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Sample records for hip fracture study

  1. Hip Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramponi, Denise R; Kaufmann, Judith; Drahnak, Gwendolen

    Hip fractures are associated with significant morbidity and mortality and a major health problem in the United States (). Eighty percent of hip fractures are experienced by 80-year-old women. Plain radiographs usually confirm the diagnosis, but if there is a high level of suspicion of an occult hip fracture, magnetic resonance imaging or bone scan is the next step to confirm the diagnosis. Areas of the hip bone have varied bone strength and blood supply, making the femoral neck one of the most vulnerable areas for fracture. A consultation to an orthopedic surgeon will determine surgical interventions.

  2. Short time-frame from first to second hip fracture in the Funen County Hip Fracture Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nymark, T; Lauritsen, Jens; Ovesen, O

    2006-01-01

    Hip fracture patients represent a frail group of elderly with increased morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to evaluate the occurrence and distribution of a second hip fracture in the time interval between the first and the second hip fracture....

  3. The association between hip fracture and hip osteoarthritis: A case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Englund Martin

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There have been reports both supporting and refuting an inverse relationship between hip fracture and hip osteoarthritis (OA. We explore this relationship using a case-control study design. Methods Exclusion criteria were previous hip fracture (same side or contralateral side, age younger than 60 years, foreign nationality, pathological fracture, rheumatoid arthritis and cases were radiographic examinations were not found in the archives. We studied all subjects with hip fracture that remained after the exclusion process that were treated at Akureyri University Hospital, Iceland 1990-2008, n = 562 (74% women. Hip fracture cases were compared with a cohort of subjects with colon radiographs, n = 803 (54% women to determine expected population prevalence of hip OA. Presence of radiographic hip OA was defined as a minimum joint space of 2.5 mm or less on an anteroposterior radiograph, or Kellgren and Lawrence grade 2 or higher. Possible causes of secondary osteoporosis were identified by review of medical records. Results The age-adjusted odds ratio (OR for subjects with hip fracture having radiographic hip OA was 0.30 (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 0.12-0.74 for men and 0.33 (95% CI 0.19-0.58 for women, compared to controls. The probability for subjects with hip fracture and hip OA having a secondary cause of osteoporosis was three times higher than for subjects with hip fracture without hip OA. Conclusion The results of our study support an inverse relationship between hip fractures and hip OA.

  4. Contralateral hip fractures and other osteoporosis-related fractures in hip fracture patients: Incidence and risk factors. An observational cohort study of 1,229 patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J.H. Vochteloo (Anne); B.L. Borger van der Burg (Boudewijn); M.L. Röling (Maarten); D.H.-J. van Leeuwen (Diederik); P. van den Berg (Peter); A.H.P. Niggebrugge (Arthur); M.R. de Vries (Mark); W.E. Tuinebreijer (Wim); R.M. Bloem (Rolf); R.G.H.H. Nelissen (Rob); P. Pilot (Peter)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: To report risk factors, 1-year and overall risk for a contralateral hip and other osteoporosis-related fractures in a hip fracture population. Methods: An observational study on 1,229 consecutive patients of 50 years and older, who sustained a hip fracture between January 2005

  5. Hip fracture - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inter-trochanteric fracture repair - discharge; Subtrochanteric fracture repair - discharge; Femoral neck fracture repair - discharge; Trochanteric fracture repair - discharge; Hip pinning surgery - ...

  6. Studies on hip fracture patients : effects of nutrition and rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    Flodin, Lena

    2015-01-01

    Hip fracture in the elderly is a serious condition associated with increased mortality. Survivors experience an increase in morbidity and disability that affect their independence and quality of life; the outcome for patients with dementia is particularly poor. Many hip fracture patients have signs of malnutrition already on admission and this patient group has been shown to have a lower body mass index (BMI) than aged-matched controls. A catabolic state develops following hip fracture, chara...

  7. Hip fracture surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... neck fracture repair; Trochanteric fracture repair; Hip pinning surgery; Osteoarthritis - hip ... You may receive general anesthesia for this surgery. This means you ... spinal anesthesia . With this kind of anesthesia, medicine is ...

  8. Secondary prevention of fractures after hip fracture: a qualitative study of effective service delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, S; Judge, A; Cooper, C; Javaid, M K; Farmer, A; Gooberman-Hill, R

    2016-05-01

    There is variation in how services to prevent secondary fractures after hip fracture are delivered and no consensus on best models of care. This study identifies healthcare professionals' views on effective care for the prevention of these fractures. It is hoped this will provide information on how to develop services. Hip fracture patients are at high risk of subsequent osteoporotic fractures. Whilst fracture prevention services are recommended, there is variation in delivery and no consensus on best models of care. This study aims to identify healthcare professionals' views on effective care for prevention of secondary fracture after hip fracture. Forty-three semi-structured interviews were undertaken with healthcare professionals involved in delivering fracture prevention across 11 hospitals in one English region. Interviews explored views on four components of care: (1) case finding, (2) osteoporosis assessment, (3) treatment initiation, and (4) monitoring and coordination. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, anonymised and coded using NVivo software. Case finding: a number of approaches were discussed. Multiple methods ensured there was a 'backstop' if patients were overlooked. Osteoporosis assessment: there was no consensus on who should conduct this. The location of the dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scanner influenced the likelihood of patients receiving a scan. Treatment initiation: it was felt this was best done in inpatients rather request initiation in the post-discharge/outpatients period. Monitoring (adherence): adherence was a major concern, and participants felt more monitoring could be conducted by secondary care. Coordination of care: participants advocated using dedicated coordinators and formal and informal methods of communication. A gap between primary and secondary care was identified and strategies suggested for addressing this. A number of ways of organising effective fracture prevention services after hip fracture were

  9. Age Related Incidence and Early Outcomes of Hip Fractures: A Prospective Cohort Study of 1177 patients

    OpenAIRE

    Shenoy Ravikiran; Eranki Vivek; Pillai Anand; Hadidi Mahar

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Associated with the increase in the aging population, there is an increase in the incidence of hip fractures worldwide. Outcome following such fractures is affected by age of the patient. This study aims to assess the incidence and early outcome of hip fractures, comparing between different age groups. Methods Data of hip fractures collected over a period of five years was analysed. Patients were divided into three groups, group A (patients under the age of 64), group B ...

  10. Educational Inequalities in Post-Hip Fracture Mortality: A NOREPOS Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omsland, Tone K; Eisman, John A; Naess, Øyvind; Center, Jacqueline R; Gjesdal, Clara G; Tell, Grethe S; Emaus, Nina; Meyer, Haakon E; Søgaard, Anne Johanne; Holvik, Kristin; Schei, Berit; Forsmo, Siri; Magnus, Jeanette H

    2015-12-01

    Hip fractures are associated with high excess mortality. Education is an important determinant of health, but little is known about educational inequalities in post-hip fracture mortality. Our objective was to investigate educational inequalities in post-hip fracture mortality and to examine whether comorbidity or family composition could explain any association. We conducted a register-based population study of Norwegians aged 50 years and older from 2002 to 2010. We measured total mortality according to educational attainment in 56,269 hip fracture patients (NORHip) and in the general Norwegian population. Both absolute and relative educational inequalities in mortality in people with and without hip fracture were compared. There was an educational gradient in post-hip fracture mortality in both sexes. Compared with those with primary education only, the age-adjusted relative risk (RR) of mortality in hip fracture patients with tertiary education was 0.82 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.77-0.87) in men and 0.79 (95% CI 0.75-0.84) in women. Additional adjustments for Charlson comorbidity index, marital status, and number of children did not materially change the estimates. Regardless of educational attainment, the 1-year age-adjusted mortality was three- to fivefold higher in hip fracture patients compared with peers in the general population without fracture. The absolute differences in 1-year mortality according to educational attainment were considerably larger in hip fracture patients than in the population without hip fracture. Absolute educational inequalities in mortality were higher after hip fracture compared with the general population without hip fracture and were not mediated by comorbidity or family composition. Investigation of other possible mediating factors might help to identify new targets for interventions, based on lower educational attainment, to reduce post-hip fracture mortality. © 2015 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  11. Study of Hip Fracture Risk using Tree Structured Survival Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Y

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In dieser Studie wird das Hüftfraktur-Risiko bei postmenopausalen Frauen untersucht, indem die Frauen in verschiedene Subgruppen hinsichtlich dieses Risikos klassifiziert werden. Frauen in einer gemeinsamen Subgruppe haben ein ähnliches Risiko, hingegen in verschiedenen Subgruppen ein unterschiedliches Hüftfraktur-Risiko. Die Subgruppen wurden mittels der Tree Structured Survival Analysis (TSSA aus den Daten von 7.665 Frauen der SOF (Study of Osteoporosis Fracture ermittelt. Bei allen Studienteilnehmerinnen wurde die Knochenmineraldichte (BMD von Unterarm, Oberschenkelhals, Hüfte und Wirbelsäule gemessen. Die Zeit von der BMD-Messung bis zur Hüftfraktur wurde als Endpunkt notiert. Eine Stichprobe von 75% der Teilnehmerinnen wurde verwendet, um die prognostischen Subgruppen zu bilden (Trainings-Datensatz, während die anderen 25% als Bestätigung der Ergebnisse diente (Validierungs-Datensatz. Aufgrund des Trainings-Datensatzes konnten mittels TSSA 4 Subgruppen identifiziert werden, deren Hüftfraktur-Risiko bei einem Follow-up von im Mittel 6,5 Jahren bei 19%, 9%, 4% und 1% lag. Die Einteilung in die Subgruppen erfolgte aufgrund der Bewertung der BMD des Ward'schen Dreiecks sowie des Oberschenkelhalses und nach dem Alter. Diese Ergebnisse konnten mittels des Validierungs-Datensatzes reproduziert werden, was die Sinnhaftigkeit der Klassifizierungregeln in einem klinischen Setting bestätigte. Mittels TSSA war eine sinnvolle, aussagekräftige und reproduzierbare Identifikation von prognostischen Subgruppen, die auf dem Alter und den BMD-Werten beruhen, möglich. In this paper we studied the risk of hip fracture for post-menopausal women by classifying women into different subgroups based on their risk of hip fracture. The subgroups were generated such that all the women in a particular subgroup had relatively similar risk while women belonging to two different subgroups had rather different risks of hip fracture. We used the Tree Structured

  12. Is the association between hip fractures and seasonality modified by influenza vaccination? An ecological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraenkel, M; Yitshak-Sade, M; Beacher, L; Carmeli, M; Mandelboim, M; Siris, E; Novack, V

    2017-05-23

    Osteoporotic hip fractures in 4344 patients were more common during winter. Lower temperatures were associated with higher rates of fracture only in those not vaccinated for influenza. Influenza outbreaks increased the risk of hip fractures. Further studies are needed to assess whether influenza vaccination can prevent hip fractures. Winter seasonality of osteoporotic hip fracture incidence has been demonstrated, yet the explanation for the association is lacking. We hypothesize that the seasonality of osteoporotic hip fracture can be explained by an association between hip fractures and seasonal influenza outbreaks. This retrospective cohort study included all patients admitted to Soroka University Medical Center with a diagnosis of osteoporotic hip fracture (ICD-9 code 820) between the years 2001 and 2013. Patients with malignancies, trauma, and age under 50 were excluded. In a time series analysis, we examined the association between hip fracture incidence and seasonality adjusted for meteorological factors, and population rates of influenza infection and vaccination using Poisson models. Four thousand three hundred forty-four patients with a hip fracture were included (69% females, mean age 78). Daily fracture rates were significantly higher in winter (1.1 fractures/day) compared to summer, fall, and spring (0.79, 0.90, and 0.91; p risk only in those not vaccinated for influenza (n = 2939, for every decrease of 5 °C, RR 1.08, CI 1.02-1.16; p risk for hip fracture, adjusted for seasons and temperature, was 1.26 2 weeks following a week with high infection burden (CI 1.05;1.51 p = 0.01), while the temperature was not significantly associated with the fracture risk. Under dry and warm desert climate, winter hip fracture incidence increase might be associated with influenza infection, and this effect can be negated by influenza vaccination.

  13. Inflammatory markers and risk of hip fracture in older white women: the study of osteoporotic fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbour, Kamil E; Lui, Li-Yung; Ensrud, Kristine E; Hillier, Teresa A; LeBlanc, Erin S; Ing, Steven W; Hochberg, Marc C; Cauley, Jane A

    2014-09-01

    Hip fractures are the most devastating consequence of osteoporosis and impact 1 in 6 white women leading to a two- to threefold increased mortality risk in the first year. Despite evidence of inflammatory markers in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis, few studies have examined their effect on hip fracture. To determine if high levels of inflammation increase hip fracture risk and to explore mediation pathways, a case-cohort design nested in a cohort of 4709 white women from the Study of Osteoporotic Fractures was used. A random sample of 1171 women was selected as the subcohort (mean age 80.1 ± 4.2 years) plus the first 300 women with incident hip fracture. Inflammatory markers interleukin-6 (IL-6) and soluble receptors (SR) for IL-6 (IL-6 SR) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF SR1 and TNF SR2) were measured, and participants were followed for a median (interquartile range) of 6.3 (3.7, 6.9) years. In multivariable models, the hazard ratio (HR) of hip fracture for women in the highest inflammatory marker level (quartile 4) was 1.64 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.09-2.48, p trend = 0.03) for IL-6 and 2.05 (95% CI, 1.35-3.12, p trend hip fracture was 1.51 (95% CI, 1.07-2.14) and 1.42 (95% CI, 0.87-2.31) compared with women with zero to one marker(s) in the highest quartile (p trend = 0.03). After individually adjusting for seven potential mediators, cystatin-C (a biomarker of renal function) and bone mineral density (BMD) attenuated HRs among women with the highest inflammatory burden by 64% and 50%, respectively, suggesting a potential mediating role. Older white women with high inflammatory burden are at increased risk of hip fracture in part due to poor renal function and low BMD. © 2014 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  14. Hip fracture after hemiplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulley, G.; Espley, A. J.

    1979-01-01

    In a series of 57 hemiplegic patients who subsequently fractured their hips, it was found that hip fracture occurred significantly more often on the hemiplegic side. Hip fracture was equally common in right- and left-sided hemiplegia, and often occurred within one year of the stroke. Two factors seem to be important in the genesis of hip fractures in hemiplegic patients: the tendency of stroke patients to fall to the affected side as a result of impaired locomotor function, and the development of disuse osteoporosis in the hemiplegic limb. PMID:471862

  15. Hip Fractures among Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... online training for health care providers. Learn More Hip Fractures Among Older Adults Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... get older. What You Can Do to Prevent Hip Fractures You can prevent hip fractures by taking steps ...

  16. The influence of renal dialysis and hip fracture sites on the 10-year mortality of elderly hip fracture patients: A nationwide population-based observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Li-Wei; Hwang, Yi-Ting; Huang, Guey-Shiun; Liang, Cheng-Chih; Lin, Jinn

    2017-09-01

    Hip fractures in older people requiring dialysis are associated with high mortality. Our study primarily aimed to evaluate the specific burden of dialysis on the mortality rate following hip fracture. The secondary aim was to clarify the effect of the fracture site on mortality. A retrospective cohort study was conducted using Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database to analyze nationwide health data regarding dialysis and non-dialysis patients ≥65 years who sustained a first fragility-related hip fracture during the period from 2001 to 2005. Each dialysis hip fracture patient was age- and sex-matched to 5 non-dialysis hip fracture patients to construct the matched cohort. Survival status of patients was followed-up until death or the end of 2011. Survival analyses using multivariate Cox proportional hazards models and the Kaplan-Meier estimator were performed to compare between-group survival and impact of hip fracture sites on mortality. A total of 61,346 hip fracture patients were included nationwide. Among them, 997 dialysis hip fracture patients were identified and matched to 4985 non-dialysis hip fracture patients. Mortality events were 155, 188, 464, and 103 in the dialysis group, and 314, 382, 1505, and 284 in the non-dialysis group, with adjusted hazard ratios (associated 95% confidence intervals) of 2.58 (2.13-3.13), 2.95 (2.48-3.51), 2.84 (2.55-3.15), and 2.39 (1.94-2.93) at 0 to 3 months, 3 months to 1 year, 1 to 6 years, and 6 to 10 years after the fracture, respectively. In the non-dialysis group, survival was consistently better for patients who sustained femoral neck fractures compared to trochanteric fractures (0-10 years' log-rank test, P dialysis group, survival of patients with femoral neck fractures was better than that of patients with trochanteric fractures only within the first 6 years post-fracture (0-6 years' log-rank, P Dialysis was a significant risk factor of mortality in geriatric hip fracture patients. Survival

  17. Celiac disease autoimmunity and hip fracture risk: findings from a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkilä, Katriina; Heliövaara, Markku; Impivaara, Olli; Kröger, Heikki; Knekt, Paul; Rissanen, Harri; Mäki, Markku; Kaukinen, Katri

    2015-04-01

    The impact of celiac disease autoimmunity on bone health is unclear. We investigated the associations of seropositivity for tissue transglutaminase antibodies (tTGA) and endomysial antibodies (EMA) with incident hip fractures using data from a prospective cohort study, Mini-Finland Health Survey. Baseline serum samples, taken in 1978-80, were tested for tTGA and EMA. Incident hip fractures up to the year 2011 were ascertained from a national hospitalization register. Associations between seropositivity and hip fractures were modeled using Cox proportional hazards regression adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, vitamin D, gamma-glutamyl transferase, smoking, and self-rated health. Our analyses were based on 6919 men and women who had no record of celiac disease or hip fracture before the study baseline. A total of 382 individuals had a hip fracture during a median follow-up of 30 years. Compared with the tTGA-negative individuals (n = 6350), tTGA-positive participants (n = 569; with hip fracture, n = 51) had a higher risk of hip fractures (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.59, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.17, 2.14). The findings were similar for another tTGA test (n 200; with hip fracture, n = 26; HR = 2.23, 95% CI 1.49, 3.34). We found no evidence for an association between EMA positivity and hip fracture risk (HR = 0.92, 95% CI 0.34, 2.47; n = 74; with hip fracture, n = 4). In our prospective population-based study of Finnish adults, seropositivity for tTGA was associated with an increased hip fracture risk. © 2014 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  18. Mortality in British hip fracture patients, 2000-2010 : a population-based retrospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klop, Corinne; Welsing, Paco M J; Cooper, Cyrus; Harvey, Nicholas C; Elders, Petra J M; Bijlsma, Johannes W J; Leufkens, Hubert G M; de Vries, Frank

    BACKGROUND: Data on recent trends in mortality after hip fracture are scarce. Aims were therefore to examine secular trends in all-cause and cause-specific mortality post hip fracture and to compare this to the general population from 2000 to 2010. METHODS: Population-based cohort study within the

  19. Mortality in British hip fracture patients, 2000-2010: A population-based retrospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klop, C.; Welsing, P.M.J.; Cooper, C.; Harvey, N.C.; Elders, P.J.M.; Bijlsma, J.W.J.; Leufkens, H.G.M.; de Vries, F.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Data on recent trends in mortality after hip fracture are scarce. Aims were therefore to examine secular trends in all-cause and cause-specific mortality post hip fracture and to compare this to the general population from 2000 to 2010. Methods: Population-based cohort study within the

  20. Exposure to antiepileptic drugs and the risk of hip fracture: a case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsiropoulos, Ioannis; Andersen, Morten; Nymark, Tine

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate whether the use of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) increases the risk of hip fracture. METHODS: We performed a case-control study using data from the Funen County (population 2004: 475,000) hip fracture register. Cases (n = 7,557) were all patients admitted to county hospitals ...

  1. Danish, national cross-sectional observational study on the prevalence of prior major osteoporotic fractures in adults presenting with hip fracture—limitations and scope for fracture liaison services in prevention of hip fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, A.; Abrahamsen, B.; Johansen, P. B.

    2018-01-01

    . Identification of vertebral fractures in particular is lacking. Introduction: The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence of prior major osteoporotic fractures (MOF) in the prior 10 years preceding hip fracture in order to provide information about the potential for prevention of hip fractures...... if occurring more than 6 months before the present fracture. Results: A total of 28% of hip fracture patients (32% of women and 19% of men) had at least one recognized MOF in the preceding 10 years. Forearm and humerus fractures constituted > 70% of prior MOF. In both genders, vertebral fractures only...... represented a small percentage (2.6%) of previously recognized MOF. Men were less likely than women to have experienced a prior MOF, chiefly due to fewer forearm and humerus fractures. Conclusion: The majority of hip fractures—and in particular hip fractures in men—occur without a previously treated MOF...

  2. Fracture After Total Hip Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... osteolysis. Symptoms The most common symptoms of periprosthetic hip fracture include: • Pain around the hip or thigh • Swelling ... o en very painful, someone with a periprosthetic hip fracture will most likely go directly to the emergency ...

  3. Risk factors for failure to return to the pre-fracture place of residence after hip fracture: a prospective longitudinal study of 444 patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J.H. Vochteloo (Anne); S.T. Vliet-Koppert; A.B. Maier (Andrea); W.E. Tuinebreijer (Wim); M.R. de Vries (Mark); R.M. Bloem (Rolf); R.G.H.H. Nelissen (Rob); P. Pilot (Peter)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: Long-term place of residence after hip fracture is not often described in literature. The goal of this study was to identify risk factors, known at admission, for failure to return to the pre-fracture place of residence of hip fracture patients in the Wrst year after a hip

  4. Magnitude and consequences of misclassification of incident hip fractures in large cohort studies: the Study of Osteoporotic Fractures and Medicare claims data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schousboe, J T; Paudel, M L; Taylor, B C; Virnig, B A; Cauley, J A; Curtis, J R; Ensrud, K E

    2013-03-01

    In the Study of Osteoporotic Fractures (SOF), 18.5 % of incident hip fractures identified in Medicare Fee-for-Service claims data were not reported to or confirmed by the cohort. Cognitive impairment was a modest risk factor for false-negative hip fracture ascertainment via self-report. Prospective cohort studies of fractures that rely on participant self-report to be the initial signal of an incident fracture could be prone to bias if a significant proportion of fractures are not self-reported. We used data from the SOF merged with Medicare Fee-for-Service claims data to estimate the proportion of participants who had an incident hip fracture identified in Medicare claims that was either not self-reported or confirmed (by review of radiographic reports) in SOF. Between 1/1/1991 and 12/31/2007, 647 SOF participants had a hip fracture identified in Medicare claims, but 120 (18.5 %) were either not reported to or confirmed by the cohort. False-negative hip fracture ascertainment was associated with a reduced modified Mini-Mental State Exam (MMSE) score (odds ratio 1.31 per SD decrease, 95 % C.I. 1.06-1.63). Point estimates of associations of predictors of incident hip fracture were changed minimally when the misclassification of incident hip fracture status was corrected with use of claims data. A substantial minority of incident hip fractures were not reported to or confirmed in the SOF. Cognitive impairment was modestly associated with false-negative hip fracture ascertainment. While there was no evidence to suggest that misclassification of incident hip fracture status resulted in biased associations of potential predictors with hip fracture in this study, false-negative incident fracture ascertainment in smaller cohort studies with limited power may increase the risk of type 2 error (not finding significant associations of predictors with incident fractures).

  5. Risk Factors for Hip Fracture in Older Men: The Osteoporotic Fractures in Men Study (MrOS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauley, Jane A; Cawthon, Peggy M; Peters, Katherine E; Cummings, Steven R; Ensrud, Kristine E; Bauer, Douglas C; Taylor, Brent C; Shikany, James M; Hoffman, Andrew R; Lane, Nancy E; Kado, Deborah M; Stefanick, Marcia L; Orwoll, Eric S

    2016-10-01

    Almost 30% of hip fractures occur in men; the mortality, morbidity, and loss of independence after hip fractures are greater in men than in women. To comprehensively evaluate risk factors for hip fracture in older men, we performed a prospective study of 5994 men, primarily white, age 65+ years recruited at six US clinical centers. During a mean of 8.6 years of 97% complete follow-up, 178 men experienced incident hip fractures. Information on risk factors including femoral neck bone mineral density (FNBMD) was obtained at the baseline visit. Cox proportional hazards models were used to calculate the hazard ratio (HR) with 95% confidence intervals; Fine and Gray models adjusted for competing mortality risk. Older age (≥75 years), low FNBMD, currently smoking, greater height and height loss since age 25 years, history of fracture, use of tricyclic antidepressants, history of myocardial infarction or angina, hyperthyroidism or Parkinson's disease, lower protein intake, and lower executive function were all associated with an increased hip fracture risk. Further adjustment for competing mortality attenuated HR for smoking, hyperthyroidism, and Parkinson's disease. The incidence rate of hip fracture per 1000 person-years (PY) was greatest in men with FNBMD T-scores hip fracture at rates of 14.52 versus 0.88 per 1000 PY in men age hip fracture. Many of these assessments can easily be incorporated into routine clinical practice and may lead to improved risk stratification. © 2016 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. © 2016 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  6. Benzodiazepines and hip fractures in elderly people: case-control study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierfitte, Corinne; Macouillard, Gerard; Thicoïpe, Michel; Chaslerie, Anicet; Pehourcq, Fabienne; Aïssou, Myriam; Martinez, Béatrice; Lagnaoui, Rajaa; Fourrier, Annie; Bégaud, Bernard; Dangoumau, Jacques; Moore, Nicholas

    2001-01-01

    Objective To determine whether benzodiazepines are associated with an increased risk of hip fracture. Design Case-control study. Participants All incident cases of hip fracture not related to traffic accidents or cancer in patients over 65 years of age. 245 cases were matched to 817 controls. Setting Emergency department of a university hospital. Main outcome measures Exposure to benzodiazepines and other potential risk or protective factors or lifestyle items. Results The use of benzodiazepines as determined from questionnaires, medical records, or plasma samples at admission to hospital was not associated with an increased risk of hip fracture (odds ratio 0.9, 95% confidence interval 0.5 to 1.5). Hip fracture was, however, associated with the use of two or more benzodiazepines, as determined from questionnaires or medical records but not from plasma samples. Of the individual drugs, only lorazepam was significantly associated with an increased risk of hip fracture (1.8, 1.1 to 3.1). Conclusion Except for lorazepam, the presence of benzodiazepines in plasma was not associated with an increased risk of hip fracture. The method used to ascertain exposure could influence the results of case-control studies. What is already known on this topicBenzodiazepines increase the risk of elderly people falling in a dose dependent wayTheir role in hip fracture remains disputed, with increased risk sometimes attributed to drugs with a longer half life or those used to induce sleepWhat this study addsBenzodiazepines were not associated with hip fracture either as a group or according to half life or to characterisation as hypnotic or anxiolyticPatients using two or more benzodiazepines may be at higher riskPatients using lorazepam or certain other benzodiazepines may also be at a higher risk of fracture PMID:11264208

  7. Hip and fragility fracture prediction by 4-item clinical risk score and mobile heel BMD: a women cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thulesius Hans

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One in four Swedish women suffers a hip fracture yielding high morbidity and mortality. We wanted to revalidate a 4-item clinical risk score and evaluate a portable heel bone mineral density (BMD technique regarding hip and fragility fracture risk among elderly women. Methods In a population-based prospective cohort study we used clinical risk factors from a baseline questionnaire and heel BMD to predict a two-year hip and fragility fracture outcome for women, in a fracture preventive program. Calcaneal heel BMD was measured by portable dual X-ray laser absorptiometry (DXL and compared to hip BMD, measured with stationary dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA technique. Results Seven women suffered hip fracture and 14 women fragility fracture/s (at hip, radius, humerus and pelvis among 285 women; 60% having heel BMD ≤ -2.5 SD. The 4-item FRAMO (Fracture and Mortality Index combined the clinical risk factors age ≥80 years, weight Conclusions In a follow-up study we identified high risk groups for hip and fragility fracture with our plain 4-item risk model. Increased fracture risk was also related to decreasing heel BMD in calcaneal bone, measured with a mobile DXL technique. A combination of high FRAMO Index, prior fragility fracture, and very low BMD restricted the high risk group to 11%, among whom most hip fractures occurred (71%. These practical screening methods could eventually reduce hip fracture incidence by concentrating preventive resources to high fracture risk women.

  8. Height Loss Predicts Subsequent Hip Fracture in Men and Women of the Framingham Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannan, Marian T.; Broe, Kerry E.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Dufour, Alyssa B.; Rockwell, Margo; Kiel, Douglas P.

    2013-01-01

    Background Although height is a risk factor for osteoporotic fracture, current risk assessments do not consider height loss. Height loss may be a simple measurement that clinicians could use to predict fracture or need for further testing. Objective To examine height loss and subsequent hip fracture, evaluating both long-term adult height loss and recent height loss. Methods Prospective cohort of 3,081 adults from the Framingham Heart Study. Height was measured biennially since 1948, and cohort followed for hip fracture through 2005. Adult height loss from middle-age years across 24 years and recent height loss in elderly years were considered. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to estimate association between height loss and risk of hip fracture. Results Of 1,297 men and 1,784 women, mean baseline age was 66y (SD7.8). Average height loss for men was 1.06 inches (0.76), and for women was 1.12 inches (0.84). 11% of men and 15% of women lost ≤ 2 inches of height. Mean follow-up was 17y during which 71 men and 278 women had incident hip fractures. For each 1-inch of height loss, HR=1.4 in men (95%CI: 1.00, 1.99), and 1.04 in women (95%CI: 0.88, 1.23). Men and women who lost ≤ 2 inches of height had increased fracture risk (compared to 0 to height loss in elders significantly increased the risk of hip fracture, 54% in men and 21% in women (95%CI: 1.14, 2.09; 1.03, 1.42, respectively). Conclusions Adult height loss predicted hip fracture risk in men in our study. Recent height loss in elderly men and women predicted risk of hip fracture. PMID:22072590

  9. Height and Risk of Hip Fracture: A Meta-Analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zhihong; Ren, Dong; Feng, Wei; Chen, Yan; Kan, Wusheng; Xing, Danmou

    2016-01-01

    The association between height and risk of hip fracture has been investigated in several studies, but the evidence is inconclusive. We therefore conducted this meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies to explore whether an association exists between height and risk of hip fracture. We searched PubMed and EMBASE, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library for studies of height and risk of hip fracture up to February 16, 2016. The random-effects model was used to combine results from individual studies. Seven prospective cohort studies, with 7,478 incident hip fracture cases and 907,913 participants, were included for analysis. The pooled relative risk (RR) was 1.65 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.26-2.16) comparing the highest with the lowest category of height. Result from dose-response analysis suggested a linear association between height and hip fracture risk (P-nonlinearity = 0.0378). The present evidence suggests that height is positively associated with increased risk of hip fracture. Further well-designed cohort studies are needed to confirm the present findings in other ethnicities.

  10. Correlation of hip fracture with other fracture types: Toward a rational composite hip fracture endpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colón-Emeric, Cathleen; Pieper, Carl F; Grubber, Janet; Van Scoyoc, Lynn; Schnell, Merritt L; Van Houtven, Courtney Harold; Pearson, Megan; Lafleur, Joanne; Lyles, Kenneth W; Adler, Robert A

    2015-12-01

    With ethical requirements to the enrollment of lower risk subjects, osteoporosis trials are underpowered to detect reduction in hip fractures. Different skeletal sites have different levels of fracture risk and response to treatment. We sought to identify fracture sites which cluster with hip fracture at higher than expected frequency; if these sites respond to treatment similarly, then a composite fracture endpoint could provide a better estimate of hip fracture reduction. Cohort study using Veterans Affairs and Medicare administrative data. Male Veterans (n=5,036,536) aged 50-99 years receiving VA primary care between 1999 and 2009 were included. Fractures were ascertained using ICD9 and CPT codes and classified by skeletal site. Pearson correlation coefficients, logistic regression and kappa statistics were used to describe the correlation between each fracture type and hip fracture within individuals, without regard to the timing of the events. 595,579 (11.8%) men suffered 1 or more fractures and 179,597 (3.6%) suffered 2 or more fractures during the time under study. Of those with one or more fractures, the rib was the most common site (29%), followed by spine (22%), hip (21%) and femur (20%). The fracture types most highly correlated with hip fracture were pelvic/acetabular (Pearson correlation coefficient 0.25, pfractures cluster with hip fractures within individuals at greater than expected frequency. If we observe similar treatment risk reductions within that cluster, subsequent trials could consider the use of a composite endpoint to better estimate hip fracture risk. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Age related incidence and early outcomes of hip fractures: a prospective cohort study of 1177 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Anand; Eranki, Vivek; Shenoy, Ravikiran; Hadidi, Mahar

    2011-01-24

    Associated with the increase in the aging population, there is an increase in the incidence of hip fractures worldwide. Outcome following such fractures is affected by age of the patient. This study aims to assess the incidence and early outcome of hip fractures, comparing between different age groups. Data of hip fractures collected over a period of five years was analysed. Patients were divided into three groups, group A (patients under the age of 64), group B (patients between 65 and 84 years of age), and group C (patients over the age of 85). Of the 1177 patients included in the study, there were 90 patients in group A, 702 patients in group B and 385 patients in group C. There was a female preponderance across all age groups, and this increased as age advanced (p propioception and shorter operation time.

  12. A comparative prospective study of dynamic variable angle hip screw and Gamma nail in intertrochanteric hip fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarantino, Umberto; Oliva, Francesco; Impagliazzo, Angelo; Mattei, Antonio; Cannata, Giuseppe; Pompili, Gian Francesco Spurio; Maffulli, Nicola

    To compare the results between a variable angle dynamic screw-plate(DMS) and the Gamma nail in the treatment of intertrochanteric hip fractures. A comparative prospective study of 142 patients (AO/OTA Type 31-A1; A2; A3 and B2) treated by variable angle dynamic screw-plate (DMS Group = 71) or by intramedullary nailing (Gamma Nail Group = 71). At the 12-month follow-up, we did not find any statistically significant difference, intraoperatively, radiographically, or clinically, between the two groups of patients, except for shortening. In 12 patients in the DMS group (17%) and in one patient in the Gamma nail group, there was shortening of the operated leg between 1 cm and 3 cm (p = 0.02). In all instances, shortening occurred in patients who sustained A.O. type fractures 31A2. 2 and 3 (19 patients), which are unstable and comminuted. The DMS allows effective management of intertrochanteric fractures of the femur. Surgeons should consider choosing surgical treatment according to the type of intertrochanteric fracture. In less comminuted fractures, a compression hip screw may be a faster and safer surgical solution. In comminuted fractures, surgical difficulties may increase in parallel to fracture complexity.

  13. Organizational Factors and Long-Term Mortality after Hip Fracture Surgery. A Cohort Study of 6143 Consecutive Patients Undergoing Hip Fracture Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Caterina A; Møller, Ann M; Wetterslev, Jørn

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In hospital and health care organizational factors may be changed to reduce postoperative mortality. The aim of this study is to evaluate a possible association between mortality and 'length of hospital stay', 'priority of surgery', 'time of surgery', or 'surgical delay' in hip fracture......, anaesthetic and surgical procedures were retrieved. PARTICIPANTS: 6143 patients aged more than 65 years undergoing hip fracture surgery. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: All-cause mortality. RESULTS: The one year mortality was 30% (28-31%, 95% Confidence interval (CI)). In a multivariate model 'length of hospital stay...

  14. Physical activity in middle-aged women and hip fracture risk: the UFO study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englund, U; Nordström, P; Nilsson, J; Bucht, G; Björnstig, U; Hallmans, G; Svensson, O; Pettersson, U

    2011-02-01

    In a population-based case-control study, we demonstrate that middle-aged women who were active with walking or in different physical spare time activities were at lower risk of later sustaining a hip fracture compared to more sedentary women. In middle-aged women participating in the Umeå Fracture and Osteoporosis (UFO) study, we investigated whether physical activity is associated with a subsequent decreased risk of sustaining a hip fracture. The UFO study is a nested case-control study investigating associations between bone markers, lifestyle, and osteoporotic fractures. We identified 81 female hip fracture cases that had reported lifestyle data before they sustained their fracture. Each case was compared with two female controls who were identified from the same cohort and matched for age and week of reporting data, yielding a total cohort of 237 subjects. Mean age at baseline was 57.2 ± 5.0 years, and mean age at fracture was 65.4 ± 6.4 years. Conditional logistic regression analysis with adjustments for height, weight, smoking, and menopausal status showed that subjects who were regularly active with walking or had a moderate or high frequency of physical spare time activities (i.e. berry/mushroom picking and snow shovelling) were at reduced risk of sustaining a hip fracture (OR 0.14; 95% CI; 0.05-0.53 for walking and OR 0.19; 95% CI; 0.08-0.46, OR 0.17, 95% CI; 0.05-0.64 for moderate and high frequency of spare time activities, respectively) compared to more sedentary women. An active lifestyle in middle age seems to reduce the risk of future hip fracture. Possible mechanisms may include improved muscle strength, coordination, and balance resulting in a decreased risk of falling and perhaps also direct skeletal benefits.

  15. Case-control study of risk factors for hip fractures in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumming, R G; Klineberg, R J

    1994-03-01

    The objective of this population-based case-control study was to identify risk factors for hip fracture among elderly women and men, particularly factors during young and middle adult life. The study base comprised people aged 65 years and over living in a defined region in Sydney, Australia, during 1990-1991. Cases were recruited from 12 hospitals, and controls were selected using an area probability sampling method, with additional sampling from nursing homes. There were 416 subjects (209 cases and 207 controls); proxy respondents were needed for 27 percent of the subjects. Smoking, underweight in old age, overweight at age 20 years, and weight loss were associated with an increased risk of hip fracture. Consumption of dairy products, particularly at age 20 years, was associated with an increased risk of hip fracture in old age. Multivariate-adjusted odds ratios for quintiles of dairy product consumption at age 20 years were 1.0 (lowest quintile), 0.8, 1.8, 3.4, 2.9 (highest quintile). Caffeine and alcohol intake were not associated with hip fracture risk. Some of the results of this study were unanticipated and may be due to chance or bias. If confirmed by other studies, these results would challenge some current approaches to hip fracture prevention.

  16. Age Related Incidence and Early Outcomes of Hip Fractures: A Prospective Cohort Study of 1177 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenoy Ravikiran

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Associated with the increase in the aging population, there is an increase in the incidence of hip fractures worldwide. Outcome following such fractures is affected by age of the patient. This study aims to assess the incidence and early outcome of hip fractures, comparing between different age groups. Methods Data of hip fractures collected over a period of five years was analysed. Patients were divided into three groups, group A (patients under the age of 64, group B (patients between 65 and 84 years of age, and group C (patients over the age of 85. Results Of the 1177 patients included in the study, there were 90 patients in group A, 702 patients in group B and 385 patients in group C. There was a female preponderance across all age groups, and this increased as age advanced (p Conclusions Hip fractures are more common among females irrespective of age group. Older patients have a higher mortality and a greater deterioration of walking ability after such injuries. Internal fixation of intracapsular fractures have demonstrated satisfactory early outcome in the immediate period. This could be attributed to retention of native bone, better propioception and shorter operation time.

  17. Study of sex differences in the association between hip fracture risk and body parameters by DXA-based biomechanical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasiri, Masoud; Luo, Yunhua

    2016-09-01

    There is controversy about whether or not body parameters affect hip fracture in men and women in the same way. In addition, although bone mineral density (BMD) is currently the most important single discriminator of hip fracture, it is unclear if BMD alone is equally effective for men and women. The objective of this study was to quantify and compare the associations of hip fracture risk with BMD and body parameters in men and women using our recently developed two-level biomechanical model that combines a whole-body dynamics model with a proximal-femur finite element model. Sideways fall induced impact force of 130 Chinese clinical cases, including 50 males and 80 females, were determined by subject-specific dynamics modeling. Then, a DXA-based finite element model was used to simulate the femur bone under the fall-induced loading conditions and calculate the hip fracture risk. Body weight, body height, body mass index, trochanteric soft tissue thickness, and hip bone mineral density were determined for each subject and their associations with impact force and hip fracture risk were quantified. Results showed that the association between impact force and hip fracture risk was not strong enough in both men (r=-0.31,phip fracture risk. The correlation between hip BMD and hip fracture risk in men (r=-0.83,phip fracture in men (r=-0.13,p>0.05), but it can be considered as a protective factor among women (r=-0.28,phip fracture in women (r=-0.50,phip fracture are sex-specific. Therefore, the effect of body parameters should be considered differently for men and women in hip fracture risk assessment tools. These findings support further exploration of sex-specific preventive and protective measurements to reduce the incidence of hip fractures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Death, debility, and destitution following hip fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajeu, Gabriel S; Delzell, Elizabeth; Smith, Wilson; Arora, Tarun; Curtis, Jeffrey R; Saag, Kenneth G; Morrisey, Michael A; Yun, Huifeng; Kilgore, Meredith L

    2014-03-01

    We examined the effects of hip fracture on mortality, entry into long-term institutional care, and new evidence of poverty. We estimate of the proportion of hip fracture patients who require not just short-term rehabilitation but who become dependent on long-term institutional care, and the risk of becoming newly dependent on Medicaid or eligible for low-income subsidies following hip fracture. We used data from 2005 through 2010 for a random 5% sample of Medicare beneficiaries (N = 3.1 million) to conduct a retrospective matched cohort study. We used high-dimensional propensity score matching to compare outcomes for patients who experienced a hip fracture with subjects who did not, but had similar propensity for suffering a hip fracture. We then compared the 1-year risk of death, debility, and destitution between groups. We matched 43,210 hip fracture patients to comparators without a hip fracture. Hip fractures were associated with more than a twofold increase in likelihood of mortality (incidence proportion ratio [IPR] of 2.27, 95% CI, 2.20-2.34), a fourfold increase in likelihood of requiring long-term nursing facility care (IPR, 3.96; 95% CI, 3.77-4.16), and a twofold increase in the probability of entering into low-income status (IPR, 2.14; 95% CI 1.99-2.31) within 1 year following hip fracture compared with subjects without a hip fracture. Hip fracture in elderly patients resulted in increased death, debility, and destitution. Initiatives that lead to improved treatment of osteoporosis could result in a decrease in incidence of fractures, subsequent death, debility, and destitution for older adults.

  19. Geriatric Patients With Fractures Below the Hip are Medically Similar to Geriatric Patients With Hip Fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Rocca, Gregory J; Uppal, Harmeeth S; Copeland, Marilyn E; Crist, Brett D; Volgas, David A

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to compare a cohort of geriatric patients with operatively managed isolated fractures below the hip to a cohort of geriatric patients with operatively managed isolated hip fractures. All patients greater than 59 years of age admitted to our institution for surgical care of an isolated lower extremity fracture during a 3-year period were included. Patients were divided into 2 cohorts: BTH (fracture below the subtrochanteric region of the femur) and HIP (proximal femoral fracture at subtrochanteric region or proximal). We identified 141 patients included in cohort BTH and 205 patients included in cohort HIP. HIP patients were older (P patients and of peripheral neuropathy (P = .014) in BTH patients. HIP patients were more likely to be under active antiosteoporotic medication management and were more likely to be receiving pharmacological anticoagulation at the time of admission. HIP patients and BTH patients were similar with regard to necessity of assistance with ambulation preinjury, but HIP patients were less likely to reside independently at home than were BTH patients (P patients were also less likely to be discharged directly home from the hospital (P Geriatric patients with fractures below the hip are medically similar to geriatric patients with hip fracture. Medical comanagement protocols have been extensively published that improve care of geriatric patients with hip fracture; consideration should be given to similar protocol-driven medical comanagement programs for geriatric patients with fractures below the hip.

  20. Asymmetry in CT Scan Measures of Thigh Muscle 2 Months After Hip Fracture: The Baltimore Hip Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Ram R; Eastlack, Marty; Hicks, Gregory E; Alley, Dawn E; Shardell, Michelle D; Orwig, Denise L; Goodpaster, Bret H; Chomentowski, Peter J; Hawkes, William G; Hochberg, Marc C; Ferrucci, Luigi; Magaziner, Jay

    2015-10-01

    Hip fracture is an important problem for older adults with significant functional consequences. After hip fracture, reduced muscle loading can result in muscle atrophy. We compared thigh muscle characteristics in the fractured leg to those in the nonfractured leg in participants from the Baltimore Hip Studies 7th cohort using computed tomography scan imaging. At 2 months postfracture, a single 10mm axial computed tomography scan was obtained at the midthigh level in 43 participants (23 men, 20 women) with a mean age of 79.9 years (range: 65-96 years), and thigh muscle cross-sectional area, cross-sectional area of intermuscular adipose tissue, and mean radiologic attenuation were measured. Total thigh muscle cross-sectional area was less on the side of the fracture by 9.46cm(2) (95% CI: 5.97cm(2), 12.95cm(2)) while the cross-sectional area of intermuscular adipose tissue was greater by 2.97cm(2) (95% CI: 1.94cm(2), 4.01cm(2)) on the fractured side. Mean muscle attenuation was lower on the side of the fracture by 3.66 Hounsfield Units (95% CI: 2.98 Hounsfield Units, 4.34 Hounsfield Units). The observed asymmetry is consistent with the effect of disuse and inflammation in the affected limb along with training effects in the unaffected limb due to the favoring of this leg with ambulation during the postfracture period. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Estimated drinking water fluoride exposure and risk of hip fracture: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Näsman, P; Ekstrand, J; Granath, F; Ekbom, A; Fored, C M

    2013-11-01

    The cariostatic benefit from water fluoridation is indisputable, but the knowledge of possible adverse effects on bone and fracture risk due to fluoride exposure is ambiguous. The association between long-term (chronic) drinking water fluoride exposure and hip fracture (ICD-7-9: '820' and ICD-10: 'S72.0-S72.2') was assessed in Sweden using nationwide registers. All individuals born in Sweden between January 1, 1900 and December 31, 1919, alive and living in their municipality of birth at the time of start of follow-up, were eligible for this study. Information on the study population (n = 473,277) was linked among the Swedish National In-Patient Register (IPR), the Swedish Cause of Death Register, and the Register of Population and Population Changes. Estimated individual drinking water fluoride exposure was stratified into 4 categories: very low, fluoride exposure and the occurrence of hip fracture. The risk estimates did not change in analyses restricted to only low-trauma osteoporotic hip fractures. Chronic fluoride exposure from drinking water does not seem to have any important effects on the risk of hip fracture, in the investigated exposure range.

  2. Distribution of cortical bone in the femoral neck and hip fracture: a prospective case-control analysis of 143 incident hip fractures; the AGES-REYKJAVIK Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannesdottir, Fjola; Poole, Kenneth E S; Reeve, Jonathan; Siggeirsdottir, Kristin; Aspelund, Thor; Mogensen, Brynjolfur; Jonsson, Brynjolfur Y; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; Harris, Tamara B; Gudnason, Vilmundur G; Sigurdsson, Gunnar

    2011-06-01

    In this prospective nested case-control study we analyzed the circumferential differences in estimated cortical thickness (Est CTh) of the mid femoral neck as a risk factor for osteoporotic hip fractures in elderly women and men. Segmental QCT analysis of the mid femoral neck was applied to assess cortical thickness in anatomical quadrants. The superior region of the femoral neck was a stronger predictor for hip fracture than the inferior region, particularly in men. There were significant gender differences in Est CTh measurements in the control group but not in the case group. In multivariable analysis for risk of femoral neck (FN) fracture, Est CTh in the supero-anterior (SA) quadrant was significant in both women and men, and remained a significant predictor after adjustment for FN areal BMD (aBMD, dimensions g/cm², DXA-like), (p=0.05 and pfracture. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Hip protectors for preventing hip fractures in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santesso, Nancy; Carrasco-Labra, Alonso; Brignardello-Petersen, Romina

    2014-03-31

    Older people living in nursing care facilities or older adults living at home are at high risk of falling and a hip fracture may occur after a fall. Hip protectors have been advocated as a means to reduce the risk of hip fracture. Hip protectors are plastic shields (hard) or foam pads (soft), usually fitted in pockets in specially designed underwear.This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 1999, and updated several times, most recently in 2010. To determine if the provision of external hip protectors (sometimes referred to as hip pads or hip protector pads) reduces the risk of fracturing the hip in older people. We searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group Specialised Register (December 2012), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 12), MEDLINE (1950 to week 3 November 2012), MEDLINE In-Process (18 December 2012), EMBASE (1988 to 2012 Week 50), CINAHL (1982 to December 2012), BioMed Central (January 2010), trial registers and reference lists of relevant articles. All randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing an intervention group provided with hip protectors with a control group not provided with hip protectors. Two review authors independently assessed risk of bias and extracted data. We sought additional information from trialists. Data were pooled using fixed-effect or random-effects models as appropriate. This review includes 19 studies, nine of which were cluster randomised. These included approximately 17,000 people (mean age range 78 to 86 years). Most studies were overall at low risk of bias for fracture outcomes. Trials tested hard or soft hip protectors enclosed in special underwear in 18 studies.Pooling of data from 14 studies (11,808 participants) conducted in nursing or residential care settings found moderate quality evidence for a small reduction in hip fracture risk (risk ratio (RR) 0.82, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.67 to 1.00); the absolute

  4. Case-only designs for studying the association of antidepressants and hip or femur fracture.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, M.C.H. de; Candore, G.; Uddin, M.J.; Souverein, P.C.; Ali, M.S.; Belitser, S.V.; Huerta, C.; Groenwold, R.H.H.; Alvarez, Y.; Slattery, J.; Korevaar, J.; Hoes, A.W.; Roes, K.C.B.; Boer, A. de; Douglas, I.J.; Schlienger, R.G.; Reynolds, R.; Klungel, O.H.; Gardarsdottir, H.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the performance and validity of the case-crossover (CCO) and self-controlled case-series (SCCS) designs when studying the association between hip/femur fracture (HF) and antidepressant (AD) use in general practitioner databases. In addition,

  5. Case-only designs for studying the association of antidepressants and hip or femur fracture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Groot, Mark C H; Candore, Gianmario; Uddin, Md Jamal; Souverein, Patrick C.; Ali, M. Sanni; Belitser, Svetlana V.; Huerta, Consuelo; Groenwold, Rolf H H; Alvarez, Yolanda; Slattery, Jim; Korevaar, Joke; Hoes, Arno W.; Roes, Kit C B; de Boer, Anthonius; Douglas, Ian J.; Schlienger, Raymond G.; Reynolds, Robert; Klungel, Olaf H.; Gardarsdottir, Helga

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the performance and validity of the case-crossover (CCO) and self-controlled case-series (SCCS) designs when studying the association between hip/femur fracture (HF) and antidepressant (AD) use in general practitioner databases. In addition,

  6. Case-only designs for studying the association of antidepressants and hip or femur fracture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Groot, Mark C. H.; Candore, Gianmario; Uddin, Jamal; Souverein, Patrick; Ali, M. Sanni; Belitser, S.; Huerta, Consuelo; Groenwold, Rolf H. H.; Alvarez, Yolanda; Slattery, Jim; Korevaar, Joke; Hoes, Arno W.; Roes, Kit C. B.; de Boer, Anthonius; Douglas, Ian J.; Schlienger, Raymond G.; Reynolds, Robert; Klungel, Olaf H.; Gardarsdottir, Helga

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the performance and validity of the case-crossover (CCO) and self-controlled case-series (SCCS) designs when studying the association between hip/femur fracture (HF) and antidepressant (AD) use in general practitioner databases. In addition,

  7. Hormone replacement therapy and risk of hip fracture: population based case-control study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaëlsson, Karl; Baron, John A; Farahmand, Bahman Y; Johnell, Olof; Magnusson, Cecilia; Persson, Per-Gunnar; Persson, Ingemar; Ljunghall, Sverker

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To determine the relative risk of hip fracture associated with postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy including the effect of duration and recency of treatment, the addition of progestins, route of administration, and dose. Design: Population based case-control study. Setting: Six counties in Sweden. Subjects: 1327 women aged 50-81 years with hip fracture and 3262 randomly selected controls. Main outcome measure: Use of hormone replacement therapy. Results: Compared with women who had never used hormone replacement therapy, current users had an odds ratio of 0.35 (95 % confidence interval 0.24 to 0.53) for hip fracture and former users had an odds ratio of 0.76 (0.57 to 1.01). For every year of therapy, the overall risk decreased by 6% (3% to 9%): 4% (1% to 8%) for regimens without progestin and 11% (6% to 16%) for those with progestin. Last use between one and five years previously, with a duration of use more than five years, was associated with an odds ratio of 0.27 (0.08 to 0.94). After five years without hormone replacement therapy the protective effect was substantially diminished (−7% to 48%). With current use, an initiation of therapy nine or more years after the menopause gave equally strong reduction in risk for hip fracture as an earlier start. Oestrogen treatment with skin patches gave similar risk estimates as oral regimens. Conclusions: Recent use of hormone replacement therapy is required for optimum fracture protection, but therapy can be started several years after the menopause. The protective effect increases with duration of use, and an oestrogen-sparing effect is achieved when progestins are included in the regimen. Key messages Hormone replacement therapy should be continued for long periods for optimal protection of hip fracture No overall substantial hip fracture protection remains after five years without hormone replacement therapy Therapy can be initiated several years after menopause without loss of fracture protection

  8. Hip fracture history and risk of nonmelanoma skin cancer: a Danish population-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamberg AL

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Anna Lei Lamberg1,2, Anne Braae Olesen1,2, Annette Østergaard Jensen11Department of Clinical Epidemiology, 2Department of Dermatology, Aarhus University Hospital, DenmarkBackground: Vitamin D deficiency is associated with osteoporotic fractures, such as hip fracture. Sun exposure, the natural source of vitamin D, is the main risk factor for basal cell carcinoma (BCC and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC. In this study, we examined the association between a history of hip fracture and risk of BCC and SCC.Methods: We conducted a population-based case-controlled study using data on BCC and SCC cases registered in the Danish Cancer Registry from 1990–2005. For each case, we selected five population controls matched by age and gender. We used conditional logistic regression to compute odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI, while adjusting for chronic diseases and socioeconomic status.Results: A history of hip fracture was associated with a decreased risk of BCC (OR 0.90, 95% CI 0.85–0.94, which was most pronounced in cases of tumors on the trunk, extremities, or at multiple sites. We found no association for SCC (OR 1.07, 95% CI 0.98–1.17.Conclusion: Our study showed an inverse association between history of hip fracture and risk of BCC, but not of SCC. Sun exposure, resulting in vitamin D synthesis, may explain the link between the two diseases.Keywords: hip fracture, vitamin D, sunlight, basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma

  9. Predicting Hip Fracture Type With Cortical Bone Mapping (CBM) in the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treece, Graham M; Gee, Andrew H; Tonkin, Carol; Ewing, Susan K; Cawthon, Peggy M; Black, Dennis M; Poole, Kenneth E S

    2015-11-01

    Hip fracture risk is known to be related to material properties of the proximal femur, but fracture prediction studies adding richer quantitative computed tomography (QCT) measures to dual-energy X-ray (DXA)-based methods have shown limited improvement. Fracture types have distinct relationships to predictors, but few studies have subdivided fracture into types, because this necessitates regional measurements and more fracture cases. This work makes use of cortical bone mapping (CBM) to accurately assess, with no prior anatomical presumptions, the distribution of properties related to fracture type. CBM uses QCT data to measure the cortical and trabecular properties, accurate even for thin cortices below the imaging resolution. The Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) study is a predictive case-cohort study of men over 65 years old: we analyze 99 fracture cases (44 trochanteric and 55 femoral neck) compared to a cohort of 308, randomly selected from 5994. To our knowledge, this is the largest QCT-based predictive hip fracture study to date, and the first to incorporate CBM analysis into fracture prediction. We show that both cortical mass surface density and endocortical trabecular BMD are significantly different in fracture cases versus cohort, in regions appropriate to fracture type. We incorporate these regions into predictive models using Cox proportional hazards regression to estimate hazard ratios, and logistic regression to estimate area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Adding CBM to DXA-based BMD leads to a small but significant (p fracture, with AUC increasing from 0.78 to 0.79, assessed using leave-one-out cross-validation. For specific fracture types, the improvement is more significant (p fractures and 0.76 to 0.82 for femoral neck fractures. In contrast, adding DXA-based BMD to a CBM-based predictive model does not result in any significant improvement. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research published by

  10. A Biomechanical Study for Developing Wearable-Sensor System to Prevent Hip Fractures among Seniors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gongbing Shan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available As the population ages, falls are becoming a major health problem, not only for those with some degree of balance or mobility impairment, but also among healthy active seniors. Previous studies suggest that the degradation of human sensorimotor function related to age contributes to falls. Hip bones are among the most frequently fractured body parts resulting from falls. Hip fractures are a frequent cause of early death, functional dependence, and high medical care costs. The current prevention method is to use hip protectors. Unfortunately, it often fails to do so because the pocket containing the pad can move away from the area during falls. Additionally, some seniors refuse to use hip protectors because they find them constraining. Hence, a new protector that is only activated during a fall is much desired. The current study explored the possibility via biomechanical analyses for building a wearable sensor system that triggers a mini-airbag system during a fall, i.e., the air-pad is only present for protection when a fall occurs. The results have revealed that two sensors placed on the left and right shoulder would be best for a detection of any-direction fall and could be applied for building a wearable sensor system for prevention of hip fractures resulting from falls.

  11. Incidence of hip fracture in Kermanshah, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyranvand, Mandana; Mohammadi, Goergee

    2009-12-01

    SUMMARY: The aim of this study was to estimate the incidence of hip fracture in Kermanshah, Iran. 161 cases (88 men and 73 women) were recorded. The annual age-standardized incidence rates were 181.1/100,000 in men and 214.6/100,000 in women. Incidence rate of hip fracture was less than in Western countries. INTRODUCTION: Hip fracture is the most serious complication of osteoporosis, the most common metabolic bone disease worldwide. The incidence of hip fracture in the elderly patients varies in different areas. The aim of this study was to estimate the incidence rate of hip fracture in Kermanshah, Iran. MATERIALS AND METHODS: All cases of hip fracture patients who aged 50 years or more admitted in six referral orthopedic hospitals in Kermanshah from May 21, 2007 to May 21, 2008 were studied. The age- and sex-specific incidence rates of hip fracture per 100,000 persons were calculated using the population data from the last national census in Iran, 2007. RESULTS: A total of 161 cases of hip fracture (88 men and 73 women) were recorded. The annual age-standardized incidence rates were 181.1/100,000 in men and 214.6/100,000 in women. The female to male ratio of hip fracture incidence was 1.18. CONCLUSION: We found a relatively low incidence of hip fracture in Iran than in Western countries, which is mostly due to the lower rate in women. This is probably related to the different lifestyle factors in different societies.

  12. Predicting Future Hip Fractures on Routine Abdominal CT Using Opportunistic Osteoporosis Screening Measures: A Matched Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Scott J; Anderson, Paul A; Pickhardt, Perry J

    2017-08-01

    Hip fracture is a major consequence of low bone mineral density, which is treatable but underdiagnosed. The purpose of this case-control study is to determine whether lumbar vertebral trabecular attenuation, vertebral compression fractures, and femoral neck T scores readily derived from abdominopelvic CT scans obtained for various indications are associated with future hip fragility fracture. A cohort of 204 patients with hip fracture (130 women and 74 men; mean age, 74.3 years) who had undergone abdominopelvic CT before fracture occurred (mean interval, 24.8 months) was compared with an age- and sex-matched control cohort without hip fracture. L1 trabecular attenuation, vertebral compression fractures of grades 2 and 3, and femoral neck T scores derived from asynchronous quantitative CT were recorded. The presence of one or more clinical risk factor for fracture was also recorded. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to determine the association of each measurement with the occurrence of hip fracture. The mean L1 trabecular attenuation value, the presence of one or more vertebral compression fracture, and CT-derived femoral neck T scores were all significantly different in patients with hip fracture versus control subjects (p hip fracture outcome after adjustments were made for age, sex, and the presence of one or more clinical risk factor. L1 trabecular attenuation and CT-derived femoral neck T scores showed moderate accuracy in differentiating case and control patients (AUC, 0.70 and 0.78, respectively). L1 trabecular attenuation, CT-derived femoral neck T scores, and the presence of at least one vertebral compression fracture on CT are all associated with future hip fragility fracture in adults undergoing routine abdominopelvic CT for a variety of conditions.

  13. Risk factors for contra-lateral hip fracture in elderly patients with previous hip fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jun-Dong; Yoo, Je-Hyun; Reddy, Pradeep; Lee, Sang-Soo; Hwang, Ji-Hyo; Kim, Tae-Young

    2013-12-01

    Contra-lateral hip fractures in elderly patients with a previous hip fracture increase the incidence of complications and socioeconomic burden. The purpose of this study was to identify the risk factors that contribute to the occurrence of contra-lateral hip fracture in elderly patients. Among 1093 patients treated for a hip fracture, 47 patients sustained a contra-lateral hip fracture. These patients were compared with 141 patients with a unilateral hip fracture (controls). The incidence of contra-lateral hip fracture was 4.3% among the 1093 patients treated for a hip fracture at our institute. A contra-lateral hip fracture occurred within 2 years of initial fracture in 66%, and subsequently, the annual incidence rate decreased. A similar fracture pattern was noted in 70% of patients who sustained an intertrochanteric fracture. In terms of preoperative factors, respiratory disease (OR 2.57, P=0.032) and visual impairment (OR 2.51, P=0.012) were higher in patients with a contra-lateral hip fracture than in controls, and for postoperative factors, the proportions of patients with postoperative delirium (OR 2.91, P=0.022), late onset of rehabilitation (OR 1.05, P=0.023), and poor ambulatory status at 3 months (OR 1.34, P=0.002) were also significantly higher in patients than in controls. Postoperative delirium and underlying visual impairment and respiratory disease could be risk factors of contra-lateral fracture in elderly patients. Early and active rehabilitation after surgery is important to prevent the occurrence of contra-lateral hip fracture in the elderly. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Risk of hip fractures associated with benzodiazepines: Applying common protocol to a multi-database nested case-control study. The protect project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Requena, Gema; Logie, John; González-González, Rocío; Gardarsdottir, Helga|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/321858131; Afonso, Ana; Souverein, Patrick C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/243074948; Merino, Elisa Martin; Boudiaf, Nada; Huerta, Consuelo; Bate, Andrew; Alvarez, Yolanda; García-Rodríguez, Luis A.; Reynolds, Robert; Schlienger, Raymond G.; De Groot, Mark C.H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/313936455; Klungel, Olaf H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/181447649; De Abajo, Francisco J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The association between benzodiazepines (BZD) and hip fractures has been estimated in several observational studies although diverse methodologies and definitions have hampered comparability. Objectives: To evaluate the discrepancies in the risk estimates of hip/femur fractures

  15. Unchanging Incidence of Hip Fracture in Southeastern Norway

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Polesie, Sam; Sigurdsen, Ulf; Bjørgul, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to ascertain trends in the incidence of hip fracture in southeastern Norway by comparing the hip fracture incidence for the years 2008 to 2010 to that of a study from 1998...

  16. Recovery after Hip Fracture: Interventions and Their Timing to Address Deficits and Desired Outcomes--Evidence from the Baltimore Hip Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magaziner, Jay; Chiles, Nancy; Orwig, Denise

    2015-01-01

    Hip fracture is a significant public health problem affecting an estimated 1.6 million persons annually. The consequences of hip fracture are also significant, with more than half of those who sustain a fracture either dying or not returning to functional abilities present before fracture required to function independently. The Baltimore Hip Studies (BHS) is a program of research that for more than 30 years has been doing investigations to identify, develop, and evaluate strategies to optimize recovery from hip fracture. This paper provides an overview of known outcomes and recovery patterns following a hip fracture, which are derived primarily from the BHS. Target areas and timing for interventions based on this recovery sequence are suggested. The paper concludes with a discussion of some of the areas that the next generation of studies needs to concentrate on in order to advance knowledge about the care of hip fracture patients to maximize their recovery. © 2015 Nestec Ltd., Vevey/S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. SIGN HIP construct: Achieving hip fracture fixation without using an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The aim of this study was to assess outcomes of using the SIGN Hip Construct (SHC) to achieve hip fracture fixation without the use of an image intensifier. Design: Prospective case series. Setting: Muhimbili Orthopaedic Institute, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Outcome measures: Radiographic union, callus formation ...

  18. Influence of Premature Mortality on the Link Between Type 2 Diabetes and Hip Fracture: The Fremantle Diabetes Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Emma; Davis, Wendy A; Bruce, David G; Davis, Timothy M E

    2017-02-01

    Studies of hip fracture complicating diabetes have not considered the effect of premature mortality. The aim of our study was to determine influence of the competing risk of death on the association between type 2 diabetes and hip fracture. The study was designed as a longitudinal observational study. The study setting was an urban community. Participants included 1291 patients with type 2 diabetes (mean age 64.0 years) and 5159 matched residents without diabetes. Primary outcome measures were incident hip fracture hospitalizations and deaths. Hip fracture risk was assessed using proportional hazards and competing risk regression modeling. During a mean of 14.1 years of follow-up, the incidence rate ratio for first hip fracture hospitalization in participants with vs without diabetes was 1.33 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.05 to 1.68; P = 0.013]. Type 2 diabetes was associated with a cause-specific hazard ratio (csHR) for hip fracture of 1.50 (95% CI, 1.19 to 1.89; P < 0.001) and a subdistribution hazard ratio (sdHR) of 1.21 (95% CI, 0.96 to 1.52; P = 0.11) after adjustment for age, sex, and comorbidities. In patients with diabetes, significant csHRs for incident hip fracture were male sex (protective), body mass index (protective), insulin use, and renal impairment. These variables, with increasing age, also had significant sdHRs. The diabetes-associated risk of hip fracture is attenuated after allowing for the competing risk of death. Risk factors for hip fracture in diabetes were those in reported in general population studies plus insulin use.

  19. Hip fracture risk estimation based on principal component analysis of QCT atlas: a preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenjun; Kornak, John; Harris, Tamara; Lu, Ying; Cheng, Xiaoguang; Lang, Thomas

    2009-02-01

    We aim to capture and apply 3-dimensional bone fragility features for fracture risk estimation. Using inter-subject image registration, we constructed a hip QCT atlas comprising 37 patients with hip fractures and 38 age-matched controls. In the hip atlas space, we performed principal component analysis to identify the principal components (eigen images) that showed association with hip fracture. To develop and test a hip fracture risk model based on the principal components, we randomly divided the 75 QCT scans into two groups, one serving as the training set and the other as the test set. We applied this model to estimate a fracture risk index for each test subject, and used the fracture risk indices to discriminate the fracture patients and controls. To evaluate the fracture discrimination efficacy, we performed ROC analysis and calculated the AUC (area under curve). When using the first group as the training group and the second as the test group, the AUC was 0.880, compared to conventional fracture risk estimation methods based on bone densitometry, which had AUC values ranging between 0.782 and 0.871. When using the second group as the training group, the AUC was 0.839, compared to densitometric methods with AUC values ranging between 0.767 and 0.807. Our results demonstrate that principal components derived from hip QCT atlas are associated with hip fracture. Use of such features may provide new quantitative measures of interest to osteoporosis.

  20. Sex effects on short-term complications after hip fracture: a prospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekström W

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Wilhelmina Ekström,1 Bodil Samuelsson,2 Sari Ponzer,3 Tommy Cederholm,4,5 Karl-Göran Thorngren,6 Margareta Hedström7 1Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Section of Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna, 2Department of Clinical Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Danderyd Hospital, 3Department of Clinical Science and Education, Section of Orthopaedics, Karolinska Institutet, Södersjukhuset, Stockholm, 4Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, 5Department of Geriatrics, Uppsala University, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, 6Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund, Orthopaedics, Lund University, Lund, 7Department of Orthopaedics, Institute of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology (CLINTEC, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden Objectives: To evaluate potential sex differences and other factors associated with complications within 4 months after a hip fracture.Methods: A total of 1,915 patients ≥65 years (480 men with hip fracture were consecutively included in a prospective multicenter cohort study. A review of medical records and patient interviews according to a study protocol based on the Standardized Audit of Hip Fractures in Europe (SAHFE, RIKSHÖFT was performed. Sex differences in comorbidity according to the American Society of Anesthesiologists score and complications 4 months after a hip fracture were registered. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify factors related to complications.Results: Male sex was associated with worse general health according to the American Society of Anesthesiologists classification (P=0.005 and with more comorbidities (P<0.001. Male sex emerged as a risk factor for developing pneumonia (P<0.001, and additionally, 18% of the men suffered from cardiac complications compared with 13% of the females (P=0.018. Female sex was predisposed for urinary tract infections, 30% vs 23

  1. Epidemiology of hip fracture: Worldwide geographic variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh K Dhanwal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis is a major health problem, especially in elderly populations, and is associated with fragility fractures at the hip, spine, and wrist. Hip fracture contributes to both morbidity and mortality in the elderly. The demographics of world populations are set to change, with more elderly living in developing countries, and it has been estimated that by 2050 half of hip fractures will occur in Asia. This review conducted using the PubMed database describes the incidence of hip fracture in different regions of the world and discusses the possible causes of this wide geographic variation. The analysis of data from different studies show a wide geographic variation across the world, with higher hip fracture incidence reported from industrialized countries as compared to developing countries. The highest hip fracture rates are seen in North Europe and the US and lowest in Latin America and Africa. Asian countries such as Kuwait, Iran, China, and Hong Kong show intermediate hip fracture rates. There is also a north-south gradient seen in European studies, and more fractures are seen in the north of the US than in the south. The factors responsible of this variation are population demographics (with more elderly living in countries with higher incidence rates and the influence of ethnicity, latitude, and environmental factors. The understanding of this changing geographic variation will help policy makers to develop strategies to reduce the burden of hip fractures in developing countries such as India, which will face the brunt of this problem over the coming decades.

  2. Preoperative CSF Melatonin Concentrations and the Occurrence of Delirium in Older Hip Fracture Patients : A Preliminary Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtens, Rikie M; de Rooij, Sophia E J A; Vellekoop, Annelies E; Vrouenraets, Bart C; van Munster, Barbara C

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Delirium is characterized by disturbances in circadian rhythm. Melatonin regulates our circadian rhythm. Our aim was to compare preoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) melatonin levels in patients with and without postoperative delirium. METHODS: Prospective cohort study with hip fracture

  3. [Hip fracture as risk factor for mortality in patients over 65 years of age. Case-control study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrete-Corona, J; Alvarado-Soriano, J C; Reyes-Santiago, L A

    2014-01-01

    Hip fracture among older patients is a devastating injury in most cases. It profoundly affects the physical, mental, functional and social balance that patients used to have and, beyond the orthopedic injury, it reflects the aging process and its dire consequences. Some reports show that up to 50% of patients with hip fracture die within six months and many of those who survive do not recover their baseline independence and function. In recent decades the increase in life expectancy after 60 years of age has led to an exponential growth in hip fractures. This is why it is essential to determine the patient-related and environmental factors leading to the increased mortality rates seen in patients with hip fracture, to improve the survival and quality of life of older adults. The objective was to determine the association between hip fracture and mortality in patients over 65 years of age. An observational, longitudinal, retrospective, descriptive, comparative case-control study was conducted. The clinical records of all patients over 65 years of age admitted to the Orthopedics Service, Hospital Regional , ISSSTE, with a diagnosis of hip fracture during the previous 12 months were analyzed, regardless of the type of fracture and treatment they received. A group of patients without hip fracture was used as control group. Total sample size was 50 patients with hip fracture and 50 patients without hip fracture. The following data were collected in data collection forms: age, sex, time elapsed since the fracture, survival at one year and, in the case of deceased patients, the cause of death (pneumonia, sepsis, arrhythmia, hydroelectrolytic imbalance, heart failure and others). The results obtained are shown as tables and charts to facilitate their visual understanding. Patient demographics show that there were 40 (80%) female patients and 10 (20%) male patients with a diagnosis of hip fracture. The control group included 35 (70%) females and 15 (30) males. An

  4. The Fascia Iliaca Block as the Primary Intraoperative Anesthesia for Hip Fracture Surgery: A Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzbarsky, Joseph J; Gausden, Elizabeth B; Goldwyn, Elan M; Lowenwirt, Isaac P; Kotlyar, Vitaly

    2018-02-01

    Early surgical intervention for hip fractures in the elderly has proven efficacious. However, surgical delays commonly occur in this patient population due to comorbid conditions that put these patients at a high risk for hypotension-related complications of general or neuraxial anesthesia or anticoagulants that delay the safe use of neuraxial anesthesia. The questions/purposes of this study are (1) to investigate if a fascia iliaca block in conjunction with light to moderate sedation could provide adequate analgesia throughout open surgery for intertrochanteric hip fractures (AO/OTA 31-1) without requiring conversion to general anesthesia with airway support and (2) to assess its perioperative complication profile. A retrospective chart review was conducted to identify patients with intertrochanteric hip fractures who underwent anesthesia with a fascia iliaca block over a 1.5-year period. In the six patients identified, there were no intraoperative conversions to general anesthesia requiring airway support. Additionally, there were no intraoperative complications, no mortalities within 30 days, 2 patients on anticoagulation who required a blood transfusion, and a single patient who developed a postoperative hospital-acquired pneumonia that resolved with an antibiotic course. In this series of patients, we demonstrate that a fascia iliaca block can reliably be utilized as the primary anesthetic for patients undergoing surgical fixation of intertrochanteric hip fractures, with an acceptable perioperative complication profile. Although concomitant sedation was provided with the block, this anesthesia strategy has the potential to reduce preoperative delays and minimize the overall burden of sedative and anesthetic medications in a geriatric population. These initial findings may serve as a basis for future, higher-quality prospective and comparative studies.

  5. Association of incident hip fracture with the estimated femoral strength by finite element analysis of DXA scans in the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, L; Parimi, N; Orwoll, E S; Black, D M; Schousboe, J T; Eastell, R

    2017-11-22

    Finite element model can estimate bone strength better than BMD. This study used such a model to determine its association with hip fracture risk and found that the strength estimate provided limited improvement over the hip BMDs in predicting femoral neck (FN) fracture risk only. Bone fractures occur only when it is loaded beyond its ultimate strength. The goal of this study was to determine the association of femoral strength, as estimated by finite element (FE) analysis of DXA scans, with incident hip fracture as a single condition or with femoral neck (FN) and trochanter (TR) fractures separately in older men. This prospective case-cohort study included 91 FN and 64 TR fracture cases and a random sample of 500 men (14 had a hip fracture) from the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men study during a mean ± SD follow-up of 7.7 ± 2.2 years. We analysed the baseline DXA scans of the hip using a validated plane-stress, linear-elastic FE model of the proximal femur and estimated the femoral strength during a sideways fall. The estimated strength was significantly (P fracture independent of the TR and total hip (TH) BMDs but not FN BMD, and combining the strength with BMD did not improve the hip fracture prediction. The strength estimate was associated with FN fractures independent of the FN, TR and TH BMDs; the age-BMI-BMD adjusted hazard ratio (95% CI) per SD decrease of the strength was 1.68 (1.07-2.64), 2.38 (1.57, 3.61) and 2.04 (1.34, 3.11), respectively. This association with FN fracture was as strong as FN BMD (Harrell's C index for the strength 0.81 vs. FN BMD 0.81) and stronger than TR and TH BMDs (0.8 vs. 0.78 and 0.81 vs. 0.79). The strength's association with TR fracture was not independent of hip BMD. Although the strength estimate provided additional information over the hip BMDs, its improvement in predictive ability over the hip BMDs was confined to FN fracture only and limited.

  6. Social inequality and hip fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harvey, N. C.; Hansen, L.; Judge, A.

    2015-01-01

    Social inequality appears to be increasing in many countries. We explored whether risk of hip fracture was associated with markers of inequality and whether these relationships changed with time, using data from Danish Health Registries. Methods: All patients 60 years or older with a primary hip...

  7. Preoperative position splint versus skin traction in patients with hip fracture: An experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosun, Betul; Aslan, Ozlem; Tunay, Servet

    2018-02-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the effects of a preoperative position splint and skin traction on pain, comfort, complications, and satisfaction with the treatment and care for patients with hip fracture. This randomized trial was conducted with a total of 68 patients with hip fracture in a tertiary care hospital in Turkey. Preoperatively, a position splint was applied to the patients in the intervention group (n = 34) and skin traction was applied to patients (n = 34) in the control group. Outcomes studied were pain, comfort, satisfaction and complications. Mann-Whitney U Test showed a significant difference between the position splint group and skin traction group regarding pain severity after the application (p < .05). A significant difference was demonstrated between the two groups concerning comfort levels after the application (p < .05). The position splint group was significantly more satisfied with the treatment and care than the control group in the later period after the application (p < .05). The number of preoperative complications in the position splint group was significantly fewer than that of the skin traction group in the preoperative period (p < .05). Preoperative position splint application in patients with hip fracture relieved pain and complications and increased comfort and satisfaction with treatment and care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Acute cognitive dysfunction after hip fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bitsch, M S; Foss, N B; Kristensen, B B

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients undergoing hip fracture surgery often experience acute post-operative cognitive dysfunction (APOCD). The pathogenesis of APOCD is probably multifactorial, and no single intervention has been successful in its prevention. No studies have investigated the incidence of APOCD after...... hip fracture surgery in an optimized, multimodal, peri-operative rehabilitation regimen. METHODS: One hundred unselected hip fracture patients treated in a well-defined, optimized, multimodal, peri-operative rehabilitation regimen were included. Patients were tested upon admission and on the second...... without a concomitant medical complication, the only risk factors were cognitive level and regular anti-psychotic treatment. CONCLUSION: On the basis of current evidence, APOCD is prevalent amongst hip fracture patients despite multimodal intervention; future research should therefore focus on defining...

  9. Non-hip, non-spine fractures drive healthcare utilization following a fracture: the Global Longitudinal study of Osteoporosis in Women (GLOW)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannidis, G.; Flahive, J.; Pickard, L.; Papaioannou, A.; Chapurlat, R. D.; Saag, K. G.; Silverman, S.; Anderson, F. A.; Gehlbach, S. H.; Hooven, F. H.; Boonen, S.; Compston, J. E.; Cooper, C.; Díez-Perez, A.; Greenspan, S. L.; LaCroix, A. Z.; Lindsay, R.; Netelenbos, J. C.; Pfeilschifter, J.; Rossini, M.; Roux, C.; Sambrook, P. N.; Siris, E. S.; Watts, N. B.

    2016-01-01

    Summary We evaluated healthcare utilization associated with treating different fracture types in over 51,000 women aged ≥55 years. Over the course of 1 year, there were five times more non-hip, non-spine fractures than hip or spine fractures, resulting in twice as many days of hospitalization and rehabilitation/nursing home care for non-hip, non-spine fractures. Purpose To evaluate the medical healthcare utilization associated with treating several types of fractures in women aged 55 years or older from various geographic regions. Methods Information from the Global Longitudinal study of Osteoporosis in Women (GLOW) was collected via self-administered patient questionnaires at baseline and year 1 (n=51,491). Self-reported clinically recognized low-trauma fractures at year 1 were classified as incident spine, hip, wrist/hand, arm/shoulder, pelvis, rib, leg, and other fractures. Healthcare utilization data were self-reported and included whether the fracture was treated at a doctor’s office/clinic or at a hospital. Patients were also asked if they had undergone surgery or been treated at a rehabilitation center or nursing home. Results Over the 1-year study period, there were 195 spine, 134 hip, and 1,654 non-hip, non-spine fractures. In the GLOW cohort, clinical vertebral fractures resulted in 617 days of hospitalization and 512 days of rehabilitation/nursing home care, while hip fractures accounted for 1,306 days of hospitalization and 1,650 days of rehabilitation/nursing home care. Of particular interest is the result that non-hip, non-spine fractures resulted in 3,805 days in hospital and 5,186 days of rehabilitation/nursing home care. Conclusions While hip and vertebral fractures are well recognized for their associated increase in health resource utilization, non-hip, non-spine fractures, by virtue of their 5-fold greater number, require significantly more healthcare resources. PMID:22525976

  10. Sarcopenia in patients with hip fracture: A multicenter cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steihaug, Ole Martin; Gjesdal, Clara Gram; Bogen, Bård; Kristoffersen, Målfrid Holen; Lien, Gunhild; Ranhoff, Anette Hylen

    2017-01-01

    Sarcopenia is prevalent in older persons and is a risk factor for falls, fractures, and mortality. The aim of this study was to determine a) the feasibility of determining sarcopenia in patients with acute hip fracture, b) the prevalence of sarcopenia and c) associations of sarcopenia with nutritional status and comorbidities. A multicenter cross-sectional study on sarcopenia in male and female patients with acute hip fracture. Participants were previously ambulatory and living in the community. Sarcopenia was assessed postoperatively with muscle mass estimated by anthropometry using triceps skinfold, arm circumference, height, weight and sex. Grip strength was measured by Jamar dynamometer and pre-fracture mobility was by self-report using the New Mobility Score. Out of 282 patients, 202 were assessed for sarcopenia of whom 74 (37%) were diagnosed as sarcopenic. Sarcopenia was associated with age, odds ratio (OR) 1.4 per 5 years, 95% confidence interval (CI) [1.1, 1.8], ASA Physical Status Classification System score, OR 2.3 per point, 95% CI [1.3, 4.3] and number of medications at discharge, OR 1.2 per medication, 95% CI [1.0, 1.3] and inversely associated with BMI, OR 0.8, 95% CI [0.7, 0.9] and serum albumin, OR 0.9, 95% CI [0.8,1.0]. Thirty-seven percent of assessed subjects were diagnosed with sarcopenia. Our data demonstrates that the prevalence of sarcopenia is associated with older age, malnutrition and comorbidities. Determining sarcopenia at the bedside was feasible in postoperative hip fracture patients by using grip strength, estimation of muscle mass by anthropometry and self-reported mobility.

  11. Routine functional assessment for hip fracture patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Tonny J; Lauritsen, Jens M

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose - Pre-fracture functional level has been shown to be a consistent predictor of rehabilitation outcomes in older hip fracture patients. We validated 4 overall pre-fracture functional level assessment instruments in patients aged 65 or more, used the prediction of outcome at 4...... months post-fracture, and assessed cutoff values for decision making in treatment and rehabilitation. Patients and methods - 165 consecutive patients with acute primary hip fracture were prospectively included in the study. Pre-fracture Barthel-20, Barthel-100, cumulated ambulation score, and new...... mobility score were scored immediately after admission. Outcome defined as mortality, residential status, and independent walking ability was assessed at 4 months. Results - 3 of the assessment instruments, namely Barthel-20, Barthel-100, and new mobility score, correlated with outcome at 4 months post-fracture...

  12. Evaluating recovery following hip fracture : a qualitative interview study of what is important to patients\\ud

    OpenAIRE

    Griffiths, Frances; Mason, Victoria; Boardman, Felicity K.; Dennick, Kathryn J.; Haywood, Kirstie L.; Achten, Juul; Parsons, Nicholas R; Griffin, Xavier L.; Costa, Matthew L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: \\ud To explore what patients consider important when evaluating their recovery from hip fracture and to consider how these priorities could be used in the evaluation of the quality of hip fracture services.\\ud \\ud Design:\\ud Semistructured interviews exploring the experience of recovery from hip fracture at two time points—4 weeks and 4 months postoperative hip fixation. Two approaches to analysis: thematic analysis of data specifically related to recovery from hip fracture; summar...

  13. Geriatric trauma hip fractures: is there a difference in outcomes based on fracture patterns?

    OpenAIRE

    Mangram, Alicia; Moeser, Phillip; Corneille, Michael G; Prokuski, Laura J; Zhou, Nicolas; Sohn, Jacqueline; Chaliki, Shalini; Oguntodu, Olakunle F; Dzandu, James K

    2014-01-01

    Background Annually in the US, there are over 300,000 hospital admissions due to hip fractures in geriatric patients. Consequently, there have been several large observational studies, which continue to provide new insights into differences in outcomes among hip fracture patients. However, few hip fracture studies have specifically examined the relationship between hip fracture patterns, sex, and short-term outcomes including hospital length of stay and discharge disposition in geriatric trau...

  14. High hip fracture risk in men with severe aortic calcification - MrOS study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szulc, Pawel; Blackwell, Terri; Schousboe, John T.; Bauer, Douglas C.; Cawthon, Peggy; Lane, Nancy E.; Cummings, Steven R.; Orwoll, Eric S.; Black, Dennis M.; Ensrud, Kristine E.

    2013-01-01

    A significant link between cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis is established in postmenopausal women, but data in men are scarce. We tested the hypothesis that greater severity of abdominal aortic calcification (AAC) was associated with an increased risk of non-spine fracture in 5994 men aged ≥65 years. AAC wasassessed on 5400 baseline lateral thoraco-lumbar radiographs using a validated visual semi-quantitative score. Total hip bone mineral density (BMD) was measured using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Incident non-spine fractures were centrally adjudicated. After adjustment for age, BMI, total hip BMD, fall history, prior fracture, smoking status, co-morbidities, race and clinical center, the risk of non-spine fracture (n=805) was increased among men with higher AAC (HR Q4 (AAC score ≥9) vs Q1 (0-1): 1.36, 96%CI: 1.10-1.68). This association was due to an increased risk of hip fracture (n=178) among men with higher AAC (HR Q4 vs Q1: 2.33, 95%CI: 1.41-3.87). By contrast, the association between AAC and the risk of non-spine-non-hip fracture was weaker and not significant (HR Q4 vs Q1: 1.22, 95%CI: 0.96-1.55). The findings regarding higher AAC and increased risk of fracture were not altered in additional analyses accounting for degree of trauma, estimated glomerular filtration rate, presence of lumbar vertebral fractures (which may bias AAC assessment), preexisting cardiovascular disease, ankle brachial index or competing risk of death. Thus, in this large cohort of elderly men, greater AAC was independently associated with an increased risk of hip fracture, but not with other non-spine fractures. These findings suggest that AAC assessment may be a useful method for identification of older men at high risk of hip fracture. PMID:23983224

  15. Risk factors and epidemiological profile of hip fractures in Indian population: A case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaustubh Ahuja

    2017-09-01

    Conclusions: Hip fractures in the elderly population are on a rising trend especially in the Indian subcontinent due to a number of factors both hereditary and acquired. Simple measures like routine usage of bedside railing, wall-side railings at an appropriate height, high friction tiles inside rooms and washrooms, and adequate lighting indoors can play a significant role in reducing falls and hip fractures among the elderly.

  16. Age Related Macular Degeneration and Total Hip Replacement Due to Osteoarthritis or Fracture: Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine W Chong

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis is the leading cause of total hip replacement, accounting for more than 80% of all total hip replacements. Emerging evidence suggests that osteoarthritis has a chronic inflammatory component to its pathogenesis similar to age-related macular degeneration. We evaluated the association between age-related macular degeneration and total hip replacement as proxy for severe osteoarthritis or fractured neck of femur in the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study. 20,744 participants had complete data on both age-related macular degeneration assessed from colour fundus photographs taken during 2003-2007 and total hip replacement. Total hip replacements due to hip osteoarthritis and fractured neck of femur during 2001-2011 were identified by linking the cohort records to the Australian Orthopedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between age-related macular degeneration and risk of total hip replacement due to osteoarthritis and fracture separately, adjusted for confounders. There were 791 cases of total hip replacement for osteoarthritis and 102 cases of total hip replacement due to fractured neck of femur. After adjustment for age, sex, body mass index, smoking, and grouped country of birth, intermediate age-related macular degeneration was directly associated with total hip replacement for osteoarthritis (odds ratio 1.22, 95% CI 1.00-1.49. Late age-related macular degeneration was directly associated with total hip replacement due to fractured neck of femur (odds ratio 5.21, 95% CI2.25-12.02. The association between intermediate age-related macular degeneration and an increased 10-year incidence of total hip replacement due to osteoarthritis suggests the possibility of similar inflammatory processes underlying both chronic diseases. The association of late age-related macular degeneration with an increased 10-year incidence of total hip replacement due to fractured

  17. Age Related Macular Degeneration and Total Hip Replacement Due to Osteoarthritis or Fracture: Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Elaine W; Wang, Yuanyuan; Robman, Liubov D; Aung, Khin Zaw; Makeyeva, Galina A; Giles, Graham G; Graves, Stephen; Cicuttini, Flavia M; Guymer, Robyn H

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is the leading cause of total hip replacement, accounting for more than 80% of all total hip replacements. Emerging evidence suggests that osteoarthritis has a chronic inflammatory component to its pathogenesis similar to age-related macular degeneration. We evaluated the association between age-related macular degeneration and total hip replacement as proxy for severe osteoarthritis or fractured neck of femur in the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study. 20,744 participants had complete data on both age-related macular degeneration assessed from colour fundus photographs taken during 2003-2007 and total hip replacement. Total hip replacements due to hip osteoarthritis and fractured neck of femur during 2001-2011 were identified by linking the cohort records to the Australian Orthopedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between age-related macular degeneration and risk of total hip replacement due to osteoarthritis and fracture separately, adjusted for confounders. There were 791 cases of total hip replacement for osteoarthritis and 102 cases of total hip replacement due to fractured neck of femur. After adjustment for age, sex, body mass index, smoking, and grouped country of birth, intermediate age-related macular degeneration was directly associated with total hip replacement for osteoarthritis (odds ratio 1.22, 95% CI 1.00-1.49). Late age-related macular degeneration was directly associated with total hip replacement due to fractured neck of femur (odds ratio 5.21, 95% CI2.25-12.02). The association between intermediate age-related macular degeneration and an increased 10-year incidence of total hip replacement due to osteoarthritis suggests the possibility of similar inflammatory processes underlying both chronic diseases. The association of late age-related macular degeneration with an increased 10-year incidence of total hip replacement due to fractured neck of femur may be

  18. Distribution of bone density and cortical thickness in the proximal femur and their association with hip fracture in postmenopausal women: a quantitative computed tomography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, L; Udall, W J M; McCloskey, E V; Eastell, R

    2014-01-01

    The quantitative computed tomography (QCT) scans in an individually matched case-control study of women with hip fracture were analysed. There were widespread deficits in the femoral volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) and cortical thickness of cases, and cortical vBMD and thickness discriminated hip fracture independently of BMD by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Acknowledging the limitations of QCT associated with partial volume effects, we used QCT in an individually matched case-control study of women with hip fracture to better understand its structural basis. Fifty postmenopausal women (55-89 years) who had sustained hip fractures due to low-energy trauma underwent QCT scans of the contralateral hip within 3 months of the fracture. For each case, postmenopausal women, matched by age (±5 years), weight (±5 kg) and height (±5 cm), were recruited as controls. We quantified cortical, trabecular and integral vBMD and apparent cortical thickness (AppCtTh) in four quadrants of cross-sections along the length of the femoral head (FH), femoral neck (FN), intertrochanter and trochanter and examined their association with hip fracture. Women with hip or intracapsular (IC) fracture had significantly (p fractures independent of hip areal BMD (aBMD). The combination of AppCtTh and trabecular or integral vBMD discriminated hip fracture, whereas the combination of FH and FN AppCtTh discriminated IC fracture significantly (p fracture independently of aBMD by DXA.

  19. Health-related quality of life after vertebral or hip fracture: a seven-year follow-up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toss Göran

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The negative impact of vertebral and hip low-energy fractures on health-related quality-of-life (HRQOL has been demonstrated previously, but few prospective long-term follow-up studies have been conducted. This study aims to (i investigate the changes and long-term impact of vertebral or hip fracture and between fracture groups on HRQOL in postmenopausal women prospectively between two and seven years after the inclusion fracture, (ii compare HRQOL results between fracture and reference groups and (iii study the relationship between HRQOL and physical performance, spinal deformity index and bone mineral density at seven-year follow-up. Methods Ninety-one women examined two years after a low-energy vertebral or hip fracture were invited to a new examination seven years after the diagnosis. HRQOL was examined using the SF-36 questionnaire and was compared with an age and sex-matched reference group. Physical function was assessed using tests and questionnaires. Bone mineral density was measured. Radiographs of the spine were evaluated using the visual semiquantitative technique. A longitudinal and cross-sectional design was used in this study. Statistical analyses included descriptive statistics, Student's t-tests, ANCOVA, and partial correlation. Results Sixty-seven women participated. In the 42 women (mean age 75.8, SD 4.7 with vertebral fracture as inclusion fracture, bodily pain had deteriorated between two and seven years and might be explained by new fracture. Remaining pronounced reduction of HRQOL was seen in all domains except general health and mental health at seven-year follow-up in women with vertebral fractures compared to the reference group (p Conclusion The long-term reduction of HRQOL in women with vertebral fracture emerged clearly in this study. The relationships between HRQOL and physical performance in women with vertebral and hip fracture raise questions for more research.

  20. Computed tomography compared to magnetic resonance imaging in occult or suspect hip fractures. A retrospective study in 44 patients

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    Collin, David; Goethlin, Jan H. [Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Moelndal (Sweden); Geijer, Mats [Lund University, Department of Medical Imaging and Physiology, Skaane University Hospital, Lund (Sweden)

    2016-11-15

    Computed tomography (CT) for evaluation of occult and suspect hip fractures has been proposed as a good second-line investigation. The diagnostic precision compared to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is unclear. To compare the diagnostic performance of CT and MRI in a retrospective study on patients with suspect and occult hip fractures. Forty-four elderly consecutive patients with low-energy trauma to the hip were identified where negative or suspect CT was followed by MRI. Primary reporting and review by two observers as well as the diagnostic performance of the two modalities were compared. Surgical treatment and clinical course were used as outcomes. Compared to the primary reports, the CT reviewers found fewer normal and no suspect cases. MRI changed the primary diagnoses in 27 cases, and in 14 and 15 cases, respectively, at review. There was no disagreement on MRI diagnoses. In our patient population, MRI was deemed a more reliable modality for hip fracture diagnosis in comparison to CT. For clinical decision making, MRI seems to have a higher accuracy than CT. A negative CT finding cannot completely rule out a hip fracture in patients where clinical findings of hip fracture persevere. (orig.)

  1. Direct health-care costs attributed to hip fractures among seniors: a matched cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitovic, M; Wodchis, W P; Krahn, M D; Cadarette, S M

    2013-02-01

    Using a matched cohort design, we estimated the mean direct attributable cost in the first year after hip fracture in Ontario to be $36,929 among women and $39,479 among men. These estimates translate into an annual $282 million in direct attributable health-care costs in Ontario and $1.1 billion in Canada. Osteoporosis is a major public health concern that results in substantial fracture-related morbidity and mortality. It is well established that hip fractures are the most devastating consequence of osteoporosis, yet the health-care costs attributed to hip fractures in Canada have not been thoroughly evaluated. We determined the 1- and 2-year direct attributable costs and cost drivers associated with hip fractures among seniors in comparison to a matched non-hip fracture cohort using health-care administrative data from Ontario (2004-2008). Entry into long-term care and deaths attributable to hip fracture were also determined. We successfully matched 22,418 female (mean age = 83.3 years) and 7,611 male (mean age = 81.3 years) hip fracture patients. The mean attributable cost in the first year after fracture was $36,929 (95 % CI $36,380-37,466) among women and $39,479 (95 % CI $38,311-$40,677) among men. These estimates translate into an annual $282 million in direct attributable health-care costs in Ontario and $1.1 billion in Canada. Primary cost drivers were acute and post-acute institutional care. Approximately 24 % of women and 19 % of men living in the community at the time of fracture entered a long-term care facility, and 22 % of women and 33 % of men died within the first year following hip fracture. Attributable costs remained elevated into the second year ($9,017 among women, $10,347 among men) for patients who survived the first year. We identified significant health-care costs, entry into long-term care, and mortality attributed to hip fractures. Results may inform health economic analyses and policy decision-making in Canada.

  2. Pediatric Hip Fractures in California: Results from a Community-Based Hip Fracture Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prentice, Heather A; Paxton, Elizabeth W; Hunt, Jessica J; Grimsrud, Christopher D; Weiss, Jennifer M

    2017-01-01

    Hip fracture registries offer an opportunity to identify and to monitor patients with rare conditions and outcomes, including hip fractures in pediatric patients. To report patient demographics and surgical outcomes of pediatric patients treated surgically for hip fractures in a large integrated health care system. Pediatric patients (fracture) with hip fractures were identified between 2009 and 2012 using our health care system's hip fracture registry. Patient characteristics, type of fracture, surgical treatment, and short-term complications. Among 39 patients identified, 31 (79.5%) were male, and the median age was 15 years old (interquartile range: 11-17 years). Most patients were Hispanic (n = 17, 43.6%) or white (n = 14, 35.9%). There were 8 patients (20.5%) with 15 comorbidities. Delbet Type IV (intertrochanteric) fractures were the most common fracture type (n = 22, 56.4%), and fixation method was equally distributed between intramedullary, screw and sideplate, and screws (n = 12, 30.8% for each). Most surgeries were performed by medium-volume surgeons (n = 22, 56.4%) at medium- and high-volume hospitals (n = 37, 94.9%). Three 90-day readmissions (7.7%), 1 infection (2.6%), 1 malunion (2.6%), and 1 revision (2.6%) were observed in this cohort during the study period. In our series using registry data, hip fractures younger than age 21 years were more common in boys and Hispanic patients. Intertrochanteric fractures (Delbet Type IV) were the most frequently observed type in our community-based hip fracture registry. Short-term complications were infrequent.

  3. A qualitative study of Functioning, Disability, and Rehabilitation of patients after hip fracture surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehlers, Monica Milter

    2013-01-01

    on the Model of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (The ICF model) (Figure 1) and White Paper of the Rehabilitation Concept. The method of the project is qualitative, and the design used to answer the research questions is qualitative deductive content analysis (Figure 2......A qualitative study of functioning, disability, and rehabilitation of patients after hip fracture surgery Monica Milter Ehlers PhD student, MSc in Nursing Merete Bender Bjerrum* PhD, MA, Associate Professor Claus Vinther Nielsen* Professor, PhD, MD, Specialist in Clinical Social Medicine...... fracture patients consists primarily of muscle training and daily mobilisation. Patients' functioning, disability, and involvement in their rehabilitation process have not been investigated in scientific studies. Aims To establish a specific research-based knowledge for functioning, disability...

  4. Resuscitation in hip fractures: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocos, Brett; Whitehouse, Michael R; Kelly, Michael B

    2017-05-04

    To evaluate the evidence for the resuscitation of patients with hip fracture in the preoperative or perioperative phase of their treatment and its impact on mortality. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL and PROSPERO databases using a systematic search strategy for randomised trials and observational studies investigating the fluid resuscitation of any patient with hip fracture. No language limits were applied to the search, which was complemented by manually screening the reference lists of appropriate studies. Mortality at 1 week, 30 days and 1 year following surgery. Two hundred and ninety-eight citations were identified, and 12 full manuscripts were reviewed; no studies satisfied the inclusion criteria. The background literature showed that the mortality for these patients at 30 days is approximately 8.5% and that bone cement implantation syndrome is insufficient to explain this. The literature was explored to define the need for an interventional investigation into the preoperative resuscitation of patients with hip fracture. Patients with hip fracture show similar physiological disturbance to major trauma patients. Nineteen per cent of patients presenting with hip fracture are hypoperfused and 50% show preoperative anaemia suggesting that under resuscitation is a common problem that has not been investigated. A properly conducted interventional trial could improve the outcome of these vulnerable patients. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  5. Prediction of incident hip fracture with the estimated femoral strength by finite element analysis of DXA Scans in the study of osteoporotic fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lang; Palermo, Lisa; Black, Dennis M; Eastell, Richard

    2014-12-01

    A bone fractures only when loaded beyond its strength. The purpose of this study was to determine the association of femoral strength, as estimated by finite element (FE) analysis of dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scans, with incident hip fracture in comparison to hip bone mineral density (BMD), Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX), and hip structure analysis (HSA) variables. This prospective case-cohort study included a random sample of 1941 women and 668 incident hip fracture cases (295 in the random sample) during a mean ± SD follow-up of 12.8 ± 5.7 years from the Study of Osteoporotic Fractures (n = 7860 community-dwelling women ≥67 years of age). We analyzed the baseline DXA scans (Hologic 1000) of the hip using a validated plane-stress, linear-elastic finite element (FE) model of the proximal femur and estimated the femoral strength during a simulated sideways fall. Cox regression accounting for the case-cohort design assessed the association of estimated femoral strength with hip fracture. The age-body mass index (BMI)-adjusted hazard ratio (HR) per SD decrease for estimated strength (2.21; 95% CI, 1.95-2.50) was greater than that for total hip (TH) BMD (1.86; 95% CI, 1.67-2.08; p  0.05), FRAX scores (range, 1.32-1.68; p hip BMD or FRAX scores. The association of estimated strength with incident hip fracture was strong (Harrell's C index 0.770), significantly better than TH BMD (0.759; p  0.05). Similar findings were obtained for intracapsular and extracapsular fractures. In conclusion, the estimated femoral strength from FE analysis of DXA scans is an independent predictor and performs at least as well as FN BMD in predicting incident hip fracture in postmenopausal women. © 2014 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  6. Objectively-Verified Parental Non-Hip Major Osteoporotic Fractures and Offspring Osteoporotic Fracture Risk: A Population-Based Familial Linkage Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuman; Leslie, William D; Walld, Randy; Roos, Leslie L; Morin, Suzanne N; Majumdar, Sumit R; Lix, Lisa M

    2017-04-01

    Parental hip fracture (HF) is associated with increased risk of offspring major osteoporotic fractures (MOFs; comprising hip, forearm, clinical spine or humerus fracture). Whether other sites of parental fracture should be used for fracture risk assessment is uncertain. The current study tested the association between objectively-verified parental non-hip MOF and offspring incident MOF. Using population-based administrative healthcare data for the province of Manitoba, Canada, we identified 255,512 offspring with linkage to at least one parent (238,054 mothers and 209,423 fathers). Parental non-hip MOF (1984-2014) and offspring MOF (1997-2014) were ascertained with validated case definitions. Time-dependent multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). During a median of 12 years of offspring follow-up, we identified 7045 incident MOF among offspring (3.7% and 2.5% for offspring with and without a parental non-hip MOF, p hip MOF (HR 1.27; 95% CI, 1.19 to 1.35), paternal non-hip MOF (HR 1.33; 95% CI, 1.20 to 1.48), and any parental non-hip MOF (HR 1.28; 95% CI, 1.21 to 1.36) were significantly associated with offspring MOF after adjusting for covariates. The risk of MOF was even greater for offspring with both maternal and paternal non-hip MOF (adjusted HR 1.61; 95% CI, 1.27 to 2.02). All HRs were similar for male and female offspring (all pinteraction >0.1). Risks associated with parental HF only (adjusted HR 1.26; 95% CI, 1.13 to 1.40) and non-hip MOF only (adjusted HR 1.26; 95% CI, 1.18 to 1.34) were the same. The strength of association between any parental non-hip MOF and offspring MOF decreased with older parental age at non-hip MOF (ptrend  = 0.028). In summary, parental non-hip MOF confers an increased risk for offspring MOF, but the strength of the relationship decreases with older parental age at fracture. © 2016 American Society for Bone and

  7. Prediction of incident hip fracture by femoral neck bone mineral density and neck-shaft angle: a 5-year longitudinal study in post-menopausal females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnudi, S; Sitta, E; Pignotti, E

    2012-08-01

    To compare hip fracture incidence in post-menopausal females who were differently stratified for the fracture risk according to bone mineral density and proximal femur geometry. In a 5 year follow-up study, the hip fracture incidence in 729 post-menopausal females (45 of whom suffered from incident hip fracture) was assessed and compared. Forward logistic regression was used to select independent predictors of hip fracture risk, including age, age at menopause, height, weight, femoral neck bone mineral density (FNBMD), neck-shaft angle (NSA), hip axis length, femoral neck diameter and femoral shaft diameter as covariates. Fracture incidence was then calculated for the categories of young/old age, high/low FNBMD and wide/narrow NSA, which were obtained by dichotomising each hip fracture independent predictor at the value best separating females with and without a hip fracture. The hip fracture incidence of the whole cohort was significantly higher in females with a wide NSA (8.52%) than in those with a narrow NSA (3.51%). The combination of wide NSA and low FNBMD had the highest hip fracture incidence in the whole cohort (17.61%) and each age category. The combinations of narrow/wide NSA with low/high FNBMD, respectively, gave a significantly higher fracture incidence in older than in younger women, whereas women with a combined wide NSA and low FNBMD had no significantly different fracture incidence in young (14.60%) or old age (21.62%). Our study showed that NSA is effective at predicting the hip fracture risk and that the detection in early post-menopause of a wide NSA together with a low FNBMD should identify females at high probability of incident hip fracture.

  8. [Clinical pathway for hip fracture patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez López, Pilar; Sánchez Hernández, Natalia; Paniagua Tejo, Sonsoles; Valverde García, José Antonio; Montero Díaz, Margarita; Alonso García, Noelia; Freites Esteve, Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    Hip fracture in the elderly often occurs in patients with high co-morbidity. Effective management requires a comprehensive and multidisciplinary approach. To evaluate the effect of a quality improvement intervention in the detection and treatment of complications in elderly patients admitted for hip fracture. A comparative study was conducted between two groups of patients admitted for hip fracture prior to 2010, and after a quality improvement intervention in 2013. The intervention consisted of implementing improved multidisciplinary measures in accordance with recent scientific evidence. The degree of compliance of the implemented measures was quantified. Patients admitted due to hip fracture in 2010 (216 patients) and 2013 (196 patients) were similar in age, sex, Barthel Index, and a reduced Charlson Index, although there were more comorbidities in 2013. After implementation of the protocols, the detection of delirium, malnutrition, anemia, and electrolyte disturbances increased. A larger number of patients in 2013 were precribed intravenous iron (24% more) and osteoporosis treatment (61.3% more). The average stay was reduced by 45.3% and surgical delay by 29.4%, achieving better functional efficiency. The implementation of a clinical pathway in geriatric patients with hip fracture is useful to detect and treat complications at an early stage, and to reduce pre-operative and overall stay, all without a negative clinical or functional impact. Copyright © 2014 SEGG. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Schizophrenia, antipsychotics and risk of hip fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Holger J; Jensen, Signe O W; Nielsen, Jimmi

    2013-01-01

    In a nationwide study using linkage of Danish hospital registers we examined predictors of hip fracture (ICD-10: S72) in 15,431 patients with schizophrenia (ICD-10: F20 or ICD-8: 295) and 3,807,597 population controls. Shorter education, disability pension, lifetime alcohol abuse, somatic co......-morbidity, antipsychotics (IRR=1.19; 95% CI 1.15-1.24), antidepressant (IRR=1.18; 95% CI 1.16-1.20), anticholinergics (IRR=1.29; 95% CI 1.22-1.36), benzodiazepines (IRR=1.06; 95% CI 1.04-1.08) and corticosteroids (IRR=1.44; 95% CI 1.36-1.53) were significant predictors. In 556 persons with schizophrenia and hip fracture...... (matched to 1:3 to schizophrenia controls without hip fracture), antipsychotic polypharmacy predicted hip fracture. Analyses among antipsychotic monotherapy patients showed no differential effect of individual antipsychotics. A dose-response relationship of hip fracture and lifetime antipsychotics...

  10. [Functional capabilities of users of mobility devices after femoral hip fracture. A comparison study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mischker, A; Steinhagen-Thiessen, E

    2010-10-01

    The present study investigates the functional skills and capabilities of a sample of 105 patients treated at the Lutheran Geriatric Center Berlin after a hip fracture during a period of two years between 2004 and 2006. Geriatric assessment instruments (Barthel index, Instrumental Activities of Daily Living Scale (IADL), Timed Up & Go (TUG), Tinetti, grip strength, Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS)) were implemented to measure the functional capabilities in this prospective study. The subjects were divided into three groups, characterized by the type of mobility device they used: crutches, a four-wheeled walker, or a wheel chair. Furthermore, the data were measured at three test intervals (t(0:): baseline before discharge, t(1): 4 weeks after discharge, t(2): 4 months after discharge). The results of the study differ significantly for each of the three groups at the different test intervals (Barthel index, IADL, TUG, Tinetti, grip strength, all pTinetti, grip strength, IADL, TUG, p≤0.05, general linear model). The results of the study differ significantly for each of the three groups at the different test intervals (Barthel index, IADL, TUG, Tinetti, grip strength, all p Tinetti, grip strength, IADL, TUG, p≤0.001, general linear model) A group-specific approach, based on the mobility devices used, allowed for better differentiation of functional capabilities after femoral hip fracture.

  11. Use of Oral Corticosteroids and Risk of Hip Fracture in the Elderly in a Case-Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Wei Lai

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Little is known regarding the relationship between use of oral corticosteroids and hip fracture in the elderly in Taiwan. The aim of the study was to examine this issue.Methods: A retrospective population-based case-control study using the database of the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program (2000–2013 was conducted. We identified 4538 individuals aged ≥ 65 years with newly diagnosed hip fracture as the cases. We randomly selected 4538 individuals without hip fracture as the control subjects. The cases and the control subjects were matched with sex, age, comorbidities, and the year of index date. Individuals who never had a prescription for oral corticosteroids were defined as never use. Individuals who ever had at least one prescription for oral corticosteroids were defined as ever use. The odds ratio (OR and 95% confidence interval (CI of hip fracture associated with oral corticosteroids use was estimated by a multivariable unconditional logistic regression analysis.Results: After adjustments for potential confounding factors, the multivariable logistic regression model showed that the adjusted OR of hip fracture was 1.17 for individuals with ever use of oral corticosteroids (95%CI 1.08, 1.28, compared to those with never use of oral corticosteroids. An sub-analysis showed that for every 1-mg increase in cumulative dose of oral corticosteroids, the adjusted OR of hip fracture was 1.01 (95% CI 1.01, 1.02. The adjusted ORs were 1.31 (95% CI 1.17, 1.47 for cumulative exposure to oral corticosteroids ≥ 3 months and 1.09 (95% CI 0.98, 1.20 for cumulative exposure < 3 months.Conclusion: We conclude that oral corticosteroids use is associated with a trivial but statistically significant increase in risk of hip fracture in Taiwan. Additionally, the results suggest that there are dose-response and duration-response effects of oral corticosteroids on the risk of hip fracture. The results confirm our understanding of oral corticosteroid

  12. Parathyroid hormone response to severe vitamin D deficiency is sex associated: an observational study of 571 hip fracture inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Monaco, M; Castiglioni, C; Vallero, F; Di Monaco, R; Tappero, R

    2013-02-01

    To investigate the association between sex and parathyroid hormone response to severe vitamin D deficiency after hip fracture. Cross-sectional study. Rehabilitation hospital in Italy. 571 consecutive inpatients with hip fracture and severe vitamin D deficiency (serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D secondary hyperparathyroidism (serum PTH >75pg/ml) or functional hypoparathyroidism, i.e., inappropriate normal levels of PTH (≤75pg/ml). Among the 571 patients, 336 (59%) had functional hypoparathyroidism, whereas 235 (41%) had secondary hyperparathyroidism. PTH status was significantly different between sexes (p=0.003): we found functional hypoparathyroidism in 61% of women and 43% of men (secondary hyperparathyroidism in 39% of women and 57% of men). The significance of the between-sex difference was maintained after adjustment for age, estimated GFR, phosphate, albumin-adjusted total calcium, albumin, Barthel index scores, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, and hip fracture type (either cervical or trochanteric). The adjusted odds ratio was 1.85 (95%CI from 1.09 to 3.13; p=0.023). Data shows that PTH response to vitamin D deficiency was sex-associated following a fracture of the hip. The higher prevalence of secondary hyperparathyroidism may play a role in the known prognostic disadvantage found in hip-fracture men.

  13. Do cadmium, lead, and aluminum in drinking water increase the risk of hip fractures? A NOREPOS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Cecilie; Søgaard, Anne Johanne; Tell, Grethe S; Flaten, Trond Peder; Hongve, Dag; Omsland, Tone Kristin; Holvik, Kristin; Meyer, Haakon E; Aamodt, Geir

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate relations between cadmium, lead, and aluminum in municipality drinking water and the incidence of hip fractures in the Norwegian population. A trace metals survey in 566 waterworks was linked geographically to hip fractures from hospitals throughout the country (1994-2000). In all those supplied from these waterworks, 5,438 men and 13,629 women aged 50-85 years suffered a hip fracture. Poisson regression models were fitted, adjusting for age, region of residence, urbanization, and type of water source as well as other possibly bone-related water quality factors. Effect modification by background variables and interactions between water quality factors were examined (correcting for false discovery rate). Men exposed to a relatively high concentration of cadmium (IRR = 1.10; 95 % CI 1.01, 1.20) had an increased risk of fracture. The association between relatively high lead and hip fracture risk was significant in the oldest age group (66-85 years) for both men (IRR = 1.11; 95 % CI 1.02, 1.21) and women (IRR = 1.10; 95 % CI 1.04, 1.16). Effect modification by degree of urbanization on hip fracture risk in men was also found for all three metals: cadmium, lead, and aluminum. In summary, a relatively high concentration of cadmium, lead, and aluminum measured in drinking water increased the risk of hip fractures, but the associations depended on gender, age, and urbanization degree. This study could help in elucidating the complex effects on bone health by risk factors found in the environment.

  14. Validation of a 5-year risk score of hip fracture in postmenopausal women. The Danish Nurse Cohort Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hundrup, Y A; Jacobsen, R K; Andreasen, A H

    2010-01-01

    of 61.4%. INTRODUCTION: A new score based on data from the WHI has been designed to predict 5-year risk of hip fracture in postmenopausal women. The performance of the algorithm has not been validated in populations with different lifestyle characteristics and ethnicity. The aim of this study......We evaluated the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) hip fracture risk score in 15,648 postmenopausal Danish nurses. The algorithm was well calibrated for Denmark. However, the sensitivity was poor at common decision making thresholds. Obtaining sensitivity better than 80% led to a low specificity...... was to test the clinical performance of the algorithm in a large Danish cohort of postmenopausal Caucasian women against hip fracture. METHODS: The Danish Nurse Cohort is a prospective risk factor and hormone therapy (HT) study established in 1993. Participants in the present analysis were 15...

  15. Evaluating recovery following hip fracture: a qualitative interview study of what is important to patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Frances; Mason, Victoria; Boardman, Felicity; Dennick, Katherine; Haywood, Kirstie; Achten, Juul; Parsons, Nicholas; Griffin, Xavier; Costa, Matthew

    2015-01-06

    To explore what patients consider important when evaluating their recovery from hip fracture and to consider how these priorities could be used in the evaluation of the quality of hip fracture services. Semistructured interviews exploring the experience of recovery from hip fracture at two time points-4 weeks and 4 months postoperative hip fixation. Two approaches to analysis: thematic analysis of data specifically related to recovery from hip fracture; summarising the participant's experience overall. 31 participants were recruited, of whom 20 were women and 12 were cognitively impaired. Mean age was 81.5 years. Interviews were provided by 19 patients, 14 carers and 8 patient/carer dyad; 10 participants were interviewed twice. Single major trauma centre in the West Midlands of the UK. Stable mobility (without falls or fear of falls) for valued activities was considered most important by participants who had some prefracture mobility and were able to articulate what they valued during recovery. Mobility was important for managing personal care, for day-to-day activities such as shopping and gardening, and for maintenance of mental well-being. Some participants used assistive mobility devices or adapted to their limitations. Others maintained their previous limited function through increased care provision. Many participants were unable to articulate what they valued as hip fracture was perceived as part of their decline with age. The fracture and problems from other health conditions were an inseparable part of one health experience. Prefracture mobility, adaptations to reduced mobility before or after fracture, and whether or not patients perceive themselves to be declining with age influence what patients consider important during recovery from hip fracture. No single patient-reported outcome measure could evaluate quality of care for all patients following hip fracture. General health-related quality of life tools may provide useful information within

  16. Hip fractures in a tropical teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunlade, S O; Alonge, T O; Idowu, O E

    2003-03-01

    The pattern of hip fractures, treatment, outcome of treatment, and complications of forty-four consecutive patients treated over a five-year period were retrospectively studied. This represents 3.5% of the hospitalised patients in orthopaedic services. The male:female ratio was 1:1.3. Seventy percent of the fractures occurred in those over 65 years of age. The fractures were the result of low energy trauma in 81.8% of patients. Intracapsular (cervical) fractures accounted for 79.5% of the total cases. Only two patients had associated injuries on admission. Austin Moore hemiarthroplasty was the choice of hip replacement for intracapsular fractures, while ORIF (Open reduction and internal fixation using fixed angle blade plate) was done for patients with (extracapsular) trochanteric fractures. Anaesthesia (general or regional) was uneventful. Non-fatal pulmonary embolism occurred in one patient post-hemiarthroplasty while in the hospital. This study shows that hip fractures are not uncommon in our environment although far less common than what obtains in the Caucasians.

  17. Complications of hip fractures in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Feng-Chih; Kuo, Shu-Jui; Ko, Jih-Yang; Wong, To

    2011-01-01

    Hip fractures account for coxa vara in 3 (13%) and coxa valga in 2 (9%). There was no nonunion. Poor outcomes were related to the development of osteonecrosis. The time to surgery (≤ 12 hours) and the quality of reduction significantly influenced the occurrence of osteonecrosis. The occurrence and severity of femoral head osteonecrosis significantly influenced the functional results (p < 0.001, and p < 0.048, respectively). Osteonecrosis is the most severe complication after hip fractures in children and is associated with poor functional results. The time to surgery and the quality of reduction were the significant predictors in our study.

  18. Distribution of bone density in the proximal femur and its association with hip fracture risk in older men: the osteoporotic fractures in men (MrOS) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lang; Burton, Annabel C; Bradburn, Mike; Nielson, Carrie M; Orwoll, Eric S; Eastell, Richard

    2012-11-01

    This prospective case-cohort study aimed to map the distribution of bone density in the proximal femur and examine its association with hip fracture. We analyzed baseline quantitative computed tomography (QCT) scans in 250 men aged 65 years or older, which comprised a randomly-selected subcohort of 210 men and 40 cases of first hip fracture during a mean follow-up period of 5.5 years. We quantified cortical, trabecular, and integral volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD), and cortical thickness (CtTh) in four quadrants of cross-sections along the length of the femoral neck (FN), intertrochanter (IT), and trochanter (TR). In most quadrants, vBMDs and CtTh were significantly (p fracture, we merged the two quadrants in the medial and lateral aspects of the FN, IT, and TR. At most sites, QCT measurements were associated significantly (p fracture, the hazard ratio (HR) adjusted for age, body mass index (BMI), and clinical site for a 1-SD decrease ranged between 2.28 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.44-3.63) to 6.91 (95% CI, 3.11-15.53). After additional adjustment for total hip (TH) areal BMD (aBMD), trabecular vBMDs at the FN, TR, and TH were still associated with hip fracture significantly (p fracture significantly (p > 0.05) better than TH aBMD. With an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.901 (95% CI, 0.852-0.950), the regression model combining TH aBMD, age, and trabecular vBMD predicted hip fracture significantly (p fracture risk and highlight trabecular vBMD at the FN and TR as an independent risk factor. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  19. Anchorage strategies in geriatric hip fracture management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knobe Matthias

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available There is an enormous humanitarian and socioeconomic need to improve the quality and effectiveness of care for patients with hip fracture. To reduce mechanical complications in the osteosynthesis of proximal femoral fractures, improved fixation techniques have been developed including blade or screw-anchor devices, locked minimally invasive or cement augmentation strategies. However, despite numerous innovations and advances regarding implant design and surgical techniques, systemic and mechanical complication rates remain high. Treatment success depends on secure implant fixation in often-osteoporotic bone as well as on patient-specific factors (fracture stability, bone quality, comorbidity, and gender and surgeon-related factors (experience, correct reduction, and optimal screw placement in the head/neck fragment. For fracture fixation, the anchorage of the lag screw within the femoral head plays a crucial role depending on the implant’s design. Meta-analyses and randomized controlled studies demonstrate that there is a strong trend towards arthroplasty treating geriatric femoral neck fractures. However, for young adults as well as older patients with less compromised bone quality, or in undisplaced fractures, head-preserving therapy is preferred as it is less invasive and associated with good functional results. This review summarizes the evidence for the internal fixation of femoral neck fractures and trochanteric femoral fractures in elderly patients. In addition, biomechanical considerations regarding implant anchorage in the femoral head including rotation, migration, and femoral neck shortening are made. Finally, cement augmentation strategies for hip fracture implants are evaluated critically.

  20. Hip fractures. Epidemiology, risk factors, falls, energy absorption, hip protectors, and prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, J B

    1997-01-01

    with aging, but the time-trend in increasing age-specific incidence may not be a universal phenomenon. Postmenopausal women suffering earlier non-hip fractures have an increased risk of later hip fracture. The relative risk being highest within the first years following the fracture. Nursing home residents...... have a high risk of hip fracture (annual rate of 5-6%), and the incidence of falls is about 1,500 falls/1,000 persons/year. Most hip fractures are a result of a direct trauma against the hip. The incidence of falls on the hip among nursing home residents is about 290 falls/1,000 persons/year and about...... the hip may influence the risk of hip fracture, and being an important determinant for the development of hip fracture, maybe more important than bone strength. External hip protectors were developed and tested in an open randomised nursing home study. The rate of hip fractures was reduced by 50...

  1. Off-hours admission and quality of hip fracture care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Nina Sahlertz; Kristensen, Pia Kjær; Nørgård, Bente Mertz

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Higher risks of adverse outcomes have been reported for patients admitted acutely during off-hours. However, in relation to hip fracture, the evidence is inconsistent. We examined whether time of admission influenced compliance with performance measures, surgical delay and 30-day...... mortality in patients with hip fracture. DESIGN: Cohort study. SETTING: Data from The Danish Multidisciplinary Hip Fracture Registry linked with data from Danish National Registries. PARTICIPANTS: Danish patients undergoing hip fracture surgery, aged >65 years, admitted 1 March 2010 to 30 November 2013 (N...

  2. One-leg standing time and hip-fracture prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundin, H; Sääf, M; Strender, L-E; Nyren, S; Johansson, S-E; Salminen, H

    2014-04-01

    A hip fracture results in a lower quality of life and a cost of £30,000. In this study, one-leg standing time (OLST) had a negative linear relationship to the risk of a hip fracture. OLST could be a useful tool to assess the need for fracture-preventive interventions. A hip fracture immobilizes, restricts autonomy, shortens life expectancy, and results in a cost of £30,000 in the UK health care system. However, effective preventive treatments can be offered to high-risk individuals. Impaired postural balance is an important risk factor for hip fractures, and the aim of this study was to evaluate whether OLST can predict hip fractures in elderly women. FRAX is the most established fracture risk assessment tool worldwide and a secondary aim was to relate the predictive ability of OLST to that of FRAX in this population. Three hundred fifty-one women aged between 69 and 79 years were timed standing on one leg up to 30 s with eyes open and assessed with FRAX. Fracture data was obtained from registers. The main outcome, a hip fracture, occurred in 40 of the 351 participants (11.4%). The age-adjusted risk of a hip fracture was 5% lower with 1 s longer OLST (Hazard ratio 0.95, 95% CI 0.927-0.978). The relation between OLST and hip fracture risk was linear. Harrell's c was 0.60 for FRAX and 0.68 for OLST adjusted for age. With 1 s longer OLST, the risk of a hip fracture decreased significantly by 5%. This risk reduction was not explained by differences in the classic fracture risk factors included in FRAX. OLST had a predictive ability similar to FRAX. OLST is an easily performed balance test which may prove to be valuable in the assessment of hip fracture risk.

  3. The vertical hip fracture – a treatment challenge. A cohort study with an up to 9 year follow-up of 137 consecutive hips treated with sliding hip screw and antirotation screw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enocson Anders

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Femoral neck fractures with a vertical orientation have been associated with an increased risk for failure as they are both axial and rotational unstable and experience increased shear forces compared to the conventional and more horizontally oriented femoral neck fractures. The purpose of this study was to analyse outcome and risk factors for reoperation of these uncommon fractures. Methods A cohort study with a consecutive series of 137 hips suffering from a vertical hip fracture, treated with one method: a sliding hips screw with plate and an antirotation screw. Median follow-up time was 4.8 years. Reoperation data was validated against the National Board of Health and Welfare’s national registry using the unique Swedish personal identification number. Results The total reoperation rate was 18%. After multivariable Logistic regression analysis adjusting for possible confounding factors there was an increased risk for reoperation for displaced fractures (22% compared to undisplaced fractures (3%, and for fractures with poor implant position (38% compared to fractures with adequate implant position (15%. Conclusions The reoperation rate was high, and special attention should be given to achieve an appropriate position of the implant.

  4. After the fall: improving osteoporosis treatment following hip fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuiper, B W; Graybill, S; Tate, J M; Kaufman, N; Bersabe, D

    2018-02-20

    Osteoporotic hip fractures can be life changing and can increase mortality. Treatment of osteoporosis following hip fracture is often delayed. We began offering osteoporosis medication during hospitalization for hip fracture, dramatically increasing the number of patients meeting standard of care. Osteoporotic hip fracture is a debilitating condition with major morbidity and mortality implications. Osteoporosis medication given within 90 days of hip fracture improves mortality and reduces risk of future fractures. The aim of this project was to improve rates of timely osteoporosis treatment following fragility hip fracture. This was a two-step intervention utilizing the Plan-Do-Study-Act cycle, beginning with resident-focused education in cycle 1. In cycle 2, we offered osteoporosis medication to inpatients for hip fracture with help from a new electronic order set. Prior to this intervention, 32% of patients received osteoporosis medication within 90 days of fragility hip fracture; this improved to 81% after intervention. Resident education and an electronic order set dramatically improved the percentage of patients meeting standard of care with osteoporosis pharmacotherapy following fragility fracture.

  5. Predictors of Infective Outcomes Following Hip Fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J. Hotchen BMedSc (Hons, MBChB

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study sought to assess the value of differing pre-operative measures in prediction of post-operative non-surgical site infection (NSSI and length of hospital stay following hip fracture surgery. Methods: All patients admitted during a one year period with a hip fracture to our department were included in the study (n=207. Primary outcome measures were ten independent risk factors correlated to the development of non-surgical site infection following surgery for hip fracture. Secondary outcome measures were duration of hospital stay and inpatient mortality. Results: The patients who had severe cognitive impairment had a 71.0% risk of developing non-surgical site infection. Patients who had multiple medical co-morbidities also had increased risk of developing non-surgical site infection at 59.1%. Patients who developed NSSI on average stayed in hospital 13.1 days longer than patients who did not (31.6 vs. 18.5, p < .001. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the importance of reducing post-operative infection in hip fracture patients in view of reducing morbidity, mortality and cost. These patients can be stratified by risk factors and interventions can be employed in view of reducing inpatient post-operative infection rates in this cohort.

  6. Pre-fracture nutritional status is predictive of functional status at discharge during the acute phase with hip fracture patients: A multicenter prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Tatsuro; Misu, Syogo; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Sakamoto, Hiroki; Iwata, Kentaro; Chuman, Yuki; Ono, Rei

    2017-10-01

    Malnutrition is common in patients with hip fractures, and elderly patients with hip fractures lose functional independence and often fail to recover previous functional status. The aim of this study was to determine whether pre-fracture nutritional status predicts functional status of patients with hip fracture at discharge from acute hospitals. In the present multicenter prospective cohort study, pre-fracture nutritional status was assessed using the Mini Nutritional Assessment Short-Form (MNA-SF). At discharge from acute hospitals, functional status was evaluated using a functional independent measurement instrument (FIM). Subsequently, multiple regression analyses were performed using FIM as the dependent variable and MNA-SF as the independent variable. Among the 204 patients analyzed in the present study, the mean length of hospital stay was 26.2 ± 12.6 days, and according to MNA-SF assessments, 51 (25.0%) patients were malnourished, 98 (48.0%) were at risk of malnutrition, and 55 (27.0%) were well-nourished before fracture. At discharge, FIM scores were higher in patients who were well-nourished than in those who were malnourished or were at risk of malnutrition (p nutritional status was a significant independent predictor for functional status at discharge during the acute phase, warranting early assessment of nutritional status and early intervention for successful postoperative rehabilitation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  7. Concomitant hip and distal radius fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Pin Lin

    2015-05-01

    Conclusion: Concomitant hip and distal radius fractures were generally ipsilateral and involved the femoral neck after a backward fall. These patients were younger than and not more osteoporotic than the population with isolated hip fractures; however, the hospital stay was significantly increased. The functional outcome was not influenced by concomitant wrist fracture.

  8. Facts and fiction in hip fracture treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Embden, Daphne van

    2016-01-01

    As the number of hip fracture patients has increased dramatically over the years, the need for high quality, multidisciplinary and patient centred fracture treatment continues to grow. The first aim of this thesis is to provide better understanding of fracture patterns and classification in hip

  9. [Effects of long-term fluoride in drinking water on risks of hip fracture of the elderly: an ecologic study based on database of hospitalization episodes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun Young; Hwang, Seung Sik; Kim, Jai Yong; Cho, Soo Hun

    2008-05-01

    Fluoridation of drinking water is known to decrease dental caries, particularly in children. However, the effects of fluoridated water on bone over several decades are still in controversy. To assess the risk of hip fracture related to water fluoridation, we evaluated the hip fracture-related hospitalizations of the elderly between a fluoridated city and non-fluoridated cities in Korea. Cheongju as a fluoridated area and Chungju, Chuncheon, Suwon, Wonju as non-fluoridated areas were chosen for the study. We established a database of hip fracture hospitalization episode based on the claims data submitted to the Health Insurance Review Agency from January 1995 to December 2002. The hip fracture hospitalization episodes that satisfied the conditions were those that occurred in patients over 65 years old, the injuries had a hip fracture code (ICD-9 820, ICD-10 S72) and the patients were hospitalized for at least 7days. A total of 80,558 cases of hip fracture hospitalization episodes were analyzed. The admission rates for hip fracture increased with the age of the men and women in both a fluoridated city and the non-fluoridated cities (pfluoridated city and the nonfluoridated cities. We cannot conclude that fluoridation of drinking water increases the risk of hip fracture in the elderly.

  10. Exposure to Fluoride in Drinking Water and Hip Fracture Risk: A Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xin-Hai; Huang, Guang-Lei; Lin, Du-Ren; Wan, Cheng-Cheng; Wang, Ya-Dong; Song, Ju-Kun; Xu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Background Many observational studies have shown that exposure to fluoride in drinking water is associated with hip fracture risk. However, the findings are varied or even contradictory. In this work, we performed a meta-analysis to assess the relationship between fluoride exposure and hip fracture risk. Methods PubMed and EMBASE databases were searched to identify relevant observational studies from the time of inception until March 2014 without restrictions. Data from the included studies were extracted and analyzed by two authors. Summary relative risks (RRs) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were pooled using random- or fixed-effects models as appropriate. Sensitivity analyses and meta-regression were conducted to explore possible explanations for heterogeneity. Finally, publication bias was assessed. Results Fourteen observational studies involving thirteen cohort studies and one case-control study were included in the meta-analysis. Exposure to fluoride in drinking water does not significantly increase the incidence of hip fracture (RRs, 1.05; 95% CIs, 0.96–1.15). Sensitivity analyses based on adjustment for covariates, effect measure, country, sex, sample size, quality of Newcastle–Ottawa Scale scores, and follow-up period validated the strength of the results. Meta-regression showed that country, gender, quality of Newcastle–Ottawa Scale scores, adjustment for covariates and sample size were not sources of heterogeneity. Little evidence of publication bias was observed. Conclusion The present meta-analysis suggests that chronic fluoride exposure from drinking water does not significantly increase the risk of hip fracture. Given the potential confounding factors and exposure misclassification, further large-scale, high-quality studies are needed to evaluate the association between exposure to fluoride in drinking water and hip fracture risk. PMID:26020536

  11. Decreasing incidence of hip fracture in the Funen County, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nymark, Tine; Lauritsen, Jens; Ovesen, Ole

    2006-01-01

    Hip fracture incidence rates are high, and increase with increasing age. Previous studies have predicted a continued increase in both crude and age-standardized rates.......Hip fracture incidence rates are high, and increase with increasing age. Previous studies have predicted a continued increase in both crude and age-standardized rates....

  12. Contemporary risk of hip fracture in type 1 and type 2 diabetes: a national registry study from Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hothersall, Eleanor J; Livingstone, Shona J; Looker, Helen C; Ahmed, S Faisal; Cleland, Steve; Leese, Graham P; Lindsay, Robert S; McKnight, John; Pearson, Donald; Philip, Sam; Wild, Sarah H; Colhoun, Helen M

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare contemporary risk of hip fracture in type 1 and type 2 diabetes with the nondiabetic population. Using a national diabetes database, we identified those with type 1 and type 2 diabetes who were aged 20 to 84 years and alive anytime from January 1, 2005 to December 31, 2007. All hospitalized events for hip fracture in 2005 to 2007 for diabetes patients were linked and compared with general population counts. Age- and calendar-year-adjusted incidence rate ratios were calculated by diabetes type and sex. One hundred five hip fractures occurred in 21,033 people (59,585 person-years) with type 1 diabetes; 1421 in 180,841 people (462,120 person-years) with type 2 diabetes; and 11,733 hip fractures over 10,980,599 person-years in the nondiabetic population (3.66 million people). Those with type 1 diabetes had substantially elevated risks of hip fracture compared with the general population incidence risk ratio (IRR) of 3.28 (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.52-4.26) in men and 3.54 (CI 2.75-4.57) in women. The IRR was greater at younger ages, but absolute risk difference was greatest at older ages. In type 2 diabetes, there was no elevation in risk among men (IRR 0.97 [CI 0.92-1.02]) and the increase in risk in women was small (IRR 1.05 [CI 1.01-1.10]). There remains a substantial elevation relative risk of hip fracture in people with type 1 diabetes, but the relative risk is much lower than in earlier studies. In contrast, there is currently little elevation in overall hip fracture risk with type 2 diabetes, but this may mask elevations in risk in particular subgroups of type 2 diabetes patients with different body mass indexes, diabetes duration, or drug exposure. © 2014 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  13. Plasma dimethylglycine, nicotine exposure and risk of low bone mineral density and hip fracture: the Hordaland Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Øyen, J; Svingen, G F T; Gjesdal, C G; Tell, G S; Ueland, P M; Lysne, V; Apalset, E M; Meyer, K; Vollset, S E; Nygård, O K

    2015-05-01

    In the large community-based Hordaland Health Study, low plasma dimethylglycine was associated with low bone mineral density in both middle-aged and elderly subjects and to an increased risk of subsequent hip fracture among the elderly. These associations seemed to be particularly strong among subjects exposed to nicotine. Dimethylglycine (DMG) is a product of the choline oxidation pathway and formed from betaine during the folate-independent remethylation of homocysteine (Hcy) to methionine. Elevated plasma DMG levels are associated with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and inflammation, which in turn are related to osteoporosis. High plasma total Hcy and low plasma choline are associated with low bone mineral density (BMD) and hip fractures, but the role of plasma DMG in bone health is unknown. We studied the associations of plasma DMG with BMD among 5315 participants (46-49 and 71-74 years old) and with hip fracture among 3310 participants (71-74 years old) enrolled in the Hordaland Health Study. In age and sex-adjusted logistic regression models, subjects in the lowest versus highest DMG tertile were more likely to have low BMD (odds ratio [OR] 1.68, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.43-1.99). The association was stronger in participants exposed compared to those unexposed to nicotine (OR 2.31, 95% CI 1.73-3.07 and OR 1.43, 95% CI 1.16-1.75, respectively, p interaction = 0.008). In the older cohort, Cox regression analyses adjusted for sex showed that low plasma DMG was associated with an increased risk of hip fracture (hazard ratio [HR] 1.70, 95% CI 1.28-2.26). A trend toward an even higher risk was found among women exposed to nicotine (HR 3.41, 95% CI 1.40-8.28). Low plasma DMG was associated with low BMD and increased risk of hip fractures. A potential effect modification by nicotine exposure merits particular attention.

  14. Risk factors for mortality in geriatric hip fractures: a compressional study of different surgical procedures in 785 consecutive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercin, Ersin; Bilgili, M Gokhan; Sari, Cihangir; Basaran, S Hakan; Tanriverdi, Bulent; Edipoglu, Erdem; Celen, K Mumtaz; Cetingok, Halil; Kural, Cemal

    2017-01-01

    Only a little is known about whether type of surgical intervention has an effect on mortality of these patients. Our primary objective was to assess whether different type of surgical procedures has an effect on mortality among elderly patients with hip fracture. A secondary objective was to examine factors that are related to mortality in our patient population. Our hypothesis is that type of surgical procedure, especially external fixation, should have an influence on mortality outcomes. We included 785 patients age 65 years or older, with hip fractures. Operative treatment consisted of external fixation, internal fixation, total hip arthroplasty and hip hemiarthroplasty. Age, gender, type of fracture, type of surgery performed, American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) grade, clinical comorbidities, anesthesia type, blood transfusion requirement, time to surgery, intensive care unit requirement, operation length and length of hospital stay and number of comorbidities were documented. During the study period, 785 patients (262 male, 523 female) were included to study, Overall mortality rate was 37.2 % (292/785). Their age ranged between 65 and 100 years (mean 81). Surgery type Kaplan-Meier cumulative mortality curves suggested no significant difference between four different types of surgery groups (p = 0.064). Transfusion requirement was significantly lower in external fixation group comparing to other groups (p = 0.014). Cox regression analysis showed the number of comorbidities 2 and ≥ 3 (p = 0.0027, p = 0.015), transfusion requirement (p = 0.0001), ASA 4 (p = 0.016) to be significant predictors of mortality. Transfusion requirement, ASA grade 4 and having more than two comorbidities are risk factors for mortality in geriatric hip fractures. Type of surgical intervention and fracture type had similar mortality rates in our patient population.

  15. Odds ratios for hip- and lower forearm fracture using peripheral bone densitometry; a case-control study of postmenopausal women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saleh, M M A; Jørgensen, H L; Lauritzen, J B

    2002-01-01

    concern when using peripheral densitometry is the poor correlation with the central measurements. The main aim of this study is, therefore, to assess the possibility of expressing ultrasound measurements at the heel and bone mineral density (BMD) measured at the distal forearm as fracture odds ratios...... rather than an absolute measure of bone mass. METHODS: A total of 76 women with lower forearm fracture, 47 women with hip fracture and 231 age-matched women (controls) were included. All had broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA) and speed of sound (SOS) measured at the heel using the DTU-one ultrasound...... scanner as well as BMD measured by dual X-ray absorptiometry on the DTX-200 at the distal forearm. RESULTS: BUA, SOS and BMD at the distal forearm were all significantly lower in fracture patients compared with their respective control groups. The odds ratio for lower forearm fracture was 3.1 (95% CI: 1...

  16. Anaemia impedes functional mobility after hip fracture surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, N.B.; Kristensen, M.T.; Kehlet, H.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: the impact of anaemia on the outcome after a hip fracture surgery is controversial, but anaemia can potentially decrease the physical performance and thereby impede post-operative rehabilitation. We therefore conducted a prospective study to establish whether anaemia affected functional...... mobility in the early post-operative phase after a hip fracture surgery. PATIENTS AND METHODS: four hundred and eighty seven consecutive hip fracture patients, treated according to a well-defined multimodal rehabilitation programme with a uniform, liberal transfusion threshold, were studied. Hb...... mobility in the early post-operative phase after a hip fracture surgery and is an independent risk factor for patients not being able to walk post-operatively. The potential for a liberal transfusion policy to improve the rehabilitation potential in hip fracture patients with anaemia should be investigated...

  17. Orthogeriatric Service Reduces Mortality in Patients With Hip Fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenqvist, Charlotte; Madsen, Christian Medom; Riis, Troels

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Orthogeriatric service has been shown to improve outcomes in patients with hip fracture. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of orthogeriatrics at Bispebjerg University Hospital, Denmark. The primary outcome is mortality inhospital and after 1, 3, and 12 months...... for patients with hip fracture. The secondary outcome is mortality for home dwellers and nursing home inhabitants. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This is a retrospective clinical cohort study with an historic control group including all patients with hip fracture admitted from 2007 to 2011. Patients with hip fracture...... = .009) after orthogeriatrics. However, when adjusting for age, gender, and American Society of Anaesthesiologists (ASA) score in a multivariate analysis, including all patients with hip fracture, we find significantly reduced mortality inhospital (odds ratio [OR] 0.35), after 30 [OR 0.66] and 90 days...

  18. Post-operative rounds by anaesthesiologists after hip fracture surgery: a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Nicolai Bang; Christensen, Dorte Stig; Krasheninnikoff, Michael

    2006-01-01

    a multidisciplinary effort between anaesthesiologists and orthopaedic surgeons. METHODS: During the first 25 weeks of 2004, 98 consecutive community-residing patients admitted to a hip fracture unit received daily rounds by anaesthesiologists during the first four post-operative days, on weekdays only, focusing...... in the intervention group (P = 0.02). There was no significant difference between post-operative morbidity and hospital stay in the control and intervention groups; in-hospital mortality was 12% in the control group and 7% in the intervention group (P = 0.24). The rounds by anaesthesiologists improved nursing care......BACKGROUND: Efforts to optimize the peri-operative care of hip fracture patients through multidisciplinary intervention have focused on orthopaedic-geriatric liaisons, which have not resulted in significant outcome changes. The early phase of rehabilitation could potentially be optimized through...

  19. Readmission Within 30 Days of Discharge After Hip Fracture Care

    OpenAIRE

    Pollock, Frederic H.; Bethea, Audis; Samanta, Damayanti; Modak, Asmita; Maurer, James P.; Chumbe, Julton Tomanguillo

    2015-01-01

    The Affordable Care Act currently requires hospitals to report 30-day readmission rates for certain medical conditions. It has been suggested that surveillance will expand to include hip and knee surgery-related readmissions in the future. To ensure quality of care and avoid penalties, readmissions related to hip fractures require further investigation. The goal of this study was to evaluate factors associated with 30-day hospital readmission after hip fracture at a level I trauma center. Thi...

  20. Proximal femoral bone geometry in osteoporotic hip fractures in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    A number of different bone geometries have been reported to be correlated with osteoporosis, bone mineral density and fractures. Those correlations are used for diagnosis, treatment and prediction of fracture risk in osteoporosis cases. However there have been no studies of significant bone parameters predicting osteoporosis and hip fracture in Thailand To evaluate the correlation between geometric parameters of the proximal femur and both the Singh index and bone mineral density as well as to investigate the relationship between those two metrics and osteoporotic hip fracture in the Thai population. Forty-four Thai patients with osteoporotic hip fractures andforty-five healthy Thai people matched for age and gender were included in the present study. Bone mineral density and bone geometry from plain hip radiographs of non-fracture sites in the fracture group and proximal femur radiographs of the same site in the healthy group were measured That data were analyzed to determine levels of correlation. Bone geometries were also analyzed to determine hip fracture predictive capacity. Correlation between the Singh index and bone mineral density was significant (p hip fracture (p = 0.014 and p = 0.035, respectively). Each 1 mm reduction in the width of the femoral medial neck cortex increased the osteoporotic hip fracture risk by a factor of 2.7 (OR = 0.37, 95% CI = 0.15-0.93). In the Thai population, bone geometry from plain radiographs can help predict the risk of osteoporotic hip fracture. Osteoporosis is correlated with a low Singh index value. The width of the femoral medial neck cortex is a reliable predictor of hip fracture risk.

  1. High prevalence of simultaneous rib and vertebral fractures in patients with hip fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bong-Gun; Sung, Yoon-Kyoung; Kim, Dam; Choi, Yun Young; Kim, Hunchul; Kim, Yeesuk

    2017-02-01

    The purpose was to evaluate the prevalence and location of simultaneous fracture using bone scans in patients with hip fracture and to determine the risk factors associated with simultaneous fracture. One hundred eighty two patients with hip fracture were reviewed for this study. Clinical parameters and bone mineral density (BMD) of the lumbar vertebra and femoral neck were investigated. To identify acute simultaneous fracture, a bone scan was performed at 15.4±4.1days after hip fracture. The prevalence and location of simultaneous fracture were evaluated, and multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the risk factors. Simultaneous fracture was observed in 102 of 182 patients, a prevalence of 56.0%. Rib fracture was the most common type of simultaneous fracture followed by rib with vertebral fracture. The BMD of the lumbar vertebra was significantly lower in patients with simultaneous fracture (p=0.044) and was identified as an independent risk factor (odds ratio: OR 0.05, 95% confidence interval: CI 0.01-0.57). The prevalence of simultaneous fracture was relatively high among patients with hip fracture, and BMD was significantly lower in patients with simultaneous fracture than in patients without it. Surgeons should be aware of the possibility of simultaneous fracture in patients with hip fracture. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Association of Increased Urinary Albumin With Risk of Incident Clinical Fracture and Rate of Hip Bone Loss: the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Howard A; Vo, Tien N; Langsetmo, Lisa; Barzilay, Joshua I; Cauley, Jane A; Schousboe, John T; Orwoll, Eric S; Canales, Muna T; Ishani, Areef; Lane, Nancy E; Ensrud, Kristine E

    2017-05-01

    Prior studies suggest that increased urine albumin is associated with a heightened fracture risk in women, but results in men are unclear. We used data from Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS), a prospective cohort study of community-dwelling men aged ≥65 years, to evaluate the association of increased urine albumin with subsequent fractures and annualized rate of hip bone loss. We calculated albumin/creatinine ratio (ACR) from urine collected at the 2003-2005 visit. Subsequent clinical fractures were ascertained from triannual questionnaires and centrally adjudicated by review of radiographic reports. Total hip BMD was measured by DXA at the 2003-2005 visit and again an average of 3.5 years later. We estimated risk of incident clinical fracture using Cox proportional hazards models, and annualized BMD change using ANCOVA. Of 2982 men with calculable ACR, 9.4% had ACR ≥30 mg/g (albuminuria) and 1.0% had ACR ≥300 mg/g (macroalbuminuria). During a mean of 8.7 years of follow-up, 20.0% of men had an incident clinical fracture. In multivariate-adjusted models, neither higher ACR quintile (p for trend 0.75) nor albuminuria (HR versus no albuminuria, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.65 to 1.20) was associated with increased risk of incident clinical fracture. Increased urine albumin had a borderline significant, multivariate-adjusted, positive association with rate of total hip bone loss when modeled in ACR quintiles (p = 0.06), but not when modeled as albuminuria versus no albuminuria. Macroalbuminuria was associated with a higher rate of annualized hip bone loss compared to no albuminuria (-1.8% more annualized loss than in men with ACR fracture associations. In these community-dwelling older men, we found no association between urine albumin levels and risk of incident clinical fracture, but found a borderline significant, positive association with rate of hip bone loss. © 2016 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. © 2016 American Society for Bone and

  3. Evaluation of the effect of a comprehensive multidisciplinary care pathway for hip fractures: design of a controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flikweert, Elvira R; Izaks, Gerbrand J; Reininga, Inge H F; Wendt, Klaus W; Stevens, Martin

    2013-10-12

    Hip fractures constitute an economic burden on healthcare resources. Most persons with a hip fracture undergo surgery. As morbidity and mortality rates are high, perioperative care leaves room for improvement. Improvement can be achieved if it is organized in comprehensive care pathways, but the effectiveness of these pathways is not yet clear. Hence the objective of this study is to compare the clinical effectiveness of a comprehensive care pathway with care as usual on self-reported limitations in Activities of Daily Living. A controlled trial will be conducted in which the comprehensive care pathway of University Medical Center Groningen will be compared with care as usual in two other, nonacademic, hospitals. In this trial, propensity scores will be used to adjust for differences at baseline between the intervention and control group. Propensity scores can be used in intervention studies where a classical randomized controlled trial is not feasible. Patients aged 60 years and older will be included. The hypothesis is that 15% more patients at University Medical Center Groningen compared with patients in the care-as-usual condition will have recovered at least as well at 6 months follow-up to pre-fracture levels for Activities of Daily Living. This study will yield new knowledge with respect to the clinical effectiveness of a comprehensive care pathway for the treatment of hip fractures. This is relevant because of the growing incidence of hip fractures and the consequent massive burden on the healthcare system. Additionally, this study will contribute to the growing knowledge of the application of propensity scores, a relatively novel statistical technique to simulate a randomized controlled trial in studies where it is not possible or difficult to execute this kind of design. Nederlands Trial Register NTR3171.

  4. Health-related quality of life after surgery for hip fracture: a multicentric study in Mexican population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esperanza Ramírez-Pérez

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Hip fractures are an important cause of morbidity and mortality and one of the main causes of disability in the older population. The lifetime risk for any type of osteoporotic fracture is very high and falls within the range of 40–50% in women and 13–22% for men. In Mexico, the lifetime likelihood of having a hip fracture at 50 years of age is 8.5% in Mexican women and 3.8% in Mexican men, but this is expected to rise in upcoming years. AIM This study aims to report the Health-Related Quality of Life over the first six months after a hip fracture in two public and two private tertiary care hospitals in Mexico City. METHOD Changes over time were evaluated through visual observation of each patient’s development trajectory using the graphic representation of the EQ-5D global score. The trajectories were grouped by affinity into five levels of progress according to clinical course. The identified descriptive options were analyzed using the multinomial logistic regression model (LR. RESULTS One-hundred-and-thirty-six (136 patients with a hip fracture were followed after surgery. Their mean age was 77 ± 10 years. During the first month, mobility, daily activities, and self-care were the most affected. The group aged between 80 and 84 years reported extreme problems regarding anxiety and depression (21%, and those aged between 50 and 74 years described having issues concerning pain and discomfort (27%. At the 6-month follow-up, only those aged > 85 years of age showed worsening of their condition, a high proportion of these ranking at level 3 in mobility, self-care, and anxiety/depression. Toward the end of the follow-up period, this last group reported having extreme problems (being unable to carry out everyday activities and worsening of their mobility (9.2% (inability to walk about (LR test, p = 0.06. DISCUSSION Patients with hip fracture showed difficulties in different areas during the first month after surgery, with steady

  5. An osteoprotegerin gene polymorphism is associated with an increased risk of hip fracture in Japanese patients with rheumatoid arthritis: results from the IORRA Observational Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji Yoshida

    Full Text Available Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA have a higher prevalence of osteoporosis and hip fracture than healthy individuals. Multiple genetic loci for osteoporotic fracture were identified in recent genome-wide association studies. The purpose of this study was to identify genetic variants associated with the occurrence of hip fracture in Japanese patients with RA.DNA samples from 2,282 Japanese patients with RA were obtained from the DNA collection of the Institute of Rheumatology Rheumatoid Arthritis cohort (IORRA study. Six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs that have been reported to be associated with fractures in recent studies were selected and genotyped. Forty hip fractures were identified with a maximum follow-up of 10 years. The genetic risk for hip fracture was examined using a multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression model.The risk analyses revealed that patients who are homozygous for the major allele of SNP rs6993813, in the OPG locus, have a higher risk for hip fracture (hazard ratio [95% CI] = 2.53 [1.29-4.95], P = 0.0067. No association was found for the other SNPs.Our results indicate that an OPG allele is associated with increased risk for hip fracture in Japanese patients with RA.

  6. The risk of second hip fracture is decreased with compliant and persistent use of bisphosphonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Louise; Vestergaard, Peter; Petersen, Karin Dam

    BACKGROUND: Osteoporotic fractures are characterized as fractures of the hip, spine, and forearm resulting from low energy trauma. In Denmark, hip fracture is the second most prevalent fracture in persons above 50 years of age, with an estimated incidence of 5 per 1000 inhabitants in 2011. Patients...... experience a 19% increased mortality within the first year following hip fractures. Furthermore, studies have shown that within 10 years after first hip fracture 40% will experience another hip fracture. The risk for second hip fracture is markedly increased, initiating at a relative risk of 11.8 within...... the first month after fracture and does not normalise until 15 years later. Fracture prevention programs have focused on identifying patients at risk of secondary low energy trauma fractures. The secondary prevention programs for fractures begin immediately after the first fracture, through identification...

  7. The fall descriptions and health characteristics of older adults with hip fracture: a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavy, Breiffni; Byberg, Liisa; Michaëlsson, Karl; Melhus, Håkan; Åberg, Anna Cristina

    2015-04-08

    In light of the multifactorial etiology of fall-related hip fracture, knowledge of fall circumstances may be especially valuable when placed in the context of the health of the person who falls. We aimed to investigate the circumstances surrounding fall-related hip fractures and to describe fall circumstances in relation to participants' health and functional characteristics. The fall circumstances of 125 individuals (age ≥ 50 years) with hip fracture were investigated using semi-structured interviews. Data concerning participants' health (comorbidities and medications) and function (self-reported performance of mobility, balance, personal activities of daily living and physical activity, previous falls and hand grip strength) were collected via medical records, questionnaires and dynamometry. Using a mixed methods design, both data sets were analysed separately and then merged in order to provide a comprehensive description of fall events and identify eventual patterns in the data. Fall circumstances were described as i) Activity at the time of the fall: Positional change (n = 24, 19%); Standing (n = 16, 13%); Walking (n =71, 57%); Balance challenging (n = 14, 11%) and ii) Nature of the fall: Environmental (n = 32, 26%); Physiological (n = 35, 28%); Activity-related indoor (n = 8, 6%) and outdoor (n = 8, 6%); Trips and slips on snow (n = 20, 16%) and in snow-free conditions (n = 12, 10%) and Unknown (n = 10, 8%). We observed the following patterns regarding fall circumstances and participants' health: those who fell i) during positional change had the poorest functional status; ii) due to environmental reasons (indoors) had moderate physical function, but high levels of comorbidity and fall risk increasing medications; iii) in snow-free environments (outdoors) appeared to have a poorer health and functional status than other outdoor groups. Our findings indicate that patterns exist in relation to the falls circumstances and health characteristics of people with

  8. Pressure ulcer risk in hip fracture patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houwing, R. H.; Rozendaal, M; Wouters-Wesseling, W; Buskens, E.; Keller, P; Haalboom, JRE

    Hip fracture patients have a high risk of pressure ulcers (PU). We followed 121 hip fracture patients for the development of pressure ulcers and evaluated a risk assessment tool for sensitivity and specificity. More than half of the patients presented with PU, mostly stage I. Risk factors for PU

  9. The influence of renal dialysis and hip fracture sites on the 10-year mortality of elderly hip fracture patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Li-Wei; Hwang, Yi-Ting; Huang, Guey-Shiun; Liang, Cheng-Chih; Lin, Jinn

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Hip fractures in older people requiring dialysis are associated with high mortality. Our study primarily aimed to evaluate the specific burden of dialysis on the mortality rate following hip fracture. The secondary aim was to clarify the effect of the fracture site on mortality. A retrospective cohort study was conducted using Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database to analyze nationwide health data regarding dialysis and non-dialysis patients ≥65 years who sustained a first fragility-related hip fracture during the period from 2001 to 2005. Each dialysis hip fracture patient was age- and sex-matched to 5 non-dialysis hip fracture patients to construct the matched cohort. Survival status of patients was followed-up until death or the end of 2011. Survival analyses using multivariate Cox proportional hazards models and the Kaplan-Meier estimator were performed to compare between-group survival and impact of hip fracture sites on mortality. A total of 61,346 hip fracture patients were included nationwide. Among them, 997 dialysis hip fracture patients were identified and matched to 4985 non-dialysis hip fracture patients. Mortality events were 155, 188, 464, and 103 in the dialysis group, and 314, 382, 1505, and 284 in the non-dialysis group, with adjusted hazard ratios (associated 95% confidence intervals) of 2.58 (2.13–3.13), 2.95 (2.48–3.51), 2.84 (2.55–3.15), and 2.39 (1.94–2.93) at 0 to 3 months, 3 months to 1 year, 1 to 6 years, and 6 to 10 years after the fracture, respectively. In the non-dialysis group, survival was consistently better for patients who sustained femoral neck fractures compared to trochanteric fractures (0–10 years’ log-rank test, P fractures was better than that of patients with trochanteric fractures only within the first 6 years post-fracture (0–6 years’ log-rank, P hip fracture patients. Survival outcome was better for non-dialysis patients with femoral neck fractures compared to those with

  10. The incidence of hip, forearm, humeral, ankle, and vertebral fragility fractures in Italy: results from a 3-year multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarantino, Umberto; Capone, Antonio; Planta, Marco; D'Arienzo, Michele; Letizia Mauro, Giulia; Impagliazzo, Angelo; Formica, Alessandro; Pallotta, Francesco; Patella, Vittorio; Spinarelli, Antonio; Pazzaglia, Ugo; Zarattini, Guido; Roselli, Mauro; Montanari, Giuseppina; Sessa, Giuseppe; Privitera, Marco; Verdoia, Cesare; Corradini, Costantino; Feola, Maurizio; Padolino, Antonio; Saturnino, Luca; Scialdoni, Alessandro; Rao, Cecilia; Iolascon, Giovanni; Brandi, Maria Luisa; Piscitelli, Prisco

    2010-01-01

    We aimed to assess the incidence and hospitalization rate of hip and "minor" fragility fractures in the Italian population. We carried out a 3-year survey at 10 major Italian emergency departments to evaluate the hospitalization rate of hip, forearm, humeral, ankle, and vertebral fragility fractures in people 45 years or older between 2004 and 2006, both men and women. These data were compared with those recorded in the national hospitalizations database (SDO) to assess the overall incidence of fragility fractures occurring at hip and other sites, including also those events not resulting in hospital admissions. We observed 29,017 fractures across 3 years, with hospitalization rates of 93.0% for hip fractures, 36.3% for humeral fractures, 31.3% for ankle fractures, 22.6% for forearm/wrist fractures, and 27.6% for clinical vertebral fractures. According to the analyses performed with the Italian hospitalization database in year 2006, we estimated an annual incidence of 87,000 hip, 48,000 humeral, 36,000 ankle, 85,000 wrist, and 155,000 vertebral fragility fractures in people aged 45 years or older (thus resulting in almost 410,000 new fractures per year). Clinical vertebral fractures were recorded in 47,000 events per year. The burden of fragility fractures in the Italian population is very high and calls for effective preventive strategies.

  11. Low risk for hip fracture and high risk for hip arthroplasty due to osteoarthritis among Swedish farmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, H; Hongslo Vala, C; Odén, A; Lorentzon, M; McCloskey, E; Kanis, J A; Harvey, N C; Ohlsson, C; Stefan Lohmander, L; Kärrholm, J; Mellström, D

    2018-01-12

    We aimed to study the risk of hip fracture and risk of hip arthroplasty among farmers in Sweden. Our results indicate that farming, representing an occupation with high physical activity, in men is associated with a lower risk of hip fracture but an increased risk of hip arthroplasty. The risks of hip fracture and hip arthroplasty are influenced by factors including socioeconomic status, education, urbanization, latitude of residence, and physical activity. Farming is an occupation encompassing rural living and high level of physical activity. Therefore, we aimed to study the risk of hip fracture and risk of hip arthroplasty among farmers in Sweden. We studied the risk of hip fracture, and hip arthroplasty due to primary osteoarthritis, in all men and women aged 35 years or more in Sweden between 1987 and 2002. Documented occupations were available in 3.5 million individuals, of whom 97,136 were farmers. The effects of age, sex, income, education, location of residence, and occupation on risk of hip fracture or hip arthroplasty were examined using a modification of Poisson regression. A total of 4027 farmers and 93,109 individuals with other occupations sustained a hip fracture, while 5349 farmers and 63,473 others underwent a hip arthroplasty. Risk of hip fracture was higher with greater age, lower income, lower education, higher latitude, and urban area for all men and women. Compared to all other occupations, male farmers had a 20% lower age-adjusted risk of hip fracture (hazard ratio (HR) 0.80, 95%CI 0.77-0.84), an effect that was not seen in female farmers (HR 0.96, 95% CI 0.91-1.01). Both male and female farmers had a higher age-adjusted risk for hip arthroplasty. Our results indicate that farming, representing an occupation with high physical activity, in men is associated with a lower risk of hip fracture but an increased risk of hip arthroplasty.

  12. Intertrochanteric fracture under an arthrodesed hip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwish, Fayeq M; Haddad, Walid

    2013-01-01

    Female, 30. Intertrochanteric fracture under an arthrodesed hip. Developmental dysplasia of the hip. Pain • inability to walk. Open reduction and internal fixation. Orthopedics and traumatology. Rare disease, Unusual setting of medical care. An intertrochanteric fracture among elderly people is common, but it is rare to see such a fracture under a longstanding hip arthrodesis. Its surgical management represents a real challenge to orthopedic surgeons. A 30-year-old female teacher with long-standing hip arthrodesis was involved in a traffic accident. Clinical and radiological examination revealed the presence of a displaced intertrochanteric fracture under an arthrodesed hip and high neck shaft angle. Before embarking on surgery, we have to consider many factors such as patient personality (a young active and ambitious woman) and the mature of the fracture (a displaced fracture, coxa valga, and atrophied muscles). After a deep discussion and evaluation of the available devices, we selected a heavy duty locked plate and cannulated screws to fix the fracture. Because of the rarity of intertrochanteric fracture under an arthrodesis hip, the proper surgical treatment is controversial. Nevertheless, we were fortunate in successfully treating this unusual fracture using a locked plate and cannulated screws, which are implants that can be useful in treatment of such fractures.

  13. Increased cortical porosity in women with hip fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundh, D; Nilsson, A G; Nilsson, M; Johansson, L; Mellström, D; Lorentzon, M

    2017-05-01

    Hip fractures cause increased mortality and disability and consume enormous healthcare resources. Only 46% of hip fracture patients have osteoporosis at the total hip according to dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) measurement. Cortical porosity increases with ageing and is believed to be important for bone strength. To investigate whether older women with hip fracture have higher cortical porosity than controls, and if so whether this difference is independent of clinical risk factors and areal bone mineral density (aBMD). From an ongoing population-based study, we identified 46 women with a prevalent X-ray-verified hip fracture and 361 control subjects without any fractures. aBMD was measured with DXA. High-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography was used to measure bone microstructure at the standard (ultradistal) site and at 14% (distal) of the tibial length. Women with a previous hip fracture had lower aBMD at the femoral neck (-11.8%) and total hip (-14.6%) as well as higher cortical porosity at the ultradistal (32.1%) and distal (29.3%) tibia compared with controls. In multivariable logistic regression analysis, with adjustment for covariates (age, height, weight, smoking, calcium intake, physical activity, walk time, oral glucocorticoids, parental hip fracture, rheumatoid arthritis, previous fall, current bisphosphonate treatment and femoral neck aBMD), cortical porosity at the ultradistal [odds ratio per standard deviation increase (95% confidence interval) 2.61 (1.77-3.85)] and distal [1.57 (1.12-2.20)] sites was associated with prevalent hip fracture. Cortical porosity was associated with prevalent hip fracture in older women independently of femoral neck aBMD and clinical risk factors. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Internal Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Association for Publication of The Journal of Internal Medicine.

  14. A STUDY OF PRIMARY CEMENTED BIPOLAR HEMIARTHROPLASTY OF HIP IN ELDERLY PATIENTS WITH OSTEOPOROTIC, UNSTABLE INTERTROCHANTERIC FRACTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maheshwar

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intertrochanteric fractures are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in geriatric population. Osteoporosis contributes significantly to the comminution and instability in such fractures. Internal fixations in unstable intertrochanteric fractures are a ssociated with high rates of implant failures and gross restriction of hip movements. This study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of cemented bipolar hemiart h roplasty in elderly patients with osteoporotic, unstable intertrochanteric fractures. PATIE NTS AND METHODS: 52 patients aged above 60 years with unstable, comminuted intertrochanteric fractures with Singh’s index < 4 were operated with primary cemented bipolar hemireplacement arthroplasty. All the patients were mobilized early with full weight b earing in the post - operative period as permitted. 50 patients were evaluated for the functional outcome with Harris Hip score. RESULTS: The average age of patients was 65 years with female predominance (64%. Left side (56% was commonly involved and the c ommonest mode of injury was due to a trivial fall at home. Hypertension (30% was the commonest co - morbid condition. Limb shortening was the commonest complication (8%. The mean ± S.D. of the Harris Hip score was 85.6 ± 10.59 with a range from 56 to 96. Resul ts were excellent in 62%, good in 22%, fair in 12% and poor in 4% of cases. CONCLUSION: Elderly osteoporotic patients with comminuted, unstable intertrochanteric fractures have an increased prevalence of unsatisfactory functional results with conventional internal fixation devices. Primary cemented bipolar hemiarthroplasty with anatomical reconstruction of the trochanters allows early mobilization, improved functional outcome with relatively low incidence of associated complications.

  15. Identification of hip fracture patients from radiographs using Fourier analysis of the trabecular structure: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reid David M

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study presents an analysis of trabecular bone structure in standard radiographs using Fourier transforms and principal components analysis (PCA to identify contributions to hip fracture risk. Methods Radiographs were obtained from 26 hip fracture patients and 24 controls. They were digitised and five regions of interest (ROI were identified from the femoral head and neck for analysis. The power spectrum was obtained from the Fourier transform of each region and three profiles were produced; a circular profile and profiles parallel and perpendicular to the preferred orientation of the trabeculae. PCA was used to generate a score from each profile, which we hypothesised could be used to discriminate between the fracture and control groups. The fractal dimension was also calculated for comparison. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (Az discriminating the hip fracture cases from controls was calculated for each analysis. Results Texture analysis of standard radiographs using the fast Fourier transform yielded variables that were significantly associated with fracture and not significantly correlated with age, body mass index or femoral neck bone mineral density. The anisotropy of the trabecular structure was important; both the perpendicular and circular profiles were significantly better than the parallel-profile (P Az = 0.84 – 0.93, there were no significant correlations with femoral neck bone mineral density, age, or body mass index. PCA analysis was found to perform better than fractal analysis (P = 0.019. Conclusions Both PCA and fractal analysis of the FFT data could discriminate successfully between the fracture and control groups, although PCA was significantly stronger than fractal dimension. This method appears to provide a powerful tool for the assessment of bone structure in vivo with advantages over standard fractal methods.

  16. Declining incidence trends for hip fractures have not been accompanied by improvements in lifetime risk or post-fracture survival--A nationwide study of the Swedish population 60 years and older.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karampampa, Korinna; Ahlbom, Anders; Michaëlsson, Karl; Andersson, Tomas; Drefahl, Sven; Modig, Karin

    2015-09-01

    Hip fracture is a common cause of disability and mortality among the elderly. Declining incidence trends have been observed in Sweden. Still, this condition remains a significant public health problem since Sweden has one of the highest incidences worldwide. Yet, no Swedish lifetime risk or survival trends have been presented. By examining how hip fracture incidence, post-fracture survival, as well as lifetime risk have developed between 1995 and 2010 in Sweden, this study aims to establish how the burden hip fractures pose on the elderly changed over time, in order to inform initiatives for improvements of their health. The entire Swedish population 60 years-old and above was followed between 1987 and 2010 in the National Patient Register and the Cause of Death Register. Annual age-specific hip fracture cumulative incidence was estimated using hospital admissions for hip fractures. Three-month and one-year survival after the first hip fracture were also estimated. Period life table was used to assess lifetime risk of hip fractures occurring from age 60 and above, and the expected mean age of the first hip fracture. The age-specific hip fracture incidence decreased between 1995 and 2010 in all ages up to 94 years, on average by 1% per year. The lifetime risk remained almost stable, between 9% and 11% for men, and between 18% and 20% for women. The expected mean age of a first hip fracture increased by 2.5 years for men and by 2.2 years for women. No improvements over time were observed for the 3-month survival for men, while for women a 1% decrease per year was observed. The 1-year survival slightly increased over time for men (0.4% per year) while no improvement was observed for women. The age-specific hip fracture incidence has decreased over time. Yet the lifetime risk of a hip fracture has not decreased because life expectancy in the population has increased in parallel. Overall, survival after hip fracture has not improved. Copyright © 2015. Published by

  17. Risk factors for complications and in-hospital mortality following hip fractures: a study using the National Trauma Data Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belmont, Philip J; Garcia, E'Stephan J; Romano, David; Bader, Julia O; Nelson, Kenneth J; Schoenfeld, Andrew J

    2014-05-01

    Retrospective review of prospectively collected data. To describe the impact of patient demographics, injury-specific factors, and medical co-morbidities on outcomes after hip fracture using the National Sample Program (NSP) of the National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB). The 2008 NSP-NTDB was queried to identify patients sustaining hip fractures. Patient demographics, co-morbidities, injury-specific factors, and outcomes (including mortality and complications) were recorded and a national estimate model was developed. Unadjusted differences for risk factors were evaluated using t test/Wald Chi square analyses. Weighted logistic regression and sensitivity analyses were performed to control for all factors in the model. The weighted sample contained 44,419 incidents of hip fracture. The average age was 72.7. Sixty-two percent of the population was female and 80 % was white. The mortality rate was 4.5 % and 12.5 % sustained at least one complication. Seventeen percent of patients who sustained at least one complication died. Dialysis, presenting in shock, cardiac disease, male sex, and ISS were significant predictors of mortality, while dialysis, obesity, cardiac disease, diabetes, and a procedure delay of ≥2 days influenced complications. The major potential modifiable risk factor appears to be time to procedure, which had a significant impact on complications. This is the first study to postulate predictors of morbidity and mortality following hip fracture in a US national model. While many co-morbidities appear to be influential in predicting outcome, some of the more significant factors include the presence of shock, dialysis, obesity, and time to surgery. Prognostic study, Level II.

  18. Anatomical Variance in Acetabular Anteversion Does Not Predict Hip Fracture Patterns in the Elderly: A Retrospective Study in 135 Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Kamath, Megan Y.; Coleman, Nathan W.; Belkoff, Stephen M.; Mears, Simon C.

    2011-01-01

    It has been suggested that variances in the anatomy of the acetabulum determine the type of hip fracture in elderly patients. Based on this concept, an overly anteverted acetabulum would lead to impingement of the femoral neck against the posterior rim of the acetabulum, causing a femoral neck fracture, whereas with a retroverted acetabulum, external rotation of the hip would be limited by the capsular tissues attached to the trochanteric region, causing a trochanteric fracture. To test the h...

  19. Evaluation of the risk of hip fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanis, J A; McCloskey, E V

    1996-03-01

    Hip fracture is the most serious complication of osteoporosis and the incidence is rising worldwide. Bone mineral density measurements can be used not only to diagnose osteoporosis at the hip, but also to give prognostic information on the lifetime risk of hip fracture. A number of additional risk factors enhance the ability of density measurements to assess risk. Candidates include markers of bone resorption, prior fragility fractures, hip axis length, and estimates of postural integrity, each of which improve prognostic value independently of bone mineral assessments. Their use in the stratification of risk will help define intervention thresholds for treatments and improve the design of population screening policies, particularly in elderly women in whom the burden of hip fracture is greatest.

  20. Evaluation of Osteoporosis in Patients with Hip Fracture - Original Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firuzan Altın

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study is to determine the state of osteoporosis and treatment in patients with osteoporotic hip fracture. Patients and Methods: 39 patients enrolled in this study that were above 50 years with an atraumatic hip fracture and operated in 1. and 2. Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology. Istanbul Training and Research Hospital, in our study (31 women, 8 men we investigate patients about risk factors of osteoporosis, before and after fracture severity of osteoporosis, treatment of osteoporosis. Patients who are younger than 50 years, and immobilized for long time, have pathological fracture, hip fracture is 2 cm distal than minor trochanter; are taken out from our study. Results: There is not significant difference between type of fracture, age, sex and risk factors. Before fractured 5 patients were diagnosed as osteoporosis and only 4 of them had been using antiresorptive, vitamin D, and calcium preparats. 36 patients that we studied never examined and treated for osteoporosis. All patients participating in study were informed about osteoporosis. Each patient was asked to apply for physical therapy and rehabilitation department with result of lumber and femoral bone mineral density measurement. Conclusion: Patients who had recent osteoporotic fractures must be treated to prevent new fracture. Orthopedic doctors should care osteoporosis and a new fracture risk as a serious important complication of osteoporotic hip fracture. (From the World of Osteoporosis 2007;13:11-4

  1. Tight intra-operative blood pressure control versus standard care for patients undergoing hip fracture repair - Hip Fracture Intervention Study for Prevention of Hypotension (HIP-HOP) trial: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moppett, Iain Keith; White, Stuart; Griffiths, Richard; Buggy, Donal

    2017-07-25

    Hypotension during anaesthesia for hip fracture surgery is common. Recent data suggest that there is an association between the lowest intra-operative blood pressure and mortality, even when adjusted for co-morbidities. This is consistent with data derived from the wider surgical population, where magnitude and duration of hypotension are associated with mortality and peri-operative complications. However, there are no trial to data to support more aggressive blood pressure control. We are conducting a three-centre, randomised, double-blinded pilot study in three hospitals in the United Kingdom. The sample size will be 75 patients (25 from each centre). Randomisation will be done using computer-generated concealed tables. Both participants and investigators will be blinded to group allocation. Participants will be aged >70 years, cognitively intact (Abbreviated Mental Test Score 7 or greater), able to give informed consent and admitted directly through the emergency department with a fractured neck of the femur requiring operative repair. Patients randomised to tight blood pressure control or avoidance of intra-operative hypotension will receive active treatment as required to maintain both of the following: systolic arterial blood pressure >80% of baseline pre-operative value and mean arterial pressure >75 mmHg throughout. All participants will receive standard hospital care, including spinal or general anaesthesia, at the discretion of the clinical team. The primary outcome is a composite of the presence or absence of defined cardiovascular, renal and delirium morbidity within 7 days of surgery (myocardial injury, stroke, acute kidney injury, delirium). Secondary endpoints will include the defined individual morbidities, mortality, early mobility and discharge to usual residence. This is a small-scale pilot study investigating the feasibility of a trial of tight intra-operative blood pressure control in a frail elderly patient group with known high morbidity

  2. Influence of bone mineral density and hip geometry on the different types of hip fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yizhong; Lin, Jinkuang; Cai, Siqing; Yan, Lisheng; Pan, Yuancheng; Yao, Xuedong; Zhuang, Huafeng; Wang, Peiwen; Zeng, Yanjun

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the influence of bone mineral density and hip geometry on the fragility fracture of femoral neck and trochanteric region. There were 95 menopausal females of age ≥ 50 years with fragility fracture of hip, including 55 cases of femoral neck fracture and 40 cases of trochanteric fracture. Another 63 non-fractured females with normal bone mineral density (BMD) were chosen as control. BMD, hip axis length, neck-shaft angle and structural parameters including cross surface area, cortical thickness and buckling ratio were detected and compared. Compared with control group, the patients with femoral neck fracture or trochanteric fractures had significantly lower BMD of femoral neck, as well as lower cross surface area and cortical thickness and higher buckling ratio in femoral neck and trochanteric region. There were no significant differences of BMD and structural parameters in the femoral neck fracture group and intertrochanteric fracture group. Hip axis length and neck-shaft angle were not significantly different among three groups. The significant changes of BMD and proximal femur geometry were present in the fragility fracture of femoral neck and trochanteric region. The different types of hip fractures cannot be explained by these changes.

  3. [Delirium prevention and treatment in elderly hip fracture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles, María José; Formiga, Francesc; Vidán, M Teresa

    2014-04-22

    The fracture of the proximal femur or hip fracture in the elderly usually happens after a fall and carries a high morbidity and mortality. One of the most common complications during hospitalization for hip fracture is the onset of delirium or acute confusional state that in elderly patients has a negative impact on the hospital stay, and prognosis, worsening functional ability, cognitive status and mortality. Also the development of delirium during hospitalization increases health care costs. Strategies to prevent and treat delirium during hospitalization for hip fracture have been less studied. In this context, this paper aims to conduct a review of the literature on strategies that exist in the prevention and treatment of delirium in elderly patients with hip fracture. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  4. Femoral head fracture without hip dislocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aggarwal Aditya K

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Femoral head fractures without dislocation or subluxation are extremely rare injuries. We report a neglected case of isolated comminuted fracture of femoral head without hip dislocation or subluxation of one year duration in a 36-year-old patient who sustained a high en- ergy trauma due to road traffic accident. He presented with painful right hip and inability to bear full weight on right lower limb with Harris hip score of 39. He received cementless total hip replacement. At latest follow-up of 2.3 years, functional outcome was excellent with Harris hip score of 95. Such isolated injuries have been described only once in the literature and have not been classified till now. The purpose of this report is to highlight the extreme rarity, possible mechanism involved and a novel classification system to classify such injuries. Key words: Femur head; Hip dislocation; Classification; Arthroplasty, replacement, hip

  5. Prehospital intravenous fentanyl to patients with hip fracture: an observational cohort study of risk factors for analgesic non-treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesgaard, Kristian D; Christensen, Erika F; Kirkegaard, Hans; Bendtsen, Mette D; Jensen, Flemming B; Nikolajsen, Lone

    2017-01-19

    Patients with proximal femoral neck fracture have a high short-term mortality, a high risk of postoperative complications, and impaired quality of life. One of the challenges related to the prehospital treatment of these patients is to administer systemic opioids fast and properly. Effective analgesic prehospital treatment ought be initiated rapidly in order to alleviate the stress that follows acute pain, to facilitate transportation, and to improve quality of care. The objectives of this study were to explore the prevalence of prehospital administration of intravenous fentanyl to patients with proximal femoral neck fracture in the ambulances and to assess risk factors for analgesic non-treatment. This was a register-based observational cohort study of patients with proximal femoral neck fracture from the North Denmark Region transported by ambulance. The patients were identified via the Danish Interdisciplinary Hip Fracture Registry over a 3-year period from 1 July 2011 to 30 June 2014. This hospital registry contains data on several patient characteristics used for the risk factor analysis. Data on prehospital treatment (intravenous fentanyl) and patient monitoring were registered in an electronic prehospital patient record. A modified Poisson regression with robust standard errors was carried out with intravenous fentanyl as the primary binary outcome and the following explanatory variables: age, sex, Charlson Comorbidity Index score, housing, body mass index, type of fracture, fracture displacement, prior consultation with general practitioner, dispatch triage level, and time with ambulance personnel. In total, 2,140 patients with proximal femoral neck fracture were transported by ambulance, of which 584 (27.3%, 95% CI: 25.4-29.2) were treated with intravenous fentanyl. Risk factors for non-treatment were: older age, male sex (RR 0.77, 95% CI: 0.64-0.91), institutional housing (RR 0.72, 95% CI: 0.56-0.92), medial fracture (RR 0.74, 95% CI: 0.60-0.92), short

  6. Geriatric trauma hip fractures: is there a difference in outcomes based on fracture patterns?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangram, Alicia; Moeser, Phillip; Corneille, Michael G; Prokuski, Laura J; Zhou, Nicolas; Sohn, Jacqueline; Chaliki, Shalini; Oguntodu, Olakunle F; Dzandu, James K

    2014-01-01

    Annually in the US, there are over 300,000 hospital admissions due to hip fractures in geriatric patients. Consequently, there have been several large observational studies, which continue to provide new insights into differences in outcomes among hip fracture patients. However, few hip fracture studies have specifically examined the relationship between hip fracture patterns, sex, and short-term outcomes including hospital length of stay and discharge disposition in geriatric trauma patients. We performed a retrospective study of hip fractures in geriatric trauma patients. Hip fracture patterns were based on ICD -9 CM diagnostic codes for hip fractures (820.00-820.9). Patient variables were patient demographics, mechanism of injury, injury severity score, hospital and ICU length of stay, co-morbidities, injury location, discharge disposition, and in-patient mortality. A total of 325 patient records met the inclusion criteria. The mean age of the patients was 82.2 years, and the majority of the patients were white (94%) and female (70%). Hip fractures patterns were categorized as two fracture classes and three fracture types. We observed a difference in the proportion of males to females within each fracture class (Femoral neck fractures Z-score = -8.86, p fractures Z-score = -5.63, p fractures were fixed based on fracture pattern and patient characteristics. Hip fracture class or fracture type did not predict short-term outcomes such as in-hospital or ICU length of stay, death, or patient discharge disposition. The majority of patients (73%) were injured at home. However, 84% of the patients were discharged to skilled nursing facility, rehabilitation, or long-term care while only 16% were discharged home. There was no evidence of significant association between fracture pattern, injury severity score, diabetes mellitus, hypertension or dementia. Hip fracture patterns differ between geriatric male and female trauma patients. However, there was no

  7. Nationwide data on municipal drinking water and hip fracture: could calcium and magnesium be protective? A NOREPOS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Cecilie; Søgaard, Anne Johanne; Tell, Grethe S; Flaten, Trond Peder; Hongve, Dag; Omsland, Tone Kristin; Holvik, Kristin; Meyer, Haakon E; Aamodt, Geir

    2013-11-01

    Norway has a high incidence of hip fractures, and the incidence varies by degree of urbanization. This variation may reflect a difference in underlying environmental factors, perhaps variations in the concentration of calcium and magnesium in municipal drinking water. A trace metal survey (1986-1991) in 556 waterworks (supplying 64% of the Norwegian population) was linked geographically to hip fractures from hospitals throughout the country (1994-2000). In all, 5472 men and 13,604 women aged 50-85years suffered a hip fracture. Poisson regression models were fitted, adjusting for age, urbanization degree, region of residence, type of water source, and pH. The concentrations of calcium and magnesium in drinking water were generally low. An inverse association was found between concentration of magnesium and risk of hip fracture in both genders (IRR men highest vs. lowest tertile=0.80, 95% CI: 0.74, 0.87; IRR women highest vs. lowest tertile=0.90, 95% CI: 0.85, 0.95), but no consistent association between calcium and hip fracture risk was observed. The highest tertile of urbanization degree (city), compared to the lowest (rural), was related to a 23 and 24% increase in hip fracture risk in men and women, respectively. The association between magnesium and hip fracture did not explain the variation in hip fracture risk between city and rural areas. Magnesium in drinking water may have a protective role against hip fractures; however this association should be further investigated. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Quantitative ultrasound parameters as well as bone mineral density are better predictors of trochanteric than cervical hip fractures in elderly women. Results from the EPIDOS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schott, A M; Hans, D; Duboeuf, F; Dargent-Molina, P; Hajri, T; Bréart, G; Meunier, P J

    2005-12-01

    Hip fractures can be separated into cervical and trochanteric fractures. Trochanteric fractures have been associated with up to twice the short-term mortality of cervical fractures in the elderly. There is also evidence suggesting that the mechanisms are different. Evidence from the literature remains limited on the predictive power of bone mineral density (BMD) and quantitative ultrasounds (QUS) for both types of hip fractures. 5703 elderly women aged 75 years or more, who were recruited from the voting lists in the EPIDOS study, and had baseline calcaneal ultrasounds (QUS) and DXA measurements at the hip and the whole body, were analyzed in this paper. Among those, 192 hip fractures occurred during an average follow-up of 4 years, 108 cervical and 84 trochanteric fractures. Femoral neck, trochanteric and whole body BMD were able to predict trochanteric hip fracture (RR's and 95% CI were, respectively, 3.2 (2.4-4.2); 4.8 (3.5-6.6); and 2.8 (2.2-3.6)) more accurately than cervical fractures (respectively, 2.1 (1.7-2.7); 2.3 (1.8-3.0); 1.2 (1.0-1.6)). All ultrasound parameters, SOS, BUA, and stiffness index (SI) were significant predictors of trochanteric (RR's respectively 3.0 (2.2-4.1), 2.5(2.0-3.1), and 3.5(2.6-4.7)) but not cervical fractures. After adjustment for femoral neck or trochanteric BMD ultrasound parameters were still significant predictors of trochanteric fracture, and stiffness tended to be a better predictor of trochanteric fractures than either BUA or SOS with a relative risk of 2.25 (1.6-3.1). A significant decrease of all bone measurements, BMD and QUS, was highly predictive of trochanteric fractures, whereas a decrease of femoral neck and trochanteric BMD were only associated with a slight increase in cervical fracture risk and a low total body BMD or QUS parameters were not significant predictors of cervical fractures. In women who sustained a hip fracture, the decrease of BMD and QUS values increases the risk of trochanteric fracture as

  9. The Patient's View of Nursing Care after Hip Fracture

    OpenAIRE

    Ami Hommel; Marie-Louise Kock; Jeanette Persson; Elisabeth Werntoft

    2012-01-01

    Background: The pathway for patients with a hip fracture described in this study is a fast track. Many studies have focused on prevention of various complications but, so far, the patient's view of nursing care has not been highlighted. Aim: The aim of the study is to illuminate the patient's view on nursing care when treated for a hip fracture. Method: Ten patients were interviewed. A content analysis design was conducted. Findings. From the analysis, four m...

  10. Association of 25-hydroxyvitamin D with prevalent osteoarthritis of the hip in elderly men: the osteoporotic fractures in men study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaganti, R K; Parimi, N; Cawthon, P; Dam, T L; Nevitt, M C; Lane, N E

    2010-02-01

    To examine the cross-sectional association of serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D, or 25(OH)D, with prevalent radiographic hip osteoarthritis (OA) in elderly men. In a cohort of 1,104 elderly men from the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men Study, 25(OH)D serum levels were determined by mass spectrometry, followed by pelvic radiographs approximately 4.6 years later. Categories of vitamin D levels were defined as follows: deficiency as 30 ng/ml. Radiographs were assessed for severity of hip OA using a summary grade of 0-4 for individual features of hip OA. Logistic regression was used to assess associations of serum 25(OH)D levels with prevalent radiographic hip OA; covariates included age, clinic site, season at the time of blood withdrawal, self-reported hip pain for >30 days, timed 6-meter walk, presence of at least 1 coexisting condition, and self-rated health status. Men with radiographic hip OA had a slower 6-meter walking time (P vitamin D level (P = 0.0002), and had a higher prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency (P = 0.002) and vitamin D deficiency (P = 0.012) compared with controls. Higher 25(OH)D levels were associated with a lower prevalence of radiographic hip OA (odds ratio [OR] 1.39 per 1 SD decrease in 25[OH]D, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.11-1.74) after adjusting for age, season, and clinic site. Men with vitamin D insufficiency had an increased likelihood of prevalent radiographic hip OA (OR 2.19, 95% CI 1.21-3.97) compared with men with sufficient levels of 25(OH)D, and in men with vitamin D deficiency, there was a tendency toward an increased likelihood of radiographic hip OA (OR 1.99, 95% CI 0.83-4.74). Men with vitamin D deficiencies are twice as likely to have prevalent radiographic hip OA, and therefore vitamin D therapy to augment skeletal health in the elderly is warranted.

  11. Missed opportunities for prevention of hip fracture in older patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dubljanin-Raspopović Emilija

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Osteoporotic fractures are a major cause of morbidity in the population. Therefore, fracture prevention strategies should be a major concern, and one of the priorities in the primary health care system. The aim of the study was to assess fracture and fall risk factors, and fracture risk level in patients with acute hip fracture, and to evaluate if there had been adequate osteoporosis treatment prior to fracture in this group of patients. Methods. Fracture and fall risk factors were assessed in 342 patients, ≥ 65 years old, hospitalized due to acute hip fracture at the Clinic for Orthopedic Surgery and Traumatology, Clinical Centre of Serbia in a 12-month period. Fall risk factors were assessed with the Fracture Risk Assessment (FRAX® algorithm, and patients were classified in respect to fracture risk level. Results. Hip fracture occurred in the majority of the patients in the high risk group (74.2%, where no additional bone mineral density testing was needed. Less than 10% of the patients had a diagnosis of osteoporosis before injury, while less than 2% were treated. Cognitive impairment (95.3%, visual impairment (58.2%, lower index of daily activities (51.8%, and depression (47.1% were the most frequently observed fall risk factors. Conclusion. The results of our investigation reveal insufficient identification of clinical fracture risk factors in the primary care setting, inadequate treatment of osteoporosis and, consequently, ineffective prevention of hip fractures in the geriatric population. The introduction of FRAX® into clinical practice enables more effective acknowledgment of patients with elevated fracture risk, even if bone density measurement is not available. The results of this study have a special significance for everyday clinical practice, because they impose a need for reviewing the existing approaches to osteoporosis prevention, and precise definiment of hip prevention strategies.

  12. Trajectory of physical activity after hip fracture: An analysis of community-dwelling individuals from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboelmagd, Tariq; Dainty, Jack R; MacGregor, Alex; Smith, Toby O

    2018-02-10

    To analyse physical activity participation in a community-dwelling people in England with hip fracture the interval prior to fracture, in the fracture recovery period, and a minimum of two years post-fracture. 215 individuals were identified from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing cohort (2002-2014) who sustained a hip fracture following a fall and for whom data were available on physical activity participation relating to the period pre-fracture, within-fracture recovery phase and post-fracture (minimum of two years). Physical activity was assessed using the validated ELSA physical activity questionnaire. Prevalence of 'low' physical activity participation was calculated and multi-level modelling analyses were performed to explore physical activity trajectories over the follow-up phase, and whether age, depression, gender and frailty were associated with physical activity participation. Prevalence of low physical activity participation within two years prior to hip fracture was 16.7% (95% Confidence Intervals (CI): 11.6% to 21.8%). This increased at the final follow-up phase to 21.3% (95% CI: 15.1% to 27.6%). This was not a statistically significant change (P = 0.100). Age (P = 0.005) and frailty (P < 0.001) were statistically significant explanatory variables (P = 0.005) where older age and greater frailty equated to lower physical activity participation. Neither gender (P = 0.288) nor depression (P = 0.121) were significant explanatory variables. Physical activity levels do not significantly change between pre-fracture to a minimum of two years post-hip fracture for community-dwelling individuals. This contrasts with previous reports of reduced mobility post-hip fracture, suggesting that 'physical activity' and 'mobility' should be considered as separate outcomes in this population. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The Hip Fracture Surgery in Elderly Patients (HIPELD study: protocol for a randomized, multicenter controlled trial evaluating the effect of xenon on postoperative delirium in older patients undergoing hip fracture surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coburn Mark

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Strategies to protect the brain from postoperative delirium (POD after hip fracture are urgently needed. The development of delirium often is associated with the loss of independence, poor functional recovery, and increased morbidity, as well as increases in length of hospital stay, discharges to nursing facilities, and healthcare costs. We hypothesize that xenon may reduce the burden of POD, (i by avoiding the need to provide anesthesia with a drug that targets the γ-amino-butyric acid (GABAA receptor and (ii through beneficial anesthetic and organ-protective effects. Methods and design An international, multicenter, phase 2, prospective, randomized, blinded, parallel group and controlled trial to evaluate the incidence of POD, diagnosed with the Confusion Assessment Method (CAM, in older patients undergoing hip fracture surgery under general anesthesia with xenon or sevoflurane, for a period of 4 days post surgery (primary outcome is planned. Secondary objectives are to compare the incidence of POD between xenon and sevoflurane, to evaluate the incidence of POD from day 5 post surgery until discharge from hospital, to determine the time to first POD diagnosis, to evaluate the duration of POD, to evaluate the evolution of the physiological status of the patients in the postoperative period, to evaluate the recovery parameters, to collect preliminary data to evaluate the economical impact of POD in the postoperative period and to collect safety data. Patients are eligible if they are older aged (≥ 75 years and assigned to a planned hip fracture surgery within 48 h after the hip fracture. Furthermore, patients need to be willing and able to complete the requirements of this study including the signature of the written informed consent. A total of 256 randomized patients in the 10 participating centers will be recruited, that is, 128 randomized patients in each of the 2 study groups (receiving either xenon or sevoflurane

  14. Resuscitation in hip fractures:A systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Rocos, Brett; Whitehouse, Michael R.; Kelly, Michael B

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the evidence for the resuscitation of patients with hip fracture in the preoperative or perioperative phase of their treatment and its impact on mortality.DESIGN: We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL and PROSPERO databases using a systematic search strategy for randomised trials and observational studies investigating the fluid resuscitation of any patient with hip fracture. No language limits were applied to the search, which was complemented by manually screening the reference l...

  15. Effect of Cigarette Smoking on Risk of Hip Fracture in Men: A Meta-Analysis of 14 Prospective Cohort Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhen-Jie; Zhao, Peng; Liu, Bin; Yuan, Zhen-Chao

    2016-01-01

    Several observational studies have suggested an association between cigarette smoking and risk of hip fracture. However, no formal systematic review or meta-analysis was performed to summarize this risk in men. A search was applied to MEDLINE, EMBASE, and web of science (up to November 1 2016). All prospective cohort studies assessing risk of hip fracture with the factor of cigarette smoking in men without language restriction were reviewed, and qualities of all included studies were assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Two authors independently assessed literatures and extracted information eligibility, and any disagreement was resolved by consensus. Newcastle-Ottawa quality assessment scale was used to evaluate studies' quality in meta-analyses. We calculated the RR with 95% CIs in a random-effects model as well as the fixed-effects model using the metan command in the STATA version 12.0 (StataCorp, USA). Fourteen prospective cohort studies were eligible for the present analysis. A meta-analysis of 12 prospective studies showed that the relative risk (RR) for current male smoking was 1.47 [95% confidence interval (CI) (1.28-1.66), p = 0.54; I2 = 0%]. Subgroup analyses show study characteristics (including geography region, length of follow-up, size of cohorts and study quality) did not substantially influence these positive associations. Eight studies reported the RRs for former smokers compared with never smokers and the pooled RR was 1.15 [95% CI, (0.97-1.34), (I2 = 0%, p = 0.975)]. The present meta-analysis of 14 prospective studies suggests that, compared with never smokers, cigarette smoking increases risk of hip fracture in man, specifically in current smokers. However, further larger prospective cohorts with more power or meta-analysis of individual patient data are needed to confirm this association.

  16. Predictors of not regaining basic mobility after hip fracture surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hulsbæk, Signe; Larsen, Rikke Faebo; Troelsen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Regaining basic mobility after hip fracture surgery is a milestone in the in-hospital rehabilitation. The aims were to investigate predictors for not regaining basic mobility at the fifth post-operative day and at discharge after undergoing hip fracture surgery. METHOD: In a prospective...... cohort study 274 hip fracture patients were included. Patients with compromised ability to exercise were excluded leaving 167 patients for analysis. Patient demographics, functional level, method of operation, post-operative hemoglobin and the completion of physiotherapy was registered. Basic mobility...... on first post-operative day (OR = 3.3) (p values: 0.009-hip fracture surgery, who are not able to complete physiotherapy on first post-operative day, are at a greater risk of not regaining basic mobility during hospitalization...

  17. A new algorithm for hip fracture surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palm, Henrik; Krasheninnikoff, Michael; Holck, Kim

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose Treatment of hip fracture patients is controversial. We implemented a new operative and supervision algorithm (the Hvidovre algorithm) for surgical treatment of all hip fractures, primarily based on own previously published results. Methods 2,000 consecutive patients over 50...... years of age who were admitted and operated on because of a hip fracture were prospectively included. 1,000 of these patients were included after implementation of the algorithm. Demographic parameters, hospital treatment, and reoperations within the first postoperative year were assessed from patient...... 192 of 1,000 to 105 of 1,000 (p fractures and a decline of 13% to 7% for extracapsular fractures. The proportion of bed-days caused...

  18. Validity of bone mineral density and WHO fracture risk assessment thresholds in hip fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahla, Ahmad

    2011-09-01

    Hip fractures are common and serious consequence of osteoporosis. Bone mineral density (BMD) measurement and the World Health Organization (WHO) fracture risk assessment tool are considered to predict the hip osteoporotic fractures. In this study, their sensitivities in hip fracture cases are evaluated. BMD and WHO probability of fracture risk were determined in 71 hip fractures ≥ 50 years of old. Totally, 65% of patients had ≤-2.5 BMD T score. 81% of patients had above the upper interventional threshold of WHO fracture risk probability model. Sensitivities were low in 50-59 year age group with progression in older age groups. Results of BMD T score and fracture risk probabilities were not significant between men and women. There were 23% and 49% sensitivities of less than or equal to -2.5 T score in the 50-59 and 60-69 year age groups with a 31% sensitivity of greater than 3% probability of hip fracture risk in the 50-59 year age group, both of which were not valid for predicting hip fracture risk.

  19. Management of older adults with hip fractures in India: a mixed methods study of current practice, barriers and facilitators, with recommendations to improve care pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath, Santosh; Yadav, Lalit; Tewari, Abha; Chantler, Tracey; Woodward, Mark; Kotwal, Prakash; Jain, Anil; Dey, Aparajit; Garg, Bhavuk; Malhotra, Rajesh; Goel, Ashish; Farooque, Kamran; Sharma, Vijay; Webster, Premila; Norton, Robyn

    2017-12-01

    Evidence-based management can reduce deaths and suffering of older adults with hip fractures. This study investigates the evidence-practice gaps in hip fracture care in three major hospitals in Delhi, potential barriers and facilitators to improving care, and consequently, identifies contextually appropriate interventions for implementing best practice for management of older adults with hip fractures in India. Hip fracture in older adults is a significant public health issue in India. The current study sought to document current practices, identify barriers and facilitators to adopting best practice guidelines and recommend improvements in the management of older adults with hip fractures in Delhi, India. This mixed methods observational study collected data from healthcare providers, patients, carers and medical records from three major public tertiary care hospitals in Delhi, India. All patients aged ≥50 years with an X-ray confirmed hip fracture that were admitted to these hospitals over a 10-week period were recruited. Patients' data were collected at admission, discharge and 30 days post-injury. Eleven key informant interviews and four focus group discussions were conducted with healthcare providers. Descriptive data for key quantitative variables were computed. The qualitative data were analysed and interpreted using a behaviour change wheel framework. A total of 136 patients, 74 (54%) men and 62 women, with hip fracture were identified in the three participating hospitals during the recruitment period and only 85 (63%) were admitted for treatment with a mean age of 66.5 years (SD 11.9). Of these, 30% received surgery within 48 h of hospital admission, 95% received surgery within 39 days of hospital admission and two (3%) had died by 30 days of injury. According to the healthcare providers, inadequate resources and overcrowding prevent adequate caring of the hip fracture patients. They unanimously felt the need for protocol-based management of hip

  20. A long-term follow-up of 221 hip fracture patients in southeastern Finland: analysis of survival and prior or subsequent fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüthje, Peter; Helkamaa, Teemu; Kaukonen, Juha-Pekka; Nurmi-Lüthje, Ilona; Kataja, Matti

    2012-01-01

    To analyze the type and effect of prior and subsequent fractures in a hip fracture cohort. Hip fracture patients (n=221) were followed for a mean of 8 years and all prior and subsequent fractures were studied. Incidence of the first fracture and subsequent fractures according to sex, age group, and time between the first and the index hip fracture were measured. The absolute fracture risk was measured in the study subjects and in the age groups hip fracture patients had sustained previous fractures. In men, these were mostly ankle or hip fractures, and in women, wrist fractures. Of the subjects, 24% suffered a subsequent fracture, which in both sexes was usually a second hip fracture. At the end of the 8-year follow-up, 74% of the patients had died. The observed absolute fracture risk was 7% at one year and 24% at 5 years. In women, excess mortality was lowest during the first 4.8 years after the index hip fracture among patients with one fracture. However, it was highest among women with two fractures. In men, excess mortality was lowest among those with two fractures and highest among those with ≥3 fractures. There were no differences between the genders in sustaining subsequent fractures. The fracture risk subsequent to hip fracture was similar in both genders. Patients with prior hip fractures had the worst survival rate. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Trajectories of depressive symptoms after hip fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristancho, P; Lenze, E J; Avidan, M S; Rawson, K S

    2016-05-01

    Hip fracture is often complicated by depressive symptoms in older adults. We sought to characterize trajectories of depressive symptoms arising after hip fracture and examine their relationship with functional outcomes and walking ability. We also investigated clinical and psychosocial predictors of these trajectories. We enrolled 482 inpatients, aged ⩾60 years, who were admitted for hip fracture repair at eight St Louis, MO area hospitals between 2008 and 2012. Participants with current depression diagnosis and/or notable cognitive impairment were excluded. Depressive symptoms and functional recovery were assessed with the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale and Functional Recovery Score, respectively, for 52 weeks after fracture. Health, cognitive, and psychosocial variables were gathered at baseline. We modeled depressive symptoms using group-based trajectory analysis and subsequently identified correlates of trajectory group membership. Three trajectories emerged according to the course of depressive symptoms, which we termed 'resilient', 'distressed', and 'depressed'. The depressed trajectory (10% of participants) experienced a persistently high level of depressive symptoms and a slower time to recover mobility than the other trajectory groups. Stressful life events prior to the fracture, current smoking, higher anxiety, less social support, antidepressant use, past depression, and type of implant predicted membership of the depressed trajectory. Depressive symptoms arising after hip fracture are associated with poorer functional status. Clinical and psychosocial variables predicted membership of the depression trajectory. Early identification and intervention of patients in a depressive trajectory may improve functional outcomes after hip fracture.

  2. Focal osteoporosis defects play a key role in hip fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Kenneth E S; Skingle, Linda; Gee, Andrew H; Turmezei, Thomas D; Johannesdottir, Fjola; Blesic, Karen; Rose, Collette; Vindlacheruvu, Madhavi; Donell, Simon; Vaculik, Jan; Dungl, Pavel; Horak, Martin; Stepan, Jan J; Reeve, Jonathan; Treece, Graham M

    2017-01-01

    Hip fractures are mainly caused by accidental falls and trips, which magnify forces in well-defined areas of the proximal femur. Unfortunately, the same areas are at risk of rapid bone loss with ageing, since they are relatively stress-shielded during walking and sitting. Focal osteoporosis in those areas may contribute to fracture, and targeted 3D measurements might enhance hip fracture prediction. In the FEMCO case-control clinical study, Cortical Bone Mapping (CBM) was applied to clinical computed tomography (CT) scans to define 3D cortical and trabecular bone defects in patients with acute hip fracture compared to controls. Direct measurements of trabecular bone volume were then made in biopsies of target regions removed at operation. The sample consisted of CT scans from 313 female and 40 male volunteers (158 with proximal femoral fracture, 145 age-matched controls and 50 fallers without hip fracture). Detailed Cortical Bone Maps (c.5580 measurement points on the unfractured hip) were created before registering each hip to an average femur shape to facilitate statistical parametric mapping (SPM). Areas where cortical and trabecular bone differed from controls were visualised in 3D for location, magnitude and statistical significance. Measures from the novel regions created by the SPM process were then tested for their ability to classify fracture versus control by comparison with traditional CT measures of areal Bone Mineral Density (aBMD). In women we used the surgical classification of fracture location ('femoral neck' or 'trochanteric') to discover whether focal osteoporosis was specific to fracture type. To explore whether the focal areas were osteoporotic by histological criteria, we used micro CT to measure trabecular bone parameters in targeted biopsies taken from the femoral heads of 14 cases. Hip fracture patients had distinct patterns of focal osteoporosis that determined fracture type, and CBM measures classified fracture type better than a

  3. The utility of dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, calcaneal quantitative ultrasound, and fracture risk indices (FRAX® and Osteoporosis Risk Assessment Instrument) for the identification of women with distal forearm or hip fractures: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeilzadeh, Sina; Cesme, Fatih; Oral, Aydan; Yaliman, Ayse; Sindel, Dilsad

    2016-08-01

    Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is considered the "gold standard" in predicting osteoporotic fractures. Calcaneal quantitative ultrasound (QUS) variables are also known to predict fractures. Fracture risk assessment tools may also guide us for the detection of individuals at high risk for fractures. The aim of this case-control study was to evaluate the utility of DXA bone mineral density (BMD), calcaneal QUS parameters, FRAX® (Fracture Risk Assessment Tool), and Osteoporosis Risk Assessment Instrument (ORAI) for the discrimination of women with distal forearm or hip fractures. This case-control study included 20 women with a distal forearm fracture and 18 women with a hip fracture as cases and 76 age-matched women served as controls. BMD at the spine, proximal femur, and radius was measured using DXA and acoustic parameters of bone were obtained using a calcaneal QUS device. FRAX® 10-year probability of fracture and ORAI scores were also calculated in all participants. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to assess fracture discriminatory power of all the tools. While all DXA BMD, and QUS variables and FRAX® fracture probabilities demonstrated significant areas under the ROC curves for the discrimination of hip-fractured women and those without, only 33% radius BMD, broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA), and FRAX® major osteoporotic fracture probability calculated without BMD showed significant discriminatory power for distal forearm fractures. It can be concluded that QUS variables, particularly BUA, and FRAX® major osteoporotic fracture probability without BMD are good candidates for the identification of both hip and distal forearm fractures.

  4. Predicting discharge location of hip fracture patients; the new discharge of hip fracture patients score

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J.H. Vochteloo (Anne); W.E. Tuinebreijer (Wim); A.B. Maier (Andrea); R.G.H.H. Nelissen (Rob); R.M. Bloem (Rolf); P. Pilot (Peter)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractPurpose This paper reports on the development and validity of a new instrument, called the discharge of hip fracture patients score (DHP), that predicts at admission the discharge location in patients living in their own home prior to hip fracture surgery. Methods A total of 310 patients

  5. Associations between the dietary intake of antioxidant nutrients and the risk of hip fracture in elderly Chinese: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Li-li; Li, Bao-lin; Xie, Hai-li; Fan, Fan; Yu, Wei-zhong; Wu, Bao-hua; Xue, Wen-qiong; Chen, Yu-ming

    2014-11-28

    The role of oxidative stress in skeletal health is unclear. The present study investigated whether a high dietary intake of antioxidant nutrients (vitamins C and E, β-carotene, animal-derived vitamin A, retinol equivalents, Zn and Se) is associated with a reduced risk of hip fracture in elderly Chinese. This 1:1 matched case-control study involved 726 elderly Chinese with hip fracture and 726 control subjects, recruited between June 2009 and May 2013. Face-to-face interviews were conducted to determine habitual dietary intakes of the above-mentioned seven nutrients based on a seventy-nine-item FFQ and information on various covariates, and an antioxidant score was calculated. After adjustment for potential covariates, dose-dependent inverse associations were observed between the dietary intake of vitamin C, vitamin E, β-carotene, and Se and antioxidant score and the risk of hip fracture (P for trend ≤ 0·005). The OR of hip fracture for the highest (v. lowest) quartile of intake were 0·39 (95 % CI 0·28, 0·56) for vitamin C, 0·23 (95 % CI 0·16, 0·33) for vitamin E, 0·51 (95 % CI 0·36, 0·73) for β-carotene, 0·43 (95 % CI 0·26, 0·70) for Se and 0·24 (95 % CI 0·17, 0·36) for the antioxidant score. A moderate-to-high dietary intake of retinol equivalents in quartiles 2-4 (v. 1) was found to be associated with a lower risk of hip fracture (OR range: 0·51-0·63, Pvitamin A intake and hip fracture risk (P for trend >0·20). In conclusion, a higher dietary intake of vitamins C and E, β-carotene, and Se and a moderate-to-high dietary intake of retinol equivalents are associated with a lower risk of hip fracture in elderly Chinese.

  6. Zoledronic acid and clinical fractures and mortality after hip fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyles, Kenneth W; Colón-Emeric, Cathleen S; Magaziner, Jay S

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mortality is increased after a hip fracture, and strategies that improve outcomes are needed. METHODS: In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 1065 patients were assigned to receive yearly intravenous zoledronic acid (at a dose of 5 mg), and 1062 patients were...... assigned to receive placebo. The infusions were first administered within 90 days after surgical repair of a hip fracture. All patients (mean age, 74.5 years) received supplemental vitamin D and calcium. The median follow-up was 1.9 years. The primary end point was a new clinical fracture. RESULTS...... in the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: An annual infusion of zoledronic acid within 90 days after repair of a low-trauma hip fracture was associated with a reduction in the rate of new clinical fractures and with improved survival. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00046254 [ClinicalTrials.gov].)....

  7. Excess mortality following hip fracture: a systematic epidemiological review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, B; van Staa, T; Ariely, R

    2009-01-01

    the need for interventions to reduce this risk.Patients experiencing hip fracture after low-impact trauma are at considerable risk for subsequent osteoporotic fractures and premature death. We conducted a systematic review of the literature to identify all studies that reported unadjusted and excess...

  8. Trend in the Age-Adjusted Incidence of Hip Fractures in South Korea: Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Kyun; Kim, Jin Woo; Lee, Myung Ho; Moon, Kyung Ho; Koo, Kyung-Hoi

    2017-12-01

    The incidence of hip fractures has been reported to vary geographically, and its trend has also varied widely. However, the trend in the age-adjusted incidence of hip fractures has not been well studied in Korea. After we identified eligible studies presenting multiple age-adjusted incidences of hip fractures in the Korean population in PubMed, we evaluated changes in the absolute number of occurrence and calculated the annual percentage change (APC) of age-adjusted incidences of hip fractures. We have searched PubMed for the original and English-language literature on the incidence of hip fractures in the Korean population published since 2000. The studies presenting multiple age-adjusted incidences of hip fractures were selected. We evaluated the change in the absolute number of hip fractures and calculated the APC of age-adjusted incidences of hip fractures for each study. Three eligible articles were identified. The absolute number of hip fractures for both genders increased over time in all three studies although the operational definition of hip fracture differed from one another. The APC of the age-adjusted incidence of hip fractures was positive for women and negative for men. However, the change was not statistically significant in both genders during each study period (2001-2004, 2005-2008, and 2006-2010, respectively). The age-adjusted incidence of hip fractures was stable among men and women, while the absolute number of hip fractures increased for both genders in Korea. Further studies with longer study periods on age-adjusted incidences are required to better determine the trend in the incidence of hip fractures in Korea.

  9. Patient characteristics and outcomes of a hip fracture and concomitant fracture compared with hip fracture alone: results from a United Kingdom teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Terence; Anand, Varun; Tan, Wei; Quah, Edmund; Moran, Chris; Sahota, Opinder

    2016-04-01

    A proportion of patients sustaining hip fractures present with a concomitant fracture. We aimed to evaluate the relationship between patient characteristics and clinical outcomes, in those with a hip and concomitant fracture compared with those sustaining a hip fracture alone from a clinical service registry. Cross-sectional study using data obtained from a clinical service registry (Nottingham Hip Fracture Database) on patients aged 50 and above who suffered a hip fracture between 1/1/2003 and 31/12/2012. Data was collected on patient demographics, fracture information and healthcare outcomes. 7338 patients of which 75 % were female (mean age 82 (SD 9.4), had a hip fracture with 334 (4.6 %) patients having a concomitant fracture. The majority (58 %) were distal radius or proximal humeral fractures. Only females (p = 0.002), those taking three or fewer medications (p = 0.018) and those on long term steroids (p = 0.048) were more likely to suffer a concomitant fracture. There was no difference in mortality, rates of postoperative complication, intensive care unit or care home admission between both groups. Patients with a concomitant fracture have a 16 % longer average length of stay in hospital (mean difference 1.16; 95 % CI 1.07-1.25, p fractures have similar patient characteristics, except gender, polypharmacy and long term steroid use; and outcomes to those presenting with hip fracture alone, except a longer average inpatient stay.

  10. Feasibility of using administrative data for identifying medical reasons to delay hip fracture surgery: a Canadian database study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guy, Pierre; Sheehan, Katie J; Morin, Suzanne N; Waddell, James; Dunbar, Michael; Harvey, Edward; Sirett, Susan; Sobolev, Boris; Kuramoto, Lisa; Tang, Michael

    2017-10-05

    Failure to account for medically necessary delays may lead to an underestimation of early surgery benefits. This study investigated the feasibility of using administrative data to identify the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) 124 guideline list of conditions that appropriately delay hip fracture surgery. We assembled a list of diagnosis and procedure codes to reflect the NICE 124 conditions. The list was reviewed and updated by an advanced clinical coder. The list was refined by five clinical experts. We then screened Canadian Institute for Health Information discharge abstracts for 153 918 patients surgically treated for a non-pathological first hip fracture between 1 January 2004 and 31 December 2012 for diagnosis codes present on admission and procedure codes that antedated hip fracture surgery. We classified abstracts as having medical reasons for delaying surgery based on the presence of these codes. In total, 10 237 (6.7%; 95% CI 6.5% to 6.8%) patients had diagnostic and procedure codes indicating medical reasons for delay. The most common reasons for medical delay were exacerbation of a chronic chest condition (35.9%) and acute chest infection (23.2%). The proportion of patients with reasons for medical delays increased with time from admission to surgery: 3.9% (95% CI 3.6% to 4.1%) for same day surgery; 4.7% (95% CI 4.5% to 4.8%) for surgery 1 day after admission; 7.1% (95% CI 6.9% to 7.4%) for surgery 2 days after admission; and 15.5% (95% CI 15.1% to 16.0%) for surgery more than 2 days after admission. The trend was seen for admissions on weekday working hours, weekday after hours and on weekends. Administrative data can be considered to identify conditions that appropriately delay hip fracture surgery. Accounting for medically necessary delays can improve estimates of the effectiveness of early surgery. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights

  11. Postoperative pain after hip fracture is procedure specific

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Nicolai; Kristensen, Morten Tange; Palm, H

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hip fracture patients experience high pain levels during postoperative rehabilitation. The role of surgical technique on postoperative pain has not been evaluated previously. METHODS: One hundred and seventeen hip fracture patients were included in a descriptive prospective study. All.......001) and walking (r=-0.36, P=0.004). CONCLUSIONS: Postoperative pain levels after surgery for hip fracture are dependent on the surgical procedure, which should be taken into account in future studies of analgesia and rehabilitation....... patients received continuous epidural analgesia and were treated according to a standardized perioperative rehabilitation programme. Resting pain, pain on hip flexion, and walking were measured during daily physiotherapy sessions on a verbal five-point rating scale during the first four postoperative days...

  12. Hidden blood loss after surgery for hip fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, N B; Kehlet, H

    2006-01-01

    Our aim was to determine the total blood loss associated with surgery for fracture of the hip and to identify risk factors for increased blood loss. We prospectively studied 546 patients with hip fracture. The total blood loss was calculated on the basis of the haemoglobin difference, the number...... with aspirin, intra-operative hypotension and gastro-intestinal bleeding or ulceration were all independent predictors of blood loss. We conclude that total blood loss after surgery for hip fracture is much greater than that observed intra-operatively. Frequent post-operative measurements of haemoglobin...... of transfusions and the estimated blood volume. The hidden blood loss, in excess of that observed during surgery, varied from 547 ml (screws/ pins) to 1473 ml (intramedullary hip nail and screw) and was significantly associated with medical complications and increased hospital stay. The type of surgery, treatment...

  13. Hidden blood loss after surgery for hip fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Nicolai Bang; Kehlet, H

    2006-01-01

    Our aim was to determine the total blood loss associated with surgery for fracture of the hip and to identify risk factors for increased blood loss. We prospectively studied 546 patients with hip fracture. The total blood loss was calculated on the basis of the haemoglobin difference, the number...... of transfusions and the estimated blood volume. The hidden blood loss, in excess of that observed during surgery, varied from 547 ml (screws/ pins) to 1473 ml (intramedullary hip nail and screw) and was significantly associated with medical complications and increased hospital stay. The type of surgery, treatment...... with aspirin, intra-operative hypotension and gastro-intestinal bleeding or ulceration were all independent predictors of blood loss. We conclude that total blood loss after surgery for hip fracture is much greater than that observed intra-operatively. Frequent post-operative measurements of haemoglobin...

  14. [Treatment of anemia in hip fracture surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Pascual, E

    2015-06-01

    Repairing hip fractures is one of the most common surgical procedures and has greater morbidity and mortality. This procedure is also a process that involves a greater need for blood products. Numerous factors influence morbidity, mortality and the use of blood products: patient age, concomitant diseases and drug treatments that change hemostasis and hemorrhaging (preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative), which are usually significant. On top of all this is the presence in a high percentage of cases of preoperative anemia, which can have one or more causes. It is therefore essential to establish an appropriate management of perioperative anemia and optimize the transfusion policy. The aim of this review is to briefly analyze the epidemiology of hip fractures as well as establish a basis for treating perioperative anemia and transfusion policies, proposing guidelines and recommendations for clinical management based on the most current studies. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Larger femoral periprosthetic bone mineral density decrease following total hip arthroplasty for femoral neck fracture than for osteoarthritis: a prospective, observational cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Tobias; Eisler, Thomas; Bodén, Henrik; Muren, Olle; Stark, André; Salemyr, Mats; Sköldenberg, Olof

    2015-04-01

    Studies on patients with degenerative joint disease of the hip show that femoral periprosthetic bone mineral decreases following total hip arthroplasty. Scarcely any osteodensitometric data exist on femoral neck fracture (FNF) patients and periprosthetic bone remodelling. In two parallel cohorts we enrolled 87 patients (mean age, 72 ± 12 years; male:female ratio, 30:57) undergoing total hip arthroplasty for either primary osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip (n = 37) or for an acute FNF (n = 50) and followed them for a mean of 5.4 years. Outcomes were bone mineral density (BMD) changes in the periprosthetic Gruen zones 1-7, the incidence of periprosthetic fractures and clinical outcome. The bone mineral loss in the fracture group was more than twice that of the osteoarthritis group, -16.9% versus -6.8% (p = 0.004). The incidence of periprosthetic fractures was 12% (6/50) in the fracture cohort compared with none (0%) in the OA cohort (p = 0.03). Periprosthetic bone mineral loss following total hip arthroplasty is significantly greater in patients who are treated for acute FNF than in OA patients. This decrease of BMD follows a different pattern with the FNF patients losing larger proportions of bone in Gruen zones 1, 2, 6, and 7 while the OA patients tend to have larger losses only in zones 1 and 7. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Total Hip Arthroplasty in Failed Hip Fractures: A Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Shahid Noor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis is epidemic in Asian countries. It is a major cause of fractures that orthopaedic surgeons deal in Pakistan, though proper epidemiological data is not available. Habiba U et al found that 75.3% of post menopausal women of Pakistan were predisposed to Osteoporosis; whereas Baig L has described an average T - score of -1.833±0.65 on bone mineral density calculation of post menopausal females of Pakistan. Osteoporotic hip fractures constitute a major cause of elderly mortality worldwide and recent figures supporting the idea that these patients have survival rates comparable to breast and thyroid cancer patients. Pakistan is a developing country with large burden of hip fractures. Patients living in remote areas are the ones which suffer more because of inadequate awareness, fear of surgical treatment and lack of availability of standard treatment. These patients are dealt by surgeons of various expertise and levels of experience. Lack of facilities in hospitals is well known and usage of sub-standard implant is a major cause of failure. Therefore these patients either because of their bone fragility or mal-treatment suffer frequently from failure of hip fracture surgeries. Being in a tertiary care centre we come across these types of cases very frequently. Six to eight such cases present to outpatient department of Liaquat National Hospital every month being referred from every part of the country. These patients may have been operated once, twice or even multiple times. Special attention is required to acquire an informative history from these cases and perform a comprehensive examination. Moreover previous records and radiographs provide invaluable information regarding cause of failure and deciding course of further treatment. We herein discuss few of the cases of failure of hip fractures which were treated by hip arthroplasty.

  17. Risk of hip fracture after osteoporosis fractures. 451 women with fracture of lumbar spine, olecranon, knee or ankle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, J B; Lund, B

    1993-01-01

    In a follow-up study during 1976-1984, the risk of a subsequent hip fracture was investigated in women aged 60-99 years, hospitalized for the following fractures: lumbar spine (n 70), olecranon (n 52), knee (n 129) and ankle (n 200). Follow-up ranged from 0 to 9 years. Observation time of the 4...... different fractures were 241, 180, 469, and 779, person-years, respectively. In women aged 60-79 years with one of the following fractures the relative risk of a subsequent hip fracture was increased by 4.8 (lumbar spine), 4.1 (olecranon), 3.5 (knee) and 1.5 (ankle). The relative risk of hip fracture showed...... a tendency to level off 3 years after the primary fracture....

  18. [Incidence of hip fracture in Spain (1997-2010)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azagra, Rafael; López-Expósito, Francisco; Martin-Sánchez, Juan Carlos; Aguyé-Batista, Amada; Gabriel-Escoda, Paula; Zwart, Marta; Díaz-Herrera, Miguel Angel; Pujol-Salud, Jesús; Iglesias-Martínez, Milagros; Puchol-Ruiz, Núria

    2015-12-07

    To analyse differences in the incidence of hip fracture in people older than 65 years in the 17 autonomous communities (AA. CC.) (regions) of the Spanish state in the 1997-2010 period. Ecological, observational and retrospective study that includes people≥65 year old who have suffered a hip fracture in Spain over 14 years. These records are taken from the minimum basic data set of patients treated in all hospitals of Spain. The analysis include 534,043 hip fractures in≥65 year olds (414,518 women and 119,525 men). A percentage of 85.4 of hip fractures occurred in people≥75 years (86.7% women; 80.7% men). The adjusted hip fracture rate/100,000/year was 722.6 in women and 284.8 in men. AA. CC. with women above the average of the country were 7, including Catalonia, Comunidad Valenciana and Castilla-La Mancha. Six AA. CC. had patients below the average, including Canary Islands and Galicia. In AA. CC. with highest and lowest adjusted hip fracture rate/100,000/year, the difference was 44% lower in women (Canary vs. Castilla-La Mancha) and 50% lower in men (Galicia vs. Catalonia). The analysis of the incidence of hip fracture in Spain in people≥65 year old shows a significant variability between AA. CC. Except in Canary Islands, this variability is difficult to explain only by factors such as population age, sun exposure or north-south gradient. Additional studies are needed to analyse the causes of these important differences between Spanish AA. CC. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Walking Recovery after a Hip Fracture: A Prospective Follow-Up Study among Community-Dwelling over 60-Year Old Men and Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anu Salpakoski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Recovery of walking outdoors after hip fracture is important for equal participation in the community. The causes of poor recovery are not fully understood. This study investigates recovery of walking outdoors and associated determinants after hip fracture. Methods. A prospective follow-up study, among clinical sample of 81 community-dwelling hip fracture patients over 60 years. Perceived difficulty in walking outdoors and 500 meters was assessed before fracture, at discharge to home (3.2 ± 2.2 weeks after surgery, and on average 6.0 ± 3.3 weeks after discharge. Potential determinants for walking recovery were assessed. Linear latent trajectory model was used to analyse changes during follow-up. Association between walking trajectories and potential determinants was analysed with a logistic regression model. Results. Two trajectories, No-to-minor-difficulty and Catastrophic, were found. Thirty-eight percent of the participants ended up in the Catastrophic trajectory for walking outdoors and 67% for 500 meters. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that use of walking aid and indoor falls before fracture and prolonged pain were independently associated with catastrophic decline in both primary outcomes: difficulty in walking outdoors and 500 meters. Conclusions. A large proportion of community-dwelling older people recovering from hip fracture experienced catastrophic decline in outdoor walking. Acknowledging recovery prognoses at early stage enables individualized rehabilitation.

  20. High mortality and poor morbidity after hip fracture in patients with previous vertebral fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Yong-Chan; Baek, Ji-Hoon; Ko, Young-Bong; Park, Sang-Min; Song, Sang-Heon

    2015-09-01

    Although vertebral fracture in patients is a predictor of subsequent hip fracture, no study has assessed the mortality and functional outcome in hip fracture patients with previous vertebral fracture. Between September 2009 and December 2012, we evaluated 246 patients over 50-years-of-age diagnosed with femoral neck or intertrochanteric fractures who underwent surgery. The patients were categorized into two groups and two subgroups. Group Ia comprised 150 patients with previous vertebral fracture at the time of hip fracture. Group Ib comprised 96 patients with no vertebral fracture. Group IIa consisted of 76 patients fracture. Group IIb comprised 69 patients fracture. The mortality rate and functional outcome of osteoporotic hip fracture patients with and without vertebral fractures were compared. The cumulative mortality rate at 6 and 12 months post-fracture was 19 and 23 % in Group Ia and 6 and 7 % in Group Ib, respectively. In subgroup analysis, the cumulative mortality rate at 6 and 12 months was 13 and 17 % in Group IIa and 3 and 4 % in Group IIb, respectively. Shut-in patients at the final follow-up included 51 of 103 (49.5 %) patients in Group Ia and 19 of 83 (22.9 %) patients in Group Ib. In subgroup analysis, the shut-in patients included 18 of 58 (31.0 %) patients in Group IIa and 10 of 62 (16.1 %) patients in Group IIb. Previous vertebral fracture was associated with a poor functional outcome and increased mortality in patients with hip fracture.

  1. Hip fracture risk estimation based on bone mineral density of a biomechanically guided region of interest: a preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenjun; Kornak, John; Li, Caixia; Koyama, Alain; Saeed, Isra; Lu, Ying; Lang, Thomas

    2008-03-01

    We aim to define a biomechanically-guided region of interest inside the proximal femur for improving fracture risk prediction based on bone density measurements. The central hypothesis is that by identifying and focusing on the proximal femoral tissues strongly associated with hip fracture risk, we can provide a better densitometric evaluation of fracture risk compared to current evaluations based on anatomically defined regions of interest using DXA or CT. To achieve this, we have constructed a hip statistical atlas of quantitative computed tomography (QCT) images by applying rigid and non-rigid inter-subject image registration to transform hip QCT scans of 15 fractured patients and 15 controls into a common reference space, and performed voxel-by-voxel t-tests between the two groups to identify bone tissues that showed the strongest relevance to hip fracture. Based on identification of this fracture-relevant tissue volume, we have generated a biomechanically-guided region of interest (B-ROI). We have applied BMD measured from this new region of interest to discriminate the fractured patients and controls, and compared it to BMD measured in the total proximal femur. For the femur ROI approach, the BMD values of the fractured patients and the controls had an overlap of 60 mg/cm 3, and only 1 out of 15 fractured patients had BMD below the overlap region; for the B-ROI approach, a much narrower BMD overlap region of 28 mg/cm 3 was observed, and 11 out of 15 fractured patients had BMDs below the overlap region.

  2. Total hip arthroplasty after failed treatment of proximal femur fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetsunaga, Tomonori; Fujiwara, Kazuo; Endo, Hirosuke; Noda, Tomoyuki; Tetsunaga, Tomoko; Sato, Toru; Shiota, Naofumi; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2017-03-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) is a good option as a salvage procedure after failed treatment of proximal femur fracture. The anatomy of the proximal femur, however, makes this surgery complicated and challenging. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radiographic and clinical outcomes of THA after failed treatment of proximal femur fractures. We retrospectively analysed 50 consecutive THAs (42 women, 8 men; mean age 77 years) after failed treatment of a proximal femur fracture. Mean postoperative follow-up was 58.1 months. Preoperative diagnoses were femoral neck fracture in 18 hips and trochanteric fracture in 32 hips, including three that were infected. Failure resulted from cutout in 22 cases, osteonecrosis in 12, non-union with failed fixation in nine, postoperative osteoarthritis in four, and infection in three. Factors compared included radiographic assessment, complication rate, visual analogue scale (VAS), and Harris Hip Scores (HHS). Radiographic variables included femoral neck anteversion and cup and stem alignment. Absolute values of the differences in femoral neck anteversion between the affected and healthy sides were 6.0° in the femoral neck fracture group and 19.2° in the trochanteric fracture group (p = 0.01). There were no significant differences in cup anteversion (p = 0.20) or stem anteversion (p = 0.08). The complication rate was significantly higher in the trochanteric fracture group than in the femoral neck fracture group (25 vs 0%, p fracture group included three periprosthetic fractures (9.4%), two dislocations (6.3%), two surgical-site infections (6.3%), and one stem penetration (3.1%). Although no significant differences between groups were seen in the VAS or HHS at final follow-up (p = 0.32, 0.09, respectively), these measures were significantly improved at final follow-up in both groups (p fractures requires consideration of complication risk and incorrect femoral neck anteversion.

  3. Hip axis length is a FRAX- and bone density-independent risk factor for hip fracture in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, William D; Lix, Lisa M; Morin, Suzanne N; Johansson, Helena; Odén, Anders; McCloskey, Eugene V; Kanis, John A

    2015-05-01

    Bone mineral density (BMD) measurement from dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is widely used to assess skeletal strength in clinical practice, but DXA instruments can also measure biomechanical parameters related to skeletal shape. The objective of the study was to determine whether DXA-derived hip geometry measures provide information on fracture prediction that is independent of hip fracture probability determined from the fracture risk assessment tool (FRAX) algorithm. This was a retrospective registry study using BMD results for Manitoba, Canada. Women aged 40 years and older with baseline hip DXA, derived hip geometry measures, and FRAX scores (n = 50 420) participated in the study. Hospitalized hip fracture (n = 1020) diagnosed during 319 137 person-years of follow-up (median 6.4 y) was measured. Among the hip geometry measures, hip axis length (HAL) showed a consistent association with hip fracture risk when adjusted for age [hazard ratio (HR) 1.30 per SD increase, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.22-1.38], and this was unaffected by further adjustment for BMD or FRAX score. Adjusted for FRAX score with BMD, there was a significant effect of increasing HAL quintile on hip fracture risk (linear trend P women (FRAX adjusted HR 1.70 per SD increase, 95% CI 1.48-1.94). DXA-derived hip geometry measurements are associated with incident hip fracture risk, but many do not confer significant independent predictive information. HAL was found to predict hip fractures when adjusted for BMD or FRAX score and may be of clinical value in refining hip fracture risk.

  4. Total medical costs of treating femoral neck fracture patients with hemi- or total hip arthroplasty: a cost analysis of a multicenter prospective study

    OpenAIRE

    Burgers, Paul; Hoogendoorn, Martine; Van Woensel, E.A.C.; Poolman, Rudolf; Bhandari, Mohit; Patka, Peter; Lieshout, Esther

    2016-01-01

    Summary The aim of this study was to determine the total medical costs for treating displaced femoral neck fractures with hemi- or total hip arthroplasty in fit elderly patients. The mean total costs per patient at 2?years of follow-up were ?26,399. These results contribute to cost awareness. Introduction The absolute number of hip fractures is rising and increases the already significant burden on society. The aim of this study was to determine the mean total medical costs per patient for tr...

  5. Acute cholecystitis in elderly patients after hip fracture: Incidence and epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Suk Kyu; Park, Hyung Jun; Oh, Hyoung-Keun; Kang, Yoo Kyung; Kim, Youngwoo

    2016-03-01

    Acute cholecystitis is a medical complication that can develop in the postoperative period after hip surgery. However, few studies have examined this complication in elderly patients. Our aim was therefore to evaluate the incidence and clinical manifestations of acute cholecystitis after hip fracture in elderly patients. Medical records and radiological studies of patients aged older than 65 years who underwent hip surgery for femoral neck or intertrochanteric fractures at a single hospital from April 2003 to March 2013 were reviewed retrospectively. We analyzed the type of cholecystitis (acalculous or calculous), clinical manifestations, fracture type (neck or trochanteric fracture), age, sex, body mass index, type of surgery, time to surgery, time from surgery to onset of acute cholecystitis and the timing of ambulation in acute cholecystitis cases. There were nine confirmed acute cholecystitis cases among 1211 hip fractures; thus, the incidence of acute cholecystitis within 2 months after hip fracture surgery was 0.74%. The incidence of acute cholecystitis was higher than we expected, and this condition can lead to more serious problems if overlooked. Acute cholecystitis as a medical complication after hip fracture was underestimated in previous studies. Furthermore, acute cholecystitis should be considered as a complication of hip fracture, not hip surgery, in the elderly. The present study does not imply that hip fracture causes acute cholecystitis, although elderly hip fracture patients are in an extremely debilitated state and are prone to developing acute cholecystitis. © 2015 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  6. Experiences of well-being and suffering after hip fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Birgit; Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth

    Background: Dependency and limited functional ability is common when older people fracture their hip. Experiences of well-being seem to be important during recovery and when living with a hip fracture as a balancing of suffering. Evidence exists that self-confidence is important during rehabilita......Background: Dependency and limited functional ability is common when older people fracture their hip. Experiences of well-being seem to be important during recovery and when living with a hip fracture as a balancing of suffering. Evidence exists that self-confidence is important during...... qualitative studies of lived experiences of well-being and suffering within one year after discharge with hip fracture. Method: Following the methodology of the Joanna Briggs Institute, a three-step literature search strategy was developed. Initially, a structured search was performed in the databases CINAHL...... five steps of meaning condensation was performed. Results: 30 studies were critically appraised, leaving 29 studies for inclusion in the analysis. Two main categories emerged, each containing three sub-categories. “Balancing a new life” described how participants strived to regain well-being through...

  7. Second Hip Fracture: Incidence, Trends, and Predictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzucchelli, Ramón; Pérez-Fernández, Elia; Crespí, Natalia; García-Vadillo, Alberto; Rodriguez Caravaca, Gil; Gil de Miguel, Angel; Carmona, Loreto

    2017-11-20

    Older persons who have suffered a hip fracture (HFx) are at increased risk of subsequent hip fractures. The cumulative incidence of a second hip fracture (SHFx) has been estimated in 8.4%; however, no studies have been carried out in our country, and the information on risk markers of SHFx is limited. The aim of this study was to estimate the incidence, explore trends, and examine predictors of SHFx in a suburban population of Spain. An observational longitudinal retrospective study was performed in a universal health coverage setting (Alcorcón, 1999-2011). Data were obtained from the area hospital discharge database. Annual incidence of HFx was estimated over 100,000 population (general and persons with HFx), and median time to SHFx by Kaplan-Meier tables. Cox regression was used for the analysis of association between SHFx and baseline predictors, measured by hazard ratio (HR). Among the 3430 patients who suffered a first HFx in the study period, 255 (7.4%) experienced a SHFx (4.5% of men and 8.5% of women). Median time between the first and second HFx was 3.7 years (SD 3.2). Annual incidence of HFx in population over 45 was 290.5 per 100,000 inhabitants (131.03 in men and 433.11 in women). Annual incidence of SHFx among persons with a HFx was 956.7 per 100,000 (1052.1 in women and 595.5 in men). There was a decline trend along the study period with an annual reduction of 10.4% (95% CI 7.7-13.0%; p < 0.001) in both sexes. The following associations were found: female sex (HR 1.41, 95% CI 0.97-2.02), age (HR 1.03, 95% CI 1.01-1.04), living in a nursing house (HR 1.46, 95% CI 1.10-1.94), and moderate to severe liver disease (HR 4.96, 95% CI 1.23-20.06). In our environment the occurrence of a SHFx is 7.4%, three-fold risk compared to no previous HFx. Being woman, elderly, living in a nursing home, and having severe to moderate liver disease may be important predictors of a SHFx. There seems to be adequate time between the first and the SHFx for interventions

  8. Higher incidence of hip fracture in newly diagnosed schizophrenic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Higher incidence of hip fracture in newly diagnosed schizophrenic patients in Taiwan. Hip fracture is a major public health concern due to its poor outcome and serious socioeconomic burden in older people (1). Evidence has shown that many factors are related to increased risk of hip fracture, but psychiatric diseases are ...

  9. Superior dislocation hip with anterior column acetabular fracture ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Superior variety of anterior dislocation of the hip is a rare injury. Its occurrence with acetabular fractures has been documented infrequently. We report a case of superior dislocation of the hip with anterior column acetabular fracture. Open reduction of the hip and internal fixation of the fracture was carried out using a twin ...

  10. Microarchitecture and Peripheral BMD are Impaired in Postmenopausal White Women With Fracture Independently of Total Hip T-Score: An International Multicenter Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutroy, Stephanie; Khosla, Sundeep; Sornay-Rendu, Elisabeth; Zanchetta, Maria Belen; McMahon, Donald J; Zhang, Chiyuan A; Chapurlat, Roland D; Zanchetta, Jose; Stein, Emily M; Bogado, Cesar; Majumdar, Sharmila; Burghardt, Andrew J; Shane, Elizabeth

    2016-06-01

    Because single-center studies have reported conflicting associations between microarchitecture and fracture prevalence, we included high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) data from five centers worldwide into a large multicenter analysis of postmenopausal women with and without fracture. Volumetric BMD (vBMD) and microarchitecture were assessed at the distal radius and tibia in 1379 white postmenopausal women (age 67 ± 8 years); 470 (34%) had at least one fracture including 349 with a major fragility fracture. Age, height, weight, and total hip T-score differed across centers and were employed as covariates in analyses. Women with fracture had higher BMI, were older, and had lower total hip T-score, but lumbar spine T-score was similar between groups. At the radius, total and trabecular vBMD and cortical thickness were significantly lower in fractured women in three out of five centers, and trabecular number in two centers. Similar results were found at the tibia. When data from five centers were combined, however, women with fracture had significantly lower total, trabecular, and cortical vBMD (2% to 7%), lower trabecular number (4% to 5%), and thinner cortices (5% to 6%) than women without fracture after adjustment for covariates. Results were similar at the radius and tibia. Similar results were observed with analysis restricted to major fragility fracture, vertebral and hip fractures, and peripheral fracture (at the radius). When focusing on osteopenic women, each SD decrease of total and trabecular vBMD was associated with a significantly increased risk of major fragility fracture (OR = 1.55 to 1.88, p fracture discrimination beyond peripheral total vBMD. In conclusion, we observed differences by center in the magnitude of fracture/nonfracture differences at both the distal radius and tibia. However, when data were pooled across centers and the sample size increased, we observed significant and consistent deficits in v

  11. COMPARATIVE STUDY BETWEEN PROXIMAL FEMORAL NAILING AND DYNAMIC HIP SCREW IN THE MANAGEMENT OF INTERTROCHANTERIC FRACTURES OF FEMUR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penugonda Ravi Shankar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AIMS AND OBJECTIVES : To determine the rate of union, complications, operative risks and functional outcomes in intertrochanteric fractures treated with DHS and PFN , To compare the results obtained and To compare the effectiveness of DHS and PFN in treatment of intertrochanteric fractures. RESULTS : In the present series of 24 cases of Intertrochanteric fractures were treated by proximal femoral nailing and dynamic hip screw, 12 cases in each. Out of 24 there were 13 male and 11 female. Minimum age was 36 years, maximum age 76 years with mean age of 59.25 years. Slip and fall accounted for 75% of cases. BOYD and GRIFFIN type II fracture accounted for 58.3% of cases. Mean duration of hospital stay was 26 days in both PFN and DHS groups. Length of incision was small 5 - 6cm in PFN group compared to 10 - 12cm in DHS group. Mean external blood loss 150ml in PFN group and 315 ml in DHS group. Mean time for full weight bearing was 11.5 weeks for PFN group and 14.3 weeks for DHS group. Radiological union was 12.3 weeks in PFN group and 15.5 weeks in DHS group. Good to excellent results were seen in 91.7% of cases in PFN group and 75% in DHS group. CONCLUSION : From the study, we consider PFN as better alternative to DHS in the treatment of intertrochanteric fractures but is technically difficult procedure and requires more expertise compared to DHS.As learning curve of PFN procedure is steep, with experience gained from each case operative time, radiation exposure and intraoperative complications can be reduced in each case of PFN

  12. Risedronate's Role in Reducing Hip Fracture in Postmenopausal Women with Established Osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian J. Gates

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis is a significant concern for postmenopausal women and is a critical factor in hip fracture. Examining evidence for osteoporosis medications in hip fracture is important for optimizing treatment. Purpose Review risedronate's role for hip fracture in postmenopausal women. Methods A literature search was conducted using Medline and Web of Science. The search was limited using the terms “risedronate” and “hip fracture,” and to studies that included women. Similar articles linked to the search and pertinent articles in bibliographies were also examined. Results Risedronate has demonstrated efficacy and cost effectiveness for hip fracture, but may not be beneficial for patients with low fracture risk. Risedronate is generally well tolerated, but may cause side effects in some patient populations. Conclusion Risedronate has benefit for hip fracture, but patients should be carefully screened to determine the appropriateness of risedronate before starting treatment.

  13. Are Hip-Specific Items Useful in a Quality of Life Questionnaire for Patients with Hip Fractures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Kai-Ping Grace; Lee, Hsin-Yi; Tsauo, Jau-Yih

    2009-01-01

    Researchers measure the significance of hip fracture by the patient's impairment. The patient's quality of life (QOL) is usually also substantially affected. However, there is no specific quality of life (QOL) questionnaire for patients with hip fractures. This study was designed to determine whether adding a new set of specific questions about…

  14. Risk Factors for Hip Fracture in Japanese Older Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Yamashita

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Risk factors for hip fracture in Japanese older populations are understudied compared with Western countries arguably due to the relatively lower prevalence rates in Japan. Nationally representative data from the Nihon University Japanese Longitudinal Study of Aging were analyzed using logistic regression to examine possible risk factors of hip fractures, separately for older women (n = 2,859 and older men (n = 2,108. Results showed that older Japanese women with difficulty bending their knees (OR = 1.9, with diabetes (OR = 1.7 times, and/or with more activity of daily living limitations (OR = 1.1 had higher risks of hip fracture. Older Japanese men with difficulty bending their knees (OR = 2.6, who use more external prescription drugs (OR = 1.9, and with cancer (OR = 2.0 times had higher risks of hip fracture. Further considerations of gender- and culture-specific factors along with the identified risk factors may provide insights into future intervention programs for hip fracture in Japanese older populations.

  15. Total Hip Bone Area Affects Fracture Prediction With FRAX® in Canadian White Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, William D; Lix, Lisa M; Majumdar, Sumit R; Morin, Suzanne N; Johansson, Helena; Odén, Anders; McCloskey, Eugene V; Kanis, John A

    2017-11-01

    Areal bone mineral density (BMD) measurements are confounded by skeletal size. Hip BMD is an input to the FRAX® tool (Centre for Metabolic Bone Diseases, University of Sheffield, United Kingdom), but it is unknown whether performance is affected by hip area. To examine whether fracture prediction by FRAX® is affected by hip area. Cohort study using a population-based BMD registry. A total of 58,108 white women aged ≥40 years. Incident major osteoporotic fracture (MOF; n = 4913) and hip fracture (n = 1369), stratified by total hip area quintile, before and after adjustment for hip axis length (HAL). Smaller hip area was associated with younger age and lower FRAX® scores, whereas incident fractures were greater in those with larger hip area (P for trend hip area quintile increased risk for MOF and hip fracture when adjusted for FRAX® score with BMD (P for trend hip area was associated with greater risk for incident MOF [adjusted hazard ratio (HR), 1.08; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.05 to 1.11] and hip fracture (HR, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.11 to 1.21), but not after adjustment for HAL. FRAX® with BMD underestimated MOF risk in the largest hip area quintile and underestimated hip fracture risk in the three largest hip area quintiles. In Canadian white women, skeletal size based on hip area affects fracture risk assessment based on FRAX® score with BMD, with risk underestimated in those with larger hip areas. Including HAL in the risk assessment compensates for this confounding by skeletal size and provides for more accurate assessment of fracture risk.

  16. Words of wisdom – patient perspectives to guide recovery for older adults after hip fracture: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schiller C

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Claire Schiller,1,2,* Thea Franke,1,* Jessica Belle,2 Joanie Sims-Gould,1,2 Joanna Sale,3,4 Maureen C Ashe1,2 1Centre for Hip Health and Mobility, Robert H N Ho Research Centre, Vancouver, BC, Canada; 2Department of Family Practice, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada; 3Musculoskeletal Health and Outcomes Research, Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, St Michael’s Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada; 4Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Recovery after hip fracture is complex involving many transitions along the care continuum. The recovery process, and these transitions, often present significant challenges for older adults and their families and caregivers. There is an identified need for more targeted information to support older adults and their families throughout the recovery process.Therefore, our goal was to understand the recovery phase after hip fracture from the patient perspective, and identify specific messages that could be integrated into future educational material for clinical practice to support patients during recovery. Using a qualitative description design guided by a strengths-based focus, we invited men and women 60+ years with previous hip fracture and their family members/caregivers to participate in interviews. We used purposive criterion sampling within the community setting to recruit participants. We followed a semi-structured guide to conduct the interviews, either in person or over the telephone, and focused questions on experiences with hip fracture and factors that enabled recovery. Two investigators coded and analyzed interview transcripts to identify key messages. We interviewed a total of 19 participants: eleven older adults who sustained a hip fracture and eight family member/caregivers. Participants described three main messages that enabled recovery: 1 seek support; 2 move more

  17. A Biomechanical Study Comparing Helical Blade with Screw Design for Sliding Hip Fixations of Unstable Intertrochanteric Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Luo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic hip screw (DHS is a well-established conventional implant for treating intertrochanteric fracture. However, revision surgery sometimes still occurs due to the cutting out of implants. A helical blade instead of threaded screw (DHS blade was designed to improve the fixation power of the osteoporotic intertrochanteric fracture. In this study, the biomechanical properties of DHS blade compared to the conventional DHS were evaluated using an unstable AO/OTA 31-A2 intertrochanteric fracture model. Fifty synthetic proximal femoral bone models with such configuration were fixed with DHS and DHS blade in five different positions: centre-centre (CC, superior-centre (SC, inferior-center (IC, centre-anterior (CA, and centre-posterior (CP. All models had undergone mechanical compression test, and the vertical and rotational displacements were recorded. The results showed that DHS blade had less vertical or rotational displacement than the conventional DHS in CC, CA, and IC positions. The greatest vertical and rotational displacements were found at CP position in both groups. Overall speaking, DHS blade was superior in resisting vertical or rotational displacement in comparison to conventional DHS, and the centre-posterior position had the poorest performance in both groups.

  18. Modeling climate effects on hip fracture rate by the multivariate GARCH model in Montreal region, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modarres, Reza; Ouarda, Taha B. M. J.; Vanasse, Alain; Orzanco, Maria Gabriela; Gosselin, Pierre

    2014-07-01

    Changes in extreme meteorological variables and the demographic shift towards an older population have made it important to investigate the association of climate variables and hip fracture by advanced methods in order to determine the climate variables that most affect hip fracture incidence. The nonlinear autoregressive moving average with exogenous variable-generalized autoregressive conditional heteroscedasticity (ARMA X-GARCH) and multivariate GARCH (MGARCH) time series approaches were applied to investigate the nonlinear association between hip fracture rate in female and male patients aged 40-74 and 75+ years and climate variables in the period of 1993-2004, in Montreal, Canada. The models describe 50-56 % of daily variation in hip fracture rate and identify snow depth, air temperature, day length and air pressure as the influencing variables on the time-varying mean and variance of the hip fracture rate. The conditional covariance between climate variables and hip fracture rate is increasing exponentially, showing that the effect of climate variables on hip fracture rate is most acute when rates are high and climate conditions are at their worst. In Montreal, climate variables, particularly snow depth and air temperature, appear to be important predictors of hip fracture incidence. The association of climate variables and hip fracture does not seem to change linearly with time, but increases exponentially under harsh climate conditions. The results of this study can be used to provide an adaptive climate-related public health program and ti guide allocation of services for avoiding hip fracture risk.

  19. Modeling climate effects on hip fracture rate by the multivariate GARCH model in Montreal region, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modarres, Reza; Ouarda, Taha B M J; Vanasse, Alain; Orzanco, Maria Gabriela; Gosselin, Pierre

    2014-07-01

    Changes in extreme meteorological variables and the demographic shift towards an older population have made it important to investigate the association of climate variables and hip fracture by advanced methods in order to determine the climate variables that most affect hip fracture incidence. The nonlinear autoregressive moving average with exogenous variable-generalized autoregressive conditional heteroscedasticity (ARMAX-GARCH) and multivariate GARCH (MGARCH) time series approaches were applied to investigate the nonlinear association between hip fracture rate in female and male patients aged 40-74 and 75+ years and climate variables in the period of 1993-2004, in Montreal, Canada. The models describe 50-56% of daily variation in hip fracture rate and identify snow depth, air temperature, day length and air pressure as the influencing variables on the time-varying mean and variance of the hip fracture rate. The conditional covariance between climate variables and hip fracture rate is increasing exponentially, showing that the effect of climate variables on hip fracture rate is most acute when rates are high and climate conditions are at their worst. In Montreal, climate variables, particularly snow depth and air temperature, appear to be important predictors of hip fracture incidence. The association of climate variables and hip fracture does not seem to change linearly with time, but increases exponentially under harsh climate conditions. The results of this study can be used to provide an adaptive climate-related public health program and ti guide allocation of services for avoiding hip fracture risk.

  20. High reliability of an algorithm for choice of implants in hip fracture patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palm, Henrik; Posner, Eva; Ahler-Toftehøj, Hans-Ulrik

    2013-01-01

    Hip fracture treatment is controversial, with high complication rates. An algorithm for hip fracture surgery has shown reduced reoperation rates, but choice of implant is based on the commonly used fracture classifications, which were previously evaluated to be unreliable. The purpose of this study...

  1. A retrospective analysis of bilateral fractures over sixteen years: localisation and variation in treatment of second hip fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Kok, Laura M.; van der Steenhoven, Tim J.; Nelissen, Rob G. H. H.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was the evaluation of contralateral hip fractures after a previous hip fracture. For this retrospective analysis patients were selected from the database of the LUMC, a teaching hospital in the south-west of the Netherlands. We analyzed all patients with a second fracture of a hip between 1992 and 2007. The exclusion criteria were high impact trauma and patients with diseases or medication known to have a negative effect on bone metabolism. A total of 1,604 hip fractures...

  2. Predicting discharge location of hip fracture patients; the new discharge of hip fracture patients score

    OpenAIRE

    Vochteloo, Anne; Tuinebreijer, Wim; Maier, Andrea; Nelissen, Rob; Bloem, Rolf; Pilot, Peter

    2012-01-01

    textabstractPurpose This paper reports on the development and validity of a new instrument, called the discharge of hip fracture patients score (DHP), that predicts at admission the discharge location in patients living in their own home prior to hip fracture surgery. Methods A total of 310 patients aged 50 years and above were included. Risk factors for discharge to an alternative location (DAL) were analysed with a multivariable regression analysis taking the admission variables into accoun...

  3. Effectiveness of multidisciplinary nutritional care on nutritional intake, nutritional status and quality of life in patients with hip fractures: a controlled prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, Jellie C.; Goosen, Jon H. M.; de Wolf, G. Sander; Verheyen, Cees C. P. M.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of a multidisciplinary intervention program on nutritional intake and of nutritional intake on nutritional status and quality of life in older patients treated for a hip fracture. A controlled prospective cohort study included 66 patients

  4. Zoledronic acid and clinical fractures and mortality after hip fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyles, Kenneth W; Colón-Emeric, Cathleen S; Magaziner, Jay S

    2007-01-01

    receiving zoledronic acid were pyrexia, myalgia, and bone and musculoskeletal pain. No cases of osteonecrosis of the jaw were reported, and no adverse effects on the healing of fractures were noted. The rates of renal and cardiovascular adverse events, including atrial fibrillation and stroke, were similar......BACKGROUND: Mortality is increased after a hip fracture, and strategies that improve outcomes are needed. METHODS: In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 1065 patients were assigned to receive yearly intravenous zoledronic acid (at a dose of 5 mg), and 1062 patients were...... assigned to receive placebo. The infusions were first administered within 90 days after surgical repair of a hip fracture. All patients (mean age, 74.5 years) received supplemental vitamin D and calcium. The median follow-up was 1.9 years. The primary end point was a new clinical fracture. RESULTS...

  5. Validation of a 5-year risk score of hip fracture in postmenopausal women. The Danish Nurse Cohort Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hundrup, Y A; Jacobsen, R K; Andreasen, A H

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) hip fracture risk score in 15,648 postmenopausal Danish nurses. The algorithm was well calibrated for Denmark. However, the sensitivity was poor at common decision making thresholds. Obtaining sensitivity better than 80% led to a low specificity...

  6. [Periprosthetic fractures following total hip and knee arthroplasty: Risk factors, epidemiological aspects, diagnostics and classification systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, M; Perka, C; von Roth, P

    2016-03-01

    Periprosthetic fractures following hip and knee arthroplasty are potentially severe complications. As a fundament in diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, specific classification systems are necessary to ensure an optimal individualized treatment of these sometimes complicated fractures. This review article summarizes the epidemiological aspects, risk factors and diagnostics of periprosthetic hip and knee fractures. The most frequently used location related fracture classifications systems are explained. In addition, the recently introduced unified classification system (UCS), which is applicable to any location of periprosthetic fractures, is described in detail. Initial studies have shown a reliable applicability of the UCS to periprosthetic hip and knee fractures.

  7. Use of inhaled and oral glucocorticoids, severity of inflammatory disease and risk of hip/femur fracture : a population-based case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, F.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/303546670; Pouwels, S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/34158990X; Lammers, J.W.J.; Leufkens, H.G.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/075255049; Bracke, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/185443354; Cooper, C.; van Staa, T.P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304827762

    BACKGROUND: Patients using higher dosages of inhaled or oral glucocorticoids (GCs) have an increased risk of hip/femur fractures. The role of the underlying disease in the aetiology of this increased risk has not been widely studied. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the contribution of the underlying disease

  8. Total medical costs of treating femoral neck fracture patients with hemi- or total hip arthroplasty: a cost analysis of a multicenter prospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.T.P.W. Burgers (Paul); M. Hoogendoorn (Martine); E.A.C. Van Woensel; R.W. Poolman (Rudolf); M. Bhandari (Mohit); P. Patka (Peter); E.M.M. van Lieshout (Esther)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractSummary: The aim of this study was to determine the total medical costs for treating displaced femoral neck fractures with hemi- or total hip arthroplasty in fit elderly patients. The mean total costs per patient at 2 years of follow-up were €26,399. These results contribute to cost

  9. Greater intake of fruit and vegetables is associated with a lower risk of osteoporotic hip fractures in elderly Chinese: a 1:1 matched case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, H-L; Wu, B-H; Xue, W-Q; He, M-G; Fan, F; Ouyang, W-F; Tu, S-L; Zhu, H-L; Chen, Y-M

    2013-11-01

    In this case-control study, we examined the relationship between the consumption of fruit and vegetables and risk of hip fractures in 646 pairs of incident cases and controls in elderly Chinese. We found that greater consumption of both fruit and vegetables in men and vegetables in women was associated with a lower risk of osteoporotic hip fractures in elderly Chinese. The association between fruit and vegetable consumption and the risk of osteoporotic fractures remains controversial due to limited published evidence. The purpose of this study was to determine whether consuming fruits and vegetables has a protective effect against hip fractures. Between January 2008 and December 2012, 646 (162 males, 484 females) incident cases (70.9 ± 6.8 years) of hip fractures were enrolled from five hospitals, with 646 sex- and age-matched (±3 years) controls (70.7 ± 6.8 years) from hospitals or the community. Face-to-face interviews were conducted to assess habitual dietary intakes using a 79-item food frequency questionnaire and various covariates by structured questionnaires. Multivariate conditional logistic regression analyses showed dose-dependent inverse correlations between the intake of total fruit (p-trend = 0.014), total vegetables (p-trend fruits and vegetables combined (p-trend fruits, vegetables and the combination of fruits and vegetables were 0.53 (0.32-0.87), 0.37 (0.23-0.60) and 0.25 (0.15-0.41), respectively. Stratified analyses showed that the benefits remained significant in males (p = 0.001) but not in females (p = 0.210) (p-interaction 0.045). Among the subcategories of fruits and vegetables, similar associations were observed for all subgroups except light-coloured fruits. Our findings suggest that greater consumption of both fruits and vegetables in men and vegetables in women may decrease the risk of osteoporotic hip fractures in elderly Chinese.

  10. Dislocation of bipolar hip hemiarthroplasty through a postero-lateral approach for femoral neck fractures: A cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukka, Sebastian; Lindqvist, Jenny; Peyda, Sara; Brodén, Cyrus; Mahmood, Sarwar; Hassany, Hamid; Sayed-Noor, Arkan

    2015-07-01

    To analyze postoperative global femoral offset (FO), leg length discrepancy (LLD) and Wiberg angle as risk factors for prosthetic dislocation after treatment with bipolar hemiarthoplasty (HA) through a postero-lateral approach for femoral neck fracture (FNF). Three hundred and seventy three patients treated with a cemented bipolar HA through a postero-lateral approach between January 2006 and December 2013 were included in a cohort study with a follow-up time ranging from 6 months to 7 years. Radiographs and all surgical records were reviewed regarding Global FO, LLD and Wiberg angle. We compared stable hips without dislocation to those with either a single dislocation and those with recurrent instability. Three hundred and twenty eight hips fulfilled the inclusion criteria and were analyzed in the study. The incidence of prosthetic dislocation was 10.7% (36/373). The mean time from surgery to first dislocation was 3.9 months (0-47) and 62.5% had recurrent dislocations. Patients with dislocation had a statistically significantly decreased postoperative global FO (-6.4 mm vs. -2.8 mm, p = 0.04), LLD (-2 vs. 1.5 mm, p = 0.03) and smaller Wiberg angle (40° vs. 46°, p = 0.01) on the operated side compared with the rest of cohort. In comparison to age and sex-matched control groups from the cohort, the difference in the radiographic parameters were significant in patients with recurrent dislocations but not in patients with a single dislocation. Patients with recurrent dislocations had a decreased postoperative global FO, shorter leg and shallower acetabulum on the operated side compared with their controls. These factors might decrease the soft-tissue tension around the operated hip and predispose to dislocation. Therapeutic Level III. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  11. Recent hip fracture trends in Sweden and Denmark with age-period-cohort effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosengren, B E; Björk, J; Cooper, C

    2017-01-01

    born thereafter however seem to have a higher hip fracture risk, and we expect a reversal of the present decline in rates, with increasing hip fracture rates in both Denmark and Sweden during the upcoming decade. CONCLUSIONS: Time trends, cohort, and period effects were different in SE and DK. This may......This study used nationwide hip fracture data from Denmark and Sweden during 1987-2010 to examine effects of (birth) cohort and period. We found that time trends, cohort, and period effects were different in the two countries. Results also indicated that hip fracture rates may increase in the not so...... far future. INTRODUCTION: The reasons for the downturn in hip fracture rates remain largely unclear but circumstances earlier in life seem important. METHODS: We ascertained hip fractures in the populations ≥50 years in Denmark and Sweden in national discharge registers. Country- and sex-specific age...

  12. Hip Fracture in the Elderly Patients: A Sentinel Event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koso, Riikka E; Sheets, Charles; Richardson, William J; Galanos, Anthony N

    2017-01-01

    Hip fracture in the elderly patients is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. There is great need for advance care planning should a patient fail to rehabilitate or experience an adverse event during or after recovery. This study was performed to evaluate for palliative care consultation and changes in code status and/or advance directives in elderly patients with hip fracture. We performed a retrospective review of 186 consecutive patients aged 65 years and older with a hip fracture due to a low-energy fall who underwent surgery at a large academic institution between August 1, 2013, and September 1, 2014. Risk factors assessed were patient demographics, home status, mobility, code status, comorbidities, medications, and hospitalizations prior to injury. Outcomes of interest included palliative care consultation, complications, mortality, and most recent code status, mobility, and home. About 186 patients with hip fractures were included. Three patients died, and 12 (6.5%) sustained major complications during admission. Nearly one-third (51 patients) died upon final follow-up approximately 1.5 years after surgery. Of the patients who died, palliative care consulted on 6 (11.8%) during initial admission. Eleven (21.6%) were full code at death. Three patients underwent cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and 1 underwent massive transfusion and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation prior to changing their code status to do not attempt resuscitation. Hip fracture in elderly patients is an important opportunity to reassess the patient's personal health-care priorities. Advance directives, goals of care, and code status documentation should be updated in all elderly patients with hip fracture, should the patient's health decompensate.

  13. Adherence to an Exercise Intervention Among Older Women Post Hip Fracture

    OpenAIRE

    Resnick, Barbara; D’Adamo, Christopher; Shardell, Michelle; Orwig, Denise; Hawkes, William; Hebel, J. Richard; Golden, Justine; Magaziner, Jay; Zimmerman, Sheryl; Yu-Yahiro, Janet

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate adherence to home-based exercise interventions among older women post hip fracture that were randomized to one of three exercise intervention groups or a routine care group. A total of 157 female hip fracture patients provided data for the intervention analysis. Factors evaluated baseline, 2, 6, and 12 months post hip fracture included demographic variables, adherence to treatment visits, self-efficacy, outcome expectations, stage of change for exerci...

  14. Which AO/OTA 31-A2 pertrochanteric fractures can be treated with a dynamic hip screw without developing a lateral wall fracture? A CT-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Gaurav; Singh, Ravijot; Gn, Kiran Kumar; Jain, Vaibhav; Gupta, Ankit; Gamanagatti, Shivanand; Farooque, Kamran; Sharma, Vijay

    2016-05-01

    To determine whether radiographic measurements derived from standard computed tomography (CT) evaluation can be used to predict likelihood of a peri-operative lateral femoral wall fracture in AO/OTA 31-A2 pertrochanteric fractures treated with a dynamic hip screw (DHS). Fifty-one patients with AO/OTA 31-A2 classified pertrochanteric fractures were evaluated using a pre-operative CT scan of the pelvis with both hips. Dimensions of the lateral wall were calculated for each patient using four parameters: (1) height of the lateral wall above the vastus ridge; (2) circumference of the lateral wall 2 cm below the vastus ridge at an angle of 135°; this circumference was further divided into an anterior, lateral and posterior component; (3) cortical thickness at the centre of the lateral component of the lateral wall; and (4) cortical index. All patients were treated with a 135° DHS. Postoperative radiographs were assessed for lateral femoral wall fracture. Patients with a lateral wall fracture (17/51) had a smaller circumference (4.47 cm vs 5.44 cm p value fractures with a lateral wall height of > 1.68 cm and an anterior component of > 2.10 cm in circumference are not likely to sustain a lateral wall fracture when treated with a DHS.

  15. Non-hip and non-vertebral fractures: the neglected fracture sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, K L; Henry, M J; Brennan-Olsen, S L; Bucki-Smith, G; Nicholson, G C; Korn, S; Sanders, K M; Pasco, J A; Kotowicz, M A

    2016-03-01

    Non-hip, non-vertebral fractures (NHNVF) were compared with hip, vertebral and controls. NHNVF were younger and heavier than controls and hip/vertebral fractures in both men and women, respectively. Falls and prior fractures were less common in NHNVF than hip fractures. Glucocorticoid use was lower in NHNVF compared to vertebral fracture (VF) in men. Although hip fracture (HF) and vertebral fractures (VF) receive the most attention in the literature and are the targeted sites for fracture prevention, non-hip, non-vertebral fracture (NHNVF) sites account for a greater proportion of fractures than the hip or vertebrae. This study aimed to assess risk factors for NHNVF and compare them with those for HF, VF and controls. Incident fractures during 2005-2007 for men and 1994-1996 for women were identified using computerised keyword searches of radiological reports, and controls were selected at random from electoral rolls for participation in the Geelong Osteoporosis Study. Participants aged 60+ years were included in this study. Compared to controls, men and women with NHNVF were younger (ORs, 0.90, 95% CI 0.86-0.94; and 0.96, 0.93-0.98, respectively) and had a lower femoral neck bone mineral density (BMD) T-score (age-adjusted; difference [men] 0.383, P = 0.002; [women] 0.287, P = 0.001). Compared to HF, men and women with NHNVF were heavier (difference [men] 9.0 kg, P = 0.01; [women] 7.6 kg, P fractures (0.38, 0.15-0.98) were less common compared to HF; and glucocorticoid use was less common for NHNVF (0.30, 0.11-0.85) compared to VF. Given the high numbers of NHNVF sustained by men and women in this study, fracture prevention strategies should focus on individuals with high risk of sustaining these types of fractures, as well as on individuals who are more likely to sustain a HF or VF.

  16. Hip fracture risk in relation to vitamin D supplementation and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials and observational studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roddam Andrew W

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vitamin D supplementation for fracture prevention is widespread despite conflicting interpretation of relevant randomised controlled trial (RCT evidence. This study summarises quantitatively the current evidence from RCTs and observational studies regarding vitamin D, parathyroid hormone (PTH and hip fracture risk. Methods We undertook separate meta-analyses of RCTs examining vitamin D supplementation and hip fracture, and observational studies of serum vitamin D status (25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OHD level, PTH and hip fracture. Results from RCTs were combined using the reported hazard ratios/relative risks (RR. Results from case-control studies were combined using the ratio of 25(OHD and PTH measurements of hip fracture cases compared with controls. Original published studies of vitamin D, PTH and hip fracture were identified through PubMed and Web of Science databases, searches of reference lists and forward citations of key papers. Results The seven eligible RCTs identified showed no significant difference in hip fracture risk in those randomised to cholecalciferol or ergocalciferol supplementation versus placebo/control (RR = 1.13[95%CI 0.98-1.29]; 801 cases, with no significant difference between trials of 21 (heterogeneity = 51.02, p 216 (heterogeneity = 137.9, p 29 (heterogeneity = 149.68, p Conclusions Neither higher nor lower dose vitamin D supplementation prevented hip fracture. Randomised and observational data on vitamin D and hip fracture appear to differ. The reason for this is unclear; one possible explanation is uncontrolled confounding in observational studies. Post-fracture PTH levels are unrelated to hip fracture risk.

  17. Handgrip strength but not appendicular lean mass is an independent predictor of functional outcome in hip-fracture women: a short-term prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Monaco, Marco; Castiglioni, Carlotta; De Toma, Elena; Gardin, Luisa; Giordano, Silvia; Di Monaco, Roberto; Tappero, Rosa

    2014-09-01

    To investigate the contribution of muscle mass and handgrip strength in predicting the functional outcome after hip fracture in women. Observational study. Rehabilitation hospital. White women (N=123 of 149) who were consecutively admitted to a rehabilitation hospital because of their first fracture of the hip. Not applicable. We measured appendicular lean mass (aLM) by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) 21.1 ± 8.7 (mean ± SD) days after hip fracture occurrence in the 123 women. On the same day, we assessed grip strength at the nondominant arm with a dynamometer. At the end of acute inpatient rehabilitation we measured the ability to function in activities of daily living by using the Barthel Index, and lower limb performance by using the Timed Up and Go (TUG) test. We found significant correlations between handgrip strength measured before rehabilitation and Barthel Index scores after rehabilitation (ρ=.50; Pwomen after a hip fracture. Copyright © 2014 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Impact of board-certificated physiatrists on rehabilitation outcomes in elderly patients after hip fracture: An observational study using the Japan Rehabilitation Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momosaki, Ryo; Kakuda, Wataru; Yamada, Naoki; Abo, Masahiro

    2016-08-01

    To clarify the impact on rehabilitation outcomes of board-certificated physiatrists (BCP) as the physicians with primary responsibility for elderly patients in convalescent rehabilitation wards after hip fracture. The present retrospective observational study used 2005-2013 data from the Japan Rehabilitation Database. We identified in-hospital patients with hip fracture admitted to rehabilitation wards. After applying exclusion criteria, 824 patients were eligible. The primary outcome was functional independence measure instrument efficiency. BCP were responsible for the care of 46% of patients with hip fracture. Patients who were managed by a BCP had significantly higher mean functional independence measure efficiency than patients who were not, both before and after adjustment by inverse propensity-score weighting (0.37 vs 0.26; P = 0.04 and 0.39 vs 0.26; P rehabilitation outcomes in patients with hip fracture at convalescent rehabilitation wards. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2016; 16: 963-968. © 2015 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  19. Exercise, nutrition and managing hip fracture in older persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiatarone Singh, Maria A

    2014-01-01

    Lifestyle factors play a role in both the genesis and recovery from fragility fracture. The purpose of this review is to summarize recent evidence for exercise and nutrition in the management of hip fracture. Recent randomized controlled trials of exercise have primarily consisted of isolated resistance training or multimodal home-based programs. More robust, long-term, or supervised training is generally associated with greater clinical benefits, including muscle strength, mobility, and function. Recent nutritional interventions have included multinutrient supplements, nutritional counseling and support, and vitamin D/calcium supplementation. Isolated nutritional interventions have not consistently shown significant impact on long-term outcomes after hip fracture, although improvements in body weight, biochemical indices, complication rates, and mobility have been reported. Overall, there is marked heterogeneity in the robustness of responses seen to hip fracture treatment studies. Few large, long-term, multicomponent interventions with clinically relevant outcomes of functional independence, need for residential care, mortality, and quality of life have been reported. Evidence-based approaches to hip fracture should include comprehensive risk-factor assessment and treatment for sarcopenia/dynapenia, balance impairment, undernutrition of protein, energy, vitamin D and calcium, depression, cognitive impairment, sensory impairment, social isolation, and comorbid illness with exercise, nutrition and other modalities.

  20. Population data on calcium in drinking water and hip fracture: An association may depend on other minerals in water. A NOREPOS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Cecilie; Søgaard, Anne Johanne; Tell, Grethe S; Forsén, Lisa; Flaten, Trond Peder; Hongve, Dag; Omsland, Tone Kristin; Holvik, Kristin; Meyer, Haakon E; Aamodt, Geir

    2015-12-01

    The Norwegian population has among the highest hip fracture rates in the world. The incidence varies geographically, also within Norway. Calcium in drinking water has been found to be beneficially associated with bone health in some studies, but not in all. In most previous studies, other minerals in water have not been taken into account. Trace minerals, for which drinking water can be an important source and even fulfill the daily nutritional requirement, could act as effect-modifiers in the association between calcium and hip fracture risk. The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between calcium in drinking water and hip fracture, and whether other water minerals modified this association. A survey of trace metals in 429 waterworks, supplying 64% of the population in Norway, was linked geographically to the home addresses of patients with incident hip fractures (1994-2000). Drinking water mineral concentrations were divided into "low" (below and equal waterworks average) and "high" (above waterworks average). Poisson regression models were fitted, and all incidence rate ratios (IRRs) were adjusted for age, geographic region, urbanization degree, type of water source, and pH of the water. Effect modifications were examined by stratification, and interactions between calcium and magnesium, copper, zinc, iron and manganese were tested both on the multiplicative and the additive scale. Analyses were stratified on gender. Among those supplied from the 429 waterworks (2,110,916 person-years in men and 2,397,217 person-years in women), 5433 men and 13,493 women aged 50-85 years suffered a hip fracture during 1994-2000. Compared to low calcium in drinking water, a high level was associated with a 15% lower hip fracture risk in men (IRR=0.85, 95% CI: 0.78, 0.91) but no significant difference was found in women (IRR=0.98, 95%CI: 0.93-1.02). There was interaction between calcium and copper on hip fracture risk in men (p=0.051); the association

  1. Feasibility of Progressive Strength Training Implemented in the Acute Ward after Hip Fracture Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronborg, Lise; Bandholm, Thomas; Palm, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Patients with a hip fracture lose more than 50% knee-extension strength in the fractured limb within one week of surgery. Hence, immediate progressive strength training following hip fracture surgery may be rational, but the feasibility unknown. OBJECTIVE: To examine the feasibility...... of in-hospital progressive strength training implemented in the acute ward following hip fracture surgery, based on pre-specified criteria for feasibility. DESIGN, SETTING AND PATIENTS: A prospective cohort study conducted in an acute orthopedic hip fracture unit at a university hospital. A consecutive...... sample of 36 patients, 18 with a cervical and 18 with a trochanteric hip fracture (27 women and 9 men, mean (SD) age of 79.4 (8.3) years) were included between June and December 2012. INTERVENTION: A daily (on weekdays) program of progressive knee-extension strength training for the fractured limb, using...

  2. Prediction of postoperative morbidity, mortality and rehabilitation in hip fracture patients: the cumulated ambulation score

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Nicolai Bang; Kristensen, Morten Tange; Kehlet, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To validate the cumulated ambulation score as an early postoperative predictor of short-term outcome in hip fracture patients. DESIGN: Prospective, descriptive study. SETTING: An orthopaedic hip fracture unit in a university hospital. PATIENTS: Four hundred and twenty-six consecutive hip...... of short-term postoperative outcome after hip fracture surgery....... fracture patients with an independent walking function admitted from their own home. Rehabilitation followed a well-defined multimodal rehabilitation regimen and discharge criteria. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Admission tests with a new mobility score to assess prefracture functional mobility and a short mental...

  3. Survival times of patients with a first hip fracture with and without subsequent major long-bone fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angthong, Chayanin; Angthong, Wirana; Harnroongroj, Thos; Naito, Masatoshi; Harnroongroj, Thossart

    2013-01-01

    Survival rates are poorer after a second hip fracture than after a first hip fracture. Previous survival studies have included in-hospital mortality. Excluding in-hospital deaths from the analysis allows survival times to be evaluated in community-based patients. There is still a lack of data regarding the effects of subsequent fractures on survival times after hospital discharge following an initial hip fracture. This study compared the survival times of community-dwelling patients with hip fracture who had or did not have a subsequent major long-bone fracture. Hazard ratios and risk factors for subsequent fractures and mortality rates with and without subsequent fractures were calculated. Of 844 patients with hip fracture from 2000 through 2008, 71 had a subsequent major long-bone fracture and 773 did not. Patients who died of other causes, such as perioperative complications, during hospitalization were excluded. Such exclusion allowed us to determine the effect of subsequent fracture on the survival of community-dwelling individuals after hospital discharge or after the time of the fracture if they did not need hospitalization. Demographic data, causes of death, and mortality rates were recorded. Differences in mortality rates between the patient groups and hazard ratios were calculated. Mortality rates during the first year and from 1 to 5 years after the most recent fracture were 5.6% and 1.4%, respectively, in patients with subsequent fractures, and 4.7% and 1.4%, respectively, in patients without subsequent fractures. These rates did not differ significantly between the groups. Cox regression analysis and calculation of hazard ratios did not show significant differences between patients with subsequent fractures and those without. On univariate and multivariate analyses, age fracture. This study found that survival times did not differ significantly between patients with and without subsequent major long-bone fractures after hip fracture. Therefore, all

  4. Unpacking the key components of a programme to improve the timeliness of hip-fracture care: a mixed-methods case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzocato, Pamela; Unbeck, Maria; Elg, Mattias; Sköldenberg, Olof Gustaf; Thor, Johan

    2015-11-09

    Delay to surgery for patients with hip fracture is associated with higher incidence of post-operative complications, prolonged recovery and length of stay, and increased mortality. Therefore, many health care organisations launch improvement programmes to reduce the wait for surgery. The heterogeneous application of similar methods, and the multifaceted nature of the interventions, constrain the understanding of which method works, when, and how. In complex acute care settings, another concern is how changes for one patient group influence the care for other groups. We therefore set out to analyse how multiple components of hip-fracture improvement efforts aimed to reduce the time to surgery influenced that time both for hip-fracture patients and for other acute surgical orthopaedic inpatients. This study is an observational mixed-methods single case study of improvement efforts at a Swedish acute care hospital, which triangulates control chart analysis of process performance data over a five year period with interview, document, and non-participant observation data. The improvement efforts led to an increase in the monthly percentage of hip-fracture patients operated within 24 h of admission from an average of 47% to 83%, with performance predictably ranging between 67% and 98% if the process continues unchanged. Meanwhile, no significant changes in lead time to surgery for other acute surgical orthopaedic inpatients were observed. Interview data indicated that multiple intervention components contributed to making the process more reliable. The triangulation of qualitative and quantitative data, however, indicated that key changes that improved performance were the creation of a process improvement team and having an experienced clinician coordinate demand and supply of surgical services daily and enhance pre-operative patient preparation. Timeliness of surgery for patients with hip fracture in a complex hospital setting can be substantially improved without

  5. Effects of impairment in activities of daily living on predicting mortality following hip fracture surgery in studies using administrative healthcare databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Impairment in activities of daily living (ADL) is an important predictor of outcomes although many administrative databases lack information on ADL function. We evaluated the impact of ADL function on predicting postoperative mortality among older adults with hip fractures in Ontario, Canada. Methods Sociodemographic and medical correlates of ADL impairment were first identified in a population of older adults with hip fractures who had ADL information available prior to hip fracture. A logistic regression model was developed to predict 360-day postoperative mortality and the predictive ability of this model were compared when ADL impairment was included or omitted from the model. Results The study sample (N = 1,329) had a mean age of 85.2 years, were 72.8% female and the majority resided in long-term care (78.5%). Overall, 36.4% of individuals died within 360 days of surgery. After controlling for age, sex, medical comorbidity and medical conditions correlated with ADL impairment, addition of ADL measures improved the logistic regression model for predicting 360 day mortality (AIC = 1706.9 vs. 1695.0; c -statistic = 0.65 vs 0.67; difference in - 2 log likelihood ratios: χ2 = 16.9, p = 0.002). Conclusions Direct measures of ADL impairment provides additional prognostic information on mortality for older adults with hip fractures even after controlling for medical comorbidity. Observational studies using administrative databases without measures of ADLs may be potentially prone to confounding and bias and case-mix adjustment for hip fracture outcomes should include ADL measures where these are available. PMID:24472282

  6. The effect of osteoporotic treatment on the functional outcome, re-fracture rate, quality of life and mortality in patients with hip fractures: a prospective functional and clinical outcome study on 520 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makridis, Konstantinos G; Karachalios, Theofilos; Kontogeorgakos, Vasilios A; Badras, Leonidas S; Malizos, Konstantinos N

    2015-02-01

    Numerous high quality studies have shown the positive effects of various osteoporotic medical treatment regimens on bone mass and on the reduction of risk for new spinal, hip and non-spinal fractures in osteoporotic patients. However, the effect of osteoporotic treatment on the functional and clinical outcome of patients who have sustained hip fractures and been treated surgically has not yet been addressed. Five hundred and twenty patients out of 611 who were admitted (2009-2011), operated on due to a hip fracture and completed their follow-up evaluations were included in this study. Data related to functional outcome scores, re-fracture rate, quality of life and mortality rate were prospectively recorded, analysed and correlated to osteoporotic medical treatment. There were 151 (25%) men and 369 (71%) women with a mean age of 80.7 years (range, 60 to 90 years). At a mean follow-up of 27.5 months (range, 24 to 36 months) a mortality rate of 23.6% at 2 years was recorded. Mean values of functional and quality of life scores were found to have progressively improved within two years after surgery. Seventy-eight (15%) patients were taking osteoporotic treatment before their hip fracture and 89 (17.1%) started afterwards. Osteoporotic treatment proved to be an important predictor of functional recovery (all p valuesfracture rate (p=0.028) and quality of life (EQ-5D, all dimensions, p valuesfracture mortality rates. Osteoporotic treatment taken before or initiated after fracture is a strong predictor of functional and clinical outcome in patients with hip fractures treated surgically. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. A pilot study examining the impact of exercise training on skeletal muscle genes related to the TLR signaling pathway in older adults following hip fracture recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Alec I; Briggs, Robert A; Barrows, Katherine M; Nelson, Daniel S; Kwon, Oh Sung; Hopkins, Paul N; Higgins, Thomas F; Marcus, Robin L; Drummond, Micah J

    2017-01-01

    Older adults after hip fracture surgery experience progressive muscle atrophy and weakness, limiting full recovery. Further understanding of the molecular mechanisms in muscle with adaptation to exercise training in this vulnerable population is necessary. Therefore, we conducted a pilot study to investigate the skeletal muscle inflammatory and ceramide biosynthesis gene expression levels associated with the toll-like receptor (TLR) pathway before (Pre) and following a 3-mo multicomponent exercise training program in older adults (3M, 4F; 78.4 ± 13.3 yr; 25.5 ± 2.3 kg/m2) ~4 mo after repair from hip fracture (HipFx). Vastus lateralis biopsies from the surgical limb were obtained before (Pre) and after training. Molecular end points and muscle function data were also compared with matched nonexercise healthy controls (CON). As a follow-up analysis, we evaluated specific sphingolipid pools in HipFx and CON muscle. Following training, quadriceps cross-sectional area, strength, and 6-min walk (6MW) increased in the surgical limb (P exercise training alters skeletal muscle inflammation and ceramide metabolism associated with TLR signaling in older adults recovering from hip fracture surgery and may be related to improvements in muscle function recovery. These pilot data demonstrate that 3 mo of exercise training in older adults recovering from hip fracture surgery was able to mitigate skeletal muscle gene expression related to inflammation and ceramide metabolism while also improving surgical limb lean tissue, strength, and physical function. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  8. Rapid Geriatric Assessment of Hip Fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanker, Jesse; Duque, Gustavo

    2017-08-01

    A comprehensive geriatric assessment, combined with a battery of imaging and blood tests, should be able to identify those hip fracture patients who are at higher risk of short- and long-term complications. This comprehensive assessment should be followed by the implementation of a comprehensive multidimensional care plan aimed to prevent negative outcomes in the postoperative period (short and long term), thus assuring a safe and prompt functional recovery while also preventing future falls and fractures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Anaesthesia for hip fracture surgery in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guay, Joanne; Parker, Martyn J; Gajendragadkar, Pushpaj R; Kopp, Sandra

    2016-02-22

    The majority of people with hip fracture are treated surgically, requiring anaesthesia. The main focus of this review is the comparison of regional versus general anaesthesia for hip (proximal femoral) fracture repair in adults. We did not consider supplementary regional blocks in this review as they have been studied in another review. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; the Cochrane Library; 2014, Issue 3), MEDLINE (Ovid SP, 2003 to March 2014) and EMBASE (Ovid SP, 2003 to March 2014). We included randomized trials comparing different methods of anaesthesia for hip fracture surgery in adults. The primary focus of this review was the comparison of regional anaesthesia versus general anaesthesia. The use of nerve blocks preoperatively or in conjunction with general anaesthesia is evaluated in another review. The main outcomes were mortality, pneumonia, myocardial infarction, cerebrovascular accident, acute confusional state, deep vein thrombosis and return of patient to their own home. Two reviewers independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. We analysed data with fixed-effect (I(2) anaesthesia. Based on 11 studies that included 2152 participants, we did not find a difference between the two anaesthetic techniques for mortality at one month: risk ratio (RR) 0.78, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.57 to 1.06; I(2) = 24% (fixed-effect model). Based on six studies that included 761 participants, we did not find a difference in the risk of pneumonia: RR 0.77, 95% CI 0.45 to 1.31; I(2) = 0%. Based on four studies that included 559 participants, we did not find a difference in the risk of myocardial infarction: RR 0.89, 95% CI 0.22 to 3.65; I(2) = 0%. Based on six studies that included 729 participants, we did not find a difference in the risk of cerebrovascular accident: RR 1.48, 95% CI 0.46 to 4.83; I(2) = 0%. Based on six studies that included 624 participants, we did not find a difference in the risk of acute confusional

  10. Hip Fracture-Related Pain Strongly Influences Functional Performance of Patients With an Intertrochanteric Fracture Upon Discharge From the Hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Morten Tange

    2013-01-01

    patients (20 men and 35 women; ages 75.8 ± 10 years), 33 with a cervical hip fracture and 22 with an intertrochanteric hip fracture, all of whom were allowed to bear full weight after surgery. METHODS: All patients were evaluated upon discharge from the hospital to their own homes at a mean of 10 ± 6 days......OBJECTIVE: To examine whether functional performance upon hospital discharge is influenced by pain in the region of the hip fracture or related to the fracture type. DESIGN: Prospective observational study. SETTING: A 20-bed orthopedic hip fracture unit. PATIENTS: Fifty-five cognitively intact.......7 seconds to perform the TUG. No significant differences were observed in baseline characteristics or pain medication given for patients with a cervical versus an intertrochanteric fracture (P ≥ .22), but patients with an intertrochanteric fracture presented more often with moderate to severe pain during...

  11. Electrocardiographic abnormalities in patients admitted for hip fracture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goslings, J C; Schafroth, M U; de Rooij, S E J A; Jansen, S.; Koster, R.W.; de Lange, F.J.; van der Velde, N

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several risk factors for falls and hip fractures have been recognised, but controversy still exists regarding the importance of rhythm and conduction abnormalities as potentially modifiable risk factors for recurrent falls. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of

  12. Dementia and delirium, the outcomes in elderly hip fracture patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mosk, C.A. (Christina A.); Mus, M. (Marnix); Vroemen, J.P.A.M. (Jos P. A. M.); T. van der Ploeg (Tjeerd); D.I. Vos (Dagmar); Elmans, L.H.G.J. (Leon H. G. J.); L. van der Laan (Lyckle)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Delirium in hip fractured patients is a frequent complication. Dementia is an important risk factor for delirium and is common in frail elderly. This study aimed to extend the previous knowledge on risk factors for delirium and the consequences. Special attention was given to

  13. Risk-factors for surgical delay following hip fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Reig, J; Salvador Marín, J; Ferrández Martínez, J; Orozco Beltrán, D; Martínez López, J F

    To identify pre-operative risk factors for surgical delay of more than 2 days after admission in patients older than 65 years with a hip fracture. A prospective observational study was conducted on 180 hip fractures in patients older than 65 years of age admitted to our hospital from January 2015 to April 2016. The data recorded included, patient demographics, day of admission, pre-fracture comorbidities, mental state, level of mobility and physical function, type of fracture, antiaggregant and anticoagulant medication, pre-operative haemoglobin value, type of treatment, and surgical delay. The mean age of the patients was 83.7 years. The mean Charlson Index was 2.8. The pre-fracture baseline co-morbidities were equal or greater than 2 in 70% of cases. Mean timing of surgery was 3.1 days. At the time of admission, 122 (67.7%) patients were fit for surgery, of which 80 (44.4%) underwent surgery within 2 days. A Charlson index greater than 2, anticoagulant therapy, and admission on Thursday to Saturday, were independently associated with a surgical delay greater than 2 days. The rate of hip fracture patients undergoing surgery within 2 days is low. Risk factors associated to surgical delay are non-modifiable. However, their knowledge should allow the development of protocols that can reduce surgical delay in this group of patients. Copyright © 2017 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Risk factors for in-hospital mortality following hip fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Reig, J; Salvador Marín, J; Pérez Alba, J M; Ferrández Martínez, J; Orozco Beltrán, D; Martínez López, J F

    To identify and quantify the risk factors for in-hospital mortality in patients older than 65 years with a hip fracture. Retrospective review of prospectively collected data. We studied a cohort of 331 hip fracture patients older than 65 years of age admitted to our hospital from 2011 to 2014. Patients demographics, type of residence, physical function, mobility, prefracture comorbidities data, cognitive status, anti-aggregant and anticoagulant medication, preoperative haemoglobin value, type of fracture, type of treatment, surgical delay, and complications, were recorded. The average age was 83, 73% female, and 57% had sustained a subcapital fracture. In 62.8% pre-fracture baseline co-morbidities were equal or greater than 2. The in-hospital mortality rate was 11.4%. In univariate analysis, age over 90, male gender, haemoglobin ≤ 10g/dl, no antiplatelet agents, orthopaedic treatment, number of co-morbidities≥2, Charlson index≥2, age-adjusted Charlson index≥6, congestive heart failure, asthma, rheumatologic disease, were associated with in-hospital mortality. Preoperative patient-related factors have a strong relationship with in-hospital mortality in a hip fracture patients aged older than 65 years. These factors are non-modifiable; we recommend the development of protocols to reduce in-hospital mortality in this group of patients. Copyright © 2017 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. The rate of hip osteoarthritis in patients with proximal femoral fractures versus hip contusion

    OpenAIRE

    Robstad, B.; Frihagen, F.; Nordsletten, L.

    2011-01-01

    Summary We found no difference in the rate of radiological hip osteoarthritis in the injured hip when comparing 349 patients with proximal femoral fractures and 112 patients with hip contusion. There was, however, a tendency for more osteoarthritis in patients with trochanteric fractures than in patients with femoral neck fractures. Introduction Osteoarthritis (OA) and osteoporotic fractures are two age-related disorders associated with considerable morbidity. There is a clinical impression o...

  16. Psychotropics, thiazide diuretics and hip fractures in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumming, R G; Klineberg, R J

    1993-03-15

    To determine whether psychotropic medications increase, and thiazide diuretics decrease, the risk of hip fractures in elderly Australians. Population-based case-control study. The population aged 65 years and over living in a defined area in western Sydney, Australia, during 1990-1991. Cases (n = 209) were recruited from hospitals and controls (n = 207) were selected by an area probability sampling method, with additional sampling from nursing homes. Response rates were 96% for cases and 84% for controls. Data were collected directly from subjects by questionnaire; a proxy respondent was required for 27% of subjects. In addition to medication use, information was also collected on potential confounders: alcohol consumption, body mass index, cognitive status, dairy product consumption, health status, physical activity, smoking history and type of residence. The use of temazepam, a short-acting benzodiazepine, was associated with an increase in the risk of hip fracture--odds ratio, adjusted for age, gender and residence is 3.78; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.60-8.92. After adjusting for multiple potential confounders by logistic regression, the odds ratio for temazepam use was 3.52. There was a non-significant (P > 0.05) increase in hip fracture risk associated with the use of antidepressants and antipsychotics. Thiazide diuretics were not associated with a risk of hip fracture--the multivariate-adjusted odds ratio was 0.98 (95% CI, 0.49-1.99). Temazepam may increase the risk of hip fracture in elderly people. The effect of thiazide diuretics on fracture risk should be assessed in a large randomised trial.

  17. Promoting mobility after hip fracture (ProMo: study protocol and selected baseline results of a year-long randomized controlled trial among community-dwelling older people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sipilä Sarianna

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To cope at their homes, community-dwelling older people surviving a hip fracture need a sufficient amount of functional ability and mobility. There is a lack of evidence on the best practices supporting recovery after hip fracture. The purpose of this article is to describe the design, intervention and demographic baseline results of a study investigating the effects of a rehabilitation program aiming to restore mobility and functional capacity among community-dwelling participants after hip fracture. Methods/Design Population-based sample of over 60-year-old community-dwelling men and women operated for hip fracture (n = 81, mean age 79 years, 78% were women participated in this study and were randomly allocated into control (Standard Care and ProMo intervention groups on average 10 weeks post fracture and 6 weeks after discharged to home. Standard Care included written home exercise program with 5-7 exercises for lower limbs. Of all participants, 12 got a referral to physiotherapy. After discharged to home, only 50% adhered to Standard Care. None of the participants were followed-up for Standard Care or mobility recovery. ProMo-intervention included Standard Care and a year-long program including evaluation/modification of environmental hazards, guidance for safe walking, pain management, progressive home exercise program and physical activity counseling. Measurements included a comprehensive battery of laboratory tests and self-report on mobility limitation, disability, physical functional capacity and health as well as assessments for the key prerequisites for mobility, disability and functional capacity. All assessments were performed blinded at the research laboratory. No significant differences were observed between intervention and control groups in any of the demographic variables. Discussion Ten weeks post hip fracture only half of the participants were compliant to Standard Care. No follow-up for Standard Care or

  18. The cost and mortality of hip fractures in centenarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, J; Carmody, O; Carey, B; Harty, J A; Reidy, D

    2017-11-01

    Centenarians are the fastest rising age group in Ireland. Hip fractures most commonly affect older adults and are associated with significant morbidity and mortality, as well as the financial cost of healthcare resources. Despite this, very little is known regarding hip fractures in centenarians. The aim of this study was to investigate our experience with hip fractures in this group and to record the cost of treating these fractures to identify both the social and economic impact these injuries impose on the health system. The study was a retrospective data review at a major trauma centre. Nine proximal femoral fractures from June 2010-2016 were identified through a stepwise analysis of theatre data and patient notes. Time of death was recorded directly from patient records or by contacting the patient's general practitioner. With the assistance of the hospital finance department, individual inpatient costs were calculated using length of stay, theatre time and implant costs. Over the 7-year period we examined nine patients over 100 years of age were managed operatively for hip fractures with an average inpatient cost of €14,898. The mean age at the time of fracture was 101 years and 7 months. Eight of the patients were female and there was one male. Our inpatient, 30-day and 1-year mortality rate were 22, 22, and 71%. The 1-year mortality rate of any person aged 100 years or older is thought to be 67% for men and 59% for women. This suggests that the 1-year mortality rate of 71% in this current study is only slightly worse than the usual life expectancy of a person older than 100 years of age. Our data suggest that the extreme elderly should be offered operative management.

  19. Posterior acetabular arc angle of unstable posterior hip fracture-dislocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnroongroj, Thos; Riansuwan, Kongkhet; Sudjai, Narumol; Harnroongroj, Thossart

    2013-12-01

    Posterior hip fracture-dislocation needs stability evaluation. A previous study in the normal acetabulum has shown that the coronal posterior acetabular arc angle (PAAA) could be used to assess an unstable posterior hip fracture. Our study was designed to assess PAAA of unstable posterior hip fracture-dislocation and whether posterior acetabular wall fracture involves the superior acetabular dome. Using coronal computed tomography (CT) of the acetabulum and 3D reconstruction of the lateral pelvis, we measured coronal, vertical PAAA and posterior acetabular wall depth of 21 unstable posterior hip fracture-dislocations and of 50% normal contralateral acetabula. Posterior acetabular wall fracture was assessed to determine whether the fracture involved the superior acetabular dome and then defined as a high or low wall fracture using vertical PAAA in reference to the centroacetabulo-greater sciatic notch line. The coronal PAAA of unstable posterior hip fracture-dislocations and of 50% of the posterior acetabular wall of normal the contralateral acetabulum were 54.48° (9.09°) and 57.43° (5.88°) and corresponded to 15.06 (4.39) and 15.61 (2.01) mm of the posterior acetabular wall without significant difference (p > 0.05). The vertical PAAA of unstable posterior hip fracture-dislocation was 101.67° (20.44°). There were 16 high posterior acetabular wall fractures with 35.00 (16.18) vertical PAAA involving the acetabular dome and 5 low wall fractures. High posterior wall fractures resulted in four avascular necroses of the femoral head, three sciatic nerve injuries and one osteoarthritic hip. Coronal and vertical PAAA of unstable posterior hip fracture-dislocations were 54.48° and 101.67°. Vertical PAAA assesses high or low posterior acetabular wall fracture by referring to the centroacetabulo-greater sciatic notch line. High posterior wall fracture seems to be the most frequent and is involved with many complications.

  20. Adjusting Hip Fracture Probability in Men and Women Using Hip Axis Length: the Manitoba Bone Density Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, William D; Lix, Lisa M; Morin, Suzanne N; Johansson, Helena; Odén, Anders; McCloskey, Eugene V; Kanis, John A

    2016-01-01

    Most studies report that longer hip axis length (HAL) is associated with increased hip fracture risk in women, but comparable data in men are sparse. Using a registry of all dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) results for Manitoba, Canada, we identified 4738 men and 50,420 women aged 40 yr and older with baseline hip DXA results, HAL measurements, and Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX) hip fracture probability computed with femoral neck bone mineral density (BMD). Population-based health service records were assessed for a subsequent hospitalization with a primary diagnosis of hip fracture. During mean 6.2 yr of follow-up, 70 men and 1020 women developed incident hip fractures. Mean HAL was significantly greater in those with vs without incident hip fractures (men 123.0 ± 7.6 vs 121.3 ± 7.4 mm, p = 0.050; women 106.9 ± 6.2 vs 104.6 ± 6.2 mm, p hip fracture risk by 3.6% in men (p = 0.022) and 4.6% in women (p hip fracture probability, each millimeter increase in HAL increased hip fracture risk by 3.4% in men (p = 0.031) and 4.8% in women (p hip fracture probability 4.7% for every millimeter that HAL is above the sex-specific average, relative decrease in hip fracture probability 3.8% for every millimeter that HAL is below the sex-specific average. We concluded that greater DXA-derived HAL is associated with increased incident hip fracture risk in both men and women, and this risk is independent of BMD and FRAX probability. Copyright © 2016 The International Society for Clinical Densitometry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The Exercise Plus Program for Older Women Post Hip Fracture: Participant Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, Barbara; Orwig, Denise; Wehren, Lois; Zimmerman, Sheryl; Simpson, Marjorie; Magaziner, Jay

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of older women post hip fracture who were exposed to a motivational intervention, the Exercise Plus Program, intended to increase adherence to exercise. Design and Methods: This study used a naturalistic inquiry. We interviewed a total of 70 older women, 12 months post hip fracture,…

  2. Pain Treatments After Hip Fracture Among Older Nursing Home Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zullo, Andrew R; Zhang, Tingting; Beaudoin, Francesca L; Lee, Yoojin; McConeghy, Kevin W; Kiel, Douglas P; Daiello, Lori A; Mor, Vincent; Berry, Sarah D

    2018-02-01

    To examine the association between use of opioids versus other analgesics with death and functioning after hip fracture in older nursing home (NH) residents. Retrospective cohort using national Medicare fee-for-service claims linked to the Minimum Data Set. US NHs. NH residents aged ≥65 years who became a long-stay resident (>100 days in the NH) between January 2008 and December 2009, had a hospitalized hip fracture, and returned to the NH. New use of opioid versus nonopioid analgesics (acetaminophen or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) within 14 days post hip fracture. Follow-up began on the index date and continued until the first occurrence of death, significant functional decline (3-point increase on MDS Activities of Daily Living scale), or 120 days of follow-up. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for outcomes were estimated using inverse probability of treatment-weighted multinomial logistic regression models. Among the 2755 NH residents with a hip fracture included in our study, 1155 (41.9%) were opioid users, and 1600 (58.1%) were nonopioid analgesic users. The mean age was 86.3 years, 73.8% were female, and 86.0% were white. Opioid use was associated with a significantly lower likelihood of death (OR = 0.47, 95% CI 0.39-0.56) and a nonsignificant decrease in functional decline (OR = 0.77, 95% CI 0.58-1.03). A rigorous study that addresses the limitations of this study is critical to validate our preliminary findings and provide evidence about the effect of using opioid versus nonopioid analgesics to optimize acute pain in NH residents with a hip fracture. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. A Comparison of Mortality following Distal Femoral Fractures and Hip Fractures in an Elderly Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. W. Jordan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Patients suffering a distal femoral fracture are at a high risk of morbidity and mortality. Currently this cohort is not afforded the same resources as those with hip fractures. This study aims to compare their mortality rates and assess whether surgical intervention improves either outcome or mortality following distal femoral fractures. Methods. Patients over sixty-five admitted with a distal femoral fracture between June 2007 and 2012 were retrospectively identified. Patients mobility was categorised as unaided, walking aid, zimmer frame, or immobile. The 30-day, six-month, and one-year mortality rates were recorded for this group as well as for hip fractures during the same period. Results. 68 patients were included in the study. The mortality rate for all patients with distal femoral fractures was 7% at 30 days, 26% at six months, and 38% at one year, higher than hip fractures during the same period by 8%, 13%, and 18%, respectively. Patients managed surgically had lower mortality rates and higher mobility levels. Conclusion. Patients suffering a distal femoral fracture have a high mortality rate and surgical intervention seems to improve both mobility and mortality.

  4. Diet-quality scores and risk of hip fractures in elderly urban Chinese in Guangdong, China: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, F F; Xue, W Q; Cao, W T; Wu, B H; Xie, H L; Fan, F; Zhu, H L; Chen, Y M

    2014-08-01

    This case-control study compared the associations of four widely used diet-quality scoring systems with the risk of hip fractures and assessed their utility in elderly Chinese. We found that individuals avoiding a low-quality diet have a lower risk of hip fractures in elderly Chinese. Few studies examined the associations of diet-quality scores on bone health, and no studies were available in Asians and compared their validity and utility in a study. We assessed the associations and utility of four widely used diet-quality scoring systems with the risk of hip fractures. A case-control study of 726 patients with hip fractures (diagnosed within 2 weeks) aged 55-80 years and 726 age- (within 3 years) and gender-matched controls was conducted in Guangdong, China (2009-2013). Dietary intake was assessed using a 79-item food frequency questionnaire with face-to-face interviews, and the Healthy Eating Index-2005 (HEI-2005, 12 items), the alternate Healthy Eating Index (aHEI, 8 items), the Diet Quality Index-International (DQI-I, 17 items), and the alternate Mediterranean Diet Score (aMed, 9 items) (the simplest one) were calculated. All greater values of the diet-quality scores were significantly associated with a similar decreased risk of hip fractures (all p trends quality scores were 0.29 (0.18, 0.46) (HEI-2005), 0.20 (0.12, 0.33) (aHEI), 0.25 (0.16, 0.39) (DQI-I), and 0.28 (0.18, 0.43) (aMed) in total subjects; and the corresponding ORs ranged from 0.04 to 0.27 for men and from 0.26 to 0.44 for women (all p trends quality diet is associated with a lower risk of hip fractures, and the aMed score is the best scoring system due to its equivalent performance and simplicity for the user.

  5. Mortality and Readmission After Cervical Fracture from a Fall in Older Adults: Comparison with Hip Fracture Using National Medicare Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Zara; Mitchell, Susan L; Lipsitz, Stuart; Harris, Mitchel B; Ayanian, John Z; Bernacki, Rachelle E; Jha, Ashish K

    2015-10-01

    To examine the prevalence of cervical spine fractures after falls in older Americans, to show changes in recent years, and to compare 12-month outcomes between individuals with cervical and hip fracture after falls. Retrospective study of Medicare data from 2007 to 2011. Acute care hospitals. Individuals aged 65 and older with cervical or hip fracture after a fall. Cervical fracture rate, 12-month mortality, and readmission rate after injury. Rates of cervical fracture increased from 4.6 per 10,000 in 2007 to 5.3 per 10,000 in 2011; rates of hip fracture decreased from 77.3 per 10,000 in 2007 to 63.5 per 10,000 in 2011. Participants with cervical fracture with and without spinal cord injury (SCI) were more likely than those with hip fracture to receive treatment at large hospitals (59.4% and 54.1% vs 28.1%, P cervical fracture without (24.7%) and with SCI (41.7%) had greater risk-adjusted mortality at 1 year than those with hip fracture (22.7%) (P cervical fracture with and 59.5% without SCI and 59.3% of those with hip fracture had died or were readmitted to the hospital (P Cervical spinal fractures occur in one of every 2,000 Medicare beneficiaries annually and appear to be increasing over time. Participants with cervical fracture had greater mortality than those with hip fracture. Given the increasing prevalence and the poor outcomes in this population, hospitals need to develop processes to improve care for these vulnerable individuals. © 2015, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2015, The American Geriatrics Society.

  6. Long-term functional outcome in geriatric hip fracture patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammerlander, Christian; Gosch, Markus; Kammerlander-Knauer, Ursula; Luger, Thomas J; Blauth, Michael; Roth, Tobias

    2011-10-01

    Fragility fractures are a major health care problem worldwide. The proportion of the geriatric population and the overall life expectancy will increase. Hip fractures are the most common fragility fractures needing surgery and nowadays treatment concepts are changing. We studied the long-term functional outcome and their influencing factors in patients treated without any interdisciplinary aspects. A retrospective cohort study with functional long-term follow-up examination was carried out in a level one trauma centre on hip fracture patients 80 years old and above treated without any formalized interdisciplinary aspects ("usual care"). Of 281 consecutive patients who were treated 2005 and 2006 with usual care, 246 patients with a mean age of 86.8 years met our inclusion criteria. 69.1% died within the study period of 4.9 years. On the remaining patients, the residential status, the Barthel Index and the Parker Score were assessed. The mean Barthel Index was 49.6 and the mean Parker Score was 2.7. More than one-fourth of the survivors were found to be bedridden and 45% were not able to walk outside. 88% are bound to one floor and only 8% are able to walk unaided. Patients with more comorbidities and patients with subsequent fractures had significant higher mortality rates. Patients with trochanteric fractures had significant better functional outcome scores compared to patients with femoral neck fractures. Nursing home residents showed significant higher mortality rates and lower functional outcome scores. Patients who were transferred to a nearby acute geriatric hospital for further treatment had significantly higher functional outcome scores. This paper shows the frustrating long-term outcome of geriatric hip fracture patients but it also suggests that an early geriatric intervention may lead to better function.

  7. Specific microRNA signatures responsible for immune disturbance related to hip fracture in aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaobin; Zhang, Jianzheng; Liu, Zhi; Zhang, Simeng; Sun, Tiansheng

    2018-01-22

    Hip fracture is commonly associated with an overwhelming inflammatory response, which may lead to high rates of morbidity and mortality in the elderly. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in the functions of immune system. However, the association between miRNA dysregulation and immune disturbance (IMD) related to elderly hip fracture is largely unknown. In this study, microarray profiling was carried out to evaluate the differential expression patterns of miRNAs in plasma of the aged hip fracture rats with IMD, those without IMD, and normal aged rats, followed by validation using quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Genes and signaling pathways of the dysregulated miRNAs related to elderly hip fracture-induced IMD were investigated in silico using Gene Ontology and analysis of Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes or Genomes. Dead or moribund rats with hip fracture exhibited significantly reduced TNF-α/IL-10 ratio compared with healthy controls and other hip fracture rats, which were therefore named as hip fracture rats with IMD. Seven serum miRNAs in hip fracture rats with IMD were significantly downregulated. qRT-PCR and in silico analysis revealed that miR-130a-3p likely participated in regulating the hip fracture-induced IMD. Furthermore, Western blot experiment demonstrated that in lung tissue, the reduction of miR-130a-3p was accompanied with the increase of the protein expression of interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF1) and sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 (SIPR1). miR-130a-3p desregulation may be associated with elderly hip fracture-induced IMD, which might act as a new potential biomarker for the diagnosis and prognosis of elderly hip fracture-induced IMD and a potential therapeutic target as well.

  8. Hip fractures and Parkinson's disease: A case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coomber, Ross; Alshameeri, Zeiad; Masia, Antonio Francesco; Mela, Federico; Parker, Martyn J

    2017-12-01

    There are no specific guidelines for treating Parkinson's disease patients who present with a hip fracture. Here we present a large cohort of patients with Parkinson's disease who suffered hip fractures. Our aim was to assess for differences between a Parkinson's disease population and a non-Parkinson's disease population with hip fractures and make recommendations on management guidelines. We performed a comprehensive analysis of prospectively collected data on all patients with hip fracture who were admitted into our department over a period of 29 years. In total 9225 patients with hip fractures were included in this study, 452 (4.9%) patients had Parkinson's disease. The mobility scores were worse pre- and post-operatively in the Parkinson's group as were mini-mental scores and ASA grade. Post-operative complications were similar between the two groups, with no difference in dislocation rate or wound complications. However, other outcomes including mobility and mortality rate at 1year were worse in the Parkinson's group. These patients also had a longer hospital stay and were more likely to be immobile and discharged to an institution. We recommend that Parkinson's disease patients should be assessed more thoroughly in the peri-operative period and arrangement for rehab and discharge planning should commence as soon as possible following admission. The consent process should reflect longer hospital stays, worse mobility, higher mortality and increased likelihood of discharge to institution but concern over increased complications, specifically dislocation was not evident in our data. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Risk Factors for Hip Fracture in Older Home Care Clients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poss, Jeff; Cook, Richard J.; Byrne, Kerry; Hirdes, John P.

    2009-01-01

    Background Little information is available on hip fracture risks among community-dwelling persons receiving home care. Our aim was to identify risk factors for hip fracture from health information routinely collected for older home care clients. Methods This was a cohort study involving secondary analysis of data on 40,279 long-stay (>60 days) home care clients aged 65 and older in Ontario, Canada; occurrence of hip fracture as well as potential risk factor information were measured using the Resident Assessment Instrument (RAI)/Minimum Data Set–Home Care assessment instrument. Results In all, 1,003 clients (2.5%) had hip fracture on follow-up assessment. Older (85+ vs 65–74, relative risk [95% confidence interval]: 0.52 [0.43–0.64]) clients are at increased risk; males are at reduced risk [0.60 (0.51–0.70)]. Other risk factors include osteoporosis (1.19 [1.03–1.36]), falls (1.31 [1.15–1.49]), unsteady gait (1.18 [1.03–1.36]), use of ambulation aide (1.39 [1.21–1.59]), tobacco use (1.42, [1.13–1.80]), severe malnutrition (2.61 [1.67–4.08]), and cognitive impairment (1.30 [1.12–1.51]). Arthritis (0.86 [0.76–0.98]) and morbid obesity (0.34 [0.16–0.72]) were associated with reduced risk. Males and females demonstrated different risk profiles. Conclusions Important risk factors for hip fracture can be identified from routinely collected data; these could be used to identify at-risk clients for further investigation and prevention strategies [22]. PMID:19196903

  10. Total medical costs of treating femoral neck fracture patients with hemi- or total hip arthroplasty: a cost analysis of a multicenter prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgers, P T P W; Hoogendoorn, M; Van Woensel, E A C; Poolman, R W; Bhandari, M; Patka, P; Van Lieshout, E M M

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the total medical costs for treating displaced femoral neck fractures with hemi- or total hip arthroplasty in fit elderly patients. The mean total costs per patient at 2 years of follow-up were €26,399. These results contribute to cost awareness. The absolute number of hip fractures is rising and increases the already significant burden on society. The aim of this study was to determine the mean total medical costs per patient for treating displaced femoral neck fractures with hemi- or total hip arthroplasty in fit elderly patients. The population was the Dutch sample of an international randomized controlled trial consisting of femoral neck fracture patients treated with hemi- or total hip arthroplasty. Patient data and health care utilization were prospectively collected during a total follow-up period of 2 years. Costs were separated into costs for hospital care during primary stay, hospital costs for clinical follow-up, and costs generated outside the hospital during rehabilitation. Multiple imputations were used to account for missing data. Data of 141 participants (mean age 81 years) were included in the analysis. The 2-year mortality rate was 19 %. The mean total cost per patient after 10 weeks of follow-up was €15,216. After 1 and 2 years of follow-up the mean total costs were €23,869 and €26,399, respectively. Rehabilitation was the main cost determinant, and accounted for 46 % of total costs. Primary hospital admission days accounted for 22 % of the total costs, index surgery for 11 %, and physical therapy for 7 %. The main cost determinants for hemi- or total hip arthroplasty after treatment of displaced femoral neck fractures (€26,399 per patient until 2 years) were rehabilitation and nursing homes. Most of the costs were made in the first year. Reducing costs after hip fracture surgery should focus on improving the duration and efficiency of the rehabilitation phase.

  11. Mortality analysis in hip fracture patients: implications for design of future outcome trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, N B; Kehlet, H

    2006-01-01

    Patients with hip fractures are usually frail and elderly with a 30-day mortality in excess of 10% in European series. Perioperative morbidity is often multifactorial in nature, and unimodal interventions will not necessarily decrease mortality. The purpose of this prospective study was to analyse...... causes of mortality, and thereby the potential and limitations to decrease mortality after hip fracture surgery....

  12. Effect of postoperative epidural analgesia on rehabilitation and pain after hip fracture surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Nicolai Bang; Kristensen, Morten Tange; Kristensen, Billy Bjarne

    2005-01-01

    Hip fracture surgery usually carries a high demand for rehabilitation and a significant risk of perioperative morbidity and mortality. Postoperative epidural analgesia may reduce morbidity and has been shown to facilitate rehabilitation in elective orthopedic procedures. No studies exist...... on the effect of postoperative epidural analgesia on pain and rehabilitation after hip fracture surgery....

  13. Fascia iliaca compartment blockade for acute pain control in hip fracture patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Nicolai B; Kristensen, Billy B; Bundgaard, Morten

    2007-01-01

    Hip fracture patients are in severe pain upon arrival at the emergency department. Pain treatment is traditionally based on systemic opioids. No study has examined the effect of fascia iliaca compartment blockade (FICB) in acute hip fracture pain management within a double-blind, randomized setup....

  14. Room for improvement in the treatment of hip fractures in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egerod, Ingrid; Rud, Kirsten; Specht, Kirsten

    2010-01-01

    Treatment of hip fractures has evolved since the introduction of fast-track surgical programs in the late 1990s. The aim of our study was to describe the quality of treatment and care related to fast-track hip fracture surgery in Denmark by external audit of patient records....

  15. Preoperative factors associated with red blood cell transfusion in hip fracture patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Christian Medom; Jørgensen, Henrik Løvendahl; Norgaard, Astrid

    2014-01-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) transfusion is a frequently used treatment in patients admitted with a fractured hip, but the use remains an area of much debate. The aim of this study was to determine preoperative factors associated with the risk of receiving a red blood cell transfusion in hip fracture...

  16. Biomechanical and clinical alterations of the hip joint following femoral neck fracture and implantation of bipolar hip endoprosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smrke, Dragica; Biscević, Mirza; Smrke, Barbara U R; Zupan, Blaz

    2010-09-01

    The implantation of a bipolar partial hip endoprosthesis is a treatment of choice for displaced medial femoral neck fracture. We present an experimental study which asses and compare biomechanical and clinical status through period before and after hip fracture and implantation of bipolar partial hip endoprosthesis. This study encompassed 75 patients who suffered from an acute medial femoral neck fracture and were treated with the implantation of a bipolar partial hip endoprosthesis. Their biomechanical status (stress distribution on the hip joint weight bearing area) and clinical status (Harris Hip Score) were estimated for the time prior to the injury and assessed at the follow-up examination that was, on average, carried out 40 months after the operation. Despite ageing, the observed Harris Hip Score at the follow-up examination was higher than that estimated prior to the injury (77.9 > 69.6; p = 0.006). Similarly, the hip stress distribution was reduced (2.7 MPa endoprosthesis for patients with displaced medial femoral neck fractures improves the biomechanical and clinical features of the hip, what should have on mind during making decision about treatment.

  17. Femoral Nerve Catheters Improve Home Disposition and Pain in Hip Fracture Patients Treated With Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsoy, Diren; Huddleston, James I; Amanatullah, Derek F; Giori, Nicholas J; Maloney, William J; Goodman, Stuart B

    2017-11-01

    Opioids have been the mainstay of treatment in the physiologically young geriatric hip fracture patient undergoing total hip arthroplasty (THA). However opioid-related side effects increase morbidity. Regional anesthesia may provide better analgesia, while decreasing opioid-related side effects. The goal of this study was to examine the effect of perioperative continuous femoral nerve blockade with regards to pain scores, opioid-related side effects and posthospital disposition in hip fracture patients undergoing THA. Twenty-nine consecutive geriatric hip fracture patients (22 women/7 men) underwent THA. Average follow-up was 8.3 months (6 weeks-39 months). Fifteen patients were treated with standard analgesia (SA). Fourteen patients received an ultrasound-guided insertion of a femoral nerve catheter after radiographic confirmation of a hip fracture. All complications and readmissions that occurred within 6 weeks of surgery were noted. Continuous femoral nerve catheter (CFNC) patients were discharged home more frequently than SA patients (43% for CFNC vs 7% for SA; P = .023). CFNC patients reported lower average pain scores preoperatively (P home more frequently. Use of a CFNC decreased daily average patient-reported pain scores, preoperative opioid usage, and opioid-related side effects after THA for hip fracture. Based on these data, we recommend routine use of perioperative CFNC in hip fracture patients undergoing THA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Fractures in the elderly: when is hip replacement a necessity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad Antapur

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Prasad Antapur, Nizar Mahomed, Rajiv GandhiToronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, CanadaAbstract: As the world’s population ages, hip fractures pose a significant health care problem. Hip fractures in the elderly are associated with impaired mobility, and increased morbidity and mortality. Associated conditions, such as osteoporosis, medical comorbidity, and dementia, pose a significant concern and determine optimal treatment. One-year mortality rates currently range from 14% to 36%, and care for these patients represents a major global economic burden. The incidence of hip fractures is bimodal in its distribution. Young adult hip fractures are the result of high energy trauma, and the larger peak seen in the elderly population is secondary to low-energy injuries. The predilection for the site of fracture at the neck of femur falls into two major subgroups. Pertrochanteric fractures occur when the injury is extracapsular and the blood supply to the head of femur is unaffected. The management of this group involves internal fixation through a sliding hip screw device or intramedullary fixation device, both of which have good results. The other group of patients who sustain an intracapsular fracture at the femoral neck are at increased risk of nonunion and osteonecrosis. Recent papers in the literature have shown better functional outcomes with a primary hip replacement over other treatment modalities. This article reviews the current literature and indications for a primary total hip replacement in these patients.Keywords: hip fractures, elderly, hip replacement

  19. Celiac disease is not increased in women with hip fractures and low vitamin D levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leboff, M S; Cobb, H; Gao, L Y; Hawkes, W; Yu-Yahiro, J; Kolatkar, N S; Magaziner, J

    2013-01-01

    Celiac disease is associated with decreased bone density; however, the risk of fractures in celiac disease patients is unclear. We compared the prevalence of celiac disease between a group of women with hip fractures and a group of women undergoing elective joint replacement surgery and the association between celiac disease and vitamin D levels. Two hundred eight community dwelling and postmenopausal women were recruited from Boston, MA (n=81) and Baltimore, MD (n=127). We measured tissue transglutaminase IgA by ELISA to diagnose celiac disease and 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels by radioimmunoassay in both women with hip fractures (n=157) and a control group (n=51) of total hip replacement subjects from Boston. Subjects were excluded if they took any medications or had medical conditions that might affect bone. Median serum 25(OH)D levels were significantly lower (pwomen with hip fractures versus the control group (1.91% vs. 1.96%, respectively). Vitamin D levels are markedly reduced in women with hip fractures, however hip fracture patients did not show a higher percentage of positive tissue transglutaminase levels compared with controls. These data suggest that routine testing for celiac disease among hip fracture patients may not be necessary in the absence of clinical signs and symptoms, although data from larger studies among hip fracture subjects are needed.

  20. A comparison of bone density and bone morphology between patients presenting with hip fractures, spinal fractures or a combination of the two.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crilly, Richard G; Cox, Lizebeth

    2013-02-22

    Currently it is uncertain how to define osteoporosis and who to treat after a hip fracture. There is little to support the universal treatment of all such patients but how to select those most in need of treatment is not clear. In this study we have compared cortical and trabecular bone status between patients with spinal fractures and those with hip fracture with or without spinal fracture with the aim to begin to identify, by a simple clinical method (spine x-ray), a group of hip fracture patients likely to be more responsive to treatment with current antiresorptive agents. Comparison of convenience samples of three groups of 50 patients, one with spinal fractures, one with a hip fracture, and one with both. Measurements consist of bone mineral density at the lumbar spine, at the four standard hip sites, number, distribution and severity of spinal fractures by the method of Genant, cortical bone thickness at the infero-medial femoral neck site, femoral neck and axis length and femoral neck width. Patients with spinal fractures alone have the most deficient bones at both trabecular and cortical sites: those with hip fracture and no spinal fractures the best at trabecular bone and most cortical bone sites: and those with both hip and spinal fractures intermediate in most measurements. Hip axis length and neck width did not differ between groups. The presence of the spinal fracture indicates poor trabecular bone status in hip fracture patients. Hip fracture patients without spinal fractures have a bone mass similar to the reference range for their age and gender. Poor trabecular bone in hip fracture patients may point to a category of patient more likely to benefit from therapy and may be indicated by the presence of spinal fractures.

  1. A comparison of bone density and bone morphology between patients presenting with hip fractures, spinal fractures or a combination of the two

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Currently it is uncertain how to define osteoporosis and who to treat after a hip fracture. There is little to support the universal treatment of all such patients but how to select those most in need of treatment is not clear. In this study we have compared cortical and trabecular bone status between patients with spinal fractures and those with hip fracture with or without spinal fracture with the aim to begin to identify, by a simple clinical method (spine x-ray), a group of hip fracture patients likely to be more responsive to treatment with current antiresorptive agents. Methods Comparison of convenience samples of three groups of 50 patients, one with spinal fractures, one with a hip fracture, and one with both. Measurements consist of bone mineral density at the lumbar spine, at the four standard hip sites, number, distribution and severity of spinal fractures by the method of Genant, cortical bone thickness at the infero-medial femoral neck site, femoral neck and axis length and femoral neck width. Results Patients with spinal fractures alone have the most deficient bones at both trabecular and cortical sites: those with hip fracture and no spinal fractures the best at trabecular bone and most cortical bone sites: and those with both hip and spinal fractures intermediate in most measurements. Hip axis length and neck width did not differ between groups. Conclusion The presence of the spinal fracture indicates poor trabecular bone status in hip fracture patients. Hip fracture patients without spinal fractures have a bone mass similar to the reference range for their age and gender. Poor trabecular bone in hip fracture patients may point to a category of patient more likely to benefit from therapy and may be indicated by the presence of spinal fractures. PMID:23432767

  2. An intervention study exploring the effects of providing older adult hip fracture patients with an information booklet in the early postoperative period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Siobhan; Conway, Col; McGrath, Niamh B; O'Leary, Breda; O'Sullivan, Mary P; O'Sullivan, Dawn

    2011-12-01

    To determine whether the provision of an information booklet on mobilisation improves early mobility postsurgical repair of hip fracture. Hip fracture among older people can have long-lasting consequences with the majority of patients failing to achieve their prefracture functional status. Early postoperative mobility may have a positive effect on long-term recovery. The importance of providing postoperative information on mobility has been highlighted. It is suggested that patients remain passive in their recovery when they do not understand the importance of mobilisation. The study used a pretest-post-test design of two treatments and a usual care control group. Eighty-three adults postsurgical repair of hip fracture, aged 65 years and older, were recruited to the study. Participants were assigned to one of three groups, a usual care group, treatment group 1 (T(1)) usual care plus basic information booklet or treatment group 2 (T(2)) usual care plus detailed information booklet. Data collection three days postsurgery and prior to discharge included the Mini-Mental State Examination, a Demographic Questionnaire, the Elderly Mobility Scale and a Numerical Pain Scale. Greatest improvements in Elderly Mobility Scale scores occurred in T(1), with least changes observed in T(2). Changes did not reach significance level (p=0·105). The results of the study suggest that the provision of basic information is preferable and highlights a deficiency of education in usual care. Hip fracture patients should be provided with an educational booklet containing basic information on mobility to promote optimal recovery. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. [Cementless total hip arthroplasty after acute femoral neck fracture in active patients. Prospective matched study with a minimum follow-up of 5 years].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizaur-Utrilla, A; Sanz-Reig, J; Miralles-Muñoz, F A

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate outcomes of cementless total hip replacement after acute femoral neck fracture in active patients. A prospective matched study was conducted to compare the results between 76 patients with fractures and 76 patients with osteoarthritis. The Harris score, short-WOMAC and SF-12 were used for the clinical assessment. The mean follow-up was 7.3 years (range 5-11). There were no significant differences in medical or surgical complications between the 2 groups. Functional outcomes were similar, but more walking aids were used in fracture group. There were 6 revisions among the fractures group (one dislocation, 2 deep infections, 3 aseptic loosening), and 2 aseptic loosening among controls. There was no significant difference in arthroplasty survival at 10 years (88.7 vs. 96.1%, P=.15). The mortality rates at 2 and 10 years were similar. Cementless total hip replacement for treatment of acute femoral neck fracture showed similar results to those of elective surgery for osteoarthritis in these selected patients. Copyright © 2013 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. P18 - The Incidence of Hip, Forearm, Humeral, Ankle, and Vertebral Fragility Fractures: Results of a Three-Year Multicentre Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarantino, U.; Capone, A.; Planta, M.; D’Arienzo, M.; Letizia, M. G.; Impagliazzo, A.; Formica, D.; Pallotta, F.; Patella, V.; Spinarelli, A.; Pazzaglia, U.E.; Zarattini, G.; Roselli, M.; Montanari, G.; Sessa, G.; Privitera, M.; Verdoia, C.A.; Corradini, C.; Feola, M.; Padolino, A.; Saturnino, L.; Scialdoni, A.; Brandi, M.L.; Piscitelli, P.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: We aimed to assess the incidence and hospitalisation rate of hip fractures and “minor” fragility fractures and their incidence in the Italian population. Methods: We conducted a three-year survey at 10 major Italian emergency departments in order to evaluate the hospitalisation rate for hip, forearm, humeral, ankle, and vertebral fragility fractures occurring in people aged ≥45 years between 2004 and 2006, both men and women. These data were compared to those recorded in the national hospitalisations database (SDO) in order to assess the overall incidence of hip fractures and minor fragility fractures, also including those events not resulting in hospital admissions. Results: We have estimated that a total of 430,000 new hip, humeral, wrist, ankle and vertebral fragility fractures occur in Italy each year. Hospitalisation rates, referring to a total of 29,017 fractures, were the following: 92.7% for hip fractures, 36.3% for humeral fractures, 31.3% for ankle fractures, 22.6% for forearm/wrist fractures, and 27.6% for clinical vertebral fractures. According to the analyses performed on the SDO database, we estimated an annual incidence of 100,000 hip (0.40 per 100 adults), 39,000 humeral (0.15 per 100), 47,000 ankle (0.18 per 100), 73,000 wrist (0.21 per 100) and 190,000 (0.76 per 100 adults) vertebral fragility fractures in people aged >45 years. Clinical vertebral fractures were computed as 56,000 events per year (0.22 per 100). Conclusion: A national registry of fragility fractures is needed in order adequately to assess the incidence of osteoporotic fractures in the Italian population.

  5. Timing of surgery for hip fracture and in-hospital mortality: a retrospective population-based cohort study in the Spanish National Health System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Librero Julián

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While the benefits or otherwise of early hip fracture repair is a long-running controversy with studies showing contradictory results, this practice is being adopted as a quality indicator in several health care organizations. The aim of this study is to analyze the association between early hip fracture repair and in-hospital mortality in elderly people attending public hospitals in the Spanish National Health System and, additionally, to explore factors associated with the decision to perform early hip fracture repair. Methods A cohort of 56,500 patients of 60-years-old and over, hospitalized for hip fracture during the period 2002 to 2005 in all the public hospitals in 8 Spanish regions, were followed up using administrative databases to identify the time to surgical repair and in-hospital mortality. We used a multivariate logistic regression model to analyze the relationship between the timing of surgery ( Results Early surgery was performed on 25% of the patients. In the unadjusted analysis early surgery showed an absolute difference in risk of mortality of 0.57 (from 4.42% to 3.85%. However, patients undergoing delayed surgery were older and had higher comorbidity and severity of illness. Timeliness for surgery was not found to be related to in-hospital mortality once confounding factors such as age, sex, chronic comorbidities as well as the severity of illness were controlled for in the multivariate analysis. Conclusions Older age, male gender, higher chronic comorbidity and higher severity measured by the Risk Mortality Index were associated with higher mortality, but the time to surgery was not.

  6. Effect of the overlap syndrome of depressive symptoms and delirium on outcomes in elderly adults with hip fracture: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radinovic, Kristina S; Markovic-Denic, Ljiljana; Dubljanin-Raspopovic, Emilija; Marinkovic, Jelena; Jovanovic, Lepa B; Bumbasirevic, Vesna

    2014-09-01

    To analyze the incidence of the overlap syndrome of depressive symptoms and delirium, risk factors, and independent and dose-response effect of the overlap syndrome on outcomes in elderly adults with hip fracture. Prospective cohort study. University hospital. Individuals with hip fracture without delirium (N = 277; aged 78.0 ± 8.2) consequently enrolled in a prospective cohort study. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Geriatric Depression Scale and cognitive status using the Short Portable Mental Status Questionnaire upon hospital admission. Incident delirium was assessed daily during the hospital stay using the Confusion Assessment Method. Information on complications acquired in the hospital, severity of complications, re-interventions, length of hospital stay, and 1-month mortality was recorded. Thirty (10.8%) participants had depressive symptoms alone, 88 (31.8%) delirium alone, 60 (21.7%) overlap syndrome, and 99 (35.7%) neither condition. According to multivariate regression analysis, participants with the overlap syndrome had significantly higher incidence of vision impairment (P = .02), longer time-to-surgery (P = .03), and lower cognitive function (P overlap syndrome (P = .03). After adjustment, participants with the overlap syndrome were at higher risk of longer hospital stay independently (P = .003) and in a dose-response manner in the following order: no depression and no delirium, depressive symptoms alone, delirium alone, and the overlap syndrome (P = .002). Depressive symptoms and delirium increase the likelihood of adverse outcomes after hip fracture in a step-wise manner when they coexist. To reduce the risk of adverse outcome in individuals with hip fracture, efforts to identify, prevent, and treat this condition need to be increased. © 2014, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2014, The American Geriatrics Society.

  7. Hip Hemiarthroplasty for Femoral Neck Fractures Using the Modified ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Key words: Femoral neck fractures, hip hemiarthroplasty, modified stracathro approach. DOI: 10.4103/2006- ... using the modified Stracathro approach following fracture of the neck of the femur and have been .... Superior rim of the acetabulum and remnant of the fractured neck and head; 2 = The distal end of the fractured ...

  8. Cemented total hip arthroplasty following acetabular fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, C E H; MacDonald, D; Moran, M; White, T O; Patton, J T; Keating, J F

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the outcomes of cemented total hip arthroplasty (THA) following a fracture of the acetabulum, with evaluation of risk factors and comparison with a patient group with no history of fracture. Between 1992 and 2016, 49 patients (33 male) with mean age of 57 years (25 to 87) underwent cemented THA at a mean of 6.5 years (0.1 to 25) following acetabular fracture. A total of 38 had undergone surgical fixation and 11 had been treated non-operatively; 13 patients died at a mean of 10.2 years after THA (0.6 to 19). Patients were assessed pre-operatively, at one year and at final follow-up (mean 9.1 years, 0.5 to 23) using the Oxford Hip Score (OHS). Implant survivorship was assessed. An age and gender-matched cohort of THAs performed for non-traumatic osteoarthritis (OA) or avascular necrosis (AVN) (n = 98) were used to compare complications and patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs). The mean time from fracture to THA was significantly shorter for patients with AVN (2.2 years) or protrusio (2.2 years) than those with post-traumatic OA (9.4 years) or infection (8.0 years) (p = 0.03). Nine contained and four uncontained defects were managed with autograft (n = 11), bulk allograft (n = 1), or trabecular metal augment (n = 1). Initial fracture management (open reduction and internal fixation or non-operative), timing of THA (>// 10 mm) were significantly higher following acetabular fracture compared with atraumatic OA/AVN and OHSs were inferior: one-year OHS (35.7 v ersus 40.2, p = 0.026); and final follow-up OHS (33.6 v ersus 40.9, p = 0.008). Cemented THA is a reasonable option for the sequelae of acetabular fracture. Higher complication rates and poorer PROMs, compared with patients undergoing THA for atraumatic causes, reflects the complex nature of these cases. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2017;99-B:1399-1408. ©2017 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  9. Milk Intake in Early and Late Adulthood and Risk of Osteoporotic Hip Fractures in Utah

    OpenAIRE

    Slavens, Melanie Jean

    2006-01-01

    The relationship between milk intake and risk of osteoporotic fractures is uncertain. Associations between milk intake and milk avoidance in relation to osteoporotic hip fracture were examined in the Utah Study of Nutrition and Bone Health (USNBH), a statewide case-control study. Cases were ascertained at Utah hospitals treating 98 percent of hip fractures during 1997-2001 and included 1188 men and women aged 50-89 years. Age- and gender-matched controls were randomly selected from Utah drive...

  10. Fear of falling in older patients after hip fracture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visschedijk, Johannes Hermanus Maria (Jan)

    2016-01-01

    FoF is possibly one of the most important factors in patients after hip fracture, with a substantial impact on the final results of the rehabilitation process. Moreover, patients with hip fracture who rehabilitate in a SNF with high rates of comorbidity and complications, may have even worse

  11. External validation of the discharge of hip fracture patients score

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vochteloo, A.J.H.; Flikweert, E.R.; Tuinebreijer, W.E.; Maier, A.B.; Bloem, R.M.; Pilot, P.; Nelissen, R.G.H.H.

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the external validation of a recently developed instrument, the Discharge of Hip fracture Patients score (DHP) that predicts discharge location on admission in patients living in their own home prior to hip fracture surgery. The DHP (maximum score 100 points) was applied to 125

  12. Feasibility of progressive strength training shortly after hip fracture surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Jan; Kristensen, Morten T

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the feasibility of a 6-wk progressive strength-training programme commenced shortly after hip fracture surgery in community-dwelling patients.......To investigate the feasibility of a 6-wk progressive strength-training programme commenced shortly after hip fracture surgery in community-dwelling patients....

  13. External validation of the discharge of hip fracture patients score

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vochteloo, Anne J. H.; Flikweert, Elvira R.; Tuinebreijer, Wim E.; Maier, Andrea B.; Bloem, Rolf M.; Pilot, Peter; Nelissen, Rob G. H. H.

    This paper reports the external validation of a recently developed instrument, the Discharge of Hip fracture Patients score (DHP) that predicts discharge location on admission in patients living in their own home prior to hip fracture surgery. The DHP (maximum score 100 points) was applied to 125

  14. Posterior Hip Dislocation with Ipsilateral Femoral Neck Fracture ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    crash and sustained a posterior hip dislocation of the right hip with an associated fracture of the neck of femur. This is a rare case but may occur in ... considered to be the most conservative yet functional mode of management(2). ... was thought to be a poor prognostic factor precluding. ORIF. A total hip athroplasty was our ...

  15. Hip Fracture Surgery and Survival in Centenarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzola, Paolo; Rea, Federico; Merlino, Luca; Bellelli, Giuseppe; Dubner, Lauren; Corrao, Giovanni; Pasinetti, Giulio M; Annoni, Giorgio

    2016-11-01

    Hip fracture (HF) is increasingly frequent with advancing age. Studies describing the HF incidence rate and survival after surgery in centenarians are scanty. To fill this gap, we performed a large population-based investigation on Lombardy centenarians (Italy). Retrospective observational cohort study based on information from the Healthcare Utilization Database. Among the cohort of 7,830 residents that reached 100 years of age between 2004 and 2011, incidence rate of HF was calculated. Two hundred fifty-nine patients were discharged alive from a hospital after HF and surgical repair (HF cohort). For each HF cohort member, a control was randomly selected from the initial cohort to be matched for gender and date of birth, and who did not experience HF from the date of their hundredth birthday until the date of hospital discharge of the corresponding HF cohort member. The survival curves and the hazard functions of HF and control cohort were calculated within 2 years. Over a mean follow-up of 1.85 years, HF incidence rate was 23.1 per 1,000 centenarians per year. Survival probability was significantly lower in HF cohort than in control cohort (31.5 vs 48.1%, p < .001). Hazard functions showed an increased risk of death in HF cohort than in control cohort, especially in the 3 months after surgery. Survival analysis exhibited an excess mortality in the first 3 months among HF cohort members, but not beyond this period. Every effort to counteract HF is warranted, including prevention of falls and high quality of care, especially in the early postsurgical time. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Factors Influencing The Six-Month Mortality Rate In Patients With A Hip Fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prodovic Tanja

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available There are several potential risk factors in patients with a hip fracture for a higher rate of mortality that include: comorbid disorders, poor general health, age, male gender, poor mobility prior to injury, type of fracture, poor cognitive status, place of residence. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of potential risk factors for six-month mortality in hip fracture patients.

  17. Usefulness of Arthroscopic Treatment of Painful Hip after Acetabular Fracture or Hip Dislocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jung-Taek; Lee, Woo-Yong; Kang, Chan; Hwang, Deuk-Soo; Kim, Dong-Yeol; Zheng, Long

    2015-12-01

    Painful hip following hip dislocation or acetabular fracture can be an important signal for early degeneration and progression to osteoarthritis due to intraarticular pathology. However, there is limited literature discussing the use of arthroscopy for the treatment of painful hip. The purpose of this retrospective study was to analyze the effectiveness and benefit of arthroscopic treatment for patients with a painful hip after major trauma. From July 2003 to February 2013, we reviewed 13 patients who underwent arthroscopic treatment after acetabular fracture or hip dislocation and were followed up for a minimum of 2 postoperative years. The degree of osteoarthritis based on the Tonnis classification pre- and postoperatively at final follow-up was determined. Clinical outcomes were evaluated using visual analogue scale for pain (VAS) and modified Harris hip score (MHHS), and range of motion (ROM) of the hip pre- and postoperatively at final follow-up. There were nine male and four female patients with a mean age at surgery of 28 years (range, 20 to 50 years). The mean follow-up period of the patients was 59.8 months (range, 24 to 115 months), and the mean interval between initial trauma and arthroscopic treatment was 40.8 months (range, 1 to 144 months). At the final follow-up, VAS and MHHS improved significantly from 6.3 and 53.4 to 3.0 and 88.3, respectively (p = 0.002 and p hip flexion, abduction, adduction, external rotation, and internal rotation as minor improvements from 113.1°, 38.5°, 28.5°, 36.5°, and 22.7° to 118.5°, 39.0°, 29.2°, 38.9°, and 26.5° were observed, respectively (p = 0.070, p = 0.414, p = 0.317, p = 0.084, and p = 0.136, respectively). None of the patients exhibited progression of osteoarthritis of the hip at the final follow-up. Arthroscopic treatment after acetabular fracture or hip dislocation is effective and delays the progression of traumatic osteoarthritis.

  18. Hip fractures in the elderly: The role of cortical bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarantino, Umberto; Rao, Cecilia; Tempesta, Valerio; Gasbarra, Elena; Feola, Maurizio

    2016-10-01

    Osteoporosis is characterised by poor bone quality arising from alterations to trabecular bone. However, recent studies have also described an important role of alterations to cortical bone in the physiopathology of osteoporosis. Although dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is a valid method to assess bone mineral density (BMD), real bone fragility in the presence of comorbidities cannot be evaluated with this method. The aim of this study was to evaluate if cortical thickness could be a good parameter to detect bone fragility in patients with hip fracture, independent of BMD. A retrospective study was conducted on 100 patients with hip fragility fractures. Cortical index was calculated on fractured femur (femoral cortical index [FCI]) and, when possible, on proximal humerus (humeral cortical index [HCI]). All patients underwent densitometric evaluation by DXA. Average value of FCI was 0.43 and of HCI was 0.25. Low values of FCI were found in 21 patients with normal or osteopenic values of BMD, while low values of HCI were found in three patients with non-osteoporotic values of BMD. Cortical thinning measured from X-Ray of the femur identifies 21% additional fracture cases over that identified by a T-score fracture risk even in patients with normal and osteopenic BMD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Inflammatory Cytokine Levels and Depressive Symptoms in Older Women in the Year after Hip Fracture: Findings from the Baltimore Hip Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheny, Maya E.; Miller, Ram R.; Shardell, Michelle D.; Hawkes, William G.; Lenze, Eric J.; Magaziner, Jay; Orwig, Denise L.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Determine whether interleukin 6 (IL-6) or soluble tumor necrosis factor α receptor 1 (sTNF-αR1) are associated with depressive symptoms in the year after hip fracture DESIGN Prospective cohort SETTING Three Baltimore-area hospitals PARTICIPANTS Community-dwelling women aged ≥65 years, admitted with a new, non-pathological fracture of the proximal femur (n=133). MEASUREMENTS At 2, 6 and 12 months postfracture, serum was analyzed for IL-6 and sTNF-αR1, and depressive symptoms were measured using the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS). Generalized estimating equations were used to model the longitudinal relationship between IL-6 and sTNF-αR1 and GDS score. We also examined whether lower extremity function, as measured by Lower Extremity Gain Scale (LEGS), explained the relationship between IL-6, sTNF-αR1 and GDS score. RESULTS Patients in the highest categories of IL-6 (≥5.14 pg/ml) and sTNF-αR1 (≥2421 pg/ml) had the highest GDS scores in the year postfracture (p=0.09 for both). At 12 months postfracture, those in the highest IL-6 and sTNF-αR1 categories had GDS scores that were on average 1.9 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.4, 3.4; p=0.01) and 1.4 (95% CI: −0.1, 3.0; p=0.07) points higher than those in the lowest category, respectively. Adjusting for LEGS score, the mean difference in GDS scores for highest versus lowest IL-6 categories was 1.6 (95% CI: 0.2, 3.0; p=0.02) points at 12 months. CONCLUSION Results from these exploratory analyses support a role for inflammation in the pathophysiology of depressive symptoms after hip fracture. Depressive symptoms in the context of elevated cytokines may represent a sickness syndrome that is chronic in some individuals. Further research should establish the cause and effect of this relationship as well as long-term correlates. PMID:22188073

  20. Posterior Hip Dislocation with Ipsilateral Femoral Neck Fracture ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dislocations of the hip associated with fractures of the neck of femur are rare entities. We report a case of a 23 year old man involved in a road traffic crash and sustained a posterior hip dislocation of the right hip with an associated fracture of the neck of femur. This is a rare case but may occur in high energy injuries. He was ...

  1. Incidence and direct hospitalisation costs of hip fractures in Vilnius, capital of Lithuania, in 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamulaitiene Marija

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few epidemiological data on hip fractures were previously available in Lithuania. The aim of this study was to estimate the incidence and hospital costs of hip fractures in Vilnius in 2010. Methods Data were collected from the medical charts of all patients admitted to hospitals in Vilnius (population, 548,835 due to new low-energy trauma hip fracture, during 2010. The estimated costs included ambulance transportation and continuous hospitalisation immediately after a fracture, which are covered by the Lithuanian healthcare system. Results The incidence of new low-energy trauma hip fractures was 252 (308 women and 160 men per 100,000 inhabitants of Vilnius aged 50-years or more. There was an exponential increase in the incidence with increasing age. The overall estimated cost of hip fractures in Vilnius was 1,114,292 EUR for the year 2010. The greatest part of the expenditure was accounted for by fractures in individuals aged 65-years and over. The mean cost per case was 2,526.74 EUR, and cost varied depending on the treatment type. Hip replacement did not affect the overall mean costs of hip fracture. The majority of costs were incurred for acute (53% and long-term care (35% hospital stays, while medical rehabilitation accounted for only 12% of the overall cost. The costs of hip fracture were somewhat lower than those found in other European countries. Conclusion The data on incidence and costs of hip fractures will help to assess the importance of interventions to reduce the number of fractures and associated costs.

  2. Radiographic templating of total hip arthroplasty for femoral neck fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakstein, Dror; Bachar, Ira; Debi, Ronen; Lubovsky, Omri; Cohen, Ornit; Tan, Zachary; Atoun, Ehud

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of pre-operative digital templating to minimize complications including limb length discrepancy (LLD), intraoperative fractures and early dislocations in patients with intracapsular femoral neck fractures. We retrospectively compared 23 patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty (THA) for intracapsular femoral fractures with pre-operative digital templating and 48 patients without templating. The mean post-operative LLD was significantly lower in patients who had pre-operative templating than in the control group (6.7 vs. 11.5 mm, p = 0.023). Only three patients (13 %) with templating had LLD greater than 1.5 cm, compared to the 15 patients (31 %) without templating (p = 0.17). In eight cases the final femoral stem size matched the templated size, while 19 patients were within two size increments. Complications included one dislocation and one intra-operative fracture in the control group. The present study demonstrated that careful pre-operative planning may reduce LLD in patients undergoing THA due to intracapsular hip fractures.

  3. Changing trends in the epidemiology of hip fracture in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azagra, R.; López-Expósito, F.; Martin-Sánchez, JC.; Aguyé, A.; Moreno, N.; Cooper, C.; Díez-Pérez, A.; Dennison, EM.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Temporal trends in hip fracture incidence have recently been reported in some developed countries. Such data in Spain has previously been incomplete; this study reports the stratified incidence of hip fractures in people over 65 in Spain during the last 14 years. Introduction The main objective is to establish whether temporal trends in hip fracture incidence in Spain exist. Methods Ecological study with data from hospital discharges nationwide. The study includes patients aged ≥ 65 years during a 14-year period (1997-2010). The analysis compares two periods of four years: 1997-2000 (P1) and 2007-2010 (P2). Results There were 119,857 fractures in men and 415,421 in women. Comparing periods (P1 vs P2), over ten years the crude incidence rate/100,000 inhabitant/year increased an average of 2.3%/year in men and 1.4% in women. After adjustment, the rate increased an average of 0.4%/year in men (p<0.0001), but decreased 0.2%/year in women (p<0.0001). In men younger than 85, the decrease was not significant except in 70-74 years and from 80 years the adjusted rate increases significantly (p<0.0001). In women under 80 years of age, the decrease in adjusted rate was significant, there was no change in 80-84 years and the adjusted rate increased significantly in individuals 85 years and older (p<0.0001). Mortality rates declined by 22% in both sexes and the index of overaging population rises 30.1% in men and 25.2% in women. Conclusions This study supports other international studies by showing changes in the incidence of hip fractures after age-population adjustment, which denotes a decrease in the younger age groups and among women and shows an increase in both groups over 85 years. The increase in the crude incidence rate of hip fracture in Spain reflects changes in population structure. PMID:24322478

  4. Which factors are independent predictors of early recovery of mobility in the older adults' population after hip fracture? A cohort prognostic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morri, Mattia; Forni, Cristiana; Marchioni, Maura; Bonetti, Elena; Marseglia, Francesca; Cotti, Andrea

    2017-09-27

    The aim of the present study was to identify all factors that might influence the short-term recovery of mobility in older adults' patients after hip surgery. A prospective cohort prognostic study was carried out. The study enrolled all consecutive patients aged 65 years or over admitted for hip fracture due to fragility. Patients were monitored from their admission into the emergency department of the hospital, until their discharge. The level of mobility was measured by the ILOA scale, administered during the 6th day of hospitalisation. The identified variables were divided into baseline patient variables, linked to the patient's characteristics, and, healthcare/hospital variables, linked to the program of care within post-surgery hospitalisation. The total number of patients enrolled and examined at discharge was 484. Six days after surgery, the level of mobility achieved by patients, as measured by ILOA Scale, was 42.4 (± 6.0). Increased age (B = 0.111; p = 0,042), pressure sore mattress with a motor used (B = 3.817; p mobility in the initial post-operative period in patients surgically treated for hip fracture. Therapy and physiotherapy choices after surgery for hip fracture are significantly associated with early recovery of mobility of older adults' patients, regardless of their baseline conditions. Early removal of supporting devices promoting prolonged bed immobility, such as air mattress, catheter, and incontinence pad, together with achieving an early upright position, are elements to take into account when planning future trials to understand its efficacy in enabling better recovery of mobility.

  5. Complications after hip fracture surgery: are they preventable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flikweert, E R; Wendt, K W; Diercks, R L; Izaks, G J; Landsheer, D; Stevens, M; Reininga, I H F

    2017-08-09

    Surgery for hip fractures is frequently followed by complications that hinder the rehabilitation of patients. The aim of this study was to describe the incidence rate and type of complications, including mortality, after hip fracture surgery, and to identify the risk factors of these complications that may be amenable to prevention. Prospective cohort study of all consecutive patients aged ≥60 treated for a hip fracture at University Medical Center Groningen between July 2009 and June 2013. All patients were treated in a comprehensive multidisciplinary care pathway. Logistic regression analyses were used to investigate which variables were significant risk factors for the occurrence of complications. Additional analyses were conducted to investigate whether the independent variables were significant risk factors for several specific complications and mortality. The study population consisted of 479 patients with a mean age of 78.4 (SD 9.5) years; 33% were men. The overall complication rate was 75%. Delirium was the complication seen most frequently (19%); the incidence of surgical complications was 9%. Most risk factors for complications were not preventable (high comorbidity rate, high age and dependent living situation). However, general anesthesia (OR 1.51; 95% CI 0.97-2.35) and delay in surgery (OR 3.16; 95% CI 1.43-6.97) may be risk factors that can potentially be prevented. Overall, the mortality risk was not higher in patients with a complication, but delirium and pneumonia were risk factors for mortality. The overall complication rate after hip fracture surgery was high. Only few complications were potentially preventable.

  6. Clinical assessment of patients with isolated hip fractures associated with an upper limb fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Álvarez, J; González-Escobar, S; Gil-Garay, E

    2017-11-28

    Some patients with a hip fracture also present a concomitant upper limb fracture. We want to know whether these patients have a worse functional level and whether they have any differences in various clinical parameters compared with patients with an isolated hip fracture. We retrospectively reviewed 1061 discharge reports from the Orthogeriatrics Unit. We collected information on several clinical parameters of the fractures. Subsequently, we performed a statistical analysis of the data by comparing the associated fracture group with the isolated fracture group. We detected 44 patients with associated upper limb fracture, 90.9% were women (40) and the average age was 84.45years. Eighty-one point eight percent of the upper limb fractures were distal radius or proximal humerus. Pertrochanteric fractures were the most common (none of them were subtrochanteric fractures). Surgical delay was 2.60days and the average hospital stay was 12.30days. Sixty-four point three percent were nail surgery and 31% arthroplasty. The mean Barthel index score was 84.88 (P=.021). Fifty-two point 5 percent of the patients in the study group were referred to a functional support unit (P=.03). The in-hospital mortality rate was 4.2%, with no differences between groups. Patients with an associated fracture have a higher previous functional capacity and they are more independent. Nevertheless, after the fracture they need more help from the healthcare system for optimal functional recovery. Copyright © 2017 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. The Bristol Hip View: Its Role in the Diagnosis and Surgical Planning and Occult Fracture Diagnosis for Proximal Femoral Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Harding

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate whether a modified radiographic view of the femoral neck improves the diagnosis of occult proximal femoral. Materials and Methods. Prospective study of patients presenting with clinically suspected proximal femoral fractures or who underwent traditional plain radiographic views and the Bristol hip view (a 30-degree angled projection. Six blinded independent observers assessed the images for presence of a fracture, anatomical level, and displacement. Results. 166 consecutive patients presenting with the clinical diagnosis of a proximal femoral fracture, of which 61 sustained a fracture. Six of these were deemed occult due to negative plain and had proven fractures on subsequent cross-sectional imaging. The Bristol hip view demonstrated five of these six fractures. It performed better than the traditional lateral hip view to identify the injury. The Bristol hip view predicted correctly the fracture type and displacement in all cases and missed only one of the occult fractures. Conclusion. The Bristol hip view is more sensitive and clearer than a lateral projection for patients. It adds useful diagnostic information and performs better than the traditional views in occult fractures. Its use may prevent the need for further cross sectional imaging and subsequent surgical delay.

  8. Trochanteric hip fracture during cardioversion therapy. A case report

    OpenAIRE

    J. Gómez; J. Albareda; L. Ezquerra

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Trochanteric hip fractures in elderly patients with osteoporosis are commonly caused by low energy trauma. The cardioversion therapy is an extremely rare cause of this type of fracture. Presentation of case: We report the case of a woman with hip fracture after cardioversion. Discussion: We discuss the production mechanism of this injury and the importance of the care of the osteoporotic bone under these therapies. Conclusion: The propofol sedation should be complemente...

  9. Intermittent versus indwelling catheters for older patients with hip fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Inger; Athlin, Elsy; Frykholm, Lillemor; Bolinder, Helen; Larsson, Gerry

    2002-09-01

    Nursing staff identified postoperative urinary tract infection (UTI) in patients with hip fracture as an increasing problem. A quality improvement project was carried out to investigate the problem and to reduce the incidence. The aim of the study was to describe the occurrence of UTI among patients with hip fracture before and after surgery, to assess whether the decision to use intermittent catheters instead of indwelling catheters was adopted and to test the hypothesis that hospital stay is significantly longer for patients with UTI than for those without infection. One hundred and forty-four patients were investigated for bacteriuria before the first catheterization and 1 week after the last catheterization. Positive urine cultures on admission to hospital were found in 38% of patients. Among those free from bacteria on admission, 61% had a positive urine culture after indwelling catheterization compared with 32% in the group treated with intermittent catetherization. A significantly longer hospital stay (P study points to the necessity for systematic assessment to detect and prevent UTI among older patients with hip fracture.

  10. Bisphosphonates and hip and nontraumatic subtrochanteric femoral fractures in the Veterans Health Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safford, Monika M; Barasch, Andrei; Curtis, Jeffrey R; Outman, Ryan; Saag, Kenneth

    2014-10-01

    Subtrochanteric femoral shaft fractures after little or no trauma have been reported in long-term users of bisphosphonates, but risks relative to hip fracture protective effects and among men are not clear. We examined associations between bisphosphonate use and nontraumatic subtrochanteric (NTST) femoral fractures and hip fractures in the Veterans Health Administration. This retrospective cohort study was conducted using 1998-2007 Veterans Health Administration electronic medical records data on 78,155 individuals who had a fragility fracture at age 45 years or older. Time-to-event analysis examined associations of bisphosphonates with risk of NTST femoral fracture and, separately, hip fracture, controlling for sociodemographics, medications, and comorbid medical conditions. The cohort had a mean age 66.5 years (32.5% were ≥75 years old) at the time of their first fracture, and 69.3% were observed for 6 or more years; only 11.8% were prescribed bisphosphonates during observation. During follow-up, 408 had an NTST femoral second fracture, and 1584 had a hip second fracture. Compared with those never on bisphosphonates, the adjusted hazard ratio for NTST femoral second fracture among patients on 4 years of therapy or longer was 0.40 (95% confidence interval, 0.16-0.97) and for hip second fracture was 0.38 (95% confidence interval, 0.24-0.61). Bisphosphonate treatment in this high-risk cohort was infrequent with few long-term users, limiting power to assess long-term effects. Nontraumatic subtrochanteric femoral fractures were uncommon, and longer bisphosphonate use was associated with lower (not higher) risk. In men, risks of NTST femoral fractures associated with bisphosphonate treatment may be low in contrast to substantial protective benefits for hip fracture.

  11. Anterior locking plate reduces trochanteric fracture migrations during hip extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloutier, Luc P; Laflamme, G Yves; Menard, Jeremie; Petit, Yvan

    2014-09-01

    Greater trochanter fractures or osteotomies fixed with lateral plates still present high rates of complications. Unblocked greater trochanter anterior movement during hip extension might be a possible cause of failure. This study aimed to determine, under stair climbing conditions, the biomechanical behaviour of a greater trochanter fragment and the impact of an anterior locking plate on its migration. Eighteen femurs paired from nine fresh frozen cadaveric specimens were tested on a quasi-dynamic stair climbing cycling test bench. Left and right sides with greater trochanter fractures were randomly fixed either with an antero-lateral locking plate or with a lateral locking plate. Migrations, defined as the remaining movements of the unloaded greater trochanter fragment, were measured for all 18 femurs. During hip extension, multi-directional greater trochanter fragment movements occurred and showed a back-and-forth anterior rotation. The lateral locking plate failed due to greater trochanter fragment rotation around the superior axis and anterior translation. The antero-lateral locking plate significantly reduced greater trochanter anterior migration (-0.9 mm ± 1.6) compared to the lateral locking plate (9.6 mm ± 9.5). Hip extension provides a plausible explanation for the high rate of post-operative failures of greater trochanter fixations. An antero-lateral locking plate represents an efficient surgical alternative counteracting the multi-directional greater trochanter movements occurring during hip extension. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Mild prolonged chronic hyponatremia and risk of hip fracture in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayus, Juan Carlos; Fuentes, Nora Angelica; Negri, Armando Luis; Moritz, Michael L; Giunta, Diego Hernan; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Nigwekar, Sagar U; Thadhani, Ravi I; Go, Alan S; De Quiros, Fernan Gonzalez Bernaldo

    2016-10-01

    Hip fractures are among the most serious bone fractures in the elderly, producing significant morbidity and mortality. Several observational studies have found that mild hyponatremia can adversely affect bone, with fractures occurring as a potential complication. We examined if there is an independent association between prolonged chronic hyponatremia (>90 days duration) and risk of hip fracture in the elderly. We performed a retrospective cohort study in adults >60 years of age from a prepaid health maintenance organization who had two or more measurements of plasma sodium between 2005 and 2012. The incidence of hip fractures was assessed in a very restrictive population: subjects with prolonged chronic hyponatremia, defined as plasma sodium values 90 days. Multivariable Cox regression was performed to determine the hazard ratio (HR) for hip fracture risk associated with prolonged chronic hyponatremia after adjustment for the propensity to have hyponatremia, fracture risk factors and relevant baseline characteristics. Among 31 527 eligible patients, only 228 (0.9%) had prolonged chronic hyponatremia. Mean plasma sodium was 132 ± 5 mmol/L in hyponatremic patients and 139 ± 3 mmol/L in normonatremic patients (P hip fracture was 7/282 in patients with prolonged chronic hyponatremia and 411/313 299 in normonatremic patients. Hyponatremic patients had a substantially elevated rate of hip fracture [adjusted HR 4.52 (95% CI 2.14-9.6)], which was even higher in those with moderate hyponatremia (hip fracture risk in the elderly population, although the absolute risk is low. However, proof that correcting hyponatremia will result in a reduction of hip fractures is lacking. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  13. Economic Analysis of Bisphosphonate Use after Distal Radius Fracture for Prevention of Hip Fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suneel B. Bhat

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Osteoporosis is a common condition among the elderly population, and is associated with an increased risk of fracture. One of the most common fragility fractures involve the distal radius, and are associated with risk of subsequent fragility fracture. Early treatment with bisphosphonates has been suggested to decrease the population hip fracture burden. However, there have been no prior economic evaluations of the routine treatment of distal radius fracture patients with bisphosphonates, or the implications on hip fracture rate reduction. Methods: Age specific distal radius fracture incidence, age specific hip fracture rates after distal radius fracture with and without risendronate treatment, cost of risendronate treatment, risk of atypical femur fracture with bisphosphonate treatment, and cost of hip fracture treatment were obtained from the literature. A unique stochastic Markov chain decision tree model was constructed from derived estimates. The results were evaluated with comparative statistics, and a one-way threshold analysis performed to identify the break-even cost of bisphosphonate treatment. Results: Routine treatment of the current population of all women over the age of 65 suffering a distal radius fracture with bisphosphonates would avoid 94,888 lifetime hip fractures at the cost of 19,464 atypical femur fractures and $19,502,834,240, or on average $2,186,617,527 annually, which translates to costs of $205,534 per hip fracture avoided. The breakeven price point of annual bisphosphonate therapy after distal radius fracture for prevention of hip fractures would be approximately $70 for therapy annually. Conclusion: Routine treatment of all women over 65 suffering distal radius fracture with bisphosphonates would result in a significant reduction in the overall hip fracture burden, however at a substantial cost of over a $2 billion dollars annually. To optimize efficiency of treatment either patients may be selectively

  14. Risk factors for hip fracture in elderly persons

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    P. Olivi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this observational study, promoted by the Health Authorities of the Regione Veneto (Italy, is to assess the prevalence of the most relevant environmental and individual risk factors in subjects with a recent hip fracture. Methods: Patients aged more than 60 years of both genders with a recent hip fracture not associated with malignancies, were administered questionnaires on dietary habits, sun exposure, and disability score. A complete family, pharmacological and pathology history was collected together with information on previous falls, details of the fracture index, and anthropometric data. In all subjects, blood was taken for the measurement of serum 25 hydroxy-vitamin D (25OHD. Results: The study included 704 patients (573 women and 131 men. Mean age was 81±8 years (range 60-102. Severe pre-fracture disability was a common feature (58% associated with multiple co-morbidities (84%, more frequently cardio- vascular and neurological diseases, and specific medications. In a large proportion (86% of the patients, environmental or individual risk factors for falling were found. Vitamin D insufficiency (serum 25OHD levels <75 nmol/l was quite common (70%, particularly in the regional Health Districts were strategies for preventing vitamin D deficiency were not implemented (91%. Only a small proportion (17% of the study population had been evaluated and treated for osteoporosis. Conclusions: In senile patients with a recent hip fracture, pre-existing disability, multiple co-morbidities, high risk of falling and inadequate intake of calcium and vitamin D is relatively common. Community and case-finding interventions aimed at selecting subjects at high risk of osteoporosis, preventing vitamin D and dietary calcium deficiency, and increasing awareness on the environmental risks of falling are highly warranted.

  15. Comparison of Primary Hip Spica with Crossed Retrograde Intramedullary Rush Pins for the Management of Diaphyseal Femur Fractures in Children: A Prospective, Randomized Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ruhullah

    2013-12-01

    Conclusions: Intra-medullary crossed Rush pinning is an effective method of paediatric diaphyseal femur fracture fixation as compared to primary hip spica in terms of early weight bearing and restoration of normal anatomy.

  16. Older peoples' lived experiences after hip fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Birgit; Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth

    Background Older people's hip fracture (HF) may occur due to osteoporosis, impaired balance or other health problems. For the individual, the experience of changes in wellbeing and/or changes in a recent active everyday-life; new health problems such as dependency, pain and a fear of falling may...... add to the load of wellbeing-challenges after HF. Evidence-based knowledge in order to address the wellbeing of older people and the challenges they meet in changing times after HF is needed for professionals. Aim To explore the support older people with HF may need to optimize their wellbeing during...... by the philosophies of Heidegger and Gadamer to explore older people´s lived experiences through repeated interviews; and applying an existential framework of wellbeing where meaning and health can be understood as a balancing of mobility and dwelling. Results The systematic review reveals older peoples´ worries when...

  17. Risk of Hip Fracture in Benzodiazepine Users With and Without Alzheimer Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarelainen, Laura; Tolppanen, Anna-Maija; Koponen, Marjaana; Tanskanen, Antti; Sund, Reijo; Tiihonen, Jari; Hartikainen, Sirpa; Taipale, Heidi

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the association between benzodiazepine and related drug (BZDR) use and hip fracture as well as postfracture mortality and duration of hospital stay in community-dwellers with and without Alzheimer disease (AD). Retrospective cohort study. The register-based Medication Use and Alzheimer's disease (MEDALZ) study, including all community-dwelling persons diagnosed with AD in Finland during 2005-2011 (n = 70,718) and their matched comparison persons without AD. Persons without BZDR use during the year preceding the AD diagnosis or the corresponding matching date as well as persons without history of hip fracture were included in this study. We investigated the risk of hip fracture associated with BZDR use compared with nonuse separately in persons with and without AD. Further, we investigated the association between BZDR use during hip fracture and 1-year mortality as well as longer than a 4-month hospital stay after hip fracture. Associations were reported as hazard ratios and odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals (CI). BZDR use was associated with an increased risk of hip fracture in persons with and without AD (adjusted hazard ratio 1.4 [95% CI 1.2-1.7] and 1.6 [95% CI 1.3-1.9], respectively). BZDR use during hip fracture was associated with longer than 4-month postfracture hospital stay in persons with AD [adjusted odds ratio 1.9 (95% CI 1.3-2.8)] but not in comparison persons. One-year mortality was not associated with BZDR use during hip fracture. Higher threshold in prescribing BZDRs for neuropsychiatric symptoms might decrease the hip fracture rate and affect the length of hospital stay in persons with AD. Copyright © 2016 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Physical Activity and Hip Fracture Disability: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Ray

    2011-01-01

    Objective. The present paper examines pertinent literature sources published in the peer-reviewed English language between 1980 and November 1, 2010 concerning hip fractures. The aim was to highlight potential intervention points to offset the risk of incurring a hip fracture and its attendant disability. Methods. An in-depth search of the literature using the key terms: disability, epidemiology, hip fracture, prevention, and risk factors was conducted, along with data from the author's research base detailing the disability associated with selected hip fracture cases. All articles that dealt with these key topics were reviewed, and relevant data were tabulated and analyzed. Results. Hip fractures remain an important but potentially preventable public health problem. Among the many related remediable risk factors, low physical activity levels are especially important. Related determinants of suboptimal neuromuscular function also contribute significantly to hip fracture disability. Conclusion. Physical activity participation can help to reduce the prevalence and excess disability of hip fractures and should be encouraged. PMID:21584248

  19. Effects of a social cognitive theory-based hip fracture prevention web site for older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahm, Eun-Shim; Barker, Bausell; Resnick, Barbara; Covington, Barbara; Magaziner, Jay; Brennan, Patricia Flatley

    2010-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to develop a Social Cognitive Theory-based, structured Hip Fracture Prevention Web site for older adults and conduct a preliminary evaluation of its effectiveness. The Theory-based, structured Hip Fracture Prevention Web site is composed of learning modules and a moderated discussion board. A total of 245 older adults recruited from two Web sites and a newspaper advertisement were randomized into the Theory-based, structured Hip Fracture Prevention Web site and the conventional Web sites groups. Outcomes included (1) knowledge (hip fractures and osteoporosis), (2) self-efficacy and outcome expectations, and (3) calcium intake and exercise and were assessed at baseline, end of treatment (2 weeks), and follow-up (3 months). Both groups showed significant improvement in most outcomes. For calcium intake, only the Theory-based, structured Hip Fracture Prevention Web site group showed improvement. None of the group and time interactions were significant. The Theory-based, structured Hip Fracture Prevention Web site group, however, was more satisfied with the intervention. The discussion board usage was significantly correlated with outcome gains. Despite several limitations, the findings showed some preliminary effectiveness of Web-based health interventions for older adults and the use of a Theory-based, structured Hip Fracture Prevention Web site as a sustainable Web structure for online health behavior change interventions.

  20. OCCURRENCE AND INCIDENCE OF THE 2ND HIP FRACTURE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    SCHRODER, HM; Petersen, KK; ERLANDSEN, M

    1993-01-01

    During a 16-year period, 256 second hip fractures were found in 3898 persons 40 years of age and older who had a previous hip fracture. Ninety-two percent of the second fractures were contra-lateral, and 68% of these were the same type as the first. Thus, 62% of the femoral neck and 72......% of the trochanteric fractures were preceded by a contra-lateral fracture of the same type. The mean interval between fractures was 3.3 years, and there was no significant difference between genders or among fracture types. The risk of the first fracture was 1.6 per 1000 men per year and 3.6 per 1000 women......, and for the second fracture 15 per 1000 men per year and 22 per 1000 women. This increase was highly significant for both genders, especially for men....

  1. High prevalence of undiagnosed vertebral fractures in patients suffering from hip fracture at their hospital admission: weak concordance among observers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa, Manuel; Saavedra, Pedro; Gómez-de-Tejada, María-Jesús; Navarro, María-del-Carmen; Jódar, Esteban; García, Esther; Fuentes, Rafael

    2015-12-01

    Vertebral fracture is often underdiagnosed. Patients with hip fracture may suffer from vertebral fracture without knowing it. The diagnosis of vertebral fracture is sometimes difficult because there is no consensus regarding the definition of osteoporotic vertebral fracture, and several indexes may be used to diagnose it and the concordance between several observers may not be optimal. To study the concordance in the diagnosis of vertebral fracture done by three different doctors: an orthopedic surgeon, a radiologist, and a bone mineral metabolism expert. A lateral thoracic-lumbar spine X-Ray was performed in 177 patients suffering from hip fracture to assess the presence or absence of vertebral fractures. Three different observers applied Genant's criteria for it. Concordance between observers was measured using Cohen's kappa coefficient. Patients suffering from hip fractures have undiagnosed vertebral fractures in a range that varies from 41.8 to 47.5% depending on the observer. The concordance in the diagnosis of vertebral fractures is quite low, ranging a Cohen's kappa coefficient from 0.43 to 0.55 and a percentage of concordance varying from 64 to 72%. The best concordance was found between observers 1 and 3. Depending on the observer who made the diagnosis, the prevalence of previously undiagnosed vertebral fractures in patients with HF varied widely. We selected three different observers to assess the possible differences in the diagnosis of vertebral fractures among these patients and using the same method (Genant's semi-quantitative assessment), surprisingly, there was little concordance among the three of them. Patients with hip fracture have high prevalence of undiagnosed vertebral fractures. The diagnosis of these fractures varies widely depending on the observers and the Cohen's kappa coefficient and percentage of concordance is rather low.

  2. Plasma phosphatidylcholine concentrations of polyunsaturated fatty acids are differentially associated with hop bone mineral density and hip fracture in older adults: The Framingham Osteoporosis Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) may influence bone health. Our objective was to examine associations between plasma phosphatidylcholine (PC) PUFA concentrations and hip measures: 1) femoral neck bone mineral density (FN-BMD) (n=765); 2) 4-y change in FN-BMD (n=556); and 3) hip fracture risk (n=76...

  3. Postoperative Treatment of Pain after Hip Fracture in Elderly Patients with Dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen-Dahm, Christina; Palm, Henrik; Gasse, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: Prior studies have shown that patients with dementia are at risk of receiving insufficient treatment for pain after a hip fracture. We therefore hypothesized that elderly hip fracture patients with dementia received less postoperative pain treatment than those without dementia....... METHOD: All patients (age ≥65 years) who had been operated on for a hip fracture in the Copenhagen University Hospital region in 2009 were included. Data about analgesic use for the first 72 h after surgery were acquired from the hospitals' electronic medication system and linked with information about...

  4. The incidence of hip fractures in Estonia, 2005-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jürisson, M; Vorobjov, S; Kallikorm, R; Lember, M; Uusküla, A

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of hip fractures among individuals aged over 50 in Estonia and trends over time were assessed for 2005-2012. The incidence among women is relatively low, with the declining trend, but the rate among men is among the highest in Eastern and Central Europe. The aim of this study was to assess the incidence and trends of hip fractures among individuals over 50 years in Estonia in 2005-2012 and to increase understanding of the incidence of hip fractures in Eastern Europe. We identified all patients aged 50 years or older with hip fracture (ICD-10 codes S72.0, S72.1 and S72.2) in 2005-2012 using medical claims data from the Estonian Health Insurance Fund. Crude and age-specific incidence rates were calculated for men and women using the population of Estonia in 2005-2012. To adjust for age differences in the population, standardized incidence rates (SIR) were estimated. The SIR per 100,000 for the entire observation period was 209.2 (95% CI 204.2 to 214.2) in women and 215.6 (95%CI 208.2 to 223.1) in men, resulting in a female to male rate ratio of 0.97 (95% CI 0.84 to 1.11). Over the period of 2005-2012 the estimated SIR/100,000 ranged from 211.5 (95% CI 196.8-226.3) in 2005 to 183.7 (95% CI 170.8-196.7) in 2012 in women, and from 238.5 (95% CI 215.4-261.7) in 2005 to 187.9 (95% CI 169.0-206.8) in 2012, in men. For women, the decrease in SIR for the study period approached statistical significance (p = 0.058), and for the period of 2009-2012, we observed an accelerated 16% decrease (p = 0.008). The incidence of hip fractures among Estonian women is relatively low, whereas the rate among men is among the highest in Eastern and Central Europe. In line with many countries, we found a recent decline in incidence among women.

  5. Dementia and delirium, the outcomes in elderly hip fracture patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosk CA

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Christina A Mosk,1 Marnix Mus,1 Jos PAM Vroemen,1 Tjeerd van der Ploeg,2 Dagmar I Vos,1 Leon HGJ Elmans,3 Lijckle van der Laan1 1Department of Surgery, Amphia Hospital, Breda, 2Department of Public Health, Erasmus MC–University Medical Center, Rotterdam, 3Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Amphia Hospital, Breda, the Netherlands Background: Delirium in hip fractured patients is a frequent complication. Dementia is an important risk factor for delirium and is common in frail elderly. This study aimed to extend the previous knowledge on risk factors for delirium and the consequences. Special attention was given to patients with dementia and delirium.Methods: This is a retrospective cohort study performed in the Amphia Hospital, Breda, the Netherlands. A full electronic patient file system (Hyperspace Version IU4: Epic, Inc., Verona, WI, USA was used to assess data between January 2014 and September 2015. All patients presented were aged ≥70 years with a hip fracture, who underwent surgery with osteosynthesis or arthroplasty. Patients were excluded in case of a pathological or a periprosthetic hip fracture, multiple traumatic injuries, and high-energy trauma. Patient and surgical characteristics were documented. Postoperative outcomes were noted. Delirium was screened using Delirium Observation Screening Scale and dementia was assessed from medical notes.Results: Of a total of 566 included patients, 75% were females. The median age was 84 years (interquartile range: 9. Delirium was observed in 35%. Significant risk factors for delirium were a high American Society of Anesthesiology score, delirium in medical history, functional dependency, preoperative institutionalization, low hemoglobin level, and high amount of blood transfusion. Delirium was correlated with a longer hospital stay (P=0.001, increased association with complications (P<0.001, institutionalization (P<0.001, and 6-month mortality (P<0.001. Patients with dementia (N=168 had a

  6. Older men who sustain a hip fracture experience greater declines in bone mineral density at the contralateral hip than non-fractured comparators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathbun, A M; Magaziner, J; Shardell, M D; Yerges-Armstrong, L M; Orwig, D; Hicks, G E; Hochberg, M C

    2017-10-24

    Men experience declining bone mineral density (BMD) after hip fracture; however, changes attributable to fracture are unknown. This study evaluated the excess BMD decline attributable to hip fracture among older men. Older men with hip fracture experienced accelerated BMD declines and are at an increased risk of secondary fractures. The objective was to determine whether bone mineral density (BMD) changes in men after hip fracture exceed that expected with aging. Two cohorts were used: Baltimore Hip Studies 7th cohort (BHS-7) and Baltimore Men's Osteoporosis Study (MOST). BHS-7 recruited older adults (N = 339) hospitalized for hip fracture; assessments occurred within 22 days of admission and at 2, 6, and 12 months follow-up. MOST enrolled age-eligible men (N = 694) from population-based listings; data were collected at a baseline visit and a second visit that occurred between 10 and 31 months later. The combined sample (n = 452) consisted of Caucasian men from BHS-7 (n = 89) and MOST (n = 363) with ≥ 2 dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scans and overlapping ranges of age, height, and weight. Mixed-effect models estimated rates of BMD change, and generalized linear models evaluated differences in annual bone loss at the total hip and femoral neck between cohorts. Adjusted changes in total hip and femoral neck BMD were - 4.16% (95% CI, - 4.87 to - 3.46%) and - 4.90% (95% CI, - 5.88 to - 3.92%) in BHS-7 participants; - 1.57% (95% CI, - 2.19 to - 0.96%) and - 0.99% (95% CI, - 1.88 to - 0.10%) in MOST participants; and statistically significant (P Hip fracture in older men is associated with accelerated BMD declines at the non-fractured hip that are greater than those expected during aging, and pharmacological interventions in this population to prevent secondary fractures may be warranted.

  7. Improving Hip Fracture Care in Ireland: A Preliminary Report of the Irish Hip Fracture Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad Ellanti

    2014-01-01

    IHFD is a clinically led web-based audit. We summarize the data collected on hip fractures from April 2012 to March 2013 from 8 centres. Results. There were 843 patients with the majority being (70% female. The 80–89-year age group accounted for the majority of fractures (44%. Most (71% sustained a fall at home. Intertrochanteric fractures (40% were most common. Only 28% were admitted to an orthopaedic ward within 4 hours. The majority (97% underwent surgery with 44% having surgery within 36 hours. Medical optimization (35% and lack of theatre space (26% accounted for most of the surgical delay. While 29% were discharged home, 33% were discharged to a nursing home or other long-stay facilities. There was a 4% in-hospital mortality rate. Conclusions. Several key areas in both the database and aspects of patient care needing improvement have been highlighted. The implementation of similar databases has led to improved hip fracture care in other countries and we believe this can be replicated in Ireland.

  8. Initiation of Monthly Minodronate Therapy at an Early Stage After Hip Fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohishi, Tsuyoshi; Fujita, Tomotada; Suzuki, Daisuke; Nishida, Tatsuya; Okabayashi, Ryo; Yamamoto, Kazufumi; Ushirozako, Hiroki; Banno, Tomohiro; Matsuyama, Yukihiro

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of second hip fractures occurring within a year of initial fractures is 20%-45%. The high incidence of second hip fractures in this period can be attributed to the rapid bone loss that occurs during this time. Restoring bone mass at an early stage after hip fractures is critical for preventing subsequent fractures. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of monthly minodronate therapy (50 mg/4 wk) for preventing bone loss over a 9-mo period following hip fractures. Minodronate was administered monthly to 51 patients (44 females), beginning within 3 mo after hip fracture surgery. The mean (±standard deviation) age of the patients was 82.0 ± 0.9 yr. Demographics, mobility status, bone turnover makers, and bone mineral density (BMD) in the lumbar spine and proximal femur (including femoral neck and total hip BMD) were examined prior to and after 9 mo of treatment. Lumbar BMD was increased by 2.7% ± 4.4% (p hip BMD did not significantly change. Bone formation and resorption markers both decreased by approximately 70% during treatment. Monthly treatment with minodronate did not adversely affect the healing process on the fracture site or the patients' laboratory results. The patients who were independently mobile prior to injury exhibited greater recovery of BMD in the femoral neck during the 9-mo treatment period. Monthly minodronate therapy during the early stages after hip fractures has favorable effects on restoring overall lumbar BMD and contralateral femoral neck BMD in patients with independent mobility prior to fractures. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Clinical Densitometry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The association between knee airbag deployment and knee-thigh-hip fracture injury risk in motor vehicle collisions: A matched cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Vijal; Griffin, Russell; Eberhardt, Alan W; McGwin, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    In the U.S. alone, an estimated 30,000 knee-thigh-hip (KTH) injuries occur annually in frontal motor vehicle collisions. These fractures typically occur through occupant contact with the vehicle's knee bolster. Research has suggested that knee airbags (KABs) can mitigate the forces sustained during this contact, resulting in decreased injury risk; however, previous research has been limited by small sample sizes or by occurring in a controlled setting. The objective of the current study is to determine the effectiveness of KABs on KTH fracture risk using nationally representative, real-world data. Using combined data from the Crash Injury Research and Engineering Network and the National Automotive Sampling Survey, a matched cohort study was conducted among front-seat occupants of vehicles involved in a frontal collision occurring from 2000 to 2009. Occupants exposed to a KAB deployment were matched to occupants with no KAB deployment based on age ±5 years, sex, seatbelt use, vehicle seating position (i.e., driver or front passenger), car vehicle body type, collision impact, and sampling weight. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to calculate risk ratios (RRs) and associated 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) to estimate the association between KAB deployment and lower extremity fracture risk. There was no association between KAB deployment and risk of lower extremity fracture (RR 0.83, 95% CI 0.52-1.31). A notable pattern in fracture risk, though not statistically significant, was observed, with a decreased risk of hip (RR 0.72, 95% CI 0.26-1.97) and thigh fracture (RR 0.81, 95% CI 0.32-2.05), and an increased risk of tibia/fibula (RR 1.23, 95% CI 0.52-2.90) and foot fracture (RR 1.96, 95% CI 0.72-5.32). The results of the current study suggest that KABs are not associated with the risk of lower extremity fractures. However, given the small sample size of the current study, it is difficult to definitively say whether the observed injury pattern is

  10. Femoral neck shaft angle width is associated with hip-fracture risk in males but not independently of femoral neck bone density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripamonti, C; Lisi, L; Avella, M

    2014-05-01

    To investigate the specificity of the neck shaft angle (NSA) to predict hip fracture in males. We consecutively studied 228 males without fracture and 38 with hip fracture. A further 49 males with spine fracture were studied to evaluate the specificity of NSA for hip-fracture prediction. Femoral neck (FN) bone mineral density (FN-BMD), NSA, hip axis length and FN diameter (FND) were measured in each subject by dual X-ray absorptiometry. Between-mean differences in the studied variables were tested by the unpaired t-test. The ability of NSA to predict hip fracture was tested by logistic regression. Compared with controls, FN-BMD (p fractures, whereas FND (p fracture group. A significant inverse correlation (p fracture, whereas NSA (p fracture together with age (p fracture predictor to enter the best model to predict both fracture types. NSA is associated with hip-fracture risk in males but is not independent of FN-BMD. The lack of ability of NSA to predict hip fracture in males independent of FN-BMD should depend on its inverse correlation with FN-BMD by capturing, as the strongest fracture predictor, some of the effects of NSA on the hip fracture. Conversely, NSA in females does not correlate with FN-BMD but independently predicts hip fractures.

  11. Readmission within 30 days of discharge after hip fracture care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Frederic H; Bethea, Audis; Samanta, Damayanti; Modak, Asmita; Maurer, James P; Chumbe, Julton Tomanguillo

    2015-01-01

    The Affordable Care Act currently requires hospitals to report 30-day readmission rates for certain medical conditions. It has been suggested that surveillance will expand to include hip and knee surgery-related readmissions in the future. To ensure quality of care and avoid penalties, readmissions related to hip fractures require further investigation. The goal of this study was to evaluate factors associated with 30-day hospital readmission after hip fracture at a level I trauma center. This retrospective cohort study included 1486 patients who were 65 years or older and had a surgical procedure performed to treat a femoral neck, intertrochanteric, and/or subtrochanteric hip fracture during an 8-year period. Analysis of these patients showed a 30-day readmission rate of 9.35% (n=139). Patients in the readmission group had a significantly higher rate of pre-existing diabetes and pulmonary disease and a longer initial hospital length of stay. Readmissions were primarily the result of medical complications, with only one-fourth occurring secondary to orthopedic surgical failure. Pre-existing pulmonary disease (odds ratio [OR], 1.885; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.305-2.724), initial hospitalization of 8 days or longer (OR, 1.853; 95% CI, 1.223-2.807), and discharge to a skilled nursing facility (OR, 1.586; 95% CI, 1.043-2.413) were determined to be predictors of readmission. Accordingly, patient management should be consistently geared toward optimizing chronic disease states while concomitantly working to minimize the duration of initial hospitalization and decrease readmission rates Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. Antifracture efficacy and reduction of mortality in relation to timing of the first dose of zoledronic acid after hip fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Erik Fink; Lyles, Kenneth W; Colón-Emeric, Cathleen S

    2009-01-01

    Annual infusions of zoledronic acid (5 mg) significantly reduced the risk of vertebral, hip, and nonvertebral fractures in a study of postmenopausal women with osteoporosis and significantly reduced clinical fractures and all-cause mortality in another study of women and men who had recently...... that administration of zoledronic acid to patients suffering a low-trauma hip fracture 2 wk or later after surgical repair increases hip BMD, induces significant reductions in the risk of subsequent clinical vertebral, nonvertebral, and hip fractures, and reduces mortality....

  13. Effectiveness of sensor monitoring in an occupational therapy rehabilitation program for older individuals after hip fracture, the SO-HIP trial: study protocol of a three-arm stepped wedge cluster randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pol, Margriet C; Ter Riet, Gerben; van Hartingsveldt, Margo; Kröse, Ben; de Rooij, Sophia E; Buurman, Bianca M

    2017-01-03

    The performance of activities of daily living (ADL) at home is important for the recovery of older individuals after hip fracture. However, 20-90% of these individuals lose ADL function and never fully recover. It is currently unknown to what extent occupational therapy (OT) with coaching based on cognitive behavioral treatment (CBT) improves recovery. The same holds for sensor monitoring-based coaching in addition to OT. Here, we describe the design of a study investigating the effect of sensor monitoring embedded in an OT rehabilitation program on the recovery of ADL among older individuals after hip fracture. Six nursing homes will be randomized in a three-arm stepped wedge cluster randomized trial. All nursing homes will initially provide standard care. At designated time points, nursing homes, successively and in random order, will cross over to the provision of OT and at the next time point, to sensor monitoring-enhanced OT. A total of 288 older individuals, previously living alone in the community, who after a hip fracture were admitted to a geriatric rehabilitation ward for a short-term rehabilitation, will be enrolled. Individuals in the first intervention group (OTc) will participate in an OT rehabilitation program with coaching based on cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) principles. In the sensor monitoring group, sensor monitoring is added to the OT intervention (OTcsm). Participants will receive a sensor monitoring system consisting of (i) an activity monitor during nursing home stay, (ii) a sensor monitoring system at home and a (iii) a web-based feedback application. These components will be embedded in the OT. The OT consists of a weekly session with an occupational therapist during the nursing home stay followed by four home visits and four telephone consultations. The primary outcome is patient-perceived daily functioning at 6 months, assessed using the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM). As far as we know, this study is the first

  14. Differences in the trajectory of bone mineral density change measured at the total hip and femoral neck between men and women following hip fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathbun, Alan M; Shardell, Michelle; Orwig, Denise; Hebel, J Richard; Hicks, Gregory E; Beck, Thomas; Hochberg, Marc C; Magaziner, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Research has not examined changes in bone mineral density (BMD) between men and women following hip fracture. The aim was to evaluate sex differences in BMD following hip fracture. Men experienced significant declines in BMD, while not statistically greater than women, underscoring the necessity for better osteoporosis care in men. Each year in the USA, approximately 260,000 older adults experience a hip fracture. Women experiencing hip fracture have excess decline in BMD in the year following fracture compared to expected decrements due to aging, but few studies have assessed sex differences in the sequelae of hip fracture. Thus, our objective was to examine sex differences in BMD change in the year after hip fracture. The sample (n = 286) included persons enrolled in the Baltimore Hip Studies 7th cohort, a study that matched (1:1) men and women experiencing hip fracture. Weighted estimating equations that accounted for missing data and selective survival were used to estimate sex differences in 12-month total hip (TH) and femoral neck (FN) BMD changes. Men had larger average adjusted percent decline in TH and FN BMD. Adjusted 12-month decreases at the FN showed a statistically significant decline of -4.60% (95% confidence interval [CI] -7.76%, -0.20%) in men and an insignificant change of -1.62% (95% CI -4.57%, 1.32%) in women. Yet, the difference in change between men and women was not statistically significant (P = 0.17). The estimated sex differences for TH BMD loss were smaller in magnitude. There is evidence of significant BMD loss among men at the FN in the year after hip fracture. Although not statistically greater than women, these clinically significant findings highlight the need for improved osteoporosis care among men prior to and after hip fracture.

  15. Osteoporotic hip fractures in Singapore--costs and patient's outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, M K; Arjandas; Ching, L K; Lim, S L; Lo, N N

    2002-01-01

    Little data are available on costs and outcome associated with osteoporotic hip fractures in Singapore. A retrospective study was carried out on 280 consecutive hip fractures in patients older than 60 years admitted over a 3-year period. The mean age of patients was 80 years. Sixty-eight per cent were female and 58% were intertrochanteric fractures. Two hundred and sixty-four patients (95%) were operated upon. The mean total hospitalisation period was 17 days. Seventy-six per cent were staying in their own homes prior to the hip fracture while 22% were admitted from nursing homes. After surgery, 63% of patients returned to their homes while 26% needed nursing home care. The index admission mortality rate was 5.7%. Mortality was 26% at 1 year. Of those alive at 1 year, ambulatory status was: 28% were walking without aids, 39% were walking with aids, 24% were wheelchair bound and 9% were bedridden. Poor ambulatory function at discharge was related to increased mortality at 1 year. The average cost incurred was S$7367. The average government subsidy amounted to 82%. Ninety-one per cent of patients were warded in subsidized beds. Breakdown of cost was as follows: hospital stay, 42.6%; surgery, 36.5%; ward treatment, fee 9%; laboratory and X-ray investigations, 4.4%; implant costs, 3.5%; drugs, 1.6% and rehabilitation, 1.1%. Multivariate analysis showed that the cost is significantly related to days spent awaiting surgery, preoperative sepsis, operative complications and cerebrovascular accidents. Young age, good American Society of Anesthetists (ASA) status and endoprosthesis replacement were factors that allowed for early ambulation and lower costs. The mortality rates and functional outcome are not very different from published studies in the West. More of our patients returned to their own homes after hospitalisation. Early surgery, close involvement of the medical social worker and intensive physiotherapy or provision of outpatient therapy facilities may help cut

  16. Hyponatremia and hypernatremia are associated with increased 30-day mortality in hip fracture patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, C M; Jantzen, C; Lauritzen, J B

    2016-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Using data from the Danish national registries on 7317 patients, this study shows that abnormal plasma sodium levels, in the form of hyponatremia and hypernatremia, are prevalent and associated with increased 30-day mortality in hip fracture patients. INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study...... was to examine the prevalence of hyponatremia and hypernatremia in patients admitted with a fractured hip as well as the association with 30-day in mortality in these patients. METHODS: A total of 7317 hip fracture patients (aged 60 years or above) with admission plasma sodium measurements were included. Data...... compared to persistent hypernatremia (12.4 vs 33.3 %, p = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that abnormal plasma sodium levels are prevalent in patients admitted with a fractured hip and that both hyponatremia and hypernatremia are associated with increased risk of death within 30 days of admission....

  17. Senior Managed Care System for Hip Fracture in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdanshenas, Hamed; Washington, Eleby R; Shamie, Arya Nick; Madadi, Firooz; Washington, Eleby R

    2016-03-01

    It is debatable whether a managed care model would affect the quality of care and length of hospital stay in the treatment of hip fractures in elderly patients. This prospective study was undertaken to determine whether or not a managed care critical pathway tool shortened hospital stay in a group of 102 senior patients with fractures of the hip during follow-up. We compared our study findings with two equivalent populations of senior hip fracture patients not treated using a critical care pathway concerning specific markers of quality. The managed care group had a 9% mortality rate, 95% return to prefracture living and 63% return to ambulatory status. The rates compared favorably with previous studies. The quality of care provided before and after the critical pathway was equivalent, while the post-pathway length of stay dropped 30%. The proposed care protocol is recommended to shorten hospital stay in elderly patients with hip fractures.

  18. Bone impregnated hip screw in femoral neck fracture Clinicoradiological results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P K Sundar Raj

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Femoral neck fractures are treated either by internal fixation or arthroplasty. Usually, cannulated cancellous screws are used for osteosynthesis of fracture neck of femur. The bone impregnated hip screw (BIHS is an alternative implant, where osteosyntehsis is required in femoral neck fracture. Materials and Methods: The BIHS is a hollow screw with thread diameter 8.3 mm, shank diameter 6.5 mm and wall thickness 2.2 mm and holes in the shaft of the screw with diameter 2 mm, placed in a staggered fashion. Biomechanical and animal experimental studies were done. Clinical study was done in two phases: Phase 1 in a group of volunteers, only with BIHS was used in a pilot study and phase 2 comparative study was done in a group with AO cannulated screws and the other group treated with BIHS. Results: In the phase 1 study, out of 15 patients, only one patient had delayed union. In phase 2, there were 78 patients, 44 patients in BIHS showed early union, compared to the rest 34 cases of AO cannulated screws Out of 44 patients with BIHS, 41 patients had an excellent outcome, 2 had nonunions and one implant breakage was noted. Conclusions: Bone impregnated hip screw has shown to provide early solid union since it incorporates the biomechanical principles and also increases the osteogenic potential and hence, found superior to conventional cannulated cancellous screw.

  19. Value of routine blood tests for prediction of mortality risk in hip fracture patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosfeldt, Mathias; Pedersen, Ole Birger Vesterager; Riis, Troels

    2012-01-01

    There is a 5- to 8-fold increased risk of mortality during the first 3 months after a hip fracture. Several risk factors are known. We studied the predictive value (for mortality) of routine blood tests taken on admission.......There is a 5- to 8-fold increased risk of mortality during the first 3 months after a hip fracture. Several risk factors are known. We studied the predictive value (for mortality) of routine blood tests taken on admission....

  20. Cervical Hip Fracture in Afinnish Population: Incidence and Mortality

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Panula, J; Pihlajamäki, H; Sävelä, M; Jaatinen, P. T; Vahlberg, T; Aarnio, P; Kivelä, S.-L

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims: Our aim was to describe the incidence of cervical hip fractures and to describe the relationships between selected background variables and mortality at 30 days, 6 months, and 3 years postoperatively...

  1. Cervical hip fracture in a Finnish population: incidence and mortality

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Panula, J; Pihlajamäki, H; Sävelä, M; Jaatinen, P T; Vahlberg, T; Aarnio, P; Kivelä, S L

    2009-01-01

    Our aim was to describe the incidence of cervical hip fractures and to describe the relationships between selected background variables and mortality at 30 days, 6 months, and 3 years postoperatively...

  2. Predictors of 30-day mortality following hip/pelvis fractures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dodd, A C; Bulka, C; Jahangir, A; Mir, H R; Obremskey, W T; Sethi, M K

    2016-01-01

    .... Though the 30-day mortality is considered a highly effective tool in measuring hospital performance, little data actually exists that explores the rate and risk factors for trauma-related hip and pelvis fractures...

  3. The risk of major and any (non-hip) fragility fracture after hip fracture in the United Kingdom: 2000-2010

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gibson-Smith, D.; Klop, C.; Elders, P.J.M.; Welsing, P.M.J.; van Schoor, N.M.; Leufkens, H.G.M.; Harvey, N.C.; van Staa, TP; de Vries, F.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Hip fractures are associated with subsequent fractures, particularly in the year following initial fracture. Age-adjusted hip fracture rates have stabilised in many developed countries, but secular trends in subsequent fracture remain poorly documented. We thus evaluated secular trends

  4. Tobacco smoking and risk of hip fracture in men and women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høidrup, S; Prescott, E; Sørensen, T I

    2000-01-01

    to tobacco smoking. CONCLUSION: Tobacco smoking is an independent risk factor for hip fracture in men and women, and there appears to be no gender differences in smoking related risk. Smoking cessation reduces the risk of hip fracture in men after 5 years, while the deleterious effect of smoking seems......BACKGROUND: Previous findings suggest that tobacco smoking increases the risk of hip fracture in women. A similar adverse effect of smoking is suspected to be present in men, but bone mineral density studies have raised the concern that men may be more sensitive to the deleterious effect of smoking...... on bone than women. In this study we prospectively determined the influence of current, previous, and cumulative smoking history on risk of hip fracture in men and women and addressed the issue of possible gender difference in the susceptibility to tobacco smoking. METHODS: Pooled data from three...

  5. Developing a multidisciplinary rehabilitation package following hip fracture and testing in a randomised feasibility study: Fracture in the Elderly Multidisciplinary Rehabilitation (FEMuR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Nefyn H; Roberts, Jessica L; Din, Nafees Ud; Charles, Joanna M; Totton, Nicola; Williams, Michelle; Mawdesley, Kevin; Hawkes, Claire A; Morrison, Val; Lemmey, Andrew; Edwards, Rhiannon T; Hoare, Zoe; Pritchard, Aaron W; Woods, Robert T; Alexander, Swapna; Sackley, Catherine; Logan, Pip; Wilkinson, Clare; Rycroft-Malone, Jo

    2017-08-01

    Proximal femoral fracture is a major health problem in old age, with annual UK health and social care costs of £2.3B. Rehabilitation has the potential to maximise functional recovery and maintain independent living, but evidence of clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness is lacking. To develop an enhanced community-based rehabilitation package following surgical treatment for proximal femoral fracture and to assess acceptability and feasibility for a future definitive randomised controlled trial (RCT) and economic evaluation. Phase I - realist review, survey and focus groups to develop the rehabilitation package. Phase II - parallel-group, randomised (using a dynamic adaptive algorithm) feasibility study with focus groups and an anonymised cohort study. Recruitment was from orthopaedic wards of three acute hospitals in the Betsi Cadwaladr University Health Board, North Wales. The intervention was delivered in the community following hospital discharge. Older adults (aged ≥ 65 years) who had received surgical treatment for hip fracture, lived independently prior to fracture, had mental capacity (assessed by the clinical team) and received rehabilitation in the North Wales area. Participants received usual care (control) or usual care plus an enhanced rehabilitation package (intervention). Usual care was variable and consisted of multidisciplinary rehabilitation delivered by the acute hospital, community hospital and community services depending on need and availability. The intervention was designed to enhance rehabilitation by improving patients' self-efficacy and increasing the amount and quality of patients' practice of physical exercise and activities of daily living. It consisted of a patient-held information workbook, a goal-setting diary and six additional therapy sessions. The primary outcome measure was the Barthel Activities of Daily Living (BADL) index. The secondary outcome measures included the Nottingham Extended Activities of Daily Living

  6. Fear of Falling and Cognitive Impairments in Elderly People with Hip Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Kasai

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: The purpose of this study was to investigate the estimated prevalence of dementia and the relationship between cognitive impairment and fear of falling in patients with hip fractures. Methods: Analysis 1 included 100 patients with hip fractures. Analysis 2 included a subgroup of subjects with ≥75 years of functional independence: 46 patients with hip fractures and 46 control subjects without hip fractures, and presence or absence of dementia. We used an informant-rated questionnaire including the AD8 for screening for dementia, the Barthel Index for assessing activities of daily living, and the Short Falls Efficacy Scale-International (FES-I for assessing fear of falling. Results: The estimated prevalence of dementia was 66% in patients with hip fractures. There were significant fracture and dementia effects, with significant covariate effects of age and gender on the Short FES-I scores. Conclusion: Our results suggested that more than two-thirds of patients with hip fractures had dementia. Fear of falling may reflect not only physical functions but also cognitive impairments.

  7. A vast increase in the use of CT scans for investigating occult hip fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, Robert, E-mail: Robert.jordan@doctors.org.uk; Dickenson, Edward, E-mail: edwarddickenson@doctors.org.uk; Westacott, Daniel, E-mail: dan_westacott@hotmail.com; Baraza, Njalalle, E-mail: njaleb@Doctors.Org.Uk; Srinivasan, Kuntrapka, E-mail: bijusri@Yahoo.Co.Uk

    2013-08-15

    Background: Early diagnosis in neck of femur fractures has been shown to improve outcome. The National Institute for Clinical Excellence recommends if an occult hip fracture is suspected then an MRI should be performed and if not available within 24 h a CT should be considered. At our centre, emergency MRI is rarely available and so CT is commonly used. Objectives: Our study aims to analyse the trends in CT use over a five year period for the diagnosis of neck of femur fractures. Methods: Both the number of patients with a hip fracture and those undergoing a CT hip to diagnose an occult injury were identified across two district general hospitals between 2006–2007 and 2010–2011. The time from initial radiograph to CT and initial radiograph to operation were calculated. Results: In 2006–2007, of 547 hip fractures, 20 CT hips were performed and 6 reported as a fractured neck of femur (30%). In 2010–2011, of 499 hip fractures, 239 CT hips were performed and 65 fractures were recognised (27%). The mean time from radiograph until CT scan was 2.0 days in 2007 and 3.2 days in 2011, which was a statistically significant difference (p < 0.001). For those diagnosed using a CT scan the mean time from admission X-ray to surgery was 1.2 days in 2007 and 3.6 days in 2011. Conclusion: Clinicians are becoming increasingly reliant on CT for the diagnosis of hip fractures with our data suggesting further imaging is one factor that can delay time to diagnosis and theatre.

  8. Post-operative rounds by anaesthesiologists after hip fracture surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, N B; Christensen, D S; Krasheninnikoff, M

    2006-01-01

    Efforts to optimize the peri-operative care of hip fracture patients through multidisciplinary intervention have focused on orthopaedic-geriatric liaisons, which have not resulted in significant outcome changes. The early phase of rehabilitation could potentially be optimized through a multidisci......Efforts to optimize the peri-operative care of hip fracture patients through multidisciplinary intervention have focused on orthopaedic-geriatric liaisons, which have not resulted in significant outcome changes. The early phase of rehabilitation could potentially be optimized through...

  9. Enhanced hip fracture management: use of statistical methods and dataset to evaluate a fractured neck of femur fast track pathway-pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilchrist, Nigel; Dalzell, Kristian; Pearson, Scott; Hooper, Gary; Hoeben, Kit; Hickling, Jeremy; McKie, John; Yi, Ma; Chamberlain, Sandra; McCullough, Caroline; Gutenstein, Marc

    2017-05-12

    The increasing elderly population and subsequent rise in total hip fracture(s) in this group means more effective management strategies are necessary to improve efficiency. We have changed our patient care strategy from the emergency department (ED), acute orthopaedic wards, operating theatre, post-operation and rehabilitation, and called it Fracture Neck of Femur Fast Track Pathway. All clinical data and actions were captured, integrated and displayed on a weekly basis using 'signalfromnoise' (SFN) software. The initial four months analysis of this project showed significant improvement in patient flow within the hospitals. The overall length of stay was reduced by four days. Time in ED was reduced by 30 minutes, and the wait for rehabilitation reduced by three days. Overall time in rehabilitation reduced by 3-7 days depending on facility. On average, fast track patients spent 95 less hours in hospital, resulting in 631 bed days saved in this period, with projected savings of NZD700,000. No adverse effects were seen in mortality, readmission and functional improvement status. Fractured neck of femur has increasing clinical demand in a busy tertiary hospital. Length of stay, co-morbidities and waiting time for theatres are seen as major barriers to treatment for these conditions. Wait for rehabilitation can significantly lengthen hospital stay; also poor communication between the individual hospital management facets of this condition has been an ongoing issue. Lack of instant and available electronic information on this patient group has also been seen as a major barrier to improvement. This paper demonstrates how integration of service components that are involved in fractured neck of femur can be achieved. It also shows how the use of electronic data capture and analysis can give a very quick and easily interpretable data trend that will enable change in practice. This paper indicates that cooperation between health professionals and practitioners can

  10. Distinct Cognitive Trajectories in the First Year After Hip Fracture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beishuizen, Sara J. E.; van Munster, Barbara C.; de Jonghe, Annemarieke; Abu-Hanna, Ameen; Buurman, Bianca M.; de Rooij, Sophia E.

    ObjectivesChange in cognitive functioning is often observed after hip fracture. Different patterns, with both improvement and decline, are expected, depending on premorbid cognitive functioning and events that occur during hospitalization. These patterns are unknown and important for older hip

  11. Perineal anterior dislocation of the hip with avulsion fracture of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Traumatic anterior dislocation of the hip is rare even in children. Very uncommon also is the perineal variant of the inferior type of anterior dislocation with concomitant avulsion fracture of the greater trochanter. We report such a case highlighting the peculiarity of its management. No similar case of triumvirate injury of the hip ...

  12. [Accepted Manuscript] Increased orthogeriatrician involvement in hip fracture care and its impact on mortality in England

    OpenAIRE

    Neuburger, J.; C. Currie; Wakeman, R.; Johansen, A.; Tsang, C.; Plant, F.; Wilson, H.; Cromwell, D. A.; Van der Meulen, J.; De Stavola, B.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives to describe the increase in orthogeriatrician involvement in hip fracture care in England and its association with improvements in time to surgery and mortality.\\ud \\ud Study design analysis of Hospital Episode Statistics for 196,401 patients presenting with hip fracture to 150 hospitals in England between 1 April 2010 and 28 February 2014, combined with data on orthogeriatrician hours from a national organisational survey.\\ud \\ud Methods we examined changes in the average number o...

  13. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF MANAGEMENT OF INTERTROCHANTERIC FRACTURES (TYPE 3 AND 4 BOYD AND GRIFFIN CLASSIFICATION BY DYNAMIC HIP SCREW OR PROXIMAL FEMORAL NAIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunkara Dinesh Chowdary

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Intertrochanteric fractures are one the common fractures encountered in today’s orthopaedic practice. Intertrochanteric fractures are devastating injuries that most commonly affect the elderly population, but not increased in the younger population. In young and healthy individuals, the injury results from high energy trauma, whereas in the elder age group, most of the fractures are osteoporotic resulting from a trivial fall. MATERIALS AND METHODS This study was conducted in Konaseema Institute of Medical Sciences, Amalapuram, from July 2013 to September 2016. During this period, adult patients with pertrochanteric fractures of femur were classified according to Boyd and Griffin classification and 40 patients were selected according to inclusion criteria. This study was conducted with due emphasis for clinical observation and analysis of results after surgical management of these fractures of femur with dynamic hip screw or proximal femoral nailing. RESULTS Anatomical results were assessed by presence or absence of shortening, range of movements and deformities. 70% of the cases had good results in PFN series as compared to 65% in DHS series. Functional results were assessed in the 40 cases. These constituted of 20 cases in PFN series and 20 cases in DHS series. In PFN series, results were excellent results in 7 cases, good in 6 cases, fair in 2 cases and poor in 5 cases. In DHS series, results were excellent in 5 cases, good in 9 cases, fair in 2 cases and poor in 4 cases. CONCLUSION An intertrochanteric fracture of the femur is common in the elderly due to osteoporosis and in young due to high velocity trauma. As the fracture is more common in the elderly, early reduction and internal fixation increases patient comfort, facilitates nursing care, helps in early mobilisation of the patient and decreases the duration of hospitalisation. Anatomical reduction can be achieved by closed manipulation or open methods. As the incidence of

  14. Safety of total hip arthroplasty for femoral neck fractures using the direct anterior approach: a retrospective observational study in 86 elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thürig, Grégoire; Schmitt, Jürgen Wilfried; Slankamenac, Ksenija; Werner, Clément M L

    2016-01-01

    The femoral neck fracture is one of the most common fractures in the elderly. A variety of methods and approaches are used to treat it. Total hip arthroplasty is a preferred approach in independent, mobile, elderly patients, given its more favorable long-term outcome. Our hypothesis is that the direct anterior approach in geriatric trauma patients has a lower dislocation-rate with the advantage of early recovery due to a muscle sparing approach and therefore early possible full weight-bearing. Patients were retrospectively sought who suffered a femoral neck fracture from 2008 to 2013. All patients were treated through a direct anterior approach and using the same brand of implants. Medical history, standardized physical exam, conventional pelvic plain and axial hip x-rays, Harris Hip Score, Merle D'Aubigné and Postel and SF-36 were assessed. Eighty-six patients were included in the study with a mean age of seventy-five years. The mortality rate was 16.7 %. Complications were encountered in nineteen patients (22.0 %) who needed operative revision and one postoperative complication (1.2 %) which could be handled conservatively. There were five intraoperative complications (5.8 %), two dislocations (2.3 %), one aseptic loosening in a non-cemented stem (1.2 %), six periprosthetic fractures in non-cemented stems (6.9 %), one displacement of a non-cemented cup (1.2 %), two early infections (2.3 %) and three hematomas (3.5 %) recorded. Although the direct anterior approach is associated with a rather long learning curve we have found it to preserve the soft-tissues with no injury to abductors. It therefore shows an early advantage in elderly patients in terms of early recovery and therefore early possible full weight-bearing. Fracture treatment with dual mobility cups might lead to lower dislocation rates, but are associated with higher costs. Due to higher complication rates in non-cemented versus cemented shafts, we have changed our practice towards favoring

  15. A pragmatic study exploring the prevention of delirium among hospitalized older hip fracture patients: Applying evidence to routine clinical practice using clinical decision support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmaltz Heidi N

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Delirium occurs in up to 65% of older hip fracture patients. Developing delirium in hospital has been associated with a variety of adverse outcomes. Trials have shown that multi-component preventive interventions can lower delirium rates. The objective of this study was to implement and evaluate the effectiveness of an evidence-based electronic care pathway, which incorporates multi-component delirium strategies, among older hip fracture patients. We conducted a pragmatic study using an interrupted time series design in order to evaluate the use and impact of the intervention. The target population was all consenting patients aged 65 years or older admitted with an acute hip fracture to the orthopedic units at two Calgary, Alberta hospitals. The primary outcome was delirium rates. Secondary outcomes included length of hospital stay, in-hospital falls, in-hospital mortality, new discharges to long-term care, and readmissions. A Durbin Watson test was conducted to test for serial correlation and, because no correlation was found, Chi-square statistics, Wilcoxon test and logistic regression analyses were conducted as appropriate. At study completion, focus groups were conducted at each hospital to explore issues around the use of the order set. During the 40-week study period, 134 patients were enrolled. The intervention had no effect on the overall delirium rate (33% pre versus 31% post; p = 0.84. However, there was a significant interaction between study phase and hospital (p = 0.03. Although one hospital did not experience a decline in delirium rate, the delirium rate at the other hospital declined from 42% to 19% (p = 0.08. This difference by hospital was mirrored in focus group feedback. The hospital that experienced a decline in delirium rates was more supportive of the intervention. Overall, post-intervention there were no significant differences in mean length of stay (12 days post versus 14 days pre; p = 0.74, falls (6% post

  16. A pragmatic study exploring the prevention of delirium among hospitalized older hip fracture patients: Applying evidence to routine clinical practice using clinical decision support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holroyd-Leduc, Jayna M; Abelseth, Greg A; Khandwala, Farah; Silvius, James L; Hogan, David B; Schmaltz, Heidi N; Frank, Cyril B; Straus, Sharon E

    2010-10-22

    Delirium occurs in up to 65% of older hip fracture patients. Developing delirium in hospital has been associated with a variety of adverse outcomes. Trials have shown that multi-component preventive interventions can lower delirium rates. The objective of this study was to implement and evaluate the effectiveness of an evidence-based electronic care pathway, which incorporates multi-component delirium strategies, among older hip fracture patients. We conducted a pragmatic study using an interrupted time series design in order to evaluate the use and impact of the intervention. The target population was all consenting patients aged 65 years or older admitted with an acute hip fracture to the orthopedic units at two Calgary, Alberta hospitals. The primary outcome was delirium rates. Secondary outcomes included length of hospital stay, in-hospital falls, in-hospital mortality, new discharges to long-term care, and readmissions. A Durbin Watson test was conducted to test for serial correlation and, because no correlation was found, Chi-square statistics, Wilcoxon test and logistic regression analyses were conducted as appropriate. At study completion, focus groups were conducted at each hospital to explore issues around the use of the order set. During the 40-week study period, 134 patients were enrolled. The intervention had no effect on the overall delirium rate (33% pre versus 31% post; p = 0.84). However, there was a significant interaction between study phase and hospital (p = 0.03). Although one hospital did not experience a decline in delirium rate, the delirium rate at the other hospital declined from 42% to 19% (p = 0.08). This difference by hospital was mirrored in focus group feedback. The hospital that experienced a decline in delirium rates was more supportive of the intervention. Overall, post-intervention there were no significant differences in mean length of stay (12 days post versus 14 days pre; p = 0.74), falls (6% post versus 10% pre; p = 0.43) or

  17. Pilot case-control investigation of risk factors for hip fractures in the urban Indian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malhotra Nidhi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the reported high prevalence of osteoporosis in India, there have been no previous studies examining the risk factors for hip fracture in the Indian population. Methods We carried out a case control investigation comprising 100 case subjects (57 women and 43 men admitted with a first hip fracture into one of three hospitals across New Delhi. The 100 controls were age and sex matched subjects who were either healthy visitors not related to the case patients or hospital staff. Information from all subjects was obtained through a questionnaire based interview. Results There was a significant increase in the number of cases of hip fracture with increasing age. There were significantly more women (57% than men (43%. Univariate analysis identified protective effects for increased activity, exercise, calcium and vitamin supplements, almonds, fish, paneer (cottage cheese, curd (plain yogurt, and milk. However, tea and other caffeinated beverages were significant risk factors. In women, hormone/estrogen therapy appeared to have a marginal protective effect. For all cases, decreased agility, visual impairment, long term medications, chronic illnesses increased the risk of hip fracture. The multivariate analysis confirmed a protective effect of increased activity and also showed a decrease in hip fracture risk with increasing body mass index (odds ratio (OR 0.024, 95% confidence interval (CI 0.006-0.10 & OR 0.81, 95% CI 0.68-0.97 respectively. Individuals who take calcium supplements have a decreased risk of hip fracture (OR 0.076; CI 0.017-0.340, as do individuals who eat fish (OR 0.094; CI 0.020-0.431, and those who eat paneer (OR 0.152; 0.031-0.741. Tea drinkers have a higher risk of hip fracture (OR 22.8; 95% CI 3.73-139.43. Difficulty in getting up from a chair also appears to be an important risk factor for hip fractures (OR 14.53; 95% CI 3.86-54.23. Conclusions In the urban Indian population, dietary calcium, vitamin D

  18. Secular trends in hip fractures worldwide: opposing trends East versus West.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballane, Ghada; Cauley, Jane A; Luckey, Marjorie M; Fuleihan, Ghada El-Hajj

    2014-08-01

    Despite wide variations in hip rates fractures worldwide, reasons for such differences are not clear. Furthermore, secular trends in the age-specific hip fracture rates are changing the world map of this devastating disease, with the highest rise projected to occur in developing countries. The aim of our investigation is to systematically characterize secular trends in hip fractures worldwide, examine new data for various ethnic groups in the United States, evidence for divergent temporal patterns, and investigate potential contributing factors for the observed change in their epidemiology. All studies retrieved through a complex Medline Ovid search between 1966 and 2013 were examined. For each selected study, we calculated the percent annual change in age-standardized hip fracture rates de-novo. Although occurring at different time points, trend breaks in hip fracture incidence occurred in most Western countries and Oceania. After a steep rise in age-adjusted rates in these regions, a decrease became evident sometimes between the mid-seventies and nineties, depending on the country. Conversely, the data is scarce in Asia and South America, with evidence for a continuous rise in hip fracture rates, with the exception of Hong-Kong and Taiwan that seem to follow Western trends. The etiologies of these secular patterns in both the developed and the developing countries have not been fully elucidated, but the impact of urbanization is at least one plausible explanation. Data presented here show close parallels between rising rates of urbanization and hip fractures across disparate geographic locations and cultures. Once the proportion of the urban population stabilized, hip fracture rates also stabilize or begin to decrease perhaps due to the influence of other factors such as birth cohort effects, changes in bone mineral density and BMI, osteoporosis medication use and/or lifestyle interventions such as smoking cessation, improvement in nutritional status and fall

  19. Assessment of Hip Fracture Risk Using Cross-Section Strain Energy Determined by QCT-Based Finite Element Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheirollahi, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Accurate assessment of hip fracture risk is very important to prevent hip fracture and to monitor the effect of a treatment. A subject-specific QCT-based finite element model was constructed to assess hip fracture risk at the critical locations of femur during the single-leg stance and the sideways fall. The aim of this study was to improve the prediction of hip fracture risk by introducing a novel failure criterion to more accurately describe bone failure mechanism. Hip fracture risk index was defined using cross-section strain energy, which is able to integrate information of stresses, strains, and material properties affecting bone failure. It was found that the femoral neck and the intertrochanteric region have higher fracture risk than other parts of the femur, probably owing to the larger content of cancellous bone in these regions. The study results also suggested that women are more prone to hip fracture than men. The findings in this study have a good agreement with those clinical observations reported in the literature. The proposed hip fracture risk index based on strain energy has the potential of more accurate assessment of hip fracture risk. However, experimental validation should be conducted before its clinical applications. PMID:26601105

  20. Assessment of pain-related fear in patients with the thrust plate prosthesis (TPP): due to hip fracture and hip osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengul, Yesim Salik; Unver, Bayram; Karatosun, Vasfi; Gunal, Izge

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the differences between hip fracture and hip arthrosis groups and to assess pain related fear of injury in patients who were operated using the TPP following hip fracture or hip arthrosis. Fifty-eight patients (mean age = 63.9 ± 10.3 years) who were operated using the TPP, following hip fracture (hip fracture group; n = 25) or coxarthrosis (coxarthrosis group; n = 33) were recruited. All of the measurements were performed after a follow-up time of at least 2 years. Functional level by Harris Hip Scoring System (HHS), pain related fear by Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia (TSK) and pain intensity by numerical rating scale (NRS) was evaluated. There were no significant differences between demographic and clinical characteristics of two groups. However, pain intensity was higher in coxarthrosis group than hip fracture group. There was no correlation between the TSK scores and either Harris scores or NRS scores (p > 0.05) in the hip fracture group. No correlation between NRS and TSK was found in coxarthrosis group but there was a significant correlation between TSK and HHS. TSK scores were high in both groups. High TSK scores proved us that the patients with TPP had fear of movement even they had enough physical performance. The coxarthrosis group had higher pain intensity. Rehabilitation clinicians should consider pain-related belief which is more important than pain intensity and functional level in coxarthrosis patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Anemia on Admission Is an Independent Predictor of Long-Term Mortality in Hip Fracture Population: A Prospective Study With 2-Year Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Licheng; Yin, Pengbin; Lv, Houchen; Long, Anhua; Gao, Yuan; Zhang, Lihai; Tang, Peifu

    2016-02-01

    Anemia is a disputable factor for long-term mortality in hip fracture population in previous studies. Previous studies indicated that the level of hemoglobin (Hb) might fluctuate due to various factors, such as comorbidities and in-hospital interventions, and the changing level of Hb, may lead to discordance diagnosis of anemia and thus to the conflicting conclusions on prognostic value of anemia. So in this study, we aim to compare factors affecting the diagnosis of anemia at different time-points, admission, postoperation, and discharge, and to determine which the time point is most suitable for mortality prediction.This prospective cohort study included 1330 hip fracture patients from 1 January 2000 to 18 November 2012. Hb levels at 3 different time points, such as admission, postoperation, and discharge, were collected and used to stratify the cohort into anemia and nonanemia groups. Candidate factors including commodities, perioperative factors, blood transfusion, and other in-hospital interventions were collected before discharge. Logistic regression analyses were performed to detect risk factors for anemia for the 3 time points separately. Kaplan-Meier and multivariate Cox regression analyses were used to evaluate the association between anemia and 2-year mortality.Factors affecting the diagnosis of anemia were different for the 3 time points. Age, female sex, American Society of Anesthesiologists score (ASA), and intertrochanteric fracture were associated with admission anemia, while surgical procedure, surgical duration, blood transfusion, blood loss during the operation, and drainage volume were major risk factors for postoperation anemia. Cox proportional-hazards regression analysis suggested that the risk of all-cause mortality was higher in the anemia group on admission (1.680, 95%CI: 1.201-2.350, P discharge, after adjustment for confounding factors.Our study showed that risk factors for anemia varied at different time points, and therapy

  2. A computer-assisted systematic quality monitoring method for cervical hip fracture radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurin, Olof; Johnsson, Ragnar; Laurin, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Background A thorough quality analysis of radiologic performance is cumbersome. Instead, the prevalence of missed cervical hip fractures might be used as a quality indicator. Purpose To validate a computer-based quality study of cervical hip fracture radiography. Material and Methods True and false negative and positive hip trauma radiography during 6 years was assessed manually. Patients with two or more radiologic hip examinations before surgery were selected by computer analysis of the databases. The first of two preoperative examinations might constitute a missed fracture. These cases were reviewed. Results Out of 1621 cervical hip fractures, manual perusal found 51 (3.1%) false negative radiographic diagnoses. Among approximately 14,000 radiographic hip examinations, there were 27 (0.2%) false positive diagnoses. Fifty-seven percent of false negative reports were occult fractures, the other diagnostic mistakes. There were no significant differences over the years. Diagnostic sensitivity was 96.9% and specificity 99.8%. Computer-assisted analysis with a time interval of at least 120 days between the first and the second radiographic examination discovered 39 of the 51 false negative reports. Conclusion Cervical hip trauma radiography has high sensitivity and specificity. With computer-assisted analysis, 76% of false negative reports were found. PMID:27994880

  3. Nurse-administered femoral nerve block after hip fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Andy

    Hip fracture is a common injury that predominantly affects older people. Pain following fracture of the neck of the femur is present throughout the illness trajectory, including the preoperative and postoperative periods. This article describes how nurses at one trust implemented an innovative nurse-administered femoral nerve block service.

  4. (TAD) in Dynamic Hip Screw (DHS) Fixation of Femoral Fractures

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Femoral neck fractures commonly occur in elderly osteoporotic females, and include extra-capsular fractures (intertrochanteric and pertrochanteric), and usually treated with the Dynamic Hip Screw (DHS). This is based on tension band principle which allows the screw to slide within the barrel to enable compression of the ...

  5. Factors affecting functional prognosis of patients with hip fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, M T

    2011-01-01

    Having a hip fracture is considered one of the most fatal fractures for elderly people, resulting in impaired function, and increased morbidity and mortality. This challenges clinicians in identifying patients at risk of worse outcome, in order to optimise and intensify treatment in these patient...

  6. Tranexamic acid reduces blood loss in patients with extracapsular fractures of the hip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tengberg, P T; Foss, N B; Palm, H

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: We chose unstable extra-capsular hip fractures as our study group because these types of fractures suffer the largest blood loss. We hypothesised that tranexamic acid (TXA) would reduce total blood loss (TBL) in extra-capsular fractures of the hip. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A single......-centre placebo-controlled double-blinded randomised clinical trial was performed to test the hypothesis on patients undergoing surgery for extra-capsular hip fractures. For reasons outside the control of the investigators, the trial was stopped before reaching the 120 included patients as planned in the protocol...... in this patient group must be investigated further before the use of TXA can be recommended. TAKE HOME MESSAGE: We present a randomised clinical trial that is unique in the literature. We evaluate the effect of TXA in very homogenous population - extra-capsular fractures operated with short intramedullary nails...

  7. Evaluation of a simplified hip structure analysis method for the prediction of incident hip fracture events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoo, B C C; Lewis, J R; Brown, K; Prince, R L

    2016-01-01

    Many attempts have been made to improve the predictive ability of areal bone mineral density (aBMD) which integrates bone mass and area. The addition of an extra variable derived from the hip dual-energy X-ray (DXA) image TR_σ, which describes distribution of mass within the scanned area of the trochanter, improved prediction of 15-year hip fracture probability in elderly women. Two-dimensional DXA imaging of the proximal femur to produce an aBMD is a clinically useful predictor of future fracture risk. Further analysis of the DXA image to produce an eight-variable hip structure analysis (Beck HSA) has been developed to improve understanding of structural factors determining hip bone strength at each of three proximal femur sites, the narrow femoral neck (NN), intertrochanter (TR) and shaft (S). Recently, data on four measurements derived from the currently used eight Beck HSA variables were used to capture population variation in bone structure at each site. These include two previously used variables, the localised aBMD and the sub-periosteal width (W) applying to 5-mm sections (at each sites), and two new variables, standard deviation of normalised mineral-mass projection profile distribution (σ), and displacement between centre-of-mineral mass and geometric centre-of-mineral mass of projection profile (δ). Using a cohort of 1159 women, mean baseline age 75, who sustained 139 hip fractures over 15 years, we determined whether these measures significantly improved 15-year hip fracture prediction compared to current approach utilising age and total hip aBMD. To describe the most parsimonious model for hip fracture risk prediction, the 12 base measures (4 from each site), total hip aBMD and age were evaluated in stepwise logistic regression models. The final model included TR_σ, total hip aBMD and age and provided improved utility for hip fracture prediction compared to total hip aBMD and age alone (C-statistic 0.73 vs. 0.69, P = 0.009 and net

  8. Age-specific incidence of hip fracture in the elderly: a healthy decline.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Green, C

    2012-02-01

    Hip fractures in the elderly are an important source of morbidity and mortality. The predicted increase in the number of hip fractures due to the increasing elderly population has not been universally observed. The purpose of this study was to examine the incidence of hip fractures over a twenty year period to determine if this rise is occurring in our region. All hip fractures from the unit over 20 years were identified. Population data for those over 65 in the catchment area of our hospital was acquired. The rate of fractures occurring each year relative to the population was determined. The results were split into age groups. There was a strong correlation between the population rise and number of fractures (p = 0.77). But there was no significant difference in the rate of fracture over time (p = 0.41). However, the average age at which fracture occurred increased by two years. In addition we show the overall trend in the rate of fractures decreases in the younger age groups and increases in the older age groups. Therefore, the predicted rapid increase in rate is not occurring. This probably reflects the strengthening of the economy in Ireland from the 1930\\'s onwards, leading to a healthier population.

  9. Reducing falls and resulting hip fractures among older women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, J A; Olson, S

    2000-03-31

    Fall-related injuries are the leading cause of injury deaths and disabilities among older adults (i.e., persons aged > or = 65 years). The most serious fall injury is hip fracture; one half of all older adults hospitalized for hip fracture never regain their former level of function. In 1996, a total of 340,000 hospitalizations for hip fracture occurred among persons aged > or = 65 years, and 80% of these admissions occurred among women. From 1988 to 1996, hip fracture hospitalization rates for women aged > or = 65 years increased 23%. Risk factors for falls include increasing age, muscle weakness, functional limitations, environmental hazards, use of psychoactive medications, and a history of falls. Age is also a risk factor for hip fracture. Women aged > or = 85 years are nearly eight times more likely than women aged 65-74 years to be hospitalized for hip fracture. White women aged > or = 65 years are at higher risk for hip fracture than black women. Other riskfactors for hip fracture include lack of physical activity, osteoporosis, low body mass index, and a previous hip fracture. Because approximately 95% of hip fractures result from falls, minimizing fall risk is a practical approach to reducing these serious injuries. Research demonstrates that effective fall prevention strategies require a multifaceted approach with both behavioral and environmental components. Important elements include education and skill building to increase knowledge about fall risk factors, exercise to improve strength and balance, home modifications to reduce fall hazards, and medication assessment to minimize side effects (e.g., dizziness and grogginess). Coordination needs to be improved among the diverse Federal, state, and local organizations that conduct fall prevention activities. The effectiveness of existing fall prevention programs among specific groups of women (e.g., those aged > or = 85 years or living with functional limitations) needs careful evaluation. New primary fall

  10. The use of MRI and CT in Imaging Occult Hip Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obadă B.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosis of hip fractures is particularly important due to the high dependence on the integrity of this structure for people to function in their daily lives. Left unrecognized, patients face increasing morbidity and mortality as time from the original injury lengthens. A delay of just 2 days in surgical treatment for an acute hip fracture doubles mortality. In addition, an unrecognized non-displaced fracture may displace, requiring surgery of much higher risk. This may be part of the reason that the most frequent lawsuit against Emergency Physicians is for missed orthopedic injury. We reviewed the use of MRI and CT for occult hip fractures (OHF detection at a major urban trauma unit. Our study is a retrospective review. Inclusion criteria: all patients presenting to the Emergency Clinical Hospital of Constanta with a suspected, posttraumatic, occult hip fracture, over a 5 years period were included. All patients had negative initial radiographs and underwent further imaging with either CT or MRI. A total of 185 cases meeting the inclusion criteria were identified. 72 occult hip fractures were detected with both imaging modalities. Although MRI certainly enables greater image detail, in our experience both modalities are able to provide satisfactory fracture characterization. The choice of imaging should be determined by availability and indication. MRI provides superior imaging of soft tissue but is less sensitive for degenerative changes in presence of bone edema.

  11. Effect of Implementing a Discharge Plan on Functional Abilities of Geriatric Patients with Hip Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    AL Khayya, Hatem; El Geneidy, Moshera; Ibrahim, Hanaa; Kassem, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Hip fracture is considered one of the most fatal fractures for elderly people, resulting in increased morbidity and mortality and impaired functional capacity, particularly for basic and instrumental activities of daily living. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of implementing a discharge plan on functional abilities of geriatric…

  12. Occupational physical demand and risk of hip fracture in older women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Aimee J; Michael, Yvonne L; Burstyn, Igor; Lee, Brian K; Wallace, Robert

    2015-08-01

    Hip fractures are leading causes of disability, morbidity and mortality among older women. Since physical activity helps maintain physical functioning and bone mineral density, occupational physical demand may influence fracture risk. This study investigates the association of occupational physical demand with hip fracture incidence among women. The Women's Health Initiative Observational Study is a multiethnic cohort of 93,676 postmenopausal women, 50-79 years of age at enrolment, enrolled from 1994 to 1998 at 40 geographically diverse clinical centres throughout the USA. Outcomes including hip fractures were assessed annually and up to 3 jobs held since age 18 years were reported by each woman. Occupational physical demand levels were assigned for each job through linkage of occupational titles with Standard Occupational Codes and the Occupational Information Network. Average, cumulative and peak physical demand scores both before and after menopause and throughout women's work life were estimated. Women were followed through 2010 for an average of 11.5 years; 1834 hip fractures occurred during this time. We did not observe an overall association of occupational physical demand with subsequent risk of hip fracture after adjusting for age, race/ethnicity, birth region and education. Previous research on occupations and hip fracture risk in women is inconclusive. This study was able to take critical risk periods into account and control for confounding factors in a large cohort of older women to show that overall occupational physical demand neither increases nor decreases risk of hip fracture later in life. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  13. Fibrosis markers, hip fracture risk, and bone density in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzilay, J I; Bůžková, P; Kizer, J R; Djoussé, L; Ix, J H; Fink, H A; Siscovick, D S; Cauley, J A; Mukamal, K J

    2016-02-01

    We examined whether blood levels of two markers of fibrosis (transforming growth factor beta one (TGF-β1) and procollagen type III N-terminal propeptide (PIIINP)) are related to hip fracture risk and to bone mineral density (BMD). TGF-β1 levels were associated with lower hip fracture risk in women and with lower BMD in men. PIIINP levels were not associated with either outcome. TGF-β1 serves several roles in bone formation and resorption. A consequence of TGF-β1 activation is the production of PIIINP, a marker of collagen III deposition. Here, we explore whether these two biomarkers are related to incident hip fracture and bone mineral density (BMD) and whether their associations are modified by systemic inflammation, as measured by C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. Participants were from the Cardiovascular Health Study (mean age 78 years; mean follow-up 8.3 years). We included 1681 persons with measured levels of TGF-β1 (149 hip fractures) and 3226 persons with measured levels of PIIINP (310 hip fractures). Among women, higher TGF-β1 levels were associated with lower hip fracture risk (HR, per doubling, 0.78 [95 % CI 0.61, 0.91]). Among men, TGF-β1 levels were associated with hip fracture risk in a non-linear manner, but among those with elevated CRP levels, doubling was associated with increased risk of fracture (HR 2.22 [1.20, 4.08]) (p = 0.02, interaction between low and high CRP and TGF-β1 on fracture risk). TGF-β1 levels had no significant association with total hip or total body BMD in women but were significantly associated with lower BMD in men. There were no associations of PIIINP levels with hip fracture risk or BMD in men or women. TGF-β1 levels appear to be associated with bone-related phenotypes in a sex-specific manner. The reasons for these differences between men and women regarding TGF-β1 levels and hip fracture risk and bone density require further investigation.

  14. Improvements in hip fracture incidence counterbalanced by the rise of other fracture types: data from Spain 2000-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirera, Eva; Pérez, Katherine; Santamariña-Rubio, Elena; Novoa, Ana M; Olabarria, Marta

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, the incidence of injury in older people has increased. The aim of this study is to address the hypothesis that this increase is due to an increase in the incidence of some injuries that, while less common than hip fractures, are sufficient jointly to counteract the decrease or stabilisation in hip fracture rates observed in most countries. We performed a descriptive study of trends using data from the National Hospital Discharge Register. We included individuals 65 years and older who were discharged from a Spanish hospital during the period 2000-2010 with at least one injury diagnosis in the primary diagnosis field on the discharge form. The dependent variables were the following injury groups, classified using the Barell Matrix: hip fracture, shoulder and upper arm fractures, forearm and elbow fractures, thoracic fractures, lower leg and ankle fractures, and TBI type 1 internal injury. Incidence rates were calculated per 100,000 inhabitants (data from National Statistics Institute) and stratified by sex and age group. Trends, in terms of Annual Percent Change (APC), were assessed using Poisson Regression with discharge year as the independent variable. Hip fracture continues to be the most important injury type in older people. Thoracic fractures and TBI internal injuries are more common in men, while fractures in the upper extremities are more common in women. All injuries increased in frequency with age, except lower leg and ankle fractures, which decreased. While a secular decreasing trend in hip fracture was noted, the incidences of fractures of the shoulder and upper arm, forearm and elbow, and lower leg and ankle, as well as of TBI type 1 internal injuries have increased steadily. Although hip fracture continue to be the most common type of injury in older people, this study has allowed identifying other types of injury that are becoming increasingly common. These trends are driving paradigm changes in the burden of injuries requiring

  15. The risk of major and any (non-hip) fragility fracture after hip fracture in the United Kingdom : 2000-2010

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gibson-Smith, D; Klop, C; Elders, P J M; Welsing, P M J; van Schoor, N; Leufkens, H G M; Harvey, N C; van Staa, T P; de Vries, F

    2014-01-01

    UNLABELLED: The risk of a subsequent major or any fracture after a hip fracture and secular trends herein were examined. Within 1 year, 2.7 and 8.4% of patients sustained a major or any (non-hip) fracture, which increased to 14.7 and 32.5% after 5 years. Subsequent fracture rates increased during

  16. Interpretation of hip fracture patterns using areal bone mineral density in the proximal femur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hey, Hwee Weng Dennis; Sng, Weizhong Jonathan; Lim, Joel Louis Zongwei; Tan, Chuen Seng; Gan, Alfred Tau Liang; Ng, Jun Han Charles; Kagda, Fareed H Y

    2015-12-01

    Bone mineral density scans are currently interpreted based on an average score of the entire proximal femur. Improvements in technology now allow us to measure bone density in specific regions of the proximal femur. The study attempts to explain the pathophysiology of neck of femur (NOF) and intertrochanteric/basi-cervical (IT) fractures by correlating areal BMD (aBMD) scores with fracture patterns, and explore possible predictors for these fracture patterns. This is a single institution retrospective study on all patients who underwent hip surgeries from June 2010 to August 2012. A total of 106 patients (44 IT/basi-cervical, 62 NOF fractures) were studied. The data retrieved include patient characteristics and aBMD scores measured at different regions of the contralateral hip within 1 month of the injury. Demographic and clinical characteristic differences between IT and NOF fractures were analyzed using Fisher's Exact test and two-sample t test. Relationship between aBMD scores and fracture patterns was assessed using multivariable regression modeling. After adjusted multivariable analysis, T-Troc and T-inter scores were significantly lower in intertrochanteric/basi-cervical fractures compared to neck of femur fractures (P = 0.022 and P = 0.026, respectively). Both intertrochanteric/basi-cervical fractures (mean T.Tot -1.99) and neck of femur fractures (mean T.Tot -1.64) were not found to be associated with a mean T.tot less than -2.5. However, the mean aBMD scores were consistently less than -2.5 for both intertrochanteric/basi-cervical fractures and neck of femur fractures. Gender and calcium intake at the time of injury were associated with specific hip fracture patterns (P = 0.002 and P = 0.011, respectively). Hip fracture patterns following low energy trauma may be influenced by the pattern of reduced bone density in different areas of the hip. Intertrochanteric/basi-cervical fractures were associated with significantly lower T-Troc and T-Inter scores

  17. The Patient's View of Nursing Care after Hip Fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hommel, Ami; Kock, Marie-Louise; Persson, Jeanette; Werntoft, Elisabeth

    2012-01-01

    Background. The pathway for patients with a hip fracture described in this study is a fast track. Many studies have focused on prevention of various complications but, so far, the patient's view of nursing care has not been highlighted. Aim. The aim of the study is to illuminate the patient's view on nursing care when treated for a hip fracture. Method. Ten patients were interviewed. A content analysis design was conducted. Findings. From the analysis, four main categories emerged: waiting times; pain/pain relief and mobilisation; attitude/information and sense of security; complications. Conclusion. Patients generally felt satisfied with the nursing provided. The staff created a feeling of security and showed interest and empathy for the patient. However, patients experienced a stressful waiting for surgery, and patients who developed confusion waited more than 24 hours for surgery. Therefore, waiting time must be decreased. Furthermore, patients' descriptions of a variety of pain problem show, for example, that good collaboration between the nurse and physiotherapist is critical for achieving good pain relief before mobilisation. Nursing staff need to be attentive and should elicit the patient's feelings through patient-focused communication in order to relieve anxiety about going home.

  18. Anabolic steroids for rehabilitation after hip fracture in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooqi, Vaqas; Berg, Maayken E L van den; Cameron, Ian D; Crotty, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Hip fracture occurs predominantly in older people, many of whom are frail and undernourished. After hip fracture surgery and rehabilitation, most patients experience a decline in mobility and function. Anabolic steroids, the synthetic derivatives of the male hormone testosterone, have been used in combination with exercise to improve muscle mass and strength in athletes. They may have similar effects in older people who are recovering from hip fracture. To examine the effects (primarily in terms of functional outcome and adverse events) of anabolic steroids after surgical treatment of hip fracture in older people. Search methods: We searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group Specialized Register (10 September 2013), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library, 2013 Issue 8), MEDLINE (1946 to August Week 4 2013), EMBASE (1974 to 2013 Week 36), trial registers, conference proceedings, and reference lists of relevant articles. The search was run in September 2013.Selection criteria: Randomized controlled trials of anabolic steroids given after hip fracture surgery, in inpatient or outpatient settings, to improve physical functioning in older patients with hip fracture.Data collection and analysis: Two review authors independently selected trials (based on predefined inclusion criteria), extracted data and assessed each study's risk of bias. A third review author moderated disagreements. Only very limited pooling of data was possible. The primary outcomes were function (for example, independence in mobility and activities of daily living) and adverse events, including mortality. We screened 1290 records and found only three trials involving 154 female participants, all of whom were aged above 65 years and had had hip fracture surgery. All studies had methodological shortcomings that placed them at high or unclear risk of bias. Because of this high risk of bias, imprecise results and likelihood of publication bias

  19. Anabolic steroids for rehabilitation after hip fracture in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooqi, Vaqas; van den Berg, Maayken E L; Cameron, Ian D; Crotty, Maria

    2014-10-06

    Hip fracture occurs predominantly in older people, many of whom are frail and undernourished. After hip fracture surgery and rehabilitation, most patients experience a decline in mobility and function. Anabolic steroids, the synthetic derivatives of the male hormone testosterone, have been used in combination with exercise to improve muscle mass and strength in athletes. They may have similar effects in older people who are recovering from hip fracture. To examine the effects (primarily in terms of functional outcome and adverse events) of anabolic steroids after surgical treatment of hip fracture in older people. We searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group Specialised Register (10 September 2013), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library, 2013 Issue 8), MEDLINE (1946 to August Week 4 2013), EMBASE (1974 to 2013 Week 36), trial registers, conference proceedings, and reference lists of relevant articles. The search was run in September 2013. Randomised controlled trials of anabolic steroids given after hip fracture surgery, in inpatient or outpatient settings, to improve physical functioning in older patients with hip fracture. Two review authors independently selected trials (based on predefined inclusion criteria), extracted data and assessed each study's risk of bias. A third review author moderated disagreements. Only very limited pooling of data was possible. The primary outcomes were function (for example, independence in mobility and activities of daily living) and adverse events, including mortality. We screened 1290 records and found only three trials involving 154 female participants, all of whom were aged above 65 years and had had hip fracture surgery. All studies had methodological shortcomings that placed them at high or unclear risk of bias. Because of this high risk of bias, imprecise results and likelihood of publication bias, we judged the quality of the evidence for all primary outcomes to

  20. Can experts in acetabular fracture care determine hip stability after posterior wall fractures using plain radiographs and computed tomography?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Adrian T; Moed, Berton R

    2013-10-01

    Hip stability status after a posterior wall acetabular fracture involving 20%-50% of the posterior wall is difficult to determine. However, noted experts have professed that hip stability can be accurately determined by careful review of high-quality anteroposterior and oblique plain radiographs and a computed tomography scan. The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the interobserver and intraobserver reliabilities and accuracies in determining hip stability status by fellowship-trained orthopedic traumatologists expert in acetabular fracture care using these studies. Reliability and validation study. Level 1 trauma center. Fifteen patients with isolated unilateral posterior wall (OTA 62-A1) acetabular fractures involving 20%-50% of the posterior acetabular wall and known clinical outcome had undergone dynamic stress fluoroscopy under anesthesia to determine hip stability. High-quality anteroposterior and oblique plain radiographs and axial computed tomography images of 15 fractures involving 20%-50% of the posterior acetabular wall were reviewed in random order by 4 fellowship-trained orthopedic traumatologists specializing in acetabular fracture care in 2 separate sessions. The second session occurred after a minimum 1-month washout period. Determination of hip stability status was made for each fracture at the 2 time points based on the images along with any history of dislocation of the hip at the time of injury. These determinations were compared with the findings of examination under anesthesia, which served as the gold standard. Measurement of agreement using the Kappa statistic. Although intraobserver reliability was good (0.65), interobserver reliability was poor (0.12). In addition, percent correct was only 53% (32/60) for the initial reading and only 52% (31/60) for the second. For the initial reading, sensitivity and specificity were 100% (28/28) and 13% (4/32), respectively. For the second reading, the sensitivity and specificity were 57

  1. Functional recovery among elderly people one year after hip fracture surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Pi-Chu; Chang, Su-Yu

    2004-03-01

    The purposes of the present study were to follow up on the recovery of activities of daily living (ADL) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) one year after hip fracture in elderly people and to understand the factors that affect functional recovery. Information for this one-year study was obtained through structured interviews during the first week after admission, at discharge, three months and one year after fracture. One hundred and three elderly people over 65 years old, with femoral neck fractures and intertrochanteric fractures due to falling down were recruited from a medical center in Taipei. The results were as follows: In most cases, ADL and IADL in elderly people could not be recovered to the status before fracture in the one-year period of follow-up; the most rapid recovery period was within three months after discharge. In terms of ADL before fracture, 93.2 %, 74.8 %, and about 90 % of patients could walk, climb stairs, and take care of themselves (feeding, toileting, dressing), respectively; however, only 70.9 %, 49.1 % and about 75 % of patients respectively could walk, climb stairs and take care of themselves one year after hip fracture. As for IADL, 73.8 % of patients could walk outdoors before fracture, but only 58.2 % could walk outdoors one year after fracture. The factor on which ADL recovery within one year after hip fracture depended was the ability to walk outdoors before fracture. It explained 39.7 % of total variance in ADL. As for IADL, significant predictors included doing housework, marital status and use of walking aids before fracture. These items explained 56.1% of total variance in IADL. The findings point to the functional decline of elderly people after hip fracture and suggest the importance of focusing on hospital-based multidisciplinary interventions and discharge

  2. Pre-fracture hospitalization is associated with worse functional outcome and higher mortality in geriatric hip fracture patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aigner, Rene; Buecking, Benjamin; Hack, Juliana; Eschbach, Daphne; Oberkircher, Ludwig; Ruchholtz, Steffen; Bliemel, Christopher

    2017-12-01

    Hip fractures are common in elderly people. Despite great progress in surgical care, the outcomes of these patients remain disappointing. This study determined pre-fracture hospital admission as a prognostic variable for inferior functional outcomes and increased mortality rates in the perioperative phase and in the first postoperative year. The influence of a pre-fracture hospitalization on outcomes in hip fracture patients has not yet been investigated. Four hundred two patients who were surgically treated for hip fracture were prospectively enrolled. Patients with a hospital stay within the last 3 months prior to a hip fracture were compared to patients without a pre-fracture hospitalization. Postoperative functional outcomes and mortality rates were compared between groups at the time of hospital discharge and additionally at the six- and twelve-month follow-up appointments. A multivariate regression analysis was performed. A pre-fracture hospitalization was reported by 67 patients (17%). In 63% of cases, patients were admitted due to non-surgical, general medical conditions. In 37% of cases, patients were treated due to a condition related to a surgical subject. In the multivariate analysis, pre-fracture hospitalization was an independent risk factor for reduced values on the Barthel Index at 6 months after surgery (B, -9.918; 95%CI of B, -19.001--0.835; p = 0.032) and on the Tinetti Test at 6 months (B, -2.914; 95%CI of B, -1.992--0.047; p = 0.047) and 12 months after surgery (B, -4.680; 95%CI of B, -8.042--1.319; p = 0.007). Pre-fracture hospitalization was additionally associated with increased mortality rates at 6 months (OR 1.971; 95%CI 1.052-3.693; p = 0.034) and 12 months after surgery (OR 1.888; 95%CI 1.010-9.529; p = 0.046). Hip fracture patients with a recent pre-fracture hospital admission are at a substantial risk for inferior functional outcomes and increased mortality rates not only in the perioperative phase but also in the first

  3. A comparison of bone density and bone morphology between patients presenting with hip fractures, spinal fractures or a combination of the two

    OpenAIRE

    Richard G. Crilly; Cox, Lizebeth

    2013-01-01

    Background Currently it is uncertain how to define osteoporosis and who to treat after a hip fracture. There is little to support the universal treatment of all such patients but how to select those most in need of treatment is not clear. In this study we have compared cortical and trabecular bone status between patients with spinal fractures and those with hip fracture with or without spinal fracture with the aim to begin to identify, by a simple clinical method (spine x-ray), a group of hip...

  4. Incidence rates and trends of hip/femur fractures in five European countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Requena, G; Abbing-Karahagopian, V; Huerta, C

    2014-01-01

    Hip fractures represent a major public health challenge worldwide. Multinational studies using a common methodology are scarce. We aimed to estimate the incidence rates (IRs) and trends of hip/femur fractures over the period 2003-2009 in five European countries. The study was performed using seven...... electronic health-care records databases (DBs) from Denmark, The Netherlands, Germany, Spain, and the United Kingdom, based on the same protocol. Yearly IRs of hip/femur fractures were calculated for the general population and for those aged ≥50 years. Trends over time were evaluated using linear regression......, P fractures varied greatly across European countries. With the exception of Denmark, no decreasing trend was observed over the study period....

  5. "Hidden" Preoperative Blood Loss With Extracapsular Versus Intracapsular Hip Fractures: What Is the Difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Katharine D; Navo, Paul; Ramsey, Frederick; Jallow, Sainabou; Rehman, Saqib

    2017-12-01

    Excessive blood loss with hip fracture management has been shown to result in increased rates of complications. Our goal is to compare blood loss and transfusion rates between patients with intracapsular and extracapsular (both intertrochanteric (IT) and subtrochanteric (ST)) hip fractures. 472 patients were evaluated over a five-year period. Those who presented to the hospital with a proximal femur fracture (femoral neck, IT or ST) were considered for the study. Exclusion criteria included polytrauma, gunshot injuries, periprosthetic fractures, and non-operative management. Primary endpoint was hemoglobin (Hgb) drop from admission to day of surgery (DOS); secondary endpoint was need for pre-op transfusion and discharge location. 304 patients were analyzed who sustained a proximal femur fracture. Median IC Hgb drop was 0.6g/dL; median EC Hgb drop was 1.1g/dL from admission to DOS ( p = 0.0272). Rate of pre-operative transfusions was higher in EC (36/194 = 18.6%) than IC fractures (5/105 = 4.5%) ( p = 0.0006), and overall transfusion rates remained higher throughout hospital stay (55.7% EC vs. 32.7% IC; p = 0.0001). Breakdown of bleeding rate and tranfusion rates between IT and ST fractures were not significant ( p = 0.07; p = 0.4483). Extracapsular hip fractures were more likely to be discharged to a skilled nursing facility (SNF) (84.4% EC vs. 73.8% IC; p = 0.027). Intracapsular hip fractures have significantly less pre-operative blood loss and fewer pre-operative transfusions than their extracapsular counterparts. These findings can be used to establish appropriate pre-operative resuscitative efforts, ensuring that hip fracture protocols account for the increased likelihood of blood loss in extracapsular fractures.

  6. Recent hip fracture trends in Sweden and Denmark with age-period-cohort effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosengren, B E; Björk, J; Cooper, C; Abrahamsen, B

    2017-01-01

    This study used nationwide hip fracture data from Denmark and Sweden during 1987-2010 to examine effects of (birth) cohort and period. We found that time trends, cohort, and period effects were different in the two countries. Results also indicated that hip fracture rates may increase in the not so far future. The reasons for the downturn in hip fracture rates remain largely unclear but circumstances earlier in life seem important. We ascertained hip fractures in the populations ≥50 years in Denmark and Sweden in national discharge registers. Country- and sex-specific age-period-cohort (APC) effects during 1987-2010 were evaluated by log-likelihood estimates in Poisson regression models presented as incidence rate ratios (IRR). There were 399,596 hip fractures in SE and 248,773 in DK. Age-standardized hip fracture rate was stable in SE men but decreased in SE women and in DK. Combined period + cohort effects were generally stronger in SE than DK and in women than men. IRR per period ranged from 1.05 to 1.30 in SE and 0.95 to 1.21 in DK. IRR per birth cohort ranged from 1.07 to 3.13 in SE and 0.77 to 1.67 in DK. Relative period effects decreased with successive period in SE and described a convex curve in DK. Relative cohort effects increased with successive birth cohort in both countries but with lower risks for DK women and men and SE women born around the 1930s (age 75-86 years today and responsible for most hip fractures) partly explaining the recent downturn. Men and women born thereafter however seem to have a higher hip fracture risk, and we expect a reversal of the present decline in rates, with increasing hip fracture rates in both Denmark and Sweden during the upcoming decade. Time trends, cohort, and period effects were different in SE and DK. This may reflect differences in general health as evident in known differences in life expectancy, healthcare organization, and prevention such as use of anti-osteoporosis drugs. Analyses indicate that hip

  7. Low Levels of Hemoglobin at Admission Are Associated With Increased 30-Day Mortality in Patients With Hip Fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Praetorius, Katrine; Madsen, Christian M; Abrahamsen, Bo

    2016-01-01

    in patients with anemia (type of fracture, gender, and comorbidities (Charlson score) slightly attenuated the risk estimate (HR: 1.21, CI: 1.03-1.41, P = .02). CONCLUSION: This study......INTRODUCTION: Previous smaller studies suggest that anemia is a risk factor for mortality in patients with hip fracture. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the correlation between hemoglobin at admission with 30-day mortality following a hip fracture in a large-scale study. PATIENTS...

  8. Is dislocation rate higher in total hip arthroplasty done for acute displaced fracture neck of femur?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganesan Ram Ganesan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Hip replacement has transformed the lives of hundreds of thousands of people regardless of the underlying aetiology. Debate about the role of arthroplasty for an acute displaced femoral neck fracture has been ongoing for decades. In this article we are going to evaluate whether dislocation rate is higher in total hip replacement done for acute displaced fracture neck of femur. Materials and Methods: Retrospective study of sixty two patients who underwent total hip replacement in Sri Ramachandra medical center. The minimum follow-up was taken as 5 years. Patients were divided into two group; traumatic and non traumatic group. We had 38 patient who underwent hip replacement for non traumatic indications. Traumatic group had 24 patients. The inclusion criteria for the traumatic group were acute displaced fracture neck of femur above 50 years and fracture neck with fracture head with dislocation above 50 years. We used the Harris hip score (Modified for clinical and functional evaluation. Results: We had 89% excellent/good results in non traumatic group 75% excellent/good result in traumatic group. We had one dislocation in non-traumatic group and four dislocations in traumatic group. Conclusions: There is an increase rate of dislocation in patient who underwent total hip replacement for a traumatic condition when compared to their non traumatic counterpart.

  9. Ageism perceived by the elderly in Taiwan following hip fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yueh-Fang; Liang, Jersey; Shyu, Yea-Ing Lotus

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative, longitudinal study explored the feelings about and responses to discrimination experiences related to perceived ageism of older persons following hip fracture. Five male and six female hip-fractured elderly patients were sampled from a medical center in northern Taiwan. Semi-structured questionnaires were used to explore participants' experiences of and responses to ageism-related experiences. Data were collected in face-to-face interviews during home visits at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after discharge from hospital, between June 2007 and December 2008. Textual data of participants' responses were analyzed by directed content analysis. All participants experienced ageism. In first 3 months after discharge, participants' main perceived ageism was positive because of their dependency and feeling overprotected by others. From 3 months to 1 year after discharge, other ageism experiences emerged: isolated because of physical restrictions and neglected. Furthermore, participants' responses were divided into two categories: disregard and tolerance of ageism, or becoming more independent because of ageism. The elderly participants considered that the influences of positive ageism in the early months after discharge reduced their autonomy and deprived them of power. This response to ageism was temporary; over time the participants tried to regain autonomy by overcoming their dependency and improving their physical functioning. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Post-discharge management following hip fracture - get you back to B4: A parallel group, randomized controlled trial study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown Roy A

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fall-related hip fractures result in significant personal and societal consequences; importantly, up to half of older adults with hip fracture never regain their previous level of mobility. Strategies of follow-up care for older adults after fracture have improved investigation for osteoporosis; but managing bone health alone is not enough. Prevention of fractures requires management of both bone health and falls risk factors (including the contributing role of cognition, balance and continence to improve outcomes. Methods/Design This is a parallel group, pragmatic randomized controlled trial to test the effectiveness of a post-fracture clinic compared with usual care on mobility for older adults following their hospitalization for hip fracture. Participants randomized to the intervention will attend a fracture follow-up clinic where a geriatrician and physiotherapist will assess and manage their mobility and other health issues. Depending on needs identified at the clinical assessment, participants may receive individualized and group-based outpatient physiotherapy, and a home exercise program. Our primary objective is to assess the effectiveness of a novel post-discharge fracture management strategy on the mobility of older adults after hip fracture. We will enrol 130 older adults (65 years+ who have sustained a hip fracture in the previous three months, and were admitted to hospital from home and are expected to be discharged home. We will exclude older adults who prior to the fracture were: unable to walk 10 meters; diagnosed with dementia and/or significant comorbidities that would preclude their participation in the clinical service. Eligible participants will be randomly assigned to the Intervention or Usual Care groups by remote allocation. Treatment allocation will be concealed; investigators, measurement team and primary data analysts will be blinded to group allocation. Our primary outcome is mobility

  11. Single shot spinal anesthesia with very low hyperbaric bupivacaine dose (3.75 mg) for hip fracture repair surgery in the elderly. A randomized, double blinded study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Errando, C L; Peiró, C M; Gimeno, A; Soriano, J L

    2014-11-01

    Single shot spinal anesthesia is used worldwide for hip fracture repair surgery in the elderly. Arterial hypotension is a frequent adverse effect. We hypothesized that lowering local anesthetics dose could decrease the incidence of arterial hypotension, while maintaining quality of surgical anesthesia. In a randomized double blinded study, 66 patients over the age of 65 years, with hip fracture needing surgical repair, were assigned to B0.5 group 7.5mg hyperbaric bupivacaine 5mg/ml (control group), and B0.25 group 3.75mg hyperbaric bupivacaine 2.5mg/ml (study group). Sensory and motor block level, and hemodynamic parameters including blood presure, heart rate and vasopressor dose administration were registered, along with rescue anesthesia needs, the feasibility of surgery, its duration, and regression time of sensory anesthesia to T12. After exclusions, 61 patients were included in the final analysis. Arterial hypotension incidence was lower in the B0.25 group (at the 5, 10, and 15min determinations), and a lower amount of vasopressor drugs was needed (mean accumulated ephedrine dose 1.6mg vs. 8.7mg in the B0.5 group, p<0.002). Sensory block regression time to T12 was shorter in the B0.25 group, mean 78.6±23.6 (95% CI 51.7-110.2)min vs. 125.5±37.9 (95% CI 101.7-169.4)min in the B0.5 group, p=0.033. All but one patient in the B0.25 group were operated on under the anesthetic procedure first intended. No rescue anesthesia was needed. Lowering bupivacaine dose for single shot spinal anesthesia for hip fracture repair surgery in elderly patients was effective in decreasing the occurrence of arterial hypotension and vasopressor use, while intraoperative quality remained. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Effectiveness of sensor monitoring in an occupational therapy rehabilitation program for older individuals after hip fracture, the SO-HIP trial: study protocol of a three-arm stepped wedge cluster randomized trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pol, M.C.; ter Riet, G.; van Hartingsveldt, M.; Kröse, B.; de Rooij, S.E.; Buurman, B.M.

    2017-01-01

    Background The performance of activities of daily living (ADL) at home is important for the recovery of older individuals after hip fracture. However, 20–90% of these individuals lose ADL function and never fully recover. It is currently unknown to what extent occupational therapy (OT) with coaching

  13. Effectiveness of sensor monitoring in an occupational therapy rehabilitation program for older individuals after hip fracture, the SO-HIP trial: : study protocol of a three-arm stepped wedge cluster randomized trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pol, Margriet C; Ter Riet, Gerben; van Hartingsveldt, Margo; Kröse, Ben; de Rooij, Sophia E; Buurman, Bianca M

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The performance of activities of daily living (ADL) at home is important for the recovery of older individuals after hip fracture. However, 20-90% of these individuals lose ADL function and never fully recover. It is currently unknown to what extent occupational therapy (OT) with

  14. Low osteocalcin/collagen type I bone gene expression ratio is associated with hip fragility fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Ana M; Caetano-Lopes, Joana; Vale, Ana C; Vidal, Bruno; Lopes, Ana; Aleixo, Inês; Polido-Pereira, Joaquim; Sepriano, Alexandre; Perpétuo, Inês P; Monteiro, Jacinto; Vaz, Maria F; Fonseca, João E; Canhão, Helena

    2012-12-01

    Osteocalcin (OC) is the most abundant non-collagenous bone protein and is determinant for bone mineralization. We aimed to compare OC bone expression and serum factors related to its carboxylation in hip fragility fracture and osteoarthritis patients. We also aimed to identify which of these factors were associated with worse mechanical behavior and with the hip fracture event. In this case-control study, fragility fracture patients submitted to hip replacement surgery were evaluated and compared to a group of osteoarthritis patients submitted to the same procedure. Fasting blood samples were collected to assess apolipoproteinE (apoE) levels, total OC and undercarboxylated osteocalcin (ucOC), vitamin K, LDL cholesterol, triglycerides and bone turnover markers. The frequency of the apoε4 isoform was determined. Femoral epiphyses were collected and trabecular bone cylinders drilled in order to perform compression mechanical tests. Gene expression of bone matrix components was assessed by quantitative RT-PCR analysis. 64 patients, 25 submitted to hip replacement surgery due to fragility fracture and 39 due to osteoarthritis, were evaluated. Bone OC/collagen expression (OC/COL1A1) ratio was significantly lower in hip fracture compared to osteoarthritis patients (phip fracture event (OR ~0; p=0.003) independently of the group assigned, or the clinical characteristics. Apoε4 isoform was more frequent in the hip fracture group (p=0.029). ucOC levels were higher in the fracture group although not significantly (p=0.058). No differences were found regarding total OC (p=0.602), apoE (p=0.467) and Vitamin K (p=0.371). In hip fracture patients, multivariate analysis, adjusted for clinical characteristics, serum factors related to OC metabolism and gene expression of bone matrix proteins showed that low OC/COL1A1 expression ratio was significantly associated with worse trabecular strength (β=0.607; p=0.013) and stiffness (β=0.693; p=0.003). No association was found between

  15. Costs of fragility hip fractures globally: a systematic review and meta-regression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, S; Landeiro, F; McConnell, T; Fulford-Smith, L; Javaid, M K; Judge, A; Leal, J

    2017-10-01

    Purpose This study was conducted in order to systematically review the costs of hip fractures globally and identify drivers of differences in costs. Methods A systematic review was conducted to identify studies reporting patient level fragility hip fracture costs between 1990 and 2015. We extracted data on the participants and costs from these studies. Cost data concerning the index hospitalisation were pooled, and a meta-regression was used to examine its potential drivers. We also pooled data on the first-year costs following hip fracture and considered healthcare, social care as well as other cost categories if reported by studies. Results One hundred and thirteen studies reported costs of hip fracture based on patient level data. Patients developing complications as well as patients enrolled in intervention arms of comparative studies were found to have significantly higher costs compared to the controls. The pooled estimate of the cost for the index hospitalisation was $10,075. Health and social care costs at 12 months were $43,669 with inpatient costs being their major driver. Meta-regression analysis identified age, gender and geographic region as being significantly associated with the differences in costs for the index hospitalisation. Conclusion Hip fracture poses a significant economic burden and variation exists in their costs across different regions. We found that there was a considerable variation across studies in terms of study design, methodology, follow-up period, costs considered and results reported that highlights the need for more standardisation in this area of research.

  16. [Hip fracture in older adults: prevalence and costs in two hospitals. Tabasco, Mexico, 2009].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quevedo-Tejero, Elsy del Carmen; Zavala-González, Marco Antonio; Hernández-Gamas, Arianna del Carmen; Hernández-Ortega, Hilda María

    2011-01-01

    To determine hip fracture prevalence and direct healthcare costs in elderly users of the reference hospitals of the Mexican Institute of Social Insurance (IMSS by spanish initials) and Mexican Oils (PEMEX by spanish initials), from Villahermosa, Tabasco, Mexico, during 2009. This is a cross-sectional study. The information was based on the registers of surgical interventions and institutional reports of the elderly inpatients who had a registered attention in their institution. Descriptive statistical analysis was performed considering the following variables: age, gender, hip fracture type, occurrence month, direct healthcare cost. Out of 10,765 records of hospitalized elderly, 57 hip fracture cases were found (33 in the IMSS and 24 in PEMEX). Hip fracture prevalence was 0.5%, (IMSS 1.1% and PEMEX 0.3%), being more frequent in women and older than 69. The most frequent fracture type was the femur neck one (78.9%). The estimated cost of healthcare in the hospital per patient was USD 5,803 in the IMSS and USD 11,800 in PEMEX. The hip fracture prevalence was higher in the IMSS users. Estimated healthcare costs per patient were higher than the reported in other institutions of the of the mexican health national system.

  17. Comparison of hip geometry, strength, and estimated fracture risk in women with anorexia nervosa and overweight/obese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Katherine Neubecker; Fazeli, Pouneh K; Lawson, Elizabeth A; Russell, Brian M; Riccio, Ariana D; Meenaghan, Erinne; Gerweck, Anu V; Eddy, Kamryn; Holmes, Tara; Goldstein, Mark; Weigel, Thomas; Ebrahimi, Seda; Mickley, Diane; Gleysteen, Suzanne; Bredella, Miriam A; Klibanski, Anne; Miller, Karen K

    2014-12-01

    Data suggest that anorexia nervosa (AN) and obesity are complicated by elevated fracture risk, but skeletal site-specific data are lacking. Traditional bone mineral density (BMD) measurements are unsatisfactory at both weight extremes. Hip structural analysis (HSA) uses dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry data to estimate hip geometry and femoral strength. Factor of risk (φ) is the ratio of force applied to the hip from a fall with respect to femoral strength; higher values indicate higher hip fracture risk. The objective of the study was to investigate hip fracture risk in AN and overweight/obese women. This was a cross-sectional study. The study was conducted at a Clinical Research Center. PATIENTS included 368 women (aged 19-45 y): 246 AN, 53 overweight/obese, and 69 lean controls. HSA-derived femoral geometry, peak factor of risk for hip fracture, and factor of risk for hip fracture attenuated by trochanteric soft tissue (φ(attenuated)) were measured. Most HSA-derived parameters were impaired in AN and superior in obese/overweight women vs controls at the narrow neck, intertrochanteric, and femoral shaft (P ≤ .03). The φ(attenuated) was highest in AN and lowest in overweight/obese women (P fractures. Femoral geometry by HSA, hip BMD, and factor of risk for hip fracture attenuated by soft tissue are impaired in AN and superior in obesity, suggesting higher and lower hip fracture risk, respectively. Only attenuated factor of risk was associated with fragility fracture prevalence, suggesting that variability in soft tissue padding may help explain site-specific fracture risk not captured by BMD.

  18. The trochanteric gamma nail versus the dynamic hip screw: a prospective randomised study. One-year follow-up of 146 intertrochanteric fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ovesen, O; Andersen, M; Poulsen, T

    2006-01-01

    In a prospective, randomized trial we compared the trochanteric gamma nail (TGN) and the dynamic hip screw (DHS) in the treatment of 146 intertrochanteric fractures. Follow-up was after four and 12 months. The operation time was significantly shorter in the DHS group. At discharge the need...

  19. Acute cognitive dysfunction after hip fracture: frequency and risk factors in an optimized, multimodal, rehabilitation program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bitsch, Martin; Foss, Nicolai Bang; Kristensen, Billy Bjarne

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients undergoing hip fracture surgery often experience acute post-operative cognitive dysfunction (APOCD). The pathogenesis of APOCD is probably multifactorial, and no single intervention has been successful in its prevention. No studies have investigated the incidence of APOCD after...... hip fracture surgery in an optimized, multimodal, peri-operative rehabilitation regimen. METHODS: One hundred unselected hip fracture patients treated in a well-defined, optimized, multimodal, peri-operative rehabilitation regimen were included. Patients were tested upon admission and on the second......, fourth and seventh post-operative days with the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) score. RESULTS: Thirty-two per cent of patients developed a significant post-operative cognitive decline, which was associated with several pre-fracture patient characteristics, including age and cognitive function...

  20. An unusual case of traumatic bilateral hip dislocation without fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobar, Andrés; Bregni, María; Altamirano, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Bilateral traumatic hip dislocations are extremely rare. Most of these are related to acetabular or proximal femoral fractures, consisting of complex lesions, and are rarely pure ligamentous injuries. Posterior dislocation is the most frequent. Some dislocations are accompanied by sciatic nerve palsy. The present case is a posterior bilateral hip dislocation with no other associated lesions, there are very few reports published with this clinical setting. The patient had good functional outcome. PMID:28560017

  1. Benzodiazepines, Z-drugs and the risk of hip fracture: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Karen; Bracchi, Robert; Hewitt, Jonathan; Routledge, Philip A.; Carter, Ben

    2017-01-01

    Background Hip fractures in the older person lead to an increased risk of mortality, poorer quality of life and increased morbidity. Benzodiazepine (BNZ) use is associated with increased hip fracture rate, consequently Z-drugs are fast becoming the physician’s hypnotic prescription of choice yet data on their use is limited. We compared the risk of hip fracture associated with Z-drugs and BNZ medications, respectively, and examined if this risk varied with longer-term use. Methods and findings We carried out a systematic review of the literature and meta-analysis. MEDLINE and SCOPUS were searched to identify studies involving BNZ or Z-drugs and the risk of hip fracture up to May 2015. Each included study was quality-assessed. A pooled relative risk of hip fracture was calculated using the generic inverse variance method, with a random effects model, with the length of hypnotic usage as a subgroup. Both BNZ, and Z-drug use respectively, were significantly associated with an increased risk of hip fracture (RR = 1.52, 95% CI 1.37–1.68; and RR = 1.90, 95% CI 1.68–2.13). Short-term use of BNZ and Z-drugs respectively, was also associated with the greatest risk of hip fracture (RR = 2.40, 95% CI 1.88–3.05 and RR = 2.39, 95% CI 1.74–3.29). Conclusions There is strong evidence that both BNZ and Z-drugs are associated with an increased risk of hip fracture in the older person, and there is little difference between their respective risks. Patients newly prescribed these medicines are at the greatest risk of hip fracture. Clinicians and policy makers need to consider the increased risk of fallings and hip fracture particularly amongst new users of these medications. PMID:28448593

  2. Femoral neck fracture after removal of the compression hip screw from healed intertrochanteric fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Pil Whan; Kwon, Ji Eun; Yoo, Jeong Joon; Kim, Hee Joong; Yoon, Kang Sup

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate the incidence of femoral neck fracture (FNF) after removal of a compression hip screw (CHS) without trauma and to determine the risk factors for this type of fracture. Retrospective study of consecutive patient series. University teaching hospital. Sixty-seven patients with a mean age of 65.3 years (45 women and 22 men). A total of 67 implants were removed in the presence of bony consolidation of the fracture site; most of them were due to hardware pain. The incidence of FNF after a CHS removal, clinical parameters (age, gender, bone mineral density, body mass index, and fracture stability), and radiologic parameters (the femoral neck-shaft angle, femoral neck width, distance between thread of lag screw, and neck cortex). Univariate analysis was performed for those parameters of the fracture group and the nonfracture group. To assess which variables were associated with FNF, a multiple logistic regression was used. Six (9.0%) FNFs occurred within 1 month after a CHS removal. The mean anterior and lateral neck widths were significantly smaller, and the mean anterior and inferior thread-to-cortex distances were significantly shorter in the fracture group compared with the nonfracture group. The risk factor significantly associated with FNF was the inferior thread-to-cortex distance (odds ratio, 0.462; 95% confidence interval, 0.217-0.988). CHS should not be removed routinely due to the risk of FNF. Furthermore, attention should be paid to at-risk patients with a hip screw positioned close to the inferior femoral neck cortex. Prognostic level II.

  3. Structural asymmetry between the hips and its relation to experimental fracture type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevenot, Jérôme; Pulkkinen, Pasi; Kuhn, Volker; Eckstein, Felix; Jämsä, Timo

    2010-09-01

    Experimental analysis with paired femurs provides the opportunity to study within-person differences in fracture type and associated structural side differences. We hypothesized that different fracture types in the hips of a subject are associated with structural asymmetry. Bone mineral density (BMD) and structural measurements of paired cadaver femurs (32 females, 24 males) were performed before mechanical testing in a side-impact configuration. Fractures were classified (cervical or trochanteric) and differences in structural parameters, BMD, and failure load were evaluated between the left and right hips as well as between experimental fracture types. We observed larger dimensions (P hip than in the right. Seventeen pairs (30.4%) had trochanteric fractures on one side and cervical on the contralateral side. The asymmetric trochanteric fracture side had a higher head/neck diameter ratio (HD/ND) (P cervical side in females and a lower HD and higher FSD (P fracture cases displayed lower NSA (P cervical ones. In males, asymmetric fracture cases showed larger dimensions than the other groups (P cervical to asymmetric and then to symmetric trochanteric cases (P fracture types. Asymmetry should be considered when using the opposite side as control in clinical studies.

  4. What happens to patients when they fracture their hip during a skilled nursing facility stay?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leland, Natalie E; Gozalo, Pedro; Bynum, Julie; Mor, Vincent; Christian, Thomas J; Teno, Joan M

    2015-09-01

    To characterize outcomes of patients experiencing a fall and subsequent hip fracture while in a nursing home receiving skilled nursing facility (SNF) services. Observational study. Short-stay fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries who experienced their first hip fracture during an SNF stay. Outcomes measured in the 90 days after the hip fracture hospitalization included community discharge (with a stay in the community death, and institutionalization. Between 1999 and 2007, 27,305 hip fractures occurred among short-stay nursing home patients receiving SNF care. After surgical repair of the hip fracture, 83.9% of these patients were discharged from the hospital back to an SNF, with most (99%) returning to the facility where the hip fracture occurred. In the first 90 days after hospitalization, 24.1% of patients died, 7.3% were discharged to the community but remained fewer than 30 days, 14.0% achieved successful community discharge, and 54.6% were still in a health care institution with almost 46.4% having transitioned to long-term care. SNF care aims to maximize the short-stay patient's independence and facilitate a safe community transition. However, experiencing a fall and hip fracture during the SNF stay was a sentinel event that limited the achievement of this goal. There is an urgent need to ensure the integration of fall prevention into the patient's plan of care. Further, falls among SNF patients may serve as indicator of quality, which consumers and payers can use to make informed health care decisions. Copyright © 2015 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Factors that influence exercise activity among women post hip fracture participating in the Exercise Plus Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Resnick

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Barbara Resnick1, Denise Orwig2, Christopher D’Adamo2, Janet Yu-Yahiro3, William Hawkes2, Michelle Shardell2, Justine Golden2, Sheryl Zimmerman4, Jay Magaziner21University of Maryland School of Nursing, 655 West Lombard Street, Baltimore, MD,21201, USA; 2University of Maryland School of Medicine, Howard Hall, Redwood Street, Baltimore MD 21201, USA; 3Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Union Memorial Hospital, Baltimore, USA; 4University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, 301 Pittsboro St., CB#3550, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3550, USAAbstract: Using a social ecological model, this paper describes selected intra- and interpersonal factors that influence exercise behavior in women post hip fracture who participated in the Exercise Plus Program. Model testing of factors that influence exercise behavior at 2, 6 and 12 months post hip fracture was done. The full model hypothesized that demographic variables; cognitive, affective, physical and functional status; pain; fear of falling; social support for exercise, and exposure to the Exercise Plus Program would influence self-efficacy, outcome expectations, and stage of change both directly and indirectly influencing total time spent exercising. Two hundred and nine female hip fracture patients (age 81.0 ± 6.9, the majority of whom were Caucasian (97%, participated in this study. The three predictive models tested across the 12 month recovery trajectory suggest that somewhat different factors may influence exercise over the recovery period and the models explained 8 to 21% of the variance in time spent exercising. To optimize exercise activity post hip fracture, older adults should be helped to realistically assess their self-efficacy and outcome expectations related to exercise, health care providers and friends/peers should be encouraged to reinforce the positive benefits of exercise post hip fracture, and fear of falling should be addressed throughout the entire hip fracture recovery trajectory

  6. Fascia iliaca block for pain control in hip fracture patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillón, P; Veloso, M; Gómez, O; Salvador, J; Bartra, A; Anglés, F

    Pain treatment for patients with hip fracture has been based on the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories and opioid derived drugs. These medications have been associated with multiple adverse effects. Fascia iliaca block is a recent pain management alternative for these patients. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of fascia iliaca block performed in the emergency room (ER) for patients over 65years of age with hip fracture. A cohort of 216 patients, from January to December 2016, was studied prospectively. Analyzed variables were: pain upon arrival at ER, pain after fascia iliaca block, need for rescue medication, protocol compliance, delay in analgesia administration and delay for surgery. Differences between visual analogue scale (VAS), before and after the fascia iliaca block, were statistically significant (P<.001). Pre-block VAS recorded was 6.16 (SD=2.82). The mean VAS reduction after the block was 2.99 (95%CI: 2.45-3.53%). Twenty-six percent of patients required morphine as rescue medication in the first 8hours after diagnosis. Compliance with protocol administration was of 84%. Fascia iliaca block was performed in a mean time of 16minutes (SD=10.33) after diagnosis. The median delay for surgery was 1 day (RIQ 25-75%: 1-2). Fascia iliaca block is a reproducible, safe and effective technique for pain management. It is a keystone in pain treatment for patients with a proximal femur fracture at our institution. Other objectives in our pain management protocol include early analgesia administration and reduction of time to surgery. Copyright © 2017 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Maximising functional recovery following hip fracture in frail seniors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaupre, Lauren A; Binder, Ellen F; Cameron, Ian D; Jones, C Allyson; Orwig, Denise; Sherrington, Cathie; Magaziner, Jay

    2013-12-01

    This review discusses factors affecting recovery following hip fracture in frail older people as well as interventions associated with improved functional recovery. Prefracture function, cognitive status, co-morbidities, depression, nutrition and social support impact recovery and may interact to affect post-fracture outcome. There is mounting evidence that exercise is beneficial following hip fracture with higher-intensity/duration programmes showing more promising outcomes. Pharmacologic management for osteoporosis has benefits in preventing further fractures, and interest is growing in pharmacologic treatments for post-fracture loss of muscle mass and strength. A growing body of evidence suggests that sub-populations - those with cognitive impairment, residing in nursing homes or males - also benefit from rehabilitation after hip fracture. Optimal post-fracture care may entail the use of multiple interventions; however, more work is needed to determine optimal exercise components, duration and intensity as well as exploring the impact of multimodal interventions that combine exercise, pharmacology, nutrition and other interventions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Maximising functional recovery following hip fracture in frail seniors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaupre, Lauren A.; Binder, Ellen F.; Cameron, Ian D.; Jones, C. Allyson; Orwig, Denise; Sherrington, Cathie; Magaziner, Jay

    2015-01-01

    This review discusses factors affecting recovery following hip fracture in frail older people as well as interventions associated with improved functional recovery. Prefracture function, cognitive status, co-morbidities, depression, nutrition and social support impact recovery and may interact to affect post-fracture outcome. There is mounting evidence that exercise is beneficial following hip fracture with higher-intensity/duration programmes showing more promising outcomes. Pharmacologic management for osteoporosis has benefits in preventing further fractures, and interest is growing in pharmacologic treatments for post-fracture loss of muscle mass and strength. A growing body of evidence suggests that sub-populations – those with cognitive impairment, residing in nursing homes or males – also benefit from rehabilitation after hip fracture. Optimal post-fracture care may entail the use of multiple interventions; however, more work is needed to determine optimal exercise components, duration and intensity as well as exploring the impact of multimodal interventions that combine exercise, pharmacology, nutrition and other interventions. PMID:24836335

  9. Vertebral fracture assessment in patients presenting with a non-hip non-vertebral fragility fracture: experience of a UK Fracture Liaison Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reniu, Aina Capdevila; Ong, Terence; Ajmal, Syed; Sahota, Opinder

    2017-12-01

    Twenty-five percent of patients with a non-hip non-vertebral fragility fracture have an undiagnosed vertebral fracture detected by vertebral fracture assessment during bone densitometric assessment. The prevalence of an undiagnosed vertebral fracture is higher in older people, and they are more likely to have multiple vertebral fractures. Most vertebral fragility fractures (VFF) have no history of trauma. Vertebral fracture assessment (VFA) during dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) can be used to detect these VFFs. This study aims to identify the prevalence of undiagnosed VFF in patients presenting with a non-hip non-vertebral fragility fracture. Patients identified by the fracture liaison service (FLS) of a large UK university hospital presenting with a non-hip non-vertebral fragility fracture were evaluated from 1 January 2012 to 30 September 2015. Local protocol identified those that would proceed for VFA. Data was collected on patient characteristics, fracture details, bone mineral density (BMD) measurements and VFA results. Five hundred sixty-seven patients (mean (SD) age, 72 (9.4) years) of mostly women (88.3%) had a VFA performed as part of their DXA assessment. One hundred forty-three patients (25.2%) were identified to have a vertebral fracture, of whom 57.3% of them had one fracture. 49.5% of those with vertebral fractures had BMD measurements diagnostic of osteoporosis. Mean (SD) age was higher in those with vertebral fractures compared to those without; 74.9 (8.3) years vs 70.4 (9.5) years, p fractures than those younger than 75 years (16.3 vs 4%, p = 0.01). A quarter of patients presenting with a non-hip non-vertebral fragility fracture have an undiagnosed vertebral fracture. Older people are more likely to have vertebral fractures and more likely to have multiple fractures. VFA during bone densitometric assessment can further aid stratifying future fracture risk.

  10. Complications and institutionalization are almost doubled after second hip fracture surgery in the elderly patient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.J. van der Steenhoven; B. Staffhorst (Bas); S.K. van de Velde (Samuel); R.G.H.H. Nelissen (Rob); M.H.J. Verhofstad (Michiel)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract Purpose To determine patient and hip fracture characteristics, early postoperative complication rate and need for institutionalization at time of discharge from the hospital in patients treated for a second, contralateral hip fracture. Methods During a

  11. Type II Intertrochanteric Fractures: Proximal Femoral Nailing (PFN) Versus Dynamic Hip Screw(DHS)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cyril Jonnes; Shishir Suranigi; Syed Najimudeen

    2016-01-01

    Background: Intertrochanteric fracture is one of the most common fractures of the hip especially in the elderly with osteoporotic bones, usually due to low-energy trauma like simple falls. Dynamic Hip Screw (DHS...

  12. High reliability of an algorithm for choice of implants in hip fracture patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palm, Henrik; Posner, Eva; Ahler-Toftehøj, Hans-Ulrik; Siesing, Peter; Gylvin, Silas; Aasvang, Tobias; Holck, Kim; Holtz, Kenneth Brian

    2013-06-01

    Hip fracture treatment is controversial, with high complication rates. An algorithm for hip fracture surgery has shown reduced reoperation rates, but choice of implant is based on the commonly used fracture classifications, which were previously evaluated to be unreliable. The purpose of this study was to investigate the reliability of the algorithm. From two hospitals, four observers (orthopaedic consultant, fellow, resident and intern) used the algorithm to classify into 15 hip fracture types [Garden type I-IV femoral neck including posterior tilt, vertical femoral neck, basocervical and Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen (AO)-31 A1.1 to A3.3 trochanteric fractures] and to choose between five surgical procedures [parallel implants, prosthesis, two-or four-hole sliding hip screw (SHS) and intermedullary (IM) nail]. After individual assessment, each hospital made a consensus decision. Observations were performed twice, ten weeks apart, on pelvic, anteroposterior (AP) and axial X-rays from 100 consecutive patients. For fracture classification, mean kappa values were 0.60 for intra and 0.62 for interobserver variation, with interobserver variation between hospitals at 0.65. For posterior tilt, mean intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.91 for intra and 0.87 for interobserver variation. For choice of implant type, mean kappa values were 0.86 for both intra and interobserver variation. The two hospital consensus decisions chose same implant in 91 of 100 patients, giving a kappa value at 0.88. Although hip fracture classification confirmed to be somewhat unreliable in this study, posterior tilt measurement and subsequent choice of implant type by the algorithm was found to be reliable, which opens up the possibility for a more standardized treatment of hip fracture patients between hospitals.

  13. Total hip arthroplasty with cementless cup after acetabular fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Alfonso Lugones

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Acetabular fractures are a common cause of degenerative hip arthritis. The incidence of post-traumatic osteoarthritis has been reported between 12% and 57% and avascular necrosis of the femoral head may occur in 2% to 40% after posterior fracture dislocation. The fracture is often caused by major trauma in road accidents, at work or during sports, and patients usually present for total hip replacement (THR at an earlier age than the general arthritic population. We describe and analyze our patients with uncemented acetabular reconstruction in post-traumatic arthritis and compare them with THR in non-traumatic arthritis. Methods We retrospectively evaluated 19 patients who underwent uncemented acetabular reconstruction due to post-traumatic arthritis secondary to acetabular fracture. Results The average age at the time of arthroplasty was 52.2 years (19-83. The age at the time of fracture was 47.9 years (16-81. The average time between the acetabular fracture and THR was 52.4 months (4-360. The average follow-up was 4.25 years. No acetabular component loosening or infections were seen in either group. The Harris Hip Score at an average follow-up of 4.25 years was 89.3 (57-99. The follow-up in the control group with non-traumatic arthritis was 4.9 years, and the Harris Hip Score was 94.1 points (78-100. There were no significant difference in the Harris Hip Score between groups (p = 0.24. Conclusion Uncemented acetabular reconstruction in post-traumatic arthritis secondary to acetabular fracture is a more difficult procedure than routine arthroplasty in patient with non-traumatic arthritis. In the short-term there are no clinical or radiographic differences in THR with uncemented acetabular cups in post-traumatic arthritis patients compared to patients with non-traumatic arthritis.

  14. Gamma and other cephalocondylic intramedullary nails versus extramedullary implants for extracapsular hip fractures in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Martyn J; Handoll, Helen H G

    2008-07-16

    Two types of implants used for the surgical fixation of extracapsular hip fractures are cephalocondylic intramedullary nails, which are inserted into the femoral canal proximally to distally across the fracture, and extramedullary implants (e.g. the sliding hip screw). To compare cephalocondylic intramedullary nails with extramedullary implants for extracapsular hip fractures in adults. We searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group Specialised Register (June 2007), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library 2007, Issue 2), MEDLINE (1966 to June week 3 2007), EMBASE (1988 to 2007 Week 27), the UK National Research Register, orthopaedic journals, conference proceedings and reference lists of articles. All randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing cephalocondylic nails with extramedullary implants for extracapsular hip fractures. Both authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. Wherever appropriate, results were pooled. Predominantly older people with mainly trochanteric fractures were treated in the 36 included trials.Twenty-two trials (3871 participants) compared the Gamma nail with the sliding hip screw (SHS). The Gamma nail was associated with an increased risk of operative and later fracture of the femur and an increased reoperation rate. There were no major differences between implants in the wound infection, mortality or medical complications.Five trials (623 participants) compared the intramedullary hip screw (IMHS) with the SHS. Fracture fixation complications were more common in the IMHS group; all cases of operative and later fracture of the femur occurred in this group. Results for post-operative complications, mortality and functional outcomes were similar in the two groups. Three trials (394 participants) showed no difference in fracture fixation complications, reoperation, wound infection and length of hospital stay for proximal femoral nail (PFN) compared with the SHS

  15. Red blood cell transfusion for people undergoing hip fracture surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunskill, Susan J; Millette, Sarah L; Shokoohi, Ali; Pulford, E C; Doree, Carolyn; Murphy, Michael F; Stanworth, Simon

    2015-04-21

    The incidence of hip fracture is increasing and it is more common with increasing age. Surgery is used for almost all hip fractures. Blood loss occurs as a consequence of both the fracture and the surgery and thus red blood cell transfusion is frequently used. However, red blood cell transfusion is not without risks. Therefore, it is important to identify the evidence for the effective and safe use of red blood cell transfusion in people with hip fracture. To assess the effects (benefits and harms) of red blood cell transfusion in people undergoing surgery for hip fracture. We searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group Specialised Register (31 October 2014), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library, 2014, Issue 10), MEDLINE (January 1946 to 20 November 2014), EMBASE (January 1974 to 20 November 2014), CINAHL (January 1982 to 20 November 2014), British Nursing Index Database (January 1992 to 20 November 2014), the Systematic Review Initiative's Transfusion Evidence Library, PubMed for e-publications, various other databases and ongoing trial registers. Randomised controlled trials comparing red blood cell transfusion versus no transfusion or an alternative to transfusion, different transfusion protocols or different transfusion thresholds in people undergoing surgery for hip fracture. Three review authors independently assessed each study's risk of bias and extracted data using a study-specific form. We pooled data where there was homogeneity in the trial comparisons and the timing of outcome measurement. We used GRADE criteria to assess the quality (low, moderate or high) of the evidence for each outcome. We included six trials (2722 participants): all compared two thresholds for red blood cell transfusion: a 'liberal' strategy to maintain a haemoglobin concentration of usually 10 g/dL versus a more 'restrictive' strategy based on symptoms of anaemia or a lower haemoglobin concentration, usually 8 g/dL. The exact

  16. QCT of the proximal femur--which parameters should be measured to discriminate hip fracture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Museyko, O; Bousson, V; Adams, J; Laredo, J -D; Engelke, K

    2016-03-01

    For quantitative computed tomography (QCT), most relevant variables to discriminate hip fractures were determined. A multivariate analysis showed that trabecular bone mineral density (BMD) of the trochanter with "cortical" thickness of the neck provided better fracture discrimination than total hip integral BMD. A slice-by-slice analysis of the neck or the inclusion of strength-based parameters did not improve fracture discrimination. For QCT of the proximal femur, a large variety of analysis parameters describing bone mineral density, geometry, or strength has been considered. However, in each given study, generally just a small subset was used. The aim of this study was to start with a comprehensive set and then select a best subset of QCT parameters for discrimination of subjects with and without acute osteoporotic hip fractures. The analysis was performed using the population of the European Femur Fracture (EFFECT) study (Bousson et al. J Bone Min Res: Off J Am Soc Bone Min Res 26:881-893, 2011). Fifty-six female control subjects (age 73.2 ± 9.3 years) were compared with 46 female patients (age 80.9 ± 11.1 years) with acute hip fractures. The QCT analysis software MIAF-Femur was used to virtually dissect the proximal femur and analyze more than 1000 parameters, predominantly in the femoral neck. A multivariate best-subset analysis was used to extract the parameters best discriminating hip fractures. All results were adjusted for age, height, and weight differences between the two groups. For the discrimination of all proximal hip fractures as well as for cervical fractures alone, the measurement of neck parameters suffices (area under the curve (AUC) = 0.84). Parameters characterizing bone strength are discriminators of hip fractures; however, in multivariate models, only "cortical" cross-sectional area in the neck center remained as a significant contributor. The combination of one BMD parameter, trabecular BMD of the trochanter, and one geometry

  17. Excess mortality in men compared with women following a hip fracture. National analysis of comedications, comorbidity and survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kannegaard, Pia Nimann; van der Mark, Susanne; Eiken, Pia Agnete

    2010-01-01

    osteoporosis is a common disease, and the incidence of osteoporotic fractures is expected to rise with the growing elderly population. Immediately following, and probably several years after a hip fracture, patients, both men and women, have a higher risk of dying compared to the general population...... regardless of age. The aim of this study was to assess excess mortality following hip fracture and, if possible, identify reasons for the difference between mortality for the two genders....

  18. Differential impact of some risk factors on trochanteric and cervical hip fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tal, Sari; Gurevich, Alexander; Sagiv, Shaul; Guller, Vladimir

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the potential distinct risk factors associated with trochanteric and cervical hip fractures. Elderly patients aged 65 years and older (n = 1161) were admitted to the orthopedic department with hip fractures during the years 2006-2011. Demographic and clinical data, as well as routine blood tests, were retrieved from the patient electronic medical records. Approximately 58% of patients had trochanteric fractures and 42% had cervical fractures. Women were more likely to have trochanteric fractures than men (P = 0.002). Female sex, frailty, falls, diabetes and subnormal calcium, as well as subnormal hemoglobin levels, were significant risk factors for trochanteric fractures (OR 1.39, P = 0.0202, OR 1.36, P = 0.0166, OR 1.49, P = 0.0015, OR 1.33, P = 0.0343, OR 0.68, P = 0.0054, OR 0.70, P = 0.0036, respectively). Patients with Parkinson's disease were at a lower risk for trochanteric fractures (OR 0.6, P = 0.007). As there are some differences between risk factors for trochanteric and cervical hip fractures, there is a need for further studies in order to understand the etiology of fractures and to be able to carry out effective preventive efforts. © 2014 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  19. Early reduction of acetabular fractures decreases the risk of post-traumatic hip osteoarthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahueque, Mario; Martínez, Marcos; Cobar, Andrés; Bregni, María

    2017-01-01

    Acetabular fractures are complex high-energy injuries. Increasing in recent years with the increased use of high-speed motor vehicles. One of the most important complications of acetabular fracture is the post-traumatic hip osteoarthritis; this complication has been associated to poor fracture reduction, type of fracture and delay in the reduction and fixation of acetabular fracture (Timing surgery). The aims of this study were to determine the incidence of post-traumatic hip osteoarthritis after acetabulum fracture and demonstrate whether the delay surgery is associated to early post-traumatic hip osteoarthritis. Using the database of patients with acetabular fractures treated with open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) over 3 years (2011-2014) with minimum of 2 years follow-up. Data was acquired and saved in a digital format. Demographic information was obtained from each patient with minimum of 2 years follow-up. Acetabular fracture was distributed according to the classification of Judet. The quality of reduction was classified in anatomic (0-1 mm) and non-anatomic (>1 mm) and the timing surgery, early (7 days). Clinical and radiographic follow-up was generally performed at six weeks, three months, one and two years after fracture fixation. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the strength of the covariates in relation to the development of post-traumatic hip osteoarthritis. 59 (48%) patients of 122, developed post-traumatic hip osteoarthritis before 2 years. Posterior wall fracture with or without transverse fracture was associated with higher post-traumatic hip osteoarthritis compared with other types of fractures (p osteoarthritis compared with those who had nonanatomic reduction (p osteoarthritis (p = 7092). According to our results, the anatomical reduction of the articular surface in acetabular fractures is the most important factor in hip osteoarthritis prevention. This factor is strongly associated with early

  20. Concomitant upper limb fractures and short-term functional recovery in hip fracture patients: does the site of upper limb injury matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Monaco, Marco; Castiglioni, Carlotta; Vallero, Fulvia; Di Monaco, Roberto; Tappero, Rosa

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate functional recovery in a subgroup of hip fracture patients who sustained a simultaneous fracture at the upper limb, taking into account the site of upper limb injury. Of 760 patients admitted consecutively to the authors' rehabilitation hospital because of a fall-related hip fracture, 700 were retrospectively investigated. Functional outcome was assessed using Barthel Index scores. In 49 of the 700 patients, a single fall resulted in both a hip fracture and a fracture of either wrist (n = 34) or proximal humerus (n = 15). The patients with concomitant shoulder fractures had lower median Barthel Index scores after rehabilitation (70 vs. 90, P = 0.003), lower median Barthel Index effectiveness (57.1 vs. 76.9, P = 0.018), and prolonged median length of stay (42 vs. 36 days, P = 0.011) than did the patients with isolated hip fractures. Significant differences persisted after adjustment for six potential confounders. The adjusted odds ratio for achieving a Barthel Index score lower than 85 was 6.71 (95% confidence interval, 1.68-26.81; P = 0.007) for the patients with concomitant shoulder fractures. Conversely, no prognostic disadvantages were associated with concomitant wrist fractures. Data show a worse functional recovery and a prolonged length of stay in the subgroup of hip fracture patients who sustained a concomitant fracture at the proximal humerus, but not at the wrist.

  1. Identification of gait domains and key gait variables following hip fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thingstad, Pernille; Egerton, Thorlene; Ihlen, Espen F; Taraldsen, Kristin; Moe-Nilssen, Rolf; Helbostad, Jorunn L

    2015-11-18

    Restoration of gait is an important goal of rehabilitation after hip fracture. Numerous spatial and temporal gait variables have been reported in the literature, but beyond gait speed, there is little agreement on which gait variables should be reported and which are redundant in describing gait recovery following hip fracture. The aims of this study were to identify distinct domains of gait and key variables representing these domains, and to explore how known predictors of poor outcome after hip fracture were associated with these key variables. Spatial and temporal gait variables were collected four months following hip fracture in 249 participants using an electronic walkway (GAITRite®). From the initial set of 31 gait variables, 16 were selected following a systematic procedure. An explorative factor analysis with oblique (oblimin) rotation was performed, using principal component analysis for extraction of factors. Unique domains of gait and the variable best representing these domains were identified. Multiple regression analyses including six predictors; age, gender, fracture type, pain, global cognitive function and grip strength were performed for each of the identified key gait variables. Mean age of participants was 82.6 (SD = 6.0) years, 75 % were women, and mean gait speed was 0.6 (SD = 0.2) m/sec. The factor analysis revealed four distinct gait domains, and the key variables that best represented these domains were double support time, walk ratio, variability of step velocity, and single support asymmetry. Cognitive decline, low grip strength, extra capsular fracture and male gender, but not pain or age, were significant predictors of impaired gait. This work proposes four key variables to represent gait of older people after hip fracture. These core variables were associated with known predictors of poor outcome after hip fracture and should warrant further assessment to confirm their importance as outcome variables in addition to gait

  2. Is mortality after hip fracture associated with surgical delay or admission during weekends and public holidays?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugaard, Cecilie Laubjerg; Jørgensen, Henrik L; Riis, Troels

    2012-01-01

    Hip fractures are associated with high mortality, but the cause of this is still not entirely clear. We investigated the effect of surgical delay, weekends, holidays, and time of day admission on mortality in hip fracture patients.......Hip fractures are associated with high mortality, but the cause of this is still not entirely clear. We investigated the effect of surgical delay, weekends, holidays, and time of day admission on mortality in hip fracture patients....

  3. A randomised study in all cervical hip fractures osteosynthesis with Hansson hook-pins versus AO-screws in 199 consecutive patients followed for two years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mjørud, Jan; Skaro, Olav; Solhaug, Jan Helge; Thorngren, Karl-Göran

    2006-08-01

    A consecutive series of patients with all types of cervical hip fracture (both undisplaced and displaced) were randomised to osteosynthesis with Hansson hook-pins (n = 98) or AO-screws (n = 101). Background parameters, fracture type and reduction of the fracture did not differ significantly between the groups. Fifty-seven percent of the patients were operated on within 6 h of admission to hospital, 74% within 12 h and 92% within 24 h. The mean (median) time for operation was 36 (30) min for the hook-pins and 40 (35) min for the AO-screws. The devices were significantly better positioned in the hook-pin group (81% of cases good) compared to the AO-screws (66% good) (p = 0.04). In all, 72% of the patients had no deficiency either in reduction of the fracture, positioning of the implants or had drill penetration of the femoral head. Direct unrestricted weight bearing was encouraged in 92% of the hook-pin and 90% of the AO-screws group. The mean (median) hospital time was 13 (10) days with no significant difference between the groups. Following treatment, 5% walked without aids, 76% of the patients walked with some aids, and 16% could not walk. The walking ability was not known for 4%. At four months, 59% of the patients were living in their own home (64% before fracture), 18% (25% before) in a nursing home, 5% (11% before) in other accommodation and 18% were dead. After two years, 77% of the hook-pin patients had not needed any re-operation compared to 73% in the AO-screw group. In total a secondary hemi-arthroplasty had been performed in 7% and total hip arthroplasty in 12% of the patients. Extraction only of osteosynthesis material had been performed in 5%. The difference in the reoperation rates between the two methods was not significant. In the undisplaced fractures, 84% of the patients had not needed any reoperation after two years compared to 70% among the displaced fractures. Major reoperation had been performed in 10% (1% hemi and 9% total hip arthroplasty

  4. What is the risk of death or severe harm due to bone cement implantation syndrome among patients undergoing hip hemiarthroplasty for fractured neck of femur? A patient safety surveillance study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutter, Paul D; Panesar, Sukhmeet S; Darzi, Ara; Donaldson, Liam J

    2014-01-01

    Objective To estimate the risk of death or severe harm due to bone cement implantation syndrome (BCIS) among patients undergoing hip hemiarthroplasty for fractured neck of femur. Setting Hospitals providing secondary and tertiary care throughout the National Health Service (NHS) in England and Wales. Participants Cases reported to the National Reporting and Learning System (NRLS) in which the reporter clearly describes severe acute patient deterioration associated with cement use in hip hemiarthroplasty for fractured neck of femur (assessed independently by two reviewers). Outcome measures Primary—number of reported deaths, cardiac arrests and periarrests per year. Secondary—timing of deterioration and outcome in relation to cement insertion. Results Between 2005 and 2012, the NRLS received 62 reports that clearly describe death or severe harm associated with the use of cement in hip hemiarthroplasty for fractured neck of femur. There was one such incident for every 2900 hemiarthroplasties for fractured neck of femur during the period. Of the 62 reports, 41 patients died, 14 were resuscitated from cardiac arrest and 7 from periarrest. Most reports (55/62, 89%) describe acute deterioration occurring during or within a few minutes of cement insertion. The vast majority of deaths (33/41, 80%) occurred on the operating table. Conclusions These reports provide narrative evidence from England and Wales that cement use in hip hemiarthroplasty for fractured neck of femur is associated with instances of perioperative death or severe harm consistent with BCIS. In 2009, the National Patient Safety Agency publicised this issue and encouraged the use of mitigation measures. Three-quarters of the deaths in this study have occurred since that alert, suggesting incomplete implementation or effectiveness of those mitigation measures. There is a need for stronger evidence that weighs the risks and benefits of cement in hip hemiarthroplasty for fractured neck of femur. PMID

  5. Lumbar chance fracture after direct anterior total hip arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Pitta, MD

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This report describes a patient with ankylosing spondylitis (AS who underwent total hip arthroplasty (THA by the direct anterior approach and sustained a L4-5 extension fracture dislocation with neural deficits. A magnetic resonance imaging revealed an epidural hematoma at the site of the fracture causing critical stenosis. The patient was taken to the operating room for a L3-S1 posterior decompression with L2-pelvis posterior spinal fusion. AS and diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis create a stiff spine that predisposes to fractures because of the larger moment arms experienced than normal spines. The arthroplasty surgeon performing THA should be aware and take precautions to reduce stress on the spine. Keywords: Direct anterior total hip arthroplasty, Ankylosing spondylitis, Specialized table, Lumbar chance fracture, Complication

  6. Fracture fixation in the operative management of hip fractures (FAITH): an international, multicentre, randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nauth, A. (Aaron); Creek, A.T. (Aaron T.); Zellar, A. (Abby); Lawendy, A.-R. (Abdel-Rahman); Dowrick, A. (Adam); Gupta, A. (Ajay); Dadi, A. (Akhil); A. van Kampen (A.); Yee, A. (Albert); A.C. de Vries (Alexander); de Mol van Otterloo, A. (Alexander); Garibaldi, A. (Alisha); Liew, A. (Allen); McIntyre, A.W. (Allison W.); Prasad, A.S. (Amal Shankar); Romero, A.W. (Amanda W.); Rangan, A. (Amar); Oatt, A. (Amber); Sanghavi, A. (Amir); Foley, A.L. (Amy L.); Karlsten, A. (Anders); Dolenc, A. (Andrea); Bucknill, A. (Andrew); Chia, A. (Andrew); Evans, A. (Andrew); Gong, A. (Andrew); Schmidt, A.H. (Andrew H.); Marcantonio, A.J. (Andrew J.); Jennings, A. (Andrew); Ward, A. (Angela); Khanna, A. (Angshuman); Rai, A. (Anil); Smits, A.B. (Anke B.); Horan, A.D. (Annamarie D.); Brekke, A.C. (Anne Christine); Flynn, A. (Annette); Duraikannan, A. (Aravin); Stødle, A. (Are); van Vugt, A.B. (Arie B.); Luther, A. (Arlene); Zurcher, A.W. (Arthur W.); Jain, A. (Arvind); Amundsen, A. (Asgeir); Moaveni, A. (Ash); Carr, A. (Ashley); Sharma, A. (Ateet); Hill, A.D. (Austin D.); Trommer, A. (Axel); Rai, B.S. (B. Sachidananda); Hileman, B. (Barbara); Schreurs, B. (Bart); Verhoeven, B. (Bart); Barden, B.B. (Benjamin B.); Flatøy, B. (Bernhard); B.I. Cleffken (Berry); Bøe, B. (Berthe); Perey, B. (Bertrand); Hanusch, B.C. (Birgit C.); Weening, B. (Brad); B. Fioole (Bram); Rijbroek, B. (Bram); Crist, B.D. (Brett D.); Halliday, B. (Brett); Peterson, B. (Brett); Mullis, B. (Brian); Richardson, C.G. (C. Glen); Clark, C. (Callum); Sagebien, C.A. (Carlos A.); C. van der Pol (Carmen); Bowler, C. (Carol); Humphrey, C.A. (Catherine A.); Coady, C. (Catherine); Koppert, C.L. (Cees L.); Coles, C. (Chad); Tannoury, C. (Chadi); DePaolo, C.J. (Charles J.); Gayton, C. (Chris); Herriott, C. (Chris); Reeves, C. (Christina); Tieszer, C. (Christina); Dobb, C. (Christine); Anderson, C.G. (Christopher G.); Sage, C. (Claire); Cuento, C. (Claudine); Jones, C.B. (Clifford B.); Bosman, C.H.R. (Coks H.R.); Linehan, C. (Colleen); C.P. van der Hart (Cor P.); Henderson, C. (Corey); Lewis, C.G. (Courtland G.); Davis, C.A. (Craig A.); Donohue, C. (Craig); Mauffrey, C. (Cyril); Sundaresh, D.C. (D. C.); Farrell, D.J. (Dana J.); Whelan, D.B. (Daniel B.); Horwitz, D. (Daniel); Stinner, D. (Daniel); Viskontas, D. (Darius); Roffey, D.M. (Darren M.); Alexander, D. (David); Karges, D.E. (David E.); Hak, D. (David); Johnston, D. (David); Love, D. (David); Wright, D.M. (David M.); Zamorano, D.P. (David P.); Goetz, D.R. (David R.); Sanders, D. (David); Stephen, D. (David); Yen, D. (David); Bardana, D. (Davide); Olakkengil, D.J. (Davy J); Lawson, D. (Deanna); Maddock, D. (Deborah); Sietsema, D.L. (Debra L.); Pourmand, D. (Deeba); D. den Hartog (Dennis); Donegan, D. (Derek); D. Heels-Ansdell (Diane); Nam, D. (Diane); Inman, D. (Dominic); Boyer, D. (Dory); Li, D. (Doug); Gibula, D. (Douglas); Price, D.M. (Dustin M.); Watson, D.J. (Dylan J.); Hammerberg, E.M. (E. Mark); Tan, E.T.C.H. (Edward T.C.H.); E.J.R. de Graaf (Eelco); Vesterhus, E.B. (Elise Berg); Roper, E. (Elizabeth); Edwards, E. (Elton); E.H. Schemitsch (Emil); E.R. Hammacher (Eric); Henderson, E.R. (Eric R.); Whatley, E. (Erica); Torres, E.T. (Erick T.); Vermeulen, E.G.J. (Erik G.J.); Finn, E. (Erin); E.M.M. van Lieshout (Esther); Wai, E.K. (Eugene K.); Bannister, E.R. (Evan R.); Kile, E. (Evelyn); Theunissen, E.B.M. (Evert B.M.); Ritchie, E.D. (Ewan D.); Khan, F. (Farah); Moola, F. (Farhad); Howells, F. (Fiona); F. de Nies (Frank); F.H.W.M. van der Heijden (Frank); de Meulemeester, F.R.A.J. (Frank R.A.J.); F. Frihagen (Frede); Nilsen, F. (Fredrik); Schmidt, G.B. (G. Ben); Albers, G.H.R. (G.H. Robert); Gudger, G.K. (Garland K.); Johnson, G. (Garth); Gruen, G. (Gary); Zohman, G. (Gary); Sharma, G. (Gaurav); Wood, G. (Gavin); G.W.M. Tetteroo (Geert); Hjorthaug, G. (Geir); Jomaas, G. (Geir); Donald, G. (Geoff); Rieser, G.R. (Geoffrey Ryan); Reardon, G. (Gerald); Slobogean, G.P. (Gerard P.); G.R. Roukema (Gert); Visser, G.A. (Gijs A.); Moatshe, G. (Gilbert); Horner, G. (Gillian); Rose, G. (Glynis); Guyatt, G. (Gordon); Chuter, G. (Graham); Etherington, G. (Greg); Rocca, G.J.D. (Gregory J. Della); Ekås, G. (Guri); Dobbin, G. (Gwendolyn); Lemke, H.M. (H. Michael); Curry, H. (Hamish); H. Boxma (Han); Gissel, H. (Hannah); Kreder, H. (Hans); Kuiken, H. (Hans); H.L.F. Brom; Pape, H.-C. (Hans-Christoph); H.M. van der Vis (Harm); Bedi, H. (Harvinder); Vallier, H.A. (Heather A.); Brien, H. (Heather); Silva, H. (Heather); Newman, H. (Heike); H. Viveiros (Helena); van der Hoeven, H. (Henk); Ahn, H. (Henry); Johal, H. (Herman); H. Rijna; Stockmann, H. (Heyn); Josaputra, H.A. (Hong A.); Carlisle, H. (Hope); van der Brand, I. (Igor); I. Dawson (Imro); Tarkin, I. (Ivan); Wong, I. (Ivan); Parr, J.A. (J. Andrew); Trenholm, J.A. (J. Andrew); J.C. Goslings (Carel); Amirault, J.D. (J. David); Broderick, J.S. (J. Scott); Snellen, J.P. (Jaap P.); Zijl, J.A.C. (Jacco A.C.); Ahn, J. (Jaimo); Ficke, J. (James); Irrgang, J. (James); Powell, J. (James); Ringler, J.R. (James R.); Shaer, J. (James); Monica, J.T. (James T.); J. Biert (Jan); Bosma, J. (Jan); Brattgjerd, J.E. (Jan Egil); J.P.M. Frölke (Jan Paul); J.C. Wille (Jan); Rajakumar, J. (Janakiraman); Walker, J.E. (Jane E.); Baker, J.K. (Janell K.); Ertl, J.P. (Janos P.); de Vries, J.P.P.M. (Jean Paul P.M.); Gardeniers, J.W.M. (Jean W.M.); May, J. (Jedediah); Yach, J. (Jeff); Hidy, J.T. (Jennifer T.); Westberg, J.R. (Jerald R.); Hall, J.A. (Jeremy A.); van Mulken, J. (Jeroen); McBeth, J.C. (Jessica Cooper); Hoogendoorn, J. (Jochem); Hoffman, J.M. (Jodi M.); Cherian, J.J. (Joe Joseph); Tanksley, J.A. (John A.); Clarke-Jenssen, J. (John); Adams, J.D. (John D.); Esterhai, J. (John); Tilzey, J.F. (John F.); Murnaghan, J. (John); Ketz, J.P. (John P.); Garfi, J.S. (John S.); Schwappach, J. (John); Gorczyca, J.T. (John T.); Wyrick, J. (John); Rydinge, J. (Jonas); Foret, J.L. (Jonathan L.); Gross, J.M. (Jonathan M.); Keeve, J.P. (Jonathan P.); Meijer, J. (Joost); J.J. Scheepers (Joris J.); Baele, J. (Joseph); O'Neil, J. (Joseph); Cass, J.R. (Joseph R.); Hsu, J.R. (Joseph R.); Dumais, J. (Jules); Lee, J. (Julia); Switzer, J.A. (Julie A.); Agel, J. (Julie); Richards, J.E. (Justin E.); Langan, J.W. (Justin W.); Turckan, K. (Kahn); Pecorella, K. (Kaili); Rai, K. (Kamal); Aurang, K. (Kamran); Shively, K. (Karl); K.J.P. van Wessem; Moon, K. (Karyn); Eke, K. (Kate); Erwin, K. (Katie); Milner, K. (Katrine); K.J. Ponsen (Kees-jan); Mills, K. (Kelli); Apostle, K. (Kelly); Johnston, K. (Kelly); Trask, K. (Kelly); Strohecker, K. (Kent); Stringfellow, K. (Kenya); Kruse, K.K. (Kevin K.); Tetsworth, K. (Kevin); Mitchell, K. (Khalis); Browner, K. (Kieran); Hemlock, K. (Kim); Carcary, K. (Kimberly); Jørgen Haug, K. (Knut); Noble, K. (Krista); Robbins, K. (Kristin); Payton, K. (Krystal); Jeray, K.J. (Kyle J.); Rubino, L.J. (L. Joseph); Nastoff, L.A. (Lauren A.); Leffler, L.C. (Lauren C.); L.P. Stassen (Laurents); O'Malley, L.K. (Lawrence K.); Specht, L.M. (Lawrence M.); L. Thabane (Lehana); Geeraedts, L.M.G. (Leo M.G.); Shell, L.E. (Leslie E.); Anderson, L.K. (Linda K.); Eickhoff, L.S. (Linda S.); Lyle, L. (Lindsey); Pilling, L. (Lindsey); Buckingham, L. (Lisa); Cannada, L.K. (Lisa K.); Wild, L.M. (Lisa M.); Dulaney-Cripe, L. (Liz); L.M.S.J. Poelhekke; Govaert, L. (Lonneke); Ton, L. (Lu); Kottam, L. (Lucksy); L.P.H. Leenen (Luke); Clipper, L. (Lydia); Jackson, L.T. (Lyle T.); Hampton, L. (Lynne); de Waal Malefijt, M.C. (Maarten C.); M.P. Simons; M. van der Elst (Maarten); M.W.G.A. Bronkhorst (Maarten); Bhatia, M. (Mahesh); M.F. Swiontkowski (Marc ); Lobo, M.J. (Margaret J.); Swinton, M. (Marilyn); Pirpiris, M. (Marinis); Molund, M. (Marius); Gichuru, M. (Mark); Glazebrook, M. (Mark); Harrison, M. (Mark); Jenkins, M. (Mark); MacLeod, M. (Mark); M.R. de Vries (Mark); Butler, M.S. (Mark S.); Nousiainen, M. (Markku); van ‘t Riet, M. (Martijne); Tynan, M.C. (Martin C.); Campo, M. (Martin); M.G. Eversdijk (Martin); M.J. Heetveld (Martin); Richardson, M. (Martin); Breslin, M. (Mary); Fan, M. (Mary); Edison, M. (Matt); Napierala, M. (Matthew); Knobe, M. (Matthias); Russ, M. (Matthias); Zomar, M. (Mauri); de Brauw, M. (Maurits); Esser, M. (Max); Hurley, M. (Meghan); Peters, M.E. (Melissa E.); Lorenzo, M. (Melissa); Li, M. (Mengnai); Archdeacon, M. (Michael); Biddulph, M. (Michael); Charlton, M. (Michael); McDonald, M.D. (Michael D.); McKee, M.D. (Michael D.); Dunbar, M. (Michael); Torchia, M.E. (Michael E.); Gross, M. (Michael); Hewitt, M. (Michael); Holt, M. (Michael); Prayson, M.J. (Michael J.); M.J.R. Edwards (Michael); Beckish, M.L. (Michael L.); Brennan, M.L. (Michael L.); Dohm, M.P. (Michael P.); Kain, M.S.H. (Michael S.H.); Vogt, M. (Michelle); Yu, M. (Michelle); M.H.J. Verhofstad (Michiel); Segers, M.J.M. (Michiel J.M.); M.J.M. Segers (Michiel); Siroen, M.P.C. (Michiel P.C.); M.R. Reed (Mike); Vicente, M.R. (Milena R.); M.M.M. Bruijninckx (Milko); Trivedi, M. (Mittal); M. Bhandari (Mohit); Moore, M.M. (Molly M.); Kunz, M. (Monica); Smedsrud, M. (Morten); Palla, N. (Naveen); Jain, N. (Neeraj); Out, N.J.M. (Nico J.M.); Simunovic, N. (Nicole); Simunovic, N. (Nicole); N.W.L. Schep (Niels); Müller, O. (Oliver); Guicherit, O.R. (Onno R.); O.J.F. van Waes (Oscar); Wang, O. (Otis); P. Doornebosch (Pascal); Seuffert, P. (Patricia); Hesketh, P.J. (Patrick J.); Weinrauch, P. (Patrick); Duffy, P. (Paul); Keller, P. (Paul); Lafferty, P.M. (Paul M.); Pincus, P. (Paul); P. Tornetta III (Paul); Zalzal, P. (Paul); McKay, P. (Paula); Cole, P.A. (Peter A.); de Rooij, P.D. (Peter D.); Hull, P. (Peter); Go, P.M.N.Y.M. (Peter M.N.Y.M.); P. Patka (Peter); Siska, P. (Peter); Weingarten, P. (Peter); Kregor, P. (Philip); Stahel, P. (Philip); Stull, P. (Philip); P. Wittich (Philippe); P.A.R. Rijcke (Piet); P.P. Oprel (Pim); Devereaux, P.J. (P. J.); Zhou, Q. (Qi); Lee Murphy, R. (R.); Alosky, R. (Rachel); Clarkson, R. (Rachel); Moon, R. (Raely); Logishetty, R. (Rajanikanth); Nanda, R. (Rajesh); Sullivan, R.J. (Raymond J.); Snider, R.G. (Rebecca G.); Buckley, R.E. (Richard E.); Iorio, R. (Richard); Farrugia, R.J. (Richard J); Jenkinson, R. (Richard); Laughlin, R. (Richard); R.P.R. Groenendijk (Richard); Gurich, R.W. (Richard W.); Worman, R. (Ripley); Silvis, R. (Rob); R. Haverlag (Robert); Teasdall, R.J. (Robert J.); Korley, R. (Robert); McCormack, R. (Robert); Probe, R. (Robert); Cantu, R.V. (Robert V.); Huff, R.B. (Roger B.); R.K.J. Simmermacher; Peters, R. (Rolf); Pfeifer, R. (Roman); Liem, R. (Ronald); Wessel, R.N. (Ronald N.); Verhagen, R. (Ronald); Vuylsteke, R. (Ronald); Leighton, R. (Ross); McKercher, R. (Ross); R.W. Poolman (Rudolf); Miller, R. (Russell); Bicknell, R. (Ryan); Finnan, R. (Ryan); Khan, R.M. (Ryan M.); Mehta, S. (Samir); Vang, S. (Sandy); Singh, S. (Sanjay); Anand, S. (Sanjeev); Anderson, S.A. (Sarah A.); Dawson, S.A. (Sarah A.); Marston, S.B. (Scott B.); Porter, S.E. (Scott E.); Watson, S.T. (Scott T.); S. Festen; Lieberman, S. (Shane); Puloski, S. (Shannon); Bielby, S.A. (Shea A.); Sprague, S. (Sheila); Hess, S. (Shelley); MacDonald, S. (Shelley); Evans, S. (Simone); Bzovsky, S. (Sofia); Hasselund, S. (Sondre); Lewis, S. (Sophie); Ugland, S. (Stein); Caminiti, S. (Stephanie); Tanner, S.L. (Stephanie L.); S.M. Zielinski (Stephanie); Shepard, S. (Stephanie); Sems, S.A. (Stephen A.); Walter, S.D. (Stephen D.); Doig, S. (Stephen); Finley, S.H. (Stephen H.); Kates, S. (Stephen); Lindenbaum, S. (Stephen); Kingwell, S.P. (Stephen P.); Csongvay, S. (Steve); Papp, S. (Steve); Buijk, S.E. (Steven E.); S. Rhemrev (Steven); Hollenbeck, S.M. (Steven M.); van Gaalen, S.M. (Steven M.); Yang, S. (Steven); Weinerman, S. (Stuart); Subash, (); Lambert, S. (Sue); Liew, S. (Susan); S.A.G. Meylaerts (Sven); Blokhuis, T.J. (Taco J.); de Vries Reilingh, T.S. (Tammo S.); Lona, T. (Tarjei); Scott, T. (Taryn); Swenson, T.K. (Teresa K.); Endres, T.J. (Terrence J.); Axelrod, T. (Terry); van Egmond, T. (Teun); Pace, T.B. (Thomas B.); Kibsgård, T. (Thomas); Schaller, T.M. (Thomas M.); Ly, T.V. (Thuan V.); Miller, T.J. (Timothy J.); Weber, T. (Timothy); Le, T. (Toan); Oliver, T.M. (Todd M.); T.M. Karsten (Thomas); Borch, T. (Tor); Hoseth, T.M. (Tor Magne); Nicolaisen, T. (Tor); Ianssen, T. (Torben); Rutherford, T. (Tori); Nanney, T. (Tracy); Gervais, T. (Trevor); Stone, T. (Trevor); Schrickel, T. (Tyson); Scrabeck, T. (Tyson); Ganguly, U. (Utsav); Naumetz, V. (V.); Frizzell, V. (Valda); Wadey, V. (Veronica); Jones, V. (Vicki); Avram, V. (Victoria); Mishra, V. (Vimlesh); Yadav, V. (Vineet); Arora, V. (Vinod); Tyagi, V. (Vivek); Borsella, V. (Vivian); W.J. Willems (Jaap); Hoffman, W.H. (W. H.); Gofton, W.T. (Wade T.); Lackey, W.G. (Wesley G.); Ghent, W. (Wesley); Obremskey, W. (William); Oxner, W. (William); Cross, W.W. (William W.); Murtha, Y.M. (Yvonne M.); Murdoch, Z. (Zoe)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground Reoperation rates are high after surgery for hip fractures. We investigated the effect of a sliding hip screw versus cancellous screws on the risk of reoperation and other key outcomes. Methods For this international, multicentre, allocation concealed randomised controlled

  7. Fracture fixation in the operative management of hip fractures (FAITH) : an international, multicentre, randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nauth, Aaron; Creek, Aaron T.; Zellar, Abby; Lawendy, Abdel Rahman; Dowrick, Adam; Gupta, Ajay; Dadi, Akhil; van Kampen, Albert; Yee, Albert; de Vries, Alexander C.; de Mol van Otterloo, Alexander; Garibaldi, Alisha; Liew, Allen; McIntyre, Allison W.; Prasad, Amal Shankar; Romero, Amanda W.; Rangan, Amar; Oatt, Amber; Sanghavi, Amir; Foley, Amy L.; Karlsten, Anders; Dolenc, Andrea; Bucknill, Andrew; Chia, Andrew; Evans, Andrew; Gong, Andrew; Schmidt, Andrew H.; Marcantonio, Andrew J.; Jennings, Andrew; Ward, Angela; Khanna, Angshuman; Rai, Anil; Smits, Anke B; Horan, Annamarie D.; Brekke, Anne Christine; Flynn, Annette; Duraikannan, Aravin; Stødle, Are; van Vugt, Arie B.; Luther, Arlene; Zurcher, Arthur W.; Jain, Arvind; Amundsen, Asgeir; Moaveni, Ash; Carr, Ashley; Sharma, Ateet; Hill, Austin D.; Trommer, Axel; Rai, B. Sachidananda; Hileman, Barbara; Schreurs, Bart; Verhoeven, Bart A N; Barden, Benjamin B.; Flatøy, Bernhard; Cleffken, Berry I.; Bøe, Berthe; Perey, Bertrand; Hanusch, Birgit C.; Weening, Brad; Fioole, Bram; Rijbroek, Bram; Crist, Brett D.; Halliday, Brett; Peterson, Brett; Mullis, Brian; Richardson, C. Glen; Clark, Callum; Sagebien, Carlos A.; van der Pol, Carmen C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/41397006X; Bowler, Carol; Humphrey, Catherine A.; Coady, Catherine; Koppert, Cees L.; Coles, Chad; Tannoury, Chadi; DePaolo, Charles J.; Gayton, Chris; Herriott, Chris; Reeves, Christina; Tieszer, Christina; Dobb, Christine; Anderson, Christopher G.; Sage, Claire; Cuento, Claudine; Jones, Clifford B.; Bosman, Coks H.R.; Linehan, Colleen; van der Hart, Cor P.; Henderson, Corey; Lewis, Courtland G.; Davis, Craig A.; Donohue, Craig; Mauffrey, Cyril; Sundaresh, D. C.; Farrell, Dana J.; Whelan, Daniel B.; Horwitz, Daniel; Stinner, Daniel; Viskontas, Darius; Roffey, Darren M.; Alexander, David; Karges, David E.; Hak, David; Johnston, David; Love, David; Wright, David M.; Zamorano, David P.; Goetz, David R.; Sanders, David; Stephen, David; Yen, David; Bardana, Davide; Olakkengil, Davy J.; Lawson, Deanna; Maddock, Deborah; Sietsema, Debra L.; Pourmand, Deeba; Den Hartog, Dennis; Donegan, Derek; Heels-Ansdell, Diane; Nam, Diane; Inman, Dominic; Boyer, Dory; Li, Doug; Gibula, Douglas; Price, Dustin M.; Watson, Dylan J.; Hammerberg, E. Mark; Tan, Edward C T H; de Graaf, Eelco J.R.; Vesterhus, Elise Berg; Roper, Elizabeth; Edwards, Elton; Schemitsch, Emil H.; Hammacher, Eric R.; Henderson, Eric R.; Whatley, Erica; Torres, Erick T.; Vermeulen, Erik G.J.; Finn, Erin; Van Lieshout, Esther M M; Wai, Eugene K.; Bannister, Evan R.; Kile, Evelyn; Theunissen, Evert B.M.; Ritchie, Ewan D.; Khan, Farah; Moola, Farhad; Howells, Fiona; de Nies, Frank; van der Heijden, Frank H.W.M.; de Meulemeester, Frank R.A.J.; Frihagen, Frede; Nilsen, Fredrik; Schmidt, G. Ben; Albers, G. H.Robert; Gudger, Garland K.; Johnson, Garth; Gruen, Gary; Zohman, Gary; Sharma, Gaurav; Wood, Gavin; Tetteroo, Geert W.M.; Hjorthaug, Geir; Jomaas, Geir; Donald, Geoff; Rieser, Geoffrey Ryan; Reardon, Gerald; Slobogean, Gerard P.; Roukema, Gert R.; Visser, Gijs A.; Moatshe, Gilbert; Horner, Gillian; Rose, Glynis; Guyatt, Gordon; Chuter, Graham; Etherington, Greg; Rocca, Gregory J.Della; Ekås, Guri; Dobbin, Gwendolyn; Lemke, H. Michael; Curry, Hamish; Boxma, Han; Gissel, Hannah; Kreder, Hans; Kuiken, Hans; Brom, Hans L.F.; Pape, Hans Christoph; van der Vis, Harm M.; Bedi, Harvinder; Vallier, Heather A.; Brien, Heather; Silva, Heather; Newman, Heike; Viveiros, Helena; van der Hoeven, Henk; Ahn, Henry; Johal, Herman; Rijna, Herman; Stockmann, Heyn; Josaputra, Hong A.; Carlisle, Hope; van der Brand, Igor; Dawson, Imro; Tarkin, Ivan; Wong, Ivan; Parr, J. Andrew; Trenholm, J. Andrew; Goslings, J Carel; Amirault, J. David; Broderick, J. Scott; Snellen, Jaap P.; Zijl, Jacco A.C.; Ahn, Jaimo; Ficke, James; Irrgang, James; Powell, James; Ringler, James R.; Shaer, James; Monica, James T.; Biert, Jan; Bosma, Jan; Brattgjerd, Jan Egil; Frölke, Jan Paul M.; Wille, Jan; Rajakumar, Janakiraman; Walker, Jane E.; Baker, Janell K.; Ertl, Janos P.; De Vries, Jean-Paul P. M.; Gardeniers, Jean W.M.; May, Jedediah; Yach, Jeff; Hidy, Jennifer T.; Westberg, Jerald R.; Hall, Jeremy A.; van Mulken, Jeroen; McBeth, Jessica Cooper; Hoogendoorn, Jochem M; Hoffman, Jodi M.; Cherian, Joe Joseph; Tanksley, John A.; Clarke-Jenssen, John; Adams, John D.; Esterhai, John; Tilzey, John F.; Murnaghan, John; Ketz, John P.; Garfi, John S.; Schwappach, John; Gorczyca, John T.; Wyrick, John; Rydinge, Jonas; Foret, Jonathan L.; Gross, Jonathan M.; Keeve, Jonathan P.; Meijer, Joost; Scheepers, Joris J.G.; Baele, Joseph; O'Neil, Joseph; Cass, Joseph R.; Hsu, Joseph R.; Dumais, Jules; Lee, Julia; Switzer, Julie A.; Agel, Julie; Richards, Justin E.; Langan, Justin W.; Turckan, Kahn; Pecorella, Kaili; Rai, Kamal; Aurang, Kamran; Shively, Karl; van Wessem, Karlijn|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/337932077; Moon, Karyn; Eke, Kate; Erwin, Katie; Milner, Katrine; Ponsen, Kees Jan; Mills, Kelli; Apostle, Kelly; Johnston, Kelly; Trask, Kelly; Strohecker, Kent; Stringfellow, Kenya; Kruse, Kevin K.; Tetsworth, Kevin; Mitchell, Khalis; Browner, Kieran; Hemlock, Kim; Carcary, Kimberly; Jørgen Haug, Knut; Noble, Krista; Robbins, Kristin; Payton, Krystal; Jeray, Kyle J.; Rubino, L. Joseph; Nastoff, Lauren A.; Leffler, Lauren C.; Stassen, Laurents P.S.; O'Malley, Lawrence K.; Specht, Lawrence M.; Thabane, Lehana; Geeraedts, Leo M.G.; Shell, Leslie E.; Anderson, Linda K.; Eickhoff, Linda S.; Lyle, Lindsey; Pilling, Lindsey; Buckingham, Lisa; Cannada, Lisa K.; Wild, Lisa M.; Dulaney-Cripe, Liz; Poelhekke, Lodewijk M.S.J.; Govaert, Lonneke; Ton, Lu; Kottam, Lucksy; Leenen, Luke P.H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/071390596; Clipper, Lydia; Jackson, Lyle T.; Hampton, Lynne; de Waal Malefijt, Maarten C.; Simons, Maarten P.; van der Elst, Maarten; Bronkhorst, Maarten W.G.A.; Bhatia, Mahesh; Swiontkowski, Marc; Lobo, Margaret J.; Swinton, Marilyn; Pirpiris, Marinis; Molund, Marius; Gichuru, Mark; Glazebrook, Mark; Harrison, Mark; Jenkins, Mark; MacLeod, Mark; de Vries, Mark R.; Butler, Mark S.; Nousiainen, Markku; van ‘t Riet, Martijne; Tynan, Martin C.; Campo, Martin; Eversdijk, Martin G.; Heetveld, Martin J.; Richardson, Martin; Breslin, Mary; Fan, Mary; Edison, Matt; Napierala, Matthew; Knobe, Matthias; Russ, Matthias; Zomar, Mauri; de Brauw, Maurits; Esser, Max; Hurley, Meghan; Peters, Melissa E.; Lorenzo, Melissa; Li, Mengnai; Archdeacon, Michael; Biddulph, Michael; Charlton, Michael R; McDonald, Michael D.; McKee, Michael D.; Dunbar, Michael; Torchia, Michael E.; Gross, Michael; Hewitt, Michael; Holt, Michael; Prayson, Michael J.; Edwards, Michael J R; Beckish, Michael L.; Brennan, Michael L.; Dohm, Michael P.; Kain, Michael S.H.; Vogt, Michelle; Yu, Michelle; Verhofstad, Michiel H J; Segers, Michiel J M; Segers, Michiel J M; Siroen, Michiel P.C.; Reed, Mike; Vicente, Milena R.; Bruijninckx, Milko M.M.; Trivedi, Mittal; Bhandari, Mohit; Moore, Molly M.; Kunz, Monica; Smedsrud, Morten; Palla, Naveen; Jain, Neeraj; Out, Nico J.M.; Simunovic, Nicole; Simunovic, Nicole; Schep, Niels W. L.; Müller, Oliver; Guicherit, Onno R.; Van Waes, Oscar J.F.; Wang, Otis; Doornebosch, Pascal G.; Seuffert, Patricia; Hesketh, Patrick J.; Weinrauch, Patrick; Duffy, Paul; Keller, Paul; Lafferty, Paul M.; Pincus, Paul; Tornetta, Paul; Zalzal, Paul; McKay, Paula; Cole, Peter A.; de Rooij, Peter D.; Hull, Peter; Go, Peter M.N.Y.M.; Patka, Peter; Siska, Peter; Weingarten, Peter; Kregor, Philip; Stahel, Philip; Stull, Philip; Wittich, Philippe; de Rijcke, Piet A.R.; Oprel, Pim; Devereaux, P. J.; Zhou, Qi; Lee Murphy, R.; Alosky, Rachel; Clarkson, Rachel; Moon, Raely; Logishetty, Rajanikanth; Nanda, Rajesh; Sullivan, Raymond J.; Snider, Rebecca G.; Buckley, Richard E.; Iorio, Richard; Farrugia, Richard J.; Jenkinson, Richard; Laughlin, Richard; Groenendijk, Richard P R; Gurich, Richard W.; Worman, Ripley; Silvis, Rob; Haverlag, Robert; Teasdall, Robert J.; Korley, Robert; McCormack, Robert; Probe, Robert; Cantu, Robert V.; Huff, Roger B.; Simmermacher, Rogier K J; Peters, Rolf; Pfeifer, Roman; Liem, Ronald; Wessel, Ronald N.; Verhagen, Ronald; Vuylsteke, Ronald J C L M; Leighton, Ross; McKercher, Ross; Poolman, Rudolf W; Miller, Russell; Bicknell, Ryan; Finnan, Ryan; Khan, Ryan M.; Mehta, Samir; Vang, Sandy; Singh, Sanjay; Anand, Sanjeev; Anderson, Sarah A.; Dawson, Sarah A.; Marston, Scott B.; Porter, Scott E.; Watson, Scott T.; Festen, Sebastiaan; Lieberman, Shane; Puloski, Shannon; Bielby, Shea A.; Sprague, Sheila; Hess, Shelley; MacDonald, Shelley; Evans, Simone; Bzovsky, Sofia; Hasselund, Sondre; Lewis, Sophie; Ugland, Stein; Caminiti, Stephanie; Tanner, Stephanie L.; Zielinski, Stephanie M.; Shepard, Stephanie; Sems, Stephen A.; Walter, Stephen D.; Doig, Stephen; Finley, Stephen H.; Kates, Stephen; Lindenbaum, Stephen; Kingwell, Stephen P.; Csongvay, Steve; Papp, Steve; Buijk, Steven E.; Rhemrev, Steven J.; Hollenbeck, Steven M.; van Gaalen, Steven M.; Yang, Steven; Weinerman, Stuart; Lambert, Sue; Liew, Susan; Meylaerts, Sven A.G.; Blokhuis, Taco J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/231997841; de Vries Reilingh, Tammo S.; Lona, Tarjei; Scott, Taryn; Swenson, Teresa K.; Endres, Terrence J.; Axelrod, Terry; van Egmond, Teun; Pace, Thomas B.; Kibsgård, Thomas; Schaller, Thomas M.; Ly, Thuan V.; Miller, Timothy J.; Weber, Timothy; Le, Toan; Oliver, Todd M.; Karsten, Tom M.; Borch, Tor; Hoseth, Tor Magne; Nicolaisen, Tor; Ianssen, Torben; Rutherford, Tori; Nanney, Tracy; Gervais, Trevor; Stone, Trevor; Schrickel, Tyson; Scrabeck, Tyson; Ganguly, Utsav; Naumetz, V.; Frizzell, Valda; Wadey, Veronica; Jones, Vicki; Avram, Victoria; Mishra, Vimlesh; Yadav, Vineet; Arora, Vinod; Tyagi, Vivek; Borsella, Vivian; Willems, W. Jaap; Hoffman, W. H.; Gofton, Wade T.; Lackey, Wesley G.; Ghent, Wesley; Obremskey, William; Oxner, William; Cross, William W.; Murtha, Yvonne M.; Murdoch, Zoe

    2017-01-01

    Background Reoperation rates are high after surgery for hip fractures. We investigated the effect of a sliding hip screw versus cancellous screws on the risk of reoperation and other key outcomes. Methods For this international, multicentre, allocation concealed randomised controlled trial, we

  8. Immediate results of treatment periprosthetic femoral fractures after hip replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Khominets

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Periprosthetic fractures are one of the most serious complications after hip replacement. Nineteen periprosthetic femoral fractures operated on during the period 2011-2015 were followed-up retrospectively. Periprosthetic fractures were classified according to the Vancouver classification. The functional results were evaluated using Harrison scale. Bone healing and implant stability were evaluated clinically, on plain radiographs and computed tomography. The periprosthetic fractures in all patients occurred in the postoperative period. Time from operation until fracture varied from 2 weeks to 11 years. A wedge-shaped cemented or cementless stems were implanted during the first surgery: Versys ET, Spotorno, CPT (Zimmer, США: cementless fixation was performed in 16 (84,2% patients, hybrid -in 2 (10,5% and cemented fixation - in 1 (5,3% patient. The fractures of greater trochanter were diagnosed in all patients with type A periprosthetic fractures. In type B1 periprosthetic fracture (8 patients open reduction, cerclage wiring and internal plate osteosynthesis were applied. Loosening stems in 3 patients with type B2 fractures were replaced with Wagner cementless revision component (Wagner SL Revision Stem. Angle-stable plate osteosynthesis and cerclage wiring were also performed. Closed reduction and internal minimal invasive plate osteosynthesis were performed in patients with type C periprosthetic fractures. Bone consolidation was achieved in 18 (94,7% patients, the average term was 14,3±5,2 weeks. The average Harris hip score in all patients 3 months after treatment was 64,9±16,7 points, and in 12 patients (63,2% after a year - 86,5±15,9. Femoral periprosthetic fractures require a specialized approach to choosing the treatment tactic depending on the fracture type and quality of bone tissue. It is necessary to evaluate the femoral component stability, especially in differential diagnosis of type B1 and B2 periprosthetic fractures. Computed

  9. Elderly with proximal hip fracture present significantly lower levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Teodoro Ezequiel Guerra

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To compare serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D levels, a serum marker of vitamin D3, between patients with and without proximal hip fracture. METHODS: This was a case-control study in which serum samples of 25(OHD were obtained from 110 proximal hip fracture inpatients and 231 control patients without fractures, all over 60 years of age. Levels of 25(OHD lower than or equal to 20 ng/mL were considered deficient; from 21 ng/mL to 29 ng/mL, insufficient; and above 30 ng/mL, sufficient. Sex, age, and ethnicity were considered for association with the study groups and 25(OHD levels. RESULTS: Patients with proximal hip fracture had significantly lower serum 25(OHD levels (21.07 ng/mL than controls (28.59 ng/mL; p = 0.000. Among patients with proximal hip fracture, 54.5% had deficient 25(OHD levels, 27.2% had insufficient levels, and only 18.2% had sufficient levels. In the control group, 30.3% of patients had deficient 25(OHD levels, 30.7% had insufficient levels, and 38.9% had sufficient levels. Female patients had decreased serum 25(OHD levels both in the fracture group and in the control group (19.50 ng/mL vs. 26.94 ng/mL; p = 0.000 when compared with male patients with and without fracture (25.67 ng/mL vs. 33.74 ng/mL; p = 0.017. Regarding age, there was a significant association between 25(OHD levels and risk of fracture only for the age groups 71-75 years and above 80 years. CONCLUSION: Patients with proximal hip fracture had significantly decreased serum 25(OHD levels when compared with the control group. Female patients had significantly lower serum 25(OHD levels in both groups.

  10. sign hip construct: achieving hip fracture fixation without using

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Africa, and Latin America due to the aging population and the increasing prevalence of osteoporosis in these countries (2). Intertrochanteric fractures are defined as .... patients, inability to obtain transport (n=9) and death due to unrelated cause (n=3) were the reasons cited for missing the follow-up clinics. The remaining.

  11. Zoledronic Acid in Reducing Clinical Fracture and Mortality after Hip Fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyles, Kenneth W; Colón-Emeric, Cathleen S; Magaziner, Jay S

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mortality is increased after a hip fracture, and strategies that improve outcomes are needed. METHODS: In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 1065 patients were assigned to receive yearly intravenous zoledronic acid (at a dose of 5 mg), and 1062 patients were...... assigned to receive placebo. The infusions were first administered within 90 days after surgical repair of a hip fracture. All patients received supplemental vitamin D and calcium. The median follow-up was 1.9 years. The primary end point was a new clinical fracture. RESULTS: The rates of any new clinical...... infusion of zoledronic acid within 90 days after repair of a low-trauma hip fracture was associated with a reduction in the rate of new clinical fractures and improved survival. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00046254.)....

  12. Arthroscopic removal of intraarticular fragments following fracture dislocation of the hip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bagaria Vaibhav

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We report here a case of posterior dislocation of hip with fracture of posterior lip of acetabulum, with retained fracture fragments after a successful closed reduction. The fractured fragments were removed by arthroscopy of the hip. The technique of hip arthroscopy used in removing the fragments is discussed.

  13. An Unusual Variant of Pipkin's Fracture Dislocation of Hip: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jangir, Rajat; Mishra, Diwakar

    2014-01-01

    Injuries of the hip joint from pure hip dislocations to fracture dislocations have been described and classified by various authors. These descriptions do not include fracture dislocation of hip associated with fracture of the greater trochanter. We report an unusual case of fracture dislocation of hip in which posterior dislocation of hip was associated with fracture of acetabulum, femoral head, femoral neck, greater trochanter and ipsilateral shaft of tibia. The fracture dislocation was managed with open reduction and internal fixation. Such fracture dislocation has not been reported in literature to the best of our knowledge. We believe that fracture dislocations associate with fractures of greater trochanter should be included in current classification systems of fracture dislocations of hip.

  14. Impact of the Holocaust on the Rehabilitation Outcome of Older Patients Sustaining a Hip Fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizrahi, Eliyahu H; Lubart, Emilia; Heymann, Anthony; Leibovitz, Arthur

    2017-04-01

    Holocaust survivors report a much higher prevalence of osteoporosis and