsibility', 'concern about child's weight', 'restriction', 'pressure to eat', and 'monitoring' and the 6-factor model also tested 'food as a reward'. Multi-group analysis assessed measurement invariance by race/ethnicity. In the 5-factor model, two low-loading items from 'restriction' and one low-variance item from 'perceived responsibility' were dropped to achieve fit. Only removal of the low-variance item was needed to achieve fit in the 6-factor model. Invariance analyses demonstrated differences in factor loadings. This finding suggests African-American and Hispanic mothers may vary in their interpretation of some CFQ items and use of cognitive interviews could enhance item interpretation. Our results also demonstrated that 'food as a reward' is a plausible construct among a low-income minority sample and adds to the evidence that this factor resonates conceptually with parents of preschoolers; however, further testing is needed to determine the validity of this factor with older age groups.

  1. Self-Reported Cancer Prevalence among Hispanics in the US: Results from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank J Penedo

    Full Text Available Cancer has surpassed heart disease as the leading cause of death among Hispanics in the U.S., yet data on cancer prevalence and risk factors in Hispanics in regard to ancestry remain scarce. This study sought to describe (a the prevalence of cancer among Hispanics from four major U.S. metropolitan areas, (b cancer prevalence across Hispanic ancestry, and (c identify correlates of self-reported cancer prevalence. Participants were 16,415 individuals from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL, who self-identified as Cuban, Dominican, Mexican, Puerto Rican, Central or South American. All data were collected at a single time point during the HCHS/SOL baseline clinic visit. The overall self-reported prevalence rate of cancer for the population was 4%. The rates varied by Hispanic ancestry group, with individuals of Cuban and Puerto Rican ancestry reporting the highest cancer prevalence. For the entire population, older age (OR = 1.47, p < .001, 95% CI, 1.26-1.71 and having health insurance (OR = 1.93, p < .001, 95% CI, 1.42-2.62 were all significantly associated with greater prevalence, whereas male sex was associated with lower prevalence (OR = 0.56, p < .01, 95% CI, .40-.79. Associations between study covariates and cancer prevalence also varied by Hispanic ancestry. Findings underscore the importance of sociodemographic factors and health insurance in relation to cancer prevalence for Hispanics and highlight variations in cancer prevalence across Hispanic ancestry groups. Characterizing differences in cancer prevalence rates and their correlates is critical to the development and implementation of effective prevention strategies across distinct Hispanic ancestry groups.

  2. Self-Reported Cancer Prevalence among Hispanics in the US: Results from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penedo, Frank J; Yanez, Betina; Castañeda, Sheila F; Gallo, Linda; Wortman, Katy; Gouskova, Natalia; Simon, Melissa; Arguelles, William; Llabre, Maria; Sanchez-Johnsen, Lisa; Brintz, Carrie; Gonzalez, Patricia; Van Horn, Linda; Rademaker, Alfred W; Ramirez, Amelie G

    2016-01-01

    Cancer has surpassed heart disease as the leading cause of death among Hispanics in the U.S., yet data on cancer prevalence and risk factors in Hispanics in regard to ancestry remain scarce. This study sought to describe (a) the prevalence of cancer among Hispanics from four major U.S. metropolitan areas, (b) cancer prevalence across Hispanic ancestry, and (c) identify correlates of self-reported cancer prevalence. Participants were 16,415 individuals from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL), who self-identified as Cuban, Dominican, Mexican, Puerto Rican, Central or South American. All data were collected at a single time point during the HCHS/SOL baseline clinic visit. The overall self-reported prevalence rate of cancer for the population was 4%. The rates varied by Hispanic ancestry group, with individuals of Cuban and Puerto Rican ancestry reporting the highest cancer prevalence. For the entire population, older age (OR = 1.47, p < .001, 95% CI, 1.26-1.71) and having health insurance (OR = 1.93, p < .001, 95% CI, 1.42-2.62) were all significantly associated with greater prevalence, whereas male sex was associated with lower prevalence (OR = 0.56, p < .01, 95% CI, .40-.79). Associations between study covariates and cancer prevalence also varied by Hispanic ancestry. Findings underscore the importance of sociodemographic factors and health insurance in relation to cancer prevalence for Hispanics and highlight variations in cancer prevalence across Hispanic ancestry groups. Characterizing differences in cancer prevalence rates and their correlates is critical to the development and implementation of effective prevention strategies across distinct Hispanic ancestry groups.

  3. Baseline correlates of insulin resistance in inner city high-BMI African-American children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Aarthi; Fitch, Mark D; Hudes, Mark L; Lustig, Robert H; Murray, Carolyn B; Ikeda, Joanne P; Fleming, Sharon E

    2008-09-01

    To characterize the influence of diet-, physical activity-, and self-esteem-related factors on insulin resistance in 8- 10-year-old African-American (AA) children with BMI greater than the 85th percentile who were screened to participate in a community-based type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) prevention trial. In 165 subjects, fasting glucose- and insulin-derived values for homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) assessed insulin resistance. Body fatness was calculated following bioelectrical impedance analysis, and fitness was measured using laps from a 20-m shuttle run. Child questionnaires assessed physical activity, dietary habits, and self-esteem. Pubertal staging was assessed using serum levels of sex hormones. Parent questionnaires assessed family demographics, family health, and family food and physical activity habits. Girls had significantly higher percent body fat but similar anthropometric measures compared with boys, whereas boys spent more time in high-intensity activities than girls. Scores for self-perceived behavior were higher for girls than for boys; and girls desired a more slender body. Girls had significantly higher insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), compared with boys (P < 0.01). Adjusting for age, sex, pubertal stage, socioeconomic index (SE index), and family history of diabetes, multivariate regression analysis showed that children with higher waist circumference (WC) (P < 0.001) and lower Harter's scholastic competence (SC) scale (P = 0.044) had higher insulin resistance. WC and selected self-esteem parameters predicted insulin resistance in high-BMI AA children. The risk of T2DM may be reduced in these children by targeting these factors.

  4. Effects of high and low glycemic load meals on energy intake, satiety and hunger in obese Hispanic-American youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Nazrat M; Klein, Catherine J; Palmer, Matilde G; McCarter, Robert; He, Jianping; Ebbeling, Cara B; Ludwig, David S; Yanovski, Jack A

    2011-06-01

    Some short-term pediatric studies have suggested beneficial effects of low glycemic load (LGL) meals on feelings of hunger and on energy intake. However, the effects of LGL diets have not been systematically studied in obese Hispanic children, who stand to benefit from successful interventions. To examine the effects of LGL and high-GL (HGL) meals on appetitive responses and ad libitum energy intake of obese Hispanic youth. A total of 88 obese Hispanic youth aged 7-15 years were enrolled in a community-based obesity intervention program and randomly assigned to consume meals designed as either LGL (n = 45) or HGL (n = 43). After 12 weeks, participants were admitted for a 24-hour metabolic study. Following the morning test meal, subjects serially reported hunger, fullness, and satiety using a visual analog scale. Blood insulin and glucose were measured. After 5 hours, participants were fed another test meal and given a snack platter from which to eat ad libitum. All test food was weighed and the energy, macronutrients, and glycemic load (GL) of consumed foods were calculated. The HGL group had significantly higher insulin (p = 0.0005) and glucose (p = 0.0001) responses to the breakfast meal compared with the LGL group. There were no significant between-group differences in energy consumed from the snack platter (1303 vs. 1368 kcal, p = 0.5), or in the subjective feelings of hunger (p = 0.3), fullness (p = 0.5) or satiety (p = 0.3) between the two groups. Our study provides no evidence that, for obese Hispanic youth, changing the GL of the diet affects short-term hunger, fullness, satiety, or energy intake. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01068197.

  5. Making Mathematics and Science Work for Hispanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendon, Laura I.; Triana, Estrella M.

    This document discusses barriers that impede the progress and participation of Hispanic American students in mathematics and science education, and recommends extensive educational reforms. Following an introduction, the first of two main sections reviews the current Hispanic American underrepresentation in mathematics and science and describes…

  6. Quality, and not just quantity, of education accounts for differences in psychometric performance between african americans and white non-hispanics with Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Alexander L; Negash, Selam; Xie, Sharon; Arnold, Steven E; Hamilton, Roy

    2012-03-01

    The effect of race on cognitive test performance in the evaluation of Alzheimer's disease (AD) remains controversial. One factor that may contribute substantially to differences in cognitive test performance in diverse populations is education. The current study examined the extent to which quality of education, even after controlling for formal years of education, accounts for differences in cognitive performance between African Americans and White Non-Hispanics (WNHs). The retrospective cohort included 244 patients diagnosed with AD who self-identified as African Americans (n = 51) or WNHs (n = 193). The Wechsler Test of Adult Reading (WTAR) was used as an estimate of quality of education. In an analysis that controlled for traditional demographics, including age, sex, and years of formal education, African Americans scored significantly lower than WNHs on the Mini-Mental State Examination, as well as on neuropsychological tests of memory, attention, and language. However, after also adjusting for reading level, all previously observed differences were significantly attenuated. The attenuating effect remained even after controlling for disease severity, indicating that reading scores are not confounded by severity of dementia. These findings suggest that quality, and not just quantity, of education needs to be taken into account when assessing cognitive performance in African Americans with AD.

  7. Social disadvantage, stress, and alcohol use among black, Hispanic, and white Americans: findings from the 2005 U.S. National Alcohol Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulia, Nina; Ye, Yu; Zemore, Sarah E; Greenfield, Thomas K

    2008-11-01

    Despite growing evidence of the adverse health effects of social disadvantage on minority populations, few studies have investigated whether such effects extend to alcohol problems. This study examines social disadvantage as a source of stress and analyzes its association with alcohol use and problems in the three largest racial/ethnic groups in the United States. Data on white, black, and Hispanic Americans (n = 6,631) were obtained from the 2005 U.S. National Alcohol Survey, a nationally representative telephone-based survey of adults ages 18 and older. Social disadvantage was measured by poverty level, frequency of unfair treatment, racial/ethnic stigma consciousness, and cumulative disadvantage. Outcomes included drinking status, at-risk drinking, and problem drinking. Blacks and Hispanics reported greater exposure to social disadvantage than whites, including greater poverty, unfair treatment, racial/ethnic stigma, and cumulative disadvantage. In all three racial/ethnic groups, exposure to disadvantage was associated with problem drinking. Frequent unfair treatment, high racial stigma (among minorities), and multiple sources of extreme disadvantage corresponded to a twofold to sixfold greater risk of alcohol problems, partially explained by psychological distress. These results are consistent with other studies of stress and adverse health consequences associated with social disadvantage. Although there is a clear disparity in exposure to such hardship, experiences of disadvantage appear to have similar effects on problem drinking among both racial/ethnic minorities and whites. Future research should attempt to assess causal directions in the relationships among social and economic hardship, stress, and alcohol problems.

  8. Genotyping and Resolution of a Case of Osteomyelitis in a 16-Month-Old Boy of Hispanic/African American Ethnicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachira, Eunice; Tran, Kayla; Taylor, Sara; Hoger, Sally; Dunn, James

    2016-02-01

    Most cases of osteomyelitis in children are caused by Staphylococcus aureus, although Kingella kingae, various streptococci, and Salmonella species also underlie this condition. Organisms such as Mycobacterium, Histoplasma, and Cryptococcus are much less commonly identified as etiologic agents in osteomyelitis. This case report describes a 16-month-old boy of Hispanic/African American ethnicity who had extensive inflammation of and discharge from his right ankle. Imaging studies supported a diagnosis of osteomyelitis. Acid-fast bacillus (AFB) and routine wound cultures were ordered on the wound discharge. The AFB culture yielded a positive result for Mycobacterium bovis, and molecular diagnostic testing further genotyped the microorganism as Mycobacterium bovis, Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG). Herein, we report a rare case of osteomyelitis that we believe resulted from a BCG vaccine that the patient had received outside the United States.

  9. BIRTHPLACE, CULTURE, SELF-ESTEEM AND INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE AMONG COMMUNITY DWELLING HISPANIC WOMEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Guarda, Rosa M.; Vermeesch, Amber L.; Florom-Smith, Aubrey L.; McCabe, Brian E.; Peragallo, Nilda P.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore variations in demographics, culture, self-esteem and intimate partner violence among Hispanic women according to birthplace, and to identify factors that are associated with these differences in intimate partner violence. Baseline data from a randomized control trial testing the efficacy of an HIV prevention program was used. Path analyses identified differences in intimate partner violence between Colombian women and women from other Central/South American. Self-esteem was the only factor that was associated with these differences. Interventions that address the unique needs of Hispanic women from different subgroups are needed. PMID:23363655

  10. Birthplace, culture, self-esteem, and intimate partner violence among community-dwelling Hispanic women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Guarda, Rosa M; Vermeesch, Amber L; Florom-Smith, Aubrey L; McCabe, Brian E; Peragallo, Nilda P

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore variations in demographics, culture, self-esteem, and intimate partner violence among Hispanic women according to birthplace, and to identify factors associated with these differences in intimate partner violence (IPV). Baseline data from a randomized control trial testing the efficacy of an HIV prevention program were used. Path analyses identified differences in IPV between Colombian women and women from other Central/South American countries. Self-esteem was the only factor associated with these differences. Interventions addressing the unique needs of Hispanic women from different subgroups are needed.

  11. Comparison of Echocardiographic Measures in a Hispanic/Latino Population with the 2005 and 2015 American Society of Echocardiography Reference Limits [The Echocardiographic Study of Latinos (ECHO-SOL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Waqas T.; Leigh, J. Adam; Swett, Katrina; Ajay, Dharod; Allison, Matthew A.; Cai, Jianwen; Gonzalez, Franklyn; Hurwitz, Barry E.; Shah, Sanjiv J.; Desai, Ankit A.; Spevack, Daniel M.; Rodriguez, Carlos J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Reference limits for echocardiographic quantification of cardiac chambers in Hispanics are not well studied. Methods and Results We examined the reference values of left atrium (LA) and ventricle (LV) structure in a large ethnically diverse Hispanic cohort. Two-dimensional transthoracic echocardiography was performed in 1,818 participants of the Echocardiographic Study of Latinos (ECHO-SOL). Individuals with body mass index ≥30kg/m2, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, coronary artery disease and atrial fibrillation were excluded leaving 525 participants defined as healthy reference-cohort. We estimated 95th weighted percentiles of LV end systolic volume, LV end diastolic volume, relative wall and septal thickness, LV mass and left atrial volume. We then used upper reference limits of the 2005 and 2015 American Society of Echocardiography (ASE) and 95th percentile of reference cohort to classify the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) target population into abnormal and normal. Reference limits were also calculated for each of 6 Hispanic origins. Using ASE 2015 defined reference values we categorized 7%, 21%, 57% and 17% of males and 18%, 29%, 60% and 26% of females as having abnormal LV mass index, relative, septal and posterior wall thickness, respectively. Conversely, 10%, and 11% of males and 4% and 2% of females were classified as having abnormal end-diastolic volume and internal diameter by ASE 2015 cut-offs, respectively. Similar differences were found when we used 2005 ASE cut offs. Several differences were noted in distribution of cardiac structure and volumes among various Hispanic/Latino origins. Cubans had highest values of echocardiographic measures and Central Americans had the lowest. Conclusions This is the first large study that provides normal reference values for cardiac structure. It further demonstrates that a considerable segment of Hispanic/Latinos residing in US may be classified as having abnormal measures

  12. The Intersection of Mental and Physical Health in Older Mexican Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Myra G.

    2004-01-01

    The incidence of chronic diseases is highest among the elderly in general; compared to Anglo-Americans, Mexican Americans have lower rates of cancer and cardiovascular disease and higher rates of depression and diabetes. Using baseline data from the Hispanic Established Populations for Epidemiologic Studies of the Elderly (EPESE) study, weighted…

  13. Outreach to Future Hispanic Educational Leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafin, Ana Gil

    This paper discusses issues related to the recruitment of Hispanic-American educational leaders, focusing on the El Centro de Recursos Educativos outreach center at Northeastern Illinois University in Chicago, which began operation in Fall 1997. It examines the characteristics of successful programs for Hispanic recruitment and retention and the…

  14. Obesity and health conditions in elderly Mexican Americans: the Hispanic EPESE. Established Population for Epidemiologic Studies of the Elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostir, G V; Markides, K S; Freeman, D H; Goodwin, J S

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this analysis was to determine the prevalence of obesity and its association with selected medical conditions in a non-institutionalized elderly Mexican-American population. Data employed are from a representative sample of 3050 elderly Mexican Americans from the five Southwestern states: Texas, California, Colorado, New Mexico, and Arizona. Complete Body Mass Index (BMI) data were available for 2769 individuals. The in-home survey obtained socio-demographic data, anthropometric measurements, including height and weight, blood pressure readings, self-reported health conditions and depressive symptomatology. It was found that 23% of men and 35% of women were obese (BMI > or =30 kg/m2). Using a weighted logistic regression model, a BMI of > or =26 kg/m2 was associated with a significantly higher risk of diabetes; a BMI of > or =30 kg/m2 was significantly associated with arthritis and measured hypertension and a BMIMexican-American population than in the general population.

  15. Cross-Sectional Relationships Between Household Food Insecurity and Child BMI, Feeding Behaviors, and Public Assistance Utilization Among Head Start Children From Predominantly Hispanic and American Indian Communities in the CHILE Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trappmann, Jessica L; Jimenez, Elizabeth Yakes; Keane, Patricia C; Cohen, Deborah A; Davis, Sally M

    Associations between food insecurity and overweight/obesity, feeding behaviors, and public food assistance utilization have been explored to a greater extent among adults and adolescents than among young children. This cross-sectional study examines a subset of pre-intervention implementation data (n = 347) among families participating in the Child Health Initiative for Lifelong Eating and Exercise (CHILE) study conducted in rural New Mexico among predominantly Hispanic and American Indian Head Start centers. No significant relationships emerged between food insecurity and child overweight/obesity, certain feeding behaviors, or public food assistance utilization. Additional research is necessary to understand relationships between food insecurity and child overweight/obesity status, use of public assistance benefits, and certain feeding behaviors among rural preschool-aged children in predominantly Hispanic and American Indian communities.

  16. Disparities in preventive health behaviors among non-Hispanic White men: heterogeneity among foreign-born Arab and European Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallo, Florence J; Kindratt, Tiffany B

    2015-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to estimate and compare the age-adjusted prevalence of not receiving a flu vaccine, pneumonia vaccine, or prostate cancer screening among U.S.- and foreign-born White men by region of birth (Europe/Russia and the Arab Nations) and examine these associations while controlling for potential confounders. Twelve years of restricted data from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) including 91,636 U.S.- and foreign-born men were used. Chi-squares were used to compare descriptive statistics, and odds ratios (ORs; 95% confidence intervals [CIs]) were used for inferential statistics. In crude and adjusted analyses, foreign-born Arab American men were less likely to report receiving a flu (OR = 0.38; 95% CI = 0.21, 0.67) and pneumonia (OR = 0.33; 95% CI = 0.16, 0.70) vaccine compared with U.S.-born White men. There were no statistically significant differences for PSA testing between Arab American and White men. This national study examining uptake of flu and pneumonia vaccines suggests estimates are lower for foreign-born Arab American men compared with U.S.-born White men. Future studies should collect qualitative data that assesses the cultural context surrounding prevention and screening behaviors among Arab Americans.

  17. Historical topics in the posmodern Hispanic American drama. (Acto cultural by José Ignacio Cabrujas and La noche de Hernán Cortés by Vincente Leñero)

    OpenAIRE

    Skleničková, Jana

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to describe the mayor changes that the Hispanic American historical drama underwent in the last third of the 20th century, in connection with the increasing influence of the poetics of postmodernism. The work will mention the decisive artistic and philosophical concepts that had impact on the creation of postmodern historical dramas. The main part of the study is dedicated to the analysis of two examples of the postmodern representation of history and the historial m...

  18. Cross-Sectional Relationships Between Household Food Insecurity and Child BMI, Feeding Behaviors, and Public Assistance Utilization Among Head Start Children From Predominantly Hispanic and American Indian Communities in the CHILE Study

    OpenAIRE

    Trappmann, Jessica L.; Jimenez, Elizabeth Yakes; Keane, Patricia C.; Deborah A. Cohen; Davis, Sally M

    2015-01-01

    Associations between food insecurity and overweight/obesity, feeding behaviors, and public food assistance utilization have been explored to a greater extent among adults and adolescents than among young children. This cross-sectional study examines a subset of pre-intervention implementation data (n = 347) among families participating in the Child Health Initiative for Lifelong Eating and Exercise (CHILE) study conducted in rural New Mexico among predominantly Hispanic and American Indian He...

  19. Population data on the thirteen CODIS core short tandem repeat loci in African Americans, U.S. Caucasians, Hispanics, Bahamians, Jamaicans, and Trinidadians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budowle, B; Moretti, T R; Baumstark, A L; Defenbaugh, D A; Keys, K M

    1999-11-01

    Allele distributions for 13 tetrameric short tandem repeat (STR) loci, CSF1PO, FGA, TH01, TPOX, VWA, D3S1358, D5S818, D7S820, D8S1179, D13S317, D16S539, D18S51, and D21S11, were determined in African American, United States Caucasian, Hispanic, Bahamian, Jamaican, and Trinidadian sample populations. There was little evidence for departures from Hardy-Weinberg expectations (HWE) in any of the populations. Based on the exact test, the loci that departed significantly from HWE are: D21S11 (p = 0.010, Bahamians); CSF1PO (p = 0.014, Trinidadians); TPOX (p = 0.011, Jamaicans and p = 0.035, U.S. Caucasians); and D16S539 (p = 0.043, Bahamians). After employing the Bonferroni correction for the number of loci analyzed (i.e., 13 loci per database), these observations are not likely to be significant. There is little evidence for association of alleles between the loci in these databases. The allelic frequency data are similar to other comparable data within the same major population group.

  20. Asthma in Hispanics. An 8-year update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosser, Franziska J; Forno, Erick; Cooper, Philip J; Celedón, Juan C

    2014-06-01

    This review provides an update on asthma in Hispanics, a diverse group tracing their ancestry to countries previously under Spanish rule. A marked variability in the prevalence and morbidity from asthma remains among Hispanic subgroups in the United States and Hispanic America. In the United States, Puerto Ricans and Mexican Americans have high and low burdens of asthma, respectively (the "Hispanic Paradox"). This wide divergence in asthma morbidity among Hispanic subgroups is multifactorial, likely reflecting the effects of known (secondhand tobacco smoke, air pollution, psychosocial stress, obesity, inadequate treatment) and potential (genetic variants, urbanization, vitamin D insufficiency, and eradication of parasitic infections) risk factors. Barriers to adequate asthma management in Hispanics include economic and educational disadvantages, lack of health insurance, and no access to or poor adherence with controller medications such as inhaled corticosteroids. Although considerable progress has been made in our understanding of asthma in Hispanic subgroups, many questions remain. Studies of asthma in Hispanic America should focus on environmental or lifestyle factors that are more relevant to asthma in this region (e.g., urbanization, air pollution, parasitism, and stress). In the United States, research studies should focus on risk factors that are known to or may diverge among Hispanic subgroups, including but not limited to epigenetic variation, prematurity, vitamin D level, diet, and stress. Clinical trials of culturally appropriate interventions that address multiple aspects of asthma management in Hispanic subgroups should be prioritized for funding. Ensuring high-quality healthcare for all remains a pillar of eliminating asthma disparities.

  1. The Effects of the American Dream Academy on Hispanic Parents' Beliefs, Knowledge, and Behaviors Regarding Pre-Kinder to Post-Secondary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portillo, Danelia

    2013-01-01

    The high percentage and the steady growth of Hispanic/Latino students in Arizona demand that special attention be placed on improving academic achievement and attainment. The need to support Hispanic/Latino parents in becoming meaningful positive contributors to their children's schooling continues to surface as a critical issue in school…

  2. The Effects of the American Dream Academy on Hispanic Parents' Beliefs, Knowledge, and Behaviors Regarding Pre-Kinder to Post-Secondary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portillo, Danelia

    2013-01-01

    The high percentage and the steady growth of Hispanic/Latino students in Arizona demand that special attention be placed on improving academic achievement and attainment. The need to support Hispanic/Latino parents in becoming meaningful positive contributors to their children's schooling continues to surface as a critical issue in school…

  3. Medical advice and diabetes self-management reported by Mexican-American, Black- and White-non-Hispanic adults across the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaccaro Joan A

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetes has reached epidemic proportions in the United States, particularly among minorities, and if improperly managed can lead to medical complications and death. Healthcare providers play vital roles in communicating standards of care, which include guidance on diabetes self-management. The background of the client may play a role in the patient-provider communication process. The aim of this study was to determine the association between medical advice and diabetes self care management behaviors for a nationally representative sample of adults with diabetes. Moreover, we sought to establish whether or not race/ethnicity was a modifier for reported medical advice received and diabetes self-management behaviors. Methods We analyzed data from 654 adults aged 21 years and over with diagnosed diabetes [130 Mexican-Americans; 224 Black non-Hispanics; and, 300 White non-Hispanics] and an additional 161 with 'undiagnosed diabetes' [N = 815(171 MA, 281 BNH and 364 WNH] who participated in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES 2007-2008. Logistic regression models were used to evaluate whether medical advice to engage in particular self-management behaviors (reduce fat or calories, increase physical activity or exercise, and control or lose weight predicted actually engaging in the particular behavior and whether the impact of medical advice on engaging in the behavior differed by race/ethnicity. Additional analyses examined whether these relationships were maintained when other factors potentially related to engaging in diabetes self management such as participants' diabetes education, sociodemographics and physical characteristics were controlled. Sample weights were used to account for the complex sample design. Results Although medical advice to the patient is considered a standard of care for diabetes, approximately one-third of the sample reported not receiving dietary, weight management, or physical

  4. Diverse Hispanic population to become largest U.S. minority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-11-01

    High immigration rates and relatively high birth rates have made Hispanics the second fastest growing minority population in the US. Only the Asian population is growing faster. In 1996, 11% of the US's population was Hispanic. However, Hispanic Americans are projected to outnumber African Americans by 2005, and by 2050, the Hispanic population in the US is projected to total approximately 100 million, 25% of the US population and the largest of the country's ethnic minorities. Latinos have the lowest rates of high school and college graduation of any major population group in the US. Since relevant data first became available in 1972 and until 1994, the median income of Latino families has remained below that of White families, but above that of African American families. The Hispanics' median family income of $24,000 in 1995 was below that of African American families. Puerto Rican and Mexican families are most likely to be poor, while Cubans are least likely. There is considerable diversity within the US's Hispanic population. For example, some Hispanics speak only Spanish, while others speak no Spanish at all. Hispanic Americans come from many countries and cultures, making the differences between and within the Hispanic ethnic groups sometimes as great as their similarities. Most Americans do not understand that Hispanics are an ethnic group, not a racial group.

  5. Heart Disease in Hispanic Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... And that catering largely has to do with food. For Hispanic and Latina women, cooking for family is an act of love that can involve unhealthy pork products and lard. And the more they assimilate to American traditions, the quality of their diets really deteriorate. Turn ...

  6. CUERPOS Y TONOS DISCURSIVOS: UN PORTAVOZ DE HISPANOAMERICANISMO DEL SIGLO XIX (BERNARDO MONTEAGUDO DISCOURSE BODIES AND TONES: A SPOKESPERSON OF XIX CENTURY HISPANIC-AMERICANISM (BERNARDO MONTEAGUDO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graciana Vázquez Villanueva

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo presentamos, a partir de los escritos publicados en la Gaceta de Buenos Aires por Bernardo Monteagudo entre 1811-1812, la conformación de una zona de la tradición discursiva del discurso revolucionario hispanoamericanista del siglo xix, centrado en la construcción de un determinado sujeto político -el portavoz/militante-. Para indagar las matrices que diseñan la emergencia de esa tradición discursiva, nuestro análisis se focaliza en el relevamiento de tres estrategias: el portavoz, el ethos discursivo y la comunidad discursiva. El portavoz, concebido como una forma particular de conducta política, permite esbozar la emergencia de la modernidad política a partir de sujetos imbricados en un complejo haz de preconstruidos culturales insertos en la filiación ilustrada y romántica. La delimitación del ethos conlleva a considerar la imagen del sujeto a partir del tono, del cuerpo y del carácter discursivo, encastrados en diversas huellas del lenguaje. Finalmente, la instauración de una comunidad discursiva, definida como la cara social de toda formación discursiva, posibilita aunar el vínculo entre la constitución de un modo de decir -de un lenguaje, de un sistema de representaciones- y de un orden político. A partir de estas estrategias se traza uno de los modelos discursivos del hispanoamericanismo, que será retomado y reformulado en posteriores procesos históricos, para expandir una memoria discursiva latinoamericana posicionada en la necesidad de implementar la integración regional.Starting from the papers published in Gaceta de Buenos Aires by Bernardo Monteagudo between 1811 and 1812, in this work we present the shaping of a discourse tradition zone of the Hispanic-Americanism revolution discourse in the nineteenth century. Such discourse focuses on the construction of a particular political subject: the militant spokesperson. To go deeper into the roots of the emergence of such a discourse tradition, our

  7. Is self-rated health comparable between non-Hispanic whites and Hispanics? Evidence from the health and retirement study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Dejun; Wen, Ming; Markides, Kyriakos S

    2013-07-01

    Using subsequent all-cause mortality as a yardstick for retrospective health, this study assessed the comparability of self-rated health (SRH) between non-Hispanic whites and Hispanics. Based on longitudinal data from 6,870 white and 886 Hispanic respondents aged between 51 and 61 in the 1992 Health and Retirement Study, we related SRH in 1992 to risk of mortality in the 1992-2008 period. Logit models were used to predict white-Hispanic differences in reporting fair or poor SRH. Survival curves and cox proportional hazard models were estimated to assess whether and the extent to which the SRH-mortality association differs between non-Hispanic whites and Hispanics. Hispanic respondents reported worse SRH than whites at the baseline, yet they had similar risk of mortality as whites in the 1992-2008 period. Overall, Hispanics rated their health more pessimistically than whites. This was especially the case for Hispanics who rated their health fair or poor at the baseline, whereas their presumed health conditions, as reflected by subsequent risk of mortality, should be considerably better than their white counterparts. Health disparities between whites and Hispanics aged between 51 and 61 will be overestimated if the assessment has been solely based on differences in SRH between the two groups. Findings from this study call for caution in relying on SRH to quantify and explain health disparities between non-Hispanic whites and Hispanics in the United States.

  8. Metabolic Abnormalities Are Common among South American Hispanics Subjects with Normal Weight or Excess Body Weight: The CRONICAS Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine P Benziger

    Full Text Available We aimed to characterize metabolic status by body mass index (BMI status.The CRONICAS longitudinal study was performed in an age-and-sex stratified random sample of participants aged 35 years or older in four Peruvian settings: Lima (Peru's capital, costal urban, highly urbanized, urban and rural Puno (both high-altitude, and Tumbes (costal semirural. Data from the baseline study, conducted in 2010, was used. Individuals were classified by BMI as normal weight (18.5-24.9 kg/m2, overweight (25.0-29.9 kg/m2, and obese (≥30 kg/m2, and as metabolically healthy (0-1 metabolic abnormality or metabolically unhealthy (≥2 abnormalities. Abnormalities included individual components of the metabolic syndrome, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and insulin resistance.A total of 3088 (age 55.6±12.6 years, 51.3% females had all measurements. Of these, 890 (28.8%, 1361 (44.1% and 837 (27.1% were normal weight, overweight and obese, respectively. Overall, 19.0% of normal weight in contrast to 54.9% of overweight and 77.7% of obese individuals had ≥3 risk factors (p<0.001. Among normal weight individuals, 43.1% were metabolically unhealthy, and age ≥65 years, female, and highest socioeconomic groups were more likely to have this pattern. In contrast, only 16.4% of overweight and 3.9% of obese individuals were metabolically healthy and, compared to Lima, the rural and urban sites in Puno were more likely to have a metabolically healthier profile.Most Peruvians with overweight and obesity have additional risk factors for cardiovascular disease, as well as a majority of those with a healthy weight. Prevention programs aimed at individuals with a normal BMI, and those who are overweight and obese, are urgently needed, such as screening for elevated fasting cholesterol and glucose.

  9. Adapting Evidence-Based Strategies to Increase Physical Activity Among African Americans, Hispanics, Hmong, and Native Hawaiians: A Social Marketing Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Ann S. Van Duyn, PhD, MPH, RD

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionUsing a social marketing approach, we studied how best to adapt proven, evidence-based strategies to increase physical activity for use with underserved racial or ethnic groups.MethodsWe conducted focus groups with low-income Hispanic women in Texas, Hmong parents and their children in California, low-income African American women and men in the Mississippi Delta, and Native Hawaiian college students in Hawaii. We also interviewed key leaders of these communities. Topics of discussion were participants’ perceptions about 1 the benefits of engaging in physical activity, 2 the proposed evidence-based strategies for increasing each community’s level of physical activity, and 3 the benefits and barriers to following the proposed interventions for increasing physical activity. A total of 292 individuals participated in the study.ResultsAll groups considered that being physically active was part of their culture, and participants found culturally relevant suggestions for physical activities appealing. Overwhelmingly, strategies that aimed to create or improve social support and increase access to physical activity venues received the most positive feedback from all groups. Barriers to physical activity were not culturally specific; they are common to all underserved people (lack of time, transportation, access, neighborhood safety, or economic resources.ConclusionResults indicate that evidence-based strategies to increase physical activity need to be adapted for cultural relevance for each racial or ethnic group. Our research shows that members of four underserved populations are likely to respond to strategies that increase social support for physical activity and improve access to venues where they can be physically active. Further research is needed to test how to implement such strategies in ways that are embraced by community members.

  10. Adapting evidence-based strategies to increase physical activity among African Americans, Hispanics, Hmong, and Native Hawaiians: a social marketing approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Duyn, Mary Ann S; McCrae, Tarsha; Wingrove, Barbara K; Henderson, Kimberly M; Boyd, Jamie K; Kagawa-Singer, Marjorie; Ramirez, Amelie G; Scarinci-Searles, Isabel; Wolff, Lisa S; Penalosa, Tricia L; Maibach, Edward W

    2007-10-01

    Using a social marketing approach, we studied how best to adapt proven, evidence-based strategies to increase physical activity for use with underserved racial or ethnic groups. We conducted focus groups with low-income Hispanic women in Texas, Hmong parents and their children in California, low-income African American women and men in the Mississippi Delta, and Native Hawaiian college students in Hawaii. We also interviewed key leaders of these communities. Topics of discussion were participants' perceptions about 1) the benefits of engaging in physical activity, 2) the proposed evidence-based strategies for increasing each community's level of physical activity, and 3) the benefits and barriers to following the proposed interventions for increasing physical activity. A total of 292 individuals participated in the study. All groups considered that being physically active was part of their culture, and participants found culturally relevant suggestions for physical activities appealing. Overwhelmingly, strategies that aimed to create or improve social support and increase access to physical activity venues received the most positive feedback from all groups. Barriers to physical activity were not culturally specific; they are common to all underserved people (lack of time, transportation, access, neighborhood safety, or economic resources). Results indicate that evidence-based strategies to increase physical activity need to be adapted for cultural relevance for each racial or ethnic group. Our research shows that members of four underserved populations are likely to respond to strategies that increase social support for physical activity and improve access to venues where they can be physically active. Further research is needed to test how to implement such strategies in ways that are embraced by community members.

  11. Asthma self-management is sub-optimal in urban Hispanic and African American/black early adolescents with uncontrolled persistent asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruzzese, Jean-Marie; Stepney, Cesalie; Fiorino, Elizabeth K; Bornstein, Lea; Wang, Jing; Petkova, Eva; Evans, David

    2012-02-01

    Youth as young as 11 are given responsibility to manage their asthma. Yet, little is known regarding early adolescents' asthma self-management behaviors. This study characterizes urban early adolescents' asthma self-management behaviors and perceived responsibility to manage asthma, exploring demographic differences and examining the relationship between asthma responsibility and disease management. About 317 Hispanic and African American/Black early adolescents (mean age = 12.71) with persistent, uncontrolled asthma reported prevention and symptom management steps, and responsibility for asthma care. We used Poisson, cumulative logistic, logistic, and linear mixed-effects regression models to assess the relationships among demographic predictors, prevention and management behaviors, and responsibility for asthma care. Fifty percent took 7-9 prevention steps; few saw physicians when asymptomatic or took daily medication. When symptomatic, 92% used medication to treat symptoms and 56% sought medical attention. Controlling for asthma responsibility, fewer older youth reported observing how they feel when asthma is likely to start, observing symptom changes, or asking for help. More boys reported taking medication daily or upon trigger exposure. Controlling for age, gender, and race/ethnicity, those reporting more asthma responsibility were less likely to report taking management steps, seeking preventive care, asking for help, or going to a doctor/hospital for their asthma. Early adolescents' asthma self-management is suboptimal. With increasing age, they are less observant regarding their asthma and less likely to seek help. Although they perceive themselves to have greater responsibility for managing their asthma, early adolescents do less to care for their asthma, suggesting they are being given responsibility for asthma care prematurely.

  12. Years of potential life lost before age 65, by race, Hispanic origin, and sex--United States, 1986-1988.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desenclos, J C; Hahn, R A

    1992-11-20

    A substantial proportion of mortality among young persons is preventable. National vital statistics were used to establish a baseline for the surveillance of rates of years of potential life lost before age 65 (YPLL origin, and sex. U.S. racial and ethnic populations differed widely in YPLL < 65. Among males, the rate (per 1,000 population < 65 years) of YPLL < 65 was highest for non-Hispanic blacks (140.0), followed by American Indians/Alaskan Natives (100.9), Hispanics (74.3), non-Hispanic whites (68.3), and Asians/Pacific Islanders (38.2). Among females, the rate was highest for non-Hispanic blacks (73.7), followed by American Indians/Alaskan Natives (52.0), non-Hispanic whites (35.7), Hispanics (32.9), and Asians/Pacific Islanders (23.2). For non-Hispanic blacks, the high rate of YPLL < 65 was due to increased rates for all causes of death considered, particularly homicide. The high rate for American Indians/Alaskan Natives was due principally to deaths from four causes: unintentional injuries, cirrhosis, suicide, and diabetes. Asians/Pacific Islanders had low rates for most causes of death. In setting health-care priorities and prevention strategies to reduce the large racial-ethnic gap in early deaths, it is essential to recognize the differences in causes of premature mortality among sex, racial, and ethnic populations. Periodic reassessment of YPLL < 65 among these groups provides a simple, timely, and representative means of conducting surveillance to measure the impact of intervention strategies on a national basis.

  13. School-Based Exercise to Lower Blood Pressure in High-Risk African American Girls: Project Design and Baseline Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewart, Craig K.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes effective methods for identifying and recruiting high risk African American ninth-grade girls to measure their fitness and assess the impact of fitness training on blood pressure. A multistage step test for fitness assessment in such girls is presented. The "Project Heart" aerobics class and control groups are described. (SM)

  14. B lymphocyte stimulator levels in systemic lupus erythematosus: higher circulating levels in African American patients and increased production after influenza vaccination in patients with low baseline levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritterhouse, Lauren L; Crowe, Sherry R; Niewold, Timothy B; Merrill, Joan T; Roberts, Virginia C; Dedeke, Amy B; Neas, Barbara R; Thompson, Linda F; Guthridge, Joel M; James, Judith A

    2011-12-01

    To examine the relationship between circulating B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS) levels and humoral responses to influenza vaccination in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients, as well as the effect of vaccination on BLyS levels, and to investigate clinical and serologic features of SLE that are associated with elevated BLyS levels. Clinical history, disease activity measurements, and blood specimens were collected from 60 SLE patients at baseline and after influenza vaccination. Sera were tested for BLyS levels, lupus-associated autoantibodies, serum interferon-α (IFNα) activity, 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D), and humoral responses to influenza vaccination. Thirty percent of the SLE patients had elevated BLyS levels, with African American patients having higher BLyS levels than white patients (P = 0.006). Baseline BLyS levels in patients were not correlated with humoral responses to influenza vaccination (P = 0.863), and BLyS levels increased postvaccination only in the subset of patients with BLyS levels in the lowest quartile (P = 0.0003). Elevated BLyS levels were associated with increased disease activity, as measured by the SLE Disease Activity Index, physician's global assessment, and Systemic Lupus Activity Measure in white patients (P = 0.035, P = 0.016, and P = 0.018, respectively), but not in African Americans. Elevated BLyS levels were also associated with anti-nuclear RNP (P = 0.0003) and decreased 25(OH)D (P = 0.018). Serum IFNα activity was a significant predictor of elevated BLyS in a multivariate analysis (P = 0.002). Our findings indicate that African American patients with SLE have higher BLyS levels regardless of disease activity. Humoral response to influenza vaccination is not correlated with baseline BLyS levels in SLE patients, and only those patients with low baseline BLyS levels demonstrate an increased BLyS response after vaccination. Copyright © 2011 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  15. Cervical cancer screening among immigrant Hispanics: an analysis by country of origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Rachel C; Jandorf, Lina; King, Sheba; Thelemaque, Linda; Erwin, Deborah O

    2012-08-01

    As the largest and most diverse ethnic minority population in the U.S., it is important to examine differences in and correlates of Pap test adherence among Hispanics by country of origin. The data for these analyses are baseline responses from a Randomized Controlled Trial. Bivariate and multivariable logistic regression models were conducted among Hispanic immigrant women who identified as Mexican, Puerto Rican, Dominican, or Central/South American (n = 1,305). There were significant differences in Pap test adherence: Dominicans (81.6%), Mexicans (77.5%), Central/South Americans (71.2%), and Puerto Ricans (69.3%). In multivariable analyses, there were different correlates of Pap test adherence for each country of origin. For example, marriage status (P = .0001) and younger age (P = .006) were positively associated with adherence among Mexican women. This research provides insight into the variability that exists among Hispanics and can help improve understanding of important determinants that may influence Pap test screening among diverse Hispanics.

  16. Dietary Patterns among Vietnamese and Hispanic Immigrant Elementary School Children Participating in an After School Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Megan A McCrory; Charles L Jaret; Jung Ha Kim; Donald C Reitzes

    2017-01-01

    .... We examined Vietnamese and Hispanic immigrant children’s American food consumption patterns in a convenience sample of 63 Vietnamese and Hispanic children in grades four to six who were attending an after school program...

  17. Challenges associated with insulin therapy progression among patients with type 2 diabetes: Latin American MOSAIc study baseline data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linetzky, Bruno; Curtis, Brad; Frechtel, Gustavo; Montenegro, Renan; Escalante Pulido, Miguel; Stempa, Oded; de Lana, Janaina Martins; Gagliardino, Juan José

    2016-01-01

    Poor glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes is commonly recorded worldwide; Latin America (LA) is not an exception. Barriers to intensifying insulin therapy and which barriers are most likely to negatively impact outcomes are not completely known. The objective was to identify barriers to insulin progression in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in LA countries (Mexico, Brazil, and Argentina). MOSAIc is a multinational, non-interventional, prospective, observational study aiming to identify the patient-, physician-, and healthcare-based factors affecting insulin intensification. Eligible patients were ≥18 years, had T2DM, and were treated with insulin for ≥3 months with/without oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs). Demographic, clinical, and psychosocial data were collected at baseline and regular intervals during the 24-month follow-up period. This paper however, focuses on baseline data analysis. The association between glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and selected covariates was assessed. A trend toward a higher level of HbA1c was observed in the LA versus non-LA population (8.40 ± 2.79 versus 8.18 ± 2.28; p ≤ 0.069). Significant differences were observed in clinical parameters, treatment patterns, and patient-reported outcomes in LA compared with the rest of the cohorts and between Mexico, Brazil, and Argentina. Higher number of insulin injections and lower number of OADs were used, whereas a lower level of knowledge and a higher level of diabetes-related distress were reported in LA. Covariates associated with HbA1c levels included age (-0.0129; p education level (-0.2261; p = 0.0101), healthy diet (-0.0555; p = 0.0083), self-monitoring blood glucose (-0.0512; p = 0.0033), hurried communication style in the process of care (0.1295; p = 0.0208), number of insulin injections (0.1616; p = 0.0088), adherence (-0.1939; p ≤ 0.0104), and not filling insulin prescription due to associated cost (0.2651; p = 0.0198). MOSAIc

  18. A History of Ashes: An 80 Year Comparative Portrait of Smoking Initiation in American Indians and Non-Hispanic Whites—the Strong Heart Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack Goldberg

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The consequences of starting smoking by age 18 are significant. Early smoking initiation is associated with higher tobacco dependence, increased difficulty in smoking cessation and more negative health outcomes. The purpose of this study is to examine how closely smoking initiation in a well-defined population of American Indians (AI resembles a group of Non-Hispanic white (NHW populations born over an 80 year period. We obtained data on age of smoking initiation among 7,073 AIs who were members of 13 tribes in Arizona, Oklahoma and North and South Dakota from the 1988 Strong Heart Study (SHS and the 2001 Strong Heart Family Study (SHFS and 19,747 NHW participants in the 2003 National Health Interview Survey. The participants were born as early as 1904 and as late as 1985. We classified participants according to birth cohort by decade, sex, and for AIs, according to location. We estimated the cumulative incidence of smoking initiation by age 18 in each sex and birth cohort group in both AIs and NHWs and used Cox regression to estimate hazard ratios for the association of birth cohort, sex and region with the age at smoking initiation. We found that the cumulative incidence of smoking initiation by age 18 was higher in males than females in all SHS regions and in NHWs (p < 0.001. Our results show regional variation of age of initiation significant in the SHS (p < 0.001. Our data showed that not all AIs (in this sample showed similar trends toward increased earlier smoking. For instance, Oklahoma SHS male participants born in the 1980s initiated smoking before age 18 less often than those born before 1920 by a ratio of 0.7. The results showed significant variation in age of initiation across sex, birth cohort, and location. Our preliminary analyses suggest that AI smoking trends are not uniform across region or gender but are likely shaped by local context. If tobacco prevention and control programs depend in part on addressing the origin of AI

  19. Correlates of overweight and obesity among American Indian/Alaska Native and Non-Hispanic White children and adolescents: National Survey of Children's Health, 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ness, Maria; Barradas, Danielle T; Irving, Jennifer; Manning, Susan E

    2012-12-01

    Risk factors for overweight and obesity may be different for American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) children compared to children of other racial/ethnic backgrounds, as obesity prevalence among AI/AN children remains much higher. Using data from the 2007 National Survey of Children's Health, behavioral (child's sport team participation, vigorous physical activity, television viewing, and computer use), household (parental physical activity, frequency of family meals, rules limiting television viewing, and television in the child's bedroom), neighborhood (neighborhood support, perceived community and school safety, and presence of parks, sidewalks, and recreation centers in the neighborhood), and sociodemographic (child's age and sex, household structure, and poverty status) correlates of overweight/obesity (body mass index ≥85th percentile for age and sex) were assessed among 10-17 year-old non-Hispanic white (NHW) and AI/AN children residing in Alaska, Arizona, Montana, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oklahoma, and South Dakota (n = 5,372). Prevalence of overweight/obesity was 29.0 % among NHW children and 48.3 % among AI/AN children in this sample. Viewing more than 2 h of television per day (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 2.0; 95 % confidence interval [CI] = 1.5-2.8), a lack of neighborhood support (aOR = 1.9; 95 % CI = 1.1-3.5), and demographic characteristics were significantly associated with overweight/obesity in the pooled sample. Lack of sport team participation was significantly associated with overweight/obesity only among AI/AN children (aOR = 2.7; 95 % CI = 1.3-5.2). Culturally sensitive interventions targeting individual predictors, such as sports team participation and television viewing, in conjunction with neighborhood-level factors, may be effective in addressing childhood overweight/obesity among AI/AN children. Longitudinal studies are needed to confirm these findings.

  20. Heart Disease and African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Minority Population Profiles > Black/African American > Heart Disease Heart Disease and African Americans Although African American adults are ... were 30 percent more likely to die from heart disease than non-Hispanic whites. African American women are ...

  1. Hispanic Heritage Month

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, Sherry

    2004-01-01

    Hispanic heritage month is from September 15 to October 15. One problem that arises when grouping people into categories such as Hispanic or Latino is stereotyping, stereotypes can be promoted or used in this Hispanic month to promote a greater understanding of Latino cultures.

  2. Hispanic Victims. Special Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastian, Lisa D.

    This report provides detailed information about crimes committed against Hispanics from 1979 to 1986 based on the U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics' National Crime Survey (NCS). The rate of violent crime committed against Hispanics each year surveyed is examined and compared to that for non-Hispanics. The demographic characteristics of the…

  3. Is there a link between wealth and cardiovascular disease risk factors among Hispanic/Latinos? Results from the HCHS/SOL sociocultural ancillary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Cevallos, Daniel F; Gonzalez, Patricia; Bethel, Jeffrey W; Castañeda, Sheila F; Isasi, Carmen R; Penedo, Frank J; Ojeda, Lizette; Davis, Sonia M; Chirinos, Diana A; Molina, Kristine M; Teng, Yanping; Bekthesi, Venera; Gallo, Linda C

    2017-04-06

    To examine the relationship between wealth and cardiovascular disease risk factors among Hispanic/Latinos of diverse backgrounds. This cross-sectional study used data from 4971 Hispanic/Latinos, 18-74 years, who participated in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) baseline exam and the HCHS/SOL Sociocultural Ancillary Study. Three objectively measured cardiovascular disease risk factors (hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and obesity) were included. Wealth was measured using an adapted version of the Home Affluence Scale, which included questions regarding the ownership of a home, cars, computers, and recent vacations. After adjusting for traditional socioeconomic indicators (income, employment, education), and other covariates, we found that wealth was not associated with hypertension, hypercholesterolemia or obesity. Analyses by sex showed that middle-wealth women were less likely to have hypercholesterolemia or obesity. Analyses by Hispanic/Latino background groups showed that while wealthier Central Americans were less likely to have obesity, wealthier Puerto Ricans were more likely to have obesity. This is the first study to explore the relationship between wealth and health among Hispanic/Latinos of diverse backgrounds, finding only partial evidence of this association. Future studies should utilize more robust measures of wealth, and address mechanisms by which wealth may impact health status among Hispanic/Latinos of diverse backgrounds in longitudinal designs.

  4. Maternal employment, acculturation, and time spent in food-related behaviors among Hispanic mothers in the United States. Evidence from the American Time Use Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliwa, Sarah A; Must, Aviva; Peréa, Flavia; Economos, Christina D

    2015-04-01

    Employment is a major factor underlying im/migration patterns. Unfortunately, lower diet quality and higher rates of obesity appear to be unintended consequences of moving to the US. Changes in food preparation practices may be a factor underlying dietary acculturation. The relationships between employment, acculturation, and food-related time use in Hispanic families have received relatively little attention. We used cross-sectional data collected from Hispanic mothers (ages 18-65) with at least one child acculturation (US-born vs. im/migrant), and time spent in food preparation and family dinner. Regression models were estimated separately for the employed and the non-working and were adjusted for Hispanic origin group, socio-demographic and household characteristics. Working an eight-hour day was associated with spending 38 fewer minutes in food preparation (-38.0 ± SE 4.8, p Acculturation did not appear to modify the relationship between hours worked and time spent in food preparation or family dinner. Mothers who worked late hours spent less time eating the evening meal with their families (-9.8 ± SE 1.3). Although an eight-hour workday was associated with a significant reduction in food preparation time, an unexpected result is that, for working mothers, additional time spent in paid work is not associated with the duration of family dinner later that day.

  5. Cultural Practices of Hispanics: Implications for the Prevention of AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikawa, James K.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Among 190 Hispanic Americans in Nevada, condom use as an AIDS prevention measure appeared to be a male prerogative associated with "being the one who buys the condoms" (mostly males) and machismo practices such as protection of women. Adherence to Hispanic cultural traits was related to education and acculturation. (SV)

  6. Dropping Out: Hispanic Students, Attrition, and the Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Jose; And Others

    1992-01-01

    A survey of Hispanic American students leaving college found significant differences between dropouts and those dismissed for academic performance. Familial values and demands and other extra-academic variables exerted considerable pressure on individual students. Institutional assumptions in Hispanic student retention need to be challenged and…

  7. Cultural Practices of Hispanics: Implications for the Prevention of AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikawa, James K.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Among 190 Hispanic Americans in Nevada, condom use as an AIDS prevention measure appeared to be a male prerogative associated with "being the one who buys the condoms" (mostly males) and machismo practices such as protection of women. Adherence to Hispanic cultural traits was related to education and acculturation. (SV)

  8. 78 FR 57459 - National Hispanic Heritage Month, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-18

    ... vibrant cultures, each of which enriches communities in valuable ways. Just as America embraces a rich... boundless opportunity, many Hispanics have marched for social justice and helped advance America's journey... States of America A Proclamation From the earliest days of our Republic, Hispanic Americans have written...

  9. College Student Civic Development and Engagement at a Hispanic Serving Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Roger Geertz

    2008-01-01

    This study compares the civic development and engagement of Cuban American and non-Hispanic White college students at a large, urban Hispanic Serving Institution (HSI). The findings indicate that both ethnic groups civically develop and engage in similar ways at Hispanic Serving Institution. However, when it comes to political discussions, there…

  10. Acculturation, social self-control, and substance use among Hispanic adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokhrel, Pallav; Herzog, Thaddeus A; Sun, Ping; Rohrbach, Louise A; Sussman, Steve

    2013-09-01

    It is unclear how acculturation is related to self-control characteristics and whether part of the effect of acculturation on Hispanic adolescents' substance use behavior is mediated through lower self-control. We tested social self-control, peer substance use, and baseline substance use as mediators of the effect of Hispanic (predominantly Mexican or Mexican American) adolescents' level of U.S. acculturation on their substance use behavior 1 year later. In addition, we tested gender as a possible moderator of the pathways involved in the mediation model. Participants included 1,040 self-identified Hispanic/Latino adolescents (M = 14.7; SD = 0.90; 89% Mexican/Mexican American) recruited from nine public high schools. Acculturation was measured in terms of adolescents' extent of English language use in general, at home, with friends, and their use of the English-language entertainment media. Analyses were conducted using structural equation modeling and controlled for potential confounders such as age and parental education. Results indicated a statistically significant three-path mediation in which poor social self-control and peer substance use mediated the effects of acculturation on prospective substance use. Paths in the mediation model were not found to differ by gender. Our findings suggest that acculturation may influence adolescents' self-control characteristics related to interpersonal functioning, which may in turn influence their affiliation with substance-using friends and substance use behavior. Implications of the findings are discussed in terms of future research and prevention programming.

  11. Acculturation, Social Self-Control, and Substance Use Among Hispanic Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokhrel, Pallav; Herzog, Thaddeus A.; Sun, Ping; Rohrbach, Louise A.; Sussman, Steve

    2014-01-01

    It is unclear how acculturation is related to self-control characteristics and whether part of the effect of acculturation on Hispanic adolescents’ substance use behavior is mediated through lower self-control. We tested social self-control, peer substance use, and baseline substance use as mediators of the effect of Hispanic (predominantly Mexican or Mexican American) adolescents’ level of U.S. acculturation on their substance use behavior 1 year later. In addition, we tested gender as a possible moderator of the pathways involved in the mediation model. Participants included 1,040 self-identified Hispanic/Latino adolescents (M = 14.7; SD = 0.90; 89% Mexican/Mexican American) recruited from nine public high schools. Acculturation was measured in terms of adolescents’ extent of English language use in general, at home, with friends, and their use of the English-language entertainment media. Analyses were conducted using structural equation modeling and controlled for potential confounders such as age and parental education. Results indicated a statistically significant three-path mediation in which poor social self-control and peer substance use mediated the effects of acculturation on prospective substance use. Paths in the mediation model were not found to differ by gender. Our findings suggest that acculturation may influence adolescents’ self-control characteristics related to interpersonal functioning, which may in turn influence their affiliation with substance-using friends and substance use behavior. Implications of the findings are discussed in terms of future research and prevention programming. PMID:23772765

  12. Obesity and Asian Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Data > Minority Population Profiles > Asian American > Obesity Obesity and Asian Americans Non-Hispanic whites are 60% ... youthonline . [Accessed 05/25/2016] HEALTH IMPACT OF OBESITY More than 80 percent of people with type ...

  13. Teatro! Hispanic Plays for Young People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigil, Angel

    This collection of 14 folk drama scripts is drawn from the Hispanic culture and traditions of the American Southwest and designed for use in educational settings. The plays are short, simple, and easy to produce. A single play can fill a class period, while several plays grouped together would make a school assembly. Six plays, intended for grades…

  14. Teatro! Hispanic Plays for Young People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigil, Angel

    This collection of 14 folk drama scripts is drawn from the Hispanic culture and traditions of the American Southwest and designed for use in educational settings. The plays are short, simple, and easy to produce. A single play can fill a class period, while several plays grouped together would make a school assembly. Six plays, intended for grades…

  15. Baseline rationing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Jens Leth; Moreno-Ternero, Juan D.; Østerdal, Lars Peter Raahave

    The standard problem of adjudicating conflicting claims describes a situation in which a given amount of a divisible good has to be allocated among agents who hold claims against it exceeding the available amount. This paper considers more general rationing problems in which, in addition to claims......, there exist baselines (to be interpreted as objective entitlements, ideal targets, or past consumption) that might play an important role in the allocation process. The model we present is able to accommodate real-life rationing situations, ranging from resource allocation in the public health care sector...... to international protocols for the reduction of greenhouse emissions, or water distribution in drought periods. We define a family of allocation methods for such general rationing problems - called baseline rationing rules - and provide an axiomatic characterization for it. Any baseline rationing rule within...

  16. Acculturation determines BMI percentile and noncore food intake in Hispanic children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, James F; Cloutier, Michelle M; Wakefield, Dorothy B; Hernandez, Dominica B; Grant, Autherene; Beaulieu, Annamarie; Gorin, Amy A

    2014-03-01

    Hispanic children in the United States are disproportionately affected by obesity. The role of acculturation in obesity is unclear. This study examined the relation between child obesity, dietary intake, and maternal acculturation in Hispanic children. We hypothesized that children of more acculturated mothers would consume more unhealthy foods and would have higher body mass index (BMI) percentiles. A total of 209 Hispanic mothers of children aged 2-4 y (50% female, 35.3 ± 8.7 mo, BMI percentile: 73.1 ± 27.8, 30% obese, 19% overweight) were recruited for an obesity prevention/reversal study. The associations between baseline maternal acculturation [Brief Acculturation Rating Scale for Mexican Americans-II (Brief ARSMA-II)], child BMI percentile, and child diet were examined. Factor analysis of the Brief ARSMA-II in Puerto Rican mothers resulted in 2 new factors, which were named the Hispanic Orientation Score (4 items, loadings: 0.64-0.81) and U.S. Mainland Orientation Score (6 items, loadings: -0.61-0.92). In the total sample, children who consumed more noncore foods were more likely to be overweight or obese (P acculturation to the United States consumed more noncore foods (P acculturation served fewer noncore foods (P acculturation to the United States served more noncore foods (P acculturation and child BMI percentile in this subgroup. These mothers, however, served fewer sugar-sweetened beverages (P acculturation, noncore food consumption, and child BMI percentile in Puerto Rican and non-Puerto Rican Hispanic children.

  17. Hispanic Higher Education and HSIs. Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents facts about Hispanic higher education. Facts on the following topics are presented: (1) Hispanic demographics; (2) Hispanic academic attainment; (3) Hispanic higher education; and (4) Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSIs).

  18. Understanding the Hispanic Student.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, John M.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Describes cultural differences of Hispanic students in family structure, language, motivation, mysticism, machismo, touching, and time concepts which may lead to problems in the classroom. Suggests strategies teachers may employ to increase opportunities for positive school experiences for Hispanic students through recognition and acknowledgement…

  19. Reducing Hispanic Teenage Pregnancy and Family Poverty: A Replication Guide. Final Version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Sonia M.; Duany, Luis A.

    This guide was designed to help Hispanic American community-based organizations develop and establish a teenage pregnancy prevention or teenage parenting program for Hispanic American adolescents. The guide does not assume prior knowledge of the scope of the teenage pregnancy problem in the United States, but it does underscore the critical role…

  20. Hispanic Mental Health, Drugs and Alcohol Policy Issues: Views from the Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szapocznik, Jose, Ed.

    This work contains three papers presented at a conference held in 1976 for the purpose of examining, from a national perspective, the status of health and human services among Hispanic Americans. The first chapter, by A. Anthony Arce, concerns mental health policy in relation to the Hispanic American community. The author delineates some of the…

  1. The Import of Trust in Regular Providers to Trust in Cancer Physicians among White, African American, and Hispanic Breast Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauscher, Garth H.; Jacobs, Elizabeth A.; Strenski, Teri A.; Estwing Ferrans, Carol; Warnecke, Richard B.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Interpersonal trust is an important component of the patient-doctor relationship. Little is known about patients’ trust in the multiple providers seen when confronting serious illness. OBJECTIVES To characterize breast cancer patients’ trust in their regular providers, diagnosing physicians, and cancer treatment team and examine whether high trust in one’s regular provider confers high trust to cancer physicians. DESIGN In-person interviews. PARTICIPANTS 704 white, black, and Hispanic breast cancer patients, age 30 to 79, with a first primary in situ or invasive breast cancer who reported having a regular provider. MEASURES We measure trust in: (1) regular provider, (2) diagnosing doctors, and (3) cancer treatment team. Other variables include demographic variables, preventive health care, comorbidities, time with regular provider, time since diagnosis, cancer stage, and treatment modality. RESULTS Sixty-five percent of patients reported high trust in their regular provider, 84% indicated high trust in their diagnosing doctors, and 83% reported high trust in their treatment team. Women who reported high trust in their regular provider were significantly more likely to be very trusting of diagnosing doctors (OR: 3.44, 95% CI: 2.27–5.21) and cancer treatment team (OR: 3.09, 95% CI: 2.02–4.72 ). Black women were significantly less likely to be very trusting of their regular doctor (OR: 0.58, 95% CI: 0.38–0.88) and cancer treatment team (OR: 0.45, 95% CI: 0.25–0.80). English-speaking Hispanic women were significantly less trusting of their diagnosing doctors (OR: 0.29, 95% CI: 0.11–0.80). CONCLUSIONS Our results suggest that patients are very trusting of their breast cancer providers. This is an important finding given that research with other populations has shown an association between trust and patient satisfaction and treatment adherence. Our findings also suggest that a trusting relationship with a regular provider facilitates trusting

  2. Clinical characteristics, process of care and outcomes among Mexican, Hispanic and non-Hispanic white patients presenting with non-ST elevation acute coronary syndromes: Data from RENASICA and CRUSADE registries

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez-Diaz,Carlos Jerjes; García-Badillo,Edgar; Sánchez-Ramírez,Carlos Jerjes; Juárez,Úrsulo; Martínez-Sánchez,Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Data regarding management characteristics of non-ST elevation acute coronary syndromes (NSTE ACS) in Mexican, Hispanic and Non- Hispanic white patients are scarce. Methods: We sought to describe the clinical characteristics, process of care, and outcomes of Mexicans, Hispanics and non-Hispanic whites presenting with NSTE ACS at Mexican and US hospitals. We compared baseline characteristics, resource use, clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) compliance and in-hospital mortality am...

  3. Clinical characteristics, process of care and outcomes among Mexican, Hispanic and non-Hispanic white patients presenting with non-ST elevation acute coronary syndromes: Data from RENASICA and CRUSADE registries

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez-Diaz,Carlos Jerjes; García-Badillo,Edgar; Sánchez-Ramírez,Carlos Jerjes; Juárez,Úrsulo; Martínez-Sánchez,Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Data regarding management characteristics of non-ST elevation acute coronary syndromes (NSTE ACS) in Mexican, Hispanic and Non- Hispanic white patients are scarce. Methods: We sought to describe the clinical characteristics, process of care, and outcomes of Mexicans, Hispanics and non-Hispanic whites presenting with NSTE ACS at Mexican and US hospitals. We compared baseline characteristics, resource use, clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) compliance and in-hospital mortality am...

  4. El Estado de la Educacion para los Hispanos en los Estados Unidos (The Condition of Education for Hispanics in the United States).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, George H.; And Others

    Organized into 4 chapters, the report provides tabular data portraying the educational condition for about 12 million Hispanic Americans in the United States, and shows how Hispanics compare with the majority population on various measures of educational participation and achievement. Providing an overview of Hispanic Americans in the U.S.,…

  5. School co-ethnicity and Hispanic parental involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klugman, Joshua; Lee, Jennifer C; Nelson, Shelley L

    2012-09-01

    Scholars of immigration disagree about the role ethnic communities play in immigrant families' engagement in educational institutions. While some researchers argue that the concentration of disadvantaged ethnic groups may prevent meaningful engagement with schools, others argue that ethnic communities can possess resources that help immigrant families be involved in their children's schooling. In this study we use a nationally representative dataset of Hispanic children from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Cohort (ECLS-K) to determine if the relative size of the Hispanic population in the school affects levels of their parents' involvement in their education, as well as parents' perceptions of barriers to their involvement. Our results suggest that a large Hispanic presence in a child's school can help increase immigrant Hispanic parents' involvement in their children's schooling, but there are no benefits for US-born Hispanic parents, indicating that ethnic communities help immigrant families acculturate to American institutions.

  6. Sleep-disordered breathing in Hispanic/Latino individuals of diverse backgrounds. The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redline, Susan; Sotres-Alvarez, Daniela; Loredo, Jose; Hall, Martica; Patel, Sanjay R; Ramos, Alberto; Shah, Neomi; Ries, Andrew; Arens, Raanan; Barnhart, Janice; Youngblood, Marston; Zee, Phyllis; Daviglus, Martha L

    2014-02-01

    Hispanic/Latino populations have a high prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors and may be at risk for sleep-disordered breathing (SDB). An understanding of SDB among these populations is needed given evidence that SDB increases cardiovascular risk. To quantify SDB prevalence in the U.S. Hispanic/Latino population and its association with symptoms, risk factors, diabetes, and hypertension; and to explore variation by sex and Hispanic/Latino background. Cross-sectional analysis from the baseline examination of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos. The apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) was derived from standardized sleep tests; diabetes and hypertension were based on measurement and history. The sample of 14,440 individuals had an age-adjusted prevalence of minimal SDB (AHI ≥ 5), moderate SDB (AHI ≥ 15), and severe SDB (AHI ≥ 30) of 25.8, 9.8, and 3.9%, respectively. Only 1.3% of participants reported a sleep apnea diagnosis. Moderate SDB was associated with being male (adjusted odds ratio, 2.7; 95% confidence interval, 2.3-3.1), obese (16.8; 11.6-24.4), and older. SDB was associated with an increased adjusted odds of impaired glucose tolerance (1.7; 1.3-2.1), diabetes (2.3; 1.8-2.9), and hypertension. The association with hypertension varied across background groups with the strongest associations among individuals of Puerto Rican and Central American background. SDB is prevalent in U.S. Latinos but rarely associated with a clinical diagnosis. Associations with diabetes and hypertension suggest a large burden of disease may be attributed to untreated SDB, supporting the development and evaluation of culturally relevant detection and treatment approaches.

  7. Predisposing and Enabling Factors Associated with Mammography Use among Hispanic and Non-Hispanic White Women Living in a Rural Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejeda, Silvia; Thompson, Beti; Coronado, Gloria D.; Martin, Diane P.; Heagerty, Patrick J.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Women who do not receive regular mammograms are more likely than others to have breast cancer diagnosed at an advanced stage. Purpose: To examine predisposing and enabling factors associated with mammography use among Hispanic and non-Hispanic White women. Methods: Baseline data were used from a larger study on cancer prevention in rural…

  8. The Hispanic Paradox and Older Adults’ Disabilities: Is There a Healthy Migrant Effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Esme Fuller; Nuru-Jeter, Amani; Richardson, Dawn; Raza, Ferrah; Minkler, Meredith

    2013-01-01

    The “Hispanic Paradox” suggests that despite rates of poverty similar to African Americans, Hispanics have far better health and mortality outcomes, more comparable to non-Hispanic White Americans. Three prominent possible explanations for the Hispanic Paradox have emerged. The “Healthy Migrant Effect” suggests a health selection effect due to the demands of migration. The Hispanic lifestyle hypothesis focuses on Hispanics’ strong social ties and better health behaviors. The reverse migration argument suggests that the morbidity profile in the USA is affected when many Hispanic immigrants return to their native countries after developing a serious illness. We analyzed data from respondents aged 55 and over from the nationally representative 2006 American Community Survey including Mexican Americans (13,167 U.S. born; 11,378 immigrants), Cuban Americans (314 U.S. born; 3,730 immigrants), and non-Hispanic White Americans (629,341 U.S. born; 31,164 immigrants). The healthy migrant effect was supported with SES-adjusted disability comparable between Mexican, Cuban and non-Hispanic Whites born in the USA and all immigrants having lower adjusted odds of functional limitations than U.S. born non-Hispanic Whites. The reverse migration hypothesis was partially supported, with citizenship and longer duration in the USA associated with higher rates of SES-adjusted disability for Mexican Americans. The Hispanic healthy life-style explanation had little support in this study. Our findings underline the importance of considering nativity when planning for health interventions to address the needs of the growing Hispanic American older adult population. PMID:23644828

  9. The Hispanic Paradox and Older Adults’ Disabilities: Is There a Healthy Migrant Effect?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrah Raza

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The “Hispanic Paradox” suggests that despite rates of poverty similar to African Americans, Hispanics have far better health and mortality outcomes, more comparable to non-Hispanic White Americans. Three prominent possible explanations for the Hispanic Paradox have emerged. The “Healthy Migrant Effect” suggests a health selection effect due to the demands of migration. The Hispanic lifestyle hypothesis focuses on Hispanics’ strong social ties and better health behaviors. The reverse migration argument suggests that the morbidity profile in the USA is affected when many Hispanic immigrants return to their native countries after developing a serious illness. We analyzed data from respondents aged 55 and over from the nationally representative 2006 American Community Survey including Mexican Americans (13,167 U.S. born; 11,378 immigrants, Cuban Americans (314 U.S. born; 3,730 immigrants, and non-Hispanic White Americans (629,341 U.S. born; 31,164 immigrants. The healthy migrant effect was supported with SES-adjusted disability comparable between Mexican, Cuban and non-Hispanic Whites born in the USA and all immigrants having lower adjusted odds of functional limitations than U.S. born non-Hispanic Whites. The reverse migration hypothesis was partially supported, with citizenship and longer duration in the USA associated with higher rates of SES-adjusted disability for Mexican Americans. The Hispanic healthy life-style explanation had little support in this study. Our findings underline the importance of considering nativity when planning for health interventions to address the needs of the growing Hispanic American older adult population.

  10. Effects of Glycemic Control on Bone Turnover in Older Mexican Americans with Type 2 Diabetes: Data from the Cameron County Hispanic Cohort in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rianon, N.; Smith, S. M.; Lee, M.; Musgrave, P.; Nader, S.; Khosla, S.; Ambrose, C.; McCormick, J.; Fisher-Hoch, S.

    2016-01-01

    High bone turnover, evidenced by high serum osteocalcin (OC) concentration, is indicated as risk of fracture in old age. However, low bone turnover has been reported in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) who also have high fracture risk. Poor glycemic control indicated by higher glycated hemoglobin levels (HbA1c) has been associated with lower serum OC in older Caucasian and Asian patients with T2D. There remains a gap in knowledge about effects of T2D on bone turnover status in Hispanic populations. We report bone turnover in association with glycemic control in 72 older (greater than or equal to 50 years) men (N=21) and women (N=51) from the Cameron County Hispanic Cohort (CCHC) in Texas. Prevalence of T2D is about 30 percent in this cohort who live in health disparity due to poor access to health care. Separate multivariable linear regression models were conducted to determine association between high/diabetic levels of HbA1c (less than 6.5 normal versus greater than or equal to 6.5 high) and serum OC after controlling for age, body mass index (BMI, greater than 30 obese versus less than 30 non-obese), visceral fat, femoral neck BMD and serum concentrations of creatinine, calcium, and vitamin D for men and women. Interaction effects were assessed while developing final multivariable model to identify factors that modify the association between HbA1c and OC. Subjects were 66 plus or minus 9 (mean plus or minus Standard Deviation) years for men and 67 plus or minus 8 years for women. HbA1c was 8.0 plus or minus 2.0 for men and 7.8 plus or minus 2.0 for women. There were no significant differences for BMI, femoral neck BMD, serum calcium or 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations between men and women. High HbA1c was significantly associated with lower OC levels in men in both age groups (mean difference in OC between high vs. low HbA1c [95 percent confidence interval] for older group (greater than or equal to 65 years) was minus 9.51 (minus 16.36 to minus 2.65) and

  11. Assessing the Watson-Barker Listening Test (WBLT)-Form C in Measuring Listening Comprehension of Post-Secondary Hispanic-American Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthington, Debra L.; Keaton, Shaughan; Cook, John; Fitch-Hauser, Margaret; Powers, William G.

    2014-01-01

    The Watson-Barker Listening Test (WBLT) is one of the most popular measures of listening comprehension. However, participants in studies utilizing this scale have been almost exclusively Anglo-American. At the same time, previous research questions the psychometric properties of the test. This study addressed both of these issues by testing the…

  12. Attitudes Regarding the Use of Ventilator Support Given a Supposed Terminal Condition among Community-Dwelling Mexican American and Non-Hispanic White Older Adults: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rosina Finley

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To determine the factors that are associated with Mexican Americans’ preference for ventilator support, given a supposed terminal diagnosis. Methods. 100 Mexican Americans, aged 60–89, were recruited and screened for MMSE scores above 18. Eligible subjects answered a questionnaire in their preferred language (English/Spanish concerning ventilator use during terminal illness. Mediator variables examined included demographics, generation, religiosity, occupation, self-reported depression, self-reported health, and activities of daily living. Results. Being first or second generation American (OR = 0.18, CI = 0.05–0.66 with no IADL disability (OR = 0.11, CI = 0.02–0.59 and having depressive symptoms (OR = 1.43, CI = 1.08–1.89 were associated with preference for ventilator support. Implications. First and second generation older Mexican Americans and those functionally independent are more likely to prefer end-of-life ventilation support. Although depressive symptoms were inversely associated with ventilator use at the end of life, scores may more accurately reflect psychological stress associated with enduring the scenario. Further studies are needed to determine these factors’ generalizability to the larger Mexican American community.

  13. Breast Cancer Screening in Black and Hispanic Subpopulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah J. Miller

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The primary objective was to examine and compare the breast cancer screening adherence rates between black (African American and Afro-Caribbean and Hispanic (foreign born Hispanic and US-born Hispanic subpopulations. Methods: Study data was collected in community settings in New York City between the years of 2011-2012. Participants (N=592 were black and Hispanic individuals who attended a breast cancer screening community outreach program. Breast cancer screening rates as well as demographic data were collected. Results: Results revealed that Afro-Caribbean and foreign-born Hispanics are at a greater risk for non-adherence in breast cancer screening compared with African Americans and US-born Hispanics. Conclusions: The majority of breast screening research and community outreach programs categorize people into broad racial and ethnic groups (e.g., black and Hispanic. The results revealed significant variability within these broader racial/ethnic categories with regard to breast cancer screening. Community outreach programs and future research efforts should target the subpopulations that are at particular risk for breast cancer screening non-adherence.

  14. Rationale, design, and baseline findings from HIPP: A randomized controlled trial testing a Home-based, Individually-tailored Physical activity Print intervention for African American women in the Deep South

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekmezi, Dori; Ainsworth, Cole; Joseph, Rodney; Bray, Molly S.; Kvale, Elizabeth; Isaac, Shiney; Desmond, Renee; Meneses, Karen; Marcus, Bess; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    African American women report high rates of physical inactivity and related health disparities. In our previous formative research, we conducted a series of qualitative assessments to examine physical activity barriers and intervention preferences among African American women in the Deep South. These data were used to inform a 12-month Home-based, Individually-tailored Physical activity Print (HIPP) intervention, which is currently being evaluated against a wellness contact control condition among 84 post-menopausal African American women residing in the metropolitan area of Birmingham, Alabama. This paper reports the rationale, design and baseline findings of the HIPP trial. The accrued participants had an average age of 57 (SD= 4.7), a BMI of 32.1 kg/m2 (SD=5.16) with more than half (55%) having a college education and an annual household income under $50,000 (53.6%). At baseline, participants reported an average of 41.5 minutes/week (SD=49.7) of moderate intensity physical activity, and 94.1% were in the contemplation or preparation stages of readiness for physical activity. While social support for exercise from friends and family was low, baseline levels of self-efficacy, cognitive and behavioral processes of change, decisional balance, outcome expectations, and enjoyment appeared promising. Baseline data indicated high rates of obesity and low levels of physical activity, providing strong evidence of need for intervention. Moreover, scores on psychosocial measures suggested that such efforts may be well received. This line of research in technology-based approaches for promoting physical activity in African American women in the Deep South has great potential to address health disparities and impact public health. PMID:26944022

  15. Participation in SEPA, a sexual and relational health intervention for Hispanic women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrani, Victoria B; McCabe, Brian E; Gonzalez-Guarda, Rosa M; Florom-Smith, Aubrey; Peragallo, Nilda

    2013-08-01

    HIV and intimate partner violence (IPV) risks are linked in Hispanic women, so integrated interventions can efficiently produce meaningful change. Integrated interventions for Hispanic women are promising, but factors that put Hispanic women at risk for HIV and violence may also impede engagement with interventions. This study examined barriers and facilitators of engagement in a group educational intervention, SEPA (Salud, Educación, Prevención y Autocuidado [Health, Education, Prevention, and Self-Care]), for Hispanic women. A total of 274 Hispanic women from South Florida in the SEPA condition of a randomized controlled trial completed baseline measures of violence, depression, familism, Hispanic stress, acculturation, and demographics, and 57% of the women engaged (attended two of five sessions). Education, IPV, and acculturation predicted engagement. Understanding engagement advances intervention development/refinement. Hispanic women who experience relationship violence are open to group interventions. Further program development and outreach work are needed to connect women with low education, who are particularly vulnerable.

  16. Health-Related Conditions and Depression in Elderly Mexican American and Non-Hispanic White Residents of a United States-Mexico Border County: Moderating Effects of Educational Attainment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David F. Briones

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the prevalence of “high” levels of depressive symptomatology and 13 health-related medical conditions in elderly Mexican American (MA and non-Hispanic white (NHW residents of El Paso County, Texas. We analyzed the extent to which depressive symptoms in this population are associated with these conditions. Elderly MA residents possessed a higher prevalence of current depression, a relatively unique health-related condition profile, and were more likely to experience a set of conditions that impede participation in daily life—conditions that we found to be strongly associated with high depressive symptomatology in the elderly. After adjusting for educational attainment, using multiple regression analyses, depression was not associated with ethnicity and only six of the health related conditions showed significant differences between MA and NHW subjects. We believe these results provide an important insight into the mechanism of health-related conditions and depressive symptomatology in a large sample of elderly MAs; and how conditions typically attributed to MA ethnicity may in actuality be an artifact of socioeconomic status variables such as educational-attainment.

  17. Psychometric Evaluation of the Brief Acculturation Scale for Hispanics

    OpenAIRE

    Mills, Sarah D; Malcarne, Vanessa L.; Fox, Rina S.; Sadler, Georgia Robins

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the psychometric properties of the Brief Acculturation Scale for Hispanics (BASH), a four-item, language-based measure of acculturation. Participants in the study were 435 Hispanic Americans from a large metropolitan area with English or Spanish language preference. Internal consistency reliability was strong in both language-preference groups. Multiple-group confirmatory factor analysis was used to evaluate the structural validity of the measure. A unidimensional factor s...

  18. Thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis in a Hispanic male.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumo, Lawrence A.; Terzian, Christian; Brannan, Timothy

    2002-01-01

    We report a case of a Hispanic male presenting with acute onset of bilateral lower extremity weakness, without any antecedent viral or bacterial illness, dietary changes, infiltrative orbitopathy, diffuse goiter, infiltrative dermopathy, and family history of periodic paralysis, who was later found to have Graves' disease. This demonstrates a rare case of periodic paralysis as the initial presentation of hyperthyroidism. Thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis is common in Asian and Hispanic individuals and uncommon in whites and African Americans. PMID:12069220

  19. Hispanics and the Military: A Reference Data Base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-02-01

    the cases he describes are those reported by Army doctors in Puerto Rican units. Laosa, Luis M. "Bilingualism in Three United States’ Hispanic...Mexican- ’ Americans and Cubans. Laosa, Luis M. "Cognitive Styles and Learning Strategies Research." Journal of Teacher Education 28 (No. 3, 1977):26-30...US Bureau of the Census, 1976). It is a statistical analysis that looks at various sources of wage loss for Hispanic subgroups. JI. Rincon , Edward T

  20. Hispanic Subgroups, Acculturation, and Substance Abuse Treatment Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartier, Karen G; Carmody, Tom; Akhtar, Maleeha; Stebbins, Mary B; Walters, Scott T; Warden, Diane

    2015-12-01

    This study explored Hispanic subgroup differences in substance use treatment outcomes, and the relationship of acculturation characteristics to these outcomes. Data were from a multisite randomized clinical trial of motivational enhancement therapy versus treatment as usual in a sample of Spanish-speaking substance abusers. Participants were Cuban American (n=34), Mexican American (n=209), Puerto Rican (n=78), and other Hispanic American (n=54). Results suggested that Cuban Americans and individuals with more connection to Hispanic culture had lower treatment retention. Hispanics born in the U.S and those who spoke English at home had a lower percentage of days abstinent during weeks 5-16, although Puerto Ricans born in the U.S. and Cuban Americans living more years in the U.S. had a higher percentage of days abstinent in weeks 1-4 and 5-16, respectively. Results may inform future hypothesis-driven studies in larger Hispanic treatment seeking samples of the relationship between acculturation and treatment outcome.

  1. Mental Health and African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Minority Population Profiles > Black/African American > Mental Health Mental Health and African Americans Poverty level affects mental health ... compared to 120% of non-Hispanic whites. 1 MENTAL HEALTH STATUS Serious psychological distress among adults 18 years ...

  2. The Hispanic Women's Social Stressor Scale: Understanding the Multiple Social Stressors of U.S.- and Mexico-Born Hispanic Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodkind, Jessica R.; Gonzales, Melissa; Malcoe, Lorraine H.; Espinosa, Judith

    2008-01-01

    Measurement of social stressors among Hispanic women is a growing and important area of study, particularly in terms of understanding explanatory mechanisms for health disparities. This study involved adaptation of the Hispanic Stress Inventory and the Latin American Stress Inventory to create a measure of social stressors specifically for both…

  3. Migração internacional recente no amazonas: o caso dos Hispano-americanos Latest international migration in the amazon: the case of Hispanic-Americans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidney Antônio da Silva

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A imigração para o Amazonas continua sendo um campo aberto à pesquisa antropológica, seja aquela de cunho histórico, ainda pouco pesquisada, seja a mais recente, sobretudo a oriunda de países fronteiriços da Região Amazônica. Entretanto, o grande desafio que se coloca aos estudiosos dessa temática é superar a referência teórica que norteou as análises que tiveram como marco explicativo os ciclos econômicos, entre eles o da borracha. No caso da imigração recente para o Amazonas, a tentação é relacioná-la também com o ciclo de desenvolvimento econômico propiciado pela criação da Zona Franca de Manaus em 1967, fator que poderia por si só explicar a presença de novos imigrantes, entre eles os hispano-americanos. Compreender a lógica e as especificidades dessa presença é o que pretendemos discutir neste artigo, que se insere em uma preocupação de pensar a imigração no Amazonas não apenas como um fenômeno demográfico e econômico, mas sobretudo como um processo social de mão dupla, ou seja, que afeta tanto a sociedade de origem quanto a de acolhida, em suas dimensões sociais e culturais, nas relações de gênero e nos processos identitários.Immigration to Amazonas state remains an open field for anthropological research, either that of a historical nature, still poorly researched, or that with a current focus, especially from neighboring countries of the Amazon region. However, the great challenge posed to scholars of the subject is to overcome the theoretical framework that guided analysis based on business cycles, such as rubber. In the case of recent immigration to the Amazonas state, the challenge is also to relate it to the cycle of economic development made possible by the creation of the Manaus Free Trade Zone, in 1967. This factor alone could explain the presence of new immigrants, among them, Hispanics. This article, which intends to discuss the rationale and the specifics of this presence, is immerse

  4. Dental morphology and ancestry in Albuquerque, New Mexico Hispanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willermet, C M; Edgar, H J H

    2009-01-01

    The term "Hispanic" groups people from Central and South America and the Caribbean, combining disparate cultures, languages, and ancestry, and masking biological differences. Historical and current admixture patterns within these populations and with indigenous and European-, African-, and/or Asian- derived populations complicate the biological picture. Although "Hispanic" has little biological meaning, it is used widely in epidemiology, disease management, and forensics as a biologically significant group. An interdisciplinary approach combining historical, cultural, and biological data can characterize regional and temporal differences between Hispanic populations. We examined biological distances with a population of central New Mexico Hispanics, as a case study of the local specificity of population history. We collected dental morphological trait frequencies from samples of recent Albuquerque-area Hispanic Americans and several ancestral and contemporary groups. To explore regional admixture patterns we calculated biological distances using the modified Mahalanobis D(2) statistic. Our results indicate that Albuquerque Hispanics are more similar to their European and African ancestral groups than to Native Americans in New Mexico. Additionally, their affinity to Native Americans is greater with prehistoric rather than contemporary samples. We argue that these results reflect a local rather than pan-Hispanic admixture pattern; they underscore that populations are better understood at the local and regional levels. It is undesirable to make sweeping biological generalizations for groups known to be geographically and genetically disparate. This research is part of a growing trend in biological research concerning Hispanics and other groups-an emphasis on local samples, informed by historical, cultural, and biological factors.

  5. Hispanic Health PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-05-05

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the May 2015 CDC Vital Signs report. About one in six people living in the U.S. are Hispanic. The two leading causes of death in this group are heart disease and cancer, accounting for two out of five deaths. Unfortunately, many Hispanics face considerable barriers to getting high quality health care, including language and low income. Learn what can be done to reduce the barriers.  Created: 5/5/2015 by Office of Minority Health & Health Equity (OMHHE).   Date Released: 5/5/2015.

  6. Hispanics in Fast Food Jobs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charner, Ivan; Fraser, Bryna Shore

    A study examined the employment of Hispanics in the fast-food industry. Data were obtained from a national survey of employees at 279 fast-food restaurants from seven companies in which 194 (4.2 percent) of the 4,660 respondents reported being Hispanic. Compared with the total sample, Hispanic fast-food employees were slightly less likely to be…

  7. Do Hispanics Fail to Assimilate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, Thomas G.

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author describes the content of an article by Samuel P. Huntington entitled "The Hispanic Challenge," which ignited a protest from the Hispanic community. Huntington posits in his article that the persistent flow of Hispanic immigrants threatens to divide the US into two peoples, two cultures, and two languages. He explains…

  8. Bicultural Advertising and Hispanic Acculturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Wan-Hsiu Sunny; Li, Cong

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the moderating effects of acculturation modes (assimilated, integrated, and separated) on Hispanic consumers' responses to three advertising targeting strategies (Caucasian targeted, bicultural, and Hispanic targeted). The hypotheses were empirically tested in a 3 x 3 factorial experiment with 155 self-identified Hispanic adult…

  9. Bicultural Advertising and Hispanic Acculturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Wan-Hsiu Sunny; Li, Cong

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the moderating effects of acculturation modes (assimilated, integrated, and separated) on Hispanic consumers' responses to three advertising targeting strategies (Caucasian targeted, bicultural, and Hispanic targeted). The hypotheses were empirically tested in a 3 x 3 factorial experiment with 155 self-identified Hispanic adult…

  10. Proteomic-coupled-network analysis of T877A-androgen receptor interactomes can predict clinical prostate cancer outcomes between White (non-Hispanic and African-American groups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naif Zaman

    Full Text Available The androgen receptor (AR remains an important contributor to the neoplastic evolution of prostate cancer (CaP. CaP progression is linked to several somatic AR mutational changes that endow upon the AR dramatic gain-of-function properties. One of the most common somatic mutations identified is Thr877-to-Ala (T877A, located in the ligand-binding domain, that results in a receptor capable of promiscuous binding and activation by a variety of steroid hormones and ligands including estrogens, progestins, glucocorticoids, and several anti-androgens. In an attempt to further define somatic mutated AR gain-of-function properties, as a consequence of its promiscuous ligand binding, we undertook a proteomic/network analysis approach to characterize the protein interactome of the mutant T877A-AR in LNCaP cells under eight different ligand-specific treatments (dihydrotestosterone, mibolerone, R1881, testosterone, estradiol, progesterone, dexamethasone, and cyproterone acetate. In extending the analysis of our multi-ligand complexes of the mutant T877A-AR we observed significant enrichment of specific complexes between normal and primary prostatic tumors, which were furthermore correlated with known clinical outcomes. Further analysis of certain mutant T877A-AR complexes showed specific population preferences distinguishing primary prostatic disease between white (non-Hispanic vs. African-American males. Moreover, these cancer-related AR-protein complexes demonstrated predictive survival outcomes specific to CaP, and not for breast, lung, lymphoma or medulloblastoma cancers. Our study, by coupling data generated by our proteomics to network analysis of clinical samples, has helped to define real and novel biological pathways in complicated gain-of-function AR complex systems.

  11. Proteomic-coupled-network analysis of T877A-androgen receptor interactomes can predict clinical prostate cancer outcomes between White (non-Hispanic) and African-American groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, Naif; Giannopoulos, Paresa N; Chowdhury, Shafinaz; Bonneil, Eric; Thibault, Pierre; Wang, Edwin; Trifiro, Mark; Paliouras, Miltiadis

    2014-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) remains an important contributor to the neoplastic evolution of prostate cancer (CaP). CaP progression is linked to several somatic AR mutational changes that endow upon the AR dramatic gain-of-function properties. One of the most common somatic mutations identified is Thr877-to-Ala (T877A), located in the ligand-binding domain, that results in a receptor capable of promiscuous binding and activation by a variety of steroid hormones and ligands including estrogens, progestins, glucocorticoids, and several anti-androgens. In an attempt to further define somatic mutated AR gain-of-function properties, as a consequence of its promiscuous ligand binding, we undertook a proteomic/network analysis approach to characterize the protein interactome of the mutant T877A-AR in LNCaP cells under eight different ligand-specific treatments (dihydrotestosterone, mibolerone, R1881, testosterone, estradiol, progesterone, dexamethasone, and cyproterone acetate). In extending the analysis of our multi-ligand complexes of the mutant T877A-AR we observed significant enrichment of specific complexes between normal and primary prostatic tumors, which were furthermore correlated with known clinical outcomes. Further analysis of certain mutant T877A-AR complexes showed specific population preferences distinguishing primary prostatic disease between white (non-Hispanic) vs. African-American males. Moreover, these cancer-related AR-protein complexes demonstrated predictive survival outcomes specific to CaP, and not for breast, lung, lymphoma or medulloblastoma cancers. Our study, by coupling data generated by our proteomics to network analysis of clinical samples, has helped to define real and novel biological pathways in complicated gain-of-function AR complex systems.

  12. Latin American and Caribbean countries’ baseline clinical and policy guidelines for responding to intimate partner violence and sexual violence against women

    OpenAIRE

    Donna E Stewart; Aviles, Raquel; Guedes, Alessandra; Riazantseva, Ekaterina; MacMillan, Harriet

    2015-01-01

    Background Violence against women is a global public health problem with negative effects on physical, mental, and reproductive health. The World Health Organization (WHO) has identified intimate partner violence (IPV) and sexual violence (SV) as major targets for prevention and amelioration and recently developed clinical and policy guidelines to assist healthcare providers. This project was undertaken to determine the 2013 baseline national policies and clinical guidelines on IPV and SV wit...

  13. The Urgency for Change: School Reform and Quality Education for Hispanic Youth. Publication No. 90-03.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negroni, Peter J.

    This paper looks at the successful initiatives and unforeseen problems that have arisen in Massachusetts public education since the passage of the Public School Improvement Act of 1985, with a focus on the needs of Hispanic Americans. There is overwhelming evidence that the specific needs of Hispanic Americans are neither being identified nor met…

  14. Hispanic Alcoholic Treatment Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Raymond M.

    1987-01-01

    A path analytic model for Hispanic alcoholics relating socioclinical prognostic variables to outcome following treatment in a therapeutic community differs markedly from that fitted to Anglo alcoholics. The differential relationship of education to alcoholism severity and outcome was noted specifically as reflecting different racial-ethnic paths…

  15. Rationale and Design of the Echocardiographic Study of Hispanics / Latinos (ECHO-SOL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Carlos J.; Dharod, Ajay; Allison, Matthew A.; Shah, Sanjiv J.; Hurwitz, Barry; Bangdiwala, Shrikant I.; Gonzalez, Franklyn; Kitzman, Dalane; Gillam, Linda; Spevack, Daniel; Dadhania, Rupal; Langdon, Sarah; Kaplan, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Background Information regarding the prevalence and determinants of cardiac structure and function (systolic and diastolic) among the various Hispanic background groups in the United States is limited. Methods and Results The Echocardiographic Study of Latinos (ECHO-SOL) ancillary study recruited 1,824 participants through a stratified-sampling process representative of the population-based Hispanic Communities Health Study – Study of Latinos (HCHS-SOL) across four sites (Bronx, NY; Chicago, Ill; San Diego, Calif; Miami, Fla). The HCHS-SOL baseline cohort did not include an echo exam. ECHO-SOL added the echocardiographic assessment of cardiac structure and function to an array of existing HCHS-SOL baseline clinical, psychosocial, and socioeconomic data and provides sufficient statistical power for comparisons among the Hispanic subgroups. Standard two-dimensional (2D) echocardiography protocol, including M-mode, spectral, color and tissue Doppler study was performed. The main objectives were to: 1) characterize cardiac structure and function and its determinants among Hispanics and Hispanic subgroups; and 2) determine the contributions of specific psychosocial factors (acculturation and familismo) to cardiac structure and function among Hispanics. Conclusion We describe the design, methods and rationale of currently the largest and most comprehensive study of cardiac structure and function exclusively among US Hispanics. ECHO-SOL aims to enhance our understanding of Hispanic cardiovascular health as well as help untangle the relative importance of Hispanic subgroup heterogeneity and sociocultural factors on cardiac structure and function. (Ethn Dis. 2015;25[2]:180–186) PMID:26118146

  16. Oversight Hearing on Hispanic Employment. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Employment Opportunities of the Committee on Education and Labor. House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, First Session (September 16, 1987).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and Labor.

    This document reports the oral and written testimony of five witnesses who discussed the employment status of Hispanics in the American workplace. Testimony centered around the fact that, while the Hispanic population is growing, Hispanic Americans continue to lag in their participation in the U.S. workforce. Witnesses testified to the importance…

  17. Neurocognitive performance and symptom profiles of Spanish-speaking Hispanic athletes on the ImPACT test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Summer; Schatz, Philip; Solomon, Gary; Ryan, Joseph J

    2014-03-01

    This study documented baseline neurocognitive performance of 23,815 athletes on the Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing (ImPACT) test. Specifically, 9,733 Hispanic, Spanish-speaking athletes who completed the ImPACT test in English and 2,087 Hispanic, Spanish-speaking athletes who completed the test in Spanish were compared with 11,955 English-speaking athletes who completed the test in English. Athletes were assigned to age groups (13-15, 16-18). Results revealed a significant effect of language group (p speaking athletes completing the test in Spanish scored more poorly than Spanish-speaking and English-speaking athletes completing the test in English, on all Composite scores and Total Symptom scores. Spanish-speaking athletes completing the test in English also performed more poorly than English-speaking athletes completing the test in English on three Composite scores. These differences in performance and reported symptoms highlight the need for caution in interpreting ImPACT test data for Hispanic Americans.

  18. A multicenter survey of Hispanic caregiver preferences for patient decision control in the United States and Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yennurajalingam, Sriram; Noguera, Antonio; Parsons, Henrique Afonseca; Torres-Vigil, Isabel; Duarte, Eva Rosina; Palma, Alejandra; Bunge, Sofia; Palmer, J Lynn; Delgado-Guay, Marvin Omar; Bruera, Eduardo

    2013-07-01

    Understanding family caregivers' decisional role preferences is important for communication, quality of care, and patient and family satisfaction. The family caregiver has an important role in a patient's decisional role preferences. There are limited studies on family caregivers' preferences of the patient's decision control at the end of life among Hispanics. To identify Hispanic caregivers' preferences of the decision control of patients with advanced cancer and to compare the preferences of caregivers in Hispanic Latin American and Hispanic American caregivers. We surveyed patients and their family caregivers referred to outpatient palliative care clinics in the United States, Chile, Argentina, and Guatemala. Caregiver preferences of patient's decision control were evaluated using the Control Preference Scale. Caregivers' and patients' sociodemographic variables, patient performance status, and Hispanic American patient acculturation level were also collected. A total of 387 caregivers were surveyed: 100 (26%) in Chile, 99 (26%) in Argentina, 97 (25%) in Guatemala, and 91 (24%) in the United States. The median age was 56 years, and 59% were female. Caregiver preference of patient's decision control was passive, shared, and active for 10 (11%), 45 (52%), and 32 (37%) Hispanic American caregivers and 54 (19%), 178 (62%), and 55 (19%) Hispanic Latin American caregivers (p = 0.0023), respectively. Caregiver acculturation level did not affect the preferences of the Hispanic American sample (p = 0.60). Most Hispanic family caregivers preferred the patient to make shared decisions. Hispanic Latin American caregivers more frequently preferred patients to assume a passive decisional role. Acculturation did not influence the preferences of Hispanic American caregivers.

  19. Evidence of nonconscious stereotyping of Hispanic patients by nursing and medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean, Meghan G; Stone, Jeff; Moskowitz, Gordon B; Badger, Terry A; Focella, Elizabeth S

    2013-01-01

    Current research on nonconscious stereotyping in healthcare is limited by an emphasis on practicing physicians' beliefs about African American patients and by heavy reliance on a measure of nonconscious processes that allows participants to exert control over their behaviors if they are motivated to appear nonbiased. The present research examined whether nursing and medical students exhibit nonconscious activation of stereotypes about Hispanic patients using a task that subliminally primes patient ethnicity. It was hypothesized that participants would exhibit greater activation of noncompliance and health risk stereotypes after subliminal exposure to Hispanic faces compared with non-Hispanic White faces and, because ethnicity was primed outside of conscious awareness, that explicit motivations to control prejudice would not moderate stereotype activation. Nursing and medical students completed a sequential priming task that measured the speed with which they recognized words related to noncompliance and health risk after subliminal exposure to Hispanic and non-Hispanic White faces. They then completed explicit measures of their motivation to control prejudice against Hispanics. Both nursing and medical students exhibited greater activation of noncompliance and health risk words after subliminal exposure to Hispanic faces, compared with non-Hispanic White faces. Explicit motivations to control prejudice did not moderate stereotype activation. These findings show that, regardless of their motivation to treat Hispanics fairly, nursing and medical students exhibit nonconscious activation of negative stereotypes when they encounter Hispanics. Implications are discussed.

  20. Comparisons Between Hispanic and Non-Hispanic White Informal Caregivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy J. Karlin

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on understanding similarities and differences between non-Hispanic White and Hispanic informal caregivers of those with Alzheimer’s disease. Comparisons take place between caregivers reporting high levels of burden as indicated by the Zarit Burden Inventory. Data suggest similarities and differences between Hispanic (n = 17 and non-Hispanic White (n = 17 caregivers in this study in several areas. Hispanic caregivers indicated fewer sources of income, had less investment money for family member’s treatment, reported caregiving as a greater interference with life’s accomplishments, and indicated a lesser percentage of the total care cost provided by the family member. Non-Hispanic White caregivers reported having completed a higher level of formal education and that organized religion’s importance prior to becoming a caregiver was not quite as important as compared with the Hispanic care provider. With current trends, of demographic and cultural changes, it is crucial to fully understand the changing role and needs of both Hispanic and non-Hispanic White caregivers.

  1. Critical race theory as a tool for understanding poor engagement along the HIV care continuum among African American/Black and Hispanic persons living with HIV in the United States: a qualitative exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Robert; Gwadz, Marya Viorst; Silverman, Elizabeth; Kutnick, Alexandra; Leonard, Noelle R; Ritchie, Amanda S; Reed, Jennifer; Martinez, Belkis Y

    2017-03-24

    African American/Black and Hispanic persons living with HIV (AABH-PLWH) in the U.S. evidence insufficient engagement in HIV care and low uptake of HIV antiretroviral therapy, leading to suboptimal clinical outcomes. The present qualitative study used critical race theory, and incorporated intersectionality theory, to understand AABH-PLWH's perspectives on the mechanisms by which structural racism; that is, the macro-level systems that reinforce inequities among racial/ethnic groups, influence health decisions and behaviors. Participants were adult AABH-PLWH in New York City who were not taking antiretroviral therapy nor well engaged in HIV care (N = 37). Participants were purposively sampled for maximum variation from a larger study, and engaged in semi-structured in-depth interviews that were audio-recorded and professionally transcribed verbatim. Data were analyzed using a systematic content analysis approach. We found AABH-PLWH experienced HIV care and medication decisions through a historical and cultural lens incorporating knowledge of past and present structural racism. This contextual knowledge included awareness of past maltreatment of people of color in medical research. Further, these understandings were linked to the history of HIV antiretroviral therapy itself, including awareness of the first HIV antiretroviral regimen; namely, AZT (zidovudine) mono-therapy, which was initially prescribed in unacceptably high doses, causing serious side effects, but with only modest efficacy. In this historical/cultural context, aspects of structural racism negatively influenced health care decisions and behavior in four main ways: 1) via the extent to which healthcare settings were experienced as overly institutionalized and, therefore, dehumanizing; 2) distrust of medical institutions and healthcare providers, which led AABH-PLWH to feel pressured to take HIV antiretroviral therapy when it was offered; 3) perceptions that patients are excluded from the health

  2. Do all components of the metabolic syndrome cluster together in US Hispanics/Latinos? Results from the Hispanic Community Health Study (HCHS/SOL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llabre, Maria M.; Arguelles, William; Schneiderman, Neil; Gallo, Linda C.; Daviglus, Martha L.; Chambers, Earle C.; Sotres-Alvarez, Daniela; Chirinos, Diana A.; Talavera, Gregory A.; Castaneda, Sheila F.; Roesch, Scott C.; Heiss, Gerardo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Metabolic syndrome (MetS), the clustering of several risk factors for cardiovascular disease, is highly prevalent in Hispanics/Latinos. We tested whether all components significantly loaded on the syndrome in Hispanics/Latinos and whether their contribution differed by sex and Hispanic ancestry. We also examined associations of metabolic syndrome with prevalent diabetes and coronary heart disease (CHD) in Hispanics/Latinos. Methods Data were obtained from a population-based cohort of N = 15,823 participants in the HCHS/SOL who self-identified as being of Central American, Cuban, Dominican, Mexican American, Puerto Rican, or South American ancestry, aged 18-74 years at screening. Results A latent variable model of waist circumference, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and fasting glucose fit the data in men and women, but the contribution of HDL-C was weak. No difference in the latent model of MetS was detected across Hispanic/Latino ancestry groups. MetS was significantly associated with diabetes and CHD. Conclusions Our results indicate that similar criteria for MetS may be applied across Hispanic/Latino ancestry groups; but call into question the role of HDL-C in classifying the MetS in Hispanics/Latinos. PMID:25818844

  3. Reconsidering Hispanic Gang Membership and Acculturation in a Multivariate Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Holly Ventura; Barnes, J. C.; Hartley, Richard D.

    2011-01-01

    Previous qualitative research has suggested that Hispanic gang membership is linked to the process of acculturation. Specifically, studies have indicated that those who are less assimilated into mainstream American or "Anglo" society are at greater risk for joining gangs. Building on these observations, this study examines the relationship between…

  4. Ethnic Identity at a Majority Hispanic-Serving Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Roger Geertz

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the ethnic identity of Cuban American and non-Hispanic White college students at Florida International University (FIU) in Miami, Florida. Current Latino/a and White college student ethnic identity theories are limited regarding a variety of contextual considerations such as immigration, majority-minority demographics, student…

  5. Acculturation, Biculturalism and Familism among Hispanic and Mainstream Navy Recruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-04-01

    bee r Hispanics who were moderately acculturated. The moderately acculturated are also more bicultural than the highly acculturated, so that bi ... Psicologia /Inter- american Journal of PsychoogY, 1978, 12, 113-130. I DISTRIBUTION LIST List 1 (Mandatory) List 2 ONR Field (12 copies) Defense

  6. Reconsidering Hispanic Gang Membership and Acculturation in a Multivariate Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Holly Ventura; Barnes, J. C.; Hartley, Richard D.

    2011-01-01

    Previous qualitative research has suggested that Hispanic gang membership is linked to the process of acculturation. Specifically, studies have indicated that those who are less assimilated into mainstream American or "Anglo" society are at greater risk for joining gangs. Building on these observations, this study examines the relationship between…

  7. Aguas!: An Introduction to Hispanic Plays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldana, Johnny

    1996-01-01

    Notes that the number of Hispanic children in schools is growing. Presents an annotated bibliography of 46 Hispanic plays, sources of information, and organizations dealing with Hispanic themes and ideas. (PA)

  8. A preliminary analysis of environmental dilemmas and environmental ethical reasoning among Hispanic and non-Hispanic forest visitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas C. Swearingen; Robert E. Pfister

    1995-01-01

    In a preliminary investigation of environmental reasoning, Hispanic and Anglo-American visitors were interviewed during the summer of 1991 in two National Forests near Los Angeles. A bilingual research technician approached parties visiting the sample sites and, after a brief introduction, requested that they participate in the study. No more than two persons from each...

  9. Moyamoya in Hispanics: not only in Japanese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarmad Said

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Moyamoya disease was first described in 1957 as hypoplasia of the bilateral internal carotid arteries, the characteristic appearance of the associated network of abnormally dilated collateral vessels on angiography was later likened to something hazy, like a puff of cigarette smoke, which, in Japanese, is moyamoya. This paper describes two cases of moyamoya presentations, including moyamoya disease and moyamoya syndrome. Moyamoya may rarely occur in North American Hispanic patients. The presentation can vary significantly and ranges bwtween fulminant outcome and prolonged survival. Awareness about moyamoya and its different presentations may be beneficial for the patients and can improve the outcome.

  10. A pre-Hispanic head.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaella Bianucci

    Full Text Available This report on a male head revealed biologic rhythms, as gleaned from hydrogen isotope ratios in hair, consistent with a South-American origin and Atomic Mass Spectrometry radiocarbon dating (AMS compatible with the last pre-Hispanic period (1418-1491 AD, 95.4% probability. Biopsies showed exceptionally well-preserved tissues. The hair contained high levels of toxic elements (lead, arsenic and mercury incompatible with life. There was no evidence for lead deposition in bone consistent with post-mortem accumulation of this toxic element in the hair. We propose that the high content of metals in hair was the result of metabolic activity of bacteria leading to metal complexation in extra cellular polymeric substances (EPS. This is a recognized protective mechanism for bacteria that thrive in toxic environments. This mechanism may account for the tissues preservation and gives a hint at soil composition where the head was presumably buried. Our results have implications for forensic toxicology which has, hitherto, relied on hair analyses as one means to reconstruct pre-mortem metabolism and for detecting toxic elements accumulated during life. Our finding also has implications for other archaeological specimens where similar circumstances may distort the results of toxicological studies.

  11. Hispanic College Students Library Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumley, Risa; Newman, Eric; Brown, Haakon T.

    2015-01-01

    This study looks at undergraduate Hispanic students' interpretations and current perceptions of the academic library's purpose, usefulness and value. What are the reasons to use the library? What are the barriers to use? This study will examine academic libraries' move toward electronic library materials and what it means for Hispanic students.…

  12. Drug use and service utilization among Hispanics in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Michael A; Salas-Wright, Christopher P; Vaughn, Michael G

    2015-11-01

    To examine illicit drug use and service utilization patterns of US-born and foreign-born Hispanics in the United States. Hispanic respondents 18 years and older in the NESARC were categorized as being of Mexican (n = 3,556), Puerto Rican (n = 785), Cuban (n = 346), Central American (n = 513), or South American (n = 381) origin. We examined lifetime prevalence of drug use and substance abuse treatment utilization patterns for US-born and Hispanic immigrants across subgroups. Lifetime prevalence of drug use was greater among US-born Hispanics than Hispanic immigrants after controlling for age, gender, income, education, urbanicity, parental history of drug use problems and lifetime DSM-IV mood/anxiety disorders. Both US-born and immigrant Hispanic drug users were less likely than non-Hispanic white drug users to have utilized any form of substance abuse treatment (US-born AOR = 0.89, immigrant AOR = 0.64) and more likely to have utilized family or social services (US-born AOR = 1.17, immigrant AOR = 1.19). Compared to US-born Hispanic drug users, Hispanic immigrant drug users were less likely to have used any form of substance abuse treatment (AOR = 0.81) and were more likely to have utilized family or social services (AOR = 1.22). Strategies to increase engagement and retention of Hispanic drug users in substance abuse treatment include increasing access to linguistically and culturally competent programs that address unmet family and social needs. Further studies examining differences in drug use and service utilization patterns within Hispanic subgroups are needed.

  13. Hispanic AIDS education in South Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, J

    1988-04-01

    The Hispanic AIDS Committee for Education and Resources (HACER) was established in 1987 as an AIDS education program targeted at the Mexicano population of South Texas. The word "Mexicano" is used because "Hispanic" refers to a larger, more diversified group. "Mexicano" refers specifically to people of South Texas who are either Mexican-Americans (people of Mexican descent, born and educated in the US) or Mexicans (people born and educated in Mexico). Mexicanos constitute 56% of the population of South Texas and 54% of the population of San Antonio. Mexican-Americans, in general, speak and read English and listen to English-language television and radio. Mexicans are poorer and less educated, Spanish-speaking, and often illiterate. The Mexicanos do not constitute a high risk group for AIDS; at present there are only 64 Mexicano AIDS patients in San Antonio. AIDS education campaigns on television which are directed at the whole Hispanic community may be counter-productive when directed at the Mexicano population because they know that AIDS is not yet a serious problem among them, and scare tactics only cause hysteria. AIDS education is essential, but it must be specifically geared to the Mexicano community, which, in general, is a very conservative community, in which subjects like sex, homosexuality, condoms, or anal intercourse are not discussed in public. But it is also a community of young (median age 23) sexually active people. An AIDS education program directed at them must use simple, elementary language in standard Mexican Spanish for the Mexicans and in English for the young Mexican-Americans. The single most effective way to reach the Mexicano population would be public service announcements aired on television during the time when the telenovelas (soap operas) are on. Not only are the telenovelas widely watched, but their actors are popular heros, who will be listened to by their audience. The use of radio for public service announcements would be useful

  14. Psychosocial risk factors for eating disorders in Hispanic females of diverse ethnic background and non-Hispanic females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Valerie A; Erb, Allison F; Harris, Cristen L; Casazza, Krista

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated differences in psychosocial risk factors for eating disorders among university females (n=406) of diverse Hispanic background (Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central American/Mexican, Dominican, Venezuelan) and among White non-Hispanic (n=102) female students. Risk factors were assessed using the Psychosocial Risk Factor Questionnaire (PRFQ) which includes four subscales: Social Pressure for Thinness, Media Pressure for Thinness, Concern for Physical Appearance, and Perception of Physical Appearance. There were significant differences among the groups in total PRFQ score, F(7,499)=2.76, Peating disorders in this population.

  15. O sagrado no romance hispano-americano do século XX (The sacred in the Hispanic-American novel of the 20th century - DOI: 10.5752/P.2175-5841.2013v11n29p279

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lucia Trevisan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available O trabalho estuda as formas de representação do sagrado no romance hispano-americano do século XX e propõe uma reflexão sobre algumas formas de utilização das mitologias e tradições religiosas pela literatura. A presença das narrativas sagradas no texto literário do século XX surge marcada por uma renovada experiência estética, pois não se trata apenas de utilizar ou reutilizar uma temática exótica, mas, sim, perceber um potencial tradutor de verdades universais, imanentes aos textos religiosos ou mitologias ancestrais. O artigo propõe uma reflexão sobre as particularidades da produção literária europeia e hispano-americana, que utilizam os temas sagrados, a fim de perceber as consonâncias e dissonâncias estéticas e históricas. O fenômeno estético denominado “mitologismo”, estudado por E.M. Mielietinski, pode ser entendido como um modus operandi da estruturação do romance que conjuga literatura e relatos sagrados e, neste estudo, fundamenta a discussão sobre a heterogeneidade cultural dos povos hispânicos expressa em suas representações literárias. Palavras-chave: Romance . Mitologias. Religião. Hispano-América. Abstract This article studies the forms of representation of the sacred in the Hispanic-American novel of the 20th century and proposes a reflection on some ways of using the mythological and religious traditions by literature. The presence of sacred narratives in the literary texts of the 20th century is marked by a renewed aesthetic experience, once it does not only refer to using or re-using an exotic theme, but perceiving a potential translator of universal truths, immanent to religious texts or mythological ancestors. The present proposal offers a reflection on the peculiarities of European and Hispanic-American productions which make use of sacred themes, meaning to understand the aesthetic and historical consonances and dissonances. The aesthetic phenomenon named “mythologism”, studied

  16. Physical activity of pregnant Hispanic women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Kristine E; Landsbaugh, Jill R; Whitcomb, Brian W; Pekow, Penny; Markenson, Glenn; Chasan-Taber, Lisa

    2012-10-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that physical activity during pregnancy can reduce risk of pregnancy complications. However, factors influencing activity in pregnant Hispanic women, who have high rates of sedentary activity as compared to non-Hispanic whites, are not well characterized. To assess patterns and correlates of physical activity among 1355 participants in Proyecto Buena Salud, a prospective cohort of pregnant Hispanic women in Massachusetts from 2006 to 2011. Analyses were conducted in 2012. Pre-, early-, mid-, and late-pregnancy physical activity were assessed using the Pregnancy Physical Activity Questionnaire. Women reported the frequency and duration of household/caregiving, occupational, sports/exercise, and transportation activities and were classified according to compliance with American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists guidelines for physical activity. Household/caregiving activity was the primary mode of pregnancy activity ranging from 56% to 60% of total activity while sports/exercise contributed the least (<10%). Compared to nulliparous women, women with two or more children were 85% less likely to become inactive at any time during pregnancy (OR=0.15, 95% CI=0.04, 0.56, p-trend <0.01). Women with one or more children increased their total physical activity on average 9.73±2.04 MET-hours/week and 12.04±2.39 MET-hours/week, respectively, with the onset of pregnancy (p<0.01). Those with the highest levels of total physical activity prior to pregnancy were 87% less likely to become inactive with the onset of pregnancy than those who were inactive prior to pregnancy (OR=0.13, 95% CI= 0.05, 0.29). Findings can inform culturally appropriate interventions designed to reduce pregnancy complications through the promotion of physical activity during pregnancy. Copyright © 2012 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Usual source of health care among Hispanic children: the implications of immigration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durden, T Elizabeth

    2007-08-01

    Deep inequities continue to exist in the access to and sources of care across racial and ethnic groups in the United States. This research examines differences in the regular source of usual health care for children among Hispanic subgroups of the United States. The immigration status of the mother -- including nativity, duration in the United States, and citizenship status -- as well as sociodemographic factors are considered as significant influences on the type of regular sources of care. Using the National Health Interview Survey from 1999 to 2001, multinomial logistic regression models are estimated to compare Mexican American and other Hispanic children with non-Hispanic whites and blacks. Both Mexican Americans and other Hispanics were more likely to report the use of clinic or the emergency room over private doctor's office as their regular source of health care compared with non-Hispanic whites. Together, the impact of the mother's nativity, duration, and citizenship status explains much of the differentials in the sources of care among Mexican American and other Hispanic children compared with non-Hispanic whites.

  18. Risk Factors for Hispanic Male Intimate Partner Violence Perpetration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancera, Bibiana M; Dorgo, Sandor; Provencio-Vasquez, Elias

    2017-07-01

    The literature review analyzed 24 studies that explored male intimate partner violence (IPV) perpetration risk factors among men, in particular Hispanics, using the socioecological model framework composed of four socioecological levels for violence prevention. Six databases were reviewed within the EBSCO search engine for articles published from 2000 to 2014. Articles reviewed were specific to risk factors for IPV perpetration among Hispanic men, focusing particularly on Mexican American men. Many key factors have previously been associated with risk for IPV perpetration; however, certain determinants are unique to Hispanics such as acculturation, acculturation stress, and delineated gender roles that include Machismo and Marianismo. These risk factors should be incorporated in future targeted prevention strategies and efforts and capitalize on the positive aspects of each to serve as protective factors.

  19. Baseline Estimates of Adherence to American Society of Clinical Oncology/American Board of Internal Medicine Choosing Wisely Initiative Among Patients With Cancer Enrolled With a Large Regional Commercial Health Insurer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Scott D; Fedorenko, Catherine; Chauhan, Rakesh; McGee, Richard; Lyman, Gary H; Kreizenbeck, Karma; Bansal, Aasthaa

    2015-07-01

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO)/American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) Choosing Wisely (CW) measures aim to reduce the use of interventions that lack evidence of benefit in cancer care. The study presented here characterized adherence to the 2012 ASCO/ABIM CW recommendations by linking health plan claims data with a regional cancer registry and sought to identify areas for research interventions to improve adherence. SEER records for patients diagnosed with cancer in Western Washington State between 2007 and 2014 were linked with enrollment and claims from a large regional commercial insurance plan. Using claims and SEER records, algorithms were developed to characterize adherence to each CW measure. In addition, we calculated differences in total reimbursements and procedure-specific reimbursements for patients receiving adherent and nonadherent care. A total of 22,359 unique individuals with cancer were linked with insurance enrollment records and met basic eligibility criteria. Overall adherence varied from 53% (breast surveillance) to 78% (breast staging). Within each measure, adherence varied substantially by stage at diagnosis and by cancer site in situations in which the CW measure affected multiple types of cancer. The difference in reimbursements between adherent and nonadherent populations across all five measures was approximately $29 million. Adherence to the ASCO/ABIM CW measures varies widely, as does the cost implication of nonadherence. A structured approach to evaluating adherence and cost impact is needed before developing programs aimed at improving adherence to the ASCO/ABIM CW measures. Copyright © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  20. Acculturation and Substance Use among Hispanic Early Adolescents: Investigating the Mediating Roles of Acculturative Stress and Self-Esteem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamboanga, Byron L.; Schwartz, Seth J.; Jarvis, Lorna Hernandez; Van Tyne, Kathryne

    2009-01-01

    We examined the extent to which Hispanic orientation and American orientation are associated with substance use (cigarette, alcohol, and marijuana) both directly and indirectly through acculturative stress and self-esteem. Participants were 347 Hispanic early adolescents (50.7% male; mean age = 12.57, SD = 0.92, range 11-15) from two middle…

  1. Acculturation and Substance Use among Hispanic Early Adolescents: Investigating the Mediating Roles of Acculturative Stress and Self-Esteem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamboanga, Byron L.; Schwartz, Seth J.; Jarvis, Lorna Hernandez; Van Tyne, Kathryne

    2009-01-01

    We examined the extent to which Hispanic orientation and American orientation are associated with substance use (cigarette, alcohol, and marijuana) both directly and indirectly through acculturative stress and self-esteem. Participants were 347 Hispanic early adolescents (50.7% male; mean age = 12.57, SD = 0.92, range 11-15) from two middle…

  2. Socioeconomic status and body mass index among Hispanic children of immigrants and children of natives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balistreri, Kelly Stamper; Van Hook, Jennifer

    2009-12-01

    We examined how Hispanic parents' income and education, combined with their nativity status, influenced the body mass index (BMI) of their children, compared with non-Hispanic White children and their parents. We used data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 1998-99 to estimate linear growth curve models of children's initial BMI in kindergarten and change in BMI through fifth grade. Socioeconomic status was measured by logged household income and parental educational attainment (less than high school, high school graduate, some college, college graduate or higher). Parental education was negatively associated with children's BMI (baseline and growth) for non-Hispanic White children. Among Hispanic children, the association of parental education with growth in BMI was negative but much weaker. The weak effect of parental education was not explained by the presence of immigrants in the Hispanic population. Income was strongly negatively associated with children's BMI in kindergarten among children of Hispanic and White natives, but positively associated among Hispanic immigrant families. The positive income-BMI association among Hispanic immigrant children might reflect cultural differences that immigrant parents carry with them from their countries of origin.

  3. Profile of HIV-Infected Hispanics with Pancytopenia

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Pancytopenia is seen in late HIV infection; it is associated with medical complications and with decreased survival. We determined the prevalence of pancytopenia at baseline in a cohort of HIV-positive Hispanics living in Puerto Rico, and compared their socio-demographic, immunological and clinical characteristics. A total of 1202 patients enrolled between 2000 and 2010 were included. They were grouped according to pancytopenia status, defined by having: platelets <150,000 μL, white cell c...

  4. Actigraphic Sleep Patterns of U.S. Hispanics: The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, Katherine A; Weng, Jia; Sotres-Alvarez, Daniela; Simonelli, Guido; Cespedes Feliciano, Elizabeth; Ramirez, Maricelle; Ramos, Alberto R; Loredo, Jose S; Reid, Kathryn J; Mossavar-Rahmani, Yasmin; Zee, Phyllis C; Chirinos, Diana A; Gallo, Linda C; Wang, Rui; Patel, Sanjay R

    2017-02-01

    To assess the extent to which objective sleep patterns vary among U.S. Hispanics/Latinos. We assessed objective sleep patterns in 2087 participants of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos from 6 Hispanic/Latino subgroups aged 18-64 years who underwent 7 days of wrist actigraphy. The age- and sex-standardized mean (SE) sleep duration was 6.82 (0.05), 6.72 (0.07), 6.61 (0.07), 6.59 (0.06), 6.57 (0.10), and 6.44 (0.09) hr among individuals of Mexican, Cuban, Dominican, Central American, Puerto Rican, and South American heritage, respectively. Sleep maintenance efficiency ranged from 89.2 (0.2)% in Mexicans to 86.5 (0.4)% in Puerto Ricans, while the sleep fragmentation index ranged from 19.7 (0.3)% in Mexicans to 24.2 (0.7)% in Puerto Ricans. In multivariable models adjusted for age, sex, season, socioeconomic status, lifestyle habits, and comorbidities, these differences persisted. There are important differences in actigraphically measured sleep across U.S. Hispanic/Latino heritages. Individuals of Mexican heritage have longer and more consolidated sleep, while those of Puerto Rican heritage have shorter and more fragmented sleep. These differences may have clinically important effects on health outcomes.

  5. Discrimination and Depression among Urban Hispanics with Poorly Controlled Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    March, Dana; Williams, Jasmine; Wells, Shayla; Eimicke, Joseph P; Teresi, Jeanne A; Almonte, Casandra; Link, Bruce G; Findley, Sally E; Palmas, Walter; Carrasquillo, Olveen; Luchsinger, José A

    2015-01-01

    We had three objectives for our study: 1) to describe the prevalence and burden of experiences of discrimination among Hispanics with poorly controlled diabetes; 2) to evaluate associations among discrimination experiences and their burden with comorbid depression among Hispanics with poorly controlled diabetes; and 3) to evaluate whether discrimination encountered in the health care context itself was associated with comorbid depression for Hispanic adults with diabetes. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of baseline data of a randomized controlled trial (RCT). We collected data in the context of an RCT in a clinical setting in New York City. Our sample comprised 221 urban-dwelling Hispanics, largely of Caribbean origin. The main outcome measure was major depression, measured by the Euro-D (score > 3). Of 221 participants, 58.8% reported at least one experience of everyday discrimination, and 42.5% reported at least one major experience of discrimination. Depression was associated significantly with counts of experiences of major discrimination (OR = 1.46, 95% CI = 1.09 - 1.94, P = .01), aggregate counts of everyday and major discrimination (OR = 1.13, 95% CI = 1.02 - 1.26, P = .02), and the experience of discrimination in getting care for physical health (OR = 6.30, 95% CI= 1.10-36.03). Discrimination may pose a barrier to getting health care and may be associated with depression among Hispanics with diabetes. Clinicians treating Caribbean-born Hispanics should be aware that disadvantage and discrimination likely complicate a presentation of diabetes.

  6. Functional vs. Critical Literacy: A Case Study in a Hispanic Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Brown, Flora V.; Mulhern, Margaret M.

    A family literacy program for increasing 3- to 5-year-old children's literacy skills by educating their Mexican American parents is evaluated. Project Family Literacy--Aprendiendo, Mejorando, Educando ("Learning, Improving, Educating") (Project FLAME) is a federally funded program addressing Hispanic Americans' academic failure,…

  7. Acculturation and perceived discrimination: predictors of substance use trajectories from adolescence to emerging adulthood among Hispanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, Jennifer B; Schwartz, Seth J; Huh, Jimi; Soto, Daniel W; Baezconde-Garbanati, Lourdes

    2014-09-01

    Previous studies have documented associations between cultural factors and substance use among Hispanic adolescents. Negative cultural experiences such as discrimination have been associated with an increased risk of substance use among Hispanic adolescents, whereas positive cultural resources, such as maintenance of Hispanic cultural orientations, have shown protective effects. However, few studies have examined the continuing influence of cultural factors on substance use from adolescence to emerging adulthood. We surveyed a cohort of Hispanic adolescents in Southern California in 9th, 10th, and 11th grades, and 3-4 years after high school. Growth curve analyses were conducted to examine the effects of U.S. acculturation, Hispanic acculturation, ethnic identity, and perceived discrimination on change in tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana use over time. Higher perceived discrimination at baseline was significantly associated with a higher intercept (initial level) of tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana use. Higher initial level of Hispanic acculturation was significantly associated with a lower slope of tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana use. Cultural phenomena such as acculturation and perceived discrimination can continue to affect substance use through the transition to emerging adulthood. Health education interventions are needed to help Hispanics navigate this developmental transition without engaging in substance use. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The Relationship between Native American Ancestry, Body Mass Index and Diabetes Risk among Mexican-Americans: e0141260

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hao Hu; Chad D Huff; Yuko Yamamura; Xifeng Wu; Sara S Strom

    2015-01-01

      Higher body mass index (BMI) is a well-established risk factor for type 2 diabetes, and rates of obesity and type 2 diabetes are substantially higher among Mexican-Americans relative to non-Hispanic European Americans...

  9. Hispanic Transfer in 2-Year Hispanic-Serving Institutions. A White Paper for HACU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunez, Anne-Marie; Crisp, Gloria; Elizondo, Diane

    2012-01-01

    Community colleges offer Hispanic students a critical gateway to bachelor's degrees, but these institutions also have low transfer rates to four-year institutions. Some research suggests that Hispanic-Serving community colleges have higher Hispanic transfer rates. This paper examines transfer patterns of a national sample of Hispanic community…

  10. Promotora de salud: promoting folic acid use among Hispanic women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    deRosset, Leslie; Mullenix, Amy; Flores, Alina; Mattia-Dewey, Daniel; Mai, Cara T

    2014-06-01

    The U.S. Public Health Service recommends that all women in the United States capable of becoming pregnant consume 400 μg of folic acid daily to reduce their risk of having a pregnancy affected by a neural tube defect (NTD). However, disparities exist in the consumption of folic acid, with Hispanic women having lower rates of folic acid consumption than non-Hispanic white women. A community-based feasibility study was designed to assess the utility of the promotora de salud model to promote consumption of multivitamins containing folic acid for the prevention of NTDs among Spanish-speaking Hispanic women in North Carolina. The study consisted of an educational intervention given by a promotora (a lay, community health worker), with data collection occurring at baseline and four months post-intervention to measure changes in knowledge and behavior. Overall, 52% (n=303) of participants completed all components of the study. Self-reported daily multivitamin consumption increased from 24% at baseline to 71% four months post-intervention. During the same time frame, awareness of folic acid increased from 78% to 98% and knowledge of the role of folic acid in the prevention of birth defects increased from 82% to 92%. The results of this study indicate that the promotora de salud model may be effective in reaching a subpopulation of women with the folic acid message. Additional studies with larger population sizes are warranted to validate these findings.

  11. Sleep health in U.S. Hispanic population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loredo, Jose S; Soler, Xavier; Bardwell, Wayne; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia; Dimsdale, Joel E; Palinkas, Lawrence A

    2010-07-01

    The importance of sleep on health has only been recently recognized, and the general public and the medical community are not yet fully knowledgeable about this issue. The great majority of sleep research has been performed in whites of European descent and to a lesser extent in African Americans, making generalization of the findings to other ethnic and racial groups difficult. Very little sleep research has been done in U.S. Hispanics. However, based on the available literature and the high prevalence of risk factors in Hispanics, such as obesity, diabetes, living in the inner city, and use of alcohol, the prevalence of such important sleep disorders such as obstructive sleep apnea and sleep habits such as poor sleep hygiene are suspected to be high. There is also some evidence that acculturation to the U.S. life style may lead to worse sleep habits in Hispanics, including fewer hours of sleep. Two current large NIH sponsored studies of sleep in U.S. Hispanics promise to significantly add to the literature on various sleep disorders such as sleep disordered breathing, insomnia, restless legs syndrome, periodic limb movement disorder, and sleep habits such as short sleep duration and sleep hygiene.

  12. Determinants of CPAP Adherence in Hispanics with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montserrat Diaz-Abad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. We hypothesized that socioeconomic factors and a language barrier would impact adherence with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP among Hispanics with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA. Methods. Patients with OSA who were prescribed CPAP for at least 1 year and completed a questionnaire evaluating demographic data, socioeconomic status, and CPAP knowledge and adherence participated in the study. Results. Seventy-nine patients (26 males; 53±11 yrs; body mass index (BMI=45±9 kg/m2 with apnea-hypopnea index (AHI 33±30 events/hr completed the study. Included were 25 Hispanics, 39 African Americans, and 15 Caucasians, with no difference in age, AHI, CPAP use, or BMI between the groups. While there was a difference in educational level (P=0.006, income level (P<0.001, and employment status (P=0.03 between the groups, these did not influence CPAP adherence. Instead, overall improvement in quality of life and health status and perceived benefit from CPAP influenced adherence, both for the group as a whole (P=0.03, P=0.004, and P=0.001, resp., as well as in Hispanics (P=0.02, P=0.02, P=0.03, resp.. Conclusion. In Hispanic patients with OSA, perceived benefit with therapy, rather than socioeconomic status or a language barrier, appears to be the most important factor in determining CPAP adherence.

  13. Cardiovascular disease risk factors in the Hispanic/Latino population: lessons from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daviglus, Martha L; Pirzada, Amber; Talavera, Gregory A

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is one of the leading causes of mortality among Hispanics/Latinos residing in the United States (US), yet despite the rapid growth of this diverse population, there has been a dearth of objective, comprehensive data on prevalence of risk factors for CVD and other chronic diseases. The Hispanic Community Health Study/SOL) is the largest and most comprehensive cohort study to date/SOL) was initiated to address this gap in knowledge. This article reviews existing research on CVD risk factors among Hispanic/Latino adults of diverse background residing in the US, compares findings from HCHS/SOL with other representative samples on prevalence of major CVD risk factors in this population, and discusses the lessons learned thus far from HCHS/SOL. Baseline findings from this study demonstrate that sizeable burdens in CVD risk exist among all major Hispanic/Latino background groups in the US. At the same time, there are marked variations in rates of individual risk factors by Hispanic/Latino background groups. Comprehensive public health policies to lower CVD risk among those who have adverse levels of one or more risk factors, and to prevent development of CVD risk factors in the small proportion free of CVD risk are urgently needed to lower the future burden of CVD among the US Hispanic/Latino population.

  14. Neurocognitive Function Among Middle-aged and Older Hispanic/Latinos: Results from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Hector M.; Tarraf, Wassim; Gouskova, Natalia; Gallo, Linda C.; Penedo, Frank J.; Davis, Sonia M.; Lipton, Richard B.; Argüelles, William; Choca, James P.; Catellier, Diane J.; Mosley, Thomas H.

    2015-01-01

    We sought to examine and describe neurocognitive function among middle-aged and older Hispanic/Latino Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) participants. We analyzed baseline cross-sectional data from the middle-aged and older (ages 45–74 years old) participants (n = 9,063) to calculate neurocognitive function scores and their correlates. Older age and higher depressive symptoms scores were associated with lower average neurocognitive performance, whereas greater educational attainment and household income were associated with higher neurocognitive performance. Hispanic/Latino heritage groups significantly varied in neurocognitive performances. Some neurocognitive differences between Hispanics/Latinos were maintained after controlling for language preference, education, household income, and depressive symptoms. We found notable differences in neurocognitive scores between Hispanic/Latino heritage groups that were not fully explained by the cultural and socioeconomic correlates examined in this study. Further investigations into plausible biological and environmental factors contributing to the Hispanic/Latino heritage group differences in neurocognitive found in the HCHS/SOL are warranted. PMID:25451561

  15. The relation of hypertension to changes in ADL/IADL limitations of Mexican american older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caskie, Grace I L; Sutton, Maryann C; Margrett, Jennifer A

    2010-05-01

    Hypertension, highly prevalent and often undiagnosed among older Mexican Americans, is associated with greater limitations in activities of daily living (ADLs) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs) that can lead to greater dependency for older adults. Using data from the Hispanic Established Populations for Epidemiologic Studies of the Elderly study, the rate of increase in ADL/IADL limitations for a 7-year period was examined for 3,046 older Mexican Americans classified either as reporting hypertension at baseline, first reporting hypertension at subsequent waves, or never reporting hypertension. Latent growth models indicated increased ADL/IADL limitations over time; individuals with hypertension evidenced greater increases than those without hypertension. Age, comorbidities, and depression were positively related to greater ADL/IADL limitations at baseline for all groups; only age was consistently related to ADL/IADL change over time. Development of hypertension may increase the risk of ADL/IADL decline, but early diagnosis and treatment may attenuate this effect.

  16. Teaching Hispanic Linguistics: Strategies to Engage Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knouse, Stephanie M.; Gupton, Timothy; Abreau, Laurel

    2015-01-01

    Even though many post-secondary institutions offer a variety of Hispanic linguistics classes (Hualde 2006; Lipski 2006), research on the pedagogy of Hispanic linguistics is an underdeveloped or non-existent area of the discipline. Courses in Hispanic linguistics can present not only linguistic challenges for non-native speakers of Spanish, but…

  17. Alcohol Related Problems and the Hispanic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Louis S.

    1977-01-01

    Although Hispanic women report high rates of abstinence, more Hispanic men report alcohol related problems than Anglos, Blacks, or Asians and report more heavy drinking. Yet little has been done to develop or fund culturally specific alcoholism prevention, treatment and rehabilitation programs for the Hispanics. (NQ)

  18. Teaching Hispanic Linguistics: Strategies to Engage Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knouse, Stephanie M.; Gupton, Timothy; Abreau, Laurel

    2015-01-01

    Even though many post-secondary institutions offer a variety of Hispanic linguistics classes (Hualde 2006; Lipski 2006), research on the pedagogy of Hispanic linguistics is an underdeveloped or non-existent area of the discipline. Courses in Hispanic linguistics can present not only linguistic challenges for non-native speakers of Spanish, but…

  19. Education Level of Catholic Hispanic Deacons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Joseph R.

    2016-01-01

    The present study assessed self-reported religiosity, spirituality, faith-related behaviors, leadership styles, and personality dimensions of 156 Hispanic Catholic deacons, based on varied educational degrees assisting in Hispanic (n = 91) or non-Hispanic (n = 65) parishes. Results found no significant differences on any self-reported variables…

  20. Redes En Acción. Increasing Hispanic participation in cancer research, training, and awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Amelie G; Talavera, Gregory A; Marti, Jose; Penedo, Frank J; Medrano, Martha A; Giachello, Aida L; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo J

    2006-10-15

    Hispanics are affected by many health care disparities. The National Cancer Institute (NCI), through its Special Populations Branch, is supporting networking and capacity-building activities designed to increase Hispanic participation and leadership in cancer research. Redes En Acción established a national network of cancer research centers, community-based organizations, and federal partners to facilitate opportunities for junior Hispanic scientists to participate in training and research projects on cancer control. Since 2000, Redes En Acción has established a network of more than 1800 Hispanic leaders involved in cancer research and education. The project has sustained 131 training positions and submitted 29 pilot projects to NCI for review, with 16 awards for a total of $800,000, plus an additional $8.8 million in competing grant funding based on pilot study results to date. Independent research has leveraged an additional $32 million in non-Redes funding, and together the national and regional network sites have participated in more than 1400 community and professional awareness events. In addition, the program conducted extensive national survey research that provided the basis for the Redes En Acción Latino Cancer Report, a national agenda on Hispanic cancer issues. Redes En Acción has increased participation in cancer control research, training, and awareness among Hispanic scientists and within Hispanic communities. Cancer 2006. (c) 2006 American Cancer Society.

  1. The Effects of Computer Graphic Organizers on the Persuasive Writing of Hispanic Middle School Students with Specific Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unzueta, Caridad H.; Barbetta, Patricia M.

    2012-01-01

    A multiple baseline design investigated the effects of computer graphic organizers on the persuasive composition writing skills of four Hispanic students with specific learning disabilities. Participants reviewed the elements of persuasive writing and then developed compositions using a word processing program. Baseline planning was done with a…

  2. The Effects of Computer Graphic Organizers on the Persuasive Writing of Hispanic Middle School Students with Specific Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unzueta, Caridad H.; Barbetta, Patricia M.

    2012-01-01

    A multiple baseline design investigated the effects of computer graphic organizers on the persuasive composition writing skills of four Hispanic students with specific learning disabilities. Participants reviewed the elements of persuasive writing and then developed compositions using a word processing program. Baseline planning was done with a…

  3. Latin American cheeses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latin American (or Hispanic-style) cheeses are a category of cheeses that were developed in Mexico, Latin America, and the Caribbean and have become increasingly popular in the U.S. Although research has been conducted on some of the cheeses, quantitative information on the quality traits of most L...

  4. Advances in Hispanic Linguistics: Papers from the Hispanic Linguistics Symposium (2nd, Columbus, OH, October 9-11, 1998). Volumes 1-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez-Rexach, Javier, Ed.; Martinez-Gil, Fernando, Ed.

    Papers from the 1998 Hispanic Linguistics Symposium include: "Patterns of Gender Agreement in the Speech of Second Language Learners"; "'Nomas' in Mexican American Dialect"; "Parsing Spanish 'solo'"; "On Levels of Processing and Levels of Comprehension"; "The Role of Attention in Second/Foreign Language Classroom Research: Methodological Issues";…

  5. Hispanic Women Small Business Owners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarason, Yolanda; Koberg, Christine

    1994-01-01

    A survey of 22 Hispanic women who owned small businesses in a western state found that most were located in metropolitan areas, were new to business ownership, had started the business themselves, engaged in "miscellaneous services," and generated lower than average revenues. Respondents were similar to nonminority owners in educational…

  6. Hispanics in the Pacific Northwest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Annabel Kirschner

    Sources of diversity in the Pacific Northwest's Spanish origin population, up 79.7% since 1970, was the subject of research based on 1980 Census data. Census information for Whites and Hispanics from metropolitan and nonmetropolitan counties with 400 or more persons of Spanish origin was compared on the basis of age, family/household structure,…

  7. Hispanics' Awareness of Assistive Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Alberto; Ostrander, Noam

    2009-01-01

    This study compared Hispanics' awareness of services available to acquire assistive technology and whether they actually sought help to the findings from a national sample. The study assists the field by providing information on a group largely ignored in the literature. The authors sought to answer the following research questions: Are there…

  8. Prevalence of hypertension in Hispanic and non-Hispanic white populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, Carlos; Serrano-Rios, Manuel; Martinez-Larrad, Maria T; Gabriel, Rafael; Williams, Ken; Gonzalez-Villalpando, Clicerio; Stern, Michael P; Hazuda, Helen P; Haffner, Steven

    2002-02-01

    Mexican nationals in Mexico City and Mexican Americans in San Antonio, Tex, have a lower adjusted prevalence of hypertension than San Antonio non-Hispanic whites, especially after adjusting for the greater obesity of San Antonio Mexican Americans. The concomitant examination of a new study from Spain may better explain the association of genetic and environmental factors with hypertension. Three population-based epidemiological studies conducted in Mexico City, Spain, and San Antonio, Tex, were available for comparisons. Hypertension was defined as systolic blood pressure > or = 140 mm Hg, diastolic blood pressure > or = 90 mm Hg, or the use of antihypertensive medications. The prevalence of hypertension was independently associated with age, body mass index, glucose tolerance, and alcohol consumption, with comparable degrees of relationship in all 4 populations. Relative to San Antonio non-Hispanic whites, an excess prevalence of hypertension was observed in Spaniards (odds ratio [OR], 1.53; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.24 to 1.90). A deficit in hypertension prevalence was statistically significant in Mexican nationals (OR, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.53 to 0.85) and close to significance in San Antonio Mexican Americans (OR, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.71 to 1.03). Thus, obesity, educational attainment, type 2 diabetes, glucose tolerance, and marked alcohol consumption (> or = 14 drinks/wk) do not fully explain the increased prevalence of hypertension in Spain and the lower prevalence of hypertension in Mexican-origin populations. Although we cannot conclude definitively that these differences are genetically driven, our results suggest no relationship between Spanish genetic admixture and the deficit in hypertension prevalence in Mexican-origin populations.

  9. Validation of the Spanish SIRS with monolingual Hispanic outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, Amor A; Rogers, Richard; Hoersting, Raquel

    2010-09-01

    Psychologists are faced with formidable challenges in making their assessment methods relevant to growing numbers of Hispanic clients for whom English is not the primary or preferred language. Among other clinical issues, the determination of malingering has profound consequences for clients. In this investigation, we evaluated a Spanish translation of the Structured Interview of Reported Symptoms (SIRS; Rogers, Bagby, & Dickens, 1992) with 80 Spanish-speaking Hispanic American outpatients. Using a between-subjects simulation design, the Spanish SIRS was found to produce reliable results with small standard errors of measurement. Regarding validity, very large effect sizes (mean Cohen's d= 2.00) were observed between feigners and honest responders for the SIRS primary scales. We consider the potential role of the Spanish SIRS with reference to Spanish translations for other assessment instruments.

  10. How Valid Are the Portland Baseline Essays?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Erich

    1991-01-01

    Portland, Oregon's "African-American Baseline Essays," widely used in creating multicultural curricula, inaccurately depicts ancient Egyptians as black people and Olmec civilization as derived from African influences. The authors advance racial theories long abandoned by mainline Africa scholars, attribute mystical powers to pyramids,…

  11. Reactions to two versions of affirmative action among whites, blacks, and Hispanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravitz, D A; Klineberg, S L

    2000-08-01

    Houston-area Whites (n = 414), Blacks (n = 392), American-born Hispanics (n = 162), and Hispanic immigrants (n = 177) evaluated a self-defined "typical" affirmative action plan (AAP) and a tiebreak AAP that applies under conditions of equal qualifications and underrepresentation. Whites preferred Tiebreak; Blacks and Hispanics preferred the typical AAP. The groups differed in beliefs about the procedures and fairness of affirmative action (AA), perceptions of workplace discrimination, and political orientations. Perceived fairness predicted support for both AAPs in all American-born groups, but the impact of other predictors varied greatly across AAPs and ethnic groups. The results clarify the bases for Whites' opposition to AA as they construe it. The results also underscore the importance of specifying the AAP procedures, of uncovering the predictors of AA attitudes among target-group members, and of conducting separate analyses in each ethnic community.

  12. Hispanic Youth--Dropout Prevention. Report of the Task Force on the Participation of Hispanic Students in Vocational Education Programs = La Joventud Hispana. Reporte del Grupo Especial. La Investigacion de la Participacion de los Estudiantes Hispanos en la Educacion Relativa a la Vocacion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idaho State Dept. of Education, Boise. Div. of Vocational Education.

    An Idaho task force of Hispanic Americans, industry representatives, and education leaders studied the reasons Hispanic students were not enrolling in and completing vocational education programs. The task force sponsored a series of community meetings to identify reasons and solutions. Approximately 40-60 parents, students, and other interested…

  13. Hispanic Youth--Dropout Prevention. Report of the Task Force on the Participation of Hispanic Students in Vocational Education Programs = La Joventud Hispana. Reporte del Grupo Especial. La Investigacion de la Participacion de los Estudiantes Hispanos en la Educacion Relativa a la Vocacion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idaho State Dept. of Education, Boise. Div. of Vocational Education.

    An Idaho task force of Hispanic Americans, industry representatives, and education leaders studied the reasons Hispanic students were not enrolling in and completing vocational education programs. The task force sponsored a series of community meetings to identify reasons and solutions. Approximately 40-60 parents, students, and other interested…

  14. Hospice Use by Hispanic and Non‐Hispanic White Cancer Decedents

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lackan, Nuha A; Ostir, Glenn V; Freeman, Jean L; Kuo, Yong‐Fang; Zhang, Dong D; Goodwin, James S

    2004-01-01

    Objective. To investigate rates of hospice use between Hispanic and non‐Hispanic white Medicare beneficiaries diagnosed with cancer using data from a large, population‐based study. Data Sources...

  15. Experiences with Dating Violence and Help Seeking Among Hispanic Females in Their Late Adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Guarda, Rosa M; Ferranti, Dina; Halstead, Valerie; Ilias, Vanessa M

    2016-01-01

    Hispanic females in their late adolescence appear to be disproportionately affected by dating violence, yet the majority of victims never seek out formal services. The purpose of this study was to explore the dating violence and help-seeking experiences of Hispanic females in their late adolescence. Participants were recruited from a social service agency providing wrap-around services to individuals and families affected by abuse in South Florida. Eleven in-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with Hispanic female victims of dating violence in their late adolescence (18 to 24 years of age) in English or Spanish. A thematic analysis of transcripts identified four major themes: (a) conflict, culture, and context influences Hispanic couples; (b) missed opportunities to accessing help; (c) pivotal moments are needed to access formal services; and (d) family matters. Participants of this study believed that dating violence was more normative in Hispanic relationships than "American" relationships. Although participants had opportunities to seek formal services early in their relationships, formal services were only sought after pivotal moments. Families played an important role in supporting or further victimizing the participants. Findings from this study can be used to inform interventions addressing both informal and formal sources of support for Hispanic female victims of dating violence in their late adolescence.

  16. Race/Ethnicity and Cardiovascular Outcomes in Adults With CKD: Findings From the CRIC (Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort) and Hispanic CRIC Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lash, James P; Ricardo, Ana C; Roy, Jason; Deo, Rajat; Fischer, Michael; Flack, John; He, Jiang; Keane, Martin; Lora, Claudia; Ojo, Akinlolu; Rahman, Mahboob; Steigerwalt, Susan; Tao, Kaixiang; Wolf, Myles; Wright, Jackson T; Go, Alan S

    2016-10-01

    Non-Hispanic blacks and Hispanics with end-stage renal disease have a lower risk for death than non-Hispanic whites, but data for racial/ethnic variation in cardiovascular outcomes for non-dialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease are limited. Prospective cohort. 3,785 adults with entry estimated glomerular filtration rates of 20 to 70mL/min/1.73m(2) enrolled in the CRIC (Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort) Study. Race/ethnicity (non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black, and Hispanic). Cardiovascular outcomes (atherosclerotic events [myocardial infarction, stroke, or peripheral arterial disease] and heart failure) and a composite of each cardiovascular outcome or all-cause death. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards. During a median follow-up of 6.6 years, we observed 506 atherosclerotic events, 551 heart failure events, and 692 deaths. In regression analyses, there were no significant differences in atherosclerotic events among the 3 racial/ethnic groups. In analyses stratified by clinical site, non-Hispanic blacks had a higher risk for heart failure events (HR, 1.59; 95% CI, 1.29-1.95), which became nonsignificant after adjustment for demographic factors and baseline kidney function. In contrast, Hispanics had similar risk for heart failure events as non-Hispanic whites. In analyses stratified by clinical site, compared with non-Hispanic whites, non-Hispanic blacks were at similar risk for atherosclerotic events or death. However, after further adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors, medications, and mineral metabolism markers, non-Hispanic blacks had 17% lower risk for the outcome (HR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.69-0.99) than non-Hispanic whites, whereas there was no significant association with Hispanic ethnicity. Hispanics were largely recruited from a single center, and the study was underpowered to evaluate the association between Hispanic ethnicity and mortality. There were no significant racial/ethnic differences in adjusted risk for atherosclerotic or heart

  17. Language Intervention for Hispanic Children with Language-Learning Disabilities: Evidence-Based Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kummerer, Sharon Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (1996) estimated that 10% of the United States population has a disorder of speech, language, or hearing, with proportional distribution among members of racially and ethnically diverse groups. Individuals of Hispanic origin are the fastest-growing minority group in the country. Current national…

  18. Preventing Drug Abuse among Hispanic Adolescents: Developing a Responsive Intervention Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schinke, Steven P.; Schwinn, Traci M.; Hursh, Hilary A.

    2015-01-01

    Intervention research is essential to help Hispanic American adolescents avoid drug use. This article describes an intervention research program aimed at preventing drug use among these youths. Grounded in salient epidemiological data, the program is informed by bicultural competence, social learning, and motivational interviewing theories. The…

  19. Hispanic Orientation to Life in America. Project HOLA, 1987-88. OREA Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berney, Tomi D.; Mohagdam, Val

    In its fifth year, the Hispanic Orientation to Life in America Project (Project HOLA) served 472 Spanish-speaking students of limited English proficiency. The aim of the program was to help students develop English language skills, enter mainstream classes, and understand Spanish and American culture. The program provided instruction in English as…

  20. Parental Cultural Orientation, Shyness, and Anxiety in Hispanic Children: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudino, Omar G.; Lau, Anna S.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined associations between parental cultural orientation, childhood shyness, and anxiety symptoms in a sample of Hispanic American children (N = 127). Parents completed measures of their level of acculturation, collectivism, and socialization goals, while children provided self-reports of anxiety symptoms and both parents and…

  1. Effects of Non-Traditional Teaching on Retention among Predominantly Hispanic Engineering Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peper, John; And Others

    This study examined the effects of non-traditional instructional methods on student learning in an engineering course at the University of Texas at El Paso. The summer 1993 material selection course enrolled 33 students, the majority of whom were Hispanic Americans. Instead of the traditional lecture method, the course employed student project…

  2. Researching Hispanic Fans: Professional Sports' Use of Spanish Language on the Internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodey, Kimberly J.; Judge, Lawrence W.; Steward, Marshall; Gobel, Tamara

    2009-01-01

    With buying power exceeding $850 billion and tendencies toward brand loyalty, Hispanic consumers are a desirable market. Yet, at a time when North American professional sport leagues and teams have expanded to international territories to increase revenue, market share, and fan base, it is worthwhile to study the extent leagues and teams reach…

  3. Segregation and the Underrepresentation of Blacks and Hispanics in Gifted Education: Social Inequality and Deficit Paradigms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Donna Y.

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the underrepresentation of African American and Hispanic students in gifted education, proposing that social inequality, deficit thinking, and microaggressions contribute to the inequitable segregated programs. Underrepresentation trends are presented, along with methods for calculating underrepresentation and inequity.…

  4. ?Cuan buenas son nuestras viviendas?: Los hispanos [How Good Is Our Housing? Hispanics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yezer, Anthony; Limmer, Ruth

    This report provides statistical information regarding the quality and cost of housing occupied by Hispanic Americans throughout the United States. Some of the findings include: (1) Hispanos occupy older and worse dwellings than the general U.S. population, with a significant number of dwellings lacking heat and adequate electricity and plumbing…

  5. Breast Cancer Screening among Older Hispanic Women: Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint-Germain, Michelle A.; Longman, Alice J.

    1993-01-01

    Data from 409 Hispanic-American and 138 Anglo older women in Tucson identified few differences in their use of breast cancer screening and low levels of risk knowledge. Both groups fell well below recommended frequency of screening. Clinical examination and self-examination were used more than mammography. (SK)

  6. Multicultural Considerations: Working with Families of Developmentally Disabled and High Risk Children. The Hispanic Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Rocio DeMateo

    The paper first points out how important it is for professionals who work with families and infants with developmental problems to be aware of ethnic and cultural differences, and then goes on to discuss some values typically held by Hispanic Americans. Professionals should understand the family's immigration history and status in order to know…

  7. Franchisees boost growth of Hispanic PPO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, J

    1991-10-07

    What began as a local marketing effort by two Chicago hospitals to reach the city's fast-growing Hispanic population has turned into a national program with franchises in San Diego and San Antonio, Texas. Formed in 1989, Hispanocare, a preferred provider organization catering to Hispanics, began attracting attention in other cities with large Hispanic populations, prompting the Chicago hospitals to begin a marketing push.

  8. ANGPTL4 variants E40K and T266M are associated with lower fasting triglyceride levels in Non-Hispanic White Americans from the Look AHEAD Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pownall Henry J

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elevated triglyceride levels are a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Angiopoietin-like protein 4 (Angptl4 is a metabolic factor that raises plasma triglyceride levels by inhibiting lipoprotein lipase (LPL. In non-diabetic individuals, the ANGPTL4 coding variant E40K has been associated with lower plasma triglyceride levels while the T266M variant has been associated with more modest effects on triglyceride metabolism. The objective of this study was to determine whether ANGPTL4 E40K and T266M are associated with triglyceride levels in the setting of obesity and T2D, and whether modification of triglyceride levels by these genetic variants is altered by a lifestyle intervention designed to treat T2D. Methods The association of ANGPTL4 E40K and T266M with fasting triglyceride levels was investigated in 2,601 participants from the Look AHEAD Clinical Trial, all of whom had T2D and were at least overweight. Further, we tested for an interaction between genotype and treatment effects on triglyceride levels. Results Among non-Hispanic White Look AHEAD participants, ANGPTL4 K40 carriers had mean triglyceride levels of 1.61 ± 0.62 mmol/L, 0.33 mmol/L lower than E40 homozygotes (p = 0.001. Individuals homozygous for the minor M266 allele (MAF 30% had triglyceride levels of 1.75 ± 0.58 mmol/L, 0.24 mmol/L lower than T266 homozygotes (p = 0.002. The association of the M266 with triglycerides remained significant even after removing K40 carriers from the analysis (p = 0.002. There was no interaction between the weight loss intervention and genotype on triglyceride levels. Conclusions This is the first study to demonstrate that the ANGPTL4 E40K and T266M variants are associated with lower triglyceride levels in the setting of T2D. In addition, our findings demonstrate that ANGPTL4 genotype status does not alter triglyceride response to a lifestyle intervention in the Look AHEAD study.

  9. ANGPTL4 variants E40K and T266M are associated with lower fasting triglyceride levels in Non-Hispanic White Americans from the Look AHEAD Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Elevated triglyceride levels are a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Angiopoietin-like protein 4 (Angptl4) is a metabolic factor that raises plasma triglyceride levels by inhibiting lipoprotein lipase (LPL). In non-diabetic individuals, the ANGPTL4 coding variant E40K has been associated with lower plasma triglyceride levels while the T266M variant has been associated with more modest effects on triglyceride metabolism. The objective of this study was to determine whether ANGPTL4 E40K and T266M are associated with triglyceride levels in the setting of obesity and T2D, and whether modification of triglyceride levels by these genetic variants is altered by a lifestyle intervention designed to treat T2D. Methods The association of ANGPTL4 E40K and T266M with fasting triglyceride levels was investigated in 2,601 participants from the Look AHEAD Clinical Trial, all of whom had T2D and were at least overweight. Further, we tested for an interaction between genotype and treatment effects on triglyceride levels. Results Among non-Hispanic White Look AHEAD participants, ANGPTL4 K40 carriers had mean triglyceride levels of 1.61 ± 0.62 mmol/L, 0.33 mmol/L lower than E40 homozygotes (p = 0.001). Individuals homozygous for the minor M266 allele (MAF 30%) had triglyceride levels of 1.75 ± 0.58 mmol/L, 0.24 mmol/L lower than T266 homozygotes (p = 0.002). The association of the M266 with triglycerides remained significant even after removing K40 carriers from the analysis (p = 0.002). There was no interaction between the weight loss intervention and genotype on triglyceride levels. Conclusions This is the first study to demonstrate that the ANGPTL4 E40K and T266M variants are associated with lower triglyceride levels in the setting of T2D. In addition, our findings demonstrate that ANGPTL4 genotype status does not alter triglyceride response to a lifestyle intervention in the Look AHEAD study. PMID:21714923

  10. Older Hispanics' explanatory model of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadule-Rios, Nohemi; Tappen, Ruth; Williams, Christine L; Rosselli, Monica

    2014-08-01

    Cultural variations in the perception of depression make it difficult to recognize the disorder resulting in older Hispanics not being diagnosed and not receiving appropriate treatment. This study used a mixed-method design to explore older Hispanics' explanatory model of depression. Depression was recognized as the result of life stressors and personal weaknesses. Terms used for depressed people included "crazy, worry, bored, and nerves." These culturally coded terms may confound diagnosis among many Hispanics who find depression a shameful condition. Findings can be used to inform the adaptation of culturally relevant approaches to better serve the Hispanic community in this country.

  11. Hepatitis C Infection Among Hispanics in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, Catherine A; Erlyana, Erlyana; Fisher, Dennis G; Reynolds, Grace L

    2015-01-01

    Hispanics in California are more likely to be infected with hepatitis C, and those infected have had their infection detected later. A total of 1,567 Hispanic and Caucasian individuals were tested for antibodies to hepatitis C from 2000 through 2013. Interviewers administered the Risk Behavior Assessment. Hepatitis C-infected Hispanics were incarcerated longer than hepatitis C-infected Caucasians, and they used marijuana less and illicit methadone more. They were more likely to use crack, heroin, speedballs, and to have been in methadone treatment. Hispanics need hepatitis C testing linked to methadone treatment and written information in Spanish and English.

  12. Demographic Changes of Hispanic Populations and Hispanic Student Enrollment in Texas Community Colleges: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Jack; Slate, John R.; Joyner, Sheila A.

    2015-01-01

    In this literature review, Hispanic demographic changes in the United States and in Texas are examined. Hispanics have accounted for large changes in population, population change, and proportion of population. Accordingly, the literature was reviewed regarding Hispanic immigrants, both authorized and non-authorized immigrants. The issue of…

  13. Fear of Falling in Older Mexican Americans: A Longitudinal Study of Incidence and Predictive Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierking, Leah; Markides, Kyriakos; Al Snih, Soham; Kristen Peek, M

    2016-12-01

    To determine predictors of fear of falling in older Mexican Americans over time. Longitudinal study. Community-dwelling residents throughout California, Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona, and Texas. Community-dwelling Mexican Americans aged 72 and older participating in the Hispanic Established Populations for the Epidemiologic Study of the Elderly from 2000-01 to 2010-11 (N = 1,682). Fear of falling was measured at baseline and at each subsequent wave. Baseline demographic and clinical variables included social support, fall history, depression symptoms, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score, activity of daily living (ADL) and instrumental ADL (IADL) limitations, and chronic health conditions. Nine hundred fifty three (56.7%) subjects reported fear of falling at baseline, 262 of whom reported severe fear of falling. The predictors of reporting any fear of falling over time included female sex, frequent familial interaction, depression, chronic health conditions, IADL limitations, higher MMSE score, and three or more falls in the last 12 months. Predictors of severe fear of falling included older age, female sex, married, depressive symptoms, chronic health conditions, IADL limitations, higher MMSE score, and fall history. Protective factors included frequent friend interaction and higher levels of education. Fear of falling is prevalent in older Mexican-American adults. The presence of friends nearby was shown to be protective against, whereas the presence of family nearby was shown to be predictive of fear of falling. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  14. IDENTIFYING PROBABLE DIABETES MELLITUS AMONG HISPANICS/LATINOS FROM FOUR U.S. CITIES: FINDINGS FROM THE HISPANIC COMMUNITY HEALTH STUDY/STUDY OF LATINOS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avilés-Santa, M Larissa; Schneiderman, Neil; Savage, Peter J; Kaplan, Robert C; Teng, Yanping; Pérez, Cynthia M; Suárez, Erick L; Cai, Jianwen; Giachello, Aida L; Talavera, Gregory A; Cowie, Catherine C

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the ability of American Diabetes Association (ADA) diagnostic criteria to identify U.S. Hispanics/Latinos from diverse heritage groups with probable diabetes mellitus and assess cardiovascular risk factor correlates of those criteria. Cross-sectional analysis of data from 15,507 adults from 6 Hispanic/Latino heritage groups, enrolled in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos. The prevalence of probable diabetes mellitus was estimated using individual or combinations of ADA-defined cut points. The sensitivity and specificity of these criteria at identifying diabetes mellitus from ADA-defined prediabetes and normoglycemia were evaluated. Prevalence ratios of hypertension, abnormal lipids, and elevated urinary albumin-creatinine ratio for unrecognized diabetes mellitus-versus prediabetes and normoglycemia-were calculated. Among Hispanics/Latinos (mean age, 43 years) with diabetes mellitus, 39.4% met laboratory test criteria for probable diabetes, and the prevalence varied by heritage group. Using the oral glucose tolerance test as the gold standard, the sensitivity of fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and hemoglobin A1c-alone or in combination-was low (18, 23, and 33%, respectively) at identifying probable diabetes mellitus. Individuals who met any criterion for probable diabetes mellitus had significantly higher (Pdiabetes mellitus among Hispanics/Latinos, independent of heritage group. Assessing cardiovascular risk factors at diagnosis might prompt multitarget interventions and reduce health complications in this young population. 2hPG = 2-hour post-glucose load plasma glucose ADA = American Diabetes Association BMI = body mass index CV = cardiovascular FPG = fasting plasma glucose HbA1c = hemoglobin A1c HCHS/SOL = Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos HDL-C = high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol NGT = normal glucose tolerance NHANES = National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey OGTT = oral glucose

  15. Depressive symptoms and externalizing behaviors among Hispanic immigrant adolescents: Examining longitudinal effects of cultural stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, Miguel Ángel; Schwartz, Seth J; Castillo, Linda G; Romero, Andrea J; Huang, Shi; Lorenzo-Blanco, Elma I; Unger, Jennifer B; Zamboanga, Byron L; Des Rosiers, Sabrina E; Baezconde-Garbanati, Lourdes; Lizzi, Karina M; Soto, Daniel W; Oshri, Assaf; Villamar, Juan Andres; Pattarroyo, Monica; Szapocznik, José

    2015-07-01

    This study examined longitudinal effects of cultural stress (a latent factor comprised of bicultural stress, ethnic discrimination, and negative context of reception) on depressive symptoms and a range of externalizing behaviors among recently (≤5 years in the U.S. at baseline) immigrated Hispanic adolescents. A sample of 302 adolescents (53% boys; mean age 14.51 years) completed baseline measures of perceived ethnic discrimination, bicultural stress, and perceived negative context of reception; and outcome measures of depressive symptoms, cigarette smoking, alcohol use, aggressive behavior, and rule-breaking behavior six months post-baseline. A path analysis indicated that higher cultural stress scores predicted higher levels of all outcomes. These effects were consistent across genders, but varied by study site. Specifically, higher cultural stress scores increased depressive symptoms among participants in Miami, but not in Los Angeles. Findings suggest that cultural stress is a clinically relevant predictor of depressive symptoms and externalizing behaviors among Hispanic immigrant adolescents.

  16. Long-term Diet and Biomarker Changes after a Short-term Intervention among Hispanic Breast Cancer Survivors: The ¡Cocinar Para Su Salud! Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenlee, Heather; Ogden Gaffney, Ann; Aycinena, A Corina; Koch, Pam; Contento, Isobel; Karmally, Wahida; Richardson, John M; Shi, Zaixing; Lim, Emerson; Tsai, Wei-Yann; Santella, Regina M; Blaner, William S; Clugston, Robin D; Cremers, Serge; Pollak, Susan; Sirosh, Iryna; Crew, Katherine D; Maurer, Matthew; Kalinsky, Kevin; Hershman, Dawn L

    2016-11-01

    Among Hispanic breast cancer survivors, we examined the long-term effects of a short-term culturally based dietary intervention on increasing fruits/vegetables (F/V), decreasing fat, and changing biomarkers associated with breast cancer recurrence risk. Spanish-speaking women (n = 70) with a history of stage 0-III breast cancer who completed treatment were randomized to ¡Cocinar Para Su Salud! (n = 34), a culturally based 9-session program (24 hours over 12 weeks, including nutrition education, cooking classes, and food-shopping field trips), or a control group (n = 36, written dietary recommendations for breast cancer survivors). Diet recalls, fasting blood, and anthropometric measures were collected at baseline, 6, and 12 months. We report changes between groups at 12 months in dietary intake and biomarkers using 2-sample Wilcoxon t tests and generalized estimating equation (GEE) models. At 12 months, the intervention group compared with the control group reported higher increases in mean daily F/V servings (total: +2.0 vs. -0.4; P Salud! program was effective at increasing long-term F/V intake in Hispanic breast cancer survivors and changed biomarkers associated with breast cancer recurrence risk. It is possible for short-term behavioral interventions to have long-term effects on behaviors and biomarkers in minority cancer patient populations. Results can inform future study designs. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 25(11); 1491-502. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  17. AIDS-related stigma among Black and Hispanic young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow, William W; Montanea, Julie E; Gladwin, Hugh

    2009-12-01

    Telephone surveys with national probability samples of English-speaking adults have suggested that popular support for punitive policies toward people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) declined in the 1990s, but AIDS-related stigma persists in the United States. Our aim was to assess the prevalence and impact of AIDS-related stigma in non-Hispanic Black and Hispanic communities. A cross-sectional computer-assisted telephone-interview survey was conducted in summer 2003 with African-American, Afro-Caribbean, Haitian, and Hispanic 18-39 year-old residents of 12 high AIDS-incidence areas in Broward County, Florida. Stigma items were adopted from national surveys, but interviews were conducted in Spanish and Haitian Creole as well as in English. Stigma scores were higher than those reported for national samples, especially among Haitians interviewed in Creole. AIDS-related stigma was associated with never receiving an HIV-antibody test (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 0.78, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.62-0.99, P = .046), an elevated perception of HIV risk (AOR = 1.32, 95% CI: 1.01-1.73, P = .045) and a failure to participate in HIV-prevention efforts (AOR = 0.53, 95% CI: 0.34-0.85, P = .008). Interventions are needed to mitigate the pernicious effects of AIDS-related stigma.

  18. Magic Baseline Beta Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Agarwalla, Sanjib Kumar; Raychaudhuri, Amitava

    2007-01-01

    We study the physics reach of an experiment where neutrinos produced in a beta-beam facility at CERN are observed in a large magnetized iron calorimeter (ICAL) at the India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO). The CERN-INO distance is close to the so-called "magic" baseline which helps evade some of the parameter degeneracies and allows for a better measurement of the neutrino mass hierarchy and $\\theta_{13}$.

  19. Rationing with baselines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Jens Leth; Moreno-Ternero, Juan D.; Østerdal, Lars Peter Raahave

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a new operator for general rationing problems in which, besides conflicting claims, individual baselines play an important role in the rationing process. The operator builds onto ideas of composition, which are not only frequent in rationing, but also in related problems...... such as bargaining, choice, and queuing. We characterize the operator and show how it preserves some standard axioms in the literature on rationing. We also relate it to recent contributions in such literature....

  20. The TDAQ Baseline Architecture

    CERN Multimedia

    Wickens, F J

    The Trigger-DAQ community is currently busy preparing material for the DAQ, HLT and DCS TDR. Over the last few weeks a very important step has been a series of meetings to complete agreement on the baseline architecture. An overview of the architecture indicating some of the main parameters is shown in figure 1. As reported at the ATLAS Plenary during the February ATLAS week, the main area where the baseline had not yet been agreed was around the Read-Out System (ROS) and details in the DataFlow. The agreed architecture has: Read-Out Links (ROLs) from the RODs using S-Link; Read-Out Buffers (ROB) sited near the RODs, mounted in a chassis - today assumed to be a PC, using PCI bus at least for configuration, control and monitoring. The baseline assumes data aggregation, in the ROB and/or at the output (which could either be over a bus or in the network). Optimization of the data aggregation will be made in the coming months, but the current model has each ROB card receiving input from 4 ROLs, and 3 such c...

  1. Do Gender and Race/Ethnicity Influence Acute Myocardial Infarction Quality of Care in a Hospital with a Large Hispanic Patient and Provider Representation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomás Romero

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Disparities in acute myocardial infarction (AMI care for women and minorities have been extensively reported in United States but with limited information on Hispanics. Methods. Medical records of 287 (62% Hispanic and 176 (38% non-Hispanic white (NHW patients and 245 women (53% admitted with suspected AMI to a southern California nonprofit community hospital with a large Hispanic patient and provider representation were reviewed. Baseline characteristics, outcomes (mortality, CATH, PCI, CABG, and use of pertinent drug therapy, and medical insurance were analyzed according to gender, Hispanic and NHW race/ethnicity when AMI was confirmed. For categorical variables, 2×2 chi-square analysis was conducted. Odds ratio and 95% confidence interval for outcomes adjusted for gender, race/ethnicity, cardiovascular risk factors, and insurance were obtained. Results. Women and Hispanics had similar drug therapy, CATH, PCI, and mortality as men and NHW when AMI was confirmed (n=387. Hispanics had less private insurance than NHW (31.4% versus 56.3%, P<0.001; no significant differences were found according to gender. Conclusions. No differences in quality measures and outcomes were found for women and between Hispanic and NHW in AMI patients admitted to a facility with a large Hispanic representation. Disparities in medical insurance showed no influence on these findings.

  2. Fostering Healthy Lifestyles in the African American Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murimi, Mary; Chrisman, Matthew S.; McAllister, Tiffany; McDonald, Olevia D.

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 8.3% of the U.S. population (25.8 million people) is affected by type 2 diabetes. The burden of diabetes is disproportionately greater in the African American community. Compared with non-Hispanic Caucasian adults, the risk of diagnosed type 2 diabetes was 77% higher among non-Hispanic Blacks, who are 27% more likely to die of…

  3. Evaluation of hospice care by family members of Hispanic and non-Hispanic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkendall, Abbie; Holland, Jason M; Keene, Jennifer R; Luna, Nora

    2015-05-01

    The Hispanic older adult population is increasing rapidly and past research suggests that this demographic group underutilizes hospice services, highlighting the need to improve our understanding of their needs in end of life. This study relied upon information from the family evaluation of hospice care survey provided by 2980 caregivers, 152 of whom cared for a Hispanic patient and 2828 who cared for a non-Hispanic patient. Caregivers of Hispanic patients were more likely to report that hospice was inconsistent with the patient's wishes, and that they received more attention than desired for emotional issues. Caregivers of Hispanic patients were also more likely to express that emotional/spiritual forms of support were insufficient. Similar levels of satisfaction were reported for caregivers of Hispanics and non-Hispanics regarding dignity/respect, information received, care coordination, and overall satisfaction. © The Author(s) 2014.

  4. Hispanic Population Growth and Rural Income Inequality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrado, Emilio A.; Kandel, William A.

    2010-01-01

    We analyze the relationship between Hispanic population growth and changes in U.S. rural income inequality from 1990 through 2000. Applying comparative approaches used for urban areas we disentangle Hispanic population growth's contribution to inequality by comparing and statistically modeling changes in the family income Gini coefficient across…

  5. Hispanic Literature: A Fiesta for Literacy Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isom, Bess A.; Casteel, Carolyn P.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses how literature can facilitate students' appreciation of the multifaceted Hispanic culture. Offers advice on merging Hispanic literature and literacy instruction, organizing children's books by category to help structure classroom activities, exploring themes and cultural concepts, and integrating literacy/thinking strategies with…

  6. Hispanic Vocational Exploration Project. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centro De La Comunidad, Inc., New London, CT.

    During its second year, the Hispanic Vocational Exploration Project recruited eighth and ninth grade Hispanic youth for a four-week cycle, after-school, career exploratory program at Southeastern Regional Vocational Technical School, Groton, Connecticut. A series of career education workshops was the other major project activity. Supportive…

  7. Hispanics Find Jobs that Shift Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilroy, Marilyn

    2007-01-01

    Economic opportunity, the force that has driven population shifts for years, is changing the face of migration as Hispanics move into parts of the nation beyond border states and traditional ports of entry. North Carolina, Tennessee, Georgia, and Indiana are experiencing a steady growth in Hispanic population. In addition, West Virginia, Ohio, and…

  8. 25 Great Ideas for Hispanic Heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Instructor, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Hispanic Heritage Month, celebrated September 15th through October 15th, is a great opportunity to kick off a whole year of cultural discovery. This article presents 25 great ideas for Hispanic heritage. These 25 fresh ideas--from Aztec math to Carnaval masks--are easy to put together, and they offer students the chance to celebrate their own…

  9. The Impact of Technology on Hispanic Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsey, Cheryl; Mata-Claflin, Guadalupe; Holland, Glenda; Castillo, Jose Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine if elementary teachers use technology as a tool to enhance classroom strategies for improving student achievement among Hispanic students. The following research questions were utilized: a) Are computers available for classroom teachers and Hispanic students? b) Has the available technology contributed to…

  10. Literatura Oral Hispanica (Hispanic Oral Literature).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlpine, Dave

    As part of a class in Hispanic Oral Literature, students collected pieces of folklore from various Hispanic residents in the region known as "Siouxland" in Iowa. Consisting of some of the folklore recorded from the residents, this paper includes 18 "cuentos y leyendas" (tales and legends), 48 "refranes" (proverbs), 17…

  11. Outpatient drug abuse treatment for Hispanic adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szapocznik, José; Lopez, Barbara; Prado, Guillermo; Schwartz, Seth J; Pantin, Hilda

    2006-09-01

    The objective of this article is to review the state of the science in evidence-based drug abuse treatments for Hispanic adolescents, highlight scientific opportunities, and offer recommendations to further the field of drug abuse treatment for this population. The article is divided into seven sections: boundaries for this review, drug abuse and associated problems, behavioral treatment, cultural issues in hispanic adolescent behavioral drug abuse treatment, pharmacological treatment, gender differences in treatment, and scientific opportunities/recommendations. Although only one treatment approach, Brief Strategic Family Therapy, has been empirically shown to be efficacious in treating Hispanic adolescent drug abusers, with some modifications other treatments may also have the potential to be efficacious with Hispanic adolescents. Family-based approaches, which typically appear to be most efficacious with adolescents in general, may also have the greatest potential to treat drug abuse in Hispanic adolescents.

  12. Listening to Hispanic mothers: guidelines for teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, A H; Robledo, L

    1999-01-01

    Teaching Hispanic mothers in a culturally sensitive way to care for their children is a challenge to pediatric nurses. Pediatric nurses must be familiar with customs and the folk medicine practiced by Hispanic mothers. It is very important that the pediatric nurse listens to the voices of Hispanic mothers to determine their health practices, and those that may have been used in their children. Familiarity with folk medicine and health practices will facilitate an appropriate treatment plan and will help to determine whether the mothers' practices are dangerous or beneficial for the child. Pediatric nurses should assess for concurrent use of home remedies and conventional medications to determine if there are any known interactive effects. Finally, increasing the number of pediatric nurses who are fluent in Spanish will enable the voices of Hispanic mothers to be better heard, which in turn, will improve the health status of Hispanic children.

  13. Cardiovascular disease risk factors and psychological distress among Hispanics/Latinos: The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda, Sheila F; Buelna, Christina; Giacinto, Rebeca Espinoza; Gallo, Linda C; Sotres-Alvarez, Daniela; Gonzalez, Patricia; Fortmann, Addie L; Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia; Gellman, Marc D; Giachello, Aida L; Talavera, Gregory A

    2016-06-01

    Studies show that cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors are correlated with psychological distress, yet research examining these relationships among Hispanic/Latinos is lacking. The population-based Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos enrolled a cohort of Hispanic/Latino adults (N=16,415) 18-74years of age at the time of recruitment, from four US metropolitan areas, between March 2008 and June 2011. Psychological distress (i.e., 10-item Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale, 10 item Spielberger Trait Anxiety Scale, and a combined depression/anxiety score), socio-demographics (i.e., age, education, income, insurance, sex, and Hispanic/Latino background), acculturation (i.e., country of birth and language preference), and traditional CVD risk factors (i.e., dyslipidemia, obesity, current cigarette smoking, diabetes, and hypertension) were assessed at baseline. Associations between CVD risk factors and psychological distress measures by sex were examined using multiple linear regression models, accounting for complex survey design and sampling weights and controlling for socio-demographic and acculturation covariates. In adjusted analyses, all three psychological distress measures were significantly related to smoking. For females, greater psychological distress was significantly related to obesity and current smoking. For males, diabetes and current smoking were associated with psychological distress. For males and females, dyslipidemia and hypertension were not associated with psychological distress after adjusting for other factors. Elevated depression and anxiety symptoms were associated with CVD risk factors for Hispanic/Latino men and women. However, these results were not consistent across Hispanic/Latino groups. As promoted by the integrative care model, psychosocial concerns should be considered in research on CVD risk and chronic disease prevention.

  14. Population structure of Hispanics in the United States: the multi-ethnic study of atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manichaikul, Ani; Palmas, Walter; Rodriguez, Carlos J; Peralta, Carmen A; Divers, Jasmin; Guo, Xiuqing; Chen, Wei-Min; Wong, Quenna; Williams, Kayleen; Kerr, Kathleen F; Taylor, Kent D; Tsai, Michael Y; Goodarzi, Mark O; Sale, Michèle M; Diez-Roux, Ana V; Rich, Stephen S; Rotter, Jerome I; Mychaleckyj, Josyf C

    2012-01-01

    Using ~60,000 SNPs selected for minimal linkage disequilibrium, we perform population structure analysis of 1,374 unrelated Hispanic individuals from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA), with self-identification corresponding to Central America (n = 93), Cuba (n = 50), the Dominican Republic (n = 203), Mexico (n = 708), Puerto Rico (n = 192), and South America (n = 111). By projection of principal components (PCs) of ancestry to samples from the HapMap phase III and the Human Genome Diversity Panel (HGDP), we show the first two PCs quantify the Caucasian, African, and Native American origins, while the third and fourth PCs bring out an axis that aligns with known South-to-North geographic location of HGDP Native American samples and further separates MESA Mexican versus Central/South American samples along the same axis. Using k-means clustering computed from the first four PCs, we define four subgroups of the MESA Hispanic cohort that show close agreement with self-identification, labeling the clusters as primarily Dominican/Cuban, Mexican, Central/South American, and Puerto Rican. To demonstrate our recommendations for genetic analysis in the MESA Hispanic cohort, we present pooled and stratified association analysis of triglycerides for selected SNPs in the LPL and TRIB1 gene regions, previously reported in GWAS of triglycerides in Caucasians but as yet unconfirmed in Hispanic populations. We report statistically significant evidence for genetic association in both genes, and we further demonstrate the importance of considering population substructure and genetic heterogeneity in genetic association studies performed in the United States Hispanic population.

  15. Population structure of Hispanics in the United States: the multi-ethnic study of atherosclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ani Manichaikul

    Full Text Available Using ~60,000 SNPs selected for minimal linkage disequilibrium, we perform population structure analysis of 1,374 unrelated Hispanic individuals from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA, with self-identification corresponding to Central America (n = 93, Cuba (n = 50, the Dominican Republic (n = 203, Mexico (n = 708, Puerto Rico (n = 192, and South America (n = 111. By projection of principal components (PCs of ancestry to samples from the HapMap phase III and the Human Genome Diversity Panel (HGDP, we show the first two PCs quantify the Caucasian, African, and Native American origins, while the third and fourth PCs bring out an axis that aligns with known South-to-North geographic location of HGDP Native American samples and further separates MESA Mexican versus Central/South American samples along the same axis. Using k-means clustering computed from the first four PCs, we define four subgroups of the MESA Hispanic cohort that show close agreement with self-identification, labeling the clusters as primarily Dominican/Cuban, Mexican, Central/South American, and Puerto Rican. To demonstrate our recommendations for genetic analysis in the MESA Hispanic cohort, we present pooled and stratified association analysis of triglycerides for selected SNPs in the LPL and TRIB1 gene regions, previously reported in GWAS of triglycerides in Caucasians but as yet unconfirmed in Hispanic populations. We report statistically significant evidence for genetic association in both genes, and we further demonstrate the importance of considering population substructure and genetic heterogeneity in genetic association studies performed in the United States Hispanic population.

  16. Attendance at Health Promotion Programs: Baseline Predictors and Program Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Catherine J.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    As part of a family cardiovascular health promotion project, 111 Mexican-American and 95 Anglo-American families with fifth or sixth grade children were assigned to either a primary prevention program involving 18 sessions or to a control condition. Correlates of attendance were low baseline scores on physical activity and cardiovascular fitness…

  17. Nuevos datos sobre el uso de voces del fondo hispánico tradicional en textos españoles del siglo XVI (New data on the use of words of traditional Hispanic origin in 16th-century American texts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Teresa Cáceres-Lorenzo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available En textos españoles del siglo XVI se documentan glosas explicativas que acompañan a voces del fondo hispánico tradicional. Dichas apostillas indican que los indios o los que forman parte de las primeras ciudades americanas emplean léxico español que los autores desconocen o consideran extrañas a su vocabulario patrimonial. Los autores principalmente implicados en estos casos son funcionarios y algunos cronistas con una actitud purista ante el vocabulario. El análisis de los ejemplos no investigados hasta el momento en este contexto, permite aseverar que estos son de procedencia árabe o portuguesa, o son producto de cambios semánticos, y derivados con significados muy alejados de la voz originaria. (Spanish texts from the 16th century included some explanatory notes accompanying words of traditional Hispanic origin. These annotations indicate that indigenous people or Spaniards living in the first American cities employed a lexicon unfamiliar or unknown to the annotators' inherited traditional Spanish vocabulary. The annotators mainly involved in these cases were civil servants as well as some journalists with a puristic attitude towards vocabulary. Analyses of under researched examples of the lexicon in question reveal that these words are of Arabic or Portuguese origin, which are the product of semantic changes, or derivatives with meanings very distant from those of the original phrases. This transformation indicates a first-level separation between the lexicon employed in America and the one that was used in Peninsular Spain.

  18. Acculturation and substance use among Hispanic early adolescents: investigating the mediating roles of acculturative stress and self-esteem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamboanga, Byron L; Schwartz, Seth J; Jarvis, Lorna Hernandez; Van Tyne, Kathryne

    2009-07-01

    We examined the extent to which Hispanic orientation and American orientation are associated with substance use (cigarette, alcohol, and marijuana) both directly and indirectly through acculturative stress and self-esteem. Participants were 347 Hispanic early adolescents (50.7% male; mean age = 12.57, SD = 0.92, range 11-15) from two middle schools in western Michigan. Findings showed that self-esteem emerged as the most consistent predictor of likelihood and extent of substance use. Ethnic identity was positively related to risk for substance use, and acculturative stress and self-esteem mediated the relationships of Hispanic cultural orientation to alcohol use. Self-esteem was the most important protective factor against substance use, and as such, we conclude that prevention programs designed to address precocious substance use that incorporate a self-esteem building component could prove useful among Hispanic early adolescents residing in monocultural contexts within the United States.

  19. Aging, migration, and mortality: current status of research on the Hispanic paradox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markides, Kyriakos S; Eschbach, Karl

    2005-10-01

    We reviewed recent evidence on the apparent Hispanic mortality paradox. Recent studies using vital statistics, national community surveys linked to the National Death Index, Medicare data linked to application records for social security cards maintained in the Social Security Administration NUDIMENT file, and mortality follow-up by regional studies are reviewed critically. Data based on vital statistics show the greatest mortality advantage compared with non-Hispanic Whites for all Hispanics combined. The advantage is greatest among older people. National Community Surveys linked to the National Death Index show a narrowing of the advantage, and one study suggests that the Mexican Origin mortality advantage can be attributed to selective return migration of less healthy immigrants to Mexico. The Medicare-NUDIMENT data that avoid problems of other data sets also show an advantage in mortality among Hispanic elders, although the advantage is considerably lower than is found using the vital statistics method. Although some research has recently begun to question whether indeed all Hispanic groups enjoy a mortality advantage, the majority of the evidence continues to support a mortality advantage at a minimum among Mexican Americans and especially in old age, at least among men, which may provide partial, albeit indirect, support for a selective return migration or "salmon bias" effect. There is a need to further explore the existence of a selective return migration effect with expanded data bases that include more subjects from the various Hispanic origins. To date, the majority of the evidence continues to support the Hispanic paradox at least among people of Mexican origin and calls for additional attention to this interesting and highly important phenomenon.

  20. Nativity differences in allostatic load by age, sex, and Hispanic background from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Christian R; Strizich, Garrett; Seeman, Teresa E; Isasi, Carmen R; Gallo, Linda C; Avilés-Santa, M Larissa; Cai, Jianwen; Penedo, Frank J; Arguelles, Willian; Sanders, Anne E; Lipton, Richard B; Kaplan, Robert C

    2016-12-01

    Allostatic load (AL), an index of biological "wear and tear" on the body from cumulative exposure to stress, has been little studied in US Hispanics/Latinos. We investigated AL accumulation patterns by age, sex, and nativity in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos. We studied 15,830 Hispanic/Latinos of Mexican, Cuban, Dominican, Puerto Rican, Central and South American descent aged 18-74 years, 77% of whom were foreign-born. Consistent with the conceptualization of AL, we developed an index based upon 16 physiological markers that spanned the cardiometabolic, parasympathetic, and inflammatory systems. We computed mean adjusted AL scores using log-linear models across age-groups (18-44, 45-54, 55-74 years), by sex and nativity status. Among foreign-born individuals, differences in AL by duration of residence in the US (<10, ≥10 years) and age at migration (<24, ≥24 years) were also examined. In persons younger than 55 years old, after controlling for socioeconomic and behavioral factors, AL was highest among US-born individuals, intermediate in foreign-born Hispanics/Latinos with longer duration in the US (≥10 years), and lowest among those with shorter duration in the US (<10 years) (P <0.0001 for increasing trend). Similarly, AL increased among the foreign-born with earlier age at immigration. These trends were less pronounced among individuals ≥55 years of age. Similar patterns were observed across all Hispanic/Latino heritage groups (P for interaction=0.5). Our findings support both a "healthy immigrant" pattern and a loss of health advantage over time among US Hispanics/Latinos of diverse heritages.

  1. Hispanics in the Labor Force: A Conference Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borjas, George, Ed.; Tienda, Marta, Ed.

    Hispanics in the U.S. labor force are the subject of the studies in this volume. After an introduction by George J. Borjas and Marta Tienda, the first three papers focus on the same issue: the determination of wage rates for Hispanics and comparison of Hispanic and non-Hispanic wage rates. Cordelia Reimers compares the situation for Black, White,…

  2. The Use of Inpatient Mental Health Services by Hispanic Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Nancy Felipe; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Provides a profile of Hispanic women's use of inpatient mental health facilities. Presents gender differences for Hispanic and non-Hispanic inpatient admissions regarding age, marital status, and diagnosis. Women, particularly Hispanics, used service less than men; admission rates were higher for men with schizophrenia and alcohol-related…

  3. Lyme Disease in Hispanics, United States, 2000-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Christina A; Starr, J Andrew; Kugeler, Kiersten J; Mead, Paul S

    2016-03-01

    Hispanics comprise a growing portion of the US population and might have distinct risk factors for tickborne diseases. During 2000-2013, a total of 5,473 Lyme disease cases were reported among Hispanics through national surveillance. Hispanics were more likely than non-Hispanics to have signs of disseminated infection and onset during fall months.

  4. The Hispanic Stress Inventory Version 2: Improving the assessment of acculturation stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes, Richard C; Fisher, Dennis G; Padilla, Amado M; Napper, Lucy E

    2016-05-01

    This article reports on a 2-phase study to revise the Hispanic Stress Inventory (HSI; Cervantes, Padilla, & Salgado de Snyder, 1991). The necessity for a revised stress-assessment instrument was determined by demographic and political shifts affecting Latin American immigrants and later-generation Hispanics in the United States in the 2 decades since the development of the HSI. The data for the revision of the HSI (termed the HSI2) was collected at 4 sites: Los Angeles, El Paso, Miami, and Boston, and included 941 immigrants and 575 U.S.-born Hispanics and a diverse population of Hispanic subgroups. The immigrant version of the HSI2 includes 10 stress subscales, whereas the U.S.-born version includes 6 stress subscales. Both versions of the HSI2 are shown to possess satisfactory Cronbach's alpha reliabilities and demonstrate expert-based content validity, as well as concurrent validity when correlated with subscales of the Brief Symptom Inventory (Derogatis, 1993) and the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (Kroenke, Spitzer, & Williams, 2001). The new HSI2 instruments are recommended for use by clinicians and researchers interested in assessing psychosocial stress among diverse Hispanic populations of various ethnic subgroups, age groups, and geographic location. (PsycINFO Database Record

  5. Hispanic residential ethnic density and depression in post-ACS patients: Re-thinking the role of social support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, Ellen-ge D.; Shaffer, Jonathan A.; Alcantara, Carmela; Clemow, Lynn; Brondolo, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Objective The ethnic density hypothesis suggests that ethnic density confers greater social support and consequently protects against depressive symptoms in ethnic minority individuals. However, the potential benefits of ethnic density have not been examined in individuals who are facing a specific and salient life stressor. We examined the degree to which the effects of Hispanic ethnic density on depressive symptoms are explained by socioeconomic resources and social support. Methods Patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS, N = 472) completed the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and measures of demographics, ACS clinical factors and disease severity, and perceived social support. Neighborhood characteristics, including median income, number of single-parent households, and Hispanic ethnic density, were extracted from the American Community Survey Census (2005 – 2009) for each patient using his/her geocoded address. Results In a linear regression analysis adjusted for demographic and clinical factors, Hispanic ethnic density was positively associated with depressive symptoms (β = .09, SE = .04, p = .03). However, Hispanic density was no longer a significant predictor of depressive symptoms when measures of neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage were controlled. In addition, the effects of Hispanic density were not the same for all groups. The relationship of Hispanic density on depressive symptoms was moderated by nativity status. Among US-born patients with ACS, there was a significant positive relationship between Hispanic density and depressive symptoms, and social support significantly mediated this effect. There was no observed effect of Hispanic density to depressive symptoms for foreign-born ACS patients. Discussion Although previous research suggests that ethnic density may be protective against depression, our data suggest that among patients with ACS, living in a community with a high concentration of Hispanic individuals is associated with

  6. Hispanic children and overweight: causes and interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centrella-Nigro, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    The incidence and prevalence of overweight is increasing to alarming rates in children and adolescents in the United States. Hispanic children are one of the highest risk groups for overweight. Many different factors are positively correlated with childhood overweight in Hispanics: lower socioeconomic status, lacking health insurance or being under-insured, poor diet, decreased physical activity, overweight status of parents, mother's perception of overweight, and degree of acculturation. Pediatric nurses are in a pivotal position to assist in curtailing the epidemic. Various evidence-based practices to prevent and treat pediatric overweight are discussed with recommendations to intervene, particularly with Hispanic youth.

  7. Long Baseline Neutrino Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzetto, Mauro

    2016-05-01

    Following the discovery of neutrino oscillations by the Super-Kamiokande collaboration, recently awarded with the Nobel Prize, two generations of long baseline experiments had been setup to further study neutrino oscillations. The first generation experiments, K2K in Japan, Minos in the States and Opera in Europe, focused in confirming the Super-Kamiokande result, improving the precision with which oscillation parameters had been measured and demonstrating the ντ appearance process. Second generation experiments, T2K in Japan and very recently NOνA in the States, went further, being optimized to look for genuine three neutrino phenomena like non-zero values of θ13 and first glimpses to leptonic CP violation (LCPV) and neutrino mass ordering (NMO). The discovery of leptonic CP violation will require third generation setups, at the moment two strong proposals are ongoing, Dune in the States and Hyper-Kamiokande in Japan. This review will focus a little more in these future initiatives.

  8. Biofuels Baseline 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamelinck, C.; Koper, M.; Berndes, G.; Englund, O.; Diaz-Chavez, R.; Kunen, E.; Walden, D.

    2011-10-15

    The European Union is promoting the use of biofuels and other renewable energy in transport. In April 2009, the Renewable Energy Directive (2009/28/EC) was adopted that set a 10% target for renewable energy in transport in 2020. The directive sets several requirements to the sustainability of biofuels marketed in the frame of the Directive. The Commission is required to report to the European Parliament on a regular basis on a range of sustainability impacts resulting from the use of biofuels in the EU. This report serves as a baseline of information for regular monitoring on the impacts of the Directive. Chapter 2 discusses the EU biofuels market, the production and consumption of biofuels and international trade. It is derived where the feedstock for EU consumed biofuels originally come from. Chapter 3 discusses the biofuel policy framework in the EU and major third countries of supply. It looks at various policy aspects that are relevant to comply with the EU sustainability requirements. Chapter 4 discusses the environmental and social sustainability aspects associated with EU biofuels and their feedstock. Chapter 5 discusses the macro-economic effects that indirectly result from increased EU biofuels consumption, on commodity prices and land use. Chapter 6 presents country factsheets for main third countries that supplied biofuels to the EU market in 2008.

  9. The Effects of Contact on the Prejudice between Hispanics and Non-Hispanic Whites in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Charles N.

    2007-01-01

    The growing Hispanic population has come into increasing contact with the larger population of non-Hispanic Whites. It is important to understand the effects of this contact on prejudice. The effects of six kinds of contact were examined for their effects on prejudice between Hispanics (n = 156) and non-Hispanic Whites (n = 1,479) who were…

  10. Hypertension and diabetes prevalence among U.S. Hispanics by country of origin: the National Health Interview Survey 2000-2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabon-Nau, Lina P; Cohen, Amy; Meigs, James B; Grant, Richard W

    2010-08-01

    Despite their diverse cultural origins, Hispanics in the US are generally studied as a single ethnic group. 1) Assess demographic and disease-related differences among U.S. Hispanics by country of origin, and 2) Examine the mediating roles of socioeconomic status and acculturation on disease prevalence in these subgroups. Using data from the 2000-2005 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), we compared characteristics of Mexican-Americans with Hispanics originally from: Mexico, Puerto Rico, Central/South America, Cuba, and Dominican Republic (n = 31,240). We stratified the analysis by foreign versus US-born Hispanic subgroups and modeled hypertension and diabetes prevalence, adjusting for demographic and acculturation differences. The six Hispanic subgroups were significantly diverse in all measured variables. Prevalence of hypertension (32%) and diabetes (15%) was highest in foreign-born Puerto Ricans. After adjusting for age, BMI, smoking, socioeconomic status and acculturation in foreign-born Hispanics, Puerto Ricans (OR = 1.76 [95% CI: 1.23, 2.50], p = 0.002) and Dominicans (OR = 1.93 [1.24, 3.00], p = 0.004), had higher prevalence of hypertension relative to Mexican-Americans. Adjusted diabetes prevalence among foreign-born Hispanics was half or less in Cubans (OR = 0.42 [0.25, 0.68] p hypertension (OR = 0.53, [0.33, 0.83], p = 0.006) and Mexicans (OR = 0.76 [0.60, 0.98], p = 0.03) had lower diabetes prevalence compared to Mexican-Americans in adjusted models. The prevalence of hypertension and diabetes varies significantly among Hispanics by country of origin. Health disparities research should include representation from all Hispanic subgroups.

  11. Colonoscopy Screening Information Preferences Among Urban Hispanics

    OpenAIRE

    Ellison, Jennie; Jandorf, Lina; DuHamel, Katherine

    2011-01-01

    Existing disparities are evident in colorectal cancer (CRC) screening. We sought to assess preferred sources of colonoscopy screening information among Hispanics in East Harlem, NY. Face-to-face interviews were conducted among average-risk for CRC, non-symptomatic Hispanics in community-based sites and health clinics. SPSS 16 analysis explored the relationships between sociodemographic and health care variables and preferred sources of colonoscopy information for 395 participants. The top fou...

  12. Machismo, Marianismo, and Negative Cognitive-Emotional Factors: Findings From the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos Sociocultural Ancillary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuñez, Alicia; González, Patricia; Talavera, Gregory A; Sanchez-Johnsen, Lisa; Roesch, Scott C; Davis, Sonia M; Arguelles, William; Womack, Veronica Y; Ostrovsky, Natania W; Ojeda, Lizette; Penedo, Frank J; Gallo, Linda C

    2016-11-01

    There is limited research on the traditional Hispanic male and female gender roles of machismo and marianismo, respectively, in relation to negative cognitions and emotions. Given the vulnerability of Hispanics to negative cognitions and emotions, it is important to examine sociocultural correlates of emotional distress. Therefore, we examined associations of machismo and marianismo with negative cognitive-emotional factors (i.e., depression symptoms; cynical hostility; and trait anxiety and anger) in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos Sociocultural Ancillary Study, a cross-sectional cohort study of sociocultural and psychosocial correlates of cardiometabolic health. Participants were aged 18-74 years and self-identified as Hispanic of Central American, Cuban, Dominican, Mexican, Puerto Rican, South American, and other Hispanic background (N = 4,426). Results revealed that specific components of machismo (traditional machismo) and marianismo (family and spiritual pillar dimensions) were associated with higher levels of negative cognitions and emotions after adjusting for socio-demographic factors (p < .05); these associations remained consistent across sex, Hispanic background group, and acculturation. Findings can inform mental health interventions and contribute to our understanding of the importance of gender role socialization in the context of self-reported negative cognitive-emotional factors in Hispanics.

  13. A health protection model for Hispanic adults with Type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latham, Christine L; Calvillo, Evelyn

    2007-07-01

    The Hispanic Health Protection Model (HHPM) was designed to assist practitioners' systematic assessment of Hispanic people to establish baselines and evaluate the success of early diabetes treatment. This article provides the research basis of the HHPM and related assessment tools. The treatment of diabetes incorporates lifestyle change, and this adjustment is particularly important to follow with vulnerable groups. One such group is the Hispanic population, since the impact of diabetes is greatest on economically disadvantaged segments of this population, who suffer disproportionately higher Type 2 diabetes prevalence and higher levels of morbidity and mortality as compared with other populations. Traditional Hispanic health beliefs are often in conflict with Western medicine, so the adjustments to the lifestyle demands of this disease need to be evaluated. To understand this discrepancy fully in patient outcomes, a culturally sensitive assessment framework was developed based on health protection theories and research with Hispanic people with diabetes and, based on this framework, assessment tools were translated for use during interviews with low literacy, Spanish-speaking patients. The HHPM translated measures of premorbid lifestyle, health beliefs, support, self-efficacy, quality of life, knowledge of diabetes, and physiological parameters can be used during consecutive clinic visits during the first six months of therapy to map the success of patients' understanding of and psychological adjustment to diabetes. The HHPM is a culturally-relevant, systematic, and holistic approach to assessing adjustment of Hispanic people to a new diagnosis of diabetes, including their psychological, cognitive, and physiological outcomes. Using this type of systematic approach will allow practitioners to target barriers to therapy, such as a lack of self-efficacy or incomplete knowledge of the disease and its treatment in a strategic manner to improve patient success in

  14. Applying recovery biomarkers to calibrate self-report measures of energy and protein in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    We investigated measurement error in the self-reported diets of US Hispanics/Latinos, who are prone to obesity and related comorbidities, by background (Central American, Cuban, Dominican, Mexican, Puerto Rican, and South American) in 2010–2012. In 477 participants aged 18–74 years, doubly labeled w...

  15. Disease features and outcomes in United States lupus patients of Hispanic origin and their Mestizo counterparts in Latin America: a commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugarte-Gil, Manuel F; Pons-Estel, Guillermo J; Molineros, Julio; Wojdyla, Daniel; McGwin, Gerald; Nath, Swapan K; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta; Alarcón, Graciela S

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate disease features and outcomes in two populations with significant Amerindian ancestry. Hispanic patients (from Texas) from the Lupus in Minorities: Nature versus Nurture (LUMINA) cohort and Mestizo patients from the Grupo Latino Americano De Estudio del Lupus or Latin American Group for the Study of Lupus (GLADEL) cohort were included. Disease features and outcomes were evaluated at baseline and last visit. Admixture informative markers of Mestizo Genoma de Lupus Eritematoso Sistémico Network consortium (GENLES) patients and Hispanic LUMINA patients were compared. Univariable analyses were performed using Chi square or Student's t test as appropriate. Multivariable analyses adjusting for possible confounders were carried out using Poisson, logistic or Cox regression models as appropriate. A total of 114 LUMINA and 619 GLADEL patients were included. GLADEL patients had accrued more damage at baseline, but the opposite was the case at last visit. Being from LUMINA was a risk factor for damage accrual, even after adjusting for possible confounders [relative risk (RR) 1.33, 95% CI 1.12, 1.58]. Also, LUMINA patients have a higher risk of mortality than GLADEL patients [hazard ratio (HR) 2.37, 95% CI 1.10, 5.15], having 5-year survival of 85.6% and 94.5%, respectively. In addition, 79 LUMINA patients and 744 Mestizo GENLES patients were evaluated in order to compare genetic ancestry between the two groups; GENLES patients had a higher proportion of European ancestry (48.5% vs 43.3%, P = 0.003) and a lower proportion of Asian ancestry (3.7% vs 4.9%, P = 0.048), but the proportions of Amerindian and African ancestry were comparable in both. USA Hispanic patients seemed to have a poorer prognosis than their counterparts from Latin America, despite having a comparable genetic background. Socioeconomic factors may account for these observations. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights

  16. Longitudinal social cognitive influences on physical activity and sedentary time in Hispanic breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mama, Scherezade K; Song, Jaejoon; Ortiz, Alexis; Tirado-Gomez, Maribel; Palacios, Cristina; Hughes, Daniel C; Basen-Engquist, Karen

    2017-02-01

    This study evaluated the effect of two home-based exercise interventions (one culturally adapted and one standard) on changes in social cognitive theory (SCT) variables, physical activity (PA), and sedentary time (ST), and determined the association between changes in SCT variables and changes in PA and ST in Hispanic breast cancer survivors. Project VIVA! was a 16-week randomized controlled pilot study to test the effectiveness and feasibility of a culturally adapted exercise intervention for Mexican American and Puerto Rican breast cancer survivors in Houston, Texas and San Juan, Puerto Rico, respectively. Women (N = 89) completed questionnaires on SCT variables, PA, and ST and were then randomized to a 16-week culturally adapted exercise program, a non-culturally adapted standard exercise intervention or a wait-list control group. Multiple regression models were used to determine associations between changes in SCT variables and changes in PA and ST. Participants were in their late 50s (58.5 ± 9.2 years) and obese (31.0 ± 6.5 kg/m(2) ). Women reported doing roughly 34.5 min/day of PA and spending over 11 h/day in sedentary activities. Across groups, women reported significant increases in exercise self-efficacy and moderate-intensity, vigorous-intensity, and total PA from baseline to follow-up (p cancer survivors benefit from PA interventions that focus on increasing social support from family and friends and social modeling. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. The role of acculturation and family functioning in predicting HIV risk behaviors among Hispanic delinquent youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrelly, Colleen; Cordova, David; Huang, Shi; Estrada, Yannine; Prado, Guillermo

    2013-06-01

    The present study examined the relationship between Berry's acculturation typology and HIV risk behaviors and whether family functioning mediated any such effects. A total of 235 high risk Hispanic adolescents were categorized into one of Berry's four acculturation typologies through the use of cut-off scores on measures of Hispanicism and Americanism. Structural equation modeling was used to examine the effects of acculturation typology on HIV risk behaviors and the indirect effects of acculturation typology on HIV risk behaviors through family functioning. Acculturation typology was related to HIV risk behaviors. Family functioning partially mediated the effects of acculturation typology on the HIV risk behavior outcomes. These findings suggest that both Americanism and Hispanicism play an important role in the etiology of HIV risk behaviors among Hispanic youth and that both, along with family functioning, are important to consider when designing preventive interventions for this population.

  18. Awareness of genetic testing for cancer among United States Hispanics: the role of acculturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, Julia E; Franco, Rebeca; Jurkowski, Janine M; Sheinfeld Gorin, Sherri

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine how acculturation affected awareness of genetic testing for cancer among Hispanic Americans. Subjects were 10,883 Hispanic respondents from the 2000 and 2005 National Health Interview Surveys. Acculturation was measured with language use and the length of time subjects had lived in the US. Weighted logistic regression was used to determine subjects' awareness of genetic susceptibility testing. Greater use of English (adjusted odds ratio, OR = 1.25, 95% confidence interval, CI = 1.15-1.36) was associated with increased awareness of genetic testing. Residence in the US for less than 5 years (adjusted OR = 0.55, 95% CI 0.36-0.83) was associated with lower awareness of testing. To better inform diverse American groups about genetic testing, intercultural variations and language skills must be taken into account. (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel

  19. The Computing Alliance of Hispanic-Serving Institutions: Supporting Hispanics at Critical Transition Points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Ann Quiroz; Hug, Sarah; Thiry, Heather; Alo, Richard; Beheshti, Mohsen; Fernandez, John; Rodriguez, Nestor; Adjouadi, Malek

    2011-01-01

    Hispanics have the highest growth rates among all groups in the U.S., yet they remain considerably underrepresented in computing careers and in the numbers who obtain advanced degrees. Hispanics constituted about 7% of undergraduate computer science and computer engineering graduates and 1% of doctoral graduates in 2007-2008. The small number of…

  20. Twenty-Two Hispanic Leaders Discuss Poverty: Results from the Hispanic Leaders Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz, Julia Teresa

    This study reports twenty-two Hispanic leaders' responses to interviews assessing their perspectives on the nature, prevalence, and causes of poverty among Hispanics. This report contains six parts. Part 1 is an introduction. Part 2 presents the methodology used in the study. Part 3 gives the leaders' demographic and educational backgrounds. Part…

  1. The Computing Alliance of Hispanic-Serving Institutions: Supporting Hispanics at Critical Transition Points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Ann Quiroz; Hug, Sarah; Thiry, Heather; Alo, Richard; Beheshti, Mohsen; Fernandez, John; Rodriguez, Nestor; Adjouadi, Malek

    2011-01-01

    Hispanics have the highest growth rates among all groups in the U.S., yet they remain considerably underrepresented in computing careers and in the numbers who obtain advanced degrees. Hispanics constituted about 7% of undergraduate computer science and computer engineering graduates and 1% of doctoral graduates in 2007-2008. The small number of…

  2. Twenty-Two Hispanic Leaders Discuss Poverty: Results from the Hispanic Leaders Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz, Julia Teresa

    This study reports twenty-two Hispanic leaders' responses to interviews assessing their perspectives on the nature, prevalence, and causes of poverty among Hispanics. This report contains six parts. Part 1 is an introduction. Part 2 presents the methodology used in the study. Part 3 gives the leaders' demographic and educational backgrounds. Part…

  3. Perceptions and Needs of Hispanic and Non-Hispanic Parents of Children Receiving Learning Disabilities Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Burgo, Nydia I.; Reyes-Wasson, Pamela; Brusca-Vega, Rita

    1999-01-01

    A survey of 50 Hispanic and non-Hispanic parents of children with learning disabilities examined treatment of the two groups of parents in the special education process, parents' involvement in the process, and how parental treatment compared to the mandates of the Individuals with Disabilities Act (IDEA). Strategies are suggested to maximize…

  4. Hispanic Student Experiences at a Hispanic-Serving Institution: Strong Voices, Key Message

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Christina A.; Posadas, Carlos E.

    2012-01-01

    A symposium at New Mexico State University, a Hispanic-Serving Institution, revealed Hispanic students' attitudes about their experiences at the university. Discussions concerned the campus climate, mentors, the experiences of first-time students, cultural challenges, retention, and accountability. Discussion of the resulting data yields policy…

  5. Perceptions and Needs of Hispanic and Non-Hispanic Parents of Children Receiving Learning Disabilities Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Burgo, Nydia I.; Reyes-Wasson, Pamela; Brusca-Vega, Rita

    1999-01-01

    A survey of 50 Hispanic and non-Hispanic parents of children with learning disabilities examined treatment of the two groups of parents in the special education process, parents' involvement in the process, and how parental treatment compared to the mandates of the Individuals with Disabilities Act (IDEA). Strategies are suggested to maximize…

  6. Improving the Mental Health, Healthy Lifestyle Choices, and Physical Health of Hispanic Adolescents: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnyk, Bernadette M.; Jacobson, Diana; Kelly, Stephanie; O'Haver, Judith; Small, Leigh; Mays, Mary Z.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Obesity and mental health disorders are 2 major public health problems in American adolescents, with prevalence even higher in Hispanic teens. Despite the rapidly increasing incidence and adverse health outcomes associated with overweight and mental health problems, very few intervention studies have been conducted with adolescents to…

  7. Entrevista/Interview: Q: How to Raise Money for Your Hispanic Students? A: Involve Your Alumni and Their Corporate Contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Karla

    1983-01-01

    An interview with Raul Vargas, the director of the University of Southern California's Office for Mexican American Programs is presented. The office provides scholarships for some of USC's Hispanic undergraduates, raises scholarship money through alumni and corporate contacts, and acts as a liaison between the university and the Hispanic…

  8. Extending the Helping Hand to Hispanics: The Role of the General Education Board in New Mexico in the 1930s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getz, Lynne Marie

    1992-01-01

    In the 1930s, educational leaders in New Mexico turned to the General Education Board (originally created to assist southern African-American students) for philanthropic aid, envisioning reforms geared to the needs of Hispanic students. The board's sponsorship allowed great latitude to some very innovative educators who were sensitive to cultural…

  9. Generation, language, body mass index, and activity patterns in Hispanic children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taverno, Sharon E; Rollins, Brandi Y; Francis, Lori A

    2010-02-01

    The acculturation hypothesis proposes an overall disadvantage in health outcomes for Hispanic immigrants with more time spent living in the U.S., but little is known about how generational status and language may influence Hispanic children's relative weight and activity patterns. To investigate associations among generation and language with relative weight (BMI z-scores), physical activity, screen time, and participation in extracurricular activities (i.e., sports, clubs) in a U.S.-based, nationally representative sample of Hispanic children. Participants included 2012 Hispanic children aged 6-11 years from the cross-sectional 2003 National Survey of Children's Health. Children were grouped according to generational status (first, second, or third), and the primary language spoken in the home (English versus non-English). Primary analyses included adjusted logistic and multinomial logistic regression to examine the relationships among variables; all analyses were conducted between 2008 and 2009. Compared to third-generation, English speakers, first- and second-generation, non-English speakers were more than two times more likely to be obese. Moreover, first-generation, non-English speakers were half as likely to engage in regular physical activity and sports. Both first- and second-generation, non-English speakers were less likely to participate in clubs compared to second- and third-generation, English speakers. Overall, non-English-speaking groups reported less screen time compared to third-generation, English speakers. The hypothesis that Hispanics lose their health protection with more time spent in the U.S. was not supported in this sample of Hispanic children. Copyright 2010 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Incidence rates of the major leukemia subtypes among US Hispanics, Blacks, and non-Hispanic Whites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matasar, Matthew J; Ritchie, Ellen K; Consedine, Nathan; Magai, Carol; Neugut, Alfred I

    2006-11-01

    While leukemia rates are thought to be lower in South and Central America, no study has systematically investigated incidence rates of the leukemia subtypes among Hispanics in the U.S. This was a retrospective cohort study, using data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program of the National Cancer Institute, 1992 - 2001, to compare leukemia incidence rates as a function of race and ethnicity. It was found that in adults, Hispanics had lower incidence rates for each of the major types of leukemia as compared to non-Hispanic Whites: For AML, elderly Whites had an incidence rate ratio (IRR) of 1.61 in comparison to Hispanics (p < 0.001) and 1.27 in comparison to Blacks (p < 0.001); for CML, the IRR among the elderly was 1.42 that of Hispanics (p < 0.001) and 1.22 that of Blacks (p = 0.003); and for CLL, the IRR was 2.31 times that of Hispanics (p < 0.001) and 1.48 times that of Blacks (p < 0.001). In ALL, however, Hispanics aged 0 - 19 had a significantly higher incidence rate than Whites and Blacks, with an IRR of 1.32 compared to Whites (p < 0.001), and 2.62 compared to Blacks (p < 0.001). In AML, CML, and CLL, among people age 65 or older, white non-Hispanics have higher incidence rates than Blacks, and Blacks have higher incidence rates than Hispanics. Childhood ALL incidence rates are highest among Hispanics, and lowest among Blacks.

  11. Promoting organ donation to Hispanics: the role of the media and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frates, Janice; Bohrer, Gloria Garcia; Thomas, David

    2006-01-01

    This study assesses the impact of a paid media advertising campaign employing Spanish language, culturally sensitive television and radio spots airing on major Hispanic stations in southern California. An advertising tracking study with a baseline and three postintervention telephone surveys was conducted from 2001 through 2003 among 500 randomly selected self-identified, primarily Spanish language dominant adult Hispanics. Measures of organ donation attitudes and behaviors (decision and declared intent to donate organs) improved significantly (P fear that medical personnel might withhold care from identified organ donors, suggesting lack of knowledge and distrust of the health care system. Few respondents talked to health care professionals or contacted the organ procurement agency for information either before or after the campaign. Findings from this study indicate a need for ongoing public education in the Hispanic community about organ transplantation and donation. Health professionals need to become more engaged in encouraging Hispanic patients to learn about organ transplantation and donation, and to inform their families that they have made the personal decision to donate.

  12. Cultural awareness: bridging the gap between caregivers and Hispanic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Denise M

    2003-01-01

    The healthcare environment is undergoing rapid change. Healthcare settings have shifted from acute care to encompass a variety of other locations. The healthcare work force is changing from a common ethnic origin to include a multitude of ethnic and racial groups. The patient population also embraces a plethora of different cultural backgrounds. By the year 2080, an estimated 51.1% of the population will be composed mostly of Hispanics, followed by African Americans and Asians. This dynamic transformation has created a critical need for nurses to become more knowledgeable and culturally aware to care for and work with people of other cultures. This article attempts to sensitize nurses to the important roles culture and ethnicity play in the delivery of optimal nursing care. The domain of intercultural communication and its importance in providing culturally competent, patient-relevant care is discussed.

  13. Promoting Multivitamins to Hispanic Adolescents and Mothers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Mackert

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Neural tube defects (NTDs can be reduced by 50% to 70% with sufficient periconceptional intake of folic acid. Hispanic women are up to 3 times more likely than non-Hispanics to have a child affected by NTDs. This disparity is complicated by health literacy, as women impacted by this disparity are also at-risk for low health literacy. The purpose of this project was to pilot advertisements to promote multivitamins, increasing folic acid consumption, among Hispanic adolescents. The advertisements for Hispanic adolescents and their mothers focused on broad benefits of a multivitamin, downplaying folic acid’s role in prenatal health. Participants were Hispanic mothers (n = 25 and adolescents (n = 25 at a clinic in the Southwestern United States. Likert-type survey items and an open-ended question were used to assess attitudes toward multivitamins and advertisements. The Newest Vital Sign (NVS was used to assess participants’ health literacy. Participants’ impressions of the ads were positive. Both groups expressed the intent to start taking a daily multivitamin after viewing the ads—adolescents for themselves and mothers to start their daughters on a daily multivitamin. There was no relationship between participants’ health literacy and perceptions of the advertisements or intentions to begin a multivitamin habit. This research illustrates the potential of messages that rely on peripheral health benefits to overcome communication barriers posed by health literacy and address serious health problems such as NTDs.

  14. Hanford Site technical baseline database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, P.E.

    1996-09-30

    This document includes a cassette tape that contains the Hanford specific files that make up the Hanford Site Technical Baseline Database as of September 30, 1996. The cassette tape also includes the delta files that dellinate the differences between this revision and revision 4 (May 10, 1996) of the Hanford Site Technical Baseline Database.

  15. Hanford Site technical baseline database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, P.E., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-05-10

    This document includes a cassette tape that contains the Hanford specific files that make up the Hanford Site Technical Baseline Database as of May 10, 1996. The cassette tape also includes the delta files that delineate the differences between this revision and revision 3 (April 10, 1996) of the Hanford Site Technical Baseline Database.

  16. Plutonium Immobilization Project Baseline Formulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebbinghaus, B.

    1999-02-01

    A key milestone for the Immobilization Project (AOP Milestone 3.2a) in Fiscal Year 1998 (FY98) is the definition of the baseline composition or formulation for the plutonium ceramic form. The baseline formulation for the plutonium ceramic product must be finalized before the repository- and plant-related process specifications can be determined. The baseline formulation that is currently specified is given in Table 1.1. In addition to the baseline formulation specification, this report provides specifications for two alternative formulations, related compositional specifications (e.g., precursor compositions and mixing recipes), and other preliminary form and process specifications that are linked to the baseline formulation. The preliminary specifications, when finalized, are not expected to vary tremendously from the preliminary values given.

  17. Developmental Trajectories of Acculturation: Links with Family Functioning and Mental Health in Recent-Immigrant Hispanic Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Seth J.; Unger, Jennifer B.; Zamboanga, Byron L.; Córdova, David; Mason, Craig A.; Huang, Shi; Baezconde-Garbanati, Lourdes; Lorenzo-Blanco, Elma I.; Des Rosiers, Sabrina; Soto, Daniel W.; Villamar, Juan A.; Pattarroyo, Monica; Lizzi, Karina M.; Szapocznik, José

    2014-01-01

    The present study was designed to examine acculturative changes, and their effects on mental health and family functioning, in recent-immigrant Hispanic adolescents. A sample of 302 Hispanic adolescents was assessed five times over a 2½-year period. Participants completed measures of Hispanic and U.S. practices, collectivist and individualist values, and ethnic and U.S. identity at each timepoint. Baseline and Time 5 levels of mental health and family functioning were also assessed. Latent class growth analyses produced two-class solutions for practices, values, and identifications. Adolescents who increased over time in practices and values reported the most adaptive mental health and family functioning. Adolescents who did not change in any acculturation domain reported the least favorable mental health and family functioning. PMID:25644262

  18. Science self-efficacy in tenth grade Hispanic female high school students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Maria Decanio

    Historical data have demonstrated an underrepresentation of females and minorities in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) professions. The purpose of the study considered the variables of gender and ethnicity collectively in relationship to tenth grade Hispanic females' perception of their self-efficacy in science. The correlation of science self-efficacy to science academic achievement was also studied. Possible interventions for use with female Hispanic minority populations might help increase participation in STEM field preparation during the high school career. A population of 272 students was chosen through convenience sampling methods, including 80 Hispanic females. Students were administered a 27-item questionnaire taken directly from the Smist (1993) Science Self-efficacy Questionnaire (SSEQ). Three science self-efficacy factors were successfully extracted and included Academic Engagement Self-efficacy (M=42.57), Laboratory Self-efficacy (M=25.44), and Biology Self-efficacy ( M=19.35). Each factor showed a significant positive correlation ( pself-efficacy perceptions. Asian/Pacific and Native American females had higher self-efficacy mean scores as compared to White, Black and Hispanic females on all three extracted science self-efficacy factors. Asian/Pacific females had the highest mean scores. No statistically significant correlations were found between science-self-efficacy and a measure of science achievement. Two high-ability and two low-ability Hispanic females were randomly chosen to participate in a brief structured interview. Three general themes emerged. Classroom Variables, Outside School Variables, and Personal Variables were subsequently divided into sub themes influenced by participants' views of science. It was concluded that Hispanic female science self-efficacy was among the subgroups which self-scored the lowest. Asian/Pacific and Native American females fared better than White, Black, and Hispanic female counterparts

  19. Associations of Structural and Functional Social Support with Diabetes Prevalence in U.S. Hispanics/Latinos: Results from the HCHS/SOL Sociocultural Ancillary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Linda C.; Fortmann, Addie L.; McCurley, Jessica L.; Isasi, Carmen R.; Penedo, Frank J.; Daviglus, Martha L.; Roesch, Scott C.; Talavera, Gregory A.; Gouskova, Natalia; Gonzalez, Franklyn; Schneiderman, Neil; Carnethon, Mercedes R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Little research has examined associations of social support with diabetes (or other physical health outcomes) in Hispanics, who are at elevated risk. Purpose We examined associations between social support and diabetes prevalence in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) Sociocultural Ancillary Study. Methods Participants were 5181 adults, 18–74 years old, representing diverse Hispanic backgrounds, who underwent baseline exam with fasting blood draw, oral glucose tolerance test, medication review, sociodemographic assessment, and sociocultural exam with functional and structural social support measures. Results In adjusted analyses, one standard deviation higher structural and functional social support related to 16% and 15% lower odds, respectively, of having diabetes. Structural and functional support were related to both previously diagnosed diabetes (OR = .84 and .88, respectively) and newly recognized diabetes prevalence (OR = .84 and .83, respectively). Conclusions Higher functional and structural social support are associated with lower diabetes prevalence in Hispanics/Latinos. PMID:25107504

  20. 77 FR 58291 - National Hispanic Heritage Month, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-19

    ... Proclamation Our Nation's story would not be possible without generations of Hispanics who have shaped and... reach for all who seek it. From promoting job creation and ensuring Hispanics are represented in the...

  1. Health Snapshot: Hispanic Adolescents in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Updates March 2013 March 2013 Health Snapshot - Hispanic Adolescents in the United States Our nation’s adolescents are ... care and more positive health outcomes. 5 Hispanic adolescents in the U.S... Increasingly have health care coverage. ...

  2. Parent-Centered Prevention of Risky Behaviors Among Hispanic Youths in Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Yannine; Lee, Tae Kyoung; Huang, Shi; Tapia, Maria I; Velázquez, Maria-Rosa; Martinez, Marcos J; Pantin, Hilda; Ocasio, Manuel A; Vidot, Denise C; Molleda, Lourdes; Villamar, Juan; Stepanenko, Bryan A; Brown, C Hendricks; Prado, Guillermo

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of an evidence-based, parent-centered intervention, Familias Unidas, delivered by nonresearch personnel, in preventing substance use (alcohol, illicit drugs) and sex without a condom among Hispanic adolescents. A randomized controlled trial (n = 746) evaluated the effectiveness of Familias Unidas among Hispanic eighth graders (age range = 12-16 years), relative to prevention as usual, within a public school system. School personnel, including social workers and mental health counselors, were trained to deliver the evidence-based intervention. Participant recruitment, intervention delivery, and follow-up ran from September 2010 through June 2014 in Miami-Dade County, Florida. Familias Unidas was effective in preventing drug use from increasing and prevented greater increases in sex without a condom 30 months after baseline, relative to prevention as usual. Familias Unidas also had a positive impact on family functioning and parental monitoring of peers at 6 months after baseline. This study demonstrated the effectiveness of a parent-centered preventive intervention program in preventing risky behaviors among Hispanic youths. Findings highlight the feasibility of training nonresearch personnel on effectively delivering a manualized intervention in a real-world setting.

  3. Reliability of third molar development for age estimation in a Texas Hispanic population: a comparison study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Kathleen A; Austin, Dana; Kvanli, Alan H; Rios, Tara R; Senn, David R

    2009-05-01

    Evaluating third molars from 950 Hispanic individuals aged 12-22 years using Demirjian's schematic for crown and root formation found that Hispanic third molar development was 8-18 months faster than American Caucasians as reported by Mincer, Harris and Berryman in 1993. This represents a statistically significant increase. Earlier development was more apparent in the later stages F through H. Hispanic males reach developmental stages faster than Hispanic females and maxillary third molars reach developmental stages faster than mandibular third molars in both sexes. The earliest age observed for stages B-H (e.g., Stage H first observed at age 13.92 years in females) and the oldest age observed for Stages B-G were developed to facilitate age prediction of unknown individuals. Prediction tables for minimum and maximum age for an observed stage (e.g., if a female maxillary third molar is stage F it means she is older than 13 years) for each sex-jaw group were calculated.

  4. Does 8-foot walk time predict cognitive decline in older Mexicans Americans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfaro-Acha, Ana; Al Snih, Soham; Raji, Mukaila A; Markides, Kyriakos S; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J

    2007-02-01

    To examine the association between 8-foot time walk and change in cognitive function over time in older Mexican Americans. Data used are from the Hispanic Established Population for the Epidemiological Study of the Elderly (1993-2001). Five southwestern states: Texas, New Mexico, Colorado, Arizona, and California. Two thousand seventy noninstitutionalized Mexican-American men and women aged 65 and older who had a Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score of 21 or greater at baseline. Sociodemographic factors (age, sex, education, marital status), MMSE score, 8-foot walk time, body mass index, medical conditions (stroke, heart attack, diabetes mellitus, depression, and hypertension), and near and distant visual impairment. Using general linear mixed models, it was found that subjects with the slowest 8-foot walk time had a significantly greater rate of cognitive decline over 7 years than subjects with the fastest 8-foot walk time. There was a significant 8-foot walk time-by-time interaction with MMSE scores. Subjects in the lowest 8-foot walk time quartile had a greater cognitive decline over 7 years (estimate=-0.32, SE=0.08; PMexican-American adults without cognitive impairment at baseline was an independent predictor of MMSE score decline over a 7-year period. Slow 8-foot walk time may be an early marker for older adults in a predementia state who may benefit from early-intervention programs to prevent or slow cognitive decline.

  5. CDC Vital Signs-Hispanic Health

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-05-05

    This podcast is based on the May 2015 CDC Vital Signs report. About one in six people living in the U.S. are Hispanic. The two leading causes of death in this group are heart disease and cancer, accounting for two out of five deaths. Unfortunately, many Hispanics face considerable barriers to getting high quality health care, including language and low income. Learn what can be done to reduce the barriers.  Created: 5/5/2015 by Office of Minority Health & Health Equity (OMHHE).   Date Released: 5/5/2015.

  6. The Supply and Demand of High-Achieving Hispanic Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurantz, Oded; Hurwitz, Michael; Smith, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Hispanics are the largest minority group in the United States, increasing almost six-fold from 1970 to 2014. Although Hispanics youth in the U.S. have traditionally had lower college attendance rates, some sources suggest a narrowing of the White-Hispanic postsecondary attendance gap over the last fifteen years. A key question is whether altering…

  7. Military Enlistment of Hispanic Youth: Obstacles and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asch, Beth J.; Buck, Christopher; Klerman, Jacob Alex; Kleykamp, Meredith; Loughran, David S.

    2009-01-01

    An implicit goal of Congress, the Department of Defense, and the armed services is that diversity in the armed services should approximate diversity in the general population. A key aspect of that diversity is the representation of Hispanics. Although polls of Hispanic youth show a strong propensity to serve in the military, Hispanics are…

  8. 75 FR 57369 - National Hispanic Heritage Month, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-21

    ... Hispanic Heritage Month, 2010 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation From the... and strengthened our country. During National Hispanic Heritage Month, we pause to celebrate the..., Hispanics have preserved the rich heritage of generations past while contributing mightily to the promise...

  9. 76 FR 59499 - National Hispanic-Serving Institutions Week, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-26

    ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8718 of September 21, 2011 National Hispanic-Serving Institutions Week, 2011... National Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSIs) Week, we renew our commitment to strengthening and expanding... country are helping Hispanic students gain access to a quality higher education. These institutions...

  10. Hispanic Cultural Survival and Academic Achievement: A Partnership That Works.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Manuel G.

    The life of Benito Juarez--who broke all odds to achieve academically, politically, and socially--serves proof that Hispanics can achieve without sacrificing their cultural heritage. The current educational achievement of Hispanics in California and elsewhere in the nation is a matter for serious consideration. Nearly 50% of all Hispanics enrolled…

  11. Tools for Success in Recruiting and Retaining Hispanic Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilroy, Marilyn

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about strategies for success in recruiting and retaining Hispanic students. One strategy suggested by Raul Lorenzo, account director for Bauza & Associates, a Hispanic marketing agency that helps colleges and universities recruit and retain Hispanic students, is that institutions need to speak to the heart as well…

  12. Hispanic Cultural Survival and Academic Achievement: A Partnership That Works.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Manuel G.

    The life of Benito Juarez--who broke all odds to achieve academically, politically, and socially--serves proof that Hispanics can achieve without sacrificing their cultural heritage. The current educational achievement of Hispanics in California and elsewhere in the nation is a matter for serious consideration. Nearly 50% of all Hispanics enrolled…

  13. Oscillation Baselining and Analysis Tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-03-27

    PNNL developed a new tool for oscillation analysis and baselining. This tool has been developed under a new DOE Grid Modernization Laboratory Consortium (GMLC) Project (GM0072 - “Suite of open-source applications and models for advanced synchrophasor analysis”) and it is based on the open platform for PMU analysis. The Oscillation Baselining and Analysis Tool (OBAT) performs the oscillation analysis and identifies modes of oscillations (frequency, damping, energy, and shape). The tool also does oscillation event baselining (fining correlation between oscillations characteristics and system operating conditions).

  14. Hispanic Mosaic: A Public Health Service Perspective. Proceedings of the Annual Forum on the Status of Hispanic Health (1st, Rockville, Maryland).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotomayor, Marta, Ed.

    Five agencies of the Public Health Service (PHS) joined with PHS Hispanic employees and other Hispanic health specialists to commemorate Hispanic Heritage Week by critically examining health issues of particular relevance to Hispanics. The first day the forum sought to define, from an Hispanic perspective, issues relating to health statistics,…

  15. The Correction of Myopia Evaluation Trial (COMET): design and general baseline characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyman, L; Gwiazda, J; Marsh-Tootle, W L; Norton, T T; Hussein, M

    2001-10-01

    The Correction of Myopia Evaluation Trial (COMET) is a multicenter, randomized, double-masked, controlled clinical trial evaluating whether there is a difference in the progression of myopia between children wearing progressive addition lenses (PALs) versus conventional single vision lenses (SVLs), as measured by cycloplegic autorefraction. Axial length, measured by A-scan ultrasonography, is an additional outcome measure. To meet the recruitment goal of 450 participants, eligible children ages 6-11 years (inclusive) with myopia in both eyes (spherical equivalent between -1.25 diopters (D) and -4.50 D, astigmatism Sonomed A2500 ultrasound), subjective refraction (Marco TRS system), visual acuity (modified Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study protocol), accommodation (Canon R-1), and phoria (cover test and Maddox rod). Outcome measures are collected annually; adherence is assessed and prescriptions updated semiannually. Participants are being followed for at least 3 years. COMET enrolled 469 children. Their mean age is 9.3 years (range 6-11 years); 52% are female. COMET children are ethnically diverse, according to a self-report with 46% White, 26% African American, 14% Hispanic, and 8% Asian. Best-corrected visual acuity is better than 20/32 in both eyes. Baseline mean (+/-SD) cycloplegic refractive correction is -2.38 D (+/-0.81) in the right eye and -2.40 D (+/-0.82) in the left eye; mean (+/-SD) axial length is 24.1 mm (+/-0.7) in both eyes. Follow-up of these children will provide a first step in answering the important question of whether there are effective means to slow myopia progression. Study results should be applicable to a large proportion of children with myopia. The study will also provide useful information on myopia progression in children wearing conventional single vision lenses.

  16. Quivira NWR biological baseline data

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This dataset is biological baseline data for Quivira National Wildlife Refuge as of January 2016. It contains data on species found on the refuge, when and where...

  17. 324 Building Baseline Radiological Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.J. Reeder, J.C. Cooper

    2010-06-24

    This report documents the analysis of radiological data collected as part of the characterization study performed in 1998. The study was performed to create a baseline of the radiological conditions in the 324 Building.

  18. Hispanic and Immigrant Paradoxes in U.S. Breast Cancer Mortality: Impact of Neighborhood Poverty and Hispanic Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruitt, Sandi L.; Tiro, Jasmin A.; Xuan, Lei; Lee, Simon J. Craddock

    2016-01-01

    To test the Hispanic and Immigrant Paradoxes—i.e., survival advantages despite a worse risk factor profile—and the modifying role of neighborhood context, we examined associations between patient ethnicity, birthplace, neighborhood Hispanic density and neighborhood poverty among 166,254 female breast cancer patients diagnosed 1995–2009 in Texas, U.S. Of all, 79.9% were non-Hispanic White, 15.8% Hispanic U.S.-born, and 4.2% Hispanic foreign-born. We imputed birthplace for the 60.7% of Hispanics missing birthplace data using multiple imputation. Shared frailty Cox proportional hazard models (patients nested within census tracts) adjusted for age, diagnosis year, stage, grade, histology, urban/rural residence, and local mammography capacity. Whites (vs. U.S.-born Hispanics) had increased all-cause and breast cancer mortality. Foreign-born (vs. U.S.-born) Hispanics had increased all-cause and breast cancer mortality. Living in higher Hispanic density neighborhoods was generally associated with increased mortality, although associations differed slightly in magnitude and significance by ethnicity, birthplace, and neighborhood poverty. We found no evidence of an Immigrant Paradox and some evidence of a Hispanic Paradox where protective effects were limited to U.S.-born Hispanics. Contrary to prior studies, foreign birthplace and residence in higher Hispanic density neighborhoods were associated with increased mortality. More research on intersections between ethnicity, birthplace and neighborhood context are needed. PMID:27983668

  19. Hispanic and Immigrant Paradoxes in U.S. Breast Cancer Mortality: Impact of Neighborhood Poverty and Hispanic Density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandi L. Pruitt

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available To test the Hispanic and Immigrant Paradoxes—i.e., survival advantages despite a worse risk factor profile—and the modifying role of neighborhood context, we examined associations between patient ethnicity, birthplace, neighborhood Hispanic density and neighborhood poverty among 166,254 female breast cancer patients diagnosed 1995–2009 in Texas, U.S. Of all, 79.9% were non-Hispanic White, 15.8% Hispanic U.S.-born, and 4.2% Hispanic foreign-born. We imputed birthplace for the 60.7% of Hispanics missing birthplace data using multiple imputation. Shared frailty Cox proportional hazard models (patients nested within census tracts adjusted for age, diagnosis year, stage, grade, histology, urban/rural residence, and local mammography capacity. Whites (vs. U.S.-born Hispanics had increased all-cause and breast cancer mortality. Foreign-born (vs. U.S.-born Hispanics had increased all-cause and breast cancer mortality. Living in higher Hispanic density neighborhoods was generally associated with increased mortality, although associations differed slightly in magnitude and significance by ethnicity, birthplace, and neighborhood poverty. We found no evidence of an Immigrant Paradox and some evidence of a Hispanic Paradox where protective effects were limited to U.S.-born Hispanics. Contrary to prior studies, foreign birthplace and residence in higher Hispanic density neighborhoods were associated with increased mortality. More research on intersections between ethnicity, birthplace and neighborhood context are needed.

  20. Antisocial Behavior and Psychoactive Substance Involvement among Hispanic and Non-Hispanic Caucasian Adolescents in Substance Abuse Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, David G.; Brown, Sandra A.; Myers, Mark G.

    1997-01-01

    Compared conduct disorder behaviors and substance involvement of Hispanic (n=34) and non-Hispanic Caucasian (n=34) adolescents so as to determine pre-treatment problem behavior. Results indicate that non-Hispanic Caucasian youth were three times as likely to be diagnosed with conduct disorder prior to substance involvement than were their Hispanic…

  1. Factor structure and psychometric properties of english and spanish versions of the edinburgh postnatal depression scale among Hispanic women in a primary care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Chelsey M; Barroso, Nicole; Rey, Yasmin; Pettit, Jeremy W; Bagner, Daniel M

    2014-12-01

    Although a number of studies have examined the factor structure of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) in predominately White or African American samples, no published research has reported on the factor structure among Hispanic women who reside in the United States. The current study examined the factor structure of the EPDS among Hispanic mothers in the United States. Among 220 Hispanic women, drawn from a pediatric primary care setting, with an infant aged 0 to 10 months, 6 structural models guided by the empirical literature were evaluated using confirmatory factor analysis. Results supported a 2-factor model of depression and anxiety as the best fitting model. Multigroup models supported the factorial invariance across women who completed the EDPS in English and Spanish. These findings provide initial support for the 2-factor structure of the EPDS among Hispanic women in the United States. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Hispanic Mothers' Perceptions of Self-Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shogren, Karrie

    2012-01-01

    Limited research has explored the perceptions of self-determination held by diverse families. In this study, seven mothers of transition-age youth with severe disabilities who were Hispanic were interviewed. Each mother was actively engaged in advocacy related to diverse children with disabilities in their local schools and communities. Mothers…

  3. Hispanic Parents' Perceptions of Children's Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Young Suk; Vrongistinos, Konstantinos

    2010-01-01

    This study examined 32 Hispanic parents' perceptions of education, especially, (a) parent's motivation for their children's career choice, (b) their perceptions of education, and (c) informal means of education at home. The data were collected using openended questions and were analyzed using content analysis. Findings in this study provide…

  4. Media and Sex: Perspectives from Hispanic Teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston Polacek, Georgia N. L.; Rojas, Viviana; Levitt, Steven; Mika, Virginia Seguin

    2006-01-01

    Little is known about Hispanic teens' sexual knowledge, attitudes and behaviors and their relationship to media influences. Information about this relationship could contribute to an understanding of the early onset of sexual behavior and early teen pregnancy. This paper reports preliminary findings from a pilot project conducted to determine…

  5. Hispanic Parents' Perceptions of Children's Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Young Suk; Vrongistinos, Konstantinos

    2010-01-01

    This study examined 32 Hispanic parents' perceptions of education, especially, (a) parent's motivation for their children's career choice, (b) their perceptions of education, and (c) informal means of education at home. The data were collected using openended questions and were analyzed using content analysis. Findings in this study provide…

  6. Hispanic Literature: A Guide to Reference Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayman, Valerie, Comp.

    Intended for use by those conducting research in Hispanic literature, this guide contains annotations of more than 100 reference works. Types of materials included in the guide are (1) encyclopedias; (2) guides to literature and to periodicals; (3) literary dictionaries, handbooks, and biographical sources; (4) book reviews; (5) theses and…

  7. Descriptive study of cerebrovascular accidents among Hispanic population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Sánchez, Juan A; Vélez Acevedo, Ivonne; Rodríguez Guilloty, Nicole M

    2007-01-01

    Data characterizing stroke patients among Hispanic population are scant. The aim of this study was to describe this population and to assess baseline knowledge of stroke type, risk factors, and family history, among others. A retrospective chart review of 253 stroke patients admitted to the University of Puerto Rico Hospital during the fiscal year July 2002 to June 2003 was done. A standardized data collection form was used to obtain the following information from patient records: patient age, gender, stroke type, time of symptom onset, patient risk factors, family risk factors, and patient outcome. We enrolled 253 patients, 120 (47%) males and 133 (53%) females. Patient age distribution was as follows: 18 (7%) were 65 years. Stroke type distribution was: ischemic 174 (69%), hemorrhagic 49 (19%), and transformation from ischemic to hemorrhagic 13 (5%). Ischemic stroke subtypes distribution was: large-artery occlusion 113 (65%), small-artery occlusion 60 (34%), cardio-embolism 1 (0.6%), 17 (7%) information was not recorded. Time of symptom onset: 153 (60%) > 3 hours, 14 (6%) 65 years 156 (62%), male gender 120 (47%), diabetes mellitus 105 (42%), previous history of stroke 91 (36%), hyper-cholesterolemia 44 (17%), history of smoking 51 (20%), alcoholism 43 (17%). The data obtained from this Hispanic population is similar to that reported in the literature for the general population. The prevalence of ischemic strokes out numbered by far the occurrence of hemorrhagic strokes in the study group. Both men and women demonstrated an increasing tendency of stroke incidence with increasing age. Among death outcome, a difference was evident in the > 65 age group, showing an increase in women fatality compared to men. Hypertension was the most prevalent risk factor. This study will serve to build a database for future reference, thus providing an evidence-based foundation for treatment, therapy improvement, and patient care.

  8. Accelerometer-measured sedentary time among Hispanic adults: Results from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Gina; Buelna, Christina; Castañeda, Sheila F; Arredondo, Elva M; Marshall, Simon J; Strizich, Garrett; Sotres-Alvarez, Daniela; Chambers, Earle C; McMurray, Robert G; Evenson, Kelly R; Stoutenberg, Mark; Hankinson, Arlene L; Talavera, Gregory A

    2015-01-01

    Excessive sedentary behavior is associated with negative health outcomes independent of physical activity. Objective estimates of time spent in sedentary behaviors are lacking among adults from diverse Hispanic/Latino backgrounds. The objective of this study was to describe accelerometer-assessed sedentary time in a large, representative sample of Hispanic/Latino adults living in the United States, and compare sedentary estimates by Hispanic/Latino background, sociodemographic characteristics and weight categories. This study utilized baseline data from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) that included adults aged 18-74 years from four metropolitan areas (N = 16,415). Measured with the Actical accelerometer over 6 days, 76.9% (n = 12,631) of participants had > 10 h/day and > 3 days of data. Participants spent 11.9 h/day (SD 3.0), or 74% of their monitored time in sedentary behaviors. Adjusting for differences in wear time, adults of Mexican background were the least (11.6 h/day), whereas adults of Dominican background were the most (12.3 h/day), sedentary. Women were more sedentary than men, and older adults were more sedentary than younger adults. Household income was positively associated, whereas employment was negatively associated, with sedentary time. There were no differences in sedentary time by weight categories, marital status, or proxies of acculturation. To reduce sedentariness among these populations, future research should examine how the accumulation of various sedentary behaviors differs by background and region, and which sedentary behaviors are amenable to intervention.

  9. Accelerometer-measured sedentary time among Hispanic adults: Results from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gina Merchant

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Excessive sedentary behavior is associated with negative health outcomes independent of physical activity. Objective estimates of time spent in sedentary behaviors are lacking among adults from diverse Hispanic/Latino backgrounds. The objective of this study was to describe accelerometer-assessed sedentary time in a large, representative sample of Hispanic/Latino adults living in the United States, and compare sedentary estimates by Hispanic/Latino background, sociodemographic characteristics and weight categories. This study utilized baseline data from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL that included adults aged 18–74 years from four metropolitan areas (N = 16,415. Measured with the Actical accelerometer over 6 days, 76.9% (n = 12,631 of participants had >10 h/day and >3 days of data. Participants spent 11.9 h/day (SD 3.0, or 74% of their monitored time in sedentary behaviors. Adjusting for differences in wear time, adults of Mexican background were the least (11.6 h/day, whereas adults of Dominican background were the most (12.3 h/day, sedentary. Women were more sedentary than men, and older adults were more sedentary than younger adults. Household income was positively associated, whereas employment was negatively associated, with sedentary time. There were no differences in sedentary time by weight categories, marital status, or proxies of acculturation. To reduce sedentariness among these populations, future research should examine how the accumulation of various sedentary behaviors differs by background and region, and which sedentary behaviors are amenable to intervention.

  10. Birth Rates Among Hispanics and Non-Hispanics and their Representation in Contemporary Obstetric Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahr, Maike K; De La Torre, Rosa; Racusin, Diana A; Suter, Melissa A; Mastrobattista, Joan M; Ramin, Susan M; Clark, Steven L; Dildy, Gary A; Belfort, Michael A; Aagaard, Kjersti M

    2016-10-01

    Objective Our study aims were to establish whether subjects enrolled in current obstetric clinical trials proportionately reflects the contemporary representation of Hispanic ethnicities and their birth rates in the United States. Methods Using comprehensive source data over a defined interval (January 2011-September 2015) on birth rates by ethnicity from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), we evaluated the proportional rate by ethnicity, then analyzed the observed to expected relative ratio of enrolled subjects. Results Hispanic women comprise a significant contribution to births in the United States (23% of all births). Systematic analysis of 90 published obstetric clinical trials showed a correlation between inclusion of Hispanic gravidae and the corresponding state's birth rates (r = 0.501, p < 0.001). While the mean was strongly correlated, individual clinical trials may have relatively over-enrolled (n = 31, or 34%) or under-enrolled (n = 33, or 37%) relative to their regional population. In 48% of obstetric clinical trials the Hispanic proportion of the study population was not reported. Conclusion Hispanic gravidae represent a significant number of contemporary U.S. births, and are generally adequately represented as obstetric subjects in clinical trials. However, this is trial-dependent, with significant trial-specific under- and over-enrollment of Hispanic subjects relative to the regional birth population.

  11. Treatment Acceptability among Mexican American Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrego, Joaquin, Jr.; Ibanez, Elizabeth S.; Spendlove, Stuart J.; Pemberton, Joy R.

    2007-01-01

    There is a void in the literature with regard to Hispanic parents' views about common interventions for children with behavior problems. The purpose of this study was to examine the treatment acceptability of child management techniques in a Mexican American sample. Parents' acculturation was also examined to determine if it would account for…

  12. Relationship between frailty and cognitive decline in older Mexican Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samper-Ternent, Rafael; Al Snih, Soham; Raji, Mukaila A; Markides, Kyriakos S; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J

    2008-10-01

    To examine the association between frailty status and change in cognitive function over time in older Mexican Americans. Data used were from the Hispanic Established Population for the Epidemiological Study of the Elderly. Five southwestern states: Texas, New Mexico, Colorado, Arizona, and California. One thousand three hundred seventy noninstitutionalized Mexican-American men and women aged 65 and older with a Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score of 21 or higher at baseline (1995/96). Frailty, defined as three or more of the following components: unintentional weight loss of more than 10 pounds, weakness (lowest 20% in grip strength), self-reported exhaustion, slow walking speed (lowest 20% in 16-foot walk time in seconds), and low physical activity level (lowest 20% on Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly score). Information about sociodemographic factors, MMSE score, medical conditions (stroke, heart attack, diabetes mellitus, arthritis, cancer, and hypertension), depressive symptoms, and visual impairment was obtained. Of the 1,370 subjects, 684 (49.9%) were not frail, 626 (45.7%) were prefrail (1-2 components), and 60 (4.4%) were frail (>/=3 components) in 1995/96. Using general linear mixed models, it was found that frail subjects had greater cognitive decline over 10 years than not frail subjects (estimate=-0.67, standard error=0.13; PMexican Americans with MMSE scores of 21 or higher at baseline is an independent predictor of MMSE score decline over a 10-year period. Future research is needed to establish pathophysiological components that can clarify the relationship between frailty and cognitive decline.

  13. Recruiting Hispanics to dietetics: WIC educators' perceptions of the profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiss, Cynthia J; Henley, Samantha M; Daniluk, Patricia; Rengers, Bruce; Fajardo-Lira, Claudia; Gillette, Cynthia Dormer; Bizeau, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Although Hispanics comprise approximately 12% of the population, only 3% of registered dietitians (RDs) are Hispanic. This pilot study explored non-RD Hispanic Women, Infant and Children (WIC) educators' perceptions of dietetics and identified recruitment strategies to increase Hispanic representation. Hispanic WIC educators (n = 48) completed a questionnaire to determine reasons for not pursuing RD status, reasons Hispanics are underrepresented in dietetics, and recruitment strategies. Thirty-eight percent of respondents planned on becoming an RD; 56% had considered becoming an RD. Eighty-two percent postponed pursing the RD due to expense and 65% due to life circumstances. Reasons cited for underrepresentation of Hispanics in the field included lack of knowledge about dietetics, lack of Hispanic role models, and length and expense of training. Suggested recruitment strategies included scholarships, mentoring programs, and awareness campaigns with schools and community-based organizations serving Hispanics. Many WIC educators are interested in becoming RDs, but barriers prevent them from pursing the necessary education and training. To support WIC educators in becoming RDs, the length and expense of the education/ training should be addressed. Increasing awareness of the profession in the Hispanic community and providing financial support would help recruit more Hispanics to the dietetics major.

  14. Life-Space Mobility and Cognitive Decline Among Mexican Americans Aged 75 Years and Older.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberschmidt, Seraina; Kumar, Amit; Raji, Mukaila M; Markides, Kyriakos; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J; Al Snih, Soham

    2017-07-01

    To examine the association between life-space mobility and cognitive decline over a five-year period among older Mexican Americans. Longitudinal study. Hispanic Established Population for the Epidemiologic Study of the Elderly survey conducted in the southwestern of United States (Texas, Colorado, Arizona, New Mexico, and California). Four hundred thirty-two Mexican Americans aged 75 and older with normal or high cognitive function at baseline. Socio-demographic factors, living arrangement, type of household, social support, financial strain, self-reported medical conditions, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), depressive symptoms, activities of daily living (ADLs), and Short Physical Performance Battery. Life-space assessment (LSA) during the past 4 weeks was assessed during in-home interview. Scores ranged from 0 (daily restriction to the bedroom) to 120 (daily trips outside of their own town without assistance) and categorized as 0 to 20, 21 to 40, 41 to 60, 61 to 80, and 81 to 120. Because of the small sample size in the category of 81 to 120, the two highest categories were combined into a single group. The mean LSA score and MMSE score of participants at baseline was 44.6 (Standard Deviation [SD], 20.7) and 25.7 (SD, 3.2), respectively. Mixed Model analyses showed that participants in the highest life-space category (≥61) experienced slower rates of cognitive decline over time compared to participants in the lowest category (0 to 20) (β = 1.03, Standard Error [SE] = 0.29, P = 0.0004), after adjusting for all covariates. Greater life-space mobility at baseline was predictor of slower rates of cognitive decline over 5 years in older Mexican Americans. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  15. Negotiating Religiosity and Sexual Identity Among Hispanic Lesbian Mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuthill, Zelma

    2016-09-01

    Hispanic lesbian mothers face bicultural tensions that stigmatize their roles as mothers. Religion could produce heightened conflict given their potential incompatibility with the role of a "good mother." In particular, there is a potential for conflict between the definition of a "good mother" set forth in Catholicism and the sexual orientation of Hispanic lesbians. I conducted semistructured in-depth interviews to examine how Hispanic lesbian mothers negotiate their Catholic religious identity with aspects of their sexual identity. More specifically, I examined the strategies that Hispanic lesbian mothers use to reconcile or navigate perceived conflict between their roles as a Catholic and as a lesbian. The research questions to be answered were: How do Hispanic lesbian mothers negotiate a Catholic religious and a sexual identity? How do Hispanic lesbian mothers create and maintain a religious narrative? How do Hispanic lesbian mothers redefine religion and spirituality?

  16. Hispanic Medical Organizations' Support for LGBT Health Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, John Paul; Sola, Orlando; Ramallo, Jorge; Sánchez, Nelson Felix; Dominguez, Kenneth; Romero-Leggott, Valerie

    2014-09-01

    Hispanics represent the fastest growing ethnic segment of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) community in the United States and are disproportionately burdened by LGBT-related health issues and limited political support from Hispanic medical organizations. Recently, the Latino Medical Student Association, the National Hispanic Medical Association, and the Hispanic Serving Health Professions Schools, representing over 60,000 Hispanic students and providers and 35 institutions, collaborated to support a resolution opposing discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender identity and recognizing the obstacles encountered by LGBTQ Hispanics. The resolution provides an important framework for organizational members and leaders to address LGBT health issues and serve to support a more positive sociopolitical climate for the Hispanic LGBT community nationally and internationally.

  17. Reliability and validity of the DCP among hispanic veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Victoria; Mohler, M Jane; Wendel, Christopher S; Hoffman, Richard M; Murata, Glen H; Shah, Jayendra H; Duckworth, William C

    2005-12-01

    The Diabetes Care Profile (DCP) was designed to measure psychosocial factors related to diabetes and its treatment. This study sought to determine the reliability and validity of the DCP in Hispanic veterans with Type 2 diabetes. Hispanic (n=81) and non-Hispanic White (n=238) patients were recruited at three southwestern VA hospitals. Scale reliabilities calculated by Cronbach's coefficient alpha revealed reliabilities ranging from .54 to .97 in Hispanics and .63 to .95 in non-Hispanic Whites. Only one scale, Monitoring Barriers, differed significantly between the two patient groups. Mean values on the DCP scales were consistent within and across ethnicities lending support for construct validity of the DCP in Hispanics. Convergent validity was also supported for DCP scales within the Hispanic patients as evidenced by correlations in expected directions with external measures.

  18. Geography, Resources, and Environment of Latin America: An Undergraduate Science Course focused on Attracting Hispanic students to Science and on Educating Non-Hispanics about Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujana, I.; Stern, R. J.; Ledbetter, C. E.

    2004-12-01

    With NSF-CCLI funding, we have developed, taught, and evaluated a new lower-division science course for non-majors, entitled "Geography, Resources, and Environment of Hispanic America" (GRELA). This is an adaptation of a similar course, "Geology and Development of Modern Africa" developed by Barbara Tewksbury (Hamilton College), to attract African American students to science by highlighting cultural ties with their ancestral lands. We think that a similar approach focusing on Latin America may attract Hispanic undergraduates, at the same time that it increases awareness among non-Hispanic students about challenges facing our neighbors to the south. GRELA is an interdisciplinary exploration of how the physical and biological environment of Mexico, Central America, and South America have influenced the people who live there. The course consists of 20 lectures and requires the student to present a report partnering with correspondents in Latin American universities. GRELA begins with an overview of Latin American physical and cultural geography and geologic evolution followed by a series of modules that relate the natural resources and environment of Latin America to the history, economy, and culture of the region. This is followed by an exploration of pre-Columbian cultures. The use of metals by pre-Columbian, colonial, and modern cultures is presented next. We then discuss hydrocarbon resources, geothermal energy, and natural hazards of volcanoes and earthquakes. The last half of the course focuses on Earth System Science themes, including El Nino, glaciers, the Amazon river and rainforest, and coral reefs. The final presentation concerns population growth and water resources along the US-Mexico border. Grades are based on two midterms, one final, and a project which requires that groups of students communicate with scientists in Latin America to explore some aspect of geography, natural resources, or the environment of a Latin American region of common interest

  19. Three Presentations of Takayasu’s Arteritis in Hispanic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramy Magdy Hanna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Takayasu’s arteritis (TA is a medium and large vessel vasculitis, defined as a nonspecific aortitis that usually involves the aorta and its branches Kobayashi and Numano (2002. Its etiology remains unclear, and its complications are diverse and severe, including stenosis of the thoracic and abdominal aorta, aortic valve damage and regurgitation, and stenosis of the branches of the aorta. Carotid stenosis, coronary artery aneurysms, and renal artery stenosis resulting in renovascular hypertension are also reported sequellae of TA Kobayashi and Numano (2002. The disease was first described in Japan, but has also been diagnosed in India and Mexico Johnston (2002. Its incidence in the United States has been quoted as 2.6 patients per 1,000,000 people/year Johnston (2002. In Japan, its incidence is 3.6 patients per 1,000,000 patients/year and prevalence is 7.85 patients per 100,000 per year Morita et al. (1996. The natural history of this disease, which is commonly present in Asian populations, has only recently been studied in Hispanic patients despite the notable incidence and prevalence of TA in Mexican, South American, and Indian populations (Johnston 2002, Gamarra et al. 2010 . We present three cases of Hispanic patients who presented with TA at Olive-View-UCLA Medical Center (OVMC. We review their clinical and radiographic presentations. Finally, we review the literature to compare the clinical features of our three patients with data regarding the presentation of TA in more traditional Asian populations.

  20. Red meat, poultry, and fish intake and breast cancer risk among Hispanic and Non-Hispanic white women: The Breast Cancer Health Disparities Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Andre E; Lundgreen, Abbie; Wolff, Roger K; Fejerman, Laura; John, Esther M; Torres-Mejía, Gabriela; Ingles, Sue A; Boone, Stephanie D; Connor, Avonne E; Hines, Lisa M; Baumgartner, Kathy B; Giuliano, Anna; Joshi, Amit D; Slattery, Martha L; Stern, Mariana C

    2016-04-01

    There is suggestive but limited evidence for a relationship between meat intake and breast cancer (BC) risk. Few studies included Hispanic women. We investigated the association between meats and fish intake and BC risk among Hispanic and NHW women. The study included NHW (1,982 cases and 2,218 controls) and the US Hispanics (1,777 cases and 2,218 controls) from two population-based case-control studies. Analyses considered menopausal status and percent Native American ancestry. We estimated pooled ORs combining harmonized data from both studies, and study- and race-/ethnicity-specific ORs that were combined using fixed or random effects models, depending on heterogeneity levels. When comparing highest versus lowest tertile of intake, among NHW we observed an association between tuna intake and BC risk (pooled OR 1.25; 95 % CI 1.05-1.50; trend p = 0.006). Among Hispanics, we observed an association between BC risk and processed meat intake (pooled OR 1.42; 95% CI 1.18-1.71; trend p < 0.001), and between white meat (OR 0.80; 95% CI 0.67-0.95; trend p = 0.01) and BC risk, driven by poultry. All these findings were supported by meta-analysis using fixed or random effect models and were restricted to estrogen receptor-positive tumors. Processed meats and poultry were not associated with BC risk among NHW women; red meat and fish were not associated with BC risk in either race/ethnic groups. Our results suggest the presence of ethnic differences in associations between meat and BC risk that may contribute to BC disparities.

  1. Establishing an Anthropogenic Nitrogen Baseline Using Native American Shell Middens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island, has been heavily influenced by anthropogenic nutrients for more than 200 years. Recent efforts to improve water quality have cut sewage nitrogen (N) loads to this point source estuary by more than half. Given that the bay has been heavily fertilize...

  2. Differences in Infant Care Practices and Smoking among Hispanic Mothers Living in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provini, Lauren E; Corwin, Michael J; Geller, Nicole L; Heeren, Timothy C; Moon, Rachel Y; Rybin, Denis V; Shapiro-Mendoza, Carrie K; Colson, Eve R

    2017-03-01

    To assess the association between maternal birth country and adherence to the American Academy of Pediatrics safe sleep recommendations in a national sample of Hispanic mothers, given that data assessing the heterogeneity of infant care practices among Hispanics are lacking. We used a stratified, 2-stage, clustered design to obtain a nationally representative sample of mothers from 32 US intrapartum hospitals. A total of 907 completed follow-up surveys (administered 2-6 months postpartum) were received from mothers who self-identified as Hispanic/Latina, forming our sample, which we divided into 4 subpopulations by birth country (US, Mexico, Central/South America, and Caribbean). Prevalence estimates and aORs were determined for infant sleep position, location, breastfeeding, and maternal smoking. When compared with US-born mothers, we found that mothers born in the Caribbean (aOR 4.56) and Central/South America (aOR 2.68) were significantly more likely to room share without bed sharing. Caribbean-born mothers were significantly less likely to place infants to sleep supine (aOR 0.41). Mothers born in Mexico (aOR 1.67) and Central/South America (aOR 2.57) were significantly more likely to exclusively breastfeed; Caribbean-born mothers (aOR 0.13) were significantly less likely to do so. Foreign-born mothers were significantly less likely to smoke before and during pregnancy. Among US Hispanics, adherence to American Academy of Pediatrics safe sleep recommendations varies widely by maternal birth country. These data illustrate the importance of examining behavioral heterogeneity among ethnic groups and have potential relevance for developing targeted interventions for safe infant sleep. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Learning to Baseline Business Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Gore

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available bills, sign multi-­‐year contracts, and make purchasing decisions without having an overall technology plan. That plan includes a technology baseline to fully assess existing technology. A CIO's goal is to align IT with business goals. Businesses must know total cost of ownership and the return on investment for all technology purchases and monthly costs. A business must also be able to manage technology assets and best utilize resources across the business. Teaching students to baseline technology will enable them to track and manage costs, discover errors and waste, and consolidate and improve existing technology.

  4. Baseline Removal From EMG Recordings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    a time-varying baseline contamination. Acknowledgements: Work funded by the Departamento de Salud del Gobierno de Navarrra and by a Spanish MEC...Name(s) and Address(es) Departamento de Ingenieria Electra y Electronica Universidad Publica de Navarra Pamplona, Spain Performing Organization Report

  5. Television viewing by young Hispanic children: evidence of heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Darcy A; Sibinga, Erica M S; Jennings, Jacky M; Bair-Merritt, Megan H; Christakis, Dimitri A

    2010-02-01

    To determine if hours of daily television viewed by varying age groups of young children with Hispanic mothers differs by maternal language preference and to compare these differences with young children with white mothers. Cross-sectional analysis of data collected in 2000 from the National Survey of Early Childhood Health. Nationally representative sample. One thousand three hundred forty-seven mothers of children aged 4 to 35 months. Subgroups of self-reported maternal race/ethnicity (white or Hispanic) and within Hispanic race/ethnicity, stratification by maternal language preference (English or Spanish). Hours of daily television the child viewed. Bivariate analyses showed that children of English- vs Spanish-speaking Hispanic mothers watched more television daily (1.88 vs 1.31 hours, P speaking Hispanic mothers watched similar amounts. However, among children aged 12 to 23 and 24 to 35 months, those of English-speaking Hispanic mothers watched more television than children of Spanish-speaking Hispanic mothers (incidence rate ratio [IRR], 1.61; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.17-2.22; IRR, 1.66; 95% CI, 1.10-2.51, respectively). Compared with children of white mothers, children of both Hispanic subgroups watched similar amounts among the 4- to 11-month-old group. However, among 12- to 23-month-old children, those of English-speaking Hispanic mothers watched more compared with children of white mothers (IRR, 1.57; 95% CI, 1.18-2.11). Among 24- to 35-month-old children, those of English-speaking Hispanic mothers watched similar amounts compared with children of white mothers, but children of Spanish-speaking Hispanic mothers watched less (IRR, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.50-0.95). Television-viewing amounts among young children with Hispanic mothers vary by child age and maternal language preference, supporting the need to explore sociocultural factors that influence viewing in Hispanic children.

  6. Promoting Weight Maintenance among Overweight and Obese Hispanic Children in a Rural Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra-Medina, Deborah; Mojica, Cynthia; Liang, Yuanyuan; Ouyang, Yongjian; Ramos, Awilda I; Gomez, Ismaela

    2015-08-01

    US Hispanic children experience a disproportionate burden of overweight and obesity. Comprehensive high-intensity behavioral programs have demonstrated effectiveness in improving weight status among obese children. However, there remains a need to develop more efficient interventions that are feasible in primary care and demonstrate effectiveness in Hispanic children. The pilot study used a two-group randomized design. Eligible overweight (BMI between the 85th and 94th percentile for age and gender) or obese (BMI ≥95th percentile) Hispanic children and their parents (N=118 child/parent dyads) were recruited from a rural pediatric clinic and randomized to: standard care (SC; n=61 dyads) or behavioral intervention (INT; n=57 dyads). The primary outcomes-weight, waist circumference, and zBMI-were measured at baseline, 2, 6, and 18 weeks. Multivariate logistic regression was used to examine the effect of INT on the likelihood of weight maintenance adjusting for potential confounding variables. Significantly fewer INT children (68.5%) experienced weight gain, compared to SC children (89.7%; p=0.009). The same pattern was observed for waist circumference, where fewer INT children (44%) experienced an increase in waist circumference, compared to SC children (68.6%; p=0.02). Although a trend of improvement in favor of the INT was observed for zBMI, it was not significant. This study provides preliminary evidence for the feasibility of a primary-care-based approach to promoting weight maintenance among a high-risk population.

  7. Hispanic caregiver perceptions of preventive service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Michael H; Paumgarten, Annie C

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative study uses grounded theory to examine 38 Hispanic caregivers' perceptions of preventive service at six urban community-based Agencies. The findings show caregivers seek an open personal relationship with workers, value a worker's ability to speak Spanish, respond well to group treatment, place a strong value on family, have deficits in the area of social supports, and struggle to meet the goals of preventive service treatment due to socioeconomic pressures. The article discusses implications for treatment.

  8. Communicating terminal diagnoses to Hispanic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrion, Iraida V

    2010-06-01

    This study addressed factors physicians employ in their communication of a terminal diagnosis and a hospice referral to Hispanic patients. The research method used was an exploratory qualitative in-depth semi-structured interview with thematic analysis. The interviews were with ten physicians in Central Florida. The interviews were conducted in Spanish and/or English with physicians who serve terminally ill Hispanic patients. The findings provide vital information on factors that impact communication of diagnosis and hospice referral. Themes emerged relating to role of family members and end-of-life decision-making. Language barriers and limited knowledge of cultural factors and beliefs impacted communication related to end-of-life decisions. Gaps in training and education for physicians were also identified. These results suggest that discussing end-of-life issues with the diverse category of Hispanic patients and families will be enhanced by eliminating language barriers, increased understanding of the role of family members, and knowledge of cultural factors and beliefs related to end-of-life decisions.

  9. An assessment of hospice bereavement programs for Hispanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arriaza, Pablo; Martin, Shadi S; Csikai, Ellen L

    2011-01-01

    Hispanics are the fastest growing minority group in the United States, numbering over 42 million and comprising 15% of the total population (U.S. Census Bureau, 2008 ). Hispanics are a heterogeneous group that experience disparities in accessing health care, including at the end of life. Specific gaps can be identified in the care of bereaved Hispanic individuals and families. This exploratory study examined bereavement services available and perceived needs for Hispanics in Florida. Hospice bereavement coordinators indicated that limited services were available specifically for Spanish-speakers and that language and cultural barriers were challenges when communicating, offering, and delivering bereavement services to Hispanics. Implications for social workers include the need to increase access to and evaluate the effectiveness of bereavement services for Hispanics.

  10. The Hispanic paradox in cardiovascular disease and total mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Inojosa, Jose; Jean, Nathalie; Cortes-Bergoderi, Mery; Lopez-Jimenez, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Health statistics and epidemiologic studies have shown that Hispanics live longer than Non Hispanic Whites, despite a high prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors and an average low socioeconomic status, both strong predictors of CVD and mortality. This phenomenon has been dubbed "The Hispanic paradox" and has been demonstrated in old and contemporary cohorts. To date, no factor has been identified that could explain this phenomenon, but socio demographic factors, dietary intake and genetic predisposition have been proposed as possible explanations for the Hispanic paradox. As with the French paradox, where French were found to have a lower rate of coronary heart disease (CHD), helped to identify the role of the Mediterranean diet and wine consumption in the prevention of CHD, the Hispanic paradox could help identify protective factors against CHD. This article describes the current evidence supporting the existence of the Hispanic paradox and provides a brief review on the possible explanations. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Mode S Baseline Radar Tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-11-01

    range units and 20 azimuth units) overlaying the position of the beacon reports. In the cases analyzed where beacon reports were not radar reinforced ...82/53 j~ C ~ 7 C _ _ _ _ _ _ 4. Title end Su.btitle 5. Neget at. November 1982 MDDE S BASELINE RADAR TRACKIN4G 6. Poelin Orgeuianti.. Cede ACT-100...Ground Clutter 33 Mode S/ARTS III 100-Scan False Radar Track Summary 74 34 Percent Beacon Radar Reinforcement 77 vii INTRODUCTION PURPOSE. The purpose of

  12. Lower extremity amputations in diabetic Mexican American elders: incidence, prevalence and correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otiniano, Max E; Du, Xianglin; Ottenbacher, Kenneth; Black, Sandra A; Markides, Kyriakos S

    2003-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the incidence and prevalence of amputations in diabetic Mexican American elders and to identify correlates of lower extremity amputations. Data for this study came from baseline and two follow-up interviews of the Hispanic Established Population for the Epidemiological Study of the Elderly (EPESE) conducted in five southwestern states (Texas, California, New Mexico, Colorado and Arizona) in 1993-1994. Of the 3050 subjects aged 65 and older, 690 reported diabetes, and from these, 60 (8%) reported having at least one lower extremity amputation. Losing a leg was the most common type of amputation (53%). Twelve percent of respondents reported a new amputation and 40% of amputees reported a second amputation during follow-up. Mortality among amputees was 46% during a 5-year follow-up. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that being male and having eye problems, hip fracture and diabetes for 10 or more years were significantly associated with lower extremity amputations at baseline, whereas obesity, stroke and 10 or more years with diabetes were significantly associated with new amputations at 5-year follow-up. Gender and disease history were associated with lower extremity amputations at baseline and follow-up. These variables may be useful in developing patient education and intervention programs.

  13. Hispanic residential ethnic density and depression in post-acute coronary syndrome patients: Re-thinking the role of social support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, Ellen-Ge D; Shaffer, Jonathan A; Alcantara, Carmela; Clemow, Lynn; Brondolo, Elizabeth

    2015-05-01

    The ethnic density hypothesis suggests that ethnic density confers greater social support and consequently protects against depressive symptoms in ethnic minority individuals. However, the potential benefits of ethnic density have not been examined in individuals who are facing a specific and salient life stressor. We examined the degree to which the effects of Hispanic ethnic density on depressive symptoms are explained by socioeconomic resources and social support. Patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS, N = 472) completed the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and measures of demographics, ACS clinical factors and perceived social support. Neighborhood characteristics, including median income, number of single parent households and Hispanic ethnic density, were extracted from the American Community Survey Census (2005-2009) for each patient using his or her geocoded address. In a linear regression analysis adjusted for demographic and clinical factors, Hispanic ethnic density was positively associated with depressive symptoms (β = .09, standard error (SE) = .04, p = .03). However, Hispanic density was no longer a significant predictor of depressive symptoms when neighborhood characteristics were controlled. The relationship of Hispanic density on depressive symptoms was moderated by nativity status. Among US-born patients with ACS, there was a significant positive relationship between Hispanic density and depressive symptoms and social support significantly mediated this effect. There was no observed effect of Hispanic density to depressive symptoms for foreign-born ACS patients. Although previous research suggests that ethnic density may be protective against depression, our data suggest that among patients with ACS, living in a community with a high concentration of Hispanic individuals is associated with constrained social and economic resources that are themselves associated with greater depressive symptoms. These data add to a growing body of literature

  14. Household food insecurity as a determinant of overweight and obesity among low-income Hispanic subgroups: Data from the 2011-2012 California Health Interview Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Teresa M; Colón-Ramos, Uriyoán; Pinard, Courtney A; Yaroch, Amy L

    2016-02-01

    An estimated 78% of Hispanics in the United States (US) are overweight or obese. Household food insecurity, a condition of limited or uncertain access to adequate food, has been associated with obesity rates among Hispanic adults in the US. However, the Hispanic group is multi-ethnic and therefore associations between obesity and food insecurity may not be constant across Hispanic country of origin subgroups. This study sought to determine if the association between obesity and food insecurity among Hispanics is modified by Hispanic ancestry across low-income (≤200% of poverty level) adults living in California. Data are from the cross-sectional 2011-12 California Health Interview Survey (n = 5498). Rates of overweight or obesity (BMI ≥ 25), Calfresh receipt (California's Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program), and acculturation were examined for differences across subgroups. Weighted multiple logistic regressions examined if household food insecurity was significantly associated with overweight or obesity and modified by country of origin after controlling for age, education, marital status, country of birth (US vs. outside of US), language spoken at home, and Calfresh receipt (P food security, Calfresh receipt, country of birth, and language spoken at home. Results from the adjusted logistic regression models found that food insecurity was significantly associated with overweight or obesity among Mexican-American women (β (SE) = 0.22 (0.09), p = .014), but not Mexican-American men or Non-Mexican groups, suggesting Hispanic subgroups behave differently in their association between food insecurity and obesity. By highlighting these factors, we can promote targeted obesity prevention interventions, which may contribute to more effective behavior change and reduced chronic disease risk in this population.

  15. Diversity by race, Hispanic ethnicity, and sex of the United States medical oncology physician workforce over the past quarter century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deville, Curtiland; Chapman, Christina H; Burgos, Ramon; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Both, Stefan; Thomas, Charles R

    2014-09-01

    To assess the medical oncology (MO) physician workforce diversity by race, Hispanic ethnicity, and sex, with attention to trainees. Public registries were used to assess 2010 differences among MO practicing physicians, academic faculty, and fellows; internal medicine (IM) residents; and the US population, using binomial tests with P diversity remains unchanged. For Blacks alone, representation as MO fellows is decreased compared with IM residents, suggesting greater disparity in MO training. Copyright © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  16. Chronic Periodontitis Genome-wide Association Study in the Hispanic Community Health Study / Study of Latinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, A E; Sofer, T; Wong, Q; Kerr, K F; Agler, C; Shaffer, J R; Beck, J D; Offenbacher, S; Salazar, C R; North, K E; Marazita, M L; Laurie, C C; Singer, R H; Cai, J; Finlayson, T L; Divaris, K

    2017-01-01

    Chronic periodontitis (CP) has a genetic component, particularly its severe forms. Evidence from genome-wide association studies (GWASs) has highlighted several potential novel loci. Here, the authors report the first GWAS of CP among a large community-based sample of Hispanics/Latinos. The authors interrogated a quantitative trait of CP (mean interproximal clinical attachment level determined by full-mouth periodontal examinations) among 10,935 adult participants (mean age: 45 y, range: 18 to 76 y) from the Hispanic Community Health Study / Study of Latinos. Genotyping was done with a custom Illumina Omni2.5M array, and imputation to approximately 20 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms was based on the 1000 Genomes Project phase 1 reference panel. Analyses were based on linear mixed models adjusting for sex, age, study design features, ancestry, and kinship and employed a conventional P evidence of association ( P based sample of Hispanic/Latinos. It identified a genome-wide significant locus that was independently replicated in an African-American population. Identifying this genetic marker offers direction for interrogation in subsequent genomic and experimental studies of CP.

  17. Living kidney donation among Hispanics: a qualitative examination of barriers and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvaro, Eusebio M; Siegel, Jason T; Turcotte, Dana; Lisha, Nadra; Crano, William D; Dominick, Alexander

    2008-12-01

    Despite their increasing need for kidneys and low nonliving donation rates, minimal research has been conducted to ascertain the perceptions of Hispanic Americans about living organ donation and the process of asking for such a donation. To examine perceptions of Hispanics regarding barriers to and benefits of living donation as well as the process of asking someone to be a living donor. A qualitative study consisting of 10 focus groups conducted in 2 series. Adult Spanish-language-dominant Hispanic members of the general population of Tucson, Arizona. The main barriers to living organ donation were a lack of knowledge or information and fear of the donation process. Knowing that one has helped save or improve another's life was the central benefit. Most participants reported being willing to ask a relative to be a living donor if they were ever in need. Two main responses typified these individuals: no concern about asking because of a strong desire to fight for one's health and for one's family, or asking despite difficulties and concerns about the process. A significant minority of participants indicated they would not ask for a donation, because of either a desire to avoid harming others or the expectation that a relative would initiate an offer.

  18. Hispanic parents' reading language preference and pediatric oral health-related quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazicioglu, Iffet; Jones, Judith A; Cortés, Dharma; Rich, Sharron; Garcia, Raul

    2013-01-01

    This study compared scores and psychometric properties from self-identified Hispanic parents who completed Pediatric Oral Health-related Quality of life (POQL) parent report-on-child questionnaires in Spanish or English. The study hypothesized that there were no differences in psychometric properties or POQL scores by parent reading language preference, controlling for dental needs, child's place of birth, age, insurance and use of care. POQL scores were computed, and the internal consistency, feasibility, factor structure and construct validity of the Spanish language version assessed. Hispanic parents (N = 387) of 8-14 year old children (mean age 10.2) completed the survey; 237 in Spanish and 150 in English. Internal consistency scores were higher (Cronbach α range = .86-.93) among Hispanic parents who completed the questionnaire in Spanish than in English (.66-.86). POQL scores from parents who completed questionnaires in Spanish were higher (worse) overall (6.03 vs. 3.82, P = 0.022), as were physical (11.61 vs. 6.54, P = 0.001) and role functioning domains (1.87 vs. 0.82, P = 0.029). Items for crying, pain, and eating were higher (P language (not significant) and visit in last year in the final multivariate linear regression. © 2013 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  19. SES Gradients Among Mexicans in the United States and in Mexico: A New Twist to the Hispanic Paradox?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrán-Sánchez, Hiram; Palloni, Alberto; Riosmena, Fernando; Wong, Rebeca

    2016-10-01

    Recent empirical findings have suggested the existence of a twist in the Hispanic paradox, in which Mexican and other Hispanic foreign-born migrants living in the United States experience shallower socioeconomic status (SES) health disparities than those in the U.S. In this article, we seek to replicate this finding and test conjectures that could explain this new observed phenomenon using objective indicators of adult health by educational attainment in several groups: (1) Mexican-born individuals living in Mexico and in the United States, (2) U.S.-born Mexican Americans, and (3) non-Hispanic American whites. Our analytical strategy improves upon previous research on three fronts. First, we derive four hypotheses from a general framework that has also been used to explain the standard Hispanic paradox. Second, we study biomarkers rather than self-reported health and related conditions. Third, we use a binational data platform that includes both Mexicans living in Mexico (Mexican National Health and Nutrition Survey 2006) and Mexican migrants to the United States (NHANES 1999-2010). We find steep education gradients among Mexicans living in Mexico's urban areas in five of six biomarkers of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and in the overall MetS score. Mexican migrants living in the United States experience similar patterns to Mexicans living in Mexico in glucose and obesity biomarkers. These results are inconsistent with previous findings, suggesting that Mexican migrants in the United States experience significantly attenuated health gradients relative to the non-Hispanic white U.S. Our empirical evidence also contradicts the idea that SES-health gradients in Mexico are shallower than those in the United States and could be invoked to explain shallower gradients among Mexicans living in the United States.

  20. Outreach to Hispanic/Latino Communities With a Spanish-Language Version of the Earthscope Website

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, A. M.; Stein, S.; Delaughter, J.

    2005-12-01

    Spanish is estimated to be the fourth language in the world based on number of speakers, the second as a vehicle of international communication and the third as an international language of politics, economics and culture. Its importance in the U.S. is illustrated by the fact that the Hispanic/Latino population is becoming the largest minority group because it has the fastest growth rate of all ethnic groups in the U.S. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, in 2004 there were ~41 million people in the U.S. (~14% of the total population) of Hispanic or Latino origin. Although the Spanish-speaking population is growing rapidly, the same cannot be said about the number of Hispanic/Latino high school and college graduates. Studies by the National Center for Education Statistics show that Hispanic/Latino students are as likely to drop out are to complete high school. Similarly, although more Hispanic/Latino students enroll in college and/or universities than a decade ago, few complete degrees. For example, in the geosciences only 3% of bachelor's degrees were granted to people identifying themselves as Hispanic or Latino. Over the last 28 years, only 263 of the 20,000 geoscience Ph.D.s awarded in the U.S. went to Hispanic Americans. Bilingual educational offerings are one technique for addressing this discrepancy. For example, scientists and research programs such as EarthScope, NASA, NOAA, and ODP frequently reach out to students and the general public using the internet. Many well-made and useful websites with scientific themes in the U.S. are available to millions of users worldwide, providing a resource that is limited or non-existent in other countries. Unfortunately, few geoscience education sites are available in languages other than English. To address this need, Earthscope is developing a Spanish version of its website describing its goals, techniques, and educational opportunities. Currently, approximately 90% of the educational content on this site (http

  1. Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Diwan, M V; Qian, X; Rubbia, A

    2016-01-01

    We review long-baseline neutrino experiments in which neutrinos are detected after traversing macroscopic distances. Over such distances neutrinos have been found to oscillate among flavor states. Experiments with solar, atmospheric, reactor, and accelerator neutrinos have resulted in a coherent picture of neutrino masses and mixing of the three known flavor states. We will summarize the current best knowledge of neutrino parameters and phenomenology with our focus on the evolution of the experimental technique. We proceed from the first evidence produced by astrophysical neutrino sources to the current open questions and the goals of future research.

  2. Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diwan, M. V.; Galymov, V.; Qian, X.; Rubbia, A.

    2016-10-01

    We review long-baseline neutrino experiments in which neutrinos are detected after traversing macroscopic distances. Over such distances neutrinos have been found to oscillate among flavor states. Experiments with solar, atmospheric, reactor, and accelerator neutrinos have resulted in a coherent picture of neutrino masses and mixing of the three known flavor states. We summarize the current best knowledge of neutrino parameters and phenomenology, with a focus on the evolution of the experimental technique. We proceed from the first evidence produced by astrophysical neutrino sources to the current open questions and the goals of future research.

  3. Baseline LAW Glass Formulation Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, Albert A. [USDOE Office of River Protection, Richland, WA (United States); Mooers, Cavin [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab.; Bazemore, Gina [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Pegg, Ian L. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Hight, Kenneth [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Lai, Shan Tao [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Buechele, Andrew [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Rielley, Elizabeth [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Gan, Hao [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Muller, Isabelle S. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Cecil, Richard [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab

    2013-06-13

    The major objective of the baseline glass formulation work was to develop and select glass formulations that are compliant with contractual and processing requirements for each of the LAW waste streams. Other objectives of the work included preparation and characterization of glasses with respect to the properties of interest, optimization of sulfate loading in the glasses, evaluation of ability to achieve waste loading limits, testing to demonstrate compatibility of glass melts with melter materials of construction, development of glass formulations to support ILAW qualification activities, and identification of glass formulation issues with respect to contract specifications and processing requirements.

  4. Treatment outcomes in undocumented Hispanic immigrants with HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Kenneth K; Dang, Bich N; Davila, Jessica A; Hartman, Christine; Giordano, Thomas P

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the treatment outcomes of undocumented Hispanic immigrants with HIV infection. We sought to compare the treatment outcomes of undocumented and documented patients 12-months after entering HIV care. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of antiretroviral-naive patients 18 years and older attending their first visit at Thomas Street Health Center in Houston, Texas, between 1/1/2003 and 6/30/2008. The study population of 1,620 HIV-infected adults included 186 undocumented Hispanic, 278 documented Hispanic, 986 Black, and 170 White patients. The main outcome measures were retention in care (quarter years with at least one completed HIV primary care provider visit) and HIV suppression (HIV RNA Undocumented Hispanic patients had lower median initial CD4 cell count (132 cells/mm(3)) than documented Hispanic patients (166 cells/mm(3); P = 0.186), Black patients (226 cells/mm(3); Pundocumented Hispanic patients did as well or better than their documented counterparts. One year after entering HIV care, undocumented Hispanics achieved similar rates of retention in care and HIV suppression as documented Hispanic and White patients. Of note, black patients were significantly less likely to have optimal retention in care (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 0.65, CI = 0.45-0.94) or achieve HIV suppression (aOR 0.32, CI = 0.17-0.61) than undocumented Hispanics. Undocumented Hispanic persons with HIV infection enter care with more advanced disease than documented persons, suggesting testing and/or linkage to care efforts for this difficult-to-reach population need intensification. Once diagnosed, however, undocumented Hispanics have outcomes as good as or better than other racial/ethnic groups. Safety net providers for undocumented immigrants are vital for maintaining individual and public health.

  5. Developing a Leadership Identity as a Hispanic Woman at a Hispanic- Serving Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onorato, Suzanne; Musoba, Glenda Droogsma

    2015-01-01

    Institutions of higher education are uniquely positioned to educate tomorrow's leaders and initiate change in the number and ethnic diversity of women in leadership roles. The purpose of our study was to understand the essence of Hispanic college women's leadership identity development with participants and researchers co-constructing meaning. We…

  6. The Coming Black/Hispanic Coalition. A Black View and An Hispanic View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, Lillian; Arias, Ron

    1980-01-01

    Two journalists discuss political, economic, and social issues which unite Blacks and Hispanics and consider the problems which impede the formation of a formal political coalition between the two groups. Among the common issues identified are police brutality, voter registration, unemployment, health, housing, and the media. (GC)

  7. Latinas: Hispanic Women in the United States. The Hispanic Experience in America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza, Hedda

    The term "Latinas" encompasses many different groups of women. Despite the disparities among the cultures of their countries of origin, Spanish-speaking peoples have been lumped as "Hispanics," and later "Latinos," in the United States. The Latino group is rapidly becoming the largest minority population in the United…

  8. Alcohol-related social problems among Mexican Americans living in U.S.-Mexico border and non-border areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaeth, Patrice A C; Caetano, Raul; Mills, Britain A; Rodriguez, Lori A

    2012-08-01

    This paper examines alcohol-related social problems among Mexican Americans living along the U.S.-Mexico border and in non-border areas. Interviews were conducted among Mexican Americans in the border regions of California, Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas (N=1307). Non-border respondents were interviewed primarily in Houston and Los Angeles (N=1288) as part of the Hispanic Americans Baseline Alcohol Survey (HABLAS). Both the border and HABLAS surveys employed multistage cluster sample designs (response rates were 67% and 76%, respectively). In the bivariate analysis, there were no significant differences between border and non-border areas in the proportion of those with one or more social problem. In non-border areas, the prevalence of alcohol problems did not differ significantly by age. However, along the border the prevalence of alcohol problems was significantly different across age groups, with 18 to 29year old men and women having the highest prevalence. The final models showed no residence effect on problem likelihood. Drinking was strongly associated with problems. Although young border residents had higher problem prevalence rates than older residents, the logistic regression models showed no effect of border residence on the likelihood of problems, indicating that problems are due to alcohol consumption, not the border environment. The border, however, did appear to influence more drinking among young people. Regardless of residence, alcohol treatment and preventive interventions tailored to Mexican Americans are essential and special attention should be focused on younger individuals near the border.

  9. The effects of cancer and racial disparities in health-related quality of life among older Americans: a case-control, population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Laura C; Wheeler, Stephanie B; Chen, Ronald C; Mayer, Deborah K; Lyons, Jessica C; Reeve, Bryce B

    2015-04-15

    Understanding the impact of the cancer care system on racial/ethnic disparities in health-related quality of life (HRQOL) is increasingly important as the number of cancer survivors in the United States grows. The authors prospectively assessed changes in HRQOL before and after a first cancer diagnosis among non-Hispanic whites (NHWs), African Americans (AAs), Hispanics, and Asians in a cohort of Medicare beneficiaries with and without cancer. Data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results linked with the Medicare Health Outcomes Survey were used to identify 1778 individuals aged ≥65 years with prostate, breast, or colorectal cancer from 1998 to 2007. The Medical Outcomes Trust Short Form 36 (SF-36) instrument was used to measure HRQOL. By using propensity scores, each patient with cancer (case) was matched to 5 individuals without cancer (noncancer controls), and differences in HRQOL according to race/ethnicity were assessed. Mixed effects analysis of covariance models was used to assess differences in HRQOL, adjusting for baseline HRQOL, demographics, and self-reported comorbid conditions while controlling for each individual's managed care plan. Stratified analyses were used to assess racial/ethnic disparities between cases and noncancer controls. Before cancer diagnosis, NHWs had better HRQOL scores than AAs and Hispanics on the Role-Physical and Role-Emotional SF-36 subscales. Cancer diagnosis/treatment negatively impacted individuals' lives regardless of race/ethnicity. However, among cases, gaps between racial/ethnic groups narrowed (compared with controls) before and after cancer diagnosis for some SF-36 HRQOL measures. Racial/ethnic HRQOL gaps exist among cancer survivors but may narrow because of exposure to the cancer care system. Further research to understand why this occurs will help inform initiatives to manage the impact of cancer on HRQOL among elderly cancer survivors. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  10. An application of a diabetes knowledge scale for low-literate Hispanic/Latinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Purcell, Ninfa C; Boggess, May M

    2014-03-01

    The threefold purpose of this study is to assess diabetes knowledge among Hispanic/Latinos attending a culturally sensitive, empowerment-based, diabetes self-management education program; second, to examine the utility of the Spoken Knowledge in Low Literacy in Diabetes (SKILLD) scale as an assessment tool for this population; and third, to assess the relationship between hemoglobin A1C and knowledge improvement in the intervention group. A prospective, quasi-experimental, repeated-measure design tested pre- and post-A1C and diabetes knowledge using the SKILLD scale. The sample consisted of 71 in the intervention group and 64 controls. Most participants were female, marginally acculturated, and, on average, 60 years of age. Both groups were similar in baseline diabetes knowledge score (median 6 out of 10), and higher literacy was significantly related to increased baseline knowledge. The intervention group significantly improved at follow-up compared with the controls: Participants in the intervention with low baseline knowledge scores had a mean follow-up score of 5.6; those with a high baseline score had a mean score of 7.6. The intervention cohort scored significantly better in knowing why to see an eye doctor, what are normal fasting blood glucose and A1C, and understanding long-term diabetes complications. Increased knowledge of a normal fasting blood glucose level had a significant effect on follow-up A1C in the intervention group. The intervention favorably affects diabetes knowledge, and the SKILLD scale has utility with low-literate Hispanic/Latinos. The significant impact on A1C by diabetes knowledge gain shows that the empowerment-based diabetes self-management education was successful for this ethnic population.

  11. FED baseline engineering studies report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sager, P.H.

    1983-04-01

    Studies were carried out on the FED Baseline to improve design definition, establish feasibility, and reduce cost. Emphasis was placed on cost reduction, but significant feasibility concerns existed in several areas, and better design definition was required to establish feasibility and provide a better basis for cost estimates. Design definition and feasibility studies included the development of a labyrinth shield ring concept to prevent radiation streaming between the torus spool and the TF coil cryostat. The labyrinth shield concept which was developed reduced radiation streaming sufficiently to permit contact maintenance of the inboard EF coils. Various concepts of preventing arcing between adjacent shield sectors were also explored. It was concluded that installation of copper straps with molybdenum thermal radiation shields would provide the most reliable means of preventing arcing. Other design studies included torus spool electrical/structural concepts, test module shielding, torus seismic response, poloidal conditions in the magnets, disruption characteristics, and eddy current effects. These additional studies had no significant impact on cost but did confirm the feasibility of the basic FED Baseline concept.

  12. Retirement Planning Among Hispanics: In God's Hands?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Luisa R; Aguila, Emma; Gongora, Arturo; Duru, O Kenrik

    2016-12-15

    We conducted a qualitative study on retirement preparedness among middle-aged and older low-income Hispanics in Los Angeles. Data were derived from four focus groups conducted in the greater Los Angeles area. Findings demonstrate how behavioral and cultural factors-family experiences, religiosity, and denial of retirement-explain the lack of savings and preparedness for retirement. Findings also indicate that the majority of participants want to be economically independent and to keep working until they are unable to do so. Participants helped their parents financially but did not feel comfortable asking their own children for help. Instead, participants placed their survival in retirement "in God's hands."

  13. Developing a national database to recent Hispanic/minority graduates and professionals for employmnet, procurement, consulting, and educational research opportunities with the federal government. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, G.D.; Garza, H.

    1996-09-30

    This report very briefly summarizes notable accomplishments of the grant collaboration between the Hispanic Experts Database/Minority Experts Database and the American Council on Education. The Directory of Hispanic Experts was compiled and distributed from the database. The database was expanded through several initiatives, and information dissemination was increased. The database is now available on the Internet and the World Wide Web. Restructuring of Web sites and other means of information dissemination was performed to coordinate the database with other government databases and eliminate duplication.

  14. Feeding Infants and Toddlers Study: meal and snack intakes of Hispanic and non-Hispanic infants and toddlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Paula; Hanson, Charlotte; Ponza, Michael; Novak, Timothy; Hendricks, Kristy

    2006-01-01

    To describe meal and snack patterns of Hispanic and non-Hispanic infants and toddlers. A cross-sectional telephone survey in which mothers or other primary caregivers reported their infants' and toddlers' food and beverage intake for a 24-hour period. Subjects were a subset of the national random sample of children aged 4-24 months who participated in the 2002 Feeding Infants and Toddlers Study. The Feeding Infants and Toddlers Study includes a stratified random sample of 3,022 infants and toddlers aged 4-24 months. Three hundred seventy-one Hispanic and 2,637 non-Hispanic children who had 24-hour dietary recalls are included in the subset. Means+/-standard errors of daily intakes of energy, nutrients, and nutrient densities were calculated, as were percentages of children consuming foods at each eating occasion. Hispanic and non-Hispanic infants and toddlers, on average, were fed seven times per day. Overall, the percentages of children who ate snacks increased with age, and more than 80% of toddlers aged 12-24 months consumed afternoon snacks, with more than 90% of Hispanic children consuming an afternoon snack. In each age group, there were significant differences between ethnic groups in nutrient intakes by eating occasion. No significant difference was seen for energy across all meal occasions. At age 6-11 months, Hispanic children had a significantly lower intake of carbohydrate at dinner and lower intake of saturated fat at afternoon snacks compared with non-Hispanic children (Pfiber intake contributed 2 g/meal for both ethnic groups. Snacks contributed, on average, less than 1 g fiber, except Hispanic toddlers had significantly higher fiber intake at afternoon snacks (1.5 g) than non-Hispanic toddlers. Foods frequently consumed at meals and snacks were lacking in whole grains, vegetables, and fruits. Most nutrients were not significantly different between Hispanics and non-Hispanics for meals and snacks. Considering the sizeable contribution that snacks

  15. A Rationale for Hispanic Representation in Instructional Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasquillo, Angela L.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the need for increased and more appropriate Hispanic representation in instructional materials at school to promote understanding of Latin culture. Stereotypes about Hispanics relate to punctuality, machismo, initiative, self-image, skin color, socioeconomic status, intelligence, parents' role in education, language proficiency, and…

  16. Overweight, Body Image, and Depression in Asian and Hispanic Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Bin; Unger, Jennifer B.; Gallaher, Peggy; Johnson, C. Anderson; Wu, Qiaobing; Chou, Chih-Ping

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To prospectively investigate associations between overweight and depressive symptoms in Asian and Hispanic adolescents. Methods: Data included 780 Hispanic and 375 Asian students. Structural equation model was used to prospectively explore moderation effects of gender, ethnicity, and acculturation on associations of overweight, body…

  17. The Impact of Acculturation on Hispanic Students' Learning Styles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonyea, Nathan E.

    2010-01-01

    The present study investigated the impact of acculturation on the learning styles of 151 Hispanic students enrolled in a Hispanic Serving Institution in South Texas, controlling for age, gender, and country of origin. Acculturation did not significantly predict learning style when controlling for these three variables. These results may be because…

  18. A Comparison of Acculturation Measures among Hispanic/Latino Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, Jennifer B.; Ritt-Olson, Anamara; Wagner, Karla; Soto, Daniel; Baezconde-Garbanati, Lourdes

    2007-01-01

    Acculturation has been associated with numerous health and social outcomes among Hispanic/Latino adolescents. Various self-report scales have been used to measure acculturation, making comparisons of results across studies difficult. This study administered several commonly-used acculturation scales to 221 Hispanic/Latino 9th grade students in Los…

  19. Bridging the Gap: The Struggle of One Hispanic Father

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Parent involvement has been shown to be one of the keys to student educational success, their ability to perform at a high level and persevere. The latest government statistics reveal that 53 million Hispanics now reside in the United States and 75 % of this population speaks Spanish at home [Cooper, M. (2014). "Hispanics in America and in…

  20. Coca-Cola Hispanic Education Fund: Los Angeles Program Description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coca Cola Bottling Co. of Los Angeles, CA.

    The Coca-Cola Hispanic Education Fund was created in response to the high school dropout problem in Los Angeles. The Fund enables the Coca-Cola Bottling Company of Los Angeles to build upon the successful relationship it has developed in the Hispanic community and maximizes the effectiveness of existing student support programs by directing needy…