WorldWideScience

Sample records for hip joint replacements

  1. Hip joint replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a part of the pelvic bone called the acetabulum) The upper end of the thighbone (called the ... Other reasons for replacing the hip joint are: Fractures in the thigh bone. Older adults often have ...

  2. Joint replacement in Zambia: A review of Hip & Knee Replacement ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Incidence of major joint replacement surgery is on the rise in Africa but this trend has not been matched by proper audits in the form of National Joint Registries. Objective: This paper presents the short-term findings from a joint replacement register started at the Zambian-Italian Orthopaedic Hospital (ZIOH) in ...

  3. Total hip replacement for Mseleni Joint Disease undertaken in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    after dislocation and acetabular fracture treatment by mold arthroplasty J Bone Joint. Surg (Am) 1969;51A:737-55. 10. Fender D, Harper WM, Gregg PJ. Outcome of Charnley total hip replacement across a single health region in England. J Bone Joint. Surg (Br) 1999;81-B(4):577-81. 11. Havelin LI, Espehaug B, Vollset SE,.

  4. Risk factors for renal dysfunction after total hip joint replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassan, Basim Kamil; Sahlström, Arne; Dessau, Ram Benny Christian

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE OF THE STUDY: Renal injury and dysfunction are serious complications after major surgery, which may lead to increased morbidity and mortality. The objective of our study was to identify the possible risk factors for renal dysfunction after total hip joint replacement surgery....... METHODS: A retrospective study was conducted among 599 consecutive primary hip joint replacements performed between January 2011 and December 2013. According to the RIFLE criteria, increased postoperative serum creatinine was considered indicative of postoperative renal injury. The Welch two-sample test...

  5. Risk factors for renal dysfunction after total hip joint replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassan, Basim Kamil; Sahlström, Arne; Dessau, Ram Benny Christian

    2015-01-01

    . METHODS: A retrospective study was conducted among 599 consecutive primary hip joint replacements performed between January 2011 and December 2013. According to the RIFLE criteria, increased postoperative serum creatinine was considered indicative of postoperative renal injury. The Welch two-sample test...

  6. Articular capsule repair in initial artificial hip replacement via anterolateral approach to the hip joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, B L; Wang, F; Tian, M B; Yin, W L; You, X Y; Li, D; Ma, L G; Xing, L Q

    2016-01-01

    This study was carried out to explore articular capsule repair in first artificial hip replacement (AHR) via anterolateral approach and its influence on postoperative dislocation. A total of 292 patients who received AHR via anterolateral approach and had the articular capsule repaired in People’s Hospital of Zhengzhou (Henan, China) from February 2008 to February 2014 were selected and divided into total hip replacement (THR) group (group A1) and artificial femoral head replacement (AFHR) group (group A2). Five hundred and five cases in the control group treated using the same approach but receiving no articular capsule repair were divided into THR group (group B1) and AFHR group (group B2). Condition of postoperative dislocation was compared between the two groups. All cases were followed up for 6 months to 5 years (average: 3.75 years); it was noted that the difference in average age, gender, disease constitution and follow-up time in the two groups was not significant (P>0.05). Moreover, groups A1 and B1 were found with 1 case of early hip joint dislocation (0.73%) and 13 cases of hip joint dislocation (5.24%) respectively post-operatively, and the comparison between the two groups was statistically significant (P less than 0.05). One case of hip joint dislocation (0.65%) was found in group A2 and 5 cases (1.95%) in group B2 in early post operation and the difference between two groups had no statistical significance (P>0.05). Neither the repair group nor the control group developed late-onset dislocation after the operation. Thus, we can state that articular capsule repair is feasible during the first AHR via anterolateral approach, which decreases the occurrence of early hip joint dislocation after operation and proves that repairing articular capsule during AFHR via anterolateral approach is unnecessary.

  7. Is there a risk of permanent renal dysfunction after primary total hip and knee joint replacements?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassan, Basim Kamil; Dessau, Ram Benny; Sahlström, Arne

    2016-01-01

    primary total hip and knee joint replacements. METHODS: Long-term postoperative renal dysfunction was analyzed in a retrospective study of 1301 consecutive primary total hip and knee joint replacements performed between January 2009 and December 2013. According to the RIFLE criteria, increased serum...

  8. Choice of a Perioperative Analgesia Mode during Hip Joint Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. B. Borisov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the efficiency and safety of various perioperative analgesia modes during total hip joint replacement (THR. Subjects and methods. A randomized controlled trial enrolled 90 patients who were divided into 3 groups according to the choice of a perioperative analgesia mode on day 1: general sevofluorane anesthesia, by switching to intravenous patient-controlled analgesia with fentanyl (PCA, GA group, a combination of general and spinal bupiva-caine anesthesia, by switching to PCA with fentanyl (SA group, a combination of general and epidural ropivacaine anesthesia with continuous postoperative epidural ropivacaine infusion (EA group. All the patients received non-opi-oid analgesics after surgery. Results. Prolonged epidural block ensures better postoperative analgesia at rest and during mobilization and a less need for opioids than other analgesia modes (p<0.05. With neuroaxial block, the preoperative need for sympatomimetics is much higher than that in the GA group (p<0.05. There is also a trend toward a higher incidence of cardiac arrhythmias and postoperative nausea and vomiting in the SA and EA groups. There are no differences in the frequency of hemotransfusion and postoperative complications and the length of hospital stay. Conclusion. Prolonged epidural block provides excellent perioperative analgesia during THR, but the risk-benefit ratio needs to be carefully assessed when an analgesia mode is chosen.

  9. Total hip replacement for Mseleni Joint Disease undertaken in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Girdlestones, without any deterioration in function or mobility. The X-ray appearance of loosening was common, although clinical symptoms were not associated with the findings. It was therefore found that hip surgery in this setting is of great benefit to Mseleni Joint Disease patients, although further attention needs to be ...

  10. Hip Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The most common cause of damage is osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis causes pain, swelling, and reduced motion in your joints. It can interfere with your daily activities. If other treatments such as physical therapy, pain medicines, and exercise haven't helped, hip ...

  11. Measuring functional outcome after total hip replacement with subject-specific hip joint loading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weber, Tim; Dendorfer, Sebastian; Dullien, Silvia; Grifka, Joachim; Verkerke, Gijsbertus Jacob; Renkawitz, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    Total hip replacement is an often-performed orthopedic surgical procedure; the amount of procedures undertaken will increase since our life expectancy is growing. In order to optimize function, hip biomechanics should be restored to as near normal as possible. The goal of this pilot study was to

  12. Total hip replacement for Mseleni Joint Disease undertaken in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this project was to ascertain whether it is reasonable to perform specialist surgery for Mseleni Joint Disease (MJD) in a rural hospital by assessing the medium-term outcome of surgery for MJD performed at Mseleni. The study was designed as a review of patients at Mseleni Hospital in rural KwaZulu Natal, ...

  13. Hip Joint Replacement Using Monofilament Polypropylene Surgical Mesh: An Animal Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Białecki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hip joint dysplasia is a deformation of the articular elements (pelvic acetabulum, head of the femur, and/or ligament of the head of the femur leading to laxity of the hip components and dislocation of the femoral head from the pelvic acetabulum. Diagnosis is based on symptoms observed during clinical and radiological examinations. There are two treatment options: conservative and surgical. The classic surgical procedures are juvenile pubic symphysiodesis (JPS, triple pelvic osteotomy (TPO, total hip replacement (THR, and femoral head and neck resection (FHNE. The aim of this experiment was to present an original technique of filling the acetabulum with a polypropylene implant, resting the femoral neck directly on the mesh. The experiment was performed on eight sheep. The clinical value of the new surgical technique was evaluated using clinical, radiological, and histological methods. This technique helps decrease the loss of limb length by supporting the femoral neck on the mesh equivalent to the femoral head. It also reduces joint pain and leads to the formation of stable and mobile pseudarthrosis. The mesh manifested osteoprotective properties and enabled the formation of a stiff-elastic connection within the hip joint. The method is very cost-effective and the technique itself is simple to perform.

  14. Hip Joint Replacement Using Monofilament Polypropylene Surgical Mesh: An Animal Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Białecki, Jacek; Klimowicz-Bodys, Małgorzata Dorota; Wierzchoś, Edward; Kołomecki, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Hip joint dysplasia is a deformation of the articular elements (pelvic acetabulum, head of the femur, and/or ligament of the head of the femur) leading to laxity of the hip components and dislocation of the femoral head from the pelvic acetabulum. Diagnosis is based on symptoms observed during clinical and radiological examinations. There are two treatment options: conservative and surgical. The classic surgical procedures are juvenile pubic symphysiodesis (JPS), triple pelvic osteotomy (TPO), total hip replacement (THR), and femoral head and neck resection (FHNE). The aim of this experiment was to present an original technique of filling the acetabulum with a polypropylene implant, resting the femoral neck directly on the mesh. The experiment was performed on eight sheep. The clinical value of the new surgical technique was evaluated using clinical, radiological, and histological methods. This technique helps decrease the loss of limb length by supporting the femoral neck on the mesh equivalent to the femoral head. It also reduces joint pain and leads to the formation of stable and mobile pseudarthrosis. The mesh manifested osteoprotective properties and enabled the formation of a stiff-elastic connection within the hip joint. The method is very cost-effective and the technique itself is simple to perform. PMID:24987672

  15. INNOPLANT Total Hip Replacement System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Tisha A M

    2017-07-01

    Total hip replacement is a salvage procedure that is done to alleviate discomfort secondary to osteoarthritis in the hip, which is most often a result of hip dysplasia. Commercially available total hip replacement implants for small animal patients are classified as cemented or cementless. The INNOPLANT Total Hip Replacement system includes modular, screw-in cementless components that were developed to improve implant stability by maintaining as much normal anatomic structure, and by extension biomechanics of the coxofemoral joint, as possible. As a newer system, there are few data and no long-term studies available in the veterinary literature. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Tribology and total hip joint replacement: current concepts in mechanical simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affatato, S; Spinelli, M; Zavalloni, M; Mazzega-Fabbro, C; Viceconti, M

    2008-12-01

    Interest in the rheology and effects of interacting surfaces is as ancient as man. This subject can be represented by a recently coined word: tribology. This term is derived from the Greek word "tribos" and means the "science of rubbing". Friction, lubrication, and wear mechanism in the common English language means the precise field of interest of tribology. Wear of total hip prosthesis is a significant clinical problem that involves, nowadays, a too high a number of patients. In order to acquire further knowledge on the tribological phenomena that involve hip prosthesis wear tests are conducted on employed materials to extend lifetime of orthopaedic implants. The most basic type of test device is the material wear machine, however, a more advanced one may more accurately reproduce some of the in vivo conditions. Typically, these apparatus are called simulators, and, while there is no absolute definition of a joint simulator, its description as a mechanical rig used to test a joint replacement, under conditions approximating those occurring in the human body, is acceptable. Simulator tests, moreover, can be used to conduct accelerated protocols that replicate/simulate particularly extreme conditions, thus establishing the limits of performance for the material. Simulators vary in their level of sophistication and the international literature reveals many interpretations of the design of machines used for joint replacement testing. This paper aims to review the current state of the art of the hip joint simulators worldwide. This is specified through a schematic overview by describing, in particular, constructive solutions adopted to reproduce in vivo conditions. An exhaustive commentary on the evolution and actually existing simulation standards is proposed by the authors. The need of a shared protocol among research laboratories all over the world could lead to a consensus conference.

  17. Meat consumption and risk of primary hip and knee joint replacement due to osteoarthritis: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Simpson, Julie Anne; Wluka, Anita E; English, Dallas R; Giles, Graham G; Graves, Stephen; Cicuttini, Flavia M

    2011-01-16

    There is emerging evidence for a beneficial effect of meat consumption on the musculoskeletal system. However, whether it affects the risk of knee and hip osteoarthritis is unknown. We performed a prospective cohort study to examine the relationship between meat consumption and risk of primary hip and knee replacement for osteoarthritis. Eligible 35,331 participants were selected from the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study recruited during 1990-1994. Consumption of fresh red meat, processed meat, chicken, and fish was assessed using a food frequency questionnaire. Primary hip and knee replacement for osteoarthritis during 2001-2005 was determined by linking the cohort records to the Australian National Joint Replacement Registry. There was a negative dose-response relationship between fresh red meat consumption and the risk of hip replacement (hazard ratio (HR) 0.94 per increase in intake of one time/week, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.89-0.98). In contrast, there was no association with knee replacement risk (HR 0.98, 95% CI 0.94-1.02). Consumption of processed meat, chicken and fish were not associated with risk of hip or knee replacement. A high level consumption of fresh red meat was associated with a decreased risk of hip, but not knee, joint replacement for osteoarthritis. One possible mechanism to explain these differential associations may be via an effect of meat intake on bone strength and hip shape. Further confirmatory studies are warranted.

  18. Less invasive posterior surgical approach for hip joint replacement--complications and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabłoński, Mirosław; Gorzelak, Mieczysław; Kuczyński, Paweł; Piasecki, Jarosław; Turzańska, Karolina

    2007-01-01

    We attempted to analyse the difficulties and risk of complications associated with total hip replacement using a limited posterior approach and standard instrumentation. A series of 85 consecutive cases (47 females and 38 males; age range 22-87 years; mean age: 65.6 +/- 10.4) of total hip replacement using a modified Gibson approach were analyzed prospectively. Bilateral surgery was performed in 7 patients. There were 44 non-cemented arthroplasties. Body mass index varied from 22 to 36 (body weight 78-104 kg) and the length of the operative wound varied from 6.5 to 14 cm (mean 9.8 +/- 1.3 cm). The wound was 14 centimeters long in six subjects with a BMI of 35-36. The procedure was performed in a lateral decubitus position using an appropriately limited posterior approach. After careful coagulation of blood vessels surrounding the base of the femoral head posteriorly, the obturator and gemelli tendons and the posterior part of the joint capsule were cut through as close to the femoral attachment (T) as possible. This made it possible to dislocate the joint posteriorly. Further stages of the procedure were performed in a typical manner, with special attention paid to the preservation of the tendon of the piriformis muscle. Continuity of the muscle was re-examined following the reposition of the artificial joint. Two injuries to the piriform tendon were observed. Persistent bleeding from vessels surrounding the femoral neck base occurred in 5 patients while in four others there was transient paresis of the peroneal muscles and dorsal extensors of the ipsilateral foot, probably caused by extension of the sciatic nerve. There was one oblique fracture of the proximal femoral shaft. We did not observe significant errors in postoperative joint geometry. Mean intraoperative blood loss was 400 ml. We did not note postoperative dislocations or infections. On the basis of our observations of a series of 85 patients, minimizing the extent of the posterior surgical approach for

  19. Depression and the Overall Burden of Painful Joints: An Examination among Individuals Undergoing Hip and Knee Replacement for Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv Gandhi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The majority of patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis (OA report one or more symptomatic joints apart from the one targeted for surgical care. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to investigate the association between the burden of multiple symptomatic joints and self-reported depression in patients awaiting joint replacement for OA. Four hundred and seventy-five patients at a single centre were evaluated. Patients self-reported joints that were painful and/or symptomatic most days of the previous month on a homunculus, with nearly one-third of the sample reporting 6 or more painful joints. The prevalence of depression was 12.2% (58/475. When adjusted for age, sex, education level, hip or knee OA, body mass index, chronic condition count, and joint-specific WOMAC scores, each additional symptomatic joint was associated with a 19% increased odds (odds ratio: 1.19 (95% CI: 1.08, 1.31, P<0.01 of self-reported depression. Individuals reporting 6 or more painful joints had 2.5-fold or greater odds of depression when compared to those patients whose symptoms were limited to the surgical joint. A focus on the surgical joint alone is likely to miss a potentially important determinant of postsurgical patient-reported outcomes in patients undergoing hip or knee replacement.

  20. Total Hip Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can occur after surgery. Avoiding Problems After Surgery Hip implant dislocation. Recognizing the Signs of a Blood Clot Follow ... Other Precautions To assure proper recovery and prevent dislocation of the ... your hip replacement. Prior to discharge from the hospital, your ...

  1. Comparing contemporary revision burden among hip and knee joint replacement registries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian J. McGrory, MD, MS

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: Revision burden has gradually decreased for hip replacements and has remained relatively constant for knee replacements both for the last 4 years and compared to historic controls. Knee revision burden was lower than hip revision burden for each period examined. Revision burden is one measure that may be helpful in following the effect of changes in surgical technique and implant design over time in registry populations and may be a helpful way to compare overall results between registries.

  2. OMERACT/OARSI initiative to define states of severity and indication for joint replacement in hip and knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gossec, Laure; Hawker, Gillian; Davis, Aileen M

    2007-01-01

    that represent the progression from early to late disease for individuals with OA of the hip and knee, and to create a composite measure of these 3 domains to define states of OA severity and a surrogate measure of "need for joint replacement surgery." METHODS: For pain, focus groups and one-on-one interviews....... For structure, a comparison of existing indices (Kellgren-Lawrence, OARSI stages, and joint space width) was performed for the hip and the knee. RESULTS: For pain, key features of pain that are most distressing to people with OA from early to late disease were identified. For function, the reduction......OBJECTIVE: Time to theoretical indication of joint replacement surgery has been proposed as a primary outcome for potential structure-modifying interventions for osteoarthritis (OA). The objectives of this OMERACT/OARSI Working Group were to identify pain, physical function, and structure states...

  3. The Cost of Joint Replacement: Comparing Two Approaches to Evaluating Costs of Total Hip and Knee Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palsis, John A; Brehmer, Thomas S; Pellegrini, Vincent D; Drew, Jacob M; Sachs, Barton L

    2018-02-21

    In an era of mandatory bundled payments for total joint replacement, accurate analysis of the cost of procedures is essential for orthopaedic surgeons and their institutions to maintain viable practices. The purpose of this study was to compare traditional accounting and time-driven activity-based costing (TDABC) methods for estimating the total costs of total hip and knee arthroplasty care cycles. We calculated the overall costs of elective primary total hip and total knee replacement care cycles at our academic medical center using traditional and TDABC accounting methods. We compared the methods with respect to the overall costs of hip and knee replacement and the costs for each major cost category. The traditional accounting method resulted in higher cost estimates. The total cost per hip replacement was $22,076 (2014 USD) using traditional accounting and was $12,957 using TDABC. The total cost per knee replacement was $29,488 using traditional accounting and was $16,981 using TDABC. With respect to cost categories, estimates using traditional accounting were greater for hip and knee replacement, respectively, by $3,432 and $5,486 for personnel, by $3,398 and $3,664 for space and equipment, and by $2,289 and $3,357 for indirect costs. Implants and consumables were derived from the actual hospital purchase price; accordingly, both methods produced equivalent results. Substantial cost differences exist between accounting methods. The focus of TDABC only on resources used directly by the patient contrasts with the allocation of all operating costs, including all indirect costs and unused capacity, with traditional accounting. We expect that the true costs of hip and knee replacement care cycles are likely somewhere between estimates derived from traditional accounting methods and TDABC. TDABC offers patient-level granular cost information that better serves in the redesign of care pathways and may lead to more strategic resource-allocation decisions to optimize

  4. In the queue for total joint replacement: patients' perspectives on waiting times. Ontario Hip and Knee Replacement Project Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llewellyn-Thomas, H A; Arshinoff, R; Bell, M; Williams, J I; Naylor, C D

    1998-02-01

    We assessed patients on the waiting lists of a purposive sample of orthopaedic surgeons in Ontario, Canada, to determine patients' attitudes towards time waiting for hip or knee replacement. We focused on 148 patients who did not have a definite operative date, obtaining complete information on 124 (84%). Symptom severity was assessed with the Western Ontario/McMaster Osteoarthritis Index and a disease-specific standard gamble was used to elicit patients' overall utility for their arthritic state. Next, in a trade-off task, patients considered a hypothetical choice between a 1-month wait for a surgeon who could provide a 2% risk of post-operative mortality, or a 6-month wait for joint replacement with a 1% risk of post-operative mortality. Waiting times were then shifted systematically until the patient abandoned his/her initial choice, generating a conditional maximal acceptable wait time. Patients were divided in their attitudes, with 57% initially choosing a 6-month wait with a 1% mortality risk. The overall distribution of conditional maximum acceptable wait time scores ranged from 1 to 26 months, with a median of 7 months. Utility values were independently but weakly associated with patients' tolerance of waiting times (adjusted R-square = 0.059, P = 0.004). After splitting the sample along the median into subgroups with a relatively 'low' and 'high' tolerance for waiting, the subgroup with the apparently lower tolerance for waiting reported lower utility scores (z = 2.951; P = 0.004) and shorter times since their surgeon first advised them of the need for surgery (z = 3.014; P = 0.003). These results suggest that, in the establishment and monitoring of a queue management system for quality-of-life-enhancing surgery, patients' own perceptions of their overall symptomatic burden and ability to tolerate delayed relief should be considered along with information derived from clinical judgements and pre-weighted health status instruments.

  5. Cross-sectional analysis of association between socioeconomic status and utilization of primary total hip joint replacements 2006–7: Australian Orthopaedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brennan Sharon L

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The utilization of total hip replacement (THR surgery is rapidly increasing, however few data examine whether these procedures are associated with socioeconomic status (SES within Australia. This study examined primary THR across SES for both genders for the Barwon Statistical Division (BSD of Victoria, Australia. Methods Using the Australian Orthopaedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry data for 2006–7, primary THR with a diagnosis of osteoarthritis (OA among residents of the BSD was ascertained. The Index of Relative Socioeconomic Disadvantage was used to measure SES; determined by matching residential addresses with Australian Bureau of Statistics census data. The data were categorised into quintiles; quintile 1 indicating the most disadvantaged. Age- and sex-specific rates of primary THR per 1,000 person years were reported for 10-year age bands using the total population at risk. Results Females accounted for 46.9% of the 642 primary THR performed during 2006–7. THR utilization per 1,000 person years was 1.9 for males and 1.5 for females. The highest utilization of primary THR was observed in those aged 70–79 years (males 6.1, and females 5.4 per 1,000 person years. Overall, the U-shaped pattern of THR across SES gave the appearance of bimodality for both males and females, whereby rates were greater for both the most disadvantaged and least disadvantaged groups. Conclusions Further work on a larger scale is required to determine whether relationships between SES and THR utilization for the diagnosis of OA is attributable to lifestyle factors related to SES, or alternatively reflects geographic and health system biases. Identifying contributing factors associated with SES may enhance resource planning and enable more effective and focussed preventive strategies for hip OA.

  6. [Shortening osteotomy for alloarthoplastic joint replacement for hip dislocation in adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohtz, S W; Perka, C

    2012-04-01

    Total hip arthroplasty to create an articulating hip joint. Acetabular cup implantation in the original rotational center of the pelvis. Simultaneous femoral shortening osteotomy to prevent neurovascular damage and equalize leg length in patients with unilateral occurrence. Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) in adults; type 3 and 4 dislocation according to Crowe. Cerebrospinal dysfunction with permanent restriction of coordination ability, muscular dystrophies, and multiple malformations of the musculoskeletal system. Apparent disturbance of the bone metabolism. The Watson-Jones interval approach to the hip joint is used to avoid functional disorders of the hip abductors. After preparation of the proximal femur and femoral neck resection, adjustment of the non-regularly developed acetabular cavity with reduced anterior coverage takes place. The cup component is implanted and the interval between the vastus intermedius and the vastus lateralis below the lesser trochanter examined. Loss of periosteum of the femoral cortex due to blunt spreading is to be avoided. Following the femoral shortening osteotomy initially the preparation of the distal bone segment takes place to adjust the endofemoral canal for shaft implantation in the following preparation of the metaphyseal segment. Afterwards osteotomy-bridging implantation of a cementless, distal anchoring stem design is performed. Partial weight bearing of the leg with 20 kp is necessary for 6 weeks combined with therapy of existing contractures and active pelvic rotation training. Within 10 postoperative weeks full weight bearing is usually reached. After this period mobilization without crutches is possible. Inpatient rehabilitation is possible after bony recovery of the femoral osteotomy. From 1993 to 1999, the first 15 total hip arthroplasties were performed in adult patients with DDH; they were treated with simultaneous femoral shortening osteotomy and without additive osteosynthesis. During the midterm

  7. The association between ambulatory activity, body composition and hip or knee joint replacement due to osteoarthritis: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munugoda, I P; Wills, K; Cicuttini, F; Graves, S E; Lorimer, M; Jones, G; Callisaya, M L; Aitken, D

    2018-02-20

    To examine the association between ambulatory activity (AA), body composition measures and hip or knee joint replacement (JR) due to osteoarthritis. At baseline, 1082 community-dwelling older-adults aged 50 - 80 years were studied. AA was measured objectively using pedometer and body composition by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. The incidence of primary (first-time) JR was determined by data linkage to the Australian Orthopaedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry. Log binomial regression with generalized estimating equations were used to estimate the risk of JR associated with baseline AA and body composition measures, adjusting for age, sex, x-ray disease severity, and pain. Over 13 years of follow-up, 74 (6.8%) participants had a knee replacement (KR) and 50 (4.7%) a hip replacement (HR). AA was associated with a higher risk of KR (RR 1.09/1000 steps/day, 95% CI 1.01, 1.16) and a lower risk of HR (RR 0.90/1000 steps/day, 95% CI 0.81, 0.99). BMI (RR 1.07/kg/m 2 , 95% CI 1.03, 1.12), total fat mass (RR 1.04/kg, 95% CI 1.02, 1.07), trunk fat mass (RR 1.04/kg, 95% CI 1.02, 1.07), and waist circumference (RR 1.03/cm, 95% CI 1.01, 1.05) were associated with a higher risk of KR. Body composition measures were not associated with HR. An objective measure of AA was associated with a small increased risk of KR and a small reduced risk of HR. Worse body composition profiles were associated with knee, but not hip replacement. Altogether this may suggest different causal pathways for each site with regard to habitual activity and obesity. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Digital correction of magnification in pelvic x rays for preoperative planning of hip joint replacements : Theoretical development and clinical results of a new protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    The, B; Diercks, RL; Stewart, RE; van Ooijen, PMA; van Horn, [No Value; van Horn, J.R.

    The introduction of digital radiological facilities leads to the necessity of digital preoperative planning, which is an essential part of joint, replacement surgery. To avoid errors in the preparation and execution of hip surgery, reliable correction of the Magnification of the projected hip is a

  9. A Systematic Review Investigating the Presence of Inflammatory Synovitis in Hip and Knee Joint Replacement Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherif Hosny

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Synovial tissue can display an inflammatory response in the presence of OA. There is increasing interest to better understand the role of inflammation in OA, particularly with regard to those who require joint replacement. A systematic review of inflammatory synovitis in OA of literature databases was undertaken from their inception until October 14, 2014. Independent critical appraisal of each study was undertaken using the CASP appraisal tool. From a total of sixty-six identified citations, twenty-three studies were deemed eligible for review. The studies presented moderate to strong methodological quality. Strong correlation was identified between histological and imaging synovitis severity. Correlation was weaker between clinical symptoms and imaging and/or histological synovitis severity. There was little consensus, with regard to expressed cytokines and chemokines at the different stages of OA disease progression. Few studies investigated the influence of inflammatory synovitis on the outcome of major joint replacement. Research into inflammatory synovitis in OA is an emerging field. Longitudinal studies applying proven imaging modalities, histological analysis, and longer follow-up are required in order to further define our understanding of the role of synovitis in the pathogenesis of OA and its effects on outcomes following major joint replacement.

  10. The Phan-Thien and Tanner model applied to thin film spherical coordinates: applications for lubrication of hip joint replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tichy, John; Bou-Saïd, Benyebka

    2008-04-01

    The Phan-Thien and Tanner (PTT) model is one of the most widely used rheological models. It can properly describe the common characteristics of viscoelastic non-Newtonian fluids. There is evidence that synovial fluid in human joints, which also lubricates artificial joints, is viscoelastic. Modeling the geometry of the total hip replacement, the PTT model is applied in spherical coordinates for a thin confined fluid film. A modified Reynolds equation is developed for this geometry. Several simplified illustrative problems are solved. The effect of the edge boundary condition on load-carrying normal stress is discussed. Solutions are also obtained for a simple squeezing flow. The effect of both the relaxation time and the PTT shear parameter is to reduce the load relative to a Newtonian fluid with the same viscosity. This implies that the Newtonian model is not conservative and may overpredict the load capacity. The PTT theory is a good candidate model to use for joint replacement lubrication. It is well regarded and derivable from molecular considerations. The most important non-Newtonian characteristics can be described with only three primary material parameters.

  11. PERIPROSTHETIC INFECTION AFTER ENDOPROSTHETIC REPLACEMENT OF THE HIP JOINT IN PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOID DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadim Petrovich Pavlov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Periprosthetic infection (PI in patients with rheumatoid diseases (RD after total hip joint endoprosthesis (THJE is a relevant problem of rheumoorphopedics that has not been solved yet. The relative assessment of PI incidence rate after THJE and treatment outcomes in patients with this complication is expected to be carried out. A total of 1201 THJE performed in 1069 patients with RD are considered. The female : male ratio was 3.6 : 1; the mean age was 49.6 years (range: 16 to 83 years. 323 patients had rheumatoid arthritis (RA; 124 patients had juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA; 80 patients had ankylosing spondylitis (AS; 79 patients had systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE; 11 patients had systemic sclerodermatitis (SSD; 18 patients had psoriatic arthropathy (PsA; and 353 patients had osteoarthritis (OA. Other RD were revealed in 81 patients. PI were detected in 9 (0.84% of 1069 patients with RD, including 7 (2.17% of 323 patients with RA; 1 (0.8% of 124 patients with JRA; and 1 (0.28% of 353 patients with OA. No PI were detected in 81 patients who had other RD. An eightfold (in patients with RA and a threefold (in patients with JRA increase in PI compared to that in patients with OA attests to the high risk of this complication in patients with inflammatory as compared to the patients with degenerative RD. After integrated treatment (revision surgery, sanation, continuous irrigation with antibiotics/lavasept, the graft was preserved in OA patients; the complication was prevented in RA patients. Six patients will be subjected to repeated revision surgery; one patient died of diabetes complications after the graft had been removed. A significant increase in PI incidence rate after THJE in patients with RA and JRA as compared to that in OA patients allows one to regard inflammatory RD as risk factors of this complication. The low effectiveness of the procedure for integrated therapy for PI in RD patients indicates that it needs to

  12. Joint replacement in Zambia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MJZ

    Penicillin allergy. 01. 02.0. Rheumatoid arthritis. 02. 03.9. TB. 01. 02.0. SCD. 01. 02.0. Fused lt. Hip. 01. 02.0. HIV +. 02. 03.9. Nil. 30. 58.7. Table 2. Distribution of operation related variables (n = 51). AVN = Avascular Necrosis. THR = Total Hip Replacement.TKR = Total Knee Replacement, C1 = Consultant 1.

  13. FIVE YEAR OUTCOMES OF CERAMIC-ОN-CERAMIC AND CERAMIC-ОN-POLYETHYLENE BEARINGS IN HIP JOINT REPLACEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Yu. Murylev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In view of the increasing number of hip joint replacement volume there remains the key issue of improving prosthesis survivorship which directly depends on the friction couple. Material and methods. The authors have analyzed five year outcomes of two bearing types (head and insert used in hip replacement: ceramic-on-ceramic (CoC in 324 patients and ceramic-on-polyethylene (CoP in 300 patients. Totally 550 patients were operated in the period starting 2010 till 2014, including 74 patients underwent bilateral hip replacement. The authors divided patients based on gender and also into three age groups: 20-40, 41-60 and 61-80 years old. The largest group comprised 156 women aged 41-60 years (28.4%. Additional grouping of patients was made based on gender, age and bearing diameter.36 mm diameter bearing was characterized of the most frequent use. Functional outcomes were assessed by Harris Hip Score. Statistical analysis was made with Statistica 10 software. Statistical significant was observed at p<0.05.Results.28 mm diameter bearing were rarely (19.5% applied and mainly in women which is related to need for use of smaller acetabulum components and inability to implant a larger insert.36 mm diameter bearing were used most frequently, CoC articulation of36 mm was used in men in 34% of cases and in women – in 18.12% of cases.40 mm articulations were implanted in women two times less than in men which is related to a smaller diameter of acetabulum in women. Generally, CoC bearings were implanted more often in men which can be explained by a bigger social demand as well as a higher anti-luxation stability of large diameter bearings. Dislocations of implants occurred in 5 (0.91% patients: in 4 patients with CoP bearingand in one patient with CoC articulation. Four revision procedures (0.64% were made due to deep periprosthetic infection: two surgeries in each group. Harris Hip Score evaluation in CoC group demonstrated excellent and good outcomes in

  14. [Validity and Reliability of the German Version of the HSS Expectation Questionnaire on Hip Joint Replacement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balck, F; Kirschner, S; Jeszenszky, C; Lippmann, M; Günther, K-P

    2016-12-01

    Background: Total hip arthroplasty is one of the most successful operations in medicine. The clinical result after surgery and compliance during rehabilitation are influenced by the patient's expectations. There is a lack of a validated German instrument to record these expectations in a standardised manner. Patients: 193 patients from the Dresden Hip Register with osteoarthritis of the hip were surveyed with respect to their expectations before the operation. The study sample consists of 108 women and 85 men. The average age of the patients was 59.7 years, with a standard deviation of 12.2 years. Methods: The Hospital for Special Patient Expectations Survey was translated into German and culturally adapted. In addition, the RKI demographic core data set, the HADS-D, LOT-R and the SCL-(K-)9 were collected to validate the instrument. In the statistical analysis, four main factors could be distinguished. These were "everyday activities", "pain relief and improvement in function", "medication and social participation" and "gait improvement". Results: Patients were predominantly married. 20 % of the women were widowed. 20 % had received higher education. Almost half of the patients were retired, 30 % were employed, 15.1 % self-employed and 7.3 % were unemployed. For most of the items, patients expected major improvements up to normalisation of their health. There were many different answers to several items, such as the question on occupation. For sporting and sexual activities no high expectations were given. The average expectation of the whole sample shows major differences to individual expectations. Men showed higher expectations for medication, social participation and gait improvement than did women. There were lower expectations for everyday activities, medication and social participation and gait improvement for older patients. Summary: The German version of the HSS patients expectation survey was validated. The instrument is useful in the

  15. Knee joint replacement - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100088.htm Knee joint replacement - series—Normal anatomy To use the ... to slide 4 out of 4 Overview The knee is a complex joint. It contains the distal ...

  16. Reliability of performance-based measures in people awaiting joint replacement surgery of the hip or knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Stephen; McBurney, Helen

    2008-09-01

    Understanding the reliability of selected measurement tools is a prerequisite to understanding the effects of clinical interventions. The aim of this investigation was to determine the reliability of the 50-Foot Timed Walk (50 FTW) and 30-second Chair Stand Test (30 CST) in subjects awaiting joint replacement surgery of the hip or knee. Eighty-two subjects participating in a 6-week exercise programme were assessed at baseline, 7 weeks and 15 weeks. Four trials of the 50 FTW and two trials of the 30 CST were completed at each assessment. Eleven trained assessors completed the assessments. Intra-class correlations were consistently high for the 50 FTW and 30 CST at all assessments. At the baseline assessment, trial 1 was found to be significantly different from subsequent trials for both the 50 FTW and 30 CST. This effect was not evident at the 7-week and 15-week assessments. At the baseline assessment, scores for the 50 FTW became stable after the first trial. Estimates of minimum detectable change indicated that participants needed to change by more than 3.08 seconds and 1.64 stands to be 90% confident that a real change had occurred for the 50 FTW and 30 CST, respectively. The 50 FTW and 30 CST can be reliable measures of physical performance. However, because we found a practice effect at the baseline assessment, a practice trial should be allowed before data collection begins. Because only two trials of the 30 CST were completed, further research is required to confirm whether scores at the initial assessment become stable on repeated testing. Copyright (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. 90-day mortality after 409,096 total hip replacements for osteoarthritis, from the National Joint Registry for England and Wales: a retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Linda P; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Clark, Emma M; Dieppe, Paul; Judge, Andrew; MacGregor, Alex J; Tobias, Jon H; Vernon, Kelly; Blom, Ashley W

    2013-09-28

    Death within 90 days after total hip replacement is rare but might be avoidable dependent on patient and treatment factors. We assessed whether a secular decrease in death caused by hip replacement has occurred in England and Wales and whether modifiable perioperative factors exist that could reduce deaths. We took data about hip replacements done in England and Wales between April, 2003, and December, 2011, from the National Joint Registry for England and Wales. Patient identifiers were used to link these data to the national mortality database and the Hospital Episode Statistics database to obtain details of death, sociodemographics, and comorbidity. We assessed mortality within 90 days of operation by Kaplan-Meier analysis and assessed the role of patient and treatment factors by Cox proportional hazards model. 409,096 primary hip replacements were done to treat osteoarthritis. 1743 patients died within 90 days of surgery during 8 years, with a substantial secular decrease in mortality, from 0·56% in 2003 to 0·29% in 2011, even after adjustment for age, sex, and comorbidity. Several modifiable clinical factors were associated with decreased mortality according to an adjusted model: posterior surgical approach (hazard ratio [HR] 0·82, 95% CI 0·73-0·92; p=0·001), mechanical thromboprophylaxis (0·85, 0·74-0·99; p=0·036), chemical thromboprophylaxis with heparin with or without aspirin (0·79, 0·66-0·93; p=0·005), and spinal versus general anaesthetic (0·85, 0·74-0·97; p=0·019). Type of prosthesis was unrelated to mortality. Being overweight was associated with lower mortality (0·76, 0·62-0·92; p=0·006). Postoperative mortality after hip joint replacement has fallen substantially. Widespread adoption of four simple clinical management strategies (posterior surgical approach, mechanical and chemical prophylaxis, and spinal anaesthesia) could, if causally related, reduce mortality further. National Joint Registry for England and Wales. Copyright

  18. Obesity in total hip replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, J G; Palan, J; Kurup, H V; Gibson, P; Murray, D W; Beard, D J

    2008-04-01

    A prospective, multi-centre study was carried out on 1421 total hip replacements between January 1999 and July 2007 to examine if obesity has an effect on clinical outcomes. The patients were categorised into three groups: non-obese (body mass index (BMI) 40 kg/m(2)). The primary outcome measure was the change in Oxford hip score at five years. Secondary outcome measures included dislocation and revision rates, increased haemorrhage, deep infection, deep-vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, mean operating time and length of hospital stay. Radiological analysis assessing heterotopic ossification, femoral osteolysis and femoral stem positioning was performed. Data were incomplete for 362 hips (25.5%) There was no difference in the change in the Oxford hip score, complication rates or radiological changes at five years between the groups. The morbidly obese group was significantly younger and required a significantly longer operating time. Obese and morbidly obese patients have as much to gain from total hip replacement as non-obese patients.

  19. Implications of Introducing New Technology: Comparative Survivorship Modeling of Metal-on-Metal Hip Replacements and Contemporary Alternatives in the National Joint Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Linda P; Whitehouse, Michael R; Beswick, Andrew; Porter, Martyn L; Howard, Peter; Blom, Ashley W

    2018-02-07

    New medical technologies are often used widely without adequate supporting data, a practice that can lead to widespread catastrophic failure such as occurred with metal-on-metal (MoM) hip replacements. We determined both how revision rates would have differed if, instead of receiving MoM hip replacements, patients had received existing alternatives and the subsequent cumulative re-revision rates of the patients who did receive MoM hip replacements compared with alternatives. This study is a population-based longitudinal cohort study of patient data recorded in the National Joint Registry (NJR) for England, Wales and Northern Ireland between April 2003 and December 2014. We ascertained implant failure rates separately among stemmed MoM total hip replacement (THR) and hip-resurfacing procedures and, using flexible parametric survival modeling, compared them with the failure rates that would have been expected had existing alternatives been used. We used Kaplan-Meier survivorship analysis to compare cumulative re-revision of patients who received stemmed MoM primary replacements that failed and of those who underwent hip resurfacing that failed with those whose non-MoM THRs had failed. In all, 37,555 patients underwent MoM hip resurfacing, with a 10-year revision rate of 12.6% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 12.2% to 13.1%) compared with a predicted revision rate of 4.8% if alternative implants had been used. The 32,024 stemmed MoM THRs had a 19.8% (95% CI: 18.9% to 20.8%) 10-year failure rate compared with an expected rate of 3.9% if alternatives had been used. For every 100 MoM hip-resurfacing procedures, there were 7.8 excess revisions by 10 years, and for every 100 stemmed MoM THR procedures, there were 15.9, which equates to 8,021 excess first revisions. Seven-year re-revision rates were 14.9% (95% CI: 13.8% to 16.2%) for stemmed non-MoM THRs, 18.0% (95% CI: 15.7% to 20.7%) for MoM hip resurfacing, and 19.8% (95% CI: 17.0% to 23.0%) for stemmed MoM THRs. This

  20. The use of a lipped acetabular liner decreases the rate of revision for instability after total hip replacement: a study using data from the New Zealand Joint Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insull, P J; Cobbett, H; Frampton, C M; Munro, J T

    2014-07-01

    We compared the rate of revision for instability after total hip replacement (THR) when lipped and non-lipped acetabular liners were used. We hypothesised that the use of a lipped liner in a modular uncemented acetabular component reduces the risk of revision for instability after primary THR. Using data from the New Zealand Joint Registry, we found that the use of a lipped liner was associated with a significantly decreased rate of revision for instability and for all other indications. Adjusting for the size of the femoral head, the surgical approach and the age and gender of the patient, this difference remained strongly significant (p < 0.001). We conclude that evidence from the New Zealand registry suggests that the use of lipped liners with modular uncemented acetabular components is associated with a decreased rate of revision for instability after primary THR. ©2014 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  1. Evaluation of bone mechanical strenght and fracture risk assessment (Frax) in patients with hip joint replacement surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, A; Caetano-Lopes, J; Nery, A; Sousa, E; Polido-Pereira, J; Vale, M; Amaral, P; Romeu, J C; Viana Queiroz, M; Monteiro, J; Vaz, M F; Fonseca, J E; Canhão, H

    2009-01-01

    Fracture risk assessment tools are useful to calculate the long term probability of osteoporotic fracture. However, how it reflects bone quality is unknown. The aim of this study was to correlate the WHO clinical fracture risk assessment tool, FRAX, with bone mechanical properties. Six patients submitted to hip replacement surgery, either due to osteoporotic fractures or to osteoarthritis, were evaluated. Bone samples were collected and the mechanical properties assessed by compression tests. Patients' data regarding the presence of clinical risk factors for fracture were registered. Laboratorial assessment of bone metabolic parameters and a dual X-ray absorptiometry(DXA) were done. Analysis of the load-displacement curves showed that patients with fragility fractures (n=4) had low values of elastic modulus, yield load and energy absorbed until yield point. Osteoarthritis patients tend to have a better biomechanical performance.Femoral neck DXA scan was also performed in 3 patients. Fragility fracture patients had a lower bone mineral density than the patients with osteoarthritis. FRAX algorithm was applied and a positive relation was found between FRAX results and biomechanical parameters. Blood bone metabolic markers were within the normal range for all the subjects. The worse mechanical properties observed in the fragility fracture patients were related to high probability of fracture given by FRAX. These observations, in a very small sample, need further confirmation. However, they suggest that the fracture risk assessment tool, FRAX, may reflect the current mechanical bone behavior of the patient.

  2. Achieving Consensus on Total Joint Replacement Trial Outcome Reporting Using the OMERACT Filter: Endorsement of the Final Core Domain Set for Total Hip and Total Knee Replacement Trials for Endstage Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jasvinder A; Dowsey, Michelle M; Dohm, Michael; Goodman, Susan M; Leong, Amye L; Scholte Voshaar, Marieke M J H; Choong, Peter F

    2017-11-01

    Discussion and endorsement of the OMERACT total joint replacement (TJR) core domain set for total hip replacement (THR) and total knee replacement (TKR) for endstage arthritis; and next steps for selection of instruments. The OMERACT TJR working group met at the 2016 meeting at Whistler, British Columbia, Canada. We summarized the previous systematic reviews, the preliminary OMERACT TJR core domain set and results from previous surveys. We discussed preliminary core domains for TJR clinical trials, made modifications, and identified challenges with domain measurement. Working group participants (n = 26) reviewed, clarified, and endorsed each of the inner and middle circle domains and added a range of motion domain to the research agenda. TJR were limited to THR and TKR but included all endstage hip and knee arthritis refractory to medical treatment. Participants overwhelmingly endorsed identification and evaluation of top instruments mapping to the core domains (100%) and use of subscales of validated multidimensional instruments to measure core domains for the TJR clinical trial core measurement set (92%). An OMERACT core domain set for hip/knee TJR trials has been defined and we are selecting instruments to develop the TJR clinical trial core measurement set to serve as a common foundation for harmonizing measures in TJR clinical trials.

  3. Fracture After Total Hip Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... osteolysis. Symptoms The most common symptoms of periprosthetic hip fracture include: • Pain around the hip or thigh • Swelling ... o en very painful, someone with a periprosthetic hip fracture will most likely go directly to the emergency ...

  4. Machine learning techniques for the optimization of joint replacements: Application to a short-stem hip implant

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Myriam Cilla; Edoardo Borgiani; Javier Martínez; Georg N Duda; Sara Checa

    2017-01-01

    .... Therefore, the aim of this project was to investigate if the geometry of a commercial short stem hip prosthesis can be further optimized to reduce stress shielding effects and achieve better short...

  5. Deciding to have knee or hip replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000368.htm Deciding to have knee or hip replacement To use the sharing ... date. Why you may not be Able to Have Replacement Surgery Your provider may recommend against knee ...

  6. The role of pain and functional impairment in the decision to recommend total joint replacement in hip and knee osteoarthritis: an international cross-sectional study of 1909 patients. Report of the OARSI-OMERACT Task Force on total joint replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gossec, L; Paternotte, S; Maillefert, J F

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the pain and functional disability levels corresponding to an indication for total joint replacement (TJR) in hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA). METHODS: Design: International cross-sectional study in 10 countries. Patients: Consecutive outpatients with definite hip or knee OA...... attending an orthopaedic outpatient clinic. Gold standard measure for recommendation for TJR: Surgeon's decision that TJR is justified. Outcome measures: Pain (ICOAP: intermittent and constant osteoarthritis pain, 0-100) and functional impairment (HOOS-PS/KOOS-PS: Hip/Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome......: In all, 1909 patients were included (1130 knee/779 hip OA). Mean age was 66.4 [standard deviation (SD) 10.9] years, 58.1% were women; 628/1130 (55.6%) knee OA and 574/779 (73.7%) hip OA patients were recommended for TJR. Although patients recommended for TJR (yes vs no) had worse symptom levels [pain, 55...

  7. Hip joint pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tijssen, M; van Cingel, R E H; de Visser, E

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective cohort study was to (a) describe the clinical presentation of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and hip labral pathology; (b) describe the accuracy of patient history and physical tests for FAI and labral pathology as confirmed by hip arthroscopy. Patients (18......-65 years) were included if they were referred to a physical therapist to gather pre-operative data and were then diagnosed during arthroscopy. Results of pre-operative patient history and physical tests were collected and compared to arthroscopy. Data of 77 active patients (mean age: 37 years) were...... are suggested to rule out the diagnosis of symptomatic FAI and/or labral pathology....

  8. Machine learning techniques for the optimization of joint replacements: Application to a short-stem hip implant

    OpenAIRE

    Cilla, Myriam; Borgiani, Edoardo; Mart?nez, Javier; Duda, Georg N.; Checa, Sara

    2017-01-01

    Today, different implant designs exist in the market; however, there is not a clear understanding of which are the best implant design parameters to achieve mechanical optimal conditions. Therefore, the aim of this project was to investigate if the geometry of a commercial short stem hip prosthesis can be further optimized to reduce stress shielding effects and achieve better short-stemmed implant performance. To reach this aim, the potential of machine learning techniques combined with param...

  9. Hip contact forces in asymptomatic total hip replacement patients differ from normal healthy individuals: Implications for preclinical testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junyan; Redmond, Anthony C; Jin, Zhongmin; Fisher, John; Stone, Martin H; Stewart, Todd D

    2014-08-01

    Preclinical durability testing of hip replacement implants is standardised by ISO-14242-1 (2002) which is based on historical inverse dynamics analysis using data obtained from a small sample of normal healthy individuals. It has not been established whether loading cycles derived from normal healthy individuals are representative of loading cycles occurring in patients following total hip replacement. Hip joint kinematics and hip contact forces derived from multibody modelling of forces during normal walking were obtained for 15 asymptomatic total hip replacement patients and compared to 38 normal healthy individuals and to the ISO standard for pre-clinical testing. Hip kinematics in the total hip replacement patients were comparable to the ISO data and the hip contact force in the normal healthy group was also comparable to the ISO cycles. Hip contact forces derived from the asymptomatic total hip replacement patients were comparable for the first part of the stance period but exhibited 30% lower peak loads at toe-off. Although the ISO standard provides a representative kinematic cycle, the findings call into question whether the hip joint contact forces in the ISO standard are representative of those occurring in the joint following total hip replacement. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. The tribology of metal-on-metal total hip replacements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholes, S C; Unsworth, A

    2006-02-01

    Total hip surgery is an effective way of alleviating the pain and discomfort caused by diseased or damaged joints. However, in the majority of cases, these joints have a finite life. The main reason for failure is osteolysis (bone resorption). It is well documented that an important cause of osteolysis, and therefore the subsequent loosening and failure of conventional metal- or ceramic-on-ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene joints, is the body's immunological response to the polyethylene wear particles. To avoid this, interest has been renewed in metal-on-metal joints. The intention of this paper is to review the studies that have taken place within different laboratories to determine the tribological performance of new-generation metal-on-metal total hip replacements. These types of joint offer a potential solution to enhance the longevity of prosthetic hip systems; however, problems may arise owing to the effects of metal ion release, which are, as yet, not fully understood.

  11. Machine learning techniques for the optimization of joint replacements: Application to a short-stem hip implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilla, Myriam; Borgiani, Edoardo; Martínez, Javier; Duda, Georg N; Checa, Sara

    2017-01-01

    Today, different implant designs exist in the market; however, there is not a clear understanding of which are the best implant design parameters to achieve mechanical optimal conditions. Therefore, the aim of this project was to investigate if the geometry of a commercial short stem hip prosthesis can be further optimized to reduce stress shielding effects and achieve better short-stemmed implant performance. To reach this aim, the potential of machine learning techniques combined with parametric Finite Element analysis was used. The selected implant geometrical parameters were: total stem length (L), thickness in the lateral (R1) and medial (R2) and the distance between the implant neck and the central stem surface (D). The results show that the total stem length was not the only parameter playing a role in stress shielding. An optimized implant should aim for a decreased stem length and a reduced length of the surface in contact with the bone. The two radiuses that characterize the stem width at the distal cross-section in contact with the bone were less influential in the reduction of stress shielding compared with the other two parameters; but they also play a role where thinner stems present better results.

  12. Machine learning techniques for the optimization of joint replacements: Application to a short-stem hip implant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myriam Cilla

    Full Text Available Today, different implant designs exist in the market; however, there is not a clear understanding of which are the best implant design parameters to achieve mechanical optimal conditions. Therefore, the aim of this project was to investigate if the geometry of a commercial short stem hip prosthesis can be further optimized to reduce stress shielding effects and achieve better short-stemmed implant performance. To reach this aim, the potential of machine learning techniques combined with parametric Finite Element analysis was used. The selected implant geometrical parameters were: total stem length (L, thickness in the lateral (R1 and medial (R2 and the distance between the implant neck and the central stem surface (D. The results show that the total stem length was not the only parameter playing a role in stress shielding. An optimized implant should aim for a decreased stem length and a reduced length of the surface in contact with the bone. The two radiuses that characterize the stem width at the distal cross-section in contact with the bone were less influential in the reduction of stress shielding compared with the other two parameters; but they also play a role where thinner stems present better results.

  13. [Rehabilitation and sport following total hip replacement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt-Sody, M; Pilger, V; Gerdesmeyer, L

    2011-06-01

    The number of total hip replacement (THR) surgeries has increased significantly over the last few years and patients undergoing surgery are of decreasing age. In consequence the question of the influencing factors for the survival of artificial hip joints becomes more and more urgent. The expected survival time of an implant is nowadays 15-20 years and it seems that factors for a shorter lifetime are female gender, overweight, younger age and certain indications which led to surgery, such as rheumatoid arthritis or fractures. In the early phase of rehabilitation, measures against dislocation including training of the abductor muscles are most important. Starting rehabilitation programs early after surgery has positive effects on outcome, especially when strengthening programs are included. There are different opinions concerning the question how the lifetime of a THR is influenced by sports activities. However, it seems to have been demonstrated that suitable sports activities have a positive effect and do not necessarily correlate with higher loosening rates after THR. In general, high-impact sports should be avoided. Recommended activities are cycling, swimming, aquajogging, hiking, rowing and dancing.

  14. An in vitro simulation method for the tribological assessment of complete natural hip joints

    OpenAIRE

    Groves, Dawn; Fisher, John; Williams, Sophie

    2017-01-01

    The use of hip joint simulators to evaluate the tribological performance of total hip replacements is widely reported in the literature, however, in vitro simulation studies investigating the tribology of the natural hip joint are limited with heterogeneous methodologies reported. An in vitro simulation system for the complete natural hip joint, enabling the acetabulum and femoral head to be positioned with different orientations whilst maintaining the correct joint centre of rotation, was su...

  15. Chronic Periprosthetic Hip Joint Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Jeppe; Troelsen, Anders; Søballe, Kjeld

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Limited information is available regarding the treatment strategy and prognosis of non-selected patients treated for chronic periprosthetic hip joint infection. Such information is important as no head-to-head studies on treatment strategies are available. The purpose of this study...... is to report on the treatment strategy and prognosis of a non-selected, consecutive patient population. METHODS: We identified 130 patients in the National Patient Registry, consecutively treated for a chronic periprosthetic hip joint infection between 2003-2008 at 11 departments of orthopaedic surgery. We...... chart review with a minimum of 5 years follow-up by the nationwide electronic patient record system. RESULTS: After primary revision surgery, 53 patients (41%) had a spacer in situ, 64 (50%) had a resection arthroplasty and 13 (9%) did not have the infected implant removed. 63% were re...

  16. OARSI/OMERACT initiative to define states of severity and indication for joint replacement in hip and knee osteoarthritis. An OMERACT 10 Special Interest Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gossec, Laure; Paternotte, Simon; Bingham, Clifton O

    2011-01-01

    To define pain and physical function cutpoints that would, coupled with structural severity, define a surrogate measure of "need for joint replacement surgery," for use as an outcome measure for potential structure-modifying interventions for osteoarthritis (OA).......To define pain and physical function cutpoints that would, coupled with structural severity, define a surrogate measure of "need for joint replacement surgery," for use as an outcome measure for potential structure-modifying interventions for osteoarthritis (OA)....

  17. Shoulder Joint Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the development of osteoarthritis. It is a common reason people have shoulder replacement surgery. Rheumatoid Arthritis This is ... severe fracture of the shoulder is another common reason people have shoulder replacements. When the head of the ...

  18. [Juvenile rheumatoid diseases: Endoprosthetic care of destroyed hip joints].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehart, S; Henniger, M

    2015-07-01

    Patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) often suffer from involvement of the hip joints, with joint destruction and related functional limitations, making hip replacement necessary. To discover what special features are to be expected in patients with JIA and hip arthroplasty and what impact they have on surgical indication, choice of implant, and technique. Selective literature review and evaluation of our patient population. Compared with osteoarthritis patients, JIA patients are on average much younger at the time of hip replacement. Owing to the onset of the disease in childhood or adolescence and the frequent glucocorticoid therapy, growth disorders or abnormal anatomical findings are common in these patients. Bone density is often reduced at an early age. The perioperative management of medication has to be planned. Special implants for patients with rheumatic diseases do not exist, but the above peculiarities of this group of patients should be considered for surgical procedure and choice of implant and material. Overall, the results of hip arthroplasty in juvenile rheumatic diseases, in terms of pain relief and functional improvement, are good. The limited life of the arthroplasty is problematic. By relieving pain, improvement of the range of motion and activity level very high patient satisfaction is usually achieved by hip arthroplasty in JIA patients. In the case of involvement of the contralateral hip or the ipsilateral knee joint it may be useful to perform a simultaneous, single-stage joint replacement of both joints.

  19. The Infection Rate of Metal-on-Metal Total Hip Replacement Is Higher When Compared to Other Bearing Surfaces as Documented by the Australian Orthopaedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Phil; Lyons, Matt; O'Sullivan, Michael

    2018-02-01

    Despite the well-documented decline in the use of metal-on-metal (MoM) implants over the last decade, there are still controversies regarding whether all MoM implants are created equally. Complications such as elevated serum metal ion levels, aseptic lymphocyte-dominated vasculitis-associated lesion (ALVAL) and pseudotumours have all been well documented, but recent studies suggest increased risk of infection with MoM bearing surfaces. Most of these studies however have small patient numbers. The purpose of this study was to examine the cumulative incidence of revision for infection of MoM bearing surfaces in primary hip arthroplasty at a national and single-surgeon level. Data was collected from the Australian Orthopaedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry, which contains over 98% of all arthroplasties performed in Australia since 2001. The cumulative incidence of revision for infection was extracted at a national level and single-surgeon level. Two hundred seventy-six thousand eight hundred seventy-eight subjects were documented in the Australian registry. The 10-year cumulative percent revision for infection of MoM bearing surfaces in primary total hip replacement (THR) was 2.5% at a national level, compared to 0.8% for other bearing surfaces. The senior author contributed 1755 subjects with 7-year follow-up and a cumulative percent revision for infection of MoM bearing surfaces in primary THR of 36.9%, compared to 2.0% for other bearing surfaces. The cumulative percent of revision of MoM bearing surfaces is higher compared to other bearing surfaces; this is especially pronounced in cumulative percent of revision for infection. There was a higher cumulative percent of revision for infection in MoM bearings surfaces (in particular, large-head MoM) compared to other bearing surfaces at both the national and individual-surgeon level.

  20. Sonography for hip joint effusion in adults with hip pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.M. Bierma-Zeinstra (Sita); A.M. Bohnen (Arthur); J.A.N. Verhaar (Jan); A. Prins (Ad); J.S. Lameris; A.Z. Ginai (Abida)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: To study the prevalence of ultrasonic hip joint effusion and its relation with clinical, radiological and laboratory (ESR) findings in adults with hip pain. METHODS: Patients (n = 224) aged 50 years or older with hip pain, referred by the general

  1. Postoperative Recovery of Mechanical Muscle Function in Hip Replacement Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Carsten; Aagaard, Per; Overgaard, Søren

    2011-01-01

    formal training. Parameters: In vivo isometric peak strength/torque (Tmax) and rate of torque development (RTD) were measured during unilateral knee extension and flexion but also extension, flexion, adduction and abduction of the hip muscle groups were evaluated. Data was obtained pre, 8, 26 and 52......INTRODUCTION Muscle function in patients with hip osteoarthritis (OA) is not well-studied. We established a new setup of tests in order to monitor patients before and after surgery. Our novel setup was used to evaluate single- and multi-joint strength (torque) and power in a group of 40 – 65 year...... old hip patients.   MATERIAL AND METHODS Patients: Forty elderly patients (age 55 ± 6, BMI 27.5 ± 4.1) with unilateral osteoarthritis participated in this prospectively study and were randomized to either total or resurfacing hip replacement. All implants inserted by two senior surgeons using only...

  2. Wear testing of total hip replacements under severe conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zietz, Carmen; Fabry, Christian; Reinders, Joern; Dammer, Rebecca; Kretzer, Jan Philippe; Bader, Rainer; Sonntag, Robert

    2015-07-01

    Controlled wear testing of total hip replacements in hip joint simulators is a well-established and powerful method, giving an extensive prediction of the long-term clinical performance. To understand the wear behavior of a bearing and its limits under in vivo conditions, testing scenarios should be designed as physiologically as possible. Currently, the ISO standard protocol 14242 is the most common preclinical testing procedure for total hip replacements, based on a simplified gait cycle for normal walking conditions. However, in recent years, wear patterns have increasingly been observed on retrievals that cannot be replicated by the current standard. The purpose of this study is to review the severe testing conditions that enable the generation of clinically relevant wear rates and phenomena. These conditions include changes in loading and activity, third-body wear, surface topography, edge wear and the role of aging of the bearing materials.

  3. Metal-on-metal hip joint tribology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowson, D; Jin, Z M

    2006-02-01

    The basic tribological features of metal-on-metal total hip replacements have been reviewed to facilitate an understanding of the engineering science underpinning the renaissance of these hard-on-hard joints. Metal-on-polymer hip replacements operate in the boundary lubrication regime, thus leading to the design guidance to reduce the femoral head diameter as much as is feasible to minimize frictional torque and volumetric wear. This explains why the gold-standard implant of this form from the past half-century had a diameter of only 22.225 mm (7/8 in). Metal-on-metal implants can operate in the mild mixed lubrication regime in which much of the applied load is supported by elastohydrodynamic films. Correct tribological design leads to remarkably low steady state wear rates. Promotion of the most effective elastohydrodynamic films calls for the largest possible head diameters and the smallest clearances that can reasonably be adopted, consistent with fine surface finishes, good sphericity and minimal structural elastic deformation of the cup on its foundations. This guidance, which is opposite in form to that developed for metal-on-polymer joints, is equally valid for solid (monolithic) metallic heads on metallic femoral stems and surface replacement femoral shells. Laboratory measurements of friction and wear in metal-on-metal joints have confirmed their potential to achieve a very mild form of mixed lubrication. The key lies in the generation of effective elastohydrodynamic lubricating films of adequate thickness compared with the composite roughness of the head and cup. The calculation of the film thickness is by no means easy, but the full procedure is outlined and the use of an empirical formula that displays good agreement with calculations based upon the full numerical solutions is explained. The representation of the lambda ratio, lambda, embracing both film thickness and composite roughness, is described.

  4. A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS BETWEEN THE RECOVERY RESULTS OF PATIENTS WITH HIP JOINT REPLACEMENT IN THE PERIOD OF EARLY REHABILITATION AT HOME (13-45 DAYS AFTER SURGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya St. Krastanova

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Rehabilitation of the patients with Hip Joint Arthroplasthy is an indispensable part of the functional recovery. The purpose of this report is to track and measure the results of an applied complex rehabilitation program during the early post-surgery period in home setting (13-45 days after surgery and to make a comparative analysis between the recovery results of patients who conducted a comprehensive rehabilitation treatment, and a control group of patients who conducted only early physical therapy and occupational therapy in the hospitalization in the Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology. Methods and materials: 152 patients (107 female and 45 male aged between 22 and 84 with Hip Joint Arthroplasthy due to osteoarthritis or femoral neck fracture participated in the study, divided into two groups, according to postoperative behavior. The rehabilitation program consists of: kinesitherapy (positional therapy, isometric exercises, movement of the artificial hip joint within the allowed volumes, exercises for upper limbs and the healthy lower limb and ergotherapy (ergonomic home environment adjusted to performing the daily activities of life. Patients in the second control group have conducted kinesitherapy and occupational therapy only in the early postoperative period in orthopedic clinic. Results: Locomotion test and DAL test measurements were taken and the results for each patient were stored in a special patient file. Conclusion: Ensuring an ergonomic home environment and independent practice of kinesitherapeutic and ergotherapeutic stimulate the recovery of the patients’ self-reliance significantly improve the psycho-emotional balance and self-respect, and serves as an important basis for the latter stages of rehabilitation.

  5. Segmental blood pressure after total hip replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gebuhr, Peter Henrik; Soelberg, M; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl

    1992-01-01

    Twenty-nine patients due to have a total hip replacement had their systemic systolic and segmental blood pressures measured prior to operation and 1 and 6 weeks postoperatively. No patients had signs of ischemia. The segmental blood pressure was measured at the ankle and at the toes. A significan...

  6. Does the use of laminar flow and space suits reduce early deep infection after total hip and knee replacement?: the ten-year results of the New Zealand Joint Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, G J; Rothwell, A G; Frampton, C; Wyatt, M C

    2011-01-01

    We have investigated whether the use of laminar-flow theatres and space suits reduced the rate of revision for early deep infection after total hip (THR) and knee (TKR) replacement by reviewing the results of the New Zealand Joint Registry at ten years. Of the 51 485 primary THRs and 36 826 primary TKRs analysed, laminar-flow theatres were used in 35.5% and space suits in 23.5%. For THR there was a significant increase in early infection in those procedures performed with the use of a space suit compared with those without (p space suit (p space suit (p space suits were used in those theatres (p deep infection has not been reduced by using laminar flow and space suits. Our results question the rationale for their increasing use in routine joint replacement, where the added cost to the health system seems to be unjustified.

  7. Preoperative Quadriceps Strength as a Predictor for Short-Term Functional Outcome After Total Hip Replacement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holstege, Marije S.; Lindeboom, Robert; Lucas, Cees

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine the preoperative strength of the muscle group of the lower extremity that is most important in predicting functional recovery after primary unilateral total hip replacement (THR). Design: Prospective observational study with inception cohort. Settings: Joint care program

  8. Adventure sports and sexual freedom hip replacement: the tripolar hip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchett, James W

    2017-06-28

    Certain athletic activities and lifestyles require a completely stable and very mobile hip. Total hip replacement with a natural femoral head size and two mobile-bearing surfaces (i.e., a "tripolar" prosthesis) is the most stable prosthesis. Elegant design and wear-resistant bearing surfaces are the keys to long-term implant survivorship. The hypothesis is that a ceramic-coated tripolar prosthesis using highly cross-linked polyethylene can provide full function and complete stability with low wear. This study sought to determine: (1) patient-reported outcomes, (2) functional outcomes, (3) implant survivorship and complications, and (4) postoperative sexual limitations. Between 1998 and 2011, the author performed 160 primary total hip replacements using tripolar prostheses in patients participating in adventure sports and other physically demanding activities. The institutional review board approved this study. The inclusion criteria were patients who needed unrestricted activity and who were not candidates for or did not choose hip resurfacing. Patients were followed every second year and assessed with radiographs, Harris Hip Score, WOMAC, SF-12, and UCLA functional outcome scores. Patients were asked about symptoms of instability and satisfaction with their hip replacement. Patients were asked both preoperatively and 2 years postoperatively four questions about their sexual activity. Mean follow-up was 11 years. At 2 years' postoperatively, 98% of patients reported their satisfaction as excellent or good and 99% were not limited for sexual activity following surgery. Seventy-four percent of patients reported they were recovered within 6 weeks of surgery. There were no dislocations. There were three revision procedures for implant loosening, infection, and periprosthetic fracture, but there were no failures of the tripolar articulation. The mean postoperative UCLA score was the highly athletic score of 8. There were no signs of osteolysis, wear, or metal

  9. Pain in the hip joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Aleksandrovich Olyunin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pathological changes that develop in the hip joints (HJ have different origins and mechanisms of development, but their main manifestation is pain. The nature of this pain cannot be well established on frequent occasions. The English-language medical literature currently classifies such disorders as greater trochanter pain syndrome (GTPS. Its major signs are chronic pain and local palpatory tenderness in the outer part of HJ. The development of GTPS may be associated with inflammation of the synovial bursae situated in the greater tronchanter, as well as with tendinitis, myorrhexis, iliotibial band syndrome, and other local changes in the adjacent tissues or with systemic diseases. So GTPS may be characterized as regional pain syndrome that frequently mimics pain induced by different diseases, including myofascial pain syndrome, osteoarthrosis, spinal diseases, etc.

  10. Resurfacing total hip replacement--a therapeutical approach in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis and hip arthrosis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Popescu, D; Ene, R; Cirstoiu, C

    2011-01-01

    Patients with incipient hip arthrosis may benefit from a relatively new therapeutical approach using resurfacing total hip replacement, but in those with associated osteoporosis, this type of surgical...

  11. Stereo-radiographic analysis of loosening processes of alloplastic hip joint replacement. Stereo-Roentgen-Analyse (SRA) von Lockerungsvorgaengen alloplastischer Hueftgelenkimplantate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Probst, K.J.

    1980-01-01

    A computer-aided diagnostic system has been developed by which implant dislocation of an order of 0.2 mm can be detected in all three dimensions. The diagnostic system is based on a point-by-point evaluation of stereoradiographic pictures; precise localisation of the implant relative to its place of insertion is made possible by special mathematical operations which are discussed in detail in the methodical part of the book. The method has been tested in clinical practice in 351 cases (208 patients) in the period between September 1, 1977, and May 31, 1979. By taking functional pictures during adduction and abduction of the extremity carrying the endoprosthesis and then evaluating these pictures, the diagnostic system can detect dislocations of the endoprosthesis inside the bone at a given moment. Also, the fate of hip joints with endoprostheses can be followed in the framework of longitudinal research. The method described here may also help to solve other problems of clinical relevance. The only precondition for this is the imaging of the structures of interest in the X-ray picture. A program to analyze loosening processes of alloplastic knee joint implants is new being worked on which will be of great use to the increasing number of patients with alloplastic knee joint implants.

  12. Joint replacement surgery in homeless veterans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chase G. Bennett, MD

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Total joint arthroplasty (TJA in a homeless patient is generally considered contraindicated. Here, we report our known medical and social (housing and employment results of homeless veterans who had TJA. Thirty-seven TJAs were performed on 33 homeless patients (31 men at our hospital between November 2000 and March 2014. This was 1.2% of all TJAs. Average age was 54 years. Average hospital stay was 4.1 days. There were no major inpatient complications. Thirty-four cases had at least 1-year follow-up in any clinic within the Veterans Affairs health care system. There were no known surgery-related reoperations or readmissions. At final follow-up, 24 patients had stable housing and 9 were employed. The extensive and coordinated medical and social services that were provided to veterans from the Department of Veterans Affairs contributed to our positive results. Keywords: Homeless, Veteran, Joint replacement, Total hip, Total knee, Employment

  13. Hip joint mobility in dancers: preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drężewska, Marlena; Gałuszka, Renata; Sliwiński, Zbigniew

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of dancing on hip joint mobility and to assess the relationship between active movements of the hips and injuries among dancers, which may be important in planning rehabilitation in this group. The sample comprised 49 dancers (37 women and 12 men) aged 15 to 32 years. The participants were the professional dancers of the Kielce Dance Theatre and members of two youth jazz dance teams from the Kielce Dance Theatre. The active range of motion of the hips was measured in three planes using a goniometer in order to assess the influence of dance training on hip joint mobility. A questionnaire-based survey was also conducted. The range of flexion, extension and external rotation was significantly greater in the group of long-time dancers (p gender were associated with an increased range of hip joint motion.

  14. Revision rates after primary hip and knee replacement in England between 2003 and 2006.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nokuthaba Sibanda

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Hip and knee replacement are some of the most frequently performed surgical procedures in the world. Resurfacing of the hip and unicondylar knee replacement are increasingly being used. There is relatively little evidence on their performance. To study performance of joint replacement in England, we investigated revision rates in the first 3 y after hip or knee replacement according to prosthesis type.We linked records of the National Joint Registry for England and Wales and the Hospital Episode Statistics for patients with a primary hip or knee replacement in the National Health Service in England between April 2003 and September 2006. Hospital Episode Statistics records of succeeding admissions were used to identify revisions for any reason. 76,576 patients with a primary hip replacement and 80,697 with a primary knee replacement were included (51% of all primary hip and knee replacements done in the English National Health Service. In hip patients, 3-y revision rates were 0.9% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.8%-1.1% with cemented, 2.0% (1.7%-2.3% with cementless, 1.5% (1.1%-2.0% CI with "hybrid" prostheses, and 2.6% (2.1%-3.1% with hip resurfacing (p < 0.0001. Revision rates after hip resurfacing were increased especially in women. In knee patients, 3-y revision rates were 1.4% (1.2%-1.5% CI with cemented, 1.5% (1.1%-2.1% CI with cementless, and 2.8% (1.8%-4.5% CI with unicondylar prostheses (p < 0.0001. Revision rates after knee replacement strongly decreased with age.Overall, about one in 75 patients needed a revision of their prosthesis within 3 y. On the basis of our data, consideration should be given to using hip resurfacing only in male patients and unicondylar knee replacement only in elderly patients.

  15. Renal function after elective total hip replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perregaard, Helene; Damholt, Mette B; Solgaard, Søren

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose - Acute kidney injury (AKI) is associated with increased short-term and long-term mortality in intensive care populations and in several surgical specialties, but there are very few data concerning orthopedic populations. We have studied the incidence of AKI...... involving all primary elective total hip replacements performed from January 2003 through December 2012. Patient demographics and creatinine values were registered. We evaluated the presence of CKD and AKI according to the international guidelines for kidney disease (KDIGO Acute Kidney Injury Workgroup 2013...... reduced kidney function, was seen in 374 individuals (11%). Interpretation - Development of acute kidney injury appears to be a substantial problem compared to other complications related to elective total hip arthroplasty, i.e. luxation and infection. Patients with pre-existing chronic kidney disease may...

  16. Hip or knee replacement - in the hospital after

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hip replacement surgery - after - self-care; Knee replacement surgery - after - self-care ... taking walks in the hallways with help. After knee replacement, some surgeons recommend using a continuous passive ...

  17. COMPLEX FUNCTIONAL ASSESSMENT OF THE HIP JOINT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya S. Krastanova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In relation to the study reporting the effects of applying phased complex rehabilitation in patients with total hip arthroplasty, it has been concluded that the everyday clinical practice in Bulgaria does not apply complex examination, giving an objective picture about the extent of functional status of patients with trauma and diseases of the hip. Aim: The main goal of this report is to present a test which incorporates all known and routine research and in which the total number of points determines the functional status of patients with trauma and diseases of the hip. Material and Methods: Based on the Hip dysfunction and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, the Harris Hip Score modified test, scale D’Aubigne and Postel and Iowa’s test for complex functional evaluation of the hip joint, we have developed a test including information about the degree of pain; goniometry and manual muscle testing of the hip; locomotor test – type of gait and adjuvants; test for Daily Activities of Life. The test has been developed on the basis of expert assessment by doctors and physiotherapists of the proposed indicators for evaluation and determination of the weighting factors’ contribution to the general condition of the patient. Conclusion: The developed and tested method of complex functional assessment of the hip joint enables our colleagues, dealing with trauma and diseases of the hip, to use it in various research and scientific projects, as well as in general medical practice.

  18. Computed tomography through the hip joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dihlmann, W.

    1981-09-01

    Computed tomography through the hip joint should be used only after conventional radiographs (at least a.p. views). It may provide information that is diagnostic or helpful, e.g. in bacterial infections, trauma of praearthrotic states. Indications for surgery may be obtained in the presence of inflammatory-rheumatic and degenerative hip disease, arthritic deformities and trauma, and the type of suitable operation may be indicated. The obturator internus muscle, which can be seen medial to the acetabulum on the scan, is an important diagnostic indicator where there is trauma or bacterial infection of the hip joint. The capsule of the hip joint can be visualized directly. Slice thickness of 6 mm, or less is necessary.

  19. Atraumatic Anterior Dislocation of the Hip Joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadahiko Ohtsuru

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dislocation of the hip joint in adults is usually caused by high-energy trauma such as road traffic accidents or falls from heights. Posterior dislocation is observed in most cases. However, atraumatic anterior dislocation of the hip joint is extremely rare. We present a case of atraumatic anterior dislocation of the hip joint that was induced by an activity of daily living. The possible causes of this dislocation were anterior capsule insufficiency due to developmental dysplasia of the hip, posterior pelvic tilt following thoracolumbar kyphosis due to vertebral fracture, and acetabular anterior coverage changes by postural factor. Acetabular anterior coverage changes in the sagittal plane were measured using a tomosynthesis imaging system. This system was useful for elucidation of the dislocation mechanism in the present case.

  20. Aberrant pelvis and hip kinematics impair hip loading before and after total hip replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenaerts, G; Mulier, M; Spaepen, A; Van der Perre, G; Jonkers, I

    2009-10-01

    Musculoskeletal loading is an important factor affecting the development of osteoarthritis, bone remodelling and primary fixation of total hip replacement (THR). In this study, we analyzed the relation between muscular force, gait kinematics and kinetics and hip loading in 20 patients before and six weeks after THR. Hip contact forces were calculated from gait analysis data using musculoskeletal modelling, inverse dynamics and static optimization. We found aberrant pelvis and hip kinematics and kinetics before and six weeks after surgery, confirming previous findings in literature. Furthermore, we found a decrease in the total contact force and its vertical component. These changes result in a decrease of the associated inclination angles of the total hip contact force in the sagittal and transverse planes, changing the orientation towards more vertical implant loading after THR. These changes in hip loading were related to observed gait kinematics and kinetics. Most importantly, excessive pelvic obliquity and associated hip adduction related to impaired implant loading. We concluded, therefore, that physical therapy in the early post-operative phase should primarily focus on stretching of anterior and medial structures and strengthening of hip flexors and abductors to achieve normalization of the hip and pelvis kinematics and consequently normalize hip loading.

  1. HIP JOINT PATHOLOGY IN THE NEONATAL PERIOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Baindurashvili

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The frequency of developmental hip dysplasia among newborns and its change with ultrasound application are presented. The ultrasound estimation of coxofemoral joints in children of the first days of life is resulted and the analysis of conformity of the clinical and ultrasonic data is carried out. The tactical algorithm of screening and monitoring of coxofemoral joints is offered.

  2. HIP JOINT PATHOLOGY IN THE NEONATAL PERIOD

    OpenAIRE

    A. G. Baindurashvili; I. Y. Chukhraeva

    2011-01-01

    The frequency of developmental hip dysplasia among newborns and its change with ultrasound application are presented. The ultrasound estimation of coxofemoral joints in children of the first days of life is resulted and the analysis of conformity of the clinical and ultrasonic data is carried out. The tactical algorithm of screening and monitoring of coxofemoral joints is offered.

  3. Demographics, clinical characteristics and predictive factors for total knee or hip replacement in patients with rheumatoid arthritis in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantos, Panayiotis G; Tzioufas, Athanasios G; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B; Soucacos, Panayiotis N; Moutsopoulos, Haralampos M

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to study the prevalence of total knee and hip replacements in Greek patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and to identify possible predictive factors for future total hip or knee replacement. A retrospective medical record review was performed in 750 RA patients who were recruited during 1994 to 2008 in a single Greek medical centre. Of the reviewed patients, 489 with a minimum follow-up duration of 1 year were enrolled in the study. The occurrence of total hip or knee replacement was used as the primary outcome variable in the predictive analysis. Total hip or knee replacement associated with RA was performed in 21 patients (4.3%). Total disease duration was the most significant factor associated with increased likelihood of total joint replacement. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) at baseline examination was positively associated with subsequent knee or hip joint replacement (OR=1.023, 95%CI 1.005-1.04). Inadequate response to treatment was associated with a 3.12-times higher likelihood of joint replacement (95%CI, 1.28-7.58). The patients who underwent total hip or knee replacement had significantly higher ESRs and DAS 28 levels (pjoint hip or knee replacement can improve pharmacological treatment to maintain function and prevent destruction of the affected joints. Longer disease duration and inadequate response to treatment after the first year of follow-up increases the likelihood ratio for total joint replacement during the course of disease in Greek RA patients.

  4. An in vitro simulation method for the tribological assessment of complete natural hip joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves, Dawn; Fisher, John; Williams, Sophie

    2017-01-01

    The use of hip joint simulators to evaluate the tribological performance of total hip replacements is widely reported in the literature, however, in vitro simulation studies investigating the tribology of the natural hip joint are limited with heterogeneous methodologies reported. An in vitro simulation system for the complete natural hip joint, enabling the acetabulum and femoral head to be positioned with different orientations whilst maintaining the correct joint centre of rotation, was successfully developed for this study. The efficacy of the simulation system was assessed by testing complete, matched natural porcine hip joints and porcine hip hemiarthroplasty joints in a pendulum friction simulator. The results showed evidence of biphasic lubrication, with a non-linear increase in friction being observed in both groups. Lower overall mean friction factor values in the complete natural joint group that increased at a lower rate over time, suggest that the exudation of fluid and transition to solid phase lubrication occurred more slowly in the complete natural hip joint compared to the hip hemiarthroplasty joint. It is envisaged that this methodology will be used to investigate morphological risk factors for developing hip osteoarthritis, as well as the effectiveness of early interventional treatments for degenerative hip disease.

  5. An in vitro simulation method for the tribological assessment of complete natural hip joints.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawn Groves

    Full Text Available The use of hip joint simulators to evaluate the tribological performance of total hip replacements is widely reported in the literature, however, in vitro simulation studies investigating the tribology of the natural hip joint are limited with heterogeneous methodologies reported. An in vitro simulation system for the complete natural hip joint, enabling the acetabulum and femoral head to be positioned with different orientations whilst maintaining the correct joint centre of rotation, was successfully developed for this study. The efficacy of the simulation system was assessed by testing complete, matched natural porcine hip joints and porcine hip hemiarthroplasty joints in a pendulum friction simulator. The results showed evidence of biphasic lubrication, with a non-linear increase in friction being observed in both groups. Lower overall mean friction factor values in the complete natural joint group that increased at a lower rate over time, suggest that the exudation of fluid and transition to solid phase lubrication occurred more slowly in the complete natural hip joint compared to the hip hemiarthroplasty joint. It is envisaged that this methodology will be used to investigate morphological risk factors for developing hip osteoarthritis, as well as the effectiveness of early interventional treatments for degenerative hip disease.

  6. Increased pain sensitivity but normal function of exercise induced analgesia in hip and knee osteoarthritis - treatment effects of neuromuscular exercise and total joint replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kosek, E; Roos, Ewa M.; Ageberg, E

    2013-01-01

    To assess exercise induced analgesia (EIA) and pain sensitivity in hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA) and to study the effects of neuromuscular exercise and surgery on these parameters.......To assess exercise induced analgesia (EIA) and pain sensitivity in hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA) and to study the effects of neuromuscular exercise and surgery on these parameters....

  7. Preoperative education for hip or knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Steve; Page, Matthew J; Beringer, Katherine; Wasiak, Jason; Sprowson, Andrew

    2014-05-13

    Hip or knee replacement is a major surgical procedure that can be physically and psychologically stressful for patients. It is hypothesised that education before surgery reduces anxiety and enhances clinically important postoperative outcomes. To determine whether preoperative education in people undergoing total hip replacement or total knee replacement improves postoperative outcomes with respect to pain, function, health-related quality of life, anxiety, length of hospital stay and the incidence of adverse events (e.g. deep vein thrombosis). We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (2013, Issue 5), MEDLINE (1966 to May 2013), EMBASE (1980 to May 2013), CINAHL (1982 to May 2013), PsycINFO (1872 to May 2013) and PEDro to July 2010. We handsearched the Australian Journal of Physiotherapy (1954 to 2009) and reviewed the reference lists of included trials and other relevant reviews. Randomised or quasi-randomised trials of preoperative education (verbal, written or audiovisual) delivered by a health professional within six weeks of surgery to people undergoing hip or knee replacement compared with usual care. Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. We analysed dichotomous outcomes using risk ratios. We combined continuous outcomes using mean differences (MD) or standardised mean differences (SMD) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Where possible, we pooled data using a random-effects meta-analysis. We included 18 trials (1463 participants) in the review. Thirteen trials involved people undergoing hip replacement, three involved people undergoing knee replacement and two included both people with hip and knee replacements. Only six trials reported using an adequate method of allocation concealment, and only two trials blinded participants. Few trials reported sufficient data to analyse the major outcomes of the review (pain, function, health-related quality of life, global assessment, postoperative anxiety

  8. Cognitive dysfunction after fast-track hip and knee replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, Lene; Kehlet, Henrik; Bæk Hansen, Torben

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) is reported to occur after major surgery in as many as 20% of patients, elderly patients may especially experience problems in the weeks and months after surgery. Recent studies vary greatly in methods of evaluation and diagnosis of POCD......, and the pathogenic mechanisms are still unclear. We evaluated a large uniform cohort of elderly patients in a standardized approach, after major joint replacement surgery (total hip and knee replacement). Patients were in an optimized perioperative approach (fast track) with multimodal opioid-sparing analgesia...... to 2 weeks and 3 months postoperatively. LOS, pain, opioid use, inflammatory response, and sleep quality were recorded. The practice effect of repeated cognitive testing was gauged using data from a healthy community-dwelling control group (n = 161). RESULTS: Median LOS was 2 days (interquartile range...

  9. Hip involvement in ankylosing spondylitis: epidemiology and risk factors associated with hip replacement surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Cruyssen, Bert; Muñoz-Gomariz, Elisa; Font, Pilar; Mulero, Juan; de Vlam, Kurt; Boonen, Annelies; Vazquez-Mellado, Janitzia; Flores, Diana; Vastesaeger, Nathan; Collantes, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    Although clinicians recognize hip involvement, which frequently leads to hip replacement surgery, as an important feature of AS, data on the epidemiology, nature of the disease and therapeutic strategies are scarce. We aimed to describe the epidemiology of clinical and radiological hip involvement and define the risk factors for the hip replacement surgery in AS patients. Data from 3 datasets were merged, including 847 Belgian (ASPECT database), 1405 Spanish (REGISPONSER database) and 466 Ibero-American (RESPONDIA database) AS patients. The ASPECT and REGISPONSER database (Dataset A) are used for exploratory analysis; the RESPONDIA database (Dataset B) is used for confirmative analysis. Factors associated with hip involvement and the hip replacement surgery were analysed. Twenty four (REGISPONSER) to 36% (RESPONDIA) of AS patients under rheumatologist's care presented clinical hip involvement, including the 5% (Dataset A) of AS patients who needed hip replacement surgery. Patients with hip involvement had significantly worse overall Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI) scores compared with patients without hip involvement (mean difference = 1.6, P < 0.001) (Dataset A, confirmed in B). Corrected for disease duration, patients with early disease onset, enthesial and axial disease needed most frequently hip replacement surgery (Dataset A, confirmed in B). Hip involvement is commonly recognized by rheumatologists in AS patients, and involves about one out of the three to four patients with AS and is associated with impaired functioning reflected by higher overall BASFI scores. Early onset of disease, axial and enthesial disease are associated with the hip replacement surgery in AS.

  10. Segmental blood pressure after total hip replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gebuhr, Peter Henrik; Soelberg, M; Henriksen, Jens Henrik

    1992-01-01

    Twenty-nine patients due to have a total hip replacement had their systemic systolic and segmental blood pressures measured prior to operation and 1 and 6 weeks postoperatively. No patients had signs of ischemia. The segmental blood pressure was measured at the ankle and at the toes. A significant...... drop was found in all pressures 1 week postoperatively. The decrease followed the systemic pressure and was restored to normal after 6 weeks. In a group of six patients with preoperatively decreased ankle pressure, a significant transient further decrease in the ankle-toe gradient pressure was found...... on the operated side. None of the patients had symptoms from the lowered pressure. We conclude that in patients without signs of ischemia, the postoperative segmental pressure decrease is reversible and therefore not dangerous....

  11. Immediate Effect of Grade IV Inferior Hip Joint Mobilization on Hip Abductor Torque: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Makofsky, Howard; Panicker, Siji; Abbruzzese, Jeanine; Aridas, Cynthia; Camp, Michael; Drakes, Jonelle; Franco, Caroline; Sileo, Ray

    2007-01-01

    Joint mobilization and manipulation stimulate mechanoreceptors, which may influence the joint and surrounding muscles. The purpose of this pilot study was to determine the effect of grade IV inferior hip joint mobilization on hip abductor torque. Thirty healthy subjects were randomly assigned to a control group (grade I inferior hip joint mobilization) or an experimental group (grade IV inferior hip joint mobilization). Subjects performed a pre- and post-intervention test of five isometric re...

  12. Increased body mass index is a predisposition for treatment by total hip replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Steffen; Sonne-Holm, Stig

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the radiological and epidemiological data of 4,151 subjects followed up from 1976 to 2003 to determine individual risk factors for hip osteoarthritis (OA), hip pain and/or treatment by total hip replacement (THR). Pelvic radiographs recorded in 1992 were assessed for evidence of hip......-joint degeneration and treatment by THR do not necessarily share the same risk factors, and caution should be exercised in epidemiological studies in attributing one or the other as the end point of coxarthrosis....... prevalence was 1.0--2.5% in subjects or=60 years of age. While radiological OA was significantly influenced by hip dysplasia in men and hip dysplasia and age in women, the risk of THR being performed was only influenced by BMI assessed in 1976. Hip...

  13. Hip joint geometry effects on cartilage contact stresses during a gait cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui-Hui Wu; Dong Wang; An-Bang Ma; Dong-Yun Gu

    2016-08-01

    The cartilage surface geometry of natural human hip joint is commonly regarded as sphere. It has been widely applied in computational simulation and hip joint prosthesis design. Some new geometry models have been developed and the sphere assumption has been questioned recently. The objective of this study was to analyze joint geometry effects on cartilage contact stress distribution and investigate contact patterns during a whole gait cycle. Hip surface was reconstructed from CT data of a healthy volunteer. Three finite element (FE) models of hip joint were developed from different cartilage geometries: natural geometry, sphere and rotational ellipsoid. Loads at ten instants of gait cycle were applied to these models based on published in-vivo data. FE predictions of peak contact pressure during gait of natural hip were compared with sphere and rotational ellipsoid replaced hip joint. Contact occurs mainly in upper anterior region of both acetabulum and femur distributing along sagittal plane of human body. It moves towards inferolateral aspect as the resultant joint reaction force changes during walking for natural hip. Peak pressures at the instant with maximum contact force were 7.48 MPa, 14.97 MPa and 13.12 MPa for models with natural hip surface, sphere replaced and rotational ellipsoid replaced surface respectively. During the whole gait cycle, contact pressure of natural hip ranked lowest in most of the instants, followed by rotational ellipsoid replaced and sphere replaced hip. The results indicate that rotational ellipsoid is more consistent with natural hip cartilage geometry than sphere during normal walking. This means rotational ellipsoid prosthesis could give a better description of physiological structure compared with standard sphere prosthesis. Therefore, rotational ellipsoid would be a better choice for prosthesis design.

  14. The access dependence of endoprosthetic ball dislocation in hip replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulnasyrov R.K.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the course of the study the foreign and native publications concerning total hip replacement have been analyzed. The data from National Registers of various countries are presented in the study. They highlight some issues upon total hip replacement, technologies of surgical intervention advancing and most important risk factors for endoprosthetic ball dislocation. 

  15. Joint Replacement (Finger and Wrist Joints)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... artificial joint Damage to vessels, nerves or other structures in the region of the surgery Alternatives Some alternate procedures for treating arthritis include: Joint injections Oral medications such as aspirin or anti-inflammatory medicines Hand therapy exercises and ...

  16. Engineering Alloplastic Temporomandibular Joint Replacements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinno, Hani; Tahiri, Youssef; Gilardino, Mirko; Bobyn, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are part of a heterogeneous group of pathologies that manifest with a constellation of signs and symptoms. They are the most frequent cause of chronic orofacial pain and are prevalent in 12% of the general population. Despite the debilitating nature of these disorders, there is no standardization for treatment of the diseased temporomandibular joint (TMJ). In this review, we present an overview of the functional anatomy of the TMJ and the engineering concepts that must be understood to better understand the indications for surgical management, the types of available treatments and the requirements for reconstruction. A comparison is made of the clinical outcomes with autogenous versus alloplastic reconstruction, including a history of alloplastic materials and the design features of currently available implants. Emphasis is made on material selection, modulus, stiffness, notch sensitivity and modularity. For the treatment of TMD, engineered TMJ alloplastic replacements have had considerable promise with additional room for improvement using new materials and recent design concepts. PMID:22363183

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of hip joint cartilage and labrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Zilkens

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Hip joint instability and impingement are the most common biomechanical risk factors that put the hip joint at risk to develop premature osteoarthritis. Several surgical procedures like periacetabular osteotomy for hip dysplasia or hip arthroscopy or safe surgical hip dislocation for femoroacetabular impingement aim at restoring the hip anatomy. However, the success of joint preserving surgical procedures is limited by the amount of pre-existing cartilage damage. Biochemically sensitive MRI techniques like delayed Gadolinium Enhanced MRI of Cartilage (dGEMRIC might help to monitor the effect of surgical or non-surgical procedures in the effort to halt or even reverse joint damage.

  18. Case Study of Physiotherapy Treatment of a Patient with the Diagnosis of Total Hip Replacement

    OpenAIRE

    Papageorgiou, Chrystalla

    2014-01-01

    The abstract of my study concerns the treatment of the case of my patient who had an operation of total hip replacement on the right hip joint, caused by post dysplastic arthrosis. My practice was performed at Fakultni Nemocnice Kralovske Vinohrady. Physiotherapy program started on Tuesday 29th of January 2013 and ended on Friday 1st of February 2013. My Bachelor Thesis is divided in two parts: 1) Theoretical part 2) Practical part. In the theoretical part I analyse everything concerning the ...

  19. Joint Replacement (Finger and Wrist Joints)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... alternate procedures for treating arthritis include: Joint injections Oral medications such as aspirin or anti-inflammatory medicines Hand therapy exercises and protective splints Arthrodesis surgery to fuse bones together, which relieves pain by eliminating motion be-tween damaged joint surfaces ...

  20. Process optimized minimally invasive total hip replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Gebel

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to analyse a new concept of using the the minimally invasive direct anterior approach (DAA in total hip replacement (THR in combination with the leg positioner (Rotex- Table and a modified retractor system (Condor. We evaluated retrospectively the first 100 primary THR operated with the new concept between 2009 and 2010, regarding operation data, radiological and clinical outcome (HOOS. All surgeries were perfomed in a standardized operation technique including navigation. The average age of the patients was 68 years (37 to 92 years, with a mean BMI of 26.5 (17 to 43. The mean time of surgery was 80 min. (55 to 130 min. The blood loss showed an average of 511.5 mL (200 to 1000 mL. No intra-operative complications occurred. The postoperative complication rate was 6%. The HOOS increased from 43 points pre-operatively to 90 (max 100 points 3 months after surgery. The radiological analysis showed an average cup inclination of 43° and a leg length discrepancy in a range of +/- 5 mm in 99%. The presented technique led to excellent clinic results, showed low complication rates and allowed correct implant positions although manpower was saved.

  1. Does total hip replacement affect sexual quality of life?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmsen, Rita Th E; Haanstra, Tsjitske M; Sierevelt, Inger N; Jansma, Elise P; Nolte, Peter A; Nicolai, Melianthe P J; Wall, Peter D H; Van Royen, Barend J

    2016-05-04

    Total Hip Replacement (THR) is an effective treatment for end-stage hip osteoarthritis. Since the introduction of total joint replacement, the effect on the Sexual Quality of Life (SQoL) following THR has been addressed in scant studies. The aim of our study was to systematically review the literature, to summarise effects of THR on patients' SQoL. We searched PubMed, EMBASE and PsycINFO between January 1970 and February 9th, 2015 with search terms including Total Hip, Osteoarthritis, SQoL, and THR. Eligible studies were identified and two independent authors extracted data including details of SQoL, study quality and risk of bias. There were 12 eligible studies, which included a total of 2099 patients with an age range of 20-85 years. The methodological quality of ten studies was rated as low, and of two as moderate. Amongst the majority of patients, SQoL improved after surgery, both in terms of physical-functional and psychosocial well-being. However, changes between pre-operative and postoperative SQoL ranged extensively: for example, Sexual Dysfunction Δ 8-51% and Sexual Activity (SA) Δ 0-77%. Three studies reported that some patients never resumed SA again after surgery. In over 40 years of THR treatment, scant studies have examined the effect of THR on patients' SQoL. This review suggests that SQol improves after THR, although the magnitude of effects varies highly. However, the quality of the supporting evidence was rated as low to moderate. This suggests a need for more high quality evidence about the effects of THR on SQoL.

  2. In vivo hip joint loads and pedal forces during ergometer cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damm, P; Dymke, J; Bender, A; Duda, G; Bergmann, G

    2017-07-26

    The rising prevalence of osteoarthritis and an increase in total hip replacements calls for attention to potential therapeutic activities. Cycling is considered as a low impact exercise for the hip joint and hence recommended. However, there are limited data about hip joint loading to support this claim. The aim of this study was to measure synchronously the in vivo hip joint loads and pedal forces during cycling. The in vivo hip joint loads were measured in 5 patients with instrumented hip implants. Data were collected at several combinations of power and cadence, at two saddle heights. Joint loads and pedal forces showed strong linear correlation with power. So the relationship between the external pedal forces and internal joint forces was shown. While cycling at different cadences the minimum joint loads were acquired at 60RPM. The lower saddle height configuration results in an approximately 15% increase compared to normal saddle height. The results offered new insights into the actual effects of cycling on the hip joint and can serve as useful tools while developing an optimum cycling regimen for individuals with coxarthrosis or following total hip arthroplasty. Due to the relatively low contact forces, cycling at a moderate power level of 90W at a normal saddle height is suitable for patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A case report of severely damaged hip joint caused by SAPHO syndrome treated with 2-stage total hip arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Ingwon; Cha, Hoon-Suk; Yoon, Young Cheol; Park, Youn-Soo; Lim, Seung-Jae

    2016-07-01

    Synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis (SAPHO) syndrome is an increasingly recognized entity. The hip joint is known as a less frequently affected site in SAPHO syndrome, and there has been limited reports about hip joint diseases caused by SAPHO syndrome, and as such adequate treatment for this disease spectrum is still not fully elucidated. We describe the case of a 52-year-old man admitted for SAPHO syndrome who went on to be diagnosed with advanced secondary hip arthritis associated with disabling right hip pain. The diagnosis of SAPHO syndrome was delayed; the patient was given a clinical diagnosis of osteomyelitis and treated with prolonged courses of antibiotics and open surgical debridement at previous tertiary health facility. The patient underwent 2-stage joint replacement surgery in our hospital. At 1 year after the surgery, he is well, with minimal right hip pain and the prosthesis is functioning well. This case shows the safety and effectiveness of the 2-stage joint replacement in treating destructive hip disease caused by SAPHO syndrome mimicking infectious arthritis.

  4. [Clinical evaluation of the hip joint after implantation of cementless Mittelmeier type and Parhofer-Mönch type hip prosthesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzegorzewski, A; Synder, M; Witoński, D

    2000-01-01

    Total hip replacement is the most common procedure in the treatment of severe degenerative changes in the hip joint. The authors present clinical evaluation of 129 patients (151 hips) who underwent total hip replacement using either the Mittelmeier type or the Parhofer-Mönch type hip prothesis. The age of the patients ranged at the time of the operation between 17 and 74 years (average 44.9). The follow-up ranged from 24 to 143 months (average 61.2 months). The P-M prothesis was implanted in 53 hips, the P-M "Plasmapore" prothesis in 42 patients, Mittelmeier Autophor 900 prothesis in 49 patients and the Mittelmeier Autophor 900S prothesis in 7 patients. Clinical evaluation was performed according to the d'Aubigne-Postel method with the Charnley modification. The results were graded as very good in 17 cases, good in 64 cases, satisfactory in 53 cases and poor in 17 cases. Very good and good results were mainly observed after implantation of the P-M type prothesis and P-M "Plasmapore" type prothesis. Worse results were observed in patients, who at the time of the operation were aged 45 years or less and who had congenital hip dysplasia. P-M type prothesis gives better clinical results in the treatment of degenerative changes of the hip joint.

  5. Fractures in the elderly: when is hip replacement a necessity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad Antapur

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Prasad Antapur, Nizar Mahomed, Rajiv GandhiToronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, CanadaAbstract: As the world’s population ages, hip fractures pose a significant health care problem. Hip fractures in the elderly are associated with impaired mobility, and increased morbidity and mortality. Associated conditions, such as osteoporosis, medical comorbidity, and dementia, pose a significant concern and determine optimal treatment. One-year mortality rates currently range from 14% to 36%, and care for these patients represents a major global economic burden. The incidence of hip fractures is bimodal in its distribution. Young adult hip fractures are the result of high energy trauma, and the larger peak seen in the elderly population is secondary to low-energy injuries. The predilection for the site of fracture at the neck of femur falls into two major subgroups. Pertrochanteric fractures occur when the injury is extracapsular and the blood supply to the head of femur is unaffected. The management of this group involves internal fixation through a sliding hip screw device or intramedullary fixation device, both of which have good results. The other group of patients who sustain an intracapsular fracture at the femoral neck are at increased risk of nonunion and osteonecrosis. Recent papers in the literature have shown better functional outcomes with a primary hip replacement over other treatment modalities. This article reviews the current literature and indications for a primary total hip replacement in these patients.Keywords: hip fractures, elderly, hip replacement

  6. Analgesia after total hip replacement: epidural versus psoas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    combined with a sciatic nerve block. Ho et al. used this approach for the reduction of a hip fracture in a patient with severe aortic stenosis.10. Buckenmaier et al. used it for total hip replacement surgery.11 However,. Adams et al. found that the surgical stress response is controlled better after epidural anaesthesia than after a ...

  7. Total hip replacement in an alpaca using a cementless implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Kara L; Roush, James K; Anderson, David E; Hoots, Eric

    2009-01-01

    To report use of a cementless total hip prosthesis in an alpaca. Case report. Alpaca (n=1) with chronic craniodorsal coxofemoral luxation. A 2.5-year-old Suri alpaca, 3 months pregnant, was admitted for evaluation of acute onset severe left hind limb lameness (grade 4/5) of 6 weeks duration. After diagnosis of craniodorsal luxation of the left femoral head, total hip replacement (THR) using a cementless implant was performed because of the poor prognosis for reduction of a chronic luxation. A press-fit prosthesis was used and the alpaca delivered a live cria 8 months later. Persistent mild mechanical lameness remained after surgery, with moderate reduction in mobility of the coxofemoral joint. The prosthesis was stable and correctly positioned at 7 weeks and at 9 months. There was mild exostosis surrounding the proximal aspect of the femur at 9 months, and Steinmann pins used to repair the trochanteric osteotomy were removed because of migration. At 1 year, the alpaca has a slight gait abnormality, remains with the herd on pasture and has been re-bred. Chronic coxofemoral luxation in an alpaca can be managed by THR. THR is a viable treatment option in alpacas with severe coxofemoral disease.

  8. [Arthroscopic synovectomy of the hip joint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wünsch, M; Rühmann, O; Lipka, W; Stark, D A; Lerch, S

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the treatment is reduction of hip pain through arthroscopic synovectomy of the hip joint, reduction in activity of the synovial disease and removal of loose bodies in chondromatosis. Synovialitis of the hip due to synovial disease, such as pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) and chondromatosis, synovialitis of the hip due to a further diseases of the hip. The disease must be treatable by arthroscopy (e.g. femoroacetabular impingement and lesion of the acetabular labrum). Suspicion of malignant synovial disease, extensive synovitis, especially in those areas of the hip which are difficult to reach or inaccessible to arthroscopy, primary disease not sufficiently treatable by arthroscopy, e.g. coxarthrosis. Arthroscopy of the central compartment of the hip is carried out by lateral, anterolateral (alternatively inferior anterolateral) and posterolateral portals, using all portals both for the camera and for instruments. In the central compartment synovectomy of the acetabular fossa is performed. A shaver and/or a high frequency diathermy applicator (HF applicator) are employed for removal of the synovial membrane. For arthroscopy of the peripheral compartment lateral, anterolateral (alternatively inferior anterolateral) and superior anterolateral portals are established and all portals are used both for the camera and instruments. In the peripheral compartment, the synovial membrane of the anterior, anteromedial, anterolateral and as far as possible posterolateral areas of the hip is removed. The dorsolateral synovial plica needs to be spared. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are administered as prophylaxis of heterotopic ossification for 10 days. Contraindications for NSAIDs need to be considered. Thrombosis prophylaxis with low molecular weight heparin over 5 days. Mobilization with full weight bearing. Intensive physiotherapeutic exercises for at least 6 and possibly up to 12 postoperative weeks. Radiosynoviorthesis 6-8 weeks after

  9. Experimental validation of finite element modelling of a modular metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Xijin; Wang, Ling; Al-Hajjar, Mazen; Jin, Zhongmin; Wilcox, Ruth K; Fisher, John

    2014-07-01

    Finite element models are becoming increasingly useful tools to conduct parametric analysis, design optimisation and pre-clinical testing for hip joint replacements. However, the verification of the finite element model is critically important. The purposes of this study were to develop a three-dimensional anatomic finite element model for a modular metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacement for predicting its contact mechanics and to conduct experimental validation for a simple finite element model which was simplified from the anatomic finite element model. An anatomic modular metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacement model (anatomic model) was first developed and then simplified with reasonable accuracy to a simple modular total hip replacement model (simplified model) for validation. The contact areas on the articulating surface of three polyethylene liners of modular metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacement bearings with different clearances were measured experimentally in the Leeds ProSim hip joint simulator under a series of loading conditions and different cup inclination angles. The contact areas predicted from the simplified model were then compared with that measured experimentally under the same conditions. The results showed that the simplification made for the anatomic model did not change the predictions of contact mechanics of the modular metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacement substantially (less than 12% for contact stresses and contact areas). Good agreements of contact areas between the finite element predictions from the simplified model and experimental measurements were obtained, with maximum difference of 14% across all conditions considered. This indicated that the simplification and assumptions made in the anatomic model were reasonable and the finite element predictions from the simplified model were valid. © IMechE 2014.

  10. What do patients know about their joint replacement implants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Al-Rub, Zaid; Hussaini, Muhammad; Gerrand, Craig H

    2014-08-01

    Following a hip or knee replacement, patients may have little information about their prosthesis. This can lead to anxiety in the face of media reports about failing implants or misconceptions about how to live with a joint replacement. The aim of this study was to determine the level of understanding amongst patients who had undergone joint replacement in order to inform the development of an educational intervention. A cross-sectional, questionnaire-based survey. The survey was administered to patients attending an orthopaedic arthroplasty follow up clinic between June 2012 and October 2012. Patients were selected in a convenience sampling manner and had all undergone joint replacement at least three months prior to the survey. Responses were available from 52 patients; 49/52 (94%) of patients did not know what model of joint replacement they had and 44/52 (85%) did not know what materials the implant was made from. There was wide variation in recall of advice about activity restrictions. Whilst patients used the internet and other sources to look for advice, this survey suggests the most appropriate educational intervention for this population would involve written information including advice about type of implant, activity restrictions, dental treatment and airport security detectors. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  11. A Simplified Method for the Aspiration of Bone Marrow from Patients Undergoing Hip and Knee Joint Replacement for Isolating Mesenchymal Stem Cells and In Vitro Chondrogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhash C. Juneja

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The procedure for aspiration of bone marrow from the femur of patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA or total hip arthroplasty (THA may vary from an OR (operating room to OR based on the surgeon’s skill and may lead to varied extent of clotting of the marrow and this, in turn, presents difficulty in the isolation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs from such clotted bone marrow. We present a simple detailed protocol for aspirating bone marrow from such patients, isolation, and characterization of MSCs from the aspirated bone marrow specimens and show that the bone marrow presented no clotting or exhibited minimal clotting. This represents an economical source and convenient source of MSCs from bone marrow for use in regenerative medicine. Also, we presented the detailed protocol and showed that the MSCs derived from such bone marrow specimens exhibited MSCs characteristics and generated micromass cartilages, the recipe for regenerative medicine for osteoarthritis. The protocols we presented can be used as standard operating procedures (SOPs by researchers and clinicians.

  12. The role of surgery in postoperative nerve injuries following total hip replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uskova, Anna A; Plakseychuk, Anton; Chelly, Jacques E

    2010-06-01

    Although postoperative nerve injury is infrequent in patients undergoing joint replacement, it is extremely distressing for the patient, surgeon, and anesthesiologist. The nature of nerve injury is often closely related to the type of surgery; this review details the potential surgical causes of nerve injuries following total hip arthroplasty. The current orthopedic literature (1943-2008) was reviewed to help anesthesiologists better understand the pathophysiology of surgery-related postoperative nerve injuries, including the relationship with hip joint anatomy and the surgical techniques. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Hip abductor moment arm - a mathematical analysis for proximal femoral replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Temple H Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients undergoing proximal femoral replacement for tumor resection often have compromised hip abductor muscles resulting in a Trendelenberg limp and hip instability. Commercially available proximal femoral prostheses offer several designs with varying sites of attachment for the abductor muscles, however, no analyses of these configurations have been performed to determine which design provides the longest moment arm for the hip abductor muscles during normal function. Methods This study analyzed hip abductor moment arm through hip adduction and abduction with a trigonometric mathematical model to evaluate the effects of alterations in anatomy and proximal femoral prosthesis design. Prosthesis dimensions were taken from technical schematics that were obtained from the prosthesis manufacturers. Manufacturers who contributed schematics for this investigation were Stryker Orthopaedics and Biomet. Results Superior and lateral displacement of the greater trochanter increased the hip abductor mechanical advantage for single-leg stance and adduction and preserved moment arm in the setting of Trendelenberg gait. Hip joint medialization resulted in less variance of the abductor moment arm through coronal motion. The Stryker GMRS endoprosthesis provided the longest moment arm in single-leg stance. Conclusions Hip abductor moment arm varies substantially throughout the hip's range of motion in the coronal plane. Selection of a proximal femur endoprosthesis with an abductor muscle insertion that is located superiorly and laterally will optimize hip abductor moment arm in single-leg stance compared to one located inferiorly or medially.

  14. Primary extra-cranial meningioma following total hip replacement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, T.J.; Beggs, I. [Royal Infirmary, Department of Radiology, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Patton, J.T.; Porter, D. [Royal Infirmary, Department of Orthopaedics, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Salter, D.M.; Al-Nafussi, A. [Royal Infirmary, Department of Pathology, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    2009-01-15

    A 61-year-old man presented with pain at the left hip and decreased mobility 10 years after total hip replacement. Imaging demonstrated a large destructive expansile mass adjacent to the prosthesis. Histological analysis confirmed the presence of an extra-cranial meningioma. Primary tumours after total hip replacement are rare and include soft tissue sarcomas, bone sarcomas and lymphomas. To our knowledge, no previous cases of primary extracranial meningioma have been identified. The imaging features, histology, pathogenesis and differential diagnosis are discussed. (orig.)

  15. Anterior dislocation after total hip replacement - effects of pelvic rotation and femoral head size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Fu-Yuen; Wang, Qun; Chiu, Kwong-Yuen; Yan, Chun-Hoi

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the effects of pelvic rotation and femoral head diameter on the anterior stability of the hip joint after total hip replacement. Computer navigation and cadaveric bone were used to simulate the range of motion after total hip replacement. The hip was put at 0 degrees of flexion and it was gradually externally rotated until the hip dislocated. The degree of external rotation when the hip was dislocated was recorded. The test was repeated with the hip at +10, -10, -20, -30, -40 and -50 degrees of flexion. The acetabular component was positioned with abduction of 45 degrees and anteversion at 20 degrees. There was a significant difference amongst each group of pelvic rotation from 0 to -50 degrees in the degree of external rotation when the hip was dislocated. The degree became insignificant when pelvic rotation was increased from 0 to 10 degrees. From -10 to -50 degree of pelvic rotation, 36mm head had significant better stability compared with 32mm and 28mm femoral heads. The presence of significant pelvic sagittal malrotation can increase the risk of anterior dislocation. A larger femoral head is more stable than smaller heads. When pelvic sagittal malrotation is not present, there is no difference in stability between large and small femoral heads.

  16. Variation in age and physical status prior to total knee and hip replacement surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ackerman, Ilana N; Dieppe, Paul A; March, Lyn M

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether variation exists in the preoperative age, pain, stiffness, and physical function of people undergoing total knee replacement (TKR) and total hip replacement (THR) at several centers in Australia and Europe. METHODS: Individual Western Ontario and McMaster Univers......OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether variation exists in the preoperative age, pain, stiffness, and physical function of people undergoing total knee replacement (TKR) and total hip replacement (THR) at several centers in Australia and Europe. METHODS: Individual Western Ontario and Mc...... in the timing of joint replacement across the centers studied, with potential for compromised surgical outcomes due to premature or delayed surgery. Possible contributing factors include patient preferences, the absence of concrete indications for surgery, and the capacity of the health care systems....

  17. Balancing innovation and medical device regulation: the case of modern metal-on-metal hip replacements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard JJ

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Jason J Howard1,2 1Division of Orthopedic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Sidra Medical and Research Center, 2Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Weill Cornell Medical College, Doha, Qatar Abstract: Due to problems with wear particle generation and subsequent loosening using conventional metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacements, there has been a shift toward alternative bearing systems, including metal-on-metal (MoM, for younger, more active patients with degenerative joint disease. Based on positive results from early short-term clinical studies, MoM hip replacements were readily adopted by orthopedic surgeons with thousands being implanted worldwide over the past decade. Unacceptably high revision rates reported by two national joint registries called into question the rigorousness of the regulatory approval process for these implants, particularly with respect to premarket data requirements to prove safety, effectiveness, and the appropriateness of the regulatory pathway chosen. The purpose of this review was to investigate the balance between facilitating the introduction of new medical technologies and the need to ensure safety and effectiveness through comprehensive regulatory assessment. The case of MoM hip replacement devices was used to frame the investigation and subsequent discussions. The regulatory approval processes and post-market surveillance requirements associated with three common MoM hip replacements (two resurfacings: the Birmingham and articular surface replacement and the articular surface replacement XL total hip replacement were investigated. With respect to modern MoM hip replacement devices, the balance between facilitating the introduction of these new medical technologies and the need to ensure safety and effectiveness through comprehensive regulatory assessment was not achieved. The lessons learned from these experiences have application beyond joint replacements to the introduction of new medical technologies in

  18. The prevalence of predisposing deformity in osteoarthritic hip joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klit, Jakob; Gosvig, Kasper; Jacobsen, Steffen

    2011-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly evident that hip joint deformities may be major contributors to the development of osteoarthritis, and the term 'idiopathic osteoarthritis' may be inappropriate in many cases. Our study cohort was derived from the Copenhagen Osteoarthritis Sub-study, a cross sectional...... population-based database of 4151 individuals, all of whom had a standard anteroposterior weight-bearing pelvic radiograph taken. Hip joints were classified according to type and degree of deformity. We defined hip osteoarthritis by a minimum joint space width of ... relationship in both sexes with the clinical presentation. The study cohort which fulfilled these inclusion criteria consisted of 322 females (149 right hips and 173 left hips) and 162 males (77 right hips and 85 left hips) with osteoarthritis. We found an overall prevalence of predisposing hip deformities...

  19. TOTAL HIP REPLACEMENTS AT KIKUYU HOSPITAL, KENYA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thrombosis, one sciatic nerve neuropraxia, one haematoma formation and one intraoperative femoral fracture. Out of the 97 patients 40 of them had the surgery performed more than six months after a proper diagnosis was made and hip arthroplasty recommended. This is mainly due to lack of finances. At operation two ...

  20. Confronting hip resurfacing and big femoral head replacement gait analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiotis K. Karampinas

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Improved hip kinematics and bone preservation have been reported after resurfacing total hip replacement (THRS. On the other hand, hip kinematics with standard total hip replacement (THR is optimized with large diameter femoral heads (BFH-THR. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the functional outcomes of THRS and BFH-THR and correlate these results to bone preservation or the large femoral heads. Thirty-one patients were included in the study. Gait speed, postural balance, proprioception and overall performance. Our results demonstrated a non-statistically significant improvement in gait, postural balance and proprioception in the THRS confronting to BFH-THR group. THRS provide identical outcomes to traditional BFH-THR. The THRS choice as bone preserving procedure in younger patients is still to be evaluated.

  1. [Nerve distribution and density in the canine hip joint capsule. Comparison of healthy and dysplastic hip joints].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giebels, Felix; Prescher, Andreas; Wagenpfeil, Stefan; Bücker, Arno; Kinzel, Sylvia

    2017-04-19

    The hip-joint capsule is exposed to increased tension forces during canine hip dysplasia, resulting in inflammation of the capsular tissue. It has been postulated that inflammation is associated with an increased nerve-distribution density. Therefore, it could be supposed that the nerve-distribution density in the hip-joint capsule is higher in dogs with dysplastic hip compared to healthy dogs. In 16 Labrador Retriever dogs that had been euthanised due to unrelated reasons, the hip joints were classified as normoplastic (group 1, n = 18) or dysplastic (group 2, n = 14) based on radiography. Following staining of the capsular nerve fibres by the Sihler method, histological specimens of the hip-joint capsules were scanned. By subdividing each specimen into 10 quadrants numbered from dorsomedial (Q01) to craniodorsolateral (Q10), the ratio of black to white pixels was calculated digitally for each specimen and each quadrant by using a semiautomatic image analysis. Statistical analysis was performed using an independent t-test. Comparison of the mean values of each quadrant showed a significantly higher (p hip-joint capsule in dogs with dysplastic hip could be the result of increased tension forces on this area following hip-joint dysplasia. The craniodorsal region of the hip-joint capsule is an important origin of pain and coxarthrosis in canine hip dysplasia. The results provide the pathophysiological basis for the efficacy of hip-joint denervation. Denervation of the cranial region of the acetabular rim is essential to reduce capsular inflammation and joint-related pain in canine hip dysplasia.

  2. Hip joint range of motion improvements using three different interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreside, Janice M; McGill, Stuart M

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the effect of 3 different exercise interventions plus a control group on passive hip range of motion (ROM). Previous research studies into the methods of improving passive hip mobility have focused on stretching protocols aimed specifically at the hip joint. The effect of core stabilization, motor training, and myofascial stretching techniques on hip mobility in a selected asymptomatic group with limited hip mobility is unclear. In this study, 24 young men with limited hip mobility (stretching, stretching with motor control exercises for the hip and trunk, core endurance with motor control exercises, and the control group. Six-week home exercise programs were individually prescribed based on the assigned group, hip ROM, movement patterns, and timed core endurance. Two-way analyses of variances were conducted to analyze the effect of group assignment on hip ROM improvements. Both stretching groups demonstrated significant improvements in hip ROM (p stretching also demonstrated a moderate increase in ROM but only significantly so in rotation. Average core endurance holding times improved 38-53%. These results indicate that stretches aimed at the myofascial components of the upper body, in addition to the hip joint, resulted in dramatic increases in hip ROM in a group of young men with limited hip mobility. Hip ROM also improved in the group that did no active stretching, highlighting the potential role of including stabilization or "proximal stiffening training" when rehabilitating the extremities.

  3. The evolution and concepts of joint-preserving surgery of the hip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leunig, M; Ganz, R

    2014-01-01

    The use of joint-preserving surgery of the hip has been largely abandoned since the introduction of total hip replacement. However, with the modification of such techniques as pelvic osteotomy, and the introduction of intracapsular procedures such as surgical hip dislocation and arthroscopy, previously unexpected options for the surgical treatment of sequelae of childhood conditions, including developmental dysplasia of the hip, slipped upper femoral epiphysis and Perthes' disease, have become available. Moreover, femoroacetabular impingement has been identified as a significant aetiological factor in the development of osteoarthritis in many hips previously considered to suffer from primary osteoarthritis. As mechanical causes of degenerative joint disease are now recognised earlier in the disease process, these techniques may be used to decelerate or even prevent progression to osteoarthritis. We review the recent development of these concepts and the associated surgical techniques.

  4. Joint Stiffness Is Heritable and Associated with Fibrotic Conditions and Joint Replacement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frances M Williams

    Full Text Available Joint stiffness is a common, debilitating, age-related symptom, which may be seen after total joint replacement (TJR. Stiffness also occurs in fibrotic conditions such as shoulder capsulitis and Dupuytren's contracture. We speculated that the two traits (TJR and fibrotic disease are linked pathogenically.Using the TwinsUK NIHR BRC BioResource we tested the hypotheses that 1 joint (hip and knee stiffness, TJR (hip and knee, and fibrotic conditions are associated and 2 genetic factors contribute to them.Participating twins (n = 9718 had completed self-reported questionnaires on the traits of interest. All three traits were significantly associated with increasing age and body mass index (BMI, as well as female sex, on univariate analysis. Multivariable logistic regression analyses showed a significant association between TJR and joint stiffness (OR = 3.96, 95% confidence interval, CI 2.77-5.68 and between fibrotic conditions and joint stiffness (OR = 2.39, 1.74-3.29, adjusting for age, sex, BMI and twin relatedness. Monozygotic versus dizygotic intraclass correlations gave heritability estimates for TJR = 46% and joint stiffness = 32%.That fibrotic conditions, joint stiffness and TJR are significantly associated suggests a common disease process, possibly fibrosis, which is genetically mediated.

  5. Associations among exercise duration, lameness severity, and hip joint range of motion in Labrador Retrievers with hip dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Laura M; Marcellin-Little, Denis J; Lascelles, B Duncan X

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate factors associated with lameness severity and hip joint range of motion in dogs with hip dysplasia and to assess the association between hip joint range of motion and degree of lameness. Prospective case series. 60 client-owned Labrador Retrievers with hip dysplasia. Owners completed a questionnaire regarding their dogs' daily exercise duration and type (i.e., low impact vs high impact) and lifestyle. Range of motion of affected hip joints was measured with a transparent plastic goniometer. The presence of subluxation or luxation of hip joints as a consequence of hip dysplasia and the size of the largest osteophytes or enthesophytes of hip joints on ventrodorsal radiographic images of the pelvis were recorded. Multivariate analyses were performed to identify factors associated with lameness, loss of hip joint flexion, and loss of hip joint extension and to identify factors associated with the presence of large osteophytes. Exercise was associated with a decrease in the severity of lameness in dogs with hip dysplasia. The strength of this inverse relationship increased with longer exercise duration. Lameness was more severe in dogs with hip joint luxation than in dogs without luxation. Hip joint extension was 1° lower for each year of age, and osteophyte or enthesophyte size was 1 mm larger with each 3-year increase in age. Longer daily exercise duration was associated with lower lameness scores in dogs with hip dysplasia. Dogs with hip joint luxation secondary to hip dysplasia had higher lameness scores than did dogs without hip joint luxation.

  6. Reconstruction of the Acetabulum in Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip in Total Hip Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasileios Sakellariou

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH or congenital hip dysplasia (CDH is the most prevalent developmental childhood hip disorder. It includes a wide spectrum of hip abnormalities ranging from dysplasia to subluxation and complete dislocation of the hip joint. The natural history of neglected DDH in adults is highly variable. The mean age of onset of symptoms is 34.5 years for dysplastic DDH, 32.5 years for low dislocation, 31.2 years for high dislocation with a false acetabulum, and 46.4 years for high dislocation without a false acetabulum. Thorough understanding of the bony and soft tissue deformities induced by dysplasia is crucial for the success of total hip arthroplasty. It is important to evaluate the existing acetabular deformity three-dimensionally, and customize the correction in accordance with the quantity and location of ace tabular deficiencies. Acetabular reconstruction in patients with DDH is hallenging. Interpretation of published data is difficult and should be done with caution because most series include patients with different types of hip disease. In general, the complication rate associated with THA is higher in patients with hip dysplasia than it is in patients with osteoarthritis. Overall, clinical and functional outcomes following THA in patients hip dysplasia (DDH differ from those treated for primary hip osteoarthritis, possibly due to the lower age and level of activity. Although function scores decline with age, the scores for pain and range of motion presented with a statistically significant improvement in the long-term.

  7. Complex total hip replacement for dysplastic or hypoplastic hips using miniature or microminiature components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolson, S T; Harris, W H

    1983-10-01

    We analyzed the preoperative and perioperative data on sixty-nine consecutive complex total hip replacements performed in fifty-seven patients using miniature or microminiature custom-made femoral components. The patients' average age was 45.7 years. The preoperative diagnosis was congenital dysplasia or dislocation of the hip in 72 per cent of the hips. Acetabular bone grafts were required in thirty-seven of the sixty-nine hips. Operative complications occurred in thirteen (19 per cent) and postoperative dislocation occurred in eleven (16 per cent) of the sixty-nine hips. Fifty-five hips in forty-seven patients were followed for a minimum of two years, the average follow-up being 4.8 years and the longest, 9.8 years. All acetabular grafts united. Loosening of one or both prosthetic components occurred in ten (18 per cent) of the fifty-five hips (twelve of the 110 components became loose). There were no instances of a stem bending or fracturing, despite the small size of the femoral components. Eight hips (14.5 per cent) had undergone revision, six for painful loose components and two for recurrent dislocation. For the forty-seven hips that were not revised, the average Harris hip score rose from 43 points preoperatively to 80 points postoperatively.

  8. Prosthesis infections after orthopedic joint replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Zhijun; Borgwardt, Lotte; Høiby, Niels

    2013-01-01

    Prosthesis-related infection is a serious complication for patients after orthopedic joint replacement, which is currently difficult to treat with antibiotic therapy. Consequently, in most cases, removal of the infected prosthesis is the only solution to cure the infection. It is, therefore...

  9. Mild to Moderate Hip OA: Joint Preservation or Total Hip Arthroplasty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Christopher L

    2015-07-01

    Treatment of structural hip disease such as FAI and acetabular dysplasia has increased dramatically over the past decade with the goal of preservation of the native hip joint. A number of patient and disease specific parameters including the amount of underlying hip osteoarthrosis can help predict success with joint preservation surgery. Total hip arthroplasty remains a very good option in young patients who are not ideal candidates for joint preservation surgery. Future developments will help to better identify ideal surgical candidates and improve understanding of the disease processes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. the Hip Joint Affected by Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anetta Zioła-Frankowska

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine the content of particular elements Ca, Mg, P, Na, K, Zn, Cu, Fe, Mo, Cr, Ni, Ba, Sr, and Pb in the proximal femur bone tissue (cancellous and cortical bone of 96 patients undergoing total hip replacement for osteoarthritis using ICP-AES and FAAS analytical techniques. The interdependencies among these elements and their correlations depended on factors including age, gender, place of residence, tobacco consumption, alcohol consumption, exposure to environmental pollution, physical activity, and type of degenerative change which were examined by statistical and chemometric methods. The factors that exerted the greatest influence on the elements in the femoral head and neck were tobacco smoking (higher Cr and Ni content in smokers, alcohol consumption (higher concentrations of Ni, Cu in people who consume alcohol, and gender (higher Cu, Zn, and Ni concentrations in men. The factors influencing Pb accumulation in bone tissue were tobacco, alcohol, gender, and age. In primary and secondary osteoarthritis of the hip, the content and interactions of elements are different (mainly those of Fe and Pb. There were no significant differences in the concentrations of elements in the femoral head and neck that could be attributed to residence or physical activity.

  11. Surgery of a Rare Case of Multiple Synovial Osteochondromatosis of the Hip Joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi Min; Liu, Xiaoguang

    2016-01-01

    walk, slowly run, and squat freely. But sometimes he could feel a bit painful on his left hip joint after long walking and fatigue. And sometimes he could feel and hear mild crepitus on the left hip joint. 12 months later, the patient came again and complained that the pain of his operated hip became a bit more serious than before since about 20 days ago. The range (internal rotation, abduction in particular) of this hip joint could not live up to normal, compared with the uninvolved hip in physical examination. X-ray shew osteoarthritis had become a bit severer. The patient accepted the suggestion of prospective total hip replacement. Multiple synovial osteochondromatosis is not a very uncommon condition. However, there may be unusual presentations. It can take place in any joint, the knee is most commonly affected, however, involvement of the hip joint is relatively rare as was seen in our patient.

  12. Radiological evaluation of painful total hip replacement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tehranzadeh, J.; Schneider, R.; Freiberger, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    Ninety-four cases of clinically failed, cemented, total hip prostheses requiring surgery were reviewed to determine the accuracy of preoperative plain radiography, culture of aspirated fluid, arthrography, and bone scanning. When radiopaque cement had been used to embed the prosthesis, plain radiography was highly accurate in detecting a loose femoral component, less so in detecting a loose acetabular component. Culture of aspirated fluid was accurate in diagnosing infection. A positive arthrogram identified loosening with good accuracy; however, a negative arthrogram did not reliably exclude loosening. /sup 99/mTc bone scans frequently differentiated loosening from loosening with infection. The suggested sequence of diagnostic tests is plain radiography followed by bone scanning. If the bone scan shows diffuse augmented uptake, culture of aspirated fluid followed by arthrography is indicated.

  13. The joint capsule and joint laxity in dogs with hip dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, J S

    1997-05-15

    Present knowledge of the complexity of joint diseases makes it difficult to investigate the causes and early pathogenesis of canine hip dysplasia. Clinical signs of canine hip dysplasia including joint laxity may be a result of primary or secondary alterations of the joint. We already know that joint laxity is related to effusive synovitis (ie, accumulation of synovial fluid) and to other primary collagenous diseases. Canine hip dysplasia may be a third collagenous disease associated with joint laxity. This paper summarizes some of the studies that investigated the relationship between joint laxity and a defect in collagen metabolism and the influence that alterations in transsynovial flow have on joint laxity.

  14. [Hip joint arthrolysis due to heterotopic ossification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anagnostakos, Konstantinos; Schmid, Nora; Kohn, Dieter

    2009-12-01

    Restoration of joint mobility with preservation of femoral head perfusion and warranty of joint stability. Pain reduction. Enhancement of the autonomous daily mobility (if possible regarding the cognitive status) as well as the ability to sit. For nonambulatory, bedridden patients ease of sanitary tasks and improvement of patients' convenience. Joint stiffness with limitation of the quality of life. Pain. Joint deformity, especially in cases of progressive subluxation. Relative: radiologically and scintigraphically immature heterotopic ossification (HO) with moderate limitation of motion and patients who are not able to tolerate the demanding postoperative management. The patient is positioned depending on size and location of ectopic bone. Ectopic bone is released from surrounding soft tissue or by making use of a gap between original bone and ectopic bone from the femur or pelvis. If ectopic bone is close to neurovascular structures, these have to be identified and protected. Postoperative irradiation in patients > 50 years. Generally, medicamentous prevention for recurrent cases with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Intensive and aggressive physical therapy, especially in patients with neurologic disorders. Depending on the extent of arthrolysis and the cause of HO, full, partial, or no weight bearing of the extremity over the first 6 postoperative weeks. The literature does not allow to draw firm conclusions regarding the occurrence of HO. The incidence of HO after primary total hip arthroplasty is estimated at 42%. In 9% of these cases, a severe HO with major limitation of motion or ankylosis occurs. In patients with neurologic injuries (brain injuries, spinal cord injuries) the incidence varies between 20-40%, but only one third of these patients show limited function or ankylosis. After surgical arthrolysis, the recurrence rate amounts to 25-30% at a mean follow-up of 6 years.

  15. Sports Activity Following Cementless Metaphyseal Hip Joint Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czech, Szymon; Hermanson, Jacek; Rodak, Piotr; Stołtny, Tomasz; Rodak, Łukasz; Kasperczyk, Sławomir; Koczy, Bogdan; Mielnik, Michał

    2017-12-01

    An adequate level of physical activity has a substantial effect on both mental and physical human health. Physical activity is largely dependent on the function of the musculoskeletal and articular system. One of the most frequent diseases of this system is degenerative joint disease. Due to the changing and more demanding lifestyles and patients' willingness to be involved in sports activity, the expectations of hip joint arthroplasty are becoming increasingly high. Alleviating pain ceases to be the only reason for which patients choose surgical interventions, while the expectations often include involvement in various sports. Only few studies contain recommendations concerning the frequency, type and intensity of sports activity which are acceptable after hip joint arthroplasty. The aim of the study was to evaluate function and physical activity of people following cementless short-stem hip joint arthroplasty in the observation of at least five years. The study group comprised 106 patients who underwent total hip arthroplasty due to degenerative joint diseases, chosen according to inclusion criteria. Patients underwent routine physical examinations following the Harris Hip Score protocol, responded to the UCLA scale and questionnaires concerning pre-surgical and current physical activity. Our results demonstrated that hip joint arthroplasty in people suffering from degenerative joint diseases has a beneficial effect on their level of functioning and physical activity. Although physical activity and the level of functioning obviously reduced as a person aged, the level of physical activity continued to be very high in both groups, with function of the hip joint evaluated as very good.

  16. Age Related Macular Degeneration and Total Hip Replacement Due to Osteoarthritis or Fracture: Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine W Chong

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis is the leading cause of total hip replacement, accounting for more than 80% of all total hip replacements. Emerging evidence suggests that osteoarthritis has a chronic inflammatory component to its pathogenesis similar to age-related macular degeneration. We evaluated the association between age-related macular degeneration and total hip replacement as proxy for severe osteoarthritis or fractured neck of femur in the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study. 20,744 participants had complete data on both age-related macular degeneration assessed from colour fundus photographs taken during 2003-2007 and total hip replacement. Total hip replacements due to hip osteoarthritis and fractured neck of femur during 2001-2011 were identified by linking the cohort records to the Australian Orthopedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between age-related macular degeneration and risk of total hip replacement due to osteoarthritis and fracture separately, adjusted for confounders. There were 791 cases of total hip replacement for osteoarthritis and 102 cases of total hip replacement due to fractured neck of femur. After adjustment for age, sex, body mass index, smoking, and grouped country of birth, intermediate age-related macular degeneration was directly associated with total hip replacement for osteoarthritis (odds ratio 1.22, 95% CI 1.00-1.49. Late age-related macular degeneration was directly associated with total hip replacement due to fractured neck of femur (odds ratio 5.21, 95% CI2.25-12.02. The association between intermediate age-related macular degeneration and an increased 10-year incidence of total hip replacement due to osteoarthritis suggests the possibility of similar inflammatory processes underlying both chronic diseases. The association of late age-related macular degeneration with an increased 10-year incidence of total hip replacement due to fractured

  17. Age Related Macular Degeneration and Total Hip Replacement Due to Osteoarthritis or Fracture: Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Elaine W; Wang, Yuanyuan; Robman, Liubov D; Aung, Khin Zaw; Makeyeva, Galina A; Giles, Graham G; Graves, Stephen; Cicuttini, Flavia M; Guymer, Robyn H

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is the leading cause of total hip replacement, accounting for more than 80% of all total hip replacements. Emerging evidence suggests that osteoarthritis has a chronic inflammatory component to its pathogenesis similar to age-related macular degeneration. We evaluated the association between age-related macular degeneration and total hip replacement as proxy for severe osteoarthritis or fractured neck of femur in the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study. 20,744 participants had complete data on both age-related macular degeneration assessed from colour fundus photographs taken during 2003-2007 and total hip replacement. Total hip replacements due to hip osteoarthritis and fractured neck of femur during 2001-2011 were identified by linking the cohort records to the Australian Orthopedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between age-related macular degeneration and risk of total hip replacement due to osteoarthritis and fracture separately, adjusted for confounders. There were 791 cases of total hip replacement for osteoarthritis and 102 cases of total hip replacement due to fractured neck of femur. After adjustment for age, sex, body mass index, smoking, and grouped country of birth, intermediate age-related macular degeneration was directly associated with total hip replacement for osteoarthritis (odds ratio 1.22, 95% CI 1.00-1.49). Late age-related macular degeneration was directly associated with total hip replacement due to fractured neck of femur (odds ratio 5.21, 95% CI2.25-12.02). The association between intermediate age-related macular degeneration and an increased 10-year incidence of total hip replacement due to osteoarthritis suggests the possibility of similar inflammatory processes underlying both chronic diseases. The association of late age-related macular degeneration with an increased 10-year incidence of total hip replacement due to fractured neck of femur may be

  18. Dislocation Following Total Hip Replacement: The Avon Orthopaedic Centre Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, Ashley W; Rogers, Mark; Taylor, Adrian H; Pattison, Giles; Whitehouse, Sarah; Bannister, Gordon C

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The aim of this study was to determine the incidence and outcome of dislocation after total hip arthroplasty at our unit. PATIENTS AND METHODS In total, 1727 primary total joint arthroplasties and 305 revision total hip arthroplasties were performed between 1993 and 1996 at our unit. We followed up 1567 (91%) of the primary hip arthroplasties and 284 (93%) of the revision hip arthroplasties at 8–11 years after surgery. Patients were traced by postal questionnaire, telephone interview or examination of case notes of the deceased. RESULTS The dislocation rates by approach were 23 out of 555 (4.1%) for the posterior approach, 0 out of 120 (0%) for the Omega approach and 30 out of 892 (3.4%) for the modified Hardinge approach. Of dislocations after primary total hip arthroplasty, 58.5% were recurrent. The mean number of dislocations per patient was 2.81. Overall, 8.1% of revision total hip arthroplasties dislocated. 70% of these became recurrent. The mean number of dislocations per patient was 2.87. The vast majority of dislocations occurred within 2 months of surgery. DISCUSSION To our knowledge, this is the largest multisurgeon audit of dislocation after total hip arthroplasty published in the UK. The follow-up of 8–11 years is longer than most comparable studies. The results of this study can be used to inform patients as to the risk and outcome of dislocation, as well as to the risk of further dislocation. PMID:18828962

  19. Cost-effectiveness of total hip and knee replacements for the Australian population with osteoarthritis: discrete-event simulation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, Hideki; Barendregt, Jan J

    2011-01-01

    Osteoarthritis constitutes a major musculoskeletal burden for the aged Australians. Hip and knee replacement surgeries are effective interventions once all conservative therapies to manage the symptoms have been exhausted. This study aims to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of hip and knee replacements in Australia. To our best knowledge, the study is the first attempt to account for the dual nature of hip and knee osteoarthritis in modelling the severities of right and left joints separately. We developed a discrete-event simulation model that follows up the individuals with osteoarthritis over their lifetimes. The model defines separate attributes for right and left joints and accounts for several repeat replacements. The Australian population with osteoarthritis who were 40 years of age or older in 2003 were followed up until extinct. Intervention effects were modelled by means of disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) averted. Both hip and knee replacements are highly cost effective (AUD 5,000 per DALY and AUD 12,000 per DALY respectively) under an AUD 50,000/DALY threshold level. The exclusion of cost offsets, and inclusion of future unrelated health care costs in extended years of life, did not change the findings that the interventions are cost-effective (AUD 17,000 per DALY and AUD 26,000 per DALY respectively). However, there was a substantial difference between hip and knee replacements where surgeries administered for hips were more cost-effective than for knees. Both hip and knee replacements are cost-effective interventions to improve the quality of life of people with osteoarthritis. It was also shown that the dual nature of hip and knee OA should be taken into account to provide more accurate estimation on the cost-effectiveness of hip and knee replacements.

  20. Cost-effectiveness of total hip and knee replacements for the Australian population with osteoarthritis: discrete-event simulation model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Higashi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Osteoarthritis constitutes a major musculoskeletal burden for the aged Australians. Hip and knee replacement surgeries are effective interventions once all conservative therapies to manage the symptoms have been exhausted. This study aims to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of hip and knee replacements in Australia. To our best knowledge, the study is the first attempt to account for the dual nature of hip and knee osteoarthritis in modelling the severities of right and left joints separately. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We developed a discrete-event simulation model that follows up the individuals with osteoarthritis over their lifetimes. The model defines separate attributes for right and left joints and accounts for several repeat replacements. The Australian population with osteoarthritis who were 40 years of age or older in 2003 were followed up until extinct. Intervention effects were modelled by means of disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs averted. Both hip and knee replacements are highly cost effective (AUD 5,000 per DALY and AUD 12,000 per DALY respectively under an AUD 50,000/DALY threshold level. The exclusion of cost offsets, and inclusion of future unrelated health care costs in extended years of life, did not change the findings that the interventions are cost-effective (AUD 17,000 per DALY and AUD 26,000 per DALY respectively. However, there was a substantial difference between hip and knee replacements where surgeries administered for hips were more cost-effective than for knees. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Both hip and knee replacements are cost-effective interventions to improve the quality of life of people with osteoarthritis. It was also shown that the dual nature of hip and knee OA should be taken into account to provide more accurate estimation on the cost-effectiveness of hip and knee replacements.

  1. Cost-Effectiveness of Total Hip and Knee Replacements for the Australian Population with Osteoarthritis: Discrete-Event Simulation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, Hideki; Barendregt, Jan J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis constitutes a major musculoskeletal burden for the aged Australians. Hip and knee replacement surgeries are effective interventions once all conservative therapies to manage the symptoms have been exhausted. This study aims to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of hip and knee replacements in Australia. To our best knowledge, the study is the first attempt to account for the dual nature of hip and knee osteoarthritis in modelling the severities of right and left joints separately. Methodology/Principal Findings We developed a discrete-event simulation model that follows up the individuals with osteoarthritis over their lifetimes. The model defines separate attributes for right and left joints and accounts for several repeat replacements. The Australian population with osteoarthritis who were 40 years of age or older in 2003 were followed up until extinct. Intervention effects were modelled by means of disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) averted. Both hip and knee replacements are highly cost effective (AUD 5,000 per DALY and AUD 12,000 per DALY respectively) under an AUD 50,000/DALY threshold level. The exclusion of cost offsets, and inclusion of future unrelated health care costs in extended years of life, did not change the findings that the interventions are cost-effective (AUD 17,000 per DALY and AUD 26,000 per DALY respectively). However, there was a substantial difference between hip and knee replacements where surgeries administered for hips were more cost-effective than for knees. Conclusions/Significance Both hip and knee replacements are cost-effective interventions to improve the quality of life of people with osteoarthritis. It was also shown that the dual nature of hip and knee OA should be taken into account to provide more accurate estimation on the cost-effectiveness of hip and knee replacements. PMID:21966520

  2. [Evaluation of treatment outcomes in tuberculosis of knee and hip joints in 2005-2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chocholáč, D; Kala, B; Gallo, J; Netval, M; Chaloupka, R

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) in a joint region presents high risk of damage to the joint. Consequences of a late diagnosis and inadequate therapy may be serious particularly in the large joints of lower extremities. Tuberculosis of knee and hip joints accounts for about 25% to 35% of osteoarticular tuberculosis (OAT). The aim of this study was to evaluate the objective and subjective results of tuberculosis treatment in knee and hip joints. Of 258 OAT patients treated at the Specialised Treatment Centre Jevíčko between January 2005 and September 2012, tuberculosis of the hip joint was diagnosed in 31 patients in whom three hips were treated by incision and drainage and 10 by total hip replacement; 18 patients had tuberculosis of the knee joint with the following treatment: puncture in seven knees, incision and drainage in eight, excochleation of a tuberculous focus in the proximal tibia in two, removal of a bursa in one, arthrodesis in four and total knee replacement in four patients. The patients continued to be followed up at the Jevíčko Centre. The scale of 1 to 5 (best to worst) was established for evaluation of objective and subjective results of the treatment. The data were analysed using the basic statistical characteristics and compared. The objective evaluation was better for the hip joint; the sums of relative frequencies of marks 1 to 3 were 72.22% in the knee and 80.65% in the hip. In the knee more than 50% of the cases fell in the interval , in the hip this was . The hip joint was better subjectively evaluated, it had a higher sum of relative frequencies of marks 1 to 3, i.e., 96.77% as compared with 88.89% for the knee. In the knee more than 50% of the cases had marks in the interval ; in the hip this was . The hip joint was better evaluated both objectively and subjectively. An early diagnosis allows for the treatment of synovitis, which has a better prognosis than an arthritic disease. The subjective perception of treatment results showed a better

  3. Bone cement implantation syndrome in hip replacement procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onur Palabiyik

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Total hip replacement procedures are common in geriatric patients with osteoarthrosis of the hip or femur fracture. We planned combined spinal epidural anesthesia for total hip replacement operation due to femur fracture in a ninety-five female case with cardiorespiratory failure. Although the regional anesthesia had applied smoothly, intraoperative cardiac arrest during the placement of cement was thought to be a case with bone cement implantation syndrome. Bone cement implantation syndrome is occured in cemented prosthesis operations and a life-threatened complication. Clinic presentation is characterized by hypoxia, hypotension, unexpected loss of consciousness and cardiac arrest. Mortality rate due to bone cement implantation syndrome is approximately 0.1%. In this present, we examined bone cement implantation syndrome, which is a severe complication. [J Contemp Med 2013; 3(2.000: 121-124

  4. Synovial joint fluid cytokine levels in hip disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Hirohito; Sakai, Takashi; Ando, Wataru; Takao, Masaki; Nishii, Takashi; Nakamura, Nobuo; Hamasaki, Toshimitsu; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Sugano, Nobuhiko

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate cytokine level characteristics in the hip joint fluid, including rapidly destructive coxopathy (RDC), OA, osteonecrosis (ON) of the femoral head and RA. Thirty-three hips with RDC, 57 with OA, 36 with ON and 10 with RA were included in the study. OA hips were divided into two groups: 20 hips with early OA without joint space narrowing and 37 hips with terminal OA. ON hips were divided into three groups: 13 hips with hips with >3 mm collapse and 9 hips with terminal ON. Joint fluid was collected during surgery. Cytokine levels including IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α were measured using homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence. All measured cytokine levels in RDC were significantly higher than those in OA (P 3 mm collapse were higher than those found in the ON group with hip diseases. The IL-8 level may reflect the aggressiveness of joint destruction in RDC, and IL-6 and TNF-α levels may also reflect ongoing destruction in OA and ON.

  5. Hip joint mechanics during walking in individuals with mild-to-moderate hip osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantinou, Maria; Loureiro, Aderson; Carty, Christopher; Mills, Peter; Barrett, Rod

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this case-control study was to characterise hip joint kinematics and moments during gait in people with mild-to-moderate hip osteoarthritis (OA). Eligible participants were allocated to the hip OA group (n=27) or the age-matched control group (n=26) based on radiographic and symptomatically defined inclusion criteria. Participants walked barefoot along a 10-m walkway at their self-selected gait speed. Trajectories of 43 markers attached to the trunk, pelvis, upper and lower limbs were recorded using a 12-camera motion capture system. Ground reaction force data were simultaneously collected. Individuals in the hip OA group had a 10% higher body mass, 13% slower self-selected walking speed, 10% shorter step length, 2% and 9% longer relative stance and double support duration (% stride) respectively, 41% lower sagittal plane hip range of motion, and 28% and 45% lower peak sagittal and transverse plane hip joint moments respectively during gait compared to controls (phip OA experienced less net hip joint loading over a reduced range of hip motion for a longer proportion of the gait cycle when walking at their preferred gait speed suggest that the mechanics of the hip joint are altered in hip OA, and could have implications for disease progression through altered mechano-biological processes within the joint. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Prospective evaluation of ground reaction forces in dogs undergoing unilateral total hip replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budsberg, S C; Chambers, J N; Lue, S L; Foutz, T L; Reece, L

    1996-12-01

    To evaluate clinical and biomechanical gait variables in a group of dogs before and after (for 1 year) total hip replacement. 16 dogs with degenerative joint disease of the coxofemoral joint secondary to hip dysplasia deemed candidates for total hip replacement. Before and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after surgery, each dog was trotted over a biomechanical force platform. Vertical force data evaluated for each stance phase of the treated and untreated hind limbs included peak force, impulse, and limb loading and unloading rates. Vertical peak and impulse data were also evaluated for the forelimbs. Measurements analyzed in the craniocaudal axis, divided into braking and propulsion phases, consisted of peak force and associated impulses. Also, orthopedic examination for each dog included subjective scoring for limb lameness at each evaluation period. Most ground reaction forces (GRF) were significantly lower before surgery for the proposed treated, compared with the proposed untreated, limb. This difference between limbs continued through postoperative month 1. Also at 1 month, some treated limb values were significantly lower than preoperative values. By 3 to 6 months, treated limb GRF increased so that no significant difference between limbs could be found. Vertical and craniocaudal propulsion impulse values were significantly higher in the treated than untreated limb from the 6-month evaluation period through the remainder of the study. Braking component of the craniocaudal axes measurements was unchanged throughout the study. GRF indicated that dogs of this study had significantly increased loading function of the treated hind limb by 6 months after unilateral total hip replacement. Data also indicated that some force was transferred from the untreated to treated hip over the study period. Loading rates also increased over the study period, indicating increased willingness to load the treated hip over time. Craniocaudal axis data indicated no improvement in braking

  7. Biomorphological features of the hip joint of some Strigiformes

    OpenAIRE

    DRUZ N.V.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the biomorphological features of the hip joint muscles of representatives of the order Strigiformes(Snowy Owl and Strix). It was found that in representatives of this order the degree of differentiation of the knee joint muscles is caused by the jumping type of bipedal locomotion and biomorphological static features, which in turn has an influence on the degree of every hip joint muscle development.

  8. Apixaban versus enoxaparin for thromboprophylaxis after hip replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Michael Rud; Gallus, Alexander; Raskob, Gary E

    2010-01-01

    There are various regimens for thromboprophylaxis after hip replacement. Low-molecular-weight heparins such as enoxaparin predominantly inhibit factor Xa but also inhibit thrombin to some degree. Orally active, specific factor Xa inhibitors such as apixaban may provide effective thromboprophylaxi...

  9. Philosophies of stem designs in cemented total hip replacement.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdonschot, N.J.J.

    2005-01-01

    Stem designs, which have different design features, may produce similar clinical survival curves. Alteratively, some designs that are considered to be similar in design produce different survival rates. In this paper, design aspects of cemented femoral total hip replacement stems, how they can be

  10. [Fractures of the acetabulum: complications and joint replacement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herath, S C; Holstein, J H; Pizanis, A; Pohlemann, T

    2014-08-01

    Acetabular fractures assume a special role amongst the fractures of the pelvis, because they involve a major weight-bearing joint. As those fractures mostly result from exposure to great force, and because of their location in an anatomically complex region, a high rate of complications has to be anticipated. Besides general and perioperative complications long-term consequences, especially post-traumatic arthrosis, are relevant problems when it comes to treating fractures of the acetabulum. The primary reconstruction of the acetabulum, as well as a possibly necessary prosthetic replacement of the hip joint, makes high demands on the diagnostic and operative capabilities of the attending physician. Exact knowledge of the specific risks and pitfalls for each type of fracture and for the specific surgical techniques is crucial for a successful treatment. Due to the much worse long-term outcome when compared to primary total hip replacement in patients with osteoarthritis, acetabular fractures should, regardless of the patient's age, whenever possible be treated by operative reconstruction. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Femoral nerve palsy caused by ileopectineal bursitis after total hip replacement: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bähr Mathias

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Infectious ileopectineal bursitis is a rare complication after total hip replacement and is associated mainly with rheumatoid arthritis. The main complications are local swelling and pain, but communication of the inflamed bursa with the joint can occur, leading to subsequent cartilage damage and bone destruction. Case presentation We report a case of a 47-year-old Caucasian woman without rheumatoid arthritis who reported pain and palsy in her left leg almost one year after total hip replacement. She was diagnosed with an ileopectineal bursitis after total hip replacement, leading to femoral nerve palsy. The diagnosis was obtained by thorough clinical examination, the results of focused computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Conclusion To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of non-infectious ileopectineal bursitis in a patient without rheumatoid arthritis as a complication of total hip replacement. This rare case underlines the importance of proper neurologic examination of persistent conditions after orthopedic intervention in otherwise healthy individuals. We believe this case should be useful for a broad spectrum of medical specialties, including orthopedics, neurology, radiology, and general practice.

  12. Supervised neuromuscular exercise prior to hip and knee replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandes, Linda; Roos, Ewa M; Overgaard, Søren

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There are indications of beneficial short-term effect of pre-operative exercise in reducing pain and improving activity of daily living after total hip replacement (THR) and total knee replacement (TKR) surgery. Though, information from studies conducting longer follow-ups and economic...... for standard THR or TKR at a hospital located in a rural area of Denmark. The patients were randomised to replacement surgery with or without an 8-week preoperative supervised neuromuscular exercise program (Clinical Trials registration no.: NCT01003756). Clinical effect was measured with Hip disability...... and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS) and Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS). Quality adjusted life years (QALYs) were based on EQ-5D-3L and Danish preference weights. Resource use was extracted from national registries and valued using standard tariffs (2012-EUR). Incremental net benefit...

  13. HFE C282Y homozygosity is associated with an increased risk of total hip replacement for osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Gurrin, Lyle C; Wluka, Anita E; Bertalli, Nadine A; Osborne, Nicholas J; Delatycki, Martin B; Giles, Graham G; English, Dallas R; Hopper, John L; Simpson, Julie A; Graves, Stephen; Allen, Katrina J; Cicuttini, Flavia M

    2012-06-01

    The evidence for an association between mutations in the HFE (hemochromatosis) gene and the risk of hip or knee osteoarthritis is inconsistent. Total joint replacement is considered a surrogate measure for symptomatic end-stage osteoarthritis. We examined the relationship between HFE gene mutations and risk of total hip and knee replacement using a prospective cohort study. The Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study recruited participants between 1990 and 1994. Participants born in Australia, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, or Ireland (n = 27,848) were genotyped for the HFE C282Y mutation. Total hip and knee replacements for osteoarthritis during 2001 to 2009 were ascertained from the Australian Orthopaedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry. Hazard ratios (HR)/odds ratios (OR) and confidence intervals (CI) were obtained from Cox regression or logistic regression. Compared with those with no C282Y mutation, C282Y homozygotes had an increased risk of single total hip replacement (HR 1.94, 95% CI 1.04-3.62) and bilateral total hip replacement (OR 5.86, 95% CI 2.36-14.57) for osteoarthritis, adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, and educational level. Only 3 C282Y homozygotes had single total knee replacement; the HR was 0.51 (95% CI 0.16-1.57). C282Y/H63D compound heterozygosity was not related to the risk of total hip or knee replacement. HFE C282Y homozygosity was associated with an increased risk of both single and bilateral total hip replacement for osteoarthritis. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Outcome of treatment for dislocation after primary total hip replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotwal, R S; Ganapathi, M; John, A; Maheson, M; Jones, S A

    2009-03-01

    We have studied the natural history of a first episode of dislocation after primary total hip replacement (THR) to clarify the incidence of recurrent dislocation, the need for subsequent revision and the quality of life of these patients. Over a six-year period, 99 patients (101 hips) presented with a first dislocation of a primary THR. A total of 61 hips (60.4%) had dislocated more than once. After a minimum follow-up of one year, seven patients had died. Of the remaining 94 hips (92 patients), 47 underwent a revision for instability and one awaits operation (51% in total). Of these, seven re-dislocated and four needed further surgery. The quality of life of the patients was studied using the Oxford Hip Score and the EuroQol-5 Dimension (EQ-5D) questionnaire. A control group of patients who had not dislocated was also studied. At a mean follow-up of 4.5 years (1 to 20), the mean Oxford Hip Score was 26.7 (15 to 47) after one episode of dislocation, 27.2 (12 to 45) after recurrent dislocation, 34.5 (12 to 54) after successful revision surgery, 42 (29 to 55) after failed revision surgery and 17.4 (12 to 32) in the control group. The EuroQol-5 dimension questionnaire revealed more health problems in patients undergoing revision surgery.

  15. Computational Modelling and Movement Analysis of Hip Joint with Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siswanto, W. A.; Yoon, C. C.; Salleh, S. Md.; Ngali, M. Z.; Yusup, Eliza M.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the model of hip joint and the main muscles are modelled by finite elements. The parts included in the model are hip joint, hemi pelvis, gluteus maximus, quadratus femoris and gamellus inferior. The materials that used in these model are isotropic elastic, Mooney Rivlin and Neo-hookean. The hip resultant force of the normal gait and stair climbing are applied on the model of hip joint. The responses of displacement, stress and strain of the muscles are then recorded. FEBio non-linear solver for biomechanics is employed to conduct the simulation of the model of hip joint with muscles. The contact interfaces that used in this model are sliding contact and tied contact. From the analysis results, the gluteus maximus has the maximum displacement, stress and strain in the stair climbing. Quadratus femoris and gamellus inferior has the maximum displacement and strain in the normal gait however the maximum stress in the stair climbing. Besides that, the computational model of hip joint with muscles is produced for research and investigation platform. The model can be used as a visualization platform of hip joint.

  16. Taking care of your new hip joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of activity. But, even when you do your everyday activities, you will need to move carefully so that you do not dislocate your hip. You will need to learn exercises to make your new hip stronger. After you ...

  17. Incidence of joint replacement among active component service members, U.S. Armed Forces, 2004-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniele, Denise O; Taubman, Stephen B; Clark, Leslie L

    2015-05-01

    In the U.S., joint replacements have become more common and the average age of individuals who undergo joint replacements has decreased. Joint replacements among active component service members increased 10.5% during 2004-2009, then 61.9% during 2009-2014. Knees and hips were the most frequently replaced joints among service members. During the surveillance period (and particularly after 2009), incidence rates increased in each age group of service members 30 years or older. Relative to their respective counterparts, rates of joint replacement overall--and of the hip and knee specifically--were higher among service members who were black, non-Hispanic; officers; and healthcare workers. One year after joint replacement, 18.2% had retired; 5.2% had been medically disqualified from service; 6.3% had otherwise left service; and 70.3% were still in service. By 2 years post-joint replacement, 30.2% had retired; 13.0% had been medically disqualified; 10.0% had otherwise left service; and 46.8% were still in service. Service members aged 30-44 years were the most likely to remain in service post-joint replacement. Given the increases in the frequency of joint replacement among younger service members, the number of service members who remain in service post-joint replacement may continue to increase.

  18. [Autogenous femoral head bone grafting combined with total hip arthroplasty for the treatment of old dislocation of hip joint center in 16 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuai-lei; Sun, Yong-qiang

    2015-10-01

    To study effects of autogenous femoral head bone grafting combined with total hip replacement for the treatment of old center dislocation of hip joint, and to evaluate the superiority of acetabular defect reconstruction with autogenous bone. From March 2008 to December 2013, 16 patients (16 hips) with old center dislocation of hip joint were treated with autologous bone graft combined with total hip replacement. There were 11 males and 5 females, ranging in age from 41 to 72 years old, with an average of 56.3 years old. The duration of the disease ranged from 3.6 to 37.2 years. Twelve patients had injuries caused by traffic accidents and 4 patients were caused by falling down. The hip joint pain at the first month after operation, Harris score and hip joint movement of all patients were observed by using electronic case follow-up system. All the patients were followed up, and the duration ranged from 11 to 78 months, with an average of 27.3 months. The postoperative hip joint movement of (56.2±23.4)° VAS 86.3±7.2 and Harris score 32.6±12.6 were all better than preoperative (181.8±17.6)°, 11.1±2.6 and 86.3±7.2. The joint pain was reduced and the function limitation was improved after operation, and the prosthesis position was good. When the autologous femoral head bone grafting combined with total hip arthroplasty is used to treat old hip central dislocation, the initial and long-term stability of acetabular bone grafting is good, and the technique can avoid allogeneic bone complications, bone source rationally and reduce the economic burden of patients.

  19. The effects of the empowerment education program in older adults with total hip replacement surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tzu-Ting; Sung, Chia-Chun; Wang, Woan-Shyuan; Wang, Bi-Hwa

    2017-08-01

    To measure the effectiveness of an education empowerment program on primary (self-efficacy and self-care competence) and secondary outcomes (Activities of Daily Life, mobility, depressive mood and quality of life) for older adults with total hip replacement surgery. Degenerative arthritis is a common and serious chronic illness that impacts the quality of life of older adults. As joints continue to degenerate and the hip damaged by arthritis, activities of daily life will be difficult to perform due to severe hip pain and joint stiffness. Therefore, hip replacement surgery should be considered and effective nursing care should be provided to improve the recovery of older adults. A prospective randomized control trial. A trial was conducted from September 2013 - May 2014 in two hospitals in northern Taiwan. 108 participants were random assigned to either the education empowerment group or in the comparison group. The researchers collected baseline data at admission and outcomes on the day of discharge, one month after and three months after the discharge. After the interventions, the education empowerment group participants demonstrated significantly higher self-care competence and self-efficacy and lower depressive inclinations compared with those in the comparison group. Participants in both groups significantly improved on activities of daily life, mobility and quality of life over the course of the interventions. This education empowerment intervention was very effective in enhancing participants' outcomes. Moreover, involving both older adults and their caregivers for the participation this program is recommended for a greater impact. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. ULTRASONOGRAPHY OF THE HIP JOINT EXAMINATION HIP JOINT IN THE ASSESSMENT OF THE EFFECTIVENESS OF TREATMENT IN CHILDREN WITH LEGG-CALVE-PERTHES DISEASE AND HIP OSTEOARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Татьяна Ивановна Тихоненко

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We performed dynamic hip doppler ultrasonography in children with Legg-Calve-Perthes disease (LCPD in order to determine the effectiveness of the conservative and surgical treatment. The study included children aged from 3 to 7 years old with LCPD who had pain in the hip joints during admission. We assessed the structural changes in the head of the femur and the hip joint (B-mode, when the Doppler study analyzed diameter of enveloping hip vessels, blood velocity and resistance index. The study found that severe pain and contracture of the hip during admission appeared as a manifestation of concomitant hip osteoarthritis. On admission all patients had signs of arterial spasm and venous stasis in the hip joints, which determined the administration of a comprehensive arthrologic, osteogenesis stimulating and angioprotective therapy, according to the data of dynamic ultrasound.

  1. Outcome of Hip Impingement Surgery: Does Generalized Joint Hypermobility Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naal, Florian D; Müller, Aileen; Varghese, Viju D; Wellauer, Vanessa; Impellizzeri, Franco M; Leunig, Michael

    2017-05-01

    Generalized joint hypermobility (JH) might negatively influence the results of surgical femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) treatment, as JH has been linked to musculoskeletal pain and injury incidence in athletes. JH may also be associated with worse outcomes of FAI surgery in thin females. To (1) determine the results of FAI surgery at a minimum 2-year follow-up by means of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) and failure rates, (2) assess the prevalence of JH in FAI patients and its effect on outcomes, and (3) identify other risk factors associated with treatment failure. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. We included 232 consecutive patients (118 females; mean age, 36 years) with 244 hips surgically treated for symptomatic FAI between 2010 and 2012. All patients completed different PROMs preoperatively and at a mean follow-up of 3.7 years. Satisfaction questions were used to define subjective failure (answering any of the 2 subjective questions with dissatisfied/ very dissatisfied and/or didn't help/ made things worse). Conversion to total hip replacement (THR) was defined as objective failure. JH was assessed using the Beighton score. All PROM values significantly ( P FAI surgery yielded favorable outcomes at short- to midterm follow-up. JH as assessed by the Beighton score was not consistently associated with subjective and objective results. Joint degeneration was the most important risk factor for conversion to THR. Although statistical significance was not reached, female patients with no joint degeneration, only mild FAI deformity, and higher Oxford scores at the time of surgery seemed to be at increased risk for subjective dissatisfaction.

  2. Influence of Different Hip Joint Centre Locations on Hip and Knee Joint Kinetics and Kinematics During the Squat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinclair Jonathan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Identification of the hip joint centre (HJC is important in the biomechanical examination of human movement. However, there is yet to be any published information regarding the influence of different HJC locations on hip and knee joint kinetics during functional tasks. This study aimed to examine the influence of four different HJC techniques on 3- D hip and knee joint kinetics/kinematics during the squat. Hip and knee joint kinetics/kinematics of the squat were obtained from fifteen male participants using an eight camera motion capture system. The 3-D kinetics/kinematics of the squat were quantified using four hip joint centre estimation techniques. Repeated measures ANOVAs were used to compare the discrete parameters as a function of each HJC location. The results show that significant differences in joint angles and moment parameters were evident at both the hip and knee joint in the coronal and transverse planes. These observations indicate that when calculating non-sagittal joint kinetics/kinematics during the squat, researchers should carefully consider their HJC method as it may significantly affect the interpretation of their data.

  3. Do hip prosthesis related infection codes in administrative discharge registers correctly classify periprosthetic hip joint infection?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Jeppe; Pedersen, Alma B; Troelsen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Administrative discharge registers could be a valuable and easily accessible single-sources for research data on periprosthetic hip joint infection. The aim of this study was to estimate the positive predictive value of the International Classification of Disease 10th revision (ICD-10......) periprosthetic hip joint infection diagnosis code in the Danish National Patient Register. METHODS: Patients were identified with an ICD-10 discharge diagnosis code of T84.5 ("Infection and inflammatory reaction due to internal joint prosthesis") in association with hip-joint associated surgical procedure codes...... in The Danish National Patient Register. Medical records of the identified patients (n = 283) were verified for the existence of a periprosthetic hip joint infection. Positive predictive values with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated. RESULTS: A T84.5 diagnosis code irrespective of the associated...

  4. Lower limb joint replacement in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clement Nicholas D

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction There is limited literature regarding the peri-operative and surgical management of patients with rheumatoid disease undergoing lower limb arthroplasty. This review article summarises factors involved in the peri-operative management of major lower limb arthroplasty surgery for patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Methods We performed a search of the medical literature, using the PubMed search engine (http://www.pubmed.gov. We used the following terms: ‘rheumatoid’ ‘replacement’ ‘arthroplasty’ and ‘outcome’. Findings The patient should be optimised pre-operatively using a multidisciplinary approach. The continued use of methotrexate does not increase infection risk, and aids recovery. Biologic agents should be stopped pre-operatively due the increased infection rate. Patients should be made aware of the increased risk of infection and periprosthetic fracture rates associated with their disease. The surgical sequence is commonly hip, knee and then ankle. Cemented total hip replacement (THR and total knee replacement (TKR have superior survival rates over uncemented components. The evidence is not clear regarding a cruciate sacrificing versus retaining in TKR, but a cruciate sacrificing component limits the risk early instability and potential revision. Patella resurfacing as part of a TKR is associated with improved outcomes. The results of total ankle replacement remain inferior to THR and TKR. RA patients achieve equivalent pain relief, but their rehabilitation is slower and their functional outcome is not as good. However, the key to managing these complicated patients is to work as part of a multidisciplinary team to optimise their outcome.

  5. Hip joint contact forces calculated using different muscle optimization techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wesseling, M.; Derikx, L.C.; de Groote, F.; Bartels, W.; Meyer, C.; Verdonschot, Nicolaas Jacobus Joseph; Jonkers, I.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study was to calculate muscle forces using different optimization techniques and investigate their effect on hip joint contact forces in gait and sit to stand. These contact forces were compared to measured hip contact forces [3]. The results showed that contact forces were

  6. Paraplegic flexion contracture of hip joints: An unsolvable problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Sailendra

    2016-01-01

    Paraplegic flexion contracture of hip joints beyond 90° is a difficult condition to treat for any orthopedic surgeon. There is no fixed protocol of treatment described, by and large it is individualized. A 20 year old female presented with paraplegia for last 15 years due to irrecoverable spinal cord disease with complete sensory and motor loss of both lower extremities and was admitted with acute flexion contracture of both hip joints with trunk resting on thighs. She underwent bilateral proximal femoral resection. Both hip joints were straight immediately after surgery and patient could lie on her back. In a course of time, she started sitting on her buttocks, led a comfortable wheelchair life with a sitting balance. Proximal femoral resection is an effective method to treat long standing irrecoverable paraplegic acute flexion deformity of the hip joint.

  7. The prevalence of predisposing deformity in osteoarthritic hip joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klit, Jakob; Gosvig, Kasper; Jacobsen, Steffen

    2011-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly evident that hip joint deformities may be major contributors to the development of osteoarthritis, and the term 'idiopathic osteoarthritis' may be inappropriate in many cases. Our study cohort was derived from the Copenhagen Osteoarthritis Sub-study, a cross sectional...... population-based database of 4151 individuals, all of whom had a standard anteroposterior weight-bearing pelvic radiograph taken. Hip joints were classified according to type and degree of deformity. We defined hip osteoarthritis by a minimum joint space width of ... in females of 62.4% and in males of 78.9%. Minor and major deformities showed the same prevalence. Both sexes had a comparable prevalence of minor and major hip joint deformity, except for pistol grip deformity, which was more prevalent in men. We concluded that 'idiopathic osteoarthritis' is uncommon...

  8. Vitamin D deficiency in patients with osteoarthritis undergoing total hip replacement: a cause for concern?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawabi, D H; Chin, K F; Keen, R W; Haddad, F S

    2010-04-01

    We measured the plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D(3) (25(OH)D(3)) levels in 62 consecutive Caucasian patients undergoing total hip replacement for osteoarthritis. The patients were divided into two groups based on whether they were vitamin D sufficient or deficient. The groups were matched for age, gender and the American Society of Anaesthesiologists (ASA) grade. The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in our patients was comparable with recent population-based studies performed in the United Kingdom. Patients with vitamin D deficiency had lower pre-operative Harris hip scores (Mann-Whitney test, p = 0.018) and were significantly less likely to attain an excellent outcome from total hip replacement (chi-squared test, p = 0.038). Vitamin D levels were found to positively correlate with both pre- and post-operative Harris hip scores. These results warrant further study of vitamin D deficiency in patients undergoing joint replacement as it is a risk factor for a suboptimal outcome which is relatively simple and cheap to correct.

  9. Clinical and genetic assessments of hip joint laxity in the Boykin spaniel

    OpenAIRE

    Tsai, Kate L.; Murphy, Keith E.

    2006-01-01

    Canine hip dysplasia (CHD) is characterized by a malformation of the hip joint that leads to joint laxity and consequential degenerative joint disease. The most widely used method for diagnosis of CHD is the ventrodorsal hip-extended radiologic view, commonly referred to as the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA) method. The method of the University of Pennsylvania Hip Improvement Program (PennHIP), an alternative technique that is based on hip joint laxity, provides a quantitative assess...

  10. Radiographic Hip Joint Phenotype of the Pembroke Welsh Corgi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbe, Georga T.; Biery, Darryl N.; Gregor, Thomas P.; Giger, Urs; Smith, Gail K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the radiographic hip joint phenotype of the Pembroke Welsh Corgi. Study Design Prospective and retrospective cross-sectional study. Animals Pembroke Welsh Corgis (n = 399). Methods Ventrodorsal, hip-extended radiographs were evaluated for subluxation, osteoarthritis (OA), caudolateral curvilinear osteophytes (CCO), and circumferential femoral head osteophytes (CFHO) of PennHIP evaluated Corgis. Joint laxity was measured by distraction index (DI). Results All Corgis had DI > 0.30 (mean, 0.66), 6.8% had OA, 18% had subluxation, 22.3% had CCO, and 74.4% had CFHO. Higher DI increased the odds for subluxation and canine hip dysplasia (CHD) but not for OA, CCO, or CFHO. The presence of CCO increased the odds for OA by 4.6 times (P = .002) and 2.2 times (P = .01) for hip dysplasia. All dogs with OA had CFHO. The presence of CFHO increased the odds for subluxation by 8.7 times (p hip dysplasia. Subluxation increased the odds for OA by 15.4 times (P hip laxity that has been shown to correlate with hip OA and hip dysplasia in large-breed dogs. The relationship between CCO and OA was similar to published findings in nonchondrodystrophic large-breed dogs and the CFHO was significantly associated with subluxation. Both CCO and CFHO are associated with hip dysplasia in this small chondrodystrophic breed. PMID:23253037

  11. Miserable case of total hip replacement caused by postirradiation necrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ihara, Fumitoshi; Okue, Akira; Kumagai, Hiroyuki; Ohzuma, Masakazu; Wada, Fumio (Saga Prefectural Hospital (Japan))

    1983-06-01

    We experienced a miserable case of postirradiation femoral head necrosis. Osteomyelitis due to a screw penetration into the cecum was followed by total hip replacement. The patient is a sixty seven years old woman. As she was injured by inoperable uterus cancer at fifty one years old, /sup 60/Co irradiation therapy was done. As postirradiation necrosis occurred 5 years after irradiation, total hip replacement (Mckee-Farrar type) was done. However, bone necrosis area in iliac bone due to irradiation progressed gradually, and anchoring screw migrated proximally into the cecum. Then the fistula formed at the region of right major trochanter. In fistulography, contrast medium leaked out into the cecum. So after iliocecectomy and anastomosis of colon, removal of prosthesis and local continuous suction irrigation was done twice. Since then, there has been no recurrence.

  12. The effect of education and supervised exercise vs. education alone on the time to total hip replacement in patients with severe hip osteoarthritis. A randomized clinical trial protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Carsten; Roos, Ewa M.; Kjærsgaard-Andersen, Per

    2013-01-01

    Background: The age- and gender-specific incidence of total hip replacement surgery has increased over the last two decades in all age groups. Recent studies indicate that non-surgical interventions are effective in reducing pain and disability, even at later stages of the disease when joint...... replacement is considered. We hypothesize that the time to hip replacement can be postponed in patients with severe hip osteoarthritis following participation in a patient education and supervised exercise program when compared to patients receiving patient education alone. Methods/design: A prospective...... will receive 3 months of supervised exercise consisting of 12 sessions of individualized, goal-based neuromuscular training, and 12 sessions of intensive resistance training plus patient education (3 sessions). The control group will receive only patient education (3 sessions). The primary end...

  13. A patterned microtexture to reduce friction and increase longevity of prosthetic hip joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chyr, Anthony; Qiu, Mingfeng; Speltz, Jared; Jacobsen, Ronald L; Sanders, Anthony P; Raeymaekers, Bart

    2014-07-15

    More than 285,000 total hip replacement surgeries are performed in the US each year. Most prosthetic hip joints consist of a cobalt-chromium (CoCr) femoral head that articulates with a polyethylene acetabular component, lubricated with synovial fluid. The statistical survivorship of these metal-on-polyethylene prosthetic hip joints declines significantly after 10 to 15 years of use, primarily as a result of polyethylene wear and wear debris incited disease. The current engineering paradigm to increase the longevity of prosthetic hip joints is to improve the mechanical properties of the polyethylene component, and to manufacture ultra-smooth articulating surfaces. In contrast, we show that adding a patterned microtexture to the ultra-smooth CoCr femoral head reduces friction when articulating with the polyethylene acetabular liner. The microtexture increases the load-carrying capacity and the thickness of the joint lubricant film, which reduces contact between the articulating surfaces. As a result, friction and wear is reduced. We have used a lubrication model to design the geometry of the patterned microtexture, and experimentally demonstrate reduced friction for the microtextured compared to conventional smooth surrogate prosthetic hip joints.

  14. Failure rate of cemented and uncemented total hip replacements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makela, K. T.; Matilainen, M.; Pulkkinen, P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the failure rate of cemented, uncemented, hybrid, and reverse hybrid total hip replacements in patients aged 55 years or older. Design Register study. Setting Nordic Arthroplasty Register Association database (combined data from Sweden, Norway, Denmark, and Finland). Participa......Objective To assess the failure rate of cemented, uncemented, hybrid, and reverse hybrid total hip replacements in patients aged 55 years or older. Design Register study. Setting Nordic Arthroplasty Register Association database (combined data from Sweden, Norway, Denmark, and Finland......). Participants 347 899 total hip replacements performed during 1995-2011. Main outcome measures Probability of implant survival (Kaplan-Meier analysis) along with implant survival with revision for any reason as endpoint (Cox multiple regression) adjusted for age, sex, and diagnosis in age groups 55-64, 65.......8% to 96.1%, respectively) was higher than that of uncemented (92.9%, 92.3% to 93.4% and 93.0%, 91.8% to 94.0%), hybrid (91.6%, 90.9% to 92.2% and 93.9%, 93.1% to 94.5%), and reverse hybrid (90.7%, 87.3% to 93.2% and 93.2%, 90.7% to 95.1%) implants. The survival of cemented (92.2%, 91.8% to 92...

  15. Quantitative assessment of bone scintigraphy in the hip joint disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, Yukiharu

    1985-05-01

    Quantitative assessment of bone scintigraphy was performed in fifty-six patients with hip joint disease including femoral neck fracture, aseptic necrosis of the femoral head, traumatic dislocation of the hip, Perthes disease, and transient synovitis of the hip. In the static study, bone scintigraphy was obtained 3 hours after injection of sup(99m)Tc-MDP by gamma camera equipped with a computer and uptake ratios were calculated. In the dynamic study, bone scintigraphy was performed in one, 3 and 5 hours after injection of radionuclide. Femoral head uptake ratio was markedly decreased in osteonecrosis following femoral neck fracture and characteristically increased in aseptic necrosis of the femoral head but prolonged retention of sup(99m)Tc-MDP could be observed. Uptake ratios of epiphysis were decreased in Perthes disease but normal in transient synovitis of the hip. Static and dynamic study of bone scintigraphy may be useful for early diagnosis and treatment in the hip joint disease. (author).

  16. Sports Activity Following Cementless Metaphyseal Hip Joint Arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Czech Szymon

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available An adequate level of physical activity has a substantial effect on both mental and physical human health. Physical activity is largely dependent on the function of the musculoskeletal and articular system. One of the most frequent diseases of this system is degenerative joint disease. Due to the changing and more demanding lifestyles and patients’ willingness to be involved in sports activity, the expectations of hip joint arthroplasty are becoming increasingly high. Alleviating pain ceases to be the only reason for which patients choose surgical interventions, while the expectations often include involvement in various sports. Only few studies contain recommendations concerning the frequency, type and intensity of sports activity which are acceptable after hip joint arthroplasty. The aim of the study was to evaluate function and physical activity of people following cementless short-stem hip joint arthroplasty in the observation of at least five years. The study group comprised 106 patients who underwent total hip arthroplasty due to degenerative joint diseases, chosen according to inclusion criteria. Patients underwent routine physical examinations following the Harris Hip Score protocol, responded to the UCLA scale and questionnaires concerning pre-surgical and current physical activity. Our results demonstrated that hip joint arthroplasty in people suffering from degenerative joint diseases has a beneficial effect on their level of functioning and physical activity. Although physical activity and the level of functioning obviously reduced as a person aged, the level of physical activity continued to be very high in both groups, with function of the hip joint evaluated as very good.

  17. Radiographic parameters of the hip joint from birth to adolescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Than, P.; Kranicz, J.; Bellyei, A. [Dept. of Orthopaedics, Univ. of Pecs, Medical Faculty, Ifjusag utja (Hungary); Sillinger, T. [Dept. of Orthopaedics, Szt Gyorgy County Hospital, Szekesfehervar (Hungary)

    2004-03-01

    Background: Various qualitative and quantitative radiological geometrical parameters can be of great help when assessing dysplasia of the hip joint and in understanding developmental processes of the infant hip. There are few data on the normal values of the hip joint at different ages. Objective: To perform radiographic measurements on hip joints considered to be anatomically normal and to provide data for each age group, thus describing features of the radiographic development of the hip. Materials and methods: Radiographs were examined from 355 children (age 0-16 years) undergoing examination for scoliosis (long film), urography or plain abdominal radiography. Qualitative and quantitative signs were observed and measured, focusing on the Hilgenreiner, Wiberg and Idelberger angles and the decentric distance. Results: Before the age of 9 years measurable data from neighbouring age groups differed significantly, indicating typical radiological changes of the joint. For the same age range, qualitative changes could also be observed. After 9 years of age, radiological development of the normal hip joint during childhood is much slower. (orig.)

  18. Is physical activity a risk factor for primary knee or hip replacement due to osteoarthritis? A prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Simpson, Julie Anne; Wluka, Anita E; Teichtahl, Andrew J; English, Dallas R; Giles, Graham G; Graves, Stephen; Cicuttini, Flavia M

    2011-02-01

    To estimate prospectively any association between measures of physical activity and the risk of either primary knee or hip replacement due to osteoarthritis (OA). Eligible subjects (n = 39,023) were selected from participants in a prospective cohort study recruited 1990-1994. Primary knee and hip replacement for OA during 2001-2005 was determined by linking the cohort records to the National Joint Replacement Registry. A total physical activity level was computed, incorporating both intensity and frequency for different forms of physical activity obtained by questionnaire at baseline attendance. There was a dose-response relationship between total physical activity level and the risk of primary knee replacement [hazards ratio (HR) 1.04, 95% CI 1.01-1.07 for an increase of 1 level in total physical activity]. Although vigorous activity frequency was associated with an increased risk of primary knee replacement (HR 1.42, 95% CI 1.08-1.86) for 1-2 times/week and HR 1.24 (95% CI 0.90-1.71) for ≥ 3 times/week), the p for trend was marginal (continuous HR 1.08, 95% CI 1.00-1.16, p = 0.05). The frequency of less vigorous activity or walking was not associated with the risk of primary knee replacement, nor was any measure of physical activity associated with the risk of primary hip replacement. Increasing levels of total physical activity are positively associated with the risk of primary knee but not hip replacement due to OA. Physical activity might affect the knee and hip joints differently depending on the preexisting health status and anatomy of the joint, as well as the sort of physical activity performed.

  19. Revision for recurrent dislocation of total hip replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Mark; Blom, Ashley W; Barnett, Andrew; Karantana, Alexia; Bannister, Gordon C

    2009-01-01

    Dislocation is one of the commonest complications of total hip arthroplasty with an incidence of between 0.5 and 9.2%. Despite this, little is known of the outcome of treatment strategies for dislocation. The aim of this study was to establish the optimal strategy for the operative management of recurrent dislocation following THA taking account of the surgical approach employed in the replacement that became unstable and the direction of the instability that followed. We reviewed 70 patients who underwent revision surgery for recurrent dislocation after total hip arthroplasty (THA), 38 through the transgluteal (Hardinge) and 32 through the posterior approach.52 of these followed primary and 18 followed revision THA for reasons other than instability.We recorded the surgical approach, the direction of dislocation and the operative strategy employed for each case. We achieved stability in 75% of patients who dislocated after primary and 50% after revision THA. 77% of dislocations performed initially through the transgluteal approach were anterior and 88% through the posterior approach were posterior. Following the transgluteal approach, we stabilised anterior dislocation in 54% of cases. Following the posterior approach we stabilised posterior dislocation in 79%. The most successful operative strategy overall was cup augmentation which conferred stability in 90% of cases. Instability after primary total hip replacement is easier to treat (75% chance of success) than after revision total hip replacement (50% chance of success). Although previous studies have shown that the posterior approach has a slightly higher risk of dislocation, this study has shown that achieving stability after a posterior dislocation is more likely than after an anterior dislocation. The outcome of revision for instability depends on the surgical approach used initially, and the direction of dislocation.

  20. OPTIMAL IMPROVEMENT IN FUNCTION AFTER TOTAL HIP AND KNEE REPLACEMENT: HOW DEEP DO YOU KNOW YOUR PATIENT’S MIND?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Caro, M F; Vicenti, G; Abate, A; Picca, G; Leoncini, V; Lomuscio, M; Casalino, A; Solarino, G; Moretti, B

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip and knee causes pain and loss of joint mobility, leading to limitations in physical function. When conservative treatment fails total hip and knee replacement is a cost-effective surgical option. Patients have high expectations regarding functional outcome after these procedures. If such expectations are not met, they may still be dissatisfied with the outcome of a technically successful procedure. Recently, numerous studies reported that psychological factors can influence the outcome of total knee replacement (tkr) and total hip artrhoplasty with total hip replacement (thr). We conducted a prospective study on a consecutive sample of 280 patients affected by hip or knee OA who underwent total joint replacement. At patients’ admission, Harris Hip Score (HHS) and Knee Society Score (KSS) were used to assess pain and function. Furthermore, SF-36, Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE), Symptom Checklist-90-R (SCL-90-R), Coping Orientation to Problems Experienced (BRIEF-COPE) and the Amsterdam Preoperative Anxiety and Information Scale (APAIS) were administered. Patients had clinical and radio graphical follow up at 1, 3 and 6 months post-operatively. The HHS and KSS values before surgery showed a linear correlation with both SCL-90-R and MMSE. None of the investigated variables influenced post-operative HHS and KSS scores; however, the improvement of functional scores resulted conditioned by SCL-90-R values, VAS score, schooling and MMSE. Psychological factors and mental status in primary total hip and knee replacement can affect outcome and patient satisfaction. Strategies focused on identification and facing of these conditions must be considered to improve outcome of total replacement.

  1. Risk factors for perioperative hyperglycemia in primary hip and knee replacements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jämsen, Esa; Nevalainen, Pasi I; Eskelinen, Antti; Kalliovalkama, Jarkko; Moilanen, Teemu

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Background and purpose — Perioperative hyperglycemia has been associated with adverse outcomes in several fields of surgery. In this observational study, we identified factors associated with an increased risk of hyperglycemia following hip and knee replacement. Patients and methods Patients and methods — We prospectively monitored changes in glucose following primary hip and knee replacements in 191 patients with osteoarthritis. Possible associations of patient characteristics and operation-related factors with hyperglycemia (defined as glucose > 7.8 mmol/L in 2 consecutive measurements) and severe hyperglycemia (glucose > 10 mmol/L) were analyzed using binary logistic regression with adjustment for age, sex, operated joint, and anesthesiological risk score. Results Results — 76 patients (40%) developed hyperglycemia, and 48 of them (25% of the whole cohort) had severe hyperglycemia. Glycemic responses were similar following hip replacement and knee replacement. Previously diagnosed diabetes was associated with an increased risk of hyperglycemia and severe hyperglycemia, compared to patients with normal glucose metabolism, whereas newly diagnosed diabetes and milder glucose metabolism disorders had no effect. In patients without previously diagnosed diabetes, increased values of preoperative glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and fasting glucose on the day of operation were associated with hyperglycemia. Higher anesthesiological risk score—but none of the operation-related factors analyzed—was associated with an increased risk of hyperglycemia. Interpretation Interpretation — Perioperative hyperglycemia is common in primary hip and knee replacements. Previously diagnosed diabetes is the strongest risk factor for hyperglycemia. In patients with no history of diabetes, preoperative HbA1c and fasting glucose on the day of operation can be used to stratify the risk of hyperglycemia. PMID:25409255

  2. [Total hip replacement in psoriatic arthritis--raport of 4 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrzak, Krzysztof; Strzyzewski, Wojciech; Pucher, Andrzej; Kaczmarek, Wiesław

    2011-01-01

    It is unusual for the hips to be affected by psoriatic arthritis. But in that rare cases, totalhip replacement (THR) is at present an accepted treatment in patients with severe and painfull deformity. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the results of THR in patients suffering from psoriatic arthritis of the hip, operated from 2000 to 2008 in the Orthopaedic and Traumatologic Department of Poznan University of Medical Sciences. Material included 4 patients, 2 females and 2 males, on whom 5 THRs were performed, lateral approach was used in all cases. At the time of operation, the age of patients ranged from 48 to 61 years (mean 53). Follow-up ranged from 2 to 10 years (mean 6 years). The operative treatment was a multistage process (during one operation only one joint was replaced). Cementeless total hip arthroplasty was used during all of the THRs. The patients were clinically and radiologically evaluated preoperatively, postoperatively, and at final examination. The clinical state was evaluated with Harris hip score and WOMAC scale. We based our radiological examination on Hip Society system. The average preoperative Harris score for the group of patients was 31, WOMAC score 77. After an average of 6 years follow-up all hips were considered excellent, with average Harris score of 90, WOMAC Score of 5. All patients had increased function and decreased pain. The radiograms of all patients revealed that the acetabular and femoral components were correctly positioned with no radiographic evidence of loosening in the last examination. The inclination angle of the acetabular component was 30-48 (mean: 39 degrees) and the acetabular opening angle was 3-20 degrees (mean: 4 degrees). The stem was neutral-oriented in all hips. No ectopic ossification concentrations were found. The hip may be involved by the psoriatic arthritis. Clinical and radiological evaluation of our material showed that total hip replacement in the treatment of psoriatic arthritis allows regaining

  3. MRI of the hip joint; MRT des Hueftgelenks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czerny, C.; Noebauer-Huhmann, I.M.; Imhof, H. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, Medizinische Univ. Wien (Austria)

    2005-12-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is performed to diagnose many pathologic conditions affecting the hip joint. Either conventional MRI (without contrast enhancement of the joint cavity) or MR arthrography is used to detect and most accurately differentiate hip joint pathologies. Conventional MRI is performed in cases of bone marrow edema, necrosis, arthrosis and especially the so-called ''activated arthrosis'', as well as in inflammatory and tumorous entities. MR arthography, which has only recently become available for use, is excellently suited for diagnosing lesions of the acetabular labrum, cartilage lesions, and free articular bodies. This article provides an overview about MRI characteristics and their accuracy of hip joint diseases and the impact on the therapeutic procedure. (orig.)

  4. Ankle and hip postural strategies defined by joint torques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runge, C. F.; Shupert, C. L.; Horak, F. B.; Zajac, F. E.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Previous studies have identified two discrete strategies for the control of posture in the sagittal plane based on EMG activations, body kinematics, and ground reaction forces. The ankle strategy was characterized by body sway resembling a single-segment-inverted pendulum and was elicited on flat support surfaces. In contrast, the hip strategy was characterized by body sway resembling a double-segment inverted pendulum divided at the hip and was elicited on short or compliant support surfaces. However, biomechanical optimization models have suggested that hip strategy should be observed in response to fast translations on a flat surface also, provided the feet are constrained to remain in contact with the floor and the knee is constrained to remain straight. The purpose of this study was to examine the experimental evidence for hip strategy in postural responses to backward translations of a flat support surface and to determine whether analyses of joint torques would provide evidence for two separate postural strategies. Normal subjects standing on a flat support surface were translated backward with a range of velocities from fast (55 cm/s) to slow (5 cm/s). EMG activations and joint kinematics showed pattern changes consistent with previous experimental descriptions of mixed hip and ankle strategy with increasing platform velocity. Joint torque analyses revealed the addition of a hip flexor torque to the ankle plantarflexor torque during fast translations. This finding indicates the addition of hip strategy to ankle strategy to produce a continuum of postural responses. Hip torque without accompanying ankle torque (pure hip strategy) was not observed. Although postural control strategies have previously been defined by how the body moves, we conclude that joint torques, which indicate how body movements are produced, are useful in defining postural control strategies. These results also illustrate how the biomechanics of the body can transform discrete control

  5. Hip supporting device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention relates to a device for limiting movements in one or more anatomical joints, such as a device for limiting movement in the human hip joint after hip replacement surgery. This is provided by a device for limiting movement in the human hip joint, said device comprising: at least...

  6. [Total Joint Replacement and Return to Sports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehler, N; Schmidt, T; Niemeier, A

    2016-12-01

    Background: An increasing number of physically active patients not only need to know if they will basically be able to engage in sports after undergoing arthroplasty. They also would like to know whether or not they will be able to resume their preoperative activity levels. This article aims to provide an overview of recent data regarding the following questions on hip, knee and shoulder arthroplasty: (1) What is the impact of physical activity on an endoprosthesis? (2) What level of sports can be achieved after an arthroplasty procedure? (3) What types of sport are recommended for patients with an endoprosthesis? Methods: PubMed-based review of the literature. Narrative review focusing on current data from the years 2010 to 2016. Results: The commonly known recommendation to exercise low-impact sports such as hiking, swimming, cycling or golf at a moderate intensity remains valid for all types of prostheses in all joints. There is broad consensus that the benefits of these sports outweigh the negative effects. Having undergone total hip or knee arthroplasty, most patients with a high preoperative activity level return to sports after 3-6 months, albeit with a clear tendency to lower intensity and a shift from high-impact to low-impact sports. Some key questions have to be answered regarding the effects of low-impact sports that are exercised with high intensity, the effects resulting from high-impact sports, effects specific to different types of sport, and possibilities provided by different prosthesis types. In this context, a lot remains to be done to investigate the limits between positive and negative effects resulting from physical activity of varying intensity. New data suggests that generally a higher physical performance level may be achieved than has been traditionally recommended. Early results of unicondylar knee prostheses are far better than those achieved with bicondylar prostheses. In contrast to expert recommendations, shoulder endoprostheses show

  7. Difficulty of diagnosing the origin of lower leg pain in patients with both lumbar spinal stenosis and hip joint osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Junya; Ohtori, Seiji; Kishida, Shunji; Nakamura, Junichi; Takeshita, Munenori; Shigemura, Tomonori; Takazawa, Makoto; Eguchi, Yawara; Inoue, Gen; Orita, Sumihisa; Takaso, Masashi; Ochiai, Nobuyasu; Kuniyoshi, Kazuki; Aoki, Yasuchika; Ishikawa, Tetsuhiro; Arai, Gen; Miyagi, Masayuki; Kamoda, Hiroto; Suzuki, Miyako; Sakuma, Yoshihiro; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Kubota, Gou; Inage, Kazuhide; Sainoh, Takeshi; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Toyone, Tomoaki; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2012-12-01

    Case series. To present the difficulty of diagnosing the origin of lower leg pain in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis and hip joint arthritis. Pain arising from a degenerated hip joint is sometimes localized to the lower leg. Patients with lumbar spinal disease may also show radicular pain corresponding to the lower leg area. If patients present with both conditions and only pain at the lower leg, it is difficult to determine the origin of the pain. We reviewed 420 patients who had leg pain with lumbar spinal stenosis diagnosed by myelography, computed tomography after myelography, or magnetic resonance imaging. Pain only at the ipsilateral lateral aspect of the lower leg but slight low back pain or pain around the hip joint was shown in 4 patients who had lumbar spinal stenosis and hip osteoarthritis. The symptoms resolved after L5 spinal nerve block, but remained after lidocaine infiltration into the hip joint. We performed decompression and posterolateral fusion surgery for these 4 patients. Leg pain did not resolve after lumbar surgery in all patients. Conservative treatment was not effective from 6 to 12 months, so ultimately we performed ipsilateral total hip replacement for all patients and they became symptom-free. It is difficult to determine the origin of lower leg pain by spinal nerve block and hip joint block in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis and hip osteoarthritis. We take this into consideration before surgery.

  8. The effect of education and supervised exercise vs. education alone on the time to total hip replacement in patients with severe hip osteoarthritis. A randomized clinical trial protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jensen Carsten

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The age- and gender-specific incidence of total hip replacement surgery has increased over the last two decades in all age groups. Recent studies indicate that non-surgical interventions are effective in reducing pain and disability, even at later stages of the disease when joint replacement is considered. We hypothesize that the time to hip replacement can be postponed in patients with severe hip osteoarthritis following participation in a patient education and supervised exercise program when compared to patients receiving patient education alone. Methods/design A prospective, blinded, parallel-group multi-center trial (2 sites, with balanced randomization [1:1]. Patients with hip osteoarthritis and an indication for hip replacement surgery, aged 40 years and above, will be consecutively recruited and randomized into two treatment groups. The active treatment group will receive 3 months of supervised exercise consisting of 12 sessions of individualized, goal-based neuromuscular training, and 12 sessions of intensive resistance training plus patient education (3 sessions. The control group will receive only patient education (3 sessions. The primary end-point for assessing the effectiveness of the intervention is 12 months after baseline. However, follow-ups will also be performed once a year for at least 5 years. The primary outcome measure is the time to hip replacement surgery measured on a Kaplain-Meier survival curve from time of inclusion. Secondary outcome measures are the five subscales of the Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, physical activity level (UCLA activity score, and patient’s global perceived effect. Other measures include pain after exercise, joint-specific adverse events, exercise adherence, general health status (EQ-5D-5L, mechanical muscle strength and performance in physical tests. A cost-effectiveness analysis will also be performed. Discussion To our knowledge, this is the first

  9. Development of the hip joint in relation to congenital dislocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer-Torrelles, M; Ceballos, T; Ferrer-Loewinsohn, A

    1990-01-01

    As an introduction to the pathology and treatment of C.D.H., a simplified outline of fundamental embryologic events and growth characteristics of the hip joint (selected from past and actual bibliography) is presented. Congenital dislocation of the hip appears to be the result of various genetic, developmental, environmental and mechanical factors that affect articular structures in the perinatal period. At this time, the hip joint is anatomically and functionally more vulnerable to alterations of its normal concentric disposition. If incongruency persists, subsequent morphological changes, characteristic of dysplasia will develop. The main conclusions derived from a review of the development of the hip joint in relation to C.D.H. are: 1) The hip joint is an anatomical and functional unit derived from a common primitive blastema. 2) Primitive condensed sclerotomic mesenchyme transforms into cartilage that shapes in a genetically determined pattern to form the femur and os innominatum in continuity. 3) The joint space develops by autolytic degeneration in the 7-8 week embryo. By the 11th week, the joint cavity, evolved in the capsule lined internally by synovium, has a well differentiated labrum and ligamentum teres with the basic morphology of a developed hip joint. Only after this stage is displacement possible. 4) Depth (and stability) of the acetabulum increase with development of the glenoid labrum and cartilaginous rim (incomplete only in its inferior portion). Here a fibrous band (transverse ligament) offers less resistance to displacement, but on occasions is an anatomic barrier to concentric reduction. 5) In the early fetal period, the acetabulum is a deep set cavity, becoming shallower at the time of birth. Femoral head coverage at birth is more deficient than at any other previous or subsequent stage of development. 6) The relationship between femoral and acetabular anteversion (instability index) is more important than absolute values which are variable

  10. Joint space width in dysplasia of the hip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Steffen; Sonne-Holm, Stig; Søballe, K

    2005-01-01

    . Neither subjects with dysplasia nor controls had radiological signs of ongoing degenerative disease at admission. The primary radiological discriminator of degeneration of the hip was a change in the minimum joint space width over time. There were no significant differences between these with dysplasia...... and controls in regard to age, body mass index or occupational exposure to daily repeated lifting at admission.We found no significant differences in the reduction of the joint space width at follow-up between subjects with dysplasia and the control subjects nor in self-reported pain in the hip......In a longitudinal case-control study, we followed 81 subjects with dysplasia of the hip and 136 control subjects without dysplasia for ten years assessing radiological evidence of degeneration of the hip at admission and follow-up. There were no cases of subluxation in the group with dysplasia...

  11. Position of the prosthesis and the incidence of dislocation following total hip replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Rong-xin; Yan, Shi-gui; Wu, Li-dong; Wang, Xiang-hua; Dai, Xue-song

    2007-07-05

    Dislocation is the second most common complication of hip replacement surgery, and impact of the prosthesis is believed to be the fundamental reason. The present study employed Solidworks 2003 and MSC-Nastran software to analyze the three dimensional variables in order to investigate how to prevent dislocation following hip replacement surgery. Computed tomography (CT) imaging was used to collect femoral outline data and Solidworks 2003 software was used to construct the cup model with variabilities. Nastran software was used to evaluate dislocation at different prosthesis positions and different geometrical shapes. Three dimensional movement and results from finite element method were analyzed and the values of dislocation resistance index (DRI), range of motion to impingement (ROM-I), range of motion to dislocation (ROM-D) and peak resisting moment (PRM) were determined. Computer simulation was used to evaluate the range of motion of the hip joint at different prosthesis positions. Finite element analysis showed: (1) Increasing the ratio of head/neck increased the ROM-I values and moderately increased ROM-D and PRM values. Increasing the head size significantly increased PRM and to some extent ROM-I and ROM-D values, which suggested that there would be a greater likelihood of dislocation. (2) Increasing the anteversion angle increased the ROM-I, ROM-D, PRM, energy required for dislocation (ENERGY-D) and DRI values, which would increase the stability of the joint. (3) As the chamber angle was increased, ROM-I, ROM-D, PRM, Energy-D and DRI values were increased, resulting in improved joint stability. Chamber angles exceeding 55 degrees resulted in increases in ROM-I and ROM-D values, but decreases in PRM, Energy-D, and DRI values, which, in turn, increased the likelihood of dislocation. (4) The cup, which was reduced posteriorly, reduced ROM-I values (2.1 -- 5.3 degrees ) and increased the DRI value (0.073). This suggested that the posterior high side had the

  12. A case of severe ankylosing spondylitis posted for hip replacement surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalini Kotekar

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A 50-year-old male patient with history of ankylosing spondylitis (AS for 30 years presented for hip replacement surgery. Airway management in ankylosing spondylitis patients presents the most serious array of intubation and airway hazards imagin-able, which is secondary to decrease in cervical spine mobility and possible temporo-mandibular joint disease. Literatures support definitive airway management and many authors consider regional anaesthesia to be contraindicated. The reasons cited include inability to gain neuraxial access and the need for urgent airway control in case of complication of regional anaesthesia.

  13. Radiological diagnosis of hip joint abnormalities in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Михаил Михайлович Камоско

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Abnormalities of the hip joint in children covers a wide range of diseases, including both congenital and acquired ones. Hip dysplasia, Legg-Calve-Perthes disease and juvenile slipped capital femoral epiphysis account for up to 25 % of all diseases of the musculoskeletal system in pediatric patients. Early diagnosis of these disorders and timely treatment are of paramount importance in the prevention of childhood disability.

  14. Preoperative therapeutic exercise in frail elderly scheduled for total hip replacement: A randomized pilot trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogeboom, T.J.; Dronkers, J.J.; Ende, C.H.M. van den; Oosting, E.; Meeteren, N.L.U. van

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the feasibility and preliminary effectiveness of therapeutic exercise before total hip replacement in frail elderly. Design: A single-blind, randomized clinical pilot trial. Setting: Outpatient physiotherapy department. Subjects: Frail elderly with hip osteoarthritis awaiting

  15. Relationships between results of the Ortolani method of hip joint palpation and distraction index, Norberg angle, and hip score in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puerto, D A; Smith, G K; Gregor, T P; LaFond, E; Conzemius, M G; Cabell, L W; McKelvie, P J

    1999-02-15

    To determine whether results of the Ortolani method of hip joint palpation in dogs were related to distraction index (DI), Norberg angle, or radiographic hip score. Cross-sectional study. 459 clinically normal dogs. Dogs were sedated for radiography and palpation of the hip joints. Results of hip joint palpation were classified as negative, mild positive, moderate positive, or severe positive. Distraction indices were measured for all dogs. Norberg angles were measured for 380 dogs for which ventrodorsal hip-extended radiographic projections were available. Hip scores assigned by the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA) were available for 95 dogs. Age, weight, and sex were not significantly associated with results of hip joint palpation. There was moderate correlation between results of hip joint palpation and DI (r = 0.636), low-moderate correlation between results of hip joint palpation and OFA hip scores (rs = 0.437), and weak negative correlation (r = -0.236) between results of hip joint palpation and Norberg angle. For joints without degenerative joint disease (DJD), there was a significant linear relationship between results of hip palpation and DI; however, for joint with DJD, there was not. Results of hip joint palpation were 5.3-fold as likely to be negative for dogs with DJD as for dogs without. Results of hip joint palpation were at best moderately correlated with radiographic measures of hip joint laxity. Therefore, hip joint palpation should be combined with hip-extended and stress radiography when assessing hip joint quality.

  16. Temporomandibular joint replacement: a New Zealand perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdoch, B; Buchanan, J; Cliff, J

    2014-05-01

    Alloplastic total temporomandibular joint replacement (TMJ TJR) has been performed in New Zealand utilizing the TMJ Concepts patient-fitted system since 2000. The data analysed in this study were collected retrospectively from questionnaires sent to all maxillofacial surgeons in New Zealand who had implanted TMJ Concepts devices between 2000 and 2011. A total of 63 devices were implanted in 42 patients (13 males, 29 females) during this 12-year period. The primary indication for TMJ TJR was end-stage joint disease resulting from ankylosis and arthritis. The mean age of the patients was 47 years (range 7-80 years). The most common complication reported was transient facial nerve impairment in 4.8% of the patients. Objective results, measured as the maximal incisional opening, improved by a mean of 17.3mm (PTMJ TJR using the TMJ Concepts prosthesis is a reliable treatment option for the management of end-stage TMJ disease. Copyright © 2013 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Validity and responsiveness of radiographic joint space width metric measurement in hip osteoarthritis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu Miow Lin, D; Reichmann, W M; Gossec, L; Losina, E; Conaghan, P G; Maillefert, J F

    2011-05-01

    To perform a systematic review of the literature on the concurrent validity, predictive validity and responsiveness of radiographic metric measurement of femoro-acetabular joint space width (JSW) in hip osteoarthritis (OA). studies reporting any data on (1) JSW on X-rays in hip OA patients and (2) concurrent validity (correlations with clinical symptoms), predictive validity (correlations with future symptomatic state, joint space loss or joint replacement), and/or responsiveness (JSW change over time evaluated using the standardized response mean (SRM)). Medline PUBMED and Embase databases. Random-effects models were constructed to obtain pooled SRMs. Of 448 articles, 79 met the abstract inclusion criteria and were read for further screening. Of these, 15 reported measures of validity and 11 reported measures of responsiveness. Concurrent validity: Five studies suggested an association between JSW and symptoms in the general population. Two evaluated the correlations between JSW and symptoms in hip OA patients, with conflicting results. Five demonstrated that JSW is predictive of future hip joint replacement. Responsiveness was moderate (SRM=0.66; 95% confidential interval (95%CI): 0.41, 0.91), but tended to be lower in randomized clinical trials than in cohort studies (0.35 vs 0.83), using an intention to treat rather than a completer analysis (0.30 vs 0.80), and using manual rather than computer-based measurement (0.47 vs 1.12). There is evidence of a weak association between JSW and symptoms, of predictive validity for subsequent joint replacement, and of moderate responsiveness of metric measurement of JSW. Copyright © 2011 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Do hip prosthesis related infection codes in administrative discharge registers correctly classify periprosthetic hip joint infection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Jeppe; Pedersen, Alma B; Troelsen, Anders; Søballe, Kjeld

    2015-01-01

    Administrative discharge registers could be a valuable and easily accessible single-sources for research data on periprosthetic hip joint infection. The aim of this study was to estimate the positive predictive value of the International Classification of Disease 10th revision (ICD-10) periprosthetic hip joint infection diagnosis code in the Danish National Patient Register. Patients were identified with an ICD-10 discharge diagnosis code of T84.5 ("Infection and inflammatory reaction due to internal joint prosthesis") in association with hip-joint associated surgical procedure codes in The Danish National Patient Register. Medical records of the identified patients (n = 283) were verified for the existence of a periprosthetic hip joint infection. Positive predictive values with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated. A T84.5 diagnosis code irrespective of the associated surgical procedure code had a positive predictive value of 85% (95% CI: 80-89). Stratified to T84.5 in combination with an infection-specific surgical procedure code the positive predictive value increased to 86% (95% CI: 80-91), and in combination with a noninfection-specific surgical procedure code decreased to 82% (95% CI: 72-89). Misclassification must be expected and taken into consideration when using administrative discharge registers for epidemiological research on periprosthetic hip joint infection. We believe that the periprosthetic hip joint infection diagnosis code can be of use in future single-source register based studies, but preferably should be used in combination with alternate data sources to ensure higher validity.

  19. On Patellofemoral joint replacement - Clinical, radiological, and numerical studies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonbergen, J.P.W. van

    2011-01-01

    Patellofemoral, osteoarthritis, joint replacement, arthroplasty, anterior knee pain Isolated patellofemoral joint osteoarthritis is a degenerative disorder of the knee estimated to occur in approximately 4% to 24% of patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. Mild isolated patellofemoral

  20. Relationship between mechanical thresholds and limb use in dogs with coxofemoral joint oa-associated pain and the modulating effects of pain alleviation from total hip replacement on mechanical thresholds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomas, Andrea; Marcellin-Little, Denis J; Roe, Simon C; Motsinger-Reif, Alison; Lascelles, B Duncan X

    2014-07-01

    To compare von Frey mechanical quantitative sensory thresholds (mQSTvF ) between pelvic limbs in dogs before unilateral total hip replacement (THR) surgery; to correlate ground reaction forces (GRF) with mQSTvF ; to assess changes in mQSTvF after THR surgery. Prospective clinical study. Dogs (n = 44). mQSTvF and GRF measured using a pressure sensitive walkway were evaluated before, and 3, 6, and 12 months after, unilateral THR. Measurements were recorded from the affected (operated) pelvic limb (APL) and the non-operated pelvic limb (NPL). Random effects analysis and forwards stepwise linear regression models were used to evaluate the influence of time since surgery and patient factors on mQSTvF thresholds. There were no significant correlations between mQSTvF data and age, bodyweight or the GRF variables. Preoperative mQSTvF measured at the APL and NPL did not differ (P = .909). mQSTvF thresholds increased significantly after 12 months in NPL (P = .047) and APL (P = .001). In addition to time, APL mQSTvF values were significantly affected by sex (higher in males, P = .010) and body condition score (higher in leaner dogs, P = .035) and NPL mQSTvF values by sex (P = .038). Successful unilateral THR results in decreased central sensitization after 12 months. © Copyright 2014 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  1. Cemented, cementless, and hybrid prostheses for total hip replacement: cost effectiveness analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Pennington, Mark; Grieve, Richard; Sekhon, Jasjeet S; Gregg, Paul; Black, Nick; van der Meulen, Jan H

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare the cost effectiveness of the three most commonly chosen types of prosthesis for total hip replacement. DESIGN Lifetime cost effectiveness model with parameters estimated from individual patient data obtained from three large national databases. SETTING English National Health Service. PARTICIPANTS Adults aged 55 to 84 undergoing primary total hip replacement for osteoarthritis. INTERVENTIONS Total hip replacement using either cemented, cementless, or hybrid prostheses. M...

  2. Iranian Joint Registry (Iranian National Hip and Knee Arthroplasty Registry).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslani, Hamidreza; Nourbakhsh, Seyed Taghi; Lahiji, Farivar A; Heydarian, Keykavoos; Jabalameli, Mahmood; Ghazavi, Mohammad Taghi; Tahmasebi, Mohammad Naghi; Fayyaz, Mahmoud Reza; Sazegari, Mohammad Ali; Mohaddes, Maziar; Rajabpour, Mojtaba; Emami, Mohammad; Jazayeri, Seyyed Mohammad; Madadi, Firooz; Farahini, Hossein; Mirzatoloee, Fardin; Gharahdaghi, Mohammad; Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad Hossein; Ebrahimian, Mohammadreza; Mirvakili, Hossein; Bashti, Kaveh; Almasizadeh, Mohtasham; Abolghasemian, Mansour; Taheriazam, Afshin; Motififard, Mehdi; Yazdi, Hamidreza; Mobarakeh, Mahmood Karimi; Shayestehazar, Masoud; Moghtadae, Mehdi; Siavashi, Babak; Sajjadi, Mohammadreza M; Rasi, Alireza Manafi; Chabok, Seyyed Kazem; Zafarani, Zohreh; Salehi, Shahin; Ahmadi, Monireh; Mohammadi, Amin; Shahsavand, Mohammad Ebrahim

    2016-04-01

    Periodic evaluation and monitoring the health and economic outcome of joint replacement surgery is a common and popular process under the territory of joint registries in many countries. In this article we introduce the methodology used for the foundation of the National Iranian Joint Registry (IJR) with a joint collaboration of the Social Security Organization (SSO) and academic research departments considering the requirements of the Iran's Ministry of Health and Education.

  3. Synovial hemangioma of the hip joint in a pediatric patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demertzis, Jennifer L.; Loomans, Rachel; Wessell, Daniel E. [Washington University School of Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, St. Louis, MO (United States); Kyriakos, Michael [Washington University School of Medicine, Division of Surgical Pathology, St. Louis, MO (United States); McDonald, Douglas J. [Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Hemangiomas of the articular synovium are rare and commonly associated with recurrent joint swelling and painful limitation of motion. The knee joint is the most commonly involved site, with most patients diagnosed in the second to third decade of life [1]. Although over 200 cases have been reported in the English-language medical literature, only three have originated within the hip joint, all of which were in adult patients reported in the surgical literature [2-4]. We describe a histologically proven synovial hemangioma of the hip joint in a pediatric patient that invaded the femur, acetabulum, and adjacent soft tissues, with a detailed discussion of the differential diagnosis based on the radiographic and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. (orig.)

  4. Monocular Vision- and IMU-Based System for Prosthesis Pose Estimation During Total Hip Replacement Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Shaojie; Zhou, Yixin; Wang, Zhihua; Chen, Hong

    2017-06-01

    The average age of population increases worldwide, so does the number of total hip replacement surgeries. Total hip replacement, however, often involves a risk of dislocation and prosthetic impingement. To minimize the risk after surgery, we propose an instrumented hip prosthesis that estimates the relative pose between prostheses intraoperatively and ensures the placement of prostheses within a safe zone. We create a model of the hip prosthesis as a ball and socket joint, which has four degrees of freedom (DOFs), including 3-DOF rotation and 1-DOF translation. We mount a camera and an inertial measurement unit (IMU) inside the hollow ball, or "femoral head prosthesis," while printing customized patterns on the internal surface of the socket, or "acetabular cup." Since the sensors were rigidly fixed to the femoral head prosthesis, measuring its motions poses a sensor ego-motion estimation problem. By matching feature points in images of the reference patterns, we propose a monocular vision based method with a relative error of less than 7% in the 3-DOF rotation and 8% in the 1-DOF translation. Further, to reduce system power consumption, we apply the IMU with its data fused by an extended Kalman filter to replace the camera in the 3-DOF rotation estimation, which yields a less than 4.8% relative error and a 21.6% decrease in power consumption. Experimental results show that the best approach to prosthesis pose estimation is a combination of monocular vision-based translation estimation and IMU-based rotation estimation, and we have verified the feasibility and validity of this system in prosthesis pose estimation.

  5. DIFFICULTIeS OF TOTAL HIP REPLACEMENT IN PATIENTS WITH ANKYLOSING SPONDYLITIS (case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Tikhilov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A distinctive feature of patients with ankylosing spondylitis is the formation of hip ankylosis in an extremely unfavorable functional position combined with upset of sagittal balance of the body along with a thoracolumbar kyphosis. Treatment of these patients poses considerable technical difficulties and is often associated with complications. The authors report a clinical case of a female 40 years old patient with confirmed rhizomelic spondylitis. The patient mainly complained of fixed malposition of the right lower extremity (hip ankylosis in extreme 1450 flexion and 1500 abduction combined with a severe fixed spine deformity (thoracic kyphosis 920, lumbar lordosis 170. Considering significant sagittal balance disorder it was decided to go for a two-stage procedure. Total hip arthroplasty of the right joint was performed at the first stage. At the second stage the authors corrected thoracolumbar spinal deformity by Th12 (type PSO 4 and L2 (type PSO 3 wedge resections and converging resected vertebral bodies by a multilevel fixation system with transpedicular support elements. The interval between the stages was 11 months. Two-stage treatment of this patient al-lowed to avoid adverse postoperative complications and to achieve a significant functional improvement in one year after treatment started. The sum of points before and after the treat-ment amounted respectively to 46 and 79 on Harris Hip Score, 17 and 38 points on Oxford Hip Score (OHS. To summarize, comprehensive treatment with planning of all subsequent steps prior to hip replacement is the method of choice for avoidance of postoperative complications in patients with ankylosing spondylitis accompanied by a significant upset of sagittal balance.

  6. Management of acute calcific tendinitis around the hip joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang-Min; Baek, Ji-Hoon; Ko, Young-Bong; Lee, Han-Jun; Park, Ki Jeong; Ha, Yong-Chan

    2014-11-01

    Although the natural history of calcific tendinitis within the rotator cuff of the shoulder is established, the natural history of calcific tendinitis around the hip joint remains unknown. To examine the duration of symptoms including pain, the location of calcific tendinitis around the hip joint, the radiologic course of calcium phosphate crystals, and the proportion of patients who required surgical treatment. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Thirty hips (29 patients) with acute calcific tendinitis were treated between January 2010 and December 2012. Level of subjective hip pain using the visual analog scale pain score, radiologic type, and the location and size of calcium deposits were measured during a follow-up period of 12 to 32 months. The 29 patients included 7 men (24%) and 22 women (76%) with a mean age of 51.5 years (range, 28-78 years). All visual analog scale pain scores significantly improved from a mean of 7.1 to 0.8 at the latest follow-up (P 3 months) of severe pain, solid type, and large size (range, 96-416 mm(2)) were treated with arthroscopic excision. Nonoperative treatment in patients with acute calcific tendinitis of the hip joint might be successful in most patients. Surgical treatment is of value for patients experiencing prolonged severe pain, solid type, and large size. © 2014 The Author(s).

  7. Principles of human joint replacement design and clinical application

    CERN Document Server

    Buechel, Frederick F

    2015-01-01

    This book is written for the users and designers of joint replacements. In its second extended edition it conveys to the reader the knowledge accumulated by the authors during their forty year effort on the development of replacement devices for the lower limb for the purpose of aiding the reader in their design and evaluation of joint replacement devices. The early chapters describe the engineering, scientific and medical principles needed for replacement joint evaluation. One must understand the nature and performance of the materials involved and their characteristics in vivo, i.e. the response of the body to implant materials. It is also essential to understand the response of the implants to applied loading and motion, particularly in the hostile physiological environment. A chapter describes the design methodology now required for joint replacement in the USA and EU countries. The remaining chapters provide a history of joint replacement, an evaluation of earlier and current devices and sample case hist...

  8. Explanations pertaining to the Hip Joint Flexor Moment During the Stance Phase of Human Walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Erik B; Cappelen, Katrine L; Skorini, Ragnhild

    2012-01-01

    positions: normal, inclined and reclined. Net joint moments were calculated about the hip, knee and ankle joint. The peak hip joint flexor moment during late stance was significantly lower during inclined walking than in the two other conditions. During normal walking the iliacus muscle showed no or very...... activity but only in the swing phase. It is concluded that the hip flexor moment in question is largely generated by passive structures in the form of ligaments resisting hip joint extension....

  9. Comparison of arthroscopic and radiographic abnormalities in the hip joints of juvenile dogs with hip dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holsworth, Ian G; Schulz, Kurt S; Kass, Philip H; Scherrer, William E; Beale, Brian S; Cook, James L; Hornof, William J

    2005-10-01

    To compare radiographic and arthroscopic abnormalities in juvenile dogs with clinically apparent hip dysplasia. Case series. 52 dogs (70 hip joints) with clinical signs of hip dysplasia scheduled to undergo triple pelvic osteotomy. A ventrodorsal radiographic projection of the pelvis was evaluated by a radiologist unaware of clinical and arthroscopic findings, and radiographic osteoarthritic abnormalities were judged and scored as absent (0), mild (1), moderate (2), or severe (3). Arthroscopy was performed by a surgeon unaware of clinical and radiographic findings, and arthroscopic abnormalities were graded from 0 (normal) to 5 (exposed, eburnated subchondral bone). In 30 of the 70 (43%) hip joints, no radiographic osteoarthritic abnormalities were seen. Severe, full-thickness articular cartilage lesions (grade 4) of the femoral head or acetabulum were seen arthroscopically in 14 (20%) joints. Lesions > or = grade 2 were seen in 60 (86%) joints. Partial tearing of the ligament of the femoral head was present in 57 (81%) joints, and complete rupture was seen in 5 (7%). Radiographic abnormalities were seen in 13 of the 14 (93%; 95% confidence interval, 66% to 99.8%) joints with grade 4 arthroscopic abnormalities but in only 23 of the 46 (50%; 95% confidence interval, 35% to 65%) joints with grade 2 or 3 arthroscopic abnormalities. Results suggest that radiography is not a sensitive method for identifying moderate cartilage lesions in juvenile dogs with hip dysplasia. If moderate cartilage lesions are an important prognostic indicator for the success of triple pelvic osteotomy, then methods other than radiography should be used to detect these lesions.

  10. Septic Arthritis of The Hip Joint presenting as Acute Abdomen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Septic arthritis of the hip joint in two children, originally thought to be cases of acute abdomen is presented. In one case, the discovery of extra-peritoneal purulent fluid at surgery, obviated the need for laparotomy and in the other, the true nature of the disease became apparent one week after laparotomy. These cases ...

  11. Immediate Effect of Grade IV Inferior Hip Joint Mobilization on Hip Abductor Torque: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makofsky, Howard; Panicker, Siji; Abbruzzese, Jeanine; Aridas, Cynthia; Camp, Michael; Drakes, Jonelle; Franco, Caroline; Sileo, Ray

    2007-01-01

    Joint mobilization and manipulation stimulate mechanoreceptors, which may influence the joint and surrounding muscles. The purpose of this pilot study was to determine the effect of grade IV inferior hip joint mobilization on hip abductor torque. Thirty healthy subjects were randomly assigned to a control group (grade I inferior hip joint mobilization) or an experimental group (grade IV inferior hip joint mobilization). Subjects performed a pre- and post-intervention test of five isometric repetitions on the Cybex Normö dynamometer; the average torque was determined for both pre- and post-intervention measurements. These data were analyzed using the independent samples t-test with the significance level set at Phip abductor torque in the experimental group (P=0.03). The experimental group demonstrated a 17.35% increase in average torque whereas the control group demonstrated a 3.68% decrease in average torque. These findings are consistent with other studies demonstrating that the use of grade IV non-thrust mobilization improves strength immediately post-intervention in healthy individuals. The results of this pilot study provide physical therapists with further support for the utilization of manual therapy in conjunction with therapeutic exercise to enhance muscle strength.

  12. Total dislocation of the hip joint after arthroscopy and ileopsoas tenotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansone, Mikael; Ahldén, Mattias; Jónasson, Páll; Swärd, Leif; Eriksson, Thomas; Karlsson, Jon

    2013-02-01

    The hip is a highly stable joint. Non-traumatic dislocation of the hip is extremely uncommon. In this article, we report two cases of non-traumatic hip dislocations following hip arthroscopy. In both cases, capsulotomy and ileopsoas tenotomy had been performed. These cases raise questions about the importance of the natural stabilisers of the hip. Level of evidence V.

  13. Osteoarthritis in other joints (hip, elbow, foot, ankle, toes, wrist) after sports injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Jason; Dietz, Jeffrey

    2005-01-01

    Osteoarthritis of nonknee joints, although less common than knee osteoarthritis, remains a significant and disabling condition for many present and former athletes. These injuries can be caused by repeated loads or following a specific traumatic event. The resulting pain and loss of motion can limit function and ability. Arthroscopic techniques in many cases enable surgeons to symptomatically treat limitations of range of motion and pain, prolonging active careers. Joint replacement remains the ultimate solution for hip osteoarthritis, and may be a viable option in ankle osteoarthritis.

  14. Disparities in Post-Acute Rehabilitation Care for Joint Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freburger, Janet K.; Holmes, George M.; Ku, Li-Jung E.; Cutchin, Malcolm P.; Heatwole-Shank, Kendra; Edwards, Lloyd J.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To determine the extent to which demographic and geographic disparities exist in the use of post-acute rehabilitation care (PARC) for joint replacement. Methods Cross-sectional analysis of two years (2005–2006) of population-based hospital discharge data from 392 hospitals in four states (AZ, FL, NJ, WI). 164,875 individuals 45 years and older admitted to the hospital for a hip or knee joint replacement and who survived their inpatient stay were identified. Three dichotomous dependent variables were examined: 1) discharge to home vs. institution (i.e., skilled nursing facility (SNF) or inpatient rehabilitation facility (IRF)); 2) discharge to home with vs. without home health (HH); and 3) discharge to a SNF vs. IRF. Multilevel logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify demographic and geographic disparities in PARC use, controlling for illness severity/comorbidities, hospital characteristics, and PARC supply. Interactions among race, socioeconomic, and geographic variables were explored. Results Considering PARC as a continuum from more to less intensive care in regard to hours of rehabilitation/day (e.g., IRF→SNF→HH→no HH), the uninsured received less intensive care in all three models. Individuals on Medicaid and those of lower SES received less intensive care in the HH/no HH and SNF/IRF models. Individuals living in rural areas received less intensive care in the institution/home and HH/no HH models. The effect of race was modified by insurance and by state. In most instances minorities received less intensive care. PARC use varied by hospital. Conclusions Efforts to further understand the reasons behind these disparities and their effect on outcomes are needed. PMID:21485020

  15. The use of clinical analysis of movements in evaluation of motor functional status of patients after total hip replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romakina N.A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to estimate functional status of coxarthrosis in patients requiring total hip replacement of the two hip joints. Material and methods. The biomechanical examination of 94 patients with bilateral primary coxarthrosis before and after total hip replacement was performed using clinical stabilometric software complex. The ability to perceive the mechanical load during standing and walking was evaluated at different stages of the treatment. The difference between the samples was estimated with the use of Mann — Whitney U-test. The rank correlation of biomechanical parameters was measured by Spearman coefficient. Results. It was revealed that the most responsive indicators are the transfer period, the first and second periods of double support and the deviation of the center of pressure relative to the average position in the frontal plane. Conclusion. After surgical treatment there was observed some improvement: the-left-and-right-step asymmetry decrease, rhythm rate increase, improved ability to maintain body balance, jog reactions increase.

  16. Patient-reported outcome of hip resurfacing arthroplasty and standard total hip replacement after short-term follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Nina; Douw, Karla; Overgaard, Søren

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate patientreported outcome in terms of satisfaction in two study groups that had undergone hip resurfacing arthro-plasty (HRA) or total hip replacement (THR). The procedure consists of placing a hollow, mushroom-shaped metal cap over the femoral head while...

  17. Dislocation following total hip replacement: causes and cures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, P J

    2013-11-01

    Dislocation is one of the most common causes of patient and surgeon dissatisfaction following hip replacement and to treat it, the causes must first be understood. Patient factors include age greater than 70 years, medical comorbidities, female gender, ligamentous laxity, revision surgery, issues with the abductors, and patient education. Surgeon factors include the annual quantity of procedures and experience, the surgical approach, adequate restoration of femoral offset and leg length, component position, and soft-tissue or bony impingement. Implant factors include the design of the head and neck region, and so-called skirts on longer neck lengths. There should be offset choices available in order to restore soft-tissue tension. Lipped liners aid in gaining stability, yet if improperly placed may result in impingement and dislocation. Late dislocation may result from polyethylene wear, soft-tissue destruction, trochanteric or abductor disruption and weakness, or infection. Understanding the causes of hip dislocation facilitates prevention in a majority of instances. Proper pre-operative planning includes the identification of patients with a high offset in whom inadequate restoration of offset will reduce soft-tissue tension and abductor efficiency. Component position must be accurate to achieve stability without impingement. Finally, patient education cannot be over-emphasised, as most dislocations occur early, and are preventable with proper instructions.

  18. Resumption of car driving after total hip replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Ghulam; Waheed, Abdul

    2011-04-01

    To assess periods required for resuming car driving in 130 patients who had undergone total hip replacement (THR). 80 men and 50 women aged 39 to 80 years who had been driving automatic (n=49) or manual (n=81) cars in the previous 3 months and underwent unilateral primary THR of the right (n=85) or left (n=45) hip were recruited. Patients were advised to resume driving after 6 weeks if they felt comfortable to do so. 105 (81%) patients were able to resume driving at week 6 to 8; 67 (64%) had had a right THR and 65 (62%) were manual car drivers. 22 (17%) patients were able to do so at week 12. The remaining 3 (2%) patients were not confident to drive even at week 12. No patient reported deterioration in driving ability, whereas 48 (38%) felt a subjective improvement in their driving ability. The time to resume driving varies in different patients. The advice should be individualised, depending on the patient's recovery and confidence level.

  19. Complications after total hip replacement. Komplikationen nach Hueftgelenksendoprothesen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelbrecht, E.; Siegel, A. (Endo-Klinik, Hamburg (Germany, F.R.))

    1989-10-01

    Complications seen after long-term follow-up examinations of total hip replacement should be treated immediately and completely. In the past decade a considerable increase in revisions has been noted. Radiographic assessment may be regarded as an effective means in diagnosing prosthetic complications from the surgeon's point of view. Examples are given. The difficulties in radiographic assessment of complications after cementless implanation or cemented prostheses without contrast media are mentioned. Prosthesis-related complications, such as mechanical loosening, infection with and without loosening, fatigue fractures and wear, fractures of the femur or pelvis, dislocations and surgical failures, are illustrated, as are clinical courses with gross loss of bone stock after repeated surgery and delayed revisions. Complications not related to the prosthesis such as periarticular ossification, muscle deficiencies, and nervous and vascular lesions are also explained using examples. (orig.).

  20. Sexual Function before and after Total Hip Replacement: Narrative Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rotem Meiri, BPT

    2014-12-01

    Conclusions: The ability to move comfortably is included among the many physical and psychosocial factors influencing sexual functioning. Practitioners should be encouraged to question their THR patients about sexual concerns and to provide counseling related to physical and functional aspects of sexual activity. Rehabilitation that focuses specifically on activities of daily living of sex should include sexual counseling, therapeutic exercise, and advice regarding sexual positions. Rehabilitation provided by physical therapists may help decrease pain, and facilitate greater self‐awareness, self‐confidence, and improved body image, all of which encourage and affirm optimal sexual health. Meiri R, Rosenbaum TY, and Kalichman L. Sexual function before and after total hip replacement: Narrative review. Sex Med 2014;2:159–167.

  1. Surgical site infection following primary joint replacement at the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Total joint replacement is increasingly in use for treatment of orthopaedic ailments. Infection following joint replacement surgery can be devastating. Infection rates of 1-2.3% are reported in developed countries. In Nigeria proper theatre facilities, like controlled airflow systems and the use of body exhaust suits, ...

  2. Immediate results of treatment periprosthetic femoral fractures after hip replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Khominets

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Periprosthetic fractures are one of the most serious complications after hip replacement. Nineteen periprosthetic femoral fractures operated on during the period 2011-2015 were followed-up retrospectively. Periprosthetic fractures were classified according to the Vancouver classification. The functional results were evaluated using Harrison scale. Bone healing and implant stability were evaluated clinically, on plain radiographs and computed tomography. The periprosthetic fractures in all patients occurred in the postoperative period. Time from operation until fracture varied from 2 weeks to 11 years. A wedge-shaped cemented or cementless stems were implanted during the first surgery: Versys ET, Spotorno, CPT (Zimmer, США: cementless fixation was performed in 16 (84,2% patients, hybrid -in 2 (10,5% and cemented fixation - in 1 (5,3% patient. The fractures of greater trochanter were diagnosed in all patients with type A periprosthetic fractures. In type B1 periprosthetic fracture (8 patients open reduction, cerclage wiring and internal plate osteosynthesis were applied. Loosening stems in 3 patients with type B2 fractures were replaced with Wagner cementless revision component (Wagner SL Revision Stem. Angle-stable plate osteosynthesis and cerclage wiring were also performed. Closed reduction and internal minimal invasive plate osteosynthesis were performed in patients with type C periprosthetic fractures. Bone consolidation was achieved in 18 (94,7% patients, the average term was 14,3±5,2 weeks. The average Harris hip score in all patients 3 months after treatment was 64,9±16,7 points, and in 12 patients (63,2% after a year - 86,5±15,9. Femoral periprosthetic fractures require a specialized approach to choosing the treatment tactic depending on the fracture type and quality of bone tissue. It is necessary to evaluate the femoral component stability, especially in differential diagnosis of type B1 and B2 periprosthetic fractures. Computed

  3. Anesthesia for joint replacement surgery: Issues with coexisting diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P N Kakar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The first joint replacement surgery was performed in 1919. Since then, joint replacement surgery has undergone tremendous development in terms of surgical technique and anesthetic management. In this era of nuclear family and independent survival, physical mobility is of paramount importance. In recent years, with an increase in life expectancy, advances in geriatric medicine and better insurance coverage, the scenario of joint replacement surgery has changed significantly. Increasing number of young patients are undergoing joint replacement for pathologies like rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis. The diverse pathologies and wide range of patient population brings unique challenges for the anesthesiologist. This article deals with anesthetic issues in joint replacement surgery in patients with comorbidities.

  4. CT evaluation of native acetabular orientation and localization: sex-specific data comparison on 336 hip joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohtz, Stephan W; Sassy, Danny; Matziolis, Georg; Preininger, Bernd; Perka, Carsten; Hasart, Olaf

    2010-01-01

    The reorientation of the acetabular component in total hip replacement is currently carried out under consideration of the safe zone, respecting the best possible range of motion and is influenced by wear debris of different bearings. Is the preferred orientation a reconstruction of the native anatomy and are there sex-specific differences? On the basis of 168 CT datasets (72 women, 96 men) 336 native hip joints were analysed. The abduction and anteversion of the acetabulum as well as the location of the hip center were detected. As a reference the anterior pelvic plane was used. The 144 female hip joints showed a mean abduction of 53.0 degrees (SD 6.14 degrees ) and an anteversion of 24.63 degrees (SD 6.61 degrees ). The 192 male hip joints showed an abduction of 53.58 degrees (SD 6.68 degrees ) and an anteversion of 21.31 degrees (SD 6.17 degrees ). Significant differences were observed on comparison between the sexes in relation to the anteversion and the location of the hip center. Likewise, there was a significant correlation between the position of the hip center and the degree of anteversion. In total hip arthroplasty a reconstruction of the native acetabular orientation is not possible, gender specific characteristics should be considered.

  5. Factors influencing health-related quality of life after total hip replacement - a comparison of data from the Swedish and Danish hip arthroplasty registers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gordon, Max; Paulsen, Aksel; Overgaard, Søren

    2013-01-01

    There is an increasing focus on measuring patient-reported outcomes (PROs) as part of routine medical practice, particularly in fields such as joint replacement surgery where pain relief and improvement in health-related quality of life (HRQoL) are primary outcomes. Between-country comparisons of...... health-related quality of life (HRQoL) one year after total hip replacement (THR) surgery in Sweden and in Denmark.......There is an increasing focus on measuring patient-reported outcomes (PROs) as part of routine medical practice, particularly in fields such as joint replacement surgery where pain relief and improvement in health-related quality of life (HRQoL) are primary outcomes. Between-country comparisons...

  6. Principles of Human Joint Replacement Design and Clinical Application

    CERN Document Server

    Buechel, Frederick F

    2012-01-01

    Drs. Buechel, an orthopaedic surgeon, and Pappas, a professor of Mechanical Engineering, are the designers of several successful joint replacement systems. The most well-known of these is the pioneering LCS knee replacement. They have written this book for the users and designers of joint replacements. It is an attempt to convey to the reader the knowledge accumulated by the authors during their thirty five year effort on the development of replacement devices for the lower limb for the purpose of aiding the reader in their design and evaluation of joint replacement devices. The early chapters describe the engineering, scientific and medical principles needed for replacement joint evaluation. One must understand the nature and performance of the materials involved and their characteristics in vivo, i.e. the response of the body to implant materials. It is also essential to understand the response of the implants to applied loading and motion, particularly in the hostile physiological environment. A chapter de...

  7. Predictors of length of stay and patient satisfaction after hip and knee replacement surgery: fast-track experience in 712 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husted, Henrik; Holm, Gitte; Jacobsen, Steffen

    2008-01-01

    after total hip and knee replacement surgery. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Between September 2003 and December 2005, 712 consecutive, unselected patients (440 women) with a mean age of 69 (31-91) years were admitted for hip and knee replacement surgery at our specialized fast-track joint replacement unit......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Very few studies have focused on patient characteristics that influence length of stay (LOS) in fast-track total hip (THR) and knee arthroplasty (TKR). The aim of this prospective study was to identify patient characteristics associated with LOS and patient satisfaction...... characteristics that influence postoperative outcome, LOS, and patient satisfaction in our series of consecutive fast-track joint replacement patients, enabling further attention to be paid to certain aspects of surgery and rehabilitation....

  8. Computer Assisted Surgery and Current Trends in Orthopaedics Research and Total Joint Replacements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirouche, Farid

    2008-06-01

    Musculoskeletal research has brought about revolutionary changes in our ability to perform high precision surgery in joint replacement procedures. Recent advances in computer assisted surgery as well better materials have lead to reduced wear and greatly enhanced the quality of life of patients. The new surgical techniques to reduce the size of the incision and damage to underlying structures have been the primary advance toward this goal. These new techniques are known as MIS or Minimally Invasive Surgery. Total hip and knee Arthoplasties are at all time high reaching 1.2 million surgeries per year in the USA. Primary joint failures are usually due to osteoarthristis, rheumatoid arthritis, osteocronis and other inflammatory arthritis conditions. The methods for THR and TKA are critical to initial stability and longevity of the prostheses. This research aims at understanding the fundamental mechanics of the joint Arthoplasty and providing an insight into current challenges in patient specific fitting, fixing, and stability. Both experimental and analytical work will be presented. We will examine Cementless total hip arthroplasty success in the last 10 years and how computer assisted navigation is playing in the follow up studies. Cementless total hip arthroplasty attains permanent fixation by the ingrowth of bone into a porous coated surface. Loosening of an ingrown total hip arthroplasty occurs as a result of osteolysis of the periprosthetic bone and degradation of the bone prosthetic interface. The osteolytic process occurs as a result of polyethylene wear particles produced by the metal polyethylene articulation of the prosthesis. The total hip arthroplasty is a congruent joint and the submicron wear particles produced are phagocytized by macrophages initiating an inflammatory cascade. This cascade produces cytokines ultimately implicated in osteolysis. Resulting bone loss both on the acetabular and femoral sides eventually leads to component instability. As

  9. A longitudinal study of quality of life and functional status in total hip and total knee replacement patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandzuk, Lynda L; McMillan, Diana E; Bohm, Eric R

    2015-05-01

    Primary total hip and primary total knee surgeries are commonly performed to improve patients' quality of life and functional status. This longitudinal retrospective study (N = 851) examined self-reported quality of life and functional status over the preoperative and postoperative periods: 12 months prior to surgery, one month prior to surgery and 12 months following surgery. A linear mixed effects model was used to analyze the changes in quality of life and functional status over the sampling period. Patients in the convenience sample reported improvements in quality of life and functional status utilizing the SF-12 and Oxford Hip and Oxford Knee, although differences were noted by procedure and gender. Total hip patients tended to demonstrate greater improvement than total knee patients and males reported higher levels of physical and mental quality of life as well as functional status when compared to females. Of particular note was that mental health scores were consistently lower in both total hip and total knee replacement patients across the perioperative period and up to one year postoperative. This study identifies an opportunity for health care providers to proactively address the mental health of total hip and total knee replacement patients throughout their joint replacement trajectory. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Exercise recommendations after total joint replacement: a review of the current literature and proposal of scientifically based guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuster, Markus S

    2002-01-01

    This article presents a literature review of the current recommendations regarding sports after total joint replacement and also suggests scientifically based guidelines. Patients should be encouraged to remain physically active for general health and also for the quality of their bone. There is evidence that increased bone quality will improve prosthesis fixation and decrease the incidence of early loosening. To recommend a certain activity after total knee or hip replacement, factors such as wear, joint load, intensity and the type of prosthesis must be taken into account for each patient and sport. It has been shown that the reduction of wear is one of the main factors in improving long-term results after total joint replacement. Wear is dependent on the load, the number of steps and the material properties of total joint replacements. The most important question is, whether a specific activity is performed for exercise to obtain and maintain physical fitness or whether an activity is recreational only. To maintain physical fitness an endurance activity will be performed several times per week with high intensity. Since load will influence the amount of wear exponentially, only activities with low joint loads such as swimming, cycling or possibly power walking should be recommended. If an activity is carried out on a low intensity and therefore recreational base, activities with higher joint loads such as skiing or hiking can also be performed. It is unwise to start technically demanding activities after total joint replacement, as the joint loads and the risk for injuries are generally higher for these activities in unskilled individuals. Finally, it is important to distinguish between suitable activities following total knee and total hip replacement. To recommend suitable physical activities after total knee replacement, it is important to consider both the load and the knee flexion angle of the peak load, while for total hip replacement, which involves a

  11. Neurologic complications of shoulder joint replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Craig M

    2017-07-05

    Little attention has been given to neurologic complications after shoulder joint replacement (SJR). Previously thought to occur infrequently, it is likely that many are not clinically recognized, and they can result in postoperative morbidity and impair the patient's recovery. The purpose of this study was to document the prevalence of nerve complications after SJR, to identify the nerves involved, and to define patient outcomes. This was a retrospective review of 211 SJRs in 202 patients during a 5-year period were included, with 89 male and 122 female patients at an average age of 70 years. All patients underwent a comprehensive analysis of any postoperative nerve complication, including onset, duration, investigation, treatment, and symptom resolution. Of the 211 SJR procedures, 44 were identified as having sustained a nerve complication (20.9%), with 36 female (81.8%) and 8 male patients (18.2%). Reverse SJR was associated with the highest number of nerve complications. The median nerve (25 patients) and musculocutaneous nerve (8 patients) were most commonly involved. Most nerve complications were transient and resolved within 6 months. Permanent sequelae and injuries that required secondary surgical intervention were rare. The occurrence of nerve complications after SJR is common, but almost all will fully recover. Most are transient neurapraxias involving the lateral cord of the brachial plexus. Women are more likely to be affected, as are patients who have undergone prior surgery to the affected shoulder. Most are likely to be the result of excessive traction or direct injury to the nerves during glenoid exposure. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. USING TRABECULAR METAL AUGMENTS FOR TOTAL HIP REPLACEMENT IN PATIENTS AFTER ACETABULAR FRACTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Tikhilov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors presented the experience of treatment of two patients with hip arthritis after acetabular fracture. Both patients were treated with total hip replacement. During the operation, to manage posterior-superior bone defects of the acetabulum, augments of trabecular metal were used. Pain and limitation of motions in hip were indications for operative treatment. After a year of follow up there was no pain in hip; also recovery of motion and improved quality of life were observed.

  13. Development of quality of care indicators for patients undergoing total hip or total knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SooHoo, N F; Lieberman, J R; Farng, E; Park, S; Jain, S; Ko, C Y

    2011-02-01

    The objective of this study was to develop evidence-based quality indicators to measure key aspects of care that can be targeted to decrease variations in complication rates between surgeons performing total joint replacement. RAND/University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) modified-Delphi expert panel method. To accomplish this objective, a proposed set of quality of care indicators was developed through a comprehensive literature search and structured interviews with expert clinicians. An expert panel of orthopaedic surgeons was then convened to rate the validity of these quality indicators using the RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method. Indicators were classified as valid by the panel based on the median panel rating and the amount of dispersion of panel ratings. There were 101 candidate indicators of quality identified in the six domains of preoperative processes of care, intraoperative processes, postoperative processes, implant selection and the use of new technology, privileging of hospitals and surgeons, and outcomes and comorbidity assessment. A total of 68 of the 101 indicators were rated as valid with statistical agreement. This study identifies measures of structure, process and outcome rated as valid quality indicators for hip and knee replacement. This project provides tools to measure and improve quality of care for patients undergoing total joint replacement.

  14. Restriction in participation in leisure activities after joint replacement: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylde, Vikki; Livesey, Christine; Blom, Ashley W

    2012-03-01

    currently, assessment of outcomes after joint replacement is predominantly centred on impairment and activity limitation (e.g. walking), with little consideration of participation restriction. structured telephone interviews about participation in leisure activities were conducted with 56 total hip replacement (THR) and 60 total knee replacement (TKR) patients before and 1 year after joint replacement. before surgery, THR patients participated in 209 leisure activities, with an average of four leisure activities per person. TKR patients participated in 171 leisure activities, with an average of three leisure activities per person. The leisure activities were coded into four categories: sports/exercise, hobbies, social activities and holidays. Between 89 and 95% of leisure activities were rated as important by THR and TKR patients prior to surgery. Before surgery, THR patients rated 82% of leisure activities as difficult to perform because of joint problems, which decreased to 25% of leisure activities by 1-year after surgery. TKR patients rated 86% of leisure activities as difficult to perform because of joint problems, which decreased to 32% after surgery. this research highlights that participation in leisure activities is important to patients undergoing joint replacement, but that approximately a quarter of patients are unable to perform their valued leisure activities after surgery.

  15. Community reintegration following a total joint replacement: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stergiou-Kita, Mary; Grigorovich, Alisa

    2014-06-01

    To examine community reintegration following a hip or knee total joint replacement (TJR) from the perspective of rehabilitation clients. A phenomenological frame of reference guided the present study. Ten participants who received inpatient rehabilitation completed semi-structured qualitative interviews to explore their experiences with reintegrating back into their chosen communities and the meanings that they ascribed to their reintegration. Interview data were analysed using thematic analysis. Demographic data, and information regarding participants' living situation and supports were extracted from existing databases and used to characterize the sample. Participants revealed that reintegration after a TJR encompassed two key elements of meaning: i) engagement in meaningful activities; and ii) satisfaction levels. Additionally, the following five factors were identified as facilitators or barriers to community reintegration following a TJR: i) ongoing preparation and education; ii) confounding health issues; iii) driving and transportation; iv) personal facilitators; v) access to supports from professionals, family and friends, and community programmes. The present study highlights the significance of engaging in meaningful activities and being satisfied in one's level of engagement to achieving a sense of community reintegration following a TJR. This suggests that reintegration post-TJR has broader meanings than just improvements in functional abilities. Practitioners are encouraged to inquire about patients' meaningful activities, support their preparedness throughout the rehabilitation process, to identify confounding health issues that may limit reintegration, consider patients' fears and anxieties and establish supports to enhance their feelings of self-efficacy and abilities to cope following a TJR. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. THA following deformities due to congenital dislocation of the hip joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macheras, George A; Koutsostathis, Stefanos D; Lepetsos, Panagiotis; Anastasopoulos, Panagiotis P; Galanakos, Spyridon; Papadakis, Stamatios A

    2014-10-02

    Total hip replacement is the treatment of choice for the patient suffering from end-stage hip osteoarthritis. Excellent long-term results have been published. In the presence of deformities due to congenital hip dislocation, total hip replacement is, in most of the cases, a difficult task, since the technique of performing such an operation is demanding and the results could vary. This paper presents our experience and preferred strategies focusing on challenges and surgical techniques associated with reconstructing the dysplastic hip.

  17. Accelerated Degenerative Joint Disease After Staged Hip Arthroscopy and Periacetabular Osteotomy in a Patient with Hip Dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guss, Michael; Youm, Thomas

    2017-05-01

    Hip dysplasia, when significant, is effectively treated with periacetabular osteotomy. There have been good results reported with hip arthroscopy when dysplasia is mild. However, when dysplasia is significant, hip arthroscopy with labral repair alone has led to poor results and even rapid decline to end stage arthritis. Staged hip arthroscopy and periacetabular osteotomy would potentially treat the labral lesion and correct the underlying bony abnormality that resulted in the labral pathology. Such a staged treatment plan should help prevent progression to degenerative joint disease. We report a case of a 33-year-old woman who presented with left hip pain and was diagnosed with mild hip dysplasia and a labral tear. She underwent staged hip arthroscopy and labral repair followed by periacetabular osteotomy 2 weeks later. Three and a half months after surgery she developed constant pain and began limping at 5 months. Radiographs showed progression to severe degenerative joint disease. The patient was indicated for total hip arthroplasty.

  18. In vivo hip joint contact distribution and bony impingement in normal and dysplastic human hips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Keisuke; Sakai, Takashi; Koyanagi, Junichiro; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Sugamoto, Kazuomi

    2013-10-01

    Our objectives were to clarify the 3D articular contact areas of the in vivo normal hip joint and acetabular dysplasia during specific positions using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), voxel-based registration, and proximity mapping. Forty-two normal and 24 dysplastic hips were examined. MRI was performed at four positions: neutral; 45° flexion; 15° extension; and the Patrick position. Femur and pelvis bone models were reconstructed at the neutral position and superimposed over the images of each different position using voxel-based registration. The inferred cartilage contact and bony impingement were investigated using proximity mapping. The femoral head translated in the anterior or posteroinferior, anterosuperior, and posteroinferior direction from neutral to 45° flexion, 15° extension, and the Patrick position, respectively. Multiple regression analyses showed age, femoral head sphericity, and acetabular sphericity to be associated with higher hip instability. The present technique using subject-specific models revealed the in vivo hip joint contact area in a population of healthy individuals and dysplastic patients without radioactive exposure. These results can be used for analyzing disease progression in the dysplastic hip and pathogenesis of acetabular labral tear. Copyright © 2013 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  19. Total hip replacement for the treatment of atraumatic slipped femoral capital epiphysis in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemmill, T J; Pink, J; Clarke, S P; McKee, W M

    2012-08-01

    To evaluate dogs diagnosed with slipped femoral capital epiphysis which were treated by total hip replacement. Clinical and radiographic records of consecutive cases of slipped femoral capital epiphysis treated by total hip replacement were reviewed. Longer-term follow-up was by owner questionnaire. Fifteen cases were identified; 14 were affected unilaterally, 1 bilaterally. Median age at presentation was 13 months (range 6 to 30); median weight was 35 kg (range 10 to 66). Radiographically, proximal femoral sclerosis was evident in 13 of 16 hips. Thirteen hybrid and three cemented total hip replacements were performed. One dog had a stem complication five months postoperatively necessitating explantation. All other total hip replacements remained functional. At four weeks postoperatively lameness and pain scores were improved in all cases. Fourteen total hip replacements were examined after three months. Lameness was mild in 2 limbs and absent in 12; pain on manipulation was not apparent in any case. Significant radiographic complications were not encountered. Telephone questionnaires were performed for 14 cases (15 total hip replacements) at a median of 22 months postoperatively (range 8 to 45). Lameness was reportedly absent for 12 limbs and intermittent in 3. All owners felt that their dogs' quality of life was good. Total hip replacement can be a successful technique to treat slipped femoral capital epiphysis. © 2012 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  20. Eleven-year results of the ABG I hip replacement

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, W Y; Muddu, B. N.

    2006-01-01

    The ABG I uncemented hip prosthesis has demonstrated an unacceptably high failure rate and poor functional outcome in our patients. A prospective review was performed of 38 implanted hips with a mean follow-up of 11 years. Sixteen hips have been revised or are candidates for revision hip surgery, due principally to polyethylene wear and pelvic osteolysis. Contributing factors were likely to be the poor wear characteristics of the polyethylene liners—which were gamma irradiated in air—and the ...

  1. [Vascular injuries in joint replacement surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novotný, K; Pádr, R; Landor, I; Sosna, A

    2011-01-01

    Iatrogenic injuries to blood vessels in joint replacement surgery are rare events that occur as few per thousand. However, their sequelae are serious. The patient may either bleed to death, because vascular injury is not obvious and therefore difficult to diagnose, or lose the limb due to ischaemia. The highest risk of vascular injury is associated with repeat surgery and loosening of the acetabular component. We distinguish sharp and blunt force injuries. The former are caused by implants, sharp instruments, bone fragments or bone cement debris. The latter arise from stretching over a part of implanted material. Bleeding can be inapparent or apparent. Inapparent bleeding is difficult to diagnose and is recognized from the dynamics of blood losses. Haemodynamic instability or, in a worse case, even hypovolaemic shock may be the only signs of bleeding. Occlusion of an artery is manifested by limb ischaemia. The seriousness and progression of ischaemia depends on the rate of arterial occlusion, potential pathways for collateral circulation and the degree of atherosclerotic vascular disease. The patient with conduction anaesthesia does not feel pain and therefore the diagnosis must primarily be based on arterial pulsation in the limb and its skin colour. A pseudoaneurysm can develop due to a partially weakened vascular wall and its rupture is a life-threatening complication. Its presence is recognized as a pulsating mass in the groin. An arterio- venous fistula which arises from traumatic communication between the two vessels may lead to cardiac failure. The diagnosis is based on examination by sonography and digital subtraction angiography. The results of CT angiography and MR angiography are difficult to evaluate because of the presence of metal implants. In apparent bleeding it is sometimes difficult to locate the source. It is recommended to perform digital compression and gain access to the vessels from the extraperitoneal approach. When an expanding haematoma or

  2. Total Hip Replacement as a Treatment Option for Osteoarthritis of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As the age of the population increases, total hip arthroplasty as a treatment option for osteoarthritis will assume greater significance. The aim of this study is to document the problems encountered with total hip arthroplasty in treating patients with osfeoarthrifis ofthe hip at the National Orthropaedic Hospital, Dala Kanso ...

  3. Synthetic Versus Tissue-Engineered Implants for Joint Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duncan E. T. Shepherd

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Human synovial joints are remarkable as they can last for a lifetime. However, they can be affected by disease that may lead to destruction of the joint surface. The most common treatment in the advanced stages of joint disease is artificial joint replacement, where the diseased synovial joint is replaced with an artificial implant made from synthetic materials, such as metals and polymers. A new technique for repairing diseased synovial joints is tissue engineering where cells are used to grow replacement tissue. This paper explores the relative merits of synthetic and tissue-engineered implants, using joint replacement as an example. Synthetic joint replacement is a well-established procedure with the advantages of early mobilisation, pain relief and high patient satisfaction. However, synthetic implants are not natural tissues; they can cause adverse reactions to the body and there could be a mismatch in mechanical properties compared to natural tissues. Tissue-engineered implants offer great potential and have major advantages over synthetic implants as they are natural tissue, which should ensure that they are totally biocompatible, have the correct mechanical properties and integrate well with the existing tissue. However, there are still many limitations to be addressed in tissue engineering such as scaling up for production, bioreactor design, appropriate regulation and the potential for disease to attack the new tissue-engineered implant.

  4. Finite element analysis of artificial hip joint movement during human activities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saputra, Eko; Budiwan, I.; Jamari, Jamari; van der Heide, Emile

    2014-01-01

    The range of motion of artificial hip joint during human activities, measured from the postoperative total hip arthroplasty patients, has been reported previously. There were two human activities discussed, i.e. Western-style and Japanese-style. This paper analyzes the hip joint movement during

  5. Periprosthetic microvasculature in loosening of total hip replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santavirta, S; Ceponis, A; Solovieva, S A; Hurri, H; Jin, J; Takagi, M; Suda, A; Konttinen, Y T

    1996-01-01

    This study was performed to quantitate vascularity in periprosthetic tissues of loose total hip replacements (THRs), because most likely revascularization and endothelial cells are important for implant osseointegration and loosening. Interface and pseudocapsular tissue samples obtained from loose THRs were stained with an immunohistochemical labelling (ABC technique) for von Willebrand factor. Non-inflammatory synovial samples served as controls. The results were quantitated by morphometry using the Kontron image analysis system. Evaluation of the mean endothelial index (EI; positively stained area micron/mm2 of tissue) revealed that in the control samples synovium was better vascularized than was the case in the cellular areas of the periprosthetic pseudocapsule (P = 0.0008) and interface (P = 0.0004) of loose THRs. There was no significant difference between mean EI of cellular areas in the interface and that of the pseudocapsule (P = 0.24). In the interface the vascularity was irregular. Vascular injury and decreased blood supply seem to occur at the implant-host interface, which may be one of the reasons for insufficient implant osseointegration and loosening.

  6. Acupuncture provides short-term pain relief for patients in a total joint replacement program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespin, Daniel J; Griffin, Kristen H; Johnson, Jill R; Miller, Cynthia; Finch, Michael D; Rivard, Rachael L; Anseth, Scott; Dusek, Jeffery A

    2015-06-01

    Given the risks of opioid medications, nonpharmacological strategies should be considered for total joint replacement patients. We investigated acupuncture as an adjunct therapy for postsurgical pain management in a total joint replacement program by examining which total hip and knee replacement patients elected to receive acupuncture and the effect of acupuncture on short-term pain. A total joint replacement program using fast-track physiotherapy offered elective postsurgical acupuncture to all patients, at no additional cost, as an adjunct therapy to opioids for pain management. The Joint Replacement Center at Abbott Northwestern Hospital, a 630-bed teaching and specialty hospital in Minneapolis, Minnesota from 2010 to 2012. Our sample included 2,500 admissions of total hip (THR) and total knee replacement (TKR) patients. Self-reported pain was assessed before and after acupuncture using a 0-10 scale and categorized as none/mild (0-4) and moderate/severe pain (5-10). Seventy-five percent of admissions included acupuncture. Women (Odds Ratio: 1.48, 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.22, 1.81) had higher odds of receiving acupuncture compared to men, and nonwhite patients (Odds Ratio: 0.55, 95% CI: 0.39, 0.78) had lower odds of receiving acupuncture compared to white patients. Average short-term pain reduction was 1.91 points (95% CI: 1.83, 1.99), a 45% reduction from the mean prepain score. Forty-one percent of patients reported moderate/severe pain prior to receiving acupuncture, while only 15% indicated moderate/severe pain after acupuncture. Acupuncture may be a viable adjunct to pharmacological approaches for pain management after THR or TKR. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Redesigning a joint replacement program using Lean Six Sigma in a Veterans Affairs hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayed, Benjamin; Black, Stephen; Daggy, Joanne; Munshi, Imtiaz A

    2013-11-01

    In April 2009, an analysis of joint replacement surgical procedures at the Richard L. Roudebush Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Indianapolis, Indiana, revealed that total hip and knee replacements incurred $1.4 million in non-Veterans Affairs (VA) care costs with an average length of stay of 6.1 days during fiscal year 2008. The Joint Replacement Program system redesign project was initiated following the Vision-Analysis-Team-Aim-Map-Measure-Change-Sustain (VA-TAMMCS) model to increase efficiency, decrease length of stay, and reduce non-VA care costs. To determine the effectiveness of Lean Six Sigma process improvement methods applied in a VA hospital. Perioperative processes for patients undergoing total joint replacement were redesigned following the VA-TAMMCS model--the VA's official, branded method of Lean Six Sigma process improvement. A multidisciplinary team including the orthopedic surgeons, frontline staff, and executive management identified waste in the current processes and initiated changes to reduce waste and increase efficiency. Data collection included a 1-year baseline period and a 20-month sustainment period. The primary endpoint was length of stay; a secondary analysis considered non-VA care cost reductions. Length of stay decreased 36% overall, decreasing from 5.3 days during the preproject period to 3.4 days during the 20-month sustainment period (P Six Sigma process improvement initiatives in a surgical practice, producing a 36% sustained reduction in length of stay and completely eliminating non-VA care for total hip and knee replacements while increasing total joint replacement volume at this medical center.

  8. Comprehensive Care For Joint Replacement Model - Provider Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement Model - provider data. This data set includes provider data for two quality measures tracked during an episode of care:...

  9. Effect of arm swinging on lumbar spine and hip joint forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelini, Lorenza; Damm, Philipp; Zander, Thomas; Arshad, Rizwan; Di Puccio, Francesca; Schmidt, Hendrik

    2017-09-14

    During level walking, arm swing plays a key role in improving dynamic stability. In vivo investigations with a telemeterized vertebral body replacement showed that spinal loads can be affected by differences in arm positions during sitting and standing. However, little is known about how arm swing could influence the lumbar spine and hip joint forces and motions during walking. The present study aims to provide better understanding of the contribution of the upper limbs to human gait, investigating ranges of motion and joint reaction forces. A three-dimensional motion analysis was carried out via a motion capturing system on six healthy males and five patients with hip instrumented implant. Each subject performed walking with different arm swing amplitudes (small, normal, and large) and arm positions (bound to the body, and folded across the chest). The motion data were imported in a commercial musculoskeletal analysis software for kinematic and inverse dynamic investigation. The range of motion of the thorax with respect to the pelvis and of the pelvis with respect to the ground in the transversal plane were significantly associated with arm position and swing amplitude during gait. The hip external-internal rotation range of motion statistically varied only for non-dominant limb. Unlike hip joint reaction forces, predicted peak spinal loads at T12-L1 and L5-S1 showed significant differences at approximately the time of contralateral toe off and contralateral heel strike. Therefore, arm position and swing amplitude have a relevant effect on kinematic variables and spinal loads, but not on hip loads during walking. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Hip and pelvis diseases on lumbar AP radiographs including both hip joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Hyun Soo; Juhng, Seon Kwan; Kim, Eun A; Kim, Jeong Ho; Song, Ha Heon; Shim, Dae Moo [Wonkwang University School of Medicine, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-12-01

    To determine the frequency of disease, and to evaluate the methods used for lumbar spine radiography in Korea. Sixty university and training hospitals were randomly selected and asked to describe the projections, film size and radiographic techniques employed for routine radiography in patients with suspected disease of the lumbar spine. Plain radiographs of 1215 patients, taken using 14x17 inch film and depicting both hip joints and the lumbar region, were analysed between March 1999 and February 2000. In 15 patients (1.2%), the radiographs revealed hip or pelvic lesion, confirmed as follows: avascular necrosis of the femoral head (n=11, with bilateral lesion in four cases); sustained ankylosing spondylitis (n=2); acetabular dysplasia (n=1); and insufficiency fracture of the pubic rami secondary to osteoporosis (n=1). In 11 or the 20 hospitals which responded, 14{sup x}17{sup f}ilm was being used for lumbar radiography, while in the other nine, film size was smaller. Plain radiography of the lumbar spine including both hip joints, may be a useful way to simultaneously evaluate lesions not only of the lumbar spine but also of the hip and/or pelvis.

  11. The painful bone marrow edema syndrome of the hip joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Siegfried

    2005-02-01

    In this issue of the WKW, Aigner et al have published that, for the first time, a conservative approach with iloprost has shown to be equally successful as the well-documented core decompression surgical approach in patients with BMES of the hip joint. The BME pattern on MR-imaging of the hip joint represents a common but unspecific finding, which may be associated with several diseases requiring different therapeutic strategies (Table 1). It is still controversial, whether BMES of the hip represents a distinct self-limiting disease also known as transient osteoporosis, transient marrow edema, or algodystrophy, or merely reflects a subtype of ON. Since prognosis and therapeutic consequences vary significantly, differential diagnosis between BMES, CRPS and ON is of clinical interest (Table 2). Both, BMES and ON show similar ON risk factors and a male prevalence, while classical CRPS has a history of trauma and a prevalence among females. Clinical presentation of BMES and ON is similar with typical mechanical pain and prevalence of the hip joint. In contrast, classical CRPS shows a diffuse and burning pain in combination with trophic and vasomotor signs, mainly in the hands and feet. Imaging patterns of BMES are more diffuse, across the entire femoral head, while focal and subchondral in ON. In both, the patterns are limited to the femoral head. In contrast to classical CRPS, the imaging changes are located in all periarticular bones, and the soft tissues are always affected. The histological bone marrow changes are similar in all three diseases, but with abundant new bone formation in BMES and CRPS, whereas in ON only limited new bone formation surrounds the focal necrosis with a sclerotic rim. Protected weight-bearing and treatment with iloprost for BMES, but operative treatment for ON, and a sophisticated physiotherapy for CRPS in combination with iloprost are the preferred treatment strategies in our institution.

  12. Hydroxyapatite crystal deposition causing rapidly destructive arthropathy of the hip joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Hyuk Yang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Destructive arthropathy of the hip joint can be attributed to various etiologies like rheumatoid arthritis, aseptic necrosis of the femur head, Charcot′s joint, subacute septic arthritis, and tubercular arthritis. A disease that results in much rapid destruction of the hip joint and is not associated with clinical syndrome of above mentioned disease has been reported way back in 1970. However, no evidence-based study has been published to support hydroxyapatite (HA crystals as a probable cause of rapidly destructive arthropathy of the hip joint. We report a case with microscopic and biochemical confirmation of HA crystal deposition causing destructive arthropathy of the hip joint.

  13. The role of MRI in early ankylosing spondylitis: emphasis on the sacroiliac and hip joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chul Min; Kang, Moo Song; Kim, Chang Soo; Chung, Chun Phil [Maryknoll Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-05-15

    In clinically suspected ankylosing spondylitis of sacroiliac (SIJ) and hip joints with normal or minimal secondary bone change in simple X-ray films, we evaluated the role of MRI in sacroiliac and hip joints. Authors evaluated 11 cases (36 joints; SIJ 14 hip 22) confirmed as ankylosing spondylitis by clinical, laboratory, and radiologic findings, and compared the detectability of involvement of joints by simple X-ray film and MRI. Authors analysed MR findings for the presence of pannus and its signal intensities (SI), change of articular cartilage, bony erosion and sclerosis, subchondral bone cysts, osteophytosis, bone marrow edema, joint effusion, adjacent soft tissue change, and contrast enhancement of pannus. MRI detected not only 20 joints (SIJ 11, hip 9) detected in simple X-ray, but also additional 7 joints (SIJ 3, hip 4). MRI depicted simultaneous involvement of SIJ and hip joints in 5 of 11 cases (SIJ 10 joints, hip 9 joints), and bilateral involvement of SIJ and hip joints in 4 among the 5 cases. MRI also demonstrated pannus, which were not detected in conventional films, as intermediate SI on T1WI and high SI on T2WI, in all 27 joints (SIJ 14, hip 13). Gd-DTPA enhanced T1WI revealed enhancement of pannus in 7 cases (17 joints). MRI was a valuable modality in evaluation of clinically suspected ankylosing spondylitis of SIJ or hip joints with normal or minimal secondary bone change in simple X-ray. Simultaneous evaluation of SIJ and hip joints is suggested in clinically suspected ankylosing spondylitis or other joint diseases.

  14. Total hip replacement surgery in Ethiopia | Gokcen | East and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The hip implant used was a Stryker Omnfit Uncemented HA-coated prosthesis. The Visual Analog Scale (VAS) for pain and the Modified Oxford Hip Score were used to assess outcomes. Variables recorded for each patient included sociodemographic information, diagnosis, comorbidity, surgical approach, duration of ...

  15. Prevention of heterotopic ossification after total hip replacement with NSAIDs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fijn, R; Koorevaar, RT; Brouwers, JRBJ

    Introduction: non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs ( NSAIDs) and prophylactic radiotherapy can prevent ectopic bone formation around the hip after total hip arthroplasty. Methods: We retrieved from Medline, Embase and the Cochrane Register ( clinical) trials and other relevant literature on the

  16. Increasing risk of prosthetic joint infection after total hip arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dale, Håvard; Fenstad, Anne M; Hallan, Geir

    2012-01-01

    of primary surgery, and most notably in the first 3 months. The risk of revision due to infection increased in all 4 countries. Risk factors for revision due to infection were male sex, hybrid fixation, cement without antibiotics, and THA performed due to inflammatory disease, hip fracture, or femoral head......Background and purpose The risk of revision due to infection after primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) has been reported to be increasing in Norway. We investigated whether this increase is a common feature in the Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden). Materials and methods...... explain this increase. We believe that there has been an actual increase in the incidence of prosthetic joint infections after THA....

  17. Progressive hip joint subluxation in Saul-Wilson syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinen, Yasutsugu; Kaneshi, Takuya; Kamiya, Takeshi; Hata, Kenichiro; Nishimura, Gen; Kaname, Tadashi

    2015-11-01

    Saul-Wilson syndrome (SWS) is a rare congenital skeletal syndrome characterized by postnatal onset of short stature, relative microcephaly, frontal bossing, prominent eyes with shallow orbits, midface hypoplasia, cataract, and generalized skeletal changes, including spondylar dysplasia, overtubulation of the long bones with metaphyseal flaring and megaepiphyses, coxa valga, elbow deformity, and brachydactyly. We describe a boy with the overall clinical and radiological features fitting the characteristics of SWS, although cataract, elbow deformity, and overt brachydactyly were not seen. He presented with painful hip joint due to hip subluxation in late childhood, which exacerbated with age and ultimately, required surgical intervention. Awareness of this orthopedic complication in SWS is essential in the management of patients with SWS. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. A Report Of Two Cases Of Uncemented Total Hip Replacement In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This is a report of two sickle cell patients (HbSS) with advanced osteoarthritis of the right hip. The patients were in Ficat and Arlet\\'s stage 3 and 4 respectively. Both were females aged 23 and 46 years and they had uncemented hydroxyapatite coated omnifit (Stryker Howmedica Osteonics) total hip prosthetic replacement.

  19. FACTS: Fully Automatic CT Segmentation of a Hip Joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Chengwen; Chen, Cheng; Liu, Li; Zheng, Guoyan

    2015-05-01

    Extraction of surface models of a hip joint from CT data is a pre-requisite step for computer assisted diagnosis and planning (CADP) of periacetabular osteotomy (PAO). Most of existing CADP systems are based on manual segmentation, which is time-consuming and hard to achieve reproducible results. In this paper, we present a Fully Automatic CT Segmentation (FACTS) approach to simultaneously extract both pelvic and femoral models. Our approach works by combining fast random forest (RF) regression based landmark detection, multi-atlas based segmentation, with articulated statistical shape model (aSSM) based fitting. The two fundamental contributions of our approach are: (1) an improved fast Gaussian transform (IFGT) is used within the RF regression framework for a fast and accurate landmark detection, which then allows for a fully automatic initialization of the multi-atlas based segmentation; and (2) aSSM based fitting is used to preserve hip joint structure and to avoid penetration between the pelvic and femoral models. Taking manual segmentation as the ground truth, we evaluated the present approach on 30 hip CT images (60 hips) with a 6-fold cross validation. When the present approach was compared to manual segmentation, a mean segmentation accuracy of 0.40, 0.36, and 0.36 mm was found for the pelvis, the left proximal femur, and the right proximal femur, respectively. When the models derived from both segmentations were used to compute the PAO diagnosis parameters, a difference of 2.0 ± 1.5°, 2.1 ± 1.6°, and 3.5 ± 2.3% were found for anteversion, inclination, and acetabular coverage, respectively. The achieved accuracy is regarded as clinically accurate enough for our target applications.

  20. Effect of preoperative exercise on postoperative mobility in obese total joint replacement patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Claire E; Bono, James V; Ward, Daniel M; Barry, Marilyn T; Doren, Janice; McNinch, Amanda

    2010-09-07

    There has been a significant increase in obesity in the United States over the past 20 years. Reports in the literature identify the association of obesity-related osteoarthritis and the likelihood of future total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in this patient population. However, little is known about the effect of preoperative exercise on immediate postoperative mobility and discharge disposition in obese total joint replacement patients. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of preoperative exercise in the obese total joint replacement patient on early postoperative mobility and discharge disposition. We retrospectively reviewed a consecutive series of patients with a body mass index (BMI) ≥30 kg/m(2) who underwent primary total joint replacement surgery from June 2005 through October 2005 at 1 institution. Two hundred seven patients met the inclusion criteria. Sixty-five patients performed self-reported preoperative exercise, defined as physical activity deemed above and beyond that of activities of daily living. Fewer exercise patients, 6.8%, required the assistance of ≥2 caregivers for mobility on postoperative day 1 vs 17.4% for nonexercisers. Fifty-four percent of patients participating in preoperative exercise were discharged home vs 46% who did not participate in exercise. A preoperative exercise program can improve postoperative functional mobility and increase the likelihood of discharge home in total joint replacement patients with a BMI of ≥30 kg/m(2). Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. Computer tomography prototyping and virtual procedure simulation in difficult cases of hip replacement surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parchi, Paolo Domenico; Ferrari, Vincenzo; Piolanti, Nicola; Andreani, Lorenzo; Condino, Sara; Evangelisti, Gisberto; Lisanti, Michele

    2013-09-01

    Each year approximately 1 million total hip replacements (THR) are performed worldwide. A percentage of failure due to surgical approach and imprecise implant placement still exists. These result in several serious complications. We propose an approach to plan, to simulate, and to assist prosthesis implantation for difficult cases of THR based on 3-D virtual models, generated by segmenting patients' CT images, 3-D solid models, obtained by rapid prototyping (RP), and virtual procedure simulation. We carried out 8 THR with the aid of 3-D reconstruction and RP. After each procedure a questionnaire was submitted to the surgeon to assess the perceived added value of the technology. In all cases, the surgeon evaluated the 3-D model as useful in order to perform the planning. The clinical results showed a mean increase in the Harris Hip Score of about 42.5 points. The mean time of prototyping was 7.3 hours, (min 3.5 hours, max 9.3 hours). The mean surgery time was 65 minutes (min 50 minutes, max 88 minutes). Our study suggests that meticulous preoperative planning is necessary in front of a great aberration of the joint and in absence of normal anatomical landmarks, CT scan is mandatory, and 3-D reconstruction with solid model is useful.

  2. Micro total hip replacement for dogs and cats: surgical technique and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liska, William D

    2010-10-01

    To describe the surgical technique for the micro total hip replacement (Micro THR) system and report clinical outcomes. Prospective study. Dogs (n=49) and cats (n=8) with coxofemoral arthropathy. Small breed dogs and cats with coxofemoral arthritis were enrolled for Micro THR. Patient data were recorded. Implant positioning and cement mantle quality were evaluated radiographically. Orthopedic examinations and client interviews were used to assess outcome. Micro THR was performed unilaterally (40 dogs, 8 cats) and staged bilaterally (9 dogs) to resolve pain associated with osteoarthritis or trauma. Mean body weight was 7.2 kg. Postoperative complications included prosthesis luxation (9), cup aseptic loosening (1), and sciatic neurapraxia (1). Mean radiographic follow up was 96.1 weeks; 10 joints were followed for ≥3.0 years. Sixty of the 66 (91%) Micro THRs had excellent outcomes. Two dogs (dogs with unmanageable luxation had explantation. Micro THR is considered a satisfactory procedure for management of small breed dogs and cats with coxofemoral disease unresponsive to medical management. Micro THR is a viable option to treat disabling disorders of the hip. More than 170 cat and small dog breeds, and many mixed breeds, could benefit from Micro THR surgery. © Copyright 2010 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  3. Hip replacements at the Hospital Nacional Guillermo Almenara, 1995-1997

    OpenAIRE

    Bermúdez García, Alejandro; Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To review the main features of hip replacements, both partial and total, performed at the Hospital Nacional Guillermo Almenara, Lima-Peru, between 1995-1997. METHODS: a descriptive, cross-sectional, observational and partially prospective review of 232 clinical records from 325 surgical hip replacements. RESULTS: Patients with ages between 59 and 70 years old (60% females), most of them were homeworkers and come from Lima. Coxofemoral artrosis was the commonest etiology conducing ...

  4. Surgical treatment for young adult hip dysplasia: joint-preserving options

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen, Min; Shang, Xi-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is a spectrum of disorders that results in anatomic abnormalities leading to increased contact stress in the joint and, eventually, secondary osteoarthritis...

  5. Osteochondromatosis of the hip Joint. Report of a Cast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kh. MOAZZEZ

    1975-06-01

    Full Text Available Osteochondromatosis of the hip is a rare disease inwhich segments of synovial membrane become cartilaginous. These may calcify or ossify formin- g osteocartilag-inous masses as loose bodies. It occurs most often in young or middle-aged adults and the etiology or the condition is unknown. The diagnosis can be apparent with due consideration on clinical history and proper X-ray examination or the joint. One case or such disease with typical X-ray findings is reported.

  6. Asymmetrical lumbosacral transitional vertebrae in dogs may promote asymmetrical hip joint development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flückiger, Mark A; Steffen, Frank; Hässig, Michael; Morgan, Joseph P

    2017-03-20

    This study examines the relationship between the morphology of the lumbosacral transitional vertebra (LTV) and asymmetrical development of the hip joints in dogs. A total of 4000 dogs which had been consecutively scored for canine hip dysplasia were checked for the presence of a LTV. A LTV was noted in 138 dogs and classified depending on the morphology of the transverse processes and the degree of contact with the ilium. In dogs with an asymmetrical LTV, the hip joint was significantly more predisposed to subluxation and malformation on the side of the intermediate or sacral-like transverse process (p hip joint conformation was less affected on the side featuring a free transverse process (p hip joint, and secondary osteoarthritis. Asymmetrical hip conformation may therefore be the sequela of a LTV and mask or aggravate genetically induced canine hip dysplasia.

  7. Tribolayer Formation in a Metal-on-Metal (MoM) Hip Joint: An Electrochemical Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, MT; Nagelli, C; Pourzal, R; Fischer, A; Laurent, MP; Jacobs, JJ; Wimmer, MA

    2013-01-01

    The demand for total hip replacement (THR) surgery is increasing in the younger population due to faster rehabilitation and more complete restoration of function. Up to 2009, metal-on-metal (MoM) hip joint bearings were a popular choice due to their design flexibility, post-operative stability and relatively low wear rates. The main wear mechanisms that occur along the bearing surface of MoM joints are tribochemical reactions that deposit a mixture of wear debris, metal ions and organic matrix of decomposed proteins known as a tribolayer. No in-depth electrochemical studies have been reported on the structure and characteristics of this tribolayer or about the parameters involved in its formation. In this study, we conducted an electrochemical investigation of different surfaces (bulk-like: control, nano-crystalline: new implant and tribolayer surface: retrieved implant) made out of two commonly used hip CoCrMo alloys (high-carbon and low-carbon). As per ASTM standard, cyclic polarization tests and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy tests were conducted. The results obtained from electrochemical parameters for different surfaces clearly indicated a reduction in corrosion for the tribolayer surface (Icorr: 0.76 μA/cm2). Further, polarization resistance (Rp:2.39±0.60MΩ/cm2) and capacitance (Cdl:15.20±0.75 μF/cm2) indicated variation in corrosion kinetics for the tribolayer surface, that attributed to its structure and stability in a simulated body environment. PMID:24099949

  8. Hips, elbows and stifles: common joint diseases in the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grierson, James

    2012-01-01

    Cats commonly present with joint disease and trauma. A methodical approach to diagnostics and treatment can aid the clinician in the management of these cases. Cats with joint disease may present with a vague history owing to their independent nature, and gait assessment is often challenging when compared with the dog. Knowledge of feline-specific anatomy is important to avoid over- or misinterpretation of physical examination or imaging findings. This review of feline joint disease focuses on the more common, non-traumatic conditions of the hip, stifle and elbow. It aims to provide first opinion clinicians with a guide to decision making that will assist them in achieving a diagnosis and formulating a management strategy. There is an extensive body of original articles and textbooks in the published literature relating to aspects of feline joint disease. This article combines information from key companion animal and feline-specific references together with the author's clinical experience to provide a practical overview of joint disease, and highlight important differences between cats and dogs in terms of presentation and treatment.

  9. The instability of wrist joint and total wrist replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jin-Xing; Xu, Yong-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Total wrist arthroplasty are not used as widely as total knee and hip replacement. The functional hands are requiring surgeons to design a durable and functional satisfying prosthesis. This article will list the main reasons that cause the failure of the prosthesis. Some remarkable and representative prostheses are listed to show the devolvement of total wrist prosthesis and their individual special innovations to fix the problems. And the second part we will discuss the part that biomechanical elements act in the total wrist replacement (TWA). Summarize and find out what the real problem is and how we can find a way to fix it.

  10. Alternative materials to improve total hip replacement tribology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santavirta, Seppo; Böhler, Max; Harris, William H; Konttinen, Yrjö T; Lappalainen, Reijo; Muratoglu, Orhun; Rieker, Claude; Salzer, Martin

    2003-08-01

    An improvement in tribology of bearing surfaces is an effective means of increasing the longevity of total hip replacement (THR). Currently, 3 approaches are available to achieve this aim: first, use of highly cross-linked UHMWPE; second, aluminum oxide ceramic bearings, and third, metal-on-metal bearings. Cross-linking reduces the wear resistance of UHMWPE markedly without impairment of other significant properties of the material. Simulator studies and some clinical long-term (10-22 years) follow-up surveys suggest an almost immeasurable wear of the highly cross-linked UHMWPE-based acetabular components during an expected clinical life span. Bioinert alumina ceramic (aluminum oxide) was introduced 3 decades ago for THR-bearing surfaces to improve performance and longevity. Alumina ceramic is entirely biostable and bioinert and has good mechanical properties. For correctly positioned alumina-on-alumina bearings, the annual linear wear rate has been reported to be 3.9 microm. Alumina heads have been successfully used in combination with polyethylene sockets, but as regards wear, the best results have been obtained with alumina-on-alumina bearings. In ceramic THR bearings, precise manufacture and contact surface geometry, including optimal clearance, are most important. For the currently available products, the component fracture risk is almost nonexistent (less than 1 per 1000). Metal-on-metal bearings were used in the early stage of THR surgery, although not all old designs were successful. More recent analyses of the early series have shown the advantages of metal-on-metal to be better and have led to a renaissance of this articulation. Initially, stainless steel was used because it was easy to manufacture and polish. Current metal-on-metal bearings are based on cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloys with varying carbon contents. Such bearings are self-polishing. Linear wear rates remain at the level of a few microm a year. An improvement in technology has increased

  11. Relationships of hip joint volume ratios with degrees of joint laxity and degenerative disease from youth to maturity in a canine population predisposed to hip joint osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amico, Laura L; Xie, Lin; Abell, Lindsey K; Brown, Katherine T; Lopez, Mandi J

    2011-03-01

    To assess relationships of acetabular volume (AV), femoral head volume (FV), and portion of the femoral head within in the acetabulum (FVIA) with each other and with degrees of hip joint laxity and degenerative joint disease from youth to maturity in dogs predisposed to developing hip joint osteoarthritis (OA). 46 mixed-breed half- or full-sibling hound-type dogs. The distraction index (DI), AV, FV, FVIA, and degree of osteoarthritis (OA score) were quantified in 1 hip joint at 16, 32, and 104 weeks of age. Relationships among variables were evaluated within and between ages. Ratios corresponding to OA scores were compared within ages. Differences among 16-week ratios corresponding to 32-week OA scores and among 16- and 32-week ratios corresponding to 104-week OA scores were evaluated. Significant positive relationships existed between FV and AV across ages as well as between FVIA/FV and FVIA/AV and between DI and OA score across and within most ages. Such relationships also existed within these variables across most ages. Negative relationships of DI and OA scores with FVIA/FV and FVIA/AV within and among all ages were significant. Sixteen-week AVs, FVs, and FVIAs were greater and FV/AVs and OA scores were less than 32- and 104-week values. The 32-week FVIA/FV was less than 16- and 104-week values, and the 32-week FVIA/AV was less than the 104-week value. The FVIA/FV and FVIA/AV were lower and the DI was higher with higher OA scores within and among most ages. Structural volumes in lax canine hip joints changed predictably relative to each other during growth, despite degenerative changes. Measures developed in this study may augment current diagnosis and treatment strategies for hip dysplasia in dogs.

  12. Relationships of hip joint volume ratios with degrees of joint laxity and degenerative disease from youth to maturity in a canine population predisposed to hip joint osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    D’Amico, Laura L.; Xie, Lin; Abell, Lindsey K.; Brown, Katherine T.; Lopez, Mandi J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess relationships of acetabular volume (AV), femoral head volume (FV), and portion of the femoral head within in the acetabulum (FVIA) with each other and with degrees of hip joint laxity and degenerative joint disease from youth to maturity in dogs predisposed to developing hip joint osteoarthritis (OA). Animals 46 mixed-breed half- or full-sibling hound-type dogs. Procedures The distraction index (DI), AV, FV, FVIA, and degree of osteoarthritis (OA score) were quantified in 1 hip joint at 16, 32, and 104 weeks of age. Relationships among variables were evaluated within and between ages. Ratios corresponding to OA scores were compared within ages. Differences among 16-week ratios corresponding to 32-week OA scores and among 16- and 32-week ratios corresponding to 104-week OA scores were evaluated. Results Significant positive relationships existed between FV and AV across ages as well as between FVIA/FV and FVIA/AV and between DI and OA score across and within most ages. Such relationships also existed within these variables across most ages. Negative relationships of DI and OA scores with FVIA/FV and FVIA/AV within and among all ages were significant. Sixteen-week AVs, FVs, and FVIAs were greater and FV/AVs and OA scores were less than 32- and 104-week values. The 32-week FVIA/FV was less than 16- and 104-week values, and the 32-week FVIA/AV was less than the 104-week value. The FVIA/FV and FVIA/AV were lower and the DI was higher with higher OA scores within and among most ages. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance Structural volumes in lax canine hip joints changed predictably relative to each other during growth, despite degenerative changes. Measures developed in this study may augment current diagnosis and treatment strategies for hip dysplasia in dogs. PMID:21355741

  13. Steroid-associated hip joint collapse in bipedal emus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Zhen Zheng

    Full Text Available In this study we established a bipedal animal model of steroid-associated hip joint collapse in emus for testing potential treatment protocols to be developed for prevention of steroid-associated joint collapse in preclinical settings. Five adult male emus were treated with a steroid-associated osteonecrosis (SAON induction protocol using combination of pulsed lipopolysaccharide (LPS and methylprednisolone (MPS. Additional three emus were used as normal control. Post-induction, emu gait was observed, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI was performed, and blood was collected for routine examination, including testing blood coagulation and lipid metabolism. Emus were sacrificed at week 24 post-induction, bilateral femora were collected for micro-computed tomography (micro-CT and histological analysis. Asymmetric limping gait and abnormal MRI signals were found in steroid-treated emus. SAON was found in all emus with a joint collapse incidence of 70%. The percentage of neutrophils (Neut % and parameters on lipid metabolism significantly increased after induction. Micro-CT revealed structure deterioration of subchondral trabecular bone. Histomorphometry showed larger fat cell fraction and size, thinning of subchondral plate and cartilage layer, smaller osteoblast perimeter percentage and less blood vessels distributed at collapsed region in SAON group as compared with the normal controls. Scanning electron microscope (SEM showed poor mineral matrix and more osteo-lacunae outline in the collapsed region in SAON group. The combination of pulsed LPS and MPS developed in the current study was safe and effective to induce SAON and deterioration of subchondral bone in bipedal emus with subsequent femoral head collapse, a typical clinical feature observed in patients under pulsed steroid treatment. In conclusion, bipedal emus could be used as an effective preclinical experimental model to evaluate potential treatment protocols to be developed for prevention of

  14. Serum levels of BMP-2, 4, 7 and AHSG in patients with degenerative joint disease requiring total arthroplasty of the hip and temporomandibular joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albilia, Jonathan B; Tenenbaum, Howard C; Clokie, Cameron M L; Walt, David R; Baker, Gerald I; Psutka, David J; Backstein, David; Peel, Sean A F

    2013-01-01

    To date, there is no objective or reliable means of assessing the severity of degenerative joint disease (DJD) and need for joint replacement surgery. Hence, it is difficult to know when an individual with DJD has reached a point where total arthroplasty is indicated. The purpose of the present study is to determine whether serum levels of Alpha-2 HS-glycoprotein (AHSG) as well as bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP-2, 4, 7) can be used to predict the presence of severe DJD of the hip and/or temporomandibular joint (TMJ) (specifically: joints that require replacement). A total of 30 patients scheduled for arthroplasty (diseased) (15 HIP, 15 TMJ) and 120 age-matched controls (healthy/non-diseased) were included. Blood samples were collected from all patients ≥8 weeks after the last arthroplasty. Concentrations of serum analytes were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, and these were compared between the Diseased and Healthy groups, utilizing the Mann-Whitney U-test. Patients with disease had significantly higher levels of BMP-2 and BMP-4 and lower levels of AHSG in serum compared to non-diseased humans (p AHSG appear to characterize patients who have DJD that is severe enough to require total joint replacement. Perhaps measurements of these proteins can be used to make objective decisions regarding the need for total arthroplasty as opposed to the current subjective approaches. Copyright © 2012 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  15. Dissemination of wear particles to the liver, spleen, and abdominal lymph nodes of patients with hip or knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, R M; Jacobs, J J; Tomlinson, M J; Gavrilovic, J; Black, J; Peoc'h, M

    2000-04-01

    The importance of particles generated by wear and corrosion of joint replacement prostheses has been understood primarily in the context of the local effects of particle-induced periprosthetic osteolysis and aseptic loosening. We studied dissemination of wear particles in patients with total hip and knee replacement to determine the prevalence of and the histopathological response to prosthetic wear debris in the liver, spleen, and abdominal para-aortic lymph nodes. Postmortem specimens from twenty-nine patients and biopsy specimens from two living patients with a failed replacement were analyzed. Specimens of tissue obtained from the cadavera of fifteen patients who had not had a joint replacement served as controls. The concentration of particles and the associated tissue response were characterized with the use of light microscopy of stained histological sections. Metallic particles were identified by electron microprobe analysis. Polyethylene particles were studied with the use of oil-red-O stain and polarized light microscopy. The composition of polyethylene particles was confirmed in selected cases by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and hot-stage thermal analysis. Twenty-one of the patients studied post mortem had had a primary total joint replacement. Eleven of them had had a hip prosthesis for a mean of sixty-nine months (range, forty-three to 171 months), and ten had had a knee replacement for a mean of eighty-four months (range, thirty-one to 179 months). The other eight patients studied post mortem had had a hip replacement in which one or more components had loosened and had been revised. The mean time between the initial arthroplasty and the time of death was 174 months (range, forty-seven to 292 months), and the mean time between the last revision procedure and the time of death was seventy-one months (range, one to 130 months). Metallic wear particles in the liver or spleen were more prevalent in patients who had had a failed hip arthroplasty

  16. Rapidly destructive arthropathy of the hip joint in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Ho Hyun; Song, Seung Yeop; Park, Sung Bum; Lee, Jee Wun

    2012-06-01

    This article describes 3 patients with rheumatoid arthritis in which hip joint conditions were similar to rapidly destructive arthropathy of the hip joint. The patients had the following additional characteristics: (1) age at diagnosis was comparatively older; (2) rheumatoid arthritis had an onset after age 40 years; (3) severe rheumatoid arthritis was present in >4 major joints; (4) long-term steroids and disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs were taken due to the high activity of rheumatoid arthritis; and (5) patients were underweight, with body mass indexes hip joint rarely occurs in osteoarthritis, avascular necrosis of the femoral head, and rheumatoid arthritis. Clinically, rapidly destructive arthropathy of the hip joint occurs in elderly patients who report severe pain but have a relatively preserved range of motion. Typical radiologic changes in rapidly destructive arthropathy of the hip joint are rapid destruction, resorption, or subluxation of the femoral head, destruction of the acetabulum, and minimal spur formation developing 6 to 12 months after symptom onset. Destruction of the hip joint in rheumatoid arthritis occurs in the sequence of depression, flattening, and loss, and commonly progresses gradually. When patients with rheumatoid arthritis report persistent and severe pain in the hip joint with no specific cause, rapidly destructive arthropathy of the hip joint must be identified through repetitive follow-up radiographic observations. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  17. Metal on metal surface replacement of the hip. Experience of the McMinn prothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMinn, D; Treacy, R; Lin, K; Pynsent, P

    1996-08-01

    The historical failure of surface replacement has been due to the production of wear debris with subsequent bone resorption, loosening, and failure. To avoid these problems, a surface replacement using a metal on metal bearing allowing thin components and femoral design and instrumentation to avoid varus alignment has been designed. Two hundred thirty-five joints have been resurfaced with this prosthesis in almost 5 years. There have been no femoral neck fractures and no dislocations. There have been 4 designs differing in the method of fixation. In the press fit group, 6 of 70 hips had to be revised for aseptic loosening. In the cemented group, debonding of the cup occurred in 3 of 43 cases. Six patients had hydroxyapatite coated components and have had excellent clinical outcomes. The current design uses a peripherally expanded hydroxyapatite coated cup and a cemented metal head; 116 of this design have been implanted during a 19-month period with excellent outcome. Despite short followup the authors are hopeful that the combination of a polar metal on metal bearing with appropriate fixation will yield a method of preserving bone stock in the younger patient requiring arthroplasty.

  18. Characterization and tribology of PEG-like coatings on UHMWPE for total hip replacements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Sheryl R; Ashby, Paul D; Pruitt, Lisa A

    2010-03-15

    A crosslinked hydrogel coating similar to poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) was covalently bonded to the surface of ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) to improve the lubricity and wear resistance of the UHWMPE for use in total joint replacements. The chemistry, hydrophilicity, and protein adsorption resistance of the coatings were determined, and the wear behavior of the PEG-like coating was examined by two methods: pin-on-disk tribometry to evaluate macroscale behavior, and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to simulate asperity wear. As expected, the coating was found to be highly PEG-like, with approximately 83% ether content by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and more hydrophilic and resistant to protein adsorption than uncoated UHMWPE. Pin-on-disk testing showed that the PEG-like coating could survive 3 MPa of contact pressure, comparable to that experienced by total hip replacements. AFM nanoscratching experiments uncovered three damage mechanisms for the coatings: adhesion/microfracture, pure adhesion, and delamination. The latter two mechanisms appear to correlate well with wear patterns induced by pin-on-disk testing and evaluated by attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy mapping. Understanding the mechanisms by which the PEG-like coatings wear is critical for improving the behavior of subsequent generations of wear-resistant hydrogel coatings. (c) 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Hip-Knee-Ankle-Foot Orthosis Using a Medial Single Hip Joint : A Clinical Study of a Paraplegic Child

    OpenAIRE

    Watanabe, Susumu

    1998-01-01

    This study describes and discusses a clinical experience with a hip-knee-ankle-foot orthotic (HKAFO) system using a medial single hip joint (MSH-KAFO). The MSH-KAFO (Walkabout(R))was invented by Stewart MacKay in 1992. It has many merits compared with other HKAFO systems because the hip joint is compact and removable. This system was clinically tested with a paraplegic child (female, 14 years old) whose condition was the result of a thoracic spinal cord injury. Her functional level was T-6. A...

  20. Predicting the Incremental Hospital Cost of Adverse Events Among Medicare Beneficiaries in the Comprehensive Joint Replacement Program During Fiscal Year 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culler, Steven D; Jevsevar, David S; McGuire, Kevin J; Shea, Kevin G; Little, Kenneth M; Schlosser, Michael J

    2017-06-01

    The Medicare program's Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement (CJR) payment model places hospitals at financial risk for the treatment cost of Medicare beneficiaries (MBs) undergoing lower extremity joint replacement (LEJR). This study uses Medicare Provider Analysis and Review File and identified 674,777 MBs with LEJR procedure during fiscal year 2014. Adverse events (death, acute myocardial infarction, pneumonia, sepsis or shock, surgical site bleeding, pulmonary embolism, mechanical complications, and periprosthetic joint infection) were studied. Multivariable regressions were modeled to estimate the incremental hospital cost of treating each adverse event. The risk-adjusted estimated hospital cost of treating adverse events varied from a high of $29,061 (MBs experiencing hip fracture and joint infection) to a low of $6308 (MBs without hip fracture that experienced pulmonary embolism). Avoidance of adverse events in the LEJR hospitalization will play an important role in managing episode hospital costs in the Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement program. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Alumina-alumina artificial hip joints. Part II: characterisation of the wear debris from in vitro hip joint simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipper, J L; Hatton, A; Nevelos, J E; Ingham, E; Doyle, C; Streicher, R; Nevelos, A B; Fisher, J

    2002-08-01

    Until recently it was not possible to reproduce clinically relevant wear rates and wear patterns in in vitro hip joint simulators for alumina ceramic-on-ceramic hip prostheses. The introduction of microseparation of the prosthesis components into in vitro wear simulations produced clinically relevant wear rates and wear patterns for the first time. The aim of this study was to characterise the wear particles generated from standard simulator testing and microseparation simulator testing of hot isostatically pressed (HIPed) and non-HIPed alumina ceramic-on-ceramic hip prostheses, and compare these particles to those generated in vivo. Standard simulation conditions produced wear rates of approximately 0.1 mm3 per million cycles for both material types. No change in surface roughness was detected and very few wear features were observed. In contrast, when microseparation was introduced into the wear simulation, wear rates of between 1.24 (HIPed) and 1.74 mm3 per million cycles (non-HIPed) were produced. Surface roughness increased and a wear stripe often observed clinically on retrieved femoral heads was also reproduced. Under standard simulation conditions only nanometre-sized wear particles (2-27.5 nm) were observed by TEM, and it was thought likely that these particles resulted from relief polishing of the alumina ceramic. However, when microseparation of the prosthesis components was introduced into the simulation, a bi-modal distribution of particle sizes was observed. The nanometre-sized particles produced by relief polishing were present (1-35nm). however, larger micrometre-sized particles were also observed by both transmission electron microscopy (TEM) (0.021 microm) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) (0.05-->10 microm). These larger particles were thought to originate from the wear stripe and were produced by trans-granular fracture of the alumina ceramic. In Part I of this study, alumina ceramic wear particles were isolated from the periprosthetic

  2. [Practical significance of sonographic type IIa of dysplastic hip joint according to Graf's classifications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peled, Eli; Fishkin, Michael; Eidelman, Mark; Katzman, Alexander; Bialik, Victor

    2004-06-01

    Hip joint assessment in newborns and neonates is currently performed with ultrasonography due to the high degree of sensitivity and specificity of this technology as compared to the usual radiography. Measuring the alpha and beta angles is indicative in assessing the hip joint. The alpha angle represents the bony acetabular components and the beta angle represents the cartilaginous roof. According to Graf's classifications, type IIa is subdivided into two subgroups; type IIa- and IIa+. This study examined the need for following-up on these hip joints in newborn and neonate. The study population included the newborns and neonates born in our facility between the period 1/1/1999 to 1/4/2002. We routinely screened 10,432 newborns both clinically and ultrasonographically. This included a total of 20,862 hip joints, of which 915 were pathological according to Graf's classifications. Type IIa was diagnosed in 232 newborns and a total of 330 hip joints. The follow-up examinations were performed at 6 and 12 weeks of age, and at six months of age. Each follow-up visit included clinical and sonographic evaluation and alpha angle measuring. The incidence of type IIa was 1.6% of all hips and 36.9% of the pathological hip joints. These joints were divided into two subgroups. Group A included 254 hip joints among 156 newborns, 116 girls [74.3%] and 40 boys [25.6%]. Group A members had bilateral or unilateral type IIa hip joints. In the latter case, the other joint was type I-normal. Group B included 76 hip joints among 76 newborns, 72 girls [94.5%] and four boys [5.5%]. Group B members had one type IIa hip joint and a second more severely graded hip joint. Follow-up only was required in 88% of the type IIa hip joints and 12% were treated using Pavlik's method. Surprisingly, all the joints with unilateral type IIa hips developed into normal or type I by six months of age without treatment, independent of the alpha angle value, and the pathology on the opposite side.

  3. [Analysis of development of hip joint dysplasia in dogs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledecký, V; Sevcík, A; Capík, I; Trbolová, A

    1997-01-01

    Hip joint dysplasia in dogs occurs mainly in large and heavy breeds. It brings about changes on the acetabulum (socket) and the head of thigh bone, thus causing pain, tiredness, refusal to jump and refusal of increased activity. Even though presently the genetic basis of development of this disease, numerous literary sources indicate existence of pre-disposing factors that facilitate development in later stages of life. Diet and unbalanced development of skeleton and support tissues-ligaments, joint capsule and musculature also have the effect on development of dysplasia. We have analyzed acquired results of X-ray examination of dogs-German shepherds. The size of the group was 4 206 and the examination was aimed at incidence of hip-joint dysplasia during the period of 1977-1995 in the Slovak Republic. We have found out that in 1977 there were 70.7% positive cases out of the total number of examined individuals. Gradual exclusion of dogs with heavier grades of dysplasia (D, E) decreased occurrence of dysplasia to current rate of 40.8%. We considered it to be a high incidence rate. Internal structure of the positive group has changed. The number of dogs with the lightest grade of dysplasia (B) has increased, while the number of heavier grade dysplasia (C, D, E) decreased. In other breeds of dogs, of which more than 20 have been examined at the clinic, the following results have been acquired: Slovak chuvash-32%, Bavarian and Hannover bloodhound-30.6%, Rotweiler-28.6%, Newfoundland dog-26.3%, Bern sheep-dog-13.6%. At the same time we analyze the incidence of dysplasia in dogs whose parents were negative. Group of descendants of 11 negative males and 28 females consisted of 73 dogs. Through x-ray examination, 42.5% of dogs were found to have dysplasia B, C and D at the age of 1 year.

  4. [Partial and total joint replacement in femur head necrosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, B; Rüther, W

    2000-05-01

    In literature, the results of hip arthroplasty in patients with avascular osteonecrosis of the femoral head vary. The main reason may be the nonhomogeneous patient groups concerning etiology of the femoral head necrosis (FHN). Analyzing the results of hip endoprosthesis in relation to the etiology of FHN leads to the assumption that steroid-induced FHN and FHN with underlying systemic bone diseases (renal osteodystrophy, sickle-cell hemoglobinopathy) have the highest loosening rates. Diseases with immunosuppressive medication and sickle-cell hemoglobinopathy have the highest risk of joint infection. Therefore etiology plays an important role in the long-term results of hip endoprostheses in FHN. Modern cement techniques of the second generation and new non-cemented total hip endoprostheses seem to have better results than older prostheses and cement techniques. We followed-up 52 non-cemented thrust plate prostheses in 45 patients with FHN, prospectively, for at least 2 years (3.7 +/- 1.6 years). The revision rate was 9.6% (two aseptic loosenings in one patient with renal osteodystrophy and one patient with alcohol abuse, as well as three late infections in one patient with alcohol abuse and two patients with renal osteodystrophy). Additionally, five prostheses showed radiologic lines of a minimum of 2 mm. Future studies with longer follow-up are needed to find out whether these prosthetic designs with proximal fixation of the femoral component preserving the diaphysial bone have advantages in young FHN patients.

  5. Dorsal root ganglion neurons with dichotomizing axons projecting to the hip joint and the knee skin in rats: possible mechanism of referred knee pain in hip joint disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Yoko; Ohtori, Seiji; Nakajima, Takayuki; Kishida, Shinji; Harada, Yoshitada; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2011-11-01

    Patients who have hip joint diseases sometimes complain of knee pain as well as hip joint area pain. However, the precise sensory innervation pattern and correlation of the sensory nerves of the hip joint and knee are unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons with dichotomizing axons projecting to both the hip joint and the knee skin in rats using double fluorescent labeling techniques, and to examine characteristics of the DRG neurons with dichotomizing axons using immunohistochemical staining for inflammatory neuropeptides such as calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). For 20 rats, two kinds of neurotracers, Fluoro-Gold (FG) and 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethyl-indocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI), were used in the double-labeling study. FG was injected into the left hip joint, and DiI was applied to the left medial portion of knee skin. Ten days after application, bilateral DRGs were harvested and immunohistochemically stained for CGRP. DRG neurons double labeled with FG and DiI were observed only from L2 to L4 on the left side. Approximately 1.6% of all DRG neurons innervating the hip joints had other axons that extended to the medial portion of knee skin, and 35% of double-labeled neurons were CGRP positive. Our results showed that the double-labeled neurons had peripheral axons that dichotomized into both the hip joint and the knee skin. CGRP-positive neurons of these dichotomizing fibers may play some role in the manifestation of referred knee pain with hip joint pain.

  6. Clinical and genetic assessments of hip joint laxity in the Boykin spaniel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Kate L; Murphy, Keith E

    2006-04-01

    Canine hip dysplasia (CHD) is characterized by a malformation of the hip joint that leads to joint laxity and consequential degenerative joint disease. The most widely used method for diagnosis of CHD is the ventrodorsal hip-extended radiologic view, commonly referred to as the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA) method. The method of the University of Pennsylvania Hip Improvement Program (PennHIP), an alternative technique that is based on hip joint laxity, provides a quantitative assessment, the distraction index (DI), of the likelihood of the development of CHD because of increased laxity in the hip joint. Linear regression analysis showed that, across many breeds of dog, the incidence of CHD, as defined by the OFA, is positively correlated with the mean DI, the determination coefficient (r2) being 26%. We used families of Boykin spaniels (BSs) to determine the level of joint laxity in the breed and to conduct an initial whole-genome screening to identify markers that co-segregate with increased joint laxity. Although there was a positive correlation between the incidence of hip dysplasia and increased joint laxity, we did not find significant linkage in the 28 BSs that underwent genotyping, likely owing to the small size of the pedigree.

  7. Chronic asymptomatic dislocation of a total hip replacement: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidder Surjit

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Dislocation of a prosthetic hip is the second most common complication after thromboembolic disease in patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty, with an incidence reported as 0.5 to 20%. Although the period of greatest risk for dislocation has been reported to be within the first few months after surgery, late dislocation occurs more commonly then previously thought. Case presentation A 60-year-old man underwent a right Exeter cemented total hip replacement and was subsequently discharged after appropriate follow-up. He next presented 8 years later complaining of pain in the left groin. An anterioposterior radiograph of the pelvis revealed degenerative changes in the left hip and a dislocated right total hip replacement. The dislocated femoral component had formed a neoacetabulum within the ilium, in which it was freely articulating. He remained pain-free on this side, had 5 cm of true leg length shortening with a good range of movement and was very pleased with his hip replacement. He was later placed on the waiting list for a left total hip replacement. Conclusion This case illustrates that a dislocated total hip replacement may occasionally not cause symptoms that cause significant discomfort or reduction in range of movement. The prosthetic femoral head can form a neoacetabulum allowing a full range of pain-free movement. Furthermore it emphasises that with an increased trend to earlier hospital discharge and shorter follow-up, potential complications may be missed. We urge a low index of suspicion for potential complications and suggest that regular review with radiographic follow-up should be made.

  8. Total hip replacements at Kikuyu Hospital, Kenya | Kingori | East ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... one upper gastro intestinal bleeding, two Deep Vein Thrombosis, one sciatic nerve neuropraxia, one haematoma formation and one intraoperative femoral fracture. Out of the 97 patients 40 of them had the surgery performed more than six months after a proper diagnosis was made and hip arthroplasty recommended.

  9. Periprosthetic femoral fracture within two years after total hip replacement:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thien, T. M.; Chatziagorou, G.; Garellick, G.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We used the Nordic Arthroplasty Register Association database to evaluate whether age, sex, preoperative diagnosis, fixation, and implant design influence the risk of revision arthroplasty due to periprosthetic fracture within two years from operation of a primary total hip replacemen...

  10. Analgesia after total hip replacement: epidural versus psoas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods Patients scheduled for hip arthroplasty received either a psoas compartment or epidural infusion of bupivacaine. The outcome measures that were examined were postoperative pain, local anaesthetic and morphine consumption, and side effects. Results There was no significant difference between the two groups ...

  11. Evaluation of a new methodology to simulate damage and wear of polyethylene hip replacements subjected to edge loading in hip simulator testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, Susan; Tipper, Joanne L; Al-Hajjar, Mazen; Isaac, Graham H; Fisher, John; Williams, Sophie

    2017-06-29

    Wear and fatigue of polyethylene acetabular cups have been reported to play a role in the failure of total hip replacements. Hip simulator testing under a wide range of clinically relevant loading conditions is important. Edge loading of hip replacements can occur following impingement under extreme activities and can also occur during normal gait, where there is an offset deficiency and/or joint laxity. This study evaluated a hip simulator method that assessed wear and damage in polyethylene acetabular liners that were subjected to edge loading. The liners tested to evaluate the method were a currently manufactured crosslinked polyethylene acetabular liner and an aged conventional polyethylene acetabular liner. The acetabular liners were tested for 5 million standard walking cycles and following this 5 million walking cycles with edge loading. Edge loading conditions represented a separation of the centers of rotation of the femoral head and the acetabular liner during the swing phase, leading to loading of the liner rim on heel strike. Rim damage and cracking was observed in the aged conventional polyethylene liner. Steady-state wear rates assessed gravimetrically were lower under edge loading compared to standard loading. This study supports previous clinical findings that edge loading may cause rim cracking in liners, where component positioning is suboptimal or where material degradation is present. The simulation method developed has the potential to be used in the future to test the effect of aging and different levels of severity of edge loading on a range of cross-linked polyethylene materials. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Patellofemoral Joint Replacement and Nickel Allergy: An Unusual Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Farhan; Jenner, Edward; Faisal, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Metal allergy is an unusual complication of joint replacement that may cause aseptic loosening and necessitate joint revision surgery. We present the case of nickel allergy causing aseptic loosening following patellofemoral joint replacement (PFJR) in a 54-year-old male. Joint revision surgery to a nickel-free total knee replacement was performed with good results. Our literature review shows that there is no evidence to guide the management of metal allergy in PFJR. The evidence from studies of total knee replacement is limited to retrospective case series and case reports and gives contradictory recommendations. The optimal management strategy for metal allergy in PFJR is not clear. We recommend allergy testing in patients with history of metal allergy and use of an allergen-free implant in those with positive tests. As there is no gold standard test to establish metal allergy, the choice of test should be guided by availability and recommendation from the local unit of dermatology and allergy testing. We recommend investigation for metal allergy in patients with implant loosening where other causes have been excluded. PMID:26543657

  13. Patellofemoral Joint Replacement and Nickel Allergy: An Unusual Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhan Syed

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Metal allergy is an unusual complication of joint replacement that may cause aseptic loosening and necessitate joint revision surgery. We present the case of nickel allergy causing aseptic loosening following patellofemoral joint replacement (PFJR in a 54-year-old male. Joint revision surgery to a nickel-free total knee replacement was performed with good results. Our literature review shows that there is no evidence to guide the management of metal allergy in PFJR. The evidence from studies of total knee replacement is limited to retrospective case series and case reports and gives contradictory recommendations. The optimal management strategy for metal allergy in PFJR is not clear. We recommend allergy testing in patients with history of metal allergy and use of an allergen-free implant in those with positive tests. As there is no gold standard test to establish metal allergy, the choice of test should be guided by availability and recommendation from the local unit of dermatology and allergy testing. We recommend investigation for metal allergy in patients with implant loosening where other causes have been excluded.

  14. Medium term results of Avon patellofemoral joint replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen K Sarda

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion: The Avon patellofemoral joint replacement provides predictably good results and excellent survivorship in the medium term, for isolated patellofemoral arthritis. However, progression of tibiofemoral arthritis remains unpredictable and therefore patient selection is crucial to ensure success. Clicking remains a potential problem and can compromise the postoperative results in upto 15% of the cases.

  15. The accuracy of Intramedullary Femoral alignment in Total Knee Replacement in the prescence of ipsilateral Hip Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, A/Prof Michael; Parkinson, Dr Benjamin; Parr, Dr Adam; Conyard, Dr Christopher; Armit, Dr Drew; Anscomb, Dr Helen

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: During total knee replacement (TKR) surgery, the most commonly used method for aligning the distal femur appropriately is via an intramedullary (IM) distal femoral alignment rod. The alignment of the rod itself is reliant on the isthmus which is used to most accurately place the rod in the correct anatomical axis. In the instance of something preventing the rod from entering the isthmus correctly, such as a hip replacement, then the degree of accuracy could be assumed to be even less. Mechanical-anatomical malalignment has been shown to decrease the implant (TKR) survival and so methods of increasing accuracy of alignment relative to the mechanical axis have been developed. At present the most accurate method intraoperatively is computer navigation and several studies have demonstrated improved alignment. An increasing number of patients year on year are having both knee and hip replacements and as the population ages the likelihood of having both a knee and hip replacement will also increase. We propose that the presence of a hip replacement within the isthmus of the femur may further decrease the accuracy of the IM alignment of the femur leading to incorrect implant positioning. Methods: The study was conducted on 10 cadaveric specimens (20 femurs). Computational navigation instrumentation was attached in turn to each femur and the ideal alignment data recorded in a standard fashion by a single operator (principal investigator). A standard entry port was then be made in the femur for the introduction of the IM rod. An IM rod was then inserted with the distal femoral cutting block in the accepted position recorded blindly on the computer navigation (both in terms of varus/valgus alignment to the mechanical axis and the degree of flexion). The process was then repeated at 3 levels to represent primary and revision hip lengths from the greater trochanter (replicating the changes that would occur in the presence of a hip replacement) The process was

  16. Small joints replacement for hand osteoarthritis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papalia, Rocco; Tecame, Andrea; Torre, Gugliemo; D'Adamio, Stefano; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Small joints replacement is a valid treatment for moderate to severe osteoarthritis of the hand. Several design and materials are now available for prostethic procedures with very different clinical and functional outcomes. An online search was carried out using Medline, Cochrane and Google scholar online databases, searching for studies on small joints replacement in hand surgery. Good functional and clinical outcomes can be achieved with silicone and pyrolitic carbon implants, either for trapeziometacarpal and metacarpophalangeal joints. In particular, the silicone spacer seems to be very effective for trapeziometacarpal osteoarthrosis, while the pyrolitic carbon total joint prosthesis produces excellent outcomes if used for metacarpophalangeal replacement. Major complications, such as persistent pain and implant loosening, have still a variable rate of occurrence. Heterogeneity in the methodology of the assessments in the studies reviewed and the implants and techniques involved makes it difficult to carry out a complete and effective comparative analysis of the data collected. Larger cohorts treated with the same implant should be investigated in better designed trials, to draw more clinically relevant conclusions from the evidences presented. Better methodology is also a goal to achieve, since the average Coleman Methodology Score measured for the articles included was 54.9 out of 100. More and better designed studies are needed to produce clear guidelines to define the better implant in terms of clinical outcomes, function and complications for trapeziometacarpal and metacarpophalangeal joints. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Validity of summing painful joint sites to assess joint-pain comorbidity in hip or knee osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjin-Kam-Jet-Siemons, Liseth; ten Klooster, Peter M.; van de Laar, Mart A F J; van den Ende, Cornelia H.M.; Hoogeboom, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies in patients with hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA) have advocated the relevance of assessing the number of painful joint sites, other than the primary affected joint, in both research and clinical practice. However, it is unclear whether joint-pain comorbidities can

  18. Hip and Knee Replacement in the HIV positive patient | Anand ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arthroplasty is used to relieve pain associated with degenerative or inflammatory joint disease, some post-traumatic joint problems, and avascular necrosis. Avascular necrosis, inflammatory and post-traumatic problems are seen on a regular basis in areas of high HIV seroprevalence. Degenerative arthritis is rare in ...

  19. Physiotherapy rehabilitation after total knee or hip replacement: an evidence-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this health technology policy analysis was to determine, where, how, and when physiotherapy services are best delivered to optimize functional outcomes for patients after they undergo primary (first-time) total hip replacement or total knee replacement, and to determine the Ontario-specific economic impact of the best delivery strategy. The objectives of the systematic review were as follows: To determine the effectiveness of inpatient physiotherapy after discharge from an acute care hospital compared with outpatient physiotherapy delivered in either a clinic-based or home-based setting for primary total joint replacement patientsTo determine the effectiveness of outpatient physiotherapy delivered by a physiotherapist in either a clinic-based or home-based setting in addition to a home exercise program compared with a home exercise program alone for primary total joint replacement patientsTo determine the effectiveness of preoperative exercise for people who are scheduled to receive primary total knee or hip replacement surgery Total hip replacements and total knee replacements are among the most commonly performed surgical procedures in Ontario. Physiotherapy rehabilitation after first-time total hip or knee replacement surgery is accepted as the standard and essential treatment. The aim is to maximize a person's functionality and independence and minimize complications such as hip dislocation (for hip replacements), wound infection, deep vein thrombosis, and pulmonary embolism. THE THERAPY: The physiotherapy rehabilitation routine has 4 components: therapeutic exercise, transfer training, gait training, and instruction in the activities of daily living. Physiotherapy rehabilitation for people who have had total joint replacement surgery varies in where, how, and when it is delivered. In Ontario, after discharge from an acute care hospital, people who have had a primary total knee or hip replacement may receive inpatient or outpatient

  20. Breathing zone concentrations of methylmethacrylate monomer during joint replacement operations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darre, E; Jørgensen, L G; Vedel, P

    1992-01-01

    By use of a methylmethacrylate (MMA) Dräger tube and bellow bump, the breathing zone concentrations of MMA monomer were measured for the operating surgeon during cementation of the components of hip and knee joint prostheses. The highest recordings (50-100 p.p.m.) were encountered during...... cementation of the acetabular cups with conventional polymethylmethacrylate cement. Such exposure could be eliminated by the use of personal protection equipment, local punctual field suction or change to a MMA/n-decylmethacrylate/isobornylmethacrylate bone cement....

  1. Increased expression of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) in osteoarthritis of human knee joint compared to hip joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, John H; Rai, Vikrant; Dilisio, Matthew F; Sekundiak, Todd D; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2017-12-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative disease characterized by the destruction of cartilage. The greatest risk factors for the development of OA include age and obesity. Recent studies suggest the role of inflammation in the pathogenesis of OA. The two most common locations for OA to occur are in the knee and hip joints. The knee joint experiences more mechanical stress, cartilage degeneration, and inflammation than the hip joint. This could contribute to the increased incidence of OA in the knee joint. Damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), including high-mobility group box-1, receptor for advanced glycation end products, and alarmins (S100A8 and S100A9), are released in the joint in response to stress-mediated chondrocyte and cartilage damage. This facilitates increased cartilage degradation and inflammation in the joint. Studies have documented the role of DAMPs in the pathogenesis of OA; however, the comparison of DAMPs and its influence on OA has not been discussed. In this study, we compared the DAMPs between OA knee and hip joints and found a significant difference in the levels of DAMPs expressed in the knee joint compared to the hip joint. The increased levels of DAMPs suggest a difference in the underlying pathogenesis of OA in the knee and the hip and highlights DAMPs as potential therapeutic targets for OA in the future.

  2. Postural control in degenerative diseases of the hip joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sziver, Edit; Nagy, Edit; Preszner-Domján, Andrea; Pósa, Gabriella; Horvath, Gyöngyi; Balog, Attila; Tóth, Kálmán

    2016-06-01

    Few studies investigated the postural control in patients with hip joint impairments; in some cases, balance impairments have been found, while other researchers have seen no significant changes. The goal of this study was to characterize postural stability in patients suffering from unilateral osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis in different balance tasks and to reveal potential differences between the two diseases in this respect. Ten patients with hip osteoarthritis (mean age: 62.3years), 10 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (mean age: 55.4years) and 10 healthy control subjects (mean age: 54.3years) took part in the study. Displacement of centre of pressure was measured with a force plate in mediolateral and anteroposterior directions during two-leg standing on firm and compliant surfaces with eyes opened and closed. Standing on a firm surface sway path increased significantly in the anteroposterior direction in both patient groups and in the mediolateral direction in all groups with eyes closed as compared to eyes opened condition. Standing on a compliant surface, sway paths increased significantly in both directions in all groups with eyes closed as compared to eyes opened condition; furthermore, sway paths were significantly longer with eyes closed in patients with rheumatoid arthritis in comparison with control and osteoarthritis groups. Our data revealed that the manipulation of both visual and somatosensory information can reveal subtle impairments in balance control. Thus, this paradigm can unmask the effects of decreased proprioception due to joint capsule lesion in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Reduced rates of primary joint replacement for osteoarthritis in Italian and Greek migrants to Australia: the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Simpson, Julie A; Wluka, Anita E; Urquhart, Donna M; English, Dallas R; Giles, Graham G; Graves, Stephen; Cicuttini, Flavia M

    2009-01-01

    Racial and ethnic disparities in rates of total joint replacement have been described, but little work has been done in well-established migrant groups. The aim of this study was to compare the rates of primary joint replacement for osteoarthritis for Italian and Greek migrants to Australia and Australian-born individuals. Eligible participants (n = 39,023) aged 27 to 75 years, born in Italy, Greece, Australia and the United Kingdom, were recruited for the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study between 1990 and 1994. Primary hip and knee replacement for osteoarthritis between 2001 and 2005 was determined by data linkage to the Australian Orthopaedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry. Participants born in Italy and Greece had a lower rate of primary joint replacement compared with those born in Australia (hazard ratio [HR] 0.32, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.26 to 0.39, P osteoarthritis in this cohort study compared with Australian-born people, which could not simply be explained by factors such as education level, physical functioning, and weight. Although differential access to health care found in the population may explain the different rates of joint replacement, it may be that social factors and preferences regarding treatment or different rates of progression to end-stage osteoarthritis in this population are important to ethnic disparity.

  4. Preoperative quadriceps strength as a predictor for short-term functional outcome after total hip replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holstege, Marije S; Lindeboom, Robert; Lucas, Cees

    2011-02-01

    To determine the preoperative strength of the muscle group of the lower extremity that is most important in predicting functional recovery after primary unilateral total hip replacement (THR). Prospective observational study with inception cohort. Joint care program (hospital care/clinical division of a nursing home/outpatient physical therapy). Patients (N=55) undergoing primary unilateral THR. Not applicable. Baseline measures within 2 weeks preoperative and follow-up at 6 and 12 weeks postoperative included isometric strength measurement of the hip (flexors, extensors, abductors, adductors) and knee (flexors, extensors) musculature using a handheld dynamometer. Functional outcome was tested using performance-based (Timed Up and Go Test, 6-Minute Walk Test) and self-report measures (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, subscale Physical Function [WOMAC PF], 36-Item Short Form Health Survey subscale Mental Health, visual analog scale for pain). Of the patients (N=55; mean age, 72.7±6.8y; 41 women) included; 18 dropped out, leaving 37 patients for analyses. After correction for WOMAC PF score at baseline, body mass index, sex, and age, the preoperative knee extensors strength measure of the operated site was the only muscle group showing a significant effect on functional outcome measured by using the WOMAC PF at 12 weeks postoperatively (R(2)=.355; β=-.105; P for β=.004). Preoperative greater knee extensor strength of the operated site is associated with better physical function, measured by using the WOMAC PF at 12 weeks postoperative. Copyright © 2011 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Pre-operative function, motivation and duration of symptoms predict sporting participation after total hip replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollivier, M; Frey, S; Parratte, S; Flecher, X; Argenson, J N

    2014-08-01

    There is little in the literature on the level of participation in sports which patients undertake after total hip replacement (THR). Our aims in this study were to determine first, the level of sporting activity, second, the predictive factors for returning to sporting activity, and third, the correlation between participation in sports and satisfaction after THR. We retrospectively identified 815 patients who had undergone THR between 1995 and 2005. All were asked to complete a self-administered questionnaire regarding their sporting activity. A total of 571 patients (71%) met the inclusion criteria and completed the evaluation. At a mean follow-up of 9.8 years (sd 2.9), 366 patients (64%) returned to sporting activity as defined by a University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) score of > 5. The main reasons that patients had for refraining from sports were fear of dislocation (65; 31.6%), avoiding wear (52; 25.4%), and the recommendation of the surgeon (34; 16.6%). There was a significant relationship between higher post-operative participation in sport in those patients with a higher pre-operative Harris hip score (HHS) (p = 0.0074), motivation to participate in sporting activities (p = 0.00022) and a shorter duration of symptoms (p = 0.0034). Finally, there was a correlation between age (p = 0.00013), UCLA score (p = 0.012) and pre-operative HHS (p = 0.00091) and satisfaction. In conclusion, we found that most patients participate in sporting activity after THR, regardless of the advice of their surgeon, and that there is a correlation between the level of participation and pre-operative function, motivation, duration of symptoms and post-operative satisfaction. ©2014 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  6. 21 CFR 888.3358 - Hip joint metal/polymer/metal semi-constrained porous-coated uncemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint metal/polymer/metal semi-constrained... Devices § 888.3358 Hip joint metal/polymer/metal semi-constrained porous-coated uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/polymer/metal semi-constrained porous-coated uncemented prosthesis is a device...

  7. 21 CFR 888.3330 - Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an uncemented acetabular component, prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an... Devices § 888.3330 Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an uncemented acetabular component, prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an uncemented acetabular...

  8. 21 CFR 888.3320 - Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a cemented acetabular component, prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a... Devices § 888.3320 Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a cemented acetabular component, prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a cemented acetabular...

  9. Do financial incentives trump clinical guidance? Hip Replacement in England and Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanicolas, Irene; McGuire, Alistair

    2015-12-01

    Following devolution in 1999 England and Scotland's National Health Services diverged, resulting in major differences in hospital payment. England introduced a case payment mechanism from 2003/4, while Scotland continued to pay through global budgets. We investigate the impact this change had on activity for Hip Replacement. We examine the financial reimbursement attached to uncemented Hip Replacement in England, which has been more generous than for its cemented counterpart, although clinical guidance from the National Institute for Clinical Excellence recommends the later. In Scotland this financial differential does not exist. We use a difference-in-difference estimator, using Scotland as a control, to test whether the change in reimbursement across the two countries had an influence on treatment. Our results indicate that financial incentives are directly linked to the faster uptake of the more expensive, uncemented Hip Replacement in England, which ran against the clinical guidance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Modern Radiological Imaging of Osteoarthritis of The Hip Joint With Consideration of Predisposing Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, M-A; Merle, C; Rehnitz, C; Gotterbarm, T

    2016-07-01

    Osteoarthritis is the most common disease of the hip joint in adults and has a high socioeconomic impact. This review article discusses the value of three imaging modalities in the diagnosis of osteoarthritis of the hip joint: projection radiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Besides established imaging diagnostics of osteoarthritis, this review also outlines new MRI techniques that enable the biochemical analysis of hip joint cartilage and discusses predisposing deformities of the hip joint including femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) with labral pathologies, hip joint dysplasia, malrotation, and, finally, femoral head necrosis, for which early detection and an exact description of the extent and localization of the necrotic area are extremely important. Conventional X-rays remain indispensable for the diagnosis of osteoarthritis, while MRI is able to depict additional early symptoms and signs of activity of the disease. With the increasing number of joint-preserving interventions such as surgical hip luxation and hip joint arthroscopy for treating FAI, high-resolution imaging is gaining further importance for both pre- and postoperative diagnostics because it can accurately recognize early stages of joint damage. With high-resolution MR sequences and MR arthrography, the detailed depiction of the thin cartilaginous coating of the hip joint has become quite possible. • Projection radiography is the method of choice for the diagnostic work-up of osteoarthritis of the hip joint.• Using computed tomography, the amount of acetabular bone stock prior to total hip arthroplasty is assessed in selected patients.• Magnetic resonance imaging can substantiate the indication of surgery in case of discrepancy between clinical symptoms and radiological findings of the hip joint.• If distinct and left untreated, predisposing conditions (such as femoroacetabular impingement) may lead to early development of osteoarthritis of the

  11. Periacetabular osteotomy for painful non-paralytic dysplastic hip joints in adults affected by poliomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tzu-Ping; Ko, Jih-Yang; Chen, Sung-Hsiung; Wu, Re-Wen; Wong, To; Chou, Wen-Yi

    2007-01-01

    Few researchers have discussed hip joint dysplasia in adults affected by poliomyelitis. We retrospectively studied the outcomes of hip joint function in poliomyelitic adults who underwent periacetabular osteotomy for the contralateral painful non-paralytic dysplastic hip joints. Eight female patients with the mean age of 35.9 years underwent periacetabular osteotomy from January 1991 through July 2002. The procedure was performed on eight non-paralytic hip joints via a modified Ollier transtrochanteric approach. Harris hip joint scores and radiographs were used to evaluate the hip joint functions. At a mean of 9.0 +/- 3.8 years postoperatively, the modified Harris hip joint scores had improved from 45.6 +/- 12.9 points preoperatively to 75.8 +/- 20.9 points. Radiographically, the degree of osteoarthrosis remained unchanged in seven hip joints and got worse in one. The anterior center-edge (CE) angle increased from 14.0 +/- 17.5 to 30.9 +/- 10.4 degrees. The lateral CE angle increased from -16.0 +/- 11.7 to 18.0 +/- 23.3 degrees. The acetabular index angle improved from 26.0 +/- 6.9 to 11.3 +/- 4.4 degrees. The acetabular head index increased from 36.1 +/- 11.7 to 63.1 +/- 20.7%. With an outcome system combining modified Harris hip joint scores and radiographic severity of osteoarthrosis, six patients had satisfactory results. Coxa valga usually occurred bilaterally with the neck-shaft angle of 159.1 +/- 15.7 degrees for the operated non-paralytic hip joints versus 161.4 +/- 6.7 degrees for the non-operated paralytic hip joints. Complications included osteonecrosis of the rotated acetabular fragment, acetabulofemoral impingement, a defect on the rotated ilium, and non-union of the superior pubic ramus (one hip joint each). Acetabular dysplasia can be severe in the non-paralytic leg because of coxa valga, leg length discrepancy, and pelvic tilt. Periacetabular osteotomy through a modified Ollier transtrochanteric approach provides extensive correction and relief of

  12. Profiles of Biomarkers of Excess Alcohol Consumption in Patients Undergoing Total Hip Replacement: Correlation with Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul J. Jenkins

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. Patients who misuse alcohol may be at increased risk of surgical complications and poorer function following hip replacement. Identification and intervention may lead to harm reduction and improve the outcomes of surgery. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of biomarker elevation in patients undergoing hip replacement and to investigate any correlation with functional scores and complications. Methods. We performed a retrospective study that examined the profile of biomarkers of alcohol misuse in 1049 patients undergoing hip replacement. Results. Gamma-glutamyltransferase was elevated in 150 (17.6%, and mean corpuscular volume was elevated in 23 (4%. At one year general physical health was poorer where there was elevation of γGT, and the mental health and hip function was poorer with elevation of MCV. There were no differences in complications. Discussion. Raised biomarkers can alert clinicians to potential problems. They also provide an opportunity to perform further investigation and offer intervention. Future research should focus on the use in orthopaedic practice of validated screening questionnaires and more sensitive biomarkers of alcohol misuse. Conclusion. This study demonstrates a potential substantial proportion of unrecognised alcohol misuse that is associated with poorer functional scores in patients after total hip replacement.

  13. Biomechanical and clinical alterations of the hip joint following femoral neck fracture and implantation of bipolar hip endoprosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smrke, Dragica; Biscević, Mirza; Smrke, Barbara U R; Zupan, Blaz

    2010-09-01

    The implantation of a bipolar partial hip endoprosthesis is a treatment of choice for displaced medial femoral neck fracture. We present an experimental study which asses and compare biomechanical and clinical status through period before and after hip fracture and implantation of bipolar partial hip endoprosthesis. This study encompassed 75 patients who suffered from an acute medial femoral neck fracture and were treated with the implantation of a bipolar partial hip endoprosthesis. Their biomechanical status (stress distribution on the hip joint weight bearing area) and clinical status (Harris Hip Score) were estimated for the time prior to the injury and assessed at the follow-up examination that was, on average, carried out 40 months after the operation. Despite ageing, the observed Harris Hip Score at the follow-up examination was higher than that estimated prior to the injury (77.9 > 69.6; p = 0.006). Similarly, the hip stress distribution was reduced (2.7 MPa endoprosthesis for patients with displaced medial femoral neck fractures improves the biomechanical and clinical features of the hip, what should have on mind during making decision about treatment.

  14. [Total hip replacement in elderly and senile patients with initial femur neck fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ternovoĭ, N K; Samokhin, A V; Grebennikov, K A

    2003-12-01

    We carried out researches with the purpose of comparison of operative treatment results of femur neck fractures in elderly and senile patients with those in other countries. Total hip replacement technique was used over the period of 1991-2002 yy. for 123 patients with femur neck fractures. We have used "Smith & Nephews" or "Zimmer" prostheses with "Polacos" or "Osteobond" acrylcements. Surgical approach tactics is very important for prophylaxis of early and late postoperative complications. Active and of sound mind patients with femur neck fractures should undergo total hip replacement procedure. Rehabilitation is also an important factor in preventive early and late postoperative complications.

  15. Rehabilitation of patients aged 65 and over after total hip replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hørdam, Britta

    The overall aim of this thesis was to investigate improvement in health status of patients aged 65 and over after total hip replacement (THR) as a result of nursing rehabilitation. The projects conssits of three studies, first a description of patients´health status after THR, followed by a rando......The overall aim of this thesis was to investigate improvement in health status of patients aged 65 and over after total hip replacement (THR) as a result of nursing rehabilitation. The projects conssits of three studies, first a description of patients´health status after THR, followed...

  16. Development of a Mandibular Motion Simulator for Total Joint Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celebi, Nukhet; Rohner, E. Carlos; Gateno, Jaime; Noble, Philip C.; Ismaily, Sabir K.; Teichgraeber, John F.; Xia, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to develop a motion simulator capable of recreating and recording the full range of mandibular motions in a cadaveric preparation for an intact temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and after total joint replacement. Material and Methods A human cadaver head was used. Two sets of tracking balls were attached to the forehead and mandible, respectively. Computed tomographic (CT) scan was performed and 3-dimensional CT models of the skull were generated. The cadaver head was then dissected to attach the muscle activation cables and mounted onto the TMJ simulator. Realistic jaw motions were generated through the application of the following muscle forces: lateral pterygoid muscle, suprahyoid depressors (geniohyoid, mylohyoid, and digastric muscles), and elevator muscles. To simulate muscle contraction, cables were inserted into the mandible at the center area of each muscle's attachment. To provide a minimum mouth closing force at the initial position, the elevator muscles were combined at the anterior mandible. During mandibular movement, each motion was recorded using a high-resolution laser scanner. The right TMJ of the same head was reconstructed with a total TMJ prosthesis. The same forces were applied and the jaw motions were recorded again. CT scan was performed and 3-dimensional CT models of the skull with TMJ prosthesis were generated. Results Mandibular motions, before and after TMJ replacement, with and without lateral pterygoid muscle reattachment, were re-created in a cadaveric preparation. The laser-scanned data during the mandibular motion were used to drive 3-dimensional CT models. A movie for each mandibular motion was subsequently created for motion path analysis. Compared with mandibular motion before TMJ replacement, mandibular lateral and protrusive motions after TMJ replacement, with and without lateral pterygoid muscle reattachment, were greatly limited. The jaw motion recorded before total joint replacement was

  17. Friction in total hip joint prosthesis measured in vivo during walking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Damm

    Full Text Available Friction-induced moments and subsequent cup loosening can be the reason for total hip joint replacement failure. The aim of this study was to measure the in vivo contact forces and friction moments during walking. Instrumented hip implants with Al2O3 ceramic head and an XPE inlay were used. In vivo measurements were taken 3 months post operatively in 8 subjects. The coefficient of friction was calculated in 3D throughout the whole gait cycle, and average values of the friction-induced power dissipation in the joint were determined. On average, peak contact forces of 248% of the bodyweight and peak friction moments of 0.26% bodyweight times meter were determined. However, contact forces and friction moments varied greatly between individuals. The friction moment increased during the extension phase of the joint. The average coefficient of friction also increased during this period, from 0.04 (0.03 to 0.06 at contralateral toe off to 0.06 (0.04 to 0.08 at contralateral heel strike. During the flexion phase, the coefficient of friction increased further to 0.14 (0.09 to 0.23 at toe off. The average friction-induced power throughout the whole gait cycle was 2.3 W (1.4 W to 3.8 W. Although more parameters than only the synovia determine the friction, the wide ranges of friction coefficients and power dissipation indicate that the lubricating properties of synovia are individually very different. However, such differences may also exist in natural joints and may influence the progression of arthrosis. Furthermore, subjects with very high power dissipation may be at risk of thermally induced implant loosening. The large increase of the friction coefficient during each step could be caused by the synovia being squeezed out under load.

  18. Smoking and primary total hip or knee replacement due to osteoarthritis in 54,288 elderly men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mnatzaganian, George; Ryan, Philip; Reid, Christopher M; Davidson, David C; Hiller, Janet E

    2013-09-05

    The reported association of smoking with risk of undergoing a total joint replacement (TJR) due to osteoarthritis (OA) is not consistent. We evaluated the independent association between smoking and primary TJR in a large cohort. The electronic records of 54,288 men and women, who were initially recruited for the Second Australian National Blood Pressure study, were linked to the Australian Orthopaedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry to detect total hip replacement (THR) or total knee replacement (TKR) due to osteoarthritis. Competing risk regressions that accounted for the competing risk of death estimated the subhazard ratios for TJR. One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were undertaken to represent uncertainty in the classification of smoking exposure and socioeconomic disadvantage scores. An independent inverse association was found between smoking and risk of THR and TKR observed in both men and women. Compared to non-smokers, male and female smokers were respectively 40% and 30% less likely to undergo a TJR. This significant association persisted after controlling for age, co-morbidities, body mass index (BMI), physical exercise, and socioeconomic disadvantage. The overweight and obese were significantly more likely to undergo TJR compared to those with normal weight. A dose-response relationship between BMI and TJR was observed (P osteoarthritis causing TJR.

  19. Instrumental and laboratory assessment of stressful remodelling processes in bone tissue at total hip replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.V. Karjakina

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Research objective is to estimate stressful remodelling features of bone tissue according to the densitometry data and to the level of biochemical markers of bone resorption and formation in total hip replacement (THR. Bone tissue mineral density (BTMD, condition of calcium-phosphoric metabolism and biochemical markers of bone formation (osteocalcin and bone isoenzyme of alkaline phosphatase and resorption (С-terminal bodypeptide of the I type collagen have been determined in 52 patients with coxarthrosis of ll-lll stages with marked joint dysfunction before and after THR. The control group included 24 donors. The data were considered to be reliable when the probability index was р<0,05. The reliable (р<0,05 change of BTMD was determined only in 3-6 months after the operation, whereas the change of biochemical markers of remodeling had already been done after 1,5-3 months, allowing to define the group of patients with obvious negative bone balance: strong predominance of resorption processes without compensation of the subsequent adequate osteogenesis, that subsequently could lead to significant bone tissue deficiency in the area adjacent to the endoprosthesis. Changes of indices of calcium-phosphoric metabolism were not certain during the investigation term. ln conclusion it is to state that biochemical markers of remodeling in comparison with BTMD allow to estimate objectively features of adaptive bone tissue remodeling after THR in earlier periods and to define group of patients with sharp intensification of metabolism and obvious negative bone balance

  20. SYNDROME-PATHOGENETIC APPROACH TO MEDICAL REHABILITATION OF PATIENTS AFTER THE TOTAL HIP AND KNEE REPLACEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Y. Udartsev

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of treatment 103 patients in term of 4-6 months after total hip and knee replacement were examined. Established that in the operated limb disorders of regional blood flow in the form of chronic lympho-venous insufficiency and changes in the functional state of neuromuscular apparatus in the form of muscle dysfunction, autonomic dysfunction occured. According to detected characteristics the medical rehabilitation for patients of the 1st group (52 patients was based on the combination of therapeutic factors complex usage, each of which exerts a specific effect on pathogenesis of a certain syndrome or their different combinations, and developing therapeutic factors are summarized and potentiated. That is why balneo-radon-kinesiotherapy, intermittent pneumocompression, low-frequency magnetotherapy, transcranial electroanalgesia, electrical myostimulation, pelotherapy, taking of central myorelexanat tizanidine were included in the treatment program. Among the patients of the 2nd group medical rehabilitation was based exclusively on motion state and bodily exercises. The analysis of treatment showed the advantage of syndrome-pathogenetic approach, applied for the 1st group of patients: joint range of motions increased by 33,1%, venous drainage increased by 24,4%, neuromuscular apparatus duty improved by 51,8%, involuntary nervous system balance normalized, functional outcome of the medical rehabilitation improved by 73,1%.

  1. Arthritic periosteal tissue from joint replacement surgery: a novel, autologous source of stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hana; Docheva, Denitsa; Knothe, Ulf R; Knothe Tate, Melissa L

    2014-03-01

    The overarching aim of this study is to assess the feasibility of using periosteal tissue from the femoral neck of arthritic hip joints, usually discarded in the normal course of hip replacement surgery, as an autologous source of stem cells. In addition, the study aims to characterize intrinsic differences between periosteum-derived cell (PDC) populations, isolated via either enzymatic digestion or a migration assay, including their proliferative capacity, surface marker expression, and multipotency, relative to commercially available human bone marrow-derived stromal cells (BMSCs) cultured under identical conditions. Commercial BMSCs and PDCs were characterized in vitro, using a growth assay, flow cytometry, as well as assay of Oil Red O, alizarin red, and Safranin O/Fast Green staining after respective culture in adipo-, osteo-, and chondrogenic media. Based on these outcome measures, PDCs exhibited proliferation rate, morphology, surface receptor expression, and multipotency similar to those of BMSCs. No significant correlation was observed between outcome measures and donor age or diagnosis (osteoarthritis [OA] and rheumatoid arthritis [RA], respectively), a profound finding given recent rheumatological studies indicating that OA and RA share not only common biomarkers and molecular mechanisms but also common pathophysiology, ultimately resulting in the need for joint replacement. Furthermore, PDCs isolated via enzymatic digestion and migration assay showed subtle differences in surface marker expression but otherwise no significant differences in proliferation or multipotency; the observed differences in surface marker expression may indicate potential effects of isolation method on the population of cells isolated and/or the behavior of the respective isolated cell populations. This study demonstrates, for the first time to our knowledge, the feasibility of using arthritic tissue resected during hip replacement as a source of autologous stem cells. In sum

  2. Computer-based estimation of the hip joint reaction force and hip flexion angle in three different sitting configurations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Houcke, J; Schouten, A; Steenackers, G; Vandermeulen, D; Pattyn, C; Audenaert, E A

    2017-09-01

    Sitting is part of our daily work and leisure activities and can be performed in different configurations. To date, the impact of different sitting configurations on hip joint loading has not been studied. We therefore evaluated the hip joint reaction force (HJRF) and hip flexion angle in a virtual representative male Caucasian population by means of musculoskeletal modelling of three distinct sitting configurations: a simple chair, a car seat and a kneeling chair configuration. The observed median HJRF in relation to body weight and hip flexion angle, respectively, was 22.3% body weight (%BW) and 63° for the simple chair, 22.5%BW and 79° for the car seat and 8.7%BW and 50° for the kneeling chair. Even though the absolute values of HJRF are low compared to the forces generated during dynamic activities, a relative reduction of over 50% in HJRF was observed in the kneeling chair configuration. Second, the hip flexion angles were both in the kneeling chair (-29°) and simple chair configuration (-16°) lower compared to the car seat and, as such, did not reach the threshold value for femoroacetabular conflict. In conclusion, the kneeling chair appears to hold the greatest potential as an ergonomic sitting configuration for the hip joint. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation of the relationship between Orthopedic Foundation for Animals' hip joint scores and PennHIP distraction index values in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Michelle Y; Karbe, Georga T; Gregor, Thomas P; McKelvie, Pamela; Culp, William T N; Fordyce, Hilary H; Smith, Gail K

    2010-09-01

    To compare 2 screening methods for detecting evidence of hip dysplasia (Orthopedic Foundation for Animals [OFA] and PennHIP) in dogs. Diagnostic test evaluation study. Animals-439 dogs >or= 24 months of age that received routine hip joint screening from June 1987 through July 2008. Dogs were sedated, and PennHIP radiography was performed (hip joint- extended [HE], compression, and distraction radiographic views). The HE radiographic view was submitted for OFA evaluation. A copy of the HE radiographic view plus the compression and distraction radiographic views were submitted for routine PennHIP evaluation, including quantification of hip joint laxity via the distraction index (DI). 14% (60/439) of dogs had hip joints scored as excellent by OFA standards; however, 52% (31/60) of those had a DI >or= 0.30 (range, 0.14 to 0.61). Eighty-two percent of (183/223) dogs with OFA-rated good hip joints had a DI >or= 0.30 (range, 0.10 to 0.77), and 94% (79/84) of dogs with OFA-rated fair hip joints had a DI >or= 0.30 (range, 0.14 to 0.77). Of all dogs with fair to excellent hip joints by OFA standards, 80% (293/367) had a DI >or= 0.30. All dogs with OFA-rated borderline hip joints or mild, moderate, or severe hip dysplasia had a DI >or= 0.30 (range, 0.30 to 0.83). Dogs judged as phenotypically normal by the OFA harbored clinically important passive hip joint laxity as determined via distraction radiography. Results suggested that OFA scoring of HE radiographs underestimated susceptibility to osteoarthritis in dogs, which may impede progress in reducing or eliminating hip dysplasia through breeding.

  4. Clinical and radiological evaluation of hybrid hip replacement in various disorders of hip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhaon B

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: High rates of loosening of cemented implants led to change in technique of fixation of the implant. Methods: Fifty-nine hips were operated in 42 patients with non-cemented acetabular and cemented femoral components between January 1999 and July 2003. The average age of the patient was 45.2 years in our study. Preoperative diagnosis was avascular necrosis (28, ankylosing spondylitis (18, fracture neck femur (9, rheumatoid arthritis (2 and osteoarthritis (2. Results: At an average follow up of 3.6 years (range 1.2-5.8 years excellent to good results were obtained 92% according to Harris hip criteria. No radiological loosening was noted in any femoral or acetabular component on follow up. One poor result was seen in a case of bilateral ankylosing spondylitis operated on one side. Conclusion: Hybrid THA provides a viable and highly acceptable method of treatment of diseases of hip in young patients.

  5. DIAGNOSTIC APPLICATION OF MULTIROW COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY OF THE HIP JOINT OF JAPANESE QUAILS (COTURNIX JAPONICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Paśko

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The morphological assessment of selected parts of the hindlimb of Japanese quails (Temminck & Schlegel, 1849, with particular emphasis on hip joint structures, was performed, using a 128-row scanner (GE Optima Aquilion, Toshiba, Japan. Eight dead 3-month-old Japanese quails were evaluated. During intravital examination of those birds, no hindlimb abnormalities or locomotion disorders were detected. Bird body, which hip joints and other structures of hindlimbs were studied, was examined in posterioranterior position. The following hip joint structures, on both sides, were assessed in this study: hip joint gap width, acetabulum width, femoral head diameter, and femoral shaft width. The applied imaging method allowed accurate assessment of the selected structures. There was low variability between left and right hindlimbs and among individuals. Modern imaging techniques, such as multirow computed tomography (MCT allows quick intravital assessment of normal and pathological structures of poultry bones and joints.

  6. Acetabular cartilage defects cause altered hip and knee joint coordination variability during gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaan, Michael A; Teng, Hsiang-Ling; Kumar, Deepak; Lee, Sonia; Link, Thomas M; Majumdar, Sharmila; Souza, Richard B

    2015-12-01

    Patients with acetabular cartilage defects reported increased pain and disability compared to those without acetabular cartilage defects. The specific effects of acetabular cartilage defects on lower extremity coordination patterns are unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine hip and knee joint coordination variability during gait in those with and without acetabular cartilage defects. A combined approach, consisting of a semi-quantitative MRI-based quantification method and vector coding, was used to assess hip and knee joint coordination variability during gait in those with and without acetabular cartilage lesions. The coordination variability of the hip flexion-extension/knee rotation, hip abduction-adduction/knee rotation, and hip rotation/knee rotation joint couplings were reduced in the acetabular lesion group compared to the control group during loading response of the gait cycle. The lesion group demonstrated increased variability in the hip flexion-extension/knee rotation and hip abduction-adduction/knee rotation joint couplings, compared to the control group, during the terminal stance/pre-swing phase of gait. Reduced variability during loading response in the lesion group may suggest reduced movement strategies and a possible compensation mechanism for lower extremity instability during this phase of the gait cycle. During terminal stance/pre-swing, a larger variability in the lesion group may suggest increased movement strategies and represent a compensation or pain avoidance mechanism caused by the load applied to the hip joint. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. [Viscosity determination of synovial fluids from the canine hip and elbow joint as well as the human knee joint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helms, Gabriele; Rittmann, Pia; Wefstaedt, Patrick; Windhagen, Henning; Pressel, Thomas; Behrens, Bernd-Arno; Nolte, Ingo

    2008-01-01

    The development of pathological changes in both human and canine hip joints is mainly caused by a lack of synovial fluid lubrication. This results in an increased joint abrasion. Even after implantation of joint prosthesis, inadequate lubrication can lead to abrasion in the tribological pair. This can finally result in aseptic loosening of the prosthesis. In spite of the enormous number of studies that have been performed on human, only little knowledge about the tribological properties of the joints in dogs is available in the literature. For this reason the viscosities of synovial fluid, derived from physiological and pathologically changed canine elbow joints were measured. The viscosities were determined by the use of a cone-plate viscometer at different temperatures and shear rates. The obtained values were compared with the viscosity values of pathologically changed synovial fluids from human knee joints as well as with pathological samples from the canine hip joint. The results show that the viscosity values vary within a series of measurements and are inversely proportional to the temperature of the sample and the shear rate. The differences between the average viscosities of canine and human synovial fluids taken from pathologically changed joints are below 4% (22.5 s(-1) at theta1 = 25 degrees C). The findings of this study are being implemented in a FE-Model for the computation of actual forces in the hip joint during different movements. This would represent a contribution to an improved prosthetic treatment of canine and human hips.

  8. Hip Implant Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... made of metal or ceramic, and the socket (acetabulum) is removed and replaced with a prosthetic cup. ... its socket in the hip bone (pelvis) Bone fracture Joint infection Local nerve damage with numbness/weakness ...

  9. Verification of an improved hip joint center prediction method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Emily J; Kaufman, Kenton R

    2018-01-01

    In motion analysis, the hip joint center (HJC) is used to define the proximal location of the thigh segment and is also the point about which hip moments are calculated. The HJC cannot be palpated; its location must be calculated. Functional methods have been proposed but are difficult to perform by some clinical populations. Therefore, regression methods are utilized, but yield large errors in estimating the HJC location. These prediction methods typically utilize the anterior and posterior superior iliac spines, where excessive adipose tissue makes correctly locating difficult. A new regression method (Hara) utilizes leg length and has been shown to improve HJC location in cadavers and less error than previous pelvic based regression methods, such as those proposed by Harrington et al. This study compared the accuracy of the HJC location calculated with both of the Harrington methods and the Hara method. The coronal knee angle was calculated for each method using a static motion analysis trial, and compared to the tibiofemoral angle measured on a gold standard digital full-leg coronal radiograph. This study demonstrated that the Hara method was more accurate than either of the Harrington methods. The mean error between the gold standard x-ray measurement and the motion analysis calculation for the Harrington (stepwise and LOOCV), the Harrington (linear regression), and Hara regression methods, respectively were 6.0°, 4.0°, and 1.8°. Accurately modeling the HJC is critical for data interpretation and patient care. This study confirmed that the Hara HJC regression method is valid in an in-vivo setting. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Periprosthetic hip joint infection with Aspergillus terreus: A clinical case and a review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Bartash

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Fungal periprosthetic joint infections due to Aspergillus species are rare but are associated with significant cost and morbidity. We present a case of Asperigillus terreus prosthetic joint infection of the hip. The patient was successfully treated with a prolonged course of systemic antifungals along with surgical management. Keywords: Fungal prosthetic joint infection, Aspergillus terreus

  11. Corrosion and Tribology of Materials Used in a Novel Reverse Hip Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braddon, Linda; Termanini, Zafer; MacDonald, Steven; Parvizi, Jay; Lieberman, Jay; Frankel, Victor; Zuckerman, Joseph

    2017-07-05

    Total hip arthroplasty has been utilized for the past 50 years as an effective treatment for degenerative, inflammatory and traumatic disorders of the hip. The design of these implants has generally followed the anatomy of the hip as a ball and socket joint with the femoral head representing the ball and the acetabulum representing the socket. We describe a novel hip arthroplasty design in which the "ball" is located on the acetabular side and the "socket" is located on the femoral side. The results of extensive biomechanical testing are described and document wear and corrosion characteristics that are at least equivalent to standard designs. These results support clinical assessment as the next step of the evaluation.

  12. Who should have knee joint replacement surgery for osteoarthritis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dieppe, Paul; Lim, Keith; Lohmander, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Knee joint replacement is an effective and cost-effective intervention for severe symptomatic osteoarthritis of the knee joint. However, utilisation rates vary hugely, there are no indications, it is difficult to know when (in the course of arthritis) it is best to operate, and some 10-20% of peo......Knee joint replacement is an effective and cost-effective intervention for severe symptomatic osteoarthritis of the knee joint. However, utilisation rates vary hugely, there are no indications, it is difficult to know when (in the course of arthritis) it is best to operate, and some 10...... criteria, including appropriateness criteria are available, but if produced by professionals alone, they may conflict with the views of patients and the public. Databases and cohort studies can be used to attempt relating outcomes to baseline characteristics, but at present we can only account for a small...... percentage of the variance with this technique. Finally, we propose use of the 'capacity to benefit framework' to attempt providing guidance to both patients and healthcare professionals....

  13. Evaluation of the magnitude of hip joint deformation in subjects with avascular necrosis of the hip joint during walking with and without Scottish Rite orthosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Mohammad Taghi; Mohammadi, Ali; Ebrahimi, Mohammad Hossein; McGarry, Anthony

    2017-02-01

    The femoral head in subjects with leg calve perthes disease (LCPD) is generally considerably deformed. It is debatable whether this deformation is due to an increase in applied loads, a decrease in bone mineral density or a change in containment of articular surfaces. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of these factors on deformation of the femoral head. Two subjects with LCPD participated in this study. Subject motion and the forces applied on the affected leg were recorded using a motion analysis system (QualsisTM) and a Kistler force plate. OpenSim software was used to determine joint contact force of the hip joint whilst walking with and without a Scottish Rite orthosis. 3D Models of hip joints of both subjects were produced by Mimics software. The deformation of femoral bone was determined by Abaqus. Mean values of the force applied on the leg increased while walking with the orthosis. There was no difference between bone mineral density (BMD) of the femoral bone of normal and LCPD sides (p-value>0.05) and no difference between hip joint contact force of normal and LCPD sides. Hip joint containment appeared to decrease follow the use of the orthosis. It can be concluded that the deformation of femoral head in LCPD may not be due to change in BMD or applied load. Although the Scottish Rite orthosis is used mostly to increase hip joint containment, it appears to reduce hip joint contact area. It is recommended that a similar study is conducted using a higher number of subjects. Copyright © 2016 IPEM. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of hip joint position and intra-capsular volume on hip joint intra-capsular pressure: a human cadaveric model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tse Paul

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increase in hip intra-capsular pressure has been implicated in various hip pathologies, such as avascular necrosis complicating undisplaced femoral neck fracture. Our study aimed at documenting the relationship between intra-capsular volume and pressure in various hip positions. Methods Fifty-two cadaveric hips were studied. An electronic pressure-monitoring catheter recorded the intra-capsular hip pressure after each instillation of 2 ml of normal saline and in six hip positions. Results In neutral hip position, the control position for investigation, intra-capsular pressure remained unchanged when its content was below 10 ml. Thereafter, it increased exponentially. When the intra-capsular volume was 12 ml, full abduction produced a 2.1-fold increase (p = 0.028 of the intra-capsular hip joint pressure; full external rotation and full internal rotation increased the pressure by at least 4-fold (p Conclusion Intra-capsular pressure increases with its volume, but with a wide variation with different positions. It would be appropriate to recommend that hips with haemarthrosis or effusion should be positioned in 45-degree flexion.

  15. Feasibility of Early-Initiated Progressive Resistance Training after Total Hip Replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Lone Ramer; Mechlenburg, Inger; Petersen, Annemette Krintel

    Background: Muscle atrophy, reduced hip muscle strength and function are documented within the first weeks after Total Hip Replacement (THR). Purpose / Aim of Study: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of early-initiated progressive resistance training (PRT) after THR....... Materials and Methods: 10 patients were followed 4 weeks post THR. The PRT was initiated 2-5 days after surgery, and performed twice a week for 4 weeks. Unilateral exercises were performed in 4 training machines applying 3 sets of 10 repetitions at 10 RM (repetition maximum). Absolute loading (kg) and pain......, mean (sd): 0.98 (0.26), 1.03 (0.29) Nm/kg, p=0.52. Conclusions: It seems feasible to commence PRT within the first week after THR, as hip pain remained the same or decreased, while the training load increased progressively. The included patients reached their preoperative hip-strength levels after 4...

  16. Increased risk of revision for infection in rheumatoid arthritis patients with total hip replacements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrama, Johannes Cornelis; Fenstad, Anne M; Dale, Håvard

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose-Medical treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has changed dramatically over the last 15 years, including immune modulation. We investigated the risk of revision for infection after primary total hip replacement (THR) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis over a 16-year per...

  17. Comparative responsiveness of measures of pain and function after total hip replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsdotter, A K; Roos, Ewa M.; Westerlund, J P

    2001-01-01

    To compare the responsiveness of the Functional Assessment System (FAS), the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), and the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short Form (SF-36) in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) scheduled for total hip replacement....

  18. Functional exercise after total hip replacement (FEATHER): a randomised control trial.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Monaghan, Brenda

    2012-11-01

    Prolonged physical impairments in range of movement, postural stability and walking speed are commonly reported following total hip replacement (THR). It is unclear from the current body of evidence what kind of exercises should be performed to maximize patient function and quality of life.

  19. Oral rivaroxaban for the prevention of symptomatic venous thromboembolism after elective hip and knee replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, B I; Kakkar, A K; Turpie, A G G

    2009-01-01

    A once-daily dose of rivaroxaban 10 mg, an oral, direct Factor Xa inhibitor, was compared with enoxaparin 40 mg subcutaneously once daily for prevention of venous thromboembolism in three studies of patients undergoing elective hip and knee replacement (RECORD programme). A pooled analysis of data...

  20. A nationwide analysis of socioeconomic outcomes after hip and knee replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjellberg, Jakob; Kehlet, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Total hip and knee replacement (THA and TKA) are successful operations based on patient-reported outcomes and short-term socioeconomic evaluations. However, other data have shown problems regarding persistent pain and function. No detailed large-scale, long-term socioeconomic data...

  1. Purulent Necrotic Dislocation of the Hip Joint Associated with Umbilical Infection in a Foal

    Science.gov (United States)

    MAGATA, Fumie; ISHII, Mitsuo; OIKAWA, Eri; FURUOKA, Hidefumi; YAMADA, Kazutaka; SASAKI, Naoki; SHIMIZU, Syo; INOKUMA, Hisashi

    2010-01-01

    A 42-day-old heavy draft horse fell into sudden astasia. Significant swelling and heat sensation of the left femoral region were observed. Because of a friction sound in the left hip, we supposed that the hip joint was dislocated or the hip bone was fractured. Computed Tomography (CT) examination showed that the left hip joint was dislocated and the left femoral head was disjunct. We carried out a pathological autopsy, and made a diagnosis of the foal as fracture of the hip bone and femoral head with suppurative umbilical arteritis. Pathologic changes in the umbilical artery and hind leg were completely unilateral, suggesting that left umbilical arteritis spread to the blood circulation, causing arthritis and dislocation of the hip bone. PMID:24833975

  2. Use of irradiated autologous bone in joint sparing endoprosthetic femoral replacement tumor surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sridhar Vijayan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Joint preservation is usually attempted in cases of bone tumors, though insufficient bone following tumour resection may prevent fixation of conventional joint sparing prosthesis. To preserve the hip joint in skeletally immature patients, we have combined autologous proximal femoral irradiation and intercalary re-implantation with custom made distal femoral replacements. Materials and Methods: A retrospective cohort study of four patients (aged 4-12 years; in whom irradiated autologous bone was combined with an extendable distal femoral endoprostheses was performed. There were three cases of osteosarcoma and one case of Ewing′s sarcoma. Results: At a mean follow-up of 70.5 months (range 26-185 months, all four patients were alive without evidence of local recurrence. There was no evidence of metastatic disease in three patients while one patient showed chest metastatic disease at presentation. In all cases, the irradiated segment of bone united with the proximal femur and demonstrated bone ongrowth at the prosthetic collar. There were no cases of loosening or peri-prosthetic fracture. One implant was revised after 14 years following fracture of the extending component of the endoprosthesis. Conclusions: We report encouraging results utilizing irradiated autologous proximal femoral bone combined with distal femoral replacement in skeletally immature patients.

  3. Surgical challenges and clinical outcomes of total hip replacement in patients with Down's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zywiel, M G; Mont, M A; Callaghan, J J; Clohisy, J C; Kosashvili, Y; Backstein, D; Gross, A E

    2013-11-01

    Down's syndrome is associated with a number of musculoskeletal abnormalities, some of which predispose patients to early symptomatic arthritis of the hip. The purpose of the present study was to review the general and hip-specific factors potentially compromising total hip replacement (THR) in patients with Down's syndrome, as well as to summarise both the surgical techniques that may anticipate the potential adverse impact of these factors and the clinical results reported to date. A search of the literature was performed, and the findings further informed by the authors' clinical experience, as well as that of the hip replacement in Down Syndrome study group. The general factors identified include a high incidence of ligamentous laxity, as well as associated muscle hypotonia and gait abnormalities. Hip-specific factors include: a high incidence of hip dysplasia, as well as a number of other acetabular, femoral and combined femoroacetabular anatomical variations. Four studies encompassing 42 hips, which reported the clinical outcomes of THR in patients with Down's syndrome, were identified. All patients were successfully treated with standard acetabular and femoral components. The use of supplementary acetabular screw fixation to enhance component stability was frequently reported. The use of constrained liners to treat intra-operative instability occurred in eight hips. Survival rates of between 81% and 100% at a mean follow-up of 105 months (6 to 292) are encouraging. Overall, while THR in patients with Down's syndrome does present some unique challenges, the overall clinical results are good, providing these patients with reliable pain relief and good function.

  4. Hormone replacement therapy and risk of hip fracture: population based case-control study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaëlsson, Karl; Baron, John A; Farahmand, Bahman Y; Johnell, Olof; Magnusson, Cecilia; Persson, Per-Gunnar; Persson, Ingemar; Ljunghall, Sverker

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To determine the relative risk of hip fracture associated with postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy including the effect of duration and recency of treatment, the addition of progestins, route of administration, and dose. Design: Population based case-control study. Setting: Six counties in Sweden. Subjects: 1327 women aged 50-81 years with hip fracture and 3262 randomly selected controls. Main outcome measure: Use of hormone replacement therapy. Results: Compared with women who had never used hormone replacement therapy, current users had an odds ratio of 0.35 (95 % confidence interval 0.24 to 0.53) for hip fracture and former users had an odds ratio of 0.76 (0.57 to 1.01). For every year of therapy, the overall risk decreased by 6% (3% to 9%): 4% (1% to 8%) for regimens without progestin and 11% (6% to 16%) for those with progestin. Last use between one and five years previously, with a duration of use more than five years, was associated with an odds ratio of 0.27 (0.08 to 0.94). After five years without hormone replacement therapy the protective effect was substantially diminished (−7% to 48%). With current use, an initiation of therapy nine or more years after the menopause gave equally strong reduction in risk for hip fracture as an earlier start. Oestrogen treatment with skin patches gave similar risk estimates as oral regimens. Conclusions: Recent use of hormone replacement therapy is required for optimum fracture protection, but therapy can be started several years after the menopause. The protective effect increases with duration of use, and an oestrogen-sparing effect is achieved when progestins are included in the regimen. Key messages Hormone replacement therapy should be continued for long periods for optimal protection of hip fracture No overall substantial hip fracture protection remains after five years without hormone replacement therapy Therapy can be initiated several years after menopause without loss of fracture protection

  5. [Short- and medium-term effectivenesses of stemless hip arthroplasty for treating hip joint disease in young and middle-aged patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qingzhen; Liu, Wuyang; Gao, Hui; Shi, Mingxiang; Lian, Yucai

    2014-09-01

    To summarize the short- and medium-term effectivenesses of stemless hip arthroplasty for treating hip joint disease in young and middle-aged patients. Between June 2005 and December 2010, 25 cases (27 hips) of hip joint disease were treated with stemless hip arthroplasty. There were 17 males (19 hips) and 8 females (8 hips) with an average age of 45.6 years (range, 30-57 years), including 13 left hips, 10 right hips, and 2 bilateral hips. The causes included avascular necrosis of the femoral head (ANFH) secondary to femoral neck fracture in 5 cases (5 hips), ANFH in 15 cases (16 hips), osteoarthritis of the hip joint caused by ankylosing spondylitis in 2 cases (3 hips), osteoarthritis of the hip joint caused by dysplasia of acetabular in 2 cases (2 hips), and rheumatoid arthritis in 1 case (1 hip). The disease duration was 1-17 years (mean, 6.1 years). Before operation, the Harris score was 47.6 ± 14.2. The incision healed by first intention in all patients, and no complications occurred, such as infection, periprosthetic fracture, and deep vein thrombosis of lower extremity. Twenty-five patients (27 hips) were followed up 36-96 months (mean, 51 months). One case (1 hip) had sciatic nerve injury after operation, which was relieved by symptomatic treatment. One case (1 hip) had prosthesis loosening, which was relieved after revision. The survival rate of prosthesis was 96.3% (26/27). At last follow-up, the Harris score was 92.1 ± 3.6, which was significantly better than preoperative score (t = 18.241, P = 0.000). The excellent and good rate was 88.9% (excellent in 19 hips, good in 5 hips, fair in 2 hips, and poor in 1 hip). The X-ray films showed good location of prosthesis, and no evidence of dislocation, bone resorption, osteolysis, and heterotopic ossification. Because of reserving femoral neck, biomechanics conduction and distribute of the proximal femur achieve natural biomechanics state of the human body. The short- and medium-term effectivenesses of

  6. Sonographic evaluation of hip joint effusion in osteoarthritis with correlation to radiographic findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birn, Jeff; Pruente, Ryan; Avram, Raluca; Eyler, William; Mahan, Meredith; van Holsbeeck, Marnix

    2014-05-01

    Hip joint effusion is expected in rapidly destructive osteoarthritis, a diagnosis often only made retrospectively at the end stage of the disease. This study assesses whether the presence of an effusion identified during routine ultrasound-guided hip injection may suggest a more aggressive process such as rapidly destructive osteoarthritis. After the observation of 10 index cases of rapidly destructive osteoarthritis in patients who presented with a joint effusion on ultrasound, we retrospectively reviewed 94 hips from 89 patients who underwent ultrasound-guided hip injection for pain. Preinjection longitudinal ultrasound images of the anterior capsule adjacent to the femoral neck and inferior to the femoral head were reviewed to determine if a joint effusion was present and the size of the effusion if one was there. Comparison of effusion size was then made between those hips that had a clinical and radiographic diagnosis of osteoarthritis and those who had rapidly destructive osteoarthritis by comparing the severity of joint effusion, if one was present. Patients with rapidly destructive osteoarthritis were more likely to have a large joint effusion 60% (3/5) than were those with osteoarthritis 6.7% (6/89) (p = 0.013). Large joint effusions identified sonographically correlate well with radiographic findings of rapidly destructive osteoarthritis. Given rapid onset and severity of the disease, when a large joint effusion is identified on routine hip intervention, patients should be forewarned of the potential for this disease process. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Traumatic dislocation of the hip joint - pattern and management in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Traumatic dislocation of the hip is an orthopaedic emergency for which early reduction is indicated. This article describe our experience of the pattern and choice of management of traumatic dislocation of the hip joint in a tropical African population. Majority of the dislocation (87%) were Thompson and Epstein's grades I ...

  8. Validation of the diagnosis 'prosthetic joint infection' in the Danish Hip Arthroplasty Register

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gundtoft, P H; Pedersen, Alma Becic; Schønheyder, H C

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: The purpose of this study was to validate the diagnosis of periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) in the Danish Hip Arthroplasty Register (DHR). PATIENTS AND METHODS: We identified a cohort of patients from the DHR who had undergone primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) since 1 January 2005 an...

  9. The morphology and functions of the muscles around the hip joint after a unilateral transfemoral amputation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaegers, Sonja Maria Héléne José

    1993-01-01

    This dissertation is concerned with the consequences of a transfemoral amputation for the morphology and functions of the muscles around the hip joint. Knowledge about and insight into the changes appearing in the morphology and functions of the hip muscles of transfemoral amputees are important to

  10. The influence of Hip Joint Stiffness on Crutch Supported Paraplegic Standing - A modeling Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Spek, J.H.; Veltink, Petrus H.; Hermens, Hermanus J.

    1999-01-01

    In this study, the use of hip joint stiffness to control crutch supported paraplegic stance was investigated. A model was made and simulations were performed. Currently experiments are performed to validate the modelling results

  11. Regression models to predict hip joint centers in pathological hip population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantovani, Giulia; Ng, K C Geoffrey; Lamontagne, Mario

    2016-02-01

    The purpose was to investigate the validity of Harrington's and Davis's hip joint center (HJC) regression equations on a population affected by a hip deformity, (i.e., femoroacetabular impingement). Sixty-seven participants (21 healthy controls, 46 with a cam-type deformity) underwent pelvic CT imaging. Relevant bony landmarks and geometric HJCs were digitized from the images, and skin thickness was measured for the anterior and posterior superior iliac spines. Non-parametric statistical and Bland-Altman tests analyzed differences between the predicted HJC (from regression equations) and the actual HJC (from CT images). The error from Davis's model (25.0 ± 6.7 mm) was larger than Harrington's (12.3 ± 5.9 mm, pmodels. Measured skin thickness was 9.7 ± 7.0mm and 19.6 ± 10.9 mm for the anterior and posterior bony landmarks, respectively, and correlated with body mass index. Skin thickness estimates can be considered to reduce the systematic error introduced by surface markers. New adult-specific regression equations were developed from the CT dataset, with the hypothesis that they could provide better estimates when tuned to a larger adult-specific dataset. The linear models were validated on external datasets and using leave-one-out cross-validation techniques; Prediction errors were comparable to those of Harrington's model, despite the adult-specific population and the larger sample size, thus, prediction accuracy obtained from these parameters could not be improved. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Custom made total hip replacement--necessary or not?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozowski, Andrzej; Paprocka-Borowicz, Małgorzata; Jarzab, Sławomir; Romaszkiewicz, Patryk; Starzyk, Maciej

    2009-01-01

    Indication and technical requirements analyses for custom made THR have been made. Indications for the use of custom made THR and the results achieved have been assessed according to the available literature and compared to the results of standard THR. There is a significant divergence in indications, late results and production costs. Clinical reports focus mostly on individual project metric data preparation method, technical aspects (such as shape or used material) or implantation method. Biomechanical analysis of achievable range of motion, ways of load transportation and equalization of frequently substantial discrepancy in leg length, is more hypothetical. The difficulty stems from the soft tissue quality which cannot be determined precisely, the cause of contracture or dynamic dysfunction triggered by the change of muscle action axis and muscle force over the joint, after changes of offset and joint axis of motion. In complicated cases, preoperative planning of a single approach/solution strategy can pose severe difficulties which would be hard to overcome during operation. Analysis was based on 2 cases.

  13. Influence of weak hip abductor muscles on joint contact forces during normal walking: probabilistic modeling analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Giordano; Taddei, Fulvia; Jonkers, Ilse

    2013-09-03

    The weakness of hip abductor muscles is related to lower-limb joint osteoarthritis, and joint overloading may increase the risk for disease progression. The relationship between muscle strength, structural joint deterioration and joint loading makes the latter an important parameter in the study of onset and follow-up of the disease. Since the relationship between hip abductor weakness and joint loading still remains an open question, the purpose of this study was to adopt a probabilistic modeling approach to give insights into how the weakness of hip abductor muscles, in the extent to which normal gait could be unaltered, affects ipsilateral joint contact forces. A generic musculoskeletal model was scaled to each healthy subject included in the study, and the maximum force-generating capacity of each hip abductor muscle in the model was perturbed to evaluate how all physiologically possible configurations of hip abductor weakness affected the joint contact forces during walking. In general, the muscular system was able to compensate for abductor weakness. The reduced force-generating capacity of the abductor muscles affected joint contact forces to a mild extent, with 50th percentile mean differences up to 0.5 BW (maximum 1.7 BW). There were greater increases in the peak knee joint loads than in loads at the hip or ankle. Gluteus medius, particularly the anterior compartment, was the abductor muscle with the most influence on hip and knee loads. Further studies should assess if these increases in joint loading may affect initiation and progression of osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of clinical pathways in the joint replacement: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faggiano F

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the use of clinical pathways for hip and knee joint replacements when compared with standard medical care. The impact of clinical pathways was evaluated assessing the major outcomes of in-hospital hip and knee joint replacement processes: postoperative complications, number of patients discharged at home, length of in-hospital stay and direct costs. Methods Medline, Cinahl, Embase and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched. The search was performed from 1975 to 2007. Each study was assessed independently by two reviewers. The assessment of methodological quality of the included studies was based on the Jadad methodological approach and on the New Castle Ottawa Scale. Data analysis abided by the guidelines set out by The Cochrane Collaboration regarding statistical methods. Meta-analyses were performed using RevMan software, version 4.2. Results Twenty-two studies met the study inclusion criteria and were included in the meta-analysis for a total sample of 6,316 patients. The aggregate overall results showed significantly fewer patients suffering postoperative complications in the clinical pathways group when compared with the standard care group. A shorter length of stay in the clinical pathway group was also observed and lower costs during hospital stay were associated with the use of the clinical pathways. No significant differences were found in the rates of discharge to home. Conclusion The results of this meta-analysis show that clinical pathways can significantly improve the quality of care even if it is not possible to conclude that the implementation of clinical pathways is a cost-effective process, because none of the included studies analysed the cost of the development and implementation of the pathways. Based on the results we assume that pathways have impact on the organisation of care if the care process is structured in a standardised way

  15. Flexion reminder device to discourage recurrent posterior dislocation of a total hip replacement: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong King

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Recurrent dislocation of a total hip replacement prosthesis is a frustrating complication for both the surgeon and the patient. For positional dislocations with no indications for revision surgery, the current best treatment is physiotherapy, the use of abduction braces and avoidance of unsafe hip positions. Abduction braces can be cumbersome and have poor compliance. We report the successful use of a new lightweight flexion reminder device that can be used to treat people with this condition. Case presentation A 64-year-old British woman experienced recurrent positional posterior dislocation after primary hip replacement, particularly when involved in activities involving unsafe flexion of the operated hip. She disliked using an abduction brace and hence was given a simple 'flexion reminder device' that could be strapped to the thigh. Beyond the safe flexion limit, the padded top end of the device hitched against the groin crease and reminded her not to flex further, to avoid dislocation. She experienced no discomfort in wearing the device continuously throughout the day and was very satisfied. She has had no further dislocations in the 2 years since she began using it. Conclusion In cases of arthroplasty dislocation caused mainly by an unsafe hip position, and with no indication for revision surgery, this new lightweight and easily worn flexion reminder device may be a good option for avoiding such positional dislocations, particularly those caused by unsafe flexion.

  16. The effect of triclosan coated sutures on rate of surgical site infection after hip and knee replacement: a protocol for a double-blind randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprowson, Andrew P; Jensen, Cyrus D; Parsons, Nick; Partington, Paul; Emmerson, Kevin; Carluke, Ian; Asaad, Seif; Pratt, Roland; Muller, Scott; Reed, Mike R

    2014-07-14

    187,000 hip and knee joint replacements are performed every year in the National Health Service (NHS). One of the commonest complications is surgical site infection (SSI), and this represents a significant burden in terms of patient morbidity, mortality and cost to health services around the world. The aim of this randomised controlled trial (RCT) is to determine if the addition of triclosan coated sutures to a standard regimen can reduce the rate of SSI after total knee replacement (TKR) and total hip replacement (THR). 2400 patients due to undergo a total hip or knee replacement are being recruited into this two-centre RCT. Participants are recruited before surgery and randomised to either standard care or intervention group. Participants, outcome assessors and statistician are blind to treatment allocation throughout the study. The intervention consists of triclosan coated sutures vs. standard non-coated sutures. The primary outcome is the Health protection Agency (HPA) defined superficial surgical site infection at 30 days. Secondary outcomes include HPA defined deep surgical site infection at 12 months, length of hospital stay, critical care stay, and payer costs. To date there are no orthopaedic randomised controlled trials on this scale assessing the effectiveness of a surgical intervention, particularly those that can be translated across the surgical specialities. The results from this trial will inform evidence-based recommendations for suture selection in the management of patients undergoing total hip or knee replacement. If triclosan coated sutures are found to be an effective intervention, implementation into clinical practice could improve long-term outcomes for patients undergoing hip and knee replacement. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN 17807356.

  17. Development of a model to induce transient synovitis and lameness in the hip joint of dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Elham A; Lambrechts, Nicolaas E; Moore, George E; Weng, Hsin-Yi; Heng, Hock Gan; Breur, Gert J

    2015-10-01

    To develop a model of hip joint synovitis on the basis of intra-articular injection of a sodium urate suspension in dogs and to characterize associated gait changes. 6 healthy adult dogs. Each dog was sedated, and synovitis was induced by injection of 1 mL of a sodium urate suspension (20 mg/mL) into the right hip joint under ultrasonographic guidance. Observational and instrumented gait analyses to determine temporospatial, kinetic, and kinematic variables were performed prior to and 4, 8, and 24 hours after sedation and synovitis induction. Injection of a sodium urate suspension into the hip joint of healthy dogs resulted in lameness of the ipsilateral pelvic limb as determined by observational and instrumented gait analyses. For all dogs, lameness was clinically detectable within 1.5 to 2 hours after injection, reached its maximum intensity at 4 hours after injection, and had subsided by 24 hours after injection. Results indicated that injection of a sodium urate suspension into the hip joint of healthy dogs reliably induced synovitis and signs of pain and lameness in the ipsilateral pelvic limb that lasted 24 hours. This model can be used in conjunction with instrumented gait analysis to provide information on gait changes associated with hip joint disease and might be useful for evaluating the efficacy of analgesics or other interventions for the treatment of hip joint disease in dogs.

  18. Agreements and disagreements in exercise therapy prescriptions after hip replacement among rehabilitation professionals: a multicenter survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eulenburg, Christine; Rahlf, Anna-Lina; Kutasow, Andrej; Zech, Astrid

    2015-08-05

    Exercise therapy following total hip replacement (THR) is considered to be important during the initial postoperative care, but till date only a few evidence-based recommendations exist. The aim of this survey was to identify prescription standards among different rehabilitation professionals, for the exercise therapy management after THR in Germany. The study was a cross-sectional survey. Standardized questionnaires were sent to 38 eligible rehabilitation facilities in Germany. Participating surgeons, orthopaedic physicians, physiotherapists and exercise therapists rated the optimal early weight-bearing, resistance training, key components and dose of exercise therapy, and the hip loading during exercising. The returned questionnaires were then analyzed for level of agreement (≥80%) among respondents. 313 rehabilitation professionals from 28 clinics returned completed questionnaires and were considered eligible for analysis. Out of total respondents, 53.9% (cemented THR) and 18.2% (uncemented THR) recommended full weight-bearing within five days after surgery. Commencement of resistance training later than three weeks after surgery is recommended by 20.6% (36%) for cemented (uncemented) prosthesis. Feedback varied significantly amongst the professions. Regarding the overall objectives of rehabilitation after hip replacement, respondents agree in six out of eight requested items. Agreement concerning priorities of specific exercises was achieved in three out of twelve items. The recommended exercise therapy dose varied significantly with working experience (p = 0.02). Rehabilitation professionals mainly disagreed with the exercise therapy prescriptions following the total hip replacement during the initial postoperative care in Germany.

  19. The relationship of hip joint space to self reported hip pain. A survey of 4.151 subjects of the Copenhagen City Heart Study: the Osteoarthritis Substudy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Steffen; Sonne-Holm, Stig; Søballe, Kjeld

    2004-01-01

    was significantly associated to self reported pain in or around the hip joint in both sexes. CONCLUSION: Measurements of minimum hip JSW did not seem to be significantly influenced by varying spatial orientation of the pelvis during X-ray recordings. An inclusion criteria of minimum JSW... definite degenerative pathology in hips will be used by the current authors in future studies....

  20. Complications after endoprosthetic joint replacement in patients receiving genetically engineered biological agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Yuryevna Pogozheva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the clinical features and to define the frequency of postoperative complications in patients with rheumatic diseases (RD who had undergone endoprosthetic knee and hip joint replacement (EKJR and EHJR during therapy with genetically engineered biological agents (GEBAs. Subjects and methods. The study included 37 patients with RD: 30 with rheumatoid arthritis (RA, 6 with ankylosing spondylitis (AS, and 1 with psoriatic arthritis (PsA. All the patients had indications for endoprosthetic joint replacement (EJR: evident deformity and dysfunction of the joint; pain unrelieved by analgesics and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs; and low quality of life (QL. EHJR and EKJR were performed in 21 and 16 patients, respectively. Their mean age was 40.6+15.8 years (range 18 to 64 years; 78.4% were women; the mean duration of disease was 15 years. 73% patients received synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs; 68% took small-dose glucocorticosteroids (GCs. All the patients were on GEBA therapy: 16 patients on rituximab, 15 on infliximab, 1 on adalimumab, 3 on abatacept, and 2 on tocilizumab. The activity of RA was determined using DAS 28 scores, that of AS and PsA was estimated using BASDAI and DAS 4 scores, respectively; functional activity was calculated from HAQ scores; QL was defined using the EQ-5D questionnaire. Results. The diagnosis was established in 73% of the patients within the first 2 years after disease onset; at that time, half of them started receiving DMARD therapy. GEBAs were given to patients with high disease activity, inefficacy or intolerance of synthetic DMARDs at an average of 13 years of disease. Addition of GEBAs could lessen preoperative disease activity in the majority of patients (to moderate and low activities in 60 and 27% of the patients, respectively and the activity remained high only in 13%. During their disease, 84% of the patients took small-dose GCs long (for 1 to 19 years; however, only

  1. Factors influencing inpatient rehabilitation length of stay following revision hip replacements: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davis Aileen M

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The annual incidence of revision hip replacements has increased in both Canada and United States, particularly in younger adults. Patients following revision hip replacements often require longer hospital length of stay (LOS but little is known about predictors of inpatient rehabilitation LOS in this group of patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the socio-demographic, pre-surgery, surgery and post-surgery related factors that might influence rehabilitation LOS of inpatients following revision hip replacements. Methods This study included inpatients discharged from a musculoskeletal ward between 2002 and 2006 following rehabilitation revision hip replacement. Data sources included the National Reporting System, a standardized, provincial administrative database and augmented by chart abstraction. The collected elements included the outcome LOS and the following independent variables: age, sex, support at home, environmental barriers, language barrier, number of revision surgeries on the affected hip, comorbidity, previous orthopaedic surgeries in the lower extremities (L/ES, the hip component(s revised, weight-bearing status, hemoglobin level, complications, days lapsed from surgery to rehabilitation admission and admission scores on the Functional Independence Measure (FIM. Simple linear regression was used to take forward any predictors significant at p Results The 275 patients in this sample had a mean age of 69 years; 62% were female and the mean LOS was 29.6 days. Statistically significant predictors of longer LOS were low admission FIM score, female sex, revision of only the femoral component, 2 or more prior surgeries in the L/Es and 2 or more hip revisions (redo revision. The final model explained 28% of variance in inpatient LOS. Conclusions A score of 9-14 points lower in admission FIM, female sex, revision of only the femoral component, prior surgeries in the L/Es and redo hip revision are all

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging features of complications following hip replacement: A pictorial review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khushboo Pilania

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hip replacement surgery helps millions of people worldwide walk painlessly each year. With increasing life spans and decreased clinical threshold for surgery, this number will continue to rise. With the increase in the number of surgeries and the longevity of implants, the need for early and prompt diagnosis of complications is also rising. This essay underlines the fact that magnetic resonance imaging on a 1.5T scanner with specialized metal artefact reduction sequences is a viable technique to image the post-arthroplasty hip and has vast potential in the prompt and early diagnosis of complications in these patients.

  3. Comminuted Fracture of Elbow - Ostheosynthesis vs. Total Joint Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwingmann, J; Neumann, M V; Hammer, T O; Reising, K; Südkamp, N P

    2016-01-01

    Comminuted fractures of the elbow are very rare and in most cases very complex and the successful treatment can be a challenge for the treating surgeon. Due to the elbow joint's complex functional anatomy, the multi-fragmentary nature of many fractures and concomitant destabilizing associated injuries, comminuted fractures of the elbow still present a serious challenge for the orthopedic surgeon. Especially in more severe communicated injuries an osteosynthesis or endoprosthesis must be discussed with the patient. There is a lack of clear treatment recommendations based on solid evidence. An overview of the literature including a treatment algorithm to guide decision making for the distal humeral fracture in the adults is presented and own results are analyzed. Key words: comminuted fracture of elbow, total joint replacement of the elbow, elbow prosthesis, elbow arthroplasty, distal humeral fracture.

  4. Changes in bone mineral density of the acetabulum, femoral neck and femoral shaft, after hip resurfacing and total hip replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penny, J O; Brixen, K; Varmarken, J E

    2012-01-01

    , 3, 6, and particularly zone 7, with a gain of 7.5% (95% confidence interval (CI) 2.6 to 12.5) compared with a loss of 14.6% (95% CI 7.6 to 21.6). Resurfacing replacements maintained the BMD of the medial femoral neck and increased that in the lateral zones between 12.8% (95% CI 4.3 to 21.4) and 25.......9% (95% CI 7.1 to 44.6). On the acetabular side, BMD was similar in every zone at each point in time. The mean BMD of all acetabular regions in the resurfaced group was reduced to 96.2% (95% CI 93.7 to 98.6) and for the total hip replacement group to 97.6% (95% CI 93.7 to 101.5) (p = 0.4863). A mean...

  5. Joint Loading in the Sagittal Plane During Gait Is Associated With Hip Joint Abnormalities in Patients With Femoroacetabular Impingement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaan, Michael A; Schwaiger, Benedikt J; Gallo, Matthew C; Sada, Kiyoshi; Link, Thomas M; Zhang, Alan L; Majumdar, Sharmila; Souza, Richard B

    2017-03-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is a morphological abnormality of the hip joint that results in functional impairments during various activities of daily living (ADL) such as walking. Purpose/Hypothesis: The purpose of this study was to determine if lower extremity joint loading differed between patients with FAI and controls and to determine whether these altered biomechanical parameters were associated with intra-articular abnormalities. It was hypothesized that patients with FAI would exhibit altered lower extremity joint loading during walking when compared with healthy controls and that these altered joint loading patterns would be associated with intra-articular abnormalities. Controlled laboratory study. Lower extremity kinetics was assessed during walking at a self-selected speed in 15 presurgical patients with FAI and 34 healthy controls matched for age and body mass index. All participants underwent unilateral hip magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to assess hip joint abnormalities. Hip joint abnormalities were assessed using a semiquantitative MRI-based scoring system. Self-reported outcomes of pain and function were obtained using the Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS), and physical performance was measured using the 6-minute walk test (6MWT). Group differences were assessed using an independent t test and analysis of variance. In the patients with FAI, associations of joint kinetics with HOOS subscores and intra-articular abnormalities were assessed using the Pearson ( r) and Spearman (ρ) correlation coefficients, respectively. Compared with the control group, the FAI group exhibited a significantly increased severity of acetabular (FAI: 1.87 ± 1.55; control: 0.47 ± 0.79; P FAI: 3.27 ± 2.79; control: 1.21 ± 1.55; P = .002) cartilage abnormalities, increased levels of pain (FAI: 65.0 ± 18.8; control: 98.2 ± 3.4; P = .001), and reduced function (FAI: 67.2 ± 21.5; control: 98.9 ± 3.4; P FAI: 1.55 ± 0.19 m/s; control: 1.63

  6. Current knowledge and importance of dGEMRIC techniques in diagnosis of hip joint diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zilkens, Christoph; Krauspe, Ruediger; Bittersohl, Bernd [University of Duesseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Duesseldorf (Germany); Tiderius, Carl Johann [Lund University Hospital, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Lund (Sweden)

    2015-08-15

    Accurate assessment of early hip joint cartilage alterations may help optimize patient selection and follow-up of hip joint preservation surgery. Delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of cartilage (dGEMRIC) is sensitive to the glycosaminoglycan content in cartilage that is lost early in the development of osteoarthritis (OA). Hence, the dGEMRIC technique holds promise for the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. However, because of the location of the hip joint deep within the body and due to the fairly thin cartilage layers that require high spatial resolution, the diagnosis of early hip joint cartilage alterations may be problematic. The purpose of this review is to outline the current status of dGEMRIC in the assessment of hip joint cartilage. A literature search was performed with PubMed, using the terms ''cartilage, osteoarthritis, hip joint, MRI, and dGEMRIC'', considering all levels of studies. This review revealed that dGEMRIC can be reliably used in the evaluation of early stage cartilage pathology in various hip joint disorders. Modifications in the technique, such as the operation of three-dimensional imaging and dGEMRIC after intra-articular contrast medium administration, have expanded the range of application. Notably, the studies differ considerably in patient selection and technical prerequisites. Furthermore, there is a need for multicenter prospective studies with the required technical conditions in place to establish outcome based dGEMRIC data to obtain, in conjunction with clinical data, reliable threshold values for normal and abnormal cartilage, and for hips that may benefit from conservative or surgical treatment. (orig.)

  7. UK survey of occupational therapist's and physiotherapist's experiences and attitudes towards hip replacement precautions and equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, T O; Sackley, C M

    2016-05-25

    Total hip replacement (THR) is one of the most common orthopaedic procedures in the United Kingdom (UK). Historically, people following THR have been provided with hip precautions and equipment such as: raised toilet seats and furniture rises, in order to reduce the risks of dislocation post-operation. The purpose of this study was to determine current practices in the provision of these interventions in the UK for people following primary THR. A 27-question, self-administered online survey was developed and distributed to UK physiotherapists and occupational therapists involved in the management of people following primary THR (target respondents). The survey included questions regarding the current practices in the provision of equipment and hip precautions for THR patients, and physiotherapist's and occupational therapist's attitudes towards these practices. The survey was disseminated through print and web-based/social media channels. 170 health professionals (87 physiotherapists and 83 occupational therapists), responded to the survey. Commonly prescribed equipment in respondent's health trusts were raised toilet seats (95 %), toilet frames and rails (88 %), furniture raises (79 %), helping hands/grabbers (77 %), perching stools (75 %) and long-handled shoe horns (75 %). Hip precautions were routinely prescribed by 97 % of respondents. Hip precautions were most frequently taught in a pre-operative group (52 % of respondents). Similarly equipment was most frequently provided pre-operatively (61 % respondents), and most commonly by occupational therapists (74 % respondents). There was variability in the advice provided on the duration of hip precautions and equipment from up to 6 weeks post-operatively to life-time usage. Current practice on hip precautions and provision of equipment is not full representative of clinician's perceptions of best care after THR. Future research is warranted to determine whether and to whom hip precautions and equipment

  8. The effect of resistance exercise direction for hip joint stabilization on lateral abdominal muscle thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Ju-Hyeon; Lee, Sang-Yeol

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of resistance direction in hip joint stabilization exercise on change in lateral abdominal muscle thickness in healthy adults. Twenty-six healthy adults were randomly allocated to either a hip stabilization exercise by hip straight resistance group (n=12) or a hip diagonal resistance group (n=14). The outcome measures included contraction thickness ratio in transversus abdominis (TrA), internal oblique (IO) and external oblique, and TrA lateral slide were assessed during the abdominal drawing-in maneuver by b-mode ultrasound. The researcher measured the abdominal muscle thickness of each participant before the therapist began the intervention and at the moment intervention was applied. There was a significant difference in lateral abdominal muscle thickness between the straight resistance exercise of hip joint group and the diagonal resistance exercise of hip joint group. Significant differences were found between the two groups in the percentage of change of muscle thickness of the TrA (P=0.018) and in the thickness ratio of the TrA (P=0.018). Stability exercise accompanied by diagonal resistance on the hip joint that was applied in this study can induce automatic contraction of the IO and TrA, which provides stability to the lumbar spine.

  9. Periprosthetic bone loss in total hip arthroplasty. Polyethylene wear debris and the concept of the effective joint space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmalzried, T P; Jasty, M; Harris, W H

    1992-07-01

    Thirty-four hips in which there had been prosthetic replacement were selected for study because of the presence of linear (diffuse) or lytic (localized) areas of periprosthetic bone loss. In all hips, there was careful documentation of the anatomical location of the material that had been obtained for histological analysis, and the specific purpose of the removal of the tissue was for examination to determine the cause of the resorption of bone. Specimens from twenty-three hips were retrieved during an operation and from eleven hips, at autopsy. The area of bone loss was linear only in sixteen hips, lytic only in thirteen, and both linear and lytic in five. In all thirty-four hips, intracellular particulate debris was found in the macrophages that were present in the area of bone resorption. All thirty-four had intracellular particles of polyethylene, many of which were less than one micrometer in size. Thirty-one hips had extracellular particles of polyethylene as well. Twenty-two of the thirty-four hips had intracellular metallic debris; in ten, metallic debris was found extracellularly as well. Ten of the sixteen cemented specimens had intracellular and extracellular polymethylmethacrylate debris. In the mechanically stable prostheses--cemented and uncemented--polyethylene wear debris was identified in areas of bone resorption far from the articular surfaces. The number of macrophages in a microscopic field was directly related to the amount of particulate polyethylene debris that was visible by light microscopy. Although the gross radiographic appearances of linear bone loss and lytic bone loss were different, the histological appearance of the regions in which there was active bone resorption was similar. Regardless of the radiographic appearance and anatomical origin of the specimen, bone resorption was found to occur in association with macrophages that were laden with polyethylene debris. In general, the number of macrophages present had a direct

  10. Pseudoacetabulum a subtle radiological feature of a chronic dislocated total hip replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odak, Saurabh; Mangwani, Jitendra; Ivory, John

    2012-10-06

    We report the presence of an unusual radiological feature of formation of pseudoacetabulum in a chronically dislocated and asymptomatic total hip arthroplasty. An elderly demented patient with a history of recurrent dislocations presented to us after an unwitnessed fall and leg length discrepancy. Radiographs showed a dislocated hip arthroplasty with a well-defined, concentric, radio-opaque shadow around the dislocated femoral head suggestive of a pseudoacetabulum. Previous radiographs revealed formation of heterotopic ossification in the soft tissues surrounding the hip. The dislocated joint was reduced under a general anaesthetic with difficulty. This case highlights the presence of heterotopic ossification and formation of pseudoacetabulum as subtle radiological features of chronic instability and dislocation.

  11. Total hip replacement for the treatment of end stage arthritis of the hip: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Tsertsvadze

    Full Text Available Evolvements in the design, fixation methods, size, and bearing surface of implants for total hip replacement (THR have led to a variety of options for healthcare professionals to consider. The need to determine the most optimal combinations of THR implant is warranted. This systematic review evaluated the clinical effectiveness of different types of THR used for the treatment of end stage arthritis of the hip.A comprehensive literature search was undertaken in major health databases. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs and systematic reviews published from 2008 onwards comparing different types of primary THR in patients with end stage arthritis of the hip were included.Fourteen RCTs and five systematic reviews were included. Patients experienced significant post-THR improvements in Harris Hip scores, but this did not differ between impact types. There was a reduced risk of implant dislocation after receiving a larger femoral head size (36 mm vs. 28 mm; RR = 0.17, 95% CI: 0.04, 0.78 or cemented cup (vs. cementless cup; pooled odds ratio: 0.34, 95% CI: 0.13, 0.89. Recipients of cross-linked vs. conventional polyethylene cup liners experienced reduced femoral head penetration and revision. There was no impact of femoral stem fixation and cup shell design on implant survival rates. Evidence on mortality and complications (aseptic loosening, femoral fracture was inconclusive.The majority of evidence was inconclusive due to poor reporting, missing data, or uncertainty in treatment estimates. The findings warrant cautious interpretation given the risk of bias (blinding, attrition, methodological limitations (small sample size, low event counts, short follow-up, and poor reporting. Long-term pragmatic RCTs are needed to allow for more definitive conclusions. Authors are encouraged to specify the minimal clinically important difference and power calculation for their primary outcome(s as well CONSORT, PRISMA and STROBE guidelines to ensure better

  12. Do joint registries report true rates of hip dislocation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devane, Peter A; Wraighte, Philip J; Ong, David C G; Horne, J Geoffrey

    2012-11-01

    Despite advances in primary THA, dislocation remains a common complication. In New Zealand (NZ), dislocations are reported to the National Joint Registry (NJR) only when prosthetic components are revised in the treatment of a dislocation. Closed reductions of dislocated hips are not recorded by the NJR. We compared the true dislocation rate for patients receiving primary THA in the Wellington region with the rate reported by the NZ NJR for the same group of patients. The NZ NJR identified 570 patients undergoing primary THA from January 1, 2008, to December 31, 2009, with addresses in the Wellington region. The mean age was 67.5 years (range, 27-96 years). The minimum followup was 2 years (mean, 3 years; range, 2-4 years). Six patients required revision of at least one component for dislocation. There was 100% agreement between the hospital database and the NJR. Using the NJR criteria of revision of any component as an end point, the dislocation rate in the Wellington region after primary THA was 1.05%. The hospital database identified a further eight patients who presented with a dislocation of their primary THA and underwent a closed reduction. These patients were not recorded by the NJR. The true rate of all dislocations, which includes closed reductions, was 2.46%. This article documents the discrepancy between the NZ NJR reported rate of revision for dislocation and the true rate of dislocation in primary THA. We recommend documentation of all dislocations by NJR in their database to allow more accurate comparisons between centers and research outcomes. Level IV, clinical research study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  13. EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH OF REGENERATIVE FEATURES IN BONE TISSUES AROUND IMPLANTS AFTER ONE-STAGE BILATERAL TOTAL HIP REPLACEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Mashkov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to research the specific features of regenerative processes of bone tissue around implants after one-stage bilateral total hip replacement in experiment. Material and methods: 27 total hip replacement operations have been performed in 18 rabbits of breed "chinchilla" to which bipolar femoral endoprosthesis made of titanic alloy PT-38, one type-size, with friction pair metal-on-metal and neck-shaft angle 165 degrees have been implanted: total unilateral hip replacement operations have been performed in 9 animals (control group, one-stage bilateral total hip replacement operations have been performed in 9 animals (experimental group. During research they have been on radiological and clinical checking-up. After the experiment the animals had histological tests of the tissues around endoprosthesis components. Results and conclusions: After one-stage bilateral total hip replacement in early terms of research more expressed changes of bone tissue in the form of its thinning and decompaction were found around implants. One-stage bilateral total hip replacement did not essentially influence on the speed of osteogenesis around endoprothesis components in comparison with unilateral total hip replacement, so in late terms of observation in both groups the fixing of endoprothesis components did not differ.

  14. New concepts of coxofemoral joint stability and the development of a clinical stress-radiographic method for quantitating hip joint laxity in the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, G K; Biery, D N; Gregor, T P

    1990-01-01

    From mechanical principles and postmortem observations of coxofemoral joints of dogs, a hydrostatic mechanism influencing hip joint stability was discovered. This discovery led to the development of a stress-radiographic positioning method to quantitate hip joint laxity in dogs. The method incorporated 2 views with the dog in supine position and hips at neutral flexion/extension angle: a compression view, with the femoral heads fully seated in the acetabula; and a distraction view, with the femoral heads at maximal lateral displacement. An index measurement method was formulated to quantitate the relative degree of joint laxity appearing in either the compression or distraction view. Clinical evaluation of 6 dogs was done to compare the compression/distraction method with the standard hip-extended radiographic method. Also, the stress-radiographic method was performed on 16-week-old Borzoi and German Shepherd Dogs to compare the characteristics of inherent hip joint laxity in these breeds. In all dogs tested, hip joint laxity was masked by the standard hip-extended view as indicated by a 2.5-fold improvement in sensitivity to hip joint laxity of the new method (P less than 0.00001). Moreover, the mean hip joint laxity of 16-week-old German Shepherd Dogs exceeded the mean hip joint laxity of Borzois by 79% (P less than 0.00001). Reports in the literature document the incontrovertible association of hip joint laxity to the development of hip dysplasia in dogs. We believe the ability to accurately quantitate hip joint laxity will provide key diagnostic and prognostic criteria for the selection of pet dogs, and more importantly, breeding stock.

  15. Evaluation of risk factors for degenerative joint disease associated with hip dysplasia in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, G K; Popovitch, C A; Gregor, T P; Shofer, F S

    1995-03-01

    Passive coxofemoral joint laxity of dogs, as quantitated by a distraction-stress radiographic method, may have important prognostic value in determining susceptibility to hip dysplasia. Data from 151 dogs, representing 13 breeds, were included in a logistic regression model to evaluate the contribution of factors such as age, breed, weight, sex, distraction index, and Norberg angle to the risk of developing degenerative joint disease (DJD) of the coxofemoral joint. Of the factors studied, the amount of passive hip laxity, as quantitated by the distraction index, was the most significant (P joint. In the longitudinal and cross-sectional components of the study, distraction index was a significant (P hip laxity:DJD correlation increased with the age of dog. In contrast, the Norberg angle, a measure of hip laxity on the standard hip-extended radiograph, was not found to be a significant risk factor for DJD, either in the longitudinal or cross-sectional analyses. Breed-specific probability curves of DJD susceptibility indicated that German Shepherd Dogs had a significantly (P Dogs. The information derived from this statistical model will help to scientifically characterize the role of passive hip laxity as a component in the pathogenesis of DJD of the coxofemoral joint.

  16. Validity of summing painful joint sites to assess joint-pain comorbidity in hip or knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemons, Liseth; ten Klooster, Peter M; van de Laar, Mart A F J; van den Ende, Cornelia H M; Hoogeboom, Thomas J

    2013-08-09

    Previous studies in patients with hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA) have advocated the relevance of assessing the number of painful joint sites, other than the primary affected joint, in both research and clinical practice. However, it is unclear whether joint-pain comorbidities can simply be summed up. A total of 401 patients with hip or knee OA completed questionnaires on demographic variables and joint-pain comorbidities. Rasch analysis was performed to evaluate whether a sum score of joint-pain comorbidities can be calculated. Self-reported joint-pain comorbidities showed a good fit to the Rasch model and were not biased by gender, age, disease duration, BMI, or patient group. As a group, joint-pain comorbidities covered a reasonable range of severity levels, although the sum score had rather low reliability levels suggesting it cannot discriminate well among patients. Joint-pain comorbidities, in other than the primary affected joints, can be summed into a joint pain comorbidity score. Nevertheless, its use is discouraged for individual decision making purposes since its lacks discriminative power in patients with minimal or extreme joint pain.

  17. Effect of early progressive resistance training compared with home-based exercise after total hip replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Lone Ramer; Mechlenburg, Inger; Søballe, Kjeld

    /week). The IG trained with loads of 10 repetition maximum from week 1 to 10 after THR. Before surgery and after the intervention, performance was evaluated by leg extension power (primary outcome), isometric strength (hip abduction + flexion), sit-to-stand test (STS), stair test and 20 meter walking speed......Introduction Muscle strength and physical function deficits persist after total hip replacement (THR). Training effect evidence after THR is lacking. This study investigates the effect of supervised progressive resistance training in early post-THR rehabilitation on muscle strength and functional...... performance. Material and Method 73 THR patients with preoperative self-assessed disability (HOOS ADL score≤67) were randomly assigned to a control group (CG, home-based exercise 7 days/week) or an intervention group (IG, home-based exercise 5 days/week and resistance training of hip and thigh muscles 2 days...

  18. [Survey on the use and behaviour of metal-metal hip replacements in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcerrada, N; Fernández-Vega, A; Valls-León, C; Garcia-Cimbrelo, E

    2016-01-01

    Following medical device alerts published in different countries of problems with metal-on-metal total hip replacements, the Spanish Agency of Medicines and Medical Devices (AEMPS) in collaboration with the Spanish Hip Society Surgery designed a national survey to gather information on the use and behaviour of these hip implants. The survey consisted of a questionnaire sent by e-mail to 283 clinical centre recipients of metal-on-metal hips to be filled in by surgeons with expertise in the field. A total of 257 questionnaires were completed. The response rate of the clinical centres was 36.7%. A total of 97.7% of the responses reported that clinical and radiological follow-ups are carried out, and 79.6% undertook metal ion analyses (chromium and cobalt). A large majority (83.6%) of the responders who had who used surface implants, and 70% of those with large-head implants reported peri-operative complications. The most common complication was pain (25% with surface implants and 30.8% with large-head implants). Currently 80.8% of those responding were considering abandoning implanting of these hip replacements. Despite the many limitations to this study, the survey has allowed us to obtain in a quick first view of the implant scenario of Metal on Metal hip implants in Spain, and to determine the type of patient implanted, the time of implantation, and the experience/expertise of the surgeons, and the type of follow-up carried out. Copyright © 2015 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. The Biologic Response to Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) Wear Particles in Total Joint Replacement: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratton-Powell, Ashley A; Pasko, Kinga M; Brockett, Claire L; Tipper, Joanne L

    2016-11-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) and its composites are polymers resistant to fatigue strain, radiologically transparent, and have mechanical properties suitable for a range of orthopaedic applications. In bulk form, PEEK composites are generally accepted as biocompatible. In particulate form, however, the biologic response relevant to joint replacement devices remains unclear. The biologic response to wear particles affects the longevity of total joint arthroplasties. Particles in the phagocytozable size range of 0.1 µm to 10 µm are considered the most biologically reactive, particularly particles with a mean size of PEEK-based wear debris from total joint arthroplasties. (1) What are the quantitative characteristics of PEEK-based wear particles produced by total joint arthroplasties? (2) Do PEEK wear particles cause an adverse biologic response when compared with UHMWPE or a similar negative control biomaterial? (3) Is the biologic response affected by particle characteristics? Embase and Ovid Medline databases were searched for studies that quantified PEEK-based particle characteristics and/or investigated the biologic response to PEEK-based particles relevant to total joint arthroplasties. The keyword search included brands of PEEK (eg, MITCH, MOTIS) or variations of PEEK types and nomenclature (eg, PAEK, CFR-PEEK) in combination with types of joint (eg, hip, knee) and synonyms for wear debris or immunologic response (eg, particles, cytotoxicity). Peer-reviewed studies, published in English, investigating total joint arthroplasty devices and cytotoxic effects of PEEK particulates were included. Studies investigating devices without articulating bearings (eg, spinal instrumentation devices) and bulk material or contact cytotoxicity were excluded. Of 129 studies, 15 were selected for analysis and interpretation. No studies were found that isolated and characterized PEEK wear particles from retrieved periprosthetic human tissue samples. In the four studies that

  20. Preliminary Experience with a New Total Distal Radioulnar Joint Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewald, Timothy J.; Skeete, Kshamata; Moran, Steven L.

    2012-01-01

    This study reports the intermediate-term results of four patients from a series eight patients who have had an insertion of a new complete distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) prosthesis. A retrospective review was performed for all patients who underwent DRUJ joint replacement with the STABILITY Sigmoid Notch Total DRUJ System between the years of 2003 and 2008. To be included in this report, all patients had to have more than 24 months of follow-up and hand examination by the senior author. From the eight patients with this procedure, four patients met the inclusion criteria. These included one patient with painful posttraumatic arthritis, two patients with failed hemiarthroplasty, and one patient with a failed Sauvé–Kapandji procedure. Mean age at the time of surgery was 42.5 years (range: 35 to 51 years) and mean follow-up was 46 months (range: 36 to 66 months). Preoperative and postoperative assessment included range of motion, grip strength, visual analog pain scale, patient satisfaction, and radiographic evaluation. There was a successful replacement of the DRUJ in all four patients. Final range of motion showed mean pronation of 80 degrees (range: 60 to 90 degrees) and mean supination of 64 degrees (range: 45 to 90 degrees). Final grip strength on the operated extremity was 25.5 kg and averaged 73% of contralateral side. This was an improvement from preoperative grip strength of 14.5 kg visual analog pain scale decreased from 8 to 2.5 following surgery (scale: 1 to 10). Patient satisfaction was 100%. One patient returned to manual labor, one patient returned to office work, and two patients remained off work. Postoperative radiographs depict appropriate alignment of the DRUJ, and there have been no cases of subluxation or dislocation. Implant survival has been 100%. Total DRUJ joint replacement with sigmoid notch resurfacing and distal ulna replacement is an alternative to ulnar head resection in cases of DRUJ arthritis. Total DRUJ arthroplasty with this

  1. Assessment Of Patient Problems Encountered With Total Hip Replacement At Baghdad Teaching Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faris Fauze Ahmed

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Total hip replacements conduct highly effective in relieving pain dysfunction for patients who suffer from hip inflammation and a variety of reasons however after several decades of success in hip replacement there was also an increase in cases of fractures after you perform a detailed switch and attributed this The increase in the prevalence of a large fraction of the increase in the number of switch detailed and increasing age and poverty operations. Objectives The study aims toAssess the pre operation physical and psychosocial problems of patients with total hip replacement. To Assess the post operation physical and psychosocial problems of patients with total hip replacement. To find out the relationship between pre post physical and psychosocial problems with age gender duration of illness and type of operation. Design of the study A descriptive design study was carried out in Nursing Home hospital and Ghazi AL-Hariri for specialized surgical hospitals starting from January 13th 2015 to September 1st 2015 The study Sample A non- probability purposive sample of 50 patients undergoing total hip replacement surgery who have several problems before and after surgery. The study Instrument The study instrument was composed of three parts which as socio demographic information was included age group gender marital status level of education occupational economic part two consist of medical information was comprised of 7 items and part three contain physical and psychosocial problems through Hamilton anxiety scale consist of 84 items. Validity and Reliability The content validity of the instrument was established through a panel of 14 experts the reliability of the items was based on the internal consistency of the questionnaire was assessed by calculating Cronbach s Coefficient alpha which as 0.73. Statistical Analysis The researchers used the appropriate statistical methods for data analysis which include the descriptive data

  2. One-stage revision of an infected cementless total hip replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficklin, Michael G; Kowaleski, Michael P; Kunkel, Kevin A R; Suber, Jonathan T

    2016-11-23

    A two-year-old, 44 kg dog with a right Helica cementless total hip replacement (THR) was radiographically diagnosed with implant loosening eight months after the index total hip replacement procedure. Subsequent synoviocentesis and synovial fluid culture revealed a methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp infection of the right THR. A one-stage revision using a hybrid BFX cementless acetabular cup and CFX cemented femoral stem was performed. Vancomycin and micro-silver antimicrobial powder impregnated cement were used in the revision. At re-evaluation 27 months following the revision procedure, the patient did not exhibit any signs of lameness. Radiographic images confirmed stable implants, with bone ingrowth into the cup and no signs of implant loosening. Our report demonstrates the success of a one-stage THR revision when faced with a multi-drug resistant periprosthetic infection, when combined with the use of micro-silver antimicrobial powder and culture-based antibiotic impregnated cement therapy.

  3. Association of hip joint effusion volume with early osteonecrosis of the femoral head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bingli; Yi, Hongli; Zhang, Zhigang; Li, Zirong; Yue, Debo; Sun, Wei

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the association between hip joint effusion volume and osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) using the Association Research Circulation Osseous (ARCO) classification. Patients (n = 403) who were diagnosed with ONFH were enrolled between February 2005 and December 2008. Only patients (n = 109) with complete clinical and imaging data and at early to mid ARCO stage (I - III) were eligible for further analysis, including 94 males and 15 females. All the included patients had hip joint radiographic examinations (anteroposterior and frog-leg views) and magnetic resonance imaging scans (axial and coronal views). Out of 109 patients included in this study, 185 hip joints were involved (unilateral disease in 33 patients and bilateral diseases in 76 patients). The patients had a mean age of 39 ± 11 years (range, 13-70). All the affected hip joints exhibited effusion, classified as grade 1 (n = 70, 37.8%), grade 2 (n = 62, 33.5%), and grade 3 (n = 53, 28.7%). The volume of joint effusion varied significantly among stage I, II, and III (X2 = 29.210, P 0.05), whereas it differed significantly among stage IIIA, IIIB, and IIIC (X2 =11.556, P hip joint effusion was associated with the ARCO stage, and increased over the staging.

  4. Variations in the pre-operative status of patients coming to primary hip replacement for osteoarthritis in European orthopaedic centres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puhl Wofhart

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Total hip joint replacement (THR is a high volume, effective intervention for hip osteoarthritis (OA. However, indications and determinants of outcome remain unclear. The 'EUROHIP consortium' has undertaken a cohort study to investigate these questions. This paper describes the variations in disease severity in this cohort and the relationships between clinical and radiographic severity, and explores some of the determinants of variation. Methods A minimum of 50 consecutive, consenting patients coming to primary THR for primary hip OA in each of the 20 participating orthopaedic centres entered the study. Pre-operative data included demographics, employment and educational attainment, drug utilisation, and involvement of other joints. Each subject completed the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC – Likert version 3.1. Other data collected at the time of surgery included the prosthesis used and American Society of Anaesthesiologists (ASA status. Pre-operative radiographs were read by the same three readers for Kellgren and Lawrence (K&L grading and Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI atlas features. Regression analyses were carried out. Results Data from 1327 subjects has been analysed. The mean age of the group was 65.7 years, and there were more women (53.4% than men. Most (79% were ASA status 1 or 2. Reported disease duration was 5 years or less in 69.2%. Disease in other joint sites was common. Radiographs were available in 1051 subjects and the K&L grade was 3 or 4 in 95.8%. There was much more variation in clinical severity (WOMAC score; the mean total WOMAC score was 59.2 (SD 16.1. The radiographic severity showed no correlation with WOMAC scores. Significantly higher WOMAC scores (worse disease were seen in older people, women, those with obesity, those with worse general health, and those with lower educational attainment. Conclusion 1. Clinical disease severity

  5. Palacos compared to Palamed bone cement in total hip replacement: a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinardi, Joris E; Valstar, Edward R; Van Der Voort, Paul; Kaptein, Bart L; Fiocco, Marta; Nelissen, Rob G H H

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Stability and survival of cemented total hip prostheses is dependent on a multitude of factors, including the type of cement that is used. Bone cements vary in viscosity, from low to medium and high. There have been few clinical RSA studies comparing the performance of low- and high-viscosity bone cements. We compared the migration behavior of the Stanmore hip stem cemented using novel low-viscosity Palamed bone cement with that of the same stem cemented with conventional high-viscosity Palacos bone cement. Patients and methods We performed a randomized controlled study involving 39 patients (40 hips) undergoing primary total hip replacement for primary or secondary osteoarthritis. 22 patients (22 hips) were randomized to Palacos and 17 patients (18 hips) were randomized to Palamed. Migration was determined by RSA. Results None of these 40 hips had been revised at the 10-year follow-up mark. To our knowledge, the patients who died before they reached the 10-year endpoint still had the implant in situ. No statistically significant or clinically significant differences were found between the 2 groups for mean translations, rotations, and maximum total-point motion (MTPM). Interpretation We found similar migration of the Stanmore stem in the high-viscosity Palacos cement group and the low-viscosity Palamed cement group. We therefore expect that the risk of aseptic loosening with the new Palamed cement would be comparable to that with the conventional Palacos cement. The choice of which type of bone cement to use is therefore up to the surgeon’s preference. PMID:27329869

  6. Effect of preoperative education of patients before hip or knee replacement surgery: A systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aydin, Dogu; Klit, Jakob; Husted, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Background Total hip (THA) and knee arthroplasty (TKA) are standard procedures for treatment of end stage osteoarthritis, and much is done to optimize results. It is usually hypothesized that education of patients before surgery reduces anxiety, secures more realistic patient expectations...... and enhances postoperative outcomes. Objectives To determine whether results reported in the literature proves an effect of preoperative education on postoperative outcomes in replacement surgery patients regarding anxiety, pain, length of hospital stay, patient satisfaction, postoperative complications...

  7. Abnormal bone marrow distribution following unsuccessful hip replacement: A potential confusion on white cell scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunningham, D.A. (Saint Mary' s Hospital, London (UK). Dept. of Clinical Physics and Radiology)

    1991-01-01

    The use of indium 111 white blood cell imaging for the detection of bony sepsis is now well established. Labelled white cells are seen normally in the liver, spleen and bone marrow, and recent reports have stressed the need for concomitant bone marrow imaging to reduce the incidence of false-positive results. In the case described, a grossly abnormal distribution of bone marrow following failed hip replacement would have led to a false diagnosis of osteomyelitis. (orig.).

  8. Cemented, cementless, and hybrid prostheses for total hip replacement: cost effectiveness analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, Mark; Grieve, Richard; Sekhon, Jasjeet S; Gregg, Paul; Black, Nick; van der Meulen, Jan H

    2013-02-27

    To compare the cost effectiveness of the three most commonly chosen types of prosthesis for total hip replacement. Lifetime cost effectiveness model with parameters estimated from individual patient data obtained from three large national databases. English National Health Service. Adults aged 55 to 84 undergoing primary total hip replacement for osteoarthritis. Total hip replacement using either cemented, cementless, or hybrid prostheses. Cost (£), quality of life (EQ-5D-3L, where 0 represents death and 1 perfect health), quality adjusted life years (QALYs), incremental cost effectiveness ratios, and the probability that each prosthesis type is the most cost effective at alternative thresholds of willingness to pay for a QALY gain. Lifetime costs were generally lowest with cemented prostheses, and postoperative quality of life and lifetime QALYs were highest with hybrid prostheses. For example, in women aged 70 mean costs were £6900 ($11 000; €8200) for cemented prostheses, £7800 for cementless prostheses, and £7500 for hybrid prostheses; mean postoperative EQ-5D scores were 0.78, 0.80, and 0.81, and the corresponding lifetime QALYs were 9.0, 9.2, and 9.3 years. The incremental cost per QALY for hybrid compared with cemented prostheses was £2500. If the threshold willingness to pay for a QALY gain exceeded £10 000, the probability that hybrid prostheses were most cost effective was about 70%. Hybrid prostheses have the highest probability of being the most cost effective in all subgroups, except in women aged 80, where cemented prostheses were most cost effective. Cemented prostheses were the least costly type for total hip replacement, but for most patient groups hybrid prostheses were the most cost effective. Cementless prostheses did not provide sufficient improvement in health outcomes to justify their additional costs.

  9. Increased risk for early periprosthetic fractures after uncemented total hip replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solgaard, Søren; Kjersgaard, Anne Grete

    2014-01-01

    in women. No correlation with diagnosis, age, body mass index, operation time, operative technique or implant position could be demonstrated, but a possible correlation with post-operative mobilisation and pain treatment was observed. Trainees had more fractures than experienced surgeons (non......-significant). CONCLUSION: We conclude that the increasing use of uncemented hip replacements implies an increasing risk of perioperative femoral fracture. The cause of the fractures remains unclear, but is probably multifactorial. FUNDING: not relevant. TRIAL REGISTRATION: not relevant....

  10. Postoperative Sleep Disturbances after Zolpidem Treatment in Fast-Track Hip and Knee Replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, Lene; Jennum, Poul; Kehlet, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    arousals (p = 0.004). Levels of pain and opioid use were similar in the 2 groups. CONCLUSIONS: Our objective data did not support the primary hypothesis that one night's treatment with zolpidem would significantly improve sleep architecture following...... major surgery, although there was improved feeling of sleep quality and fatigue associated with fewer postoperative arousals. CITATION: Krenk L; Jennum P; Kehlet H. Postoperative sleep disturbances after zolpidem treatment in fast-track hip and knee replacement....

  11. [Biodynamics of the hip joint. The elasticity of the human femur and its importance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzl, H R

    1976-01-22

    Pauwels' biomechanical analysis of hip joint function shows that the dynamic forces acting on the joint can be large. In these techniques, spring mechanisms are being used to neutralize dynamic forces. The question remains as to whether such a mechanism in humans exists in the vicinity of the hip joint, i.e. in the femur. Fresh human femoral bones were put under axial stress and their qualities examined. Different spring qualities were found in the various femora; and by comparing these, 6 groups were established which were then subjected to statistical analysis. More than half the bones examined possessed good spring qualities. A practical example proves that the spring qualities of the femur are apt to absorb a considerable amount of kinetic energy during the axial stress and thus lessen the vertical mechanical strain vector of the hip joint.

  12. Causes for revision surgery in total hip replacement. A retrospective epidemiological analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capón-García, D; López-Pardo, A; Alves-Pérez, M T

    2016-01-01

    To determine the impact of each cause of revision surgery in total hip arthroplasty during the period 2009-2013. To analyse the relationship between these causes with different variables. A study was conducted on 127 patients who had hip replacement revision surgery in our hospital during this period. Parameters, such as age, sex, date of primary arthroplasty, prosthetic replacement date, and main cause of the revision were recorded. Those revisions performed within 5 years after the primary arthroplasty were considered as early rescue. The most common cause of rescue was aseptic loosening in 38 (30%) followed by instability in 30 (24%). In terms of age at the time of rescue, statistically significant differences were found, with it being significantly higher in patients re-operated for a fracture. Differences in age at first surgery were found to be 7 years younger than those with late rescue (63.40) with respect to early (70.21). Similar results to ours have been observed in other published series, except for the higher incidence of instability in early rescue. This study demonstrates aseptic loosening and instability as the most frequent causes of revision surgery in our hospital. Age is a very influential factor in relation to longevity of primary arthroplasty. Complications were higher in when the primary hip replacement is implanted in older patients. Copyright © 2016 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Synovial cyst of the hip joint as a rare cause of unlateral leg edema; A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Ji Hun; Chang, Il Soo; Park, Sang Woo; Yun, Ik Jin; Park, Hyung Kyu; Kim, Wan Seop; Lee, Hui Jin; Kim, Na Ra; Moon, Sung Gyu [Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    A synovial cyst of the hip joint is a rare cause of unilateral leg edema, and it is usually associated with arthropathies such as rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. An asymptomatic synovial cyst of the hip joint that is not associated with an arthritic condition occurs infrequently. In this paper, we described the case of a 52-year-old woman who presented with unilateral right leg edema caused by a synovial cyst of the hip joint.

  14. Hip joint structures assessment in juvenile idiopathic (chronic arthritis with ultrasound TOC \\o "1-5" \\h \\z examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. R. Movsisyan

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Sonographic (SG examination of hip joints was performed in 100 pts with juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA with different forms, activity and duration. SG signs of hip joint inflammation in JCA were identified. SG features in pts with different disease duration, form and activity were revealed. SG changes of clinically unchanged hip joints were noted which may be of important significance for early diagnosis of coxitis. More wide use of arthrosonography in pediatric rheumatology was proved.

  15. Finite element analysis of mechanical behavior of human dysplastic hip joints: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vafaeian, B; Zonoobi, D; Mabee, M; Hareendranathan, A R; El-Rich, M; Adeeb, S; Jaremko, J L

    2017-04-01

    Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is a common condition predisposing to osteoarthritis (OA). Especially since DDH is best identified and treated in infancy before bones ossify, there is surprisingly a near-complete absence of literature examining mechanical behavior of infant dysplastic hips. We sought to identify current practice in finite element modeling (FEM) of DDH, to inform future modeling of infant dysplastic hips. We performed multi-database systematic review using PRISMA criteria. Abstracts (n = 126) fulfilling inclusion criteria were screened for methodological quality, and results were analyzed and summarized for eligible articles (n = 12). The majority of the studies modeled human adult dysplastic hips. Two studies focused on etiology of DDH through simulating mechanobiological growth of prenatal hips; we found no FEM-based studies in infants or children. Finite element models used either patient-specific geometry or idealized average geometry. Diversities in choice of material properties, boundary conditions, and loading scenarios were found in the finite-element models. FEM of adult dysplastic hips demonstrated generally smaller cartilage contact area in dysplastic hips than in normal joints. Contact pressure (CP) may be higher or lower in dysplastic hips depending on joint geometry and mechanical contribution of labrum (Lb). FEM of mechanobiological growth of prenatal hip joints revealed evidence for effects of the joint mechanical environment on formation of coxa valga, asymmetrically shallow acetabulum and malformed femoral head associated with DDH. Future modeling informed by the results of this review may yield valuable insights into optimal treatment of DDH, and into how and why OA develops early in DDH. Copyright © 2016 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Ultrasonographic Features of Hip Joints in Mucopolysaccharidoses Type I and II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żuber, Zbigniew; Jurecka, Agnieszka; Różdżyńska-Świątkowska, Agnieszka; Migas-Majoch, Agata; Lembas, Agnieszka; Kieć-Wilk, Beata; Tylki-Szymańska, Anna

    2015-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to assess the ultrasonographic features of hip joints in patients with mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) type I and II in comparison with healthy population. The secondary aims were to correlate these features with clinical measures and to evaluate the utility of ultrasound in the diagnosis of MPS disease. Sixteen MPS I (n = 3) and II (n = 13) patients were enrolled in the present study and underwent clinical and radiological evaluation, and bilateral high-resolution ultrasonography (US) of hip joints. The distance from the femoral neck to joint capsule (synovial joint space, SJS), joint effusion, synovial hyperthrophy, and local pathological vascularization were evaluated. The results were compared to the healthy population and correlated with clinical and radiological measures. 1. There was a difference in US SJS between children with MPS disease and the normative value for healthy population (7mm). Mean values of SJS were 15.81 ± 4.08 cm (right hip joints) and 15.69 ± 4.19 cm (left joints). 2. No inflammatory joint abnormalities were detected in MPS patients. 3. There was a clear correlation between US SJS and patients' age and height, while no clear correlation was observed between SJS and disease severity. 1. Patients with MPS I and II present specific features in hip joint ultrasonography. 2. The data suggests that ultrasonography might be effective in the evaluation of hip joint involvement in patients with MPS and might present a valuable tool in facilitating the diagnosis and follow up of the disease.

  17. Traumatic posterior urethral fistula to hip joint following gunshot injury: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rezaee Ahmad

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Urinary system fistula to the hip joint is a rare complication. We report a case of delayed posterior urethral fistula to the hip joint following penetrating gunshot wound injury. Case presentation A 37-year-old Iranian Balochi male was shot with a firearm in the superior part of his right pelvis. He underwent primary closure on the same day. Ten months later, he developed urinary retention. He underwent retrograde urethrography and antegrade cystography which showed a stricture measuring 5 cm in length. There was also a history of progressive pain in the right hip joint accompanied by low grade fever which started 2 months after the initial injury. Hip X-ray showed evidence of an acetabular cavity and femoral head destruction diagnostic of complicated septic arthritis. The patient subsequently underwent reconstructive surgery for the urethral stricture and urethral fistula via a transperineal approach followed by total hip arthroplasty. Conclusion Hip joint contamination with urine following a urethro-acetabular fistula can lead to severe and disabling complications such as septic arthritis. We recommend that every clinician should keep these fistulas in mind as a complication of penetrating urethral injury and every attempt should be made for their early diagnosis and prompt treatment.

  18. [Manipulative reduction of shoulder lift for the treatment of posterior dislocation of hip joint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Quan; Tang, Xiao-Fu

    2012-07-01

    To observe the effects of shoulder lift reduction for treatment of posterior dislocation of hip joint. From July 2001 to June 2010, 14 cases of posterior dislocation of hip joint were treated with shoulder lift reduction involving 12 males and 2 females with an average age of 34.6 years ranging from 18 to 57 years. After recduction, all patients were assisted with the traction, exercise and traditional Chinese medicine. The mean duration between injured and treatment was 1.1 days (2 hours to 3 days). According to Harris scoring system the hip joint function were evaluated. All patients were followed-up for 8 to 24 months (means 16 months). Fourteen cases were reset well in first without any complication. The Harris score was (97.14 +/- 4.90) in total, involving hip pain (42.86 +/- 1.88), articular activity (4.71 +/- 0.47), daily activity (45.57 +/- 9.26), deformity (4.00 +/- 0.00), the clinical outcome was excellent in 12 cases,good in 2. There were not complications such as avascular necrosis of the femoral head, and so on. The shoulder lift reduction can be used by one person, and the treatment of posterior dislocation of hip joint is effective. It established a good foundation for the rehabilitation of trouble hip.

  19. Hip-joint congruity after Dega osteotomy in patients with cerebral palsy: long-term results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braatz, Frank; Staude, Daniel; Klotz, Matthias C; Wolf, Sebastian I; Dreher, Thomas; Lakemeier, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    Neurogenic hip dislocation is quite common in children with cerebral palsy (CP). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the long-term outcome of single-event multilevel surgery (SEMLS) in combination with hip reconstruction by using a periacetabular osteotomy as described by Dega concerning post-operative remodeling and plasticity of the femoral head post-operatively. A total of 72 patients with CP as the primary disease and in whom a complex surgical hip reconstruction was performed during SEMLS between 1998 and 2004 were included in the study. There were 45 men and 27 women, with a median age of 7.6 (4.7-16.3) years at the time SEMLS was performed. The mean follow-up time was 7.7 years (4.9-11.8). X-rays were taken before and after surgery, and Rippstein 1 and 2 were used for follow-up. As the most reliable value for decentration, migration percentage (MP) as described by Reimers was used. To measure hip-joint cover at follow-up, the centre-edge angle was used. The hip was divided into four different categories according to sphericity and congruity. Using this approach, we could evaluate joint remodeling. Pre-operatively, the mean MP measured by X-ray was 68 %. Directly after surgery, this value decreased on average by 12 % and at the long-term follow-up was 16.0 % on average. A high rate of incongruence was observed on X-rays taken directly after surgery: 66 hip joints were classified as incongruent. The number of aspherical and incongruent joints decreased to 54 at the follow-up examination. Data of our study with high plasticity of the hip joint suggest that even if the femoral head is deformed and a persistent incongruency after surgery is expected, hip reconstruction can be recommended.

  20. The effect of angle and moment of the hip and knee joint on iliotibial band hardness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateuchi, Hiroshige; Shiratori, Sakiko; Ichihashi, Noriaki

    2015-02-01

    Although several studies have described kinematic deviations such as excessive hip adduction in patients with iliotibial band (ITB) syndrome, the factors contributing to increased ITB hardness remains undetermined, owing to lack of direct in vivo measurement. The purpose of this study was to clarify the factors contributing to an increase in ITB hardness by comparing the ITB hardness between the conditions in which the angle, moment, and muscle activity of the hip and knee joint are changed. Sixteen healthy individuals performed the one-leg standing under five conditions in which the pelvic and trunk inclination were changed in the frontal plane. The shear elastic modulus in the ITB was measured as an indicator of the ITB hardness using shear wave elastography. The three-dimensional joint angle and external joint moment in the hip and knee joints, and muscle activities of the gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, tensor fasciae latae, and vastus lateralis, which anatomically connect to the ITB, were also measured. ITB hardness was significantly increased in the posture with pelvic and trunk inclination toward the contralateral side of the standing leg compared with that in all other conditions (increase of approximately 32% compared with that during normal one-leg standing). This posture increased both the hip adduction angle and external adduction moment at the hip and knee joint, although muscle activities were not increased. Our findings suggest that coexistence of an increased adduction moment at the hip and knee joints with an excessive hip adduction angle lead to an increase in ITB hardness. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Loads in the hip joint during physically demanding occupational tasks: A motion analysis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varady, Patrick Aljoscha; Glitsch, Ulrich; Augat, Peter

    2015-09-18

    Epidemiologic studies of osteoarthritis of the hip indicate a possible connection between work related activities and the pathogenesis of the disease. This study investigated the hip joint contact forces for physically demanding occupational tasks (lifting, carrying, transferring of a weight (mass: 25 kg, 40 kg and 50 kg); stair climbing without and with additional load of 25 kg; ladder climbing) and compared these with everyday activities (level gait, sitting down and getting up). The hip joint contact force was calculated with the human multibody simulation software AnyBody employing motion capture and ground reaction force measurements by force plates and an instrumented staircase and ladder. Although the results for 11 male test subjects showed individual variations, a general trend could be observed in regards of force curves' characteristics and maxima. The largest joint contact forces calculated were (637 ± 148)%-body weight for horizontal transfer of a 50 kg weight. For several of the occupational activities the computed hip joint contact forces were significantly larger compared to the investigated examples of activities of daily living. This study provides original data of simulated hip joint contact forces for physically demanding activities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Static balance according to hip joint angle of unsupported leg during one-leg standing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Ju-Hyung; Kim, Jang-Joon; Ye, Jae-Gwan; Lee, Seul-Ji; Hong, Jeong-Mi; Choi, Hyun-Kyu; Choi, Ho-Suk; Shin, Won-Seob

    2017-05-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine static balance according to hip joint angle of the unsupported leg during one-leg standing. [Subjects and Methods] Subjects included 45 healthy adult males and females in their 20s. During one-leg standing on the non-dominant leg, the position of the unsupported leg was classified according to hip joint angles of point angle was class. Static balance was then measured using a force plate with eyes open and closed. The total length, sway velocity, maximum deviation, and velocity on the mediolateral and anteroposterior axes of center of pressure were measured. [Results] In balance assessment with eyes open, there were significant differences between groups according to hip joint angle, except for maximum deviation on the anteroposterior axis. In balance assessment with eyes closed, there were significant differences between total length measurements at 0° and 30°, 60° and between 30° and 90°. There were significant differences between sway velocity measurements at 0° and 30° and between 30° and 90°. [Conclusion] Thus, there were differences in static balance according to hip joint angle. It is necessary to clearly identify the hip joint angle during one-leg standing testing.

  3. Usability Test of Exercise Games Designed for Rehabilitation of Elderly Patients After Hip Replacement Surgery: Pilot Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Ling (Yun); L.P.D.M. ter Meer (Louis); Z. Yumak (Zerrin); R.C. Veltkamp (Remco)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractBACKGROUND: Patients who receive rehabilitation after hip replacement surgery are shown to have increased muscle strength and better functional performance. However, traditional physiotherapy is often tedious and leads to poor adherence. Exercise games, provide ways for increasing

  4. Prevention of deep vein thrombosis after hip replacement: randomised comparison between unfractionated heparin and low molecular weight heparin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leyvraz, P. F.; Bachmann, F.; Hoek, J.; Büller, H. R.; Postel, M.; Samama, M.; Vandenbroek, M. D.

    1991-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of two subcutaneous prophylactic regimens for postoperative deep vein thrombosis after total hip replacement. Prospective open randomised multicentre trial. 28 European departments of orthopaedic surgery. All patients had bilateral phlebography 10 days after

  5. Prospective monitoring improves outcomes of primary total hip replacement: a cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zayed Gamal

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over the past decade several studies have questioned current standards of patient safety in health care delivery. In response, our institution started a clinical pathway for total hip replacement in 1996. Prospective monitoring with regular feedback sessions to the individuals involved in patient care did however not start until 2003. The present study evaluates the effect of prospective monitoring on outcomes of total hip replacement. Methods Clinical records of patients undergoing primary elective total hip replacement between 1997 and 2004 were reviewed. Data on adverse events as well as adherence to protocols for venous thromboembolism prophylaxis were extracted retrospectively for the period 1997 to 2001 and prospectively from 2003 to 2004. Results were compared and analyzed in order to establish possible improvement in outcomes. Data was analyzed with Chi-square or Fisher's Exact test for categorical variables and Student's t-test for continuous variables. Alpha was set as less than 5% and analysis was performed with Stata 9.0 for Macintosh. Results Two-hundred and eighty-three patients were included from 1997 to 2001, and 62 from 2003 to 2004. Mean age, male to female ratio and initial diagnosis were similar in both groups. At least one adverse event occurred in 45% of patients in 1997–2001 and in 21% in 2003–2004 (p Conclusion Overall rate of adverse events as well as in-hospital hip dislocations, oliguria and non-adherence to VTE prophylaxis protocols were significantly reduced during the second period. We conclude that clinical pathways alone are insufficient to improve patient safety and require prospective monitoring and continuous feedback to health care providers in order to achieve the desired effect.

  6. A Rare Case of Morel-Lavallee Syndrome Complicating an Anterior Dislocation of Hip Joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekkanti, Supreeth; Vijay, C; Theja, Sujana; Shankar, R Ravi; Verma, Anubhav

    2016-01-01

    Hip dislocations are serious injuries as hip joint is an extremely stable joint. It requires a significant amount of force to produce such an injury. Anterior dislocations are uncommon. Potential complications of anterior hip dislocations are a neurovascular injury to femoral vessels or acetabular fractures. We report a rare late complication of Morel-Lavallee syndrome occurring 3 weeks after an anterior dislocation of the hip in a 43-year-old male. The patient presented to us with history. Morel-Lavallee syndrome is a rare complication. However if diagnosed early can be successfully treated with minimal burden to the patient. The authors recommend surgeons to have a high index of suspicion for this syndrome and a stringent follow-up examination of the patient.

  7. Volume of the ligamentum capitis femoris in osteoarthritic hip joints of adult dogs

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    J.D. Mande

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Ventrodorsal pelvic radiographs were made of 32 adult dogs under general anaesthesia. The hip joints were evaluated according to the severity of osteoarthritic changes graded as 0, 1, 2 or 3. The dogs were euthanased, the hip joints opened and the ligamentum capitis femoris dissected out in toto. The volume of each ligament was determined using a water displacement technique and the mean volume compared to the four radiographic grades of osteoarthritis. There was an inverse correlation (r = -0.75 between the mean volume of the ligamentum capitis femoris and the increasing severity of osteoarthritis as assessed by radiography. The results confirmed the crucial role of radiography in the clinical evaluation of hip dysplasia and osteoarthritis in the adult dog. Assessment of the volume of the ligamentum capitis femoris revealed that it is an important tool for research in canine hip dysplasia and osteoarthritis.

  8. The migration of femoral components after total hip replacement surgery: accuracy and precision of software-aided measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decking, J. [Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Univ. of Mainz School of Medicine, Mainz (Germany); Schuetz, U.; Decking, R.; Puhl, W. [Orthopaedic Dept., Univ. of Ulm, School of Medicine (Germany)

    2003-09-01

    Objective: To assess the accuracy and precision of a software-aided system to measure migration of femoral components after total hip replacement (THR) on digitised radiographs. Design and patients: Subsidence and varus-valgus tilt of THR stems within the femur were measured on digitised anteroposterior pelvic radiographs. The measuring software (UMA, GEMED, Germany) relies on bony landmarks and comparability parameters of two consecutive radiographs. Its accuracy and precision were calculated by comparing it with the gold standard in migration measurements, radiostereometric analysis (RSA). Radiographs and corresponding RSA measurements were performed in 60 patients (38-69 years) following cementless THR surgery. Results and conclusions: The UMA software measured the subsidence of the stems with an accuracy of {+-}2.5 mm and varus-valgus tilt with an accuracy of {+-}1.8 (95% confidence interval). A good interobserver and intraobserver reliability was calculated with Cronbach's alpha ranging from 0.86 to 0.97. Measuring the subsidence of THR stems within the femur is an important parameter in the diagnosis of implant loosening. Software systems such as UMA improve the accuracy of migration measurements and are easy to use on routinely performed radiographs of operated hip joints. (orig.)

  9. Epilepsia partialis continua present with shoulder joint-trunk-hip joint rhythmic clonic seizure: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lv YD

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Yudan Lv, Zan Wang, Fengna Chu, Chang Liu, Hongmei Meng Department of Neurology and Neuroscience Center, The First Hospital of Jilin University, ChangChun, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Epilepsia partialis continua (EPC is a particular type of epilepsy which is distinguished from “common epilepsy” by its characteristic semiological features. However, unusual manifestations should be described in order to give awareness at clinical diagnosis. In this case report we describe a rare EPC case not previously reported, in which left shoulder joint-trunk-hip joint jerk was present for 1 week. Abnormal electroencephalogram and cerebrospinal fluid results supported a diagnosis of viral encephalitis. Antiepileptic treatment seemed effective. Our report emphasizes that a detailed functional anatomical analysis and synchronized electroencephalogram discharge should be done to avoid misdiagnosis in patients with synchronic shoulder-trunk-hip jerk symptoms. Keywords: EPC, shoulder-trunk-hip, EEG, clonic seizure, virus encephalitis

  10. Normal radiological unossified hip joint space and femoral head size development during growth in 675 children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegener, Veronika; Jorysz, Gabriele; Arnoldi, Andreas; Utzschneider, Sandra; Wegener, Bernd; Jansson, Volkmar; Heimkes, Bernhard

    2017-03-01

    Evaluation of hip joint space width during child growth is important to aid in the early diagnosis of hip pathology in children. We established reference values for hip joint space and femoral head size for each age. Hip joint space development during growth was retrospectively investigated medial and cranial in 1350 hip joints of children using standard anteroposterior supine plain pelvic radiographs. Maximum capital femoral epiphysis diameter and femoral radii were further more investigated. Hip joint space values show a slow decline during growth. Joint space was statistically significantly (p < 0.006) larger in boys than girls. Our hip joint space measurements on supine subjects seem slightly larger than those reported by Hughes on standing subjects. Evaluation of the femoral head diameter and the radii showed a size curve quite parallel to the known body growth charts. Radii medial and perpendicular to the physis are not statistically significantly different. We recommend to compare measurements of hip joint space at two locations to age dependent charts using the same imaging technique. During growth, a divergence in femoral head size from the expected values or loss of the spherical shape should raise the question of hip disorder. Clin. Anat. 30:267-275, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Routine one-stage exchange for chronic infection after total hip replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenny, Jean-Yves; Lengert, Régis; Diesinger, Yann; Gaudias, Jeannot; Boeri, Cyril; Kempf, Jean-François

    2014-12-01

    We hypothesized that a routine one-stage exchange for treatment of chronically infected total hip replacement (THR) will lead to (1) a higher rate of infection recurrence and (2) a poorer hip outcome than the published rates after two-stage exchange. Sixty-five cases have been treated consecutively with one-stage exchange. All patients have been followed for a period of three to six years or until death or infection recurrence. The five-year rate for infection recurrence was 16%. The five-year survival rate for recurrence of the index infection was 8%. Forty-two percent of the hips had a good or excellent PMA score, and 46% a good or excellent OH score. Routine one-stage exchange was not associated with a higher recurrence rate and a poorer hip function than previously published series of two-stage exchange. Therefore, there is little support to choose two-stage exchange as the routine treatment for management of chronically infected THR.

  12. No evidence hip joint angle modulates intrinsically produced stretch reflex in human hopping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, W; Campbell, A; Allison, G

    2013-09-01

    Motor output in activities such as walking and hopping is suggested to be mediated neurally by purported stretch reflex augmentation of muscle output. Reflex EMG activity during these tasks has been frequently investigated in the soleus muscle; with alterations in reflex amplitude being associated with changes in hip joint angle/phase of the gait cycle. Previous work has focussed on reflex activity induced by an artificial perturbation or by induction of H-reflexes. As such, it is currently unknown if stretch reflex activity induced intrinsically (as part of the task) is modulated by changes in hip joint angle. This study investigated whether hip joint angle modulated reflex EMG 'burst' activity during a hopping task performed on a custom-built partially reclined sleigh. Ten subjects participated; EMG and kinematic data (VICON motor capture system) was collected for each hop cycle. Participants completed 5 sets of 30s of self-paced hopping in (1) hip neutral and (2) hip 60° flexion conditions. There was no difference in EMG 'burst' activity or in sagittal plane kinematics (knee/ankle) in the hopping task between the two conditions. The results indicate that during a functional task such as hopping, changes in hip angle do not alter the stretch reflex-like activity associated with landing. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The trainer, the trainee and the surgeons' assistant: clinical outcomes following total hip replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palan, J; Gulati, A; Andrew, J G; Murray, D W; Beard, D J

    2009-07-01

    Balancing service provision and surgical training is a challenging issue that affects all healthcare systems. A multicentre prospective study of 1501 total hip replacements was undertaken to investigate whether there is an association between surgical outcome and the grade of the operating surgeon, and whether there is any difference in outcome if surgeons' assistants assist with the operation, rather than orthopaedic trainees. The primary outcome measure was the change in the Oxford hip score (OHS) at five years. Secondary outcomes included the rate of revision and dislocation, operating time, and length of hospital stay. There was no significant difference in DeltaOHS or complication rates between operations undertaken by trainers and trainees, or those at which surgeons' assistants and trainees were the assistant. However, there was a significant difference in the duration of surgery, with a mean reduction of 28 minutes in those in which a surgeons' assistant was the assistant. This study provides evidence that total hip replacements can be performed safely and effectively by appropriately trained surgeons in training, and that there are potential benefits of using surgeons' assistants in orthopaedic surgery.

  14. Articular soft tissue anatomy of the archosaur hip joint: Structural homology and functional implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Henry P; Holliday, Casey M

    2015-06-01

    Archosaurs evolved a wide diversity of locomotor postures, body sizes, and hip joint morphologies. The two extant archosaurs clades (birds and crocodylians) possess highly divergent hip joint morphologies, and the homologies and functions of their articular soft tissues, such as ligaments, cartilage, and tendons, are poorly understood. Reconstructing joint anatomy and function of extinct vertebrates is critical to understanding their posture, locomotor behavior, ecology, and evolution. However, the lack of soft tissues in fossil taxa makes accurate inferences of joint function difficult. Here, we describe the soft tissue anatomies and their osteological correlates in the hip joint of archosaurs and their sauropsid outgroups, and infer structural homology across the extant taxa. A comparative sample of 35 species of birds, crocodylians, lepidosaurs, and turtles ranging from hatchling to skeletally mature adult were studied using dissection, imaging, and histology. Birds and crocodylians possess topologically and histologically consistent articular soft tissues in their hip joints. Epiphyseal cartilages, fibrocartilages, and ligaments leave consistent osteological correlates. The archosaur acetabulum possesses distinct labrum and antitrochanter structures on the supraacetabulum. The ligamentum capitis femoris consists of distinct pubic- and ischial attachments, and is homologous with the ventral capsular ligament of lepidosaurs. The proximal femur has a hyaline cartilage core attached to the metaphysis via a fibrocartilaginous sleeve. This study provides new insight into soft tissue structures and their osteological correlates (e.g., the antitrochanter, the fovea capitis, and the metaphyseal collar) in the archosaur hip joint. The topological arrangement of fibro- and hyaline cartilage may provide mechanical support for the chondroepiphysis. The osteological correlates identified here will inform systematic and functional analyses of archosaur hindlimb evolution and

  15. Release of zirconia nanoparticles at the metal stem-bone cement interface in implant loosening of total hip replacements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schunck, Antje; Kronz, Andreas; Fischer, Cornelius; Buchhorn, Gottfried Hans

    2016-02-01

    In a previous failure analysis performed on femoral components of cemented total hip replacements, we determined high volumes of abraded bone cement. Here, we describe the topography of the polished surface of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) bone cement containing zirconia radiopacifier, analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and vertical scanning interferometry. Zirconia spikes protruded about 300nm from the PMMA matrix, with pits of former crystal deposition measuring about 400nm in depth. We deduced that the characteristically mulberry-shaped agglomerates of zirconia crystals are ground and truncated into flat surfaces and finally torn out of the PMMA matrix. Additionally, evaluation of in vitro PMMA-on-PMMA articulation confirmed that crystal agglomerations of zirconia were exposed to grain pullout, fatigue, and abrasion. In great quantities, micron-sized PMMA wear and zirconia nanoparticles accumulate in the cement-bone interface and capsular tissues, thereby contributing to osteolysis. Dissemination of nanoparticles to distant lymph nodes and organs of storage has been reported. As sufficient information is lacking, foreign body reactions to accumulated nanosized zirconia in places of long-term storage should be investigated. The production of wear particles of PMMA bone cement in the interface to joint replacement devices, presents a local challenge. The presence of zirconia particles results in frustrated digestion attempts by macrophages, liberation of inflammatory mediators, and necrosis leading to aseptic inflammation and osteolyses. Attempts to minimize wear of articulating joints reduced the attention to the deterioration of cement cuffs. We therefore investigated polished surfaces of retrieved cuffs to demonstrate their morphology and to measure surface roughness. Industrially admixed agglomerates of the radiopacifier are abraded to micron and nano-meter sized particles. The dissemination of zirconia particles in the reticulo-endothelial system to

  16. Dynamical analysis of dislocation-associated factors in total hip replacements by hardware-in-the-loop simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geier, Andreas; Kluess, Daniel; Grawe, Robert; Herrmann, Sven; D'Lima, Darryl; Woernle, Christoph; Bader, Rainer

    2017-11-01

    Since dislocation of total hip replacements (THR) remains a clinical problem, its mechanisms are still in the focus of research. Previous studies ignored the impact of soft tissue structures and dynamic processes or relied on simplified joint contact mechanics, thus, hindered a thorough understanding. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to use hardware-in-the-loop (HiL) simulation to analyze systematically the impact of varying implant positions and designs as well as gluteal and posterior muscle function on THR instability under physiological-like loading conditions during dynamic movements. A musculoskeletal multibody model emulated the in situ environment of the lower extremity during deep sit-to-stand with femoral adduction maneuver while a six-axis robot moved and loaded a THR accordingly to feed physical measurements back to the multibody model. Commercial THRs with hard-soft bearings were used in the simulation with three different head diameters (28, 36, 44 mm) and two offsets (M, XL). Cup inclination of 45°, cup anteversion of 20°, and stem anteversion of 10° revealed to be outstandingly robust against any instability-related parameter variation. For the flexion motion, higher combined anteversion angles of cup and stem seemed generally favorable. Total hip instability was either deferred or even avoided even in the presence of higher cup inclination. Larger head diameters (>36 mm) and femoral head offsets (8 mm) deferred occurrence of prosthetic and bone impingement associated with increasing resisting torques. In summary, implant positioning had a much higher impact on total hip stability than gluteal insufficiency and impaired muscle function. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:2557-2566, 2017. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Implant Optimisation for Primary Hip Replacement in Patients over 60 Years with Osteoarthritis: A Cohort Study of Clinical Outcomes and Implant Costs Using Data from England and Wales.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon S Jameson

    Full Text Available Hip replacement is one of the most commonly performed surgical procedures worldwide; hundreds of implant configurations provide options for femoral head size, joint surface material and fixation method with dramatically varying costs. Robust comparative evidence to inform the choice of implant is needed. This retrospective cohort study uses linked national databases from England and Wales to determine the optimal type of replacement for patients over 60 years undergoing hip replacement for osteoarthritis.Implants included were the commonest brand from each of the four types of replacement (cemented, cementless, hybrid and resurfacing; the reference prosthesis was the cemented hip procedure. Patient reported outcome scores (PROMs, costs and risk of repeat (revision surgery were examined. Multivariable analyses included analysis of covariance to assess improvement in PROMs (Oxford hip score, OHS, and EQ5D index (9159 linked episodes and competing risks modelling of implant survival (79,775 procedures. Cost of implants and ancillary equipment were obtained from National Health Service procurement data.EQ5D score improvements (at 6 months were similar for all hip replacement types. In females, revision risk was significantly higher in cementless hip prostheses (hazard ratio, HR = 2.22, p<0.001, when compared to the reference hip. Although improvement in OHS was statistically higher (22.1 versus 20.5, p<0.001 for cementless implants, this small difference is unlikely to be clinically important. In males, revision risk was significantly higher in cementless (HR = 1.95, p = 0.003 and resurfacing implants, HR = 3.46, p<0.001, with no differences in OHS. Material costs were lowest with the reference implant (cemented, range £1103 to £1524 and highest with cementless implants (£1928 to £4285. Limitations include the design of the study, which is intrinsically vulnerable to omitted variables, a paucity of long-term implant survival data (reflecting the

  18. Implant Optimisation for Primary Hip Replacement in Patients over 60 Years with Osteoarthritis: A Cohort Study of Clinical Outcomes and Implant Costs Using Data from England and Wales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jameson, Simon S.; Mason, James; Baker, Paul N.; Gregg, Paul J.; Deehan, David J.; Reed, Mike R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hip replacement is one of the most commonly performed surgical procedures worldwide; hundreds of implant configurations provide options for femoral head size, joint surface material and fixation method with dramatically varying costs. Robust comparative evidence to inform the choice of implant is needed. This retrospective cohort study uses linked national databases from England and Wales to determine the optimal type of replacement for patients over 60 years undergoing hip replacement for osteoarthritis. Methods and Findings Implants included were the commonest brand from each of the four types of replacement (cemented, cementless, hybrid and resurfacing); the reference prosthesis was the cemented hip procedure. Patient reported outcome scores (PROMs), costs and risk of repeat (revision) surgery were examined. Multivariable analyses included analysis of covariance to assess improvement in PROMs (Oxford hip score, OHS, and EQ5D index) (9159 linked episodes) and competing risks modelling of implant survival (79,775 procedures). Cost of implants and ancillary equipment were obtained from National Health Service procurement data. Results EQ5D score improvements (at 6 months) were similar for all hip replacement types. In females, revision risk was significantly higher in cementless hip prostheses (hazard ratio, HR = 2.22, p<0.001), when compared to the reference hip. Although improvement in OHS was statistically higher (22.1 versus 20.5, p<0.001) for cementless implants, this small difference is unlikely to be clinically important. In males, revision risk was significantly higher in cementless (HR = 1.95, p = 0.003) and resurfacing implants, HR = 3.46, p<0.001), with no differences in OHS. Material costs were lowest with the reference implant (cemented, range £1103 to £1524) and highest with cementless implants (£1928 to £4285). Limitations include the design of the study, which is intrinsically vulnerable to omitted variables, a paucity of long

  19. [SOMATOTYPE JOINT MOBILITY AND RANGES OF HIP AND KNEE OF COLLEGE STUDENTS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoy-Cumillaf, Andrés; Valdés-Badilla, Pablo; García Sandoval, Alan; Grandón Fuentes, Monica; Lagos Del Canto, Loreto; Aravena Turra, Raúl; Herrera-Valenzuela, Tomás; Bruneau Chavez, José; Durán Agüero, Samuel

    2015-12-01

    several studies indicate a consistency between the physical inactivity and low levels of mobility in hip and knee joint. to determine the differences in the motion range of the hip and knee joint between the different classifications of somatotype in students of Pedagogy in Physical Education of the Universidad Autónoma de Chile, campus Temuco. the sample included 102 physical education students (31.3% female), somatotype was obtained through the protocol of the International Society for the Advancement of Kinanthropometry (ISAK) and the motion range of the hip and knee joint (ROM) using a universal goniometer. the mean somatotype was endo-mesomorphic (4.8 - 3.4 - 2) for the women and meso-endomorphic (3.5 - 5.7 - 2) for the males, while the ROM evaluation indicated that the 50% of the students presented mobility values of joint lower than the normal ones. Furthermore, the endo-mesomorphic women showed lower ROM values of medial rotation of the right hip (45.5 ° ± 10.2 °; P = 0.0125, t = 2.732) and left hip side rotation (41.7 ° ± 10.3 °; P = 0.0256; p = 2.402) than the women meso-endomorphic. the results shows a relationship between the somatotype and hip ROM in the women, showing that in the women the most favorable results of joint mobility are related with a greater muscle mass. In contrasts, no significant differences were observed in men. It is important to encourage the development of joint mobility exercises according to the specific needs of each sex. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  20. Bone bruise, lipohemarthrosis, and joint effusion in CT of non-displaced hip fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geijer, Mats; Dunker, Dennis; Collin, David; Göthlin, Jan H

    2012-03-01

    A suspected occult hip fracture after normal radiography is not uncommon in an elderly person after a fall. Despite a lack of robust validation in the literature, computed tomography (CT) is often used as secondary imaging. To assess the frequency and clinical utility of non-cortical skeletal and soft tissue lesions as ancillary fracture signs in CT diagnosis of occult hip fractures. All fracture signs (cortical and trabecular fractures, bone bruise, joint effusion, and lipohemarthrosis) were recorded in 231 hip low-energy trauma cases with CT performed after normal or equivocal radiography in two trauma centers. There were no fracture signs in 110 patients. Twelve of these had a joint effusion. In 121 patients with 46 cervical hip fractures and 75 trochanteric fractures one or more fracture signs were present. Cortical fractures were found in 115 patients. Bone bruise was found in 119 patients, joint effusion in 35, and lipohemarthrosis in 20 patients. Ancillary signs such as bone bruise and lipohemarthrosis can strengthen and sometimes indicate the diagnosis in CT of occult hip fractures. Joint effusion is a non-specific sign.

  1. The impingement-dislocation risk of total hip replacement: effects of cup orientation and patient maneuvers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffari, M; Nickmanesh, R; Tamannaee, N; Farahmand, F

    2012-01-01

    Hip dislocation is one of the most frequent complications after total hip arthroplasty. Impingement and dislocation might be caused due to misalignment of the acetabular cup during surgery, or performing dislocation-prone activities afterwards. A finite element model was developed to predict the impingement and dislocation behavior of the prosthetic joint, for different combinations of cup orientation and patient maneuver. Four dislocation-prone activities of daily life and 25 cup orientations were analyzed to determine how close they are to the impingement and subsequent dislocation events. The angular margin results obtained indicated that the sit-to-stand and standing while bending at the waist are prone to dislocation, in particular when the cup anteversion angle is small.

  2. The dislocating hip replacement - revision with a dual mobility cup in 56 consecutive patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Thomas; Kappel, Andreas; Hansen, Flemming

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Recurrent dislocations of hip replacements are a difficult challenge. One treatment option for recurrent dislocations is the use of a dual mobility cup. The aim of this study was to retrospective investigate the effect of dual mobility cups as a treatment for recurrent dislocations...... with a Saturne dual mobility cup (Amplitude, Neyron, France). The mean follow-up period was 44 months (SD 30, range 0.1-119). RESULTS: One patient (1.8%) experienced a re-dislocation. Three patients (5.3%) had to be revised. One due to disintegration between the femoral head and inner shell, one due to loosening...... of the acetabular component, and one due to infection. Harris Hip Score improved from a mean of 76 before index surgery to 87 within one year after index surgery. CONCLUSION: This study advocates the use of a dual mobility cup for treatment of recurrent dislocations of THR. However, studies with a longer follow up...

  3. Static balance according to hip joint angle of unsupported leg during one-leg standing

    OpenAIRE

    Cha, Ju-Hyung; Kim, Jang-Joon; Ye, Jae-Gwan; Lee, Seul-Ji; Hong, Jeong-Mi; Choi, Hyun-Kyu; Choi, Ho-Suk; Shin, Won-Seob

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine static balance according to hip joint angle of the unsupported leg during one-leg standing. [Subjects and Methods] Subjects included 45 healthy adult males and females in their 20s. During one-leg standing on the non-dominant leg, the position of the unsupported leg was classified according to hip joint angles of point angle was class. Static balance was then measured using a force plate with eyes open and closed. The total length, sway velocity, maximu...

  4. SHOULD DISEASE-MODIFYING THERAPY BE STOPPED IN PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS BEFORE ENDOPROSTHETIC JOINT REPLACEMENT?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Savenkova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to analyze disease activity, functional state, quality of life (QL, and the frequency of infectious complications in methotrexate (MT – or leflunomide (LF-treated patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA who had undergone endoprosthetic replacement of the large joints of the lower limbs. Subjects and methods. One hundred and fourteen patients with RA who had undergone endoprosthetic replacement of the knee and hip joints were divided into 3 groups: 1 36 patients who continuously received MT or LF in the perioperative period; 2 42 patients who dis- continued MT or LF 2 and 4 weeks, respectively, prior to surgery; 3 36 patients who took no disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs within 12 months before surgery. Disease activity was estimated by the DAS28 index. QL was determined using the EQ-5D questionnaire and functional capacity was estimated by the HAQ index. Results and discussion. In all the groups, there was a preponderance of patients with moderate RA activity (more than 60%. In Groups 1 and 2, the mean dose of MT was about 10 mg weekly and that of LF was 20 mg daily. The use duration of glucocorticoids (GC and their doses were comparable in all the groups. Twelve months after surgery, DAS28 significantly reduced from 4.22±1.08 to 3.58±1.07 months in Group 1 (p = 0.01; in Group 2, the decrease was insignificant: from 4.17±1.17 to 3.80±1.15 (p > 005; in Group 3, RA activity remained as before. All the groups achieved 50% functional improvement; better results were obtained in the group of patients who continued to use DMARDs in the perioperative period (∆HAQ=-0.67. The difference in the Eq-5D index corresponded to a moderate QL improvement: ∆EQ-5D = 0.28, 0.29, and 0.31 in Groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively (p < 0.05. There were no significant group differences. Deep infection in the endoprosthetic replacement area was detected in 2.8, 2.4, and 8.3% of cases, respectively (p > 005. Conclusion. Continuous use of MT

  5. ANTERIOR SUPERIOR DISLOCATION OF THE HIP JOINT: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    transchondral or indentation type) and/or neck of the femur. C. Associated fracture of the acetabulum. Of these, most are of the inferior variety, with the classical history of a violent abduction force at the hip having caused the insult. The limb in an ...

  6. Cobalt toxicity after revision total hip replacement due to fracture of a ceramic head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelayo-de Tomás, J M; Novoa-Parra, C; Gómez-Barbero, P

    Symptomatic cobalt toxicity from a failed total hip replacement is a rare, but devastating complication. Potential clinical findings include cardiomyopathy, hypothyroidism, skin rash, visual and hearing impairment, polycythaemia, weakness, fatigue, cognitive impairment, and neuropathy. The case is presented of a 74year-old man in whom, after a ceramic-ceramic replacement and two episodes of prosthetic dislocation, it was decided to replace it with a polyethylene-metal total hip arthroplasty (THA). At 6months after the revision he developed symptoms of cobalt toxicity, confirmed by analytical determination (serum cobalt level=651.2μg/L). After removal of the prosthesis, the levels of chromium and cobalt in blood and urine returned to normal, with the patient currently being asymptomatic. It is recommended to use a new ceramic on ceramic bearing at revision, in order to minimise the risk of wear-related cobalt toxicity following breakage of ceramic components. Copyright © 2016 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Influence of borderline hip dysplasia on joint kinematics of clinically sound Belgian Shepherd dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockstahler, Barbara A; Henninger, Wolfgang; Müller, Marion; Mayrhofer, Elisabeth; Peham, Christian; Podbregar, Iztok

    2007-03-01

    To detect changes in joint kinematics of clinically sound dogs with or without radiographically detectable borderline hip dysplasia (HD). 20 Belgian Shepherd Dogs (Malinois; mean +/- SD age, 2.75 +/- 1.32 years) with no clinical signs of HD. Kinematic gait analysis was performed in Malinois walking on a treadmill. On the basis of results of radiographic examination for HD and in accordance with guidelines established by the Fédération Cynologique Internationale, dogs were assigned to group 1 (no radiographic signs of HD; 8 dogs) or group 2 (borderline HD; 12 dogs). Ground reaction forces and weight distribution among limbs and differences between groups were evaluated. Maximal sagittal angle during the stance and swing phases, the time at which they were detected, and angle velocities were calculated for joints of the hind limbs. Ground reaction forces revealed no differences between groups. Dogs in group 1 had significant changes (earlier time for maximal flexion of the hip joint and less flexion and less range of motion of the stifle joint), compared with results for dogs in group 2. Maximal angle velocity of the stifle and tarsal joints was significantly lower during the swing phase in group 1 than in group 2. This study revealed that dogs with borderline HD had altered joint kinematics. Our data provide basic kinematic values for clinically sound and affected dogs and can be used to investigate the long-term effects for subclinical radiographic changes of the hip joints of dogs.

  8. Bicentric bipolar hip prosthesis: A radiological study of movement at the interprosthetic joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Kumar Rai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The bipolar hip prostheses after some time functions as a unipolar device. There is a need to change the design of bipolar hip prostheses to make it function as a bipolar device over a prolonged period of time. A bicentric bipolar hip prosthesis was used as an implant for various conditions of the hip. We evaluated the movement of this newly developed prosthesis at the interprosthetic joint radiologically at periodic intervals. Materials and Methods: Fifty two cases were operarted with the Bicentric bipolar prosthesis for indications like fracture neck of femur and various other diseases of the hip and were followed up with serial radiographs at periodic intervals to evaluate, what fraction of the total abduction at the hip was occurring at the interprosthetic joint. Results: In cases of intracapsular fracture neck of femur, the percentage of total abduction occurring at the interprosthetic joint at 3 months follow-up was 33.74% (mean value of all the patients, which fell to 25.66% at 1.5 years. In indications for bipolar hemireplacement other than fracture neck of femur, the percentage of total abduction occurring at the interprosthetic joint at 3 months follow-up was 71.71% (mean value and at 1.5 years it was 67.52%. Conclusion: This study shows the relative preservation of inner bearing movement in the bipolar hip prosthesis with time probably due its refined design. Further refinements are needed to make the prosthesis work better in patients of intracapsular fracture neck femur.

  9. Functional improvement after hip arthroscopy in cases of active paediatric hip joint tuberculosis: a retrospective comparative study vis-à-vis conservative management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Vivek; Khan, Shah Alam; Kumar, Ashok; Poudel, Rishiram; Kumar, Venkatesan Sampath

    2015-12-01

    Tuberculosis of the hip joint is a significant cause of preventable disability, especially in children. The aim of our study was to evaluate the functional results of hip arthroscopy done in a cohort of patients with hip joint tuberculosis and to compare them with the outcome of conservatively managed cases. This was a retrospective cohort study in which we evaluated the records of 22 hip arthroscopies performed in known cases of tuberculosis of the hip joint in children less than 12 years of age. A note of the demographic and clinical parameters like age, duration of symptoms, stage of the disease, time period of follow-up, any complications during surgery, and pre- and post-operative modified Harris hip score (MHHS) was made in all cases. We compared the results with an age-matched cohort of 44 children with hip joint tuberculosis who were treated non-operatively with anti-tuberculosis therapy and traction in the same tertiary care institute. The arthroscopic findings in our series included synovitis, chondral erosions of the femoral head and/or acetabulum, pannus formation over the femoral head and/or acetabulum, and labral tears. The various arthroscopic procedures which were done included joint lavage, synovectomy, labral debridement and cheilectomy. The mean follow-up was 45 months, with the minimum being 36 months. There was a statistically significant change in the mean MHHS after hip arthroscopic procedures (p hip arthroscopy and that after conservative management. Arthroscopy of the hip joint in children in cases of tuberculosis can serve as an emerging therapeutic modality. It is an effective and safe minimally invasive procedure, and helps in improving the functional outcome in early disease.

  10. Iranian Joint Registry(Iranian National Hip and Knee Arthroplasty Registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidreza Aslani

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Periodic evaluation and monitoring the health and economic outcome of joint replacement surgery is a common and popular process under the territory of joint registries in many countries. In this article we introduce the methodology used for the foundation of the National Iranian Joint Registry (IJR with a joint collaboration of the Social Security Organization (SSO and academic research departments considering the requirements of the Iran’s Ministry of Health and Education.

  11. Automatic Tools for Diagnosis Support of Total Hip Replacement Follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SULTANA, A.

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Total hip replacement is a common procedure in today orthopedics, with high rate of long-term success. Failure prevention is based on a regular follow-up aimed at checking the prosthesis fit and state by means of visual inspection of radiographic images. It is our purpose to provide automatic means for aiding medical personnel in this task. Therefore we have constructed tools for automatic identification of the component parts of the radiograph, followed by analysis of interactions between the bone and the prosthesis. The results form a set of parameters with obvious interest in medical diagnosis.

  12. Obturator externus bursa: prevalence of communication with the hip joint and associated intra-articular findings in 200 consecutive hip MR arthrograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassarjian, Ara; Llopis, Eva; Schwartz, Richard B; Bencardino, Jenny T

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of the study was to demonstrate the prevalence of communication between the hip joint and the obturator externus bursa on hip MR arthrography. Following institutional review board approval, 200 hip MR arthrograms in 196 subjects were independently reviewed by two musculoskeletal radiologists. Discrepancies were resolved by adjudication. The presence or absence of communication between the hip joint and the obturator externus bursa was recorded. Associated lesions involving the acetabular labrum and articular cartilage were recorded. The obturator externus bursa was shown to communicate with the hip joint in 11 of the 200 (5.5%) hip MR arthrograms. Of these, six were in men and five were in women. The age range was 15-63 years with a mean age of 34 years. All 11 patients had labral tears. Eight of the 11 had cartilage lesions. The obturator externus bursa can be seen to communicate with the hip joint in 5.5% of hip MR arthrograms. Associated labral and cartilage lesions are common.

  13. Patient-related predictors of implant failure after primary total hip replacement in the initial, short- and long-terms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, S.P.; Sørensen, H.T.; Lucht, Ulf

    2006-01-01

    replacement, an age of 80 years or more and hip replacement undertaken as a sequela of trauma, for avascular necrosis or paediatric conditions, were associated with an increased risk of failure. However, during six months to 8.6 years after surgery, being less than 60 years old was associated...

  14. Joint Replacement Volume Positively Correlates With Improved Hospital Performance on Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Quality Metrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibley, Rachel A; Charubhumi, Vanessa; Hutzler, Lorraine H; Paoli, Albit R; Bosco, Joseph A

    2017-05-01

    The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) is transitioning Medicare from a fee-for-service program into a value-based pay-for-performance program. In order to accomplish this goal, CMS initiated 3 programs that attempt to define quality and seek to reward high-performing hospitals and penalize poor-performing hospitals. These programs include (1) penalties for hospital-acquired conditions (HACs), (2) penalties for excess readmissions for certain conditions, and (3) performance on value-based purchasing (VBP). The objective of this study was to determine whether high-volume total joint hospitals perform better in these programs than their lower-volume counterparts. We analyzed data from the New York Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System database on total New York State hospital discharges from 2013 to 2015 for total knee and total hip arthroplasty. This was compared to data from Hospital Compare on HAC's, excess readmissions, and VBP. From these databases, we identified 123 hospitals in New York, which participated in all 3 Medicare pay-for-performance programs and performed total joint replacements. Over the 3-year period spanning 2013-2015, hospitals in New York State performed an average of 1136.59 total joint replacement surgeries and achieved a mean readmission penalty of 0.005909. The correlation coefficient between surgery volume and combined performance score was 0.277. Of these correlations, surgery volume and VBP performance, and surgery volume and combined performance showed statistical significance (P quality, as well as joint replacement volumes and VBP performance, specifically. These findings are consistent with previously reported associations between patient outcomes and procedure volumes. However, a relationship between joint replacement volume and HAC scores or readmission penalties could not be demonstrated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Dissolution behaviour of silicon nitride coatings for joint replacements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersson, Maria; Bryant, Michael; Schmidt, Susann; Engqvist, Håkan; Hall, Richard M; Neville, Anne; Persson, Cecilia

    2016-05-01

    In this study, the dissolution rate of SiNx coatings was investigated as a function of coating composition, in comparison to a cobalt chromium molybdenum alloy (CoCrMo) reference. SiNx coatings with N/Si ratios of 0.3, 0.8 and 1.1 were investigated. Electrochemical measurements were complemented with solution (inductively coupled plasma techniques) and surface analysis (vertical scanning interferometry and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy). The dissolution rate of the SiNx coatings was evaluated to 0.2-1.4 nm/day, with a trend of lower dissolution rate with higher N/Si atomic ratio in the coating. The dissolution rates of the coatings were similar to or lower than that of CoCrMo (0.7-1.2 nm/day). The highest nitrogen containing coating showed mainly Si-N bonds in the bulk as well as at the surface and in the dissolution area. The lower nitrogen containing coatings showed Si-N and/or Si-Si bonds in the bulk and an increased formation of Si-O bonds at the surface as well as in the dissolution area. The SiNx coatings reduced the metal ion release from the substrate. The possibility to tune the dissolution rate and the ability to prevent release of metal ions encourage further studies on SiNx coatings for joint replacements. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Patients' experiences of telerehabilitation at home after shoulder joint replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Lisbeth; Lindström, Britta; Ekenberg, Lilly

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the experience of ten patients who received video-based physiotherapy at home for two months after a shoulder joint replacement. Videoconferencing took place via the patient's home broadband connection at a bandwidth of 256-768 kbit/s. Qualitative interviews were carried out, transcribed and analysed. Through qualitative content analysis six categories were identified: (1) a different reinforced communication; (2) pain-free exercising as an effective routine; (3) from a dependent patient to a strengthened person at home; (4) closeness at a distance; (5) facilitated daily living; and (6) continuous physiotherapy chain. The access to bodily knowledge, continuity, collaboration and being at home were all aspects that contributed to the patients' recovery. The patients described experiences of safety, and strengthening during their daily exercise routine at home. The frequent interplay with the patient during telerehabilitation made it possible for the physiotherapist to make an individual judgement about each patient; this could be one reason for the positive findings. Home video-based physiotherapy may be useful in other kinds of physiotherapy.

  17. Towards computer-assisted surgery in shoulder joint replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valstar, Edward R.; Botha, Charl P.; van der Glas, Marjolein; Rozing, Piet M.; van der Helm, Frans C. T.; Post, Frits H.; Vossepoel, Albert M.

    A research programme that aims to improve the state of the art in shoulder joint replacement surgery has been initiated at the Delft University of Technology. Development of improved endoprostheses for the upper extremities (DIPEX), as this effort is called, is a clinically driven multidisciplinary programme consisting of many contributory aspects. A part of this research programme focuses on the pre-operative planning and per-operative guidance issues. The ultimate goal of this part of the DIPEX project is to create a surgical support infrastructure that can be used to predict the optimal surgical protocol and can assist with the selection of the most suitable endoprosthesis for a particular patient. In the pre-operative planning phase, advanced biomechanical models of the endoprosthesis fixation and the musculo-skeletal system of the shoulder will be incorporated, which are adjusted to the individual's morphology. Subsequently, the support infrastructure must assist the surgeon during the operation in executing his surgical plan. In the per-operative phase, the chosen optimal position of the endoprosthesis can be realised using camera-assisted tools or mechanical guidance tools. In this article, the pathway towards the desired surgical support infrastructure is described. Furthermore, we discuss the pre-operative planning phase and the per-operative guidance phase, the initial work performed, and finally, possible approaches for improving prosthesis placement.

  18. Does aquatic exercise reduce hip and knee joint loading? In vivo load measurements with instrumented implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutzner, Ines; Richter, Anja; Gordt, Katharina; Dymke, Jörn; Damm, Philipp; Duda, Georg N; Günzl, Reiner; Bergmann, Georg

    2017-01-01

    Aquatic exercises are widely used for rehabilitation or preventive therapies in order to enable mobilization and muscle strengthening while minimizing joint loading of the lower limb. The load reducing effect of water due to buoyancy is a main advantage compared to exercises on land. However, also drag forces have to be considered that act opposite to the relative motion of the body segments and require higher muscle activity. Due to these opposing effects on joint loading, the load-reducing effect during aquatic exercises remains unknown. The aim of this study was to quantify the joint loads during various aquatic exercises and to determine the load reducing effect of water. Instrumented knee and hip implants with telemetric data transfer were used to measure the resultant joint contact forces in 12 elderly subjects (6x hip, 6x knee) in vivo. Different dynamic, weight-bearing and non-weight-bearing activities were performed by the subjects on land and in chest-high water. Non-weight-bearing hip and knee flexion/extension was performed at different velocities and with additional Aquafins. Joint forces during aquatic exercises ranged between 32 and 396% body weight (BW). Highest forces occurred during dynamic activities, followed by weight-bearing and slow non-weight-bearing activities. Compared to the same activities on land, joint forces were reduced by 36-55% in water with absolute reductions being greater than 100%BW during weight-bearing and dynamic activities. During non-weight-bearing activities, high movement velocities and additional Aquafins increased the joint forces by up to 59% and resulted in joint forces of up to 301%BW. This study confirms the load reducing effect of water during weight-bearing and dynamic exercises. Nevertheless, high drag forces result in increased joint contact forces and indicate greater muscle activity. By the choice of activity, movement velocity and additional resistive devices joint forces can be modulated individually in the

  19. Bone mineral density in patients with destructive arthrosis of the hip joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okano, Kunihiko; Aoyagi, Kiyoshi; Enomoto, Hiroshi; Osaki, Makoto; Chiba, Ko; Yamaguchi, Kazumasa

    2014-05-01

    Recent reports have shown the existence of subchondral insufficiency fracture in rapidly destructive arthrosis of the hip joint (RDA), and the findings suggest that osteopenia is related to the pathogenesis of the rapid progression of this disease. Therefore, we measured bone mineral density (BMD) in RDA patients. We measured BMD of the lumbar spine, radius, and calcaneus using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry in 19 patients with RDA and 75 with osteoarthritis of the hip (OA) and compared BMD at different skeletal sites between RDA and OA patients. No significant differences were observed in BMD of the lumbar spine, ultradistal radius, mid-radius, and calcaneous between the RDA and OA groups. Our data suggest that RDA is not accompanied by generalized osteoporosis. Factors other than generalized bone status, for example, BMD around the affected hip joint before destruction, need to be analyzed to elucidate the pathophysiological mechanism of RDA.

  20. Experimentally reduced hip abductor function during walking: Implications for knee joint loads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Aaboe, Jens; Simonsen, Erik B

    2009-01-01

    medius (GM) muscle would lead to increased external knee adduction moment during level walking in healthy subjects. Reduced GM muscle function was induced experimentally, by means of intramuscular injections of hypertonic saline that produced an intense short-term muscle pain and reduced muscle function......Hip and knee functions are intimately connected and reduced hip abductor function might play a role in development of knee osteoarthritis (OA) by increasing the external knee adduction moment during walking. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that reduced function of the gluteus......-dimensional trunk and lower extremity joint kinematics and kinetics. Surface electromyography (EMG) of the glutei, quadriceps, and hamstring muscles were also measured. The peak GM EMG activity had temporal concurrence with peaks in frontal plane moments at both hip and knee joints. The EMG activity in the GM...

  1. MR imaging of transient osteoporosis of the hip: an update on 155 hip joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klontzas, Michail E; Vassalou, Evangelia E; Zibis, Aristeidis H; Bintoudi, Antonia S; Karantanas, Apostolos H

    2015-03-01

    Transient osteoporosis of the hip (TOH) presents with acute onset pain and bone marrow edema (BMe) on MR imaging. The purpose of this study is to revise the MR imaging characteristics of TOH by analyzing the data derived from 155 hip examinations. We also sought to explore the relationship between the duration of symptoms and the presence of sparing and subchondral fractures. MR images of 155 hips (141 TOH patients) were retrospectively evaluated for the presence of insufficiency fractures and the morphology of BMe. Sparing of the medial bone marrow of the femoral head was recorded together with demographic and clinical data. Progression to regional migratory osteoporosis (RMO) and postpartum cases were also recorded. Our population consisted of 76.4% male and 23.6% female patients. RMO progression was recorded in 19.4% and 4 postpartum cases displayed bilateral disease. Sparing of the medial bone marrow was present at 87.7% of patients and disappeared as the disease progressed (P=0.005). BMe was restricted within the femoral head in 11.0%, extended to the femoral neck in 40% and to the femoral shaft in 49% of the cases studied. Subchondral fractures were present at 48.7% of the hips. This study describes TOH patient characteristics, the MR imaging findings (BMe pattern, microfractures), their association with symptom duration and the chance of progressing to RMO. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Joint-preserving surgical options for management of chondral injuries of the hip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Bitar, Youssef F; Lindner, Dror; Jackson, Timothy J; Domb, Benjamin G

    2014-01-01

    Management of injuries to the articular cartilage is complex and challenging; it becomes especially problematic in weight-bearing joints such as the hip. Several causes of articular cartilage damage have been described, including trauma, labral tears, and femoroacetabular impingement, among others. Because articular cartilage has little capacity for healing, nonsurgical management options are limited. Surgical options include total hip arthroplasty, microfracture, articular cartilage repair, autologous chondrocyte implantation, mosaicplasty, and osteochondral allograft transplantation. Advances in hip arthroscopy have broadened the spectrum of tools available for diagnosis and management of chondral damage. However, the literature is still not sufficiently robust to draw firm conclusions regarding best practices for chondral defects. Additional research is needed to expand our knowledge of and develop guidelines for management of chondral injuries of the hip.

  3. Traumatic dislocation of the hip joint--pattern and management in a tropical African population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonge, T O; Ogunlade, S O; Idowu, O E

    2002-01-01

    Traumatic dislocation of the hip is an orthopaedic emergency for which early reduction is indicated. This article describe our experience of the pattern and choice of management of traumatic dislocation of the hip joint in a tropical African population. Majority of the dislocation (87%) were Thompson and Epstein's grades I and II which were easily managed by closed reduction following the administration of titrated intravenous analgesic and intravenous diazepam. This treatment option is cheap and readily administrable to avoid undue delays in the management of this orthopaedic emergency. All the close reduction were carried out in the accident and emergency room except for one patient with bilateral posterior hip dislocation who had his reduction on the ward. Early diagnosis and treatment of traumatic hip dislocation are essential to reduce the morbidities that are commonly associated with delay in reduction.

  4. Micro-Raman spectroscopy for the crystallinity characterization of UHMWPE hip cups run on joint simulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoluzza, A.; Fagnano, C.; Rossi, M.; Tinti, A.; Cacciari, G. L.

    2000-03-01

    In this work Raman microspectrometry was used to evaluate the crystallinity changes of hip cups made of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). In vitro experiments were carried out using hip joint movement-wear simulators, run for five million cycles in water or bovine calf serum. The hip cups were subjected to mechanical friction with ceramic femoral heads (alumina-zirconia blend). The crystallinity of the polymer hip cups was studied as a function of inner surface position and thickness, from the stressed surface to the unstressed outer one. The Partial Least Square (PLS-l) calibration was used to correlate the Raman spectra with the crystallinity of the polymer measured with DSC calorimetry.

  5. Bilateral rapidly destructive arthrosis of the hip joint resulting from subchondral fracture with superimposed secondary osteonecrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Takuaki; Iwamoto, Yukihide [Kyushu University, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Fukuoka (Japan); Schneider, Robert [Hospital for Special Surgery, Department of Radiology, New York (United States); Bullough, Peter G. [Hospital for Special Surgery, Department of Laboratory Medicine, New York, NY (United States)

    2010-02-15

    A 57-year-old woman suffered rapid destruction of both hip joints over a 10 months period. At the first visit, her radiographs demonstrated slight joint space narrowing and acetabular cyst formation in both hips. Five months later, joint space narrowing had further progressed, and intra-articular injection of steroid was given in both hips. However, the hip pain gradually became worse. Five months later, both joint spaces had totally disappeared and both femoral heads had undergone massive collapse. At gross examination, both resected femoral heads showed extensive opaque yellow areas consistent with osteonecrosis. Microscopic examination of these areas revealed evidence of both extensive fracture and callus formation, as well as necrosis throughout, indicating that the osteonecrosis observed in this case was a secondary phenomenon superimposed on pre-existing osteoarthritis and subchondral fracture. There were many pseudogranulomatous lesions in the marrow space and necrotic area, where tiny fragments of bone and articular cartilage, surrounded by histiocytes and giant cells, were embedded, such as are typically seen in rapidly destructive arthrosis. No radiologic or morphologic evidence of primary osteonecrosis was noted. This case indicates that at least some cases of rapidly destructive arthritis are the result of subchondral fracture with superimposed secondary osteonecrosis. (orig.)

  6. Clinical examination and physical assessment of hip joint-related pain in athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reiman, Michael P; Thorborg, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Evidence-based clinical examination and assessment of the athlete with hip joint related pain is complex. It requires a systematic approach to properly differentially diagnose competing potential causes of athletic pain generation. An approach with an initial broad focus (and hence us...

  7. Within- and between-examiner repeatability of distraction indices of the hip joints in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, G K; LaFond, E; Gregor, T P; Lawler, D F; Nie, R C

    1997-10-01

    To evaluate in vivo repeatability of the distraction index method of evaluating hip joint laxity in dogs. 31 two-year-old Labrador Retrievers. Each dog was anesthetized and radiographically evaluated for hip joint laxity 4 times: twice by an experienced examiner and twice by an examiner who had no previous knowledge of or training in the technique prior to the first day of testing. Distraction indices (DI) were determined from the radiographs and intraclass correlation coefficients were calculated to evaluate the repeatability of DI measurements between and within examiners. Intraclass correlation coefficients were high (range, 0.85 to 0.94). Lower limits of the 95% confidence intervals for the intraclass correlation coefficients ranged from 0.75 to 0.89. Between- and within-examiner repeatabilities of DI measurements were high, suggesting that the technique is clinically reliable. Distraction index is a reliable measure of hip joint laxity and a good predictor of the risk of development of degenerative joint disease associated with hip dysplasia in dogs. Establishment of high repeatability of DI measurements suggests that the stress-radiographic method may be used by multiple examiners with the expectation of comparable and consistent results.

  8. A method to investigate the biomechanical alterations in Perthes’ disease by hip joint contact modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salmingo, Remel A.; Skytte, Tina Lercke; Traberg, Marie Sand

    2017-01-01

    was to develop a method to investigate the biomechanical alterations in Perthes’ disease by finite element (FE ) contact modeling using MRI. The MRI data of a unilateral Perthes’ case was obtained to develop the three-dimensional FE model of the hip joint. The stress and contact pressure patterns...

  9. Conversion coefficients for determining organ doses in paediatric pelvis and hip joint radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidenbusch, Michael C; Schneider, Karl

    2014-09-01

    Knowledge of organ and effective doses achieved during paediatric X-ray examinations is an important prerequisite for assessment of radiation burden to the patient. Conversion coefficients for reconstruction of organ and effective doses from entrance doses for pelvis and hip joint radiographs of 0-, 1-, 5-, 10-, 15- and 30-year-old patients are provided regarding the Guidelines of Good Radiographic Technique of the European Commission. Using the personal computer program PCXMC developed by the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (Säteilyturvakeskus STUK), conversion coefficients for conventional pelvis and hip joint radiographs were calculated by performing Monte Carlo simulations in mathematical hermaphrodite phantom models representing patients of different ages. The clinical variation of radiation field settings was taken into consideration by defining optimal and suboptimal standard field settings. Conversion coefficients for the reconstruction of organ doses in about 40 organs and tissues from measured entrance doses during pelvis and hip joint radiographs of 0-, 1-, 5-, 10-, 15- and 30-year-old patients were calculated for the standard sagittal beam projection and the standard focus detector distance of 115 cm. The conversion coefficients presented can be used for organ dose assessments from entrance doses measured during pelvis and hip joint radiographs of children and young adults with all field settings within the optimal and suboptimal standard field settings.

  10. Biomechanical study of the effect of coxofemoral positioning on passive hip joint laxity in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyman, S J; Smith, G K; Cofone, M A

    1993-02-01

    Ten coxofemoral joints from 5 dog cadavers were used to study the effect of coxofemoral positioning on passive hip laxity. A material test system was used to measure lateral translation when force was between 20 N of compression and 40 N of distraction. Using the orthogonal coordinate system imposed in this study, neutral position was empirically defined at 15 degrees of extension and 10 degrees of abduction, relative to the plane of the pelvis, and no internal or external rotation of the femur. The hips were mounted in a custom-designed jig that allowed 1 rotational degree of freedom (ie, either flexion/extension, adduction/abduction, or internal/external rotation), while holding the other 2 constant. Lateral translation of the hips was tested at 10 degrees intervals from 30 degrees of flexion to 70 degrees of extension, 40 degrees of adduction to 60 degrees of abduction, and 30 degrees of internal rotation to 40 degrees of external rotation. Lateral displacement was maximal at 10 degrees of extension, 20 degrees of abduction, and 10 degrees of external rotation, approximating the neutral coxofemoral position during stance. As the hips were rotated into extreme positions, the amount of lateral displacement occurring with the same applied load decreased significantly to 32.0 to 65.3% of the maximal displacement. Determining the position of the hip associated with maximal passive laxity in vitro is essential to the design of a precise and accurate clinical stress-radiographic method to quantitate joint laxity in dogs. Our results confirm earlier work that passive hip joint laxity is at a maximum with the hip approximately in a neutral weight-bearing position.

  11. Implementation of a total joint replacement-focused perioperative surgical home: a management case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garson, Leslie; Schwarzkopf, Ran; Vakharia, Shermeen; Alexander, Brenton; Stead, Stan; Cannesson, Maxime; Kain, Zeev

    2014-05-01

    The perioperative setting in the United States is noted for variable and fragmented care that increases the chance for errors and adverse outcomes as well as the overall cost of perioperative care. Recently, the American Society of Anesthesiologists put forward the Perioperative Surgical Home (PSH) concept as a potential solution to this problem. Although the PSH concept has been described previously, "real-life" implementation of this new model has not been reported. Members of the Departments of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care and Orthopedic Surgery, in addition to perioperative hospital services, developed and implemented a series of clinical care pathways defining and standardizing preoperative, intraoperative, postoperative, and postdischarge management for patients undergoing elective primary hip (n = 51) and knee (n = 95) arthroplasty. We report on the impact of the Total Joint Replacement PSH on length of hospital stay (LOS), incidence of perioperative blood transfusions, postoperative complications, 30-day readmission rates, emergency department visits, mortality, and patient satisfaction. The incidence of major complication was 0.0 (0.0-7.0)% and of perioperative blood transfusion was 6.2 (2.9-11.4)%. In-hospital mortality was 0.0 (0.0-7.0)% and 30-day readmission was 0.7 (0.0-3.8)%. All Surgical Care Improvements Project measures were at 100.0 (93.0-100.0)%. The median LOS for total knee arthroplasty and total hip arthroplasty, respectively, was (median (95% confidence interval [interquartile range]) 3 (2-3) [2-3] and 3 (2-3) [2-3] days. Approximately half of the patients were discharged to a location other than their customary residence (70 to skilled nursing facility, 1 to rehabilitation, 39 to home with organization health services, and 36 to home). We believe that our experience with the Total Joint Replacement PSH program provides solid evidence of the feasibility of this practice model to improve patient outcomes and achieve high patient

  12. Single nucleotide polymorphisms refine QTL intervals for hip joint laxity in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, L; Zhang, Z; Feng, F; Schweitzer, P; Phavaphutanon, J; Vernier-Singer, M; Corey, E; Friedenberg, S; Mateescu, R; Williams, A; Lust, G; Acland, G; Todhunter, R

    2008-04-01

    Hip laxity is one characteristic of canine hip dysplasia (CHD), an inheritable disease that leads to hip osteoarthritis. Using a genome-wide screen with 250 microsatellites in a crossbreed pedigree of 159 dysplastic Labrador retrievers and unaffected greyhounds, we previously identified putative (P dogs including 105 Labrador retrievers, seven greyhounds, four generations of their crossbreed offspring and three German shepherds for 111 and 171 SNPs on CFA11 and CFA29 respectively. The distraction index (DI, a measure of maximum hip laxity) was used as an intermediate phenotype that predicts whether a hip joint will or will not develop osteoarthritis. Using a multipoint linkage analysis, significant evidence (95% posterior probability) was found for QTL contributing to hip laxity in the 16.2-21 cM region on CFA11 that explained 15-18% of the total variance in DI. Evidence for an independent QTL on CFA29 was weaker than that on CFA11. Identification of the causative mutation(s) will lead to better understanding of biochemical pathways in both dogs and humans with hip laxity and dysplasia.

  13. Clinical evaluation of hip joint rotation range of motion in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouyoumdjian, P; Coulomb, R; Sanchez, T; Asencio, G

    2012-02-01

    Data on hip joint rotation range of motion (ROM) are rare; the methods of measurement vary and reproducibility has not been evaluated, in particular in relation to the subject's position (prone or supine, seated). Hip joint rotation ROM is symmetrical, and ROM is not modified by the patient's position when data is obtained. This series included 120 adults between 20 and 60 years old (71 women, 49 men), who had no hip, spine or lower extremity disorders. External (ER) and internal (IR) rotation ROM was obtained using a photographic method by two observers. Measurements were obtained with the patient in three positions: the dorsal decubitus (supine) (P1), and ventral decubitus (prone) (P2) with the hip in extension and seated with the hip in flexion (P3). Hip rotation ROM was P1: 68.1° (ER=38.5°; IR=29.6°); P2: 77.1°(ER=41.8°; IR=35.2°); P3: 78.5° (ER=78.5°; IR=37.9°) with no significant difference among the three positions. Interobserver reproducibility was satisfactory (concordance correlation coefficient (ccc) 0.7) and was comparable in the three positions with a ccc of 0.7072 (P1), 0.7426 (P2) and 0.7332 (P3), respectively. Hip rotation ROM balance was ER predominant in 47.5%, neutral in 39.5% and IR predominant in 13%. Hip rotation ROM balance was symmetric in both hips in 73 subjects (61%). Hip rotation ROM was reduced with age (P<0.0001), and was 4.7° less in men (P=0.0078), and in overweight subjects (P<0.0006). Our values are probably lower than those in the literature because of the difference in study population. In our series, age, BMI and gender seemed to be determining factors. Hip rotation ROM balance is usually ER predominant or neutral. Hip rotation ROM can be measured in the three positions with no significant difference, with satisfactory interobserver reproducibility for each. Diagnostic prospective study: level III. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Enhancing the CuCrZr/316L HIP-joint by Ni electroplating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, R. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, 230031 (China); Science Island Branch of Graduate School, University of Science & Technology of China, Hefei, 230031 (China); Zhao, S.X., E-mail: sxzhao@impcas.ac.cn [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Lanzhou, 730000 (China); Dong, H.; Che, H.Y. [Advanced Technology and Materials Co. Ltd., Beijing, 100081 (China); Li, Q.; Wang, W.J.; Wang, J.C.; Wang, X.L.; Sun, Z.X. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, 230031 (China); Luo, G.-N. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, 230031 (China); Science Island Branch of Graduate School, University of Science & Technology of China, Hefei, 230031 (China); Hefei Center for Physical Science and Technology, Hefei, 230022 (China); Hefei Science Center of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, 230027 (China)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • The quality of CuCrZr/316L HIP-joint can be enhanced by nickel electroplating on CuCrZr and 316L. • Nickel layer can prevent the occurrence of nickel-poor region in 316L and protect CuCrZr from oxidation. • A Charpy Impact Value as high as 111.5 ± 3.3 J/cm{sup 2} can be obtained by HIP at 980 °C, 140 MPa for 2 h. • At high temperature, CuCrZr is easily oxidized even in the situation of a high vacuum degree of 2 × 10{sup −5} Pa. - Abstract: The quality of CuCrZr/316L joint is crucial for the safety of ITER hypervapotron cooling structure and hot isostatic pressing (HIP) is an important bonding technique for this structure. In this paper, the authors present a finding that the CuCrZr/316L HIP-joint can be enhanced by nickel electroplating on 316L and CuCrZr. A Charpy Impact Value as high as 111.5 ± 3.3 J/cm{sup 2}, which is more than two times the value in a published article, is obtained. The influence of nickel electroplating is twofold: (1) it can prevent the occurrence of nickel-poor region in 316L and the formation of ferrite; (2) it can protect CuCrZr from oxidation during the heating stage of HIP. However, tensile test is not as effective as Charpy Impact Test in characterizing the bonding quality of the CuCrZr/316L HIP-joint. The surface treatment employed in this study is amenable to batch-scale industrial manufacturing at low cost.

  15. In vivo hip joint loading during post-operative physiotherapeutic exercises.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena Schwachmeyer

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: After hip surgery, it is the orthopedist's decision to allow full weight bearing to prevent complications or to prescribe partial weight bearing for bone ingrowth or fracture consolidation. While most loading conditions in the hip joint during activities of daily living are known, it remains unclear how demanding physiotherapeutic exercises are. Recommendations for clinical rehabilitation have been established, but these guidelines vary and have not been scientifically confirmed. The aim of this study was to provide a basis for practical recommendations by determining the hip joint contact forces and moments that act during physiotherapeutic activities. METHODS: Joint contact loads were telemetrically measured in 6 patients using instrumented hip endoprostheses. The resultant hip contact force, the torque around the implant stem, and the bending moment in the neck were determined for 13 common physiotherapeutic exercises, classified as weight bearing, isometric, long lever arm, or dynamic exercises, and compared to the loads during walking. RESULTS: With peak values up to 441%BW, weight bearing exercises caused the highest forces among all exercises; in some patients they exceeded those during walking. During voluntary isometric contractions, the peak loads ranged widely and potentially reached high levels, depending on the intensity of the contraction. Long lever arms and dynamic exercises caused loads that were distributed around 50% of those during walking. CONCLUSION: Weight bearing exercises should be avoided or handled cautiously within the early post-operative period. The hip joint loads during isometric exercises depend strongly on the contraction intensity. Nonetheless, most physiotherapeutic exercises seem to be non-hazardous when considering the load magnitudes, even though the loads were much higher than expected. When deciding between partial and full weight bearing, physicians should consider the loads relative to

  16. A method to investigate the biomechanical alterations in Perthes' disease by hip joint contact modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmingo, Remel Alingalan; Skytte, Tina Lercke; Traberg, Marie Sand; Mikkelsen, Lars Pilgaard; Henneberg, Kaj-Åge; Wong, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Perthes' disease is a destructive hip joint disorder characterized by malformation of the femoral head in young children. While the morphological changes have been widely studied, the biomechanical effects of these changes still need to be further elucidated. The objective of this study was to develop a method to investigate the biomechanical alterations in Perthes' disease by finite element (FE) contact modeling using MRI. The MRI data of a unilateral Perthes' case was obtained to develop the three-dimensional FE model of the hip joint. The stress and contact pressure patterns in the unaffected hip were well distributed. Elevated concentrations of stress and contact pressure were found in the Perthes' hip. The highest femoral cartilage von Mises stress 3.9 MPa and contact pressure 5.3 MPa were found in the Perthes' hip, whereas 2.4 MPa and 4.9 MPa in the healthy hip, respectively. The healthy bone in the femoral head of the Perthes' hip carries additional loads as indicated by the increase of stress levels around the necrotic-healthy bone interface. Identifying the biomechanical changes, such as the location of stress and contact pressure concentrations, is a prerequisite for the preoperative planning to obtain stress relief for the highly stressed areas in the malformed hip. This single-patient study demonstrated that the biomechanical alterations in Perthes' disease can be evaluated individually by patient-specific finite element contact modeling using MRI. A multi-patient study is required to test the strength of the proposed method as a pre-surgery planning tool.

  17. Development of computer-tailored education program for patients with total hip replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Yeo Won; Kim, Jung A

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a Web-based computer-tailored education program to promote self-care for patients with total hip replacement. The program was developed in five phases. Phase 1: Program content was developed, including the educational needs of patients with total hip replacement, based on a review of previous research and literature. Phase 2: A computer-tailored algorithm written as a series of 'if-then' statements was developed to offer the appropriate type of intervention based on an individual's personal health characteristics. Phase 3: A professional Web programmer produced then the program for use on the Web. Phase 4: An expert evaluation was performed focusing on two aspects, Web contents and website design. SPSS ver. 16.0 was used for the analysis, and grade point averages were used to compare each evaluation item. Phase 5: Based on comments from the experts' evaluation, modifications and revisions were made, and the program was completed. The developed program presented tailored messages using animations, video and flash considering the individual health status and characteristics of the primary target generation. In addition, the expert evaluation confirmed the validity of the program's content and design.

  18. Microscale wear behavior and crosslinking of PEG-like coatings for total hip replacements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Sheryl R; Ashby, Paul D; Pruitt, Lisa A

    2010-04-01

    The predominant cause of late-state failure of total hip replacements is wear-mediated osteolysis caused by wear particles that originate from the ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) acetabular cup surface. One strategy for reducing wear particle formation from UHMWPE is to modify the surface with a hydrophilic coating to increase lubrication from synovial fluid. This study focuses on the wear behavior of hydrophilic coatings similar to poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). The coatings were produced by plasma-polymerizing tetraglyme on UHMWPE in a chamber heated to 40 degrees C or 50 degrees C. Both temperatures yielded coatings with PEG-like chemistry and increased hydrophilicity relative to uncoated UHMWPE; however, the 40 degrees C coatings were significantly more resistant to damage induced by atomic force microscopy nanoscratching. The 40 degrees C coatings exhibited only one damage mode (delamination) and often showed no signs of damage after repeated scratching. In contrast, the 50 degrees C coatings exhibited three damage modes (roughening, thinning, and delamination), and always showed visible signs of damage after no more than two scratches. The greater wear resistance of the 40 degrees C coatings could not be explained by coating chemistry or hydrophilicity, but it corresponded to an approximately 26-32% greater degree of crosslinking relative to the 50 degrees C surfaces, suggesting that crosslinking should be a significant design consideration for hydrophilic coatings used for total hip replacements and other wear-dependent applications.

  19. Time-based analysis of total cost of patient episodes: a case study of hip replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltokorpi, Antti; Kujala, Jaakko

    2006-01-01

    Healthcare in the public and private sectors is facing increasing pressure to become more cost-effective. Time-based competition and work-in-progress have been used successfully to measure and improve the efficiency of industrial manufacturing. Seeks to address this issue. Presents a framework for time based management of the total cost of a patient episode and apply it to the six sigma DMAIC-process development approach. The framework is used to analyse hip replacement patient episodes in Päijät-Häme Hospital District in Finland, which has a catchment area of 210,000 inhabitants and performs an average of 230 hip replacements per year. The work-in-progress concept is applicable to healthcare--notably that the DMAIC-process development approach can be used to analyse the total cost of patient episodes. Concludes that a framework, which combines the patient-in-process and the DMAIC development approach, can be used not only to analyse the total cost of patient episode but also to improve patient process efficiency. Presents a framework that combines patient-in-process and DMAIC-process development approaches, which can be used to analyse the total cost of a patient episode in order to improve patient process efficiency.

  20. 3D Crack Behavior in the Orthopedic Cement Mantle of a Total Hip Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abderahmen Sahli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The total hip replacement is an operation that replaces a diseased hip with a mechanical articulation. Both components of the mechanical articulation (stem and the cup are bonded to bone using orthopedic cement, whose reliability determines the longevity of the implant. The cement around the metallic stem forms a mantle whose strength and toughness determine its resistance to fatigue and failure by fracture. Typical cements are acrylic polymers that often suffer from internal cracks and other defects created during polymerization. This study is a systematic analysis of preexisting 3D crack behavior in the orthopedic cement mantle when subjected to external body forces. Different crack orientations and angular positions around the mantle are studied to identify which locations will propagate the crack. This is accomplished by a global stress analysis of the mantle followed by a failure analysis. Amongst others, the existence of a crack in the proximal region of the orthopedic cement is identified as a critical area, especially in the lateral sides of the stem in the radial direction.

  1. Increased use of an expensive, elective procedure: total hip replacements in the 1980s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, B; Elixhauser, A

    1993-07-01

    Between 1980 and 1987, the number of hospital discharges with total hip replacement (THR) increased by more than 90%, while total hospital discharges fell by more than 10%. Total hip replacement is one of the most costly hospital inpatient procedures, both per case and in total Medicare expenses. Explanations for the growth in use of THR may clarify some of the major forces driving national health care costs. This study assumes that treatment choices are made by (or for) each patient to maximize expected net benefits. Within this framework, the use of THR might have increased because of improved safety for the procedure, longer life expectancy and better control of many serious illnesses that led to increased demand for quality-enhancing procedures, and increased out-of-pocket cost for alternative treatments that are not covered well by insurance. These possible explanations imply changes in the characteristics of THR recipients over time. An upward shift was found in the age distribution of patients, more than simply because of an aging of the population. Sharply increased proportions of patients were also found with serious comorbidities such as cancer and dementia. The safety of the procedure seems to have improved, in terms of the death rate in the hospital. The results suggest that demands for expensive, elective procedures have been increasing for patients previously regarded as too old or impaired to benefit sufficiently. This process leads to continuing increases in real health care expenses even without the invention of new technologies.

  2. The short stem GHEs in total hip replacement – experience after 380 implantations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghanem, Mohamed

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Standard straight stems have been recognized as a gold standard implant in the field of hip replacement surgery. However, lately uncemented bone-preserving short stems started to gain more and more popularity. This was reflected in the increasing variety of available models. Up till now, short and mid-term results are available.Patients and methods: In 2002, the cementless short stemmed GHEs was introduced. 380 patients were included in our study between 2002 and 2008. Only GHEs short stems were implanted. The clinical and radiological evaluations were performed in the Orthopaedic Department, Leipzig University Hospitals, on the average of 24 months (3 to 60 months postoperatively.Results: 365 primary implantations and 15 revision implantations were carried out. Average age 60 years. Favourable clinical and radiological outcome was seen in 361/380 patients (95%. Postoperative complications were seen in 19/380 patients (5%: 8 fissures/fractures (2.1%, 5 infections (1.3%, 4 aseptic loosenings (1.1%, 2 dislocations (0.5%.Conclusions: Short stem implants, including our own experience with GHEs model, are satisfying and promising. They represent a valuable supplementation of the treatment modalities in hip replacement surgery. However, long term results are still awaited.

  3. Measurement of titanium in hip-replacement patients by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Chris F; McKibbin, Craig; Rahanu, Monika; Langton, David; Taylor, Andrew

    2017-05-01

    Background Patients with metal-on-metal hip replacements require testing for cobalt and chromium. There may also be a need to test for titanium, which is used in the construction of the femoral stem in total hip replacements. It is not possible to use quadrupole inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry due to interferences. Methods Titanium was measured using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy using the emission line at 336.1 nm and Y (internal standard) at 371.0 nm. Internal quality control materials were prepared for blood and serum and concentrations assigned using a sector field-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. A candidate whole blood certified reference material was also evaluated. Results The method had detection and quantitation limits of 0.6 and 1.9 µg/L, respectively. The respective bias (%) and measurement uncertainty ( U) (k = 2) were 3.3% and 2.0 µg/L (serum) and - 1.0% and 1.4 µg/L (whole blood). The respective repeatability and intermediate precision (%) were 5.1% and 10.9% (serum) and 2.4% and 8.6% (whole blood). The concentration of titanium was determined in patients' samples, serum (median = 2.4 µg/L, n = 897) and whole blood (median = 2.4 µg/L, n = 189). Serum is recommended for monitoring titanium in patients, since the concentration is higher than in whole blood and the matrix less problematic. In hip fluid samples, the concentrations were much higher (mean 58.5 µg/L, median 5.1 µg/L, n = 83). Conclusions A method based on inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy was developed and validated for measuring titanium in clinical samples.

  4. Computer and experimental analyses of the stress state in the cement hip joint endoprosthesis body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabaković, Slobodan; Grujić, Jovan; Zeljković, Milan; Blagojević, Zoran; Radojević, Bojan; Popović, Zoran; Zivković, Aleksandar; Stevanović, Vladan

    2014-11-01

    One of the possible complications after implantation of a cement hip-joint endoprosthesis is frac- ture in the endoprosthesis body. Fractures arise from overload or material fatigue of which an implant is made. The purpose of this research was to define the intensity of maximum stress and the positions of a critical cross-section in the endoprosthesis body. Unilaterally changing forces which act on the hip joint during walking as well as the loads result in flexible deformations of the endoprosthesis body. Biomechanical analysis of the forces acting on the hip joint determine their direction and intensity, whereas on the basis of Gruen's classification of the endoprosthesis body loosening the level of fixation is established. The bodies of cement hip joint endoprosthesis are made of cobalt-chromium-molybdenum (CoCrMo) alloy, suitable for vacuum casting, are submitted to the analysis. Analysis of the critical stress in the endoprosthesis body was performed on the endoprosthesis body by means of the finite element method. The experimental verification of the obtained results was carried out on the physical prototype under laboratory conditions. Computer analysis, by means of the finite element method, determined the stress state by calculation of the maximum Von Mises stress and critical cross-sections for different angles of the resultant force action. The results obtained by the computer and experimental method correlate and are comparable to the results of similar analyses conducted on various endoprosthesis types. The analyses described in the paper make the basis for improving the process designing of hip joint endoprostheses and their customization to each individual patient (custom made).

  5. Unilateral hip osteoarthritis: The effect of compensation strategies and anatomic measurements on frontal plane joint loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, André; Meurer, Andrea; Lenarz, Katharina; Vogt, Lutz; Froemel, Dara; Lutz, Frederick; Barker, John; Stief, Felix

    2017-08-01

    In order to reduce pain caused by the affected hip joint, unilateral hip osteoarthritis patients (HOAP) adopt characteristic gait patterns. However, it is unknown if the knee and hip joint loading in the non-affected (limbnon-affected ) and the affected (limbaffected ) limb differ from healthy controls (HC) and which gait parameters correlate with potential abnormal joint loading. Instrumented 3D-gait analysis was performed on 18 HOAP and 18 sex, age, and height matched HC. The limbnon-affected showed greater first and second peak external hip adduction moments (first HAM: +15%, p = 0.014; second HAM: +15%, p = 0.021, respectively), than seen in HC. In contrast, the second peak external knee adduction moment (KAM) in the limbaffected is reduced by about 23% and 30% compared to the limbnon-affected and HC, respectively. Furthermore, our patients showed characteristic gait compensation strategies including reduced peak vertical forces (pvF), a greater foot progression angle (FPA), and reduced knee range of motion (ROM) in the limbaffected . The limbaffected was 5.6 ± 3.8 mm shorter than the limbnon-affected . Results of stepwise regression analyses showed that increased first pvF explain 16% of first HAM alterations, whereas knee ROM and FPA explain 39% of second KAM alterations. We therefore expect an increased rate of progression of OA in the hip joint of the limbnon-affected and suggest that the shift in the medial-to-lateral knee joint load distribution may impact the rate of progression of OA in the limbaffected . The level of evidence is III. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:1764-1773, 2017. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. MR imaging of transient osteoporosis of the hip: An update on 155 hip joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klontzas, Michail E.; Vassalou, Evangelia E. [Department of Medical Imaging, University Hospital of Heraklion, Medical School, University of Crete (Greece); Zibis, Aristeidis H. [Department of Anatomy, University of Thessalia, Medical School, Larissa (Greece); Bintoudi, Antonia S. [Department of Radiology, “Papageorgiou” General Hospital of Thessaloniki (Greece); Karantanas, Apostolos H., E-mail: akarantanas@gmail.com [Department of Medical Imaging, University Hospital of Heraklion, Medical School, University of Crete (Greece)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: •Characteristics of TOH are described based on the largest series of patients in the literature. •The chance of regional migratory osteoporosis progression is estimated to be 19.4%. •The pattern of bone marrow edema with respect to symptom duration is described. •The prevalence of subchondral microfractures is high in TOH patients. •Microfractures are not complicated with avascular necrosis or articular collapse. -- Abstract: Purpose: Transient osteoporosis of the hip (TOH) presents with acute onset pain and bone marrow edema (BMe) on MR imaging. The purpose of this study is to revise the MR imaging characteristics of TOH by analyzing the data derived from 155 hip examinations. We also sought to explore the relationship between the duration of symptoms and the presence of sparing and subchondral fractures. Materials and methods: MR images of 155 hips (141 TOH patients) were retrospectively evaluated for the presence of insufficiency fractures and the morphology of BMe. Sparing of the medial bone marrow of the femoral head was recorded together with demographic and clinical data. Progression to regional migratory osteoporosis (RMO) and postpartum cases were also recorded. Results: Our population consisted of 76.4% male and 23.6% female patients. RMO progression was recorded in 19.4% and 4 postpartum cases displayed bilateral disease. Sparing of the medial bone marrow was present at 87.7% of patients and disappeared as the disease progressed (P = 0.005). BMe was restricted within the femoral head in 11.0%, extended to the femoral neck in 40% and to the femoral shaft in 49% of the cases studied. Subchondral fractures were present at 48.7% of the hips. Conclusion: This study describes TOH patient characteristics, the MR imaging findings (BMe pattern, microfractures), their association with symptom duration and the chance of progressing to RMO.

  7. Alloplastic total temporomandibular joint replacements: do they perform like natural joints? Prospective cohort study with a historical control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojczyńska, A; Leiggener, C S; Bredell, M; Ettlin, D A; Erni, S; Gallo, L M; Colombo, V

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to qualitatively and quantitatively describe the biomechanics of existing total alloplastic reconstructions of temporomandibular joints (TMJ). Fifteen patients with unilateral or bilateral TMJ total joint replacements and 15 healthy controls were evaluated via dynamic stereometry technology. This non-invasive method combines three-dimensional imaging of the subject's anatomy with jaw tracking. It provides an insight into the patient's jaw joint movements in real time and provides a quantitative evaluation. The patients were also evaluated clinically for jaw opening, protrusive and laterotrusive movements, pain, interference with eating, and satisfaction with the joint replacements. The qualitative assessment revealed that condyles of bilateral total joint replacements displayed similar basic motion patterns to those of unilateral prostheses. Quantitatively, mandibular movements of artificial joints during opening, protrusion, and laterotrusion were all significantly shorter than those of controls. A significantly restricted mandibular range of motion in replaced joints was also observed clinically. Fifty-three percent of patients suffered from chronic pain at rest and 67% reported reduced chewing function. Nonetheless, patients declared a high level of satisfaction with the replacement. This study shows that in order to gain a comprehensive understanding of complex therapeutic measures, a multidisciplinary approach is needed. Copyright © 2016 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. [Quality of Outcome after Primary Total Hip Replacement at a Maximum Care Hospital in Relation to Preoperative Influencing Factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osmanski-Zenk, K; Steinig, N S; Glass, Ä; Mittelmeier, W; Bader, R

    2015-12-01

    As the need for joint replacements will continue to rise, the outcome of primary total hip replacement (THR) must be improved and stabilised at a high level. In this study, we investigated whether pre-operative risk factors, such as gender, age and body weight at the time of the surgery or a restricted physical status (ASA-Status > 2 or Kellgren and Lawrence grade > 2) have a negative influence on the post-operative results or on patient satisfaction. Retrospective data collection and a prospective interview were performed with 486 patients who underwent primary total hip replacement between January 2007 and December 2010 in our hospital. The patients' satisfaction and quality of life were surveyed with the WOMAC-Score, SF-36 and EuroQol-5. Differences between more than two independent spot tests were tested with the non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis test. Differences between two independent spot tests were tested with the non-parametric Mann-Whitney U test. The frequencies were reported and odds ratios calculated. The confidence interval was set at 95 %. The level of significance was p total score of the SF-36 was 66.9 points. The patients declared an average EuroQol Index of 0.81. Our data show that the patients' gender did not influence the duration of surgery or the scores. However, female patients tended to exhibit more postoperative complications. However, increased patient age at the time of surgery was associated with an increased OR for duration of surgery, length of stay and risk of complications. Patients who had a normal body weight at time of the surgery showed better peri- and post-operative results. We showed that the preoperative estimated Kellgren and Lawrence grade had a significant influence on the duration of surgery. The ASA classification influenced the duration of surgery as well the length of stay and the rate of complications. The quality of results after primary THR depends on preoperative factors. Existing comorbidities have a

  9. Comparison of global and joint-to-joint methods for estimating the hip joint load and the muscle forces during walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraysse, F; Dumas, R; Cheze, L; Wang, X

    2009-10-16

    A three-dimensional musculoskeletal model of the lower limb was developed to study the influence of biarticular muscles on the muscle force distribution and joint loads during walking. A complete walking cycle was recorded for 9 healthy subjects using the standard optoelectronic motion tracking system. Ground contact forces were also measured using a 6-axes force plate. Inverse dynamics was used to compute net joint reactions (forces and torques) in the lower limb. A static optimization method was then used to estimate muscle forces. Two different approaches were used: in the first one named global method, the biarticular muscles exerted a torque on the two joints they spanned at the same time, and in the second one called joint-by-joint method, these biarticular muscles were divided into two mono-articular muscles with geometrical (insertion, origin, via points) and physiological properties remained unchanged. The hip joint load during the gait cycle was then calculated taking into account the effect of muscle contractions. The two approaches resulted in different muscle force repartition: the biarticular muscles were favoured over any set of single-joint muscles with the same physiological function when using the global method. While the two approaches yielded only little difference in the resultant hip load, the examination of muscle power showed that biarticular muscles could produce positive work at one joint and negative work at the other, transferring energy between body segments and thus decreasing the metabolic cost of movement.

  10. [Ultrasonographic examination of the hip joint region and bony pelvis in cattle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubelnik, M; Kofler, J; Martinek, B; Stanek, Ch

    2002-01-01

    Transcutaneous and transrectal ultrasonographic examination of the hip joint region and the pelvis was carried out in 7 cadavers, transcutaneous ultrasonography in 17 healthy young and adult cattle, and transrectal sonography was performed in 12 healthy cows in order to study the normal ultrasonographic appearance of these regions. 7.5 MHz linear-, 5.0 MHz and 3.5 MHz convex transducers and a 7.5 MHz rectal probe were used. The bone surfaces of the greater trochanter, the femoral neck and head, the acetabulum and the other pelvic bones were visualised as hyperechoic contours. The coxofemoral joint space was identified in all cadavers and live cattle. The joint pouch could not be visualised, neither in cadavers nor in live cattle. After experimental filling of the coxofemoral joint pouch by injection of 35-45 ml eosin-solution it appeared as a large anechoic zone between the articular surface and the echogenic joint capsule. The inner contours of the pelvic girdle, both iliosacral joint spaces, the abdominal aorta and the external iliac arteries were depicted clearly by transrectal ultrasonography. The practical application of diagnostic ultrasound in these regions is demonstrated in clinical patients suffering from a septic coxarthritis and a sequestration of a part of the tuber coxae following an open fracture. These results serve as reference data for ultrasonographic investigation of disorders of the hip joint and the pelvic region in cattle.

  11. Endoscopic or arthroscopic iliopsoas tenotomy for iliopsoas impingement following total hip replacement. A prospective multicenter 64-case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guicherd, W; Bonin, N; Gicquel, T; Gedouin, J E; Flecher, X; Wettstein, M; Thaunat, M; Prevost, N; Ollier, E; May, O

    2017-12-01

    Impingement between the acetabular component and the iliopsoas tendon is a cause of anterior pain after total hip replacement (THR). Treatment can be non-operative, endoscopic or arthroscopic, or by open revision of the acetabular component. Few studies have assessed these options. The present study hypothesis was that endo/arthroscopic treatment provides rapid pain relief with a low rate of complications. A prospective multicenter study included 64 endoscopic or arthroscopic tenotomies for impingement between the acetabular component and the iliopsoas tendon, performed in 8 centers. Mean follow-up was 8months, with a minimum of 6months and no loss to follow-up. Oxford score, patient satisfaction, anterior pain and iliopsoas strength were assessed at last follow-up. Complications and revision procedures were collated. Forty-four percent of patients underwent rehabilitation. At last follow-up, 92% of patients reported pain alleviation. Oxford score, muscle strength and pain in hip flexion showed significant improvement. The complications rate was 3.2%, with complete resolution. Mean hospital stay was 0.8 nights. In 2 cases, arthroscopy revealed metallosis, indicating revision of the acetabular component. The only predictive factor was acetabular projection on oblique view. Rehabilitation significantly improved muscle strength. Endoscopic or arthroscopic tenotomy for impingement between the acetabular component and the iliopsoas tendon following THR significantly alleviated anterior pain in more than 92% of cases. The low complications rate makes this the treatment of choice in case of failure of non-operative management. Arthroscopy also reorients diagnosis in case of associated joint pathology. Projection of the acetabular component on preoperative oblique view is the most predictive criterion, guiding treatment. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  12. Hip joint torques in type II diabetes with and without neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laleh Abadi, MS (PT

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients with diabetes and peripheral neuropathy demonstrate significantly reduced peak torques at the peripheral joints. Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess isometric and concentric peak torques of the hip joint in people with type II diabetes with and without peripheral neuropathy in comparison with healthy participants. Methods: 27 patients with type II diabetes including 15 patients without peripheral neuropathy, 12 patients with diabetes and peripheral neuropathy and 15 healthy people participated. Isometric and concentric peak torques of hip flexion, extension, adduction and abduction of the non-dominant leg were measured by motorized dynamometer. Results: Peak and average peak concentric torques of the hip extension and abduction in patients with diabetes and peripheral neuropathy were lower than those patients with diabetes and control group. Angle of extension peak torque was significantly greater in patients with diabetes and peripheral neuropathy compared with other groups. Angle of flexion peak torque was lower in the patients with diabetes and peripheral neuropathy. Conclusions: Torque related parameters in patients with type II diabetes with or without peripheral neuropathy, are different from healthy subjects. As a result, patients with diabetes especially with peripheral neuropathy are more susceptible of injury and disability in lower limbs. Keywords: type II diabetes, hip, joint, torques, peripheral neuropathy

  13. Comparison of femoral neck fracture healing and affected limb pain after anterolateral-approach minimally invasive total hip replacement and hemiarthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Dong Cao

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the differences in femoral neck fracture healing and affected limb pain after anterolateral-approach minimally invasive total hip replacement and hemiarthroplasty. Methods: A total of 92 patients with femoral neck fracture who received hip replacement in our hospital between May 2013 and December 2015 were selected and randomly divided into total hip and half hip group, total hip group received anterolateral-approach minimally invasive total hip replacement, half hip group received anterolateral-approach minimally invasive hemiarthroplasty, and 1 month after operation, serum was collected to detect the levels of bone metabolism markers, osteocyte cytokines, SP and CGRP. Results: 1 month after operation, serum PINP, PICP, BMP, TGF-β, FGF, IGF-I and IGF-II levels of total hip group were significantly higher than those of half hip group while TRAP5b and CatK levels were significantly lower than those of half hip group; the day after operation, serum pain media SP and CGRP levels were not significantly different between the two groups of patients; 36 h after operation, serum SP and CGRP levels of total hip group were significantly lower than those of half hip group. Conclusion: The bone metabolism after anterolateral-approach minimally invasive total hip replacement is better than that after hemiarthroplasty, and the degree of pain is less than that after hemiarthroplasty.

  14. Tribology considerations for hip joint articulations in relation to the "new orthopaedic patient".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieker, C B

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to examine alternative bearings used in total hip arthroplasty (THA) and discuss the specific tribologic needs of the "New Orthopaedic Patient". As orthopaedic patients today are younger and more active, there is a clear need for hip joint implants and articulations minimising the amount of wear and guarantying better stability. Recent modern developments in tribology with highly cross-linked polyethylenes and hard-on-hard bearings allow the safe and effective use of larger diameter articulations in THA.

  15. Validation of a standardized mapping system of the hip joint for radial MRA sequencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klenke, Frank M.; Hoffmann, Daniel B.; Cross, Brian J.; Siebenrock, Klaus A. [Bern University Hospital, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Inselspital, Bern (Switzerland)

    2014-10-14

    Intraarticular gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) is commonly applied to characterize morphological disorders of the hip. However, the reproducibility of retrieving anatomic landmarks on MRA scans and their correlation with intraarticular pathologies is unknown. A precise mapping system for the exact localization of hip pathomorphologies with radial MRA sequences is lacking. Therefore, the purpose of the study was the establishment and validation of a reproducible mapping system for radial sequences of hip MRA. Sixty-nine consecutive intraarticular gadolinium-enhanced hip MRAs were evaluated. Radial sequencing consisted of 14 cuts orientated along the axis of the femoral neck. Three orthopedic surgeons read the radial sequences independently. Each MRI was read twice with a minimum interval of 7 days from the first reading. The intra- and inter-observer reliability of the mapping procedure was determined. A clockwise system for hip MRA was established. The teardrop figure served to determine the 6 o'clock position of the acetabulum; the center of the greater trochanter served to determine the 12 o'clock position of the femoral head-neck junction. The intra- and inter-observer ICCs to retrieve the correct 6/12 o'clock positions were 0.906-0.996 and 0.978-0.988, respectively. The established mapping system for radial sequences of hip joint MRA is reproducible and easy to perform. (orig.)

  16. Interfacial properties of HIP joint between beryllium and reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirose, T. [Blanket Engineering Group, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka, Ibaraki (Japan); Ogiwara, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naga-gun, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Enoe