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Sample records for hippocampal neuronal damage

  1. Damage of hippocampal neurons in rats with chronic alcoholism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ailin Du; Hongbo Jiang; Lei Xu; Na An; Hui Liu; Yinsheng Li; Ruiling Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Chronic alcoholism can damage the cytoskeleton and aggravate neurological deifcits. However, the effect of chronic alcoholism on hippocampal neurons remains unclear. In this study, a model of chronic alcoholism was established in rats that were fed with 6%alcohol for 42 days. Endog-enous hydrogen sulifde content and cystathionine-beta-synthase activity in the hippocampus of rats with chronic alcoholism were signiifcantly increased, while F-actin expression was decreased. Hippocampal neurons in rats with chronic alcoholism appeared to have a fuzzy nuclear mem-brane, mitochondrial edema, and ruptured mitochondrial crista. These findings suggest that chronic alcoholism can cause learning and memory decline in rats, which may be associated with the hydrogen sulfide/cystathionine-beta-synthase system, mitochondrial damage and reduced expression of F-actin.

  2. Use of confocal microscopy in the study of ischemia-induced hippocampal neuronal damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radenović Lidija

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was undertaken to reveal by means of confocal laser microscopy the cytoarchitecture of hippocampal CA3 neurons in Mongolian gerbils before and after cerebral ischemia of different duration. The common carotid arteries of gerbils were occluded for 5, 10, or 15 min. On the 4th, 14th and 28th day after reperfusion, neuronal damage was examined by laser scanning confocal microscopy in the CA3 region of hippocampus (30 μm slices. Slices were stained with fluorescent Nissl staining and fluorescent membrane tracer DiI. Increased duration of cerebral ischemia resulted in a progressive loss of hippocampal CA3 neurons. Four days after the ischemic insult, neuronal damage in the hippocampal CA3 region was mild but visible. On the 28th day after reperfusion, neuronal damage in the observed brain structure was most severe. These results demonstrate the temporal profile of neuronal damage after an ischemic insult as observed using confocal microscopy.

  3. Batroxobin Against Anoxic Damage of Rat Hippocampal Neurons in Culture: Morphological Changes and Hsp70 Expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@Batroxobin,the thrombin-like enzyme,is used for therapeutic defibrination. We have found that batroxobin has good therapeutic effect in ischemic reperfusion rats and clinical practices in vivo. But we have not studied the neuroprotective effect of batroxobin on anoxic hippocampal neurons in vitro. The purpose of this study was to obtain further information on the mechanism of the batroxobin-induced neuroprotection and examine the neuroprotective effect on neurons exposed to anoxia. The effect of batroxobin on anoxic damages in cultured hippocampal neurons of neonatal rats was investigated by using morphological changes and heat shock protein 70Kd (Hsp70) immunoreactive expression as indicators. The results indicate that batroxobin, besides its defibrination, may have a direct neuroprotective effect on anoxic damage of hippocampal neurons.

  4. Exercise preconditioning exhibits neuroprotective effects on hippocampal CA1 neuronal damage after cerebral ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nabi Shamsaei; Mehdi Khaksari; Sohaila Erfani; Hamid Rajabi; Nahid Aboutaleb

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has suggested the neuroprotective effects of physical exercise on cerebral isch-emic injury. However, the role of physical exercise in cerebral ischemia-induced hippocampal damage remains controversial. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of pre-ischemia treadmill training on hippocampal CA1 neuronal damage after cerebral ischemia. Male adult rats were randomly divided into control, ischemia and exercise + ischemia groups. In the exercise + ischemia group, rats were subjected to running on a treadmill in a designated time schedule (5 days per week for 4 weeks). Then rats underwent cerebral ischemia induction th rough occlusion of common carotids followed by reperfusion. At 4 days after cerebral ischemia, rat learning and memory abilities were evaluated using passive avoidance memory test and rat hippocampal neuronal damage was detected using Nissl and TUNEL staining. Pre-ischemic ex-ercise signiifcantly reduced the number of TUNEL-positive cells and necrotic cell death in the hippocampal CA1 region as compared to the ischemia group. Moreover, pre-ischemic exercise significantly prevented ischemia-induced memory dysfunction. Pre-ischemic exercise mighct prevent memory deficits after cerebral ischemia through rescuing hippocampal CA1 neurons from ischemia-induced degeneration.

  5. Reduced calcium-dependent mitochondrial damage underlies the reduced vulnerability of excitotoxicity-tolerant hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivovarova, Natalia B; Stanika, Ruslan I; Watts, Charlotte A; Brantner, Christine A; Smith, Carolyn L; Andrews, S Brian

    2008-03-01

    In central neurons, over-stimulation of NMDA receptors leads to excessive mitochondrial calcium accumulation and damage, which is a critical step in excitotoxic death. This raises the possibility that low susceptibility to calcium overload-induced mitochondrial damage might characterize excitotoxicity-resistant neurons. In this study, we have exploited two complementary models of preconditioning-induced excitotoxicity resistance to demonstrate reduced calcium-dependent mitochondrial damage in NMDA-tolerant hippocampal neurons. We have further identified adaptations in mitochondrial calcium handling that account for enhanced mitochondrial integrity. In both models, enhanced tolerance was associated with improved preservation of mitochondrial membrane potential and structure. In the first model, which exhibited modest neuroprotection, mitochondria-dependent calcium deregulation was delayed, even though cytosolic and mitochondrial calcium loads were quantitatively unchanged, indicating that enhanced mitochondrial calcium capacity accounts for reduced injury. In contrast, the second model, which exhibited strong neuroprotection, displayed further delayed calcium deregulation and reduced mitochondrial damage because downregulation of NMDA receptor surface expression depressed calcium loading. Reducing calcium entry also modified the chemical composition of the calcium-buffering precipitates that form in calcium-loaded mitochondria. It thus appears that reduced mitochondrial calcium loading is a major factor underlying the robust neuroprotection seen in highly tolerant cells.

  6. Prevention of Hippocampal Neuronal Damage and Cognitive Function Deficits in Vascular Dementia by Dextromethorphan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Bin; Lu, Kaili; Deng, Jiangshan; Zhao, Fei; Zhao, Bing-Qiao; Zhao, Yuwu

    2016-07-01

    Dextromethorphan (DM) is a non-competitive antagonist of NMDA receptors and a widely used component of cough medicine. Recently, its indication has been extended experimentally to a wide range of disorders including inflammation-mediated central nervous system disorders such as Parkinson disease (PD) and multiple sclerosis (MS). In this study, we investigate whether DM treatment has protective effects on the hippocampal neuron damage induced by bilateral occlusion of the common carotid arteries (two-vessel occlusion [2VO]), an animal model of vascular dementia (VaD). Sprague-Dawley (SD) (10 weeks of age) rats were subjected to the 2VO, and DM was injected intraperitoneally once per day for 37 days. Neuron death, glial activation, and cognitive function were assessed at 37 days after 2VO (0.2 mg/kg, i.p., "DM-0.2" and 2 mg/kg, i.p., "DM-2"). DM-2 treatment provided protection against neuronal death and glial activation in the hippocampal CA1 subfield and reduced cognitive impairment induced by 2VO in rats. The study also demonstrates that activation of the Nrf2-HO-1 pathway and upregulation of superoxide dismutase (SOD) play important roles in these effects. These results suggest that DM is effective in treating VaD and protecting against oxidative stress, which is strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of VaD. Therefore, the present study suggests that DM treatment may represent a new and promising protective strategy for treating VaD.

  7. Phenolic antioxidants attenuate hippocampal neuronal cell damage against kainic acid induced excitotoxicity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M S Parihar; Taruna Hemnani

    2003-02-01

    Increasing evidence supports the role of excitotoxicity in neuronal cell injury. Thus, it is extremely important to explore methods to retard or reverse excitotoxic neuronal injury. In this regard, certain dietary compounds are begining to receive increased attention, in particular those involving phytochemicals found in medicinal plants in alleviating neuronal injury. In the present study, we examined whether medicinal plant extracts protect neurons against excitotoxic lesions induced by kainic acid (KA) in female Swiss albino mice. Mice were anesthetized with ketamine and xylazine (200 mg and 2 mg/kg body wt. respectively) and KA (0.25 g in a volume of 0.5 l) was administered to mice by intra hippocampal injections. The results showed an impairment of the hippocampus region of brain after KA injection. The lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyl content were significantly ( < 0.05) increased in comparison to controls. Glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity (EC 1.11.1.9) and reduced glutathione (GSH) content declined after appearance of excitotoxic lesions. As GPx and GSH represent a major pathway in the cell for metabolizing hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), their depletion would be expected to allow H2O2 to accumulate to toxic levels. Dried ethanolic plant extracts of Withania somnifera (WS), Convolvulus pleuricauas (CP) and Aloe vera (AV) dissolved in distilled water were tested for their total antioxidant activity. The diet was prepared in terms of total antioxidant activity of plant extracts. The iron (Fe3+) reducing activity of plant extracts was also tested and it was found that WS and AV were potent reductants of Fe3+ at pH 5.5. CP had lower Fe3+ reducing activity in comparison to WS and AV. Plant extracts given singly and in combination 3 weeks prior to KA injections resulted in a decrease in neurotoxicity. Measures of lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyl declined. GPx activity and GSH content were elevated in hippocampus supplemented with WS and combination of

  8. Efficacy of atorvastatin on hippocampal neuronal damage caused by chronic intermittent hypoxia: Involving TLR4 and its downstream signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yan; Yuan, Xiao; Guo, Xue-ling; Zhu, Die; Pan, Yue-ying; Liu, Hui-guo

    2015-11-01

    Hippocampal neuronal damage is critical for the initiation and progression of neurocognitive impairment accompanied obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) plays an important role in the development of several hippocampus-related neural disorders. Atorvastatin was reported beneficially regulates TLR4. Here, we examined the effects of atorvastatin on hippocampal injury caused by chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), the most characteristic pathophysiological change of OSAS. Mice were exposed to intermittent hypoxia with or without atorvastatin for 4 weeks. Cell damage, the expressions of TLR4 and its two downstream factors myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MYD88) and TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (TRIF), inflammatory agents (tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin 1β), and the oxidative stress (superoxide dismutase and malondialdehyde) were determined. Atorvastatin decreased the neural injury and the elevation of TLR4, MyD88, TRIF, pro-inflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress caused by CIH. Our study suggests that atorvastatin may attenuate CIH induced hippocampal neuronal damage partially via TLR4 and its downstream signaling pathway.

  9. Culturing rat hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audesirk, G; Audesirk, T; Ferguson, C

    2001-01-01

    Cultured neurons are widely used to investigate the mechanisms of neurotoxicity. Embryonic rat hippocampal neurons may be grown as described under a wide variety of conditions to suit differing experimental procedures, including electrophysiology, morphological analysis of neurite development, and various biochemical and molecular analyses.

  10. Protection from neuronal damage induced by combined oxygen and glucose deprivation in organotypic hippocampal cultures by glutamate receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasser, U; Fischer, G

    1995-07-31

    Organotypic hippocampal cultures were exposed to defined periods (30 and 60 min) of combined oxygen and glucose deprivation, mimicking transient ischemic conditions. The involvement of different glutamate receptors in individual hippocampal subfields (CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus) was studied using antagonists of NMDA (dizocilpine) and AMPA/kainate receptors (CNQX and GYKI 52466). Staining with the fluorescent dye propidium iodide (PI) allowed detection of damaged cells. For quantitative determination of neuronal damage, fluorescence intensity was measured after a 22 h recovery period and was related to maximal fluorescence intensity measured after fixation and PI restaining of the cultures at the end of the experiment. Dizocilpine (10 microM), CNQX (100 microM) and GYKI 52466 (100 microM) provided complete protection in CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus following the moderate ischemic insult, when the antagonists were present permanently. This indicates that none of the ionotropic glutamate receptor subtypes dominated toxicity in the most sensitive subpopulation of neurons. When applied only during the recovery period protection with dizocilpine (10 microM) or CNQX (100 microM) was drastically reduced by about 60% in the most sensitive area (CA1), but only slightly by 15% in CA3. Therefore the onset of irreversible damage seems to occur earlier in CA1 than in CA3. Blockade of AMPA/kainate receptors by GYKI 52466 (100 microM) offered no neuroprotection if the compound was applied only during the recovery period.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Neuroprotective Effects of Inhibiting Fyn S-Nitrosylation on Cerebral Ischemia/Reperfusion-Induced Damage to CA1 Hippocampal Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Lingyun; Wei, Xuewen; Guo, Peng; Zhang, Guangyi; Qi, Suhua

    2016-07-12

    Nitric oxide (NO) can regulate signaling pathways via S-nitrosylation. Fyn can be post-translationally modified in many biological processes. In the present study, using a rat four-vessel-occlusion ischemic model, we aimed to assess whether Fyn could be S-nitrosylated and to evaluate the effects of Fyn S-nitrosylation on brain damage. In vitro, Fyn could be S-nitrosylated by S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO, an exogenous NO donor), and in vivo, endogenous NO synthesized by NO synthases (NOS) could enhance Fyn S-nitrosylation. Application of GSNO, 7-nitroindazole (7-NI, an inhibitor of neuronal NOS) and hydrogen maleate (MK-801, the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonist) could decrease the S-nitrosylation and phosphorylation of Fyn induced by cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). Cresyl violet staining validated that these compounds exerted neuroprotective effects against the cerebral I/R-induced damage to hippocampal CA1 neurons. Taken together, in this study, we demonstrated that Fyn can be S-nitrosylated both in vitro and in vivo and that inhibiting S-nitrosylation can exert neuroprotective effects against cerebral I/R injury, potentially via NMDAR-mediated mechanisms. These findings may lead to a new field of inquiry to investigate the underlying pathogenesis of stroke and the development of novel treatment strategies.

  12. Interleukin-1beta exacerbates and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist attenuates neuronal injury and microglial activation after excitotoxic damage in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hailer, Nils P; Vogt, Cornelia; Korf, Horst-Werner; Dehghani, Faramarz

    2005-05-01

    The effects of interleukin (IL)-1beta and IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) on neurons and microglial cells were investigated in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSCs). OHSCs obtained from rats were excitotoxically lesioned after 6 days in vitro by application of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and treated with IL-1beta (6 ng/mL) or IL-1ra (40, 100 or 500 ng/mL) for up to 10 days. OHSCs were then analysed by bright field microscopy after hematoxylin staining and confocal laser scanning microscopy after labeling of damaged neurons with propidium iodide (PI) and fluorescent staining of microglial cells. The specificity of PI labeling of damaged neurons was validated by triple staining with neuronal and glial markers and it was observed that PI accumulated in damaged neurons only but not in microglial cells or astrocytes. Treatment of unlesioned OHSCs with IL-1beta did not induce neuronal damage but caused an increase in the number of microglial cells. NMDA lesioning alone resulted in a massive increase in the number of microglial cells and degenerating neurons. Treatment of NMDA-lesioned OHSCs with IL-1beta exacerbated neuronal cell death and further enhanced microglial cell numbers. Treatment of NMDA-lesioned cultures with IL-1ra significantly attenuated NMDA-induced neuronal damage and reduced the number of microglial cells, whereas application of IL-1ra in unlesioned OHSCs did not induce significant changes in either cell population. Our findings indicate that: (i) IL-1beta directly affects the central nervous system and acts independently of infiltrating hematogenous cells; (ii) IL-1beta induces microglial activation but is not neurotoxic per se; (iii) IL-1beta enhances excitotoxic neuronal damage and microglial activation and (iv) IL-1ra, even when applied for only 4 h, reduces neuronal cell death and the number of microglial cells after excitotoxic damage.

  13. Hippocampal neurons in organotypic slice culture are highly resistant to damage by endogenous and exogenous nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keynes, Robert G; Duport, Sophie; Garthwaite, John

    2004-03-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been proposed to mediate neurodegeneration arising from NMDA receptor activity, but the issue remains controversial. The hypothesis was re-examined using organotypic slice cultures of rat hippocampus, with steps being taken to avoid known artefacts. The NO-cGMP signalling pathway was well preserved in such cultures. Brief exposure to NMDA resulted in a concentration-dependent delayed neuronal death that could be nullified by administration of the NMDA antagonist MK801 (10 microm) given postexposure. Two inhibitors of NO synthesis failed to protect the slices, despite fully blocking NMDA-induced cGMP accumulation. By comparing NMDA-induced cGMP accumulation with that produced by an NO donor, toxic NMDA concentrations were estimated to produce only physiological NO concentrations (2 nm). In studies of the vulnerability of the slices to exogenous NO, it was found that continuous exposure to up to 4.5 microm NO failed to affect ATP levels (measured after 6 h) or cause damage during 24 h, whereas treatment with the respiratory inhibitors myxothiazol or cyanide caused ATP depletion and complete cell death within 24 h. An NO concentration of 10 microm was required for ATP depletion and cell death, presumably through respiratory inhibition. It is concluded that sustained activity of neuronal NO synthase in intact hippocampal tissue can generate only low nanomolar NO concentrations, which are unlikely to be toxic. At the same time, the tissue is remarkably resistant to exogenous NO at up to 1000-fold higher concentrations. Together, the results seriously question the proposed role of NO in NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity.

  14. Ephrin-A3 reverse signaling regulates hippocampal neuronal damage and astrocytic glutamate transport after transient global ischemia.

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    Yang, Jinshan; Luo, Xiang; Huang, Xiaojiang; Ning, Qin; Xie, Minjie; Wang, Wei

    2014-11-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that the Eph receptors and their ephrin ligands are involved in the regulation of interactions between neurons and astrocytes. Moreover, astrocytic ephrin-A3 reverse signaling mediated by EphA4 receptors is necessary for controlling the abundance of glial glutamate transporters. However, the role of ephrin-A3 reverse signaling in astrocytic function and neuronal death under ischemic conditions remains unclear. In the present study, we found that the EphA4 receptor and its ephrin-A3 ligand, which were distributed in neurons and astrocytes, respectively, in the hippocampus showed a coincident up-regulation of protein expression in the early stage of ischemia. Application of clustered EphA4 decreased the expressions of astrocytic glutamate transporters together with astrocytic glutamate uptake capacity through activating ephrin-A3 reverse signaling. In consequence, neuronal loss was aggravated in the CA1 region of the hippocampus accompanied by impaired hippocampus-dependent spatial memory when clustered EphA4 treatment was administered prior to transient global ischemia. These findings indicate that EphA4-mediated ephrin-A3 reverse signaling is a crucial mechanism for astrocytes to control glial glutamate transporters and prevent glutamate excitotoxicity under pathological conditions. Astrocytic ephrin-A3 reverse signaling mediated by EphA4 receptor is necessary for controlling the abundance of glial glutamate transporters under physiological conditions. However, the role of ephrin-A3 reverse signaling in astrocytic function and neuronal death under ischemic conditions remains unclear. We found EphA4-mediated ephrin-A3 reverse signaling to be a crucial mechanism for astrocytes to control glial glutamate transporters and protect hippocampal neurons from glutamate excitotoxicity under ischemic conditions, this cascade representing a potential therapeutic target for stroke.

  15. Repeated febrile convulsions impair hippocampal neurons and cause synaptic damage in immature rats:neuroprotective effect of fructose-1,6-diphosphate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianping Zhou; Fan Wang; Jun Zhang; Hui Gao; Yufeng Yang; Rongguo Fu

    2014-01-01

    Fructose-1,6-diphosphate is a metabolic intermediate that promotes cell metabolism. We hy-pothesize that fructose-1,6-diphosphate can protect against neuronal damage induced by febrile convulsions. Hot-water bathing was used to establish a repetitive febrile convulsion model in rats aged 21 days, equivalent to 3-5 years in humans. Ninety minutes before each seizure induc-tion, rats received an intraperitoneal injection of low- or high-dose fructose-1,6-diphosphate (500 or 1,000 mg/kg, respectively). Low- and high-dose fructose-1,6-diphosphate prolonged the latency and shortened the duration of seizures. Furthermore, high-dose fructose-1,6-di-phosphate effectively reduced seizure severity. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that 24 hours after the last seizure, high-dose fructose-1,6-diphosphate reduced mitochondrial swelling, rough endoplasmic reticulum degranulation, Golgi dilation and synaptic cleft size, and increased synaptic active zone length, postsynaptic density thickness, and synaptic interface cur-vature in the hippocampal CA1 area. The present findings suggest that fructose-1,6-diphosphate is a neuroprotectant against hippocampal neuron and synapse damage induced by repeated fe-brile convulsion in immature rats.

  16. Excitotoxic insult results in a long-lasting activation of CaMKIIα and mitochondrial damage in living hippocampal neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolai Otmakhov

    Full Text Available Over-activation of excitatory NMDA receptors and the resulting Ca2+ overload is the main cause of neuronal toxicity during stroke. CaMKII becomes misregulated during such events. Biochemical studies show either a dramatic loss of CaMKII activity or its persistent autonomous activation after stroke, with both of these processes being implicated in cell toxicity. To complement the biochemical data, we monitored CaMKII activation in living hippocampal neurons in slice cultures using high spatial/temporal resolution two-photon imaging of the CaMKIIα FRET sensor, Camui. CaMKII activation state was estimated by measuring Camui fluorescence lifetime. Short NMDA insult resulted in Camui activation followed by a redistribution of its protein localization: an increase in spines, a decrease in dendritic shafts, and concentration into numerous clusters in the cell soma. Camui activation was either persistent (> 1-3 hours or transient (~20 min and, in general, correlated with its protein redistribution. After longer NMDA insult, however, Camui redistribution persisted longer than its activation, suggesting distinct regulation/phases of these processes. Mutational and pharmacological analysis suggested that persistent Camui activation was due to prolonged Ca2+ elevation, with little impact of autonomous states produced by T286 autophosphorylation and/or by C280/M281 oxidation. Cell injury was monitored using expressible mitochondrial marker mito-dsRed. Shortly after Camui activation and clustering, NMDA treatment resulted in mitochondrial swelling, with persistence of the swelling temporarily linked to the persistence of Camui activation. The results suggest that in living neurons excitotoxic insult produces long-lasting Ca2+-dependent active state of CaMKII temporarily linked to cell injury. CaMKII function, however, is to be restricted due to strong clustering. The study provides the first characterization of CaMKII activation dynamics in living neurons

  17. Brief anoxia preconditioning and HIF prolyl-hydroxylase inhibition enhances neuronal resistance in organotypic hippocampal slices on model of ischemic damage.

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    Lushnikova, Iryna; Orlovsky, Maxim; Dosenko, Victor; Maistrenko, Anastasiia; Skibo, Galina

    2011-04-22

    It is well known that a brief anoxia or hypoxia episodes can render brain resistant to a subsequent ischemia. Recent investigations indicate that mechanisms of such stimulated endogenous neuroprotection are related to the family of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF), however there are still little data available on the role of HIF family members in hippocampus-a brain structure, highly sensitive to oxygen deficiency. We have used the model of cultured hippocampal slices and single-cell quantitative RT-PCR to study HIF-1α and HIF-3α mRNA expression following triple 5-min mild anoxia, 30-min oxygen-glucose deprivation and their combination. We also tested the effects of HIF prolyl-hydroxylase inhibition with 2,4-pyridinedicarboxylic acid diethyl ester pre-treatment followed by a 30-min oxygen-glucose deprivation. It was found that neuronal damage induced by oxygen-glucose deprivation was accompanied by a significant decrease in both HIF-1α and HIF-3α mRNA levels in CA1 but not CA3 neurons. Anoxia preconditioning did not affect cell viability and HIF mRNA levels but applied before oxygen-glucose deprivation prevented neuronal damage and suppression of HIF-1α and HIF-3α mRNA expression. It was also found that effects of the prolyl-hydroxylase inhibitor were similar to anoxia preconditioning. These results suggest that anoxia preconditioning increases anti-ischemic neuronal resistance which to a certain extent correlates with the changes of HIF-1α and HIF-3α expression.

  18. Delayed hippocampal damage in humans following cardiorespiratory arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petito, C K; Feldmann, E; Pulsinelli, W A; Plum, F

    1987-08-01

    Transient ischemia in animals produces delayed cell death in vulnerable hippocampal neurons. To see if this occurs in humans, we reexamined brain slides from all patients with anoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and a well-documented cardiorespiratory arrest. Eight patients dying 18 hours or less after cardiac arrest had minimal damage in hippocampus and moderate damage in cerebral cortex and putamen. Six patients living 24 hours or more had severe damage in all four regions. The increase in damage with time postarrest was significant only in the hippocampus. Delayed hippocampal injury now documented in humans provides a target for possible therapy that can be initiated after cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

  19. Neuroprotective effects of α-iso-cubebene against glutamate-induced damage in the HT22 hippocampal neuronal cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sun Young; Jung, Won Jung; Kang, Jum Soon; Kim, Cheol-Min; Park, Geuntae; Choi, Young-Whan

    2015-02-01

    Since oxidative stress is critically involved in excitotoxic damage, we sought to determine whether the activation of the transcription factors, cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) and nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2, also known as NFE2L2), by α-iso-cubebene is involved in its protective effects against glutamate-induced neuronal cell death. Pre-treatment with α-iso-cubebene significantly attenuated glutamate-induced cytotoxicity in mouse hippocampus-derived neuronal cells. α-iso-cubebene also reduced the glutamate-induced generation of reactive oxygen species and calcium influx, thus preventing apoptotic cell death. α-iso-cubebene inhibited glutamate-induced mitochondrial membrane depolarization and, consequently, inhibited the release of the apoptosis-inducing factor from the mitochondria. Immunoblot anlaysis revealed that the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) by glutamate was reduced in the presence of α-iso-cubebene. α-iso-cubebene activated protein kinase A (PKA), CREB and Nrf2, which mediate the expression of the antioxidant enzymes, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and NAD(P)H dehydrogenase [quinone] 1 (NQO1), involved in neuroprotection. In addition, α-iso-cubebene induced the expression of antioxidant responsive element and CRE transcriptional activity, thus conferring neuroprotection against glutamate-induced oxidative injury. α-iso-cubebene also induced the expression of Nrf2-dependent genes encoding HO-1 and NQO1. Furthermore, the knockdown of CREB and Nrf2 by small interfering RNA attenuated the neuroprotective effects of α-iso-cubebene. Taken together, our results indicate that α-iso-cubebene protects HT22 cells from glutamate-induced oxidative damage through the activation of Nrf2/HO-1/NQO-1, as well as through the PKA and CREB signaling pathways.

  20. Cannabidiol attenuates OGD/R-induced damage by enhancing mitochondrial bioenergetics and modulating glucose metabolism via pentose-phosphate pathway in hippocampal neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanshan Sun

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Deficient bioenergetics and diminished redox conservation have been implicated in the development of cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. In this study, the mechanisms underlying the neuroprotective effects of cannabidiol (CBD, a nonpsychotropic compound derived from Cannabis sativa with FDA-approved antiepilepsy properties, were studied in vitro using an oxygen–glucose-deprivation/reperfusion (OGD/R model in a mouse hippocampal neuronal cell line. CBD supplementation during reperfusion rescued OGD/R-induced cell death, attenuated intracellular ROS generation and lipid peroxidation, and simultaneously reversed the abnormal changes in antioxidant biomarkers. Using the Seahorse XFe24 Extracellular Flux Analyzer, we found that CBD significantly improved basal respiration, ATP-linked oxygen consumption rate, and the spare respiratory capacity, and augmented glucose consumption in OGD/R-injured neurons. The activation of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase and the preservation of the NADPH/NADP+ ratio implies that the pentose-phosphate pathway is stimulated by CBD, thus protecting hippocampal neurons from OGD/R injury. This study is the first to document the neuroprotective effects of CBD against OGD/R insult, which depend in part on attenuating oxidative stress, enhancing mitochondrial bioenergetics, and modulating glucose metabolism via the pentose-phosphate pathway, thus preserving both energy and the redox balance.

  1. Interleukin-1beta exacerbates hypoxia-induced neuronal damage, but attenuates toxicity produced by simulated ischaemia and excitotoxicity in rat organotypic hippocampal slice cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pringle, A K; Niyadurupola, N; Johns, P; Anthony, D C; Iannotti, F

    2001-06-01

    Using organotypic hippocampal slice cultures we have investigated the actions of Interleukin-1 (IL-1) in a number of injury paradigms. Low concentrations of IL-1 potentiated hypoxia-induced neurodegeneration whilst high concentrations had no effect. In contrast, higher concentrations of IL-1 were strongly neuroprotective in models of combined oxygen/glucose deprivation and N-methyl-D-aspartate toxicity, but no potentiation was observed at low IL-1 concentrations. Both protective and toxic effects of IL-1 were fully antagonized by IL-1 receptor antagonist. These data demonstrate that the effects of IL-1 on neuronal injury are complex, and may be directly related to the injury paradigm studied.

  2. HIPPOCAMPAL SCLEROSIS, HIPPOCAMPAL NEURON LOSS PATTERNS AND TDP-43 IN THE AGED POPULATION.

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    Hokkanen, Suvi R K; Hunter, Sally; Polvikoski, Tuomo M; Keage, Hannah A D; Minett, Thais; Matthews, Fiona E; Brayne, Carol

    2017-08-18

    Hippocampal neuron loss is a common neuropathological feature in old age with various underlying aetiologies. Hippocampal sclerosis of aging (HS-Aging) is neuropathologically characterized by severe CA1 neuronal loss and frequent presence of transactive response DNA-binding protein of 43kDa (TDP-43) aggregations. Its aetiology is unclear and currently no standardized approaches to measure HS-Aging exist. We developed a semi-quantitative protocol, which captures various hippocampal neuron loss patterns, and compared their occurrence in the context of HS-Aging, TDP-43, vascular and tau pathology in 672 brains (TDP-43 staining n=642/672, 96%) donated for the population-based Cambridge City over-75s Cohort and the Cognitive Function and Ageing Study. HS-Aging was first evaluated independently from the protocol using the most common criteria defined in literature, and then described in detail through examination of neuron loss patterns and associated pathologies. 34 (5%) cases were identified, with a maximum of five pyramidal neurons in each of over half CA1 fields-of-view (x200 magnification), no vascular damage, no neuron loss in CA2-CA4, but consistent TDP-43 neuronal solid inclusions and neurites. We also report focal CA1 neuron loss with vascular pathology to affect predominantly CA1 bordering CA2 (Fisher's exact, p=0.009), whereas neuron loss in the subicular end of CA1 was associated with TDP-43 inclusions (Fisher's exact, pTDP-43. We conclude that hippocampal neuron loss patterns are associated with different aetiologies within CA1, and propose that these patterns can be used to form objective criteria for HS-Aging diagnosis. Finally, based on our results we hypothesize that neuron loss leading to HS-Aging starts from the subicular end of CA1 when it is associated with TDP-43 pathology, and that this neurodegenerative process is likely to be significantly more common than "end-stage" HS-Aging only. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Indomethacin protects rats from neuronal damage induced by traumatic brain injury and suppresses hippocampal IL-1β release through the inhibition of Nogo-A expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Po-Kuan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nogo-A is a member of the reticulon family of membrane-associated proteins and plays an important role in axonal remodeling. The present study aimed to investigate alterations in Nogo-A expression following traumatic brain injury (TBI-induced inflammation and neuronal damage. Methods A weight-drop device was used to deliver a standard traumatic impact to rats. Western blot, RT-PCR and ELISA were used to analyze the expression of Nogo-A and IL-1β. Nogo-A antisense, and an irrelevant control oligonucleotide was intracerebroventricularly infused. We also performed H & E staining and luxol fast blue staining to evaluate the neuronal damage and demyelination resulting from TBI and various treatments. Results Based on RT-PCR and western blot analyses, the expression of Nogo-A was found to be significantly upregulated in the hippocampus beginning eight hours after TBI. In addition, TBI caused an apparent elevation in IL-1β levels and severe neuronal damage and demyelination in the tested animals. All of the TBI-associated molecular and cellular consequences could be effectively reversed by treating the animals with the anti-inflammatory drug indomethacin. More importantly, the TBI-associated stimulation in the levels of both Nogo-A and IL-1β could be effectively inhibited by a specific Nogo-A antisense oligonucleotide. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the suppression of Nogo-A expression appears to be an early response conferred by indomethacin, which then leads to decreases in the levels of IL-1β and TBI-induced neuron damage.

  4. Amyloid Beta-peptide (25-35) changes (Ca2+) in hippocampal neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Helle Smidt; Beatty, Diane; Morris, Stephen

    1998-01-01

    neuroscience, Alzheimer, calcium ion, hippocampal neurons, amyloid-beta-peptide, hydrogen ion, rat......neuroscience, Alzheimer, calcium ion, hippocampal neurons, amyloid-beta-peptide, hydrogen ion, rat...

  5. EFFECT OF MOBILE PHONE RADIOFREQUENCY ON HIPPOCAMPAL CA3 NEURONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivas Rao Bolla

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of the study is to investigate the effects of mobile phone [MP] radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF exposure for different durations on dendritic morphology and nerve cell damage in CA3 sub region of Hippocampus in Swiss albino mice. Materials &Methods: Total 70 Swiss albino mice of both sexes were used in the study. Animals were divided into 10 groups randomly. Five groups (n=6 were used for assessment of neuronal damage by cresyl violet staining. Another five groups (n=8 were used for assessment of dendritic morphology by Golgi- Cox staining. Groups were divided by exposure duration (15, 30, 45 and 60 minutes/ per day for 30 days; age matched unexposed groups served as controls. Results: Results of the study have shown that there was decrease in the number of viable neurons and dendritic arborization in CA3 sub region of hippocampus in 30, 45 and 60 min exposed groups. Conclusions: Increased neuronal damage and decreased dendritic arborization of hippocampal CA3 neurons was found with increase in exposure duration of MPRF-EMF.

  6. Establishment of a mechanical injury model of rat hippocampal neurons in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xiao-feng; CAO Fei; PAN De-sheng; LIU Wei-guo; HU Wei-wei; ZHENG Xiu-jue; ZHAO Xue-qun; L(U) Shi-ting

    2006-01-01

    Objective:To establish a simple, reproducible, and practical mechanical injury model of hippocampal neurons of Sprague-Dawley rats in vitro.Methods: Hippocampal neurons isolated from1-2-day old rats were cultured in vitro. Mild, moderate and severe mechanical injuries were delivered to the neurons by syringe needle tearing, respectively. The control neurons were treated identically with the exception of trauma. Cell damage was assessed by measuring the Propidium Iodide(PI) uptaking at different time points (0.5, 1, 6, 12 and24 hours) after injury. The concentration of neuron specific enolase was also measured at some time points.Results: Pathological examination showed that degeneration, degradation and necrosis occurred in the injured cultured neurons. Compared with the control group, the ratio of PI-positive cells in the injured groups increased significantly after 30 minutes of injury (P <0.05). More severe the damage was, more PI-positive neurons were detected. Compared with the control group,the concentration of neuron specific enolase in the injured culture increased significantly after 1 hour of injury (P <0.05).Conclusions: The established model of hippocampal neuron injury in vitro can be repeated easily and can simulate the damage mechanism of traumatic brain injury,which can be used in the future research of traumatic brain injury.

  7. Isoflurane-induced neuronal apoptosis in developing hippocampal neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongliang Liu; Tijun Dai; Weitao Guo

    2013-01-01

    We hypothesized that the P2X7 receptor may be the target of isoflurane, so we investigated the roles of the P2X7 receptor and inositol triphosphate receptor in calcium overload and neuronal apoptosis induced by isoflurane in cultured embryonic rat hippocampal neurons. Results showed that isoflurane induced widespread neuronal apoptosis and significantly increased cytoplasmic Ca2+. Blockade of P2X7 receptors or removal of extracellular Ca2+ combined with blockade of inositol triphosphate receptors completely inhibited apoptosis or increase in cytoplasmic Ca2+. Removal of extracellular Ca2+ or blockade of inositol triphosphate receptor alone could partly inhibit these effects of isoflurane. Isoflurane could directly activate P2X7-gated channels and induce inward currents, but did not affect the expression of P2X7 receptor protein in neurons. These findings indicate that the mechanism by which isoflurane induced neuronal apoptosis in rat developing brain was mediated by intracellular calcium overload, which was caused by P2X7 receptor mediated calcium influx and inositol triphosphate receptor mediated calcium release.

  8. Cocaine depresses GABAA current of hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, J H; Liu, P L; Wu, W H; McArdle, J J

    1997-10-01

    Although blockade of dopamine re-uptake and the resulting elevation of excitatory agonists is commonly thought the primary mechanism of cocaine-induced seizures, it is possible that other neurotransmitters such as gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) are involved. To examine this possibility, the effects of cocaine on the whole cell GABA current (IGABA) of freshly isolated rat hippocampal neurons were investigated with the patch-clamp technique. Preincubation or acute application of cocaine reversibly suppressed IGABA. The IC50 was 127 microM when cocaine was applied before the application of GABA. The concentration-response relations of cocaine in various GABA concentrations revealed that cocaine inhibited IGABA non-competitively. This effect of cocaine appeared to be independent of voltage. The present study suggests that the GABA receptor/channel complex is also a target for cocaine's action. The suppression of IGABA may contribute to cocaine-induced seizures.

  9. Neuronal injury and cytogenesis after simple febrile seizures in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of juvenile rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazem, Amir; Jafarian, Amir Hossein; Sadraie, Seyed Homayoon; Gorji, Ali; Kheradmand, Hamed; Radmard, Mahla; Haghir, Hossein

    2012-11-01

    Although simple febrile seizures are frequently described as harmless, there is evidence which suggests that hippocampal damage may occur after simple febrile seizures. This study aimed to investigate possible neuronal damages as well as alterations in cytogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus following simple febrile seizures. Simple febrile seizure was modeled by hyperthermia-induced seizures in 22-day-old male rats. The brains were removed 2 or 15 days after hyperthermia in all rats with (n=20) and without (n=10) occurrence of seizures as well as in control animals (n=10). The sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin to estimate the surface numerical density of dark neurons. Ki-67 immunohistochemistry was performed to evaluate changes of cytogenesis following simple febrile seizures. Hyperthermia induced behavioral seizure activities in 67 % of the rats. The numerical densities of dark neurons as well as the mean Ki-67 index (the fraction of Ki-67-positive cells) were significantly increased in dentate gyrus after induction of seizures by hyperthermia compared to both controls and rats without seizure after hyperthermia. Both the seizure duration and intensity were correlated significantly with numerical densities of dark neurons (but not with Ki-67 index). The data indicate that simple febrile seizures can cause neuronal damages and enhancement of cytogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus, which were still visible for at least 2 weeks. These findings also suggest the correlation of febrile seizure intensity and duration with neuronal damage.

  10. Chrysophanol attenuates lead exposure-induced injury to hippocampal neurons in neonatal mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji Zhang; Chunlin Yan; Shu Wang; Yong Hou; Guiping Xue; Li Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that chrysophanol protects against learning and memory impairments in lead-exposed adult mice. In the present study, we investigated whether chrys-ophanol can alleviate learning and memory dysfunction and hippocampal neuronal injury in lead-exposed neonatal mice. At the end of lactation, chrysophanol (0.1, 1.0, 10.0 mg/kg) was administered to the neonatal mice by intraperitoneal injection for 15 days. Chrysophanol signifi-cantly alleviated injury to hippocampal neurons and improved learning and memory abilities in the lead-poisoned neonatal mice. Chrysophanol also significantly decreased lead content in blood, brain, heart, spleen, liver and kidney in the lead-exposed neonatal mice. The levels of malondialdehyde in the brain, liver and kidney were significantly reduced, and superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities were significantly increased after chrysophanol treatment. Collectively, these findings indicate that chrysophanol can significantly reduce damage to hippocampal neurons in lead-exposed neonatal mice.

  11. Dendritic potassium channels in hippocampal pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, D; Hoffman, D A; Magee, J C; Poolos, N P; Watanabe, S; Colbert, C M; Migliore, M

    2000-05-15

    Potassium channels located in the dendrites of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons control the shape and amplitude of back-propagating action potentials, the amplitude of excitatory postsynaptic potentials and dendritic excitability. Non-uniform gradients in the distribution of potassium channels in the dendrites make the dendritic electrical properties markedly different from those found in the soma. For example, the influence of a fast, calcium-dependent potassium current on action potential repolarization is progressively reduced in the first 150 micrometer of the apical dendrites, so that action potentials recorded farther than 200 micrometer from the soma have no fast after-hyperpolarization and are wider than those in the soma. The peak amplitude of back-propagating action potentials is also progressively reduced in the dendrites because of the increasing density of a transient potassium channel with distance from the soma. The activation of this channel can be reduced by the activity of a number of protein kinases as well as by prior depolarization. The depolarization from excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) can inactivate these A-type K+ channels and thus lead to an increase in the amplitude of dendritic action potentials, provided the EPSP and the action potentials occur within the appropriate time window. This time window could be in the order of 15 ms and may play a role in long-term potentiation induced by pairing EPSPs and back-propagating action potentials.

  12. 钾电流在甲基苯丙胺引起神经元损伤中的作用%The involvement of outward potassium currents in methamphetamine-induced hippocampal neuron damage in fetal rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋雷; 王军; 高蓉; 肖杭; 张劲松

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of methamphetamine (Meth) on the outward K+ currents and elucidate the role of outward K+ channels in Meth induced hippocampal neuron damage.Methods Hippocampal neurons were harvest from 18-day-old embryonic rats and were divided into two groups:the control group and the Meth treated group.Both of 4-AP and TEA sensitive K+ currents were recorded after the treatment of Meth by performing the whole cell patch clamp.Furthermore,the MTT and TUNEL assays were performed to evaluate the effects of K+ channel on hippocampal neuron damage mediated by Meth.For statistical comparison,One-way ANOVA and LSD multiple comparison test or t-test was used.P-value < 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant.Results The density of 4-AP sensitive K+ channel currents in Meth treated group [(120.1 ± 19.6) pA/pF,n =7] were significantly increased when compared with control group [(87.4 ± 12.5) pA/pF,n =10,P <0.01] and the increments of the currents induced by Meth was dose dependent.The MTT data showed that the cell viability was obviously decreased in Meth treated group (48.72 ± 4.38) % relative to the control group (100.07 ± 3.36) %.Moreover,application of K+ channel antagonist,4-AP (61.39 ± 3.15)%,and the high K+ solution (78.25 ± 9.42) % substantially enhanced the cell viability.The TUNEL assay showed there were protective effects of 4-AP and the high K+ solution against neuron damage observed during cells exposed to Meth.Conclusions The increments of 4-AP sensitive K+ channel currents induced by Meth might be involved in hippocampal neuron damage.%目的 探讨甲基苯丙胺(Meth)对外向钾电流的影响及外向型钾通道在Meth引起的海马神经元损伤过程中的作用.方法 以分离出的怀孕18 d Sprague-Dawley大鼠胎鼠的海马神经元作为实验对象,分为对照组和Meth处理组,采用全细胞膜片钳的实验方法,分别记录Meth处理后外向4-AP和TEA敏感型钾电流大小的变

  13. Quantitative measurement of neuronal degeneration in organotypic hippocampal cultures after combined oxygen/glucose deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasser, U; Fischer, G

    1995-04-01

    Organotypic hippocampal cultures were used to study cell degeneration during the recovery period after defined periods (30 and 60 min) of combined oxygen/glucose deprivation mimicking transient ischemic conditions. Staining with the fluorescent dye propidium iodide allowed detection of damaged cells. Fluorescence intensity was measured by an image analysis system and used to quantify cell damage at different time points during the recovery period (up to 22 h). At 30 min of oxygen/glucose deprivation cells in the CA1 area were relatively more sensitive compared to CA3 and dentate gyrus cells, with respect to the time course of degeneration and the percentage of affected cells. Expanding the oxygen/glucose deprivation period from 30 to 60 min drastically increased the percentage of cells dying in all hippocampal areas. Still, however, cells in CA1 degenerated faster compared to those in the CA3 area and dentate gyrus. A histological analysis of toluidine blue as well as MAP2-immunostained sections revealed that almost all neurons degenerated in all hippocampal areas following the 60-min deprivation period, whereas GFAP-stained astrocytes appeared to be unaffected. Therefore, neuronal degeneration could be quantified by taking the fluorescence intensity values 22 h after 60 min of oxygen/glucose deprivation as 100% neuronal damage. The possibility to quantify neuronal damage in organotypic cultures offers a useful tool for detailed studies on mechanisms of neuronal cell death in a cell culture system which is closer to in situ conditions than monolayer cell cultures.

  14. EFFECTS OF CILIARY NEUROTROPHIC FACTOR ON BEHAVIORAL DISORDERAND HIPPOCAMPAL CA1 NEURONAL DAMAGE INDUCED BY STRESS IN RATS%CNTF对应激大鼠行为障碍和海马CA1神经元损害的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    严进; 路长林; 汤淑萍; 何成; 王成海; 王雪琦; 黄爱军; 孟玲; 鲍璇; 张铁峰

    2000-01-01

    实验采用open field测定、Nissl染色、Bielschowsky-Gros-Lawrentjew染色和常规透射电镜技术,观察急性和慢性足底电击应激大鼠的open field行为和海马CAl神经元形态的变化,及双侧海马注射睫状神经营养因子(CNTF)对它的影响。结果表明,急性应激大鼠open field行为活动增加,海马CAl神经元形态无明显变化;慢性应激大鼠open field行为活动减少,海马CAl神经元出现明显的损伤性形态变化;睫状神经营养因子对对照组大鼠和急性应激大鼠的open field行为和海马CAl神经元形态均无明显作用,但可显著减轻慢性应激大鼠海马CAl神经元损伤程度,改善其行为障碍。实验结果提示睫状神经营养因子可能通过保护海马神经元从而改善慢性应激大鼠的行为障碍。%Objective The experiment was to investigate into the effects of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) on behavioral disorder and hippocampal CAl neuronal damage induced by stress in rats. Methods The footshock stress-induced changes of behaviors and morphology of hippocampal CAl neurons during acute or chronic stress in rats, and the effects of CNTF administrated into bilateral hippocampus on the changes were observed with open field test, Nissl stain, Bielschowsky-Gros-Lawrentjew stain and electron microscope. Results The open field behaviors increased and morphology of hippocampal CA1 neurons did not change during acute stress in rats. The open field behaviors decreased and hippoampal CAl neuronal damage occurred during chronic stress. CNTF administrated into bilateral hippocampus had no effect on behavior and morphology of hippocampal CA1 neurons in control and acute stressful rats, but it significantly reduced hippocampal CAl neuronal damage and improved behavioral disorder induced by chronic stress. Conclusion CNTF could improve depressive behavior induced by chronic stress via protection of hippocampal CAl neurons.

  15. Ultrastructural study of hippocampal cortex neurons in an experimental model of valproate encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sendrowski, Krzysztof; Sobaniec, Wojciech; Sobaniec, Piotr; Sobaniec-Lotowska, Maria E

    2013-01-01

    Valproate (VPA) is a widely used antiepileptic drug. A serious neurological-outcome defined as valproate encephalopathy (VE) may rarely occur during VPA therapy. Structural abnormalities within neurons are postulated as one of the reasons for VE. The aim of this study was to assess the ultrastructure of neurons in the hippocampal cortex during the course of chronic application of VPA to rats. VPA was chronically administered to rats, intragastrically, once daily at a dose of 200 mg/kg b.w. for 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months. The samples of hippocampal cortex, after routine laboratory preparation, were examined by electron microscopy. The drug induced pronounced ultrastructural changes in the population of pyramidal neurons within the hippocampal cortex after 9 and 12 months of VPA administration. The most expressed abnormalities were observed within the mitochondria and manifested by fragmentation of crests and almost complete disappearance of intramitochondrial granules. Mitochondria of numerous neurons resembled large vacuolar structures. Widening, shortening and irregular distribution of rough endoplasmic reticulum was also found. A characteristic feature of damaged neurocytes in the last two phases of the experiment was the disintegration of nuclear chromatin and the presence of numerous lipofuscin deposits within hyaloplasm. These cells assumed the look of "dark neurons" and presented the ultrastructural features of apoptosis and necrosis. Our results indicate that long-term VPA administration to rats leads to aponecrosis of hippocampal neurons.

  16. Preservation of hippocampal neuron numbers in aged rhesus monkeys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keuker, J.I.H.; Luiten, P.G.M.; Fuchs, E.

    2003-01-01

    To investigate whether or not aging of nonhuman primates is accompanied by a region-specific neuron loss in the hippocampal formation, we used the optical fractionator technique to obtain stereological estimates of unilateral neuron numbers of the hippocampi of eight young (0-4 years) and five aged

  17. SIRT1 regulates dendritic development in hippocampal neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan F Codocedo

    Full Text Available Dendritic arborization is required for proper neuronal connectivity. SIRT1, a NAD+ dependent histone deacetylase, has been associated to ageing and longevity, which in neurons is linked to neuronal differentiation and neuroprotection. In the present study, the role of SIRT1 in dendritic development was evaluated in cultured hippocampal neurons which were transfected at 3 days in vitro with a construct coding for SIRT1 or for the dominant negative SIRT1H363Y, which lacks the catalytic activity. Neurons overexpressing SIRT1 showed an increased dendritic arborization, while neurons overexpressing SIRT1H363Y showed a reduction in dendritic arbor complexity. The effect of SIRT1 was mimicked by treatment with resveratrol, a well known activator of SIRT1, which has no effect in neurons overexpressing SIRT1H363Y indicating that the effect of resveratrol was specifically mediated by SIRT1. Moreover, hippocampal neurons overexpressing SIRT1 were resistant to dendritic dystrophy induced by Aβ aggregates, an effect that was dependent on the deacetylase activity of SIRT1. Our findings indicate that SIRT1 plays a role in the development and maintenance of dendritic branching in hippocampal neurons, and suggest that these effects are mediated by the ROCK signaling pathway.

  18. SIRT1 Regulates Dendritic Development in Hippocampal Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoy, Juan A.; Varela-Nallar, Lorena; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic arborization is required for proper neuronal connectivity. SIRT1, a NAD+ dependent histone deacetylase, has been associated to ageing and longevity, which in neurons is linked to neuronal differentiation and neuroprotection. In the present study, the role of SIRT1 in dendritic development was evaluated in cultured hippocampal neurons which were transfected at 3 days in vitro with a construct coding for SIRT1 or for the dominant negative SIRT1H363Y, which lacks the catalytic activity. Neurons overexpressing SIRT1 showed an increased dendritic arborization, while neurons overexpressing SIRT1H363Y showed a reduction in dendritic arbor complexity. The effect of SIRT1 was mimicked by treatment with resveratrol, a well known activator of SIRT1, which has no effect in neurons overexpressing SIRT1H363Y indicating that the effect of resveratrol was specifically mediated by SIRT1. Moreover, hippocampal neurons overexpressing SIRT1 were resistant to dendritic dystrophy induced by Aβ aggregates, an effect that was dependent on the deacetylase activity of SIRT1. Our findings indicate that SIRT1 plays a role in the development and maintenance of dendritic branching in hippocampal neurons, and suggest that these effects are mediated by the ROCK signaling pathway. PMID:23056585

  19. NaHS Protects against the Impairments Induced by Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation in Different Ages of Primary Hippocampal Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qian; Wang, Binrong; Zhao, Tianzhi; Zhang, Xiangnan; Tao, Lei; Shi, Jinshan; Sun, Xude; Ding, Qian

    2017-01-01

    Brain ischemia leads to poor oxygen supply, and is one of the leading causes of brain damage and/or death. Neuroprotective agents are thus in great need for treatment purpose. Using both young and aged primary cultured hippocampal neurons as in vitro models, we investigated the effect of sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), an exogenous donor of hydrogen sulfide, on oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) damaged neurons that mimick focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) induced brain injury. NaHS treatment (250 μM) protected both young and aged hippocampal neurons, as indicated by restoring number of primary dendrites by 43.9 and 68.7%, number of dendritic end tips by 59.8 and 101.1%, neurite length by 36.8 and 66.7%, and spine density by 38.0 and 58.5% in the OGD-damaged young and aged neurons, respectively. NaHS treatment inhibited growth-associated protein 43 downregulation, oxidative stress in both young and aged hippocampal neurons following OGD damage. Further studies revealed that NaHS treatment could restore ERK1/2 activation, which was inhibited by OGD-induced protein phosphatase 2 (PP2A) upregulation. Our results demonstrated that NaHS has potent protective effects against neuron injury induced by OGD in both young and aged hippocampal neurons.

  20. The Contradictory Effects of Neuronal Hyperexcitationon Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Manuel Encinas

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is a highly plastic process that responds swiftly to neuronal activity. Adult hippocampal neurogenesis can be regulated at the level of neural stem cell recruitment and activation, progenitor proliferation, as well as newborn cell survival and differentiation. An excitation-neurogenesis rule was proposed after the demonstration of the capability of cultured neural stem and progenitor cells to intrinsically sense neuronal excitatory activity. In vivo, this property has remained elusive although recently the direct response of neural stem cells to GABA in the hippocampus via GABAA receptors has evidenced a mechanism for a direct talk between neurons and neural stem cells. As it is pro-neurogenic, the effect of excitatory neuronal activity has been generally considered beneficial. But what happens in situations of neuronal hyperactivity in which neurogenesis can be dramatically boosted? In animal models, electroconvulsive shock markedly increases neurogenesis. On the contrary, in epilepsy rodent models, seizures induce the generation of misplaced neurons with abnormal morphological and electrophysiological properties, namely aberrant neurogenesis. We will herein discuss what is known about the mechanisms of influence of neurons on neural stem cells, as well as the severe effects of neuronal hyperexcitation on hippocampal neurogenesis.

  1. Prefibrillar Tau oligomers alter the nucleic acid protective function of Tau in hippocampal neurons in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Violet, Marie; Chauderlier, Alban; Delattre, Lucie; Tardivel, Meryem; Chouala, Meliza Sendid; Sultan, Audrey; Marciniak, Elodie; Humez, Sandrine; Binder, Lester; Kayed, Rakez; Lefebvre, Bruno; Bonnefoy, Eliette; Buée, Luc; Galas, Marie-Christine

    2015-10-01

    The accumulation of DNA and RNA oxidative damage is observed in cortical and hippocampal neurons from Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains at early stages of pathology. We recently reported that Tau is a key nuclear player in the protection of neuronal nucleic acid integrity in vivo under physiological conditions and hyperthermia, a strong inducer of oxidative stress. In a mouse model of tauopathy (THY-Tau22), we demonstrate that hyperthermia selectively induces nucleic acid oxidative damage and nucleic acid strand breaks in the nucleus and cytoplasm of hippocampal neurons that display early Tau phosphorylation but no Tau fibrils. Nucleic acid-damaged neurons were exclusively immunoreactive for prefibrillar Tau oligomers. A similar association between prefibrillar Tau oligomers and nucleic acid oxidative damage was observed in AD brains. Pretreatment with Methylene Blue (MB), a Tau aggregation inhibitor and a redox cycler, reduced hyperthermia-induced Tau oligomerization as well as nucleic acid damage. This study clearly highlights the existence of an early and critical time frame for hyperthermia-induced Tau oligomerization, which most likely occurs through increased oxidative stress, and nucleic acid vulnerability during the progression of Tau pathology. These results suggest that at early stages of AD, Tau oligomerization triggers the loss of the nucleic acid protective function of monomeric Tau. This study highlights the existence of a short therapeutic window in which to prevent the formation of pathological forms of Tau and their harmful consequences on nucleic acid integrity during the progression of Tau pathology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Dendrosomatic Sonic Hedgehog Signaling in Hippocampal Neurons Regulates Axon Elongation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petralia, Ronald S.; Ott, Carolyn; Wang, Ya-Xian; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer; Mattson, Mark P.

    2015-01-01

    The presence of Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) and its signaling components in the neurons of the hippocampus raises a question about what role the Shh signaling pathway may play in these neurons. We show here that activation of the Shh signaling pathway stimulates axon elongation in rat hippocampal neurons. This Shh-induced effect depends on the pathway transducer Smoothened (Smo) and the transcription factor Gli1. The axon itself does not respond directly to Shh; instead, the Shh signal transduction originates from the somatodendritic region of the neurons and occurs in neurons with and without detectable primary cilia. Upon Shh stimulation, Smo localization to dendrites increases significantly. Shh pathway activation results in increased levels of profilin1 (Pfn1), an actin-binding protein. Mutations in Pfn1's actin-binding sites or reduction of Pfn1 eliminate the Shh-induced axon elongation. These findings indicate that Shh can regulate axon growth, which may be critical for development of hippocampal neurons. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Although numerous signaling mechanisms have been identified that act directly on axons to regulate their outgrowth, it is not known whether signals transduced in dendrites may also affect axon outgrowth. We describe here a transcellular signaling pathway in embryonic hippocampal neurons in which activation of Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) receptors in dendrites stimulates axon growth. The pathway involves the dendritic-membrane-associated Shh signal transducer Smoothened (Smo) and the transcription factor Gli, which induces the expression of the gene encoding the actin-binding protein profilin 1. Our findings suggest scenarios in which stimulation of Shh in dendrites results in accelerated outgrowth of the axon, which therefore reaches its presumptive postsynaptic target cell more quickly. By this mechanism, Shh may play critical roles in the development of hippocampal neuronal circuits. PMID:26658865

  3. Necroptosis Mediates TNF-Induced Toxicity of Hippocampal Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α is a critical proinflammatory cytokine regulating neuroinflammation. Elevated levels of TNF-α have been associated with various neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. However, the signaling events that lead to TNF-α-initiated neurotoxicity are still unclear. Here, we report that RIP3-mediated necroptosis, a form of regulated necrosis, is activated in the mouse hippocampus after intracerebroventricular injection of TNF-α. RIP3 deficiency attenuates TNF-α-initiated loss of hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, we characterized the molecular mechanism of TNF-α-induced neurotoxicity in HT-22 hippocampal neuronal cells. HT-22 cells are sensitive to TNF-α only upon caspase blockage and subsequently undergo necrosis. The cell death is suppressed by knockdown of CYLD or RIP1 or RIP3 or MLKL, suggesting that this necrosis is necroptosis and mediated by CYLD-RIP1-RIP3-MLKL signaling pathway. TNF-α-induced necroptosis of HT-22 cells is largely independent of both ROS accumulation and calcium influx although these events have been shown to be critical for necroptosis in certain cell lines. Taken together, these data not only provide the first in vivo evidence for a role of RIP3 in TNF-α-induced toxicity of hippocampal neurons, but also demonstrate that TNF-α promotes CYLD-RIP1-RIP3-MLKL-mediated necroptosis of hippocampal neurons largely bypassing ROS accumulation and calcium influx.

  4. Necroptosis mediates TNF-induced toxicity of hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shan; Wang, Xing; Li, Yun; Xu, Lei; Yu, Xiaoliang; Ge, Lin; Li, Jun; Zhu, Yongjin; He, Sudan

    2014-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is a critical proinflammatory cytokine regulating neuroinflammation. Elevated levels of TNF-α have been associated with various neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. However, the signaling events that lead to TNF-α-initiated neurotoxicity are still unclear. Here, we report that RIP3-mediated necroptosis, a form of regulated necrosis, is activated in the mouse hippocampus after intracerebroventricular injection of TNF-α. RIP3 deficiency attenuates TNF-α-initiated loss of hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, we characterized the molecular mechanism of TNF-α-induced neurotoxicity in HT-22 hippocampal neuronal cells. HT-22 cells are sensitive to TNF-α only upon caspase blockage and subsequently undergo necrosis. The cell death is suppressed by knockdown of CYLD or RIP1 or RIP3 or MLKL, suggesting that this necrosis is necroptosis and mediated by CYLD-RIP1-RIP3-MLKL signaling pathway. TNF-α-induced necroptosis of HT-22 cells is largely independent of both ROS accumulation and calcium influx although these events have been shown to be critical for necroptosis in certain cell lines. Taken together, these data not only provide the first in vivo evidence for a role of RIP3 in TNF-α-induced toxicity of hippocampal neurons, but also demonstrate that TNF-α promotes CYLD-RIP1-RIP3-MLKL-mediated necroptosis of hippocampal neurons largely bypassing ROS accumulation and calcium influx.

  5. Preservation of hippocampal neuron numbers and hippocampal subfield volumes in behaviorally characterized aged tree shrews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keuker, Jeanine I H; de Biurrun, Gabriel; Luiten, Paul G M; Fuchs, Eberhard

    2004-01-19

    Aging is associated with a decreased ability to store and retrieve information. The hippocampal formation plays a critical role in such memory processes, and its integrity is affected during normal aging. We used tree shrews (Tupaia belangeri) as an animal model of aging, because in many characteristics, tree shrews are closer to primates than they are to rodents. Young and aged male tree shrews performed a holeboard spatial memory task, which permits assessment of reference and working memory. Upon completion of the behavioral measurements, we carried out modified stereological analyses of neuronal numbers in various subdivisions of the hippocampus and used the Cavalieri method to calculate the volumes of these subfields. Results showed that the working memory of aged tree shrews was significantly impaired compared with that of young animals, whereas the hippocampus-dependent reference memory remained unchanged by aging. Estimation of the number of neurons revealed preserved neuron numbers in the subiculum, in the subregions CA1, CA2, CA3, and in the hilus of the dentate gyrus. Volume measurements showed no aging-related changes in the volume of any of these hippocampal subregions, or in the molecular and granule cell layers of the dentate gyrus of tree shrews. We conclude that the observed changes in memory performance in aging tree shrews are not accompanied by observable reductions of hippocampal neuron numbers or hippocampal volume, rather, the changes in memory performance are more likely the result of modified subcellular mechanisms that are affected by the aging process.

  6. 癫(痫)持续状态模型中海马神经元损伤及其可能机制%Hippocampal neuronal damage and its possible mechanism in status epilepticus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁秀芳; 王纪文; 姚国; 代方方; 张冰

    2015-01-01

    目的探讨癫(痫)持续状态(SE)大鼠模型中海马神经元损伤、谷氨酸α-氨基-3-羟基-5-甲基异(噁)唑-4-丙酸(AMPA)受体第二亚单位GluR2的表达变化以及是否存在GluR2与甘油醛-3-磷酸脱氢酶(GAPDH)蛋白复合物的耦合变化.方法 应用氯化锂-毛果芸香碱建立SE大鼠模型(62只),同时设立正常对照组(20只),按照随机数字表法将建SE大鼠分为SE后1h组(6只)、6h组(12只)、24h组(12只)、72 h组(12只)及7d组(20只).按照随机数字表法选择正常对照及SE后6h、24 h、72 h、7d(各6只)作Nissl染色、原位末端标记(TUNEL)分别观察大鼠海马形态学变化、凋亡发生;再选择对照组及SE后1h、6h、24 h、72 h及7d组大鼠(各6只)用Western blot检测GluR2蛋白的表达变化,用免疫共沉淀及Western blot技术研究GluR2与GAPDH蛋白复合物的耦合变化情况.结果 SE后各时间点海马CA1、CA3区神经细胞数量显著减少,与正常对照组比较差异有统计学意义(F=30.866、24.043,P均<0.05);SE后24h、72 h、7d海马CA1、CA3区凋亡细胞数量增加,与正常对照组比较差异有统计学意义(F=84.762、52.574,P均<0.01);与正常对照组比较,SE后1h、6h海马GluR2蛋白相对表达量减少,但差异无统计学意义(P>0.05),SE后24 h、72 h、7 d GluR2相对表达量减少,差异有统计学意义(F=76.506,P<0.01);SE后72 h与正常对照组比较,GluR2与GAPDH形成的蛋白复合物耦合增加,差异有统计学意义(t=7.029,P<0.05).结论 SE可导致海马区神经元损伤,GluR2表达降低及GluR2/GAPDH蛋白复合物耦合增加可能是其机制之一.%Objective To investigate hippocampal neuronal damage and dynamic change of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptor subunit GluR2 in status epilepticus, to find out whether GluR2/glyceral dehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) interaction has any change.Methods Male Wistar rats (62 cases) were induced to status epilepticus

  7. Septo-hippocampal deafferentation protects CA1 neurons against ischemic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchan, A M; Pulsinelli, W A

    1990-03-26

    Excessive synaptic excitation caused by transient cerebral ischemia has been proposed to explain the greater vulnerability of specific neuronal populations to ischemic injury. We tested this hypothesis in rats by cutting, alone or in combination, the afferent fibers that travel in the fimbria/fornix, the perforant, or the Schäffer collateral pathways and innervate the right CA1 hippocampus. Seven to twelve days later the animals were subjected to 30 min of reversible forebrain ischemia. Irreversible damage to the CA1 neurons was assessed with the light microscope after 70-120 h of cerebral reperfusion. The left, unlesioned hippocampus served as a control. Simultaneous cutting of the 3 major afferent pathways significantly reduced CA1 neuronal damage compared to the unlesioned side (P less than 0.001) or to sham-lesioned controls (P less than 0.001). Selective lesions of the fimbria/fornix but not the perforant or the Schäffer collateral pathways also protected against ischemic CA1 damage. These data indicate that afferent fiber input modulates hippocampal damage caused by ischemia, but they are inconsistent with the hypothesis that excitatory afferent fibers, travelling in either the perforant or the Schäffer collateral pathways alone, play a major role. Neurotransmitters, other than those activating excitatory amino acid receptors or yet-to-be-identified synaptic events, may be invoked to explain the spatial and temporal sensitivity of hippocampal CA1 neurons to ischemia.

  8. [Electrophysiological properties of inhibitory neurones in cultured dissociated hippocampal cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskaliuk, A O; Kolodin, Iu O; Kravchenko, M O; Fedulova, S A; Veselovs'kyĭ, M S

    2004-01-01

    Electrophysiological properties of inhibitory (GABAergic) neurones were studied in dissociated hippocampal culture using simultaneous whole cell recordings from pairs of monosynaptically coupled neurons. Reliable identification of GABAergic neuron was performed by presence of monosynaptic inhibitory currents at postsynaptic cell in response to action potentials at stimulated cell. It was shown that GABAergic neurons in hippocampal culture are divided in two groups by their firing characteristics: first type generates action potentials at high frequency in response to injection of current (duration 0.5 s)--fast-spiking neurons (FS), cells from second type has no ability for high-frequency action potential generation--regular spiking neurons (RS). These two groups were distinguished by kinetic characteristics of action potentials, adaptation characteristics during continuous generation of action potentials and inhibitory effect making on postsynaptic cell. Application of potassium channel blocker 4-AP to somas of FS neurons in concentration, which selectively inhibits Kv3 potassium channels evoked reversible changes in kinetic of action potentials, frequency and adaptation characteristics during continuous generation of action potentials. It was concluded that there is hight level of expression of Kv3 potassium channels in the first group of neurons.

  9. Neuroprotective effect of piperine on primarily cultured hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Min; Sun, Zhao-Hui; Zuo, Huan-Cong

    2010-01-01

    It was previously reported that piperine (PIP) significantly blocks convulsions induced by intracerebroventricular injection of threshold doses of kainate, but had no or only slight effects on convulsions induced by L-glutamate, N-methyl-D-aspartate and guanidinosuccinate. In traditional Chinese medicine, black pepper has been used for epileptic treatment; however, the exact mechanism is still unclear. We reported here in that appropriate concentration of PIP effectively inhibites the synchronized oscillation of intracellular calcium in rat hippocampal neuronal networks and represses spontaneous synaptic activities in terms of spontaneous synaptic currents (SSC) and spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSC). Moreover, pretreatment with PIP expects protective effect on glutamate-induced decrease of cell viability and apoptosis of hippocampal neurons. These data suggest that the neuroprotective effects of PIP might be associated with suppression of synchronization of neuronal networks, presynaptic glutamic acid release, and Ca(2+) overloading.

  10. Hippocampal neuron populations are reduced in vervet monkeys with fetal alcohol exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burke, Mark W; Ptito, Maurice; Ervin, Frank R

    2015-01-01

    of pregnancy. Here, we report significant numerical reductions in the principal hippocampal neurons of fetal alcohol-exposed (FAE) offspring, as compared to age-matched, similarly housed conspecifics with isocaloric sucrose exposure. These deficits, particularly marked in CA1 and CA3, are present neonatally...... late pregnancy results in a stable loss of hippocampal neurons and a progressive reduction of hippocampal volume....

  11. Apolipoprotein E isoform-dependent dendritic recovery of hippocampal neurons following activation of innate immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maezawa Izumi

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Innate immune activation, including a role for cluster of differentiation 14/toll-like receptor 4 co-receptors (CD14/TLR-4 co-receptors, has been implicated in paracrine damage to neurons in several neurodegenerative diseases that also display stratification of risk or clinical outcome with the common alleles of the apolipoprotein E gene (APOE: APOE2, APOE3, and APOE4. Previously, we have shown that specific stimulation of CD14/TLR-4 with lipopolysaccharide (LPS leads to greatest innate immune response by primary microglial cultures from targeted replacement (TR APOE4 mice and greatest p38MAPK-dependent paracrine damage to neurons in mixed primary cultures and hippocampal slice cultures derived from TR APOE4 mice. In contrast, TR APOE2 astrocytes had the highest NF-kappaB activity and no neurotoxicity. Here we tested the hypothesis that direct activation of CD14/TLR-4 in vivo would yield different amounts of paracrine damage to hippocampal sector CA1 pyramidal neurons in TR APOE mice. Methods We measured in vivo changes in dendrite length in hippocampal CA1 neurons using Golgi staining and determined hippocampal apoE levels by Western blot. Neurite outgrowth of cultured primary neurons in response to astrocyte conditioned medium was assessed by measuring neuron length and branch number. Results Our results showed that TR APOE4 mice had slightly but significantly shorter dendrites at 6 weeks of age. Following exposure to intracerebroventricular LPS, there was comparable loss of dendrite length at 24 hr among the three TR APOE mice. Recovery of dendrite length over the next 48 hr was greater in TR APOE2 than TR APOE3 mice, while TR APOE4 mice had failure of dendrite regeneration. Cell culture experiments indicated that the enhanced neurotrophic effect of TR APOE2 was LDL related protein-dependent. Conclusion The data indicate that the environment within TR APOE2 mouse hippocampus was most supportive of dendrite regeneration

  12. Achyranthes bidentata Blume extract promotes neuronal growth in cultured embryonic rat hippocampal neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Tang; Yiren Chen; Xiaosong Gu; Fei Ding

    2009-01-01

    We have prepared an aqueous extract of Achyranthes bidentata Blume,a commonly prescribed Chinese medicinal herb,and reported,in previous studies,that A.bidentata extract benefits nerve growth and prevents neuron apoptosis.In this study,we investigated the actions of ,4.bidentata extract on survival and growth of primarily cultured rat hippocampal neurons.The morphological observation revealed that neurite growth from hippocampal neurons was significantly enhanced by A.bidentata extract with similar effects to those induced by nerve growth factor (NGF),and the greatest neurite growth appeared on treatment with A.bidentata extract at 1 ttg/ml for 24 h.DNA microarray analysis indicated that there were 25 upregulated genes and 47 downregulated genes exhibiting significantly differential expression in hippocampal neurons treated with A.bidentata extract at 1 μg/ml for 6 h when compared to those in untreated hippocampal neurons.Real-time quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot analysis demonstrated that the expression of growth-associated protein-43 in hippocampal neurons was upregulated at both mRNA and protein levels after treatment with A.bidentata extract,and the optimal dosage of the extract was also 1 μg/ml.These data confirm that A.bidentata extract could promote in vitro hippocampal neuronal growth in a dose- and time-dependent manner.(C) 2009 National Natural Science Foundation of China and Chinese Academy of Sciences.Published by Elsevier Limited and Science in China Press.All rights reserved.

  13. Hippocampal Damage Increases Deontological Responses during Moral Decision Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Cornelia; Rosenthal, Clive R; Miller, Thomas D; Maguire, Eleanor A

    2016-11-30

    Complex moral decision making is associated with the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) in humans, and damage to this region significantly increases the frequency of utilitarian judgments. Since the vmPFC has strong anatomical and functional links with the hippocampus, here we asked how patients with selective bilateral hippocampal damage would derive moral decisions on a classic moral dilemmas paradigm. We found that the patients approved of the utilitarian options significantly less often than control participants, favoring instead deontological responses-rejecting actions that harm even one person. Thus, patients with hippocampal damage have a strikingly opposite approach to moral decision making than vmPFC-lesioned patients. Skin-conductance data collected during the task showed increased emotional arousal in the hippocampal-damaged patients and they stated that their moral decisions were based on emotional instinct. By contrast, control participants made moral decisions based on the integration of an adverse emotional response to harming others, visualization of the consequences of one's action, and the rational re-evaluation of future benefits. This integration may be disturbed in patients with either hippocampal or vmPFC damage. Hippocampal lesions decreased the ability to visualize a scenario and its future consequences, which seemed to render the adverse emotional response overwhelmingly dominant. In patients with vmPFC damage, visualization might also be reduced alongside an inability to detect the adverse emotional response, leaving only the utilitarian option open. Overall, these results provide insights into the processes involved in moral decision making and highlight the complementary roles played by two closely connected brain regions. The ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) is closely associated with the ability to make complex moral judgements. When this area is damaged, patients become more utilitarian (the ends justify the means) and have

  14. Benzodiazepines do not potentiate GABA responses in neonatal hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovira, C; Ben-Ari, Y

    1991-09-16

    Benzodiazepines (midazolam; flunitrazepam) and pentobarbital increase the response to exogenous gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in adult hippocampal cells. We report in this paper that in contrast pentobarbital but not benzodiazepine potentiate the effects of exogenous (GABA) in neurons recorded from slices of less than two weeks old. This finding suggests that the functional association of benzodiazepine and GABAA receptors is changed during early postnatal life.

  15. High frequency stimulation induces sonic hedgehog release from hippocampal neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yujuan; Yuan, Yuan; Feng, Shengjie; Ma, Shaorong; Wang, Yizheng

    2017-01-01

    Sonic hedgehog (SHH) as a secreted protein is important for neuronal development in the central nervous system (CNS). However, the mechanism about SHH release remains largely unknown. Here, we showed that SHH was expressed mainly in the synaptic vesicles of hippocampus in both young postnatal and adult rats. High, but not low, frequency stimulation, induces SHH release from the neurons. Moreover, removal of extracellular Ca2+, application of tetrodotoxin (TTX), an inhibitor of voltage-dependent sodium channels, or downregulation of soluble n-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) proteins, all blocked SHH release from the neurons in response to HFS. Our findings suggest a novel mechanism to control SHH release from the hippocampal neurons. PMID:28262835

  16. Theta Oscillations and Reactivity of Hippocampal Stratum Oriens Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina F. Kitchigina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The supposition was advanced that the neuronal theta rhythmicity is the key mode of signal selection at the hippocampal level. To address this hypothesis, the experimental data on the responses of putative hippocampal interneurons of the stratum oriens CA1-CA3 to stimulation during enhanced theta rhythm and after its blockade are reviewed. Both a strong increase and a decrease of the natural theta rhythm disturbed the reactions of hippocampal neurons; during theta augmentation, the responses were masked or disappeared, and after theta blockade, they lost the ability to habituate. In both cases, two important events were broken: the resetting of the background activity and the phase-locking of theta cycles to stimulus. These data allow one to suppose that only important stimuli are normally capable to evoke these events and these stimuli are selected for recording. When the response to a significant stimulus occurs, the following theta prevents the responses to other stimuli. This probably protects the hippocampal activity from interference from irrelevant signals. Presumably, the absence of the theta deprives the hippocampus of this protection. During enhanced and persistent theta oscillations, the reset disappeared and theta bursts were generated without stimulus locking. In this state, the system is probably closed and the information cannot be recorded. During the theta blockade, the reset was too long and did not habituate. In this case, the system is open for any signals and the hippocampus loses the ability to select signal. This analysis suggests that information selection in the hippocampus may be performed with the participation of nonpyramidal neurons.

  17. Concentration-dependent effects of fullerenol on cultured hippocampal neuron viability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zha YY

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Ying-ying Zha,1 Bo Yang,1 Ming-liang Tang,2 Qiu-chen Guo,1 Ju-tao Chen,1 Long-ping Wen,3 Ming Wang11CAS Key Laboratory of Brain Function and Disease, School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, 2Suzhou Institute of NanoTech and NanoBionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Suzhou, 3Laboratory of Nano-biology, School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, People's Republic of ChinaBackground: Recent studies have shown that the biological actions and toxicity of the water-soluble compound, polyhydroxyfullerene (fullerenol, are related to the concentrations present at a particular site of action. This study investigated the effects of different concentrations of fullerenol on cultured rat hippocampal neurons.Methods and results: Fullerenol at low concentrations significantly enhanced hippocampal neuron viability as tested by MTT assay and Hoechst 33342/propidium iodide double stain detection. At high concentrations, fullerenol induced apoptosis confirmed by Comet assay and assessment of caspase proteins.Conclusion: These findings suggest that fullerenol promotes cell death and protects against cell damage, depending on the concentration present. The concentration-dependent effects of fullerenol were mainly due to its influence on the reduction-oxidation pathway.Keywords: fullerenol, nanomaterial, neurotoxicity, neuroprotection, hippocampal neuron

  18. Neuroprotective effects of ginsenoside Rb1 on hippocampal neuronal injury and neurite outgrowth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juan Liu; Jing He; Liang Huang; Ling Dou; Shuang Wu; Qionglan Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Ginsenoside Rb1 has been reported to exert anti-aging and anti-neurodegenerative effects. In the present study, we investigate whether ginsenoside Rb1 is involved in neurite outgrowth and neuroprotection against damage induced by amyloid beta (25-35) in cultured hippocampal neu-rons, and explore the underlying mechanisms. Ginsenoside Rb1 significantly increased neurite outgrowth in hippocampal neurons, and increased the expression of phosphorylated-Akt and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2. These effects were abrogated by API-2 and PD98059, inhibitors of the signaling proteins Akt and MEK. Additionally, cultured hippo-campal neurons were exposed to amyloid beta (25-35) for 30 minutes; ginsenoside Rb1 prevented apoptosis induced by amyloid beta (25-35), and this effect was blocked by API-2 and PD98059. Furthermore, ginsenoside Rb1 significantly reversed the reduction in phosphorylated-Akt and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 levels induced by amyloid beta (25-35), and API-2 neutralized the effect of ginsenoside Rb1. The present results indicate that ginsenoside Rb1 enhances neurite outgrowth and protects against neurotoxicity induced by amyloid beta (25-35) via a mechanism involving Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 signaling.

  19. Chemically Induced Damage to the Hippocampal Formation,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-05-01

    at low concentrations of trimethyltin (paper II). The effect on release was quantitatively different for CABA and L-glutamate (paper II). A similar...mergic neurons seems to take place. Previous studies have reported changes also in the GABAergic markers, a reduced concentration of CABA within the...Transmitter candi- dates in rhinencephalon. In: Bel-Air Symposium, V, pp 61-72, George and Co, Geneva. Fonnum, F and Storm-Mathisen, J (1969): CABA synthesis

  20. Protective effects of endoplasmic reticulum stress preconditioning on hippocampal neurons in rats with status epilepticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi ZHANG

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the protective effects of endoplasmic reticulum stress preconditioning induced by 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG on hippocampal neurons of rats with status epilepticus (SE and the possible mechanism.  Methods Ninety Sprague-Dawley (SD rats were randomly enrolled into preconditioning group (N = 30, SE group (N = 30 and control group (N = 30. Each group was divided into 6 subsets (N = 5 according to six time points (before seizure, 6 h, 12 h, 1 d, 2 d and 7 d after seizure. The preconditioning group was administered 2-DG intraperitoneally with a dose of 150 mg/kg for 7 days, and the lithium-pilocarpine induced SE rat model was established on both preconditioning group and SE group. The rats were sacrificed at the above six time points, and the brains were removed to make paraffin sections. Nissl staining was performed by toluidine blue to evaluate the hippocampal neuronal damage after seizure, and the number of survival neurons in hippocampal CA1 and CA3 regions of the rats were counted. Immunohistochemical staining was performed to detect the expressions of glucose regulated protein 78 (GRP78 and X-box binding protein 1 (XBP-1 in hippocampal CA3 region of the rats.  Results The number of survival neurons in preconditioning group was much more than that in SE group at 7 d after seizure (t = 5.353, P = 0.000, and was more obvious in CA1 region. There was no significant hippocampal neuronal damage in control group. The expressions of GRP78 and XBP-1 in CA3 region of hippocampus in SE group at 6 h after seizure were significantly higher than that in control group (P = 0.000, and then kept increasing until reaching the peak at 2 d (P = 0.000, for all. The expressions of GRP78 and XBP-1 in hippocampal CA3 region in preconditioning group were significantly higher than that in control group before seizure (P = 0.000, for all. The level of GRP78 maintained the highest at 24 h and 2 d after seizure (P = 0.000, for all, while the XBP-1 level

  1. Oxygen/glucose deprivation induces a reduction in synaptic AMPA receptors on hippocampal CA3 neurons mediated by mGluR1 and adenosine A3 receptors.

    OpenAIRE

    Dennis, Siobhan; Jaafari, Nadia; Cimarosti, Helena; Hanley, Jonathan G.; Henley, Jeremy M.; Mellor, Jack R.

    2011-01-01

    Hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons are highly sensitive to ischemic damage, whereas neighboring CA3 pyramidal neurons are less susceptible. It is proposed that switching of AMPA receptor (AMPAR) subunits on CA1 neurons during an in vitro model of ischemia, oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD), leads to an enhanced permeability of AMPARs to Ca2+, resulting in delayed cell death. However, it is unclear whether the same mechanisms exist in CA3 neurons and whether this underlies the differential sensi...

  2. Oxygen/glucose Deprivation Induces a Reduction in Synaptic AMPA Receptors on Hippocampal CA3 Neurons Mediated by mGluR1 and A3 Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Dennis, Siobhan H.; Jaafari, Nadia; Cimarosti, Helena; Hanley, Jonathan G.; Henley, Jeremy M.; Mellor, Jack R.

    2011-01-01

    Hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons are highly sensitive to ischemic damage, whereas neighbouring CA3 pyramidal neurons are less susceptible. It is proposed that switching of AMPA receptor (AMPAR) subunits on CA1 neurons during an in vitro model of ischemia, oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD), leads to an enhanced permeability of AMPARs to Ca2+ resulting in delayed cell death. However, it is unclear if the same mechanisms exist in CA3 neurons and whether this underlies the differential sensitivit...

  3. Susceptibility of Rat Hippocampal Neurons to Hypothermia during Development

    OpenAIRE

    Kyung Ah Seo; Sehhyun Kim; Na Mi Lee; Soo Ahn Chae

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study evaluated the extent of damage due to hypothermia in the mature and immature brain. Methods: Hippocampal tissue cultures at 7 and 14 days in vitro (DIV) were used to represent the immature and mature brain, respectively. The cultures were exposed at 25?#608;for 0, 10, 30, and 60 minutes (n=30 in each subgroup). Propidium iodide fluorescent images were captured 24 and 48 hours after hypothermic injury. Damaged areas of the cornu ammonis 1 (CA1), CA3, and dentate gyrus (...

  4. Effects of prolonged abstinence from METH on the hippocampal BDNF levels, neuronal numbers and apoptosis in methamphetamine-sensitized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajheidari, Samira; Sameni, Hamid Reza; Bandegi, Ahmad Reza; Miladi-Gorji, Hossein

    2017-04-03

    Methamphetamine (METH) use is associated with neuronal damage in various regions of brain, while effects of prolonged abstinence on METH-induced damage are not quite clear. This study evaluated serum and hippocampal BDNF levels, neuronal numbers and apoptosis in METH-sensitized and abstinent rats. Rats were sensitized to METH (2mg/kg, daily/18 days, s.c.). All rats were evaluated for neuron counting, the TUNEL test and serum and hippocampal BDNF levels after 30 days of forced abstinence from METH. The results showed that increased BDNF levels in the hippocampus and serum of METH-sensitized rats returned to control level after 30 days of abstinence. The number of neurons in the DG and CA1 of hippocampus and also, the total hippocampal perimeter and area in METH-sensitized rats were significantly lower than the saline rats. While, the number of neurons was not significantly increased in the hippocampus after prolonged abstinence from METH. Also, METH-sensitized rats showed a significant increase in TUNEL-positive cells, whereas METH-abstinent rats showed a slight but significant decrease in TUNEL-positive cells in the DG and CA3 of hippocampus. These results suggest that despite the reduction in BDNF levels, reducing the number of neurons, perimeter and area of the hippocampus were stable after abstinence. Thus, the degenerative effects of METH have been sustained even after prolonged abstinence in the hippocampus.

  5. Glucose deprivation activates diversity of potassium channels in cultured rat hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, Myrian; García, Esperanza; Onetti, Carlos G

    2006-05-01

    1. Glucose is one of the most important substrates for generating metabolic energy required for the maintenance of cellular functions. Glucose-mediated changes in neuronal firing pattern have been observed in the central nervous system of mammals. K(+) channels directly regulated by intracellular ATP have been postulated as a linkage between cellular energetic metabolism and excitability; the functional roles ascribed to these channels include glucose-sensing to regulate energy homeostasis and neuroprotection under energy depletion conditions. The hippocampus is highly sensitive to metabolic insults and is the brain region most sensitive to ischemic damage. Because the identity of metabolically regulated potassium channels present in hippocampal neurons is obscure, we decided to study the biophysical properties of glucose-sensitive potassium channels in hippocampal neurons. 2. The dependence of membrane potential and the sensitivity of potassium channels to glucose and ATP in rat hippocampal neurons were studied in cell-attached and excised inside-out membrane patches. 3. We found that under hypoglycemic conditions, at least three types of potassium channels were activated; their unitary conductance values were 37, 147, and 241 pS in symmetrical K(+), and they were sensitive to ATP. For K(+) channels with unitary conductance of 37 and 241, when the membrane potential was depolarized the longer closed time constant diminished and this produced an increase in the open-state probability; nevertheless, the 147-pS channels were not voltage-dependent. 4. We propose that neuronal glucose-sensitive K(+) channels in rat hippocampus include subtypes of ATP-sensitive channels with a potential role in neuroprotection during short-term or prolonged metabolic stress.

  6. Mitochondrial and nuclear changes in hippocampal neurons in a lithium-pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus rat model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuhai Tang; Li Zhang; Jianying Sun; Xiaojun Pan

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mitochondrial damage plays a key role in neuronal damage.OBJECTIVE: To observe ultrastructural damage to mitochondria and nuclei, as well as caspase-3 expression, in hippocampal CA3 neurons of lithium-pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus rats.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: The neuropathological, randomized, controlled study was performed at the Animal Experimental Center, Shandong University, China in May 2008.MATERIALS: A total of 75 healthy, adult, male, Wistar rats were randomly assigned into model (n = 45) and control (n = 30) groups. Lithium-pilocarpine (Sigma, USA) was used in this study.METHODS: Rats in the model group were intraperitoneally injected with lithium chloride (3 mEq/kg),and 24 hours later with pilocarpine (45 mg/kg), to induce seizures for 2 hours. Rats in the control group were intraperitoneally infused with the same volume of saline. Rat hippocampal CA3 tissue was obtained at 3, 12, and 24 hours following status epilepticus.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Neuronal changes were observed under an optical microscope. Ultrastructural changes in mitochondria and nuclei were observed using an electron microscope.caspase-3 mRNA levels were quantified by semiquantitative RT-PCR.RESULTS: After 3 hours of status epilepticus, mitochondria with swollen cristae and ruptured membranes were observed by electron microscopy. Nuclei with marginated chromatin were observed after 24 hours status epilepticus. RT-PCR results demonstrated increased caspase-3 expression at 12 hours, and significantly increased expression at 24 hours following termination of status epilepticus. This was in accordance with acidophilia occurrence, as indicated by hematoxylin-eosin staining, and time of ultrastructural damage to nuclei.CONCLUSION: In lithium-pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus rat models, ultrastructural damage to mitochondria in hippocampal neurons occurred during early stages, followed by increased caspase-3 expression and nuclear changes. These results suggested

  7. Age-Dependent Glutamate Induction of Synaptic Plasticity in Cultured Hippocampal Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivenshitz, Miriam; Segal, Menahem; Sapoznik, Stav

    2006-01-01

    A common denominator for the induction of morphological and functional plasticity in cultured hippocampal neurons involves the activation of excitatory synapses. We now demonstrate massive morphological plasticity in mature cultured hippocampal neurons caused by a brief exposure to glutamate. This plasticity involves a slow, 70%-80% increase in…

  8. Protective effects of aloperine on neonatal rat primary cultured hippocampal neurons injured by oxygen-glucose deprivation and reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ning-Tian; Zhou, Ru; Chang, Ren-Yuan; Hao, Yin-Ju; Ma, Lin; Jin, Shao-Ju; Du, Juan; Zheng, Jie; Zhao, Cheng-Jun; Niu, Yang; Sun, Tao; Li, Wei; Koike, Kazuo; Yu, Jian-Qiang; Li, Yu-Xiang

    2015-10-01

    Aloperine (ALO), one of the alkaloids isolated from Sophora alopecuroides L., is traditionally used for various diseases including neuronal disorders. This study investigated the protective effects of ALO on neonatal rat primary-cultured hippocampal neurons injured by oxygen-glucose deprivation and reperfusion (OGD/RP). Treatment with ALO (25, 50, and 100 mg/l) attenuated neuronal damage (p oxygen species and malondialdehyde production and enhanced the antioxidant enzymatic activities of catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and the total antioxidant capacity. The results suggested that ALO has significant neuroprotective effects that can be attributed to anti-oxidative stress.

  9. Ischemic Preconditioning Mediates Neuroprotection against Ischemia in Mouse Hippocampal CA1 Neurons by Inducing Autophagy.

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    Chunlin Gao

    Full Text Available The hippocampal CA1 region is sensitive to hypoxic and ischemic injury but can be protected by ischemic preconditioning (IPC. However, the mechanism through which IPC protects hippocampal CA1 neurons is still under investigation. Additionally, the role of autophagy in determining the fate of hippocampal neurons is unclear. Here, we examined whether IPC induced autophagy to alleviate hippocampal CA1 neuronal death in vitro and in vivo with oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD and bilateral carotid artery occlusion (BCCAO models. Survival of hippocampal neurons increased from 51.5% ± 6.3% in the non-IPC group (55 min of OGD to 77.3% ± 7.9% in the IPC group (15 min of OGD, followed by 55 min of OGD 24 h later. The number of hippocampal CA1 layer neurons increased from 182 ± 26 cells/mm2 in the non-IPC group (20 min of BCCAO to 278 ± 55 cells/mm2 in the IPC group (1 min × 3 BCCAO, followed by 20 min of BCCAO 24 h later. Akt phosphorylation and microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3-II/LC3-I expression were increased in the preconditioning group. Moreover, the protective effects of IPC were abolished only by inhibiting the activity of autophagy, but not by blocking the activation of Akt in vitro. Using in vivo experiments, we found that LC3 expression was upregulated, accompanied by an increase in neuronal survival in hippocampal CA1 neurons in the preconditioning group. The neuroprotective effects of IPC on hippocampal CA1 neurons were completely inhibited by treatment with 3-MA. In contrast, hippocampal CA3 neurons did not show changes in autophagic activity or beneficial effects of IPC. These data suggested that IPC may attenuate ischemic injury in hippocampal CA1 neurons through induction of Akt-independent autophagy.

  10. Ischemic Preconditioning Mediates Neuroprotection against Ischemia in Mouse Hippocampal CA1 Neurons by Inducing Autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Chunlin; Cai, Ying; Zhang, Xuebin; Huang, Huiling; Wang, Jin; Wang, Yajing; Tong, Xiaoguang; Wang, Jinhuan; Wu, Jialing

    2015-01-01

    The hippocampal CA1 region is sensitive to hypoxic and ischemic injury but can be protected by ischemic preconditioning (IPC). However, the mechanism through which IPC protects hippocampal CA1 neurons is still under investigation. Additionally, the role of autophagy in determining the fate of hippocampal neurons is unclear. Here, we examined whether IPC induced autophagy to alleviate hippocampal CA1 neuronal death in vitro and in vivo with oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD) and bilateral carotid artery occlusion (BCCAO) models. Survival of hippocampal neurons increased from 51.5% ± 6.3% in the non-IPC group (55 min of OGD) to 77.3% ± 7.9% in the IPC group (15 min of OGD, followed by 55 min of OGD 24 h later). The number of hippocampal CA1 layer neurons increased from 182 ± 26 cells/mm2 in the non-IPC group (20 min of BCCAO) to 278 ± 55 cells/mm2 in the IPC group (1 min × 3 BCCAO, followed by 20 min of BCCAO 24 h later). Akt phosphorylation and microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3)-II/LC3-I expression were increased in the preconditioning group. Moreover, the protective effects of IPC were abolished only by inhibiting the activity of autophagy, but not by blocking the activation of Akt in vitro. Using in vivo experiments, we found that LC3 expression was upregulated, accompanied by an increase in neuronal survival in hippocampal CA1 neurons in the preconditioning group. The neuroprotective effects of IPC on hippocampal CA1 neurons were completely inhibited by treatment with 3-MA. In contrast, hippocampal CA3 neurons did not show changes in autophagic activity or beneficial effects of IPC. These data suggested that IPC may attenuate ischemic injury in hippocampal CA1 neurons through induction of Akt-independent autophagy.

  11. The isotropic fractionator provides evidence for differential loss of hippocampal neurons in two mouse models of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brautigam, Hannah; Steele, John W; Westaway, David; Fraser, Paul E; St George-Hyslop, Peter H; Gandy, Sam; Hof, Patrick R; Dickstein, Dara L

    2012-11-22

    The accumulation of amyloid beta (Aβ) oligomers or fibrils is thought to be one of the main causes of synaptic and neuron loss, believed to underlie cognitive dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Neuron loss has rarely been documented in amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic mouse models. We investigated whether two APP mouse models characterized by different folding states of amyloid showed different neuronal densities using an accurate method of cell counting. We examined total cell and neuronal populations in Swedish/Indiana APP mutant mice (TgCRND8) with severe Aβ pathology that includes fibrils, plaques, and oligomers, and Dutch APP mutant mice with only Aβ oligomer pathology. Using the isotropic fractionator, we found no differences from control mice in regional total cell populations in either TgCRND8 or Dutch mice. However, there were 31.8% fewer hippocampal neurons in TgCRND8 compared to controls, while no such changes were observed in Dutch mice. We show that the isotropic fractionator is a convenient method for estimating neuronal content in milligram quantities of brain tissue and represents a useful tool to assess cell loss efficiently in transgenic models with different types of neuropathology. Our data support the hypothesis that TgCRND8 mice with a spectrum of Aβ plaque, fibril, and oligomer pathology exhibit neuronal loss whereas Dutch mice with only oligomers, showed no evidence for neuronal loss. This suggests that the combination of plaques, fibrils, and oligomers causes more damage to mouse hippocampal neurons than Aβ oligomers alone.

  12. Reverse stochastic resonance in a hippocampal CA1 neuron model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Dominique M; Kawaguchi, Minato; Mino, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    Stochastic resonance (SR) is a ubiquitous and counter- intuitive phenomenon whereby the addition of noise to a non-linear system can improve the detection of sub-threshold signals. The "signal" is normally periodic or deterministic whereas the "noise" is normally stochastic. However, in neural systems, signals are often stochastic. Moreover, periodic signals are applied near neurons to control neural excitability (i.e. deep brain stimulation). We therefore tested the hypothesis that a quasi-periodic signal applied to a neural network could enhance the detection of a stochastic neural signal (reverse stochastic resonance). Using computational methods, a CA1 hippocampal neuron was simulated and a Poisson distributed subthreshold synaptic input ("signal") was applied to the synaptic terminals. A periodic or quasi periodic pulse train at various frequencies ("noise") was applied to an extracellular electrode located near the neuron. The mutual information and information transfer rate between the output and input of the neuron were calculated. The results display the signature of stochastic resonance with information transfer reaching a maximum value for increasing power (or frequency) of the "noise". This result shows that periodic signals applied extracellularly can improve the detection of subthreshold stochastic neural signals. The optimum frequency (110 Hz) is similar to that used in patients with Parkinson's suggesting that this phenomenon could play a role in the therapeutic effect of high frequency stimulation.

  13. Mechanism of PAMAM Dendrimers Internalization in Hippocampal Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Felipe; Vásquez, Pilar; Díaz, Carola; Nova, Daniela; Alderete, Joel; Guzmán, Leonardo

    2016-10-03

    Polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers are hyperbranched macromolecules which have been described as one of the most promising drug nanocarrier systems. A key process to understand is their cellular internalization mechanism because of its direct influence on their intracellular distribution, association with organelles, entry kinetics, and cargo release. Despite that internalization mechanisms of dendrimers have been studied in different cell types, in the case of neurons they are not completely described. Considering the relevance of central nervous system (CNS) diseases and neuropharmacology, the aim of this report is to describe the molecular internalization mechanism of different PAMAM-based dendrimer systems in hippocampal neurons. Four dendrimers based on fourth generation PAMAM with different surface properties were studied: unmodified G4, with a positively charged surface; PP50, with a substitution of the 50% of amino surface groups with polyethylene glycol neutral groups; PAc, with a substitution of the 30% of amino surface groups with acrylate anionic groups; and PFO, decorated with folic acid groups in a 25% of total terminal groups. Confocal images show that both G4 and PFO are able to enter the neurons, but not PP50 and PAc. Colocalization study with specific endocytosis markers and specific endocytosis inhibitor assay demonstrate that clathrin-mediated endocytosis would be the main internalization mechanism for G4, whereas clathrin- and caveolae-mediated endocytosis would be implicated in PFO internalization. These results show the existence of different internalization mechanisms for PAMAM dendrimers in neurons and the possibility to control their internalization properties with specific chemical modifications.

  14. Kinase/phosphatase overexpression reveals pathways regulating hippocampal neuron morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchser, William J; Slepak, Tatiana I; Gutierrez-Arenas, Omar; Bixby, John L; Lemmon, Vance P

    2010-07-01

    Development and regeneration of the nervous system requires the precise formation of axons and dendrites. Kinases and phosphatases are pervasive regulators of cellular function and have been implicated in controlling axodendritic development and regeneration. We undertook a gain-of-function analysis to determine the functions of kinases and phosphatases in the regulation of neuron morphology. Over 300 kinases and 124 esterases and phosphatases were studied by high-content analysis of rat hippocampal neurons. Proteins previously implicated in neurite growth, such as ERK1, GSK3, EphA8, FGFR, PI3K, PKC, p38, and PP1a, were confirmed to have effects in our functional assays. We also identified novel positive and negative neurite growth regulators. These include neuronal-developmentally regulated kinases such as the activin receptor, interferon regulatory factor 6 (IRF6) and neural leucine-rich repeat 1 (LRRN1). The protein kinase N2 (PKN2) and choline kinase alpha (CHKA) kinases, and the phosphatases PPEF2 and SMPD1, have little or no established functions in neuronal function, but were sufficient to promote neurite growth. In addition, pathway analysis revealed that members of signaling pathways involved in cancer progression and axis formation enhanced neurite outgrowth, whereas cytokine-related pathways significantly inhibited neurite formation.

  15. Low-dose ionizing radiation induces mitochondrial fusion and increases expression of mitochondrial complexes I and III in hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Ling; Chen, Wun-Ke; Liu, Szu-Ting; Chang, Chuang-Rung; Kao, Mou-Chieh; Chen, Kuan-Wei; Chiu, Shih-Che; Hsu, Ming-Ling; Hsiang, I-Chou; Chen, Yu-Jen; Chen, Linyi

    2015-10-13

    High energy ionizing radiation can cause DNA damage and cell death. During clinical radiation therapy, the radiation dose could range from 15 to 60 Gy depending on targets. While 2 Gy radiation has been shown to cause cancer cell death, studies also suggest a protective potential by low dose radiation. In this study, we examined the effect of 0.2-2 Gy radiation on hippocampal neurons. Low dose 0.2 Gy radiation treatment increased the levels of MTT. Since hippocampal neurons are post-mitotic, this result reveals a possibility that 0.2 Gy irradiation may increase mitochondrial activity to cope with stimuli. Maintaining neural plasticity is an energy-demanding process that requires high efficient mitochondrial function. We thus hypothesized that low dose radiation may regulate mitochondrial dynamics and function to ensure survival of neurons. Our results showed that five days after 0.2 Gy irradiation, no obvious changes on neuronal survival, neuronal synapses, membrane potential of mitochondria, reactive oxygen species levels, and mitochondrial DNA copy numbers. Interestingly, 0.2 Gy irradiation promoted the mitochondria fusion, resulting in part from the increased level of a mitochondrial fusion protein, Mfn2, and inhibition of Drp1 fission protein trafficking to the mitochondria. Accompanying with the increased mitochondrial fusion, the expressions of complexes I and III of the electron transport chain were also increased. These findings suggest that, hippocampal neurons undergo increased mitochondrial fusion to modulate cellular activity as an adaptive mechanism in response to low dose radiation.

  16. Point application with Angong Niuhuang sticker protects hippocampal and cortical neurons in rats with cerebral ischemia

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    Dong-shu Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Angong Niuhuang pill, a Chinese materia medica preparation, can improve neurological functions after acute ischemic stroke. Because of its inconvenient application and toxic components (Cinnabaris and Realgar, we used transdermal enhancers to deliver Angong Niuhuang pill by modern technology, which expanded the safe dose range and clinical indications. In this study, Angong Niuhuang stickers administered at different point application doses (1.35, 2.7, and 5.4 g/kg were administered to the Dazhui (DU14, Qihai (RN6 and Mingmen (DU4 of rats with chronic cerebral ischemia, for 4 weeks. The Morris water maze was used to determine the learning and memory ability of rats. Hematoxylin-eosin staining and Nissl staining were used to observe neuronal damage of the cortex and hippocampal CA1 region in rats with chronic cerebral ischemia. The middle- and high-dose point application of Angong Niuhuang stickers attenuated neuronal damage in the cortex and hippocampal CA1 region, and improved the memory of rats with chronic cerebral ischemia with an efficacy similar to interventions by electroacupuncture at Dazhui (DU14, Qihai (RN6 and Mingmen (DU4. Our experimental findings indicate that point application with Angong Niuhuang stickers can improve cognitive function after chronic cerebral ischemia in rats and is neuroprotective with an equivalent efficacy to acupuncture.

  17. Differential NMDA receptor-dependent calcium loading and mitochondrial dysfunction in CA1 vs. CA3 hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanika, Ruslan I; Winters, Christine A; Pivovarova, Natalia B; Andrews, S Brian

    2010-02-01

    Hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons are selectively vulnerable to ischemia, while adjacent CA3 neurons are relatively resistant. Although glutamate receptor-mediated mitochondrial Ca(2+) overload and dysfunction is a major component of ischemia-induced neuronal death, no direct relationship between selective neuronal vulnerability and mitochondrial dysfunction has been demonstrated in intact brain preparations. Here, we show that in organotypic slice cultures NMDA induces much larger Ca(2+) elevations in vulnerable CA1 neurons than in resistant CA3. Consequently, CA1 mitochondria exhibit stronger calcium accumulation, more extensive swelling and damage, stronger depolarization of their membrane potential, and a significant increase in ROS generation. NMDA-induced Ca(2+) and ROS elevations were abolished in Ca(2+)-free medium or by NMDAR antagonists, but not by zinc chelation. We conclude that Ca(2)(+) overload-dependent mitochondrial dysfunction is a determining factor in the selective vulnerability of CA1 neurons.

  18. Tamoxifen mediated estrogen receptor activation protects against early impairment of hippocampal neuron excitability in an oxygen/glucose deprivation brain slice ischemia model

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Huaqiu; Xie, Minjie; Gary P. Schools; Feustel, Paul F.; Wang, Wei; Lei, Ting; Kimelberg, Harold K.; Zhou, Min

    2008-01-01

    Pretreatment of ovarectomized rats with estrogen shows long-term protection via activation of the estrogen receptor (ER). However, it remains unknown whether activation of the ER can provide protection against early neuronal damage when given acutely, we simulated ischemic conditions by applying oxygen and glucose deprived (OGD) solution to acute male rat hippocampal slices and examined the neuronal electrophysiological changes. Pyramidal neurons and interneurons showed a time-dependent membr...

  19. Delayed hippocampal neuronal death in young gerbil following transient global cerebral ischemia is related to higher and longer-term expression of p63 in the ischemic hippocampus

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    Eun Joo Bae

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The tumor suppressor p63 is one of p53 family members and plays a vital role as a regulator of neuronal apoptosis in the development of the nervous system. However, the role of p63 in mature neuronal death has not been addressed yet. In this study, we first compared ischemia-induced effects on p63 expression in the hippocampal regions (CA1- 3 between the young and adult gerbils subjected to 5 minutes of transient global cerebral ischemia. Neuronal death in the hippocampal CA1 region of young gerbils was significantly slow compared with that in the adult gerbils after transient global cerebral ischemia. p63 immunoreactivity in the hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons in the sham-operated young group was significantly low compared with that in the sham-operated adult group. p63 immunoreactivity was apparently changed in ischemic hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons in both ischemia-operated young and adult groups. In the ischemia-operated adult groups, p63 immunoreactivity in the hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons was significantly decreased at 4 days post-ischemia; however, p63 immunoreactivity in the ischemia-operated young group was significantly higher than that in the ischemia-operated adult group. At 7 days post-ischemia, p63 immunoreactivity was decreased in the hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons in both ischemia-operated young and adult groups. Change patterns of p63 level in the hippocampal CA1 region of adult and young gerbils after ischemic damage were similar to those observed in the immunohistochemical results. These findings indicate that higher and longer-term expression of p63 in the hippocampal CA1 region of the young gerbils after ischemia/reperfusion may be related to more delayed neuronal death compared to that in the adults.

  20. Delayed hippocampal neuronal death in young gerbil following transient global cerebral ischemia is related to higher and longer-term expression of p63 in the ischemic hippocampus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eun Joo Bae; Seongkweon Hong; Dong Won Kim; Jun Hwi Cho; Yun Lyul Lee; Moo-Ho Won; Joon Ha Park; Bai Hui Chen; Bing Chun Yan; Bich Na Shin; Jeong Hwi Cho; In Hye Kim; Ji Hyeon Ahn; Jae Chul Lee; Hyun-Jin Tae

    2015-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p63 is one of p53 family members and plays a vital role as a regulator of neuronal apoptosis in the development of the nervous system. However, the role of p63 in mature neuronal death has not been addressed yet. In this study, we ifrst compared ischemia-in-duced effects on p63 expression in the hippocampal regions (CA1–3) between the young and adult gerbils subjected to 5 minutes of transient global cerebral ischemia. Neuronal death in the hippocampal CA1 region of young gerbils was signiifcantly slow compared with that in the adult gerbils after transient global cerebral ischemia. p63 immunoreactivity in the hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons in the sham-operated young group was signiifcantly low compared with that in the sham-operated adult group. p63 immunoreactivity was apparently changed in ischemic hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons in both ischemia-operated young and adult groups. In the ischemia-operated adult groups, p63 immunoreactivity in the hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons was signiifcantly decreased at 4 days post-ischemia;however, p63 immunoreactivity in the ischemia-operated young group was signiifcantly higher than that in the ischemia-operated adult group. At 7 days post-ischemia, p63 immunoreactivity was decreased in the hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons in both ischemia-operated young and adult groups. Change patterns of p63 level in the hippocampal CA1 region of adult and young gerbils after ischemic damage were similar to those observed in the immunohistochemical results. These ifndings indicate that higher and longer-term expression of p63 in the hippocampal CA1 region of the young gerbils after ischemia/reperfusion may be related to more delayed neuronal death compared to that in the adults.

  1. Effect of bilobalide B on cholinergic hippocampal neurons exposed to cholesterol and apoliprotein E4

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xijuan Jiang; Bin Lu; Yingchang Fan

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Extracts of ginkgo biloba leaves have been reported to improve nerve function and activity in Alzheimer's disease, which is associated with reduced secretion of cholinergic neurotransmitter in hippocampal neurons.OBJECTIVE: To validate the protective effect of bilobalide B against in vitro injury of cholinergic neurons of the hippocampus induced by combined cholesterol and apoE4DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: This randomized, controlled animal experiment was performed in the Pathology Laboratory, Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine from July 2003 to July 2006.MATERIALS: Neonatal Wistar rats, 1-day-old, both male and female, and mean body mass of 5g were selected for this study. Cholesterol and apolipoprotein E4 (apoE4) were purchased from Sigma Company (USA), bilobalide B was purchased from Tianjin Zhongyi Pharmaceutical Factory, batch number 20050312.METHODS: Hippocampal neurons were divided into three groups; a normal control group (routinely added media), a model group (exposed to media containing 40mg/L cholesterol and 30mg/L apoE4 for 24 hours) and a bilobalide B group (exposed to media containing 160mg/L bilobalide B for 16 hours, and then with addition of 40mg/L cholesterol and 30mg/L apoE4 for an additional 24 hours).MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Levels of acetylcholine (ACh) and activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) in hippocampal neurons were determined by microdosage hydroxylamine colorimetry, hydroxylamine colorimetry and radiological chemistry, respectively.RESULTS: The ACh level was significantly lower in the model group than that in the normal control group (P0.05). Activity of ChAT was significantly lower in the model group than in the normal control group (P<0.01), while the activity was significantly higher in the bilobalide B group than in the model group (P<0.05).CONCLUSION: Bilobalide B can enhance the ACh level of hippocampal neurons damaged by combined cholesterol and apoE4, by promoting

  2. Tat-HSP22 inhibits oxidative stress-induced hippocampal neuronal cell death by regulation of the mitochondrial pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Hyo Sang; Kim, Dae Won; Shin, Min Jea; Cho, Su Bin; Park, Jung Hwan; Lee, Chi Hern; Yeo, Eun Ji; Choi, Yeon Joo; Yeo, Hyeon Ji; Sohn, Eun Jeong; Son, Ora; Cho, Sung-Woo; Kim, Duk-Soo; Yu, Yeon Hee; Lee, Keun Wook; Park, Jinseu; Eum, Won Sik; Choi, Soo Young

    2017-01-04

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the progression of various neuronal diseases including ischemia. Heat shock protein 22 (HSP22) is known to protect cells against oxidative stress. However, the protective effects and mechanisms of HSP22 in hippocampal neuronal cells under oxidative stress remain unknown. In this study, we determined whether HSP22 protects against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative stress in HT-22 using Tat-HSP22 fusion protein. We found that Tat-HSP22 transduced into HT-22 cells and that H2O2-induced cell death, oxidative stress, and DNA damage were significantly reduced by Tat-HSP22. In addition, Tat-HSP22 markedly inhibited H2O2-induced mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c release, cleaved caspase-3, and Bax expression levels, while Bcl-2 expression levels were increased in HT-22 cells. Further, we showed that Tat-HSP22 transduced into animal brain and inhibited cleaved-caspase-3 expression levels as well as significantly inhibited hippocampal neuronal cell death in the CA1 region of animals in the ischemic animal model. In the present study, we demonstrated that transduced Tat-HSP22 attenuates oxidative stress-induced hippocampal neuronal cell death through the mitochondrial signaling pathway and plays a crucial role in inhibiting neuronal cell death, suggesting that Tat-HSP22 protein may be used to prevent oxidative stress-related brain diseases including ischemia.

  3. Influence of Ginkgo Biloba extract on beta-secretase in rat hippocampal neuronal cultures following chronic hypoxic and hypoglycemic conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xueneng Guan; Fuling Yan

    2008-01-01

    12, 24, or 36 hours, compared to control cells (P < 0.05), and was decreased compared to neurons treated with Egb761 (P < 0.05).CONCLUSION: β -secretase expression and activity in rat neonatal hippocampal neurons were influenced by hypoxic and hypoglycemic culture. Egb761 played a protective role in hippocampal neurons damaged by chronic hypoxic and hypoglycemic culture conditions, possibly through its effect on β-secretase expression and activity.

  4. Frizzled-5 receptor is involved in neuronal polarity and morphogenesis of hippocampal neurons.

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    Paula G Slater

    Full Text Available The Wnt signaling pathway plays important roles during different stages of neuronal development, including neuronal polarization and dendritic and axonal outgrowth. However, little is known about the identity of the Frizzled receptors mediating these processes. In the present study, we investigated the role of Frizzled-5 (Fzd5 on neuronal development in cultured Sprague-Dawley rat hippocampal neurons. We found that Fzd5 is expressed early in cultured neurons on actin-rich structures localized at minor neurites and axonal growth cones. At 4 DIV, Fzd5 polarizes towards the axon, where its expression is detected mainly at the peripheral zone of axonal growth cones, with no obvious staining at dendrites; suggesting a role of Fzd5 in neuronal polarization. Overexpression of Fzd5 during the acquisition of neuronal polarity induces mislocalization of the receptor and a loss of polarized axonal markers. Fzd5 knock-down leads to loss of axonal proteins, suggesting an impaired neuronal polarity. In contrast, overexpression of Fzd5 in neurons that are already polarized did not alter polarity, but decreased the total length of axons and increased total dendrite length and arborization. Fzd5 activated JNK in HEK293 cells and the effects triggered by Fzd5 overexpression in neurons were partially prevented by inhibition of JNK, suggesting that a non-canonical Wnt signaling mechanism might be involved. Our results suggest that, Fzd5 has a role in the establishment of neuronal polarity, and in the morphogenesis of neuronal processes, in part through the activation of the non-canonical Wnt mechanism involving JNK.

  5. Frizzled-5 Receptor Is Involved in Neuronal Polarity and Morphogenesis of Hippocampal Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Paula G.; Ramirez, Valerie T.; Gonzalez-Billault, Christian; Varela-Nallar, Lorena; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.

    2013-01-01

    The Wnt signaling pathway plays important roles during different stages of neuronal development, including neuronal polarization and dendritic and axonal outgrowth. However, little is known about the identity of the Frizzled receptors mediating these processes. In the present study, we investigated the role of Frizzled-5 (Fzd5) on neuronal development in cultured Sprague-Dawley rat hippocampal neurons. We found that Fzd5 is expressed early in cultured neurons on actin-rich structures localized at minor neurites and axonal growth cones. At 4 DIV, Fzd5 polarizes towards the axon, where its expression is detected mainly at the peripheral zone of axonal growth cones, with no obvious staining at dendrites; suggesting a role of Fzd5 in neuronal polarization. Overexpression of Fzd5 during the acquisition of neuronal polarity induces mislocalization of the receptor and a loss of polarized axonal markers. Fzd5 knock-down leads to loss of axonal proteins, suggesting an impaired neuronal polarity. In contrast, overexpression of Fzd5 in neurons that are already polarized did not alter polarity, but decreased the total length of axons and increased total dendrite length and arborization. Fzd5 activated JNK in HEK293 cells and the effects triggered by Fzd5 overexpression in neurons were partially prevented by inhibition of JNK, suggesting that a non-canonical Wnt signaling mechanism might be involved. Our results suggest that, Fzd5 has a role in the establishment of neuronal polarity, and in the morphogenesis of neuronal processes, in part through the activation of the non-canonical Wnt mechanism involving JNK. PMID:24205342

  6. Dipeptide Piracetam Analogue Noopept Improves Viability of Hippocampal HT-22 Neurons in the Glutamate Toxicity Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antipova, T A; Nikolaev, S V; Ostrovskaya, P U; Gudasheva, T A; Seredenin, S B

    2016-05-01

    Effect of noopept (N-phenylacetyl-prolylglycine ethyl ester) on viability of neurons exposed to neurotoxic action of glutamic acid (5 mM) was studied in vitro in immortalized mouse hippocampal HT-22 neurons. Noopept added to the medium before or after glutamic acid improved neuronal survival in a concentration range of 10-11-10-5 M. Comparison of the effective noopept concentrations determined in previous studies on cultured cortical and cerebellar neurons showed that hippocampal neurons are more sensitive to the protective effect of noopept.

  7. Ablation of NMDA receptors enhances the excitability of hippocampal CA3 neurons.

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    Fumiaki Fukushima

    Full Text Available Synchronized discharges in the hippocampal CA3 recurrent network are supposed to underlie network oscillations, memory formation and seizure generation. In the hippocampal CA3 network, NMDA receptors are abundant at the recurrent synapses but scarce at the mossy fiber synapses. We generated mutant mice in which NMDA receptors were abolished in hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons by postnatal day 14. The histological and cytological organizations of the hippocampal CA3 region were indistinguishable between control and mutant mice. We found that mutant mice lacking NMDA receptors selectively in CA3 pyramidal neurons became more susceptible to kainate-induced seizures. Consistently, mutant mice showed characteristic large EEG spikes associated with multiple unit activities (MUA, suggesting enhanced synchronous firing of CA3 neurons. The electrophysiological balance between fast excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission was comparable between control and mutant pyramidal neurons in the hippocampal CA3 region, while the NMDA receptor-slow AHP coupling was diminished in the mutant neurons. In the adult brain, inducible ablation of NMDA receptors in the hippocampal CA3 region by the viral expression vector for Cre recombinase also induced similar large EEG spikes. Furthermore, pharmacological blockade of CA3 NMDA receptors enhanced the susceptibility to kainate-induced seizures. These results raise an intriguing possibility that hippocampal CA3 NMDA receptors may suppress the excitability of the recurrent network as a whole in vivo by restricting synchronous firing of CA3 neurons.

  8. Recombinant AAV-mediated Expression of Human BDNF Protects Neurons against Cell Apoptosis in Aβ-induced Neuronal Damage Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zhaohui; MA Dongliang; FENG Gaifeng; MA Yanbing; HU Haitao

    2007-01-01

    The human brain-derived neurotrophic factor (hBDNF) gene was cloned by polymerase chain reaction and the recombinant adeno-associated viral vector inserted with hBDNF gene (AAV-hBDNF) was constructed. Cultured rat hippocampal neurons were treated with Aβ25-35 and serued as the experimental Aβ-induced neuronal damage model (AD model), and the AD model was infected with AAV-hBDNF to explore neuroprotective effects of expression of BDNF. Cell viability was assayed by MTT. The expression of bcl-2 anti-apoptosis protein was detected by immunocytochemical staining. The change of intracellular free Ca ion ([Ca2+]i) was measured by laser scanning confocal microscopy. The results showed that BDNF had protective effects against Aβ-induced neuronal damage. The expression of the bcl-2 anti-apoptosis protein was raised significantly and the balance of [Ca2+]i was maintained in the AAV-hBDNF treatment group as compared with AD model group. These data suggested that recombinant AAV mediated a stable expression of hBDNF in cultured hippocampal neurons and resulted in significant neuron protective effects in AD model. The BDNF may reduce neuron apoptosis through increasing the expression of the bcl-2 anti-apoptosis protein and inhibiting intracellular calcium overload. The viral vector-mediated gene expression of BDNF may pave the way of a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease.

  9. Habitat-specific shaping of proliferation and neuronal differentiation in adult hippocampal neurogenesis of wild rodents

    OpenAIRE

    Cavegn, Nicole; van Dijk, R. Maarten; Menges, Dominik; Brettschneider, Helene; Phalanndwa, Mashudu; Chimimba, Christian T; Isler, Karin; Lipp, Hans-Peter; Slomianka, Lutz; Amrein, Irmgard

    2013-01-01

    Daily life of wild mammals is characterized by a multitude of attractive and aversive stimuli. The hippocampus processes complex polymodal information associated with such stimuli and mediates adequate behavioral responses. How newly generated hippocampal neurons in wild animals contribute to hippocampal function is still a subject of debate. Here, we test the relationship between adult hippocampal neurogenesis (AHN) and habitat types. To this end, we compare wild Muridae species of southern ...

  10. Habitat-Specific Shaping of Proliferation and Neuronal Differentiation in Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis of Wild Rodents

    OpenAIRE

    Nicole eCavegn; R. Maarten evan Dijk; Dominik eMenges; Helene eBrettschneider; Mashudu ePhalanndwa; Chimimba, Christian T; Karin eIsler; Hans-Peter eLipp; Lutz eSlomianka; Irmgard eAmrein

    2013-01-01

    Daily life of wild mammals is characterized by a multitude of attractive and aversive stimuli. The hippocampus processes complex polymodal information associated with such stimuli and mediates adequate behavioral responses. How newly generated hippocampal neurons in wild animals contribute to hippocampal function is still a subject of debate. Here, we test the relationship between adult hippocampal neurogenesis and habitat types. To this end, we compare wild Muridae species of southern Africa...

  11. Metabolites of cerebellar neurons and hippocampal neurons play opposite roles in pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Du

    Full Text Available Metabolites of neural cells, is known to have a significant effect on the normal physiology and function of neurons in brain. However, whether they play a role in pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases is unknown. Here, we show that metabolites of neurons play essential role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Firstly, in vivo and in vitro metabolites of cerebellar neurons both significantly induced the expression of Abeta-degrading enzymes in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex and promoted Abeta clearance. Moreover, metabolites of cerebellar neurons significantly reduced brain Abeta levels and reversed cognitive impairments and other AD-like phenotypes of APP/PS1 transgenic mice, in both early and late stages of AD pathology. On the other hand, metabolites of hippocampal neurons reduced the expression of Abeta-degrading enzymes in the cerebellum and caused cerebellar neurodegeneration in APP/PS1 transgenic mice. Thus, we report, for the first time, that metabolites of neurons not only are required for maintaining the normal physiology of neurons but also play essential role in the pathogenesis of AD and may be responsible for the regional-specificity of Abeta deposition and AD pathology.

  12. Loss of STAT3 signaling during elevated activity causes vulnerability in hippocampal neurons

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Chronically altered levels of network activity lead to changes in the morphology and functions of neurons. However, little is known of how changes in neuronal activity alter the intracellular signaling pathways mediating neuronal survival. Here we use primary cultures of rat hippocampal neurons to show that elevated neuronal activity impairs phosphorylation of the serine/threonine kinase, Erk1/2 and the activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) by phosphorylatio...

  13. The BDNF effects on dendritic spines of mature hippocampal neurons depend on neuronal activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yves eKellner

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The fine tuning of neural networks during development and learning relies upon both functional and structural plastic processes. Changes in the number as well as in the size and shape of dendritic spines are associated to long-term activity-dependent synaptic plasticity. However, the molecular mechanisms translating functional into structural changes are still largely unknown. In this context, neurotrophins, like Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF, are among promising candidates. Specifically BDNF-TrkB receptor signaling is crucial for activity-dependent strengthening of synapses in different brain regions. BDNF application has been shown to positively modulate dendritic and spine architecture in cortical and hippocampal neurons as well as structural plasticity in vitro. However, a global BDNF deprivation throughout the central nervous system (CNS resulted in very mild structural alterations of dendritic spines, questioning the relevance of the endogenous BDNF signaling in modulating the development and the mature structure of neurons in vivo. Here we show that a loss-of-function approach, blocking BDNF results in a significant reduction in dendritic spine density, associated with an increase in spine length and a decrease in head width. These changes are associated with a decrease in F-actin levels within spine heads. On the other hand, a gain-of-function approach, applying exogenous BDNF, could not reproduce the increase in spine density or the changes in spine morphology previously described. Taken together, we show here that the effects exerted by BDNF on the dendritic architecture of hippocampal neurons are dependent on the neuron’s maturation stage. Indeed, in mature hippocampal neurons in vitro as shown in vivo BDNF is specifically required for the activity-dependent maintenance of the mature spine phenotype.

  14. Changes in mitochondrial function in primary culture of rat’s hippocampal neurons after exposure to electromagnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-yue QU

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the changes in mitochondrial function in rat's hippocampal neurons of primary culture after exposure to electromagnetic field (EMF. Methods Rat's hippocampal neurons of primary culture were exposed to EMF irradiation (2.45GHz with average power density of 5, 10, 30 and 60 mW/cm2 for 10 minutes. CCK-8 kit and LDH kit were used to determine the injurious effects on rat hippocampal neurons at 0, 3, 6, 12, 24 and 48 hours after irradiation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS were detected using fluorescent probe DCFH-DA, mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm was assessed using fluorescent probe JC-1, mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP opening was determined by calcein-fluorescence quenching method, and the intracellular ATP levels were determined by ATP detection kit at 12 hours after irradiation. Results  Hippocampal neuron damage was found after EMF irradiation, and it was aggravated by an increase in power density. Compared with the control, the viability of hippocampal neurons decreased significantly at 12, 24 and 48 h (P<0.05, and LDH levels increased at 24 and 48 h (P<0.05 after 10 mW/cm2 irradiation, while their viability decreased at 3, 6, 12, 24 and 48 h (P<0.05, P<0.01, and LDH levels increased at 6, 12, 24 and 48 h (P<0.05, P<0.01 after 30 and 60 mW/cm2 irradiation. Compared with the control, the mitochondrial ROS level was elevated significantly (P<0.05, P<0.01 after 5, 10, 30 and 60 mW/cm2 irradiation, while ΔΨm and ATP levels lowered and mPTP was obviously opened and activated (P<0.05, P<0.01 after 10, 30 and 60 mW/cm2 irradiation. Conclusion EMF irradiation may induce damage to rat's hippocampal neurons of primary culture in dose- and time-dependent manners, and mitochondrial dysfunction occurs during the exposure. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2014.08.12

  15. Study on the Hippocampal Neuron's Minimal Models' Discharge Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yueping Peng

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The hippocampal CA1 pyramid neuron has plenty of discharge actions. The one-compartment model of CA1 pyramid neuron developed by David is a nine-dimension complex dynamic model. In the thesis, the currents related to the nine-dimension complex model are analyzed and classified by the model’s reduction theory and methods based on neurodynamics, and four minimal models are gotten: (I_Na+I_Kdr-minimal model, (I_Na+I_M-minimal model, (I_Na+I_Ca+I_y-minimal model, and (I_Na+I_Ca+I_sAHP-minimal model. These minimal models have plenty of dynamic actions, and under the current’s stimulation, they can all generate regular discharge and have period discharge pattern, bursting pattern, the chaos discharge pattern, and so on. Compared with the initial nine-dimension complex model, these minimal models’ dimension are much reduced, and are more convenient to numerical simulation, calculating, and analyzing. In addition, these minimal models provide a simpler and flexible method to discuss the specific currents’ dynamic characteristics and functions of the initial nine-dimension complex model by the theory of neurodynamics.

  16. Synaptic network activity induces neuronal differentiation of adult hippocampal precursor cells through BDNF signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harish Babu

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is regulated by activity. But how do neural precursor cells in the hippocampus respond to surrounding network activity and translate increased neural activity into a developmental program? Here we show that long-term potential (LTP-like synaptic activity within a cellular network of mature hippocampal neurons promotes neuronal differentiation of newly generated cells. In co-cultures of precursor cells with primary hippocampal neurons, LTP-like synaptic plasticity induced by addition of glycine in Mg2+-free media for 5 min, produced synchronous network activity and subsequently increased synaptic strength between neurons. Furthermore, this synchronous network activity led to a significant increase in neuronal differentiation from the co-cultured neural precursor cells. When applied directly to precursor cells, glycine and Mg2+-free solution did not induce neuronal differentiation. Synaptic plasticity-induced neuronal differentiation of precursor cells was observed in the presence of GABAergic neurotransmission blockers but was dependent on NMDA-mediated Ca2+ influx. Most importantly, neuronal differentiation required the release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF from the underlying substrate hippocampal neurons as well as TrkB receptor phosphorylation in precursor cells. This suggests that activity-dependent stem cell differentiation within the hippocampal network is mediated via synaptically evoked BDNF signaling.

  17. GABA mediated excitation in immature rat CA3 hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherubini, E; Rovira, C; Gaiarsa, J L; Corradetti, R; Ben Ari, Y

    1990-01-01

    Intracellular recordings from rat hippocampal neurons in vitro during the first postnatal week revealed the presence of spontaneous giant depolarizing potentials (GDPs). These were generated by the synchronous discharge of a population of neurons. GDPs reversed polarity at -27 and -51 mV when recorded with KCl or K-methylsulphate filled electrodes, respectively. GDPs were blocked by the GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline (10 microM). Iontophoretic or bath applications of GABA (10-300 microM) in the presence of tetrodotoxin (1 microM), induced a membrane depolarization or in voltage clamp experiments an inward current which reversed polarity at the same potential as GDPs. The response to GABA was blocked in a non-competitive manner by bicuculline (10 microM) and did not desensitize. GABA mediated GDPs were presynaptically modulated by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and non-NMDA receptors. Their frequency was reduced or blocked by NMDA receptor antagonists and by the rather specific non-NMDA receptor antagonist 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX). The frequency of GDPs was enhanced by glycine and D-serine (10-30 microM) in a strychnine insensitive manner. This effect was blocked by AP-5, suggesting that it was mediated by the allosteric modulatory site of the NMDA receptor. These observations suggest that most of the 'excitatory' drive in immature neurons is mediated by GABA acting on GABAA receptors; furthermore excitatory amino acids modulate the release of GABA by a presynaptic action on GABAergic interneurons.

  18. Pathological changes in hippocampal neuronal circuits underlie age-associated neurodegeneration and memory loss: positive clue toward SAD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorthi, P; Premkumar, P; Priyanka, R; Jayachandran, K S; Anusuyadevi, M

    2015-08-20

    defect in neuronal-circuits of hippocampus (DG-CA4-CA1-Sub) that were significantly damaged leading to memory impairment. Interestingly, RSV was observed to culminate pathological events in the hippocampal neuronal circuit during aging, proving them as potent therapeutic drug against age-associated neurodegeneration and memory loss. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Long-term live imaging of neuronal circuits in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogolla, Nadine; Galimberti, Ivan; DePaola, Vincenzo; Caroni, Pico

    2006-01-01

    This protocol details a method for imaging organotypic slice cultures from the mouse hippocampus. The cultures are based on the interface method, which does not require special equipment, is easy to execute, and yields slice cultures that can be imaged repeatedly after they are isolated on postnatal day 6-9 and for up to 6 months in vitro. The preserved tissue architecture facilitates the analysis of defined hippocampal synapses, cells and entire projections. Time-lapse imaging is based on transgenes expressed in the mice, or on constructs introduced through transfection or viral vectors; it can reveal processes that develop over time periods ranging from seconds to months. Imaging can be repeated at least eight times without detectable morphological damage to neurons. Subsequent to imaging, the slices can be processed for immunocytochemistry or electron microscopy, to collect further information about the structures that have been imaged. This protocol can be completed in 35 min.

  20. Conditional overexpression of insulin-like growth factor-1 enhances hippocampal neurogenesis and restores immature neuron dendritic processes after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Shaun W; Madathil, Sindhu K; Sama, Diana M; Gao, Xiang; Chen, Jinhui; Saatman, Kathryn E

    2014-08-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is associated with neuronal damage or neuronal death in the hippocampus, a region critical for cognitive function. Immature neurons within the hippocampal neurogenic niche are particularly susceptible to TBI. Therapeutic strategies that protect immature hippocampal neurons or enhance posttraumatic neurogenesis may be advantageous for promoting functional recovery after TBI. Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) promotes neurogenesis in the adult brain, but its effects on neurogenesis after TBI are unknown. We used an astrocyte-specific conditional IGF-1-overexpressing mouse model to supplement IGF-1 in regions of neuronal damage and reactive astrocytosis after controlled cortical impact injury. Although early loss of immature neurons was not significantly attenuated, overexpression of IGF-1 resulted in a marked increase in immature neuron density in the subgranular zone at 10 days after injury. This delayed increase seemed to be driven by enhanced neuron differentiation rather than by increased cellular proliferation. In wild-type mice, dendrites of immature neurons exhibited significant decreases in total length and number of bifurcations at 10 days after injury versus neurons in sham-injured mice. In contrast, the morphology of immature neuron dendrites in brain-injured IGF-1-overexpressing mice was equivalent to that in sham controls. These data provide compelling evidence that IGF-1 promotes neurogenesis after TBI.

  1. Inhibition of TYRO3/Akt signaling participates in hypoxic injury in hippocampal neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-zhen Zhu; Wei Wang; Na Xian; Bing Wu

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the role of the TYRO3/Akt signaling pathway in hypoxic injury to hippocampal neurons. 3-(4,5-Dimethylth-iazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay showed that hypoxia inhibited the proliferation and viability of hippocampal neurons. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay demonstrated that hypoxia induced neuronal apoptosis in a time-dependent manner, with a greater number of apoptotic cells with longer hypoxic exposure. Immunolfuorescence labeling revealed that hypoxia suppressed TYRO3 expression. Western blot assay showed that hypoxia decreased Akt phosphorylation levels in a time-de-pendent manner. Taken together, these ifndings suggest that hypoxia inhibits the proliferation of hippocampal neurons and promotes apoptosis, and that the inhibition of the TYRO3/Akt signaling pathway plays an important role in hypoxia-induced neuronal injury.

  2. Transient oxytocin signaling primes the development and function of excitatory hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripamonti, Silvia; Ambrozkiewicz, Mateusz C; Guzzi, Francesca; Gravati, Marta; Biella, Gerardo; Bormuth, Ingo; Hammer, Matthieu; Tuffy, Liam P; Sigler, Albrecht; Kawabe, Hiroshi; Nishimori, Katsuhiko; Toselli, Mauro; Brose, Nils; Parenti, Marco; Rhee, JeongSeop

    2017-02-23

    Beyond its role in parturition and lactation, oxytocin influences higher brain processes that control social behavior of mammals, and perturbed oxytocin signaling has been linked to the pathogenesis of several psychiatric disorders. However, it is still largely unknown how oxytocin exactly regulates neuronal function. We show that early, transient oxytocin exposure in vitro inhibits the development of hippocampal glutamatergic neurons, leading to reduced dendrite complexity, synapse density, and excitatory transmission, while sparing GABAergic neurons. Conversely, genetic elimination of oxytocin receptors increases the expression of protein components of excitatory synapses and excitatory synaptic transmission in vitro. In vivo, oxytocin-receptor-deficient hippocampal pyramidal neurons develop more complex dendrites, which leads to increased spine number and reduced γ-oscillations. These results indicate that oxytocin controls the development of hippocampal excitatory neurons and contributes to the maintenance of a physiological excitation/inhibition balance, whose disruption can cause neurobehavioral disturbances.

  3. Increased vulnerability of hippocampal CA1 neurons to hypoperfusion in ataxia and male sterility (AMS) mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xueyun; Nagai, Atsushi; Sheikh, Abdullah Md; Wang, Hui; Mitaki, Shingo; Araki, Asuka; Maruyama, Riruke; Harada, Takayuki

    2013-02-04

    The nna1 gene mutation is associated with spontaneous degeneration of cerebellar Purkinje cells and germ cells in Ataxia and Male Sterility (AMS) mouse. Since nna1 is also expressed in hippocampal neurons, we investigated their vulnerability to hypoperfusion in AMS mouse. Eight-week-old male wild type (WT) and AMS mice were subjected to bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCCAO) for 10 min and sacrificed 1, 3, 7 and 28 days after BCCAO. Nissl staining revealed the neuronal cell loss and pyknotic change in the CA1 of AMS mice. TUNEL(+) apoptotic cells were found in the area at 7 days in AMS mice. Bcl-2 mRNA and protein in WT hippocampus were increased, while they were not increased in AMS. Bax mRNA was increased in AMS. Moreover, Bax activation was immunohistochemically demonstrated only in AMS at 3 and 7 days after BCCAO. An oxidative DNA damage marker, 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine-positive cells were increased in both strains at 1 day; decreased in WT at 3 days but remained high in AMS. BCCAO increased glutathione, an antioxidant, in WT, but not in AMS at 3 days. The mRNA level of mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2, a regulator of oxidative stress, was increased only in WT at 1 day. Nna1 mRNA was similarly expressed in WT and AMS, but the protein was undetectable in AMS. Thus, our results indicate the increased vulnerability of hippocampal CA1 neurons of AMS mice to cerebral hypoperfusion could be due to an imbalance between oxidative stress and antioxidative defense system.

  4. NMDA receptors and the differential ischemic vulnerability of hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, Christine E; Benquet, Pascal; Raineteau, Olivier; Rietschin, Lotty; Kirbach, Sebastian W; Gerber, Urs

    2006-05-01

    Transient cerebral ischemia causes an inhomogeneous pattern of cell death in the brain. We investigated mechanisms, which may underlie the greater susceptibility of hippocampal CA1 vs. CA3 pyramidal cells to ischemic insult. Using an in vitro oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) model of ischemia, we found that N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) responses were enhanced in the more susceptible CA1 pyramidal cells and transiently depressed in the resistant CA3 pyramidal cells. The long-lasting potentiation of NMDA responses in CA1 cells was associated with delayed cell death and was prevented by blocking tyrosine kinase-dependent up-regulation of NMDA receptor function. In CA3 cells, the energy deprivation-induced transient depression of NMDA responses was converted to potentiation by blocking protein phosphatase signalling. These results suggest that energy deprivation differentially shifts the intracellular equilibrium between the tyrosine kinase and phosphatase activities that modulate NMDA responses in CA1 and CA3 pyramidal cells. Therapeutic modulation of tyrosine phosphorylation may thus prove beneficial in mitigating ischemia-induced neuronal death in vulnerable brain areas.

  5. Perampanel inhibition of AMPA receptor currents in cultured hippocampal neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Yin Chen

    Full Text Available Perampanel is an aryl substituted 2-pyridone AMPA receptor antagonist that was recently approved as a treatment for epilepsy. The drug potently inhibits AMPA receptor responses but the mode of block has not been characterized. Here the action of perampanel on AMPA receptors was investigated by whole-cell voltage-clamp recording in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. Perampanel caused a slow (τ∼1 s at 3 µM, concentration-dependent inhibition of AMPA receptor currents evoked by AMPA and kainate. The rates of block and unblock of AMPA receptor currents were 1.5×105 M-1 s-1 and 0.58 s-1, respectively. Perampanel did not affect NMDA receptor currents. The extent of block of non-desensitizing kainate-evoked currents (IC50, 0.56 µM was similar at all kainate concentrations (3-100 µM, demonstrating a noncompetitive blocking action. Parampanel did not alter the trajectory of AMPA evoked currents indicating that it does not influence AMPA receptor desensitization. Perampanel is a selective negative allosteric AMPA receptor antagonist of high-affinity and slow blocking kinetics.

  6. Neuro-protective effects of CNTF on hippocampal neurons via an unknown signal transduction pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In our previous study, we proposed that there may be an unknown pathway in the upper stream of the known signal transduction pathway of Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) that mediates the neuro-protective function of CNTF. In the present experiment, we observed that the neuro-protective function of the non-classic signal transduction pathway in a L-NMDA (a glutamic acid ion type receptor atagonist) induced hippocampal neuron injury model, using primary culture rat hippocampal neurons, continuous photography and gp130 immunohistochemical assay. The results showed that L-NMDA induced injurious reaction of hippocampal neurons, and CNTF was able to inhibit the toxic action of L-NMDA on hippocampal neurons. Additionally, when JAK/STATs in the known classic signal transduction pathway of CNTF were blocked by PTPi-2, the protective effect of CNTF against L-NMDA injury still existed. L-NMDA caused a rapid increase in the concentration of hippocampal intracellular free [Ca2+]i. CNTF was able to attenuate L-NMDA-induced elevation of [Ca2+]i, and blocking JAK/STATs in the known classic signal trans- duction pathway of CNTF did not affect L-NMDA- induced elevation of [Ca2+]i, indicating that, apart from the known classic signal transduction pathway, there may be some other transduction pathways for CNTF to exert the protective effect on hippocampal neurons, and this pathway is related to [Ca2+].

  7. Effects of SO2 derivatives on sodium currents in acutely isolated rat hippocampal lead-exposed neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the effects of acute SO2 derivatives and chronic lead exposure together on sodium cur-rents (INa) were investigated in acutely isolated rat hippocampal neurons by using the whole-cell patch clamp techniques. We found that chronic lead exposure hardly reduced the amplitudes of INa. In the normal condition, sodium current started to appear at around ?70 mV, and reached the peak current at around ?40 mV. After chronic lead exposure, the data changed to ?70 and ?30 mV. After adding SO2 derivatives, the data changed to ?80 and ?40 mV, respectively. SO2 derivatives caused a significant in-crease of INa in hippocampal chronic-lead exposed neurons. Chronic lead exposure induced a right shift of the activation curve and a left shift of the inactivation curve of sodium channels. SO2 derivatives caused negative shifts of the activation and inactivation curves of INa in hippocampal chronic-lead ex-posed neurons. Lead exposure put off the time reaching the peak of INa activation. SO2 derivatives in-creased the time constants of inactivation after lead exposure. The interaction of lead and SO2 deriva-tives with voltage-dependent sodium channels may lead to changes in electrical activity and contribute to worsening the neurotoxicological damage.

  8. Downregulation of CREB expression in Alzheimer's brain and in Aβ-treated rat hippocampal neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pham Serena

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oxidative stress plays an important role in neuronal dysfunction and neuron loss in Alzheimer's brain. Previous studies have reported downregulation of CREB-mediated transcription by oxidative stress and Aβ. The promoter for CREB itself contains cyclic AMP response elements. Therefore, we examined the expression of CREB in the hippocampal neurons of Tg2576 mice, AD post-mortem brain and in cultured rat hippocampal neurons exposed to Aβ aggregates. Results Laser Capture Microdissection of hippocampal neurons from Tg2576 mouse brain revealed decreases in the mRNA levels of CREB and its target, BDNF. Immunohistochemical analysis of Tg2576 mouse brain showed decreases in CREB levels in hippocampus and cortex. Markers of oxidative stress were detected in transgenic mouse brain and decreased CREB staining was observed in regions showing abundance of astrocytes. There was also an inverse correlation between SDS-extracted Aβ and CREB protein levels in Alzheimer's post-mortem hippocampal samples. The levels of CREB-regulated BDNF and BIRC3, a caspase inhibitor, decreased and the active cleaved form of caspase-9, a marker for the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis, was elevated in these samples. Exposure of rat primary hippocampal neurons to Aβ fibrils decreased CREB promoter activity. Decrease in CREB mRNA levels in Aβ-treated neurons was reversed by the antioxidant, N-acetyl cysteine. Overexpression of CREB by adenoviral transduction led to significant protection against Aβ-induced neuronal apoptosis. Conclusions Our findings suggest that chronic downregulation of CREB-mediated transcription results in decrease of CREB content in the hippocampal neurons of AD brain which may contribute to exacerbation of disease progression.

  9. Immunohistochemical visualization of hippocampal neuron activity after spatial learning in a mouse model of neurodevelopmental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provenzano, Giovanni; Pangrazzi, Luca; Poli, Andrea; Berardi, Nicoletta; Bozzi, Yuri

    2015-05-12

    Induction of phosphorylated extracellular-regulated kinase (pERK) is a reliable molecular readout of learning-dependent neuronal activation. Here, we describe a pERK immunohistochemistry protocol to study the profile of hippocampal neuron activation following exposure to a spatial learning task in a mouse model characterized by cognitive deficits of neurodevelopmental origin. Specifically, we used pERK immunostaining to study neuronal activation following Morris water maze (MWM, a classical hippocampal-dependent learning task) in Engrailed-2 knockout (En2(-/-)) mice, a model of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). As compared to wild-type (WT) controls, En2(-/-) mice showed significant spatial learning deficits in the MWM. After MWM, significant differences in the number of pERK-positive neurons were detected in specific hippocampal subfields of En2(-/-) mice, as compared to WT animals. Thus, our protocol can robustly detect differences in pERK-positive neurons associated to hippocampal-dependent learning impairment in a mouse model of ASD. More generally, our protocol can be applied to investigate the profile of hippocampal neuron activation in both genetic or pharmacological mouse models characterized by cognitive deficits.

  10. The Edible Red Alga Porphyra yezoensis Promotes Neuronal Survival and Cytoarchitecture in Primary Hippocampal Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohibbullah, Md; Bhuiyan, Mohammad Maqueshudul Haque; Hannan, Md Abdul; Getachew, Paulos; Hong, Yong-Ki; Choi, Jae-Suk; Choi, In Soon; Moon, Il Soo

    2016-07-01

    The edible red alga Porphyra yezoensis is among the most popular marine algae and is of economic and medicinal importance. In the present study, the neurotrophic and neuroprotective activities of the ethanol extract of P. yezoensis (PYE) were investigated in primary cultures of hippocampal neurons. Results revealed that PYE significantly increased neurite outgrowth at an optimal concentration of 15 µg/mL. PYE dose-dependently increased viable cells, significantly accelerated the rate of neuronal differentiation in cultures, promoted axodendritic arborization, and eventually induced synaptogenesis. In addition to morphological development, PYE also promoted functional maturation as indicated by the staining of live cultures with FM 1-43. Moreover, PYE increased neuronal survivability, which was attributed to reduced apoptosis and its ROS scavenging activity. Taurine, a major organic acid in PYE (2.584/100 mg of dry PYE) promoted neurite outgrowth in a dose-dependent manner, and this promotion was suppressed by the taurine antagonist isethionic acid. The study indicates that PYE and its active component, taurine, facilitate neuronal development and maturation and have a neuroprotective effect.

  11. Neuron volumes in hippocampal subfields in delayed poststroke and aging-related dementias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemmell, Elizabeth; Tam, Edward; Allan, Louise; Hall, Roslyn; Khundakar, Ahmad; Oakley, Arthur E; Thomas, Alan; Deramecourt, Vincent; Kalaria, Raj N

    2014-04-01

    Hippocampal atrophy is widely recognized in Alzheimer disease (AD). Whether neurons within hippocampal subfields are similarly affected in other aging-related dementias, particularly after stroke, remains an open question. We investigated hippocampal CA3 and CA4 pyramidal neuron volumes and densities using 3-dimensional stereologic techniques in postmortem samples from a total of 67 subjects: poststoke demented (PSD; n = 11), nondemented stroke survivors (PSND) and PSD patients from the CogFAST (Cognitive Function After Stroke) cohort (n = 13), elderly controls (n = 12), and subjects diagnosed as having vascular dementia (n = 11), AD (n = 10), and mixed AD and vascular dementia (n = 10). We found that CA3 and CA4 neuron volumes were reduced in PSD samples compared with those in PSND samples. The CA3 and CA4 neuron volumes were positively correlated with poststroke global cognitive function but were not associated with the burden of AD pathology. There were no differences in total neuron densities in either subfield in any of the groups studied. Our results indicate that selective reductions in CA4 and to a lesser extent CA3 neuron volumes may be related to post stroke cognitive impairment and aging-related dementias. These data suggest that CA4 neurons are vulnerable to disease processes and support our previous finding that a reduction in hippocampal neuron volume predominantly reflects vascular mechanisms as contributing to dementia after stroke.

  12. Effects of GSM 1800 MHz on dendritic development of cultured hippo-campal neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei NING; Shu-jun XU; Huai CHIANG; Zheng-ping XU; Su-ya ZHOU; Wei YANG; Jian-hong LUO

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the effects of global system for mobile communications (GSM)1800 MHz microwaves on dendritic filopodia, dendritic arborization, and spine maturation during development in cultured hippocampal neurons in rats. Methods: The cultured hippocampal neurons were exposed to GSM 1800 MHz microwaves with 2.4 and 0.8 W/kg, respectively, for 15 min each day from 6 days in vitro (DIV6) to DIV14. The subtle structures of dendrites were displayed by transfection with farnesylated enhanced green fluorescent protein (F-GFP) and GFP-actin on DIV5 into the hippocampal neurons. Results: There was a significant decrease in the density and mobility of dendritic filopodia at DIV8 and in the density of mature spines at DIV14 in the neurons exposed to GSM 1800 MHz microwaves with 2.4 W/kg. In addition, the average length of dendrites per neuron at DIV10 and DIV14 was decreased, while the dendritic arborization was unaltered in these neurons. However, there were no significant changes found in the neurons ex- posed to the GSM 1800 MHz microwaves with 0.8 W/kg. Conclusion: These data indicate that the chronic exposure to 2.4 W/kg GSM 1800 MHz micro- waves during the early developmental stage may affect dendritic development and the formation of excitatory synapses of hippocampal neurons in culture.

  13. Time window characteristics of cultured rat hippocampal neurons subjected to ischemia and reperfusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Zhong; XU Ru-xiang; LIU Bao-song; JIANG Xiao-dan; HUANG Tao; DING Lian-shu; YUAN Jun

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To explore cell death and apoptosis in rat hippocampal neurons at different time points after ischemia, hypoxia and reperfusion injury and to elucidate time window characteristics in ischemia neuronal injury.Methods: Hippocampal neurons were obtained from rat embryo and were cultured in vitro. The ischemia and reperfusion of cultured rat hippocampal neurons were simulated by oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) and recovery. OGD at different time points (0.25 h to 3.0 h) and then the same recovery (24 h) were prepared. Annexin V-PI staining and flow cytometry examined neuron death and apoptosis at different time after injury. Results: After OGD and recovery, both necrosis and apoptosis were observed. At different times after OGD, there were statistically significant differences in neuron necrosis rate (P0.05). At recovery, survival rate of hippocampal neurons further decreased while apoptosis rate increased. Furthermore, apoptosis rates of different time differed greatly (P<0.05). Apoptosis rate gradually increased with significant difference among those of different time points (P<0.05). However, 2 h after ischemia, apoptosis rate decreased markedly.Conclusions: Apoptosis is an important pathway of delayed neuron death. The therapeutic time window should be within 2 h after cerebral ischemia and hypoxia.

  14. Curcumin protects against interleukin-6-induced rapid Ca2+ influx in rat hippocampal neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qinying Deng; Tao Huang; Hongmei Tang; Xingming Zhong; Sujian Xia; Xiangcai Wei; Jun Dong

    2011-01-01

    The current study sought to investigate the potential protective action of curcumin against interleukin-6-induced injury in rat hippocampal neurons. The results revealed that interleukin-6 induced typical cellular injury, such as the swelling of cell bodies and increased Ca2+ concentration. After administration of curcumin, interleukin-6-induced neurons recovered to a normal state, and the fluorescence intensity of Ca2+ gradually returned to normal. These findings suggest that curcumin exerts a protective effect on hippocampal neurons of rats. In addition, our results suggest that the protective effect of curcumin involves prevention of the rapid Ca2+ influx induced by interleukin-6, which maintains Ca2+ homeostasis.

  15. [The effects of SO2 on electric activity learning and memory of rat hippocampal neurons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoli; Yang, Dongsheng; Meng, Ziqiang

    2008-11-01

    To study the toxicological mechanism of SO2 on central neural system by electrophysiological method. Male SD rats were housed in exposure chambers and treated at the concentration of 28 mg/m3 SO2 for 7 days (6h/d), while control rats were treated with filtered air in the same condition. Using glass micro-electrodes recording in vivo, the frequencies and numbers of spontaneous discharge in hippocampal CAI neurons were measured. Influences of the learning and memory functions were measured by setting up passive avoidance behavior reflex. SO2 decreased significantly the neurons spontaneous discharge frequency and prolonged the neurons spontaneous period in hippocampal CAl. SO2 significantly decreased the learning and memory function of rats. The results indicated that SO2 could be a neurotoxin. It could inhibit the hippocampal neurons excitability and affect the learning and memory function of rats.

  16. Giant synaptic potentials in immature rat CA3 hippocampal neurones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ari, Y; Cherubini, E; Corradetti, R; Gaiarsa, J L

    1989-09-01

    1. Intracellular recordings were made from rat CA3 hippocampal neurones in vitro during the first eighteen days of postnatal life. The cells had resting membrane potentials more negative than -51 mV, action potentials greater than 55 mV and membrane input resistances of 117 +/- 12 M omega. An unusual characteristic of these cells was the presence of spontaneous giant depolarizing potentials (GDPs) which were observed during the first eight postnatal (P) days in over 85% of neurones. They were less frequent between P9 and P12 (48%) and disappeared after P12. 2. The GDPs were synchronously generated by a population of neurones; they reversed polarity at -27 mV when recorded with KCl-containing electrodes and at -51 mV with potassium acetate- or potassium methylsulphate-filled electrodes. 3. The GDPs were blocked by bath application of bicuculline (10 microM) or picrotoxin (100-200 microM). Exogenously applied gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA; 0.2-1 mM) induced at resting membrane potential a bicuculline-sensitive membrane depolarization which reversed polarity at -25 and -51 mV when recorded with KCl- or potassium methylsulphate-filled electrodes respectively. 4. The GDPs were reduced in frequency or blocked by the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists DL-2-amino-7-phosphonoheptanoate (AP-7; 50 microM), D(-)2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate (AP-5, 10-50 microM) and (+-)3-(2-carboxypiperazin-4-yl)-propyl-1-phosphonic acid (CPP, 10-50 microM) or NMDA channel blockers phencyclidine (2 microM) and ketamine (20 microM). 5. Stimulation of the hilus during the first week of life evoked a GDP followed by a hyperpolarization. The GDPs were generated by a population of synchronized neurones and reversed polarity at -27 mV with KCl-filled electrodes and at -52 mV with potassium acetate- or potassium methylsulphate-containing electrodes. 6. Bath application of bicuculline (1-10 microM) or picrotoxin (100-200 microM) reversibly blocked the evoked GDPs in the majority of cells

  17. Maternal molecular hydrogen administration ameliorates rat fetal hippocampal damage caused by in utero ischemia-reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mano, Yukio; Kotani, Tomomi; Ito, Mikako; Nagai, Taku; Ichinohashi, Yuko; Yamada, Kiyofumi; Ohno, Kinji; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Toyokuni, Shinya

    2014-04-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H2) scavenges hydroxyl radicals. Recently, H2 has been reported to prevent a variety of diseases associated with oxidative stress in model systems and in humans. Here, we studied the effects of H2 on rat fetal hippocampal damage caused by ischemia and reperfusion (IR) on day 16 of pregnancy with the transient occlusion of the bilateral utero-ovarian arteries. Starting 2 days before the operation, we provided the mothers with hydrogen-saturated water ad libitum until vaginal delivery. We observed a significant increase in the concentration of H2 in the placenta after the oral administration of hydrogen-saturated water to the mothers, with less placental oxidative damage after IR in the presence of H2. Neonatal growth retardation was observed in the IR group, which was alleviated by the H2 administration. We analyzed the neuronal cell damage in the CA1 and CA3 areas of the hippocampus at day 7 after birth by immunohistochemical analysis of the 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2׳-deoxyguanosine- and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal-modified proteins. Both oxidative stress markers were significantly increased in the IR group, which was again ameliorated by the H2 intake. Last, 8-week-old rats were subjected to a Morris water maze test. Maternal H2 administration improved the reference memory of the offspring to the sham level after IR injury during pregnancy. Overall, the present results support the idea that maternal H2 intake helps prevent the hippocampal impairment of offspring induced by IR during pregnancy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Regulation of GABA Equilibrium Potential by mGluRs in Rat Hippocampal CA1 Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo; Rajput, Padmesh S; Kumar, Ujendra; Sastry, Bhagavatula R

    2015-01-01

    The equilibrium potential for GABA-A receptor mediated currents (EGABA) in neonatal central neurons is set at a relatively depolarized level, which is suggested to be caused by a low expression of K+/Cl- co-transporter (KCC2) but a relatively high expression of Na+-K+-Cl- cotransporter (NKCC1). Theta-burst stimulation (TBS) in stratum radiatum induces a negative shift in EGABA in juvenile hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. In the current study, the effects of TBS on EGABA in neonatal and juvenile hippocampal CA1 neurons and the underlying mechanisms were examined. Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are suggested to modulate KCC2 and NKCC1 levels in cortical neurons. Therefore, the involvement of mGluRs in the regulation of KCC2 or NKCC1 activity, and thus EGABA, following TBS was also investigated. Whole-cell patch recordings were made from Wistar rat hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, in a slice preparation. In neonates, TBS induces a positive shift in EGABA, which was prevented by NKCC1 antisense but not NKCC1 sense mRNA. (RS)-a-Methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine (MCPG), a group I and II mGluR antagonist, blocked TBS-induced shifts in both juvenile and neonatal hippocampal neurons. While blockade of mGluR1 or mGluR5 alone could interfere with TBS-induced shifts in EGABA in neonates, only a combined blockade could do the same in juveniles. These results indicate that TBS induces a negative shift in EGABA in juvenile hippocampal neurons but a positive shift in neonatal hippocampal neurons via corresponding changes in KCC2 and NKCC1 expressions, respectively. mGluR activation seems to be necessary for both shifts to occur while the specific receptor subtype involved seems to vary.

  19. Regulation of GABA Equilibrium Potential by mGluRs in Rat Hippocampal CA1 Neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Yang

    Full Text Available The equilibrium potential for GABA-A receptor mediated currents (EGABA in neonatal central neurons is set at a relatively depolarized level, which is suggested to be caused by a low expression of K+/Cl- co-transporter (KCC2 but a relatively high expression of Na+-K+-Cl- cotransporter (NKCC1. Theta-burst stimulation (TBS in stratum radiatum induces a negative shift in EGABA in juvenile hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. In the current study, the effects of TBS on EGABA in neonatal and juvenile hippocampal CA1 neurons and the underlying mechanisms were examined. Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs are suggested to modulate KCC2 and NKCC1 levels in cortical neurons. Therefore, the involvement of mGluRs in the regulation of KCC2 or NKCC1 activity, and thus EGABA, following TBS was also investigated. Whole-cell patch recordings were made from Wistar rat hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, in a slice preparation. In neonates, TBS induces a positive shift in EGABA, which was prevented by NKCC1 antisense but not NKCC1 sense mRNA. (RS-a-Methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine (MCPG, a group I and II mGluR antagonist, blocked TBS-induced shifts in both juvenile and neonatal hippocampal neurons. While blockade of mGluR1 or mGluR5 alone could interfere with TBS-induced shifts in EGABA in neonates, only a combined blockade could do the same in juveniles. These results indicate that TBS induces a negative shift in EGABA in juvenile hippocampal neurons but a positive shift in neonatal hippocampal neurons via corresponding changes in KCC2 and NKCC1 expressions, respectively. mGluR activation seems to be necessary for both shifts to occur while the specific receptor subtype involved seems to vary.

  20. Volume regulated anion channel currents of rat hippocampal neurons and their contribution to oxygen-and-glucose deprivation induced neuronal death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaqiu Zhang

    Full Text Available Volume-regulated anion channels (VRAC are widely expressed chloride channels that are critical for the cell volume regulation. In the mammalian central nervous system, the physiological expression of neuronal VRAC and its role in cerebral ischemia are issues largely unknown. We show that hypoosmotic medium induce an outwardly rectifying chloride conductance in CA1 pyramidal neurons in rat hippocampal slices. The induced chloride conductance was sensitive to some of the VRAC inhibitors, namely, IAA-94 (300 µM and NPPB (100 µM, but not to tamoxifen (10 µM. Using oxygen-and-glucose deprivation (OGD to simulate ischemic conditions in slices, VRAC activation appeared after OGD induced anoxic depolarization (AD that showed a progressive increase in current amplitude over the period of post-OGD reperfusion. The OGD induced VRAC currents were significantly inhibited by inhibitors for glutamate AMPA (30 µM NBQX and NMDA (40 µM AP-5 receptors in the OGD solution, supporting the view that induction of AD requires an excessive Na(+-loading via these receptors that in turn to activate neuronal VRAC. In the presence of NPPB and DCPIB in the post-OGD reperfusion solution, the OGD induced CA1 pyramidal neuron death, as measured by TO-PRO-3-I staining, was significantly reduced, although DCPIB did not appear to be an effective neuronal VRAC blocker. Altogether, we show that rat hippocampal pyramidal neurons express functional VRAC, and ischemic conditions can initial neuronal VRAC activation that may contribute to ischemic neuronal damage.

  1. Hippocampal adaptive response following extensive neuronal loss in an inducible transgenic mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristoffer Myczek

    Full Text Available Neuronal loss is a common component of a variety of neurodegenerative disorders (including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's disease and brain traumas (stroke, epilepsy, and traumatic brain injury. One brain region that commonly exhibits neuronal loss in several neurodegenerative disorders is the hippocampus, an area of the brain critical for the formation and retrieval of memories. Long-lasting and sometimes unrecoverable deficits caused by neuronal loss present a unique challenge for clinicians and for researchers who attempt to model these traumas in animals. Can these deficits be recovered, and if so, is the brain capable of regeneration following neuronal loss? To address this significant question, we utilized the innovative CaM/Tet-DT(A mouse model that selectively induces neuronal ablation. We found that we are able to inflict a consistent and significant lesion to the hippocampus, resulting in hippocampally-dependent behavioral deficits and a long-lasting upregulation in neurogenesis, suggesting that this process might be a critical part of hippocampal recovery. In addition, we provide novel evidence of angiogenic and vasculature changes following hippocampal neuronal loss in CaM/Tet-DTA mice. We posit that angiogenesis may be an important factor that promotes neurogenic upregulation following hippocampal neuronal loss, and both factors, angiogenesis and neurogenesis, can contribute to the adaptive response of the brain for behavioral recovery.

  2. Active dendrites support efficient initiation of dendritic spikes in hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Sooyun; Guzman, Segundo J.; Hu, Hua; Jonas, Peter

    2012-01-01

    CA3 pyramidal neurons are important for memory formation and pattern completion in the hippocampal network. It is generally thought that proximal synapses from the mossy fibers activate these neurons most efficiently, whereas distal inputs from the perforant path have a weaker modulatory influence. We used confocally targeted patch-clamp recording from dendrites and axons to map the activation of rat CA3 pyramidal neurons at the subcellular level. Our results reveal two distinct dendritic dom...

  3. Hippocampal GABAergic interneurons coexpressing alpha7-nicotinic receptors and connexin-36 are able to improve neuronal viability under oxygen-glucose deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voytenko, L P; Lushnikova, I V; Savotchenko, A V; Isaeva, E V; Skok, M V; Lykhmus, O Yu; Patseva, M A; Skibo, G G

    2015-08-07

    The hippocampal interneurons are very diverse by chemical profiles and rather inconsistent by sensitivity to CI. Some hippocampal GABAergic interneurons survive certain time after ischemia while ischemia-sensitive interneurons and pyramidal neurons are damaged. GABAergic signaling, nicotinic receptors expressing α7-subunit (α7nAChRs(+)) and connexin-36 (Cx36(+), electrotonic gapjunctions protein) contradictory modulate post-ischemic environment. We hypothesized that hippocampal ischemia-resistant GABAergic interneurons coexpressing glutamate decarboxylase-67 isoform (GAD67(+)), α7nAChRs(+), Cx36(+) are able to enhance neuronal viability. To check this hypothesis the histochemical and electrophysiological investigations have been performed using rat hippocampal organotypic culture in the condition of 30-min oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). Post-OGD reoxygenation (4h) revealed in CA1 pyramidal layer numerous damaged cells, decreased population spike amplitude and increased pair-pulse depression. In these conditions GAD67(+) interneurons displayed the OGD-resistance and significant increase of GABA synthesis/metabolism (GAD67-immunofluorescence, mitochondrial activity). The α7nAChRs(+) and Cx36(+) co-localizations were revealed in resistant GAD67(+) interneurons. Under OGD: GABAA-receptors (GABAARs) blockade increased cell damage and exacerbated the pair-pulse depression in CA1 pyramidal layer; α7nAChRs and Cx36-channels separate blockades sufficiently decreased cell damage while interneuronal GAD67-immunofluorescence and mitochondrial activity were similar to the control. Thus, hippocampal GABAergic interneurons co-expressing α7nAChRs and Cx36 remained resistant certain time after OGD and were able to modulate CA1 neuron survival through GABAARs, α7nAChRs and Cx36-channels activity. The enhancements of the neuronal viability together with GABA synthesis/metabolism normalization suggest cooperative neuroprotective mechanism that could be used for increase in

  4. Involvement of α2-antiplasmin in dendritic growth of hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashita, Eri; Kanno, Yosuke; Asayama, Haruka; Okada, Kiyotaka; Ueshima, Shigeru; Matsuo, Osamu; Matsuno, Hiroyuki

    2013-07-01

    The α2-Antiplasmin (α2AP) protein is known as a principal physiological inhibitor of plasmin, but we previously demonstrated that it acts as a regulatory factor for cellular functions independent of plasmin. α2AP is highly expressed in the hippocampus, suggesting a potential role for α2AP in hippocampal neuronal functions. However, the role for α2AP was unclear. This study is the first to investigate the involvement of α2AP in the dendritic growth of hippocampal neurons. The expression of microtubule-associated protein 2, which contributes to neurite initiation and neuronal growth, was lower in the neurons from α2AP⁻/⁻ mice than in the neurons from α2AP⁺/⁺ mice. Exogenous treatment with α2AP enhanced the microtubule-associated protein 2 expression, dendritic growth and filopodia formation in the neurons. This study also elucidated the mechanism underlying the α2AP-induced dendritic growth. Aprotinin, another plasmin inhibitor, had little effect on the dendritic growth of neurons, and α2AP induced its expression in the neurons from plaminogen⁻/⁻ mice. The activation of p38 MAPK was involved in the α2AP-induced dendritic growth. Therefore, our findings suggest that α2AP induces dendritic growth in hippocampal neurons through p38 MAPK activation, independent of plasmin, providing new insights into the role of α2AP in the CNS.

  5. Zbtb20 Defines a Hippocampal Neuronal Identity Through Direct Repression of Genes That Control Projection Neuron Development in the Isocortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jakob V; Thomassen, Mads; Møllgård, Kjeld

    2014-01-01

    Hippocampal pyramidal neurons are important for encoding and retrieval of spatial maps and episodic memories. While previous work has shown that Zbtb20 is a cell fate determinant for CA1 pyramidal neurons, the regulatory mechanisms governing this process are not known. In this study, we demonstrate...... that Zbtb20 binds to genes that control neuronal subtype specification in the developing isocortex, including Cux1, Cux2, Fezf2, Foxp2, Mef2c, Rorb, Satb2, Sox5, Tbr1, Tle4, and Zfpm2. We show that Zbtb20 represses these genes during ectopic CA1 pyramidal neuron development in transgenic mice. These data...

  6. Protective effect of a prostaglandin I2 analog, TEI-7165, on ischemic neuronal damage in gerbils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, S; Wen, T C; Karasawa, Y; Araki, H; Otsuka, H; Ishihara, K; Sakanaka, M

    1997-09-26

    TTC-909 (Clinprost), a chemically stable PGI2 analog, isocarbacyclin methyl ester (TEI-9090 or Clinprost) incorporated in lipid microspheres, when administered intravenously after brain ischemia, prevents ischemic neuronal damage possibly by modulating cerebral blood flow and platelet aggregation. However, the possibility exists that TEI-7165, which is the free acid form and a central metabolite of TEI-9090, has direct neurotrophic action in vivo, since TEI-7165 has been shown to block neuronal voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels in vitro, and a novel prostacyclin receptor showing high affinity with TEI-7165 has been detected in a variety of brain regions including the hippocampus. In the present study, we infused TEI-7165 for 7 days into the lateral ventricle of gerbils starting 2 h before or just after 3-min forebrain ischemia. TEI-7165 infusion prevented significantly the ischemia-induced shortening of response latency time as revealed by a step-down passive avoidance task. Subsequent light and electron microscopic examinations showed that pyramidal neurons in the hippocampal CA1 region, as well as synapses within the strata moleculare, radiatum and oriens of the region, were significantly more numerous in gerbils infused with TEI-7165 than in those receiving vehicle infusion. TEI-7165 infusion did not affect hippocampal blood flow or temperature. These findings, together with the previously depicted accumulation of centrally administered [3H]TEI-7165 around hippocampal neurons, suggest that TEI-7165 has a direct neuroprotective action in brain ischemia.

  7. Spontaneous perseverative turning in rats with radiation-induced hippocampal damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mickley, G.A.; Ferguson, J.L.; Nemeth, T.J.; Mulvihill, M.A.; Alderks, C.E. (Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1989-08-01

    This study found a new behavioral correlate of lesions specific to the dentate granule cell layer of the hippocampus: spontaneous perseverative turning. Irradiation of a portion of the neonatal rat cerebral hemispheres produced hypoplasia of the granule cell layer of the hippocampal dentate gyrus while sparing the rest of the brain. Radiation-induced damage to the hippocampal formation caused rats placed in bowls to spontaneously turn in long, slow bouts without reversals. Irradiated subjects also exhibited other behaviors characteristic of hippocampal damage (e.g., perseveration in spontaneous exploration of the arms of a T-maze, retarded acquisition of a passive avoidance task, and increased horizontal locomotion). These data extend previously reported behavioral correlates of fascia dentata lesions and suggest the usefulness of a bout analysis of spontaneous bowl turning as a measure of nondiscrete-trial spontaneous alternation and a sensitive additional indicator of radiation-induced hippocampal damage.

  8. Amentoflavone protects hippocampal neurons: anti-inflammatory, antioxidative, and antiapoptotic effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Amentoflavone is a natural biflavone compound with many biological properties, including anti-inflammatory, antioxidative, and neuroprotective effects. We presumed that amentoflavone exerts a neuroprotective effect in epilepsy models. Prior to model establishment, mice were intragastrically administered 25 mg/kg amentoflavone for 3 consecutive days. Amentoflavone effectively prevented pilocarpine-induced epilepsy in a mouse kindling model, suppressed nuclear factor-κB activation and expression, inhibited excessive discharge of hippocampal neurons resulting in a reduction in epileptic seizures, shortened attack time, and diminished loss and apoptosis of hippocampal neurons. Results suggested that amentoflavone protected hippocampal neurons in epilepsy mice via anti-inflammation, antioxidation, and antiapoptosis, and then effectively prevented the occurrence of seizures.

  9. Gentianine protects hippocampal neurons in a rat model of recurrent febrile convulsion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuewei Liu; Shumin Liu; Na Wang; Fang Lu; Min Cao

    2011-01-01

    Gentianine has been shown to have a protective effect on hippocampal CA1 neurons in rats subjected to recurrent febrile convulsion (FC).The present study sought to explore the possible mechanism of gentianine by intraperitoneally injecting gentianine into rats with warm water-induced FC.The results revealed that neuronal organelle injury was slightly ameliorated in the hippocampal CA1 region.The level of glutamate was decreased,but the level of γ-aminobutyric acid was increased,as detected by ninhydrin staining.In addition,glutamate acid decarboxylase expression in hippocampal CA1 was increased,as determined by immunohistochemistry.The results demonstrated that gentianine can ameliorate FC-induced neuronal injury by enhancing glutamate acid decarboxylase activity,decreasing glutamate levels and increasing γ-aminobutyric acid levels.

  10. Taurine attenuates hippocampal and corpus callosum damage, and enhances neurological recovery after closed head injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Y; Zhao, Y; Qian, K; Sun, M

    2015-04-16

    The protective effects of taurine against closed head injury (CHI) have been reported. This study was designed to investigate whether taurine reduced white matter damage and hippocampal neuronal death through suppressing calpain activation after CHI in rats. Taurine (50 mg/kg) was administered intravenously 30 min and 4 h again after CHI. It was found that taurine lessened the corpus callosum damage, attenuated the neuronal cell death in hippocampal CA1 and CA3 subfields and improved the neurological functions 7 days after CHI. Moreover, it suppressed the over-activation of calpain, enhanced the levels of calpastatin, and reduced the degradation of neurofilament heavy protein, myelin basic protein and αII-spectrin in traumatic tissue 24 h after CHI. These data confirm the protective effects of taurine against gray and white matter damage due to CHI, and suggest that down-regulating calpain activation could be one of the protective mechanisms of taurine against CHI. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of brain-derived neurotrophic factor haploinsufficiency on stress-induced remodeling of hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magariños, A M; Li, C J; Gal Toth, J; Bath, K G; Jing, D; Lee, F S; McEwen, B S

    2011-03-01

    Chronic restraint stress (CRS) induces the remodeling (i.e., retraction and simplification) of the apical dendrites of hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons in rats, suggesting that intrahippocampal connectivity can be affected by a prolonged stressful challenge. Since the structural maintenance of neuronal dendritic arborizations and synaptic connectivity requires neurotrophic support, we investigated the potential role of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a neurotrophin enriched in the hippocampus and released from neurons in an activity-dependent manner, as a mediator of the stress-induced dendritic remodeling. The analysis of Golgi-impregnated hippocampal sections revealed that wild type (WT) C57BL/6 male mice showed a similar CA3 apical dendritic remodeling in response to three weeks of CRS to that previously described for rats. Haploinsufficient BDNF mice (BDNF(±) ) did not show such remodeling, but, even without CRS, they presented shorter and simplified CA3 apical dendritic arbors, like those observed in stressed WT mice. Furthermore, unstressed BDNF(±) mice showed a significant decrease in total hippocampal volume. The dendritic arborization of CA1 pyramidal neurons was not affected by CRS or genotype. However, only in WT mice, CRS induced changes in the density of dendritic spine shape subtypes in both CA1 and CA3 apical dendrites. These results suggest a complex role of BDNF in maintaining the dendritic and spine morphology of hippocampal neurons and the associated volume of the hippocampal formation. The inability of CRS to modify the dendritic structure of CA3 pyramidal neurons in BDNF(±) mice suggests an indirect, perhaps permissive, role of BDNF in mediating hippocampal dendritic remodeling.

  12. Short communication: hippocampal neuronal activity and imprinting in the behaving domestic chick.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicol, A U; Brown, M W; Horn, G

    1998-08-01

    The hippocampus of the chick projects to the intermediate and medial part of the hyperstriatum ventrale (IMHV) which stores information acquired through the learning process of imprinting. We have investigated whether the response properties of hippocampal neurons are similar to those of IMHV neurons. Chicks were imprinted by exposure, one group (n = 7) to a rotating red box (RB), the other (n = 5) to a rotating blue cylinder (BC). Four chicks were untrained. The following day, when the chicks were approximately 48 h old, neuronal activity was recorded in the left hippocampus. The proportion of neurons responding to the RB and that to the BC in untrained chicks were compared with the proportions in trained birds. (i) In RB-trained chicks both the proportion responding to the RB and that to the BC were significantly increased. (ii) In BC-trained chicks no significant effect on these proportions was found. Of the responsive neurons some were colour (red or blue) sensitive and others were shape (box or cylinder) sensitive; the proportions so responsive were not influenced by training condition. Certain neurons responded significantly differently when a stimulus was 0.5 m or 2 m from the chick (35%; d-sensitive); very few neurons were equivalently responsive to a stimulus at both distances (3%; d-invariant). These proportions were not significantly affected by training condition. Hippocampal responses are compared with those in the left IMHV. It is concluded that IMHV responses do not passively reflect those of hippocampal neurons.

  13. Temporal profile of neuronal damage in a model of transient forebrain ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulsinelli, W A; Brierley, J B; Plum, F

    1982-05-01

    This study examined the temporal profile of ischemic neuronal damage following transient bilateral forebrain ischemia in the rat model of four-vessel occlusion. Wistar rats were subjected to transient but severe forebrain ischemia by permanently occluding the vertebral arteries and 24 hours later temporarily occluding the common carotid arteries for 10, 20, or 30 minutes. Carotid artery blood flow was restored and the rats were killed by perfusion-fixation after 3, 6, 24, and 72 hours. Rats with postischemic convulsions were discarded. Ischemic neuronal damage was graded in accordance with conventional neuropathological criteria. Ten minutes of four-vessel occlusion produced scattered ischemic cell change in the cerebral hemispheres of most rats. The time to onset of visible neuronal damage varied among brain regions and in some regions progressively worsened with time. After 30 minutes of ischemia, small to medium-sized striatal neurons were damaged early while the initiation of visible damage to hippocampal neurons in the h1 zone was delayed for 3 to 6 hours. The number of damaged neurons in neocortex (layer 3, layers 5 and 6, or both) and hippocampus (h1, h3-5, paramedian zone) increased significantly (p less than 0.01) between 24 and 72 hours. The unique delay in onset of ischemic cell change and the protracted increase in its incidence between 24 and 72 hours could reflect either delayed appearance of ischemic change in previously killed neurons or a delayed insult that continued to jeopardize compromised but otherwise viable neurons during the postischemic period.

  14. EFFECTS OF GLUTAMATE ON SODIUM CHANNEL IN ACUTELY DISSOCIATED HIPPOCAMPAL CA1 PYRAMIDAL NEURONS OF RATS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高宾丽; 伍国锋; 杨艳; 刘智飞; 曾晓荣

    2011-01-01

    Objective To observe the effects of glutamate on sodium channel in acutely dissociated hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons of rats.Methods Voltage-dependent sodium currents (INa) in acutely dissociated hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons of neonate rats were recorded by whole-cell patchclamp of the brain slice technique when a series of doses of glutamate (100-1000μmol/L) were applied.Results Different concentrations of glutamate could inhibit INa,and higher concentration of glutamate affected greater inhibitio...

  15. Low Concentrations of Alcohol Inhibit BDNF-Dependent GABAergic Plasticity via L-type Ca2+ channel Inhibition in Developing CA3 Hippocampal Pyramidal Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Zucca, Stefano; Valenzuela, C. Fernando

    2010-01-01

    Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) is associated with learning and memory alterations that could be, in part, a consequence of hippocampal damage. The CA3 hippocampal subfield is one of the regions affected by ethanol (EtOH), including exposure during the 3rd trimester-equivalent (i.e. neonatal period in rats). However, the mechanism of action of EtOH is poorly understood. In CA3 pyramidal neurons from neonatal rats, dendritic BDNF release causes long-term potentiation of the frequency of...

  16. Homeostatic plasticity: single hippocampal neurons see the light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Michael A

    2010-11-04

    Neurons adapt to altered network activity through homeostatic changes in synaptic function. In this issue of Neuron, Goold and Nicoll report that chronic hyperactivation of individual CA1 pyramidal neurons drives cell-autonomous, compensatory synapse elimination via CaMKIV-dependent transcription. These findings suggest that neurons gauge their intrinsic activity to instruct homeostatic regulation of synaptic inputs.

  17. Study on dynamic characteristics' change of hippocampal neuron reduced models caused by the Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yueping; Wang, Jue; Zheng, Chongxun

    2016-01-01

    In the paper, based on the electrophysiological experimental data, the Hippocampal neuron reduced model under the pathology condition of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been built by modifying parameters' values. The reduced neuron model's dynamic characteristics under effect of AD are comparatively studied. Under direct current stimulation, compared with the normal neuron model, the AD neuron model's dynamic characteristics have obviously been changed. The neuron model under the AD condition undergoes supercritical Andronov-Hopf bifurcation from the rest state to the continuous discharge state. It is different from the neuron model under the normal condition, which undergoes saddle-node bifurcation. So, the neuron model changes into a resonator with monostable state from an integrator with bistable state under AD's action. The research reveals the neuron model's dynamic characteristics' changing under effect of AD, and provides some theoretic basis for AD research by neurodynamics theory.

  18. Effects of calcium channel on 3-morpholinosydnonimine-induced rat hippocampal neuronal apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Quanzhong Chang; Shuling Zhang; Yuanyin Zheng; Lijuan Xu; Jinbao Yin; Shining Cai

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that increased chloride channel activity plays a role in nitric oxide-induced neuronal apoptosis in the rat hippocampus.The present study investigated the effects of the broad-spectrum calcium channel blocker CdC12 on survival rate, percentage of apoptosis, and morphological changes in hippocampal neurons cultured in vitro, as well as the effects of calcium channels on neuronal apoptosis.The chloride channel blockers 4-acetamido-4'-isothiocyanatostilbene-2, 2'-disulfonic acid (SITS) or 4, 4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (DIDS) increased the survival rate of 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1)-treated neurons and suppressed SIN-1-induced neuronal apoptosis.The calcium channel blocker CdC12 did not increase the survival rate of neurons and did not affect SIN-1-induced apoptosis or SITS- or DIDS-suppressed neuronal apoptosis.Results demonstrated that calcium channels did not significantly affect neuronal apoptosis.

  19. Electrophysiological actions of cyclosporin A and tacrolimus on rat hip-pocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong YU; Xue-qin CHEN; Yao-yuan CUI; Guo-yuan HU

    2007-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the present study was to investigate the electrophysiological actions of cyclosporin A (CsA) and tacrolimus (FK506) on neurons in the brain, and to elucidate the relevant mechanisms. Methods: Whole-cell current-clamp recording was made in CA1 pyramidal neurons in rat hippocampal slices; whole- cell voltage-clamp recording was made in dissociated hippocampal CA1 pyrami- dal neurons of rats. Results: CsA (100 μmol/L) and FKS06 (50 μmol/L) did not significantly alter the passive electrical properties of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, but slowed down the repolarizing phase of the action potential. CsA (10-100 μmol/L) selectively inhibited the delayed rectifier K~ current (IK,) in a concentration-dependent manner. CsA did not affect the kinetic properties of IK. Intracellular dialysis of CsA (100 μmol/L) had no effect on IK. The inhibition of IK by CsA (100/μmol/L) persisted under the low Ca2+ conditions that blocked the basal activity of calcineurin. Conclusion: CsA exerted calcineurin-independent inhibition on the IK in rat hippocampal pyramidal neurons. Taken together with our previous finding with FK506, it is conceivable that the spike broadening caused by the immunosuppressant drugs is due to direct inhibition on the IK.

  20. 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural from wine-processed Fructus corni inhibits hippocampal neuron apoptosis***

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai Gu; Zequn Jiang; Mingyan Wang; Haiying Jiang; Fengming Zhao; Xia Ding; Baochang Cai; Zhen Zhan

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that 5-hydroxymethylfurfural, a compound extracted from wine- pro-cessed Fructus corni, has a protective effect on hippocampal neurons. The present study was de-signed to explore the related mechanisms. Our study revealed that high and medium doses (10, 1μmol/L) of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural could improve the morphology of H2O2-treated rat hippocampal neurons as revealed by inverted phase-contrast microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. MTT results showed that incubation with high and medium doses of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural caused a significant increase in the viability of neuronal cells injured by H2O2. Flow cytometry assays con-firmed that H2O2 could induce cellapoptosis, while high and medium doses of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural had a visible protective effect on apoptotic rat hippocampal neurons. Re-al-time PCR and western blot analysis showed that high and medium doses of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural prevented H2O2-induced up-regulation of p53, Bax and caspase-3 and antagonized the down-regulation of Bcl-2 induced by H2O2 treatment. These results suggested that 5-hydroxymethylfurfural could inhibit apoptosis of cultured rat hippocampal neurons injured by H2O2 via increase in Bcl-2 levels and decrease in p53, Bax and caspase-3 protein expression lev-els.

  1. A viral vector expressing hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha inhibits hippocampal neuronal apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiqing Chai; Weina Kong; Lingyun Liu; Wenguo Yu; Zhenqing Zhang; Yimin Sun

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) attenuates amyloid-beta protein neurotoxicity and decreases apoptosis induced by oxidative stress or hypoxia in cortical neurons. In this study, we construct-ed a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector expressing the human HIF-1αgene (rAAV-HIF-1α), and tested the assumption that rAAV-HIF-1αrepresses hippocampal neuronal apoptosis induced by amyloid-beta protein. Our results conifrmed that rAAV-HIF-1αsigniifcant-ly reduces apoptosis induced by amyloid-beta protein in primary cultured hippocampal neurons. Direct intracerebral rAAV-HIF-1αadministration also induced robust and prolonged HIF-1αproduction in rat hippocampus. Single rAAV-HIF-1αadministration resulted in decreased apoptosis of hippocampal neurons in an Alzheimer’s disease rat model established by intrace-rebroventricular injection of aggregated amyloid-beta protein (25-35). Our in vitro and in vivo ifndings demonstrate that HIF-1 has potential for attenuating hippocampal neuronal apoptosis induced by amyloid-beta protein, and provides experimental support for treatment of neurode-generative diseases using gene therapy.

  2. Photoperiod affects the diurnal rhythm of hippocampal neuronal morphology of Siberian hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeno, Tomoko; Weil, Zachary M; Nelson, Randy J

    2013-11-01

    Individuals of many species can regulate their physiology, morphology, and behavior in response to annual changes of day length (photoperiod). In mammals, the photoperiodic signal is mediated by a change in the duration of melatonin, leading to alterations in gene expressions, neuronal circuits, and hormonal secretion. The hippocampus is one of the most plastic structures in the adult brain and hippocampal neuronal morphology displays photoperiod-induced differences. Because the hippocampus is important for emotional and cognitive behaviors, photoperiod-driven remodeling of hippocampal neurons is implicated in seasonal differences of affect, including seasonal affective disorder (SAD) in humans. Because neuronal architecture is also affected by the day-night cycle in several brain areas, we hypothesized that hippocampal neuronal morphology would display a diurnal rhythm and that day length would influence that rhythm. In the present study, we examined diurnal and seasonal differences in hippocampal neuronal morphology, as well as mRNA expression of the neurotrophic factors (i.e., brain-derived neurotrophic factor [Bdnf], tropomyosin receptor kinase B [trkB; a receptor for BDNF], and vascular endothelial growth factor [Vegf]) and a circadian clock gene, Bmal1, in the hippocampus of Siberian hamsters. Diurnal rhythms in total length of dendrites, the number of primary dendrites, dendritic complexity, and distance of the furthest intersection from the cell body were observed only in long-day animals; however, diurnal rhythms in the number of branch points and mean length of segments were observed only in short-day animals. Spine density of dendrites displayed diurnal rhythmicity with different peak times between the CA1 and DG subregions and between long and short days. These results indicate that photoperiod affects daily morphological changes of hippocampal neurons and the daily rhythm of spine density, suggesting the possibility that photoperiod-induced adjustments

  3. Dynamic Characteristics of the Hippocampal Neuron under Conductance’s Changing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yueping Peng

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The hippocampal CA1 pyramid neuron has plenty of discharge actions. In the thesis, the dynamic characteristics of the hippocampal neuron model are analyzed and discussed by the neurodynamic theory and methods. Under a certain amplitude current’s stimulation, the change of gNa(the maximum conductance of the transient sodium channel and gKdr (the maximum conductance of the delay rectification potassium channel can cause different dynamic characteristics of the neuron model. The transient Na+ current(INa caused by gNa is indispensable in the discharge’s formation process of the model. The model can generate the discharge process only when gNa reaches a certain threshold. In the discharge process of the neuron model, gNa’s changing affects little and the ISIs approximate to a straight line. The delay rectification K+ current(Ikdr caused by gKdr isn’t indispensable in the discharge’s formation process of the model. But gKdr’s changing affects much in the discharge process of the neuron model. With gKdr’s changing, the neuron model undergoes different dynamic bifurcation process, and has plenty of discharge patterns such as the chaos, period, and so on. This investigation is helpful to know and investigate the dynamic characteristics and the bifurcation mechanism of the hippocampal neuron; and it provides a certain theory assist to investigate the neural diseases such as the Alzheimer disease by neurodynamics.

  4. Evidence for glutamate-mediated activation of hippocampal neurons by glial calcium waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassinger, T D; Atkinson, P B; Strecker, G J; Whalen, L R; Dudek, F E; Kossel, A H; Kater, S B

    1995-10-01

    Communication from astrocytes to neurons has recently been reported by two laboratories, but different mechanisms were though to underlie glial calcium wave activation of associated neurons. Neuronal calcium elevation by glia observed in the present report is similar to that reported previously, where an increase in neuronal calcium was demonstrated in response to glial stimulation. In the present study hippocampal neurons plated on a confluent glial monolayer displayed a transient increase in intracellular calcium following a short delay after the passage of a wave of increased calcium in underlying glia. Activated cells displayed action potentials in response to glial waves and showed antineurofilament immunoreactivity. Finally, the N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptor antagonist DL-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid and the non-NMDA glutamate receptor antagonist 6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione significantly reduced the responsiveness of neurons to glial calcium waves. Our results indicate that hippocampal neurons growing on hippocampal or cortical astrocytes respond to glial calcium waves with elevations in calcium and increased electrical activity. Furthermore, we show that in most cases this communication appears to be mediated by ionotropic glutamate receptor channels.

  5. Effects of Regular Treadmill Exercise on a DNA Oxidative-Damage Marker and Total Antioxidant Capacity in Rat Hippocampal Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahjoub, Soleiman; Ghadi, Arezoo; Pourbagher, Roghayeh; Hajian-Tilaki, Karimollah

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Regular exercise can result in changes in the levels of oxidative stress in the hippocampus; however, little attention has been paid to physical-activity-induced neuronal protection to exposure to lead compounds. This study investigated the effects of regular treadmill exercise on a DNA oxidative-damage marker [8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG)] and the total antioxidant capacity (TAC) of hippocampal tissue in lead-acetate exposed rats. Methods This study investigated the effects of 8 weeks of regular treadmill exercise on 8-OHdG and the TAC of hippocampal tissue in lead-acetate-exposed rats. Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups: baseline, sham (control), lead, and exercise+lead. The exercise program involved running on a treadmill with increasing intensity five times a week for 8 weeks. Animals in the lead and exercise+lead groups received lead acetate at 20 mg/kg body weight intraperitoneally three times weekly for 8 weeks. Animals in the sham group received solvent (ethyl oleate) at 30 mg/kg body weight three times weekly for 8 weeks. TAC and 8-OHdG were measured by spectrophotometric and ELISA techniques, respectively. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test with a significance cutoff of p≤0.05. Results The level of 8-OHdG and the TAC were significantly higher and lower, respectively, in the lead group than in the baseline and sham groups (p<0.01). However, the 8-OHdG level and TAC value in hippocampal tissue were significantly decreased and increased, respectively, in the exercise+lead group relative to the lead group (p<0.05). Conclusions The TAC of hippocampal tissue may be directly associated with neural protection mechanisms of exercise following lead acetate injection, and the beneficial effects of regular exercise in preventing hippocampal neuronal damage could be due to decreased hippocampal oxidative stress such as reflected by a lower 8-OHdG level and increased TAC.

  6. Point application withAngong Niuhuang sticker protects hippocampal and cortical neurons in rats with cerebral ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong-shu Zhang; Yuan-liang Liu; Dao-qi Zhu; Xiao-jing Huang; Chao-hua Luo

    2015-01-01

    Angong Niuhuang pill, a Chinese materia medica preparation, can improve neurological func-tions after acute ischemic stroke. Because of its inconvenient application and toxic components (Cinnabaris andRealgar), we used transdermal enhancers to deliverAngong Niuhuang pill by modern technology, which expanded the safe dose range and clinical indications. In this study, Angong Niuhuang stickers administered at different point application doses (1.35, 2.7, and 5.4 g/kg) were administered to theDazhui (DU14), Qihai(RN6) andMingmen (DU4) of rats with chronic cerebral ischemia, for 4 weeks. The Morris water maze was used to determine the learning and memory ability of rats. Hematoxylin-eosin staining and Nissl staining were used to observe neuronal damage of the cortex and hippocampal CA1 region in rats with chronic cerebral ischemia. The middle- and high-dose point application ofAngong Niuhuangstickers attenuated neuronal damage in the cortex and hippocampal CA1 region, and improved the memory of rats with chronic cerebral ischemia with an efifcacy similar to interventions by electroacupuncture at Dazhui (DU14),Qihai (RN6) andMingmen (DU4). Our experimental ifndings indicate that point application withAngong Niuhuang stickers can improve cognitive function after chronic cerebral ischemia in rats and is neuroprotective with an equivalent efifcacy to acupuncture.

  7. Limitations of Mild, Moderate, and Profound Hypothermia in Protecting Developing Hippocampal Neurons After Simulated Ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregersen, Maren; Lee, Deok Hee; Gabatto, Pablo; Bickler, Philip E

    2013-12-01

    Mild hypothermia (33°C-34°C) after cerebral ischemia in intact animals or ischemia-like conditions in vitro reduces neuron death. However, it is now clear that more profound hypothermia or delayed hypothermia may not provide significant protection. To further define the limitations of hypothermia after cerebral ischemia, we used hippocampal slice cultures to examine the effects of various degrees, durations, and delays of hypothermia on neuron death after an ischemia-like insult. Organotypic cultures of the hippocampus from 7- to 8 day-old rat pups were cooled to 32°C, 23°C, 17°C, or 4°C immediately or after a 2-4 hour delay from an injurious insult of oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD). Cell death in CA1, CA3 and dentate regions of the cultures was assessed 24 hours later with SYTOX(®) or propidium iodide, both of which are fluorescent markers labeling damaged cells. OGD caused extensive cell death in CA1, CA3, and dentate regions of the hippocampal cultures. Hypothermia (32°C, 23°C and 17°C) for 4-6 hours immediately after OGD was protective at 24 hours, but when hypothermia was applied for longer periods or delayed after OGD, no protection or increased death was seen. Ultra-profound hypothermia (4°C) increased cell death in all cell areas of the hippocampus even when after a milder insult of only hypoxia. In an in vitro model of recovery after an ischemia-like insult, mild to profound hypothermia is protective only when applied without delay and for limited periods of time (6-8 hours). Longer durations of hypothermia, or delayed application of the hypothermia can increase neuron death. These findings may have implications for clinical uses of therapeutic hypothermia after hypoxic or ischemic insults, and suggest that further work is needed to elucidate the limitations of hypothermia as a protective treatment after ischemic stress.

  8. Wnt Signaling Prevents the Aβ Oligomer-Induced Mitochondrial Permeability Transition Pore Opening Preserving Mitochondrial Structure in Hippocampal Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrázola, Macarena S.; Ramos-Fernández, Eva; Cisternas, Pedro; Ordenes, Daniela; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder mainly known for synaptic impairment and neuronal cell loss, affecting memory processes. Beside these damages, mitochondria have been implicated in the pathogenesis of AD through the induction of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP). The mPTP is a non-selective pore that is formed under apoptotic conditions, disturbing mitochondrial structure and thus, neuronal viability. In AD, Aβ oligomers (Aβos) favor the opening of the pore, activating mitochondria-dependent neuronal cell death cascades. The Wnt signaling activated through the ligand Wnt3a has been described as a neuroprotective signaling pathway against amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide toxicity in AD. However, the mechanisms by which Wnt signaling prevents Aβos-induced neuronal cell death are unclear. We proposed here to study whether Wnt signaling protects neurons earlier than the late damages in the progression of the disease, through the preservation of the mitochondrial structure by the mPTP inhibition. To study specific events related to mitochondrial permeabilization we performed live-cell imaging from primary rat hippocampal neurons, and electron microscopy to analyze the mitochondrial morphology and structure. We report here that Wnt3a prevents an Aβos-induced cascade of mitochondrial events that leads to neuronal cell death. This cascade involves (a) mPTP opening, (b) mitochondrial swelling, (c) mitochondrial membrane potential loss and (d) cytochrome c release, thus leading to neuronal cell death. Furthermore, our results suggest that the activation of the Wnt signaling prevents mPTP opening by two possible mechanisms, which involve the inhibition of mitochondrial GSK-3β and/or the modulation of mitochondrial hexokinase II levels and activity. This study suggests a possible new approach for the treatment of AD from a mitochondrial perspective, and will also open new lines of study in the field of Wnt signaling in neuroprotection

  9. The protective role of ascorbic acid on hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons in a rat model of maternal lead exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepehri, Hamid; Ganji, Farzaneh

    2016-07-01

    Oxidative stress is a major pathogenic mechanism of lead neurotoxicity. The antioxidant ascorbic acid protects hippocampal pyramidal neurons against cell death during congenital lead exposure; however, critical functions like synaptic transmission, integration, and plasticity depend on preservation of dendritic and somal morphology. This study was designed to examine if ascorbic acid also protects neuronal morphology during developmental lead exposure. Timed pregnant rats were divided into four treatment groups: (1) control, (2) 100mg/kg ascorbic acid once a day via gavage, (3) 0.05% lead acetate in drinking water, and (4) 0.05% lead+100mg/kg oral ascorbic acid. Brains of eight male pups (P25) per treatment group were processed for Golgi staining. Changes in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons' somal size were estimated by cross-sectional area and changes in dendritic arborization by Sholl's analysis. One-way ANOVA was used to compare results among treatment groups. Lead-exposed pups exhibited a significant decrease in somal size compared to controls (Pascorbic acid. Sholl's analysis revealed a significant increase in apical dendritic branch points near cell body (PAscorbic acid significantly but only partially reversed the somal and dendritic damage caused by developmental lead exposure. Oxidative stress thus contributes to lead neurotoxicity but other pathogenic mechanisms are also involved.

  10. Electroconvulsive stimulation results in long-term survival of newly generated hippocampal neurons in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Mikkel Vestergaard; Wörtwein, Gitta; Folke, Jonas

    2017-01-01

    Electroconvulsive stimulation (ECS) is one of the strongest stimulators of hippocampal neurogenesis in rodents that represents a plausible mechanism for the efficacy of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in major depressive disorder. Using design-based stereological cell counting, we recently...... documented an initial 2.6-fold increase in neurogenesis following a clinical relevant schedule of ECS, a treatment also rescuing depression-like behavior in rats. However, these results gave no demonstration of the longevity of newly generated neurons. The present study is a direct continuation...... in neurogenesis facilitates the behavioral outcome of the forced swim test (FST), an animal model of depression. The results showed that ECS in conjunction with CRS stimulates hippocampal neurogenesis, and that a significant quantity of the newly formed hippocampal neurons survives up to 12 months. The new Brd...

  11. Effect of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Haploinsufficiency on Stress-Induced Remodeling of Hippocampal Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Magariños, A.M.; Li, C. J.; Toth, J. Gal; Bath, K.G.; Jing, D; Lee, F S; MCEWEN, B. S.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic restraint stress (CRS) induces the remodeling (i.e., retraction and simplification) of the apical dendrites of hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons in rats, suggesting that intrahippocampal connectivity can be affected by a prolonged stressful challenge. Since the structural maintenance of neuronal dendritic arborizations and synaptic connectivity requires neurotrophic support, we investigated the potential role of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a neurotrophin enriched in the ...

  12. Amyloid beta-peptide(25-35) changes [Ca2+] in hippocampal neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Helle Smidt; Beatty, D M; Morris, S J

    1998-01-01

    of A beta(25-35) on [Ca2+]i and intracellular H+ concentration ([H+]i) in single hippocampal neurons by real time fluorescence imaging using the Ca(2+)- and H(+)-specific ratio dyes, indo-1 and SNARF-1. Incubation of these cultures with A beta(25-35) for 3-12 days in vitro increased [Ca2+]i and [H......+]i in large, NMDA-responsive neurons....

  13. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor, but not neurotrophin-3, prevents ischaemia-induced neuronal cell death in organotypic rat hippocampal slice cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pringle, A K; Sundstrom, L E; Wilde, G J; Williams, L R; Iannotti, F

    1996-06-28

    We have investigated the neuroprotective actions of neurotrophins in a model of ischaemia using slice cultures. Ischaemia was induced in organotypic hippocampal cultures by simultaneous oxygen and glucose deprivation. Cell death was assessed 24 h later by propidium iodide fluorescence. Pre- but not post-ischaemic addition of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) produced a concentration-dependent reduction in neuronal damage. Neurotrophin-3 was not neuroprotective. These data suggest that BDNF may form part of an endogenous neuroprotective mechanism.

  14. Entorhinal-Hippocampal Neuronal Circuits Bridge Temporally Discontiguous Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Takashi; Macdonald, Christopher J.; Tonegawa, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    The entorhinal cortex (EC)-hippocampal (HPC) network plays an essential role for episodic memory, which preserves spatial and temporal information about the occurrence of past events. Although there has been significant progress toward understanding the neural circuits underlying the spatial dimension of episodic memory, the relevant circuits…

  15. Arrested neuronal proliferation and impaired hippocampal function following fractionated brain irradiation in the adult rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Torsten Meldgaard; Kristjansen, P.E.G.; Bolwig, Tom Gert

    2003-01-01

    irradiation blocked the formation of new neurons in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. At different time points after the termination of the irradiation procedure, the animals were tested in two tests of short-term memory that differ with respect to their dependence on hippocampal function. Eight and 21...

  16. Homeostatic maintenance in excitability of tree shrew hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons after chronic stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kole, MHP; Czeh, B; Fuchs, E

    2004-01-01

    The experience of chronic stress induces a reversible regression of hippocampal CA3 apical neuron dendrites. Although such postsynaptic membrane reduction will obviously diminish the possibility of synaptic input, the consequences for the functional membrane properties of these cells are not well un

  17. Developmental and Activity-Dependent miRNA Expression Profiling in Primary Hippocampal Neuron Cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Spronsen (Myrrhe); E.Y. van Battum (Eljo); M. Kuijpers (Marijn); V.R. Vangoor (Vamshidhar); M.L. Rietman (M. Liset); J. Pothof (Joris); L.F. Gumy (Laura); W.F.J. van IJcken (Wilfred); A.S. Akhmanova (Anna); R.J. Pasterkamp (Jeroen); C.C. Hoogenraad (Casper)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractMicroRNAs (miRNAs) are evolutionarily conserved non-coding RNAs of ∼22 nucleotides that regulate gene expression at the level of translation and play vital roles in hippocampal neuron development, function and plasticity. Here, we performed a systematic and in-depth analysis of miRNA exp

  18. Modulation of Hippocampal Theta Oscillations and Spatial Memory by Relaxin-3 Neurons of the Nucleus Incertus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Sherie; Olucha-Bordonau, Francisco E.; Hossain, M. Akhter; Lin, Feng; Kuei, Chester; Liu, Changlu; Wade, John D.; Sutton, Steven W.; Nunez, Angel; Gundlach, Andrew L.

    2009-01-01

    Hippocampal theta rhythm is thought to underlie learning and memory, and it is well established that "pacemaker" neurons in medial septum (MS) modulate theta activity. Recent studies in the rat demonstrated that brainstem-generated theta rhythm occurs through a multisynaptic pathway via the nucleus incertus (NI), which is the primary source of the…

  19. Antibody to collapsin response mediator protein 1 promotes neurite outgrowth from rat hippocampal neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongsheng Lin; Jing Chen; Wenbin Zhang; Xiaobing Gong; Biao Chen; Guoqing Guo

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the role of collapsin response mediator protein 1 (CRMP-1) on neurite outgrowth from rat hippocampal neurons by blocking its function using an antibody. Hippocampal neurons, cultured in vitro, were treated (blocked) using a polyclonal antibody to CRMP-1, and neurite outgrowth and cytoskeletal changes w ere captured using atomic force microscopy and laser confocal microscopy. Control cells, treated with normal rabbit IgG, established their characteristic morphology and had a large number of processes emerging from the soma, including numerous branches. Microtubules were clearly visible in the soma, formed an elaborate network, and were aligned in parallel arrays to form bundles which projected into neurites. After blocking with CRMP-1 antibody, the number of branches emerging from axons and dendrites significantly increased and were substantially longer, compared with control cells. However, the microtubule network nearly disappeared and only a few remnants were visible. When CRMP-1 antibody-blocked neurons were treated with the Rho inhibitor, Y27632, numerous neurites emerged from the soma, and branches were more abundant than in control neurons. Although the microtubules were not as clearly visible compared with neurons cultured in control medium, the microtubule network recovered in cells treated with Y27632, when compared with cells that were blocked by CRMP-1 antibody (but not treated with Y27632). These results demonstrate that neurite outgrowth from hippocampal neurons can be promoted by blocking CRMP-1 with a polyclonal antibody.

  20. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor mediates estradiol-induced dendritic spine formation in hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, D D; Cole, N B; Segal, M

    1998-09-15

    Dendritic spines are of major importance in information processing and memory formation in central neurons. Estradiol has been shown to induce an increase of dendritic spine density on hippocampal neurons in vivo and in vitro. The neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) recently has been implicated in neuronal maturation, plasticity, and regulation of GABAergic interneurons. We now demonstrate that estradiol down-regulates BDNF in cultured hippocampal neurons to 40% of control values within 24 hr of exposure. This, in turn, decreases inhibition and increases excitatory tone in pyramidal neurons, leading to a 2-fold increase in dendritic spine density. Exogenous BDNF blocks the effects of estradiol on spine formation, and BDNF depletion with a selective antisense oligonucleotide mimics the effects of estradiol. Addition of BDNF antibodies also increases spine density, and diazepam, which facilitates GABAergic neurotransmission, blocks estradiol-induced spine formation. These observations demonstrate a functional link between estradiol, BDNF as a potent regulator of GABAergic interneurons, and activity-dependent formation of dendritic spines in hippocampal neurons.

  1. GnRH analogue attenuated apoptosis of rat hippocampal neuron after ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Chenyu; Xu, Bainan; Huang, Weiquan

    2010-12-01

    The expression and new functions of reproductive hormones in organs beyond hypothalamus-pituitary-gonad axis have been reported. So far, there is no report about the protective effects of GnRH analogue to hippocampal neurons suffering from ischemia-reperfusion injury. Middle cerebral artery occlusion model together with TUNEL staining were made in vivo and oxygen-glucose deprivation model together with double staining of Annexin V/PI with flow cytometer were made in vitro to observe the anti-apoptotic effects of GnRH analogue to hippocampal neurons after ischemia-reperfusion injury. The results found that the number of TUNEL positive pyramidal neurons in CA1 region in GnRH analogue experiment group was less than that in control group in vivo; the percentage of apoptotic neurons in GnRH analogue experiment group was less than that in control group in vitro. These findings suggested that pretreatment with certain concentration of GnRH analogue could attenuate apoptosis of hippocampal neurons. GnRH analogue has the protective effects to neurons.

  2. VPS35 regulates developing mouse hippocampal neuronal morphogenesis by promoting retrograde trafficking of BACE1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Lei Wang

    2012-10-01

    VPS35, a major component of the retromer, plays an important role in the selective endosome-to-Golgi retrieval of membrane proteins. Dysfunction of retromer is a risk factor for neurodegenerative disorders, but its function in developing mouse brain remains poorly understood. Here we provide evidence for VPS35 promoting dendritic growth and maturation, and axonal protein transport in developing mouse hippocampal neurons. Embryonic hippocampal CA1 neurons suppressing Vps35 expression by in utero electroporation of its micro RNAs displayed shortened apical dendrites, reduced dendritic spines, and swollen commissural axons in the neonatal stage, those deficits reflecting a defective protein transport/trafficking in developing mouse neurons. Further mechanistic studies showed that Vps35 depletion in neurons resulted in an impaired retrograde trafficking of BACE1 (β1-secretase and altered BACE1 distribution. Suppression of BACE1 expression in CA1 neurons partially rescued both dendritic and axonal deficits induced by Vps35-deficiency. These results thus demonstrate that BACE1 acts as a critical cargo of retromer in vitro and in vivo, and suggest that VPS35 plays an essential role in regulating apical dendritic maturation and in preventing axonal spheroid formation in developing hippocampal neurons.

  3. Astragaloside Ⅳ inhibits spontaneous synaptic transmission and synchronized Ca2+ oscillations on hippocampal neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao-qing ZHU; Lei QI; Yan-fang RUI; Ru-xin LI; Xiang-ping HE; Zuo-ping XIE

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the changes in the spontaneous neuronal excitability in-duced by astragaloside Ⅳ (AGS-Ⅳ) in the cultured hippocampal network. Methods: Hippocampal neurons in culture for 9-11 d were used for this study. The sponta-neous synaptic activities of these hippocampal neurons were examined by Ca2+ imaging and whole-cell patch-clamp techniques. In total, 40 mg/L AGS-Ⅳ dis-solved in DMSO and 2 mL/L DMSO were applied to the neurons under a micro-scope while the experiments were taking place. Results: AGS-Ⅳ inhibited the frequencies of synchronized spontaneous Ca2+ oscillations to 59.39%+3.25% (mean+SEM), the spontaneous postsynaptic currents to 43.78%±7.72% (mean±SEM), and the spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents to 49.25%±7.06% (mean±SEM) of those of the control periods, respectively, at 16 min after the AGS-Ⅳ applications. AGS-Ⅳ also decreased the peak values of the voltage-gated K+ and Na+ channel currents at that time point. Conclusion: These results indicate that AGS-Ⅳ suppresses the spontaneous neuronal excitabilities effectively. Such a modulation of neuronal activity could represent new evidence for AGS-Ⅳ as a neuroprotector.

  4. Preservation of hippocampal neuron numbers and hippocampal subfield volumes in behaviorally characterized aged tree shrews

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keuker, J.I.H.; de Biurrun, G.; Luiten, P.G.M.; Fuchs, E.

    2004-01-01

    Aging is associated with a decreased ability to store and retrieve information. The hippocampal formation plays a critical role in such memory processes, and its integrity is affected during normal aging. We used tree shrews (Tupaia belangeri) as an animal model of aging, because in many characteris

  5. Cranial Radiation Therapy and Damage to Hippocampal Neurogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monje, Michelle

    2008-01-01

    Cranial radiation therapy is associated with a progressive decline in cognitive function, prominently memory function. Impairment of hippocampal neurogenesis is thought to be an important mechanism underlying this cognitive decline. Recent work has elucidated the mechanisms of radiation-induced failure of neurogenesis. Potential therapeutic…

  6. In vitro ischemia triggers a transcriptional response to down-regulate synaptic proteins in hippocampal neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Fernandes

    Full Text Available Transient global cerebral ischemia induces profound changes in the transcriptome of brain cells, which is partially associated with the induction or repression of genes that influence the ischemic response. However, the mechanisms responsible for the selective vulnerability of hippocampal neurons to global ischemia remain to be clarified. To identify molecular changes elicited by ischemic insults, we subjected hippocampal primary cultures to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD, an in vitro model for global ischemia that resulted in delayed neuronal death with an excitotoxic component. To investigate changes in the transcriptome of hippocampal neurons submitted to OGD, total RNA was extracted at early (7 h and delayed (24 h time points after OGD and used in a whole-genome RNA microarray. We observed that at 7 h after OGD there was a general repression of genes, whereas at 24 h there was a general induction of gene expression. Genes related with functions such as transcription and RNA biosynthesis were highly regulated at both periods of incubation after OGD, confirming that the response to ischemia is a dynamic and coordinated process. Our analysis showed that genes for synaptic proteins, such as those encoding for PICK1, GRIP1, TARPγ3, calsyntenin-2/3, SAPAP2 and SNAP-25, were down-regulated after OGD. Additionally, OGD decreased the mRNA and protein expression levels of the GluA1 AMPA receptor subunit as well as the GluN2A and GluN2B subunits of NMDA receptors, but increased the mRNA expression of the GluN3A subunit, thus altering the composition of ionotropic glutamate receptors in hippocampal neurons. Together, our results present the expression profile elicited by in vitro ischemia in hippocampal neurons, and indicate that OGD activates a transcriptional program leading to down-regulation in the expression of genes coding for synaptic proteins, suggesting that the synaptic proteome may change after ischemia.

  7. Mesenchymal stem cells enhance GABAergic transmission in co-cultured hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauri, Mario; Lentini, Daniela; Gravati, Marta; Foudah, Dana; Biella, Gerardo; Costa, Barbara; Toselli, Mauro; Parenti, Marco; Coco, Silvia

    2012-04-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent stem cells endowed with neurotrophic potential combined with immunological properties, making them a promising therapeutic tool for neurodegenerative disorders. However, the mechanisms through which MSCs promote the neurological recovery following injury or inflammation are still largely unknown, although cell replacement and paracrine mechanisms have been hypothesized. In order to find out what are the mechanisms of the trophic action of MSCs, as compared to glial cells, on CNS neurons, we set up a co-culture system where rat MSCs (or cortical astrocytes) were used as a feeding layer for hippocampal neurons without any direct contact between the two cell types. The analysis of hippocampal synaptogenesis, synaptic vesicle recycling and electrical activity show that MSCs were capable to support morphological and functional neuronal differentiation. The proliferation of hippocampal glial cells induced by the release of bioactive substance(s) from MSCs was necessary for neuronal survival. Furthermore, MSCs selectively increased hippocampal GABAergic pre-synapses. This effect was paralleled with a higher expression of the potassium/chloride KCC2 co-transporter and increased frequency and amplitude of mIPSCs and sIPSCs. The enhancement of GABA synapses was impaired by the treatment with K252a, a Trk/neurotrophin receptor blocker, and by TrkB receptor bodies hence suggesting the involvement of BDNF as a mediator of such effects. The results obtained here indicate that MSC-secreted factors induce glial-dependent neuronal survival and trigger an augmented GABAergic transmission in hippocampal cultures, highlighting a new effect by which MSCs could promote CNS repair. Our results suggest that MSCs may be useful in those neurological disorders characterized by an impairment of excitation versus inhibition balance.

  8. Loss of glutathione homeostasis associated with neuronal senescence facilitates TRPM2 channel activation in cultured hippocampal pyramidal neurons

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    Belrose Jillian C

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glutathione (GSH plays an important role in neuronal oxidant defence. Depletion of cellular GSH is observed in neurodegenerative diseases and thereby contributes to the associated oxidative stress and Ca2+ dysregulation. Whether depletion of cellular GSH, associated with neuronal senescence, directly influences Ca2+ permeation pathways is not known. Transient receptor potential melastatin type 2 (TRPM2 is a Ca2+ permeable non-selective cation channel expressed in several cell types including hippocampal pyramidal neurons. Moreover, activation of TRPM2 during oxidative stress has been linked to cell death. Importantly, GSH has been reported to inhibit TRPM2 channels, suggesting they may directly contribute to Ca2+ dysregulation associated with neuronal senescence. Herein, we explore the relation between cellular GSH and TRPM2 channel activity in long-term cultures of hippocampal neurons. Results In whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings, we observe that TRPM2 current density increases in cultured pyramidal neurons over time in vitro. The observed increase in current density was prevented by treatment with NAC, a precursor to GSH synthesis. Conversely, treatment of cultures maintained for 2 weeks in vitro with L-BSO, which depletes GSH by inhibiting its synthesis, augments TRPM2 currents. Additionally, we demonstrate that GSH inhibits TRPM2 currents through a thiol-independent mechanism, and produces a 3.5-fold shift in the dose-response curve generated by ADPR, the intracellular agonist for TRPM2. Conclusion These results indicate that GSH plays a physiologically relevant role in the regulation of TRPM2 currents in hippocampal pyramidal neurons. This interaction may play an important role in aging and neurological diseases associated with depletion of GSH.

  9. Intervention effects of ganoderma lucidum spores on epileptiform discharge hippocampal neurons and expression of neurotrophin-4 and N-cadherin.

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    Shu-Qiu Wang

    Full Text Available Epilepsy can cause cerebral transient dysfunctions. Ganoderma lucidum spores (GLS, a traditional Chinese medicinal herb, has shown some antiepileptic effects in our previous studies. This was the first study of the effects of GLS on cultured primary hippocampal neurons, treated with Mg(2+ free medium. This in vitro model of epileptiform discharge hippocampal neurons allowed us to investigate the anti-epileptic effects and mechanism of GLS activity. Primary hippocampal neurons from <1 day old rats were cultured and their morphologies observed under fluorescence microscope. Neurons were confirmed by immunofluorescent staining of neuron specific enolase (NSE. Sterile method for GLS generation was investigated and serial dilutions of GLS were used to test the maximum non-toxic concentration of GLS on hippocampal neurons. The optimized concentration of GLS of 0.122 mg/ml was identified and used for subsequent analysis. Using the in vitro model, hippocampal neurons were divided into 4 groups for subsequent treatment i control, ii model (incubated with Mg(2+ free medium for 3 hours, iii GLS group I (incubated with Mg(2+ free medium containing GLS for 3 hours and replaced with normal medium and incubated for 6 hours and iv GLS group II (neurons incubated with Mg(2+ free medium for 3 hours then replaced with a normal medium containing GLS for 6 hours. Neurotrophin-4 and N-Cadherin protein expression were detected using Western blot. The results showed that the number of normal hippocampal neurons increased and the morphologies of hippocampal neurons were well preserved after GLS treatment. Furthermore, the expression of neurotrophin-4 was significantly increased while the expression of N-Cadherin was decreased in the GLS treated group compared with the model group. This data indicates that GLS may protect hippocampal neurons by promoting neurotrophin-4 expression and inhibiting N-Cadherin expression.

  10. Electroacupuncture at Du channel and meridian of foot- Taiyang for hippocampal neurons in rats with depression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Pi; Wenshu Luo; Lihong Diao; Xiaodan Rao; Haibo Yu; Zhuoxin Yang

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Long-term anti-depression treatment can promote the regeneration of hippocampal regeneration. Up-regulation of hippocampal regeneration can reverse or prevent against the injury of stress to cerebrum, especially to hippocampal structure and function. Therefore, promoting hippocampal neuronal regeneration may be a new strategy for treating depression and anxiety.OBJECTIVE: To observe the effect of electro-acupuncture at Du channel and meridian of foot-Taiyang on hippocampal neurons from model rats of depression.DESIGN: A randomized controlled animal experiment.SETTING: Department of Acupuncture and Moxibustion, Shenzhen Affiliated Hospital, Guangzhou University of Traditional Chinese Medicine.MATERIALS: Twenty-four Wistar rats, of either gender, aged 2 months old, weighing 200 - 220 g, were provided by the Animal Experimental Center, Guangzhou University of Traditional Chinese Medicine.METHODS: This experiment was carried out in the Clinical Molecular Biochemical Laboratory, Shenzhen Affiliated Hospital, Guangzhou University of Traditional Chinese Medicine between October 2006 and April 2007.①The involved rats were randomized into 4 groups according to body mass: blank control group,model group, electroacupuncture A group and electroacupuncture B group, with 6 in each. Rats in the blank control group were free to access to water, and were not given any intervention. Rats in the latter 3 groups were developed into rat depression models by chronic stress combined with feeding alone, and received 21-day unpredictable various stresses. Rats in the model group were euthanized at 14 days after modeling,and their brain tissues were harvested. Rats in the electroacupuncture A group were modeled, then points "Baihui" and "Shenting" were chosen, and given electroacupuncture, once a day, 20 minutes once. Rats in the electroacupuncture B group were modeled, then points "Baihui", "Shenting", "Xinshu"and "Ganshu" were chosen, and frequency and therapeutic time were

  11. nNOS expression of hippocampal neurons in aged rats after brain ischemia/reperfusion and its role in DND development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨传红; 赖晃文; 詹纯列; 肖育华; 郑文岭

    2002-01-01

    To study the role of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in aged rats' hippocampal delayed neuronal death (DND) following brain ischemia. Methods: Models of incomplete brain ischemia were induced by clipping common carotid artery. A total of 46 aged SD rats were divided into 8 groups: normal control group ( Group A, n = 5 ), sham-operation group ( Group B, n = 5), reperfusion 1, 6, 12, 24, 48, and 96 hours groups after brain ischemia for 30 minutes ( Group C, D,E, F, G, and H, n = 6/group). The expression of nNOS was examined by immunohistochemistry and neuronal ultrastructural changes were observed by the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) at different time points after reperfusion. Results: Immunohistochemistry showed that nNOS expression in the hippocampal neurons was high in Group E, iow expression in Group D, moderate expression in Group F and G. There was nearly no expression of nNOS in Group A, B, C, and H. UItrastructure of hippocampal neurons was damaged more severely in reperfusion over 24 hours groups. Conclusions: Nitric oxide (NO) may be one of the important factors in inducing DND after ischemia/reperfusion.

  12. Age-dependent variations in potassium sensitivity of A-currents in rat hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klee, R; Eder, C; Ficker, E; Heinemann, U

    1997-09-01

    Hippocampal pyramidal neurons were either cultured from prenatal rats or acutely isolated from the brain of newborn and juvenile rats. The influence of lowering the concentration of the extracellular potassium concentration ([K+]o) on isolated fast transient outward K+ currents (I(A)) was studied in these neurons using the patch clamp technique in the whole cell configuration. With respect to the response of I(A) to lowering [K+]o, three types of cells were observed. The first subpopulation of neurons was characterized by a complete suppression of I(A) over the whole voltage range under potassium-free solutions (type A neurons). A second proportion of cells showed an increase of I(A) at test pulses below -0 mV and a decrease of I(A) at voltages above -0 mV (type B neurons). In a third group of neurons, amplitudes of I(A) increased at all potentials tested during omission of potassium ions from the extracellular superfusate (type C neurons). Whereas type A and type B neurons were preferentially found in freshly plated cultures and newborn rats, the majority of type C cells was detected in long-term cultures and in animals of older ages. Thus, hippocampal A-currents lose their sensitivity to extracellular potassium ions during early ontogenesis.

  13. Developmental Changes in Hippocampal CA1 Single Neuron Firing and Theta Activity during Associative Learning

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    Kim, Jangjin; Goldsberry, Mary E.; Harmon, Thomas C.; Freeman, John H.

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal development is thought to play a crucial role in the emergence of many forms of learning and memory, but ontogenetic changes in hippocampal activity during learning have not been examined thoroughly. We examined the ontogeny of hippocampal function by recording theta and single neuron activity from the dorsal hippocampal CA1 area while rat pups were trained in associative learning. Three different age groups [postnatal days (P)17-19, P21-23, and P24-26] were trained over six sessions using a tone conditioned stimulus (CS) and a periorbital stimulation unconditioned stimulus (US). Learning increased as a function of age, with the P21-23 and P24-26 groups learning faster than the P17-19 group. Age- and learning-related changes in both theta and single neuron activity were observed. CA1 pyramidal cells in the older age groups showed greater task-related activity than the P17-19 group during CS-US paired sessions. The proportion of trials with a significant theta (4–10 Hz) power change, the theta/delta ratio, and theta peak frequency also increased in an age-dependent manner. Finally, spike/theta phase-locking during the CS showed an age-related increase. The findings indicate substantial developmental changes in dorsal hippocampal function that may play a role in the ontogeny of learning and memory. PMID:27764172

  14. Cell cycle markers have different expression and localization patterns in neuron-like PC12 cells and primary hippocampal neurons.

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    Negis, Yesim; Unal, Aysegul Yildiz; Korulu, Sirin; Karabay, Arzu

    2011-06-01

    Neuron-like PC12 cells are extensively used in place of neurons in published studies. Aim of this paper has been to compare mRNA and protein expressions of cell cycle markers; cyclinA, B, D, E; Cdk1, 2 and 4; and p27 in post-mitotic primary hippocampal neurons, mitotically active PC12 cells and NGF-differentiated post-mitotic PC12 cells. Contrary to PC12 cells, in neurons, the presence of all these markers was detected only at mRNA level; except for cyclinA, cyclinE and Cdk4, which were detectable also at protein levels. In both NGF-treated PC12 cells and neurons, cyclinE was localized only in the nucleus. In NGF-treated PC12 cells cyclinD and Cdk4 were localized in the nucleus while, in neurons cyclinD expression was not detectable; Cdk4 was localized in the cytoplasm. In neurons, cyclinA was nuclear, whereas in NGF-treated PC12 cells, it was localized in the cell body and along the processes. These results suggest that PC12 cells and primary neurons are different in terms of cell cycle protein expressions and localizations. Thus, it may not be very appropriate to use these cells as neuronal model system in order to understand neuronal physiological activities, upstream of where may lie cell cycle activation triggered events.

  15. Oenanthe Javanica Extract Protects Against Experimentally Induced Ischemic Neuronal Damage via its Antioxidant Effects

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    Joon Ha Park

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Water dropwort (Oenanthe javanica as a popular traditional medicine in Asia shows various biological properties including antioxidant activity. In this study, we firstly examined the neuroprotective effect of Oenanthe javanica extract (OJE in the hippocampal cornus ammonis 1 region (CA1 region of the gerbil subjected to transient cerebral ischemia. Methods: Gerbils were established by the occlusion of common carotid arteries for 5 min. The neuroprotective effect of OJE was estimated by cresyl violet staining. In addition, 4 antioxidants (copper, zinc superoxide dismutase [SOD], manganese SOD, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase immunoreactivities were investigated by immunohistochemistry. Results: Pyramidal neurons in the CA1 region showed neuronal death at 5 days postischemia; at this point in time, all antioxidants immunoreactivities disappeared in CA1 pyramidal neurons and showed in many nonpyramidal cells. Treatment with 200 mg/kg, not 100 mg/kg, OJE protected CA1 pyramidal neurons from ischemic damage. In addition, 200 mg/kg OJE treatment increased or maintained antioxidants immunoreactivities. Especially, among the antioxidants, glutathione peroxidase immunoreactivity was effectively increased in the CA1 pyramidal neurons of the OJE-treated sham-operated and ischemia-operated groups. Conclusion: Our present results indicate that treatment with OJE can protect neurons from transient ischemic damage and that the neuroprotective effect may be closely associated with increased or maintained intracellular antioxidant enzymes by OJE.

  16. Oenanthe Javanica Extract Protects Against Experimentally Induced Ischemic Neuronal Damage via its Antioxidant Effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joon Ha Park; Jeong Hwi Cho; In Hye Kim; Ji Hyeon Ahn; Jae-Chul Lee; Bai Hui Chen; Bich-Na Shin

    2015-01-01

    Background:Water dropwort (Oenanthejavanica) as a popular traditional medicine in Asia shows various biological properties including antioxidant activity.In this study,we firstly examined the neuroprotective effect of Oenanthejavanica extract (OJE) in the hippocampal cornus ammonis 1 region (CA1 region) of the gerbil subjected to transient cerebral ischemia.Methods:Gerbils were established by the occlusion of common carotid arteries for 5 min.The neuroprotective effect of OJE was estimated by cresyl violet staining.In addition,4 antioxidants (copper,zinc superoxide dismutase [SOD],manganese SOD,catalase,and glutathione peroxidase) immunoreactivities were investigated by immunohistochemistry.Results:Pyramidal neurons in the CA1 region showed neuronal death at 5 days postischemia;at this point in time,all antioxidants immunoreactivities disappeared in CA1 pyramidal neurons and showed in many nonpyramidal cells.Treatment with 200 mg/kg,not 100 mg/kg,OJE protected CA1 pyramidal neurons from ischemic damage.In addition,200 mg/kg OJE treatment increased or maintained antioxidants immunoreactivities.Especially,among the antioxidants,glutathione peroxidase immunoreactivity was effectively increased in the CA1 pyramidal neurons of the OJE-treated sham-operated and ischemia-operated groups.Conclusion:Our present results indicate that treatment with OJE can protect neurons from transient ischemic damage and that the neuroprotective effect may be closely associated with increased or maintained intracellular antioxidant enzymes by OJE.

  17. Transient oxytocin signaling primes the development and function of excitatory hippocampal neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripamonti, Silvia; Ambrozkiewicz, Mateusz C; Guzzi, Francesca; Gravati, Marta; Biella, Gerardo; Bormuth, Ingo; Hammer, Matthieu; Tuffy, Liam P; Sigler, Albrecht; Kawabe, Hiroshi; Nishimori, Katsuhiko; Toselli, Mauro; Brose, Nils; Parenti, Marco; Rhee, JeongSeop

    2017-01-01

    Beyond its role in parturition and lactation, oxytocin influences higher brain processes that control social behavior of mammals, and perturbed oxytocin signaling has been linked to the pathogenesis of several psychiatric disorders. However, it is still largely unknown how oxytocin exactly regulates neuronal function. We show that early, transient oxytocin exposure in vitro inhibits the development of hippocampal glutamatergic neurons, leading to reduced dendrite complexity, synapse density, and excitatory transmission, while sparing GABAergic neurons. Conversely, genetic elimination of oxytocin receptors increases the expression of protein components of excitatory synapses and excitatory synaptic transmission in vitro. In vivo, oxytocin-receptor-deficient hippocampal pyramidal neurons develop more complex dendrites, which leads to increased spine number and reduced γ-oscillations. These results indicate that oxytocin controls the development of hippocampal excitatory neurons and contributes to the maintenance of a physiological excitation/inhibition balance, whose disruption can cause neurobehavioral disturbances. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22466.001 PMID:28231043

  18. Basolateral amygdala regulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis and fear-related activation of newborn neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Elizabeth D.; Friedman, Aaron R.; Covarrubias, David; Ying, Carl; Sun, Wayne G.; Goosens, Ki A.; Sapolsky, Robert M.; Kaufer, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Impaired regulation of emotional memory is a feature of several affective disorders, including depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder. Such regulation occurs, in part, by interactions between the hippocampus and the basolateral amygdala (BLA). Recent studies have indicated that within the adult hippocampus, newborn neurons may contribute to support of emotional memory, and that regulation of hippocampal neurogenesis is implicated in depressive disorders. How emotional information impacts newborn neurons in adults is not clear. Given the role of the BLA in hippocampus-dependent emotional memory, we investigated whether hippocampal neurogenesis was sensitive to emotional stimuli from the BLA. We show that BLA lesions suppress adult neurogenesis, while lesions of the central nucleus of the amygdala do not. Similarly, we show that reducing BLA activity through viral vector-mediated overexpression of an outwardly rectifying potassium channel suppresses neurogenesis. We also show that BLA lesions prevent selective activation of immature newborn neurons in response to a fear conditioning task. These results demonstrate that BLA activity regulates adult hippocampal neurogenesis and the fear context-specific activation of newborn neurons. Together, these findings denote functional implications for proliferation and recruitment of new neurons into emotional memory circuits. PMID:21670733

  19. Maturation and integration of adult born hippocampal neurons: signal convergence onto small Rho GTPases

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    Krishna eVadodaria

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Adult neurogenesis, restricted to specific regions in the mammalian brain, represents one of the most interesting forms of plasticity in the mature nervous system. Adult-born hippocampal neurons play important roles in certain forms of learning and memory, and altered hippocampal neurogenesis has been associated with a number of neuropsychiatric diseases such as major depression and epilepsy. Newborn neurons go through distinct developmental steps from a dividing neurogenic precursor to a synaptically integrated mature neuron. Previous studies have uncovered several molecular signaling pathways involved in distinct steps of this maturational process. In this context, the small Rho GTPases, Cdc42, Rac1 and RhoA have recently been shown to regulate the morphological and synaptic maturation of adult-born dentate granule cells in vivo. Distinct upstream regulators, including several growth factors that modulate maturation and integration of newborn neurons have been shown to also recruit the small Rho GTPases. Here we review recent findings and highlight the possibility that small Rho GTPases may act as central assimilators, downstream of critical input onto adult-born hippocampal neurons contributing to their maturation and integration into the existing dentate gyrus circuitry.

  20. Restraint stress increases hemichannel activity in hippocampal glial cells and neurons

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    Juan Andrés Orellana

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Stress affects brain areas involved in learning and emotional responses, which may contribute in the development of cognitive deficits associated with major depression. These effects have been linked to glial cell activation, glutamate release and changes in neuronal plasticity and survival including atrophy of hippocampal apical dendrites, loss of synapses and neuronal death. Under neuro-inflammatory conditions we recently unveiled a sequential activation of glial cells that release ATP and glutamate via hemichannels inducing neuronal death due to activation of neuronal NMDA/P2X7 receptors and pannexin1 hemichannels. In the present work, we studied if stress-induced glia activation is associated to changes in hemichannel activity. To this end, we compared hemichannel activity of brain cells after acute or chronic restraint stress in mice. Dye uptake experiments in hippocampal slices revealed that acute stress induces opening of both Cx43 and Panx1 hemichannels in astrocytes, which were further increased by chronic stress; whereas enhanced Panx1 hemichannel activity was detected in microglia and neurons after acute/chronic and chronic stress, respectively. Moreover, inhibition of NMDA/P2X7 receptors reduced the chronic stress-induced hemichannel opening, whereas blockade of Cx43 and Panx1 hemichannels fully reduced ATP and glutamate release in hippocampal slices from stressed mice. Thus, we propose that gliotransmitter release through hemichannels may participate in the pathogenesis of stress-associated psychiatric disorders and possibly depression.

  1. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase contributes to pentylenetetrazole-kindling-induced hippocampal neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xinjian; Dong, Jingde; Shen, Kai; Bai, Ying; Chao, Jie; Yao, Honghong

    2016-03-01

    Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), the major nitric oxide synthase isoform in the mammalian brain, is implicated in the pathophysiology of several neurological conditions, including epilepsy. Neurogenesis in hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) persists throughout life in the adult brain. Alterations in this process occur in many neurological diseases, including epilepsy. Few studies, however, have addressed the role of nNOS in hippocampal DG neurogenesis in epileptic brain. The present study, therefore, investigated the role of nNOS in pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-kindling-induced neurogenesis in hippocampal DG. Our results showed that nNOS expression and enzymatic activity were significantly increased in the hippocampus of PTZ-kindled mice. Meanwhile, these PTZ-kindled mice were characterized by significant enhancement of new born cells proliferation and survival in hippocampal DG, and these survived cells are co-labeled with NeuN and GFAP. Selective inhibition of nNOS by 7-NI, however, suppressed PTZ-kindling-induced hippocampal DG new born cells proliferation and survival, suggesting that nNOS contributes to PTZ-kindling-induced hippocampal neurogenesis.

  2. Muscarinic modulation of sodium current by activation of protein kinase C in rat hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, A R; Ma, J Y; Scheuer, T; Catterall, W A

    1996-05-01

    Phosphorylation of brain Na+ channels by protein kinase C (PKC) decreases peak Na+ current and slows macroscopic inactivation, but receptor-activated modulation of Na+ currents via the PKC pathway has not been demonstrated. We have examined modulation of Na+ channels by activation of muscarinic receptors in acutely-isolated hippocampal neurons using whole-cell voltage-clamp recording. Application of the muscarinic agonist carbachol reduced peak Na+ current and slowed macroscopic inactivation at all potentials, without changing the voltage-dependent properties of the channel. These effects were mediated by PKC, since they were eliminated when the specific PKC inhibitor (PKCI19-36) was included in the pipette solution and mimicked by the extracellular application of the PKC activator, OAG. Thus, activation of endogenous muscarinic receptors on hippocampal neurons strongly modulates Na+ channel activity by activation of PKC. Cholinergic input from basal forebrain neurons may have this effect in the hippocampus in vivo.

  3. Enhancement of morphological plasticity in hippocampal neurons by a physically modified saline via phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase.

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    Avik Roy

    Full Text Available Increase of the density of dendritic spines and enhancement of synaptic transmission through ionotropic glutamate receptors are important events, leading to synaptic plasticity and eventually hippocampus-dependent spatial learning and memory formation. Here we have undertaken an innovative approach to upregulate hippocampal plasticity. RNS60 is a 0.9% saline solution containing charge-stabilized nanobubbles that are generated by subjecting normal saline to Taylor-Couette-Poiseuille (TCP flow under elevated oxygen pressure. RNS60, but not NS (normal saline, PNS60 (saline containing a comparable level of oxygen without the TCP modification, or RNS10.3 (TCP-modified normal saline without excess oxygen, stimulated morphological plasticity and synaptic transmission via NMDA- and AMPA-sensitive calcium influx in cultured mouse hippocampal neurons. Using mRNA-based targeted gene array, real-time PCR, immunoblot, and immunofluorescence analyses, we further demonstrate that RNS60 stimulated the expression of many plasticity-associated genes in cultured hippocampal neurons. Activation of type IA, but not type IB, phosphatidylinositol-3 (PI-3 kinase by RNS60 together with abrogation of RNS60-mediated upregulation of plasticity-related proteins (NR2A and GluR1 and increase in spine density, neuronal size, and calcium influx by LY294002, a specific inhibitor of PI-3 kinase, suggest that RNS60 upregulates hippocampal plasticity via activation of PI-3 kinase. Finally, in the 5XFAD transgenic model of Alzheimer's disease (AD, RNS60 treatment upregulated expression of plasticity-related proteins PSD95 and NR2A and increased AMPA- and NMDA-dependent hippocampal calcium influx. These results describe a novel property of RNS60 in stimulating hippocampal plasticity, which may help AD and other dementias.

  4. Enhancement of morphological plasticity in hippocampal neurons by a physically modified saline via phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Avik; Modi, Khushbu K; Khasnavis, Saurabh; Ghosh, Supurna; Watson, Richard; Pahan, Kalipada

    2014-01-01

    Increase of the density of dendritic spines and enhancement of synaptic transmission through ionotropic glutamate receptors are important events, leading to synaptic plasticity and eventually hippocampus-dependent spatial learning and memory formation. Here we have undertaken an innovative approach to upregulate hippocampal plasticity. RNS60 is a 0.9% saline solution containing charge-stabilized nanobubbles that are generated by subjecting normal saline to Taylor-Couette-Poiseuille (TCP) flow under elevated oxygen pressure. RNS60, but not NS (normal saline), PNS60 (saline containing a comparable level of oxygen without the TCP modification), or RNS10.3 (TCP-modified normal saline without excess oxygen), stimulated morphological plasticity and synaptic transmission via NMDA- and AMPA-sensitive calcium influx in cultured mouse hippocampal neurons. Using mRNA-based targeted gene array, real-time PCR, immunoblot, and immunofluorescence analyses, we further demonstrate that RNS60 stimulated the expression of many plasticity-associated genes in cultured hippocampal neurons. Activation of type IA, but not type IB, phosphatidylinositol-3 (PI-3) kinase by RNS60 together with abrogation of RNS60-mediated upregulation of plasticity-related proteins (NR2A and GluR1) and increase in spine density, neuronal size, and calcium influx by LY294002, a specific inhibitor of PI-3 kinase, suggest that RNS60 upregulates hippocampal plasticity via activation of PI-3 kinase. Finally, in the 5XFAD transgenic model of Alzheimer's disease (AD), RNS60 treatment upregulated expression of plasticity-related proteins PSD95 and NR2A and increased AMPA- and NMDA-dependent hippocampal calcium influx. These results describe a novel property of RNS60 in stimulating hippocampal plasticity, which may help AD and other dementias.

  5. The neuroprotective effect of topiramate on the ultrastructure of pyramidal neurons of the hippocampal CA1 and CA3 sectors in an experimental model of febrile seizures in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobaniec-Lotowska, Maria E; Lotowska, Joanna M

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the current ultrastructural study was to explore the potentiality of the neuroprotective effect of TPM against damage of pyramidal neurons in the hippocampal CA1 and CA3 sectors in an experimental model of febrile seizures (FS) in rats. The FS group exhibited variously pronounced submicroscopic lesions of the neuronal perikarya, including total cell disintegration. Advanced changes induced by hyperthermic stress were manifested by marked degenerative abnormalities, such as substantial swelling of the mitochondria, dilation, degranulation and disintegration of the granular endoplasmic reticulum, and vacuolar changes in the Golgi complex. The most substantially damaged pyramidal neurons showed features of aponecrosis (so-called "dark neurons"), resulting in a marked neuronal loss in the explored areas of the hippocampal cortex. The neurodegenerative changes were accompanied by distinct damage to the blood-brain barrier components. The administration of topiramate at a dose of 80/kg b.m. prior to the induction of hyperthermic stress (as prevention against febrile seizures) caused a substantial neuroprotective action - the drug efficiently lightened the neuronal damage, basically reduced cell aponecrosis and enhanced cell viability. However, TPM applied directly after FS induction did not exert any distinct neuroprotective effect on the perikarya of pyramidal neurons in the hippocampal cortex.

  6. Estrogen intervention in microvascular morphology and choline acetyltransferase expression in rat hippocampal neurons in chronic cerebral ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhenjun Yang; Hongwei Yan; Guomin Zhang; Zhihong Chen; Jingfeng Xue

    2011-01-01

    We observed dynamic changes in microvessels and a protective effect of estrogen on chronic cerebral ischemia ovariectomized rat models established through permanent occlusion of bilateral carotid arteries at 7, 14 and 21 days. The results revealed that estrogen improved microvasculature in the hippocampus of chronic cerebral ischemic rats, upregulated Bcl-2 protein expression, downregulated Bax protein expression, increased choline acetyltransferase expression in hippocampal cholinergic neurons, and suppressed hippocampal neuronal apoptosis. These findings indicate that estrogen can protect hippocampal neurons in rats with chronic cerebral ischemia.

  7. Spatial learning depends on both the addition and removal of new hippocampal neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Dupret

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The role of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in spatial learning remains a matter of debate. Here, we show that spatial learning modifies neurogenesis by inducing a cascade of events that resembles the selective stabilization process characterizing development. Learning promotes survival of relatively mature neurons, apoptosis of more immature cells, and finally, proliferation of neural precursors. These are three interrelated events mediating learning. Thus, blocking apoptosis impairs memory and inhibits learning-induced cell survival and cell proliferation. In conclusion, during learning, similar to the selective stabilization process, neuronal networks are sculpted by a tightly regulated selection and suppression of different populations of newly born neurons.

  8. A simplified micropatterning method for straight-line neurite extension of cultured hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Ikuro; Nakamura, Kosuke; Odawara, Aoi; Alhebshi, Amani; Gotoh, Masao

    2013-01-01

    We report a simplified micropatterning method for the straight-line extension of the neurites of cultured neurons. We prepared a poly-D-lysine (PDL)-patterned surface using a polydimethylsiloxane microfluidic stamp. Hippocampal neurons were cultured on the PDL-bound substrate with the stamp removed, allowing for conventional cell seeding and detailed optical observation without fluorescent label. Cultured neurons elongated neurites along straight lines at the single-cell level and displayed spontaneous firing as detected by time-lapse imaging and Ca(2+) imaging.

  9. LTP Induction Modifies Functional Relationship among Hippocampal Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Sung H.; Lee, Deok S.; Lee, Hyunjung; Baeg, Eun H.; Kim, Yun B.; Jung, Min W.

    2007-01-01

    To obtain evidence linking long-term potentiation (LTP) and memory, we examined whether LTP induction modifies functional relationship among neurons in the rat hippocampus. In contrast to neurons in low-frequency stimulated or AP5-treated slices, LTP induction altered "functional connectivity," as defined by the degree of synchronous firing, among…

  10. Diazinon and diazoxon impair the ability of astrocytes to foster neurite outgrowth in primary hippocampal neurons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pizzurro, Daniella M.; Dao, Khoi [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Costa, Lucio G. [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Department of Neuroscience, University of Parma, Parma (Italy)

    2014-02-01

    Evidence from in vivo and epidemiological studies suggests that organophosphorus insecticides (OPs) are developmental neurotoxicants, but possible underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Astrocytes are increasingly recognized for their active role in normal neuronal development. This study sought to investigate whether the widely-used OP diazinon (DZ), and its oxygen metabolite diazoxon (DZO), would affect glial–neuronal interactions as a potential mechanism of developmental neurotoxicity. Specifically, we investigated the effects of DZ and DZO on the ability of astrocytes to foster neurite outgrowth in primary hippocampal neurons. The results show that both DZ and DZO adversely affect astrocyte function, resulting in inhibited neurite outgrowth in hippocampal neurons. This effect appears to be mediated by oxidative stress, as indicated by OP-induced increased reactive oxygen species production in astrocytes and prevention of neurite outgrowth inhibition by antioxidants. The concentrations of OPs were devoid of cytotoxicity, and cause limited acetylcholinesterase inhibition in astrocytes (18 and 25% for DZ and DZO, respectively). Among astrocytic neuritogenic factors, the most important one is the extracellular matrix protein fibronectin. DZ and DZO decreased levels of fibronectin in astrocytes, and this effect was also attenuated by antioxidants. Underscoring the importance of fibronectin in this context, adding exogenous fibronectin to the co-culture system successfully prevented inhibition of neurite outgrowth caused by DZ and DZO. These results indicate that DZ and DZO increase oxidative stress in astrocytes, and this in turn modulates astrocytic fibronectin, leading to impaired neurite outgrowth in hippocampal neurons. - Highlights: • DZ and DZO inhibit astrocyte-mediated neurite outgrowth in rat hippocampal neurons. • Oxidative stress is involved in inhibition of neuritogenesis by DZ and DZO. • DZ and DZO decrease expression of the neuritogenic

  11. Learning tasks as a possible treatment for DNA lesions induced by oxidative stress in hippocampal neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DragoCrneci; Radu Silaghi-Dumitrescu

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species have been implicated in conditions ranging from cardiovascular dysfunc-tion, arthritis, cancer, to aging and age-related disorders. The organism developed several path-ways to counteract these effects, with base excision repair being responsible for repairing one of the major base lesions (8-oxoG) in al organisms. Epidemiological evidence suggests that cognitive stimulation makes the brain more resilient to damage or degeneration. Recent studies have linked enriched environment to reduction of oxidative stressin neurons of mice with Alzheimer’s dis-ease-like disease, but given its complexity it is not clear what specific aspect of enriched environ-ment has therapeutic effects. Studies from molecular biology have shown that the protein p300, which is a transcription co-activator required for consolidation of memories during specific learning tasks, is at the same time involved in DNA replication and repair, playing a central role in the long-patch pathway of base excision repair. Based on the evidence, we propose that learning tasks such as novel object recognition could be tested as possible methods of base excision repair faci-litation, hence inducing DNA repair in the hippocampal neurons. If this method proves to be effective, it could be the start for designing similar tasks for humans, as a behavioral therapeutic complement to the classical drug-based therapy in treating neurodegenerative disorders. This review presents the current status of therapeutic methods used in treating neurodegenerative diseases induced by reactive oxygen species and proposes a new approach based on existing data.

  12. Perforated patch-clamp analysis of the passive membrane properties of three classes of hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spruston, N; Johnston, D

    1992-03-01

    1. Perforated patch-clamp recordings were made from the three major classes of hippocampal neurons in conventional in vitro slices prepared from adult guinea pigs. This technique provided experimental estimates of passive membrane properties (input resistance, RN, and membrane time constant, tau m) determined in the absence of the leak conductance associated with microelectrode impalement or the washout of cytoplasmic constituents associated with conventional whole-cell recordings. 2. To facilitate comparison of our data with previous results and to determine the passive membrane properties under conditions as physiological as possible, recordings were made at the resting potential, in physiological saline, and without any added blockers of voltage-dependent conductances. 3. Membrane-potential responses to current steps were analyzed, and four criteria were used to identify voltage responses that were the least affected by activation of voltage-dependent conductances. tau m was estimated from the slowest component (tau 0) of multiexponential fits of responses deemed passive by these criteria. RN was estimated from the slope of the linear region in the hyperpolarizing direction of the voltage-current relation. 4. It was not possible to measure purely passive membrane properties that were completely independent of membrane potential in any of the three classes of hippocampal neurons. Changing the membrane potential by constant current injection resulted in changes in RN and tau 0; subthreshold depolarization produced an increase, and hyperpolarization a decrease, in both RN and tau 0 for all three classes of hippocampal neurons. 5. Each of the three classes of hippocampal neurons also displayed a depolarizing "sag" during larger hyperpolarizing voltage transients. To evaluate the effect of the conductances underlying this sag on passive membrane properties, 2-5 mM Cs+ was added to the physiological saline. Extracellular Cs+ effectively blocked the sag in all three

  13. Mitophagy of damaged mitochondria occurs locally in distal neuronal axons and requires PINK1 and Parkin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashrafi, Ghazaleh; Schlehe, Julia S.; LaVoie, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    To minimize oxidative damage to the cell, malfunctioning mitochondria need to be removed by mitophagy. In neuronal axons, mitochondrial damage may occur in distal regions, far from the soma where most lysosomal degradation is thought to occur. In this paper, we report that PINK1 and Parkin, two Parkinson’s disease–associated proteins, mediate local mitophagy of dysfunctional mitochondria in neuronal axons. To reduce cytotoxicity and mimic physiological levels of mitochondrial damage, we selectively damaged a subset of mitochondria in hippocampal axons. Parkin was rapidly recruited to damaged mitochondria in axons followed by formation of LC3-positive autophagosomes and LAMP1-positive lysosomes. In PINK1−/− axons, damaged mitochondria did not accumulate Parkin and failed to be engulfed in autophagosomes. Similarly, initiation of mitophagy was blocked in Parkin−/− axons. Our findings demonstrate that the PINK1–Parkin-mediated pathway is required for local mitophagy in distal axons in response to focal damage. Local mitophagy likely provides rapid neuroprotection against oxidative stress without a requirement for retrograde transport to the soma. PMID:25154397

  14. Protective roles of heat stress on the neurons in hippocampal CA1 region of mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Chunxu; WANG Hanxing

    2007-01-01

    The effects of heat stress on the neurons in hippocampal CA1 region of brain ischemia/reperfusion were explored.The mice were pretreated with heat stress followed by ischemia/reperfusion by clipping bilateral cervical common arteries for 7 min.Mice were divided randomly into four groups as follows:(1)normal control group;(2)heat stress pretreated subsequent to ischemia/reperfusion group (HS/IR);(3)ischemia/reperfusion group(IR);and(4)heat stress group(HS).Animals in the last three groups were subdivided into three subgroups:1 d,4 d,14 d respectively.The Morris water maze was used to test the ability of learning and memorizing,Nissl staining was used to count the average number of survived neurons in hippocampal CA1 region,and immunohistochemistry combined with image analysis system to detect the changes of Microtubule associated protein 2 (MAP-2)expression.The results showed that mice in IR group exhibited increased escape latency when compared with that of normal,HS and HS/IR groups(P<0.01),and the mice in IR group adopted an inefficient search strategy,major in circling and restricted searching manners.Nissl staining results showed a significant reduction in the number of pyramidal neurons in hippocampal CA1 regions in HS/IR and IR groups,with a decrease in IR group(P<0.01).Compared with normal group,the expression of MAP-2 in hippocampal CA1 region obviously decreased in IR group(P<0.05).The present results indicate that heat stress pretreatment can improve the spatial learning and memorizing function through protection to hippocampal neurons.

  15. Isolated hippocampal neurons in cryopreserved long-term cultures: development of neuroarchitecture and sensitivity to NMDA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattson, M P; Kater, S B

    1988-01-01

    Isolated neurons in long-term culture provide a unique opportunity to address important problems in neuronal development. In the present study we established conditions for cryopreservation and long-term primary culture of isolated embryonic hippocampal neurons. This culture system was then used for initial characterizations of the development of neuroarchitecture and neurotransmitter response systems. Cryoprotection with 8% dimethylsulfoxide, slow freezing, and rapid thawing provided high-yield cultures which appeared normal in terms of cell types, mitotic ability, axonal and dendritic outgrowth, and sensitivity to glutamate neurotoxicity. A reduced medium volume and moderate elevation in extracellular K+ to 20 mM promoted survival of isolated neurons through 3 weeks of culture. The outgrowth of axons and dendrites in pyramidal-like neurons was found to differ over a 3-week culture period such that axons continued to grow at a relatively constant rate while dendritic outgrowth slowed during the second week and ceased by the end of week 3. Developmental changes were also observed in the sensitivity of pyramidal neurons to glutamate neurotoxicity; functional kainate/quisqualate receptors were present during the first week of culture, while responses to N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) did not appear until the second week. The technologies for cryopreservation and long-term culture of isolated hippocampal neurons reported here provide a useful system in which to address a variety of problems in development neuroscience.

  16. Active Dentate Granule Cells Encode Experience to Promote the Addition of Adult-Born Hippocampal Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschen, Gregory W; Shen, Jia; Tian, Mu; Schroeder, Bryce; Wang, Jia; Man, Guoming; Wu, Song; Ge, Shaoyu

    2017-05-03

    The continuous addition of new dentate granule cells (DGCs), which is regulated exquisitely by brain activity, renders the hippocampus plastic. However, how neural circuits encode experiences to affect the addition of adult-born neurons remains unknown. Here, we used endoscopic Ca(2+) imaging to track the real-time activity of individual DGCs in freely behaving mice. For the first time, we found that active DGCs responded to a novel experience by increasing their Ca(2+) event frequency preferentially. This elevated activity, which we found to be associated with object exploration, returned to baseline by 1 h in the same environment, but could be dishabituated via introduction to a novel environment. To transition seamlessly between environments, we next established a freely controllable virtual reality system for unrestrained mice. We again observed increased firing of active neurons in a virtual enriched environment. Interestingly, multiple novel virtual experiences increased the number of newborn neurons accumulatively compared with a single experience. Finally, optogenetic silencing of existing DGCs during novel environmental exploration perturbed experience-induced neuronal addition. Our study shows that the adult brain conveys novel, enriched experiences to increase the addition of adult-born hippocampal neurons by increasing the firing of active DGCs.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Adult brains are constantly reshaping themselves from synapses to circuits as we encounter novel experiences from moment to moment. Importantly, this reshaping includes the addition of newborn hippocampal neurons. However, it remains largely unknown how our circuits encode experience-induced brain activity to govern the addition of new hippocampal neurons. By coupling in vivo Ca(2+) imaging of dentate granule neurons with a novel, unrestrained virtual reality system for rodents, we discovered that a new experience increased firing of active dentate granule neurons rapidly and robustly

  17. EEA1 restores homeostatic synaptic plasticity in hippocampal neurons from Rett syndrome mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xin; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas

    2017-08-15

    Rett syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in MECP2, the gene encoding the transcriptional regulator methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2). Mecp2 deletion in mice results in an imbalance of excitation and inhibition in hippocampal neurons, which affects 'Hebbian' synaptic plasticity. We show that Mecp2-deficient neurons also lack homeostatic synaptic plasticity, likely due to reduced levels of EEA1, a protein involved in AMPA receptor endocytosis. Expression of EEA1 restored homeostatic synaptic plasticity in Mecp2-deficient neurons, providing novel targets of intervention in Rett syndrome. Rett syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in MECP2, the gene encoding the transcriptional regulator methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2). Deletion of Mecp2 in mice results in an imbalance of synaptic excitation and inhibition in hippocampal pyramidal neurons, which affects 'Hebbian' long-term synaptic plasticity. Since the excitatory-inhibitory balance is maintained by homeostatic mechanisms, we examined the role of MeCP2 in homeostatic synaptic plasticity (HSP) at excitatory synapses. Negative feedback HSP, also known as synaptic scaling, maintains the global synaptic strength of individual neurons in response to sustained alterations in neuronal activity. Hippocampal neurons from Mecp2 knockout (KO) mice do not show the characteristic homeostatic scaling up of the amplitude of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs) and of synaptic levels of the GluA1 subunit of AMPA-type glutamate receptors after 48 h silencing with the Na(+) channel blocker tetrodotoxin. This deficit in HSP is bidirectional because Mecp2 KO neurons also failed to scale down mEPSC amplitudes and GluA1 synaptic levels after 48 h blockade of type A GABA receptor (GABAA R)-mediated inhibition with bicuculline. Consistent with the role of synaptic trafficking of AMPA-type of glutamate receptors in HSP, Mecp2 KO neurons

  18. Role of neuronal Ras activity in adult hippocampal neurogenesis and cognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina eManns

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Hippocampal neurogenesis in the adult mammalian brain is modulated by various signals like growth factors, hormones, neuropeptides, and neurotransmitters. All of these factors can (but not necessarily do converge on the activation of the G protein p21Ras. We used a transgenic mouse model (synRas mice expressing constitutively activated G12V-Harvey Ras selectively in differentiated neurons to investigate the possible effects onto neurogenesis. Ras activation in neurons attenuates hippocampal precursor cell generation at an early stage of the proliferative cascade before neuronal lineage determination occurs. Therefore it is unlikely that the transgenically activated Ras in neurons mediates this effect by a direct, intracellular signaling mechanism. Voluntary exercise restores neurogenesis up to wild type level presumably mediated by brain derived neurotrophic factor. Reduced neurogenesis is linked to impairments in spatial short-term memory and object recognition, the latter can be rescued by voluntary exercise, as well. These data support the view that new cells significantly increase complexity that can be processed by the hippocampal network when experience requires high demands to associate stimuli over time and/or space.

  19. Theta-frequency resonance in hippocampal CA1 neurons in vitro demonstrated by sinusoidal current injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, L S; Yu, H W

    1998-03-01

    Sinusoidal currents of various frequencies were injected into hippocampal CA1 neurons in vitro, and the membrane potential responses were analyzed by cross power spectral analysis. Sinusoidal currents induced a maximal (resonant) response at a theta frequency (3-10 Hz) in slightly depolarized neurons. As predicted by linear systems theory, the resonant frequency was about the same as the natural (spontaneous) oscillation frequency. However, in some cases, the resonant frequency was higher than the spontaneous oscillation frequency, or resonance was found in the absence of spontaneous oscillations. The sharpness of the resonance (Q), measured by the peak frequency divided by the half-peak power bandwidth, increased from a mean of 0.44 at rest to 0.83 during a mean depolarization of 6.5 mV. The phase of the driven oscillations changed most rapidly near the resonant frequency, and it shifted about 90 degrees over the half-peak bandwidth of 8.4 Hz. Similar results were found using a sinusoidal function of slowly changing frequency as the input. Sinusoidal currents of peak-to-peak intensity of >100 pA may evoke nonlinear responses characterized by second and higher harmonics. The theta-frequency resonance in hippocampal neurons in vitro suggests that the same voltage-dependent phenomenon may be important in enhancing a theta-frequency response when hippocampal neurons are driven by medial septal or other inputs in vivo.

  20. Protective effects of astragalus extract against intermittent hypoxia-induced hippocampal neurons impairment in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Qiang; GAO Wen-yuan; ZHANG Yun; CHEN Bao-yun; CHEN Zhe; ZHANG Wei-san; MAN Shu-li

    2013-01-01

    Background Intermittent hypoxia is the main pathophysiological cause of the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.Astragalus shows improvement of spatial learning and memory abilities under intermittent hypoxia.Our study aimed to investigate the protective effect of astragalus against intermittent hypoxia induced-hippocampal neurons impairment in rats and lay the theoretical foundation for the sleep apnea improvement in cognitive function by astragalus.Methods Male Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups:blank control group,normoxia group,intermittent hypoxia group and astragalus treated intermittent hypoxia group.After 6-week treatment,apoptosis of neurons was evaluated by terminal deoxynucleotidyl-transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay.Furthermore,the expression of HIF-1a was detected by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) at the mRNA level as well as by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and Western blotting at the protein level.Results HPLC analysis indicated that astragaloside Ⅳ,astragaloside Ⅱ and astragaloside Ⅰ were the main compounds in astragals extract.Astragalus extract reduced the apoptosis of hippocampal neurons (P <0.05) and decreased the expression of HIF-1a at both the mRNA and protein levels in hippocampus compared with non-treated groups (P <0.05).Conclusion Astragalus protects against intermittent hypoxia-induced hippocampal neurons impairment in rats.

  1. Blockade of Ca2+-permeable AMPA/kainate channels decreases oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced Zn2+ accumulation and neuronal loss in hippocampal pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Hong Z; Sensi, Stefano L; Ogoshi, Fumio; Weiss, John H

    2002-02-15

    Synaptic release of Zn2+ and its translocation into postsynaptic neurons probably contribute to neuronal injury after ischemia or epilepsy. Studies in cultured neurons have revealed that of the three major routes of divalent cation entry, NMDA channels, voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels (VSCCs), and Ca2+-permeable AMPA/kainate (Ca-A/K) channels, Ca-A/K channels exhibit the highest permeability to exogenously applied Zn2+. However, routes through which synaptically released Zn2+ gains entry to postsynaptic neurons have not been characterized in vivo. To model ischemia-induced Zn2+ movement in a system approximating the in vivo situation, we subjected mouse hippocampal slice preparations to controlled periods of oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD). Timm's staining revealed little reactive Zn2+ in CA1 and CA3 pyramidal neurons of slices exposed in the presence of O2 and glucose. However, 15 min of OGD resulted in marked labeling in both regions. Whereas strong Zn2+ labeling persisted if both the NMDA antagonist MK-801 and the VSCC blocker Gd3+ were present during OGD, the presence of either the Ca-A/K channel blocker 1-naphthyl acetyl spermine (NAS) or the extracellular Zn2+ chelator Ca2+ EDTA substantially decreased Zn2+ accumulation in pyramidal neurons of both subregions. In parallel experiments, slices were subjected to 5 min OGD exposures as described above, followed 4 hr later by staining with the cell-death marker propidium iodide. As in the Timm's staining experiments, substantial CA1 or CA3 pyramidal neuronal damage occurred despite the presence of MK-801 and Gd3+, whereas injury was decreased by NAS or by Ca2+ EDTA (in CA1).

  2. APPswe mutation increases the frequency of spontaneous Ca2+-oscillations in rat hippocampal neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kloskowska, Ewa; Malkiewicz, Katarzyna; Winblad, Bengt;

    2008-01-01

    Altered calcium homeostasis is implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Much effort has been put into understanding the association between protein mutations causative of this devastating neurodegenerative disease and perturbed calcium signaling. Whereas the presenilin mutations...... have received most attention in the context of neuronal calcium signaling, we focused on the effects of APP with the so-called Swedish mutation (APPswe) on spontaneous neuronal activity. We observed that primary hippocampal neurons from an APPswe transgenic rat showed increased frequency and unaltered...... amplitude of spontaneous calcium oscillations as compared to wild-type neurons. We found that the altered calcium signaling of APPswe transgenic neurons was unlikely to be due to modulation of the NMDA or nicotinic neurotransmitter systems, and did not depend on secreted APP derivates. The implications...

  3. Roles of PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 and dynamin-related protein 1 in transient global ischemia-induced hippocampal neuronal injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Shang-Der, E-mail: chensd@adm.cgmh.org.tw [Department of Neurology, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Taiwan (China); Center for Translational Research in Biomedical Sciences, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Taiwan (China); Lin, Tsu-Kung [Department of Neurology, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Taiwan (China); Yang, Ding-I. [Institute of Brain Science and Brain Research Center, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lee, Su-Ying [Department of Neurology, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Taiwan (China); Shaw, Fu-Zen [Department of Psychology, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Liou, Chia-Wei [Department of Neurology, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Taiwan (China); Chuang, Yao-Chung, E-mail: ycchuang@adm.cgmh.org.tw [Department of Neurology, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Taiwan (China); Center for Translational Research in Biomedical Sciences, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Taiwan (China)

    2015-05-01

    Recent studies showed that increased mitochondrial fission is an early event of cell death during cerebral ischemia and dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) plays an important role in mitochondrial fission, which may be regulated by PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1), a mitochondrial serine/threonine-protein kinase thought to protect cells from stress-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and regulate mitochondrial fission. However, the roles of PINK1 and Drp1 in hippocampal injury caused by transient global ischemia (TGI) remain unknown. We therefore tested the hypothesis that TGI may induce PINK1 causing downregulation of Drp1 phosphorylation to enhance hippocampal neuronal survival, thus functioning as an endogenous neuroprotective mechanism. We found progressively increased PINK1 expression in the hippocampal CA1 subfield1-48 h following TGI, reaching the maximal level at 4 h. Despite lack of changes in the expression level of total Drp1 and phosphor-Drp1 at Ser637, TGI induced a time-dependent increase of Drp1 phosphorlation at Ser616 that peaked after 24 h. Notably, PINK1-siRNA increased p-Drp1(Ser616) protein level in hippocampal CA1 subfield 24 h after TGI. The PINK1 siRNA also aggravated the TGI-induced oxidative DNA damage with an increased 8-hydroxy-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) content in hippocampal CA1 subfield. Furthermore, PINK1 siRNA also augmented TGI-induced apoptosis as evidenced by the increased numbers of TUNEL-positive staining and enhanced DNA fragmentation. These findings indicated that PINK1 is an endogenous protective mediator vital for neuronal survival under ischemic insult through regulating Drp1 phosphorylation at Ser616. - Highlights: • Transient global ischemia increases expression of PINK1 and p-Drp1 at Ser616 in hippocampal CA1 subfield. • PINK1-siRNA decreases PINK1 expression but increases p-Drp1 at Ser616 in hippocampal CA1 subfield. • PINK1-siRNA augments oxidative stress and neuronal damage in hippocampal CA1 subfield.

  4. Intervention Effects of Sodium P-amino Salicylate on Manganese Induced Damage of Rat Hippocampal Neurons in Vitro%对氨基水杨酸钠干预锰致大鼠海马神经元损伤的体外研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王芳; 王禅; 姜岳明; 邓祥发; 陆继培; 区仕燕

    2011-01-01

    . Results Viability of cells in Mn exposed group was significantly lower than that of the control group (P<0. 05). Apoptosis rate in neuron and mean of fluorescence intensity in mitochondria of Mn exposed group were higher than those of the control group (P<0.05). However, no significant changes of cell viability, apoptosis ratio and mean of fluorescence intensity in mitochondria in LPAS, M-PAS and H-PAS groups were found in comparison with Mn exposed group (P>0. 05). Conclusions This study demonstrates that manganese causes obvious damage of primary cultured neurons in hippocampus of rat. However, the intervention effect of PAS-Na on the hippocampal toxicity induced by manganese is not observed.

  5. Dendritic Morphology of Hippocampal and Amygdalar Neurons in Adolescent Mice Is Resilient to Genetic Differences in Stress Reactivity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pillai, Anup G; de Jong, Danielle; Kanatsou, Sofia; Krugers, Harm; Knapman, Alana; Heinzmann, Jan-Michael; Holsboer, Florian; Landgraf, Rainer; Joels, Marian; Touma, Chadi

    2012-01-01

    Many studies have shown that chronic stress or corticosterone over-exposure in rodents leads to extensive dendritic remodeling, particularly of principal neurons in the CA3 hippocampal area and the basolateral amygdala...

  6. Novel Nuclear Protein Complexes of Dystrophin 71 Isoforms in Rat Cultured Hippocampal GABAergic and Glutamatergic Neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Rodríguez-Muñoz

    Full Text Available The precise functional role of the dystrophin 71 in neurons is still elusive. Previously, we reported that dystrophin 71d and dystrophin 71f are present in nuclei from cultured neurons. In the present work, we performed a detailed analysis of the intranuclear distribution of dystrophin 71 isoforms (Dp71d and Dp71f, during the temporal course of 7-day postnatal rats hippocampal neurons culture for 1h, 2, 4, 10, 15 and 21 days in vitro (DIV. By immunofluorescence assays, we detected the highest level of nuclear expression of both dystrophin Dp71 isoforms at 10 DIV, during the temporal course of primary culture. Dp71d and Dp71f were detected mainly in bipolar GABAergic (≥60% and multipolar Glutamatergic (≤40% neurons, respectively. We also characterized the existence of two nuclear dystrophin-associated protein complexes (DAPC: dystrophin 71d or dystrophin 71f bound to β-dystroglycan, α1-, β-, α2-dystrobrevins, α-syntrophin, and syntrophin-associated protein nNOS (Dp71d-DAPC or Dp71f-DAPC, respectively, in the hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, both complexes were localized in interchromatin granule cluster structures (nuclear speckles of neuronal nucleoskeleton preparations. The present study evinces that each Dp71's complexes differ slightly in dystrobrevins composition. The results demonstrated that Dp71d-DAPC was mainly localized in bipolar GABAergic and Dp71f-DAPC in multipolar Glutamatergic hippocampal neurons. Taken together, our results show that dystrophin 71d, dystrophin 71f and DAP integrate protein complexes, and both complexes were associated to nuclear speckles structures.

  7. Novel Nuclear Protein Complexes of Dystrophin 71 Isoforms in Rat Cultured Hippocampal GABAergic and Glutamatergic Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Muñoz, Rafael; Cárdenas-Aguayo, María Del Carmen; Alemán, Víctor; Osorio, Beatriz; Chávez-González, Oscar; Rendon, Alvaro; Martínez-Rojas, Dalila; Meraz-Ríos, Marco Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The precise functional role of the dystrophin 71 in neurons is still elusive. Previously, we reported that dystrophin 71d and dystrophin 71f are present in nuclei from cultured neurons. In the present work, we performed a detailed analysis of the intranuclear distribution of dystrophin 71 isoforms (Dp71d and Dp71f), during the temporal course of 7-day postnatal rats hippocampal neurons culture for 1h, 2, 4, 10, 15 and 21 days in vitro (DIV). By immunofluorescence assays, we detected the highest level of nuclear expression of both dystrophin Dp71 isoforms at 10 DIV, during the temporal course of primary culture. Dp71d and Dp71f were detected mainly in bipolar GABAergic (≥60%) and multipolar Glutamatergic (≤40%) neurons, respectively. We also characterized the existence of two nuclear dystrophin-associated protein complexes (DAPC): dystrophin 71d or dystrophin 71f bound to β-dystroglycan, α1-, β-, α2-dystrobrevins, α-syntrophin, and syntrophin-associated protein nNOS (Dp71d-DAPC or Dp71f-DAPC, respectively), in the hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, both complexes were localized in interchromatin granule cluster structures (nuclear speckles) of neuronal nucleoskeleton preparations. The present study evinces that each Dp71's complexes differ slightly in dystrobrevins composition. The results demonstrated that Dp71d-DAPC was mainly localized in bipolar GABAergic and Dp71f-DAPC in multipolar Glutamatergic hippocampal neurons. Taken together, our results show that dystrophin 71d, dystrophin 71f and DAP integrate protein complexes, and both complexes were associated to nuclear speckles structures.

  8. BDNF Regains Function in Hippocampal Long-Term Potentiation Deficits Caused by Diencephalic Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedder, Lindsey C.; Savage, Lisa M.

    2017-01-01

    Thiamine deficiency (TD), commonly associated with chronic alcoholism, leads to diencephalic damage, hippocampal dysfunction, and spatial learning and memory deficits. We show a decrease in the magnitude of long-term potentiation (LTP) and paired-pulse facilitation (PPF) at CA3-CA1 synapses, independent of sex, following diencephalic damage…

  9. Afadin regulates puncta adherentia junction formation and presynaptic differentiation in hippocampal neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisaku Toyoshima

    Full Text Available The formation and remodeling of mossy fiber-CA3 pyramidal cell synapses in the stratum lucidum of the hippocampus are implicated in the cellular basis of learning and memory. Afadin and its binding cell adhesion molecules, nectin-1 and nectin-3, together with N-cadherin, are concentrated at puncta adherentia junctions (PAJs in these synapses. Here, we investigated the roles of afadin in PAJ formation and presynaptic differentiation in mossy fiber-CA3 pyramidal cell synapses. At these synapses in the mice in which the afadin gene was conditionally inactivated before synaptogenesis by using nestin-Cre mice, the immunofluorescence signals for the PAJ components, nectin-1, nectin-3 and N-cadherin, disappeared almost completely, while those for the presynaptic components, VGLUT1 and bassoon, were markedly decreased. In addition, these signals were significantly decreased in cultured afadin-deficient hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, the interevent interval of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents was prolonged in the cultured afadin-deficient hippocampal neurons compared with control neurons, indicating that presynaptic functions were suppressed or a number of synapse was reduced in the afadin-deficient neurons. Analyses of presynaptic vesicle recycling and paired recordings revealed that the cultured afadin-deficient neurons showed impaired presynaptic functions. These results indicate that afadin regulates both PAJ formation and presynaptic differentiation in most mossy fiber-CA3 pyramidal cell synapses, while in a considerable population of these neurons, afadin regulates only PAJ formation but not presynaptic differentiation.

  10. Afadin Regulates Puncta Adherentia Junction Formation and Presynaptic Differentiation in Hippocampal Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoshima, Daisaku; Mandai, Kenji; Maruo, Tomohiko; Supriyanto, Irwan; Togashi, Hideru; Inoue, Takahito; Mori, Masahiro; Takai, Yoshimi

    2014-01-01

    The formation and remodeling of mossy fiber-CA3 pyramidal cell synapses in the stratum lucidum of the hippocampus are implicated in the cellular basis of learning and memory. Afadin and its binding cell adhesion molecules, nectin-1 and nectin-3, together with N-cadherin, are concentrated at puncta adherentia junctions (PAJs) in these synapses. Here, we investigated the roles of afadin in PAJ formation and presynaptic differentiation in mossy fiber-CA3 pyramidal cell synapses. At these synapses in the mice in which the afadin gene was conditionally inactivated before synaptogenesis by using nestin-Cre mice, the immunofluorescence signals for the PAJ components, nectin-1, nectin-3 and N-cadherin, disappeared almost completely, while those for the presynaptic components, VGLUT1 and bassoon, were markedly decreased. In addition, these signals were significantly decreased in cultured afadin-deficient hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, the interevent interval of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents was prolonged in the cultured afadin-deficient hippocampal neurons compared with control neurons, indicating that presynaptic functions were suppressed or a number of synapse was reduced in the afadin-deficient neurons. Analyses of presynaptic vesicle recycling and paired recordings revealed that the cultured afadin-deficient neurons showed impaired presynaptic functions. These results indicate that afadin regulates both PAJ formation and presynaptic differentiation in most mossy fiber-CA3 pyramidal cell synapses, while in a considerable population of these neurons, afadin regulates only PAJ formation but not presynaptic differentiation. PMID:24587018

  11. Oxidative stress-mediated down-regulation of bcl-2 promoter in hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugazhenthi, Subbiah; Nesterova, Albina; Jambal, Purevsuren; Audesirk, Gerald; Kern, Marcey; Cabell, Leigh; Eves, Eva; Rosner, Marsha R; Boxer, Linda M; Reusch, Jane E-B

    2003-03-01

    Generation of oxidative stress/reactive oxygen species (ROS) is one of the causes of neuronal apoptosis. We have examined the effects of ROS at the transcriptional level in an immortalized hippocampal neuronal cell line (H19-7) and in rat primary hippocampal neurons. Treatment of H19-7 cells with hydrogen peroxide (150 micro m) resulted in a 40% decrease in Bcl-2 protein and a parallel decrease in bcl-2 mRNA levels. H19-7 cells overexpressing bcl-2 were found to be resistant to ROS-induced apoptosis. We had previously shown that bcl-2 promoter activity is positively regulated by the transcription factor cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) in neurons. In the present study, we demonstrate that ROS decreases the activity of luciferase reporter gene driven by a cyclic AMP response element site containing bcl-2 promoter. Exposure of neurons to ROS for 6 h resulted in basal and fibroblast growth factor-2-stimulated phosphorylation/activation of CREB. Chronic 24 h treatment with ROS led to a significant (p < 0.01) decrease in CREB protein and CREB mRNA levels. Adenoviral overexpression of wild type CREB in H19-7 cells resulted in significant (p < 0.01) protection against ROS-induced apoptosis through up-regulation of Bcl-2 expression whereas dominant negative CREB exaggerated the injury. These findings demonstrate that loss of CREB function contributes to oxidative stress-induced neuronal dysfunction.

  12. Inhibitory neuron and hippocampal circuit dysfunction in an aged mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupam Hazra

    Full Text Available In Alzheimer's disease (AD, a decline in explicit memory is one of the earliest signs of disease and is associated with hippocampal dysfunction. Amyloid protein exerts a disruptive impact on neuronal function, but the specific effects on hippocampal network activity are not well known. In this study, fast voltage-sensitive dye imaging and extracellular and whole-cell electrophysiology were used on entorhinal cortical-hippocampal slice preparations to characterize hippocampal network activity in 12-16 month old female APPswe/PSEN1DeltaE9 (APdE9 mice mice. Aged APdE9 mice exhibited profound disruptions in dentate gyrus circuit activation. High frequency stimulation of the perforant pathway in the dentate gyrus (DG area of APdE9 mouse tissue evoked abnormally large field potential responses corresponding to the wider neural activation maps. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings of the identified inhibitory interneurons in the molecular layer of DG revealed that they fail to reliably fire action potentials. Taken together, abnormal DG excitability and an inhibitory neuron failure to generate action potentials are suggested to be important contributors to the underlying cellular mechanisms of early-stage Alzheimer's disease pathophysiology.

  13. Conditioned Medium Reconditions Hippocampal Neurons against Kainic Acid Induced Excitotoxicity: An In Vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep Kumar K. Bevinahal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapy is gaining attention as a promising treatment option for neurodegenerative diseases. The functional efficacy of grafted cells is a matter of debate and the recent consensus is that the cellular and functional recoveries might be due to “by-stander” effects of grafted cells. In the present study, we investigated the neuroprotective effect of conditioned medium (CM derived from human embryonic kidney (HEK cells in a kainic acid (KA induced hippocampal degeneration model system in in vitro condition. Hippocampal cell line was exposed to KA (200 µM for 24 hrs (lesion group whereas, in the treatment group, hippocampal cell line was exposed to KA in combination with HEK-CM (KA + HEK-CM. We observed that KA exposure to cells resulted in significant neuronal loss. Interestingly, HEK-CM cotreatment completely attenuated the excitotoxic effects of KA. In HEK-CM cotreatment group, the cell viability was ~85–95% as opposed to 47% in KA alone group. Further investigation demonstrated that treatment with HEK-CM stimulated the endogenous cell survival factors like brain derived neurotrophic factors (BDNF and antiapoptotic factor Bcl-2, revealing the possible mechanism of neuroprotection. Our results suggest that HEK-CM protects hippocampal neurons against excitotoxicity by stimulating the host’s endogenous cell survival mechanisms.

  14. Identification of conserved modes of expression profiles during hippocampal development and neuronal differentiation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabrowski, Michal; Adach, Alicja; Aerts, Stein; Moreau, Yves; Kaminska, Bozena

    2006-04-01

    Gene expression profiles can be regarded as sums of simpler modes, analogous to the modes of a vibrating violin string. Decomposition of temporal gene expression profiles into modes by singular value decomposition (SVD) was reported before, but the question as to what degree the SVD modes can be interpreted in terms of biology remains open. We report and compare the results of SVD of published datasets from hippocampal development, neuronal differentiation in vitro, and a control time-series hippocampal dataset. We demonstrate that the first SVD mode reflects the magnitude of expression, interpretable on the Affymetrix platform. In the datasets from gene profiling of hippocampal development and neuronal differentiation, the second mode reflects a monotonous change in expression, either up- or down-regulation, in the time course of experiment. We demonstrate that the top two SVD modes are conserved between datasets and therefore, likely reflect properties of the underlying system (gene expression in hippocampus) rather than of a particular experiment or dataset. Our results also indicate that the magnitude of expression, and the direction of change in expression during hippocampal development, are uncorrelated, suggesting that they are regulated by largely independent mechanisms.

  15. Sleep deprivation and hippocampal vulnerability: changes in neuronal plasticity, neurogenesis and cognitive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreutzmann, J C; Havekes, R; Abel, T; Meerlo, P

    2015-11-19

    Despite the ongoing fundamental controversy about the physiological function of sleep, there is general consensus that sleep benefits neuronal plasticity, which ultimately supports brain function and cognition. In agreement with this are numerous studies showing that sleep deprivation (SD) results in learning and memory impairments. Interestingly, such impairments appear to occur particularly when these learning and memory processes require the hippocampus, suggesting that this brain region may be particularly sensitive to the consequences of sleep loss. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying sleep and memory formation remain to be investigated, available evidence suggests that SD may impair hippocampal neuronal plasticity and memory processes by attenuating intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-protein kinase A (PKA) signaling which may lead to alterations in cAMP response element binding protein (CREB)-mediated gene transcription, neurotrophic signaling, and glutamate receptor expression. When restricted sleep becomes a chronic condition, it causes a reduction of hippocampal cell proliferation and neurogenesis, which may eventually lead to a reduction in hippocampal volume. Ultimately, by impairing hippocampal plasticity and function, chronically restricted and disrupted sleep contributes to cognitive disorders and psychiatric diseases.

  16. Relation of sorting impairment to hippocampal damage in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovagnoli, A R

    2001-01-01

    One hundred and twelve patients with left (n=65) or right (n=47) temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), associated with mesial or lateral temporal lobe lesion, were compared to 53 patients with left (n=30) or right (n=23) frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE), in order to explore the contributions of hippocampal lesions and of memory deficits to sorting impairment. Thirty-six healthy subjects of similar age and education were controls. The Modified Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (MWCST) was used to explore sorting ability. The two-syllable word span and consistent long-term retrieval from the selective reminding procedure for word-list learning were used to evaluate memory. Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices and Attentive Matrices served to control for abstract reasoning and attention. Left FLE patients and TLE patients with left hippocampal sclerosis were significantly impaired on MWCST, short-term memory, and word learning. TLE patients with other left hippocampal lesions were also impaired on MWCST, although not significantly so. Analysis of individual scores showed that 42% of TLE patients with left hippocampal sclerosis, 14% of TLE patients with other hippocampal lesions, 63% of left FLE patients, and 30% of right FLE patients were impaired on the MWCST. In patients with left hippocampal sclerosis, MWCST score was associated with the learning score provided by the selective reminding procedure and Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices score, whereas in FLE patients, MWCST score was associated with Attentive Matrices score. These results suggest that only some TLE patients, i.e. those with hippocampal damage, may be expected to be impaired on card sorting. The impaired sorting ability of these TLE patients may be due to involvement of the hippocampal function in forming associations or in registering new information.

  17. Effect of clausenamide on hippocampal neuron apoptosis induced by sodium nitroprusside

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yongjun Liu; Qifeng Zhu

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Aggregation of β -amyloid peptide (A β ), excitatory intoxication, oxidation injury and inflammation reaction are generally regarded as the main pathogenesis for Alzheimer disease (AD). (-)clausenamide is characterized by promoting intelligent development, resisting oxidation, cleaning free radicals, resisting A β neurotoxicity and nerve cell apoptosis, inhibiting over phosphorylation of tau protein,and improving central cholinergic system. However, whether (-) clausenamide has an effect on hippocampal neuron apoptosis or not need further study.OBJECTIVE: To observe the effect of ( - ) clausenamide on survival rate of hippocampal neurons due to sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and analyze the possible pathways.DESIGN: Contrast observation.SETTING: Institute of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Guangdong Medical College.MATERIALS: A total of 12 male SD rats of 24 hours old were provided by the Experimental Animal Center of Guangdong Medical College. The primer was synthesized by Beijing Huada Genetic Engineering Company and (-) clausenamide (99.6%) was provided by Pharmacological Department of Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences. SNP was provided by Sigma Company.METHODS: Bilateral hippocampus was collected from newborn rats to establish single cell suspension. On the 12th day, hippocampal neurons were pretreated with 0.2, 0.4, 0.8 and 1.6 μ mol/L ( - ) clausenamide for 6 hours; the culture medium was gotten rid of and neurons were washed with non-serum DMEM solution for three times. In addition, non-serum DMEM solution was added with the above mentioned volume of ( - ) clausenamide and 50 μ mol/L SNP to culture neurons for 24 hours and the collected cells were prepared for the experiment. Neurons were equally divided into control group (culture medium control), model group (SNP treatment) and experimental group [( - ) clausenamide + SNP]. Experiment of each group was done for three times at least. Survival rate of cells was measured with MTT

  18. Effects of Dalteparin on Structure of Hippocampal Neurons of Rats in Chronic Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Mansoureh Soleimani; Arezo Nahavandi; Fereshteh Farajdokht

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Stress is defined as any environmental change that disturbs the maintenance of brain homeostasis. Stress leads to production of pro-inflammatory cytokines that provoke rodegenerative disorders. In the present study, we investigated the effects of dalteparin on hippocampal neuronal death induced by chronic stress in rats.Methods : the study was carried out on 60 adult male wistar rats, weighing 200-250 gr. The rats were randomly divided into three groups: control, stress and stre...

  19. Amyloid-Beta Induced Changes in Vesicular Transport of BDNF in Hippocampal Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Bianca Seifert; Robert Eckenstaler; Raik Rönicke; Julia Leschik; Beat Lutz; Klaus Reymann; Volkmar Lessmann; Tanja Brigadski

    2016-01-01

    The neurotrophin brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is an important growth factor in the CNS. Deficits in transport of this secretory protein could underlie neurodegenerative diseases. Investigation of disease-related changes in BDNF transport might provide insights into the cellular mechanism underlying, for example, Alzheimer’s disease (AD). To analyze the role of BDNF transport in AD, live cell imaging of fluorescently labeled BDNF was performed in hippocampal neurons of different AD...

  20. S-Nitrosoglutathione and glutathione act as NMDA receptor agonists in cultured hippocampal neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ting-yu CHIN; Sheau-huei CHUEH; Pao-luh TAO

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To characterize the effect of combined pre- and postnatal morphine exposure on Af-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDA) receptor signaling in hippocampal neurons of the offspring of morphine-addicted female rats. Methods: Cultured hippocampal neurons and synaptosomes were prepared from neonatal and 2-week-old offspring, respectively, of control or morphine-addicted female rats. The increase in the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) of cultured cells was measured using Fura-2, and glutamate release from synaptosomes was measured enzymatically. Results: Both glutamate and NMDA caused a dose-dependent increase in the [Ca2+]i. The nitric oxide (NO) donor, S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), but not 3-morpholinosydnonimine, sodium nitroprusside, and S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine, also induced a [Ca2+]i increase. GSNO and glutathione caused a dose-dependent increase in the [Ca2+]i with respective EC50 values of 56 and 414 μmol/L. Both effects were inhibited by Mg2+ or an NMDA receptor antagonist and were unaffected by the presence of a glutamate scavenger. The other glutathione derivatives, oxidized glutathione, S-methylglutathione, S-ethylglutathione, S-propylglutathione, and S-butylglutathione, the dipeptides, Glu-Cys and Cys-Gly, and the antioxidants, dithiothreitol and mercaptoethanol, failed to induce a [Ca2+]i increase. In addition, glutathione caused a dose-dependent increase in glutamate release from synaptosomes. The maximal responses and the EC50 values for the glutamate-, NMDA-, GSNO-, and glutathione-induced [Ca2+]i increases and the glutathione-induced glutamate release were indistinguishable in the neurons of the offspring from control and morphine-addicted female rats. Conclusion: GSNO and glutathione act as NMDA receptor agonists and, in contrast to hippocampal brain slice, combined pre- and postnatal morphine exposure does not modulate NMDA receptor signaling in the cultured hippocampal neurons.

  1. Gastrin-releasing peptide contributes to the regulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis and neuronal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Noah M; de Koning, Anoek; Xie, Xiuyuan; Shin, Rick; Chen, Qian; Miyake, Shinichi; Tajinda, Katsunori; Gross, Adam K; Kogan, Jeffrey H; Heusner, Carrie L; Tamura, Kouichi; Matsumoto, Mitsuyuki

    2014-09-01

    In the postnatal hippocampus, newly generated neurons contribute to learning and memory. Disruptions in neurogenesis and neuronal development have been linked to cognitive impairment and are implicated in a broad variety of neurological and psychiatric disorders. To identify putative factors involved in this process, we examined hippocampal gene expression alterations in mice possessing a heterozygous knockout of the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II alpha heterozygous knockout gene (CaMK2α-hKO), an established model of cognitive impairment that also displays altered neurogenesis and neuronal development. Using this approach, we identified gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) as the most dysregulated gene. In wild-type mice, GRP labels NeuN-positive neurons, the lone exception being GRP-positive, NeuN-negative cells in the subgranular zone, suggesting GRP expression may be relevant to neurogenesis and/or neuronal development. Using a model of in vitro hippocampal neurogenesis, we determined that GRP signaling is essential for the continued survival and development of newborn neurons, both of which are blocked by transient knockdown of GRP's cognate receptor (GRPR). Furthermore, GRP appears to negatively regulate neurogenesis-associated proliferation in neural stem cells both in vitro and in vivo. Intracerebroventricular infusion of GRP resulted in a decrease in immature neuronal markers, increased cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation, and decreased neurogenesis. Despite increased levels of GRP mRNA, CaMK2α-hKO mutant mice expressed reduced levels of GRP peptide. This lack of GRP may contribute to the elevated neurogenesis and impaired neuronal development, which are reversed following exogenous GRP infusion. Based on these findings, we hypothesize that GRP modulates neurogenesis and neuronal development and may contribute to hippocampus-associated cognitive impairment.

  2. Characterization of NADPH Diaphorase- and Doublecortin-Positive Neurons in the Lizard Hippocampal Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo-Lima, Matheus; Freire, Marco Aurélio M; de Carvalho Pimentel, Hugo; Rodrigues Ferreira Lins, Lívia Cristina; Amador de Lucena Medeiros, Katty Anne; Viola, Giordano Gubert; Dos Santos, José Ronaldo; Marchioro, Murilo

    2016-01-01

    The lizard cortex has remarkable similarities with the mammalian hippocampus. Both regions process memories, have similar cytoarchitectural properties, and are important neurogenic foci in adults. Lizards show striking levels of widespread neurogenesis in adulthood and can regenerate entire cortical areas after injury. Nitric oxide (NO) is an important regulatory factor of mammalian neurogenesis and hippocampal function. However, little is known about its role in nonmammalian neurogenesis. Here, we analyzed the distribution, morphology, and dendritic complexity (Neurolucida reconstructions) of NO-producing neurons through NADPH diaphorase (NADPHd) activity, and how they compare with the distribution of doublecortin-positive (DCX+) neurons in the hippocampal formation of the neotropical lizard Tropidurus hispidus. NADPHd-positive (NADPHd+) neurons in the dorsomedial cortex (DMC; putatively homologous to mammalian CA3) were more numerous and complex than the ones in the medial cortex (MC; putatively homologous to the dentate gyrus). We found that NADPHd+ DMC neurons send long projections into the MC. Interestingly, in the MC, NADPHd+ neurons existed in 2 patterns: small somata with low intensity of staining in the outer layer and large somata with high intensity of staining in the deep layer, a pattern similar to the mammalian cortex. Additionally, NADPHd+ neurons were absent in the granular cell layer of the MC. In contrast, DCX+ neurons were scarce in the DMC but highly numerous in the MC, particularly in the granular cell layer. We hypothesize that NO-producing neurons in the DMC provide important input to proliferating/migrating neurons in the highly neurogenic MC. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Inositol hexakisphosphate suppresses excitatory neurotransmission via synaptotagmin-1 C2B domain in the hippocampal neuron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shao-Nian; Shi, Yue; Yang, Guang; Li, Yuxin; Yu, Lina; Shin, Ok-Ho; Bacaj, Taulant; Südhof, Thomas C.; Yu, Jia; Berggren, Per-Olof

    2012-01-01

    Inositol hexakisphosphate (InsP6) levels rise and fall with neuronal excitation and silence, respectively, in the hippocampus, suggesting potential signaling functions of this inositol polyphosphate in hippocampal neurons. We now demonstrate that intracellular application of InsP6 caused a concentration-dependent inhibition of autaptic excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) in cultured hippocampal neurons. The treatment did not alter the size and replenishment rate of the readily releasable pool in autaptic neurons. Intracellular exposure to InsP6 did not affect spontaneous EPSCs or excitatory amino acid-activated currents in neurons lacking autapses. The InsP6-induced inhibition of autaptic EPSCs was effectively abolished by coapplication of an antibody to synaptotagmin-1 C2B domain. Importantly, preabsorption of the antibody with a GST-WT synaptotagmin-1 C2B domain fragment but not with a GST-mutant synaptotagmin-1 C2B domain fragment that poorly reacted with the antibody impaired the activity of the antibody on the InsP6-induced inhibition of autaptic EPSCs. Furthermore, K+ depolarization significantly elevated endogenous levels of InsP6 and occluded the inhibition of autaptic EPSCs by exogenous InsP6. These data reveal that InsP6 suppresses excitatory neurotransmission via inhibition of the presynaptic synaptotagmin-1 C2B domain-mediated fusion via an interaction with the synaptotagmin Ca2+-binding sites rather than via interference with presynaptic Ca2+ levels, synaptic vesicle trafficking, or inactivation of postsynaptic ionotropic glutamate receptors. Therefore, elevated InsP6 in activated neurons serves as a unique negative feedback signal to control hippocampal excitatory neurotransmission. PMID:22778403

  4. Calcium current homeostasis and synaptic deficits in hippocampal neurons from Kelch-like 1 knockout mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Patricia Perissinotti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Kelch-like 1 (KLHL1 is a neuronal actin-binding protein that modulates voltage-gated CaV2.1 (P/Q-type and CaV3.2 (α1H T-type calcium channels; KLHL1 knockdown experiments (KD cause down-regulation of both channel types and altered synaptic properties in cultured rat hippocampal neurons (Perissinotti et al., 2014. Here, we studied the effect of ablation of KLHL1 on calcium channel function and synaptic properties in cultured hippocampal neurons from KLHL1 knockout (KO mice. Western blot data showed the P/Q-type channel α1A subunit was less abundant in KO hippocampus compared to wildtype (WT; and PQ-type calcium currents were smaller in KO neurons than WT during early days in vitro, although this decrease was compensated for at late stages by increases in L-type calcium current. In contrast, T-type currents did not change in culture. However, biophysical properties and western blot analysis revealed a differential contribution of T-type channel isoforms in the KO, with CaV3.2 α1H subunit being down-regulated and CaV3.1 α1G up-regulated. Synapsin I levels were reduced in the KO hippocampus; cultured neurons displayed a concomitant reduction in synapsin I puncta and decreased miniature excitatory postsynaptic current (mEPSC frequency. In summary, genetic ablation of the calcium channel modulator resulted in compensatory mechanisms to maintain calcium current homeostasis in hippocampal KO neurons; however, synaptic alterations resulted in a reduction of excitatory synapse number, causing an imbalance of the excitatory-inhibitory synaptic input ratio favoring inhibition.

  5. Neuronal Activity Regulates Hippocampal miRNA Expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eacker, Stephen M.; Keuss, Matthew J.; Berezikov, Eugene; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal activity regulates a broad range of processes in the hippocampus, including the precise regulation of translation. Disruptions in proper translational control in the nervous system are associated with a variety of disorders that fall in the autistic spectrum. MicroRNA (miRNA) represent a re

  6. Sericin can reduce hippocampal neuronal apoptosis by activating the Akt signal transduction pathway in a rat model of diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhihong Chen; Yaqiang He; Chengjun Song; Zhijun Dong; Zhejun Su; Jingfeng Xue

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, a rat model of type 2 diabetes mellitus was established by continuous peritoneal injection of streptozotocin. Following intragastric perfusion of sericin for 35 days, blood glucose levels significantly reduced, neuronal apoptosis in the hippocampal CA1 region decreased, hippocampal phosphorylated Akt and nuclear factor kappa B expression were enhanced, but Bcl-xL/Bcl-2 associated death promoter expression decreased. Results demonstrated that sericin can reduce hippocampal neuronal apoptosis in a rat model of diabetes mellitus by regulating abnormal changes in the Akt signal transduction pathway.

  7. Stochastic fluctuations in gene expression in aging hippocampal neurons could be exacerbated by traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, Joseph; Boone, Deborah; Weisz, Harris; Jennings, Kristofer; Uchida, Tatsuo; Parsley, Margaret; DeWitt, Douglas; Prough, Donald; Hellmich, Helen

    2016-04-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a risk factor for age-related dementia and development of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease that are associated with cognitive decline. The exact mechanism for this risk is unknown but we hypothesized that TBI is exacerbating age-related changes in gene expression. Here, we present evidence in an animal model that experimental TBI increases age-related stochastic gene expression. We compared the variability in expression of several genes associated with cell survival or death, among three groups of laser capture microdissected hippocampal neurons from aging rat brains. TBI increased stochastic fluctuations in gene expression in both dying and surviving neurons compared to the naïve neurons. Increases in random, stochastic fluctuations in prosurvival or prodeath gene expression could potentially alter cell survival or cell death pathways in aging neurons after TBI which may lead to age-related cognitive decline.

  8. Effect of polybrominated diphenyl ether on development of cultured hippocampal neuron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) is a persistently environmental pollutant ubiquitously found in wildlife and humans. Although concern on PBDE's toxic effects is steadily increasing, its action on the central nervous system (CNS) remains largely unknown. To address this issue, the present study examined the development inhibition of PBDE in neurons. The primary cultured hippocampal neurons of rat were exposed to the commercial decabromodiphenyl ether (deca-BDE), and the neurite length, bifurcation, and synapse formation and maturation were evaluated, based on the confocal microscope imaging. The results showed that the development inhibition in neurons occurred at 15 μmol/L, indicating that PBDE is a potent neurotoxicant and it might obviously inhibit the development of cultured neurons.

  9. Effect of polybrominated diphenyl ether on development of cultured hippocampal neuron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) is a persistently environmental pollutant ubiquitously found in wildlife and humans. Although concern on PBDE’s toxic effects is steadily increasing, its action on the central nervous system (CNS) remains largely unknown. To address this issue, the present study ex- amined the development inhibition of PBDE in neurons. The primary cultured hippocampal neurons of rat were exposed to the commercial decabromodiphenyl ether (deca-BDE), and the neurite length, bi- furcation, and synapse formation and maturation were evaluated, based on the confocal microscope imaging. The results showed that the development inhibition in neurons occurred at 15 μmol/L, indi- cating that PBDE is a potent neurotoxicant and it might obviously inhibit the development of cultured neurons.

  10. Relation of phospholipase A2-V and indoxam to hippocampal neuronal death

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang Liu; Shi Wang; Yan Lin; Runhui Li; Li Ma; Yanjun Li; Qing Jin; Xiao Gong; Yuhua Chen

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: V secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2- V ) is abundant in many mammal tissues. However, it remains unknown whether sPLA2-V causes biological or pathological response in central nervous system.OBJECTIVE: To observe the effect of phospholipase A2- V (PLA2- V ) and its inhibitor (indoxam) on hippocampal neuron survival.DESIGN: A repetitive measurement.SETTING: The Animal Center of South Carolina University.MATERIALS: Sprague-Dawley pregnancy day-7, 14, 21 female rats were selected; Reagents: sPLA2- V and indoxam were obtained from the Dennis Research Laboratories METHODS: The experiment was finished at the animal center in South Carolina University from January to December, 2004. 0, 12.5, 25, 50 and 100 μg/L sPLA2-V were added to neuron with none-MgCl2 Eagle's medium at 37 ℃, then changed to normal neuron culture medium after 3 hours. 1, 2.5, 5 and 10 μmol/L indoxam was added at 6 hours after 100 μg/L sPLA2-V was put to Day-21 SD rat hippocampal embryonic neurons with none-MgCl2 Eagle's medium at 37 ℃. After 3 hours in the inhibition experiment, it was changed to normal neuron culture medium. The embryonic hippocampal neurons were primarily cultured, and the neuron survival ratio was detected with morphological method.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Survival ratio of hippocampal neurons.RESULTS: ① Effects of sPLA2-V on neuron survival: When sPLA2-V was 0, 12.5, 25, 50 and 100 μg/L, the neuron survival ratios in embryonic neurons of day-7 SD rats were (95.3±1.1)%, (81.4±3.1)%, (74.2±2.2)%,(62.4±1.7)% and (48.9±1.6)%, those in embryonic neurons of day-14 rats were (93.2±1.4)%, (74.3±1.9)%,(68.1± 1.7)%, (56.1± 1.4)% and (42.5± 1.1)%, and those in embryonic neurons of day-21 rats were (91.2±1.2)%,(69.4±2.1)%, (60.3±2.2)%, (49.1 ± 1.2)% and (35.5± 1.9)%. There were significant differences among difierent concentrations (P< 0.05). ② Effects of indoxam on neuron survival: In case of sPLA2-V 100 μg/L, the neuron survival ratios were (58.65±1

  11. Neuronal Activity Regulates Hippocampal miRNA Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eacker, Stephen M.; Keuss, Matthew J.; Berezikov, Eugene; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal activity regulates a broad range of processes in the hippocampus, including the precise regulation of translation. Disruptions in proper translational control in the nervous system are associated with a variety of disorders that fall in the autistic spectrum. MicroRNA (miRNA) represent a relatively recently discovered player in the regulation of translation in the nervous system. We have conducted an in depth analysis of how neuronal activity regulates miRNA expression in the hippocampus. Using deep sequencing we exhaustively identify all miRNAs, including 15 novel miRNAs, expressed in hippocampus of the adult mouse. We identified 119 miRNAs documented in miRBase but less than half of these miRNA were expressed at a level greater than 0.1% of total miRNA. Expression profiling following induction of neuronal activity by electroconvulsive shock demonstrates that most miRNA show a biphasic pattern of expression: rapid induction of specific mature miRNA expression followed by a decline in expression. These results have important implications into how miRNAs influence activity-dependent translational control. PMID:21984899

  12. Neuronal activity regulates hippocampal miRNA expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen M Eacker

    Full Text Available Neuronal activity regulates a broad range of processes in the hippocampus, including the precise regulation of translation. Disruptions in proper translational control in the nervous system are associated with a variety of disorders that fall in the autistic spectrum. MicroRNA (miRNA represent a relatively recently discovered player in the regulation of translation in the nervous system. We have conducted an in depth analysis of how neuronal activity regulates miRNA expression in the hippocampus. Using deep sequencing we exhaustively identify all miRNAs, including 15 novel miRNAs, expressed in hippocampus of the adult mouse. We identified 119 miRNAs documented in miRBase but less than half of these miRNA were expressed at a level greater than 0.1% of total miRNA. Expression profiling following induction of neuronal activity by electroconvulsive shock demonstrates that most miRNA show a biphasic pattern of expression: rapid induction of specific mature miRNA expression followed by a decline in expression. These results have important implications into how miRNAs influence activity-dependent translational control.

  13. Misoprostol Reverse Hippocampal Neuron Cyclooxygenase-2 Downstream Signaling Imbalance in Aluminum-Overload Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yuanxin; Lei, Wenjuan; Wang, Jianfeng; Hu, Xinyue; Wei, Yuling; Ji, Chaonan; Yang, Junqing

    2016-01-01

    Although COX-2 inhibition in animal models of neurodegenerative diseases has shown neuroprotection, recent studies have revealed some serious side effects (ulcers, bleeding, fatal cerebrovascular diseases etc.) and the limited benefits of COX-2 inhibitors. A more focused approach is necessary to explore the therapeutic effect of the COX downstream signaling pathway in neurological research. The aim of this study was to explore the alterations of the PGES-PGE2-EP signal pathway and the effect of misoprostol on neurodegeneration by chronic aluminum-overload in rats. Adult rats were treated by intragastric administration of aluminum gluconate. The PGE2 content and expression of PGES and EPs in the hippocampi of rats were detected using ELISA, q-PCR and Western blot analysis, respectively. The content of malondialdehyde (MDA) and the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in the rat hippocampi were also detected. The misoprostol treatment dose-dependently improved spatial learning and memory function as well as healing after hippocampal neuron damage induced by chronic aluminum-overload in rats. Meanwhile, the administration of misoprostol resulted in a decrease in the PGE2 level and down-regulation of the mPGES-1, EP2 and EP4 expression levels, while there was a dose-dependent up-regulation of EP3 expression. These results suggest that misoprostol possesses a neuroprotective property, and the mechanism involves affecting the EP3 level and reducing the endogenous production of PGE2 through a negative feedback mechanism, increasing the EP3 expression level, decreasing the EP2 and EP4 expression levels, and rebuilding the mPGES-1-PGE2-EP1-4 signal pathway balance. In this way, misoprostol has a counteractive effect on oxidant stress and inflammation in the central nervous system. The PGES-PGE2-EPs signaling pathway is a potential therapeutic strategy for treating neurodegeneration in patients. PMID:27033056

  14. Prolactin mediates neuroprotection against excitotoxicity in primary cell cultures of hippocampal neurons via its receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara-Castañeda, E; Grattan, D R; Pasantes-Morales, H; Pérez-Domínguez, M; Cabrera-Reyes, E A; Morales, T; Cerbón, M

    2016-04-01

    Recently it has been reported that prolactin (PRL) exerts a neuroprotective effect against excitotoxicity in hippocampus in the rat in vivo models. However, the exact mechanism by which PRL mediates this effect is not completely understood. The aim of our study was to assess whether prolactin exerts neuroprotection against excitotoxicity in an in vitro model using primary cell cultures of hippocampal neurons, and to determine whether this effect is mediated via the prolactin receptor (PRLR). Primary cell cultures of rat hippocampal neurons were used in all experiments, gene expression was evaluated by RT-qPCR, and protein expression was assessed by Western blot analysis and immunocytochemistry. Cell viability was assessed by using the MTT method. The results demonstrated that PRL treatment of neurons from primary cultures did not modify cell viability, but that it exerted a neuroprotective effect, with cells treated with PRL showing a significant increase of viability after glutamate (Glu)--induced excitotoxicity as compared with neurons treated with Glu alone. Cultured neurons expressed mRNA for both PRL and its receptor (PRLR), and both PRL and PRLR expression levels changed after the excitotoxic insult. Interestingly, the PRLR protein was detected as two main isoforms of 100 and 40 kDa as compared with that expressed in hypothalamic cells, which was present only as a 30 kDa variant. On the other hand, PRL was not detected in neuron cultures, either by western blot or by immunohistochemistry. Neuroprotection induced by PRL was significantly blocked by specific oligonucleotides against PRLR, thus suggesting that the PRL role is mediated by its receptor expressed in these neurons. The overall results indicated that PRL induces neuroprotection in neurons from primary cell cultures.

  15. Functional P2X7 receptors at cultured hippocampal astrocytes but not neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubini, Patrizia; Pagel, Gregor; Mehri, Soghra; Marquardt, Peter; Riedel, Thomas; Illes, Peter

    2014-10-01

    P2X7 receptors have been suggested to be located both on neurons and astrocytes of the central and peripheral nervous systems. In the present Ca(2+)-imaging and patch-clamp study, we reinvestigated these findings on mixed neuronal-astrocytic cell cultures prepared from embryonic or newborn rat hippocampi. We found in a Mg(2+)-free bath medium that the prototypic P2X7 receptor agonist dibenzoyl-adenosine triphosphate (Bz-ATP) increased the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) both in the neuronal cell bodies and in their axo-dendritic processes only to a very minor extent. However, Bz-ATP produced marked [Ca(2+)]i transients in the neuronal processes, when they grew above a glial carpet, which was uniformly sensitive to Bz-ATP. These glial signals might be misinterpreted as neuronal responses because of the poor focal discrimination by a fluorescent microscope. Most astrocytes had a polygonal shape without clearly circumscribable boundaries, but a subgroup of them had neuron-like appearance. The cellular processes of this astrocytic subgroup, just as their cell somata and their polygonal counterparts, appeared to possess a high density of functional P2X7 receptors. In contrast to astrocytes, in a low Ca(2+)/no Mg(2+)-containing bath medium, hippocampal neurons failed to respond to Bz-ATP with membrane currents. In addition, neither the amplitude nor the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents, representing the quantal release of glutamate, was modified by Bz-ATP. We conclude that cultured hippocampal neurons, in contrast to astrocytes, possess P2X7 receptors, if at all, only at a low density.

  16. Altered neuronal excitability underlies impaired hippocampal function in an animal model of psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eGrüter

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Psychosis is accompanied by severe attentional deficits, and impairments in associational-memory processing and sensory information processing that are ascribed to dysfunctions in prefrontal and hippocampal function. Disruptions of glutamatergic signalling may underlie these alterations: Antagonism of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR results in similar molecular, cellular, cognitive and behavioural changes in rodents and/or humans as those that occur in psychosis, raising the question as to whether changes in glutamatergic transmission may be intrinsic to the pathophysiology of the disease. In an animal model of psychosis that comprises treatment with the irreversible NMDAR-antagonist, MK801, we explored the cellular mechanisms that may underlie hippocampal dysfunction in psychosis. MK801-treatment resulted in a profound loss of hippocampal LTP that was evident 4 weeks after treatment. Whereas neuronal expression of the immediate early gene, Arc, was enhanced in the hippocampus by spatial learning in controls, MK801-treated animals failed to show activity-dependent increases in Arc expression. By contrast, a significant increase in basal Arc expression in the absence of learning was evident compared to controls. Paired-pulse facilitation was increased at the 40 ms interval indicating that NMDAR and/or fast GABAergic-mediated neurotransmission was disrupted. In line with this, MK801-treatment resulted in a significant decrease in GABA(A, and increase in GABA(B-receptor-expression in PFC, along with a significant increase of GABA(B- and NMDAR-GluN2B expression in the dentate gyrus. NMDAR-GluN1 or GluN2A subunit expression was unchanged. These data suggest that in psychosis, deficits in hippocampus-dependent memory may be caused by a loss of hippocampal LTP that arises through enhanced hippocampal neuronal excitability, altered GluN2B and GABA receptor expression and an uncoupling of the hippocampus-prefrontal cortex circuitry.

  17. Altered neuronal excitability underlies impaired hippocampal function in an animal model of psychosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grüter, Thomas; Wiescholleck, Valentina; Dubovyk, Valentyna; Aliane, Verena; Manahan-Vaughan, Denise

    2015-01-01

    Psychosis is accompanied by severe attentional deficits, and impairments in associational-memory processing and sensory information processing that are ascribed to dysfunctions in prefrontal and hippocampal function. Disruptions of glutamatergic signaling may underlie these alterations: Antagonism of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) results in similar molecular, cellular, cognitive and behavioral changes in rodents and/or humans as those that occur in psychosis, raising the question as to whether changes in glutamatergic transmission may be intrinsic to the pathophysiology of the disease. In an animal model of psychosis that comprises treatment with the irreversible NMDAR-antagonist, MK801, we explored the cellular mechanisms that may underlie hippocampal dysfunction in psychosis. MK801-treatment resulted in a profound loss of hippocampal LTP that was evident 4 weeks after treatment. Whereas neuronal expression of the immediate early gene, Arc, was enhanced in the hippocampus by spatial learning in controls, MK801-treated animals failed to show activity-dependent increases in Arc expression. By contrast, a significant increase in basal Arc expression in the absence of learning was evident compared to controls. Paired-pulse (PP) facilitation was increased at the 40 ms interval indicating that NMDAR and/or fast GABAergic-mediated neurotransmission was disrupted. In line with this, MK801-treatment resulted in a significant decrease in GABA(A), and increase in GABA(B)-receptor-expression in PFC, along with a significant increase of GABA(B)- and NMDAR-GluN2B expression in the dentate gyrus. NMDAR-GluN1 or GluN2A subunit expression was unchanged. These data suggest that in psychosis, deficits in hippocampus-dependent memory may be caused by a loss of hippocampal LTP that arises through enhanced hippocampal neuronal excitability, altered GluN2B and GABA receptor expression and an uncoupling of the hippocampus-prefrontal cortex circuitry. PMID:26042007

  18. In vitro dose-dependent inhibition of the intracellular spontaneous calcium oscillations in developing hippocampal neurons by ketamine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lining Huang

    Full Text Available Spatial and temporal abnormalities in the frequency and amplitude of the cytosolic calcium oscillations can impact the normal physiological functions of neuronal cells. Recent studies have shown that ketamine can affect the growth and development and even induce the apoptotic death of neurons. This study used isolated developing hippocampal neurons as its study subjects to observe the effect of ketamine on the intracellular calcium oscillations in developing hippocampal neurons and to further explore its underlying mechanism using Fluo-4-loaded laser scanning confocal microscopy. Using a semi-quantitative method to analyze the spontaneous calcium oscillatory activities, a typical type of calcium oscillation was observed in developing hippocampal neurons. In addition, the administration of NMDA (N-Methyl-D-aspartate at a concentration of 100 µM increased the calcium oscillation amplitude. The administration of MK801 at a concentration of 40 µM inhibited the amplitude and frequency of the calcium oscillations. Our results demonstrated that an increase in the ketamine concentration, starting from 30 µM, gradually decreased the neuronal calcium oscillation amplitude. The inhibition of the calcium oscillation frequency by 300 µM ketamine was statistically significant, and the neuronal calcium oscillations were completely eliminated with the administration of 3,000 µM Ketamine. The administration of 100, 300, and 1,000 µM NMDA to the 1 mM ketamine-pretreated hippocampal neurons restored the frequency and amplitude of the calcium oscillations in a dose-dependent manner. In fact, a concentration of 1,000 µM NMDA completely reversed the decrease in the calcium oscillation frequency and amplitude that was induced by 1 mM ketamine. This study revealed that ketamine can inhibit the frequency and amplitude of the calcium oscillations in developing hippocampal neurons though the NMDAR (NMDA receptor in a dose-dependent manner, which might highlight a

  19. Vascular and neuronal ischemic damage in cryonics patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Benjamin P

    2012-04-01

    Cryonics technology seeks to cryopreserve the anatomical basis of the mind so that future medicine can restore legally dead cryonics patients to life, youth, and health. Most cryonics patients experience varying degrees of ischemia and reperfusion injury. Neurons can survive ischemia and reperfusion injury more than is generally believed, but blood vessels are more vulnerable, and such injury can impair perfusion of vitrifying cryoprotectant solution intended to eliminate ice formation in the brain. Forms of vascular and neuronal damage are reviewed, along with means of mitigating that damage. Recommendations are also made for preventing such damage.

  20. Habitat-Specific Shaping of Proliferation and Neuronal Differentiation in Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis of Wild Rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole eCavegn

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Daily life of wild mammals is characterized by a multitude of attractive and aversive stimuli. The hippocampus processes complex polymodal information associated with such stimuli and mediates adequate behavioral responses. How newly generated hippocampal neurons in wild animals contribute to hippocampal function is still a subject of debate. Here, we test the relationship between adult hippocampal neurogenesis and habitat types. To this end, we compare wild Muridae species of southern Africa (Namaqua rock mouse (Micaelamys namaquensis, red veld rat (Aethomys chrysophilus, highveld gerbil (Tatera brantsii and spiny mouse (Acomys spinosissimus with data from wild European Muridae (long-tailed wood mice (Apodemus sylvaticus, pygmy field mice (Apodemus microps, yellow-necked wood mice (Apodemus flavicollis, and house mice (Mus musculus domesticus from previous studies. The pattern of neurogenesis, expressed in normalized numbers of Ki67- and DCX-positive cells to total granule cells, is similar for the species from a southern African habitat. However, we found low proliferation, but high neuronal differentiation in rodents from the southern African habitat compared to rodents from the European environment. Within the African rodents, we observe additional regulatory and morphological traits in the hippocampus. Namaqua rock mice with previous pregnancies showed lower adult hippocampal neurogenesis compared to males and nulliparous females. The phylogenetically closely related species (Namaqua rock mouse and red veld rat show a CA4, which is not usually observed in murine rodents. The specific features of the southern environment that may be associated with the high number of young neurons in African rodents still remain to be elucidated. This study provides the first evidence that a habitat can shape adult neurogenesis in rodents across phylogenetic groups.

  1. Application of the Co-culture Membrane System Pointed to a Protective Role of Catestatin on Hippocampal Plus Hypothalamic Neurons Exposed to Oxygen and Glucose Deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mele, Maria; Morelli, Sabrina; Fazzari, Gilda; Avolio, Ennio; Alò, Raffaella; Piscioneri, Antonella; De Bartolo, Loredana; Facciolo, Rosa Maria; Canonaco, Marcello

    2016-11-05

    Depletion of oxygen and glucose even for brief periods is sufficient to cause cerebral ischemia, which is a predominant worldwide cause of motor deficits with the reduction of life quality and subsequently death. Hence, more insights regarding protective measures against ischemic events are becoming a major research goal. Among the many neuronal factors, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR), orexinergic neuroreceptors (ORXR), and sympatho-inhibitory neuropeptide catestatin (CST) are widely involved with ischemic episodes. In this study, it was possible to induce in vitro ischemic conditions of the hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) hippocampal and hypothalamic neuronal cultures, grown on a newly compartmentalized membrane system, via oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD). These cultures displayed notably differentiated NMDARergic and ORXergic receptor expression activities along with evident brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plus orexin A (ORX-A) secretion, especially under co-cultured conditions. Interestingly, addition of CST in OGD-insulted hippocampal cells accounted for upregulated GluN1 and ORX1R transcripts that in the case of the latter neuroreceptor was very strongly (p BDNF and ORX-A secretion in the presence of hippocampal cells. Overall, the preferential CST effects on BDNF plus ORX-A production together with altered NMDAR and ORXR levels, especially in co-cultured hypothalamic cells pointed to ORX-containing neurons as major protective constituents against ischemic damages thus opening new scenarios on the cross-talking roles of CST during ischemic disorders.

  2. Pretreatment with scutellaria baicalensis stem-leaf total lfavonoid protects against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injur y in hippocampal neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiangyu Kong; Wei Kong; Guangxin Miao; Shumin Zhao; Meng Chen; Xiaoying Zheng; Jiangtao Bai

    2014-01-01

    Previous experimental studies have shown that cerebral infarction can be effectively reduced following treatment with scutellaria baicalensis stem-leaf total lfavonoid (SSTF). However, the mechanism of action of SSTF as a preventive drug to treat cerebral infarction remains unclear. In this study, Sprague-Dawley rats were pretreated with 50, 100, 200 mg/kg SSTF via intragastric ad-ministration for 1 week prior to the establishment of focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. The results showed that pretreatment with SSTF effectively improved neurological function, re-duced brain water content and the permeability of blood vessels, ameliorated ischemia-induced morphology changes in hippocampal microvessels, down-regulated Fas and FasL protein expres-sion, elevated the activity of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase, and decreased malondialdehyde content. In contrast to low-dose SSTF pretreatment, the above changes were most obvious after pretreatment with moderate-and high-doses of SSTF. Experimental ifndings indicate that SSTF pretreatment can exert protective effects on the brain against cerebral isch-emia/reperfusion injury. The underlying mechanisms may involve reducing brain water content, increasing microvascular recanalization, inhibiting the apoptosis of hippocampal neurons, and attenuating free radical damage.

  3. Expression of neuronal nitric oxide synthase in the hippocampal formation in affective disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.M.W. Oliveira

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Hippocampal output is increased in affective disorders and is mediated by increased glutamatergic input via N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor and moderated by antidepressant treatment. Activation of NMDA receptors by glutamate evokes the release of nitric oxide (NO by the activation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS. The human hippocampus contains a high density of NMDA receptors and nNOS-expressing neurons suggesting the existence of an NMDA-NO transduction pathway which can be involved in the pathogenesis of affective disorders. We tested the hypothesis that nNOS expression is increased in the human hippocampus from affectively ill patients. Immunocytochemistry was used to demonstrate nNOS-expressing neurons in sections obtained from the Stanley Consortium postmortem brain collection from patients with major depression (MD, N = 15, bipolar disorder (BD, N = 15, and schizophrenia (N = 15 and from controls (N = 15. nNOS-immunoreactive (nNOS-IR and Nissl-stained neurons were counted in entorhinal cortex, hippocampal CA1, CA2, CA3, and CA4 subfields, and subiculum. The numbers of Nissl-stained neurons were very similar in different diagnostic groups and correlated significantly with the number of nNOS-IR neurons. Both the MD and the BD groups had greater number of nNOS-IR neurons/400 µm² in CA1 (mean ± SEM: MD = 9.2 ± 0.6 and BD = 8.4 ± 0.6 and subiculum (BD = 6.7 ± 0.4 when compared to control group (6.6 ± 0.5 and this was significantly more marked in samples from the right hemisphere. These changes were specific to affective disorders since no changes were seen in the schizophrenic group (6.7 ± 0.8. The results support the current view of the NMDA-NO pathway as a target for the pathophysiology of affective disorders and antidepressant drug development.

  4. Effects of the alkaloids 6-benzoylheteratisine and heteratisine on neuronal activity in rat hippocampal slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameri, A

    1997-08-01

    Alkaloids of different Aconitum species are employed as analgesics in traditional Chinese folk medicine. The present study was designed in order to investigate the effects of the structurally related alkaloids 6-benzoylheteratisine and heteratisine on neuronal activity in rat hippocampus. Experiments were performed as extracellular recordings of stimulus evoked population spikes in rat hippocampal slices. 6-Benzoylheteratisine (0.01-10 microM) inhibited the ortho- and antidromic population spike as well as the field EPSP in a concentration- and frequency-dependent manner. Heteratisine (1-100 microM) was a less potent inhibitor. It exerted a depression of the orthodromic spike, but failed to affect the antidromic population spike. 6-Benzoylheteratisine (10 microM) diminished epileptiform activity induced by bicuculline. In hippocampal neurons, this compound reduced the peak amplitude of the sodium current. There was no effect of heteratisine on the sodium current in concentrations up to 100 microM. It is concluded that the frequency-dependent action of 6-benzoylheteratisine suggests an inhibition of neuronal activity which underlies epileptiform burst discharges. The predominant effect is a suppression of neuronal activity due to a blockade of sodium channels.

  5. Diverse impact of neuronal activity at θ frequency on hippocampal long-term plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wójtowicz, Tomasz; Mozrzymas, Jerzy W

    2015-09-01

    Brain oscillatory activity is considered an essential aspect of brain function, and its frequency can vary from 200 Hz, depending on the brain states and projection. Episodes of rhythmic activity accompany hippocampus-dependent learning and memory in vivo. Therefore, long-term synaptic potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression, which are considered viable substrates of learning and memory, are often experimentally studied in paradigms of patterned high-frequency (>50 Hz) and low-frequency (neuronal plasticity remains less well understood. In particular, hippocampal neurons are specifically tuned for activity at θ frequency (4-8 Hz); this band contributes significantly to electroencephalographic signals, and it is likely to be involved in shaping synaptic strength in hippocampal circuits. Here, we review in vitro and in vivo studies showing that variation of θ-activity duration may affect long-term modification of synaptic strength and neuronal excitability in the hippocampus. Such θ-pulse-induced neuronal plasticity 1) is long-lasting, 2) may be built on previously stabilized potentiation in the synapse, 3) may produce opposite changes in synaptic strength, and 4) requires complex molecular machinery. Apparently innocuous episodes of low-frequency synaptic activity may have a profound impact on network signaling, thereby contributing to information processing in the hippocampus and beyond. In addition, θ-pulse-induced LTP might be an advantageous protocol in studies of specific molecular mechanisms of synaptic plasticity. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. MADP, a salidroside analog, protects hippocampal neurons from glutamate induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xian, Hua; Zhao, Jing; Zheng, Yuan; Wang, Meihong; Huang, Jun; Wu, Bingxin; Sun, Cheng; Yang, Yumin

    2014-05-08

    To investigate the anti-apoptotic effect of MADP, an analog of salidroside, against glutamate induced apoptosis in the cultured rat hippocampal neurons. Cytotoxicity was determined by the MTT method and lactate dehydrogenase release to the medium. Cell apoptosis was evaluated by Hoechst 33342 staining, TUNEL assay and flow cytometric analysis. Western blotting was applied for detecting protein levels of cellular signaling molecules. Our results showed that glutamate exposure significantly induces cell apoptosis, whereas the pretreatment of salidroside or MADP remarkably improves cell viability. Most importantly, the anti-apoptotic effect of MADP against glutamate insult is superior to salidroside. To explore the involved mechanisms, we measured some pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic protein levels, and several cell survival signaling pathways were analyzed as well. No visible alterations in Bcl-2 and Bax protein levels were observed by MADP or salidroside. Akt and JNK phosphorylation was robustly stimulated by MADP in the glutamate-treated neurons. Salidroside treatment results in a slight activation in Akt, while no significant alteration in JNK activity was observed. MADP exhibits higher capacity to attenuate glutamate induced cell apoptosis in the cultured rat hippocampal neurons, suggesting that MADP might be a better candidate than salidroside for developing novel drugs treating neuron loss associated disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Repeated mild injury causes cumulative damage to hippocampal cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.J. Matser (Amy); C.I. de Zeeuw (Chris); J.T. Weber (John)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractAn interesting hypothesis in the study of neurotrauma is that repeated traumatic brain injury may result in cumulative damage to cells of the brain. However, post-injury sequelae are difficult to address at the cellular level in vivo. Therefore, it is necessary to compl

  8. The transcriptional repressor Zbtb20 is essential for specification of hippocampal projection neurons and territory in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenthal, Eva Helga

    for specification of both hippocampal pyramidal neurons and territory in a mouse knockout model. Homozygous Zbtb20-/- mice are viable at birth, but display dwarfism and die during the first month of postnatal life. Characterization of the Zbtb20-/- brain phenotype reveals a small vestigial hippocampus...... as an essential regulator of various aspects of neuronal development and corticogenesis in the hippocampus....

  9. PACAP enhances axon outgrowth in cultured hippocampal neurons to a comparable extent as BDNF.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuya Ogata

    Full Text Available Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP exerts neurotrophic activities including modulation of synaptic plasticity and memory, hippocampal neurogenesis, and neuroprotection, most of which are shared with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare morphological effects of PACAP and BDNF on primary cultured hippocampal neurons. At days in vitro (DIV 3, PACAP increased neurite length and number to similar levels by BDNF, but vasoactive intestinal polypeptide showed much lower effects. In addition, PACAP increased axon, but not dendrite, length, and soma size at DIV 3 similarly to BDNF. The PACAP antagonist PACAP6-38 completely blocked the PACAP-induced increase in axon, but not dendrite, length. Interestingly, the BDNF-induced increase in axon length was also inhibited by PACAP6-38, suggesting a mechanism involving PACAP signaling. K252a, a TrkB receptor inhibitor, inhibited axon outgrowth induced by PACAP and BDNF without affecting dendrite length. These results indicate that in primary cultured hippocampal neurons, PACAP shows morphological actions via its cognate receptor PAC1, stimulating neurite length and number, and soma size to a comparable extent as BDNF, and that the increase in total neurite length is ascribed to axon outgrowth.

  10. NRSF causes cAMP-sensitive suppression of sodium current in cultured hippocampal neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeau, H.; Lester, H. A.

    2002-01-01

    The neuron restrictive silencer factor (NRSF/REST) has been shown to bind to the promoters of many neuron-specific genes and is able to suppress transcription of Na(+) channels in PC12 cells, although its functional effect in terminally differentiated neurons is unknown. We constructed lentiviral vectors to express NRSF as a bicistronic message with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and followed infected hippocampal neurons in culture over a period of 1-2 wk. NRSF-expressing neurons showed a time-dependent suppression of Na(+) channel function as measured by whole cell electrophysiology. Suppression was reversed or prevented by the addition of membrane-permeable cAMP analogues and enhanced by cAMP antagonists but not affected by increasing protein expression with a viral enhancer. Secondary effects, including altered sensitivity to glutamate and GABA and reduced outward K(+) currents, were duplicated by culturing GFP-infected control neurons in TTX. The striking similarity of the phenotypes makes NRSF potentially useful as a genetic "silencer" and also suggests avenues of further exploration that may elucidate the transcription factor's in vivo role in neuronal plasticity.

  11. Pericellular innervation of neurons expressing abnormally hyperphosphorylated tau in the hippocampal formation of Alzheimer's disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia Blazquez-Llorca

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Neurofibrillary tangles (NFT represent one of the main neuropathological features in the cerebral cortex associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD. This neurofibrillary lesion involves the accumulation of abnormally hyperphosphorylated or abnormally phosphorylated microtubule-associated protein tau into paired helical filaments (PHF-tau within neurons. We have used immunocytochemical techniques and confocal microscopy reconstructions to examine the distribution of PHF-tau-immunoreactive (ir cells, and their perisomatic GABAergic and glutamatergic innervations in the hippocampal formation and adjacent cortex of AD patients. Furthermore, correlative light and electron microscopy was employed to examine these neurons and the perisomatic synapses. We observed two patterns of staining in PHF-tau-ir neurons, pattern I (without NFT and pattern II (with NFT, the distribution of which varies according to the cortical layer and area. Furthermore, the distribution of both GABAergic and glutamatergic terminals around the soma and proximal processes of PHF-tau-ir neurons does not seem to be altered as it is indistinguishable from both control cases and from adjacent neurons that did not contain PHF-tau. At the electron microscope level, a normal looking neuropil with typical symmetric and asymmetric synapses was observed around PHF-tau-ir neurons. These observations suggest that the synaptic connectivity around the perisomatic region of these PHF-tau-ir neurons was apparently unaltered.

  12. Retention of reference memory following ischemic hippocampal damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, H P; Baranowski, J R; Pulsinelli, W A; Volpe, B T

    1987-01-01

    Retention of reference memory was evaluated in an animal model of cerebral ischemia. Rats were trained for 70 daily trials on an 8-arm radial maze with 5 arms baited, subjected to 30 minutes of forebrain ischemia, allowed to recover for 30 days, and then tested for an additional 50 trials. Post ischemic (PI) rats demonstrated normal retention of reference memory (p less than 0.05). Working memory was significantly impaired postoperatively (p less than 0.05). Morphologic analysis showed that PI rats had primary loss of pyramidal neurons in the CA1 region of hippocampus.

  13. Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 4-Induced Modulation of Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels in Hippocampal Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Zhiwen; Jie, Pinghui; Tian, Yujing; Chen, Tingting; Chen, Lei; Chen, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) is reported to control the resting membrane potential and increase excitability in many types of cells. Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) play an important role in initiating action potentials in neurons. However, whether VGSCs can be modulated by the activation of TRPV4 in hippocampal pyramidal neurons remains unknown. In this study, we tested the effect of TRPV4 agonists (GSK1016790A and 4α-PDD) on voltage-gated sodium current (I Na) in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons and the protein levels of α/β-subunit of VGSCs in the hippocampus of mice subjected to intracerebroventricular (icv.) injection of GSK1016790A (GSK-injected mice). Herein, we report that I Na was inhibited by acute application of GSK1016790A or 4α-PDD. In the presence of TRPV4 agonists, the voltage-dependent inactivation curve shifted to the hyperpolarization, whereas the voltage-dependent activation curve remained unchanged. The TRPV4 agonist-induced inhibition of I Na was blocked by the TRPV4 antagonist or tetrodotoxin. Moreover, blocking protein kinase A (PKA) markedly attenuated the GSK1016790A-induced inhibition of I Na, whereas antagonism of protein kinase C or p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase did not change GSK1016790A action. Finally, the protein levels of Nav1.1, Nav1.2, and Nav1.6 in the hippocampus increased in GSK-injected mice, whereas those of Nav1.3 and Navβ1 remained nearly unchanged. We conclude that I Na is inhibited by the acute activation of TRPV4 through PKA signaling pathway in hippocampal pyramidal neurons, but protein expression of α-subunit of VGSCs is increased by sustained TRPV4 activation, which may compensate for the acute inhibition of I Na and provide a possibility for hyper-excitability upon sustained TRPV4 activation.

  14. Spatial reconstruction by patients with hippocampal damage is dominated by relational memory errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Patrick D; Voss, Joel L; Warren, David E; Tranel, Daniel; Cohen, Neal J

    2013-07-01

    Hippocampal damage causes profound yet circumscribed memory impairment across diverse stimulus types and testing formats. Here, within a single test format involving a single class of stimuli, we identified different performance errors to better characterize the specifics of the underlying deficit. The task involved study and reconstruction of object arrays across brief retention intervals. The most striking feature of patients' with hippocampal damage performance was that they tended to reverse the relative positions of item pairs within arrays of any size, effectively "swapping" pairs of objects. These "swap errors" were the primary error type in amnesia, almost never occurred in healthy comparison participants, and actually contributed to poor performance on more traditional metrics (such as distance between studied and reconstructed location). Patients made swap errors even in trials involving only a single pair of objects. The selectivity and severity of this particular deficit creates serious challenges for theories of memory and hippocampus.

  15. Zbtb20 defines a hippocampal neuronal identity through direct repression of genes that control projection neuron development in the isocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Jakob V; Thomassen, Mads; Møllgård, Kjeld; Noraberg, Jens; Jensen, Niels A

    2014-05-01

    Hippocampal pyramidal neurons are important for encoding and retrieval of spatial maps and episodic memories. While previous work has shown that Zbtb20 is a cell fate determinant for CA1 pyramidal neurons, the regulatory mechanisms governing this process are not known. In this study, we demonstrate that Zbtb20 binds to genes that control neuronal subtype specification in the developing isocortex, including Cux1, Cux2, Fezf2, Foxp2, Mef2c, Rorb, Satb2, Sox5, Tbr1, Tle4, and Zfpm2. We show that Zbtb20 represses these genes during ectopic CA1 pyramidal neuron development in transgenic mice. These data reveal a novel regulatory mechanism by which Zbtb20 suppresses the acquisition of an isocortical fate during archicortical neurogenesis to ensure commitment to a CA1 pyramidal neuron fate. We further show that the expression pattern of Zbtb20 is evolutionary conserved in the fetal human hippocampus, where it is complementary to the expression pattern of the Zbtb20 target gene Tbr1. Therefore, the disclosed Zbtb20-mediated transcriptional repressor mechanism may be involved in development of the human archicortex.

  16. Phagocytosis of neuronal debris by microglia is associated with neuronal damage in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huizinga, Ruth; van der Star, Baukje J.; Kipp, Markus; Jong, Rosa; Gerritsen, Wouter; Clarner, Tim; Puentes, Fabiola; Dijkstra, Christine D.; van der Valk, Paul; Amor, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    Neuroaxonal degeneration is a pathological hallmark of multiple sclerosis (MS) contributing to irreversible neurological disability. Pathological mechanisms leading to axonal damage include autoimmunity to neuronal antigens. In actively demyelinating lesions, myelin is phagocytosed by microglia and

  17. Membrane Potential Dynamics of CA1 Pyramidal Neurons during Hippocampal Ripples in Awake Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulse, Brad K; Moreaux, Laurent C; Lubenov, Evgueniy V; Siapas, Athanassios G

    2016-02-17

    Ripples are high-frequency oscillations associated with population bursts in area CA1 of the hippocampus that play a prominent role in theories of memory consolidation. While spiking during ripples has been extensively studied, our understanding of the subthreshold behavior of hippocampal neurons during these events remains incomplete. Here, we combine in vivo whole-cell and multisite extracellular recordings to characterize the membrane potential dynamics of identified CA1 pyramidal neurons during ripples. We find that the subthreshold depolarization during ripples is uncorrelated with the net excitatory input to CA1, while the post-ripple hyperpolarization varies proportionately. This clarifies the circuit mechanism keeping most neurons silent during ripples. On a finer timescale, the phase delay between intracellular and extracellular ripple oscillations varies systematically with membrane potential. Such smoothly varying delays are inconsistent with models of intracellular ripple generation involving perisomatic inhibition alone. Instead, they suggest that ripple-frequency excitation leading inhibition shapes intracellular ripple oscillations.

  18. Subthreshold membrane-potential oscillations in immature rat CA3 hippocampal neurones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psarropoulou, C; Avoli, M

    1995-12-15

    Subthreshold membrane potential oscillations (MPOs) were recorded intracellularly in 31 of 43 (>70%) immature CA3 hippocampal neurones (from 3-17 days postnatally). MPOs (3-5 mV, 3-15 Hz) occurred at resting membrane potential (RMP) in 20 of 31 neurones, or following depolarization (11 of 31 neurones); with sufficient depolarization spontaneous action potentials (APs) were generated from the positive-going phase of MPOs. In all cells, MPOs were blocked by steady membrane hyperpolarization. Tetrodotoxin abolished MPOs (n = 4); Co(2+) markedly reduced them (n = 3), and tetraethylammonium, added in the presence of TTX, revealed lower frequency oscillatory activity (n = 2). We conclude that subthreshold MPOs in immature hippocampus, possibly linked to theta rhythm generation and memory acquisition, depend on voltage-dependent Na+ electrogenesis and they might be additionally controlled by Ca(2+) and K+ conductances.

  19. Genetic deletion of melanin-concentrating hormone neurons impairs hippocampal short-term synaptic plasticity and hippocampal-dependent forms of short-term memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Barillier, Léa; Léger, Lucienne; Luppi, Pierre-Hervé; Fort, Patrice; Malleret, Gaël; Salin, Paul-Antoine

    2015-11-01

    The cognitive role of melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) neurons, a neuronal population located in the mammalian postero-lateral hypothalamus sending projections to all cortical areas, remains poorly understood. Mainly activated during paradoxical sleep (PS), MCH neurons have been implicated in sleep regulation. The genetic deletion of the only known MCH receptor in rodent leads to an impairment of hippocampal dependent forms of memory and to an alteration of hippocampal long-term synaptic plasticity. By using MCH/ataxin3 mice, a genetic model characterized by a selective deletion of MCH neurons in the adult, we investigated the role of MCH neurons in hippocampal synaptic plasticity and hippocampal-dependent forms of memory. MCH/ataxin3 mice exhibited a deficit in the early part of both long-term potentiation and depression in the CA1 area of the hippocampus. Post-tetanic potentiation (PTP) was diminished while synaptic depression induced by repetitive stimulation was enhanced suggesting an alteration of pre-synaptic forms of short-term plasticity in these mice. Behaviorally, MCH/ataxin3 mice spent more time and showed a higher level of hesitation as compared to their controls in performing a short-term memory T-maze task, displayed retardation in acquiring a reference memory task in a Morris water maze, and showed a habituation deficit in an open field task. Deletion of MCH neurons could thus alter spatial short-term memory by impairing short-term plasticity in the hippocampus. Altogether, these findings could provide a cellular mechanism by which PS may facilitate memory encoding. Via MCH neuron activation, PS could prepare the day's learning by increasing and modulating short-term synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Epilepsy induced by extended amygdala-kindling in rats: lack of clear association between development of spontaneous seizures and neuronal damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, C; Ebert, U; Löscher, W

    2004-12-01

    Most patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), the most common type of epilepsy, show pronounced loss of neurons in limbic brain regions, including the hippocampus, amygdala, and parahippocampal regions. Hippocampal damage in patients with TLE is characterized by extensive neuronal loss in the CA3 and CA1 sectors and the hilus of the dentate gyrus. There is a long and ongoing debate on whether this type of hippocampal damage, referred to as hippocampal sclerosis, is the cause or consequence of TLE. Furthermore, hippocampal damage may contribute to the progressive features of TLE. The present study was designed to determine whether development of spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRS) after extended kindling of the amygdala in rats is associated with neuronal damage. The kindling model of TLE was chosen because previous studies have shown that only part of the rats develop SRS after extended kindling, thus allowing to compare the brain pathology of rats that received the same number of amygdala stimulation but did or did not develop SRS. For extended kindling, rats were stimulated twice daily 3-5 days a week for up to about 280 stimulations. During long-term EEG/video monitoring, SRS were observed in 50% of the rats over the period of extended kindling. SRS often started with myoclonic jerks or focal seizures and subsequently progressed into secondarily generalized seizures, so that the development of SRS recapitulated the earlier kindling of elicited seizures. No obvious neurodegeneration was observed in the CA1 and CA3 sectors of the hippocampus, the amygdala, parahippocampal regions or thalamus. A significant bilateral reduction in neuronal density was determined in the dentate hilus after extended kindling, but this reduction in hilar cell density did not significantly differ between rats with and without observed SRS. Determination of the total number of hilar neurons and of hilar volume indicated that the reduced neuronal density in the dentate hilus was due

  1. Moderate increases in intracellular calcium activate neuroprotective signals in hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickler, P E; Fahlman, C S

    2004-01-01

    Although large increases in neuronal intracellular calcium concentrations ([Ca(2+)](i)) are lethal, moderate increases in [Ca(2+)](i) of 50-200 nM may induce immediate or long-term tolerance of ischemia or other stresses. In neurons in rat hippocampal slice cultures, we determined the relationship between [Ca(2+)](i), cell death, and Ca(2+)-dependent neuroprotective signals before and after a 45 min period of oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD). Thirty minutes before OGD, [Ca(2+)](i) was increased in CA1 neurons by 40-200 nM with 1 nM-1 microM of a Ca(2+)-selective ionophore (calcimycin or ionomycin-"Ca(2+) preconditioning"). Ca(2+) preconditioning greatly reduced cell death in CA1, CA3 and dentate during the following 7 days, even though [Ca(2+)](i) was similar (approximately 2 microM) in preconditioned and control neurons 1 h after the OGD. When pre-OGD [Ca(2+)](i) was lowered to 25 nM (10 nM ionophore in Ca(2+)-free medium) or increased to 8 microM (10 microM ionophore), more than 90% of neurons died. Increased levels of the anti-apoptotic protein protein kinase B (Akt) and the MAP kinase ERK (p42/44) were present in preconditioned slices after OGD. Reducing Ca(2+) influx, inhibiting calmodulin, and preventing Akt or MAP kinase p42/44 upregulation prevented Ca(2+) preconditioning, supporting a specific role for Ca(2+) in the neuroprotective process. Further, in continuously oxygenated cultured hippocampal/cortical neurons, preconditioning for 30 min with 10 nM ionomycin reduced cell death following a 4 microM increase in [Ca(2+)](i) elicited by 1 microM ionomycin. Thus, a zone of moderately increased [Ca(2+)](i) before a potentially lethal insult promotes cell survival, uncoupling subsequent large increases in [Ca(2+)](i) from initiating cell death processes.

  2. Recovery of network-driven glutamatergic activity in rat hippocampal neurons during chronic glutamate receptor blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leininger, Eric; Belousov, Andrei B

    2009-01-28

    Previous studies indicated that a long-term decrease in the activity of ionotropic glutamate receptors induces cholinergic activity in rat and mouse hypothalamic neuronal cultures. Here we studied whether a prolonged inactivation of ionotropic glutamate receptors also induces cholinergic activity in hippocampal neurons. Receptor activity was chronically suppressed in rat hippocampal primary neuronal cultures with two proportionally increasing sets of concentrations of NMDA plus non-NMDA receptor antagonists: 100 microM/10 microM AP5/CNQX (1X cultures) and 200 microM/20 microM AP5/CNQX (2X cultures). Using calcium imaging we demonstrate that cholinergic activity does not develop in these cultures. Instead, network-driven glutamate-dependent activity, that normally is detected in hyper-excitable conditions, reappears in each culture group in the presence of these antagonists and can be reversibly suppressed by higher concentrations of AP5/CNQX. This activity is mediated by non-NMDA receptors and is modulated by NMDA receptors. Further, non-NMDA receptors, the general level of glutamate receptor activity and CaMK-dependent signaling are critical for development of this network-driven glutamatergic activity in the presence of receptor antagonists. Using electrophysiology, western blotting and calcium imaging we show that some neuronal parameters are either reduced or not affected by chronic glutamate receptor blockade. However, other parameters (including neuronal excitability, mEPSC frequency, and expression of GluR1, NR1 and betaCaMKII) become up-regulated and, in some cases, proportionally between the non-treated, 1X and 2X cultures. Our data suggest recovery of the network-driven glutamatergic activity after chronic glutamate receptor blockade. This recovery may represent a form of neuronal plasticity that compensates for the prolonged suppression of the activity of glutamate receptors.

  3. Zinc enhances the inhibitory effects of strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors in mouse hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hai Xia; Thio, Liu Lin

    2007-12-01

    Although extracellular Zn(2+) is an endogenous biphasic modulator of strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors (GlyRs), the physiological significance of this modulation remains poorly understood. Zn(2+) modulation of GlyR may be especially important in the hippocampus where presynaptic Zn(2+) is abundant. Using cultured embryonic mouse hippocampal neurons, we examined whether 1 microM Zn(2+), a potentiating concentration, enhances the inhibitory effects of GlyRs activated by sustained glycine applications. Sustained 20 microM glycine (EC(25)) applications alone did not decrease the number of action potentials evoked by depolarizing steps, but they did in 1 microM Zn(2+). At least part of this effect resulted from Zn(2+) enhancing the GlyR-induced decrease in input resistance. Sustained 20 microM glycine applications alone did not alter neuronal bursting, a form of hyperexcitability induced by omitting extracellular Mg(2+). However, sustained 20 microM glycine applications depressed neuronal bursting in 1 microM Zn(2+). Zn(2+) did not enhance the inhibitory effects of sustained 60 microM glycine (EC(70)) applications in these paradigms. These results suggest that tonic GlyR activation could decrease neuronal excitability. To test this possibility, we examined the effect of the GlyR antagonist strychnine and the Zn(2+) chelator tricine on action potential firing by CA1 pyramidal neurons in mouse hippocampal slices. Co-applying strychnine and tricine slightly but significantly increased the number of action potentials fired during a depolarizing current step and decreased the rheobase for action potential firing. Thus Zn(2+) may modulate neuronal excitability normally and in pathological conditions such as seizures by potentiating GlyRs tonically activated by low agonist concentrations.

  4. Effects of topiramate on hippocampal neuronal apoptosis in rats after kainic acid-evoked seizures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan Wu; Jiarong Pang; Jinou Zheng; Xiaoqing Deng; Xiulin Liang; Jiaquan Li; Zhiying Chen

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Apoptosis plays an important role in brain injury after seizures and the formation of chronic epilepsy.It is important to investigate whether topiramate exhibits either antiepileptic and/or anti-apoptotic effects on hippocampal neurons.OBJECTIVE:To observe euronal apoptosis in hippocampus of rat seizure models,and to investigate the antagonizing effect of topiramate on neuronal apoptosis after seizures.DESIGN:An animal experiment of comparative observation.SETTING:First Affiliated Hospital of Guangxi Medical University.MATERIALS:Sixty healthy male Sprague Dawley(SD)rats,4-6 weeks old and weighing 160-220 g,were provided by the Experimental Animal Center of Guangxi Medical University.Main apparatus and reagents were as follows:Rat brain solid positioner(SR-6N,made in Japan); kainic acid by Sigma(USA);pathological image analyzer(DMR+550)by Leica(Germany); in situ apoptosis detection kit by Wuhan Boster Biological Technology Co.,Ltd; topiramate by Xi'an-Janssen Pharmaceutical,Ltd.The treatment on animals in the experiment was in accordance with the standards of animal ethics.METHODS:The experiments were performed at the Scientific Experimental Center of Guangxi Medical University from June to December 2006.The rats were randomly divided into a topiramate-treated group(n=30)and a model group(n=30).① After anesthesia,all rats were administered a kainic acid injection(0.2 μ L,2 g/L)into the right lateral ventricle.Grade Ⅲ and greater Racine standards were considered to be a successful model establishment.Thirty minutes after seizure ,rats in the topiramate-treated group were treated with an intraperitoneal(i.p.)injection of topiramate every day(40 mg/kg/d)for 2 weeks.The rats in the model group were treated with an equal volume of saline for 2 weeks.③Six rats in the topiramate-treated group were sacrificed at 1 day,and 1,2,3,and 4 weeks after treatment,respectively.The model group animals were sacrificed at corresponding time points.The brain

  5. Hippocampal pyramidal neurons switch from a multipolar migration mode to a novel "climbing" migration mode during development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitazawa, Ayako; Kubo, Ken-ichiro; Hayashi, Kanehiro; Matsunaga, Yuki; Ishii, Kazuhiro; Nakajima, Kazunori

    2014-01-22

    The hippocampus plays important roles in brain functions. Despite the importance of hippocampal functions, recent analyses of neuronal migration have mainly been performed on the cerebral neocortex, and the cellular mechanisms responsible for the formation of the hippocampus are not yet completely understood. Moreover, why a prolonged time is required for hippocampal neurons to complete their migration has been unexplainable for several decades. We analyzed the migratory profile of neurons in the developing mouse hippocampal CA1 region and found that the hippocampal pyramidal neurons generated near the ventricle became postmitotic multipolar cells and accumulated in the multipolar cell accumulation zone (MAZ) in the late stage of development. The hippocampal neurons passed through the pyramidal layer by a unique mode of migration. Their leading processes were highly branched and made contact with many radial fibers. Time-lapse imaging revealed that the migrating cells changed their scaffolds from the original radial fibers to other radial fibers, and as a result they proceed in a zigzag manner, with long intervals. The migrating cells in the hippocampus reminded us of "rock climbers" that instead of using their hands to pull up their bodies were using their leading processes to pull up their cell bodies. Because this mode of migration had never been described, we called it the "climbing" mode. The change from the "climbing" mode in the hippocampus to the "locomotion" mode in the neocortex may have contributed to the brain expansion during evolution.

  6. Low concentrations of alcohol inhibit BDNF-dependent GABAergic plasticity via L-type Ca2+ channel inhibition in developing CA3 hippocampal pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucca, Stefano; Valenzuela, C Fernando

    2010-05-12

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is associated with learning and memory alterations that could be, in part, a consequence of hippocampal damage. The CA3 hippocampal subfield is one of the regions affected by ethanol (EtOH), including exposure during the third trimester-equivalent (i.e., neonatal period in rats). However, the mechanism of action of EtOH is poorly understood. In CA3 pyramidal neurons from neonatal rats, dendritic BDNF release causes long-term potentiation of the frequency of GABAA receptor-mediated spontaneous postsynaptic currents (LTP-GABAA) and this mechanism is thought to play a role in GABAergic synapse maturation. Here, we show that short- and long-term exposure of neonatal male rats to low EtOH concentrations abolishes LTP-GABAA by inhibiting L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. These findings support the recommendation that even light drinking should be avoided during pregnancy.

  7. The hippocampal laminin matrix is dynamic and critical for neuronal survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zu-Lin; Indyk, Justin A; Strickland, Sidney

    2003-07-01

    Laminins are extracellular matrix proteins that participate in neuronal development, survival, and regeneration. During excitotoxin challenge in the mouse hippocampus, neuron interaction with laminin-10 (alpha5,beta1,gamma1) protects against neuronal death. To investigate how laminin is involved in neuronal viability, we infused laminin-1 (alpha1,beta1,gamma1) into the mouse hippocampus. This infusion specifically disrupted the endogenous laminin layer. This disruption was at least partially due to the interaction of the laminin-1 gamma1 chain with endogenous laminin-10, because infusion of anti-laminin gamma1 antibody had the same effect. The disruption of the laminin layer by laminin-1 1) did not require the intact protein because infusion of plasmin-digested laminin-1 gave similar results; 2) was posttranscriptional, because there was no effect on laminin mRNA expression; and 3) occurred in both tPA(-/-) and plasminogen(-/-) mice, indicating that increased plasmin activity was not responsible. Finally, although tPA(-/-) mice are normally resistant to excitotoxin-induced neurodegeneration, disruption of the endogenous laminin layer by laminin-1 or anti-laminin gamma1 antibody renders the tPA(-/-) hippocampal neurons sensitive to kainate. These results demonstrate that neuron interactions with the deposited matrix are not necessarily recapitulated by interactions with soluble components and that the laminin matrix is a dynamic structure amenable to modification by exogenous molecules.

  8. Glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation in neurons and astrocytes during network activity in hippocampal slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Anton I; Malkov, Anton E; Waseem, Tatsiana; Mukhtarov, Marat; Buldakova, Svetlana; Gubkina, Olena; Zilberter, Misha; Zilberter, Yuri

    2014-03-01

    Network activation triggers a significant energy metabolism increase in both neurons and astrocytes. Questions of the primary neuronal energy substrate (e.g., glucose vs. lactate) as well as the relative contributions of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation and their cellular origin (neurons vs. astrocytes) are still a matter of debates. Using simultaneous measurements of electrophysiological and metabolic parameters during synaptic stimulation in hippocampal slices from mature mice, we show that neurons and astrocytes use both glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation to meet their energy demands. Supplementation or replacement of glucose in artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF) with pyruvate or lactate strongly modifies parameters related to network activity-triggered energy metabolism. These effects are not induced by changes in ATP content, pH(i), [Ca(2+)](i) or accumulation of reactive oxygen species. Our results suggest that during network activation, a significant fraction of NAD(P)H response (its overshoot phase) corresponds to glycolysis and the changes in cytosolic NAD(P)H and mitochondrial FAD are coupled. Our data do not support the hypothesis of a preferential utilization of astrocyte-released lactate by neurons during network activation in slices--instead, we show that during such activity glucose is an effective energy substrate for both neurons and astrocytes.

  9. Ginsenoside Rb1 attenuates activated microglia-induced neuronal damage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lining Ke; Wei Guo; Jianwen Xu; Guodong Zhang; Wei Wang; Wenhua Huang

    2014-01-01

    The microglia-mediated inlfammatory reaction promotes neuronal damage under cerebral isch-emia/hypoxia conditions. We therefore speculated that inhibition of hypoxia-induced microglial activation may alleviate neuronal damage. To test this hypothesis, we co-cultured ginsenoside Rb1, an active component of ginseng, and cortical neurons. Ginsenoside Rb1 protected neuronal morphology and structure in a single hypoxic culture system and in a hypoxic co-culture system with microglia, and reduced neuronal apoptosis and caspase-3 production. The protective effect was observable prior to placing in co-culture. Additionally, ginsenoside Rb1 inhibited levels of tumor necrosis factor-αin a co-culture system containing activated N9 microglial cells. Ginse-noside Rb1 also signiifcantly decreased nitric oxide and superoxide production induced by N9 microglia. Our ifndings indicate that ginsenoside Rb1 attenuates damage to cerebral cortex neu-rons by downregulation of nitric oxide, superoxide, and tumor necrosis factor-αexpression in hypoxia-activated microglia.

  10. Nitric oxide damages neuronal mitochondria and induces apoptosis in neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The cytotoxic effect of nitric oxide on primarily cultured rat cerebellar granule cells was studied,and the mechanisms were discussed.The results showed that nitric oxide donor S-nitroso-N-acetyl-penicillamine (SNAP; 500 μmol/L) could induce apoptosis in immature cultures of cerebellar granule cells.Flow cytometry and HPLC analyses revealed that after treatment with SNAP,the mitochondrial transmembrane potential and the cellular ATP content decreased significantly.Nitric oxide scavenger hemoglobin could effectively prevent the neuronal mitochondria from dysfunction and attenuate apoptosis.The results suggested that nitric oxide activated the apoptotic program by inhibiting the activity of mitochondrial respiratory chain and thus decreasing the cellular ATP content.

  11. Cytomorphometric changes in hippocampal CA1 neurons exposed to simulated microgravity using rats as model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit eRanjan

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Microgravity and sleep loss lead to cognitive and learning deficits. These behavioral alterations are likely to be associated with cytomorphological changes and loss of neurons. To understand the phenomenon, we exposed rats (225-275g to 14 days simulated microgravity (SMg and compared its effects on CA1 hippocampal neuronal plasticity, with that of normal cage control rats. We observed that the mean area, perimeter, synaptic cleft and length of active zone of CA1 hippocampal neurons significantly decreased while dendritic arborization and number of spines significantly increased in SMg group as compared with controls. The mean thickness of the post synaptic density and total dendritic length remained unaltered. The changes may be a compensatory effect induced by exposure to microgravity; however, the effects may be transient or permanent, which need further study. These findings may be useful for designing effective prevention for those, including the astronauts, exposed to microgravity. Further, subject to confirmation we propose that SMg exposure might be useful for recovery of stroke patients.

  12. Aging Triggers a Repressive Chromatin State at Bdnf Promoters in Hippocampal Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernest Palomer

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive capacities decline with age, an event accompanied by the altered transcription of synaptic plasticity genes. Here, we show that the transcriptional induction of Bdnf by a mnemonic stimulus is impaired in aged hippocampal neurons. Mechanistically, this defect is due to reduced NMDA receptor (NMDAR-mediated activation of CaMKII. Decreased NMDAR signaling prevents changes associated with activation at specific Bdnf promoters, including displacement of histone deacetylase 4, recruitment of the histone acetyltransferase CBP, increased H3K27 acetylation, and reduced H3K27 trimethylation. The decrease in NMDA-CaMKII signaling arises from constitutive reduction of synaptic cholesterol that occurs with normal aging. Increasing the levels of neuronal cholesterol in aged neurons in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo restored NMDA-induced Bdnf expression and chromatin remodeling. Furthermore, pharmacological prevention of age-associated cholesterol reduction rescued signaling and cognitive deficits of aged mice. Thus, reducing hippocampal cholesterol loss may represent a therapeutic approach to reverse cognitive decline during aging.

  13. The ever-changing morphology of hippocampal granule neurons in physiology and pathology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María eLlorens-Martín

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Newborn neurons are continuously added to the hippocampal dentate gyrus throughout adulthood. In this review, we analyze the maturational stages that newborn granule neurons go through, with a focus on their unique morphological features during each stage under both physiological and pathological circumstances. In addition, the influence of deleterious (such as schizophrenia, stress, Alzheimer’s disease, seizures, stroke, inflammation, dietary deficiencies, or the consumption of drugs of abuse or toxic substances and neuroprotective (physical exercise and environmental enrichment stimuli on the maturation of these cells will be examined. Finally, the regulation of this process by proteins involved in neurodegenerative and neurological disorders (such as Glycogen synthase kinase 3β, Disrupted in Schizophrenia 1 (DISC-1, Glucocorticoid receptor, pro-inflammatory mediators, Presenilin-1, Amyloid precursor protein, Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5, among others, will be evaluated. Given the recently acquired relevance of the dendritic branch as a functional synaptic unit required for memory storage, a full understanding of the morphological alterations observed in newborn neurons may have important consequences for the prevention and treatment of the cognitive and affective alterations that evolve in conjunction with impaired adult hippocampal neurogenesis.

  14. Addition of glutamate to serum free culture promotes recovery of electrical activity in adult hippocampal neurons in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Darin; Das, Mainak; Molnar, Peter; Hickman, James J.

    2010-01-01

    A long-term cell culture system utilizing normal adult hippocampal neurons would represent an important tool that could be useful in research on the mature brain, neurological disorders and age-related neurological diseases. Historically, in vitro neuronal systems are derived from embryonic rather than mature brain tissue, a practice predicated upon difficulties in supporting regeneration, functional recovery and long-term survival of adult neurons in vitro. A few studies have shown that neurons derived from the hippocampal tissue of adult rats can survive and regenerate in vitro under serum-free conditions. However, while the adult neurons regenerated morphologically under these conditions, both the electrical activity characteristic of in vivo neurons as well as long-term neuronal survival was not consistently recovered in vitro. In this study, we report on the development of a defined culture system with the ability to support functional recovery and long-term survival of adult rat hippocampal neurons. In this system, the cell-adhesive substrate, N-1 [3-(trimethoxysilyl) propyl]-diethylenetriamine, supported neuronal attachment, regeneration, and long-term survival of adult neurons for more than 80 days in vitro. Additionally, the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate, applied at 25 μM for 1 to 7 days after morphological neuronal regeneration in vitro, enabled full recovery of neuronal electrical activity. This low concentration of glutamate promoted the recovery of neuronal electrical activity but with minimal excitotoxicity. These improvements allowed electrically active adult neurons to survive in vitro for several months, providing a stable test-bed for the long-term study of regeneration in adult derived neuronal systems, especially for traumatic brain injury (TBI). PMID:20452373

  15. Addition of glutamate to serum-free culture promotes recovery of electrical activity in adult hippocampal neurons in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Darin; Das, Mainak; Molnar, Peter; Hickman, James J

    2010-07-15

    A long-term cell culture system utilizing normal adult hippocampal neurons would represent an important tool that could be useful in research on the mature brain, neurological disorders and age-related neurological diseases. Historically, in vitro neuronal systems are derived from embryonic rather than mature brain tissue, a practice predicated upon difficulties in supporting regeneration, functional recovery and long-term survival of adult neurons in vitro. A few studies have shown that neurons derived from the hippocampal tissue of adult rats can survive and regenerate in vitro under serum-free conditions. However, while the adult neurons regenerated morphologically under these conditions, both the electrical activity characteristic of in vivo neurons as well as long-term neuronal survival was not consistently recovered in vitro. In this study, we report on the development of a defined culture system with the ability to support functional recovery and long-term survival of adult rat hippocampal neurons. In this system, the cell-adhesive substrate, N-1 [3-(trimethoxysilyl) propyl]-diethylenetriamine, supported neuronal attachment, regeneration, and long-term survival of adult neurons for more than 80 days in vitro. Additionally, the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate, applied at 25muM for 1-7 days after morphological neuronal regeneration in vitro, enabled full recovery of neuronal electrical activity. This low concentration of glutamate promoted the recovery of neuronal electrical activity but with minimal excitotoxicity. These improvements allowed electrically active adult neurons to survive in vitro for several months, providing a stable test-bed for the long-term study of regeneration in adult-derived neuronal systems, especially for traumatic brain injury (TBI). Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Habitat-specific shaping of proliferation and neuronal differentiation in adult hippocampal neurogenesis of wild rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavegn, Nicole; van Dijk, R Maarten; Menges, Dominik; Brettschneider, Helene; Phalanndwa, Mashudu; Chimimba, Christian T; Isler, Karin; Lipp, Hans-Peter; Slomianka, Lutz; Amrein, Irmgard

    2013-01-01

    Daily life of wild mammals is characterized by a multitude of attractive and aversive stimuli. The hippocampus processes complex polymodal information associated with such stimuli and mediates adequate behavioral responses. How newly generated hippocampal neurons in wild animals contribute to hippocampal function is still a subject of debate. Here, we test the relationship between adult hippocampal neurogenesis (AHN) and habitat types. To this end, we compare wild Muridae species of southern Africa [Namaqua rock mouse (Micaelamys namaquensis), red veld rat (Aethomys chrysophilus), highveld gerbil (Tatera brantsii), and spiny mouse (Acomys spinosissimus)] with data from wild European Muridae [long-tailed wood mice (Apodemus sylvaticus), pygmy field mice (Apodemus microps), yellow-necked wood mice (Apodemus flavicollis), and house mice (Mus musculus domesticus)] from previous studies. The pattern of neurogenesis, expressed in normalized numbers of Ki67- and Doublecortin(DCX)-positive cells to total granule cells (GCs), is similar for the species from a southern African habitat. However, we found low proliferation, but high neuronal differentiation in rodents from the southern African habitat compared to rodents from the European environment. Within the African rodents, we observe additional regulatory and morphological traits in the hippocampus. Namaqua rock mice with previous pregnancies showed lower AHN compared to males and nulliparous females. The phylogenetically closely related species (Namaqua rock mouse and red veld rat) show a CA4, which is not usually observed in murine rodents. The specific features of the southern environment that may be associated with the high number of young neurons in African rodents still remain to be elucidated. This study provides the first evidence that a habitat can shape adult neurogenesis in rodents across phylogenetic groups.

  17. Blocking brain-derived neurotrophic factor inhibits injury-induced hyperexcitability of hippocampal CA3 neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Raminder; Chang, Philip K-Y; Prenosil, George A; Deane, Emily C; McKinney, Rebecca A

    2013-12-01

    Brain trauma can disrupt synaptic connections, and this in turn can prompt axons to sprout and form new connections. If these new axonal connections are aberrant, hyperexcitability can result. It has been shown that ablating tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB), a receptor for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), can reduce axonal sprouting after hippocampal injury. However, it is unknown whether inhibiting BDNF-mediated axonal sprouting will reduce hyperexcitability. Given this, our purpose here was to determine whether pharmacologically blocking BDNF inhibits hyperexcitability after injury-induced axonal sprouting in the hippocampus. To induce injury, we made Schaffer collateral lesions in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures. As reported by others, we observed a 50% reduction in axonal sprouting in cultures treated with a BDNF blocker (TrkB-Fc) 14 days after injury. Furthermore, lesioned cultures treated with TrkB-Fc were less hyperexcitable than lesioned untreated cultures. Using electrophysiology, we observed a two-fold decrease in the number of CA3 neurons that showed bursting responses after lesion with TrkB-Fc treatment, whereas we found no change in intrinsic neuronal firing properties. Finally, evoked field excitatory postsynaptic potential recordings indicated an increase in network activity within area CA3 after lesion, which was prevented with chronic TrkB-Fc treatment. Taken together, our results demonstrate that blocking BDNF attenuates injury-induced hyperexcitability of hippocampal CA3 neurons. Axonal sprouting has been found in patients with post-traumatic epilepsy. Therefore, our data suggest that blocking the BDNF-TrkB signaling cascade shortly after injury may be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of post-traumatic epilepsy.

  18. Intracellular activities related to in vitro hippocampal sharp waves are altered in CA3 pyramidal neurons of aged mice.

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    Moradi-Chameh, H; Peng, J; Wu, C; Zhang, L

    2014-09-26

    Pyramidal neurons in the hippocampal CA3 area interconnect intensively via recurrent axonal collaterals, and such CA3-to-CA3 recurrent circuitry plays important roles in the generation of hippocampal network activities. In particular, the CA3 circuitry is able to generate spontaneous sharp waves (SPWs) when examined in vitro. These in vitro SPWs are thought to result from the network activity of GABAergic inhibitory interneurons as SPW-correlating intracellular activities are featured with strong IPSPs in pyramidal neurons and EPSPs or spikes in GABAergic interneurons. In view of accumulating evidence indicating a decrease in subgroups of hippocampal GABAergic interneurons in aged animals, we test the hypothesis that the intracellular activities related to in vitro SPWs are altered in CA3 pyramidal neurons of aged mice. Hippocampal slices were prepared from adult and aged C57 black mice (ages 3-6 and 24-28months respectively). Population and single-cell activities were examined via extracellular and whole-cell patch-clamp recordings. CA3 SPW frequencies were not significantly different between the slices of adult and aged mice but SPW-correlating intracellular activities featured weaker IPSC components in aged CA3 pyramidal neurons compared to adult neurons. It was unlikely that this latter phenomenon was due to general impairments of GABAergic synapses in the aged CA3 circuitry as evoked IPSC responses and pharmacologically isolated IPSCs were observed in aged CA3 pyramidal neurons. In addition, aged CA3 pyramidal neurons displayed more positive resting potentials and had a higher propensity of burst firing than adult neurons. We postulate that alterations of GABAergic network activity may explain the reduced IPCS contributions to in vitro SPWs in aged CA3 pyramidal neurons. Overall, our present observations are supportive of the notion that excitability of hippocampal CA3 circuitry is increased in aged mice.

  19. Dissociations in future thinking following hippocampal damage: evidence from discounting and time perspective in episodic amnesia.

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    Kwan, Donna; Craver, Carl F; Green, Leonard; Myerson, Joel; Rosenbaum, R Shayna

    2013-11-01

    Recollecting past experiences and imagining future experiences activate a common set of brain regions that includes the hippocampus (Schacter, Addis, & Buckner, 2007), and both functions are impaired in people with compromised hippocampal function (Klein, Loftus, & Kihlstrom, 2002; Tulving, 1985). These findings indicate a role for the hippocampus that extends beyond declarative memory. However, a case study revealed that a person with extensive medial temporal lobe (MTL) damage and episodic amnesia was able to forgo smaller, immediate rewards for a larger future payoff to a degree similar to control participants (Kwan et al., 2012). This finding suggests that typical regard for the future does not depend on hippocampal integrity. To test this hypothesis, the current study examined the nature and limits of the role of the hippocampus in future thinking and decision making in amnesic individuals with hippocampal damage and associated impairments in episodic memory and future imagining. The amnesic individuals were administered a delay discounting task to assess valuation of future rewards, a probability discounting task to assess risk taking, and the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory to assess personal orientation toward the past, present, and future. Comparisons with demographically matched controls indicated that aspects of temporal thought and future-oriented decision making are preserved in individuals with hippocampal amnesia despite their inability to imagine themselves in detailed future events. Thus, even extensive MTL damage and the resulting episodic amnesia do not preclude prudent decision making, including consideration of future financial outcomes and personal identification with the past and future. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  20. VLSI implementation of a nonlinear neuronal model: a "neural prosthesis" to restore hippocampal trisynaptic dynamics.

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    Hsiao, Min-Chi; Chan, Chiu-Hsien; Srinivasan, Vijay; Ahuja, Ashish; Erinjippurath, Gopal; Zanos, Theodoros P; Gholmieh, Ghassan; Song, Dong; Wills, Jack D; LaCoss, Jeff; Courellis, Spiros; Tanguay, Armand R; Granacki, John J; Marmarelis, Vasilis Z; Berger, Theodore W

    2006-01-01

    We are developing a biomimetic electronic neural prosthesis to replace regions of the hippocampal brain area that have been damaged by disease or insult. We have used the hippocampal slice preparation as the first step in developing such a prosthesis. The major intrinsic circuitry of the hippocampus consists of an excitatory cascade involving the dentate gyrus (DG), CA3, and CA1 subregions; this trisynaptic circuit can be maintained in a transverse slice preparation. Our demonstration of a neural prosthesis for the hippocampal slice involves: (i) surgically removing CA3 function from the trisynaptic circuit by transecting CA3 axons, (ii) replacing biological CA3 function with a hardware VLSI (very large scale integration) model of the nonlinear dynamics of CA3, and (iii) through a specially designed multi-site electrode array, transmitting DG output to the hardware device, and routing the hardware device output to the synaptic inputs of the CA1 subregion, thus by-passing the damaged CA3. Field EPSPs were recorded from the CA1 dendritic zone in intact slices and "hybrid" DG-VLSI-CA1 slices. Results show excellent agreement between data from intact slices and transected slices with the hardware-substituted CA3: propagation of temporal patterns of activity from DG-->VLSI-->CA1 reproduces that observed experimentally in the biological DG-->CA3-->CA1 circuit.

  1. Neuroligin-1 knockdown reduces survival of adult-generated newborn hippocampal neurons

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    Eric eSchnell

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Survival of adult-born hippocampal granule cells is modulated by neural activity, and thought to be enhanced by excitatory synaptic signaling. Here, we report that a reduction in the synaptogenic protein neuroligin-1 in adult-born neurons in vivo decreased their survival, but surprisingly, this effect was independent of changes in excitatory synaptic function. Instead, the decreased survival was associated with unexpected changes in dendrite and spine morphology during granule cell maturation, suggesting a link between cell growth and survival.

  2. Kainic acid-induced neurodegeneration and activation of inflammatory processes in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures: treatment with cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor does not prevent neuronal death.

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    Järvelä, Juha T; Ruohonen, Saku; Kukko-Lukjanov, Tiina-Kaisa; Plysjuk, Anna; Lopez-Picon, Francisco R; Holopainen, Irma E

    2011-06-01

    In the postnatal rodent hippocampus status epilepticus (SE) leads to age- and region-specific excitotoxic neuronal damage, the precise mechanisms of which are still incompletely known. Recent studies suggest that the activation of inflammatory responses together with glial cell reactivity highly contribute to excitotoxic neuronal damage. However, pharmacological tools to attenuate their activation in the postnatal brain are still poorly elucidated. In this study, we investigated the role of inflammatory mediators in kainic acid (KA)-induced neuronal damage in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHCs). A specific cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor N-[2-(cyclohexyloxy)-4-nitrophenyl]-methanesulfonamide (NS-398) was used to study whether or not it could ameliorate neuronal death. Our results show that KA treatment (24 h) resulted in a dose-dependent degeneration of CA3a/b pyramidal neurons. Furthermore, COX-2 immunoreactivity was pronouncedly enhanced particularly in CA3c pyramidal neurons, microglial and astrocyte morphology changed from a resting to active appearance, the expression of the microglial specific protein, Iba1, increased, and prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂) production increased. These indicated the activation of inflammatory processes. However, the expression of neither proinflammatory cytokines, i.e. tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), nor the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 mRNA was significantly altered by KA treatment as studied by real-time PCR. Despite activation of an array of inflammatory processes, neuronal damage could not be rescued either with the combined pre- and co-treatment with a specific COX-2 inhibitor, NS-398. Our results suggest that KA induces activation of a repertoire of inflammatory processes in immature OHCs, and that the timing of anti-inflammatory treatment to achieve neuroprotection is a challenge due to developmental properties and the complexity of inflammatory processes activated by

  3. Protective mechanisms of microRNA-27a against oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced injuries in hippocampal neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qun Cai; Ting Wang; Wen-jie Yang; Xing Fen

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxic injuries during fetal distress have been shown to cause reduced expression of microRNA-27a (miR-27a), which regulates sensi-tivity of cortical neurons to apoptosis. We hypothesized that miR-27a overexpression attenuates hypoxia-and ischemia-induced neuronal apoptosis by regulating FOXO1, an important transcription factor for regulating the oxidative stress response. miR-27a mimic was transfected into hippocampal neurons to overexpress miR-27a. Results showed increased hippocampal neuronal viability and decreased caspase-3 ex-pression. The luciferase reporter gene system demonstrated that miR-27a directly binded to FOXO1 3′UTR in hippocampal neurons and inhibited FOXO1 expression, suggesting that FOXO1 was the target gene for miR-27a. These ifndings conifrm that miR-27a protects hippo-campal neurons against oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced injuries. The mechanism might be mediated by modulation of FOXO1 and apoptosis-related gene caspase-3 expression.

  4. Modulators of cytoskeletal reorganization in CA1 hippocampal neurons show increased expression in patients at mid-stage Alzheimer's disease.

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    Patricia F Kao

    Full Text Available During the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD, hippocampal neurons undergo cytoskeletal reorganization, resulting in degenerative as well as regenerative changes. As neurofibrillary tangles form and dystrophic neurites appear, sprouting neuronal processes with growth cones emerge. Actin and tubulin are indispensable for normal neurite development and regenerative responses to injury and neurodegenerative stimuli. We have previously shown that actin capping protein beta2 subunit, Capzb2, binds tubulin and, in the presence of tau, affects microtubule polymerization necessary for neurite outgrowth and normal growth cone morphology. Accordingly, Capzb2 silencing in hippocampal neurons resulted in short, dystrophic neurites, seen in neurodegenerative diseases including AD. Here we demonstrate the statistically significant increase in the Capzb2 expression in the postmortem hippocampi in persons at mid-stage, Braak and Braak stage (BB III-IV, non-familial AD in comparison to controls. The dynamics of Capzb2 expression in progressive AD stages cannot be attributed to reactive astrocytosis. Moreover, the increased expression of Capzb2 mRNA in CA1 pyramidal neurons in AD BB III-IV is accompanied by an increased mRNA expression of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF receptor tyrosine kinase B (TrkB, mediator of synaptic plasticity in hippocampal neurons. Thus, the up-regulation of Capzb2 and TrkB may reflect cytoskeletal reorganization and/or regenerative response occurring in hippocampal CA1 neurons at a specific stage of AD progression.

  5. Protective Effects of Testosterone on Presynaptic Terminals against Oligomeric β-Amyloid Peptide in Primary Culture of Hippocampal Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Fai Lau

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing lines of evidence support that testosterone may have neuroprotective effects. While observational studies reported an association between higher bioavailable testosterone or brain testosterone levels and reduced risk of Alzheimer’s disease (AD, there is limited understanding of the underlying neuroprotective mechanisms. Previous studies demonstrated that testosterone could alleviate neurotoxicity induced by β-amyloid (Aβ, but these findings mainly focused on neuronal apoptosis. Since synaptic dysfunction and degeneration are early events during the pathogenesis of AD, we aim to investigate the effects of testosterone on oligomeric Aβ-induced synaptic changes. Our data suggested that exposure of primary cultured hippocampal neurons to oligomeric Aβ could reduce the length of neurites and decrease the expression of presynaptic proteins including synaptophysin, synaptotagmin, and synapsin-1. Aβ also disrupted synaptic vesicle recycling and protein folding machinery. Testosterone preserved the integrity of neurites and the expression of presynaptic proteins. It also attenuated Aβ-induced impairment of synaptic exocytosis. By using letrozole as an aromatase antagonist, we further demonstrated that the effects of testosterone on exocytosis were unlikely to be mediated through the estrogen receptor pathway. Furthermore, we showed that testosterone could attenuate Aβ-induced reduction of HSP70, which suggests a novel mechanism that links testosterone and its protective function on Aβ-induced synaptic damage. Taken together, our data provide further evidence on the beneficial effects of testosterone, which may be useful for future drug development for AD.

  6. Dendritic Na(+) spikes enable cortical input to drive action potential output from hippocampal CA2 pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qian; Srinivas, Kalyan V; Sotayo, Alaba; Siegelbaum, Steven A

    2014-01-01

    Synaptic inputs from different brain areas are often targeted to distinct regions of neuronal dendritic arbors. Inputs to proximal dendrites usually produce large somatic EPSPs that efficiently trigger action potential (AP) output, whereas inputs to distal dendrites are greatly attenuated and may largely modulate AP output. In contrast to most other cortical and hippocampal neurons, hippocampal CA2 pyramidal neurons show unusually strong excitation by their distal dendritic inputs from entorhinal cortex (EC). In this study, we demonstrate that the ability of these EC inputs to drive CA2 AP output requires the firing of local dendritic Na(+) spikes. Furthermore, we find that CA2 dendritic geometry contributes to the efficient coupling of dendritic Na(+) spikes to AP output. These results provide a striking example of how dendritic spikes enable direct cortical inputs to overcome unfavorable distal synaptic locale to trigger axonal AP output and thereby enable efficient cortico-hippocampal information flow.

  7. Basal forebrain neurons suppress amygdala kindling via cortical but not hippocampal cholinergic projections in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferencz, I; Leanza, G; Nanobashvili, A; Kokaia, M; Lindvall, O

    2000-06-01

    Intraventricular administration of the immunotoxin 192 IgG-saporin in rats has been shown to cause a selective loss of cholinergic afferents to the hippocampus and cortical areas, and to facilitate seizure development in hippocampal kindling. Here we demonstrate that this lesion also accelerates seizure progression when kindling is induced by electrical stimulations in the amygdala. However, whereas intraventricular 192 IgG-saporin facilitated the development of the initial stages of hippocampal kindling, the same lesion promoted the late stages of amygdala kindling. To explore the role of various parts of the basal forebrain cholinergic system in amygdala kindling, selective lesions of the cholinergic projections to either hippocampus or cortex were produced by intraparenchymal injections of 192 IgG-saporin into medial septum/vertical limb of the diagonal band or nucleus basalis, respectively. Cholinergic denervation of the cortical regions caused acceleration of amygdala kindling closely resembling that observed after the more widespread lesion induced by intraventricular 192 IgG-saporin. In contrast, removal of the cholinergic input to the hippocampus had no effect on the development of amygdala kindling. These data indicate that basal forebrain cholinergic neurons suppress kindling elicited from amygdala, and that this dampening effect is mediated via cortical but not hippocampal projections.

  8. Extracellular calcium modulates persistent sodium current-dependent burst-firing in hippocampal pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, H; Alroy, G; Kirson, E D; Yaari, Y

    2001-06-15

    The generation of high-frequency spike bursts ("complex spikes"), either spontaneously or in response to depolarizing stimuli applied to the soma, is a notable feature in intracellular recordings from hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells (PCs) in vivo. There is compelling evidence that the bursts are intrinsically generated by summation of large spike afterdepolarizations (ADPs). Using intracellular recordings in adult rat hippocampal slices, we show that intrinsic burst-firing in CA1 PCs is strongly dependent on the extracellular concentration of Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)](o)). Thus, lowering [Ca(2+)](o) (by equimolar substitution with Mn(2+) or Mg(2+)) induced intrinsic bursting in nonbursters, whereas raising [Ca(2+)](o) suppressed intrinsic bursting in native bursters. The induction of intrinsic bursting by low [Ca(2+)](o) was associated with enlargement of the spike ADP. Low [Ca(2+)](o)-induced intrinsic bursts and their underlying ADPs were suppressed by drugs that reduce the persistent Na(+) current (I(NaP)), indicating that this current mediates the slow burst depolarization. Blocking Ca(2+)-activated K(+) currents with extracellular Ni(2+) or intracellular chelation of Ca(2+) did not induce intrinsic bursting. This and other evidence suggest that lowering [Ca(2+)](o) may induce intrinsic bursting by augmenting I(NaP). Because repetitive neuronal activity in the hippocampus is associated with marked decreases in [Ca(2+)](o), the regulation of intrinsic bursting by extracellular Ca(2+) may provide a mechanism for preferential recruitment of this firing mode during certain forms of hippocampal activation.

  9. Whole-cell recordings of voltage-gated Calcium, Potassium and Sodium currents in acutely isolated hippocampal pyramidal neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuyun Huang; Qing Cai; Weitian Liu; Xiaoling Wang; Tao Wang

    2009-01-01

    Objective:To record Calcium, Potassium and Sodium currents in acutely isolated hippocampal pyramidal neurons. Methods:Hip-pocampal CA3 neurons were freshly isolated by 1 mg protease/3 ml SES and mechanical trituration with polished pipettes of progressively smaller tip diameters. Patch clamp technique in whole-cell mode was employed to record voltage-gated channel currents. Results:The procedure dissociated hippocampal neurons, preserving apical dendrites and several basal dendrites, without impairing the electrical characteristics of the neurons. Whole-cell patch clamp configuration was successfully used to record voltage-gated Ca2+ currents, delayed rectifier K+ current and voltage-gated Na+ currents. Conclusion:Protease combined with mechanical trituration may be used for the dissociation of neurons from rat hippocampus. Voltage-gated channels currents could be recorded using a patch clamp technique.

  10. Developmental Expression of Kv Potassium Channels at the Axon Initial Segment of Cultured Hippocampal Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Ponce, Diana; DeFelipe, Javier; Garrido, Juan José; Muñoz, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Axonal outgrowth and the formation of the axon initial segment (AIS) are early events in the acquisition of neuronal polarity. The AIS is characterized by a high concentration of voltage-dependent sodium and potassium channels. However, the specific ion channel subunits present and their precise localization in this axonal subdomain vary both during development and among the types of neurons, probably determining their firing characteristics in response to stimulation. Here, we characterize the developmental expression of different subfamilies of voltage-gated potassium channels in the AISs of cultured mouse hippocampal neurons, including subunits Kv1.2, Kv2.2 and Kv7.2. In contrast to the early appearance of voltage-gated sodium channels and the Kv7.2 subunit at the AIS, Kv1.2 and Kv2.2 subunits were tethered at the AIS only after 10 days in vitro. Interestingly, we observed different patterns of Kv1.2 and Kv2.2 subunit expression, with each confined to distinct neuronal populations. The accumulation of Kv1.2 and Kv2.2 subunits at the AIS was dependent on ankyrin G tethering, it was not affected by disruption of the actin cytoskeleton and it was resistant to detergent extraction, as described previously for other AIS proteins. This distribution of potassium channels in the AIS further emphasizes the heterogeneity of this structure in different neuronal populations, as proposed previously, and suggests corresponding differences in action potential regulation. PMID:23119056

  11. Scale invariant disordered nanotopography promotes hippocampal neuron development and maturation with involvement of mechanotransductive pathways

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    Carsten Schulte

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The identification of biomaterials which promote neuronal maturation up to the generation of integrated neural circuits is fundamental for modern neuroscience. The development of neural circuits arises from complex maturative processes regulated by poorly understood signalling events, often guided by the extracellular matrix (ECM. Here we report that nanostructured zirconia surfaces, produced by supersonic cluster beam deposition of zirconia nanoparticles and characterised by ECM-like nanotopographical features, can direct the maturation of neural networks. Hippocampal neurons cultured on such cluster-assembled surfaces displayed enhanced differentiation paralleled by functional changes. The latter was demonstrated by single-cell electrophysiology showing earlier action potential generation and increased spontaneous postsynaptic currents compared to the neurons grown on the featureless unnaturally flat standard control surfaces. Label-free shotgun proteomics broadly confirmed the functional changes and suggests furthermore a vast impact of the neuron/nanotopography interaction on mechanotransductive machinery components, known to control physiological in vivo ECM-regulated axon guidance and synaptic plasticity. Our results indicate a potential of cluster-assembled zirconia nanotopography exploitable for the creation of efficient neural tissue interfaces and cell culture devices promoting neurogenic events, but also for unveiling mechanotransductive aspects of neuronal development and maturation.

  12. Scale Invariant Disordered Nanotopography Promotes Hippocampal Neuron Development and Maturation with Involvement of Mechanotransductive Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Carsten; Ripamonti, Maddalena; Maffioli, Elisa; Cappelluti, Martino A.; Nonnis, Simona; Puricelli, Luca; Lamanna, Jacopo; Piazzoni, Claudio; Podestà, Alessandro; Lenardi, Cristina; Tedeschi, Gabriella; Malgaroli, Antonio; Milani, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The identification of biomaterials which promote neuronal maturation up to the generation of integrated neural circuits is fundamental for modern neuroscience. The development of neural circuits arises from complex maturative processes regulated by poorly understood signaling events, often guided by the extracellular matrix (ECM). Here we report that nanostructured zirconia surfaces, produced by supersonic cluster beam deposition of zirconia nanoparticles and characterized by ECM-like nanotopographical features, can direct the maturation of neural networks. Hippocampal neurons cultured on such cluster-assembled surfaces displayed enhanced differentiation paralleled by functional changes. The latter was demonstrated by single-cell electrophysiology showing earlier action potential generation and increased spontaneous postsynaptic currents compared to the neurons grown on the featureless unnaturally flat standard control surfaces. Label-free shotgun proteomics broadly confirmed the functional changes and suggests furthermore a vast impact of the neuron/nanotopography interaction on mechanotransductive machinery components, known to control physiological in vivo ECM-regulated axon guidance and synaptic plasticity. Our results indicate a potential of cluster-assembled zirconia nanotopography exploitable for the creation of efficient neural tissue interfaces and cell culture devices promoting neurogenic events, but also for unveiling mechanotransductive aspects of neuronal development and maturation. PMID:27917111

  13. Hippocampal neurons respond uniquely to topographies of various sizes and shapes

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    Fozdar, David Y; Chen Shaochen [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, C2200, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Lee, Jae Young; Schmidt, Christine E, E-mail: scchen@mail.utexas.ed, E-mail: schmidt@che.utexas.ed [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, C2200, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2010-09-15

    A number of studies have investigated the behavior of neurons on microfabricated topography for the purpose of developing interfaces for use in neural engineering applications. However, there have been few studies simultaneously exploring the effects of topographies having various feature sizes and shapes on axon growth and polarization in the first 24 h. Accordingly, here we investigated the effects of arrays of lines (ridge grooves) and holes of microscale ({approx}2 {mu}m) and nanoscale ({approx}300 nm) dimensions, patterned in quartz (SiO{sub 2}), on the (1) adhesion, (2) axon establishment (polarization), (3) axon length, (4) axon alignment and (5) cell morphology of rat embryonic hippocampal neurons, to study the response of the neurons to feature dimension and geometry. Neurons were analyzed using optical and scanning electron microscopy. The topographies were found to have a negligible effect on cell attachment but to cause a marked increase in axon polarization, occurring more frequently on sub-microscale features than on microscale features. Neurons were observed to form longer axons on lines than on holes and smooth surfaces; axons were either aligned parallel or perpendicular to the line features. An analysis of cell morphology indicated that the surface features impacted the morphologies of the soma, axon and growth cone. The results suggest that incorporating microscale and sub-microscale topographies on biomaterial surfaces may enhance the biomaterials' ability to modulate nerve development and regeneration.

  14. The electrical activity of hippocampal pyramidal neuron is subjected to descending control by the brain orexin/hypocretin system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riahi, Esmail; Arezoomandan, Reza; Fatahi, Zahra; Haghparast, Abbas

    2015-03-01

    The hippocampus receives sparse orexinergic innervation from the lateral hypothalamus and expresses a high level of orexin receptor. The function of orexin receptor in the regulation of hippocampal neural activity has never been investigated. In this study, in vivo single unit recording was performed in urethane-anesthetized rats. After 15 min of baseline recording from pyramidal neuron within the CA1 region of the dorsal hippocampus, i.c.v. injection of orexin-A 0.5 nmol, SB334867 400 nmol, a selective orexin receptor 1 antagonist, saline, or DMSO, or microinjection of carbachol 250 nmol or saline into the ipsilateral lateral hypothalamus were performed using a Hamilton microsyringe, and the spontaneous firing activity continued to be recorded for 25 min. Results showed that orexin administration into the lateral cerebral ventricle excited 6 out of 8 neurons and inhibited 1 neuron. Chemical stimulation of the lateral hypothalamus by carbachol excited 9 out of 13 hippocampal neurons and inhibited 3 neurons. On the other hand, i.c.v. injection of the SB334867, caused reductions in the firing activity of 6 out of 10 neurons and increases in 4 additional neurons. It seems that orexin neurotransmission in the hippocampus mostly elicits an excitatory response, whereas blockade of orexin receptor has an inhibitory effect. Further studies need to be done to elucidate the underlying mechanism of orexin action on hippocampal neurons.

  15. BDNF regulates the expression and distribution of vesicular glutamate transporters in cultured hippocampal neurons.

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    Carlos V Melo

    Full Text Available BDNF is a pro-survival protein involved in neuronal development and synaptic plasticity. BDNF strengthens excitatory synapses and contributes to LTP, presynaptically, through enhancement of glutamate release, and postsynaptically, via phosphorylation of neurotransmitter receptors, modulation of receptor traffic and activation of the translation machinery. We examined whether BDNF upregulated vesicular glutamate receptor (VGLUT 1 and 2 expression, which would partly account for the increased glutamate release in LTP. Cultured rat hippocampal neurons were incubated with 100 ng/ml BDNF, for different periods of time, and VGLUT gene and protein expression were assessed by real-time PCR and immunoblotting, respectively. At DIV7, exogenous application of BDNF rapidly increased VGLUT2 mRNA and protein levels, in a dose-dependent manner. VGLUT1 expression also increased but only transiently. However, at DIV14, BDNF stably increased VGLUT1 expression, whilst VGLUT2 levels remained low. Transcription inhibition with actinomycin-D or α-amanitine, and translation inhibition with emetine or anisomycin, fully blocked BDNF-induced VGLUT upregulation. Fluorescence microscopy imaging showed that BDNF stimulation upregulates the number, integrated density and intensity of VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 puncta in neurites of cultured hippocampal neurons (DIV7, indicating that the neurotrophin also affects the subcellular distribution of the transporter in developing neurons. Increased VGLUT1 somatic signals were also found 3 h after stimulation with BDNF, further suggesting an increased de novo transcription and translation. BDNF regulation of VGLUT expression was specifically mediated by BDNF, as no effect was found upon application of IGF-1 or bFGF, which activate other receptor tyrosine kinases. Moreover, inhibition of TrkB receptors with K252a and PLCγ signaling with U-73122 precluded BDNF-induced VGLUT upregulation. Hippocampal neurons express both isoforms during

  16. Chronic homocysteine exposure causes changes in the intrinsic electrophysiological properties of cultured hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaub, Christina; Uebachs, Mischa; Beck, Heinz; Linnebank, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Homocystinuria is an inborn error of metabolism characterized by plasma homocysteine levels up to 500 μM, premature vascular events and mental retardation. Mild elevations of homocysteine plasma levels up to 25 μM, which are common in the general population, are associated with vascular disease, cognitive impairment and neurodegeneration. Several mechanisms of homocysteine neurotoxicity have been investigated. However, information on putative effects of hyperhomocysteinemia on the electrophysiology of neurons is limited. To screen for such effects, we examined primary cultures of mouse hippocampal neurons with the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Homocysteine was applied intracellularly (100 μM), or cell cultures were incubated with 100 μM homocysteine for 24 h. Membrane voltage was measured in current-clamp mode, and action potential firing was induced with short and prolonged current injections. Single action potentials induced by short current injections (5 ms) were not altered by acute application or incubation of homocysteine. When we elicited trains of action potentials with prolonged current injections (200 ms), a broadening of action potentials during repetitive firing was observed in control neurons. This spike broadening was unaltered by acute application of homocysteine. However, it was significantly diminished when incubation with homocysteine was extended to 24 h prior to recording. Furthermore, the number of action potentials elicited by low current injections was reduced after long-term incubation with homocysteine, but not by the acute application. After 24 h of homocysteine incubation, the input resistance was reduced which might have contributed to the observed alterations in membrane excitability. We conclude that homocysteine exposure causes changes in the intrinsic electrophysiological properties of cultured hippocampal neurons as a mechanism of neurological symptoms of hyperhomocysteinemia.

  17. Dopamine-dependent effects on basal and glutamate stimulated network dynamics in cultured hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Chen, Xin; Dzakpasu, Rhonda; Conant, Katherine

    2017-02-01

    Oscillatory activity occurs in cortical and hippocampal networks with specific frequency ranges thought to be critical to working memory, attention, differentiation of neuronal precursors, and memory trace replay. Synchronized activity within relatively large neuronal populations is influenced by firing and bursting frequency within individual cells, and the latter is modulated by changes in intrinsic membrane excitability and synaptic transmission. Published work suggests that dopamine, a potent modulator of learning and memory, acts on dopamine receptor 1-like dopamine receptors to influence the phosphorylation and trafficking of glutamate receptor subunits, along with long-term potentiation of excitatory synaptic transmission in striatum and prefrontal cortex. Prior studies also suggest that dopamine can influence voltage gated ion channel function and membrane excitability in these regions. Fewer studies have examined dopamine's effect on related endpoints in hippocampus, or potential consequences in terms of network burst dynamics. In this study, we record action potential activity using a microelectrode array system to examine the ability of dopamine to modulate baseline and glutamate-stimulated bursting activity in an in vitro network of cultured murine hippocampal neurons. We show that dopamine stimulates a dopamine type-1 receptor-dependent increase in number of overall bursts within minutes of its application. Notably, however, at the concentration used herein, dopamine did not increase the overall synchrony of bursts between electrodes. Although the number of bursts normalizes by 40 min, bursting in response to a subsequent glutamate challenge is enhanced by dopamine pretreatment. Dopamine-dependent potentiation of glutamate-stimulated bursting was not observed when the two modulators were administered concurrently. In parallel, pretreatment of murine hippocampal cultures with dopamine stimulated lasting increases in the phosphorylation of the

  18. Reactive changes in astrocytes, and delayed neuronal death, in the rat hippocampal CA1 region following cerebral ischemia/reperfusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guiqing Zhang; Xiang Luo; Zhiyuan Yu; Chao Ma; Shabei Xu; Wei Wang

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Blood supply to the hippocampus is not provided by the middle cerebral artery. However, previous studies have shown that delayed neuronal death in the hippocampus may occur following focal cerebral ischemia induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion. OBJECTIVE: To observe the relationship between reactive changes in hippocampal astrocytes and delayed neuronal death in the hippocampal CA1 region following middle cerebral artery occlusion. DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: The immunohistochemical, randomized, controlled animal study was performed at the Laboratory of Department of Neurology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, from July to November 2007. MATERIALS: Rabbit anti-glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) (Neomarkers, USA), goat anti-rabbit IgG (Sigma, USA) and ApoAlert apoptosis detection kit (Biosciences Clontech, USA) were used in this study. METHODS: A total of 42 healthy adult male Wistar rats, aged 3-5 months, were randomly divided into a sham operation group (n = 6) and a cerebral ischemia/reperfusion group (n = 36). In the cerebral ischemia/reperfusion group, cerebral ischemia/reperfusion models were created by middle cerebral artery occlusion. In the sham operation group, the thread was only inserted into the initial region of the internal carotid artery, and middle cerebral artery occlusion was not induced. Rats in the cerebral ischemia/reperfusion group were assigned to a delayed neuronal death (+) subgroup and a delayed neuronal death (-) subgroup, according to the occurrence of delayed neuronal death in the ischemic side of the hippocampal CA1 region following cerebral ischemia. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Delayed neuronal death in the hippocampal CA1 region was measured by Nissl staining. GFAP expression and delayed neuronal death changes were measured in the rat hippocampal CA1 region at the ischemic hemisphere by double staining for GFAP and TUNEL. RESULTS: After 3 days of ischemia

  19. Phagocytosis of neuronal debris by microglia is associated with neuronal damage in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huizinga, Ruth; van der Star, Baukje J; Kipp, Markus; Jong, Rosa; Gerritsen, Wouter; Clarner, Tim; Puentes, Fabiola; Dijkstra, Christine D; van der Valk, Paul; Amor, Sandra

    2012-03-01

    Neuroaxonal degeneration is a pathological hallmark of multiple sclerosis (MS) contributing to irreversible neurological disability. Pathological mechanisms leading to axonal damage include autoimmunity to neuronal antigens. In actively demyelinating lesions, myelin is phagocytosed by microglia and blood-borne macrophages, whereas the fate of degenerating or damaged axons is unclear. Phagocytosis is essential for clearing neuronal debris to allow repair and regeneration. However, phagocytosis may lead to antigen presentation and autoimmunity, as has been described for neuroaxonal antigens. Despite this notion, it is unknown whether phagocytosis of neuronal antigens occurs in MS. Here, we show using novel, well-characterized antibodies to axonal antigens, that axonal damage is associated with HLA-DR expressing microglia/macrophages engulfing axonal bulbs, indicative of axonal damage. Neuronal proteins were frequently observed inside HLA-DR(+) cells in areas of axonal damage. In vitro, phagocytosis of neurofilament light (NF-L), present in white and gray matter, was observed in human microglia. The number of NF-L or myelin basic protein (MBP) positive cells was quantified using the mouse macrophage cell line J774.2. Intracellular colocalization of NF-L with the lysosomal membrane protein LAMP1 was observed using confocal microscopy confirming that NF-L is taken up and degraded by the cell. In vivo, NF-L and MBP was observed in cerebrospinal fluid cells from patients with MS, suggesting neuronal debris is drained by this route after axonal damage. In summary, neuroaxonal debris is engulfed, phagocytosed, and degraded by HLA-DR(+) cells. Although uptake is essential for clearing neuronal debris, phagocytic cells could also play a role in augmenting autoimmunity to neuronal antigens.

  20. Neurogenic and neurotrophic effects of BDNF peptides in mouse hippocampal primary neuronal cell cultures.

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    Maria del Carmen Cardenas-Aguayo

    Full Text Available The level of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, a member of the neurotrophin family, is down regulated in Alzheimer's disease (AD, Parkinson's disease (PD, depression, stress, and anxiety; conversely the level of this neurotrophin is increased in autism spectrum disorders. Thus, modulating the level of BDNF can be a potential therapeutic approach for nervous system pathologies. In the present study, we designed five different tetra peptides (peptides B-1 to B-5 corresponding to different active regions of BDNF. These tetra peptides were found to be non-toxic, and they induced the expression of neuronal markers in mouse embryonic day 18 (E18 primary hippocampal neuronal cultures. Additionally, peptide B-5 induced the expression of BDNF and its receptor, TrkB, suggesting a positive feedback mechanism. The BDNF peptides induced only a moderate activation (phosphorylation at Tyr 706 of the TrkB receptor, which could be blocked by the Trk's inhibitor, K252a. Peptide B-3, when combined with BDNF, potentiated the survival effect of this neurotrophin on H(2O(2-treated E18 hippocampal cells. Peptides B-3 and B-5 were found to work as partial agonists and as partial antagonists competing with BDNF to activate the TrkB receptor in a dose-dependent manner. Taken together, these results suggest that the described BDNF tetra peptides are neurotrophic, can modulate BDNF signaling in a partial agonist/antagonist way, and offer a novel therapeutic approach to neural pathologies where BDNF levels are dysregulated.

  1. Tissue plasminogen activator inhibits NMDA-receptor-mediated increases in calcium levels in cultured hippocampal neurons

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    Samuel D Robinson

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available NMDA receptors (NMDARs play a critical role in neurotransmission, acting as essential mediators of many forms of synaptic plasticity, and also modulating aspects of development, synaptic transmission and cell death. NMDAR-induced responses are dependent on a range of factors including subunit composition and receptor location. Tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA is a serine protease that has been reported to interact with NMDARs and modulate NMDAR activity. In this study we report that tPA inhibits NMDAR-mediated changes in intracellular calcium levels in cultures of primary hippocampal neurons stimulated by low (5 μM but not high (50 μM concentrations of NMDA. tPA also inhibited changes in calcium levels stimulated by presynaptic release of glutamate following treatment with bicucculine/4-AP. Inhibition was dependent on the proteolytic activity of tPA but was unaffected by α2-antiplasmin, an inhibitor of the tPA substrate plasmin, and RAP, a pan-ligand blocker of the low-density lipoprotein receptor, two proteins previously reported to modulate NMDAR activity. These findings suggest that tPA can modulate changes in intracellular calcium levels in a subset of NMDARs expressed in cultured embryonic hippocampal neurons through a mechanism that involves the proteolytic activity of tPA and synaptic NMDARs.

  2. Saikosaponin a Enhances Transient Inactivating Potassium Current in Rat Hippocampal CA1 Neurons

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    Wei Xie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Saikosaponin a (SSa, a main constituent of the Chinese herb Bupleurum chinense DC., has been demonstrated to have antiepileptic activity. Recent studies have shown that SSa could inhibit NMDA receptor current and persistent sodium current. However, the effects of SSa on potassium (K+ currents remain unclear. In this study, we tested the effect of SSa on 4AP-induced epileptiform discharges and K+ currents in CA1 neurons of rat hippocampal slices. We found that SSa significantly inhibited epileptiform discharges frequency and duration in hippocampal CA1 neurons in the 4AP seizure model in a dose-dependent manner with an IC50 of 0.7 μM. SSa effectively increased the amplitude of ITotal and IA, significantly negative-shifted the activation curve, and positive-shifted steady-state curve of IA. However, SSa induced no significant changes in the amplitude and activation curve of IK. In addition, SSa significantly increased the amplitude of 4AP-sensitive K+ current, while there was no significant change in the amplitude of TEA-sensitive K+ current. Together, our data indicate that SSa inhibits epileptiform discharges induced by 4AP in a dose-dependent manner and that SSa exerts selectively enhancing effects on IA. These increases in IA may contribute to the anticonvulsant mechanisms of SSa.

  3. Selective regulation of axonal growth from developing hippocampal neurons by tumor necrosis factor superfamily member APRIL☆

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    Osório, Catarina; Chacón, Pedro J.; White, Matthew; Kisiswa, Lilian; Wyatt, Sean; Rodríguez-Tébar, Alfredo; Davies, Alun M.

    2014-01-01

    APRIL (A Proliferation-Inducing Ligand, TNFSF13) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor superfamily that regulates lymphocyte survival and activation and has been implicated in tumorigenesis and autoimmune diseases. Here we report the expression and first known activity of APRIL in the nervous system. APRIL and one of its receptors, BCMA (B-Cell Maturation Antigen, TNFRSF17), are expressed by hippocampal pyramidal cells of fetal and postnatal mice. In culture, these neurons secreted APRIL, and function-blocking antibodies to either APRIL or BCMA reduced axonal elongation. Recombinant APRIL enhanced axonal elongation, but did not influence dendrite elongation. The effect of APRIL on axon elongation was inhibited by anti-BCMA and the expression of a signaling-defective BCMA mutant in these neurons, suggesting that the axon growth-promoting effect of APRIL is mediated by BCMA. APRIL promoted phosphorylation and activation of ERK1, ERK2 and Akt and serine phosphorylation and inactivation of GSK-3β in cultured hippocampal pyramidal cells. Inhibition of MEK1/MEK2 (activators of ERK1/ERK2), PI3-kinase (activator of Akt) or Akt inhibited the axon growth-promoting action of APRIL, as did pharmacological activation of GSK-3β and the expression of a constitutively active form of GSK-3β. These findings suggest that APRIL promotes axon elongation by a mechanism that depends both on ERK signaling and PI3-kinase/Akt/GSK-3β signaling. PMID:24444792

  4. Mechanism underlying blockade of voltage-gated calcium channels by agmatine in cultured rat hippocampal neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-quan ZHENG; Xie-chuan WENG; Xiao-dan GAI; Jin LI; Wen-bin XIAO

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether agmatine could selectively block a given type of the voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC) and whether related receptors are involved in the blocking effect of agmatine on VGCC. METHODS: The whole-cell patch recording technique was performed to record VGCC currents in the cultured neonatal rat hippocampal neurons. RESULTS: Verapamil (100 μmol/L), a selective blocker of L-type calcium channel, significantly inhibited VGCC current by 80 %± 7 %. Agmatine (100 μmol/L) could further depress the remained currents by 25 %±6 %. The α2-adrenoceptor antagonist yohimbine (10 μmol/L) and the I2 imidazoline receptor antagonist idazoxon (10 and 40 μmol/L) had no significant effect on VGCC currents when used respectively. When the mixture of yohimbine and agmatine was applied, VGCC currents were still depressed remarkably. However, the blocking effect of agmatine was decreased by 29 %± 8 % in the presence of idazoxon (10 μmol/L). The effect of idazoxon did not increase at a higher concentration (40 μmol/L). CONCLUSION: Agmatine could block the L- and other types of VGCC currents in the cultured rat hippocampal neurons. Blocking effect of agmatine on VGCC was partially related to I2 imidazoline receptor and had no relationship with α2-adrenoceptors.

  5. Amyloid-Beta Induced Changes in Vesicular Transport of BDNF in Hippocampal Neurons

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    Bianca Seifert

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The neurotrophin brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF is an important growth factor in the CNS. Deficits in transport of this secretory protein could underlie neurodegenerative diseases. Investigation of disease-related changes in BDNF transport might provide insights into the cellular mechanism underlying, for example, Alzheimer’s disease (AD. To analyze the role of BDNF transport in AD, live cell imaging of fluorescently labeled BDNF was performed in hippocampal neurons of different AD model systems. BDNF and APP colocalized with low incidence in vesicular structures. Anterograde as well as retrograde transport of BDNF vesicles was reduced and these effects were mediated by factors released from hippocampal neurons into the extracellular medium. Transport of BDNF was altered at a very early time point after onset of human APP expression or after acute amyloid-beta(1-42 treatment, while the activity-dependent release of BDNF remained unaffected. Taken together, extracellular cleavage products of APP induced rapid changes in anterograde and retrograde transport of BDNF-containing vesicles while release of BDNF was unaffected by transgenic expression of mutated APP. These early transport deficits might lead to permanently impaired brain functions in the adult brain.

  6. The Gαo Activator Mastoparan-7 Promotes Dendritic Spine Formation in Hippocampal Neurons

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    Valerie T. Ramírez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mastoparan-7 (Mas-7, an analogue of the peptide mastoparan, which is derived from wasp venom, is a direct activator of Pertussis toxin- (PTX- sensitive G proteins. Mas-7 produces several biological effects in different cell types; however, little is known about how Mas-7 influences mature hippocampal neurons. We examined the specific role of Mas-7 in the development of dendritic spines, the sites of excitatory synaptic contact that are crucial for synaptic plasticity. We report here that exposure of hippocampal neurons to a low dose of Mas-7 increases dendritic spine density and spine head width in a time-dependent manner. Additionally, Mas-7 enhances postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95 clustering in neurites and activates Gαo signaling, increasing the intracellular Ca2+ concentration. To define the role of signaling intermediates, we measured the levels of phosphorylated protein kinase C (PKC, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK, and calcium-calmodulin dependent protein kinase IIα (CaMKIIα after Mas-7 treatment and determined that CaMKII activation is necessary for the Mas-7-dependent increase in dendritic spine density. Our results demonstrate a critical role for Gαo subunit signaling in the regulation of synapse formation.

  7. The Gαo Activator Mastoparan-7 Promotes Dendritic Spine Formation in Hippocampal Neurons

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    Ramírez, Valerie T.; Ramos-Fernández, Eva; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.

    2016-01-01

    Mastoparan-7 (Mas-7), an analogue of the peptide mastoparan, which is derived from wasp venom, is a direct activator of Pertussis toxin- (PTX-) sensitive G proteins. Mas-7 produces several biological effects in different cell types; however, little is known about how Mas-7 influences mature hippocampal neurons. We examined the specific role of Mas-7 in the development of dendritic spines, the sites of excitatory synaptic contact that are crucial for synaptic plasticity. We report here that exposure of hippocampal neurons to a low dose of Mas-7 increases dendritic spine density and spine head width in a time-dependent manner. Additionally, Mas-7 enhances postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95) clustering in neurites and activates Gαo signaling, increasing the intracellular Ca2+ concentration. To define the role of signaling intermediates, we measured the levels of phosphorylated protein kinase C (PKC), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and calcium-calmodulin dependent protein kinase IIα (CaMKIIα) after Mas-7 treatment and determined that CaMKII activation is necessary for the Mas-7-dependent increase in dendritic spine density. Our results demonstrate a critical role for Gαo subunit signaling in the regulation of synapse formation. PMID:26881110

  8. High abundance of BDNF within glutamatergic presynapses of cultured hippocampal neurons

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    Thomas eAndreska

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In the mammalian brain, the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF has emerged as a key factor for synaptic refinement, plasticity and learning. Although BDNF-induced signaling cascades are well known, the spatial aspects of the synaptic BDNF localization remained unclear. Recent data provide strong evidence for an exclusive presynaptic location and anterograde secretion of endogenous BDNF at synapses of the hippocampal circuit. In contrast, various studies using BDNF overexpression in cultured hippocampal neurons support the idea that postsynaptic synapses and other dendritic structures are the preferential sites of BDNF localization and release. In this study we used rigorously tested anti-BDNF antibodies and achieved a dense labeling of endogenous BDNF close to synapses. Confocal microscopy showed natural BDNF close to many, but not all glutamatergic synapses, while neither GABAergic synapses nor postsynaptic structures carried a typical synaptic BDNF label. To visualize the BDNF distribution within the fine structure of synapses, we implemented super resolution fluorescence imaging by direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM. Two-color dSTORM images of neurites were acquired with a spatial resolution of ~20 nm. At this resolution, the synaptic scaffold proteins Bassoon and Homer exhibit hallmarks of mature synapses and form juxtaposed bars, separated by a synaptic cleft. BDNF imaging signals form granule-like clusters with a mean size of ~60 nm and are preferentially found within the fine structure of the glutamatergic presynapse. Individual glutamatergic presynapses carried up to 90% of the synaptic BDNF immunoreactivity, and only a minor fraction of BDNF molecules was found close to the postsynaptic bars. Our data proof that hippocampal neurons are able to enrich and store high amounts of BDNF in small granules within the mature glutamatergic presynapse, at a principle site of synaptic plasticity.

  9. Allopregnanolone-induced rise in intracellular calcium in embryonic hippocampal neurons parallels their proliferative potential

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    Brinton Roberta

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Factors that regulate intracellular calcium concentration are known to play a critical role in brain function and neural development, including neural plasticity and neurogenesis. We previously demonstrated that the neurosteroid allopregnanolone (APα; 5α-pregnan-3α-ol-20-one promotes neural progenitor proliferation in vitro in cultures of rodent hippocampal and human cortical neural progenitors, and in vivo in triple transgenic Alzheimer's disease mice dentate gyrus. We also found that APα-induced proliferation of neural progenitors is abolished by a calcium channel blocker, nifedipine, indicating a calcium dependent mechanism for the proliferation. Methods In the present study, we investigated the effect of APα on the regulation of intracellular calcium concentration in E18 rat hippocampal neurons using ratiometric Fura2-AM imaging. Results Results indicate that APα rapidly increased intracellular calcium concentration in a dose-dependent and developmentally regulated manner, with an EC50 of 110 ± 15 nM and a maximal response occurring at three days in vitro. The stereoisomers 3β-hydroxy-5α-hydroxy-pregnan-20-one, and 3β-hydroxy-5β-hydroxy-pregnan-20-one, as well as progesterone, were without significant effect. APα-induced intracellular calcium concentration increase was not observed in calcium depleted medium and was blocked in the presence of the broad spectrum calcium channel blocker La3+, or the L-type calcium channel blocker nifedipine. Furthermore, the GABAA receptor blockers bicuculline and picrotoxin abolished APα-induced intracellular calcium concentration rise. Conclusion Collectively, these data indicate that APα promotes a rapid, dose-dependent, stereo-specific, and developmentally regulated increase of intracellular calcium concentration in rat embryonic hippocampal neurons via a mechanism that requires both the GABAA receptor and L-type calcium channel. These data suggest that AP

  10. Cytosolic phospholipase A(2) alpha mediates electrophysiologic responses of hippocampal pyramidal neurons to neurotoxic NMDA treatment.

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    Shen, Ying; Kishimoto, Koji; Linden, David J; Sapirstein, Adam

    2007-04-03

    The arachidonic acid-generating enzyme cytosolic phospholipase A(2) alpha (cPLA(2)alpha) has been implicated in the progression of excitotoxic neuronal injury. However, the mechanisms of cPLA(2)alpha toxicity have yet to be determined. Here, we used a model system exposing mouse hippocampal slices to NMDA as an excitotoxic injury, in combination with simultaneous patch-clamp recording and confocal Ca(2+) imaging of CA1 pyramidal neurons. NMDA treatment caused significantly greater injury in wild-type (WT) than in cPLA(2)alpha null CA1 neurons. Bath application of NMDA evoked a slow inward current in voltage-clamped neurons (composed of both NMDA receptor-mediated and other conductances) that was smaller in cPLA(2)alpha null than in WT slices. This was not due to down-regulation of NMDA receptor function because NMDA receptor-mediated currents were equivalent in each genotype following brief photolysis of caged glutamate. Current-clamp recordings were made during and following NMDA exposure by eliciting a single action potential with a brief current injection. After NMDA exposure, WT CA1 neurons developed a spike-evoked plateau potential and an increased spike-evoked dendritic Ca(2+) transient. These effects were absent in CA1 neurons from cPLA(2)alpha null mice and WT neurons treated with a cPLA(2)alpha inhibitor. The Ca-sensitive K-channel toxins, apamin and paxilline, caused spike broadening and Ca(2+) enhancement in WT and cPLA(2)alpha null slices. NMDA application in WT and arachidonate applied to cPLA(2)alpha null cells occluded the effects of apamin/paxilline. These results indicate that cPLA(2)alpha activity is required for development of aberrant electrophysiologic events triggered by NMDA receptor activation, in part through attenuation of K-channel function.

  11. Influence of morphine on levels of type Ⅱ inhibitory guanine nucleotide binding protein in primary hippocampal neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qinghua Wu; Qiang Fu; Xinhua Wang; Jianhua Zhao; Liwei Liu; Shirong Tang

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The pharmacological action of opioid drugs is related to signal transduction of inhibitory guanine nucleotide binding protein.OBJECTIVE: To quantitatively and qualitatively analyze the influence of morphine on levels of type Ⅱ inhibitory guanine nucleotide binding protein (Gi2 protein) in primary cultured hippocampal neurons at different time points.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: A randomized controlled study, which was performed at the Department of Neurobiology, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University of Chinese PLA between September 2002 and March 2004.MATERIALS: Cerebral hippocampal neurons were obtained from newborn SD rats at 1-2 days of age. Biotin-antibody Ⅱ-avidin fluorescein isothiocyanate (Avidin-FITC) was purchased from Sigma Company (USA) and the Gi2 protein polyclonal antibody from Santa Cruz Biochemistry Company (USA).METHODS: Seven days after culture, mature hippocampal neurons were randomly divided into six groups: 4-, 8-, 16-, 24-, and 48-hour morphine groups, and a blank control group. Neurons in the morphine groups Received morphine (10μmol/L), which could cause alterations of G-protein mRNA and cAMP expression in the prefrontal cortex. Neurons in the blank control group were given the same volume of saline.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Gi2 protein levels were detected by an immunofluorescence technique, and were analyzed by the image analytic system with the use of green fluorescence intensity.RESULTS: Gi2 protein levels in hippocampal neurons gradually decreased in the 4-, 8-, 16-, 24-, and 48-hour morphine groups. In particular, Gi2 protein levels in the 16-, 24-, and 48-hour morphine groups were significantly lower than that in the blank control group (P<0.05-0.01).CONCLUSION: Morphine may decrease Gi2 protein level in primary hippocampal neurons, and the decreasing trend is positively related to morphine-induced time.

  12. GSK-3β Overexpression Alters the Dendritic Spines of Developmentally Generated Granule Neurons in the Mouse Hippocampal Dentate Gyrus

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    Pallas-Bazarra, Noemí; Kastanauskaite, Asta; Avila, Jesús; DeFelipe, Javier; Llorens-Martín, María

    2017-01-01

    The dentate gyrus (DG) plays a crucial role in hippocampal-related memory. The most abundant cellular type in the DG, namely granule neurons, are developmentally generated around postnatal day P6 in mice. Moreover, a unique feature of the DG is the occurrence of adult hippocampal neurogenesis, a process that gives rise to newborn granule neurons throughout life. Adult-born and developmentally generated granule neurons share some maturational aspects but differ in others, such as in their positioning within the granule cell layer. Adult hippocampal neurogenesis encompasses a series of plastic changes that modify the function of the hippocampal trisynaptic network. In this regard, it is known that glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β) regulates both synaptic plasticity and memory. By using a transgenic mouse overexpressing GSK-3β in hippocampal neurons, we previously demonstrated that the overexpression of this kinase has deleterious effects on the maturation of newborn granule neurons. In the present study, we addressed the effects of GSK-3β overexpression on the morphology and number of dendritic spines of developmentally generated granule neurons. To this end, we performed intracellular injections of Lucifer Yellow in developmentally generated granule neurons of wild-type and GSK-3β-overexpressing mice and analyzed the number and morphologies of dendritic spines (namely, stubby, thin and mushroom). GSK-3β overexpression led to a general reduction in the number of dendritic spines. In addition, it caused a slight reduction in the percentage, head diameter and length of thin spines, whereas the head diameter of mushroom spines was increased. PMID:28344548

  13. Topiramate protects against glutamate excitotoxicity via activating BDNF/TrkB-dependent ERK pathway in rodent hippocampal neurons.

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    Mao, Xiao-Yuan; Cao, Yong-Gang; Ji, Zhong; Zhou, Hong-Hao; Liu, Zhao-Qian; Sun, Hong-Li

    2015-07-01

    Topiramate (TPM) was previously found to have neuroprotection against neuronal injury in epileptic and ischemic models. However, whether TPM protects against glutamate-induced excitotoxicity in hippocampal neurons is elusive. Our present work aimed to evaluate the protective effect of TPM against glutamate toxicity in hippocampal neurons and further figure out the potential molecular mechanisms. The in vitro glutamate excitotoxic model was prepared with 125μM glutamate for 20min. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) analysis and Hoechst 33342 staining were conducted to detect neuronal survival. The protein expressions of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), TrkB, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade (including extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 MAPK), cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB), Bcl-2, Bax and β-actin were detected via Western blot assay. Our results demonstrated that TPM protected hippocampal neurons from glutamate toxicity. Meanwhile, the pretreatment of TPM for 10min significantly prevented the down-regulation of BDNF and the phosphorylation of TrkB. Furthermore, the elevation of phosphorylated EKR expression was significantly inhibited after blockade of TrkB by TrkB IgG, while no alterations of phosphorylated JNK and p38 MAPK were found in the cultured hippocampal neurons. Besides, it was also found that the enhanced phosphorylation of CREB was evidently reversed under excitotoxic conditions after treating with U0126 (the selective inhibitor of ERK). The protein level of Bcl-2 was also observed to be remarkably increased after TPM treatment. In conclusion, these findings implicate that TPM exerts neuroprotective effects against glutamate excitotoxicity in hippocampal neurons and its protection may be modulated through BDNF/TrkB-dependent ERK pathway.

  14. Intercellular Signaling Pathway among Endothelia, Astrocytes and Neurons in Excitatory Neuronal Damage

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    Kanato Yamagata

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Neurons interact closely with astrocytes via glutamate; this neuron-glia circuit may play a pivotal role in synaptic transmission. On the other hand, astrocytes contact vascular endothelial cells with their end-feet. It is becoming obvious that non-neuronal cells play a critical role in regulating the neuronal activity in the brain. We find that kainic acid (KA administration induces the expression of microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGES-1 in venous endothelial cells and the prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 receptor prostaglandin E receptor (EP-3 on astrocytes. Endothelial mPGES-1 exacerbates KA-induced neuronal damage in in vivo experiments. In in vitro experiments, mPGES-1 produces PGE2, which enhances astrocytic Ca2+ levels via the EP3 receptor and increases Ca2+-dependent glutamate release, thus aggravating neuronal injury. This novel endothelium-astrocyte-neuron signaling pathway may be crucial for driving neuronal damage after repetitive seizures and could be a new therapeutic target for epilepsy and other brain disorders.

  15. Comparison of the severity of injury of hippocampal neuron in rats induced by simulated push-pull maneuver at various degrees

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suhong Guo; Hui Zhang

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Push-pull effect is often caused during maneuver,and the changes of unconsciousness induced can affect or damage cerebral neurons at various degrees.OBJECTIVE: To observe the effect of simulated push-pull maneuver at various degrees on injury of hippocampal neurons in rats and analyze its phase effect.DESIGN: Randomized control study.SETTING: Physiological Department of Jilin Medical College.MATERIALS: A total of 40 healthy male Wistar rats, of clean grade, weighting 205-300 g, aged 3-4months, were randomly divided into control group (n=4) and three push-pull experimental groups, including ±2 Gz group (intensity: -2 Gz to +2 Gz, n=12), ±6 Gz group (-6 Gz to +6 Gz, n=12) and ±8 Gz group (-8 Gz to +8 Gz, n=12).METHODS:The experiment was completed in the Physiological Department of Jilin Military Medical College from March 2002 to May 2003. ① Rats in the experimental groups were put at the specially rolling arm of animal centrifugal machine. Then, they were pushed and pulled with ±2 Gz, ± 6 Gz and ±8 Gz, respectively. The jolt was 1 Gz/s. However, rats in control group were not treated with any ways. ② Stroke index and neurological evaluation were performed on rats in the experimental groups at 0.5,6 and 24 hours after push-pull. Stroke index was 25 points in total. The higher the scores were, the severer the cerebral injury was. Neurological evaluation was 10 points in total. The higher the scores were, the severer the nerve injury was. ③ Hippocampal tissue in brain of rats were selected to cut into sections at each time points, and form and distribution of neurons were observed in hippocampal areas with HE staining. Degrees of neuronal injury in hippocampal CA1 area were assayed after push-pull at various degrees with electron microscope.④ Measurement data were compared with t test.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:① Stroke index and neurological evaluation;② form and distribution of neurons in hippocampal areas; ③ degrees of neuronal injury in

  16. The microtubule destabilizing protein stathmin controls the transition from dividing neuronal precursors to postmitotic neurons during adult hippocampal neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boekhoorn, Karin; van Dis, Vera; Goedknegt, Erika; Sobel, André; Lucassen, Paul J; Hoogenraad, Casper C

    2014-12-01

    The hippocampus is one of the two areas in the mammalian brain where adult neurogenesis occurs. Adult neurogenesis is well known to be involved in hippocampal physiological functions as well as pathophysiological conditions. Microtubules (MTs), providing intracellular transport, stability, and transmitting force, are indispensable for neurogenesis by facilitating cell division, migration, growth, and differentiation. Although there are several examples of MT-stabilizing proteins regulating different aspects of adult neurogenesis, relatively little is known about the function of MT-destabilizing proteins. Stathmin is such a MT-destabilizing protein largely restricted to the CNS, and in contrast to its developmental family members, stathmin is also expressed at significant levels in the adult brain, notably in areas involved in adult neurogenesis. Here, we show an important role for stathmin during adult neurogenesis in the subgranular zone of the mouse hippocampus. After carefully mapping stathmin expression in the adult dentate gyrus (DG), we investigated its role in hippocampal neurogenesis making use of stathmin knockout mice. Although hippocampus development appears normal in these animals, different aspects of adult neurogenesis are affected. First, the number of proliferating Ki-67+ cells is decreased in stathmin knockout mice, as well as the expression of the immature markers Nestin and PSA-NCAM. However, newborn cells that do survive express more frequently the adult marker NeuN and have a more mature morphology. Furthermore, our data suggest that migration in the DG might be affected. We propose a model in which stathmin controls the transition from neuronal precursors to early postmitotic neurons.

  17. Antiapoptotic effect both in vivo and in vitro of A20 gene when transfected into rat hippocampal neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-sheng MIAO; Lu-yang YU; Guo-zhen HUI; Li-he GUO

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the antiapoptotic effect of the A20 gene in primary hippocampal neurons both in vivo and in vitro. Methods: Primary hippocampal neurons in embryonic day 18 (El 8) rats were transfected with the A20 gene by using the new Nucleofector electroporation transfection method. We then examined, whether A20 -neurons possessed anti-apoptotic abilities after TNF-α stimulation in vitro.A20-neurons and pcDNA3 -neurons were transplanted into the penumbra of the brains of rats that had been subjected to 90-min of ischemia induced by left middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Results: A20-neurons resisted TNF-α induced apoptosis in vitro. The apoptosis rate of neurons overexpressing A20(28.46%±3.87%) was lower than that in neurons transfected with pcDNA3(53.06%±5.36%). More A20-neurons survived in the penumbra both 3-d and 7-d after transplantation than did sham pcDNA3 neurons. Conclusion: The novel function of A20 may make it a potential targets for the gene therapy for neurological diseases.

  18. ENA/VASP downregulation triggers cell death by impairing axonal maintenance in hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, D Lorena; Rezával, Carolina; Cáceres, Alfredo; Schinder, Alejandro F; Ceriani, M Fernanda

    2010-06-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases encompass a broad variety of motor and cognitive disorders that are accompanied by death of specific neuronal populations or brain regions. Cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying these complex disorders remain largely unknown. In a previous work we searched for novel Drosophila genes relevant for neurodegeneration and singled out enabled (ena), which encodes a protein involved in cytoskeleton remodeling. To extend our understanding on the mechanisms of ENA-triggered degeneration we now investigated the effect of silencing ena ortholog genes in mouse hippocampal neurons. We found that ENA/VASP downregulation led to neurite retraction and concomitant neuronal cell death through an apoptotic pathway. Remarkably, this retraction initially affected the axonal structure, showing no effect on dendrites. Reduction in ENA/VASP levels blocked the neuritogenic effect of a specific RhoA kinase (ROCK) inhibitor, thus suggesting that these proteins could participate in the Rho-signaling pathway. Altogether these observations demonstrate that ENA/VASP proteins are implicated in the establishment and maintenance of the axonal structure and that a change on their expression levels triggers neuronal degeneration.

  19. Morphine- and CaMKII-dependent enhancement of GIRK channel signaling in hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassirpour, Rounak; Bahima, Laia; Lalive, Arnaud L; Lüscher, Christian; Luján, Rafael; Slesinger, Paul A

    2010-10-06

    G-protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels, which help control neuronal excitability, are important for the response to drugs of abuse. Here, we describe a novel pathway for morphine-dependent enhancement of GIRK channel signaling in hippocampal neurons. Morphine treatment for ∼20 h increased the colocalization of GIRK2 with PSD95, a dendritic spine marker. Western blot analysis and quantitative immunoelectron microscopy revealed an increase in GIRK2 protein and targeting to dendritic spines. In vivo administration of morphine also produced an upregulation of GIRK2 protein in the hippocampus. The mechanism engaged by morphine required elevated intracellular Ca(2+) and was insensitive to pertussis toxin, implicating opioid receptors that may couple to Gq G-proteins. Met-enkephalin, but not the μ-selective (DAMGO) and δ-selective (DPDPE) opioid receptor agonists, mimicked the effect of morphine, suggesting involvement of a heterodimeric opioid receptor complex. Peptide (KN-93) inhibition of CaMKII prevented the morphine-dependent change in GIRK localization, whereas expression of a constitutively activated form of CaMKII mimicked the effects of morphine. Coincident with an increase in GIRK2 surface expression, functional analyses revealed that morphine treatment increased the size of serotonin-activated GIRK currents and Ba(2+)-sensitive basal K(+) currents in neurons. These results demonstrate plasticity in neuronal GIRK signaling that may contribute to the abusive effects of morphine.

  20. Stimulation of glutamate receptors in cultured hippocampal neurons causes Ca2+-dependent mitochondrial contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brustovetsky, Tatiana; Li, Viacheslav; Brustovetsky, Nickolay

    2009-07-01

    Cultured hippocampal neurons expressing mitochondrially-targeted enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (mito-eYFP) were used to quantitatively examine mitochondrial remodelling in response to excitotoxic glutamate. Mitochondrial morphology was evaluated using laser spinning-disk confocal microscopy followed by calibrated image processing and 3D image rendering. Glutamate triggered an increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) and mitochondrial depolarization accompanied by Ca(2+)-dependent morphological transformation of neuronal mitochondria from "thread-like" to rounded structures. The quantitative analysis of the mitochondrial remodelling revealed that exposure to glutamate resulted in a decrease in mitochondrial volume and surface area concurrent with an increase in sphericity of the organelles. NIM811, an inhibitor of the mitochondrial permeability transition, attenuated the glutamate-induced sustained increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) and suppressed mitochondrial remodelling in the majority of affected neurons, but it did not rescue mitochondrial membrane potential. Shortening, fragmentation, and formation of circular mitochondria with decreased volume and surface area accompanied mitochondrial depolarization with FCCP. However, FCCP-induced morphological alterations appeared to be distinctly different from mitochondrial remodelling caused by glutamate. Moreover, FCCP prevented glutamate-induced mitochondrial remodelling suggesting an important role of Ca(2+) influx into mitochondria in the morphological alterations. Consistent with this, in saponin-permeabilized neurons, Ca(2+) caused mitochondrial remodelling which could be prevented by Ru(360).

  1. Learning causes reorganization of neuronal firing patterns to represent related experiences within a hippocampal schema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Sam; Robinson, Nick T M; Herrera, Lauren; Churchill, Jordana C; Eichenbaum, Howard

    2013-06-19

    According to schema theory as proposed by Piaget and Bartlett, learning involves the assimilation of new memories into networks of preexisting knowledge, as well as alteration of the original networks to accommodate the new information. Recent evidence has shown that rats form a schema of goal locations and that the hippocampus plays an essential role in adding new memories to the spatial schema. Here we examined the nature of hippocampal contributions to schema updating by monitoring firing patterns of multiple CA1 neurons as rats learned new goal locations in an environment in which there already were multiple goals. Before new learning, many neurons that fired on arrival at one goal location also fired at other goals, whereas ensemble activity patterns also distinguished different goal events, thus constituting a neural representation that linked distinct goals within a spatial schema. During new learning, some neurons began to fire as animals approached the new goals. These were primarily the same neurons that fired at original goals, the activity patterns at new goals were similar to those associated with the original goals, and new learning also produced changes in the preexisting goal-related firing patterns. After learning, activity patterns associated with the new and original goals gradually diverged, such that initial generalization was followed by a prolonged period in which new memories became distinguished within the ensemble representation. These findings support the view that consolidation involves assimilation of new memories into preexisting neural networks that accommodate relationships among new and existing memories.

  2. Effects of dorsal hippocampal damage on conditioning and conditioned-response timing: A pooled analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Shu K E; Jennings, Dómhnall J; Bonardi, Charlotte

    2015-04-01

    Behavioral findings suggest that the dorsal hippocampus (DHPC) plays a role in timing of appetitive conditioned responding. The present article explored the relationship between the extent of DHPC damage and timing ability, in a pooled analysis of three published studies from our laboratory. Initial analyses of variance confirmed our previous reports that DHPC damage reduced peak time (a measure of timing accuracy). However, the spread (a measure of timing precision) was unchanged, such that the coefficient of variation (spread/peak time) was significantly larger in DHPC-lesioned animals. This implies that, in addition to the well-established effect of DHPC lesions on timing accuracy, DHPC damage produced a deficit in precision of timing. To complement this analysis, different generalized linear mixed-effects models (GLMMs) were performed on the combined dataset, to examine which combinations of the different behavioral measures of timing were the best predictors of the degree of hippocampal damage. The results from the GLMM analysis suggested that the greater the DHPC damage, the greater the absolute difference between the observed peak time and reinforced duration. Nevertheless, this systematic relationship between damage and performance was not specific to the temporal domain: paradoxically the greater the damage the greater the magnitude of peak responding. We discuss these lesion effects in terms of scalar timing theory.

  3. Oxygen/glucose deprivation induces a reduction in synaptic AMPA receptors on hippocampal CA3 neurons mediated by mGluR1 and adenosine A3 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Siobhan H; Jaafari, Nadia; Cimarosti, Helena; Hanley, Jonathan G; Henley, Jeremy M; Mellor, Jack R

    2011-08-17

    Hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons are highly sensitive to ischemic damage, whereas neighboring CA3 pyramidal neurons are less susceptible. It is proposed that switching of AMPA receptor (AMPAR) subunits on CA1 neurons during an in vitro model of ischemia, oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD), leads to an enhanced permeability of AMPARs to Ca(2+), resulting in delayed cell death. However, it is unclear whether the same mechanisms exist in CA3 neurons and whether this underlies the differential sensitivity to ischemia. Here, we investigated the consequences of OGD for AMPAR function in CA3 neurons using electrophysiological recordings in rat hippocampal slices. Following a 15 min OGD protocol, a substantial depression of AMPAR-mediated synaptic transmission was observed at CA3 associational/commissural and mossy fiber synapses but not CA1 Schaffer collateral synapses. The depression of synaptic transmission following OGD was prevented by metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1) or A(3) receptor antagonists, indicating a role for both glutamate and adenosine release. Inhibition of PLC, PKC, or chelation of intracellular Ca(2+) also prevented the depression of synaptic transmission. Inclusion of peptides to interrupt the interaction between GluA2 and PICK1 or dynamin and amphiphysin prevented the depression of transmission, suggesting a dynamin and PICK1-dependent internalization of AMPARs after OGD. We also show that a reduction in surface and total AMPAR protein levels after OGD was prevented by mGluR1 or A(3) receptor antagonists, indicating that AMPARs are degraded following internalization. Thus, we describe a novel mechanism for the removal of AMPARs in CA3 pyramidal neurons following OGD that has the potential to reduce excitotoxicity and promote neuroprotection.

  4. Oxygen/glucose Deprivation Induces a Reduction in Synaptic AMPA Receptors on Hippocampal CA3 Neurons Mediated by mGluR1 and A3 Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Siobhan H.; Jaafari, Nadia; Cimarosti, Helena; Hanley, Jonathan G.; Henley, Jeremy M.; Mellor, Jack R.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons are highly sensitive to ischemic damage, whereas neighbouring CA3 pyramidal neurons are less susceptible. It is proposed that switching of AMPA receptor (AMPAR) subunits on CA1 neurons during an in vitro model of ischemia, oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD), leads to an enhanced permeability of AMPARs to Ca2+ resulting in delayed cell death. However, it is unclear if the same mechanisms exist in CA3 neurons and whether this underlies the differential sensitivity to ischemia. Here, we investigated the consequences of OGD for AMPAR function in CA3 neurons using electrophysiological recordings in rat hippocampal slices. Following a 15 minute OGD protocol a substantial depression of AMPAR-mediated synaptic transmission was observed at CA3 associational/commissural and mossy fiber synapses but not CA1 Schaffer collateral synapses. The depression of synaptic transmission following OGD was prevented by mGluR1 or A3 receptor antagonists, indicating a role for both glutamate and adenosine release. Inhibition of PLC, PKC or chelation of intracellular Ca2+ also prevented the depression of synaptic transmission. Inclusion of peptides to interrupt the interaction between GluA2 and PICK1 or dynamin and amphiphysin prevented the depression of transmission, suggesting a dynamin and PICK1-dependent internalisation of AMPARs after OGD. We also show a reduction in surface and total AMPAR protein levels after OGD was prevented by mGluR1 or A3 receptor antagonists indicating that AMPARs are degraded following internalisation. Thus, we describe a novel mechanism for the removal of AMPARs in CA3 pyramidal neurons following OGD that has the potential to reduce excitotoxicity and promote neuroprotection. PMID:21849555

  5. Visualizing Metal Content and Intracellular Distribution in Primary Hippocampal Neurons with Synchrotron X-Ray Fluorescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A Colvin

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence suggests that metal dyshomeostasis plays an important role in human neurodegenerative diseases. Although distinctive metal distributions are described for mature hippocampus and cortex, much less is known about metal levels and intracellular distribution in individual hippocampal neuronal somata. To solve this problem, we conducted quantitative metal analyses utilizing synchrotron radiation X-Ray fluorescence on frozen hydrated primary cultured neurons derived from rat embryonic cortex (CTX and two regions of the hippocampus: dentate gyrus (DG and CA1. Comparing average metal contents showed that the most abundant metals were calcium, iron, and zinc, whereas metals such as copper and manganese were less than 10% of zinc. Average metal contents were generally similar when compared across neurons cultured from CTX, DG, and CA1, except for manganese that was larger in CA1. However, each metal showed a characteristic spatial distribution in individual neuronal somata. Zinc was uniformly distributed throughout the cytosol, with no evidence for the existence of previously identified zinc-enriched organelles, zincosomes. Calcium showed a peri-nuclear distribution consistent with accumulation in endoplasmic reticulum and/or mitochondria. Iron showed 2-3 distinct highly concentrated puncta only in peri-nuclear locations. Notwithstanding the small sample size, these analyses demonstrate that primary cultured neurons show characteristic metal signatures. The iron puncta probably represent iron-accumulating organelles, siderosomes. Thus, the metal distributions observed in mature brain structures are likely the result of both intrinsic neuronal factors that control cellular metal content and extrinsic factors related to the synaptic organization, function, and contacts formed and maintained in each region.

  6. Visualizing Metal Content and Intracellular Distribution in Primary Hippocampal Neurons with Synchrotron X-Ray Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that metal dyshomeostasis plays an important role in human neurodegenerative diseases. Although distinctive metal distributions are described for mature hippocampus and cortex, much less is known about metal levels and intracellular distribution in individual hippocampal neuronal somata. To solve this problem, we conducted quantitative metal analyses utilizing synchrotron radiation X-Ray fluorescence on frozen hydrated primary cultured neurons derived from rat embryonic cortex (CTX) and two regions of the hippocampus: dentate gyrus (DG) and CA1. Comparing average metal contents showed that the most abundant metals were calcium, iron, and zinc, whereas metals such as copper and manganese were less than 10% of zinc. Average metal contents were generally similar when compared across neurons cultured from CTX, DG, and CA1, except for manganese that was larger in CA1. However, each metal showed a characteristic spatial distribution in individual neuronal somata. Zinc was uniformly distributed throughout the cytosol, with no evidence for the existence of previously identified zinc-enriched organelles, zincosomes. Calcium showed a peri-nuclear distribution consistent with accumulation in endoplasmic reticulum and/or mitochondria. Iron showed 2–3 distinct highly concentrated puncta only in peri-nuclear locations. Notwithstanding the small sample size, these analyses demonstrate that primary cultured neurons show characteristic metal signatures. The iron puncta probably represent iron-accumulating organelles, siderosomes. Thus, the metal distributions observed in mature brain structures are likely the result of both intrinsic neuronal factors that control cellular metal content and extrinsic factors related to the synaptic organization, function, and contacts formed and maintained in each region. PMID:27434052

  7. Cell surface area regulation in neurons in hippocampal slice cultures is resistant to oxygen-glucose deprivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalya Shulyakova

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Natalya Shulyakova1,2, Jamie Fong2, Diana Diec2, Adrian Nahirny1,2, Linda R Mills1,21Department of Physiology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada, M5T 2S8; 2Toronto Western Hospital Research Institute, University Health Network, 11-430, 399 Bathurst St, Toronto, ON, Canada, M5T 2S8Background: Neurons swell in response to a variety of insults. The capacity to recover, ie, to shrink, is critical for neuronal function and survival. Studies on dissociated neurons have shown that during swelling and shrinking, neurons reorganize their plasma membrane; as neurons swell, in response to hypo-osmotic media, the bilayer area increases. Upon restoration of normo-osmotic media, neurons shrink, forming transient invaginations of the plasma membrane known as vacuole-like dilations (VLDs, to accommodate the decrease in the bilayer.Methods: Here we used confocal microscopy to monitor neuronal swelling and shrinking in the three-dimensional (3D environment of post-natal rat hippocampal slice cultures. To label neurons, we used biolistic transfection, to introduce enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP targeted to the cytoplasm; and a membrane targeted GFP (lckGFP, targeted to the plasma membrane.Results: Neurons in slice cultures swelled and shrank in response to hypo-osmotic to normo-osmotic media changes. Oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD caused sustained neuronal swelling; after reperfusion, some neurons recovered but in others, VLD recovery was stalled. OGD did not impair neuronal capacity to recover from a subsequent osmotic challenge.Conclusion: These results suggest cell surface area regulation (SAR is an intrinsic property of neurons, and that neuronal capacity for SAR may play an important role in the brain’s response to ischemic insults.Keywords: neurons, swelling, ischemia, cell surface area, hippocampal slice culture

  8. The F-BAR Protein Rapostlin Regulates Dendritic Spine Formation in Hippocampal Neurons*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakita, Yohei; Kakimoto, Tetsuhiro; Katoh, Hironori; Negishi, Manabu

    2011-01-01

    Pombe Cdc15 homology proteins, characterized by Fer/CIP4 homology Bin-Amphiphysin-Rvs/extended Fer/CIP4 homology (F-BAR/EFC) domains with membrane invaginating property, play critical roles in a variety of membrane reorganization processes. Among them, Rapostlin/formin-binding protein 17 (FBP17) has attracted increasing attention as a critical coordinator of endocytosis. Here we found that Rapostlin was expressed in the developing rat brain, including the hippocampus, in late developmental stages when accelerated dendritic spine formation and maturation occur. In primary cultured rat hippocampal neurons, knockdown of Rapostlin by shRNA or overexpression of Rapostlin-QQ, an F-BAR domain mutant of Rapostlin that has no ability to induce membrane invagination, led to a significant decrease in spine density. Expression of shRNA-resistant wild-type Rapostlin effectively restored spine density in Rapostlin knockdown neurons, whereas expression of Rapostlin deletion mutants lacking the protein kinase C-related kinase homology region 1 (HR1) or Src homology 3 (SH3) domain did not. In addition, knockdown of Rapostlin or overexpression of Rapostlin-QQ reduced the uptake of transferrin in hippocampal neurons. Knockdown of Rnd2, which binds to the HR1 domain of Rapostlin, also reduced spine density and the transferrin uptake. These results suggest that Rapostlin and Rnd2 cooperatively regulate spine density. Indeed, Rnd2 enhanced the Rapostlin-induced tubular membrane invagination. We conclude that the F-BAR protein Rapostlin, whose activity is regulated by Rnd2, plays a key role in spine formation through the regulation of membrane dynamics. PMID:21768103

  9. Mechanisms underlying activation of the slow AHP in rat hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Pedro A; Marrion, Neil V

    2007-05-30

    The firing of a train of action potentials in hippocampal pyramidal neurons is terminated by an afterhyperpolarization (AHP) that displays two main components; the medium AHP (I(mAHP)), lasting a few hundred milliseconds and the slow AHP (I(sAHP)), that has a duration of several seconds. It is unclear how much of I(mAHP) is dependent on the entry of calcium ions (Ca(2+)), whereas it is accepted that I(sAHP) is caused by activation of Ca(2+)-activated potassium channels. There has been controversy regarding the subcellular localization and mechanism of activation of these channels. Whole-cell recordings from CA1 neurons in the hippocampal slice preparation showed that inhibition of L-type, but not N-, P/Q-, T- and R-type Ca(2+) channels, reduced both I(mAHP) and I(sAHP). Inhibition of both AHP components by L-type Ca(2+) channel antagonists was not complete, with I(sAHP) being significantly more sensitive than I(mAHP). Somatic extracellular ionophoresis of BAPTA during I(sAHP) caused a transient inhibition, but had no effect on I(mAHP). Cell-attached patch recordings from the soma of CA1 neurons within a slice displayed channels that produced an ensemble waveform reminiscent of I(sAHP) when the patch was subjected to a train of action potential waveforms. The channels were Ca(2+)-activated, exhibited a limiting slope conductance of 19 pS and were not observed in dendritic membrane patches. These data demonstrate that the I(sAHP) is somatic in origin and arises from continued Ca(2+) entry through functionally co-localized L-type channels.

  10. Parvalbumin-immunoreactive neurons in the hippocampal formation of Alzheimer's diseased brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, D R; Mufson, E J

    1997-10-01

    The number and topographic distribution of immunocytochemically stained parvalbumin interneurons was determined in the hippocampal formation of control and Alzheimer's diseased brain. In control hippocampus, parvalbumin interneurons were aspiny and pleomorphic, with extensive dendritic arbors. In dentate gyrus, parvalbumin cells, as well as a dense plexus of fibers and puncta, were associated with the granule cell layer. A few cells also occupied the molecular layer. In strata oriens and pyramidale of CA1-CA3 subfields, parvalbumin neurons gave rise to dendrites that extended into adjacent strata. Densely stained puncta and beaded fibers occupied stratum pyramidale, with less dense staining in adjacent strata oriens and radiatum. Virtually no parvalbumin profiles were observed in stratum lacunosum-moleculare or the alveus. Numerous polymorphic parvalbumin neurons and a dense plexus of fibers and puncta characterized the deep layer of the subiculum and the lamina principalis externa of the presubiculum. In Alzheimer's diseased hippocampus, there was an approximate 60% decrease in the number of parvalbumin interneurons in the dentate gyrus/CA4 subfield (Pparvalbumin neurons did not statistically decline in subfields CA3, subiculum or presubiculum in Alzheimer's diseased brains relative to controls. Concurrent staining with Thioflavin-S histochemistry did not reveal degenerative changes within parvalbumin-stained profiles. These findings reveal that parvalbumin interneurons within specific hippocampal subfields are selectively vulnerable in Alzheimer's disease. This vulnerability may be related to their differential connectivity, e.g., those regions connectionally related to the cerebral cortex (dentate gyrus and CA1) are more vulnerable than those regions connectionally related to subcortical loci (subiculum and presubiculum).

  11. The new iminothiadiazole derivative VP1.14 ameliorates hippocampal damage after an excitotoxic injury

    OpenAIRE

    Susín, Cristina; Morales-García, José A.; Aguilar Morante, Diana; Palomo Ruiz, Valle; Sanz-SanCristóbal, Marina; Alonso-Gil, Sandra; Gil, Carmen; Santos, Ángel; Martínez, Ana; Pérez Castillo, Ana

    2012-01-01

    Increased levels of glutamate causing excitotoxic damage accompany many neurological disorders. A well-characterized model of excitotoxic damage involves administration of kainic acid (KA), which causes limbic seizure activity and subsequent neuronal death, particularly in the CA1 and CA3 areas of the hippocampus. Inhibition of the enzyme glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) and cAMP levels might play an important role in neuroprotection. As intracellular cAMP levels depend, in part, on the act...

  12. The aspirin metabolite salicylate enhances neuronal excitation in rat hippocampal CA1 area through reducing GABAergic inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Neng; Zhang, Min; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Chen, Lin; Sun, Guang-Chun; Xu, Tian-Le

    2008-02-01

    Salicylate is the major metabolite and active component of aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid), which is widely used in clinical medicine for treating inflammation, pain syndromes and cardiovascular disorders. The well-known mechanism underlying salicylate's action mainly involves the inhibition of cyclooxygenase and subsequent decrease in prostaglandin production. Recent evidence suggests that salicylate also affects neuronal function through interaction with specific membrane channels/receptors. However, the effect of salicylate on synaptic and neural network function remains largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the effect of sodium salicylate on the synaptic transmission and neuronal excitation in the hippocampal CA1 area of rats, a key structure for many complex brain functions. With electrophysiological recordings in hippocampal slices, we found that sodium salicylate significantly enhanced neuronal excitation through reducing inhibitory GABAergic transmission without affecting the basal excitatory synaptic transmission. Salicylate significantly inhibited the amplitudes of both evoked and miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents, and directly reduced gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A)) receptor-mediated responses in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. Together, our results suggest that the widely used aspirin might impair hippocampal synaptic and neural network functions through its actions on GABAergic neurotransmission. Given the capability of aspirin to penetrate the blood-brain barrier, the present data imply that aspirin intake may cause network hyperactivity and be potentially harmful in susceptible subpopulations.

  13. Dendritic morphology of hippocampal and amygdalar neurons in adolescent mice is resilient to genetic differences in stress reactivity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pillai, A.G.; de Jong, D.; Kanatsou, S.; Krugers, H.; Knapman, A.; Heinzmann, J.-M.; Holsboer, F.; Landgraf, R.; Joëls, M.; Touma, C.

    2012-01-01

    Many studies have shown that chronic stress or corticosterone over-exposure in rodents leads to extensive dendritic remodeling, particularly of principal neurons in the CA3 hippocampal area and the basolateral amygdala. We here investigated to what extent genetic predisposition of mice to high

  14. The effect of basic fibroblast growth factor on glutamate-injured neuroarchitecture and arachidonic acid release in adult hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himmelseher, S; Pfenninger, E; Georgieff, M

    1996-01-22

    During development in culture, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) protected immature primary hippocampal neurons against glutamate-induced neurotoxicity. We investigated the effects of bFGF on mature, differentiated rat hippocampal neurons cultured for 10-12 days after an 8-min exposure to 500 microM glutamate. Seven days post-injury, hippocampal cells demonstrated severe reductions in cellular viability and axonal and dendritic outgrowth, which were accompanied by a marked increase in [3H]arachidonic acid (ARA) release from prelabelled neurons. bFGF applied post-injury attenuated cell death and cytoarchitectural destruction at all concentrations used (500 pg/ml, 1, 10, 20 ng/ml). However, neurite elongation and branching processes were only significantly protected by 10 ng/ml bFGF. [3H]ARA release decreased in a dose-related fashion within a concentration range of 1-10 ng/ml bFGF. 20 ng/ml bFGF was not superior to 10 ng/ml bFGF. Therefore, bFGF's neurotropic actions appear to be concentration-dependent. Our data suggest that bFGF applied post-injury may have a neuroprotective potential for mature, differentiated, completely polarized hippocampal neurons.

  15. Timing of light pulses and photoperiod on the diurnal rhythm of hippocampal neuronal morphology of Siberian hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeno, T; Weil, Z M; Nelson, R J

    2014-06-13

    Rapid remodeling of neurons provides the brain with flexibility to adjust to environmental fluctuations. In Siberian hamsters, hippocampal dendritic morphology fluctuates across the day. To reveal the regulatory mechanism of diurnal remodeling of hippocampal neurons, we investigated the effects of light signals applied under different photoperiodic conditions on dendritic morphology. A 4-h dark pulse during the morning of long days (LD) increased basilar dendritic length, as well as complexity of basilar dendrites of neurons in the CA1. A light pulse during the late night in short days (SD) reduced basilar dendrite branching and increased primary apical dendrites of CA1 neurons. Spine density of dentate gyrus (DG) dendrites was increased by a dark pulse in LD and spine density of CA1 basilar dendrites was decreased by a light pulse in SD. These results indicate that light signals induce rapid remodeling of dendritic morphology in a hippocampal subregion-specific manner. A light pulse in SD decreased hippocampal expression of fetal liver kinase 1 (Flk1), a receptor for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), raising the possibility that VEGF-FLK1 signaling might be involved in the rapid decrease of branching or spine density of CA1 basilar dendrites by light. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The transcriptional repressor Zbtb20 is essential for specification of hippocampal projection neurons and territory in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenthal, Eva Helga

    for specification of both hippocampal pyramidal neurons and territory in a mouse knockout model. Homozygous Zbtb20-/- mice are viable at birth, but display dwarfism and die during the first month of postnatal life. Characterization of the Zbtb20-/- brain phenotype reveals a small vestigial hippocampus...

  17. ERK1/2 Activation Is Necessary for BDNF to Increase Dendritic Spine Density in Hippocampal CA1 Pyramidal Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Mariana; Medina, Jorge H.; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas

    2004-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a potent modulator of synaptic transmission and plasticity in the CNS, acting both pre- and postsynaptically. We demonstrated recently that BDNF/TrkB signaling increases dendritic spine density in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. Here, we tested whether activation of the prominent ERK (MAPK) signaling…

  18. beta-estradiol influences differentiation of hippocampal neurons in vitro through an estrogen receptor-mediated process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audesirk, T; Cabell, L; Kern, M; Audesirk, G

    2003-01-01

    We utilized morphometric analysis of 3 day cultures of hippocampal neurons to determine the effects of both estradiol and the synthetic estrogen receptor modulator raloxifene on several parameters of neuronal growth and differentiation. These measurements included survival, neurite production, dendrite number, and axon and dendrite length and branching. 17 beta-Estradiol (10 nM) selectively stimulated dendrite branching; this effect was neither mimicked by alpha-estradiol, nor blocked by the estrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182780. The selective estrogen receptor modulator raloxifene (100 nM) neither mimicked nor reversed the effects of estradiol on dendritic branching. Western immunoblotting for the alpha and beta subtypes of estrogen receptor revealed the presence of alpha, but not beta, estrogen receptors in our hippocampal cultures. There is growing recognition of the effects of 17 beta-estradiol on neuronal development and physiology, with implications for brain sexual dimorphism, plasticity, cognition, and the maintenance of cognitive function during aging. The role of estradiol in hippocampal neuronal differentiation and function has particular implications for learning and memory. These data support the hypothesis that 17 beta-estradiol is acting via alpha estrogen receptors in influencing hippocampal development in vitro. Raloxifene, prescribed to combat osteoporosis in post-menopausal women, is a selective estrogen receptor modulator with tissue-specific agonist/antagonist properties. Because raloxifene had no effect on dendritic branching, we hypothesize that it does not interact with the alpha estrogen receptor in this experimental paradigm.

  19. Somatodendritic and excitatory postsynaptic distribution of neuron-type dystrophin isoform, Dp40, in hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Takahiro; Itoh, Kyoko; Yaoi, Takeshi; Fushiki, Shinji

    2014-09-12

    The Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene produces multiple dystrophin (Dp) products due to the presence of several promoters. We previously reported the existence of a novel short isoform of Dp, Dp40, in adult mouse brain. However, the exact biochemical expression profile and cytological distribution of the Dp40 protein remain unknown. In this study, we generated a polyclonal antibody against the NH2-terminal region of the Dp40 and identified the expression profile of Dp40 in the mouse brain. Through an analysis using embryonic and postnatal mouse cerebrums, we found that Dp40 emerged from the early neonatal stages until adulthood, whereas Dp71, an another Dp short isoform, was highly detected in both prenatal and postnatal cerebrums. Intriguingly, relative expressions of Dp40 and Dp71 were prominent in cultured dissociated neurons and non-neuronal cells derived from mouse hippocampus, respectively. Furthermore, the immunocytological distribution of Dp40 was analyzed in dissociated cultured neurons, revealing that Dp40 is detected in the soma and its dendrites, but not in the axon. It is worthy to note that Dp40 is localized along the subplasmalemmal region of the dendritic shafts, as well as at excitatory postsynaptic sites. Thus, Dp40 was identified as a neuron-type Dp possibly involving dendritic and synaptic functions.

  20. Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone (CRH)-Containing Neurons in the Immature Rat Hippocampal Formation: Light and Electron Microscopic Features and Colocalization With Glutamate Decarboxylase and Parvalbumin

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Xiao-Xin; Toth, Zsolt; Schultz, Linda; Ribak, Charles E; Tallie Z. Baram

    1998-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) excites hippocampal neurons and induces death of selected CA3 pyramidal cells in immature rats. These actions of CRH require activation of specific receptors that are abundant in CA3 during early postnatal development. Given the dramatic effects of CRH on hippocampal neurons and the absence of CRH-containing afferents to this region, we hypothesized that a significant population of CRHergic neurons exists in developing rat hippocampus. This study defined ...

  1. Somatodendritic and excitatory postsynaptic distribution of neuron-type dystrophin isoform, Dp40, in hippocampal neurons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimoto, Takahiro; Itoh, Kyoko, E-mail: kxi14@koto.kpu-m.ac.jp; Yaoi, Takeshi; Fushiki, Shinji

    2014-09-12

    Highlights: • Identification of dystrophin (Dp) shortest isoform, Dp40, is a neuron-type Dp. • Dp40 expression is temporally and differentially regulated in comparison to Dp71. • Somatodendritic and nuclear localization of Dp40. • Dp40 is localized to excitatory postsynapses. • Dp40 might play roles in dendritic and synaptic functions. - Abstract: The Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene produces multiple dystrophin (Dp) products due to the presence of several promoters. We previously reported the existence of a novel short isoform of Dp, Dp40, in adult mouse brain. However, the exact biochemical expression profile and cytological distribution of the Dp40 protein remain unknown. In this study, we generated a polyclonal antibody against the NH{sub 2}-terminal region of the Dp40 and identified the expression profile of Dp40 in the mouse brain. Through an analysis using embryonic and postnatal mouse cerebrums, we found that Dp40 emerged from the early neonatal stages until adulthood, whereas Dp71, an another Dp short isoform, was highly detected in both prenatal and postnatal cerebrums. Intriguingly, relative expressions of Dp40 and Dp71 were prominent in cultured dissociated neurons and non-neuronal cells derived from mouse hippocampus, respectively. Furthermore, the immunocytological distribution of Dp40 was analyzed in dissociated cultured neurons, revealing that Dp40 is detected in the soma and its dendrites, but not in the axon. It is worthy to note that Dp40 is localized along the subplasmalemmal region of the dendritic shafts, as well as at excitatory postsynaptic sites. Thus, Dp40 was identified as a neuron-type Dp possibly involving dendritic and synaptic functions.

  2. N-乙酰半胱氨酸对甲基乙二醛诱导的大鼠海马神经元毒性损伤的保护作用%Effects of N-acetylcysteine upon methylglyoxal-induced damage in hippocampal neuronal cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周红; 郑秀琴; 张志珺; 滕皋军

    2009-01-01

    Objective To explore the effects of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) upon the methylglyoxal (MG)-induced injury of hippocampal neuronal cells.Methods Primary cultures of 1-day-old SD rat hippocampal neuron were exposed to MG and/or NAC for 24 h respectively.Apoptosis was quantified by flow cytometer using annexin V-FITC and propidium iodide (PI) staining.The level of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) was measured by an oxidant-sensitive dye 2,7-dichorofluoresin diacetate (DCFH).The protein and mRNA levels of BDNF and TrkB were assayed with Western blot and real-time reversetranscription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) respectively.Results After a 24 h cell incubation with 100 μmol/L MG,the ratio of apoptotic cells in MG group (8.80±0.31)% significantly increased versus the control group (1.60±0.15)% and MG + NAC group (4.83±0.31)% respectively.The level of intracellular oxidation of MG group (10 229±946) also significantly increased versus the NAC group (2118±320),control group (4265±82),MG + NAC group (3886±415) and pretreated NAC + MG group (2997±606).MG increased the cellular levels of BDNF but decreased the TrkB mRNA and protein expression significantly.However,NAC significantly decreased the BDNF and increased the TrkB mRNA and protein expression in rat hippocampal neuron after MG induction.All these differences were considered statistically significant.Conclusion MG-induced neurotoxicity in hippocampal neurons is mediated by oxidative stress and it can impair the BDNF/TrkB signal pathway.Antioxidant NAC has protective effect upon MG-induced neurotoxicity through its antiapoptotic action and its antioxidant effect on ROS level.And it works partly by activating the BDNF/TrkB signal pathway.%目的 探讨N-乙酰半胱氨酸(NAC)对甲基乙二醛(MG)诱导的海马神经元损伤的保护作用及可能机制.方法 取新生24 h SD大鼠的海马神经元原代培养至第7天,予MG和(或)NAC干预24 h,异硫氰酸荧光

  3. Effect of etomidate on voltage-dependent potassium currents in rat isolated hippocampal pyramidal neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAN Hong-yu; SUN Li-na; WANG Xiao-liang; YE Tie-hu

    2010-01-01

    Background Previous studies demonstrated general anesthetics affect potassium ion channels, which may be one of the mechanisms of general anesthesia. Because the effect of etomidate on potassium channels in rat hippocampus which is involved in memory function has not been studied, we investigated the effects of etomidate on both delayed rectifier potassium current (I_((K(DR))) and transient outward potassium current (I_((K(A))) in acutely dissociated rat hippocampal pyramidal neurons.Methods Single rat hippocampal pyramidal neurons from male Wistar rats of 7-10 days were acutely dissociated by enzymatic digestion and mechanical dispersion according to the methods of Kay and Wong with slight modification. Voltage-clamp recordings were performed in the whole-cell patch clamp configuration. Currents were recorded with a List EPC-10 amplifier and data were stored in a computer using Pulse 8.5. Student's paired two-tail t test was used for data analysis. Results At the concentration of 100 μmol/L, etomidate significantly inhibited I_(K(DR)) by 49.2% at +40 mV when depolarized from -110 mV (P 0.05). The IC_(50) value of etomidate for blocking I_(K(DR)) was calculated as 5.4 μmol/L, with a Hill slope of 2.45. At the presence of 10 μmol/L etomidate, the V_(1/2) of activation curve was shifted from (17.3±1.5) mV to (10.7±9.9) mV (n=8, P <0.05), the V_(1/2) of inactivation curve was shifted from (-18.3±2.2) mV to (-45.3±9.4) mV (n=8, P <0.05). Etomidate 10 μmol/L shifted both the activation curve and inactivation curve of I_(K(DR)) to negative potential, but mainly affected the inactivation kinetics.Conclusions Etomidate potently inhibited I_(K(DR)) but not I_(K(A)) in rat hippocampal pyramidal neurons. I_(K(DR)) was inhibited by etomidate in a concentration-dependent manner, while I_(K(A)) remained unaffected.

  4. Motherhood and the hormones of pregnancy modify concentrations of hippocampal neuronal dendritic spines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsley, Craig H; Trainer, Regina; Stafisso-Sandoz, Graciela; Quadros, Princy; Marcus, Lori Keyser; Hearon, Christa; Meyer, Elizabeth Ann Amory; Hester, Naomi; Morgan, Melissa; Kozub, Frederick J; Lambert, Kelly G

    2006-02-01

    Short-term fluctuations in steroid hormones such as estradiol (E2) and progesterone (P) can affect the concentration of hippocampal dendritic spines in adult, cycling nulliparous female rats. Pregnancy is characterized by a significantly longer duration of substantially elevated E2 and P compared to the estrous cycle. Thus, even greater changes than those reported during estrus may be evident. In two experiments, we examined the extent to which reproductive and hormonal state altered the concentration of apical neuronal dendritic spines of the CA1 region of the hippocampus in the following age-matched groups (N's = 7-10/group) of rats: in Exp. 1., CA1 dendritic spine density was examined in nulliparous diestrus (DES), proestrus (PRO), and estrus (ES) females, and late-pregnant (LP) (day 21) and lactating (day 5-6; LACT) females. In Exp. 2, the effects on spine density of a regimen mimicking pregnancy (and that stimulates maternal behavior) were examined, using ovariectomized, no hormone-exposed (OVX-minus) vs. sequential P&E(2)-treated (OVX + P&E2) groups. For both experiments, brains were removed, Golgi-Cox-stained and the most lateral tertiary branches of the apical dendrite of completely-stained hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons were traced with oil-immersion at x 1600 and dendritic spine density (# spines/10 micro dendritic segment) recorded. In Exp. 1, spine density was increased in LP and LACT females (which were not different) compared to the other virgin groups, including PRO females, who had more spines than DES and ES. In Exp. 2, OVX + P&E2 displayed significantly more dendritic spines per 10 micro than OVX-minus females (and had numbers that were similar to those of LP and LACT from Exp. 1). Pregnancy and its attendant hormonal fluctuations, therefore, may alter hippocampal neurons that regulate some non-pup-directed components of maternal behavior (e.g., nest building) or behaviors that support maternal behavior (e.g., foraging, associative memory).

  5. Glial and neuronal damage markers in patients with anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, Stefan; Burghardt, Roland; Weiss, Deike; Salbach-Andrae, Harriet; Craciun, Eugenia Maria; Goldhahn, Klaus; Klapp, Burghard F; Lehmkuhl, Ulrike

    2008-06-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) commonly arises during adolescence leading to interruptions of somatic and psychological development as well as to atrophic brain changes. It remains unclear whether these brain changes are related to the loss of neurons, glia, neuropil or merely due to fluid shifts. We determined leptin levels and two brain-derived damage markers: glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and neuron-specific enolase (NSE) of 43 acute AN patients and 50 healthy control woman (HCW). Peripheral GFAP and NSE concentrations of AN patients were not elevated and not different from HCW. Subjects with particularly low leptin concentration, indicating severe malnutrition, did not show abnormal values either. During weight recovery the marker proteins remained unchanged. Our preliminary results are in line with neuroimaging studies supporting the reversibility of brain changes in AN and do not substantiate hypotheses relying on the extensive damage of brain cells as an explanation for cerebral atrophy in AN.

  6. Multiple target of hAmylin on rat primary hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nan; Yang, Shengchang; Wang, Chang; Zhang, Jianghua; Huo, Lifang; Cheng, Yiru; Wang, Chuan; Jia, Zhanfeng; Ren, Leiming; Kang, Lin; Zhang, Wei

    2017-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and type II diabetes mellitus (DM2) are the most common aging-related diseases and are characterized by β-amyloid and amylin accumulation, respectively. Multiple studies have indicated a strong correlation between these two diseases. Amylin oligomerization in the brain appears to be a novel risk factor for developing AD. Although amylin aggregation has been demonstrated to induce cytotoxicity in neurons through altering Ca(2+) homeostasis, the underlying mechanisms have not been fully explored. In this study, we investigated the effects of amylin on rat hippocampal neurons using calcium imaging and whole-cell patch clamp recordings. We demonstrated that the amylin receptor antagonist AC187 abolished the Ca(2+) response induced by low concentrations of human amylin (hAmylin). However, the Ca(2+) response induced by higher concentrations of hAmylin was independent of the amylin receptor. This effect was dependent on extracellular Ca(2+). Additionally, blockade of L-type Ca(2+) channels partially reduced hAmylin-induced Ca(2+) response. In whole-cell recordings, hAmylin depolarized the membrane potential. Moreover, application of the transient receptor potential (TRP) channel antagonist ruthenium red (RR) attenuated the hAmylin-induced increase in Ca(2+). Single-cell RT-PCR demonstrated that transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) mRNA was expressed in most of the hAmylin-responsive neurons. In addition, selective knockdown of TRPV4 channels inhibited the hAmylin-evoked Ca(2+) response. These results indicated that different concentrations of hAmylin act through different pathways. The amylin receptor mediates the excitatory effects of low concentrations of hAmylin. In contrast, for high concentrations of hAmylin, hAmylin aggregates precipitated on the neuronal membrane, activated TRPV4 channels and subsequently triggered membrane voltage-gated calcium channel opening followed by membrane depolarization. Therefore, our data suggest

  7. Tetramethylpyrazine suppresses transient oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced connexin32 expression and cell apoptosis via the ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK pathway in cultured hippocampal neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu Gong

    Full Text Available Tetramethylpyrazine (TMP has been widely used in China as a drug for the treatment of various diseases. Recent studies have suggested that TMP has a protective effect on ischemic neuronal damage. However, the exact mechanism is still unclear. This study aims to investigate the mechanism of TMP mediated ischemic hippocampal neurons injury induced by oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD. The effect of TMP on hippocampal neurons viability was detected by MTT assay, LDH release assay and apoptosis rate was measured by flow cytometry. TMP significantly suppressed neuron apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner. TMP could significantly reduce the elevated levels of connexin32 (Cx32 induced by OGD. Knockdown of Cx32 by siRNA attenuated OGD injury. Moreover, our study showed that viability was increased in siRNA-Cx32-treated-neurons, and neuron apoptosis was suppressed by activating Bcl-2 expression and inhibiting Bax expression. Over expression of Cx32 could decrease neurons viability and increase LDH release. Furthermore, OGD increased phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and p38, whose inhibitors relieved the neuron injury and Cx32 up-regulation. Taken together, TMP can reverse the OGD-induced Cx32 expression and cell apoptosis via the ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK pathways.

  8. The effects of triethyl lead on the development of hippocampal neurons in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audesirk, T; Shugarts, D; Cabell-Kluch, L; Wardle, K

    1995-02-01

    Triethyl lead is the major metabolite of tetraethyl lead, which is used in industrial processes and as an antiknock additive to gasoline. We tested the hypothesis that low levels of triethyl lead (0.1 nmol/L to 5 mumol/L) interfere with the normal development of cultured E18 rat hippocampal neurons, possibly through increases in intracellular free calcium ion concentration, [Ca2+]in. The study assessed survival and differentiation using morphometric analysis of individual neurons. We also looked at short-term (up to 3.75-h) changes in intracellular calcium using the calcium-sensitive dye fura-2. Survival of neurons was significantly reduced at 5 mumol/L, and overall production of neurites was reduced at > or = 2 mumol/L. The length of axons and the number of axons and dendrites were reduced at > or = 1 mumol/L. Neurite branching was inhibited at 10 nmol/L for dendrites and 100 nmol/L for axons. Increases in intracellular calcium were observed during a 3.75-h exposure of newly plated neurons to 5 mumol/L triethyl lead. These increases were prevented by BAPTA-AM; which clamps [Ca2+]in at about 100 nmol/L. Culturing neurons with BAPTA-AM and 5 mumol/L triethyl lead did not reverse the effects of triethyl lead, suggesting that elevation of [Ca2+]in is not responsible for decreases in survival and neurite production. Triethyl lead has been shown to disrupt cytoskeletal elements, particularly neurofilaments, at very low levels, suggesting a possible mechanism for its inhibition of neurite branching at nanomolar concentrations.

  9. Effects of lithium chloride on outward potassium currents in acutely isolated hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Chaofeng; DU Huizhi; YANG Pin

    2006-01-01

    Although lithium possesses neuroprotective functions, the molecular mechanism underlying its actions has not been fully elucidated. In the present paper, the effects of lithium chloride on voltage-dependent potassium currents in the CA1 pyramidal neurons acutely isolated from rat hippocampus were studied using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Depolarizing test pulses activated two components of outward potassium currents: a rapidly activating and inactivating component, IA and a delayed component, IK. Results showed that lithium chloride increased the amplitude of IA in a concentration-dependent manner. Half enhancement concentration (EC50) was 22.80±5.45 μmol·L-1. Lithium chloride of 25 μmol·L-1 shifted the steady-state activation curve and inactivation curve of IA to more negative potentials, but mainly affected the activation kinetics. The amplitude and the activation processes of IK were not affected by lithium chloride. The effects of lithium chloride on potassium channel appear to possess neuroprotective properties by Ca2+-lowing effects modulate neuronal excitability by activating IA in rat hippocampal neurons.

  10. Nanoparticle Targeting to Neurons in a Rat Hippocampal Slice Culture Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Walters

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We have previously shown that CdSe/ZnS core/shell luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals or QDs (quantum dots coated with PEG [poly(ethylene glycol]-appended DHLA (dihydrolipoic acid can bind AcWG(PalVKIKKP9GGH6 (Palm1 through the histidine residues. The coating on the QD provides colloidal stability and this peptide complex uniquely allows the QDs to be taken up by cultured cells and readily exit the endosome into the soma. We now show that use of a polyampholyte coating [in which the neutral PEG is replaced by the negatively heterocharged CL4 (compact ligand], results in the specific targeting of the palmitoylated peptide to neurons in mature rat hippocampal slice cultures. There was no noticeable uptake by astrocytes, oligodendrocytes or microglia (identified by immunocytochemistry, demonstrating neuronal specificity to the overall negatively charged CL4 coating. In addition, EM (electron microscopy images confirm the endosomal egress ability of the Palm1 peptide by showing a much more disperse cytosolic distribution of the CL4 QDs conjugated to Palm1 compared with CL4 QDs alone. This suggests a novel and robust way of delivering neurotherapeutics to neurons.

  11. Deoxyschisandrin modulates synchronized Ca2+ oscillations and spontaneous synaptic transmission of cultured hippocampal neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min FU; Zhao-hui SUN; Min ZONG; Xiang-ping HE; Huan-cong ZUO; Zuo-ping XIE

    2008-01-01

    Aim: Deoxyschisandrin is one of the most effective composites of Schisandra chinensis, a famous Chinese medicine widely used as an antistress, anti-aging, and neurological performance-improving herb. In this study, we examined its spe- cific mechanisms of action on cultured hippocampal neurons. Methods: Hippoc- ampal neurons, primarily cultured for 9-11 d in vitro, were used for this study. DS were dissolved in DMSO and applied to calcium imaging and whole-cell patch clamp. Results: The application of 3 mg/L DS decreased the frequency of sponta- neous and synchronous oscillations of intracellular Ca2+ to 72%±2% (mean±SEM), and the spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents to 60%±3% (mean±SEM). The inhibitory concentraton 50% (IC50) for the effect of DS on calcium oscillations was 3.8 mg/L. DS also depressed the high voltage-gated Ca2+ channel and the voltage-gated Na+ channel currents at the same time point. It had no effect, however, on voltage-gated K+ and spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents. Conclusion: DS inhibited the spontaneous and synchronous oscillations of intra- cellular Ca2+ through the depression of influx of extracellular calcium and the initiation of action potential. By repressing the spontaneous neurotransmitter release, DS modulated the neuronal network activities.

  12. Nanoparticle targeting to neurons in a rat hippocampal slice culture model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard P Kraig

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We have previously shown that CdSe/ZnS core/shell luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals or QDs (quantum dots coated with PEG [poly(ethylene glycol]-appended DHLA (dihydrolipoic acid can bind AcWG(PalVKIKKP9GGH6 (Palm1 through the histidine residues. The coating on the QD provides colloidal stability and this peptide complex uniquely allows the QDs to be taken up by cultured cells and readily exit the endosome into the soma. We now show that use of a polyampholyte coating [in which the neutral PEG is replaced by the negatively heterocharged CL4 (compact ligand], results in the specific targeting of the palmitoylated peptide to neurons in mature rat hippocampal slice cultures. There was no noticeable uptake by astrocytes, oligodendrocytes or microglia (identified by immunocytochemistry, demonstrating neuronal specificity to the overall negatively charged CL4 coating. In addition, EM (electron microscopy images confirm the endosomal egress ability of the Palm1 peptide by showing a much more disperse cytosolic distribution of the CL4 QDs conjugated to Palm1 compared with CL4 QDs alone. This suggests a novel and robust way of delivering neurotherapeutics to neurons.

  13. Ammonia inhibits long-term potentiation via neurosteroid synthesis in hippocampal pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Y; Svrakic, N; O'Dell, K; Zorumski, C F

    2013-03-13

    Neurosteroids are a class of endogenous steroids synthesized in the brain that are believed to be involved in the pathogenesis of neuropsychiatric disorders and memory impairment. Ammonia impairs long-term potentiation (LTP), a synaptic model of learning, in the hippocampus, a brain region involved in memory acquisition. Although mechanisms underlying ammonia-mediated LTP inhibition are not fully understood, we previously found that the activation of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) is important. Based on this, we hypothesize that metabolic stressors, including hyperammonemia, promote untimely NMDAR activation and result in neural adaptations that include the synthesis of allopregnanolone (alloP) and other GABA-potentiating neurosteroids that dampen neuronal activity and impair LTP and memory formation. Using an antibody against 5α-reduced neurosteroids, we found that 100 μM ammonia acutely enhanced neurosteroid immunostaining in pyramidal neurons in the CA1 region of rat hippocampal slices. The enhanced staining was blocked by finasteride, a selective inhibitor of 5α-reductase, a key enzyme required for alloP synthesis. Finasteride also overcame LTP inhibition by 100 μM ammonia, as did picrotoxin, an inhibitor of GABA-A receptors. These results indicate that GABA-enhancing neurosteroids, synthesized locally within pyramidal neurons, contribute significantly to ammonia-mediated synaptic dysfunction. These results suggest that the manipulation of neurosteroid synthesis could provide a strategy to improve cognitive function in individuals with hyperammonemia.

  14. Dopamine receptor activation reorganizes neuronal ensembles during hippocampal sharp waves in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeyuki Miyawaki

    Full Text Available Hippocampal sharp wave (SW/ripple complexes are thought to contribute to memory consolidation. Previous studies suggest that behavioral rewards facilitate SW occurrence in vivo. However, little is known about the precise mechanism underlying this enhancement. Here, we examined the effect of dopaminergic neuromodulation on spontaneously occurring SWs in acute hippocampal slices. Local field potentials were recorded from the CA1 region. A brief (1 min treatment with dopamine led to a persistent increase in the event frequency and the magnitude of SWs. This effect lasted at least for our recording period of 45 min and did not occur in the presence of a dopamine D1/D5 receptor antagonist. Functional multineuron calcium imaging revealed that dopamine-induced SW augmentation was associated with an enriched repertoire of the firing patterns in SW events, whereas the overall tendency of individual neurons to participate in SWs and the mean number of cells participating in a single SW were maintained. Therefore, dopaminergic activation is likely to reorganize cell assemblies during SWs.

  15. Prototypical antipsychotic drugs protect hippocampal neuronal cultures against cell death induced by growth medium deprivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Sylvain

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several clinical studies suggested that antipsychotic-based medications could ameliorate cognitive functions impaired in certain schizophrenic patients. Accordingly, we investigated the effects of various dopaminergic receptor antagonists – including atypical antipsychotics that are prescribed for the treatment of schizophrenia – in a model of toxicity using cultured hippocampal neurons, the hippocampus being a region of particular relevance to cognition. Results Hippocampal cell death induced by deprivation of growth medium constituents was strongly blocked by drugs including antipsychotics (10-10-10-6 M that display nM affinities for D2 and/or D4 receptors (clozapine, haloperidol, (±-sulpiride, domperidone, clozapine, risperidone, chlorpromazine, (+-butaclamol and L-741,742. These effects were shared by some caspases inhibitors and were not accompanied by inhibition of reactive oxygen species. In contrast, (--raclopride and remoxipride, two drugs that preferentially bind D2 over D4 receptors were ineffective, as well as the selective D3 receptor antagonist U 99194. Interestingly, (--raclopride (10-6 M was able to block the neuroprotective effect of the atypical antipsychotic clozapine (10-6 M. Conclusion Taken together, these data suggest that D2-like receptors, particularly the D4 subtype, mediate the neuroprotective effects of antipsychotic drugs possibly through a ROS-independent, caspase-dependent mechanism.

  16. Effects of acrous gramineus and its component,alpha-asarone, on apoptosis of hippocampal neurons after seizure in immature rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Libin Yang; Shulei Li; Yanzhi Huang; Jianmin Liang; Yuhong Wang

    2008-01-01

    , animals that reached stage 4 and 5 were chosen and randomly divided into 4 groups: model group, phenobarbital sodium, acrous gramineus, and α-asarone group. The normal control group was treated with an I.p. Injection of physiological saline (0.5 Ml). After modeling, the model groups were intragastrically administrated 0.5 Ml saline. The phenobarbital sodium, acrous gramineus, andα-asarone groups were intragastrically administrated 18 mg/kg/d phenobarbital sodium, 2 350 mg/kg/d acrous gramineus and 29 mg/kg/d α-asarone, respectively. The course of treatment was twice a day for 7 days. The normal group received intragastric administration of 0.5 Ml saline at the same time. The rats were sacrificed and brain sections were prepared for light microscopy and electron microscopy.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: ① Pathological changes of CA1 and CA3 hippocampal region neurons were observed by light microscopy and electronic microscopy. ② Neuronal apoptosis in the CA1 and CA3 region was measured by TUNEL staining. ③ Bcl-2 and Bax expression in CA1 and CA3 region neurons was detected by immunohistochemistry and a ratio of Bcl-2/Bax was calculated.RESULTS: All 50 immature rats were included in the final analysis. ① Pathological changes of CA1 and CA3 region hippocampal neurons: there were different pathological changes in all groups other than the normal control group. The number of damaged neurons in the model group was highest. The phenobarbital sodium, acrous gramineus, and α-asarone group exhibited different degrees of improvement. ② Neuronal apoptosis in the CA1 and CA3 regions: there were less TUNEL-positive cells in the CA1 and CA3 regions in the normal control group. One week after PTZ-induced seizure, numerous TUNEL-positive cells were detected in the CA1 and CA3 regions in the remaining four groups. There was a significant difference between the normal control group and the remaining four groups (t = 12.089-19.162, P 0.05). The number of Bcl-2-positive cells in the

  17. Hippocampal and thalamic neuronal metabolism in a putative rat model of schizophrenia○

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guolin Ma; Tianbin Song; Min Chen; Yuan Fu; Yong Xu; Ensen Ma; Wu Wang; Jiang Du; Mingxiong Huang

    2013-01-01

    The transcription factor early growth response protein 3 (EGR3) is involved in schizophrenia. We developed a putative rat model of schizophrenia by transfecting lentiviral particles carrying the Egr3 gene into bilateral hippocampal dentate gyrus. We assessed spatial working memory using the Morris water maze test, and neuronal metabolite levels in bilateral hippocampus and thalamus were determined by 3.0 T proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Choline content was significantly greater in the hippocampus after transfection, while N-acetylaspartate and the ratio of N-acetylaspartate to creatine/phosphocreatine in the thalamus were lower than in controls. This study is the first to report evaluation of brain metabolites using 3.0 T proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in rats transfected with Egr3, and reveals metabolic abnormalities in the hippocampus and thalamus in this putative model of schizophrenia.

  18. Rutin attenuates ethanol-induced neurotoxicity in hippocampal neuronal cells by increasing aldehyde dehydrogenase 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kibbeum; Kim, Sokho; Na, Ji-Young; Park, Jong-Heum; Kim, Jae-Kyung; Kim, Jae-Hun; Kwon, Jungkee

    2014-10-01

    Rutin is derived from buckwheat, apples, and black tea. It has been shown to have beneficial anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. Ethanol is a central nervous system depressant and neurotoxin. Its metabolite, acetaldehyde, is critically toxic. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) metabolizes acetaldehyde into nontoxic acetate. This study examined rutin's effects on ALDH2 activity in hippocampal neuronal cells (HT22 cells). Rutin's protective effects against acetaldehyde-based ethanol neurotoxicity were confirmed. Daidzin, an ALDH2 inhibitor, was used to clarify the mechanisms of rutin's protective effects. Cell viability was significantly increased after rutin treatment. Rutin significantly reversed ethanol-increased Bax, cytochrome c expression and caspase 3 activity, and decreased Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL protein expression in HT22 cells. Interestingly, rutin increased ALDH2 expression, while daidzin reversed this beneficial effect. Thus, this study demonstrates rutin protects HT22 cells against ethanol-induced neurotoxicity by increasing ALDH2 activity.

  19. 916 MHz electromagnetic field exposure affects rat behavior and hippocampal neuronal discharge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dongmei Hao; Lei Yang; Su Chen; Yonghao Tian; Shuicai Wu

    2012-01-01

    Wistar rats were exposed to a 916 MHz,10 W/m2 mobile phone electromagnetic field for 6 hours a day,5 days a week.Average completion times in an eight-arm radial maze were longer in the exposed rats than control rats after 4-5 weeks of exposure.Error rates in the exposed rats were greater than the control rats at 6 weeks.Hippocampal neurons from the exposed rats showed irregular firing patterns during the experiment,and they exhibited decreased spiking activity 6-9 weeks compared with that after 2-5 weeks of exposure.These results indicate that 916 MHz electromagnetic fields influence learning and memory in rats during exposure,but long-term effects are not obvious.

  20. Modulation of neurite branching by protein phosphorylation in cultured rat hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audesirk, G; Cabell, L; Kern, M

    1997-09-20

    The control of branching of axons and dendrites is poorly understood. It has been hypothesized that branching may be produced by changes in the cytoskeleton [F.J. Diez-Guerra, J. Avila, MAP2 phosphorylation parallels dendrite arborization in hippocampal neurones in culture, NeuroReport 4 (1993) 412-419; P. Friedrich, A. Aszodi, MAP2: a sensitive cross-linker and adjustable spacer in dendritic architecture, FEBS Lett. 295 (1991) 5-9]. The assembly and stability of microtubules, which are prominent cytoskeletal elements in both axons and dendrites, are regulated by microtubule-associated proteins, including tau (predominantly found in axons) and MAP2 (predominantly found in dendrites). The phosphorylation state of tau and MAP2 modulates their interactions with microtubules. In their low-phosphorylation states, tau and MAP2 bind to microtubules and increase microtubule assembly and/or stability. Increased phosphorylation decreases these effects. Diez-Guerra and Avila [F.J. Diez-Guerra, J. Avila, MAP2 phosphorylation parallels dendrite arborization in hippocampal neurones in culture, NeuroReport 4 (1993) 412-419] found that protein phosphorylation correlates with neurite branching in cultured rat hippocampal neurons, and hypothesized that increased protein phosphorylation stimulates neurite branching. To test this hypothesis, we cultured rat hippocampal neurons in the presence of specific modulators of serine-threonine protein kinases and phosphatases. Inhibitors of several protein kinases, which would be expected to decrease protein phosphorylation, reduced branching. KT5720, an inhibitor of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase, and KN62, an inhibitor of Ca(2+)-calmodulin-dependent protein kinases, inhibited branching of both axons and dendrites. Calphostin C and chelerythrine, inhibitors of protein kinase C, inhibited branching of axons but not dendrites. Treatments that would be expected to increase protein phosphorylation, including inhibitors of protein

  1. Golli Myelin Basic Proteins Modulate Voltage-Operated Ca(++) Influx and Development in Cortical and Hippocampal Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vt, Cheli; DA, Santiago González; V, Spreuer; V, Handley; At, Campagnoni; Pm, Paez

    2016-10-01

    The golli proteins, products of the myelin basic protein gene, are widely expressed in oligodendrocyte progenitor cells and neurons during the postnatal development of the brain. While golli appears to be important for oligodendrocyte migration and differentiation, its function in neuronal development is completely unknown. We have found that golli proteins function as new and novel modulators of voltage-operated Ca(++) channels (VOCCs) in neurons. In vitro, golli knock-out (KO) neurons exhibit decreased Ca(++) influx after plasma membrane depolarization and a substantial maturational delay. Increased expression of golli proteins enhances L-type Ca(++) entry and processes outgrowth in cortical neurons, and pharmacological activation of L-type Ca(++) channels stimulates maturation and prevents cell death in golli-KO neurons. In situ, Ca(++) influx mediated by L-type VOCCs was significantly decreased in cortical and hippocampal neurons of the golli-KO brain. These Ca(++) alterations affect cortical and hippocampal development and the proliferation and survival of neural progenitor cells during the postnatal development of the golli-KO brain. The CA1/3 sections and the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus were reduced in the golli-KO mice as well as the density of dendrites in the somatosensory cortex. Furthermore, the golli-KO mice display abnormal behavior including deficits in episodic memory and reduced anxiety. Because of the expression of the golli proteins within neurons in learning and memory centers of the brain, this work has profound implication in neurodegenerative diseases and neurological disorders.

  2. Loss of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling during elevated activity causes vulnerability in hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murase, Sachiko; Kim, Eunyoung; Lin, Lin; Hoffman, Dax A; McKay, Ronald D

    2012-10-31

    Chronically altered levels of network activity lead to changes in the morphology and functions of neurons. However, little is known of how changes in neuronal activity alter the intracellular signaling pathways mediating neuronal survival. Here, we use primary cultures of rat hippocampal neurons to show that elevated neuronal activity impairs phosphorylation of the serine/threonine kinase, Erk1/2, and the activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) by phosphorylation of serine 727. Chronically stimulated neurons go through apoptosis when they fail to activate another serine/threonine kinase, Akt. Gain- and loss-of-function experiments show that STAT3 plays the key role directly downstream from Erk1/2 as the alternative survival pathway. Elevated neuronal activity resulted in increased expression of a tumor suppressor, p53, and its target gene, Bax. These changes are observed in Kv4.2 knock-out mouse hippocampal neurons, which are also sensitive to the blockade of TrkB signaling, confirming that the alteration occurs in vivo. Thus, this study provides new insight into a mechanism by which chronic elevation of activity may cause neurodegeneration.

  3. Methamphetamine modulates glutamatergic synaptic transmission in rat primary cultured hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuzhuo; Jin, Yuelei; Liu, Xiaoyan; Yang, Lujia; Ge, Zhi juan; Wang, Hui; Li, Jin; Zheng, Jianquan

    2014-09-25

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a psychostimulant drug. Abuse of METH produces long-term behavioral changes including behavioral, sensitization, tolerance, and dependence. It induces neurotoxic effects in several areas of the brain via enhancing dopamine (DA) level abnormally, which may cause a secondary release of glutamate (GLU). However, repeated administration of METH still increases release of GLU even when dopamine content in tissue is significantly depleted. It implies that some other mechanisms are likely to involve in METH-induced GLU release. The goal of this study was to observe METH affected glutamatergic synaptic transmission in rat primary cultured hippocampal neurons and to explore the mechanism of METH modulated GLU release. Using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings, we found that METH (0.1-50.0μM) increased the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) and miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs). However, METH decreased the frequency of sEPSCs and mEPSCs at high concentration of 100μM. The postsynaptic NMDA receptor currents and P/Q-type calcium channel were not affected by the use of METH (10,100μM). METH did not present visible effect on N-type Ca(2+) channel current at the concentration lower than 50.0μM, but it was inhibited by use of METH at a 100μM. The effect of METH on glutamatergic synaptic transmission was not revered by pretreated with DA receptor antagonist SCH23390. These results suggest that METH directly modulated presynaptic GLU release at a different concentration, while dopaminergic system was not involved in METH modulated release of GLU in rat primary cultured hippocampal neurons.

  4. Full Length Bid is sufficient to induce apoptosis of cultured rat hippocampal neurons

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    Ward Manus W

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bcl-2 homology domain (BH 3-only proteins are pro-apoptotic proteins of the Bcl-2 family that couple stress signals to the mitochondrial cell death pathways. The BH3-only protein Bid can be activated in response to death receptor activation via caspase 8-mediated cleavage into a truncated protein (tBid, which subsequently translocates to mitochondria and induces the release of cytochrome-C. Using a single-cell imaging approach of Bid cleavage and translocation during apoptosis, we have recently demonstrated that, in contrast to death receptor-induced apoptosis, caspase-independent excitotoxic apoptosis involves a translocation of full length Bid (FL-Bid from the cytosol to mitochondria. We induced a delayed excitotoxic cell death in cultured rat hippocampal neurons by a 5-min exposure to the glutamate receptor agonist N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA; 300 μM. Results Western blot experiments confirmed a translocation of FL-Bid to the mitochondria during excitotoxic apoptosis that was associated with the release of cytochrome-C from mitochondria. These results were confirmed by immunofluorescence analysis of Bid translocation during excitotoxic cell death using an antibody raised against the amino acids 1–58 of mouse Bid that is not able to detect tBid. Finally, inducible overexpression of FL-Bid or a Bid mutant that can not be cleaved by caspase-8 was sufficient to induce apoptosis in the hippocampal neuron cultures. Conclusion Our data suggest that translocation of FL-Bid is sufficient for the activation of mitochondrial cell death pathways in response to glutamate receptor overactivation.

  5. Inorganic lead may inhibit neurite development in cultured rat hippocampal neurons through hyperphosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, M; Audesirk, G

    1995-09-01

    Inorganic lead inhibits neurite initiation in cultured rat hippocampal neurons at concentrations as low as 100 nM. Conflicting reports suggest that Pb2+ may stimulate or inhibit protein kinase C, adenylyl cyclase, phosphodiesterase, and calmodulin, or increase intracellular free Ca2+ concentrations. Therefore, Pb2+ may alter the activities of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaM kinase) or protein kinases C or A. We cultured rat hippocampal neurons in 100 nM PbCI2 alone or in combination with kinase or calmodulin inhibitors. Inhibiting protein kinase C with calphostin C exacerbated the inhibition of neurite initiation caused by PbCI2, but inhibiting protein kinase A with KT5720, CaM kinase with KN62, or calmodulin with calmidazolium completely reversed the effects of PbCI2. These results indicate that Pb2+ may inhibit neurite initiation by inappropriately stimulating protein phosphorylation by CaM kinase or cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), possibly by stimulating calmodulin. This hypothesis is supported by findings that other treatments that should increase protein phosphorylation (okadaic acid, a protein phosphatase inhibitor, and Sp-cAMPS, a PKA activator) also reduced neurite initiation. Whole-cell intracellular free Ca2+ ion concentrations were not significantly altered by 100 nM PbCI2 at 4, 12, 24, or 48 hr. Therefore, the hypothesized stimulatory effects of Pb2+ exposure on calmodulin, CaM kinase, or PKA are probably not caused by increases in whole-cell intracellular free Ca2+, but may be attributable either to intracellular Pb2+ or to localized increases in [Ca2+]in that are not reflected in whole-cell measurements.

  6. Comparison of the effects of glycerol, mannitol, and urea on ischemic hippocampal damage in gerbils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsubo, K; Katayama, Y; Kashiwagi, F; Muramatsu, H; Terashi, A

    1994-01-01

    The effects of glycerol and mannitol, as well as urea, on delayed neuronal death (DND) in the gerbil hippocampus were investigated. 20% solution of glycerol, mannitol and urea were prepared, and 6.5 ml/kg of each agent, or saline, was administered to male Mongolian gerbils intraperitoneally 30 min before ischemia. The animals were subjected to transient forebrain ischemia for 5 min. Seven days after the ischemic insult, the brains were fixed and stained for histopathological analysis. The number of normal neurons (neuronal density, ND) in a 1 mm linear length of hippocampal CA1 region was counted. ND of sham-operated group (n = 6) was 275.3 +/- 16.7 (mean +/- SD). ND in the saline-treated group (n = 6) was 14.8 +/- 5.0. ND of groups treated with glycerol (n = 6), mannitol (n = 6) and urea (n = 4) was 68.2 +/- 56.7 (p glycerol and mannitol have some protective effects against DND in the gerbil hippocampus, whereas urea has no effect.

  7. Neuroprotection of n-Butanol Extract from Roots of Potentilla anserina on Hypoxic Injury in Primary Hippocampal Neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN Xiao-jing; LI Ling-zhi; LV Qi; YU Bao-guo; YANG Shu-wang; HE Tao; ZHANG Yong-liang

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the protective effect of n-butanol extract from the roots of Potentilla anserina (NP) on hypoxic hippocampal neurons in neonatal rats.Methods Primary cultured hippocampal neurons were pretreated with different concentration of NP (0.25,0.0625,and 0.0156 mg/mL) before incubation in a low oxygen (0.1%) environment for 4 h.Cell viability was evaluated by Trypan blue staining assay.Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) released by neurons into the medium was measured.The activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in cell cytosol was determined using nitroblue tetrazolium.Morphological changes and mitochondrial function were observed by transmission electron microscopy.Results Hypoxic injury could decrease the cells viability of neuron,enhance LDH release (P < 0.05),decrease SOD activity,and increase mitochondrial injury.Pretreatment with NP significantly increased cell viability,decreased LDH release (P < 0.05),promoted SOD activity (P < 0.05),and remarkably improved cellular ultra-microstructure compared with the model group.Conclusion NP could protect the primary hippocampal neurons from hypoxic injury by attenuating mitochondrial cell death.

  8. Aluminum alters NMDA receptor 1A and 2A/B expression on neonatal hippocampal neurons in rats

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    Yuan Chia-Yi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High aluminum (Al content in certain infant formula raises the concern of possible Al toxicity on brain development of neonates during their vulnerable period of growing. Results of in vivo study showed that Al content of brain tissues reached to 74 μM when oral intake up to 1110 μM, 10 times of that in the hi-Al infant formula. Methods Utilizing a cultured neuron cells in vitro model, we have assessed Al influence on neuronal specific gene expression alteration by immunoblot and immunohistochemistry and neural proliferation rate changes by MTT assay. Results Microscopic images showed that the neurite outgrowth of hippocampal neurons increased along with the Al dosages (37, 74 μM Al (AlCl3. MTT results also indicated that Al increased neural cell viability. On the other hand, the immunocytochemistry staining suggested that the protein expressions of NMDAR 1A and NMDAR 2A/B decreased with the Al dosages (p Conclusion Treated hippocampal neurons with 37 and 74 μM of Al for 14 days increased neural cell viability, but hampered NMDAR 1A and NMDAR 2A/B expressions. It was suggested that Al exposure might alter the development of hippocampal neurons in neonatal rats.

  9. PCB 136 atropselectively alters morphometric and functional parameters of neuronal connectivity in cultured rat hippocampal neurons via ryanodine receptor-dependent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dongren; Kania-Korwel, Izabela; Ghogha, Atefeh; Chen, Hao; Stamou, Marianna; Bose, Diptiman D; Pessah, Isaac N; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim; Lein, Pamela J

    2014-04-01

    We recently demonstrated that polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners with multiple ortho chlorine substitutions sensitize ryanodine receptors (RyRs), and this activity promotes Ca²⁺-dependent dendritic growth in cultured neurons. Many ortho-substituted congeners display axial chirality, and we previously reported that the chiral congener PCB 136 (2,2',3,3',6,6'-hexachlorobiphenyl) atropselectively sensitizes RyRs. Here, we test the hypothesis that PCB 136 atropisomers differentially alter dendritic growth and other parameters of neuronal connectivity influenced by RyR activity. (-)-PCB 136, which potently sensitizes RyRs, enhances dendritic growth in primary cultures of rat hippocampal neurons, whereas (+)-PCB 136, which lacks RyR activity, has no effect on dendritic growth. The dendrite-promoting activity of (-)-PCB 136 is observed at concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 100 nM and is blocked by pharmacologic RyR antagonism. Neither atropisomer alters axonal growth or cell viability. Quantification of PCB 136 atropisomers in hippocampal cultures indicates that atropselective effects on dendritic growth are not due to differential partitioning of atropisomers into cultured cells. Imaging of hippocampal neurons loaded with Ca²⁺-sensitive dye demonstrates that (-)-PCB 136 but not (+)-PCB 136 increases the frequency of spontaneous Ca²⁺ oscillations. Similarly, (-)-PCB 136 but not (+)-PCB 136 increases the activity of hippocampal neurons plated on microelectrode arrays. These data support the hypothesis that atropselective effects on RyR activity translate into atropselective effects of PCB 136 atropisomers on neuronal connectivity, and suggest that the variable atropisomeric enrichment of chiral PCBs observed in the human population may be a significant determinant of individual susceptibility for adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes following PCB exposure.

  10. Adult-generated hippocampal neurons allow the flexible use of spatially precise learning strategies.

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    Alexander Garthe

    Full Text Available Despite enormous progress in the past few years the specific contribution of newly born granule cells to the function of the adult hippocampus is still not clear. We hypothesized that in order to solve this question particular attention has to be paid to the specific design, the analysis, and the interpretation of the learning test to be used. We thus designed a behavioral experiment along hypotheses derived from a computational model predicting that new neurons might be particularly relevant for learning conditions, in which novel aspects arise in familiar situations, thus putting high demands on the qualitative aspects of (re-learning.In the reference memory version of the water maze task suppression of adult neurogenesis with temozolomide (TMZ caused a highly specific learning deficit. Mice were tested in the hidden platform version of the Morris water maze (6 trials per day for 5 days with a reversal of the platform location on day 4. Testing was done at 4 weeks after the end of four cycles of treatment to minimize the number of potentially recruitable new neurons at the time of testing. The reduction of neurogenesis did not alter longterm potentiation in CA3 and the dentate gyrus but abolished the part of dentate gyrus LTP that is attributed to the new neurons. TMZ did not have any overt side effects at the time of testing, and both treated mice and controls learned to find the hidden platform. Qualitative analysis of search strategies, however, revealed that treated mice did not advance to spatially precise search strategies, in particular when learning a changed goal position (reversal. New neurons in the dentate gyrus thus seem to be necessary for adding flexibility to some hippocampus-dependent qualitative parameters of learning.Our finding that a lack of adult-generated granule cells specifically results in the animal's inability to precisely locate a hidden goal is also in accordance with a specialized role of the dentate gyrus in

  11. ATP induces NO production in hippocampal neurons by P2X(7 receptor activation independent of glutamate signaling.

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    Juan Francisco Codocedo

    Full Text Available To assess the putative role of adenosine triphosphate (ATP upon nitric oxide (NO production in the hippocampus, we used as a model both rat hippocampal slices and isolated hippocampal neurons in culture, lacking glial cells. In hippocampal slices, additions of exogenous ATP or 2'(3'-O-(4-Benzoylbenzoyl ATP (Bz-ATP elicited concentration-dependent NO production, which increased linearly within the first 15 min and plateaued thereafter; agonist EC50 values were 50 and 15 µM, respectively. The NO increase evoked by ATP was antagonized in a concentration-dependent manner by Coomassie brilliant blue G (BBG or by N(ω-propyl-L-arginine, suggesting the involvement of P2X7Rs and neuronal NOS, respectively. The ATP induced NO production was independent of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA receptor activity as effects were not alleviated by DL-2-Amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (APV, but antagonized by BBG. In sum, exogenous ATP elicited NO production in hippocampal neurons independently of NMDA receptor activity.

  12. ATP Induces NO Production in Hippocampal Neurons by P2X7 Receptor Activation Independent of Glutamate Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codocedo, Juan Francisco; Godoy, Juan Alejandro; Poblete, Maria Ines; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.; Huidobro-Toro, Juan Pablo

    2013-01-01

    To assess the putative role of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) upon nitric oxide (NO) production in the hippocampus, we used as a model both rat hippocampal slices and isolated hippocampal neurons in culture, lacking glial cells. In hippocampal slices, additions of exogenous ATP or 2′(3′)-O-(4-Benzoylbenzoyl) ATP (Bz-ATP) elicited concentration-dependent NO production, which increased linearly within the first 15 min and plateaued thereafter; agonist EC50 values were 50 and 15 µM, respectively. The NO increase evoked by ATP was antagonized in a concentration-dependent manner by Coomassie brilliant blue G (BBG) or by Nω-propyl-L-arginine, suggesting the involvement of P2X7Rs and neuronal NOS, respectively. The ATP induced NO production was independent of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor activity as effects were not alleviated by DL-2-Amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (APV), but antagonized by BBG. In sum, exogenous ATP elicited NO production in hippocampal neurons independently of NMDA receptor activity. PMID:23472093

  13. Carboxypeptidase E protects hippocampal neurons during stress in male mice by up-regulating prosurvival BCL2 protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, S R K; Thouennon, E; Li, W-S; Cheng, Y; Bhupatkar, J; Cawley, N X; Lane, M; Merchenthaler, I; Loh, Y P

    2013-09-01

    Prolonged chronic stress causing elevated plasma glucocorticoids leads to neurodegeneration. Adaptation to stress (allostasis) through neuroprotective mechanisms can delay this process. Studies on hippocampal neurons have identified carboxypeptidase E (CPE) as a novel neuroprotective protein that acts extracellularly, independent of its enzymatic activity, although the mechanism of action is unclear. Here, we aim to determine if CPE plays a neuroprotective role in allostasis in mouse hippocampus during chronic restraint stress (CRS), and the molecular mechanisms involved. Quantitative RT-PCR/in situ hybridization and Western blots were used to assay for mRNA and protein. After mild CRS (1 h/d for 7 d), CPE protein and mRNA were significantly elevated in the hippocampal CA3 region, compared to naïve littermates. In addition, luciferase reporter assays identified a functional glucocorticoid regulatory element within the cpe promoter that mediated the up-regulation of CPE expression in primary hippocampal neurons following dexamethasone treatment, suggesting that circulating plasma glucocorticoids could evoke a similar effect on CPE in the hippocampus in vivo. Overexpression of CPE in hippocampal neurons, or CRS in mice, resulted in elevated prosurvival BCL2 protein/mRNA and p-AKT levels in the hippocampus; however, CPE(-/-) mice showed a decrease. Thus, during mild CRS, CPE expression is up-regulated, possibly contributed by glucocorticoids, to mediate neuroprotection of the hippocampus by enhancing BCL2 expression through AKT signaling, and thereby maintaining allostasis.

  14. Organotypic hippocampal slice cultures for studies of brain damage, neuroprotection and neurorepair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noraberg, Jens; Poulsen, Frantz Rom; Blaabjerg, Morten

    2005-01-01

    ), Alzheimer's disease (AD) and epilepsia. Studies of non-excitotoxic neurotoxic compounds and the experimental use of slice cultures in studies of HIV neurotoxicity, traumatic brain injury (TBI) and neurogenesis are included. For cerebral ischemia, experimental models with oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD......) and exposure to glutamate receptor agonists (excitotoxins) are reviewed. For epilepsia, focus is on induction of seizures with effects on neuronal loss, axonal sprouting and neurogenesis. For Alzheimer's disease, the review centers on the use of beta-amyloid (Abeta) in different models, while the section...... on repair is focused on neurogenesis and cell migration. The culturing techniques, set-up of models, and analytical tools, including markers for neurodegeneration, like the fluorescent dye propidium iodide (PI), are reviewed and discussed. Comparisons are made between hippocampal slice cultures and other...

  15. Chloride-cotransport blockade desynchronizes neuronal discharge in the "epileptic" hippocampal slice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochman, D W; Schwartzkroin, P A

    2000-01-01

    Antagonism of the chloride-cotransport system in hippocampal slices has been shown to block spontaneous epileptiform (i.e., hypersynchronized) discharges without diminishing excitatory synaptic transmission. Here we test the hypotheses that chloride-cotransport blockade, with furosemide or low-chloride (low-[Cl(-)](o)) medium, desynchronizes the firing activity of neuronal populations and that this desynchronization is mediated through nonsynaptic mechanisms. Spontaneous epileptiform discharges were recorded from the CA1 and CA3 cell body layers of hippocampal slices. Treatment with low-[Cl(-)](o) medium led to cessation of spontaneous synchronized bursting in CA1 >/=5-10 min before its disappearance from CA3. During the time that CA3 continued to burst spontaneously but CA1 was silent, electrical stimulation of the Schaffer collaterals showed that hyperexcited CA1 synaptic responses were maintained. Paired intracellular recordings from CA1 pyramidal cells showed that during low-[Cl(-)](o) treatment, the timing of action potential discharges became desynchronized; desynchronization was identified with phase lags in firing times of action potentials between pairs of neurons as well as a with a broadening and diminution of the CA1 field amplitude. Continued exposure to low-[Cl(-)](o) medium increased the degree of the firing-time phase shifts between pairs of CA1 pyramidal cells until the epileptiform CA1 field potential was abolished completely. Intracellular recordings during 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) treatment showed that prolonged low-[Cl(-)](o) exposure did not diminish the frequency or amplitude of spontaneous postsynaptic potentials. CA3 antidromic responses to Schaffer collateral stimulation were not significantly affected by prolonged low-[Cl(-)](o) exposure. In contrast to CA1, paired intracellular recordings from CA3 pyramidal cells showed that chloride-cotransport blockade did not cause a significant desynchronization of action potential firing times in the

  16. Tamoxifen mediated estrogen receptor activation protects against early impairment of hippocampal neuron excitability in an oxygen/glucose deprivation brain slice ischemia model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huaqiu; Xie, Minjie; Schools, Gary P; Feustel, Paul F; Wang, Wei; Lei, Ting; Kimelberg, Harold K; Zhou, Min

    2009-01-09

    Pretreatment of ovarectomized rats with estrogen shows long-term protection via activation of the estrogen receptor (ER). However, it remains unknown whether activation of the ER can provide protection against early neuronal damage when given acutely. We simulated ischemic conditions by applying oxygen and glucose deprived (OGD) solution to acute male rat hippocampal slices and examined the neuronal electrophysiological changes. Pyramidal neurons and interneurons showed a time-dependent membrane potential depolarization and reduction in evoked action potential frequency and amplitude over a 10 to 15 min OGD exposure. These changes were largely suppressed by 10 microM TAM. The TAM effect was neuron-specific as the OGD-induced astrocytic membrane potential depolarization was not altered. The TAM effect was mediated through ER activation because it could be simulated by 17beta-estradiol and was completely inhibited by the ER inhibitor ICI 182, 780, and is therefore an example of TAM's selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) action. We further show that TAM's effects on OGD-induced impairment of neuronal excitability was largely due to activation of neuroprotective BK channels, as the TAM effect was markedly attenuated by the BK channel inhibitor paxilline at 10 microM. TAM also significantly reduced the frequency and amplitude of AMPA receptor mediated spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) in pyramidal neurons which is an early consequence of OGD. Altogether, this study demonstrates that both 17beta-estradiol and TAM attenuate neuronal excitability impairment early on in a simulated ischemia model via ER activation mediated potentiation of BK K(+) channels and reduction in enhanced neuronal AMPA/NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity.

  17. Impaired rRNA synthesis triggers homeostatic responses in hippocampal neurons

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    Anna eKiryk

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Decreased rRNA synthesis and nucleolar disruption, known as nucleolar stress, are primary signs of cellular stress associated with aging and neurodegenerative disorders. Silencing of rDNA occurs during early stages of Alzheimer´s disease (AD and may play a role in dementia. Moreover aberrant regulation of the protein synthesis machinery is present in the brain of suicide victims and implicates the epigenetic modulation of rRNA. Recently, we developed unique mouse models characterized by nucleolar stress in neurons. We inhibited RNA polymerase I by genetic ablation of the basal transcription factor TIF-IA in adult hippocampal neurons. Nucleolar stress resulted in progressive neurodegeneration, although with a differential vulnerability within the CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus. Here, we investigate the consequences of nucleolar stress on learning and memory. The mutant mice show normal performance in the Morris water maze and in other behavioral tests, suggesting the activation of adaptive mechanisms. In fact, we observe a significantly enhanced learning and re-learning corresponding to the initial inhibition of rRNA transcription. This phenomenon is accompanied by aberrant synaptic plasticity. By the analysis of nucleolar function and integrity, we find that the synthesis of rRNA is later restored. Gene expression profiling shows that thirty-six transcripts are differentially expressed in comparison to the control group in absence of neurodegeneration. Additionally, we observe a significant enrichment of the putative serum response factor (SRF binding sites in the promoters of the genes with changed expression, indicating potential adaptive mechanisms mediated by the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. In the dentate gyrus a neurogenetic response might compensate the initial molecular deficits. These results underscore the role of nucleolar stress in neuronal homeostasis and open a new ground for therapeutic strategies aiming at preserving

  18. Impaired rRNA synthesis triggers homeostatic responses in hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiryk, Anna; Sowodniok, Katharina; Kreiner, Grzegorz; Rodriguez-Parkitna, Jan; Sönmez, Aynur; Górkiewicz, Tomasz; Bierhoff, Holger; Wawrzyniak, Marcin; Janusz, Artur K; Liss, Birgit; Konopka, Witold; Schütz, Günther; Kaczmarek, Leszek; Parlato, Rosanna

    2013-01-01

    Decreased rRNA synthesis and nucleolar disruption, known as nucleolar stress, are primary signs of cellular stress associated with aging and neurodegenerative disorders. Silencing of rDNA occurs during early stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and may play a role in dementia. Moreover, aberrant regulation of the protein synthesis machinery is present in the brain of suicide victims and implicates the epigenetic modulation of rRNA. Recently, we developed unique mouse models characterized by nucleolar stress in neurons. We inhibited RNA polymerase I by genetic ablation of the basal transcription factor TIF-IA in adult hippocampal neurons. Nucleolar stress resulted in progressive neurodegeneration, although with a differential vulnerability within the CA1, CA3, and dentate gyrus (DG). Here, we investigate the consequences of nucleolar stress on learning and memory. The mutant mice show normal performance in the Morris water maze and in other behavioral tests, suggesting the activation of adaptive mechanisms. In fact, we observe a significantly enhanced learning and re-learning corresponding to the initial inhibition of rRNA transcription. This phenomenon is accompanied by aberrant synaptic plasticity. By the analysis of nucleolar function and integrity, we find that the synthesis of rRNA is later restored. Gene expression profiling shows that 36 transcripts are differentially expressed in comparison to the control group in absence of neurodegeneration. Additionally, we observe a significant enrichment of the putative serum response factor (SRF) binding sites in the promoters of the genes with changed expression, indicating potential adaptive mechanisms mediated by the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. In the DG a neurogenetic response might compensate the initial molecular deficits. These results underscore the role of nucleolar stress in neuronal homeostasis and open a new ground for therapeutic strategies aiming at preserving neuronal function.

  19. KSRP modulation of GAP-43 mRNA stability restricts axonal outgrowth in embryonic hippocampal neurons.

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    Clark W Bird

    Full Text Available The KH-type splicing regulatory protein (KSRP promotes the decay of AU-rich element (ARE-containing mRNAs. Although KSRP is expressed in the nervous system, very little is known about its role in neurons. In this study, we examined whether KSRP regulates the stability of the ARE-containing GAP-43 mRNA. We found that KSRP destabilizes this mRNA by binding to its ARE, a process that requires the presence of its fourth KH domain (KH4. Furthermore, KSRP competed with the stabilizing factor HuD for binding to these sequences. We also examined the functional consequences of KSRP overexpression and knockdown on the differentiation of primary hippocampal neurons in culture. Overexpression of full length KSRP or KSRP without its nuclear localization signal hindered axonal outgrowth in these cultures, while overexpression of a mutant protein without the KH4 domain that has less affinity for binding to GAP-43's ARE had no effect. In contrast, depletion of KSRP led to a rise in GAP-43 mRNA levels and a dramatic increase in axonal length, both in KSRP shRNA transfected cells and neurons cultured from Ksrp(+/- and Ksrp(-/- embryos. Finally we found that overexpression of GAP-43 rescued the axonal outgrowth deficits seen with KSRP overexpression, but only when cells were transfected with GAP-43 constructs containing 3' UTR sequences targeting the transport of this mRNA to axons. Together, our results suggest that KSRP is an important regulator of mRNA stability and axonal length that works in direct opposition to HuD to regulate the levels of GAP-43 and other ARE-containing neuronal mRNAs.

  20. Imaging dendritic spines of rat primary hippocampal neurons using structured illumination microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schouten, Marijn; De Luca, Giulia M R; Alatriste González, Diana K; de Jong, Babette E; Timmermans, Wendy; Xiong, Hui; Krugers, Harm; Manders, Erik M M; Fitzsimons, Carlos P

    2014-05-04

    Dendritic spines are protrusions emerging from the dendrite of a neuron and represent the primary postsynaptic targets of excitatory inputs in the brain. Technological advances have identified these structures as key elements in neuron connectivity and synaptic plasticity. The quantitative analysis of spine morphology using light microscopy remains an essential problem due to technical limitations associated with light's intrinsic refraction limit. Dendritic spines can be readily identified by confocal laser-scanning fluorescence microscopy. However, measuring subtle changes in the shape and size of spines is difficult because spine dimensions other than length are usually smaller than conventional optical resolution fixed by light microscopy's theoretical resolution limit of 200 nm. Several recently developed super resolution techniques have been used to image cellular structures smaller than the 200 nm, including dendritic spines. These techniques are based on classical far-field operations and therefore allow the use of existing sample preparation methods and to image beyond the surface of a specimen. Described here is a working protocol to apply super resolution structured illumination microscopy (SIM) to the imaging of dendritic spines in primary hippocampal neuron cultures. Possible applications of SIM overlap with those of confocal microscopy. However, the two techniques present different applicability. SIM offers higher effective lateral resolution, while confocal microscopy, due to the usage of a physical pinhole, achieves resolution improvement at the expense of removal of out of focus light. In this protocol, primary neurons are cultured on glass coverslips using a standard protocol, transfected with DNA plasmids encoding fluorescent proteins and imaged using SIM. The whole protocol described herein takes approximately 2 weeks, because dendritic spines are imaged after 16-17 days in vitro, when dendritic development is optimal. After completion of the

  1. Synaptic currents in anatomically identified CA3 neurons during hippocampal gamma oscillations in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oren, Iris; Mann, Edward O; Paulsen, Ole; Hájos, Norbert

    2006-09-27

    Gamma-frequency oscillations are prominent during active network states in the hippocampus. An intrahippocampal gamma generator has been identified in the CA3 region. To better understand the synaptic mechanisms involved in gamma oscillogenesis, we recorded action potentials and synaptic currents in distinct types of anatomically identified CA3 neurons during carbachol-induced (20-25 microM) gamma oscillations in rat hippocampal slices. We wanted to compare and contrast the relationship between excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic currents in pyramidal cells and perisomatic-targeting interneurons, cell types implicated in gamma oscillogenesis, as well as in other interneuron subtypes, and to relate synaptic currents to the firing properties of the cells. We found that phasic synaptic input differed between cell classes. Most strikingly, the dominant phasic input to pyramidal neurons was inhibitory, whereas phase-coupled perisomatic-targeting interneurons often received a strong phasic excitatory input. Differences in synaptic input could account for some of the differences in firing rate, action potential phase precision, and mean action potential phase angle, both between individual cells and between cell types. There was a strong positive correlation between the ratio of phasic synaptic excitation to inhibition and firing rate over all neurons and between the phase precision of excitation and action potentials in interneurons. Moreover, mean action potential phase angle correlated with the phase of the peak of the net-estimated synaptic reversal potential in all phase-coupled neurons. The data support a recurrent mechanism of gamma oscillations, whereby spike timing is controlled primarily by inhibition in pyramidal cells and by excitation in interneurons.

  2. Differential effects of cannabis extracts and pure plant cannabinoids on hippocampal neurones and glia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Duncan; Drysdale, Alison J; Pertwee, Roger G; Platt, Bettina

    2006-11-20

    We have shown previously that the plant cannabinoid cannabidiol (CBD) elevates intracellular calcium levels in both cultured hippocampal neurones and glia. Here, we investigated whether the main psychotropic constituent of cannabis, Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) alone or in combination with other cannabis constituents can cause similar responses, and whether THC affects the responses induced by CBD. Our experiments were performed with 1 microM pure THC (pTHC), with 1 microM pure CBD (pCBD), with a high-THC, low CBD cannabis extract (eTHC), with a high-CBD, low THC cannabis extract (eCBD), with a mixture of eTHC and eCBD (THC:CBD=1:1) or with corresponding 'mock extracts' that contained only pTHC and pCBD mixed in the same proportion as in eTHC, eCBD or the 1:1 mixture of eTHC and eCBD. We detected significant differences in neurones both between the effects of pTHC and eTHC and between the effects of pCBD and eCBD. There were also differences between the Ca(2+) responses evoked in both neurones and glia by eTHC and mock eTHC, but not between eCBD and mock eCBD. A particularly striking observation was the much increased response size and maximal responder rates induced by the mixture of eTHC and eCBD than by the corresponding 1:1 mixture of pTHC and pCBD. Our data suggest that THC shares the ability of CBD to elevate Ca(2+) levels in neurones and glia, that THC and CBD interact synergistically and that the cannabis extracts have other constituents yet to be identified that can significantly modulate the ability of THC and CBD to raise Ca(2+) levels.

  3. Myelin basic protein induces neuron-specific toxicity by directly damaging the neuronal plasma membrane.

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    Jie Zhang

    Full Text Available The central nervous system (CNS insults may cause massive demyelination and lead to the release of myelin-associated proteins including its major component myelin basic protein (MBP. MBP is reported to induce glial activation but its effect on neurons is still little known. Here we found that MBP specifically bound to the extracellular surface of the neuronal plasma membrane and induced neurotoxicity in vitro. This effect of MBP on neurons was basicity-dependent because the binding was blocked by acidic lipids and competed by other basic proteins. Further studies revealed that MBP induced damage to neuronal membrane integrity and function by depolarizing the resting membrane potential, increasing the permeability to cations and other molecules, and decreasing the membrane fluidity. At last, artificial liposome vesicle assay showed that MBP directly disturbed acidic lipid bilayer and resulted in increased membrane permeability. These results revealed that MBP induces neurotoxicity through its direct interaction with acidic components on the extracellular surface of neuronal membrane, which may suggest a possible contribution of MBP to the pathogenesis in the CNS disorders with myelin damage.

  4. Critical role of NADPH oxidase in neuronal oxidative damage and microglia activation following traumatic brain injury.

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    Quan-Guang Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Oxidative stress is known to play an important role in the pathology of traumatic brain injury. Mitochondria are thought to be the major source of the damaging reactive oxygen species (ROS following TBI. However, recent work has revealed that the membrane, via the enzyme NADPH oxidase can also generate the superoxide radical (O(2(-, and thereby potentially contribute to the oxidative stress following TBI. The current study thus addressed the potential role of NADPH oxidase in TBI. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The results revealed that NADPH oxidase activity in the cerebral cortex and hippocampal CA1 region increases rapidly following controlled cortical impact in male mice, with an early peak at 1 h, followed by a secondary peak from 24-96 h after TBI. In situ localization using oxidized hydroethidine and the neuronal marker, NeuN, revealed that the O(2(- induction occurred in neurons at 1 h after TBI. Pre- or post-treatment with the NADPH oxidase inhibitor, apocynin markedly inhibited microglial activation and oxidative stress damage. Apocynin also attenuated TBI-induction of the Alzheimer's disease proteins β-amyloid and amyloid precursor protein. Finally, both pre- and post-treatment of apocynin was also shown to induce significant neuroprotection against TBI. In addition, a NOX2-specific inhibitor, gp91ds-tat was also shown to exert neuroprotection against TBI. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: As a whole, the study demonstrates that NADPH oxidase activity and superoxide production exhibit a biphasic elevation in the hippocampus and cortex following TBI, which contributes significantly to the pathology of TBI via mediation of oxidative stress damage, microglial activation, and AD protein induction in the brain following TBI.

  5. Soman increases neuronal COX-2 levels: possible link between seizures and protracted neuronal damage.

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    Angoa-Pérez, Mariana; Kreipke, Christian W; Thomas, David M; Van Shura, Kerry E; Lyman, Megan; McDonough, John H; Kuhn, Donald M

    2010-12-01

    Nerve agent-induced seizures cause neuronal damage in brain limbic and cortical circuits leading to persistent behavioral and cognitive deficits. Without aggressive anticholinergic and benzodiazepine therapy, seizures can be prolonged and neuronal damage progresses for extended periods of time. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of the nerve agent soman on expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), the initial enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway of the proinflammatory prostaglandins and a factor that has been implicated in seizure initiation and propagation. Rats were exposed to a toxic dose of soman and scored behaviorally for seizure intensity. Expression of COX-2 was determined throughout brain from 4h to 7 days after exposure by immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting. Microglial activation and astrogliosis were assessed microscopically over the same time-course. Soman increased COX-2 expression in brain regions known to be damaged by nerve agents (e.g., hippocampus, amygdala, piriform cortex and thalamus). COX-2 expression was induced in neurons, and not in microglia or astrocytes, and remained elevated through 7 days. The magnitude of COX-2 induction was correlated with seizure intensity. COX-1 expression was not changed by soman. Increased expression of neuronal COX-2 by soman is a late-developing response relative to other signs of acute physiological distress caused by nerve agents. COX-2-mediated production of prostaglandins is a consequence of the seizure-induced neuronal damage, even after survival of the initial cholinergic crisis is assured. COX-2 inhibitors should be considered as adjunct therapy in nerve agent poisoning to minimize nerve agent-induced seizure activity.

  6. Altered balance of glutamatergic/GABAergic synaptic input and associated changes in dendrite morphology after BDNF expression in BDNF-deficient hippocampal neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, B; Henneberger, C.; Betances, D.; Arevalo, M. A.; Rodriguez-Tebar, A.; Meier, J C; Grantyn, R.

    2006-01-01

    Cultured neurons from bdnf-/- mice display reduced densities of synaptic terminals, although in vivo these deficits are small or absent. Here we aimed at clarifying the local responses to postsynaptic brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). To this end, solitary enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-labeled hippocampal neurons from bdnf-/- mice were compared with bdnf-/- neurons after transfection with BDNF, bdnf-/- neurons after transient exposure to exogenous BDNF, and bdnf+/+ neurons...

  7. Post-traumatic administration of the p53 inactivator pifithrin-α oxygen analogue reduces hippocampal neuronal loss and improves cognitive deficits after experimental traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ling-Yu; Greig, Nigel H; Huang, Ya-Ni; Hsieh, Tsung-Hsun; Tweedie, David; Yu, Qian-Sheng; Hoffer, Barry J; Luo, Yu; Kao, Yu-Chieh; Wang, Jia-Yi

    2016-12-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of death and disability worldwide. Neuronal apoptosis in the hippocampus has been detected after TBI. The hippocampal dysfunction may result in cognitive deficits in learning, memory, and spatial information processing. Our previous studies demonstrated that a p53 inhibitor, pifithrin-α oxygen analogue (PFT-α (O)), significantly reduced cortical cell death, which is substantial following controlled cortical impact (CCI) TBI, and improved neurological functional outcomes via anti-apoptotic mechanisms. In the present study, we examined the effect of PFT-α (O) on CCI TBI-induced hippocampal cellular pathophysiology in light of this brain region's role in memory. To investigate whether p53-dependent apoptosis plays a role in hippocampal neuronal loss and associated cognitive deficits and to define underlying mechanisms, SD rats were subjected to experimental CCI TBI followed by the administration of PFT-α or PFT-α (O) (2mg/kg, i.v.) or vehicle at 5h after TBI. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were acquired at 24h and 7days post-injury to assess evolving structural hippocampal damage. Fluoro-Jade C was used to stain hippocampal sub-regions, including CA1 and dentate gyrus (DG), for cellular degeneration. Neurological functions, including motor and recognition memory, were assessed by behavioral tests at 7days post injury. p53, p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA), 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), cyclooxygenase-IV (COX IV), annexin V and NeuN were visualized by double immunofluorescence staining with cell-specific markers. Levels of mRNA encoding for caspase-3, p53, PUMA, Bcl-2, Bcl-2-associated X protein (BAX) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were measured by RT-qPCR. Our results showed that post-injury administration of PFT-α and, particularly, PFT-α (O) at 5h dramatically reduced injury volumes in the ipsilateral hippocampus, improved motor outcomes, and ameliorated cognitive deficits at 7days after TBI, as

  8. Rotenone-induced toxicity is mediated by Rho-GTPases in hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Monica; Gastaldi, Laura; Remedi, Monica; Cáceres, Alfredo; Landa, Carlos

    2008-08-01

    In this study, we have examined the effects of rotenone in primary cultures of hippocampal and dopaminergic neurons in order to obtain insights into the possible mechanisms underlying the neurotoxic effects of this pesticide. The results obtained indicate that a 48-h exposure to rotenone (0.1 microM) produces a complete and selective suppression of axon formation. This effect was dose dependent, not accompanied by changes in microtubule organization, and reversible after washout of the agrochemical from the tissue culture medium. Interestingly, pull-down assays revealed that rotenone decreases Cdc42 and Rac activities, whereas increasing that of Rho. In accordance with this, treatment of neuronal cultures with cytochalasin D, an actin-depolymerizing drug, or with the Rho-kinase inhibitor Y27632, or overexpression of Tiam1, a guanosine nucleotide exchange factor for Rac, reverts the inhibitory effect of rotenone on axon formation. Taken together, our data suggest that at least some of the neurotoxic effects of rotenone are associated with an inhibition of actin dynamics through modifications of Rho-GTPase activity.

  9. Persistent sodium current properties in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons of young and adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunko, Oleksii; Isaev, Dmytro; Maximyuk, Oleksandr; Ivanchick, Gleb; Sydorenko, Vadym; Krishtal, Oleg; Isaeva, Elena

    2014-01-24

    Persistent tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium current (INaP) plays an important role in cellular and neuronal network excitability in physiological conditions and under different pathological circumstances. However, developmental changes in INaP properties remain largely unclear. In the present study using whole cell patch clamp technique we evaluated INaP properties in CA1 hippocampal pyramidal neurons isolated from young (postnatal day (P) 12-16) and adult (P60-75) rats. We show that the INaP density is substantially larger in the adult group. Although INaP inactivation characteristics were found to be similar in both groups, voltage dependence of INaP activation is shifted to more negative membrane potentials (young: -48.6±0.5mV vs. adult: -52.4±0.2mV, p<0.01). Our data indicates the increase of INaP contribution in the basal membrane sodium conductivity in the mature hippocampus.

  10. Altered synaptic properties during integration of adult-born hippocampal neurons following a seizure insult.

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    Johanna Jackson

    Full Text Available Pathological conditions affect several stages of neurogenesis in the adult brain, including proliferation, survival, cell fate, migration, and functional integration. Here we explored how a pathological environment modulates the heterogeneous afferent synaptic input that shapes the functional properties of newly formed neurons. We analyzed the expression of adhesion molecules and other synaptic proteins on adult-born hippocampal neurons formed after electrically-induced partial status epilepticus (pSE. New cells were labeled with a GFP-retroviral vector one week after pSE. One and three weeks thereafter, synaptic proteins were present on dendritic spines and shafts, but without differences between pSE and control group. In contrast, at six weeks, we found fewer dendritic spines and decreased expression of the scaffolding protein PSD-95 on spines, without changes in expression of the adhesion molecules N-cadherin or neuroligin-1, primarily located at excitatory synapses. Moreover, we detected an increased expression of the inhibitory scaffolding protein gephyrin in newborn but not mature neurons after SE. However, this increase was not accompanied by a difference in GABA expression, and there was even a region-specific decrease in the adhesion molecule neuroligin-2 expression, both in newborn and mature neurons. Neuroligin-2 clusters co-localized with presynaptic cholecystokinin terminals, which were also reduced. The expression of neuroligin-4 and glycine receptor was unchanged. Increased postsynaptic clustering of gephyrin, without an accompanying increase in GABAergic input or neuroligin-2 and -4 expression, the latter important for clustering of GABA(A and glycine receptors, respectively, could imply an increased but altered inhibitory connectivity specific for newborn neurons. The changes were transient and expression of both gephyrin and NL-2 was normalized 3 months post-SE. Our findings indicate that seizure-induced brain pathology alters

  11. Enduring Effects of Early Life Stress on Firing Patterns of Hippocampal and Thalamocortical Neurons in Rats: Implications for Limbic Epilepsy.

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    Idrish Ali

    Full Text Available Early life stress results in an enduring vulnerability to kindling-induced epileptogenesis in rats, but the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Recent studies indicate the involvement of thalamocortical neuronal circuits in the progression of kindling epileptogenesis. Therefore, we sought to determine in vivo the effects of early life stress and amygdala kindling on the firing pattern of hippocampus as well as thalamic and cortical neurons. Eight week old male Wistar rats, previously exposed to maternal separation (MS early life stress or early handling (EH, underwent amygdala kindling (or sham kindling. Once fully kindled, in vivo juxtacellular recordings in hippocampal, thalamic and cortical regions were performed under neuroleptic analgesia. In the thalamic reticular nucleus cells both kindling and MS independently lowered firing frequency and enhanced burst firing. Further, burst firing in the thalamic reticular nucleus was significantly increased in kindled MS rats compared to kindled EH rats (p<0.05. In addition, MS enhanced burst firing of hippocampal pyramidal neurons. Following a stimulation-induced seizure, somatosensory cortical neurons exhibited a more pronounced increase in burst firing in MS rats than in EH rats. These data demonstrate changes in firing patterns in thalamocortical and hippocampal regions resulting from both MS and amygdala kindling, which may reflect cellular changes underlying the enhanced vulnerability to kindling in rats that have been exposed to early life stress.

  12. Role of hippocampal dentate gyrus neurons in the protective effects of heat shock factor 1 on working memory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Peng; Xiongzhao Zhu; Ming Cheng; Xiangyi Chen; Shuqiao Yao

    2011-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that heat shock factor 1 exerts endogenous protective effects on working memory under conditions of chronic psychological stress. However, the precise underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. This study examined the protective factors affecting working memory in heat shock transcription factor 1 gene knockout mice. The results indicated that the number of correct T maze alternations decreased following mild chronic psychological stress in knockout mice. This change was accompanied by a decrease in neurogenesis and an increase in neuronal apoptosis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. The number of correct T maze alternations was positively correlated with neurogenesis in hippocampal dentate gyrus, and negatively correlated with neuronal apoptosis. In wild type mice, no significant difference was detected in the number of correct T maze alternations or neuronal apoptosis in hippocampal dentate gyrus. These results indicate that the heat shock factor 1 gene has an endogenous protective role in working memory during mild chronic psychological stress associated with dentate gyrus neuronal apoptosis.Moreover, dentate gyrus neurogenesis appears to participate in the protective mechanism.

  13. Tumour necrosis factor-alpha impairs neuronal differentiation but not proliferation of hippocampal neural precursor cells: Role of Hes1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keohane, Aoife; Ryan, Sinead; Maloney, Eimer; Sullivan, Aideen M; Nolan, Yvonne M

    2010-01-01

    Tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine, which influences neuronal survival and function yet there is limited information available on its effects on hippocampal neural precursor cells (NPCs). We show that TNFalpha treatment during proliferation had no effect on the percentage of proliferating cells prepared from embryonic rat hippocampal neurosphere cultures, nor did it affect cell fate towards either an astrocytic or neuronal lineage when cells were then allowed to differentiate. However, when cells were differentiated in the presence of TNFalpha, significantly reduced percentages of newly born and post-mitotic neurons, significantly increased percentages of astrocytes and increased expression of TNFalpha receptors, TNF-R1 and TNF-R2, as well as expression of the anti-neurogenic Hes1 gene, were observed. These data indicate that exposure of hippocampal NPCs to TNFalpha when they are undergoing differentiation but not proliferation has a detrimental effect on their neuronal lineage fate, which may be mediated through increased expression of Hes1.

  14. Neonatal sevoflurane anesthesia induces long-term memory impairment and decreases hippocampal PSD-95 expression without neuronal loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S-Q; Fang, F; Xue, Z-G; Cang, J; Zhang, X-G

    2013-04-01

    Volatile anesthetics are widely used in the clinic, and sevoflurane is the most prevalent volatile anesthetic in pediatric anesthesia. Recent findings question the potential risks of volatile anesthetics on brain development. Evidence suggests that sevoflurane may cause neuronal deficiency. This study investigates the long-term effect of sevoflurane in the developing brain. We anesthetized 7 day-old rats for 4 h with 2.5% sevoflurane. A Morris water maze was used to evaluate hippocampal function 7 weeks after sevoflurane exposure. Nissl staining was performed to analyze neuronal loss. PSD-95 (postsynaptic density protein-95) expression in the hippocampus was measured using a western blot. The exposure to 2.5% sevoflurane caused long-term deficits in hippocampal function and decreased hippocampal PSD-95 expression without neuronal loss. This study demonstrates that P7 rats exposed for 4 h to 2.5% sevoflurane have significant spatial learning and memory impairment 7 weeks after anesthesia. In addition, PSD-95 expression in the hippocampus decreased at P56 without neuronal loss. These data suggest that sevoflurane causes neurotoxicity in the developing brain, which may be attributed to decreased PSD-95 in the hippocampus.

  15. Underlying mechanism of protection from hypoxic injury seen with n-butanol extract of Potentilla anserine L. in hippocampal neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaojing Qin; Lingzhi Li; Qi Lv; Baoguo Yu; Shuwang Yang; Tao He; Yongliang Zhang

    2012-01-01

    The alcohol and n-butanol extract of Potentilla anserine L.significantly protects myocardium from acute ischemic injury.However,its effects on rat hippocampal neurons and the mechanism of protection remain unclear.In this study,primary cultured hippocampal neurons from neonatal rats were incubated in 95% N2 and 5% CO2 for 4 hours.Results indicated that hypoxic injury decreased the viability of neurons,increased the expression levels of caspase-9 and caspase-3 mRNA,as well as cytochrome c,Caspase-9,and Caspase-3 protein.Pretreatment with 0.25,0.0625,0.0156 mg/mL n-butanol extract of Potentilla anserine L.led to a significant increase in cell viability.Expression levels of caspase-9 and caspase-3 mRNA,as well as cytochrome c,Caspase-9,andCaspase-3 protein,were attenuated.The neuroprotective effect of n-butanol extract of Potentillaanserine L.was equivalent to tanshinone IIA.Our data suggest that the n-butanol extract of Potentilla anserine L.could protect primary hippocampal neurons from hypoxic injury by deactivating mitochondrial cell death.

  16. Spatial representations in dorsal hippocampal neurons during a tactile-visual conditional discrimination task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Amy L; Owens, Cullen B; Peters, Gregory J; Adelman, Peter C; Cline, Kathryn M

    2012-02-01

    Trajectory-dependent coding in dorsal CA1 of hippocampus has been evident in various spatial memory tasks aiming to model episodic memory. Hippocampal neurons are considered to be trajectory-dependent if the neuron has a place field located on an overlapping segment of two trajectories and exhibits a reliable difference in firing rate between the two trajectories. It is unclear whether trajectory-dependent coding in hippocampus is a mechanism used by the rat to solve spatial memory tasks. A first step in answering this question is to compare results between studies using tasks that require spatial working memory and those that do not. We recorded single units from dorsal CA1 of hippocampus during performance of a discrete-trial, tactile-visual conditional discrimination (CD) task in a T-maze. In this task, removable floor inserts that differ in texture and appearance cue the rat to visit either the left or right goal arm to receive a food reward. Our goal was to assess whether trajectory coding would be evident in the CD task. Our results show that trajectory coding was rare in the CD task, with only 12 of 71 cells with place fields on the maze stem showing a significant firing rate difference between left and right trials. For comparison, we recorded from dorsal CA1 during the acquisition and performance of a continuous spatial alternation task identical to that used in previous studies and found a proportion of trajectory coding neurons similar to what has been previously reported. Our data suggest that trajectory coding is not a universal mechanism used by the hippocampus to disambiguate similar trajectories, and instead may be more likely to appear in tasks that require the animal to retrieve information about a past trajectory, particularly in tasks that are continuous rather than discrete in nature.

  17. Single mechanically-gated cation channel currents can trigger action potentials in neocortical and hippocampal pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaev, Yury A; Dosen, Peter J; Laver, Derek R; van Helden, Dirk F; Hamill, Owen P

    2015-05-22

    The mammalian brain is a mechanosensitive organ that responds to different mechanical forces ranging from intrinsic forces implicated in brain morphogenesis to extrinsic forces that can cause concussion and traumatic brain injury. However, little is known of the mechanosensors that transduce these forces. In this study we use cell-attached patch recording to measure single mechanically-gated (MG) channel currents and their affects on spike activity in identified neurons in neonatal mouse brain slices. We demonstrate that both neocortical and hippocampal pyramidal neurons express stretch-activated MG cation channels that are activated by suctions of ~25mm Hg, have a single channel conductance for inward current of 50-70pS and show weak selectivity for alkali metal cations (i.e., Na(+)hippocampal pyramidal neurons. Not all neuron types studied here expressed MG channel currents. In particular, locus coeruleus and cerebellar Purkinje neurons showed no detectable MG channel activity. Moreover their robust rhythmic spike activity was resistant to mechanical modulation. Our observation that a single MG channel current can trigger spiking predicates the need for reassessment of the long held view that the impulse output of central neurons depends only upon their intrinsic voltage-gated channels and/or their integrated synaptic input.

  18. Reduced Hyperpolarization-Activated Current Contributes to Enhanced Intrinsic Excitability in Cultured Hippocampal Neurons from PrP(-/-) Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jing; Stemkowski, Patrick L; Gandini, Maria A; Black, Stefanie A; Zhang, Zizhen; Souza, Ivana A; Chen, Lina; Zamponi, Gerald W

    2016-01-01

    Genetic ablation of cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) has been linked to increased neuronal excitability and synaptic activity in the hippocampus. We have previously shown that synaptic activity in hippocampi of PrP-null mice is increased due to enhanced N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) function. Here, we focused on the effect of PRNP gene knock-out (KO) on intrinsic neuronal excitability, and in particular, the underlying ionic mechanism in hippocampal neurons cultured from P0 mouse pups. We found that the absence of PrP(C) profoundly affected the firing properties of cultured hippocampal neurons in the presence of synaptic blockers. The membrane impedance was greater in PrP-null neurons, and this difference was abolished by the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channel blocker ZD7288 (100 μM). HCN channel activity appeared to be functionally regulated by PrP(C). The amplitude of voltage sag, a characteristic of activating HCN channel current (I h), was decreased in null mice. Moreover, I h peak current was reduced, along with a hyperpolarizing shift in activation gating and slower kinetics. However, neither HCN1 nor HCN2 formed a biochemical complex with PrP(C). These results suggest that the absence of PrP downregulates the activity of HCN channels through activation of a cell signaling pathway rather than through direct interactions. This in turn contributes to an increase in membrane impedance to potentiate neuronal excitability.

  19. Penicillin-induced epilepsy model in rats: dose-dependant effect on hippocampal volume and neuron number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akdogan, Ilgaz; Adiguzel, Esat; Yilmaz, Ismail; Ozdemir, M Bulent; Sahiner, Melike; Tufan, A Cevik

    2008-10-22

    This study was designed to evaluate the penicillin-induced epilepsy model in terms of dose-response relationship of penicillin used to induce epilepsy seizure on hippocampal neuron number and hippocampal volume in Sprague-Dawley rats. Seizures were induced with 300, 500, 1500 and 2000IU of penicillin-G injected intracortically in rats divided in four experimental groups, respectively. Control group was injected intracortically with saline. Animals were decapitated on day 7 of treatment and brains were removed. The total neuron number of pyramidal cell layer from rat hippocampus was estimated using the optical fractionator method. The volume of same hippocampal areas was estimated using the Cavalieri method. Dose-dependent decrease in hippocampal neuron number was observed in three experimental groups (300, 500 and 1500IU of penicillin-G), and the effects were statistically significant when compared to the control group (P<0.009). Dose-dependent decrease in hippocampal volume, on the other hand, was observed in all three of these groups; however, the difference compared to the control group was only statistically significant in 1500IU of penicillin-G injected group (P<0.009). At the dose of 2000IU penicillin-G, all animals died due to status seizures. These results suggest that the appropriate dose of penicillin has to be selected for a given experimental epilepsy study in order to demonstrate the relevant epileptic seizure and its effects. Intracortical 1500IU penicillin-induced epilepsy model may be a good choice to practice studies that investigate neuroprotective mechanisms of the anti-epileptic drugs.

  20. Phenolic Compounds Protect Cultured Hippocampal Neurons against Ethanol-Withdrawal Induced Oxidative Stress

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    Marianna E. Jung

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Ethanol withdrawal is linked to elevated oxidative damage to neurons. Here we report our findings on the contribution of phenolic antioxidants (17β-estradiol, p-octyl-phenol and 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol to counterbalance sudden ethanol withdrawal-initiated oxidative events in hippocampus-derived cultured HT-22 cells. We showed that ethanol withdrawal for 4 h after 24-h ethanol treatment provoked greater levels of oxidative damage than the preceding ethanol exposure. Phenolic antioxidant treatment either during ethanol exposure or ethanol withdrawal only, however, dose-dependently reversed cellular oxidative damage, as demonstrated by the significantly enhanced cell viability, reduced malondialdehyde production and protein carbonylation, compared to untreated cells. Interestingly, the antioxidant treatment schedule had no significant impact on the observed neuroprotection. In addition, the efficacy of the three phenolic compounds was practically equipotent in protecting HT-22 cells in spite of predictions based on an in silico study and a cell free assay of lipid peroxidation. This finding implies that free-radical scavenging may not be the sole factor responsible for the observed neuroprotection and warrants further studies to establish, whether the HT-22 line is indeed a suitable model for in vitro screening of antioxidants against EW-related neuronal damage.

  1. αν and β1 Integrins mediate Aβ-induced neurotoxicity in hippocampal neurons via the FAK signaling pathway.

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    Hai-Yan Han

    Full Text Available αν and β1 integrins mediate Aβ-induced neurotoxicity in primary hippocampal neurons. We treated hippocampal neurons with 2.5 µg/mL 17E6 and 5 µg/mL ab58524, which are specific αν and β1 integrin antagonists, respectively, for 42 h prior to 10 µM Aβ treatment. Next, we employed small interfering RNA (siRNA to silence focal adhesion kinase (FAK, a downstream target gene of integrins. The siRNAs were designed with a target sequence, an MOI of 10 and the addition of 5 µg/mL polybrene. Under these conditions, the neurons were transfected and the apoptosis of different cell types was detected. Moreover, we used real-time PCR and Western blotting analyses to detect the expression of FAK and ρFAK genes in different cell types and investigated the underlying mechanism and signal pathway by which αν and β1 integrins mediate Aβ-induced neurotoxicity in hippocampal neurons. An MTT assay showed that both 17E6 and ab58524 significantly increased cell viability compared with the Aβ-treated neurons (P<0.01 and P<0.05, respectively. However, this protective effect was markedly attenuated after transfection with silencing FAK (siFAK. Moreover, TUNEL immunostaining and flow cytometry indicated that both 17E6 and ab58524 significantly protected hippocampal neurons against apoptosis induced by Aβ (P<0.05 compared with the Aβ-treated cells. However, this protective effect was reversed with siFAK treatment. Both the gene and protein expression of FAK increased after Aβ treatment. Interestingly, as the gene and protein levels of FAK decreased, the ρFAK protein expression markedly increased. Furthermore, both the gene and protein expression of FAK and ρFAK were significantly diminished. Thus, we concluded that both αν and β1 integrins interfered with Aβ-induced neurotoxicity in hippocampal neurons and that this mechanism partially contributes to the activation of the Integrin-FAK signaling pathway.

  2. THE PROTECTIVE EFFECTS OF THE TOTAL SAPONIN OF DIPSACUS ASPEROIDES ON THE APOPTOSIS OF HIPPOCAMPAL NEURONS INDUCED BY β-AMYLOID PROTEIN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱亦华; 杨杰; 胡海涛; 刘勇; 杨广德; 曹云新; 任惠民

    2004-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of the total saponin of Dipsacus asperoides (tSDA) and ginsenoside Rb1 (GRb1) on the apoptosis of primary cultured hippocampal neurons induced by β-amyloid protein (Aβ). Methods Primary cultured hippocampal neurons, the cultures were pretreated with tSDA and GRb1 on 10d for 24 hours respectively. Then the cultures were treated with 35μmol·L-1 Aβ25-35 for 24 hours, observed the changing of survival rate of neurons and the apoptosis of neurons with biochemical analysis combining immunofluorescent cytochemical double-staining technique. Results Hippocampal neurons were treated with 35μmol*L-1 Aβ for 24 hours, and survival rate of neurons downed to 52.6%. When neurons were pretreated by tSDA and GRb1, survival rate of neurons increased 11% to 15%. The findings of immunofluorescent cytochemical double-staining indicated that apoptotic neurons were obviously more than that of the blank group, reaching 43.9%.When neurons were pretreated by tSDA and GRb1, apoptotic neurons were downed to 16.6%, 10.8% respectively. Conclusion tSDA had the same effects as GRb1, protecting the neurons, antagonizing neurotoxicity of Aβ, increasing survival rate of neurons, and reducing apoptotic neurons induced by Aβ.

  3. Temporal correlation between auditory neurons and the hippocampal theta rhythm induced by novel stimulations in awake guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberman, Tamara; Velluti, Ricardo A; Pedemonte, Marisa

    2009-11-17

    The hippocampal theta rhythm is associated with the processing of sensory systems such as touch, smell, vision and hearing, as well as with motor activity, the modulation of autonomic processes such as cardiac rhythm, and learning and memory processes. The discovery of temporal correlation (phase locking) between the theta rhythm and both visual and auditory neuronal activity has led us to postulate the participation of such rhythm in the temporal processing of sensory information. In addition, changes in attention can modify both the theta rhythm and the auditory and visual sensory activity. The present report tested the hypothesis that the temporal correlation between auditory neuronal discharges in the inferior colliculus central nucleus (ICc) and the hippocampal theta rhythm could be enhanced by changes in sensory stimulation. We presented chronically implanted guinea pigs with auditory stimuli that varied over time, and recorded the auditory response during wakefulness. It was observed that the stimulation shifts were capable of producing the temporal phase correlations between the theta rhythm and the ICc unit firing, and they differed depending on the stimulus change performed. Such correlations disappeared approximately 6 s after the change presentation. Furthermore, the power of the hippocampal theta rhythm increased in half of the cases presented with a stimulation change. Based on these data, we propose that the degree of correlation between the unitary activity and the hippocampal theta rhythm varies with--and therefore may signal--stimulus novelty.

  4. Hippocampal neuronal nitric oxide synthase mediates the stress-related depressive behaviors of glucocorticoids by downregulating glucocorticoid receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qi-Gang; Zhu, Li-Juan; Chen, Chen; Wu, Hai-Yin; Luo, Chun-Xia; Chang, Lei; Zhu, Dong-Ya

    2011-05-25

    The molecular mechanisms underlying the behavioral effects of glucocorticoids are poorly understood. We report here that hippocampal neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) is a crucial mediator. Chronic mild stress and glucocorticoids exposures caused hippocampal nNOS overexpression via activating mineralocorticoid receptor. In turn, hippocampal nNOS-derived nitric oxide (NO) significantly downregulated local glucocorticoid receptor expression through both soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC)/cGMP and peroxynitrite (ONOO(-))/extracellular signal-regulated kinase signal pathways, and therefore elevated hypothalamic corticotrophin-releasing factor, a peptide that governs the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. More importantly, nNOS deletion or intrahippocampal nNOS inhibition and NO-cGMP signaling blockade (using NO scavenger or sGC inhibitor) prevented the corticosterone-induced behavioral modifications, suggesting that hippocampal nNOS is necessary for the role of glucocorticoids in mediating depressive behaviors. In addition, directly delivering ONOO(-) donor into hippocampus caused depressive-like behaviors. Our findings reveal a role of hippocampal nNOS in regulating the behavioral effects of glucocorticoids.

  5. Hypothermia but not the N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist, MK-801, attenuates neuronal damage in gerbils subjected to transient global ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchan, A; Pulsinelli, W A

    1990-01-01

    Several laboratories have reported a significant reduction of ischemia-induced injury to hippocampal neurons in rodents treated with competitive and noncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-channel antagonists. This study examined the effects of the noncompetitive antagonist (+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine maleate (MK-801) in Mongolian gerbils subjected to 5 min of bilateral carotid artery occlusion. In adult female gerbils, single doses of MK-801 injected 1 hr prior to ischemia significantly (p less than 0.01) reduced damage to CA1 hippocampal neurons. However, the drug rendered the postischemic animals comatose and hypothermic for several hours compared with the saline-treated animals. In subsequent experiments, animals pretreated with MK-801 and maintained normothermic during and after forebrain ischemia demonstrated no amelioration of hippocampal damage. Gerbils not treated with MK-801, but kept hypothermic in the postischemic period to approximately the same degree (34.5 degrees C) and duration (8 hr) as was induced by MK-801 therapy showed significant (p less than 0.01) protection of CA1 neurons against ischemia. The neuroprotective activity of MK-801 against transient global ischemia appears to be largely a consequence of postischemic hypothermia rather than a direct action on NMDA receptor-channels.

  6. A novel perspective on neuron study: damaging and promoting effects in different neurons induced by mechanical stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yazhou; Wang, Wei; Li, Zong; Hao, Shilei; Wang, Bochu

    2016-10-01

    A growing volume of experimental evidence demonstrates that mechanical stress plays a significant role in growth, proliferation, apoptosis, gene expression, electrophysiological properties and many other aspects of neurons. In this review, first, the mechanical microenvironment and properties of neurons under in vivo conditions are introduced and analyzed. Second, research works in recent decades on the effects of different mechanical forces, especially compression and tension, on various neurons, including dorsal root ganglion neurons, retinal ganglion cells, cerebral cortex neurons, hippocampus neurons, neural stem cells, and other neurons, are summarized. Previous research results demonstrate that mechanical stress can not only injure neurons by damaging their morphology, impacting their electrophysiological characteristics and gene expression, but also promote neuron self-repair. Finally, some future perspectives in neuron research are discussed.

  7. Age-related changes of NGF, BDNF, parvalbumin and neuronal nitric oxide synthase immunoreactivity in the mouse hippocampal CA1 sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Natsumi; Abe, Manami; Eto, Risa; Kato, Hiroyuki; Araki, Tsutomu

    2008-06-01

    We investigated the age-related alterations in nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), parvalbumin and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) immunoreactivity of the mouse hippocampal CA1 sector. NGF and BDNF immunoreactivity was unchanged in the hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons from 2 to 50-59 weeks of birth. In contrast, a significant increase in the NGF and BDNF immunoreactivity was observed in glial cells of the hippocampal CA1 sector from 40-42 to 50-59 weeks of birth. On the other hand, the number of parvalbumin- and nNOS-positive interneurons was unchanged in the hippocampal CA1 sector during aging processes, except for a significant decrease of nNOS-positive interneurons 2 weeks of birth. Our results indicate that NGF and BDNF immunoreactivity was unaltered in the hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons during aging processes. In contrast, a significant increase in the NGF and BDNF immunoreactivity was observed in glial cells of the hippocampal CA1 sector during aging processes. The present study also shows that the number of parvalbumin- and nNOS-positive interneurons was unchanged in the hippocampal CA1 sector during aging processes, except for a significant decrease of nNOS-positive interneurons 2 weeks of birth. These results demonstrate that the expression of glial NGF and BDNF may play a key role for helping survival and maintenance of pyramidal neurons and neuronal functions in the hippocampal CA1 sector during aging processes. Furthermore, our findings suggest that parvalbumin- and nNOS-positive interneurons in the hippocampal CA1 sector are resistant to aging processes. Moreover, our findings suggest that nitric oxide synthesized by the nNOS may play some role for neuronal growth during postnatal development.

  8. More vulnerability of left than right hippocampal damage in right-handed patients with post-traumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Xi-Ji; Xue, Li; Liu, Wei; Chen, Fu-Yin; Zhu, Cheng; Sun, Xiao-Hai; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Liu, Zhong-Cun; Zhao, Hu

    2013-06-30

    Previous studies have shown hippocampal abnormalities in people with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), but findings of diminished volume in shortages in the hippocampus have been inconsistent. In this study, we investigated changes in hippocampal volume and neuronal metabolites in right-handed PTSD patients to determine their possible relationship(s) with PTSD severity. We performed a case-control study of 11 right-handed PTSD patients and 11 healthy controls using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H MRS). Hippocampal volume and metabolite ratios of N-acetylaspartate (NAA) to creatine (Cr) (NAA/Cr) and choline compounds (Cho) to Cr (Cho/Cr) were calculated. The severity of PTSD was evaluated by the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS). Significantly decreased left and total normalized hippocampal volumes were found in PTSD patients compared with controls (6.6% for the left hippocampus, 5.5% for total hippocampus). Also, the bilateral hippocampal NAA/Cr ratio of PTSD patients was significantly reduced compared with controls. The volume of the left hippocampus was negatively correlated to the CAPS total and CPAS-C scores. The left hippocampal NAA/Cr ratio was negatively correlated to the CAPS-total, CAPS-B, CAPS-C, and CAPS-D scores. The CAPS total and the CAPS-B scores were positively correlated to the Cho/Cr ratio of the right hippocampus. Our results indicate that hippocampal dysfunction is asymmetric in right-handed PTSD patients, with the left side affected more than the right.

  9. Modulation of Hyperpolarization-Activated Cation Currents (Ih) by Ethanol in Rat Hippocampal CA3 Pyramidal Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Licheri, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that ethanol (EtOH), through the interaction with several membrane proteins, as well as intracellular pathways, is capable to modulate many neuronal function. Recent reports show that EtOH increases the firing rate of hippocampal GABAergic interneurons through the positive modulation of the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) cation channels. This effect might be consistent with the increase of GABA release from presynaptic terminals...

  10. Repeated transcranial magnetic stimulation prevents kindling-induced changes in electrophysiological properties of rat hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shojaei, A; Semnanian, S; Janahmadi, M; Moradi-Chameh, H; Firoozabadi, S M; Mirnajafi-Zadeh, J

    2014-11-01

    The mechanisms underlying antiepileptic or antiepileptogenic effects of repeated transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) are poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of rTMS applied during rapid amygdala kindling on some electrophysiological properties of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. Male Wistar rats were kindled by daily electrical stimulation of the basolateral amygdala in a semi-rapid manner (12 stimulations/day) until they achieved stage-5 seizure. One group (kindled+rTMS (KrTMS)) of animals received rTMS (1Hz for 4min) 5min after termination of daily kindling stimulations. Twenty four hours following the last kindling stimulation electrophysiological properties of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons were investigated using whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Amygdala kindling significantly depolarized the resting membrane potential and increased the input resistance, spontaneous firing activity, number of evoked spikes and half-width of the first evoked spike. Kindling also decreased the first-spike latency and amplitude significantly. Application of rTMS during kindling somehow prevented the development of seizures and protected CA1 pyramidal neurons of hippocampus against deleterious effect of kindling on both passive and active neuronal electrophysiological properties. Interestingly, application of rTMS alone enhanced the excitability of CA1 pyramidal neurons significantly. Based on the results of our study, it may be suggested that rTMS exerts its anticonvulsant effect, in part, through preventing the amygdala kindling-induced changes in electrophysiological properties of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. It seems that rTMS exerts protective effects on the neural circuits involved in spreading the seizures from the focus to other parts of the brain.

  11. Serotonin (5-HT) regulates neurite outgrowth through 5-HT1A and 5-HT7 receptors in cultured hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Paulina S; Neira, David; Muñoz, Mauricio; Lavandero, Sergio; Fiedler, Jenny L

    2014-08-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) production and expression of 5-HT receptors (5-HTRs) occur early during prenatal development. Recent evidence suggests that, in addition to its classical role as a neurotransmitter, 5-HT regulates neuronal connectivity during mammalian development by modulating cell migration and neuronal cytoarchitecture. Given the variety of 5-HTRs, researchers have had difficulty clarifying the specific role of each receptor subtype in brain development. Signalling mediated by the G-protein-coupled 5-HT1A R and 5-HT7 R, however, has been associated with neuronal plasticity. Thus, we hypothesized that 5-HT promotes neurite outgrowth through 5-HT1A R and 5-HT7 R. The involvement of 5-HT1A R and 5-HT7 R in the morphology of rat hippocampal neurons was evaluated by treating primary cultures at 2 days in vitro with 5-HT and specific antagonists for 5-HT1A R and 5-HT7 R (WAY-100635 and SB269970, respectively). The stimulation of hippocampal neurons with 100 nM 5-HT for 24 hr produced no effect on either the number or the length of primary neurites. Nonetheless, after 5HT7 R was blocked, the addition of 5-HT increased the number of primary neurites, suggesting that 5HT7 R could inhibit neuritogenesis. In contrast, 5-HT induced secondary neurite outgrowth, an effect inhibited by 1 μM WAY-100635 or SB269970. These results suggest that both serotonergic receptors participate in secondary neurite outgrowth. We conclude that 5-HT1A R and 5-HT7 R regulate neuronal morphology in primary hippocampal cultures by promoting secondary neurite outgrowth.

  12. Formaldehyde increases intracellular calcium concentration in primary cultured hippocampal neurons partly through NMDA receptors and T-type calcium channels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ye-Nan Chi; Xu Zhang; Jie Cai; Feng-Yu Liu; Guo-Gang Xing; You Wan

    2012-01-01

    Objective Formaldehyde at high concentrations is a contributor to air pollution.It is also an endogenous metabolic product in cells,and when beyond physiological concentrations,has pathological effects on neurons.Formaldehyde induces mis-folding and aggregation of neuronal tau protein,hippocampal neuronal apoptosis,cognitive impairment and loss of memory functions,as well as excitation of peripheral nociceptive neurons in cancer pain models.Intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) is an important intracellular messenger,and plays a key role in many pathological processes.The present study aimed to investigate the effect of formaldehyde on [Ca2+]i and the possible involvement of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) and T-type Ca2+ channels on the cell membrane.Methods Using primary cultured hippocampal neurons as a model,changes of [Ca2+]i in the presence of formaldehyde at a low concentration were detected by confocal laser scanning microscopy.Results Formaldehyde at 1 mmol/L approximately doubled [Ca2+]i.(2R)-amino-5-phosphonopentanoate (AP5,25 μtmol/L,an NMDAR antagonist) and mibefradil (MIB,1 μtmol/L,a T-type Ca2+ channel blocker),given 5 min after formaldehyde perfusion,each partly inhibited the formaldehyde-induced increase of [Ca2+]i,and this inhibitory effect was reinforced by combined application of AP5 and MIB.When applied 3 min before formaldehyde perfusion,AP5 (even at 50 μmol/L) did not inhibit the formaldehyde-induced increase of [Ca2+]i,but MIB (1 μmol/L) significantly inhibited this increase by 70%.Conclusion These results suggest that formaldehyde at a low concentration increases [Ca2+]i in cultured hippocampal neurons; NMDARs and T-type Ca2+ channels may be involved in this process.

  13. Rapid effect of stress concentration corticosterone on glutamate receptor and its subtype NMDA receptor activity in cultured hippocampal neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘玲; 孙继虎; 王春安

    2003-01-01

    Objective:To study the rapid effect of glucocorticoids(GCs)on NMDA receptor activity in hippocampal neurons in stress and to elucidate its underlying probable membrane mechanisms.Methods:Whole-cell patch-clamp recording was used to assess the effect of stress concentration corticosterone(B)on the responses of cultured hippocampal neurons to glutamate and NMDA(N-methy-D-asparatic acid).To make clear the target of B,intracellular dialysis of B(10 μ mol/L)through patch pipette and extracellular application of bovine serum albumin-conjugated corticosterone(B-BSA,10 μmol/L)were carried out to observe their influence on peak amplitude of NMDA-evoked current.Results:B had a rapid,reversible and inhibitory effect on peak amplitude of GLU- or NMDA-evoked current in cultured hippocampal neurons.Furthermore,B-BSA had the inhibitory effect on INMDA as that of B,but intracellularly dialyzed B had no significant effect on INMDA.Conclusion:These results suggest that under the condition of stress,GCs may rapidly,negatively regulate excitatory synaptic receptors-glutamate receptors(GluRs),especially NMDA receptor(NMDAR)in central nervous system,which is mediated by rapid membrane mechanisms,but not by classical,genomic mechanisms.

  14. Imipramine protects against the deleterious effects of chronic corticosterone on depression-like behavior, hippocampal reelin expression, and neuronal maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, Erin Y; Fournier, Neil M; Lussier, April L; Romay-Tallon, Raquel; Caruncho, Hector J; Kalynchuk, Lisa E

    2015-07-03

    We have hypothesized that a downregulation of reelin and deficient maturation of adult-born hippocampal neurons are important factors in the pathogenesis of depression. This hypothesis is based on previous work showing that depression-like behavior in rats treated with protracted corticosterone develops in concert with decreased dendritic complexity in newborn hippocampal granule neurons and decreased reelin expression in the proliferative subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus. In addition, heterozygous reeler mice with approximately 50% of normal brain levels of reelin are more vulnerable to the depressogenic effects of corticosterone than wild-type mice. The purpose of this experiment was to provide pharmacological validation for the link between reelin, neuronal maturation, and depression by examining whether the deleterious effects of corticosterone on these measures could be prevented by co-administration of the antidepressant imipramine. Rats received corticosterone injections, corticosterone injections plus either 10 or 15mg/kg imipramine injections, or vehicle injections for 21 consecutive days. They were then subjected to the forced swim test to assess depression-like behavior and sacrificed for immunohistochemical examination of immature neuron number and dendritic complexity and the presence of reelin+cells. We found that corticosterone increases depression-like behavior, decreases the number of reelin+cells in the subgranular zone, and decreases the number and complexity of immature neurons in the granule cell layer. All of these behavioral and cellular phenotypes were prevented by imipramine, providing further support for the idea that reelin is involved in the pathogenesis of depression.

  15. DIDS prevents ischemic membrane degradation in cultured hippocampal neurons by inhibiting matrix metalloproteinase release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamenter, Matthew E; Ryu, Julie; Hua, Serena T; Perkins, Guy A; Mendiola, Vincent L; Gu, Xiang Q; Ellisman, Mark H; Haddad, Gabriel G

    2012-01-01

    During stroke, cells in the infarct core exhibit rapid failure of their permeability barriers, which releases ions and inflammatory molecules that are deleterious to nearby tissue (the penumbra). Plasma membrane degradation is key to penumbral spread and is mediated by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), which are released via vesicular exocytosis into the extracellular fluid in response to stress. DIDS (4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid) preserves membrane integrity in neurons challenged with an in vitro ischemic penumbral mimic (ischemic solution: IS) and we asked whether this action was mediated via inhibition of MMP activity. In cultured murine hippocampal neurons challenged with IS, intracellular proMMP-2 and -9 expression increased 4-10 fold and extracellular latent and active MMP isoform expression increased 2-22 fold. MMP-mediated extracellular gelatinolytic activity increased ∼20-50 fold, causing detachment of 32.1±4.5% of cells from the matrix and extensive plasma membrane degradation (>60% of cells took up vital dyes and >60% of plasma membranes were fragmented or blebbed). DIDS abolished cellular detachment and membrane degradation in neurons and the pathology-induced extracellular expression of latent and active MMPs. DIDS similarly inhibited extracellular MMP expression and cellular detachment induced by the pro-apoptotic agent staurosporine or the general proteinase agonist 4-aminophenylmercuric acetate (APMA). Conversely, DIDS-treatment did not impair stress-induced intracellular proMMP production, nor the intracellular cleavage of proMMP-2 to the active form, suggesting DIDS interferes with the vesicular extrusion of MMPs rather than directly inhibiting proteinase expression or activation. In support of this hypothesis, an antagonist of the V-type vesicular ATPase also inhibited extracellular MMP expression to a similar degree as DIDS. In addition, in a proteinase-independent model of vesicular exocytosis, DIDS prevented stimulus

  16. DIDS prevents ischemic membrane degradation in cultured hippocampal neurons by inhibiting matrix metalloproteinase release.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew E Pamenter

    Full Text Available During stroke, cells in the infarct core exhibit rapid failure of their permeability barriers, which releases ions and inflammatory molecules that are deleterious to nearby tissue (the penumbra. Plasma membrane degradation is key to penumbral spread and is mediated by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, which are released via vesicular exocytosis into the extracellular fluid in response to stress. DIDS (4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid preserves membrane integrity in neurons challenged with an in vitro ischemic penumbral mimic (ischemic solution: IS and we asked whether this action was mediated via inhibition of MMP activity. In cultured murine hippocampal neurons challenged with IS, intracellular proMMP-2 and -9 expression increased 4-10 fold and extracellular latent and active MMP isoform expression increased 2-22 fold. MMP-mediated extracellular gelatinolytic activity increased ∼20-50 fold, causing detachment of 32.1±4.5% of cells from the matrix and extensive plasma membrane degradation (>60% of cells took up vital dyes and >60% of plasma membranes were fragmented or blebbed. DIDS abolished cellular detachment and membrane degradation in neurons and the pathology-induced extracellular expression of latent and active MMPs. DIDS similarly inhibited extracellular MMP expression and cellular detachment induced by the pro-apoptotic agent staurosporine or the general proteinase agonist 4-aminophenylmercuric acetate (APMA. Conversely, DIDS-treatment did not impair stress-induced intracellular proMMP production, nor the intracellular cleavage of proMMP-2 to the active form, suggesting DIDS interferes with the vesicular extrusion of MMPs rather than directly inhibiting proteinase expression or activation. In support of this hypothesis, an antagonist of the V-type vesicular ATPase also inhibited extracellular MMP expression to a similar degree as DIDS. In addition, in a proteinase-independent model of vesicular exocytosis, DIDS

  17. Membrane voltage modulates the GABA(A) receptor gating in cultured rat hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pytel, Maria; Mercik, Katarzyna; Mozrzymas, Jerzy W

    2006-02-01

    The kinetics of GABAergic currents in neurons is known to be modulated by the membrane voltage but the underlying mechanisms have not been fully explored. In particular, the impact of membrane potential on the GABA(A) receptor gating has not been elucidated. In the present study, the effect of membrane voltage on current responses elicited by ultrafast GABA applications was studied in cultured hippocampal neurons. The current to voltage relationship (I-V) for responses to saturating [GABA] (10 mM) showed an inward rectification (slope conductance at positive voltages was 0.62 +/- 0.05 of that at negative potentials). On the contrary, I-V for currents evoked by low [GABA] (1 microM) showed an outward rectification. The onset of currents elicited by saturating [GABA] was significantly accelerated at positive potentials. Analysis of currents evoked by prolonged applications of saturating [GABA] revealed that positive voltages significantly increased the rate and extent of desensitization. The onsets of current responses to non-saturating [GABA] were significantly accelerated at positive voltages indicating an enhancement of the binding rate. However, at low [GABA] at which the onset rate is expected to approach an asymptote set by opening/closing and unbinding rates, no significant modification of current onset by voltage was observed. Quantitative analysis based on model simulations indicated that the major effect of membrane depolarization was to increase the rates of binding, desensitization and of opening as well as to slightly reduce the rate of exit from desensitization. In conclusion, we provide evidence that membrane voltage affects the GABA(A) receptor microscopic gating.

  18. Pregabalin reduces the release of synaptic vesicles from cultured hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micheva, Kristina D; Taylor, Charles P; Smith, Stephen J

    2006-08-01

    Pregabalin [S-[+]-3-isobutylGABA or (S)-3-(aminomethyl)-5-methylhexanoic acid, Lyrica] is an anticonvulsant and analgesic medication that is both structurally and pharmacologically related to gabapentin (Neurontin; Pfizer Inc., New York, NY). Previous studies have shown that pregabalin reduces the release of neurotransmitters in several in vitro preparations, although the molecular details of these effects are less clear. The present study was performed using living cultured rat hippocampal neurons with the synaptic vesicle fluorescent dye probe FM4-64 to determine details of the action of pregabalin to reduce neurotransmitter release. Our results indicate that pregabalin treatment, at concentrations that are therapeutically relevant, slightly but significantly reduces the emptying of neurotransmitter vesicles from presynaptic sites in living neurons. Dye release is reduced in both glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD)-immunoreactive and GAD-negative (presumed glutamatergic) synaptic terminals. Furthermore, both calcium-dependent release and hyperosmotic (calcium-independent) dye release are reduced by pregabalin. The effects of pregabalin on dye release are masked in the presence of l-isoleucine, consistent with the fact that both of these compounds have a high binding affinity to the calcium channel alpha(2)-delta protein. The effect of pregabalin is not apparent in the presence of an N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist [D(-)-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid], suggesting that pregabalin action depends on NMDA receptor activation. Finally, the action of pregabalin on dye release is most apparent before and early during a train of electrical stimuli when vesicle release preferentially involves the readily releasable pool.

  19. Transient increase in Zn2+ in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons causes reversible memory deficit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Takeda

    Full Text Available The translocation of synaptic Zn(2+ to the cytosolic compartment has been studied to understand Zn(2+ neurotoxicity in neurological diseases. However, it is unknown whether the moderate increase in Zn(2+ in the cytosolic compartment affects memory processing in the hippocampus. In the present study, the moderate increase in cytosolic Zn(2+ in the hippocampus was induced with clioquinol (CQ, a zinc ionophore. Zn(2+ delivery by Zn-CQ transiently attenuated CA1 long-term potentiation (LTP in hippocampal slices prepared 2 h after i.p. injection of Zn-CQ into rats, when intracellular Zn(2+ levels was transiently increased in the CA1 pyramidal cell layer, followed by object recognition memory deficit. Object recognition memory was transiently impaired 30 min after injection of ZnCl(2 into the CA1, but not after injection into the dentate gyrus that did not significantly increase intracellular Zn(2+ in the granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus. Object recognition memory deficit may be linked to the preferential increase in Zn(2+ and/or the preferential vulnerability to Zn(2+ in CA1 pyramidal neurons. In the case of the cytosolic increase in endogenous Zn(2+ in the CA1 induced by 100 mM KCl, furthermore, object recognition memory was also transiently impaired, while ameliorated by co-injection of CaEDTA to block the increase in cytosolic Zn(2+. The present study indicates that the transient increase in cytosolic Zn(2+ in CA1 pyramidal neurons reversibly impairs object recognition memory.

  20. Dietary Restriction reduces hippocampal neurogenesis and granule cell neuron density without affecting the density of mossy fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staples, Miranda C; Fannon-Pavlich, McKenzie J; Mysore, Karthik K; Dutta, Rahul R; Ongjoco, Alexandria T; Quach, Leon W; Kharidia, Khush M; Somkuwar, Sucharita S; Mandyam, Chitra D

    2017-03-08

    The hippocampal formation undergoes significant morphological and functional changes after prolonged caloric and dietary restriction (DR). In this study we tested whether prolonged DR results in deleterious alterations in hippocampal neurogenesis, density of granule cell neurons and mossy fibers, all of which support plasticity in the dentate gyrus. Young adult animals either experienced free access to food (control condition), or every-other-day feeding regimen (DR condition) for 3 months. The number of Ki-67 cells and 28-day old 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) cells were quantified in the dorsal and ventral dentate gyrus to determine the effect of DR on cellular proliferation and survival of neural progenitor cells in the anatomically defined regions of the dentate gyrus. The density of granule cell neurons and synaptoporin were also quantified to determine the effect of DR on granule cell neurons and mossy fiber projections in the dentate gyrus. Our results show that DR increases cellular proliferation and concurrently reduces survival of newly born neurons in the ventral dentate gyrus without effecting the number of cells in the dorsal dentate gyrus. DR reduced density of granule cell neurons in the dorsal dentate gyrus. These alterations in the number of granule cell neurons did not affect mossy fiber density in DR animals, which was visualized as no differences in synaptoporin expression. Our findings demonstrate that granule cell neurons in the dentate gyrus are vulnerable to chronic DR and that the reorganization of granule cells in the dentate gyrus subregions is not producing concomitant alterations in dentate gyrus neuronal circuitry with this type of dietary restriction.

  1. Electrophysiological effects of SKF83959 on hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons: potential mechanisms for the drug's neuroprotective effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Yuan Chu

    Full Text Available Although the potent anti-parkinsonian action of the atypical D₁-like receptor agonist SKF83959 has been attributed to the selective activation of phosphoinositol(PI-linked D₁ receptor, whereas the mechanism underlying its potent neuroprotective effect is not fully understood. In the present study, the actions of SKF83959 on neuronal membrane potential and neuronal excitability were investigated in CA1 pyramidal neurons of rat hippocampal slices. SKF83959 (10-100 µM caused a concentration-dependent depolarization, associated with a reduction of input resistance in CA1 pyramidal neurons. The depolarization was blocked neither by antagonists for D₁, D₂, 5-HT(2A/2C receptors and α₁-adrenoceptor, nor by intracellular dialysis of GDP-β-S. However, the specific HCN channel blocker ZD7288 (10 µM antagonized both the depolarization and reduction of input resistance caused by SKF83959. In voltage-clamp experiments, SKF83959 (10-100 µM caused a concentration-dependent increase of Ih current in CA1 pyramidal neurons, which was independent of D₁ receptor activation. Moreover, SKF83959 (50 µM caused a 6 mV positive shift in the activation curve of Ih and significantly accelerated the activation of Ih current. In addition, SKF83959 also reduced the neuronal excitability of CA1 pyramidal neurons, which was manifested by the decrease in the number and amplitude of action potentials evoked by depolarizing currents, and by the increase of firing threshold and rhoebase current. The above results suggest that SKF83959 increased Ih current through a D₁ receptor-independent mechanism, which led to the depolarization of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. These findings provide a novel mechanism for the drug's neuroprotective effects, which may contributes to its therapeutic benefits in Parkinson's disease.

  2. The potential of apolipoprotein E4 to act as a substrate for primary cultures of hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwang-Min; Vicenty, Janice; Palmore, G Tayhas R

    2013-04-01

    The E4 isoform of apolipoprotein (apoE4) is known to be a major risk factor for Alzheimer's Disease (AD). Previous in vitro studies have shown apoE4 to have a negative effect on neuronal outgrowth when incubated with lipids. The effect of apoE4 itself on the development of neurons from the central nervous system (CNS), however, has not been well characterized. Consequently, apoE4 alone has not been pursued as a substrate for neuronal cultures. In this study, the effect of surface-bound apoE4 on developmental features of rat hippocampal neurons was examined. We show that apoE4 substrates elicit significantly enhanced values in all developmental features at day 2 of culture when compared to laminin (LN) substrates, which is the current substrate-of-choice for neuronal cultures. Interestingly, the adhesion of hippocampal neurons was found to be significantly lower on LN substrates than on glass substrates, but the axon lengths on both substrates were similar. In addition, this study demonstrates that the adhesion- and growth-enhancing effects of apoE4 substrates are not mediated by heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs), proteins that have been indicated to function as receptors or co-receptors for apoE4. In the absence of lipids, apoE4 appears to use an unknown pathway for up-regulating neuronal adhesion and neurite outgrowth. Our results indicate that apoE4 is better than LN as a substrate for primary cultures of CNS neurons and should be considered in the design of tissue engineered CNS.

  3. Complexity and multifractality of neuronal noise in mouse and human hippocampal epileptiform dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serletis, Demitre; Bardakjian, Berj L.; Valiante, Taufik A.; Carlen, Peter L.

    2012-10-01

    Fractal methods offer an invaluable means of investigating turbulent nonlinearity in non-stationary biomedical recordings from the brain. Here, we investigate properties of complexity (i.e. the correlation dimension, maximum Lyapunov exponent, 1/fγ noise and approximate entropy) and multifractality in background neuronal noise-like activity underlying epileptiform transitions recorded at the intracellular and local network scales from two in vitro models: the whole-intact mouse hippocampus and lesional human hippocampal slices. Our results show evidence for reduced dynamical complexity and multifractal signal features following transition to the ictal epileptiform state. These findings suggest that pathological breakdown in multifractal complexity coincides with loss of signal variability or heterogeneity, consistent with an unhealthy ictal state that is far from the equilibrium of turbulent yet healthy fractal dynamics in the brain. Thus, it appears that background noise-like activity successfully captures complex and multifractal signal features that may, at least in part, be used to classify and identify brain state transitions in the healthy and epileptic brain, offering potential promise for therapeutic neuromodulatory strategies for afflicted patients suffering from epilepsy and other related neurological disorders. This paper is based on chapter 5 of Serletis (2010 PhD Dissertation Department of Physiology, Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto).

  4. Investigating sub-spine actin dynamics in rat hippocampal neurons with super-resolution optical imaging.

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    Vedakumar Tatavarty

    Full Text Available Morphological changes in dendritic spines represent an important mechanism for synaptic plasticity which is postulated to underlie the vital cognitive phenomena of learning and memory. These morphological changes are driven by the dynamic actin cytoskeleton that is present in dendritic spines. The study of actin dynamics in these spines traditionally has been hindered by the small size of the spine. In this study, we utilize a photo-activation localization microscopy (PALM-based single-molecule tracking technique to analyze F-actin movements with approximately 30-nm resolution in cultured hippocampal neurons. We were able to observe the kinematic (physical motion of actin filaments, i.e., retrograde flow and kinetic (F-actin turn-over dynamics of F-actin at the single-filament level in dendritic spines. We found that F-actin in dendritic spines exhibits highly heterogeneous kinematic dynamics at the individual filament level, with simultaneous actin flows in both retrograde and anterograde directions. At the ensemble level, movements of filaments integrate into a net retrograde flow of approximately 138 nm/min. These results suggest a weakly polarized F-actin network that consists of mostly short filaments in dendritic spines.

  5. Erythropoietin and carbamylated erythropoietin promote histone deacetylase 5 phosphorylation and nuclear export in rat hippocampal neurons

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    Jo, Hye-Ryeong [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Graduate School of Biomedical Science and Engineering (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong-Seok [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Graduate School of Biomedical Science and Engineering (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine, Hanyang University, 17 Haengdang-dong, Sungdong-gu, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Son, Hyeon, E-mail: hyeonson@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Graduate School of Biomedical Science and Engineering (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine, Hanyang University, 17 Haengdang-dong, Sungdong-gu, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-29

    Erythropoietin (EPO) produces neurotrophic effects in animal model of neurodegeneration. However, clinical use of EPO is limited due to thrombotic risk. Carbamylated EPO (cEPO), devoid of thrombotic risk, has been proposed as a novel neuroprotective and neurotrophic agent although the molecular mechanisms of cEPO remain incomplete. Here, we show a previously unidentified role of histone deacetylase 5 (HDAC5) in the actions of EPO and cEPO. EPO and cEPO regulate the HDAC5 phosphorylation at two critical sites, Ser259 and Ser498 through a protein kinase D (PKD) dependent pathway. In addition, EPO and cEPO rapidly stimulates nuclear export of HDAC5 in rat hippocampal neurons which expressing HDAC5-GFP. Consequently, EPO and cEPO enhanced the myocyte enhancer factor-2 (MEF2) target gene expression. Taken together, our results reveal that EPO and cEPO mediate MEF2 target gene expression via the regulation of HDAC5 phosphorylation at Ser259/498, and suggest that HDAC5 could be a potential mechanism contributing to the therapeutic actions of EPO and cEPO.

  6. Pinacidil and levamisole prevent glutamate-induced death of hippocampal neuronal cells through reducing ROS production.

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    Shukry, Mustafa; Kamal, Tarek; Ali, Radi; Farrag, Foad; Almadaly, Essam; Saleh, Ayman A; Abu El-Magd, Mohammed

    2015-10-01

    Activators of both adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP)-sensitive K(+) (KATP) channel and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel have significant in vivo and in vitro neuroprotection against glutamate-induced death of some neuronal cells. Here, the effect of the KATP channel activator, pinacidil, and the CFTR Cl(-) channel opener, levamisole, against glutamate-induced oxidative stress were investigated in mouse hippocampal cells, HT22. The results from cell viability assay (WST-1) showed that pinacidil and levamisole weakly protected cells against glutamate-induced toxicity at 10 μM and their effect increased in a dose-dependent manner till reach maximum protection at 300 μM. Pretreatment with pinacidil or levamisole significantly suppressed the elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) triggered by glutamate through stabilising mitochondrial membrane potential and subsequently protected HT22 cells against glutamate-induced death. HT22 cells viability was maintained by pinacidil and levamisole in presence of glutathione inhibitor, BSO. Also, pinacidil and levamisole pretreatment did not induce recovery of glutathione levels decreased by glutamate Expectedly, this protection was abolished by the KATP and CFTR Cl(-) channels blocker, glibenclamide. Thus, both pinacidil and levamisole protect HT22 cells against glutamate-induced cell death through stabilising mitochondrial membrane potential and subsequently decreasing ROS production.

  7. Synaptic Effects of Munc18-1 Alternative Splicing in Excitatory Hippocampal Neurons.

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    Marieke Meijer

    Full Text Available The munc18-1 gene encodes two splice-variants that vary at the C-terminus of the protein and are expressed at different levels in different regions of the adult mammalian brain. Here, we investigated the expression pattern of these splice variants within the brainstem and tested whether they are functionally different. Munc18-1a is expressed in specific nuclei of the brainstem including the LRN, VII and SOC, while Munc18-1b expression is relatively low/absent in these regions. Furthermore, Munc18-1a is the major splice variant in the Calyx of Held. Synaptic transmission was analyzed in autaptic hippocampal munc18-1 KO neurons re-expressing either Munc18-1a or Munc18-1b. The two splice variants supported synaptic transmission to a similar extent, but Munc18-1b was slightly more potent in sustaining synchronous release during high frequency stimulation. Our data suggest that alternative splicing of Munc18-1 support synaptic transmission to a similar extent, but could modulate presynaptic short-term plasticity.

  8. Synaptic Effects of Munc18-1 Alternative Splicing in Excitatory Hippocampal Neurons.

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    Meijer, Marieke; Cijsouw, Tony; Toonen, Ruud F; Verhage, Matthijs

    2015-01-01

    The munc18-1 gene encodes two splice-variants that vary at the C-terminus of the protein and are expressed at different levels in different regions of the adult mammalian brain. Here, we investigated the expression pattern of these splice variants within the brainstem and tested whether they are functionally different. Munc18-1a is expressed in specific nuclei of the brainstem including the LRN, VII and SOC, while Munc18-1b expression is relatively low/absent in these regions. Furthermore, Munc18-1a is the major splice variant in the Calyx of Held. Synaptic transmission was analyzed in autaptic hippocampal munc18-1 KO neurons re-expressing either Munc18-1a or Munc18-1b. The two splice variants supported synaptic transmission to a similar extent, but Munc18-1b was slightly more potent in sustaining synchronous release during high frequency stimulation. Our data suggest that alternative splicing of Munc18-1 support synaptic transmission to a similar extent, but could modulate presynaptic short-term plasticity.

  9. Nicotine uses neuron-glia communication to enhance hippocampal synaptic transmission and long-term memory.

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    López-Hidalgo, Mónica; Salgado-Puga, Karla; Alvarado-Martínez, Reynaldo; Medina, Andrea Cristina; Prado-Alcalá, Roberto A; García-Colunga, Jesús

    2012-01-01

    Nicotine enhances synaptic transmission and facilitates long-term memory. Now it is known that bi-directional glia-neuron interactions play important roles in the physiology of the brain. However, the involvement of glial cells in the effects of nicotine has not been considered until now. In particular, the gliotransmitter D-serine, an endogenous co-agonist of NMDA receptors, enables different types of synaptic plasticity and memory in the hippocampus. Here, we report that hippocampal long-term synaptic plasticity induced by nicotine was annulled by an enzyme that degrades endogenous D-serine, or by an NMDA receptor antagonist that acts at the D-serine binding site. Accordingly, both effects of nicotine: the enhancement of synaptic transmission and facilitation of long-term memory were eliminated by impairing glial cells with fluoroacetate, and were restored with exogenous D-serine. Together, these results show that glial D-serine is essential for the long-term effects of nicotine on synaptic plasticity and memory, and they highlight the roles of glial cells as key participants in brain functions.

  10. Dendrigraft polylysine coated-poly(glycolic acid) fibrous scaffolds for hippocampal neurons.

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    Kojima, Chie; Fusaoka-Nishioka, Eri; Imai, Toshio; Nakahira, Atsushi; Onodera, Hiroshi

    2016-11-01

    Poly(glycolic acid) (PGA) fibers are a good candidate material for nerve cell scaffolds, which is applicable to the treatment of peripheral nerve injuries. Polylysine is widely used as a coating material for cell substrates to promote nerve cell adhesion. In this study, linear and dendrigraft polylysines were used to coat PGA fibers. The association of large dendrigraft polylysines with PGA fibers was lower and unstable, compared with linear polylysine. However, more hippocampal neurons adhered to PGA fibers coated with large dendrigraft polylysine than linear polylysine. Enhanced cell adhesion was observed, even when the dendrigraft polylysine was coated on the PGA fibers at a low concentration (0.05 μg/mL) or when it was coated in water instead of alkaline buffer. Differences in cell adhesion properties were seen between the dendrigraft polylysine coating and a laminin coating. Thus, large dendrigraft polylysines are a useful coating material for nerve cell scaffolds. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2744-2750, 2016.

  11. Nicotine uses neuron-glia communication to enhance hippocampal synaptic transmission and long-term memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica López-Hidalgo

    Full Text Available Nicotine enhances synaptic transmission and facilitates long-term memory. Now it is known that bi-directional glia-neuron interactions play important roles in the physiology of the brain. However, the involvement of glial cells in the effects of nicotine has not been considered until now. In particular, the gliotransmitter D-serine, an endogenous co-agonist of NMDA receptors, enables different types of synaptic plasticity and memory in the hippocampus. Here, we report that hippocampal long-term synaptic plasticity induced by nicotine was annulled by an enzyme that degrades endogenous D-serine, or by an NMDA receptor antagonist that acts at the D-serine binding site. Accordingly, both effects of nicotine: the enhancement of synaptic transmission and facilitation of long-term memory were eliminated by impairing glial cells with fluoroacetate, and were restored with exogenous D-serine. Together, these results show that glial D-serine is essential for the long-term effects of nicotine on synaptic plasticity and memory, and they highlight the roles of glial cells as key participants in brain functions.

  12. Ezh1 and Ezh2 differentially regulate PSD-95 gene transcription in developing hippocampal neurons.

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    Henriquez, Berta; Bustos, Fernando J; Aguilar, Rodrigo; Becerra, Alvaro; Simon, Felipe; Montecino, Martin; van Zundert, Brigitte

    2013-11-01

    Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) mediates transcriptional silencing by catalyzing histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3), but its role in the maturation of postmitotic mammalian neurons remains largely unknown. We report that the PRC2 paralogs Ezh1 and Ezh2 are differentially expressed during hippocampal development. We show that depletion of Ezh2 leads to increased expression of PSD-95, a critical plasticity gene, and that reduced PSD-95 gene transcription is correlated with enrichment of Ezh2 at the PSD-95 gene promoter; however, the H3K27me3 epigenetic mark is not present at the PSD-95 gene promoter, likely due to the antagonizing effects of the H3S28P and H3K27Ac marks and the activity of the H3K27 demethylases JMJD3 and UTX. In contrast, increased PSD-95 gene transcription is accompanied by the presence of Ezh1 and elongation-engaged RNA Polymerase II complexes at the PSD-95 gene promoter, while knock-down of Ezh1 reduces PSD-95 transcription. These results indicate that Ezh1 and Ezh2 have antagonistic roles in regulating PSD-95 transcription. © 2013.

  13. Kv2 channel regulation of action potential repolarization and firing patterns in superior cervical ganglion neurons and hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons.

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    Liu, Pin W; Bean, Bruce P

    2014-04-02

    Kv2 family "delayed-rectifier" potassium channels are widely expressed in mammalian neurons. Kv2 channels activate relatively slowly and their contribution to action potential repolarization under physiological conditions has been unclear. We explored the function of Kv2 channels using a Kv2-selective blocker, Guangxitoxin-1E (GxTX-1E). Using acutely isolated neurons, mixed voltage-clamp and current-clamp experiments were done at 37°C to study the physiological kinetics of channel gating and action potentials. In both rat superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurons and mouse hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, 100 nm GxTX-1E produced near-saturating block of a component of current typically constituting ∼60-80% of the total delayed-rectifier current. GxTX-1E also reduced A-type potassium current (IA), but much more weakly. In SCG neurons, 100 nm GxTX-1E broadened spikes and voltage clamp experiments using action potential waveforms showed that Kv2 channels carry ∼55% of the total outward current during action potential repolarization despite activating relatively late in the spike. In CA1 neurons, 100 nm GxTX-1E broadened spikes evoked from -70 mV, but not -80 mV, likely reflecting a greater role of Kv2 when other potassium channels were partially inactivated at -70 mV. In both CA1 and SCG neurons, inhibition of Kv2 channels produced dramatic depolarization of interspike voltages during repetitive firing. In CA1 neurons and some SCG neurons, this was associated with increased initial firing frequency. In all neurons, inhibition of Kv2 channels depressed maintained firing because neurons entered depolarization block more readily. Therefore, Kv2 channels can either decrease or increase neuronal excitability depending on the time scale of excitation.

  14. The driving system for hippocampal theta in the brainstem: an examination by single neuron recording in urethane-anesthetized rats.

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    Takano, Yuji; Hanada, Yasuhiro

    2009-05-08

    The brainstem has been shown to be involved in generating hippocampal theta; however, which brainstem region plays the most important role in generating the rhythm has remained unclear. To reveal which brainstem region triggers the theta, the hippocampal local field potential was recorded simultaneously with single unit activity in the brainstem of urethane-anesthetized rat. The firing latencies before theta onset and offset were compared among recording sites (deep mesencephalic nucleus, DpMe; pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus, PPT; nucleus pontis oralis, PnO). We examined the activities of 59 cells; PPT showed the highest proportion of neurons changing their firing rates at theta onset (14/16, 87.5%). The proportion in the PnO was 14/22 (63.6%), but the neurons in the PnO showed the earliest changes in latencies (0.57s before theta onset). The change in the PPT was 0.96s after theta onset. Regarding the theta offset, the PPT showed the highest proportion of neurons changing their firing rates at theta offset (9/16, 56.3%; the proportion in the PnO was 5/22, 22.7%), but the difference in latent time was not significant among recorded regions. The neurons in the DpMe did not show any remarkable firing tendency at theta onset and offset. From these results, we propose a driving system of hippocampal theta, in which neurons in the PnO first trigger the theta onset and then those in the PPT maintain the theta by activating broadly the brainstem areas for the wave.

  15. Enhancement of dendritic branching in cultured hippocampal neurons by 17beta-estradiol is mediated by nitric oxide.

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    Audesirk, T; Cabell, L; Kern, M; Audesirk, G

    2003-06-01

    Both 17beta-estradiol (E2) and nitric oxide (NO) are important in neuronal development, learning and memory, and age-related memory changes. There is growing evidence that a number of estrogen receptor-mediated effects of estradiol utilize nitric oxide as an intermediary. The role of estradiol in hippocampal neuronal differentiation and function has particular implications for learning and memory. Low levels of estradiol (10nM) significantly increase dendritic branching in cultured embryonic rat hippocampal neurons (158% of control). This study investigates the hypothesis that the estrogen-stimulated increase in dendritic branching is mediated by nitric oxide. We found that nitric oxide donors also produce significantly increased dendritic branching S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP: 119%; 2,2'-(hydroxynitrosohydrazino)bis-ethanamine (NOC-18): 128% of control). We then determined that the increases in dendritic branchi