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Sample records for hippocampus preventive effect

  1. Dosimetric analysis of the alopecia preventing effect of hippocampus sparing whole brain radiation therapy

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    Mahadevan, Anand; Sampson, Carrie; LaRosa, Salvatore; Floyd, Scott R.; Wong, Eric T.; Uhlmann, Erik J.; Sengupta, Soma; Kasper, Ekkehard M.

    2015-01-01

    Whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) is widely used for the treatment of brain metastases. Cognitive decline and alopecia are recognized adverse effects of WBRT. Recently hippocampus sparing whole brain radiation therapy (HS-WBRT) has been shown to reduce the incidence of memory loss. In this study, we found that multi-field intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), with strict constraints to the brain parenchyma and to the hippocampus, reduces follicular scalp dose and prevents alopecia. Suitable patients befitting the inclusion criteria of the RTOG 0933 trial received Hippocampus sparing whole brain radiation. On follow up, they were noticed to have full scalp hair preservation. 5 mm thickness of follicle bearing scalp in the radiation field was outlined in the planning CT scans. Conventional opposed lateral WBRT radiation fields were applied to these patient-specific image sets and planned with the same nominal dose of 30 Gy in 10 fractions. The mean and maximum dose to follicle bearing skin and Dose Volume Histogram (DVH) data were analyzed for conventional and HS-WBRT. Paired t-test was used to compare the means. All six patients had fully preserved scalp hair and remained clinically cognitively intact 1–3 months after HS-WBRT. Compared to conventional WBRT, in addition to the intended sparing of the Hippocampus, HS-WBRT delivered significantly lower mean dose (22.42 cGy vs. 16.33 cGy, p < 0.0001), V 24 (9 cc vs. 44 cc, p < 0.0000) and V 30 (9 cc vs. 0.096 cc, p = 0.0106) to follicle hair bearing scalp and prevented alopecia. There were no recurrences in the Hippocampus area. HS-WBRT, with an 11-field set up as described, while attempting to conserve hippocampus radiation and maintain radiation dose to brain inadvertently spares follicle-bearing scalp and prevents alopecia

  2. Effects of HZE irradiation on chemical neurotransmission in rodent hippocampus

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    Machida, Mayumi

    Space radiation represents a significant risk to the CNS (central nervous system) during space missions. Most harmful are the HZE (high mass, highly charged (Z), high energy) particles, e.g. 56Fe, which possess high ionizing ability, dense energy deposition pattern, and high penetrance. Accumulating evidence suggests that radiation has significant impact on cognitive functions. In ground-base experiments, HZE radiation induces pronounced deficits in hippocampus dependent learning and memory in rodents. However, the mechanisms underlying these impairments are mostly unknown. Exposure to HZE radiation elevates the level of oxidation, resulting in cell loss, tissue damage and functional deficits through direct ionization and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). When hippocampal slices were exposed to ROS, neuronal excitability was reduced. My preliminary results showed enhanced radio-vulnerability of the hippocampus and reduction in basal and depolarization-evoked [3H]-norepinephrine release after HZE exposure. These results raised the possibility that HZE radiation deteriorates cognitive function through radiation-induced impairments in hippocampal chemical neurotransmission, the hypothesis of this dissertation. In Aim 1 I have focused on the effects of HZE radiation on release of major neurotransmitter systems in the hippocampus. I have further extended my research on the levels of receptors of these systems in Aim 2. In Aim 3, I have studied the level of oxidation in membranes of my samples. My research reveals that HZE radiation significantly reduces hyperosmotic sucrose evoked [3H]-glutamate and [14C]-GABA release both three and six months post irradiation. The same radiation regimen also significantly enhances oxidative stress as indicated by increased levels of lipid peroxidation in the hippocampus, suggesting that increased levels of lipid peroxidation may play a role in reduction of neurotransmitter release. HZE radiation also significantly reduces

  3. Treadmill running prevents age-related memory deficit and alters neurotrophic factors and oxidative damage in the hippocampus of Wistar rats.

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    Vanzella, Cláudia; Neves, Juliana Dalibor; Vizuete, Adriana Fernanda; Aristimunha, Dirceu; Kolling, Janaína; Longoni, Aline; Gonçalves, Carlos Alberto Saraiva; Wyse, Angela T S; Netto, Carlos Alexandre

    2017-09-15

    Clinical and pre-clinical studies indicate that exercise is beneficial to many aspects of brain function especially during aging. The present study investigated the effects of a treadmill running protocol in young (3month-old) and aged (22month-old) male Wistar rats, on: I) cognitive function, as assessed by spatial reference memory in the Morris water maze; II) oxidative stress parameters and the expression of neurotrophic factors BDNF, NT-3, IGF-1 and VEGF in the hippocampus. Animals of both ages were assigned to sedentary (non-exercised) and exercised (20min of daily running sessions, 3 times per week for 4weeks) groups. Cognition was assessed by a reference memory task run in the Morris water maze; twenty four hours after last session of behavioral testing hippocampi were collected for biochemical analysis. Results demonstrate that the moderate treadmill running exercise: I) prevented age-related deficits in reference memory in the Morris water maze; II) prevented the age-related increase of reactive oxygen species levels and lipid peroxidation in the hippocampus; III) caused an increase of BDNF, NT-3 and IGF-1 expression in the hippocampus of aged rats. Taken together, results suggest that both exercise molecular effects, namely the reduction of oxidative stress and the increase of neurotrophic factors expression in the hippocampus, might be related to its positive effect on memory performance in aged rats. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Caffeine consumption prevents diabetes-induced memory impairment and synaptotoxicity in the hippocampus of NONcZNO10/LTJ mice.

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    João M N Duarte

    Full Text Available Diabetic conditions are associated with modified brain function, namely with cognitive deficits, through largely undetermined processes. More than understanding the underlying mechanism, it is important to devise novel strategies to alleviate diabetes-induced cognitive deficits. Caffeine (a mixed antagonist of adenosine A(1 and A(2A receptors emerges as a promising candidate since caffeine consumption reduces the risk of diabetes and effectively prevents memory deficits caused by different noxious stimuli. Thus, we took advantage of a novel animal model of type 2 diabetes to investigate the behavioural, neurochemical and morphological modifications present in the hippocampus and tested if caffeine consumption might prevent these changes. We used a model closely mimicking the human type 2 diabetes condition, NONcNZO10/LtJ mice, which become diabetic at 7-11 months when kept under an 11% fat diet. Caffeine (1 g/l was applied in the drinking water from 7 months onwards. Diabetic mice displayed a decreased spontaneous alternation in the Y-maze accompanied by a decreased density of nerve terminal markers (synaptophysin, SNAP25, mainly glutamatergic (vesicular glutamate transporters, and increased astrogliosis (GFAP immunoreactivity compared to their wild type littermates kept under the same diet. Furthermore, diabetic mice displayed up-regulated A(2A receptors and down-regulated A(1 receptors in the hippocampus. Caffeine consumption restored memory performance and abrogated the diabetes-induced loss of nerve terminals and astrogliosis. These results provide the first evidence that type 2 diabetic mice display a loss of nerve terminal markers and astrogliosis, which is associated with memory impairment; furthermore, caffeine consumption prevents synaptic dysfunction and astrogliosis as well as memory impairment in type 2 diabetes.

  5. Caffeine consumption prevents diabetes-induced memory impairment and synaptotoxicity in the hippocampus of NONcZNO10/LTJ mice.

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    Duarte, João M N; Agostinho, Paula M; Carvalho, Rui A; Cunha, Rodrigo A

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic conditions are associated with modified brain function, namely with cognitive deficits, through largely undetermined processes. More than understanding the underlying mechanism, it is important to devise novel strategies to alleviate diabetes-induced cognitive deficits. Caffeine (a mixed antagonist of adenosine A(1) and A(2A) receptors) emerges as a promising candidate since caffeine consumption reduces the risk of diabetes and effectively prevents memory deficits caused by different noxious stimuli. Thus, we took advantage of a novel animal model of type 2 diabetes to investigate the behavioural, neurochemical and morphological modifications present in the hippocampus and tested if caffeine consumption might prevent these changes. We used a model closely mimicking the human type 2 diabetes condition, NONcNZO10/LtJ mice, which become diabetic at 7-11 months when kept under an 11% fat diet. Caffeine (1 g/l) was applied in the drinking water from 7 months onwards. Diabetic mice displayed a decreased spontaneous alternation in the Y-maze accompanied by a decreased density of nerve terminal markers (synaptophysin, SNAP25), mainly glutamatergic (vesicular glutamate transporters), and increased astrogliosis (GFAP immunoreactivity) compared to their wild type littermates kept under the same diet. Furthermore, diabetic mice displayed up-regulated A(2A) receptors and down-regulated A(1) receptors in the hippocampus. Caffeine consumption restored memory performance and abrogated the diabetes-induced loss of nerve terminals and astrogliosis. These results provide the first evidence that type 2 diabetic mice display a loss of nerve terminal markers and astrogliosis, which is associated with memory impairment; furthermore, caffeine consumption prevents synaptic dysfunction and astrogliosis as well as memory impairment in type 2 diabetes.

  6. Effect of zinc supplementation on neuronal precursor proliferation in the rat hippocampus after traumatic brain injury.

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    Cope, Elise C; Morris, Deborah R; Gower-Winter, Shannon D; Brownstein, Naomi C; Levenson, Cathy W

    2016-05-01

    There is great deal of debate about the possible role of adult-born hippocampal cells in the prevention of depression and related mood disorders. We first showed that zinc supplementation prevents the development of the depression-like behavior anhedonia associated with an animal model of traumatic brain injury (TBI). This work then examined the effect of zinc supplementation on the proliferation of new cells in the hippocampus that have the potential to participate in neurogenesis. Rats were fed a zinc adequate (ZA, 30ppm) or zinc supplemented (ZS, 180ppm) diet for 4wk followed by TBI using controlled cortical impact. Stereological counts of EdU-positive cells showed that TBI doubled the density of proliferating cells 24h post-injury (pprecursor cells in the hippocampus was robust, use of targeted irradiation to eliminate these cells after zinc supplementation and TBI revealed that these cells are not the sole mechanism through which zinc acts to prevent depression associated with brain injury, and suggest that other zinc dependent mechanisms are needed for the anti-depressant effect of zinc in this model of TBI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Neurogenic effects of fingolimod in hippocampus, affecting fear memory.

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    Paschalis Efstathopoulos

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Fingolimod (FTY720; Gilenya™,Novartis Pharma AG is a recently developed Sphingosine-1-Phosphate (S1P analogue, orally administered as a new therapeutic agent in Multiple Sclerosis (MS (Brinkmann V. et al. 2010. S1P receptors (S1PRs are expressed in various sites in the CNS including the subventricular zone (Waeber C. et al. 1999; Choi J.W. et al. 2013 while endogenous S1P was shown to induce proliferation and morphological changes in embryonic hippocampal neural progenitors in culture (Harada J. et al. 2004. In this study we investigated the effects of fingolimod on adult rodent hippocampal neurogenesis and their possible functional role. To this aim, thymidine analogue BrdU was injected at the end or before a 2-week i.p. administration of a therapeutic dose of Fingolimod (0,3 mg/kg in young and old mice. Stereological counts of BrdU+ cells revealed significant increase in both proliferation, and survival of neural stem cells (NSC in the area of Dentate Gyrus (DG of the hippocampus, compared to control untreated animals of young but not old ages. In the case of survival assessment, most of the BrdU + cells were also positive for NeuN, suggesting an increase of newly formed neurons. The increase in proliferation rate of NSC was also confirmed by BrdU uptake in hippocampal NSC cultures in vitro, implying that the effects of fingolimod are cell autonomous. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that S1PR was not co-localized with GFAP+ cells in the Subgranular zone (SGZ of the DG, but was strongly co-localized with transcription factor MASH1 and weakly with DcX or PSA-NCAM positive neural progenitors. These findings suggest that expression of S1PR1 in the SGZ is restricted to transit amplifying neural progenitors and maintained also in the stage of neuroblast. In addition, the effects of Fingolimod in DG neurogenesis were positively correlated to enhanced fear memory and increased context discrimination, an established DG-dependent cognitive task

  8. Differential effects of centrally-active antihypertensives on 5-HT1A receptors in rat dorso-lateral septum, rat hippocampus and guinea-pig hippocampus.

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    Leishman, D J; Boeijinga, P H; Galvan, M

    1994-01-01

    1. The electrophysiological responses elicited by 5-hydroxytryptamine1A-(5-HT1A) receptor agonists in rat and guinea-pig CA1 pyramidal neurones and rat dorso-lateral septal neurones were compared in vitro by use of conventional intracellular recording techniques. 2. In the presence of 1 microM tetrodotoxin (TTX), to prevent indirect effects, 5-HT, N,N-dipropyl-5-carboxamidotryptamine (DP-5-CT) and 8-hydroxy-2(di-n-propylamino) tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) hyperpolarized the neurones from rat and guinea-pig brain. 3. The hypotensive drug flesinoxan, a selective 5-HT1A receptor agonist, hyperpolarized neurones in all three areas tested; however, another hypotensive agent with high affinity at 5-HT1A-receptors, 5-methyl-urapidil, hyperpolarized only the neurones in rat hippocampus and septum. 4. In guinea-pig hippocampal neurones, 5-methyl-urapidil behaved as a 5-HT1A-receptor antagonist. 5. The relative efficacies (5-HT = 1) of DP-5-CT, 8-OH-DPAT, flesinoxan and 5-methyl-urapidil at the three sites were: rat hippocampus, 1.09, 0.7, 0.5 and 0.24; rat septum, 0.88, 0.69, 0.82 and 0.7; guinea-pig hippocampus, 1.0, 0.69, 0.89 and 0, respectively. 6. It is concluded that the hypotensive agents flesinoxan and 5-methyl-urapidil appear to have different efficacies at 5-HT1A receptors located in different regions of the rodent brain. Whether these regional and species differences arise from receptor plurality or variability in intracellular transduction mechanisms remains to be elucidated.

  9. Stress Effects on the Hippocampus: A Critical Review

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    Kim, Eun Joo; Pellman, Blake; Kim, Jeansok J.

    2015-01-01

    Uncontrollable stress has been recognized to influence the hippocampus at various levels of analysis. Behaviorally, human and animal studies have found that stress generally impairs various hippocampal-dependent memory tasks. Neurally, animal studies have revealed that stress alters ensuing synaptic plasticity and firing properties of hippocampal…

  10. Effects of neonatal. gamma. -ray irradiation on rat hippocampus: Pt. 1; Postnatal maturation of hippocampal cells

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    Represa, A; Dessi, F; Beaudoin, M; Ben-Ari, Y [Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale (INSERM), 75 - Paris (France)

    1991-01-01

    The axons of dentate granule cells, the mossy fibres, establish synaptic contacts with the thorny excrescences of the apical dendrite of CA3 pyramidal neurons. Dentate granule cells develop postnatally in rats, whereas the CA3 pyramidal cells are generated before birth. In the present studies, using unilateral neonatal {gamma}-ray irradiation to destroy the granule cells in one hemisphere, we have studied the effect of mossy fibre deprivation on the development of their targets. We show that such ''degranulation'' prevents the normal development of giant thorny excrescences, suggesting that the development of thorny excrescences in CA3 pyramidal neurons is under the control of mossy fibres. In contrast, irradiation of the hippocampus of the neonatal rat does not affect the development of the dendritic arborization of CA3 pyramidal cells and their non-mossy dendritic spines. (author).

  11. Neuroprotective effect of pretreatment with ganoderma lucidum in cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury in rat hippocampus

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    Zhang, Wangxin; Zhang, Quiling; Deng, Wen; Li, Yalu; Xing, Guoqing; Shi, Xinjun; Du, Yifeng

    2014-01-01

    Ganoderma lucidum is a traditional Chinese medicine, which has been shown to have both anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory effects, and noticeably decreases both the infarct area and neuronal apoptosis of the ischemic cortex. This study aimed to investigate the protective effects and mechanisms of pretreatment with ganoderma lucidum (by intragastric administration) in cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats. Our results showed that pretreatment with ganoderma lucidum for 3 and 7 days reduced neuronal loss in the hippocampus, diminished the content of malondialdehyde in the hippocampus and serum, decreased the levels of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-8 in the hippocampus, and increased the activity of superoxide dismutase in the hippocampus and serum. These results suggest that pretreatment with ganoderma lucidum was protective against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury through its anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory actions. PMID:25317156

  12. Effect of pregabalin on apoptotic regulatory genes in hippocampus of rats with chronic temporal lobe epilepsy

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    ZHANG Yi-dan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To observe the effect of pregabalin on the expression of Bcl-2 and Bax in hippocampus of chronic epileptic rats induced by pilocarpine, to explore the anti-epileptic pharmacology mechanism of pregabalin, and its anti-apoptotic effect on hippocampal neurons of rats. Methods The model of chronic temporal lobe epileptic rats induced by lithium-pilocarpine was established, then the rats in pregabalin treatment group received intraperitoneal injection of pregabalin (40 mg/kg once daily for three weeks. The expression of Bcl-2 and Bax in hippocampus of all rats was detected by immunohistochemical technique and Western blotting. Results Compared with normal saline group rats, the expression of Bcl-2 and Bax in hippocampus of rats with chronic temporal lobe epilepsy was significantly increased (P = 0.000, for all. Pregabalin can down-regulate the expression of Bax and up-regulate the expression of Bcl-2 in hippocampus of rats compared to model group rats (P = 0.000, for all. Conclusion Pregabalin may have the effects of inhibiting cell apoptosis and protecting neurons through lowing Bax level and increasing Bcl-2 level in hippocampus of chronic temporal lobe epileptic rats.

  13. [Effect of tongluo xingnao effervescent tablet on learning and memory of AD rats and expression of insulin-degrading enzyme in hippocampus].

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    Zhang, Yin-Jie; Dai, Yuan; Hu, Yong; Ma, Yun-Tong; Xu, Shi-Jun; Wang, Yong-Yan

    2013-09-01

    To study the effect of Tongluo Xingnao effervescent tablet on learning and memory of dementia rats induced by injection of Abeta25-35 in hippocampus and expression of insulin-degrading enzyme in hippocampus, in order to provide basis for preventing and treating senile dementia. The dementia rat model was established by injecting Abeta25-35 in hippocampus. The rats were divided into the model control group, the Aricept (1.4 mg x kg(-1)) group, and Tongluo Xingnao effervescent tablet high dose (7.56 g x kg(-1)), middle dose (3.78 g x kg(-1)) and low dose (1.59 g x kg(-1)) groups. A sham operation group was established by injecting normal saline in hippocampus. The rats were orally given drugs for 90 days, once a day. Their learning and memory were tested by using Morris water maze. Immunohistochemistry and image analysis were utilized for a quantitative analysis on the expression of insulin-degrading enzyme in hippocampus. Tongluo Xingnao effervescent tablet could significantly shorten the escape latency of rats in the directional navigation test, prolong the retention time in the first quadrant dwell, decrease the retention time in the third quadrant dwell, increase the frequency of crossing the platform, show a more notable statistical significance than the model control group (P tablet has the effects of improving learning and memory capacity of AD rats and promoting the expression of insulin-degrading enzyme in hippocampus. Its effect in promoting intelligence will be related to increased insulin-degrading enzyme in hippocampus.

  14. Structural and functional effects of social isolation on the hippocampus of rats with traumatic brain injury.

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    Khodaie, Babak; Lotfinia, Ahmad Ali; Ahmadi, Milad; Lotfinia, Mahmoud; Jafarian, Maryam; Karimzadeh, Fariba; Coulon, Philippe; Gorji, Ali

    2015-02-01

    Social isolation has significant long-term psychological and physiological consequences. Both social isolation and traumatic brain injury (TBI) alter normal brain function and structure. However, the influence of social isolation on recovery from TBI is unclear. This study aims to evaluate if social isolation exacerbates the anatomical and functional deficits after TBI in young rats. Juvenile male rats were divided into four groups; sham operated control with social contacts, sham control with social isolation, TBI with social contacts, and TBI with social isolation. During four weeks after brain injury in juvenile rats, we evaluated the animal behaviors by T-maze and open-field tests, recorded brain activity with electrocorticograms and assessed structural changes by histological procedures in the hippocampal dentate gyrus, CA1, and CA3 areas. Our findings revealed significant memory impairments and hyperactivity conditions in rats with TBI and social isolation compared to the other groups. Histological assessments showed an increase of the mean number of dark neurons, apoptotic cells, and caspase-3 positive cells in all tested areas of the hippocampus in TBI rats with and without social isolation compared to sham rats. Furthermore, social isolation significantly increased the number of dark cells, apoptotic neurons, and caspase-3 positive cells in the hippocampal CA3 region in rats with TBI. This study indicates the harmful effect of social isolation on anatomical and functional deficits induced by TBI in juvenile rats. Prevention of social isolation may improve the outcome of TBI. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The effects of study task on prestimulus subsequent memory effects in the hippocampus.

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    de Chastelaine, Marianne; Rugg, Michael D

    2015-11-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was employed to examine the effects of a study task manipulation on pre-stimulus activity in the hippocampus predictive of later successful recollection. Eighteen young participants were scanned while making either animacy or syllable judgments on visually presented study words. Cues presented before each word denoted which judgment should be made. Following the study phase, a surprise recognition memory test was administered in which each test item had to be endorsed as "Remembered," "Known," or "New." As expected, "deep" animacy judgments led to better memory for study items than did "shallow" syllable judgments. In both study tasks, pre-stimulus subsequent recollection effects were evident in the interval between the cue and the study item in bilateral anterior hippocampus. However, the direction of the effects differed according to the study task: whereas pre-stimulus hippocampal activity on animacy trials was greater for later recollected items than items judged old on the basis of familiarity (replicating prior findings), these effects reversed for syllable trials. We propose that the direction of pre-stimulus hippocampal subsequent memory effects depends on whether an optimal pre-stimulus task set facilitates study processing that is conducive or unconducive to the formation of contextually rich episodic memories. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Similar effects of substance P on learning and memory function between hippocampus and striatal marginal division

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    Yu, Yan; Zeng, Changchun; Shu, Siyun; Liu, Xuemei; Li, Chuhua

    2014-01-01

    Substance P is an endogenous neurokinin that is present in the central and peripheral nervous systems. The neuropeptide substance P and its high-affinity receptor neurokinin 1 receptor are known to play an important role in the central nervous system in inflammation, blood pressure, motor behavior and anxiety. The effects of substance P in the hippocampus and the marginal division of the striatum on memory remain poorly understood. Compared with the hippocampus as a control, immunofluorescence showed high expression of the substance P receptor, neurokinin 1, in the marginal division of the striatum of normal rats. Unilateral or bilateral injection of an antisense oligonucleotide against neurokinin 1 receptor mRNA in the rat hippocampus or marginal division of the striatum effectively reduced neurokinin 1 receptor expression. Independent of injection site, rats that received this antisense oligonucleotide showed obviously increased footshock times in a Y-maze test. These results indicate that the marginal division of the striatum plays a similar function in learning and memory to the hippocampus, which is a valuable addition to our mechanistic understanding of the learning and memory functions of the marginal division of the striatum. PMID:25206901

  17. Lipoic acid effects on glutamate and taurine concentrations in rat hippocampus after pilocarpine-induced seizures

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    P S Santos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pilocarpine-induced seizures can be mediated by increases in oxidative stress and by cerebral amino acid changes. The present research suggests that antioxidant compounds may afford some level of neuroprotection against the neurotoxicity of seizures in cellular level. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the lipoic acid (LA effects in glutamate and taurine contents in rat hippocampus after pilocarpine-induced seizures. Wistar rats were treated intraperitoneally (i.p. with 0.9% saline (Control, pilocarpine (400 mg/kg, Pilocarpine, LA (10 mg/kg, LA, and the association of LA (10 mg/kg plus pilocarpine (400 mg/kg, that was injected 30 min before of administration of LA (LA plus pilocarpine. Animals were observed during 24 h. The amino acid concentrations were measured using high-performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC. In pilocarpine group, it was observed a significant increase in glutamate content (37% and a decrease in taurine level (18% in rat hippocampus, when compared to control group. Antioxidant pretreatment significantly reduced the glutamate level (28% and augmented taurine content (32% in rat hippocampus, when compared to pilocarpine group. Our findings strongly support amino acid changes in hippocampus during seizures induced by pilocarpine, and suggest that glutamate-induced brain damage plays a crucial role in pathogenic consequences of seizures, and imply that strong protective effect could be achieved using lipoic acid through the release or decrease in metabolization rate of taurine amino acid during seizures.

  18. Neuroprotective Effect of Ginseng against Alteration of Calcium Binding Proteins Immunoreactivity in the Mice Hippocampus after Radiofrequency Exposure

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    Dhiraj Maskey

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium binding proteins (CaBPs such as calbindin D28-k, parvalbumin, and calretinin are able to bind Ca2+ with high affinity. Changes in Ca2+ concentrations via CaBPs can disturb Ca2+ homeostasis. Brain damage can be induced by the prolonged electromagnetic field (EMF exposure with loss of interacellular Ca2+ balance. The present study investigated the radioprotective effect of ginseng in regard to CaBPs immunoreactivity (IR in the hippocampus through immunohistochemistry after one-month exposure at 1.6 SAR value by comparing sham control with exposed and ginseng-treated exposed groups separately. Loss of dendritic arborization was noted with the CaBPs in the Cornu Ammonis areas as well as a decrease of staining intensity of the granule cells in the dentate gyrus after exposure while no loss was observed in the ginseng-treated group. A significant difference in the relative mean density was noted between control and exposed groups but was nonsignificant in the ginseng-treated group. Decrease in CaBP IR with changes in the neuronal staining as observed in the exposed group would affect the hippocampal trisynaptic circuit by alteration of the Ca2+ concentration which could be prevented by ginseng. Hence, ginseng could contribute as a radioprotective agent against EMF exposure, contributing to the maintenance of Ca2+ homeostasis by preventing impairment of intracellular Ca2+ levels in the hippocampus.

  19. Mitochondria morphologic changes and metabolic effects of rat hippocampus after microwave irradiation

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    Zhao Li; Peng Ruiyun; Gao Yabing; Wang Shuiming; Wang Lifeng; Dong Qi; Xu Xinping; Ma Junjie

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of microwave on mitochondria morphologic and metabolism of rat hippocampus. Methods: 30 male rats were exposed to microwave with the average power density of 30 mW/cm 2 . Rats were sacrificed at 6 h, 1 d, 3 d and 7 d after irradiation. Electron microscope, enzymatic activity staining and spectrophotometer were used to study ultrastructure change of hippocampus mitochondria and activity of ATPase, SDH and MAO. Mitochondrial ATP, ADP and AMP contents were measured by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Results: At 6 h after microwave radiation, the sizes and shapes of hippocampus mitochondria were abnormal and the injury of mitochondria was aggravated at 1 and 3 d after radiation. The mitochondria presented swell, cavitation including disorder, shortness and decrease of crest. The activity of SDH and content of ATP were decreased at 6 h, most serious at 3 d(P<0.01), and recovered at 7 d after radiation. The activity of ATPase and MAO increased notably at 1 d and 3 d after radiation (P<0.01). Conclusions: Microwave can damage the structure and function of mitochondria in rat hippocampus, and cause the energy metabolism of enzyme disorder. (authors)

  20. Beneficial effects of environmental enrichment on behavior, stress reactivity and synaptophysin/BDNF expression in hippocampus following early life stress.

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    Dandi, Εvgenia; Kalamari, Aikaterini; Touloumi, Olga; Lagoudaki, Rosa; Nousiopoulou, Evangelia; Simeonidou, Constantina; Spandou, Evangelia; Tata, Despina A

    2018-06-01

    Exposure to environmental enrichment can beneficially influence the behavior and enhance synaptic plasticity. The aim of the present study was to investigate the mediated effects of environmental enrichment on postnatal stress-associated impact with regard to behavior, stress reactivity as well as synaptic plasticity changes in the dorsal hippocampus. Wistar rat pups were submitted to a 3 h maternal separation (MS) protocol during postnatal days 1-21, while another group was left undisturbed. On postnatal day 23, a subgroup from each rearing condition (maternal separation, no-maternal separation) was housed in enriched environmental conditions until postnatal day 65 (6 weeks duration). At approximately three months of age, adult rats underwent behavioral testing to evaluate anxiety (Elevated Plus Maze), locomotion (Open Field Test), spatial learning and memory (Morris Water Maze) as well as non-spatial recognition memory (Novel Object Recognition Test). After completion of behavioral testing, blood samples were taken for evaluation of stress-induced plasma corticosterone using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), while immunofluorescence was applied to evaluate hippocampal BDNF and synaptophysin expression in dorsal hippocampus. We found that environmental enrichment protected against the effects of maternal separation as indicated by the lower anxiety levels and the reversal of spatial memory deficits compared to animals housed in standard conditions. These changes were associated with increased BDNF and synaptophysin expression in the hippocampus. Regarding the neuroendocrine response to stress, while exposure to an acute stressor potentiated corticosterone increases in maternally-separated rats, environmental enrichment of these rats prevented this effect. The current study aimed at investigating the compensatory role of enriched environment against the negative outcomes of adverse experiences early in life concurrently on emotional and cognitive

  1. Effects of Asiatic Acid on Spatial Working Memory and Cell Proliferation in the Adult Rat Hippocampus

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    Apiwat Sirichoat

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Asiatic acid is a pentacyclic triterpene from Centella asiatica. Previous studies have reported that asiatic acid exhibits antioxidant and neuroprotective activities in cell culture. It also prevents memory deficits in animal models. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between spatial working memory and changes in cell proliferation within the hippocampus after administration of asiatic acid to male Spraque-Dawley rats. Control rats received vehicle (propylene glycol while treated rats received asiatic acid (30 mg/kg orally for 14 or 28 days. Spatial memory was determined using the novel object location (NOL test. In animals administered asiatic acid for both 14 and 28 days, the number of Ki-67 positive cells in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus was significantly higher than in control animals. This was associated with a significant increase in their ability to discriminate between novel and familiar object locations in a novel object discrimination task, a hippocampus-dependent spatial memory test. Administration of asiatic acid also significantly increased doublecortin (DCX and Notch1 protein levels in the hippocampus. These findings demonstrate that asiatic acid treatment may be a potent cognitive enhancer which improves hippocampal-dependent spatial memory, likely by increasing hippocampal neurogenesis.

  2. Antioxidant effects of nerolidol in mice hippocampus after open field test.

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    Nogueira Neto, José Damasceno; de Almeida, Antonia Amanda Cardoso; da Silva Oliveira, Johanssy; Dos Santos, Pauline Sousa; de Sousa, Damião Pergentino; de Freitas, Rivelilson Mendes

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the neuroprotective effects of nerolidol in mice hippocampus against oxidative stress in neuronal cells compared to ascorbic acid (positive control) as well as evaluated the nerolidol sedative effects by open field test compared to diazepam (positive control). Thirty minutes prior to behavioral observation on open field test, mice were intraperitoneally treated with vehicle, nerolidol (25, 50 and 75 mg/kg), diazepam (1 mg/kg) or ascorbic acid (250 mg/kg). To clarify the action mechanism of of nerolidol on oxidative stress in animals subjected to the open field test, Western blot analysis of Mn-superoxide dismutase and catalase in mice hippocampus were performed. In nerolidol group, there was a significant decrease in lipid peroxidation and nitrite levels when compared to negative control (vehicle). However, a significant increase was observed in superoxide dismutase and catalase activities in this group when compared to the other groups. Vehicle, diazepam, ascorbic acid and nerolidol groups did not affected Mn-superoxide dismutase, catalase mRNA or protein levels. Our findings strongly support the hypothesis that oxidative stress occurs in hippocampus. Nerolidol showed sedative effects in animals subjected to the open field test. Oxidative process plays a crucial role on neuronal pathological consequence, and implies that antioxidant effects could be achieved using this sesquiterpene.

  3. Effects of sleep deprivation on extracellular serotonin in hippocampus and frontal cortex of the rat

    OpenAIRE

    Bjorvatn, B; Grønli, J; Hamre, F; Sørensen, E; Fiske, E; Bjorkum, Alvhild Alette; Portas, CM; Ursin, R

    2002-01-01

    Sleep deprivation improves the mood of depressed patients, but the exact mechanism behind this effect is unclear. An enhancement of serotonergic neurotransmission has been suggested. In this study, we used in vivo microdialysis to monitor extracellular serotonin in the hippocampus and the frontal cortex of rats during an 8 h sleep deprivation period. These brain regions were selected since both have been implicated in depression. The behavioral state of the animal was continuously monitored b...

  4. Early Life Stress Effects on Glucocorticoid—BDNF Interplay in the Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daskalakis, Nikolaos P.; De Kloet, Edo Ronald; Yehuda, Rachel; Malaspina, Dolores; Kranz, Thorsten M.

    2015-01-01

    Early life stress (ELS) is implicated in the etiology of multiple psychiatric disorders. Important biological effects of ELS are manifested in stress-susceptible regions of the hippocampus and are partially mediated by long-term effects on glucocorticoid (GC) and/or neurotrophin signaling pathways. GC-signaling mediates the regulation of stress response to maintain homeostasis, while neurotrophin signaling plays a key role in neuronal outgrowth and is crucial for axonal guidance and synaptic integrity. The neurotrophin and GC-signaling pathways co-exist throughout the central nervous system (CNS), particularly in the hippocampus, which has high expression levels of glucocorticoid-receptors (GR) and mineralocorticoid-receptors (MR) as well as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor, tropomyosin-related kinase receptor B (TrkB). This review addresses the effects of ELS paradigms on GC- and BDNF-dependent mechanisms and their crosstalk in the hippocampus, including potential implications for the pathogenesis of common stress-related disorders. PMID:26635521

  5. Early Life Stress Effects on the Glucocorticoid - BDNF interplay in the Hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos P Daskalakis

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Early life stress (ELS is implicated in the etiology of multiple psychiatric disorders. Important biological effects of ELS are manifested in stress-susceptible regions of the hippocampus and are partially mediated by long-term effects on glucocorticoid and/or neurotrophin signaling pathways. Glucocorticoid (GC signaling mediates the regulation of the stress response to maintain homeostasis, while neurotrophin signaling plays a key role in neuronal outgrowth and is crucial for axonal guidance and synaptic integrity. The neurotrophin and glucocorticoid signaling pathways co-exist throughout the central nervous system (CNS, particularly in the hippocampus, which has high expression of glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors (GR and MR as well as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and its receptor, tropomyosin-related kinase receptor B (TrkB. This review addresses the effects of ELS paradigms on GC- and BDNF- dependent mechanisms and their crosstalk in the hippocampus, including potential implications for the pathogenesis of common stress-related disorders.

  6. Effect of tibolone on dendritic spine density in the rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrán-Campos, V; Díaz-Ruiz, A; Padilla-Gómez, E; Aguilar Zavala, H; Ríos, C; Díaz Cintra, S

    2015-09-01

    Oestrogen deficiency produces oxidative stress (OS) and changes in hippocampal neurons and also reduces the density of dendritic spines (DS). These alterations affect the plastic response of the hippocampus. Oestrogen replacement therapy reverses these effects, but it remains to be seen whether the same changes are produced by tibolone (TB). The aim of this study was to test the neuroprotective effects of long-term oral TB treatment and its ability to reverse DS pruning in pyramidal neurons (PN) of hippocampal area CA1. Young Sprague Dawley rats were distributed in 3 groups: a control group in proestrus (Pro) and two ovariectomised groups (Ovx), of which one was provided with a daily TB dose (1mg/kg), OvxTB and the other with vehicle (OvxV), for 40 days in both cases. We analysed lipid peroxidation and DS density in 3 segments of apical dendrites from PNs in hippocampal area CA1. TB did not reduce lipid peroxidation but it did reverse the spine pruning in CA1 pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus which had been caused by ovariectomy. Oestrogen replacement therapy for ovariectomy-induced oestrogen deficiency has a protective effect on synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Lasting Differential Effects on Plasticity Induced by Prenatal Stress in Dorsal and Ventral Hippocampus

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    Gayane Grigoryan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Early life adversaries have a profound impact on the developing brain structure and functions that persist long after the original traumatic experience has vanished. One of the extensively studied brain structures in relation to early life stress has been the hippocampus because of its unique association with cognitive processes of the brain. While the entire hippocampus shares the same intrinsic organization, it assumes different functions in its dorsal and ventral sectors (DH and VH, resp., based on different connectivity with other brain structures. In the present review, we summarize the differences between DH and VH and discuss functional and structural effects of prenatal stress in the two sectors, with the realization that much is yet to be explored in understanding the opposite reactivity of the DH and VH to stressful stimulation.

  8. Melatonin mediated antidepressant-like effect in the hippocampus of chronic stress-induced depression rats: Regulating vesicular monoamine transporter 2 and monoamine oxidase A levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanovic, Bojana; Spasojevic, Natasa; Jovanovic, Predrag; Jasnic, Nebojsa; Djordjevic, Jelena; Dronjak, Sladjana

    2016-10-01

    The hippocampus is sensitive to stress which activates norepinephrine terminals deriving from the locus coeruleus. Melatonin exerts positive effects on the hippocampal neurogenic process and on depressive-like behaviour. Thus, in the present study, an examination was made of the effect of chronic melatonin treatment on norepinephrine content, synthesis, uptake, vesicular transport and degradation in the hippocampus of rats exposed to CUMS. This entailed quantifying the norephinephrine, mRNA and protein levels of DBH, NET, VMAT 2, MAO-A and COMT. The results show that CUMS evoked prolonged immobility. Melatonin treatment decreased immobility in comparison with the placebo group, reflecting an antidepressant-like effect. Compared with the placebo group, a dramatic decrease in norepinephrine content, decreased VMAT2 mRNA and protein and increased MAO-A protein levels in the hippocampus of the CUMS rats were observed. However, no significant differences in the levels of DBH, NET, COMT mRNA and protein and MAO-A mRNA levels between the placebo and the stressed groups were found. The results showed the restorative effects of melatonin on the stress-induced decline in the norepinephrine content of the hippocampus. It was observed that melatonin treatment in the CUMS rats prevented the stress-induced decrease in VMAT2 mRNA and protein levels, whereas it reduced the increase of the mRNA of COMT and protein levels of MAO-A. Chronic treatment with melatonin failed to alter the gene expression of DBH or NET in the hippocampus of the CUMS rats. Additionally, the results show that melatonin enhances VMAT2 expression and norepinephrine storage, whilst it reduces norepinephrine degrading enzymes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  9. Intermittent hypercapnic hypoxia effects on the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the developing piglet hippocampus and brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivekanandarajah, Arunnjah; Aishah, Atqiya; Waters, Karen A; Machaalani, Rita

    2017-05-01

    This study investigated the effects of acute (1 day) vs repeated (4 days) exposure to intermittent hypercapnic hypoxia (IHH) on the immunohistochemical expression of α2, α3, α5, α7, α9 and β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunits in the developing piglet hippocampus and brainstem medulla, and how prior nicotine exposure alters the response to acute IHH. Five piglet groups included: 1day IHH (1D IHH, n=9), 4days IHH (4D IHH, n=8), controls exposed only to air cycles for 1day (1D Air, n=6) or 4days (4D Air, n=5), and pre-exposed to nicotine for 13days prior to 1day IHH (Nic+1D IHH, n=7). The exposure period alternated 6min of HH (8%O 2 , 7%CO 2 , balance N 2 ) and 6min of air over 48min, while controls were switched from air-to-air. Results showed that: 1. repeated IHH induces more changes in nAChR subunit expression than acute IHH in both the hippocampus and brainstem medulla, 2. In the hippocampus, α2 and β2 changed the most (increased) following IHH and the CA3, CA2 and DG were mostly affected. In the brainstem medulla, α2, α5, α9 and β2 were changed (decreased) in most nuclei with the hypoglossal and nucleus of the solitary tract being mostly affected. 3. Pre-exposure to nicotine enhanced the changes in the hippocampus but dampened those in the brainstem medulla. These findings indicate that the nAChRs (predominantly with the α2/β2 complex) are affected by IHH in critical hippocampal and brainstem nuclei during early brain development, and that pre-exposure to nicotine alters the pattern of susceptibility to IHH. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of seizure on hippocampus in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy and neocortical epilepsy: an MRS study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.K.; Kim, D.W.; Kim, K.K.; Chung, C.K.; Song, I.C.; Chang, K.H.

    2005-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the effect of seizures on the bilateral hippocampus in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) and neocortical epilepsy by single voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Forty-one patients with mTLE having unilateral hippocampal sclerosis and 43 patients with a neocortical epilepsy who underwent subsequent epilepsy surgery were recruited. Ninety-five percent confidence intervals of N-acetyl aspartate/choline (NAA/Cho) and NAA/creatine (NAA/Cr) ratios in 20 healthy control subjects were used as threshold values to determine abnormal NAA/Cho and NAA/Cr. NAA/Cho and NAA/Cr were significantly lower in the ipsilateral hippocampus of mTLE and neocortical epilepsy. Using asymmetry indices for patients with bilaterally abnormal ratios of NAA/Cho and NAA/Cr in addition to using unilateral abnormal ratio, the seizure focus was correctly lateralized in 65.9% of patients with mTLE and 48.8% of neocortical epilepsy patients. Bilateral NAA/Cho abnormality was significantly related to a poor surgical outcome in mTLE. No significant relationship was found between the results of NAA/Cho or NAA/Cr and surgical outcome in neocortical epilepsy. The mean contralateral NAA/Cr ratio of the hippocampus in mTLE was significantly lower in patients with a history of secondary generalized tonic-clonic seizure (SGTCS) than in those without. (orig.)

  11. Effect of seizure on hippocampus in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy and neocortical epilepsy: an MRS study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.K.; Kim, D.W.; Kim, K.K. [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Neurology, Chongno ku, Seoul (Korea); Chung, C.K. [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Chongno ku, Seoul (Korea); Song, I.C.; Chang, K.H. [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Chongno ku, Seoul (Korea)

    2005-12-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the effect of seizures on the bilateral hippocampus in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) and neocortical epilepsy by single voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Forty-one patients with mTLE having unilateral hippocampal sclerosis and 43 patients with a neocortical epilepsy who underwent subsequent epilepsy surgery were recruited. Ninety-five percent confidence intervals of N-acetyl aspartate/choline (NAA/Cho) and NAA/creatine (NAA/Cr) ratios in 20 healthy control subjects were used as threshold values to determine abnormal NAA/Cho and NAA/Cr. NAA/Cho and NAA/Cr were significantly lower in the ipsilateral hippocampus of mTLE and neocortical epilepsy. Using asymmetry indices for patients with bilaterally abnormal ratios of NAA/Cho and NAA/Cr in addition to using unilateral abnormal ratio, the seizure focus was correctly lateralized in 65.9% of patients with mTLE and 48.8% of neocortical epilepsy patients. Bilateral NAA/Cho abnormality was significantly related to a poor surgical outcome in mTLE. No significant relationship was found between the results of NAA/Cho or NAA/Cr and surgical outcome in neocortical epilepsy. The mean contralateral NAA/Cr ratio of the hippocampus in mTLE was significantly lower in patients with a history of secondary generalized tonic-clonic seizure (SGTCS) than in those without. (orig.)

  12. The effects of neonatal amygdala or hippocampus lesions on adult social behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliss-Moreau, Eliza; Moadab, Gilda; Santistevan, Anthony; Amaral, David G

    2017-03-30

    The present report details the final phase of a longitudinal evaluation of the social behavior in a cohort of adult rhesus monkeys that received bilateral neurotoxic lesions of the amygdala or hippocampus, or sham operations at 2 weeks of age. Results were compared to previous studies in which adult animals received amygdala lesions and were tested in a similar fashion. Social testing with four novel interaction partners occurred when the animals were between 7 and 8 years of age. Experimental animals interacted with two male and two female partners in two conditions - one in which physical access was restricted (the constrained social access condition) and a second in which physical access was unrestricted (the unconstrained social access condition). Across conditions and interaction partners, there were no significant effects of lesion condition on the frequency or duration of social interactions. As a group, the hippocampus-lesioned animals generated the greatest number of communicative signals during the constrained social access condition. Amygdala-lesioned animals generated more frequent stress-related behaviors and were less exploratory. Amygdala and hippocampus-lesioned animals demonstrated greater numbers of stereotypies than control animals. Subtle, lesion-based differences in the sequencing of behaviors were observed. These findings suggest that alterations of adult social behavior are much less prominent when damage to the amygdala occurs early in life rather than in adulthood. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of microalga Spirulina platensis (Arthrospira platensis on hippocampus lipoperoxidation and lipid profile in rats with induced hypercholesterolemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telma Elita Bertolin

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Studies have been conducted on microalga Spirulina platensis (Arthrospira platensis due to its therapeutic potential in several areas, including the capacity for preventing and decreasing the damages caused by hyperlipidemia and the antioxidant activity. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of microalga Spirulina platensis on hippocampus lipoperoxidation and lipid profile in rats with induced hypercholesterolemia during 60 days. The measurement of hippocampus lipoperoxidation did not demonstrate significant difference (p>0.05 when Spirulina platensis was added to hypercholesterolemic diet. The evaluation of lipid profile showed that the administration of the microalga in therapeutic and preventive ways led to a significant protective effect (pA microalga Spirulina platensis (Arthrospira platensis vem sendo fonte de pesquisas devido a evidências de seu potencial terapêutico em diversas áreas, dentre elas a capacidade de prevenção e diminuição dos danos causados por dislipidemias e sua atividade antioxidante. Objetivou-se avaliar o efeito da microalga Spirulina platensis sobre a lipoperoxidação no hipocampo e perfil lipídico sérico em ratos com hipercolesterolemia induzida durante 60 dias. A dosagem da lipoperoxidação no hipocampo não demonstrou diferença significativa (p>0,05 quando Spirulina platensis foi adicionada na dieta hipercolêsterolemica. A avaliação do perfil lipídico demonstrou que a administração da microlaga de forma terapêutica e preventiva demonstrou efeito significativo (p<0,05 na proteção do desenvolvimento de hipercolesterolemia.

  14. [Effect of electromagnetic radiation on discharge activity of neurons in the hippocampus CA1 in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Jun; Chen, Su; Liu, Xiang-Ming; Hao, Dong-Mei

    2013-09-01

    In order to explore effect of electromagnetic radiation on learning and memory ability of hippocampus neuron in rats, the changes in discharge patterns and overall electrical activity of hippocampus neuron after electromagnetic radiation were observed. Rat neurons discharge was recorded with glass electrode extracellular recording technology and a polygraph respectively. Radiation frequency of electromagnetic wave was 900 MHZ and the power was 10 W/m2. In glass electrode extracellular recording, the rats were separately irradiated for 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 and 60 min, every points repeated 10 times and updated interval of 1h, observing the changes in neuron discharge and spontaneous discharge patterns after electromagnetic radiation. In polygraph recording experiments, irradiation group rats for five days a week, 6 hours per day, repeatedly for 10 weeks, memory electrical changes in control group and irradiation group rats when they were feeding were repeatedly monitored by the implanted electrodes, observing the changes in peak electric digits and the largest amplitude in hippocampal CA1 area, and taking some electromagnetic radiation sampling sequence for correlation analysis. (1) Electromagnetic radiation had an inhibitory role on discharge frequency of the hippocampus CA1 region neurons. After electromagnetic radiation, discharge frequency of the hippocampus CA1 region neurons was reduced, but the changes in scale was not obvious. (2) Electromagnetic radiation might change the spontaneous discharge patterns of hippocampus CA1 region neurons, which made the explosive discharge pattern increased obviously. (3) Peak potential total number within 5 min in irradiation group was significantly reduced, the largest amplitude was less than that of control group. (4) Using mathematical method to make the correlation analysis of the electromagnetic radiation sampling sequence, that of irradiation group was less than that of control group, indicating that there was a tending

  15. Anxiolytic-like effects after vector-mediated overexpression of neuropeptide Y in the amygdala and hippocampus of mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Søren Hofman Oliveira; Olesen, Mikkel Vestergaard; Gøtzsche, Casper René

    2014-01-01

    , injections of rAAV-NPY caused significant anxiolytic-like effect in the open field, elevated plus maze, and light-dark transition tests. In the hippocampus, rAAV-NPY treatment was associated with anxiolytic-like effect only in the elevated plus maze. No additive effect was observed after combined r....... Using a recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vector, we addressed this idea by testing effects on anxiolytic- and depression-like behaviours in adult mice after overexpression of NPY transgene in the amygdala and/or hippocampus, two brain regions implicated in emotional behaviours. In the amygdala......AAV-NPY injection into both the amygdala and hippocampus where anxiolytic-like effect was found in the elevated plus maze and light-dark transition tests. Antidepressant-like effects were not detected in any of the rAAV-NPY injected groups. Immobility was even increased in the tail suspension and forced swim tests...

  16. Portulaca oleracea L. prevents lipopolysaccharide-induced passive avoidance learning and memory and TNF-α impairments in hippocampus of rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noorbakhshnia, Maryam; Karimi-Zandi, Leila

    2017-02-01

    There is a growing body of evidence that neuroinflammation can impair memory. It has been indicated that Portulaca oleracea Linn. (POL), possess anti-inflammatory activity and might improve memory disruption caused by inflammation. In this study the effect of pre-treatment with the hydro-alcoholic extract of POL on memory retrieval investigated in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treated rats. Male Wistar rats (200-220g) received either a control diet or a diet containing of POL (400mg/kg, p.o.) for 14days. Then, they received injections of either saline or LPS (1mg/kg, i.p.). In all the experimental groups, 4h following the last injection, passive avoidance learning (PAL) and memory test was performed. The retention test was done 24h after the training and then the animals were sacrificed. Hippocampal TNF-α levels measured using ELISA as one criteria of LPS-induced neuroinflammation. The results indicated that LPS significantly impaired PAL and memory and increased TNF-α levels in hippocampus tissue. Pre-treatment with POL improved memory in control rats and prevented memory and TNF-α deterioration in LPS treated rats. Taken together, the results of this study suggest that the hydro-alcoholic extract of POL may improve memory deficits in LPS treated rats, possibly via inhibition of TNF-α and anti-inflammatory activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of Prolonged Simulated Microgravity on Metabolic Proteins in Rat Hippocampus: Steps toward Safe Space Travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yun; Javed, Iqbal; Liu, Yahui; Lu, Song; Peng, Guang; Zhang, Yongqian; Qing, Hong; Deng, Yulin

    2016-01-04

    Mitochondria are not only the main source of energy in cells but also produce reactive oxygen species (ROS), which result in oxidative stress when in space. This oxidative stress is responsible for energy imbalances and cellular damage. In this study, a rat tail suspension model was used in individual experiments for 7 and 21 days to explore the effect of simulated microgravity (SM) on metabolic proteins in the hippocampus, a vital brain region involved in learning, memory, and navigation. A comparative (18)O-labeled quantitative proteomic strategy was used to observe the differential expression of metabolic proteins. Forty-two and sixty-seven mitochondrial metabolic proteins were differentially expressed after 21 and 7 days of SM, respectively. Mitochondrial Complex I, III, and IV, isocitrate dehydrogenase and malate dehydrogenase were down-regulated. Moreover, DJ-1 and peroxiredoxin 6, which defend against oxidative damage, were up-regulated in the hippocampus. Western blot analysis of proteins DJ-1 and COX 5A confirmed the mass spectrometry results. Despite these changes in mitochondrial protein expression, no obvious cell apoptosis was observed after 21 days of SM. The results of this study indicate that the oxidative stress induced by SM has profound effects on metabolic proteins.

  18. Altered Effective Connectivity of Hippocampus-Dependent Episodic Memory Network in mTBI Survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Yan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injuries (TBIs are generally recognized to affect episodic memory. However, less is known regarding how external force altered the way functionally connected brain structures of the episodic memory system interact. To address this issue, we adopted an effective connectivity based analysis, namely, multivariate Granger causality approach, to explore causal interactions within the brain network of interest. Results presented that TBI induced increased bilateral and decreased ipsilateral effective connectivity in the episodic memory network in comparison with that of normal controls. Moreover, the left anterior superior temporal gyrus (aSTG, the concept forming hub, left hippocampus (the personal experience binding hub, and left parahippocampal gyrus (the contextual association hub were no longer network hubs in TBI survivors, who compensated for hippocampal deficits by relying more on the right hippocampus (underlying perceptual memory and the right medial frontal gyrus (MeFG in the anterior prefrontal cortex (PFC. We postulated that the overrecruitment of the right anterior PFC caused dysfunction of the strategic component of episodic memory, which caused deteriorating episodic memory in mTBI survivors. Our findings also suggested that the pattern of brain network changes in TBI survivors presented similar functional consequences to normal aging.

  19. Effect of thyroxine on munc-18 and syntaxin-1 expression in dorsal hippocampus of adult-onset hypothyroid rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Zhu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Adult-onset hypothyroidism induces a variety of impairments on hippocampus- dependent neurocognitive functioningin which many synaptic proteins in hippocampus neurons are involved. Here, we observed the effect of adult-onset hypothyroidism on the expression of syntaxin-1 and munc-18 in the dorsal hippocampus and whether the altered proteins could be restored by levothyroxine (T4 treatment. All rats were separated into 4 groups randomly: hypothyroid group, 5μg T4/100 g body weight (BW treated group, 20 μg T4/100g BW treated group and control group. The radioimmunoassay kits were applied to assay the levels of serum T3 and T4, and the levels of syntaxin-1 and munc-18 in hippocampus were assessed by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Both analysis corroborated that syntaxin-1 in the hypothyroid group was significantly higher. Munc-18 was lower in four layers of CA3 and dentate gyrus by immunohistochemistry. After two weeks of treatment with 5 μg T4/100g BW for hypothyroidism, syntaxin-1 levels were completely restored, whereas the recovery of munc-18 only located in two of the four impaired layers. Twenty μg T4/100g BW treatment normalized munc-18 levels. These data suggested that adult-onset hypothyroidism induced increment of syntaxin-1 and decrement of munc-18 in the dorsal hippocampus, which could be restored by T4 treatment. Larger dosage of T4 caused more effective restorations.

  20. The Effects of Lycopene and Insulin on Histological Changes and the Expression Level of Bcl-2 Family Genes in the Hippocampus of Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleymaninejad, Masoume; Joursaraei, Seyed Gholamali; Feizi, Farideh; Jafari Anarkooli, Iraj

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of antioxidants lycopene and insulin on histological changes and expression of Bcl-2 family genes in the hippocampus of streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetic rats. Forty-eight Wistar rats were divided into six groups of control (C), control treated with lycopene (CL), diabetic (D), diabetic treated with insulin (DI), diabetic treated with lycopene (DL), and diabetic treated with insulin and lycopene (DIL). Diabetes was induced by an injection of streptozotocin (60 mg/kg, IP), lycopene (4 mg/kg/day) was given to the lycopene treated groups as gavages, and insulin (Sc, 1-2 U/kg/day) was injected to the groups treated with insulin. The number of hippocampus neurons undergoing cell death in group D had significant differences with groups C and DIL ( p lycopene alone or together reduced the expression of Bax , but increased Bcl-2 and Bcl-x L levels in DI, DL, and DIL rats, especially when compared to group D ( p lycopene contribute to the prevention of cell death by reducing the expression of proapoptotic genes and increasing the expression of antiapoptotic genes in the hippocampus.

  1. Effects of developmental exposure to a Commercial PBDE mixture (DE-71) on protein networks in the rat Cerebellum and Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Title (20 words): Effects of developmental exposure to a Commercial PBDE mixture (DE-71) on protein networks in the rat Cerebellum and Hippocampus. Introduction (120 words): Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDE5) possess neurotoxic effects similar to those of PCBs. The cellular a...

  2. Inactivation of the dorsal hippocampus or the medial prefrontal cortex impairs retrieval but has differential effect on spatial memory reconsolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossato, Janine I; Köhler, Cristiano A; Radiske, Andressa; Bevilaqua, Lia R M; Cammarota, Martín

    2015-11-01

    Active memories can incorporate new information through reconsolidation. However, the notion that memory retrieval is necessary for reconsolidation has been recently challenged. Non-reinforced retrieval induces hippocampus and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC)-dependent reconsolidation of spatial memory in the Morris water maze (MWM). We found that the effect of protein synthesis inhibition on this process is abolished when retrieval of the learned spatial preference is hindered through mPFC inactivation but not when it is blocked by deactivation of dorsal CA1. Our results do not fully agree with the hypothesis that retrieval is unneeded for reconsolidation. Instead, they support the idea that a hierarchic interaction between the hippocampus and the mPFC controls spatial memory in the MWM, and indicate that this cortex is sufficient to retrieve the information essential to reconsolidate the spatial memory trace, even when the hippocampus is inactivated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Tramadol Pretreatment Enhances Ketamine-Induced Antidepressant Effects and Increases Mammalian Target of Rapamycin in Rat Hippocampus and Prefrontal Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Yang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Several lines of evidence have demonstrated that acute administration of ketamine elicits fast-acting antidepressant effects. Moreover, tramadol also has potential antidepressant effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of pretreatment with tramadol on ketamine-induced antidepressant activity and was to determine the expression of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR in rat hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. Rats were intraperitoneally administrated with ketamine at the dose of 10 mg/kg or saline 1 h before the second episode of the forced swimming test (FST. Tramadol or saline was intraperitoneally pretreated 30 min before the former administration of ketamine or saline. The locomotor activity and the immobility time of FST were both measured. After that, rats were sacrificed to determine the expression of mTOR in hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. Tramadol at the dose of 5 mg/kg administrated alone did not elicit the antidepressant effects. More importantly, pretreatment with tramadol enhanced the ketamine-induced antidepressant effects and upregulated the expression of mTOR in rat hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. Pretreatment with tramadol enhances the ketamine-induced antidepressant effects, which is associated with the increased expression of mTOR in rat hippocampus and prefrontal cortex.

  4. Neuroprotective effect of olive oil in the hippocampus CA1 neurons following ischemia: Reperfusion in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Zamani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Transient global ischemia induces selective, delayed neuronal death of pyramidal neurons in the hippocampal CA1. Oxidative Stress is considered to be involved in a number of human diseases including ischemia. Preliminary studies confirmed reduction of cell death in brain following treatment with antioxidants. Aim: According to this finding, we study the relationship between consumption of olive oil on cell death and memory disorder in brain ischemia. We studied the protective effect of olive oil against ischemia-reperfusion. Material and Methods: Experimental design includes three groups: Intact (n = 8, ischemic control (n = 8 and treatment groups with olive oil (n = 8. The mice treated with olive oil as pre-treatment for a week. Then, ischemia induced by common carotid artery ligation and following the reduction of inflammation [a week after ischemia], the mice post-treated with olive oil. Nissl staining applied for counting necrotic cells in hippocampus CA1. Tunnel kit was used to quantify apoptotic cell death while to short term memory scale, we apply y-maze and shuttle box tests and for detection the rate of apoptotic and treated cell, we used western blotting test for bax and bcl2 proteins. Results: High rate of apoptosis was seen in ischemic group that significantly associated with short-term memory loss. Cell death was significantly lower when mice treated with olive oil. The memory test results were adjusted with cell death results and bax and bcl2 expression in all groups′ comparison. Ischemia for 15 min induced cell death in hippocampus with more potent effect on CA1. Conclusion: Olive oil intake significantly reduced cell death and decreased memory loss.

  5. [Effect of electroacupuncture on cellular structure of hippocampus in splenic asthenia pedo-rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhuo-xin; Zhuo, Yuan-yuan; Yu, Hai-bo; Wang, Ning

    2010-02-01

    To observe the effect of electroacupuncture (EA) on hippocampal structure in splenic asthenia pedo-rats. A total of 15 SD male rats were randomly assigned to normal control group (n=5), model group (n=5) and EA group (n=5). Splenic asthenic syndrome model was established by intragastric administration of rhubarb and intraperitoneal injection of Reserpine for 14 d. EA (1 mA, 3 Hz/iS Hz) was applied to bilateral "Zusanli" (ST 36) and "Sanyinjiao" (SP 6) for 20 mm, once a day for 14 days. The cellular structure of hippocampus was observed by light microscope and transmission electron microscope. Optical microscopic observation showed that in normal control group, the cellular nucleus was distinct, and the granular cell layer well-arranged and tight. In model group, the intracellular space was widened, and the granular cell layer was out of order in the arrangement. In EA group, the celluldr nucleus and the granular cell layer were nearly normal. Results of the electronic microscope showed that cells in model group had a karyopyknosis with irregular appearance and clear incisure, and some of them presented dissolving and necrotic phenomena; and those in EA group were milder in injury, had nearly-normal nucleus with visible nucleoli and relatively-intact nuclear membrane. Regarding the cellular plasma, in comparison with rich normal organelles of control group, the mitochondria in model group were swelling, with vague, dissolved and broken cristae, while in EA group, majority of the organelles were well-kept, and slightly dissolved mitochondrial cristae found. In regard to the synaptic structure, in comparison with control group, synaptic apomorphosis and swelling mitochondria were found in model group While in EA group, milder swelling and hydropic degeneration were seen. Different from the distinct pre- and post-synaptic membrane and synaptic vesicles of control group, while those in EA group were nearly-normal. electroacupunture can effectively relieve splenasthenic

  6. Effects of chronic malnourishment and aging on the ultrastructure of pyramidal cells of the dorsal hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Chavira, Susana Angelica; Aguilar-Vázquez, Azucena Ruth; Martínez-Chávez, Yvonne; Palma, Lourdes; Padilla-Gómez, Euridice; Diaz-Cintra, Sofia

    2016-10-01

    Malnourishment (M) produces permanent alterations during the development of the CNS and might modify the aging process. In pyramidal neurons (PN) of the hippocampus, which are associated with learning and memory performance, few studies have focused on changes at the subcellular level under chronic malnutrition (ChM) in young (Y, 2 months old) and aged (A, 22 months old) rats. The present work evaluated the extent to which ChM disrupts organelles in PN of the dorsal hippocampus CA1 as compared to controls (C). Ultrastructural analysis was performed at 8000×  and 20 000×  magnification: Nucleus eccentricity and somatic, cytoplasmic, and nuclear areas were measured; and in the PN perikaryon, density indices (number of organelles/cytoplasmic area) of Golgi membrane systems (GMS, normal, and swollen), mitochondria (normal and abnormal), and vacuolated organelles (lysosomes, lipofuscin granules, and multivesicular bodies (MVB)) were determined. The density of abnormal mitochondria, swollen GMS, and MVB increased significantly in the AChM group compared to the other groups. The amount of lipofuscin was significantly greater in the AChM than in the YChM groups - a sign of oxidative stress due to malnutrition and aging; however, in Y animals, ChM showed no effect on organelle density or the cytoplasmic area. An increased density of lysosomes as well as nucleus eccentricity was observed in the AC group, which also showed an increase in the cytoplasmic area. Malnutrition produces subcellular alterations in vulnerable hippocampal pyramidal cells, and these alterations may provide an explanation for the previously reported deficient performance of malnourished animals in a spatial memory task in which aging and malnutrition were shown to impede the maintenance of long-term memory.

  7. Effect of intrahippocampal kainic acid injections and surgical lesions on neurotransmitters in hippocampus and septum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonnum, F; Walaas, I

    1978-01-01

    Local injection of kainic acid (2 ..mu..g) was accompanied by destruction of intrinsic neurons in the dorsal part of hippocampus. The lesion was accompanied by a 75% reduction in glutamate decarboxylase activity, a 60% reduction in the high affinity uptake of L-glutamate, a 40 to 60% reduction in the endogeneous levels of aspartate, glutamate and GABA and no changes in the activities of choline acetyltransferase or aromatic amino acid decarboxylase in the dorsal hippocampus. Unilateral destruction of neurons in the dorsal hippocampus was followed by a 20 to 40% reduction in the high affinity uptake of glutamate in lateral, but not in medial septum, on both sides. There was no reduction in choline acetyltransferase, glutamate decarboxylase or aromatic amino acid decarboxylase activities in the lateral or medial part of the septum. Transection of fimbria and superior fornix was accompanied by a severe reduction in choline acetyltransferase and aromatic amino acid decarboxylase activity in hippocampus, in the high affinity uptake of glutamate and in the endogenous level of glutamate in the lateral septum. The results are consistent with the concept that in the hippocampus kainic acid destroys intrinsic neurons and not afferent fibres. It seems therefore that all GABAergic fibres in the hippocampus belong to intrinsic neurons whereas glutamergic and aspartergic neurons belong partly to local neurons. The connection from the hippocampus to the lateral septum probably uses glutamate as a transmitter.

  8. Caffeine Consumption Prevents Diabetes-Induced Memory Impairment and Synaptotoxicity in the Hippocampus of NONcZNO10/LTJ Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Duarte, João M. N.; Agostinho, Paula M.; Carvalho, Rui A.; Cunha, Rodrigo A.

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic conditions are associated with modified brain function, namely with cognitive deficits, through largely undetermined processes. More than understanding the underlying mechanism, it is important to devise novel strategies to alleviate diabetes-induced cognitive deficits. Caffeine (a mixed antagonist of adenosine A(1) and A(2A) receptors) emerges as a promising candidate since caffeine consumption reduces the risk of diabetes and effectively prevents memory deficits caused by different...

  9. Caffeine consumption prevents memory impairment, neuronal damage, and adenosine A2A receptors upregulation in the hippocampus of a rat model of sporadic dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, Janaína; Rocha, Andreia; Nunes, Fernanda; Costa, Marcelo S; Schein, Vanessa; Kazlauckas, Vanessa; Kalinine, Eduardo; Souza, Diogo O; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Porciúncula, Lisiane O

    2013-01-01

    Intracerebroventricular (icv) streptozotocin (STZ) administration induces pathological and behavioral alterations similar to those observed in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and is thus considered an experimental model of sporadic AD. Since caffeine (an adenosine receptor antagonist) and selective antagonists of adenosine A2A receptors modify the course of memory impairment in different amyloid-β-based experimental models of AD, we now tested the impact of caffeine on STZ-induced dementia and associated neurodegeneration in the hippocampus as well as on the expression and density of adenosine receptors. Adult male rats received a bilateral infusion of saline or STZ (3 mg/kg, icv), which triggered memory deficits after four weeks, as gauged by impaired object recognition memory. This was accompanied by a reduced NeuN immunoreactivity in the hippocampal CA1 region and an increased expression and density of adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR), but not A1R, in the hippocampus. Caffeine consumption (1 g/L in the drinking water starting 2 weeks before the STZ challenge) prevented the STZ-induced memory impairment and neurodegeneration as well as the upregulation of A2AR. These findings provide the first demonstration that caffeine prevents sporadic dementia and implicate the control of central A2AR as its likely mechanism of action.

  10. Pharmacological blockade of either cannabinoid CB1 or CB2 receptors prevents both cocaine-induced conditioned locomotion and cocaine-induced reduction of cell proliferation in the hippocampus of adult male rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco-Calvo, Eduardo; Rivera, Patricia; Arrabal, Sergio; Vargas, Antonio; Pavón, Francisco Javier; Serrano, Antonia; Castilla-Ortega, Estela; Galeano, Pablo; Rubio, Leticia; Suárez, Juan; Rodriguez de Fonseca, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Addiction to major drugs of abuse, such as cocaine, has recently been linked to alterations in adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus. The endogenous cannabinoid system modulates this proliferative response as demonstrated by the finding that pharmacological activation/blockade of cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors not only modulates neurogenesis but also modulates cell death in the brain. In the present study, we evaluated whether the endogenous cannabinoid system affects cocaine-induced alterations in cell proliferation. To this end, we examined whether pharmacological blockade of either CB1 (Rimonabant, 3 mg/kg) or CB2 receptors (AM630, 3 mg/kg) would affect cell proliferation [the cells were labeled with 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU)] in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricle and the dentate subgranular zone (SGZ). Additionally, we measured cell apoptosis (as monitored by the expression of cleaved caspase-3) and glial activation [by analyzing the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and Iba-1] in the striatum and hippocampus during acute and repeated (4 days) cocaine administration (20 mg/kg). The results showed that acute cocaine exposure decreased the number of BrdU-immunoreactive (ir) cells in the SVZ and SGZ. In contrast, repeated cocaine exposure reduced the number of BrdU-ir cells only in the SVZ. Both acute and repeated cocaine exposure increased the number of cleaved caspase-3-, GFAP- and Iba1-ir cells in the hippocampus, and this effect was counteracted by AM630 or Rimonabant, which increased the number of BrdU-, GFAP-, and Iba1-ir cells in the hippocampus. These results indicate that the changes in neurogenic, apoptotic and gliotic processes that were produced by repeated cocaine administration were normalized by pharmacological blockade of CB1 and CB2. The restorative effects of cannabinoid receptor blockade on hippocampal cell proliferation were associated with the prevention of the induction of conditioned

  11. Long Term Depression in Rat Hippocampus and the Effect of Ethanol during Fetal Life

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    Olivier Pierrefiche

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol (ethanol disturbs cognitive functions including learning and memory in humans, non-human primates, and laboratory animals such as rodents. As studied in animals, cellular mechanisms for learning and memory include bidirectional synaptic plasticity, long-term potentiation (LTP, and long-term depression (LTD, primarily in the hippocampus. Most of the research in the field of alcohol has analyzed the effects of ethanol on LTP; however, with recent advances in the understanding of the physiological role of LTD in learning and memory, some authors have examined the effects of ethanol exposure on this particular signal. In the present review, I will focus on hippocampal LTD recorded in rodents and the effects of fetal alcohol exposure on this signal. A synthesis of the findings indicates that prenatal ethanol exposure disturbs LTD concurrently with LTP in offspring and that both glutamatergic and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA neurotransmissions are altered and contribute to LTD disturbances. Although the ultimate mode of action of ethanol on these two transmitter systems is not yet clear, novel suggestions have recently appeared in the literature.

  12. Anticonvulsant and neuroprotective effects of Rosa damascena hydro-alcoholic extract on rat hippocampus

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    Mansour Homayoun

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Previously, analgesic, hypnotic, and anticonvulsant effects have been suggested for Rosa damascena (R. damascena. In the present study, possible anti-seizure and neuro-protective effects of hydro-alcoholic extract of R. damascena has been investigated after inducing seizures in rats by pentylenetetrazole (PTZ. Materials and Methods: The rats were divided to five groups: (1 Control: received saline, (2 PTZ: 100 mg/kg, i.p., (3 PTZ-Extract 50 mg/kg(PTZ-Ext 50, (4 PTZ- Extract 100 mg/kg(PTZ-Ext 100, and (5 PTZ- Extract 200 mg/kg(PTZ-Ext 200 groups which were treated with 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg respectively of hydro-alcoholic extract of R. damascena for one week before PTZ injection. The animals were examined for electrocorticography (ECoG recording and finally, the brains were removed for histological study. Results: The hydro-alcoholic extract of R. damascena significantly prolonged the latency of seizure attacks and reduced the frequency and amplitude of epileptiform burst discharges induced by PTZ injection. Moreover, all three doses of the extract significantly inhibited production of dark neurons in different regions of the hippocampus in the mentioned animal model. Conclusion: The present study showed that the hydro-alcoholic extract of R. damascena has anticonvulsant and neuroprotective effects. More investigations are needed to be done in order to better understand the responsible compound(s as well as the possible mechanism(s.

  13. The effect of mitochondrial calcium uniporter on mitochondrial fission in hippocampus cells ischemia/reperfusion injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Lantao; Li, Shuhong; Wang, Shilei, E-mail: wshlei@aliyun.com; Yu, Ning; Liu, Jia

    2015-06-05

    The mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) transports free Ca{sup 2+} into the mitochondrial matrix, maintaining Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis, thus regulates the mitochondrial morphology. Previous studies have indicated that there was closely crosstalk between MCU and mitochondrial fission during the process of ischemia/reperfusion injury. This study constructed a hypoxia reoxygenation model using primary hippocampus neurons to mimic the cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury and aims to explore the exactly effect of MCU on the mitochondrial fission during the process of ischemia/reperfusion injury and so as the mechanisms. Our results found that the inhibitor of the MCU, Ru360, decreased mitochondrial Ca{sup 2+} concentration, suppressed the expression of mitochondrial fission protein Drp1, MIEF1 and Fis1, and thus improved mitochondrial morphology significantly. Whereas spermine, the agonist of the MCU, had no significant impact compared to the I/R group. This study demonstrated that the MCU regulates the process of mitochondrial fission by controlling the Ca{sup 2+} transport, directly upregulating mitochondrial fission proteins Drp1, Fis1 and indirectly reversing the MIEF1-induced mitochondrial fusion. It also provides new targets for brain protection during ischemia/reperfusion injury. - Highlights: • We study MCU with primary neuron culture. • MCU induces mitochondrial fission. • MCU reverses MIEF1 effect.

  14. Prenatal ethanol exposure reduces the effects of excitatory amino acids in the rat hippocampus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noble, E.P.; Ritchie, T.

    1989-01-01

    Chronic alcohol ingestion during pregnancy can lead to the Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS), a disorder marked by learning disabilities. A rat model of FAS was used by introducing pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats to a liquid diet containing 35% ethanol-derived calories (E), while a second group was pair-fed an isocaloric liquid diet without ethanol (P). A third group of pregnant dams received ad libitum lab chow (C). At parturition, pups from the E and P groups were cross fostered by C mothers and all groups received lab chow. During adulthood, male offspring were sacrificed and hippocampal and prefrontal cortical slices were prelabeled with [3H]inositol. Phosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis was determined by measuring the accumulation of [3H]inositol phosphates in the presence of LiCl in response to activation of various excitatory amino acid (EAA) receptors. In hippocampal slices, ibotenate- and quisqualate-induced PI hydrolysis was reduced in E compared to P and C animals. Moreover, the inhibitory effect of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) on carbachol-induced PI hydrolysis, evident in P and C animals, was completely abolished in the hippocampus of E animals. In contrast, in the prefrontal cerebral cortex, this inhibitory effect of NMDA prevailed even in the E animals. The evidence suggests that prenatal ethanol exposure alters the activity of EAA receptors in the hippocampal generation of 2nd messengers

  15. Effects of hypergravic fields on serotonergic neuromodulation in the rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horrigan, D J; Fuller, C A; Horowitz, J M

    1997-10-01

    The effects of 7 day exposure to 2G fields on serotonergic modulation at two synapses on a hippocampal pathway were examined by recording dentate gyrus and CA1 pyramidal cell layer electrical activity. Serotonin decreased the amplitude of the population spike (synchronous action potentials in hundreds of neurons) in both the dentate gyrus and CA1 regions of rats exposed to 2G fields for 7 days. The inhibition, averaging 26 +/- 4% (mean +/- SEM) in the dentate gyrus and 80 +/- 5% in the CA1 region, was not significantly different from inhibitory responses observed in 1G controls. The 5-HT1A agonist 8-OH-DPAT mimicked this inhibition in the dentate and CA1 regions of 1G rats. 8-OH-DPAT responses were not affected by exposure to 2G fields. We conclude that the hippocampus contains surplus 5-HT receptors so that decreases in receptor density reported in receptor binding studies do not result in a decrease in modulatory capability. A model to account for the physiological pathway that relates gravitational field strength to 5-HT receptor density without changing the effectiveness of 5-HT neuromodulation is discussed.

  16. Fast effects of glucocorticoids on memory-related network oscillations in the mouse hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, E K; Krupka, N; Bähner, F; Both, M; Draguhn, A

    2008-05-01

    Transient or lasting increases in glucocorticoids accompany deficits in hippocampus-dependent memory formation. Recent data indicate that the formation and consolidation of declarative and spatial memory are mechanistically related to different patterns of hippocampal network oscillations. These include gamma oscillations during memory acquisition and the faster ripple oscillations (approximately 200 Hz) during subsequent memory consolidation. We therefore analysed the effects of acutely applied glucocorticoids on network activity in mouse hippocampal slices. Evoked field population spikes and paired-pulse responses were largely unaltered by corticosterone or cortisol, respectively, despite a slight increase in maximal population spike amplitude by 10 microm corticosterone. Several characteristics of sharp waves and superimposed ripple oscillations were affected by glucocorticoids, most prominently the frequency of spontaneously occurring sharp waves. At 0.1 microm, corticosterone increased this frequency, whereas maximal (10 microm) concentrations led to a reduction. In addition, gamma oscillations became slightly faster and less regular in the presence of high doses of corticosteroids. The present study describes acute effects of glucocorticoids on sharp wave-ripple complexes and gamma oscillations in mouse hippocampal slices, revealing a potential background for memory deficits in the presence of elevated levels of these hormones.

  17. Modulation of memory with septal injections of morphine and glucose: effects on extracellular glucose levels in the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNay, Ewan C; Canal, Clinton E; Sherwin, Robert S; Gold, Paul E

    2006-02-28

    The concentration of glucose in the extracellular fluid (ECF) of the hippocampus decreases substantially during memory testing on a hippocampus-dependent memory task. Administration of exogenous glucose, which enhances task performance, prevents this decrease, suggesting a relationship between hippocampal glucose availability and memory performance. In the present experiment, spontaneous alternation performance and task-related changes in hippocampal ECF glucose were assessed in rats after intraseptal administration of morphine, which impairs memory on a spontaneous alternation task, and after co-administration of intraseptal glucose, which attenuates that impairment. Consistent with previous findings, spontaneous alternation testing resulted in a decrease in hippocampal ECF glucose levels in control rats. However, rats that received intraseptal morphine prior to testing showed memory impairments and an absence of the task-related decrease in hippocampal ECF glucose levels. Intraseptal co-administration of glucose with morphine attenuated the memory impairment, and ECF glucose levels in the hippocampus decreased in a manner comparable to that seen in control rats. These data suggest that fluctuations in hippocampal ECF glucose levels may be a marker of mnemonic processing and support the view that decreases in extracellular glucose during memory testing reflect increased glucose demand during memory processing.

  18. The effect of alcoholic extract of Panicum miliaceum L. seed on hippocampus neuronal density in male mouse

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    Arezoo Bornarodi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hippocampus organization is a part of temporal lobe, which consists of several sections including hippocampal body, dentate gyrus and subiculum. Panicum miliaceum L. contains proteins, vitamins and antioxidants for human health. This study was conducted to examine the effect of the alcoholic extract of the seed of Panicum miliaceum L. plant on hippocampus neuronal density. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 24 male mice were divided into 4 groups (n=6, each group. The alcoholic extract of the seed of the Panicum miliaceum L. plant was prepared by soxhlet extraction. Three doses of the extract 25, 50, 75 mg/kg were intraperitoneally injected to 3 treatment groups for 21 days and the control group received normal saline injection. At the end of the experiment, the animals were anesthetized and after perfusion, their brains were removed from the skull. After tissue processing, slices of the brain were prepared and stained. Then, different regions of the hippocampus were photographed and neuronal densities were evaluated. Results: Results showed that the neuronal density in the CA1, CA3 regions of the group treated with 50 mg/kg of the alcoholic extract and in all regions of hippocampus (CA1,CA2,CA3 in groups treated with dose of 75 mg/kg of the alcoholic extract had a significant increase compared to the control group (P<0.05. Conclusion: The present study shows that the alcoholic extract of the seed of Panicum miliaceum L. plant increases neuronal density and induces neurogenesis in the mouse hippocampus.

  19. The effect of chronic fluoxetine on social isolation-induced changes on sucrose consumption, immobility behavior, and on serotonin and dopamine function in hippocampus and ventral striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenes, Juan C; Fornaguera, Jaime

    2009-03-02

    This study examined the effect of fluoxetine, a selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitor, on isolation-induced changes on sucrose consumption and preference, spontaneous open-field activity, forced swimming behavior, and on tissue levels of 5-HT and dopamine (DA) in hippocampus and ventral striatum (VS). Male Sprague-Dawley rats were reared in social isolation or group housing from postnatal day 28. Thirty-two days later, half of the isolated animals were orally treated with fluoxetine (10mg/kg/day) during the following 34 days. At the end of this period, behavior was assessed and afterward ex-vivo tissue samples were obtained. It was found that fluoxetine restored isolation-increased sucrose consumption and immobility behavior, without affecting locomotor activity, which appeared slightly increased in isolated groups both treated and untreated. In the hippocampus, isolation rearing depleted 5-HT contents and increased 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) levels, as well as 5-HT and DA turnover. These neurochemical alterations were reversed by fluoxetine. In VS, treated and untreated isolated rats showed higher 5-HT levels than grouped congeners. Although fluoxetine did not affect 5-HT and DA contents in this region, it slightly reversed the alterations in the 5-HT and DA turnover observed in isolated rats. Overall, social isolation impaired incentive and escape motivated behaviors. At the neurochemical level, isolation rearing affected 5-HT rather than DA activity, and this differential effect was more noticeable in hippocampus than in VS. The chronic treatment with fluoxetine during the last month of rearing somewhat prevented these behavioral and neurochemical alterations. Our data suggest that isolation rearing is an appropriate procedure to model some developmental-related alterations underlying depression disorders.

  20. Differential effects of benzodiazepines on phospholipid methylation in hippocampus and cerebellum of rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tacconi, M.T.; Salmona, M.

    1988-01-01

    To elucidate the relationship between the occupancy of BDZ binding sites and phospholipid methylation in brain, the authors examined phosphatidylethanolamine-N-methyltransferase (PEMT) activity in synaptosomes of rat hippocampi and cerebella in the presence of BDZ ligands with different modes of action. We found that Ro 5-4864, a specific ligand for peripheral type receptors, increased PL methylation in hippocampal and cerebellar synaptosomes. This effect was directly related to receptor occupancy, since the specific antagonist PK11195 inhibited the rise in PEMT activity induced by Ro 5-4864. Clonazepam, on the other hand, tended to reduce PL production in cerebellum and hippocampus except for hiccocampal (/sup 3/H)-phosphatidyl-N-monomethylethanolamine which was elevated by 40 to 70% at doses ranging from 10/sup -9/ to 10/sup -6/M. When equimolar concentrations of the antagonist Ro 15-1788 were given in association the clonazepam-induced phosphatidyl-N-monomethylethanolamine increase was reduced by 70%. These data support the involvement of structural and functional membrane alterations in the action of BDZ. 20 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  1. The analgesic effect of trans-resveratrol is regulated by calcium channels in the hippocampus of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weijie; Yu, Yingcong; Li, Jing; Wang, Lin; Li, Zhi; Zhang, Chong; Zhen, Linlin; Ding, Lianshu; Wang, Gang; Sun, Xiaoyang; Xu, Ying

    2017-08-01

    Resveratrol has been widely studied in terms of it's potential to slow the progression of many diseases. But little is known about the mechanism of action in neuropathic pain. Neuropathic pain is the main type of chronic pain associated with tissue injury. Calcium channels and calcium/caffeine-sensitive pools are associated with analgesic pathway involving neuropathic pain. Our previous study suggested that the antinociceptive effect of resveratrol was involved in Ca 2+ /calmodulin-dependent signaling in the spinal cord of mice. The aim of this study was to explore the involvement of Ca 2+ in analgesic effects of trans-resveratrol in neuropathic pain and signal pathway in hippocampus. Hot plate test was used to assess antinociceptive response when mice were treated with trans-resveratrol alone or in combination with Mk 801, nimodipine, CaCl 2 , ryanodine or EGTA. The effects of trans-resveratrol and the combination on Ca 2+ /calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor) expression in hippocampus were also investigated. The results showed that trans-resveratrol increased paw withdraw latency in the hot plate test. The effect of resveratrol was enhanced by Mk 801 and nimodipine. Central administration of Ca 2+ , however, abolished the antinociceptive effects of resveratrol. In contrast, centrally administered EGTA or ryanodine improved trans-resveratrol induced antinociception. There was a significant increase in p-CaMKII and BDNF expression in the hippocampus when resveratrol were combined with Mk 801, nimodipine, ryanodine and EGTA. Administration of CaCl 2 blocked changes in p-CaMKII and BDNF levels in the hippocampus. These findings suggest that trans-resveratrol exerts the effects of antinociception through regulation of calcium channels and calcium/caffeine-sensitive pools.

  2. Associative recognition and the hippocampus: differential effects of hippocampal lesions on object-place, object-context and object-place-context memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langston, Rosamund F; Wood, Emma R

    2010-10-01

    The hippocampus is thought to be required for the associative recognition of objects together with the spatial or temporal contexts in which they occur. However, recent data showing that rats with fornix lesions perform as well as controls in an object-place task, while being impaired on an object-place-context task (Eacott and Norman (2004) J Neurosci 24:1948-1953), suggest that not all forms of context-dependent associative recognition depend on the integrity of the hippocampus. To examine the role of the hippocampus in context-dependent recognition directly, the present study tested the effects of large, selective, bilateral hippocampus lesions in rats on performance of a series of spontaneous recognition memory tasks: object recognition, object-place recognition, object-context recognition and object-place-context recognition. Consistent with the effects of fornix lesions, animals with hippocampus lesions were impaired only on the object-place-context task. These data confirm that not all forms of context-dependent associative recognition are mediated by the hippocampus. Subsequent experiments suggested that the object-place task does not require an allocentric representation of space, which could account for the lack of impairment following hippocampus lesions. Importantly, as the object-place-context task has similar spatial requirements, the selective deficit in object-place-context recognition suggests that this task requires hippocampus-dependent neural processes distinct from those required for allocentric spatial memory, or for object memory, object-place memory or object-context memory. Two possibilities are that object, place, and context information converge only in the hippocampus, or that recognition of integrated object-place-context information requires a hippocampus-dependent mode of retrieval, such as recollection. © 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Differential Effects of Cannabinoid Receptor Agonist on Social Discrimination and Contextual Fear in Amygdala and Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segev, Amir; Akirav, Irit

    2011-01-01

    We examined whether the cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN55,212-2 (WIN; 5 [mu]g/side) microinjected into the hippocampus or the amygdala would differentially affect memory processes in a neutral vs. an aversive task. In the aversive contextual fear task, WIN into the basolateral amygdala impaired fear acquisition/consolidation, but not retrieval.…

  4. Effect of 8 weeks Resistance Training on BDNF and TrkB in the Hippocampus of Adult Male Rats

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    S Mojtahedi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Exercise enhances the synaptic plasticity and neuroprotective effects in the adult brain. However, it remains unknown that how plasticity molecules change following types of training. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of eight weeks resistance training on protein levels of Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor(BDNF and receptor of TrkB, in the hippocampus of adult male rats. Methods: In this experimental study, twelve adult male rats, 8 weeks of age, with an average weight of 200 to 225 grams were randomly divided into two groups, control and exercise respectively. The exercise was to increase the weight on the ladder. 24 hours after their last training session. The animals were killed and the hippocampus was removed for further testing. ELISA determined changes in protein levels. Data were analyzed by independent t test. Results: There was a significant difference between train and control groups In protein level of variables statically (p≤0.05. In addition, protein levels of BDNF and TrkB in the hippocampus of rats increased. Conclusion: Resistance training is beneficial for promoting hippocampal plasticity associated with BDNF signaling and consequently functional and cognitive benefits.

  5. Effects of acute voluntary loaded wheel running on BDNF expression in the rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Minchul; Soya, Hideaki

    2017-12-31

    Voluntary loaded wheel running involves the use of a load during a voluntary running activity. A muscle-strength or power-type activity performed at a relatively high intensity and a short duration may cause fewer apparent metabolic adaptations but may still elicit muscle fiber hypertrophy. This study aimed to determine the effects of acute voluntary wheel running with an additional load on brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in the rat hippocampus. Ten-week old male Wistar rats were assigned randomly to a (1) sedentary (Control) group; (2) voluntary exercise with no load (No-load) group; or (3) voluntary exercise with an additional load (Load) group for 1-week (acute period). The expression of BDNF genes was quantified by real-time PCR. The average distance levels were not significantly different in the No-load and Load groups. However, the average work levels significantly increased in the Load group. The relative soleus weights were greater in the No-load group. Furthermore, loaded wheel running up-regulated the BDNF mRNA level compared with that in the Control group. The BDNF mRNA levels showed a positive correlation with workload levels (r=0.75), suggesting that the availability of multiple workload levels contributes to the BDNF-related benefits of loaded wheel running noted in this study. This novel approach yielded the first set of findings showing that acute voluntary loaded wheel running, which causes muscular adaptation, enhanced BDNF expression, suggesting a possible role of high-intensity short-term exercise in hippocampal BDNF activity. ©2017 The Korean Society for Exercise Nutrition

  6. [Effects of polydatin on learning and memory and Cdk5 kinase activity in the hippocampus of rats with chronic alcoholism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin-juan; Zhang, Yan; Xu, Chun-yang; Li, Shuang; Du, Ai-lin; Zhang, Li-bin; Zhang, Rui-ling

    2015-03-01

    To observe the effects of polydatin on learning and memory and cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) kinase activity in the hippocampus of rats with chronic alcoholism. Forty rats were randomly divided into 4 groups: control group, chronic alcoholism group, low and high polydatin group. The rat chronic alcoholism model was established by ethanol 3.0 g/(kg · d) (intragastric administration). The abstinence scoring was used to evaluate the rats withdrawal symptoms; cognitive function was measured by Morris water maze experiment; Cdk5 protein expression in the hippocampus was detected by immunofluorescence; Cdk5 kinase activity in the hippocampus was detected by liquid scintillation counting method. The abstinence score, escape latency, Cdk5 kinase activity in chronic alcoholism group rats were significantly higher than those of control group (P chronic alcoholism group (P chronic alcoholism group( P chronic alcoholism group were significantly increased compared with control group (P chronic alcoholism group ( P chronic alcoholism damage may interrelate with regulation of Cdk5 kinase activity.

  7. Modulatory Effect of Aerobic Physical Activity on Synaptic Ultrastructure in the Old Mouse Hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrizia Fattoretti

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Aerobic physical exercise (APE leads to improved brain functions. To better understand the beneficial effect of APE on the aging brain, a morphometric study was carried out of changes in hippocampal synapses of old (>27 months Balb/c mice undergoing treadmill training (OTT for 4 weeks in comparison with old sedentary (OS, middle-aged sedentary (MAS and middle-aged treadmill training (MATT mice. The inner molecular layer of the hippocampal dentate gyrus (IMLDG and the molecular stratum of Ammon’s horn1 neurons (SMCA1 were investigated. The number of synapses per cubic micron of tissue (numeric density, Nv, overall synaptic area per cubic micron of tissue (surface density, Sv, average area of synaptic contact zones (S, and frequency (% of perforated synapses (PS were measured in electron micrographs of ethanol-phosphotungstic acid (E-PTA stained tissue. Data were analyzed with analysis of variance (ANOVA. In IMLDG, an effect of age was found for Nv and Sv, but not S and %PS. Similar results were found for exercise and the interaction of age and exercise. In post hoc analysis Nv was higher (60.6% to 75.1%; p < 0.001 in MATT vs. MAS, OS and OTT. Sv was higher (32.3% to 54.6%; p < 0.001 in MATT vs. MAS, OS and OTT. In SMCA1, age affected Nv, Sv and %PS, but not S. The effect of exercise was significant for Sv only. The interaction of age and exercise was significant for Nv, Sv and %PS. In post hoc analysis Nv was lower in OS vs. MAS, MATT and OTT (−26.1% to −32.1%; p < 0.038. MAS and OTT were similar. Sv was lower in OS vs. MAS, MATT and OTT (−23.4 to −30.3%, p < 0.004. MAS and OTT were similar. PS frequency was higher in OS vs. MAS, MATT and OTT (48.3% to +96.6%, p < 0.023. APE positively modulated synaptic structural dynamics in the aging hippocampus, possibly in a region-specific way. The APE-associated reduction in PS frequency in SMCA1 of old mice suggests that an increasing complement of PS is a compensatory phenomenon to maintain

  8. The Effect of Lorazepam and Aqueous Extract of Melissa officinalis on Histological Changes in the Hippocampus and Spatial Memory in Male Rats

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    Sakine Heydarifar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Hippocampus is the most important part of learning and memory in the brain. Melissa officinalis naturally affects the nervous system and induces calmness. Lorazepam is also used in the treatment of insomnia and anxiety. In this study, the effect of Lorazepam and aqueous extract of Melissa officinalis (AEMO was investigated on hippocampus tissue and spatial memory in male rats using radial maze method. Methods: In this experimental study, 24 male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups. Control group received normal diet and water, the second group received lorazepam (dose. 10mg/kg, and two other groups received AEMO (at doses of 10 and 100mg/kg by gavage for 18 days. Then, their spatial memory were tested in an 8 arm radial maze (RAM. The level of lipid peroxidation of homogenized brain tissue was assessed, and hippocampal tissue sections were prepared and after H&E staining, DG area was investigated under a microscope. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey statistical tests. The level of significance was set at p<0.05. Results: There was no significant difference in learning level between animals received lorazepam and control group. The results of the experiments showed the positive effect of low dose of AEMO (10mg/kg on spatial memory, while high dose of Melissa officinalis (100mg/kg prevented memory formation. Conclusion: The results of this research showed that AEMO can increase short-term memory at low dose (10mg/kg, but it may prevent spatial memory formation at high doses.

  9. Effect of Fluoxetine on the Hippocampus of Wistar Albino Rats in Cold Restraint Stress Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, Saikarthik; Raghunath, Gunapriya; Ilango, Saraswathi; Vijayakumar, J; Vijayaraghavan, R

    2017-06-01

    Stress has been known to be a potential modulator of learning and memory. Long term stress can lead to depression. Fluoxetine is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor group of drug used in the treatment of depression. The present study was conducted to evaluate the potential of Fluoxetine on cold restraint induced stress in the hippocampus of Wistar rats. A total of 18 male wistar albino rats were divided randomly into three groups (n=6). Group 1 was the control group which were kept in normal laboratory conditions. Group 2 was the negative control group which were given cold restraint stress for period of four weeks. Group 3 was the experimental group, where the animals were pretreated with fluoxetine 10 mg/kg for a period of one week followed by cold restraint stress for 30 minutes and cotreated with fluoxetine 10 mg/kg for a period of four weeks. The whole study was done for a period of five weeks followed by behavioural studies and subsequently sacrificed with removal of brain for various histological, Immunohistochemical (IHC), neurochemical and antioxidant analysis. The values were expressed as Mean±SEM. One-way analysis of variance followed by Tukey's multiple comparisons test was used for the comparison of means. A probability of 0.05 and less was taken as statistically significant using Prism Graphpad software version 6.01. The results show there was significant improvement in the Morris water maze test after treatment with fluoxetine in Group 2. Similar results were also noted in the levels of neurotransmitters and antioxidant levels in brain and also in the number of cells counted in IHC and histological studies by H&E when Group 3 was compared with Group 2. The treatment reversed the damage in Group 2 which was comparable with the control group. The results revealed that administration of fluoxetine 10 mg/kg given orally has a potential antistressor effect by improving the neurogenic and neuroprotective effect on the cold restraint stress induced

  10. The Effect of a Short-term Glucose Deprivation on Neuron Net Functioning of Hippocampus Primary Culture on a Multi-electrode Matrix

    OpenAIRE

    Vedunova M.V.; Korotchenko S.A.; Balashova A.N.; Isakova A.O.; Khaspekov L.G.; Kazantsev V.B.; Mukhina I.V.

    2011-01-01

    There has been studied the effect of a short-term glucose deprivation on neuron net functioning of hippocampus primary culture developing within 32 days on a multi-electrode matrix MED64 (Alpha MED Sciences Company, Japan) in an early and remote periods after deprivation. A short-term glucose deprivation (20 min) has been shown to result in the increase of electrobiological activity of neuron net of hippocampus primary culture, with the cascade of metabolic reactions being activated leading t...

  11. Effect of hindlimb unloading on stereological parameters of the motor cortex and hippocampus in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Mohammad Saied; Mirzaii-Dizgah, Iraj; Vasaghi-Gharamaleki, Behnoosh; Zamiri, Mohammad Javad

    2016-11-09

    Hindlimb unloading (HU) can cause motion and cognition dysfunction, although its cellular and molecular mechanisms are not well understood. The aim of the present study was to determine the stereological parameters of the brain areas involved in motion (motor cortex) and spatial learning - memory (hippocampus) under an HU condition. Sixteen adult male rats, kept under a 12 : 12 h light-dark cycle, were divided into two groups of freely moving (n=8) and HU (n=8) rats. The volume of motor cortex and hippocampus, the numerical cell density of neurons in layers I, II-III, V, and VI of the motor cortex, the entire motor cortex as well as the primary motor cortex, and the numerical density of the CA1, CA3, and dentate gyrus subregions of the hippocampus were estimated. No significant differences were observed in the evaluated parameters. Our results thus indicated that motor cortical and hippocampal atrophy and cell loss may not necessarily be involved in the motion and spatial learning memory impairment in the rat.

  12. Adult Onset-hypothyroidism has Minimal Effects on Synaptic Transmission in the Hippocampus of Rats Independent of Hypothermia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction: Thyroid hormones (TH) influence central nervous system (CNS) function during development and in adulthood. The hippocampus, a brain area critical for learning and memory is sensitive to TH insufficiency. Synaptic transmission in the hippocampus is impaired following...

  13. Effects of fluoxetine on the amygdala and the hippocampus after administration of a single prolonged stress to male Wistar rates: In vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Fang; Xiao, Bing; Wen, Lili; Shi, Yuxiu

    2015-05-30

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is an anxiety- and memory-based disorder. The hippocampus and amygdala are key areas in mood regulation. Fluoxetine was found to improve the anxiety-related symptoms of PTSD patients. However, little work has directly examined the effects of fluoxetine on the hippocampus and the amygdala. In the present study, male Wistar rats received fluoxetine or vehicle after exposure to a single prolonged stress (SPS), an animal model of PTSD. In vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) was performed -1, 1, 4, 7 and 14 days after SPS to examine the effects of fluoxetine on neurometabolite changes in amygdala, hippocampus and thalamus. SPS increased the N-acetylaspartate (NAA)/creatine (Cr) and choline moieties (Cho)/Cr ratios in the bilateral amygdala on day 4, decreased the NAA/Cr ratio in the left hippocampus on day 1, and increased both ratios in the right hippocampus on day 14. But no significant change was found in the thalamus. Fluoxetine treatment corrected the SPS increases in the NAA/Cr and Cho/Cr levels in the amygdala on day 4 and in the hippocampus on day 14, but it failed to normalise SPS-associated decreases in NAA/Cr levels in the left hippocampus on day 1. These results suggested that metabolic abnormalities in the amygdala and the hippocampus were involved in SPS, and different effects of fluoxetine in correcting SPS-induced neurometabolite changes among the three areas. These findings have implications for fluoxetine treatment in PTSD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Stress leads to contrasting effects on the levels of brain derived neurotrophic factor in the hippocampus and amygdala.

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    Harini Lakshminarasimhan

    Full Text Available Recent findings on stress induced structural plasticity in rodents have identified important differences between the hippocampus and amygdala. The same chronic immobilization stress (CIS, 2 h/day causes growth of dendrites and spines in the basolateral amygdala (BLA, but dendritic atrophy in hippocampal area CA3. CIS induced morphological changes also differ in their temporal longevity--BLA hypertrophy, unlike CA3 atrophy, persists even after 21 days of stress-free recovery. Furthermore, a single session of acute immobilization stress (AIS, 2 h leads to a significant increase in spine density 10 days, but not 1 day, later in the BLA. However, little is known about the molecular correlates of the differential effects of chronic and acute stress. Because BDNF is known to be a key regulator of dendritic architecture and spines, we investigated if the levels of BDNF expression reflect the divergent effects of stress on the hippocampus and amygdala. CIS reduces BDNF in area CA3, while it increases it in the BLA of male Wistar rats. CIS-induced increase in BDNF expression lasts for at least 21 days after the end of CIS in the BLA. But CIS-induced decrease in area CA3 BDNF levels, reverses to normal levels within the same period. Finally, BDNF is up regulated in the BLA 1 day after AIS and this increase persists even 10 days later. In contrast, AIS fails to elicit any significant change in area CA3 at either time points. Together, these findings demonstrate that both acute and chronic stress trigger opposite effects on BDNF levels in the BLA versus area CA3, and these divergent changes also follow distinct temporal profiles. These results point to a role for BDNF in stress-induced structural plasticity across both hippocampus and amygdala, two brain areas that have also been implicated in the cognitive and affective symptoms of stress-related psychiatric disorders.

  15. Taurine Pretreatment Prevents Isoflurane-Induced Cognitive Impairment by Inhibiting ER Stress-Mediated Activation of Apoptosis Pathways in the Hippocampus in Aged Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanan; Li, Dongliang; Li, Haiou; Hou, Dailiang; Hou, Jingdong

    2016-10-01

    Isoflurane, a commonly used inhalation anesthetic, may induce neurocognitive deficits, especially in elderly patients after surgery. Recent study demonstrated that isoflurane caused endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and subsequent neuronal apoptosis in the brain, contributing to cognitive deficits. Taurine, a major intracellular free amino acid, has been shown to inhibit ER stress and neuronal apoptosis in several neurological disorders. Here, we examined whether taurine can prevent isoflurane-induced ER stress and cognitive impairment in aged rats. Thirty minutes prior to a 4-h 1.3 % isoflurane exposure, aged rats were treated with vehicle or taurine at low, middle and high doses. Aged rats without any treatment served as control. The brains were harvested 6 h after isoflurane exposure for molecular measurements, and behavioral study was performed 2 weeks later. Compared with control, isoflurane increased expression of hippocampal ER stress biomarkers including glucose-regulated protein 78, phosphorylated (P-) inositol-requiring enzyme 1, P-eukaryotic initiation factor 2-α (EIF2α), activating transcription factor 4 (ATF-4), cleaved ATF-6 and C/EBP homologous protein, along with activation of apoptosis pathways as indicated by decreased B cell lymphoma 2 (BCL-2)/BCL2-associated X protein, increased expressions of cytochrome-c and cleaved caspase-3. Taurine pretreatment dose-dependently inhibited isoflurane-induced increase in expression of ER stress biomarkers except for P-EIF2α and ATF-4, and reversed isoflurane-induced changes in apoptosis-related proteins. Moreover, isoflurane caused spatial working memory deficits in aged rats, which were prevented by taurine pretreatment. The results indicate that taurine pretreatment prevents anesthetic isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment by inhibiting ER stress-mediated activation of apoptosis pathways in the hippocampus in aged rats.

  16. Neuroprotective Effects of Kolaviron, a Biflavonoid Complex of Garcinia kola, on Rats Hippocampus against Methamphetamine-Induced Neurotoxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Ijomone, Omamuyovwi M.; Nwoha, Polycarp U.; Olaibi, Olayemi K.; Obi, Augustine U.; Alese, Margaret O.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the protective effects of kolaviron on brain weight and behavioural performance and the histology of the hippocampus of adult Wistar rats following methamphetamine challenge.Materials and Methods: Twenty four adult Wistar rats weighing between 150-200 g, randomly assigned into four groups of six each (Groups A, B, C, D) were used for this research. Group A served as control, while groups B and C were given single dose methamphetamine (10 mg/kg) intraperitoneally after grou...

  17. Experience Modulates the Effects of Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors on Gene and Protein Expression in the Hippocampus: Impaired Plasticity in Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewal, Angila S; Patzke, Holger; Perez, Evelyn J; Park, Pul; Lehrmann, Elin; Zhang, Yongqing; Becker, Kevin G; Fletcher, Bonnie R; Long, Jeffrey M; Rapp, Peter R

    2015-08-19

    The therapeutic potential of histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) treatment has attracted considerable attention in the emerging area of cognitive neuroepigenetics. The possibility that ongoing cognitive experience importantly regulates the cell biological effects of HDACi administration, however, has not been systematically examined. In an initial experiment addressing this issue, we tested whether water maze training influences the gene expression response to acute systemic HDACi administration in the young adult rat hippocampus. Training powerfully modulated the response to HDACi treatment, increasing the total number of genes regulated to nearly 3000, including many not typically linked to neural plasticity, compared with neuroepigenetics. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/3511730-14$15.00/0.

  18. Protective effects of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase on neurotoxicity of aluminium applied into the CA1 sector of rat hippocampus

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    Marina D Jovanovic

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Aluminum (Al toxicity is closely linked to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer′s disease (AD. This experimental study was aimed to investigate the active avoidance behaviour of rats after intrahippocampal injection of Al, and biochemical and immunohistochemical changes in three bilateral brain structures namely, forebrain cortex (FBCx, hippocampus and basal forebrain (BF. Methods: Seven days after intra-hippocampal (CA1 sector injection of AlCl 3 into adult male Wistar rats they were subjected to two-way active avoidance (AA tests over five consecutive days. Control rats were treated with 0.9% w/v saline. The animals were decapitated on the day 12 post-injection. The activities of acetylcholinesterase (AChE and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH were measured in the FBCx, hippocampus and BF. Immunohistochemical staining was performed for transferrin receptors, amyloid β and tau protein. Results: The activities of both AChE and G6PDH were found to be decreased bilaterally in the FBCx, hippocampus and basal forebrain compared to those of control rats. The number of correct AA responses was reduced by AlCl 3 treatment. G6PDH administered prior to AlCl 3 resulted in a reversal of the effects of AlCl 3 on both biochemical and behavioural parameters. Strong immunohistochemical staining of transferrin receptors was found bilaterally in the FBCx and the hippocampus in all three study groups. In addition, very strong amyloid β staining was detected bilaterally in all structures in AlCl 3 -treated rats but was moderate in G6PDH/AlCl 3 -treated rats. Strong tau staining was noted bilaterally in AlCl 3 -treated rats. In contrast, tau staining was only moderate in G6PDH/AlCl 3 -treated rats. Interpretation & conclusions: Our findings indicated that the G6PDH alleviated the signs of behavioural and biochemical effects of AlCl 3 -treatment suggesting its involvement in the pathogenesis of Al neurotoxicity and its potential

  19. Supplementation with different teas from Camellia sinensis prevents memory deficits and hippocampus oxidative stress in ischemia-reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Alexandre; Schimidt, Helen L; Garcia, Alexandre; Colletta Altermann, Caroline Dalla; Santos, Francielli W; Carpes, Felipe P; da Silva, Weber Cláudio; Mello-Carpes, Pâmela B

    2017-09-01

    Memory and cognition impairments resultant of ischemic stroke could be minimized or avoided by antioxidant supplementation. In this regard, the neuroprotective potential of Green tea from Camellia sinensis has been investigated. However, there is a lack of information regarding the neuroprotective potential of others teas processed from the Camellia sinensis. Here we investigate the neuroprotective role of green, red, white and black tea on memory deficits and brain oxidative stress in a model of ischemic stroke in rats. Our findings show that green and red teas prevent deficits in object and social recognition memories, but only green tea protects against deficits in spatial memory and avoids hippocampal oxidative status and intense necrosis and others alterations in the brain tissue. In summary, green tea shows better neuroprotection in ischemic stroke than the others teas from Camellia sinensis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. [Effects of electromagnetic radiation on RAF/MEK/ERK signaling pathway in rats hippocampus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Hong-yan; Wang, De-wen; Peng, Rui-yun; Wang, Shui-ming; Gao, Ya-bing; Xu, Xin-ping; Ma, Jun-Jie

    2009-05-01

    To study the development of changes for signaling molecules related to Raf/MEK/ERK pathway in hippocampus of rats after electromagnetic radiation, and investigate the mechanisms of radiation injury. Rats were exposed to X-HPM, S-HPM and EMP radiation source respectively, and animal model of electromagnetic radiation was established. Western blot was used to detect the expression of Raf-1, phosphorylated Raf-1 and phospholylated ERK. The expression of Raf-1 down-regulated during 6 h-14 d after radiation, most significantly at 7 d, and recovered at 28 d. There was no significant difference between the radiation groups. The expression of phosphorylated Raf-1 and phosphorylated ERK both up-regulated at 6 h and 7 d after radiation, more significantly at 6 h, and the two microwave groups were more serious for phosphorylated ERK. During 6 h-14 d after S-HPM radiation, the expression of phosphorylated Raf-1 increased continuously, but phosphorylated ERK changed wavily, 6 h and 7 d were expression peak. Raf/MEK/ERK signaling pathway participates in the hippocampus injury induced by electromagnetic radiation. The excessive activation of ERK pathway may result in the apoptosis and death of neurons, which is the important mechanism of recognition disfunction caused by electromagnetic radiation.

  1. Extensive training and hippocampus or striatum lesions: effect on place and response strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Tara K; Gruenbaum, Benjamin F; Markus, Etan J

    2012-02-01

    The hippocampus has been linked to spatial navigation and the striatum to response learning. The current study focuses on how these brain regions continue to interact when an animal is very familiar with the task and the environment and must continuously switch between navigation strategies. Rats were trained to solve a plus maze using a place or a response strategy on different trials within a testing session. A room cue (illumination) was used to indicate which strategy should be used on a given trial. After extensive training, animals underwent dorsal hippocampus, dorsal lateral striatum or sham lesions. As expected hippocampal lesions predominantly caused impairment on place but not response trials. Striatal lesions increased errors on both place and response trials. Competition between systems was assessed by determining error type. Pre-lesion and sham animals primarily made errors to arms associated with the wrong (alternative) strategy, this was not found after lesions. The data suggest a qualitative change in the relationship between hippocampal and striatal systems as a task is well learned. During acquisition the two systems work in parallel, competing with each other. After task acquisition, the two systems become more integrated and interdependent. The fact that with extensive training (as something becomes a "habit"), behaviors become dependent upon the dorsal lateral striatum has been previously shown. The current findings indicate that dorsal lateral striatum involvement occurs even when the behavior is spatial and continues to require hippocampal processing. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Effect of environmental enrichment exposure on neuronal morphology of streptozotocin-induced diabetic and stressed rat hippocampus

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    Narendra Pamidi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Environmental enrichment (EE exposure is known to influence the structural changes in the neuronal network of hippocampus. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of EE exposure on the streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetic and stressed rat hippocampus. Methods: Male albino rats of Wistar strain (4-5 weeks old were grouped into normal control (NC, vehicle control (VC, diabetes (DI, diabetes + stress (DI + S, diabetes + EE (DI + E, and diabetes + stress + EE (DI + S + E groups (n = 8 in each group. Rats were exposed to stress and EE after inducing diabetes with STZ (40 mg/kg. Rats were sacrificed on Day 30 and brain sections were processed for cresyl violet staining to quantify the number of surviving neurons in the CA1, CA3, and dentate hilus (DH regions of hippocampus. Results: A significant (p < 0.001 decrease in the number of survived neurons was noticed in DI (CA1, 34.06 ± 3.2; CA3, 36.1 ± 3.62; DH, 9.83 ± 2.02 as well as DI + S (CA1, 14.03 ± 3.12; CA3, 20.27 ± 4.09; DH, 6.4 ± 1.21 group rats compared to NC rats (CA1, 53.64 ± 2.96; CA3, 62.1 ± 3.34; DH, 21.11 ± 1.03. A significant (p < 0.001 increase in the number of survived neurons was observed in DI + E (CA1, 42.3 ± 3.66; CA3, 46.73 ± 4.74; DH, 17.03 ± 2.19 and DI + S + E (CA1, 29.69 ± 4.47; CA3, 36.73 ± 3.89; DH, 12.23 ± 2.36 group rats compared to DI and DI + S groups, respectively. Conclusions: EE exposure significantly reduced the amount of neuronal damage caused by complications of diabetes and stress to the neurons of hippocampus.

  3. Effects of previous physical exercise to chronic stress on long-term aversive memory and oxidative stress in amygdala and hippocampus of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Tiago Marcon; Kolling, Janaína; Siebert, Cassiana; Biasibetti, Helena; Bertó, Carolina Gessinger; Grun, Lucas Kich; Dalmaz, Carla; Barbé-Tuana, Florencia María; Wyse, Angela T S

    2017-02-01

    Since stressful situations are considered risk factors for the development of depression and there are few studies evaluating prevention therapies for this disease, in the present study we evaluated the effect of previous physical exercise in animals subjected to chronic variable stress (CVS), an animal model of depression, on behavior tasks. We also investigated some parameters of oxidative stress and Na + , K + -ATPase activity, immunocontent and gene expression of alpha subunits in amygdala and hippocampus of rats. Young male rats were randomized into four study groups (control, exercised, stressed, exercised+stressed). The animals were subjected to controlled exercise treadmill for 20min,three times a week, for two months prior to submission to the CVS (40days). Results show that CVS impaired performance in inhibitory avoidance at 24h and 7days after training session. CVS induced oxidative stress, increasing reactive species, lipoperoxidation and protein damage, and decreasing the activity of antioxidant enzymes. The activity of Na + , K + -ATPase was decreased, but the immunocontents and gene expression of catalytic subunits were not altered. The previous physical exercise was able to improve performance in inhibitory avoidance at 24h after training; additionally, exercise prevented oxidative damage, but was unable to reverse completely the changes observed on the enzymatic activities. Our findings suggest that physical exercise during the developmental period may protect against aversive memory impairment and brain oxidative damage caused by chronic stress exposure later in life. Copyright © 2016 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Histological studies of neuroprotective effects of Curcuma longa Linn. on neuronal loss induced by dexamethasone treatment in the rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issuriya, Acharaporn; Kumarnsit, Ekkasit; Wattanapiromsakul, Chatchai; Vongvatcharanon, Uraporn

    2014-10-01

    Long term exposure to dexamethasone (Dx) is associated with brain damage especially in the hippocampus via the oxidative stress pathway. Previously, an ethanolic extract from Curcuma longa Linn. (CL) containing the curcumin constituent has been reported to produce antioxidant effects. However, its neuroprotective property on brain histology has remained unexplored. This study has examined the effects of a CL extract on the densities of cresyl violet positive neurons and glial fibrillary acidic protein immunoreactive (GFAP-ir) astrocytes in the hippocampus of Dx treated male rats. It showed that 21 days of Dx treatment (0.5mg/kg, i.p. once daily) significantly reduced the densities of cresyl violet positive neurons in the sub-areas CA1, CA3 and the dentate gyrus, but not in the CA2 area. However, CL pretreatment (100mg/kg, p.o.) was found to significantly restore neuronal densities in the CA1 and dentate gyrus. In addition, Dx treatment also significantly decreased the densities of the GFAP-ir astrocytes in the sub-areas CA1, CA3 and the dentate gyrus. However, CL pretreatment (100mg/kg, p.o.) failed to protect the loss of astrocytes in these sub-areas. These findings confirm the neuroprotective effects of the CL extract and indicate that the cause of astrocyte loss might be partially reduced by a non-oxidative mechanism. Moreover, the detection of neuronal and glial densities was suitable method to study brain damage and the effects of treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Synaptophysin and the dopaminergic system in hippocampus are involved in the protective effect of rutin against trimethyltin-induced learning and memory impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Zhao, Qi; Chen, Chun-Hai; Qin, Qi-Zhong; Zhou, Zhou; Yu, Zheng-Ping

    2014-09-01

    This study aimed to investigate the protective effect of rutin against trimethyltin-induced spatial learning and memory impairment in mice. This study focused on the role of synaptophysin, growth-associated protein 43 and the action of the dopaminergic system in mechanisms associated with rutin protection and trimethyltin-induced spatial learning and memory impairment. Cognitive learning and memory was measured by Morris Water Maze. The expression of synaptophysin and growth-associated protein 43 in hippocampus was analyzed by western blot. The concentrations of dopamine, homovanillic acid, and dihyroxyphenylacetic acid in hippocampus were detected using reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Trimethyltin-induced spatial learning impairment showed a dose-dependent mode. Synaptophysin but not growth-associated protein 43 was decreased in the hippocampus after trimethyltin administration. The concentration of dopamine decreased, while homovanillic acid increased in the hippocampus after trimethyltin administration. Mice pretreated with 20 mg/kg of rutin for 7 consecutive days exhibited improved water maze performance. Moreover, rutin pretreatment reversed the decrease of synaptophysin expression and dopamine alteration. These results suggest that rutin may protect against spatial memory impairment induced by trimethyltin. Synaptophysin and the dopaminergic system may be involved in trimethyltin-induced neuronal damage in hippocampus.

  6. Differential proteomics analysis of the analgesic effect of electroacupuncture intervention in the hippocampus following neuropathic pain in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Yong-Hui

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence is building steadily on the effectiveness of acupuncture therapy in pain relief and repeated acupuncture-induced pain relief is accompanied by improvement of hippocampal neural synaptic plasticity. To further test the cellular and molecular changes underlying analgesic effect of acupuncture, the global change of acupuncture associated protein profiles in the hippocampus under neuropathic pain condition was profiled. Methods The chronic constrictive injury (CCI model was established by ligature of the unilateral sciatic nerve in adult Wistar rats. Rats were randomized into normal control (NC group, CCI group, and CCI with electroacupuncture (EA stimulation group. EA was applied to bilateral Zusanli (ST36 and Yanglingquan (GB34 in the EA group. Differentially expressed proteins in the hippocampus in the three groups were identified by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry. The functional clustering of the identified proteins was analyzed by Mascot software. Results After CCI, the thermal pain threshold of the affected hind footpad was decreased and was reversed gradually by 12 sessions of acupuncture treatment. Following EA, there were 19 hippocampal proteins identified with significant changes in expression (>2-fold, which are involved in metabolic, physiological, and cellular processes. The top three canonical pathways identified were “cysteine metabolism”, “valine, leucine, and isoleucine degradation” and “mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling”. Conclusions These data suggest that the analgesic effect of EA is mediated by regulation of hippocampal proteins related to amino acid metabolism and activation of the MAPK signaling pathway.

  7. The effects of electromagnetic irradiation on activation of microglia and JAKs in rat hippocampus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Chunhai; Yang Xuesen; Hao Yutong; Zhang Guangbin; Yu Zhengping

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To determine the activation of microglia and the phosphorylation of Jaks, the upstream factors of JAK/STAT(janus activated kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription) signaling pathway, after electromagnetic irradiation. Methods: Rats were irradiated by 90 mW/cm 2 EMF for 20 min. The phosphorylation of Jaks was determined by western blot at different time after electromagnetic irradiation. The activation of microglia was determined by immuno- chemistry. Results: GSA-IB4 was upregulated in microglia, which indicated microglia was activated after electromagnetic irradiation. The phosphorylation of Jak1, Jak2 and Jak3 in rat hippocampus was upregulated after electromagnetic irradiation. The phosphorylation of Jakl was upregulated after microwave exposure and peaked at 12 h. Jak2 peaked at 0 h after electro-magnetic irradiation and sustained in a high level. Jak3 was slightly affected by electromagnetic irradiation. All the three members of JAKs return to normal at 72 h after electromagnetic irradiation. Conclusion: Microglia cells was activated after electromagnetic irradiation. The phosphorylation of Jaks was upregulated by electromagnetic irradiation. It suggested that JAK/ STAT singnaling pathway was activated after electromagnetic irradiation, which indicated that JAK/STAT signaling pathway may participate in brain microglia activation induced by electromagnetic irradiation. (authors)

  8. Effects of realgar on GSH synthesis in the mouse hippocampus: Involvement of system XAG(-), system XC(-), MRP-1 and Nrf2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanlei; Chen, Mo; Zhang, Yinghua; Huo, Taoguang; Fang, Ying; Jiao, Xuexin; Yuan, Mingmei; Jiang, Hong

    2016-10-01

    Realgar is a type of mineral drug that contains arsenic and has neurotoxicity. Glutathione (GSH), which is the main antioxidant in the central nervous system, plays a key role in antioxidant defenses and the detoxification of arsenic. However, whether realgar interferes with the synthesis of GSH in the brain and the molecular mechanisms underlying its effects are largely unknown. Here, we used mouse models of exposure to realgar to show that realgar affects the synthesis of GSH in the hippocampus, leading to ultrastructural changes in hippocampal neurons and synapses and deficiencies in cognitive abilities, and that the mechanisms that cause this effect may be associated with alterations in the expression of system XAG(-), system XC(-), multidrug resistance-associated protein 1(MRP-1), nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-GCS), and the levels of glutamate (Glu) and cysteine (Cys) in the extracellular fluid. These findings provide a theoretical basis for preventing the drug-induced chronic arsenic poisoning in the nervous system that is triggered by realgar. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of Paullinia cupana Mart. Commercial Extract During the Aging of Middle Age Wistar Rats: Differential Effects on the Hippocampus and Striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingori, Moara Rodrigues; Heimfarth, Luana; Ferreira, Charles Francisco; Gomes, Henrique Mautone; Moresco, Karla Suzana; Delgado, Jeferson; Roncato, Sabrina; Zeidán-Chuliá, Fares; Gelain, Daniel Pens; Moreira, José Cláudio Fonseca

    2017-08-01

    During aging, there is a marked decline in the antioxidant capacity of brain tissue, leading to a gradual loss of the antioxidant/oxidant balance, which causes oxidative damage. The effects of Paullinia cupana Mart. extract, which is described as being rich in caffeine and many polyphenol compounds, on the central nervous system have not been extensively investigated. The aim of this study was to therefore investigate the effect of a commercial guarana extract (CGE) on cognitive function, oxidative stress, and brain homeostasis proteins related to cognitive injury and senescence in middle age, male Wistar rats. Animals were randomly assigned to a group according to their treatment (saline, CGE, or caffeine). Solutions were administered daily by oral gavage for 6 months. Open field and novel object recognition tasks were performed before and after treatment. Biochemical analyses were carried out on the hippocampus and striatum. Our open field data showed an increase in exploratory activity and a decrease in anxiety-like behavior with caffeine but not with the CGE treatment. In the CGE-treated group, catalase activity decreased in the hippocampus and increased in the striatum. Analyses of the hippocampus and striatum indicate that CGE and/or caffeine altered some of the analyzed parameters in a tissue-specific manner. Our data suggest that CGE intake does not improve cognitive development, but modifies the oxidative stress machinery and neurodegenerative-signaling pathway, inhibiting pro-survival pathway molecules in the hippocampus and striatum. This may contribute to the development of unfavorable microenvironments in the brain and neurodegenerative disorders.

  10. Effects of exercise on neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus and ability of learning and memory after hippocampus lesion in adult rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin CHEN; Shan GONG; Li-Dong SHAN; Wei-Ping XU; Yue-Jin ZHANG; Shi-Yu GUO; Tadashi Hisamitsu; Qi-Zhang YIN; Xing-Hong JIANG

    2006-01-01

    Objective To explore the effects of exercise on dentate gyrus (DG) neurogenesis and the ability of learning and memory in hippocampus-lesioned adult rats. Methods Hippocampus lesion was produced by intrahippocampal microinjection of kainic acid (KA). Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) was used to label dividing cells. Y maze test was used to evaluate the ability of learning and memory. Exercise was conducted in the form of forced running in a motor-driven running wheel. The speed of wheel revolution was regulated at 3 kinds of intensity: lightly running, moderately running, or heavily running. Results Hippocampus lesion could increase the number of BrdU-labeled DG cells, moderately running after lesion could further enhance the number of BrdU-labeled cells and decrease the error number (EN) in Y maze test,while neither lightly running, nor heavily running had such effects. There was a negative correlation between the number of DG BrdU-labeled cells and the EN in the Y maze test after running. Conclusion Moderate exercise could enhance the DG neurogenesis and ameliorate the ability of learning and memory in hippocampus-lesioned rats.

  11. Effects of visual deprivation during brain development on expression of AMPA receptor subunits in rat’s hippocampus

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    Sayyed Alireza Talaei

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: Dark rearing of rats during critical period of brain development changes the relative expression and also arrangement of both AMPA receptor subunits, GluR1 and GluR2 in the hippocampus, age dependently.

  12. Effect of donepezil hydrochloride (E2020) on basal concentration of extracellular acetylcholine in the hippocampus of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosasa, T; Kuriya, Y; Matsui, K; Yamanishi, Y

    1999-09-10

    The effects of oral administration of the centrally acting acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors, donepezil hydrochloride (donepezil: E2020: (+/-)-2-[(1-benzylpiperidin-4-yl)methyl]-5,6-dimethoxy-indan-1-one monohydrochloride), tacrine (9-amino-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroacridine hydrochloride) and ENA-713 (rivastigmine: (S)-N-ethyl-3-[(1-dimethyl-amino)ethyl]-N-methyl-phenylcarbamate hydrogentartrate), which have been developed for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, on the extracellular acetylcholine concentration in the hippocampus of rats were evaluated by using a microdialysis technique without adding cholinesterase inhibitor to the perfusion solution. We also compared the inhibition of brain AChE and the brain concentrations of these drugs. Donepezil at 2.5 mg/kg and tacrine at 5 mg/kg showed significant effects for more than 6 h. At these doses, the maximum increases were observed at about 1.5 h after administration of donepezil, and at about 2 h with tacrine, and were 499% and 422% of the pre-level, respectively. ENA-713 produced significant effects at doses of 0.625, 1.25 and 2.5 mg/kg, which lasted for about 1, 2 and 4 h, respectively. The maximum increases produced by these doses at about 0.5 h after administration were 190, 346 and 458% of the pre-level, respectively. The time courses of brain AChE inhibition with donepezil at 2.5 mg/kg, tacrine at 10 mg/kg and ENA-713 at 2.5 mg/kg were mirror images of the extracellular acetylcholine-increasing action at the same doses. The time courses of the brain concentrations of drugs after oral administration of donepezil at 2.5 mg/kg and tacrine at 10 mg/kg were consistent with those of brain AChE inhibition at the same doses, and there was a linear relation between these parameters. Brain concentration of ENA-713 at 2.5 mg/kg was below the limit of quantification at all time points measured. These results suggest that oral administration of donepezil, tacrine and ENA-713 increases acetylcholine concentration in the

  13. Regulation of the kynurenine metabolism pathway by Xiaoyao San and the underlying effect in the hippocampus of the depressed rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiajia; Li, Xiaofang; He, Shugui; Hu, Lijun; Guo, Jiewen; Huang, Xiangning; Hu, Jinqing; Qi, Yaoqun; Chen, Bin; Shang, Dewei; Wen, Yuguan

    2018-03-25

    Xiaoyao San (XYS) is a classic Chinese herbal formula for treatment of depression. The present study aimed to investigate the antidepressant effects of XYS in a rat model of chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) and the underlying mechanisms. A CUMS rat model of depression was established via 4 weeks of unpredictable stimulation. Then the rats were orally administered paroxetine and XYS for 2 weeks with continued stress. Behavioral assessments, including an open field test (OFT), sucrose preference test (SPT) and forced swim test (FST), were conducted to evaluate the antidepressant effects of XYS. The concentrations in rat plasma of tryptophan (Trp) and its metabolic products, including kynurenine (Kyn) and quinolinic acid (QUIN), were determined using high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry with electrochemical detection (HPLC-MS/MS). The mRNA and protein levels in rat hippocampus of depression-related brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) and nerve cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) were determined by real-time qPCR and Western blot, respectively. Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) was used to detect the activities of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and kynurenine-3-monooxygenase (KMO) in rat plasma. The results showed that a successful CUMS rat model was established through 4 weeks of continuous unpredictable stimulation, as indicated by the significant decrease in locomotor activity and increase in immobility time in the OFT, reduction in body weight and food intake etc. Compared with the normal group, the concentrations of Kyn and QUIN had significantly (p KMO. Compared with the normal group, the mRNA of NCAM, CREB and BDNF were significantly down-regulated (p < 0.001) in the control group, BDNF gene was up-regulated by paroxetine or XYS treatment, NCAM and CREB gene did not change in XYS group, protein expressions of BDNF and CREB were significantly increased, and NCAM was

  14. Prenatal Stress Induces Long-Term Effects in Cell Turnover in the Hippocampus-Hypothalamus-Pituitary Axis in Adult Male Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baquedano, Eva; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Diz-Chaves, Yolanda; Lagunas, Natalia; Calmarza-Font, Isabel; Azcoitia, Iñigo; Garcia-Segura, Luis M.; Argente, Jesús; Chowen, Julie A.; Frago, Laura M.

    2011-01-01

    Subchronic gestational stress leads to permanent modifications in the hippocampus-hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis of offspring probably due to the increase in circulating glucocorticoids known to affect prenatal programming. The aim of this study was to investigate whether cell turnover is affected in the hippocampus-hypothalamus-pituitary axis by subchronic prenatal stress and the intracellular mechanisms involved. Restraint stress was performed in pregnant rats during the last week of gestation (45 minutes; 3 times/day). Only male offspring were used for this study and were sacrificed at 6 months of age. In prenatally stressed adults a decrease in markers of cell death and proliferation was observed in the hippocampus, hypothalamus and pituitary. This was associated with an increase in insulin-like growth factor-I mRNA levels, phosphorylation of CREB and calpastatin levels and inhibition of calpain -2 and caspase -8 activation. Levels of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 were increased and levels of the pro-apoptotic factor p53 were reduced. In conclusion, prenatal restraint stress induces a long-term decrease in cell turnover in the hippocampus-hypothalamus-pituitary axis that might be at least partly mediated by an autocrine-paracrine IGF-I effect. These changes could condition the response of this axis to future physiological and pathophysiological situations. PMID:22096592

  15. [Effects of Betel shisanwei ingredients pill on AC-cAMP-PKA signal transduction pathways in hippocampus and prefrontal cortex of depressive rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Hai-Ying; Wu, Jisiguleng; Bai, Liang-Feng; Bao, Wu-Ye; Hu, Rilebagen; Li, Jing; Zhang, Yue

    2014-05-01

    To observe the effects of Mongolian pharmaceutical Betel shisanwei ingredients pill on AC-cAMP-PKA signal transduction pathways in hippocampus and prefrontal cortex of depressive rats. Sixty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into six groups according to the sugar consumption test (10 rats in each group), normal control group,model group,fluoxetine group (3.3 mg x kg(-1)) and low dose, medium dose and high dose group (0.25, 0.5, 1 g x kg(-1)) of Betel shisanwei ingredients pill. Except the normal control,the other groups were treated with the chronic unpredictable mild stress stimulation combined with lonely raising for 28 days. 10 mL x kg(-1) of drugs were given to each rat once daily,continuously for 28 days. The AC activity of the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex were determined by radiation immunity analysis (RIA), while cAMP and PKA quantity were determinated by Enzyme-linked immunosorbent (ELISA). The AC activity, cAMP and PKA quantity of hippocampus and prefrontal of mouse model of Chronic stress depression decreased significantly than those of control group (P Betel shisanwei ingredients pill group indecreased significantly than those of model group (P Betel shisanwei ingredients pill. The AC-cAMP-PKA signal transduction pathways in hippocampus and prefrontal cortex of depression model of rats is down-regulated, whereas Mongolian pharmaceutical Betel shisanwei ingredients pill could up-regulated it to resist depression.

  16. Effect of electroacupuncture on brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA expression in mouse hippocampus following cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jianxin; Xu, Huazhou; Tian, Yuanxiang; Hu, Manxiang; Xiao, Hongling

    2013-04-01

    This work aims to observe the effects of electroacupuncture on brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA expression in mouse hippocampus following cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury. The models of mouse cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury were established. A total of 96 healthy mice were randomly assigned into 4 groups, namely, the sham surgery, model, model + electroacupuncture, and mode + hydergine groups. Mice in the model + electroacupuncture group were treated through electroacupuncture at the Shenshu (BL 23), Geshu (BL 17), and Baihui (GV 20) acupoints. Mice in the model+hydergine group were intragastrically administered with hydergine (0.77 mg/kg(-1) x day(-1)). The levels of BDNF mRNA expressions in the hippocampus were ana lyzed through a semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay on days 1 and 7 after the surgeries. BDNF mRNA expressions in the mouse hippocampus of the model group on days 1 and 7 after the surgery were higher than those of the sham surgery group (both P electroacupuncture treatment, BDNF mRNA expression in the mouse hippocampus of the model + electroacupuncture group was significantly elevated compared with the model group (both P 0.05). Electroacupuncture treatment enhances endogenous BDNF expression, which may improve the survival environment for intracerebral neurons and inhibit the apoptosis of hippocampal cells.

  17. Recognition memory for social and non-social odors: differential effects of neurotoxic lesions to the hippocampus and perirhinal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinberg, Leila M; Allen, Timothy A; Ly, Denise; Fortin, Norbert J

    2012-01-01

    The contributions of the hippocampus (HC) and perirhinal cortex (PER) to recognition memory are currently topics of debate in neuroscience. Here we used a rapidly-learned (seconds) spontaneous novel odor recognition paradigm to assess the effects of pre-training N-methyl-D-aspartate lesions to the HC or PER on odor recognition memory. We tested memory for both social and non-social odor stimuli. Social odors were acquired from conspecifics, while non-social odors were household spices. Conspecific odor stimuli are ethologically-relevant and have a high degree of overlapping features compared to non-social household spices. Various retention intervals (5 min, 20 min, 1h, 24h, or 48 h) were used between study and test phases, each with a unique odor pair, to assess changes in novelty preference over time. Consistent with findings in other paradigms, modalities, and species, we found that HC lesions yielded no significant recognition memory deficits. In contrast, PER lesions caused significant deficits for social odor recognition memory at long retention intervals, demonstrating a critical role for PER in long-term memory for social odors. PER lesions had no effect on memory for non-social odors. The results are consistent with a general role for PER in long-term recognition memory for stimuli that have a high degree of overlapping features, which must be distinguished by conjunctive representations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The hippocampus and appetitive Pavlovian conditioning: effects of excitotoxic hippocampal lesions on conditioned locomotor activity and autoshaping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Rutsuko; Everitt, Barry J; Robbins, Trevor W

    2005-01-01

    The hippocampus (HPC) is known to be critically involved in the formation of associations between contextual/spatial stimuli and behaviorally significant events, playing a pivotal role in learning and memory. However, increasing evidence indicates that the HPC is also essential for more basic motivational processes. The amygdala, by contrast, is important for learning about the motivational significance of discrete cues. This study investigated the effects of excitotoxic lesions of the rat HPC and the basolateral amygdala (BLA) on the acquisition of a number of appetitive behaviors known to be dependent on the formation of Pavlovian associations between a reward (food) and discrete stimuli or contexts: (1) conditioned/anticipatory locomotor activity to food delivered in a specific context and (2) autoshaping, where rats learn to show conditioned discriminated approach to a discrete visual CS+. While BLA lesions had minimal effects on conditioned locomotor activity, hippocampal lesions facilitated the development of both conditioned activity to food and autoshaping behavior, suggesting that hippocampal lesions may have increased the incentive motivational properties of food and associated conditioned stimuli, consistent with the hypothesis that the HPC is involved in inhibitory processes in appetitive conditioning. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Antinociceptive Effect of Morphine Microinjections into the Dorsal Hippocampus in the Formalin-Induced Orofacial Pain in Rats

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    Emad Khalilzadeh

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the effects of intra-hippocampal microinjections of morphine (an opioid agonist and naloxone (an opioid antagonist were investigated in the formalin-induced orofacial pain in rats. Orofacial pain was induced by subcutaneous injection of formalin (1 %, 50 μl in the upper lip region and the time spent of face rubbing was measured in 3-min blocks for 45 min. Formalin induced a biphasic (first phase: 0-3 min; second phase: 15-33 min pain response. Intra-hippocampal microinjections of morphine at doses of 2 and 4 μg significantly (P < 0.05 attenuated the first phase, and at doses of 1, 2 and 4 μg, morphine significantly (P < 0.05 suppressed both phases of formalin-induced orofacial pain response. Intra-hippocampal microinjections of naloxone (1 and 4 μg non-significantly increased pain when used alone, and in pretreatment microinjection, naloxone (4 μg reversed morphine (2 μg-induced antinociception. These results indicate that at the level of hippocampus of the brain, morphine through a naloxone-reversible mechanism produced an antinociceptive effect confronting the pain induced by formalin in the orofacial region in rats.

  20. Stereological Study on the Positive Effect of Running Exercise on the Capillaries in the Hippocampus in a Depression Model

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    Linmu Chen

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Running exercise is an effective method to improve depressive symptoms when combined with drugs. However, the underlying mechanisms are not fully clear. Cerebral blood flow perfusion in depressed patients is significantly lower in the hippocampus. Physical activity can achieve cerebrovascular benefits. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impacts of running exercise on capillaries in the hippocampal CA1 and dentate gyrus (DG regions. The chronic unpredictable stress (CUS depression model was used in this study. CUS rats were given 4 weeks of running exercise from the fifth week to the eighth week (20 min every day from Monday to Friday each week. The sucrose consumption test was used to measure anhedonia. Furthermore, stereological methods were used to investigate the capillary changes among the control group, CUS/Standard group and CUS/Running group. Sucrose consumption significantly increased in the CUS/Running group. Running exercise has positive effects on the capillaries parameters in the hippocampal CA1 and DG regions, such as the total volume, total length and total surface area. These results demonstrated that capillaries are protected by running exercise in the hippocampal CA1 and DG might be one of the structural bases for the exercise-induced treatment of depression-like behavior. These results suggest that drugs and behavior influence capillaries and may be considered as a new means for depression treatment in the future.

  1. Infusions of allopregnanolone into the hippocampus and amygdala, but not into the nucleus accumbens and medial prefrontal cortex, produce antidepressant effects on the learned helplessness rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirayama, Yukihiko; Muneoka, Katsumasa; Fukumoto, Makoto; Tadokoro, Shigenori; Fukami, Goro; Hashimoto, Kenji; Iyo, Masaomi

    2011-10-01

    Patients with depression showed a decrease in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid allopregnanolone (ALLO). But antidepressants increased the contents of ALLO in the rat brain. We examined the antidepressant-like effects of infusion of ALLO into the cerebral ventricle, hippocampus, amygdala, nucleus accumbens, or prefrontal cortex of learned helplessness (LH) rats (an animal model of depression). Of these regions, infusions of ALLO into the cerebral ventricle, the CA3 region of hippocampus, or the central region of amygdala exerted antidepressant-like effects. Infusion of ALLO into the hippocampal CA3 region or the central amygdala did not produce memory deficits or locomotor activation in the passive avoidance and open field tests. It is well documented that ALLO exerts its effects through GABA receptors. Therefore, we examined the antagonistic effects of flumazenil (a GABA receptor antagonist) on the antidepressant-like effects of ALLO. Coinfusion of flumazenil with ALLO into the hippocampal CA3 region, but not into the central amygdala, blocked the antidepressant-like effects of ALLO. However, coinfusion of (+)MK801 (an NMDA receptor antagonist), but not cycloheximide (a protein synthesis inhibitor), blocked the antidepressant-like effects of ALLO in the central amygdala. These results suggest that ALLO exerts antidepressant-like effects in the CA3 region of hippocampus through the GABA system and in the central region of amygdala, dependently on the activation of the glutamatergic mechanisms. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Comparative effects of parathion and chlorpyrifos on extracellular endocannabinoid levels in rat hippocampus: Influence on cholinergic toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Jing; Parsons, Loren; Pope, Carey

    2013-01-01

    Parathion (PS) and chlorpyrifos (CPF) are organophosphorus insecticides (OPs) that elicit acute toxicity by inhibiting acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Endocannabinoids (eCBs, N-arachidonoylethanolamine, AEA; 2-arachidonoylglycerol, 2AG) can modulate neurotransmission by inhibiting neurotransmitter release. We proposed that differential inhibition of eCB-degrading enzymes (fatty acid amide hydrolase, FAAH, and monoacylglycerol lipase, MAGL) by PS and CPF leads to differences in extracellular eCB levels and toxicity. Microdialysis cannulae were implanted into hippocampus of adult male rats followed by treatment with vehicle (peanut oil, 2 ml/kg, sc), PS (27 mg/kg) or CPF (280 mg/kg) 6–7 days later. Signs of toxicity, AChE, FAAH and MAGL inhibition, and extracellular levels of AEA and 2AG were measured 2 and 4 days later. Signs were noted in PS-treated rats but not in controls or CPF-treated rats. Cholinesterase inhibition was extensive in hippocampus with PS (89–90%) and CPF (78–83%) exposure. FAAH activity was also markedly reduced (88–91%) by both OPs at both time-points. MAGL was inhibited by both OPs but to a lesser degree (35–50%). Increases in extracellular AEA levels were noted after either PS (about 2-fold) or CPF (about 3-fold) while lesser treatment-related 2-AG changes were noted. The cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist/inverse agonist AM251 (3 mg/kg, ip) had no influence on functional signs after CPF but markedly decreased toxicity in PS-treated rats. The results suggest that extracellular eCBs levels can be markedly elevated by both PS and CPF. CB1-mediated signaling appears to play a role in the acute toxicity of PS but the role of eCBs in CPF toxicity remains unclear. - Highlights: • Chlorpyrifos and parathion both extensively inhibited hippocampal cholinesterase. • Functional signs were only noted with parathion. • Chlorpyrifos and parathion increased hippocampal extracellular anandamide levels. • 2-Arachidonoylglycerol levels were

  3. Comparative effects of parathion and chlorpyrifos on extracellular endocannabinoid levels in rat hippocampus: Influence on cholinergic toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jing [Department of Physiological Sciences, Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK (United States); Parsons, Loren [Committee on Neurobiology of Affective Disorders, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA (United States); Pope, Carey, E-mail: carey.pope@okstate.edu [Department of Physiological Sciences, Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Parathion (PS) and chlorpyrifos (CPF) are organophosphorus insecticides (OPs) that elicit acute toxicity by inhibiting acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Endocannabinoids (eCBs, N-arachidonoylethanolamine, AEA; 2-arachidonoylglycerol, 2AG) can modulate neurotransmission by inhibiting neurotransmitter release. We proposed that differential inhibition of eCB-degrading enzymes (fatty acid amide hydrolase, FAAH, and monoacylglycerol lipase, MAGL) by PS and CPF leads to differences in extracellular eCB levels and toxicity. Microdialysis cannulae were implanted into hippocampus of adult male rats followed by treatment with vehicle (peanut oil, 2 ml/kg, sc), PS (27 mg/kg) or CPF (280 mg/kg) 6–7 days later. Signs of toxicity, AChE, FAAH and MAGL inhibition, and extracellular levels of AEA and 2AG were measured 2 and 4 days later. Signs were noted in PS-treated rats but not in controls or CPF-treated rats. Cholinesterase inhibition was extensive in hippocampus with PS (89–90%) and CPF (78–83%) exposure. FAAH activity was also markedly reduced (88–91%) by both OPs at both time-points. MAGL was inhibited by both OPs but to a lesser degree (35–50%). Increases in extracellular AEA levels were noted after either PS (about 2-fold) or CPF (about 3-fold) while lesser treatment-related 2-AG changes were noted. The cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist/inverse agonist AM251 (3 mg/kg, ip) had no influence on functional signs after CPF but markedly decreased toxicity in PS-treated rats. The results suggest that extracellular eCBs levels can be markedly elevated by both PS and CPF. CB1-mediated signaling appears to play a role in the acute toxicity of PS but the role of eCBs in CPF toxicity remains unclear. - Highlights: • Chlorpyrifos and parathion both extensively inhibited hippocampal cholinesterase. • Functional signs were only noted with parathion. • Chlorpyrifos and parathion increased hippocampal extracellular anandamide levels. • 2-Arachidonoylglycerol levels were

  4. Hippocampus at 25

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenbaum, Howard; Amaral, David G.; Buffalo, Elizabeth A.; Buzsáki, György; Cohen, Neal; Davachi, Lila; Frank, Loren; Heckers, Stephan; Morris, Richard G. M.; Moser, Edvard I.; Nadel, Lynn; O'Keefe, John; Preston, Alison; Ranganath, Charan; Silva, Alcino; Witter, Menno

    2017-01-01

    The journal Hippocampus has passed the milestone of 25 years of publications on the topic of a highly studied brain structure, and its closely associated brain areas. In a recent celebration of this event, a Boston memory group invited 16 speakers to address the question of progress in understanding the hippocampus that has been achieved. Here we present a summary of these talks organized as progress on four main themes: (1) Understanding the hippocampus in terms of its interactions with multiple cortical areas within the medial temporal lobe memory system, (2) understanding the relationship between memory and spatial information processing functions of the hippocampal region, (3) understanding the role of temporal organization in spatial and memory processing by the hippocampus, and (4) understanding how the hippocampus integrates related events into networks of memories. PMID:27399159

  5. Hippocampus discovery First steps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliasz Engelhardt

    Full Text Available The first steps of the discovery, and the main discoverers, of the hippocampus are outlined. Arantius was the first to describe a structure he named "hippocampus" or "white silkworm". Despite numerous controversies and alternate designations, the term hippocampus has prevailed until this day as the most widely used term. Duvernoy provided an illustration of the hippocampus and surrounding structures, considered the first by most authors, which appeared more than one and a half century after Arantius' description. Some authors have identified other drawings and texts which they claim predate Duvernoy's depiction, in studies by Vesalius, Varolio, Willis, and Eustachio, albeit unconvincingly. Considering the definition of the hippocampal formation as comprising the hippocampus proper, dentate gyrus and subiculum, Arantius and Duvernoy apparently described the gross anatomy of this complex. The pioneering studies of Arantius and Duvernoy revealed a relatively small hidden formation that would become one of the most valued brain structures.

  6. The effect of repeated stress on KCC2 and NKCC1 immunoreactivity in the hippocampus of female mice

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    Takao Tsukahara

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available K+–Cl− co-transporter (KCC2 and Na+–K+–2Cl− co-transporter (NKCC1 are the main regulators of neuronal intracellular chloride concentration; altered expression patterns of KCC2 and NKCC1 have been reported in several neurodegenerative diseases. In this paper, we show the effect of repeated stress on KCC2, NKCC1, and serine 940 phosphorylated KCC2 (pKCC2ser940 immunoreactivity.The data were obtained from the hippocampus of female mice using single-plane confocal microscopy images. The mean fluorescence intensity of the perisomatic area of neurons, defined as raw fluorescence intensity (RFI was calculated. Repeated stress (RS resulted in a decrease in perisomatic area of immunoreactive (IR-KCC2 and an increase of the IR-NKCC1. In addition, RS decreased perisomatic IR-pKCC2ser940, corresponding to that of KCC2. The data in this article support the results of a previous study [1] and provide the details of immunohistological methods. Interpretation of the data in this article can be found in “Repeated stress-induced expression pattern alterations of the hippocampal chloride transporters KCC2 and NKCC1 associated with behavioral abnormalities in female mice” by Tsukahara et al. [1]. Keywords: KCC2, NKCC1, repeated stress, IHC

  7. When Music and Long-Term Memory Interact: Effects of Musical Expertise on Functional and Structural Plasticity in the Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groussard, Mathilde; La Joie, Renaud; Rauchs, Géraldine; Landeau, Brigitte; Chételat, Gaël; Viader, Fausto; Desgranges, Béatrice; Eustache, Francis; Platel, Hervé

    2010-01-01

    The development of musical skills by musicians results in specific structural and functional modifications in the brain. Surprisingly, no functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study has investigated the impact of musical training on brain function during long-term memory retrieval, a faculty particularly important in music. Thus, using fMRI, we examined for the first time this process during a musical familiarity task (i.e., semantic memory for music). Musical expertise induced supplementary activations in the hippocampus, medial frontal gyrus, and superior temporal areas on both sides, suggesting a constant interaction between episodic and semantic memory during this task in musicians. In addition, a voxel-based morphometry (VBM) investigation was performed within these areas and revealed that gray matter density of the hippocampus was higher in musicians than in nonmusicians. Our data indicate that musical expertise critically modifies long-term memory processes and induces structural and functional plasticity in the hippocampus. PMID:20957158

  8. When music and long-term memory interact: effects of musical expertise on functional and structural plasticity in the hippocampus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathilde Groussard

    Full Text Available The development of musical skills by musicians results in specific structural and functional modifications in the brain. Surprisingly, no functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI study has investigated the impact of musical training on brain function during long-term memory retrieval, a faculty particularly important in music. Thus, using fMRI, we examined for the first time this process during a musical familiarity task (i.e., semantic memory for music. Musical expertise induced supplementary activations in the hippocampus, medial frontal gyrus, and superior temporal areas on both sides, suggesting a constant interaction between episodic and semantic memory during this task in musicians. In addition, a voxel-based morphometry (VBM investigation was performed within these areas and revealed that gray matter density of the hippocampus was higher in musicians than in nonmusicians. Our data indicate that musical expertise critically modifies long-term memory processes and induces structural and functional plasticity in the hippocampus.

  9. When music and long-term memory interact: effects of musical expertise on functional and structural plasticity in the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groussard, Mathilde; La Joie, Renaud; Rauchs, Géraldine; Landeau, Brigitte; Chételat, Gaël; Viader, Fausto; Desgranges, Béatrice; Eustache, Francis; Platel, Hervé

    2010-10-05

    The development of musical skills by musicians results in specific structural and functional modifications in the brain. Surprisingly, no functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study has investigated the impact of musical training on brain function during long-term memory retrieval, a faculty particularly important in music. Thus, using fMRI, we examined for the first time this process during a musical familiarity task (i.e., semantic memory for music). Musical expertise induced supplementary activations in the hippocampus, medial frontal gyrus, and superior temporal areas on both sides, suggesting a constant interaction between episodic and semantic memory during this task in musicians. In addition, a voxel-based morphometry (VBM) investigation was performed within these areas and revealed that gray matter density of the hippocampus was higher in musicians than in nonmusicians. Our data indicate that musical expertise critically modifies long-term memory processes and induces structural and functional plasticity in the hippocampus.

  10. Effects of realgar on GSH synthesis in the mouse hippocampus: Involvement of system X{sub AG}{sup −}, system X{sub C}{sup −}, MRP-1 and Nrf2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yanlei [Department of Health Laboratory Technology, School of Public Health, China Medical University, No. 77 Puhe Road, Shenyang North New Area, Shenyang, Liaoning 110122 (China); School of Basic Medical Sciences, North China University of Science and Technology, 46 Xinhua Road, Tangshan, Hebei 063009 (China); Chen, Mo; Zhang, Yinghua; Huo, Taoguang [Department of Health Laboratory Technology, School of Public Health, China Medical University, No. 77 Puhe Road, Shenyang North New Area, Shenyang, Liaoning 110122 (China); Fang, Ying [Department of Health Laboratory Technology, School of Public Health, China Medical University, No. 77 Puhe Road, Shenyang North New Area, Shenyang, Liaoning 110122 (China); School of Pharmacy, Liaoning University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, No. 77 Shenning1 Road, Double D Port, Dalian, Liaoning 116600 (China); Jiao, Xuexin [Department of Health Laboratory Technology, School of Public Health, China Medical University, No. 77 Puhe Road, Shenyang North New Area, Shenyang, Liaoning 110122 (China); Yuan, Mingmei [Department of Health Laboratory Technology, School of Public Health, China Medical University, No. 77 Puhe Road, Shenyang North New Area, Shenyang, Liaoning 110122 (China); School of Pharmacy, China Medical University, No. 77 Puhe Road, Shenyang North New Area, Shenyang, Liaoning 110122 (China); Jiang, Hong, E-mail: jianghong@mail.cmu.edu.cn [Department of Health Laboratory Technology, School of Public Health, China Medical University, No. 77 Puhe Road, Shenyang North New Area, Shenyang, Liaoning 110122 (China)

    2016-10-01

    Realgar is a type of mineral drug that contains arsenic and has neurotoxicity. Glutathione (GSH), which is the main antioxidant in the central nervous system, plays a key role in antioxidant defenses and the detoxification of arsenic. However, whether realgar interferes with the synthesis of GSH in the brain and the molecular mechanisms underlying its effects are largely unknown. Here, we used mouse models of exposure to realgar to show that realgar affects the synthesis of GSH in the hippocampus, leading to ultrastructural changes in hippocampal neurons and synapses and deficiencies in cognitive abilities, and that the mechanisms that cause this effect may be associated with alterations in the expression of system X{sub AG}{sup −}, system X{sub C}{sup −}, multidrug resistance-associated protein 1(MRP-1), nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-GCS), and the levels of glutamate (Glu) and cysteine (Cys) in the extracellular fluid. These findings provide a theoretical basis for preventing the drug-induced chronic arsenic poisoning in the nervous system that is triggered by realgar. - Highlights: • Realgar can induce neurotoxicity. • Realgar can modulate GSH levels in the hippocampus. • The mechanisms rely on expression changes of system X{sub AG}{sup −}, system X{sub C}{sup −}, MRP-1, Nrf2.

  11. The effect of taurine and enriched environment on behaviour, memory and hippocampus of diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmeier, Francine Luciano; Zavalhia, Lisiane Silveira; Tortorelli, Lucas Silva; Huf, Fernanda; Géa, Luiza Paul; Meurer, Rosalva Thereza; Machado, Aryadne Cardoso; Gomez, Rosane; Fernandes, Marilda da Cruz

    2016-09-06

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) has been studied recently as a major cause of cognitive deficits, memory and neurodegenerative damage. Taurine and enriched environment have stood out for presenting neuroprotective and stimulating effects that deserve further study. In this paper, we examined the effects of taurine and enriched environment in the context of diabetes, evaluating effects on behaviour, memory, death and cellular activity. Eighty-eight Wistar rats were divided into 2 groups (E=enriched environment; C=standard housing). Some animals (24/group) underwent induction of diabetes, and within each group, some animals (half of diabetics (D) and half of non-diabetics (ND)/group) were treated for 30days with taurine (T). Untreated animals received saline (S). In total, there were eight subgroups: DTC, DSC, NDTC, NDSC, DTE, DSE, NDTE and NDSE. During the experiment, short-term memory was evaluated. After 30th day of experiment, the animals were euthanized and was made removal of brains used to immunohistochemistry procedures for GFAP and cleaved caspase-3. As a result, we observed that animals treated with taurine showed better performance in behavioural and memory tasks, and the enriched environment had positive effects, especially in non-diabetic animals. Furthermore, taurine and enriched environment seemed to be able to interfere with neuronal apoptosis and loss of glial cells, and in some instances, these two factors seemed to have synergistic effects. From these data, taurine and enriched environment may have important neurostimulant and neuroprotective effects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of chronic multiple stress on learning and memory and the expression of Fyn, BDNF, TrkB in the hippocampus of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Heng; Liu, Neng-Bao; Zhang, Min-Hai; Zhou, Yan-Ling; Liao, Jia-Wan; Liu, Xiang-Qian; Chen, Hong-Wei

    2007-04-20

    The effect of chronic stress on cognitive functions has been one of the hot topics in neuroscience. But there has been much controversy over its mechanism. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of chronic multiple stress on spatial learning and memory as well as the expression of Fyn, BDNF and TrkB in the hippocampus of rats. Adult rats were randomly divided into control and chronic multiple stressed groups. Rats in the multiple stressed group were irregularly and alternatively exposed to situations of vertical revolution, sleep expropriation and restraint lasting for 6 weeks, 6 hours per day with night illumination for 6 weeks. Before and after the period of chronic multiple stresses, the performance of spatial learning and memory of all rats was measured using the Morris Water Maze (MWM). The expression of Fyn, BDNF and TrkB proteins in the hippocampus was assayed by Western blotting and immunohistochemical methods. The levels of Fyn and TrkB mRNAs in the hippocampus of rats were detected by RT-PCR technique. The escape latency in the control group and the stressed group were 15.63 and 8.27 seconds respectively. The performance of spatial learning and memory of rats was increased in chronic multiple stressed group (P < 0.05). The levels of Fyn, BDNF and TrkB proteins in the stressed group were higher than those of the control group (P < 0.05). The results of immunoreactivity showed that Fyn was present in the CA3 region of the hippocampus and BDNF positive particles were distributed in the nuclei of CA1 and CA3 pyramidal cells as well as DG granular cells. Quantitative analysis indicated that level of Fyn mRNA was also upregulated in the hippocampus of the stressed group (P < 0.05). Chronic multiple stress can enhance spatial learning and memory function of rats. The expression of Fyn, BDNF and TrkB proteins and the level of Fyn mRNA are increased in the stessed rat hippocampus. These suggest that Fyn and BDNF/TrkB signal transduction pathways may

  13. Effect of running exercise on the number of the neurons in the hippocampus of young transgenic APP/PS1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lin; Ma, Jing; Zhang, Yi; Zhou, Chun-Ni; Zhang, Lei; Chao, Feng-Lei; Chen, Lin-Mu; Jiang, Rong; Wu, Hong; Tang, Yong

    2018-08-01

    To investigate the effect of running exercise on the number of the neurons in the hippocampus of young APP/PS1 mice, twenty 6-month-old male APP/ PS1 transgenic mice were randomly divided into the APP/PS1 control (AD control) group and the APP/PS1 running (AD running) group (10 mice per group), and ten wild-type mice of the littermate were regarded as the wild-type (WT) group. The AD running mice ran on motorized treadmill machiene for 4 months, while the WT mice and AD control mice were housed in standard condition without running. Then, Morris water maze tests (MWM) were used to assess the special learning and memory abilities of mice in three groups. The stereological methods were used to quantitatively evaluate the volume of the hippocampus, CA1/2, CA3 and the dentate gyrus (DG) and count the number of the neurons in CA1/2, CA3 and DG. We found that 4-month running effectively shortened the escape latency of young APP/PS1 control mice in MWM. More importantly, 4-month running effectively increased the volumes of the hippocampus, CA1/2, CA3 and DG and increased the number of neurons in CA1/2, CA3 and DG in young APP/PS1 mice. The present results suggested that 4-month running has significant beneficial effects on the spatial learning and memory capacities of young APP/PS1 mice and could delay the progress of atrophy of hippocampus and the neuron death in CA1/2, CA3 and DG in young APP/PS1 mice. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of unpredictable chronic stress on behavior and brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in CA3 subfield and dentate gyrus of the hippocampus in different aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Ji, Yong-juan; Jiang, Hong; Liu, De-xiang; Zhang, Qian; Fan, Shu-jian; Pan, Fang

    2009-07-05

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a stress-responsive intercellular messenger modifying hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity. The interaction between stress and age in BDNF expression is currently not fully understood. This study was conducted to observe unpredictable stress effect on behavior and BDNF expression in CA3 subfield (CA3) and dentate gyrus of hippocampus in different aged rats. Forty-eight Wistar rats of two different ages (2 months and 15 months) were randomly assigned to six groups: two control groups and four stress groups. The rats in the stress group received three weeks of unpredictable mild stress. The depression state and the stress level of the animals were determined by sucrose preference test and observation of exploratory behavior in an open field (OF) test. The expressions of BDNF in CA3 and dentate gyrus of the hippocampus were measured using immunohistochemistry. Age and stress had different effects on the behavior of different aged animals (age: F = 6.173, P BDNF expression in the CA3 and dentate gyrus regions of the hippocampus following stress in both age groups (P BDNF (F = 9.408, P BDNF expression compared to the young stressed group at every testing time point. Stress has age-dependent effects on behavioral responses and hippocampal BDNF expression in rats.

  15. Prior regular exercise reverses the decreased effects of sleep deprivation on brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels in the hippocampus of ovariectomized female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadati, Hakimeh; Sheibani, Vahid; Esmaeili-Mahani, Saeed; Darvishzadeh-Mahani, Fatemeh; Mazhari, Shahrzad

    2014-11-01

    Previous studies indicated that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is the main candidate to mediate the beneficial effects of exercise on cognitive function in sleep deprived male rats. In addition, our previous findings demonstrate that female rats are more vulnerable to the deleterious effects of sleep deprivation on cognitive performance and synaptic plasticity. Therefore, the current study was designed to investigate the effects of treadmill exercise and/or sleep deprivation (SD) on the levels of BDNF mRNA and protein in the hippocampus of female rats. Intact and ovariectomized (OVX) female Wistar rats were used in the present experiment. The exercise protocol was four weeks treadmill running and sleep deprivation was accomplished using the multiple platform method. Quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunoblot analysis were used to evaluate the level of BDNF mRNA and protein in the rat hippocampus respectively. Our results showed that protein and mRNA expression of BDNF was significantly (psleep deprived OVX rats under exercise conditions had a significant (peffect against hippocampus-related functions and impairments induced by sleep deprivation probably by inducing BDNF expression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of 5-HT on memory and the hippocampus: model and data.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeter, M.; Talamini, L.M.; Schmitt, J.A.J.; Riedel, W.J.

    2006-01-01

    5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) transmission has been implicated in memory and in depression. Both 5-HT depletion and specific 5-HT agonists lower memory performance, while depression is also associated with memory deficits. The precise neuropharmacology and neural mechanisms underlying these effects are

  17. Adverse effect of combination of chronic psychosocial stress and high fat diet on hippocampus-dependent memory in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzoubi, K H; Abdul-Razzak, K K; Khabour, O F; Al-Tuweiq, G M; Alzubi, M A; Alkadhi, K A

    2009-12-01

    The combined effects of high fat diet (HFD) and chronic stress on the hippocampus-dependent spatial learning and memory were studied in rats using the radial arm water maze (RAWM). Chronic psychosocial stress and/or HFD were simultaneously administered for 3 months to young adult male Wister rats. In the RAWM, rats were subjected to 12 learning trials as well as short-term and long-term memory tests. This procedure was applied on a daily basis until the animal reaches days to criterion (DTC) in the 12th learning trial and in memory tests. DTC is the number of days that the animal takes to make zero error in two consecutive days. Groups were compared based on the number of errors per trial or test as well as on the DTC. Chronic stress, HFD and chronic stress/HFD animal groups showed impaired learning as indicated by committing significantly (Pchronic stress, HFD and chronic stress/HFD groups showed significantly impaired performance compared to control group. Additionally, the stress/HFD was the only group that showed significantly impaired performance in memory tests on the 5th training day, suggesting more severe memory impairment in that group. Furthermore, DTC value for above groups indicated that chronic stress or HFD, alone, resulted in a mild impairment of spatial memory, but the combination of chronic stress and HFD resulted in a more severe and long-lasting memory impairment. The data indicated that the combination of stress and HFD produced more deleterious effects on hippocampal cognitive function than either chronic stress or HFD alone.

  18. Valproic acid effects in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex in an animal model of post-traumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, C Brad; McLaughlin, Leslie D; Ebenezer, Philip J; Nair, Anand R; Francis, Joseph

    2014-07-15

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and pro-inflammatory cytokines (PIC) are upregulated in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) modify genetic transcription and can diminish ROS and PIC escalation. They can also modulate levels of neurotransmitters such as catecholamines and serotonin (5-HT). Thus, this study sought to analyze the effects of the HDACi valproic acid (VA) on oxidative stress, inflammation, and neurotransmitter modulation via a predator exposure/psychosocial stress animal model of PTSD. PTSD-like effects were induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=6/group×4 groups). The rats were secured in Plexiglas cylinders and placed in a cage with a cat for 1h on days 1, 11, and 40 of a 40-day stress regimen. PTSD rats were also subjected to psychosocial stress via daily cage cohort changes. At the conclusion of the stress regimen, the treatment group (PTSD+VA) and control group (Control+VA) rats were given VA in their drinking water for 30 days. The rats were then euthanized and their brains were dissected to remove the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex (PFC). Whole blood was collected to assess systemic oxidative stress. ROS and PIC mRNA and protein elevation in the PTSD group were normalized with VA. Anxiety decreased in this group via improved performance on the elevated plus-maze (EPM). No changes were attributed to VA in the control group, and no improvements were noted in the vehicle groups. Results indicate VA can attenuate oxidative stress and inflammation, enhance fear extinction, and correct neurotransmitter aberrancies in a rat model of PTSD. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Pathway to neural resilience: Self-esteem buffers against deleterious effects of poverty on the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yinan; Zhang, Lin; Kong, Xiangzhen; Hong, Yingyi; Cheon, Bobby; Liu, Jia

    2016-11-01

    Human neuroimaging studies have shown that people living in poverty tend to suffer hippocampal atrophy, which leads to impaired memory and learning throughout life. However, behavioral studies demonstrate that poor people with high self-esteem are often exempt from the deleterious effect of poverty and instead possess a happy and successful life. Here we investigated whether high self-esteem can buffer against the deleterious effects of poverty, as indicated by low subjective socioeconomic status (SSS), on the hippocampal gray matter volume (GMV) in a large cohort of young participants (N = 280). As expected, findings revealed that although low (vs. high) SSS was linked with a smaller hippocampal GMV, the deleterious effect of low SSS on hippocampal GMV was alleviated when the participants have high self-esteem. Commonality analyses further confirmed this observation. The current study suggests that positive psychological resources such as self-esteem may provide protection for the hippocampal atrophy in adversity. Hum Brain Mapp 37:3757-3766, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Differential Effect of Neuropeptides on Excitatory Synaptic Transmission in Human Epileptic Hippocampus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ledri, Marco; Sorensen, Andreas T.; Madsen, Marita G.

    2015-01-01

    therapy is an evolving innovative approach that may prove useful for clinical applications. In animal models of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), gene therapy treatments based on viral vectors encoding NPY or galanin have been shown to effectively suppress seizures. However, how this translates to human TLE...... remains unknown. A unique possibility to validate these animal studies is provided by a surgical therapeutic approach, whereby resected epileptic tissue from temporal lobes of pharmacoresistant patients are available for neurophysiological studies in vitro. To test whether NPY and galanin have...

  1. Effects of combined prenatal stress and toluene exposure on apoptotic neurodegeneration in cerebellum and hippocampus of rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladefoged, Ole; Hougaard, Karin Sørig; Hass, Ulla

    2004-01-01

    the offspring for developmental neurotoxicity and level of apoptosis in the brain. The number of apoptotic cells in cerebellum postnatal day 22, 24, and 27 and in hippocampus (postnatal day 22, 24, and 27) were counted after visualization by the TUNEL staining or measured by DNA-laddering technique. Caspase-3...

  2. Transcript-specific effects of adrenalectomy on seizure-induced BDNF expression in rat hippocampus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauterborn, J C; Poulsen, F R; Stinis, C T

    1998-01-01

    Activity-induced brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression is negatively modulated by circulating adrenal steroids. The rat BDNF gene gives rise to four major transcript forms that each contain a unique 5' exon (I-IV) and a common 3' exon (V) that codes for BDNF protein. Exon-specific i......Activity-induced brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression is negatively modulated by circulating adrenal steroids. The rat BDNF gene gives rise to four major transcript forms that each contain a unique 5' exon (I-IV) and a common 3' exon (V) that codes for BDNF protein. Exon...... and in exon II-containing mRNA with 30-days survival. In the dentate gyrus granule cells, adrenalectomy markedly potentiated increases in exon I and II cRNA labeling, but not increases in exon III and IV cRNA labeling, elicited by one hippocampal afterdischarge. Similarly, for the granule cells and CA1...... no effect on exon IV-containing mRNA content. These results demonstrate that the negative effects of adrenal hormones on activity-induced BDNF expression are by far the greatest for transcripts containing exons I and II. Together with evidence for region-specific transcript expression, these results suggest...

  3. The combined effects of developmental lead and ethanol exposure on hippocampus dependent spatial learning and memory in rats: Role of oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleimani, Elham; Goudarzi, Iran; Abrari, Kataneh; Lashkarbolouki, Taghi

    2016-10-01

    Either developmental lead or ethanol exposure can impair learning and memory via induction of oxidative stress, which results in neuronal damage. we examined the effect of combined exposure with lead and ethanol on spatial learning and memory in offspring and oxidative stress in hippocampus. Rats were exposed to lead (0.2% in drinking water) or ethanol (4 g/kg) either individually or in combination in 5th day gestation through weaning. On postnatal days (PD) 30, rats were trained with six trials per day for 6 consecutive days in the water maze. On day 37, a probe test was done. Also, oxidative stress markers in the hippocampus were also evaluated. Results demonstrated that lead + ethanol co-exposed rats exhibited higher escape latency during training trials and reduced time spent in target quadrant, higher escape location latency and average proximity in probe trial test. There was significant decrease in superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities and increase of malondialdehyde (MDA) levels in hippocampus of animals co-exposed to lead and ethanol compared with their individual exposures. We suggest that maternal consumption of ethanol during lead exposure has pronounced detrimental effects on memory, which may be mediated by oxidative stress. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Gene expression profiles in the cerebellum and hippocampus following exposure to a neurotoxicant, Aroclor 1254: Developmental effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Royland, Joyce E.; Wu, Jinfang; Zawia, Nasser H.; Kodavanti, Prasada Rao S.

    2008-01-01

    The developmental consequences of exposure to the polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) have been widely studied, making PCBs a unique model to understand issues related to environmental mixture of persistent chemicals. PCB exposure in humans adversely affects neurocognitive development, causes psychomotor difficulties, and contributes to attention deficits in children, all of which seem to be associated with altered patterns of neuronal connectivity. In the present study, we examined gene expression profiles in the rat nervous system following PCB developmental exposure. Pregnant rats (Long-Evans) were dosed perinatally with 0 or 6 mg/kg/day of Aroclor 1254 from gestation day 6 through postnatal day (PND) 21. Gene expression in cerebellum and hippocampus from PND7 and PND14 animals was analyzed with an emphasis on developmental aspects. Changes in gene expression (≥ 1.5 fold) in control animals identified normal developmental changes. These basal levels of expression were compared to data from Aroclor 1254-treated animals to determine the impact of gestational PCB exposure on developmental parameters. The results indicate that the expression of a number of developmental genes related to cell cycle, synaptic function, cell maintenance, and neurogenesis is significantly altered from PND7 to PND14. Aroclor 1254 treatment appears to dampen the overall growth-related gene expression levels in both regions with the effect being more pronounced in the cerebellum. Functional analysis suggests that Aroclor 1254 delays maturation of the developing nervous system, with the consequences dependent on the ontological state of the brain area and the functional role of the individual gene. Such changes may underlie learning and memory deficits observed in PCB exposed animals and humans

  5. Effects of feed species and HUFA composition on survival and growth of the longsnout seahorse (Hippocampus reidi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick eSchubert

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Globally, wild seahorse populations are threatened due to, habitat destruction and unsustainable human exploitation among others. Furthermore, aquaculture-based mass-scale rearing is still uncommon due to the low survival rates of seahorse juveniles and exceptionally high feed costs. Previous studies have demonstrated the importance of both highly unsaturated fatty acid (HUFA supplies and a copepod-based rearing for seahorse survival and growth. As the latter is expensive, the question arises as to how high survival rates of seahorse juveniles can be assured under low- to moderate-cost feed regimes. In particular, it remains unknown whether the diet species or their dietary HUFA profiles determine the successful development of seahorse fry.Therefore, the aims of this study were to assess the dependence of growth and survival rates of Hippocampus reidi brood on the animal feed and to infer the impact of feed species vs. dietary HUFA profiles on juvenile growth. A nutrition experiment was conducted where juveniles were treated either with enriched Artemia nauplii (low-cost diet Art or with a mixed diet of Artemia and copepods (moderate-cost diet Art/Cop. Larval survival and growth were analyzed using Cox proportional-hazard and mixed linear model analyses. We found that i both diets enabled good survival, ii diet Art/Cop resulted in superior weight and height growth, and iii the differential effects of diets Art/Cop and Art cannot be explained by their different HUFA compositions alone.From an economical point of view, our findings of high survival rates and relatively high growth rates with the medium-cost treatment Art/Cop may open new possibilities for the large-scale rearing of seahorses. Even the application of a low-cost Art diet might be appropriate for seahorse aquacultures as both survival and growth rates are only marginally lower compared to the former diet.

  6. Multi-Scale Model of Galactic Cosmic Ray Effects on the Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis

    An important concern for risk assessment from galactic cosmic ray (GCR) exposures is impacts to the central nervous systems including changes in cognition, and associations with increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). AD, which affects about 50 percent of the population above age 80-yr, is a degenerative disease that worsens with time after initial onset leading to death, and has no known cure. AD is difficult to detect at early stages, and the small number of epidemiology studies that have considered the possibility have not identified an association with low dose radiation. However, experimental studies in transgenic mice suggest the possibility exits. We discuss modeling approaches to consider mechanisms whereby GCR would accelerate the occurrence of AD to earlier ages. Biomarkers of AD include Amyloid beta plaques, and neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) made up of aggregates of the hyper-phosphorylated form of the micro-tubule associated, tau protein. Related markers include synaptic degeneration, dendritic spine loss, and neuronal cell loss through apoptosis. GCR may affect these processes by causing oxidative stress, aberrant signaling following DNA damage, and chronic neuro-inflammation. Cell types considered in multi-scale models are neurons, astrocytes, and microglia. We developed biochemical and cell kinetics models of DNA damage signaling related to glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta and neuro-inflammation, and considered approaches to develop computer simulations of GCR induced cell interactions and their relationships to Amyloid beta plaques and NFTs. Comparison of model results to experimental data for the age specific development of plaques in transgenic mice and predictions of space radiation effects will be discussed.

  7. Effects of chronic stress on the brain – the evidence from morphological examinations of hippocampus in a chronic unpredictable stress (CUS model in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Sekita-Krzak

    2016-12-01

        Abstract Background. Chronic stress exposure deteriorates memory and increases the risk of psychiatric disorders, including depression. Objectives. The objective of this study was to perform morphological studies in experimental model of neuropsychiatric disorder and to assess histologically the effect of chronic unpredictable stress procedure (CUS influence on hippocampus. Material and methods. Chronic unpredictable stress procedure (CUS was applied for 8 weeks in rats by the modified method described by Katz et al. Experimental model of neuropsychiatric disorder was used based on morphological studies of hippocampal formation. Results. Stress-induced alterations were observed in the hippocampus. Nerve cell changes included  neuron shrinkage and dendritic remodeling. The most vulnerable hippocampal cells to chronic stress were CA3 and CA4 pyramidal neurons. In dentate gyrus chronic stress led to granule neuron shrinkage and slight exacerbation of apoptosis in the polygonal cell layer. CUS led to statistically significant changes in quantitative characteristics of the CA3 and CA4 neuron size and nuclei diameter. Conclusions. Chronic stress induces degeneration of hippocampal neurons. The observed neuronal changes indicate the damage of the neurons did not involve neither apoptosis nor necrosis Similarity between histological changes obtained in 8-week long CUS procedure applied in our research and morphological changes described in depressed patients confirms the usefulness of the applied stress procedure as the experimental model of depression.   Key words: stress, depression, hippocampus, chronic unpredictable stress procedure (CUS, animal model, morphology.

  8. The hippocampus, medial prefrontal cortex, and selective memory retrieval: evidence from a rodent model of the retrieval-induced forgetting effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jade Q; Peters, Greg J; Rittner, Pedro; Cleland, Thomas A; Smith, David M

    2014-09-01

    Inhibition is an important component of many cognitive functions, including memory. For example, the retrieval-induced forgetting (RIF) effect occurs when extra practice with some items from a study list inhibits the retrieval of the nonpracticed items relative to a baseline condition that does not involve extra practice. Although counterintuitive, the RIF phenomenon may be important for resolving interference by inhibiting potentially competing retrieval targets. Neuroimaging studies suggest that the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex are involved in the RIF effect, but controlled lesion studies have not yet been performed. We developed a rodent model of the RIF training procedure and trained control rats and rats with temporary inactivation of the hippocampus or medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Rats were trained on a list of odor cues, presented in cups of digging medium with a buried reward, followed by additional practice trials with a subset of the cues. We then tested the rats' memories for the cues and their association with reward by presenting them with unbaited cups containing the test odorants and measuring how long they persisted in digging. Control rats exhibited a robust RIF effect in which memory for the nonpracticed odors was significantly inhibited. Thus, extra practice with some odor cues inhibited memory for the others, relative to a baseline condition that involved an identical amount of training. Inactivation of either the hippocampus or the mPFC blocked the RIF effect. We also constructed a computational model of a representational learning circuit to simulate the RIF effect. We show in this model that "sideband suppression" of similar memory representations can reproduce the RIF effect and that alteration of the suppression parameters and learning rate can reproduce the lesion effects seen in our rats. Our results suggest that the RIF effect is widespread and that inhibitory processes are an important feature of memory function. © 2014 Wiley

  9. Impact of video games on plasticity of the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, G L; Konishi, K; Diarra, M; Benady-Chorney, J; Drisdelle, B L; Dahmani, L; Sodums, D J; Lepore, F; Jolicoeur, P; Bohbot, V D

    2017-08-08

    The hippocampus is critical to healthy cognition, yet results in the current study show that action video game players have reduced grey matter within the hippocampus. A subsequent randomised longitudinal training experiment demonstrated that first-person shooting games reduce grey matter within the hippocampus in participants using non-spatial memory strategies. Conversely, participants who use hippocampus-dependent spatial strategies showed increased grey matter in the hippocampus after training. A control group that trained on 3D-platform games displayed growth in either the hippocampus or the functionally connected entorhinal cortex. A third study replicated the effect of action video game training on grey matter in the hippocampus. These results show that video games can be beneficial or detrimental to the hippocampal system depending on the navigation strategy that a person employs and the genre of the game.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 8 August 2017; doi:10.1038/mp.2017.155.

  10. Distinct Effect of Stress on 11 beta-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase Type 1 and Corticosteroid Receptors in Dorsal and Ventral Hippocampus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ergang, Peter; Kuželová, A.; Soták, Matúš; Klusoňová, Petra; Makal, J.; Pácha, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 63, č. 2 (2014), s. 255-261 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/10/0969 Grant - others:Univerzita Karlova(CZ) 6187/2012; Univerzita Karlova(CZ) 5366/2012 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase * stress * hippocampus Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.293, year: 2014

  11. Effect of complex aerobic physical exercise on PSD-95 in the hippocampus and on cognitive function in juvenile mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satriani, W. H.; Redjeki, S.; Kartinah, N. T.

    2017-08-01

    Increased neuroplasticity induced by complex aerobic physical exercise is associated with improved cognitive function in adult mice. Increased cognitive function is assumed to be based on increased synapse formation. One of the regions of the brain that is important in cognitive function is the hippocampus, which plays a role in memory formation. Post synaptic density-95 (PSD-95) is an adhesion protein of the post-synaptic density scaffolding that is essential to synaptic stabilization. As we age, the PSD-95 molecule matures the synapses needed for the formation of the basic circuitry of the nervous system in the brain. However, during the growth period, synapse elimination is higher than its formation. This study aims to determine whether complex aerobic exercise can improve cognitive function and PSD-95 levels in the hippocampus of juvenile mice during their growth stage. The mice performed complex aerobic exercise starting at five weeks of age and continuing for seven weeks with a gradual increase of 8 m/min. At eight weeks it was increased to 10 m/min. The exercise was done for five days of each week. The subjects of the study were tested for cognition one week before being sacrificed (at 12 weeks). The PSD-95 in the hippocampus was measured with ELISA. The results showed that there was a significant difference in cognitive function, where p cognitive ability in adulthood but does not increase the levels of PSD-95 in adults.

  12. Effects of prenatal low dose beta radiation from tritiated water on rat hippocampus neurons. Electrophysiological and neuro behavioural changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Weimin; Zhou Xiangyan

    1997-01-01

    Pregnent Wistar rats were exposed to tritiated water (HTO) on day 13 of gestation so that for their offsprings, the absorbed doses were estimated to be 0.000, 0.044, 0.088 and 0.264 Gy. The influence of HTO to the morphology and number of hippocampus pyramidal neurons and the maximum electric current of Ca 2+ in neurons was observed for the in-vitro-cultured hippocampus of new-born rats and the learning and memory behaviours were assessed by the electric avoidance reflex test in a Y-maze and the condition reflex test for young rats. The results show that prenatal exposure to HTO in a cumulative dose of 0.088 Gy can cause a reduction in number of neurons in hippocampus cultured in vitro, and that the electric current of Ca 2+ tends to decline with cumulative dose increasing, with the significant decrease in offsprings prenatally exposed to HTO in dose of 0.264 Gy. The results of electric avoidance reflex test in a Y-maze and condition reflex test indicate that for young rats prenatally exposed to HTO, a cumulative dose of 0.088 Gy could induce damage in their learning and memory behaviours

  13. The effect of anticipation and the specificity of sex differences for amygdala and hippocampus function in emotional memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackiewicz, Kristen L; Sarinopoulos, Issidoros; Cleven, Krystal L; Nitschke, Jack B

    2006-09-19

    Prior research has shown memory is enhanced for emotional events. Key brain areas involved in emotional memory are the amygdala and hippocampus, which are also recruited during aversion and its anticipation. This study investigated whether anticipatory processes signaling an upcoming aversive event contribute to emotional memory. In an event-related functional MRI paradigm, 40 healthy participants viewed aversive and neutral pictures preceded by predictive warning cues. Participants completed a surprise recognition task directly after functional MRI scanning or 2 weeks later. In anticipation of aversive pictures, bilateral dorsal amygdala and anterior hippocampus activations were associated with better immediate recognition memory. Similar associations with memory were observed for activation of those areas in response to aversive pictures. Anticipatory activation predicted immediate memory over and above these associations for picture viewing. Bilateral ventral amygdala activations in response to aversive pictures predicted delayed memory only. We found that previously reported sex differences of memory associations with left amygdala for women and with right amygdala for men were confined to the ventral amygdala during picture viewing and delayed memory. Results support an established animal model elucidating the functional neuroanatomy of the amygdala and hippocampus in emotional memory, highlight the importance of anticipatory processes in such memory for aversive events, and extend neuroanatomical evidence of sex differences for emotional memory.

  14. The hippocampus - pictorial essay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whan, A.; Mitchell, L.A.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: We aim to demonstrate the anatomy and pathology of the hippocampus. It is important that radiologists distinguish normal and abnormal hippocampal hippocampal MR appearances, since hippocampal sclerosis is the commonest cause of surgically treatable temporal lobe epilepsy. The detailed anatomy of the hippocampus is reviewed and correlated with normal MR appearances. Our radiology database was reviewed to determine both common and unusual pathologies affecting the hippocampus. Most scans were performed for our large Comprehensive Epilepsy Program, for investigation of epilepsy of possible seizures. Less frequent indications included memory loss (acute or chronic), stroke, headache, and altered conscious state. Hippocampal sclerosis was the commonest MR abnormality. This was occasionally bilateral or associated with other pathology. Other common findings included mild hippocampal asymmetry, bilateral atrophy, or normal variants such as choroid fissure cysts. Other pathologies included cortical developmental malformations, infarction, posttraumatic gliosis, herpes, simplex encephalitis, paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis, vascular malformations, sarcoidosis, benign tumours such as gangliogliomas and dysembyoplastic neuroepithelial tumours (DNET) and malignant tumours. The hippocampus has a complex anatomy visible on high resolution MRI. In the clinical context of epilepsy, hippocampal sclerosis is an important pathology, but a range of conditions may affect the hippocampus, readily demonstrated by MRI. Copyright (2002) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  15. Effectiveness of Crime Prevention through Environmental Design ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examined crime prevention strategies vis-a-vis perceived residents. feeling of safety in Osogbo Nigeria. The survey was conducted using systematic sampling. Four (4) crime prevention approaches were identified in the study area. Residents. perception of effectiveness of these safety strategies measured ...

  16. Comparative effectiveness of malaria preventive measures on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The burden of malaria and its associated problems in pregnancy can be reduced by the use of different malaria preventive measures. This study was conducted to determine the comparative effectiveness of three different malaria preventive measures on populations of parturient in Abeokuta, Ogun State, Nigeria.

  17. Neonatal Stress Has a Long-Lasting Sex-Dependent Effect on Anxiety-Like Behavior and Neuronal Morphology in the Prefrontal Cortex and Hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Melo, Silvana Regina; de David Antoniazzi, Caren Tatiane; Hossain, Shakhawat; Kolb, Bryan

    2018-01-01

    The long-lasting effects of early stress on brain development have been well studied. Recent evidence indicates that males and females respond differently to the same stressor. We examined the chronic effects of daily maternal separation (MS) on behavior and cerebral morphology in both male and female rats. Cognitive and anxiety-like behaviors were evaluated, and neuroplastic changes in 2 subregions of the prefrontal cortex (dorsal agranular insular cortex [AID] and cingulate cortex [Cg3]) and hippocampus (CA1 and dentate gyrus) were measured in adult male and female rats. The animals were subjected to MS on postnatal day (P) 3-14 for 3 h per day. Cognitive and emotional behaviors were assessed in the object/context mismatch task, elevated plus maze, and locomotor activity test in early adulthood (P87-P95). Anatomical assessments were performed in the prefrontal cortex (i.e., cortical thickness and spine density) and hippocampus (i.e., spine density). Sex-dependent effects were observed. MS increased anxiety-related behavior only in males, whereas locomotor activity was higher in females, with no effects on cognition. MS decreased spine density in the AID and increased spine density in the CA1 area in males. Females exhibited an increase in spine density in the Cg3. Our findings confirm previous work that found that MS causes long-term behavioral and anatomical effects, and these effects were dependent on sex and the duration of MS stress. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Serotonin Receptors in Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berumen, Laura Cristina; Rodríguez, Angelina; Miledi, Ricardo; García-Alcocer, Guadalupe

    2012-01-01

    Serotonin is an ancient molecular signal and a recognized neurotransmitter brainwide distributed with particular presence in hippocampus. Almost all serotonin receptor subtypes are expressed in hippocampus, which implicates an intricate modulating system, considering that they can be localized as autosynaptic, presynaptic, and postsynaptic receptors, even colocalized within the same cell and being target of homo- and heterodimerization. Neurons and glia, including immune cells, integrate a functional network that uses several serotonin receptors to regulate their roles in this particular part of the limbic system. PMID:22629209

  19. Chewing Maintains Hippocampus-Dependent Cognitive Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huayue; Iinuma, Mitsuo; Onozuka, Minoru; Kubo, Kin-Ya

    2015-01-01

    Mastication (chewing) is important not only for food intake, but also for preserving and promoting the general health. Recent studies have showed that mastication helps to maintain cognitive functions in the hippocampus, a central nervous system region vital for spatial memory and learning. The purpose of this paper is to review the recent progress of the association between mastication and the hippocampus-dependent cognitive function. There are multiple neural circuits connecting the masticatory organs and the hippocampus. Both animal and human studies indicated that cognitive functioning is influenced by mastication. Masticatory dysfunction is associated with the hippocampal morphological impairments and the hippocampus-dependent spatial memory deficits, especially in elderly. Mastication is an effective behavior for maintaining the hippocampus-dependent cognitive performance, which deteriorates with aging. Therefore, chewing may represent a useful approach in preserving and promoting the hippocampus-dependent cognitive function in older people. We also discussed several possible mechanisms involved in the interaction between mastication and the hippocampal neurogenesis and the future directions for this unique fascinating research.

  20. Effects of benzo(a)pyrene exposure on the ATPase activity and calcium concentration in the hippocampus of neonatal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kai; Chen, Chengzhi; Cheng, Shuqun; Cao, Xianqing; Tu, Baijie

    2017-03-30

    To investigate whether postnatal benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P) exposure caused the impairments on the process of neurodevelopment and the alteration in the calcium medium in the neonatal rats. Eighty neonatal Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into 5 groups (untreated control group, vehicle group, 0.02 mg/kg, 0.2 mg/kg and 2 mg/kg B(a)P-exposed group). Rats were treated with B(a)P by the intragastric administration from postnatal day (PND) 4 to 25. Morris water maze (MWM) was employed to observe the spatial memory of rats. The activity of calcium adenosine triphosphatase (Ca2+-ATPase), sodium-potassium adenosine triphosphatase (Na+-K+-ATPase) and calcium-magnesium adenosine triphosphatase (Ca2+-Mg2+-ATPase) in the hippocampus were detected by commercial kits. Fura-2 pentakis(acetoxymethyl) (Fura-2/AM) probe and reactive oxygen species (ROS) reagent kit were used for measuring the concentration of Ca2+ and ROS in the hippocampus synapse, respectively. Rats exposed to B(a)P resulted in the deficits in the spatial memory manifested by the increased escape latency and decreased number of crossing platform and time spent in target quadrant in comparison with the control groups. Benzo(a)pyrene exposure caused the significant decrease in the ATPase activity in the hippocampus and caused Ca2+ overload in the synaptic, besides, the ROS concentration increased significantly which may further induce neurobehavioral impairment of the neonatal rats. Our findings suggest that postnatal B(a)P exposure may cause the neurobehavioral impairments in the neonatal rats, which were mediated by the decreased ATPase activity and elevated Ca2+ concentration. Int J Occup Med Environ Health 2017;30(2):203-211. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  1. Effects of intermittent fasting on age-related changes on Na,K-ATPase activity and oxidative status induced by lipopolysaccharide in rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, Andrea Rodrigues; Kinoshita, Paula Fernanda; Yshii, Lidia Mitiko; Marques Orellana, Ana Maria; Böhmer, Ana Elisa; de Sá Lima, Larissa; Alves, Rosana; Andreotti, Diana Zukas; Marcourakis, Tania; Scavone, Cristoforo; Kawamoto, Elisa Mitiko

    2015-05-01

    Chronic neuroinflammation is a common characteristic of neurodegenerative diseases, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) signaling is linked to glutamate-nitric oxide-Na,K-ATPase isoforms pathway in central nervous system (CNS) and also causes neuroinflammation. Intermittent fasting (IF) induces adaptive responses in the brain that can suppress inflammation, but the age-related effect of IF on LPS modulatory influence on nitric oxide-Na,K-ATPase isoforms is unknown. This work compared the effects of LPS on the activity of α1,α2,3 Na,K-ATPase, nitric oxide synthase gene expression and/or activity, cyclic guanosine monophosphate, 3-nitrotyrosine-containing proteins, and levels of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances in CNS of young and older rats submitted to the IF protocol for 30 days. LPS induced an age-related effect in neuronal nitric oxide synthase activity, cyclic guanosine monophosphate, and levels of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances in rat hippocampus that was linked to changes in α2,3-Na,K-ATPase activity, 3-nitrotyrosine proteins, and inducible nitric oxide synthase gene expression. IF induced adaptative cellular stress-response signaling pathways reverting LPS effects in rat hippocampus of young and older rats. The results suggest that IF in both ages would reduce the risk for deficits on brain function and neurodegenerative disorders linked to inflammatory response in the CNS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The antioxidant effect of Green Tea Mega EGCG against electromagnetic radiation-induced oxidative stress in the hippocampus and striatum of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Nawal A; Radwan, Nasr M; Aboul Ezz, Heba S; Salama, Noha A

    2017-01-01

    Electromagnetic radiation (EMR) of cellular phones may affect biological systems by increasing free radicals and changing the antioxidant defense systems of tissues, eventually leading to oxidative stress. Green tea has recently attracted significant attention due to its health benefits in a variety of disorders, ranging from cancer to weight loss. Thus, the aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of EMR (frequency 900 MHz modulated at 217 Hz, power density 0.02 mW/cm 2 , SAR 1.245 W/kg) on different oxidative stress parameters in the hippocampus and striatum of adult rats. This study also extends to evaluate the therapeutic effect of green tea mega EGCG on the previous parameters in animals exposed to EMR after and during EMR exposure. The experimental animals were divided into four groups: EMR-exposed animals, animals treated with green tea mega EGCG after 2 months of EMR exposure, animals treated with green tea mega EGCG during EMR exposure and control animals. EMR exposure resulted in oxidative stress in the hippocampus and striatum as evident from the disturbances in oxidant and antioxidant parameters. Co-administration of green tea mega EGCG at the beginning of EMR exposure for 2 and 3 months had more beneficial effect against EMR-induced oxidative stress than oral administration of green tea mega EGCG after 2 months of exposure. This recommends the use of green tea before any stressor to attenuate the state of oxidative stress and stimulate the antioxidant mechanism of the brain.

  3. Effects of x irradiation on the postnatally-forming granule cell populations in the olfactory bulb, hippocampus, and cerebellum of the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayer, S.A.; Altman, J.

    1975-01-01

    Beginning on the second postnatal day, either two (2X group), four (4X group) or six (6X group) daily or alternate daily exposures to low-level x irradiation (150 to 200 R) were used to interfere with the acquisition of granule cells in the olfactory bulb, hippocampus, and cerebellum of the rat. At 60 days of age, the relationship between post-irradiation recovery and permanent granule cell loss was assessed with two quantitative techniques. First, the total number of granule cells was determined to estimate the magnitude of permanent loss. Secondly, the number of labeled granule cells were counted on day 60 after a 3 H-thymidine injection given on either day 15 or on day 20 to estimate differential rates of cell proliferation during the recovery period. Permanent loss of granule cells was sustained in all regions by all schedules of irradiation. The time for the most effective exposures was earlier in the hippocampus and olfactory bulb than in the cerebellum. In all regions, both the irradiated groups and the controls showed a decrease in the level of cell proliferation between 15 and 20 days. The number of cells that could be labeled after either the 15 or 20 day injection was below control levels for all groups in the hippocampus, at control levels for all groups in the cerebellum, and either at (2X and 4X) or below (6X) control levels in the olfactory bulb. These results are discussed in the light of the formation time of the granule cells in each region

  4. Effects of x-irradiation on the postnatally-forming granule cell populations in the olfactory bulb, hippocampus, and cerebellum of the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayer, S.A.; Altman, J.

    1975-01-01

    Beginning on the second postnatal day, either two (2X group), four (4X group) or six (6X group) daily or alternate daily exposures to low-level x irradiation (150-200 r) were used to interfere with the acquisition of granule cells in the olfactory bulb, hippocampus, and cerebellum of the rat. At 60 days of age, the relationship between post-irradiation recovery and permanent granule cell loss was assessed with two quantitative techniques. First, the total number of granule cells was determined to estimate the magnitude of permanent loss. Secondly, the number of labeled granule cells were counted on day 60 after a 3 H-thymidine injection given on either day 15 or on day 20 to estimate differential rates of cell proliferation during the recovery period. Permanent loss of granule cells was sustained in all regions by all schedules of irradiation. The time for the most effective exposures was earlier in the hippocampus and olfactory bulb than in the cerebellum. In all regions, both the irradiated groups and the controls showed a decrease in the level of cell proliferation between 15 and 20 days. The number of cells that could be labeled after either the 15 or 20 day injection was below control levels for all groups in the hippocampus, at control levels for all groups in the cerebellum, and either at (2X and 4X) or below (6X) control levels in the olfactory bulb. These results are discussed in the light of the formation time of the granule cells in each region

  5. Effects of a normolipidic diet containing trans fatty acids during perinatal period on the growth, hippocampus fatty acid profile, and memory of young rats according to sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Amanda Santos; Rocha, Mônica Santos; Tavares do Carmo, Maria das Graças

    2012-04-01

    To investigate whether dietary trans fatty acids (TFAs) are incorporated in the hippocampus and its effects on the growth and aversive and spatial memories of young rats. Wistar rat offspring whose mothers were fed with normolipidic diets containing soybean oil (soy group) or hydrogenated vegetable oil (trans group) during gestation and lactation were used. Male and female pups received the same diets as their mothers until the end of behavioral testing. The composition of fatty acids in the total lipids of the diets and hippocampus was quantified by gas chromatography. The results were evaluated by Student's t test or analysis of variance followed by the Bonferroni correction. The trans male and female body weights were higher during lactation and after weaning, with trans males having the lower body weight of the two. There was incorporation of 0.11% and 0.17% of TFAs in the hippocampi of male and female rats, respectively. During passive avoidance test, there was no significant difference. In the water maze test, there was no significant difference between male groups in the training and retention phases, except on day 4, when there was a significant decrease in latency in trans males. Trans females were worse on day 2 only and showed an improvement in spatial memory during the probe trial. The TFAs were incorporated in small amounts in the hippocampus and did not affect aversive memory. However, spatial memory was modified in young rats fed with a diet rich in TFAs. These findings suggested that, in addition to the TFA content of the diet provided, it is important to consider the provision of essential fatty acids and the ω-6/ω-3 ratio. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of Ethanol on the Expression Level of Various BDNF mRNA Isoforms and Their Encoded Protein in the Hippocampus of Adult and Embryonic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahla Shojaei

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to compare the effects of oral ethanol (Eth alone or combined with the phytoestrogen resveratrol (Rsv on the expression of various brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF transcripts and the encoded protein pro-BDNF in the hippocampus of pregnant and embryonic rats. A low (0.25 g/kg body weight (BW/day dose of Eth produced an increase in the expression of BDNF exons I, III and IV and a decrease in that of the exon IX in embryos, but failed to affect BDNF transcript and pro-BDNF protein expression in adults. However, co-administration of Eth 0.25 g/kg·BW/day and Rsv led to increased expression of BDNF exons I, III and IV and to a small but significant increase in the level of pro-BDNF protein in maternal rats. A high (2.5 g/kg·BW/day dose of Eth increased the expression of BDNF exons III and IV in embryos, but it decreased the expression of exon IX containing BDNF mRNAs in the maternal rats. While the high dose of Eth alone reduced the level of pro-BDNF in adults, it failed to change the levels of pro-BDNF in embryos. Eth differentially affects the expression pattern of BDNF transcripts and levels of pro-BDNF in the hippocampus of both adult and embryonic rats.

  7. Contribution to the study of non-lethal whole-body gamma irradiation effects on the unitary activities of the dorsal hippocampus in rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassant, M.-H.

    1976-01-01

    The effects of non-lethal whole-body gamma irradiation on the spontaneous activity of the dorsal hippocampus pyramidal cells were studied in rabbits. First of all the unitary activity of the CA 1 and CA 4 pyramidal cells was recorded extracellularly in the reference animal. The results were analyzed by a statistical method. By classifying the various cell functioning modes observed, and measuring the frequency with which they appear as a function of the state of vigilance, an attempt was made to characterize precisely the spontaneous activity of the hippocampal neurons. Recording were then made under identical experimental conditions on animals totally irradiated to mean absorbed doses of 250 and 450 rads (delivered at a constant rate of 14 rads/mn). The electroencephalographic activity of the hippocampus shows many anomalies (slow waves, wave-points, theta rythm deformation) as a function of which several pathological states were distinguished and used to classify the data, then processed by the methods already used for the reference data. The results obtained prove that the statistical characteristics of the unitary activity are changed by irradiation [fr

  8. Effect of electroacupuncture on the expression of mTOR and eIF4E in hippocampus of rats with vascular dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yanzhen; Zeng, Yanjun; Wang, Xuan; Ye, Xiaobao

    2013-07-01

    Clinically, electroacupuncture is proved to be an effective therapy for vascular dementia; however, their mechanisms remain uncertain. The aim of the current study was to investigate the mechanism of electroacupuncture therapy for vascular dementia. One month after a vascular dementia animal model was established by bilateral occlusion of common carotid arteries, electroacupuncture treatment was given at "Baihui" (DU20), "Dazhui" (DU14), and "Shenshu" (BL23). Morris water maze was used to assess the learning and memory ability of rats. Western blot assay was performed to detect the expression of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) in hippocampus of rats. Morris water maze test showed that electroacupuncture improved the learning ability of vascular dementia rats. Western blot assay revealed that the expression level of mTOR and eIF4E in the electroacupuncture group and sham-operated group was higher than that in the vascular dementia group (P Electroacupuncture improves learning and memory ability by up-regulating expression of mTOR and eIF4E in the hippocampus of vascular dementia rats.

  9. The effect of chronic ozone exposure on the activation of endoplasmic reticulum stress and apoptosis in rat hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Rodríguez-Martínez

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The chronic exposure to low doses of ozone, like in environmental pollution, leads to a state of oxidative stress, which has been proposed to contribute to neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease. It induces an increase of calcium in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER, which produces ER stress. On the other hand, different studies show that, in diseases such as Alzheimer’s, there exist disturbances in protein folding where ER plays an important role. The objective of this study was to evaluate the state of chronic oxidative stress on ER stress and its relationship with apoptotic death in the hippocampus of rats exposed to low doses of ozone. We used 108 male Wistar rats randomly divided into five groups. The groups received one of the following treatments: 1 Control (air, 2 Ozone (O3 7 days, 3 O3 15 days, 4 O3 30 days, 5 O3 60 days, and 6 O3 90 days. Two hours after each treatment, the animals were sacrificed and the hippocampus was extracted. Afterwards, the tissue was processed for western blot and immunohistochemistry using the following antibodies: ATF6, GRP8 and caspase 12. It was also performed TUNEL assay and electronic microscopy. Our results show an increase in ATF6, GRP78 and caspase 12 as well as ER ultrastructural alterations and an increase of TUNEL positive cells after 60 and 90 days of exposure to ozone. With the obtained results, we can conclude that oxidative stress induced by chronic exposure to low doses of ozone leads to ER stress. ER stress activates ATF6 inducing the increase of GRP78 in the cytoplasm, which leads to the increase in the nuclear translocation of ATF6. Finally, the translocation creates a vicious cycle that, together with the activation of the cascade for apoptotic cell death, contributes to the maintenance of ER stress. These events potentially contribute in the neurodegeneration processes in diseases like Alzheimer’s Disease.

  10. Effects of oxcarbazepine on monoamines content in hippocampus and head and body shakes and sleep patterns in kainic acid-treated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfaro-Rodríguez, Alfonso; González-Piña, Rigoberto; Bueno-Nava, Antonio; Arch-Tirado, Emilio; Ávila-Luna, Alberto; Uribe-Escamilla, Rebeca; Vargas-Sánchez, Javier

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this work was to analyze the effect of oxcarbazepine (OXC) on sleep patterns, "head and body shakes" and monoamine neurotransmitters level in a model of kainic-induced seizures. Adult Wistar rats were administered kainic acid (KA), OXC or OXC + KA. A polysomnographic study showed that KA induced animals to stay awake for the whole initial 10 h. OXC administration 30 min prior to KA diminished the effect of KA on the sleep parameters. As a measure of the effects of the drug treatments on behavior, head and body shakes were visually recorded for 4 h after administration of KA, OXC + KA or saline. The presence of OXC diminished the shakes frequency. 4 h after drug application, the hippocampus was dissected out, and the content of monoamines was analyzed. The presence of OXC still more increased serotonin, 5-hidroxyindole acetic acid, dopamine, and homovanilic acid, induced by KA.

  11. Uncovering effective strategies for hearing loss prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morata, Thais C.; Meinke, Deanna

    2016-01-01

    Occupational health agencies, researchers and policy makers have recognized the need for evidence on the effectiveness of interventions designed to reduce or prevent workplace injuries and illnesses. While many workplaces comply with legal or obligatory requirements and implement recommended interventions, few publications exist documenting the effectiveness of these actions. Additionally, some workplaces have discovered through their own processes, novel ways to reduce the risk of injury. Peer-reviewed information on the effectiveness of the many strategies and approaches currently in use could help correct weaknesses, or further encourage their adoption and expansion. The evaluation of intervention effectiveness would certainly contribute to improved worker health and safety. This need is particularly relevant regarding noise exposure in the workplace and hearing loss prevention interventions. In a 2006 review of the U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Hearing Loss Research Program, the independent National Academies of Sciences recommended that NIOSH place greater emphasis on identifying the effectiveness of hearing loss prevention measures on the basis of outcomes that are as closely related as possible to reducing noise exposure and work related hearing loss (http://www.nap.edu/openbook.php?record_id=11721). NIOSH used two different approaches to address that recommendation: the first one was to conduct research, including broad systematic reviews on the effectiveness of interventions to prevent occupational noise-induced hearing loss. The second was to create an award program, the Safe-In-Sound Excellence in Hearing Loss Prevention Award™, to identify and honor excellent real-world examples of noise control and other hearing loss prevention practices and innovations. PMID:27397968

  12. [Condom effectiveness to prevent sexually transmitted diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera, Eduardo Gayón; Orozco, Hilda Hernández; Soto, Selene Sam; Aburto, Esther Lombardo

    2008-02-01

    Sexual transmitted diseases (included HIV/AIDS) are a common and preventable cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality. When used consistently and correctly, condoms are effective to prevent these diseases, however, its protection does not account for 100%. To know the effectiveness of male condom, through bibliographic evidence, to prevent sexual transmitted infections in heterosexual serodiscordant partners. A bibliographical review of Medline/Pubmed, LILACS and Cochrane databases, and publications of the National Health Institutes, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, World Health Organization, and WHO AIDS Global Program was done to analyze male condom effectiveness to prevent sexual transmitted diseases. Reports demonstrated that male condom protection against HIV/AIDS in heterosexual serodiscordant partners goes from 60 to 95%. Most recent information (2006) showed 80%. Two studies demonstrated no HPV protection with male condom, and another one 70% of protection. Male condom demonstrated no HPV-1 protection, but decrease of risk in HVS-2 transmission in women (0.85 of protection). Male condom protection against sexual transmitted diseases is not 100%. There must be used additional measures that have demonstrated its utility to decrease transmission risk.

  13. Effects of neonatal. gamma. -ray irradiation on rat hippocampus: Pt. 2; Development of excitatory amino acid binding sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dessi, F; Represa, A; Ben-Ari, Y [Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale (INSERM), 75 - Paris (France)

    1991-01-01

    In the rat, neonatal irradiation produces a destruction of denate granule cells and prevents the development of the mossy fibre-CA3 pyramidal cell synapse. The developmental increase of high affinity kainate binding sites in the stratum lucidum was reduced on the irradiated side as compared with the control side. This suggests that a proportion of high affinity kainate binding sites is associated with mossy fibres. In contrast, the development profile of N-methyl-D-aspartate binding sites, which are associated with associational and commissural synapses in CA3, was not affected by irradiation. The role that afferent fibres may play in the development of pyramidal cells is discussed in connection with the modulatory effects of glutamate receptors on the development of neurons. (author).

  14. [Effect of Corydalis Rhizoma and L-tetrahydropalmatine on dopamine system of hippocampus and striatum in morphine-induced conditioned place preference rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shou-Yang; Bai, Wei-Feng; Tu, Ping; Qiu, Cheng-Kai; Yang, Pei-Run; Luo, Su-Yuan

    2016-10-01

    To investigate the effects of Corydalis Rhizoma and L-tetrahydropalma-tine (L-THP) on the levels of dopamine neurotransmitter (DA), dopamine transporter (DAT) and the second dopamine receptor (D2R) in learning and memory-related brain areas, hippocampus and striatum, the DA, DAT and D2R were detected in conditioned place preference (CPP) rats suffered from morphine. And comparation the degree of similarity and consistency of the pharmacological effects was also studied. The rats were trained in black compartments and white ones (drug-paired compartment) with the increasing doses of morphine for 10 days (hypodermically injected from 10 mg•kg⁻¹ to 100 mg•kg⁻¹). Models of CPP were validated in those psychological dependence rats after 48 h training. The dopamine contents were detected as soon as the materials of hippocampus and striatum are harvested from rats of NS control group and model group. The DAT and D2R levels are measured by Western blot. The high, medium and low dose group of Corydalis Rhizoma are given Corydalis Rhizoma 2, 1, 0.5 g•kg⁻¹ water extraction liquid respectively (which contains L-THP were 0.274, 0.137 and 0.137 mg respectively), and the high, medium and low dose group of L-THP were given L-THP 3.76, 1.88, 0.94 mg•kg⁻¹ lavage treatment respectively, NS treatment group were lavaged normal saline for 6 days and they were killed after test of CPP, again tested DA levels and expression of DAT and D2R similar to the front of materials. The reduction effects of CPP were observed in the groups of both Corydalis Rhizoma (2, 1 g•kg⁻¹) and L-THP (3.76, 1.88 mg•kg⁻¹) subjected to medicine for 6 days (Peffect of L-THP. The similar effects were observed on the neurotransmitter dopamine, DAT and D2R in learning and memory-related brain areas, hippocampus and striatum of the morphine- dependent rats. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  15. Histopathological, immunohistochemical, and stereological analysis of the effect of Ginkgo biloba (Egb761) on the hippocampus of rats exposed to long-term cellphone radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevrek, Fikret

    2018-05-01

    Cellular phones are major sources of electromagnetic radiation (EMR) that can penetrate the human body and pose serious health hazards. The increasingly widespread use of mobile communication systems has raised concerns about the effects of cellphone radiofrequency (RF) on the hippocampus because of its close proximity to radiation during cellphone use. The effects of cellphone EMR exposure on the hippocampus of rats and the possible counteractive effects of Ginkgo biloba (Egb761) were aimed to investigate. Rats were divided into three groups: Control, EMR, and EMR+Egb761. The EMR and EMR+Egb761 groups were exposed to cellphone EMR for one month. Egb761 was also administered to the EMR+Egb761 group. Specifically, we evaluated the effect of RF exposure on rat hippocampi at harmful EMR levels (0.96 W/kg specific absorption rate [SAR]) for one month and also investigated the possible impact of Ginkgo biloba (Egb761) using stereological, TUNEL-staining, and immunohistochemical methods. An increase in apoptotic proteins (Bax, Acas-3) and a decrease in anti-apoptotic protein (Bcl-2) immunoreactivity along with a decrease in the total granule and pyramidal cell count were noted in the EMR group. A decrease in Bax and Acas-3 and an increase in Bcl-2 immunoreactivity were observed in rats treated with Egb761 in addition to a decrease in TUNEL-stained apoptotic cells and a higher total viable cell number. In conclusion, chronic cellphone EMR exposure may affect hippocampal cell viability, and Egb761 may be used to mitigate some of the deleterious effects.

  16. The effect of rosemary extract on spatial memory, learning and antioxidant enzymes activities in the hippocampus of middle-aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasoolijazi, Homa; Mehdizadeh, Mehdi; Soleimani, Mansoureh; Nikbakhte, Farnaz; Eslami Farsani, Mohsen; Ababzadeh, Shima

    2015-01-01

    The Rosemary extract (RE) possesses various antioxidant, cytoprotective and cognition- improving bioactivities. In this study, we postulated which doses of RE have a more effect on the hippocampus of middle-aged rats. In this experimental study, thirty-two middle-aged male Wistar rats were fed by different doses (50,100 and 200 mg/kg/day) of RE (containing 40% carnosic acid) or distilled water for 12 weeks. The effects of different RE doses on learning and spatial memory scores, hippocampal neuronal survival, antioxidant enzymes and lipid peroxidation amount were evaluated by one and two way analysis of variance (ANOVA). It seemed that RE (100mg/kg) could recover the spatial memory retrieval score (prosemary extract (40% carnosic acid) may improve the memory score and oxidative stress activity in middle aged rats in a dose dependent manner, especially in 100mg/kg.

  17. The Effect of Rosa Damascena Extract on Expression of Neurotrophic Factors in the CA1 Neurons of Adult Rat Hippocampus Following Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyedeh Farzaneh Moniri

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke is an important cause of death and disability in the world. Brain ischemia causes damage to brain cell, and among brain neurons, pyramidal neurons of the hippocampal CA1 region are more susceptive to ischemic injury. Recent findings suggest that neurotrophic factors protect against ischemic cell death. A dietary component of Rosa damascene extract possibly is associated with expression of neurotrophic factors mRNA following ischemia, so it can have therapeutic effect on cerebral ischemia. The present study attempts to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of Rosa damascene extract on adult rat hippocampal neurons following ischemic brain injury. Forty-eight adult male Wistar rats (weighing 250±20 gr and ages 10-12 weeks used in this study, animals randomly were divided into 6 groups including Control, ischemia/ reperfusion (IR, vehicle and three treated groups (IR+0.5, 1, 2 mg/ml extract. Global ischemia was induced by bilateral common carotid arteries occlusion for 20 minutes. The treatment was done by different doses of Rosa damascena extract for 30 days. After 30 days cell death and gene expression in neurons of the CA1 region of the hippocampus were evaluated by Nissl staining and real time PCR assay. We found a significant decrease in NGF, BDNF and NT3 mRNA expression in neurons of CA1 region of the hippocampus in ischemia group compared to control group (P<0.0001. Our results also revealed that the number of dark neurons significantly increases in ischemia group compared to control group (P<0.0001. Following treatment with Rosa damascene extract reduced the number of dark neurons that was associated with NGF, NT3, and BDNF mRNA expression. All doses level had positive effects, but the most effective dose of Rosa damascena extract was 1 mg/ml. Our results suggest that neuroprotective activity of Rosa damascena can enhance hippocampal CA1 neuronal survival after global ischemia.

  18. Effective prevention programs for tobacco use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pentz, M A

    1999-01-01

    Several types of prevention programs have shown effects on delaying or reducing youth tobacco use for periods of 1-5 years or more. These are referred to as evidence-based programs. However, they are not widely used. At the same time, with few exceptions, adolescent tobacco use rates have been stable or have increased in the 1990s. The challenge for prevention is to identify critical components shared by effective prevention programs--that is, components most associated with effect, and then to evaluate factors that are most likely to promote adoption, implementation, and diffusion of effective programs across schools and communities in the United States. Effective tobacco prevention programs focus on counteracting social influences on tobacco use, include either direct training of youth in resistance and assertiveness skills or, for policy and community organization interventions, direct or indirect (through adults) training in community activism, and are mainly theory-based, with an emphasis on three levels of theory: (a) personal (attitudes, normative expectations, and beliefs); (b) social (social or group behavior); and/or (c) environmental (communications and diffusion). Program effects increase with the use of booster sessions, standardized implementor training and support, multiple program components, and multiple levels of theory. Overall, multi-component community programs that have a school program as a basis, with supportive parent, media, and community organization components, have shown the most sustained effects on tobacco use. Positive program adoption by the school or community, extent and quality of program implementation, and existence of credible networks of leaders to promote the program are critical for any effect. Research on predictors of adoption, implementation, and diffusion of evidence-based programs is scanty relative to outcome research. In addition, more research is needed on why multi-component programs appear to be most effective

  19. Maximum potential preventive effect of hip protectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schoor, N.M.; Smit, J.H.; Bouter, L.M.; Veenings, B.; Asma, G.B.; Lips, P.T.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To estimate the maximum potential preventive effect of hip protectors in older persons living in the community or homes for the elderly. DESIGN: Observational cohort study. SETTING: Emergency departments in the Netherlands. PARTICIPANTS: Hip fracture patients aged 70 and older who

  20. Why avoid the hippocampus? A comprehensive review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gondi, Vinai; Tome, Wolfgang A.; Mehta, Minesh P.

    2010-01-01

    In this review article, we provide a detailed and comprehensive discussion of the rationale for using modern IMRT techniques to spare the subgranular zone of the hippocampus during cranial irradiation. We review the literature on neurocognitive effects of cranial irradiation; discuss clinical and preclinical data associating damage to neural progrenitor cells located in subgranular zone of the hippocampus with radiation-induced neurocognitive decline, specifically in terms of short-term memory formation and recall; and present a review of our pilot investigations into the feasibility and risks of sparing the subgranular zone of the hippocampus during whole-brain radiotherapy for brain metastases. We also introduce our phase II cooperative group clinical trial (RTOG 0933) designed to prospectively evaluate the postulated neurocognitive benefit of hippocampal subgranular zone sparing and scheduled to open in 2010.

  1. Stress, memory, and the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingenfeld, Katja; Wolf, Oliver T

    2014-01-01

    Stress hormones, i.e. cortisol in human and cortisone in rodents, influence a wide range of cognitive functions, including hippocampus-based declarative memory performance. Cortisol enhances memory consolidation, but impairs memory retrieval. In this context glucocorticoid receptor sensitivity and hippocampal integrity play an important role. This review integrates findings on the relationships between the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, one of the main coordinators of the stress response, hippocampus, and memory. Findings obtained in healthy participants will be compared with selected mental disorders, including major depressive disorder (MDD), posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and borderline personality disorder (BPD). These disorders are characterized by alterations of the HPA axis and hippocampal dysfunctions. Interestingly, the acute effects of stress hormones on memory in psychiatric patients are different from those found in healthy humans. While cortisol administration has failed to affect memory retrieval in patients with MDD, patients with PTSD and BPD have been found to show enhanced rather than impaired memory retrieval after hydrocortisone. This indicates an altered sensitivity to stress hormones in these mental disorders. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel

  2. Effects of Electrical Stimulation of the Rat Vestibular Labyrinth on c-Fos Expression in the Hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitier, Martin; Sato, Go; Zhang, Yan-Feng; Besnard, Stephane; Smith, Paul F

    2018-04-22

    Several studies have demonstrated that electrical activation of the peripheral vestibular system can evoke field potential, multi-unit neuronal activity and acetylcholine release in the hippocampus (HPC). However, no study to date has employed the immediate early gene protein, c-Fos, to investigate the distribution of activation of cells in the HPC following electrical stimulation of the vestibular system. We found that vestibular stimulation increased the number of animals expressing c-Fos in the dorsal HPC compared to sham control rats (P ≤ 0.02), but not in the ventral HPC. c-Fos was also expressed in an increased number of animals in the dorsal dentate gyrus (DG) compared to sham control rats (P ≤ 0.0001), and to a lesser extent in the ventral DG (P ≤ 0.006). The results of this study show that activation of the vestibular system results in a differential increase in the expression of c-Fos across different regions of the HPC. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of parental age and associated size on fecundity, growth and survival in the yellow seahorse Hippocampus kuda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzyuba, Borys; Van Look, Katrien J W; Cliffe, Alex; Koldewey, Heather J; Holt, William V

    2006-08-01

    Seahorses, together with the pipefishes (Family Syngnathidae), are the only vertebrates in which embryonic development takes place within a specialised body compartment, the brood pouch, of the male instead of the female. Embryos develop in close association with the brood pouch epithelium in a manner that bears some resemblance to embryo-placental relationships in mammals. We have explored the hypothesis that parental body size and age should affect offspring postnatal growth and survival if brood pouch quality impacts upon prenatal embryonic nutrition or respiration. Using an aquarium population of the yellow seahorse, Hippocampus kuda, we show here that large parents produce offspring whose initial postnatal growth rates (weeks one to three) were significantly higher than those of the offspring of younger and smaller parents. Whereas 90% of offspring from the larger parents survived for the duration of the study (7 weeks), less that 50% of offspring from smaller parents survived for the same period. For the offspring of large parents, growth rates from individual males were negatively correlated with the number of offspring in the cohort (r=-0.82; P0.9). Observations of embryos within the pouch suggested that when relatively few embryos are present they may attach to functionally advantageous sites and thus gain physiological support during gestation. These results suggest that male body size, and pouch size and function, may influence the future fitness and survival of their offspring.

  4. Improved statistical power with a sparse shape model in detecting an aging effect in the hippocampus and amygdala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Moo K.; Kim, Seung-Goo; Schaefer, Stacey M.; van Reekum, Carien M.; Peschke-Schmitz, Lara; Sutterer, Matthew J.; Davidson, Richard J.

    2014-03-01

    The sparse regression framework has been widely used in medical image processing and analysis. However, it has been rarely used in anatomical studies. We present a sparse shape modeling framework using the Laplace- Beltrami (LB) eigenfunctions of the underlying shape and show its improvement of statistical power. Tradition- ally, the LB-eigenfunctions are used as a basis for intrinsically representing surface shapes as a form of Fourier descriptors. To reduce high frequency noise, only the first few terms are used in the expansion and higher frequency terms are simply thrown away. However, some lower frequency terms may not necessarily contribute significantly in reconstructing the surfaces. Motivated by this idea, we present a LB-based method to filter out only the significant eigenfunctions by imposing a sparse penalty. For dense anatomical data such as deformation fields on a surface mesh, the sparse regression behaves like a smoothing process, which will reduce the error of incorrectly detecting false negatives. Hence the statistical power improves. The sparse shape model is then applied in investigating the influence of age on amygdala and hippocampus shapes in the normal population. The advantage of the LB sparse framework is demonstrated by showing the increased statistical power.

  5. Effects of troxerutin on cognitive deficits and glutamate cysteine ligase subunits in the hippocampus of streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetes mellitus rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Songyun; Li, Hongyan; Zhang, Lihui; Li, Jie; Wang, Ruiying; Wang, Mian

    2017-02-15

    Increasing evidence demonstrates an association between diabetes and hippocampal neuron damage. This study aimed to determine the effects of troxerutin on cognitive deficits and glutamate cysteine ligase subunits (GCLM and GCLC) in the hippocampus of streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) rats. At 12weeks after streptozotocin injection, T1DM rats were randomly divided into 4 groups (n=15 each group) to receive no treatment (T1DM), saline (T1DM+saline), alpha-lipoic acid (T1DM+alpha-lipoic acid), and troxerutin (T1DM+troxerutin), respectively, for 6weeks. Meanwhile, 10 control animals (NC group) were assessed in parallel. Learning performance was evaluated by the Morris water maze. After treatment, hippocampi were collected for pathological examination by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining. Next, hippocampal superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione (GSH) levels were assessed. Finally, glutamate cysteine ligase catalytic (GCLC) and glutamate cysteine ligase modifier (GCLM) subunit mRNA and protein levels were quantified by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot, respectively. Compared with T1DM and T1DM+saline groups, escape latency was overtly reduced in T1DM+alpha-lipoic acid and T1DM+troxerutin groups. Significantly increased GCLM and GCLC mRNA levels, GCLC protein amounts, SOD activity, and GSH levels, and reduced MDA amounts were observed in T1DM+alpha-lipoic acid and T1DM+troxerutin groups. In T1DM and T1DM+saline groups, H&E staining showed less pyramidal cells in the hippocampus, with disorganized layers, karyopyknosis, decreased endochylema, and cavitation, effects relieved in T1DM+alpha-lipoic acid and T1DM+troxerutin groups. Troxerutin alleviates oxidative stress and promotes learning in streptozotocin-induced T1DM rats, a process involving GCLC expression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Long-term effects of enriched environment following neonatal hypoxia-ischemia on behavior, BDNF and synaptophysin levels in rat hippocampus: Effect of combined treatment with G-CSF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griva, Myrsini; Lagoudaki, Rosa; Touloumi, Olga; Nousiopoulou, Evangelia; Karalis, Filippos; Georgiou, Thomas; Kokaraki, Georgia; Simeonidou, Constantina; Tata, Despina A; Spandou, Evangelia

    2017-07-15

    Increasing evidence shows that exposure to an enriched environment (EE) is neuroprotective in adult and neonatal animal models of brain ischemia. However, the mechanisms underlying this effect remain unclear. The aim of the current study was to investigate whether post-weaning EE would be effective in preventing functional deficits and brain damage by affecting markers of synaptic plasticity in a neonatal rat model of hypoxia-ischemia (HI). We also examined the possibility that granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), a growth factor with known neuroprotective effects in a variety of experimental brain injury models, combined with EE stimulation could enhance the potential beneficial effect of EE. Seven-day-old Wistar rats of either sex were subjected to permanent ligation of the left common carotid artery followed by 60min of hypoxia (8% O 2 ) and immediately after weaning (postnatal day 21) were housed in enriched conditions for 4weeks. A group of enriched-housed rats had been treated with G-CSF immediately after HI for 5 consecutive days (50μg/kg/day). Behavioral examination took place approximately at three months of age and included assessments of learning and memory (Morris water maze) as well as motor coordination (Rota-Rod). Infarct size and hippocampal area were estimated following behavioral assessment. Synaptic plasticity was evaluated based on BDNF and synaptophysin expression in the dorsal hippocampus. EE resulted in recovery of post-HI motor deficits and partial improvement of memory impairments which was not accompanied by reduced brain damage. Increased synaptophysin expression was observed in the contralateral to carotid ligation hemisphere. Hypoxia-ischemia alone or followed by enriched conditions did not affect BDNF expression which was increased only in enriched-housed normal rats. The combined therapy of G-CSF and EE further enhanced cognitive function compared to EE provided as monotherapy and prevented HI-induced brain damage by

  7. Preventive effect of dexketoprofen on postoperative pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelir, İsmail Kerem; Güleç, Sacit; Ceyhan, Dilek

    2016-04-01

    Preventive analgesia has been defined as reduction in noxious stimuli during preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative periods. The aim of the present study was to prevent central sensitization by administering ketamine infusion throughout the surgical procedure. In addition, possible preventive effects of dexketoprofen when administered before and after incision were evaluated. Fifty patients were included. Group I was administered 50 mg intravenous dexketoprofen prior to surgical incision, and Group II received the same amount 10 minutes after the incision had been made. Following induction of general anesthesia, all patients received a bolus of 0.50 mg/kg ketamine in 0.07 mg/kg/h intravenous infusion. When postoperative visual analog scale values were compared, values for Group I after 1 and 4 hours were significantly lower than those of Group II. In addition, morphine consumption at 4, 8, 12, and 24 hours was significantly lower in Group I. Combined with the prevention of central sensitization with ketamine, administration of dexketoprofen prior to incision led to a lower rate of morphine consumption and more effective analgesia than post-incision administration.

  8. The effect of diet on ontogenic development of the digestive tract in juvenile reared long snout seahorse Hippocampus guttulatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, J; Bureau, D P; Andrade, J P

    2014-06-01

    Ontogenetic development of the digestive tract and associated organs in long snout seahorse Hippocampus guttulatus juveniles was morphologically and histologically examined from the time of release from the male's pouch until 72 h after the first meal. When released from the male's pouch, juvenile seahorses are small adult replicates. This means that unlike other teleost fish larvae, the first developmental phase has already taken place, and juveniles are morphologically prepared and able to feed on live prey immediately following parturition. At this stage, the buccopharynx, oesophagus, and intestine already appear to be fully developed. The intestine is divided into the midgut and hindgut by an intestinal valve, and intestinal villi are visible in the midgut. When fed with DHA-Selco(®) enriched Artemia, H. guttulatus juveniles developed a severe condition of overinflation of the gas bladder. The continuous overinflation of the gas bladder forced air into the gut (48 h after the first meal), resulting in overinflation of both the gut and the gas bladder (72 h after the first meal), and death occurred within 120 h after the first meal. When fed natural copepods, H. guttulatus juveniles continued a normal feeding activity with no signs of intestinal disorders, and the gas bladder and intestine maintained their normal shape. This is the first study to positively associate gas bladder overinflation of juvenile seahorses with nutritionally unbalanced diets, and not to gas supersaturation alone. It is therefore necessary to develop more adequate feed and/or enrichment products to improve the survival of juvenile seahorses in captivity.

  9. Toxic Stress: Effects, Prevention and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hillary A. Franke

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Children who experience early life toxic stress are at risk of long-term adverse health effects that may not manifest until adulthood. This article briefly summarizes the findings in recent studies on toxic stress and childhood adversity following the publication of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP Policy Report on the effects of toxic stress. A review of toxic stress and its effects is described, including factors of vulnerability, resilience, and the relaxation response. An integrative approach to the prevention and treatment of toxic stress necessitates individual, community and national focus.

  10. Effects of high-altitude environment on cognitive function and ultrastructure in CA1 region of hippocampus of rats after sleep deprivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang-hua SI

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the effects of high-altitude environment on cognitive function and ultrastructure in CA1 region of the hippocampus of Wistar rats in sleep deprivation (SD.  Methods SD was induced in Wistar rats by employing "flower pot" technique. Sixty-four rats were randomly divided into 2 groups: Lanzhou group (at an altitude of 1520 m and Kekexili group (at an altitude of 4767 m, and each group was further divided into 4 subgroups according to the time of SD (0, 1, 3 and 5 d. The behaviors of rats were studied by Morris water maze test at given time points. The ultrastructure of hippocampal neurons was observed by transmission electron microscope (TEM.  Results 1 Compared with Lanzhou group, rat behavior of Kekexili group presented excitement-irritation-suppression changes with the extension of SD time, but the extent was weakened gradually, and time of sleepiness increased obviously. 2 Compared with Lanzhou group, neurons in CA1 region of hippocampus showed enlarged cell body, disappeared nuclear membrane, shrunken nuclei and decreased organelle. End-feet of glia cells sticking to capillaries swelled and ruptured, and the typical synaptic structure disappeared. 3 Morris water maze test: as compared with Lanzhou group, the escape latency of Kekexili group prolonged (P < 0.05, for all, the ability of distance exploration increased (P < 0.05, for all, and the times across plot decreased (P < 0.05, for all in 1, 3 and 5 d of SD.  Conclusions High-altitude environment may significantly influence the cognitive function of rats in SD, and there was close correlation between the cognitive disorders and the changes in the ultrastructure of hippocampal CA1 region. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.04.012

  11. [Effects of electric stimulation at the cerebellar fastigial nucleus on astrocytes in the hippocampus of neonatal rats with hypoxic-ischemic brain damage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Li; Jia, Tian-Ming; Luan, Bin; Liu, Tao; Yuan, Yan

    2011-04-01

    To study the effects of electric stimulation at the cerebellar fastigial nucleus on astrocytes in the hippocampus of neonatal rats with hypoxic-ischemic brain damage (HIBD) and the possible mechanism. One hundred and eighty 7-day-old neonatal Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups: sham-operation (control group) and HIBD with and without electric stimulation (n=60 each). The HIBD model of neonatal rats was prepared by the Rice-Vennucci method. Electric stimulation at the cerebellar fastigial nucleus was given 24 hrs after the operation in the electric stimulation group once daily and lasted for 30 minutes each time. The other two groups were not subjected to electric stimulation but captured to fix in corresponding periods. Rats were sacrificed 3, 7, 14 and 21 days after stimulations to observe the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression by immunohistochemisty and the ultrastructural changes of astrocytes in the hippocampus under an electron microscope. Immunohistochemical analysis showed the expression of GFAP in the HIBD groups with and without electric stimulation increased significantly compared with the control group on day 3, reached the peak on day 7, and the increased expression remained till to day 21. The GFAP expression in the electric stimulation group was significantly lower than that in the untreated HIBD group at all time points. Under the electron microscope, the astrocytes in the untreated HIBD group were swollen and the amount of organelles was reduced, while the swelling of astrocytes was alleviated and the organelles remained in integrity in the electric stimulation group. The electric stimulation at the cerebellar fastigial nucleus can inhibit the excessive proliferation of astrocytes and relieve the structural damage of astrocytes in neonatal rats following HIBD.

  12. Electroconvulsive stimulations prevent chronic stress-induced increases in L-type calcium channel mRNAs in the hippocampus and basolateral amygdala

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maigaard, Katrine; Pedersen, Ida Hageman; Jørgensen, Anders

    2012-01-01

    Although affective disorders have high prevalence, morbidity and mortality, we do not fully understand disease etiopathology, nor have we determined the exact mechanisms by which treatment works. Recent research indicates that intracellular calcium ion dysfunction might be involved. Here we use...... the chronic restraint stress model of affective disorder (6 h restraint per day for 21 days) in combination with electroconvulsive stimulations to examine the effects of stress and an effective antidepressive treatment modality on L-type voltage gated calcium channel subunit mRNA expression patterns...... in the brain. We find that stress tended to upregulate Ca(v)1.2 and Ca(v)1.3 channels in a brain region specific manner, while ECS tended to normalise this effect. This was more pronounced for Ca(v)1.2 channels, where stress clearly increased expression in both the basolateral amygdala, dentate gyrus and CA3...

  13. Potential of Environmental Enrichment to Prevent Transgenerational Effects of Paternal Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gapp, Katharina; Bohacek, Johannes; Grossmann, Jonas; Brunner, Andrea M; Manuella, Francesca; Nanni, Paolo; Mansuy, Isabelle M

    2016-10-01

    Adverse experiences in early life are risk factors for the development of behavioral and physiological symptoms that can lead to psychiatric and cognitive disorders later in life. Some of these symptoms can be transmitted to the offspring, in some cases by non-genomic mechanisms involving germ cells. Using a mouse model of unpredictable maternal separation and maternal stress, we show that postnatal trauma alters coping behaviors in adverse conditions in exposed males when adult and in their adult male progeny. The behavioral changes are accompanied by increased glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression and decreased DNA methylation of the GR promoter in the hippocampus. DNA methylation is also decreased in sperm cells of exposed males when adult. Transgenerational transmission of behavioral symptoms is prevented by paternal environmental enrichment, an effect associated with the reversal of alterations in GR gene expression and DNA methylation in the hippocampus of the male offspring. These findings highlight the influence of both negative and positive environmental factors on behavior across generations and the plasticity of the epigenome across life.

  14. Pleiotropic effects of statins in stroke prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yenny Yenny

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death and disability, and  contributes substantially to healthcare budgets. The lipid-lowering drugs, 3-hydroxy-3-methylgulutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor or statins, reducing mortality and cardiovascular morbidity in patients with established cardiovascular disease. Statins therefore have a place in the secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. Recent experimental and clinical studies suggest that statins may exert vascular protective effect beyond cholesterol reduction. The cholesterol-independet or “pleiotropic” effects of statin include the upregulation and activation of endothelial nitric acid synthase (eNOS that can increase nitric oxide (NO production. Augmentation of NO production increases cerebral blood flow, which can lead to neuroprotection during brain ischaemia. By inhibiting mevalonate synthesis, statins prevent the formation of several isoprenoids (including farnesylpyrophosphate and geranylgeranylpyrophosphate. Inhibiting geranylgeranylation of RhoA small G proteins increases the stability of eNOS mRNA through the remodeling of endothelial actin microfilamens. Moreover, statins directly increase eNOS activity within minutes by activating the pathway involving phosphoinositide 3-kinase and protein kinase B. In the secondary prevention of stroke, the use of statins reduces the incidence of either recurrent stroke or other major vascular events and treatment should be initiated soon after the event. The use of statins does not increase hemorrhagic stroke or cancer and may also favor atherosclerotic plaque regression.

  15. Pleiotropic effects of statins in stroke prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yenny

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death and disability, and contributes substantially to healthcare budgets. The lipid-lowering drugs, 3-hydroxy-3-methylgulutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor or statins, reducing mortality and cardiovascular morbidity in patients with established cardiovascular disease. Statins therefore have a place in the secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. Recent experimental and clinical studies suggest that statins may exert vascular protective effect beyond cholesterol reduction. The cholesterol-independet or “pleiotropic” effects of statin include the upregulation and activation of endothelial nitric acid synthase (eNOS that can increase nitric oxide (NO production. Augmentation of NO production increases cerebral blood flow, which can lead to neuroprotection during brain ischaemia. By inhibiting mevalonate synthesis, statins prevent the formation of several isoprenoids (including farnesylpyrophosphate and geranylgeranylpyrophosphate. Inhibiting geranylgeranylation of RhoA small G proteins increases the stability of eNOS mRNA through the remodeling of endothelial actin microfilamens. Moreover, statins directly increase eNOS activity within minutes by activating the pathway involving phosphoinositide 3-kinase and protein kinase B. In the secondary prevention of stroke, the use of statins reduces the incidence of either recurrent stroke or other major vascular events and treatment should be initiated soon after the event. The use of statins does not increase hemorrhagic stroke or cancer and may also favor atherosclerotic plaque regression.

  16. CDK5-mediated phosphorylation of p19INK4d avoids DNA damage-induced neurodegeneration in mouse hippocampus and prevents loss of cognitive functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogara, María Florencia; Belluscio, Laura M; de la Fuente, Verónica; Berardino, Bruno G; Sonzogni, Silvina V; Byk, Laura; Marazita, Mariela; Cánepa, Eduardo T

    2014-07-01

    DNA damage, which perturbs genomic stability, has been linked to cognitive decline in the aging human brain, and mutations in DNA repair genes have neurological implications. Several studies have suggested that DNA damage is also increased in brain disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. However, the precise mechanisms connecting DNA damage with neurodegeneration remain poorly understood. CDK5, a critical enzyme in the development of the central nervous system, phosphorylates a number of synaptic proteins and regulates dendritic spine morphogenesis, synaptic plasticity and learning. In addition to these physiological roles, CDK5 has been involved in the neuronal death initiated by DNA damage. We hypothesized that p19INK4d, a member of the cell cycle inhibitor family INK4, is involved in a neuroprotective mechanism activated in response to DNA damage. We found that in response to genotoxic injury or increased levels of intracellular calcium, p19INK4d is transcriptionally induced and phosphorylated by CDK5 which provides it with greater stability in postmitotic neurons. p19INK4d expression improves DNA repair, decreases apoptosis and increases neuronal survival under conditions of genotoxic stress. Our in vivo experiments showed that decreased levels of p19INK4d rendered hippocampal neurons more sensitive to genotoxic insult resulting in the loss of cognitive abilities that rely on the integrity of this brain structure. We propose a feedback mechanism by which the neurotoxic effects of CDK5-p25 activated by genotoxic stress or abnormal intracellular calcium levels are counteracted by the induction and stabilization of p19INK4d protein reducing the adverse consequences on brain functions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Andrographolide Stimulates Neurogenesis in the Adult Hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Varela-Nallar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Andrographolide (ANDRO is a labdane diterpenoid component of Andrographis paniculata widely used for its anti-inflammatory properties. We have recently determined that ANDRO is a competitive inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β, a key enzyme of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling cascade. Since this signaling pathway regulates neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus, we evaluated whether ANDRO stimulates this process. Treatment with ANDRO increased neural progenitor cell proliferation and the number of immature neurons in the hippocampus of 2- and 10-month-old mice compared to age-matched control mice. Moreover, ANDRO stimulated neurogenesis increasing the number of newborn dentate granule neurons. Also, the effect of ANDRO was evaluated in the APPswe/PS1ΔE9 transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease. In these mice, ANDRO increased cell proliferation and the density of immature neurons in the dentate gyrus. Concomitantly with the increase in neurogenesis, ANDRO induced the activation of the Wnt signaling pathway in the hippocampus of wild-type and APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mice determined by increased levels of β-catenin, the inactive form of GSK-3β, and NeuroD1, a Wnt target gene involved in neurogenesis. Our findings indicate that ANDRO stimulates neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus suggesting that this drug could be used as a therapy in diseases in which neurogenesis is affected.

  18. [Effect of Acupuncture Intervention on c-jun N-terminal Kinase Signaling in the Hippocampus in Rats with Forced Swimming Stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yu; Xu, Ke; Bao, Wu-ye; Wang, Yu; Zhang, Xu-hui; Xu, Ming-min; Yu, Miao; Zhang, Chun-tao; Zhao, Bing-cong; Wu, Ji-hong; Tu, Ya

    2016-02-01

    To observe the effect of acupuncture on c-jun N-terminal Kinase (JNK) signaling in the hippocampus in rats with forced-swimming stress, so as to reveal its underlying mechanism in relieving depression-like motor response. Forty-eight Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 8 groups as control, control + JNK inhibitor (SP 600125) , model, model + SP 600125, acupuncture, acupuncture + SP 600125, Fluoxetine (an anti-depressant) , and Fluoxetine + SP 600125 (n = 6 in each group). The depression-like behavior (immobility) model was established by forcing the rat to swim in a glass-cylinder and solitary raise. Acupuncture stimulation was applied to "Baihui" (GV-20) and "Yintang" (GV 29) for 20 min before forced swimming and once again 24 h later.. The rats of the Fluoxetine and Fluoxetine+ SP 600125 groups were treated by intragastric administration of fluoxetine 10 mL (1.8 mg)/kg before forced swimming and once again 24 h thereafter. The rats of the model + SP 600125 and acupuncture + SP 600125 groups were treated by intraperitoneal injection of SP 600125 (10 mg/kg) 90 min before forced swimming and 30 min before acupuncture intervention, respectively. The immobility duration of rats in the water glass-cylinder was used to assess their depression-like behavior response. The expression levels of protein kinase kinase 4 (MKK 4), MKK 7, JNK, and phosphorylated JNK (p-JNK) in the hippocampus were detected by Western blot. Compared to the control group, the duration of immobility, and the expression levels of hippocampal MKK 4, MKK 7, and p-JNK proteins were significantly increased in the model group (P Fluoxetine and Fluoxetine + SP 600125 groups, the expression levels of hippocampal MKK 4 and MKK 7 proteins in the Fluoxetine + SP 600125 group, and those of p-JNK protein in the acupuncture, acupuncture + SP 600125, model + SP 600125, Fluoxetine and Fluoxetine + SP 600125 groups were considerably decreased (P Fluoxetine and Fluoxetine + SP 600125 groups in the

  19. The effects of black garlic ethanol extract on the spatial memory and estimated total number of pyramidal cells of the hippocampus of monosodium glutamate-exposed adolescent male Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermawati, Ery; Sari, Dwi Cahyani Ratna; Partadiredja, Ginus

    2015-09-01

    Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is believed to exert deleterious effects on various organs, including the hippocampus, likely via the oxidative stress pathway. Garlic (Alium sativum L.), which is considered to possess potent antioxidant activity, has been used as traditional remedy for various ailments since ancient times. We have investigated the effects of black garlic, a fermented form of garlic, on spatial memory and estimated the total number of pyramidal cells of the hippocampus in adolescent male Wistar rats treated with MSG. Twenty-five rats were divided into five groups: C- group, which received normal saline; C+ group, which was exposed to 2 mg/g body weight (bw) of MSG; three treatment groups (T2.5, T5, T10), which were treated with black garlic extract (2.5, 5, 10 mg/200 g bw, respectively) and MSG. The spatial memory test was carried out using the Morris water maze (MWM) procedure, and the total number of pyramidal cells of the hippocampus was estimated using the physical disector design. The groups treated with black garlic extract were found to have a shorter path length than the C- and C+ groups in the escape acquisition phase of the MWM test. The estimated total number of pyramidal cells in the CA1 region of the hippocampus was higher in all treated groups than that of the C+ group. Based on these results, we conclude that combined administration of black garlic and MSG may alter the spatial memory functioning and total number of pyramidal neurons of the CA1 region of the hippocampus of rats.

  20. Neurobiological toxicity of radiation in hippocampus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Yeong Hoon; Kim, Joong Sun [Research center, Dongnam institute of radiological and Medical Sciences (DIRAMS), Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Ho; Moon, Chang Jong [College of Veterinary Medicine, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    Ionizing radiation affects multiple organs, which differ in their apparent response. Nevertheless, the adult brain is less vulnerable to radiation than other radiosensitive organs. Clinically, patients receive partial large-field or whole-brain irradiation for cancer treatment yearly, long-term survivors increases, and thus, radiation induced side effects, including cognitive impairment, will become a major health problem. Although the most commonly reported noxious effects of irradiation occur via damage to DNA and consequent disruption of protein synthesis, there are also specific effects on biochemical pathways that have indirect effects on DNA transcription. The hippocampus dependent memory dysfunction is consistent with the changes in neurogenesis after 1 and 3 dyas after irradiation. At 30 and 90 days following irradiation, mice displayed significant depression-like behaviors. Hippocampal dysfunction during the chronic phase following cranial irradiation may be associated with decreases in the neurogenesis and synaptic plasticity related signals, concomitant with microglial reduction in the hippocampus.

  1. Endogenous synthesis of corticosteroids in the hippocampus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimpei Higo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Brain synthesis of steroids including sex-steroids is attracting much attention. The endogenous synthesis of corticosteroids in the hippocampus, however, has been doubted because of the inability to detect deoxycorticosterone (DOC synthase, cytochrome P450(c21. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The expression of P450(c21 was demonstrated using mRNA analysis and immmunogold electron microscopic analysis in the adult male rat hippocampus. DOC production from progesterone (PROG was demonstrated by metabolism analysis of (3H-steroids. All the enzymes required for corticosteroid synthesis including P450(c21, P450(2D4, P450(11β1 and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD were localized in the hippocampal principal neurons as shown via in situ hybridization and immunoelectron microscopic analysis. Accurate corticosteroid concentrations in rat hippocampus were determined by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. In adrenalectomized rats, net hippocampus-synthesized corticosterone (CORT and DOC were determined to 6.9 and 5.8 nM, respectively. Enhanced spinogenesis was observed in the hippocampus following application of low nanomolar (10 nM doses of CORT for 1 h. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results imply the complete pathway of corticosteroid synthesis of 'pregnenolone →PROG→DOC→CORT' in the hippocampal neurons. Both P450(c21 and P450(2D4 can catalyze conversion of PROG to DOC. The low nanomolar level of CORT synthesized in hippocampal neurons may play a role in modulation of synaptic plasticity, in contrast to the stress effects by micromolar CORT from adrenal glands.

  2. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Forensic Psychiatric Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makushkina O.A.,

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the quantitative indicators, the analysis of which gives an idea of the strengths and means at the disposal of forensic health care. We discuss the possibility of using the existing statistical monitoring system for a dynamic assessment of the quality of the measures for primary prevention of socially dangerous acts and implementation of compulsory medical measures at the regional and federal levels. We emphasize the quality indicators of the process for specialized assistance: security environment, organizational culture, training and upgrading the skills of staff, completeness and quality of psychosocial interventions, the degree of profiling the psycho-educational work, the quality of psychotherapeutic contact and its dynamics. We discuss the problem of the validity of the criteria of rehabilitation interventions success by compliance with the methodological principles for the evaluation of their effectiveness. We suggest ways to improve the effectiveness of regional mental health services for the prevention of socially dangerous acts, approaches to peer review and monitoring of the work

  3. Effectiveness of condoms in preventing HIV transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkerton, S D; Abramson, P R

    1997-05-01

    The consistent use of latex condoms continues to be advocated for primary prevention of HIV infection despite limited quantitative evidence regarding the effectiveness of condoms in blocking the sexual transmission of HIV. Although recent meta-analyses of condom effectiveness suggest that condoms are 60 to 70% effective when used for HIV prophylaxis, these studies do not isolate consistent condom use, and therefore provide only a lower bound on the true effectiveness of correct and consistent condom use. A reexamination of HIV seroconversion studies suggests that condoms are 90 to 95% effective when used consistently, i.e. consistent condom users are 10 to 20 times less likely to become infected when exposed to the virus than are inconsistent or non-users. Similar results are obtained utilizing model-based estimation techniques, which indicate that condoms decrease the per-contact probability of male-to-female transmission of HIV by about 95%. Though imperfect, condoms provide substantial protection against HIV infection. Condom promotion therefore remains an important international priority in the fight against AIDS.

  4. Role of the hippocampus in memory functioning: modern view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. O. Assonov

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this review was to develop the comprehensive conception of the hippocampus role in the functioning of human memory, based on data obtained by analysis of the latest scientific literature on the topic and make recommendations for further ways of researches in this topic. The scientific literature of the last 5 years on the role of the hippocampus in memory functioning was analyzed. Based on the reviewed literature, we made the next conclusions: the hippocampus is an extremely important for memory structure with various connections for different types of memory; the hippocampus is affected by a variety of substances, most studied now are glucocorticosteroids, whose effect on memory differs depending on the start time of action; the hippocampus volume in mental disorders affecting memory is less than normal, which makes it an important diagnostic criterion; at the moment, various promising methods that can help in the therapy of PTSD, depression, phobias and other disorders associated with memory impairment and based on the knowledge of the hippocampus for the treatment of memory disorders are being developed. Based on these conclusions and data, which were analyzed, we offered the following recommendations: to implement the hippocampal function examination in the diagnostics of mental disorders, which are accompanied by a violation of its work; to use the size of the hippocampus as one of the prognostic factors for the severity of the memory-associated disorders and the therapy progress; to carefully investigate the difference in the effect of various psychotherapies and pharmacotherapies on the hippocampus to determine exactly which of the therapies is the most morphologically reasonable; to find out how significant the decrease in the hippocampal volume is for the memory functioning; to use pathogenetically and morphologically based methods to improve the function of the hippocampus in the treatment of disorders that are

  5. The hippocampus and visual perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Andy C. H.; Yeung, Lok-Kin; Barense, Morgan D.

    2012-01-01

    In this review, we will discuss the idea that the hippocampus may be involved in both memory and perception, contrary to theories that posit functional and neuroanatomical segregation of these processes. This suggestion is based on a number of recent neuropsychological and functional neuroimaging studies that have demonstrated that the hippocampus is involved in the visual discrimination of complex spatial scene stimuli. We argue that these findings cannot be explained by long-term memory or working memory processing or, in the case of patient findings, dysfunction beyond the medial temporal lobe (MTL). Instead, these studies point toward a role for the hippocampus in higher-order spatial perception. We suggest that the hippocampus processes complex conjunctions of spatial features, and that it may be more appropriate to consider the representations for which this structure is critical, rather than the cognitive processes that it mediates. PMID:22529794

  6. The hippocampus and visual perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy C. H. Lee

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we will discuss the idea that the hippocampus may be involved in both memory and perception, contrary to theories that posit functional and neuroanatomical segregation of these processes. This suggestion is based on a number of recent neuropsychological and functional neuroimaging studies that have demonstrated that the hippocampus is involved in the visual discrimination of complex spatial scene stimuli. We argue that these findings cannot be explained by long-term memory or working memory processing or, in the case of patient findings, dysfunction beyond the medial temporal lobe. Instead, these studies point towards a role for the hippocampus in higher-order spatial perception. We suggest that the hippocampus processes complex conjunctions of spatial features, and that it may be more appropriate to consider the representations for which this structure is critical, rather than the cognitive processes that it mediates.

  7. Toluene Effects on Gene Expression in the Hippocampus of Young-Adult, Middle-Age and Senescent Brown Norway Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Differential susceptibility to environmental exposure(s) across life stages is an area of toxicology about which little is known. We examined the effects of toluene, a known neurotoxicant with reported behavioral, electrophysiological and pathological effects, on transcriptomic...

  8. Developmental Exposure to A Commercial PBDE Mixture: Effects on Protein Networks in the Cerebellum and Hippocampus of Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND: Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are structurally similar topolychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and have both central (learning and memory deficits) and peripheral (motor dysfunction) neurotoxic effects at concentrations/doses similar to those of PCBs. The cellular...

  9. The effects of soy and tamoxifen on apoptosis in the hippocampus and dentate gyrus in a pentylenetetrazole-induced seizure model of ovariectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimzadeh-Bideskan, Ali Reza; Mansouri, Somaieh; Ataei, Mariam Lale; Jahanshahi, Mehrdad; Hosseini, Mahmoud

    2018-03-01

    The effects of tamoxifen and soy on apoptosis of the hippocampus and dentate gyrus of ovariectomized rats after repeated seizures were investigated. Female rats were divided into: (1) Control, (2) Sham, (3) Sham-Tamoxifen (Sham-T), (4) Ovariectomized (OVX), (5) OVX-Tamoxifen (OVX-T), (6)OVX-Soy(OVX-S) and (7) OVX-S-T. The animals in the OVX-S, OVX-T and OVX-S-T groups received soy extract (60 mg/kg; i.p.), tamoxifen (10 mg/kg) or both for 2 weeks before induction of seizures. The animals in these groups additionally received the mentioned treatments before each injection of pentylenetetrazole (PTZ; 40 mg/kg) for 6 days. The animals in the Sham and OVX groups received a vehicle of tamoxifen and soy. A significant decrease in the seizure score and TUNEL-positive neurons was seen in the OVX group compared to the Sham (P < 0.001). The animals in both the OVX-T and OVX-S groups had a significantly higher seizure score as well as number of TUNEL-positive neurons compared to the OVX group (P < 0.01-P < 0.001). Co-treatment of the OVX rats by the extract and tamoxifen decreased the seizure score and number of TUNEL-positive neurons compared to OVX-S (P < 0.001). Treatment of the OVX rats by either soy or tamoxifen increased the seizure score as well as the number of TUNEL-positive neurons in the hippocampal formation. Co-administration of tamoxifen and soy extract inhibited the effects of the soy extract and tamoxifen when they were administered alone. It might be suggested that both soy and tamoxifen have agonistic effects on estrogen receptors by changing the seizure severity.

  10. Effect of Chronic Restraint Stress on HPA Axis Activity and Expression of BDNF and Trkb in the Hippocampus of Pregnant Rats: Possible Contribution in Depression during Pregnancy and Postpartum Period

    OpenAIRE

    Maghsoudi, Nader; Ghasemi, Rasoul; Ghaempanah, Zahra; Ardekani, Ali M.; Nooshinfar, Elahe; Tahzibi, Abbas

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) and its receptor, TrkB, in the hippocampus are targets for adverse effects of stress paradigms; in addition, BDNF and its receptor play key role in the pathology of brain diseases like depression. In the present study, we evaluated the possible role of hippocampal BDNF in depression during pregnancy, Methods To achieve the purpose, repeated restrain stress (1 or 3 hours daily for 7 days) during the last week of pregnancy was used and alter...

  11. Effects of met-enkephalin on GABAergic spontaneous miniature IPSPs in organotypic slice cultures of the rat hippocampus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rekling, J C

    1993-01-01

    The action of met-enkephalin on GABAergic spontaneous miniature IPSPs (smIPSPs) was investigated in CA1 neurons from hippocampal slice cultures. In the presence of excitatory amino acid blockers (2,3-dihydroxy-6-nitro-7-sulphamoyl-benzo(F)quinoxaline, DL-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid) and TTX...... the amplitude distribution of the smIPSPs. The proportion of "large" smIPSPs was reduced, but a loss of "small" smIPSPs also contributed to the reduction in smIPSP frequency. The selective mu-receptor agonist DAGO mimicked the effect of met-enkephalin and naloxone blocked the effect of DAGO. Hyperpolarization......IPSP frequency, nor did it block the effect of DAGO. These results suggest that CA1 pyramidal cells of hippocampal organotypic cultures are tonically inhibited by spontaneous release of GABA, through a release mechanism that is independent of propagated sodium action potentials. Met-enkephalin and DAGO reduce...

  12. A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Hippocampus: The Effects of Humor on Student Achievement and Memory Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCartney Matthews, Melissa Lee

    2011-01-01

    Research literature relating to the use of humor as a teaching method or curricula specifically designed to include humor was reviewed to investigate the effects of humor on student learning in various environments from elementary schools to post-secondary classrooms. In this multi-method study, four instruments and a humor treatment were selected…

  13. Anxiolytic-Like Effects and Increase in Locomotor Activity Induced by Infusions of NMDA into the Ventral Hippocampus in Rat: Interaction with GABAergic System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bina, Payvand; Rezvanfard, Mehrnaz; Ahmadi, Shamseddin; Zarrindast, Mohammad Reza

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we investigated the role of N-Methyl-D-Aspartate (NMDA) receptors in the ventral hippocampus (VH) and their possible interactions with GABAA system on anxiety-like behaviors. We used an elevated-plus maze test (EPM) to assess anxiety-like behaviors and locomotor activity in male Wistar rats. The results showed that intra-VH infusions of different doses of NMDA (0.25 and 0.5 μg/rat) increased locomotor activity, and also induced anxiolytic-like behaviors, as revealed by a tendency to increase percentage of open arm time (%OAT), and a significant increase in percentage of open arm entries (%OAE). The results also showed that intra-VH infusions of muscimol (0.5 and 1 μg/rat) or bicuculline (0.5 and 1 μg/rat) did not significantly affect anxiety-like behaviors, but bicuculline at dose of 1 μg/rat increased locomotor activity. Intra-VH co-infusions of muscimol (0.5 μg/rat) along with low doses of NMDA (0.0625 and 0.125 μg/rat) showed a tendency to increase %OAT, %OAE and locomotor activity; however, no interaction was observed between the drugs. Interestingly, intra-VH co-infusions of bicuculline (0.5 μg/rat) along with effective doses of NMDA (0.25 and 0.5 μg/rat) decreased %OAT, %OAE and locomotor activity, and a significant interaction between two drugs was observed. It can be concluded that GABAergic system may mediate the anxiolytic-like effects and increase in locomotor activity induced by NMDA in the VH.

  14. Study The Effect of 4 weeks of Special Aerobic Training on CBS and SAM Levels in Hippocampus of Rats with Alzheimer-induced Disease with Aβ1-42 Injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Azimi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: H2S plays a key role in the pathogenesis of the Alzheimer’s disease. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of 4 weeks of the special aerobic training after induction of Alzheimer’s disease by Aβ1-42 injection on CBS and SAM levels in hippocampus of Wistar male rats. Materials and Methods: Twenty male Wistar rats (8 weeks old and weight 195 ± 20 g were divided into four groups including: healthy control, Alzheimer’s control, Alzheimer’s + training and sham. To induce Alzheimer’s disease, Aβ1-42 was infused into the hippocampus of rats. Training group trained for 4-week. For data analysis, one-way ANOVA was used and Eta and Omega squared tests were used to determine the effect size (p<0.05. Results: Findings revealed that 4 weeks of special aerobic training increased significantly the CBS and SAM levels in hippocampus of Alzheimer’s rats compared to the control Alzheimer’s rats ( ES=53; p= 0.007, ES= 92.22; p= 0.001. Also, we showed 4 weeks of special aerobic training increased CBS level in hippocampus of Alzheimer’s rats compared to the healthy cotrol group (ES= 44.07; p= 0.014. Conclusion: It seems that the special aerobic training can be used as a useful non-pharmacologically effective therapeutic treatment for Alzheimer's patients through positive regulation of hydrogen sulfide via CBS and SAM enzymes.

  15. Protective effect of methanol extract of Uncaria rhynchophylla against excitotoxicity induced by N-methyl-D-aspartate in rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jongseok; Son, Dongwook; Lee, Pyeongjae; Kim, Dae-Keun; Shin, Min-Chul; Jang, Mi-Hyeon; Kim, Chang-Ju; Kim, Yong-Sik; Kim, Sun-Yeou; Kim, Hocheol

    2003-05-01

    Uncaria rhynchophylla is a medicinal herb used for convulsive disorders in Oriental medicine. In this study, the effect of the methanol extract of Uncaria rhynchophylla against N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-induced excitotoxicity was investigated. Pretreatment with the extract of Uncaria rhynchopylla reduced the degree of neuronal damage induced by NMDA exposure in cultured hippocampal slices. In the patch clamp study, Uncaria rhynchophylla significantly inhibited NMDA receptor-activated ion current in acutely dissociated hippocampal CA1 neurons. These results indicate that Uncaria rhynchophylla offers protection against NMDA-induced neuronal injury and inhibitory action on NMDA receptor-mediated ion current may be a mechanism behind the neuroprotective effect of Uncaria rhynchophylla.

  16. Somatostatin receptors in rat hippocampus: localization to intrinsic neurons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palacios, J.M.; Reubi, J.C.; Maurer, R.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of neurotoxic chemical and electrolytical lesions on somatostatin (SS) receptor binding in the septo-hippocampal afferents, pyramidal and granule cells of the rat hippocampus was examined by autoradiography using the stable SS analogue 125 I-204-090 as radioligand. Electrolytical lesions of the septum did not result in modification of SS binding in the hippocampus. In contrast, both granule cell lesion with colchicine and pyramidal or pyramidal and granule cell lesions with increasing kainic acid doses did result in a specific decrease of binding in the dentate gyrus and hippocampus (CA 1 and CA 3 ). These results suggest that SS receptors in the hippocampus are probably associated with elements from intrinsic neurons. (Author)

  17. Effect of inhibitory avoidance trainning, ACTH, beta-endorphin and adrenaline on the incorporation of 14C-leucine into synaptosomal proteins of rat hypothalamus, amygdala and hippocampus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalmaz, C.; Maia, H.M.M.; Izquierdo, I.

    1986-01-01

    'In vitro' incorporation of leucine to protein was studied in synaptosomes isolated from the hypothalamus, amygdala and hippocampus of rats submitted to inhibitory avoidance training or to the i.p. injection of ACTH, beta-endorphin or adrenaline; or in synaptosomes incubated with these substances. (M.A.C.) [pt

  18. Effect of Vitamin D in HN9.10e Embryonic Hippocampal Cells and in Hippocampus from MPTP-Induced Parkinson’s Disease Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuela Cataldi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available It has long been proven that neurogenesis continues in the adult brains of mammals in the dentatus gyrus of the hippocampus due to the presence of neural stem cells. Although a large number of studies have been carried out to highlight the localization of vitamin D receptor in hippocampus, the expression of vitamin D receptor in neurogenic dentatus gyrus of hippocampus in Parkinson’s disease (PD and the molecular mechanisms triggered by vitamin D underlying the production of differentiated neurons from embryonic cells remain unknown. Thus, we performed a preclinical in vivo study by inducing PD in mice with MPTP and showed a reduction of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP and vitamin D receptor in the dentatus gyrus of hippocampus. Then, we performed an in vitro study by inducing embryonic hippocampal cell differentiation with vitamin D. Interestingly, vitamin D stimulates the expression of its receptor. Vitamin D receptor is a transcription factor that probably is responsible for the upregulation of microtubule associated protein 2 and neurofilament heavy polypeptide genes. The latter increases heavy neurofilament protein expression, essential for neurofilament growth. Notably N-cadherin, implicated in activity for dendritic outgrowth, is upregulated by vitamin D.

  19. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and chronic stress-induced modulations of glutamatergic neurotransmission in the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennebelle, Marie; Champeil-Potokar, Gaëlle; Lavialle, Monique; Vancassel, Sylvie; Denis, Isabelle

    2014-02-01

    Chronic stress causes the release of glucocorticoids, which greatly influence cerebral function, especially glutamatergic transmission. These stress-induced changes in neurotransmission could be counteracted by increasing the dietary intake of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs). Numerous studies have described the capacity of n-3 PUFAs to help protect glutamatergic neurotransmission from damage induced by stress and glucocorticoids, possibly preventing the development of stress-related disorders such as depression or anxiety. The hippocampus contains glucocorticoid receptors and is involved in learning and memory. This makes it particularly sensitive to stress, which alters certain aspects of hippocampal function. In this review, the various ways in which n-3 PUFAs may prevent the harmful effects of chronic stress, particularly the alteration of glutamatergic synapses in the hippocampus, are summarized. © 2014 International Life Sciences Institute.

  20. Synergistic Effects of Psychosocial Stress and Mild Peripheral Infection on Inducing Microglial Activation in the Hippocampal Dentate Gyrus and Long-Lasting Deficits in Hippocampus-Related Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeng, Wen-Yu; Su, Chien-Chou; Sun, Li-Han; Cherng, Chianfang G.; Yu, Lung

    2018-04-30

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment and stress may cause immune activation in the brain, an event which has been thought to play a role in mediating stress-induced cognitive dysfunction. However, the enduring impact of psychosocial stress on brain immune activation or cognitive deficits has not been well investigated. Likewise, it remains unexplored whether there exist synergistic effects of psychosocial stress and a weak systemic LPS treatment on brain immune activation and/or cognitive function. In this work, a 10-day social defeat regimen was used to model psychosocial stress and the number and density of ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule 1 (Iba1)-stained microglia was used to reveal brain immune activation in male Balb/C mice. The social defeat regimen did not cause observable microglial activation in dentate gyrus (DG) 24 h after the conclusion of the regimen. Microglial activation peaked in DG 24 h following a single 1 mg/kg intra-peritoneal LPS injection. At this time point, DG microglial activation was not evident providing 0.125 mg/kg or lower of LPS was used, this dose of LPS was, thus, regarded as the “sub-threshold” in this study. Twenty-four h after the conclusion of the defeat regimen, mice received a social interaction test to determine their defeat stress susceptibility and a “sub-threshold” LPS injection. DG microglial activation was observed in the defeat-stress susceptible, but not in the resilient, mice. Furthermore, the stress-susceptible mice showed impairment in object location and Y maze tasks 24 and 72 h after the “sub-threshold” LPS injection. These results suggest that psychosocial stress, when combined with a negligible peripheral infection, may induce long-lasting hippocampus-related memory deficits exclusively in subjects susceptible to psychosocial stresses.

  1. Effect of Different Intensities of Short Term Aerobic Exercise on Expression of miR-124 in the Hippocampus of Adult Male Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shima Mojtahedi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: One of the most specific miRNA of the brain is miR-124 which has been detected in the hippocampal area. This microRNA through suppression of some target genes, cause the stem cell to be changed into the neuron. The aim of this study was to identify the effect of exercise intensity on the expression of miR-124.Materials and Method: Eighteenadult male Wistar rats were selected as subjects. The animals randomly divided into 3 groups of control (n=6 and runner (n=6. In low intensity group (n=6 animals daily, were allowed to run on treadmill with an intensity of about 35-40% of maximum oxygen consumption, daily for 30 minutes, of 2 weeks period. In high intensity group (n=6 the subjects were run in the same conditions but with an intensity of about 70-75% maximum oxygen consumption. After 24 hours of the last session of exercise, the animals were killed. Changes in expression analyzed using the quantitave RT-PCR technique.Results: Statistical analysis by one-way ANOVA showed a statistically significant association between the intensities of exercise and elevated expression of miR-124 in the exercise group at significant level of p≤0.05.Conclusion: To sum up, expression of miR-124, in the hippocampus of adult rats, is associated with exercise intensity and running forcefully in comparison with lower intensity, in which leads to robust changes in some mechanisms that involve in exercise- induced neurogenesis

  2. The effect of various morphine weaning regimens on the sequelae of opioid tolerance involving physical dependency, anxiety and hippocampus cell neurodegeneration in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motaghinejad, Majid; Karimian, Seyed Morteza; Motaghinejad, Ozra; Shabab, Behnaz; Asadighaleni, Majid; Fatima, Sulail

    2015-06-01

    Chronic consumption of morphine induces physical dependency, anxiety, and neurodegeneration. In this study, morphine on its own has been used for the management of morphine-induced dependency, oxidative stress, and apoptosis. Forty-eight male rats were randomly divided into six groups. Rats in groups 1-5 were made morphine dependent by an increasing manner of morphine for 7 days (15-45 mg/kg). For the next 14 days, morphine was administered using the following regimen: (i) once daily 45 mg/kg (positive controls), (ii) the same dose at additional intervals (6 h longer than the previous intervals each time), (iii) 45 mg/kg of morphine at irregular intervals like of 12, 24, 36 h, (iv) decreasing dose once daily (every time 2.5 mg/kg less than the former dosage). Group 5 received 45 mg/kg of morphine and 10 mg/kg of SOD mimetic agent (M40401) injection per day. Group 6 (negative control) received saline solution only. On day 22, all animals received naloxone (3 mg/kg) and their Total Withdrawal Index (TWI) and blood cortisol levels were measured. After drug treatment, hippocampus cells were isolated, and oxidative, antioxidative, and apoptotic factors were evaluated. Various regimens of morphine reduced TWI, cortisol levels, Bax activity, caspase-3, caspase-9, TNF-α, and IL-1β and lipid peroxidation. In all treatment groups, GSH level, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and Bcl-2 activity were significantly increased. Furthermore, SOD mimetic agent c diminished morphine effect on SOD activity. Thus, varying the dosage regimen of morphine can reduce the severity of morphine-induced dependency and neurodegeneration. © 2015 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  3. Curcumin attenuates glutamate neurotoxicity in the hippocampus by suppression of ER stress-associated TXNIP/NLRP3 inflammasome activation in a manner dependent on AMPK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ying; Li, Jia; Li, Shanshan; Li, Yi; Wang, Xiangxiang; Liu, Baolin [Department of Pharmacology of Chinese Materia Medica, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, 639, Longmian Road, Nanjing 211198 (China); Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory for TCM Evaluation and Translational Research, China Pharmaceutical University, 639, Longmian Road, Nanjing 211198 (China); Fu, Qiang, E-mail: fuqiang@cpu.edu.cn [Department of Pharmacology of Chinese Materia Medica, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, 639, Longmian Road, Nanjing 211198 (China); Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory for TCM Evaluation and Translational Research, China Pharmaceutical University, 639, Longmian Road, Nanjing 211198 (China); Ma, Shiping, E-mail: spma@cpu.edu.cn [Department of Pharmacology of Chinese Materia Medica, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, 639, Longmian Road, Nanjing 211198 (China); Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory for TCM Evaluation and Translational Research, China Pharmaceutical University, 639, Longmian Road, Nanjing 211198 (China)

    2015-07-01

    Curcumin is a natural polyphenolic compound in Curcuma longa with beneficial effects on neuronal protection. This study aims to investigate the action of curcumin in the hippocampus subjected to glutamate neurotoxicity. Glutamate stimulation induced reactive oxygen species (ROS), endoplasmic reticulum stress (ER stress) and TXNIP/NLRP3 inflammasome activation, leading to damage in the hippocampus. Curcumin treatment in the hippocampus or SH-SY5Y cells inhibited IRE1α and PERK phosphorylation with suppression of intracellular ROS production. Curcumin increased AMPK activity and knockdown of AMPKα with specific siRNA abrogated its inhibitory effects on IRE1α and PERK phosphorylation, indicating that AMPK activity was essential for the suppression of ER stress. As a result, curcumin reduced TXNIP expression and inhibited NLRP3 inflammasome activation by downregulation of NLRP3 and cleaved caspase-1 induction, and thus reduced IL-1β secretion. Specific fluorescent probe and flow cytometry analysis showed that curcumin prevented mitochondrial malfunction and protected cell survival from glutamate neurotoxicity. Moreover, oral administration of curcumin reduced brain infarct volume and attenuated neuronal damage in rats subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion. Immunohistochemistry showed that curcumin inhibited p-IRE1α, p-PERK and NLRP3 expression in hippocampus CA1 region. Together, these results showed that curcumin attenuated glutamate neurotoxicity by inhibiting ER stress-associated TXNIP/NLRP3 inflammasome activation via the regulation of AMPK, and thereby protected the hippocampus from ischemic insult. - Highlights: • Curcumin attenuates glutamate neurotoxicity in the hippocampus. • Curcumin suppresses ER stress in glutamate-induced hippocampus slices. • Curcumin inhibits TXNIP/NLRP3 inflammasome activation. • Regulation of AMPK by curcumin contributes to suppressing ER stress.

  4. Curcumin attenuates glutamate neurotoxicity in the hippocampus by suppression of ER stress-associated TXNIP/NLRP3 inflammasome activation in a manner dependent on AMPK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Ying; Li, Jia; Li, Shanshan; Li, Yi; Wang, Xiangxiang; Liu, Baolin; Fu, Qiang; Ma, Shiping

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin is a natural polyphenolic compound in Curcuma longa with beneficial effects on neuronal protection. This study aims to investigate the action of curcumin in the hippocampus subjected to glutamate neurotoxicity. Glutamate stimulation induced reactive oxygen species (ROS), endoplasmic reticulum stress (ER stress) and TXNIP/NLRP3 inflammasome activation, leading to damage in the hippocampus. Curcumin treatment in the hippocampus or SH-SY5Y cells inhibited IRE1α and PERK phosphorylation with suppression of intracellular ROS production. Curcumin increased AMPK activity and knockdown of AMPKα with specific siRNA abrogated its inhibitory effects on IRE1α and PERK phosphorylation, indicating that AMPK activity was essential for the suppression of ER stress. As a result, curcumin reduced TXNIP expression and inhibited NLRP3 inflammasome activation by downregulation of NLRP3 and cleaved caspase-1 induction, and thus reduced IL-1β secretion. Specific fluorescent probe and flow cytometry analysis showed that curcumin prevented mitochondrial malfunction and protected cell survival from glutamate neurotoxicity. Moreover, oral administration of curcumin reduced brain infarct volume and attenuated neuronal damage in rats subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion. Immunohistochemistry showed that curcumin inhibited p-IRE1α, p-PERK and NLRP3 expression in hippocampus CA1 region. Together, these results showed that curcumin attenuated glutamate neurotoxicity by inhibiting ER stress-associated TXNIP/NLRP3 inflammasome activation via the regulation of AMPK, and thereby protected the hippocampus from ischemic insult. - Highlights: • Curcumin attenuates glutamate neurotoxicity in the hippocampus. • Curcumin suppresses ER stress in glutamate-induced hippocampus slices. • Curcumin inhibits TXNIP/NLRP3 inflammasome activation. • Regulation of AMPK by curcumin contributes to suppressing ER stress

  5. Use of quality management methods in the transition from efficacious prevention programs to effective prevention services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Vicki-Smith; Sandler, Irwin; Wolchik, Sharlene

    2008-06-01

    This paper applies concepts and methods developed in management to translate efficacious prevention programs into effective prevention services. The paper describes Quality Function Deployment (QFD) as a method for structured planning and development that connects the needs and wants of the consumer with the design of the product or service. The paper describes basic tools used in quality management, and discusses how they might be applied to prepare a prevention program for implementation by community agencies. Prevention programs are conceptualized as having multiple consumers (i.e., stakeholders), including the participants who receive the service, the service providers, the organizations that deliver the program, and the researchers who evaluate the programs. As an illustration of one step in the application of QFD to translate efficacious prevention programs into effective prevention services, analysis of the needs and preferences of Family Courts for the implementation of an the New Beginnings Program is presented.

  6. [The effect of hypoxia preconditioning no binding activity of HIF-1 on the HRE with EPO in the hippocampus of mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Guo; Zhou, Wei-Hua; Gao, Cui-Ying; Zhang, Ran; Lu, Guo-Wei

    2007-02-01

    To observe change of binding activity of HIF-1 with erythropoietin (EPO) hypoxia response element (HRE) in the hippocampus of mice preconditioned to hypoxia and explore relationship between the changes and the preconditioning. The hippocampus was removed from mice exposed to hypoxia for 0 run (control group), 1 run (H1 group) and 4 runs(H4 group). Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA), chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)and real time PCR were used to detect the change of activity of HIF-1 on HRE of EPO. Both in vitro and in vivo binding tests showed that the HIF-1 DNA-binding activities were increased in group H1 and markedly increased in group H4. The increase of HIF-1 and HRE of EPO binding activities is thought be involved in hypoxic preconditioning.

  7. Effects of Chronic Alcohol Exposure on the Modulation of Ischemia-Induced Glutamate Release via Cannabinoid Receptors in the Dorsal Hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lei; Wu, Xiaoda; Dong, Xiao; Ding, Xinli; Song, Cunfeng

    2015-10-01

    Chronic alcohol consumption is a critical contributing factor to ischemic stroke, as it enhances ischemia-induced glutamate release, leading to more severe excitotoxicity and brain damage. But the neural mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are poorly understood. We evaluated the effects of chronic alcohol exposure on the modulation of ischemia-induced glutamate release via CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors during middle cerebral artery occlusion, using in vivo microdialysis coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography, in alcohol-naïve rats or rats after 1 or 30 days of withdrawal from chronic ethanol intake (6% v/v for 14 days). Intra-dorsal hippocampus (DH) infusions of ACEA or JWH133, selective CB1 or CB2 receptor agonists, respectively, decreased glutamate release in the DH in alcohol-naïve rats in a dose-dependent manner. Such an effect was reversed by co-infusions of SR141716A or AM630, selective CB1 or CB2 receptor antagonists, respectively. After 30 days, but not 1 day of withdrawal, ischemia induced an enhancement in glutamate release in the DH, as compared with non-alcohol-treated control group. Intra-DH infusions of JWH133, but not ACEA, inhibited ischemia-induced glutamate release in the DH after 30 days of withdrawal. Finally, 1 day of withdrawal did not alter the protein level of CB1 or CB2 receptors in the DH, as compared to non-alcohol-treated control rats. Whereas 30 days of withdrawal robustly decreased the protein level of CB1 receptors, but failed to alter the protein level of CB2 receptors, in the DH, as compared to non-alcohol-treated control rats. Together, these findings suggest that loss of expression/function of CB1 receptors, but not CB2 receptors in the DH, is correlated with the enhancement of ischemia-induced glutamate release after prolonged alcohol withdrawal. Copyright © 2015 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  8. Effect of background color of tanks on growth and survival of juvenile Yellow Seahorse, Hippocampus kuda (Bleeker 1852), in the pelagic phase

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pawar, H.B.; Sanaye, S.V.; Murugan, A.; Sreepada, R.A.; Tanu

    the supply, with at least 25 million seahorses (>70 tons dry weight) traded globally (Project Seahorse, 2006; Salin and Mohankumran, 2006). High exploitation rates in India, Indonesia, Philippines, Thailand, and Vietnam resulted in a decline of 25... and ecology of seahorses: implications for conservation and management. J. Fish Biol., 65:1-61. Garcia L.M.B., Hilomen-Garcia G.V. and R.L.M, Calibara, 2010. Culturing seahorse (Hippocampus barbouri) in illuminated cages with supplementary Acetes feeding...

  9. Effects of drugs of abuse on hippocampal plasticity and hippocampus-dependent learning and memory: contributions to development and maintenance of addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutlu, Munir Gunes; Gould, Thomas J

    2016-10-01

    It has long been hypothesized that conditioning mechanisms play major roles in addiction. Specifically, the associations between rewarding properties of drugs of abuse and the drug context can contribute to future use and facilitate the transition from initial drug use into drug dependency. On the other hand, the self-medication hypothesis of drug abuse suggests that negative consequences of drug withdrawal result in relapse to drug use as an attempt to alleviate the negative symptoms. In this review, we explored these hypotheses and the involvement of the hippocampus in the development and maintenance of addiction to widely abused drugs such as cocaine, amphetamine, nicotine, alcohol, opiates, and cannabis. Studies suggest that initial exposure to stimulants (i.e., cocaine, nicotine, and amphetamine) and alcohol may enhance hippocampal function and, therefore, the formation of augmented drug-context associations that contribute to the development of addiction. In line with the self-medication hypothesis, withdrawal from stimulants, ethanol, and cannabis results in hippocampus-dependent learning and memory deficits, which suggest that an attempt to alleviate these deficits may contribute to relapse to drug use and maintenance of addiction. Interestingly, opiate withdrawal leads to enhancement of hippocampus-dependent learning and memory. Given that a conditioned aversion to drug context develops during opiate withdrawal, the cognitive enhancement in this case may result in the formation of an augmented association between withdrawal-induced aversion and withdrawal context. Therefore, individuals with opiate addiction may return to opiate use to avoid aversive symptoms triggered by the withdrawal context. Overall, the systematic examination of the role of the hippocampus in drug addiction may help to formulate a better understanding of addiction and underlying neural substrates. © 2016 Kutlu and Gould; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  10. Effects of drugs of abuse on hippocampal plasticity and hippocampus-dependent learning and memory: contributions to development and maintenance of addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutlu, Munir Gunes

    2016-01-01

    It has long been hypothesized that conditioning mechanisms play major roles in addiction. Specifically, the associations between rewarding properties of drugs of abuse and the drug context can contribute to future use and facilitate the transition from initial drug use into drug dependency. On the other hand, the self-medication hypothesis of drug abuse suggests that negative consequences of drug withdrawal result in relapse to drug use as an attempt to alleviate the negative symptoms. In this review, we explored these hypotheses and the involvement of the hippocampus in the development and maintenance of addiction to widely abused drugs such as cocaine, amphetamine, nicotine, alcohol, opiates, and cannabis. Studies suggest that initial exposure to stimulants (i.e., cocaine, nicotine, and amphetamine) and alcohol may enhance hippocampal function and, therefore, the formation of augmented drug-context associations that contribute to the development of addiction. In line with the self-medication hypothesis, withdrawal from stimulants, ethanol, and cannabis results in hippocampus-dependent learning and memory deficits, which suggest that an attempt to alleviate these deficits may contribute to relapse to drug use and maintenance of addiction. Interestingly, opiate withdrawal leads to enhancement of hippocampus-dependent learning and memory. Given that a conditioned aversion to drug context develops during opiate withdrawal, the cognitive enhancement in this case may result in the formation of an augmented association between withdrawal-induced aversion and withdrawal context. Therefore, individuals with opiate addiction may return to opiate use to avoid aversive symptoms triggered by the withdrawal context. Overall, the systematic examination of the role of the hippocampus in drug addiction may help to formulate a better understanding of addiction and underlying neural substrates. PMID:27634143

  11. Effect of dietary γ-aminobutyric acid on the nerve growth factor and the choline acetyltransferase in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of ovariectomized female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tujioka, Kazuyo; Thanapreedawat, Panicha; Yamada, Takashi; Yokogoshi, Hidehiko; Horie, Kenji; Kim, Mujo; Tsutsui, Kazumi; Hayase, Kazutoshi

    2014-01-01

    The brain protein synthesis and the plasma concentration of growth hormone (GH) is sensitive to the dietary γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in ovariectomized female rats; however, the role of dietary GABA on biomarkers including nerve growth factor (NGF) and choline acetyltransferase for the function of cholinergic neurons remains unknown in ovariectomized female rats. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the dietary GABA affects the concentration and mRNA level of NGF, and the activity of choline acetyltransferase in the brains of ovariectomized female rats. Experiments were done on two groups of 24-wk-old ovariectomized female rats given 0 or 0.5% GABA added to a 20% casein diet. The concentrations of NGF and activities of choline acetyltransferase in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus, and mRNA level of NGF in the hippocampus increased significantly with the 20% casein+0.5% GABA compared with the 20% casein diet alone. In the hippocampus, the mRNA level of NGF significantly correlated with the NGF concentration (r=0.714, pGABA to ovariectomized female rats is likely to control the mRNA level and concentration of NGF and cause an increase in the activity of choline acetyltransferase in the brains.

  12. The functions of sound production in the lined seahorse, Hippocampus erectus, and effects of loud ambient noise on its behavior and physiology in captive environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Paul August

    Loud noise in aquaria represents a cacophonous environment for captive fishes. I tested the effects of loud noise on acoustic communication, feeding behavior, courtship behavior, and the stress response of the lined seahorse, Hippocampus erectus. Total Root Mean Square (RMS) power of ambient noise to which seahorses are exposed in captivity varies widely but averages 126.1 +/- 0.8 deciBels with reference to one micropascal (dB re: 1 muPa) at the middle of the water column and 133.7 +/- 1.1 dB at the tank bottom, whereas ambient noise in the wild averages 119.6 +/- 3.5 dB. Hearing sensitivity of H. erectus, measured from auditory evoked potentials, demonstrated maximum spectrum-level sensitivities of 105.0 +/- 1.5 dB and 3.5 x 10-3 + 7.6 x 10-4 m/s2 at 200 Hz; which is characteristic of hearing generalists. H. erectus produces acoustic clicks with mean peak spectrum-level amplitudes of 94.3 +/- 0.9 dB at 232 +/- 16 Hz and 1.5 x 10 -3 +/- 1.9 x 10-4 m/s2 at 265 +/- 22 Hz. Frequency matching of clicks to best hearing sensitivity, and estimates of audition of broadband signals suggest that seahorses may hear conspecific clicks, especially in terms of particle motion. Behavioral investigations revealed that clicking did not improve prey capture proficiency. However, animals clicked more often as time progressed in a courtship sequence, and mates performed more courtship behaviors with control animals than with muted animals, lending additional evidence to the role of clicking as an acoustic signal during courtship. Despite loud noise and the role of clicking in communication, masking of the acoustic signal was not demonstrated. Seahorses exposed to loud noise in aquaria for one month demonstrated physiological, chronic stress responses: reduced weight and body condition, and increased heterophil to lymphocyte ratio. Behavioral alterations were characterized by greater mean and variance of activity among animals housed in loud tanks in the first week, followed by

  13. Beneficial Effects of Tianeptine on Hippocampus-Dependent Long-Term Memory and Stress-Induced Alterations of Brain Structure and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoladz, Phillip R.; Muñoz, Carmen; Diamond, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Tianeptine is a well-described antidepressant which has been shown to prevent stress from producing deleterious effects on brain structure and function. Preclinical studies have shown that tianeptine blocks stress-induced alterations of neuronal morphology and synaptic plasticity. Moreover, tianeptine prevents stress from impairing learning and memory, and, importantly, demonstrates memory-enhancing properties in the absence of stress. Recent research has indicated that tianeptine works by normalizing glutamatergic neurotransmission, a mechanism of action that may underlie its effectiveness as an antidepressant. These findings emphasize the value in focusing on the mechanisms of action of tianeptine, and specifically, the glutamatergic system, in the development of novel pharmacotherapeutic strategies in the treatment of depression.

  14. Beneficial Effects of Tianeptine on Hippocampus-Dependent Long-Term Memory and Stress-Induced Alterations of Brain Structure and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Muñoz

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Tianeptine is a well-described antidepressant which has been shown to prevent stress from producing deleterious effects on brain structure and function. Preclinical studies have shown that tianeptine blocks stress-induced alterations of neuronal morphology and synaptic plasticity. Moreover, tianeptine prevents stress from impairing learning and memory, and, importantly, demonstrates memory-enhancing properties in the absence of stress. Recent research has indicated that tianeptine works by normalizing glutamatergic neurotransmission, a mechanism of action that may underlie its effectiveness as an antidepressant. These findings emphasize the value in focusing on the mechanisms of action of tianeptine, and specifically, the glutamatergic system, in the development of novel pharmacotherapeutic strategies in the treatment of depression.

  15. Short-Term Fructose Feeding Induces Inflammation and Oxidative Stress in the Hippocampus of Young and Adult Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cigliano, Luisa; Spagnuolo, Maria Stefania; Crescenzo, Raffaella; Cancelliere, Rosa; Iannotta, Lucia; Mazzoli, Arianna; Liverini, Giovanna; Iossa, Susanna

    2018-04-01

    The drastic increase in the consumption of fructose encouraged the research to focus on its effects on brain physio-pathology. Although young and adults differ largely by their metabolic and physiological profiles, most of the previous studies investigated brain disturbances induced by long-term fructose feeding in adults. Therefore, we investigated whether a short-term consumption of fructose (2 weeks) produces early increase in specific markers of inflammation and oxidative stress in the hippocampus of young and adult rats. After the high-fructose diet, plasma lipopolysaccharide and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha were found significantly increased in parallel with hippocampus inflammation, evidenced by a significant rise in TNF-alpha and glial fibrillar acidic protein concentrations in both the young and adult groups. The fructose-induced inflammatory condition was associated with brain oxidative stress, as increased levels of lipid peroxidation and nitro-tyrosine were detected in the hippocampus. The degree of activation of the protein kinase B, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, and insulin receptor substrate 1 pathways found in the hippocampus after fructose feeding indicates that the detrimental effects of the fructose-rich diet might largely depend on age. Mitochondrial function in the hippocampus, together with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha content, was found significantly decreased in fructose-treated adult rats. In vitro studies with BV-2 microglial cells confirmed that fructose treatment induces TNF-alpha production as well as oxidative stress. In conclusion, these results suggest that unbalanced diet, rich in fructose, may be highly deleterious in young people as in adults and must be strongly discouraged for the prevention of diet-associated neuroinflammation and neurological diseases.

  16. Diapause prevention effect of Bombyx mori by dimethyl sulfoxide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayuki Yamamoto

    Full Text Available HCl treatment has been, for about 80 years, the primary method for the prevention of entry into embryonic diapauses of Bombyx mori. This is because no method is as effective as the HCl treatment. In this study, we discovered that dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO prevented entry into the diapause of the silkworm, Bombyx mori. The effect of diapause prevention was 78% as a result of treatment with 100% DMSO concentration, and the effect was comparable to that of the HCl treatment. In contrast, in the case of non-diapause eggs, hatchability was decreased by DMSO in a concentration-dependent manner. The effect of DMSO was restricted within 24 hours after oviposition of diapause eggs, and the critical period was slightly shorter than the effective period of the HCl treatment. DMSO analogs, such as dimethyl formamide (DMF and dimethyl sulfide (DMS, did little preventive effect against the diapause. Furthermore, we also investigated the permeation effects of chemical compounds by DMSO. When treated with an inhibitor of protein kinase CK2 (CK2 dissolved in DMSO, the prevention rate of the diapause was less than 40%. This means that the inhibition effect by the CK2 inhibitor was the inhibition of embryonic development after diapause prevention by DMSO. These data suggest that DMSO has the effects of preventing from entering into the diapause and permeation of chemicals into diapause eggs.

  17. The economic effect of Planet Health on preventing bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li Yan; Nichols, Lauren P; Austin, S Bryn

    2011-08-01

    To assess the economic effect of the school-based obesity prevention program Planet Health on preventing disordered weight control behaviors and to determine the cost-effectiveness of the intervention in terms of its combined effect on prevention of obesity and disordered weight control behaviors. On the basis of the intervention's short-term effect on disordered weight control behaviors prevention, we projected the number of girls who were prevented from developing bulimia nervosa by age 17 years. We further estimated medical costs saved and quality-adjusted life years gained by the intervention over 10 years. As a final step, we compared the intervention costs with the combined intervention benefits from both obesity prevention (reported previously) and prevention of disordered weight control behaviors to determine the overall cost-effectiveness of the intervention. Middle schools. A sample of 254 intervention girls aged 10 to 14 years. The Planet Health program was implemented during the school years from 1995 to 1997 and was designed to promote healthful nutrition and physical activity among youth. Intervention costs, medical costs saved, quality-adjusted life years gained, and cost-effectiveness ratio. An estimated 1 case of bulimia nervosa would have been prevented. As a result, an estimated $33 999 in medical costs and 0.7 quality-adjusted life years would be saved. At an intervention cost of $46 803, the combined prevention of obesity and disordered weight control behaviors would yield a net savings of $14 238 and a gain of 4.8 quality-adjusted life years. Primary prevention programs, such as Planet Health, warrant careful consideration by policy makers and program planners. The findings of this study provide additional argument for integrated prevention of obesity and eating disorders.

  18. REBAMIPIDE: EFFECTIVE DRUG PREVENTION OF NSAID ENTEROPATHY IS POSSIBLE

    OpenAIRE

    E. V. Moroz; A. E. Karateev

    2016-01-01

    Prevention of gastrointestinal tract (GIT) complications is the most important element for the rational use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and low-dose aspirin (LDA). Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have long been the only medication to prevent these complications. However, PPIs are only effective in preventing and treating upper GIT diseases (NSAID gastropathy) rather than small intestinal injury (NSAID enteropathy). Rebamipide has emerged as a novel agent to protect the gast...

  19. Kaempferia parviflora rhizome extract and Myristica fragrans volatile oil increase the levels of monoamine neurotransmitters and impact the proteomic profiles in the rat hippocampus: Mechanistic insights into their neuroprotective effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waluga Plaingam

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Potentially useful in the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders, Kaempferia parviflora and Myristica fragrans have been shown to possess a wide spectrum of neuropharmacological activities and neuroprotective effects in vivo and in vitro. In this study, we determined whether and how K. parviflora ethanolic extract and M. fragrans volatile oil could influence the levels of neurotransmitters and the whole proteomic profile in the hippocampus of Sprague Dawley (SD rats. The effects of K. parviflora and M. fragrans on protein changes were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2D-gel, and proteins were identified by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS. The target proteins were then confirmed by Western blot. The levels of neurotransmitters were evaluated by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC. The results showed that K. parviflora, M. fragrans and fluoxetine (the control drug for this study increased serotonin, norepinephrine and dopamine in the rat hippocampus compared to that of the vehicle-treated group. Our proteomic data showed that 37 proteins in the K. parviflora group were up-regulated, while 14 were down-regulated, and 27 proteins in the M. fragrans group were up-regulated, while 16 were down-regulated. In the fluoxetine treatment group, we found 29 proteins up-regulated, whereas 14 proteins were down-regulated. In line with the proteomic data, the levels of GFAP, PDIA3, DPYSL2 and p-DPYSL2 were modified in the SD rat groups treated with K. parviflora, M. fragrans and fluoxetine as confirmed by Western blot. K. parviflora and M. fragrans mediated not only the levels of monoamine neurotransmitters but also the proteomic profiles in the rat hippocampus, thus shedding light on the mechanisms targeting neurodegenerative diseases.

  20. The antidepressant agomelatine blocks the adverse effects of stress on memory and enables spatial learning to rapidly increase neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) expression in the hippocampus of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conboy, Lisa; Tanrikut, Cihan; Zoladz, Phillip R; Campbell, Adam M; Park, Collin R; Gabriel, Cecilia; Mocaer, Elisabeth; Sandi, Carmen; Diamond, David M

    2009-04-01

    Agomelatine, a novel antidepressant with established clinical efficacy, acts as a melatonin receptor agonist and 5-HT(2C) receptor antagonist. As stress is a significant risk factor in the development of depression, we sought to determine if chronic agomelatine treatment would block the stress-induced impairment of memory in rats trained in the radial-arm water maze (RAWM), a hippocampus-dependent spatial memory task. Moreover, since neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) is known to be critically involved in memory consolidation and synaptic plasticity, we evaluated the effects of agomelatine on NCAM, and polysialylated NCAM (PSA-NCAM) expression in rats given spatial memory training with or without predator stress. Adult male rats were pre-treated with agomelatine (10 mg/kg i.p., daily for 22 d), followed by a single day of RAWM training and memory testing. Rats were given 12 training trials and then they were placed either in their home cages (no stress) or near a cat (predator stress). Thirty minutes later the rats were given a memory test trial followed immediately by brain extraction. We found that: (1) agomelatine blocked the predator stress-induced impairment of spatial memory; (2) agomelatine-treated stressed, as well as non-stressed, rats exhibited a rapid training-induced increase in the expression of synaptic NCAM in the ventral hippocampus; and (3) agomelatine treatment blocked the water-maze training-induced decrease in PSA-NCAM levels in both stressed and non-stressed animals. This work provides novel observations which indicate that agomelatine blocks the adverse effects of stress on hippocampus-dependent memory and activates molecular mechanisms of memory storage in response to a learning experience.

  1. 音乐对大鼠学习和记忆及海马NMDA受体表达的作用%Effect of music on learning and memory and expression of NMDA receptor on rat hippocampus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王增贤; 王晓亚; 王怀经; 李振中; 王越; 邢子英

    2007-01-01

    目的 研究音乐对大鼠空间学习和记忆的影响及对大鼠海马内NMDA受体的表达的影响.方法 用Morris水迷宫中,位置非匹配任务行为检测方法,检测音乐刺激后,大鼠学习和记忆行为能力的变化,并用免疫组织化学、PCR技术,检测大鼠海马NMDA受体及编码NMDA受体的mRNA表达的变化.结果 音乐刺激后,大鼠空间记忆能力改善,信息游泳逃和选择游泳逃避潜伏期缩短,选择游泳选择正确率提高;海马神经元NMDA受体及其mRNA表达增加.这些变化以持续音乐刺激组变化最明显,生后音乐组次之,对照组变化最小.结论 音乐刺激能提高大鼠空间记忆能力,能增强大鼠海马神经元NMDA受体表达,增强海马组织编码NMDA受体的mRNA表达.%Objective: To study the effect of music on spatial learning and memory and the expression of the NMDA receptor in rat hippocampus. Methods:The no-matched position task in the Morris's water maze was used to examine the behavior changes on learning and memory , and immunohistochemistry and PCR technique were carried out to measure the expression of NMDA receptor and mRNA coding the receptor on hippocampus from Wistar rats after music stimulation. Results:After music exposure the spatial memory of rats improved; the avoiding latency of information swim and choice swim shortened, and choice accuration in choice swim increased; the expression of NMDA receptor and the mRNA coding the NMDA receptor on hippocampus was strengthened. All these effects were the strongest in the persistent music treated group, moderate in the postnatal music treated group, and least in the control groups. Conclusion:Music can improve the spatial memory of rats and increase the expression of the NMDA receptor and the mRNA coding the NMDA receptor in hippocampus.

  2. Comparative effect of Prunus persica L. BATSCH-water extract and tacrine (9-amino-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroacridine hydrochloride) on concentration of extracellular acetylcholine in the rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeon-Kye; Koo, Byung-Soo; Gong, Dae-Jong; Lee, Young-Choon; Ko, Jeong-Heon; Kim, Cheorl-Ho

    2003-08-01

    Prunus persica L. BATSCH seed-water extract (PPE) has been used in the treatment of the degenerative disorders, such as hypermenorrhea and dysmenorrhea, in Taiwan, China, Japan and Korea. In this study, the effects of oral administration of PPE on the extracellular acetylcholine concentration in the hippocampus of rats were evaluated, and compared to that of tacrine (9-amino-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroacridine hydrochloride), a well-known and centrally acting acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitor, which had been developed for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. We measured the inhibition of brain AChE. PPE at 2.5g/kg and tacrine at 5mg/kg showed significant effects for more than 6h. At these doses, the maximum increases were observed at about 1.5h after administration of PPE, and at about 2h with tacrine, and were 454 and 412% of the pre-level, respectively. The results suggest that oral administration of PPE and tacrine increases acetylcholine concentration in the synaptic cleft of the hippocampus mostly through AChE inhibition, and that PPE has a potent and long-lasting effect on the central cholinergic system.

  3. Learned helplessness is independent of levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, B N; Strong, P V; Foley, T E; Thompson, R S; Fleshner, M

    2007-02-23

    Reduced levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the hippocampus have been implicated in human affective disorders and behavioral stress responses. The current studies examined the role of BDNF in the behavioral consequences of inescapable stress, or learned helplessness. Inescapable stress decreased BDNF mRNA and protein in the hippocampus of sedentary rats. Rats allowed voluntary access to running wheels for either 3 or 6 weeks prior to exposure to stress were protected against stress-induced reductions of hippocampal BDNF protein. The observed prevention of stress-induced deceases in BDNF, however, occurred in a time course inconsistent with the prevention of learned helplessness by wheel running, which is evident following 6 weeks, but not 3 weeks, of wheel running. BDNF suppression in physically active rats was produced by administering a single injection of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine (10 mg/kg) just prior to stress. Despite reduced levels of hippocampal BDNF mRNA following stress, physically active rats given the combination of fluoxetine and stress remained resistant against learned helplessness. Sedentary rats given both fluoxetine and stress still demonstrated typical learned helplessness behaviors. Fluoxetine by itself reduced BDNF mRNA in sedentary rats only, but did not affect freezing or escape learning 24 h later. Finally, bilateral injections of BDNF (1 mug) into the dentate gyrus prior to stress prevented stress-induced reductions of hippocampal BDNF but did not prevent learned helplessness in sedentary rats. These data indicate that learned helplessness behaviors are independent of the presence or absence of hippocampal BDNF because blocking inescapable stress-induced BDNF suppression does not always prevent learned helplessness, and learned helplessness does not always occur in the presence of reduced BDNF. Results also suggest that the prevention of stress-induced hippocampal BDNF suppression is not

  4. The air pollution: sources, effects, prevention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elichegaray, C.

    2008-01-01

    The author offers a detailed and illustrated panorama of the air pollution sources and effects. The study is realized at the individual scale with the indoor pollution and at a global scale with the consequences of the greenhouse effect gases. Added to classical pollutants, the book takes into account new pollutants (organic, nano particulates, biological) and the epidemiology. (A.L.B.)

  5. Effects of L-arginine and Nω-nitro-L-arginine methylester on learning and memory and α7 nAChR expression in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus of rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Ming Wei; Wei Yang; Li-Xia Liu; Wen-Xiu Qi

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a novel type of neurotransmitter that is closely associated with synaptic plasticity,learning and memory.In the present study,we assessed the effects of L-arginine and Nω-nitro-L-arginine methylester (L-NAME,a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor) on learning and memory.Rats were assigned to three groups receiving intracerebroventricular injections of L-Arg (the NO precursor),L-NAME,or 0.9% NaCI (control),once daily for seven consecutive days.Twelve hours after the last injection,they underwent an electric shock-paired Y maze test.Twenty-four hours later,the rats' memory of the safe illuminated arm was tested.After that,the levels of NO and α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAChR) in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus were assessed using an NO assay kit,and immunohistochemistry and Western blots,respectively.We found that,compared to controls,L-Arg-treated rats received fewer foot shocks and made fewer errors to reach the learning criterion,and made fewer errors during the memory-testing session.In contrast,L-NAME-treated rats received more foot shocks and made more errors than controls to reach the learning criterion,and made more errors during the memory-testing session.In parallel,NO content in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus was higher in L-Arg-treated rats and lower in L-NAME rats,compared to controls.Similarly,α7 nAChR immunoreactivity and protein expression in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus were higher in L-Arg-treated rats and lower in L-NAME rats,compared to controls.These results suggest that the modulation of NO content in the brain correlates with α7 nAChR distribution and expression in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus,as well as with learning and memory performance in the Y-maze.

  6. Forest fires prevention and limitation of the greenhouse effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The contribution of forest fires to the carbon budget and greenhouse effect is examined at global and national (Italian scale and forest management options directed to preventing fires are briefly outlined.

  7. Ensuring effective prevention of iodine-deficiency disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Völzke, Henry; Caron, Philippe Jean; Dahl, Lisbeth

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Programs initiated to prevent iodine deficiency disorders (IDD) may not remain effective due to changes in government policies, commercial factors, and human behavior that may affect the efficacy of IDD prevention programs in unpredictable directions. Monitoring and outcome studies...... by the lack of centralized standardization procedures. In addition, data on outcomes and the cost of achieving them are needed in order to provide evidence of the beneficial effects of IDD prevention in countries with mild iodine deficiency. CONCLUSION: Monitoring studies can be optimized by including...... in mildly iodine-deficient areas and that it should include populations from regions with different environmental, ethnic, and cultural backgrounds....

  8. Post-Training Reversible Inactivation of the Hippocampus Enhances Novel Object Recognition Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Ana M. M.; Hawk, Joshua D.; Abel, Ted; Havekes, Robbert

    2010-01-01

    Research on the role of the hippocampus in object recognition memory has produced conflicting results. Previous studies have used permanent hippocampal lesions to assess the requirement for the hippocampus in the object recognition task. However, permanent hippocampal lesions may impact performance through effects on processes besides memory…

  9. Prevention of the Portion Size Effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Versluis (Iris)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractAn increase in the portion size leads to an increase in energy intake, a phenomenon which is also referred to as the portion size effect. The increase in portion sizes in recent years is regarded as an important contributor to the increase in the prevalence of obesity. Hence, the aim

  10. Cardiac rehabilitation: an effective secondary prevention intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milligan, Fiona

    A combination of quantitative and qualitative research was used to determine the effectiveness of a cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programme in a cohort of patients referred to the service at a London hospital. Quantitative data analysis provided evidence of effectiveness of participation in CR in reduced hospital readmission rates and use of recognised pharmacological management strategies. Self-reported physical activity levels and quality of life (QOL) in individuals who participated in the cardiac rehabilitation programme were qualitatively measured with questionnaires. Results provided evidence of benefit in continued participation in exercise. However, there was no evidence of benefit to QOL status post participation at 1 year. A p-value of 0.001 provided significant statistical evidence supporting the hypothesis of benefit in continued participation in exercise in participants following attendance at a cardiac rehabilitation programme. QOL status; a statistically significant p-value of 0.001 rejected the hypothesis (H1) of benefit. This would imply that participation CR programmes does not appear to provide sustained benefits in QOL. A number of moderating variables were suggested as explaining the finding such as homogeneity of respondents, age, mood bias and the timeframe of 1 year between participation in rehabilitation and self-reporting. CR appears to be an effective but time-limited intervention in relation to improvements in QOL. Collaborative working partnerships between specialist interventions, such as CR with chronic disease management strategies may provide greater sustainability of benefits gained from participation in cardiac rehabilitation programmes.

  11. The effects of electromagnetic pulse on the protein levels of tight junction associated-proteins in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, heart, lung, and testis of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, LianBo; Chen, Chen; Ding, GuiRong; Zhou, Yan; Zhang, MengYao

    2011-08-01

    To investigate changes in the expression of tight junction (TJ) proteins in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, heart, lung, and testes of rats after exposure to electromagnetic pulse (EMP). Eighteen adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into sham and exposure groups. The exposure groups received EMP at 200 kV/m for 200 pulses with a repetition rate of 1 Hz. The expression of TJ proteins (ZO-1, occludin, actin) in the several organs was examined by western blotting. ZO-1 levels in the cerebral cortex decreased 1 h and 3 h after EMP exposure compared with sham group (P<0.05). No significant difference was observed for occludin and actin. ZO-1 levels in the hippocampus increased 1 h and 3 h post-exposure (P<0.05), and occludin decreased after 3 h (P<0.05); however, actin was unaffected. ZO-1 levels in the heart increased 3 h post-exposure (P<0.05), occludin decreased 3 h post-exposure (P<0.05), and actin increased 1 h and 3 h post-exposure (P<0.05). ZO-1, occludin and actin levels in the lung decreased compared with those in the sham group (P<0.05). ZO-1 and occludin levels in the testes decreased 1 h and 3 h post-exposure (P<0.05), but actin showed no significant change. Exposure to EMP altered the expression levels of TJ proteins, particularly ZO-1, in the organs of adult male rats, which may induce changes in barrier structure and function. Copyright © 2011 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Dynamic regulation effect of long non-coding RNA-UCA1 on NF-kB in hippocampus of epilepsy rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H-K; Yan, H; Wang, K; Wang, J

    2017-07-01

    We aimed to discuss the mechanism of occurrence and progression of epilepsy through analyzing the expression changes of UCA1 and NF-Kb in temporal hippocampus and UCA1 in peripheral blood in rats with epilepsy induced by lithium chloride-pilocarpine. The lithium chloride-pilocarpine-induced epilepsy rat model was established; 1, 7, 14, 30, and 60 d after status epilepticus were selected as the time points of research. The expression levels of UCA1 and NF-kB in the hippocampus of rats and UCA1 in peripheral blood were detected and analyzed using quantitative Real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). The differences and correlations between expression levels of UCA1 and NF-kB at each time point of research in experimental group and control group were analyzed statistically. Results showed that mRNA expression levels of UCA1 and NF-kB in brain tissues in experimental group were higher than those in control group at each time point. The change trend of expression levels of UCA1 and NF-kB with time was consistent. The expression level of UCA1 in peripheral blood in experimental group at each time point was higher than that in control group, and mRNA expression level of UCA1 in peripheral blood in experimental group was positively correlated with that in brain tissue. The expressions of UCA1 and NF-Kb are in the dynamic change in the formation of epilepsy, suggesting that UCA1 may participate in the pathogenesis of epilepsy, so as to provide a potentially feasible new direction for guiding the clinical diagnosis and treatment of epilepsy.

  13. Effects of potassium concentration on firing patterns of low-calcium epileptiform activity in anesthetized rat hippocampus: inducing of persistent spike activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhouyan; Durand, Dominique M

    2006-04-01

    It has been shown that a low-calcium high-potassium solution can generate ictal-like epileptiform activity in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, during status epileptiform activity, the concentration of [K+]o increases, and the concentration of [Ca2+]o decreases in brain tissue. Therefore we tested the hypothesis that long-lasting persistent spike activity, similar to one of the patterns of status epilepticus, could be generated by a high-potassium, low-calcium solution in the hippocampus in vivo. Artificial cerebrospinal fluid was perfused over the surface of the exposed left dorsal hippocampus of anesthetized rats. A stimulating electrode and a recording probe were placed in the CA1 region. By elevating K+ concentration from 6 to 12 mM in the perfusate solution, the typical firing pattern of low-calcium ictal bursts was transformed into persistent spike activity in the CA1 region with synaptic transmission being suppressed by calcium chelator EGTA. The activity was characterized by double spikes repeated at a frequency approximately 4 Hz that could last for >1 h. The analysis of multiple unit activity showed that both elevating [K+]o and lowering [Ca2+]o decreased the inhibition period after the response of paired-pulse stimulation, indicating a suppression of the after-hyperpolarization (AHP) activity. These results suggest that persistent status epilepticus-like spike activity can be induced by nonsynaptic mechanisms when synaptic transmission is blocked. The unique double-spike pattern of this activity is presumably caused by higher K+ concentration augmenting the frequency of typical low-calcium nonsynaptic burst activity.

  14. Electronic Immunization Alerts and Spillover Effects on Other Preventive Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Julia M; Rivera, Maria; Persing, Nichole; Bundy, David G; Psoter, Kevin J; Ghazarian, Sharon R; Miller, Marlene R; Solomon, Barry S

    2017-08-01

    The impact of electronic health record (EHR) immunization clinical alert systems on the delivery of other preventive services remains unknown. We assessed for spillover effects of an EHR immunization alert on delivery of 6 other preventive services, in children 18 to 30 months of age needing immunizations. We conducted a secondary data analysis, with additional primary data collection, of a randomized, historically controlled trial to improve immunization rates with EHR alerts, in an urban, primary care clinic. No significant differences were found in screening for anemia, lead, development, nutrition, and injury prevention counseling in children prompting EHR immunization alerts (n = 129), compared with controls (n = 135). Significant increases in oral health screening in patients prompting EHR alerts (odds ratio = 4.8, 95% CI = 1.8-13.0) were likely due to practice changes over time. An EHR clinical alert system targeting immunizations did not have a spillover effect on the delivery of other preventive services.

  15. Agomelatine, venlafaxine, and running exercise effectively prevent anxiety- and depression-like behaviors and memory impairment in restraint stressed rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarawut Lapmanee

    Full Text Available Several severe stressful situations, e.g., natural disaster, infectious disease out break, and mass casualty, are known to cause anxiety, depression and cognitive impairment, and preventive intervention for these stress complications is worth exploring. We have previously reported that the serotonin-norepinephrine-dopamine reuptake inhibitor, venlafaxine, as well as voluntary wheel running are effective in the treatment of anxiety- and depression-like behaviors in stressed rats. But whether they are able to prevent deleterious consequences of restraint stress in rats, such as anxiety/depression-like behaviors and memory impairment that occur afterward, was not known. Herein, male Wistar rats were pre-treated for 4 weeks with anti-anxiety/anti-depressive drugs, agomelatine and venlafaxine, or voluntary wheel running, followed by 4 weeks of restraint-induced stress. During the stress period, rats received neither drug nor exercise intervention. Our results showed that restraint stress induced mixed anxiety- and depression-like behaviors, and memory impairment as determined by elevated plus-maze, elevated T-maze, open field test (OFT, forced swimming test (FST, and Morris water maze (MWM. Both pharmacological pre-treatments and running successfully prevented the anxiety-like behavior, especially learned fear, in stressed rats. MWM test suggested that agomelatine, venlafaxine, and running could prevent stress-induced memory impairment, but only pharmacological treatments led to better novel object recognition behavior and positive outcome in FST. Moreover, western blot analysis demonstrated that venlafaxine and running exercise upregulated brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF expression in the hippocampus. In conclusion, agomelatine, venlafaxine as well as voluntary wheel running had beneficial effects, i.e., preventing the restraint stress-induced anxiety/depression-like behaviors and memory impairment.

  16. Predicting the effect of prevention of ischaemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik

    2002-01-01

    Priority setting in public health policy must be based on information on the effectiveness of alternative preventive and therapeutic interventions. The purpose of this study is to predict the effect on mortality from ischaemic heart disease (IHD) in Denmark of reduced exposure to the risk factors...... hypertension, hypercholesterolaemia, cigarette smoking, and physical inactivity....

  17. Estradiol enhances retention but not organization of hippocampus-dependent memory in intact male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Abed, Alice Shaam; Sellami, Azza; Brayda-Bruno, Laurent; Lamothe, Valérie; Noguès, Xavier; Potier, Mylène; Bennetau-Pelissero, Catherine; Marighetto, Aline

    2016-07-01

    Because estrogens have mostly been studied in gonadectomized females, effects of chronic exposure to environmental estrogens in the general population are underestimated. Estrogens can enhance hippocampus-dependent memory through the modulation of information storage. However, declarative memory, the hippocampus-dependent memory of facts and events, demands more than abilities to retain information. Specifically, memory of repetitive events of everyday life such as "where I parked" requires abilities to organize/update memories to prevent proactive interference from similar memories of previous "parking events". Whether such organizational processes are estrogen-sensitive is unknown. We here studied, in intact young and aged adult mice, drinking-water (1μM) estradiol effects on both retention and organizational components of hippocampus-dependent memory, using a radial-maze task of everyday-like memory. Demand on retention vs organization was manipulated by varying the time-interval separating repetitions of similar events. Estradiol increased performance in young and aged mice under minimized organizational demand, but failed to improve the age-associated memory impairment and diminished performance in young mice under high organizational demand. In fact, estradiol prolonged mnemonic retention of successive events without improving organization abilities, hence resulted in more proactive interference from irrelevant memories. c-Fos imaging of testing-induced brain activations showed that the deterioration of young memory was associated with dentate gyrus dysconnectivity, reminiscent of that seen in aged mice. Our findings support the view that estradiol is promnesic but also reveal that such property can paradoxically impair memory. These findings have important outcomes regarding health issues relative to the impact of environmental estrogens in the general population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of subchronic benzo(a)pyrene exposure on neurotransmitter receptor gene expression in the rat hippocampus related with spatial learning and memory change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Chongying; Cheng, Shuqun; Xia, Yinyin; Peng, Bin; Tang, Qian; Tu, Baijie

    2011-11-18

    Exposure of laboratory rats to Benzo(a)pyrene (BaP), an environmental contaminant with its high lipophilicify which is widely dispersed in the environment and can easily cross the blood brain barrier presenting in the central nervous system, is associated with impaired learning and memory. The purpose of the research was to examine whether subchronic exposure to BaP affects spatial learning and memory, and how it alters normal gene expression in hippocampus, as well as selection of candidate genes involving neurotransmitter receptor attributed to learning and memory. Morris water maze (MWM) was used to evaluate behavioral differences between BaP-treated and vehicle-treated groups. To gain a better insight into the mechanism of BaP-induced neurotoxicity on learning and memory, we used whole genome oligo microarrays as well as Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) to assess the global impact of gene expression. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were intraperitoneally injected with 6.25mg/kg of BaP or vehicle for 14 weeks. The results from the Morris water maze (MWM) test showed that rats treated with BaP exhibited significantly higher mean latencies as compared to vehicle controls. BaP exposure significantly decreased the number of crossing the platform and the time spent in the target area. After the hippocampus was collected from each rat, total RNA was isolated. Microarray and PCR revealed that exposure to BaP affected mRNA expression of neurotransmitter receptors. The web tool DAVID was used to analyze the significantly enriched gene ontology (GO) and KEGG pathways in the differentially expressed genes. Analysis showed that the most significantly affected gene ontology category was behavior. Furthermore, the fourth highest significantly affected gene ontology category was learning and memory. KEGG molecular pathway analysis showed that "neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction" was affected by BaP with highest statistical significance, and 9 candidate neurotransmitter receptor

  19. The mast cell stabilizer sodium cromoglycate reduces histamine release and status epilepticus-induced neuronal damage in the rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle-Dorado, María Guadalupe; Santana-Gómez, César Emmanuel; Orozco-Suárez, Sandra Adela; Rocha, Luisa

    2015-05-01

    Experiments were designed to evaluate changes in the histamine release, mast cell number and neuronal damage in hippocampus induced by status epilepticus. We also evaluated if sodium cromoglycate, a stabilizer of mast cells with a possible stabilizing effect on the membrane of neurons, was able to prevent the release of histamine, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate during the status epilepticus. During microdialysis experiments, rats were treated with saline (SS-SE) or sodium cromoglycate (CG-SE) and 30 min later received the administration of pilocarpine to induce status epilepticus. Twenty-four hours after the status epilepticus, the brains were used to determine the neuronal damage and the number of mast cells in hippocampus. During the status epilepticus, SS-SE group showed an enhanced release of histamine (138.5%, p = 0.005), GABA (331 ± 91%, p ≤ 0.001) and glutamate (467%, p ≤ 0.001), even after diazepam administration. One day after the status epilepticus, SS-SE group demonstrated increased number of mast cells in Stratum pyramidale of CA1 (88%, p status epilepticus (p = 0.048), absence of wet-dog shakes, reduced histamine (but not GABA and glutamate) release, lower number of mast cells (p = 0.008) and reduced neuronal damage in hippocampus. Our data revealed that histamine, possibly from mast cells, is released in hippocampus during the status epilepticus. This effect may be involved in the subsequent neuronal damage and is diminished with sodium cromoglycate pretreatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halken, S; Høst, A

    2001-01-01

    , breastfeeding should be encouraged for 4-6 months. In high-risk infants a documented extensively hydrolysed formula is recommended if exclusive breastfeeding is not possible for the first 4 months of life. There is no evidence for preventive dietary intervention neither during pregnancy nor lactation...... populations. These theories remain to be documented in proper, controlled and prospective studies. Breastfeeding and the late introduction of solid foods (>4 months) is associated with a reduced risk of food allergy, atopic dermatitis, and recurrent wheezing and asthma in early childhood. In all infants....... Preventive dietary restrictions after the age of 4-6 months are not scientifically documented....

  1. The antioxidant effect of hesperetin and nano-hesperetin on activity of catalase and superoxide dismutase enzymes in the hippocampus of animal model of Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Alizadeh*

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Hesperetin flavanone is a natural bioflavonoid found abundantly in citrus fruits with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Nano sizing techniques improve the bioavailability of poorly soluble drugs such as hesperetin. Main feature of Parkinson's disease is the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. The rate of oxidative damage increases during Parkinson's disease, as the efficiency of antioxidant and repair mechanisms decreases.The purpose of this study was to investigate the beneficial potential of hesperetin and nano-hesperetinon the activity of catalase and superoxide dismutase antioxidant enzymes in the animal model of Parkinson's disease. Methods:  Forty nine male rats were divided into 7 groups. All groups except the control group and vehicle with unilateral injection of 6-hydroxydopamine to striatum were converted to Parkinson's models. The four treatment groups received 5 and 10 mg/kg hesperetin and nano-hesperetinper day orally for four weeks. Then, at the end of the fourth week, the activity of catalase and superoxide dismutase in the hippocampus area was measured. Results: The results showed that intrastriatal injection of 6-hydroxydopamine significantly (p

  2. Preventive Effects of Beta-Hydroxy-Beta-Methyl Butyrate

    OpenAIRE

    N. Ravanbakhsh; N. Torabi; M. Foadoddini

    2016-01-01

    Aims: One of the major factors in sudden cardiac arrest is the initiation and continuation of deadly arrhythmias during ischemia. It is known that beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate (HMB) has useful effects such as anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptosis effects in the skeletal muscles. The aim of this study was to investigate the preventive effects of HMB on the ventricular arrhythmias due to the ischemia. Materials & Methods: In the experimental study, 30 Wistar male rats were randomly div...

  3. Aerobic Exercise During Encoding Impairs Hippocampus-Dependent Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soga, Keishi; Kamijo, Keita; Masaki, Hiroaki

    2017-08-01

    We investigated how aerobic exercise during encoding affects hippocampus-dependent memory through a source memory task that assessed hippocampus-independent familiarity and hippocampus-dependent recollection processes. Using a within-participants design, young adult participants performed a memory-encoding task while performing a cycling exercise or being seated. The subsequent retrieval phase was conducted while sitting on a chair. We assessed behavioral and event-related brain potential measures of familiarity and recollection processes during the retrieval phase. Results indicated that source accuracy was lower for encoding with exercise than for encoding in the resting condition. Event-related brain potential measures indicated that the parietal old/new effect, which has been linked to recollection processing, was observed in the exercise condition, whereas it was absent in the rest condition, which is indicative of exercise-induced hippocampal activation. These findings suggest that aerobic exercise during encoding impairs hippocampus-dependent memory, which may be attributed to inefficient source encoding during aerobic exercise.

  4. Intrauterine growth restriction affects the preterm infant's hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodygensky, Gregory A; Seghier, Mohammed L; Warfield, Simon K; Tolsa, Cristina Borradori; Sizonenko, Stephane; Lazeyras, François; Hüppi, Petra S

    2008-04-01

    The hippocampus is known to be vulnerable to hypoxia, stress, and undernutrition, all likely to be present in fetal intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). The effect of IUGR in preterm infants on the hippocampus was studied using 3D magnetic resonance imaging at term-equivalent age Thirteen preterm infants born with IUGR after placental insufficiency were compared with 13 infants with normal intrauterine growth age matched for gestational age. The hippocampal structural differences were defined using voxel-based morphometry and manual segmentation. The specific neurobehavioral function was evaluated by the Assessment of Preterm Infants' Behavior at term and at 24 mo of corrected age by a Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development. Voxel-based morphometry detected significant gray matter volume differences in the hippocampus between the two groups. This finding was confirmed by manual segmentation of the hippocampus with a reduction of hippocampal volume after IUGR. The hippocampal volume reduction was further associated with functional behavioral differences at term-equivalent age in all six subdomains of the Assessment of Preterm Infants' Behavior but not at 24 mo of corrected age. We conclude that hippocampal development in IUGR is altered and might result from a combination of maternal corticosteroid hormone exposure, hypoxemia, and micronutrient deficiency.

  5. Resistance exercise improves hippocampus-dependent memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.C. Cassilhas

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available It has been demonstrated that resistance exercise improves cognitive functions in humans. Thus, an animal model that mimics this phenomenon can be an important tool for studying the underlying neurophysiological mechanisms. Here, we tested if an animal model for resistance exercise was able to improve the performance in a hippocampus-dependent memory task. In addition, we also evaluated the level of insulin-like growth factor 1/insulin growth factor receptor (IGF-1/IGF-1R, which plays pleiotropic roles in the nervous system. Adult male Wistar rats were divided into three groups (N = 10 for each group: control, SHAM, and resistance exercise (RES. The RES group was submitted to 8 weeks of progressive resistance exercise in a vertical ladder apparatus, while the SHAM group was left in the same apparatus without exercising. Analysis of a cross-sectional area of the flexor digitorum longus muscle indicated that this training period was sufficient to cause muscle fiber hypertrophy. In a step-through passive avoidance task (PA, the RES group presented a longer latency than the other groups on the test day. We also observed an increase of 43 and 94% for systemic and hippocampal IGF-1 concentration, respectively, in the RES group compared to the others. A positive correlation was established between PA performance and systemic IGF-1 (r = 0.46, P < 0.05. Taken together, our data indicate that resistance exercise improves the hippocampus-dependent memory task with a concomitant increase of IGF-1 level in the rat model. This model can be further explored to better understand the effects of resistance exercise on brain functions.

  6. Preventive effectiveness of pre-employment medical assessments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Kort, W.; van Dijk, F.

    1997-01-01

    Health gain, prevention of health loss, and avoidance of financial risk all seem to be driving forces for the use of pre-employment medical assessment. An attempt is made to measure the effect of implementing the pre-employment medical assessment on these end points. The anticipated maximum

  7. Effect of health education on knowledge and prevention on Hepatitis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of health education on knowledge and prevention on Hepatitis infection among secondary school students in Ibadan North Local Government Area of Oyo state. ... Based on these findings, the study recommended that health education/ health campaign should be directed to school students and Specific risk practices ...

  8. REBAMIPIDE: EFFECTIVE DRUG PREVENTION OF NSAID ENTEROPATHY IS POSSIBLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Moroz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Prevention of gastrointestinal tract (GIT complications is the most important element for the rational use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs and low-dose aspirin (LDA. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs have long been the only medication to prevent these complications. However, PPIs are only effective in preventing and treating upper GIT diseases (NSAID gastropathy rather than small intestinal injury (NSAID enteropathy. Rebamipide has emerged as a novel agent to protect the gastrointestinal mucosa today. The effect of the drug differs from that of PPIs: it is a typical gastroand enteroprotector that enhances the synthesis of endogenous prostaglandins and possesses a significant anti-inflammatory potential. Rebamipide has long been widely used by doctors inJapan,South Korea, andChinaas an effective and safe agent for the treatment of many diseases of the digestive system. There is a strong evidence base for the efficacy of rebamipide in preventing and treating NSAID gastropathy and NSAID enteropathy (including LDA-induced injuries. Controlled studies have found that the drug is not inferior to the classic gastroprotective agent misoprostol, significantly outperforming the latter in its tolerability. This review describes the mechanism of action of rebamipide and main clinical trials of its therapeutic effect in NSAID gastropathy and NSAID enteropathy. 

  9. Household Barriers to Effective Malaria Prevention and Control in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Malaria is endemic throughout Nigeria. Majority of Nigerians live in rural areas where subsistence farming is their main occupation. Most of them live below poverty line, earning less than $1.25 a day. In rural communities, many household factors constitute barriers to effective malaria prevention and control.

  10. Caffeine and modafinil given during 48 h sleep deprivation modulate object recognition memory and synaptic proteins in the hippocampus of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhwa, M; Sahu, S; Kumari, P; Kauser, H; Ray, K; Panjwani, U

    2015-11-01

    We aimed to evaluate the effect of caffeine/modafinil on sleep deprivation (SD) induced alterations in recognition memory and synaptic proteins. The data revealed a beneficial effect of caffeine/modafinil against deficit in the familiar object retrieval performance and object exploration ratio after 48 h SD. Caffeine treatment prevented the SD induced down-regulation of synaptophysin and synapsin I proteins with no change in PSD-95 protein in hippocampus. However, modafinil administration improved the down-regulation of synaptophysin, synapsin I and PSD-95 proteins in hippocampus. Hence, caffeine/modafinil can serve as counter measures in amelioration of SD induced consequences at behavioural and protein levels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Obesity in aging exacerbates blood-brain barrier disruption, neuroinflammation, and oxidative stress in the mouse hippocampus: effects on expression of genes involved in beta-amyloid generation and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucsek, Zsuzsanna; Toth, Peter; Sosnowska, Danuta; Gautam, Tripti; Mitschelen, Matthew; Koller, Akos; Szalai, Gabor; Sonntag, William E; Ungvari, Zoltan; Csiszar, Anna

    2014-10-01

    There is growing evidence that obesity has deleterious effects on the brain and cognitive function in the elderly population. However, the specific mechanisms through which aging and obesity interact to promote cognitive decline remain unclear. To test the hypothesis that aging exacerbates obesity-induced cerebromicrovascular damage and neuroinflammation, we compared young (7 months) and aged (24 months) high fat diet-fed obese C57BL/6 mice. Aging exacerbated obesity-induced systemic inflammation and blood-brain barrier disruption, as indicated by the increased circulating levels of proinflammatory cytokines and increased presence of extravasated immunoglobulin G in the hippocampus, respectively. Obesity-induced blood-brain barrier damage was associated with microglia activation, upregulation of activating Fc-gamma receptors and proinflammatory cytokines, and increased oxidative stress. Treatment of cultured primary microglia with sera derived from aged obese mice resulted in significantly more pronounced microglia activation and oxidative stress, as compared with treatment with young sera. Serum-induced activation and oxidative stress were also exacerbated in primary microglia derived from aged animals. Hippocampal expression of genes involved in regulation of the cellular amyloid precursor protein-dependent signaling pathways, beta-amyloid generation, and the pathogenesis of tauopathy were largely unaffected by obesity in aged mice. Collectively, obesity in aging is associated with a heightened state of systemic inflammation, which exacerbates blood-brain barrier disruption. The resulting neuroinflammation and oxidative stress in the mouse hippocampus likely contribute to the significant cognitive decline observed in aged obese animals. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Effectiveness and Evaluation of Crime Prevention Programs in Minas Gerais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Beato

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This essay analyzes previous studies evaluating the effectiveness of the crime prevention policies adopted by the Government of Minas Gerais (Brazil. In this work, greater emphasis is placed on studies evaluating outcomes than on studies dealing with the process of setting up and implementing programs and projects. In order to allow a more systematic discussion, the Maryland Scale, which categorizes research and evaluations according to the methodological strengths and weaknesses in five levels, is employed. Subsequently, the authors draw a parallel between Brazil and other settings. Finally, this essay lays out the implications of this discussion regarding the prevention programs. 

  13. Long-term Impact of Prevention Programs to Promote Effective Parenting: Lasting Effects but Uncertain Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Sandler, Irwin; Schoenfelder, Erin; Wolchik, Sharlene; MacKinnon, David

    2011-01-01

    This chapter reviews findings from 46 randomized experimental trials of preventive parenting interventions. The findings of these trials provide evidence of effects to prevent a wide range of problem outcomes and to promote competencies from one to twenty years later. However, there is a paucity of evidence concerning the processes that account for program effects. Three alternative pathways are proposed as a framework for future research on the long-term effects of preventive parenting progr...

  14. Cost-effectiveness of root caries preventive treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwendicke, Falk; Göstemeyer, Gerd

    2017-01-01

    With a growing number of individuals retaining their teeth lifelong, often with periodontitis-induced root surface exposure, there is the need for cost-effective management strategies for root caries lesions. The present study aimed to assess the cost-effectiveness of root caries preventive treatments. Patients were simulated over 10 years using a Markov model. Four treatments were compared: No treatment, daily 225-800ppm fluoride rinses, chlorhexidine (CHX) varnish (2×/year), silver diamine fluoride (SDF) varnish (2×/year). Data from a systematic review were submitted to network meta-analysis for inferring relative efficacies of treatments. The health outcome was years of teeth being free of root caries. A mixed public-private payer perspective within 2016 German healthcare was taken, with costs being estimated from fee item catalogues or based on market prices. Populations with different numbers of teeth and tooth-level risks were modelled. Monte-Carlo microsimulations, univariate- and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed. In populations with 16 teeth at risk and low tooth-level risk for root caries, providing no preventive treatment was least costly, but also least effective (130 Euro, 144 years). SDF ranked next, being more costly (180 Euro), but also more effective (151 years). Payers willing to invest 8.30 Euro per root caries-free tooth-year found SDF most cost-effective. CHX varnish and fluoride rinse were not cost-effective. In populations with more teeth and high tooth-level risk, SDF was the most effective and least costly option. Root caries preventive treatments (like SDF) are effective and might even be cost-saving in high risk populations. Application of SDF can be recommended as a cost-saving treatment for prevention of root caries in patients with high risk of root caries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. [The new German prevention act: an effective strategy?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garlichs, Dietrich

    2015-10-01

    The new German prevention act attempts to deal with the influx of obesity and chronic diseases by educating and informing. It seeks to change individual behaviour and supress lifestyle-related risk factors. In the past, however this behavioural prevention strategy has proved ineffective. A structural prevention strategy, as requested by the WHO, should additionally be put into effect with measures that reach all walks of life, not just the health-conscious people in society. It proposes the following: · At least one hour of daily physical activity or sport at school and kindergarten. · A differential food tax that makes unhealthy foods more expensive and healthy foods cheaper (taxing sugary / fatty foods). · Mandatory quality standards for kindergarten and school meals. · Banning food advertising targeted at children. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Hippocampus in health and disease: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuljeet Singh Anand

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hippocampus is a complex brain structure embedded deep into temporal lobe. It has a major role in learning and memory. It is a plastic and vulnerable structure that gets damaged by a variety of stimuli. Studies have shown that it also gets affected in a variety of neurological and psychiatric disorders. In last decade or so, lot has been learnt about conditions that affect hippocampus and produce changes ranging from molecules to morphology. Progresses in radiological delineation, electrophysiology, and histochemical characterization have made it possible to study this archicerebral structure in greater detail. Present paper attempts to give an overview of hippocampus, both in health and diseases.

  17. Preventive effects of benfotiamine in chronic diabetic complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Rana; Chen, Megan; Liu, Weihua; Chen, Shali

    2011-04-07

    Aims/Introduction:  In diabetes, increased oxidative stress as a result of damage to the electron transport chain can lead to tissue injury through upregulation of multiple vasoactive factors and extracellular matrix proteins. Benfotiamine, a lipid soluble thiamine derivative, through reducing mitochondrial superoxide production, blocks multiple pathways leading to tissue damage in hyperglycemia. We investigated if treatment with benfotiamine can prevent diabetes-induced production of vasoactive factors and extracellular matrix proteins, and whether such effects are tissue-specific. We also examined whether effects of benfotiamine are mediated through a nuclear mechanism.   Retinal, renal and cardiac tissues from the streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats were examined after 4 months of follow up. mRNA levels were quantified using real-time RT-PCR. Protein levels were quantified using western blot and ELISA. Cellular expressions of 8-Hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine, a marker of nuclear DNA damage and Phospho-H2AX were also examined.   Diabetic animals showed hyperglycemia, glucosuria, increased urinary albumin/creatine ratio and loss of bodyweight. In the kidneys, heart and retina, diabetes caused increased production of endothelin-1, transforming growth factor-β1, vascular endothelial growth factor and augmented extracellular matrix proteins (collagen, fibronectin [FN] and its splice variant extradomain B containing FN), along with evidence of structural alterations, characteristic of diabetes-induced tissue damage. Such changes were prevented by benfotiamine. Furthermore, benfotiamine prevented diabetes-induced oxidative DNA damage and upregulation of p300, a histone acetylator and a transcription coactivator.   Data from the present study suggest that benfotiamine is effective in preventing tissue damage in diabetes and at the transcriptional level such effects are mediated through prevention of p300 upregulation. (J Diabetes Invest, doi: 10.1111/j.2040

  18. Evaluation method of radon preventing effect in underground construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Shaodong; Deng Yuequan; Dong Faqin; Qu Ruixue; Xie Zhonglei

    2014-01-01

    Background: It's difficult to evaluate the radon prevention effect because of the short operating time of measuring instrument under the circumstances of high humidity in underground construction. Purpose: A new rapid method to evaluate the radon prevention efficiency of underground construction was introduced. Methods: The radon concentrations before and after shielding operation were determined, and according to the regularity of radon decay, the shielding rate can be calculated. Results: The results showed that radon shielding rate in underground construction remains generally stable with variation of time, and the actual relatively standard deviation was 3.95%. So the rapid determination and evaluation of radon preventing effect under special conditions in underground construction can be realized by taking shielding rate in a short time for the final shielding rate. Compared with those by the local static method in ground lab, the results were similar. Conclusion: This paper provided a prompt, accurate and practicable way for the evaluation of radon prevention in underground construction, having a certain reference value. (authors)

  19. Cost-effectiveness in fall prevention for older women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hektoen, Liv F; Aas, Eline; Lurås, Hilde

    2009-08-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the cost-effectiveness of implementing an exercise-based fall prevention programme for home-dwelling women in the > or = 80-year age group in Norway. The impact of the home-based individual exercise programme on the number of falls is based on a New Zealand study. On the basis of the cost estimates and the estimated reduction in the number of falls obtained with the chosen programme, we calculated the incremental costs and the incremental effect of the exercise programme as compared with no prevention. The calculation of the average healthcare cost of falling was based on assumptions regarding the distribution of fall injuries reported in the literature, four constructed representative case histories, assumptions regarding healthcare provision associated with the treatment of the specified cases, and estimated unit costs from Norwegian cost data. We calculated the average healthcare costs per fall for the first year. We found that the reduction in healthcare costs per individual for treating fall-related injuries was 1.85 times higher than the cost of implementing a fall prevention programme. The reduction in healthcare costs more than offset the cost of the prevention programme for women aged > or = 80 years living at home, which indicates that health authorities should increase their focus on prevention. The main intention of this article is to stipulate costs connected to falls among the elderly in a transparent way and visualize the whole cost picture. Cost-effectiveness analysis is a health policy tool that makes politicians and other makers of health policy conscious of this complexity.

  20. Working memory and the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baddeley, Alan; Jarrold, Christopher; Vargha-Khadem, Faraneh

    2011-12-01

    A number of studies suggest an important role for the hippocampus in tasks involving visuospatial or relational working memory. We test the generality of this proposal across tasks using a battery designed to investigate the various components of working memory, studying the working memory performance of Jon, who shows a bilateral reduction in hippocampal volume of approximately 50%, comparing him to a group of 48 college students. We measure performance on four complex working memory span measures based on combining visuospatial and verbal storage with visuospatial or verbal concurrent processing as well as measuring Jon's ability to carry out the component storage and processing aspects of these tasks. Jon performed at a consistently high level across our range of tasks. Possible reasons for the apparent disparity between our own findings and earlier studies showing a hippocampal deficit are discussed in terms of both the potential differences in the demands placed on relational memory and of the proposed distinction between egocentric and allocentric visuospatial processing.

  1. Fast and robust extraction of hippocampus from MR images for diagnostics of Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lötjönen, Jyrki; Wolz, Robin; Koikkalainen, Juha

    2011-01-01

    importance in the clinical decision making. We propose a method for computing automatically the volume of hippocampus using a modified multi-atlas segmentation framework, including an improved initialization of the framework and the correction of partial volume effect. The method produced a high similarity......Assessment of temporal lobe atrophy from magnetic resonance images is a part of clinical guidelines for the diagnosis of prodromal Alzheimer's disease. As hippocampus is known to be among the first areas affected by the disease, fast and robust definition of hippocampus volume would be of great...

  2. Propagation of cortical spreading depression into the hippocampus: The role of the entorhinal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens-Mantai, Tanja; Speckmann, Erwin-Josef; Gorji, Ali

    2014-07-22

    Propagation of cortical spreading depression (CSD) to the subcortical structures could be the underlying mechanism of some neurological deficits in migraine with aura. The entorhinal cortex (EC) as a gray matter bridge between the neocortex and subcortical regions plays an important role in this propagation. In vitro combined neocortex-hippocampus brain slices were used to study the propagation pattern of CSD between the neocortex and the hippocampus. The effects of different compounds as well as tetanic electrical stimulations in the EC on propagation of CSD to the hippocampus were investigated. Repetitive induction of CSD by KCl injection in the somatosensory cortex enhanced the probability of CSD entrance to the hippocampus via EC. Local application of AMPA receptor blocker CNQX and cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN 55212-2 in EC facilitated the propagation of CSD to the hippocampus, whereas application of NMDA receptor blocker APV and GABA A receptor blocker bicuculline in this region reduced the probability of CSD penetration to the hippocampus. Application of tetanic stimulation in EC also facilitated the propagation of CSD entrance to the hippocampus. Our data suggest the importance of synaptic plasticity of EC in filtering the propagation of CSD into subcortical structures and possibly the occurrence of concomitant neurological deficits. Synapse, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Preventive effects of Flos Perariae (Gehua water extract and its active ingredient puerarin in rodent alcoholism models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yuqiang

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Radix Puerariae is used in Chinese medicine to treat alcohol addiction and intoxication. The present study investigates the effects of Flos puerariae lobatae water extract (FPE and its active ingredient puerarin on alcoholism using rodent models. Methods Alcoholic animals were given FPE or puerarin by oral intubation prior or after alcohol treatment. The loss of righting reflex (LORR assay was used to evaluate sedative/hypnotic effects. Changes of gama-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABAAR subunits induced by alcohol treatment in hippocampus were measured with western blot. In alcoholic mice, body weight gain was monitored throughout the experiments. Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH levels in liver were measured. Results FPE and puerarin pretreatment significantly prolonged the time of LORR induced by diazepam in acute alcoholic rat. Puerarin increased expression of gama-aminobutyric acid type A receptor alpha1 subunit and decreased expression of alpha4 subunit. In chronic alcoholic mice, puerarin pretreatment significantly increased body weight and liver ADH activity in a dose-dependent manner. Puerarin pretreatment, but not post-treatment, can reverse the changes of gama-aminobutyric acid type A receptor subunit expression and increase ADH activity in alcoholism models. Conclusion The present study demonstrates that FPE and its active ingredient puerarin have preventive effects on alcoholism related disorders.

  4. Effectiveness of HIV prevention for women: What is working?

    OpenAIRE

    Gil Llario, María Dolores; Ballester Arnal, Rafael; Giménez García, Cristina; Salmerón Sánchez, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    The HIV-AIDS remains a public health prob- lem which disproportionally affects women. However, prevention strategies have rarely considered their specific efficacy for them. For this reason, this study examines the differential effectiveness of six intervention elements based on socio-cognitive theories addressing young women. A controlled between-groups design examined the change in risk profile among 167 young Spanish women (mean age ...

  5. The moderating effects of school climate on bullying prevention efforts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Sabina; Van Ryzin, Mark

    2014-09-01

    Bullying prevention efforts have yielded mixed effects over the last 20 years. Program effectiveness is driven by a number of factors (e.g., program elements and implementation), but there remains a dearth of understanding regarding the role of school climate on the impact of bullying prevention programs. This gap is surprising, given research suggesting that bullying problems and climate are strongly related. The current study examines the moderating role of school climate on the impacts of a stand-alone bullying prevention curriculum. In addition, the current study examined 2 different dimensions of school climate across both student and staff perceptions. Data for this study were derived from a Steps to Respect (STR) randomized efficacy trial that was conducted in 33 elementary schools over a 1-year period. Schools were randomly assigned to intervention or wait-listed control condition. Outcome measures (pre-to-post) were obtained from (a) all school staff, (b) a randomly selected subset of 3rd-5th grade teachers in each school, and (c) all students in classrooms of selected teachers. Multilevel analyses revealed that psychosocial climate was strongly related to reductions in bullying-related attitudes and behaviors. Intervention status yielded only 1 significant main effect, although, STR schools with positive psychosocial climate at baseline had less victimization at posttest. Policies/administrative commitment to bullying were related to reduced perpetration among all schools. Findings suggest positive psychosocial climate (from both staff and student perspective) plays a foundational role in bullying prevention, and can optimize effects of stand-alone programs. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  6. Estimating intervention effects of prevention programs: accounting for noncompliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Elizabeth A; Perry, Deborah F; Le, Huynh-Nhu; Ialongo, Nicholas S

    2008-12-01

    Individuals not fully complying with their assigned treatments is a common problem encountered in randomized evaluations of behavioral interventions. Treatment group members rarely attend all sessions or do all "required" activities; control group members sometimes find ways to participate in aspects of the intervention. As a result, there is often interest in estimating both the effect of being assigned to participate in the intervention, as well as the impact of actually participating and doing all of the required activities. Methods known broadly as "complier average causal effects" (CACE) or "instrumental variables" (IV) methods have been developed to estimate this latter effect, but they are more commonly applied in medical and treatment research. Since the use of these statistical techniques in prevention trials has been less widespread, many prevention scientists may not be familiar with the underlying assumptions and limitations of CACE and IV approaches. This paper provides an introduction to these methods, described in the context of randomized controlled trials of two preventive interventions: one for perinatal depression among at-risk women and the other for aggressive disruptive behavior in children. Through these case studies, the underlying assumptions and limitations of these methods are highlighted.

  7. Sustaining the Effects of Gatekeeper Suicide Prevention Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtivelband, Annette; Aloise-Young, Patricia A; Chen, Peter Y

    2015-02-23

    Background: Gatekeeper training is a promising suicide prevention strategy that is growing in popularity. Although gatekeeper training programs have been found to improve trainee knowledge, self-efficacy, and perceived skills, researchers have found that the benefit of gatekeeper training may not last over time. Aims: The purpose of this study was to identify strategies for strengthening the long-term effects of suicide prevention gatekeeper training. Method: In-depth interviews and focus groups were conducted with gatekeepers (N = 44) and data were analyzed using a qualitative research approach. Results: The results of this study suggest that posttraining interventions may be more effective if they include the following seven themes: (a) social network - connecting with other gatekeepers; (b) continued learning - further education; (c) community outreach - building awareness; (d) accessibility - convenience; (e) reminders - ongoing communication; (f) program improvement -- enhancing previous training; and (g) certification - accreditation. Conclusion: Posttraining interventions that incorporate the themes from this study offer a promising direction in which to sustain the effects of gatekeeper suicide prevention training.

  8. Effect of Yi-nao-jie-yu decoction on γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor in the hippocampus and serum inflammatory factors in a rat model of poststroke anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang W

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Wen Zhang,1 Ruizhen Zhao,1 Xiaoli Li,1 Xia Cui,1 Zijun Zhao,1 Yingqiu Mao,2 Fengzhi Wu,3 Qisheng Tang1 1Department of Encephalopathy, The Third Affiliated Hospital, 2Center of Scientific Research, 3Center of Journals, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Chaoyang District, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Background: The Yi-nao-jie-yu decoction (YNJYD is a herbal preparation widely used in the clinics of traditional Chinese medicine and has been recently used as an important new therapeutic agent in poststroke anxiety (PSA. The neuroendocrine–immune system plays an important role in PSA mechanisms, although the modulating effects of YNJYD remain unknown. This study investigated the potential effects of YNJYD on the neuroendocrine–immune system in a rat model of PSA.Materials and methods: The PSA model was induced by injecting collagenase (type VII into the right globus pallidus, accompanied by empty water bottle stimulation for 2 weeks. The sham group and the PSA model group were gavaged with saline, while the treatment groups received buspirone (BuSpar or YNJYD. Behavior was evaluated with the open field test and elevated plus maze once a week. Pathological changes were observed by hematoxylin and eosin staining. Serum levels of tumor necrosis factor, interleukin (IL-6, adrenocorticotropic hormone, thyroid stimulating hormone, free triiodothyronine, free thyroxine, IL-1α, and cortisol were detected by radioimmunoassay. Expression of the γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABAAR α2 subunit was examined by Western blot and real-time polymerase chain reaction.Results: YNJYD-treated rats exhibited significantly better recovery than BuSpar-treated rats at 21 days and 28 days in the open field test and elevated plus maze. Hematoxylin and eosin staining revealed neural repair in the hippocampus in the treatment groups. Serum levels of IL-1α in the YNJYD group were significantly less than those in the model group and the Bu

  9. Preventive effects of physical exercise on the inhibition of creatine kinase in the cerebral cortex of mice exposed to cigarette smoke. DOI: 10.5007/1980-0037.2011v13n2p106

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiane Bittencourt Fraga

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown the health benefits of physical exercise, increasing the oxidative response of muscle. However, the effects of exercise on the brain are poorly understood and contradictory. The inhibition of creatine kinase (CK activity has been associated with the pathogenesis of a large number of diseases, especially in the brain. The objective of this study was to determine the preventive effects of physical exercise in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex of mice after chronic cigarette smoke exposure. Eight to 10-week-old male mice (C57BL-6 were divided into four groups and submitted to an exercise program (swimming, 5 times a week, for 8 weeks. After this period, the animals were passively exposed to cigarette smoke for 60 consecutive days, 3 times a day (4 Marlboro red cigarettes per session, for a total of 12 cigarettes. CK activity was measured in cerebral cortex and hippocampal homogenates. Enzyme activity was inhibited in the cerebral cortex of animals submitted to the inhalation of cigarette smoke. However, exercise prevented this inhibition. In contrast, CK activity remained unchanged in the hippocampus. This inhibition of CK by inhalation of cigarette smoke might be related to the process of cell death. Physical exercise played a preventive role in the inhibition of CK activity caused by exposure to cigarette smoke.

  10. Preventive effects of physical exercise on the inhibition of creatine kinase in the cerebral cortex of mice exposed to cigarette smoke. DOI: 10.5007/1980-0037.2011v13n2p106

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiane Bittencourt Fraga

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown the health benefits of physical exercise, increasing the oxidative response of muscle. However, the effects of exercise on the brain are poorly understood and contradictory. The inhibition of creatine kinase (CK activity has been associated with the pathogenesis of a large number of diseases, especially in the brain. The objective of this study was to determine the preventive effects of physical exercise in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex of mice after chronic cigarette smoke exposure. Eight to 10-week-old male mice (C57BL-6 were divided into four groups and submitted to an exercise program (swimming, 5 times a week, for 8 weeks. After this period, the animals were passively exposed to cigarette smoke for 60 consecutive days, 3 times a day (4 Marlboro red cigarettes per session, for a total of 12 cigarettes. CK activity was measured in cerebral cortex and hippocampal homogenates. Enzyme activity was inhibited in the cerebral cortex of animals submitted to the inhalation of cigarette smoke. However, exercise prevented this inhibition. In contrast, CK activity remained unchanged in the hippocampus. This inhibition of CK by inhalation of cigarette smoke might be related to the process of cell death. Physical exercise played a preventive role in the inhibition of CK activity caused by exposure to cigarette smoke.

  11. Minocycline produced antidepressant-like effects on the learned helplessness rats with alterations in levels of monoamine in the amygdala and no changes in BDNF levels in the hippocampus at baseline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, Shiho; Shirayama, Yukihiko; Fujita, Yuko; Ishima, Tamaki; Horio, Mao; Muneoka, Katsumasa; Iyo, Masaomi; Hashimoto, Kenji

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that minocycline might function as an antidepressant drug. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antidepressant-like effects of minocycline, which is known to suppress activated microglia, using learned helplessness (LH) rats (an animal model of depression). Infusion of minocycline into the cerebral ventricle of LH rats induced antidepressant-like effects. However, infusion of minocycline into the cerebral ventricle of naïve rats did not produce locomotor activation in the open field tests, suggesting that the antidepressant-like effects of minocycline were not attributed to the enhanced locomotion. LH rats showed significantly higher serotonin turnover in the orbitofrontal cortex and lower levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the hippocampus than control rats. However, these alterations in serotonin turnover and BDNF expression remained unchanged after treatment with minocycline. On the contrary, minocycline treatment of LH rats induced significant increases in the levels of dopamine and its metabolites in the amygdala when compared with untreated LH rats. Taken together, minocycline may be a therapeutic drug for the treatment of depression. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. [Clinical effectiveness and economical evaluation of preventive vaccination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz Carneiro, António; Belo, Ana Isabel; Gouveia, Miguel; Costa, João; Borges, Margarida

    2011-01-01

    The value of mass vaccination as a preventive measure for infectious diseases is one of the most important advances of modern Medicine. The impact on incidence of several infectious diseases, until recently responsible for significant morbidity and mortality at world level, is well proved in a series of high quality epidemiological studies. In this scientific review we aimed firstly to briefly resume the history of mass vaccination and its scientists, responsible for synthesis and marketing of these drugs. In second place we present a group of a few disease preventable by vaccines as well as the Portuguese National Vaccination Plan and its benefits. In third place we identified groups of subjects in which a well structured vaccination plan is particularly important, as well as the correspondent diseases to be covered by vaccination. Fourthly, we discussed the ethical considerations of vaccination, and its tensions between subject autonomy and society advantages in com pulsive programs. Fifthly, we analyzed clinical effectiveness of vaccines through the concept of herd immunity, clinical evaluation of immune response to vaccines and some examples of systematic reviews on three relevant diseases (influenza, meningococcal and pneumococcal infections). In sixth place we discussed vaccine safety presenting monitoring methods of vaccination risks, as well as discussing the public myths concerning vaccines. Finally we present a economic analysis of preventive vaccination with a review of some published literature on specific diseases. We conclude that mass vaccination is a efficacious preventive measure, as well as a economic rational choice, and that this public health intervention should be a pillar of a modern preventive system.

  13. Adeno-Associated Viral Vector-Induced Overexpression of Neuropeptide Y Y2 Receptors in the Hippocampus Suppresses Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woldbye, David P. D.; Angehagen, Mikael; Gotzsche, Casper R.; Elbrond-Bek, Heidi; Sorensen, Andreas T.; Christiansen, Soren H.; Olesen, Mikkel V.; Nikitidou, Litsa; Hansen, Thomas v. O.; Kanter-Schlifke, Irene; Kokaia, Merab

    2010-01-01

    Gene therapy using recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors overexpressing neuropeptide Y in the hippocampus exerts seizure-suppressant effects in rodent epilepsy models and is currently considered for clinical application in patients with intractable mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Seizure suppression by neuropeptide Y in the hippocampus is…

  14. Crisis Phones - Suicide Prevention Versus Suggestion/Contagion Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stack, Steven

    2015-01-01

    There has been no systematic work on the short- or long-term impact of the installation of crisis phones on suicides from bridges. The present study addresses this issue. Data refer to 219 suicides from 1954 through 2013 on the Skyway Bridge in St. Petersburg, Florida. Six crisis phones with signs were installed in July 1999. In the first decade after installation, the phones were used by 27 suicidal persons and credited with preventing 26 or 2.6 suicides a year. However, the net suicide count increased from 48 in the 13 years before installation of phones to 106 the following 13 years or by 4.5 additional suicides/year (t =3.512, p < .001). Although the phones prevented some suicides, there was a net increase after installation. The findings are interpreted with reference to suggestion/contagion effects including the emergence of a controversial bridge suicide blog.

  15. Design an effective storm water pollution prevention plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vivona, M.A.

    1995-01-01

    A case history shows ''how'' to plan and organize a storm water pollution prevention program (SWPPP). Using easy-to-use worksheets and guidelines, hydrocarbon processing industry (HPI) operators can build upon existing best management practices (i.e., housekeeping procedures, visual inspections, spill prevention programs, etc.) to meet tighter restrictions set by National Pollutant Discharge Elimination system (NPDES) permits. Especially in high rainfall areas, storm water poses an intermittent, but large volume problem. The facility's site size is another factor that impacts the scope and cost for SWPPP. The five steps to implementing a SWPPP are: Planning and organization; Assessment; Best management practice (BMP) identification; Implementation; Evaluation and monitoring. Initially, HPI operators must identify all potential contamination sources and past spills and leak areas. Following the SWPP guidelines, operators can map out a cost-effective storm water program that meets all NPDES requirements

  16. Decreased BDNF levels in amygdala and hippocampus after intracerebroventricular administration of ouabain

    OpenAIRE

    Jornada, Luciano K.; Valvassori, Samira S.; Resende, Wilson R.; Moretti, Morgana; Ferreira, Camila L.; Fries, Gabriel R.; Kapczinski, Flavio; Quevedo, João

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The present study aims to investigate the effects of ouabain intracerebroventricular injection on BDNF levels in the amygdala and hippocampus of Wistar rats. METHODS: Animals received a single intracerebroventricular injection of ouabain (10-3 and 10-2 M) or artificial cerebrospinal fluid and immediately, 1h, 24h, or seven days after injection, BDNF levels were measured in the rat's amygdala and hippocampus by sandwich-ELISA (n = 8 animals per group). RESULTS: When evaluated immedi...

  17. Effect of Chronic Restraint Stress on HPA Axis Activity and Expression of BDNF and Trkb in the Hippocampus of Pregnant Rats: Possible Contribution in Depression during Pregnancy and Postpartum Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nader maghsoudi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF and its receptor, TrkB, in the hippocampus are targets for adverse effects of stress paradigms in addition, BDNF and its receptor play key role in the pathology of brain diseases like depression. In the present study, we evaluated the possible role of hippocampal BDNF in depression during pregnancy, Methods: To achieve the purpose, repeated restrain stress (1 or 3 hours daily for 7 days during the last week of pregnancy was used and alteration in the gene expression of hippocampal BDNF and TrkB evaluated by semi-quantitative PCR. Results: The results showed that in stress group the level of ACTH and Corticosterone is increased showing that our model was efficient in inducing psychological stress we also found that BDNF and TrkB expression are decreased in 3 hours stress group but not in 1 hour stress compared to control group. Discussion: Our results imply that decrease in BDNF and its receptor could contribute in some adverse effects of stress during pregnancy such as elevation of depressive like behavior.

  18. Effect of Chronic Restraint Stress on HPA Axis Activity and Expression of BDNF and Trkb in the Hippocampus of Pregnant Rats: Possible Contribution in Depression during Pregnancy and Postpartum Period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghsoudi, Nader; Ghasemi, Rasoul; Ghaempanah, Zahra; Ardekani, Ali M; Nooshinfar, Elahe; Tahzibi, Abbas

    2014-01-01

    Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) and its receptor, TrkB, in the hippocampus are targets for adverse effects of stress paradigms; in addition, BDNF and its receptor play key role in the pathology of brain diseases like depression. In the present study, we evaluated the possible role of hippocampal BDNF in depression during pregnancy. To achieve the purpose, repeated restrain stress (1 or 3 hours daily for 7 days) during the last week of pregnancy was used and alteration in the gene expression of hippocampal BDNF and TrkB evaluated by semi-quantitative PCR. The results showed that in stress group the level of ACTH and Corticosterone is increased showing that our model was efficient in inducing psychological stress; we also found that BDNF and TrkB expression are decreased in 3 hours stress group but not in 1 hour stress compared to control group. Our results imply that decrease in BDNF and its receptor could contribute in some adverse effects of stress during pregnancy such as elevation of depressive like behavior.

  19. Do Barriers to Crime Prevention Moderate the Effects of Situational Crime Prevention Policies on Violent Crime in High Schools?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevigny, Eric L.; Zhang, Gary

    2018-01-01

    This study investigates how barriers to school-based crime prevention programming moderate the effects of situational crime prevention (SCP) policies on levels of violent crime in U.S. public high schools. Using data from the 2008 School Survey on Crime and Safety, we estimate a series of negative binomial regression models with interactions to…

  20. Memory of music: roles of right hippocampus and left inferior frontal gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takamitsu; Yagishita, Sho; Kikyo, Hideyuki

    2008-01-01

    We investigated neural correlates of retrieval success for music memory using event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging. To minimize the interference from MRI scan noise, we used sparse temporal sampling technique. Newly composed music materials were employed as stimuli, which enabled us to detect regions in absence of effects of experience with the music stimuli in this study. Whole brain analyses demonstrated significant retrieval success activities in the right hippocampus, bilateral lateral temporal regions, left inferior frontal gyrus and left precuneus. Anatomically defined region-of-interests analyses showed that the activity of the right hippocampus was stronger than that of the left, while the activities of the inferior frontal gyri showed the reverse pattern. Furthermore, performance-based analyses demonstrated that the retrieval success activity of the right hippocampus was positively correlated with the corrected recognition rate, suggesting that the right hippocampus contributes to the accuracy of music retrieval outcome.

  1. Preventive effects of Ancer 20 injection against radiation stomatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Naohiko; Nomura, Yasuya; Takano, Shinya (Showa Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine) (and others)

    1993-10-01

    Ancer 20 was injected subcutaneously twice a day into 23 patients during the couse of radiation therapy for head and neck cancer, with the aim of preventing radiation stomatitis. Oral mucosa was assessed both subjectively and objectively, in addition to white blood cell counts. Objective findings of oral mucosa revealed grade I in 71%, grade II in 52%, grade III in 14%, and grade IV in 5%. The dose of irradiation needed to produce grade I in 50% was 22.8 Gy. Subjective findings revealed grade I in 67%, grade II in 33%, and grade III in 10%. Irradiation dose needed to produce grade I in 50% was 23.9 Gy. Mucosous damage was slight when the white blood cell count of 6,000/mm[sup 3] was maintained. According to the rate of leukopenia, this drug was effective in 86.4%. These findings showed that Ancer 20 injection is useful in maintaining white blood cell counts and in preventing radiation stomatitis associated with radiation therapy especially to the field of mucous membrane. There was inverse correlation between white blood cell counts and both the occurrence rate and degree of radiation stomatitis. It seemed necessary to maintain white blood cell counts to prevent radiation stomatitis. (N.K.).

  2. The Effectiveness of Fraud Prevention and Detection Methods at Universities in Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Zamzami, Faiz; Nusa, Nabella Duta; Timur, Rudi Prasetya

    2016-01-01

    Some cases of corruption have taken place in several universities in Indonesia. To prevent and handle the cases, internal auditors play pivotal roles in detecting and preventing fraud. Therefore, effective methods to detect and prevent fraud are needed. The methods are expected to set the appropriate measures to detect and prevent fraud effectively. This research proposed a question how the internal auditors perceive the effectiveness of fraud detection and prevention methods. The research ai...

  3. Cost-effectiveness in fall prevention for older women

    OpenAIRE

    Hektoen, Liv F.; Aas, Eline; Lurås, Hilde

    2009-01-01

    Artikkelen beskriver en studie hvor hensikten var å estimere kostnadseffekten av fallforebygging for hjemmeboende eldre kvinner i Norge. The aim of this study was to estimate the cost-effectiveness of implementing an exercise-based fall prevention programme for home-dwelling women in the 80-year age group in Norway. Methods: the impact of the home-based individual exercise programme on the number of falls is based on a New Zealand study. On the basis of the cost estimates and the estimate...

  4. [Preventive effects of pueraria on presbycusis in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wangyan; Yao, Qi; Liu, Weihong; Zhang, Bibo; Wang, Ying; Liu, Bo

    2009-08-01

    To investigate the preventive effects of Pueraria on presbycusis in rats. Thirty-two 24-26 month old Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups, and were treated with different dosages of Pueraria (1, 2, 4, 0 g x kg(-1) x d(-1)) separately for 4 weeks. Auditory brainstem response (ABR) was used to detect the change of hearing threshold of rats. Hemorheological items of rats were checked in each group. Compared with control group, the hearing threshold and hemorheological items of rats was significantly improved after treated with Pueraria (Ppresbycusis of rats.

  5. Effects of early weaning and social isolation on the expression of glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptor and 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 and 2 mRNAs in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poletto, R; Steibel, J P; Siegford, J M; Zanella, A J

    2006-01-05

    Pigs weaned at young ages show more abnormal and aggressive behaviors and cognitive deficits compared to later weaned pigs. We investigated the effects of age, weaning and/or social isolation on the expression of genes regulating glucocorticoid response [glucocorticoid receptor (GR), mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases 1 and 2 (11beta-HSD1 and 11beta-HSD2)] in the frontal cortex and hippocampus. Early- (EW; n = 6) and conventionally-weaned (CW; n = 6) piglets were weaned at 10 and 21 days after birth, respectively. Non-weaned (NW) piglets of both ages (NW; n = 6/group) remained with their dams. Immediately before euthanasia, half of CW, EW and NW animals were socially isolated for 15 min at 12 (EW, NW) and 23 (CW, NW) days of age. Differences in amounts of 11beta-HSD1, 11beta-HSD2, GR and MR mRNA were determined by quantitative real-time RT-PCR and data subjected to multivariate linear mixed model analysis. When compared with NW piglets at 12 days of age, the hippocampi of EW piglets showed decreased gene expression (P Social isolation decreased gene expression (P social isolation affected frontal cortex regardless of age. These results may be correlated with behavioral and cognitive changes reported in EW piglets.

  6. The effects of preventive mental health programmes in secondary schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Bror Just

    2013-01-01

    The author wanted to test the effects of preventive mental health programmes in schools and established a longitudinal study with a test group and a control group, using Solomon's method. Data was collected through questionnaires prior to intervention and at 1, 6, 12, and 24 months after the intervention. The size of the effect on the various indices were estimated in terms of (a) differences in improvement of total percentage scores and (b) Cohen's d. From to to t1, t2 and t3 the intervention group showed significantly greater progress in six out of seven knowledge indexes, and 12 months later we found significant effects on the level of mental health problems.

  7. What Representations and Computations Underpin the Contribution of the Hippocampus to Generalization and Inference?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dharshan eKumaran

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Empirical research and theoretical accounts have traditionally emphasized the function of the hippocampus in episodic memory. Here we draw attention to the importance of the hippocampus to generalization, and focus on the neural representations and computations that might underpin its role in tasks such as the paired associate inference paradigm. We make a principal distinction between two different mechanisms by which the hippocampus may support generalization: an encoding-based mechanism that creates overlapping representations that capture higher-order relationships between different items (e.g. TCM – and a retrieval-based model (REMERGE that effectively computes these relationships at the point of retrieval, through a recurrent mechanism that allows the dynamic interaction of multiple pattern separated episodic codes. We also discuss what we refer to as transfer effects - a more abstract example of generalization that has also been linked to the function of the hippocampus. We consider how this phenomenon poses inherent challenges for models such as TCM and REMERGE, and outline the potential applicability of a separate class of models - hierarchical bayesian models (HBMs in this context. Our hope is that this article will provide a basic framework within which to consider the theoretical mechanisms underlying the role of the hippocampus in generalization, and at a minimum serve as a stimulus for future work addressing issues that go to the heart of the function of the hippocampus.

  8. Long-term effects of adolescent marijuana use prevention on adult mental health services utilization: the midwestern prevention project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggs, Nathaniel R; Pentz, Mary Ann

    2009-01-01

    Evaluated were effects of a drug abuse(1) prevention program, previously shown to prevent marijuana use in adolescence, on adulthood mental health service use. Analyses were conducted on 961 6th (41%) and 7th (59%) grade participants randomly assigned to intervention or control groups at baseline in 1984. These participants were followed-up through 2003 representing 15 waves of data collection. Eighty-five percent of participants were Caucasian and 56% were female. The hypothesis was that direct program effects on early adulthood mental health service use would be mediated by program effects on high school marijuana use trajectories. Structural equation models, imputing for missing data, demonstrated that MPP (Midwestern Prevention Project) program effects on mental health were mediated by the marijuana use growth curve intercept. Findings support the role of early adolescent drug use prevention programs in impacting later mental health problems. The study's limitations are noted.

  9. Cannabinoids prevent the differential long-term effects of exposure to severe stress on hippocampal- and amygdala-dependent memory and plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoshan, Noa; Segev, Amir; Abush, Hila; Mizrachi Zer-Aviv, Tomer; Akirav, Irit

    2017-10-01

    Exposure to excessive or uncontrolled stress is a major factor associated with various diseases including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The consequences of exposure to trauma are affected not only by aspects of the event itself, but also by the frequency and severity of trauma reminders. It was suggested that in PTSD, hippocampal-dependent memory is compromised while amygdala-dependent memory is strengthened. Several lines of evidence support the role of the endocannabinoid (eCB) system as a modulator of the stress response. In this study we aimed to examine cannabinoids modulation of the long-term effects (i.e., 1 month) of exposure to a traumatic event on memory and plasticity in the hippocampus and amygdala. Following exposure to the shock and reminders model of PTSD in an inhibitory avoidance light-dark apparatus rats demonstrated: (i) enhanced fear retrieval and impaired inhibitory extinction (Ext), (ii) no long-term potentiation (LTP) in the CA1, (iii) impaired hippocampal-dependent short-term memory in the object location task, (iv) enhanced LTP in the amygdala, and (v) enhanced amygdala-dependent conditioned taste aversion memory. The cannabinoid CB1/2 receptor agonist WIN55-212,2 (0.5mg/kg, i.p.) and the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitor URB597 (0.3mg/kg, i.p.), administered 2 hr after shock exposure prevented these opposing effects on hippocampal- and amygdala-dependent processes. Moreover, the effects of WIN55-212,2 and URB597 on Ext and acoustic startle were prevented by co-administration of a low dose of the CB1 receptor antagonist AM251 (0.5mg/kg, i.p.), suggesting that the preventing effects of both drugs are mediated by CB1 receptors. Exposure to shock and reminders increased CB1 receptor levels in the CA1 and basolateral amygdala 1 month after shock exposure and this increase was also prevented by administering WIN55-212,2 or URB597. Taken together, these findings suggest the involvement of the eCB system, and specifically CB1

  10. The preventive effect of Rofecoxib in postoperative intraperitoneal adhesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldemir, M; Oztürk, H; Erten, C; Büyükbayram, H

    2004-02-01

    Previous studies showed that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAI) drugs suppressed prostaglandin synthesis and were able to prevent adhesion formation following surgical trauma to the peritoneum. The selective suppression inflammatory cascade may prevent adhesion formation. Therefore, we planned this study to experimentally evaluate the effects of Rofecoxib, the selective cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitor, in postoperative intraperitoneal adhesions in an animal model. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups of 10. All rats underwent midline laparotomy under ketamine anaesthesia (25 mg/kg im). In group 1 (n = 10), the sham operation group (SG); abdominal walls were closed without any process after 2 minutes. In Group 2 (n = 10), the control group (CG); standard serosal damage was constituted and the abdominal wall was closed. In group 3 (n = 10), the COX-2 group (COXG), after serosal damage, the abdominal wall was closed. A 12 mg/kg/day dose of was given orally to the rats during one week. On the 7th postoperative day, all rats were sacrificed and intra-abdominal adhesions were evaluated both macroscopically and microscopically. Macroscopically, no serious adhesion formations were seen in the SG. Multiple adhesion formations of the CG were significantly more than those of the SG (p < 0.0001). It was determined that adhesions of the COXG diminished (p < 0.0001) when macromorphological adhesion scale results of the COXG were compared with those of the CG. The adhesion scores of the CG were compared microscopically with those of the COXG and granulation tissue formation and fibrosis in the COXG were found to be significantly less than those of the CG (respectively p = 0.002, p < 0.0001). We were of the opinion that Rofecoxib, the selective cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor, was effective in the prevention of postoperative peritoneal adhesions.

  11. Synaptic plasticity, memory and the hippocampus: a neural network approach to causality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Guilherme; Cooke, Sam F; Bliss, Tim V P

    2008-01-01

    Two facts about the hippocampus have been common currency among neuroscientists for several decades. First, lesions of the hippocampus in humans prevent the acquisition of new episodic memories; second, activity-dependent synaptic plasticity is a prominent feature of hippocampal synapses. Given this background, the hypothesis that hippocampus-dependent memory is mediated, at least in part, by hippocampal synaptic plasticity has seemed as cogent in theory as it has been difficult to prove in practice. Here we argue that the recent development of transgenic molecular devices will encourage a shift from mechanistic investigations of synaptic plasticity in single neurons towards an analysis of how networks of neurons encode and represent memory, and we suggest ways in which this might be achieved. In the process, the hypothesis that synaptic plasticity is necessary and sufficient for information storage in the brain may finally be validated.

  12. Methamphetamine transiently increases the blood-brain barrier permeability in the hippocampus: role of tight junction proteins and matrix metalloproteinase-9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Tânia; Baptista, Sofia; Gonçalves, Joana; Leal, Ermelindo; Milhazes, Nuno; Borges, Fernanda; Ribeiro, Carlos F; Quintela, Oscar; Lendoiro, Elena; López-Rivadulla, Manuel; Ambrósio, António F; Silva, Ana P

    2011-09-09

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a powerful stimulant drug of abuse that has steadily gained popularity worldwide. It is known that METH is highly neurotoxic and causes irreversible damage of brain cells leading to neurological and psychiatric abnormalities. Recent studies suggested that METH-induced neurotoxicity might also result from its ability to compromise blood-brain barrier (BBB) function. Due to the crucial role of BBB in the maintenance of brain homeostasis and protection against toxic molecules and pathogenic organisms, its dysfunction could have severe consequences. In this study, we investigated the effect of an acute high dose of METH (30mg/kg) on BBB permeability after different time points and in different brain regions. For that, young adult mice were sacrificed 1h, 24h or 72h post-METH administration. METH increased BBB permeability, but this effect was detected only at 24h after administration, being therefore a transitory effect. Interestingly, we also found that the hippocampus was the most susceptible brain region to METH, comparing to frontal cortex and striatum. Moreover, in an attempt to identify the key players in METH-induced BBB dysfunction we further investigated potential alterations in tight junction (TJ) proteins and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9). METH was able to decrease the protein levels of zonula occludens (ZO)-1, claudin-5 and occludin in the hippocampus 24h post-injection, and increased the activity and immunoreactivity of MMP-9. The pre-treatment with BB-94 (30mg/kg), a matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor, prevented the METH-induced increase in MMP-9 immunoreactivity in the hippocampus. Overall, the present data demonstrate that METH transiently increases the BBB permeability in the hippocampus, which can be explained by alterations on TJ proteins and MMP-9. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Cost-effectiveness criteria for marine oil spill preventive measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanem, Erik; Endresen, Oyvind; Skjong, Rolf

    2008-01-01

    Oil tanker accidents resulting in large quantities of oil spills and severe pollution have occurred in the past, leading to major public attention and an international focus on finding solutions for minimising the risks related to such events. This paper proposes a novel approach for evaluating measures for prevention and control of marine oil spills, based on considerations of oil spill risk and cost effectiveness. A cost model that incorporates all costs of a shipping accident has been established and oil tanker spill accidents have been further elaborated as a special case of such accidents. Utilising this model, novel implementation criteria, in terms of the Cost of Averting a Tonne of oil Spilt (CATS), for risk control options aiming at mitigating the environmental risk of accidental oil spills, are proposed. The paper presents a review of previous studies on the costs associated with oil spills from shipping, which is a function of many factors such as location of spill, spill amount, type of oil, etc. However, ships are designed for global trade, transporting different oil qualities. Therefore, globally applicable criteria must average over most of these factors, and the spill amount is the remaining factor that will be used to measure cost effectiveness against. A weighted, global average cleanup cost of USD 16,000/tonne of oil spilt has been calculated, considering the distribution of oil tanker traffic densities. Finally, the criteria are compared with some existing regulations for oil spill prevention, response and compensation (OPA 90)

  14. Micronutrient deficiencies in pregnancy worldwide: health effects and prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gernand, Alison D.; Schulze, Kerry J.; Stewart, Christine P.; West, Keith P.; Christian, Parul

    2016-01-01

    Micronutrients, vitamins and minerals accessible from the diet, are essential for biologic activity. Micronutrient status varies widely throughout pregnancy and across populations. Women in low-income countries often enter pregnancy malnourished, and the demands of gestation can exacerbate micronutrient deficiencies with health consequences to the fetus. Examples of efficacious single micronutrient interventions include folic acid to prevent neural tube defects, iodine to prevent cretinism, zinc to reduce of preterm birth, and iron to reduce the risk of low birth weight. Folic acid and vitamin D might also increase birth weight. While extensive mechanism and association research links antenatal multiple micronutrients to plausible materno-fetal health advantages, hypothesized benefits have often been absent, minimal or unexpected in trials. These findings suggest a role for population context in determining health responses and extensive gaps in knowledge. Multiple micronutrient supplements reduce risks of being born low birth weight, small for gestational age or stillborn in undernourished settings, and justify micronutrient interventions with antenatal care. Measurable health effects of gestational micronutrient exposure may persist into childhood but few data exists on potential long-term benefits. In this Review, we discuss micronutrient intake recommendations, risks and consequences of deficiencies, and the effects of interventions with a particular emphasis on offspring. PMID:27032981

  15. Organised Crime Prevention in the Netherlands: Exposing the Effectiveness of Preventive Measures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.R.A. van der Schoot

    2006-01-01

    textabstractThe preventive approach against organised crime has gained much attention since the early 1990s. On an international level as well as on a national one various preventive measures against organised crime have been developed. This is certainly true in the European Union and the

  16. Effectiveness of Mindfulness-Based Relapse Prevention in opioid Dependence Treatment &Mental Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-11-01

    Findings: therapy compliance, retention in treatment, decrease in somatic symptoms, anxiety, social dysfunction and increase in health was significantly in both combination of psychological intervention method than the Naltroxan group. Mindfulness-based on relapse prevention was more effective than CBT relapse prevention in decreasing of, social dysfunction, relapse prevention, increase of therapy compliance, and health. Results: Mindfulness based relapse prevention was superior to CBT and Naltroxan and considerably increased effectiveness of opioid relapse prevention therapy.

  17. Preventing Rehospitalization through effective home health nursing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Monica S

    2009-01-01

    To identify strategies to improve patient outcomes and prevent rehospitalizations in home healthcare. PRIMARY PRACTICE SETTINGS(S): Primarily for home healthcare but can also be a tool for all other fields in nursing. Through team collaboration and the proper resources, patient outcomes can improve and be cost-effective for home healthcare agencies despite the changes implemented after the Medicare change in payment for services, the prospective payment system. The main goal for home healthcare is to improve patient outcomes. Nurses experienced in case management can devise creative strategies to ensure patient outcomes are met in a cost-effective manner. With continuous changes in reimbursement and payment incentives, case managers in every level of care must know about, and be responsible for, fiscal initiatives.

  18. Loss of muscarinic receptors and of stimulated phospholipid labeling in ibotenate-treated hippocampus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, S.K.; Frey, K.A.; Agranoff, B.W.

    1981-01-01

    The stimulation of phospholipid labeling by muscarinic agonists has been examined in nerve ending preparations from lesioned hippocampus in order to investigate the synaptic locus of the effect. Unilateral injections of the neurotoxin, ibotenic acid, into the hippocampus resulted in an extensive loss of nerve cells from both the dentate gyrus and hippocampus on the lesioned side and a parallel loss of muscarinic receptors as revealed by [ 3 H]quinuclidinyl benzilate autoradiography. Homogenates and nerve ending fractions prepared from the lesioned side of the hippocampus possessed a reduced specific activity (expressed per milligram of protein) of glutamic acid decarboxylase as well as a reduced number of muscarinic receptors compared with the control side. By contrast, choline acetyltransferase activity was either unchanged or slightly increased on the lesioned side. Although there was a reduced yield (25%) of nerve endings from the lesioned side, the specific activity of 32 Pi incorporation into phospholipids in the absence of added carbachol was comparable to that of the control side. There was, however, a marked reduction in the carbachol stimulation of phosphatidic acid and phosphatidylinositol labeling in nerve ending fractions obtained from he lesioned hippocampus. These results indicate that the muscarinic receptors present in nerve ending fractions from hippocampus and implicated in stimulated phospholipid turnover are derived from cholinoceptive intrinsic neurons

  19. Sex, hormones and neurogenesis in the hippocampus: hormonal modulation of neurogenesis and potential functional implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galea, L A M; Wainwright, S R; Roes, M M; Duarte-Guterman, P; Chow, C; Hamson, D K

    2013-11-01

    The hippocampus is an area of the brain that undergoes dramatic plasticity in response to experience and hormone exposure. The hippocampus retains the ability to produce new neurones in most mammalian species and is a structure that is targeted in a number of neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric diseases, many of which are influenced by both sex and sex hormone exposure. Intriguingly, gonadal and adrenal hormones affect the structure and function of the hippocampus differently in males and females. Adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus is regulated by both gonadal and adrenal hormones in a sex- and experience-dependent way. Sex differences in the effects of steroid hormones to modulate hippocampal plasticity should not be completely unexpected because the physiology of males and females is different, with the most notable difference being that females gestate and nurse the offspring. Furthermore, reproductive experience (i.e. pregnancy and mothering) results in permanent changes to the maternal brain, including the hippocampus. This review outlines the ability of gonadal and stress hormones to modulate multiple aspects of neurogenesis (cell proliferation and cell survival) in both male and female rodents. The function of adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus is linked to spatial memory and depression, and the present review provides early evidence of the functional links between the hormonal modulation of neurogenesis that may contribute to the regulation of cognition and stress. © 2013 British Society for Neuroendocrinology.

  20. Adult neurogenesis is reduced in the dorsal hippocampus of rats displaying learned helplessness behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Y C; Wang, S

    2010-11-24

    Clinical and preclinical studies suggest that the hippocampus has a role in the pathophysiology of major depression. In the learned helplessness (LH) animal model of depression after inescapable shocks (ISs) animals that display LH behavior have reduced cell proliferation in the hippocampus; this effect can be reversed by antidepressant treatment. Using this model, we compared rats that displayed LH behavior and rats that did not show LH behavior (NoLH) after ISs to determine whether reduced hippocampal cell proliferation is associated with the manifestation of LH behavior or is a general response to stress. Specifically, we examined cell proliferation, neurogenesis, and synaptic function in dorsal and ventral hippocampus of LH and NoLH animals and control rats that were not shocked. The LH rats had showed reduced cell proliferation, neurogenesis, and synaptic transmission in the dorsal hippocampus, whereas no changes were seen in the ventral hippocampus. These changes were not observed in the NoLH animals. In a group of NoLH rats that received the same amount of electrical shock as the LH rats to control for the unequal shocks received in these two groups, we observed changes in Ki-67(+) cells associated with acute stress. We conclude that reduced hippocampal cell proliferation and neurogenesis are associated with the manifestation of LH behavior and that the dorsal hippocampus is the most affected area. Copyright © 2010 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Implicit transitive inference and the human hippocampus: does intravenous midazolam function as a reversible hippocampal lesion?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greene Anthony J

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recent advances have led to an understanding that the hippocampus is involved more broadly than explicit or declarative memory alone. Tasks which involve the acquisition of complex associations involve the hippocampus whether the learning is explicit or implicit. One hippocampal-dependent implicit task is transitive inference (TI. Recently it was suggested that implicit transitive inference does not depend upon the hippocampus (Frank, M. J., O'Reilly, R. C., & Curran, T. 2006. When memory fails, intuition reigns: midazolam enhances implicit inference in humans. Psychological Science, 17, 700–707. The authors demonstrated that intravenous midazolam, which is thought to inactivate the hippocampus, may enhance TI performance. Three critical assumptions are required but not met: 1 that deactivations of other regions could not account for the effect 2 that intravenous midazolam does indeed deactivate the hippocampus and 3 that midazolam influences explicit but not implicit memory. Each of these assumptions is seriously flawed. Consequently, the suggestion that implicit TI does not depend upon the hippocampus is unfounded.

  2. The Role of Hippocampus in the Pathophysiology of Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem Donat Eker

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Hippocampus, as a part of the limbic cortex, has a variety of functions ranging from mating behavior to memory besides its role in the regulation of emotions. The hippocampus has reciprocal interactions of with other brain regions which act in the pathophysiology of major depressive disorder (MDD. Moreover, since the hippocampus is a scene for the neurogenesis, which can be seen as a response to antidepressant treatment, the hippocampus became a focus of attention in neuroimaging studies of MDD. It has been shown that brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, that is responsible from the neurogenesis, is associated with the response to the antidepressants and antidepressant drugs are ineffective if neurogenesis is hindered.Hippocampal atrophy is expected with the decrease of neurogenesis as a result of the lower BDNF levels with the deleterious effects of glucocorticoids in depression. Recurrent and severe depression seems to cause such a volume reduction though first episode MDD subjects do not differ from healthy individuals in respect to their hippocampal volumes (HCVs measured by magnetic resonance imaging methods. One may argue regarding these findings that the atrophy in the hippocampus may be observed in the long term and the decrease in BDNF levels may predispose the volume reduction. Although it has been postulated that smaller HCV as a result of genetic and environmental factors and prior to the illness, may cause a vulnerability to MDD, sufficient evidence has not been accumulated yet and the view that HCV loss develops as depression progresses is widely accepted. Findings that serum BDNF (sBDNF is lower in MDD patients though HCVs of patients do not differ from healthy individuals and the positive correlation of sBDNF with HCV seen only in the patient group support this view. It can be assumed that depressed patients have sensitivity for the fluctuations in BDNF levels. Follow-up studies which consider effects of hipotalamo

  3. Preventive Effects of Beta-Hydroxy-Beta-Methyl Butyrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Ravanbakhsh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aims: One of the major factors in sudden cardiac arrest is the initiation and continuation of deadly arrhythmias during ischemia. It is known that beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate (HMB has useful effects such as anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptosis effects in the skeletal muscles. The aim of this study was to investigate the preventive effects of HMB on the ventricular arrhythmias due to the ischemia. Materials & Methods: In the experimental study, 30 Wistar male rats were randomly divided into three groups including control, HMB320, and HMB700. As control group received normal saline, HMB320 and HMB700 groups orally received 320 and 700 mg/Kg HMB as gavage for 2 weeks, respectively. The rats, having been anesthetized, underwent 30-minute ischemia. Then, the numbers of premature ventricular contractions (PVC, the appearance duration of ventricular tachycardia (VT, and the ventricular fibrillation (VF were assessed. Data was analyzed by SPSS 16 software using Kruskal-Walis, one-way ANOVA, Tukey’s post-hoc, and Chi-square tests. Findings: There was a significant reduction in the mean PVC number in HMB320 and HMB700 groups than control group (p=0.001. In addition, there was such a significant difference between the groups received the doses (p=0.008. There was a reduction in the mean appearance duration of VT in HMB320 and HMB700 groups than control group (p=0.001. There was a significant reduction in the mean appearance duration of VF in HMB700 group compared to control group, only (p=0.003. Conclusion: Through arrhythmias reduction, 2-week preventive consumption of HMB might considerably reduce the severe side effects of ischemia.

  4. 牛磺酸拮抗铅对大鼠海马NOS阳性神经元数目的影响%The effect of taurine to NOS vigor in hippocampus of rat induced lead lesion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李积胜; 杨峰; 刘亚华

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study taurine resist lead impact ability of learning and memory. Methods: Using NADPH - dhistochemistry method to study the quantity change of the rat's NOS positive neuron in hippocampus , the rat in experi-ment sections which are feeded with distinct dosage lead acetate in drinking (0.02, 0.2g/L) and feed contain distinctdosage taurine (5, 10g/kg). Results: Taurine could increase NOS positive neuron quantity obviously in hippocampus ofrat induced lead lesion. Conclusion: Taurine could resist lead impact ability of learning and memory obviously.

  5. Effects of the Natural β-Carboline Alkaloid Harmine, a Main Constituent of Ayahuasca, in Memory and in the Hippocampus: A Systematic Literature Review of Preclinical Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Rafael G; Hallak, Jaime E C

    2017-01-01

    Harmine is a natural β-carboline alkaloid found in several botanical species, such as the Banisteriopsis caapi vine used in the preparation of the hallucinogenic beverage ayahuasca and the seeds of Syrian rue (Peganum harmala). Preclinical studies suggest that harmine may have neuroprotective and cognitive-enhancing effects, and retrospective/observational investigations of the mental health of long-term ayahuasca users suggest that prolonged use of this harmine-rich hallucinogen is associated with better neuropsychological functioning. Thus, in order to better investigate these possibilities, we performed a systematic literature review of preclinical studies analyzing the effects of harmine on hippocampal neurons and in memory-related behavioral tasks in animal models. We found two studies involving hippocampal cell cultures and nine studies using animal models. Harmine administration was associated with neuroprotective effects such as reduced excitotoxicity, inflammation, and oxidative stress, and increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels. Harmine also improved memory/learning in several animal models. These effects seem be mediated by monoamine oxidase or acetylcholinesterase inhibition, upregulation of glutamate transporters, decreases in reactive oxygen species, increases in neurotrophic factors, and anti-inflammatory effects. The neuroprotective and cognitive-enhancing effects of harmine should be further investigated in both preclinical and human studies.

  6. [Daily practice using the guidelines for prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. Effectiveness of exercise for preventing and treating osteoporosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyakoshi, Naohisa

    2008-08-01

    There is increasing evidence that exercise is an effective strategy for the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. The randomized controlled trials and their meta-analyses to date, evaluating the effects of exercise on osteoporosis reveal that the exercise is effective in preserving bone mass, preventing fractures and falls, and improving quality of life in patients with osteoporosis. Emphasis is also given to the importance of the specific protocols of exercises needed to achieve positive effects safely, keeping in view the age and general physical condition of the person.

  7. Long-term impact of prevention programs to promote effective parenting: lasting effects but uncertain processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandler, Irwin N; Schoenfelder, Erin N; Wolchik, Sharlene A; MacKinnon, David P

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews findings from 46 randomized experimental trials of preventive parenting interventions. The findings of these trials provide evidence of effects to prevent a wide range of problem outcomes and to promote competencies from one to 20 years later. However, there is a paucity of evidence concerning the processes that account for program effects. Three alternative pathways are proposed as a framework for future research on the long-term effects of preventive parenting programs: (a) through program effects on parenting skills, perceptions of parental efficacy, and reduction in barriers to effective parenting; (b) through program-induced reductions in short-term problems of youth that persist over time, improvements in youth adaptation to stress, and improvements in youth belief systems concerning the self and their relationships with others; and (c) through effects on contexts in which youth become involved and on youth-environment transactions.

  8. Community-based osteoporosis prevention: Physical activity in relation to bone density, fall prevention, and the effect of training programmes : The Vadstena Osteoporosis Prevention Project

    OpenAIRE

    Grahn Kronhed, Ann-Charlotte

    2003-01-01

    This thesis is based on studies of the ten-year community-based intervention programme entitled, the Vadstena Osteoporosis Prevention Project (VOPP). The specific aims of the research were to describe the effects of physical activity and training programmes on bone mass and balance performance in adults, to determine whether a fall risk prevention programme could motivate personal actions among the elderly, to ascertain whether the intervention programme could reduce the incidence of forearm ...

  9. Is Case Management Effective for Long-Lasting Suicide Prevention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liang-Jen; Wu, Ya-Wen; Chen, Chih-Ken

    2015-01-01

    Case management services have been implemented in suicide prevention programs. To investigate whether case management is an effective strategy for reducing the risks of repeated suicide attempts and completed suicides in a city with high suicide rates in northern Taiwan. The Suicide Prevention Center of Keelung City (KSPC) was established in April 2005. Subjects included a consecutive sample of individuals (N = 2,496) registered in KSPC databases between January 1, 2006, and December 31, 2011, with at least one episode of nonfatal self-harm. Subjects were tracked for the duration of the study. Of all the subjects, 1,013 (40.6%) received case management services; 416 (16.7%) had at least one other deliberate self-harm episode and 52 (2.1%) eventually died by suicide. No significant differences were found in the risks of repeated self-harm and completed suicides between suicide survivors who received case management and those who refused the services. However, a significant reduction in suicide rates was found after KSPC was established. Findings suggest that case management services might not reduce the risks of suicide repetition among suicide survivors during long-term follow-up. Future investigation is warranted to determine factors impacting the downward trend of suicide rates.

  10. Cost effectiveness of the MDOT preventive maintenance program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    The Michigan Department of Transportations (MDOT) pavement preservation program dates back to 1992. MDOTs pavement preservation strategy is primarily implemented through its capital preventive maintenance (CPM) program, in which preventive main...

  11. Effects of Glycyrrhetinic Acid on GSH Synthesis Induced by Realgar in the Mouse Hippocampus: Involvement of System [Formula: see text], System [Formula: see text], MRP-1, and Nrf2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan-Lei; Chen, Mo; Huo, Tao-Guang; Zhang, Ying-Hua; Fang, Ying; Feng, Cong; Wang, Shou-Yun; Jiang, Hong

    2017-05-01

    Realgar, a type of mineral drug-containing arsenic, exhibits neurotoxicity. Brain glutathione (GSH) is crucial to protect the nervous system and to resist arsenic toxicity. Therefore, the main aim of this study was to explore the neurotoxic mechanisms of realgar and the protective effects of glycyrrhetinic acid (GA) by observing the effects of GA on the hippocampal GSH biosynthetic pathway after exposure to realgar. Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) mice were randomly divided into five groups: a control group, a GA control group, a realgar alone group, a low-dose GA intervention group, and a high-dose GA intervention group. Cognitive ability was tested using an object recognition task (ORT). The ultrastructures of the hippocampal neurons and synapses were observed. mRNA and protein levels of EAAT1, EAAT2, EAAT3, xCT, Nrf2, HO-1, γ-GCS (GCLC, GCLM), and MRP-1 were measured, as was the cellular localization of EAAT3, xCT, MRP-1, and Nrf2. The levels of GSH in the hippocampus, the levels of glutamate (Glu) and cysteine (Cys) in the extracellular fluid of hippocampal CA1 region, and the levels of active sulfur in the brain were also investigated. The results indicate that realgar lowered hippocampal GSH levels, resulting in ultrastructural changes in hippocampal neurons and synapses and deficiencies in cognitive ability, ultimately inducing neurotoxicity. GA could trigger the expression of Nrf2, HO-1, EAAT1, EAAT2, EAAT3, xCT, MRP-1, GCLC, and GCLM. Additionally, the expression of γ-GT and the supply levels of Glu and Cys increased, ultimately causing a significant increase in hippocampal GSH to alleviate realgar-induced neurotoxicity. In conclusion, the findings from our study indicate that GA can antagonize decreased brain GSH levels induced by realgar and can lessen the neurotoxicity of realgar.

  12. Connect: An Effective Community-Based Youth Suicide Prevention Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean, Gretchen; Baber, Kristine M.

    2011-01-01

    Youth suicide prevention is an important public health issue. However, few prevention programs are theory driven or systematically evaluated. This study evaluated Connect, a community-based youth suicide prevention program. Analysis of pre and posttraining questionnaires from 648 adults and 204 high school students revealed significant changes in…

  13. Does the endangered Knysna seahorse, Hippocampus capensis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. The Knysna seahorse, Hippocampus capensis, is an endangered teleost confined to three South African estuaries. Its abundance within these systems is low and distributions are patchy. Consequently, monitoring population sizes is labour- intensive. The aim of this study was to establish if Knynsa seahorses are ...

  14. Coordinating different representations in the hippocampus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kelemen, Eduard; Fenton, A.A.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 129, Mar 2016 (2016), s. 50-59 ISSN 1074-7427 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-03627S Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : dynamic functional grouping * multiple representations * cognitive control * hippocampus * overdispersion Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.543, year: 2016

  15. Effect of elevated potassium ion concentrations on electrically evoked release of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine in slices of rat hippocampus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szerb, J C; Hadhazy, P; Dudar, J D [Dalhousie Univ., Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada). Dept. of Physiology and Biophysics

    1978-01-01

    To establish the effect of raising the concentration of extracellular potassium ions on axonal conduction and transmitter release in a mammalian central pathway, the septohippocampal cholinergic tract, the rate of (/sup 3/H) acetylcholine release evoked by electrical stimulation was measured in rat hippocampal slices superfused with Krebs' solution containing 3-15 mM K/sup +/. The evoked release of (/sup 3/H) acetylcholine was abolished by the presence of tetrodotoxin or by the omission of Ca/sup 2 +/ in the superfusion medium, indicating that it originated from terminals depolarized by conducted action potentials. Potassium concentrations between 3 and 8 mM had no effect but 10-15 mM K/sup +/ reduced the rate of evoked release and decreased the size of the releasable pool of (/sup 3/H) acetylcholine. Decreasing the sodium content of the Krebs' solution to 97 mM or less had effects similar to those of elevated (K/sup +/). Elevated K/sup +/ (10-15 mM) reversibly reduced the size of compound action potentials in the fimbria and the alveus. The results suggest that extracellular potassium concentrations occurring under physiological conditions do not affect axonal conduction and transmitter release but that both are reduced in pathological states when extracellular (K/sup +/) above 8 mM occur.

  16. Prevention of dental caries through the effective use of fluoride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Poul Erik

    2016-01-01

    Background: The World Health Organization (WHO) emphasizes that dental caries is a severe public health problem across the world. The current global and regional patterns of dental caries reflect distinct risk profiles of countries which relate to the structure of the society, living conditions......, lifestyles, and the existence of preventive oral health programmes. Research conducted in high income countries documents that systematic use of fluoride reduces the burden of dental caries; such research is scarce in low and middle income countries. Objectives: This article reviews the evidence on effective...... use of fluoride, highlights the public health approach to fluoridation, and clarifies how automatic fluoridation contributes to breaking social inequities in dental caries. Data collection: Scientific publications on fluoride administration stored in PubMed/Medline and caries data from the WHO...

  17. Effects of sugammadex on the prevention of postoperative peritoneal adhesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Şahin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Many materials and techniques have been used to prevent and repair intra-abdominal adhesions, but an effective solution has not been found. The aim of this study is to research the effect of sugammadex on intra-abdominal adhesions in an experimentally induced intra-abdominal adhesion model. Twenty-four female Wistar albino rats were included in the study. The experimental animals were randomly divided into three groups: the sugammadex group (Group SX, n = 8, the control group (Group C, n = 8, and the sham group (Group S, n = 8. After starvation for 1 night, the rats were injected with a 50 mg/kg intramuscular dose of ketamine and a 5 mg/kg intramuscular dose of xylazine for anesthesia. The rats in the SX group were given 3 mL sugammadex into the peritoneal cavity, while rats in the control group were given 3 mL 0.9% sodium chloride. In the sham group, the peritoneal cavity was opened, but no chemicals were administered. All rats were sacrificed on the 10th postoperative day. The adhesions were staged as 0, 1, 2, and 3 according to Evans et al.'s model. Our evaluation of macroscopic adhesion intensity found statistically significant differences between the groups. The sugammadex group was observed to have fewer adhesions in a statistically significant manner compared with the control group (p < 0.05. In our experimental intra-abdominal adhesion model in rats, we observed that sugammadex prevented postoperative intra-abdominal adhesions.

  18. Effects of sugammadex on the prevention of postoperative peritoneal adhesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şahin, Hasan; Toman, Hüseyin; Kiraz, Hasan Ali; Şimşek, Tuncer; Erbaş, Mesut; Özkul, Faruk; Arık, Muhammet Kasım; Hancı, Volkan

    2015-09-01

    Many materials and techniques have been used to prevent and repair intra-abdominal adhesions, but an effective solution has not been found. The aim of this study is to research the effect of sugammadex on intra-abdominal adhesions in an experimentally induced intra-abdominal adhesion model. Twenty-four female Wistar albino rats were included in the study. The experimental animals were randomly divided into three groups: the sugammadex group (Group SX, n = 8), the control group (Group C, n = 8), and the sham group (Group S, n = 8). After starvation for 1 night, the rats were injected with a 50 mg/kg intramuscular dose of ketamine and a 5 mg/kg intramuscular dose of xylazine for anesthesia. The rats in the SX group were given 3 mL sugammadex into the peritoneal cavity, while rats in the control group were given 3 mL 0.9% sodium chloride. In the sham group, the peritoneal cavity was opened, but no chemicals were administered. All rats were sacrificed on the 10(th) postoperative day. The adhesions were staged as 0, 1, 2, and 3 according to Evans et al.'s model. Our evaluation of macroscopic adhesion intensity found statistically significant differences between the groups. The sugammadex group was observed to have fewer adhesions in a statistically significant manner compared with the control group (p sugammadex prevented postoperative intra-abdominal adhesions. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  19. Effects of pilocarpine and kainate-induced seizures on N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor gene expression in the rat hippocampus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Przewlocka, B.; Labuz, D.; Machelska, H.; Przewlocki, R.; Turchan, J.; Lason, W. [Department of Molecular Neuropharmacology, Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences, 12 Smetna Street, 31-343 Krakow (Poland)

    1997-04-14

    The effects of pilocarpine- and kainate-induced seizures on N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit-1 messenger RNA and [{sup 3}H]dizocilpine maleate binding were studied in the rat hippocampal formation. Pilocarpine- but not kainate-induced seizures decreased N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit-1 messenger RNA level in dentate gyrus at 24 and 72 h after drug injection. Both convulsants decreased the messenger RNA level in CA1 pyramidal cells at 24 and 72 h, the effects of kainate being more profound. Kainate also decreased the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit-1 messenger RNA level in CA3 region after 24 and 72 h, whereas pilocarpine decreased the messenger RNA level at 72 h only. At 3 h after kainate, but not pilocarpine, an increased binding of [{sup 3}H]dizocilpine maleate in several apical dendritic fields of pyramidal cells was found. Pilocarpine reduced the [{sup 3}H]dizocilpine maleate binding in stratum lucidum only at 3 and 24 h after the drug injection. Pilocarpine but not kainate induced prolonged decrease in N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit-1 gene expression in dentate gyrus. However, at the latest time measured, kainate had the stronger effect in decreasing both messenger RNA N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit-1 and [{sup 3}H]dizocilpine maleate binding in CA1 and CA3 hippocampal pyramidal cells. The latter changes corresponded, however, to neuronal loss and may reflect higher neurotoxic potency of kainate.These data point to some differences in hippocampal N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor regulation in pilocarpine and kainate models of limbic seizures. Moreover, our results suggest that the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit-1 messenger RNA level is more susceptible to limbic seizures than is [{sup 3}H]dizocilpine maleate binding in the rat hippocampal formation. (Copyright (c) 1997 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  20. Effects of pilocarpine and kainate-induced seizures on N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor gene expression in the rat hippocampus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Przewlocka, B.; Labuz, D.; Machelska, H.; Przewlocki, R.; Turchan, J.; Lason, W.

    1997-01-01

    The effects of pilocarpine- and kainate-induced seizures on N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit-1 messenger RNA and [ 3 H]dizocilpine maleate binding were studied in the rat hippocampal formation. Pilocarpine- but not kainate-induced seizures decreased N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit-1 messenger RNA level in dentate gyrus at 24 and 72 h after drug injection. Both convulsants decreased the messenger RNA level in CA1 pyramidal cells at 24 and 72 h, the effects of kainate being more profound. Kainate also decreased the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit-1 messenger RNA level in CA3 region after 24 and 72 h, whereas pilocarpine decreased the messenger RNA level at 72 h only. At 3 h after kainate, but not pilocarpine, an increased binding of [ 3 H]dizocilpine maleate in several apical dendritic fields of pyramidal cells was found. Pilocarpine reduced the [ 3 H]dizocilpine maleate binding in stratum lucidum only at 3 and 24 h after the drug injection. Pilocarpine but not kainate induced prolonged decrease in N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit-1 gene expression in dentate gyrus. However, at the latest time measured, kainate had the stronger effect in decreasing both messenger RNA N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit-1 and [ 3 H]dizocilpine maleate binding in CA1 and CA3 hippocampal pyramidal cells. The latter changes corresponded, however, to neuronal loss and may reflect higher neurotoxic potency of kainate.These data point to some differences in hippocampal N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor regulation in pilocarpine and kainate models of limbic seizures. Moreover, our results suggest that the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit-1 messenger RNA level is more susceptible to limbic seizures than is [ 3 H]dizocilpine maleate binding in the rat hippocampal formation. (Copyright (c) 1997 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  1. MDMA Decreases Gluatamic Acid Decarboxylase (GAD) 67-Immunoreactive Neurons in the Hippocampus and Increases Seizure Susceptibility: Role for Glutamate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Courtney L.; Morano, Rachel L.; Herman, James P.; Yamamoto, Bryan K.; Gudelsky, Gary A.

    2016-01-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxy-methamphetamine (MDMA) is a unique psychostimulant that continues to be a popular drug of abuse. It has been well documented that MDMA reduces markers of 5-HT axon terminals in rodents, as well as humans. A loss of parvalbumin-immunoreactive (IR) interneurons in the hippocampus following MDMA treatment has only been documented recently. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that MDMA reduces glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) 67-IR, another biochemical marker of GABA neurons, in the hippocampus and that this reduction in GAD67-IR neurons and an accompanying increase in seizure susceptibility involve glutamate receptor activation. Repeated exposure to MDMA (3×10mg/kg, ip) resulted in a reduction of 37–58% of GAD67-IR cells in the dentate gyrus (DG), CA1, and CA3 regions, as well as an increased susceptibility to kainic acid-induced seizures, both of which persisted for at least 30 days following MDMA treatment. Administration of the NMDA antagonist MK-801 or the glutamate transporter type 1 (GLT-1) inducer ceftriaxone prevented both the MDMA-induced loss of GAD67-IR neurons and the increased vulnerability to kainic acid-induced seizures. The MDMA-induced increase in the extracellular concentration of glutamate in the hippocampus was significantly diminished in rats treated with ceftriaxone, thereby implicating a glutamatergic mechanism in the neuroprotective effects of ceftriaxone. In summary, the present findings support a role for increased extracellular glutamate and NMDA receptor activation in the MDMA-induced loss of hippocampal GAD67-IR neurons and the subsequent increased susceptibility to evoked seizures. PMID:27773601

  2. MDMA decreases glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) 67-immunoreactive neurons in the hippocampus and increases seizure susceptibility: Role for glutamate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Courtney L; Morano, Rachel L; Herman, James P; Yamamoto, Bryan K; Gudelsky, Gary A

    2016-12-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxy-methamphetamine (MDMA) is a unique psychostimulant that continues to be a popular drug of abuse. It has been well documented that MDMA reduces markers of 5-HT axon terminals in rodents, as well as humans. A loss of parvalbumin-immunoreactive (IR) interneurons in the hippocampus following MDMA treatment has only been documented recently. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that MDMA reduces glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) 67-IR, another biochemical marker of GABA neurons, in the hippocampus and that this reduction in GAD67-IR neurons and an accompanying increase in seizure susceptibility involve glutamate receptor activation. Repeated exposure to MDMA (3×10mg/kg, ip) resulted in a reduction of 37-58% of GAD67-IR cells in the dentate gyrus (DG), CA1, and CA3 regions, as well as an increased susceptibility to kainic acid-induced seizures, both of which persisted for at least 30days following MDMA treatment. Administration of the NMDA antagonist MK-801 or the glutamate transporter type 1 (GLT-1) inducer ceftriaxone prevented both the MDMA-induced loss of GAD67-IR neurons and the increased vulnerability to kainic acid-induced seizures. The MDMA-induced increase in the extracellular concentration of glutamate in the hippocampus was significantly diminished in rats treated with ceftriaxone, thereby implicating a glutamatergic mechanism in the neuroprotective effects of ceftriaxone. In summary, the present findings support a role for increased extracellular glutamate and NMDA receptor activation in the MDMA-induced loss of hippocampal GAD67-IR neurons and the subsequent increased susceptibility to evoked seizures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Maternal dietary loads of alpha-tocopherol increase synapse density and glial synaptic coverage in the hippocampus of adult offspring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Salucci

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available An increased intake of the antioxidant α-Tocopherol (vitamin E is recommended in complicated pregnancies, to prevent free radical damage to mother and fetus. However, the anti-PKC and antimitotic activity of α-Tocopherol raises concerns about its potential effects on brain development. Recently, we found that maternal dietary loads of α-Tocopherol through pregnancy and lactation cause developmental deficit in hippocampal synaptic plasticity in rat offspring. The defect persisted into adulthood, with behavioral alterations in hippocampus-dependent learning. Here, using the same rat model of maternal supplementation, ultrastructural morphometric studies were carried out to provide mechanistic interpretation to such a functional impairment in adult offspring by the occurrence of long-term changes in density and morphological features of hippocampal synapses. Higher density of axo-spinous synapses was found in CA1 stratum radiatum of α-Tocopherol-exposed rats compared to controls, pointing to a reduced synapse pruning. No morphometric changes were found in synaptic ultrastructural features, i.e., perimeter of axon terminals, length of synaptic specializations, extension of bouton-spine contact. Glia-synapse anatomical relationship was also affected. Heavier astrocytic coverage of synapses was observed in Tocopherol-treated offspring, notably surrounding axon terminals; moreover, the percentage of synapses contacted by astrocytic endfeet at bouton-spine interface (tripartite synapses was increased. These findings indicate that gestational and neonatal exposure to supranutritional tocopherol intake can result in anatomical changes of offspring hippocampus that last through adulthood. These include a surplus of axo-spinous synapses and an aberrant glia-synapse relationship, which may represent the morphological signature of previously described alterations in synaptic plasticity and hippocampus-dependent learning.

  4. Traveling Theta Waves in the Human Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Honghui

    2015-01-01

    The hippocampal theta oscillation is strongly correlated with behaviors such as memory and spatial navigation, but we do not understand its specific functional role. One hint of theta's function came from the discovery in rodents that theta oscillations are traveling waves that allow parts of the hippocampus to simultaneously exhibit separate oscillatory phases. Because hippocampal theta oscillations in humans have different properties compared with rodents, we examined these signals directly using multielectrode recordings from neurosurgical patients. Our findings confirm that human hippocampal theta oscillations are traveling waves, but also show that these oscillations appear at a broader range of frequencies compared with rodents. Human traveling waves showed a distinctive pattern of spatial propagation such that there is a consistent phase spread across the hippocampus regardless of the oscillations' frequency. This suggests that traveling theta oscillations are important functionally in humans because they coordinate phase coding throughout the hippocampus in a consistent manner. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT We show for the first time in humans that hippocampal theta oscillations are traveling waves, moving along the length of the hippocampus in a posterior–anterior direction. The existence of these traveling theta waves is important for understanding hippocampal neural coding because they cause neurons at separate positions in the hippocampus to experience different theta phases simultaneously. The theta phase that a neuron measures is a key factor in how that cell represents behavioral information. Therefore, the existence of traveling theta waves indicates that, to fully understand how a hippocampal neuron represents information, it is vital to also account for that cell's location in addition to conventional measures of neural activity. PMID:26354915

  5. Effect of Mobile Phone Microwaves on Fetal Period of Balb-C Mice in Histological Characteristics of Hippocampus and Learning Behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Moghimi

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective(sThe possible risks of radio-frequency electromagnetic fields (EMF for the living organisms and human body are a growing concern for our society. In this study, we examined the possibility of changes in working memory and hippocampal histological characteristics effects in mice brain following whole body exposure to microwave radiation.Materials and MethodsDuring gestation period, we exposed mice for 4 hr to Global system for mobile communications (GSM, Specific Absorption Rate (SAR of 200 mW/kg. Pregnant control mice were sham-exposed or free in a cage without further restraining. Three month after exposure animals were prepared for behavioral (Radial Arm Maze (RAM and Morris Water Maze (MWM and histological studies.ResultsThe results showed that microwave exposed mice were slower than sham, and control in finding the platform. Analyses of error rates in RAM and MWM performance revealed significant differences which emphasize the effect of acute exposure to pulsed microwaves in deficit of spatial reference memory in the mice. However in this study exposed group didn’t show any statistically significant loss of hippocampal CA1, CA3 neurons versus controls or sham. ConclusionWe conclude that there is evidence from the current study that exposure to MW radiation under parameters examined caused decrements in the ability of mice to learn the spatial memory task.

  6. [The effect of enzymatic treatment using proteases on properties of persistent sodium current in CA1 pyramidal neurons of rat hippocampus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lun'ko, O O; Isaiev, D S; Maxymiuk, O P; Kryshtal', O O; Isaieva, O V

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effect of proteases, widely used for neuron isolation in electrophysiological studies, on the amplitude and kinetic characteristics of persistent sodium current (I(NaP)) in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. Properties of I(NaP) were studied on neurons isolated by mechanical treatment (control group) and by mechanical and enzymatic treatment using pronase E (from Streptomyces griseus) or protease type XXIII (from Aspergillus oryzae). We show that in neurons isolated with pronase E kinetic of activation and density of I(NaP) was unaltered. Enzymatic treatment with protease type XXIII did not alter I(NaP) activation but result in significant decrease in I(NaP) density. Our data indicates that enzymatic treatment using pronase E for neuron isolation is preferable for investigation of I(NaP).

  7. Effect of ascorbic acid on prevention of hypercholesterolemia induced atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, S; Ray, R; Snehlata; Das, N; Srivastava, L M

    2006-04-01

    The notion that oxidation of lipids and propagation of free radicals may contribute to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis is supported by a large body of evidence. To circumvent the damage caused by oxygen free radicals, antioxidants are needed which provide the much needed neutralization of free radical by allowing the pairing of electrons. In this study we have investigated the effect of ascorbic acid, a water soluble antioxidant on the development of hypercholesterolemia induced atherosclerosis in rabbits. Rabbits were made hypercholesterolemic and atherosclerotic by feeding 100 mg cholesterol/day. Different doses of ascorbic acid were administered to these rabbits. Low dose of ascorbic acid (0.5 mg/100 g body weight/day) did not have any significant effect on the percent of total area covered by atherosclerotic plaque. However, ascorbic acid when fed at a higher dose (15 mg/100 g body weight/day) was highly effective in reducing the atherogenecity. With this dose the percent of total surface area covered by atherosclerotic plaque was significantly less (p ascorbic acid may have great promise in the prevention of hypercholesterolemia induced atherosclerosis.

  8. Effects of the Strategic Prevention Framework State Incentives Grant (SPF SIG) on state prevention infrastructure in 26 states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orwin, Robert G; Stein-Seroussi, Alan; Edwards, Jessica M; Landy, Ann L; Flewelling, Robert L

    2014-06-01

    The Strategic Prevention Framework State Incentive Grant (SPF SIG) program is a national public health initiative sponsored by the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration's Center for Substance Abuse Prevention to prevent substance abuse and its consequences. State grantees used a data-driven planning model to allocate resources to 450 communities, which in turn launched over 2,200 intervention strategies to target prevention priorities in their respective populations. An additional goal was to build prevention capacity and infrastructure at the state and community levels. This paper addresses whether the state infrastructure goal was achieved, and what contextual and implementation factors were associated with success. The findings are consistent with claims that, overall, the SPF SIG program met its goal of increasing prevention capacity and infrastructure across multiple infrastructure domains, though the mediating effects of implementation were evident only in the evaluation/monitoring domain. The results also show that an initiative like the SPF SIG, which could easily have been compartmentalized within the states, has the potential to permeate more broadly throughout state prevention systems.

  9. Effects of a Cancer Prevention Advertisement on Beliefs and Knowledge about Cancer Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kye, Su Yeon; Yoo, Jisu; Lee, Min Hee; Jun, Jae Kwan

    2015-01-01

    Outcome-expectation beliefs and knowledge may ultimately influence behavior for cancer prevention. The aims of this study were to measure changes in knowledge and beliefs about cancer prevention before and after viewing a television advertisement and identify the factors affecting receptivity to its messages. A one-group pretest-posttest design was used in this study of 1,000 individuals aged 20 to 65 years who were recruited online in November 2014. The outcome variables included cancer prevention beliefs based on the Health Belief Model (five items) and knowledge about risk factors for cancer (seven items). Perceived susceptibility, perceived benefits, and self-efficacy increased significantly and their perceived severity and perceived barriers decreased significantly, after participants viewed the television advertisement. Correct responses to questions about risk factors also increased significantly, except for smoking. The main factors affecting changes in the outcome variables were age, interest in cancer prevention, social network, satisfaction with the ad, and pretest scores. Television advertisements with positive frameworks can be an efficient channel of improving beliefs and knowledge about cancer prevention in a short period. The continuous development of intervention materials that consider the demographics, needs, and satisfaction of the target group will be necessary for future studies.

  10. Reduced brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in cortex and hippocampus involved in the learning and memory deficit in molarless SAMP8 mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Qing-song; LIANG Zi-liang; WU Min-Jie; FENG Lin; LIU Li-li; ZHANG Jian-jun

    2011-01-01

    Background The molarless condition has been reported to compromise learning and memory functions. However, it remains unclear how the molarless condition directly affects the central nervous system, and the functional consequences on the brain cortex and hippocampus have not been described in detail. The aim of this study was to find the molecular mechanism related with learning and memory deficit after a bilateral molarless condition having been surgically induced in senescence-accelerated mice/prone8 (SAMP8) mice, which may ultimately provide an experimental basis for clinical prevention of senile dementia.Methods Mice were either sham-operated or subjected to complete molar removal. The animals' body weights were monitored every day. Learning ability and memory were measured in a water maze test at the end of the 1 st, 2nd, and 3rd months after surgery. As soon as significantly prolonged escape latency in the molarless group was detected, the locomotor activity was examined in an open field test. Subsequently, the animals were decapitated and the cortex and hippocampus were dissected for Western blotting to measure the expression levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and the tropomyosin related kinase B (TrkB), the high affinity receptor of BDNF.Results Slightly lower weights were consistently observed in the molarless group, but there was no significant difference in weights between the two groups (P>0.05). Compared with the sham group, the molarless group exhibited lengthened escape latency in the water maze test three months after surgery, whereas no difference in locomotor activity was observed. Meanwhile, in the cortex and hippocampus, BDNF levels were significantly decreased in the molarless group (P<0.05); but the expression of its receptor, TrkB, was not significantly affected.Conclusion These results suggested that the molarless condition impaired learning and memory abilities in SAMP8mice three months after teeth extraction, and this

  11. Effects of RAGE-Specific Inhibitor FPS-ZM1 on Amyloid-β Metabolism and AGEs-Induced Inflammation and Oxidative Stress in Rat Hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yan; Shen, Chao; Yin, Qingqing; Sun, Menghan; Ma, Yingjuan; Liu, Xueping

    2016-05-01

    An increased level of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) is observed in brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). AGEs and receptor for AGEs (RAGE) play important roles in the pathogenesis of AD. FPS-ZM1 is a high-affinity RAGE-specific blocker that inhibits amyloid-β binding to RAGE, neurological damage and inflammation in the APP(sw/0) transgenic mouse model of AD. FPS-ZM1 is not toxic to mice and can easily cross the blood-brain barrier. In this study, an AGEs-RAGE-activated rat model were established by intrahippocampal injection of AGEs, then these rats were treated with intraperitoneal administration of FPS-ZM1 and the possible neuroprotective effects were investigated. We found that AGEs administration induced an-regulation of Abeta production, inflammation, and oxidative stress, and an increased escape latency of rats in the Morris water maze test, all of these are significantly reduced by FPS-ZM1 treatment. Our results suggest that the AGEs-RAGE pathway is responsible for cognitive deficits, and therefore may be a potential treatment target. FPS-ZM1 might be a novel therapeutic agent to treat AD patients.

  12. Regional Susceptibility to Domoic Acid in Primary Astrocyte Cells Cultured from the Brain Stem and Hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga M. Pulido

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Domoic acid is a marine biotoxin associated with harmful algal blooms and is the causative agent of amnesic shellfish poisoning in marine animals and humans. It is also an excitatory amino acid analog to glutamate and kainic acid which acts through glutamate receptors eliciting a very rapid and potent neurotoxic response. The hippocampus, among other brain regions, has been identified as a specific target site having high sensitivity to DOM toxicity. Histopathology evidence indicates that in addition to neurons, the astrocytes were also injured. Electron microscopy data reported in this study further supports the light microscopy findings. Furthermore, the effect of DOM was confirmed by culturing primary astrocytes from the hippocampus and the brain stem and subsequently exposing them to domoic acid. The RNA was extracted and used for biomarker analysis. The biomarker analysis was done for the early response genes including c-fos, c-jun, c-myc, Hsp-72; specific marker for the astrocytes- GFAP and the glutamate receptors including GluR 2, NMDAR 1, NMDAR 2A and B. Although, the astrocyte-GFAP and c-fos were not affected, c-jun and GluR 2 were down-regulated. The microarray analysis revealed that the chemokines / cytokines, tyrosine kinases (Trk, and apoptotic genes were altered. The chemokines that were up-regulated included - IL1-a, IL-1B, IL-6, the small inducible cytokine, interferon protein IP-10, CXC chemokine LIX, and IGF binding proteins. The Bax, Bcl-2, Trk A and Trk B were all downregulated. Interestingly, only the hippocampal astrocytes were affected. Our findings suggest that astrocytes may present a possible target for pharmacological interventions for the prevention and treatment of amnesic shellfish poisoning and for other brain pathologies involving excitotoxicity

  13. Inhibition of local estrogen synthesis in the hippocampus impairs hippocampal memory consolidation in ovariectomized female mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuscher, Jennifer J; Szinte, Julia S; Starrett, Joseph R; Krentzel, Amanda A; Fortress, Ashley M; Remage-Healey, Luke; Frick, Karyn M

    2016-07-01

    The potent estrogen 17β-Estradiol (E2) plays a critical role in mediating hippocampal function, yet the precise mechanisms through which E2 enhances hippocampal memory remain unclear. In young adult female rodents, the beneficial effects of E2 on memory are generally attributed to ovarian-synthesized E2. However, E2 is also synthesized in the adult brain in numerous species, where it regulates synaptic plasticity and is synthesized in response to experiences such as exposure to females or conspecific song. Although de novo E2 synthesis has been demonstrated in rodent hippocampal cultures, little is known about the functional role of local E2 synthesis in mediating hippocampal memory function. Therefore, the present study examined the role of hippocampal E2 synthesis in hippocampal memory consolidation. Using bilateral dorsal hippocampal infusions of the aromatase inhibitor letrozole, we first found that blockade of dorsal hippocampal E2 synthesis impaired hippocampal memory consolidation. We next found that elevated levels of E2 in the dorsal hippocampus observed 30min after object training were blocked by dorsal hippocampal infusion of letrozole, suggesting that behavioral experience increases acute and local E2 synthesis. Finally, aromatase inhibition did not prevent exogenous E2 from enhancing hippocampal memory consolidation, indicating that hippocampal E2 synthesis is not necessary for exogenous E2 to enhance hippocampal memory. Combined, these data are consistent with the hypothesis that hippocampally-synthesized E2 is necessary for hippocampus-dependent memory consolidation in rodents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Long-term aerobic exercise increases redox-active iron through nitric oxide in rat hippocampus.

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    Chen, Qian; Xiao, De-Sheng

    2014-01-30

    Adult hippocampus is highly vulnerable to iron-induced oxidative stress. Aerobic exercise has been proposed to reduce oxidative stress but the findings in the hippocampus are conflicting. This study aimed to observe the changes of redox-active iron and concomitant regulation of cellular iron homeostasis in the hippocampus by aerobic exercise, and possible regulatory effect of nitric oxide (NO). A randomized controlled study was designed in the rats with swimming exercise treatment (for 3 months) and/or an unselective inhibitor of NO synthase (NOS) (L-NAME) treatment. The results from the bleomycin-detectable iron assay showed additional redox-active iron in the hippocampus by exercise treatment. The results from nonheme iron content assay, combined with the redox-active iron content, showed increased storage iron content by exercise treatment. NOx (nitrate plus nitrite) assay showed increased NOx content by exercise treatment. The results from the Western blot assay showed decreased ferroportin expression, no changes of TfR1 and DMT1 expressions, increased IRP1 and IRP2 expression, increased expressions of eNOS and nNOS rather than iNOS. In these effects of exercise treatment, the increased redox-active iron content, storage iron content, IRP1 and IRP2 expressions were completely reversed by L-NAME treatment, and decreased ferroportin expression was in part reversed by L-NAME. L-NAME treatment completely inhibited increased NOx and both eNOS and nNOS expression in the hippocampus. Our findings suggest that aerobic exercise could increase the redox-active iron in the hippocampus, indicating an increase in the capacity to generate hydroxyl radicals through the Fenton reactions, and aerobic exercise-induced iron accumulation in the hippocampus might mainly result from the role of the endogenous NO. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Behavioural Effects of Adult Vitamin D Deficiency in BALB/c Mice Are not Associated with Proliferation or Survival of Neurons in the Adult Hippocampus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie J Groves

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies have shown that up to one third of adults have insufficient levels of vitamin D and there is an association between low vitamin D concentrations and adverse brain outcomes, such as depression. Vitamin D has been shown to be involved in processes associated with neurogenesis during development. Therefore, the aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that adult vitamin D (AVD deficiency in BALB/c mice was associated with (a adult hippocampal neurogenesis at baseline, b following 6 weeks of voluntary wheel running and (c a depressive-like phenotype on the forced swim test (FST, which may be linked to alterations in hippocampal neurogenesis. We assessed proliferation and survival of adult born hippocampal neurons by counting the number of cells positive for Ki67 and doublecortin (DCX, and incorporation of 5-Bromo-2'-Deoxyuridine (BrdU within newly born mature neurons using immunohistochemistry. There were no significant effects of diet on number of Ki67+, DCX+ or BrdU+ cells in the dentate gyrus. All mice showed significantly increased number of Ki67+ cells and BrdU incorporation, and decreased immobility time in the FST, after voluntary wheel running. A significant correlation was found in control mice between immobility time in the FST and level of hippocampal neurogenesis, however, no such correlation was found for AVD-deficient mice. We conclude that AVD deficiency was not associated with impaired proliferation or survival of adult born neurons in BALB/c mice and that the impact on rodent behaviour may not be due to altered neurogenesis per se, but to altered function of new hippocampal neurons or processes independent of adult neurogenesis.

  16. Restorative effects of curcumin on sleep-deprivation induced memory impairments and structural changes of the hippocampus in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noorafshan, Ali; Karimi, Fatemeh; Kamali, Ali-Mohammad; Karbalay-Doust, Saied; Nami, Mohammad

    2017-11-15

    The present study examined the consequences of rapid eye-movement sleep-deprivation (REM-SD) with or without curcumin treatment. The outcome measures comprised quantitative features in the three-dimensional reconstruction (3DR) CA1 and dentate gyrus in experimental and control animals using stereological procedures. Male rats were arbitrarily assigned to nine groups based on the intervention and treatment administered including: 1-cage control+distilled water, 2-cage control+curcumin (100mg/kg/day), 3-cage control+olive oil, 4-REM-SD+distilled water, 5-REM-SD+curcumin, 6-REM-SD+olive oil, 7-grid-floor control+distilled water, 8-grid-floor control+curcumin, and 9-grid-floor control+olive oil. Animals in the latter three groups were placed on wire-mesh grids in the sleep-deprivation box. REM-SD was induced by an apparatus comprising a water tank and multiple platforms. After a period of 21days, rats were submitted to the novel object-recognition task. Later, their brains were excised and evaluated using stereological methods. Our results indicated a respective 29% and 31% reduction in the total volume of CA1, and dentate gyrus in REM-SD+distilled water group as compared to the grid-floor control+distilled water group (pcurcumin compared to the REM-SD+distilled water group. This suggests the potential neuro-restorative effects of curcumin in our model. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Environmental Enrichment during Gestation Improves Behavior Consequences and Synaptic Plasticity in Hippocampus of Prenatal-Stressed Offspring Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Mingbo; Wang, Miao; Ding, Siqing; Li, Changqi; Luo, Xuegang

    2012-01-01

    Prenatal stress can result in various behavior deficits in offspring. Here we tested the effects of environmental enrichment during gestation used as a preventive strategy on the behavior deficits of prenatal-stressed offspring rats as well as the underlying structure basis. We compared the effect size of environmental enrichment during gestation on prenatal-stressed offspring to that of environmental enrichment after weaning. Our results showed that environmental enrichment during gestation partially prevented anxiety and the damage in learning and memory in prenatal-stressed offspring as evaluated by elevated plus-maze test and Morris water maze test. At the same time, environmental enrichment during gestation inhibited the decrease in spine density of CA1 and dentate gyrus neurons and preserved the expression of synaptophysin and glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) in the hippocampus of prenatal-stressed offspring. There was no significant difference in offspring behavior between 7-day environmental enrichment during gestation and 14-day offspring environmental enrichment after weaning. These data suggest that environmental enrichment during gestation effectively prevented the behavior deficits and the abnormal synapse structures in prenatal-stressed offspring, and that it can be used as an efficient preventive strategy against prenatal stresses

  18. Altered Neurochemical Ingredient of Hippocampus in Patients with Bipolar Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murad Atmaca

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. In a number of investigations, hippocampal neurochemicals were evaluated in the patients with bipolar disorder who were on their first episode or euthymic periods. However, we did not meet any investigation in which only patients with bipolar depression were examined. As a consequence, the objective of the present study was to examine both sides of hippocampus of patients with bipolar disorder in depressive episode and healthy controls using 1H-MRS. Methods. Thirteen patients with DSM-IV bipolar I disorder, most recent episode depressed, were recruited from the Department of Psychiatry at Firat University School of Medicine. We also studied 13 healthy comparison subjects who were without any DSM-IV Axis I disorders recruited from the hospital staff. The patients and controls underwent proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS of their hippocampus. NAA, CHO, and CRE values were measured. Results. No significant effect of diagnosis was observed for NAA/CRE ratio. For the NAA/CHO ratio, the ANCOVA with age, gender, and whole brain volume as covariates revealed that the patients with bipolar depression had significantly lower ratio compared to healthy control subjects for right and for left side. As for the CHO/CRE ratio, the difference was statistically significant for right side, with an effect diagnosis of F = 4.763, P = 0.038, and was very nearly significant for left side, with an effect diagnosis of F = 3.732, P = 0.064. Conclusions. We found that the patients with bipolar depression had lower NAA/CHO and higher CHO/CRE ratios compared to those of healthy control subjects. The findings of the present study also suggest that there may be a degenerative process concerning the hippocampus morphology in the patients with bipolar depression.

  19. Preventive and therapeutic effects of tranexamic acid on postpartum bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samaneh Solltani

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Postpartum hemorrhage is among the leading causes of maternal mortality throughout the world. Severe blood loss contributes to  the increased blood transfusion risk with its concerned inherent adverse events and therefore increased rate of emergency re-operative interventions such as arterial ligation or hysterectomy. It also can lead to protracted anemia, particularly in low or median income countries. Extended application of antifibrinolytic agents such as tranexamic acid has been customary for long years to stop or reduce blood loss in postpartum period. However, there are not enough reliable evidence to approve the real efficacy of these drugs. In this brief and summary review, we pointed to a few conducted studies. The PubMed was searched for keyword including postpartum hemorrhage, tranexamic acid, cesarean section, vaginal delivery, and blood loss prevention. The articles with language other than English were excluded from our review.  We concluded that more convincing information is needed to determine the precise effects of tranexamic acid, and its benefits against adverse effects.

  20. Pre-exposure prophylaxis for HIV-1 prevention does not diminish the pregnancy prevention effectiveness of hormonal contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murnane, Pamela M; Heffron, Renee; Ronald, Allan; Bukusi, Elizabeth A; Donnell, Deborah; Mugo, Nelly R; Were, Edwin; Mujugira, Andrew; Kiarie, James; Celum, Connie; Baeten, Jared M

    2014-07-31

    For women at risk of HIV-1, effective contraception and effective HIV-1 prevention are global priorities. In a clinical trial of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for HIV-1 prevention in HIV-1-serodiscordant couples, we estimated the effectiveness of hormonal contraceptives (oral contraceptive pills, injectable depot medroxyprogesterone acetate, and hormonal implants) for pregnancy prevention relative to no contraception among 1785 HIV-1-uninfected women followed up to 36 months. We compared the effectiveness of each method among women assigned PrEP versus placebo. Contraception was not required for participation, but was offered on-site and was recorded monthly; incident pregnancy was determined by monthly urine testing. For women using no contraception, overall pregnancy incidence was 15.4% per year. Women reporting oral contraceptive use had comparable pregnancy incidence to women using no contraception, and this lack of contraceptive effectiveness was similar for those assigned PrEP and placebo (17.7 and 10.0% incidence per year, respectively; P-value for difference in effect by PrEP use = 0.24). Women reporting injectable contraception had reduced pregnancy incidence compared to those reporting no contraception, which did not differ by arm (PrEP 5.1%, placebo 5.3% per year; P-value for difference = 0.47). Contraceptive effectiveness was highest among women using implants (pregnancy incidence <1% per year in both arms). PrEP had no adverse impact on hormonal contraceptive effectiveness for pregnancy prevention. As seen previously in similar populations, women reporting contraceptive pill use had little protection from pregnancy, possibly due to poor adherence. Injectable or implantable hormonal contraception and PrEP provide effective prevention for pregnancy and HIV-1.

  1. Vanillin improves scopolamine‑induced memory impairment through restoration of ID1 expression in the mouse hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Chul; Kim, In Hye; Cho, Jeong Hwi; Lee, Tae-Kyeong; Park, Joon Ha; Ahn, Ji Hyeon; Shin, Bich Na; Yan, Bing Chun; Kim, Jong-Dai; Jeon, Yong Hwan; Lee, Young Joo; Won, Moo-Ho; Kang, Il Jun

    2018-03-01

    4-Hydroxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde (vanillin), contained in a number of species of plant, has been reported to display beneficial effects against brain injuries. In the present study, the impact of vanillin on scopolamine‑induced alterations in cognition and the expression of DNA binding protein inhibitor ID‑1 (ID1), one of the inhibitors of DNA binding/differentiation proteins that regulate gene transcription, in the mouse hippocampus. Mice were treated with 1 mg/kg scopolamine with or without 40 mg/kg vanillin once daily for 4 weeks. Scopolamine‑induced cognitive impairment was observed from 1 week and was deemed to be severe 4 weeks following the administration of scopolamine. However, treatment with vanillin in scopolamine‑treated mice markedly attenuated cognitive impairment 4 weeks following treatment with scopolamine. ID1‑immunoreactive cells were revealed in the hippocampus of vehicle‑treated mice, and were hardly detected 4 weeks following treatment with scopolamine. However, treatment with vanillin in scopolamine‑treated mice markedly restored ID1‑immunoreactive cells and expression 4 weeks subsequent to treatment. The results of the present study suggested that vanillin may be beneficial for cognitive impairment, by preventing the reduction of ID1 expression which may be associated with cognitive impairment.

  2. Stress, the hippocampus, and epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joëls, M.

    2009-01-01

    Stress is among the most frequently self-reported precipitants of seizures in patients with epilepsy. This review considers how important stress mediators like corticotropin-releasing hormone, corticosteroids, and neurosteroids could contribute to this phenomenon. Cellular effects of stress

  3. Designing an Effective Prevention Program: Principles Underlying the Rand Smoking and Drug Prevention Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellickson, Phyllis L.

    This paper describes the Project ALERT program (Adolescent Learning Experiences in Resistance Training) which was established by the Rand Corporation to prevent smoking and drug use among seventh graders. The program is based on the social influence model of drug use initiation. Curriculum features are described including motivation to resist and…

  4. Intracranial EEG correlates of implicit relational inference within the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reber, T P; Do Lam, A T A; Axmacher, N; Elger, C E; Helmstaedter, C; Henke, K; Fell, J

    2016-01-01

    Drawing inferences from past experiences enables adaptive behavior in future situations. Inference has been shown to depend on hippocampal processes. Usually, inference is considered a deliberate and effortful mental act which happens during retrieval, and requires the focus of our awareness. Recent fMRI studies hint at the possibility that some forms of hippocampus-dependent inference can also occur during encoding and possibly also outside of awareness. Here, we sought to further explore the feasibility of hippocampal implicit inference, and specifically address the temporal evolution of implicit inference using intracranial EEG. Presurgical epilepsy patients with hippocampal depth electrodes viewed a sequence of word pairs, and judged the semantic fit between two words in each pair. Some of the word pairs entailed a common word (e.g., "winter-red," "red-cat") such that an indirect relation was established in following word pairs (e.g., "winter-cat"). The behavioral results suggested that drawing inference implicitly from past experience is feasible because indirect relations seemed to foster "fit" judgments while the absence of indirect relations fostered "do not fit" judgments, even though the participants were unaware of the indirect relations. A event-related potential (ERP) difference emerging 400 ms post-stimulus was evident in the hippocampus during encoding, suggesting that indirect relations were already established automatically during encoding of the overlapping word pairs. Further ERP differences emerged later post-stimulus (1,500 ms), were modulated by the participants' responses and were evident during encoding and test. Furthermore, response-locked ERP effects were evident at test. These ERP effects could hence be a correlate of the interaction of implicit memory with decision-making. Together, the data map out a time-course in which the hippocampus automatically integrates memories from discrete but related episodes to implicitly influence future

  5. Methamphetamine differentially affects BDNF and cell death factors in anatomically defined regions of the hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galinato, Melissa H.; Orio, Laura; Mandyam, Chitra D.

    2014-01-01

    Methamphetamine exposure reduces hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) and neurogenesis and these alterations partially contribute to hippocampal maladaptive plasticity. The potential mechanisms underlying methamphetamine-induced maladaptive plasticity were identified in the present study. Expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF; a regulator of LTP and neurogenesis), and its receptor tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) were studied in the dorsal and ventral hippocampal tissue lysates in rats that intravenously self-administered methamphetamine in a limited access (1 h/day) or extended access (6 h/day) paradigm for 17 days post baseline sessions. Extended access methamphetamine enhanced expression of BDNF with significant effects observed in the dorsal and ventral hippocampus. Methamphetamine-induced enhancements in BDNF expression were not associated with TrkB receptor activation as indicated by phospho (p)-TrkB-706 levels. Conversely, methamphetamine produced hypophosphorylation of NMDA receptor subunit 2B (GluN2B) at Tyr-1472 in the ventral hippocampus, indicating reduced receptor activation. In addition, methamphetamine enhanced expression of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and reduced pro-apoptotic protein Bax levels in the ventral hippocampus, suggesting a mechanism for reducing cell death. Analysis of Akt, a pro-survival kinase that suppresses apoptotic pathways and pAkt at Ser-473 demonstrated that extended access methamphetamine reduces Akt expression in the ventral hippocampus. These data reveal that alterations in Bcl-2 and Bax levels by methamphetamine were not associated with enhanced Akt expression. Given that hippocampal function and neurogenesis vary in a subregion-specific fashion, where dorsal hippocampus regulates spatial processing and has higher levels of neurogenesis, whereas ventral hippocampus regulates anxiety-related behaviors, these data suggest that methamphetamine self-administration initiates distinct allostatic changes in

  6. Effectiveness of a Social Change Approach to Sexual Assault Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Keith E.

    2009-01-01

    The author examined the impact on resident assistants of a social change approach to sexual assault prevention. The interactive multi-media program focused on engaging men on sexual assault prevention, accurately defining rape for college men and women, identifying aspects of the rape culture in society and on-campus, and empowering college…

  7. The effectiveness of exercise interventions to prevent sports injuries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauersen, Jeppe Bo; Bertelsen, Ditte Marie; Andersen, Lars Bo

    2014-01-01

    Physical activity is important in both prevention and treatment of many common diseases, but sports injuries can pose serious problems.......Physical activity is important in both prevention and treatment of many common diseases, but sports injuries can pose serious problems....

  8. Preventive and Therapeutic Effects of Propolis in Gamma Irradiated Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamza, R.G.; El-Shahat, A.N.

    2011-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is known to stimulate the generation of oxygen radicals which destabilize organic molecules resulting in a decrease of the system's antioxidant potential. Propolis (bee glue) is a complex mixture of natural substances that exhibits a broad spectrum of biological activities. As the possibility exists that it may exert a radio protections role, the present study aimed to examine the preventive and therapeutic effects of propolis on the gamma irradiation-induced changes in antioxidant status and certain biochemical parameters. HPLC chromatography for analysis of propolis showed that the number of identified phenols was 6 compounds (natural antioxidants). Male albino rats were exposed to 6 Gy of gamma radiation. The efficiency of propolis was evaluated when propolis was administered orally to rats at a dose of 200 mg/kg as follow: non-irradiated rats received orally propolis extract for 6 weeks (positive control) and rats received orally propolis extract for 3 weeks before or after gamma irradiation. The obtained results revealed that propolis given to rats before gamma irradiation protect the hazardous effects of gamma irradiation. In addition, administration of propolis to gamma irradiated rats caused significant enhancement in hepatic antioxidant enzymes (glutathion reductase; GR and catalase; CAT) and total antioxidant capacity associated with a remarkable decrease in the level of lipid peroxidation (TBARS). Also, it significantly reduced the changes induced by gamma irradiation in the serum levels of glucose and liver enzymes; aminotransferases (AST, ALT) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP). In addition, a significant improvement was observed in the serum levels of total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), low density lipoprotein- cholesterol (LDL-C) and high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C). In conclusion, the positive results obtained in the gamma irradiated rats given propolis indicated that propolis could be considered as effective

  9. Effectiveness of waste prevention program in primary students' schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorpas, Antonis A; Voukkali, Irene; Loizia, Pantelitsa

    2017-06-01

    Even though reducing waste is at the top of the waste hierarchy, no real decoupling between waste generation and consumption has been demonstrated. Several waste directives had been published from EU, but they have only brought minor changes within the key objective of reducing waste generation. Most efforts have been targeted towards greater amounts of recycling and better management of waste disposal. While these are necessary and socially beneficial goals, they are not adequate for the achievement of long-term sustainability goals. The purpose of this study is to understand students' knowledge, attitudes and behavioural changes in relation to the water plastic bottle of 500 ml. Understanding waste prevention behaviour (WPB) could enable schools' principals, local authorities and committees as well as decision makers to design and implement more effective policies for reducing the amount of specific waste streams that is generated. Students in a daily base bring their own water containers of 500 ml or buy water from the school as they do not feel safe to use other sources of water. Nine hundred ninety-eight refilling stainless steel water refilling bottles (SSWRB-of 600 ml) were shared to the students in four primary schools. The results indicated that the students are presented with different behaviours from class to class for many reasons; most of them are related with what their parents believe, and how themselves or the synergies between them reacts and affected.

  10. Preventing blood transfusion failures: FMEA, an effective assessment method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafpour, Zhila; Hasoumi, Mojtaba; Behzadi, Faranak; Mohamadi, Efat; Jafary, Mohamadreza; Saeedi, Morteza

    2017-06-30

    Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA) is a method used to assess the risk of failures and harms to patients during the medical process and to identify the associated clinical issues. The aim of this study was to conduct an assessment of blood transfusion process in a teaching general hospital, using FMEA as the method. A structured FMEA was recruited in our study performed in 2014, and corrective actions were implemented and re-evaluated after 6 months. Sixteen 2-h sessions were held to perform FMEA in the blood transfusion process, including five steps: establishing the context, selecting team members, analysis of the processes, hazard analysis, and developing a risk reduction protocol for blood transfusion. Failure modes with the highest risk priority numbers (RPNs) were identified. The overall RPN scores ranged from 5 to 100 among which, four failure modes were associated with RPNs over 75. The data analysis indicated that failures with the highest RPNs were: labelling (RPN: 100), transfusion of blood or the component (RPN: 100), patient identification (RPN: 80) and sampling (RPN: 75). The results demonstrated that mis-transfusion of blood or blood component is the most important error, which can lead to serious morbidity or mortality. Provision of training to the personnel on blood transfusion, knowledge raising on hazards and appropriate preventative measures, as well as developing standard safety guidelines are essential, and must be implemented during all steps of blood and blood component transfusion.

  11. [Psychological effects of preventive voice care training in student teachers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nusseck, M; Richter, B; Echternach, M; Spahn, C

    2017-07-01

    Studies on the effectiveness of preventive voice care programs have focused mainly on voice parameters. Psychological parameters, however, have not been investigated in detail so far. The effect of a voice training program for German student teachers on psychological health parameters was investigated in a longitudinal study. The sample of 204 student teachers was divided into the intervention group (n = 123), who participated in the voice training program, and the control group (n = 81), who received no voice training. Voice training contained ten 90-min group courses and an individual visit by the voice trainer in a teaching situation with feedback afterwards. Participants were asked to fill out questionnaires (self-efficacy, Short-Form Health Survey, self-consciousness, voice self-concept, work-related behaviour and experience patterns) at the beginning and the end of their student teacher training period. The training program showed significant positive influences on psychological health, voice self-concept (i.e. more positive perception and increased awareness of one's own voice) and work-related coping behaviour in the intervention group. On average, the mental health status of all participants reduced over time, whereas the status in the trained group diminished significantly less than in the control group. Furthermore, the trained student teachers gained abilities to cope with work-related stress better than those without training. The training program clearly showed a positive impact on mental health. The results maintain the importance of such a training program not only for voice health, but also for wide-ranging aspects of constitutional health.

  12. Development of short-snouted seahorse (Hippocampus hippocampus, L. 1758): osteological and morphological aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novelli, B; Otero-Ferrer, F; Socorro, J A; Caballero, M J; Segade-Botella, A; Molina Domínguez, L

    2017-06-01

    Information about early development after male release lags behind studies of juveniles and adult seahorses, and newborn seahorses, similar in shape to adults, are considered juveniles or fry. During early life, Hippocampus hippocampus present behavioural (shift in habitat, from planktonic to benthic) and morphological changes; for this reasons, the aims of this study are to define the stage of development of H. hippocampus after they are expelled from the male brood pouch and to establish direct or indirect development through an osteological analysis. The ossification process was studied in 120 individuals, from their release to 30 days after birth. To analyse the osteological development, Alcian Blue-Alizarin Red double staining technique for bone and cartilage was adapted to this species. At birth, H. hippocampus presents a mainly cartilaginous structure that ossifies in approximately 1 month. The bony armour composed of bony rings and plates develops in 10 days. The caudal fin, a structure absent in juveniles and adult seahorses, is present at birth and progressively disappears with age. The absence of adult osteological structure in newborns, like coronet, bony rings and plates, head spines and components allowing tail prehensile abilities, suggests a metamorphosis before the juvenile stage. During the indirect development, the metamorphic stage started inside brood pouch and followed outside and leads up to reconsider the status of H. hippocampus newborns.

  13. The muscarinic stimulation of phospholipid labeling in hippocampus is independent of its cholinergic input

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, S.K.; Boast, C.A.; Agranoff, B.W.

    1980-01-01

    The authors have examined the role of cholinergic innervation on the acetylcholine (ACh)-induced 'phospholipid labeling effect' (PLE) in synaptosomes derived from the hippocampus. The hippocampus supports a robust PLE and its sole cholinergic input from the septal nuclei can be readily disrupted by the placement of lesions in the fornix. The lesion is expected to cause degeneration of cholinergic presynaptic fibers, but should have little effect on the integrity of postsynaptic structures, and thus provide a means of further localizing the synaptosomal PLE. (Auth.)

  14. Ulinastatin suppresses endoplasmic reticulum stress and apoptosis in the hippocampus of rats with acute paraquat poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-feng Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung injury is the main manifestation of paraquat poisoning. Few studies have addressed brain damage after paraquat poisoning. Ulinastatin is a protease inhibitor that can effectively stabilize lysosomal membranes, prevent cell damage, and reduce the production of free radicals. This study assumed that ulinastatin would exert these effects on brain tissues that had been poisoned with paraquat. Rat models of paraquat poisoning were intraperitoneally injected with ulinastatin. Simultaneously, rats in the control group were administered normal saline. Hematoxylin-eosin staining showed that most hippocampal cells were contracted and nucleoli had disappeared in the paraquat group. Fewer cells in the hippocampus were concentrated and nucleoli had disappeared in the ulinastatin group. Western blot assay showed that expressions of GRP78 and cleaved-caspase-3 were significantly lower in the ulinastatin group than in the paraquat group. Immunohistochemical findings showed that CHOP immunoreactivity was significantly lower in the ulinastatin group than in the paraquat group. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling staining showed that the number of apoptotic cells was reduced in the paraquat and ulinastatin groups. These data confirmed that endoplasmic reticular stress can be induced by acute paraquat poisoning. Ulinastatin can effectively inhibit this stress as well as cell apoptosis, thereby exerting a neuroprotective effect.

  15. A SIMPLE AND EFFECTIVE TREATMENT FOR PERICHONDRITIS TO PREVENT REACCUMULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pampa Pathi Goud

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: A simple treatment for perichondritis to prevent reaccumulation by using a drain. Existing treatment for this condition is initially medical, surgical (incision and drainage and compression to prevent recurrence with accompanying medical management. However the result is often a failure, resulting in partial or complete cauliflower ear deformity. PROCEDURE: Treatment involves to drain the site of infection and placing a drain to prevent reaccumulation. RESULT: The prescribed treatment avoids reaccumulation of fluid and repeated drainage. CONCLUSION: This method can be implemented for routine minor OT practice.

  16. Deleterious Metabolic Effects of High Fructose Intake: The Preventive Effect of Lactobacillus kefiri Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubiría, María Guillermina; Gambaro, Sabrina Eliana; Rey, María Amanda; Carasi, Paula; Serradell, María de Los Ángeles; Giovambattista, Andrés

    2017-05-17

    Modern lifestyle and diets have been associated with metabolic disorders and an imbalance in the normal gut microbiota. Probiotics are widely known for their health beneficial properties targeting the gut microbial ecosystem. The aim of our study was to evaluate the preventive effect of Lactobacillus kefiri ( L. kefiri ) administration in a fructose-rich diet (FRD) mice model. Mice were provided with tap water or fructose-added (20% w / v ) drinking water supplemented or not with L. kefiri . Results showed that probiotic administration prevented weight gain and epidydimal adipose tissue (EAT) expansion, with partial reversion of the adipocyte hypertrophy developed by FRD. Moreover, the probiotic prevented the increase of plasma triglycerides and leptin, together with the liver triglyceride content. Leptin adipocyte secretion was also improved by L. kefiri , being able to respond to an insulin stimulus. Glucose intolerance was partially prevented by L. kefiri treatment (GTT) and local inflammation (TNFα; IL1β; IL6 and INFγ) was completely inhibited in EAT. L. kefiri supplementation generated an impact on gut microbiota composition, changing Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes profiles. Overall, our results indicate that the administration of probiotics prevents the deleterious effects of FRD intake and should therefore be promoted to improve metabolic disorders.

  17. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: adverse effects and their prevention.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonkeman, Harald Erwin; van de Laar, Mart A F J

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To discuss nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), their history, development, mode of action, toxicities, strategies for the prevention of toxicity, and future developments. - Methods: Medline search for articles published up to 2007, using the keywords acetylsalicylic acid,

  18. High Plasticity of New Granule Cells in the Aging Hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariela F. Trinchero

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Summary: During aging, the brain undergoes changes that impair cognitive capacity and circuit plasticity, including a marked decrease in production of adult-born hippocampal neurons. It is unclear whether development and integration of those new neurons are also affected by age. Here, we show that adult-born granule cells (GCs in aging mice are scarce and exhibit slow development, but they display a remarkable potential for structural plasticity. Retrovirally labeled 3-week-old GCs in middle-aged mice were small, underdeveloped, and disconnected. Neuronal development and integration were accelerated by voluntary exercise or environmental enrichment. Similar effects were observed via knockdown of Lrig1, an endogenous negative modulator of neurotrophin receptors. Consistently, blocking neurotrophin signaling by Lrig1 overexpression abolished the positive effects of exercise. These results demonstrate an unparalleled degree of plasticity in the aging brain mediated by neurotrophins, whereby new GCs remain immature until becoming rapidly recruited to the network by activity. : Trinchero et al. show that development of new granule cells born in the adult hippocampus is strongly influenced by age. In the aging hippocampus, new neurons remain immature for prolonged intervals, yet voluntary exercise triggers their rapid growth and functional synaptogenesis. This extensive structural remodeling is mediated by neurotrophins. Keywords: adult neurogenesis, dentate gyrus, functional integration, neurotrophins, synaptogenesis, exercise

  19. TrkB blockade in the hippocampus after training or retrieval impairs memory: protection from consolidation impairment by histone deacetylase inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Martina; Petry, Fernanda S; Lichtenfels, Martina; Valiati, Fernanda E; Dornelles, Arethuza S; Roesler, Rafael

    2016-03-01

    Relatively little is known about the requirement of signaling initiated by brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor, tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB), in the early phases of memory consolidation, as well as about its possible functional interactions with epigenetic mechanisms. Here we show that blocking TrkB in the dorsal hippocampus after learning or retrieval impairs retention of memory for inhibitory avoidance (IA). More importantly, the impairing effect of TrkB antagonism on consolidation was completely prevented by the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor sodium butyrate (NaB). Male Wistar rats were given an intrahippocampal infusion of saline (SAL) or NaB before training, followed by an infusion of either vehicle (VEH) or the selective TrkB antagonist ANA-12 immediately after training. In a second experiment, the infusions were administered before and after retrieval. ANA-12 after either training or retrieval produced a significant impairment in a subsequent memory retention test. Pretraining administration of NaB prevented the effect of ANA-12, although NaB given before retrieval did not alter the impairment resulting from TrkB blockade. The results indicate that inhibition of BDNF/TrkB in the hippocampus can hinder consolidation and reconsolidation of IA memory. However, TrkB activity is not required for consolidation in the presence of NaB, suggesting that a dysfunction in BDNF/TrkB signaling can be fully compensated by HDAC inhibition to allow hippocampal memory formation.

  20. The investigation of biometric characteristics of seahorse species [Hippocampus hippocampus (Linnaeus,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şule Gürkan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Bu çalışma, İzmir Körfezi’nde dağılım gösteren Syngnathidae familyasına ait denizatı türlerini ve bu türlerin biyometrik özelliklerini belirlemek amacıyla yapılmıştır. Şubat 2000 tarihinde bölgede avlanan balıkçılardan 29 adet Hippocampus hippocampus, ve 200 adet Hippocampus guttulatus örneği temin edilmiştir. Elde edilen örneklerin metrik ve meristik özellikleri ve boy-ağırlık ilişkileri ile boy ve ağırlık frekans değerleri verilmiştir

  1. The fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitor URB597 exerts anti-inflammatory effects in hippocampus of aged rats and restores an age-related deficit in long-term potentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murphy Niamh

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several factors contribute to the deterioration in synaptic plasticity which accompanies age and one of these is neuroinflammation. This is characterized by increased microglial activation associated with increased production of proinflammatory cytokines like interleukin-1β (IL-1β. In aged rats these neuroinflammatory changes are associated with a decreased ability of animals to sustain long-term potentiation (LTP in the dentate gyrus. Importantly, treatment of aged rats with agents which possess anti-inflammatory properties to decrease microglial activation, improves LTP. It is known that endocannabinoids, such as anandamide (AEA, have anti-inflammatory properties and therefore have the potential to decrease the age-related microglial activation. However, endocannabinoids are extremely labile and are hydrolyzed quickly after production. Here we investigated the possibility that inhibiting the degradation of endocannabinoids with the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH inhibitor, URB597, could ameliorate age-related increases in microglial activation and the associated decrease in LTP. Methods Young and aged rats received subcutaneous injections of the FAAH inhibitor URB597 every second day and controls which received subcutaneous injections of 30% DMSO-saline every second day for 28 days. Long-term potentiation was recorded on day 28 and the animals were sacrificed. Brain tissue was analyzed for markers of microglial activation by PCR and for levels of endocannabinoids by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. Results The data indicate that expression of markers of microglial activation, MHCII, and CD68 mRNA, were increased in the hippocampus of aged, compared with young, rats and that these changes were associated with increased expression of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα which were attenuated by treatment with URB597. Coupled with these changes, we

  2. Erythropoietin prevents the effect of chronic restraint stress on the number of hippocampal CA3c dendritic terminals-relation to expression of genes involved in synaptic plasticity, angiogenesis, inflammation, and oxidative stress in male rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aalling, Nadia; Hageman, Ida; Miskowiak, Kamilla Woznica

    2018-01-01

    . Interestingly, these effects seemed to be mechanistically distinct, as stress and EPO had differential effects on gene expression. While chronic restraint stress lowered the expression of spinophilin, tumor necrosis factor α, and heat shock protein 72, EPO increased expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-2α...... and lowered the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in hippocampus. These findings indicate that the effects of treatment with EPO follow different molecular pathways and do not directly counteract the effects of stress in the hippocampus....

  3. Red Wine Prevents the Acute Negative Vascular Effects of Smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Viktoria; Bachelier, Katrin; Schirmer, Stephan H; Werner, Christian; Laufs, Ulrich; Böhm, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Moderate consumption of red wine is associated with fewer cardiovascular events. We investigated whether red wine consumption counteracts the adverse vascular effects of cigarette smoking. Participants smoked 3 cigarettes alone or after drinking a titrated volume of red wine. Clinical chemistry, blood counts, plasma cytokine enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, immunomagnetic separation of CD14 + monocytes for gene expression analysis, fluorescence-activated cell sorting for microparticles, and isolation of circulating mononuclear cells to measure telomerase activity were performed, and urine cotinine levels were quantified. Compared with baseline, leukocytosis (P = .019), neutrophilia (P <.001), lymphopenia (P <.001), and eosinopenia (P = .008) were observed after only smoking. Endothelial and platelet-, monocyte-, and leukocyte-derived microparticles (P <.001 each) were elevated. In monocytes, messenger RNA expression of interleukin (IL)-6 (2.6- ± 0.57-fold), tumor necrosis factor alpha (2.2- ± 0.62-fold), and IL-1b (2.3- ± 0.44-fold) were upregulated, as was IL-6 (1.2 ± 0.12-fold) protein concentration in plasma. Smoking acutely inhibited mononuclear cell telomerase activity. Markers of endothelial damage, inflammation, and cellular aging were completely attenuated by red wine consumption. Cigarette smoke results in acute endothelial damage, vascular and systemic inflammation, and indicators of the cellular aging processes in otherwise healthy nonsmokers. Pretreatment with red wine was preventive. The findings underscore the magnitude of acute damage exerted by cigarette smoking in "occasional lifestyle smokers" and demonstrate the potential of red wine as a protective strategy to avert markers of vascular injury. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of atorvastatin on preventing contrast-induced nephropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Dongya; Zhu Jing; Chen Jianchang; Xu Weiting; Luo Xiaoyu; Zhao Liangping

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To study the effects of atorvastatin on contrast-induced renal function and urinary protein change in patients undergoing diagnostic and therapeutic coronary intervention. Methods: Two hundred and forty-six patients who underwent coronary angiography or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) were randomized to receive atorvastatin (40 mg, qn, n=123) or no atorvastatin (n=123) treatment 3 days before coronary angiography. All patients received hydrated therapy. Serum creatinine (Scr), urinary αl-microglobulin (α l -MG), and urinary albumin (mALB) were checked for evidence of tubular or glomerular damage at start, and 36 to 48 hours after the administration of a radiocontrast agent. High-sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP) levels, urinary α l -MG/ urinary creatinine(Ucr) and mALB/ Ucr were also assessed at the same time. Creatinine clearance(Ccr) was calculated according to Cockcroft-Gault formulas basing on serum creatinine. Results: (1) In the control group and atorvastatin-treated group, comparison with the value before coronary angiography or PCI, urinary α l -MG/ Ucr, mALB/ Ucr, Scr and hsCRP significantly increased from 36 to 48 hours after angiography or PCI (P l -MG/ Ucr significantly increased at the 2nd day after angiography or PCI in the control group (P<0.05), incidence of contrast induced nephropathy (CIN) significantly increased too (8.13% vs 0.81%, P<0.05). Conclusions: Contrast media induces light renal function damage. Pretreatment with atorvastatin 40 mg/qn for 3 days could significantly reduce procedural inflammatory reaction and prevent contrast-induced nephropathy. (authors)

  5. Effect of atorvastatin on preventing contrast-induced nephropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dongya, Zhang; Jing, Zhu; Jianchang, Chen; Weiting, Xu; Xiaoyu, Luo; Liangping, Zhao [Dept of Cardiology, the Second Hospital Affiliated to Soochow University, Suzhou (China)

    2011-03-15

    Objective: To study the effects of atorvastatin on contrast-induced renal function and urinary protein change in patients undergoing diagnostic and therapeutic coronary intervention. Methods: Two hundred and forty-six patients who underwent coronary angiography or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) were randomized to receive atorvastatin (40 mg, qn, n=123) or no atorvastatin (n=123) treatment 3 days before coronary angiography. All patients received hydrated therapy. Serum creatinine (Scr), urinary {alpha}l-microglobulin ({alpha}{sub l}-MG), and urinary albumin (mALB) were checked for evidence of tubular or glomerular damage at start, and 36 to 48 hours after the administration of a radiocontrast agent. High-sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP) levels, urinary {alpha}{sub l}-MG/ urinary creatinine(Ucr) and mALB/ Ucr were also assessed at the same time. Creatinine clearance(Ccr) was calculated according to Cockcroft-Gault formulas basing on serum creatinine. Results: (1) In the control group and atorvastatin-treated group, comparison with the value before coronary angiography or PCI, urinary {alpha}{sub l}-MG/ Ucr, mALB/ Ucr, Scr and hsCRP significantly increased from 36 to 48 hours after angiography or PCI (P<0.05). Ccr significantly decreased from 36 to 48 hours after angiography or PCI (P<0.05). (2) Compared the atorvastatin-treated group, the values of hsCRP, urinary {alpha}{sub l}-MG/ Ucr significantly increased at the 2nd day after angiography or PCI in the control group (P<0.05), incidence of contrast induced nephropathy (CIN) significantly increased too (8.13% vs 0.81%, P<0.05). Conclusions: Contrast media induces light renal function damage. Pretreatment with atorvastatin 40 mg/qn for 3 days could significantly reduce procedural inflammatory reaction and prevent contrast-induced nephropathy. (authors)

  6. The actual prevention of fibrogenic effect of mineral dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobro Milan

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available The dustiness occurs in the mining work environment during the process of disintegration of rocks by drilling, explosion and dislocation. The dust contains minerals forming the massif, under Slovak mining conditions, it was usually quartz and some other minerals. They usually accompanied utility minerals. The characteristic mining aerosol is created during disintegration process. It was inhaled by miners and due to the most dangerous fibrogenic mineral – quartz – it caused that employees suffered from the so far incurable industrial disease. From that reason a long-term research of reaction qualities of quartz dust was carried out and the possibility to decrease its fibrogenic properties was researched. The prevention vested in the elimination of these properties on the surface of quartz grain or other silicate before entering, i.e. being inhaled by lungs, using water soluble aluminium hydroxide compound. This water was used for flushing in drilling process and to decrease dustiness by spraying it directly in the mining workplace. The aluminium hydroxide agent reacted with mineral dust directly in aerosol before being inhaled. The principle vested in the reaction of one mole of agent with two moles of surface structures of quartz particle forming a thermostatic layer of a new mineral type, in this case aluminium silicate of kaolinite. The required concentration of aluminium hydroxide compound solution for pure quartz dust was determined by experimental works and calculation with a required reserve or even slight excess of agent. If the fibrogenity of quartz not influenced in this manner was considered as 100%, its cytostatic and consequently fibrogenic effect would be decreased by the influence of this agent minimally by 60%. The method has been tested directly in mines, but due to recession of mining industry, it was not introduced in practice, however, it is currently getting a certain significance in tunnelling of transport tunnels in

  7. Effectiveness of occupational injury prevention policies in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavides, Fernando G; García, Ana M; Lopez-Ruiz, Maria; Gil, Josep; Boix, Pere; Martinez, José Miguel; Rodrigo, Fernando

    2009-01-01

    We examined the effectiveness of preventive interventions against occupational injuries (preferential action plans [PAPs]) developed by Spanish regional governments starting in 2000. We included 3,252,028 occupational injuries with sick leave due to mechanical causes occurring between 1994 and 2004 in manufacturing and private service companies. Time trends for occupational injury rates were estimated before and after implementation of PAPs in each region, with a control group defined for those regions in which no PAPs were implemented (e.g., Galicia, Madrid, and Cataluña). We determined annual change percentages and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) through a negative binomial regression model. Regions were grouped into three categories according to formal quality of their PAPs. The regions with the best PAPs (Andalucia, Aragon, Valencia, and Murcia) showed annually increasing occupational injury rates (2.3%, 95% CI -2.5, 7.4) before implementation of PAPs. After PAPs were implemented, occupational injury rates decreased significantly to -7.4% (95% CI -10.2, -4.5). Similar results were also found for regions with PAPs of lower quality and even for regions that didn't implement a PAP (control group). These results did not vary substantially in stratified analysis by gender, age, type of contract, or length of sick leave. PAPs are not related to a general decline in occupational injury rates in Spain starting in 2000. Reinforcement of Spanish health and safety regulations and labor inspection activities since 2000, resulting from a social agreement between central government and social agents, remains an alternative hypothesis requiring additional research.

  8. A high-fat diet decreases GABA concentration in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuauhtemoc Sandoval-Salazar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It has been proposed that the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA plays a key role in the regulation of food intake and body weight by controlling the excitability, plasticity and the synchronization of neuronal activity in the frontal cortex (FC. It has been also proposed that the high-fat diet (HFD could disturb the metabolism of glutamate and consequently the GABA levels, but the mechanism is not yet clearly understood. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a HFD on the GABA levels in the FC and hippocampus of rats RESULTS: The HFD significantly increased weight gain and blood glucose levels, whereas decreased the GABA levels in the FC and hippocampus compared with standard diet-fed rats CONCLUSIONS: HFD decreases GABA levels in the FC and hippocampus of rat, which likely disrupts the GABAergic inhibitory processes, underlying feeding behavior.

  9. A high-fat diet decreases GABA concentration in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval-Salazar, Cuauhtemoc; Ramírez-Emiliano, Joel; Trejo-Bahena, Aurora; Oviedo-Solís, Cecilia I; Solís-Ortiz, Martha Silvia

    2016-02-29

    It has been proposed that the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) plays a key role in the regulation of food intake and body weight by controlling the excitability, plasticity and the synchronization of neuronal activity in the frontal cortex (FC). It has been also proposed that the high-fat diet (HFD) could disturb the metabolism of glutamate and consequently the GABA levels, but the mechanism is not yet clearly understood. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a HFD on the GABA levels in the FC and hippocampus of rats. The HFD significantly increased weight gain and blood glucose levels, whereas decreased the GABA levels in the FC and hippocampus compared with standard diet-fed rats. HFD decreases GABA levels in the FC and hippocampus of rat, which likely disrupts the GABAergic inhibitory processes, underlying feeding behavior.

  10. Physical Exercise Habits Correlate with Gray Matter Volume of the Hippocampus in Healthy Adult Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killgore, William D. S.; Olson, Elizabeth A.; Weber, Mareen

    2013-12-01

    Physical activity facilitates neurogenesis of dentate cells in the rodent hippocampus, a brain region critical for memory formation and spatial representation. Recent findings in humans also suggest that aerobic exercise can lead to increased hippocampal volume and enhanced cognitive functioning in children and elderly adults. However, the association between physical activity and hippocampal volume during the period from early adulthood through middle age has not been effectively explored. Here, we correlated the number of minutes of self-reported exercise per week with gray matter volume of the hippocampus using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) in 61 healthy adults ranging from 18 to 45 years of age. After controlling for age, gender, and total brain volume, total minutes of weekly exercise correlated significantly with volume of the right hippocampus. Findings highlight the relationship between regular physical exercise and brain structure during early to middle adulthood.

  11. Effect of Panax notoginseng saponins on the expression of beta-amyloid protein in the cortex of the parietal lobe and hippocampus, and spatial learning and memory in a mouse model of senile dementia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhenguo Zhong; Dengpan Wu; Liang Lü; Jinsheng Wang; Wenyan Zhang; Zeqiang Qu

    2008-01-01

    immunohistochemistry. The mRNA content of App, tau, acetylcholinesterase, and synaptophysin (Syp) was tested by real time PCR and RT-PCR.RESULTS: The PCR results show that PNS can downregulate the expression of the App gene and upregulate the expression of the Syp gene in the parietal cortex and hippocampus of SAMP8 mice. The therapeutic effects of the PNS high-dosage group were greater than those of the PNS low-dosage group and the huperzine A group (P < 0.05). The results of the Morris water maze and immunohistochemistry indicated that PNS can improve the capacity for spatial learning and memory in SAMP8 mice, and reduce the content of A β1-40,A β1-42 and expression of App in the brains of SAMP8 mice. The therapeutic effects of the PNS high-dosage group were greater than that of the PNS low-dosage group and the huperzine A group (P < 0.05).CONCLUSION: These results support the hypothesis that PNS plays a therapeutic and protective role on the pathological lesions and learning dysfunction of Alzheimer's disease. The therapeutic effects of PNS for Alzheimer's disease are possibly achieved through downregulating the expression of the App gene and upregulating the expression of the Syp gene. The therapeutic effects of PNS are dose-dependent and are greater than the effect of huperzine A.

  12. Glucose Injections into the Dorsal Hippocampus or Dorsolateral Striatum of Rats Prior to T-Maze Training: Modulation of Learning Rates and Strategy Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canal, Clinton E.; Stutz, Sonja J.; Gold, Paul E.

    2005-01-01

    The present experiments examined the effects of injecting glucose into the dorsal hippocampus or dorsolateral striatum on learning rates and on strategy selection in rats trained on a T-maze that can be solved by using either a hippocampus-sensitive place or striatum-sensitive response strategy. Percentage strategy selection on a probe trial…

  13. Granule cell potentials in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus: coping behavior and stress ulcers in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henke, P G

    1990-01-01

    Evoked population potentials of the granule cells in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus were increased in stress-resistant rats and decreased in stress-susceptible rats, as indexed by restraint-induced gastric ulcers. Inescapable, uncontrollable shock stimulation also suppressed granule cell population spikes and interfered with subsequent coping responses when escape was possible, i.e. the so-called helplessness effect. The data were interpreted to indicate that the hippocampus is part of a coping system in stressful situations.

  14. Frequency-dependent glycinergic inhibition modulates plasticity in hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keck, Tara; Lillis, Kyle P; Zhou, Yu-Dong; White, John A

    2008-07-16

    Previous studies have demonstrated the presence of functional glycine receptors (GlyRs) in hippocampus. In this work, we examine the baseline activity and activity-dependent modulation of GlyRs in region CA1. We find that strychnine-sensitive GlyRs are open in the resting CA1 pyramidal cell, creating a state of tonic inhibition that "shunts" the magnitude of EPSPs evoked by electrical stimulation of the Schaffer collateral inputs. This GlyR-mediated shunting conductance is independent of the presynaptic stimulation rate; however, pairs of presynaptic and postsynaptic action potentials, repeated at frequencies above 5 Hz, reduce the GlyR-mediated conductance and increase peak EPSP magnitudes to levels at least 20% larger than those seen with presynaptic stimulation alone. We refer to this phenomenon as rate-dependent efficacy (RDE). Exogenous GlyR agonists (glycine, taurine) block RDE by preventing the closure of postsynaptic GlyRs. The GlyR antagonist strychnine blocks postsynaptic GlyRs under all conditions, occluding RDE. During RDE, GlyRs are less responsive to local glycine application, suggesting that a reduction in the number or sensitivity of membrane-inserted GlyRs underlies RDE. By extending the RDE induction protocol to include 500 paired presynaptic and postsynaptic spikes, we can induce long-term synaptic depression (LTD). Manipulations that lead to reduced functionality of GlyRs, either pharmacologically or through RDE, also lead to increased LTD. This result suggests that RDE contributes to long-term synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus.

  15. Is systematic training in opioid overdose prevention effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosque-Prous, Marina; Folch, Cinta; Sarasa-Renedo, Ana; Majó, Xavier; Casabona, Jordi; Brugal, M. Teresa

    2017-01-01

    The objectives were to analyze the knowledge about overdose prevention, the use of naloxone, and the number of fatal overdoses after the implementation of Systematic Training in Overdose Prevention (STOOP) program. We conducted a quasi-experimental study, and held face-to-face interviews before (n = 725) and after (n = 722) implementation of systematic training in two different samples of people who injected opioids attending harm reduction centers. We asked participants to list the main causes of overdose and the main actions that should be taken when witnessing an overdose. We created two dependent variables, the number of (a) correct and (b) incorrect answers. The main independent variable was Study Group: Intervention Group (IG), Comparison Group (CG), Pre-Intervention Group With Sporadic Training in Overdose Prevention (PREIGS), or Pre-Intervention Group Without Training in Overdose Prevention (PREIGW). The relationship between the dependent and independent variables was assessed using a multivariate Poisson regression analysis. Finally, we conducted an interrupted time series analysis of monthly fatal overdoses before and after the implementation of systematic program during the period 2006–2015. Knowledge of overdose prevention increased after implementing systematic training program. Compared to the PREIGW, the IG gave more correct answers (IRR = 1.40;95%CI:1.33–1.47), and fewer incorrect answers (IRR = 0.33;95%CI:0.25–0.44). Forty percent of people who injected opioids who received a naloxone kit had used the kit in response to an overdose they witnessed. These courses increase knowledge of overdose prevention in people who use opioids, give them the necessary skills to use naloxone, and slightly diminish the number of fatal opioid overdoses in the city of Barcelona. PMID:29088247

  16. Improving Effectiveness of Capabilities in EU Conflict Prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodt, Annemarie Peen

    – severely challenging the Union’s current capabilities as an international security provider. The urgency of improving conflict preventive and crisis management measures is particularly pertinent in Africa, where the numbers affected by conflicts across the continent are staggering. This contribution sets...... out to answer whether – and if so how – EU responses to African conflicts have made a meaningful contribution to preventing (further) conflict. The Union’s efforts in Libya, South Sudan, Democratic Republic of Congo and Central African Republic are critically examined in a comparative case study...

  17. When is the hippocampus involved in recognition memory?

    OpenAIRE

    Barker, Gareth R. I.; Warburton, Elizabeth C.

    2011-01-01

    The role of the hippocampus in recognition memory is controversial. Recognition memory judgments may be made using different types of information, including object familiarity, an object's spatial location, or when an object was encountered. Experiment 1 examined the role of the hippocampus in recognition memory tasks that required the animals to use these different types of mnemonic information. Rats with bilateral cytotoxic lesions in the hippocampus or perirhinal or prefrontal cortex were ...

  18. Finding Ways to Effectively Prevent Sexual Abuse by Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Alisa; Tabachnick, Joan

    2002-01-01

    Youth with sexual behavior problems pose a complicated challenge to the society. Yet the society has succeeded in developing only a limited range of actions and attitudes to grapple with and prevent this problem. Very few of the social service and criminal justice systems have rallied to create compassionate models that not only address and…

  19. Effectiveness of Forestry Agency Personnel as Fire Prevention Contactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    M.L. Doolittle

    1980-01-01

    A major responsibility of county forest rangers in North Carolina is fire prevention. Personal contact with the public is essential to the successful performance of this function. A survey of 50 North Carolina rangers revealed that the degree of success for each ranger was directly related to the specific effort put forth as a contactor.

  20. original article assessment of effective coverage of hiv prevention of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abrham

    BACKGROUND: Coverage assessment of prevention of Pregnant Mother to Child Transmission. (PMTCT) of HIV service is useful to measure the health system effort or performance of health service delivery function and ... anti retroviral drugs, breast-feeding counseling and ... care service coverage to develop appropriate.

  1. Cost-effectiveness analysis of hepatitis A prevention in travellers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Tormans; P. van Damme (Damme); E.K.A. van Doorslaer (Eddy)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractThe advent of new vaccines and the changing epidemiology of hepatitis A call for an update of the economic evaluation of costs and benefits associated with the various alternative preventative strategies. A decision-tree-based model has been developed which enables the calculation of

  2. Is transdermal nitroglycerin application effective in preventing and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. We evaluated the efficacy of local nitroglycerin application in preventing and treating flap complications after modified radical mastectomy in a large patient cohort. Patients and methods. Between 1993 and 2008, 6 426 patients undergoing surgery for stage II breast cancer were enrolled in this prospective study.

  3. Preventive effect of polydatin against thrombosis: and its mechanism

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-10-19

    Oct 19, 2011 ... mobilization of platelet intracellular calcium (Armstrong et al., 2008; Chlopicki et al., 2003). Therefore, an obvious platelet aggregation is induced, which results in accele- ration of the process of thrombosis eventually. Thromboembolic diseases are great threats to human's life and health and prevention and ...

  4. Teen Depression and Suicide: Effective Prevention and Intervention Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Keith A.; Vidourek, Rebecca A.

    2012-01-01

    Teen depression and suicidal behaviors are intricately intertwined, with untreated depression being a leading cause of adolescent suicide. Most depressed or suicidal teens tend to show warning signs and possess specific risk factors. A key component to preventing teen depression is for adults to remain aware of such warning signs and risk factors…

  5. The Combined Inhibitory Effect of the Adenosine A1 and Cannabinoid CB1 Receptors on cAMP Accumulation in the Hippocampus Is Additive and Independent of A1 Receptor Desensitization

    OpenAIRE

    Serpa, Andr?; Correia, Sara; Ribeiro, Joaquim A.; Sebasti?o, Ana M.; Cascalheira, Jos? F.

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine A1 and cannabinoid CB1 receptors are highly expressed in hippocampus where they trigger similar transduction pathways. We investigated how the combined acute activation of A1 and CB1 receptors modulates cAMP accumulation in rat hippocampal slices. The CB1 agonist WIN55212-2 (0.3?30??M) decreased forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation with an EC50 of 6.6 ? 2.7??M and an E max? of 31% ? 2%, whereas for the A1 agonist, N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA, 10?150?nM), an EC50 of 35 ? 19?nM, an...

  6. Differential Age-Related Changes in Structural Covariance Networks of Human Anterior and Posterior Hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinwei Li

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The hippocampus plays an important role in memory function relying on information interaction between distributed brain areas. The hippocampus can be divided into the anterior and posterior sections with different structure and function along its long axis. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of normal aging on the structural covariance of the anterior hippocampus (aHPC and the posterior hippocampus (pHPC. In this study, 240 healthy subjects aged 18–89 years were selected and subdivided into young (18–23 years, middle-aged (30–58 years, and older (61–89 years groups. The aHPC and pHPC was divided based on the location of uncal apex in the MNI space. Then, the structural covariance networks were constructed by examining their covariance in gray matter volumes with other brain regions. Finally, the influence of age on the structural covariance of these hippocampal sections was explored. We found that the aHPC and pHPC had different structural covariance patterns, but both of them were associated with the medial temporal lobe and insula. Moreover, both increased and decreased covariances were found with the aHPC but only increased covariance was found with the pHPC with age (p < 0.05, family-wise error corrected. These decreased connections occurred within the default mode network, while the increased connectivity mainly occurred in other memory systems that differ from the hippocampus. This study reveals different age-related influence on the structural networks of the aHPC and pHPC, providing an essential insight into the mechanisms of the hippocampus in normal aging.

  7. Optimizing Violence Prevention Programs: An Examination of Program Effectiveness among Urban High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompkins, Amanda C.; Chauveron, Lisa M.; Harel, Ofer; Perkins, Daniel F.

    2014-01-01

    Background: While demand for youth violence prevention programs increases, the ability of the school-day schedule to accommodate their time requirements has diminished. Viable school-based prevention programs must strike a balance between brevity and effectiveness. This article reports results from an effectiveness trial of a 12-session…

  8. Stress Prevention Training; Sex Differences inTypes of Stressors, Coping, and Training Effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekker, M.H.J.; Hens, G.; Nijssen, A.

    2001-01-01

    The present study was aimed at examining the effectiveness of preventive group training and sex differences in types of work stressors, coping strategies, and training effects. Sixty-eight trainees of stress prevention courses of Regional Institutions for Ambulatory Mental Health Care (RIAGGs) in

  9. HDAC inhibition modulates hippocampus-dependent long-term memory for object location in a CBP-dependent manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haettig, Jakob; Stefanko, Daniel P.; Multani, Monica L.; Figueroa, Dario X.; McQuown, Susan C.; Wood, Marcelo A.

    2011-01-01

    Transcription of genes required for long-term memory not only involves transcription factors, but also enzymatic protein complexes that modify chromatin structure. Chromatin-modifying enzymes, such as the histone acetyltransferase (HAT) CREB (cyclic-AMP response element binding) binding protein (CBP), are pivotal for the transcriptional regulation required for long-term memory. Several studies have shown that CBP and histone acetylation are necessary for hippocampus-dependent long-term memory and hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP). Importantly, every genetically modified Cbp mutant mouse exhibits long-term memory impairments in object recognition. However, the role of the hippocampus in object recognition is controversial. To better understand how chromatin-modifying enzymes modulate long-term memory for object recognition, we first examined the role of the hippocampus in retrieval of long-term memory for object recognition or object location. Muscimol inactivation of the dorsal hippocampus prior to retrieval had no effect on long-term memory for object recognition, but completely blocked long-term memory for object location. This was consistent with experiments showing that muscimol inactivation of the hippocampus had no effect on long-term memory for the object itself, supporting the idea that the hippocampus encodes spatial information about an object (such as location or context), whereas cortical areas (such as the perirhinal or insular cortex) encode information about the object itself. Using location-dependent object recognition tasks that engage the hippocampus, we demonstrate that CBP is essential for the modulation of long-term memory via HDAC inhibition. Together, these results indicate that HDAC inhibition modulates memory in the hippocampus via CBP and that different brain regions utilize different chromatin-modifying enzymes to regulate learning and memory. PMID:21224411

  10. Effects of Educating Local Government Officers and Healthcare and Welfare Professionals in Suicide Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshio Hirayasu

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Suicide is a major public health issue. In Japan, local governments are responsible for suicide prevention, and local government officers are therefore expected to act as gatekeepers for suicide prevention. In this study, through a questionnaire survey, the authors examined the current knowledge and attitudes concerning suicide prevention among local government officers and healthcare and welfare professionals, and the effects of providing suicide prevention education on their knowledge of and attitudes toward suicide and its prevention. One hundred eighty-three local government officers and 432 healthcare/welfare professionals completed the survey before and after a single education session. Before the session, the local government officers and healthcare/welfare professionals showed mainly positive attitudes toward suicide prevention efforts, with little difference between the two groups. After the training, knowledge and attitudes were further improved for most questionnaire items. Respondents with one or more experiences of suicide prevention training showed significantly more knowledge and positive attitudes before the training than those with no such experience. Moreover, knowledge of depression and having a sympathetic attitude were found to be especially associated with the overall attitude that “suicide can be prevented”. Training in suicide prevention was shown to be effective in promoting appropriate knowledge and attitudes among local government officers and healthcare/welfare professionals who are gatekeepers for preventing suicide. Our findings confirm the importance of suicide prevention education, and will contribute to creating a standard educational program on suicide prevention in Japan.

  11. Chronic traumatic stress impairs memory in mice: Potential roles of acetylcholine, neuroinflammation and corticotropin releasing factor expression in the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhakta, Ami; Gavini, Kartheek; Yang, Euitaek; Lyman-Henley, Lani; Parameshwaran, Kodeeswaran

    2017-09-29

    Chronic stress in humans can result in multiple adverse psychiatric and neurobiological outcomes, including memory deficits. These adverse outcomes can be more severe if each episode of stress is very traumatic. When compared to acute or short term stress relatively little is known about the effects of chronic traumatic stress on memory and molecular changes in hippocampus, a brain area involved in memory processing. Here we studied the effects of chronic traumatic stress in mice by exposing them to adult Long Evan rats for 28 consecutive days and subsequently analyzing behavioral outcomes and the changes in the hippocampus. Results show that stressed mice developed memory deficits when assayed with radial arm maze tasks. However, chronic traumatic stress did not induce anxiety, locomotor hyperactivity or anhedonia. In the hippocampus of stressed mice interleukin-1β protein expression was increased along with decreased corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) gene expression. Furthermore, there was a reduction in acetylcholine levels in the hippocampus of stressed mice. There were no changes in brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) or nerve growth factor (NGF) levels in the hippocampus of stressed mice. Gene expression of immediate early genes (Zif268, Arc, C-Fos) as well as glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors were also not affected by chronic stress. These data demonstrate that chronic traumatic stress followed by a recovery period might lead to development of resilience resulting in the development of selected, most vulnerable behavioral alterations and molecular changes in the hippocampus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Circadian Oscillations within the Hippocampus Support Hippocampus-dependent Memory Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Lynn Eckel-Mahan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The ability to sustain memories over long periods of time, sometimes even a lifetime, is one of the most remarkable properties of the brain. Much knowledge has been gained over the past few decades regarding the molecular correlates of memory formation. Once a memory is forged, however, the molecular events that provide permanence are as of yet unclear. Studies in multiple organisms have revealed that circadian rhythmicity is important for the formation, stability, and recall of memories [1]. The neuronal events that provide this link need to be explored further. This article will discuss the findings related to the circadian regulation of memory-dependent processes in the hippocampus. Specifically, the circadian-controlled MAP kinase and cAMP signal transduction pathway plays critical roles in the consolidation of hippocampus-dependent memory. A series of studies have revealed the circadian oscillation of this pathway within the hippocampus, an activity that is absent in memory-deficient, transgenic mice lacking Ca2+-stimulated adenylyl cyclases. Interference with these oscillations proceeding the cellular memory consolidation period impairs the persistence of hippocampus-dependent memory. These data suggest that the persistence of long-term memories may depend upon reactivation of this signal transduction pathway in the hippocampus during the circadian cycle. New data reveals the dependence of hippocampal oscillation in MAPK activity on the SCN, again underscoring the importance of this region in maintaining the circadian physiology of memory. Finally, the downstream ramification of these oscillations in terms of gene expression and epigenetics should be considered, as emerging evidence is pointing strongly to a circadian link between epigenetics and long term synaptic plasticity.

  13. [Current prevention and treatment strategies for osteoporosis. Fracture-oriented, effective, low side effects and inexpensive].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartl, R; Bartl, C

    2015-12-01

    Osteoporosis is still an underdiagnosed and insufficiently therapied widespread disease in Germany. Of the estimated 7 million osteoporosis patients only 1.5 million receive a guideline conform diagnosis and even less receive appropriate treatment. Some 90 % of patients are provided with analgesics but only 10 % receive an effective therapy, although efficacious, well-tested and affordable medications are available. In addition, approximately one half of the patients terminate treatment after only 1 year although according to the results of recent studies the duration of therapy should be at least 3-5 years. In view of the increasing average life expectancy, a consistent management for prevention of fractures associated with osteoporosis is always most important for society, even if only for reasons of costs. Achievement of this target depends on four circumstances: clarification of the origin of osteoporosis and fractures (bone consciousness), prophylaxis of bone loss and fractures (primary prevention), consistent guideline conform diagnostics and therapy (secondary and tertiary prevention) and cooperation of all disciplines in medicine (bone is everybody's business). This article describes the current state of diagnostics (bone density measurement with dual X-ray absorptiometry, FRAX®), prophylaxis of fractures (screening program) and therapy (use of economic and effective medications with low side effects). Novel medications are already undergoing clinical testing and a "healing" of bone reduction with restoration of the normal bone structure is to be expected.

  14. Cost-effectiveness of prevention and treatment of the diabetic foot: a Markov analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M. Ortegon (Monica); W.K. Redekop (Ken); L.W. Niessen (Louis Wilhelmus)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: To estimate the lifetime health and economic effects of optimal prevention and treatment of the diabetic foot according to international standards and to determine the cost-effectiveness of these interventions in the Netherlands. RESEARCH DESIGN AND

  15. The caries-preventive effect of chlorhexidine varnish in children and adolescents: a systematic review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    James, Patrice

    2010-01-01

    Our purpose was to systematically review the literature on the effectiveness of chlorhexidine varnish for preventing dental caries in children and adolescents and to determine its effectiveness compared to fluoride varnish.

  16. Preventive effects of blueberry extract on behavioral and biochemical dysfunctions in rats submitted to a model of manic behavior induced by ketamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debom, Gabriela; Gazal, Marta; Soares, Mayara Sandrielly Pereira; do Couto, Carlus Augustu Tavares; Mattos, Bruna; Lencina, Claiton; Kaster, Manuella Pinto; Ghisleni, Gabriele Codenonzi; Tavares, Rejane; Braganhol, Elizandra; Chaves, Vitor Clasen; Reginatto, Flávio Henrique; Stefanello, Francieli; Spanevello, Roselia Maria

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the protective effects of blueberry extract on oxidative stress and inflammatory parameters in a model of mania induced by ketamine administration in rats. Male rats were pretreated with blueberry extract (200mg/kg, once a day for 14days), lithium chloride (45mg/kg, mood stabilizer used as a positive control, twice a day for 14days), or vehicle. Between the 8th and 14th days, rats also received an injection of ketamine (25mg/kg) or vehicle. In the 15th day, thirty minutes after ketamine administration the hyperlocomotion of the animals was assessed in the open - field apparatus. Immediately after the behavioral analysis brain and blood were collected for biochemical determinations. ketamine treatment induced hyperlocomotion and oxidative damage in cerebral cortex, hippocampus and striatum such as an increase in lipid peroxidation and a decrease in the antioxidant enzymes activities (superoxide dismutase, catalase e glutatione peroxidase). Ketamine administration also increased the IL-6 levels in serum in rats. Pretreatment of rats with blueberry extract or lithium prevented the hyperlocomotion, pro - oxidant effects and inflammation induced by ketamine. Our findings suggest that blueberry consumption has a neuroprotective potential against behavioral and biochemical dysfunctions induced in a preclinical model that mimic some aspects of the manic behavior. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Duloxetine prevents the effects of prenatal stress on depressive-like and anxiety-like behavior and hippocampal expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in adult male offspring rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaosong; Wang, Qi; Wang, Yan; Hu, Jingmin; Jiang, Han; Cheng, Wenwen; Ma, Yuchao; Liu, Mengxi; Sun, Anji; Zhang, Xinxin; Li, Xiaobai

    2016-12-01

    Stress during pregnancy may cause neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders. However, the mechanisms are largely unknown. Currently, pro-inflammatory cytokines have been identified as a risk factor for depression and anxiety disorder. Unfortunately, there is very little research on the long-term effects of prenatal stress on the neuroinflammatory system of offspring. Moreover, the relationship between antidepressant treatment and cytokines in the central nervous system, especially in the hippocampus, an important emotion modulation center, is unclear. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the effects of prenatal chronic mild stress during development on affective-like behaviors and hippocampal cytokines in adult offspring, and to verify whether antidepressant (duloxetine) administration from early adulthood could prevent the harmful consequences. To do so, prenatally stressed and non-stressed Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with either duloxetine (10mg/kg/day) or vehicle from postnatal day 60 for 21days. Adult offspring were divided into four groups: 1) prenatal stress+duloxetine treatment, 2) prenatal stress+vehicle, 3) duloxetine treatment alone, and 4) vehicle alone. Adult offspring were assessed for anxiety-like behavior using the open field test and depression-like behavior using the forced swim test. Brains were analyzed for pro-inflammatory cytokine markers in the hippocampus via real-time PCR. Results demonstrate that prenatal stress-induced anxiety- and depression-like behaviors are associated with an increase in hippocampal inflammatory mediators, and duloxetine administration prevents the increased hippocampal pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 and anxiety- and depression-like behavior in prenatally stressed adult offspring. This research provides important evidence on the long-term effect of PNS exposure during development in a model of maternal adversity to study the pathogenesis of depression and its therapeutic interventions

  18. Chronic caffeine treatment prevents sleep deprivation-induced impairment of cognitive function and synaptic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhaider, Ibrahim A; Aleisa, Abdulaziz M; Tran, Trinh T; Alzoubi, Karem H; Alkadhi, Karim A

    2010-04-01

    This study was undertaken to provide a detailed account of the effect of chronic treatment with a small dose of caffeine on the deleterious effects of sleep loss on brain function in rats. We investigated the effects of chronic (4 weeks) caffeine treatment (0.3 g/L in drinking water) on memory impairment in acutely (24 h) sleep-deprived adult male Wistar rats. Sleep deprivation was induced using the modified multiple platform model. The effects of caffeine on sleep deprivation-induced hippocampus-dependent learning and memory deficits were studied by 3 approaches: learning and memory performance in the radial arm water maze task, electrophysiological recording of early long-term potentiation (E-LTP) in area CA1 of the hippocampus, and levels of memory- and synaptic plasticity-related signaling molecules after E-LTP induction. The results showed that chronic caffeine treatment prevented impairment of hippocampus-dependent learning, shortterm memory and E-LTP of area CA1 in the sleep-deprived rats. In correlation, chronic caffeine treatment prevented sleep deprivation-associated decrease in the levels of phosphorylated calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (P-CaMKII) during expression of E-LTP. The results suggest that long-term use of a low dose of caffeine prevents impairment of short-term memory and E-LTP in acutely sleep-deprived rats.

  19. Disrupted functional connectivity of the hippocampus in patients with hyperthyroidism: Evidence from resting-state fMRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Wei; Liu, Xianjun; Zhang, Yi; Song, Lingheng; Hou, Jingming; Chen, Bing; He, Mei; Cai, Ping; Lii, Haitao

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The hippocampus expresses high levels of thyroid hormone receptors, suggesting that hippocampal functions, including cognition and regulation of mood, can be disrupted by thyroid pathology. Indeed, structural and functional alterations within the hippocampus have been observed in hyperthyroid patients. In addition to internal circuitry, hippocampal processing is dependent on extensive connections with other limbic and neocortical structures, but the effects of hyperthyroidism on functional connectivity (FC) with these areas have not been studied. The purpose of this study was to investigate possible abnormalities in the FC between the hippocampus and other neural structures in hyperthyroid patients using resting-state fMRI. Methods: Seed-based correlation analysis was performed on resting-state fMRI data to reveal possible differences in hippocampal FC between hyperthyroid patients and healthy controls. Correlation analysis was used to investigate the relationships between the strength of FC in regions showing significant group differences and clinical variables. Results: Compared to controls, hyperthyroid patients showed weaker FC between the bilateral hippocampus and both the bilateral anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and bilateral posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), as well as between the right hippocampus and right medial orbitofrontal cortex (mOFC). Disease duration was negatively correlated with FC strength between the bilateral hippocampus and bilateral ACC and PCC. Levels of depression and anxiety were negatively correlated with FC strength between the bilateral hippocampus and bilateral ACC. Conclusion: Decreased functional connectivity between the hippocampus and bilateral ACC, PCC, and right mOFC may contribute to the emotional and cognitive dysfunction associated with hyperthyroidism

  20. Role of the thalamic nucleus reuniens in mediating interactions between the hippocampus and medial prefrontal cortex during spatial working memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy L Griffin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite decades of research, the neural mechanisms of spatial working memory remain poorly understood. Although the dorsal hippocampus is known to be critical for memory-guided behavior, experimental evidence suggests that spatial working memory depends not only on the hippocampus itself, but also on the circuit comprised of the hippocampus and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC. Disruption of hippocampal-mPFC interactions may result in failed transfer of spatial and contextual information processed by the hippocampus to the circuitry in mPFC responsible for decision making and goal-directed behavior. Oscillatory synchrony between the hippocampus and mPFC has been shown to increase in tasks with high spatial working memory demand. However, the mechanisms and circuitry supporting hippocampal-mPFC interactions during these tasks is unknown. The midline thalamic nucleus reuniens (RE is reciprocally connected to both the hippocampus and the mPFC and has been shown to be critical for a variety of working memory tasks. Therefore, it is likely that hippocampal-mPFC oscillatory synchrony is modulated by RE activity. This article will review the anatomical connections between the hippocampus, mPFC and RE along with the behavioral studies that have investigated the effects of RE disruption on working memory task performance. The article will conclude with suggestions for future directions aimed at identifying the specific role of the RE in regulating functional interactions between the hippocampus and the PFC and investigating the degree to which these interactions contribute to spatial working memory.

  1. Disrupted functional connectivity of the hippocampus in patients with hyperthyroidism: Evidence from resting-state fMRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wei, E-mail: will.zhang.1111@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Department of Radiology, Sichuan Provincial Corps Hospital, Chinese People' s Armed Police Forces, Leshan 614000 (China); Liu, Xianjun, E-mail: xianjun6.liu@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Sichuan Provincial Corps Hospital, Chinese People' s Armed Police Forces, Leshan 614000 (China); Zhang, Yi, E-mail: yi.zhang.0833@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Sichuan Provincial Corps Hospital, Chinese People' s Armed Police Forces, Leshan 614000 (China); Song, Lingheng, E-mail: songlh1023@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Hou, Jingming, E-mail: jingminghou@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Chen, Bing, E-mail: chenbing3@medmail.com.cn [Department of Endocrinology, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); He, Mei, E-mail: sunnusunny0105@gmail.com [Department of Clinical Psychology, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Cai, Ping, E-mail: pingc_ddd@sina.com [Department of Radiology, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Lii, Haitao, E-mail: haitaolii023@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China)

    2014-10-15

    Objective: The hippocampus expresses high levels of thyroid hormone receptors, suggesting that hippocampal functions, including cognition and regulation of mood, can be disrupted by thyroid pathology. Indeed, structural and functional alterations within the hippocampus have been observed in hyperthyroid patients. In addition to internal circuitry, hippocampal processing is dependent on extensive connections with other limbic and neocortical structures, but the effects of hyperthyroidism on functional connectivity (FC) with these areas have not been studied. The purpose of this study was to investigate possible abnormalities in the FC between the hippocampus and other neural structures in hyperthyroid patients using resting-state fMRI. Methods: Seed-based correlation analysis was performed on resting-state fMRI data to reveal possible differences in hippocampal FC between hyperthyroid patients and healthy controls. Correlation analysis was used to investigate the relationships between the strength of FC in regions showing significant group differences and clinical variables. Results: Compared to controls, hyperthyroid patients showed weaker FC between the bilateral hippocampus and both the bilateral anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and bilateral posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), as well as between the right hippocampus and right medial orbitofrontal cortex (mOFC). Disease duration was negatively correlated with FC strength between the bilateral hippocampus and bilateral ACC and PCC. Levels of depression and anxiety were negatively correlated with FC strength between the bilateral hippocampus and bilateral ACC. Conclusion: Decreased functional connectivity between the hippocampus and bilateral ACC, PCC, and right mOFC may contribute to the emotional and cognitive dysfunction associated with hyperthyroidism.

  2. Disrupted functional connectivity of the hippocampus in patients with hyperthyroidism: evidence from resting-state fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Liu, Xianjun; Zhang, Yi; Song, Lingheng; Hou, Jingming; Chen, Bing; He, Mei; Cai, Ping; Lii, Haitao

    2014-10-01

    The hippocampus expresses high levels of thyroid hormone receptors, suggesting that hippocampal functions, including cognition and regulation of mood, can be disrupted by thyroid pathology. Indeed, structural and functional alterations within the hippocampus have been observed in hyperthyroid patients. In addition to internal circuitry, hippocampal processing is dependent on extensive connections with other limbic and neocortical structures, but the effects of hyperthyroidism on functional connectivity (FC) with these areas have not been studied. The purpose of this study was to investigate possible abnormalities in the FC between the hippocampus and other neural structures in hyperthyroid patients using resting-state fMRI. Seed-based correlation analysis was performed on resting-state fMRI data to reveal possible differences in hippocampal FC between hyperthyroid patients and healthy controls. Correlation analysis was used to investigate the relationships between the strength of FC in regions showing significant group differences and clinical variables. Compared to controls, hyperthyroid patients showed weaker FC between the bilateral hippocampus and both the bilateral anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and bilateral posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), as well as between the right hippocampus and right medial orbitofrontal cortex (mOFC). Disease duration was negatively correlated with FC strength between the bilateral hippocampus and bilateral ACC and PCC. Levels of depression and anxiety were negatively correlated with FC strength between the bilateral hippocampus and bilateral ACC. Decreased functional connectivity between the hippocampus and bilateral ACC, PCC, and right mOFC may contribute to the emotional and cognitive dysfunction associated with hyperthyroidism. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Dendrobium nobile Lindl alkaloid, a novel autophagy inducer, protects against axonal degeneration induced by Aβ25-35 in hippocampus neurons in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li-Sheng; Lu, Yan-Liu; Nie, Jing; Xu, Yun-Yan; Zhang, Wei; Yang, Wen-Jin; Gong, Qi-Hai; Lu, Yuan-Fu; Lu, Yang; Shi, Jing-Shan

    2017-04-01

    Axonal degeneration is a pathological symbol in the early stage of Alzheimer's disease (AD), which can be triggered by amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide deposition. Growing evidence indicates that deficit of autophagy eventually leads to the axonal degeneration. Our previous studies have shown that Dendrobium nobile Lindl alkaloid (DNLA) had protective effect on neuron impairment in vivo and in vitro; however, the underlying mechanisms is still unclear. We exposed cultured hippocampus neurons to Aβ 25-35 to investigate the effect of DNLA in vitro. Axonal degeneration was evaluated by immunofluorescence staining and MTT assay. Neurons overexpressing GFP-LC3B were used to measure the formation of autophagosome. Autophagosome-lysosome fusion, the lysosomal pH, and cathepsin activity were assessed to reflect autophagy process. Proteins of interest were analyzed by Western blot. DNLA pretreatment significantly inhibited axonal degeneration induced by Aβ 25-35 peptide in vitro. Further studies revealed DNLA treatment increased autophagic flux through promoting formation and degradation of autophagosome in hippocampus neurons. Moreover, enhancement of autophagic flux was responsible for the protective effects of DNLA on axonal degeneration. DNLA prevents Aβ 25-35 -induced axonal degeneration via activation of autophagy process and could be a novel therapeutic target. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. G-CSF and cognitive dysfunction in elderly diabetic mice with cerebral small vessel disease: Preventive intervention effects and underlying mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Zhu-Fei; Tao, Ying-Hong; Zhang, Xiao-Ming; Guo, Qi-Lin; Liu, Ying-Chao; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Yan-Mei; Ji, Gang; Wu, Guo-Feng; Wang, Na-Na; Yang, Hao; Yu, Zhong-Yu; Guo, Jing-Chun; Zhou, Hou-Guang

    2017-06-01

    Although cognitive dysfunction is a common neurological complication in elderly patients with diabetes, the mechanisms underlying this relationship remain unclear, and effective preventive interventions have yet to be developed. Thus, this study investigated the preventive effects and mechanisms of action associated with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on cognitive dysfunction in elderly diabetic mice with cerebral small vessel disease. This study included 40 male db/db diabetic and wild-type (WT) mice that were categorized into the following four groups at the age of 3 weeks: db/db group (DG), db/db+G-CSF group (DGG), WT group (WG), and WT+G-CSF group (WGG). The mice were fed normal diets for 4 months and then given G-CSF (75 μg/kg) via intraperitoneal injections for 1 month. At 7.5 months of age, the cognitive abilities of the mice were assessed with the Y-maze test and the Social Choice Test; body weight, blood pressure (BP), and blood glucose measurements were obtained throughout the study. Brain imaging and blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) contrast imaging analyses were performed with a small animal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system, autophagosome levels were detected with a transmission electron microscope (TEM), hippocampal neurons were assessed with hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining, and protein expressions and distributions were evaluated using immunohistochemistry and Western blot analyses. (i) The body weight and blood glucose levels of the DG and DGG mice were significantly higher than those of the WG and WGG mice; (ii) social choice and spatial memory capabilities were significantly reduced in DG mice but were recovered by G-CSF in DGG mice; (iii) the MRI scans revealed multiple lacunar lesions and apparent hippocampal atrophy in the brains of DG mice, but G-CSF reduced the number of lacunar lesions and ameliorated hippocampal atrophy; (iv) the MRI-BOLD scans showed a downward trend in whole-brain activity and reductions

  5. Mounting dengue awareness: A cost effective Strategy for prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kajal Srivastava

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dengue is a serious illness which takes toll on human health every year. The best way to prevent it is by increasing awareness among common people. This study was conducted to assess the level of knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding dengue fever in people urban heath training centre in Pune, Maharashtra. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among patients attending OPD of Urban heath training centre of department of community medicine, Pune situated in Ajmera, Pimpri, Pune. Through convenience sampling, a questionnaire was administered to patients after taking their informed consent. Results: A total of 100 patients were interviewed. Among knowledge 83% had heard about dengue and the most common source of information was TV & radio (72.3% Most of them were aware regarding mosquito bite being the mode of dengue transmission (80.7%. 22% were unaware regarding biting time of mosquito while 22% said night is the biting time of dengue mosquito. 62.7% were using coils for mosquito bite prevention followed by mosquito net (43.4% and spray (31.3%.. Conclusion: This study revealed that most of the study population is aware of dengue illness and increasing education level is having positive attitude on dengue illness.

  6. Mounting dengue awareness: A cost effective Strategy for prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kajal Srivastava

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dengue is a serious illness which takes toll on human health every year. The best way to prevent it is by increasing awareness among common people. This study was conducted to assess the level of knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding dengue fever in people urban heath training centre in Pune, Maharashtra. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among patients attending OPD of Urban heath training centre of department of community medicine, Pune situated in Ajmera, Pimpri, Pune. Through convenience sampling, a questionnaire was administered to patients after taking their informed consent. Results: A total of 100 patients were interviewed. Among knowledge 83% had heard about dengue and the most common source of information was TV & radio (72.3% Most of them were aware regarding mosquito bite being the mode of dengue transmission (80.7%. 22% were unaware regarding biting time of mosquito while 22% said night is the biting time of dengue mosquito. 62.7% were using coils for mosquito bite prevention followed by mosquito net (43.4% and spray (31.3%.. Conclusion: This study revealed that most of the study population is aware of dengue illness and increasing education level is having positive attitude on dengue illness.

  7. Tuning synaptic transmission in the hippocampus by stress: The CRH system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuncai eChen

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available To enhance survival, an organism needs to remember--and learn from--threatening or stressful events. This fact necessitates the presence of mechanisms by which stress can influence synaptic transmission in brain regions, such as hippocampus, that subserve learning and memory. A major focus of this series of monographs is on the role and actions of adrenal-derived hormones, corticosteroids, and of brain-derived neurotransmitters, on synaptic function in the stressed hippocampus. Here we focus on the contribution of hippocampus-intrinsic, stress-activated CRH-CRH receptor signaling to the function and structure of hippocampal synapses. CRH is expressed in interneurons of adult hippocampus, and is released from axon terminals during stress. The peptide exerts time- and dose-dependent effects on learning and memory via modulation of synaptic function and plasticity. Whereas physiological levels of CRH, acting over seconds to minutes, augment memory processes, exposure to presumed severe-stress levels of the peptide results in spine retraction and loss of synapses over more protracted time-frames. Loss of dendritic spines (and hence of synapses takes place through actin cytoskeleton collapse downstream of CRHR1 receptors that reside within excitatory synapses on spine heads. Chronic exposure to stress levels of CRH may promote dying-back (atrophy of spine-carrying dendrites. Thus, the acute effects of CRH may contribute to stress-induced adaptive mechanisms, whereas chronic or excessive exposure to the peptide may promote learning problems and premature cognitive decline.

  8. Improving the quality of pressure ulcer care with prevention: a cost-effectiveness analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padula, William V; Mishra, Manish K; Makic, Mary Beth F; Sullivan, Patrick W

    2011-04-01

    In October 2008, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services discontinued reimbursement for hospital-acquired pressure ulcers (HAPUs), thus placing stress on hospitals to prevent incidence of this costly condition. To evaluate whether prevention methods are cost-effective compared with standard care in the management of HAPUs. A semi-Markov model simulated the admission of patients to an acute care hospital from the time of admission through 1 year using the societal perspective. The model simulated health states that could potentially lead to an HAPU through either the practice of "prevention" or "standard care." Univariate sensitivity analyses, threshold analyses, and Bayesian multivariate probabilistic sensitivity analysis using 10,000 Monte Carlo simulations were conducted. Cost per quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) gained for the prevention of HAPUs. Prevention was cost saving and resulted in greater expected effectiveness compared with the standard care approach per hospitalization. The expected cost of prevention was $7276.35, and the expected effectiveness was 11.241 QALYs. The expected cost for standard care was $10,053.95, and the expected effectiveness was 9.342 QALYs. The multivariate probabilistic sensitivity analysis showed that prevention resulted in cost savings in 99.99% of the simulations. The threshold cost of prevention was $821.53 per day per person, whereas the cost of prevention was estimated to be $54.66 per day per person. This study suggests that it is more cost effective to pay for prevention of HAPUs compared with standard care. Continuous preventive care of HAPUs in acutely ill patients could potentially reduce incidence and prevalence, as well as lead to lower expenditures.

  9. Obesity prevention programs and policies: practitioner and policy-maker perceptions of feasibility and effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleland, Verity; McNeilly, Briohny; Crawford, David; Ball, Kylie

    2013-09-01

    The aims of this study were to map obesity prevention activity being implemented by government, non-government, and community-based organizations; to determine practitioner and policy-maker perceptions of the feasibility and effectiveness of a range of evidence-based obesity prevention strategies; and to determine practitioner and policy-maker perceptions of preferred settings for obesity prevention strategies. This study involved a cross-sectional survey of 304 public health practitioners and policy-makers from government, non-government, and community organizations across Victoria, Australia. Participants reported their organizations' current obesity prevention programs and policies, their own perceptions of the feasibility and effectiveness of strategies to prevent obesity and their preferred settings for obesity prevention. Thirty-nine percent had an obesity prevention policy, and 92% were implementing obesity prevention programs. The most common programs focused on education, skill-building, and increasing access to healthy eating/physical activity opportunities. School curriculum-based initiatives, social support for physical activity, and family-based programs were considered the most effective strategies, whereas curriculum-based initiatives, active after-school programs, and providing access to and information about physical activity facilities were deemed the most feasible strategies. Schools were generally perceived as the most preferred setting for obesity prevention. Many organizations had obesity prevention programs, but far fewer had obesity prevention policies. Current strategies and those considered feasible and effective are often mismatched with the empirical literature. Systems to ensure better alignment between researchers, practitioners, and policy-makers, and identifying effective methods of translating empirical evidence into practice and policy are required. Copyright © 2012 The Obesity Society.

  10. Edaravone alleviates cisplatin-induced neurobehavioral deficits via modulation of oxidative stress and inflammatory mediators in the rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jangra, Ashok; Kwatra, Mohit; Singh, Tavleen; Pant, Rajat; Kushwah, Pawan; Ahmed, Sahabuddin; Dwivedi, Durgesh; Saroha, Babita; Lahkar, Mangala

    2016-11-15

    Cisplatin is a chemotherapeutic agent used in the treatment of malignant tumors. A major clinical limitation of cisplatin is its potential toxic effects, including neurotoxicity. Edaravone, a potent free radical scavenger, has been reported to have the neuroprotective effect against neurological deficits. The aim of the present study was to determine the neuroprotective effect of edaravone against cisplatin-induced behavioral and biochemical anomalies in male Wistar rats. Our results showed that cisplatin (5mg/kg/week, i.p.) administration for seven weeks caused marked cognitive deficits and motor incoordination in rats. This was accompanied by oxido-nitrosative stress, neuroinflammation, NF-κB activation and down-regulation of Nrf2/HO-1 gene expression level in the hippocampus. Edaravone (10mg/kg/week, i.p.) treatment for seven weeks inhibited the aforementioned neurobehavioral and neurochemical deficits. Furthermore, edaravone was found to up-regulate the gene expression level of Nrf2/HO-1 and prevented the cisplatin-induced NF-κB activation. These findings demonstrated that oxido-nitrosative stress and inflammatory signaling mediators play a key role in the development of cisplatin-induced neurobehavioral deficits which were prevented by edaravone treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Hippocampus and amygdala volumes in patients with vaginismus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atmaca, Murad; Baykara, Sema; Ozer, Omer; Korkmaz, Sevda; Akaslan, Unsal; Yildirim, Hanefi

    2016-06-22

    To compare hippocampus and amygdala volumes of patients with vaginismus with those of healthy control subjects. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed on ten patients with vaginismus and ten control subjects matched for age and gender. Volumes of the hippocampus and amygdala were blindly measured. We found that the mean right amygdala volume of patients with vaginismus were smaller than that of the healthy controls. With regard to hippocampus volumes, the mean left and right hippocampus volumes were smaller than those of the healthy controls. Our present findings suggest that there have been hippocampus and amygdala structural abnormalities in patients with vaginismus. These changes provide the notion that vaginismus may be a fear-related condition.

  12. Creating a false memory in the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Steve; Liu, Xu; Lin, Pei-Ann; Suh, Junghyup; Pignatelli, Michele; Redondo, Roger L; Ryan, Tomás J; Tonegawa, Susumu

    2013-07-26

    Memories can be unreliable. We created a false memory in mice by optogenetically manipulating memory engram-bearing cells in the hippocampus. Dentate gyrus (DG) or CA1 neurons activated by exposure to a particular context were labeled with channelrhodopsin-2. These neurons were later optically reactivated during fear conditioning in a different context. The DG experimental group showed increased freezing in the original context, in which a foot shock was never delivered. The recall of this false memory was context-specific, activated similar downstream regions engaged during natural fear memory recall, and was also capable of driving an active fear response. Our data demonstrate that it is possible to generate an internally represented and behaviorally expressed fear memory via artificial means.

  13. Association between income and the hippocampus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie L Hanson

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Facets of the post-natal environment including the type and complexity of environmental stimuli, the quality of parenting behaviors, and the amount and type of stress experienced by a child affects brain and behavioral functioning. Poverty is a type of pervasive experience that is likely to influence biobehavioral processes because children developing in such environments often encounter high levels of stress and reduced environmental stimulation. This study explores the association between socioeconomic status and the hippocampus, a brain region involved in learning and memory that is known to be affected by stress. We employ a voxel-based morphometry analytic framework with region of interest drawing for structural brain images acquired from participants across the socioeconomic spectrum (n = 317. Children from lower income backgrounds had lower hippocampal gray matter density, a measure of volume. This finding is discussed in terms of disparities in education and health that are observed across the socioeconomic spectrum.

  14. Effects of Training and Feedback on Teachers' Use of Classroom Preventive Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artman-Meeker, Kathleen M.; Hemmeter, Mary Louise

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effects of in-service training with performance feedback on preschool teachers' use of classroom preventive practices. Three practices designed to prevent challenging behavior were selected: transition preparations, rule reminders, and social-emotional teaching strategies. Following a brief training on each practice,…

  15. Stacked Deck: An Effective, School-Based Program for the Prevention of Problem Gambling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Robert J.; Wood, Robert T.; Currie, Shawn R.

    2010-01-01

    School-based prevention programs are an important component of problem gambling prevention, but empirically effective programs are lacking. Stacked Deck is a set of 5-6 interactive lessons that teach about the history of gambling; the true odds and "house edge"; gambling fallacies; signs, risk factors, and causes of problem gambling; and…

  16. Cost-effectiveness of primary prevention of paediatric asthma: a decision-analytic model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramos, G. Feljandro P.; van Asselt, Antoinette D. I.; Kuiper, Sandra; Severens, Johan L.; Maas, Tanja; Dompeling, Edward; Knottnerus, J. André; van Schayck, Onno C. P.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Many children stand to benefit from being asthma-free for life with primary (i.e., prenatally started) prevention addressing one environmental exposure in a unifaceted (UF) approach or at least two in a multifaceted (MF) approach. We assessed the cost-effectiveness of primary prevention

  17. Effects of Comprehensive, Multiple High-Risk Behaviors Prevention Program on High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Crystal

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this mixed methods study was to examine the effect of a multiple high-risk behaviors prevention program applied comprehensively throughout an entire school-system involving universal, selective, and indicated levels of students at a local private high school during a 4-year period. The prevention program was created based upon the…

  18. Effect of an internally versus externally focused acl injury prevention program on injury risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dallinga, J.; Benjaminse, A.; Gokeler, A.; Otten, Egbert; Lemmink, K.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury prevention programs have shown mixed results, which may be in part due to suboptimal training components. OBJECTIVE: Determine effects of a prevention program with external and internal focus of attention on (potential) biomechanical risk factors

  19. Building and Maintaining an Effective Campus-Wide Coalition for Suicide Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaslow, Nadine J.; Garcia-Williams, Amanda; Moffitt, Lauren; McLeod, Mark; Zesiger, Heather; Ammirati, Rachel; Berg, John P.; McIntosh, Belinda J.

    2012-01-01

    Preventing suicide is a commonly shared priority among college administrators, faculty, staff, students, and family members. Coalitions are popular health promotion mechanisms for solving community-wide problems and are valuable in campus-wide suicide prevention efforts. This article provides an example of an effective suicide prevention…

  20. Factors Influencing the Effectiveness of Scalp Cooling in the Prevention of Chemotherapy-Induced Alopecia

    OpenAIRE

    Komen, Manon M.C.; Smorenburg, Carolien H.; van den Hurk, Corina J.G.; Nortier, Johan W.R.

    2013-01-01

    The success of scalp cooling in preventing or reducing chemotherapy-induced alopecia (CIA) is highly variable. In a review of the literature, this study found that the factors influencing the effectiveness of scalp cooling to prevent CIA in patients with cancer include chemotherapy type and dose, as well as the degree and duration of cooling.

  1. Testing Mediators of Intervention Effects in Randomized Controlled Trials: An Evaluation of Three Depression Prevention Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stice, Eric; Rohde, Paul; Seeley, John R.; Gau, Jeff M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Evaluate a new 5-step method for testing mediators hypothesized to account for the effects of depression prevention programs. Method: In this indicated prevention trial, at-risk teens with elevated depressive symptoms were randomized to a group cognitive-behavioral (CB) intervention, group supportive expressive intervention, CB…

  2. Introduction and Overview: Prevention Services--From Optimistic Promise to Widespread, Effective Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissberg, Roger P.; Kuster, Carol Bartels; Gullotta, Thomas P.

    This opening chapter provides an overview of the book, "Healthy Children 2010: Establishing Preventive Services." The article describes the purpose of the work, which is to provide strategies to establish and successfully implement effective prevention services in key socializing settings that powerfully affect the growth an development…

  3. Effectiveness of HIV prevention social marketing with injecting drug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, David R; Zhang, Guili; Cassady, Diana; Pappas, Les; Mitchell, Joyce; Kegeles, Susan M

    2010-10-01

    Social marketing involves applying marketing principles to promote social goods. In the context of health behavior, it has been used successfully to reduce alcohol-related car crashes, smoking among youths, and malaria transmission, among other goals. Features of social marketing, such as audience segmentation and repeated exposure to prevention messages, distinguish it from traditional health promotion programs. A recent review found 8 of 10 rigorously evaluated social marketing interventions responsible for changes in HIV-related behavior or behavioral intentions. We studied 479 injection drug users to evaluate a community-based social marketing campaign to reduce injection risk behavior among drug users in Sacramento, California. Injecting drugs is associated with HIV infection in more than 130 countries worldwide.

  4. Life history and ecology of the elusive European short-snouted seahorse Hippocampus hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, J M R; Santos, S V; Nadeau, J L; Gunn, B; Bigney Wilner, K; Balasubramanian, H; Overington, S; Lesage, C-M; D'entremont, J; Wieckowski, K

    2017-12-01

    To improve the understanding of the life history and ecology of one of Europe's most elusive fishes, the short-snouted seahorse Hippocampus hippocampus, data from wild populations in a shallow coastal lagoon in southern Portugal were analysed. The data were collected from 17 tagged seahorses on a focal-study grid as well as from >350 seahorses encountered during underwater visual surveys and a fishery-independent study using beach seines. These populations of settled juveniles and adults had a mean population density of 0·009 m -2 . During the study period (2000-2004), reproduction peaked in July and August. Juveniles recruited to the lagoon at c. 66 mm standard length (L S ) and 0·5 years of age and established small home ranges (0·8 to 18·2 m 2 ). First reproduction was estimated at 100 mm and 1 year of age. Based on a fitted von Bertalanffy model, H. hippocampus grew quickly (growth coefficient K = 0·93) to a maximum theoretical size L ∞  = 150 mm and have a maximum lifespan of c. 3·2 years. Courtship behaviours were consistent with the maintenance of pair bonds and males brooded multiple batches of young per year. Estimated annual reproductive output averaged 871 young (±632). Together these analyses provide the first life-history parameters for this species and indicate that H. hippocampus bears characteristics of opportunist and intermediate strategists. Such populations are predicted to exhibit large fluctuations in abundance, making them vulnerable to extended periods of poor recruitment. © 2017 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  5. The preventive effect on respiratory tract infections of Oscillococcinum®. A cost-effectiveness analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colombo GL

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Giorgio L Colombo,1,2 Sergio Di Matteo,2 Chiara Martinotti,2 Martina Oselin,2 Giacomo M Bruno,2 Gianfranco M Beghi3 1Department of Drug Sciences, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy; 2S.A.V.E. Studi Analisi Valutazioni Economiche S.r.l., Health Economics & Outcomes Research, Milan, Italy; 3Unit of Pulmonary Rehabilitation, Hospital of Casorate Primo, Pavia, Italy Background: Anas barbariae hepatis et cordis extractum 200K (Oscillococcinum® is used to treat and prevent seasonal colds and airway inflammatory affections, improve symptom control, and reduce the frequency of respiratory tract infection (RTI episodes. The objective of this controlled observational study is to investigate, from the Italian National Health Service (NHS point of view, the role of Anas barbariae hepatis et cordis extractum 200K in preventing RTIs and estimate the annual average cost per patient due to visits and medicines in a real-world setting, investigating whether this method of treatment can bring savings for the NHS.Methods: Data from a single center from 2002 to 2011 were used. The analysis examined 455 patients who suffered from respiratory diseases. Of the total number of patients, 246 were treated with Anas barbariae hepatis et cordis extractum 200K while 209 were not treated (Control group. All the data concerning RTI episodes, pharmacological treatments, and pneumological visits were extracted from the database.Results: It was found that, regardless of the diagnosis, the frequency of RTI episodes was always lower in patients treated with Anas barbariae hepatis et cordis extractum 200K; the difference between the numbers of events occurring was statistically significant in every class of patients (p<0.001. The costs that the NHS had to incur were significantly lower in the classes of patients treated (p<0.001.Discussion: The results indicate that Anas barbariae hepatis et cordis extractum 200K has a preventive effect on the onset of RTI episodes. The analysis

  6. A gene-environment study of cytoglobin in the human and rat hippocampus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hundahl, Christian Ansgar; Elfving, Betina; Müller, Heidi Kaastrup

    2013-01-01

    Cytoglobin (Cygb) was discovered a decade ago as the fourth vertebrate heme-globin. The function of Cygb is still unknown, but accumulating evidence from in vitro studies point to a putative role in scavenging of reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide metabolism and in vivo studies have shown C......NOS) in the rat hippocampus; 3) The effect of chronic restraint stress (CRS) on Cygb and nNOS expression.......Cytoglobin (Cygb) was discovered a decade ago as the fourth vertebrate heme-globin. The function of Cygb is still unknown, but accumulating evidence from in vitro studies point to a putative role in scavenging of reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide metabolism and in vivo studies have shown...... Cygb to be up regulated by hypoxic stress. This study addresses three main questions related to Cygb expression in the hippocampus: 1) Is the rat hippocampus a valid neuroanatomical model for the human hippocampus; 2) What is the degree of co-expression of Cygb and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (n...

  7. Decreased BDNF levels in amygdala and hippocampus after intracerebroventricular administration of ouabain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano K. Jornada

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The present study aims to investigate the effects of ouabain intracerebroventricular injection on BDNF levels in the amygdala and hippocampus of Wistar rats. METHODS: Animals received a single intracerebroventricular injection of ouabain (10-3 and 10-2 M or artificial cerebrospinal fluid and immediately, 1h, 24h, or seven days after injection, BDNF levels were measured in the rat's amygdala and hippocampus by sandwich-ELISA (n = 8 animals per group. RESULTS: When evaluated immediately, 3h, or 24h after injection, ouabain in doses of 10-2 and 10-3 M does not alter BDNF levels in the amygdala and hippocampus. However, when evaluated seven days after injection, ouabain in 10-2 and 10-3 M, showed a significant reduction in BDNF levels in both brain regions evaluated. DISCUSSION: In conclusion, we propose that the ouabain decreased BDNF levels in the hippocampus and amygdala when assessed seven days after administration, supporting the Na/K ATPase hypothesis for bipolar illness.

  8. Modulation of [3H]-glutamate binding by serotonin in the rat hippocampus: An autoradiographic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mennini, T.; Miari, A.

    1991-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) added in vitro increased [ 3 H]-glutamate specific binding in the rat hippocampus, reaching statistical significance in layers rich in N-Methyl-D-Aspartate sensitive glutamate receptors. This effect was explained by a significant increase in the apparent affinity of [ 3 H]-glutamate when 5-HT is added in vitro. Two days after lesion of serotonergic afferents to the hippocampus with 5,7- Dihydroxytryptamine [ 3 H]-glutamate binding was significantly decreased in the CA3 region and stratum lacunosum moleculare of the hippocampus, this reduction being reversed by in vitro addition of 10 μM 5-HT. The decrease observed is due to a significant reduction of quisqualate-insensitive (radiatum CA3) and kainate receptors (strata oriens, radiatum, pyramidal of CA3). Five days after lesion [ 3 H]-glutamate binding increased significantly in the CA3 region of the hippocampus but was not different from sham animals in the other hippocampal layers. Two weeks after lesion [ 3 H]-glutamate binding to quisqualate-insensitive receptors was increased in all the hippocampal layers, while kainate and quisqualate-sensitive receptors were not affected. These data are consistent with the possibility that 5-HT is a direct positive modulator of glutamate receptor subtypes

  9. An Assay of Bax and Bcl2 Expression in Mice Hippocampus Following Ischemia-Reperfusion Treatment with CoQ10

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalal Hassanshahi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Preliminary studies confirmed reduction of cell death following treatment with antioxidants. According to this finding we investigated the relationship between consumption of CoQ10 and expression of bax and bcl2 in hippocampus ischemia that this expression related to cell programmed death.Material and Methods: We studied the protective role of CoQ10 against ischemia-reperfusion. Experimental design includes four groups: intact (N=7, ischemic control (N=7, sham control (N=7 and treatment groups with CoQ10 (N=7. The mice (treatment group treated with CoQ10 as Pre-Treatment for a week. Then, ischemia induced by common carotid artery ligation and following the reduction in inflammation (a week the treatment group post-treated with CoQ10 for a week. Nissl staining applied to counting necrotic cells of hippocampus and the western blotting performed to measurement the bax and bcl2 expression. Tunnel kit was used to quantify apoptotic cell death while to short term memory scale, we apply Y-maze.Results: Cell death was significantly lower when mice treated with CoQ10. Bax expression was significantly high in ischemic group but in treatment group was less and reversely the bcl2 expression in ischemic group was lower than treatment and vehicle groups. The memory test results were consistent with cell death results. Conclusion: Ischemia for 15 minutes induced cell death in hippocampus with more potent effect on CA1. CoQ10 intake significantly reduced cell death and decreased memory loss. with prevent of expression of bax and increase in expression of bcl2.

  10. [Prevention and preventive therapy of age-related macular degeneration through the beneficial effect of treatment of endothelial dysfunction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Tamás

    2006-12-24

    The beneficial effect achieved by the treatment of endothelial dysfunction in chronic cardiovascular diseases is already an evidence belonging to the basic treatment of the disease. Given the fact that the vascular system is uniform and consubstantial both physiologically, pathophysiologically and in terms of therapy, and that it plays a key role in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) - a disease leading to tragic loss of vision with its etiology and therapy being unknown -, endothelial dysfunction should be treated. The pleiotropic effects of ACE-inhibitors, AR-blockers and statins help to restitute the balance between vasodilators and vasoconstrictors in endothelial dysfunction caused by oxidative stress, the balance of growth factors and their inhibitors, pro- and anti-inflammatory substances and prothrombotic and fibrinolytic factors, inhibit the formation of oxidative stress and its harmful effects; while aspirin with its pleiotropic effects acting as an antiaggregation substance on platelets helps to set the endothelial layer back to its normal balance regarding its vasodilating, antithrombotic, anti-adhesive and anti-inflammatory functions. For the above reasons it is suggested that, as a part of long term primary and/or secondary prevention, the following groups of patients with AMD receive - taking into consideration all possible side effects - ACE-inhibitor and/or AR-blocker and statin and aspirin treatment: 1) those without maculopathy but being over the age of 50 and having risk factors inducing endothelial dysfunction; 2) those, who already developed AMD in one eye as a prevention in the second, unaffected eye; and 3) those patients who developed AMD in both eyes in order to ameliorate or merely slow the progression of the disease. Besides, it is advisory to inhibit AMD risk factors inducing oxidative stress with consecutive endothelial dysfunction.

  11. Cost-effectiveness analysis of infant feeding strategies to prevent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Changing feeding practices is beneficial, depending on context. Breastfeeding is dominant (less costly, more effective) in rural settings, whilst formula feeding is a dominant strategy in urban settings. Cost-effectiveness was most sensitive to proportion of women on lifelong antiretroviral therapy (ART) and infant mortality rate ...

  12. ONE PROBABLE MECHANISM OF THE LEARNING-MEMORY DAMAGE BY LEAD: THE CHANGES OF NOS IN HIPPOCAMPUS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王静; 赵义; 杨章民; 张进; 李积胜; 司履生; 王一理

    2003-01-01

    Objective To study the effects of lead on the activity and expression of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and relationship between the effects of lead on learning-memory and changes of NOS in subfields of hippocampus. Methods Y-maze test was used to study the effects of lead on ability of learning-memory; NADPH-d histochemistry and immunohistochemistry methods were used to investigate the changes of NOS in subfields of hippocampus. Results Compared with the control group, the ability of learning- memory in lead-exposed rats was significantly decreased (P<0.05); the number of NOS positive neurons in CA1 region and dentate gyrus of lead-exposed rats was significantly decreased(P<0.05), but no marked changes in CA3 region; the number of nNOS positive neurons in CA1 of lead-exposed rats was also significantly decreased(P<0.05), but no obvious changes in CA3. Conclusion Lead could damage the ability of learning-memory in rats. Lead could decrease the activity and expression of NOS in hippocampus and had different effects on NOS in different subfields of hippocampus. The changes of NOS in hippocampus induced by lead may be the mechanism of the learning-memory damage by lead.

  13. Is etoricoxib effective in preventing heterotopic ossification after primary total hip arthroplasty?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brunnekreef, J.J.; Hoogervorst, P.; Ploegmakers, M.J.M.; Rijnen, W.H.C.; Schreurs, B.W.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Heterotopic ossification is a common complication after total hip arthroplasty. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are known to prevent heterotopic ossifications effectively, however gastrointestinal complaints are reported frequently. In this study, we investigated whether

  14. Comparative effectiveness of long term drug treatment strategies to prevent asthma exacerbations: network meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loymans, Rik J. B.; Gemperli, Armin; Cohen, Judith; Rubinstein, Sidney M.; Sterk, Peter J.; Reddel, Helen K.; Jüni, Peter; ter Riet, Gerben

    2014-01-01

    To determine the comparative effectiveness and safety of current maintenance strategies in preventing exacerbations of asthma. Systematic review and network meta-analysis using Bayesian statistics. Cochrane systematic reviews on chronic asthma, complemented by an updated search when appropriate.

  15. The Effective Ransomware Prevention Technique Using Process Monitoring on Android Platform

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Sanggeun; Kim, Bongjoon; Lee, Sangjun

    2016-01-01

    Due to recent indiscriminate attacks of ransomware, damage cases including encryption of users’ important files are constantly increasing. The existing vaccine systems are vulnerable to attacks of new pattern ransomware because they can only detect the ransomware of existing patterns. More effective technique is required to prevent modified ransomware. In this paper, an effective method is proposed to prevent the attacks of modified ransomware on Android platform. The proposed technique speci...

  16. Effectiveness of Physical Barriers Installation for Prevention of Incidents in Mexico City’s Subway System

    OpenAIRE

    Portillo-Villasana, Gerardo de Jesús; Huerta-Barrientos, Aida; Dillarza Andrade, Yazmin

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, suicides inside the installations of subway platforms are considered a public health problem in Mexico City. One solution to prevent them is the installation of physical barriers, but their high cost is unattractive for governmental authorities. Traditional approaches of research on the effectiveness of physical barriers for preventing suicides have been limited to analyzing statistically the effects of installing platform screen doors and blue lights on subway platforms. Although c...

  17. Specific immunotherapy has long-term preventive effect of seasonal and perennial asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, L; Niggemann, B; Dreborg, S

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: 3-year subcutaneous specific immunotherapy (SIT) in children with seasonal allergic rhinoconjunctivitis reduced the risk of developing asthma during treatment and 2 years after discontinuation of SIT (5-year follow-up) indicating long-term preventive effect of SIT. OBJECTIVE: We......: Specific immunotherapy has long-term clinical effects and the potential of preventing development of asthma in children with allergic rhino conjunctivitis up to 7 years after treatment termination....

  18. Effects of an emotional intelligence program in variables related to the prevention of violence

    OpenAIRE

    Garaigordobil, Maite; Peña-Sarrionandia, Ainize

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades, numerous studies have shown a significant increase in violence during childhood and adolescence. These data suggest the importance of implementing programs to prevent and reduce violent behavior. The study aimed to design a program of emotional intelligence (El) for adolescents and to assess its effects on variables related to violence prevention. The possible differential effect of the program on both genders was also examined. The sample comprised 148 adolescents aged fro...

  19. Principles for prevention of toxic effects from metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Landrigan, Philip J.; Kotelchuk, David; Grandjean, Philippe

    2007-01-01

    of the Toxic Effects of Metals Aluminum Antimony Arsenic Barium Beryllium Bismuth Cadmium Chromium Cobalt Copper Gallium and Semiconductor Compounds Germanium Indium Iron Lead Manganese Mercury Molybdenum Nickel Palladium Platinum Selenium Silver Tellurium Thallium Tin Titanium Tungsten Uranium Vanadium Zinc...

  20. Can GWOT Primary Prevention Strategy More Effectively Impede Religious Extremism?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Meyers, Michael A

    2007-01-01

    .... This concept, when related to the Global War on Terrorism (GWOT) in the Middle East, provides insights on the current strategy's effort and effectiveness in staying ahead of religious extremism expansion. Current U.S...

  1. Effectiveness of L-cystine in prevention of leukocytopenia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakurai, T; Nishio, M; Sako, T; Saito, A; Haruyama, M [National Hospital of Sapporo (Japan)

    1978-01-01

    The subject was 33 patients with malignant neoplasma who were treated only with irradiation or with both irradiation and anticancer drugs. Radiotherapy was performed by using betatron electron or 6MV Linac x-ray. A dose of 200-250 rad was given four times a week up to a total of 4000-6000 rad. At the some time as the start of radiotherapy, one capsule (60mg) of L-Cystine per a day (three times after each meal) was given until the finishment of radiation therapy or until 2 weeks after the finishment of radiotherapy. The number of leukocytes, fraction of leukocytes, the number of blood platelets, the number of erythrocytes, liver function, and findings in urine examination during the period from the start of irradiation to the finishment were examined. The evaluation of the effect was as follows: 1. marked effectiveness (reduction of the number of leukocytes, after irradiation was within 20% in comparison with that before irradiation), 2. effectiveness (the number of leukocytes was over 3000/mm/sup 3/ and radiotherapy could be performed according to schedule), and 3. ineffectiveness (the number of leukocytes was less than 3000/mm/sup 3/ or radiation therapy was obliged to stop). The result showed that marked effectiveness was recognized in 8 of 33 cases (24.2%), effectiveness, in 16 cases (48.5%), and ineffectiveness, in 9 cases (27.3%). 17 of 22 cases which were treated with both radiation and anticancer drugs showed response above effectiveness (77.3%). In the group with large irradiation field of over 15 x 15, effectiveness was recognized only in 1 of 5 cases regardless of treatment with anticancer drugs. In the group with irradiation field of medium or small size in which one side irradiation field was less than 15 x 15, 23 of 28 cases showed response of above effectiveness regardless of treatment with anticancer drugs (82.1%).

  2. Feasibility of preventing the effects of carcinogens on man

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shabad, L M; Wittig, K; Khesina, I A

    1973-01-01

    Measures are considered for reducing atmospheric levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons produced by domestic heating, industry, and motor vehicles. Older home heating systems should be replaced with ones which can burn more efficiently. It is recommended that emissions from industrial sources, such as by-product coke plants, petroleum refineries, and plants producing carbon black, resins, and gas, should be reduced by the use of filters or by more complete combustion. The amount of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in motor vehicle exhaust can be reduced by using oil additives, changing the ratio of gasoline to oil, and using neutralizers, but more appropriate long-term solutions would be to use vehicles powered by gas or electricity. Since the largest amounts of benzyprene (BP) are produced by idling motors, traffic flow should be improved by separating foot and automobile traffic. The amount of BP in airplane emissions has been reduced by more than 30% by adding magnesium to the fuel and by about 60% by using dearomatized fuels. To prevent lung cancer it is necessary to reduce the levels of not only carcinogens and cocarcinogens, but also of toxic substances, e.g., sulfur dioxide, oxides of nitrogen, and acrolein, which reduce ciliary activity in the bronchial epithelium. Since it is impractical to eliminate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from the human environment at present, maximum permissible concentrations of BP have been established in the Soviet Union. They are 0.01 microg/100 m/sup 3/ BP for the atmosphere and 15 microg/100 m/sup 3/ in work places.

  3. Defining success with HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis: A prevention-effective adherence paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberer, Jessica E.; Bangsberg, David R.; Baeten, Jared M.; Curran, Kathryn; Koechlin, Florence; Amico, K. Rivet; Anderson, Peter; Mugo, Nelly; Venter, Francois; Goicochea, Pedro; Caceres, Carlos; O’Reilly, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Clinical trial data have shown that oral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is efficacious when taken as prescribed; however, PrEP adherence is complex and must be understood within the context of variable risk for HIV infection and use of other HIV prevention methods. Different levels of adherence may be needed in different populations to achieve HIV prevention, and the optimal methods for achieving the necessary adherence for both individual and public health benefits are unknown. Guidance for PrEP use must consider these questions to determine the success of PrEP-based HIV prevention programs. In this article, we propose a new paradigm for understanding and measuring PrEP adherence, termed prevention-effective adherence, which incorporates dynamic HIV acquisition risk behaviors and the use of HIV alternative prevention strategies. We discuss the need for daily PrEP use only during periods of risk for HIV exposure, describe key issues for measuring and understanding relevant behaviors, review lessons from another health prevention field (i.e., family planning), and provide guidance for prevention-effective PrEP use. Moreover, we challenge emerging calls for sustained, near perfect PrEP adherence regardless of risk exposure and offer a more practical and public health-focused vision for this prevention intervention. PMID:26103095

  4. Dopamine Regulates Aversive Contextual Learning and Associated In Vivo Synaptic Plasticity in the Hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John I. Broussard

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine release during reward-driven behaviors influences synaptic plasticity. However, dopamine innervation and release in the hippocampus and its role during aversive behaviors are controversial. Here, we show that in vivo hippocampal synaptic plasticity in the CA3-CA1 circuit underlies contextual learning during inhibitory avoidance (IA training. Immunohistochemistry and molecular techniques verified sparse dopaminergic innervation of the hippocampus from the midbrain. The long-term synaptic potentiation (LTP underlying the learning of IA was assessed with a D1-like dopamine receptor agonist or antagonist in ex vivo hippocampal slices and in vivo in freely moving mice. Inhibition of D1-like dopamine receptors impaired memory of the IA task and prevented the training-induced enhancement of both ex vivo and in vivo LTP induction. The results indicate that dopamine-receptor signaling during an aversive contextual task regulates aversive memory retention and regulates associated synaptic mechanisms in the hippocampus that likely underlie learning.

  5. Inhibition of Rac1 activity in the hippocampus impaired extinction of contextual fear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lizhu; Mao, Rongrong; Tong, Jianbin; Li, Jinnan; Chai, Anping; Zhou, Qixin; Yang, Yuexiong; Wang, Liping; Li, Lingjiang; Xu, Lin

    2016-10-01

    Promoting extinction of fear memory is the main treatment of fear disorders, especially post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, fear extinction is often incomplete in these patients. Our previous study had shown that Rac1 activity in hippocampus plays a crucial role in the learning of contextual fear memory in rats. Here, we further investigated whether Rac1 activity also modulated the extinction of contextual fear memory. We found that massed extinction obviously upregulated hippocampal Rac1 activity and induced long-term extinction of contextual fear in rats. Intrahippocampal injection of the Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 prevents extinction of contextual fear in massed extinction training rats. In contrast, long-spaced extinction downregulated Rac1 activity and caused less extinction. And Rac1 activator CN04-A promotes extinction of contextual fear in long-spaced extinction rats. Our study demonstrates that inhibition of Rac1 activity in the hippocampus impaired extinction of contextual fear, suggesting that modulating Rac1 activity of the hippocampus may be promising therapy of fear disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Neoplasia of captive yellow sea horses (Hippocampus kuda) and weedy sea dragons (Phyllopteryx taeniolatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    LePage, Véronique; Dutton, Christopher J; Kummrow, Maya; McLelland, David J; Young, Karrie; Lumsden, John S

    2012-03-01

    Syngnathidae is the family of fish that includes sea horses, pipefish, and sea dragons. To date, only a single publication has described neoplasia in syngnathids, a fibrosarcoma of the brood pouch in an aquarium-reared lined sea horse (Hippocampus erectus). From 1998 until 2010, the Toronto Zoo submitted 172 syngnathids for postmortem; species included the spotted or yellow sea horse (Hippocampus kuda), the pot-bellied sea horse (Hippocampus abdominalis) and the weedy sea dragon (Phyllopteryx taeniolatus). Seven neoplasms and two neoplastic-like lesions were identified from these cases. Under light microscopy, the neoplasms had morphological characteristics of a cardiac rhabdomyosarcoma, renal adenocarcinoma, renal adenoma, renal round cell tumors, which were likely lymphomas, exocrine pancreatic carcinoma, and intestinal carcinoma. Of these neoplasms, four had clear evidence of metastasis: the pancreatic and intestinal carcinomas and both round cell tumors. As syngnathids are highly fastidious animals, they can be difficult to maintain in captivity. In order to improve their husbandry, preventative and palliative care, as well as treatment, it is important to investigate and document the types of diseases affecting syngnathids.

  7. Alterations in right posterior hippocampus in early blind individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chebat, Daniel-Robert; Chen, Jan-Kai; Schneider, Fabien

    2007-01-01

    This study compares hippocampal volumes of early blind and sex/age-matched sighted controls through volumetric and localization analyses. Early blind individuals showed a significantly smaller right posterior hippocampus compared with controls. No differences in total hippocampal volumes were fou...... of the posterior hippocampus in early blind individuals suggests the implication of this region in visual spatial memory. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Mar-5......This study compares hippocampal volumes of early blind and sex/age-matched sighted controls through volumetric and localization analyses. Early blind individuals showed a significantly smaller right posterior hippocampus compared with controls. No differences in total hippocampal volumes were found...

  8. Randomized controlled trial of the effect of medical audit on AIDS prevention in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandbæk, Annelli

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We aimed to evaluate the effect of a medical audit on AIDS prevention in general practice. METHODS: We conducted a prospective randomized controlled study performed as 'lagged intervention'. At the time of comparison, the intervention group had completed 6 months of audit including a p...... of such consultations initiated by the GPs. CONCLUSIONS: Medical audit had no observed effect on AIDS prevention in general practice. Udgivelsesdato: 1999-Oct......OBJECTIVE: We aimed to evaluate the effect of a medical audit on AIDS prevention in general practice. METHODS: We conducted a prospective randomized controlled study performed as 'lagged intervention'. At the time of comparison, the intervention group had completed 6 months of audit including....... One hundred and thirty-three GPs completed the project. The main outcome measures were the number of consultations involving AIDS prevention and the number of talks about AIDS initiated by the GP, and some elements of the content were registered on a chart. RESULTS: No statistically significant...

  9. Piracetam prevents scopolamine-induced memory impairment and decrease of NTPDase, 5'-nucleotidase and adenosine deaminase activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marisco, Patricia C; Carvalho, Fabiano B; Rosa, Michelle M; Girardi, Bruna A; Gutierres, Jessié M; Jaques, Jeandre A S; Salla, Ana P S; Pimentel, Víctor C; Schetinger, Maria Rosa C; Leal, Daniela B R; Mello, Carlos F; Rubin, Maribel A

    2013-08-01

    Piracetam improves cognitive function in animals and in human beings, but its mechanism of action is still not completely known. In the present study, we investigated whether enzymes involved in extracellular adenine nucleotide metabolism, adenosine triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (NTPDase), 5'-nucleotidase and adenosine deaminase (ADA) are affected by piracetam in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex of animals subjected to scopolamine-induced memory impairment. Piracetam (0.02 μmol/5 μL, intracerebroventricular, 60 min pre-training) prevented memory impairment induced by scopolamine (1 mg/kg, intraperitoneal, immediately post-training) in the inhibitory avoidance learning and in the object recognition task. Scopolamine reduced the activity of NTPDase in hippocampus (53 % for ATP and 53 % for ADP hydrolysis) and cerebral cortex (28 % for ATP hydrolysis). Scopolamine also decreased the activity of 5'-nucleotidase (43 %) and ADA (91 %) in hippocampus. The same effect was observed in the cerebral cortex for 5'-nucleotidase (38 %) and ADA (68 %) activities. Piracetam fully prevented scopolamine-induced memory impairment and decrease of NTPDase, 5'-nucleotidase and adenosine deaminase activities in synaptosomes from cerebral cortex and hippocampus. In vitro experiments show that piracetam and scopolamine did not alter enzymatic activity in cerebral cortex synaptosomes. Moreover, piracetam prevented scopolamine-induced increase of TBARS levels in hippocampus and cerebral cortex. These results suggest that piracetam-induced improvement of memory is associated with protection against oxidative stress and maintenance of NTPDase, 5'-nucleotidase and ADA activities, and suggest the purinergic system as a putative target of piracetam.

  10. Effectiveness of Secondary Pregnancy Prevention Programs: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Jacqueline; Pillai, Vijayan K.

    2007-01-01

    Because subsequent pregnancy in teen parents often worsens the impact of adolescent parenting; therefore, a common goal of teenage parent programs has been to reduce repeat pregnancy. To examine the impact of this goal, a meta-analysis was conducted on 16 control-comparison group studies that evaluated the effect of teenage pregnancy and parenting…

  11. Moderating effect of age on the association between future time perspective and preventive coping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tao; Liu, Lu-Lu; Cui, Ji-Fang; Chen, Xing-Jie; Shi, Hai-Song; Neumann, David L; Shum, David H K; Wang, Ya; Chan, Raymond C K

    2017-09-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the moderating effect of age on the relationship between future time perspective (FTP) and future-oriented coping. A total of 1,915 participants aged 9-84 years completed measures of FTP and future-oriented coping. Moderation analyses were conducted to examine whether age played a role in the association between FTP and future-oriented coping (proactive and preventive). Results showed that proactive and preventive coping were negatively correlated with age, and age moderated the association between FTP and preventive coping but not proactive coping. Furthermore, the strength of the positive association between FTP and preventive coping was strongest among the older participants, moderate among the middle-aged participants, and weakest among the younger participants. These results suggest that the association between FTP and preventive coping varies across the lifespan. © 2017 The Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  12. Distinct roles of the hippocampus and perirhinal cortex in GABAA receptor blockade-induced enhancement of object recognition memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Min; Kim, Dong Hyun; Lee, Younghwan; Park, Se Jin; Ryu, Jong Hoon

    2014-03-13

    It is well known that the hippocampus plays a role in spatial and contextual memory, and that spatial information is tightly regulated by the hippocampus. However, it is still highly controversial whether the hippocampus plays a role in object recognition memory. In a pilot study, the administration of bicuculline, a GABAA receptor antagonist, enhanced memory in the passive avoidance task, but not in the novel object recognition task. In the present study, we hypothesized that these different results are related to the characteristics of each task and the different roles of hippocampus and perirhinal cortex. A region-specific drug-treatment model was employed to clarify the role of the hippocampus and perirhinal cortex in object recognition memory. After a single habituation in the novel object recognition task, intra-perirhinal cortical injection of bicuculline increased and intra-hippocampal injection decreased the exploration time ratio to novel object. In addition, when animals were repeatedly habituated to the context, intra-perirhinal cortical administration of bicuculline still increased exploration time ratio to novel object, but the effect of intra-hippocampal administration disappeared. Concurrent increases of c-Fos expression and ERK phosphorylation were observed in the perirhinal cortex of the object with context-exposed group either after single or repeated habituation to the context, but no changes were noted in the hippocampus. Altogether, these results suggest that object recognition memory formation requires the perirhinal cortex but not the hippocampus, and that hippocampal activation interferes with object recognition memory by the information encoding of unfamiliar environment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Preventive effects of Lentinus edodes on homocysteinemia in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hyun; Hwang, Inho; Kim, Sun; Ahn, Changhwan; Hong, Eui-Ju; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2013-08-01

    Homocysteinemia is associated with cardiovascular and neuronal degenerative diseases. Deficiencies of the B vitamins lead to high homocysteine serum levels. Lentinus edodes ( L. edodes) is also known as the Shiitake mushroom and may have beneficial effects on vascular and lipid metabolic diseases, including hypertension, homocysteinemia and lipidemia. In this study, we induced a homocysteinemia-like condition in mice by the administration of a folate- and vitamin B12-deficient diet and evaluated the effect of L. edodes on the homocysteinemia-like condition. Homocysteinemia was induced by the administration of a diet deficient in folate and vitamin B12 (DFV) for 6 weeks to mice aged 4-10 weeks. The homocysteinemic mice were treated with L. edodes flour (5, 10 and 20%), eritadenine (10 mg/kg) or DFV only (negative control) for 2 weeks. The DFV induced a significant increase in serum homocysteine levels. The increased homocysteine serum levels were reduced by eritadenine and L. edodes flour (5, 10 and 20%). Hepatic levels of S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine hydrolase (SAH) were significantly higher under DFV administration and the elevated SAH levels were reduced by treatment with L. edodes in a dose-dependent manner. The mRNA expression levels of DNA methyl transferases, DNMT1 and DNMT3a, were reduced in the DFV group, and the reduced levels of DNMT1 and DNMT3a mRNA expression were recovered in the eritadenine and L. edodes (5, 10 and 20%) groups. These results suggest that components of L. edodes , including eritadenine may have beneficial effects on hyperhomocysteinemia and its therapeutic effects may be involved in the regulation of DNA methylation-related genes in mice.

  14. Ciproxifan, a histamine H{sub 3} receptor antagonist and inverse agonist, presynaptically inhibits glutamate release in rat hippocampus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Cheng-Wei; Lin, Tzu-Yu [Department of Anesthesiology, Far-Eastern Memorial Hospital, Pan-Chiao District, New Taipei City 22060, Taiwan (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yuan Ze University, Taoyuan 320, Taiwan (China); Chang, Chia-Ying [Department of Anesthesiology, Far-Eastern Memorial Hospital, Pan-Chiao District, New Taipei City 22060, Taiwan (China); Department of Chemistry, Fu Jen Catholic University, No. 510, Chung-Cheng Road, Hsin-Chuang District, New Taipei City 24205, Taiwan (China); Huang, Shu-Kuei [Department of Anesthesiology, Far-Eastern Memorial Hospital, Pan-Chiao District, New Taipei City 22060, Taiwan (China); Wang, Su-Jane, E-mail: med0003@mail.fju.edu.tw [School of Medicine, Fu Jen Catholic University, No. 510, Chung-Cheng Rd., Hsin-Chuang, New Taipei 24205, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Chinese Herbal Medicine, College of Human Ecology, Chang Gung University of Science and Technology, Taoyuan City, Taiwan (China)

    2017-03-15

    Ciproxifan is an H{sub 3} receptor antagonist and inverse agonist with antipsychotic effects in several preclinical models; its effect on glutamate release has been investigated in the rat hippocampus. In a synaptosomal preparation, ciproxifan reduced 4-aminopyridine (4-AP)-evoked Ca{sup 2+}-dependent glutamate release and cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} concentration elevation but did not affect the membrane potential. The inhibitory effect of ciproxifan on 4-AP-evoked glutamate release was prevented by the Gi/Go-protein inhibitor pertussis toxin and Ca{sub v}2.2 (N-type) and Ca{sub v}2.1 (P/Q-type) channel blocker ω-conotoxin MVIIC, but was not affected by the intracellular Ca{sup 2+}-release inhibitors dantrolene and CGP37157. Furthermore, the phospholipase A{sub 2} (PLA{sub 2}) inhibitor OBAA, prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}), PGE2 subtype 2 (EP{sub 2}) receptor antagonist PF04418948, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) inhibitor FR180204 eliminated the inhibitory effect of ciproxifan on glutamate release. Ciproxifan reduced the 4-AP-evoked phosphorylation of ERK and synapsin I, a presynaptic target of ERK. The ciproxifan-mediated inhibition of glutamate release was prevented in synaptosomes from synapsin I-deficient mice. Moreover, ciproxifan reduced the frequency of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents without affecting their amplitude in hippocampal slices. Our data suggest that ciproxifan, acting through the blockade of Gi/Go protein-coupled H{sub 3} receptors present on hippocampal nerve terminals, reduces voltage-dependent Ca{sup 2+} entry by diminishing PLA{sub 2}/PGE{sub 2}/EP{sub 2} receptor pathway, which subsequently suppresses the ERK/synapsin I cascade to decrease the evoked glutamate release. - Highlights: • Ciproxifan presynaptically reduces glutamate release in the hippocampus in vitro. • Decrease in voltage-dependent Ca{sup 2+} influx is involved. • A role for the PLA{sub 2}/PGE{sub 2}/EP{sub 2} pathway in the action of

  15. [Effect of fats on cardiovascular disease prevention in Denmark].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astrup, Arne; Larsen, Mogens Lytken; Stender, Steen; Dyerberg, Jørn

    2014-05-05

    In Denmark death from cardiovascular disease (CVD) has decreased, mainly due to a 72% reduction since 1990 in death from ischaemic heart disease from reduced smoking, elimination of industrial trans fatty acids in the diet, and more effective medical treatment. Replacement of saturated fat by carbohydrate and/or n-6 polyunsaturated fat may increase CVD, but it is reduced by substitution with n-3 fats, monounsaturated fat, or low glycaemic index carbohydrates. Despite a high saturated fat content dark chocolate and cheese may reduce CVD and diabetes risk and eggs may be neutral, and less restrictive dietary recommendations are indicated.

  16. Cost-effectiveness of combined oral bisphosphonate therapy and falls prevention exercise for fracture prevention in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, T; Crandall, C J; Ganz, D A

    2017-02-01

    We developed a Markov microsimulation model among hypothetical cohorts of community-dwelling US white women without prior major osteoporotic fractures over a lifetime horizon. At ages 75 and 80, adding 1 year of exercise to 5 years of oral bisphosphonate therapy is cost-effective at a conventionally accepted threshold compared with bisphosphonates alone. The purpose of this study was to examine the cost-effectiveness of the combined strategy of oral bisphosphonate therapy for 5 years and falls prevention exercise for 1 year compared with either strategy in isolation. We calculated incremental cost-effectiveness ratios [ICERs] (2014 US dollars per quality-adjusted life year [QALY]), using a Markov microsimulation model among hypothetical cohorts of community-dwelling US white women with different starting ages (65, 70, 75, and 80) without prior history of hip, vertebral, or wrist fractures over a lifetime horizon from the societal perspective. At ages 65, 70, 75, and 80, the combined strategy had ICERs of $202,020, $118,460, $46,870, and $17,640 per QALY, respectively, compared with oral bisphosphonate therapy alone. The combined strategy provided better health at lower cost than falls prevention exercise alone at ages 70, 75, and 80. In deterministic sensitivity analyses, results were particularly sensitive to the change in the opportunity cost of participants' time spent exercising. In probabilistic sensitivity analyses, the probabilities of the combined strategy being cost-effective compared with the next best alternative increased with age, ranging from 35 % at age 65 to 48 % at age 80 at a willingness-to-pay of $100,000 per QALY. Among community-dwelling US white women ages 75 and 80, adding 1 year of exercise to 5 years of oral bisphosphonate therapy is cost-effective at a willingness-to-pay of $100,000 per QALY, compared with oral bisphosphonate therapy only. This analysis will help clinicians and policymakers make better decisions about treatment

  17. Effects of the cyberbullying prevention program media heroes (Medienhelden) on traditional bullying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaux, Enrique; Velásquez, Ana María; Schultze-Krumbholz, Anja; Scheithauer, Herbert

    2016-01-01

    There is considerable debate over whether cyberbullying is just another form of bullying, or whether it is a problem distinct enough to require specific intervention. One way to explore this issue is to analyze whether programs designed to prevent traditional bullying help prevent cyberbullying, and whether programs designed to prevent cyberbullying prevent traditional bullying. The main goal of the current study was to analyze the spillover effects of the cyberbullying prevention program Media Heroes (Medienhelden) on traditional bullying. Media Heroes promotes empathy, knowledge of risks and consequences, and strategies that allow bystanders to defend victims from cyberbullying. Mixed ANOVAs were conducted comparing pretest and post-test (6 months after intervention) measures of 722 students (ages 11-17) assigned to a long (15 sessions) intervention, a short (1 day) intervention, and a control group. In addition to confirming the previously reported effects on cyberbullying, Media Heroes was found to reduce traditional bullying. Effects were larger for the long-version of the program than for the short 1-day version. No effects were found on victimization by either cyberbullying or traditional bullying. Strategies to complement traditional and cyberbullying prevention efforts are discussed. Aggr. Behav. 42:157-165, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Tetrahydroxystilbene Glucoside Effectively Prevents Apoptosis Induced Hair Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lulu Chen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of Polygonum multiflorum against hair loss has been widely recognized. 2,3,5,4′-Tetrahydroxystilbene-2-O-β-D-glucoside (TSG is the main component of Polygonum multiflorum; however, its role in hair regeneration has not been established. To evaluate the hair growth-promoting activity of TSG, depilated C57BL/6J mice were topically treated with normal saline, TSG, Pifithrin-α, Minoxidil for 2 weeks. In this study, we identified that p53, Caspase-3, Active Caspase-3, and Caspase-9 were obviously upregulated in the skin of human and mice with hair loss by western blot analysis. Depilated mice treated with TSG showed markedly hair regrowth. TUNEL+ cells were also reduced in mice with TSG. These changes were accompanied with inhibition of Fas, p53, Bax, Active Caspase-3, and Procaspase-9 activities. These results demonstrated that TSG exerts great hair regrowth effect on hair loss, which was probably mediated by inhibition of p53, Fas, and Bax induced apoptosis.

  19. Prevention of gastrointestinal side-effects in paediatric oncology: what are the guidelines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Karis K F

    2017-06-01

    Gastrointestinal side-effects, particularly with regard to alimentary tract mucositis and chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV), continue to be frequent and debilitating symptomatic conditions among children and adolescents receiving cytotoxic cancer therapy. Further avenues of progress for mucositis and CINV prevention in paediatric oncology setting are warranted. The current article reviews the major guidelines and literature published in 2016 pertaining to the prevention of mucositis and CINV. Considerable professional organizational efforts have been made to develop consensus-based or evidence-based guidelines that periodically update to define basic standards of mucositis and CINV prevention. There are a few published works in 2016 that may contribute to the emerging evidence on prevention of mucositis and CINV in the paediatric setting for future guideline updates. The concomitant use of 5-HT3 receptor antagonist and dexamethasone are effective to prevent acute and delayed CINV in children who are to receive highly or moderately emetogenic chemotherapy. Optimal control of acute and delayed CINV can prevent anticipatory CINV. Oral care protocols would be beneficial to prevent mucositis in children across all cancer treatment modalities. Cryotherapy or low-level light therapy may be applied to cooperative children undergoing chemotherapy or haematological stem cell transplant conditioning regimens with a high rate of mucositis.

  20. The inhibition of the kynurenine pathway prevents behavioral disturbances and oxidative stress in the brain of adult rats subjected to an animal model of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Réus, Gislaine Z; Becker, Indianara R T; Scaini, Giselli; Petronilho, Fabricia; Oses, Jean P; Kaddurah-Daouk, Rima; Ceretta, Luciane B; Zugno, Alexandra I; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Quevedo, João; Barichello, Tatiana

    2018-02-02

    Evidence has shown that the kynurenine pathway (KP) plays a role in the onset of oxidative stress and also in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. The aim of this study was to use a pharmacological animal model of schizophrenia induced by ketamine to investigate if KP inhibitors could protect the brains of Wistar rats against oxidative stress and behavioral changes. Ketamine, injected at the dose of 25mg/kg, increased spontaneous locomotor activity. However, the inhibitors of tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO), indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and kynurenine-3-monooxygenase (KMO) were able to reverse these changes. In addition, the IDO inhibitor prevented lipid peroxidation, and decreased the levels of protein carbonyl in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), hippocampus and striatum. It also increased the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in the hippocampus, as well as increasing the levels of catalase activity in the PFC and hippocampus. The TDO inhibitor prevented lipid damage in the striatum and reduced the levels of protein carbonyl in the hippocampus and striatum. Also, the TDO inhibitor increased the levels of SOD activity in the striatum and CAT activity in the hippocampus of ketamine-induced pro-oxidant effects. Lipid damage was not reversed by the KMO inhibitor. The KMO inhibitor increased the levels of SOD activity in the hippocampus, and reduced the levels of protein carbonyl while elevating the levels of CAT activity in the striatum of rats that had been injected with ketamine. Our findings revealed that the KP pathway could be a potential mechanism by which a schizophrenia animal model induced by ketamine could cause interference by producing behavioral disturbance and inducing oxidative stress in the brain, suggesting that the inhibition of the KP pathway could be a potential target in treating schizophrenia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Hippocampus and amygdala morphology in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plessen, Kerstin J; Bansal, Ravi; Zhu, Hongtu

    2006-01-01

    CONTEXT: Limbic structures are implicated in the genesis of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) by the presence of mood and cognitive disturbances in affected individuals and by elevated rates of mood disorders in family members of probands with ADHD. OBJECTIVE: To study the morphology...... of the hippocampus and amygdala in children with ADHD. DESIGN: A cross-sectional case-control study of the hippocampus and amygdala using anatomical magnetic resonance imaging. SETTINGS: University research institute. PATIENTS: One hundred fourteen individuals aged 6 to 18 years, 51 with combined-type ADHD and 63...... healthy controls. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Volumes and measures of surface morphology for the hippocampus and amygdala. RESULTS: The hippocampus was larger bilaterally in the ADHD group than in the control group (t = 3.35; P

  2. Role of the hippocampus in contextual modulation of fear extinction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lingzhi Kong; Xihong Wu; Liang Li

    2008-01-01

    Fear extinction is an important form of emotional learning, and affects neural plasticity. Cue fear extinction is a classical form of inhibitory learning that can be used as an exposure-based treatment for phobia, because the long-term extinction memory produced during cue fear extinction can limit the over-expression of fear. The expression of this inhibitory memory partly depends on the context in which the extinction learning occurs. Studies such as transient inhibition, electrophysiology and brain imaging have proved that the hippocampus - an important structure in the limbic system - facilitates memory retrieval by contextual cues.Mediation of the hippocampus-medial prefrontal lobe circuit may be the neurobiological basis of this process.This article has reviewed the role of the hippocampus in the learning and retrieval of fear extinction.Contextual modulation of fear extinction may rely on a neural network consisting of the hippocampus, the medial prefrontal cortex and the amygdala.

  3. Effectiveness of an Ongoing, Community-Based Breast Cancer Prevention Program for Korean American Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Eun; Choi, Ga-Young; Cho, Ji Young

    2016-02-01

    The study evaluates the effectiveness of an ongoing, community-based breast cancer prevention program offered by a local social services agency in the Washington, DC, metropolitan area. Korean American women who participated in this breast cancer prevention program were compared with those who did not participate in their knowledge, attitude, and screening behaviors. The study found that the intervention group was more knowledgeable on breast cancer and related services and reported more positive attitudes toward breast cancer screening services than the comparison group. The participants in the intervention group were also more likely to plan to receive a mammogram than those in the comparison group. However, significant differences were not observed in the two groups in their intention to receive a clinical breast examination. The study findings suggest that an ongoing, community-based breast cancer prevention program can be an effective method of addressing breast cancer prevention disparities observed among Korean American women.

  4. Making the workplace a more effective site for prevention of noncommunicable diseases in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tryon, Katherine; Bolnick, Howard; Pomeranz, Jennifer L; Pronk, Nicolaas; Yach, Derek

    2014-11-01

    Efforts to realize the potential of disease prevention in the United States have fallen behind those of peer countries, and workplace disease prevention is a major gap. This article investigates the reasons for this gap. Literature review and expert discussions. Obstacles to effective use of workplace disease prevention include limited leadership and advocacy, poor alignment of financial incentives, limitations in research quality and investment, regulation that does not support evidence-based practice, and a dearth of community-employer partnerships. We make recommendations to address these obstacles, such as the inclusion of health metrics in corporate reporting, making the workplace a central component of the strategy to combat the effect of noncommunicable diseases, and linking prevention directly benefit businesses' bottom lines.

  5. The effectiveness of a multimedia program to prevent fetal alcohol syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachausse, Robert G

    2008-07-01

    Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) continues to be the leading preventable cause of mental retardation in the United States. Because abstaining from alcohol prior to and throughout pregnancy is the only way to prevent FAS, some prevention programs try to target women before they become pregnant. The Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Teaching and Research Awareness Campaign (FASTRAC) is a multimedia, peer-delivered educational presentation designed to reduce the incidence of FAS. Results from an ethnically diverse sample of high school students indicate that the program increased participants' knowledge regarding FAS but had no significant effect on participants' attitudes, beliefs about the dangers of FAS or intention to use alcohol during pregnancy. The FASTRAC program failed partly because of its didactic approach and the lack of health education principles that have been shown to be effective in changing other substance use behaviors. Suggestions for improving FAS prevention education programs are offered.

  6. Are probiotics effective in preventing urinary tract infection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canales, Juan; Rada, Gabriel

    2018-04-04

    Urinary tract infection is the most common bacterial infection and recurrences are common. Probiotics have been proposed as an alternative to decrease this risk. However, it is not clear if they are really effective. To answer this question we used Epistemonikos, the largest database of systematic reviews in health, which is maintained by screening multiple information sources, including MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane, among others. We extracted data from the systematic reviews, reanalyzed data of primary studies, conducted a meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table using the GRADE approach. We identified six systematic reviews including nine studies overall, of which seven were randomized trials. We concluded it is not clear whether probiotics decrease the risk of symptomatic urinary tract infection, because the certainty of the evidence is very low.

  7. Leukocyte telomere length and hippocampus volume: a meta-analysis [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustav Nilsonne

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Leukocyte telomere length has been shown to correlate to hippocampus volume, but effect estimates differ in magnitude and are not uniformly positive. This study aimed primarily to investigate the relationship between leukocyte telomere length and hippocampus gray matter volume by meta-analysis and secondarily to investigate possible effect moderators. Five studies were included with a total of 2107 participants, of which 1960 were contributed by one single influential study. A random-effects meta-analysis estimated the effect to r = 0.12 [95% CI -0.13, 0.37] in the presence of heterogeneity and a subjectively estimated moderate to high risk of bias. There was no evidence that apolipoprotein E (APOE genotype was an effect moderator, nor that the ratio of leukocyte telomerase activity to telomere length was a better predictor than leukocyte telomere length for hippocampus volume. This meta-analysis, while not proving a positive relationship, also is not able to disprove the earlier finding of a positive correlation in the one large study included in analyses. We propose that a relationship between leukocyte telomere length and hippocamus volume may be mediated by transmigrating monocytes which differentiate into microglia in the brain parenchyma.

  8. Hippocampus, delay discounting, and vicarious trial-and-error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bett, David; Murdoch, Lauren H; Wood, Emma R; Dudchenko, Paul A

    2015-05-01

    In decision-making, an immediate reward is usually preferred to a delayed reward, even if the latter is larger. We tested whether the hippocampus is necessary for this form of temporal discounting, and for vicarious trial-and-error at the decision point. Rats were trained on a recently developed, adjustable delay-discounting task (Papale et al. (2012) Cogn Affect Behav Neurosci 12:513-526), which featured a choice between a small, nearly immediate reward, and a larger, delayed reward. Rats then received either hippocampus or sham lesions. Animals with hippocampus lesions adjusted the delay for the larger reward to a level similar to that of sham-lesioned animals, suggesting a similar valuation capacity. However, the hippocampus lesion group spent significantly longer investigating the small and large rewards in the first part of the sessions, and were less sensitive to changes in the amount of reward in the large reward maze arm. Both sham- and hippocampus-lesioned rats showed a greater amount of vicarious trial-and-error on trials in which the delay was adjusted. In a nonadjusting version of the delay discounting task, animals with hippocampus lesions showed more variability in their preference for a larger reward that was delayed by 10 s compared with sham-lesioned animals. To verify the lesion behaviorally, rat were subsequently trained on a water maze task, and rats with hippocampus lesions were significantly impaired compared with sham-lesioned animals. The findings on the delay discounting tasks suggest that damage to the hippocampus may impair the detection of reward magnitude. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Are food labels effective as a means of health prevention?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaia Claudia Viviana Viola

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic diseases related to unbalanced and unhealthy eating habits have definitely become one of the major issues of modern age, not only in western countries but also in those ones where rapid economic growth has increased global prosperity levels. In order to avoid medical systems to collapse under excessive costs, International and Public Organizations strongly support health policies that aim to make people shift towards wholesome dietary patterns, also encouraging the use of food-labels to choose healthier products. To evaluate the consumers’ knowledge and perception about food-labels a brief questionnaire was developed and shared on Facebook between January-March 2016. Most of the participants were young adults with higher education. They declared to do their shopping at least once a week, reading the foodlabels quite often. Despite owing limited knowledge in basic nutrition principles and food-labelling they were generally able to recognize healthier products looking over their nutritional fact tables. Anyway, on average, what they care the most about the products they purchase is the global quality level rather than the nutritional values. In order to induce the whole population to use food label as an effective self-protection tool, more efforts should be done to improve their knowledge on nutrition fundamentals and basics about food labelling, because that would make them able to take safer and more conscious choices as regards their own health.

  10. Emotional Appeals in HIV Prevention Campaigns: Unintended Stigma Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thainiyom, Prawit; Elder, Katherine

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether HIV/AIDS public service announcements (PSAs) that use emotional appeals have unintended effects of creating stigmatizing attitudes in their viewers. We analyzed data for 240 respondents located in the United States who were recruited online. Respondents were randomly assigned to one of 3 conditions, where they viewed a PSA with hope appeals, fear appeals, or non-emotional appeals. Respondents then answered a series of questions about their attitudes about HIV/AIDS; testing behavior; engagement with HIV/AIDS-related people, organizations, and issues; and HIV/AIDS knowledge. We then performed MANOVA analyses and Pearson correlations. There were no significant differences in stigmatizing attitudes and behavior across the 3 conditions. However, once the data were split by sex, men exposed to the hope condition had significantly higher stigmatizing attitudes towards people living with HIV/AIDS than men in the other 2 conditions. This result was unexpected and suggests that further research needs to be conducted with a more robust sample size to account for any moderating influences that might explain why a hopeful message that communicates togetherness would have a negative attitudinal impact on male viewers.

  11. Potential Effects of Pomegranate Polyphenols in Cancer Prevention and Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turrini, Eleonora; Ferruzzi, Lorenzo; Fimognari, Carmela

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death and is becoming the leading one in old age. Vegetable and fruit consumption is inversely associated with cancer incidence and mortality. Currently, interest in a number of fruits high in polyphenols has been raised due to their reported chemopreventive and/or chemotherapeutic potential. Pomegranate has been shown to exert anticancer activity, which is generally attributed to its high content of polyphenols. This review provides a comprehensive analysis of known targets and mechanisms along with a critical evaluation of pomegranate polyphenols as future anticancer agents. Pomegranate evokes antiproliferative, anti-invasive, and antimetastatic effects, induces apoptosis through the modulation of Bcl-2 proteins, upregulates p21 and p27, and downregulates cyclin-cdk network. Furthermore, pomegranate blocks the activation of inflammatory pathways including, but not limited to, the NF-κB pathway. The strongest evidence for its anticancer activity comes from studies on prostate cancer. Accordingly, some exploratory clinical studies investigating pomegranate found a trend of efficacy in increasing prostate-specific antigen doubling time in patients with prostate cancer. However, the genotoxicity reported for pomegranate raised certain concerns over its safety and an accurate assessment of the risk/benefit should be performed before suggesting the use of pomegranate or its polyphenols for cancer-related therapeutic purposes.

  12. Natural Forms of Vitamin E as Effective Agents for Cancer Prevention and Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Qing

    2017-11-01

    Initial research on vitamin E and cancer has focused on α-tocopherol (αT), but recent clinical studies on cancer-preventive effects of αT supplementation have shown disappointing results, which has led to doubts about the role of vitamin E, including different vitamin E forms, in cancer prevention. However, accumulating mechanistic and preclinical animal studies show that other forms of vitamin E, such as γ-tocopherol (γT), δ-tocopherol (δT), γ-tocotrienol (γTE), and δ-tocotrienol (δTE), have far superior cancer-preventive activities than does αT. These vitamin E forms are much stronger than αT in inhibiting multiple cancer-promoting pathways, including cyclo-oxygenase (COX)- and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX)-catalyzed eicosanoids, and transcription factors such as nuclear transcription factor κB (NF-κB) and signal transducer and activator of transcription factor 3 (STAT3). These vitamin E forms, but not αT, cause pro-death or antiproliferation effects in cancer cells via modulating various signaling pathways, including sphingolipid metabolism. Unlike αT, these vitamin E forms are quickly metabolized to various carboxychromanols including 13'-carboxychromanols, which have even stronger anti-inflammatory and anticancer effects than some vitamin precursors. Consistent with mechanistic findings, γT, δT, γTE, and δTE, but not αT, have been shown to be effective for preventing the progression of various types of cancer in preclinical animal models. This review focuses on cancer-preventive effects and mechanisms of γT, δT, γTE, and δTE in cells and preclinical models and discusses current progress in clinical trials. The existing evidence strongly indicates that these lesser-known vitamin E forms are effective agents for cancer prevention or as adjuvants for improving prevention, therapy, and control of cancer. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  13. Deletion of TLX and social isolation impairs exercise-induced neurogenesis in the adolescent hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozareva, Danka A; O'Leary, Olivia F; Cryan, John F; Nolan, Yvonne M

    2018-01-01

    Adolescence is a sensitive period of neurodevelopment during which life experiences can have profound effects on the brain. Hippocampal neurogenesis, the neurodevelopmental process of generating functional new neurons from neural stem cells, occurs throughout the lifespan and has been shown to play a role in learning, memory and in mood regulation. In adulthood it is influenced by extrinsic environmental factors such as exercise and stress. Intrinsic factors that regulate hippocampal neurogenesis include the orphan nuclear receptor TLX (Nr2e1) which is primarily expressed in the neurogenic niches of the brain. While mechanisms regulating adult hippocampal neurogenesis have been widely studied, less is known on how hippocampal neurogenesis is affected during adolescence. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of both TLX and isolation stress on exercise-induced increases in neurogenesis in running and sedentary conditions during adolescence. Single- (isolation stress) wild type and Nr2e1 -/- mice or pair-housed wild type mice were housed in sedentary conditions or allowed free access to running wheels for 3 weeks during adolescence. A reduction of neuronal survival was evident in mice lacking TLX, and exercise did not increase hippocampal neurogenesis in these Nr2e1 -/- mice. This suggests that TLX is necessary for the pro-neurogenic effects of exercise during adolescence. Interestingly, although social isolation during adolescence did not affect hippocampal neurogenesis, it prevented an exercise-induced increase in neurogenesis in the ventral hippocampus. Together these data demonstrate the importance of intrinsic and extrinsic factors in promoting an exercise-induced increase in neurogenesis at this key point in life. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Sleep-dependent directional coupling between human neocortex and hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Tobias; Axmacher, Nikolai; Lehnertz, Klaus; Elger, Christian E; Fell, Jürgen

    2010-02-01

    Complex interactions between neocortex and hippocampus are the neural basis of memory formation. Two-step theories of memory formation suggest that initial encoding of novel information depends on the induction of rapid plasticity within the hippocampus, and is followed by a second sleep-dependent step of memory consolidation. These theories predict information flow from the neocortex into the hippocampus during waking state and in the reverse direction during sleep. However, experimental evidence that interactions between hippocampus and neocortex have a predominant direction which reverses during sleep rely on cross-correlation analysis of data from animal experiments and yielded inconsistent results. Here, we investigated directional coupling in intracranial EEG data from human subjects using a phase-modeling approach which is well suited to reveal functional interdependencies in oscillatory data. In general, we observed that the anterior hippocampus predominantly drives nearby and remote brain regions. Surprisingly, however, the influence of neocortical regions on the hippocampus significantly increased during sleep as compared to waking state. These results question the standard model of hippocampal-neocortical interactions and suggest that sleep-dependent consolidation is accomplished by an active retrieval of hippocampal information by the neocortex. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Srl. All rights reserved.

  15. The effects of a three-year smoking prevention programme in secondary schools in Helsinki.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vartiainen, Erkki; Pennanen, Marjaana; Haukkala, Ari; Dijk, Froukje; Lehtovuori, Riku; De Vries, Hein

    2007-06-01

    This study evaluates the effects of a 3-year smoking prevention programme in secondary schools in Helsinki. The study is part of the European Smoking prevention Framework Approach (ESFA), in which Denmark, Finland, the Netherlands, Portugal, Spain and the UK participated. A total of 27 secondary schools in Finland participated in the programme (n = 1821). Schools were randomised into experimental (13) and control groups (14). The programme included 14 information lessons about smoking and refusal skills training. The 3-year smoking prevention programme was also integrated into the standard curriculum. The community-element of the programme included parents, parish confirmation camps and dentists. The schools in the experimental group received the prevention programme and the schools in the control group received the standard health education curriculum. Among baseline never smokers (60.8%), the programme had a significant effect on the onset of weekly smoking in the experimental group [OR = 0.63 (0.45-0.90) P = 0.009] when compared with the control group. Being female, doing poorly at school, having parents and best friends who smoke and more pocket money to spend compared with others were associated with an increased likelihood of daily and weekly smoking onset. These predictors did not have an interaction effect with the experimental condition. This study shows that a school- and community-based smoking prevention programme can prevent smoking onset among adolescents.

  16. An effective suicide prevention program in the Israeli Defense Forces: A cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelef, L; Tatsa-Laur, L; Derazne, E; Mann, J J; Fruchter, E

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of the IDF Suicide Prevention Program, implemented since 2006. Quasi-experimental (before and after) cohort study. Two cohorts of IDF mandatory service soldiers: the first inducted prior to (1992-2005, n=766,107) and the second subsequent to (2006-2012, n=405,252) the launching of the intervention program. The IDF Suicide Prevention Program is a population-based program, incorporating: reducing weapon availability, de-stigmatizing help-seeking behavior, integrating mental health officers into service units, and training commanders and soldiers to recognize suicide risk factors and warning signs. Suicide rate and time to suicide in cohorts before and after exposure to the Suicide Prevention Program. Trend analysis showed lower suicide rates in the cohort after intervention. The hazard ratio for the intervention effect on time to suicide was 0.44 (95% CI=0.34-0.56, Psuicide rate following the administratio