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Sample records for hippocampus caused postpubertal

  1. Temporal bone surgery causes reduced nitric oxide synthase activity in the ipsilateral guinea pig hippocampus.

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    Zheng, Y; Smith, P F; Darlington, C L

    1999-01-08

    There is a lack of data on the neurochemical basis for the interaction between the vestibular system and the hippocampus. The aim of the present study was to determine levels of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity in the ipsilateral and contralateral hippocampi at 10 h following unilateral deafferentation of the peripheral vestibular nerve (UVD) in guinea pig, using a radio-enzymatic technique. The levels of NOS activity were similar in the contralateral hippocampus following either a sham temporal bone operation or the UVD. However, NOS activity was significantly lower in the ipsilateral hippocampus following both the UVD and the sham temporal bone surgery (P<0.05 for both comparisons). These results suggest that even sham temporal bone surgery results in a reduction in NOS activity in the ipsilateral hippocampus.

  2. Apoptotic Process Induced by Oxaliplatin in Rat Hippocampus Causes Memory Impairment.

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    Bianchi, Enrica; Di Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo; Micheli, Laura; Farzad, Mersedez; Aglianò, Margherita; Ghelardini, Carla

    2017-01-01

    Aspects of memory involved in cognitive mechanisms were investigated in rat after oxaliplatin (OX) chemotherapy using animal behavioural assessment of passive avoidance and social learning paradigms, which are both hippocampus-sensitive. Rodents, previously subjected to 2-week OX treatment, showed passive avoidance and social learning impairment and apoptotic processes in the hippocampus. Apoptosis rate significantly increased in cultured hippocampal cells exposed to OX at increasing doses, and this effect was dose-dependent. Ex vivo experiments showed that cell damage and apoptosis were blocked in the hippocampus from OX rats cotreated with copper sulphate (CS) which precludes OX transport inside the cell. In vivo, passive avoidance and social learning impairment could not be observed in OX rats co-administered with CS. Thus, a site of action of OX treatment on memory impairment appears to be located at the hippocampus. These findings strongly support that cellular damage induced by OX in rodent hippocampus underlies the weakening of some memory functions. © 2016 Nordic Association for the Publication of BCPT (former Nordic Pharmacological Society).

  3. Prenatal stress causes alterations in the morphology of microglia and the inflammatory response of the hippocampus of adult female mice

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    Diz-Chaves Yolanda

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stress during fetal life increases the risk of affective and immune disorders later in life. The altered peripheral immune response caused by prenatal stress may impact on brain function by the modification of local inflammation. In this study we have explored whether prenatal stress results in alterations in the immune response in the hippocampus of female mice during adult life. Methods Pregnant C57BL/6 mice were subjected three times/day during 45 minutes to restraint stress from gestational Day 12 to delivery. Control non-stressed pregnant mice remained undisturbed. At four months of age, non-stressed and prenatally stressed females were ovariectomized. Fifteen days after surgery, mice received an i.p. injection of vehicle or of 5 mg/kg of lipopolysaccharide (LPS. Mice were sacrificed 20 hours later by decapitation and the brains were removed. Levels of interleukin-1β (IL1β, interleukin-6 (IL-6, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α, interferon γ-inducible protein 10 (IP10, and toll-like receptor 4 mRNA were assessed in the hippocampus by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Iba1 immunoreactivity was assessed by immunocytochemistry. Statistical significance was determined by one-way or two-way analysis of variance. Results Prenatal stress, per se, increased IL1β mRNA levels in the hippocampus, increased the total number of Iba1-immunoreactive microglial cells and increased the proportion of microglial cells with large somas and retracted cellular processes. In addition, prenatally stressed and non-stressed animals showed different responses to peripheral inflammation induced by systemic administration of LPS. LPS induced a significant increase in mRNA levels of IL-6, TNF-α and IP10 in the hippocampus of prenatally stressed mice but not of non-stressed animals. In addition, after LPS treatment, prenatally stressed animals showed a higher proportion of Iba1-immunoreactive cells in the hippocampus with

  4. Postpubertal nonfamilial cherubism and teeth transposition.

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    Ozan, Bora; Muğlali, Mehtap; Celenk, Peruze; Günhan, Omer

    2010-09-01

    Cherubism is a rare, nonneoplastic, fibro-osseous disease. It is an autosomal-dominant disorder in which the normal bone is replaced by cellular fibrous tissue and immature bone. It is genetically inherited, although many nonfamilial cases have been reported. Cherubism is a bone disease clinically characterized by bilateral, painless enlargements of the jaws. The mandible is the most severely affected craniofacial component, in which uncontrolled growth of the malady deteriorates the aesthetic balance of the face. A malocclusive and abnormal dentition, worse in the mandible, can be seen. Histopathologically, numerous randomly distributed multinucleated giant cells and vascular spaces within a fibrous connective tissue stroma with or without eosinophilic collagen perivascular cuffing were apparent. The appearance of the affected children is normal at birth. Between the ages of 2 and 7 years, swellings within the mandibular body or tuberosities of maxilla appear. This article relates to a postpubertal nonfamilial cherubism case that was noticed with multiple radiolucencies in radiographic examination and its effects on teeth.

  5. Street rabies virus causes dendritic injury and F-actin depolymerization in the hippocampus

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    Song, Yan; Hou, Jinli; Qiao, Bin; Li, Yanchao; XU, YE; Duan, Ming; Guan, Zhenhong; Zhang, Maolin; Sun, Liankun

    2013-01-01

    Rabies is an acute viral infection of the central nervous system and is typically fatal in humans and animals; however, its pathogenesis remains poorly understood. In this study, the morphological changes of dendrites and dendritic spines in the CA1 region of the hippocampus were investigated in mice that were infected intracerebrally with an MRV strain of the street rabies virus. Haematoxylin and eosin and fluorescence staining analysis of brain sections from the infected mice showed very fe...

  6. Cocaine withdrawal causes delayed dysregulation of stress genes in the hippocampus.

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    M Julia García-Fuster

    Full Text Available Relapse, even following an extended period of withdrawal, is a major challenge in substance abuse management. Delayed neurobiological effects of the drug during prolonged withdrawal likely contribute to sustained vulnerability to relapse. Stress is a major trigger of relapse, and the hippocampus regulates the magnitude and duration of stress responses. Recent work has implicated hippocampal plasticity in various aspects of substance abuse. We asked whether changes in stress regulatory mechanisms in the hippocampus may participate in the neuroadaptations that occur during prolonged withdrawal. We therefore examined changes in the rat stress system during the course of withdrawal from extended daily access (5-hours of cocaine self-administration, an animal model of addiction. Tissue was collected at 1, 14 and 28 days of withdrawal. Plasma corticosterone levels were determined and corticosteroid receptors (GR, MR, MR/GR mRNA ratios and expression of other stress-related molecules (HSP90AA1 and HSP90AB1 mRNA were measured in hippocampal subfields using in situ hybridization. Results showed a delayed emergence of dysregulation of stress genes in the posterior hippocampus following 28 days of cocaine withdrawal. This included increased GR mRNA in DG and CA3, increased MR and HSP90AA1 mRNA in DG, and decreased MR/GR mRNA ratio in DG and CA1. Corticosterone levels progressively decreased during the course of withdrawal, were normalized following 28 days of withdrawal, and were correlated negatively with GR and positively with MR/GR mRNA ratio in DG. These results suggest a role for the posterior hippocampus in the neuroadaptations that occur during prolonged withdrawal, and point to a signaling partner of GR, HSP90AA1, as a novel dysregulated target during cocaine withdrawal. These delayed neurobiological effects of extended cocaine exposure likely contribute to sustained vulnerability to relapse.

  7. Ultrastructure and mitochondrial numbers in pre- and postpubertal pig oocytes

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    Pedersen, Hanne Skovsgaard; Callesen, Henrik; Løvendahl, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Prepubertal pig oocytes are associated with lower developmental competence. The aim of this experiment was to conduct an exhaustive survey of oocyte ultrastructure and to use a design-unbiased stereological approach to quantify the numerical density and total number of mitochondria in oocytes...... granules and central localisation of mitochondria, vesicles and lipid droplets. Prepubertal oocytes displayed more variation. The ultrastructure of large pre- and postpubertal oocytes was compatible with higher developmental competence, whereas that of smaller prepubertal oocytes could explain...... with different diameters from pre- and postpubertal pigs. The ultrastructure of smaller prepubertal immature oocytes indicated active cells in close contact with cumulus cells. The postpubertal oocytes were more quiescent cell types. The small prepubertal oocytes had a lower total mitochondrial number...

  8. Traumatic Brain Injury Causes Aberrant Migration of Adult-Born Neurons in the Hippocampus.

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    Ibrahim, Sara; Hu, Weipeng; Wang, Xiaoting; Gao, Xiang; He, Chunyan; Chen, Jinhui

    2016-02-22

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) promotes neural stem/progenitor cell (NSC) proliferation in an attempt to initiate innate repair mechanisms. However, all immature neurons in the CNS are required to migrate from their birthplace to their final destination to develop into functional neurons. Here we assessed the destination of adult-born neurons following TBI. We found that a large percentage of immature neurons migrated past their normal stopping site at the inner granular cell layer (GCL), and became misplaced in the outer GCL of the hippocampal dentate gyrus. The aberrant migration of adult-born neurons in the hippocampus occurred 48 hours after TBI, and lasted for 8 weeks, resulting in a great number of newly generated neurons misplaced in the outer GCL in the hippocampus. Those misplaced neurons were able to become mature and differentiate into granular neurons, but located ectopically in the outer GCL with reduced dendritic complexity after TBI. The adult-born neurons at the misplaced position may make wrong connections with inappropriate nearby targets in the pre-existing neural network. These results suggest that although stimulation of endogenous NSCs following TBI might offer new avenues for cell-based therapy, additional intervention is required to further enhance successful neurogenesis for repairing the damaged brain.

  9. Prenatal stress in rat causes long-term spatial memory deficit and hippocampus MRI abnormality: differential effects of postweaning enriched environment.

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    Lui, Chun Chung; Wang, Jia-Yi; Tain, You-Lin; Chen, Yu-Chieh; Chang, Kow-Aung; Lai, Ming-Chi; Huang, Li-Tung

    2011-02-01

    Prenatal stress (PS) can cause long-term hippocampus alternations in structure and plasticity in adult offspring. Enriched environment (EE) has an effect in rescuing a variety of neurological disorders. Pregnant dams were left undisturbed (prenatal control, PC) or restrained 6h per day from days 14 to 21 (prenatal stress, PS). Control and prenatal stressed offspring rats were subjected to a standard rearing environment (SE) or an EE on postnatal days 22-120 (PC/SE PC/EE, PS/SE, and PS/EE; n=5, each group). At ∼4 months of age, all rats underwent Morris water maze test and brain MRI examination. Hippocampi were then dissected for biochemical analyses, including, Western blot for NMDA receptor (NR) subunits and synaptophysin and RT-PCR forβ1 integrin and tissue-plasminogen activator (t-PA). MRI showed all 5 rats in the PS/SE group and 5 in the PS/EE group exhibited increased signals in bilateral hippocampus and increased T2 time in the PS/SE group. Exposure to EE treatment on postnatal days 22-120 counteracted the deficit in spatial memory and increased NR1 protein expression, but it did not affect the rate of high signals and increased T2 time, decreased NR2, synaptophysin, β1 integrin and t-PA mRNA expressions in PS adult offspring. The results of this study indicate PS in rats causes long-term spatial memory deficits and gross hippocampus pathology. Postnatal EE treatment has differential benefits in terms of spatial learning, signaling molecules, and gross hippocampus pathology. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Total-body irradiation of postpubertal mice with (137)Cs acutely compromises the microarchitecture of cancellous bone and increases osteoclasts.

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    Kondo, Hisataka; Searby, Nancy D; Mojarrab, Rose; Phillips, Jonathan; Alwood, Joshua; Yumoto, Kenji; Almeida, Eduardo A C; Limoli, Charles L; Globus, Ruth K

    2009-03-01

    Ionizing radiation can cause substantial tissue degeneration, which may threaten the long-term health of astronauts and radiotherapy patients. To determine whether a single dose of radiation acutely compromises structural integrity in the postpubertal skeleton, 18-week-old male mice were exposed to (137)Cs gamma radiation (1 or 2 Gy). The structure of high-turnover, cancellous bone was analyzed by microcomputed tomography (microCT) 3 or 10 days after irradiation and in basal controls (tissues harvested at the time of irradiation) and age-matched controls. Irradiation (2 Gy) caused a 20% decline in tibial cancellous bone volume fraction (BV/TV) within 3 days and a 43% decline within 10 days, while 1 Gy caused a 28% reduction 10 days later. The BV/TV decrement was due to increased spacing and decreased thickness of trabeculae. Radiation also increased ( approximately 150%) cancellous surfaces lined with tartrate-resistant, acid phosphatase-positive osteoclasts, an index of increased bone resorption. Radiation decreased lumbar vertebral BV/TV 1 month after irradiation, showing the persistence of cancellous bone loss, although mechanical properties in compression were unaffected. In sum, a single dose of gamma radiation rapidly increased osteoclast surface in cancellous tissue and compromised cancellous microarchitecture in the remodeling appendicular and axial skeleton of postpubertal mice.

  11. Caffeine-induced activated glucocorticoid metabolism in the hippocampus causes hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis inhibition in fetal rats.

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    Dan Xu

    Full Text Available Epidemiological investigations have shown that fetuses with intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR are susceptible to adult metabolic syndrome. Clinical investigations and experiments have demonstrated that caffeine is a definite inducer of IUGR, as children who ingest caffeine-containing food or drinks are highly susceptible to adult obesity and hypertension. Our goals for this study were to investigate the effect of prenatal caffeine ingestion on the functional development of the fetal hippocampus and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis and to clarify an intrauterine HPA axis-associated neuroendocrine alteration induced by caffeine. Pregnant Wistar rats were intragastrically administered 20, 60, and 180 mg/kg · d caffeine from gestational days 11-20. The results show that prenatal caffeine ingestion significantly decreased the expression of fetal hypothalamus corticotrophin-releasing hormone. The fetal adrenal cortex changed into slight and the expression of fetal adrenal steroid acute regulatory protein (StAR and cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc, as well as the level of fetal adrenal endogenous corticosterone (CORT, were all significantly decreased after caffeine treatment. Moreover, caffeine ingestion significantly increased the levels of maternal and fetal blood CORT and decreased the expression of placental 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-2 (11β-HSD-2. Additionally, both in vivo and in vitro studies show that caffeine can downregulate the expression of fetal hippocampal 11β-HSD-2, promote the expression of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 and glucocorticoid receptor (GR, and enhance DNA methylation within the hippocampal 11β-HSD-2 promoter. These results suggest that prenatal caffeine ingestion inhibits the development of the fetal HPA axis, which may be associated with the fetal overexposure to maternal glucocorticoid and activated glucocorticoid metabolism in the fetal hippocampus. These results will be

  12. Electroconvulsive stimulation, but not chronic restraint stress, causes structural alterations in adult rat hippocampus--a stereological study.

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    Olesen, Mikkel V; Wörtwein, Gitta; Pakkenberg, Bente

    2015-01-01

    The neurobiological mechanisms underlying depression are not fully understood. Only a few previous studies have used validated stereological methods to test how stress and animal paradigms of depression affect adult hippocampal neurogenesis and whether antidepressant therapy can counteract possible changes in an animal model. Thus, in this study we applied methods that are state of the art in regard to stereological cell counting methods. Using a validated rat model of depression in combination with a clinically relevant schedule of electroconvulsive stimulation, we estimated the total number of newly formed neurons in the hippocampal subgranular zone. Also estimated were the total number of neurons and the volume of the granule cell layer in adult rats subjected to chronic restraint stress and electroconvulsive stimulation either alone or in combination. We found that chronic restraint stress induces depression-like behavior, without significantly changing neurogenesis, the total number of neurons or the volume of the hippocampus. Further, electroconvulsive stimulation prevents stress-induced depression-like behavior and increases neurogenesis. The total number of neurons and the granule cell layer volume was not affected by electroconvulsive stimulation. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Energy Drink Administration in Combination with Alcohol Causes an Inflammatory Response and Oxidative Stress in the Hippocampus and Temporal Cortex of Rats

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    Díaz, Alfonso; Treviño, Samuel; Guevara, Jorge; Muñoz-Arenas, Guadalupe; Brambila, Eduardo; Espinosa, Blanca; Moreno-Rodríguez, Albino; Lopez-Lopez, Gustavo; Peña-Rosas, Ulises; Venegas, Berenice; Handal-Silva, Anabella; Morán-Perales, José Luis; Flores, Gonzalo; Aguilar-Alonso, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Energy drinks (EDs) are often consumed in combination with alcohol because they reduce the depressant effects of alcohol. However, different researches suggest that chronic use of these psychoactive substances in combination with alcohol can trigger an oxidative and inflammatory response. These processes are regulated by both a reactive astrogliosis and an increase of proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β, TNF-α, and iNOS, causing cell death (apoptosis) at the central and peripheral nervous systems. Currently, mechanisms of toxicity caused by mixing alcohol and ED in the brain are not well known. In this study, we evaluated the effect of chronic alcohol consumption in combination with ED on inflammatory response and oxidative stress in the temporal cortex (TCx) and hippocampus (Hp) of adult rats (90 days old). Our results demonstrated that consuming a mixture of alcohol and ED for 60 days induced an increase in reactive gliosis, IL-1β, TNF-α, iNOS, reactive oxygen species, lipid peroxidation, and nitric oxide, in the TCx and Hp. We also found immunoreactivity to caspase-3 and a decrease of synaptophysin in the same brain regions. The results suggested that chronic consumption of alcohol in combination with ED causes an inflammatory response and oxidative stress, which induced cell death via apoptosis in the TCx and Hp of the adult rats. PMID:27069534

  14. Energy Drink Administration in Combination with Alcohol Causes an Inflammatory Response and Oxidative Stress in the Hippocampus and Temporal Cortex of Rats

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    Alfonso Díaz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Energy drinks (EDs are often consumed in combination with alcohol because they reduce the depressant effects of alcohol. However, different researches suggest that chronic use of these psychoactive substances in combination with alcohol can trigger an oxidative and inflammatory response. These processes are regulated by both a reactive astrogliosis and an increase of proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β, TNF-α, and iNOS, causing cell death (apoptosis at the central and peripheral nervous systems. Currently, mechanisms of toxicity caused by mixing alcohol and ED in the brain are not well known. In this study, we evaluated the effect of chronic alcohol consumption in combination with ED on inflammatory response and oxidative stress in the temporal cortex (TCx and hippocampus (Hp of adult rats (90 days old. Our results demonstrated that consuming a mixture of alcohol and ED for 60 days induced an increase in reactive gliosis, IL-1β, TNF-α, iNOS, reactive oxygen species, lipid peroxidation, and nitric oxide, in the TCx and Hp. We also found immunoreactivity to caspase-3 and a decrease of synaptophysin in the same brain regions. The results suggested that chronic consumption of alcohol in combination with ED causes an inflammatory response and oxidative stress, which induced cell death via apoptosis in the TCx and Hp of the adult rats.

  15. EFFECTS OF DIBUTYL PHTHALATE IN MALE RABBITS FOLLOWING IN UTERO, ADOLESCENT OR POST-PUBERTAL EXPOSURE

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    Effects of dibutyl phthalate in male rabbits following in utero, adolescent, or post-pubertal exposureTy T. Higuchi1, Jennifer S. Palmer1, L. Earl Gray Jr2., and D. N. Rao Veeramachaneni11Animal Reproduction and Biotechnology Laboratory, Colorado State University, Fort

  16. MITOCHONDRIAL DYNAMICS IN PRE- AND POSTPUBERTAL PIG OOCYTES BEFORE AND AFTER IN VITRO MATURATION

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    Pedersen, H. S.; Løvendahl, P.; Nikolaisen, N. K.

    2013-01-01

    Oocytes from prepubertal (PRE) or postpubertal (POST) pigs are used in, for example, somatic cell nuclear transfer and in vitro fertilization. Here we describe mitochondrial dynamics in pig oocytes of different sizes before and after in vitro maturation (IVM), isolated from PRE or POST animals. I...

  17. Factors affecting post-pubertal penile size in patients with hypospadias.

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    Moriya, Kimihiko; Nakamura, Michiko; Nishimura, Yoko; Kitta, Takeya; Kanno, Yukiko; Chiba, Hiroki; Kon, Masafumi; Shinohara, Nobuo

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate actual post-pubertal penile size and factors affecting it in hypospadias patients, we retrospectively reviewed medical charts. Hypospadias patients whose external genitalia were categorized into Tanner stage 5, and whose stretched penile length was evaluated at 15 years old or older from April 2008 to April 2015, were enrolled in the present study. Stretched penile length was measured by a single examiner. Actual post-pubertal stretched penile length and factors affecting the post-pubertal stretched penile length were estimated. Statistical analysis was performed using Mann-Whitney U test and univariate and multivariate linear regression models for the determination of independent factors. Thirty patients met the inclusion criteria. Median age at evaluation was 17.2 years. Thirteen and 17 had mild and severe hypospadias, respectively. Endocrinological abnormality was identified in 5. Multivariate analysis showed that the severity of hypospadias and endocrinological abnormality were significant factors affecting stretched penile length. Stretched penile length in 25 patients without endocrinological abnormality was significantly longer than that in those with endocrinological abnormality (p = 0.036). Among patients without endocrinological abnormality, stretched penile length in 13 with severe hypospadias was significantly shorter than that in 12 with mild hypospadias (p = 0.004). While the severity of hypospadias and endocrinological abnormality at post-pubertal evaluation were factors affecting post-pubertal penile size, stretched penile length in patients with severe hypospadias was shorter even in cases without endocrinological abnormality. These results suggest that severe hypospadias is not only a disorder of urethral development, but also a disorder of penile development.

  18. Lack of potassium channel induces proliferation and survival causing increased neurogenesis and two-fold hippocampus enlargement

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    Almgren, Malin; Persson, Ann-Sophie; Fenghua, Chen

    2007-01-01

    and the second week of life. To investigate the hyperplasia, cell proliferation was studied within the subgranular zone of the DG using BrdU and Ki67. There was a three-fold increase in proliferation in mceph/mceph mice compared to wild type mice at an age before onset of epileptic symptoms (3 weeks...... was lower in mceph/mceph supporting additional overgrowth mechanism than induced by seizures. In conclusion, lack of a functional Kv1.1 ion channel subunit in the mceph/mceph mice causes a unique neuronal hyperplasia in distinct hippocampal regions and consequently hippocampal enlargement from 2 to 3 weeks...... of age. This phenotype is a result, at least in DG, from increased proliferation, neurogenesis, and enhanced general hippocampal cell survival. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-null...

  19. Ketogenic diets cause opposing changes in synaptic morphology in CA1 hippocampus and dentate gyrus of late-adult rats.

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    Balietti, Marta; Giorgetti, Belinda; Fattoretti, Patrizia; Grossi, Yessica; Di Stefano, Giuseppina; Casoli, Tiziana; Platano, Daniela; Solazzi, Moreno; Orlando, Fiorenza; Aicardi, Giorgio; Bertoni-Freddari, Carlo

    2008-06-01

    Ketogenic diets (KDs) have beneficial effects on several diseases, such as epilepsy, mitochondriopathies, cancer, and neurodegeneration. However, little is known about their effects on aging individuals. In the present study, late-adult (19-month-old) rats were fed for 8 weeks with two medium chain triglycerides (MCT)-KDs, and the following morphologic parameters reflecting synaptic plasticity were evaluated in stratum moleculare of hippocampal CA1 region (SM CA1) and outer molecular layer of hippocampal dentate gyrus (OML DG): average area (S), numeric density (Nv(s)), and surface density (Sv) of synapses, and average volume (V), numeric density (Nv(m)), and volume density (Vv) of synaptic mitochondria. In SM CA1, MCT-KDs induced the early appearance of the morphologic patterns typical of old animals (higher S and V, and lower Nv(s) and Nv(m)). On the contrary, in OML DG, Sv and Vv of MCT-KDs-fed rats were higher (as a result of higher Nv(s) and Nv(m)) versus controls; these modifications are known to improve synaptic function and metabolic supply. The opposite effects of MCT-KDs might reflect the different susceptibility to aging processes: OML DG is less vulnerable than SM CA1, and the reactivation of ketone bodies uptake and catabolism might occur more efficiently in this region, allowing the exploitation of their peculiar metabolic properties. Present findings provide the first evidence that MCT-KDs may cause opposite morphologic modifications, being potentially harmful for SM CA1 and potentially advantageous for OML DG. This implies risks but also promising potentialities for their therapeutic use during aging.

  20. Asiatic acid protects against cognitive deficits and reductions in cell proliferation and survival in the rat hippocampus caused by 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy.

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    Pornthip Chaisawang

    Full Text Available The chemotherapy drug, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU, has been reported to cause cognitive impairments in cancer patients. The drug also reduces cell proliferation and survival in the brain. Asiatic acid (AA is a triterpene compound found in Centella asiatica that can protect against reduction of neurogenesis in the hippocampus and memory deficits induced by valproic acid (VPA. In the present study, we investigated the preventive effects of AA on the deficits in spatial working memory and cell proliferation and survival caused by 5-FU chemotherapy in a rat model. Male Sprague Dawley rats received 5-FU (5 i.v. injections, 25 mg/kg on day 8, 11, 14, 17 and 20 of the study. This was co-administered with AA (30 mg/kg, oral gavage tube either 20 days before receiving 5-FU (preventive, after receiving 5-FU (recovery, or for the entire period of the experiment (throughout. Spatial working memory was determined using the novel object location (NOL test and hippocampal cell proliferation and survival of dividing cells were quantified using immunohistochemistry. Rats in the 5-FU alone and recovery groups showed memory deficits in the NOL test and reductions in cell proliferation and cell survival in the subgranular zone (SGZ of the hippocampal dentate gyrus. Rats in the control, AA alone, and both preventive and throughout co-administration groups, however, did not exhibit these characteristics. The results showed that 5-FU chemotherapy impaired memory and reduced cell proliferation and cell survival in the SGZ of the hippocampal dentate gyrus. However, these impairments in the animals receiving 5-FU chemotherapy were restored to control levels when AA was co-administered before and during 5-FU treatment. These data demonstrate that AA can prevent the spatial working memory and hippocampal neurogenesis impairments caused by 5-FU chemotherapy.

  1. Making context memories independent of the hippocampus

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    Lehmann, Hugo; Sparks, Fraser T.; Spanswick, Simon C.; Hadikin, Crystal; McDonald, Robert. J.; Sutherland, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    We present evidence that certain learning parameters can make a memory, even a very recent one, become independent of the hippocampus. We confirm earlier findings that damage to the hippocampus causes severe retrograde amnesia for context memories, but we show that repeated learning sessions create a context memory that is not vulnerable to the damage. The findings demonstrate that memories normally dependent on the hippocampus are incrementally strengthened in other memory networks with addi...

  2. [Peculiarities of sexual behavior of female rats with hyperandrogenia in pubertal and postpubertal periods].

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    Nosenko, N D; Lymarieva, A A

    2013-01-01

    The parameters of female and male sexual behavior in 3- and 6- month old female rats which were exposed to an androgen excess (subcutaneous implantation of Silastic capsules containing 5 mg of crystalline testosterone) from the beginning of pubertal period (at the age of 35 days), or within postpubertal period (at the age of 4 months). Hyperandrogenia in pubertal period had no effect on female sexual behavior formation, but it led to appearance of male behavior components in 100% of animals. In female rats which were implanted with testosterone capsules in postpubertal period, sexual disturbances were more pronounced and were characterized by masculinization and defeminization, which was due to a higher degree of androgenic saturation. The data obtained suggest a leading role of hyperandrogenemia in the pathogenesis of sexual behavior disturbances in female rats in different periods of individual development.

  3. Paradoxical sleep deprivation in rats causes a selective reduction in the expression of type-2 metabotropic glutamate receptors in the hippocampus.

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    Panaccione, Isabella; Iacovelli, Luisa; di Nuzzo, Luigi; Nardecchia, Francesca; Mauro, Gianluca; Janiri, Delfina; De Blasi, Antonio; Sani, Gabriele; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Orlando, Rosamaria

    2017-03-01

    Paradoxical sleep deprivation in rats is considered as an experimental animal model of mania endowed with face, construct, and pharmacological validity. We induced paradoxical sleep deprivation by placing rats onto a small platform surrounded by water. This procedure caused the animal to fall in the water at the onset of REM phase of sleep. Control rats were either placed onto a larger platform (which allowed them to sleep) or maintained in their home cage. Sleep deprived rats showed a substantial reduction in type-2 metabotropic glutamate (mGlu2) receptors mRNA and protein levels in the hippocampus, but not in the prefrontal cortex or corpus striatum, as compared to both groups of control rats. No changes in the expression of mGlu3 receptor mRNA levels or mGlu1α and mGlu5 receptor protein levels were found with exception of an increase in mGlu1α receptor levels in the striatum of SD rats. Moving from these findings we treated SD and control rats with the selective mGlu2 receptor enhancer, BINA (30mg/kg, i.p.). SD rats were also treated with sodium valproate (300mg/kg, i.p.) as an active comparator. Both BINA and sodium valproate were effective in reversing the manic-like phenotype evaluated in an open field arena in SD rats. BINA treatment had no effect on motor activity in control rats, suggesting that our findings were not biased by a non-specific motor-lowering activity of BINA. These findings suggest that changes in the expression of mGlu2 receptors may be associated with the enhanced motor activity observed with mania. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Excitotoxic median raphe lesions aggravate working memory storage performance deficits caused by scopolamine infusion into the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus in the inhibitory avoidance task in rats

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    Babar E.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The interactions between the median raphe nucleus (MRN serotonergic system and the septohippocampal muscarinic cholinergic system in the modulation of immediate working memory storage performance were investigated. Rats with sham or ibotenic acid lesions of the MRN were bilaterally implanted with cannulae in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus and tested in a light/dark step-through inhibitory avoidance task in which response latency to enter the dark compartment immediately after the shock served as a measure of immediate working memory storage. MRN lesion per se did not alter response latency. Post-training intrahippocampal scopolamine infusion (2 and 4 µg/side produced a more marked reduction in response latencies in the lesioned animals compared to the sham-lesioned rats. Results suggest that the immediate working memory storage performance is modulated by synergistic interactions between serotonergic projections of the MRN and the muscarinic cholinergic system of the hippocampus.

  5. Comparison of lumbar force between pubertal and post-pubertal adolescents: interference of physical growth, body fat and lifestyle.

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    Mikael Seabra Moraes

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aim: To compare performance in the lumbar force test in pubertal and post-pubertal adolescents by controlling the interference of physical growth, body fat, screen time and physical activity. Methods: A cross-sectional study with 933 adolescents (492 girls aged 14-19 from the city of São José, Brazil. Lumbar strength was assessed using the isometric lumbar extension test proposed by the Canadian Society of Exercise Physiology. Sexual maturation was classified according to Tanner’s criteria. Physical growth variables (age, body weight, stature, BMI, body fat (triceps and subscapular skinfolds, sedentary behavior based on screen time and overall physical activity were controlled in the Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA, with a significance level of 5%. Results: Post-pubertal boys presented higher lumbar force compared to pubertal ones only when interference of BMI, body fat, screen time and physical activity was controlled. Pubertal girls presented higher lumbar force compared to post-pubertal ones, both when controlling the analysis for the studied variables and when not controlled by them. Conclusion: BMI, body fat, screen time and physical activity interfere in the difference in lumbar strength of boys, in which post-pubertal boys presented better performance in lumbar force compared to pubertal ones. Regardless of interference or not of these variables, pubertal girls presented better performance in lumbar force when compared to post-pubertal ones.

  6. Severe skeletal Class II Division 1 malocclusion in postpubertal girl treated using Forsus with miniplate anchorage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Harshal Ashok; Kerudi, Veerendra V; Rudagi, B M; Sharan, Jitendra S; Tekale, Pawankumar Dnyandeo

    2017-01-01

    This case report outlines the treatment of a 17-year-old female with Class II Division 1 malocclusion with mandibular retrusion, deep bite, and convex facial profile. The Forsus fatigue resistance device with miniplate was used for this patient and it was very affecting tool in correcting both skeletal and dental parameters. The total active treatment time was 19 months. This method can serve as an alternate choice of treatment, especially those who refuse orthognathic surgery. Hence, Forsus with miniplate might be useful in both growing and postpubertal patients.

  7. Effects of programmed physical activity on body composition in post-pubertal schoolchildren

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson dos Santos Farias

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess body composition modifications in post-pubertal schoolchildren after practice of a physical activity program during one school year. METHODS: The sample consisted of 386 students aged between 15 and 17 years and divided into two groups: the study group (SG comprised 195 students and the control group (CG, 191. The SG was submitted to a physical activity program and the CG attended conventional physical education classes. Body composition was assessed using body mass index (BMI, percentage of body fat (%BF, fat mass (FM, and lean mass (LM. RESULTS: A positive effect of the physical activity program on body composition in the SG (p < 0.001 was observed, as well as on the interaction time x group in all the variables analyzed in both genders. A reduction in %BF (mean of differences = -5.58% and waist circumference (-2.33 cm, as well as an increase in LM (+2.05 kg were observed in the SG for both genders, whereas the opposite was observed in the CG. CONCLUSION: The practice of programmed physical activity promotes significant reduction of body fat in post-pubertal schoolchildren.

  8. Damage to the vestibular inner ear causes long-term changes in neuronal nitric oxide synthase expression in the rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Y; Horii, A; Appleton, I; Darlington, C L; Smith, P F

    2001-01-01

    The vestibular inner ear detects head acceleration and initiates compensatory eye movement and postural reflexes that help keep the visual image of the world stable on the retina, and maintain balance, during unexpected head movement. The most primitive vestibular systems are estimated to have evolved more than 500 million years ago and in mammalian and submammalian species the vestibular reflexes are mediated by basic brainstem pathways (see Wilson and Melvill Jones, 1979 for review). Although the contributions of the vestibular system to higher cognitive function have generally received less attention than its reflexive roles, vestibular sensory information is transmitted to higher centres in the brain and humans with vestibular damage are known to experience debilitating perceptual illusions (see Curthoys and Halmagyi, 1995; Berthoz, 1996 for reviews). Increasing behavioural and neurophysiological evidence suggests that the hippocampus uses information from the vestibular inner ear in order to build up maps of space that can be used in the development of spatial memory during learning tasks (McNaughton et al., 1991; Chapuis et al., 1992; Wiener and Berthoz, 1993; O'Mara et al., 1994; Wiener et al., 1995; Gavrilov et al., 1995; Stackman and Taube, 1996; Vitte et al., 1996; Taube et al., 1996; Save et al., 1998; Peruch et al., 1999; Cuthbert et al., 2000; Russell et al., 2000). However, to date, there has been no indication of the long-term neurochemical effects of the loss of vestibular input on hippocampal function. Since nitric oxide has been implicated in the mechanisms of hippocampal synaptic plasticity associated with the development of short-term memory (e.g. Schuman and Madison, 1991; Schuman et al., 1994; Arancio et al., 1996; Wu et al., 1997; Lu et al., 1999), we examined whether changes occur in the activity and expression of the enzymes responsible for nitric oxide production (nitric oxide synthases) in subregions of the rat hippocampus at different

  9. Morphofunctional Changes in the Thyroid Gland of Pubertal and Postpubertal Rats Exposed to Low Dose of DDT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaglova, N V; Sledneva, Yu P; Yaglov, V V

    2016-12-01

    Consumption of low dose DDT from birth until puberty suppressed functional activity of the thyroid gland in rats and leads to destructive changes in the organ during the postpubertal period with compensatory stimulation of secretory activity of thyrocytes aimed at normalization of thyroxin production.

  10. Hippocampus at 25

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenbaum, Howard; Amaral, David G.; Buffalo, Elizabeth A.; Buzsáki, György; Cohen, Neal; Davachi, Lila; Frank, Loren; Heckers, Stephan; Morris, Richard G. M.; Moser, Edvard I.; Nadel, Lynn; O'Keefe, John; Preston, Alison; Ranganath, Charan; Silva, Alcino; Witter, Menno

    2017-01-01

    The journal Hippocampus has passed the milestone of 25 years of publications on the topic of a highly studied brain structure, and its closely associated brain areas. In a recent celebration of this event, a Boston memory group invited 16 speakers to address the question of progress in understanding the hippocampus that has been achieved. Here we present a summary of these talks organized as progress on four main themes: (1) Understanding the hippocampus in terms of its interactions with multiple cortical areas within the medial temporal lobe memory system, (2) understanding the relationship between memory and spatial information processing functions of the hippocampal region, (3) understanding the role of temporal organization in spatial and memory processing by the hippocampus, and (4) understanding how the hippocampus integrates related events into networks of memories. PMID:27399159

  11. Disrupted-in-schizophrenia1 (DISC1) L100P mutation alters synaptic transmission and plasticity in the hippocampus and causes recognition memory deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Lin; Sun, Wei; Yu, Ming; Li, Nan; Guo, Li; Gu, Huating; Zhou, Yu

    2016-10-12

    Disrupted-in-schizophrenia 1(DISC1) is a promising candidate susceptibility gene for a spectrum of psychiatric illnesses that share cognitive impairments in common, including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and major depression. Here we report that DISC1 L100P homozygous mutant shows normal anxiety- and depression-like behavior, but impaired object recognition which is prevented by administration of atypical antipsychotic drug clozapine. Ca2+ image analysis reveals suppression of glutamate-evoked elevation of cytoplasmic [Ca2+] in L100P hippocampal slices. L100P mutant slices exhibit decreased excitatory synaptic transmission (sEPSCs and mEPSCs) in dentate gyrus (DG) and impaired long-term potentiation in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. L100P mutation does not alter proteins expression of the excitatory synaptic markers, PSD95 and synapsin-1; neither does it changes dendrites morphology of primary cultured hippocampal neurons. Our findings suggest that the existence of abnormal synaptic transmission and plasticity in hippocampal network may disrupt declarative information processing and contribute to recognition deficits in DISC1 L100P mutant mice.

  12. Paradoxical (REM) Sleep Deprivation Causes a Large and Rapidly Reversible Decrease in Long-Term Potentiation, Synaptic Transmission, Glutamate Receptor Protein Levels, and ERK/MAPK Activation in the Dorsal Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravassard, Pascal; Pachoud, Bastien; Comte, Jean-Christophe; Mejia-Perez, Camila; Scoté-Blachon, Céline; Gay, Nadine; Claustrat, Bruno; Touret, Monique; Luppi, Pierre-Hervé; Salin, Paul Antoine

    2009-01-01

    Study Objectives: It has been shown that wake (W) and slow wave sleep (SWS) modulate synaptic transmission in neocortical projections. However the impact of paradoxical sleep (PS) quantities on synaptic transmission remains unknown. We examined whether PS modulated the excitatory transmission and expression of glutamate receptor subtypes and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinases (p-ERK1/2). Design: PS deprivation (PSD) was carried out with the multiple platforms method on adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. LTP, late-LTP, and synaptic transmission were studied in the dorsal and ventral hippocampus of controls, 75-h PSD and 150-min PS rebound (PSR). GluR1 and NR1 protein and mRNA expression were evaluated by western blot and real-time PCR. P-ERK1/2 level was quantified by western blot and immunohistochemistry. Measurement and Results: PSD decreased synaptic transmission and LTP selectively in dorsal CA1 and PSR rescued these deficits. PSD-induced synaptic modifications in CA1 were associated with a decrease in GluR1, NR1, and p-ERK1/2 levels in dorsal CA1 without change in GluR1 and NR1 mRNA expression. Regression analysis shows that LTP is positively correlated with both PS quantities and SWS episodes duration, whereas synaptic transmission and late-LTP are positively correlated with PS quantities and negatively correlated with SWS quantities. Conclusions: These findings unveil previously unrecognized roles of PSD on synaptic transmission and LTP in the dorsal, but not in the ventral, hippocampus. The fact that the decrease in protein expression of GluR1 and NR1 was not associated with a change in mRNA expression of these receptors suggests that a sleep-induced modulation of translational mechanisms occurs in dorsal CA1. Citation: Ravassard P; Pachoud B; Comte JC; Mejia-Perez C; Scoté-Blachon C; Gay N; Claustrat B; Touret M; Luppi PH; Salin PA. Paradoxical (REM) sleep deprivation causes a large and rapidly reversible decrease in long-term potentiation

  13. Extremely low frequency electromagnetic field exposure causes cognitive impairment associated with alteration of the glutamate level, MAPK pathway activation and decreased CREB phosphorylation in mice hippocampus: reversal by procyanidins extracted from the lotus seedpod.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yuqing; Wang, Zhigao; Zhang, Haihui; He, Yuanqing; Fan, Rong; Cheng, Yanxiang; Sun, Guibo; Sun, Xiaobo

    2014-09-01

    Lotus seedpod procyanidins (LSPCs) could effectively prevent learning and memory damage and oxidative damage caused by extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF) exposure. However, LSPCs protect neurons from ELF-EMF-induced damage by mechanisms currently not clear. An excessive release of glutamate is considered to be one of the molecular mechanisms of neuronal damage in several neurological diseases. In this study we determined whether the ELF-EMF (50 Hz, 8 mT, 28 days) exposure induced alterations of glutamate release in mice hippocampus and explored the possible mechanism, and if LSPC treatment normalized its alterations. The results showed that ELF-EMF exposure induced the increased contents of glutamate, GABA, excessively activated NMDA receptors, increasing the number of NMDA receptor 2B (NR2B) and intracellular Ca(2+) concentration [Ca(2+)]i in hippocampus. In addition, ELF-EMF exposure decreased the ERK1/2 and CREB phosphorylation, which suggested that the Ca(2+) influx induced by the ELF-EMF exposure stimulated activity of the ERK, in turn, influences the expression of downstream proteins in this signaling pathway. Besides, ELF-EMF exposure also increased JNK1/2 phosphorylation through the activated ASK1, which plays a pivotal role in hippocampal neuronal cell death. However, oral administration of LSPCs (especially 60 and 90 mg kg(-1)) markedly improved expressions of p-CREB, p-ERK1/2 and p-JNK1/2, accompanied by decreased levels of glutamate, GABA, [Ca(2+)]i and NR2B. Thus, the results from the present study suggest that p-ERK1/2, p-JNK1/2, [Ca(2+)]i and p-CREB expression normalized, possibly via a NMDA receptor-channel through the changes of GABA, glutamate and NR2B, which might be responsible for the neuroprotective or memory enhancing effects of LSPCs.

  14. Sleep restriction suppresses neurogenesis induced by hippocampus-dependent learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hairston, Ilana S; Little, Milton T M; Scanlon, Michael D; Barakat, Monique T; Palmer, Theo D; Sapolsky, Robert M; Heller, H Craig

    2005-12-01

    Sleep deprivation impairs hippocampal-dependent learning, which, in turn, is associated with increased survival of newborn cells in the hippocampus. We tested whether the deleterious effects of sleep restriction on hippocampus-dependent memory were associated with reduced cell survival in the hippocampus. We show that sleep restriction impaired hippocampus-dependent learning and abolished learning-induced neurogenesis. Animals were trained in a water maze on either a spatial learning (hippocampus-dependent) task or a nonspatial (hippocampus-independent) task for 4 days. Sleep-restricted animals were kept awake for one-half of their rest phase on each of the training days. Consistent with previous reports, animals trained on the hippocampus-dependent task expressed increased survival of newborn cells in comparison with animals trained on the hippocampus-independent task. This increase was abolished by sleep restriction that caused overall reduced cell survival in all animals. Sleep restriction also selectively impaired spatial learning while performance in the nonspatial task was, surprisingly, improved. Further analysis showed that in both training groups fully rested animals applied a spatial strategy irrespective of task requirements; this strategy interfered with performance in the nonspatial task. Conversely, in sleep-restricted animals, this preferred spatial strategy was eliminated, favoring the use of nonspatial information, and hence improving performance in the nonspatial task. These findings suggest that sleep loss altered behavioral strategies to those that do not depend on the hippocampus, concomitantly reversing the neurogenic effects of hippocampus-dependent learning.

  15. Aging, stress and the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, D B; O'Callaghan, J P

    2005-05-01

    Functional loss often occurs in many body systems (e.g., endocrine, cognitive, motor) with the passage of years, but there is great individual variation in the degree of compromise shown. The current focus on brain aging will continue because demographic trends indicate that the average lifespan will show a continued increase. There is increasing emphasis on understanding how aging contributes to a decline in brain functions, cognition being a prime example. This is due in part to the fact that dementias and other losses in brain function that sometimes accompany aging cause an obvious decline in the quality of life and these deficits are of more concern as the number of elderly increase. Stress also is a ubiquitous aspect of life and there is now a greater interest in understanding the role of stress and the stress response in brain aging. The key role of the hippocampus and its related brain structures in cognition, as well as in the feedback control of the response to stress, have made this brain area a logical focus of investigation for those interested in the impact of stress on brain aging. Here, we describe how the hippocampus changes with age and we examine the idea that age-related changes in the secretion patterns of the hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis can contribute to aging of this structure. We also examine the proposal that stress, perhaps due to compromised HPA axis function, can contribute to hippocampal aging through exposure to excessive levels of glucocorticoids. The aging hippocampus does not appear to suffer a generalized loss of cells or synapses, although atrophy of the structure may occur in humans. Thus, age-related cognitive impairments are likely related to other neurobiological alterations that could include changes in the signaling, information encoding, plasticity, electrophysiological or neurochemical properties of neurons or glia. Although excessive levels of glucocorticoids are able to interfere with cognition, as well as

  16. Serotonin Receptors in Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berumen, Laura Cristina; Rodríguez, Angelina; Miledi, Ricardo; García-Alcocer, Guadalupe

    2012-01-01

    Serotonin is an ancient molecular signal and a recognized neurotransmitter brainwide distributed with particular presence in hippocampus. Almost all serotonin receptor subtypes are expressed in hippocampus, which implicates an intricate modulating system, considering that they can be localized as autosynaptic, presynaptic, and postsynaptic receptors, even colocalized within the same cell and being target of homo- and heterodimerization. Neurons and glia, including immune cells, integrate a functional network that uses several serotonin receptors to regulate their roles in this particular part of the limbic system. PMID:22629209

  17. Body trunk fat and insulin resistance in post-pubertal obese adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luana Caroline dos Santos

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Insulin resistance is a metabolic disorder commonly associated with excess body fat accumulation that may increase chronic disease risk. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the relationship between body composition and insulin resistance among obese adolescents. DESIGN AND SETTING: Cross-sectional study, at the Adolescence Center, Pediatric Department, Universidade Federal de São Paulo. METHODS: Body composition was assessed using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Dietary intake was evaluated using a three-day dietary record. The biochemical evaluation comprised glucose, insulin, serum lipid, leptin and ghrelin measurements. Insulin resistance was calculated by means of the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR. RESULTS: Forty-nine post-pubertal obese adolescents participated in the study: 12 boys and 37 girls of mean age 16.6 (1.4 years and mean body mass index (BMI of 35.0 (3.9 kg/m². The mean glucose, insulin and HOMA values were 90.3 (6.4 mg/dl, 16.6 (8.1 µIU/ml and 3.7 (1.9, respectively. Hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance were observed in 40.2% and 57.1% of the subjects, respectively. Adolescents with insulin resistance had higher BMI and body trunk fat. There was a trend towards higher leptin concentration in obese individuals with insulin resistance. Insulin resistance was positively correlated with body trunk fat, BMI, body fat mass (kg, leptin and body fat percentage. Furthermore, there was a negative correlation between HOMA-IR and lean body mass. The body composition predicted 30% of the HOMA-IR levels, according to linear regression models. CONCLUSION: Body trunk fat was significantly associated with insulin resistance, demonstrating the clinical importance of abdominal obesity during adolescence.

  18. Renal ischemia reperfusion causes brain hippocampus oxidative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The acute kidney injury (AKI) may do damage to remote organs. Objective of the study is to investigate effect of seaweed extract (SE) on brain oxidative damage in kidney ischemia/reperfusion rats. Material and Methods: Animals were randomly divided into five groups. SE pre-fed to rats. Results: Kidney I/R ...

  19. mtDNA copy number in oocytes of different sizes from individual pre- and post-pubertal pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Hanne Skovsgaard; Løvendahl, Peter; Larsen, Knud Erik

    2014-01-01

    individual donor was either high (≥100 000) or low (differences between pre- and post-pubertal oocytes. No differences were detected in mtDNA copy number using either of the two primers (Table 1). No linear correlation was detected between oocyte size and mtDNA copy number in pre...... Reproduction 131, 233–245). However, the correlation between size and mtDNA copy number in single oocytes has not been determined. This study describes the relation between oocytes of defined diameters from individual pre- and postpubertal pigs and mtDNA copy number. Cumulus-oocyte complexes were aspirated.......99–1.00) and amplification efficiencies (COX1, 91–104%; ND1, 84–92%). As inter-assay control, standard curves were compared using interaction with dates, showing no differences. mtDNA copy number between groups was compared by ANOVA after log-transformation of data. Relationship between oocyte size and mtDNA copy number...

  20. Traveling Theta Waves in the Human Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Honghui

    2015-01-01

    The hippocampal theta oscillation is strongly correlated with behaviors such as memory and spatial navigation, but we do not understand its specific functional role. One hint of theta's function came from the discovery in rodents that theta oscillations are traveling waves that allow parts of the hippocampus to simultaneously exhibit separate oscillatory phases. Because hippocampal theta oscillations in humans have different properties compared with rodents, we examined these signals directly using multielectrode recordings from neurosurgical patients. Our findings confirm that human hippocampal theta oscillations are traveling waves, but also show that these oscillations appear at a broader range of frequencies compared with rodents. Human traveling waves showed a distinctive pattern of spatial propagation such that there is a consistent phase spread across the hippocampus regardless of the oscillations' frequency. This suggests that traveling theta oscillations are important functionally in humans because they coordinate phase coding throughout the hippocampus in a consistent manner. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT We show for the first time in humans that hippocampal theta oscillations are traveling waves, moving along the length of the hippocampus in a posterior–anterior direction. The existence of these traveling theta waves is important for understanding hippocampal neural coding because they cause neurons at separate positions in the hippocampus to experience different theta phases simultaneously. The theta phase that a neuron measures is a key factor in how that cell represents behavioral information. Therefore, the existence of traveling theta waves indicates that, to fully understand how a hippocampal neuron represents information, it is vital to also account for that cell's location in addition to conventional measures of neural activity. PMID:26354915

  1. Different roles of prepubertal and postpubertal germ cells and Sertoli cells in the regulation of serum inhibin B levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, A M; Müller, J; Skakkebaek, N E

    1998-01-01

    undetectable or barely detectable (n=1) serum levels of inhibin B. In contrast to adults, prepubertal boys with SCO (n=12) all had measurable serum inhibin B levels that corresponded to our previously determined normal range in healthy prepubertal boys (n=114). However, in postpubertal samples from the same......To elucidate the role of germ cells in the regulation of inhibin B secretion, serum inhibin B levels in prepubertal boys and adult men whom had a concurrent testicular biopsy showing either normal or impaired testicular function were compared. In addition, by immunohistochemistry the cellular......-subunit. The correlation in adult men between serum inhibin B levels and spermatogenesis may be due to the fact that inhibin B in adult men is possibly a joint product of Sertoli cells and germ cells, including the stages from pachytene spermatocytes to early spermatids....

  2. Development capacity of pre- and postpubertal pig oocytes evaluated by somatic cell nuclear transfer and parthenogenetic activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovsgaard, Hanne; Li, Rong; Liu, Ying

    2013-01-01

    Most of the porcine oocytes used for in vitro studies are collected from gilts. Our aims were to study development capacity of gilt v. sow oocytes (pre- and postpubertal respectively) using 2 techniques illustrating development competence [parthenogenetic activation (PA) and somatic cell nuclear...... transfer (SCNT)], and to describe a simple method to select the most competent oocytes. Inside-ZP diameter of in vitro-matured gilt oocytes was measured (µm; small ≤110; medium >110; large ≥120). Gilt and sow oocytes were morphologically grouped as good (even cytoplasm, smooth cell membrane, visible...... for the development of good oocytes after PA. The results show a low CL% of small-gilts compared with the other groups. The BL% increased with gilt-oocyte-diameter; however, sow oocytes reached the highest BL%. Total cell number was higher in sow than in gilt blastocysts. The SCNT experiments showed no differences...

  3. Comparison of musculoskeletal anatomic relationships, determined by magnetic resonance imaging, in postpubertal female patients with and without classic bladder exstrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anusionwu, Ifeanyi; Tekes, Aylin; Stec, Andrew A.; Gearhart, John P.; Wright, E. James

    2012-01-01

    Objective To characterize pelvic musculoskeletal anatomy in postpubertal females with classic bladder exstrophy, and to compare this with females without bladder exstrophy. Patients and Methods The authors reviewed the medical records of all females in our institutional review board-approved bladder exstrophy database of 1078 patients and identified those with classic bladder exstrophy who underwent pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after the age of 12 years. Indications for MRI included haematuria, adnexal lesion, perineal fistula, non-pelvic cancer staging, abdominal wall hernia and vaginal stenosis. Age- and race-matched female patients without exstrophy who underwent MRI evaluation for similar indications were included for comparison. The MRI protocol included axial, sagittal and coronal T1- and/or T2-weighted imaging. Results The study included 30 patients with a median (range) age of 22.5 (12--55) years at time of MRI. Ten patients had bladder exstrophy while 20 control patients did not. A smaller percentage of levator ani was located in the anterior compartment of the pelvis in patients with bladder exstrophy compared with controls. The iliac wing angle, puborectalis angle, ileococcygeous angle, levator ani width, symphyseal diastasis, erectile body diastasis, posterior bladder neck distance and posterior anal distance was greater in patients with bladder exstrophy than in those without. The ischial angle and obturator internus angle were narrower in patients with bladder exstrophy than in those without, and there was no significant difference between levator ani surface area, sacral anal angle, sacral bladder neck angle and bladder neck erectile body distance between the two patient groups. Conclusions In postpubertal females with bladder exstrophy, significant deviations from normal pelvimetry exist, including posterior location of the majority of the levator ani muscle, a wider ileococcygeous angle and a wider symphyseal diastasis. These differences

  4. Prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, and basolateral amygdala plasticity in a rat model of autism spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa-Díaz, Nuvia; Bringas, Maria Elena; Atzori, Marco; Flores, Gonzalo

    2014-10-01

    We aimed to investigate the effect of prenatal administration of valproic acid (VPA) (500 mg/kg) at embryonic day 12.5 on the anatomical properties of the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, and basolateral amygdala, at three different ages: immediately after weaning (postnatal day 21 [PD21]), prepubertal (PD35), and postpubertal (PD70) ages in a rat model of autistic spectrum disorder. Quantitative analysis of the thickness of the prefrontal cortex revealed a reduced size at all study ages in the cingulate 1 area of the prefrontal cortex and CA1 of the dorsal hippocampus in prenatally exposed animals compared to controls. At the level of the basolateral amygdala, a reduction in the size was observed at PD35 and PD70 in the VPA group. In addition, a reduced thickness was observed in the prelimbic region of the prefrontal cortex in VPA animals at PD35. Interestingly, no differences in cortical thickness were observed between control and VPA animals in the infralimbic region of the prefrontal at any age. Our results suggest that prenatal exposure to VPA differentially alters cortical limbic regions anatomical parameters, with implication in the autistic spectrum disorder. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Nicotinic receptors, memory, and hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutlu, Munir Gunes; Gould, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) modulate the neurobiological processes underlying hippocampal learning and memory. In addition, nicotine's ability to desensitize and upregulate certain nAChRs may alter hippocampus-dependent memory processes. Numerous studies have examined the effects of nicotine on hippocampus-dependent learning, as well as the roles of low- and high-affinity nAChRs in mediating nicotine's effects on hippocampus-dependent learning and memory. These studies suggested that while acute nicotine generally acts as a cognitive enhancer for hippocampus-dependent learning, withdrawal from chronic nicotine results in deficits in hippocampus-dependent memory. Furthermore, these studies demonstrated that low- and high-affinity nAChRs functionally differ in their involvement in nicotine's effects on hippocampus-dependent learning. In the present chapter, we reviewed studies using systemic or local injections of acute or chronic nicotine, nAChR subunit agonists or antagonists; genetically modified mice; and molecular biological techniques to characterize the effects of nicotine on hippocampus-dependent learning.

  6. The hippocampus and visual perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy C. H. Lee

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we will discuss the idea that the hippocampus may be involved in both memory and perception, contrary to theories that posit functional and neuroanatomical segregation of these processes. This suggestion is based on a number of recent neuropsychological and functional neuroimaging studies that have demonstrated that the hippocampus is involved in the visual discrimination of complex spatial scene stimuli. We argue that these findings cannot be explained by long-term memory or working memory processing or, in the case of patient findings, dysfunction beyond the medial temporal lobe. Instead, these studies point towards a role for the hippocampus in higher-order spatial perception. We suggest that the hippocampus processes complex conjunctions of spatial features, and that it may be more appropriate to consider the representations for which this structure is critical, rather than the cognitive processes that it mediates.

  7. A quantitative transcriptome reference map of the normal human hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caracausi, Maria; Rigon, Vania; Piovesan, Allison; Strippoli, Pierluigi; Vitale, Lorenza; Pelleri, Maria Chiara

    2016-01-01

    We performed an innovative systematic meta-analysis of 41 gene expression profiles of normal human hippocampus to provide a quantitative transcriptome reference map of it, i.e. a reference typical value of expression for each of the 30,739 known mapped and the 16,258 uncharacterized (unmapped) transcripts. For this aim, we used the software called TRAM (Transcriptome Mapper), which is able to generate transcriptome maps based on gene expression data from multiple sources. We also analyzed differential expression by comparing the hippocampus with the whole brain transcriptome map to identify a typical expression pattern of this subregion compared with the whole organ. Finally, due to the fact that the hippocampus is one of the main brain region to be severely affected in trisomy 21 (the best known genetic cause of intellectual disability), a particular attention was paid to the expression of chromosome 21 (chr21) genes. Data were downloaded from microarray databases, processed, and analyzed using TRAM software. Among the main findings, the most over-expressed loci in the hippocampus are the expressed sequence tag cluster Hs.732685 and the member of the calmodulin gene family CALM2. The tubulin folding cofactor B (TBCB) gene is the best gene at behaving like a housekeeping gene. The hippocampus vs. the whole brain differential transcriptome map shows the over-expression of LINC00114, a long non-coding RNA mapped on chr21. The hippocampus transcriptome map was validated in vitro by assaying gene expression through several magnitude orders by "Real-Time" reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The highly significant agreement between in silico and experimental data suggested that our transcriptome map may be a useful quantitative reference benchmark for gene expression studies related to human hippocampus. Furthermore, our analysis yielded biological insights about those genes that have an intrinsic over-/under-expression in the hippocampus. © 2015

  8. Expression and localization of cysteine-rich secretory protein-3 (CRISP-3) in the prepubertal and postpubertal male horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorka, C E; Scoggin, K E; Squires, E L; Ball, B A; Troedsson, M H T

    2017-01-01

    The seminal plasma protein, cysteine-rich secretory protein-3 (CRISP-3), has been correlated with increased fertility and first-cycle conception rates, and has been suggested to be involved in the modulation of polymorphonuclear neutrophil and phagocytosis of spermatozoa during the inflammatory response to breeding in the horse. Previous research demonstrated that equine CRISP-3 is located in both the ampulla of the vas deferens and the seminal vesicles. However, this was done with nonquantitative laboratory techniques. In humans and rodents, CRISP-3 has been described as an androgen-dependent protein, but the effect of androgens on the expression of CRISP-3 has not been investigated in the horse. The objectives of this study were to (a) confirm and quantify the expression of CRISP-3 in the male equine reproductive tract, (b) describe the localization of CRISP-3 within the specific tissues which express it, and (c) determine if expression of CRISP-3 increases after puberty. We hypothesized that expression of CRISP-3 would be expressed in both the ampulla of the vas deferens and the seminal vesicles, and expression would increase after puberty. Tissues were collected postmortem from three prepubertal colts (3 years). Tissue samples were collected from the ampulla of vas deferens, seminal vesicles, bulbourethral gland, prostate gland, testis, as well as the cauda, corpus, and caput aspects of the epididymis. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry (IHC) were performed using an equine-specific CRISP-3 designed primer and monocolonal antibody. A mixed linear additive model was used to compare mRNA expression between age groups, and significance was set to P CRISP-3 mRNA was found primarily in the ampulla of vas deferens with lesser expression in the seminal vesicles. Expression of CRISP-3 was higher in the postpubertal stallion when compared with the prepubertal colt for the ampulla (P CRISP-3 is primarily located in the glandular

  9. CHANGES OF ZINC CONTAMINATION IN HIPPOCAMPUS CELLS OF ADRENALECTOMIZED RATS

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    Bondaruyk О.А.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Adrenalectomy causes the decline of zinc maintenance in the neurons of hippocampus and B cells of pancreas that has been observed in experiments on rats. The loss of zinc of these cells has been partly compensated by the injection of adrenalin and prednizolon to the adrenalectomized animals. The increase of zinc maintenance in these cells has been caused by the sharp-stress process due to the simultaneous physical activity and immobilization. The given data prove the participation of adrenal glands in the mechanism of zinc exchanges regulation in central (hippocampus and peripheral (cells B of pancreas zinc-containing organs of animals.

  10. Mechanically-induced osteogenesis in the cortical bone of pre- to peripubertal stage and peri- to postpubertal stage mice

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    Plochocki Jeffrey H

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exercise during postnatal development plays a key role in determining adult bone mass and reducing the risk of fracture and osteoporosis later in life. However, the relationship between mechanically-induced osteogenesis and age is unclear. Elevated levels of estrogen during puberty may inhibit periosteal bone formation. Thus, magnitudes of mechanically-induced osteogenesis may be vary with pubertal state. Methods The present study uses a murine model to examine age-related changes in bone formation at the femoral midshaft with voluntary exercise. Pre- to peripubertal mice aged 3 weeks and peri- to postpubertal mice aged 7 weeks were randomly divided into sedentary and exercised groups and subjected to histomorphometric comparison after 4 weeks of treatment. Results Results of the experiment indicate that exercise significantly increased osteogenesis on the periosteal and endocortical surface of the mice in the older age group (P P Conclusion These findings suggest that the amount and location of mechanically-induced osteogenesis differs by age during skeletal development. Late adolescence may be the optimal time to accrue bone mass and maximize bone strength.

  11. The bumps on the hippocampus

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    Gao, Yi; Ver Hoef, Lawrence

    2016-03-01

    The hippocampus has been the focus of more imaging research than any other subcortical structure in the human brain. However a feature that has been almost universally overlooked are the bumpy ridges on the inferior aspect of the hippocampus, which we refer to as hippocampal dentation. These bumps arise from folds in the CA1 layer of Ammon's horn. Similar to the folding of the cerebral cortex, hippocampal dentation allows for greater surface area in a confined space. However, while quantitative studies of radiologic brain images have been advancing for decades, examining numerous approaches to hippocampal segmentation and morphology analysis, virtually all published 3D renderings of the hippocampus show the under surface to be quite smooth or mildly irregular; we have rarely seen the characteristic bumpy structure in the reconstructed 3D scene, one exception being the 9.4T postmortem study. This is presumably due to the fact that, based on our experience with high resolution images, there is a dramatic degree of variability in hippocampal dentation between individuals from very smooth to highly dentated. An apparent question is, does this indicate that this specific morphological signature can only be captured using expensive ultra-high field techniques? Or, is such information buried in the data we commonly acquire, awaiting a computation technique that can extract and render it clearly? In this study, we propose a super-resolution technique that captures the fine scale morphometric features of the hippocampus based on common T1-weighted 3T MR images.

  12. Neural Representations of Location Outside the Hippocampus

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    Knierim, James J.

    2006-01-01

    Place cells of the rat hippocampus are a dominant model system for understanding the role of the hippocampus in learning and memory at the level of single-unit and neural ensemble responses. A complete understanding of the information processing and computations performed by the hippocampus requires detailed knowledge about the properties of the…

  13. Nutrient restriction induces failure of reproductive function and molecular changes in hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis in postpubertal gilts.

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    Zhou, Dongsheng; Zhuo, Yong; Che, Lianqiang; Lin, Yan; Fang, Zhengfeng; Wu, De

    2014-07-01

    People on a diet to lose weight may be at risk of reproductive failure. To investigate the effects of nutrient restriction on reproductive function and the underlying mechanism, changes of reproductive traits, hormone secretions and gene expressions in hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis were examined in postpubertal gilts at anestrus induced by nutrient restriction. Gilts having experienced two estrus cycles were fed a normal (CON, 2.86 kg/d) or nutrient restricted (NR, 1 kg/d) food regimens to expect anestrus. NR gilts experienced another three estrus cycles, but did not express estrus symptoms at the anticipated fourth estrus. Blood samples were collected at 5 days' interval for consecutive three times for measurement of hormone concentrations at the 23th day of the fourth estrus cycle. Individual progesterone concentrations of NR gilts from three consecutive blood samples were below 1.0 ng/mL versus 2.0 ng/mL in CON gilts, which was considered anestrus. NR gilts had impaired development of reproductive tract characterized by absence of large follicles (diameter ≥ 6 mm), decreased number of corepus lutea and atrophy of uterus and ovary tissues. Circulating concentrations of IGF-I, kisspeptin, estradiol, progesterone and leptin were significantly lower in NR gilts than that in CON gilts. Nutrient restriction down-regulated gene expressions of kiss-1, G-protein coupled protein 54, gonadotropin-releasing hormone, estrogen receptor α, progesterone receptor, leptin receptor, follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone and insulin-like growth factor I in hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis of gilts. Collectively, nutrient restriction resulted in impairment of reproductive function and changes of hormone secretions and gene expressions in hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis, which shed light on the underlying mechanism by which nutrient restriction influenced reproductive function.

  14. Chromosome Y variants from different inbred mouse strains are linked to differences in the morphologic and molecular responses of cardiac cells to postpubertal testosterone

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    Churchill Gary A

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have reported previously that when chromosome Y (chrY from the mouse strain C57BL/6J (ChrYC57 was substituted for that of A/J mice (ChrYA, cardiomyocytes from the resulting "chromosome substitution" C57BL/6J-chrYA strain were smaller than that of their C57BL/6J counterparts. In reverse, when chrYA from A/J mice was substituted for that of chrYC57, cardiomyocytes from the resulting A/J-chrYC57 strain were larger than in their A/J counterparts. We further used these strains to test whether: 1 the origin of chrY could also be linked to differences in the profile of gene expression in the hearts of adult male mice, and 2 post-pubertal testosterone could play a role in the differential morphologic and/or molecular effects of chrYC57 and chrYA. Results The increased size of cardiomyocytes from adult male C57BL/6J mice compared to C57BL/6J-chrYA resulted from the absence of hypertrophic effects of post-pubertal testosterone on cells from the latter strain. However, gene profiling revealed that the latter effect could not be explained on the basis of an insensitivity of cells from C57BL/6J-chrYA to androgens, since even more cardiac genes were affected by post-pubertal testosterone in C57BL/6J-chrYA hearts than in C57BL/6J. By testing for interaction between the effects of surgery and strain, we identified 249 "interaction genes" whose expression was affected by post-pubertal testosterone differentially according to the genetic origin of chrY. These interaction genes were found to be enriched within a limited number of signaling pathways, including: 1 p53 signaling, which comprises the interacting genes Ccnd1, Pten and Cdkn1a that are also potential co-regulators of the androgen receptors, and 2 circadian rhythm, which comprises Arntl/Bmal1, which may in turn regulate cell growth via the control of Cdkn1a. Conclusion Although post-pubertal testosterone increased the size of cardiomyocytes from male C56BL/6J mice but not that from

  15. Reactions to First Postpubertal Male Same-Sex Sexual Experience in the Kinsey Sample: A Comparison of Minors With Peers, Minors With Adults, and Adults With Adults.

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    Rind, Bruce; Welter, Max

    2016-10-01

    Rind and Welter (2014) examined first postpubertal coitus using the Kinsey sample, finding that reactions were just as positive, and no more negative, among minors with adults compared to minors with peers and adults with adults. In the present study, we examined first postpubertal male same-sex sexual experiences in the Kinsey same-sex sample (i.e., participants mostly with extensive postpubertal same-sex behavior), comparing reactions across the same age categories. These data were collected between 1938 and 1961 (M year: 1946). Minors under age 18 years with adults (M ages: 14.0 and 30.5, respectively) reacted positively (i.e., enjoyed the experience "much") often (70 %) and emotionally negatively (e.g., fear, disgust, shame, regret) infrequently (16 %). These rates were the same as adults with adults (M ages: 21.2 and 25.9, respectively): 68 and 16 %, respectively. Minors with peers (M ages: 13.3 and 13.8, respectively) reacted positively significantly more often (82 %) and negatively nominally less often (9 %). Minors with adults reacted positively to intercourse (oral, anal) just as often (69 %) as to outercourse (body contact, masturbation, femoral) (72 %) and reacted emotionally negatively significantly less often (9 vs. 25 %, respectively). For younger minors (≤14) with adults aged 5-19 years older, reactions were just as positive (83 %) as for minors with peers within 1 year of age (84 %) and no more emotionally negative (11 vs. 7 %, respectively). Results are discussed in relation to findings regarding first coitus in the Kinsey sample and to the cultural context particular to Kinsey's time.

  16. Surgical anatomy of the hippocampus.

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    Destrieux, C; Bourry, D; Velut, S

    2013-01-01

    Hippocampectomy is an efficient procedure for medial temporal lobe epilepsy. Nevertheless, hippocampus anatomy is complex, due to a deep location, and a complex structure. In this didactic paper, we propose a description of the hippocampus that should help neurosurgeons to feel at ease in this region. Embryological data was obtained from the literature, whereas adult anatomy was described after dissecting 8 human hemispheres (with and without vascular injection) and slicing 3 additional ones. The hippocampus is C-shaped and made of 2 rolled-up laminae, the cornu Ammonis and the gyrus dentatus. Its ventricular aspect is covered by the choroid plexus of the inferior horn excepted at the head level. Its cisternal aspect faces the mesencephalon from which it is limited by the transverse fissure. Its rostral part (head) curves dorso-caudally to form the uncus, located at the medial aspect of the temporal lobe. Its caudal part (tail) splits into the fimbria and the gyrus fasciolaris that respectively run ventral and dorsal to the corpus callosum, to become the fornix and indusium griseum. Consequences of this complex anatomy are presented, and the authors stress the need for a subpial resection. Important landmarks are provided to avoid lesions of the surrounding structures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Candidate gene expression in Bos indicus ovarian tissues: pre-pubertal and post-pubertal heifers in diestrus

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    Mayara Morena Del Cambre Amaral Weller

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Growth factors such as bone morphogenetic proteins 6, 7, 15 and two isoforms of transforming growth factor-beta (BMP6, BMP7, BMP15, TGFB1 and TGFB2 and insulin-like growth factor system act as local regulators of ovarian follicular development. To elucidate if these factors as well as others candidate genes such as estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1, growth differentiation factor 9 (GDF9, follicle stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR, luteinizing hormone receptor (LHR, bone morphogenetic protein receptor, type 2 (BMPR2, type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGFR1, and key steroidogenic enzymes cytochrome P450 aromatase and 3-β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (CYP19A1 and HSD3B1 could modulate or influence diestrus on the onset of puberty in Brahman heifers, their ovarian mRNA expression was measured before and after puberty (luteal phase. Six post-pubertal (POST heifers were euthanized on the luteal phase of their second cycle, confirmed by corpus luteum observation, and six pre-pubertal (PRE heifers were euthanized in the same day. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed that the expression of FSHR, BMP7, CYP19A1, IGF1 and IGFR1 mRNA was greater in PRE heifers, when contrasted to POST heifers. The expression of LHR and HSD3B1 was lower in PRE heifers. Differential expression of ovarian genes could be associated with changes in follicular dynamics and different cell populations that have emerged as consequence of puberty and the luteal phase. The emerging hypothesis is that BMP7 and IGF1 are co-expressed and may modulate the expression of FSHR, LHR and IGFR1 and CYP19A1. BMP7 could influence the down-regulation of LHR and up-regulation of FSHR and CYP19A1, which mediates the follicular dynamics in heifer ovaries. Up-regulation of IGF1 expression pre-puberty, compared to post-puberty diestrus, correlates with increased levels FSHR and CYP19A1. Thus, BMP7 and IGF1 may play synergic roles and were predicted to interact, from the expression data (P = 0

  18. Dorsal hippocampus is necessary for novel learning but sufficient for subsequent similar learning.

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    Wang, Szu-Han; Finnie, Peter S B; Hardt, Oliver; Nader, Karim

    2012-11-01

    Our current understanding of brain mechanisms involved in learning and memory has been derived largely from studies using experimentally naïve animals. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that not all identified mechanisms may generalize to subsequent learning. For example, N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate (NMDA) receptors in the dorsal hippocampus are required for contextual fear conditioning in naïve animals but not in animals previously trained in a similar task. Here we investigated how animals learn contextual fear conditioning for a second time-a response which is not due to habituation or generalization. We found that dorsal hippocampus infusions of voltage-dependent calcium channel blockers or the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) agonist impaired the first, not the second contextual learning. Only manipulations of the entire hippocampus led to an impairment in second learning. Specifically, inactivation of either the dorsal or ventral hippocampus caused the remaining portion of the hippocampus to acquire and consolidate the second learning. Thus, dorsal hippocampus seems necessary for initial contextual fear conditioning, but either the dorsal or ventral hippocampus is sufficient for subsequent conditioning in a different context. Together, these findings suggest that prior training experiences can change how the hippocampus processes subsequent similar learning. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. The role of the avian hippocampus in spatial memory

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    Euan M. Macphail

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Avian hippocampal function is surveyed, using data drawn from three areas: conventional laboratory paradigms, pigeon navigation, and food-storing. Damage to the avian hippocampus disrupts performance in laboratory tasks that tap spatial learning and memory, and also disrupts both pigeon homing and cache recovery by food-storing birds. Further evidence of hippocampal involvement in food-storing is provided by the fact that the hippocampus of food-storing birds is selectively enlarged. These findings lend support to the notion that the hippocampus plays a critical role in spatial learning and memory. However, avian hippocampal lesions (like mammalian hippocampal lesions also disrupt certain laboratory tasks that do not have an overt spatial component. Moreover, analysis of the effects of hippocampal lesions on navigation find, first, that basic navigational processes are left intact, and second, that at least some of the disruption of homing may be caused by disruption of the associability of information derived from the sun compass - a non-spatial deficit. Finally, attempts to demonstrate that the enlarged hippocampus of food-storing birds is associated with enhanced spatial memory have failed to deliver conclusive support. The extensive parallels between effects of hippocampal lesions in birds and mammals suggest that both the spatial and the non-spatial deficits form part of a single syndrome, one that cannot readily be explained in terms of disruption of specifically spatial processes.

  20. Resistance exercise improves hippocampus-dependent memory

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    R.C. Cassilhas

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available It has been demonstrated that resistance exercise improves cognitive functions in humans. Thus, an animal model that mimics this phenomenon can be an important tool for studying the underlying neurophysiological mechanisms. Here, we tested if an animal model for resistance exercise was able to improve the performance in a hippocampus-dependent memory task. In addition, we also evaluated the level of insulin-like growth factor 1/insulin growth factor receptor (IGF-1/IGF-1R, which plays pleiotropic roles in the nervous system. Adult male Wistar rats were divided into three groups (N = 10 for each group: control, SHAM, and resistance exercise (RES. The RES group was submitted to 8 weeks of progressive resistance exercise in a vertical ladder apparatus, while the SHAM group was left in the same apparatus without exercising. Analysis of a cross-sectional area of the flexor digitorum longus muscle indicated that this training period was sufficient to cause muscle fiber hypertrophy. In a step-through passive avoidance task (PA, the RES group presented a longer latency than the other groups on the test day. We also observed an increase of 43 and 94% for systemic and hippocampal IGF-1 concentration, respectively, in the RES group compared to the others. A positive correlation was established between PA performance and systemic IGF-1 (r = 0.46, P < 0.05. Taken together, our data indicate that resistance exercise improves the hippocampus-dependent memory task with a concomitant increase of IGF-1 level in the rat model. This model can be further explored to better understand the effects of resistance exercise on brain functions.

  1. Mnemonic convergence in the human hippocampus.

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    Backus, Alexander R; Bosch, Sander E; Ekman, Matthias; Grabovetsky, Alejandro Vicente; Doeller, Christian F

    2016-06-21

    The ability to form associations between a multitude of events is the hallmark of episodic memory. Computational models have espoused the importance of the hippocampus as convergence zone, binding different aspects of an episode into a coherent representation, by integrating information from multiple brain regions. However, evidence for this long-held hypothesis is limited, since previous work has largely focused on representational and network properties of the hippocampus in isolation. Here we identify the hippocampus as mnemonic convergence zone, using a combination of multivariate pattern and graph-theoretical network analyses of functional magnetic resonance imaging data from humans performing an associative memory task. We observe overlap of conjunctive coding and hub-like network attributes in the hippocampus. These results provide evidence for mnemonic convergence in the hippocampus, underlying the integration of distributed information into episodic memory representations.

  2. Reactions to First Postpubertal Female Same-Sex Sexual Experience in the Kinsey Sample: A Comparison of Minors with Peers, Minors with Adults, and Adults with Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rind, Bruce

    2017-07-01

    This study examined reactions to first postpubertal same-sex sexual experience in the Kinsey female same-sex sample (consisting of females with extensive postpubertal same-sex experience) as a function of participant and partner ages. As such, it complemented the Rind and Welter (2016) study, which examined the same in the Kinsey male same-sex sample. Data were collected by Kinsey interviewers between 1939 and 1961 (M year = 1947). Girls under 18 (M age = 14.9), whose sexual experience was with a woman (M age = 26.3), reacted positively just as often as girls under 18 (M age = 14.1) with peers (M age = 15.0) and women (M age = 22.7) with women (M age = 26.3). The positive-reaction rates were, respectively, 85, 82, and 79 %. In a finer-graded analysis, younger adolescent girls (≤14) (M age = 12.8) with women (M age = 27.4) had a high positive-reaction rate (91 %), a rate reached by no other group. For women (M age = 22.2) with same-aged peers (M age = 22.3), this rate was 86 %. Girls with peers or women had no emotionally negative reactions (e.g., fear, disgust, shame, regret); women with women rarely did. Results contradicted prevailing clinical, legal, and lay beliefs that minor-adult sex is inherently traumatic and would be distinguished as such compared to age-concordant sex. The findings are discussed in terms of the time period in which the sexual experiences occurred.

  3. Neurogenic Effects of Ghrelin on the Hippocampus.

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    Kim, Chanyang; Kim, Sehee; Park, Seungjoon

    2017-03-08

    Mammalian neurogenesis continues throughout adulthood in the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricle and in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus in the hippocampus. It is well known that hippocampal neurogenesis is essential in mediating hippocampus-dependent learning and memory. Ghrelin, a peptide hormone mainly synthesized in the stomach, has been shown to play a major role in the regulation of energy metabolism. A plethora of evidence indicates that ghrelin can also exert important effects on neurogenesis in the hippocampus of the adult brain. The aim of this review is to discuss the current role of ghrelin on the in vivo and in vitro regulation of neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus. We will also discuss the possible role of ghrelin in dietary restriction-induced hippocampal neurogenesis and the link between ghrelin-induced hippocampal neurogenesis and cognitive functions.

  4. Influence of prenatal noise and music on the spatial memory and neurogenesis in the hippocampus of developing rats.

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    Kim, Hong; Lee, Myoung-Hwa; Chang, Hyun-Kyung; Lee, Taeck-Hyun; Lee, Hee-Hyuk; Shin, Min-Chul; Shin, Mal-Soon; Won, Ran; Shin, Hye-Sook; Kim, Chang-Ju

    2006-03-01

    During the prenatal period, the development of individual is influenced by the environmental factors. In the present study, the influence of prenatal noise and music on the spatial memory and neurogenesis in the hippocampus of developing rats was investigated. The exposure to the noise during pregnancy caused growth retardation, decreased neurogenesis in the hippocampus, and impaired spatial learning ability in pups. The exposure to music during pregnancy, on the other hand, caused increased neurogenesis in the hippocampus and enhanced spatial learning ability in pups. The present study has shown the importance of the prenatal environmental conditions for the cognition and brain development.

  5. Hippocampus segmentation using locally weighted prior based level set

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    Achuthan, Anusha; Rajeswari, Mandava

    2015-12-01

    Segmentation of hippocampus in the brain is one of a major challenge in medical image segmentation due to its' imaging characteristics, with almost similar intensity between another adjacent gray matter structure, such as amygdala. The intensity similarity has causes the hippocampus to have weak or fuzzy boundaries. With this main challenge being demonstrated by hippocampus, a segmentation method that relies on image information alone may not produce accurate segmentation results. Therefore, it is needed an assimilation of prior information such as shape and spatial information into existing segmentation method to produce the expected segmentation. Previous studies has widely integrated prior information into segmentation methods. However, the prior information has been utilized through a global manner integration, and this does not reflect the real scenario during clinical delineation. Therefore, in this paper, a locally integrated prior information into a level set model is presented. This work utilizes a mean shape model to provide automatic initialization for level set evolution, and has been integrated as prior information into the level set model. The local integration of edge based information and prior information has been implemented through an edge weighting map that decides at voxel level which information need to be observed during a level set evolution. The edge weighting map shows which corresponding voxels having sufficient edge information. Experiments shows that the proposed integration of prior information locally into a conventional edge-based level set model, known as geodesic active contour has shown improvement of 9% in averaged Dice coefficient.

  6. Chewing Maintains Hippocampus-Dependent Cognitive Function

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    Chen, Huayue; Iinuma, Mitsuo; Onozuka, Minoru; Kubo, Kin-Ya

    2015-01-01

    Mastication (chewing) is important not only for food intake, but also for preserving and promoting the general health. Recent studies have showed that mastication helps to maintain cognitive functions in the hippocampus, a central nervous system region vital for spatial memory and learning. The purpose of this paper is to review the recent progress of the association between mastication and the hippocampus-dependent cognitive function. There are multiple neural circuits connecting the masticatory organs and the hippocampus. Both animal and human studies indicated that cognitive functioning is influenced by mastication. Masticatory dysfunction is associated with the hippocampal morphological impairments and the hippocampus-dependent spatial memory deficits, especially in elderly. Mastication is an effective behavior for maintaining the hippocampus-dependent cognitive performance, which deteriorates with aging. Therefore, chewing may represent a useful approach in preserving and promoting the hippocampus-dependent cognitive function in older people. We also discussed several possible mechanisms involved in the interaction between mastication and the hippocampal neurogenesis and the future directions for this unique fascinating research. PMID:26078711

  7. The Role of Hippocampus in the Pathophysiology of Depression

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    Özlem Donat Eker

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Hippocampus, as a part of the limbic cortex, has a variety of functions ranging from mating behavior to memory besides its role in the regulation of emotions. The hippocampus has reciprocal interactions of with other brain regions which act in the pathophysiology of major depressive disorder (MDD. Moreover, since the hippocampus is a scene for the neurogenesis, which can be seen as a response to antidepressant treatment, the hippocampus became a focus of attention in neuroimaging studies of MDD. It has been shown that brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, that is responsible from the neurogenesis, is associated with the response to the antidepressants and antidepressant drugs are ineffective if neurogenesis is hindered.Hippocampal atrophy is expected with the decrease of neurogenesis as a result of the lower BDNF levels with the deleterious effects of glucocorticoids in depression. Recurrent and severe depression seems to cause such a volume reduction though first episode MDD subjects do not differ from healthy individuals in respect to their hippocampal volumes (HCVs measured by magnetic resonance imaging methods. One may argue regarding these findings that the atrophy in the hippocampus may be observed in the long term and the decrease in BDNF levels may predispose the volume reduction. Although it has been postulated that smaller HCV as a result of genetic and environmental factors and prior to the illness, may cause a vulnerability to MDD, sufficient evidence has not been accumulated yet and the view that HCV loss develops as depression progresses is widely accepted. Findings that serum BDNF (sBDNF is lower in MDD patients though HCVs of patients do not differ from healthy individuals and the positive correlation of sBDNF with HCV seen only in the patient group support this view. It can be assumed that depressed patients have sensitivity for the fluctuations in BDNF levels. Follow-up studies which consider effects of hipotalamo

  8. Effect of prepubertal and postpubertal growth and age at first calving on production and reproduction traits during the first 3 lactations in Holstein dairy cattle.

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    Krpálková, L; Cabrera, V E; Vacek, M; Stípková, M; Stádník, L; Crump, P

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of body condition score (BCS), body weight (BW), average daily weight gain (ADG), and age at first calving (AFC) of Holstein heifers on production and reproduction parameters in the 3 subsequent lactations. The data set consisted of 780 Holstein heifers calved at 2 dairy farms in the Czech Republic from 2007 to 2011. Their BW and BCS were measured at monthly intervals during the rearing period (5 to 18 mo of age), and the milk production and reproduction data of the first 3 lactations were collected over an 8-yr period (2005 to 2012). The highest milk yield in the first lactation was found in the group with medium ADG (5 to 14 mo of age; 0.949 to 0.850 kg of ADG). The highest average milk yield over lifetime performance was detected in heifers with the highest total ADG (≥ 0.950 kg/d). The difference in milk yield between the evaluated groups of highest ADG (in total and postpubertal growth ≥ 0.950 kg/d and in prepubertal growth ≥ 0.970 kg/d) and the lowest ADG (≤ 0.849 kg/d) was approximately 1,000 kg/305 d per cow. The highest milk yield in the first lactation was found in the group with the highest AFC ≥ 751 d, for which fat and protein content in the milk was not reduced. Postpubertal growth (11 to 14 mo of age) had the greatest effect on AFC. The group with lowest AFC ≤ 699 d showed a negative effect on milk yield but only in the first 100 d of the first parity. The highest ADG was detrimental to reproduction parameters in the first lactation. The highest BW at 14 mo (≥ 420 kg) led to lower AFC. Groups according to BCS at 14 mo showed no differences in AFC or milk yield in the first lactation or lifetime average production per lactation. We concluded that low AFC ≤ 699 d did not show a negative effect on subsequent production and reproduction parameters. Therefore, a shorter rearing period is recommended for dairy herds with suitable management. Copyright © 2014 American Dairy Science

  9. The Triglyceride to HDL Ratio and Its Relationship to Insulin Resistance in Pre- and Postpubertal Children: Observation from the Wausau SCHOOL Project

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    Karen Olson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance (IR is a risk factor for ischemic heart disease and diabetes and raises the triglyceride/high-density lipoprotein (TG/HDL ratio in adults, but is not well defined in children. Purpose. To investigate the TG/HDL ratios in children as an IR marker. Methods. Wausau SCHOOL Project assessed 99 prepubertal and 118 postpubertal children. The TG/HDL ratio was correlated with numerous risk factors. Results. TG/HDL ratio was significantly correlated with QUICKI, HOMA-IR, zBMI, waist-to hip ratio, systolic and diastolic BP, LDL size and LDL number. A group of 32 IR children (HOMA-IR > 1 SD from the mean, i.e., >2.45 had significantly higher TG/HDL (3.11 ± 1.77 compared to non-IR children (1.86 ± 0.75. A TG/HDL ratio of ≥2.0 identified 32 of the 40 children deemed IR by HOMA-IR (>2.45 with a sensitivity of 0.80 and a specificity of 0.66. Children with TG/HDL ratio ≥3 were heavier and had higher BP, glucose, HOMA-IR, LDL number, and lower HDL level, QUICKI, and LDL size, regardless of pubertal status. Conclusion. The TG/HDL ratio is strongly associated with IR in children, and with higher BMI, waist hip ratio, BP, and more athrogenic lipid profile.

  10. Neonatal administration of N-omega-nitro-L-arginine induces permanent decrease in NO levels and hyperresponsiveness to locomotor activity by D-amphetamine in postpubertal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Medina, Julio César; Mejorada, Alejandro; Romero-Curiel, Alejandra; Aguilar-Alonso, Patricia; León-Chávez, Bertha Alicia; Gamboa, Citlalli; Quirion, Remi; Flores, Gonzalo

    2008-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is associated with dopamine (DA) release. Previously, we demonstrated that rats treated with a non-selective nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, N-omega-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA) at postnatal days 4-6 (PD4-6) show increased locomotion and disrupt neuronal cytoarchitecture after puberty (PD60). Here, we investigate whether the modulation of NO production in rats at PD4-6 causes long term changes of NO system, its impact on DA innervation, and schizophrenia-like behaviors. NO levels were measured in seven brain areas at PD35, PD60, PD90, and PD120. Autoradiographic studies explored the effect of l-NNA on the expression of D1 and D2 receptors in the caudate-putamen (CPu) and nucleus accumbens (NAcc) at PD60. Locomotor activity was assessed at PD60 using the non-selective DA agonists, amphetamine and apomorphine, and the selective DA receptor agonist [D2, quinpirole; D3, 7-hydroxy-N,N-di-n-propylaminotetralin ((+/-)-7-OH-DPAT)]. L-NNA treatment produced decreases in NO levels in the frontal cortex, striatum, brainstem and cerebellum, while in the occipital cortex changes were observed at PD120. Hippocampus and temporoparietal cortex showed differential levels of NO. Receptor autoradiography revealed increases in D1 receptor levels in the NAcc (shell), while decreases in D2 receptor binding were observed in the CPu and NAcc (core). Amphetamine and quinpirole treatments resulted in increases in locomotion. In contrast, treatment with 7-OH-DPAT produced hypolocomotion at low doses, while increased locomotion was seen at the highest dose. These results show that modulation of NO levels early postnatally (PD4-6) produces long term alteration in NO levels, with possible consequences on DA transmission, and related behaviors relevant to schizophrenia.

  11. Andrographolide Stimulates Neurogenesis in the Adult Hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Varela-Nallar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Andrographolide (ANDRO is a labdane diterpenoid component of Andrographis paniculata widely used for its anti-inflammatory properties. We have recently determined that ANDRO is a competitive inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β, a key enzyme of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling cascade. Since this signaling pathway regulates neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus, we evaluated whether ANDRO stimulates this process. Treatment with ANDRO increased neural progenitor cell proliferation and the number of immature neurons in the hippocampus of 2- and 10-month-old mice compared to age-matched control mice. Moreover, ANDRO stimulated neurogenesis increasing the number of newborn dentate granule neurons. Also, the effect of ANDRO was evaluated in the APPswe/PS1ΔE9 transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease. In these mice, ANDRO increased cell proliferation and the density of immature neurons in the dentate gyrus. Concomitantly with the increase in neurogenesis, ANDRO induced the activation of the Wnt signaling pathway in the hippocampus of wild-type and APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mice determined by increased levels of β-catenin, the inactive form of GSK-3β, and NeuroD1, a Wnt target gene involved in neurogenesis. Our findings indicate that ANDRO stimulates neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus suggesting that this drug could be used as a therapy in diseases in which neurogenesis is affected.

  12. Coordinating different representations in the hippocampus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kelemen, Eduard; Fenton, A.A.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 129, Mar 2016 (2016), s. 50-59 ISSN 1074-7427 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-03627S Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : dynamic functional grouping * multiple representations * cognitive control * hippocampus * overdispersion Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.543, year: 2016

  13. Mind-body problem and hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrendt, Ralf-Peter

    2017-09-01

    Commentary on Faw's comprehensive response to a previous commentary ('Hippocampus as a wormhole' by Ralf-Peter Behrendt, doi: 10.1002/wcs.1446) on Faw and Faw's paper (doi: 10.1002/wcs.1412). WIREs Cogn Sci 2017, e1447. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1447. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Mnemonic convergence in the human hippocampus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Backus, A.R.; Bosch, S.E.; Ekman, M.; Vicente-Grabovetsky, A.; Doeller, C.F.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to form associations between a multitude of events is the hallmark of episodic memory. Computational models have espoused the importance of the hippocampus as convergence zone, binding different aspects of an episode into a coherent representation, by integrating information from

  15. Endogenous synthesis of corticosteroids in the hippocampus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimpei Higo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Brain synthesis of steroids including sex-steroids is attracting much attention. The endogenous synthesis of corticosteroids in the hippocampus, however, has been doubted because of the inability to detect deoxycorticosterone (DOC synthase, cytochrome P450(c21. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The expression of P450(c21 was demonstrated using mRNA analysis and immmunogold electron microscopic analysis in the adult male rat hippocampus. DOC production from progesterone (PROG was demonstrated by metabolism analysis of (3H-steroids. All the enzymes required for corticosteroid synthesis including P450(c21, P450(2D4, P450(11β1 and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD were localized in the hippocampal principal neurons as shown via in situ hybridization and immunoelectron microscopic analysis. Accurate corticosteroid concentrations in rat hippocampus were determined by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. In adrenalectomized rats, net hippocampus-synthesized corticosterone (CORT and DOC were determined to 6.9 and 5.8 nM, respectively. Enhanced spinogenesis was observed in the hippocampus following application of low nanomolar (10 nM doses of CORT for 1 h. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results imply the complete pathway of corticosteroid synthesis of 'pregnenolone →PROG→DOC→CORT' in the hippocampal neurons. Both P450(c21 and P450(2D4 can catalyze conversion of PROG to DOC. The low nanomolar level of CORT synthesized in hippocampal neurons may play a role in modulation of synaptic plasticity, in contrast to the stress effects by micromolar CORT from adrenal glands.

  16. Expression of somatostatin mRNA and peptide in rat hippocampus after cerebral ischemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bering, Robert; Johansen, Flemming Fryd

    1993-01-01

    Somatostatin, ischemia, hippocampus, rat, in situ hybridisation, immunocytochemistry, neuropathology......Somatostatin, ischemia, hippocampus, rat, in situ hybridisation, immunocytochemistry, neuropathology...

  17. US findings in uncomplicated and complicated postpubertal mumps; L'ecografia nella diagnosi della parotite epidermica post-puberale e delle sue complicanze

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarantino, L.; Giorgio, A.; De Stefano, G.; Farella, N. [Azienda Ospedaliera D. Cotugno, Naples (Italy). Servizio di Ecografia ed Ecointerventistica

    2000-06-01

    The main purpose of this work is to to assess the yield of US in the study of salivary glands and other organs involved in post-pubertal mumps. 68 patients with serologically prove post-pubertal mums (age range 14-34 years) were examined. All patients were symptomatic, with fever and salivary gland swelling in 25 cases, marked hyperamylasemia in 32, epigastric pain in 9, unilateral scrotal swelling and/or pain in 19 cases and acute bronchitis in 1 case. All patients underwent US of salivary glands, neck lymph nodes, abdomen and scrotum with 48 hours of admission. Salivary glands: Parotid and submandibular glands showed normal echotexture in all patients. The parotid glands also showed multiple hypoechoic intraparenchymal lymph nodes which were, ovoid or rounded, with smooth margins and a central hyper echoic area, with diameter ranging 3-14 mm (mean 5,4). No intraparenchymal lymph nodes were observed in submandibular glands were observed in submandibular glands. Neck: All patients had enlarged submandibular lymph nodes (maximum diameter ranging 5-22 mm; mean 11 mm); swelling was always bilateral and it was symmetric in 19/68 patients (30%) versus asymmetric because of prevailing right side involvement (more numerous and bigger nodes) in the other 47/68 cases (70%). All lymph nodes showed a benign pattern, with an ovoid or elongated shape, homogeneous hypoechoic echotexture and a hyper echoic hilum. Abdomen: The pancreas shoed normal volume and normal parenchymal echotexture in all patients. Liver and spleen were always normal. Testes: US showed mild unilateral hydrocele in 10 cases, hydrocele and unilateral swelling of epidymis in 5 cases, hydrocele and swelling of epidymis in 5 cases, hydrocele and swelling of both epidymis and didymis with inhomogeneous echotexture because of intraparenchymal hypoechoic areas in 2 cases. There were no US changes in 2 cases. US of the salivary glands shows a specific pattern in post-pubertal mumps which has never been reported for

  18. First Postpubertal Male Same-Sex Sexual Experience in the National Health and Social Life Survey: Current Functioning in Relation to Age at Time of Experience and Partner Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rind, Bruce

    2017-07-17

    This study used an important data set to examine long-term adjustment and functioning in men, who as adolescents had sexual experiences with men. The data came from the National Health and Social Life Survey, which used a national probability sample (Laumann, Gagnon, Michael, & Michaels, 1994). Three perspectives were considered, which offered different predictions. From the "child sexual abuse" (CSA) paradigm, which dominates clinical, legal, and lay views, expected was robust evidence for poorer adjustment, given that intense harm is assumed to be intrinsic. From the "mainstream psychological" perspective, derived from the CSA paradigm but more scientifically based, poorer adjustment was also expected, but with less magnitude, given that minor-adult sex is seen as posing a serious risk of harm, which may not universally apply. From the "relevant-empirical" perspective, which infers response to male adolescent-adult same-sex sex from relevant prior empirical research (as opposed to clinical cases or the female experience), expected was little or no evidence for poorer adjustment. Results supported the relevant-empirical perspective. Compared to several control groups (i.e., men whose first postpubertal same-sex sex was as men with other men; men with no postpubertal same-sex sexual experience or child-adult sex), men whose first postpubertal same-sex sex was as adolescents with men were just as well adjusted in terms of health, happiness, sexual functioning, and educational and career achievement. Results are discussed in relation to cultural influences, other cultures, and comparative data from primates.

  19. Proteomic Analysis of Rat Hippocampus under Simulated Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yun; Li, Yujuan; Zhang, Yongqian; Liu, Yahui; Deng, Yulin

    It has been found that microgravity may lead to impairments in cognitive functions performed by CNS. However, the exact mechanism of effects of microgravity on the learning and memory function in animal nervous system is not elucidated yet. Brain function is mainly mediated by membrane proteins and their dysfunction causes degeneration of the learning and memory. To induce simulated microgravity, the rat tail suspension model was established. Comparative O (18) labeling quantitative proteomic strategy was applied to detect the differentially expressed proteins in rat brain hippocampus. The proteins in membrane fraction from rat hippocampus were digested by trypsin and then the peptides were separated by off-gel for the first dimension with 24 wells device encompassing the pH range of 3 - 10. An off-gel fraction was subjected into LC-ESI-QTOF in triplicate. Preliminary results showed that nearly 77% of the peptides identified were specific to one fraction. 676 proteins were identified among which 108 proteins were found differentially expressed under simulated microgravity. Using the KOBAS server, many enriched pathways, such as metabolic pathway, synaptic vesicle cycle, endocytosis, calcium signaling pathway, and SNAREs pathway were identified. Furthermore, it has been found that neurotransmitter released by Ca (2+) -triggered synaptic vesicles fusion may play key role in neural function. Rab 3A might inhibit the membrane fusion and neurotransmitter release. The protein alteration of the synaptic vesicle cycle may further explain the effects of microgravity on learning and memory function in rats. Key words: Microgravity; proteomics; synaptic vesicle; O (18) ({}) -labeling

  20. Impact of video games on plasticity of the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, G L; Konishi, K; Diarra, M; Benady-Chorney, J; Drisdelle, B L; Dahmani, L; Sodums, D J; Lepore, F; Jolicoeur, P; Bohbot, V D

    2017-08-08

    The hippocampus is critical to healthy cognition, yet results in the current study show that action video game players have reduced grey matter within the hippocampus. A subsequent randomised longitudinal training experiment demonstrated that first-person shooting games reduce grey matter within the hippocampus in participants using non-spatial memory strategies. Conversely, participants who use hippocampus-dependent spatial strategies showed increased grey matter in the hippocampus after training. A control group that trained on 3D-platform games displayed growth in either the hippocampus or the functionally connected entorhinal cortex. A third study replicated the effect of action video game training on grey matter in the hippocampus. These results show that video games can be beneficial or detrimental to the hippocampal system depending on the navigation strategy that a person employs and the genre of the game.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 8 August 2017; doi:10.1038/mp.2017.155.

  1. Memory, scene construction, and the human hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soyun; Dede, Adam J O; Hopkins, Ramona O; Squire, Larry R

    2015-04-14

    We evaluated two different perspectives about the function of the human hippocampus--one that emphasizes the importance of memory and another that emphasizes the importance of spatial processing and scene construction. We gave tests of boundary extension, scene construction, and memory to patients with lesions limited to the hippocampus or large lesions of the medial temporal lobe. The patients were intact on all of the spatial tasks and impaired on all of the memory tasks. We discuss earlier studies that associated performance on these spatial tasks to hippocampal function. Our results demonstrate the importance of medial temporal lobe structures for memory and raise doubts about the idea that these structures have a prominent role in spatial cognition.

  2. Functional neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Praag, Henriette; Schinder, Alejandro F.; Christie, Brian R.; Toni, Nicolas; Palmer, Theo D.; Gage, Fred H.

    2002-02-01

    There is extensive evidence indicating that new neurons are generated in the dentate gyrus of the adult mammalian hippocampus, a region of the brain that is important for learning and memory. However, it is not known whether these new neurons become functional, as the methods used to study adult neurogenesis are limited to fixed tissue. We use here a retroviral vector expressing green fluorescent protein that only labels dividing cells, and that can be visualized in live hippocampal slices. We report that newly generated cells in the adult mouse hippocampus have neuronal morphology and can display passive membrane properties, action potentials and functional synaptic inputs similar to those found in mature dentate granule cells. Our findings demonstrate that newly generated cells mature into functional neurons in the adult mammalian brain.

  3. Does the hippocampus keep track of time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palombo, D J; Keane, M M; Verfaellie, M

    2016-03-01

    In the present study, we examined the role of the medial temporal lobe (MTL) in prospective time estimation at short and long timescales using a novel behavioral paradigm adapted from rodent work. Amnesic patients with MTL damage and healthy control participants estimated the duration of nature-based video clips that were either short (≤ 90 s) or long (more than 4 min). Consistent with previous work in rodents, we found that amnesic patients were impaired at making estimations for long, but not for short durations. Critically, these effects were observed in patients who had lesions circumscribed to the hippocampus, suggesting that the pattern observed was not attributable to the involvement of extra-hippocampal structures. That the MTL, and more specifically the hippocampus, is critical for prospective temporal estimation only at long intervals suggests that multiple neurobiological mechanisms support prospective time estimation. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Neurobiological toxicity of radiation in hippocampus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Yeong Hoon; Kim, Joong Sun [Research center, Dongnam institute of radiological and Medical Sciences (DIRAMS), Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Ho; Moon, Chang Jong [College of Veterinary Medicine, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    Ionizing radiation affects multiple organs, which differ in their apparent response. Nevertheless, the adult brain is less vulnerable to radiation than other radiosensitive organs. Clinically, patients receive partial large-field or whole-brain irradiation for cancer treatment yearly, long-term survivors increases, and thus, radiation induced side effects, including cognitive impairment, will become a major health problem. Although the most commonly reported noxious effects of irradiation occur via damage to DNA and consequent disruption of protein synthesis, there are also specific effects on biochemical pathways that have indirect effects on DNA transcription. The hippocampus dependent memory dysfunction is consistent with the changes in neurogenesis after 1 and 3 dyas after irradiation. At 30 and 90 days following irradiation, mice displayed significant depression-like behaviors. Hippocampal dysfunction during the chronic phase following cranial irradiation may be associated with decreases in the neurogenesis and synaptic plasticity related signals, concomitant with microglial reduction in the hippocampus.

  5. Hippocampus and Remote Spatial Memory in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, Robert E.; Broadbent, Nicola J.; Squire, Larry R.

    2005-01-01

    Damage to the hippocampus typically produces temporally graded retrograde amnesia, whereby memories acquired recently are impaired more than memories acquired remotely. This phenomenon has been demonstrated repeatedly in a variety of species and tasks. It has also figured prominently in theoretical treatments of memory and hippocampal function. Yet temporally graded retrograde amnesia has not been demonstrated following hippocampal damage in spatial tasks like the water maze. We have assessed...

  6. Contributions of the hippocampus to feedback learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickerson, Kathryn C; Delgado, Mauricio R

    2015-12-01

    Humans learn about the world in a variety of manners, including by observation, by associating cues in the environment, and via feedback. Across species, two brain structures have been predominantly involved in these learning processes: the hippocampus--supporting learning via observation and paired association--and the striatum--critical for feedback learning. This simple dichotomy, however, has recently been challenged by reports of hippocampal engagement in feedback learning, although the role of the hippocampus is not fully understood. The purpose of this experiment was to characterize the hippocampal response during feedback learning by manipulating varying levels of memory interference. Consistent with prior reports, feedback learning recruited the striatum and midbrain. Notably, feedback learning also engaged the hippocampus. The level of activity in these regions was modulated by the degree of memory interference, such that the greatest activation occurred during the highest level of memory interference. Importantly, the accuracy of information learned via feedback correlated with hippocampal activation and was reduced by the presence of high memory interference. Taken together, these findings provide evidence of hippocampal involvement in feedback learning by demonstrating both its relevance for the accuracy of information learned via feedback and its susceptibility to interference.

  7. Deafferentation Enhances Neurogenesis in the Young and Middle Aged Hippocampus but not in the Aged Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Ashok K.; Hattiangady, Bharathi; Rao, Muddanna S.; Shuai, Bing

    2010-01-01

    Increased neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus (DG) after brain insults such as excitotoxic lesions, seizures or stroke is a well known phenomenon in the young hippocampus. This plasticity reflects an innate compensatory response of neural stem cells (NSCs) in the young hippocampus to preserve function or minimize damage after injury. However, injuries to the middle-aged and aged hippocampi elicit either no or dampened neurogenesis response, which could be due to an altered plasticity of NSCs and/or the hippocampus with age. We examined whether the plasticity of NSCs to increase neurogenesis in response to a milder injury such as partial deafferentation is preserved during aging. We quantified DG neurogenesis in the hippocampus of young, middle-aged and aged F344 rats after partial deafferentation. A partial deafferentation of the left hippocampus without any apparent cell loss was induced via administration of Kainic acid (0.5 μg in 1.0 μl) into the right lateral ventricle of the brain. In this model, degeneration of CA3 pyramidal neurons and dentate hilar neurons in the right hippocampus results in loss of commissural axons which leads to partial deafferentation of the dendrites of dentate granule cells and CA1-CA3 pyramidal neurons in the left hippocampus. Quantification of newly born cells that are added to the dentate granule cell layer at post-deafferentation days 4-15 using 5′-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) labeling revealed greatly increased addition of newly born cells (~3 fold increase) in the deafferented young and middle-aged hippocampi but not in the deafferented aged hippocampus. Measurement of newly born neurons using doublecortin (DCX) immunostaining also revealed similar findings. Analyses using BrdU-DCX dual immunofluorescence demonstrated no changes in neuronal fate-choice decision of newly born cells after deafferentation, in comparison to the age-matched naive hippocampus in all age groups. Thus, the plasticity of hippocampal NSCs to increase DG

  8. Alterations of Synaptic Proteins in the Hippocampus of Mouse Offspring Induced by Developmental Lead Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haiyang; Liao, Yingjun; Li, Tingting; Cui, Yan; Wang, Gaoyang; Zhao, Fenghong; Jin, Yaping

    2016-12-01

    Lead exposure can cause cognitive dysfunction in children, thus it still raises important public health concerns in China and other countries. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are still not well defined. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the mechanisms underlying lead neurotoxicity by focusing on alterations of synaptic proteins in the mouse hippocampus at the early life. Mother mice and their offspring were exposed to 0, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 g/L lead via drinking water from the first day of gestation until postnatal day (PND) 40. Synaptic ultrastructure and expressions of postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95), neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and synaptophysin (SYP) at both protein and gene levels in the hippocampus were analyzed. The results revealed that developmental lead exposure caused a diminished postsynaptic density in the hippocampus. Moreover, the protein levels of PSD-95, nNOS, and SYP decreased significantly due to developmental lead exposure. On the other hand, the messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of PSD-95 and SYP decreased significantly in PND 40 mice exposed to lead. Collectively, developmental lead exposure might result in decreased protein and gene expressions of both presynaptic and postsynaptic proteins. Our findings raised a possibility that alterations of synaptic proteins in the hippocampus induced by lead exposure at the early life might serve an important role for the subsequent intellectual impairments, e.g., deficits in spatial learning and memory ability at later ages shown in our recently published paper.

  9. Formaldehyde impairs learning and memory involving the disturbance of hydrogen sulfide generation in the hippocampus of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiao-Qing; Zhuang, Yuan-Yuan; Zhang, Ping; Fang, Heng-Rong; Zhou, Cheng-Fang; Gu, Hong-Feng; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Chun-Yan

    2013-01-01

    Formaldehyde (FA), a well-known indoor and outdoor pollutant, has been implicated as the responsible agent in the development of neurocognitive disorders. Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S), the third gasotransimitter, is an endogenous neuromodulator, which facilitates the induction of hippocampal long-term potentiation, involving the functions of learning and memory. In the present study, we analyzed the effects of intracerebroventricular injection of FA on the formation of learning and memory and the generation of endogenous H(2)S in the hippocampus of rats. We found that the intracerebroventricular injection of FA in rats impairs the function of learning and memory in the Morris water maze and novel object recognition test and increases the formation of apoptosis and lipid peroxidation in the hippocampus. We also showed that FA exposure inhibits the expression of cystathionine β-synthase, the major enzyme responsible for endogenous H(2)S generation in hippocampus and decreases the production of endogenous H(2)S in hippocampus in rats. These results suggested that FA-disturbed generation of endogenous H(2)S in hippocampus leads to the oxidative stress-mediated neuron damage, ultimately impairing the function of learning and memory. Our findings imply that the disturbance of endogenous H(2)S generation in hippocampus is a potential contributing mechanism underling FA-caused learning and memory impairment.

  10. Hippocampus and amygdala morphology in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plessen, Kerstin J; Bansal, Ravi; Zhu, Hongtu

    2006-01-01

    of the hippocampus and amygdala in children with ADHD. DESIGN: A cross-sectional case-control study of the hippocampus and amygdala using anatomical magnetic resonance imaging. SETTINGS: University research institute. PATIENTS: One hundred fourteen individuals aged 6 to 18 years, 51 with combined-type ADHD and 63...... healthy controls. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Volumes and measures of surface morphology for the hippocampus and amygdala. RESULTS: The hippocampus was larger bilaterally in the ADHD group than in the control group (t = 3.35; P ... suggested abnormal connectivity between the amygdala and prefrontal cortex in the ADHD group. Enlarged subregions of the hippocampus tended to accompany fewer symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: The enlarged hippocampus in children and adolescents with ADHD may represent a compensatory response to the presence...

  11. LTP enhances synaptogenesis in the developing hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Deborah J; Ostroff, Linnaea; Cao, Guan; Parker, Patrick H; Smith, Heather; Harris, Kristen M

    2016-05-01

    In adult hippocampus, long-term potentiation (LTP) produces synapse enlargement while preventing the formation of new small dendritic spines. Here, we tested how LTP affects structural synaptic plasticity in hippocampal area CA1 of Long-Evans rats at postnatal day 15 (P15). P15 is an age of robust synaptogenesis when less than 35% of dendritic spines have formed. We hypothesized that LTP might therefore have a different effect on synapse structure than in adults. Theta-burst stimulation (TBS) was used to induce LTP at one site and control stimulation was delivered at an independent site, both within s. radiatum of the same hippocampal slice. Slices were rapidly fixed at 5, 30, and 120 min after TBS, and processed for analysis by three-dimensional reconstruction from serial section electron microscopy (3DEM). All findings were compared to hippocampus that was perfusion-fixed (PF) in vivo at P15. Excitatory and inhibitory synapses on dendritic spines and shafts were distinguished from synaptic precursors, including filopodia and surface specializations. The potentiated response plateaued between 5 and 30 min and remained potentiated prior to fixation. TBS resulted in more small spines relative to PF by 30 min. This TBS-related spine increase lasted 120 min, hence, there were substantially more small spines with LTP than in the control or PF conditions. In contrast, control test pulses resulted in spine loss relative to PF by 120 min, but not earlier. The findings provide accurate new measurements of spine and synapse densities and sizes. The added or lost spines had small synapses, took time to form or disappear, and did not result in elevated potentiation or depression at 120 min. Thus, at P15 the spines formed following TBS, or lost with control stimulation, appear to be functionally silent. With TBS, existing synapses were awakened and then new spines formed as potential substrates for subsequent plasticity. © 2015 The Authors Hippocampus Published by Wiley

  12. Study of the variations in apoptotic factors in hippocampus of male rats with posttraumatic stress disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behrang Alani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD is a stress-related psychosomatic disorder caused by occurrence of a traumatic event and the hippocampus volume of the patients with Post-traumatic stress disorder decreased. However, the mechanisms that cause such damage are not well-understood. The aim of this study is to detect the expression of apoptosis-related Bax, Bcl-2, Caspase-3 and Insulin-like growth Factor-I proteins in the hippocampus region in the Predatory stress rats. Materials and Methods: A total of 70 male wistar rats were divided into Predatory stress groups of 1d, 2d, 3d, 7d, 14d, 30d and a normal control group (N = 10. Rats were subjected to 5 min of predatory stress and then exposed to the elevated plus-maze (EPM. Serum corticosterone and Insulin-like growth factor-1 level of Hippocampus were measured by ELISA technique. The expression of Bax, Bcl-2, and Caspase-3 were detected by western blotting. Results: Rats spent significantly more time in closed arms of the elevated plus maze (EPM than control group after exposure to stress. Serum levels of corticosterone significantly increased at 2d-3d. The expression of hippocampal IGF-1 was significantly up-regulated at 1d-2d after stress. Both Bax and the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 significantly peaked at Predatory stress 2d-14d. Caspase3 was significantly active among 2d-30 compared to the normal control. Conclusion: The activation of caspase-3 in the stress groups indicates that apoptosis may be one of the reasons inducing hippocampus atrophy and play roles in the pathogenesis of PTSD. Increase in hippocampus levels of IGF-1 during early PTSD might be involved in the early molecular inhibitory mechanism of apoptosis in PTSD.

  13. Cocaine- or stress-induced metaplasticity of LTP in the dorsal and ventral hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keralapurath, Madhusudhanan M; Clark, Jason K; Hammond, Sherri; Wagner, John J

    2014-05-01

    Despite the well documented role of the hippocampus in various modes of drug reinstatement behavior, the persisting effects of in vivo cocaine exposure on hippocampal synaptic plasticity are not sufficiently understood. In this report we investigated the effects of cocaine conditioning on long-term potentiation (LTP) in the CA1 region of hippocampus along its septotemporal axis. Male Sprague-Dawley rats experienced a behavioral protocol, in which locomotor activity was monitored in response to various conditioning treatments. LTP was measured in ex vivo slice preparations taken 1-2 weeks after the last behavioral session from the ventral (vH) and dorsal (dH) sectors of hippocampus. Unexpectedly, experiencing the minor intermittent stimuli of the behavioral protocol caused stress-induced metaplastic changes in both vH (increased LTP) and dH (decreased LTP) in the saline conditioned rats relative to behaviorally naïve controls. These stress effects in the vH and dH were blocked by conditioning with either mineralocorticoid (spironolactone) or glucocorticoid (mifepristone) antagonists, respectively. Stress-induced metaplasticity in the vH was also prevented by prior administration of the kappa opioid antagonist nor-binaltorphimine. Cocaine conditioning induced locomotor sensitization and significantly increased LTP in the vH without causing significant change in LTP in the dH. Cocaine-induced metaplasticity in the vH was prevented by co-administration of the dopamine D2-like antagonist eticlopride during cocaine conditioning, but not by co-administration of the D1/5 antagonist SCH 23390. Our results suggest that the functional connectivity of hippocampus is altered by metaplastic triggers such as exposure to drugs of abuse and/or stressors, thereby shifting the efferent output of hippocampus from dH (cortical) toward vH (limbic) influenced circuits. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Postpubertal cherubism with Noonan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Bilal; Amin, Muhammad

    2014-03-01

    Cherubism is a self limiting, autosomal dominant, fibro-osseous lesion of the maxillo facial region affecting the young adults. The etiology is considered to be a mutation of the SH3BP2 gene from chromosome 4p16.3. Sporadic non-familial cases have also been reported. The affected subjects usually present with simultaneous, bilateral swellings of the maxillae and/or mandible, premature loss of primary teeth, malocclusion due to disturbed eruption pattern of permanent teeth and a characteristic chubby faced angelic eyed appearance. This usually presents as an isolated finding, however, it can exist in association with syndromes like Noonan's syndrome, Jaffe syndrome, Gardener syndrome and Ollier's disease. Treatment is focused on the exact genetic diagnosis and management of symptomatic conditions utilizing cosmetic surgery and orthodontics. Genetic counselling of the affected families may help to decrease its incidence. This report presents a rare case of cherubism with associated features of Noonan syndrome.

  15. Alterations in right posterior hippocampus in early blind individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chebat, Daniel-Robert; Chen, Jan-Kai; Schneider, Fabien

    2007-01-01

    This study compares hippocampal volumes of early blind and sex/age-matched sighted controls through volumetric and localization analyses. Early blind individuals showed a significantly smaller right posterior hippocampus compared with controls. No differences in total hippocampal volumes were found...... between groups and there were no within-group differences for left versus right hippocampus. Sex, age and total brain grey matter volume had no effect on hippocampal volumes. Although extensive navigational training results in structural enhancement of the hippocampus for the sighted, the reduction...... of the posterior hippocampus in early blind individuals suggests the implication of this region in visual spatial memory. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Mar-5...

  16. BDNF impairment in the hippocampus is related to enhanced despair behavior in CB1 knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aso, Ester; Ozaita, Andrés; Valdizán, Elsa M; Ledent, Catherine; Pazos, Angel; Maldonado, Rafael; Valverde, Olga

    2008-04-01

    Stress can cause damage and atrophy of neurons in the hippocampus by deregulating the expression of neurotrophic factors that promote neuronal plasticity. The endocannabinoid system represents a physiological substrate involved in neuroprotection at both cellular and emotional levels. The lack of CB1 receptor alters neuronal plasticity and originates an anxiety-like phenotype in mice. In the present study, CB1 knockout mice exhibited an augmented response to stress revealed by the increased despair behavior and corticosterone levels showed in the tail suspension test and decreased brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels in the hippocampus. Interestingly, local administration of BDNF in the hippocampus reversed the increased despair behavior of CB1 knockout mice, confirming the crucial role played by BDNF on the emotional impairment of these mutants. The neurotrophic deficiency seems to be specific for BDNF as no differences were found in the levels of nerve growth factor and NT-3, two additional neurotrophic factors. Moreover, BDNF impairment is not related to the activity of its specific tyrosine kinase receptor or the activity of the transcription factor cAMP responsive element binding. These results suggest that the lack of CB1 receptor originates an enhanced response to stress and deficiency in neuronal plasticity by decreasing BDNF levels in the hippocampus that lead to impairment in the responses to emotional disturbances.

  17. Early-life Stress Impacts the Developing Hippocampus and Primes Seizure Occurrence: cellular, molecular, and epigenetic mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Tung eHuang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Early-life stress includes prenatal, postnatal, and adolescence stress. Early-life stress can affect the development of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis, and cause cellular and molecular changes in the developing hippocampus that can result in neurobehavioral changes later in life. Epidemiological data implicate stress as a cause of seizures in both children and adults. Emerging evidence indicates that both prenatal and postnatal stress can prime the developing brain for seizures and an increase in epileptogenesis. This article reviews the cellular and molecular changes encountered during prenatal and postnatal stress, and assesses the possible link between these changes and increases in seizure occurrence and epileptogenesis in the developing hippocampus. In addititon, the priming effect of prenatal and postnatal stress for seizures and epileptogenesis is discussed. Finally, the roles of epigenetic modifications in hippocampus and HPA axis programming, early-life stress, and epilepsy are discussed.

  18. Circadian Oscillations within the Hippocampus Support Hippocampus-dependent Memory Processing

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    Kristin Lynn Eckel-Mahan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The ability to sustain memories over long periods of time, sometimes even a lifetime, is one of the most remarkable properties of the brain. Much knowledge has been gained over the past few decades regarding the molecular correlates of memory formation. Once a memory is forged, however, the molecular events that provide permanence are as of yet unclear. Studies in multiple organisms have revealed that circadian rhythmicity is important for the formation, stability, and recall of memories [1]. The neuronal events that provide this link need to be explored further. This article will discuss the findings related to the circadian regulation of memory-dependent processes in the hippocampus. Specifically, the circadian-controlled MAP kinase and cAMP signal transduction pathway plays critical roles in the consolidation of hippocampus-dependent memory. A series of studies have revealed the circadian oscillation of this pathway within the hippocampus, an activity that is absent in memory-deficient, transgenic mice lacking Ca2+-stimulated adenylyl cyclases. Interference with these oscillations proceeding the cellular memory consolidation period impairs the persistence of hippocampus-dependent memory. These data suggest that the persistence of long-term memories may depend upon reactivation of this signal transduction pathway in the hippocampus during the circadian cycle. New data reveals the dependence of hippocampal oscillation in MAPK activity on the SCN, again underscoring the importance of this region in maintaining the circadian physiology of memory. Finally, the downstream ramification of these oscillations in terms of gene expression and epigenetics should be considered, as emerging evidence is pointing strongly to a circadian link between epigenetics and long term synaptic plasticity.

  19. The hippocampus, time, and memory across scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Marc W; Eichenbaum, Howard

    2013-11-01

    A wealth of experimental studies with animals have offered insights about how neural networks within the hippocampus support the temporal organization of memories. These studies have revealed the existence of "time cells" that encode moments in time, much as the well-known "place cells" map locations in space. Another line of work inspired by human behavioral studies suggests that episodic memories are mediated by a state of temporal context that changes gradually over long time scales, up to at least a few thousand seconds. In this view, the "mental time travel" hypothesized to support the experience of episodic memory corresponds to a "jump back in time" in which a previous state of temporal context is recovered. We suggest that these 2 sets of findings could be different facets of a representation of temporal history that maintains a record at the last few thousand seconds of experience. The ability to represent long time scales comes at the cost of discarding precise information about when a stimulus was experienced--this uncertainty becomes greater for events further in the past. We review recent computational work that describes a mechanism that could construct such a scale-invariant representation. Taken as a whole, this suggests the hippocampus plays its role in multiple aspects of cognition by representing events embedded in a general spatiotemporal context. The representation of internal time can be useful across nonhippocampal memory systems. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  20. Hippocampus Segmentation Based on Local Linear Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Shumao; Jiang, Jun; Lu, Zhentai; Li, Xueli; Yang, Wei; Huang, Meiyan; Zhang, Yu; Feng, Yanqiu; Huang, Wenhua; Feng, Qianjin

    2017-04-01

    We propose local linear mapping (LLM), a novel fusion framework for distance field (DF) to perform automatic hippocampus segmentation. A k-means cluster method is propose for constructing magnetic resonance (MR) and DF dictionaries. In LLM, we assume that the MR and DF samples are located on two nonlinear manifolds and the mapping from the MR manifold to the DF manifold is differentiable and locally linear. We combine the MR dictionary using local linear representation to present the test sample, and combine the DF dictionary using the corresponding coefficients derived from local linear representation procedure to predict the DF of the test sample. We then merge the overlapped predicted DF patch to obtain the DF value of each point in the test image via a confidence-based weighted average method. This approach enabled us to estimate the label of the test image according to the predicted DF. The proposed method was evaluated on brain images of 35 subjects obtained from SATA dataset. Results indicate the effectiveness of the proposed method, which yields mean Dice similarity coefficients of 0.8697, 0.8770 and 0.8734 for the left, right and bi-lateral hippocampus, respectively.

  1. The Hippocampus as a Cognitive Map … of Social Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenbaum, Howard

    2015-07-01

    The traditional view of the hippocampus is that it creates a cognitive map to navigate physical space. Here, in this issue of Neuron, Tavares et al. (2015) show that the human hippocampus maps dimensions of social space, indicating a function in the service of navigating everyday life. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Role of the Dorsal Hippocampus in Object Memory Load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sannino, Sara; Russo, Fabio; Torromino, Giulia; Pendolino, Valentina; Calabresi, Paolo; De Leonibus, Elvira

    2012-01-01

    The dorsal hippocampus is crucial for mammalian spatial memory, but its exact role in item memory is still hotly debated. Recent evidence in humans suggested that the hippocampus might be selectively involved in item short-term memory to deal with an increasing memory load. In this study, we sought to test this hypothesis. To this aim we developed…

  3. Experience-Dependent Epigenomic Reorganization in the Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Corey G.; Kennedy, Andrew J.; Gavin, Cristin F.; Day, Jeremy J.; Sweatt, J. David

    2017-01-01

    Using a hippocampus-dependent contextual threat learning and memory task, we report widespread, coordinated DNA methylation changes in CA1 hippocampus of Sprague-Dawley rats specific to threat learning at genes involved in synaptic transmission. Experience-dependent alternations in gene expression and DNA methylation were observed as early as 1 h…

  4. Pattern Separation Deficits Following Damage to the Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirwan, C. Brock; Hartshorn, Andrew; Stark, Shauna M.; Goodrich-Hunsaker, Naomi J.; Hopkins, Ramona O.; Stark, Craig E. L.

    2012-01-01

    Computational models of hippocampal function propose that the hippocampus is capable of rapidly storing distinct representations through a process known as pattern separation. This prediction is supported by electrophysiological data from rodents and neuroimaging data from humans. Here, we test the prediction that damage to the hippocampus would…

  5. Prohormone convertase 2 activity is increased in the hippocampus of Wfs1 knockout mice

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    Karin eTein

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundMutations in WFS1 gene cause Wolfram syndrome, which is a rare autosomal recessive disorder, characterized by diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic nerve atrophy and deafness (DIDMOAD. The WFS1 gene product wolframin is located in the endoplasmic reticulum. Mice lacking this gene exhibit disturbances in the processing and secretion of peptides, such as vasopressin and insulin. In the brain, high levels of the wolframin protein have been observed in the hippocampus, amygdala and limbic structures. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Wfs1 knockout on peptide processing in mouse hippocampus. A peptidomic approach was used to characterize individual peptides in the hippocampus of wild-type and Wfs1 knockout mice. ResultsWe identified 126 peptides in hippocampal extracts and the levels of 10 peptides differed between Wfs1 KO and wild-type mice at P<0.05. The peptide with the largest alteration was little-LEN, which level was 25 times higher in the hippocampus of Wfs1 KO mice compared to wild-type mice. Processing (cleavage of little-LEN from the Pcsk1n gene product proSAAS involves prohormone convertase 2 (PC2. Thus, PC2 activity was measured in extracts prepared from the hippocampus of Wfs1 knockout mice. The activity of PC2 in Wfs1 mutant mice was significantly higher (149.9±2.3%, p<0.0001, n=8 than in wild-type mice (100.0±7.0%, n=8. However, Western blot analysis showed that protein levels of 7B2, proPC2 and PC2 were same in both groups, and so were gene expression levels.ConclusionsProcessing of proSAAS is altered in the hippocampus of Wfs1-KO mice, which is caused by increased activity of PC2. Increased activity of PC2 in Wfs1 knockout mice is not caused by alteration in the levels of PC2 protein. Our results suggest a functional link between Wfs1 and PC2. Thus, the detailed molecular mechanism of the role of Wfs1 in the regulation of PC2 activity needs further investigation.

  6. Hippocampus and amygdala volumes in patients with vaginismus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atmaca, Murad; Baykara, Sema; Ozer, Omer; Korkmaz, Sevda; Akaslan, Unsal; Yildirim, Hanefi

    2016-06-22

    To compare hippocampus and amygdala volumes of patients with vaginismus with those of healthy control subjects. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed on ten patients with vaginismus and ten control subjects matched for age and gender. Volumes of the hippocampus and amygdala were blindly measured. We found that the mean right amygdala volume of patients with vaginismus were smaller than that of the healthy controls. With regard to hippocampus volumes, the mean left and right hippocampus volumes were smaller than those of the healthy controls. Our present findings suggest that there have been hippocampus and amygdala structural abnormalities in patients with vaginismus. These changes provide the notion that vaginismus may be a fear-related condition.

  7. Navigating the human hippocampus without a GPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucker, Halle R; Ranganath, Charan

    2015-06-01

    The award of the Nobel Prize to Professors John O'Keefe, May-Britt Moser, and Edvard Moser brings global recognition to one of the most significant success stories in modern neuroscience. Here, we consider how their findings, along with related studies of spatial cognition in rodents, have informed our understanding of the human hippocampus. Rather than identifying a "GPS" in the brain, we emphasize that these researchers helped to establish a fundamental role for cortico-hippocampal networks in the guidance of behavior based on a representation of the current place, time, and situation. We conclude by highlighting the major questions that remain to be addressed in future research. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Association between income and the hippocampus.

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    Jamie L Hanson

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Facets of the post-natal environment including the type and complexity of environmental stimuli, the quality of parenting behaviors, and the amount and type of stress experienced by a child affects brain and behavioral functioning. Poverty is a type of pervasive experience that is likely to influence biobehavioral processes because children developing in such environments often encounter high levels of stress and reduced environmental stimulation. This study explores the association between socioeconomic status and the hippocampus, a brain region involved in learning and memory that is known to be affected by stress. We employ a voxel-based morphometry analytic framework with region of interest drawing for structural brain images acquired from participants across the socioeconomic spectrum (n = 317. Children from lower income backgrounds had lower hippocampal gray matter density, a measure of volume. This finding is discussed in terms of disparities in education and health that are observed across the socioeconomic spectrum.

  9. Life history and ecology of the elusive European short-snouted seahorse Hippocampus hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, J M R; Santos, S V; Nadeau, J L; Gunn, B; Bigney Wilner, K; Balasubramanian, H; Overington, S; Lesage, C-M; D'entremont, J; Wieckowski, K

    2017-12-01

    To improve the understanding of the life history and ecology of one of Europe's most elusive fishes, the short-snouted seahorse Hippocampus hippocampus, data from wild populations in a shallow coastal lagoon in southern Portugal were analysed. The data were collected from 17 tagged seahorses on a focal-study grid as well as from >350 seahorses encountered during underwater visual surveys and a fishery-independent study using beach seines. These populations of settled juveniles and adults had a mean population density of 0·009 m-2 . During the study period (2000-2004), reproduction peaked in July and August. Juveniles recruited to the lagoon at c. 66 mm standard length (LS ) and 0·5 years of age and established small home ranges (0·8 to 18·2 m2 ). First reproduction was estimated at 100 mm and 1 year of age. Based on a fitted von Bertalanffy model, H. hippocampus grew quickly (growth coefficient K = 0·93) to a maximum theoretical size L∞  = 150 mm and have a maximum lifespan of c. 3·2 years. Courtship behaviours were consistent with the maintenance of pair bonds and males brooded multiple batches of young per year. Estimated annual reproductive output averaged 871 young (±632). Together these analyses provide the first life-history parameters for this species and indicate that H. hippocampus bears characteristics of opportunist and intermediate strategists. Such populations are predicted to exhibit large fluctuations in abundance, making them vulnerable to extended periods of poor recruitment. © 2017 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  10. Effect of thyroxine on munc-18 and syntaxin-1 expression in dorsal hippocampus of adult-onset hypothyroid rats

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    Y. Zhu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Adult-onset hypothyroidism induces a variety of impairments on hippocampus- dependent neurocognitive functioningin which many synaptic proteins in hippocampus neurons are involved. Here, we observed the effect of adult-onset hypothyroidism on the expression of syntaxin-1 and munc-18 in the dorsal hippocampus and whether the altered proteins could be restored by levothyroxine (T4 treatment. All rats were separated into 4 groups randomly: hypothyroid group, 5μg T4/100 g body weight (BW treated group, 20 μg T4/100g BW treated group and control group. The radioimmunoassay kits were applied to assay the levels of serum T3 and T4, and the levels of syntaxin-1 and munc-18 in hippocampus were assessed by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Both analysis corroborated that syntaxin-1 in the hypothyroid group was significantly higher. Munc-18 was lower in four layers of CA3 and dentate gyrus by immunohistochemistry. After two weeks of treatment with 5 μg T4/100g BW for hypothyroidism, syntaxin-1 levels were completely restored, whereas the recovery of munc-18 only located in two of the four impaired layers. Twenty μg T4/100g BW treatment normalized munc-18 levels. These data suggested that adult-onset hypothyroidism induced increment of syntaxin-1 and decrement of munc-18 in the dorsal hippocampus, which could be restored by T4 treatment. Larger dosage of T4 caused more effective restorations.

  11. Hippocampal Sclerosis: Causes and Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Matthew Charles

    2015-06-01

    Hippocampal sclerosis is the commonest cause of drug-resistant epilepsy in adults, and is associated with alterations to structures and networks beyond the hippocampus.In addition to being a cause of epilepsy, the hippocampus is vulnerable to damage from seizure activity. In particular, prolonged seizures (status epilepticus) can result in hippocampal sclerosis. The hippocampus is also vulnerable to other insults including traumatic brain injury, and inflammation. Hippocampal sclerosis can occur in association with other brain lesions; the prevailing view is that it is probably a secondary consequence. In such instances, successful surgical treatment usually involves the resection of both the lesion and the involved hippocampus. Experimental data have pointed to numerous neuroprotective strategies to prevent hippocampal sclerosis. Initial neuroprotective strategies aimed at glutamate receptors may be effective, but later, metabolic pathways, apoptosis, reactive oxygen species, and inflammation are involved, perhaps necessitating the use of interventions aimed at multiple targets. Some of the therapies that we use to treat status epilepticus may neuroprotect. However, prevention of neuronal death does not necessarily prevent the later development of epilepsy or cognitive deficits. Perhaps, the most important intervention is the early, aggressive treatment of seizure activity, and the prevention of prolonged seizures. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  12. Direct Electrical Stimulation of the Human Entorhinal Region and Hippocampus Impairs Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Joshua; Miller, Jonathan; Lee, Sang Ah; Coffey, Tom; Watrous, Andrew J; Sperling, Michael R; Sharan, Ashwini; Worrell, Gregory; Berry, Brent; Lega, Bradley; Jobst, Barbara C; Davis, Kathryn; Gross, Robert E; Sheth, Sameer A; Ezzyat, Youssef; Das, Sandhitsu R; Stein, Joel; Gorniak, Richard; Kahana, Michael J; Rizzuto, Daniel S

    2016-12-07

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has shown promise for treating a range of brain disorders and neurological conditions. One recent study showed that DBS in the entorhinal region improved the accuracy of human spatial memory. Based on this line of work, we performed a series of experiments to more fully characterize the effects of DBS in the medial temporal lobe on human memory. Neurosurgical patients with implanted electrodes performed spatial and verbal-episodic memory tasks. During the encoding periods of both tasks, subjects received electrical stimulation at 50 Hz. In contrast to earlier work, electrical stimulation impaired memory performance significantly in both spatial and verbal tasks. Stimulation in both the entorhinal region and hippocampus caused decreased memory performance. These findings indicate that the entorhinal region and hippocampus are causally involved in human memory and suggest that refined methods are needed to use DBS in these regions to improve memory. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Role of the hippocampus in memory functioning: modern view

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    D. O. Assonov

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this review was to develop the comprehensive conception of the hippocampus role in the functioning of human memory, based on data obtained by analysis of the latest scientific literature on the topic and make recommendations for further ways of researches in this topic. The scientific literature of the last 5 years on the role of the hippocampus in memory functioning was analyzed. Based on the reviewed literature, we made the next conclusions: the hippocampus is an extremely important for memory structure with various connections for different types of memory; the hippocampus is affected by a variety of substances, most studied now are glucocorticosteroids, whose effect on memory differs depending on the start time of action; the hippocampus volume in mental disorders affecting memory is less than normal, which makes it an important diagnostic criterion; at the moment, various promising methods that can help in the therapy of PTSD, depression, phobias and other disorders associated with memory impairment and based on the knowledge of the hippocampus for the treatment of memory disorders are being developed. Based on these conclusions and data, which were analyzed, we offered the following recommendations: to implement the hippocampal function examination in the diagnostics of mental disorders, which are accompanied by a violation of its work; to use the size of the hippocampus as one of the prognostic factors for the severity of the memory-associated disorders and the therapy progress; to carefully investigate the difference in the effect of various psychotherapies and pharmacotherapies on the hippocampus to determine exactly which of the therapies is the most morphologically reasonable; to find out how significant the decrease in the hippocampal volume is for the memory functioning; to use pathogenetically and morphologically based methods to improve the function of the hippocampus in the treatment of disorders that are

  14. Spatial memory and the avian hippocampus: research in zebra finches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Uwe; Watanabe, Shigeru; Bischof, Hans-Joachim

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present review is to show that spatial learning and memory is not a specialty of just a few avian species, and to describe the role of the avian hippocampus in spatial learning, memory and orientation. Based on our own research in zebra finches, we try to give an (not complete and probably biased) overview of this topic, and we also discuss the question of functional equivalence of hippocampus in birds and in mammals in that we question how far theories developed for mammalian hippocampus can also be applied to the avian hippocampal formation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Protein release from hippocampus in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, G W; Hofstein, R; Shashoua, V E

    1984-07-02

    Physiologically viable slices of rat hippocampus in vitro continuously release protein into the superfusion medium at a rate of about 2 micrograms/mg tissue/h. Assays of a cytoplasmic marker enzyme (lactate dehydrogenase) indicate that this material is not the result of cell lysis. Pulse-chase experiments using [3H]valine indicate that a substantial fraction of the newly synthesized proteins eventually appear in the incubation medium (18.7% +/- 3% of the total TCA precipitable radioactivity during a 6-h superfusion) and that the releasable protein pool has an apparent half-life of about 4 h. Simultaneous labeling of newly synthetized proteins with [3H]fucose and [14C]valine showed a 3-fold higher ratio of [3H]fucose to [14C]valine in the released protein fraction compared to the soluble cytoplasmic protein and to the crude membrane protein fraction, suggesting that the soluble released proteins are more highly glycosylated than the proteins retained in the tissue. Electrophoretic migration patterns on SDS-polyacrylamide gels with both labeled and unlabeled proteins show differences between the released proteins and the soluble cytoplasmic proteins of the tissue. Several molecular weights between 14 kdalton and 86 kdalton appear to be characteristic of the released protein fraction. These results suggest that a distinct group of proteins and glycoproteins exists in hippocampal tissue which is destined to be selectively released into the extracellular space.

  16. Stress Effects on Neuronal Structure: Hippocampus, Amygdala, and Prefrontal Cortex

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McEwen, Bruce S; Nasca, Carla; Gray, Jason D

    2016-01-01

    The hippocampus provided the gateway into much of what we have learned about stress and brain structural and functional plasticity, and this initial focus has expanded to other interconnected brain...

  17. Functional compensation of increasing memory encoding demands in the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Martin; Jonas, Christina; Grön, Georg

    2010-01-06

    The hippocampus is well known to contribute to episodic memory encoding. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate the hippocampal response to exponentially varying encoding demands while forming associations between faces and names. We found that only the left hippocampus exhibited a stepped modulation of neuronal activity, which was furthermore correlated with individual memory performance. The right hippocampus, in contrast, showed a constant strong engagement throughout all difficulty levels. We hypothesize that the left hippocampus functionally compensated an overload of right hippocampal resources in an attempt to prevent memory decline. This explanation could help reconcile controversies in the debate of material-specific (i.e. verbal vs. nonverbal) lateralization of hippocampal activation.

  18. Statistical learning of temporal community structure in the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schapiro, Anna C; Turk-Browne, Nicholas B; Norman, Kenneth A; Botvinick, Matthew M

    2016-01-01

    The hippocampus is involved in the learning and representation of temporal statistics, but little is understood about the kinds of statistics it can uncover. Prior studies have tested various forms of structure that can be learned by tracking the strength of transition probabilities between adjacent items in a sequence. We test whether the hippocampus can learn higher-order structure using sequences that have no variance in transition probability and instead exhibit temporal community structure. We find that the hippocampus is indeed sensitive to this form of structure, as revealed by its representations, activity dynamics, and connectivity with other regions. These findings suggest that the hippocampus is a sophisticated learner of environmental regularities, able to uncover higher-order structure that requires sensitivity to overlapping associations. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Population dynamics and reproduction of wild longsnout seahorse Hippocampus reidi

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ana C G Mai; Gonzalo Velasco

    2012-01-01

      Life-history characteristics such as growth, mortality, and size at sexual maturity of the seahorse Hippocampus reidi were investigated in situ in north-eastern Brazil from August 2006 to July 2007...

  20. The hippocampus: hub of brain network communication for memory.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Battaglia, F.P.; Benchenane, K.; Sirota, A.; Pennartz, C.M.A.; Wiener, S.I.

    2011-01-01

    A complex brain network, centered on the hippocampus, supports episodic memories throughout their lifetimes. Classically, upon memory encoding during active behavior, hippocampal activity is dominated by theta oscillations (6-10Hz). During inactivity, hippocampal neurons burst synchronously,

  1. Hippocampus, delay discounting, and vicarious trial-and-error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bett, David; Murdoch, Lauren H; Wood, Emma R; Dudchenko, Paul A

    2015-05-01

    In decision-making, an immediate reward is usually preferred to a delayed reward, even if the latter is larger. We tested whether the hippocampus is necessary for this form of temporal discounting, and for vicarious trial-and-error at the decision point. Rats were trained on a recently developed, adjustable delay-discounting task (Papale et al. (2012) Cogn Affect Behav Neurosci 12:513-526), which featured a choice between a small, nearly immediate reward, and a larger, delayed reward. Rats then received either hippocampus or sham lesions. Animals with hippocampus lesions adjusted the delay for the larger reward to a level similar to that of sham-lesioned animals, suggesting a similar valuation capacity. However, the hippocampus lesion group spent significantly longer investigating the small and large rewards in the first part of the sessions, and were less sensitive to changes in the amount of reward in the large reward maze arm. Both sham- and hippocampus-lesioned rats showed a greater amount of vicarious trial-and-error on trials in which the delay was adjusted. In a nonadjusting version of the delay discounting task, animals with hippocampus lesions showed more variability in their preference for a larger reward that was delayed by 10 s compared with sham-lesioned animals. To verify the lesion behaviorally, rat were subsequently trained on a water maze task, and rats with hippocampus lesions were significantly impaired compared with sham-lesioned animals. The findings on the delay discounting tasks suggest that damage to the hippocampus may impair the detection of reward magnitude. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Learning and memory depend on fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 functioning in hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Hanna E; Jiang, Ginger Y; Schwartz, Michael L; Vaccarino, Flora M

    2012-06-15

    Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling controls self-renewal of neural stem cells during embryonic telencephalic development. FGF receptor 2 (FGFR2) has a significant role in the production of cortical neurons during embryogenesis, but its role in the hippocampus during development and in adulthood has not been described. Here we dissociate the role of FGFR2 in the hippocampus during development and during adulthood with the use of embryonic knockout and inducible knockout mice. Embryonic knockout of FGFR2 causes a reduction of hippocampal volume and impairment in adult spatial memory in mice. Spatial reference memory, as assessed by performance on the water maze probe trial, was correlated with reduced hippocampal parvalbumin+ cells, whereas short-term learning was correlated with reduction in immature neurons in the dentate gyrus. Furthermore, short-term learning and newly generated neurons in the dentate gyrus were deficient even when FGFR2 was lacking only in adulthood. Taken together, these findings support a dual role for FGFR2 in hippocampal short-term learning and long-term reference memory, which appear to depend on the abundance of two separate cellular components, parvalbumin interneurons and newly generated granule cells in the hippocampus. Copyright © 2012 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of Protein Malnutrition on Efferent Projections of Amygdala to the Hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Hassanzadeh

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTIntroduction: Previous investigations have shown that protein malnutrition can alters the structure and function of some areas of hippocampal formation. We investigated the effect of protein malnutrition on amygdaloid projections to the CA1 hippocampal area. In this study we investigated level and pattern of distribution of efferent projections from amygdala to hippocampus in the rat by Horseradish Peroxidas (HRP neural tract tracing in 2 groups Control group fed with regular diet (% 18 proteinsand case group fed with low protein diet (%8. We used SPSS 11.0 (T test & mann-withney Software for data analysis.Methods: Following injection of HRP to CA1 region of hippocampus in the control group Rats, Labelled neurons showed more density in the Basolateral, Cortical and Medial nuclear Groups. Having done the analysis and examining the relations between the case data and those of the control groups, we found that number of labelled neurons in the Basolateral, Cortical & medial nuclei were decreased in the case group(p<0.05. Our findings showed that different nuclei of amygdala (Basolateral, Cortical and Medial send projections to CA1 region of hippocampus Among, them basolateral nuclei group send the most projections . Discussion: This results may be caused by decrease of activity of neural cells after protein malnutrition, that can results in impairment in growth and development of nervous system. Also it is possible that axoplasmic transfer rate maybe decreased in this condition.

  4. Effect of Protein Malnutrition on Efferent Projections of Amygdala to the Hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Hassanzadeh

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTIntroduction: Previous investigations have shown that protein malnutrition can alters the structure and function of some areas of hippocampal formation. We investigated the effect of protein malnutrition on amygdaloid projections to the CA1 hippocampal area. In this study we investigated level and pattern of distribution of efferent projections from amygdala to hippocampus in the rat by Horseradish Peroxidas (HRP neural tract tracing in 2 groups; Control group fed with regular diet (% 18 proteinsand case group fed with low protein diet (%8. We used SPSS 11.0 (T test & mann-withney Software for data analysis.Methods: Following injection of HRP to CA1 region of hippocampus in the control group Rats, Labelled neurons showed more density in the Basolateral, Cortical and Medial nuclear Groups. Having done the analysis and examining the relations between the case data and those of the control groups, we found that number of labelled neurons in the Basolateral, Cortical & medial nuclei were decreased in the case group(p<0.05. Our findings showed that different nuclei of amygdala (Basolateral, Cortical and Medial send projections to CA1 region of hippocampus; Among, them basolateral nuclei group send the most projections . Discussion: This results may be caused by decrease of activity of neural cells after protein malnutrition, that can results in impairment in growth and development of nervous system. Also it is possible that axoplasmic transfer rate maybe decreased in this condition.

  5. Naringin Attenuates Autophagic Stress and Neuroinflammation in Kainic Acid-Treated Hippocampus In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoung Hoon Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Kainic acid (KA is well known as a chemical compound to study epileptic seizures and neuronal excitotoxicity. KA-induced excitotoxicity causes neuronal death by induction of autophagic stress and microglia-derived neuroinflammation, suggesting that the control of KA-induced effects may be important to inhibit epileptic seizures with neuroprotection. Naringin, a flavonoid in grapefruit and citrus fruits, has anti-inflammatory and antioxidative activities, resulting in neuroprotection in animal models from neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease. In the present study, we examined its beneficial effects involved in antiautophagic stress and antineuroinflammation in the KA-treated hippocampus. Our results showed that naringin treatment delayed the onset of KA-induced seizures and decreased the occurrence of chronic spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRS in KA-treated mice. Moreover, naringin treatment protected hippocampal CA1 neurons in the KA-treated hippocampus, ameliorated KA-induced autophagic stress, confirmed by the expression of microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3, and attenuated an increase in tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα in activated microglia. These results suggest that naringin may have beneficial effects of preventing epileptic events and neuronal death through antiautophagic stress and antineuroinflammation in the hippocampus in vivo.

  6. The Insulin Regulatory Network in Adult Hippocampus and Pancreatic Endocrine System

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    Masanao Machida

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a very strong correlation between the insulin-mediated regulatory system of the central nervous system and the pancreatic endocrine system. There are many examples of the same transcriptional factors being expressed in both regions in their embryonic development stages. Hormonal signals from the pancreatic islets influence the regulation of energy homeostasis by the brain, and the brain in turn influences the secretions of the islets. Diabetes induces neuronal death in different regions of the brain especially hippocampus, causes alterations on the neuronal circuits and therefore impairs learning and memory, for which the hippocampus is responsible. The hippocampus is a region of the brain where steady neurogenesis continues throughout life. Adult neurogenesis from undifferentiated neural stem cells is greatly decreased in diabetic patients, and as a result their learning and memory functions decline. Might it be possible to reactivate stem cells whose functions have deteriorated and that are present in the tissues in which the lesions occur in diabetes, a lifestyle disease, which plagues modern humans and develops as a result of the behavior of insulin-related factor? In this paper we summarize research in regard to these matters based on examples in recent years.

  7. The Pattern of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Gene Expression in the Hippocampus of Diabetic Rats

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    Iraj Salehi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective(sThe aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of regular exercise in preventing diabetes complication in the hippocampus of streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetic rat.Materials and MethodsA total of 48 male wistar rats were divided into four groups (control, control exercise, diabetic and diabetic exercise. Diabetes was induced by injection of single dose of STZ. Exercise was performed for one hr every day, over a period of 8 weeks. The antioxidant enzymes (SOD, GPX, CAT and GR and oxidant indexes with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF protein and its mRNA and apoptosis were measured in hippocampus of rats. ResultsA significant decrease in antioxidant enzymes activities and increased malondialdehyde (MDA level were observed in diabetic rats (P= 0.004. In response to exercise, antioxidant enzymes activities increased (P= 0.004. In contrast, MDA level decreased in diabetic rats (P= 0.004. Induction of diabetes caused an increase of BDNF protein and its mRNA expression. In response to exercise, BDNF protein and its mRNA expression reduced in hippocampus of diabetic rats. ConclusionDiabetes induced oxidative stress and increased BDNF gene expression. Exercise ameliorated oxidative stress and decreased BDNF gene expression.

  8. Musical training induces functional plasticity in human hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herdener, Marcus; Esposito, Fabrizio; di Salle, Francesco; Boller, Christian; Hilti, Caroline C; Habermeyer, Benedikt; Scheffler, Klaus; Wetzel, Stephan; Seifritz, Erich; Cattapan-Ludewig, Katja

    2010-01-27

    Training can change the functional and structural organization of the brain, and animal models demonstrate that the hippocampus formation is particularly susceptible to training-related neuroplasticity. In humans, however, direct evidence for functional plasticity of the adult hippocampus induced by training is still missing. Here, we used musicians' brains as a model to test for plastic capabilities of the adult human hippocampus. By using functional magnetic resonance imaging optimized for the investigation of auditory processing, we examined brain responses induced by temporal novelty in otherwise isochronous sound patterns in musicians and musical laypersons, since the hippocampus has been suggested previously to be crucially involved in various forms of novelty detection. In the first cross-sectional experiment, we identified enhanced neural responses to temporal novelty in the anterior left hippocampus of professional musicians, pointing to expertise-related differences in hippocampal processing. In the second experiment, we evaluated neural responses to acoustic temporal novelty in a longitudinal approach to disentangle training-related changes from predispositional factors. For this purpose, we examined an independent sample of music academy students before and after two semesters of intensive aural skills training. After this training period, hippocampal responses to temporal novelty in sounds were enhanced in musical students, and statistical interaction analysis of brain activity changes over time suggests training rather than predisposition effects. Thus, our results provide direct evidence for functional changes of the adult hippocampus in humans related to musical training.

  9. The role of the hippocampus in generalizing configural relationships.

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    Berens, Sam C; Bird, Chris M

    2017-03-01

    The hippocampus has been implicated in integrating information across separate events in support of mnemonic generalizations. These generalizations may be underpinned by processes at both encoding (linking similar information across events) and retrieval ("on-the-fly" generalization). However, the relative contribution of the hippocampus to encoding- and retrieval-based generalizations is poorly understood. Using fMRI in humans, we investigated the hippocampal role in gradually learning a set of spatial discriminations and subsequently generalizing them in an acquired equivalence task. We found a highly significant correlation between individuals' performance on a generalization test and hippocampal activity during the test, providing evidence that hippocampal processes support on-the-fly generalizations at retrieval. Within the same hippocampal region there was also a correlation between activity during the final stage of learning (when all associations had been learnt but no generalization was required) and subsequent generalization performance. We suggest that the hippocampus spontaneously retrieves prior events that share overlapping features with the current event. This process may also support the creation of generalized representations during encoding. These findings are supportive of the view that the hippocampus contributes to both encoding- and retrieval-based generalization via the same basic mechanism; retrieval of similar events sharing common features. © 2016 The Authors Hippocampus Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 The Authors Hippocampus Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Effect of berberin on the regulatin of GFAP+ astrecyte in the hippocampus of STZ diabetic rats

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    Hamid Kalalian-Moghaddam

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes mellitus increases the risk of central nervous system (CNS disorders such as stroke, seizures, dementia, and cognitive impairment. Berberine, a natural isoquinolne alkaloid, is reported to exhibit beneficial effect in various neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders. Moreover astrocytes are proving critical for normal CNS function, and alterations in their activity and impaired oxidative stress could contribute to diabetes-related cognitive dysfunction. Metabolic and oxidative insults often cause rapid changes in glial cells. Key indicators of this response are increased synthesis of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP as an astrocytic marker. Therefore, this study was conducted to determine the effect of berberine on glial reactivity of hippocampus in (STZ-induced diabetes rats. Materials and Methods: Experimental groups included: The control, control berberine treated (100 mg/kg.8 weeks, diabetic and diabetic berberine treated (50,100 mg/kg for 8 weeks groups. The effects of berberine on glial reactivity of hippocampus evaluated in (STZ-induced diabetics rats, using GFAP immunohistochemistry test. Data were analyzed by using Prism-5, one way ANOVA and Tukey tests. Results: Eight weeks after diabetes induction we observed an increase in GFAP immune staining in the hippocampus of STZ-diabetic rats relative to levels in the control brains. In contrast, chronic treatment with berberine (50 and 100 mg/kg, p.o., once daily lowered hyperglycemia, and prevents the up regulation of GFAP in brain of diabetic rats. Conclusion: the present study demonstrates treatment with berberine resulted in an obvious reduction of GFAP+ immunoreactive astrocytes in hippocampus of STZ -induced diabetic rats.

  11. Mineralocorticoid receptor associates with pro-inflammatory bias in the hippocampus of spontaneously hypertensive rats.

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    Brocca, M E; Pietranera, L; Meyer, M; Lima, A; Roig, P; de Kloet, E R; De Nicola, A F

    2017-07-01

    Damage observed in the hippocampus of the adult spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) resembles the neuropathology of mineralocorticoid-induced hypertension, supporting a similar endocrine dysfunction in both entities. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that increased expression of the hippocampal mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) in SHR animals is associated with a prevalent expression of pro-inflammatory over anti-inflammatory factors. Accordingly, in the hippocampus, we measured mRNA expression and immunoreactivity of the MR and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) using a quantitative polymerase chain reaction and histochemistry. We also measured serum-glucocorticoid-activated kinase 1 (Sgk1 mRNA), the number and phenotype of Iba1+ microglia, as well as mRNA expression levels of the pro-inflammatory factors cyclo-oxygenase 2 (Cox2), Nlrp3 inflammasome and tumour necrosis factor α (Tnfα). Expression of anti-inflammatory transforming growth factor (Tgf)β mRNA and the NADPH-diaphorase activity of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) were also determined. The results showed that, in the hippocampus of SHR rats, expression of MR and the number of immunoreactive MR/GR co-expressing cells were increased compared to Wistar-Kyoto control animals. Expression of Sgk1, Cox2, Nlrp3 and the number of ramified glia cells positive for Iba1+ were also increased, whereas Tgfβ mRNA expression and the NADPH-diaphorase activity of NOS were decreased. We propose that, in the SHR hippocampus, increased MR expression causes a bias towards a pro-inflammatory phenotype characteristic for hypertensive encephalopathy. © 2017 British Society for Neuroendocrinology.

  12. MHC class I immune proteins are critical for hippocampus-dependent memory and gate NMDAR-dependent hippocampal long-term depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, P Austin; Sage, Jennifer R; Wood, Suzanne C; Davenport, Christopher M; Anagnostaras, Stephan G; Boulanger, Lisa M

    2013-09-01

    Memory impairment is a common feature of conditions that involve changes in inflammatory signaling in the brain, including traumatic brain injury, infection, neurodegenerative disorders, and normal aging. However, the causal importance of inflammatory mediators in cognitive impairments in these conditions remains unclear. Here we show that specific immune proteins, members of the major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC class I), are essential for normal hippocampus-dependent memory, and are specifically required for NMDAR-dependent forms of long-term depression (LTD) in the healthy adult hippocampus. In β2m(-/-)TAP(-/-)mice, which lack stable cell-surface expression of most MHC class I proteins, NMDAR-dependent LTD in area CA1 of adult hippocampus is abolished, while NMDAR-independent forms of potentiation, facilitation, and depression are unaffected. Altered NMDAR-dependent synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus of β2m(-/-)TAP(-/-)mice is accompanied by pervasive deficits in hippocampus-dependent memory, including contextual fear memory, object recognition memory, and social recognition memory. Thus normal MHC class I expression is essential for NMDAR-dependent hippocampal synaptic depression and hippocampus-dependent memory. These results suggest that changes in MHC class I expression could be an unexpected cause of disrupted synaptic plasticity and cognitive deficits in the aging, damaged, and diseased brain.

  13. Evolution of the hippocampus in reptiles and birds.

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    Striedter, Georg F

    2016-02-15

    Although the hippocampus is structurally quite different among reptiles, birds, and mammals, its function in spatial memory is said to be highly conserved. This is surprising, given that structural differences generally reflect functional differences. Here I review this enigma in some detail, identifying several evolutionary changes in hippocampal cytoarchitecture and connectivity. I recognize a lepidosaurid pattern of hippocampal organization (in lizards, snakes, and the tuatara Sphenodon) that differs substantially from the pattern of organization observed in the turtle/archosaur lineage, which includes crocodilians and birds. Although individual subdivisions of the hippocampus are difficult to homologize between these two patterns, both lack a clear homolog of the mammalian dentate gyrus. The strictly trilaminar organization of the ancestral amniote hippocampus was gradually lost in the lineage leading to birds, and birds expanded the system of intrahippocampal axon collaterals, relative to turtles and lizards. These expanded collateral axon branches resemble the extensive collaterals in CA3 of the mammalian hippocampus but probably evolved independently of them. Additional examples of convergent evolution between birds and mammals are the loss of direct inputs to the hippocampus from the primary olfactory cortex and the general expansion of telencephalic regions that communicate reciprocally with the hippocampus. Given this structural convergence, it seems likely that some similarities in the function of the hippocampus between birds and mammals, notably its role in the ability to remember many different locations without extensive training, likewise evolved convergently. The currently available data do not allow for a strong test of this hypothesis, but the hypothesis itself suggests some promising new research directions. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Assessing Apoptosis Gene Expression Profiling with a PCR Array in the Hippocampus of Ts65Dn Mice

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    Bin Yu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that Down syndrome (DS is a condition in which extra genetic material causes delays in the way a child develops, both mentally and physically. Intellectual disability is the foremost and most debilitating trait, which caused loss of cognitive abilities and the development of early onset Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Ts65Dn mice were used in this study. We isolated the hippocampus. First, we used transmission scanning electron microscopy to directly observe the hippocampus and confirm if apoptosis had occurred. Second, we customized a PCR array with 53 genes, including several important genes related to cell apoptosis. Gene expression was detected by RT-PCR. There were varying degrees of changes characteristic of apoptosis in the hippocampus of Ts65Dn mice, which mainly included the following: nuclear membrane thinning, unevenly distributed chromosomes, the production of chromatin crescents, and pyknosis of the nuclei with some nuclear fragmentation. Meanwhile, three genes (API5, AIFM1, and NFκB1 showed changes of expression in the hippocampus of Ts65Dn mice compared with normal mice. Only NFκB1 expression was significantly increased, while the expressions of API5 and AIFM1 were notably decreased. The fold changes in the expression of API5, AIFM1, and NFκB1 were 11.55, 5.94, and 3.11, respectively. However, some well-known genes related to cell apoptosis, such as the caspase family, Bcl-2, Bad, Bid, Fas, and TNF, did not show changes in expression levels. The genes we found which were differentially expressed in the hippocampus of Ts65Dn mice may be closely related to cell apoptosis. PCR array technology can assist in the screening and identification of genes involved in apoptosis.

  15. Damage to Hippocampus of Rats after Being Exposed to Infrasound.

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    Zhang, Meng Yao; Chen, Chen; Xie, Xue Jun; Xu, Sheng Long; Guo, Guo Zhen; Wang, Jin

    2016-06-01

    The objective was to observe damage of hippocampus in rats after exposure to infrasound, and to assess HSP70 expression in hippocampus. SD rats in the experimental group were exposed to 140 dB (8 Hz) infrasound for 2 h per day for 3 days. The morphology of the hippocampus was examined by transmission electronic microscopic (TEM). Cell apoptosis was observed by TUNEL staining at 0 h, 24 h, 48 h, and 2 w after exposure. HSP70 expression was detected by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and Western blotting (WB). TEM showed that hippocampus was significantly damaged by exposure, and exhibited recovery 1 week after exposure. The TUNEL data showed that neuronal apoptosis after exposure was significantly higher than in the control rats at 24 h and 48 h, and the apoptotic cells decreased one week after exposure. IHC and WB showed HSP70 expression was significantly higher in the exposed rats, peaked at 24 h. Exposure to 140 dB (8 Hz) infrasound for 2 h per day for 3 days appeared to induce damage to the hippocampus of rats, based on changes in ultrastructure and increased cell apoptosis. However, recovery from the damage occurred overtime. HSP70 expression also increased after the exposure and decreased by 48. Copyright © 2016 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  16. [Effects of noise exposure on event-related potential P300 and mechanism in hippocampus of rats].

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    Cui, Bo; Wu, Ming-quan; She, Xiao-jun; Liu, Hong-tao

    2009-08-01

    To study the effects of noise on event-related potential(ERP) and its mechanism in hippocampus in rats. Male SD rats were divided into 2 groups: control group (CG) and noise exposure group(NG). The rats in NG were exposed to white noise 105 dB SPL for 2.5 h/d x 20 d. P300 were recorded at parietal bone in rats. The Nissl body, NMDAR2B and [Ca2+]i of neurons in hippocampus were analyzed. The peak latency (PL) of ERP P3a, P3 and P3b in NG were significantly longer than that in CG in the 14th and 20th exposure day. The amount of Nissl body in dentate gyrus (DG) and CA1 region and NMDAR2B in DG, CA1 and CA3 region of hippocampus of NG were significantly decreased than those of CG as well, while the concentration of Ca2+ in neurons increased markedly in NG. Decreased Nissl body and NMDAR2B and increased [Ca2+]i in hippocampus in long-term noise exposed rats might cause the change of ERP P300.

  17. Early memory formation disrupted by atypical PKC inhibitor ZIP in the medial prefrontal cortex but not hippocampus.

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    Evuarherhe, Obaro; Barker, Gareth R I; Savalli, Giorgia; Warburton, Elizabeth C; Brown, Malcolm W

    2014-08-01

    Atypical isoforms of protein kinase C (aPKCs; particularly protein kinase M zeta: PKMζ) have been hypothesized to be necessary and sufficient for the maintenance of long-term potentiation (LTP) and long term memory by maintaining postsynaptic AMPA receptors via the GluA2 subunit. A myristoylated PKMζ pseudosubstrate peptide (ZIP) blocks PKMζ activity. We examined the actions of ZIP in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and hippocampus in associative recognition memory in rats during early memory formation and memory maintenance. ZIP infusion in either hippocampus or mPFC impaired memory maintenance. However, early memory formation was impaired by ZIP in mPFC but not hippocampus; and blocking GluA2-dependent removal of AMPA receptors did not affect this impairment caused by ZIP in the mPFC. The findings indicate: (i) a difference in the actions of ZIP in hippocampus and medial prefrontal cortex, and (ii) a GluA2-independent target of ZIP (possibly PKCλ) in the mPFC during early memory formation. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Neonatal bronchopulmonary dysplasia increases neuronal apoptosis in the hippocampus through the HIF-1α and p53 pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Rong; Yuan, Lin; Ping, Lili; Hu, Liyuan

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) might lead to an increased risk for brain injury. The present study aims to investigate the effects of neonatal BPD on neuronal apoptosis in the hippocampus and cognitive function and to explore the underlying mechanisms. The results revealed that BPD model rat pups exhibited more apoptotic cells in the hippocampus and longer escape latencies in the Morris maze test. Both the caspase-dependent and caspase-nondependent signal pathways were activated. Further examinations showed an elevated p53 level by BPD via HIF-1α induction, while the caspase-3 in the hippocampus was suppressed by both HIF-1α and p53 inhibitor. These findings suggested that neonatal BPD caused impaired cognitive function and neuron apoptosis in hippocampus via p53 and HIF-1α. Although the precise mechanism requires further investigation, this study provided new evidence for and an explanation of the impaired CNS developmental outcomes of BPD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Exposure to 2.45 GHz electromagnetic fields elicits an HSP-related stress response in rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xue-Sen; He, Gen-Lin; Hao, Yu-Tong; Xiao, Yang; Chen, Chun-Hai; Zhang, Guang-Bin; Yu, Zheng-Ping

    2012-07-01

    The issue of possible neurobiological effects of the electromagnetic field (EMF) exposure is highly controversial. To determine whether electromagnetic field exposure could act as an environmental stimulus capable of producing stress responses, we employed the hippocampus, a sensitive target of electromagnetic radiation, to assess the changes in its stress-related gene and protein expression after EMF exposure. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats with body restrained were exposed to a 2.45 GHz EMF at a specific absorption rate (SAR) of 6 W/kg or sham conditions. cDNA microarray was performed to examine the changes of gene expression involved in the biological effects of electromagnetic radiation. Of 2048 candidate genes, 23 upregulated and 18 downregulated genes were identified. Of these differential expression genes, two heat shock proteins (HSP), HSP27 and HSP70, are notable because expression levels of both proteins are increased in the rat hippocampus. Result from immunocytochemistry revealed that EMF caused intensive staining for HSP27 and HSP70 in the hippocampus, especially in the pyramidal neurons of cornu ammonis 3 (CA3) and granular cells of dentate gyrus (DG). The gene and protein expression profiles of HSP27 and HSP70 were further confirmed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot. Our data provide direct evidence that exposure to electromagnetic fields elicits a stress response in the rat hippocampus. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [Effect of electromagnetic radiation on discharge activity of neurons in the hippocampus CA1 in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Jun; Chen, Su; Liu, Xiang-Ming; Hao, Dong-Mei

    2013-09-01

    In order to explore effect of electromagnetic radiation on learning and memory ability of hippocampus neuron in rats, the changes in discharge patterns and overall electrical activity of hippocampus neuron after electromagnetic radiation were observed. Rat neurons discharge was recorded with glass electrode extracellular recording technology and a polygraph respectively. Radiation frequency of electromagnetic wave was 900 MHZ and the power was 10 W/m2. In glass electrode extracellular recording, the rats were separately irradiated for 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 and 60 min, every points repeated 10 times and updated interval of 1h, observing the changes in neuron discharge and spontaneous discharge patterns after electromagnetic radiation. In polygraph recording experiments, irradiation group rats for five days a week, 6 hours per day, repeatedly for 10 weeks, memory electrical changes in control group and irradiation group rats when they were feeding were repeatedly monitored by the implanted electrodes, observing the changes in peak electric digits and the largest amplitude in hippocampal CA1 area, and taking some electromagnetic radiation sampling sequence for correlation analysis. (1) Electromagnetic radiation had an inhibitory role on discharge frequency of the hippocampus CA1 region neurons. After electromagnetic radiation, discharge frequency of the hippocampus CA1 region neurons was reduced, but the changes in scale was not obvious. (2) Electromagnetic radiation might change the spontaneous discharge patterns of hippocampus CA1 region neurons, which made the explosive discharge pattern increased obviously. (3) Peak potential total number within 5 min in irradiation group was significantly reduced, the largest amplitude was less than that of control group. (4) Using mathematical method to make the correlation analysis of the electromagnetic radiation sampling sequence, that of irradiation group was less than that of control group, indicating that there was a tending

  1. Hippocampus and two-way active avoidance conditioning: Contrasting effects of cytotoxic lesion and temporary inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia; Bast, Tobias; Wang, Yu-Cong; Zhang, Wei-Ning

    2015-12-01

    Hippocampal lesions tend to facilitate two-way active avoidance (2WAA) conditioning, where rats learn to cross to the opposite side of a conditioning chamber to avoid a tone-signaled footshock. This classical finding has been suggested to reflect that hippocampus-dependent place/context memory inhibits 2WAA (a crossing response to the opposite side is inhibited by the memory that this is the place where a shock was received on the previous trial). However, more recent research suggests other aspects of hippocampal function that may support 2WAA learning. More specifically, the ventral hippocampus has been shown to contribute to behavioral responses to aversive stimuli and to positively modulate the meso-accumbens dopamine system, whose activation has been implicated in 2WAA learning. Permanent hippocampal lesions may not reveal these contributions because, following complete and permanent loss of hippocampal output, other brain regions may mediate these processes or because deficits could be masked by lesion-induced extra-hippocampal changes, including an upregulation of accumbal dopamine transmission. Here, we re-examined the hippocampal role in 2WAA learning in Wistar rats, using permanent NMDA-induced neurotoxic lesions and temporary functional inhibition by muscimol or tetrodotoxin (TTX) infusion. Complete hippocampal lesions tended to facilitate 2WAA learning, whereas ventral (VH) or dorsal hippocampal (DH) lesions had no effect. In contrast, VH or DH muscimol or TTX infusions impaired 2WAA learning. Ventral infusions caused an immediate impairment, whereas after dorsal infusions rats showed intact 2WAA learning for 40-50 min, before a marked deficit emerged. These data show that functional inhibition of ventral hippocampus disrupts 2WAA learning, while the delayed impairment following dorsal infusions may reflect the time required for drug diffusion to ventral hippocampus. Overall, using temporary functional inhibition, our study shows that the ventral

  2. METALS IN THE METABOLISM OF HIPPOCAMPUS AND ROLE OF ZINC IN THE PATHOGENESIS OF EPILEPTIC SEIZURES

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    O. M. Kuchkovsky

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Physiological mechanisms of convulsions status during epilepsy or episindrom significantly different from the mechanisms, which were describe for other disorders associated with glutamatergic system, such as schizophrenia (a decrease of glutamate in neurons and increased dopaminergic load, drug addiction and alcoholism (the formation of endogenous opioids and dopamine, strengthening the role of GABA-ergic system. With glutamatergic transmission are сconnect not only convulsive state, but also the realization of higher integrative functions. Therefore, the development of epilepsy, particularly  which caused glutamate, implemented by activating Zn-ergic hippocampal neurons, associate with complex changes in human mental functions. Based on a scientific literature about  of the role of chelating zinc in the mechanisms of glutamatergic transmission, we can  suggest it participation in the mechanisms of formation of epilepsy  convulsions. In experience on animals, was show that in the animal organism of stressing correlative changes observe zinc content and secretory material in the hippocampus, Paneth cells  and B cells of pancreas. The nature of the changes depend on the stressor. When this change of zinc content in the hippocampus and hypothalamus (as the main regulator of stress reaction were multidirectional that this can be explained by the release of metal together with secretory material in the hypothalamus into the bloodstream. Research epileptic activity  of hippocampus by administering to the animal chelate 8 BSQ allowed to establish the dependence between convulsant action  and first  stress condition of the animal. Evocation of stress by 8-BSQ and physical activity, immobilization and alcohol abuse found that the convulsive effect of this reagent during intravitreal research increased in the case of prior exposure by specified kinds of stressors. In this pre-convulsive effect on exertion increased by 266% and the zinc content

  3. Male rat exposure to low dose of di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate during pre-pubertal, pubertal and post-pubertal periods: Impact on sperm count, gonad histology and testosterone secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudir, Malha; Chader, Henni; Bouzid, Bachir; Bendisari, Kheira; Latreche, Batoul; Boudalia, Sofiane; Iguer-Ouada, Mokrane

    2018-01-01

    Di (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is the most ubiquitous endocrine disruptor in the environment. The present study aimed to investigate the low dose effects of DEHP on the male reproductive system of rats exposed during the pre-pubertal, pubertal and post-pubertal periods. Male Wistar rats were daily gavaged by DEHP from postnatal day (PND) 21 to PND 120 with 0.5, 50 and 5000μg/kgBW/d. A decrease in sperm count of 41%, 24% and 46% was observed at 0.5, 50 and 5000μg/kgBW/d respectively. A decrease of Sertoli cells number was observed at 50 and 5000μg/kgBW/d (22% and 42%, respectively). Non-monotonic dose-response was observed for testosterone levels with a significant increase at 50μg/kgBW/d associated to a notable enhancement of Leydig cells number (35%). In conclusion, our results showed that postnatal exposure to low doses of DEHP affects sperm count, Sertoli and Leydig cells number and testosterone level. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Tranquilizing and Allaying Excitement Needling Method Affects BDNF and SYP Expression in Hippocampus

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    Peng Zheng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sleep disorder is a state of sleep loss caused by various reasons, which leads to a series of changes, such as emotion, learning and memory, and immune function. “Tranquilizing and allaying excitement” was widely used in clinical treatment of insomnia; however, the mechanism was still not very clear. We randomly divided rats into three groups: control group, sleep deprivation group, and acupuncture treatment group. We observed BDNF and SYP expression in hippocampus in these three groups. Both protein contents and mRNA contents of BDNF and SYP were measured by western blot, immunohistochemistry, and RT-PCR analysis. The sleep deprivation model was established using modified multiple platform sleep deprivation method (MMPM. Our study explored the BDNF and SYP abnormality in hippocampus caused by sleep deprivation and “tranquilizing and allaying excitement” intervention regulated the abnormal expression of BDNF and SYP caused by sleep deprivation on the short run and the long run. Our study provided a molecular evidence that “tranquilizing and allaying excitement” treatment in rats with sleep disorder affects learning and memory ability.

  5. High glycogen levels in the hippocampus of patients with epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Mads K; Madsen, Flemming F; Secher, Niels H

    2006-01-01

    During intense cerebral activation approximately half of the glucose plus lactate taken up by the human brain is not oxidized and could replenish glycogen deposits, but the human brain glycogen concentration is unknown. In patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, undergoing curative surgery, brain...... biopsies were obtained from pathologic hippocampus (n=19) and from apparently 'normal' cortical grey and white matter. We determined the in vivo brain glycogen level and the activity of glycogen phosphorylase and synthase. Regional differences in glycogen concentration were examined similarly in healthy...... pigs (n=5). In the patients, the glycogen concentration in 'normal' grey and white matter was 5 to 6 mmol/L, but much higher in the hippocampus, 13.1+/-4.3 mmol/L (mean+/-s.d.; Pglycogen phosphorylase and synthase displayed the same pattern. In normal hippocampus from pigs...

  6. Interplay of hippocampus and prefrontal cortex in memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Alison R.; Eichenbaum, Howard

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies on the hippocampus and the prefrontal cortex have considerably advanced our understanding of the distinct roles of these brain areas in the encoding and retrieval of memories, and of how they interact in the prolonged process by which new memories are consolidated into our permanent storehouse of knowledge. These studies have led to a new model of how the hippocampus forms and replays memories and how the prefrontal cortex engages representations of the meaningful contexts in which related memories occur, as well as how these areas interact during memory retrieval. Furthermore, they have provided new insights into how interactions between the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex support the assimilation of new memories into pre-existing networks of knowledge, called schemas, and how schemas are modified in this process as the foundation of memory consolidation. PMID:24028960

  7. Effects of long-term infusion of sedatives on the cognitive function and expression level of RAGE in hippocampus of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junyan; Niu, Mengxuan; Bai, Shuancheng

    2016-08-01

    This study aims to investigate the effects of long-term infusion of midazolam, propofol, and lytic cocktail on the rat cognitive ability and expression of receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) in the hippocampus. The correlation between cognitive function and RAGE protein expression level could provide basis for clinical application. Adult male Wistar rats were first treated with midazolam, propofol, lytic cocktail, and saline solution for 5 consecutive days, respectively, and then their behavioral performance in a Morris water maze was monitored to determine the effects of these sedatives on the cognition of spatial learning and memory. After the behavioral tests, the expression level of RAGE protein in the hippocampus of each rat was determined by ELISA and immunohistochemistry. Compared with the control rats, the sedative-treated rats showed impaired performance in the Morris water maze. These three sedatives rendered similar extents of impairment of learning and memory at the first day after the treatment (p  0.05). In addition, midazolam and propofol, but not lytic cocktail, caused significant upregulation of RAGE expression in the hippocampus. The upregulation of RAGE protein was further corroborated by the increment of RAGE-positive cells in the CA1 region of hippocampus from midazolam- and propofol-treated rats. The long-term treatment of propofol, midazolam, and lytic cocktail could impair cognition. The upregulation of RAGE protein in hippocampus might play a role in the midazolam- and propofol-caused cognitive dysfunction.

  8. Hippocampus is place of interaction between unconscious and conscious memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Züst, Marc Alain; Colella, Patrizio; Reber, Thomas Peter; Vuilleumier, Patrik; Hauf, Martinus; Ruch, Simon; Henke, Katharina

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that humans can form and later retrieve new semantic relations unconsciously by way of hippocampus-the key structure also recruited for conscious relational (episodic) memory. If the hippocampus subserves both conscious and unconscious relational encoding/retrieval, one would expect the hippocampus to be place of unconscious-conscious interactions during memory retrieval. We tested this hypothesis in an fMRI experiment probing the interaction between the unconscious and conscious retrieval of face-associated information. For the establishment of unconscious relational memories, we presented subliminal (masked) combinations of unfamiliar faces and written occupations ("actor" or "politician"). At test, we presented the former subliminal faces, but now supraliminally, as cues for the reactivation of the unconsciously associated occupations. We hypothesized that unconscious reactivation of the associated occupation-actor or politician-would facilitate or inhibit the subsequent conscious retrieval of a celebrity's occupation, which was also actor or politician. Depending on whether the reactivated unconscious occupation was congruent or incongruent to the celebrity's occupation, we expected either quicker or delayed conscious retrieval process. Conscious retrieval was quicker in the congruent relative to a neutral baseline condition but not delayed in the incongruent condition. fMRI data collected during subliminal face-occupation encoding confirmed previous evidence that the hippocampus was interacting with neocortical storage sites of semantic knowledge to support relational encoding. fMRI data collected at test revealed that the facilitated conscious retrieval was paralleled by deactivations in the hippocampus and neocortical storage sites of semantic knowledge. We assume that the unconscious reactivation has pre-activated overlapping relational representations in the hippocampus reducing the neural effort for conscious retrieval. This

  9. Anterior hippocampus: the anatomy of perception, imagination and episodic memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeidman, Peter; Maguire, Eleanor A.

    2017-01-01

    The brain creates a model of the world around us. We can use this representation to perceive and comprehend what we see at any given moment, but also to vividly re-experience scenes from our past and imagine future (or even fanciful) scenarios. Recent work has shown that these cognitive functions — perception, imagination and recall of scenes and events — all engage the anterior hippocampus. Here we capitalise on new findings from functional neuroimaging to propose a model that links high-level cognitive functions to specific structures within the anterior hippocampus. PMID:26865022

  10. Induction of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 in the hippocampus by chronic electroconvulsive seizures: role of [Delta]FosB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J; Zhang, Y; Kelz, M B; Steffen, C; Ang, E S; Zeng, L; Nestler, E J

    2000-12-15

    The transcription factor DeltaFosB is induced in the hippocampus and other brain regions by repeated electroconvulsive seizures (ECS), an effective antidepressant treatment. The unusually high stability of this protein makes it an attractive candidate to mediate some of the long-lasting changes in the brain caused by ECS treatment. To understand how DeltaFosB might alter brain function, we examined the gene expression profiles in the hippocampus of inducible transgenic mice that express DeltaFosB in this brain region by the use of cDNA expression arrays that contain 588 genes. Of the 430 genes detected, 20 genes were consistently upregulated, and 14 genes were downregulated, by >50%. One of the upregulated genes is cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (cdk5). On the basis of its purported role in regulating neuronal structure, we studied directly whether cdk5 is a true target for DeltaFosB. Upregulation of cdk5 immunoreactivity in the hippocampus was confirmed by Western blotting in the DeltaFosB-expressing transgenic mice as well as in rats treated chronically with ECS. Chronic ECS treatment also increased, in the hippocampus, the phosphorylation state of tau, a microtubule-associated protein that is a known substrate for cdk5. A 1.6 kb fragment of the cdk5 promoter was cloned, and activity of the promoter was found to be increased after overexpression of DeltaFosB in cell culture. Moreover, mutation of the single consensus activator protein-1 site contained within the cdk5 promoter fragment completely abolished activation of the promoter by DeltaFosB. Together, these results suggest that cdk5 is one target by which DeltaFosB produces some of its physiological effects in the hippocampus and thereby mediates certain long-term consequences of chronic ECS treatment.

  11. [Correlations between hippocampus function and stressed learning and their effect on cerebro-visceral regulation processes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, K; Hai, N V; Hecht, T; Moritz, V; Woossmann, H

    1976-01-01

    43 male albino rats were investigated to find out what are the effects of bilateral exclusion of pes hippocampus structures upon the development of arterial hypertension released by learning stress exposure. The following results were obtained: 5 weeks of stress exposure (learning load and heavy learning load) caused disturbances of information-processing events of the central nervous system in all the animals with hippocampal lesions. Systolic blood pressure values, fasting blood sugar values, and adrenal weights fall within the physiological range. The B-cells of the pancreatic islets show hypergranulation. Functional tests of the blood pressure under exercise load, and of blood sugar under glucose load revealed normal reactions in animals with hippocampal lesions. In animals with intact brains the same stress exposure caused pathologic malfunctioning (under learning stress) or even premorbid states. The results being considered in relation to the pathogenesis of arterial hypertension show that the exclusion of circumscribed areas of the hippocampus prevents the development of permanent, stress-induced emotional excitations spreading into the viscerum.

  12. Altered Effective Connectivity of Hippocampus-Dependent Episodic Memory Network in mTBI Survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Yan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injuries (TBIs are generally recognized to affect episodic memory. However, less is known regarding how external force altered the way functionally connected brain structures of the episodic memory system interact. To address this issue, we adopted an effective connectivity based analysis, namely, multivariate Granger causality approach, to explore causal interactions within the brain network of interest. Results presented that TBI induced increased bilateral and decreased ipsilateral effective connectivity in the episodic memory network in comparison with that of normal controls. Moreover, the left anterior superior temporal gyrus (aSTG, the concept forming hub, left hippocampus (the personal experience binding hub, and left parahippocampal gyrus (the contextual association hub were no longer network hubs in TBI survivors, who compensated for hippocampal deficits by relying more on the right hippocampus (underlying perceptual memory and the right medial frontal gyrus (MeFG in the anterior prefrontal cortex (PFC. We postulated that the overrecruitment of the right anterior PFC caused dysfunction of the strategic component of episodic memory, which caused deteriorating episodic memory in mTBI survivors. Our findings also suggested that the pattern of brain network changes in TBI survivors presented similar functional consequences to normal aging.

  13. Subchronic phencyclidine treatment in adult mice increases GABAergic transmission and LTP threshold in the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Toshihiro; Oyamada, Yoshihiro; Fernandes, Herman B; Remmers, Christine L; Xu, Jian; Meltzer, Herbert Y; Contractor, Anis

    2016-01-01

    Repeated administration of non-competitive N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists such as phencyclidine (PCP) to rodents causes long-lasting deficits in cognition and memory, and has effects on behaviors that have been suggested to be models of the cognitive impairment associated with schizophrenia (CIAS). Despite this being a widely studied animal model, little is known about the long lasting changes in synapses and circuits that underlie the altered behaviors. Here we examined synaptic transmission ex-vivo in the hippocampus of mice after a subchronic PCP (scPCP) administration regime. We found that after at least one week of drug free washout period when mice have impaired cognitive function, the threshold for long-term potentiation (LTP) of CA1 excitatory synapses was elevated. This elevated LTP threshold was directly related to increased inhibitory input to CA1 pyramidal cells through increased activity of GABAergic neurons. These results suggest repeated PCP administration causes a long-lasting metaplastic change in the inhibitory circuits in the hippocampus that results in impaired LTP, and could contribute to the deficits in hippocampal-dependent memory in PCP-treated mice. Changes in GABA signaling have been described in patients with schizophrenia, therefore our results support using scPCP as a model of CIAS. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Synaptopathy--from Biology to Therapy'. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Ethanol-related alterations in gene expression patterns in the developing murine hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Chanchal; Park, Kyoung Sun; Jung, Kyoung Hwa; Chai, Young Gyu

    2015-08-01

    It is well known that consuming alcohol prior to and during pregnancy can cause harm to the developing fetus. Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder is a term commonly used to describe a range of disabilities that may arise from prenatal alcohol exposure such as fetal alcohol syndrome, partial fetal alcohol syndrome, alcohol-related neurodevelopmental disorders, and alcohol-related birth defects. Here, we report that maternal binge alcohol consumption alters several important genes that are involved in nervous system development in the mouse hippocampus at embryonic day 18. Microarray analysis revealed that Nova1, Ntng1, Gal, Neurog2, Neurod2, and Fezf2 gene expressions are altered in the fetal hippocampus. Pathway analysis also revealed the association of the calcium signaling pathway in addition to other pathways with the differentially expressed genes during early brain development. Alteration of such important genes and dynamics of the signaling pathways may cause neurodevelopmental disorders. Our findings offer insight into the molecular mechanism involved in neurodevelopmental disorders associated with alcohol-related defects. © The Author 2015. Published by ABBS Editorial Office in association with Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  15. Impact of schizophrenia on anterior and posterior hippocampus during memory for complex scenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.D. Ragland

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: Results suggest a gradient of hippocampal dysfunction in which posterior hippocampus – which is necessary for processing fine-grained spatial relationships – is underactive, and anterior hippocampus – which may process context more globally - is overactive.

  16. Cooperation between the Hippocampus and the Striatum during Episodic Encoding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeh, Talya; Shohamy, Daphna; Levy, Dana Rubi; Reggev, Niv; Maril, Anat

    2011-01-01

    The hippocampus and the striatum are thought to play distinct roles in learning and memory, each supporting an independent memory system. A fundamental question is whether, and how, these systems interact to jointly contribute to learning and memory. In particular, it remains unknown whether the striatum contributes selectively to implicit,…

  17. Hippocampus and amygdalar volumes in patients with somatization disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atmaca, Murad; Sirlier, Burcu; Yildirim, Hanefi; Kayali, Alperen

    2011-08-15

    In regard to somatization disorder which covers an important section of our patient population, there is no systematic structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study in the literature. Therefore, we aimed to use structural MRI to evaluate the hippocampus amygdalar complex which is associated with both stress and regulation of emotion that are main basis clinical presentation of somatization disorder in the patients with somatization disorder. Totally 40 subjects (20 patients with somatization disorder and 20 healthy controls) were enrolled. Intracranial volume (ICV), whole brain volume, gray and white matter volumes, and hippocampus and amygdalar volumes of the subjects were measured. In regard to unadjusted mean volumes of measured structures, the patients had significantly smaller mean volumes of the left and right amygdala. However, two groups did not differ significantly in terms of whole brain, total gray and white matter or hippocampus volumes. The repeated measures ANCOVA predicting left and right amygdala volumes demonstrated a significant main effect of diagnostic group. In conclusion, the findings of the present study revealed that the patients with somatization disorder had significantly smaller mean volumes of the left and right amygdala without any differences in regard to whole brain, total gray and white matter or hippocampus volumes. On the basis of the current findings, it seems reasonable to evaluate that abnormalities in connectivity and/or metabolism dimensions and to examine the effects of drugs or psychotherapeutic approaches could be especially informative. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Adult Neurogenesis in the Mammalian Hippocampus: Why the Dentate Gyrus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Liam J.; Fusi, Stefano; Hen, René

    2013-01-01

    In the adult mammalian brain, newly generated neurons are continuously incorporated into two networks: interneurons born in the subventricular zone migrate to the olfactory bulb, whereas the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus integrates locally born principal neurons. That the rest of the mammalian brain loses significant neurogenic capacity…

  19. CHRONIC DEVELOPMENTAL LEAD EXPOSURE REDUCES NEUROGENESIS IN ADULT HIPPOCAMPUS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHRONIC DEVELOPMENTAL LEAD EXPOSURE REDUCES NEUROGENESIS IN ADULT HIPPOCAMPUS. ME Gilbert1, ME Kelly2, S. Salant3, T Shafer1, J Goodman3 1Neurotoxicology Div, US EPA, RTP, NC, 27711, 2Children's Hospital, Philadelphia, PA, 19104, 3Helen Hayes Hospital, Haverstraw, NY, 10993. ...

  20. Amygdala and Hippocampus Enlargement during Adolescence in Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groen, Wouter; Teluij, Michelle; Buitelaar, Jan; Tendolkar, Indira

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The amygdala and hippocampus are key components of the neural system mediating emotion perception and regulation and are thought to be involved in the pathophysiology of autism. Although some studies in children with autism suggest that there is an enlargement of amygdala and hippocampal volume, findings in adolescence are sparse.…

  1. A Cognitive Map for Object Memory in the Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manns, Joseph R.; Eichenbaum, Howard

    2009-01-01

    The hippocampus has been proposed to support a cognitive map, a mental representation of the spatial layout of an environment as well as the nonspatial items encountered in that environment. In the present study, we recorded simultaneously from 43 to 61 hippocampal pyramidal cells as rats performed an object recognition memory task in which novel…

  2. Stress Effects on the Hippocampus: A Critical Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Joo; Pellman, Blake; Kim, Jeansok J.

    2015-01-01

    Uncontrollable stress has been recognized to influence the hippocampus at various levels of analysis. Behaviorally, human and animal studies have found that stress generally impairs various hippocampal-dependent memory tasks. Neurally, animal studies have revealed that stress alters ensuing synaptic plasticity and firing properties of hippocampal…

  3. Fornix deep brain stimulation enhances acetylcholine levels in the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hescham, Sarah; Jahanshahi, Ali; Schweimer, Judith V; Mitchell, Stephen N; Carter, Guy; Blokland, Arjan; Sharp, Trevor; Temel, Yasin

    2016-11-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the fornix has gained interest as a potential therapy for advanced treatment-resistant dementia, yet the mechanism of action remains widely unknown. Previously, we have reported beneficial memory effects of fornix DBS in a scopolamine-induced rat model of dementia, which is dependent on various brain structures including hippocampus. To elucidate mechanisms of action of fornix DBS with regard to memory restoration, we performed c-Fos immunohistochemistry in the hippocampus. We found that fornix DBS induced a selective activation of cells in the CA1 and CA3 subfields of the dorsal hippocampus. In addition, hippocampal neurotransmitter levels were measured using microdialysis before, during and after 60 min of fornix DBS in a next experiment. We observed a substantial increase in the levels of extracellular hippocampal acetylcholine, which peaked 20 min after stimulus onset. Interestingly, hippocampal glutamate levels did not change compared to baseline. Therefore, our findings provide first experimental evidence that fornix DBS activates the hippocampus and induces the release of acetylcholine in this region.

  4. Remodeling of Hippocampal Synapses After Hippocampus-Dependent Associative Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geinisman, Yuri; Disterhoft, John F.; Gundersen, Hans Jørgen G.; McEchron, Matthew D.; Persina, Inna S.; Power, John M.; Zee, Eddy A. van der; West, Mark J.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether hippocampus-dependent associative learning involves changes in the number and/or structure of hippocampal synapses. A behavioral paradigm of trace eyeblink conditioning was used. Young adult rabbits were given daily 80 trial sessions to a criterion of

  5. Behavioural cues of reproductive status in seahorses Hippocampus abdominalis

    OpenAIRE

    Whittington C. M.; Musolf K.; Sommer S.; Wilson A. B.

    2013-01-01

    A method is described to assess the reproductive status of male Hippocampus abdominalis on the basis of behavioural traits. The non invasive nature of this technique minimizes handling stress and reduces sampling requirements for experimental work. It represents a useful tool to assist researchers in sample collection for studies of reproduction and development in viviparous syngnathids which are emerging as important model species.

  6. Incomplete inversion of the hippocampus - a common developmental anomaly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bajic, Dragan; Wang, Chen; Raininko, Raili [Uppsala University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Uppsala (Sweden); Kumlien, Eva; Mattsson, Peter [Uppsala University Hospital, Department of Neurology, Uppsala (Sweden); Lundberg, Staffan; Eeg-Olofsson, Orvar [Uppsala University Hospital, Department of Child Neurology, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2008-01-15

    Incomplete inversion of the hippocampus, an imperfect fetal development, has been described in patients with epilepsy or severe midline malformations. We studied this condition in a nonepileptic population without obvious developmental anomalies. We analyzed the coronal MR images of 50 women and 50 men who did not have epilepsy. Twenty of them were healthy volunteers and 80 were patients without obvious intracranial developmental anomalies, intracranial masses, hydrocephalus or any condition affecting the temporal lobes. If the entire hippocampus (the head could not be evaluated) were affected, the incomplete inversion was classified as total, otherwise as partial. Incomplete inversion of the hippocampus was found in 19/100 subjects (9 women, 10 men). It was unilateral, always on the left side, in 13 subjects (4 women, 9 men): 9 were of the total type, 4 were partial. It was bilateral in six subjects (five women, one man): four subjects had total types bilaterally, two had a combination of total and partial types. The collateral sulcus was vertically oriented in all subjects with a deviating hippocampal shape. We conclude that incomplete inversion of the hippocampus is not an unusual morphologic variety in a nonepileptic population without other obvious intracranial developmental anomalies. (orig.)

  7. Sleep selectively enhances hippocampus-dependent memory in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Denise J; Shuman, Tristan; Gorman, Michael R; Sage, Jennifer R; Anagnostaras, Stephan G

    2009-08-01

    Sleep has been implicated as playing a critical role in memory consolidation. Emerging evidence suggests that reactivation of memories during sleep may facilitate the transfer of declarative memories from the hippocampus to the neocortex. Previous rodent studies have utilized sleep-deprivation to examine the role of sleep in memory consolidation. The present study uses a novel, naturalistic paradigm to study the effect of a sleep phase on rodent Pavlovian fear conditioning, a task with both hippocampus-dependent and -independent components (contextual vs. cued memories). Mice were trained 1 hour before their sleep/rest phase or awake/active phase and then tested for contextual and cued fear 12 or 24 hr later. The authors found that hippocampus-dependent contextual memory was enhanced if tested after a sleep phase within 24 hr of training. This enhancement was specific to context, not cued, memory. These findings provide direct evidence of a role for sleep in enhancing hippocampus-dependent memory consolidation in rodents and detail a novel paradigm for examining sleep-induced memory effects. 2009 APA, all rights reserved

  8. The Learning Hippocampus: Education and Experience-Dependent Plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, Elisabeth; Lövdén, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The hippocampal formation of the brain plays a crucial role in declarative learning and memory while at the same time being particularly susceptible to environmental influences. Education requires a well-functioning hippocampus, but may also influence the development of this brain structure. Understanding these bidirectional influences may have…

  9. Spatial memory and the monkey hippocampus: not all space is created equal.

    OpenAIRE

    Banta Lavenex Pamela; Lavenex Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Studies of the role of the monkey hippocampus in spatial learning and memory however few have reliably produced inconsistent results. Whereas the role of the hippocampus in spatial learning and memory has been clearly established in rodents studies in nonhuman primates have made a variety of claims that range from the involvement of the hippocampus in spatial memory only at relatively longer memory delays to no role for the hippocampus in spatial memory at all. In contrast we have shown that ...

  10. Spatial memory and the monkey hippocampus: not all space is created equal

    OpenAIRE

    Lavenex, Pamela Banta; LAVENEX, PIERRE

    2008-01-01

    Studies of the role of the monkey hippocampus in spatial learning and memory, however few, have reliably produced inconsistent results. Whereas the role of the hippocampus in spatial learning and memory has been clearly established in rodents, studies in nonhuman primates have made a variety of claims that range from the involvement of the hippocampus in spatial memory only at relatively longer memory delays, to no role for the hippocampus in spatial memory at all. In contrast, we have shown ...

  11. Comparison of neurodegeneration between right and left hippocampus area in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arezo Nahavandi

    2015-02-01

    Conclusion: Our study showed different manifestations of depression after UCMS. It showed that UCMS could lead to mental depression. This study showed that the right hippocampus was more sensitive to stress than the left hippocampus. In fact, UCMS resulted in depression. The study showed that the right hippocampus was more sensitive to stress than the left hippocampus. Therefore, the main function of the right hemisphere, which is adaptation to the new environment, is disturbed more.

  12. Unraveling the Role of the Hippocampus in Reversal Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilà-Balló, Adrià; Mas-Herrero, Ernest; Ripollés, Pablo; Simó, Marta; Miró, Júlia; Cucurell, David; López-Barroso, Diana; Juncadella, Montserrat; Marco-Pallarés, Josep; Falip, Mercè; Rodríguez-Fornells, Antoni

    2017-07-12

    Research in reversal learning has mainly focused on the functional role of dopamine and striatal structures in driving behavior on the basis of classic reinforcement learning mechanisms. However, recent evidence indicates that, beyond classic reinforcement learning adaptations, individuals may also learn the inherent task structure and anticipate the occurrence of reversals. A candidate structure to support such task representation is the hippocampus, which might create a flexible representation of the environment that can be adaptively applied to goal-directed behavior. To investigate the functional role of the hippocampus in the implementation of anticipatory strategies in reversal learning, we first studied, in 20 healthy individuals (11 women), whether the gray matter anatomy and volume of the hippocampus were related to anticipatory strategies in a reversal learning task. Second, we tested 20 refractory temporal lobe epileptic patients (11 women) with unilateral hippocampal sclerosis, who served as a hippocampal lesion model. Our results indicate that healthy participants were able to learn the task structure and use it to guide their behavior and optimize their performance. Participants' ability to adopt anticipatory strategies correlated with the gray matter volume of the hippocampus. In contrast, hippocampal patients were unable to grasp the higher-order structure of the task with the same success than controls. Present results indicate that the hippocampus is necessary to respond in an appropriately flexible manner to high-order environments, and disruptions in this structure can render behavior habitual and inflexible.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Understanding the neural substrates involved in reversal learning has provoked a great deal of interest in the last years. Studies with nonhuman primates have shown that, through repetition, individuals are able to anticipate the occurrence of reversals and, thus, adjust their behavior accordingly. The present

  13. The vasopressin receptor of the blood-brain barrier in the rat hippocampus is linked to calcium signalling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hess, J.; Jensen, Claus V.; Diemer, Nils Henrik

    1991-01-01

    Neuropathology, vasopressin receptor, VI subtype, blood-brain barrier, cerebral endothelium, hippocampus, Fura-2......Neuropathology, vasopressin receptor, VI subtype, blood-brain barrier, cerebral endothelium, hippocampus, Fura-2...

  14. Aging-related alterations in the distribution of Ca(2+)-dependent PKC isoforms in rabbit hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Zee, E A; Palm, I F; O'Connor, M; Maizels, E T; Hunzicker-Dunn, M; Disterhoft, J F

    2004-01-01

    The immunocytochemical and subcellular localization of the Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase C (cPKC) isoforms (PKCalpha, beta1, beta2, and gamma) was examined in rabbit hippocampus of young (3 months of age; n = 11) and aging (36 months of age; n = 14) subjects. Detailed immunocytochemical analyses revealed a significant increase in PKCbeta1, beta2, and gamma immunoreactivity in principal cell bodies and associated dendrites, and interneurons of the hilar region in the aging rabbits. The number of PKCalpha- and gamma-positive interneurons in the aging stratum oriens declined significantly. PKCalpha was least affected in principal cells, showing an increase in immunostaining in granule cells only. Weakly PKC-positive principal cells intermingled between densely stained ones were seen in parts of the hippocampus in most of the aging rabbits, showing that the degree of aging-related alterations in PKC-immunoreactivity varies between neurons. Changes in PKC expression in the molecular and subgranular layer of the aging dentate gyrus suggested a reorganization of PKC-positive afferents to this region. Western blot analysis revealed a significant loss of PKC in the pellet fraction for all isoforms, and a tendency for increased levels of cytosolic PKC. However, no significant changes were found in total PKC content for any PKC isoform. A concurrent dramatic loss of the PKC anchoring protein receptor for activated C kinase (RACK1) in the pellet fraction was shown by Western blotting. These findings suggest that the loss of RACK1 contributes to the dysregulation of the PKC system in the aging rabbit hippocampus. The enhanced PKC-immunoreactivity might relate to reduced protein-protein interactions of PKC with the anchoring protein RACK1 leading to increased access of the antibodies to the antigenic site. In conclusion, the results suggest that memory deficits in aging rabbits are (in part) caused by dysregulation of subcellular PKC localization in hippocampal neurons

  15. Aging without Apolipoprotein D: Molecular and cellular modifications in the hippocampus and cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Diego; Bajo-Grañeras, Raquel; Del Caño-Espinel, Manuela; Garcia-Centeno, Rosa; Garcia-Mateo, Nadia; Pascua-Maestro, Raquel; Ganfornina, Maria D

    2015-07-01

    A detailed knowledge of the mechanisms underlying brain aging is fundamental to understand its functional decline and the baseline upon which brain pathologies superimpose. Endogenous protective mechanisms must contribute to the adaptability and plasticity still present in the healthy aged brain. Apolipoprotein D (ApoD) is one of the few genes with a consistent and evolutionarily conserved up-regulation in the aged brain. ApoD protecting roles upon stress or injury are well known, but a study of the effects of ApoD expression in the normal aging process is still missing. Using an ApoD-knockout mouse we analyze the effects of ApoD on factors contributing to the functional maintenance of the aged brain. We focused our cellular and molecular analyses in the cortex and hippocampus at an age representing the onset of senescence where mortality risks are below 25%, avoiding bias towards long-lived animals. Lack of ApoD causes a prematurely aged brain without altering lifespan. Age-dependent hyperkinesia and memory deficits are accompanied by differential molecular effects in the cortex and hippocampus. Transcriptome analyses reveal distinct effects of ApoD loss on the molecular age-dependent patterns of the cortex and hippocampus, with different cell-type contributions to age-regulated gene expression. Markers of glial reactivity, proteostasis, and oxidative and inflammatory damage reveal early signs of aging and enhanced brain deterioration in the ApoD-knockout brain. The lack of ApoD results in an age-enhanced significant reduction in neuronal calcium-dependent functionality markers and signs of early reduction of neuronal numbers in the cortex, thus impinging upon parameters clearly differentiating neurodegenerative conditions from healthy brain aging. Our data support the hypothesis that the physiological increased brain expression of ApoD represents a homeostatic anti-aging mechanism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Traumatic brain injury dysregulates microRNAs to modulate cell signaling in rat hippocampus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Liu

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a common cause for cognitive and communication problems, but the molecular and cellular mechanisms are not well understood. Epigenetic modifications, such as microRNA (miRNA dysregulation, may underlie altered gene expression in the brain, especially hippocampus that plays a major role in spatial learning and memory and is vulnerable to TBI. To advance our understanding of miRNA in pathophysiological processes of TBI, we carried out a time-course microarray analysis of microRNA expression profile in rat ipsilateral hippocampus and examined histological changes, apoptosis and synapse ultrastructure of hippocampus post moderate TBI. We found that 10 out of 156 reliably detected miRNAs were significantly and consistently altered from one hour to seven days after injury. Bioinformatic and gene ontology analyses revealed 107 putative target genes, as well as several biological processes that might be initiated by those dysregulated miRNAs. Among those differentially expressed microRNAs, miR-144, miR-153 and miR-340-5p were confirmed to be elevated at all five time points after TBI by quantitative RT-PCR. Western blots showed three of the predicated target proteins, calcium/calmodulin-dependent serine protein kinase (CASK, nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2 and alpha-synuclein (SNCA, were concurrently down- regulated, suggesting that miR-144, miR-153 and miR-340-5p may play important roles collaboratively in the pathogenesis of TBI-induced cognitive and memory impairments. These microRNAs might serve as potential targets for progress assessment and intervention against TBI to mitigate secondary damage to the brain.

  17. Neural dynamics of the cognitive map in the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagatsuma, Hiroaki; Yamaguchi, Yoko

    2007-06-01

    The rodent hippocampus has been thought to represent the spatial environment as a cognitive map. In the classical theory, the cognitive map has been explained as a consequence of the fact that different spatial regions are assigned to different cell populations in the framework of rate coding. Recently, the relation between place cell firing and local field oscillation theta in terms of theta phase precession was experimentally discovered and suggested as a temporal coding mechanism leading to memory formation of behavioral sequences accompanied with asymmetric Hebbian plasticity. The cognitive map theory is apparently outside of the sequence memory view. Therefore, theoretical analysis is necessary to consider the biological neural dynamics for the sequence encoding of the memory of behavioral sequences, providing the cognitive map formation. In this article, we summarize the theoretical neural dynamics of the real-time sequence encoding by theta phase precession, called theta phase coding, and review a series of theoretical models with the theta phase coding that we previously reported. With respect to memory encoding functions, instantaneous memory formation of one-time experience was first demonstrated, and then the ability of integration of memories of behavioral sequences into a network of the cognitive map was shown. In terms of memory retrieval functions, theta phase coding enables the hippocampus to represent the spatial location in the current behavioral context even with ambiguous sensory input when multiple sequences were coded. Finally, for utilization, retrieved temporal sequences in the hippocampus can be available for action selection, through the process of reverting theta rhythm-dependent activities to information in the behavioral time scale. This theoretical approach allows us to investigate how the behavioral sequences are encoded, updated, retrieved and used in the hippocampus, as the real-time interaction with the external environment. It may

  18. Developing an Animal Model of Human Amnesia: The Role of the Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesner, Raymond P.; Goodrich-Hunsaker, Naomi J.

    2010-01-01

    This review summarizes a series of experiments aimed at answering the question whether the hippocampus in rats can serve as an animal model of amnesia. It is recognized that a comparison of the functions of the rat hippocampus with human hippocampus is difficult, because of differences in methodology, differences in complexity of life experiences,…

  19. File list: His.Neu.05.AllAg.Hippocampus [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  20. File list: His.Neu.10.AllAg.Hippocampus [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  1. File list: His.Neu.20.AllAg.Hippocampus [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  19. Ethanol affects network activity in cultured rat hippocampus: mediation by potassium channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduard Korkotian

    Full Text Available The effects of ethanol on neuronal network activity were studied in dissociated cultures of rat hippocampus. Exposure to low (0.25-0.5% ethanol concentrations caused an increase in synchronized network spikes, and a decrease in the duration of individual spikes. Ethanol also caused an increase in rate of miniature spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents. Higher concentrations of ethanol eliminated network spikes. These effects were reversible upon wash. The effects of the high, but not the low ethanol were blocked by the GABA antagonist bicuculline. The enhancing action of low ethanol was blocked by apamin, an SK potassium channel antagonist, and mimicked by 1-EBIO, an SK channel opener. It is proposed that in cultured hippocampal networks low concentration of ethanol is associated with SK channel activity, rather than the GABAergic receptor.

  20. Temporary inhibition of dorsal or ventral hippocampus by muscimol: distinct effects on measures of innate anxiety on the elevated plus maze, but similar disruption of contextual fear conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei-Ning; Bast, Tobias; Xu, Yan; Feldon, Joram

    2014-04-01

    Studies in rats, involving hippocampal lesions and hippocampal drug infusions, have implicated the hippocampus in the modulation of anxiety-related behaviors and conditioned fear. The ventral hippocampus is considered to be more important for anxiety- and fear-related behaviors than the dorsal hippocampus. In the present study, we compared the role of dorsal and ventral hippocampus in innate anxiety and classical fear conditioning in Wistar rats, examining the effects of temporary pharmacological inhibition by the GABA-A agonist muscimol (0.5 ug/0.5 ul/side) in the elevated plus maze and on fear conditioning to a tone and the conditioning context. In the elevated plus maze, dorsal and ventral hippocampal muscimol caused distinct behavioral changes. The effects of ventral hippocampal muscimol were consistent with suppression of locomotion, possibly accompanied by anxiolytic effects, whereas the pattern of changes caused by dorsal hippocampal muscimol was consistent with anxiogenic effects. In contrast, dorsal and ventral hippocampal muscimol caused similar effects in the fear conditioning experiments, disrupting contextual, but not tone, fear conditioning. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. [Effects of electromagnetic radiation on RAF/MEK/ERK signaling pathway in rats hippocampus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Hong-yan; Wang, De-wen; Peng, Rui-yun; Wang, Shui-ming; Gao, Ya-bing; Xu, Xin-ping; Ma, Jun-Jie

    2009-05-01

    To study the development of changes for signaling molecules related to Raf/MEK/ERK pathway in hippocampus of rats after electromagnetic radiation, and investigate the mechanisms of radiation injury. Rats were exposed to X-HPM, S-HPM and EMP radiation source respectively, and animal model of electromagnetic radiation was established. Western blot was used to detect the expression of Raf-1, phosphorylated Raf-1 and phospholylated ERK. The expression of Raf-1 down-regulated during 6 h-14 d after radiation, most significantly at 7 d, and recovered at 28 d. There was no significant difference between the radiation groups. The expression of phosphorylated Raf-1 and phosphorylated ERK both up-regulated at 6 h and 7 d after radiation, more significantly at 6 h, and the two microwave groups were more serious for phosphorylated ERK. During 6 h-14 d after S-HPM radiation, the expression of phosphorylated Raf-1 increased continuously, but phosphorylated ERK changed wavily, 6 h and 7 d were expression peak. Raf/MEK/ERK signaling pathway participates in the hippocampus injury induced by electromagnetic radiation. The excessive activation of ERK pathway may result in the apoptosis and death of neurons, which is the important mechanism of recognition disfunction caused by electromagnetic radiation.

  2. Spred1 is required for synaptic plasticity and hippocampus-dependent learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denayer, Ellen; Ahmed, Tariq; Brems, Hilde; Van Woerden, Geeske; Borgesius, Nils Zuiderveen; Callaerts-Vegh, Zsuzsanna; Yoshimura, Akihiko; Hartmann, Dieter; Elgersma, Ype; D'Hooge, Rudi; Legius, Eric; Balschun, Detlef

    2008-12-31

    Germline mutations in SPRED1, a negative regulator of Ras, have been described in a neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1)-like syndrome (NFLS) that included learning difficulties in some affected individuals. NFLS belongs to the group of phenotypically overlapping neuro-cardio-facial-cutaneous syndromes that are all caused by germ line mutations in genes of the Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway and that present with some degree of learning difficulties or mental retardation. We investigated hippocampus-dependent learning and memory as well as synaptic plasticity in Spred1(-/-) mice, an animal model of this newly discovered human syndrome. Spred1(-/-) mice show decreased learning and memory performance in the Morris water maze and visual-discrimination T-maze, but normal basic neuromotor and sensory abilities. Electrophysiological recordings on brain slices from these animals identified defects in short- and long-term synaptic hippocampal plasticity, including a disequilibrium between long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression in CA1 region. Biochemical analysis, 4 h after LTP induction, demonstrated increased ERK-phosphorylation in Spred1(-/-) slices compared with those of wild-type littermates. This indicates that deficits in hippocampus-dependent learning and synaptic plasticity induced by SPRED1 deficiency are related to hyperactivation of the Ras/ERK pathway.

  3. Acupuncture suppresses kainic acid-induced neuronal death and inflammatory events in mouse hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung-Tae; Doo, Ah-Reum; Kim, Seung-Nam; Kim, Song-Yi; Kim, Yoon Young; Kim, Jang-Hyun; Lee, Hyejung; Yin, Chang Shik; Park, Hi-Joon

    2012-09-01

    The administration of kainic acid (KA) causes seizures and produces neurodegeneration in hippocampal CA3 pyramidal cells. The present study investigated a possible role of acupuncture in reducing hippocampal cell death and inflammatory events, using a mouse model of kainic acid-induced epilepsy. Male C57BL/6 mice received acupuncture treatments at acupoint HT8 or in the tail area bilaterally once a day for 2 days and again immediately after an intraperitoneal injection of KA (30 mg/kg). HT8 is located on the palmar surface of the forelimbs, between the fourth and fifth metacarpal bones. Twenty-four hours after the KA injection, neuronal cell survival, the activations of microglia and astrocytes, and mRNA expression of two proinflammatory cytokines, interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), were measured in the hippocampus. Acupuncture stimulation at HT8, but not in the tail area, significantly reduced the KA-induced seizure, neuron death, microglial and astrocyte activations, and IL-1β mRNA expression in the hippocampus. The acupuncture stimulation also decreased the mRNA expression of TNF-α, but it was not significant. These results indicate that acupuncture at HT8 can inhibit hippocampal cell death and suppress KA-induced inflammatory events, suggesting a possible role for acupuncture in the treatment of epilepsy.

  4. Hippocampus shape analysis for temporal lobe epilepsy detection in magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohan, Zohreh; Azmi, Reza

    2016-03-01

    There are evidences in the literature that Temporal Lobe Epilepsy (TLE) causes some lateralized atrophy and deformation on hippocampus and other substructures of the brain. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), due to high-contrast soft tissue imaging, is one of the most popular imaging modalities being used in TLE diagnosis and treatment procedures. Using an algorithm to help clinicians for better and more effective shape deformations analysis could improve the diagnosis and treatment of the disease. In this project our purpose is to design, implement and test a classification algorithm for MRIs based on hippocampal asymmetry detection using shape and size-based features. Our method consisted of two main parts; (1) shape feature extraction, and (2) image classification. We tested 11 different shape and size features and selected four of them that detect the asymmetry in hippocampus significantly in a randomly selected subset of the dataset. Then, we employed a support vector machine (SVM) classifier to classify the remaining images of the dataset to normal and epileptic images using our selected features. The dataset contains 25 patient images in which 12 cases were used as a training set and the rest 13 cases for testing the performance of classifier. We measured accuracy, specificity and sensitivity of, respectively, 76%, 100%, and 70% for our algorithm. The preliminary results show that using shape and size features for detecting hippocampal asymmetry could be helpful in TLE diagnosis in MRI.

  5. Topographical Disorientation after Ischemic Mini Infarct in the Dorsal Hippocampus: Whispers in Silence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamshid eFaraji

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Silent focal ischemic mini infarcts in the brain are thought to cause no clinically overt symptoms. Some populations of hippocampal cells are particularly sensitive to ischemic events, however, rendering hippocampal functions especially vulnerable to ischemia-induced deficits. The present study investigated whether an otherwise silent ischemic mini infarct in the hippocampus (HPC can produce impairments in spatial performance in rats. Spatial performance was assessed in the ziggurat task (ZT using a 10-trial spatial learning protocol for four days prior to undergoing hippocampal ischemic lesion or sham surgery. Hippocampal silent ischemia was induced by infusion of endothelin-1 (ET-1, a potent vasoconstrictor, into either the dorsal or the ventral hippocampus (dHPC and vHPC. When tested postoperatively in the ZT using a standard testing protocol for eight days, rats with hippocampal lesions exhibited no spatial deficit. Although spatial learning and memory in the ZT were not affected by the ET-1-induced silent ischemia, rats with dHPC stroke showed more returns when navigating the ZT as opposed to the vHPC rats. Comparison of region-specific HPC lesions in the present study indicated that dorsal hippocampal function is critically required for topographic orientation in a complex environment. Topographic disorientation as reflected by enhanced return behaviours may represent one of the earliest predictors of cognitive decline after silent ischemic insult that may be potentially traced with sensitive clinical examination in humans.

  6. Topographical disorientation after ischemic mini infarct in the dorsal hippocampus: whispers in silence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraji, Jamshid; Soltanpour, Nabiollah; Moeeini, Reza; Roudaki, Shabnam; Soltanpour, Nasrin; Abdollahi, Ali-Akbar; Metz, Gerlinde A S

    2014-01-01

    Silent focal ischemic mini infarcts in the brain are thought to cause no clinically overt symptoms. Some populations of hippocampal cells are particularly sensitive to ischemic events, however, rendering hippocampal functions especially vulnerable to ischemia-induced deficits. The present study investigated whether an otherwise silent ischemic mini infarct in the hippocampus (HPC) can produce impairments in spatial performance in rats. Spatial performance was assessed in the ziggurat task (ZT) using a 10-trial spatial learning protocol for 4 days prior to undergoing hippocampal ischemic lesion or sham surgery. Hippocampal silent ischemia was induced by infusion of endothelin-1 (ET-1), a potent vasoconstrictor, into either the dorsal or the ventral hippocampus (dHPC and vHPC). When tested postoperatively in the ZT using a standard testing protocol for 8 days, rats with hippocampal lesions exhibited no spatial deficit. Although spatial learning and memory in the ZT were not affected by the ET-1-induced silent ischemia, rats with dHPC stroke showed more returns when navigating the ZT as opposed to the vHPC rats. Comparison of region-specific HPC lesions in the present study indicated that dorsal hippocampal function is critically required for topographic orientation in a complex environment. Topographic disorientation as reflected by enhanced return behaviors may represent one of the earliest predictors of cognitive decline after silent ischemic insult that may be potentially traced with sensitive clinical examination in humans.

  7. Expression of the snoRNA host gene gas5 in the hippocampus is upregulated by age and psychogenic stress and correlates with reduced novelty-induced behavior in C57BL/6 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Ingo; Fellini, Laetitia; Jakovcevski, Mira; Schachner, Melitta; Morellini, Fabio

    2010-09-01

    The growth arrest specific 5 (gas5) is a noncoding protein gene that hosts small nucleolar RNAs. Based on the observation that gas5 RNA level in the brain is highest in the hippocampus and remarkably enhanced in aged mice, we tested the hypothesis that gas5 is involved in functions controlled by the hippocampus and known to be affected by age, such as spatial learning and novelty-induced behaviors. We show that aged (22-month-old) C57BL/6 male mice have spatial-learning impairments, reduced novelty-induced exploration, and enhanced gas5 RNA levels in the hippocampus compared to young (3-month-old) mice. At both ages, levels of gas5 RNA in the hippocampus negatively correlated with novelty-induced exploration in the open field and elevated-plus maze tests. No correlations were found between gas5 RNA levels in the hippocampus and performance in the water maze test. The expression of gas5 RNA in the rest of the brain did not correlate with any behavioral parameter analyzed. Because variations in novelty-induced behaviors could be caused by stressfull experiences, we analyzed whether gas5 RNA levels in the hippocampus are regulated by acute stressors. We found that gas5 RNA levels in the hippocampus were upregulated by 50% 24 h after a psychogenic stressor (60-min olfactory contact with a rat) but were unchanged after exposure to an unfamiliar environment or after acquisition of new spatial information in a one-trial learning task. The present results suggest that strong psychogenic stressors upregulate gas5 RNA in the hippocampus, which in turn affects novelty-induced responses controlled by this region. We hypothesize that long-life exposure to stressors causes an age-dependent increase in hippocampal gas5 RNA levels, which could be responsible for age-related reduced novelty-induced behaviors, thus suggesting a new mechanism by which ageing and stress affect hippocampal function.

  8. 2-Cl-MGV-1 Ameliorates Apoptosis in the Thalamus and Hippocampus and Cognitive Deficits After Cortical Infarct in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yicong; Veenman, Leo; Singh, Sukhdev; Ouyang, Fubing; Liang, Jiahui; Huang, Weixian; Marek, Ilan; Zeng, Jinsheng; Gavish, Moshe

    2017-11-16

    Focal cortical infarction causes neuronal apoptosis in the ipsilateral nonischemic thalamus and hippocampus, which is potentially associated with poststroke cognitive deficits. TSPO (translocator protein) is critical in regulating mitochondrial apoptosis pathways. We examined the effects of the novel TSPO ligand 2-(2-chlorophenyl)quinazolin-4-yl dimethylcarbamate (2-Cl-MGV-1) on poststroke cognitive deficits, neuronal mitochondrial apoptosis, and secondary damage in the ipsilateral thalamus and hippocampus after cortical infarction. One hundred fourteen hypertensive rats underwent successful distal middle cerebral artery occlusion (n=76) or sham procedures (n=38). 2-Cl-MGV-1 or dimethyl sulfoxide as vehicle was administrated 2 hours after distal middle cerebral artery occlusion and then for 6 or 13 days (n=19 per group). Spatial learning and memory were tested using the Morris water maze. Secondary degeneration and mitochondrial apoptosis in the thalamus and hippocampus were assessed using Nissl staining, immunohistochemistry, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling, JC-1 staining, and immunoblotting 7 and 14 days after surgery. Infarct volumes did not significantly differ between the vehicle and 2-Cl-MGV-1 groups. There were more neurons and fewer glia in the ipsilateral thalamus and hippocampus in the vehicle groups than in the sham-operated group 7 and 14 days post-distal middle cerebral artery occlusion. 2-Cl-MGV-1 significantly ameliorated spatial cognitive impairment and decreased neuronal death and glial activation when compared with vehicle treatment (P<0.05). The collapse of mitochondrial transmembrane potential and cytoplasmic release of apoptosis-inducing factors and cytochrome c was prevented within the thalamus. Caspase cleavage and the numbers of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling(+) or Nissl atrophic cells were reduced within the thalamus and hippocampus. This was accompanied by upregulation of B

  9. MOLECULAR BASIS OF LEARNING IN THE HIPPOCAMPUS AND THE AMYGDALA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łukasz BIJOCH

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The hippocampus and the amygdala are structures of mammalian brain both involved in memorizing. However, they are responsible for different types of memory: the hippocampus is involved in creating and storing declarative engrams and the amygdala is engaged in some of non-declarative learning. During memorization, changes of synapses appear and it is believed that they encode information. Long-Term Potentiation (LTP and Long-Term Depression (LTD are two processes which provide to these changes which are called synaptic plasticity. LTP strengthens connections between neurons and because of that it is traditionally linked with learning. LTD as an opposite state is usually treated as forgetting. However, there are some evidences that it is true only for few types of non-declarative engrams. More sophisticated learning (like declarative learning requires cooperation of these processes. Review is focused on functions and detailed signaling pathways of processes of synaptic plasticity.

  10. Nitric Oxide Regulates Neurogenesis in the Hippocampus following Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno P. Carreira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hippocampal neurogenesis is changed by brain injury. When neuroinflammation accompanies injury, activation of resident microglial cells promotes the release of inflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen/nitrogen species like nitric oxide (NO. In these conditions, NO promotes proliferation of neural stem cells (NSC in the hippocampus. However, little is known about the role of NO in the survival and differentiation of newborn cells in the injured dentate gyrus. Here we investigated the role of NO following seizures in the regulation of proliferation, migration, differentiation, and survival of NSC in the hippocampus using the kainic acid (KA induced seizure mouse model. We show that NO increased the proliferation of NSC and the number of neuroblasts following seizures but was detrimental to the survival of newborn neurons. NO was also required for the maintenance of long-term neuroinflammation. Taken together, our data show that NO positively contributes to the initial stages of neurogenesis following seizures but compromises survival of newborn neurons.

  11. A Closer Look at the Hippocampus and Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Joel L; Bridge, Donna J; Cohen, Neal J; Walker, John A

    2017-08-01

    Current interpretations of hippocampal memory function are blind to the fact that viewing behaviors are pervasive and complicate the relationships among perception, behavior, memory, and brain activity. For example, hippocampal activity and associative memory demands increase with stimulus complexity. Stimulus complexity also strongly modulates viewing. Associative processing and viewing thus are often confounded, rendering interpretation of hippocampal activity ambiguous. Similar considerations challenge many accounts of hippocampal function. To explain relationships between memory and viewing, we propose that the hippocampus supports the online memory demands necessary to guide visual exploration. The hippocampus thus orchestrates memory-guided exploration that unfolds over time to build coherent memories. This new perspective on hippocampal function harmonizes with the fact that memory formation and exploratory viewing are tightly intertwined. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Anorexia Reduces GFAP+ Cell Density in the Rat Hippocampus

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel Reyes-Haro; Francisco Emmanuel Labrada-Moncada; Durairaj Ragu Varman; Janina Krüger; Teresa Morales; Ricardo Miledi; Ataúlfo Martínez-Torres

    2016-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder observed primarily in young women. The neurobiology of the disorder is unknown but recently magnetic resonance imaging showed a volume reduction of the hippocampus in anorexic patients. Dehydration-induced anorexia (DIA) is a murine model that mimics core features of this disorder, including severe weight loss due to voluntary reduction in food intake. The energy supply to the brain is mediated by astrocytes, but whether their density is compromised by a...

  13. Gene expression in cortex and hippocampus during acute pneumococcal meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wittwer Matthias

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pneumococcal meningitis is associated with high mortality (~30% and morbidity. Up to 50% of survivors are affected by neurological sequelae due to a wide spectrum of brain injury mainly affecting the cortex and hippocampus. Despite this significant disease burden, the genetic program that regulates the host response leading to brain damage as a consequence of bacterial meningitis is largely unknown. We used an infant rat model of pneumococcal meningitis to assess gene expression profiles in cortex and hippocampus at 22 and 44 hours after infection and in controls at 22 h after mock-infection with saline. To analyze the biological significance of the data generated by Affymetrix DNA microarrays, a bioinformatics pipeline was used combining (i a literature-profiling algorithm to cluster genes based on the vocabulary of abstracts indexed in MEDLINE (NCBI and (ii the self-organizing map (SOM, a clustering technique based on covariance in gene expression kinetics. Results Among 598 genes differentially regulated (change factor ≥ 1.5; p ≤ 0.05, 77% were automatically assigned to one of 11 functional groups with 94% accuracy. SOM disclosed six patterns of expression kinetics. Genes associated with growth control/neuroplasticity, signal transduction, cell death/survival, cytoskeleton, and immunity were generally upregulated. In contrast, genes related to neurotransmission and lipid metabolism were transiently downregulated on the whole. The majority of the genes associated with ionic homeostasis, neurotransmission, signal transduction and lipid metabolism were differentially regulated specifically in the hippocampus. Of the cell death/survival genes found to be continuously upregulated only in hippocampus, the majority are pro-apoptotic, while those continuously upregulated only in cortex are anti-apoptotic. Conclusion Temporal and spatial analysis of gene expression in experimental pneumococcal meningitis identified potential

  14. Sleep in the human hippocampus: a stereo-EEG study.

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    Fabio Moroni

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is compelling evidence indicating that sleep plays a crucial role in the consolidation of new declarative, hippocampus-dependent memories. Given the increasing interest in the spatiotemporal relationships between cortical and hippocampal activity during sleep, this study aimed to shed more light on the basic features of human sleep in the hippocampus. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We recorded intracerebral stereo-EEG directly from the hippocampus and neocortical sites in five epileptic patients undergoing presurgical evaluations. The time course of classical EEG frequency bands during the first three NREM-REM sleep cycles of the night was evaluated. We found that delta power shows, also in the hippocampus, the progressive decrease across sleep cycles, indicating that a form of homeostatic regulation of delta activity is present also in this subcortical structure. Hippocampal sleep was also characterized by: i a lower relative power in the slow oscillation range during NREM sleep compared to the scalp EEG; ii a flattening of the time course of the very low frequencies (up to 1 Hz across sleep cycles, with relatively high levels of power even during REM sleep; iii a decrease of power in the beta band during REM sleep, at odds with the typical increase of power in the cortical recordings. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data imply that cortical slow oscillation is attenuated in the hippocampal structures during NREM sleep. The most peculiar feature of hippocampal sleep is the increased synchronization of the EEG rhythms during REM periods. This state of resonance may have a supportive role for the processing/consolidation of memory.

  15. Antioxidant activity of Citrus limon essential oil in mouse hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campêlo, Lidianne Mayra Lopes; Gonçalves, Fabrício Custódio Moura; Feitosa, Chistiane Mendes; de Freitas, Rivelilson Mendes

    2011-07-01

    Citrus limon (L.) Burms (Rutaceae) has been shown in previous studies to have various biological functions (anti-inflammatory, antiallergic, antiviral, antimutagenic, and anticarcinogenic). However, traditional uses in folk medicine suggest that C. limon may have an effect on the central nervous system (CNS). This study investigated the effects of C. limon essential oil (EO) on lipid peroxidation level, nitrite content, glutathione reduced (GSH) concentration, and antioxidant enzymes [superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, and glutathione peroxidase (GPx)] activities in mice hippocampus. Swiss mice were treated with the suspension of 0.5% Tween 80, in distilled water used as vehicle (i.p., control group) and with EO in three different doses (0.05, 0.1, or 0.15 g/kg, i.p., EO 50, EO 100, and EO 150 groups, respectively). After the treatments, all groups were observed for 24 h. The enzyme activities as well as the lipid peroxidation, nitrite, and GSH concentrations in mice hippocampus were measured using spectrophotometric methods and the results were compared with values obtained from control group. EO of C. limon treatment significantly reduced the lipid peroxidation level and nitrite content but increased the GSH levels and the SOD, catalase, and GPx activities in mice hippocampus. Our findings strongly support the hypothesis that oxidative stress in hippocampus can occur during neurodegenerative diseases, proving that hippocampal damage induced by the oxidative process plays a crucial role in brain disorders, and also imply that a strong protective effect could be achieved using EO of C. limon as an antioxidant.

  16. Behavioural cues of reproductive status in seahorses Hippocampus abdominalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittington, C M; Musolf, K; Sommer, S; Wilson, A B

    2013-07-01

    A method is described to assess the reproductive status of male Hippocampus abdominalis on the basis of behavioural traits. The non-invasive nature of this technique minimizes handling stress and reduces sampling requirements for experimental work. It represents a useful tool to assist researchers in sample collection for studies of reproduction and development in viviparous syngnathids, which are emerging as important model species. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Fish Biology © 2013 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  17. Self-generated theta oscillations in the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goutagny, Romain; Jackson, Jesse; Williams, Sylvain

    2009-12-01

    Hippocampal theta rhythm is crucial for spatial memory and is thought to be generated by extrinsic inputs. In contrast, using a complete rat hippocampus in vitro, we found several intrinsic, atropine-resistant theta generators in CA1. These oscillators were organized along the septotemporal axis and arose independently from CA3. Our results suggest that CA1 theta rhythm can emerge from the coupling of multiple autonomous hippocampal theta oscillators.

  18. Anorexia Reduces GFAP+ Cell Density in the Rat Hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Reyes-Haro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder observed primarily in young women. The neurobiology of the disorder is unknown but recently magnetic resonance imaging showed a volume reduction of the hippocampus in anorexic patients. Dehydration-induced anorexia (DIA is a murine model that mimics core features of this disorder, including severe weight loss due to voluntary reduction in food intake. The energy supply to the brain is mediated by astrocytes, but whether their density is compromised by anorexia is unknown. Thus, the aim of this study was to estimate GFAP+ cell density in the main regions of the hippocampus (CA1, CA2, CA3, and dentate gyrus in the DIA model. Our results showed that GFAP+ cell density was significantly reduced (~20% in all regions of the hippocampus, except in CA1. Interestingly, DIA significantly reduced the GFAP+ cells/nuclei ratio in CA2 (−23% and dentate gyrus (−48%. The reduction of GFAP+ cell density was in agreement with a lower expression of GFAP protein. Additionally, anorexia increased the expression of the intermediate filaments vimentin and nestin. Accordingly, anorexia increased the number of reactive astrocytes in CA2 and dentate gyrus more than twofold. We conclude that anorexia reduces the hippocampal GFAP+ cell density and increases vimentin and nestin expression.

  19. Recognition memory and theta-gamma interactions in the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimper, John B; Stefanescu, Roxana A; Manns, Joseph R

    2014-03-01

    Neuronal oscillations and cross-frequency interactions in the rat hippocampus relate in important ways to memory processes and serve as a model for studying oscillatory activity in cognition more broadly. We report here that hippocampal synchrony (CA3-CA1 coherence) increased markedly in the low gamma range as rats were exploring novel objects, particularly those for which the rat subsequently showed good memory. The gamma synchrony varied across phases of the theta rhythm such that coherence was highest at the falling slope and trough of the theta wave. Further, the shape of the theta wave was more asymmetric and elongated at the falling slope during exploration of objects for which the rat subsequently showed good memory as compared with objects for which the rat subsequently showed poor memory. The results showed a strong association between event-related gamma synchrony in rat hippocampus and memory encoding for novel objects. In addition, a novel potential mechanism of cross-frequency interactions was observed whereby dynamic alterations in the shape of theta wave related to memory in correspondence with the strength of gamma synchrony. These findings add to our understanding of how theta and gamma oscillations interact in the hippocampus in the service of memory. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Anorexia Reduces GFAP+ Cell Density in the Rat Hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Haro, Daniel; Labrada-Moncada, Francisco Emmanuel; Varman, Durairaj Ragu; Krüger, Janina; Morales, Teresa; Miledi, Ricardo; Martínez-Torres, Ataúlfo

    2016-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder observed primarily in young women. The neurobiology of the disorder is unknown but recently magnetic resonance imaging showed a volume reduction of the hippocampus in anorexic patients. Dehydration-induced anorexia (DIA) is a murine model that mimics core features of this disorder, including severe weight loss due to voluntary reduction in food intake. The energy supply to the brain is mediated by astrocytes, but whether their density is compromised by anorexia is unknown. Thus, the aim of this study was to estimate GFAP+ cell density in the main regions of the hippocampus (CA1, CA2, CA3, and dentate gyrus) in the DIA model. Our results showed that GFAP+ cell density was significantly reduced (~20%) in all regions of the hippocampus, except in CA1. Interestingly, DIA significantly reduced the GFAP+ cells/nuclei ratio in CA2 (-23%) and dentate gyrus (-48%). The reduction of GFAP+ cell density was in agreement with a lower expression of GFAP protein. Additionally, anorexia increased the expression of the intermediate filaments vimentin and nestin. Accordingly, anorexia increased the number of reactive astrocytes in CA2 and dentate gyrus more than twofold. We conclude that anorexia reduces the hippocampal GFAP+ cell density and increases vimentin and nestin expression.

  1. Gonadectomy increases neurogenesis in the male adolescent rhesus macaque hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, K M; Fung, S J; Rothmond, D A; Noble, P L; Weickert, C Shannon

    2014-02-01

    New neurons are continuously produced in the subgranular zone of the adult hippocampus and can modulate hippocampal plasticity across life. Adolescence is characterized by dramatic changes in sex hormone levels, and social and emotional behaviors. It is also an age for increased risk of psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia, which may involve altered hippocampal neurogenesis. The extent to which testosterone and other testicular hormones modulate hippocampal neurogenesis and adolescent behavioral development is unclear. This study aimed to determine if removal of testicular hormones during adolescence alters neurogenesis in the male rhesus macaque hippocampus. We used stereology to examine levels of cell proliferation, cell survival and neuronal differentiation in late adolescent male rhesus macaques (4.6-yrs old) that had previously been gonadectomized or sham operated prior to puberty (2.4-yrs old). While the absence of adolescent testicular hormones had no effect on cell proliferation, cell survival was increased by 65% and indices of immature neuronal differentiation were increased by 56% in gonadectomized monkeys compared to intact monkeys. We show for the first time that presence of circulating testicular hormones, including testosterone, may decrease neuronal survival in the primate hippocampus during adolescence. Our findings are in contrast to existing studies in adults where testosterone tends to be a pro-survival factor and demonstrate that testicular hormones may reduce hippocampal neurogenesis during the age typical of schizophrenia onset. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Cortical representations are reinstated by the hippocampus during memory retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kazumasa Z; Pevzner, Aleksandr; Hamidi, Anahita B; Nakazawa, Yuki; Graham, Jalina; Wiltgen, Brian J

    2014-10-22

    The hippocampus is assumed to retrieve memory by reinstating patterns of cortical activity that were observed during learning. To test this idea, we monitored the activity of individual cortical neurons while simultaneously inactivating the hippocampus. Neurons that were active during context fear conditioning were tagged with the long-lasting fluorescent protein H2B-GFP and the light-activated proton pump ArchT. These proteins allowed us to identify encoding neurons several days after learning and silence them with laser stimulation. When tagged CA1 cells were silenced, we found that memory retrieval was impaired and representations in the cortex (entorhinal, retrosplenial, perirhinal) and the amygdala could not be reactivated. Importantly, hippocampal inactivation did not alter the total amount of activity in most brain regions. Instead, it selectively prevented neurons that were active during learning from being reactivated during retrieval. These data provide functional evidence that the hippocampus reactivates specific memory representations during retrieval. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A neural model of normal and abnormal learning and memory consolidation: adaptively timed conditioning, hippocampus, amnesia, neurotrophins, and consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Daniel J; Grossberg, Stephen

    2017-02-01

    How do the hippocampus and amygdala interact with thalamocortical systems to regulate cognitive and cognitive-emotional learning? Why do lesions of thalamus, amygdala, hippocampus, and cortex have differential effects depending on the phase of learning when they occur? In particular, why is the hippocampus typically needed for trace conditioning, but not delay conditioning, and what do the exceptions reveal? Why do amygdala lesions made before or immediately after training decelerate conditioning while those made later do not? Why do thalamic or sensory cortical lesions degrade trace conditioning more than delay conditioning? Why do hippocampal lesions during trace conditioning experiments degrade recent but not temporally remote learning? Why do orbitofrontal cortical lesions degrade temporally remote but not recent or post-lesion learning? How is temporally graded amnesia caused by ablation of prefrontal cortex after memory consolidation? How are attention and consciousness linked during conditioning? How do neurotrophins, notably brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), influence memory formation and consolidation? Is there a common output path for learned performance? A neural model proposes a unified answer to these questions that overcome problems of alternative memory models.

  4. Changes in epigenetic markers, DNMT1 and HDAC1/2, in the adult mouse hippocampus after cranial irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sohi; Son, Yeonghoon; Lee, Sueun; Kim, Juhwan; Kim, Jong-Choon; Kim, Joong-Sun; Jung, Uhee; Kim, Sung-Ho; Yang, Miyoung; Moon, Changjong

    2017-09-14

    Brain exposure to ionizing radiation can cause functional deficits in the hippocampus, including memory impairment. However, the specific molecular mechanisms underlying irradiation-induced cognitive impairments are largely unknown. Changes in DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs), which are involved in DNA methylation and histone remodeling, may be associated with behavioral changes in learning and memory. We assessed changes in the levels of enzymes associated with the epigenetic modification of gene expression, including DNMT1, HDAC1, HDAC2, Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), and acetylated histone H3 (Ace-H3) in the mouse hippocampus 1 and 30days after a single exposure to cranial irradiation (0 or 10Gy). mRNA levels of HDAC1 were significantly downregulated 1day after irradiation with 10Gy, and those of DNMT1, HDAC1, and HDAC2 were significantly downregulated 30days post-irradiation. Western blot analysis revealed significant decreases in DNMT1, HDAC1, and HDAC2 protein levels 1 and 30days after irradiation with 10Gy. Furthermore, protein levels of SIRT1 and Ace-H3 were significantly downregulated in the mouse hippocampus 1 and 30days after cranial irradiation. Our findings suggest that the reduction in epigenetic gene expression is associated with hippocampal dysfunction in mice exposed to cranial irradiation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Histological study on hippocampus, amygdala and cerebellum following low lead exposure during prenatal and postnatal brain development in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkur, Rajashekar Rao; Bairy, Laxminarayana K

    2016-06-01

    Neuropsychological studies in children who are exposed to lead during their early brain development have shown to develop behavioural and cognitive deficit. The aim of the present study was to assess the cellular damage in hippocampus, amygdala and cerebellum of rat pups exposed to lead during different periods of early brain development. Five groups of rat pups were investigated. (a) Control group (n = 8) (mothers of these rats were given normal drinking water throughout gestation and lactation), (b) pregestation lead-exposed group (n = 8) (mothers of these rats were exposed to 0.2% lead acetate in the drinking water for one month before conception), (c) gestation lead-exposed group (n = 8) (exposed to 0.2% lead acetate in the drinking water through the mother throughout gestation [gestation day 01 to day 21]), (d) lactation lead-exposed group (n = 8) (exposed to 0.2% lead acetate in the drinking water through the mother throughout lactation [postnatal day 01 to day 21]) and (e) gestation and lactation lead-exposed group (n = 8) (exposed to 0.2% lead acetate throughout gestation and lactation). On postnatal day 30, rat pups of all the groups were killed. Numbers of surviving neurons in the hippocampus, amygdala and cerebellum regions were counted using cresyl violet staining technique. Histological data indicate that lead exposure caused significant damage to neurons of hippocampus, amygdala and cerebellum regions in all lead-exposed groups except lactation lead-exposed group. The extent of damage to neurons of hippocampus, amygdala and cerebellum regions in lactation lead-exposed group was comparable to gestation and lactation groups even though the duration of lead exposure was much less in lactation lead-exposed group. To conclude, the postnatal period of brain development seems to be more vulnerable to lead neurotoxicity compared to prenatal period of brain development. © The Author(s) 2014.

  6. Hesperidin and Silibinin Ameliorate Aluminum-Induced Neurotoxicity: Modulation of Antioxidants and Inflammatory Cytokines Level in Mice Hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jangra, Ashok; Kasbe, Prajapati; Pandey, Surya Narayan; Dwivedi, Shubham; Gurjar, Satendra S; Kwatra, Mohit; Mishra, Murli; Venu, Athira K; Sulakhiya, Kunjbihari; Gogoi, Ranadeep; Sarma, Nitul; Bezbaruah, Babul K; Lahkar, Mangala

    2015-12-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that long-term aluminum exposure results in severe toxic effects, including neurobehavioral and neurochemical anomalies. The present study was performed to examine the neuroprotective potential of hesperidin and silibinin against aluminum chloride (AlCl3)-induced neurotoxicity in mice. AlCl3 (100 mg/kg/day) was injected daily through oral gavage for 42 days. Concomitantly, hesperidin (50 and 100 mg/kg/day, p.o.) and silibinin (100 and 200 mg/kg/day, p.o.) was administered for 42 days in different groups. The extent of cognitive impairment was assessed by Morris water maze and novel object recognition test on the 43rd day. Neurotoxicity was assessed by measuring oxido-nitrosative stress and proinflammatory cytokines in the hippocampus of mice. Six weeks treatment with AlCl3 caused cognitive impairment as indicated by an increase in the retention latency time and reduction in the percentage of recognition index. AlCl3-treated group showed oxido-nitrosative stress as indicated by increase in the level of lipid peroxidation, nitrite and depleted reduced glutathione, catalase activity in the hippocampus. Moreover, the chronic AlCl3 administration raised the proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α) level and increased acetylcholinesterase activity and reduced the BDNF content in the hippocampus of AlCl3-treated animals. However, chronic treatment with hesperidin and silibinin at higher doses significantly ameliorated the AlCl3-induced cognitive impairment and hippocampal biochemical anomalies. The present study clearly indicated that hesperidin and silibinin exert neuroprotective effects against AlCl3-induced cognitive impairment and neurochemical changes. Amelioration of cognitive impairment may be attributed to the impediment of oxido-nitrosative stress and inflammation in the hippocampus.

  7. Electroconvulsive Stimulation, but not Chronic Restraint Stress, Causes Structural Alterations in Adult Rat Hippocampus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Mikkel V.; Wörtwein, Gitta; Pakkenberg, Bente

    2015-01-01

    of newly formed neurons in the hippocampal subgranular zone. Also estimated were the total number of neurons and the volume of the granule cell layer in adult rats subjected to chronic restraint stress and electroconvulsive stimulation either alone or in combination. We found that chronic restraint stress...

  8. The tired hippocampus: the molecular impact of sleep deprivation on hippocampal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havekes, Robbert; Abel, Ted

    2017-06-01

    Memory consolidation, the process by which information is stored following training, consists of synaptic consolidation and systems consolidation. It is widely acknowledged that sleep deprivation has a profound effect on synaptic consolidation, particularly for memories that require the hippocampus. It is unclear, however, which of the many molecular changes associated with sleep deprivation directly contribute to memory deficits. In this review, we highlight recent studies showing that sleep deprivation impairs hippocampal cAMP and mTOR signaling, and ultimately causes spine loss in CA1 neurons in a cofilin-dependent fashion. Reversing these molecular alterations made memory consolidation resistant to the negative impact of sleep deprivation. Together, these studies have started to identify the molecular underpinnings by which sleep deprivation impairs synaptic consolidation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators Regulate Dendritic Spine Plasticity in the Hippocampus of Male Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio González-Burgos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Some selective estrogen receptor modulators, such as raloxifene and tamoxifen, are neuroprotective and reduce brain inflammation in several experimental models of neurodegeneration. In addition, raloxifene and tamoxifen counteract cognitive deficits caused by gonadal hormone deprivation in male rats. In this study, we have explored whether raloxifene and tamoxifen may regulate the number and geometry of dendritic spines in CA1 pyramidal neurons of the rat hippocampus. Young adult male rats were injected with raloxifene (1 mg/kg, tamoxifen (1 mg/kg, or vehicle and killed 24 h after the injection. Animals treated with raloxifene or tamoxifen showed an increased numerical density of dendritic spines in CA1 pyramidal neurons compared to animals treated with vehicle. Raloxifene and tamoxifen had also specific effects in the morphology of spines. These findings suggest that raloxifene and tamoxifen may influence the processing of information by hippocampal pyramidal neurons by affecting the number and shape of dendritic spines.

  10. NeuN Expression Alterations in the Hippocampus Following Ecstasy Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghasemi Moravej

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background The administration of 3-4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA leads to learning and memory impairment. Objectives Due to the effect of neurogenesis on memory and learning, in this study, we investigated the effects of MDMA on NeuN expression (a marker of neurogenesis in the hippocampus. Methods Adult male Wistar rats (weighing 200 - 250 g received a single intraperitoneal dose of 10 mg/kg of MDMA or were left undisrupted. The expression of NeuN was assessed using the immunohistochemistry method 7, 14, 28, and 60 days following MDMA administration. Results Our results showed that MDMA administration caused a decrease in NeuN expression in the experimental group compared with the control group. Conclusions These results suggest a negative correlation between MDMA administration and adult hippocampal neurogenesis.

  11. Hippocampus sparing in whole-brain radiotherapy. A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oskan, F. [University of Munich, Department of Radiation Oncology and CCC Neuro-Oncology, Munich (Germany); Saarland University Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Ganswindt, U.; Schwarz, S.B.; Manapov, F.; Belka, C.; Niyazi, M. [University of Munich, Department of Radiation Oncology and CCC Neuro-Oncology, Munich (Germany)

    2014-04-15

    Radiation treatment techniques for whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) have not changed significantly since development of the procedure. However, the recent development of novel techniques such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and helical tomotherapy, as well as an increasing body of evidence concerning neural stem cells (NSCs) have altered the conventional WBRT treatment paradigm. In this regard, hippocampus-sparing WBRT is a novel technique that aims to spare critical hippocampus regions without compromising tumour control. Published data on this new technique are limited to planning and feasibility studies; data on patient outcome are still lacking. However, several prospective trials to analyse the feasibility of this technique and to document clinical outcome in terms of reduced neurotoxicity are ongoing. (orig.) [German] Die Technik der Ganzhirnbestrahlung (''whole-brain radiation therapy'', WBRT) hat sich seit der Entwicklung nicht wesentlich veraendert. Allerdings stellten die Neuentwicklung von Techniken wie die intensitaetsmodulierte Strahlentherapie (IMRT), die volumenmodulierte Arc-Therapie (VMAT) oder die helikale Tomotherapie sowie immer groesseres Wissen ueber das neurale Stammzellkompartiment (NSCs) das herkoemmliche Ganzhirn-Paradigma in Frage. Die hippocampusschonende Ganzhirnbestrahlung ist eine neuartige Technik, welche die kritische Region des Hippocampus schont, ohne die Tumorkontrolle zu gefaehrden. Ueber diese Technik gibt es bisher nur eine begrenzte Datenlage im Sinne von Planungs- und Machbarkeitsstudien. Klinische Daten bzgl. der Behandlungsergebnisse fehlen nach wie vor, aber einige prospektive Studien sind im Gange, um nicht nur die Machbarkeit zu belegen, sondern auch das klinische Outcome im Sinne einer verringerten Neurotoxizitaet nachzuweisen. (orig.)

  12. Intracranial EEG correlates of implicit relational inference within the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reber, T P; Do Lam, A T A; Axmacher, N; Elger, C E; Helmstaedter, C; Henke, K; Fell, J

    2016-01-01

    Drawing inferences from past experiences enables adaptive behavior in future situations. Inference has been shown to depend on hippocampal processes. Usually, inference is considered a deliberate and effortful mental act which happens during retrieval, and requires the focus of our awareness. Recent fMRI studies hint at the possibility that some forms of hippocampus-dependent inference can also occur during encoding and possibly also outside of awareness. Here, we sought to further explore the feasibility of hippocampal implicit inference, and specifically address the temporal evolution of implicit inference using intracranial EEG. Presurgical epilepsy patients with hippocampal depth electrodes viewed a sequence of word pairs, and judged the semantic fit between two words in each pair. Some of the word pairs entailed a common word (e.g., "winter-red," "red-cat") such that an indirect relation was established in following word pairs (e.g., "winter-cat"). The behavioral results suggested that drawing inference implicitly from past experience is feasible because indirect relations seemed to foster "fit" judgments while the absence of indirect relations fostered "do not fit" judgments, even though the participants were unaware of the indirect relations. A event-related potential (ERP) difference emerging 400 ms post-stimulus was evident in the hippocampus during encoding, suggesting that indirect relations were already established automatically during encoding of the overlapping word pairs. Further ERP differences emerged later post-stimulus (1,500 ms), were modulated by the participants' responses and were evident during encoding and test. Furthermore, response-locked ERP effects were evident at test. These ERP effects could hence be a correlate of the interaction of implicit memory with decision-making. Together, the data map out a time-course in which the hippocampus automatically integrates memories from discrete but related episodes to implicitly influence future

  13. Conscious Experience and Episodic Memory: Hippocampus at the Crossroads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf-Peter eBehrendt

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available If an instance of conscious experience of the seemingly objective world around us could be regarded as a newly formed event memory, much as an instance of mental imagery has the content of a retrieved event memory, and if, therefore, the stream of conscious experience could be seen as evidence for ongoing formation of event memories that are linked into episodic memory sequences, then unitary conscious experience could be defined as a symbolic representation of the pattern of hippocampal neuronal firing that encodes an event memory – a theoretical stance that may shed light into the mind-body and binding problems in consciousness research. Exceedingly detailed symbols that describe patterns of activity rapidly self-organizing, at each cycle of the θ rhythm, in the hippocampus are instances of unitary conscious experience that jointly constitute the stream of consciousness. Integrating object information (derived from the ventral visual stream and orbitofrontal cortex with contextual emotional information (from the anterior insula and spatial environmental information (from the dorsal visual stream, the hippocampus rapidly forms event codes that have the informational content of objects embedded in an emotional and spatiotemporally extending context. Event codes, formed in the CA3-dentate network for the purpose of their memorization, are not only contextualized but also allocentric representations, similarly to conscious experiences of events and objects situated in a seemingly objective and observer-independent framework of phenomenal space and time. Conscious perception is likely to be related to more fleeting and seemingly internal forms of conscious experience, such as autobiographical memory recall, mental imagery, including goal anticipation, and to other forms of externalized conscious experience, namely dreaming and hallucinations; and evidence pointing to an important contribution of the hippocampus to these conscious phenomena will

  14. The hippocampus is necessary for enhancements and impairments of learning following stress

    OpenAIRE

    Bangasser, Debra A; Shors, Tracey J

    2007-01-01

    The hippocampus is often considered to be an important site for stress and learning interactions; however, it has never been demonstrated whether these effects require the hippocampus. In the current study, hippocampal lesions prevented both enhancements of learning after stress in male rats and impairments of learning after stress in female rats without disrupting learning itself in either sex. Thus, the hippocampus is necessary for modifying learning in males and females after acute stressf...

  15. The hippocampus and exploration: dynamically evolving behavior and neural representations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam eJohnson

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available We develop a normative statistical approach to exploratory behavior called information foraging. Information foraging highlights the specific processes that contribute to active, rather than passive, exploration and learning. We hypothesize that the hippocampus plays a critical role in active exploration through directed information foraging by supporting a set of processes that allow an individual to determine where to sample. By examining these processes, we show how information directed information foraging provides a formal theoretical explanation for the common hippocampal substrates of constructive memory, vicarious trial and error behavior, schema-based facilitation of memory performance, and memory consolidation.

  16. Muscarinic receptor compensation in hippocampus of alzheimer patients. [Autoradiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordberg, A.; Larsson, C.; Adolfsson, R.; Alafuzoff, I.; Winblad, B. (Uppsala Univ. (Sweden))

    1983-01-01

    The activity of the acetylcholine synthesizing enzyme choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) (presynaptic marker) and number of muscarine-like receptor binding sites have been measured in the hippocampus from eight individuals with senile dementia of Alzheimer type (SDAT) and ten controls. A negative correlation (r=0.80; p<0.05) was found between the ChAT activity and the number of muscarine-like receptors in the SDAT group but not in the controls. The findings might indicate an ongoing compensatory receptor mechanism as a response to changes in presynaptic cholinergic activity.

  17. Choline acetyltransferase in the hippocampus is associated with learning strategy preference in adult male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, Wayne R; Witty, Christine F; Daniel, Jill M; Dohanich, Gary P

    2015-08-01

    One principle of the multiple memory systems hypothesis posits that the hippocampus-based and striatum-based memory systems compete for control over learning. Consistent with this notion, previous research indicates that the cholinergic system of the hippocampus plays a role in modulating the preference for a hippocampus-based place learning strategy over a striatum-based stimulus--response learning strategy. Interestingly, in the hippocampus, greater activity and higher protein levels of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), the enzyme that synthesizes acetylcholine, are associated with better performance on hippocampus-based learning and memory tasks. With this in mind, the primary aim of the current study was to determine if higher levels of ChAT and the high-affinity choline uptake transporter (CHT) in the hippocampus were associated with a preference for a hippocampus-based place learning strategy on a task that also could be solved by relying on a striatum-based stimulus--response learning strategy. Results confirmed that levels of ChAT in the dorsal region of the hippocampus were associated with a preference for a place learning strategy on a water maze task that could also be solved by adopting a stimulus-response learning strategy. Consistent with previous studies, the current results support the hypothesis that the cholinergic system of the hippocampus plays a role in balancing competition between memory systems that modulate learning strategy preference. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Nicotinic receptors in the dorsal and ventral hippocampus differentially modulate contextual fear conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, Justin W; Raybuck, Jonathan D; Gould, Thomas J

    2012-08-01

    Nicotine administration alters various forms of hippocampus-dependent learning and memory. Increasing work has found that the dorsal and ventral hippocampus differentially contribute to multiple behaviors. Thus, the present study examined whether the effects of nicotine in the dorsal and ventral hippocampus have distinct influences on contextual fear learning in male C57BL/6J mice. Direct infusion of nicotine into the dorsal hippocampus resulted in an enhancement of contextual fear learning, whereas nicotine infused into the ventral hippocampus resulted in deficits. Nicotine infusions into the ventral hippocampus did not alter hippocampus-independent cued fear conditioning or time spent in the open arm of the elevated plus maze, a measure of anxiety, suggesting that the effects are due to alterations in contextual learning and not other general processes. Finally, results from using direct infusions of MLA, a low-affinity α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) antagonist, in conjunction with systemic nicotine, provide evidence that α7-nAChRs in the ventral hippocampus mediate the detrimental effect of ventral hippocampal nicotine on contextual fear learning. These results suggest that with systemic nicotine administration, competition exists between the dorsal and ventral hippocampus for behavioral control over contextual learning. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Effects of arsenic exposure from drinking water on spatial memory, ultra-structures and NMDAR gene expression of hippocampus in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jiao-hua; Qiu, Zhi-qun; Shu, Wei-qun; Zhang, Yong-yan; Zhang, Liang; Chen, Ji-an

    2009-01-30

    Epidemiological investigations indicate that chronic arsenic exposure can damage neurobehavioral function in children. The present study was aimed to study the effects of arsenic exposure from drinking water on the spatial memory, and hippocampal ultra-structures and N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) gene expression in rats. Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to four groups: rats in control group drank regular water, rats in other groups drank water with final arsenic concentration of 2.72 mg/L (group A), 13.6 mg/L (group B) and 68 mg/L (group C), respectively, for 3 months. The levels of arsenic in blood serum and hippocampus were monitored. Rats were tested in Morris water maze (MWM) for memory status. Samples of hippocampus were collected from two rats in each group for transmission electron microscopic study and the detection of NMDAR expression by RT-PCR. The rats in group C showed a significant delay in hidden platform acquisition. Neurons and endothelial cells presented pathological changes and the expression of NR2A was down-regulated in hippocampus in arsenic exposed rats. Our data indicated that arsenic exposure of 68 mg/L caused spatial memory damage, of which the morphological and biochemical bases could be the ultra-structure changes and reduced NR2A expression in hippocampus.

  20. Enhanced dendritic spine number of neurons of the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and nucleus accumbens in old rats after chronic donepezil administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcantara-Gonzalez, Faviola; Juarez, Ismael; Solis, Oscar; Martinez-Tellez, Isaura; Camacho-Abrego, Israel; Masliah, Eliezer; Mena, Raul; Flores, Gonzalo

    2010-01-01

    In Alzheimer's disease brains morphological changes in the dendrites of pyramidal neurons of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus have been observed. These changes are particularly reflected in the decrement of both the dendritic tree and spine number. Donepezil is a potent and selective acetylcholinesterase inhibitor used in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. We have studied the effect of oral administration of this drug on the morphology of neuronal cells from the brain of aged rats. We examined dendrites of pyramidal neurons of the PFC, dorsal or ventral hippocampus and medium spiny neurons of the nucleus accumbens (NAcc). Donepezil (1 mg/Kg, vo) was administrated every day for 60 days to rats aged 10 and 18 months. Dendritic morphology was studied by the Golgi-Cox stain procedure followed by Sholl analysis at 12 and 20 months ages, respectively. In all Donepezil treated-rats a significant increment of the dendritic spines number in pyramidal neurons of the PFC, dorsal hippocampus was observed. However, pyramidal neurons of the ventral hippocampus and medium spiny cells of the NAcc only showed an increase in the number of their spines in 12 months old-rats. Our results suggest that Donepezil prevents the alterations of the neuronal dendrite morphology caused by aging. PMID:20336627

  1. Histopathological, Ultrastructural, and Immunohistochemical Assessment of Hippocampus Structures of Rats Exposed to TCDD and High Doses of Tocopherol and Acetylsalicylic Acid

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    Joanna Rosińczuk

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD on central nervous system consists of changing expression of estrogen receptors, whereas the result of chronic inflammatory reaction caused by dioxin is occurrence of destructive changes in various organs connected with disturbed metabolism of connective tissue and damage of cells. The aim of the study was to determine the effect of dioxins on function, ultrastructure, and cytological and histological structure of hippocampus, particularly on expression of estrogen receptors in central nervous system as well as to define protective influence of tocopherol (TCP and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA on the decrease in activity of proinflammatory effects in central nervous system. It was shown that TCDD contributes to destructive and inflammatory changes along with demyelization of myelin sheaths and atrophy of estrogen receptors in hippocampus. Dioxin contributes to atrophy of estrogen receptors in hippocampus, in which also destructive and inflammatory changes were found along with demyelination of myelin sheaths. Histopathological and ultrastructural image of hippocampus areas in rats, in which both TCP and ASA were used, is characterized by poorly expressed degenerative changes and smaller inflammatory reactivity. Using both TCP and ASA has a protective effect on functions of central nervous system.

  2. Treadmill running prevents age-related memory deficit and alters neurotrophic factors and oxidative damage in the hippocampus of Wistar rats.

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    Vanzella, Cláudia; Neves, Juliana Dalibor; Vizuete, Adriana Fernanda; Aristimunha, Dirceu; Kolling, Janaína; Longoni, Aline; Gonçalves, Carlos Alberto Saraiva; Wyse, Angela T S; Netto, Carlos Alexandre

    2017-09-15

    Clinical and pre-clinical studies indicate that exercise is beneficial to many aspects of brain function especially during aging. The present study investigated the effects of a treadmill running protocol in young (3month-old) and aged (22month-old) male Wistar rats, on: I) cognitive function, as assessed by spatial reference memory in the Morris water maze; II) oxidative stress parameters and the expression of neurotrophic factors BDNF, NT-3, IGF-1 and VEGF in the hippocampus. Animals of both ages were assigned to sedentary (non-exercised) and exercised (20min of daily running sessions, 3 times per week for 4weeks) groups. Cognition was assessed by a reference memory task run in the Morris water maze; twenty four hours after last session of behavioral testing hippocampi were collected for biochemical analysis. Results demonstrate that the moderate treadmill running exercise: I) prevented age-related deficits in reference memory in the Morris water maze; II) prevented the age-related increase of reactive oxygen species levels and lipid peroxidation in the hippocampus; III) caused an increase of BDNF, NT-3 and IGF-1 expression in the hippocampus of aged rats. Taken together, results suggest that both exercise molecular effects, namely the reduction of oxidative stress and the increase of neurotrophic factors expression in the hippocampus, might be related to its positive effect on memory performance in aged rats. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. THEORETICAL REVIEW The Hippocampus, Time, and Memory Across Scales

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    Howard, Marc W.; Eichenbaum, Howard

    2014-01-01

    A wealth of experimental studies with animals have offered insights about how neural networks within the hippocampus support the temporal organization of memories. These studies have revealed the existence of “time cells” that encode moments in time, much as the well-known “place cells” map locations in space. Another line of work inspired by human behavioral studies suggests that episodic memories are mediated by a state of temporal context that changes gradually over long time scales, up to at least a few thousand seconds. In this view, the “mental time travel” hypothesized to support the experience of episodic memory corresponds to a “jump back in time” in which a previous state of temporal context is recovered. We suggest that these 2 sets of findings could be different facets of a representation of temporal history that maintains a record at the last few thousand seconds of experience. The ability to represent long time scales comes at the cost of discarding precise information about when a stimulus was experienced—this uncertainty becomes greater for events further in the past. We review recent computational work that describes a mechanism that could construct such a scale-invariant representation. Taken as a whole, this suggests the hippocampus plays its role in multiple aspects of cognition by representing events embedded in a general spatiotemporal context. The representation of internal time can be useful across nonhippocampal memory systems. PMID:23915126

  4. High Plasticity of New Granule Cells in the Aging Hippocampus

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    Mariela F. Trinchero

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Summary: During aging, the brain undergoes changes that impair cognitive capacity and circuit plasticity, including a marked decrease in production of adult-born hippocampal neurons. It is unclear whether development and integration of those new neurons are also affected by age. Here, we show that adult-born granule cells (GCs in aging mice are scarce and exhibit slow development, but they display a remarkable potential for structural plasticity. Retrovirally labeled 3-week-old GCs in middle-aged mice were small, underdeveloped, and disconnected. Neuronal development and integration were accelerated by voluntary exercise or environmental enrichment. Similar effects were observed via knockdown of Lrig1, an endogenous negative modulator of neurotrophin receptors. Consistently, blocking neurotrophin signaling by Lrig1 overexpression abolished the positive effects of exercise. These results demonstrate an unparalleled degree of plasticity in the aging brain mediated by neurotrophins, whereby new GCs remain immature until becoming rapidly recruited to the network by activity. : Trinchero et al. show that development of new granule cells born in the adult hippocampus is strongly influenced by age. In the aging hippocampus, new neurons remain immature for prolonged intervals, yet voluntary exercise triggers their rapid growth and functional synaptogenesis. This extensive structural remodeling is mediated by neurotrophins. Keywords: adult neurogenesis, dentate gyrus, functional integration, neurotrophins, synaptogenesis, exercise

  5. Overnight Sleep Enhances Hippocampus-Dependent Aspects of Spatial Memory.

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    Nguyen, Nam D; Tucker, Matthew A; Stickgold, Robert; Wamsley, Erin J

    2013-07-01

    Several studies have now demonstrated that spatial information is processed during sleep, and that posttraining sleep is beneficial for human navigation. However, it remains unclear whether the effects of sleep are primarily due to consolidation of cognitive maps, or alternatively, whether sleep might also affect nonhippocampal aspects of navigation (e.g., speed of motion) involved in moving through a virtual environment. Participants were trained on a virtual maze navigation task (VMT) and then given a memory test following either a day of wakefulness or a night of sleep. Subjects reported to the laboratory for training at either 10:00am or 10:00pm, depending on randomly assigned condition, and were tested 11 h later. Overnight subjects slept in the laboratory with polysomnography. A hospital-based academic sleep laboratory. Thirty healthy college student volunteers. N/A. Point-by-point position data were collected from the VMT. Analysis of the movement data revealed a sleep-dependent improvement in maze completion time (P sleep benefitted performance, not because subjects moved faster through the maze, but because they were more accurate in navigating to the goal. These findings suggest that sleep enhances participants' knowledge of the spatial layout of the maze, contributing to the consolidation of hippocampus-dependent spatial information. Nguyen ND; Tucker MA; Stickgold R; Wamsley EJ. Overnight sleep enhances hippocampus-dependent aspects of spatial memory. SLEEP 2013;36(7):1051-1057.

  6. Live imaging of neurogenesis in the adult mouse hippocampus.

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    Pilz, Gregor-Alexander; Bottes, Sara; Betizeau, Marion; Jörg, David J; Carta, Stefano; Simons, Benjamin D; Helmchen, Fritjof; Jessberger, Sebastian

    2018-02-09

    Neural stem and progenitor cells (NSPCs) generate neurons throughout life in the mammalian hippocampus. We used chronic in vivo imaging and followed genetically labeled individual NSPCs and their progeny in the mouse hippocampus for up to 2 months. We show that NSPCs targeted by the endogenous Achaete-scute homolog 1 (Ascl1) promoter undergo limited rounds of symmetric and asymmetric divisions, eliciting a burst of neurogenic activity, after which they are lost. Further, our data reveal unexpected asymmetric divisions of nonradial glia-like NSPCs. Cell fates of Ascl1-labeled lineages suggest a developmental-like program involving a sequential transition from a proliferative to a neurogenic phase. By providing a comprehensive description of lineage relationships, from dividing NSPCs to newborn neurons integrating into the hippocampal circuitry, our data offer insight into how NSPCs support life-long hippocampal neurogenesis. Copyright © 2018 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  7. Sensory Deprivation Triggers Synaptic and Intrinsic Plasticity in the Hippocampus.

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    Milshtein-Parush, Hila; Frere, Samuel; Regev, Limor; Lahav, Coren; Benbenishty, Amit; Ben-Eliyahu, Shamgar; Goshen, Inbal; Slutsky, Inna

    2017-06-01

    Hippocampus, a temporal lobe structure involved in learning and memory, receives information from all sensory modalities. Despite extensive research on the role of sensory experience in cortical map plasticity, little is known about whether and how sensory experience regulates functioning of the hippocampal circuits. Here, we show that 9 ± 2 days of whisker deprivation during early mouse development depresses activity of CA3 pyramidal neurons by several principal mechanisms: decrease in release probability, increase in the fraction of silent synapses, and reduction in intrinsic excitability. As a result of deprivation-induced presynaptic inhibition, CA3-CA1 synaptic facilitation was augmented at high frequencies, shifting filtering properties of synapses. The changes in the AMPA-mediated synaptic transmission were accompanied by an increase in NR2B-containing NMDA receptors and a reduction in the AMPA/NMDA ratio. The observed reconfiguration of the CA3-CA1 connections may represent a homeostatic adaptation to augmentation in synaptic activity during the initial deprivation phase. In adult mice, tactile disuse diminished intrinsic excitability without altering synaptic facilitation. We suggest that sensory experience regulates computations performed by the hippocampus by tuning its synaptic and intrinsic characteristics. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  8. Neuromodulatory signaling in hippocampus-dependent memory retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Steven A

    2015-04-01

    Considerable advances have been made toward understanding the molecular signaling events that underlie memory acquisition and consolidation. In contrast, less is known about memory retrieval, despite its necessity for utilizing learned information. This review focuses on neuromodulatory and intracellular signaling events that underlie memory retrieval mediated by the hippocampus, for which the most information is currently available. Among neuromodulators, adrenergic signaling is required for the retrieval of various types of hippocampus-dependent memory. Although they contribute to acquisition and/or consolidation, cholinergic and dopaminergic signaling are generally not required for retrieval. Interestingly, while not required for retrieval, serotonergic and opioid signaling may actually constrain memory retrieval. Roles for histamine and non-opioid neuropeptides are currently unclear but possible. A critical effector of adrenergic signaling in retrieval is reduction of the slow afterhyperpolarization mediated by β1 receptors, cyclic AMP, protein kinase A, Epac, and possibly ERK. In contrast, stress and glucocorticoids impair retrieval by decreasing cyclic AMP, mediated in part by the activation of β2 -adrenergic receptors. Clinically, alterations in neuromodulatory signaling and in memory retrieval occur in Alzheimer's disease, Down syndrome, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder, and recent evidence has begun to link changes in neuromodulatory signaling with effects on memory retrieval. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Altered hippocampus synaptic function in selenoprotein P deficient mice

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    Peters Melinda M

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Selenium is an essential micronutrient that function through selenoproteins. Selenium deficiency results in lower concentrations of selenium and selenoproteins. The brain maintains it's selenium better than other tissues under low-selenium conditions. Recently, the selenium-containing protein selenoprotein P (Sepp has been identified as a possible transporter of selenium. The targeted disruption of the selenoprotein P gene (Sepp1 results in decreased brain selenium concentration and neurological dysfunction, unless selenium intake is excessive However, the effect of selenoprotein P deficiency on the processes of memory formation and synaptic plasticity is unknown. In the present studies Sepp1(-/- mice and wild type littermate controls (Sepp1(+/+ fed a high-selenium diet (1 mg Se/kg were used to characterize activity, motor coordination, and anxiety as well as hippocampus-dependent learning and memory. Normal associative learning, but disrupted spatial learning was observed in Sepp1(-/- mice. In addition, severe alterations were observed in synaptic transmission, short-term plasticity and long-term potentiation in hippocampus area CA1 synapses of Sepp1(-/- mice on a 1 mg Se/kg diet and Sepp1(+/+ mice fed a selenium-deficient (0 mg Se/kg diet. Taken together, these data suggest that selenoprotein P is required for normal synaptic function, either through presence of the protein or delivery of required selenium to the CNS.

  10. Neural activity in the hippocampus during conflict resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakimoto, Yuya; Okada, Kana; Hattori, Minoru; Takeda, Kozue; Sakata, Shogo

    2013-01-15

    This study examined configural association theory and conflict resolution models in relation to hippocampal neural activity during positive patterning tasks. According to configural association theory, the hippocampus is important for responses to compound stimuli in positive patterning tasks. In contrast, according to the conflict resolution model, the hippocampus is important for responses to single stimuli in positive patterning tasks. We hypothesized that if configural association theory is applicable, and not the conflict resolution model, the hippocampal theta power should be increased when compound stimuli are presented. If, on the other hand, the conflict resolution model is applicable, but not configural association theory, then the hippocampal theta power should be increased when single stimuli are presented. If both models are valid and applicable in the positive patterning task, we predict that the hippocampal theta power should be increased by presentation of both compound and single stimuli during the positive patterning task. To examine our hypotheses, we measured hippocampal theta power in rats during a positive patterning task. The results showed that hippocampal theta power increased during the presentation of a single stimulus, but did not increase during the presentation of a compound stimulus. This finding suggests that the conflict resolution model is more applicable than the configural association theory for describing neural activity during positive patterning tasks. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Reliable activation of immature neurons in the adult hippocampus.

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    Lucas A Mongiat

    Full Text Available Neurons born in the adult dentate gyrus develop, mature, and connect over a long interval that can last from six to eight weeks. It has been proposed that, during this period, developing neurons play a relevant role in hippocampal signal processing owing to their distinctive electrical properties. However, it has remained unknown whether immature neurons can be recruited into a network before synaptic and functional maturity have been achieved. To address this question, we used retroviral expression of green fluorescent protein to identify developing granule cells of the adult mouse hippocampus and investigate the balance of afferent excitation, intrinsic excitability, and firing behavior by patch clamp recordings in acute slices. We found that glutamatergic inputs onto young neurons are significantly weaker than those of mature cells, yet stimulation of cortical excitatory axons elicits a similar spiking probability in neurons at either developmental stage. Young neurons are highly efficient in transducing ionic currents into membrane depolarization due to their high input resistance, which decreases substantially in mature neurons as the inward rectifier potassium (Kir conductance increases. Pharmacological blockade of Kir channels in mature neurons mimics the high excitability characteristic of young neurons. Conversely, Kir overexpression induces mature-like firing properties in young neurons. Therefore, the differences in excitatory drive of young and mature neurons are compensated by changes in membrane excitability that render an equalized firing activity. These observations demonstrate that the adult hippocampus continuously generates a population of highly excitable young neurons capable of information processing.

  12. Angiotensin IV possibly acts through PKMzeta in the hippocampus to regulate cognitive memory in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Lok-Hi; Tao, Pao-Luh; Chen, Yuan-Hao; Lin, Yu-Hui; Huang, Eagle Yi-Kung

    2015-10-01

    Ang IV is an endogenous peptide generated from the degradation of angiotensin II. Ang IV was found to enhance learning and memory in CNS. PKMzeta was identified to be a fragment of PKCzeta (protein kinase Czeta). Its continuous activation was demonstrated to be correlated with the formation of memory in the hippocampus. Therefore, we investigated whether PKMzeta participates in the effects of Ang IV on memory. We first examined the effect of Ang IV on non-spatial memory/cognition in modified object recognition test in rats. Our data showed that Ang IV could increase the exploration time on novel object. The co-administration of ZIP (PKMzeta inhibitor) with Ang IV significantly blocked the effect by Ang IV. The effects of Ang IV on hippocampal LTP at the CA1 region were also evaluated. Ang IV significantly increased the amplitude and slope of the EPSPs, which was consistent with other reports. Surprisingly, instead of potentiating LTP, Ang IV caused a failed maintenance of LTP. Moreover, there was no quantitative change in PKMzeta induced by Ang IV and/or ZIP after behavioral experiments. Taken together, our data re-confirmed the finding of the positive effect of Ang IV to enhance memory/cognition. The increased strength of EPSPs with Ang IV could also have certain functional relevance. Since the behavioral results suggested the involvement of PKMzeta, we hypothesized that the enhancement of memory/cognition by Ang IV may rely on an increase in PKMzeta activity. Overall, the present study provided important advances in our understanding of the action of Ang IV in the hippocampus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Trans-resveratrol enriched maternal diet protects the immature hippocampus from perinatal asphyxia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isac, Sebastian; Panaitescu, Anca Maria; Spataru, Ana; Iesanu, Mara; Totan, Alexandra; Udriste, Amalia; Cucu, Natalia; Peltecu, Gheorghe; Zagrean, Leon; Zagrean, Ana-Maria

    2017-07-13

    Trans-resveratrol (tRESV), a polyphenol with antioxidant properties, is common in many food sources, hence easily accessible for study as a maternal dietary supplement in perinatal asphyxia (PA). Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy secondary to PA affects especially vulnerable brain areas such as hippocampus and is a leading cause of neonatal morbidity. The purpose of this study is to identify new epigenetic mechanisms of brain inflammation and injury related to PA and to explore the benefit of tRESV enriched maternal diet. The hippocampal interleukin 1 beta (IL-1b), tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and S-100B protein, at 24-48h after 90min of asphyxia were assessed in postnatal day 6 rats whose mothers received either standard or tRESV enriched diet. The expression of non-coding microRNAs miR124, miR132, miR134, miR146 and miR15a as epigenetic markers of hippocampus response to PA was determined 24h post-asphyxia. Our results indicate that neural response to PA could be epigenetically controlled and that tRESV reduces asphyxia-related neuroinflammation and neural injury. Moreover, tRESV could increase, through epigenetic mechanisms, the tolerance to asphyxia, with possible impact on the neuronal maturation. Our data support the neuroprotective quality of tRESV when used as a supplement in the maternal diet on the offspring's outcome in PA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Acute treatment with doxorubicin affects glutamate neurotransmission in the mouse frontal cortex and hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Theresa Currier; Beitchman, Joshua A; Pomerleau, Francois; Noel, Teresa; Jungsuwadee, Paiboon; Allan Butterfield, D; Clair, Daret K St; Vore, Mary; Gerhardt, Greg A

    2017-10-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a potent chemotherapeutic agent known to cause acute and long-term cognitive impairments in cancer patients. Cognitive function is presumed to be primarily mediated by neuronal circuitry in the frontal cortex (FC) and hippocampus, where glutamate is the primary excitatory neurotransmitter. Mice treated with DOX (25mg/kg i.p.) were subjected to in vivo recordings under urethane anesthesia at 24h post-DOX injection or 5 consecutive days of cognitive testing (Morris Water Maze; MWM). Using novel glutamate-selective microelectrode arrays, amperometric recordings measured parameters of extracellular glutamate clearance and potassium-evoked release of glutamate within the medial FC and dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus. By 24h post-DOX injection, glutamate uptake was 45% slower in the FC in comparison to saline-treated mice. In the DG, glutamate took 48% longer to clear than saline-treated mice. Glutamate overflow in the FC was similar between treatment groups, however, it was significantly increased in the DG of DOX treated mice. MWM data indicated that a single dose of DOX impaired swim speed without impacting total length traveled. These data indicate that systemic DOX treatment changes glutamate neurotransmission in key nuclei associated with cognitive function within 24h, without a lasting impact on spatial learning and memory. Understanding the functional effects of DOX on glutamate neurotransmission may help us understand and prevent some of the debilitating side effects of chemotherapeutic treatment in cancer survivors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The genus Hippocampus--a review on traditional medicinal uses, chemical constituents and pharmacological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lu; Wang, Xiaoyu; Huang, Baokang

    2015-03-13

    Several species from the genus Hippocampus have been widely used as a traditional medicine or invigorant with long history in China. Five species of them have been recorded in Chinese pharmacopoeia with name Hippocampus (Chinese name Haima [symbol: see text]). The ethnopharmacologial history of this genus indicated that they possess anti-tumor, anti-aging, anti-fatigue, anti-prostatic hyperplasia activities and can be used for the treatment of tumor, aging, fatigue, thrombus, inflammatory, hypertension and impotence. This review focuses on the traditional medicinal uses of Hippocampus species, as well as the phytochemical, pharmacological and toxicological studies on this genus. To provide an overview of the ethnopharmacology, chemical constituents, pharmacology and clinical applications of the genus Hippocampus, and to reveal their therapeutic potentials and being an evidence base for further research works of the Hippocampus. Information on the Hippocampus species was collected from scientific journals, books, thesis and reports based on the Chinese herbal classic literature and worldwide accepted scientific databases via a library and electronic search (PubMed, Elsevier, Scopus, Google Scholar, Springer, Web of Science and CNKI). A survey of literature revealed that the major chemical constituents of Hippocampus are sterides, essential amino acids, fatty acids and microelements. Experimental evidences confirmed that the Hippocampus could be used in treating tumor, aging, fatigue, thrombus, inflammatory, hypertension, prostatic hyperplasia and impotence. The most important function of Hippocampus in TCM is invigorating kidney-yang. The key traditional uses of Hippocampus have been investigated in vitro and in vivo, but their mechanism and clinical trial data are needed, and the sustainable exploitation of the endangered Hippocampus species should be considered. This literature analysis of traditional medicinal uses and experimental chemical and pharmacological

  16. Distinct time courses of secondary brain damage in the hippocampus following brain concussion and contusion in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Yuko; Horiuchi, Yutaka; Kamata, Hiroshi; Yukawa, Masayoshi; Kuwabara, Masato; Tsubokawa, Takashi

    2010-07-01

    Secondary brain damage (SBD) is caused by apoptosis after traumatic brain injury that is classified into concussion and contusion. Brain concussion is temporary unconsciousness or confusion caused by a blow on the head without pathological changes, and contusion is a brain injury with hemorrhage and broad extravasations. In this study, we investigated the time-dependent changes of apoptosis in hippocampus after brain concussion and contusion using rat models. We generated the concussion by dropping a plumb on the dura from a height of 3.5 cm and the contusion by cauterizing the cerebral cortex. SBD was evaluated in the hippocampus by histopathological analyses and measuring caspase-3 activity that induces apoptotic neuronal cell death. The frequency of abnormal neuronal cells with vacuolation or nuclear condensation, or those with DNA fragmentation was remarkably increased at 1 hr after concussion (about 30% for each abnormality) from the pre-injury level (0%) and reached the highest level (about 50% for each) by 48 hrs, whereas the frequency of abnormal neuronal cells was increased at 1 hr after contusion (about 10%) and reached the highest level (about 40%) by 48 hrs. In parallel, caspase-3 activity was increased sevenfold in the hippocampus at 1 hr after concussion and returned to the pre-injury level by 48 hrs, whereas after contusion, caspase-3 activity was continuously increased to the highest level at 48 hrs (fivefold). Thus, anti-apoptotic-cell-death treatment to prevent SBD must be performed by 1 hr after concussion and at latest by 48 hrs after contusion.

  17. Anatomical substrates for direct interactions between hippocampus, medial prefrontal cortex, and the thalamic nucleus reuniens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, C.; Kumar, S.; Yang, J. Y.; Wilson, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    The reuniens nucleus in the midline thalamus projects to the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and the hippocampus, and has been suggested to modulate interactions between these regions, such as spindle–ripple correlations during sleep and theta band coherence during exploratory behavior. Feedback from the hippocampus to the nucleus reuniens has received less attention but has the potential to influence thalamocortical networks as a function of hippocampal activation. We used the retrograde tracer cholera toxin B conjugated to two fluorophores to study thalamic projections to the dorsal and ventral hippocampus and to the prelimbic and infralimbic subregions of mPFC. We also examined the feedback connections from the hippocampus to reuniens. The goal was to evaluate the anatomical basis for direct coordination between reuniens, mPFC, and hippocampus by looking for double-labeled cells in reuniens and hippocampus. In confirmation of previous reports, the nucleus reuniens was the origin of most thalamic afferents to the dorsal hippocampus, whereas both reuniens and the lateral dorsal nucleus projected to ventral hippocampus. Feedback from hippocampus to reuniens originated primarily in the dorsal and ventral subiculum. Thalamic cells with collaterals to mPFC and hippocampus were found in reuniens, across its anteroposterior axis, and represented, on average, about 8 % of the labeled cells in reuniens. Hippocampal cells with collaterals to mPFC and reuniens were less common (~1 % of the labeled subicular cells), and located in the molecular layer of the subiculum. The results indicate that a subset of reuniens cells can directly coordinate activity in mPFC and hippocampus. Cells with collaterals in the hippocampus–reuniens–mPFC network may be important for the systems consolidation of memory traces and for theta synchronization during exploratory behavior. PMID:23571778

  18. Neuroprotective role of curcumin on the hippocampus against the structural and serological alterations of streptozotocin-induced diabetes in sprague dawely rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nermeen Mohammed Faheem

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Diabetes mellitus causes impaired memory and cognitive functions. The hippocampus plays a key role in memory and learning. Curcumin attenuates diabetic nephropathy in vivo. Curcumin has shown a neurogenic effect and cognition-enhancing potential in aged rats. The aim of this study is to evaluate the possible protective role of curcumin on the histological and serologicalchanges of the hippocampus in diabetic rats. Materials and Methods: Forty albino rats were divided into four groups, ten rats each. Group 1 control rats, group 2 rats received curcumin orally (200 mg/kg/day for six weeks, group 3 rats were injected intraperitoneally with streptozotocin (STZ (100 mg/kg, single dose, group 4 received a single injection of STZ and received curcumin orally for six weeks. Paraffin sections of hippocampus were prepared and stained with hematoxylin and eosin stain, and immnunohistochemical staining for GFAP and caspase-3. Morphometrical and statistical analyses were performed. Glycemic status and parameters of oxidative stress was measured. Results: Examination of hippocampus of diabetic rats showed disorganization of small pyramidal cells in CA1, many cellular losses in the pyramidal cells of CA3, many degenerated granule cells in the dentate gyrus. GFAP positive astrocyte and caspase-3 positive neuron counts were significantly increased.  There were significant serum glucose elevation and significant lowered levels of oxidative stress parameters as compared to control rats. Curcumin administration improved the structural and serological alterationsof the hippocampuswith significant reduction in serum glucose level. Conclusion: Curcumin ameliorates the deterious effect of diabetes on the hippocampus through its antioxidant, antiapoptotic and anti-inflammatory efficacies.

  19. Septal and hippocampal glutamate receptors modulate the output of acetylcholine in hippocampus : A microdialysis study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moor, E; Auth, F; DeBoer, P; Westerink, BHC

    In the present study, glutamate receptor agonists and antagonists were administered by retrograde microdialysis into either the medial septum/vertical limb of the diagonal band-(MS/vDB), or hippocampus, and the output of acetylcholine (ACh) was measured in the hippocampus by using intracerebral

  20. Role of Amygdala and Hippocampus in the Neural Circuit Subserving Conditioned Defeat in Syrian Hamsters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, Chris M.; Taylor, Stacie L.; Huhman, Kim L.

    2010-01-01

    We examined the roles of the amygdala and hippocampus in the formation of emotionally relevant memories using an ethological model of conditioned fear termed conditioned defeat (CD). Temporary inactivation of the ventral, but not dorsal hippocampus (VH, DH, respectively) using muscimol disrupted the acquisition of CD, whereas pretraining VH…

  1. The hippocampus supports encoding of between-domain associations within working memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piekema, C.; Kessels, R.P.C.; Rijpkema, M.J.P.; Fernandez, G.S.E.

    2009-01-01

    It has been established that the medial temporal lobe, including the hippocampus, is crucial for associative memory. The aim of the current functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study was to investigate whether the hippocampus is differentially activated for associations between items

  2. Evidence for Hippocampus-Dependent Contextual Learning at Postnatal Day 17 in the Rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Jennifer A.; Burman, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Long-term memory for fear of an environment (contextual fear conditioning) emerges later in development (postnatal day; PD 23) than long-term memory for fear of discrete stimuli (PD 17). As contextual, but not explicit cue, fear conditioning relies on the hippocampus; this has been interpreted as evidence that the hippocampus is not fully…

  3. Recognition Memory and the Hippocampus: A Test of the Hippocampal Contribution to Recollection and Familiarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeneson, Annette; Kirwan, C. Brock; Hopkins, Ramona O.; Wixted, John T.; Squire, Larry R.

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested that the hippocampus selectively supports recollection and that adjacent cortex in the medial temporal lobe can support familiarity. Alternatively, it has been suggested that the hippocampus supports both recollection and familiarity. We tested these suggestions by assessing the performance of patients with hippocampal…

  4. Post-Training Reversible Inactivation of the Hippocampus Enhances Novel Object Recognition Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Ana M. M.; Hawk, Joshua D.; Abel, Ted; Havekes, Robbert

    2010-01-01

    Research on the role of the hippocampus in object recognition memory has produced conflicting results. Previous studies have used permanent hippocampal lesions to assess the requirement for the hippocampus in the object recognition task. However, permanent hippocampal lesions may impact performance through effects on processes besides memory…

  5. Contributions of Volumetrics of the Hippocampus and Thalamus to Verbal Memory in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Christopher C.; Griffith, H. Randall; Okonkwo, Ozioma C.; Martin, Roy C.; Knowlton, Robert K.; Richardson, Elizabeth J.; Hermann, Bruce P.; Seidenberg, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Recent theories have posited that the hippocampus and thalamus serve distinct, yet related, roles in episodic memory. Whereas the hippocampus has been implicated in long-term memory encoding and storage, the thalamus, as a whole, has been implicated in the selection of items for subsequent encoding and the use of retrieval strategies. However,…

  6. The hippocampus supports encoding of between-domain associations within working memory.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piekema, C.; Kessels, R.P.C.; Rijpkema, M.J.P.; Fernandez, G.S.E.

    2009-01-01

    It has been established that the medial temporal lobe, including the hippocampus, is crucial for associative memory. The aim of the current functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study was to investigate whether the hippocampus is differentially activated for associations between items

  7. The Hippocampus Supports Encoding of Between-Domain Associations within Working Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piekema, Carinne; Kessel, Roy P. C.; Rijpkema, Mark; Fernandez, Guillen

    2009-01-01

    It has been established that the medial temporal lobe, including the hippocampus, is crucial for associative memory. The aim of the current functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study was to investigate whether the hippocampus is differentially activated for associations between items processed in the same neocortical region (within-domain)…

  8. Clinical correlates of hippocampus volume and shape in antipsychotic-naïve schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmady, Sunil Vasu; Shivakumar, Venkataram; Arasappa, Rashmi; Subramaniam, Aditi; Gautham, S; Venkatasubramanian, Ganesan; Gangadhar, Bangalore N

    2017-05-30

    While volume deficit of hippocampus is an established finding in schizophrenia, very few studies have examined large sample of patients without the confounding effect of antipsychotic treatment. Concurrent evaluation of hippocampus shape will offer additional information on the hippocampal aberrations in schizophrenia. In this study, we analyzed the volume and shape of hippocampus in antipsychotic-naïve schizophrenia patients (N=71) in comparison to healthy controls (N=82). Using 3-T MRI data, gray matter (GM) volume (anterior and posterior sub-divisions) and shape of the hippocampus were analyzed. Schizophrenia patients had significant hippocampal GM volume deficits (specifically the anterior sub-division) in comparison to healthy controls. There were significant positive correlations between anterior hippocampus volume and psychopathology scores of positive syndrome. Shape analyses revealed significant inward deformation of bilateral hippocampal surface in patients. In conclusion, our study findings add robust support for volume deficit in hippocampus in antipsychotic-naïve schizophrenia. Hippocampal shape deficits in schizophrenia observed in this study map to anterior CA1 sub-region. The differential relationship of anterior hippocampus (but not posterior hippocampus) with clinical symptoms is in tune with the findings in animal models. Further systematic studies are needed to evaluate the relationship between these hippocampal gray matter deficits with white matter and functional connectivity to facilitate understanding the hippocampal network abnormalities in schizophrenia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Correlates of Intellectual Ability with Morphology of the Hippocampus and Amygdala in Healthy Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amat, Jose A.; Bansal, Ravi; Whiteman, Ronald; Haggerty, Rita; Royal, Jason; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2008-01-01

    Several prior imaging studies of healthy adults have correlated volumes of the hippocampus and amygdala with measures of general intelligence (IQ), with variable results. In this study, we assessed correlations between volumes of the hippocampus and amygdala and full-scale IQ scores (FSIQ) using a method of image analysis that permits detailed…

  10. Estresse, depressão e hipocampo Stress, depression and the hippocampus

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    Sâmia Regiane L Joca

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available A exposição a fatores estressantes tem papel importante no desenvolvimento de transtornos depressivos. Os mecanismos envolvidos nesta relação, no entanto, ainda são pouco conhecidos, mas algumas evidências sugerem a participação da formação hipocampal: 1. o estresse pode causar alterações plásticas no hipocampo, que incluem remodelação dendrítica e inibição de neurogênese. Drogas antidepressivas impendem estes efeitos, possivelmente por aumentarem a expressão de fatores neurotróficos; 2. a facilitação da neurotransmissão serotoninérgica no hipocampo atenua conseqüências comportamentais do estresse e produz efeitos antidepressivos em modelos animais; 3. o antagonismo do principal neurotransmissor excitatório no hipocampo, o glutamato, produz efeitos semelhantes; 4. o hipocampo parece estar "hiperativo" em animais mais sensíveis em modelos de depressão e em humanos resistentes à antidepressivos; 5. o hipocampo, em conjunto com o complexo amigdalar, parece ter papel fundamental na consolidação e evocação de memórias aversivas. Não obstante estas evidências, o desafio futuro será o de tentar integrar os resultados destes diferentes campos (farmacológico, molecular, eletrofisiológico, clínico em uma teoria unificadora sobre o papel do hipocampo na regulação do humor e seus transtornos bem como nos efeitos de tratamentos antidepressivos.Stress exposure is an important factor in the development of depressive disorders. Although the mechanisms of this relationship are largely unknown, several pieces of evidence point to an involvement of the hippocampal formation: 1. stressful stimuli cause remodeling of hipocampal pyramidal cells and inhibit neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus. Antidepressive drugs attenuate these effects, probably by increasing the expression of neurotrophic factors; 2. facilitation of serotonergic neurotransmission in the hippocampus attenuates behavioral consequences of stress and produce

  11. Hippocampus NMDA receptors selectively mediate latent extinction of place learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Jarid; Gabriele, Amanda; Packard, Mark G

    2016-09-01

    Extinction of maze learning may be achieved with or without the animal performing the previously acquired response. In typical "response extinction," animals are given the opportunity to make the previously acquired approach response toward the goal location of the maze without reinforcement. In "latent extinction," animals are not given the opportunity to make the previously acquired response and instead are confined to the previous goal location without reinforcement. Previous evidence indicates that the effectiveness of these protocols may depend on the type of memory being extinguished. Thus, one aim of the present study was to further examine the effectiveness of response and latent extinction protocols across dorsolateral striatum (DLS)-dependent response learning and hippocampus-dependent place learning tasks. In addition, previous neural inactivation experiments indicate a selective role for the hippocampus in latent extinction, but have not investigated the precise neurotransmitter mechanisms involved. Thus, the present study also examined whether latent extinction of place learning might depend on NMDA receptor activity in the hippocampus. In experiment 1, adult male Long-Evans rats were trained in a response learning task in a water plus-maze, in which animals were reinforced to make a consistent body-turn response to reach an invisible escape platform. Results indicated that response extinction, but not latent extinction, was effective at extinguishing memory in the response learning task. In experiment 2, rats were trained in a place learning task, in which animals were reinforced to approach a consistent spatial location containing the hidden escape platform. In experiment 2, animals also received intra-hippocampal infusions of the NMDA receptor antagonist 2-amino-5-phosphopentanoic acid (AP5; 5.0 or 7.5 ug/0.5 µg) or saline vehicle immediately before response or latent extinction training. Results indicated that both extinction protocols were

  12. Retrieval flexibility and reinstatement in the developing hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMaster, Dana; Coughlin, Christine; Ghetti, Simona

    2016-04-01

    Episodic memory improves during childhood and this improvement has been associated with age differences in hippocampal function, but previous research has not manipulated the possible underlying mechanisms. We tested the hypothesis that age-related differences in hippocampal activation may reflect changes in retrieval flexibility. We expected these activation differences to be observed most prominently in the anterior hippocampus. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data were collected from children ages 8 and 10, and adults (N = 63) during an associative recognition task that required participants to recognize pairs of pictures which either appeared in the same location as during encoding (Same location), or in a flipped location, such that each picture switched their location with the other member of the pair (Flipped location). Recognition of same-location pairs placed lower demands on flexible retrieval compared to recognition of flipped-location pairs. Behaviorally, 8-year-olds exhibited the strongest correct recognition gains for same-location compared to flipped-location pairs, and females unexpectedly outperformed males across all ages. When we examined correct recognition, adults recruited the hippocampal head more strongly for flipped- versus same-location pairs compared to both groups of children; in contrast both adults and 10-year-olds recruited the hippocampal tail more strongly for flipped- versus same-location pairs compared to 8-year-olds. This pattern was stronger in the left hippocampus and for females. Moreover hippocampal discrimination between recognized and forgotten items in the same-location condition was stronger in 8-year-olds compared to adults, and was stronger in the flipped-location condition in adults compared to 8-year-olds; this pattern was stronger in the left hippocampus. Individual differences in this discrimination contrast for flipped-location trials in the head and body predicted performance on an index of

  13. An fMRI study of the activation of the hippocampus by emotional memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellace, Matthew; Williams, Joseph Michael; Mohamed, Feroze B; Faro, Scott H

    2013-02-01

    The current study examined the role of the hippocampus in emotional memory encoding using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The present study examined the activation patterns of 12 healthy participants who were associated with memory for words and pictures with moderately high emotional tone. Results revealed significant activation in the temporal and frontal lobes for emotional and neutral stimuli. There was greater activation in the left hippocampus for emotional words and the right hippocampus for emotional pictures. However, a separate analysis of gender suggested that the emotional responses of the women accounted for the activation of the hippocampus; men did not have a pattern of hippocampus activation consistent with the type of stimuli. These findings have important implications for the design of a clinical memory assessment using fMRI.

  14. Treadmill exercise attenuates 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine-induced memory impairment through a decrease apoptosis in male rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharebaghi, Alireza; Amiri, Iraj; Salehi, Iraj; Shahidi, Siamak; Komaki, Alireza; Mehdizadeh, Mehdi; Moravej, Fahimeh Ghasemi; Asl, Sara Soleimani

    2017-12-01

    3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) leads to apoptosis in the hippocampus with consequent induction of learning and memory impairment. In this study, we have investigated the effects of treadmill exercise on memory in relation to apoptosis and oxidative stress in the hippocampi of MDMA-treated rats. Male Wistar rats received multiple intraperitoneal (IP) injections of MDMA (10 mg/kg) and exercised for one month on a treadmill (simultaneously or asynchronously with MDMA). We assessed memory function with the Morris water maze (MWM) test. Lipid peroxidation (LPO) and expression of caspase 3, Bax, and Bcl-2 were examined by the thiobarbituric acid assay (TBA) and western blot, respectively. Our results showed that asynchronous treadmill exercise could significantly improve MDMA-induced memory impairment in the MWM test. Caspase 3 expression decreased in the exercise group compared to the MDMA group. Although MDMA treatment caused an increase in the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, the treadmill exercise reduced this ratio. Simultaneous exercise caused a reduction in lipid peroxidation in the hippocampus. This data suggests that treadmill exercise can be a useful strategy for treating memory impairment in persons with neurodegenerative disease and stimulant drug users. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Adult Onset-hypothyroidism has Minimal Effects on Synaptic Transmission in the Hippocampus of Rats Independent of Hypothermia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction: Thyroid hormones (TH) influence central nervous system (CNS) function during development and in adulthood. The hippocampus, a brain area critical for learning and memory is sensitive to TH insufficiency. Synaptic transmission in the hippocampus is impaired following...

  16. Spatial memory and the monkey hippocampus: not all space is created equal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banta Lavenex, Pamela; Lavenex, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Studies of the role of the monkey hippocampus in spatial learning and memory, however few, have reliably produced inconsistent results. Whereas the role of the hippocampus in spatial learning and memory has been clearly established in rodents, studies in nonhuman primates have made a variety of claims that range from the involvement of the hippocampus in spatial memory only at relatively longer memory delays, to no role for the hippocampus in spatial memory at all. In contrast, we have shown that selective damage restricted to the hippocampus (CA regions) prevents the learning or use of allocentric, spatial relational representations of the environment in freely behaving adult monkeys tested in an open-field arena. In this commentary, we discuss a unifying framework that explains these apparently discrepant results regarding the role of the monkey hippocampus in spatial learning and memory. We describe clear and strict criteria to interpret the findings from previous studies and guide future investigations of spatial memory in monkeys. Specifically, we affirm that, as in the rodent, the primate hippocampus is critical for spatial relational learning and memory, and in a time-independent manner. We describe how claims to the contrary are the result of experimental designs that fail to recognize, and control for, egocentric (hippocampus-independent) and allocentric (hippocampus-dependent) spatial frames of reference. Finally, we conclude that the available data demonstrate unequivocally that the central role of the hippocampus in allocentric, spatial relational learning and memory is conserved among vertebrates, including nonhuman primates. Copyright 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. The role of the hippocampus in navigation is memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenbaum, Howard

    2017-04-01

    There is considerable research on the neurobiological mechanisms within the hippocampal system that support spatial navigation. In this article I review the literature on navigational strategies in humans and animals, observations on hippocampal function in navigation, and studies of hippocampal neural activity in animals and humans performing different navigational tasks and tests of memory. Whereas the hippocampus is essential to spatial navigation via a cognitive map, its role derives from the relational organization and flexibility of cognitive maps and not from a selective role in the spatial domain. Correspondingly, hippocampal networks map multiple navigational strategies, as well as other spatial and nonspatial memories and knowledge domains that share an emphasis on relational organization. These observations suggest that the hippocampal system is not dedicated to spatial cognition and navigation, but organizes experiences in memory, for which spatial mapping and navigation are both a metaphor for and a prominent application of relational memory organization. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Dendritic inhibition in the hippocampus supports fear learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovett-Barron, Matthew; Kaifosh, Patrick; Kheirbek, Mazen A; Danielson, Nathan; Zaremba, Jeffrey D; Reardon, Thomas R; Turi, Gergely F; Hen, René; Zemelman, Boris V; Losonczy, Attila

    2014-02-21

    Fear memories guide adaptive behavior in contexts associated with aversive events. The hippocampus forms a neural representation of the context that predicts aversive events. Representations of context incorporate multisensory features of the environment, but must somehow exclude sensory features of the aversive event itself. We investigated this selectivity using cell type-specific imaging and inactivation in hippocampal area CA1 of behaving mice. Aversive stimuli activated CA1 dendrite-targeting interneurons via cholinergic input, leading to inhibition of pyramidal cell distal dendrites receiving aversive sensory excitation from the entorhinal cortex. Inactivating dendrite-targeting interneurons during aversive stimuli increased CA1 pyramidal cell population responses and prevented fear learning. We propose subcortical activation of dendritic inhibition as a mechanism for exclusion of aversive stimuli from hippocampal contextual representations during fear learning.

  19. Sub-chronic exposure to the insecticide dimethoate induces a proinflammatory status and enhances the neuroinflammatory response to bacterial lypopolysaccharide in the hippocampus and striatum of male mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astiz, Mariana, E-mail: marianaastiz@gmail.com; Diz-Chaves, Yolanda, E-mail: ydiz@cajal.csic.es; Garcia-Segura, Luis M., E-mail: lmgs@cajal.csic.es

    2013-10-15

    Dimethoate is an organophosphorus insecticide extensively used in horticulture. Previous studies have shown that the administration of dimethoate to male rats, at a very low dose and during a sub-chronic period, increases the oxidation of lipids and proteins, reduces the levels of antioxidants and impairs mitochondrial function in various brain regions. In this study, we have assessed in C57Bl/6 adult male mice, whether sub-chronic (5 weeks) intoxication with a low dose of dimethoate (1.4 mg/kg) affects the expression of inflammatory molecules and the reactivity of microglia in the hippocampus and striatum under basal conditions and after an immune challenge caused by the systemic administration of lipopolysaccharide. Dimethoate increased mRNA levels of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) and interleukin (IL) 6 in the hippocampus, and increased the proportion of Iba1 immunoreactive cells with reactive phenotype in dentate gyrus and striatum. Lipopolysaccharide caused a significant increase in the mRNA levels of IL1β, TNFα, IL6 and interferon-γ-inducible protein 10, and a significant increase in the proportion of microglia with reactive phenotype in the hippocampus and the striatum. Some of the effects of lipopolysaccharide (proportion of Iba1 immunoreactive cells with reactive phenotype and IL6 mRNA levels) were amplified in the animals treated with dimethoate, but only in the striatum. These findings indicate that a sub-chronic period of administration of a low dose of dimethoate, comparable to the levels of the pesticide present as residues in food, causes a proinflammatory status in the brain and enhances the neuroinflammatory response to the lipopolysaccharide challenge with regional specificity. - Highlights: • The dose of pesticide used was comparable to the levels of residues found in food. • Dimethoate administration increased cytokine expression and microglia reactivity. • Hippocampus and striatum were differentially affected by the treatment.

  20. Possible involvements of glutamate and adrenergic receptors on acute toxicity of methylphenidate in isolated hippocampus and cerebral cortex of adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motaghinejad, Majid; Motevalian, Manijeh; Shabab, Behnaz

    2017-04-01

    Neurodegeneration induced by methylphenidate (MPH), as a central stimulant with unknown long-term consequences, in adult rats' brain and the possible mechanisms involved were studied. Rats were acutely treated with MPH in the presence and absence of some receptor antagonists such as ketamine, topiramate, yohimbine, and haloperidol. Motor activity and anxiety level in rats were monitored. Antioxidant and inflammatory parameters were also measured in isolated hippocampus and cerebral cortex. MPH-treated groups (10 and 20 mg/kg) demonstrated anxiety-like behavior and increased motor activity. MPH significantly increased lipid peroxidation, GSSG content, IL-1β and TNF-α levels in isolated tissues, and also significantly reduced GSH content, superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and glutathione reductase (GR) activities in hippocampus and cerebral cortex. Pretreatment of animals by receptor antagonists caused inhibition of MPH-induced motor activity disturbances and anxiety-like behavior. Pretreatment of animals by ketamine, topiramate, and yohimbine inhibited the MPH-induced oxidative stress and inflammation; it significantly decreased lipid peroxidation, GSSG level, IL-1β and TNF-α levels and increased GSH content, SOD, GPx, and GR activities in hippocampus and cerebral cortex of acutely MPH-treated rats. Pretreatment with haloperidol did not cause any change in MPH-induced oxidative stress and inflammation. In conclusion, acute administration of high doses of MPH can cause oxidative and inflammatory changes in brain cells and induce neurodegeneration in hippocampus and cerebral cortex of adult rats and these changes might probably be mediated by glutamate (NMDA or AMPA) and/or α2 -adrenergic receptors. © 2016 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  1. Sex Differences in Gray Matter Volume of the Right Anterior Hippocampus Explain Sex Differences in Three-Dimensional Mental Rotation

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Wei; Chen, Chuansheng; Dong, Qi; Zhou, Xinlin

    2016-01-01

    Behavioral studies have reported that males perform better than females in 3-dimensional (3D) mental rotation. Given the important role of the hippocampus in spatial processing, the present study investigated whether structural differences in the hippocampus could explain the sex difference in 3D mental rotation. Results showed that after controlling for brain size, males had a larger anterior hippocampus, whereas females had a larger posterior hippocampus. Gray matter volume (GMV) of the rig...

  2. Neuroprotective Role of Trolox in Hippocampus after Ischemia Reperfusion Injury in Mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarveazad, Arash; Babahajian, Asrin; Yari, Abazar; Goudarzi, Farjam; Soleimani, Mansoureh; Nourani, Mohammadreza

    2017-05-09

    Cerebral ischemia is worldwide the third largest cause of mortality and disability in old people, and oxidative stress plays a considerable role in this process. In this study, for the fi rst time, we evaluated the effects of Trolox as an antioxidative agent in ischemia induced by reperfusion. Twenty-four Syrian male mice were randomly divided into the 3 groups. Both common carotid arteries of Syrian mice were ligated bilaterally for 20 min, blood fl ow was restored and Trolox (50 mg/kg) was immediately injected after induced ischemia. Shuttle box results showed an improvement in memory in the Trolox group compared to the ischemia group, however, these improvements were not signifi cant. Histopathological results showed a signifi cant increase in the number of healthy cells in the hippocampal CA1 region in the Trolox group compared to the ischemia group (p Trolox group compared to the ischemia group (p Trolox group compared to the ischemia group (p Trolox prescription increased anti-apoptotic proteins and decreased proapoptotic proteins thus protects neurons of the hippocampus and caused improvement of memory. Ultimately, these results would suggest some important treatment strategies after cerebral ischemia reperfusion.

  3. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Neocortex and Hippocampus of Olfactory Bulbectomized Mice, a Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avetisyan, A V; Samokhin, A N; Alexandrova, I Y; Zinovkin, R A; Simonyan, R A; Bobkova, N V

    2016-06-01

    Structural and functional impairments of mitochondria in brain tissues in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) cause energy deficiency, increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and premature neuronal death. However, the causal relations between accumulation of beta-amyloid (Aβ) peptide in mitochondria and mitochondrial dysfunction, as well as molecular mechanisms underlying deleterious effects of both these factors in sporadic AD, the most common form in humans, remain unknown. Here we used olfactory bulbectomized (OBX) mice of NMRI strain as a model for sporadic AD. Five weeks after surgery, the OBX mice developed major behavioral and biochemical features of AD neurodegeneration, including spatial memory loss, increased brain levels of Aβ, and energy deficiency. Mitochondria isolated from the neocortex and hippocampus of OBX mice displayed severe functional impairments, such as low NADH oxidation rate, reduced transmembrane potential, and decreased cytochrome c oxidase (complex IV) activity that correlated with high levels of soluble Aβ1-40. Mitochondria from OBX mice showed increased contents of lipid peroxidation products, indicative of the development of oxidative stress. We found that neurodegeneration caused by olfactory bulbectomy is accompanied by energy metabolism disturbances and oxidative stress in brain mitochondria similar to those occurring in transgenic animals - familial AD models and patients with sporadic AD. Therefore, OBX mice can serve as a valid AD model for investigating the mechanisms of AD neurodegeneration, drug testing, and development of therapeutic strategies for AD treatment.

  4. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor Entinostat (MS-275) Restores Anesthesia-induced Alteration of Inhibitory Synaptic Transmission in the Developing Rat Hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joksimovic, Srdjan M; Osuru, Hari Prasad; Oklopcic, Azra; Beenhakker, Mark P; Jevtovic-Todorovic, Vesna; Todorovic, Slobodan M

    2018-01-01

    Recent evidence strongly supports the idea that common general anesthetics (GAs) such as isoflurane (Iso) and nitrous oxide (N 2 O; laughing gas), as well as sedative drugs such as midazolam are neurotoxic for the developing mammalian brain having deleterious effects on neural circuits involved in cognition, learning and memory. However, to date, very little is known about epigenetic mechanisms involved in GA-induced plasticity of synaptic transmission in the hippocampus, the main memory-processing region in the brain. Here, we used patch-clamp recordings of miniature inhibitory post-synaptic currents (mIPSCs) from hippocampal neurons in slice cultures exposed to the clinically relevant GA combination. We found that in vitro exposure to a combination of midazolam, 0.75% Iso, and 70% N 2 O for 6 h leads to lasting increase in frequency of mIPSCs, while amplitudes and kinetics of the events were spared. Importantly, co-application of entinostat (MS-275), a selective inhibitor of class I histone deacetylases (HDAC), completely reversed GA-induced synaptic plasticity. Furthermore, when given in vivo to P7 pups exposed to GA with midazolam, Iso and N 2 O for 6 h, MS-275 reversed GA-induced histone-3 hypoacetylation as shown by an increase in Ac-H3 protein expression in the hippocampus. We conclude that exposure to a combination of Iso with N 2 O and midazolam causes plasticity of mIPSCs in hippocampal neurons by epigenetic mechanisms that target presynaptic sites. We hypothesize that GA-induced epigenetic alterations in inhibitory synaptic transmission in the hippocampus may contribute to altered neuronal excitability and consequently abnormal learning and memory later in life.

  5. Antioxidant Activity of Oral Administration of Rosmarinus Officinalis Leaves Extract on Rat's Hippocampus which Exposed to 6-Hydroxydopamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arashpour Rasoul

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Carnosic acid, a diterpene of Rosemarinus officinalis leaves extract (RE, has potent antioxidant activity in vitro. The dopaminergic connection of substantia nigra pars compacta to the hippocampus might be affected by oxidative stress which caused cognitive impairment observed in the early phase of Parkinson's disease (PD. Adult male Wistar rats were lesioned bilaterally by intra-nigral injection of 6-OHDA, and divided into six groups: four groups that orally given RE containing 40% of carnosic acid, at doses of 25, 50 and 100 mg/kg (treated rats and distilled water (H2O, once daily for a period of 14 days before and after the injury. There were also two another groups as control rats which injected by normal saline and untreated lesion group. The injured animals were evaluated for their spatial memory performance by Morris Water Maze test. Lesioned rats showed significant increase in escape latency, as compared with control group. Two weeks after injury, tissue samples were collected from the hippocampus. Levels of catalase (CAT, glutathione peroxidase (GPX and superoxide dismutase (SOD, malondialdehyde (MDA and reactive oxygen species (ROS were determined. There were significant increase of SOD, GPX and CAT enzymes activities in RE50 treated group as compared to lesioned rats. We found a significant decrease of ROS in RE50 treated group as compared to Lesioned rats. These findings provide evidence that 50 mg/kg of RE decreased oxidative damage of the hippocampus induced by 6-OHDA and serve as potential candidate for the treatment of PD.

  6. Rapid regulation of sialidase activity in response to neural activity and sialic acid removal during memory processing in rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Akira; Meguro, Yuko; Ishibashi, Sayaka; Ishii, Ami; Shiratori, Mako; Sai, Saki; Horii, Yuuki; Shimizu, Hirotaka; Fukumoto, Hokuto; Shimba, Sumika; Taguchi, Risa; Takahashi, Tadanobu; Otsubo, Tadamune; Ikeda, Kiyoshi; Suzuki, Takashi

    2017-04-07

    Sialidase cleaves sialic acids on the extracellular cell surface as well as inside the cell and is necessary for normal long-term potentiation (LTP) at mossy fiber-CA3 pyramidal cell synapses and for hippocampus-dependent spatial memory. Here, we investigated in detail the role of sialidase in memory processing. Sialidase activity measured with 4-methylumbelliferyl-α-d-N-acetylneuraminic acid (4MU-Neu5Ac) or 5-bromo-4-chloroindol-3-yl-α-d-N-acetylneuraminic acid (X-Neu5Ac) and Fast Red Violet LB was increased by high-K+-induced membrane depolarization. Sialidase activity was also increased by chemical LTP induction with forskolin and activation of BDNF signaling, non-NMDA receptors, or NMDA receptors. The increase in sialidase activity with neural excitation appears to be caused not by secreted sialidase or by an increase in sialidase expression but by a change in the subcellular localization of sialidase. Astrocytes as well as neurons are also involved in the neural activity-dependent increase in sialidase activity. Sialidase activity visualized with a benzothiazolylphenol-based sialic acid derivative (BTP3-Neu5Ac), a highly sensitive histochemical imaging probe for sialidase activity, at the CA3 stratum lucidum of rat acute hippocampal slices was immediately increased in response to LTP-inducible high-frequency stimulation on a time scale of seconds. To obtain direct evidence for sialic acid removal on the extracellular cell surface during neural excitation, the extracellular free sialic acid level in the hippocampus was monitored using in vivo microdialysis. The free sialic acid level was increased by high-K+-induced membrane depolarization. Desialylation also occurred during hippocampus-dependent memory formation in a contextual fear-conditioning paradigm. Our results show that neural activity-dependent desialylation by sialidase may be involved in hippocampal memory processing. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Stress leads to contrasting effects on the levels of brain derived neurotrophic factor in the hippocampus and amygdala.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harini Lakshminarasimhan

    Full Text Available Recent findings on stress induced structural plasticity in rodents have identified important differences between the hippocampus and amygdala. The same chronic immobilization stress (CIS, 2 h/day causes growth of dendrites and spines in the basolateral amygdala (BLA, but dendritic atrophy in hippocampal area CA3. CIS induced morphological changes also differ in their temporal longevity--BLA hypertrophy, unlike CA3 atrophy, persists even after 21 days of stress-free recovery. Furthermore, a single session of acute immobilization stress (AIS, 2 h leads to a significant increase in spine density 10 days, but not 1 day, later in the BLA. However, little is known about the molecular correlates of the differential effects of chronic and acute stress. Because BDNF is known to be a key regulator of dendritic architecture and spines, we investigated if the levels of BDNF expression reflect the divergent effects of stress on the hippocampus and amygdala. CIS reduces BDNF in area CA3, while it increases it in the BLA of male Wistar rats. CIS-induced increase in BDNF expression lasts for at least 21 days after the end of CIS in the BLA. But CIS-induced decrease in area CA3 BDNF levels, reverses to normal levels within the same period. Finally, BDNF is up regulated in the BLA 1 day after AIS and this increase persists even 10 days later. In contrast, AIS fails to elicit any significant change in area CA3 at either time points. Together, these findings demonstrate that both acute and chronic stress trigger opposite effects on BDNF levels in the BLA versus area CA3, and these divergent changes also follow distinct temporal profiles. These results point to a role for BDNF in stress-induced structural plasticity across both hippocampus and amygdala, two brain areas that have also been implicated in the cognitive and affective symptoms of stress-related psychiatric disorders.

  8. Maternal dietary loads of alpha-tocopherol increase synapse density and glial synaptic coverage in the hippocampus of adult offspring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Salucci

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available An increased intake of the antioxidant α-Tocopherol (vitamin E is recommended in complicated pregnancies, to prevent free radical damage to mother and fetus. However, the anti-PKC and antimitotic activity of α-Tocopherol raises concerns about its potential effects on brain development. Recently, we found that maternal dietary loads of α-Tocopherol through pregnancy and lactation cause developmental deficit in hippocampal synaptic plasticity in rat offspring. The defect persisted into adulthood, with behavioral alterations in hippocampus-dependent learning. Here, using the same rat model of maternal supplementation, ultrastructural morphometric studies were carried out to provide mechanistic interpretation to such a functional impairment in adult offspring by the occurrence of long-term changes in density and morphological features of hippocampal synapses. Higher density of axo-spinous synapses was found in CA1 stratum radiatum of α-Tocopherol-exposed rats compared to controls, pointing to a reduced synapse pruning. No morphometric changes were found in synaptic ultrastructural features, i.e., perimeter of axon terminals, length of synaptic specializations, extension of bouton-spine contact. Glia-synapse anatomical relationship was also affected. Heavier astrocytic coverage of synapses was observed in Tocopherol-treated offspring, notably surrounding axon terminals; moreover, the percentage of synapses contacted by astrocytic endfeet at bouton-spine interface (tripartite synapses was increased. These findings indicate that gestational and neonatal exposure to supranutritional tocopherol intake can result in anatomical changes of offspring hippocampus that last through adulthood. These include a surplus of axo-spinous synapses and an aberrant glia-synapse relationship, which may represent the morphological signature of previously described alterations in synaptic plasticity and hippocampus-dependent learning.

  9. Effects of a 4 month enriched environment on the hippocampus and the myelinated fibers in the hippocampus of middle-aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Xuan; Huang, Chun-Xia; Lu, Wei; Yang, Shu; Li, Chen; Shi, Xiao-Yan; Chen, Lin; Xiu, Yun; Yang, Jun-Qing; Tang, Yong

    2012-07-17

    An enriched environment has been shown to enhance learning and memory and to induce morphological changes in the hippocampus. In the present study, 14-month (middle-aged) female and male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into enriched environment (EE) rats and standard environment (SE) rats. EE rats were reared in an enriched environment and SE rats were reared in a standard environment for 4 months. The spatial learning capacity was assessed with Morris water maze. The hippocampus and the myelinated fibers in the rat hippocampus were quantitatively investigated with a transmission electronic microscope technique and stereological methods. The female rats housed in an enriched environment showed improved performance in the Morris water maze. There was no significant difference in the total volume of hippocampus between SE rats and EE rats. The total length and total volume of the myelinated fibers in the hippocampus of the female and male EE rats were significantly increased, respectively, when compared to the female and male SE rats. The increase of the total length of the myelinated nerve fibers in the hippocampus was mainly due to the increase of the myelinated fibers with diameters from 0.5 to 0.9 μm. Our results showed that a 4 month enriched environment had significant effects on the spatial learning capacity and the myelinated fibers in the hippocampus of middle-aged rats. The present study might provide an important theoretical basis for searching for an ethological strategy to delay the progress of brain aging in the future. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Propofol selectively alters GluA1 AMPA receptor phosphorylation in the hippocampus but not prefrontal cortex in young and aged mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Li-Min; Hastings, James M.; Fibuch, Eugene E; Wang, John Q.

    2014-01-01

    Propofol is a commonly used general anesthetic agent which has been previously shown to enhance the inhibitory GABAergic transmission in the central nervous system. In addition to the GABAergic element, the excitatory transmission may be another central molecular site impacted by propofol. Increasing evidence implies that the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA) receptor represents an excitatory amino acid receptor subtype subjected to the regulation by propofol. Indeed, in this study, we found that a single injection of propofol at an anesthetic dose increased AMPA receptor GluA1 subunit phosphorylation in young (2–3 months old) and aged (20–21 months old) mice in vivo. Propofol caused an increase in GluA1 phosphorylation in the hippocampus but not in the prefrontal cortex. The propofol effect was also site-selective as the drug elevated GluA1 phosphorylation at serine 831 (S831) but not serine 845. Interestingly, while propofol induced a moderate and transient increase in S831 phosphorylation in young mice, the drug caused a substantial and sustained S831 phosphorylation in aged animals. Total GluA1 abundance remained stable in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex in both young and aged mice in response to propofol. These results provide evidence supporting the sensitivity of GluA1 AMPA receptors to propofol. A single dose of propofol was able to upregulate GluA1 phosphorylation in the confined hippocampus in an age-dependent manner. PMID:24907515

  11. Diffusion-weighted imaging in transient global amnesia exposes the CA1 region of the hippocampus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ho Yun; Kim, Jae Hyoung; Weon, Young-Cheol; Youn, Sung Won; Kim, Sung Hyun [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam-si (Korea); Lee, Jung Seok; Kim, Sang Yun [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Neurology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam-si (Korea)

    2007-06-15

    Transient global amnesia (TGA) is characterized by a sudden onset of anterograde amnesia without alteration of consciousness or personal identity. Interestingly, recent studies have reported a high frequency of small high-signal abnormalities in the hippocampus with diffusion-weighted (DW) imaging, and ischemia has been proposed as an etiology of TGA. We hypothesized that TGA lesions occur preferentially in the CA1 region of the hippocampus, known to be susceptible to ischemia. Over a 30-month period 34 patients with TGA underwent MRI including DW imaging within 4 days of symptom onset. Patients with high-signal abnormalities in the hippocampus on the initial DW images underwent subsequent DW and T2-weighted imaging in the coronal plane to identify the precise lesion locations. Fourteen patients had small (1-3 mm) high-signal abnormalities in the hippocampus unilaterally on DW images. One of these patients had two lesions in one hippocampus and therefore in total 15 lesions were identified: four in the hippocampal head, and 11 in the body. Eleven lesions in ten patients with available coronal images were clearly demonstrated on both coronal DW and T2-weighted images and were localized to the lateral portion of the hippocampus, corresponding to the CA1 region. Lesions associated with TGA were localized exclusively to the lateral portion of the hippocampus corresponding to the CA1 region. This finding supports the ischemic etiology of TGA; however, the pathophysiological mechanism involved requires further study. (orig.)

  12. Impact of schizophrenia on anterior and posterior hippocampus during memory for complex scenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragland, J D; Layher, E; Hannula, D E; Niendam, T A; Lesh, T A; Solomon, M; Carter, C S; Ranganath, C

    2017-01-01

    Hippocampal dysfunction has been proposed as a mechanism for memory deficits in schizophrenia. Available evidence suggests that the anterior and posterior hippocampus could be differentially affected. Accordingly, we used fMRI to test the hypothesis that activity in posterior hippocampus is disproportionately reduced in schizophrenia, particularly during spatial memory retrieval. 26 healthy participants and 24 patients with schizophrenia from the UC Davis Early Psychosis Program were studied while fMRI was acquired on a 3 Tesla Siemens scanner. During encoding, participants were oriented to critical items through questions about item features (e.g., "Does the lamp have a square shade?") or spatial location (e.g., "Is the lamp on the table next to the couch?"). At test, participants determined whether scenes were changed or unchanged. fMRI analyses contrasted activation in a priori regions of interest (ROI) in anterior and posterior hippocampus during correct recognition of item changes and spatial changes. As predicted, patients with schizophrenia exhibited reduced activation in the posterior hippocampus during detection of spatial changes but not during detection of item changes. Unexpectedly, patients exhibited increased activation of anterior hippocampus during detection of item changes. Whole brain analyses revealed reduced fronto-parietal and striatal activation in patients for spatial but not for item change trials. Results suggest a gradient of hippocampal dysfunction in which posterior hippocampus - which is necessary for processing fine-grained spatial relationships - is underactive, and anterior hippocampus - which may process context more globally - is overactive.

  13. [Seasonal changes in hippocampus size and spatial behaviour in mammals and birds].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iaskin, V A

    2011-01-01

    Hippocampus is involved in processing of environmental spatial information, and its size is known to correlate positively with spatial abilities in mammals and birds. Comparisons between species suggest that amount of spatial information processed (the mean area of home range in particular) is related with hippocampus size. Do seasonal and age changes in hippocampus size correlate with seasonal dynamics of spatial behaviour during ontogenesis? The data obtained through observational and experimental studies confirm the possibility that hippocampus size may be subjected to adaptive modifications along with cyclic changes in spatial behavior. In course of seasonal dynamics, strong positive correlation was found between hippocampus mass, home range size, and mobility of small mammals. Recently, first facts demonstrating seasonal changes of hippocampus and spatial behaviour (in connection with food-storing and brood parasitism) were found in birds. A lot of facts obtained for different taxonomical groups shows parallel seasonal changes in spatial behaviour and morphology of brain region functionally related to such behaviour. Thus, in adult birds and mammals, not only behaviour but also brain structure is phenotypically flexible in response to seasonally changing environment. Morphophysiological mechanisms of hippocampus seasonal changes are also discussed.

  14. Effects of propofol, ginsenoside Rg-1, protein phosphatase-2a, and lithium on the learning and memory in rats and the content of glutamic acid in hippocampus after the electroconvulsive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao; Zhang, Xue-Ning; Liu, Dong; Min, Su

    2014-06-01

    To explore and compare the effects of propofol, ginsenoside Rg-1, protein phosphatae-2A, and lithium on the learning and memory and the concentration of glutamic acid in hippocampus after the electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in the model of depressed rats induced after the removal of olfactory bulb. The depressed rats were randomized into ECT intervention (two levels:no disposition and a course of electroconvulsive shock) and drug intervention (five levels:microinjection of saline injection, propofol, ginsenoside Rg-1, protein phosphatae-2A, and lithium, 20 g/L). Learning and memory were evaluated using the Morris water maze test within 24 h after the course of ECT. Glutamate contents in the hippocampus of rats were examined using high-performance liquid chromatography. Both propofol alone and ECT alone induced the impairment of learning and memory in depressed rats, but their combination alleviated the such impairment caused by ECT. Ginsenoside Rg-1, protein phosphatae-2A ,and lithium had no obvious effect on the leaning and improved the learning and memory when in combination with ECT. There was a synergic effect between ECT intervention and drug intervention. ECT remarkably increased the glutamate content in the hippocampus of depressed rats, which could be reduced by both propofol and ginsenoside Rg-1. Protein phosphatae-2A and lithium did not affect glutamate content in the hippocampus of depressed rats before and after ECT. ECT can increase the content of glutamate in hippocampus and thus cause the impairment of learning and memory in depressed rats. Propofol and ginsenoside Rg-1 can ameliorate the impairment by reducing the content of glutamate in hippocampus. Protein phosphatae-2A and lithium may also improve the learning and memory in depressed rats.

  15. Effect of environmental enrichment exposure on neuronal morphology of streptozotocin-induced diabetic and stressed rat hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narendra Pamidi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Environmental enrichment (EE exposure is known to influence the structural changes in the neuronal network of hippocampus. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of EE exposure on the streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetic and stressed rat hippocampus. Methods: Male albino rats of Wistar strain (4-5 weeks old were grouped into normal control (NC, vehicle control (VC, diabetes (DI, diabetes + stress (DI + S, diabetes + EE (DI + E, and diabetes + stress + EE (DI + S + E groups (n = 8 in each group. Rats were exposed to stress and EE after inducing diabetes with STZ (40 mg/kg. Rats were sacrificed on Day 30 and brain sections were processed for cresyl violet staining to quantify the number of surviving neurons in the CA1, CA3, and dentate hilus (DH regions of hippocampus. Results: A significant (p < 0.001 decrease in the number of survived neurons was noticed in DI (CA1, 34.06 ± 3.2; CA3, 36.1 ± 3.62; DH, 9.83 ± 2.02 as well as DI + S (CA1, 14.03 ± 3.12; CA3, 20.27 ± 4.09; DH, 6.4 ± 1.21 group rats compared to NC rats (CA1, 53.64 ± 2.96; CA3, 62.1 ± 3.34; DH, 21.11 ± 1.03. A significant (p < 0.001 increase in the number of survived neurons was observed in DI + E (CA1, 42.3 ± 3.66; CA3, 46.73 ± 4.74; DH, 17.03 ± 2.19 and DI + S + E (CA1, 29.69 ± 4.47; CA3, 36.73 ± 3.89; DH, 12.23 ± 2.36 group rats compared to DI and DI + S groups, respectively. Conclusions: EE exposure significantly reduced the amount of neuronal damage caused by complications of diabetes and stress to the neurons of hippocampus.

  16. Neurochemical phenotype of cytoglobin‑expressing neurons in the rat hippocampus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hundahl, Christian Ansgar; Fahrenkrug, Jan; Hannibal, Jens

    2014-01-01

    of Cygb neurons remain uncharacterized by the neurochemical content. The aim of the present study was to provide an additional and more detailed neurochemical phenotype of Cygb-expressing neurons in the rat hippocampus. The rat hippocampus was chosen due to the abundance of Cygb, as well as this limbic...... of Cygb neurons co-expressing nNOS. Furthermore, it was shown that the majority of neurons expressing somastostatin and vasoactive intestinal peptide also co-express Cygb and nNOS. Detailed information regarding the neurochemical phenotype of Cygb neurons in the hippocampus can be a valuable tool...

  17. Does Short-Term Dietary Omega-3 Fatty Acid Supplementation Influence Brain Hippocampus Gene Expression of Zinc Transporter-3?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Farhana Ahmad Sopian

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Dietary omega-3 fatty acids have been recognized to improve brain cognitive function. Deficiency leads to dysfunctional zinc metabolism associated with learning and memory impairment. The objective of this study is to explore the effect of short-term dietary omega-3 fatty acids on hippocampus gene expression at the molecular level in relation to spatial recognition memory in mice. A total of 24 male BALB/c mice were randomly divided into four groups and fed a standard pellet as a control group (CTL, n = 6, standard pellet added with 10% (w/w fish oil (FO, n = 6, 10% (w/w soybean oil (SO, n = 6 and 10% (w/w butter (BT, n = 6. After 3 weeks on the treatment diets, spatial-recognition memory was tested on a Y-maze. The hippocampus gene expression was determined using a real-time PCR. The results showed that 3 weeks of dietary omega-3 fatty acid supplementation improved cognitive performance along with the up-regulation of α-synuclein, calmodulin and transthyretin genes expression. In addition, dietary omega-3 fatty acid deficiency increased the level of ZnT3 gene and subsequently reduced cognitive performance in mice. These results indicate that the increased the ZnT3 levels caused by the deficiency of omega-3 fatty acids produced an abnormal zinc metabolism that in turn impaired the brain cognitive performance in mice.

  18. Reversal of reduced parvalbumin neurons in hippocampus and amygdala of Angelman syndrome model mice by chronic treatment of fluoxetine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godavarthi, Swetha K; Sharma, Ankit; Jana, Nihar Ranjan

    2014-08-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by autism, intellectual disability and motor disturbances. The disease is primarily caused by the loss of function of maternally inherited UBE3A. Ube3a maternal-deficient mice recapitulates many essential feature of AS. These AS mice have been shown to be under chronic stress and exhibits anxiety-like behaviour because of defective glucocorticoid receptor signalling. Here, we demonstrate that chronic stress in these mice could lead to down-regulation of parvalbumin-positive interneurons in the hippocampus and basolateral amygdala from early post-natal days. Down-regulation of parvalbumin-positive interneurons number could be because of decrease in the expression of parvalbumin in these neurons. We also find that treatment with fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, results in restoration of impaired glucocorticoid signalling, elevated serum corticosterone level, parvalbumin-positive interneurons and anxiety-like behaviours. Our findings suggest that impaired glucocorticod signalling in hippocampus and amygdala of AS mice is critical for the decrease in parvalbumin interneurons number, emergence of anxiety and other behavioural deficits and highlights the importance of fluoxetine in the recovery of these abnormalities. © 2014 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  19. Analysis of calretinin early expression in the rat hippocampus after beta amyloid (1-42) peptide injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altobelli, Giovanna Giuseppina; Cimini, Donatella; Esposito, Giuseppe; Iuvone, Teresa; Cimini, Vincenzo

    2015-06-12

    It has already been reported that cannabinoids are neuroprotective agents against excitotoxicity in vitro and increase after acute brain damage in vivo. This background prompted us to study the localization and expression of the calcium -binding protein calretinin in a condition similar to Alzheimer disease and its possible relationship with cannabinoids and their supposed protective role. We carried out quantitative analysis of the transient changes in calretinin expression shown by hybridochemistry within neuronal cell populations in the hippocampus of a beta amyloid-treated rat model of Alzheimer's disease and their correlation with endocannabinoid increase. Calretinin expression increases throughout the first week after cortical amyloid-beta peptide injection, and then decreases towards normal levels in the rat hippocampus during the following weeks, indicating that decreased calretinin gene expression may be associated with either increase of endocannabinoids or VDM11-induced accumulation of endocannabinoids. In contrast, SR1, an antagonist, which limits the cannabinoid effect by selective binding to the cannabinoid receptor CB1, up-regulates calretinin expression with respect to non-treated rats. This could mean that the SR1 endocannabinoid-blocking action through CB1 receptors, that are normally stimulated by endocannabinoids to inhibit calcium increase, might cause a higher calretinin expression. This would allow us to speculate on a possible reverse relationship between endocannabinoid and calretinin levels in the hippocampal calcium-homeostasis balance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Hypobaric Hypoxia Imbalances Mitochondrial Dynamics in Rat Brain Hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khushbu Jain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain is predominantly susceptible to oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction during hypobaric hypoxia, and therefore undergoes neurodegeneration due to energy crisis. Evidences illustrate a high degree of association for mitochondrial fusion/fission imbalance and mitochondrial dysfunction. Mitochondrial fusion/fission is a recently reported dynamic mechanism which frequently occurs among cellular mitochondrial network. Hence, the study investigated the temporal alteration and involvement of abnormal mitochondrial dynamics (fusion/fission along with disturbed mitochondrial functionality during chronic exposure to hypobaric hypoxia (HH. The Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to simulated high altitude equivalent to 25000 ft for 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28 days. Mitochondrial morphology, distribution within neurons, enzyme activity of respiratory complexes, Δψm, ADP: ATP, and expression of fission/fusion key proteins were determined. Results demonstrated HH induced alteration in mitochondrial morphology by damaged, small mitochondria observed in neurons with disturbance of mitochondrial functionality and reduced mitochondrial density in neuronal processes manifested by excessive mitochondrial fragmentation (fission and decreased mitochondrial fusion as compared to unexposed rat brain hippocampus. The study suggested that imbalance in mitochondrial dynamics is one of the noteworthy mechanisms occurring in hippocampal neurons during HH insult.

  1. Seahorse (Hippocampus reidi) as a bioindicator of crude oil exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delunardo, Frederico Augusto Cariello; de Carvalho, Luciano Rodrigues; da Silva, Bruno Ferreira; Galão, Michel; Val, Adalberto Luís; Chippari-Gomes, Adriana R

    2015-07-01

    This study explored the suitability of the seahorse Hippocampus reidi (Ginsburg, 1933) for assessing biomarkers of genotoxic effects and its use as a sentinel organism to detect the effects of acute exposure to petroleum hydrocarbons. Fish were exposed to three concentrations of crude oil (10, 20 and 30 g/kg) for 96 h, and the activity of phase II biotransformation enzyme glutathione S-transferase (GST) was measured. In addition, we performed genotoxicity assays, such as comet assay, micronucleus (MN) test and nuclear abnormalities (NA) induction, on the erythrocytes of the fish species. Our results revealed that the inhibition of hepatic GST activity in H. reidi was dependent on increasing crude oil concentrations. In contrast, an increase in the damage index (DI) and MN frequency were observed with increased crude oil concentrations. These results indicate that the alkaline comet assay and micronucleus test were suitable and useful in the evaluation of the genotoxicity of crude oil, which could improve determinations of the impact of oil spills on fish populations. In addition, H. reidi is a promising "sentinel organism" to detect the genotoxic impact of petroleum hydrocarbons. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Dendrites, deep learning, and sequences in the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Upinder S

    2017-10-12

    The hippocampus places us both in time and space. It does so over remarkably large spans: milliseconds to years, and centimeters to kilometers. This works for sensory representations, for memory, and for behavioral context. How does it fit in such wide ranges of time and space scales, and keep order among the many dimensions of stimulus context? A key organizing principle for a wide sweep of scales and stimulus dimensions is that of order in time, or sequences. Sequences of neuronal activity are ubiquitous in sensory processing, in motor control, in planning actions, and in memory. Against this strong evidence for the phenomenon, there are currently more models than definite experiments about how the brain generates ordered activity. The flip side of sequence generation is discrimination. Discrimination of sequences has been extensively studied at the behavioral, systems, and modeling level, but again physiological mechanisms are fewer. It is against this backdrop that I discuss two recent developments in neural sequence computation, that at face value share little beyond the label "neural." These are dendritic sequence discrimination, and deep learning. One derives from channel physiology and molecular signaling, the other from applied neural network theory - apparently extreme ends of the spectrum of neural circuit detail. I suggest that each of these topics has deep lessons about the possible mechanisms, scales, and capabilities of hippocampal sequence computation. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Gradient-based reliability maps for ACM-based segmentation of hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarpalas, Dimitrios; Gkontra, Polyxeni; Daras, Petros; Maglaveras, Nicos

    2014-04-01

    Automatic segmentation of deep brain structures, such as the hippocampus (HC), in MR images has attracted considerable scientific attention due to the widespread use of MRI and to the principal role of some structures in various mental disorders. In this literature, there exists a substantial amount of work relying on deformable models incorporating prior knowledge about structures' anatomy and shape information. However, shape priors capture global shape characteristics and thus fail to model boundaries of varying properties; HC boundaries present rich, poor, and missing gradient regions. On top of that, shape prior knowledge is blended with image information in the evolution process, through global weighting of the two terms, again neglecting the spatially varying boundary properties, causing segmentation faults. An innovative method is hereby presented that aims to achieve highly accurate HC segmentation in MR images, based on the modeling of boundary properties at each anatomical location and the inclusion of appropriate image information for each of those, within an active contour model framework. Hence, blending of image information and prior knowledge is based on a local weighting map, which mixes gradient information, regional and whole brain statistical information with a multi-atlas-based spatial distribution map of the structure's labels. Experimental results on three different datasets demonstrate the efficacy and accuracy of the proposed method.

  4. Changes in tau phosphorylation levels in the hippocampus and frontal cortex following chronic stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, C.; Guo, X. [Wuhan University, Renmin Hospital, Department of Psychiatry, Wuhan, China, Department of Psychiatry, Renmin Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan (China); Wang, G.H. [Wuhan University, Renmin Hospital, Department of Psychiatry, Wuhan, China, Department of Psychiatry, Renmin Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan (China); Wuhan University, Institute of Neuropsychiatry, Wuhan, China, Institute of Neuropsychiatry, Wuhan University, Wuhan (China); Wang, H.L.; Liu, Z.C.; Liu, H.; Zhu, Z.X.; Li, Y. [Wuhan University, Renmin Hospital, Department of Psychiatry, Wuhan, China, Department of Psychiatry, Renmin Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan (China)

    2014-03-03

    Studies have indicated that early-life or early-onset depression is associated with a 2- to 4-fold increased risk of developing Alzheimers disease (AD). In AD, aggregation of an abnormally phosphorylated form of the tau protein may be a key pathological event. Tau is known to play a major role in promoting microtubule assembly and stabilization, and in maintaining the normal morphology of neurons. Several studies have reported that stress may induce tau phosphorylation. The main aim of the present study was to investigate possible alterations in the tau protein in the hippocampus and frontal cortex of 32 male Sprague-Dawley rats exposed to chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) and then re-exposed to CUMS to mimic depression and the recurrence of depression, respectively, in humans. We evaluated the effects of CUMS, fluoxetine, and CUMS re-exposure on tau and phospho-tau. Our results showed that a single exposure to CUMS caused a significant reduction in sucrose preference, indicating a state of anhedonia. The change in behavior was accompanied by specific alterations in phospho-tau protein levels, but fluoxetine treatment reversed the CUMS-induced impairments. Moreover, changes in sucrose preference and phospho-tau were more pronounced in rats re-exposed to CUMS than in those subjected to a single exposure. Our results suggest that changes in tau phosphorylation may contribute to the link between depression and AD.

  5. Myelin damage of hippocampus and cerebral cortex in rat pentylenetetrazol model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Yu; Bai, Hui; Wang, Chao; Chen, Liang-Wei; Liu, Bei; Zhang, Hua; Gao, Guo-Dong

    2011-03-24

    Epilepsy is a chronic neurological disorder characterized by spontaneous recurrent seizures, which also occur in demyelinating diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) with a higher prevalence. Meanwhile, demyelination occurrings have been occasionally observed in CNS of epilepsy patients, indicating an association between demyelination and epileptic seizures by an unknown mechanism. However, no confirmative experimental evidence has yet been given. Thus, by using a rat pentylenetetrazol model, electroencephalogram (EEG), Western blotting, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunohistochemistry, the present study provided direct evidence that myelin sheath damage in rat hippocampus and cerebral cortex started in the early stage of epileptic seizures induction and lasted with no further increase in severity in the development of epileptic seizures. It was illustrated that myelin sheath damage was not the result of oligodendrocyte destruction, but the autoantibodies against myelin basic protein (MBP) produced in peripheral circulation accompanied by increased permeability of blood-brain barrier (BBB) formed in the development of epileptic seizures. This study firstly provided experimental evidence for myelin sheath damage in PTZ-induced rat's epileptic seizures and further demonstrated that its possible cause was autoimmunoreaction. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Oxidative stress induces apolipoprotein D overexpression in hippocampus during aging and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Eva; Navarro, Ana; Ordóñez, Cristina; Del Valle, Eva; Tolivia, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Apolipoprotein D (Apo D) is a lipid binding protein whose expression is strongly induced in the mammalian brain during aging and age-dependent neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), where it can play an important function as a neuroprotective and antioxidant protein. Increasing evidence suggests that the gradual increase in free radicals and oxidative stress with age is the primary determinant to aging brain. The aim of this work is to study the effect of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in Apo D expression, in hippocampal cells, in order to investigate the relationship between oxidative stress and elevated levels of Apo D found in hippocampus during aging and AD and also elucidate the possible pathways that lead to this increase. In this study, we demonstrated that Apo D expression in hippocampal neurons of aged and AD brains directly correlates with age-related increase in oxidative stress. More importantly, our results in the HT22 cell line indicate that Apo D protein level increases in a concentration-dependent manner specifically at those H2O2 concentrations that caused oxidative damage and apoptotic cell death. These data support the idea that oxidative stress-induced apoptosis during aging and AD may be associated with the increment in the expression of Apo D in these situations.

  7. Anatomical constraints on visualization of the human hippocampus using echo-planar imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asano, Shuichiro; Kirino, Takaaki [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Tokyo Hospital, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, 113-8655, Tokyo (Japan); Mihara, Ban [Department of Neurology, Mihara Memorial Hospital, 366 Ohta-machi, Isesaki-city, 372-0006, Gunma (Japan); Sugishita, Morihiro [Department of Cognitive Neuroscience, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, 113-8654, Tokyo (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    Reliable visualization of the hippocampus on echo-planar imaging (EPI) is essential in analyzing memory function using functional magnetic resonance imaging. However, the hippocampal area is notoriously prone to susceptibility artifacts caused by structures at the skull base, and avoiding such artifacts by appropriately selecting the subjects for a study is of practical importance. To elucidate factors affecting the extent of the artifacts we obtained EPI in a total of 62 hippocampi from 31 healthy volunteers and evaluated various anatomical measurements possibly associated with the quality of the images. The hippocampal head was sufficiently well demonstrated on 40 of 62 images (65%), and there were two parameters that significantly differed between the good (n=40) and poor (n=22) imaging studies: The vertical diameter (DV) of the opening of the internal acoustic meatus (IAM) and the pneumatization rate of the sphenoid sinus (RP-SS). From logistic regression analysis with the stepwise method, in addition to these two factors, the distance between the hippocampal body and IAM (Dhippo-IAM) and the distance between the hippocampal head and the middle cranial fossa at the skull base (Dhippo-base) were extracted. DV-IAM, RP-SS, and Dhippo-base were negatively correlated with the good imaging of the hippocampal head. On the other hand, Dhippo-IAM was positively correlated. These easily measurable parameters will be helpful in selecting subjects and in increasing the efficiency of hippocampal visualization in studies on human memory function. (orig.)

  8. Cortex and hippocampus DNA epigenetic response to a long-term arsenic exposure via drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xiaoyan; Tian, Meiping; Wang, Xiaoxue; Zhang, Jie; Huang, Qingyu; Liu, Liangpo; Shen, Heqing

    2018-03-01

    The neurotoxicity of arsenic is a serious health problem, especially for children. DNA epigenetic change may be an important pathogenic mechanism, but the molecular pathway remains obscure. In this study, the weaned male Sprague-Dawly (SD) rats were treated with arsenic trioxide via drinking water for 6 months, simulating real developmental exposure situation of children. Arsenic exposure impaired the cognitive abilities, and altered the expression of neuronal activity-regulated genes. Total arsenic concentrations of cortex and hippocampus tissues were significantly increased in a dose-dependent manner. The reduction in 5-methylcytosine (5 mC) and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) levels as well as the down-regulation of DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) and ten-eleven translocations (TETs) expression suggested that DNA methylation/demethylation processes were significantly suppressed in brain tissues. S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) level wasn't changed, but the expression of the important indicators of oxidative/anti-oxidative balance and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle was significantly deregulated. Overall, arsenic can disrupt oxidative/anti-oxidative balance, further inhibit TETs expression through TCA cycle and alpha-ketoglutarate (α-KG) pathway, and consequently cause DNA methylation/demethylation disruption. The present study implies oxidative stress but not SAM depletion may lead to DNA epigenetic alteration and arsenic neurotoxicity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Hydrogen-rich saline attenuates hippocampus endoplasmic reticulum stress after cardiac arrest in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yu; Gui, Qinfang; Jin, Li; Yu, Pan; Wu, Lin; Cao, Liangbin; Wang, Qiang; Duan, Manlin

    2017-02-15

    Hydrogen-rich saline can selectively scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS) and protect brain against ischemia reperfusion (I/R) injury. Endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) has been implicated in the pathological process of cerebral ischemia. However, very little is known about the role of hydrogen-rich saline in mediating pathophysiological reactions to ERS after I/R injury caused by cardiac arrest. The rats were randomly divided into three groups, sham group (n=30), ischemia/reperfusion group (n=40) and hydrogen-rich saline group (n=40). The rats in experimental groups were subjected to 4min of cardiac arrest and followed by resuscitation. Then they were randomized to receive 5ml/kg of either hydrogen-rich saline or normal saline. Hydrogen-rich saline significantly improves survival rate and neurological function. The beneficial effects of hydrogen-rich saline were associated with decreased levels of oxidative products, as well as the increased levels of antioxidant enzymes. Furthermore, the protective effects of hydrogen-rich saline were accompanied by the increased activity of glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), the decreased activity of cysteinyl aspartate specific proteinase-12 (caspase-12) and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP). Hydrogen-rich saline attenuates brain I/R injury may through inhibiting hippocampus ERS after cardiac arrest in rats. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Abnormal accumulation of autophagic vesicles correlates with axonal and synaptic pathology in young Alzheimer's mice hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Varo, Raquel; Trujillo-Estrada, Laura; Sanchez-Mejias, Elisabeth; Torres, Manuel; Baglietto-Vargas, David; Moreno-Gonzalez, Ines; De Castro, Vanessa; Jimenez, Sebastian; Ruano, Diego; Vizuete, Marisa; Davila, Jose Carlos; Garcia-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Jimenez, Antonio Jesus; Vitorica, Javier; Gutierrez, Antonia

    2012-01-01

    Dystrophic neurites associated with amyloid plaques precede neuronal death and manifest early in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this work we have characterized the plaque-associated neuritic pathology in the hippocampus of young (4- to 6-month-old) PS1(M146L)/APP(751SL) mice model, as the initial degenerative process underlying functional disturbance prior to neuronal loss. Neuritic plaques accounted for almost all fibrillar deposits and an axonal origin of the dystrophies was demonstrated. The early induction of autophagy pathology was evidenced by increased protein levels of the autophagosome marker LC3 that was localized in the axonal dystrophies, and by electron microscopic identification of numerous autophagic vesicles filling and causing the axonal swellings. Early neuritic cytoskeletal defects determined by the presence of phosphorylated tau (AT8-positive) and actin-cofilin rods along with decreased levels of kinesin-1 and dynein motor proteins could be responsible for this extensive vesicle accumulation within dystrophic neurites. Although microsomal Aβ oligomers were identified, the presence of A11-immunopositive Aβ plaques also suggested a direct role of plaque-associated Aβ oligomers in defective axonal transport and disease progression. Most importantly, presynaptic terminals morphologically disrupted by abnormal autophagic vesicle buildup were identified ultrastructurally and further supported by synaptosome isolation. Finally, these early abnormalities in axonal and presynaptic structures might represent the morphological substrate of hippocampal dysfunction preceding synaptic and neuronal loss and could significantly contribute to AD pathology in the preclinical stages.

  11. Memory of music: roles of right hippocampus and left inferior frontal gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takamitsu; Yagishita, Sho; Kikyo, Hideyuki

    2008-01-01

    We investigated neural correlates of retrieval success for music memory using event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging. To minimize the interference from MRI scan noise, we used sparse temporal sampling technique. Newly composed music materials were employed as stimuli, which enabled us to detect regions in absence of effects of experience with the music stimuli in this study. Whole brain analyses demonstrated significant retrieval success activities in the right hippocampus, bilateral lateral temporal regions, left inferior frontal gyrus and left precuneus. Anatomically defined region-of-interests analyses showed that the activity of the right hippocampus was stronger than that of the left, while the activities of the inferior frontal gyri showed the reverse pattern. Furthermore, performance-based analyses demonstrated that the retrieval success activity of the right hippocampus was positively correlated with the corrected recognition rate, suggesting that the right hippocampus contributes to the accuracy of music retrieval outcome.

  12. Loss of Parvalbumin in the Hippocampus of MAM Schizophrenia Model Rats Is Attenuated by Peripubertal Diazepam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yijuan; Grace, Anthony A

    2016-11-01

    Loss of parvalbumin interneurons in the hippocampus is a robust finding in schizophrenia brains. Rats exposed during embryonic day 17 to methylazoxymethanol acetate exhibit characteristics consistent with an animal model of schizophrenia, including decreased parvalbumin interneurons in the ventral hippocampus. We reported previously that peripubertal administration of diazepam prevented the emergence of pathophysiology in adult methylazoxymethanol acetate rats. We used an unbiased stereological method to examine the impact of peripubertal diazepam treatment on parvalbumin interneuron number in the ventral subiculum, dentate gyrus of the hippocampus and the basolateral amygdala. Methylazoxymethanol acetate rats with peripubertal diazepam showed significantly more parvalbumin interneurons (3355±173 in the ventral subiculum, 1211±76 in the dentate gyrus) than methylazoxymethanol acetate without diazepam (2375±109 and 824±54, respectively). No change was found in the basolateral amygdala. Peripubertal diazepam attenuated the decrease of parvalbumin in the ventral hippocampus of methylazoxymethanol acetate rats. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of CINP.

  13. Adult onset-hypothyroidism increases response latency and long-term potentiation (LTP) in rat hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyroid hormones (TH) influence central nervous system (CNS) function during both development and in adulthood. The hippocampus is critical for some types of learning and memory and is particularly sensitive to thyroid hormone deficiency. Hypothyroidism in adulthood has been ass...

  14. The tired hippocampus : The molecular impact of sleep deprivation on hippocampal function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Havekes, Robbert; Abel, Ted

    2017-01-01

    Memory consolidation, the process by which information is stored following training, consists of synaptic consolidation and systems consolidation. It is widely acknowledged that sleep deprivation has a profound effect on synaptic consolidation, particularly for memories that require the hippocampus.

  15. Hierarchical nesting of slow oscillations, spindles and ripples in the human hippocampus during sleep

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staresina, B.P.; Bergmann, T.O.; Bonnefond, M.; Meij, R. van der; Jensen, O.; Deuker, L.; Elger, C.E.; Axmacher, N.; Fell, J.

    2015-01-01

    During systems-level consolidation, mnemonic representations initially reliant on the hippocampus are thought to migrate to neocortical sites for more permanent storage, with an eminent role of sleep for facilitating this information transfer. Mechanistically, consolidation processes have been

  16. The hippocampus contributes to memory expression during transitive inference in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVito, Loren M.; Kanter, Ben; Eichenbaum, Howard

    2009-01-01

    There is substantial evidence that the hippocampus plays a role in transitive inference, the capacity to link overlapping memories and subsequently make novel judgments between elements of those memories that are only indirectly related. However, it is unclear whether the hippocampus is involved primarily during the original acquisition of the overlapping memories, or additionally during the flexible expression of those memories during transitive judgments. Here, we demonstrated that selective hippocampal damage produced after acquisition of the overlapping memories resulted in a severe impairment in subsequent transitive inference judgments, indicating that the hippocampus does play an important role beyond the initial learning phase. Furthermore, this study extends to mice a role for the hippocampus in transitive inference, as previously observed in other species. PMID:19405137

  17. Time-dependent involvement of the dorsal hippocampus in trace fear conditioning in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Misane, I.; Tovote, P.; Meyer, M.; Spiess, J.; Ögren, S.O.; Stiedl, O.

    2005-01-01

    Hippocampal and amygdaloid neuroplasticity are important substrates for Pavlovian fear conditioning. The hippocampus has been implicated in trace fear conditioning. However, a systematic investigation of the significance of the trace interval has not yet been performed. Therefore, this study

  18. Transient inactivation of the neonatal ventral hippocampus impairs attentional set-shifting behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, Julie M; Pershing, Michelle L; Thomsen, Morten Skøtt

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive deficits represent a core symptom cluster in schizophrenia that are thought to reflect developmental dysregulations within a neural system involving the ventral hippocampus (VH), nucleus accumbens (NAC), and prefrontal cortex (PFC). The present experiments determined the cognitive effects...

  19. Involvement of Granulin in Estrogen-Induced Neurogenesis in the Adult Rat Hippocampus

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    CHIBA, Shuichi; SUZUKI, Masatoshi; YAMANOUCHI, Keitaro; NISHIHARA, Masugi

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the presence of neurogenesis in the adult mammalian hippocampus, and it has been suggested that estrogen and various growth factors influence the processes of adult neurogenesis...

  20. Neuroprotective effect of pretreatment with ganoderma lucidum in cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury in rat hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wangxin; Zhang, Quiling; Deng, Wen; Li, Yalu; Xing, Guoqing; Shi, Xinjun; Du, Yifeng

    2014-01-01

    Ganoderma lucidum is a traditional Chinese medicine, which has been shown to have both anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory effects, and noticeably decreases both the infarct area and neuronal apoptosis of the ischemic cortex. This study aimed to investigate the protective effects and mechanisms of pretreatment with ganoderma lucidum (by intragastric administration) in cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats. Our results showed that pretreatment with ganoderma lucidum for 3 and 7 days reduced neuronal loss in the hippocampus, diminished the content of malondialdehyde in the hippocampus and serum, decreased the levels of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-8 in the hippocampus, and increased the activity of superoxide dismutase in the hippocampus and serum. These results suggest that pretreatment with ganoderma lucidum was protective against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury through its anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory actions. PMID:25317156

  1. Chronic Oxidative Stress, Mitochondrial Dysfunction, Nrf2 Activation and Inflammation in the Hippocampus Accompany Heightened Systemic Inflammation and Oxidative Stress in an Animal Model of Gulf War Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Geetha A; Hattiangady, Bharathi; Upadhya, Dinesh; Bates, Adrian; Attaluri, Sahithi; Shuai, Bing; Kodali, Maheedhar; Shetty, Ashok K

    2017-01-01

    Memory and mood dysfunction are the key symptoms of Gulf war illness (GWI), a lingering multi-symptom ailment afflicting >200,000 veterans who served in the Persian Gulf War-1. Research probing the source of the disease has demonstrated that concomitant exposures to anti-nerve gas agent pyridostigmine bromide (PB), pesticides, and war-related stress are among the chief causes of GWI. Indeed, exposures to GWI-related chemicals (GWIR-Cs) and mild stress in animal models cause memory and mood impairments alongside reduced neurogenesis and chronic low-level inflammation in the hippocampus. In the current study, we examined whether exposure to GWIR-Cs and stress causes chronic changes in the expression of genes related to increased oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and inflammation in the hippocampus. We also investigated whether GWI is linked with chronically increased activation of Nrf2 (a master regulator of antioxidant response) in the hippocampus, and inflammation and enhanced oxidative stress at the systemic level. Adult male rats were exposed daily to low-doses of PB and pesticides (DEET and permethrin), in combination with 5 min of restraint stress for 4 weeks. Analysis of the hippocampus performed 6 months after the exposure revealed increased expression of many genes related to oxidative stress response and/or antioxidant activity (Hmox1, Sepp1, and Srxn1), reactive oxygen species metabolism (Fmo2, Sod2, and Ucp2) and oxygen transport (Ift172 and Slc38a1). Furthermore, multiple genes relevant to mitochondrial respiration (Atp6a1, Cox6a1, Cox7a2L, Ndufs7, Ndufv1, Lhpp, Slc25a10, and Ucp1) and neuroinflammation (Nfkb1, Bcl6, Csf2, IL6, Mapk1, Mapk3, Ngf, N-pac, and Prkaca) were up-regulated, alongside 73-88% reduction in the expression of anti-inflammatory genes IL4 and IL10, and nuclear translocation and increased expression of Nrf2 protein. These hippocampal changes were associated with elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines

  2. Chronic Oxidative Stress, Mitochondrial Dysfunction, Nrf2 Activation and Inflammation in the Hippocampus Accompany Heightened Systemic Inflammation and Oxidative Stress in an Animal Model of Gulf War Illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geetha A. Shetty

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Memory and mood dysfunction are the key symptoms of Gulf war illness (GWI, a lingering multi-symptom ailment afflicting >200,000 veterans who served in the Persian Gulf War-1. Research probing the source of the disease has demonstrated that concomitant exposures to anti-nerve gas agent pyridostigmine bromide (PB, pesticides, and war-related stress are among the chief causes of GWI. Indeed, exposures to GWI-related chemicals (GWIR-Cs and mild stress in animal models cause memory and mood impairments alongside reduced neurogenesis and chronic low-level inflammation in the hippocampus. In the current study, we examined whether exposure to GWIR-Cs and stress causes chronic changes in the expression of genes related to increased oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and inflammation in the hippocampus. We also investigated whether GWI is linked with chronically increased activation of Nrf2 (a master regulator of antioxidant response in the hippocampus, and inflammation and enhanced oxidative stress at the systemic level. Adult male rats were exposed daily to low-doses of PB and pesticides (DEET and permethrin, in combination with 5 min of restraint stress for 4 weeks. Analysis of the hippocampus performed 6 months after the exposure revealed increased expression of many genes related to oxidative stress response and/or antioxidant activity (Hmox1, Sepp1, and Srxn1, reactive oxygen species metabolism (Fmo2, Sod2, and Ucp2 and oxygen transport (Ift172 and Slc38a1. Furthermore, multiple genes relevant to mitochondrial respiration (Atp6a1, Cox6a1, Cox7a2L, Ndufs7, Ndufv1, Lhpp, Slc25a10, and Ucp1 and neuroinflammation (Nfkb1, Bcl6, Csf2, IL6, Mapk1, Mapk3, Ngf, N-pac, and Prkaca were up-regulated, alongside 73–88% reduction in the expression of anti-inflammatory genes IL4 and IL10, and nuclear translocation and increased expression of Nrf2 protein. These hippocampal changes were associated with elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and

  3. Efecto del color del sustrato en el comportamiento de fijación del caballito de mar de hocico corto (Hippocampus hippocampus)

    OpenAIRE

    Segade-Botella, Ángel

    2009-01-01

    El caballito de mar (Hippocampus hippocampus) presenta una fase planctónica durante los primeros días de su vida. Cuando cambia a la fase bentónica ha de fijarse en un sustrato adecuado con su cola prensil. Este estudio, realizando recuentos diarios de la distribución de los caballitos en el acuario, ha obtenido como resultado que no existe una preferencia entre el color rojo y azul del sustrato a la hora de la fijación, no obstante, se observó una adaptación progresiva de l...

  4. Distinct hippocampal regions make unique contributions to relational memory In Press, Hippocampus

    OpenAIRE

    Giovanello, Kelly Sullivan; Schnyer, David; Verfaellie, Mieke

    2009-01-01

    Neuroscientific research has shown that the hippocampus is important for binding or linking together the various components of a learning event into an integrated memory. In a prior study, we demonstrated that the anterior hippocampus is involved in memory for the relations among informational elements to a greater extent than it is involved in memory for individual elements (Giovanello, Schnyer, and Verfaellie, 2004). In the current study, we extend those findings by further specifying the r...

  5. Simulation of Human Episodic Memory by Using a Computational Model of the Hippocampus

    OpenAIRE

    Naoyuki Sato; Yoko Yamaguchi

    2010-01-01

    The episodic memory, the memory of personal events and history, is essential for understanding the mechanism of human intelligence. Neuroscience evidence has shown that the hippocampus, a part of the limbic system, plays an important role in the encoding and the retrieval of the episodic memory. This paper reviews computational models of the hippocampus and introduces our own computational model of human episodic memory based on neural synchronization. Results from computer simulations demons...

  6. Fast and robust extraction of hippocampus from MR images for diagnostics of Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lötjönen, Jyrki; Wolz, Robin; Koikkalainen, Juha

    2011-01-01

    Assessment of temporal lobe atrophy from magnetic resonance images is a part of clinical guidelines for the diagnosis of prodromal Alzheimer's disease. As hippocampus is known to be among the first areas affected by the disease, fast and robust definition of hippocampus volume would be of great i...... of the method is about 2 minutes on a standard laptop computer. The results show a clear potential for applying the method in clinical practice....

  7. Interactions between the Lateral Habenula and the Hippocampus: Implication for Spatial Memory Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Goutagny, Romain; Loureiro, Michael; Jackson, Jesse; Chaumont, Joseph; Williams, Sylvain; Isope, Philippe; Kelche, Christian; Cassel, Jean-Christophe; Lecourtier, Lucas

    2013-01-01

    The lateral habenula (LHb) is an epithalamic structure connected with both the basal ganglia and the limbic system and that exerts a major influence on midbrain monoaminergic nuclei. The current view is that LHb receives and processes cortical information in order to select proper strategies in a variety of behavior. Recent evidence indicates that LHb might also be implicated in hippocampus-dependent memory processes. However, if and how LHb functionally interacts with the dorsal hippocampus ...

  8. Early developmental actions of endocrine disruptors on the hypothalamus, hippocampus, and cerebral cortex.

    OpenAIRE

    Parent, Anne-Simone; NAVEAU, Elise; Gerard, Arlette; Bourguignon, Jean-Pierre; Gary L Westbrook

    2011-01-01

    Sex steroids and thyroid hormones play a key role in the development of the central nervous system. The critical role of these hormonal systems may explain the sensitivity of the hypothalamus, the cerebral cortex, and the hippocampus to endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDC). This review examines the evidence for endocrine disruption of glial-neuronal functions in the hypothalamus, hippocampus, and cerebral cortex. Focus was placed on two well-studied EDC, the insecticide dichlorodiphenyltrichl...

  9. In vivo effect of chronic hypoxia on the neurochemical profile of the developing rat hippocampus

    OpenAIRE

    Raman, Lakshmi; Tkac, Ivan; Ennis, Kathleen; Georgieff, Michael K.; Gruetter, Rolf; Rao, Raghavendra

    2005-01-01

    The cognitive deficits observed in children with cyanotic congenital heart disease suggest involvement of the developing hippocampus. Chronic postnatal hypoxia present during infancy in these children may play a role in these impairments. To understand the biochemical mechanisms of hippocampal injury in chronic hypoxia, a neurochemical profile consisting of 15 metabolite concentrations and 2 metabolite ratios in the hippocampus was evaluated in a rat model of chronic postnatal hypoxia using i...

  10. Potentiating role of copper on spatial memory deficit induced by beta amyloid and evaluation of mitochondrial function markers in the hippocampus of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzadfar, Ladan; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Sabzevari, Omid; Hosseini, Rohollah; Salimi, Ahmad; Naserzadeh, Parvaneh; Sharifzadeh, Mohammad; Pourahmad, Jalal

    2017-07-19

    Mounting evidence suggests that copper, a crucial element in normal brain function, plays an important role in the etiology of Alzheimer's disease, which is known as a neurodegenerative mitochondrial disorder. However, the precise mechanisms of its effects on cognitive and mitochondrial functions through the CNS have not been thoroughly recognized yet. In this study, we aimed to investigate the long-term (3-week) effects of copper sulfate (50, 100 and 200 mg kg -1 day -1 ) exposure on learning and memory as well as on mitochondrial function in the hippocampus of rats in the presence and absence of beta amyloid (1 μg μl -1 per side) intrahippocampally (IH). After three weeks of copper exposure through drinking water, acquisition and retention of spatial memory were measured by the Morris water maze (MWM) test. Various parameters of mitochondrial function were also evaluated. Our data show that copper damaged the spatial learning and memory and also exacerbated the memory deficit induced by Aβ injection in rats in a dose-dependent manner. Mitochondria isolated from the hippocampus of rats treated with copper showed significant increases in ROS formation, mitochondrial swelling, lipid peroxidation, glutathione oxidation, outer membrane damage, and collapse of MMP, decreased cytochrome c oxidase activity, and finally increased ADP/ATP ratios. Our results indicate that copper overloading in the hippocampus of rats causes mitochondrial dysfunction and subsequent oxidative stress leading to cognitive impairment. This study also reveals that copper can potentiate Aβ deleterious effects on spatial memory and brain mitochondrial function.

  11. Integrity of the hippocampus and surrounding white matter is correlated with language training success in aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinzer, Marcus; Mohammadi, Siawoosh; Kugel, Harald; Schiffbauer, Hagen; Flöel, Agnes; Albers, Johannes; Kramer, Kira; Menke, Ricarda; Baumgärtner, Annette; Knecht, Stefan; Breitenstein, Caterina; Deppe, Michael

    2010-10-15

    Aphasia after middle cerebral artery (MCA) stroke shows highly variable degrees of recovery. One possible explanation may be offered by the variability of the occlusion location. Branches from the proximal portion of the MCA often supply the mesial temporal lobe including parts of the hippocampus, a structure known to be involved in language learning. Therefore, we assessed whether language recovery in chronic aphasia is dependent on the proximity of the MCA infarct and correlated with the integrity of the hippocampus and its surrounding white matter. Language reacquisition capability was determined after 2weeks of intensive language therapy and 8months after treatment in ten chronic aphasia patients. Proximity of MCA occlusion relative to the internal carotid artery was determined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) based on the most proximal anatomical region infarcted. Structural damage to the hippocampus was assessed by MRI-based volumetry, regional microstructural integrity of hippocampus adjacent white matter by fractional anisotropy. Language learning success for trained materials was correlated with the proximity of MCA occlusion, microstructural integrity of the left hippocampus and its surrounding white matter, but not with lesion size, overall microstructural brain integrity and a control region outside of the MCA territory. No correlations were found for untrained language materials, underlining the specificity of our results for training-induced recovery. Our results suggest that intensive language therapy success in chronic aphasia after MCA stroke is critically dependent on damage to the hippocampus and its surrounding structures. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. What Representations and Computations Underpin the Contribution of the Hippocampus to Generalization and Inference?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dharshan eKumaran

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Empirical research and theoretical accounts have traditionally emphasized the function of the hippocampus in episodic memory. Here we draw attention to the importance of the hippocampus to generalization, and focus on the neural representations and computations that might underpin its role in tasks such as the paired associate inference paradigm. We make a principal distinction between two different mechanisms by which the hippocampus may support generalization: an encoding-based mechanism that creates overlapping representations that capture higher-order relationships between different items (e.g. TCM – and a retrieval-based model (REMERGE that effectively computes these relationships at the point of retrieval, through a recurrent mechanism that allows the dynamic interaction of multiple pattern separated episodic codes. We also discuss what we refer to as transfer effects - a more abstract example of generalization that has also been linked to the function of the hippocampus. We consider how this phenomenon poses inherent challenges for models such as TCM and REMERGE, and outline the potential applicability of a separate class of models - hierarchical bayesian models (HBMs in this context. Our hope is that this article will provide a basic framework within which to consider the theoretical mechanisms underlying the role of the hippocampus in generalization, and at a minimum serve as a stimulus for future work addressing issues that go to the heart of the function of the hippocampus.

  13. The Anterior Prefrontal Cortex and the Hippocampus Are Negatively Correlated during False Memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeye, Brittany M; Karanian, Jessica M; Slotnick, Scott D

    2017-01-23

    False memories commonly activate the anterior/dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (A/DLPFC) and the hippocampus. These regions are assumed to work in concert during false memories, which would predict a positive correlation between the magnitudes of activity in these regions across participants. However, the A/DLPFC may also inhibit the hippocampus, which would predict a negative correlation between the magnitudes of activity in these regions. In the present functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, during encoding, participants viewed abstract shapes in the left or right visual field. During retrieval, participants classified each old shape as previously in the "left" or "right" visual field followed by an "unsure"-"sure"-"very sure" confidence rating. The contrast of left-hits and left-misses produced two activations in the hippocampus and three activations in the left A/DLPFC. For each participant, activity associated with false memories (right-"left"-"very sure" responses) from the two hippocampal regions was plotted as a function of activity in each A/DLPFC region. Across participants, for one region in the left anterior prefrontal cortex, there was a negative correlation between the magnitudes of activity in this region and the hippocampus. This suggests that the anterior prefrontal cortex might inhibit the hippocampus during false memories and that participants engage either the anterior prefrontal cortex or the hippocampus during false memories.

  14. Effects of the hippocampus on the motor expression of augmented breaths.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itopa E Ajayi

    Full Text Available Augmented breaths, also known as sighs, constitute the normal repertoire of breathing in freely behaving humans and animals. The breaths are believed to be generated by neurones in the preBötzinger complex but under modulatory influence from higher brain centres, particularly in the limbic system due to the strong correlations between the expression of emotional behaviours such as anxiety and the occurrence of augmented breaths. The current study examines the role of the hippocampus in the motor expression of augmented breaths, and also examines the characteristics of eupneic breaths surrounding a sigh before and after stimulating the hippocampus in urethane anaesthetised Sprague-Dawley rats. Neurochemical microstimulation using the excitatory amino acid, D,L-Homocysteic acid, was used to locate areas in the hippocampus with the potential to modulated the motor expression of augmented breaths. The CA1 neurone cluster of the ventral hippocampus was found to completely suppress the expression of augmented breaths without affecting the intrinsic properties of the breaths. A similar neurone cluster, but in the dorsal field of the hippocampus, was also investigated and found to have no effects over the expression of augmented breaths. The data supports the hypothesis that there is a structural or functional relationship between neurones of the ventral hippocampus and brainstem nuclei that control augmented breaths. The implications of these findings in the context of behaviours are discussed but with due consideration of experimental conditions.

  15. Sex, hormones and neurogenesis in the hippocampus: hormonal modulation of neurogenesis and potential functional implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galea, L A M; Wainwright, S R; Roes, M M; Duarte-Guterman, P; Chow, C; Hamson, D K

    2013-11-01

    The hippocampus is an area of the brain that undergoes dramatic plasticity in response to experience and hormone exposure. The hippocampus retains the ability to produce new neurones in most mammalian species and is a structure that is targeted in a number of neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric diseases, many of which are influenced by both sex and sex hormone exposure. Intriguingly, gonadal and adrenal hormones affect the structure and function of the hippocampus differently in males and females. Adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus is regulated by both gonadal and adrenal hormones in a sex- and experience-dependent way. Sex differences in the effects of steroid hormones to modulate hippocampal plasticity should not be completely unexpected because the physiology of males and females is different, with the most notable difference being that females gestate and nurse the offspring. Furthermore, reproductive experience (i.e. pregnancy and mothering) results in permanent changes to the maternal brain, including the hippocampus. This review outlines the ability of gonadal and stress hormones to modulate multiple aspects of neurogenesis (cell proliferation and cell survival) in both male and female rodents. The function of adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus is linked to spatial memory and depression, and the present review provides early evidence of the functional links between the hormonal modulation of neurogenesis that may contribute to the regulation of cognition and stress. © 2013 British Society for Neuroendocrinology.

  16. Tracking the Time-Dependent Role of the Hippocampus in Memory Recall Using DREADDs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, Carmen; Weiss, Sarah; Meyer, Retsina; Halassa, Michael; Biedenkapp, Joseph; Wilson, Matthew A; Goosens, Ki Ann; Bendor, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The hippocampus is critical for the storage of new autobiographical experiences as memories. Following an initial encoding stage in the hippocampus, memories undergo a process of systems-level consolidation, which leads to greater stability through time and an increased reliance on neocortical areas for retrieval. The extent to which the retrieval of these consolidated memories still requires the hippocampus is unclear, as both spared and severely degraded remote memory recall have been reported following post-training hippocampal lesions. One difficulty in definitively addressing the role of the hippocampus in remote memory retrieval is the precision with which the entire volume of the hippocampal region can be inactivated. To address this issue, we used Designer Receptors Exclusively Activated by Designer Drugs (DREADDs), a chemical-genetic tool capable of highly specific neuronal manipulation over large volumes of brain tissue. We find that remote (>7 weeks after acquisition), but not recent (1-2 days after acquisition) contextual fear memories can be recalled after injection of the DREADD agonist (CNO) in animals expressing the inhibitory DREADD in the entire hippocampus. Our data demonstrate a time-dependent role of the hippocampus in memory retrieval, supporting the standard model of systems consolidation.

  17. Label-free identification of the hippocampus and surrounding structures by multiphoton microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shu; Jiang, Liwei; Du, Huiping; Wang, Xingfu; Zheng, Liqin; Li, Lianhuang; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Chen, Jianxin

    2016-05-01

    The hippocampus is one of the essential neuroanatomical substrates and plays an important role in different neurological illnesses. In this work, multiphoton microscopy (MPM) based on intrinsic nonlinear optical processes two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG), was applied to label-freely detect the entire hippocampus and surrounding structures in high-magnification imaging, as well as acquire large-scale MPM images at subcellular resolution. It was found that MPM has the capability to identify cornu ammonis, dentate gyrus (DG), alveus, and fimbria of the entire hippocampus, choroid plexus in lateral ventricles, and white matter tracts. MPM also can be used to quantitatively describe the differences of the cellular nucleus in the cornu ammonis and the DG, further identify the morphological features of hippocampal subfields. In addition, the surrounding structures of the hippocampus including the lateral ventricles and white matter serve as useful information to determine the position of the hippocampus. Our results suggest that with the development of the clinical feasibility of two-photon fiberscopes and microendoscope probes, MPM has the potential for in vivo intraoperative identification and monitoring of hippocampus-related lesions without the need for tissue labelling or fluorescent markers.

  18. Genetic variations in two seahorse species (Hippocampus mohnikei and Hippocampus trimaculatus: evidence for middle Pleistocene population expansion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanhong Zhang

    Full Text Available Population genetic of seahorses is confidently influenced by their species-specific ecological requirements and life-history traits. In the present study, partial sequences of mitochondrial cytochrome b (cytb and control region (CR were obtained from 50 Hippocampus mohnikei and 92 H. trimaculatus from four zoogeographical zones. A total of 780 base pairs of cytb gene were sequenced to characterize mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA diversity. The mtDNA marker revealed high haplotype diversity, low nucleotide diversity, and a lack of population structure across both populations of H. mohnikei and H. trimaculatus. A neighbour-joining (NJ tree of cytb gene sequences showed that H. mohnikei haplotypes formed one cluster. A maximum likelihood (ML tree of cytb gene sequences showed that H. trimaculatus belonged to one lineage. The star-like pattern median-joining network of cytb and CR markers indicated a previous demographic expansion of H. mohnikei and H. trimaculatus. The cytb and CR data sets exhibited a unimodal mismatch distribution, which may have resulted from population expansion. Mismatch analysis suggested that the expansion was initiated about 276,000 years ago for H. mohnikei and about 230,000 years ago for H. trimaculatus during the middle Pleistocene period. This study indicates a possible signature of genetic variation and population expansion in two seahorses under complex marine environments.

  19. Effects of lentivirus-mediated CREB expression in the dorsolateral striatum: memory enhancement and evidence for competitive and cooperative interactions with the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathirvelu, Balachandar; Colombo, Paul J

    2013-11-01

    Neural systems specialized for memory may interact during memory formation or recall, and the results of interactions are important determinants of how systems control behavioral output. In two experiments, we used lentivirus-mediated expression of the transcription factor CREB (LV-CREB) to test if localized manipulations of cellular plasticity influence interactions between the hippocampus and dorsolateral striatum. In Experiment 1, we tested the hypothesis that infusion of LV-CREB in the dorsolateral striatum facilitates memory for response learning, and impairs memory for place learning. LV-CREB in the dorsolateral striatum had no effect on response learning, but impaired place memory; a finding consistent with competition between the striatum and hippocampus. In Experiment 2, we tested the hypothesis that infusion of LV-CREB in the dorsolateral striatum facilitates memory for cue learning, and impairs memory for contextual fear conditioning. LV-CREB in the dorsolateral striatum enhanced memory for cue learning and, in contrast to our prediction, also enhanced memory for contextual fear conditioning, consistent with a cooperative interaction between the striatum and hippocampus. Overall, the current experiments demonstrate that infusion of LV-CREB in the dorsolateral striatum (1) increases levels of CREB protein locally, (2) does not alter acquisition of place, response, cue, or contextual fear conditioning, (3) facilitates memory for cue learning and contextual fear conditioning, and (4) impairs memory for place learning. Taken together, the present results provide evidence that LV-CREB in the dorsolateral striatum can enhance memory formation and cause both competitive and cooperative interactions with the hippocampus. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Predator exposure/psychosocial stress animal model of post-traumatic stress disorder modulates neurotransmitters in the rat hippocampus and prefrontal cortex.

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    C Brad Wilson

    Full Text Available Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD can develop in response to a traumatic event involving a threat to life. To date, no diagnostic biomarkers have been identified for PTSD. Recent research points toward physiological abnormalities in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis, sympathoadrenal medullary and immune system that may be implicated in the disorder. The modulation of neurotransmitters is another possible mechanism, but their role in the progression of PTSD is poorly understood. Low serotonin (5-HT may be a factor, but it may not be the only neurotransmitter affected as modulation affects levels of other neurotransmitters. In this study, we hypothesized the predator exposure/psychosocial stress rodent model of PTSD may alter levels of 5-HT and other neurotransmitters in the rat hippocampus and prefrontal cortex (PFC. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were used in this experiment. We induced PTSD via a predator exposure/psychosocial stress model, whereby rats were placed in a cage with a cat for 1 hour on days 1 and 11 of the 31-day experiment. Rats also received psychosocial stress via daily cage cohort changes. On day 32, the rats were sacrificed and the brains dissected to remove the hippocampus and PFC. Norepinephrine (NE, 5-Hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA, homovanillic acid (HVA, dopamine (DA, and 3,4-Dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC, and 5-HT levels in the hippocampus and PFC were measured with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. In the hippocampus, 5-HT and HVA were lower, while NE and DOPAC were higher, in the PTSD group vs. controls. In the PFC, only 5-HT was lower, while NE, DA, and DOPAC were higher, in the PTSD group vs. controls. The rate limiting enzymes tyrosine hydroxylase and tryptophan hydroxylase were also examined and confirmed our findings. These results demonstrate that the predator exposure/psychosocial stress model of PTSD produces neurotransmitter changes similar to those seen in human patients and may

  1. Predator exposure/psychosocial stress animal model of post-traumatic stress disorder modulates neurotransmitters in the rat hippocampus and prefrontal cortex.

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    Wilson, C Brad; Ebenezer, Philip J; McLaughlin, Leslie D; Francis, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) can develop in response to a traumatic event involving a threat to life. To date, no diagnostic biomarkers have been identified for PTSD. Recent research points toward physiological abnormalities in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, sympathoadrenal medullary and immune system that may be implicated in the disorder. The modulation of neurotransmitters is another possible mechanism, but their role in the progression of PTSD is poorly understood. Low serotonin (5-HT) may be a factor, but it may not be the only neurotransmitter affected as modulation affects levels of other neurotransmitters. In this study, we hypothesized the predator exposure/psychosocial stress rodent model of PTSD may alter levels of 5-HT and other neurotransmitters in the rat hippocampus and prefrontal cortex (PFC). Male Sprague-Dawley rats were used in this experiment. We induced PTSD via a predator exposure/psychosocial stress model, whereby rats were placed in a cage with a cat for 1 hour on days 1 and 11 of the 31-day experiment. Rats also received psychosocial stress via daily cage cohort changes. On day 32, the rats were sacrificed and the brains dissected to remove the hippocampus and PFC. Norepinephrine (NE), 5-Hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), homovanillic acid (HVA), dopamine (DA), and 3,4-Dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), and 5-HT levels in the hippocampus and PFC were measured with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). In the hippocampus, 5-HT and HVA were lower, while NE and DOPAC were higher, in the PTSD group vs. controls. In the PFC, only 5-HT was lower, while NE, DA, and DOPAC were higher, in the PTSD group vs. controls. The rate limiting enzymes tyrosine hydroxylase and tryptophan hydroxylase were also examined and confirmed our findings. These results demonstrate that the predator exposure/psychosocial stress model of PTSD produces neurotransmitter changes similar to those seen in human patients and may cause a

  2. Effect of Paullinia cupana Mart. Commercial Extract During the Aging of Middle Age Wistar Rats: Differential Effects on the Hippocampus and Striatum.

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    Mingori, Moara Rodrigues; Heimfarth, Luana; Ferreira, Charles Francisco; Gomes, Henrique Mautone; Moresco, Karla Suzana; Delgado, Jeferson; Roncato, Sabrina; Zeidán-Chuliá, Fares; Gelain, Daniel Pens; Moreira, José Cláudio Fonseca

    2017-08-01

    During aging, there is a marked decline in the antioxidant capacity of brain tissue, leading to a gradual loss of the antioxidant/oxidant balance, which causes oxidative damage. The effects of Paullinia cupana Mart. extract, which is described as being rich in caffeine and many polyphenol compounds, on the central nervous system have not been extensively investigated. The aim of this study was to therefore investigate the effect of a commercial guarana extract (CGE) on cognitive function, oxidative stress, and brain homeostasis proteins related to cognitive injury and senescence in middle age, male Wistar rats. Animals were randomly assigned to a group according to their treatment (saline, CGE, or caffeine). Solutions were administered daily by oral gavage for 6 months. Open field and novel object recognition tasks were performed before and after treatment. Biochemical analyses were carried out on the hippocampus and striatum. Our open field data showed an increase in exploratory activity and a decrease in anxiety-like behavior with caffeine but not with the CGE treatment. In the CGE-treated group, catalase activity decreased in the hippocampus and increased in the striatum. Analyses of the hippocampus and striatum indicate that CGE and/or caffeine altered some of the analyzed parameters in a tissue-specific manner. Our data suggest that CGE intake does not improve cognitive development, but modifies the oxidative stress machinery and neurodegenerative-signaling pathway, inhibiting pro-survival pathway molecules in the hippocampus and striatum. This may contribute to the development of unfavorable microenvironments in the brain and neurodegenerative disorders.

  3. A computational theory of episodic memory formation in the hippocampus.

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    Rolls, Edmund T

    2010-12-31

    A quantitative computational theory of the operation of the hippocampus as an episodic memory system is described. The CA3 system operates as a single attractor or autoassociation network to enable rapid, one-trial associations between any spatial location (place in rodents or spatial view in primates) and an object or reward and to provide for completion of the whole memory during recall from any part. The theory is extended to associations between time and object or reward to implement temporal order memory, also important in episodic memory. The dentate gyrus performs pattern separation by competitive learning to produce sparse representations, producing for example neurons with place-like fields from entorhinal cortex grid cells. The dentate granule cells produce by the very small number of mossy fibre connections to CA3 a randomizing pattern separation effect important during learning but not recall that separates out the patterns represented by CA3 firing to be very different from each other, which is optimal for an unstructured episodic memory system in which each memory must be kept distinct from other memories. The direct perforant path input to CA3 is quantitatively appropriate to provide the cue for recall in CA3, but not for learning. The CA1 recodes information from CA3 to set up associatively learned backprojections to neocortex to allow subsequent retrieval of information to neocortex, providing a quantitative account of the large number of hippocampo-neocortical and neocortical-neocortical backprojections. Tests of the theory including hippocampal subregion analyses and hippocampal NMDA receptor knockouts are described and support the theory. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Modified cuckoo search algorithm in microscopic image segmentation of hippocampus.

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    Chakraborty, Shouvik; Chatterjee, Sankhadeep; Dey, Nilanjan; Ashour, Amira S; Ashour, Ahmed S; Shi, Fuqian; Mali, Kalyani

    2017-10-01

    Microscopic image analysis is one of the challenging tasks due to the presence of weak correlation and different segments of interest that may lead to ambiguity. It is also valuable in foremost meadows of technology and medicine. Identification and counting of cells play a vital role in features extraction to diagnose particular diseases precisely. Different segments should be identified accurately in order to identify and to count cells in a microscope image. Consequently, in the current work, a novel method for cell segmentation and identification has been proposed that incorporated marking cells. Thus, a novel method based on cuckoo search after pre-processing step is employed. The method is developed and evaluated on light microscope images of rats' hippocampus which used as a sample for the brain cells. The proposed method can be applied on the color images directly. The proposed approach incorporates the McCulloch's method for lévy flight production in cuckoo search (CS) algorithm. Several objective functions, namely Otsu's method, Kapur entropy and Tsallis entropy are used for segmentation. In the cuckoo search process, the Otsu's between class variance, Kapur's entropy and Tsallis entropy are employed as the objective functions to be optimized. Experimental results are validated by different metrics, namely the peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR), mean square error, feature similarity index and CPU running time for all the test cases. The experimental results established that the Kapur's entropy segmentation method based on the modified CS required the least computational time compared to Otsu's between-class variance segmentation method and the Tsallis entropy segmentation method. Nevertheless, Tsallis entropy method with optimized multi-threshold levels achieved superior performance compared to the other two segmentation methods in terms of the PSNR. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Neurons of the dentate molecular layer in the rabbit hippocampus.

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    Francisco J Sancho-Bielsa

    Full Text Available The molecular layer of the dentate gyrus appears as the main entrance gate for information into the hippocampus, i.e., where the perforant path axons from the entorhinal cortex synapse onto the spines and dendrites of granule cells. A few dispersed neuronal somata appear intermingled in between and probably control the flow of information in this area. In rabbits, the number of neurons in the molecular layer increases in the first week of postnatal life and then stabilizes to appear permanent and heterogeneous over the individuals' life span, including old animals. By means of Golgi impregnations, NADPH histochemistry, immunocytochemical stainings and intracellular labelings (lucifer yellow and biocytin injections, eight neuronal morphological types have been detected in the molecular layer of developing adult and old rabbits. Six of them appear as interneurons displaying smooth dendrites and GABA immunoreactivity: those here called as globoid, vertical, small horizontal, large horizontal, inverted pyramidal and polymorphic. Additionally there are two GABA negative types: the sarmentous and ectopic granular neurons. The distribution of the somata and dendritic trees of these neurons shows preferences for a definite sublayer of the molecular layer: small horizontal, sarmentous and inverted pyramidal neurons are preferably found in the outer third of the molecular layer; vertical, globoid and polymorph neurons locate the intermediate third, while large horizontal and ectopic granular neurons occupy the inner third or the juxtagranular molecular layer. Our results reveal substantial differences in the morphology and electrophysiological behaviour between each neuronal archetype in the dentate molecular layer, allowing us to propose a new classification for this neural population.

  6. Theta coordinated error-driven learning in the hippocampus.

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    Nicholas Ketz

    Full Text Available The learning mechanism in the hippocampus has almost universally been assumed to be Hebbian in nature, where individual neurons in an engram join together with synaptic weight increases to support facilitated recall of memories later. However, it is also widely known that Hebbian learning mechanisms impose significant capacity constraints, and are generally less computationally powerful than learning mechanisms that take advantage of error signals. We show that the differential phase relationships of hippocampal subfields within the overall theta rhythm enable a powerful form of error-driven learning, which results in significantly greater capacity, as shown in computer simulations. In one phase of the theta cycle, the bidirectional connectivity between CA1 and entorhinal cortex can be trained in an error-driven fashion to learn to effectively encode the cortical inputs in a compact and sparse form over CA1. In a subsequent portion of the theta cycle, the system attempts to recall an existing memory, via the pathway from entorhinal cortex to CA3 and CA1. Finally the full theta cycle completes when a strong target encoding representation of the current input is imposed onto the CA1 via direct projections from entorhinal cortex. The difference between this target encoding and the attempted recall of the same representation on CA1 constitutes an error signal that can drive the learning of CA3 to CA1 synapses. This CA3 to CA1 pathway is critical for enabling full reinstatement of recalled hippocampal memories out in cortex. Taken together, these new learning dynamics enable a much more robust, high-capacity model of hippocampal learning than was available previously under the classical Hebbian model.

  7. Effects of acute voluntary loaded wheel running on BDNF expression in the rat hippocampus.

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    Lee, Minchul; Soya, Hideaki

    2017-12-31

    Voluntary loaded wheel running involves the use of a load during a voluntary running activity. A muscle-strength or power-type activity performed at a relatively high intensity and a short duration may cause fewer apparent metabolic adaptations but may still elicit muscle fiber hypertrophy. This study aimed to determine the effects of acute voluntary wheel running with an additional load on brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in the rat hippocampus. Ten-week old male Wistar rats were assigned randomly to a (1) sedentary (Control) group; (2) voluntary exercise with no load (No-load) group; or (3) voluntary exercise with an additional load (Load) group for 1-week (acute period). The expression of BDNF genes was quantified by real-time PCR. The average distance levels were not significantly different in the No-load and Load groups. However, the average work levels significantly increased in the Load group. The relative soleus weights were greater in the No-load group. Furthermore, loaded wheel running up-regulated the BDNF mRNA level compared with that in the Control group. The BDNF mRNA levels showed a positive correlation with workload levels (r=0.75), suggesting that the availability of multiple workload levels contributes to the BDNF-related benefits of loaded wheel running noted in this study. This novel approach yielded the first set of findings showing that acute voluntary loaded wheel running, which causes muscular adaptation, enhanced BDNF expression, suggesting a possible role of high-intensity short-term exercise in hippocampal BDNF activity.

  8. Prenatal choline supplementation increases NGF levels in the hippocampus and frontal cortex of young and adult rats.

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    Sandstrom, Noah J; Loy, Rebekah; Williams, Christina L

    2002-08-23

    Female Sprague-Dawley rats received approximately 300 mg/kg per day of choline chloride through their drinking water on days 11 of pregnancy through birth and the level of nerve growth factor (NGF) in the hippocampus and frontal cortex of their male offspring was measured at 20 and 90 days of age. Prenatal choline supplementation caused significant increases in hippocampal NGF levels at 20 and 90 days of age, while levels of NGF in the frontal cortex were elevated in choline-supplemented rats at 20 days of age, but not 90 days of age. These results suggest that increases in NGF levels during development or adulthood may be one mechanism underlying improvements in spatial and temporal memory of adult rats exposed to elevated levels of choline chloride perinatally.

  9. Effects of estrogen in preventing neuronal insulin resistance in hippocampus of obese rats are different between genders.

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    Pratchayasakul, Wasana; Chattipakorn, Nipon; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C

    2011-11-07

    The effects of estrogen on the prevention of impaired insulin-induced long-term depression in the hippocampus and neuronal insulin signaling caused by high-fat diet (HF) were studied in male and female rats. Both male and female rats were fed with a normal diet (ND; 19.7% energy from fat) or a high-fat diet (HF; 59.3% energy from fat) for 12 weeks. Then, rats were divided into four subgroups: ND, ND+E, HF and HF+E. The subgroups with+E were given 50 μg/kg estrogen subcutaneously once a day for 30 days. At the end of the experimental period, blood and brain samples were collected to determine the peripheral insulin resistance and neuronal insulin resistance, respectively. Both male and female rats fed with HF developed peripheral insulin resistance as indicated by increased body weight, visceral fat, plasma insulin and HOMA index. Estrogen administration decreased those parameters, indicating improved peripheral insulin sensitivity, in both male and female HF rats. HF diet consumption also caused impaired insulin-induced long-term depression in hippocampus and impaired neuronal insulin receptor function and signaling, indicating neuronal insulin resistance, in both male and female rats. Estrogen treatment could attenuate these neuronal impairments only in HF female rats. The activation of the estrogen pathway could preserve insulin sensitivity in the peripheral tissue in both male and female rats. In neuronal tissue, however, the benefit of estrogen could be found only in female rats. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Jaundice causes

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    ... is a yellow color in the skin, mucus membranes, or eyes. The yellow color comes from bilirubin, a byproduct of old red blood cells. Jaundice is a sign of other diseases. This article discusses the possible causes of jaundice in children ...

  11. Structural layers of ex vivo rat hippocampus at 7T MRI.

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    Jeanine Manuella Kamsu

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI applied to the hippocampus is challenging in studies of the neurophysiology of memory and the physiopathology of numerous diseases such as epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease, ischemia, and depression. The hippocampus is a well-delineated cerebral structure with a multi-layered organization. Imaging of hippocampus layers is limited to a few studies and requires high magnetic field and gradient strength. We performed one conventional MRI sequence on a 7T MRI in order to visualize and to delineate the multi-layered hippocampal structure ex vivo in rat brains. We optimized a volumic three-dimensional T2 Rapid Acquisition Relaxation Enhancement (RARE sequence and quantified the volume of the hippocampus and one of its thinnest layers, the stratum granulare of the dentate gyrus. Additionally, we tested passive staining by gadolinium with the aim of decreasing the acquisition time and increasing image contrast. Using appropriated settings, six discrete layers were differentiated within the hippocampus in rats. In the hippocampus proper or Ammon's Horn (AH: the stratum oriens, the stratum pyramidale of, the stratum radiatum, and the stratum lacunosum moleculare of the CA1 were differentiated. In the dentate gyrus: the stratum moleculare and the stratum granulare layer were seen distinctly. Passive staining of one brain with gadolinium decreased the acquisition time by four and improved the differentiation between the layers. A conventional sequence optimized on a 7T MRI with a standard receiver surface coil will allow us to study structural layers (signal and volume of hippocampus in various rat models of neuropathology (anxiety, epilepsia, neurodegeneration.

  12. Methamphetamine differentially affects BDNF and cell death factors in anatomically defined regions of the hippocampus

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    Galinato, Melissa H.; Orio, Laura; Mandyam, Chitra D.

    2014-01-01

    Methamphetamine exposure reduces hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) and neurogenesis and these alterations partially contribute to hippocampal maladaptive plasticity. The potential mechanisms underlying methamphetamine-induced maladaptive plasticity were identified in the present study. Expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF; a regulator of LTP and neurogenesis), and its receptor tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) were studied in the dorsal and ventral hippocampal tissue lysates in rats that intravenously self-administered methamphetamine in a limited access (1 h/day) or extended access (6 h/day) paradigm for 17 days post baseline sessions. Extended access methamphetamine enhanced expression of BDNF with significant effects observed in the dorsal and ventral hippocampus. Methamphetamine-induced enhancements in BDNF expression were not associated with TrkB receptor activation as indicated by phospho (p)-TrkB-706 levels. Conversely, methamphetamine produced hypophosphorylation of NMDA receptor subunit 2B (GluN2B) at Tyr-1472 in the ventral hippocampus, indicating reduced receptor activation. In addition, methamphetamine enhanced expression of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and reduced pro-apoptotic protein Bax levels in the ventral hippocampus, suggesting a mechanism for reducing cell death. Analysis of Akt, a pro-survival kinase that suppresses apoptotic pathways and pAkt at Ser-473 demonstrated that extended access methamphetamine reduces Akt expression in the ventral hippocampus. These data reveal that alterations in Bcl-2 and Bax levels by methamphetamine were not associated with enhanced Akt expression. Given that hippocampal function and neurogenesis vary in a subregion-specific fashion, where dorsal hippocampus regulates spatial processing and has higher levels of neurogenesis, whereas ventral hippocampus regulates anxiety-related behaviors, these data suggest that methamphetamine self-administration initiates distinct allostatic changes in

  13. A Key Role for Nectin-1 in the Ventral Hippocampus in Contextual Fear Memory

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    Grosse, Jocelyn; Krummenacher, Claude; Sandi, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Nectins are cell adhesion molecules that are widely expressed in the brain. Nectin expression shows a dynamic spatiotemporal regulation, playing a role in neural migratory processes during development. Nectin-1 and nectin-3 and their heterophilic trans-interactions are important for the proper formation of synapses. In the hippocampus, nectin-1 and nectin-3 localize at puncta adherentia junctions and may play a role in synaptic plasticity, a mechanism essential for memory and learning. We evaluated the potential involvement of nectin-1 and nectin-3 in memory consolidation using an emotional learning paradigm. Rats trained for contextual fear conditioning showed transient nectin-1—but not nectin-3—protein upregulation in synapse-enriched hippocampal fractions at about 2 h posttraining. The upregulation of nectin-1 was found exclusively in the ventral hippocampus and was apparent in the synaptoneurosomal fraction. This upregulation was induced by contextual fear conditioning but not by exposure to context or shock alone. When an antibody against nectin-1, R165, was infused in the ventral-hippocampus immediately after training, contextual fear memory was impaired. However, treatment with the antibody in the dorsal hippocampus had no effect in contextual fear memory formation. Similarly, treatment with the antibody in the ventral hippocampus did not interfere with acoustic memory formation. Further control experiments indicated that the effects of ventral hippocampal infusion of the nectin-1 antibody in contextual fear memory cannot be ascribed to memory non-specific effects such as changes in anxiety-like behavior or locomotor behavior. Therefore, we conclude that nectin-1 recruitment to the perisynaptic environment in the ventral hippocampus plays an important role in the formation of contextual fear memories. Our results suggest that these mechanisms could be involved in the connection of emotional and contextual information processed in the amygdala and dorsal

  14. The ventral hippocampus, but not the dorsal hippocampus is critical for learned approach-avoidance decision making.

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    Schumacher, Anett; Vlassov, Ekaterina; Ito, Rutsuko

    2016-04-01

    The resolution of an approach-avoidance conflict induced by ambivalent information involves the appraisal of the incentive value of the outcomes and associated stimuli to orchestrate an appropriate behavioral response. Much research has been directed at delineating the neural circuitry underlying approach motivation and avoidance motivation separately. Very little research, however, has examined the neural substrates engaged at the point of decision making when opposing incentive motivations are experienced simultaneously. We hereby examine the role of the dorsal and ventral hippocampus (HPC) in a novel approach-avoidance decision making paradigm, revisiting a once popular theory of HPC function, which posited the HPC to be the driving force of a behavioral inhibition system that is activated in situations of imminent threat. Rats received pre-training excitotoxic lesions of the dorsal or ventral HPC, and were trained to associate different non-spatial cues with appetitive, aversive and neutral outcomes in three separate arms of the radial maze. On the final day of testing, a state of approach-avoidance conflict was induced by simultaneously presenting two cues of opposite valences, and comparing the time the rats spent interacting with the superimposed 'conflict' cue, and the neutral cue. The ventral HPC-lesioned group showed significant preference for the conflict cue over the neutral cue, compared to the dorsal HPC-lesioned, and control groups. Thus, we provide evidence that the ventral, but not dorsal HPC, is a crucial component of the neural circuitry concerned with exerting inhibitory control over approach tendencies under circumstances in which motivational conflict is experienced. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. In Vitro Antioxidant Activity and In Vivo Anti-Fatigue Effect of Sea Horse (Hippocampus Peptides

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    Zebin Guo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated changes the in vitro antioxidant activity of Hippocampus polypeptides during enzymatic hydrolysis, including the effects of enzyme species, enzyme concentration, material–liquid ratio, hydrolysis time, pH, and temperature of the reaction system. Its in vivo anti-fatigue activity was also studied. Hippocampus peptide prepared by papain digestion exhibited the highest 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl free radical scavenging rate (71.89% ± 1.50% and strong hydroxyl radical scavenging rate (75.53% ± 0.98%, compared to those prepared by five other commonly used enzymes (i.e., trypsin, neutral protease, compound protease, flavorzyme, and alkaline protease. Additionally, maximum antioxidant activity of Hippocampus polypeptide prepared by papain digestion was reached after hydrolysis for 40 min at pH 6.0 and 60 °C of the reaction system by using 2000 U/g enzyme and a material–liquid ratio of 1:15. Moreover, compared with the control group, Hippocampus peptide prolonged the swimming time by 33%–40%, stabilized the blood glucose concentration, increased liver glycogen levels, and decreased blood lactate levels and blood urea nitrogen levels in mice (p < 0.01. In conclusion, these results indicated that Hippocampus polypeptide prepared by papain digestion under optimal conditions exhibited high degrees of antioxidant and anti-fatigue activity.

  16. Effects of infrasound on hippocampus-dependent learning and memory in rats and some underlying mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Hua; Long, Hua; Liu, Jing; Qu, Lili; Chen, Jingzao; Mou, Xiang

    2009-09-01

    To investigate the effect of infrasound on the hippocampus-dependent spatial learning and memory as well as its underlying mechanisms, we measured the changes of cognitive abilities, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-tyrosine kinase receptor B (TrkB) signal transduction pathway and neurogenesis in the hippocampus of rats. The results showed that rats exposed to infrasound of 16 Hz at 130 dB for 14 days exhibited longer escape latency from day 2 and shortened time staying in the quadrant P in Morris water maze (MWM). It was found that mRNA and protein expression levels of hippocampal BDNF and TrkB were significantly decreased in real-time PCR and Western blot, and the number of BrdU-labeled cells in hippocampus was also reduced when compared to control. These results provided novel evidences that the infrasound of a certain exposure parameter can impair hippocampus-dependent learning and memory, in which the downregulation of the neuronal plasticity-related BDNF-TrkB signal pathway and less neurogenesis in hippocampus might be involved.

  17. Hippocampus and amygdala volumes in patients with borderline personality disorder with or without posttraumatic stress disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmahl, Christian; Berne, Kevin; Krause, Annegret; Kleindienst, Nikolaus; Valerius, Gabriele; Vermetten, Eric; Bohus, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Background Several studies have investigated volumetric brain changes in patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and borderline personality disorder (BPD). Both groups exhibit volume reductions of the hippocampus and amygdala. Our aim was to investigate the influence of comorbid PTSD on hippocampus and amygdala volumes in patients with BPD. Methods We compared 2 groups of unmedicated female patients with BPD (10 with and 15 without comorbid PTSD) and 25 healthy female controls. We used T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance images for manual tracing and 3-dimensional reconstruction of the hippocampus and amygdala. Results Hippocampus volumes of patients with BPD and PTSD were smaller than those of healthy controls. However, there was no significant difference between patients with BPD but without PTSD and controls. Impulsiveness was positively correlated with hippocampus volumes in patients with BPD. Limitations Our study did not allow for disentangling the effects of PTSD and traumatization. Another limitation was the relatively small sample size. Conclusion Our findings highlight the importance of classifying subgroups of patients with BPD. Comorbid PTSD may be related to volumetric alterations in brain regions that are of central importance to our understanding of borderline psychopathology. PMID:19568480

  18. Expression of Toll-like receptor 4 in hippocampus of rat model with temporal lobe epilepsy

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    PAN Li-ping

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the expression of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 protein in hippocampus of rat model with temporal lobe epilepsy after status epilepticus (SE and explore its function in the pathogenesis of temporal lobe epilepsy. Methods Rat model with temporal lobe epilepsy was induced by lithium chloride (LiCl-pilocarpine. Total protein was extracted from hippocampus and rat brain slices were obtained at different time points (0, 1, 6, 12, 24, 48 h and 7, 10, 30, 50 d after SE. Western blotting and immunohistochemical staining were used for detection of the expression of TLR4 in the hippocampus. Results The results of Western blotting showed the TLR4 protein expression at 0, 1, 6, 12, 24, 48 h and 7, 10, 30 d after SE was higher than that in the control group (P 0.05. Conclusion TLR4 protein was mainly expressed in cytoplasm of pyramidal cells in CA3 area of hippocampus. TLR4 protein expression in the hippocampus was increased in varying degrees at different observation time points after SE, indicating that TLR4 may play an important role in the development of epilepsy.

  19. Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy lateralization using SPHARM-based features of hippocampus and SVM

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    Esmaeilzadeh, Mohammad; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid; Jafari-Khouzani, Kourosh

    2012-02-01

    This paper improves the Lateralization (identification of the epileptogenic hippocampus) accuracy in Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy (mTLE). In patients with this kind of epilepsy, usually one of the brain's hippocampi is the focus of the epileptic seizures, and resection of the seizure focus is the ultimate treatment to control or reduce the seizures. Moreover, the epileptogenic hippocampus is prone to shrinkage and deformation; therefore, shape analysis of the hippocampus is advantageous in the preoperative assessment for the Lateralization. The method utilized for shape analysis is the Spherical Harmonics (SPHARM). In this method, the shape of interest is decomposed using a set of bases functions and the obtained coefficients of expansion are the features describing the shape. To perform shape comparison and analysis, some pre- and post-processing steps such as "alignment of different subjects' hippocampi" and the "reduction of feature-space dimension" are required. To this end, first order ellipsoid is used for alignment. For dimension reduction, we propose to keep only the SPHARM coefficients with maximum conformity to the hippocampus shape. Then, using these coefficients of normal and epileptic subjects along with 3D invariants, specific lateralization indices are proposed. Consequently, the 1536 SPHARM coefficients of each subject are summarized into 3 indices, where for each index the negative (positive) value shows that the left (right) hippocampus is deformed (diseased). Employing these indices, the best achieved lateralization accuracy for clustering and classification algorithms are 85% and 92%, respectively. This is a significant improvement compared to the conventional volumetric method.

  20. Rats use hippocampus to recognize positions of objects located in an inaccessible space.

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    Levcik, D; Nekovarova, T; Stuchlik, A; Klement, D

    2013-02-01

    Rat hippocampus plays a crucial role in many spatial tasks, including recognition of position of objects, which can be approached and explored. Whether hippocampus is also necessary for recognizing positions of objects located in an inaccessible part of the environment remains unclear. To address this question, we conditioned rats to press a lever when an object displayed on a distant computer screen was in a particular position ("reward position") and not to press the lever when the object was in other positions ("nonreward positions"). After the rats had reached an asymptotic performance, the role of the dorsal hippocampus was assessed by blocking its activity with muscimol. The rats without functional dorsal hippocampus did not discriminate the reward position from the nonreward positions. Then the same rats were trained to discriminate light and dark conditions. The hippocampal inactivation did not disrupt the ability to discriminate these two conditions. It indicated that the inactivation itself had no major effect on the operant behavior and its control by visual stimuli. We conclude that rats use dorsal hippocampus for recognizing positions of objects located in an inaccessible part of the environment. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Sex differences in the molecular signature of the developing mouse hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundy, Joseph L; Vied, Cynthia; Nowakowski, Richard S

    2017-03-16

    A variety of neurological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, major depressive disorder, dyslexia and autism, are differentially prevalent between females and males. To better understand the possible molecular basis for the sex-biased nature of neurological disorders, we used a developmental series of female and male mice at 1, 2, and 4 months of age to assess both mRNA and protein in the hippocampus with RNA-sequencing and mass-spectrometry, respectively. The transcriptomic analysis identifies 2699 genes that are differentially expressed between animals of different ages. The bulk of these differentially expressed genes are changed in both sexes at one or more ages, but a total of 198 transcripts are differentially expressed between females and males at one or more ages. The number of transcripts that are differentially expressed between females and males is greater in adult animals than in younger animals. Additionally, we identify 69 transcripts that show complex and sex-specific patterns of temporal regulation through postnatal development, 8 of which are heat-shock proteins. We also find a modest correlation between levels of mRNA and protein in the mouse hippocampus (Rho = 0.53). This study adds to the substantial body of evidence for transcriptomic regulation in the hippocampus during postnatal development. Additionally, this analysis reveals sex differences in the transcriptome of the developing mouse hippocampus, and further clarifies the need to include both female and male mice in longitudinal studies involving molecular changes in the hippocampus.

  2. Functional emergence of the hippocampus in context fear learning in infant rats

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    Raineki, Charlis; Holman, Parker J.; Debiec, Jacek; Bugg, Melissa; Beasley, Allyson; Sullivan, Regina M.

    2009-01-01

    The hippocampus is a part of the limbic system and is important for the formation of associative memories, such as acquiring information about the context (e.g. the place where an experience occurred) during emotional learning (e.g. fear conditioning). Here, we assess whether the hippocampus is responsible for pups’ newly emerging context learning. In all experiments, postnatal day (PN) 21 and PN24 rat pups received 10 pairings of odor-0.5mA shock or control unpaired odor-shock, odor only and shock only. Some pups were used for context, cue or odor avoidance tests, while the remaining pups were used for c-Fos immunohistochemistry to assess hippocampal activity during acquisition. Our results show that cue and odor avoidance learning were similar at both ages, while contextual fear learning and learning-associated hippocampal (CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus) activity (c-Fos) only occurred in PN24 paired pups. To assess a causal relationship between the hippocampus and context conditioning, we infused muscimol into the hippocampus, which blocked acquisition of context fear learning in the PN24 pups. Muscimol or vehicle infusions did not affect cue learning or aversion to the odor at PN21 or PN24. The results suggest that the newly emerging contextual learning exhibited by PN24 pups is supported by the hippocampus. PMID:19739248

  3. Intrinsic connectivity between the hippocampus, nucleus accumbens, and ventral tegmental area in humans.

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    Kahn, I; Shohamy, D

    2013-03-01

    Recent studies suggest that memory formation in the hippocampus is modulated by the motivational significance of events, allowing past experience to adaptively guide behavior. The effects of motivation on memory are thought to depend on interactions between the hippocampus, the ventral tegmental area (VTA), and the nucleus accumbens (NAcc). Indeed, animal studies reveal anatomical pathways for circuit-level interaction between these regions. However, a homologue circuit connectivity in humans remains to be shown. We characterized this circuitry in humans by exploiting spontaneous low-frequency modulations in the fMRI signal (termed resting-state functional connectivity), which are thought to reflect functionally related regions and their organization into functional networks in the brain. We examined connectivity in this network across two datasets (hi-resolution, n = 100; standard resolution, n = 894). Results reveal convergent connectivity between the hippocampus, and both the NAcc and the VTA centered on ventral regions in the body of the hippocampus. Additionally, we found individual differences in the strength of connectivity within this network. Together, these results provide a novel task-independent characterization of circuitry underlying interactions between the hippocampus, NAcc, and VTA and provide a framework with which to understand how connectivity might reflect and constrain the effects of motivation on memory. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Endogenous nociceptin/orphanin-FQ in the dorsal hippocampus facilitates despair-related behavior.

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    Goeldner, Celia; Reiss, David; Kieffer, Brigitte L; Ouagazzal, Abdel-Mouttalib

    2010-08-01

    Nociceptin/orphanin-FQ (N/OFQ) peptide and its receptor (NOP: N/OFQ opioid peptide receptor) are highly expressed in the hippocampus, but their functional role remains poorly understood. We recently showed that hippocampal N/OFQ inhibits learning and memory abilities in mice. Here, we investigated whether the endogenous peptide also regulated emotional responses at the level of the hippocampus. Bilateral infusions of the selective NOP receptor antagonist, UFP-101 (1-3 nmol/side), into the dorsal hippocampus produced antidepressant-like effects in the mouse forced swim and tail suspension tests comparable with those obtained with the prototypical antidepressant, fluoxetine (10-30 mg/kg, intraperitoneal). In the light-dark test, neither UFP-101 (1-3 nmol/side) nor N/OFQ peptide (1-3 nmol/side) modified anxiety measures when injected at behaviorally active doses in the dorsal hippocampus. These findings show a clear dissociation in the involvement of hippocampal N/OFQ system in anxiety- and despair-related behaviors. We conclude that the dorsal hippocampus is a brain region in which there is an important N/OFQ modulation of mnemonic processes and adaptive emotional responses associated to despair states. Copyright 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Effect of pregabalin on apoptotic regulatory genes in hippocampus of rats with chronic temporal lobe epilepsy

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    ZHANG Yi-dan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To observe the effect of pregabalin on the expression of Bcl-2 and Bax in hippocampus of chronic epileptic rats induced by pilocarpine, to explore the anti-epileptic pharmacology mechanism of pregabalin, and its anti-apoptotic effect on hippocampal neurons of rats. Methods The model of chronic temporal lobe epileptic rats induced by lithium-pilocarpine was established, then the rats in pregabalin treatment group received intraperitoneal injection of pregabalin (40 mg/kg once daily for three weeks. The expression of Bcl-2 and Bax in hippocampus of all rats was detected by immunohistochemical technique and Western blotting. Results Compared with normal saline group rats, the expression of Bcl-2 and Bax in hippocampus of rats with chronic temporal lobe epilepsy was significantly increased (P = 0.000, for all. Pregabalin can down-regulate the expression of Bax and up-regulate the expression of Bcl-2 in hippocampus of rats compared to model group rats (P = 0.000, for all. Conclusion Pregabalin may have the effects of inhibiting cell apoptosis and protecting neurons through lowing Bax level and increasing Bcl-2 level in hippocampus of chronic temporal lobe epileptic rats.

  6. Novel experience induces persistent sleep-dependent plasticity in the cortex but not in the hippocampus

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    Sidarta Ribeiro

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Episodic and spatial memories engage the hippocampus during acquisition but migrate to the cerebral cortex over time. We have recently proposed that the interplay between slow-wave (SWS and rapid eye movement (REM sleep propagates recent synaptic changes from the hippocampus to the cortex. To test this theory, we jointly assessed extracellular neuronal activity, local field potentials (LFP, and expression levels of plasticity-related immediate-early genes (IEG arc and zif-268 in rats exposed to novel spatio-tactile experience. Post-experience firing rate increases were strongest in SWS and lasted much longer in the cortex (hours than in the hippocampus (minutes. During REM sleep, firing rates showed strong temporal dependence across brain areas: cortical activation during experience predicted hippocampal activity in the first post-experience hour, while hippocampal activation during experience predicted cortical activity in the third post-experience hour. Four hours after experience, IEG expression was specifically upregulated during REM sleep in the cortex, but not in the hippocampus. Arc gene expression in the cortex was proportional to LFP amplitude in the spindle-range (10-14 Hz but not to firing rates, as expected from signals more related to dendritic input than to somatic output. The results indicate that hippocampo-cortical activation during waking is followed by multiple waves of cortical plasticity as full sleep cycles recur. The absence of equivalent changes in the hippocampus may explain its mnemonic disengagement over time.

  7. Interactions between the lateral habenula and the hippocampus: implication for spatial memory processes.

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    Goutagny, Romain; Loureiro, Michael; Jackson, Jesse; Chaumont, Joseph; Williams, Sylvain; Isope, Philippe; Kelche, Christian; Cassel, Jean-Christophe; Lecourtier, Lucas

    2013-11-01

    The lateral habenula (LHb) is an epithalamic structure connected with both the basal ganglia and the limbic system and that exerts a major influence on midbrain monoaminergic nuclei. The current view is that LHb receives and processes cortical information in order to select proper strategies in a variety of behavior. Recent evidence indicates that LHb might also be implicated in hippocampus-dependent memory processes. However, if and how LHb functionally interacts with the dorsal hippocampus (dHPC) is still unknown. We therefore performed simultaneous recordings within LHb and dHPC in both anesthetized and freely moving rats. We first showed that a subset of LHb cells were phase-locked to hippocampal theta oscillations. Furthermore, LHb generated spontaneous theta oscillatory activity, which was highly coherent with hippocampal theta oscillations. Using reversible LHb inactivation, we found that LHb might regulate dHPC theta oscillations. In addition, we showed that LHb silencing altered performance in a hippocampus-dependent spatial recognition task. Finally, increased coherence between LHb and dHPC was positively correlated to the memory performance in this test. Collectively, these results suggest that LHb functionally interacts with the hippocampus and is involved in hippocampus-dependent spatial information processing.

  8. Neurocomputational account of memory and perception: Thresholded and graded signals in the hippocampus.

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    Elfman, Kane W; Aly, Mariam; Yonelinas, Andrew P

    2014-12-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the hippocampus, a region critical for long-term memory, also supports certain forms of high-level visual perception. A seemingly paradoxical finding is that, unlike the thresholded hippocampal signals associated with memory, the hippocampus produces graded, strength-based signals in perception. This article tests a neurocomputational model of the hippocampus, based on the complementary learning systems framework, to determine if the same model can account for both memory and perception, and whether it produces the appropriate thresholded and strength-based signals in these two types of tasks. The simulations showed that the hippocampus, and most prominently the CA1 subfield, produced graded signals when required to discriminate between highly similar stimuli in a perception task, but generated thresholded patterns of activity in recognition memory. A threshold was observed in recognition memory because pattern completion occurred for only some trials and completely failed to occur for others; conversely, in perception, pattern completion always occurred because of the high degree of item similarity. These results offer a neurocomputational account of the distinct hippocampal signals associated with perception and memory, and are broadly consistent with proposals that CA1 functions as a comparator of expected versus perceived events. We conclude that the hippocampal computations required for high-level perceptual discrimination are congruous with current neurocomputational models that account for recognition memory, and fit neatly into a broader description of the role of the hippocampus for the processing of complex relational information. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Alterations of p75 neurotrophin receptor and Myelin transcription factor 1 in the hippocampus of perinatal phencyclidine treated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Jessica L; Newell, Kelly A; Matosin, Natalie; Huang, Xu-Feng; Fernandez-Enright, Francesca

    2015-12-03

    Postnatal administration of phencyclidine (PCP) in rodents causes major disturbances to neurological processes resulting in severe modifications to normal behavioral traits into adulthood. It is routinely used to model psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, producing many of the dysfunctional processes in the brain that are present in this devastating disorder, including elevated levels of apoptosis during neurodevelopment and disruptions to myelin and plasticity processes. Lingo-1 (or Leucine-rich repeat and immunoglobulin domain-containing protein) is responsible for negatively regulating neurite outgrowth and the myelination of axons. Recent findings using a postmortem human brain cohort showed that Lingo-1 signaling partners in the Nogo receptor (NgR)/p75/TNF receptor orphan Y (TROY) signaling complex, and downstream signaling partners With No Lysine (K) (WNK1) and Myelin transcription factor 1 (Myt1), play a significant part in schizophrenia pathophysiology. Here we have examined the implication of Lingo-1 and its signaling partners in a neurodevelopmental model of schizophrenia using PCP to determine if these pathways are altered in the hippocampus throughout different stages of neurodevelopment. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected subcutaneously with PCP (10mg/kg) or saline solution on postnatal days (PN) 7, 9, and 11. Rats (n=6/group) were sacrificed at PN12, 5weeks, or 14weeks. Relative expression levels of Lingo-1 signaling proteins were examined in the hippocampus of the treated rats. p75 and Myt1 were decreased (0.001≤p≤0.011) in the PCP treated rats at PN12. There were no significant changes in any of the tested proteins at 5weeks (p>0.05). At 14weeks, p75, TROY, and Myt1 were increased in the PCP treated rats (0.014≤p≤0.022). This is the first report of an alteration in Lingo-1 signaling proteins in the rat hippocampus, both directly after PCP treatment in early development and in adulthood. Based on our results, we propose that

  10. Muscarinic cholinergic receptors modulate inhibitory synaptic rhythms in hippocampus and neocortex

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    Bradley E Alger

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Activation of muscarinic acetylcholine (ACh receptors (mAChRs powerfully affects many neuronal properties as well as numerous cognitive behaviors. Small neuronal circuits constitute an intermediate level of organization between neurons and behaviors, and mAChRs affect interactions among cells that compose these circuits. Circuit activity is often assessed by extracellular recordings of the local field potentials (LFPs, which are analogous to in vivo EEGs, generated by coordinated neuronal interactions. Coherent forms of physiologically relevant circuit activity manifest themselves as rhythmic oscillations in the LFPs. Frequencies of rhythmic oscillations that are most closely associated with animal behavior are in the range of 4-80 Hz, which is subdivided into theta (4-14 Hz, beta (15-29 Hz and gamma (30-80 Hz bands. Activation of mAChRs triggers rhythmic oscillations in these bands in the hippocampus and neocortex. Inhibitory responses mediated by GABAergic interneurons constitute a prominent feature of these oscillations, and indeed, appear to be their major underlying factor in many cases. An important issue is which interneurons are involved in rhythm generation. Besides affecting cellular and network properties directly, mAChRs can cause the mobilization of endogenous cannabinoids (endocannabinoids, eCBs that, by acting on the principal cannabinoid receptor of the brain, CB1R, regulate the release of certain neurotransmitters, including GABA. CB1Rs are heavily expressed on only a subset of interneurons and, at lower density, on glutamatergic neurons. Exogenous cannabinoids typically disrupt oscillations in the θ and Υ ranges, which probably contributes to the behavioral effects of these drugs. It is important to understand how neuronal circuit activity is affected by mAChR-driven eCBs, as this information will provide deeper insight into circuit behavior as the effects both eCBs and exogenous cannabinoids in intacts behavior. After

  11. Anti-fatigue activity of a mixture of seahorse (Hippocampus abdominalis hydrolysate and red ginseng

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    Nalae Kang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Seahorse, a syngnathidae fish, is one of the important organisms used in Chinese traditional medicine. Hippocampus abdominalis, a seahorse species successfully cultured in Korea, was validated for use in food by the Ministry of Food and Drug Safety in February 2016; however. the validation was restricted to 50% of the entire composition. Therefore, to use H. abdominalis as a food ingredient, H. abdominalis has to be prepared as a mixture by adding other materials. In this study, the effect of H. abdominalis on muscles was investigated to scientifically verify its potential bioactivity. In addition, the anti-fatigue activity of a mixture comprising H. abdominalis and red ginseng (RG was evaluated to commercially utilize H. abdominalis in food industry. H. abdominalis was hydrolyzed using Alcalase, a protease, and the effect of H. abdominalis hydrolysate (HH on the muscles was assessed in C2C12 myoblasts by measuring cell proliferation and glycogen content. In addition, the mixtures comprising HH and RG were prepared at different percentages of RG to HH (20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, and 80% RG, and the anti-fatigue activity of these mixtures against oxidative stress was assessed in C2C12 myoblasts. In C2C12 myoblasts, H2O2-induced oxidative stress caused a decrease in viability and physical fatigue-related biomarkers such as glycogen and ATP contents. However, treatment with RG and HH mixtures increased cell viability and the content of fatigue-related biomarkers. In particular, the 80% RG mixture showed an optimum effect on cell viability and ATP synthesis activity. In this study, all results indicated that HH had anti-fatigue activity at concentrations approved for use in food by the law in Korea. Especially, an 80% RG to HH mixture can be used in food for ameliorating fatigue.

  12. An Upside to Reward Sensitivity: The Hippocampus Supports Enhanced Reinforcement Learning in Adolescence.

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    Davidow, Juliet Y; Foerde, Karin; Galván, Adriana; Shohamy, Daphna

    2016-10-05

    Adolescents are notorious for engaging in reward-seeking behaviors, a tendency attributed to heightened activity in the brain's reward systems during adolescence. It has been suggested that reward sensitivity in adolescence might be adaptive, but evidence of an adaptive role has been scarce. Using a probabilistic reinforcement learning task combined with reinforcement learning models and fMRI, we found that adolescents showed better reinforcement learning and a stronger link between reinforcement learning and episodic memory for rewarding outcomes. This behavioral benefit was related to heightened prediction error-related BOLD activity in the hippocampus and to stronger functional connectivity between the hippocampus and the striatum at the time of reinforcement. These findings reveal an important role for the hippocampus in reinforcement learning in adolescence and suggest that reward sensitivity in adolescence is related to adaptive differences in how adolescents learn from experience. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of diphenylthiocarbazone (dithizone) on glutamate level in hippocampus preparation in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kihara, T; Ishihara, T; Baba, A; Iwata, H

    1990-04-01

    To assess the functional interaction between Zn2+ and glutamate in hippocampus, diphenylthiocarbazone (dithizone), a Zn2+ chelator, was used to alter the glutamate level in hippocampus in vitro and in vivo. Dithizone at the concentration of 1 microM stimulated high K(+)- and veratrine-induced release of [3H]glutamate both in the presence and absence of Ca2+ from rat hippocampal slices preloaded with [3H]glutamate without affecting the release of [3H]gamma-aminobutyric acid and [3H]acetylcholine. Metal chelators other than dithizone did not evoke the [3H]glutamate release at the concentration of 10 microM. Two weeks after the intrahippocampal injection of 20 micrograms of dithizone, both Zn2+ and glutamate levels of the hippocampus significantly decreased with no change in the levels of other metals, amino acids, monoamines and acetylcholine.

  14. Design-based estimation of neuronal number and individual neuronal volume in the rat hippocampus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hosseini-Sharifabad, Mohammad; Nyengaard, Jens Randel

    2007-01-01

    Tools recently developed in stereology were employed for unbiased estimation of the neuronal number and volume in three major subdivisions of rat hippocampus (dentate granular, CA1 and CA3 pyramidal layers). The optical fractionator is used extensively in quantitative studies of the hippocampus......; however, the classical optical fractionator design may be affected by tissue deformation in the z-axis of the section. In this study, we applied an improved optical fractionator design to estimate total number of neurons on 100 microm thick vibratome sections that had been deformed, in the z...... vertical sections from the hippocampus. The volume of hippocampal neurons was estimated using the rotator principle on 40 microm thick plastic vertical uniform random sections and corrected for tissue shrinkage. Application of the proposed new design should result in more accurate estimates of neuron...

  15. Xiaoyaosan Decoction, a Traditional Chinese Medicine, Inhibits Oxidative-Stress-Induced Hippocampus Neuron Apoptosis In Vitro

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    Zhen-zhi Meng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Xiaoyaosan (XYS decoction is a famous prescription for the treatment of mental disorders in China. In this experiment, we explored the way in which XYS decoction-reverse hippocampus neuron apoptosis in vitro. We used XYS decoction-containing serum to treat oxidative-stress-induced hippocampus neuron apoptosis and used immunofluorescence to determine the concentration of free calcium, mitochondrial membrane potential, and apoptotic rate of neuron. Results showed that 3-hour oxidative stress decrease mitochondrial membrane potential, increase the concentration of free calcium and apoptotic rate of neuron via triggering pathological changes of nucleus such as karyorrhexis, karyopyknosis. Low, medium, high dose of XYS-decoction-containing serum could reverse these phenomenon, and the effect of low-dose XYS-decoction-containing serum was significant in improving mitochondrial membrane potential and apoptotic rate of neuron. These findings suggest that XYS decoction may be helpful in reducing oxidative-stress-induced hippocampus neuron apoptosis.

  16. Early developmental actions of endocrine disruptors on the hypothalamus, hippocampus, and cerebral cortex.

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    Parent, Anne-Simone; Naveau, Elise; Gerard, Arlette; Bourguignon, Jean-Pierre; Westbrook, Gary L

    2011-01-01

    Sex steroids and thyroid hormones play a key role in the development of the central nervous system. The critical role of these hormonal systems may explain the sensitivity of the hypothalamus, the cerebral cortex, and the hippocampus to endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDC). This review examines the evidence for endocrine disruption of glial-neuronal functions in the hypothalamus, hippocampus, and cerebral cortex. Focus was placed on two well-studied EDC, the insecticide dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB). DDT is involved in neuroendocrine disruption of the reproductive axis, whereas polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) interact with both the thyroid hormone- and sex steroid-dependent systems and disturb the neuroendocrine control of reproduction and development of hippocampus and cortex. These results highlight the impact of EDC on the developing nervous system and the need for more research in this area.

  17. Physical Exercise Habits Correlate with Gray Matter Volume of the Hippocampus in Healthy Adult Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killgore, William D. S.; Olson, Elizabeth A.; Weber, Mareen

    2013-12-01

    Physical activity facilitates neurogenesis of dentate cells in the rodent hippocampus, a brain region critical for memory formation and spatial representation. Recent findings in humans also suggest that aerobic exercise can lead to increased hippocampal volume and enhanced cognitive functioning in children and elderly adults. However, the association between physical activity and hippocampal volume during the period from early adulthood through middle age has not been effectively explored. Here, we correlated the number of minutes of self-reported exercise per week with gray matter volume of the hippocampus using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) in 61 healthy adults ranging from 18 to 45 years of age. After controlling for age, gender, and total brain volume, total minutes of weekly exercise correlated significantly with volume of the right hippocampus. Findings highlight the relationship between regular physical exercise and brain structure during early to middle adulthood.

  18. Oxidative stress status and RNA expression in hippocampus of an animal model of Alzheimer's disease after chronic exposure to aluminum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Tania; Esparza, José L; Nogués, M Rosa; Romeu, Marta; Domingo, José L; Gómez, Mercedes

    2010-01-01

    It is well established that aluminum (Al) is a neurotoxic agent that induces the production of free radicals in brain. Accumulation of free radicals may cause degenerative events of aging such as Alzheimer's disease. On the other hand, melatonin (Mel) is a known antioxidant, which can directly act as free radical scavenger, or indirectly by inducing the expression of some genes linked to the antioxidant defense. In this study, AbetaPP female transgenic (Tg2576) (Tg) and wild-type mice (5 months of age) were fed with Al lactate supplemented in the diet (1 mg Al/g diet). Simultaneously, animals received oral Mel (10 mg/kg) dissolved in tap water until the end of the study at 11 months of age. Four treatment groups were included for both Tg and wild-type mice: control, Al only, Mel only, and Al+Mel. At the end of the period of treatment, hippocampus was removed and processed to examine the following oxidative stress markers: reduced glutathione (GSH), oxidized glutathione (GSSG), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase (CAT), and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). Moreover, the gene expression of Cu-ZnSOD, GR, and CAT was evaluated by real-time RT-PCR. Aluminum concentration in hippocampus was also determined. The biochemical changes observed in this tissue suggest that Al acts as a pro-oxidant agent. Melatonin exerts an antioxidant action by increasing the mRNA levels of the antioxidant enzymes SOD, CAT, and GR evaluated in presence of Al and Mel, with independence of the animal model. Copyright 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Characterization of a new muscarinic toxin from the venom of the Brazilian coral snake Micrurus lemniscatus in rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Daniel Coelho; de Medeiros, Wyara Aparecida Araújo; Batista, Isabel de Fátima Correia; Pimenta, Daniel Carvalho; Lebrun, Ivo; Abdalla, Fernando Maurício Francis; Sandoval, Maria Regina Lopes

    2011-12-19

    We have isolated a new muscarinic protein (MT-Mlα) from the venom of the Brazilian coral snake Micrurus lemniscatus. This small protein, which had a molecular mass of 7,048Da, shared high sequence homology with three-finger proteins that act on cholinergic receptors. The first 12 amino acid residues of the N-terminal sequence were determined to be: Leu-Ile-Cys-Phe-Ile-Cys-Phe-Ser-Pro-Thr-Ala-His. The MT-Mlα was able to displace the [(3)H]QNB binding in the hippocampus of rats. The binding curve in competition experiments with MT-Mlα was indicative of two types of [(3)H]QNB-binding site with pK(i) values of 9.08±0.67 and 6.17±0.19, n=4, suggesting that various muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) subtypes may be the target proteins of MT-Mlα. The MT-Mlα and the M(1) antagonist pirenzepine caused a dose-dependent block on total [(3)H]inositol phosphate accumulation induced by carbachol. The IC(50) values for MT-Mlα and pirenzepine were, respectively, 33.1 and 2.26 nM. Taken together, these studies indicate that the MT-Mlα has antagonist effect on mAChRs in rat hippocampus. The results of the present study show, for the first time, that mAChRs function is drastically affected by MT-Mlα since it not only has affinity for mAChRs but also has the ability to inhibit mAChRs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Histological studies of neuroprotective effects of Curcuma longa Linn. on neuronal loss induced by dexamethasone treatment in the rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issuriya, Acharaporn; Kumarnsit, Ekkasit; Wattanapiromsakul, Chatchai; Vongvatcharanon, Uraporn

    2014-10-01

    Long term exposure to dexamethasone (Dx) is associated with brain damage especially in the hippocampus via the oxidative stress pathway. Previously, an ethanolic extract from Curcuma longa Linn. (CL) containing the curcumin constituent has been reported to produce antioxidant effects. However, its neuroprotective property on brain histology has remained unexplored. This study has examined the effects of a CL extract on the densities of cresyl violet positive neurons and glial fibrillary acidic protein immunoreactive (GFAP-ir) astrocytes in the hippocampus of Dx treated male rats. It showed that 21 days of Dx treatment (0.5mg/kg, i.p. once daily) significantly reduced the densities of cresyl violet positive neurons in the sub-areas CA1, CA3 and the dentate gyrus, but not in the CA2 area. However, CL pretreatment (100mg/kg, p.o.) was found to significantly restore neuronal densities in the CA1 and dentate gyrus. In addition, Dx treatment also significantly decreased the densities of the GFAP-ir astrocytes in the sub-areas CA1, CA3 and the dentate gyrus. However, CL pretreatment (100mg/kg, p.o.) failed to protect the loss of astrocytes in these sub-areas. These findings confirm the neuroprotective effects of the CL extract and indicate that the cause of astrocyte loss might be partially reduced by a non-oxidative mechanism. Moreover, the detection of neuronal and glial densities was suitable method to study brain damage and the effects of treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. The effects of doxepin on stress-induced learning, memory impairments, and TNF-α level in the rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azadbakht, Ali Ahmad; Radahmadi, Maryam; Javanmard, Shaghayegh Haghjooye; Reisi, Parham

    2015-01-01

    Stress has a profound impact on the nervous system and causes cognitive problems that are partly related to the inflammatory effects. Besides influencing the content of neurotransmitters, antidepressants such as doxepin are likely to have anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative, and anti-apoptotic effects. Therefore, the present study investigated the effects of doxepin on passive avoidance learning and the levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in the rat hippocampus following repeated restraint stress. Male Wistar rats were divided into five groups. Chronic stress was induced by keeping animals within an adjustable restraint chamber for 6 h every day for 21 successive days. In stress-doxepin group, stressed rats were given 1, 5 and 10 mg/kg of doxepin intraperitoneally (i.p) for 21 days and before placing them in restraint chamber. Healthy animals who served as control group and stressed rats received normal saline i.p. For evaluation of learning and memory, initial latency and step-through latency were determined using passive avoidance learning test. TNF-α levels were measured in hippocampus by enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) at the end of experiment. Induced stress considerably decreased the step through latencies in the rats (PStress-doxepin groups did not reveal any differences compared to control group at any given doses. TNF-α level was increased significantly (Pstress group. Only the low dose of doxepin (1 mg/kg) decreased TNF-α level. The present findings indicated that learning and memory are impaired in stressful conditions and doxepin prevented memory deficit. It seems that inflammation may involve in induced stress memory deficits, and that doxepin is helpful in alleviating the neural complications due to stress.

  2. Hesperidin inhibits glutamate release and exerts neuroprotection against excitotoxicity induced by kainic acid in the hippocampus of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia Ying; Lin, Tzu Yu; Lu, Cheng Wei; Huang, Shu Kuei; Wang, Ying Chou; Chou, Shang Shing Peter; Wang, Su Jane

    2015-09-01

    The citrus flavonoid hesperidin exerts neuroprotective effects and could cross the blood-brain barrier. Given the involvement of glutamate neurotoxicity in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders, this study was conducted to evaluate the potential role of hesperidin in glutamate release and glutamate neurotoxicity in the hippocampus of rats. In rat hippocampal nerve terminals (synaptosomes), hesperidin inhibited the release of glutamate and elevation of cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentration evoked by 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), but did not alter 4-AP-mediated depolarization. The inhibitory effect of hesperidin on evoked glutamate release was prevented by chelating the extracellular Ca(2+) ions and blocking the activity of Cav2.2 (N-type) and Cav2.1 (P/Q-type) channels or protein kinase C. In hippocampal slice preparations, whole-cell patch clamp experiments showed that hesperidin reduced the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents without affecting their amplitude, indicating the involvement of a presynaptic mechanism. In addition, intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of kainic acid (KA, 15 mg/kg) elevated the extracellular glutamate levels and caused considerable neuronal loss in the hippocampal CA3 area. These KA-induced alterations were attenuated by pretreatment with hesperidin (10 or 50 mg/kg, i.p.) before administering the KA. These results demonstrate that hesperidin inhibits evoked glutamate release in vitro and attenuates in vivo KA-induced neuronal death in the hippocampus. Our findings indicate that hesperidin may be a promising candidate for preventing or treating glutamate excitotoxicity related brain disorders such as neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Caffeine consumption prevents diabetes-induced memory impairment and synaptotoxicity in the hippocampus of NONcZNO10/LTJ mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, João M N; Agostinho, Paula M; Carvalho, Rui A; Cunha, Rodrigo A

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic conditions are associated with modified brain function, namely with cognitive deficits, through largely undetermined processes. More than understanding the underlying mechanism, it is important to devise novel strategies to alleviate diabetes-induced cognitive deficits. Caffeine (a mixed antagonist of adenosine A(1) and A(2A) receptors) emerges as a promising candidate since caffeine consumption reduces the risk of diabetes and effectively prevents memory deficits caused by different noxious stimuli. Thus, we took advantage of a novel animal model of type 2 diabetes to investigate the behavioural, neurochemical and morphological modifications present in the hippocampus and tested if caffeine consumption might prevent these changes. We used a model closely mimicking the human type 2 diabetes condition, NONcNZO10/LtJ mice, which become diabetic at 7-11 months when kept under an 11% fat diet. Caffeine (1 g/l) was applied in the drinking water from 7 months onwards. Diabetic mice displayed a decreased spontaneous alternation in the Y-maze accompanied by a decreased density of nerve terminal markers (synaptophysin, SNAP25), mainly glutamatergic (vesicular glutamate transporters), and increased astrogliosis (GFAP immunoreactivity) compared to their wild type littermates kept under the same diet. Furthermore, diabetic mice displayed up-regulated A(2A) receptors and down-regulated A(1) receptors in the hippocampus. Caffeine consumption restored memory performance and abrogated the diabetes-induced loss of nerve terminals and astrogliosis. These results provide the first evidence that type 2 diabetic mice display a loss of nerve terminal markers and astrogliosis, which is associated with memory impairment; furthermore, caffeine consumption prevents synaptic dysfunction and astrogliosis as well as memory impairment in type 2 diabetes.

  4. Caffeine consumption prevents diabetes-induced memory impairment and synaptotoxicity in the hippocampus of NONcZNO10/LTJ mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João M N Duarte

    Full Text Available Diabetic conditions are associated with modified brain function, namely with cognitive deficits, through largely undetermined processes. More than understanding the underlying mechanism, it is important to devise novel strategies to alleviate diabetes-induced cognitive deficits. Caffeine (a mixed antagonist of adenosine A(1 and A(2A receptors emerges as a promising candidate since caffeine consumption reduces the risk of diabetes and effectively prevents memory deficits caused by different noxious stimuli. Thus, we took advantage of a novel animal model of type 2 diabetes to investigate the behavioural, neurochemical and morphological modifications present in the hippocampus and tested if caffeine consumption might prevent these changes. We used a model closely mimicking the human type 2 diabetes condition, NONcNZO10/LtJ mice, which become diabetic at 7-11 months when kept under an 11% fat diet. Caffeine (1 g/l was applied in the drinking water from 7 months onwards. Diabetic mice displayed a decreased spontaneous alternation in the Y-maze accompanied by a decreased density of nerve terminal markers (synaptophysin, SNAP25, mainly glutamatergic (vesicular glutamate transporters, and increased astrogliosis (GFAP immunoreactivity compared to their wild type littermates kept under the same diet. Furthermore, diabetic mice displayed up-regulated A(2A receptors and down-regulated A(1 receptors in the hippocampus. Caffeine consumption restored memory performance and abrogated the diabetes-induced loss of nerve terminals and astrogliosis. These results provide the first evidence that type 2 diabetic mice display a loss of nerve terminal markers and astrogliosis, which is associated with memory impairment; furthermore, caffeine consumption prevents synaptic dysfunction and astrogliosis as well as memory impairment in type 2 diabetes.

  5. The role of the human hippocampus in familiarity-based and recollection-based recognition memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wixted, John T.; Squire, Larry R.

    2010-01-01

    The ability to recognize a previously encountered stimulus is dependent on the structures of the medial temporal lobe and is thought to be supported by two processes, recollection and familiarity. A focus of research in recent years concerns the extent to which these two processes depend on the hippocampus and on the other structures of the medial temporal lobe. One view holds that the hippocampus is important for both processes, whereas a different view holds that the hippocampus supports only the recollection process and the perirhinal cortex supports the familiarity process. One approach has been to study patients with hippocampal lesions and to contrast old/new recognition (which can be supported by familiarity) to free recall (which is supported by recollection). Despite some early case studies suggesting otherwise, several group studies have now shown that hippocampal patients exhibit comparable impairments on old/new recognition and free recall. These findings suggest that the hippocampus is important for both recollection and familiarity. Neuroimaging studies and Receiver Operating Characteristic analyses also initially suggested that the hippocampus was specialized for recollection, but these studies involved a strength confound (strong memories have been compared to weak memories). When steps are taken to compare strong recollection-based memories with strong familiarity-based memories, or otherwise control for memory strength, evidence for a familiarity signal (as well as a recollection signal) is evident in the hippocampus. These findings suggest that the functional organization of the medial temporal lobe is probably best understood in terms unrelated to the distinction between recollection and familiarity. PMID:20412819

  6. Increasing TNF levels solely in the rat hippocampus produces persistent pain-like symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martuscello, Regina T; Spengler, Robert N; Bonoiu, Adela C; Davidson, Bruce A; Helinski, Jadwiga; Ding, Hong; Mahajan, Supriya; Kumar, Rajiv; Bergey, Earl J; Knight, Paul R; Prasad, Paras N; Ignatowski, Tracey A

    2012-09-01

    The manifestation of chronic, neuropathic pain includes elevated levels of the cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF). Previously, we have shown that the hippocampus, an area of the brain most notable for its role in learning and memory formation, plays a fundamental role in pain sensation. Using an animal model of peripheral neuropathic pain, we have demonstrated that intracerebroventricular infusion of a TNF antibody adjacent to the hippocampus completely alleviated pain. Furthermore, intracerebroventricular infusion of rTNF adjacent to the hippocampus induced pain behavior in naïve animals similar to that expressed during a model of neuropathic pain. These data support our premise that enhanced production of hippocampal-TNF is integral in pain sensation. In the present study, TNF gene expression was induced exclusively in the hippocampus, eliciting increased local bioactive TNF levels, and animals were assessed for pain behaviors. Male Sprague-Dawley rats received stereotaxic injection of gold nanorod (GNR)-complexed cDNA (control or TNF) plasmids (nanoplasmidexes), and pain responses (i.e., thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia) were measured. Animals receiving hippocampal microinjection of TNF nanoplasmidexes developed thermal hyperalgesia bilaterally. Sensitivity to mechanical stimulation also developed bilaterally in the rat hind paws. In support of these behavioral findings, immunoreactive staining for TNF, bioactive levels of TNF, and levels of TNF mRNA per polymerase chain reaction analysis were assessed in several brain regions and found to be increased only in the hippocampus. These findings indicate that the specific elevation of TNF in the hippocampus is not a consequence of pain, but in fact induces these behaviors/symptoms. Copyright © 2012 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Hippocampus is necessary for spatial discrimination using distal cue-configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jangjin; Lee, Inah

    2011-06-01

    The role of the hippocampus in processing contextual cues has been well recognized. Contextual manipulation often involves transferring animals between different rooms. Because of vague definition of context in such a paradigm, however, it has been difficult to study the role of the hippocampus parametrically in contextual information processing. We designed a novel task in which a different context can be parametrically defined by the spatial configuration of distal cues. In this task, rats were trained to associate two different configurations of distal cue-sets (standard contexts) with different food-well locations at the end of a radial arm. Experiment 1 tested the role of the dorsal hippocampus in retrieving well-learned associations between standard contexts and rewarding food-well locations by comparing rats with neurotoxic lesions in the dorsal hippocampus with controls. We found that the hippocampal-lesioned rats were unable to retrieve the context-place paired associations learned before surgery. To further test the role of the hippocampus in generalizing altered context, in Experiment 2, rats were trained in a task in which modified versions of the standard contexts (ambiguous contexts) were presented, intermixed with the standard contexts. Rats were able to process the ambiguous contexts immediately by using their similarities to the standard contexts, whereas muscimol inactivation of the dorsal hippocampus in the same animals reversibly deprived such capability. The results suggest that rats can effectively associate discrete spatial locations with spatial configuration of distal cues. More important, rats can generalize or orthogonalize modified contextual environments using learned contextual representation of the environment. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Biopersistence of PEGylated Carbon Nanotubes Promotes a Delayed Antioxidant Response after Infusion into the Rat Hippocampus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidiane Dal Bosco

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes are promising nanomaterials for the diagnosis and treatment of brain disorders. However, the ability of these nanomaterials to cross cell membranes and interact with neural cells brings the need for the assessment of their potential adverse effects on the nervous system. This study aimed to investigate the biopersistence of single-walled carbon nanotubes functionalized with polyethylene glycol (SWCNT-PEG directly infused into the rat hippocampus. Contextual fear conditioning, Y-maze and open field tasks were performed to evaluate the effects of SWCNT-PEG on memory and locomotor activity. The effects of SWCNT-PEG on oxidative stress and morphology of the hippocampus were assessed 1 and 7 days after infusion of the dispersions at 0.5, 1.0 and 2.1 mg/mL. Raman analysis of the hippocampal homogenates indicates the biopersistence of SWCNT-PEG in the hippocampus 7 days post-injection. The infusion of the dispersions had no effect on the acquisition or persistence of the contextual fear memory; likewise, the spatial recognition memory and locomotor activity were not affected by SWCNT-PEG. Histological examination revealed no remarkable morphological alterations after nanomaterial exposure. One day after the infusion, SWCNT-PEG dispersions at 0.5 and 1.0 mg/mL were able to decrease total antioxidant capacity without modifying the levels of reactive oxygen species or lipid hydroperoxides in the hippocampus. Moreover, SWCNT-PEG dispersions at all concentrations induced antioxidant defenses and reduced reactive oxygen species production in the hippocampus at 7 days post-injection. In this work, we found a time-dependent change in antioxidant defenses after the exposure to SWCNT-PEG. We hypothesized that the persistence of the nanomaterial in the tissue can induce an antioxidant response that might have provided resistance to an initial insult. Such antioxidant delayed response may constitute an adaptive response to the biopersistence of

  9. Hippocampus leads ventral striatum in replay of place-reward information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansink, Carien S; Goltstein, Pieter M; Lankelma, Jan V; McNaughton, Bruce L; Pennartz, Cyriel M A

    2009-08-01

    Associating spatial locations with rewards is fundamental to survival in natural environments and requires the integrity of the hippocampus and ventral striatum. In joint multineuron recordings from these areas, hippocampal-striatal ensembles reactivated together during sleep. This process was especially strong in pairs in which the hippocampal cell processed spatial information and ventral striatal firing correlated to reward. Replay was dominated by cell pairs in which the hippocampal "place" cell fired preferentially before the striatal reward-related neuron. Our results suggest a plausible mechanism for consolidating place-reward associations and are consistent with a central tenet of consolidation theory, showing that the hippocampus leads reactivation in a projection area.

  10. Theta-associated high-frequency oscillations (110–160 Hz) in the hippocampus and neocortex

    OpenAIRE

    Tort, Adriano B. L.; Scheffer-Teixeira, Robson; Souza, Bryan C.; Draguhn, Andreas; Brankacˇk, Jurij

    2013-01-01

    TORT, A. B. L. ; SCHEFFER-TEIXEIRA, R ; Souza, B.C. ; DRAGUHN, A. ; BRANKACK, J. . Theta-associated high-frequency oscillations (110-160 Hz) in the hippocampus and neocortex. Progress in Neurobiology , v. 100, p. 1-14, 2013. We review recent evidence for a novel type of fast cortical oscillatory activity that occurs circumscribed between 110 and 160 Hz, which we refer to as high-frequency oscillations (HFOs). HFOs characteristically occur modulated by theta phase in the hippocampus a...

  11. The 5-HT(4) receptor levels in hippocampus correlates inversely with memory test performance in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haahr, Mette Ewers; Fisher, Patrick; Holst, Klaus Kähler

    2013-01-01

    of the 5-HT4R binding in hippocampus in relation to memory acquisition and consolidation in healthy young volunteers. We found significant, negative associations between the immediate recall scores and left and right hippocampal BP(ND) , (p = 0.009 and p = 0.010 respectively) and between the right...... hippocampal BP(ND) and delayed recall (p = 0.014). These findings provide evidence that the 5-HT(4) R is associated with memory functions in the human hippocampus and potentially pharmacological stimulation of the receptor may improve episodic memory. Hum Brain Mapp, 2012. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc....

  12. Thoracic shock wave injury causes behavioral abnormalities in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Hiromi; Miyawaki, Hiroki; Satoh, Yasushi; Saiki, Takami; Kawauchi, Satoko; Sato, Shunichi; Saitoh, Daizoh

    2015-12-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is caused by complex mechanisms of systemic, local and cerebral responses to blast exposure. However, the molecular mechanisms of cognitive impairment after exposure to blast waves are not clearly known. We tested the hypothesis that thoracic injury induced functional and morphological impairment in the brain, leading to behavioral abnormalities. Mice were exposed to laser-induced shock waves (LISWs) impacting the thorax and assessed for behavioral outcome at 7 and 28 days post injury. Hippocampus and lung were collected for histopathological analysis and gene expression profiling after injury. Thoracic injury transiently decreased the heart rate, blood pressure, peripheral oxyhemoglobin saturation and cerebral blood flow immediately after LISW exposure. Although LISWs exposure caused pulmonary contusions, hemorrhage was not apparent in the brain. At 7 and 28 days after, the injured mice exhibited impaired short-term memory and depression-like behavior compared with controls. Histological assessments showed an increase in neuronal cell death after shock wave exposure, especially in the CA3 region of the hippocampus. Moreover, shock wave exposure altered the expression of functionally relevant genes in the hippocampus at 1 h and 1 day post injury. Our findings indicate that the LISW-induced thoracic injury with no direct impact on the brain affected the hippocampal gene expression and led to morphological alterations, resulting in behavioral abnormalities. Therefore, body protection may be extremely important in the effective prevention against blast-induced alterations in brain function.

  13. Adeno-Associated Viral Vector-Induced Overexpression of Neuropeptide Y Y2 Receptors in the Hippocampus Suppresses Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woldbye, David P. D.; Angehagen, Mikael; Gotzsche, Casper R.; Elbrond-Bek, Heidi; Sorensen, Andreas T.; Christiansen, Soren H.; Olesen, Mikkel V.; Nikitidou, Litsa; Hansen, Thomas v. O.; Kanter-Schlifke, Irene; Kokaia, Merab

    2010-01-01

    Gene therapy using recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors overexpressing neuropeptide Y in the hippocampus exerts seizure-suppressant effects in rodent epilepsy models and is currently considered for clinical application in patients with intractable mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Seizure suppression by neuropeptide Y in the hippocampus is…

  14. Common proteomic changes in the hippocampus in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder and particular evidence for involvement of cornu ammonis regions 2 and 3.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2011-05-01

    The hippocampus is strongly implicated in schizophrenia and, to a lesser degree, bipolar disorder. Proteomic investigations of the different regions of the hippocampus may help us to clarify the basis and the disease specificity of the changes.

  15. Serotonin depletion results in a decrease of the neuronal activation caused by rivastigmine in the rat hippocampus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornum, Birgitte Rahbek; Weikop, Pia; Moller, Arne

    2006-01-01

    Interactions between the serotonergic and cholinergic systems are known to occur and are believed to play a role in the mechanism underlying both major depression and Alzheimer's disease. On a molecular level, studies suggest that acetylcholine (ACh) increases serotonin (5-HT) release through...

  16. Decrease of extracellular taurine in the rat dorsal hippocampus after central nervous administration of vasopressin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brust, P; Christensen, Thomas; Diemer, Nils Henrik

    1992-01-01

    of the composition of the extracellular fluid. The concentrations of 16 amino acids were measured by HPLC in the perfusate samples. The level of taurine declined 20% in the right hippocampus during perfusion with vasopressin, whereas o-phosphoethanolamine decreased in both sides, the left 20% and the right 24...

  17. The role of the hippocampus in flexible cognition and social behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachael D Rubin

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Successful behavior requires actively acquiring and representing information about the environment and people, and manipulating and using those acquired representations flexibly to optimally act in and on the world. The frontal lobes have figured prominently in most accounts of flexible or goal-directed behavior, as evidenced by often-reported behavioral inflexibility in individuals with frontal lobe dysfunction. Here, we propose that the hippocampus also plays a critical role by forming and reconstructing relational memory representations that underlie flexible cognition and social behavior. There is mounting evidence that damage to the hippocampus can produce inflexible and maladaptive behavior when such behavior places high demands on the generation, recombination, and flexible use of information. This is seen in abilities as diverse as memory, navigation, exploration, imagination, creativity, decision-making, character judgments, establishing and maintaining social bonds, empathy, social discourse, and language use. Thus, the hippocampus, together with its extensive interconnections with other neural systems, supports the flexible use of information in general. Further, we suggest that this understanding has important clinical implications. Hippocampal abnormalities can produce profound deficits in real-world situations, which typically place high demands on the flexible use of information, but are not always obvious on diagnostic tools tuned to frontal lobe function. This review documents the role of the hippocampus in supporting flexible representations and aims to expand our understanding of the dynamic networks that operate as we move through and create meaning of our world.

  18. Space, time, and episodic memory: The hippocampus is all over the cognitive map.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekstrom, Arne D; Ranganath, Charan

    2017-06-13

    In recent years, the field has reached an impasse between models suggesting that the hippocampus is fundamentally involved in spatial processing and models suggesting that the hippocampus automatically encodes all dimensions of experience in the service of memory. Here, we consider key conceptual issues that have impeded progress in our understanding of hippocampal function, and we review findings that establish the scope and limits of hippocampal involvement in navigation and memory. We argue that space and time serve as a primary scaffold to break up experiences into specific contexts, and to organize multimodal input that is to be associated within a context. However, the hippocampus is clearly capable of incorporating additional dimensions into the scaffold if they are determined to be relevant in the event-defined context. Conceiving of the hippocampal representation as constrained by immediate task demands-yet preferring axes that involve space and time-helps to reconcile an otherwise disparate set of findings on the core function of the hippocampus. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. In Vitro Antioxidant Activity and In Vivo Anti-Fatigue Effect of Sea Horse (Hippocampus) Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zebin; Lin, Duanquan; Guo, Juanjuan; Zhang, Yi; Zheng, Baodong

    2017-03-18

    This study investigated changes the in vitro antioxidant activity of Hippocampus polypeptides during enzymatic hydrolysis, including the effects of enzyme species, enzyme concentration, material-liquid ratio, hydrolysis time, pH, and temperature of the reaction system. Its in vivo anti-fatigue activity was also studied. Hippocampus peptide prepared by papain digestion exhibited the highest 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl free radical scavenging rate (71.89% ± 1.50%) and strong hydroxyl radical scavenging rate (75.53% ± 0.98%), compared to those prepared by five other commonly used enzymes (i.e., trypsin, neutral protease, compound protease, flavorzyme, and alkaline protease). Additionally, maximum antioxidant activity of Hippocampus polypeptide prepared by papain digestion was reached after hydrolysis for 40 min at pH 6.0 and 60 °C of the reaction system by using 2000 U/g enzyme and a material-liquid ratio of 1:15. Moreover, compared with the control group, Hippocampus peptide prolonged the swimming time by 33%-40%, stabilized the blood glucose concentration, increased liver glycogen levels, and decreased blood lactate levels and blood urea nitrogen levels in mice (p antioxidant and anti-fatigue activity.

  20. Localized hippocampus measures are associated with Alzheimer pathology and cognition independent of total hippocampal volume

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carmichael, Owen; Xie, Jing; Fletcher, Evan; Singh, Baljeet; Decarli, Charles; A, Saradha; Abdi, Hervé; Abdul Hadi, Normi; Abdulkadir, Ahmed; Abdullah, Afnizanfaizal; Achuthan, Anusha; Adluru, Nagesh; Aggarwal, Namita; Aghajanian, Jania; Agyemang, Alex; Ahdidan, Jamila; Ahmad, Duaa; Ahmed, Shiek; Ahmed, Fareed; Ahmed, Fayeza; Akbarifar, Roshanak; Akhondi-Asl, Alireza; Aksu, Yaman; Alcauter, Sarael; Daniel, Alexander; Alin, Aylin; Alshuft, Hamza; Alvarez-Linera, Juan; Amin-Mansour, Ali; Anderson, Dallas; Anderson, Jeff; Andorn, Anne; Ang, Amma; Angersbach, Steve; Ansarian, Reza; Appaji, Abhishek; Appannah, Arti; Arfanakis, Konstantinos; Armentrout, Steven; Arrighi, Michael; Arumughababu, S. Vethanayaki; Arunagiri, Vidhya; Ashe-McNalley, Cody; Ashford, Wes; Aurelie, Le Page; Avants, Brian; Aviv, Richard; Avula, Ramesh; Ayache, Nicholas; Ayan-Oshodi, Mosun; Ayhan, Murat; B V, Sumana; Babic, Tomislav; Bach Cuadra, Meritxell; Bagepally, Bhavani; Baird, Geoffrey; Baker, John; Baker, Suzanne; Bakker, Arnold; Baladandayuthapani, Veerabhadran; Barbash, Shahar; Barker, Warren; Bartlett, Jonathan; Bartley, Mairead; Baruchin, Andrea; Battaglini, Iacopo; Bauer, Corinna; Bayley, Peter; Beck, Irene; Becker, James; Beckett, Laurel; Bednar, Martin; Bedner, Arkadiusz; Beg, Mirza Faisal; Bekris, Lynn; Belaroussi, Boubakeur; Belloch, Vicente; Ben Ahmed, Olfa; Bender, J. Dennis; Bendib, Mohamed Mokhtar; Benois-Pineau, Jenny; Bhagchandani, Sameer; Bienkowska, Katarzyna; Biffi, Alessandro; Bilgic, Basar; Bilgin, Gokhan; Billing, Bill; Bishop, Courtney; Bittner, Daniel; Björnsdotter, Malin; Black, Sandra; Bloss, Cinnamon; Blunck, Yasmin; Bocti, Christian; Bohorquez, Adriana; Bokde, Arun; Boone, John; Borrie, Michael; Bourgeat, Pierrick; Bouttout, Haroune; Bowman, DuBois; Gene, Gene; Boxer, Adam; Bozoki, Andrea; Bracard, Serge; Braskie, Meredith; Braunewell, Karl; Breitner, Joihn; Bresell, Anders; Brewer, James; Brickhouse, Michael; Brickman, Adam; Britschgi, Markus; Broadbent, Steve; Brock, Birgitte; Buchsbaum, Monte; Buerger, Katharina; Bunce, David; Burnham, Samantha; Burns, Jeffrey; Burzykowski, Tomasz; Butler, Tracy; Cabeza, Rafael; Cabral, George; Caffery, Terrell; Cai, Zhengchen; Callhoff, Johanna; Calvini, Piero; Campbell, Noll; Carbotti, Angela; Carle, Adam; Carmasin, Carle; Carpenter, Carmichael; Carvalho, Janessa; Casanova, Casanova Ramon; Casey, Anne; David, David; Cash, David; Cataldo, Rosella; Cella, Massimo; Chakravarty, Mallar; Chang, Ih; Chao, Linda; Charil, Arnaud; Che-Wei, Chang; Chen, Kewei; Chen, Shuzhong; Chen, Ing-jou; Chen, Jung-Tai; Chen, Rong; Chen, Chuangquan; Chen, Qiang; Chen, Heng; Chen, Jake; Chen, Gang; Cheng, Wei-Chen; Cheng, Xi; Cheng, Bo; Cherkas, Yauheniya; Chertkow, Howard; Cheung, Vinci; Chiang, Gloria; Chiao, Ping; chibane, Mouatez Billah; Chida, Noriko; Chin, Simon; Ching, Christopher; Chisholm, Jane; Cho, Claire; Cho, Sung-Sik; Choe, John; Choubey, Suresh; Chowbina, Sudhir; Ciocia, Gianluigi; Clark, David; Clarkson, Matt; Clerc, Stephanie; Climer, Sharlee; Clunie, David; Coen, Michael; Coimbra, Alexandre; Compton, David; Coubard, Olivier; Coulin, Samuel; Coulson, Elizabeth; Cover, Keith S.; Crans, Gerald; Crawford, Karen; Croop, Robert; Crum, William; Cui, Yue; Da, Long; Daiello, Lori; Darby, Eveleen; Darkner, Sune; Darnell, Robert; Davatzikos, Christos; DavidPrakash, Bhaskaran; Davidson, Christopher; Davis, Melissa; de Bruijne, Marleen; Decker, Summer; DeDuck, Kristina; Dehghan, Hossein; Della Rosa, Pasquale Anthony; DeOrchis, Vincent; Dépy Carron, Delphine; Desjardins, Benoit; deToledo-Morrell, Leyla; Devanand, Davangere; Devanarayan, Viswanath; Devier, Deidre; DeVous, Michael; Di, Xin; Di, Jianing; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; Diciotti, Stefano; Dickerson, Bradford; Dickie, David Alexander; Dickinson, Philip; Dill, Vanderson; Ding, Xiaobo; Dinov, Ivo; Dobosh, Brian; Dobson, Howard; Dodge, Hiroko; Dolman, Andrew; Dolmo, Bess-Carolina; Dong, Wen; Donohue, Michael; Dore, Vincent; Dorflinger, Ernest; Dowling, Maritza; Dragicevic, Natasa; Dubal, Dena; Duchesne, Simon; Duff, Kevin; Dukart, Jürgen; Durazzo, Timothy; Dutta, Joyita; DWors, Robert; Egefjord, Lærke; Elcoroaristizabal, Xabier; Emahazion, Tesfai; Endres, Christopher; Epstein, Noam; Ereshefsky, Larry; Eskildsen, Simon; Espinosa, Eskildsen; Esposito, Mario; Ewers, Michael; Falcone, Guido; Fan, Zhen; Fan, Yong; Fan, Jing; Fang, Zheng; Farahibozorg, Seyedehrezvan; Farahmandpoor, Zeinab; Farb, Norman; Fardo, David; Farias, Sarah; Farnum, Michael; Farrer, Lindsay; Fatke, Bastian; Faux, Noel; Favilla, Stefania; Fazlollahi, Amir; Feldman, Betsy; Félix, Zandra; Fennema-Notestine, Christine; Fernandes, Michel; Fernandez, Santos; Fernandez, Elsa; Ferrer, Eugene; Fetterman, Bob; Figurski, Michal; Fillit, Howard; Finch, Stephen; Fiot, Jean-Baptiste; Flenniken, Derek; Flores, Christopher; Flynn Longmire, Crystal; Focke, Niels; Forsythe, Alan; Foxhall, Suzanne; Franko, Edit; Freeman, Roderick; Freire, Rodolpho; Friedrich, Christoph M.; Friesenhahn, Michel; Giovanni, Giovanni; Fritzsche, Klaus; Fujiwara, Ken; Fullerton, Terence; Gaffour, Yacine; Galvin, Ben; Gamst, Anthony; Gan, Ke; Gao, Sujuan; Garg, Gaurav; Gaser, Christian; Gastineau, Edward; Gattaz, Wagner; Gaubert, Malo; Gaudreau, Amanda; Gauthier, Serge; Ge, Tian; Gemme, Gianluca; Geraci, Joseph; Gholipour, Farhad; Ghosh, Debashis; Ghosh, Satrajit; Gieschke, Ronald; Gill, Ryan; Gillespie, William; Gitelman, Darren; Gkontra, Xenia; Gleason, Carey; Glymour, M. Maria; Godbey, Michael; Gold, Brian; Goldberg, Terry; Goldman, Jennifer; Gomar, Jesus; Gonzalez-Beltran, Alejandra; Gore, Chris; Gorriz, Juan Manuel; Goto, Masami; Gradkowski, Wojciech; Grasela, Thaddeus; Gray, Katherine; Gregory, Erik; Greicius, Michael; Grill, Joshua; Grolmusz, Vince; Gross, Alden; Gross, Alan; Grydeland, Håkon; Guignot, Isabelle; Guo, Hongbin; Guo, Gimiao; Guo, Liang-Hao; Gupta, Vinay; Guyot, Jennifer; Haas, Magali; Habeck, Christian; Habte, Frezghi; Haight, Thaddeus; Hajaj, Chen; Hajiesmaeili, Maryam; Hajjar, Ihab; Hammarstrom, Per; Hampel, Harald; Han, Zhaoying; Han, Duke; Hanna, Yousef; Hanna-Pladdy, Brenda; Hao, Yongfu; Hardy, Peter; Harrison, John; Harvey, Danielle; Hayashi, Toshihiro; Haynes, John-Dylan; He, Yong; He, Huiguang; Head, Denise; Heckemann, Rolf; Heegaard, Niels; Heidebrink, Judith; Hellyer, Peter; Helwig, Michael; Henderson, David; Herholz, Karl; Hess, Christopher; Hill, Sophie; Hisaka, Akihiro; Ho Ming, Au Yeung; Hobart, Jeremy; Hochstetler, Helen; Hofer, Scott; Hoffman, John; Holder, Daniel; Hollingworth, Paul; Holmes, Robin; Hong, Hyunseok; Hong, Hong; Honigberg, Lee; Hoogenraad, Frank; Hope, Thomas; Hot, Pascal; Hsieh, Helen; Hsu, Ailing; Hu, William; Hu, Xiaochen; Hu, Chenhui; Hu, Mingxing; Hua, Wen-Yu; Huang, Chien-Chih; Huang, Xudong; Huang, Juebin; Huang, Yifan; Huang, Chun-Jung; Huang, Zihan; Huentelman, Matthew; Huppertz, Hans-Jürgen; Hurt, Stephen; Hussain, Maqbool; Hutchins, Jim; Hwang, Scott; Hyun, JungMoon; Ifeachor, Emmanuel; Iglesias, Martina; Ikonomidou, Vasiliki; Iman, Adjoudj; Imani, Farzin; Immermann, Fred; Inlow, Mark; Inoue, Lurdes; Insel, Philip; Irizarry, Michael; Ishibashi, Taro; Ishii, Kenji; Ito, Kaori; Iwatsubo, Takeshi; Jacks, Adam; Jacobson, Mark; Jacqmin, Philippe; Jaeger, Markus; Jagger, Richard; Jagust, William; Janousova, Eva; Jara, Hernan; Jedynak, Bruno; Jefferson, Angela; Jenq, John; Jiang, Tianzi; Jiang, Chunxiang; Jiao, Yun; Jiaolong, Qin; Jin, Kun; Johnson, Sterling; Johnson, Julene; Johnson, Kent; Gareth, Gareth; Jones, Mark; Jones, Richard; Joshi, Rohit; Joshi, Shantanu; Jouvent, Eric; Juengling, Freimut; Jung, Wonbeom; Junjie, Zhuo; K G, Muthamma; Kabilan, Meena; Kairui, Zhang; Kam, Hye Jin; Kamer, Angela; Kanakaraj, Sithara; Kanchev, Vladimir; Kaneko, Tomoki; Kaneta, Tomohiro; Kang, Hyunseok; Kang, Ju Hee; Kang, Jian; Karantzoulis, Stella; Kaushik, Sandeep S.; Kauwe, John; Kawashima, Shoji; Kaye, Edward; Kazemi, Samaneh; Ke, Han; Kelleher, Thomas; Kennedy, Richard; Keogh, Bart; Kerchner, Geoffrey; Kerr, Daniel; Keshava, Nirmal; Khalil, Andre; Khondker, Zakaria; Kiddle, Steven; Kihara, Takeshi; Killeen, Neil; Killiany, Ron; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Kim, Seongkyun; Kim, Dajung; Kim, Ana; Kim, Jong Hun; Kimberg, Daniel; King, Richard; Kirby, Justin; Kirsch, Wolff; Klein, Gregory; Klimas, Michael; Kline, Richard; Klopfenstein, Erin; Koen, Joshua; Koenig, Loren; Koikkalainen, Juha; Kokomoor, Anders; Kong, Xiangnan; Koppel, Jeremy; Korolev, Igor; Krahnke, Tillmann; Krams, Michael; Kuceyeski, Amy; Kuhl, Donald; Kumar, Vinod; Roy, P. Kumar; Kuo, Julie; Kyrtsos, Christina Rose; Labib, Victor; Labrish, Catherine; Lai, Song; Lakatos, Anita; Lalonde, François; Lam, Shing Chun Benny; Lam, On Ki; Lampron, Antoine; Landau, Susan; Lane, Barton; Langbaum, Jessica; Langford, Dianne; Lanius, Vivian; Lasch, Shirley; Latella, Marco; Hiuyan, Hiuyan; Leatherday, Christopher; Lee, Doheon; Lee, Grace; Lee, Sei; Lee, Jong an; Lemaitre, Herve; Lenfant, Pierre; Leonards, Ute; Leong, Leonards; Leoutsakos, Jeannie-Marie; Leung, Kelvin; Leung, Yuk Yee; Levey, Allan; Li, Ming; Li, Jie; Li, Xiaodong; Li, Lexin; Li, Yanming; Li, Quanzheng; Li, Rui; Li, Yi; Li, Junning; Li, Yue; Li, Jun; Li, Weidong; Li, Xiaobo; Liang, Peipeng; Liang, Kuchang; Liang, Kelvin; Liao, Weiqi; Liao, Shu; Liaquat, Saad; Liaw, Chyn; Liberman, Gilad; Lilley, Patrick; Lin, Frank; Lin, Xiaoman; Lin, Ai-Ling; Liu, Tianming; Liu, Yawu; Liu, Yanping; Liu, Linda; Liu, Wei; Liu, Collins; Liu, Manhua; Liu, Xiuwen; Liu, Tao; Liu, Ye; Liu, Xiaofeng; Liu, Yin; Liu, Dazhong; Liu, Sidong; Liu, Guodong; Llido, Jerome; Lo, Raymond; Lobach, Iryna; Lobanov, Victor; Lockhart, Andrew; Long, Ziyi; Long, Xiaojing; Long, Miaomiao; Looi, Jeffrey; Lu, Huanxiang; Lu, Yuefeng; Lu, Po-Haong; Lucena, Nathaniel; Luis, Jorge; Lukas, Carsten; Lukic, Ana; Luo, Xi; Luo, Xiongjian; Luo, Lei; Luo, Wanchun; Ma, Suk Ling; Ma, Shen-Ming; Mackin, Scott; Mada, Marius; Madabhushi, Anant; Madeira, Sara; Magland, Jeremy; Mahanta, Mohammad Shahin; Maikusa, Norihide; Maldjian, Joseph; Mandal, Indrajit; Mang, Mandal; Manjon, Jose; Mantri, Ninad; Manzour, Amir; Marcus, Daniel; Margolin, Richard; Marrett, Sean; Marshall, Gad; Martinez Gonzalez, Alberto; Martinez Torteya, Antonio; Martins, Renato; Mather, Mara; Mathis, Chester; Matoug, Sofia; Mattei, Peter; Matthews, Dawn; Mattis, Paul; McCarroll, Steven; McEvoy, Linda; McGeown, William; McGinnis, Scott; McGonigle, John; McIntosh, Anthony Randal; McIntyre, John; McLaren, McIntyre; McMillan, Corey; McQuail, Joseph; Meadowcroft, Mark; Meda, Shashwath; Melie-Garcia, Lester; Melrose, Rebecca; Mendelson, Alexander; Mendez, Mendelson; Menendez, Mendez; Meng, Meng; Meredith, Jere; Meyer, Carsten; Mez, Jesse; Mickael, Guedj; Mikula, Margit; Miller, Michael; Colleen, Colleen; Mintun, Mark; Mistridis, Panagiota; Mitchell, Mistridis; Mitsis, Effie; Mon, Mitsis; Moore, Dana; Morabito, Moore C.; Moradi Birgani, Parmida; Moratal, David; Morimoto, Bruce; Mormino, Elizabeth; Morris, Jill; Morris, Jeffrey; Mortamet, Bénédicte; Moscato, Pablo; Mourao-Miranda, Janaina; Mueller, Susanne; Mueller, Kathyrne; Mukherjee, Shubhabrata; Mukund, Nandita; Mulder, Emma; Mungas, Dan; Munir, Kamran; Murayama, Shigeo; N, Sairam; Nagata, Ken; Nair, Anil; Nasrabadi, Samira; Nativio, Raffaella; Nazeri, Arash; Nejad, Leila; Nekooei, Sirous; Nemeth, Imola; Nencka, Andrew; Nettiksimmons, Jasmine; Neu, Scott; Ng, Yen-Bee; Nguyen, Nghi; Nguyen, Hien; Nichols, Thomas; Nicodemus, Kristin; Niecko, Timothy; Nielsen, Casper; Niethammer, Marc; Nishio, Tomoyuki; Nordstrom, Matthew; Noshad, Sina; Notomi, Keiji; Novak, Nic; Nutakki, Gopi Chand; O'Charoen, Sirimon; Obisesan, Thomas; Oh, Joonmi; Okonkwo, Ozioma; Olde Rikkert, Marcel; Oliveira, João; Oliveira, Ailton; Oliver, Ruth; Olmos, Salvador; Oltra, Javier; Ong, Rowena; Ortner, Marion; Osadebey, Michael; Ostrowitzki, Susanne; Ovando Vazquez, Cesare Moises; Overholser, Rosanna; P, Anishiya; P K A, Chitra; Pa, Judy; Palanisamy, Preethi; Pan, Guodong; Pan, Zhifang; Pan, Sarah; Pande, Yogesh; Pardo, Jose; Pardoe, Heath; Park, Sujin; Park, Lovingly; Park, Moon Ho; Park, Hyunjin; Parker, Christopher; Patel, Yogen; Patil, Amol; Patil, Manasi; Pawlak, Mikolaj; Pierre, Pierre; Pell, Gaby; Pennec, Xavier; Pereira, Francisco; Perlbarg, Vincent; Perneczky, Robert; Peters, Frederic; Petitti, Diana; Petrella, Jeffrey; Petrou, Myria; Peyrat, Jean-Marc; Ngoc, Phuong Trinh Pham; Phillips, Justin; Phillips, Nicole; Pian, Wen-ting; Pierson, Ronald; Piovezan, Mauro; Pipitone, Jon; Pirraglia, Elizabeth; Planes, Xavi; Podhorski, Adam; Poirier, Judes; Pomara, Nunzio; Popov, Veljko; Poppenk, Jordan; Potkin, Steven; Potter, Guy; Poulin, Stephane; Prastawa, Marcel; Prince, Jerry; Pruessner, Jens; Qiu, Wendy; Qu, Annie; Qualls, Constance Dean; Quarg, Peter; Quinlan, Judith; Rabbia, Michael; Rajagovindan, Rajasimhan; Rajeesh, Rajeesh; Ramadubramani, Vanamamalai; Ramage, Amy; Ramirez, Alfredo; Randolph, Christopher; Rao, Hengyi; Rao, Anil; Reed, Bruce; Reid, Andrew; Reilhac, Anthonin; Reiner, Peggy; Reinsberger, Claus; Retico, Alessandra; Rhatigan, Lewis; Rhinn, Herve; Rhoades, Earl; Ribbens, Annemie; Richard, Edo; Richards, John; Richter, Mirco; Riddle, William; Ridgway, Gerard; Ringman, John; Rizk-Jackson, Angela; Rizzi, Massimo; Rodriguez, Laura; Rodriguez-Vieitez, Elena; Rogalski, Emily; Rojas Balderrama, Javier; Rokicki, Jaroslav; Romero, Klaus; Rorden, Chris; Jonathan, Jonathan; Rosen, Ori; Rostant, Ola; Rousseau, François; Rubright, Jonathan; Rucinski, Marek; Ruiz, Agustin; Rulseh, Aaron; Rusinek, Henry; Ryan, Laurie; Sabuncu, Mert; Saculva, Marie; Sahuquillo, Juan; Said, Yasmine; Saito, Naomi; Sakata, Muneyuki; Salama, Mahetab; Salazar, Diego; Saman, Sudad; Sanchez, Luciano; Sanders, Elizabeth; Sankar, Tejas; Santhamma, Sindhumol; Sarnel, Haldun; Sarwinda, Devvi; Sasaki, Toshiaki; Sasaya, Tenta; Sato, Hajime; Sattlecker, Martina; Savio, Alexandre; Saykin, Andrew; Scanlon, Blake; Scharre, Douglas; Schegerin, Marc; Schmand, Ben; Schmansky, Nick; Schmidt-Wilcke, Tobias; Schramm, Hauke; Schuerch, Markus; Schwartz, Pamela; Schwartz, Eben; Adam, Adam; Schwarz, John; Schweizer, Tom; Selnes, Per; Sembritzki, Klaus; Senjem, Matthew; Sfikas, Giorgos; Sghedoni, Roberto; Shah, Jamal Hussain; Shahbaba, Babak; Shams, Soheil; Shankle, William; Shattuck, David; Shaw, Leslie; Shen, Qi; Shen, Jie; Shen, Qian; Shera, David; Sherva, Richard; Shi, Yonghong; Shi, Feng; Shi, Yonggang; Shi, Jie; Shilaskar, Swati; Shinohara, Russell; Shokouhi, Sepideh; Shulman, Joshua; Sideris, Konstantinos; Siegel, Rene; Silveira, Margarida; Silverman, Daniel; Simak, Alex; Simmons, Andy; Simoes, Rita; Simon, Howard; Simon, Adam; Simpson, Ivor; Singh, Nikhil; Sinha, Neelam; Siuciak, Judy; Sjögren, Niclas; Skinner, Jeannine; Skudlarski, Skinner; Smith, Michael; Smith, Charles; Peter, Peter; Soares, Holly; Soldan, Anja; Soldea, Octavian; Solomon, Paul; Solomon, Alan; Som, Subhojit; Song, Zhuang; Song, Shide; Sosova, Iveta; Soydemir, Melih; Spampinato, Maria Vittoria; Speier, William; Sperling, Reisa; Spiegel, R.; Spies, Lothar; Springate, Beth; Spychalla, Anthony; Staff, Roger; Steenland, Nelson; Steffener, Jason; Stern, Yaakov; Stokman, Harro; Stolzenberg, Ethan; Stricker, Nikki; Stühler, Elisabeth; Su, Saisai; Suen, Summit; Sugishita, Morihiro; Suk, Heung-Il; Sukkar, Rafid; Sullivan, Sukkar; Sun, Mingzhu; Sun, Jia; Sun, Yu; Sun, Ying; Sundell, Karen; Sutphen, Courtney; Svetnik, Vladimir; Swan, Melanie; Symons, Sean; Szafranska, Katarzyna; Szigeti, Kinga; Szoeke, Cassandra; Sørensen, Lauge; T, Genish; Takeuchi, Tomoko; Tanaka, Shoji; Tanaka, Rie; Tanchi, Chaturaphat; Tancredi, Daniel; Tang, Qi; Tanzi, Rudolph; Tarnow, Eugen; Tartaglia, Maria Carmela; Tarver, Erika; Tassy, Dominique; Tauber, Dominique; Taylor-Reinwald, Lisa; Teipel, Stefan; Teng, Edmond; Termenon, Maite; Terriza, Felipe; Thambisetty, Madhav; Thames, April; Thatavarti, Raja Sekhar; Thiele, Frank; Thomas, Ronald; Thomas, Charlene; Thomas, Benjamin; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Wesley; Thornton-Wells, Tricia; Thorvaldsson, Valgeir; Tokuda, Takahiko; Toledo, Juan B.; Toma, Ahmed; Tomita, Naoki; Toro, Roberto; Torrealdea, Patxi; Toschi, Nicola; Tosto, Giuseppe; Toussaint, Paule; Toyoshiba, Hiroyoshi; Tractenberg, Rochelle E.; Triggs, Tyler; Trittschuh, Emily; Trotta, Gabriele; Truong Huu, Tram; Truran, Diana; Tsalikakis, Dimitrios; Tsanas, Athanasios; Tsang, Candy; Tufail, Ahsan; Tung, Joyce; Turken, And; Turner, Raymond; Tyagi, Puneet; Ueda, Yoji; Uematsu, Daisuke; Ullrich, Lauren; Umar, Nisser; Ungar, Leo; Valenzuela, Olga; van de Nes, Joseph; van der Brug, Marcel; van der Lijn, Fedde; van Hecke, Wim; van Horn, John; van Leemput, Koen; van Train, Kenneth; Varkuti, Balint; Vasanawala, Minal; Veeraraghavan, Harini; Vellay, Stephane; Vemuri, Prashanthi; Verma, Manish; Vidoni, Eric; Louis, Louis; Vinyes, Georgina; Visser, Pieter Jelle; Vitek, Michael; Vogel, Simon; Voineskos, Aristotle; Vos, Stephanie; Vounou, Maria; Wade, Sara; Walsh, Alexander; Wang, Ze; Wang, Angela; Wang, Li; Wang, Yaping; Wang, Tiger; Wang, Li-San; Wang, Xu; Wang, Zheyu; Wang, Tianyao; Wang, Yongmei Michelle; Wang, Song; Wang, Lei; Wang, Lubin; Wang, Squall; Wang, Jingyan; Ward, Michael; Ward, Andrew; Watson, David; Wefel, Jeffrey; Weiner, Michael; Wenzel, Fabian; Wesnes, Keith; Shawn, Shawn; Westlye, Lars T.; Wheland, David; Whitcher, Brandon; White, Brooke; Whitlow, Christopher; Wilhelmsen, Kirk; Beth, Beth; Wilson, Lorraine; Wingo, Thomas; Wirth, Miranka; Wishart, Heather; Wiste, Heather; Wittemer, Elizabeth; Wolf, Henrike; Wolke, Ira; Wolz, Robin; Wong, Koon; Woo, Ellen; Woo, Jongwook; Woods, Lynn; Worth, Andrew; Wu, Xiaoying; Wu, Yanjun; Wu, Liang; Wu, Ellen; Wyman, Bradley; Xie, Sharon; Xu, Yonghong; Xu, Yi-Zheng; Xu, Shunbin; Xu, Jun; Xu, Steven; Yamada, Tomoko; Yamashita, Fumio; Yan, Yunyi; Yang, Zijiang; Yang, Hyun Duk; Yang, Edward; Yang, Chung-Yi; Yang, Wenlu; Yang, Hyuna; Yang, Eric; Yassa, Michael; Yavorsky, Christian; Ye, Byoung Seok; Yee, Laura; Yokoyama, Jennifer; Yokoyama, Takao; Stewart, Stewart; Younhyun, Jung; Yu, C. Q.; Yu, Peng; Yuan, Ying; Yuen, Bob; Yushkevich, Paul; Zaborszky, Laszlo; Zagorodnov, Vitali; Zahodne, Laura; Zarei, Mojtaba; Zeimpekis, Konstantinos; Zeitzer, Jamie; Zelinski, Elizabeth; Zeskind, Benjamin; Zhan, Xhu; Zhang, Tianhao; Zhang, Zhiguo; Zhang, Xiaoqun; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Daoqiang; Zhang, Lijun; Zhang, Kate; Zhang, Linda; Zhang, Zhe; Zhang, Ping; Zhao, Peng; Zhou, Luping; Zhou, Yongxia; Zhou, Bin; Zhu, Xuyan; Zhu, Hongtu; Zhu, Linling; Zhu, Zangen; Ziegler, Gabriel; Zilka, Samantha; Zisserman, Andrew; Zito, Giancarlo; Zu, Zito; Zulfigar, Annam

    2012-01-01

    Hippocampal injury in the Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathological process is region-specific and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based measures of localized hippocampus (HP) atrophy are known to detect region-specific changes associated with clinical AD, but it is unclear whether these measures

  1. Localized hippocampus measures are associated with Alzheimer pathology and cognition independent of total hippocampal volume.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carmichael, O.; Xie, J.; Fletcher, E.; Singh, B.; DeCarli, C.; Olde Rikkert, M.; et al.,

    2012-01-01

    Hippocampal injury in the Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathological process is region-specific and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based measures of localized hippocampus (HP) atrophy are known to detect region-specific changes associated with clinical AD, but it is unclear whether these measures

  2. Hippocampus Contributes to the Maintenance but Not the Quality of Visual Information over Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, David E.; Duff, Melissa C.; Cohen, Neal J.; Tranel, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The hippocampus has recently been implicated in the brief representation of visual information, but its specific role is not well understood. We investigated this role using a paradigm that distinguishes quantity and quality of visual memory as described in a previous study. We found that amnesic patients with bilateral hippocampal damage (N = 5)…

  3. The 5-HT4 receptor levels in hippocampus correlates inversely with memory test performance in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haahr, Mette Ewers; Fisher, Patrick; Holst, Klaus; Madsen, Karine; Jensen, Christian Gaden; Marner, Lisbeth; Lehel, Szabols; Baaré, William; Knudsen, Gitte; Hasselbalch, Steen

    2013-11-01

    The cerebral serotonin (5-HT) system is involved in cognitive functions such as memory and learning and animal studies have repeatedly shown that stimulation of the 5-HT type 4 receptor (5-HT4 R) facilitates memory and learning and further that the 5-HT4 R modulates cellular memory processes in hippocampus. However, any associations between memory functions and the expression of the 5-HT4 R in the human hippocampus have not been investigated. Using positron emission tomography with the tracer [(11) C]SB207145 and Reys Auditory Verbal Learning Test we aimed to examine the individual variation of the 5-HT4R binding in hippocampus in relation to memory acquisition and consolidation in healthy young volunteers. We found significant, negative associations between the immediate recall scores and left and right hippocampal BPND , (p = 0.009 and p = 0.010 respectively) and between the right hippocampal BPND and delayed recall (p = 0.014). These findings provide evidence that the 5-HT4 R is associated with memory functions in the human hippocampus and potentially pharmacological stimulation of the receptor may improve episodic memory. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. CHANGES IN PKC-GAMMA IMMUNOREACTIVITY IN MOUSE HIPPOCAMPUS INDUCED BY SPATIAL DISCRIMINATION-LEARNING

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERZEE, EA; COMPAAN, JC; DEBOER, M; LUITEN, PGM

    1992-01-01

    In the present study, we examined changes in immunoreactivity (ir) for the gamma-isoform of protein kinase C (PKCgamma) in mouse hippocampus in relation to spatial memory processes employing the monoclonal antibody 36G9 raised against purified PKCgamma. Learning and memory were assessed by

  5. Relative binding affinity of steroids for the corticosterone receptor system in rat hippocampus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Kloet, E R; Veldhuis, H D; Wagenaars, J L; Bergink, E W

    In cytosol of the hippocampus corticosterone displays highest affinity for the sites that remain available for binding in the presence of excess RU 26988, which is shown to be a "pure" glucocorticoid. A rather high affinity (greater than or equal to 25%) was found for 11 beta-hydroxyprogesterone,

  6. Aging-related alterations in the distribution of Ca2+-dependent PKC isoforms in rabbit hippocampus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Zee, EA; Palm, IF; O'Connor, M; Maizels, ET; Hunzicker-Dunn, M; Disterhoft, J; O’Connor, M.; Palm, L.F.

    2004-01-01

    The immunocytochemical and subcellular localization of the Ca2+-dependent protein kinase C (cPKC) isoforms (PKCalpha, beta1, beta2, and gamma) was examined in rabbit hippocampus of young (3 months of age; n = 11) and aging (36 months of age; n = 14) subjects. Detailed immunocytochemical analyses

  7. γIsoform-Selective Changes in PKC Immunoreactivity after Trace Eyeblink Conditioning in the Rabbit Hippocampus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee, E.A. van der; Kronforst-Collins, M.A.; Maizels, E.T.; Hunzicker-Dunn, M.; Disterhoft, J.F.

    1997-01-01

    An immunocytochemical examination of the rabbit hippocampus was done to determine which of the Ca2+-dependent protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms (PKCα, -βI, -βII, or -γ) are involved in associative learning. The hippocampally dependent trace eyeblink conditioning task was used for behavioral training,

  8. Age-Dependent Changes in the Immunoreactivity for Neurofilaments in Rabbit Hippocampus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee, E.A. van der; Naber, P.A.; Disterhoft, J.F.

    1997-01-01

    The distribution of the three subunits of neurofilaments was examined in the hippocampus of young adult rabbits (three months of age), employing a panel of six monoclonal antibodies. Thereafter, age-dependent and subunit-selective changes in neurofilament immunoreactivity in the ageing rabbit

  9. CHRONIC DEVELOPMENTAL LEAD EXPOSURE REDUCES NEUROGENESIS IN ADULT RAT HIPPOCAMPUS BUT DOES NOT IMPAIR SPATIAL LEARNING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    It has long been heralded that the mature brain does not generate new neurons, it only loses them as a function of injury, disease and age. An exciting recent finding in neuroscience has been that the dentate granule cell layer of the hippocampus has the distinctive property of ...

  10. Diazoxide enhances excitotoxicity-induced neurogenesis and attenuates neurodegeneration in the rat non-neurogenic hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Moreno, M; Batlle, M; Ortega, F J; Gimeno-Bayón, J; Andrade, C; Mahy, N; Rodríguez, M J

    2016-10-01

    Diazoxide, a well-known mitochondrial KATP channel opener with neuroprotective effects, has been proposed for the effective and safe treatment of neuroinflammation. To test whether diazoxide affects the neurogenesis associated with excitotoxicity in brain injury, we induced lesions by injecting excitotoxic N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) into the rat hippocampus and analyzed the effects of a daily oral administration of diazoxide on the induced lesion. Specific glial and neuronal staining showed that NMDA elicited a strong glial reaction associated with progressive neuronal loss in the whole hippocampal formation. Doublecortin immunohistochemistry and bromo-deoxyuridine (BrdU)-NeuN double immunohistochemistry revealed that NMDA also induced cell proliferation and neurogenesis in the lesioned non-neurogenic hippocampus. Furthermore, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-positive cells in the injured hippocampus expressed transcription factor Sp8 indicating that the excitotoxic lesion elicited the migration of progenitors from the subventricular zone and/or the reprograming of reactive astrocytes. Diazoxide treatment attenuated the NMDA-induced hippocampal injury in rats, as demonstrated by decreases in the size of the lesion, neuronal loss and microglial reaction. Diazoxide also increased the number of BrdU/NeuN double-stained cells and elevated the number of Sp8-positive cells in the lesioned hippocampus. These results indicate a role for KATP channel activation in regulating excitotoxicity-induced neurogenesis in brain injury. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Differential Effects of Cannabinoid Receptor Agonist on Social Discrimination and Contextual Fear in Amygdala and Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segev, Amir; Akirav, Irit

    2011-01-01

    We examined whether the cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN55,212-2 (WIN; 5 [mu]g/side) microinjected into the hippocampus or the amygdala would differentially affect memory processes in a neutral vs. an aversive task. In the aversive contextual fear task, WIN into the basolateral amygdala impaired fear acquisition/consolidation, but not retrieval.…

  12. Effect of 17β estradiol on hippocampus region of aging female rat brain: Ultrastructural study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi Jha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Estradiol has direct membrane-mediated effects on neurons and its effects are both neuroprotective and neurotrophic. This hormone modulates brain development and aging and affects neurochemical systems which are affected in age-related cognitive decline, AD and other neuropsychiatric disorders. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of 17β estradiol (E2 in hippocampus region of different age groups of rats. The changes in the hippocampus region of female rat brain of different age groups with and without E2 treatment were observed by transmission electron microscopy. Age dependent changes in myelin sheath, axon and cytoplasm membrane were observed with aging in control group rat brain but the E2 treated rats showed significantly stable myelin sheath, myelin axon and cytoplasm structure. Our results showed that E2 treatment significantly effects hippocampus brain region of aging rats. These analyses revealed that fundamental age-related changes in brain and estrogen have important implications when estrogen levels and hippocampus dependent functions decline.

  13. Developmental trajectories of amygdala and hippocampus from infancy to early adulthood in healthy individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiko Uematsu

    Full Text Available Knowledge of amygdalar and hippocampal development as they pertain to sex differences and laterality would help to understand not only brain development but also the relationship between brain volume and brain functions. However, few studies investigated development of these two regions, especially during infancy. The purpose of this study was to examine typical volumetric trajectories of amygdala and hippocampus from infancy to early adulthood by predicting sexual dimorphism and laterality. We performed a cross-sectional morphometric MRI study of amygdalar and hippocampal growth from 1 month to 25 years old, using 109 healthy individuals. The findings indicated significant non-linear age-related volume changes, especially during the first few years of life, in both the amygdala and hippocampus regardless of sex. The peak ages of amygdalar and hippocampal volumes came at the timing of preadolescence (9-11 years old. The female amygdala reached its peak age about one year and a half earlier than the male amygdala did. In addition, its rate of growth change decreased earlier in the females. Furthermore, both females and males displayed rightward laterality in the hippocampus, but only the males in the amygdala. The robust growth of the amygdala and hippocampus during infancy highlight the importance of this period for neural and functional development. The sex differences and laterality during development of these two regions suggest that sex-related factors such as sex hormones and functional laterality might affect brain development.

  14. Exposure of mouse to high gravitation forces induces long-term potentiation in the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Masamitsu; Tomizawa, Kazuhito; Matsushita, Masayuki; Matsui, Hideki

    2004-06-01

    The central nervous system is highly plastic and has been shown to undergo both transient and chronic adaptive changes in response to environmental influences. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of hypergravic field on long-term potentiation (LTP) in the mouse hippocampus. Exposure of mice to 4G fields for 48 h had no effect on input-output coupling during extracellular stimulation of Schaffer collaterals and paired pulse facilitation, suggesting that the hypergravic exposure had no detrimental effect on basal neurotransmission in the hippocampus. However, the exposure to 4G fields for 48 h significantly induced LTP compared with the control mouse hippocampus. In contrast, no significant changes of late-phase LTP (L-LTP) were found in the hippocampi of mice exposed to the hypergravic field. Exposure of mice to 4G fields for 48 h enhanced AMPA receptor phosphorylation but not cyclic AMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation. These results suggest that exposure to hyperdynamic fields influences the synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus.

  15. Tuning synaptic transmission in the hippocampus by stress: The CRH system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuncai eChen

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available To enhance survival, an organism needs to remember--and learn from--threatening or stressful events. This fact necessitates the presence of mechanisms by which stress can influence synaptic transmission in brain regions, such as hippocampus, that subserve learning and memory. A major focus of this series of monographs is on the role and actions of adrenal-derived hormones, corticosteroids, and of brain-derived neurotransmitters, on synaptic function in the stressed hippocampus. Here we focus on the contribution of hippocampus-intrinsic, stress-activated CRH-CRH receptor signaling to the function and structure of hippocampal synapses. CRH is expressed in interneurons of adult hippocampus, and is released from axon terminals during stress. The peptide exerts time- and dose-dependent effects on learning and memory via modulation of synaptic function and plasticity. Whereas physiological levels of CRH, acting over seconds to minutes, augment memory processes, exposure to presumed severe-stress levels of the peptide results in spine retraction and loss of synapses over more protracted time-frames. Loss of dendritic spines (and hence of synapses takes place through actin cytoskeleton collapse downstream of CRHR1 receptors that reside within excitatory synapses on spine heads. Chronic exposure to stress levels of CRH may promote dying-back (atrophy of spine-carrying dendrites. Thus, the acute effects of CRH may contribute to stress-induced adaptive mechanisms, whereas chronic or excessive exposure to the peptide may promote learning problems and premature cognitive decline.

  16. Functional segmentation of the hippocampus in the healthy human brain and in Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zarei, M.; Beckmann, Christian; Binnewijzend, M.A.; Schoonheim, M.M.; Oghabian, M.A.; Sanz-Arigita, E.J.; Scheltens, P.; Matthews, P.M.; Barkhof, F.

    2013-01-01

    In this study we segment the hippocampus according to functional connectivity assessed from resting state functional magnetic resonance images in healthy subjects and in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). We recorded the resting FMRI signal from 16 patients and 22 controls. We used seed-based

  17. Functional segmentation of the hippocampus in the healthy human brain and in Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zarei, M.; Beckmann, C.F.; Binnewijzend, M.A.A.; Schoonheim, M.M.; Oghabian, M.A.; Sanz-Arigita, E.J.; Scheltens, P.; Matthews, P.M.; Barkhof, F.

    2013-01-01

    In this study we segment the hippocampus according to functional connectivity assessed from resting state functional magnetic resonance images in healthy subjects and in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD).We recorded the resting FMRI signal from 16 patients and 22 controls. We used seed-based

  18. Level Set Based Hippocampus Segmentation in MR Images with Improved Initialization Using Region Growing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoliang Jiang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The hippocampus has been known as one of the most important structures referred to as Alzheimer’s disease and other neurological disorders. However, segmentation of the hippocampus from MR images is still a challenging task due to its small size, complex shape, low contrast, and discontinuous boundaries. For the accurate and efficient detection of the hippocampus, a new image segmentation method based on adaptive region growing and level set algorithm is proposed. Firstly, adaptive region growing and morphological operations are performed in the target regions and its output is used for the initial contour of level set evolution method. Then, an improved edge-based level set method utilizing global Gaussian distributions with different means and variances is developed to implement the accurate segmentation. Finally, gradient descent method is adopted to get the minimization of the energy equation. As proved by experiment results, the proposed method can ideally extract the contours of the hippocampus that are very close to manual segmentation drawn by specialists.

  19. Disruption of the Perineuronal Net in the Hippocampus or Medial Prefrontal Cortex Impairs Fear Conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hylin, Michael J.; Orsi, Sara A.; Moore, Anthony N.; Dash, Pramod K.

    2013-01-01

    The perineuronal net (PNN) surrounds neurons in the central nervous system and is thought to regulate developmental plasticity. A few studies have shown an involvement of the PNN in hippocampal plasticity and memory storage in adult animals. In addition to the hippocampus, plasticity in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) has been demonstrated to…

  20. Hippocampus and Medial Prefrontal Cortex Contributions to Trace and Contextual Fear Memory Expression over Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeman, Christopher L.; Bauer, Philip S.; Pierson, Jamie L.; Quinn, Jennifer J.

    2013-01-01

    Previous work has shown that damage to the dorsal hippocampus (DH) occurring at recent, but not remote, timepoints following acquisition produces a deficit in trace conditioned fear memory expression. The opposite pattern has been observed with lesions to the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). The present studies address: (1) whether these lesion…

  1. Enriched environment induces higher CNPase positive cells in aged rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuan-Yu; Shi, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Lei; Wu, Hong; Chao, Feng-Lei; Huang, Chun-Xia; Gao, Yuan; Qiu, Xuan; Chen, Lin; Lu, Wei; Tang, Yong

    2013-10-25

    It had been reported that enriched environment was beneficial for the brain cognition and for the neurons and synapses in hippocampus. Previous study reported that the oligodendrocyte density in hippocampus was increased when the rats were reared in the enriched environment from weaning to adulthood. However, biological conclusions based on density were difficult to interpret because the changes in density could be due to an alteration of total quantity and/or an alteration in the reference volume. In the present study, we used unbiased stereological methods to investigate the effect of enriched environment on the total number of 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNPase) positive cells in CA1 and dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus in aged rats. Our results indicated that there was significant difference in the total numbers of CNPase positive cells in both CA1 and DG between enriched environment group and standard environment group. The present study provided the first evidence for the protective effects of enriched environment on the CNPase positive cells in aged hippocampus. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Interaction between Thalamus and Hippocampus in Termination of Amygdala-Kindled Seizures in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The thalamus and hippocampus have been found both involved in the initiation, propagation, and termination of temporal lobe epilepsy. However, the interaction of these regions during seizures is not clear. The present study is to explore whether some regular patterns exist in their interaction during the termination of seizures. Multichannel in vivo recording techniques were used to record the neural activities from the cornu ammonis 1 (CA1 of hippocampus and mediodorsal thalamus (MDT in mice. The mice were kindled by electrically stimulating basolateral amygdala neurons, and Racine’s rank standard was employed to classify the stage of behavioral responses (stage 1~5. The coupling index and directionality index were used to investigate the synchronization and information flow direction between CA1 and MDT. Two main results were found in this study. (1 High levels of synchronization between the thalamus and hippocampus were observed before the termination of seizures at stage 4~5 but after the termination of seizures at stage 1~2. (2 In the end of seizures at stage 4~5, the information tended to flow from MDT to CA1. Those results indicate that the synchronization and information flow direction between the thalamus and the hippocampus may participate in the termination of seizures.

  3. The influence of interleukin-1beta on gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase activity in rat hippocampus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaiser, M.; Mareš, Vladislav; Šťastný, František; Bubeníková-Valešová, V.; Lisá, Věra; Suchomel, P.; Balcar, V. J.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 4 (2006), s. 461-465 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NF7626 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : interleukin-1beta * gamma- glutamyltranspeptidase * hippocampus Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.093, year: 2006

  4. Is the Hippocampus Necessary for Visual and Verbal Binding in Working Memory?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baddeley, Alan; Allen, Richard; Vargha-Khadem, Faraneh

    2010-01-01

    A series of experiments test the recent claim that the hippocampus is necessary for the binding of features in working memory. Some potential limitations of studies underlying this claim are discussed, and an attempt is made to further test the hypothesis by studying a case of developmental amnesia whose extensively investigated pathology appears…

  5. Astrocyte fatty acid binding protein-7 is a marker for neurogenic niches in the rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, John K; Heinbockel, Thomas; Gondré-Lewis, Marjorie C

    2013-12-01

    Recent research has determined that newborn neurons in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus of the macaque are frequently adjacent to astrocytes immunoreactive for fatty acid binding protein-7 (FABP7). To investigate if a similar relationship between FABP7-positive (FABP7+) astrocytes and proliferating cells exists in the rodent brain, sections of brains from juvenile rats were stained by immunohistochemistry to demonstrate newborn cells (antibody to Ki67 protein) and FABP7+ astrocytes. In rat brains, FABP7+ astrocytes were particularly abundant in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus and were frequently close to dividing cells immunoreactive for Ki67 protein. FABP7+ astrocytes were also present in the olfactory bulbs, arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus, and in the dorsal medulla subjacent to the area postrema, sites where more modest numbers of newborn neurons can also be found. These data suggest that regional accumulations of FABP7+ astrocytes may represent reservoirs of cells having the potential for neurogenesis. Because FABP7+ astrocytes are particularly abundant in the hippocampus, and since the gene for FABP7 has been linked to Alzheimer's disease, age-related changes in FABP7+ astrocytes (mitochondrial degeneration) may be relevant to age-associated disorders of the hippocampus. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Contributions of the hippocampus and entorhinal cortex to rapid visuomotor learning in rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tianming; Bavley, Rachel L; Fomalont, Kevin; Blomstrom, Kevin J; Mitz, Andrew R; Turchi, Janita; Rudebeck, Peter H; Murray, Elisabeth A

    2014-09-01

    The hippocampus and adjacent structures in the medial temporal lobe are essential for establishing new associative memories. Despite this knowledge, it is not known whether the hippocampus proper is essential for establishing such memories, nor is it known whether adjacent regions like the entorhinal cortex might contribute. To test the contributions of these regions to the formation of new associative memories, we trained rhesus monkeys to rapidly acquire arbitrary visuomotor associations, i.e., associations between visual stimuli and spatially directed actions. We then assessed the effects of reversible inactivations of either the hippocampus (Experiment 1) or entorhinal cortex (Experiment 2) on the within-session rate of learning. For comparison, we also evaluated the effects of the inactivations on performance of problems of the same type that had been well learned prior to any inactivations. We found that inactivation of the entorhinal cortex but not hippocampus produced impairments in acquiring novel arbitrary associations. The impairment did not extend to the familiar, previously established associations. These data indicate that the entorhinal cortex is causally involved in establishing new associations, as opposed to retrieving previously learned associations. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  7. Interaction between the human hippocampus and the caudate nucleus during route recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voermans, Nicol C; Petersson, Karl Magnus; Daudey, Leonie; Weber, Bernd; Van Spaendonck, Karel P; Kremer, H P H; Fernández, Guillén

    2004-01-01

    Navigation through familiar environments can rely upon distinct neural representations that are related to different memory systems with either the hippocampus or the caudate nucleus at their core. However, it is a fundamental question whether and how these systems interact during route recognition.

  8. Electroconvulsive stimulations prevent stress-induced morphological changes in the hippocampus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hageman, I; Nielsen, M; Wörtwein, Gitta

    2008-01-01

    pathophysiological events contribute to the shrinkage phenomenon. Animal studies have shown that various stress paradigms can induce dendritic retraction in the CA3 pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus. Since electroconvulsive treatment is the most effective treatment in humans with major depression, we investigated...

  9. Coexistence of Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors and Somatostatin in Nonpyramidal Neurons of the Rat Dorsal Hippocampus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee, E.A. van der; Benoit, R.; Strosberg, A.D.; Luiten, P.G.M.

    This study describes the colocalization of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) and the neuropeptide somatostatin (SOM) in nonpyramidal neurons of the rat dorsal hippocampus. SOM and mAChRs were identified by immunocytochemistry employing antibody S309 and M35, respectively. Half of the

  10. Glycine N-methyltransferase expression in the hippocampus and its role in neurogenesis and cognitive performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, Manuel; Rabaneda, Luis G; Murillo-Carretero, Maribel; Ortega-Martínez, Sylvia; Martínez-Chantar, María L; Woodhoo, Ashwin; Luka, Zigmund; Wagner, Conrad; Lu, Shelly C; Mato, José M; Micó, Juan A; Castro, Carmen

    2014-07-01

    The hippocampus is a brain area characterized by its high plasticity, observed at all levels of organization: molecular, synaptic, and cellular, the latter referring to the capacity of neural precursors within the hippocampus to give rise to new neurons throughout life. Recent findings suggest that promoter methylation is a plastic process subjected to regulation, and this plasticity seems to be particularly important for hippocampal neurogenesis. We have detected the enzyme GNMT (a liver metabolic enzyme) in the hippocampus. GNMT regulates intracellular levels of SAMe, which is a universal methyl donor implied in almost all methylation reactions and, thus, of prime importance for DNA methylation. In addition, we show that deficiency of this enzyme in mice (Gnmt-/-) results in high SAMe levels within the hippocampus, reduced neurogenic capacity, and spatial learning and memory impairment. In vitro, SAMe inhibited neural precursor cell division in a concentration-dependent manner, but only when proliferation signals were triggered by bFGF. Indeed, SAMe inhibited the bFGF-stimulated MAP kinase signaling cascade, resulting in decreased cyclin E expression. These results suggest that alterations in the concentration of SAMe impair neurogenesis and contribute to cognitive decline. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. The role of the hippocampus in passive and active spatial learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosaki, Yutaka; Lin, Tzu-Ching Esther; Horne, Murray R; Pearce, John M; Gilroy, Kerry E

    2014-12-01

    Rats with lesions of the hippocampus or sham lesions were required in four experiments to escape from a square swimming pool by finding a submerged platform. Experiments 1 and 2 commenced with passive training in which rats were repeatedly placed on the platform in one corner-the correct corner-of a pool with distinctive walls. A test trial then revealed a strong preference for the correct corner in the sham but not the hippocampal group. Subsequent active training of being required to swim to the platform resulted in both groups acquiring a preference for the correct corner in the two experiments. In Experiments 3 and 4, rats were required to solve a discrimination between different panels pasted to the walls of the pool, by swimming to the middle of a correct panel. Hippocampal lesions prevented a discrimination being formed between panels of different lengths (Experiment 3), but not between panels showing lines of different orientations (Experiment 4); rats with sham lesions mastered both problems. It is suggested that an intact hippocampus is necessary for the formation of stimulus-goal associations that permit successful passive spatial leaning. It is further suggested that an intact hippocampus is not necessary for the formation of stimulus-response associations, except when they involve information about length or distance. © 2014 The Authors. Hippocampus Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Corticosterone binding capacity increases in contralateral hippocampus after partial unilateral hippocampectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nyakas, C; de Kloet, E R; Veldhuis, H D; Bohus, B

    1981-01-01

    After unilateral dorsal hippocampectomy the binding of [3H]corticosterone to cytosol receptors in contralateral hippocampus was measured. For estimation of binding capacity the adrenals were removed bilaterally 24 h prior to sacrifice. The apparent maximal binding capacity (Bmax) for corticosterone

  13. REDUCTION OF ADENOSINE-A1-RECEPTORS IN THE PERFORANT PATHWAY TERMINAL ZONE IN ALZHEIMER HIPPOCAMPUS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    JAARSMA, D; SEBENS, JB; KORF, J

    1991-01-01

    The cells of origin of the perforant pathway are destroyed in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In rat the adenosine A1-receptors are specifically localized on the perforant path terminals in the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus. In the present study the density of A1-receptors in the hippocampus of

  14. Evaluation of antioxidant activities in captive-bred cultured yellow seahorse, Hippocampus kuda (Bleeker, 1852).

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sanaye, S.V.; Pise, N.M.; Pawar, A.P.; Parab, P.P.; Sreepada, R.A.; Pawar, H.B.; Revankar, A.D.

    Aquaculture Laboratory, National Institute of Oceanography (NIO), Council of Scientific & Industrial Research (CSIR), Dona Paula, Goa─403 004 (India) __________________________________________________________________________ Abstract Globally, seahorses... (Chinese and Taiwanese) with incomplete methodology thus preventing the wider application of the obtained results. The yellow seahorse, Hippocampus kuda (Bleeker, 1852) is one of the heavily traded in many Southeast Asian countries mostly for TCM (Job et...

  15. Kindling-Induced Changes in Plasticity of the Rat Amygdala and Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Manja; Siegmund, Herbert; Pape, Hans-Christian; Albrecht, Doris

    2005-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is often accompanied by interictal behavioral abnormalities, such as fear and memory impairment. To identify possible underlying substrates, we analyzed long-term synaptic plasticity in two relevant brain regions, the lateral amygdala (LA) and the CA1 region of the hippocampus, in the kindling model of epilepsy. Wistar…

  16. [Possible mechanisms for orexin effects on the functioning of the hippocampus and spatial learning (analytical review)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sil'kis, I G

    2012-01-01

    We analyzed possible mechanisms for the influence of the "wakening hormone" orexin on spatial learning acting via changes in the functioning of the hippocampus and connected structures. The literature data point out that, firstly, orexin can directly potentiate excitation of neurons in different hippocampal areas by acting on Gq/11-protein-coupled postsynaptic OX1 and OX2 receptors. Due to facilitation of induction of the long-term potentiation of excitatory transmission at each stage of trisynaptic pathway through the hippocampus, orexin can promote transduction of information through this structure and formation of neural representations of object-place associations. Secondly, orexin can increase the release of acetylcholine, GABA and glutamate in the hippocampus by enhancing activity of neurons in the medial septum that have OX1 and OX2 receptors. This could lead to changes in intensity and frequency of the hippocampal theta rhythm. Thirdly, orexin can influence the functioning of reinforcing networks that include neurons of the hippocampus, prefrontal cortex, amygdala, ventral striatum, and ventral tegmental area by direct modulation of their activity through OX receptors. By enhancing the activity of dopaminergic neurons and increasing dopamine release, orexin can improve the functioning of reinforcing networks and facilitate spatial learning.

  17. Association between Mastication, the Hippocampus, and the HPA Axis: A Comprehensive Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuma, Kagaku; Zhou, Qian; Niwa, Masami; Kubo, Kin-ya

    2017-01-01

    Mastication is mainly involved in food intake and nutrient digestion with the aid of teeth. Mastication is also important for preserving and promoting general health, including hippocampus-dependent cognition. Both animal and human studies indicate that mastication influences hippocampal functions through the end product of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, glucocorticoid (GC). Epidemiologic studies suggest that masticatory dysfunction in aged individuals, such as that resulting from tooth loss and periodontitis, acting as a source of chronic stress, activates the HPA axis, leading to increases in circulating GCs and eventually inducing various physical and psychological diseases, such as cognitive impairment, cardiovascular disorders, and osteoporosis. Recent studies demonstrated that masticatory stimulation or chewing during stressful conditions suppresses the hyperactivity of the HPA axis via GCs and GC receptors within the hippocampus, and ameliorates chronic stress-induced hippocampus-dependent cognitive deficits. Here, we provide a comprehensive overview of current research regarding the association between mastication, the hippocampus, and HPA axis activity. We also discuss several potential molecular mechanisms involved in the interactions between mastication, hippocampal function, and HPA axis activity. PMID:28771175

  18. Vortioxetine disinhibits pyramidal cell function and enhances synaptic plasticity in the rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Elena; Zhang, Hong; Leiser, Steven C; Xiao, Yixin; Lu, Dunguo; Yang, Charles R; Plath, Niels; Sanchez, Connie

    2014-10-01

    Vortioxetine, a novel antidepressant with multimodal action, is a serotonin (5-HT)3, 5-HT7 and 5-HT1D receptor antagonist, a 5-HT1B receptor partial agonist, a 5-HT1A receptor agonist and a 5-HT transporter (SERT) inhibitor. Vortioxetine has been shown to improve cognitive performance in several preclinical rat models and in patients with major depressive disorder. Here we investigated the mechanistic basis for these effects by studying the effect of vortioxetine on synaptic transmission, long-term potentiation (LTP), a cellular correlate of learning and memory, and theta oscillations in the rat hippocampus and frontal cortex. Vortioxetine was found to prevent the 5-HT-induced increase in inhibitory post-synaptic potentials recorded from CA1 pyramidal cells, most likely by 5-HT3 receptor antagonism. Vortioxetine also enhanced LTP in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. Finally, vortioxetine increased fronto-cortical theta power during active wake in whole animal electroencephalographic recordings. In comparison, the selective SERT inhibitor escitalopram showed no effect on any of these measures. Taken together, our results indicate that vortioxetine can increase pyramidal cell output, which leads to enhanced synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus. Given the central role of the hippocampus in cognition, these findings may provide a cellular correlate to the observed preclinical and clinical cognition-enhancing effects of vortioxetine. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. Dynamics of evoked local field potentials in the hippocampus of epileptic rats with spontaneous seizures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Queiroz, C.M.; Gorter, J.A.; Lopes da Silva, F.H.; Wadman, W.J.

    2009-01-01

    A change in neuronal network excitability within the hippocampus is one of the hallmarks of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). In the dentate gyrus (DG), however, neuronal loss and mossy fiber sprouting are associated with enhanced inhibition rather than progressive hyperexcitability. The aim of this

  20. Complement C1q-C3-associated synaptic changes in multiple sclerosis hippocampus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michailidou, Iliana; Willems, Janske G. P.; Kooi, Evert-Jan; van Eden, Corbert; Gold, Stefan M.; Geurts, Jeroen J. G.; Baas, Frank; Huitinga, Inge; Ramaglia, Valeria

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, leading to memory impairment in up to 65% of patients. Memory dysfunction in MS has been associated with loss of synapses in the hippocampus, but its molecular basis is unknown. Accumulating evidence suggests that

  1. Complement C1q-C3-associated synaptic changes in multiple sclerosis hippocampus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michailidou, Iliana; Willems, Janske G P; Kooi, Evert-Jan; van Eden, Corbert; Gold, Stefan M; Geurts, Jeroen J G; Baas, Frank; Huitinga, I.; Ramaglia, Valeria

    OBJECTIVE: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, leading to memory impairment in up to 65% of patients. Memory dysfunction in MS has been associated with loss of synapses in the hippocampus, but its molecular basis is unknown. Accumulating evidence

  2. Complement C1q-C3-associated synaptic changes in multiple sclerosis hippocampus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michailidou, I.; Willems, J.G.P.; Kooi, E.J.; van Eden, C.; Gold, S.M.; Geurts, J.J.G.; Baas, F.; Huitinga, I.; Ramaglia, V.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, leading to memory impairment in up to 65% of patients. Memory dysfunction in MS has been associated with loss of synapses in the hippocampus, but its molecular basis is unknown. Accumulating evidence suggests

  3. Dissociable roles for the hippocampus and the amygdala in human cued versus context fear conditioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marschner, A.; Kalish, R.; Vervliet, B.; Vansteenwegen, D.; Büchel, C.

    2008-01-01

    Lesion studies in animals have identified a critical role of the hippocampus in context fear conditioning. To extend these findings to human volunteers, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate neural responses associated with context fear conditioning in humans. Our novel

  4. Genome-wide detection and analysis of hippocampus core promoters using DeepCAGE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valen, Eivind; Pascarella, Giovanni; Chalk, Alistair

    2009-01-01

    in a given tissue. Here, we present a new method for high-throughput sequencing of 5' cDNA tags-DeepCAGE: merging the Cap Analysis of Gene Expression method with ultra-high-throughput sequence technology. We apply DeepCAGE to characterize 1.4 million sequenced TSS from mouse hippocampus and reveal a wealth...

  5. Lipoic acid effects on glutamate and taurine concentrations in rat hippocampus after pilocarpine-induced seizures

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    P S Santos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pilocarpine-induced seizures can be mediated by increases in oxidative stress and by cerebral amino acid changes. The present research suggests that antioxidant compounds may afford some level of neuroprotection against the neurotoxicity of seizures in cellular level. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the lipoic acid (LA effects in glutamate and taurine contents in rat hippocampus after pilocarpine-induced seizures. Wistar rats were treated intraperitoneally (i.p. with 0.9% saline (Control, pilocarpine (400 mg/kg, Pilocarpine, LA (10 mg/kg, LA, and the association of LA (10 mg/kg plus pilocarpine (400 mg/kg, that was injected 30 min before of administration of LA (LA plus pilocarpine. Animals were observed during 24 h. The amino acid concentrations were measured using high-performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC. In pilocarpine group, it was observed a significant increase in glutamate content (37% and a decrease in taurine level (18% in rat hippocampus, when compared to control group. Antioxidant pretreatment significantly reduced the glutamate level (28% and augmented taurine content (32% in rat hippocampus, when compared to pilocarpine group. Our findings strongly support amino acid changes in hippocampus during seizures induced by pilocarpine, and suggest that glutamate-induced brain damage plays a crucial role in pathogenic consequences of seizures, and imply that strong protective effect could be achieved using lipoic acid through the release or decrease in metabolization rate of taurine amino acid during seizures.

  6. Association between Mastication, the Hippocampus, and the HPA Axis: A Comprehensive Review.

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    Azuma, Kagaku; Zhou, Qian; Niwa, Masami; Kubo, Kin-Ya

    2017-08-03

    Mastication is mainly involved in food intake and nutrient digestion with the aid of teeth. Mastication is also important for preserving and promoting general health, including hippocampus-dependent cognition. Both animal and human studies indicate that mastication influences hippocampal functions through the end product of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, glucocorticoid (GC). Epidemiologic studies suggest that masticatory dysfunction in aged individuals, such as that resulting from tooth loss and periodontitis, acting as a source of chronic stress, activates the HPA axis, leading to increases in circulating GCs and eventually inducing various physical and psychological diseases, such as cognitive impairment, cardiovascular disorders, and osteoporosis. Recent studies demonstrated that masticatory stimulation or chewing during stressful conditions suppresses the hyperactivity of the HPA axis via GCs and GC receptors within the hippocampus, and ameliorates chronic stress-induced hippocampus-dependent cognitive deficits. Here, we provide a comprehensive overview of current research regarding the association between mastication, the hippocampus, and HPA axis activity. We also discuss several potential molecular mechanisms involved in the interactions between mastication, hippocampal function, and HPA axis activity.

  7. Advances in high-resolution imaging and computational unfolding of the human hippocampus.

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    Ekstrom, Arne D; Bazih, Adam J; Suthana, Nanthia A; Al-Hakim, Ramsey; Ogura, Kenji; Zeineh, Michael; Burggren, Alison C; Bookheimer, Susan Y

    2009-08-01

    The hippocampus is often a difficult structure to visualize with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and functional MRI (fMRI) due to its convoluted nature and susceptibility to signal dropout. Improving our ability to pinpoint changes in neural activity using fMRI in this structure remains an important challenge. Current fMRI/MRI methods typically do not permit visualization of the hippocampus and surrounding cortex at a resolution less than 1 mm. We present here improvements to our previous methods for obtaining structural MR images of the hippocampus, which provided an in-plane resolution of 0.4 mm(2) mm and two-dimensional "flat" maps of the hippocampus with an interpolated isotropic resolution of 0.4 mm(3) (Engel, S.A., Glover, G.H., and Wandell, B.A., (1997). Retinotopic organization in human visual cortex and the spatial precision of functional MRI. Cereb. Cortex 7, 181-192.; Zeineh, M.M., Engel, S.A., and Bookheimer, S.Y., (2000). Application of cortical unfolding techniques to functional MRI of the human hippocampal region. NeuroImage 11, 668-683.). We present changes to existing structural imaging sequences that now augment the resolution of previous scans, permitting visualization of the anterior portion of CA1, parts of the dentate gyrus, and CA23. These imaging improvements are of relevance generally to the field of imaging because they permit higher overall resolution imaging of the hippocampus than previously possible (at 3 T). We also introduce a novel application of a computational interpolation method that improves our ability to capture the convoluted three-dimensional shape of the hippocampus. Furthermore, we have developed a quantitative method for obtaining group activation patterns based on producing averaged flat maps using vector field warping techniques, allowing localization of activations to specific hippocampal subregions across groups of subjects. Together, these methods provide a means to improve imaging of neural activity in the human

  8. Transgenic overexpression of 14-3-3 zeta protects hippocampus against endoplasmic reticulum stress and status epilepticus in vivo.

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    Gary P Brennan

    Full Text Available 14-3-3 proteins are ubiquitous molecular chaperones that are abundantly expressed in the brain where they regulate cell functions including metabolism, the cell cycle and apoptosis. Brain levels of several 14-3-3 isoforms are altered in diseases of the nervous system, including epilepsy. The 14-3-3 zeta (ζ isoform has been linked to endoplasmic reticulum (ER function in neurons, with reduced levels provoking ER stress and increasing vulnerability to excitotoxic injury. Here we report that transgenic overexpression of 14-3-3ζ in mice results in selective changes to the unfolded protein response pathway in the hippocampus, including down-regulation of glucose-regulated proteins 78 and 94, activating transcription factors 4 and 6, and Xbp1 splicing. No differences were found between wild-type mice and transgenic mice for levels of other 14-3-3 isoforms or various other 14-3-3 binding proteins. 14-3-3ζ overexpressing mice were potently protected against cell death caused by intracerebroventricular injection of the ER stressor tunicamycin. 14-3-3ζ overexpressing mice were also potently protected against neuronal death caused by prolonged seizures. These studies demonstrate that increased 14-3-3ζ levels protect against ER stress and seizure-damage despite down-regulation of the unfolded protein response. Delivery of 14-3-3ζ may protect against pathologic changes resulting from prolonged or repeated seizures or where injuries provoke ER stress.

  9. Synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus of a APP/PS1 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease is impaired in old but not young mice.

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    Simon Gengler

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Alzheimer disease (AD is a neurodegenerative disorder for which there is no cure. We have investigated synaptic plasticity in area CA1 in a novel AD mouse model (APPPS1-21 which expresses the Swedish mutation of APP and the L166P mutation of human PS-1. This model shows initial plaque formation at 2 months in the neocortex and 4 months in the hippocampus and displays beta-amyloid-associated pathologies and learning impairments. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We tested long-term potentiation (LTP and short term potentiation (paired-pulse facilitation, PPF of synaptic transmission in vivo in area CA1 of the hippocampus. There was no difference in LTP or PPF at 4-5 months of age in APPPS1-21 mice compared to littermate controls. At 6 months of age there was also no difference in LTP but APPPS1-21 mice showed slightly increased PPF (p<0.03. In 8 months old mice, LTP was greatly impaired in APPPS-21 animals (p<0.0001 while PPF was not changed. At 15 months of age, APPPS1-21 mice showed again impaired LTP compared to littermate controls (p<0.005, and PPF was also significantly reduced at 80 ms (p<0.005 and 160 ms (p<0.01 interstimulus interval. Immunohistological analysis showed only modest amyloid deposition in the hippocampus at 4 and 6 months with a robust increase up to 15 months of age. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that increased formation and aggregation of beta amyloid with aging is responsible for the impaired LTP with aging in this mouse model, while the transient increase of PPF at 6 months of age is caused by some other mechanism.

  10. Imaging of glial cell morphology, SOD1 distribution and elemental composition in the brainstem and hippocampus of the ALS hSOD1(G93A) rat.

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    Stamenković, Stefan; Dučić, Tanja; Stamenković, Vera; Kranz, Alexander; Andjus, Pavle R

    2017-08-15

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disorder affecting motor and cognitive domains of the CNS. Mutations in the Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) cause 20% of familial ALS and provoke formation of intracellular aggregates and copper and zinc unbinding, leading to glial activation and neurodegeneration. Therefore, we investigated glial cell morphology, intracellular SOD1 distribution, and elemental composition in the brainstem and hippocampus of the hSOD1(G93A) transgenic rat model of ALS. Immunostaining for astrocytes, microglia and SOD1 revealed glial proliferation and progressive tissue accumulation of SOD1 in both brain regions of ALS rats starting already at the presymptomatic stage. Glial cell morphology analysis in the brainstem of ALS rats revealed astrocyte activation occurring before disease symptoms onset, followed by activation of microglia. Hippocampal ALS astrocytes exhibited an identical reactive profile, while microglial morphology was unchanged. Additionally, ALS brainstem astrocytes demonstrated progressive SOD1 accumulation in the cell body and processes, while microglial SOD1 levels were reduced and its distribution limited to distal cell processes. In the hippocampus both glial cell types exhibited SOD1 accumulation in the cell body. X-ray fluorescence imaging revealed decreased P and increased Ca, Cl, K, Ni, Cu and Zn in the brainstem, and higher levels of Cl, Ni and Cu, but lower levels of Zn in the hippocampus of symptomatic ALS rats. These results bring new insights into the glial response during disease development and progression in motor as well as in non-motor CNS structures, and indicate disturbed tissue elemental homeostasis as a prominent hallmark of disease pathology. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Gene expression in human hippocampus from cocaine abusers identifies genes which regulate extracellular matrix remodeling.

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    Deborah C Mash

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The chronic effects of cocaine abuse on brain structure and function are blamed for the inability of most addicts to remain abstinent. Part of the difficulty in preventing relapse is the persisting memory of the intense euphoria or cocaine "rush". Most abused drugs and alcohol induce neuroplastic changes in brain pathways subserving emotion and cognition. Such changes may account for the consolidation and structural reconfiguration of synaptic connections with exposure to cocaine. Adaptive hippocampal plasticity could be related to specific patterns of gene expression with chronic cocaine abuse. Here, we compare gene expression profiles in the human hippocampus from cocaine addicts and age-matched drug-free control subjects. Cocaine abusers had 151 gene transcripts upregulated, while 91 gene transcripts were downregulated. Topping the list of cocaine-regulated transcripts was RECK in the human hippocampus (FC = 2.0; p<0.05. RECK is a membrane-anchored MMP inhibitor that is implicated in the coordinated regulation of extracellular matrix integrity and angiogenesis. In keeping with elevated RECK expression, active MMP9 protein levels were decreased in the hippocampus from cocaine abusers. Pathway analysis identified other genes regulated by cocaine that code for proteins involved in the remodeling of the cytomatrix and synaptic connections and the inhibition of blood vessel proliferation (PCDH8, LAMB1, ITGB6, CTGF and EphB4. The observed microarray phenotype in the human hippocampus identified RECK and other region-specific genes that may promote long-lasting structural changes with repeated cocaine abuse. Extracellular matrix remodeling in the hippocampus may be a persisting effect of chronic abuse that contributes to the compulsive and relapsing nature of cocaine addiction.

  12. Effects of a toxin isolated from Tityus bahiensis scorpion venom on the hippocampus of rats.

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    Ossanai, Luciene Toshietakeishi; Lourenço, Geane Antiques; Nencioni, Ana Leonor A; Lebrun, Ivo; Yamanouye, Norma; Dorce, Valquiria Abrão Coronado

    2012-09-17

    The objective of the present study was to determine the effects of a toxin from T. bahiensis scorpion venom on the hippocampus of rats. This toxin, called Tb V-4, was chosen since it shows remarkable convulsive activity. Male Wistar rats weighing 250g were used. The toxin (1.0μg/μl) was injected into the hippocampus. The animals were then submitted to electroencephalographic and behavioral examinations or to microdialysis to determine the levels of neurotransmitters. The location of the implanted guide cannulae and electrodes was checked histologically. The number of cells in the CA1, CA3 and CA4 areas of the hippocampus was determined by light microscopy. Changes in the concentration of cytosolic free calcium were evaluated by confocal microscopy. The toxin evoked behavioral alterations such as wet dog shakes, myoclonus, yawning and orofacial automatisms. Electroencephalographic recordings exhibited alterations such as isolated or grouped spikes and epileptic-like discharges. Injection of the toxin augmented glutamate concentration in the extracellular fluid in some animals. There was also a decrease in the number of pyramidal cells, mainly in the CA1 and CA4 areas for some rats. In some slices of the hippocampus, an increase in intracellular calcium mobilization was seen. The present results suggest that the Tb V-4 toxin may be responsible for the epileptic and behavioral effects observed with the crude venom. We suggest that the convulsive and degenerative effects induced by the toxin could be due to the enhanced release of excitatory amino acids involved in the most important pathways of the hippocampus. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Immununochemical markers of the amyloid cascade in the hippocampus in motor neuron diseases

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    Ulises Gomez-Pinedo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Several findings suggest that the amyloid precursor protein (APP and the amyloid cascade may play a role in motor neuron disease (MND.Objective: Considering that dementia is one of the most frequently non-motor symptoms in ALS and that hippocampus is one of the brain areas with greater presence of amyloid related changes in neurodegenerative diseases, our aim was to analyse the molecular markers of the amyloid cascade of APP in pathology studies of the hippocampus of autopsied patients with ALS and ALS-FTD.Methods: We included 9 patients with MND and 4 controls. Immunohistochemical studies and confocal microscopy were used to analyse the expression of APP, TDP-43, pho-TDP-43, Aβ, AICD peptide, Fe65 protein, and pho-TAU in the hippocampus of 7 patients with ALS, 2 patients with ALS-FTD, and 4 controls. These findings were correlated with clinical data.Results: Patients displayed increased expression of APP and Aβ peptide. The latter was correlated with cytoplasmic pho-TDP-43 expression. We also found decreased Fe65 expression. A parallel increase in AICD expression was not found. Patients showed increased expression of pho-TAU in the hippocampus. Findings were similar in patients with ALS and those with ALS-FTD, though more marked in the latter group.Conclusion: Post-mortem analyses showed that the amyloid cascade is activated in the hippocampus of patients with MND and correlated with cytoplasmic pho-TDP-43 expression. The number of intra- or extracellular aggregates of Aβ peptides was not significant.

  14. Orthogonal Wave Propagation of Epileptiform Activity in the Planar Mouse Hippocampus in vitro

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    Kibler, Andrew B; Durand, Dominique M

    2011-01-01

    Purpose In vitro brain preparations have been used extensively to study the generation and propagation of epileptiform activity. Transverse and longitudinal slices of the rodent hippocampus have revealed various patterns of propagation. Yet intact connections between the transverse and longitudinal pathways should generate orthogonal (both transverse and longitudinal) propagation of seizures involving the entire hippocampus. This study utilizes the planar unfolded mouse hippocampus preparation to reveal simultaneous orthogonal epileptiform propagation and to test a method of arresting propagation. Methods This study utilized an unfolded mouse hippocampus preparation. It was chosen due to its preservation of longitudinal neuronal processes which are thought to play an important role in epileptiform hyper-excitability. 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), micro-electrodes, and voltage sensitive dye imaging were employed to investigate tissue excitability. Key Findings In 50 μM 4-AP, stimulation of the stratum radiatum induced transverse activation of CA3 cells but also induced a longitudinal wave of activity propagating along the CA3 region at a speed of 0.09 m/s. Without stimulation, a wave originated at the temporal CA3 and propagated in a temporal–septal direction and could be suppressed with glutamatergic antagonists. Orthogonal propagation traveled longitudinally along the CA3 pathway, secondarily invading the CA1 region at a velocity of 0.22±0.024 m/s. Moreover, a local lesion restricted to the CA3 region could arrest wave propagation. Significance These results reveal a complex two-dimensional epileptiform wave propagation pattern in the hippocampus that is generated by a combination of synaptic transmission and axonal propagation in the CA3 recurrent network. Epileptiform propagation block via a transverse selective CA3 lesion suggests a potential surgical technique for the treatment of temporal lobe epilepsy. PMID:21668440

  15. Segmenting subregions of the human hippocampus on structural magnetic resonance image scans: An illustrated tutorial

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    Dalton, Marshall A.; Zeidman, Peter; Barry, Daniel N.; Williams, Elaine; Maguire, Eleanor A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The hippocampus plays a central role in cognition, and understanding the specific contributions of its subregions will likely be key to explaining its wide-ranging functions. However, delineating substructures within the human hippocampus in vivo from magnetic resonance image scans is fraught with difficulties. To our knowledge, the extant literature contains only brief descriptions of segmentation procedures used to delineate hippocampal subregions in magnetic resonance imaging/functional magnetic resonance imaging studies. Methods: Consequently, here we provide a clear, step-by-step and fully illustrated guide to segmenting hippocampal subregions along the entire length of the human hippocampus on 3T magnetic resonance images. Results: We give a detailed description of how to segment the hippocampus into the following six subregions: dentate gyrus/Cornu Ammonis 4, CA3/2, CA1, subiculum, pre/parasubiculum and the uncus. Importantly, this in-depth protocol incorporates the most recent cyto- and chemo-architectural evidence and includes a series of comprehensive figures which compare slices of histologically stained tissue with equivalent 3T images. Conclusion: As hippocampal subregion segmentation is an evolving field of research, we do not suggest this protocol is definitive or final. Rather, we present a fully explained and expedient method of manual segmentation which remains faithful to our current understanding of human hippocampal neuroanatomy. We hope that this ‘tutorial’-style guide, which can be followed by experts and non-experts alike, will be a practical resource for clinical and research scientists with an interest in the human hippocampus. PMID:28596993

  16. Estriol preserves synaptic transmission in the hippocampus during autoimmune demyelinating disease.

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    Ziehn, Marina O; Avedisian, Andrea A; Dervin, Shannon M; O'Dell, Thomas J; Voskuhl, Rhonda R

    2012-08-01

    Cognitive deficits occur in over half of multiple sclerosis patients, with hippocampal-dependent learning and memory commonly impaired. Data from in vivo MRI and post-mortem studies in MS indicate that the hippocampus is targeted. However, the relationship between structural pathology and dysfunction of the hippocampus in MS remains unclear. Hippocampal neuropathology also occurs in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the most commonly used animal model of MS. Although estrogen treatment of EAE has been shown to be anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective in the spinal cord, it is unknown if estrogen treatment may prevent hippocampal pathology and dysfunction. In the current study we examined excitatory synaptic transmission during EAE and focused on pathological changes in synaptic protein complexes known to orchestrate functional synaptic transmission in the hippocampus. We then determined if estriol, a candidate hormone treatment, was capable of preventing functional changes in synaptic transmission and corresponding hippocampal synaptic pathology. Electrophysiological studies revealed altered excitatory synaptic transmission and paired-pulse facilitation (PPF) during EAE. Neuropathological experiments demonstrated that there were decreased levels of pre- and post-synaptic proteins in the hippocampus, diffuse loss of myelin staining and atrophy of the pyramidal layers of hippocampal cornu ammonis 1 (CA1). Estriol treatment prevented decreases in excitatory synaptic transmission and lessened the effect of EAE on PPF. In addition, estriol treatment prevented several neuropathological alterations that occurred in the hippocampus during EAE. Cross-modality correlations revealed that deficits in excitatory synaptic transmission were significantly correlated with reductions in trans-synaptic protein binding partners known to modulate excitatory synaptic transmission. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing a functional correlate to hippocampal

  17. Microglial activation in the hippocampus of hypercholesterolemic rabbits occurs independent of increased amyloid production

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    Streit Wolfgang J

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rabbits maintained on high-cholesterol diets are known to show increased immunoreactivity for amyloid beta protein in cortex and hippocampus, an effect that is amplified by presence of copper in the drinking water. Hypercholesterolemic rabbits also develop sporadic neuroinflammatory changes. The purpose of this study was to survey microglial activation in rabbits fed cholesterol in the presence or absence of copper or other metal ions, such as zinc and aluminum. Methods Vibratome sections of the rabbit hippocampus and overlying cerebral cortex were examined for microglial activation using histochemistry with isolectin B4 from Griffonia simplicifolia. Animals were scored as showing either focal or diffuse microglial activation with or without presence of rod cells. Results Approximately one quarter of all rabbits fed high-cholesterol diets showed evidence of microglial activation, which was always present in the hippocampus and not in the cortex. Microglial activation was not correlated spatially with increased amyloid immunoreactivity or with neurodegenerative changes and was most pronounced in hypercholesterolemic animals whose drinking water had been supplemented with either copper or zinc. Controls maintained on normal chow were largely devoid of neuroinflammatory changes, but revealed minimal microglial activation in one case. Conclusion Because the increase in intraneuronal amyloid immunoreactivity that results from administration of cholesterol occurs in both cerebral cortex and hippocampus, we deduce that the microglial activation reported here, which is limited to the hippocampus, occurs independent of amyloid accumulation. Furthermore, since neuroinflammation occurred in the absence of detectable neurodegenerative changes, and was also not accompanied by increased astrogliosis, we conclude that microglial activation occurs because of metabolic or biochemical derangements that are influenced by dietary factors.

  18. Alzheimer's disease pathology in the neocortex and hippocampus of the western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla).

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    Perez, Sylvia E; Raghanti, Mary Ann; Hof, Patrick R; Kramer, Lynn; Ikonomovic, Milos D; Lacor, Pascale N; Erwin, Joseph M; Sherwood, Chet C; Mufson, Elliott J

    2013-12-15

    The two major histopathologic hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are amyloid beta protein (Aβ) plaques and neurofibrillary tangles (NFT). Aβ pathology is a common feature in the aged nonhuman primate brain, whereas NFT are found almost exclusively in humans. Few studies have examined AD-related pathology in great apes, which are the closest phylogenetic relatives of humans. In the present study, we examined Aβ and tau-like lesions in the neocortex and hippocampus of aged male and female western lowland gorillas using immunohistochemistry and histochemistry. Analysis revealed an age-related increase in Aβ-immunoreactive plaques and vasculature in the gorilla brain. Aβ plaques were more abundant in the neocortex and hippocampus of females, whereas Aβ-positive blood vessels were more widespread in male gorillas. Plaques were also Aβ40-, Aβ42-, and Aβ oligomer-immunoreactive, but only weakly thioflavine S- or 6-CN-PiB-positive in both sexes, indicative of the less fibrillar (diffuse) nature of Aβ plaques in gorillas. Although phosphorylated neurofilament immunostaining revealed a few dystrophic neurites and neurons, choline acetyltransferase-immunoreactive fibers were not dystrophic. Neurons stained for the tau marker Alz50 were found in the neocortex and hippocampus of gorillas at all ages. Occasional Alz50-, MC1-, and AT8-immunoreactive astrocyte and oligodendrocyte coiled bodies and neuritic clusters were seen in the neocortex and hippocampus of the oldest gorillas. This study demonstrates the spontaneous presence of both Aβ plaques and tau-like lesions in the neocortex and hippocampus in old male and female western lowland gorillas, placing this species at relevance in the context of AD research. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Endogenous ghrelin-O-acyltransferase (GOAT) acylates local ghrelin in the hippocampus.

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    Murtuza, Mohammad I; Isokawa, Masako

    2018-01-01

    Ghrelin is an appetite-stimulating peptide. Serine 3 on ghrelin must be acylated by octanoate via the enzyme ghrelin-O-acyltransferase (GOAT) for the peptide to bind and activate the cognate receptor, growth hormone secretagogue receptor type 1a (GHSR1a). Interest in GHSR1a increased dramatically when GHSR1a mRNA was demonstrated to be widespread in the brain, including the cortex and hippocampus, indicating that it has multifaceted functions beyond the regulation of metabolism. However, the source of octanoylated ghrelin for GHSR1a in the brain, outside of the hypothalamus, is not well understood. Here, we report the presence of GOAT and its ability to acylate non-octanoylated ghrelin in the hippocampus. GOAT immunoreactivity is aggregated at the base of the dentate granule cell layer in the rat and wild-type mouse. This immunoreactivity was not affected by the pharmacological inhibition of GHSR1a or the metabolic state-dependent fluctuation of systemic ghrelin levels. However, it was absent in the GHSR1a knockout mouse hippocampus, pointing the possibility that the expression of GHSR1a may be a prerequisite for the production of GOAT. Application of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-conjugated non-octanoylated ghrelin in live hippocampal slice culture (but not in fixed culture or in the presence of GOAT inhibitors) mimicked the binding profile of FITC-conjugated octanoylated ghrelin, suggesting that extracellularly applied non-octanoylated ghrelin was acylated by endogenous GOAT in the live hippocampus while GOAT being mobilized out of neurons. Our results will advance the understanding for the role of endogenous GOAT in the hippocampus and facilitate the search for the source of ghrelin that is intrinsic to the brain. © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  20. Combustion smoke-induced inflammation in the cerebellum and hippocampus of adult rats.

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    Zou, Y-Y; Kan, E M; Cao, Q; Lu, J; Ling, E-A

    2013-08-01

    The effect of combustion smoke inhalation on the respiratory system is widely reported but its effects on the central nervous system remain unclear. Here, we aimed to determine the effects of smoke inhalation on the cerebellum and hippocampus which are areas vulnerable to hypoxia injury. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to combustion smoke inhalation and sacrificed at 0.5, 3, 24 and 72 h after exposure. The cerebellum and hippocampus were subjected to Western analysis for VEGF, iNOS, eNOS, nNOS and AQP4 expression; ELISA analysis for cytokine and chemokine levels; and immunohistochemistry for GFAP/AQP4, RECA-1/RITC and TUNEL. Aminoguanidine (AG) was administered to determine the effects of iNOS after smoke inhalation. Both the cerebellum and hippocampus showed a significant increase in VEGF, iNOS, eNOS, nNOS and AQP4 expression with corresponding increases in inflammatory cytokines and chemokines and increased AQP4 expression and RITC permeability after smoke exposure. AG was able to decrease the expression of iNOS, followed by VEGF, eNOS, nNOS, RITC and AQP4 after smoke exposure. There was also a significant increase in TUNEL+ cells in the cerebellum and hippocampus which were not significantly reduced by AG. Beam walk test revealed immediate deficits after smoke inhalation which was attenuated with AG. The findings suggest that iNOS plays a major role in the central nervous system inflammatory pathophysiology after smoke inhalation exposure with concomitant increase in proinflammatory molecules, vascular permeability and oedema, for which the cerebellum appears to be more vulnerable to smoke exposure than the hippocampus. © 2012 The Authors. Neuropathology and Applied Neurobiology © 2012 British Neuropathological Society.

  1. Multivariate pattern analysis of the human medial temporal lobe revealed representationally categorical cortex and representationally agnostic hippocampus.

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    Huffman, Derek J; Stark, Craig E L

    2014-11-01

    Contemporary theories of the medial temporal lobe (MTL) suggest that there are functional differences between the MTL cortex and the hippocampus. High-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging and multivariate pattern analysis were utilized to study whether MTL subregions could classify categories of images, with the hypothesis that the hippocampus would be less representationally categorical than the MTL cortex. Results revealed significant classification accuracy for faces versus objects and faces versus scenes in MTL cortical regions-parahippocampal cortex (PHC) and perirhinal cortex (PRC)-with little evidence for category discrimination in the hippocampus. MTL cortical regions showed significantly greater classification accuracy than the hippocampus. The hippocampus showed significant classification accuracy for images compared to a nonmnemonic baseline task, suggesting that it responded to the images. Classification accuracy in a region of interest encompassing retrosplenial cortex (RSC) and the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) posterior to RSC, showed a similar pattern of results to PHC, supporting the hypothesis that these regions are functionally related. The results suggest that PHC, PRC, and RSC/PCC are representationally categorical and the hippocampus is more representationally agnostic, which is concordant with the hypothesis of the role of the hippocampus in pattern separation. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Involvement of pregnane xenobiotic receptor in mating-induced allopregnanolone formation in the midbrain and hippocampus and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the hippocampus among female rats.

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    Frye, C A; Koonce, C J; Walf, A A

    2014-09-01

    Given that the pregnane neurosteroid, 5α-pregnan-3α-ol-20-one (3α,5α-THP), is increased following behavioral challenges (e.g., mating), and that there is behavioral-induced biosynthesis of 3α,5α-THP in midbrain and mesocorticolimbic structures, 3α,5α-THP likely has a role in homeostasis and motivated reproduction and reproduction-related behaviors (e.g., affect, affiliation). The role of pregnane xenobiotic receptor (PXR), involved in cholesterol metabolism, for these effects is of continued interest. We hypothesized that there would be differences in brain levels of 3α,5α-THP following varied behavioral experiences, an effect abrogated by knockdown of PXR in the midbrain. Proestrous rats were infused with PXR antisense oligonucleotides (AS-ODNs) or vehicle to the ventral tegmental area before different behavioral manipulations and assessments. Endpoints were expression levels of PXR in the midbrain, 3α,5α-THP, and ovarian steroids (estradiol, progesterone, dihydroprogesterone) in the midbrain, striatum, hippocampus, hypothalamus, prefrontal cortex, and plasma. Across experiments, knocking down PXR reduced PXR expression and 3α,5α-THP levels in the midbrain and hippocampus. There were differences in terms of the behavioral manipulations, such that paced mating had the most robust effects to increase 3α,5α-THP levels and reduce open field exploration and social interaction. An additional question that was addressed is whether brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a downstream factor for regulating effects of behavioral-induced 3α,5α-THP biosynthesis. Rats infused with PXR AS-ODNs had lower levels of BDNF in the hippocampus. Thus, PXR may be a regulator of mating-induced 3α,5α-THP formation and behavioral changes and neural plasticity, such as BDNF.

  3. Propofol postconditioning attenuates hippocampus ischemia-reperfusion injury via modulating JAK2/STAT3 pathway in rats after autogenous orthotropic liver transplantation.

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    Jia, Lili; Wang, Fei; Gu, Xiangqian; Weng, Yiqi; Sheng, Mingwei; Wang, Gang; Li, Shipeng; Du, Hongyin; Yu, Wenli

    2017-02-15

    Liver transplantation has been a routine treatment for the end stage liver diseases. Severe changes in circulation system and internal environment may occur during transplant surgery and cause injury to many organs including brain. Specific mechanisms of brain injury associated with liver transplantation are not yet elucidated. Previous studies have shown that the JAK/STAT signal transduction pathways are involved in the development of the central nervous system, such as nerve cell proliferation, survival, differentiation, and it also have a role in the disease processes, including brain tumor, brain ischemia and other diseases of the central nervous system. In this study we investigate whether propofol plays an important role in protecting the hippocampus through JAK2/STAT3 pathway. Thirty-two healthy male Sprague-Dawley rats, were randomly divided into four groups (n=8). Sham operation group (group S), autogenous orthotropic liver transplantation group (group I), autogenous orthotropic liver transplantation+propofol treatment group (group P) and autogenous orthotropic liver transplantation+propofol+AG490 treatment group (group A). We evaluated histological damage, inflammation, oxidative stress and apoptosis in hippocampus using HE staining, light microscope, real-time PCR and western blot. The results showed that there was a significant damage of hippocampus in group I compared to the sham group as demonstrated by increased serum levels of S100β, NSE and the histological changes. However, an induction of propofol reduced the levels of MDA, TNFα, S100β, NSE and increased activity of SOD, IL-10, and attenuated the expression of JAK2 and STAT3, meanwhile. Consistently, pretreatment with JAK2/STAT3 pathway inhibitor AG490, decreased the levels of MDA, TNFα, S100β, NSE and increased activity of SOD, IL-10, and attenuated the expression of JAK2 and STAT3. These results reveal that autogenous orthotropic liver transplantation induces the activation of JAK2/STAT3

  4. Cerebral Oedema, Blood-Brain Barrier Breakdown and the Decrease in Na(+),K(+)-ATPase Activity in the Cerebral Cortex and Hippocampus are Prevented by Dexamethasone in an Animal Model of Maple Syrup Urine Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Luciana; Galant, Leticia S; Dall'Igna, Dhébora M; Kolling, Janaina; Siebert, Cassiana; Schuck, Patrícia F; Ferreira, Gustavo C; Wyse, Angela T S; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Scaini, Giselli; Streck, Emilio L

    2016-08-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is a rare metabolic disorder associated with acute and chronic brain dysfunction. This condition has been shown to lead to macroscopic cerebral alterations that are visible on imaging studies. Cerebral oedema is widely considered to be detrimental for MSUD patients; however, the mechanisms involved are still poorly understood. Therefore, we investigated whether acute administration of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) causes cerebral oedema, modifies the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity, affects the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and alters the levels of cytokines in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex of 10-day-old rats. Additionally, we investigated the influence of concomitant administration of dexamethasone on the alterations caused by BCAA. Our results showed that the animals submitted to the model of MSUD exhibited an increase in the brain water content, both in the cerebral cortex and in the hippocampus. By investigating the mechanism of cerebral oedema, we discovered an association between H-BCAA and the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity and the permeability of the BBB to small molecules. Moreover, the H-BCAA administration increases Il-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α levels in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex, whereas IL-10 levels were decreased in the hippocampus. Interestingly, we showed that the administration of dexamethasone successfully reduced cerebral oedema, preventing the inhibition of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity, BBB breakdown and the increase in the cytokines levels. In conclusion, these findings suggest that dexamethasone can improve the acute cerebral oedema and brain injury associated with high levels of BCAA, either through a direct effect on brain capillary Na(+),K(+)-ATPase or through a generalized effect on the permeability of the BBB to all compounds.

  5. Effects of intermittent fasting on age-related changes on Na,K-ATPase activity and oxidative status induced by lipopolysaccharide in rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, Andrea Rodrigues; Kinoshita, Paula Fernanda; Yshii, Lidia Mitiko; Marques Orellana, Ana Maria; Böhmer, Ana Elisa; de Sá Lima, Larissa; Alves, Rosana; Andreotti, Diana Zukas; Marcourakis, Tania; Scavone, Cristoforo; Kawamoto, Elisa Mitiko

    2015-05-01

    Chronic neuroinflammation is a common characteristic of neurodegenerative diseases, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) signaling is linked to glutamate-nitric oxide-Na,K-ATPase isoforms pathway in central nervous system (CNS) and also causes neuroinflammation. Intermittent fasting (IF) induces adaptive responses in the brain that can suppress inflammation, but the age-related effect of IF on LPS modulatory influence on nitric oxide-Na,K-ATPase isoforms is unknown. This work compared the effects of LPS on the activity of α1,α2,3 Na,K-ATPase, nitric oxide synthase gene expression and/or activity, cyclic guanosine monophosphate, 3-nitrotyrosine-containing proteins, and levels of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances in CNS of young and older rats submitted to the IF protocol for 30 days. LPS induced an age-related effect in neuronal nitric oxide synthase activity, cyclic guanosine monophosphate, and levels of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances in rat hippocampus that was linked to changes in α2,3-Na,K-ATPase activity, 3-nitrotyrosine proteins, and inducible nitric oxide synthase gene expression. IF induced adaptative cellular stress-response signaling pathways reverting LPS effects in rat hippocampus of young and older rats. The results suggest that IF in both ages would reduce the risk for deficits on brain function and neurodegenerative disorders linked to inflammatory response in the CNS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Exercise-Induced Neuroprotection of Hippocampus in APP/PS1 Transgenic Mice via Upregulation of Mitochondrial 8-Oxoguanine DNA Glycosylase

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    Hai Bo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Improving mitochondrial function has been proposed as a reasonable therapeutic strategy to reduce amyloid-β (Aβ load and to modify the progression of Alzheimer’s disease (AD. However, the relationship between mitochondrial adaptation and brain neuroprotection caused by physical exercise in AD is poorly understood. This study was undertaken to investigate the effects of long-term treadmill exercise on mitochondrial 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase-1 (OGG1 level, mtDNA oxidative damage, and mitochondrial function in the hippocampus of APP/PS1 transgenic mouse model of AD. In the present study, twenty weeks of treadmill training significantly improved the cognitive function and reduced the expression of Aβ-42 in APP/PS1 transgenic (Tg mice. Training also ameliorated mitochondrial respiratory function by increasing the complexes I, and IV and ATP synthase activities, whereas it attenuated ROS generation and mtDNA oxidative damage in Tg mice. Furthermore, the impaired mitochondrial antioxidant enzymes and mitochondrial OGG1 activities seen in Tg mice were restored with training. Acetylation level of mitochondrial OGG1 and MnSOD was markedly suppressed in Tg mice after exercise training, in parallel with increased level of SIRT3. These findings suggest that exercise training could increase mtDNA repair capacity in the mouse hippocampus, which in turn would result in protection against AD-related mitochondrial dysfunction and phenotypic deterioration.

  7. Total Phenolic Content and Antioxidant Activity of Different Types of Chocolate, Milk, Semisweet, Dark, and Soy, in Cerebral Cortex, Hippocampus, and Cerebellum of Wistar Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niara da Silva Medeiros

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chocolate is a product consumed worldwide and it stands out for presenting an important amount of phenolic compounds. In this study, the total phenolic content and antioxidant activity in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum of male Wistar rats when consuming different types of chocolate, including milk, semisweet, dark, and soy, was evaluated. The total polyphenols concentration and antioxidant activity in vitro by the method of DPPH radical-scavenging test were evaluated in chocolate samples. Lipid peroxidation (TBARS, protein oxidation (carbonyl, sulfhydryl groups, and activity of SOD enzyme in cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum of rats treated or not with hydrogen peroxide and/or chocolate were also evaluated. The dark chocolate demonstrated higher phenolic content and antioxidant activity, followed by semisweet, soy, and milk chocolates. The addition of chocolate in the diet of the rats reduced lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation caused by hydrogen peroxide. In the sulfhydryl assay, we observed that the levels of nonenzymatic defenses only increased with the chocolate treatments The SOD enzyme activity was modulated in the tissues treated with the chocolates. We observed in the samples of chocolate a significant polyphenol content and an important antioxidant activity; however, additional studies with different chocolates and other tissues are necessary to further such findings.

  8. Repeated 6-Hz Corneal Stimulation Progressively Increases FosB/ΔFosB Levels in the Lateral Amygdala and Induces Seizure Generalization to the Hippocampus.

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    Carmela Giordano

    Full Text Available Exposure to repetitive seizures is known to promote convulsions which depend on specific patterns of network activity. We aimed at evaluating the changes in seizure phenotype and neuronal network activation caused by a modified 6-Hz corneal stimulation model of psychomotor seizures. Mice received up to 4 sessions of 6-Hz corneal stimulation with fixed current amplitude of 32 mA and inter-stimulation interval of 72 h. Video-electroencephalography showed that evoked seizures were characterized by a motor component and a non-motor component. Seizures always appeared in frontal cortex, but only at the fourth stimulation they involved the hippocampus, suggesting the establishment of an epileptogenic process. Duration of seizure non-motor component progressively decreased after the second session, whereas convulsive seizures remained unchanged. In addition, a more severe seizure phenotype, consisting of tonic-clonic generalized convulsions, was predominant after the second session. Immunohistochemistry and double immunofluorescence experiments revealed a significant increase in neuronal activity occurring in the lateral amygdala after the fourth session, most likely due to activity of principal cells. These findings indicate a predominant role of amygdala in promoting progressively more severe convulsions as well as the late recruitment of the hippocampus in the seizure spread. We propose that the repeated 6-Hz corneal stimulation model may be used to investigate some mechanisms of epileptogenesis and to test putative antiepileptogenic drugs.

  9. PTU-induced hypothyroidism in rats leads to several early neuropathological signs of Alzheimer's disease in the hippocampus and spatial memory impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaalal, Amina; Poirier, Roseline; Blum, David; Gillet, Brigitte; Le Blanc, Pascale; Basquin, Marie; Buée, Luc; Laroche, Serge; Enderlin, Valérie

    2014-11-01

    The multifactorial causes impacting the risk of developing sporadic forms of Alzheimer's disease (AD) remain to date poorly understood. Epidemiologic studies in humans and research in rodents have suggested that hypothyroidism could participate in the etiology of AD. Recently, we reported that adult-onset hypothyroidism in rats favors β-amyloid peptide production in the hippocampus. Here, using the same hypothyroidism model with the antithyroid molecule propythiouracyl (PTU), we further explored AD-related features, dysfunctional cell-signaling mechanisms and hippocampal-dependent learning and memory. In vivo MRI revealed a progressive decrease in cerebral volume of PTU-treated rats. In the hippocampus, hypothyroidism resulted in tau hyperphosphorylation and increases in several proinflammatory cytokines. These modifications were associated with impaired spatial memory and reduced hippocampal expression of signaling molecules important for synaptic plasticity and memory, including neurogranin, CaMKII, ERK, GSK3β, CREB, and expression of the transcription factor EGR1/Zif268. These data strengthen the idea that hypothyroidism represents an important factor influencing the risk of developing sporadic forms of AD. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Total Phenolic Content and Antioxidant Activity of Different Types of Chocolate, Milk, Semisweet, Dark, and Soy, in Cerebral Cortex, Hippocampus, and Cerebellum of Wistar Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Medeiros, Niara; Koslowsky Marder, Roberta; Farias Wohlenberg, Mariane; Funchal, Cláudia; Dani, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Chocolate is a product consumed worldwide and it stands out for presenting an important amount of phenolic compounds. In this study, the total phenolic content and antioxidant activity in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum of male Wistar rats when consuming different types of chocolate, including milk, semisweet, dark, and soy, was evaluated. The total polyphenols concentration and antioxidant activity in vitro by the method of DPPH radical-scavenging test were evaluated in chocolate samples. Lipid peroxidation (TBARS), protein oxidation (carbonyl), sulfhydryl groups, and activity of SOD enzyme in cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum of rats treated or not with hydrogen peroxide and/or chocolate were also evaluated. The dark chocolate demonstrated higher phenolic content and antioxidant activity, followed by semisweet, soy, and milk chocolates. The addition of chocolate in the diet of the rats reduced lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation caused by hydrogen peroxide. In the sulfhydryl assay, we observed that the levels of nonenzymatic defenses only increased with the chocolate treatments The SOD enzyme activity was modulated in the tissues treated with the chocolates. We observed in the samples of chocolate a significant polyphenol content and an important antioxidant activity; however, additional studies with different chocolates and other tissues are necessary to further such findings.

  11. Total Phenolic Content and Antioxidant Activity of Different Types of Chocolate, Milk, Semisweet, Dark, and Soy, in Cerebral Cortex, Hippocampus, and Cerebellum of Wistar Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Medeiros, Niara; Koslowsky Marder, Roberta; Farias Wohlenberg, Mariane; Funchal, Cláudia; Dani, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Chocolate is a product consumed worldwide and it stands out for presenting an important amount of phenolic compounds. In this study, the total phenolic content and antioxidant activity in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum of male Wistar rats when consuming different types of chocolate, including milk, semisweet, dark, and soy, was evaluated. The total polyphenols concentration and antioxidant activity in vitro by the method of DPPH radical-scavenging test were evaluated in chocolate samples. Lipid peroxidation (TBARS), protein oxidation (carbonyl), sulfhydryl groups, and activity of SOD enzyme in cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum of rats treated or not with hydrogen peroxide and/or chocolate were also evaluated. The dark chocolate demonstrated higher phenolic content and antioxidant activity, followed by semisweet, soy, and milk chocolates. The addition of chocolate in the diet of the rats reduced lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation caused by hydrogen peroxide. In the sulfhydryl assay, we observed that the levels of nonenzymatic defenses only increased with the chocolate treatments The SOD enzyme activity was modulated in the tissues treated with the chocolates. We observed in the samples of chocolate a significant polyphenol content and an important antioxidant activity; however, additional studies with different chocolates and other tissues are necessary to further such findings. PMID:26649198

  12. Abnormal spindle-like microcephaly-associated (ASPM) mutations strongly disrupt neocortical structure but spare the hippocampus and long-term memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passemard, Sandrine; Verloes, Alain; Billette de Villemeur, Thierry; Boespflug-Tanguy, Odile; Hernandez, Karen; Laurent, Marion; Isidor, Bertrand; Alberti, Corinne; Pouvreau, Nathalie; Drunat, Séverine; Gérard, Bénédicte; El Ghouzzi, Vincent; Gallego, Jorge; Elmaleh-Bergès, Monique; Huttner, Wieland B; Eliez, Stephan; Gressens, Pierre; Schaer, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal recessive primary microcephaly results from abnormal brain development linked to proliferation defects in neural progenitors. The most frequent form, caused by ASPM mutations, is usually defined by a reduced brain volume and is associated with intellectual disability. Although many ASPM cases have now been reported, structural brain abnormalities and their link with cognitive disabilities have rarely been investigated. In this study, we used high resolution T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in seven patients with ASPM mutations and 39 healthy age-matched controls to quantify regional volumes, thickness, surface area, gyrification index and white matter volumes of 30 cortical regions. We observed a consistent reduction of 50% or more in the volume and surface area of all cortical regions except for the hippocampus and surrounding medial temporal structures, which were significantly less reduced. Neuropsychologic assessment indicated significant impairments of cognitive abilities. However, these impairments were associated with normal mnesic abilities, in keeping with the relative preservation of the hippocampus and medial temporal structures. These results show that, contrary to current opinion, the cortical volume and surface area of patients with ASPM mutations is reduced depending on a regionally specific fashion and their cognitive profile reflects this heterogeneity. The precise characterization of the cortical map and cognitive abilities of patients with ASPM mutations should allow developing more focused reeducative interventions well-suited to their real abilities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Sevoflurane anesthesia improves cognitive performance in mice, but does not influence in vitro long-term potentation in hippocampus CA1 stratum radiatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haseneder, Rainer; Starker, Laura; Berkmann, Jasmin; Kellermann, Kristine; Jungwirth, Bettina; Blobner, Manfred; Eder, Matthias; Kochs, Eberhard; Rammes, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    Whether the occurrence of postoperative cognitive dysfunction is a result of the effects of surgery or anesthesia is under debate. In this study, we investigated the impact of sevoflurane anesthesia on cognitive performance and cellular mechanisms involved in learning and memory. Male C57Bl6/J mice (4-5 months) were exposed to one minimum alveolar concentration sevoflurane for two hours. After 24 h, cognitive performance of mice was assessed using the modified hole board test. Additionally, we evaluated hippocampal long-term potentiation and expression levels of different receptor subunits by recording excitatory postsynaptic field potentials and using the western blot technique, respectively. Non-anesthetized mice served as controls. In anesthetized mice, neither cognitive performance nor long-term potentiation was impaired 24 h after anesthesia. Interestingly, sevoflurane anesthesia induced even an improvement of cognitive performance and an elevation of the expression levels of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor type 1 and 2B subunits in the hippocampus. Since NMDA receptor type 1 and 2B subunits play a crucial role in processes related to learning and memory, we hypothesize that sevoflurane-induced changes in NMDA receptor subunit composition might cause hippocampus-dependent cognitive improvement. The data of the present study are in favor of a minor role of anesthesia in mediating postoperative cognitive dysfunction.

  14. Late-onset running biphasically improves redox balance, energy- and methylglyoxal-related status, as well as SIRT1 expression in mouse hippocampus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Falone

    Full Text Available Despite the active research in this field, molecular mechanisms underlying exercise-induced beneficial effects on brain physiology and functions are still matter of debate, especially with regard to biological processes activated by regular exercise affecting the onset and progression of hippocampal aging in individuals unfamiliar with habitual physical activity. Since such responses seem to be mediated by changes in antioxidative, antiglycative and metabolic status, a possible exercise-induced coordinated response involving redox, methylglyoxal- and sirtuin-related molecular networks may be hypothesized. In this study, hippocampi of CD1 mice undergoing the transition from mature to middle age were analyzed for redox-related profile, oxidative and methylglyoxal-dependent damage patterns, energy metabolism, sirtuin1 and glyoxalase1 expression after a 2- or 4-mo treadmill running program. Our findings suggested that the 4-mo regular running lowered the chance of dicarbonyl and oxidative stress, activated mitochondrial catabolism and preserved sirtuin1-related neuroprotection. Surprisingly, the same cellular pathways were negatively affected by the first 2 months of exercise, thus showing an interesting biphasic response. In conclusion, the duration of exercise caused a profound shift in the response to regular running within the rodent hippocampus in a time-dependent fashion. This research revealed important details of the interaction between exercise and mammal hippocampus during the transition from mature to middle age, and this might help to develop non-pharmacological approaches aimed at retarding brain senescence, even in individuals unfamiliar with habitual exercise.

  15. Prevention of postoperative fatigue syndrome in rat model by ginsenoside Rb1 via down-regulation of inflammation along the NMDA receptor pathway in the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Zhe; Liu, Shu; Chen, Fan-Feng; Zhou, Chong-Jun; Yu, Jian; Zhuang, Cheng-Le; Shen, Xian; Chen, Bi-Cheng; Yu, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative fatigue syndrome (POFS) is a common complication which decelerates recovery after surgery. The present study investigated the anti-fatigue effect of ginsenoside Rb1 (GRb1) through the inflammatory cytokine-mediated N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor pathway. A POFS rat model was created by major small intestinal resection and assessed with an open field test. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, western blot analysis, high performance liquid chromatography and a transmission electron microscopic analysis were used to determine typical biochemical parameters in the hippocampus. Our results showed that POFS rats exhibited fatigue associated with an increased expression of inflammatory cytokines and NMDA receptor 1, higher (kynurenine)/(tryptophan) and (kynurenine)/(kynurenic acid) on postoperative days 1 and 3, and an increased expression of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) on postoperative day 1. Degenerated neurons were found in the hippocampus of POFS rats. The NMDA receptor antagonist MK801 had a significant effect on central fatigue on postoperative day 1. GRb1 had no effect on IDO or tryptophan metabolism, but exhibited a significant effect on POFS by inhibiting the expression of inflammatory cytokines and NMDA receptor 1. These data suggested that inflammatory cytokines could activate tryptophan metabolism to cause POFS through the NMDA receptor pathway. GRb1 had an anti-fatigue effect on POFS by reducing inflammatory cytokines and NMDA receptors.

  16. Bmi-1 absence causes premature brain degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangliang Cao

    Full Text Available Bmi-1, a polycomb transcriptional repressor, is implicated in cell cycle regulation and cell senescence. Its absence results in generalized astrogliosis and epilepsy during the postnatal development, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate the occurrence of oxidative stress in the brain of four-week-old Bmi-1 null mice. The mice showed various hallmarks of neurodegeneration including synaptic loss, axonal demyelination, reactive gliosis and brain mitochondrial damage. Moreover, astroglial glutamate transporters and glutamine synthetase decreased in the Bmi-1 null hippocampus, which might contribute to the sporadic epileptic-like seizures in these mice. These results indicate that Bmi-1 is required for maintaining endogenous antioxidant defenses in the brain, and its absence subsequently causes premature brain degeneration.

  17. Lasting Differential Effects on Plasticity Induced by Prenatal Stress in Dorsal and Ventral Hippocampus

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    Gayane Grigoryan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Early life adversaries have a profound impact on the developing brain structure and functions that persist long after the original traumatic experience has vanished. One of the extensively studied brain structures in relation to early life stress has been the hippocampus because of its unique association with cognitive processes of the brain. While the entire hippocampus shares the same intrinsic organization, it assumes different functions in its dorsal and ventral sectors (DH and VH, resp., based on different connectivity with other brain structures. In the present review, we summarize the differences between DH and VH and discuss functional and structural effects of prenatal stress in the two sectors, with the realization that much is yet to be explored in understanding the opposite reactivity of the DH and VH to stressful stimulation.

  18. Micro-RNA speciation in fetal, adult and Alzheimer's disease hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukiw, Walter J

    2007-02-12

    Micro-RNAs constitute a family of small noncoding ribonucleic acids that are posttranscriptional regulators of messenger RNA activity. Although micro-RNAs are known to be dynamically regulated during neural development, the role of micro-RNAs in brain aging and neurodegeneration is not known. This study examined micro-RNA abundance in the hippocampal region of fetal, adult and Alzheimer's disease brain. The data indicate that micro-RNAs encoding miR-9, miR-124a, miR-125b, miR-128, miR-132 and miR-219 are abundantly represented in fetal hippocampus, are differentially regulated in aged brain, and an alteration in specific micro-RNA complexity occurs in Alzheimer hippocampus. These data are consistent with the idea that altered micro-RNA-mediated processing of messenger RNA populations may contribute to atypical mRNA abundance and neural dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease brain.

  19. Phencyclidine administration during neurodevelopment alters network activity in prefrontal cortex and hippocampus in adult rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaerby, Celia; Hovelsø, Nanna; Dalby, Nils Ole

    2017-01-01

    of this study was to determine how administration of the NMDAR antagonist phencyclidine (PCP) during neurodevelopment affects functional network activity within the hippocampus and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). We recorded field potentials in vivo after electrical brain stem stimulation and observed...... to suppressed evoked theta oscillations in ventral hippocampus in adult rats, while evoked gamma oscillations are enhanced and hypersensitive to an acute challenge with a NMDA receptor antagonist in prefrontal cortex. These observations reveal the significance of neurodevelopmental disturbances......Symptoms of schizophrenia have been linked to insults during neurodevelopment such as NMDA receptor (NMDAR) antagonist exposure. In animal models, this leads to schizophrenia-like behavioral symptoms as well as molecular and functional changes within hippocampal and prefrontal regions. The aim...

  20. Extract ofGinkgo bilobapromotes neuronal regeneration in the hippocampus after exposure to acrylamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei-Ling; Ma, Yu-Xin; Fan, Yu-Bao; Lai, Sheng-Min; Liu, Hong-Qing; Liu, Jing; Luo, Li; Li, Guo-Ying; Tian, Su-Min

    2017-08-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated a neuroprotective effect of extract of Ginkgo biloba against neuronal damage, but have mainly focused on antioxidation of extract of Ginkgo biloba . To date, limited studies have determined whether extrasct of Ginkgo biloba has a protective effect on neuronal damage. In the present study, acrylamide and 30, 60, and 120 mg/kg extract of Ginkgo biloba were administered for 4 weeks by gavage to establish mouse models. Our results showed that 30, 60, and 120 mg/kg extract of Ginkgo biloba effectively alleviated the abnormal gait of poisoned mice, and up-regulated protein expression levels of doublecortin (DCX), brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and growth associated protein-43 (GAP-43) in the hippocampus. Simultaneously, DCX- and GAP-43-immunoreactive cells increased. These findings suggest that extract of Ginkgo biloba can mitigate neurotoxicity induced by acrylamide, and thereby promote neuronal regeneration in the hippocampus of acrylamide-treated mice.

  1. Left-right functional asymmetry of ventral hippocampus depends on aversiveness of situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, Yukitoshi; Sakurai, Yoshio

    2017-05-15

    Many studies suggest that animals exhibit lateralized behaviors during aversive situations, and almost all animals exhibit right hemisphere-dominant behaviors associated with fear or anxiety. However, which brain structure in each hemisphere underlies such lateralized function is unclear. In this study, we focused on the hippocampus and investigated the effects of bilateral and unilateral lesions of the ventral hippocampus (VH) on anxiety-like behavior using the successive alleys test. We also examined the expression of c-fos in the VH, which was induced by an aversive situation. Results revealed that consistent right VH dominance trended with the anxiety level. Weaker anxiety induced both right and left VH functions, whereas stronger anxiety induced right VH function. From these results, we conclude that animals are able to adaptively regulate their behaviors to avoid aversive stimuli by changing the functional dominance of their left and right VH. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Image-based adaptive optics for in vivo imaging in the hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champelovier, D.; Teixeira, J.; Conan, J.-M.; Balla, N.; Mugnier, L. M.; Tressard, T.; Reichinnek, S.; Meimon, S.; Cossart, R.; Rigneault, H.; Monneret, S.; Malvache, A.

    2017-02-01

    Adaptive optics is a promising technique for the improvement of microscopy in tissues. A large palette of indirect and direct wavefront sensing methods has been proposed for in vivo imaging in experimental animal models. Application of most of these methods to complex samples suffers from either intrinsic and/or practical difficulties. Here we show a theoretically optimized wavefront correction method for inhomogeneously labeled biological samples. We demonstrate its performance at a depth of 200 μm in brain tissue within a sparsely labeled region such as the pyramidal cell layer of the hippocampus, with cells expressing GCamP6. This method is designed to be sample-independent thanks to an automatic axial locking on objects of interest through the use of an image-based metric that we designed. Using this method, we show an increase of in vivo imaging quality in the hippocampus.

  3. Hippocampus leads ventral striatum in replay of place-reward information.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carien S Lansink

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Associating spatial locations with rewards is fundamental to survival in natural environments and requires the integrity of the hippocampus and ventral striatum. In joint multineuron recordings from these areas, hippocampal-striatal ensembles reactivated together during sleep. This process was especially strong in pairs in which the hippocampal cell processed spatial information and ventral striatal firing correlated to reward. Replay was dominated by cell pairs in which the hippocampal "place" cell fired preferentially before the striatal reward-related neuron. Our results suggest a plausible mechanism for consolidating place-reward associations and are consistent with a central tenet of consolidation theory, showing that the hippocampus leads reactivation in a projection area.

  4. Structural synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus induced by spatial experience and its implications in information processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carasatorre, M; Ramírez-Amaya, V; Díaz Cintra, S

    2016-10-01

    Long-lasting memory formation requires that groups of neurons processing new information develop the ability to reproduce the patterns of neural activity acquired by experience. Changes in synaptic efficiency let neurons organise to form ensembles that repeat certain activity patterns again and again. Among other changes in synaptic plasticity, structural modifications tend to be long-lasting which suggests that they underlie long-term memory. There is a large body of evidence supporting that experience promotes changes in the synaptic structure, particularly in the hippocampus. Structural changes to the hippocampus may be functionally implicated in stabilising acquired memories and encoding new information. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. The Interplay of Hippocampus and Ventromedial Prefrontal Cortex in Memory-Based Decision Making

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    Regina A. Weilbächer

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Episodic memory and value-based decision making are two central and intensively studied research domains in cognitive neuroscience, but we are just beginning to understand how they interact to enable memory-based decisions. The two brain regions that have been associated with episodic memory and value-based decision making are the hippocampus and the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, respectively. In this review article, we first give an overview of these brain–behavior associations and then focus on the mechanisms of potential interactions between the hippocampus and ventromedial prefrontal cortex that have been proposed and tested in recent neuroimaging studies. Based on those possible interactions, we discuss several directions for future research on the neural and cognitive foundations of memory-based decision making.

  6. The Effects of Hypergravic Fields on Neural Signalling in the Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, John; Horwitz, Barbara

    1991-01-01

    The goal of this grant is to study the effect of hypergravic fields on the modulation of hippocampal electrical activity by serotonin (5-HT). The proposed study represents a shift from our previous NASA grants covering three diverse areas in neurobiology (thermoregulation, vestibular and auditory brainstem evoked responses, and the hippocampus) to consideration of only one of these areas, the hippocampus. To place our proposed hippocampal experiments in context with relevant Spacelab-3 experiments and hypergravic experiments, two experiments on receptor changes in animals exposed to altered gravitational fields are first described. Our experiments build on these structural/biochemical observations and extend investigations to related electrical activity at 1 G and in hypergravic fields. The background continues with a review of past studies at 1G related to effects of serotonin on hippocampal electrical activity (i.e., population spikes, intracellular potentials).

  7. Mitochondrial plasticity of the hippocampus in a generic rat model of depression after antidepressant treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Fenghua; Wegener, Gregers; Madsen, Torsten Meldgaard

    2012-01-01

    Depressive disorders and the treatment thereof have been associated with a number of neuroplastic events, such as neurogenesis and synaptic remodeling in discrete areas of the brain. The associations of these events in changes regarding the energy supply have not been investigated. Here, we...... investigated the changes in mitochondrial plasticity and its correlation to morphological alterations of neuroplasticity in the hippocampus, both associated with a depressive phenotype, and after treatment, with antidepressant imipramine. Design-based stereological methods were used to estimate the number...... of mitochondrial plasticity in the hippocampus and antidepressant treatment may counteract with the structural impairments. Moreover, the changes in mitochondrial morphology and number are a consistent feature of neuroplasticity. Synapse, 2013. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc....

  8. NPY gene transfer in the hippocampus attenuates synaptic plasticity and learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Andreas T; Kanter-Schlifke, Irene; Carli, Mirjana

    2008-01-01

    . Future clinical progress, however, requires more detailed evaluation of possible side effects of this treatment. Until now it has been unknown whether rAAV vector-based NPY overexpression in the hippocampus alters normal synaptic transmission and plasticity, which could disturb learning and memory...... processing. Here we show, by electrophysiological recordings in CA1 of the hippocampal formation of rats, that hippocampal NPY gene transfer into the intact brain does not affect basal synaptic transmission, but slightly alters short-term synaptic plasticity, most likely via NPY Y2 receptor...... is partially impaired and animals have a slower rate of hippocampal-based spatial discrimination learning. These data provide the first evidence that rAAV-based gene therapy using NPY exerts relative limited effect on synaptic plasticity and learning in the hippocampus, and therefore this approach could...

  9. Recognition memory for social and non-social odors: differential effects of neurotoxic lesions to the hippocampus and perirhinal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinberg, Leila M; Allen, Timothy A; Ly, Denise; Fortin, Norbert J

    2012-01-01

    The contributions of the hippocampus (HC) and perirhinal cortex (PER) to recognition memory are currently topics of debate in neuroscience. Here we used a rapidly-learned (seconds) spontaneous novel odor recognition paradigm to assess the effects of pre-training N-methyl-D-aspartate lesions to the HC or PER on odor recognition memory. We tested memory for both social and non-social odor stimuli. Social odors were acquired from conspecifics, while non-social odors were household spices. Conspecific odor stimuli are ethologically-relevant and have a high degree of overlapping features compared to non-social household spices. Various retention intervals (5 min, 20 min, 1h, 24h, or 48 h) were used between study and test phases, each with a unique odor pair, to assess changes in novelty preference over time. Consistent with findings in other paradigms, modalities, and species, we found that HC lesions yielded no significant recognition memory deficits. In contrast, PER lesions caused significant deficits for social odor recognition memory at long retention intervals, demonstrating a critical role for PER in long-term memory for social odors. PER lesions had no effect on memory for non-social odors. The results are consistent with a general role for PER in long-term recognition memory for stimuli that have a high degree of overlapping features, which must be distinguished by conjunctive representations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A G-protein-activated inwardly rectifying K+ channel (GIRK4) from human hippocampus associates with other GIRK channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spauschus, A; Lentes, K U; Wischmeyer, E; Dissmann, E; Karschin, C; Karschin, A

    1996-02-01

    Transcripts of a gene, GIRK4, that encodes for a 419-amino-acid protein and shows high structural similarity to other subfamily members of G-protein-activated inwardly rectifying K+ channels (GIRK) have been identified in the human hippocampus. When expressed in Xenopus oocytes, GIRK4 yielded functional GIRK channels with activity that was enhanced by the stimulation of coexpressed serotonin 1A receptors. GIRK4 potentiated basal and agonist-induced currents mediated by other GIRK channels, possibly because of channel heteromerization. Despite the structural similarity to a putative rat KATP channel, no ATP sensitivity or KATP-typical pharmacology was observed for GIRK4 alone or GIRK4 transfected in conjunction with other GIRK channels in COS-7 cells. In rat brain, GIRK4 is expressed together with three other subfamily members, GIRK1-3, most likely in identical hippocampal neurons. Thus, heteromerization or an unknown molecular interaction may cause the physiological diversity observed within this class of K+ channels.

  11. Multiple sevoflurane anesthesia in pregnant mice inhibits neurogenesis of fetal hippocampus via repressing transcription factor Pax6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Fang; Song, Ruixue; Ling, Xiaomin; Peng, Mengyuan; Xue, Zhanggang; Cang, Jing

    2017-04-15

    Sevoflurane is widely used in non-obstetric surgeries of pregnant women, but its influences on fetal brain are still not fully known. We set out to assess the effects of multiple maternal sevoflurane exposure on neurogenesis and cognitive dysfunction in fetus and offspring. Pregnant mice (gestational day 15.5) and cultured mouse neural stem cells (NSCs) received daily sevoflurane exposure (2.5%×2h and 4.1%×2h respectively) for three consecutive days. Cognitive function of the offspring was determined with the Morris water maze. The expression of Ccnd1 and Pax6 in fetal brains and NSCs were analyzed by immunofluorescence, Western blot and qPCR. The neurogenesis was evaluated by BrdU staining. Results showed that multiple sevoflurane exposure in pregnant mice caused the decrease of Pax6 and Ccnd1 expression, the inhibition of NSCs proliferation and fetal hippocampus neurogenesis, which may contribute to the impaired learning and memory in offspring at P28. Moreover, lithium mitigated the sevoflurane-induced reduction in Pax6, Ccnd1 and neurogenesis. All these results suggest that multiple sevoflurane exposure may induce detrimental effects in the developing brains of fetus and offspring by the depression of neurogenesis through Pax6 pathway. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Proteomic identification of carbonylated proteins in F344 rat hippocampus after 1-bromopropane exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Zhenlie [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 466‐8550 (Japan); Department of Toxicology, Guangdong Prevention and Treatment Center for Occupational Diseases, Guangzhou 510‐300 (China); Ichihara, Sahoko [Graduate School of Regional Innovation Studies, Mie University, Tsu 514‐8507 (Japan); Oikawa, Shinji [Department of Environmental and Molecular Medicine, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, Mie 514‐8507 (Japan); Chang, Jie; Zhang, Lingyi; Subramanian, Kaviarasan; Mohideen, Sahabudeen Sheik [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 466‐8550 (Japan); Ichihara, Gaku, E-mail: gak@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 466‐8550 (Japan)

    2012-08-15

    1-Bromopropane (1-BP) is neurotoxic in both experimental animals and humans. Previous proteomic analysis of rat hippocampus implicated alteration of protein expression in oxidative stress, suggesting that oxidative stress plays a role in 1-BP-induced neurotoxicity. To understand this role at the protein level, we exposed male F344 rats to 1-BP at 0, 400, or 1000 ppm for 8 h/day for 1 week or 4 weeks by inhalation and quantitated changes in hippocampal protein carbonyl using a protein carbonyl assay, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE), immunoblotting, and matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-TOF/MS). Hippocampal reactive oxygen species and protein carbonyl were significantly increased, demonstrating 1-BP-associated induction of oxidative stress and protein damage. MALDI-TOF-TOF/MS identified 10 individual proteins with increased carbonyl modification (p < 0.05; fold-change ≥ 1.5). The identified proteins were involved in diverse biological processes including glycolysis, ATP production, tyrosine catabolism, GTP binding, guanine degradation, and neuronal metabolism of dopamine. Hippocampal triosephosphate isomerase (TPI) activity was significantly reduced and negatively correlated with TPI carbonylation (p < 0.001; r = 0.83). Advanced glycation end-product (AGE) levels were significantly elevated both in the hippocampus and plasma, and hippocampal AGEs correlated negatively with TPI activity (p < 0.001; r = 0.71). In conclusion, 1-BP-induced neurotoxicity in the rat hippocampus seems to involve oxidative damage of cellular proteins, decreased TPI activity, and elevated AGEs. -- Highlights: ► 1-BP increases hippocampal ROS levels and hippocampal and plasma protein carbonyls. ► 1-BP increases TPI carbonylation and decreases TPI activity in the hippocampus. ► 1-BP increases hippocampal and plasma AGE levels.

  13. The hippocampus mediates glucocorticoid-induced impairment of spatial memory retrieval: Dependence on the basolateral amygdala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roozendaal, Benno; Griffith, Qyana K.; Buranday, Jason; de Quervain, Dominique J.-F.; McGaugh, James L.

    2003-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that stress-activated glucocorticoid hormones induce temporary memory retrieval impairment. The present study examined whether adrenal steroid receptors in the hippocampus mediate such glucocorticoid effects on spatial memory retrieval. The specific glucocorticoid receptor (GR) agonist 11β, 17β-dihydroxy-6,21-dimethyl-17α-pregna-4,6-trien-20yn-3-one (RU 28362; 5 or 15 ng) infused into the hippocampus of male Sprague–Dawley rats 60 min before water-maze retention testing, 24 h after training, dose-dependently impaired probe-trial retention performance, as assessed both by time spent in the training quadrant and initial latency to cross the platform location. The GR agonist did not affect circulating corticosterone levels immediately after the probe trial, indicating that RU 28362 infusions did not influence retention by altering glucocorticoid feedback mechanisms. As infusions of the GR agonist into the hippocampus 60 min before training did not influence water-maze acquisition or immediate recall, the findings indicated that the GR agonist-induced retention impairment was induced selectively by an influence on information retrieval. In contrast, pretest infusions of the GR agonist administered into the basolateral complex of the amygdala (BLA; 2 or 6 ng) did not alter retention performance in the water maze. However, N-methyl-d-aspartate-induced lesions of the BLA, made 1 week before training, blocked the memory retrieval impairment induced by intrahippocampal infusions of RU 28362 given 60 min before the retention test. These findings indicate that the effects of glucocorticoids on retrieval of long-term spatial memory depend on the hippocampus and, additionally, that neuronal input from the BLA is critical in enabling hippocampal glucocorticoid effects on memory retrieval. PMID:12538851

  14. Dexmedetomidine Oral Mucosa Patch for Sedation Suppresses Apoptosis in Hippocampus of Normal Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Je Hoon; Ko, Il Gyu; Kim, Sung Eun; Jin, Jun Jang; Hwang, Lakkyong; Kim, Chang Ju; Yoon, Soo Hwan; Hong, Jongki; Chung, Jun Young; Lee, Deok Won

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Dexmedetomidine, an ?2-adrenergic agonist, provides sedative and analgesic effects without significant respiratory depression. Dexmedetomidine has been suggested to have an antiapoptotic effect in response to various brain insults. We developed an oral mucosa patch using dexmedetomidine for sedation. The effects of the dexmedetomidine oral mucosa patch on cell proliferation and apoptosis in the hippocampus were evaluated. Methods A hydrogel oral mucosa patch was adhered onto the oral ...

  15. The influence of chronic ibuprofen treatment on proteins expressed in the mouse hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Kenji; Otani, Mieko; Takano, Masaoki; Kadoyama, Keiichi; Matsuyama, Shogo

    2015-04-05

    Ibuprofen is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), treatment with which has been shown to delay the onset, slows the cognitive decline, and decreases the incidence of Alzheimer׳s disease (AD) in epidemiological and clinical studies. However, a comprehensive understanding of its mechanism of action remains unclear. To elucidate the prophylactic effect of ibuprofen on the onset of the learning and memory disturbances of AD, we performed proteomic analysis of the hippocampus of chronic ibuprofen-treated mice using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) followed by mass spectrometry. Twenty-eight proteins and seven phosphoproteins were identified to be significantly changed in the hippocampus of chronic ibuprofen-treated mice: translationally controlled tumor protein, thioredoxin-dependent peroxide reductase, and peroxiredoxin 6 were increased, and glial fibrillary acidic protein, dihydropyrimidinase-related protein 2, EF-hand domain-containing protein D2, and 14-3-3ζ were decreased. These identified proteins and phosphoproteins could be classified as cytoskeletal, neuronal development, chaperone, metabolic, apoptosis, neurotransmitter release, ATP synthase, deubiquitination, proteasome, NOS inhibitor, adapter, vesicle transport, signal transduction, antioxidant enzyme, proton transport, synaptogenesis, and serine/threonine phosphatase types. Western blot analysis showed the changes in dihydropyrimidinase-related protein 2, heat shock protein 8, ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase PGP9.5, and γ-enolase levels in the hippocampus of chronic ibuprofen-treated mice. These findings showed that the chronic treatment with ibuprofen changed the levels of some proteins and phosphoproteins in the hippocampus. We propose that these identified proteins and phosphoproteins play an important role in decreasing the incidence of AD, especially impaired learning and memory functions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Neural correlates of object-in-place learning in