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Sample records for hila gene fusion

  1. Detection of Salmonella spp. survival and virulence in poultry feed by targeting the hilA gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, S H; Jarquin, R; Hanning, I; Almeida, G; Ricke, S C

    2011-08-01

    The objectives of this work were to evaluate immunomagnetic beads and a reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR method for the detection of Salmonella inoculated into feed. In addition, a reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR method was evaluated for quantifying virulence gene hilA expression of Salmonella ssp. in poultry feed matrices and utilized to determine the influence of poultry feed environmental factors on Salmonella hilA expression. An immunomagnetic separation technique was evaluated for increased recovery of Salmonella from feed. Salmonella cultures were inoculated into feed samples and exposed to heat treatments of 70°C and sampled periodically. From these samples, RNA was collected and hilA gene expression was measured relative to the housekeeping 16S rRNA gene. The immunomagnetic bead protocol increased recovery by 1 log. The up-regulation of hilA was demonstrated after 5 and 10 min of inoculated feed samples being exposed to heat treatment. From this work, the data indicate that the ability to detect live Salmonella cells in feed samples may be increased by targeting the hilA gene. Foodborne salmonellosis originating from poultry is a major problem, and feed is a leading source of contamination in poultry, but detection in feed is complicated by low concentrations. The assays and experiments in this study examine possible improvements to recovery and detection of Salmonella in feed. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2011 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  2. DNA-Based diagnostic tests for Salmonella strains targeting hilA, agfA, spvC and sef Genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craciunafl, C.; Keul, A. L.; Flonta, M.; Cristea, M.

    2009-07-01

    Salmoneleae are invasive enteropathogens of humans and animals. During the past decade, a dramatic increase in the occurrence of Salmonella spp infections was principally responsible for the rise of food-borne salmonellosis. The goal of this study was to evaluate the suitability of the, hilA, agfA, spvC, sef, gene amplification by PCR as a specific method for detection of Salmonella strains. (Author)

  3. Validation of DNA and RNA real-time assays for food analysis using the hilA gene of Salmonella enterica serovars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Evonne M; Burgess, Catherine M; Walsh, Des; O'Regan, Edel; McGuinness, Sheila; Barry, Thomas; Fanning, Séamus; Duffy, Geraldine

    2011-01-01

    In Europe, alternative methods for the detection of food-borne pathogens can be used instead of the standard ISO/CEN reference protocol, if validated according to the protocol outlined in ISO 16140, 2003. In this study, the performance of two novel methods for the detection of Salmonella sp. using real-time PCR technology in tandem with an adapted two-step enrichment protocol were assessed and validated against a reference culture method, ISO 6579, 2004. The DNA and RNA real-time PCR assays amplified a 270 bp region of the hilA gene of Salmonella enterica serovars, and incorporated an internal amplification control (IAC) which was co-amplified with the hilA gene to monitor potential PCR inhibitors and ensure successful amplification. The inclusivity and exclusivity of the hilA primer set was examined for both the DNA and RNA methods and detected the 30 S. enterica serovars but not the 30 non-salmonellae strains. The inoculation of meat carcass swabs with five different S. enterica serovars at five different inocula, indicated both PCR methods were able to detect between 1 and 10 CFU per carcass swab. The real-time DNA PCR assay performed as well as the traditional cultural method in detecting Salmonella sp. in artificially contaminated salad, chocolate, fish and cheese samples. The relative accuracy, relative sensitivity and relative specificity of the DNA PCR real-time method were determined to be 98.5, 98.1 and 100%, respectively. The DNA method was further validated in a collaborative inter-laboratory trial according to ISO 16140, 2003. The validated methods provide an accurate means for the rapid detection and tracking of S. enterica serovars giving equivalent results to the standard method within three days, thus providing an alternative testing method to the reference microbiological method. The real-time PCR methodology not only offers significant time-saving advantages compared to traditional methods, it can also be applied to a wide range of samples types

  4. Development and evaluation of DNA and RNA real-time assays for food analysis using the hilA gene of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Evonne M; Burgess, Catherine M; O'Regan, Edel; McGuinness, Sheila; Barry, Thomas; Fanning, Séamus; Duffy, Geraldine

    2011-05-01

    The objective of this study was the development of DNA and RNA real-time PCR methods for detection of food-borne Salmonella sp. as rapid alternatives to the traditional cultural method (ISO 6579, 2004) in fresh meat carcasses and processed meat samples. These PCR methods were based on the hilA sequence, with primers and hybridisation probes designed against this gene target. The primers and probes were evaluated for their efficiency and dynamic range and subsequently the specificity of the assay was tested using 106 Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica strains and 30 non-salmonellae strains. An internal amplification control (IAC) was also developed for incorporation. The optimum copy number of IAC was determined to be 500 copies per reaction. A complementary enrichment protocol was adapted from the existing standard ISO 6579:2004 and consisted of enrichment in Buffered Peptone Water (BPW) 22 ± 2 h and a second selective enrichment for 6 h in Rappaport Vassiliadis with Soya (RVS). The DNA and RNA-based real-time PCR protocols, were applied to meat samples inoculated with Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica strains, including swabs from meat carcasses and minced beef samples which were heat treated or frozen. The developed methods have the potential as useful alternatives to the standard ISO 6579:2004 method for the detection of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica on carcass swabs and raw meat using hilA as a target. The DNA assay is a useful tool for the screening of meat samples in the abattoir within 3 days of slaughter or in a food production process and the RNA-based assay has the potential to detect viable Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica in ready-to-eat products. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparison Study on Colonization of hilA Mutant and Parent Strains of Salmonella enteritidis in Vertically Infected Broiler Chickens

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    MohammadSadegh Madadi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Salmonella actively stimulates its own uptake into the epithelial cells by inducing cytoskeleton rearrangements and membrane ruffling triggered by some proteins secreted by Salmonella into the cytosol of the epithelial cells via a type III secretion system (TTSS encoded bygenes of the Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1. hilA is a transcriptional activator encoded on Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1 (SPI-1 genes.Methods: To assess the importance of hilA in a simulation modeling of vertical infection and shedding of S. enteritidis in broiler chickens a long-term experiment was designed. Two groups of 200 fertile eggs were inoculated with 20 colony forming units (CFU of hilA mutant of S. enteritidis or its parent strain just prior to incubation. Thirty five birds of each group were housed in separate rooms. On days 2, 4, 7, 14, 21, 28 and 35 of age, cloacal swabs from live birds as well as samples from internal organs (intestinal tract, liver and spleen were evaluated by bacteriological or molecular methods.Results: In most of sampling days colonization and invasion of parent strain S. enteritidis in intestine (especially ceaca and internal organs of chickens were higher with compared to its hilA mutant but this mutant strain could still colonize in intestinal tract and even invade liver or spleen.Conclusion: Colonization of hilA mutant of S. enteritidis indicated that hilA gene is only one part of the modulators in Salmonella invasion mechanism. The ability of hilA mutant to multiply and persist in host internal organs including ceaca may promise further research for potential of hilA mutant to prevent the initial colonization of the intestinal tract by a virulent S. enteritidis strain

  6. Comparative Colonization of HilA and Parent Strains of Salmonella enteritidis in Fertile Eggs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Sadegh Madadi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background:  Young chickens are more susceptible to Salmonella colonization than older ones that have developed resistance with age as native microflora become established.Methods:  In this study, two groups of fertile eggs were inoculated with 20 CFU of hilA or parent strains of S. enteritidis. Presence and number of Salmonella cells inside the homogenized egg contents were determined on the 2nd, 5th, 8th, 12th, 17th and 21th day of incubation period.Results:   High infectivity rate of Salmonella contamination were observed in the hilA group eggs, three genes for S. enteritidis identification were detected from isolated colonies of both groups of eggs.  The gene hilA was only detected in isolated colonies of the standard group. Conclusion:   These findings indicated that hilA mutant of Salmonella is able to rapidly multiply much higher than wild-type strain but, support more pathogenicity of wild-type strain of Salmonella compared to mutant strain.

  7. Comparative Colonization of hilA and Parent Strains of Salmonella enteritidis in Fertile Eggs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Sadegh Madadi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background:  Young chickens are more susceptible to Salmonella colonization than older ones that have developed resistance with age as native microflora become established. Methods:  In this study, two groups of fertile eggs were inoculated with 20 CFU of hilA or parent strains of S. enteritidis. Presence and number of Salmonella cells inside the homogenized egg contents were determined on the 2nd, 5th, 8th, 12th, 17th and 21th day of incubation period. Results:   High infectivity rate of Salmonella contamination were observed in the hilA group eggs, three genes for S. enteritidis identification were detected from isolated colonies of both groups of eggs.  The gene hilA was only detected in isolated colonies of the standard group. Conclusion:   These findings indicated that hilA mutant of Salmonella is able to rapidly multiply much higher than wild-type strain but, support more pathogenicity of wild-type strain of Salmonella compared to mutant strain.

  8. [Chromosomal rearrangements and fusion genes in carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massard, Christophe; Auger, Nathalie; Lacroix, Ludovic; Bénard, Jean

    2011-12-01

    In the last decades, rarity of chromosomal rearrangements and fusion genes detected in epithelial cancers in using classical karyotyping led to consider these genomic events as specifically restricted to haematological neoplasia and mesenchymal tumors. Today, gene positioning as well as bio-informatics approaches has enabled identifying in carcinoma various fusion genes subsequent to chromosomal translocations, inversions, or deletions. Thus, gene fusion formation appears as a common mechanism in oncology that concerns most of human cancers, independent of original tissue lineage. At a clinical point of view, applications of fusion genes in terms of diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutics can be envisioned. This review will present current knowledge about fusion genes in common carcinoma (prostate, breast, colon). Following a structural and functional description of various fusion genes so far found in human malignant solid tumors, as well as techniques used for their detection, the review will integrate fusion genes in epithelia oncogenesis general scheme. Finally, promising clinical issues of fusion genes will be surveyed.

  9. DNA fusion gene vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Peter Johannes; Bassi, Maria Rosaria; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    2010-01-01

    DNA vaccines are versatile and safe, but limited immunogenicity has prevented their use in the clinical setting. Experimentally, immunogenicity may be enhanced by the use of new delivery technologies, by coadministration of cytokines and pathogen-associated molecular patterns, or by fusion...... of antigens into molecular domains that enhance antigen presentation. More specifically, the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines may benefit from increased protein synthesis, increased T-cell help and MHC class I presentation, and the addition of a range of specific cytokines and pathogen-associated molecular...... patterns that increase activation of the innate immune system. Importantly, viral-vectored vaccines that act through the induction of one or more of these factors also may benefit from cytokine coadministration and increased antigen presentation. In order to increase immunogenicity to the level achieved...

  10. Characterization of fusion genes and the significantly expressed fusion isoforms in breast cancer by hybrid sequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Weirather, Jason L.; Afshar, Pegah Tootoonchi; Clark, Tyson A.; Tseng, Elizabeth; Powers, Linda S.; Underwood, Jason G.; Zabner, Joseph; Korlach, Jonas; Wong, Wing Hung; Au, Kin Fai

    2015-01-01

    We developed an innovative hybrid sequencing approach, IDP-fusion, to detect fusion genes, determine fusion sites and identify and quantify fusion isoforms. IDP-fusion is the first method to study gene fusion events by integrating Third Generation Sequencing long reads and Second Generation Sequencing short reads. We applied IDP-fusion to PacBio data and Illumina data from the MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Compared with the existing tools, IDP-fusion detects fusion genes at higher precision and ...

  11. Expression of hilA in response to mild acid stress in Salmonella enterica is serovar and strain dependent.

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    González-Gil, Francisco; Le Bolloch, Alexandre; Pendleton, Sean; Zhang, Nan; Wallis, Audra; Hanning, Irene

    2012-05-01

    Salmonella enterica is the leading cause of foodborne illness with poultry and poultry products being primary sources of infection. The 2 most common S. enterica serovars associated with human infection are Typhimurium and Enteritidis. However, Kentucky and Heidelburg and the 2 most prevalent serovars isolated from poultry environments. Given the prevalence of other serovars in poultry products and environments, research is needed to understand virulence modulation in response to stress in serovars other than Typhimurium and Enteritidis. Thus, the objective of this research was to compare hilA gene expression (a master regulator of the virulence pathogenicity island) in response to acid stress among different strains and serovars of Salmonella. A total of 11 serovars consisting of 15 strains of S. enterica were utilized for these experiments. Cultures were suspended in tryptic soy broth (TSB) adjusted to pH 7.2, 6.2, or 5.5 with HCl or acetic acid. Total RNA was extracted from cultures at specific time points (0, 2, 4, and 24 h). Gene expression of hilA was measured with quantitative reverse transcriptase real time PCR (qRT-PCR). Growth and pH were measured throughout the 24 h time frame. Regulation of hilA in response to acid stress varied by serovar and strain and type of acid. The results of these experiments indicate that hilA regulation may have some impact on virulence and colonization of S. enterica. However, these results warrant further research to more fully understand the significance of hilA regulation in response to mild acid stress in S. enterica. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  12. Fusion gene microarray reveals cancer type-specificity among fusion genes.

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    Løvf, Marthe; Thomassen, Gard O S; Bakken, Anne Cathrine; Celestino, Ricardo; Fioretos, Thoas; Lind, Guro E; Lothe, Ragnhild A; Skotheim, Rolf I

    2011-05-01

    Detection of fusion genes for diagnostic purposes and as a guide to treatment is well-established in hematological malignancies, and the prevalence of fusion genes in epithelial cancers is also increasingly appreciated. To study whether established fusion genes are present within additional cancer types, we have used an updated version of our fusion gene microarray in a systematic survey of reported fusion genes in multiple cancer types. We assembled a comprehensive database of published fusion genes, including those reported only in individual studies and samples, and fusion genes resulting from deep sequencing of cancer genomes and transcriptomes. From the total set of 548 fusion genes, we designed 599,839 oligonucleotides, targeting both chimeric transcript junctions as well as sequences internal to each of the fusion gene partners. We investigated the presence of fusion genes in a series of 67 cell lines representing 15 different cancer types. Data from ten leukemia cell lines with known fusion gene status were used to develop an automated scoring algorithm, and in five cell lines the correct fusion gene was the top scoring hit, and one came second. Two additional fusion genes, BCAS4-BCAS3 in the MCF-7 breast cancer cell line and CCDC6-RET in the TPC-1 thyroid cancer cell line were validated as true positive fusion transcripts. However, these fusion genes were not new to these cancer types, and none of 548 fusion genes were identified from a novel cancer type. We therefore find it unlikely that the assayed fusion genes are commonly present across multiple cancer types. 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Assessment of fusion gene status in sarcomas using a custom made fusion gene microarray.

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    Løvf, Marthe; Thomassen, Gard O S; Mertens, Fredrik; Cerveira, Nuno; Teixeira, Manuel R; Lothe, Ragnhild A; Skotheim, Rolf I

    2013-01-01

    Sarcomas are relatively rare malignancies and include a large number of histological subgroups. Based on morphology alone, the differential diagnoses of sarcoma subtypes can be challenging, but the identification of specific fusion genes aids correct diagnostication. The presence of individual fusion products are routinely investigated in Pathology labs. However, the methods used are time-consuming and based on prior knowledge about the expected fusion gene and often the most likely break-point. In this study, 16 sarcoma samples, representing seven different sarcoma subtypes with known fusion gene status from a diagnostic setting, were investigated using a fusion gene microarray. The microarray was designed to detect all possible exon-exon breakpoints between all known fusion genes in a single analysis. An automated scoring of the microarray data from the 38 known sarcoma-related fusion genes identified the correct fusion gene among the top-three hits in 11 of the samples. The analytical sensitivity may be further optimised, but we conclude that a sarcoma-fusion gene microarray is suitable as a time-saving screening tool to identify the majority of the correct fusion genes.

  14. Assessment of fusion gene status in sarcomas using a custom made fusion gene microarray.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marthe Løvf

    Full Text Available Sarcomas are relatively rare malignancies and include a large number of histological subgroups. Based on morphology alone, the differential diagnoses of sarcoma subtypes can be challenging, but the identification of specific fusion genes aids correct diagnostication. The presence of individual fusion products are routinely investigated in Pathology labs. However, the methods used are time-consuming and based on prior knowledge about the expected fusion gene and often the most likely break-point. In this study, 16 sarcoma samples, representing seven different sarcoma subtypes with known fusion gene status from a diagnostic setting, were investigated using a fusion gene microarray. The microarray was designed to detect all possible exon-exon breakpoints between all known fusion genes in a single analysis. An automated scoring of the microarray data from the 38 known sarcoma-related fusion genes identified the correct fusion gene among the top-three hits in 11 of the samples. The analytical sensitivity may be further optimised, but we conclude that a sarcoma-fusion gene microarray is suitable as a time-saving screening tool to identify the majority of the correct fusion genes.

  15. Characterization of fusion genes and the significantly expressed fusion isoforms in breast cancer by hybrid sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weirather, Jason L; Afshar, Pegah Tootoonchi; Clark, Tyson A; Tseng, Elizabeth; Powers, Linda S; Underwood, Jason G; Zabner, Joseph; Korlach, Jonas; Wong, Wing Hung; Au, Kin Fai

    2015-10-15

    We developed an innovative hybrid sequencing approach, IDP-fusion, to detect fusion genes, determine fusion sites and identify and quantify fusion isoforms. IDP-fusion is the first method to study gene fusion events by integrating Third Generation Sequencing long reads and Second Generation Sequencing short reads. We applied IDP-fusion to PacBio data and Illumina data from the MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Compared with the existing tools, IDP-fusion detects fusion genes at higher precision and a very low false positive rate. The results show that IDP-fusion will be useful for unraveling the complexity of multiple fusion splices and fusion isoforms within tumorigenesis-relevant fusion genes. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  16. Gene Fusion: A Genome Wide Survey

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    Liang, Ping; Riley, Monica

    2001-01-01

    As a well known fact, organisms form larger and complex multimodular (composite or chimeric) and mostly multi-functional proteins through gene fusion of two or more individual genes which have independent evolution histories and functions. We call each of these components a module. The existence of multimodular proteins may improves the efficiency in gene regulation and in cellular functions, and thus may give the host organism advantages in adaptation to environments. Analysis of all gene fusions in present-day organisms should allow us to examine the patterns of gene fusion in context with cellular functions, to trace back the evolution processes from the ancient smaller and uni-functional proteins to the present-day larger and complex multi-functional proteins, and to estimate the minimal number of ancestor proteins that existed in the last common ancestor for all life on earth. Although many multimodular proteins have been experimentally known, identification of gene fusion events systematically at genome scale had not been possible until recently when large number of completed genome sequences have been becoming available. In addition, technical difficulties for such analysis also exist due to the complexity of this biological and evolutionary process. We report from this study a new strategy to computationally identify multimodular proteins using completed genome sequences and the results surveyed from 22 organisms with the data from over 40 organisms to be presented during the meeting. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  17. Gene expression profiling of Drosophila tracheal fusion cells.

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    Chandran, Rachana R; Iordanou, Ekaterini; Ajja, Crystal; Wille, Michael; Jiang, Lan

    2014-07-01

    The Drosophila trachea is a premier genetic system to investigate the fundamental mechanisms of tubular organ formation. Tracheal fusion cells lead the branch fusion process to form an interconnected tubular network. Therefore, fusion cells in the Drosophila trachea will be an excellent model to study branch fusion in mammalian tubular organs, such as kidneys and blood vessels. The fusion process is a dynamic cellular process involving cell migration, adhesion, vesicle trafficking, cytoskeleton rearrangement, and membrane fusion. To understand how these cellular events are coordinated, we initiated the critical step to assemble a gene expression profile of fusion cells. For this study, we analyzed the expression of 234 potential tracheal-expressed genes in fusion cells during fusion cell development. 143 Tracheal genes were found to encode transcription factors, signal proteins, cytoskeleton and matrix proteins, transporters, and proteins with unknown function. These genes were divided into four subgroups based on their levels of expression in fusion cells compared to neighboring non-fusion cells revealed by in situ hybridization: (1) genes that have relative high abundance in fusion cells, (2) genes that are dynamically expressed in fusion cells, (3) genes that have relative low abundance in fusion cells, and (4) genes that are expressed at similar levels in fusion cells and non-fusion tracheal cells. This study identifies the expression profile of fusion cells and hypothetically suggests genes which are necessary for the fusion process and which play roles in distinct stages of fusion, as indicated by the location and timing of expression. These data will provide the basis for a comprehensive understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of branch fusion. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Fusion genes and their discovery using high throughput sequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Annala, M.; Parker, B.; Zhang, W.; Nykter, M.

    2013-01-01

    Fusion genes are hybrid genes that combine parts of two or more original genes. They can form as a result of chromosomal rearrangements or abnormal transcription, and have been shown to act as drivers of malignant transformation and progression in many human cancers. The biological significance of fusion genes together with their specificity to cancer cells has made them into excellent targets for molecular therapy. Fusion genes are also used as diagnostic and prognostic markers to confirm ca...

  19. Genomic hotspots but few recurrent fusion genes in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fimereli, Danai; Fumagalli, Debora; Brown, David; Gacquer, David; Rothé, Françoise; Salgado, Roberto; Larsimont, Denis; Sotiriou, Christos; Detours, Vincent

    2018-02-13

    The advent of next generation sequencing technologies has boosted the interest in exploring the role of fusion genes in the development and progression of solid tumors. In breast cancer, most of the detected gene fusions seem to be "passenger" events while the presence of recurrent and driver fusions is still under study. We performed RNA sequencing in 55 well-characterized breast cancer samples and 10 adjacent normal breast tissues, complemented by an analysis of SNP array data. We explored the presence of fusion genes and defined their association with breast cancer subtypes, clinical-pathologic characteristics and copy number aberrations. Overall, 370 fusions were detected across the majority of the samples. HER2+ samples had significantly more fusions than triple negative and luminal subtypes. The number of fusions was correlated with histological grade, Ki67 and tumor size. Clusters of fusion genes were observed across the genome and a significant correlation of fusions with copy number aberrations and more specifically amplifications was also revealed. Despite the large number of fusion events, only a few were recurrent, while recurrent individual genes forming fusions with different partners were also detected including the estrogen receptor 1 gene in the previously detected ESR1 - CCDC170 fusion. Overall we detected novel gene fusion events while we confirmed previously reported fusions. Genomic hotspots of fusion genes, differences between subtypes and small number of recurrent fusions are the most relevant characteristics of these events in breast cancer. Further investigation is necessary to comprehend the biological significance of these fusions. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. The Structural Characterization of Tumor Fusion Genes and Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Dandan; Li, Daixi; Qin, Guangrong; Zhang, Wen; Ouyang, Jian; Zhang, Menghuan; Xie, Lu

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomal translocation, which generates fusion proteins in blood tumor or solid tumor, is considered as one of the major causes leading to cancer. Recent studies suggested that the disordered fragments in a fusion protein might contribute to its carcinogenicity. Here, we investigated the sequence feature near the breakpoints in the fusion partner genes, the structure features of breakpoints in fusion proteins, and the posttranslational modification preference in the fusion proteins. Result...

  1. FusionCancer: a database of cancer fusion genes derived from RNA-seq data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunjin; Wu, Nan; Liu, Jiaqi; Wu, Zhihong; Dong, Dong

    2015-07-28

    Fusion genes are chimeric results originated from previous separate genes with aberrant functions. The resulting protein products may lead to abnormal status of expression levels, functions and action sites, which in return may cause the abnormal proliferation of cells and cancer development. With the emergence of next-generation sequencing technology, RNA-seq has spurred gene fusion discovery in various cancer types. In this work, we compiled 591 recently published RNA-seq datasets in 15 kinds of human cancer, and the gene fusion events were comprehensively identified. Based on the results, a database was developed for gene fusion in cancers (FusionCancer), with the attempt to provide a user-friendly utility for the cancer research community. A flexible query engine has been developed for the acquisition of annotated information of cancer fusion genes, which would help users to determine the chimera events leading to functional changes. FusionCancer can be accessible at the following hyperlink website: http://donglab.ecnu.edu.cn/databases/FusionCancer/ To the best of our knowledge, FusionCancer is the first comprehensive fusion gene database derived only from cancer RNA-seq data.

  2. Chromosomal aberrations and fusion genes in myeloid malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianfelici, Valentina; Lahortiga, Idoya; Cools, Jan

    2012-08-01

    Since the discovery of the BCR-ABL1 fusion gene in chronic myeloid leukemia, many more fusion genes resulting from chromosomal rearrangements have been identified and characterized. The study of these fusion genes has been extremely important for our understanding of the role of chromosomal rearrangements in leukemogenesis and in oncology in general. In chronic myeloid leukemia, or related myeloproliferative malignancies caused by the expression of oncogenic fusion kinases, tyrosine kinase inhibitors are now successfully used to treat these diseases. In acute myeloid leukemias, the presence of chromosomal rearrangements, oncogenic fusion genes and point mutations in key oncogenic drivers has important prognostic value and determines the choice of therapy. In this review, the authors provide an overview of the important fusion genes present in various myeloid malignancies and their importance for clinical practice.

  3. Fusion genes and their discovery using high throughput sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annala, M J; Parker, B C; Zhang, W; Nykter, M

    2013-11-01

    Fusion genes are hybrid genes that combine parts of two or more original genes. They can form as a result of chromosomal rearrangements or abnormal transcription, and have been shown to act as drivers of malignant transformation and progression in many human cancers. The biological significance of fusion genes together with their specificity to cancer cells has made them into excellent targets for molecular therapy. Fusion genes are also used as diagnostic and prognostic markers to confirm cancer diagnosis and monitor response to molecular therapies. High-throughput sequencing has enabled the systematic discovery of fusion genes in a wide variety of cancer types. In this review, we describe the history of fusion genes in cancer and the ways in which fusion genes form and affect cellular function. We also describe computational methodologies for detecting fusion genes from high-throughput sequencing experiments, and the most common sources of error that lead to false discovery of fusion genes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The Structural Characterization of Tumor Fusion Genes and Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dandan; Li, Daixi; Qin, Guangrong; Zhang, Wen; Ouyang, Jian; Zhang, Menghuan; Xie, Lu

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomal translocation, which generates fusion proteins in blood tumor or solid tumor, is considered as one of the major causes leading to cancer. Recent studies suggested that the disordered fragments in a fusion protein might contribute to its carcinogenicity. Here, we investigated the sequence feature near the breakpoints in the fusion partner genes, the structure features of breakpoints in fusion proteins, and the posttranslational modification preference in the fusion proteins. Results show that the breakpoints in the fusion partner genes have both sequence preference and structural preference. At the sequence level, nucleotide combination AG is preferred before the breakpoint and GG is preferred at the breakpoint. At the structural level, the breakpoints in the fusion proteins prefer to be located in the disordered regions. Further analysis suggests the phosphorylation sites at serine, threonine, and the methylation sites at arginine are enriched in disordered regions of the fusion proteins. Using EML4-ALK as an example, we further explained how the fusion protein leads to the protein disorder and contributes to its carcinogenicity. The sequence and structural features of the fusion proteins may help the scientific community to predict novel breakpoints in fusion genes and better understand the structure and function of fusion proteins.

  5. Genes that contribute to cancer fusion genes are large and evolutionarily conserved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narsing, Swetha; Jelsovsky, Zhihong; Mbah, Alfred; Blanck, George

    2009-06-01

    Numerous cancer fusion genes have been identified and studied, and in some cases, therapy or diagnostic techniques have been designed that are specific to the fusion protein encoded by the fusion gene. There has been little progress, however, in understanding the general features of cancer fusion genes in a way that could provide the foundation for an algorithm for predicting the occurrence of a fusion gene once the chromosomal translocation points have been identified by karyotype analyses. In this study, we used publicly available data sets to characterize 59 cancer fusion genes. The results indicate that all but 17% of the genes involved in fusion events are either relatively large, compared to neighboring genes, or are highly conserved in evolution. These results support a basis for designing algorithms that could have a high degree of predictive value in identifying fusion genes once conventional microscopic analyses have identified the chromosomal breakpoints.

  6. Genome Fusion Detection: a novel method to detect fusion genes from SNP-array data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieme, Sebastian; Groth, Philip

    2013-03-15

    Fusion genes result from genomic rearrangements, such as deletions, amplifications and translocations. Such rearrangements can also frequently be observed in cancer and have been postulated as driving event in cancer development. to detect them, one needs to analyze the transition region of two segments with different copy number, the location where fusions are known to occur. Finding fusion genes is essential to understanding cancer development and may lead to new therapeutic approaches. Here we present a novel method, the Genomic Fusion Detection algorithm, to predict fusion genes on a genomic level based on SNP-array data. This algorithm detects genes at the transition region of segments with copy number variation. With the application of defined constraints, certain properties of the detected genes are evaluated to predict whether they may be fused. We evaluated our prediction by calculating the observed frequency of known fusions in both primary cancers and cell lines. We tested a set of cell lines positive for the BCR-ABL1 fusion and prostate cancers positive for the TMPRSS2-ERG fusion. We could detect the fusions in all positive cell lines, but not in the negative controls.

  7. Novel fusion genes and chimeric transcripts in ependymal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Thale Kristin; Panagopoulos, Ioannis; Gorunova, Ludmila; Micci, Francesca; Andersen, Kristin; Kilen Andersen, Hege; Meling, Torstein R; Due-Tønnessen, Bernt; Scheie, David; Heim, Sverre; Brandal, Petter

    2016-12-01

    We have previously identified two ALK rearrangements in a subset of ependymal tumors using a combination of cytogenetic data and RNA sequencing. The aim of this study was to perform an unbiased search for fusion transcripts in our entire series of ependymal tumors. Fusion analysis was performed using the FusionCatcher algorithm on 12 RNA-sequenced ependymal tumors. Candidate transcripts were prioritized based on the software's filtering and manual visualization using the BLAST (Basic Local Alignment Search Tool) and BLAT (BLAST-like alignment tool) tools. Genomic and reverse transcriptase PCR with subsequent Sanger sequencing was used to validate the potential fusions. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) using locus-specific probes was also performed. A total of 841 candidate chimeric transcripts were identified in the 12 tumors, with an average of 49 unique candidate fusions per tumor. After algorithmic and manual filtering, the final list consisted of 24 potential fusion events. Raw RNA-seq read sequences and PCR validation supports two novel fusion genes: a reciprocal fusion gene involving UQCR10 and C1orf194 in an adult spinal ependymoma and a TSPAN4-CD151 fusion gene in a pediatric infratentorial anaplastic ependymoma. Our previously reported ALK rearrangements and the RELA and YAP1 fusions found in supratentorial ependymomas were until now the only known fusion genes present in ependymal tumors. The chimeric transcripts presented here are the first to be reported in infratentorial or spinal ependymomas. Further studies are required to characterize the genomic rearrangements causing these fusion genes, as well as the frequency and functional importance of the fusions. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Fusion genes: A promising tool combating against cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xiaofeng; Theobard, Rutaganda; Cheng, Hongye; Xing, Mengtao; Zhang, Jianying

    2018-01-31

    The driving roles of fusion genes during tumorigenesis have been recognized for decades, with efficacies demonstrated in clinical diagnosis and targeted therapy. With advances in sequencing technologies and computational biology, a surge in the identification of fusion genes has been witnessed during the past decade. The discovery and presence of splicing based fusions in normal tissues have challenged our canonical conceptions on fusion genes and offered us novel medical opportunities. The specificity of fusion genes to neoplastic tissues and their diverse functionalities during carcinogenesis foster them as promising tools in the battle against cancer. It is time to re-visit and comb through our cutting-edge knowledge on fusion genes to accelerate clinical translation of these internal markers. Urged as such, we are encouraged to categorize fusion events according to mechanisms leading to their generation, oncological consequences and clinical implications, offer insights on fusion occurrence across tumors from the system level, highlight feasible practices in fusion-related pharmaceutical development, and identify understudied yet important niches that may lead future research trend in this field. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Fusion genes and chromosome translocations in the common epithelial cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Paul A W

    2010-01-01

    It has been known for 25 years that fusion genes play a central role in leukaemias and sarcomas but they have been neglected in the common carcinomas, largely because of technical limitations of cytogenetics. In the last few years it has emerged that gene fusions, caused by chromosome translocations, inversions, deletions, etc., are important in the common epithelial cancers, such as prostate and lung carcinoma. Most prostate cancers, for example, have an androgen-regulated fusion of one of the ETS transcription factor gene family. Early results of genome-wide searches for gene fusions in breast and other epithelial cancers suggest that most individual tumours will have several fused genes. Fusion genes are exceptionally powerful mutations. In their simplest form they can turn on expression by promoter insertion but they can also, for example, force dimerization of a protein or change its subcellular location. They are correspondingly important clinically, in classification and management and as targets for therapy. This review surveys what we know of fusion genes in the carcinomas, summarizes the technical advances that now make it possible to search systematically for such genes, and concludes by putting fusion genes into the current picture of mutation in cancers.

  10. Unifying the genomics-based classes of cancer fusion gene partners: large cancer fusion genes are evolutionarily conserved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pava, Libia M; Morton, Daniel T; Chen, Ren; Blanck, George

    2012-11-01

    Genes that fuse to cause cancer have been studied to determine molecular bases for proliferation, to develop diagnostic tools, and as targets for drugs. To facilitate identification of additional, cancer fusion genes, following observation of a chromosomal translocation, we have characterized the genomic features of the fusion gene partners. Previous work indicated that cancer fusion gene partners, are either large or evolutionarily conserved in comparison to the neighboring genes in the region of a chromosomal translocation. These results raised the question of whether large cancer fusion gene partners were also evolutionarily conserved. We developed two methods for quantifying evolutionary conservation values, allowing the conclusion that both large and small cancer fusion gene partners are more evolutionarily conserved than their neighbors. Additionally, we determined that cancer fusion gene partners have more 3' untranslated region secondary structures than do their neighbors. Coupled with previous algorithms, with or without transcriptome approaches, we expect these results to assist in the rapid and efficient use of chromosomal translocations to identify cancer fusion genes. The above parameters for any gene of interest can be accessed at www.cancerfusiongenes.com.

  11. Identification of novel cancer fusion genes using chromosome breakpoint screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Kate; Lin, Chin-Hui; Chen, Ya-Lun; Lin, Chi-Hung; Ping, Yueh-Hsin; Jou, Yuh-Shan; Chen, Chian-Feng

    2017-04-01

    Gene fusion due to rearrangement or translocation of chromosomes is a powerful mutational mechanism during tumorigenesis. Several new high-resolution technologies have recently been developed to evaluate large numbers of small aberrations as candidate loci for fusion gene screening. In our previous whole-genome screening study using 500K SNP arrays, we identified more than 700 homozygous deletions (HDs) and amplicons in 23 cancer cell lines. To explore novel fusion genes in cancer, we established stringent criteria for defining HD and amplicon breakpoints. Then genomic PCR and sequencing analyses identified a fusion gene, FNDC3B-PRKCI, that resulted from chromosome intra-rearrangement. Western blotting and 3'-RACE analyses revealed that the chimeric transcript was an in-frame fusion between FNDC3B and PRKCI. Finally, cell migration and colony formation assays suggested that FNDC3B-PRKCI is a potential oncogene.

  12. A Search for Gene Fusions/Translocations in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    all known gene fusions are attributed to leukemias, lymphomas, and bone and soft tissue sarcomas that account for only 10% of all human cancers. In...the transcription factor RARα to PML [13]. Moreover, gene fusions play important roles in many soft tissue tumors, where over 40 known gene fusions...Sci U S A 2002;99:4477– 4482. [PubMed: 11930005] 27. Tsuda M, Davis IJ, Argani P, Shukla N, McGill GG, Nagai M, Saito T, Lae M, Fisher DE, Ladanyi M

  13. Fusion genes in malignant neoplastic disorders of haematopoietic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, Mohamed; Yusoff, Narazah Mohd

    2016-10-01

    The new World Health Organization's (WHO) classification of haematopoietic and lymphoid tissue neoplasms incorporating the recurrent fusion genes as the defining criteria for different haematopoietic malignant phenotypes is reviewed. The recurrent fusion genes incorporated in the new WHO's classification and other chromosomal rearrangements of haematopoietic and lymphoid tissue neoplasms are reviewed. Cytokines and transcription factors in haematopoiesis and leukaemic mechanisms are described. Genetic features and clinical implications due to the encoded chimeric neoproteins causing malignant haematopoietic disorders are reviewed. Multiple translocation partner genes are well known for leukaemia such as MYC, MLL, RARA, ALK, and RUNX1. With the advent of more sophisticated diagnostic tools and bioinformatics algorithms, an exponential growth in fusion genes discoveries is likely to increase. Demonstration of fusion genes and their specific translocation breakpoints in malignant haematological disorders are crucial for understanding the molecular pathogenesis and clinical phenotype of cancer, determining prognostic indexes and therapeutic responses, and monitoring residual disease and relapse status.

  14. Antibody-IL2 Fusion Protein Delivery by Gene Transfer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nicolet, Charles

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of the work described is to assess the feasibility of a gene therapy approach to deliver a specific antibody cytokine fusion protein called CC49-1L2 to a tumor expressing antigen reactive with the antibody...

  15. Dysregulation of BCL-2 family proteins by leukemia fusion genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Lauren M; Hanna, Diane T; Khaw, Seong L; Ekert, Paul G

    2017-09-01

    The genomic lesions that characterize acute lymphoblastic leukemia in childhood include recurrent translocations that result in the expression of fusion proteins that typically involve genes encoding tyrosine kinases, cytokine receptors, and transcription factors. These genetic rearrangements confer phenotypic hallmarks of malignant transformation, including unrestricted proliferation and a relative resistance to apoptosis. In this Minireview, we discuss the molecular mechanisms that link these fusions to the control of cell death. We examine how these fusion genes dysregulate the BCL-2 family of proteins, preventing activation of the apoptotic effectors, BAX and BAK, and promoting cell survival. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Relevance of Fusion Genes in Pediatric Cancers: Toward Precision Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Célia Dupain

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric cancers differ from adult tumors, especially by their very low mutational rate. Therefore, their etiology could be explained in part by other oncogenic mechanisms such as chromosomal rearrangements, supporting the possible implication of fusion genes in the development of pediatric cancers. Fusion genes result from chromosomal rearrangements leading to the juxtaposition of two genes. Consequently, an abnormal activation of one or both genes is observed. The detection of fusion genes has generated great interest in basic cancer research and in the clinical setting, since these genes can lead to better comprehension of the biological mechanisms of tumorigenesis and they can also be used as therapeutic targets and diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers. In this review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms of fusion genes and their particularities in pediatric cancers, as well as their relevance in murine models and in the clinical setting. We also point out the difficulties encountered in the discovery of fusion genes. Finally, we discuss future perspectives and priorities for finding new innovative therapies in childhood cancer.

  17. Relevance of Fusion Genes in Pediatric Cancers: Toward Precision Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupain, Célia; Harttrampf, Anne Catherine; Urbinati, Giorgia; Geoerger, Birgit; Massaad-Massade, Liliane

    2017-03-17

    Pediatric cancers differ from adult tumors, especially by their very low mutational rate. Therefore, their etiology could be explained in part by other oncogenic mechanisms such as chromosomal rearrangements, supporting the possible implication of fusion genes in the development of pediatric cancers. Fusion genes result from chromosomal rearrangements leading to the juxtaposition of two genes. Consequently, an abnormal activation of one or both genes is observed. The detection of fusion genes has generated great interest in basic cancer research and in the clinical setting, since these genes can lead to better comprehension of the biological mechanisms of tumorigenesis and they can also be used as therapeutic targets and diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers. In this review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms of fusion genes and their particularities in pediatric cancers, as well as their relevance in murine models and in the clinical setting. We also point out the difficulties encountered in the discovery of fusion genes. Finally, we discuss future perspectives and priorities for finding new innovative therapies in childhood cancer. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. RET Fusion Genes in Korean Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Yoo, Seung Soo; Jin, Guang; Jung, Hye Jin; Hong, Mi Jeong; Choi, Jin Eun; Jeon, Hyo-Sung; Lee, Shin Yup; Lim, Jeong Ok; Park, Jae Yong

    2013-01-01

    Recently, rearranged during transfection (RET) fusions have been identified in approximately 1% of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). To know the prevalence of RET fusion genes in Korean NSCLCs, we examined the RET fusion genes in 156 surgically resected NSCLCs using a reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Two KIF5B-RET fusions and one CCDC6-RET fusion were identified. All three patients were females and never smokers with adenocarcinomas. RET fusion genes were mutually exclusive ...

  19. RET fusion genes in Korean non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Seung Soo; Jin, Guang; Jung, Hye Jin; Hong, Mi Jeong; Choi, Jin Eun; Jeon, Hyo-Sung; Lee, Shin Yup; Lim, Jeong Ok; Park, Jae Yong

    2013-10-01

    Recently, rearranged during transfection (RET) fusions have been identified in approximately 1% of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). To know the prevalence of RET fusion genes in Korean NSCLCs, we examined the RET fusion genes in 156 surgically resected NSCLCs using a reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Two KIF5B-RET fusions and one CCDC6-RET fusion were identified. All three patients were females and never smokers with adenocarcinomas. RET fusion genes were mutually exclusive from EGFR, KRAS mutations and EML4-ALK fusion. RET fusion genes occur 1.9% (3 of 156) of surgically treated NSCLC patients in Koreans.

  20. Oncogenic FGFR3 gene fusions in bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Sarah V; Hurst, Carolyn D; Knowles, Margaret A

    2013-02-15

    FGF receptor 3 (FGFR3) is activated by mutation or over-expression in many bladder cancers. Here, we identify an additional mechanism of activation via chromosomal re-arrangement to generate constitutively activated fusion genes. FGFR3-transforming acid coiled coil 3 (TACC3) fusions resulting from 4p16.3 re-arrangements and a t(4;7) that generates a FGFR3-BAI1-associated protein 2-like 1 (BAIAP2L1) fusion were identified in 4 of 43 bladder tumour cell lines and 2 of 32 selected tissue samples including the tumour from which one of the cell lines was derived. These are highly activated and transform NIH-3T3 cells. The FGFR3 component is identical in all cases and lacks the final exon that includes the phospholipase C gamma 1 (PLCγ1) binding site. Expression of the fusions in immortalized normal human urothelial cells (NHUC) induced activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway but not PLCγ1. A protein with loss of the terminal region alone was not as highly activated as the fusion proteins, indicating that the fusion partners are essential. The TACC3 fusions retain the TACC domain that mediates microtubule binding and the BAIAP2L1 fusion retains the IRSp53/MIM domain (IMD) that mediates actin binding and Rac interaction. As urothelial cell lines with FGFR3 fusions are extremely sensitive to FGFR-selective agents, the presence of a fusion gene may aid in selection of patients for FGFR-targeted therapy.

  1. Kinase gene fusions in defined subsets of melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Jacqueline; Couts, Kasey; Sheren, Jamie; Saichaemchan, Siriwimon; Ariyawutyakorn, Witthawat; Avolio, Izabela; Cabral, Ethan; Glogowska, Magdelena; Amato, Carol; Robinson, Steven; Hintzsche, Jennifer; Applegate, Allison; Seelenfreund, Eric; Gonzalez, Rita; Wells, Keith; Bagby, Stacey; Tentler, John; Tan, Aik-Choon; Wisell, Joshua; Varella-Garcia, Marileila; Robinson, William

    2017-01-01

    Genomic rearrangements resulting in activating kinase fusions have been increasingly described in a number of cancers including malignant melanoma, but their frequency in specific melanoma subtypes has not been reported. We used break-apart fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to identify genomic rearrangements in tissues from 59 patients with various types of malignant melanoma including acral lentiginous, mucosal, superficial spreading, and nodular. We identified four genomic rearrangements involving the genes BRAF, RET, and ROS1. Of these, three were confirmed by Immunohistochemistry (IHC) or sequencing and one was found to be an ARMC10-BRAF fusion that has not been previously reported in melanoma. These fusions occurred in different subtypes of melanoma but all in tumors lacking known driver mutations. Our data suggest gene fusions are more common than previously thought and should be further explored particularly in melanomas lacking known driver mutations. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Identification of Novel Fusion Genes in Testicular Germ Cell Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, Andreas M; Alagaratnam, Sharmini; Zhao, Sen; Bruun, Jarle; Andrews, Peter W; Lothe, Ragnhild A; Skotheim, Rolf I

    2016-01-01

    Testicular germ cell tumors (TGCT) are the most frequently diagnosed solid tumors in young men ages 15 to 44 years. Embryonal carcinomas (EC) comprise a subset of TGCTs that exhibit pluripotent characteristics similar to embryonic stem (ES) cells, but the genetic drivers underlying malignant transformation of ECs are unknown. To elucidate the abnormal genetic events potentially contributing to TGCT malignancy, such as the existence of fusion genes or aberrant fusion transcript expression, we performed RNA sequencing of EC cell lines and their nonmalignant ES cell line counterparts. We identified eight novel fusion transcripts and one gene with alternative promoter usage, ETV6. Four out of nine transcripts were found recurrently expressed in an extended panel of primary TGCTs and additional EC cell lines, but not in normal parenchyma of the testis, implying tumor-specific expression. Two of the recurrent transcripts involved an intrachromosomal fusion between RCC1 and HENMT1 located 80 Mbp apart and an interchromosomal fusion between RCC1 and ABHD12B. RCC1-ABHD12B and the ETV6 transcript variant were found to be preferentially expressed in the more undifferentiated TGCT subtypes. In vitro differentiation of the NTERA2 EC cell line resulted in significantly reduced expression of both fusion transcripts involving RCC1 and the ETV6 transcript variant, indicating that they are markers of pluripotency in a malignant setting. In conclusion, we identified eight novel fusion transcripts that, to our knowledge, are the first fusion genes described in TGCT and may therefore potentially serve as genomic biomarkers of malignant progression. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  3. Survey of 548 oncogenic fusion transcripts in thyroid tumors supports the importance of the already established thyroid fusions genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celestino, Ricardo; Sigstad, Eva; Løvf, Marthe; Thomassen, Gard O S; Grøholt, Krystyna K; Jørgensen, Lars H; Berner, Aasmund; Castro, Patrícia; Lothe, Ragnhild A; Bjøro, Trine; Sobrinho-Simões, Manuel; Soares, Paula; Skotheim, Rolf I

    2012-12-01

    Neoplasms frequently present structural chromosomal aberrations that can alter the level of expression of a protein or to the expression of an aberrant chimeric protein. In the thyroid, the PAX8-PPARG fusion is present in the neoplastic lesions that have a follicular architecture-follicular thyroid carcinoma (FTC) and follicular variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma (FVPTC), and less frequently in follicular thyroid adenoma (FTA), while the presence of RET/PTC fusions are largely restricted to papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). The ability to detect fusion genes is relevant for a correct diagnosis and for therapy. We have developed a new fusion gene microarray-based approach for simultaneous analysis of all known and predicted fusion gene variants. We did a comprehensive screen for 548 known and putative fusion genes in 27 samples of thyroid tumors and three positive controls-one thyroid cancer cell line (TPC-1) and two PTCs with known CCDC6-RET (alias RET/PTC1) fusion gene, using this microarray. Within the thyroid tumors tested, only well known, previously reported fusion genes in thyroid oncology were identified. Our results reinforce the pathogenic role played by RET/PTC1, RET/PTC3, and PAX8-PPARG fusion genes in thyroid tumorigenesis. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Multimodality imaging of reporter gene expression using a novel fusion vector in living cells and animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambhir, Sanjiv; Pritha, Ray

    2015-07-14

    Novel double and triple fusion reporter gene constructs harboring distinct imagable reporter genes are provided, as well as applications for the use of such double and triple fusion constructs in living cells and in living animals using distinct imaging technologies.

  5. Multimodality imaging of reporter gene expression using a novel fusion vector in living cells and animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambhir, Sanjiv [Portola Valley, CA; Pritha, Ray [Mountain View, CA

    2011-06-07

    Novel double and triple fusion reporter gene constructs harboring distinct imagable reporter genes are provided, as well as applications for the use of such double and triple fusion constructs in living cells and in living animals using distinct imaging technologies.

  6. ABL1 fusion genes in hematological malignancies: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Braekeleer, Etienne; Douet-Guilbert, Nathalie; Rowe, David; Bown, Nick; Morel, Frédéric; Berthou, Christian; Férec, Claude; De Braekeleer, Marc

    2011-05-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements involving the ABL1 gene, leading to a BCR-ABL1 fusion gene, have been mainly associated with chronic myeloid leukemia and B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). At present, six other genes have been shown to fuse to ABL1. The kinase domain of ABL1 is retained in all chimeric proteins that are also composed of the N-terminal part of the partner protein that often includes a coiled-coil or a helix-loop-helix domain. These latter domains allow oligomerization of the protein that is required for tyrosine kinase activation, cytoskeletal localization, and neoplastic transformation. Fusion genes that have a break in intron 1 or 2 (BCR-ABL1, ETV6-ABL1, ZMIZ1-ABL1, EML1-ABL1, and NUP214-ABL1) have transforming activity, although NUP214-ABL1 requires amplification to be efficient. The NUP214-ABL1 gene is the second most prevalent fusion gene involving ABL1 in malignant hemopathies, with a frequency of 5% in T-cell ALL. Both fusion genes (SFPQ-ABL1 and RCSD1-ABL1) characterized by a break in intron 4 of ABL1 are associated with B-cell ALL, as the chimeric proteins lacked the SH2 domain of ABL1. Screening for ABL1 chimeric genes could be performed in patients with ALL, more particularly in those with T-cell ALL because ABL1 modulates T-cell development and plays a role in cytoskeletal remodeling processes in T cells. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  7. RARA fusion genes in acute promyelocytic leukemia: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Braekeleer, Etienne; Douet-Guilbert, Nathalie; De Braekeleer, Marc

    2014-06-01

    The t(15;17)(q24;q21), generating a PML-RARA fusion gene, is the hallmark of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). At present, eight other genes fusing with RARA have been identified. The resulting fusion proteins retain domains of the RARA protein allowing binding to retinoic acid response elements (RARE) and dimerization with the retinoid X receptor protein (RXRA). They participate in protein-protein interactions, associating with RXRA to form hetero-oligomeric complexes that can bind to RARE. They have a dominant-negative effect on wild-type RARA/RXRA transcriptional activity. Moreover, RARA fusion proteins can homodimerize, conferring the ability to regulate an expanded repertoire of genes normally not affected by RARA. RARA fusion proteins behave as potent transcriptional repressors of retinoic acid signalling, inducing a differentiation blockage at the promyelocyte stage which can be overcome with therapeutic doses of ATRA or arsenic trioxide. However, resistance to these two drugs is a major problem, which necessitates development of new therapies.

  8. InFusion: Advancing Discovery of Fusion Genes and Chimeric Transcripts from Deep RNA-Sequencing Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin Okonechnikov

    Full Text Available Analysis of fusion transcripts has become increasingly important due to their link with cancer development. Since high-throughput sequencing approaches survey fusion events exhaustively, several computational methods for the detection of gene fusions from RNA-seq data have been developed. This kind of analysis, however, is complicated by native trans-splicing events, the splicing-induced complexity of the transcriptome and biases and artefacts introduced in experiments and data analysis. There are a number of tools available for the detection of fusions from RNA-seq data; however, certain differences in specificity and sensitivity between commonly used approaches have been found. The ability to detect gene fusions of different types, including isoform fusions and fusions involving non-coding regions, has not been thoroughly studied yet. Here, we propose a novel computational toolkit called InFusion for fusion gene detection from RNA-seq data. InFusion introduces several unique features, such as discovery of fusions involving intergenic regions, and detection of anti-sense transcription in chimeric RNAs based on strand-specificity. Our approach demonstrates superior detection accuracy on simulated data and several public RNA-seq datasets. This improved performance was also evident when evaluating data from RNA deep-sequencing of two well-established prostate cancer cell lines. InFusion identified 26 novel fusion events that were validated in vitro, including alternatively spliced gene fusion isoforms and chimeric transcripts that include intergenic regions. The toolkit is freely available to download from http:/bitbucket.org/kokonech/infusion.

  9. InFusion: Advancing Discovery of Fusion Genes and Chimeric Transcripts from Deep RNA-Sequencing Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okonechnikov, Konstantin; Imai-Matsushima, Aki; Paul, Lukas; Seitz, Alexander; Meyer, Thomas F; Garcia-Alcalde, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of fusion transcripts has become increasingly important due to their link with cancer development. Since high-throughput sequencing approaches survey fusion events exhaustively, several computational methods for the detection of gene fusions from RNA-seq data have been developed. This kind of analysis, however, is complicated by native trans-splicing events, the splicing-induced complexity of the transcriptome and biases and artefacts introduced in experiments and data analysis. There are a number of tools available for the detection of fusions from RNA-seq data; however, certain differences in specificity and sensitivity between commonly used approaches have been found. The ability to detect gene fusions of different types, including isoform fusions and fusions involving non-coding regions, has not been thoroughly studied yet. Here, we propose a novel computational toolkit called InFusion for fusion gene detection from RNA-seq data. InFusion introduces several unique features, such as discovery of fusions involving intergenic regions, and detection of anti-sense transcription in chimeric RNAs based on strand-specificity. Our approach demonstrates superior detection accuracy on simulated data and several public RNA-seq datasets. This improved performance was also evident when evaluating data from RNA deep-sequencing of two well-established prostate cancer cell lines. InFusion identified 26 novel fusion events that were validated in vitro, including alternatively spliced gene fusion isoforms and chimeric transcripts that include intergenic regions. The toolkit is freely available to download from http:/bitbucket.org/kokonech/infusion.

  10. Identification of fusion genes in breast cancer by paired-end RNA-sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgren, Henrik; Murumagi, Astrid; Kangaspeska, Sara; Nicorici, Daniel; Hongisto, Vesa; Kleivi, Kristine; Rye, Inga H; Nyberg, Sandra; Wolf, Maija; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Kallioniemi, Olli

    2011-01-01

    Until recently, chromosomal translocations and fusion genes have been an underappreciated class of mutations in solid tumors. Next-generation sequencing technologies provide an opportunity for systematic characterization of cancer cell transcriptomes, including the discovery of expressed fusion genes resulting from underlying genomic rearrangements. We applied paired-end RNA-seq to identify 24 novel and 3 previously known fusion genes in breast cancer cells. Supported by an improved bioinformatic approach, we had a 95% success rate of validating gene fusions initially detected by RNA-seq. Fusion partner genes were found to contribute promoters (5' UTR), coding sequences and 3' UTRs. Most fusion genes were associated with copy number transitions and were particularly common in high-level DNA amplifications. This suggests that fusion events may contribute to the selective advantage provided by DNA amplifications and deletions. Some of the fusion partner genes, such as GSDMB in the TATDN1-GSDMB fusion and IKZF3 in the VAPB-IKZF3 fusion, were only detected as a fusion transcript, indicating activation of a dormant gene by the fusion event. A number of fusion gene partners have either been previously observed in oncogenic gene fusions, mostly in leukemias, or otherwise reported to be oncogenic. RNA interference-mediated knock-down of the VAPB-IKZF3 fusion gene indicated that it may be necessary for cancer cell growth and survival. In summary, using RNA-sequencing and improved bioinformatic stratification, we have discovered a number of novel fusion genes in breast cancer, and identified VAPB-IKZF3 as a potential fusion gene with importance for the growth and survival of breast cancer cells.

  11. Recurrent gene fusions in prostate cancer: their clinical implications and uses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hessels, D.; Schalken, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    Gene fusions, resulting from chromosomal rearrangements, have been attributed to leukaemias and soft tissue sarcomas. The recent discovery of a recurrent gene fusion TMPRSS2-ERG in approximately half of the prostate cancers tested indicates that gene fusions also play a role in the onset of common

  12. Transcriptome sequencing in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia identifies fusion genes associated with distinct DNA methylation profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marincevic-Zuniga, Yanara; Dahlberg, Johan; Nilsson, Sara; Raine, Amanda; Nystedt, Sara; Lindqvist, Carl Mårten; Berglund, Eva C; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Cavelier, Lucia; Forestier, Erik; Heyman, Mats; Lönnerholm, Gudmar; Nordlund, Jessica; Syvänen, Ann-Christine

    2017-08-14

    Structural chromosomal rearrangements that lead to expressed fusion genes are a hallmark of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). In this study, we performed transcriptome sequencing of 134 primary ALL patient samples to comprehensively detect fusion transcripts. We combined fusion gene detection with genome-wide DNA methylation analysis, gene expression profiling, and targeted sequencing to determine molecular signatures of emerging ALL subtypes. We identified 64 unique fusion events distributed among 80 individual patients, of which over 50% have not previously been reported in ALL. Although the majority of the fusion genes were found only in a single patient, we identified several recurrent fusion gene families defined by promiscuous fusion gene partners, such as ETV6, RUNX1, PAX5, and ZNF384, or recurrent fusion genes, such as DUX4-IGH. Our data show that patients harboring these fusion genes displayed characteristic genome-wide DNA methylation and gene expression signatures in addition to distinct patterns in single nucleotide variants and recurrent copy number alterations. Our study delineates the fusion gene landscape in pediatric ALL, including both known and novel fusion genes, and highlights fusion gene families with shared molecular etiologies, which may provide additional information for prognosis and therapeutic options in the future.

  13. Transcriptome sequencing in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia identifies fusion genes associated with distinct DNA methylation profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanara Marincevic-Zuniga

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Structural chromosomal rearrangements that lead to expressed fusion genes are a hallmark of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL. In this study, we performed transcriptome sequencing of 134 primary ALL patient samples to comprehensively detect fusion transcripts. Methods We combined fusion gene detection with genome-wide DNA methylation analysis, gene expression profiling, and targeted sequencing to determine molecular signatures of emerging ALL subtypes. Results We identified 64 unique fusion events distributed among 80 individual patients, of which over 50% have not previously been reported in ALL. Although the majority of the fusion genes were found only in a single patient, we identified several recurrent fusion gene families defined by promiscuous fusion gene partners, such as ETV6, RUNX1, PAX5, and ZNF384, or recurrent fusion genes, such as DUX4-IGH. Our data show that patients harboring these fusion genes displayed characteristic genome-wide DNA methylation and gene expression signatures in addition to distinct patterns in single nucleotide variants and recurrent copy number alterations. Conclusion Our study delineates the fusion gene landscape in pediatric ALL, including both known and novel fusion genes, and highlights fusion gene families with shared molecular etiologies, which may provide additional information for prognosis and therapeutic options in the future.

  14. Gene Prioritization by Compressive Data Fusion and Chaining.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinka Žitnik

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Data integration procedures combine heterogeneous data sets into predictive models, but they are limited to data explicitly related to the target object type, such as genes. Collage is a new data fusion approach to gene prioritization. It considers data sets of various association levels with the prediction task, utilizes collective matrix factorization to compress the data, and chaining to relate different object types contained in a data compendium. Collage prioritizes genes based on their similarity to several seed genes. We tested Collage by prioritizing bacterial response genes in Dictyostelium as a novel model system for prokaryote-eukaryote interactions. Using 4 seed genes and 14 data sets, only one of which was directly related to the bacterial response, Collage proposed 8 candidate genes that were readily validated as necessary for the response of Dictyostelium to Gram-negative bacteria. These findings establish Collage as a method for inferring biological knowledge from the integration of heterogeneous and coarsely related data sets.

  15. Discovery of Human-Similar Gene Fusions in Canine Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulvé, Ronan; Rault, Mélanie; Bahin, Mathieu; Lagoutte, Laetitia; Abadie, Jérôme; De Brito, Clotilde; Coindre, Jean-Michel; Botherel, Nadine; Rousseau, Audrey; Wucher, Valentin; Cadieu, Edouard; Thieblemont, Catherine; Hitte, Christophe; Cornevin, Laurence; Cabillic, Florian; Bachelot, Laura; Gilot, David; Hennuy, Benoit; Guillaudeux, Thierry; Le Goff, Arnaud; Derrien, Thomas; Hédan, Benoît; André, Catherine

    2017-11-01

    Canine cancers represent a tremendous natural resource due to their incidence and striking similarities to human cancers, sharing similar clinical and pathologic features as well as oncogenic events, including identical somatic mutations. Considering the importance of gene fusions as driver alterations, we explored their relevance in canine cancers. We focused on three distinct human-comparable canine cancers representing different tissues and embryonic origins. Through RNA-Seq, we discovered similar gene fusions as those found in their human counterparts: IGK-CCND3 in B-cell lymphoma, MPB-BRAF in glioma, and COL3A1-PDGFB in dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans-like. We showed not only similar partner genes but also identical breakpoints leading to oncogene overexpression. This study demonstrates similar gene fusion partners and mechanisms in human-dog corresponding tumors and allows for selection of targeted therapies in preclinical and clinical trials with pet dogs prior to human trials, within the framework of personalized medicine. Cancer Res; 77(21); 5721-7. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  16. Frequent miRNA-convergent fusion gene events in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Helena; Søkilde, Rolf; Häkkinen, Jari; Pirona, Anna Chiara; Vallon-Christersson, Johan; Kvist, Anders; Mertens, Fredrik; Borg, Åke; Mitelman, Felix; Höglund, Mattias; Rovira, Carlos

    2017-10-05

    Studies of fusion genes have mainly focused on the formation of fusions that result in the production of hybrid proteins or, alternatively, on promoter-switching events that put a gene under the control of aberrant signals. However, gene fusions may also disrupt the transcriptional control of genes that are encoded in introns downstream of the breakpoint. By ignoring structural constraints of the transcribed fusions, we highlight the importance of a largely unexplored function of fusion genes. Here, we show, using breast cancer as an example, that miRNA host genes are specifically enriched in fusion genes and that many different, low-frequency, 5' partners may deregulate the same miRNA irrespective of the coding potential of the fusion transcript. These results indicate that the concept of recurrence, defined by the rate of functionally important aberrations, needs to be revised to encompass convergent fusions that affect a miRNA independently of transcript structure and protein-coding potential.Fusion gene research traditionally focuses on fusions that result in hybrid proteins or promoter switching events. Here, the authors demonstrate enrichment of fusions in miRNA host genes in breast cancer, highlighting that disparate fusions could have convergent impact on miRNA.

  17. Construction and prokaryotic expression of the fusion gene PRRSV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl4

    2013-07-24

    Jul 24, 2013 ... pathology mechanisms of autoimmune diseases (Koets et al., 1999; Wong, 1999; Atay et al., 2009; ... Amplification of target gene PRRSV GP5 and construction of. pMD18-GP5 plasmid. Virus RNA was ... Construction of fusion expressed plasmid pET32-GP5-Hsp70. pMD18-GP5 and pET-32(α+) plasmids ...

  18. Exploration of the gene fusion landscape of glioblastoma using transcriptome sequencing and copy number data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Nameeta; Lankerovich, Michael; Lee, Hwahyung; Yoon, Jae-Geun; Schroeder, Brett; Foltz, Greg

    2013-11-22

    RNA-seq has spurred important gene fusion discoveries in a number of different cancers, including lung, prostate, breast, brain, thyroid and bladder carcinomas. Gene fusion discovery can potentially lead to the development of novel treatments that target the underlying genetic abnormalities. In this study, we provide comprehensive view of gene fusion landscape in 185 glioblastoma multiforme patients from two independent cohorts. Fusions occur in approximately 30-50% of GBM patient samples. In the Ivy Center cohort of 24 patients, 33% of samples harbored fusions that were validated by qPCR and Sanger sequencing. We were able to identify high-confidence gene fusions from RNA-seq data in 53% of the samples in a TCGA cohort of 161 patients. We identified 13 cases (8%) with fusions retaining a tyrosine kinase domain in the TCGA cohort and one case in the Ivy Center cohort. Ours is the first study to describe recurrent fusions involving non-coding genes. Genomic locations 7p11 and 12q14-15 harbor majority of the fusions. Fusions on 7p11 are formed in focally amplified EGFR locus whereas 12q14-15 fusions are formed by complex genomic rearrangements. All the fusions detected in this study can be further visualized and analyzed using our website: http://ivygap.swedish.org/fusions. Our study highlights the prevalence of gene fusions as one of the major genomic abnormalities in GBM. The majority of the fusions are private fusions, and a minority of these recur with low frequency. A small subset of patients with fusions of receptor tyrosine kinases can benefit from existing FDA approved drugs and drugs available in various clinical trials. Due to the low frequency and rarity of clinically relevant fusions, RNA-seq of GBM patient samples will be a vital tool for the identification of patient-specific fusions that can drive personalized therapy.

  19. Myoblast Fusion in Fly and Vertebrates: New Genes, New Processes and New Perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Richardson, Brian E.; Nowak, Scott J.; Baylies, Mary K.

    2008-01-01

    Muscle formation and repair depends critically on the fusion of myoblasts. Despite the importance of this process, little is known about the cellular and molecular mechanisms regulating fusion. Forward genetic screens in Drosophila melanogaster have uncovered genes that, when mutated, prevent myoblast fusion. Analyses of these gene products have indicated that the actin cytoskeleton and its regulation play a central role in the fusion process. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the...

  20. Detecting ALK, ROS1 and RET Fusion Genes in Cell Block Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chao; Li, Xuefei; Li, Jiayu; Zhang, Yishi; Ren, Shengxiang; Chen, Xiaoxia; Zhou, Caicun

    2014-06-01

    Whether Cell block (CB) samples are applicable to detect anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), c-ros oncogene 1 (ROS1) and ret proto-oncogene (RET) fusion genes in lung adenocarcinoma is still unknown. In this study, 108 cytological samples that contained lung adenocarcinoma cells were collected, and made into CB. The CB samples all contained at least 30% lung adenocarcinoma cells. In these patients, 48 harbored EGFR mutation. Among the 50 EGFR wild type patients who detected fusion genes, 14 carried EML4-ALK fusion (28%), 2 had TPM3-ROS1 fusion (4%), and 3 harbored KIF5B-RET fusion (6%). No double fusions were found in one sample. Patients with fusion genes were younger than those without fusion genes (p = 0.032), but no significant difference was found in sex and smoking status (p > 0.05). In the thirty-five patients who received first-line chemotherapy, patients with fusion gene positive had disease control rate (DCR) (72.7% VS 50%, p > 0.05) and objective response rate (ORR) (9.1% VS 4.2%, p > 0.05) compared with those having fusion gene negative. The median progression free survival (mPFS) were 4.0 and 2.7 months in patients harbored fusion mutations and wild type, respectively (p > 0.05). We conclude that CB samples could be used to detect ALK, ROS1 and RET fusions in NSCLC. The frequency distribution of three fusion genes is higher in lung adenocarcinoma with wild-type EGFR, compared with unselected NSCLC patient population. Patients with fusion genes positive are younger than those with fusion gene negative, but they had no significantly different PFS in first-line chemotherapy.

  1. Repeated evolution of chimeric fusion genes in the β-globin gene family of laurasiatherian mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudry, Michael J; Storz, Jay F; Butts, Gary Tyler; Campbell, Kevin L; Hoffmann, Federico G

    2014-05-09

    The evolutionary fate of chimeric fusion genes may be strongly influenced by their recombinational mode of origin and the nature of functional divergence between the parental genes. In the β-globin gene family of placental mammals, the two postnatally expressed δ- and β-globin genes (HBD and HBB, respectively) have a propensity for recombinational exchange via gene conversion and unequal crossing-over. In the latter case, there are good reasons to expect differences in retention rates for the reciprocal HBB/HBD and HBD/HBB fusion genes due to thalassemia pathologies associated with the HBD/HBB "Lepore" deletion mutant in humans. Here, we report a comparative genomic analysis of the mammalian β-globin gene cluster, which revealed that chimeric HBB/HBD fusion genes originated independently in four separate lineages of laurasiatherian mammals: Eulipotyphlans (shrews, moles, and hedgehogs), carnivores, microchiropteran bats, and cetaceans. In cases where an independently derived "anti-Lepore" duplication mutant has become fixed, the parental HBD and/or HBB genes have typically been inactivated or deleted, so that the newly created HBB/HBD fusion gene is primarily responsible for synthesizing the β-type subunits of adult and fetal hemoglobin (Hb). Contrary to conventional wisdom that the HBD gene is a vestigial relict that is typically inactivated or expressed at negligible levels, we show that HBD-like genes often encode a substantial fraction (20-100%) of β-chain Hbs in laurasiatherian taxa. Our results indicate that the ascendancy or resuscitation of genes with HBD-like coding sequence requires the secondary acquisition of HBB-like promoter sequence via unequal crossing-over or interparalog gene conversion. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  2. Repeated Evolution of Chimeric Fusion Genes in the β-Globin Gene Family of Laurasiatherian Mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudry, Michael J.; Storz, Jay F.; Butts, Gary Tyler; Campbell, Kevin L.; Hoffmann, Federico G.

    2014-01-01

    The evolutionary fate of chimeric fusion genes may be strongly influenced by their recombinational mode of origin and the nature of functional divergence between the parental genes. In the β-globin gene family of placental mammals, the two postnatally expressed δ- and β-globin genes (HBD and HBB, respectively) have a propensity for recombinational exchange via gene conversion and unequal crossing-over. In the latter case, there are good reasons to expect differences in retention rates for the reciprocal HBB/HBD and HBD/HBB fusion genes due to thalassemia pathologies associated with the HBD/HBB “Lepore” deletion mutant in humans. Here, we report a comparative genomic analysis of the mammalian β-globin gene cluster, which revealed that chimeric HBB/HBD fusion genes originated independently in four separate lineages of laurasiatherian mammals: Eulipotyphlans (shrews, moles, and hedgehogs), carnivores, microchiropteran bats, and cetaceans. In cases where an independently derived “anti-Lepore” duplication mutant has become fixed, the parental HBD and/or HBB genes have typically been inactivated or deleted, so that the newly created HBB/HBD fusion gene is primarily responsible for synthesizing the β-type subunits of adult and fetal hemoglobin (Hb). Contrary to conventional wisdom that the HBD gene is a vestigial relict that is typically inactivated or expressed at negligible levels, we show that HBD-like genes often encode a substantial fraction (20–100%) of β-chain Hbs in laurasiatherian taxa. Our results indicate that the ascendancy or resuscitation of genes with HBD-like coding sequence requires the secondary acquisition of HBB-like promoter sequence via unequal crossing-over or interparalog gene conversion. PMID:24814285

  3. Discovering and understanding oncogenic gene fusions through data intensive computational approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latysheva, Natasha S.; Babu, M. Madan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although gene fusions have been recognized as important drivers of cancer for decades, our understanding of the prevalence and function of gene fusions has been revolutionized by the rise of next-generation sequencing, advances in bioinformatics theory and an increasing capacity for large-scale computational biology. The computational work on gene fusions has been vastly diverse, and the present state of the literature is fragmented. It will be fruitful to merge three camps of gene fusion bioinformatics that appear to rarely cross over: (i) data-intensive computational work characterizing the molecular biology of gene fusions; (ii) development research on fusion detection tools, candidate fusion prioritization algorithms and dedicated fusion databases and (iii) clinical research that seeks to either therapeutically target fusion transcripts and proteins or leverages advances in detection tools to perform large-scale surveys of gene fusion landscapes in specific cancer types. In this review, we unify these different—yet highly complementary and symbiotic—approaches with the view that increased synergy will catalyze advancements in gene fusion identification, characterization and significance evaluation. PMID:27105842

  4. Advances in chromosomal translocations and fusion genes in sarcomas and potential therapeutic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xin; Garbutt, Cassandra C; Hornicek, Francis; Guo, Zheng; Duan, Zhenfeng

    2018-02-01

    Chromosomal translocations and fusion genes are very common in human cancer especially in subtypes of sarcomas, such as rhabdomyosarcoma, Ewing's sarcoma, synovial sarcoma and liposarcoma. The discovery of novel chromosomal translocations and fusion genes in different tumors are due to the advancement of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies such as whole genome sequencing. Recently, many novel chromosomal translocations and gene fusions have been identified in different types of sarcoma through NGS approaches. In addition to previously known sarcoma fusion genes, these novel specific fusion genes and associated molecular events represent important targets for novel therapeutic approaches in the treatment of sarcomas. This review focuses on recent advances in chromosomal translocations and fusion genes in sarcomas and their potential therapeutic applications in the treatment of sarcomas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. confFuse: High-Confidence Fusion Gene Detection across Tumor Entities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqin Huang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fusion genes play an important role in the tumorigenesis of many cancers. Next-generation sequencing (NGS technologies have been successfully applied in fusion gene detection for the last several years, and a number of NGS-based tools have been developed for identifying fusion genes during this period. Most fusion gene detection tools based on RNA-seq data report a large number of candidates (mostly false positives, making it hard to prioritize candidates for experimental validation and further analysis. Selection of reliable fusion genes for downstream analysis becomes very important in cancer research. We therefore developed confFuse, a scoring algorithm to reliably select high-confidence fusion genes which are likely to be biologically relevant.Results: confFuse takes multiple parameters into account in order to assign each fusion candidate a confidence score, of which score ≥8 indicates high-confidence fusion gene predictions. These parameters were manually curated based on our experience and on certain structural motifs of fusion genes. Compared with alternative tools, based on 96 published RNA-seq samples from different tumor entities, our method can significantly reduce the number of fusion candidates (301 high-confidence from 8,083 total predicted fusion genes and keep high detection accuracy (recovery rate 85.7%. Validation of 18 novel, high-confidence fusions detected in three breast tumor samples resulted in a 100% validation rate.Conclusions: confFuse is a novel downstream filtering method that allows selection of highly reliable fusion gene candidates for further downstream analysis and experimental validations. confFuse is available at https://github.com/Zhiqin-HUANG/confFuse.

  6. Protein functional links in Trypanosoma brucei, identified by gene fusion analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trimpalis Philip

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Domain or gene fusion analysis is a bioinformatics method for detecting gene fusions in one organism by comparing its genome to that of other organisms. The occurrence of gene fusions suggests that the two original genes that participated in the fusion are functionally linked, i.e. their gene products interact either as part of a multi-subunit protein complex, or in a metabolic pathway. Gene fusion analysis has been used to identify protein functional links in prokaryotes as well as in eukaryotic model organisms, such as yeast and Drosophila. Results In this study we have extended this approach to include a number of recently sequenced protists, four of which are pathogenic, to identify fusion linked proteins in Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of African sleeping sickness. We have also examined the evolution of the gene fusion events identified, to determine whether they can be attributed to fusion or fission, by looking at the conservation of the fused genes and of the individual component genes across the major eukaryotic and prokaryotic lineages. We find relatively limited occurrence of gene fusions/fissions within the protist lineages examined. Our results point to two trypanosome-specific gene fissions, which have recently been experimentally confirmed, one fusion involving proteins involved in the same metabolic pathway, as well as two novel putative functional links between fusion-linked protein pairs. Conclusions This is the first study of protein functional links in T. brucei identified by gene fusion analysis. We have used strict thresholds and only discuss results which are highly likely to be genuine and which either have already been or can be experimentally verified. We discuss the possible impact of the identification of these novel putative protein-protein interactions, to the development of new trypanosome therapeutic drugs.

  7. Fusion genes in solid tumors: an emerging target for cancer diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Brittany C; Zhang, Wei

    2013-11-01

    Studies over the past decades have uncovered fusion genes, a class of oncogenes that provide immense diagnostic and therapeutic advantages because of their tumor-specific expression. Originally associated with hemotologic cancers, fusion genes have recently been discovered in a wide array of solid tumors, including sarcomas, carcinomas, and tumors of the central nervous system. Fusion genes are attractive as both therapeutic targets and diagnostic tools due to their inherent expression in tumor tissue alone. Therefore, the discovery and elucidation of fusion genes in various cancer types may provide more effective therapies in the future for cancer patients.

  8. Fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Mahaffey, James A

    2012-01-01

    As energy problems of the world grow, work toward fusion power continues at a greater pace than ever before. The topic of fusion is one that is often met with the most recognition and interest in the nuclear power arena. Written in clear and jargon-free prose, Fusion explores the big bang of creation to the blackout death of worn-out stars. A brief history of fusion research, beginning with the first tentative theories in the early 20th century, is also discussed, as well as the race for fusion power. This brand-new, full-color resource examines the various programs currently being funded or p

  9. High-throughput detection of fusion genes in cancer using the Sequenom MassARRAY platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambros, Maryou B K; Wilkerson, Paul M; Natrajan, Rachael; Patani, Neill; Pawar, Vidya; Vatcheva, Radost; Mansour, Marthe; Laschet, Mirja; Oelze, Beatrice; Orr, Nicholas; Muller, Susanne; Reis-Filho, Jorge S

    2011-10-01

    Fusion genes have pivotal roles in the development and progression of human cancer and offer potential for rational drug design. Massively parallel sequencing has identified a panoply of in-frame expressed fusion genes, but early reports suggest that the majority of these are present at very low prevalence or are private events. Conventional methods for the identification of recurrent expressed fusion genes in large cohorts of cancers (eg fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR)) are time consuming and prone to artifacts. Here, we describe a novel high-throughput strategy for the detection of recurrent fusion genes in cancer based on the Sequenom MassARRAY platform. Fusion genes were initially identified by massively parallel sequencing of breast cancer cell lines. For each fusion gene, two Sequenom probes were designed. Primary human breast cancers and cancer cell lines were interrogated for 10 fusion genes. Sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values of the MassARRAY method were then determined using FISH and qRT-PCR as the 'gold standard.' By combining two probes per fusion gene, the negative and positive predictive values were 100 and 71.4%, respectively. All fusion genes identified by massively parallel sequencing were accurately detected. No recurrent fusion genes were found. The MassARRAY-based approach described here may, therefore, be employed as a high-throughput screening tool for known fusion genes in human cancer. In keeping with other highly sensitive assays, further refinement of this technique is necessary to reduce the number of false-positive results. © 2011 USCAP, Inc All rights reserved

  10. Recurrent Fusion Genes in Leukemia: An Attractive Target for Diagnosis and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuhui; Wu, Nan; Liu, Duo; Jin, Yan

    2017-10-01

    Since the first fusion gene was discovered decades ago, a considerable number of fusion genes have been detected in leukemia. The majority of them are generated through chromosomal rearrangement or abnormal transcription. With the development of techniques, high-throughput sequencing method makes it possible to detect fusion genes systematically in multiple human cancers. Owing to their biological significance and tumor-specific expression, some of the fusion genes are attractive diagnostic tools and therapeutic targets. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) targeting BCR-ABL1 fusions have been widely used to treat CML. The combination of ATRA and ATO targeting PML-RARA fusions has proven to be effective in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Moreover, therapy with high dose cytarabine (HDAC) has significantly improved the prognosis of core binding factor (CBF) acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. Therefore, studies on fusion genes may benefit patients with leukemia by providing more diagnostic markers and therapies in the future. The presented review focuses on the history of fusion genes, mechanisms of formation, and treatments against specific fusion genes in leukemia.

  11. Characterization of fusion genes in common and rare epithelial ovarian cancer histologic subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earp, Madalene A; Raghavan, Rama; Li, Qian; Dai, Junqiang; Winham, Stacey J; Cunningham, Julie M; Natanzon, Yanina; Kalli, Kimberly R; Hou, Xiaonan; Weroha, S John; Haluska, Paul; Lawrenson, Kate; Gayther, Simon A; Wang, Chen; Goode, Ellen L; Fridley, Brooke L

    2017-07-18

    Gene fusions play a critical role in some cancers and can serve as important clinical targets. In epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), the contribution of fusions, especially by histological type, is unclear. We therefore screened for recurrent fusions in a histologically diverse panel of 220 EOCs using RNA sequencing. The Pipeline for RNA-Sequencing Data Analysis (PRADA) was used to identify fusions and allow for comparison with The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) tumors. Associations between fusions and clinical prognosis were evaluated using Cox proportional hazards regression models. Nine recurrent fusions, defined as occurring in two or more tumors, were observed. CRHR1-KANSL1 was the most frequently identified fusion, identified in 6 tumors (2.7% of all tumors). This fusion was not associated with survival; other recurrent fusions were too rare to warrant survival analyses. One recurrent in-frame fusion, UBAP1-TGM7, was unique to clear cell (CC) EOC tumors (in 10%, or 2 of 20 CC tumors). We found some evidence that CC tumors harbor more fusions on average than any other EOC histological type, including high-grade serous (HGS) tumors. CC tumors harbored a mean of 7.4 fusions (standard deviation [sd] = 7.4, N = 20), compared to HGS EOC tumors mean of 2.0 fusions (sd = 3.3, N = 141). Few fusion genes were detected in endometrioid tumors (mean = 0.24, sd = 0.74, N = 55) or mucinous tumors (mean = 0.25, sd = 0.5, N = 4) tumors. To conclude, we identify one fusion at 10% frequency in the CC EOC subtype, but find little evidence for common (> 5% frequency) recurrent fusion genes in EOC overall, or in HGS subtype-specific EOC tumors.

  12. Optical coding of fusion genes using multicolor quantum dots for prostate cancer diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyojin; Kim, Chloe; Lee, Dongjin; Park, Jea Ho; Searson, Peter C; Lee, Kwan Hyi

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies have found that prostate cancer expresses abnormal genetic markers including multiple types of TMPRSS2-ERG fusion genes. The expression level of different TMPRSS2-ERG fusion genes is correlated to pathologic variables of aggressive prostate cancer and disease progression. State-of-the-art methods for detection of TMPRSS2-ERG fusion genes include reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with a detection limit of 1 fmol at urinary condition. RT-PCR is time consuming, costly, and inapplicable for multiplexing. Ability to identify multiple fusion genes in a single sample has become important for diagnostic and clinical purposes. There is a need for a sensitive diagnostic test to detect multiple TMPRSS2-ERG fusion genes for an early diagnosis and prognosis of prostate cancer. Here, we propose to develop an assay for prostate cancer diagnosis using oligonucleotide-functionalized quantum dot and magnetic microparticle for optical detection of rearranged TMPRSS2-ERG fusion genes at a low concentration in urine. We found that our assay was able to identify three different types of fusion gene with a wide detection range and detection limit of 1 fmol (almost the same level of the RT-PCR result reported). Here, we show detection of multiple TMPRSS2-ERG fusion genes using color-coded oligonucleotides in cell lysate and urine.

  13. Identification of novel fusion genes with 28S ribosomal DNA in hematologic malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Satoru; Taki, Tomohiko; Nagoshi, Hisao; Chinen, Yoshiaki; Yokokawa, Yuichi; Kanegane, Hirokazu; Matsumoto, Yosuke; Kuroda, Junya; Horiike, Shigeo; Nishida, Kazuhiro; Taniwaki, Masafumi

    2014-04-01

    Fusion genes are frequently observed in hematologic malignancies and soft tissue sarcomas, and are usually associated with chromosome abnormalities. Many of these fusion genes create in-frame fusion transcripts that result in the production of fusion proteins, and some of which aid tumorigenesis. These fusion proteins are often associated with disease phenotype and clinical outcome, and act as markers for minimal residual disease and indicators of therapeutic targets. Here, we identified the 28S ribosomal DNA (RN28S1) gene as a novel fusion partner of the B-cell leukemia/lymphoma 11B gene (BCL11B), the immunoglobulin κ variable 3-20 gene (IGKV3-20) and the component of oligomeric Golgi complex 1 gene (COG1) in hematologic malignancies. The RN28S1-BCL11B fusion transcript was identified in a case with mixed-lineage (T/myeloid) acute leukemia having t(6;14)(q25;q32) by cDNA bubble PCR using BCL11B primers; however, the gene fused to BCL11B on 14q32 was not on 6q25. IGKV3-20-RN28S1 and COG1-RN28S1 fusion transcripts were identified in the Burkitt lymphoma cell line HBL-5, and the multiple myeloma cell line KMS-18. RN28S1 would not translate, and the breakpoints in partner genes of RN28S1 were within the coding exons, suggesting that disruption of fusion partners by fusion to RN28S1 is the possible mechanism of tumorigenesis. Although further analysis is needed to elucidate the mechanism(s) through which these RN28S1-related fusions play roles in tumorigenesis, our findings provide important insights into the role of rDNA function in human genomic architecture and tumorigenesis.

  14. An Efficient Method for Identifying Gene Fusions by Targeted RNA Sequencing from Fresh Frozen and FFPE Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scolnick, Jonathan A; Dimon, Michelle; Wang, I-Ching; Huelga, Stephanie C; Amorese, Douglas A

    2015-01-01

    Fusion genes are known to be key drivers of tumor growth in several types of cancer. Traditionally, detecting fusion genes has been a difficult task based on fluorescent in situ hybridization to detect chromosomal abnormalities. More recently, RNA sequencing has enabled an increased pace of fusion gene identification. However, RNA-Seq is inefficient for the identification of fusion genes due to the high number of sequencing reads needed to detect the small number of fusion transcripts present in cells of interest. Here we describe a method, Single Primer Enrichment Technology (SPET), for targeted RNA sequencing that is customizable to any target genes, is simple to use, and efficiently detects gene fusions. Using SPET to target 5701 exons of 401 known cancer fusion genes for sequencing, we were able to identify known and previously unreported gene fusions from both fresh-frozen and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue RNA in both normal tissue and cancer cells.

  15. An Efficient Method for Identifying Gene Fusions by Targeted RNA Sequencing from Fresh Frozen and FFPE Samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan A Scolnick

    Full Text Available Fusion genes are known to be key drivers of tumor growth in several types of cancer. Traditionally, detecting fusion genes has been a difficult task based on fluorescent in situ hybridization to detect chromosomal abnormalities. More recently, RNA sequencing has enabled an increased pace of fusion gene identification. However, RNA-Seq is inefficient for the identification of fusion genes due to the high number of sequencing reads needed to detect the small number of fusion transcripts present in cells of interest. Here we describe a method, Single Primer Enrichment Technology (SPET, for targeted RNA sequencing that is customizable to any target genes, is simple to use, and efficiently detects gene fusions. Using SPET to target 5701 exons of 401 known cancer fusion genes for sequencing, we were able to identify known and previously unreported gene fusions from both fresh-frozen and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE tissue RNA in both normal tissue and cancer cells.

  16. Engineering and Functional Characterization of Fusion Genes Identifies Novel Oncogenic Drivers of Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hengyu; Villafane, Nicole; Dogruluk, Turgut; Grzeskowiak, Caitlin L; Kong, Kathleen; Tsang, Yiu Huen; Zagorodna, Oksana; Pantazi, Angeliki; Yang, Lixing; Neill, Nicholas J; Kim, Young Won; Creighton, Chad J; Verhaak, Roel G; Mills, Gordon B; Park, Peter J; Kucherlapati, Raju; Scott, Kenneth L

    2017-07-01

    Oncogenic gene fusions drive many human cancers, but tools to more quickly unravel their functional contributions are needed. Here we describe methodology permitting fusion gene construction for functional evaluation. Using this strategy, we engineered the known fusion oncogenes, BCR-ABL1, EML4-ALK , and ETV6-NTRK3, as well as 20 previously uncharacterized fusion genes identified in The Cancer Genome Atlas datasets. In addition to confirming oncogenic activity of the known fusion oncogenes engineered by our construction strategy, we validated five novel fusion genes involving MET, NTRK2 , and BRAF kinases that exhibited potent transforming activity and conferred sensitivity to FDA-approved kinase inhibitors. Our fusion construction strategy also enabled domain-function studies of BRAF fusion genes. Our results confirmed other reports that the transforming activity of BRAF fusions results from truncation-mediated loss of inhibitory domains within the N-terminus of the BRAF protein. BRAF mutations residing within this inhibitory region may provide a means for BRAF activation in cancer, therefore we leveraged the modular design of our fusion gene construction methodology to screen N-terminal domain mutations discovered in tumors that are wild-type at the BRAF mutation hotspot, V600. We identified an oncogenic mutation, F247L, whose expression robustly activated the MAPK pathway and sensitized cells to BRAF and MEK inhibitors. When applied broadly, these tools will facilitate rapid fusion gene construction for subsequent functional characterization and translation into personalized treatment strategies. Cancer Res; 77(13); 3502-12. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  17. Platelet-derived growth factor receptors (PDGFRs) fusion genes involvement in hematological malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appiah-Kubi, Kwaku; Lan, Ting; Wang, Ying; Qian, Hai; Wu, Min; Yao, Xiaoyuan; Wu, Yan; Chen, Yongchang

    2017-01-01

    To investigate oncogenic platelet-derived growth factor receptor(PDGFR) fusion genes involvement in hematological malignancies, the advances in the PDGFR fusion genes diagnosis and development of PDGFR fusions inhibitors. Literature search was done using terms "PDGFR and Fusion" or "PDGFR and Myeloid neoplasm" or 'PDGFR and Lymphoid neoplasm' or "PDGFR Fusion Diagnosis" or "PDGFR Fusion Targets" in databases including PubMed, ASCO.org, and Medscape. Out of the 36 fusions detected, ETV6(TEL)-PDGFRB and FIP1L1-PDGFRA fusions were frequently detected, 33 are as a result of chromosomal translocation, FIP1L1-PDGFRA and EBF1-PDGFRB are the result of chromosomal deletion and CDK5RAP2- PDGFRΑ is the result of chromosomal insertion. Seven of the 34 rare fusions have detectable reciprocals. RNA aptamers are promising therapeutic target of PDGFRs and diagnostic tools of PDGFRs fusion genes. Also, PDGFRs have variable prospective therapeutic strategies including small molecules, RNA aptamers, and interference therapeutics as well as development of adaptor protein Lnk mimetic drugs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Reanalysis of RNA-sequencing data reveals several additional fusion genes with multiple isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangaspeska, Sara; Hultsch, Susanne; Edgren, Henrik; Nicorici, Daniel; Murumägi, Astrid; Kallioniemi, Olli

    2012-01-01

    RNA-sequencing and tailored bioinformatic methodologies have paved the way for identification of expressed fusion genes from the chaotic genomes of solid tumors. We have recently successfully exploited RNA-sequencing for the discovery of 24 novel fusion genes in breast cancer. Here, we demonstrate the importance of continuous optimization of the bioinformatic methodology for this purpose, and report the discovery and experimental validation of 13 additional fusion genes from the same samples. Integration of copy number profiling with the RNA-sequencing results revealed that the majority of the gene fusions were promoter-donating events that occurred at copy number transition points or involved high-level DNA-amplifications. Sequencing of genomic fusion break points confirmed that DNA-level rearrangements underlie selected fusion transcripts. Furthermore, a significant portion (>60%) of the fusion genes were alternatively spliced. This illustrates the importance of reanalyzing sequencing data as gene definitions change and bioinformatic methods improve, and highlights the previously unforeseen isoform diversity among fusion transcripts.

  19. Identification of Gene Mutations and Fusion Genes in Patients with Sézary Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Aparna; Rabionet, Raquel; Espinet, Blanca; Zapata, Luis; Puiggros, Anna; Melero, Carme; Puig, Anna; Sarria-Trujillo, Yaris; Ossowski, Stephan; Garcia-Muret, Maria P; Estrach, Teresa; Servitje, Octavio; Lopez-Lerma, Ingrid; Gallardo, Fernando; Pujol, Ramon M; Estivill, Xavier

    2016-07-01

    Sézary syndrome is a leukemic form of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma with an aggressive clinical course. The genetic etiology of the disease is poorly understood, with chromosomal abnormalities and mutations in some genes being involved in the disease. The goal of our study was to understand the genetic basis of the disease by looking for driver gene mutations and fusion genes in 15 erythrodermic patients with circulating Sézary cells, 14 of them fulfilling the diagnostic criteria of Sézary syndrome. We have discovered genes that could be involved in the pathogenesis of Sézary syndrome. Some of the genes that are affected by somatic point mutations include ITPR1, ITPR2, DSC1, RIPK2, IL6, and RAG2, with some of them mutated in more than one patient. We observed several somatic copy number variations shared between patients, including deletions and duplications of large segments of chromosome 17. Genes with potential function in the T-cell receptor signaling pathway and tumorigenesis were disrupted in Sézary syndrome patients, for example, CBLB, RASA2, BCL7C, RAMP3, TBRG4, and DAD1. Furthermore, we discovered several fusion events of interest involving RASA2, NFKB2, BCR, FASN, ZEB1, TYK2, and SGMS1. Our work has implications for the development of potential therapeutic approaches for this aggressive disease. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. SNAP-25 gene family members differentially support secretory vesicle fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Swati; Saarloos, Ingrid; Kooistra, Robbelien; van de Bospoort, Rhea; Verhage, Matthijs; Toonen, Ruud F

    2017-06-01

    Neuronal dense-core vesicles (DCVs) transport and secrete neuropeptides necessary for development, plasticity and survival, but little is known about their fusion mechanism. We show that Snap-25 -null mutant (SNAP-25 KO) neurons, previously shown to degenerate after 4 days in vitro (DIV), contain fewer DCVs and have reduced DCV fusion probability in surviving neurons at DIV14. At DIV3, before degeneration, SNAP-25 KO neurons show normal DCV fusion, but one day later fusion is significantly reduced. To test if other SNAP homologs support DCV fusion, we expressed SNAP-23, SNAP-29 or SNAP-47 in SNAP-25 KO neurons. SNAP-23 and SNAP-29 rescued viability and supported DCV fusion in SNAP-25 KO neurons, but SNAP-23 did so more efficiently. SNAP-23 also rescued synaptic vesicle (SV) fusion while SNAP-29 did not. SNAP-47 failed to rescue viability and did not support DCV or SV fusion. These data demonstrate a developmental switch, in hippocampal neurons between DIV3 and DIV4, where DCV fusion becomes SNAP-25 dependent. Furthermore, SNAP-25 homologs support DCV and SV fusion and neuronal viability to variable extents - SNAP-23 most effectively, SNAP-29 less so and SNAP-47 ineffectively. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  1. Involvement of DPP9 in gene fusions in serous ovarian carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smebye, Marianne Lislerud; Agostini, Antonio; Johannessen, Bjarne; Thorsen, Jim; Davidson, Ben; Tropé, Claes Göran; Heim, Sverre; Skotheim, Rolf Inge; Micci, Francesca

    2017-09-11

    A fusion gene is a hybrid gene consisting of parts from two previously independent genes. Chromosomal rearrangements leading to gene breakage are frequent in high-grade serous ovarian carcinomas and have been reported as a common mechanism for inactivating tumor suppressor genes. However, no fusion genes have been repeatedly reported to be recurrent driver events in ovarian carcinogenesis. We combined genomic and transcriptomic information to identify novel fusion gene candidates and aberrantly expressed genes in ovarian carcinomas. Examined were 19 previously karyotyped ovarian carcinomas (18 of the serous histotype and one undifferentiated). First, karyotypic aberrations were compared to fusion gene candidates identified by RNA sequencing (RNA-seq). In addition, we used exon-level gene expression microarrays as a screening tool to identify aberrantly expressed genes possibly involved in gene fusion events, and compared the findings to the RNA-seq data. We found a DPP9-PPP6R3 fusion transcript in one tumor showing a matching genomic 11;19-translocation. Another tumor had a rearrangement of DPP9 with PLIN3. Both rearrangements were associated with diminished expression of the 3' end of DPP9 corresponding to the breakpoints identified by RNA-seq. For the exon-level expression analysis, candidate fusion partner genes were ranked according to deviating expression compared to the median of the sample set. The results were collated with data obtained from the RNA-seq analysis. Several fusion candidates were identified, among them TMEM123-MMP27, ZBTB46-WFDC13, and PLXNB1-PRKAR2A, all of which led to stronger expression of the 3' genes. In view of our previous findings of nonrandom rearrangements of chromosome 19 in this cancer type, particular emphasis was given to changes of this chromosome and a DDA1-FAM129C fusion event was identified. We have identified novel fusion gene candidates in high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma. DPP9 was involved in two different fusion

  2. Origin and Ascendancy of a Chimeric Fusion Gene: The β/δ-Globin Gene of Paenungulate Mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opazo, Juan C.; Sloan, Angela M.; Campbell, Kevin L.

    2009-01-01

    The δ-globin gene (HBD) of eutherian mammals exhibits a propensity for recombinational exchange with the closely linked β-globin gene (HBB) and has been independently converted by the HBB gene in multiple lineages. Here we report the presence of a chimeric β/δ fusion gene in the African elephant (Loxodonta africana) that was created by unequal crossing-over between misaligned HBD and HBB paralogs. The recombinant chromosome that harbors the β/δ fusion gene in elephants is structurally similar to the “anti-Lepore” duplication mutant of humans (the reciprocal exchange product of the hemoglobin Lepore deletion mutant). However, the situation in the African elephant is unique in that the chimeric β/δ fusion gene supplanted the parental HBB gene and is therefore solely responsible for synthesizing the β-chain subunits of adult hemoglobin. A phylogenetic survey of β-like globin genes in afrotherian and xenarthran mammals revealed that the origin of the chimeric β/δ fusion gene and the concomitant inactivation of the HBB gene predated the radiation of “Paenungulata,” a clade of afrotherian mammals that includes three orders: Proboscidea (elephants), Sirenia (dugongs and manatees), and Hyracoidea (hyraxes). The reduced fitness of the human Hb Lepore deletion mutant helps to explain why independently derived β/δ fusion genes (which occur on an anti-Lepore chromosome) have been fixed in a number of mammalian lineages, whereas the reciprocal δ/β fusion gene (which occurs on a Lepore chromosome) has yet to be documented in any nonhuman mammal. This illustrates how the evolutionary fates of chimeric fusion genes can be strongly influenced by their recombinational mode of origin. PMID:19332641

  3. GFusion: an Effective Algorithm to Identify Fusion Genes from Cancer RNA-Seq Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian; Chen, Qi; Wu, Jing; Han, Ping; Song, Xiaofeng

    2017-07-31

    Fusion gene derived from genomic rearrangement plays a key role in cancer initiation. The discovery of novel gene fusions may be of significant importance in cancer diagnosis and treatment. Meanwhile, next generation sequencing technology provide a sensitive and efficient way to identify gene fusions in genomic levels. However, there are still many challenges and limitations remaining in the existing methods which only rely on unmapped reads or discordant alignment fragments. In this work we have developed GFusion, a novel method using RNA-Seq data, to identify the fusion genes. This pipeline performs multiple alignments and strict filtering algorithm to improve sensitivity and reduce the false positive rate. GFusion successfully detected 34 from 43 previously reported fusions in four cancer datasets. We also demonstrated the effectiveness of GFusion using 24 million 76 bp paired-end reads simulation data which contains 42 artificial fusion genes, among which GFusion successfully discovered 37 fusion genes. Compared with existing methods, GFusion presented higher sensitivity and lower false positive rate. The GFusion pipeline can be accessed freely for non-commercial purposes at: https://github.com/xiaofengsong/GFusion .

  4. Engineering and Functional Characterization of Fusion Genes Identifies Novel Oncogenic Drivers of Cancer. | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oncogenic gene fusions drive many human cancers, but tools to more quickly unravel their functional contributions are needed. Here we describe methodology permitting fusion gene construction for functional evaluation. Using this strategy, we engineered the known fusion oncogenes, BCR-ABL1, EML4-ALK, and ETV6-NTRK3, as well as 20 previously uncharacterized fusion genes identified in TCGA datasets.

  5. FuseFISH : robust detection of transcribed gene fusions in single cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Semrau, Stefan; Crosetto, Nicola; Bienko, Magda; Boni, Marina; Bernasconi, Paolo; Chiarle, Roberto; van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Transcribed gene fusions are key biomarkers in many hematologic and solid tumors, often representing the primary oncogenic driver mutation. Here, we report an experimental and computational pipeline for detecting fusion transcripts using single-molecule RNA FISH and unbiased correlation analysis

  6. Analysis of Fusion Genes by NanoString System: A Role in Lung Cytology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alì, Greta; Bruno, Rossella; Savino, Mauro; Giannini, Riccardo; Pelliccioni, Serena; Menghi, Maura; Boldrini, Laura; Proietti, Agnese; Chella, Antonio; Ribechini, Alessandro; Fontanini, Gabriella

    2018-01-26

    - Patients with non-small cell lung cancer harboring ALK receptor tyrosine kinase ( ALK), ROS proto-oncogene 1 ( ROS1), and ret proto-oncogene ( RET) gene rearrangements can benefit from specific kinase inhibitors. Detection of fusion genes is critical for determining the best treatment. Assessing rearrangements in non-small cell lung cancer remains challenging, particularly for lung cytology. - To examine the possible application of the multiplex, transcript-based NanoString system (NanoString Technologies, Seattle, Washington) in the evaluation of fusion genes in lung adenocarcinoma samples. - This study is a narrative literature review. Studies about NanoString, gene fusions, and lung adenocarcinoma were collected from PubMed (National Center for Biotechnology Information, Bethesda, Maryland). We found 7 articles about the application of the NanoString system to detect fusion genes on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor tissues and one article evaluating the adequacy of lung cytologic specimens for NanoString gene expression analysis. - To maximize the yield of molecular tests on small lung biopsies, the NanoString nCounter system has been suggested to detect fusion genes. NanoString fusion gene assays have been successfully applied on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues. Although there are only few studies available, the application of NanoString assays may also be feasible in lung cytology. According to available data, the NanoString system could strengthen the routine molecular characterization of lung adenocarcinoma.

  7. Fusion of the NUP98 gene with the LEDGF/p52 gene defines a recurrent acute myeloid leukemia translocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Mario

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The NUP98 gene is involved in multiple rearrangements in haematological malignancy. The leukemic cells in an acute myeloid leukemia (AML patient with a t(9;11(p22;p15 were recently shown to have a fusion between the NUP98 gene and the LEDGF gene but it was not demonstrated that this fusion was recurrent in other leukaemia patients with the same translocation. Results We used RT-PCR to analyse the leukemic cells from an AML patient who presented with a cytogenetically identical translocation as the sole chromosomal abnormality. A NUP98-LEDGF fusion transcript was observed and confirmed by sequencing. The reciprocal transcript was also observed. The fusion transcript was not detectable during remission and recurred at relapse. The breakpoints in the NUP98 and LEDGF genes were different to those previously reported. The NUP98 breakpoint occurs in the intron between exons 8 and 9. It is the most 5' breakpoint reported in a translocation involving the NUP98 gene. All of the LEDGF gene is included in the fusion except for exon 1 which codes for the first 24 amino terminal amino acids. Conclusions Our results show that fusion of the NUP98 and LEDGF genes is a new recurrent translocation in AML.

  8. Computerized tomography in normal abdomen: retrospective study of renal hila angles; Tomografia computadorizada de abdome normal: estudo retrospectivo das angulacoes dos hilos renais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakate, Makoto; Sakate, Alzira Teruio Yida; Yamashita, Seizo; Teixeira, Altamir dos Santos; Correia, Luis Antonio [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina]. E-mail: msakate@fmb.unesp.br; Barbosa, Luciano [Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Biociencias

    2009-01-15

    To obtain mean angulation values for renal hila in relation to the horizontal plane traced over the right and left spinal erector muscles, considering the center of the lumbar vertebral spine as a parameter for measuring the renal hila angles. The authors have analyzed 250 abdominal computed tomography studies of both male and female healthy individuals (128 men with mean age 52.45 {+-} 17.42 years, and 122 women with mean age 54.39 {+-} 18.27 years), corresponding to 500 renal hila evaluated. The mean angulation of each hilum in relation to the horizontal plane was obtained taking acute angles into consideration. The comparative study have not found any statistically significant difference in acute angles of renal hila between male and female individuals. The statistical analysis demonstrated limits of 40.40 deg and 44.54 deg for mean right hilum angulation and 39.91 deg and 43.23 deg for mean left hilum angulation, with a confidence interval of 95% . Renal hila present similar angulation independently of sex. Higher angulation values correspond to hyper-rotation or excessive rotation, and lower angulation values, to incomplete or reverse rotation. (author)

  9. Novel fusion genes and chimeric transcripts in ependymal tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Thale Kristin; Panagopoulos, Ioannis; Gorunova, Ludmila

    2016-01-01

    with subsequent Sanger sequencing was used to validate the potential fusions. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) using locus-specific probes was also performed. A total of 841 candidate chimeric transcripts were identified in the 12 tumors, with an average of 49 unique candidate fusions per tumor. After......We have previously identified two ALK rearrangements in a subset of ependymal tumors using a combination of cytogenetic data and RNA sequencing. The aim of this study was to perform an unbiased search for fusion transcripts in our entire series of ependymal tumors. Fusion analysis was performed...... using the FusionCatcher algorithm on 12 RNA-sequenced ependymal tumors. Candidate transcripts were prioritized based on the software's filtering and manual visualization using the BLAST (Basic Local Alignment Search Tool) and BLAT (BLAST-like alignment tool) tools. Genomic and reverse transcriptase PCR...

  10. FuMa: reporting overlap in RNA-seq detected fusion genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogstrate, Youri; Böttcher, René; Hiltemann, Saskia; van der Spek, Peter J; Jenster, Guido; Stubbs, Andrew P

    2016-04-15

    A new generation of tools that identify fusion genes in RNA-seq data is limited in either sensitivity and or specificity. To allow further downstream analysis and to estimate performance, predicted fusion genes from different tools have to be compared. However, the transcriptomic context complicates genomic location-based matching. FusionMatcher (FuMa) is a program that reports identical fusion genes based on gene-name annotations. FuMa automatically compares and summarizes all combinations of two or more datasets in a single run, without additional programming necessary. FuMa uses one gene annotation, avoiding mismatches caused by tool-specific gene annotations. FuMa matches 10% more fusion genes compared with exact gene matching due to overlapping genes and accepts intermediate output files that allow a stepwise analysis of corresponding tools. The code is available at: https://github.com/ErasmusMC-Bioinformatics/fuma and available for Galaxy in the tool sheds and directly accessible at https://bioinf-galaxian.erasmusmc.nl/galaxy/ y.hoogstrate@erasmusmc.nl or a.stubbs@erasmusmc.nl Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Transcriptomic Profiling and Functional Characterization of Fusion Genes in Recurrent Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0403 TITLE: Transcriptomic Profiling and Functional Characterization of Fusion Genes in Recurrent Ovarian Cancer ...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Transcriptomic Profiling and Functional Characterization of Fusion Genes in Recurrent Ovarian Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...STATEMENT Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT High-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC) is known for

  12. LINE FUSION GENES: a database of LINE expression in human genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Hong-Seog

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long Interspersed Nuclear Elements (LINEs are the most abundant retrotransposons in humans. About 79% of human genes are estimated to contain at least one segment of LINE per transcription unit. Recent studies have shown that LINE elements can affect protein sequences, splicing patterns and expression of human genes. Description We have developed a database, LINE FUSION GENES, for elucidating LINE expression throughout the human gene database. We searched the 28,171 genes listed in the NCBI database for LINE elements and analyzed their structures and expression patterns. The results show that the mRNA sequences of 1,329 genes were affected by LINE expression. The LINE expression types were classified on the basis of LINEs in the 5' UTR, exon or 3' UTR sequences of the mRNAs. Our database provides further information, such as the tissue distribution and chromosomal location of the genes, and the domain structure that is changed by LINE integration. We have linked all the accession numbers to the NCBI data bank to provide mRNA sequences for subsequent users. Conclusion We believe that our work will interest genome scientists and might help them to gain insight into the implications of LINE expression for human evolution and disease. Availability http://www.primate.or.kr/line

  13. Tyrosine kinase fusion genes in pediatric BCR-ABL1-like acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boer, Judith M; Steeghs, Elisabeth M P; Marchante, João R M; Boeree, Aurélie; Beaudoin, James J; Beverloo, H Berna; Kuiper, Roland P; Escherich, Gabriele; van der Velden, Vincent H J; van der Schoot, C Ellen; de Groot-Kruseman, Hester A; Pieters, Rob; den Boer, Monique L

    2017-01-17

    Approximately 15% of pediatric B cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL) is characterized by gene expression similar to that of BCR-ABL1-positive disease and unfavorable prognosis. This BCR-ABL1-like subtype shows a high frequency of B-cell development gene aberrations and tyrosine kinase-activating lesions. To evaluate the clinical significance of tyrosine kinase gene fusions in children with BCP-ALL, we studied the frequency of recently identified tyrosine kinase fusions, associated genetic features, and prognosis in a representative Dutch/German cohort. We identified 14 tyrosine kinase fusions among 77 BCR-ABL1-like cases (18%) and none among 76 non-BCR-ABL1-like B-other cases. Novel exon fusions were identified for RCSD1-ABL2 and TERF2-JAK2. JAK2 mutation was mutually exclusive with tyrosine kinase fusions and only occurred in cases with high CRLF2 expression. The non/late response rate and levels of minimal residual disease in the fusion-positive BCR-ABL1-like group were higher than in the non-BCR-ABL1-like B-others (pfusion-negative BCR-ABL1-like group. The 8-year cumulative incidence of relapse in the fusion-positive BCR-ABL1-like group (35%) was comparable with that in the fusion-negative BCR-ABL1-like group (35%), and worse than in the non-BCR-ABL1-like B-other group (17%, p=0.07). IKZF1 deletions, predominantly other than the dominant-negative isoform and full deletion, co-occurred with tyrosine kinase fusions. This study shows that tyrosine kinase fusion-positive cases are a high-risk subtype of BCP-ALL, which warrants further studies with specific kinase inhibitors to improve outcome.

  14. Low frequency of ESRRA-C11orf20 fusion gene in ovarian carcinomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Micci

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The identification of recurrent gene fusions in common epithelial cancers--for example, TMPRSS2/ERG in prostate cancer and EML4/ALK in nonsmall cell lung carcinomas--has raised the question of whether fusion genes are pathogenetically important also in ovarian carcinomas. The first recurrent fusion transcript in serous ovarian carcinomas was reported by Salzman et al. in 2011, who used deep paired-end sequencing to detect the fusion gene ESRRA-C11orf20 in 10 out of 67 (15% serous ovarian carcinomas examined, a finding that holds great promise for our understanding of ovarian tumorigenesis as well as, potentially, for new treatment strategies. We wanted to test how frequent the ESRRA/C11orf20 fusion is in ovarian carcinomas of all subtypes, and therefore examined a series of 230 ovarian carcinomas of which 197 were of the serous subtype and 163 of the 197 were of stages III and IV--that is, the very same carcinoma subset where the fusion transcript had been found. We performed PCR and high-throughput sequencing analyses in search of the fusion transcript. We used the same primers described previously for the detection of the fusion and the same primer combination, but found no ESRRA/C11orf20 fusion in our series. A synthetic DNA plasmid containing the reported ESRRA/C11orf20 fusion was included as a positive control for our PCR experiments. Data from high-throughput sequencing of 23 ovarian carcinomas were screened in search of alternative partner(s for the ESRRA and/or C11orf20 gene, but none was found. We conclude that the frequency of the ESRRA/C11orf20 gene fusion in serous ovarian carcinomas of stages III and IV must be considerable less than that reported previously (0/163 in our experience compared with 10/67 in the previous study. At the very least, it seems clear that the said fusion cannot be a common pathogenetic event in this tumor type.

  15. Recurrent Fusion Genes in Gastric Cancer: CLDN18-ARHGAP26 Induces Loss of Epithelial Integrity

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    Fei Yao

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Genome rearrangements, a hallmark of cancer, can result in gene fusions with oncogenic properties. Using DNA paired-end-tag (DNA-PET whole-genome sequencing, we analyzed 15 gastric cancers (GCs from Southeast Asians. Rearrangements were enriched in open chromatin and shaped by chromatin structure. We identified seven rearrangement hot spots and 136 gene fusions. In three out of 100 GC cases, we found recurrent fusions between CLDN18, a tight junction gene, and ARHGAP26, a gene encoding a RHOA inhibitor. Epithelial cell lines expressing CLDN18-ARHGAP26 displayed a dramatic loss of epithelial phenotype and long protrusions indicative of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT. Fusion-positive cell lines showed impaired barrier properties, reduced cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix adhesion, retarded wound healing, and inhibition of RHOA. Gain of invasion was seen in cancer cell lines expressing the fusion. Thus, CLDN18-ARHGAP26 mediates epithelial disintegration, possibly leading to stomach H+ leakage, and the fusion might contribute to invasiveness once a cell is transformed.

  16. Role of the TMPRSS2-ERG Gene Fusion in Prostate Cancer

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    Scott A. Tomlins

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusions are the predominant molecular subtype of prostate cancer. Here, we explored the role of TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion product using in vitro and in vivo model systems. Transgenic mice expressing the ERG gene fusion product under androgen-regulation develop mouse prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN, a precursor lesion of prostate cancer. Introduction of the ERG gene fusion product into primary or immortalized benign prostate epithelial cells induced an invasion-associated transcriptional program but did not increase cellular proliferation or anchorage-independent growth. These results suggest that TMPRSS2-ERG may not be sufficient for transformation in the absence of secondary molecular lesions. Transcriptional profiling of ERG knockdown in the TMPPRSS2-ERG-positive prostate cancer cell line VCaP revealed decreased expression of genes over-expressed in prostate cancer versus PIN and genes overexpressed in ETS-positive versus -negative prostate cancers in addition to inhibiting invasion. ERG knockdown in VCaP cells also induced a transcriptional program consistent with prostate differentiation. Importantly, VCaP cells and benign prostate cells overexpressing ERG directly engage components of the plasminogen activation pathway to mediate cellular invasion, potentially representing a downstream ETS target susceptible to therapeutic intervention. Our results support previous work suggesting that TMPRSS2-ERG fusions mediate invasion, consistent with the defining histologic distinction between PIN and prostate cancer.

  17. Spinal Fusion in the Next Generation: Gene and Cell Therapy Approaches

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    Marta Barba

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone fusion represents a challenge in the orthopedics practice, being especially indicated for spine disorders. Spinal fusion can be defined as the bony union between two vertebral bodies obtained through the surgical introduction of an osteoconductive, osteoinductive, and osteogenic compound. Autogenous bone graft provides all these three qualities and is considered the gold standard. However, a high morbidity is associated with the harvest procedure. Intensive research efforts have been spent during the last decades to develop new approaches and technologies for successful spine fusion. In recent years, cell and gene therapies have attracted great interest from the scientific community. The improved knowledge of both mesenchymal stem cell biology and osteogenic molecules allowed their use in regenerative medicine, representing attractive approaches to achieve bone regeneration also in spinal surgery applications. In this review we aim to describe the developing gene- and cell-based bone regenerative approaches as promising future trends in spine fusion.

  18. Next generation sequencing approach for detecting 491 fusion genes from human cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urakami, Kenichi; Shimoda, Yuji; Ohshima, Keiichi; Nagashima, Takeshi; Serizawa, Masakuni; Tanabe, Tomoe; Saito, Junko; Usui, Tamiko; Watanabe, Yuko; Naruoka, Akane; Ohnami, Sumiko; Ohnami, Shumpei; Mochizuki, Tohru; Kusuhara, Masatoshi; Yamaguchi, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation DNA sequencing (NGS) of the genomes of cancer cells is contributing to new discoveries that illuminate the mechanisms of tumorigenesis. To this end, the International Cancer Genome Consortium and The Cancer Genome Atlas are investigating novel alterations of genes that will define the pathways and mechanisms of the development and growth of cancers. These efforts contribute to the development of innovative pharmaceuticals as well as to the introduction of genome sequencing as a component of personalized medicine. In particular, chromosomal translocations that fuse coding sequences serve as important pharmaceutical targets and diagnostic markers given their association with tumorigenesis. Although increasing numbers of fusion genes are being discovered using NGS, the methodology used to identify such fusion genes is complicated, expensive, and requires relatively large samples. Here, to address these problems, we describe the design and development of a panel of 491 fusion genes that performed well in the analysis of cultured human cancer cell lines and 600 clinical tumor specimens.

  19. A simple, flexible and efficient PCR-fusion/Gateway cloning procedure for gene fusion, site-directed mutagenesis, short sequence insertion and domain deletions and swaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etchells J Peter

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The progress and completion of various plant genome sequencing projects has paved the way for diverse functional genomic studies that involve cloning, modification and subsequent expression of target genes. This requires flexible and efficient procedures for generating binary vectors containing: gene fusions, variants from site-directed mutagenesis, addition of protein tags together with domain swaps and deletions. Furthermore, efficient cloning procedures, ideally high throughput, are essential for pyramiding of multiple gene constructs. Results Here, we present a simple, flexible and efficient PCR-fusion/Gateway cloning procedure for construction of binary vectors for a range of gene fusions or variants with single or multiple nucleotide substitutions, short sequence insertions, domain deletions and swaps. Results from selected applications of the procedure which include ORF fusion, introduction of Cys>Ser mutations, insertion of StrepII tag sequence and domain swaps for Arabidopsis secondary cell wall AtCesA genes are demonstrated. Conclusion The PCR-fusion/Gateway cloning procedure described provides an elegant, simple and efficient solution for a wide range of diverse and complicated cloning tasks. Through streamlined cloning of sets of gene fusions and modification variants into binary vectors for systematic functional studies of gene families, our method allows for efficient utilization of the growing sequence and expression data.

  20. A simple, flexible and efficient PCR-fusion/Gateway cloning procedure for gene fusion, site-directed mutagenesis, short sequence insertion and domain deletions and swaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanassov, Ivan I; Atanassov, Ilian I; Etchells, J Peter; Turner, Simon R

    2009-01-01

    Background The progress and completion of various plant genome sequencing projects has paved the way for diverse functional genomic studies that involve cloning, modification and subsequent expression of target genes. This requires flexible and efficient procedures for generating binary vectors containing: gene fusions, variants from site-directed mutagenesis, addition of protein tags together with domain swaps and deletions. Furthermore, efficient cloning procedures, ideally high throughput, are essential for pyramiding of multiple gene constructs. Results Here, we present a simple, flexible and efficient PCR-fusion/Gateway cloning procedure for construction of binary vectors for a range of gene fusions or variants with single or multiple nucleotide substitutions, short sequence insertions, domain deletions and swaps. Results from selected applications of the procedure which include ORF fusion, introduction of Cys>Ser mutations, insertion of StrepII tag sequence and domain swaps for Arabidopsis secondary cell wall AtCesA genes are demonstrated. Conclusion The PCR-fusion/Gateway cloning procedure described provides an elegant, simple and efficient solution for a wide range of diverse and complicated cloning tasks. Through streamlined cloning of sets of gene fusions and modification variants into binary vectors for systematic functional studies of gene families, our method allows for efficient utilization of the growing sequence and expression data. PMID:19863796

  1. Identification and Characterization of Genes Required for Cell-to-Cell Fusion in Neurospora crassa ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Ci; Iyer, Priyadarshini; Herkal, Amrita; Abdullah, Julia; Stout, Angela; Free, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    A screening procedure was used to identify cell fusion (hyphal anastomosis) mutants in the Neurospora crassa single gene deletion library. Mutants with alterations in 24 cell fusion genes required for cell fusion between conidial anastomosis tubes (CATs) were identified and characterized. The cell fusion genes identified included 14 genes that are likely to function in signal transduction pathways needed for cell fusion to occur (mik-1, mek-1, mak-1, nrc-1, mek-2, mak-2, rac-1, pp2A, so/ham-1, ham-2, ham-3, ham-5, ham-9, and mob3). The screening experiments also identified four transcription factors that are required for cell fusion (adv-1, ada-3, rco-1, and snf5). Three genes encoding proteins likely to be involved in the process of vesicular trafficking were also identified as needed for cell fusion during the screening (amph-1, ham-10, pkr1). Three of the genes identified by the screening procedure, ham-6, ham-7, and ham-8, encode proteins that might function in mediating the plasma membrane fusion event. Three of the putative signal transduction proteins, three of the transcription factors, the three putative vesicular trafficking proteins, and the three proteins that might function in mediating cell fusion had not been identified previously as required for cell fusion. PMID:21666072

  2. Xp11 neoplasm with melanocytic differentiation of the prostate harbouring the novel NONO-TFE3 gene fusion: report of a unique case expanding the gene fusion spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Tong; Xia, Qiu-Yuan; Ni, Hao; Wang, Zi-Yu; Ye, Sheng-Bing; Li, Rui; Wang, Xuan; Lv, Jing-Huan; Shi, Shan-Shan; Ma, Heng-Hui; Lu, Zhen-Feng; Shen, Qin; Zhou, Xiao-Jun; Rao, Qiu

    2016-09-01

    Recently, an increasing number of TFE3 rearrangement-associated tumours have been reported, such as TFE3 rearrangement-associated perivascular epithelioid cell tumours (PEComas), melanotic Xp11 translocation renal cancers and melanotic Xp11 neoplasms. We have suggested that these tumours belong to a single clinicopathological spectrum. 'Xp11 neoplasm with melanocytic differentiation' or 'melanotic Xp11 neoplasm' have been proposed to designate this unique neoplasm. Herein, we describe the first case of an Xp11 neoplasm with melanocytic differentiation to be described in the prostate, bearing the novel NONO-TFE3 gene fusion. This study both adds to the spectrum regarding melanotic Xp11 neoplasms and expands its gene fusion spectrum. Moreover, we discuss the relationship of these rare tumours to neoplasms such as conventional PEComas, alveolar soft part sarcomas, malignant melanomas, clear cell sarcomas and Xp11 translocation renal cancers. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Fusion and fission of genes define a metric between fungal genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durrens, Pascal; Nikolski, Macha; Sherman, David

    2008-10-01

    Gene fusion and fission events are key mechanisms in the evolution of gene architecture, whose effects are visible in protein architecture when they occur in coding sequences. Until now, the detection of fusion and fission events has been performed at the level of protein sequences with a post facto removal of supernumerary links due to paralogy, and often did not include looking for events defined only in single genomes. We propose a method for the detection of these events, defined on groups of paralogs to compensate for the gene redundancy of eukaryotic genomes, and apply it to the proteomes of 12 fungal species. We collected an inventory of 1,680 elementary fusion and fission events. In half the cases, both composite and element genes are found in the same species. Per-species counts of events correlate with the species genome size, suggesting a random mechanism of occurrence. Some biological functions of the genes involved in fusion and fission events are slightly over- or under-represented. As already noted in previous studies, the genes involved in an event tend to belong to the same functional category. We inferred the position of each event in the evolution tree of the 12 fungal species. The event localization counts for all the segments of the tree provide a metric that depicts the "recombinational" phylogeny among fungi. A possible interpretation of this metric as distance in adaptation space is proposed.

  4. Dual-therapeutic reporter genes fusion for enhanced cancer gene therapy and imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekar, T V; Foygel, K; Willmann, J K; Paulmurugan, R

    2013-05-01

    Two of the successful gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapies include herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase (HSV1-TK) enzyme-ganciclovir prodrug and the Escherichia coli nitroreductase (NTR) enzyme-CB1954 prodrug strategies; these enzyme-prodrug combinations produce activated cytotoxic metabolites of the prodrugs capable of tumor cell death by inhibiting DNA synthesis and killing quiescent cells, respectively. Both these strategies also affect significant bystander cell killing of neighboring tumor cells that do not express these enzymes. We have developed a dual-combination gene strategy, where we identified HSV1-TK and NTR fused in a particular orientation can effectively kill tumor cells when the tumor cells are treated with a fusion HSV1-TK-NTR gene- along with a prodrug combination of GCV and CB1954. In order to determine whether the dual-system demonstrate superior therapeutic efficacy than either HSV1-TK or NTR systems alone, we conducted both in vitro and in vivo tumor xenograft studies using triple negative SUM159 breast cancer cells, by evaluating the efficacy of cell death by apoptosis and necrosis upon treatment with the dual HSV1-TK genes-GCV-CB1954 prodrugs system, and compared the efficiency to HSV1-TK-GCV and NTR-CB1954. Our cell-based studies, tumor regression studies in xenograft mice, histological analyses of treated tumors and bystander studies indicate that the dual HSV1-TK-NTR-prodrug system is two times more efficient even with half the doses of both prodrugs than the respective single gene-prodrug system, as evidenced by enhanced apoptosis and necrosis of tumor cells in vitro in culture and xenograft of tumor tissues in animals.

  5. Discovery of CTCF-sensitive Cis-spliced fusion RNAs between adjacent genes in human prostate cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Fujun; Song, Zhenguo; Babiceanu, Mihaela; Song, Yansu; Facemire, Loryn; Singh, Ritambhara; Adli, Mazhar; Li, Hui

    2015-02-01

    Genes or their encoded products are not expected to mingle with each other unless in some disease situations. In cancer, a frequent mechanism that can produce gene fusions is chromosomal rearrangement. However, recent discoveries of RNA trans-splicing and cis-splicing between adjacent genes (cis-SAGe) support for other mechanisms in generating fusion RNAs. In our transcriptome analyses of 28 prostate normal and cancer samples, 30% fusion RNAs on average are the transcripts that contain exons belonging to same-strand neighboring genes. These fusion RNAs may be the products of cis-SAGe, which was previously thought to be rare. To validate this finding and to better understand the phenomenon, we used LNCaP, a prostate cell line as a model, and identified 16 additional cis-SAGe events by silencing transcription factor CTCF and paired-end RNA sequencing. About half of the fusions are expressed at a significant level compared to their parental genes. Silencing one of the in-frame fusions resulted in reduced cell motility. Most out-of-frame fusions are likely to function as non-coding RNAs. The majority of the 16 fusions are also detected in other prostate cell lines, as well as in the 14 clinical prostate normal and cancer pairs. By studying the features associated with these fusions, we developed a set of rules: 1) the parental genes are same-strand-neighboring genes; 2) the distance between the genes is within 30kb; 3) the 5' genes are actively transcribing; and 4) the chimeras tend to have the second-to-last exon in the 5' genes joined to the second exon in the 3' genes. We then randomly selected 20 neighboring genes in the genome, and detected four fusion events using these rules in prostate cancer and non-cancerous cells. These results suggest that splicing between neighboring gene transcripts is a rather frequent phenomenon, and it is not a feature unique to cancer cells.

  6. CRTC1-MAML2 gene fusion in mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the lacrimal gland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Holstein, Sarah Linea; Fehr, André; Heegaard, Steffen

    2012-01-01

    -grade MEC of the lacrimal gland. There were no signs of recurrence or metastases during a five-year follow-up. Using RT-PCR and FISH we demonstrated that the tumor was positive for the CRTC1-MAML2 gene fusion previously shown to be associated with in particular low-grade salivary MECs with favorable...... prognosis. By immunohistochemistry we showed that the majority of tumor cells, including epidermoid, intermediate and mucous producing cells, expressed the CRTC1-MAML2 fusion protein. In contrast, 15 non-MEC lacrimal neoplasm were fusion-negative. Our findings show that lacrimal MEC is not only clinically...... anatomical sites and organs. Moreover, our findings indicate that the CRTC1-MAML2 fusion may be a useful diagnostic and prognostic biomarker for lacrimal MEC....

  7. FLI1 is a novel ETS transcription factor involved in gene fusions in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulo, Paula; Barros-Silva, João D; Ribeiro, Franclim R; Ramalho-Carvalho, João; Jerónimo, Carmen; Henrique, Rui; Lind, Guro E; Skotheim, Rolf I; Lothe, Ragnhild A; Teixeira, Manuel R

    2012-03-01

    To characterize the pattern of ETS rearrangements and to uncover novel ETS fusion genes, we analyzed 200 prostate carcinomas (PCa) with TaqMan low-density arrays (TLDAs), followed by selective analyses with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), RT-PCR, and sequencing. Besides confirming the recurrent presence of ERG, ETV1, ETV4, and ETV5 rearrangements, we here report FLI1 as the fifth ETS transcription factor involved in fusion genes in prostate cancer. Outlier expression of the FLI1 gene was detected by TLDAs in one PCa that showed relative overexpression of FLI1 exons 4:5 as compared with FLI1 exons 2:3. A structural rearrangement was found using FISH probes flanking the FLI1 gene and RT-PCR and sequencing analyses showed fusion of SLC45A3 exon 1 with FLI1 exon 3. Interestingly, we found four cases with two different ETS rearrangements in the index tumor, thus revealing intratumor genetic heterogeneity. Correlation analysis with clinico-pathological data showed association of ERG rearrangements with locally advanced disease (pT3, P = 0.007) and MYC overexpression (P = 0.001), and association of ETV1 rearrangements with PTEN downregulation (P = 0.015). We report that FLI1 is a novel ETS transcription factor involved in gene fusions in prostate cancer and that intratumor genetic heterogeneity of ETS rearrangements can occasionally be found in index primary tumors. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Molecular Characteristics and Clinical Significance of 12 Fusion Genes in Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wenzhe; Zhang, Guangsen

    2016-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is characterized by the generation of the promyelocytic leukemia-retinoic acid (RA) receptor α (PML-RARα) fusion gene. PML-RARα is the central leukemia-initiating event in APL and is directly targeted by all-trans-RA (ATRA) as well as arsenic. In classic APL harboring PML-RARα transcripts, more than 90% of patients can achieve complete remission when treated with ATRA combined with arsenic trioxide chemotherapy. In the last 20 years, more than 10 variant fusion genes have been found and identified in APL patients. These variant APL cases present different clinical phenotypes and treatment outcomes. All variant APL cases show a similar breakpoint within the RARα gene, whereas its partner genes are variable. These fusion proteins have the ability to repress rather than activate retinoic targets. These chimeric proteins also possess different molecular characteristics, thereby resulting in variable sensitivities to ATRA and clinical outcomes. In this review, we comprehensively analyze various rearrangements in variant APL cases that have been reported in the literature as well as the molecular characteristics and functions of the fusion proteins derived from different RARα partner genes and their clinical implications. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Transformation capacities of the papillary renal cell carcinoma-associated PRCCTFE3 and TFE3PRCC fusion genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weterman, M. A.; van Groningen, J. J.; den Hartog, A.; Geurts van Kessel, A.

    2001-01-01

    A recurrent chromosomal abnormality associated with a subset of papillary renal cell carcinomas is t(X;1)(p11;q21). This translocation leads to the formation of two fusion genes, TFE3PRCC and the reciprocal product PRCCTFE3. Both fusion genes are expressed in t(X;1)-positive renal cell carcinomas

  10. ChimerDB 3.0: an enhanced database for fusion genes from cancer transcriptome and literature data mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myunggyo; Lee, Kyubum; Yu, Namhee; Jang, Insu; Choi, Ikjung; Kim, Pora; Jang, Ye Eun; Kim, Byounggun; Kim, Sunkyu; Lee, Byungwook; Kang, Jaewoo; Lee, Sanghyuk

    2017-01-04

    Fusion gene is an important class of therapeutic targets and prognostic markers in cancer. ChimerDB is a comprehensive database of fusion genes encompassing analysis of deep sequencing data and manual curations. In this update, the database coverage was enhanced considerably by adding two new modules of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) RNA-Seq analysis and PubMed abstract mining. ChimerDB 3.0 is composed of three modules of ChimerKB, ChimerPub and ChimerSeq. ChimerKB represents a knowledgebase including 1066 fusion genes with manual curation that were compiled from public resources of fusion genes with experimental evidences. ChimerPub includes 2767 fusion genes obtained from text mining of PubMed abstracts. ChimerSeq module is designed to archive the fusion candidates from deep sequencing data. Importantly, we have analyzed RNA-Seq data of the TCGA project covering 4569 patients in 23 cancer types using two reliable programs of FusionScan and TopHat-Fusion. The new user interface supports diverse search options and graphic representation of fusion gene structure. ChimerDB 3.0 is available at http://ercsb.ewha.ac.kr/fusiongene/. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  11. Protein NCRII-18: the role of gene fusion in the molecular evolution of restriction endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibryashkina, Elena M; Solonin, Alexander S; Zakharova, Marina V

    2017-06-01

    This work first constructed the fusion protein NCRII-18 by fusing the restriction endonuclease Ecl18kI gene and part of the gene coding for the N-terminal domain of the endonuclease EcoRII. The fusion of the EcoRII N-terminal domain leads to a change in the properties of the recombinant protein. Unlike Ecl18kI, which made the basis of NCRII-18, the fusion protein predominantly recognizes the CCWGG sites, having lost the capability of interacting with the CCSGG sites. Experimental data support the hypothesis of a close evolutionary relationship between type IIE and IIP restriction endonucleases via a recombination between domains with active site structure and elements for recognition with domains responsible for recognition of DNA sequences. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  12. Molecular evolution of respiratory syncytial virus fusion gene, Canada, 2006-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papenburg, Jesse; Carbonneau, Julie; Hamelin, Marie-Ève; Isabel, Sandra; Bouhy, Xavier; Ohoumanne, Najwa; Déry, Pierre; Paes, Bosco A; Corbeil, Jacques; Bergeron, Michel G; De Serres, Gaston; Boivin, Guy

    2012-01-01

    To assess molecular evolution of the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) fusion gene, we analyzed RSV-positive specimens from 123 children in Canada who did or did not receive RSV immunoprophylaxis (palivizumab) during 2006-2010. Resistance-conferring mutations within the palivizumab binding site occurred in 8.7% of palivizumab recipients and none of the nonrecipients.

  13. Identification of recurrent FGFR3 fusion genes in lung cancer through kinome-centred RNA sequencing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Majewski, Ian J.; Mittempergher, Lorenza; Davidson, Nadia M.; Bosma, Astrid; Willems, Stefan M.; Horlings, Hugo M.; de Rink, Iris; Greger, Liliana; Hooijer, Gerrit Kj; Peters, Dennis; Nederlof, Petra M.; Hofland, Ingrid; de Jong, Jeroen; Wesseling, Jelle; Kluin, Roelof Jc; Brugman, Wim; Kerkhoven, Ron; Nieboer, Frank; Roepman, Paul; Broeks, Annegien; Muley, Thomas R.; Jassem, Jacek; Niklinski, Jacek; van Zandwijk, Nico; Brazma, Alvis; Oshlack, Alicia; van den Heuvel, Michel; Bernards, René

    2013-01-01

    Oncogenic fusion genes that involve kinases have proven to be effective targets for therapy in a wide range of cancers. Unfortunately, the diagnostic approaches required to identify these events are struggling to keep pace with the diverse array of genetic alterations that occur in cancer.

  14. Recurrent MET fusion genes represent a drug target in pediatric glioblastoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bender, Sebastian; Gronych, Jan; Warnatz, Hans-Jörg; Hutter, Barbara; Gröbner, Susanne; Ryzhova, Marina; Pfaff, Elke; Hovestadt, Volker; Weinberg, Florian; Halbach, Sebastian; Kool, Marcel; Northcott, Paul A.; Sturm, Dominik; Bjerke, Lynn; Zichner, Thomas; Stütz, Adrian M.; Schramm, Kathrin; Huang, Bingding; Buchhalter, Ivo; Heinold, Michael; Risch, Thomas; Worst, Barbara C.; van Tilburg, Cornelis M.; Weber, Ursula D.; Zapatka, Marc; Raeder, Benjamin; Milford, David; Heiland, Sabine; von Kalle, Christof; Previti, Christopher; Lawerenz, Chris; Kulozik, Andreas E.; Unterberg, Andreas; Witt, Olaf; von Deimling, Andreas; Capper, David; Truffaux, Nathalène; Grill, Jacques; Jabado, Nada; Sehested, Astrid M.; Sumerauer, David; Brahim, Dorra Hmida-Ben; Trabelsi, Saoussen; Ng, Ho-Keung; Zagzag, David; Allen, Jeffrey C.; Karajannis, Matthias A.; Gottardo, Nicholas G.; Jones, Chris; Korbel, Jan O.; Schmidt, Sabine; Wolf, Stephan; Reifenberger, Guido; Felsberg, Jörg; Brors, Benedikt; Herold-Mende, Christel; Lehrach, Hans; Brummer, Tilman; Korshunov, Andrey; Eils, Roland; Yaspo, Marie-Laure; Pfister, Stefan M.; Lichter, Peter; Jones, David T. W.

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric glioblastoma is one of the most common and most deadly brain tumors in childhood. Using an integrative genetic analysis of 53 pediatric glioblastomas and five in vitro model systems, we identified previously unidentified gene fusions involving the MET oncogene in similar to 10% of cases.

  15. Downstream of identity genes: muscle-type-specific regulation of the fusion process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bataillé, Laetitia; Delon, Isabelle; Da Ponte, Jean Philippe; Brown, Nicholas H; Jagla, Krzysztof

    2010-08-17

    In all metazoan organisms, the diversification of cell types involves determination of cell fates and subsequent execution of specific differentiation programs. During Drosophila myogenesis, identity genes specify the fates of founder myoblasts, from which derive all individual larval muscles. Here, to understand how cell fate information residing within founders is translated during differentiation, we focus on three identity genes, eve, lb, and slou, and how they control the size of individual muscles by regulating the number of fusion events. They achieve this by setting expression levels of Mp20, Pax, and mspo, three genes that regulate actin dynamics and cell adhesion and, as we show here, modulate the fusion process in a muscle-specific manner. Thus, these data show how the identity information implemented by transcription factors is translated via target genes into cell-type-specific programs of differentiation. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. IGF1 is a common target gene of Ewing's sarcoma fusion proteins in mesenchymal progenitor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Cironi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The EWS-FLI-1 fusion protein is associated with 85-90% of Ewing's sarcoma family tumors (ESFT, the remaining 10-15% of cases expressing chimeric genes encoding EWS or FUS fused to one of several ets transcription factor family members, including ERG-1, FEV, ETV1 and ETV6. ESFT are dependent on insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1 for growth and survival and recent evidence suggests that mesenchymal progenitor/stem cells constitute a candidate ESFT origin. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To address the functional relatedness between ESFT-associated fusion proteins, we compared mouse progenitor cell (MPC permissiveness for EWS-FLI-1, EWS-ERG and FUS-ERG expression and assessed the corresponding expression profile changes. Whereas all MPC isolates tested could stably express EWS-FLI-1, only some sustained stable EWS-ERG expression and none could express FUS-ERG for more than 3-5 days. Only 14% and 4% of the total number of genes that were respectively induced and repressed in MPCs by the three fusion proteins were shared. However, all three fusion proteins, but neither FLI-1 nor ERG-1 alone, activated the IGF1 promoter and induced IGF1 expression. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Whereas expression of different ESFT-associated fusion proteins may require distinct cellular microenvironments and induce transcriptome changes of limited similarity, IGF1 induction may provide one common mechanism for their implication in ESFT pathogenesis.

  17. Identification of recurrent FGFR3 fusion genes in lung cancer through kinome-centred RNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewski, Ian J; Mittempergher, Lorenza; Davidson, Nadia M; Bosma, Astrid; Willems, Stefan M; Horlings, Hugo M; de Rink, Iris; Greger, Liliana; Hooijer, Gerrit K J; Peters, Dennis; Nederlof, Petra M; Hofland, Ingrid; de Jong, Jeroen; Wesseling, Jelle; Kluin, Roelof J C; Brugman, Wim; Kerkhoven, Ron; Nieboer, Frank; Roepman, Paul; Broeks, Annegien; Muley, Thomas R; Jassem, Jacek; Niklinski, Jacek; van Zandwijk, Nico; Brazma, Alvis; Oshlack, Alicia; van den Heuvel, Michel; Bernards, René

    2013-07-01

    Oncogenic fusion genes that involve kinases have proven to be effective targets for therapy in a wide range of cancers. Unfortunately, the diagnostic approaches required to identify these events are struggling to keep pace with the diverse array of genetic alterations that occur in cancer. Diagnostic screening in solid tumours is particularly challenging, as many fusion genes occur with a low frequency. To overcome these limitations, we developed a capture enrichment strategy to enable high-throughput transcript sequencing of the human kinome. This approach provides a global overview of kinase fusion events, irrespective of the identity of the fusion partner. To demonstrate the utility of this system, we profiled 100 non-small cell lung cancers and identified numerous genetic alterations impacting fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) in lung squamous cell carcinoma and a novel ALK fusion partner in lung adenocarcinoma. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Pathology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland.

  18. Recurrent fusion of the genes FN1 and ALK in gastrointestinal leiomyomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagopoulos, Ioannis; Gorunova, Ludmila; Lund-Iversen, Marius; Lobmaier, Ingvild; Bjerkehagen, Bodil; Heim, Sverre

    2016-11-01

    Leiomyomas of the gastrointestinal tract are mostly found in the esophagus, stomach, and colon. Genetic information about them is very limited and no fusion genes have been described. We present herein cytogenetic and molecular genetic analyses of two gastrointestinal leiomyomas found in the esophagus and small intestine. The esophageal leiomyoma had the karyotype 45,Y,der(X)t(X;6)(p22;p21),inv(2)(p23q35),add(6)(p21),-11[cp6]/46,XY[7]. The intestinal leiomyoma karyotype was 46,X,add(X)(q2?),der(2)add(2)(p23)add(2)(q33),add(4)(p14),add(14)(q22)[10]/47,XX,+12[2]/46,XX[1]. RNA-sequencing detected FN1-ALK fusion transcripts in both tumors. RT-PCR together with Sanger sequencing verified the presence of the FN1-ALK fusion transcripts. Fluorescence in situ hybridization using an ALK breakapart probe further confirmed the rearrangement of the ALK gene. Immunohistochemical investigation of ALK in the leiomyoma of the small intestine revealed positivity with strong granular cytoplasmatic staining in the tumor cells. This is the first ever ALK fusion reported in gastrointestinal leiomyomas. Our results are of potential clinical importance because crizotinib, a selective ALK inhibitor, has demonstrated effect in patients whose tumors harbor ALK rearrangements. Thus, ALK emerges as a possible therapeutic target in patients whose tumors, including gastrointestinal leiomyomas, carry ALK fusions.

  19. Characterization of the genomic features and expressed fusion genes in micropapillary carcinomas of the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natrajan, Rachael; Wilkerson, Paul M; Marchiò, Caterina; Piscuoglio, Salvatore; Ng, Charlotte K Y; Wai, Patty; Lambros, Maryou B; Samartzis, Eleftherios P; Dedes, Konstantin J; Frankum, Jessica; Bajrami, Ilirjana; Kopec, Alicja; Mackay, Alan; A'hern, Roger; Fenwick, Kerry; Kozarewa, Iwanka; Hakas, Jarle; Mitsopoulos, Costas; Hardisson, David; Lord, Christopher J; Kumar-Sinha, Chandan; Ashworth, Alan; Weigelt, Britta; Sapino, Anna; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Maher, Christopher A; Reis-Filho, Jorge S

    2014-04-01

    Micropapillary carcinoma (MPC) is a rare histological special type of breast cancer, characterized by an aggressive clinical behaviour and a pattern of copy number aberrations (CNAs) distinct from that of grade- and oestrogen receptor (ER)-matched invasive carcinomas of no special type (IC-NSTs). The aims of this study were to determine whether MPCs are underpinned by a recurrent fusion gene(s) or mutations in 273 genes recurrently mutated in breast cancer. Sixteen MPCs were subjected to microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) analysis and Sequenom OncoCarta mutation analysis. Eight and five MPCs were subjected to targeted capture and RNA sequencing, respectively. aCGH analysis confirmed our previous observations about the repertoire of CNAs of MPCs. Sequencing analysis revealed a spectrum of mutations similar to those of luminal B IC-NSTs, and recurrent mutations affecting mitogen-activated protein kinase family genes and NBPF10. RNA-sequencing analysis identified 17 high-confidence fusion genes, eight of which were validated and two of which were in-frame. No recurrent fusions were identified in an independent series of MPCs and IC-NSTs. Forced expression of in-frame fusion genes (SLC2A1-FAF1 and BCAS4-AURKA) resulted in increased viability of breast cancer cells. In addition, genomic disruption of CDK12 caused by out-of-frame rearrangements was found in one MPC and in 13% of HER2-positive breast cancers, identified through a re-analysis of publicly available massively parallel sequencing data. In vitro analyses revealed that CDK12 gene disruption results in sensitivity to PARP inhibition, and forced expression of wild-type CDK12 in a CDK12-null cell line model resulted in relative resistance to PARP inhibition. Our findings demonstrate that MPCs are neither defined by highly recurrent mutations in the 273 genes tested, nor underpinned by a recurrent fusion gene. Although seemingly private genetic events, some of the fusion transcripts found in

  20. Identification of fusion genes and characterization of transcriptome features in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bing; Jiang, Lu; Zhong, Meng-Ling; Li, Jian-Feng; Li, Ben-Shang; Peng, Li-Jun; Dai, Yu-Ting; Cui, Bo-Wen; Yan, Tian-Qi; Zhang, Wei-Na; Weng, Xiang-Qin; Xie, Yin-Yin; Lu, Jing; Ren, Rui-Bao; Chen, Su-Ning; Hu, Jian-Da; Wu, De-Pei; Chen, Zhu; Tang, Jing-Yan; Huang, Jin-Yan; Mi, Jian-Qing; Chen, Sai-Juan

    2018-01-09

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is a clonal malignancy of immature T cells. Recently, the next-generation sequencing approach has allowed systematic identification of molecular features in pediatric T-ALL. Here, by performing RNA-sequencing and other genomewide analysis, we investigated the genomic landscape in 61 adult and 69 pediatric T-ALL cases. Thirty-six distinct gene fusion transcripts were identified, with SET-NUP214 being highly related to adult cases. Among 18 previously unknown fusions, ZBTB16-ABL1, TRA-SALL2, and involvement of NKX2-1 were recurrent events. ZBTB16-ABL1 functioned as a leukemogenic driver and responded to the effect of tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Among 48 genes with mutation rates >3%, 6 were newly found in T-ALL. An aberrantly overexpressed short mRNA transcript of the SLC17A9 gene was revealed in most cases with overexpressed TAL1, which predicted a poor prognosis in the adult group. Up-regulation of HOXA, MEF2C, and LYL1 was often present in adult cases, while TAL1 overexpression was detected mainly in the pediatric group. Although most gene fusions were mutually exclusive, they coexisted with gene mutations. These genetic abnormalities were correlated with deregulated gene expression markers in three subgroups. This study may further enrich the current knowledge of T-ALL molecular pathogenesis.

  1. Recurrent MET fusion genes represent a drug target in pediatric glioblastoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sehested, Astrid Marie

    2016-01-01

    fusions activated mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling and, in cooperation with lesions compromising cell cycle regulation, induced aggressive glial tumors in vivo. MET inhibitors suppressed MET tumor growth in xenograft models. Finally, we treated a pediatric patient bearing a MET......Pediatric glioblastoma is one of the most common and most deadly brain tumors in childhood. Using an integrative genetic analysis of 53 pediatric glioblastomas and five in vitro model systems, we identified previously unidentified gene fusions involving the MET oncogene in ∼10% of cases. These MET...

  2. The role of CALM-AF10 gene fusion in acute leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caudell, D; Aplan, P D

    2008-04-01

    Chromosomal translocations are important genetic perturbations frequently associated with hematologic malignancies; characterization of these events has been a rich source of insights into the mechanisms that lead to malignant transformation. The t(10;11)(p13;q14-21) results in a recently identified rare but recurring chromosomal translocation seen in patients with ALL as well as AML, and results in the production of a CALM-AF10 fusion gene. Although the details by which the CALM-AF10 fusion protein exerts its leukemogenic effect remain unclear, emerging data suggests that the CALM-AF10 fusion impairs differentiation of hematopoietic cells, at least in part via an upregulation of HOXA cluster genes. This review discusses the normal structure and function of CALM and AF10, describes the spectrum of clinical findings seen in patients with CALM-AF10 fusions, summarizes recently published CALM-AF10 mouse models and highlights the role of HOXA cluster gene activation in CALM-AF10 leukemia.

  3. Fusion of the genes BRD8 and PHF1 in endometrial stromal sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micci, Francesca; Brunetti, Marta; Dal Cin, Paola; Nucci, Marisa R; Gorunova, Ludmila; Heim, Sverre; Panagopoulos, Ioannis

    2017-12-01

    We present a new endometrial stromal sarcoma (ESS)-associated genomic rearrangement involving chromosome arms 5p and 6p and leading to the formation of a BRD8-PHF1 fusion gene. The PHF1 (PHD finger protein 1) gene, from 6p21, is known to be rearranged in ESS in a promiscuous way inasmuch as it has been shown to recombine with JAZF1, EPC1, MEAF6, and now also with BRD8, in tumors of this type. In all rearrangements of PHF1, including the present one, a recurrent theme is that the entire coding part of PHF1 constitutes the 3' end of the fusion. BRD8 (bromodomain containing 8) encodes a protein which is involved in regulation of protein acetylation and/or histone acetyl transferase activity. All the genetic fusions identified so far in ESS appear to recombine genes involved in transcriptional regulation, that is, polycomb group complex-mediated and aberrant methylation/acetylation genes. This adds to the likelihood that the new BRD8-PHF1 shares the same pathogenetic mechanism as the other ESS-specific rearrangements. © 2017 The Authors Genes, Chromosomes and Cancer Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Expression of a natural fusion gene for uracil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-03-01

    Mar 1, 2010 ... MM-Ura, minimal medium without Ura; ORF, open reading frame; PCR, polymerase chain reaction; ... Saccharomyces cerevisiae, respectively (Andersen et al.,. 1992). The genes encoding UPRT have ... terized from E. coli (Fast and Sköld, 1977), S. cerevisiae. (Kern, 1990) and currently described as a ...

  5. Expression of a natural fusion gene for uracil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-03-01

    Mar 1, 2010 ... UK or UPRT were reported as separate genes in bacteria. Amino acid sequence of. OsUK/UPRT1 from rice shows homology to bacterial enzymes. Amino-terminal region is similar to UDK .... and pBluescript II KS+ as a control were used to transform E. coli. JM109, an upp mutants of GT4 and Sϕ408 and a ...

  6. Gene expression, single nucleotide variant and fusion transcript discovery in archival material from breast tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Norton

    Full Text Available Advantages of RNA-Seq over array based platforms are quantitative gene expression and discovery of expressed single nucleotide variants (eSNVs and fusion transcripts from a single platform, but the sensitivity for each of these characteristics is unknown. We measured gene expression in a set of manually degraded RNAs, nine pairs of matched fresh-frozen, and FFPE RNA isolated from breast tumor with the hybridization based, NanoString nCounter (226 gene panel and with whole transcriptome RNA-Seq using RiboZeroGold ScriptSeq V2 library preparation kits. We performed correlation analyses of gene expression between samples and across platforms. We then specifically assessed whole transcriptome expression of lincRNA and discovery of eSNVs and fusion transcripts in the FFPE RNA-Seq data. For gene expression in the manually degraded samples, we observed Pearson correlations of >0.94 and >0.80 with NanoString and ScriptSeq protocols, respectively. Gene expression data for matched fresh-frozen and FFPE samples yielded mean Pearson correlations of 0.874 and 0.783 for NanoString (226 genes and ScriptSeq whole transcriptome protocols respectively, p<2x10(-16. Specifically for lincRNAs, we observed superb Pearson correlation (0.988 between matched fresh-frozen and FFPE pairs. FFPE samples across NanoString and RNA-Seq platforms gave a mean Pearson correlation of 0.838. In FFPE libraries, we detected 53.4% of high confidence SNVs and 24% of high confidence fusion transcripts. Sensitivity of fusion transcript detection was not overcome by an increase in depth of sequencing up to 3-fold (increase from ~56 to ~159 million reads. Both NanoString and ScriptSeq RNA-Seq technologies yield reliable gene expression data for degraded and FFPE material. The high degree of correlation between NanoString and RNA-Seq platforms suggests discovery based whole transcriptome studies from FFPE material will produce reliable expression data. The RiboZeroGold ScriptSeq protocol

  7. Gene expression, single nucleotide variant and fusion transcript discovery in archival material from breast tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Nadine; Sun, Zhifu; Asmann, Yan W; Serie, Daniel J; Necela, Brian M; Bhagwate, Aditya; Jen, Jin; Eckloff, Bruce W; Kalari, Krishna R; Thompson, Kevin J; Carr, Jennifer M; Kachergus, Jennifer M; Geiger, Xochiquetzal J; Perez, Edith A; Thompson, E Aubrey

    2013-01-01

    Advantages of RNA-Seq over array based platforms are quantitative gene expression and discovery of expressed single nucleotide variants (eSNVs) and fusion transcripts from a single platform, but the sensitivity for each of these characteristics is unknown. We measured gene expression in a set of manually degraded RNAs, nine pairs of matched fresh-frozen, and FFPE RNA isolated from breast tumor with the hybridization based, NanoString nCounter (226 gene panel) and with whole transcriptome RNA-Seq using RiboZeroGold ScriptSeq V2 library preparation kits. We performed correlation analyses of gene expression between samples and across platforms. We then specifically assessed whole transcriptome expression of lincRNA and discovery of eSNVs and fusion transcripts in the FFPE RNA-Seq data. For gene expression in the manually degraded samples, we observed Pearson correlations of >0.94 and >0.80 with NanoString and ScriptSeq protocols, respectively. Gene expression data for matched fresh-frozen and FFPE samples yielded mean Pearson correlations of 0.874 and 0.783 for NanoString (226 genes) and ScriptSeq whole transcriptome protocols respectively, pNanoString and RNA-Seq platforms gave a mean Pearson correlation of 0.838. In FFPE libraries, we detected 53.4% of high confidence SNVs and 24% of high confidence fusion transcripts. Sensitivity of fusion transcript detection was not overcome by an increase in depth of sequencing up to 3-fold (increase from ~56 to ~159 million reads). Both NanoString and ScriptSeq RNA-Seq technologies yield reliable gene expression data for degraded and FFPE material. The high degree of correlation between NanoString and RNA-Seq platforms suggests discovery based whole transcriptome studies from FFPE material will produce reliable expression data. The RiboZeroGold ScriptSeq protocol performed particularly well for lincRNA expression from FFPE libraries, but detection of eSNV and fusion transcripts was less sensitive.

  8. Gene fusion analysis in the battle against the African endemic sleeping sickness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Trimpalis

    Full Text Available The protozoan Trypanosoma brucei causes African Trypanosomiasis or sleeping sickness in humans, which can be lethal if untreated. Most available pharmacological treatments for the disease have severe side-effects. The purpose of this analysis was to detect novel protein-protein interactions (PPIs, vital for the parasite, which could lead to the development of drugs against this disease to block the specific interactions. In this work, the Domain Fusion Analysis (Rosetta Stone method was used to identify novel PPIs, by comparing T. brucei to 19 organisms covering all major lineages of the tree of life. Overall, 49 possible protein-protein interactions were detected, and classified based on (a statistical significance (BLAST e-value, domain length etc., (b their involvement in crucial metabolic pathways, and (c their evolutionary history, particularly focusing on whether a protein pair is split in T. brucei and fused in the human host. We also evaluated fusion events including hypothetical proteins, and suggest a possible molecular function or involvement in a certain biological process. This work has produced valuable results which could be further studied through structural biology or other experimental approaches so as to validate the protein-protein interactions proposed here. The evolutionary analysis of the proteins involved showed that, gene fusion or gene fission events can happen in all organisms, while some protein domains are more prone to fusion and fission events and present complex evolutionary patterns.

  9. Fusion from myoblasts to myotubes is dependent on the rolling stone gene (rost) of Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paululat, A; Burchard, S; Renkawitz-Pohl, R

    1995-08-01

    The development and differentiation of the body wall musculature in Drosophila are accompanied by changes in gene expression and cellular architecture. We isolated a Drosophila gene, termed rolling stone (rost), which, when mutated, specifically blocks the fusion of mononucleated cells to myotubes in the body wall musculature. beta 3 tubulin, which is an early marker for the onset of mesoderm differentiation, is still expressed in these cells. Gastrulation and mesoderm formation, as well as the development of the epidermis and of the central and peripheral nervous systems, appear quite normal in homozygous rolling stone embryos. Embryonic development stops shortly before hatching in a P-element-induced mutant, as well as in 16 EMS-induced alleles. In mutant embryos, other mesodermal derivatives such as the visceral mesoderm and the dorsal vessel, develop fairly normally and defects are restricted to the body wall musculature. Myoblasts remain as single mononucleated cells, which express muscle myosin, showing that the developmental program of gene expression proceeds. These myoblasts occur at positions corresponding to the locations of dorsal, ventral and pleural muscles, showing that the gene rolling stone is involved in cell fusion, a process that is independent of cell migration in these mutants. This genetic analysis has set the stage for a molecular analysis to clarify where the rolling stone action is manifested in the fusion process and thus gives insight into the complex regulating network controlling the differentiation of the body wall musculature.

  10. Horizontal gene transfers with or without cell fusions in all categories of the living matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinkovics, Joseph G

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews the history of widespread exchanges of genetic segments initiated over 3 billion years ago, to be part of their life style, by sphero-protoplastic cells, the ancestors of archaea, prokaryota, and eukaryota. These primordial cells shared a hostile anaerobic and overheated environment and competed for survival. "Coexist with, or subdue and conquer, expropriate its most useful possessions, or symbiose with it, your competitor" remain cellular life's basic rules. This author emphasizes the role of viruses, both in mediating cell fusions, such as the formation of the first eukaryotic cell(s) from a united crenarchaeon and prokaryota, and the transfer of host cell genes integrated into viral (phages) genomes. After rising above the Darwinian threshold, rigid rules of speciation and vertical inheritance in the three domains of life were established, but horizontal gene transfers with or without cell fusions were never abolished. The author proves with extensive, yet highly selective documentation, that not only unicellular microorganisms, but the most complex multicellular entities of the highest ranks resort to, and practice, cell fusions, and donate and accept horizontally (laterally) transferred genes. Cell fusions and horizontally exchanged genetic materials remain the fundamental attributes and inherent characteristics of the living matter, whether occurring accidentally or sought after intentionally. These events occur to cells stagnating for some 3 milliard years at a lower yet amazingly sophisticated level of evolution, and to cells achieving the highest degree of differentiation, and thus functioning in dependence on the support of a most advanced multicellular host, like those of the human brain. No living cell is completely exempt from gene drains or gene insertions.

  11. Recurrent LRP1-SNRNP25 and KCNMB4-CCND3 fusion genes promote tumor cell motility in human osteosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jilong; Annala, Matti; Ji, Ping; Wang, Guowen; Zheng, Hong; Codgell, David; Du, Xiaoling; Fang, Zhiwei; Sun, Baocun; Nykter, Matti; Chen, Kexin; Zhang, Wei

    2014-10-10

    The identification of fusion genes such as SYT-SSX1/SSX2, PAX3-FOXO1, TPM3/TPM4-ALK and EWS-FLI1 in human sarcomas has provided important insight into the diagnosis and targeted therapy of sarcomas. No recurrent fusion has been reported in human osteosarcoma. Transcriptome sequencing was used to characterize the gene fusions and mutations in 11 human osteosarcomas. Nine of 11 samples were found to harbor genetic inactivating alterations in the TP53 pathway. Two recurrent fusion genes associated with the 12q locus, LRP1-SNRNP25 and KCNMB4-CCND3, were identified and validated by RT-PCR, Sanger sequencing and fluorescence in situ hybridization, and were found to be osteosarcoma specific in a validation cohort of 240 other sarcomas. Expression of LRP1-SNRNP25 fusion gene promoted SAOS-2 osteosarcoma cell migration and invasion. Expression of KCNMB4-CCND3 fusion gene promoted SAOS-2 cell migration. Our study represents the first whole transcriptome analysis of untreated human osteosarcoma. Our discovery of two osteosarcoma specific fusion genes associated with osteosarcoma cellular motility highlights the heterogeneity of osteosarcoma and provides opportunities for new treatment modalities.

  12. SFM: A novel sequence-based fusion method for disease genes identification and prioritization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousef, Abdulaziz; Moghadam Charkari, Nasrollah

    2015-10-21

    The identification of disease genes from human genome is of great importance to improve diagnosis and treatment of disease. Several machine learning methods have been introduced to identify disease genes. However, these methods mostly differ in the prior knowledge used to construct the feature vector for each instance (gene), the ways of selecting negative data (non-disease genes) where there is no investigational approach to find them and the classification methods used to make the final decision. In this work, a novel Sequence-based fusion method (SFM) is proposed to identify disease genes. In this regard, unlike existing methods, instead of using a noisy and incomplete prior-knowledge, the amino acid sequence of the proteins which is universal data has been carried out to present the genes (proteins) into four different feature vectors. To select more likely negative data from candidate genes, the intersection set of four negative sets which are generated using distance approach is considered. Then, Decision Tree (C4.5) has been applied as a fusion method to combine the results of four independent state-of the-art predictors based on support vector machine (SVM) algorithm, and to make the final decision. The experimental results of the proposed method have been evaluated by some standard measures. The results indicate the precision, recall and F-measure of 82.6%, 85.6% and 84, respectively. These results confirm the efficiency and validity of the proposed method. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Identification of Driving ALK Fusion Genes and Genomic Landscape of Medullary Thyroid Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Jun Ho; Oh, Young Lyun; Hong, Mineui; Yun, Jae Won; Lee, Hyun-Woo; Kim, DeokGeun; Ji, Yongick; Kim, Duk-Hwan; Park, Woong-Yang; Shin, Hyun-Tae; Kim, Kyoung-Mee; Ahn, Myung-Ju; Park, Keunchil; Sun, Jong-Mu

    2015-08-01

    The genetic landscape of medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) is not yet fully understood, although some oncogenic mutations have been identified. To explore genetic profiles of MTCs, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor tissues from MTC patients were assayed on the Ion AmpliSeq Cancer Panel v2. Eighty-four sporadic MTC samples and 36 paired normal thyroid tissues were successfully sequenced. We discovered 101 hotspot mutations in 18 genes in the 84 MTC tissue samples. The most common mutation was in the ret proto-oncogene, which occurred in 47 cases followed by mutations in genes encoding Harvey rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (N = 14), serine/threonine kinase 11 (N = 11), v-kit Hardy-Zuckerman 4 feline sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (N = 6), mutL homolog 1 (N = 4), Kiesten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (N = 3) and MET proto-oncogene (N = 3). We also evaluated anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangement by immunohistochemistry and break-apart fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Two of 98 screened cases were positive for ALK FISH. To identify the genomic breakpoint and 5' fusion partner of ALK, customized targeted cancer panel sequencing was performed using DNA from tumor samples of the two patients. Glutamine:fructose-6-phosphate transaminase 1 (GFPT1)-ALK and echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4)-ALK fusions were identified. Additional PCR analysis, followed by Sanger sequencing, confirmed the GFPT1-ALK fusion, indicating that the fusion is a result of intra-chromosomal translocation or deletion. Notably, a metastatic MTC case harboring the EML4-ALK fusion showed a dramatic response to an ALK inhibitor, crizotinib. In conclusion, we found several genetic mutations in MTC and are the first to identify ALK fusions in MTC. Our results suggest that the EML4-ALK fusion in MTC may be a potential driver mutation and a valid target of ALK inhibitors. Furthermore, the GFPT1-ALK fusion may be a potential candidate for molecular target

  14. Intrafocal heterogeneity of ERG protein expression and gene fusion pattern in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Ja Hee; Park, Jeong Hwan; Lee, Cheol; Moon, Kyung Chul

    2017-10-01

    Prostate cancer is considered to be highly heterogeneous, with various morphologic features and biologic behaviors. The TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion is the most frequently observed genetic aberration in prostate cancer. The aim of this study was to elucidate the intrafocal heterogeneity of ERG gene fusion status. ERG immunohistochemistry (IHC) was performed in samples from 168 prostate cancer patients who had undergone radical prostatectomy, and 40 cases showing ERG-positive IHC staining were selected for tissue microarray (TMA) construction. Two to six representative cores were selected from each tumor focus. In the cases with heterogeneous ERG IHC staining intensity, the areas showing different intensities were separately selected. Using the TMA blocks, IHC and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) were conducted to evaluate the heterogeneity of ERG protein expression and ERG fusion gene patterns, respectively, in a single tumor focus. Heterogeneity of ERG IHC staining was defined as the simultaneous presence of negative and positive cores in the same tumor focus. Heterogeneity of ERG FISH was defined by the presence of cores with positive and negative FISH signals or cores with break-apart and interstitial deletion FISH signals in the same tumor focus. A total of 202 TMA cores were isolated from 40 ERG-positive cases. Of the 202 total cores, 19 were negative for ERG IHC staining, and 46 showed 1+, 52 showed 2+, and 85 showed 3+ ERG staining intensity. Eleven cores were negative for ERG FISH signal, 119 cores showed ERG break-apart FISH signals, and the remaining 72 cores revealed interstitial deletion. Intrafocal heterogeneity of ERG IHC staining was found in 20% (8/40) of cases, and intrafocal heterogeneity of ERG gene fusion pattern was found in 32.5% (13/40) of cases. In summary, this study showed significantly frequent intrafocal heterogeneity of ERG protein expression, gene fusion status and fusion pattern. This heterogeneity can be caused by the development

  15. Analysis of the fusion protein gene of Newcastle disease viruses isolated in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mase, Masaji; Murayama, Kazunori; Karino, Ayako; Inoue, Toshikazu

    2011-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequences of the fusion (F) protein gene of Newcastle disease viruses (NDV) isolated in Japan from 1930 to 2007 (45 strains total) were determined and genetically analyzed. In the deduced amino acid sequences of fusion protein, the 5 potential asparagine-linked glycosylation sites and 10 cysteine residues were all conserved in the NDV examined in this study. The major epitopes involved in virus neutralization are conserved in most of the NDV strains isolated in Japan except a few strains. By virus neutralization test, no major antigenic differences were observed among representative strains of each genotype in Japan. All chickens vaccinated with the B1 strain survived without clinical signs after challenge with 2 NDV strains isolated in Japan (velogenic strains, JP/Ibaraki/2000 and JP/Kagoshima/91), which possess amino acids substitutions involved in virus neutralization in the F protein gene.

  16. ETS Gene Fusions as Predictive Biomarkers of Resistance to Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Award  Number:    W81XWH-10-1-0582 TITLE:      ETS Gene Fusions as Predictive Biomarkers of Resistance to Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer...5a.  CONTRACT  NUMBER   ETS Gene Fusions as Predictive Biomarkers of Resistance to Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer 5b.  GRANT  NUMBER   W81XWH...ramifications,  particularly  in  the  context  of   radiation   therapy ,   which  represents  a  primary  treatment  modality  for  localized  prostate

  17. Combination gene therapy using VEGF-shRNA and fusion suicide gene yCDglyTK inhibits gastric carcinoma growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ting; Ye, Ling; He, Yongzheng; Chen, Xuanmin; Peng, Jie; Zhang, Xiaomei; Yi, Hong; Peng, Fang; Leng, Aimin

    2011-12-01

    Clinical trials of suicide gene therapy have achieved limited success, which suggests a need for improvement. Angiogenesis plays a crucial role in the progression of cancers, which is greatly regulated by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF).The current study was designed to evaluate the anti-tumor effects of VEGF siRNA in combination with fusion suicide gene yCDglyTK. Introduction of a VEGF-targeted small hairpin RNA (shVEGF) to CDTK/5-FC system could induce cell apoptosis more effectively and decrease micro vessel density in xenograft tissue, thus resulted in a significant tumor growth delay in SGC7901 xenografts. These findings for the first time suggest the potential of combination gene therapy using suicide gene therapy and anti-angiogenesis gene therapy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Identification of target genes of synovial sarcoma-associated fusion oncoprotein using human pluripotent stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayakawa, Kazuo [Department of Tissue Regeneration, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Cell Growth and Differentiation, Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Ikeya, Makoto [Department of Cell Growth and Differentiation, Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Fukuta, Makoto [Department of Tissue Regeneration, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Cell Growth and Differentiation, Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Woltjen, Knut [Department of Reprogramming Sciences, Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Tamaki, Sakura; Takahara, Naoko; Kato, Tomohisa; Sato, Shingo [Department of Tissue Regeneration, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Otsuka, Takanobu [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Toguchida, Junya, E-mail: togjun@frontier.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Tissue Regeneration, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Cell Growth and Differentiation, Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)

    2013-03-22

    Highlights: ► We tried to identify targets of synovial sarcoma (SS)-associated SYT–SSX fusion gene. ► We established pluripotent stem cell (PSC) lines with inducible SYT–SSX gene. ► SYT–SSX responsive genes were identified by the induction of SYT–SSX in PSC. ► SS-related genes were selected from database by in silico analyses. ► 51 genes were finally identified among SS-related genes as targets of SYT–SSX in PSC. -- Abstract: Synovial sarcoma (SS) is a malignant soft tissue tumor harboring chromosomal translocation t(X; 18)(p11.2; q11.2), which produces SS-specific fusion gene, SYT–SSX. Although precise function of SYT–SSX remains to be investigated, accumulating evidences suggest its role in gene regulation via epigenetic mechanisms, and the product of SYT–SSX target genes may serve as biomarkers of SS. Lack of knowledge about the cell-of-origin of SS, however, has placed obstacle in the way of target identification. Here we report a novel approach to identify SYT–SSX2 target genes using human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) containing a doxycycline-inducible SYT–SSX2 gene. SYT–SSX2 was efficiently induced both at mRNA and protein levels within three hours after doxycycline administration, while no morphological change of hPSCs was observed until 24 h. Serial microarray analyses identified genes of which the expression level changed more than twofold within 24 h. Surprisingly, the majority (297/312, 95.2%) were up-regulated genes and a result inconsistent with the current concept of SYT–SSX as a transcriptional repressor. Comparing these genes with SS-related genes which were selected by a series of in silico analyses, 49 and 2 genes were finally identified as candidates of up- and down-regulated target of SYT–SSX, respectively. Association of these genes with SYT–SSX in SS cells was confirmed by knockdown experiments. Expression profiles of SS-related genes in hPSCs and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were strikingly

  19. F ield ef Serra fficacy atia ent of ino tomop organic hila AB K c carrie ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    on pest. In th r by using t ila in sesam entomophila e, both of th the unform ured that v ack by 53% .... 2011). The 16S rRNA gene sequence was registered to Gene Bank. (Accession no. GU370899). .... Statistical analysis. Standard deviation for ...

  20. Characterization of the translocation breakpoint sequences of two DEK-CAN fusion genes present in t(6;9) acute myeloid leukemia and a SET-CAN fusion gene found in a case of acute undifferentiated leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    von Lindern, M.; Breems, D.; van Baal, S.; Adriaansen, H.; Grosveld, G.

    1992-01-01

    The t(6;9) associated with a subtype of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) was shown to generate a fusion between the 3' part of the CAN gene on chromosome 9 and the 5' part of the DEK gene on chromosome 6. The same part of the CAN gene appeared to be involved in a case of acute undifferentiated leukemia

  1. Multiplex genomic test of mutation and fusion genes in small biopsy specimen of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshita, Fumihiro; Kasajima, Rika; Miyagi, Yohei

    2016-07-01

    We evaluated multiple oncogenic mutations and fusion genes in small specimen obtained by bronchoscopy. Eight patients with lung cancer were recruited, 3 small cell lung cancer, 3 non-small cell lung cancer, 1 adenocarcinoma and 1 squamous cell carcinoma. A median value of extracted RNA and DNA amounts from specimen was 1573 ng (range 367.5 to 8900) and 6700 ng (range 550 to 68000 ng), respectively. We applied amplicon sequencing panels that cover exon regions of 41 genes related to lung tumorigenesis as well as total 61 major variants of ALK, ROS, RET or NTRK1 fusion transcripts. Nineteen of 41 gene mutations were detected in our isolated DNAs of 8 patients. We could detect four to eleven mutations in each specimen; however the mutation combination in each 8 patients were different. The most common genetic alterations were TP53, KMT2D, MET, NOTCH2 and SETD2, which were detected in 4 to 6 patients. We did not detect fusion transcripts of ALK, ROS, RET and NTRK1 in every specimen. In conclusion, multiplex genomic test was performed on small amounts specimen of bronchoscopy biopsy with a 100% success rate. Such testing is considered to be able to assist physicians in matching patients with approved or experimental targeted treatments. © 2016 Old City Publishing, Inc.

  2. Expanding the molecular toolbox for Lactococcus lactis: construction of an inducible thioredoxin gene fusion expression system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cambillau Christian

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of the Nisin Inducible Controlled Expression (NICE system in the food-grade bacterium Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris represents a cornerstone in the use of Gram-positive bacterial expression systems for biotechnological purposes. However, proteins that are subjected to such over-expression in L. lactis may suffer from improper folding, inclusion body formation and/or protein degradation, thereby significantly reducing the yield of soluble target protein. Although such drawbacks are not specific to L. lactis, no molecular tools have been developed to prevent or circumvent these recurrent problems of protein expression in L. lactis. Results Mimicking thioredoxin gene fusion systems available for E. coli, two nisin-inducible expression vectors were constructed to over-produce various proteins in L. lactis as thioredoxin fusion proteins. In this study, we demonstrate that our novel L. lactis fusion partner expression vectors allow high-level expression of soluble heterologous proteins Tuc2009 ORF40, Bbr_0140 and Tuc2009 BppU/BppL that were previously insoluble or not expressed using existing L. lactis expression vectors. Over-expressed proteins were subsequently purified by Ni-TED affinity chromatography. Intact heterologous proteins were detected by immunoblotting analyses. We also show that the thioredoxin moiety of the purified fusion protein was specifically and efficiently cleaved off by enterokinase treatment. Conclusions This study is the first description of a thioredoxin gene fusion expression system, purposely developed to circumvent problems associated with protein over-expression in L. lactis. It was shown to prevent protein insolubility and degradation, allowing sufficient production of soluble proteins for further structural and functional characterization.

  3. Expanding the molecular toolbox for Lactococcus lactis: construction of an inducible thioredoxin gene fusion expression system

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Douillard, Francois P

    2011-08-09

    Abstract Background The development of the Nisin Inducible Controlled Expression (NICE) system in the food-grade bacterium Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris represents a cornerstone in the use of Gram-positive bacterial expression systems for biotechnological purposes. However, proteins that are subjected to such over-expression in L. lactis may suffer from improper folding, inclusion body formation and\\/or protein degradation, thereby significantly reducing the yield of soluble target protein. Although such drawbacks are not specific to L. lactis, no molecular tools have been developed to prevent or circumvent these recurrent problems of protein expression in L. lactis. Results Mimicking thioredoxin gene fusion systems available for E. coli, two nisin-inducible expression vectors were constructed to over-produce various proteins in L. lactis as thioredoxin fusion proteins. In this study, we demonstrate that our novel L. lactis fusion partner expression vectors allow high-level expression of soluble heterologous proteins Tuc2009 ORF40, Bbr_0140 and Tuc2009 BppU\\/BppL that were previously insoluble or not expressed using existing L. lactis expression vectors. Over-expressed proteins were subsequently purified by Ni-TED affinity chromatography. Intact heterologous proteins were detected by immunoblotting analyses. We also show that the thioredoxin moiety of the purified fusion protein was specifically and efficiently cleaved off by enterokinase treatment. Conclusions This study is the first description of a thioredoxin gene fusion expression system, purposely developed to circumvent problems associated with protein over-expression in L. lactis. It was shown to prevent protein insolubility and degradation, allowing sufficient production of soluble proteins for further structural and functional characterization.

  4. Recombinant hepatitis B surface antigen production in Aspergillus niger: evaluating the strategy of gene fusion to native glucoamylase

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    James, ER

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Microbiology and Biotechnology October 2012/ Vol. 96, No.2 Recombinant hepatitis B surface antigen production in Aspergillus niger: evaluating the strategy of gene fusion to native glucoamylase ER James a,c & WH van Zyl b & PJ van Zyl c & JF Görgens..., Pretoria 0001, South Africa Abstract This study demonstrates the potential of Aspergillus niger as a candidate expression system for virus- like particle production using gene fusion. Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) production, targeted...

  5. Kinase impact assessment in the landscape of fusion genes that retain kinase domains: a pan-cancer study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Pora; Jia, Peilin; Zhao, Zhongming

    2016-12-24

    Assessing the impact of kinase in gene fusion is essential for both identifying driver fusion genes (FGs) and developing molecular targeted therapies. Kinase domain retention is a crucial factor in kinase fusion genes (KFGs), but such a systematic investigation has not been done yet. To this end, we analyzed kinase domain retention (KDR) status in chimeric protein sequences of 914 KFGs covering 312 kinases across 13 major cancer types. Based on 171 kinase domain-retained KFGs including 101 kinases, we studied their recurrence, kinase groups, fusion partners, exon-based expression depth, short DNA motifs around the break points and networks. Our results, such as more KDR than 5'-kinase fusion genes, combinatorial effects between 3'-KDR kinases and their 5'-partners and a signal transduction-specific DNA sequence motif in the break point intronic sequences, supported positive selection on 3'-kinase fusion genes in cancer. We introduced a degree-of-frequency (DoF) score to measure the possible number of KFGs of a kinase. Interestingly, kinases with high DoF scores tended to undergo strong gene expression alteration at the break points. Furthermore, our KDR gene fusion network analysis revealed six of the seven kinases with the highest DoF scores (ALK, BRAF, MET, NTRK1, NTRK3 and RET) were all observed in thyroid carcinoma. Finally, we summarized common features of 'effective' (highly recurrent) kinases in gene fusions such as expression alteration at break point, redundant usage in multiple cancer types and 3'-location tendency. Collectively, our findings are useful for prioritizing driver kinases and FGs and provided insights into KFGs' clinical implications. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Transposon assisted gene insertion technology (TAGIT: a tool for generating fluorescent fusion proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A Gregory

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We constructed a transposon (transposon assisted gene insertion technology, or TAGIT that allows the random insertion of gfp (or other genes into chromosomal loci without disrupting operon structure or regulation. TAGIT is a modified Tn5 transposon that uses Kan(R to select for insertions on the chromosome or plasmid, beta-galactosidase to identify in-frame gene fusions, and Cre recombinase to excise the kan and lacZ genes in vivo. The resulting gfp insertions maintain target gene reading frame (to the 5' and 3' of gfp and are integrated at the native chromosomal locus, thereby maintaining native expression signals. Libraries can be screened to identify GFP insertions that maintain target protein function at native expression levels, allowing more trustworthy localization studies. We here use TAGIT to generate a library of GFP insertions in the Escherichia coli lactose repressor (LacI. We identified fully functional GFP insertions and partially functional insertions that bind DNA but fail to repress the lacZ operon. Several of these latter GFP insertions localize to lacO arrays integrated in the E. coli chromosome without producing the elongated cells frequently observed when functional LacI-GFP fusions are used in chromosome tagging experiments. TAGIT thereby faciliates the isolation of fully functional insertions of fluorescent proteins into target proteins expressed from the native chromosomal locus as well as potentially useful partially functional proteins.

  7. [Detection of ALK, ROS1 and RET fusion genes in non-small cell lung cancer patients and its clinicopathologic correlation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Shan; Zhang, Haiping; Bai, Dongyu; Gao, Dehong; Zheng, Jie; Ding, Yi

    2015-09-01

    To study the prevalence of ALK, ROS1 and RET fusion genes in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and its correlation with clinicopathologic features. Formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue sections from samples of 302 patients with NSCLC were screened for ALK, ROS1, RET fusions by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). All of the cases were validated by Sanger DNA sequencing. The relationship between ALK, ROS1, RET fusion genes and clinicopathologic features were analyzed. In the cohort of 302 NSCLC samples, 3.97% (12/302) were found to contain ALK fusion genes, including 3 cases with E13; A20 gene fusion, 3 cases with E6; A20 gene fusion and 3 cases with E20; A20 gene fusion. There was no statistically significant difference in patient's gender, age, smoking history and histologic type. Moreover, in the 302 NSCLC samples studied, 3.97% (12/302) were found to contain ROS1 fusion genes, with CD74-ROS1 fusion identified in 9 cases. There was no statistically significant difference in patients' gender, age, smoking history and histologic type. One non-smoking elderly female patient with pulmonary adenocarcinoma had RET gene fusion. None of the cases studied had concurrent ALK, ROS1 and RET mutations. The ALK, ROS1 and RET fusion gene mutation rates in NSCLC are low, they represent some specific molecular subtypes of NSCLC. Genetic testing has significant meaning to guide clinical targeted therapy.

  8. Origin of the plant Tm-1-like gene via two independent horizontal transfer events and one gene fusion event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zefeng; Liu, Li; Fang, Huimin; Li, Pengcheng; Xu, Shuhui; Cao, Wei; Xu, Chenwu; Huang, Jinling; Zhou, Yong

    2016-01-01

    The Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV) resistance gene Tm-1 encodes a direct inhibitor of ToMV RNA replication to protect tomato from infection. The plant Tm-1-like (Tm-1L) protein is predicted to contain an uncharacterized N-terminal UPF0261 domain and a C-terminal TIM-barrel signal transduction (TBST) domain. Homologous searches revealed that proteins containing both of these two domains are mainly present in charophyte green algae and land plants but absent from glaucophytes, red algae and chlorophyte green algae. Although Tm-1 homologs are widely present in bacteria, archaea and fungi, UPF0261- and TBST-domain-containing proteins are generally encoded by different genes in these linages. A co-evolution analysis also suggested a putative interaction between UPF0261- and TBST-domain-containing proteins. Phylogenetic analyses based on homologs of these two domains revealed that plants have acquired UPF0261- and TBST-domain-encoding genes through two independent horizontal gene transfer (HGT) events before the origin of land plants from charophytes. Subsequently, gene fusion occurred between these two horizontally acquired genes and resulted in the origin of the Tm-1L gene in streptophytes. Our results demonstrate a novel evolutionary mechanism through which the recipient organism may acquire genes with functional interaction through two different HGT events and further fuse them into one functional gene. PMID:27647002

  9. Analysis of EML4-ALK Gene Fusion Mutation in Patients 
with Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuzhou WANG

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC is the main type of lung cancer, and the related locus mutation detection research has become a hot direction of molecular targeted therapy, studying on gene mutation status of echinodem microtubule associated protein like 4-Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (EML4-ALK and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, detecting the sensitivity of EML4-ALK gene fusion and gene mutation of EGFR. Methods EML4-ALK gene fusion in 85 cases of paraffin embedded tumor tissue and adjacent lung tissue was detected with the application of immunohistochemistry (IHC, Scorpions amplification refractory mutation system (Scorpions ARMS fluorescence quantitative PCR and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH technology, and EGFR gene in 18, 19, 20 and 21 exon mutation status was detected with the application of ARMS method. Results In 115 cases of NSCLC, IHC showed 32 cases with ALK (D5F3 expression, the expression rate was 27.8%; ARMS showed 27 cases with EML4-ALK fusion gene mutation, the mutation detection rate was 23.5%; 53 cases were detected with EGFR mutation, the mutation rate was 46%. While FISH showed 23 cases with EML4-ALK fusion gene mutation, the detection rate was 20%, slightly lower than the ARMS detection results, suggesting that ARMS more sensitive. Conclusion The application of IHC, ARMS fluorescence quantitative PCR and FISH technology can make a rapid and accurate evaluation of EML4-ALK gene fusion.

  10. Membrane fusion inducers, chloroquine and spermidine increase lipoplex-mediated gene transfection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong-Baeza, Carlos; Bustos, Israel; Serna, Manuel; Tescucano, Alonso; Alcantara-Farfan, Veronica; Ibanez, Miguel [Biochemistry Department, National Polytechnic Institute (IPN), Mexico City 11340 (Mexico); Montanez, Cecilia [Department of Genetics and Molecular Biology, Centre for Research and Advanced Studies (CINVESTAV), IPN, Mexico City 07360 (Mexico); Wong, Carlos [Biochemistry Department, National Polytechnic Institute (IPN), Mexico City 11340 (Mexico); Baeza, Isabel, E-mail: ibaeza@encb.ipn.mx [Biochemistry Department, National Polytechnic Institute (IPN), Mexico City 11340 (Mexico)

    2010-05-28

    Gene transfection into mammalian cells can be achieved with viral and non-viral vectors. Non-viral vectors, such as cationic lipids that form lipoplexes with DNA, are safer and more stable than viral vectors, but their transfection efficiencies are lower. Here we describe that the simultaneous treatment with a membrane fusion inducer (chlorpromazine or procainamide) plus the lysosomotropic agent chloroquine increases lipoplex-mediated gene transfection in human (HEK293 and C-33 A) and rat (PC12) cell lines (up to 9.2-fold), as well as in situ in BALB/c mice spleens and livers (up to 6-fold); and that the polyamine spermidine increases lipoplex-mediated gene transfection and expression in cell cultures. The use of these four drugs provides a novel, safe and relatively inexpensive way to considerably increase lipoplex-mediated gene transfection efficiency.

  11. Deep RNA sequencing analysis of readthrough gene fusions in human prostate adenocarcinoma and reference samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nacu Serban

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Readthrough fusions across adjacent genes in the genome, or transcription-induced chimeras (TICs, have been estimated using expressed sequence tag (EST libraries to involve 4-6% of all genes. Deep transcriptional sequencing (RNA-Seq now makes it possible to study the occurrence and expression levels of TICs in individual samples across the genome. Methods We performed single-end RNA-Seq on three human prostate adenocarcinoma samples and their corresponding normal tissues, as well as brain and universal reference samples. We developed two bioinformatics methods to specifically identify TIC events: a targeted alignment method using artificial exon-exon junctions within 200,000 bp from adjacent genes, and genomic alignment allowing splicing within individual reads. We performed further experimental verification and characterization of selected TIC and fusion events using quantitative RT-PCR and comparative genomic hybridization microarrays. Results Targeted alignment against artificial exon-exon junctions yielded 339 distinct TIC events, including 32 gene pairs with multiple isoforms. The false discovery rate was estimated to be 1.5%. Spliced alignment to the genome was less sensitive, finding only 18% of those found by targeted alignment in 33-nt reads and 59% of those in 50-nt reads. However, spliced alignment revealed 30 cases of TICs with intervening exons, in addition to distant inversions, scrambled genes, and translocations. Our findings increase the catalog of observed TIC gene pairs by 66%. We verified 6 of 6 predicted TICs in all prostate samples, and 2 of 5 predicted novel distant gene fusions, both private events among 54 prostate tumor samples tested. Expression of TICs correlates with that of the upstream gene, which can explain the prostate-specific pattern of some TIC events and the restriction of the SLC45A3-ELK4 e4-e2 TIC to ERG-negative prostate samples, as confirmed in 20 matched prostate tumor and normal

  12. Analysis of API2-MALT1 fusion, trisomies, and immunoglobulin VH genes in pulmonary mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Hongjing; Nakayama, Takahisa; Sakuma, Hidenori; Yamada, Seiji; Sato, Fumihiko; Takino, Hisashi; Okabe, Mitsukuni; Fujiyoshi, Yukio; Hattori, Hideo; Inagaki, Hiroshi

    2011-09-01

    Pulmonary mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma is unique in that chronic inflammation is rare and that API2-MALT1 fusion, resulting from t(11;18)(q21;q21), occurs frequently. In this study, we examined 20 cases for API2-MALT1 fusion using the multiplex reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and looked for trisomy 3, trisomy 18, and abnormalities of MALT1 and IGH genes using fluorescence in situ hybridization. In addition, we analyzed VH genes by subcloning of the monoclonal polymerase chain reaction products. Of 20 cases studied, we detected gene abnormalities in 16: API2-MALT1 fusion in 9, trisomy 3 in 5, trisomy 18 in 4, MALT1 abnormality in 13, and IGH abnormality in 1. MALT1 gene abnormalities were concordant with API2-MALT1 fusion or trisomy 18. One case showed API2-MALT1 fusion and trisomy 3. On detection of API2-MALT1 fusion and trisomies, we were able to divide our cases into 3 groups, API2-MALT1 positive, trisomy positive, and no detectable gene abnormality, suggesting that tumor development had processed along different genetic pathways. All 20 cases were analyzed for VH genes. Most of the VH genes selected by the lymphomas belonged to the VH3 family, but there was no restriction to any particular VH fragment. Of interest, VH genes were unmutated in 7 cases, suggesting that T-cell-independent extrafollicular B-cell maturation may be important in the development of this lymphoma. In addition, both mutated and unmutated tumor cases were found to carry the API2-MALT1 fusion and trisomy 3. This observation suggests that these gene abnormalities may occur in microenvironments found before or outside of follicular germinal centers. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. MLL fusion proteins preferentially regulate a subset of wild-type MLL target genes in the leukemic genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian-fei; Wu, George; Mi, Shuangli; He, Fuhong; Wu, Jun; Dong, Jingfang; Luo, Roger T.; Mattison, Ryan; Kaberlein, Joseph J.; Prabhakar, Shyam; Ji, Hongkai

    2011-01-01

    MLL encodes a histone methyltransferase that is critical in maintaining gene expression during embryonic development and hematopoiesis. 11q23 translocations result in the formation of chimeric MLL fusion proteins that act as potent drivers of acute leukemia. However, it remains unclear what portion of the leukemic genome is under the direct control of MLL fusions. By comparing patient-derived leukemic cell lines, we find that MLL fusion-bound genes are a small subset of that recognized by wild-type MLL. In an inducible MLL-ENL model, MLL fusion protein binding and changes in H3K79 methylation are limited to a specific portion of the genome, whereas wild-type MLL distributes to a much larger set of gene loci. Surprisingly, among 223 MLL-ENL–bound genes, only 12 demonstrate a significant increase in mRNA expression on induction of the fusion protein. In addition to Hoxa9 and Meis1, this includes Eya1 and Six1, which comprise a heterodimeric transcription factor important in several developmental pathways. We show that Eya1 has the capacity to immortalize hematopoietic progenitor cells in vitro and collaborates with Six1 in hematopoietic transformation assays. Altogether, our data suggest that MLL fusions contribute to the development of acute leukemia through direct activation of a small set of target genes. PMID:21518926

  14. Structural analysis of the genome of breast cancer cell line ZR-75-30 identifies twelve expressed fusion genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Ina; Batty, Elizabeth M; Pole, Jessica C M; Blood, Katherine A; Mo, Steven; Cooke, Susanna L; Ng, Charlotte; Howe, Kevin L; Chin, Suet-Feung; Brenton, James D; Caldas, Carlos; Howarth, Karen D; Edwards, Paul A W

    2012-12-22

    It has recently emerged that common epithelial cancers such as breast cancers have fusion genes like those in leukaemias. In a representative breast cancer cell line, ZR-75-30, we searched for fusion genes, by analysing genome rearrangements. We first analysed rearrangements of the ZR-75-30 genome, to around 10kb resolution, by molecular cytogenetic approaches, combining array painting and array CGH. We then compared this map with genomic junctions determined by paired-end sequencing. Most of the breakpoints found by array painting and array CGH were identified in the paired end sequencing-55% of the unamplified breakpoints and 97% of the amplified breakpoints (as these are represented by more sequence reads). From this analysis we identified 9 expressed fusion genes: APPBP2-PHF20L1, BCAS3-HOXB9, COL14A1-SKAP1, TAOK1-PCGF2, TIAM1-NRIP1, TIMM23-ARHGAP32, TRPS1-LASP1, USP32-CCDC49 and ZMYM4-OPRD1. We also determined the genomic junctions of a further three expressed fusion genes that had been described by others, BCAS3-ERBB2, DDX5-DEPDC6/DEPTOR and PLEC1-ENPP2. Of this total of 12 expressed fusion genes, 9 were in the coamplification. Due to the sensitivity of the technologies used, we estimate these 12 fusion genes to be around two-thirds of the true total. Many of the fusions seem likely to be driver mutations. For example, PHF20L1, BCAS3, TAOK1, PCGF2, and TRPS1 are fused in other breast cancers. HOXB9 and PHF20L1 are members of gene families that are fused in other neoplasms. Several of the other genes are relevant to cancer-in addition to ERBB2, SKAP1 is an adaptor for Src, DEPTOR regulates the mTOR pathway and NRIP1 is an estrogen-receptor coregulator. This is the first structural analysis of a breast cancer genome that combines classical molecular cytogenetic approaches with sequencing. Paired-end sequencing was able to detect almost all breakpoints, where there was adequate read depth. It supports the view that gene breakage and gene fusion are important

  15. Sequential combination of karyotyping and RNA-sequencing in the search for cancer-specific fusion genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagopoulos, Ioannis; Thorsen, Jim; Gorunova, Ludmila; Micci, Francesca; Heim, Sverre

    2014-08-01

    Cancer-specific fusion genes are often caused by cytogenetically visible chromosomal rearrangements such as translocations, inversions, deletions or insertions, they can be the targets of molecular therapy, they play a key role in the accurate diagnosis and classification of neoplasms, and they are of prognostic impact. The identification of novel fusion genes in various neoplasms therefore not only has obvious research importance, but is also potentially of major clinical significance. The "traditional" methodology to detect them began with cytogenetic analysis to find the chromosomal rearrangement, followed by utilization of fluorescence in situ hybridization techniques to find the probe which spans the chromosomal breakpoint, and finally molecular cloning to localize the breakpoint more precisely and identify the genes fused by the chromosomal rearrangement. Although laborious, the above-mentioned sequential approach is robust and reliable and a number of fusion genes have been cloned by such means. Next generation sequencing (NGS), mainly RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq), has opened up new possibilities to detect fusion genes even when cytogenetic aberrations are cryptic or information about them is unknown. However, NGS suffers from the shortcoming of identifying as "fusion genes" also many technical, biological and, perhaps in particular, clinical "false positives," thus making the assessment of which fusions are important and which are noise extremely difficult. The best way to overcome this risk of information overflow is, whenever reliable cytogenetic information is at hand, to compare karyotyping and sequencing data and concentrate exclusively on those suggested fusion genes that are found in chromosomal breakpoints. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Rare Cancers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Gene fusions by chromothripsis of chromosome 5q in the VCaP prostate cancer cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teles Alves, Inês; Hiltemann, Saskia; Hartjes, Thomas; van der Spek, Peter; Stubbs, Andrew; Trapman, Jan; Jenster, Guido

    2013-06-01

    The VCaP cell line is widely used in prostate cancer research as it is a unique model to study castrate resistant disease expressing high levels of the wild type androgen receptor and the TMPRSS2-ERG fusion transcript. Using next generation sequencing, we assembled the structural variations in VCaP genomic DNA and observed a massive number of genomic rearrangements along the q arm of chromosome 5, characteristic of chromothripsis. Chromothripsis is a recently recognized phenomenon characterized by extensive chromosomal shattering in a single catastrophic event, mainly detected in cancer cells. Various structural events identified on chromosome 5q of VCaP resulted in gene fusions. Out of the 18 gene fusion candidates tested, 15 were confirmed on genomic level. In our set of gene fusions, only rarely we observe microhomology flanking the breakpoints. On RNA level, only five transcripts were detected and NDUFAF2-MAST4 was the only resulting in an in-frame fusion transcript. Our data indicate that although a marker of genomic instability, chromothripsis might lead to only a limited number of functionally relevant fusion genes.

  17. A novel EWS-CREB3L3 gene fusion in a mesenteric sclerosing epithelioid fibrosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewaele, Barbara; Libbrecht, Louis; Levy, Gabriel; Brichard, Benedicte; Vanspauwen, Vanessa; Sciot, Raf; Debiec-Rychter, Maria

    2017-09-01

    Sclerosing epithelioid fibrosarcoma (SEF) is a rare, malignant fibroblastic neoplasm, morphologically composed of cords, nests or sheets of monotonous epithelioid cells within a collagenous matrix. It has been recently characterized by recurrent pathogenic EWS-CREB3L1/2 or FUS-CREB3L2 fusions and common MUC4 protein expression by immunohistochemistry. Typically SEF occur in middle-aged adults and rarely have been reported within the abdominal cavity. Here we report an 18-year-old man with intraabdominal tumor and multiple disseminated liver metastases, presenting pure SEF histologic and immunophenotypic features. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis showed unbalanced rearrangement of Ewing sarcoma breakpoint region 1 (EWSR1) gene. Genomic profiling by array CGH, followed by RT-PCR and sequencing analysis, revealed a previously not reported EWSR1 translocation partner, cAMP-responsive element-binding protein 3-like 3 (CREB3L3). The novel EWSR1-CREB3L3 fusion further extends the range of fusion types involving EWSR1 that are characteristic for SEF. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Rational basis for the combination of PCA3 and TMPRSS2:ERG gene fusion for prostate cancer diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robert, G.Y.M.; Jannink, S.A.; Smit, F.; Aalders, T.; Hessels, D.; Cremers, R.G.H.M.; Mulders, P.F.A.; Schalken, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The prostate cancer gene 3 (PCA3) and TMPRSS2:ERG gene fusion are promising prostate cancer (PCa) specific biomarkers. Our aim was to simultaneously quantify the expression levels of PCA3 and TMPRSS2:ERG in a panel of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), normal prostate adjacent to PCa

  19. The Synovial Sarcoma-Associated SS18-SSX2 Fusion Protein Induces Epigenetic Gene (De)Regulation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruijn, D.R.H. de; Allander, S.V.; Dijk, A.H.A.; Willemse, M.P.; Thijssen, J.; Groningen, J.J.M. van; Meltzer, P.S.; Geurts van Kessel, A.H.M.

    2006-01-01

    Fusion of the SS18 and either one of the SSX genes is a hallmark of human synovial sarcoma. The SS18 and SSX genes encode nuclear proteins that exhibit opposite transcriptional activities. The SS18 protein functions as a transcriptional coactivator and is associated with the SWI/SNF complex, whereas

  20. In situ sequencing identifies TMPRSS2-ERG fusion transcripts, somatic point mutations and gene expression levels in prostate cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiflemariam, Sara; Mignardi, Marco; Ali, Muhammad Akhtar; Bergh, Anders; Nilsson, Mats; Sjöblom, Tobias

    2014-10-01

    Translocations contribute to the genesis and progression of epithelial tumours and in particular to prostate cancer development. To better understand the contribution of fusion transcripts and visualize the clonal composition of multifocal tumours, we have developed a technology for multiplex in situ detection and identification of expressed fusion transcripts. When compared to immunohistochemistry, TMPRSS2-ERG fusion-negative and fusion-positive prostate tumours were correctly classified. The most prevalent TMPRSS2-ERG fusion variants were visualized, identified, and quantitated in human prostate cancer tissues, and the ratio of the variant fusion transcripts could for the first time be directly determined by in situ sequencing. Further, we demonstrate concurrent in situ detection of gene expression, point mutations, and gene fusions of the prostate cancer relevant targets AMACR, AR, TP53, and TMPRSS2-ERG. This unified approach to in situ analyses of somatic mutations can empower studies of intra-tumoural heterogeneity and future tissue-based diagnostics of mutations and translocations. Copyright © 2014 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Decoding of exon splicing patterns in the human RUNX1-RUNX1T1 fusion gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinev, Vasily V; Migas, Alexandr A; Kirsanava, Aksana D; Mishkova, Olga A; Siomava, Natalia; Ramanouskaya, Tatiana V; Vaitsiankova, Alina V; Ilyushonak, Ilia M; Nazarov, Petr V; Vallar, Laurent; Aleinikova, Olga V

    2015-11-01

    The t(8;21) translocation is the most widespread genetic defect found in human acute myeloid leukemia. This translocation results in the RUNX1-RUNX1T1 fusion gene that produces a wide variety of alternative transcripts and influences the course of the disease. The rules of combinatorics and splicing of exons in the RUNX1-RUNX1T1 transcripts are not known. To address this issue, we developed an exon graph model of the fusion gene organization and evaluated its local exon combinatorics by the exon combinatorial index (ECI). Here we show that the local exon combinatorics of the RUNX1-RUNX1T1 gene follows a power-law behavior and (i) the vast majority of exons has a low ECI, (ii) only a small part is represented by "exons-hubs" of splicing with very high ECI values, and (iii) it is scale-free and very sensitive to targeted skipping of "exons-hubs". Stochasticity of the splicing machinery and preferred usage of exons in alternative splicing can explain such behavior of the system. Stochasticity may explain up to 12% of the ECI variance and results in a number of non-coding and unproductive transcripts that can be considered as a noise. Half-life of these transcripts is increased due to the deregulation of some key genes of the nonsense-mediated decay system in leukemia cells. On the other hand, preferred usage of exons may explain up to 75% of the ECI variability. Our analysis revealed a set of splicing-related cis-regulatory motifs that can explain "attractiveness" of exons in alternative splicing but only when they are considered together. Cis-regulatory motifs are guides for splicing trans-factors and we observed a leukemia-specific profile of expression of the splicing genes in t(8;21)-positive blasts. Altogether, our results show that alternative splicing of the RUNX1-RUNX1T1 transcripts follows strict rules and that the power-law component of the fusion gene organization confers a high flexibility to this process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  2. High-speed biosensing strategy for non-invasive profiling of multiple cancer fusion genes in urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Kevin M; Wee, Eugene J H; Trau, Matt

    2017-03-15

    Aberrant chromosal rearrangements, such as the multiple variants of TMPRSS2:ERG fusion gene mutations in prostate cancer (PCa), are promising diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers due to their specific expression in cancerous tissue only. Additionally, TMPRSS2:ERG variants are detectable in urine to provide non-invasive PCa diagnostic sampling as an attractive surrogate for needle biopsies. Therefore, rapid and simplistic assays for identifying multiple urinary TMPRSS2:ERG variants are potentially useful to aid in early cancer detection, immediate patient risk stratification, and prompt personalized treatment. However, current strategies for simultaneous detection of multiple gene fusions are limited by tedious and prolonged experimental protocols, thus limiting their use as rapid clinical screening tools. Herein, we report a simple and rapid gene fusion strategy which expliots the specificity of DNA ligase and the speed of isothermal amplification to simultaneously detect multiple fusion gene RNAs within a short sample-to-answer timeframe of 60min. The method has a low detection limit of 2 amol (1000 copies), and was successfully applied for non-invasive fusion gene profiling in patient urine samples with subsequent validation by a PCR-based gold standard approach. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Spatial and temporal analysis of gene expression during growth and fusion of the mouse facial prominences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Weiguo; Leach, Sonia M; Tipney, Hannah; Phang, Tzulip; Geraci, Mark; Spritz, Richard A; Hunter, Lawrence E; Williams, Trevor

    2009-12-16

    Orofacial malformations resulting from genetic and/or environmental causes are frequent human birth defects yet their etiology is often unclear because of insufficient information concerning the molecular, cellular and morphogenetic processes responsible for normal facial development. We have, therefore, derived a comprehensive expression dataset for mouse orofacial development, interrogating three distinct regions - the mandibular, maxillary and frontonasal prominences. To capture the dynamic changes in the transcriptome during face formation, we sampled five time points between E10.5-E12.5, spanning the developmental period from establishment of the prominences to their fusion to form the mature facial platform. Seven independent biological replicates were used for each sample ensuring robustness and quality of the dataset. Here, we provide a general overview of the dataset, characterizing aspects of gene expression changes at both the spatial and temporal level. Considerable coordinate regulation occurs across the three prominences during this period of facial growth and morphogenesis, with a switch from expression of genes involved in cell proliferation to those associated with differentiation. An accompanying shift in the expression of polycomb and trithorax genes presumably maintains appropriate patterns of gene expression in precursor or differentiated cells, respectively. Superimposed on the many coordinated changes are prominence-specific differences in the expression of genes encoding transcription factors, extracellular matrix components, and signaling molecules. Thus, the elaboration of each prominence will be driven by particular combinations of transcription factors coupled with specific cell:cell and cell:matrix interactions. The dataset also reveals several prominence-specific genes not previously associated with orofacial development, a subset of which we externally validate. Several of these latter genes are components of bidirectional

  4. Detection of 22 common leukemic fusion genes using a single-step multiplex qRT-PCR-based assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Xiaodong; Wang, Xianwei; Zhang, Lina; Chen, Zhenzhu; Zhao, Yu; Hu, Jieying; Fan, Ruihua; Song, Yongping

    2017-07-25

    Fusion genes generated from chromosomal translocation play an important role in hematological malignancies. Detection of fusion genes currently employ use of either conventional RT-PCR methods or fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), where both methods involve tedious methodologies and require prior characterization of chromosomal translocation events as determined by cytogenetic analysis. In this study, we describe a real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR)-based multi-fusion gene screening method with the capacity to detect 22 fusion genes commonly found in leukemia. This method does not require pre-characterization of gene translocation events, thereby facilitating immediate diagnosis and therapeutic management. We performed fluorescent qRT-PCR (F-qRT-PCR) using a commercially-available multi-fusion gene detection kit on a patient cohort of 345 individuals comprising 108 cases diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) for initial evaluation; remaining patients within the cohort were assayed for confirmatory diagnosis. Results obtained by F-qRT-PCR were compared alongside patient analysis by cytogenetic characterization. Gene translocations detected by F-qRT-PCR in AML cases were diagnosed in 69.4% of the patient cohort, which was comparatively similar to 68.5% as diagnosed by cytogenetic analysis, thereby demonstrating 99.1% concordance. Overall gene fusion was detected in 53.7% of the overall patient population by F-qRT-PCR, 52.9% by cytogenetic prediction in leukemia, and 9.1% in non-leukemia patients by both methods. The overall concordance rate was calculated to be 99.0%. Fusion genes were detected by F-qRT-PCR in 97.3% of patients with CML, followed by 69.4% with AML, 33.3% with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), 9.1% with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), and 0% with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). We describe the use of a F-qRT-PCR-based multi-fusion gene screening method as an efficient one-step diagnostic procedure as an

  5. Fusion gene transcripts and Ig/TCR gene rearrangements are complementary but infrequent targets for PCR-based detection of minimal residual disease in acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boeckx, N.; M.J. Willemse; T. Szczepanski (Tomasz); V.H.J. van der Velden (Vincent); A.W. Langerak (Anton); P. Vandekerckhove (Philippe); J.J.M. van Dongen (Jacques)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractPCR-based monitoring of minimal residual disease (MRD) in acute leukemias can be achieved via detection of fusion gene transcripts of chromosome aberrations or detection of immunoglobulin (lg) and T cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangements. We wished to assess whether both PCR targets are

  6. Inhibition of protein translation by the DISC1-Boymaw fusion gene from a Scottish family with major psychiatric disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Baohu; Higa, Kerin K.; Kim, Minjung; Zhou, Lynn; Young, Jared W.; Geyer, Mark A.; Zhou, Xianjin

    2014-01-01

    The t(1; 11) translocation appears to be the causal genetic lesion with 70% penetrance for schizophrenia, major depression and other psychiatric disorders in a Scottish family. Molecular studies identified the disruption of the disrupted-in-schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) gene by chromosome translocation at chromosome 1q42. Our previous studies, however, revealed that the translocation also disrupted another gene, Boymaw (also termed DISC1FP1), on chromosome 11. After translocation, two fusion genes [the DISC1-Boymaw (DB7) and the Boymaw-DISC1 (BD13)] are generated between the DISC1 and Boymaw genes. In the present study, we report that expression of the DB7 fusion gene inhibits both intracellular NADH oxidoreductase activities and protein translation. We generated humanized DISC1-Boymaw mice with gene targeting to examine the in vivo functions of the fusion genes. Consistent with the in vitro studies on the DB7 fusion gene, protein translation activity is decreased in the hippocampus and in cultured primary neurons from the brains of the humanized mice. Expression of Gad67, Nmdar1 and Psd95 proteins are also reduced. The humanized mice display prolonged and increased responses to the NMDA receptor antagonist, ketamine, on various mouse genetic backgrounds. Abnormal information processing of acoustic startle and depressive-like behaviors are also observed. In addition, the humanized mice display abnormal erythropoiesis, which was reported to associate with depression in humans. Expression of the DB7 fusion gene may reduce protein translation to impair brain functions and thereby contribute to the pathogenesis of major psychiatric disorders. PMID:24908665

  7. Inhibition of protein translation by the DISC1-Boymaw fusion gene from a Scottish family with major psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Baohu; Higa, Kerin K; Kim, Minjung; Zhou, Lynn; Young, Jared W; Geyer, Mark A; Zhou, Xianjin

    2014-11-01

    The t(1; 11) translocation appears to be the causal genetic lesion with 70% penetrance for schizophrenia, major depression and other psychiatric disorders in a Scottish family. Molecular studies identified the disruption of the disrupted-in-schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) gene by chromosome translocation at chromosome 1q42. Our previous studies, however, revealed that the translocation also disrupted another gene, Boymaw (also termed DISC1FP1), on chromosome 11. After translocation, two fusion genes [the DISC1-Boymaw (DB7) and the Boymaw-DISC1 (BD13)] are generated between the DISC1 and Boymaw genes. In the present study, we report that expression of the DB7 fusion gene inhibits both intracellular NADH oxidoreductase activities and protein translation. We generated humanized DISC1-Boymaw mice with gene targeting to examine the in vivo functions of the fusion genes. Consistent with the in vitro studies on the DB7 fusion gene, protein translation activity is decreased in the hippocampus and in cultured primary neurons from the brains of the humanized mice. Expression of Gad67, Nmdar1 and Psd95 proteins are also reduced. The humanized mice display prolonged and increased responses to the NMDA receptor antagonist, ketamine, on various mouse genetic backgrounds. Abnormal information processing of acoustic startle and depressive-like behaviors are also observed. In addition, the humanized mice display abnormal erythropoiesis, which was reported to associate with depression in humans. Expression of the DB7 fusion gene may reduce protein translation to impair brain functions and thereby contribute to the pathogenesis of major psychiatric disorders. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Identification of target genes of synovial sarcoma-associated fusion oncoprotein using human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Kazuo; Ikeya, Makoto; Fukuta, Makoto; Woltjen, Knut; Tamaki, Sakura; Takahara, Naoko; Kato, Tomohisa; Sato, Shingo; Otsuka, Takanobu; Toguchida, Junya

    2013-03-22

    Synovial sarcoma (SS) is a malignant soft tissue tumor harboring chromosomal translocation t(X; 18)(p11.2; q11.2), which produces SS-specific fusion gene, SYT-SSX. Although precise function of SYT-SSX remains to be investigated, accumulating evidences suggest its role in gene regulation via epigenetic mechanisms, and the product of SYT-SSX target genes may serve as biomarkers of SS. Lack of knowledge about the cell-of-origin of SS, however, has placed obstacle in the way of target identification. Here we report a novel approach to identify SYT-SSX2 target genes using human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) containing a doxycycline-inducible SYT-SSX2 gene. SYT-SSX2 was efficiently induced both at mRNA and protein levels within three hours after doxycycline administration, while no morphological change of hPSCs was observed until 24h. Serial microarray analyses identified genes of which the expression level changed more than twofold within 24h. Surprisingly, the majority (297/312, 95.2%) were up-regulated genes and a result inconsistent with the current concept of SYT-SSX as a transcriptional repressor. Comparing these genes with SS-related genes which were selected by a series of in silico analyses, 49 and 2 genes were finally identified as candidates of up- and down-regulated target of SYT-SSX, respectively. Association of these genes with SYT-SSX in SS cells was confirmed by knockdown experiments. Expression profiles of SS-related genes in hPSCs and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were strikingly different in response to the induction of SYT-SSX, and more than half of SYT-SSX target genes in hPSCs were not induced in hMSCs. These results suggest the importance of cellular context for correct understanding of SYT-SSX function, and demonstrated how our new system will help to overcome this issue. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Identification of cancer fusion drivers using network fusion centrality

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Chia-Chin; Kannan, Kalpana; Lin, Steven; Yen, Laising; Milosavljevic, Aleksandar

    2013-01-01

    Summary: Gene fusions are being discovered at an increasing rate using massively parallel sequencing technologies. Prioritization of cancer fusion drivers for validation cannot be performed using traditional single-gene based methods because fusions involve portions of two partner genes. To address this problem, we propose a novel network analysis method called fusion centrality that is specifically tailored for prioritizing gene fusions. We first propose a domain-based fusion model built on ...

  10. Evolution by Pervasive Gene Fusion in Antibiotic Resistance and Antibiotic Synthesizing Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orla Coleman

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Phylogenetic (tree-based approaches to understanding evolutionary history are unable to incorporate convergent evolutionary events where two genes merge into one. In this study, as exemplars of what can be achieved when a tree is not assumed a priori, we have analysed the evolutionary histories of polyketide synthase genes and antibiotic resistance genes and have shown that their history is replete with convergent events as well as divergent events. We demonstrate that the overall histories of these genes more closely resembles the remodelling that might be seen with the children’s toy Lego, than the standard model of the phylogenetic tree. This work demonstrates further that genes can act as public goods, available for re-use and incorporation into other genetic goods.

  11. Acquiring transgenic tobacco plants with insect resistance and glyphosate tolerance by fusion gene transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, He; Lang, Zhihong; Zhu, Li; Huang, Dafang

    2012-10-01

    The advantages of gene 'stacking' or 'pyramiding' are obvious in genetically modified (GM) crops, and several different multi-transgene-stacking methods are available. Using linker peptides for multiple gene transformation is considered to be a good method to meet a variety of needs. In our experiment, the Bt cry1Ah gene, which encodes the insect-resistance protein, and the mG ( 2 ) -epsps gene, which encodes the glyphosate-tolerance protein, were connected by a 2A or LP4/2A linker. Linker 2A is a peptide from the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) that has self-cleavage activity. LP4 is a peptide from Raphanus sativus seeds that has a recognition site and is cleaved by a protease. LP4/2A is a hybrid peptide that contains the first 9 amino acids of LP4 and 20 amino acids from 2A. We used the linker peptide to construct four coordinated expression vectors: pHAG, pHLAG, pGAH and pGLAH. Two single gene expression vectors, pSAh and pSmG(2), were used as controls. The six expression vectors and the pCAMBIA2301 vector were transferred into tobacco by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation, and 529 transformants were obtained. Molecular detection and bioassay detection data demonstrated that the transgenic tobaccos possessed good pest resistance and glyphosate tolerance. The two genes in the fusion vector were expressed simultaneously. The plants with the genes linked by the LP4/2A peptide showed better pest resistance and glyphosate tolerance than the plants with the genes linked by 2A. The expression level of the two genes linked by LP4/2A was not significantly different from the single gene vector. Key message The expression level of the two genes linked by LP4/2A was higher than those linked by 2A and was not significantly different from the single gene vector.

  12. Geographic Heterogeneity of the AML1-ETO Fusion Gene in Iranian Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeedeh Ghazaey Zidanloo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The human AML1 gene, located on chromosome 21, can be fused to the AML1- eight-twenty-one (ETO oncoprotein on chromosome eight, resulting in a t(8;21(q22;q22 translocation. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML associated with this translocation is considered a distinct AML with a favorable prognosis. Due to the various incidences of the translocation, which is associated with geographic diversities, investigation of molecular epidemiology is important to increase the awareness of physicians and hematologists regarding the frequency this chromosomal aberration. Methods: The patients were classified according to the French–American–British classification into eight groups: M0–M7. Determination of the prevalence of the AML1-ETO fusion gene was accomplished by TaqMan real-time PCR. Bone marrow samples from 113 patients with newly-diagnosed, untreated AML -M1, -M2, and -M4, and 20 healthy controls admitted to the Ghaem Hospital in Mashhad, Iran were studied. Results: The AML1-ETO fusion gene was detected up 50% of the M2 subgroup and absent in the M1 and M4 subtypes and healthy controls. Comparison of the prevalence of the t(8;21 translocation with results of previous studies showed that it varies between countries. This result may be due to geographic or ethnic differences, or both. Conclusions: The relatively high prevalence of the t(8;21 translocation in Iran was similar to that found in other Asian countries. It was closely associated with female gender, relatively young age, and FAB-M2 subtype. Its distribution varied considerably with geographic area. Therefore, further studies are needed to provide epidemiological data important for the establishment of optimal therapeutic strategies applicable to patients of each region.

  13. A Double-Switch Cell Fusion-Inducible Transgene Expression System for Neural Stem Cell-Based Antiglioma Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumei Luo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent progress in neural stem cell- (NSC- based tumor-targeted gene therapy showed that NSC vectors expressing an artificially engineered viral fusogenic protein, VSV-G H162R, could cause tumor cell death specifically under acidic tumor microenvironment by syncytia formation; however, the killing efficiency still had much room to improve. In the view that coexpression of another antitumoral gene with VSV-G can augment the bystander effect, a synthetic regulatory system that triggers transgene expression in a cell fusion-inducible manner has been proposed. Here we have developed a double-switch cell fusion-inducible transgene expression system (DoFIT to drive transgene expression upon VSV-G-mediated NSC-glioma cell fusion. In this binary system, transgene expression is coregulated by a glioma-specific promoter and targeting sequences of a microRNA (miR that is highly expressed in NSCs but lowly expressed in glioma cells. Thus, transgene expression is “switched off” by the miR in NSC vectors, but after cell fusion with glioma cells, the miR is diluted and loses its suppressive effect. Meanwhile, in the syncytia, transgene expression is “switched on” by the glioma-specific promoter. Our in vitro and in vivo experimental data show that DoFIT successfully abolishes luciferase reporter gene expression in NSC vectors but activates it specifically after VSV-G-mediated NSC-glioma cell fusion.

  14. Simultaneous detection of 45 fusion genes in leukemia by dual-color fluorescence real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Z; Zhang, P; He, G; Liao, K; Wang, Z; Pan, J; Du, K; Du, J; Li, B-A

    2017-04-01

    Detection of recurrent genetic abnormalities is of great significance for a refined diagnosis and assessment of prognosis in leukemia. Conventional nested reverse transcription PCR is labor intensive and time-consuming. We have developed a novel dual-color TaqMan probe-based real-time PCR method for the simultaneous screening of 45 fusion transcripts in 12 parallel reactions. The method was tested and validated with cell lines carrying known fusion transcripts and patient samples. A multiplex real-time PCR method was successfully developed for rapid detection of 45 fusion genes and validated for 15 of the more commonly detected fusion genes. Intra-assay reproducibility assessed for the most frequent rearrangements ranged from 0.41% to 0.74% for the coefficient of variation (CV) of cycle threshold (Ct) and the interassay reproducibility ranged from 1.62% to 2.83% in five separate experiments. The lowest detection limit for the translocations tested ranged between 1 : 16 000 and 1 : 32 000. Validation of the method with 213 patient samples showed 100% specificity and excellent consistence with conventional nested RT-PCR. Overall, we believe that this method is easily applicable, cost-effective, and clinically useful for a rapid screening of fusion genes in the initial diagnostic phase of leukemia. Its use can also be extended to the monitoring of minimal residual disease. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Integrated genomic profiling identifies candidate genes implicated in glioma-genesis and a novel LEO1-SLC12A1 fusion gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bralten, Linda B C; Kloosterhof, Nanne K; Gravendeel, Lonneke A M; Sacchetti, Andrea; Duijm, Elza J; Kros, Johan M; van den Bent, Martin J; Hoogenraad, Casper C; Sillevis Smitt, Peter A E; French, Pim J

    2010-06-01

    We performed genotyping and exon-level expression profiling on 21 glioblastomas (GBMs) and 19 oligodendrogliomas (ODs) to identify genes involved in glioma initiation and/or progression. Low-copy number amplifications (2.5 7) were more frequently observed in GBMs; ODs generally have more heterozygous deletions per tumor. Four high-copy amplicons were identified in more than one sample and resulted in overexpression of the known oncogenes EGFR, MDM2, and CDK4. In the fourth amplicon, RBBP5, a member of the RB pathway, may act as a novel oncogene in GBMs. Not all hCNAs contain known genes, which may suggest that other transcriptional and/or regulatory elements are the target for amplification. Regions with most frequent allelic loss, both in ODs and GBMs, resulted in a reduced expression of known tumor suppressor genes. We identified a homozygous deletion spanning the Pragmin gene in one sample, but direct sequencing of all coding exons in 20 other glioma samples failed to detect additional genetic changes. Finally, we screened for fusion genes by identifying aberrant 5'-3' expression of genes that lie over regions of a copy number change. A fusion gene between exon 11 of LEO1 and exon 10 of SLC12A1 was identified. Our data show that integrated genomic profiling can identify genes involved in tumor initiation, and/or progression and can be used as an approach to identify novel fusion genes. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Codon-Optimized NADH Oxidase Gene Expression and Gene Fusion with Glycerol Dehydrogenase for Bienzyme System with Cofactor Regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baishan Fang

    Full Text Available NADH oxidases (NOXs play an important role in maintaining balance of NAD+/NADH by catalyzing cofactors regeneration. The expression of nox gene from Lactobacillus brevis in Escherichia coli BL21 (BL21 (DE3 was studied. Two strategies, the high AT-content in the region adjacent to the initiation codon and codon usage of the whole gene sequence consistent with the host, obtained the NOX activity of 59.9 U/mg and 73.3 U/mg (crude enzyme, with enhanced expression level of 2.0 and 2.5-folds, respectively. Purified NOX activity was 213.8 U/mg. Gene fusion of glycerol dehydrogenase (GDH and NOX formed bifuctional multi-enzymes for bioconversion of glycerol coupled with coenzyme regeneration. Kinetic parameters of the GDH-NOX for each substrate, glycerol and NADH, were calculated as Vmax(Glycerol 20 μM/min, Km(Glycerol 19.4 mM, Vmax (NADH 12.5 μM/min and Km (NADH 51.3 μM, respectively, which indicated the potential application of GDH-NOX for quick glycerol analysis and dioxyacetone biosynthesis.

  17. Effects of an adenoviral vector containing a suicide gene fusion on growth characteristics of breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Heng; Liu, Chunli; Zhu, Ting; Huang, Zonghai; Yang, Liucheng; Li, Qiang

    2014-12-01

    The herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase/ganciclovir (HSV‑TK/GCV) and the cytosine deaminase/5‑fluorocytosine (CD/5‑FC) systems have been widely applied in suicide gene therapy for cancer. Although suicide gene therapy has been successfully used in vitro and in vivo studies, the number of studies on the effects of recombinant adenoviruses (Ads) containing suicide genes on target cancer cells is limited. The aim of this study was to examine whether recombinant Ads containing the CD/TK fusion gene affect cell proliferation of breast cancer cells in vitro. In the present study, we explored the use of a recombinant adenoviral vector to deliver the CD/TK fusion gene to the breast cancer cell line MCF‑7. We found that the recombinant adenoviral vector efficiently infected MCF‑7 cells. Western blot analysis revealed that CD and TK proteins are expressed in the infected cells. The infected breast cancer cells did not show any significant changes in morphology, ultrastructure, cell growth, and cell‑cycle distribution compared to the uninfected cells. This study revealed that the Ad‑vascular endothelial growth factor promoter (VEGFp)‑CD/TK vector is non‑toxic to MCF‑7 cells at the appropriate titer. Our results indicate that it is feasible to use a recombinant adenoviral vector containing the CD/TK fusion gene in suicide gene therapy to target breast cancer cells.

  18. Molecular characterization of KMT2A fusion partner genes in 13 cases of pediatric leukemia with complex or cryptic karyotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ney Garcia, Daniela R; de Souza, Mariana T; de Figueiredo, Amanda F; Othman, Moneeb A K; Rittscher, Katharina; Abdelhay, Eliana; Capela de Matos, Roberto R; Meyer, Claus; Marschalek, Rolf; Land, Marcelo G P; Liehr, Thomas; Ribeiro, Raul C; Silva, Maria Luiza Macedo

    2017-12-01

    In pediatric acute leukemias, reciprocal chromosomal translocations frequently cause gene fusions involving the lysine (K)-specific methyltransferase 2A gene (KMT2A, also known as MLL). Specific KMT2A fusion partners are associated with the disease phenotype (lymphoblastic vs. myeloid), and the type of KMT2A rearrangement also has prognostic implications. However, the KMT2A partner gene cannot always be identified by banding karyotyping. We sought to identify such partner genes in 13 cases of childhood leukemia with uninformative karyotypes by combining molecular techniques, including multicolor banding FISH, reverse-transcriptase PCR, and long-distance inverse PCR. Of the KMT2A fusion partner genes, MLLT3 was present in five patients, all with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, MLLT1 in two patients, and MLLT10, MLLT4, MLLT11, and AFF1 in one patient each. Reciprocal reading by long-distance inverse PCR also disclosed KMT2A fusions with PITPNA in one patient, with LOC100132273 in another patient, and with DNA sequences not compatible with any gene in three patients. The most common KMT2A breakpoint region was intron/exon 9 (3/8 patients), followed by intron/exon 11 and 10. Finally, multicolor banding revealed breakpoints in other chromosomes whose biological and prognostic implications remain to be determined. We conclude that the combination of molecular techniques used in this study can efficiently identify KMT2A fusion partners in complex pediatric acute leukemia karyotypes. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Inducible expression of a fusion gene encoding two proteinase inhibitors leads to insect and pathogen resistance in transgenic rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quilis, Jordi; López-García, Belén; Meynard, Donaldo; Guiderdoni, Emmanuel; San Segundo, Blanca

    2014-04-01

    Plant proteinase inhibitors (PIs) are considered as candidates for increased insect resistance in transgenic plants. Insect adaptation to PI ingestion might, however, compromise the benefits received by transgenic expression of PIs. In this study, the maize proteinase inhibitor (MPI), an inhibitor of insect serine proteinases, and the potato carboxypeptidase inhibitor (PCI) were fused into a single open reading frame and introduced into rice plants. The two PIs were linked using either the processing site of the Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1B precursor protein or the 2A sequence from the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). Expression of each fusion gene was driven by the wound- and pathogen-inducible mpi promoter. The mpi-pci fusion gene was stably inherited for at least three generations with no penalty on plant phenotype. An important reduction in larval weight of Chilo suppressalis fed on mpi-pci rice, compared with larvae fed on wild-type plants, was observed. Expression of the mpi-pci fusion gene confers resistance to C. suppressalis (striped stem borer), one of the most important insect pest of rice. The mpi-pci expression systems described may represent a suitable strategy for insect pest control, better than strategies based on the use of single PI genes, by preventing insect adaptive responses. The rice plants expressing the mpi-pci fusion gene also showed enhanced resistance to infection by the fungus Magnaporthe oryzae, the causal agent of the rice blast disease. Our results illustrate the usefulness of the inducible expression of the mpi-pci fusion gene for dual resistance against insects and pathogens in rice plants. © 2013 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Construction of a fusion gene containing hepatitis B virus L gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results of SDS-PAGE and Western blot showed that the recombinant protein was induced by methanol and stably expressed in P. pastoris, while it has specific reaction with the serum containing anti-HbsAg or anti-Ag85B. However, the successful construction of a recombinant yeast expression vector containing gene ...

  1. Heterogeneous patterns of amplification of the NUP214-ABL1 fusion gene in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graux, C.; Stevens-Kroef, M.J.P.L.; Lafage, M.; Dastugue, N.; Harrison, C.J.; Mugneret, F.; Bahloula, K.; Struski, S.; Gregoire, M.J.; Nadal, N.; Lippert, E.; Taviaux, S.; Simons, A.; Kuiper, R.P.; Moorman, A.V.; Barber, K.; Bosly, A.; Michaux, L.; Berghe, P. van den; Lahortiga, I.; Keersmaecker, K. De; Wlodarska, I.; Cools, J.; Hagemeijer, A.; Poirel, H.A.

    2009-01-01

    Episomes with the NUP214-ABL1 fusion gene have been observed in 6% of T-ALL. In this multicentric study we collected 27 cases of NUP214-ABL1-positive T-ALL. Median age was 15 years with male predominance. Outcome was poor in 12 patients. An associated abnormality involving TLX1 or TLX3 was found in

  2. Analysis of MYB expression and MYB-NFIB gene fusions in adenoid cystic carcinoma and other salivary neoplasms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brill, 2nd, Louis B; Kanner, William A; Fehr, André; Andrén, Ywonne; Moskaluk, Christopher A; Löning, Thomas; Stenman, Göran; Frierson, Jr, Henry F

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that the recurrent t(6;9)(q22-23;p23-24) translocation in adenoid cystic carcinoma results in a novel fusion of the MYB proto-oncogene with the transcription factor gene NFIB...

  3. Drosophila Erect wing (Ewg) controls mitochondrial fusion during muscle growth and maintenance by regulation of the Opa1-like gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Mamta; Katti, Prasanna; Nongthomba, Upendra

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial biogenesis and morphological changes are associated with tissue-specific functional demand, but the factors and pathways that regulate these processes have not been completely identified. A lack of mitochondrial fusion has been implicated in various developmental and pathological defects. The spatiotemporal regulation of mitochondrial fusion in a tissue such as muscle is not well understood. Here, we show in Drosophila indirect flight muscles (IFMs) that the nuclear-encoded mitochondrial inner membrane fusion gene, Opa1-like, is regulated in a spatiotemporal fashion by the transcription factor/co-activator Erect wing (Ewg). In IFMs null for Ewg, mitochondria undergo mitophagy and/or autophagy accompanied by reduced mitochondrial functioning and muscle degeneration. By following the dynamics of mitochondrial growth and shape in IFMs, we found that mitochondria grow extensively and fuse during late pupal development to form the large tubular mitochondria. Our evidence shows that Ewg expression during early IFM development is sufficient to upregulate Opa1-like, which itself is a requisite for both late pupal mitochondrial fusion and muscle maintenance. Concomitantly, by knocking down Opa1-like during early muscle development, we show that it is important for mitochondrial fusion, muscle differentiation and muscle organization. However, knocking down Opa1-like, after the expression window of Ewg did not cause mitochondrial or muscle defects. This study identifies a mechanism by which mitochondrial fusion is regulated spatiotemporally by Ewg through Opa1-like during IFM differentiation and growth.

  4. Molecular evolution of the fusion protein (F) gene in human respiratory syncytial virus subgroup B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Hirokazu; Nagasawa, Koo; Kimura, Ryusuke; Tsukagoshi, Hiroyuki; Matsushima, Yuki; Fujita, Kiyotaka; Hirano, Eiko; Ishiwada, Naruhiko; Misaki, Takako; Oishi, Kazunori; Kuroda, Makoto; Ryo, Akihide

    2017-08-01

    In this study, we examined the molecular evolution of the fusion protein (F) gene in human respiratory syncytial virus subgroup B (HRSV-B). First, we performed time-scale evolution analyses using the Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method. Next, we performed genetic distance, linear B-cell epitope prediction, N-glycosylation, positive/negative selection site, and Bayesian skyline plot analyses. We also constructed a structural model of the F protein and mapped the amino acid substitutions and the predicted B-cell epitopes. The MCMC-constructed phylogenetic tree indicated that the HRSV F gene diverged from the bovine respiratory syncytial virus gene approximately 580years ago and had a relatively low evolutionary rate (7.14×10(-4)substitutions/site/year). Furthermore, a common ancestor of HRSV-A and -B diverged approximately 290years ago, while HRSV-B diverged into three clusters for approximately 60years. The genetic similarity of the present strains was very high. Although a maximum of 11 amino acid substitutions were observed in the structural model of the F protein, only one strain possessed an amino acid substitution located within the palivizumab epitope. Four epitopes were predicted, although these did not correspond to the neutralization sites of the F protein including the palivizumab epitope. In addition, five N-glycosylation sites of the present HRSV-B strains were inferred. No positive selection sites were identified; however, many sites were found to be under negative selection. The effective population size of the gene has remained almost constant. On the basis of these results, it can be concluded that the HRSV-B F gene is highly conserved, as is the F protein of HRSV-A. Moreover, our prediction of B-cell epitopes does not show that the palivizumab reaction site may be recognized as an epitope during naturally occurring infections. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. [A standardized protocol for detection of ALK protein expression and gene fusion in lung adenocarcinoma cytologic specimens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zheng; Wu, Xiaonan; Shi, Yuankai; Han, Xiaohong; Cheng, Gang; Li, Lin; Mu, Xinlin; Zhang, Yuhui; Cui, Di; Zhang, Li; Fan, Zaiwen; Zhu, Guangqing; Ma, Lingyun; Yang, Li; Di, Jing; Liu, Dongge

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to establish a standardized protocol for detection of ALK protein expression and gene fusion in cytologic specimens. Lung adenocarcinoma cytologic specimens were collected from seven hospitals in Beijing city. A detection protocol for ALK protein expression and gene fusion was designed according to the results of comparative experiment. Ventana immunohistochemical (IHC) ALK(D5F3) detecting ALK protein expression was performed in 203 prepared formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) cell blocks. ALK gene fusion in 98 EGFR gene wild type cytologic specimens and in 4 bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BL) samples was detected by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). ALK gene fusion in the Ventana IHC ALK (D5F3) positive samples was further tested by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Six patients with ALK IHC-positive result were followed up to analyze the responses of crizotinib therapy. Comparative experiments: (1) Comparison of the results of 4% neutral buffered formalin fixed for different time (24 h, 48 h, 72 h) on the Ventana IHC ALK (D5F3) staining was conducted in two cases of IHC ALK positive FFPE cell blocks; (2) Comparing qRT-PCR results for ALK fusion in samples from FFPE cell blocks and cytospin prepared slides in 10 cases of lung adenocarcinoma cytologic specimens. Among the specimens examined using the standardized protocol recommended by this study, 229 cases of cytologic specimens met the diagnostic criteria of lung adenocarcinoma. Among them, 207 cases obtained ALK gene test results (by at least one method), with an ALK test ratio of 90.4% (207/229). FFPE cell blocks were successfully prepared in 203 cases, Ventana IHC ALK (D5F3) were successfully performed in all the 203 FFPE cell blocks (100%), and the ALK protein positive detection rate was 10.3% (21/203). ALK fusion was tested in 98 FFPE cytologic samples of EGFR wild types by qRT-PCR, and 96 out of 98 (97.96%) cytologic samples were

  6. Genome-wide identification of genes with amplification and/or fusion in small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwakawa, Reika; Takenaka, Masataka; Kohno, Takashi; Shimada, Yoko; Totoki, Yasushi; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Tsuta, Koji; Nishikawa, Ryo; Noguchi, Masayuki; Sato-Otsubo, Aiko; Ogawa, Seishi; Yokota, Jun

    2013-09-01

    To obtain a landscape of gross genetic alterations in small cell lung cancer (SCLC), genome-wide copy number analysis and whole-transcriptome sequencing were performed in 58 and 42 SCLCs, respectively. Focal amplification of known oncogene loci, MYCL1 (1p34.2), MYCN (2p24.3), and MYC (8q24.21), was frequently and mutually exclusively detected. MYCL1 and MYC were co-amplified with other regions on either the same or the different chromosome in several cases. In addition, the 9p24.1 region was identified as being amplified in SCLCs without amplification of MYC family oncogenes. Notably, expression of the KIAA1432 gene in this region was significantly higher in KIAA1432 amplified cells than in non-amplified cells, and its mRNA expression showed strong correlations with the copy numbers. Thus, KIAA1432 is a novel gene activated by amplification in SCLCs. By whole-transcriptome sequencing, a total of 60 fusion transcripts, transcribed from 95 different genes, were identified as being expressed in SCLC cells. However, no in-frame fusion transcripts were recurrently detected in ≥2 SCLCs, and genes in the amplified regions, such as PVT1 neighboring MYC and RLF in MYCL1 amplicons, were recurrently fused with genes in the same amplicons or with those in different amplicons on either the same or different chromosome. Thus, it was indicated that amplification and fusion of several genes on chromosomes 1 and 8 occur simultaneously but not sequentially through chromothripsis in the development of SCLC, and amplification rather than fusion of genes plays an important role in its development. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Hh/Gli antagonist in acute myeloid leukemia with CBFA2T3-GLIS2 fusion gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masetti, Riccardo; Bertuccio, Salvatore Nicola; Astolfi, Annalisa; Chiarini, Francesca; Lonetti, Annalisa; Indio, Valentina; De Luca, Matilde; Bandini, Jessica; Serravalle, Salvatore; Franzoni, Monica; Pigazzi, Martina; Martelli, Alberto Maria; Basso, Giuseppe; Locatelli, Franco; Pession, Andrea

    2017-01-21

    CBFA2T3-GLIS2 is a fusion gene found in 17% of non-Down syndrome acute megakaryoblastic leukemia (non-DS AMKL, FAB M7) and in 8% of pediatric cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN-AML, in association with several French-American-British (FAB) subtypes). Children with AML harboring this aberration have a poor outcome, regardless of the FAB subtype. This fusion gene drives a peculiar expression pattern and leads to overexpression of some of Hedgehog-related genes. GLI-similar protein 2 (GLIS2) is closely related to the GLI family, the final effectors of classic Hedgehog pathway. These observations lend compelling support to the application of GLI inhibitors in the treatment of AML with the aberration CBFA2T3-GLIS2. GANT61 is, nowadays, the most potent inhibitor of GLI family proteins. We exposed to GANT61 AML cell lines and primary cells positive and negative for CBFA2T3-GLIS2 and analyzed the effect on cellular viability, induction of apoptosis, cell cycle, and expression profile. As compared to AML cells without GLIS2 fusion, GANT61 exposure resulted in higher sensitivity of both cell lines and primary AML cells carrying CBFA2T3-GLIS2 to undergo apoptosis and G1 cell cycle arrest. Remarkably, gene expression studies demonstrated downregulation of GLIS2-specific signature genes in both treated cell lines and primary cells, in comparison with untreated cells. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis revealed direct regulation by GLIS2 chimeric protein of DNMT1 and DNMT3B, two genes implicated in important epigenetic functions. Our findings indicate that the GLI inhibitor GANT61 may be used to specifically target the CBFA2T3-GLIS2 fusion gene in pediatric AML.

  8. Hh/Gli antagonist in acute myeloid leukemia with CBFA2T3-GLIS2 fusion gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Masetti

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CBFA2T3-GLIS2 is a fusion gene found in 17% of non-Down syndrome acute megakaryoblastic leukemia (non-DS AMKL, FAB M7 and in 8% of pediatric cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN-AML, in association with several French-American-British (FAB subtypes. Children with AML harboring this aberration have a poor outcome, regardless of the FAB subtype. This fusion gene drives a peculiar expression pattern and leads to overexpression of some of Hedgehog-related genes. GLI-similar protein 2 (GLIS2 is closely related to the GLI family, the final effectors of classic Hedgehog pathway. These observations lend compelling support to the application of GLI inhibitors in the treatment of AML with the aberration CBFA2T3-GLIS2. GANT61 is, nowadays, the most potent inhibitor of GLI family proteins. Methods We exposed to GANT61 AML cell lines and primary cells positive and negative for CBFA2T3-GLIS2 and analyzed the effect on cellular viability, induction of apoptosis, cell cycle, and expression profile. Results As compared to AML cells without GLIS2 fusion, GANT61 exposure resulted in higher sensitivity of both cell lines and primary AML cells carrying CBFA2T3-GLIS2 to undergo apoptosis and G1 cell cycle arrest. Remarkably, gene expression studies demonstrated downregulation of GLIS2-specific signature genes in both treated cell lines and primary cells, in comparison with untreated cells. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis revealed direct regulation by GLIS2 chimeric protein of DNMT1 and DNMT3B, two genes implicated in important epigenetic functions. Conclusions Our findings indicate that the GLI inhibitor GANT61 may be used to specifically target the CBFA2T3-GLIS2 fusion gene in pediatric AML.

  9. Can, a putative oncogene associated with myeloid leukemogenesis, may be activated by fusion of its 3' half to different genes: characterization of the set gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    von Lindern, M.; van Baal, S.; Wiegant, J.; Raap, A.; Hagemeijer, A.; Grosveld, G.

    1992-01-01

    The translocation (6;9)(p23;q34) in acute nonlymphocytic leukemia results in the formation of a highly consistent dek-can fusion gene. Translocation breakpoints invariably occur in single introns of dek and can, which were named icb-6 and icb-9, respectively. In a case of acute undifferentiated

  10. Reciprocal complementation of bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 lacking either the membrane or fusion gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Marina; Matsuura, Ryosuke; Kokuho, Takehiro; Tsuboi, Takamitsu; Kameyama, Ken-Ichiro; Takeuchi, Kaoru

    2017-11-01

    Two defective bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (BPIV3) strains were generated, one lacking the membrane (M) protein gene and expressing EGFP (ΔM-EGFP) and the other lacking the fusion (F) protein gene and expressing mStrawberry (ΔF-mSB), by supplying deficient proteins in trans. When Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells were co-infected with ΔM-EGFP and ΔF-mSB at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 0.1, complemented viruses were easily obtained. Complemented viruses grew as efficiently as wild-type BPIV3 and could be passaged in MDBK cell cultures even at an MOI of 0.01, possibly due to multiploid virus particles containing genomes of both ΔM-EGFP and ΔF-mSB. This reciprocal complementation method using two defective viruses would be useful to express large or multiple proteins in cell cultures using paramyxovirus vectors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Domain retention in transcription factor fusion genes and its biological and clinical implications: a pan-cancer study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Pora; Ballester, Leomar Y; Zhao, Zhongming

    2017-12-15

    Genomic rearrangements involving transcription factors (TFs) can form fusion proteins resulting in either enhanced, weakened, or even loss of TF activity. Functional domain (FD) retention is a critical factor in the activity of transcription factor fusion genes (TFFGs). A systematic investigation of FD retention in TFFGs and their outcome (e.g. expression changes) in a pan-cancer study has not yet been completed. Here, we examined the FD retention status in 386 TFFGs across 13 major cancer types and identified 83 TFFGs involving 67 TFs that retained FDs. To measure the potential biological relevance of TFs in TFFGs, we introduced a Major Active Isofusion Index (MAII) and built a prioritized TFFG network using MAII scores and the observed frequency of fusion positive samples. Interestingly, the four TFFGs ( PML-RARA, RUNX1-RUNX1T1, TMPRSS2-ERG , and SFPQ-TFE3 ) with the highest MAII scores showed 50 differentially expressed target genes (DETGs) in fusion-positive versus fusion-negative cancer samples. DETG analysis revealed that they were involved in tumorigenesis-related processes in each cancer type. PLAU , which encodes plasminogen activator urokinase and serves as a biomarker for tumor invasion, was found to be consistently activated in the samples with the highest MAII scores. Among the 50 DETGs, 21 were drug targetable genes. Fourteen of these 21 DETGs were expressed in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) samples. Accordingly, we constructed an AML-specific TFFG network, which included 38 DETGs in RUNX1-RUNX1T1 or PML-RARA positive samples. In summary, this study revealed several TFFGs and their potential target genes, and provided insights into the clinical implications of TFFGs.

  12. Long-Term Endurance Exercise in Humans Stimulates Cell Fusion of Myoblasts along with Fusogenic Endogenous Retroviral Genes In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frese, Sebastian; Ruebner, Matthias; Suhr, Frank; Konou, Thierry M; Tappe, Kim A; Toigo, Marco; Jung, Hans H; Henke, Christine; Steigleder, Ruth; Strissel, Pamela L; Huebner, Hanna; Beckmann, Matthias W; van der Keylen, Piet; Schoser, Benedikt; Schiffer, Thorsten; Frese, Laura; Bloch, Wilhelm; Strick, Reiner

    2015-01-01

    Myogenesis is defined as growth, differentiation and repair of muscles where cell fusion of myoblasts to multinucleated myofibers is one major characteristic. Other cell fusion events in humans are found with bone resorbing osteoclasts and placental syncytiotrophoblasts. No unifying gene regulation for natural cell fusions has been found. We analyzed skeletal muscle biopsies of competitive cyclists for muscle-specific attributes and expression of human endogenous retrovirus (ERV) envelope genes due to their involvement in cell fusion of osteoclasts and syncytiotrophoblasts. Comparing muscle biopsies from post- with the pre-competitive seasons a significant 2.25-fold increase of myonuclei/mm fiber, a 2.38-fold decrease of fiber area/nucleus and a 3.1-fold decrease of satellite cells (SCs) occurred. We propose that during the pre-competitive season SC proliferation occurred following with increased cell fusion during the competitive season. Expression of twenty-two envelope genes of muscle biopsies demonstrated a significant increase of putative muscle-cell fusogenic genes Syncytin-1 and Syncytin-3, but also for the non-fusogenic erv3. Immunohistochemistry analyses showed that Syncytin-1 mainly localized to the sarcolemma of myofibers positive for myosin heavy-chain isotypes. Cellular receptors SLC1A4 and SLC1A5 of Syncytin-1 showed significant decrease of expression in post-competitive muscles compared with the pre-competitive season, but only SLC1A4 protein expression localized throughout the myofiber. Erv3 protein was strongly expressed throughout the myofiber, whereas envK1-7 localized to SC nuclei and myonuclei. Syncytin-1 transcription factors, PPARγ and RXRα, showed no protein expression in the myofiber, whereas the pCREB-Ser133 activator of Syncytin-1 was enriched to SC nuclei and myonuclei. Syncytin-1, Syncytin-3, SLC1A4 and PAX7 gene regulations along with MyoD1 and myogenin were verified during proliferating or actively-fusing human primary myoblast cell

  13. Long-Term Endurance Exercise in Humans Stimulates Cell Fusion of Myoblasts along with Fusogenic Endogenous Retroviral Genes In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Frese

    Full Text Available Myogenesis is defined as growth, differentiation and repair of muscles where cell fusion of myoblasts to multinucleated myofibers is one major characteristic. Other cell fusion events in humans are found with bone resorbing osteoclasts and placental syncytiotrophoblasts. No unifying gene regulation for natural cell fusions has been found. We analyzed skeletal muscle biopsies of competitive cyclists for muscle-specific attributes and expression of human endogenous retrovirus (ERV envelope genes due to their involvement in cell fusion of osteoclasts and syncytiotrophoblasts. Comparing muscle biopsies from post- with the pre-competitive seasons a significant 2.25-fold increase of myonuclei/mm fiber, a 2.38-fold decrease of fiber area/nucleus and a 3.1-fold decrease of satellite cells (SCs occurred. We propose that during the pre-competitive season SC proliferation occurred following with increased cell fusion during the competitive season. Expression of twenty-two envelope genes of muscle biopsies demonstrated a significant increase of putative muscle-cell fusogenic genes Syncytin-1 and Syncytin-3, but also for the non-fusogenic erv3. Immunohistochemistry analyses showed that Syncytin-1 mainly localized to the sarcolemma of myofibers positive for myosin heavy-chain isotypes. Cellular receptors SLC1A4 and SLC1A5 of Syncytin-1 showed significant decrease of expression in post-competitive muscles compared with the pre-competitive season, but only SLC1A4 protein expression localized throughout the myofiber. Erv3 protein was strongly expressed throughout the myofiber, whereas envK1-7 localized to SC nuclei and myonuclei. Syncytin-1 transcription factors, PPARγ and RXRα, showed no protein expression in the myofiber, whereas the pCREB-Ser133 activator of Syncytin-1 was enriched to SC nuclei and myonuclei. Syncytin-1, Syncytin-3, SLC1A4 and PAX7 gene regulations along with MyoD1 and myogenin were verified during proliferating or actively-fusing human

  14. Limited inter- and intra-patient sequence diversity of the genetic lineage a human metapneumovirus fusion gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, T.N.; Madsen, C.D.; Pedersen, Anders Gorm

    2005-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) is associated with respiratory tract illness especially in young children. Two hMPV genetic lineages, A and B, and four sublineages A1, A2 and B1, B2 have been defined. Infection with hMPV occurs through membrane fusion mediated by the hMPV fusion (F) protein....... In this study, the inter- and intra-patient genetic diversity of the lineage A hMPV F gene was investigated. Ten isolates were collected from 10 hMPV infected children. Viral RNA was isolated and amplified, and approximately 10 clones from each isolate were sequenced. Altogether 108 clones were successfully...... been infected with at least two viruses. Several independent viruses contained premature stop codons in exactly identical positions resulting in truncated fusion proteins. Possibly this is a mechanism for immune system evasion. The F protein is a major antigenic determinant, and the limited sequence...

  15. Limited inter- and intra-patient sequence diversity of the genetic lineage A human metapneumovirus fusion gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Thilde Nordmann; Madsen, Chris D; Pedersen, Anders

    2005-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) is associated with respiratory tract illness especially in young children. Two hMPV genetic lineages, A and B, and four sublineages A1, A2 and B1, B2 have been defined. Infection with hMPV occurs through membrane fusion mediated by the hMPV fusion (F) protein....... In this study, the inter- and intra-patient genetic diversity of the lineage A hMPV F gene was investigated. Ten isolates were collected from 10 hMPV infected children. Viral RNA was isolated and amplified, and approximately 10 clones from each isolate were sequenced. Altogether 108 clones were successfully...... been infected with at least two viruses. Several independent viruses contained premature stop codons in exactly identical positions resulting in truncated fusion proteins. Possibly this is a mechanism for immune system evasion. The F protein is a major antigenic determinant, and the limited sequence...

  16. Epigenomic profiling of prostate cancer identifies differentially methylated genes in TMPRSS2:ERG fusion-positive versus fusion-negative tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geybels, Milan S; Alumkal, Joshi J; Luedeke, Manuel; Rinckleb, Antje; Zhao, Shanshan; Shui, Irene M; Bibikova, Marina; Klotzle, Brandy; van den Brandt, Piet A; Ostrander, Elaine A; Fan, Jian-Bing; Feng, Ziding; Maier, Christiane; Stanford, Janet L

    2015-01-01

    About half of all prostate cancers harbor the TMPRSS2:ERG (T2E) gene fusion. While T2E-positive and T2E-negative tumors represent specific molecular subtypes of prostate cancer (PCa), previous studies have not yet comprehensively investigated how these tumor subtypes differ at the epigenetic level. We therefore investigated epigenome-wide DNA methylation profiles of PCa stratified by T2E status. The study included 496 patients with clinically localized PCa who had a radical prostatectomy as primary treatment for PCa. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) "break-apart" assays were used to determine tumor T2E-fusion status, which showed that 266 patients (53.6 %) had T2E-positive PCa. The study showed global DNA methylation differences between tumor subtypes. A large number of differentially methylated CpG sites were identified (false-discovery rate [FDR] Q-value <0.00001; n = 27,876) and DNA methylation profiles accurately distinguished between tumor T2E subgroups. A number of top-ranked differentially methylated CpGs in genes (FDR Q-values ≤1.53E-29) were identified: C3orf14, CACNA1D, GREM1, KLK10, NT5C, PDE4D, RAB40C, SEPT9, and TRIB2, several of which had a corresponding alteration in mRNA expression. These genes may have various roles in the pathogenesis of PCa, and the calcium-channel gene CACNA1D is a known ERG-target. Analysis of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) data provided confirmatory evidence for our findings. This study identified substantial differences in DNA methylation profiles of T2E-positive and T2E-negative tumors, thereby providing further evidence that different underlying oncogenic pathways characterize these molecular subtypes.

  17. Development of RNA-FISH Assay for Detection of Oncogenic FGFR3-TACC3 Fusion Genes in FFPE Samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Kurobe

    Full Text Available Oncogenic FGFR3-TACC3 fusions and FGFR3 mutations are target candidates for small molecule inhibitors in bladder cancer (BC. Because FGFR3 and TACC3 genes are located very closely on chromosome 4p16.3, detection of the fusion by DNA-FISH (fluorescent in situ hybridization is not a feasible option. In this study, we developed a novel RNA-FISH assay using branched DNA probe to detect FGFR3-TACC3 fusions in formaldehyde-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE human BC samples.The RNA-FISH assay was developed and validated using a mouse xenograft model with human BC cell lines. Next, we assessed the consistency of the RNA-FISH assay using 104 human BC samples. In this study, primary BC tissues were stored as frozen and FFPE tissues. FGFR3-TACC3 fusions were independently detected in FFPE sections by the RNA-FISH assay and in frozen tissues by RT-PCR. We also analyzed the presence of FGFR3 mutations by targeted sequencing of genomic DNA extracted from deparaffinized FFPE sections.FGFR3-TACC3 fusion transcripts were identified by RNA-FISH and RT-PCR in mouse xenograft FFPE tissues using the human BC cell lines RT112 and RT4. These cell lines have been reported to be fusion-positive. Signals for FGFR3-TACC3 fusions by RNA-FISH were positive in 2/60 (3% of non-muscle-invasive BC (NMIBC and 2/44 (5% muscle-invasive BC (MIBC patients. The results of RT-PCR of all 104 patients were identical to those of RNA-FISH. FGFR3 mutations were detected in 27/60 (45% NMIBC and 8/44 (18% MIBC patients. Except for one NMIBC patient, FGFR3 mutation and FGFR3-TACC3 fusion were mutually exclusive.We developed an RNA-FISH assay for detection of the FGFR3-TACC3 fusion in FFPE samples of human BC tissues. Screening for not only FGFR3 mutations, but also for FGFR3-TACC3 fusion transcripts has the potential to identify additional patients that can be treated with FGFR inhibitors.

  18. Development of RNA-FISH Assay for Detection of Oncogenic FGFR3-TACC3 Fusion Genes in FFPE Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurobe, Masahiro; Kojima, Takahiro; Nishimura, Kouichi; Kandori, Shuya; Kawahara, Takashi; Yoshino, Takayuki; Ueno, Satoshi; Iizumi, Yuichi; Mitsuzuka, Koji; Arai, Yoichi; Tsuruta, Hiroshi; Habuchi, Tomonori; Kobayashi, Takashi; Matsui, Yoshiyuki; Ogawa, Osamu; Sugimoto, Mikio; Kakehi, Yoshiyuki; Nagumo, Yoshiyuki; Tsutsumi, Masakazu; Oikawa, Takehiro; Kikuchi, Koji; Nishiyama, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Oncogenic FGFR3-TACC3 fusions and FGFR3 mutations are target candidates for small molecule inhibitors in bladder cancer (BC). Because FGFR3 and TACC3 genes are located very closely on chromosome 4p16.3, detection of the fusion by DNA-FISH (fluorescent in situ hybridization) is not a feasible option. In this study, we developed a novel RNA-FISH assay using branched DNA probe to detect FGFR3-TACC3 fusions in formaldehyde-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) human BC samples. The RNA-FISH assay was developed and validated using a mouse xenograft model with human BC cell lines. Next, we assessed the consistency of the RNA-FISH assay using 104 human BC samples. In this study, primary BC tissues were stored as frozen and FFPE tissues. FGFR3-TACC3 fusions were independently detected in FFPE sections by the RNA-FISH assay and in frozen tissues by RT-PCR. We also analyzed the presence of FGFR3 mutations by targeted sequencing of genomic DNA extracted from deparaffinized FFPE sections. FGFR3-TACC3 fusion transcripts were identified by RNA-FISH and RT-PCR in mouse xenograft FFPE tissues using the human BC cell lines RT112 and RT4. These cell lines have been reported to be fusion-positive. Signals for FGFR3-TACC3 fusions by RNA-FISH were positive in 2/60 (3%) of non-muscle-invasive BC (NMIBC) and 2/44 (5%) muscle-invasive BC (MIBC) patients. The results of RT-PCR of all 104 patients were identical to those of RNA-FISH. FGFR3 mutations were detected in 27/60 (45%) NMIBC and 8/44 (18%) MIBC patients. Except for one NMIBC patient, FGFR3 mutation and FGFR3-TACC3 fusion were mutually exclusive. We developed an RNA-FISH assay for detection of the FGFR3-TACC3 fusion in FFPE samples of human BC tissues. Screening for not only FGFR3 mutations, but also for FGFR3-TACC3 fusion transcripts has the potential to identify additional patients that can be treated with FGFR inhibitors.

  19. Development of RNA-FISH Assay for Detection of Oncogenic FGFR3-TACC3 Fusion Genes in FFPE Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Takahiro; Nishimura, Kouichi; Kandori, Shuya; Kawahara, Takashi; Yoshino, Takayuki; Ueno, Satoshi; Iizumi, Yuichi; Mitsuzuka, Koji; Arai, Yoichi; Tsuruta, Hiroshi; Habuchi, Tomonori; Kobayashi, Takashi; Matsui, Yoshiyuki; Ogawa, Osamu; Sugimoto, Mikio; Kakehi, Yoshiyuki; Nagumo, Yoshiyuki; Tsutsumi, Masakazu; Oikawa, Takehiro; Kikuchi, Koji; Nishiyama, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Introduction and Objectives Oncogenic FGFR3-TACC3 fusions and FGFR3 mutations are target candidates for small molecule inhibitors in bladder cancer (BC). Because FGFR3 and TACC3 genes are located very closely on chromosome 4p16.3, detection of the fusion by DNA-FISH (fluorescent in situ hybridization) is not a feasible option. In this study, we developed a novel RNA-FISH assay using branched DNA probe to detect FGFR3-TACC3 fusions in formaldehyde-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) human BC samples. Materials and Methods The RNA-FISH assay was developed and validated using a mouse xenograft model with human BC cell lines. Next, we assessed the consistency of the RNA-FISH assay using 104 human BC samples. In this study, primary BC tissues were stored as frozen and FFPE tissues. FGFR3-TACC3 fusions were independently detected in FFPE sections by the RNA-FISH assay and in frozen tissues by RT-PCR. We also analyzed the presence of FGFR3 mutations by targeted sequencing of genomic DNA extracted from deparaffinized FFPE sections. Results FGFR3-TACC3 fusion transcripts were identified by RNA-FISH and RT-PCR in mouse xenograft FFPE tissues using the human BC cell lines RT112 and RT4. These cell lines have been reported to be fusion-positive. Signals for FGFR3-TACC3 fusions by RNA-FISH were positive in 2/60 (3%) of non-muscle-invasive BC (NMIBC) and 2/44 (5%) muscle-invasive BC (MIBC) patients. The results of RT-PCR of all 104 patients were identical to those of RNA-FISH. FGFR3 mutations were detected in 27/60 (45%) NMIBC and 8/44 (18%) MIBC patients. Except for one NMIBC patient, FGFR3 mutation and FGFR3-TACC3 fusion were mutually exclusive. Conclusions We developed an RNA-FISH assay for detection of the FGFR3-TACC3 fusion in FFPE samples of human BC tissues. Screening for not only FGFR3 mutations, but also for FGFR3-TACC3 fusion transcripts has the potential to identify additional patients that can be treated with FGFR inhibitors. PMID:27930669

  20. [Cloning and Prokaryotic Expression of Fusion Gene of Group II Allergen Der p2 T Cell Epitope from Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Bin-bin; Song, Hong-yu; Li, Chao-pin

    2015-08-01

    To express and purify the T cell epitope fusion peptide of the major allergen Der p2 from Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus. Nucleotide sequences reported to encode four T-cell epitopes (T1-T4) of Der p2 of D. pteronyssinus were linked in the rank of T1-T2-T3-T4. In this way, the chimeric gene was synthesized, named as Der p2 T. The gene of Der p2 T was amplified by PCR, purified, and cloned into the pET-28a (+) vector, forming the prokaryotic recombinant expression vector pET-28a (+)-Der p2 T. This formation was verified by double digestion. The pET-28a (+)-Der p2 T vector was transfected into E. coli strain BL-21, and its expression was induced by addition of IPTG. The recombinant protein was purified and collected by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography, and prepared for SDS-PAGE and Western blotting analysis. ELISA was used to evaluate the binding ability of Der p2 T cell epitope fusion peptide to serum IgE from patients with house dust mite allergy. Double digestion results confirmed the construction of the pET-28a (+)-Der p2 T vector. SDS-PAGE revealed the expression of recombinant Der p2 T cell epitope fusion peptide with M, of 10,000. Western blotting confirmed the purification of Der p2 T cell epitope fusion peptide. The binding ability of Der p2 T cell epitope fusion peptide to serum IgE from patients with house dust mite allergy [(37.70±9.89) µg/ml] decreased significantly in comparison to that of Der p2 [(85.89±9.63) µg/ml] (Pcell epitope fusion peptide is prepared, and its binding ability to serum IgE from patients with house dust mite allergy significantly decreases than that of Der p2.

  1. Recombinant cholera toxin B subunit and gene fusion proteins for oral vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, J; Johansson, S; Löwenadler, B; Svennerholm, A M; Holmgren, J

    1990-01-01

    The B subunit portion of cholera toxin (CTB) is a safe and effective oral immunizing agent in humans, affording protection against both cholera and diarrhoea caused by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli producing heat-labile toxin (LT) (Clemens et al., 1986; 1988). CTB may also be used as a carrier of various "foreign" antigens suitable for oral administration. To facilitate large-scale production of CTB for vaccine development purposes, we have constructed recombinant overexpression systems for CTB proteins in which the CTB gene is under the control of strong foreign (non-cholera) promoters and in which it is also possible to fuse oligonucleotides to the CTB gene and thereby achieve overexpression of hybrid proteins (Sanchez and Holmgren, 1989; Sanchez et al., 1988). We here expand these findings by describing overexpression of CTB by a constitutive tacP promoter as well as by the T7 RNA-polymerase promoter, and also by describing gene fusions leading to overexpression of several hybrid proteins between heat-stable E. coli enterotoxin (STa)-related peptides to either the amino or carboxy ends of CTB. Each of the hybrid proteins, when tested as immunogens in rabbits, stimulated significant anti-STa as well as anti-CTB antibody formation, although the anti-STa antibody levels attained (c.a. 1-15 micrograms/ml specific anti-STa immunoglobulin) were too low to give more than partial neutralization of STa intestinal challenge in baby mice. The hybrid proteins also had a near-native conformation, as apparent from their oligomeric nature and their strong reactivity with both a neutralizing antibody against the B subunit and a neutralizing monoclonal antibody (mAb) against STa.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Fusion genes with ALK as recurrent partner in ependymoma-like gliomas: a new brain tumor entity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Thale Kristin; Panagopoulos, Ioannis; Meling, Torstein R; Micci, Francesca; Gorunova, Ludmila; Thorsen, Jim; Due-Tønnessen, Bernt; Scheie, David; Lund-Iversen, Marius; Krossnes, Bård; Saxhaug, Cathrine; Heim, Sverre; Brandal, Petter

    2015-10-01

    We have previously characterized 19 ependymal tumors using Giemsa banding and high-resolution comparative genomic hybridization. The aim of this study was to analyze these tumors searching for fusion genes. RNA sequencing was performed in 12 samples. Potential fusion transcripts were assessed by seed count and structural chromosomal aberrations. Transcripts of interest were validated using fluorescence in situ hybridization and PCR followed by direct sequencing. RNA sequencing identified rearrangements of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase gene (ALK) in 2 samples. Both tumors harbored structural aberrations involving the ALK locus 2p23. Tumor 1 had an unbalanced t(2;14)(p23;q22) translocation which led to the fusion gene KTN1-ALK. Tumor 2 had an interstitial del(2)(p16p23) deletion causing the fusion of CCDC88A and ALK. In both samples, the breakpoint of ALK was located between exons 19 and 20. Both patients were infants and both tumors were supratentorial. The tumors were well demarcated from surrounding tissue and had both ependymal and astrocytic features but were diagnosed and treated as ependymomas. By combining karyotyping and RNA sequencing, we identified the 2 first ever reported ALK rearrangements in CNS tumors. Such rearrangements may represent the hallmark of a new entity of pediatric glioma characterized by both ependymal and astrocytic features. Our findings are of particular importance because crizotinib, a selective ALK inhibitor, has demonstrated effect in patients with lung cancer harboring ALK rearrangements. Thus, ALK emerges as an interesting therapeutic target in patients with ependymal tumors carrying ALK fusions. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Mycobacterium tuberculosis HspX/EsxS Fusion Protein: Gene Cloning, Protein Expression, and Purification in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khademi, Farzad; Yousefi-Avarvand, Arshid; Derakhshan, Mohammad; Meshkat, Zahra; Tafaghodi, Mohsen; Ghazvini, Kiarash; Aryan, Ehsan; Sankian, Mojtaba

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to clone, express, and purify a novel multidomain fusion protein of Micobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) in a prokaryotic system. An hspX/esxS gene construct was synthesized and ligated into a pGH plasmid, E. coli TOP10 cells were transformed, and the vector was purified. The vector containing the construct and pET-21b (+) plasmid were digested with the same enzymes and the construct was ligated into pET-21b (+). The accuracy of cloning was confirmed by colony PCR and sequencing. E. coli BL21 cells were transformed with the pET-21b (+)/hspX/esxS expression vector and protein expression was evaluated. Finally, the expressed fusion protein was purified on a Ni-IDA column and verified by SDS-PAGE and western blotting. The hspX/esxS gene construct was inserted into pET-21b (+) and recombinant protein expression was induced with IPTG in E. coli BL21 cells. Various concentrations of IPTG were tested to determine the optimum concentration for expression induction. The recombinant protein was expressed in insoluble inclusion bodies. Three molar guanidine HCl was used to solubilize the insoluble protein. An HspX/EsxS Mtb fusion protein was expressed in E. coli and the recombinant protein was purified. After immunological analysis, the HspX/EsxS fusion protein might be an anti-tuberculosis vaccine candidate in future clinical trial studies.

  4. [Application of multiplex nested RT- PCR assay for screening the fusion genes in acute myeloid leukemia and its clinical significance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yuanyuan; Gao, Li; Sun, Junzhong; Ding, Yi; Xu, Yihan; Lyu, Chao; Liu, Wenwen; Wang, Nan; Wang, Lili; Yu, Li

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the clinical value of multiplex nested reverse transcription PCR (RT-nPCR) in screening acute myeloid leukemia(AML)fusion genes. A novel multiplex RT-nPCR assay was developed to detect 16 AML-related fusion genes (AML1-EVI1, AML1-ETO, AML1-MDS1, AML1-MTG16, MLL-AF9, MLL-AF6, MLL-AF10, MLL-ENL, MLL-MLL, PML-RARα, PLZFRARα, NPM1-RARα, CBFB-MYH11, DEK-CAN, SET-CAN and TLS-ERG) according to 2008 WHO classification of AML. The chromosome reciprocal translocations of 356 AML cases were detected by multiplex RT-nPCR and karyotyping. The positive samples were further confirmed by split- out PCR and FISH. The fusion genes were detected in 172 patients with the positive detection rate of 48.31%(172/356), which was higher than that of karyotyping (31.46%) (χ²=70.314, Pfusion genes in AML patients, which can provide important evidence for assessing diagnosis and treatment, and also provide necessary information for minimal residual disease (MRD) and prognosis.

  5. Fusion of ZMYND8 and RELA genes in acute erythroid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panagopoulos, Ioannis; Micci, Francesca; Thorsen, Jim

    2013-01-01

    Acute erythroid leukemia was diagnosed in a 4-month-old boy. Cytogenetic analysis of bone marrow (BM) cells showed a t(11;20)(p11;q11) translocation. RNA extracted from the BM was sequenced and analyzed for fusion transcripts using the software FusionMap. A ZMYND8-RELA fusion was ranked first. RT...... the translocation. The putative ZMYND8-RELA fusion protein contains the Zinc-PHD finger domain, a bromodomain, a PWWP domain, a MYND type of zinc finger of ZMYND8, and the entire RELA protein, indicating that it might act leukemogenically by influencing several cellular processes including the NF-kappa-B pathway....

  6. ZNF384-related fusion genes define a subgroup of childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia with a characteristic immunotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirabayashi, Shinsuke; Ohki, Kentaro; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Ichikawa, Hitoshi; Momozawa, Yukihide; Okamura, Kohji; Yaguchi, Akinori; Terada, Kazuki; Saito, Yuya; Yoshimi, Ai; Ogata-Kawata, Hiroko; Sakamoto, Hiromi; Kato, Motohiro; Fujimura, Junya; Hino, Moeko; Kinoshita, Akitoshi; Kakuda, Harumi; Kurosawa, Hidemitsu; Kato, Keisuke; Kajiwara, Ryosuke; Moriwaki, Koichi; Morimoto, Tsuyoshi; Nakamura, Kozue; Noguchi, Yasushi; Osumi, Tomoo; Sakashita, Kazuo; Takita, Junko; Yuza, Yuki; Matsuda, Koich; Yoshida, Teruhiko; Matsumoto, Kenji; Hata, Kenichiro; Kubo, Michiaki; Matsubara, Yoichi; Fukushima, Takashi; Koh, Katsuyoshi; Manabe, Atsushi; Ohara, Akira; Kiyokawa, Nobutaka

    2017-01-01

    Fusion genes involving ZNF384 have recently been identified in B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and 7 fusion partners have been reported. We further characterized this type of fusion gene by whole transcriptome sequencing and/or polymerase chain reaction. In addition to previously reported genes, we identified BMP2K as a novel fusion partner for ZNF384 Including the EP300-ZNF384 that we reported recently, the total frequency of ZNF384-related fusion genes was 4.1% in 291 B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients enrolled in a single clinical trial, and TCF3-ZNF384 was the most recurrent, with a frequency of 2.4%. The characteristic immunophenotype of weak CD10 and aberrant CD13 and/or CD33 expression was revealed to be a common feature of the leukemic cells harboring ZNF384-related fusion genes. The signature gene expression profile in TCF3-ZNF384-positive patients was enriched in hematopoietic stem cell features and related to that of EP300-ZNF384-positive patients, but was significantly distinct from that of TCF3-PBX1-positive and ZNF384-fusion-negative patients. However, clinical features of TCF3-ZNF384-positive patients are markedly different from those of EP300-ZNF384-positive patients, exhibiting higher cell counts and a younger age at presentation. TCF3-ZNF384-positive patients revealed a significantly poorer steroid response and a higher frequency of relapse, and the additional activating mutations in RAS signaling pathway genes were detected by whole exome analysis in some of the cases. Our observations indicate that ZNF384-related fusion genes consist of a distinct subgroup of B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia with a characteristic immunophenotype, while the clinical features depend on the functional properties of individual fusion partners. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  7. Informational lesions: optical perturbation of spike timing and neural synchrony via microbial opsin gene fusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Han

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Synchronous neural activity occurs throughout the brain in association with normal and pathological brain functions. Despite theoretical work exploring how such neural coordination might facilitate neural computation and be corrupted in disease states, it has proven difficult to test experimentally the causal role of synchrony in such phenomena. Attempts to manipulate neural synchrony often alter other features of neural activity such as firing rate. Here we evaluate a single gene which encodes for the blue-light gated cation channel channelrhodopsin-2 and the yellow-light driven chloride pump halorhodopsin from N. pharaonis, linked by a ‘self-cleaving’ 2A peptide. This fusion enables proportional expression of both opsins, sensitizing neurons to being bi-directionally controlled with blue and yellow light, facilitating proportional optical spike insertion and deletion upon delivery of trains of precisely-timed blue and yellow light pulses. Such approaches may enable more detailed explorations of the causal role of specific features of the neural code.

  8. Electrochemical biosensor based on nanoporous gold electrode for detection of PML/RARα fusion gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Guangxian; Liu, Ailin; Chen, Xuhai; Wang, Kun; Lian, Zhixian; Liu, Qicai; Chen, Yuanzhong; Du, Min; Lin, Xinhua

    2011-05-15

    In this study, a kind of nanoporous gold electrode (NPG) prepared with repetitive square-wave oxidation reduction cycle (SWORC) was reported. The active surface area of the proposed NPG electrode was 9.9 times larger than that of a bare flat one characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV). An electrochemical DNA biosensor based on NPG electrode was fabricated for detection of promyelocytic leukemia/retinoic acid receptor α (PML/RARα) fusion gene in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) by using Methylene Blue (MB) as an electroactive indicator. Differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) was employed to monitor the hybridization reaction on the probe modified electrode. The decrease of the peak current of MB was observed upon hybridization of the probe with target DNA. The results indicated that the peak current was linear with the concentration of complementary strand in the range of 60 pM to 220 pM with a detection limit of 6.7 pM. This new biosensor exhibited excellent sensitivity and selectivity and had been used for an assay of PCR real sample with a satisfactory result. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A Naturally Occurring rev1-vpu Fusion Gene Does Not Confer a Fitness Advantage to HIV-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon M Langer

    Full Text Available Pandemic strains of HIV-1 (group M encode a total of nine structural (gag, pol, env, regulatory (rev, tat and accessory (vif, vpr, vpu, nef genes. However, some subtype A and C viruses exhibit an unusual gene arrangement in which the first exon of rev (rev1 and the vpu gene are placed in the same open reading frame. Although this rev1-vpu gene fusion is present in a considerable fraction of HIV-1 strains, its functional significance is unknown.Examining infectious molecular clones (IMCs of HIV-1 that encode the rev1-vpu polymorphism, we show that a fusion protein is expressed in infected cells. Due to the splicing pattern of viral mRNA, however, these same IMCs also express a regular Vpu protein, which is produced at much higher levels. To investigate the function of the fusion gene, we characterized isogenic IMC pairs differing only in their ability to express a Rev1-Vpu protein. Analysis in transfected HEK293T and infected CD4+ T cells showed that all of these viruses were equally active in known Vpu functions, such as down-modulation of CD4 or counteraction of tetherin. Furthermore, the polymorphism did not affect Vpu-mediated inhibition of NF-кB activation or Rev-dependent nuclear export of incompletely spliced viral mRNAs. There was also no evidence for enhanced replication of Rev1-Vpu expressing viruses in primary PBMCs or ex vivo infected human lymphoid tissues. Finally, the frequency of HIV-1 quasispecies members that encoded a rev1-vpu fusion gene did not change in HIV-1 infected individuals over time.Expression of a rev1-vpu fusion gene does not affect regular Rev and Vpu functions or alter HIV-1 replication in primary target cells. Since there is no evidence for increased replication fitness of rev1-vpu encoding viruses, this polymorphism likely emerged in the context of other mutations within and/or outside the rev1-vpu intergenic region, and may have a neutral phenotype.

  10. A Naturally Occurring rev1-vpu Fusion Gene Does Not Confer a Fitness Advantage to HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Simon M; Hopfensperger, Kristina; Iyer, Shilpa S; Kreider, Edward F; Learn, Gerald H; Lee, Lan-Hui; Hahn, Beatrice H; Sauter, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Pandemic strains of HIV-1 (group M) encode a total of nine structural (gag, pol, env), regulatory (rev, tat) and accessory (vif, vpr, vpu, nef) genes. However, some subtype A and C viruses exhibit an unusual gene arrangement in which the first exon of rev (rev1) and the vpu gene are placed in the same open reading frame. Although this rev1-vpu gene fusion is present in a considerable fraction of HIV-1 strains, its functional significance is unknown. Examining infectious molecular clones (IMCs) of HIV-1 that encode the rev1-vpu polymorphism, we show that a fusion protein is expressed in infected cells. Due to the splicing pattern of viral mRNA, however, these same IMCs also express a regular Vpu protein, which is produced at much higher levels. To investigate the function of the fusion gene, we characterized isogenic IMC pairs differing only in their ability to express a Rev1-Vpu protein. Analysis in transfected HEK293T and infected CD4+ T cells showed that all of these viruses were equally active in known Vpu functions, such as down-modulation of CD4 or counteraction of tetherin. Furthermore, the polymorphism did not affect Vpu-mediated inhibition of NF-кB activation or Rev-dependent nuclear export of incompletely spliced viral mRNAs. There was also no evidence for enhanced replication of Rev1-Vpu expressing viruses in primary PBMCs or ex vivo infected human lymphoid tissues. Finally, the frequency of HIV-1 quasispecies members that encoded a rev1-vpu fusion gene did not change in HIV-1 infected individuals over time. Expression of a rev1-vpu fusion gene does not affect regular Rev and Vpu functions or alter HIV-1 replication in primary target cells. Since there is no evidence for increased replication fitness of rev1-vpu encoding viruses, this polymorphism likely emerged in the context of other mutations within and/or outside the rev1-vpu intergenic region, and may have a neutral phenotype.

  11. Prevention of adverse events of interferon γ gene therapy by gene delivery of interferon γ-heparin-binding domain fusion protein in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuru Ando

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sustained gene delivery of interferon (IFN γ can be an effective treatment, but our previous study showed high levels of IFNγ-induced adverse events, including the loss of body weight. These unwanted events could be reduced by target-specific delivery of IFNγ after in vivo gene transfer. To achieve this, we selected the heparin-binding domain (HBD of extracellular superoxide dismutase as a molecule to anchor IFNγ to the cell surface. We designed three IFNγ derivatives, IFNγ-HBD1, IFNγ-HBD2, and IFNγ-HBD3, each of which had 1, 2, or 3 HBDs, respectively. Each plasmid-encoding fusion proteins was delivered to the liver, a model target in this study, by hydrodynamic tail vein injection. The serum concentration of IFNγ-HBD2 and IFNγ-HBD3 after gene delivery was lower than that of IFNγ or IFNγ-HBD1. Gene delivery of IFNγ-HBD2, but not of IFNγ-HBD3, effectively increased the mRNA expression of IFNγ-inducible genes in the liver, suggesting liver-specific distribution of IFNγ-HBD2. Gene delivery of IFNγ-HBD2-suppressed tumor growth in the liver as efficiently as that of IFNγ with much less symptoms of adverse effects. These results indicate that the adverse events of IFNγ gene transfer can be prevented by gene delivery of IFNγ-HBD2, a fusion protein with high cell surface affinity.

  12. Killing of leukemic cells with a BCR/ABL fusion gene by RNA interference (RNAi)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wilda, Monika; Fuchs, Uta; Wössmann, Wilhelm; Borkhardt, Arndt

    2002-01-01

    .... We used dsRNA targeting the M-BCR/ABL fusion site to kill leukemic cells with such a rearrangement. Transfection of dsRNA specific for the M-BCR/ABL fusion mRNA into K562 cells depleted the corresponding mRNA and the M-BCR/ABL oncoprotein...

  13. Gene transfer mediated by fusion protein hemagglutinin reconstituted in cationic lipid vesicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoen, P; Chonn, A; Cullis, PR; Wilschut, J; Scherrer, P

    Hemagglutinin, the membrane fusion protein of influenza virus,is known to mediate a low-pH-dependent fusion reaction between the viral envelope and the limiting membrane of the endosomal cell compartment following cellular uptake of the virus particles by receptor-mediated endocytosis. Here we

  14. Monitoring of gene expression in bacteria during infections using an adaptable set of bioluminescent, fluorescent and colorigenic fusion vectors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Uliczka

    Full Text Available A family of versatile promoter-probe plasmids for gene expression analysis was developed based on a modular expression plasmid system (pZ. The vectors contain different replicons with exchangeable antibiotic cassettes to allow compatibility and expression analysis on a low-, midi- and high-copy number basis. Suicide vector variants also permit chromosomal integration of the reporter fusion and stable vector derivatives can be used for in vivo or in situ expression studies under non-selective conditions. Transcriptional and translational fusions to the reporter genes gfp(mut3.1, amCyan, dsRed2, luxCDABE, phoA or lacZ can be constructed, and presence of identical multiple cloning sites in the vector system facilitates the interchange of promoters or reporter genes between the plasmids of the series. The promoter of the constitutively expressed gapA gene of Escherichia coli was included to obtain fluorescent and bioluminescent expression constructs. A combination of the plasmids allows simultaneous detection and gene expression analysis in individual bacteria, e.g. in bacterial communities or during mouse infections. To test our vector system, we analyzed and quantified expression of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis virulence genes under laboratory conditions, in association with cells and during the infection process.

  15. Systematic mapping of occluded genes by cell fusion reveals prevalence and stability of cis-mediated silencing in somatic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looney, Timothy J.; Zhang, Li; Chen, Chih-Hsin; Lee, Jae Hyun; Chari, Sheila; Mao, Frank Fuxiang; Pelizzola, Mattia; Zhang, Lu; Lister, Ryan; Baker, Samuel W.; Fernandes, Croydon J.; Gaetz, Jedidiah; Foshay, Kara M.; Clift, Kayla L.; Zhang, Zhenyu; Li, Wei-Qiang; Vallender, Eric J.; Wagner, Ulrich; Qin, Jane Yuxia; Michelini, Katelyn J.; Bugarija, Branimir; Park, Donghyun; Aryee, Emmanuel; Stricker, Thomas; Zhou, Jie; White, Kevin P.; Ren, Bing; Schroth, Gary P.; Ecker, Joseph R.; Xiang, Andy Peng; Lahn, Bruce T.

    2014-01-01

    Both diffusible factors acting in trans and chromatin components acting in cis are implicated in gene regulation, but the extent to which either process causally determines a cell's transcriptional identity is unclear. We recently used cell fusion to define a class of silent genes termed “cis-silenced” (or “occluded”) genes, which remain silent even in the presence of trans-acting transcriptional activators. We further showed that occlusion of lineage-inappropriate genes plays a critical role in maintaining the transcriptional identities of somatic cells. Here, we present, for the first time, a comprehensive map of occluded genes in somatic cells. Specifically, we mapped occluded genes in mouse fibroblasts via fusion to a dozen different rat cell types followed by whole-transcriptome profiling. We found that occluded genes are highly prevalent and stable in somatic cells, representing a sizeable fraction of silent genes. Occluded genes are also highly enriched for important developmental regulators of alternative lineages, consistent with the role of occlusion in safeguarding cell identities. Alongside this map, we also present whole-genome maps of DNA methylation and eight other chromatin marks. These maps uncover a complex relationship between chromatin state and occlusion. Furthermore, we found that DNA methylation functions as the memory of occlusion in a subset of occluded genes, while histone deacetylation contributes to the implementation but not memory of occlusion. Our data suggest that the identities of individual cell types are defined largely by the occlusion status of their genomes. The comprehensive reference maps reported here provide the foundation for future studies aimed at understanding the role of occlusion in development and disease. PMID:24310002

  16. TBL1XR1/TP63: a novel recurrent gene fusion in B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recently, the landscape of single base mutations in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) was described. Here we report the discovery of a gene fusion between TBL1XR1 and TP63, the only recurrent somatic novel gene fusion identified in our analysis of transcriptome data from 96 DLBCL cases. Based on this cohort and a further 157 DLBCL cases analyzed by FISH, the incidence in de novo germinal center B cell-like (GCB) DLBCL is 5% (6 of 115).

  17. Identification of a novel SEPT9-ABL1 fusion gene in a patient with T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rikio Suzuki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia (T-PLL, a rare type of peripheral T-cell leukemia, is characterized by marked splenomegaly with rapidly progressive lymphocytosis and a poor prognosis. Nine kinds of ABL1 chimeric genes have been identified in various kinds of hematological malignancies, such as chronic myeloid leukemia and B- or T-lymphoblastic leukemia. However, there have been no reports describing T-PLL cases with ABL1 rearrangements. We herein report a case of T-PLL with a novel SEPT9-ABL1 fusion gene which induced strong resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors such as imatinib and dasatinib.

  18. The anti-tumour effect of a DNA vaccine carrying a fusion gene of human VEGFR2 and IL-12

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sha Wen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Because of tumour dependence on angiogenesis, anti-angiogenic therapy has become the most attractive area of basic and clinical study in the field of cancer research. In order to create a synergistic effect on angiogenesis and immune regulation, we designed and constructed a new type of DNA vaccine that can express VEGFR2 (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 and the prostate cancer antigen IL-12 (interleukin 12 in the same reading frame. The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-tumour activity of a eukaryotic expression plasmid carrying a fusion gene of human VEGFR2 and IL-12. According to the gene sequences in GenBank, we synthesized the human VEGFR2 and IL-12 genes. VEGFR2 and IL-12 were joined by a sequence encoding a Furin recognition site and a 2A cleavage site, and the resulting fusion gene was cloned into the eukaryotic expression vector pVAX1 to construct the expression plasmid pVAX1-VEGFR2-F2A-IL-12. The expression of VEGFR2 and IL-12 could be detected in 293T cells transfected with pVAX1-VEGFR2-F2A-IL-12 by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Each of these proteins, and in particular co-expression of both proteins, can result in humoral and cellular immune responses in C57BL/6 mice. After injection into the tumour-bearing mouse model, the plasmid showed stronger inhibition of tumour growth than a plasmid expressing VEGFR2 alone. Our results demonstrate that a DNA vaccine carrying a fusion gene of human VEGFR2 and IL-12 could represent a promising approach for tumour immunotherapy.

  19. Recombinant hepatitis B surface antigen production in Aspergillus niger: evaluating the strategy of gene fusion to native glucoamylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Er; van Zyl, Wh; van Zyl, Pj; Görgens, Jf

    2012-10-01

    This study demonstrates the potential of Aspergillus niger as a candidate expression system for virus-like particle production using gene fusion. Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) production, targeted through the secretory pathway in A. niger, resulted in completely assembled and properly folded HBsAg. This was achieved by implementing a gene fusion strategy using the highly expressed catalytic domain of the native glucoamylase gene (GlaA ( G2 )) fused to the HBsAg S gene. The inducible glucoamylase promoter (GlaA ( p )) was used to control transcription in the A. niger D15 host. The gene fusion strategy was designed for cleavage of the fused product by the KEX2-like protease, resulting in intracellular accumulation of HBsAg and extracellular secretion of glucoamylase. Immunodetection using a monoclonal HBsAg antibody could not detect the fused GlaA ( G2 ) ::S product in intracellular and extracellular fractions, indicating that full assembly and maturation of HBsAg occurred after cleavage of the fused product in the Golgi complex. Several breakdown products showing an immunoreactive response to the glucoamylase polyclonal antibody indicated a level of intracellular degradation. The choice of carbon source used in cultivation significantly affected HBsAg production levels through induction of the glucoamylase promoter. The highest specific HBsAg production was observed during growth on inducing substrates of starch and its degradation products (maltodextrin and maltose), although residual glucose accumulation in the mid-exponential phase reduced HBsAg production. HBsAg production in starch-based cultures may be improved further by optimization of the rates of starch hydrolysis by glucoamylase and subsequent glucose consumption by the host.

  20. ChimPipe: accurate detection of fusion genes and transcription-induced chimeras from RNA-seq data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Martín, Bernardo; Palumbo, Emilio; Marco-Sola, Santiago; Griebel, Thasso; Ribeca, Paolo; Alonso, Graciela; Rastrojo, Alberto; Aguado, Begoña; Guigó, Roderic; Djebali, Sarah

    2017-01-03

    Chimeric transcripts are commonly defined as transcripts linking two or more different genes in the genome, and can be explained by various biological mechanisms such as genomic rearrangement, read-through or trans-splicing, but also by technical or biological artefacts. Several studies have shown their importance in cancer, cell pluripotency and motility. Many programs have recently been developed to identify chimeras from Illumina RNA-seq data (mostly fusion genes in cancer). However outputs of different programs on the same dataset can be widely inconsistent, and tend to include many false positives. Other issues relate to simulated datasets restricted to fusion genes, real datasets with limited numbers of validated cases, result inconsistencies between simulated and real datasets, and gene rather than junction level assessment. Here we present ChimPipe, a modular and easy-to-use method to reliably identify fusion genes and transcription-induced chimeras from paired-end Illumina RNA-seq data. We have also produced realistic simulated datasets for three different read lengths, and enhanced two gold-standard cancer datasets by associating exact junction points to validated gene fusions. Benchmarking ChimPipe together with four other state-of-the-art tools on this data showed ChimPipe to be the top program at identifying exact junction coordinates for both kinds of datasets, and the one showing the best trade-off between sensitivity and precision. Applied to 106 ENCODE human RNA-seq datasets, ChimPipe identified 137 high confidence chimeras connecting the protein coding sequence of their parent genes. In subsequent experiments, three out of four predicted chimeras, two of which recurrently expressed in a large majority of the samples, could be validated. Cloning and sequencing of the three cases revealed several new chimeric transcript structures, 3 of which with the potential to encode a chimeric protein for which we hypothesized a new role. Applying ChimPipe to

  1. EP300-ZNF384 fusion gene product up-regulates GATA3 gene expression and induces hematopoietic stem cell gene expression signature in B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaguchi, Akinori; Ishibashi, Takeshi; Terada, Kazuki; Ueno-Yokohata, Hitomi; Saito, Yuya; Fujimura, Junya; Shimizu, Toshiaki; Ohki, Kentaro; Manabe, Atsushi; Kiyokawa, Nobutaka

    2017-08-01

    ZNF384-related fusion genes are associated with a distinct subgroup of B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemias in childhood, with a frequency of approximately 3-4%. We previously identified a novel EP300-ZNF384 fusion gene. Patients with the ZNF384-related fusion gene exhibit a hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene expression signature and characteristic immunophenotype with negative or low expression of CD10 and aberrant expression of myeloid antigens, such as CD33 and CD13. However, the molecular basis of this pathogenesis remains completely unknown. In the present study, we examined the biological effects of EP300-ZNF384 expression induced by retrovirus-mediated gene transduction in an REH B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line, and observed the acquisition of the HSC gene expression signature and an up-regulation of GATA3 gene expression, as assessed by microarray analysis. In contrast, the gene expression profile induced by wild-type ZNF384 in REH cells was significantly different from that by EP300-ZNF384 expression. Together with the results of reporter assays, which revealed the enhancement of GATA3-promoter activity by EP300-ZNF384 expression, these findings suggest that EP300-ZNF384 mediates GATA3 gene expression and may be involved in the acquisition of the HSC gene expression signature and characteristic immunophenotype in B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells.

  2. TMPRSS2-ERG Gene Fusion Causing ERG Overexpression Precedes Chromosome Copy Number Changes in Prostate Carcinomas, Paired HGPIN Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuno Cerveira

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available TMPRSS2-ETS gene fusions have been found recurrently in prostate carcinomas, but not in the presumed precursor lesion, high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN. However, HGPIN lesions may share chromosomal changes with prostate cancer. To determine the relative order of genetic events in prostate carcinogenesis, we have analyzed 34 prostate carcinomas, 19 paired HGPIN lesions, 14 benign prostate hyperplasias, 11 morphologically normal prostatic tissues for TMPRSS2-ERG, TMPRSS2-ETV1 rearrangements, genomic imbalances. TMPRSS2 exon 1 was fused in-frame with ERG exon 4 in 17 of 34 (50% prostate carcinomas, in 4 of 19 (21% HGPIN lesions, but in none of controls. The findings were further validated by sequencing analysis, by the real-time polymerase chain reaction quantification of TMPRSS2-ERG fusion transcript, the ERG exons 5/6:exons 1/2 expression ratio. Chromosome copy number changes were detected by comparative genomic hybridization in 42% of clinically confined carcinomas, in none of the 16 HGPIN lesions analyzed. We demonstrate for the first time that the TMPRSS2-ERG fusion gene can be detected in a proportion of HGPIN lesions, that this molecular rearrangement is an early event that may precede chromosome-level alterations in prostate carcinogenesis.

  3. Targeted next-generation sequencing detects point mutations, insertions, deletions and balanced chromosomal rearrangements as well as identifies novel leukemia-specific fusion genes in a single procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossmann, V; Kohlmann, A; Klein, H-U; Schindela, S; Schnittger, S; Dicker, F; Dugas, M; Kern, W; Haferlach, T; Haferlach, C

    2011-04-01

    DNA sequence enrichment from complex genomic samples using microarrays enables targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS). In this study, we combined 454 shotgun pyrosequencing with long oligonucleotide sequence capture arrays. We demonstrate the detection of mutations including point mutations, deletions and insertions in a cohort of 22 patients presenting with acute leukemias and myeloid neoplasms. Importantly, this one-step methodological procedure also allowed the detection of balanced chromosomal aberrations, including translocations and inversions. Moreover, the genomic representation of only one of the partner genes of a chimeric fusion on the capture platform also permitted identification of the novel fusion partner genes. Using acute myeloid leukemias harboring RUNX1 abnormalities as a model system, three novel chromosomal fusion sequences and KCNMA1 as a novel RUNX1 fusion partner gene were detected. This assay has the strong potential to become an important method for the comprehensive genetic characterization of particular leukemias and other malignancies harboring complex genomes.

  4. MYBL1 rearrangements and MYB amplification in breast adenoid cystic carcinomas lacking the MYB-NFIB fusion gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jisun; Geyer, Felipe C; Martelotto, Luciano G; Ng, Charlotte K Y; Lim, Raymond S; Selenica, Pier; Li, Anqi; Pareja, Fresia; Fusco, Nicola; Edelweiss, Marcia; Kumar, Rahul; Gularte-Merida, Rodrigo; Forbes, Andre N; Khurana, Ekta; Mariani, Odette; Badve, Sunil; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Norton, Larry; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Weigelt, Britta

    2017-11-17

    Breast adenoid cystic carcinoma (AdCC), a rare type of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), has been shown to be driven by MYB pathway activation, most often underpinned by the MYB-NFIB fusion gene. Alternative genetic mechanisms, such as MYBL1 rearrangements, have been reported in MYB-NFIB-negative salivary gland AdCCs. Here we report on the molecular characterization by massively parallel sequencing of four breast AdCCs lacking the MYB-NFIB fusion gene. In two cases, we identified MYBL1 rearrangements (MYBL1-ACTN1 and MYBL1-NFIB), which were associated with MYBL1 overexpression. A third AdCC harbored a high-level MYB gene amplification, which resulted in MYB overexpression at the mRNA and protein levels. RNA-sequencing and whole-genome sequencing revealed no definite alternative driver in the fourth AdCC studied, despite high levels of MYB expression and the activation of pathways similar to those activated in MYB-NFIB-positive AdCCs. In this case, a deletion encompassing the last intron and part of exon 15 of MYB, including the binding site of ERG-1, a transcription factor that may down-regulate MYB, and the exon 15 splice site, was detected. In conclusion, we demonstrate that MYBL1 rearrangements and MYB amplification likely constitute alternative genetic drivers of breast AdCCs, functioning through MYBL1 or MYB overexpression. These observations emphasize that breast AdCCs likely constitute a convergent phenotype, whereby activation of MYB/MYBL1 and their downstream targets can be driven by the MYB-NFIB fusion gene, MYBL1 rearrangements, MYB amplification or other yet to be identified mechanisms. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. Frequency and clinical impact of ETV6/RUNX1, AF4-MLL, and BCR/ABL fusion genes on features of acute lymphoblastic leukemia at presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajuba, I C; Madu, A J; Okocha, C; Ibegbulam, O G; Okpala, I; Nna, O E

    2016-01-01

    Variations in disease presentation and outcome of leukemia treatment has been associated with the presence of certain mutant genes. Three major translocations (ETV6-RUNX1, BCR-ABL, and AF4-MLL) in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have been shown to affect treatment outcome. This study is aimed at assessing the relationship between these translocations and the presence of other indicators of disease severity (white cell count, hemoglobin concentration, platelet count, and hematocrit) in ALL. Forty chemotherapy naïve patients aged between 9 months and 54 years had their marrow samples analyzed for the prevalent mutations. Their clinical and laboratory details on presentation were also obtained. Abnormal genes detected were BCR/ABL1 major transcript in 5 (12.5%), ETV6/RUNX1 in 2 (5.0%), MLL/AF4 none and none of the patients had more than one fusion gene. There was no relationship between the presence of these fusion genes and the clinical and laboratory features of ALL. An association exists between the fusion genes and ethnic origin of the patients (P = 0.005). There is no significant association between the abnormal fusion genes detected and some laboratory features of prognostic importance, which include total white blood cell count (P = 0.416) and FAB subtype (P = 0.576). Presence of fusion the genes BCR/ABL1, ETV6/RUNX1, and MLL/AF4 does not have any impact on the clinical and laboratory features of ALL at presentation.

  6. CBFβ and the leukemogenic fusion protein CBFβ-SMMHC associate with mitotic chromosomes to epigenetically regulate ribosomal genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Camacho, Cesar; van Wijnen, Andre J; Lian, Jane B; Stein, Janet L; Stein, Gary S

    2014-12-01

    Mitotic bookmarking is an epigenetic control mechanism that sustains gene expression in progeny cells; it is often found in genes related to the maintenance of cellular phenotype and growth control. RUNX transcription factors regulate a broad spectrum of RNA Polymerase (Pol II) transcribed genes important for lineage commitment but also regulate RNA Polymerase I (Pol I) driven ribosomal gene expression, thus coordinating control of cellular identity and proliferation. In this study, using fluorescence microscopy and biochemical approaches we show that the principal RUNX co-factor, CBFβ, associates with nucleolar organizing regions (NORs) during mitosis to negatively regulate RUNX-dependent ribosomal gene expression. Of clinical relevance, we establish for the first time that the leukemogenic fusion protein CBFβ-SMMHC (smooth muscle myosin heavy chain) also associates with ribosomal genes in interphase chromatin and mitotic chromosomes to promote and epigenetically sustain regulation of ribosomal genes through RUNX factor interactions. Our results demonstrate that CBFβ contributes to the transcriptional regulation of ribosomal gene expression and provide further understanding of the epigenetic role of CBFβ-SMMHC in proliferation and maintenance of the leukemic phenotype. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Association of TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion with clinical characteristics and outcomes: results from a population-based study of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gleave Martin E

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The presence of the TMPRSS2-ERG fusion gene in prostate tumors has recently been associated with an aggressive phenotype, as well as recurrence and death from prostate cancer. These associations suggest the hypothesis that the gene fusion may be used as a prognostic indicator for prostate cancer. Methods In this study, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH assays were used to assess TMPRSS2-ERG fusion status in a group of 214 prostate cancer cases from two population-based studies. The FISH assays were designed to detect both fusion type (deletion vs. translocation and the number of fusion copies (single vs. multiple. Genotyping of four ERG and one TMPRSS2 SNPs using germline DNA was also performed in a sample of the cases (n = 127. Results Of the 214 tumors scored for the TMPRSS2-ERG fusion, 64.5% were negative and 35.5% were positive for the fusion. Cases with the TMPRSS2-ERG fusion did not exhibit reduced prostate cancer survival (HR = 0.92, 95% CI = 0.22–3.93, nor was there a significant difference in cause-specific survival when stratifying by translocation or deletion (HR = 0.84, 95% CI = 0.23–3.12 or by the number of retained fusion copies (HR = 1.22, 95% CI = 0.45–3.34. However, evidence for reduced prostate cancer-specific survival was apparent in those cases whose tumor had multiple copies of the fusion. The variant T allele of the TMPRSS2 SNP, rs12329760, was positively associated with TMPRSS2-ERG fusion by translocation (p = 0.05 and with multiple copies of the gene fusion (p = 0.03. Conclusion If replicated, the results presented here may provide insight into the mechanism by which the TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion arises and also contribute to diagnostic evaluations for determining the subset of men who will go on to develop metastatic prostate cancer.

  8. [Endometrial stromal sarcoma: morphologic features and detection of JAZF1-SUZ12 and YWHAE FAM22 fusion genes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, B; Lu, L X; Tu, X Y; Cheng, Y F; Bi, R; Yang, W T

    2016-05-08

    To study the morphologic features, immunophenotype and significance of expression of JAZF1-SUZ12 and YWHAE-FAM22 fusion genes in endometrial stromal sarcoma (ESS). Fifty-three cases of ESS were retrieved and the pathologic features were reviewed. Immunohistochemical study for estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, CD10, cyclin D1, smooth muscle actin, desmin and H-caldesmon were carried out using tissue microarray technology. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was applied for detection of expression of JAZF1-SUZ12 and YWHAE-FAM22 fusion genes in 47 cases of ESS and 12 cases of other spindle cell neoplasia in uterus (including 2 cases of undifferentiated sarcoma, 3 cases of leiomyosarcoma, 3 cases of leiomyoma, 4 cases of adenosarcoma and 2 cases of uterine tumor resembling ovarian sex cord tumor). The 53 cases of ESS studied included 43 cases of low-grade ESS and 10 cases of high-grade ESS. As for low-grade ESS, in addition to the classic morphologic features, smooth muscle differentiation was present in 7 cases (16.3%), sex cord-like differentiation in 2 cases (4.7%), rhabdoid differentiation in 1 case (2.3%), clear cell changes in 1 case (2.3%) and schwannoma-like palisading pattern in 1 case (2.3%). As for high-grade ESS, sex cord-like differentiation (1 case), mucinous microcystic changes (1 case) and focal clear cell changes (1 case) were also observed. The expression rate of estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, CD10, cyclin D1, smooth muscle actin, desmin and H-caldesmon was 86.0%, 81.4%, 74.4%, 2.3%, 23.3%, 23.3% and 4.7% in low-grade ESS, respectively, and was 1/10, 6/10, 6/10, 7/10, 1/10, 1/10 and 0 in high-grade ESS, respectively. RNA extraction was successful in 47 cases of ESS, including 39 cases of low-grade ESS and 8 cases of high-grade ESS. The positive rate of JAZF1-SUZ12 fusion gene was 30.8% (12/39) in low-grade ESS. The positive rate of YWHAE-FAM22 fusion gene was 12.5% (1/8) in high-grade ESS. The 14 control cases

  9. Dysregulated Glycoprotein B-Mediated Cell-Cell Fusion Disrupts Varicella-Zoster Virus and Host Gene Transcription during Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Edward; Arvin, Ann M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The highly conserved herpesvirus glycoprotein complex gB/gH-gL mediates membrane fusion during virion entry and cell-cell fusion. Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) characteristically forms multinucleated cells, or syncytia, during the infection of human tissues, but little is known about this process. The cytoplasmic domain of VZV gB (gBcyt) has been implicated in cell-cell fusion regulation because a gB[Y881F] substitution causes hyperfusion. gBcyt regulation is necessary for VZV pathogenesis, as the hyperfusogenic mutant gB[Y881F] is severely attenuated in human skin xenografts. In this study, gBcyt-regulated fusion was investigated by comparing melanoma cells infected with wild-type-like VZV or hyperfusogenic mutants. The gB[Y881F] mutant exhibited dramatically accelerated syncytium formation in melanoma cells caused by fusion of infected cells with many uninfected cells, increased cytoskeleton reorganization, and rapid displacement of nuclei to dense central structures compared to pOka using live-cell confocal microscopy. VZV and human transcriptomes were concurrently investigated using whole transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) to identify viral and cellular responses induced when gBcyt regulation was disrupted by the gB[Y881F] substitution. The expression of four vital VZV genes, ORF61 and the genes for glycoproteins gC, gE, and gI, was significantly reduced at 36 h postinfection for the hyperfusogenic mutants. Importantly, hierarchical clustering demonstrated an association of differential gene expression with dysregulated gBcyt-mediated fusion. A subset of Ras GTPase genes linked to membrane remodeling were upregulated in cells infected with the hyperfusogenic mutants. These data implicate gBcyt in the regulation of gB fusion function that, if unmodulated, triggers cellular processes leading to hyperfusion that attenuates VZV infection. IMPORTANCE The highly infectious, human-restricted pathogen varicella-zoster virus (VZV) causes chickenpox and shingles

  10. Dysregulated Glycoprotein B-Mediated Cell-Cell Fusion Disrupts Varicella-Zoster Virus and Host Gene Transcription during Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Stefan L; Yang, Edward; Arvin, Ann M

    2017-01-01

    The highly conserved herpesvirus glycoprotein complex gB/gH-gL mediates membrane fusion during virion entry and cell-cell fusion. Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) characteristically forms multinucleated cells, or syncytia, during the infection of human tissues, but little is known about this process. The cytoplasmic domain of VZV gB (gBcyt) has been implicated in cell-cell fusion regulation because a gB[Y881F] substitution causes hyperfusion. gBcyt regulation is necessary for VZV pathogenesis, as the hyperfusogenic mutant gB[Y881F] is severely attenuated in human skin xenografts. In this study, gBcyt-regulated fusion was investigated by comparing melanoma cells infected with wild-type-like VZV or hyperfusogenic mutants. The gB[Y881F] mutant exhibited dramatically accelerated syncytium formation in melanoma cells caused by fusion of infected cells with many uninfected cells, increased cytoskeleton reorganization, and rapid displacement of nuclei to dense central structures compared to pOka using live-cell confocal microscopy. VZV and human transcriptomes were concurrently investigated using whole transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) to identify viral and cellular responses induced when gBcyt regulation was disrupted by the gB[Y881F] substitution. The expression of four vital VZV genes, ORF61 and the genes for glycoproteins gC, gE, and gI, was significantly reduced at 36 h postinfection for the hyperfusogenic mutants. Importantly, hierarchical clustering demonstrated an association of differential gene expression with dysregulated gBcyt-mediated fusion. A subset of Ras GTPase genes linked to membrane remodeling were upregulated in cells infected with the hyperfusogenic mutants. These data implicate gBcyt in the regulation of gB fusion function that, if unmodulated, triggers cellular processes leading to hyperfusion that attenuates VZV infection. The highly infectious, human-restricted pathogen varicella-zoster virus (VZV) causes chickenpox and shingles. Postherpetic

  11. FGFR3–TACC3: A novel gene fusion in cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedito A. Carneiro

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer epitomizes the success of cancer prevention through the human papillomavirus (HPV vaccine, but significant challenges remain in the treatment of advanced disease. We report the first three cases of cervical carcinoma harboring an FGFR3–TACC3 fusion, which serves as a novel therapeutic target. The fusion, identified by comprehensive genomic profiling, activates the FGFR pathway that has been implicated in HPV-driven carcinogenesis. One of the patients whose tumor contained the FGFR3–TACC3 fusion was treated with an investigational FGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Concomitant molecular alterations involving the PI3K/AKT/mTOR and RAF/MEK pathways were also identified and suggest other treatment strategies that deserve investigation. This case series highlights the role of comprehensive genomic profiling in the identification of new therapeutic targets and in targeted therapy selection for patients with cervical cancer.

  12. Characterization of FN1-FGFR1 and novel FN1-FGF1 fusion genes in a large series of phosphaturic mesenchymal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jen-Chieh; Su, Sheng-Yao; Changou, Chun A; Yang, Rong-Sen; Tsai, Keh-Sung; Collins, Michael T; Orwoll, Eric S; Lin, Chung-Yen; Chen, Shu-Hwa; Shih, Shyang-Rong; Lee, Cheng-Han; Oda, Yoshinao; Billings, Steven D; Li, Chien-Feng; Nielsen, G Petur; Konishi, Eiichi; Petersson, Fredrik; Carpenter, Thomas O; Sittampalam, Kesavan; Huang, Hsuan-Ying; Folpe, Andrew L

    2016-11-01

    Phosphaturic mesenchymal tumors typically cause paraneoplastic osteomalacia, chiefly as a result of FGF23 secretion. In a prior study, we identified FN1-FGFR1 fusion in 9 of 15 phosphaturic mesenchymal tumors. In this study, a total of 66 phosphaturic mesenchymal tumors and 7 tumors resembling phosphaturic mesenchymal tumor but without known phosphaturia were studied. A novel FN1-FGF1 fusion gene was identified in two cases without FN1-FGFR1 fusion by RNA sequencing and cross-validated with direct sequencing and western blot. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses revealed FN1-FGFR1 fusion in 16 of 39 (41%) phosphaturic mesenchymal tumors and identified an additional case with FN1-FGF1 fusion. The two fusion genes were mutually exclusive. Combined with previous data, the overall prevalence of FN1-FGFR1 and FN1-FGF1 fusions was 42% (21/50) and 6% (3/50), respectively. FGFR1 immunohistochemistry was positive in 82% (45/55) of phosphaturic mesenchymal tumors regardless of fusion status. By contrast, 121 cases of potential morphologic mimics (belonging to 13 tumor types) rarely expressed FGFR1, the main exceptions being solitary fibrous tumors (positive in 40%), chondroblastomas (40%), and giant cell tumors of bone (38%), suggesting a possible role for FGFR1 immunohistochemistry in the diagnosis of phosphaturic mesenchymal tumor. With the exception of one case reported in our prior study, none of the remaining tumors resembling phosphaturic mesenchymal tumor had either fusion type or expressed significant FGFR1. Our findings provide insight into possible mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of phosphaturic mesenchymal tumor and imply a central role of the FGF1-FGFR1 signaling pathway. The novel FN1-FGF1 protein is expected to be secreted and serves as a ligand that binds and activates FGFR1 to achieve an autocrine loop. Further study is required to determine the functions of these fusion proteins.

  13. Development and Evaluation of a Pan-Sarcoma Fusion Gene Detection Assay Using the NanoString nCounter Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kenneth T E; Goytain, Angela; Tucker, Tracy; Karsan, Aly; Lee, Cheng-Han; Nielsen, Torsten O; Ng, Tony L

    2018-01-01

    The NanoString nCounter assay is a high-throughput hybridization technique using target-specific probes that can be customized to test for numerous fusion transcripts in a single assay using RNA from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded material. We designed a NanoString assay targeting 174 unique fusion junctions in 25 sarcoma types. The study cohort comprised 212 cases, 96 of which showed fusion gene expression by the NanoString assay, including all 20 Ewing sarcomas, 11 synovial sarcomas, and 5 myxoid liposarcomas tested. Among these 96 cases, 15 showed fusion expression not identified by standard clinical assay, including EWSR1-FLI1, EWSR1-ERG, BCOR-CCNB3, ZC3H7B-BCOR, HEY1-NCOA2, CIC-DUX4, COL1A1-PDGFB, MYH9-USP6, YAP1-TFE3, and IRF2BP2-CDX1 fusions. There were no false-positive results; however, four cases were false negative when compared with clinically available fluorescence in situ hybridization or RT-PCR testing. When batched as six cases, the per-sample reagent cost was less than conventional techniques, such as fluorescence in situ hybridization, with technologist hands-on time of 1.2 hours per case and assay time of 36 hours. In summary, the NanoString nCounter Sarcoma Fusion CodeSet reliably and cost-effectively identifies fusion genes in sarcomas using formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded material, including many fusions missed by standard clinical assays, and can serve as a first-line clinical diagnostic test for sarcoma fusion gene identification, replacing multiple individual clinical assays. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Detection of EML4-ALK fusion genes in a few cancer cells from transbronchial cytological specimens utilizing immediate cytology during bronchoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaji, Nobuhiro; Bandoh, Shuji; Ishii, Tomoya; Tadokoro, Akira; Watanabe, Naoki; Takahama, Takayuki; Haba, Reiji; Imataki, Osamu; Dobashi, Hiroaki; Matsunaga, Takuya

    2012-08-01

    The presence of fusion genes between the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) and echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4) genes is useful for determining appropriate molecular-targeted therapies in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The diagnosis of NSCLC is often judged from transbronchial cytological specimens. The efficacy of RT-PCR for detection of EML4-ALK fusion genes in transbronchial cytological specimens has not been studied. Here, we evaluated the detection rate of EML4-ALK fusion genes in transbronchial cytological specimens positive for NSCLC by immediate cytology during bronchoscopic examination. Various numbers of H2228 cells carrying EML4-ALK variant 3 were combined with 1×10(6) wild-type WBCs. The RNA was extracted and the sensitivity of detection of the EML4-ALK fusion gene was determined using a nested RT-PCR. A total of 161 cell samples, from cases without available tissue samples, obtained by bronchoscopic examinations utilized for immediate cytology in patients with NSCLC were subsequently analyzed for EML4-ALK fusion genes using a nested multiplex RT-PCR. EML4-ALK variant 3 was detected in a small number of H2228 cells (10 cells), even in the presence of 1×10(6) WBCs (sensitivity: 0.001%). In the patient cytological samples, EML4-ALK fusion genes were detected in five of 161 NSCLCs (3.1%) and four of 88 adenocarcinomas (4.5%). Sequencing confirmed that these samples included three variant 1 genes, one variant 2 gene and one variant 3 gene. Using the same cytological samples, EGFR mutations were detected in 39 of 161 NSCLCs (24.2%) and 36 of 88 adenocarcinomas (40.9%). There was no case in which both EML4-ALK fusion and EGFR mutation were simultaneously detected. Rapid diagnosis during bronchoscopy utilizing immediate cytology contributed to the selection of the best samples for genetic analysis. EML4-ALK fusion genes as well as EGFR mutations were successfully detected in a small number of cancer cells from

  15. CRISPR/Cas9 Engineering of Adult Mouse Liver Demonstrates That the Dnajb1-Prkaca Gene Fusion is Sufficient to Induce Tumors Resembling Fibrolamellar Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelholm, Lars H; Riaz, Anjum; Serra, Denise

    2017-01-01

    to create a Dnajb1-Prkaca fusion and monitored the mice for liver tumor development. METHODS: We delivered CRISPR/Cas9 vectors designed to juxtapose exon 1 of Dnajb1 with exon 2 of Prkaca to create the Dnajb1-Prkaca gene fusion associated with FL-HCC, or control Cas9 vector, via hydrodynamic tail vein...... injection to livers of 8 week-old female FVB/N mice. These mice did not have any other engineered genetic alterations and were not exposed to liver toxins or carcinogens. Liver tissues were collected 14 months after delivery; genomic DNA was analyzed by PCR to detect the Dnajb1-Prkaca fusion, and tissues...... were characterized by histology, immunohistochemistry, RNA sequencing, and whole-exome sequencing. RESULTS: Livers from 12 of the 15 mice given the vectors to induce the Dnajb1-Prkaca gene fusion, but none of the 11 mice given the control vector, developed neoplasms. The tumors contained the Dnajb1...

  16. Anti-tumour research of recombinant BCG using BZLF1 and hGM-CSF fusion genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Qing-Jie; Li, Yun-Qing; Yang, Chun-Qing; Chen, Ting; Li, Xiu-Zhen; Cheng, Baohua; Wang, Chun-Mei

    2017-03-14

    The random primer Oligo(dT) 15 was used in RT-PCR to obtain cDNA from the human granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (hGM-CSF) gene and the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) gene BZLF1. Then, the sequence splicing overlap extension method was used to obtain a GCBF fusion gene containing a linker sequence that encoded the polypeptide (Gly 4 Ser) 3 . The GCBF fusion gene was inserted into pMV261, which was then transformed into competent E. coli DH5 alpha cells, and positive cells were selected based on kanamycin resistance on LB plates. The recombinant plasmid pMVBZLF1 was extracted from E. coli, and BCG (Bacillus Calmette-Guérin) was transformed into competent cells. According to the RT-PCR results, the target genes hGM-CSF and BZLF1 were 461bp and 788bp in size, which was in agreement with the expected values. Construction of the recombinant plasmid by double enzyme digestion, amplification, sequencing and Western blotting confirmed that the GCBF fusion gene (1204bp) was correctly inserted into pMV261, successfully transformed into BCG competent cells, and properly expressed. After mice were injected with rBCG (recombinant BCG), antibody levels were detected using ELISA, and spleen cells were obtained and the killing rates of specific CTLs by rBCG were detected using a CTL assay kit. Then, the influence of rBCG on tumour cells was analysed in C57BL/6 mice. We found that rBCG-secreting cytokines hybridized with hGM-CSF and BZLF1 antibodies and that the rBCG vaccine stimulated antibody production in C57BL/6 mice. The specific cytotoxic effects of the spleen cells from the rBCG group on EB virus-positive tumour cells was significantly different from the cytotoxic effects of the control group cells (P<0.01). CD8 + T and CD4 + T lymphocytes were detected in the tumour tissues of the rBCG group mice by flow cytometry, indicating that CD8 + T and CD4 + T lymphocytes infiltrated into the tumour tissue in the mice. Morphological observations of the tumour sections from

  17. Analysis of a MULE-cyanide hydratase gene fusion in Verticillium dahliae

    Science.gov (United States)

    The genome of the phytopathogenic fungus Verticillium dahliae encodes numerous Class II “cut-and-paste” transposable elements, including those of a small group of MULE transposons. We have previously identified a fusion event between a MULE transposon sequence and sequence encoding a cyanide hydrata...

  18. MYB-NFIB gene fusion in adenoid cystic carcinoma of the breast with special focus paid to the solid variant with basaloid features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alfonso, Timothy M; Mosquera, Juan Miguel; MacDonald, Theresa Y; Padilla, Jessica; Liu, Yi-Fang; Rubin, Mark A; Shin, Sandra J

    2014-11-01

    Adenoid cystic carcinomas (ACCs) from various anatomical sites harbor a translocation t(6;9)(q22-23;p23-24), resulting in MYB-NFIB gene fusion. This gene fusion is not well studied in mammary ACCs, and there are no studies examining this abnormality in solid variant of ACC with basaloid features (SBACC), a high-grade variant thought to behave more aggressively than ACCs with conventional histologic growth. Our aim was to investigate the frequency of MYB-NFIB gene fusion in mammary ACCs with a focus paid to SBACC. MYB rearrangement and MYB-NFIB fusion were assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridization and reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, respectively. Histologic features and the presence of MYB rearrangement were correlated with clinical outcome. MYB rearrangement was present in 7 (22.6%) of 31 mammary ACCs (5/15 [33.3%] ACCs with conventional growth; 2/16 [12.5%] SBACCs). One patient with conventional ACC developed distant metastasis, and no patients had axillary lymph node involvement by ACC (mean follow-up, 34 months; range, 12-84 months). Two patients with SBACC had axillary lymph node involvement at initial surgery, and 2 additional patients experienced disease recurrence (1 local, 1 distant; mean follow-up, 50 months; range, 9-192 months). MYB-NFIB fusion status did not correlate with clinical outcome in studied patients. We confirm that MYB-NFIB gene fusion is observed in mammary ACCs and that a subset lacks this abnormality. This study is the first to confirm the presence of MYB rearrangement in SBACC. Additional validation with long-term follow-up is needed to determine the relationship, if any, between MYB-NFIB gene fusion and clinical outcome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Identification of Novel Variant of EML4-ALK Fusion Gene in NSCLC: Potential Benefits of the RT-PCR Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maus, Martin K. H.; Stephens, Craig; Zeger, Gary; Grimminger, Peter P.; Huang, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Background: The discovery of the transforming fusion gene of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) with the echinoderm microtubule-associated protein like 4 (EML4) as an oncogene in 2007 has led to its validation as a clinical target in NSCLC patients in a short period of time. The inhibition of the anaplastic lymphoma receptor tyrosine kinase has demonstrated to prolong progression-free survival compared to the standard of care chemotherapy in patients with advanced NSCLC that are ALK positive. However, the clinical implications of the 15 different variants of the EML4-ALK transforming gene described so far are currently not defined. Here we present a novel variant of the EML4-ALK fusion gene which we named variant 3c. Methods: RNA extracted from formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) specimens from patients with advanced and metastatic NSCLC was amplified, using primers and probes designed to detect specific EML4-ALK fusion gene fragments. Gel electrophoresis showed a different band for the new variant 3c compared to the known bands of positive cell lines for variant 3a and 3b. These findings were further investigated by dye-terminator Sequencing and FISH. Results: The novel variant, detected in two NSCLC specimens, is longer than v3a and shorter than v3b, representing an 18 base pair insertion of intron 19 of ALK between exon 6 of EML4 and exon 20 of ALK. All of the two samples showed exactly the same sequencing result. One of the samples was negative for FISH break apart testing and the other one showed a positive result, defined by ≥15% split nuclei as indicative of an ALK rearrangement. Conclusions: Compared to FISH technology, RT-PCR enables the detection of different isoforms of the EML4-ALK transforming gene, which can be validated by sequencing. Only one out of two samples that were positive for the new variant by RT-PCR could be confirmed by FISH. The clinical significance of the different variants, notably to resistance and response to ALK

  20. Percutaneous unilateral biliary metallic stent placement in patients with malignant obstruction of the biliary hila and contralateral portal vein steno-occlusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Rak Chae; Gwon, Dong Il; Ko, Heung Kyu; Kim, Jong Woo; Ko, Gi Young [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    To investigate the outcomes of percutaneous unilateral metallic stent placement in patients with a malignant obstruction of the biliary hila and a contralateral portal vein steno-occlusion. Sixty patients with a malignant hilar obstruction and unilobar portal vein steno-occlusion caused by tumor invasion or preoperative portal vein embolization were enrolled in this retrospective study from October 2010 to October 2013. All patients were treated with percutaneous placement of a biliary metallic stent, including expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE)-covered stents in 27 patients and uncovered stents in 33 patients. A total of 70 stents were successfully placed in 60 patients. Procedural-related minor complications, including self-limiting hemobilia (n = 2) and cholangitis (n = 4) occurred in six (10%) patients. Acute cholecystitis occurred in two patients. Successful internal drainage was achieved in 54 (90%) of the 60 patients. According to a Kaplan-Meier analysis, median survival time was 210 days (95% confidence interval [CI], 135-284 days), and median stent patency time was 133 days (95% CI, 94-171 days). No significant difference in stent patency was observed between covered and uncovered stents (p = 0.646). Stent dysfunction occurred in 16 (29.6%) of 54 patients after a mean of 159 days (range, 65-321 days). Unilateral placement of ePTFE-covered and uncovered stents in the hepatic lobe with a patent portal vein is a safe and effective method for palliative treatment of patients with a contralateral portal vein steno-occlusion caused by an advanced hilar malignancy or portal vein embolization. No significant difference in stent patency was detected between covered and uncovered metallic stents.

  1. Biosensing of BCR/ABL fusion gene using an intensity-interrogation surface plasmon resonance imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiangling; Huang, Yu; Bian, Xintong; Li, DanDan; Cheng, Quan; Ding, Shijia

    2016-10-01

    In this work, a custom-made intensity-interrogation surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) system has been developed to directly detect a specific sequence of BCR/ABL fusion gene in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). The variation in the reflected light intensity detected from the sensor chip composed of gold islands array is proportional to the change of refractive index due to the selective hybridization of surface-bound DNA probes with target ssDNA. SPRi measurements were performed with different concentrations of synthetic target DNA sequence. The calibration curve of synthetic target sequence shows a good relationship between the concentration of synthetic target and the change of reflected light intensity. The detection limit of this SPRi measurement could approach 10.29 nM. By comparing SPRi images, the target ssDNA and non-complementary DNA sequence are able to be distinguished. This SPRi system has been applied for assay of BCR/ABL fusion gene extracted from real samples. This nucleic acid-based SPRi biosensor therefore offers an alternative high-effective, high-throughput label-free tool for DNA detection in biomedical research and molecular diagnosis.

  2. FGFR3-TACC3 cancer gene fusions cause mitotic defects by removal of endogenous TACC3 from the mitotic spindle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Sourav; Ryan, Ellis L; Royle, Stephen J

    2017-08-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor 3-transforming acidic coiled-coil containing protein 3 (FGFR3-TACC3; FT3) is a gene fusion resulting from rearrangement of chromosome 4 that has been identified in many cancers including those of the urinary bladder. Altered FGFR3 signalling in FT3-positive cells is thought to contribute to cancer progression. However, potential changes in TACC3 function in these cells have not been explored. TACC3 is a mitotic spindle protein required for accurate chromosome segregation. Errors in segregation lead to aneuploidy, which can contribute to cancer progression. Here we show that FT3-positive bladder cancer cells have lower levels of endogenous TACC3 on the mitotic spindle, and that this is sufficient to cause mitotic defects. FT3 is not localized to the mitotic spindle, and by virtue of its TACC domain, recruits endogenous TACC3 away from the spindle. Knockdown of the fusion gene or low-level overexpression of TACC3 partially rescues the chromosome segregation defects in FT3-positive bladder cancer cells. This function of FT3 is specific to TACC3 as inhibition of FGFR3 signalling does not rescue the TACC3 level on the spindle in these cancer cells. Models of FT3-mediated carcinogenesis should, therefore, include altered mitotic functions of TACC3 as well as altered FGFR3 signalling. © 2017 The Authors.

  3. Heterogeneous patterns of amplification of the NUP214-ABL1 fusion gene in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graux, C; Stevens-Kroef, M; Lafage, M; Dastugue, N; Harrison, C J; Mugneret, F; Bahloula, K; Struski, S; Grégoire, M J; Nadal, N; Lippert, E; Taviaux, S; Simons, A; Kuiper, R P; Moorman, A V; Barber, K; Bosly, A; Michaux, L; Vandenberghe, P; Lahortiga, I; De Keersmaecker, K; Wlodarska, I; Cools, J; Hagemeijer, A; Poirel, H A

    2009-01-01

    Episomes with the NUP214-ABL1 fusion gene have been observed in 6% of T-ALL. In this multicentric study we collected 27 cases of NUP214-ABL1-positive T-ALL. Median age was 15 years with male predominance. Outcome was poor in 12 patients. An associated abnormality involving TLX1 or TLX3 was found in all investigated cases. Fluorescent in situ hybridization revealed a heterogeneous pattern of NUP214-ABL1 amplification. Multiple episomes carrying the fusion were detected in 24 patients. Episomes were observed in a significant number of nuclei in 18 cases, but in only 1-5% of nuclei in 6. In addition, intrachromosomal amplification (small hsr) was identified either as the only change or in association with episomes in four cases and two T-ALL cell lines (PEER and ALL-SIL). One case showed insertion of apparently non-amplified NUP214-ABL1 sequences at 14q12. The amplified sequences were analyzed using array-based CGH.These findings confirm that the NUP214-ABL1 gene requires amplification for oncogenicity; it is part of a multistep process of leukemogenesis; and it can be a late event present only in subpopulations. Data also provide in vivo evidence for a model of episome formation, amplification and optional reintegration into the genome. Implications for the use of kinase inhibitors are discussed.

  4. Sclerosing epithelioid fibrosarcoma presenting as intraabdominal sarcomatosis with a novel EWSR1-CREB3L1 gene fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockman, David L; Ali, Siraj M; He, Jie; Ross, Jeffrey S; Meis, Jeanne M

    2014-10-01

    We report a case of intraabdominal sclerosing epithelioid fibrosarcoma (SEF) with a t (11;22)(p11.2;q12.2) Ewing sarcoma breakpoint region 1-cAMP-responsive element-binding protein 3-like 1 translocation. A 43-year old man presented with massive ascites and shortness of breath. Imaging studies revealed a large mesenteric-based mass with extensive omental/peritoneal disease. After resection and cytoreductive surgery, the tumor recurred with metastasis to the lungs; the patient is still alive with disease. Histologically, there was a uniform population of epithelioid cells arranged in cords and nests, embedded in a dense collagenous matrix; no areas of low-grade fibromyxoid sarcoma were identified. All immunohistochemical markers were nonreactive. Fluorescence in situ hybridization studies showed rearrangement of Ewing sarcoma breakpoint region 1. Genomic profiling by clinical grade next-generation sequencing revealed a fusion gene between intron 11 of Ewing sarcoma breakpoint region 1 (22q12.2) and intron 5 of cAMP-responsive element-binding protein 3-like 1 (11p11.2). This is the first report of "pure" or true SEF presenting as intraabdominal sarcomatosis with confirmation of the recently described unique Ewing sarcoma breakpoint region 1-cAMP-responsive element-binding protein 3-like 1 gene fusion in SEF without areas of low-grade fibromyxoid sarcoma. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Mect1-Maml2 fusion oncogene linked to the aberrant activation of cyclic AMP/CREB regulated genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coxon, Amy; Rozenblum, Ester; Park, Yoon-Soo; Joshi, Nina; Tsurutani, Junji; Dennis, Phillip A; Kirsch, Ilan R; Kaye, Frederic J

    2005-08-15

    Malignant salivary gland tumors can arise from a t(11;19) translocation that fuses 42 residues from Mect1/Torc1, a cyclic AMP (cAMP)/cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB)-dependent transcriptional coactivator, with 982 residues from Maml2, a NOTCH receptor coactivator. To determine if the Mect1-Maml2 fusion oncogene mediates tumorigenicity by disrupting cAMP/CREB signaling, we have generated in-frame deletions within the CREB-binding domain of Mect1/Torc1 for testing transformation activity and have also developed a doxycycline-regulated Mect1-Maml2 mammalian expression vector for global gene expression profiling. We observed that small deletions within the CREB-binding domain completely abolished transforming activity in RK3E epithelial cells. Further, we have shown that the ectopic induction of Mect1-Maml2 in HeLa cells strongly activated the expression of a group of known cAMP/CREB-regulated genes. In addition, we detected candidate cAMP-responsive element sites within 100 nucleotides of the transcriptional start sites of other genes activated by Mect1-Maml2 expression. In contrast, we did not observe alterations of known Notch-regulated target genes in these expression array profile experiments. We validated the results by reverse transcription-PCR in transfected HeLa, RK3E, and H2009 lung tumor cells and in mucoepidermoid cancer cells that endogenously express the fusion oncopeptide. Whereas overexpression of components of the cAMP pathway has been associated with a subset of human carcinomas, these data provide a direct genetic link between deregulation of cAMP/CREB pathways and epithelial tumorigenesis and suggest future therapeutic strategies for this group of salivary gland tumors.

  6. Identification of cancer fusion drivers using network fusion centrality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chia-Chin; Kannan, Kalpana; Lin, Steven; Yen, Laising; Milosavljevic, Aleksandar

    2013-01-01

    Summary: Gene fusions are being discovered at an increasing rate using massively parallel sequencing technologies. Prioritization of cancer fusion drivers for validation cannot be performed using traditional single-gene based methods because fusions involve portions of two partner genes. To address this problem, we propose a novel network analysis method called fusion centrality that is specifically tailored for prioritizing gene fusions. We first propose a domain-based fusion model built on the theory of exon/domain shuffling. The model leads to a hypothesis that a fusion is more likely to be an oncogenic driver if its partner genes act like hubs in a network because the fusion mutation can deregulate normal functions of many other genes and their pathways. The hypothesis is supported by the observation that for most known cancer fusion genes, at least one of the fusion partners appears to be a hub in a network, and even for many fusions both partners appear to be hubs. Based on this model, we construct fusion centrality, a multi-gene-based network metric, and use it to score fusion drivers. We show that the fusion centrality outperforms other single gene-based methods. Specifically, the method successfully predicts most of 38 newly discovered fusions that had validated oncogenic importance. To our best knowledge, this is the first network-based approach for identifying fusion drivers. Availability: Matlab code implementing the fusion centrality method is available upon request from the corresponding authors. Contact: perwu777@gmail.com Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:23505294

  7. Imaging of dihydrofolate reductase fusion gene expression in xenografts of human liver metastases of colorectal cancer in living rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer-Kuckuk, Philipp; Bertino, Joseph R.; Banerjee, Debabrata [Molecular Pharmacology and Therapeutics Program, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); The Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School/UMDNJ, 195 Little Albany Street, NJ 08903, New Brunswick (United States); Doubrovin, Mikhail; Blasberg, Ronald; Tjuvajev, Juri Gelovani [Department of Neurooncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Gusani, Niraj J.; Fong, Yuman [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Gade, Terence; Koutcher, Jason A. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Balatoni, Julius; Finn, Ronald [Radiochemistry/Cyclotron Core Facility, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Akhurst, Tim; Larson, Steven [Nuclear Medicine Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2003-09-01

    Radionuclide imaging has been demonstrated to be feasible to monitor transgene expression in vivo. We hypothesized that a potential application of this technique is to non-invasively detect in deep tissue, such as cancer cells metastatic to the liver, a specific molecular response following systemic drug treatment. Utilizing human colon adenocarcinoma cells derived from a patient's liver lesion we first developed a nude rat xenograft model for colorectal cancer metastatic to the liver. Expression of a dihydrofolate reductase-herpes simplex virus 1 thymidine kinase fusion (DHFR-HSV1 TK) transgene in the hepatic tumors was monitored in individual animals using the tracer [{sup 124}I]2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-5-iodouracil-{beta}-d-arabinofuranoside (FIAU) and a small animal micro positron emission tomograph (microPET), while groups of rats were imaged using the tracer [{sup 131}I]FIAU and a clinical gamma camera. Growth of the human metastatic colorectal cancer cells in the rat liver was detected using magnetic resonance imaging and confirmed by surgical inspection. Single as well as multiple lesions of different sizes and sites were observed in the liver of the animals. Next, using a subset of rats bearing hepatic tumors, which were retrovirally bulk transduced to express the DHFR-HSV1 TK transgene, we imaged the fusion protein expression in the hepatic tumor of living rats using the tracer [{sup 124}I]FIAU and a microPET. The observed deep tissue signals were highly specific for the tumors expressing the DHFR-HSV1 TK fusion protein compared with parental untransduced tumors and other tissues as determined by gamma counting of tissue samples. A subsequent study used the tracer [{sup 131}I]FIAU and a gamma camera to monitor two groups of transduced hepatic tumor-bearing rats. Prior to imaging, one group was treated with trimetrexate to exploit DHFR-mediated upregulation of the fusion gene product. Imaging in the living animal as well as subsequent gamma

  8. Hyperglycemia Promotes TMPRSS2-ERG Gene Fusion in Prostate Cancer Cells via Upregulating Insulin-Like Growth Factor-Binding Protein-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeff M. P. Holly

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundEpidemiologic evidence shows that obesity is associated with a greater risk of aggressive prostate cancer (PCa and PCa-specific mortality and this is observed mainly in men with the TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion. Obesity is often associated with comorbid conditions such as type 2 diabetes and hyperglycemia: we investigated whether some of the exposures associated with disturbed metabolism can also affect the frequency of this gene fusion.MethodsFusion was induced in LNCaP PCa cells in normal or high levels of glucose, with or without insulin-like growth factor binding protein-2 (IGFBP-2 silenced or the presence of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-I, insulin, or epidermal growth factor (EGF. RNA was extracted for analysis by nested PCR. Abundance of IGFBP-2, γH2AX, DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNAPKcs, and β-actin were analyzed by Western immunoblotting.ResultsOur data suggest that hyperglycemia-induced IGFBP-2 increased the frequency of the gene fusion that was accompanied by decreased levels of DNAPKcs implying that they were mediated by alterations in the rate of repair of double-strand breaks. In contrast insulin, IGF-I and EGF all decreased gene fusion events.ConclusionThese novel observations may represent a further mechanism by which obesity can exert an effect aggravating PCa progression.

  9. LAMTOR1-PRKCD and NUMA1-SFMBT1 fusion genes identified by RNA sequencing in aneurysmal benign fibrous histiocytoma with t(3;11)(p21;q13).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagopoulos, Ioannis; Gorunova, Ludmila; Bjerkehagen, Bodil; Lobmaier, Ingvild; Heim, Sverre

    2015-11-01

    RNA sequencing of an aneurysmal benign fibrous histiocytoma with the karyotype 46,XY,t(3;11)(p21;q13),del(6)(p23)[17]/46,XY[2] showed that the t(3;11) generated two fusion genes: LAMTOR1-PRKCD and NUMA1-SFMBT1. RT-PCR together with Sanger sequencing verified the presence of fusion transcripts from both fusion genes. In the LAMTOR1-PRKCD fusion, the part of the PRKCD gene coding for the catalytic domain of the serine/threonine kinase is under control of the LAMTOR1 promoter. In the NUMA1-SFMBT1 fusion, the part of the SFMBT1 gene coding for two of four malignant brain tumor domains and the sterile alpha motif domain is controlled by the NUMA1 promoter. The data support a neoplastic genesis of aneurysmal benign fibrous histiocytoma and indicate a pathogenetic role for LAMTOR1-PRKCD and NUMA1-SFMBT1. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Translocation t(6;9) in acute non-lymphocytic leukaemia results in the formation of a DEK-CAN fusion gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    von Lindern, M.; Fornerod, M.; Soekarman, N.; van Baal, S.; Jaegle, M.; Hagemeijer, A.; Bootsma, D.; Grosveld, G.

    1992-01-01

    The t(6;9) that characterizes a specific subtype of ANLL fuses the 3' part of a gene located on chromosome 9q34, CAN, to the 5' part of a gene located on chromosome 6p23, DEK. On the 6p- chromosome, the resulting DEK-CAN fusion gene is transcribed into a leukaemia-specific 5.5 kb chimaeric mRNA that

  11. [Construction of genetically modified dendritic cell vaccine expressing bcr/abl fusion gene and inducing specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes to kill K562 cells in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Wen; Huang, Ren-Wei; Hu, Yuan; Li, Xu-Dong; Wang, Dong-Ning; He, Yi; Liu, Jia-Jun

    2009-06-01

    Specific immunological effect mediated by T lymphocytes plays an important role in treating chronic myelocytic leukemia (CML). Dendritic cells (DCs)-based immunotherapy has become popular in treating tumors. This study was to construct DC vaccines by transducing with replication-defective recombinant adenoviruses expressing bcr/abl fusion gene of CML, observe the lethal effects of specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) triggered by genetically modified DC vaccines expressing bcr/abl fusion gene against K562 cells in vitro. DNA fragment of bcr/abl fusion gene was amplified by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to construct a recombinant adenovirus vector and produce recombinant adenoviruses. DCs were induced from peripheral blood monocytes in vitro, and transfected with recombinant adenoviruses or pulsed with peptide to induce specific CTLs. The lethal effect of CTLs against leukemic K562 cells in vitro was observed. We successfully constructed the replication-defective recombinant adenoviral vector expressing bcr/abl fusion gene. The recombinant adenoviruses we produced had a high virus titer of 2.0 x 10(10) pfu/mL. Transfection efficiency of DCs in vitro was 50%-60%. DC vaccines expressing bcr/abl fusion gene were successfully prepared and used to induce specific CTLs. With effector:target cell ratios of 40:1 and 20:1, the killing rates of K562 cells by CTLs were (47.6+/-4.7)% and (47.5+/-1.6)% in genetically modified DCs group, (25.8+/-4.4)% and (24.6+/-6.3)% in peptide-pulsed DCs group, and were (5.7+/-1.3)% and (4.5+/-1.6)% in control DCs group. The differences between every two groups were significant (all P<0.05). Genetically modified DC vaccine expressing bcr/abl fusion gene has a stronger contribution than peptide-pulsed DCs in triggering specific CTLs against K562 cells.

  12. [Transformation activity and antigenicity of the human papillomavirus type 58 E6E7 fusion gene mutant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, He; Yu, Ji-yun; Li, Li

    2013-07-01

    To develop a prophylactic and therapeutic vaccine against human papillomavirus (HPV) type 58-associated cervical carcinoma, and explore its transformation activity and antigenicity. The E6 and E7 three amino acid codons in the HPV 58 virus were modified respectively and fused. The modified and fused gene was named HPV58 mE6E7. The recombinant HPV58 mE6E7 gene was inserted into pIRES-neo vector to generate plasmid pIRES-neo-HPV58 mE6E7. Then NIH/3T3 cell line was transfected with plasmid pIRES-neo-HPV58 mE6E7. The pIRES-neo-HPV58 mE6E7-transfected cells were the experimental group, pIRES-neo-HPV58 E6E7-transfected cells were the positive control group, and pIRES-neo empty vector-transfected cells were the negative control group. The expression of HPV58 mE6E7 protein in the experimental cells was detected by flow cytometry, immunofluorescence and Western blot. The transformation activity of HPV58 mE6E7 was tested by soft agar colony formation assay and subcutaneously tumors in nude mice. Finally, DNA vaccine was constructed with HPV58 mE6E7 fusion antigen and used to immunize C57BL/6 mice with the vaccine plasmids. The specific serum antibodies were detected by EIISA, and the number of splenic specific CD8(+) T cells secreting IFN-γ of the immunized mice was detected by ELISPOT assay. Sequencing confirmed the expected mutation and a 100% homogeneity of the HPV58 E6E7 fusion gene. Stable transfected NIH/3T3 cells expressing HPV58 mE6E7 and HPV58 E6E7 gene were 70.3% and 84.1%, respectively. The relative expressions of HPV58 mE6E7 and HPV58 E6E7 fusion protein in 3T3-HPV58 mE6E7 experimental cells and 3T3-HPV58 E6E7 positive control cells were 2.1 ± 1.7 and 3.8 ± 1.4, respectively, and were negative in the negative control group. No colony formation was found in the experimental and 3T3-neo negative control cell groups, and 31 colonies were found in the positive control cell group, among them 10 colonies were consisted of more than 50 cells. No tumor mass was formed

  13. Development of GFP fusions for examination of the effects of the space environment on gene expression in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancinelli, R.; Fahlen, T.

    The goal of the In situ Space Gene Expression on Nano-satillites (ISGEN) program is to be ready to fly technology that can support a fully automated experiment to quantify changes in model organisms in situ in low earth orbit in a free flyer platform in less than two years. A straightforward gene expression assay that meets the ISGEN flight objective for testing flight hardware as well as return data regarding the effects of microgravity on gene expression has been developed. Escherichia coli K-12, a bacterium that exhibits changes in its growth pattern when flown in micro-gravity on the Space Shuttle, was used. The scientific objective of this work is to determine if there is a discernable change in metabolic and stress pathway gene expression due to growth in the space environment. To that end, we have linked the green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gfp to phoP, a gene that responds to extracellular Mg2+ levels, and pykF, a gene involved in the glycolytic pathway that responds to changes in intracellular pyruvate. These genes respond to the metabolic needs of the cell and may be altered in the micro-gravity environment. E. coli cells containing a plasmid encoding the phoP-gfp-mut3 reporter construct were grown with or without MgSO_4. The effect of the added MgSO_4 is the repression of the expression of GFP. This is the expected result if GFP expression were under the control of a magnesium-regulated promoter such as phoP. Consistent with the negative feedback loop, we observe repression of GFP production in cells containing our pykF-gfp plasmid construct, when grown in the presence of excess glucose. Thus, the pykF-gfp fusion functions as a glucose sensor.

  14. Translational coupling in Escherichia coli of a heterologous Bacillus subtilis-Escherichia coli gene fusion.

    OpenAIRE

    Zaghloul, T I; Doi, R H

    1986-01-01

    The efficient expression in Escherichia coli of the Tn9-derived chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (EC 2.3.1.28) gene fused distal to the promoter and N terminus of the Bacillus subtilis aprA gene was dependent on the initiation of translation from the ribosome-binding site in the aprA gene.

  15. CRISPR/Cas9 Engineering of Adult Mouse Liver Demonstrates That the Dnajb1-Prkaca Gene Fusion is Sufficient to Induce Tumors Resembling Fibrolamellar Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelholm, Lars H; Riaz, Anjum; Serra, Denise

    2017-01-01

    Background & Aims Fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma (FL-HCC) is a primary liver cancer that predominantly affects children and young adults with no underlying liver disease. A somatic, 400 Kb deletion on chromosome 19 that fuses part of the DnaJ heat shock protein family (Hsp40) member B1 gene...... (DNAJB1) to the protein kinase cAMP-activated catalytic subunit alpha gene (PRKACA) has been repeatedly identified in patients with FL-HCC. However, the DNAJB1–PRKACA gene fusion has not been shown to induce liver tumorigenesis. We used the CRISPR/Cas9 technique to delete in mice the syntenic region......–Prkaca gene fusion and had histologic and cytologic features of human FL-HCCs: large polygonal cells with granular, eosinophilic, and mitochondria-rich cytoplasm, prominent nucleoli, and markers of hepatocytes and cholangiocytes. In comparing expression levels of genes between the mouse tumor and non...

  16. CRISPR/Cas9 Engineering of Adult Mouse Liver Demonstrates That the Dnajb1-Prkaca Gene Fusion is Sufficient to Induce Tumors Resembling Fibrolamellar Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelholm, Lars H; Riaz, Anjum; Serra, Denise

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma (FL-HCC) is a primary liver cancer that predominantly affects young adults with no underlying liver disease. A somatic, 400 Kb deletion on chromosome 19 that fuses part of the DnaJ heat shock protein family (Hsp40) member B1 gene (DNAJB1......) to the protein kinase cAMP-activated catalytic subunit alpha gene (PRKACA) has been repeatedly identified in patients with FL-HCC. However, the DNAJB1-PRKACA gene fusion has not been shown to induce liver tumorigenesis. We used the CRISPR/Cas9 technique to delete in mice the syntenic region on chromosome 8......-Prkaca gene fusion and had histologic and cytologic features of human FL-HCCs: large polygonal cells with granular, eosinophilic, and mitochondria-rich cytoplasm, prominent nucleoli, and markers of hepatocytes and cholangiocytes. In comparing expression levels of genes between the mouse tumor and non...

  17. Celastrol suppresses tumor cell growth through targeting an AR-ERG-NF-κB pathway in TMPRSS2/ERG fusion gene expressing prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longjiang Shao

    Full Text Available The TMPRSS2/ERG (T/E fusion gene is present in the majority of all prostate cancers (PCa. We have shown previously that NF-kB signaling is highly activated in these T/E fusion expressing cells via phosphorylation of NF-kB p65 Ser536 (p536. We therefore hypothesize that targeting NF-kB signaling may be an efficacious approach for the subgroup of PCas that carry T/E fusions. Celastrol is a well known NF-kB inhibitor, and thus may inhibit T/E fusion expressing PCa cell growth. We therefore evaluated Celastrol's effects in vitro and in vivo in VCaP cells, which express the T/E fusion gene. VCaP cells were treated with different concentrations of Celastrol and growth inhibition and target expression were evaluated. To test its ability to inhibit growth in vivo, 0.5 mg/kg Celastrol was used to treat mice bearing subcutaneous VCaP xenograft tumors. Our results show Celastrol can significantly inhibit the growth of T/E fusion expressing PCa cells both in vitro and in vivo through targeting three critical signaling pathways: AR, ERG and NF-kB in these cells. When mice received 0.5 mg/kg Celastrol for 4 times/week, significant growth inhibition was seen with no obvious toxicity or significant weight loss. Therefore, Celastrol is a promising candidate drug for T/E fusion expressing PCa. Our findings provide a novel strategy for the targeted therapy which may benefit the more than half of PCa patients who have T/E fusion expressing PCas.

  18. Detection of EML4-ALK fusion genes in non-small cell lung cancer patients with clinical features associated with EGFR mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaozhang, Zhou; Xiaomei, Lin; Aiping, Zeng; Jianbo, He; Xiangqun, Song; Qitao, Yu

    2012-10-01

    EML4-ALK fusion genes have been recognized as novel "driver mutations" in a small subset of non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC). The frequency of EML4-ALK fusions in NSCLC patients who have clinical characteristics related to EGFR mutation remains unknown. We screened 102 Chinese patients with NSCLC based on one or more of the following characteristics: female, no or light smoking history, and adenocarcinoma histology. EML4-ALK fusion genes were identified by RT-PCR, whereas EGFR (Exons 18-21) and KRAS (Exons 1 and 2) mutations were detected by DNA sequencing. Eight specimens (8%) were positive for EML4-ALK fusions, with seven being Variant 1 and one Variant 2. There were 44 (43%) and 17 (16%) patients harboring EGFR and KRAS mutations, respectively. Thirty-one (31%) cases were wild type for EML4-ALK, EGFR, and KRAS mutations. Of the eight patients with EML4-ALK, none had an EGFR mutation, whereas a KRAS mutation was detected in one patient. Histologically, five of the EML4-ALK positive tumors were adenocarcinoma and two were mixed adenosquamous carcinoma; only one was a squamous carcinoma. Our data support the conclusion that the EML4-ALK fusion gene defines a new molecular subset of NSCLC with distinct pathologic features. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Diagnosis of extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma in the thigh using EWSR1-NR4A3 gene fusion: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Hiroki; Kikuta, Kazutaka; Sekita, Tetsuya; Susa, Michiro; Nishimoto, Kazumasa; Sasaki, Aya; Kameyama, Kaori; Sugita, Shintaro; Hasegawa, Tadashi; Nakamura, Masaya; Matsumoto, Morio; Morioka, Hideo

    2016-11-10

    Extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma is a rare soft tissue sarcoma that has unusual ultrastructural and molecular features. However, unlike other soft tissue sarcomas, it does not have specific clinical symptoms or radiological features, which can make its diagnosis difficult. Nevertheless, extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma has a rare gene fusion (EWSR1-NR4A3) that is useful for making a differential diagnosis. A 43-year-old Japanese man presented with a soft tissue mass in his right thigh. A physical examination and radiography revealed a large soft tissue mass. During magnetic resonance imaging, the mass exhibited isointensity on T1-weighted images and high intensity on T2-weighted images, as well as gadolinium enhancement at the side edge of the partition structure. Thus, we considered a possible diagnosis of a malignant myxoid soft tissue tumor, such as myxoid liposarcoma, myxofibrosarcoma, or metastatic carcinomas, including myoepithelial tumor and neuroendocrine tumor, and performed an incisional biopsy to make a definitive diagnosis. The pathological findings revealed a lobulated tumor with a myxoid structure and atypical spindle-shaped cells that created eosinophilic cord-like forms. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the tumor was positive for S-100 and negative for synaptophysin, chromogranin A, and pan keratin (AE1/AE3). The percentage of Ki-67 was 10 % in the hot spot area. Based on these clinicopathological findings, we initially considered the possibility of a myxoid liposarcoma, although we did not observe any lipoblasts. Therefore, we considered the possibility of an extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma. As this tumor is very rare, we searched for the EWSR1-NR4A3 gene fusion using fluorescence in situ hybridization, which confirmed the diagnosis of extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography did not identify any obvious metastases, and we performed radical resection of our patient's vastus medialis and

  20. Spinal fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Low back pain - fusion; Herniated disk - fusion; Spinal stenosis - fusion; Laminectomy - fusion ... be done: With other surgical procedures for spinal stenosis , such as foraminotomy or laminectomy After diskectomy in ...

  1. Expression pattern of the septin gene family in acute myeloid leukemias with and without MLL-SEPT fusion genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santos, Joana; Cerveira, Nuno; Bizarro, Susana; Ribeiro, Franclim R.; Correia, Cecília; Torres, Lurdes; Lisboa, Susana; Vieira, Joana; Mariz, José M.; Norton, Lucília; Snijder, Simone; Mellink, Clemens H.; Buijs, Arjan; Shih, Lee-Yung; Strehl, Sabine; Micci, Francesca; Heim, Sverre; Teixeira, Manuel R.

    2010-01-01

    Septins are proteins associated with crucial steps in cell division and cellular integrity. In humans, 14 septin genes have been identified, of which five (SEPT2, SEPT5, SEPT6, SEPT9, and SEPT11) are known to participate in reciprocal translocations with the MLL gene in myeloid neoplasias. We have

  2. Cysteine-rich secretory protein-3 (CRISP3 is strongly up-regulated in prostate carcinomas with the TMPRSS2-ERG fusion gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franclim R Ribeiro

    Full Text Available A large percentage of prostate cancers harbor TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusions, leading to aberrant overexpression of the transcription factor ERG. The target genes deregulated by this rearrangement, however, remain mostly unknown. To address this subject we performed genome-wide mRNA expression analysis on 6 non-malignant prostate samples and 24 prostate carcinomas with (n = 16 and without (n = 8 TMPRSS2-ERG fusion as determined by FISH. The top-most differentially expressed genes and their associations with ERG over-expression were technically validated by quantitative real-time PCR and biologically validated in an independent series of 200 prostate carcinomas. Several genes encoding metabolic enzymes or extracellular/transmembrane proteins involved in cell adhesion, matrix remodeling and signal transduction pathways were found to be co-expressed with ERG. Within those significantly over-expressed in fusion-positive carcinomas, CRISP3 showed more than a 50-fold increase when compared to fusion-negative carcinomas, whose expression levels were in turn similar to that of non-malignant samples. In the independent validation series, ERG and CRISP3 mRNA levels were strongly correlated (r(s = 0.65, p<0.001 and both were associated with pT3 disease staging. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry results showed CRISP3 protein overexpression in 63% of the carcinomas and chromatin immunoprecipitation with an anti-ERG antibody showed that CRISP3 is a direct target of the transcription factor ERG. We conclude that ERG rearrangement is associated with significant expression alterations in genes involved in critical cellular pathways that define a subset of locally advanced PCa. In particular, we show that CRISP3 is a direct target of ERG that is strongly overexpressed in PCa with the TMPRSS2-ERG fusion gene.

  3. CRISPR/Cas9 Engineering of Adult Mouse Liver Demonstrates That the Dnajb1-Prkaca Gene Fusion is Sufficient to Induce Tumors Resembling Fibrolamellar Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelholm, Lars H; Riaz, Anjum; Serra, Denise

    2017-01-01

    ) to the protein kinase cAMP-activated catalytic subunit alpha gene (PRKACA) has been repeatedly identified in patients with FL-HCC. However, the DNAJB1-PRKACA gene fusion has not been shown to induce liver tumorigenesis. We used the CRISPR/Cas9 technique to delete in mice the syntenic region on chromosome 8...... to create a Dnajb1-Prkaca fusion and monitored the mice for liver tumor development. METHODS: We delivered CRISPR/Cas9 vectors designed to juxtapose exon 1 of Dnajb1 with exon 2 of Prkaca to create the Dnajb1-Prkaca gene fusion associated with FL-HCC, or control Cas9 vector, via hydrodynamic tail vein......, as observed in human FL-HCC. CONCLUSIONS: Using CRISPR/Cas9 technology, we found generation of the Dnajb1-Prkaca fusion gene in wild-type mice to be sufficient to initiate formation of tumors that have many features of human FL-HCC. Strategies to block DNAJB1-PRKACA might be developed as therapeutics...

  4. Limited duration of complete remission on ruxolitinib in myeloid neoplasms with PCM1-JAK2 and BCR-JAK2 fusion genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwaab, Juliana; Knut, Marcin; Haferlach, Claudia; Metzgeroth, Georgia; Horny, Hans-Peter; Chase, Andrew; Tapper, William; Score, Joannah; Waghorn, Katherine; Naumann, Nicole; Jawhar, Mohamad; Fabarius, Alice; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Cross, Nicholas C P; Reiter, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    Rearrangements of chromosome band 9p24 are known to be associated with JAK2 fusion genes, e.g., t(8;9)(p22;p24) with a PCM1-JAK2 and t(9;22)(p24;q11) with a BCR-JAK2 fusion gene, respectively. In association with myeloid neoplasms, the clinical course is aggressive, and in absence of effective conventional treatment options, long-term remission is usually only observed after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (ASCT). With the discovery of inhibitors of the JAK2 tyrosine kinase and based on encouraging in vitro and in vivo data, we treated two male patients with myeloid neoplasms and a PCM1-JAK2 or a BCR-JAK2 fusion gene, respectively, with the JAK1/JAK2 inhibitor ruxolitinib. After 12 months of treatment, both patients achieved a complete clinical, hematologic, and cytogenetic response. Non-hematologic toxicity was only grade 1 while no hematologic toxicity was observed. However, remission in both patients was only short-term, with relapse occurring after 18 and 24 months, respectively, making ASCT indispensable in both cases. This data highlight (1) the ongoing importance of cytogenetic analysis for the diagnostic work-up of myeloid neoplasms as it may guide targeted therapy and (2) remission under ruxolitinib may only be short-termed in JAK2 fusion genes but it may be an important bridging therapy prior to ASCT.

  5. pBaSysBioll : an integrative plasmid generating gfp transcriptional fusions for high-throughput analysis of gene expression in Bacillus subtilis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botella, Eric; Fogg, Mark; Jules, Matthieu; Piersma, Sjouke; Doherty, Geoff; Hansen, Annette; Denham, Emma. L.; Le Chat, Ludovic; Veiga, Patrick; Bailey, Kirra; Lewis, Peter J.; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Aymerich, Stephane; Wilkinson, Anthony J.; Devine, Kevin M.

    Plasmid pBaSysBioll was constructed for high-throughput analysis of gene expression in Bacillus subtilis. It is an integrative plasmid with a ligation-independent cloning (LIC) site, allowing the generation of transcriptional gfpmut3 fusions with desired promoters. Integration is by a Campbell-type

  6. Tyrosine kinase fusion genes in pediatric BCR-ABL1-like acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, Judith M.; Steeghs, Elisabeth M. P.; Marchante, João R. M.; Boeree, Aurélie; Beaudoin, James J.; Beverloo, H. Berna; Kuiper, Roland P.; Escherich, Gabriele; van der Velden, Vincent H. J.; van der Schoot, C. Ellen; de Groot-Kruseman, Hester A.; Pieters, Rob; den Boer, Monique L.

    2017-01-01

    Approximately 15% of pediatric B cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL) is characterized by gene expression similar to that of BCR-ABL1-positive disease and unfavorable prognosis. This BCR-ABL1-like subtype shows a high frequency of B-cell development gene aberrations and tyrosine

  7. Fusion genes with ALK as recurrent partner in ependymoma-like gliomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Thale Kristin; Panagopoulos, Ioannis; Meling, Torstein R

    2015-01-01

    was located between exons 19 and 20. Both patients were infants and both tumors were supratentorial. The tumors were well demarcated from surrounding tissue and had both ependymal and astrocytic features but were diagnosed and treated as ependymomas. CONCLUSIONS: By combining karyotyping and RNA sequencing......, we identified the 2 first ever reported ALK rearrangements in CNS tumors. Such rearrangements may represent the hallmark of a new entity of pediatric glioma characterized by both ependymal and astrocytic features. Our findings are of particular importance because crizotinib, a selective ALK inhibitor......, has demonstrated effect in patients with lung cancer harboring ALK rearrangements. Thus, ALK emerges as an interesting therapeutic target in patients with ependymal tumors carrying ALK fusions....

  8. Tethering of the conserved piggyBac transposase fusion protein CSB-PGBD3 to chromosomal AP-1 proteins regulates expression of nearby genes in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas T Gray

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The CSB-PGBD3 fusion protein arose more than 43 million years ago when a 2.5-kb piggyBac 3 (PGBD3 transposon inserted into intron 5 of the Cockayne syndrome Group B (CSB gene in the common ancestor of all higher primates. As a result, full-length CSB is now coexpressed with an abundant CSB-PGBD3 fusion protein by alternative splicing of CSB exons 1-5 to the PGBD3 transposase. An internal deletion of the piggyBac transposase ORF also gave rise to 889 dispersed, 140-bp MER85 elements that were mobilized in trans by PGBD3 transposase. The CSB-PGBD3 fusion protein binds MER85s in vitro and induces a strong interferon-like innate antiviral immune response when expressed in CSB-null UVSS1KO cells. To explore the connection between DNA binding and gene expression changes induced by CSB-PGBD3, we investigated the genome-wide DNA binding profile of the fusion protein. CSB-PGBD3 binds to 363 MER85 elements in vivo, but these sites do not correlate with gene expression changes induced by the fusion protein. Instead, CSB-PGBD3 is enriched at AP-1, TEAD1, and CTCF motifs, presumably through protein-protein interactions with the cognate transcription factors; moreover, recruitment of CSB-PGBD3 to AP-1 and TEAD1 motifs correlates with nearby genes regulated by CSB-PGBD3 expression in UVSS1KO cells and downregulated by CSB rescue of mutant CS1AN cells. Consistent with these data, the N-terminal CSB domain of the CSB-PGBD3 fusion protein interacts with the AP-1 transcription factor c-Jun and with RNA polymerase II, and a chimeric CSB-LacI construct containing only the N-terminus of CSB upregulates many of the genes induced by CSB-PGBD3. We conclude that the CSB-PGBD3 fusion protein substantially reshapes the transcriptome in CS patient CS1AN and that continued expression of the CSB-PGBD3 fusion protein in the absence of functional CSB may affect the clinical presentation of CS patients by directly altering the transcriptional program.

  9. Tethering of the Conserved piggyBac Transposase Fusion Protein CSB-PGBD3 to Chromosomal AP-1 Proteins Regulates Expression of Nearby Genes in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Lucas T.; Fong, Kimberly K.; Pavelitz, Thomas; Weiner, Alan M.

    2012-01-01

    The CSB-PGBD3 fusion protein arose more than 43 million years ago when a 2.5-kb piggyBac 3 (PGBD3) transposon inserted into intron 5 of the Cockayne syndrome Group B (CSB) gene in the common ancestor of all higher primates. As a result, full-length CSB is now coexpressed with an abundant CSB-PGBD3 fusion protein by alternative splicing of CSB exons 1–5 to the PGBD3 transposase. An internal deletion of the piggyBac transposase ORF also gave rise to 889 dispersed, 140-bp MER85 elements that were mobilized in trans by PGBD3 transposase. The CSB-PGBD3 fusion protein binds MER85s in vitro and induces a strong interferon-like innate antiviral immune response when expressed in CSB-null UVSS1KO cells. To explore the connection between DNA binding and gene expression changes induced by CSB-PGBD3, we investigated the genome-wide DNA binding profile of the fusion protein. CSB-PGBD3 binds to 363 MER85 elements in vivo, but these sites do not correlate with gene expression changes induced by the fusion protein. Instead, CSB-PGBD3 is enriched at AP-1, TEAD1, and CTCF motifs, presumably through protein–protein interactions with the cognate transcription factors; moreover, recruitment of CSB-PGBD3 to AP-1 and TEAD1 motifs correlates with nearby genes regulated by CSB-PGBD3 expression in UVSS1KO cells and downregulated by CSB rescue of mutant CS1AN cells. Consistent with these data, the N-terminal CSB domain of the CSB-PGBD3 fusion protein interacts with the AP-1 transcription factor c-Jun and with RNA polymerase II, and a chimeric CSB-LacI construct containing only the N-terminus of CSB upregulates many of the genes induced by CSB-PGBD3. We conclude that the CSB-PGBD3 fusion protein substantially reshapes the transcriptome in CS patient CS1AN and that continued expression of the CSB-PGBD3 fusion protein in the absence of functional CSB may affect the clinical presentation of CS patients by directly altering the transcriptional program. PMID:23028371

  10. Mammary Analogue Secretory Carcinoma of Salivary Glands: Molecular Analysis of 25 ETV6 Gene Rearranged Tumors With Lack of Detection of Classical ETV6-NTRK3 Fusion Transcript by Standard RT-PCR: Report of 4 Cases Harboring ETV6-X Gene Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skálová, Alena; Vanecek, Tomas; Simpson, Roderick H W; Laco, Jan; Majewska, Hanna; Baneckova, Martina; Steiner, Petr; Michal, Michal

    2016-01-01

    ETV6 gene abnormalities are well described in tumor pathology. Many fusion partners of ETV6 have been reported in a variety of epithelial and hematological malignancies. In salivary gland tumor pathology, however, the ETV6-NTRK3 translocation is specific for mammary analogue secretory carcinoma (MASC), and has not been documented in any other salivary tumor type. The present study comprised a clinical and molecular analysis of 25 cases morphologically and immunohistochemically typical of MASC. They all also displayed the ETV6 rearrangement as visualized by fluorescent in situ hybridization but lacked the classical ETV6-NTRK3 fusion transcript by standard reverse-transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. In 4 cases, the classical fusion transcript was found by more sensitive, nested reverse-transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Five other cases harbored atypical fusion transcripts as detected by both standard and nested reverse-transcription-polymerase chain reaction. In addition, fluorescent in situ hybridization with an NTRK3 break-apart probe was also performed; rearrangement of NTRK3 gene was detected in 16 of 25 cases. In 3 other cases, the tissue was not analyzable, and in 2 further cases analysis could not be performed because of a lack of appropriate tissue material. Finally, in the 4 remaining cases whose profile was NTRK3 split-negative and ETV6 split-positive, unknown (non-NTRK) genes appeared to fuse with ETV6 (ETV6-X fusion). In looking for possible fusion partners, analysis of rearrangement of other kinase genes known to fuse with ETV6 was also performed, but without positive results. Although numbers were small, correlating the clinico-pathologic features of the 4 ETV6-X fusion tumors and 5 MASC cases with atypical fusion transcripts raises the possibility of that they may behave more aggressively.

  11. Enhancing potency of siRNA targeting fusion genes by optimization outside of target sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrilov, Kseniya; Seo, Young-Eun; Tietjen, Gregory T; Cui, Jiajia; Cheng, Christopher J; Saltzman, W Mark

    2015-12-01

    Canonical siRNA design algorithms have become remarkably effective at predicting favorable binding regions within a target mRNA, but in some cases (e.g., a fusion junction site) region choice is restricted. In these instances, alternative approaches are necessary to obtain a highly potent silencing molecule. Here we focus on strategies for rational optimization of two siRNAs that target the junction sites of fusion oncogenes BCR-ABL and TMPRSS2-ERG. We demonstrate that modifying the termini of these siRNAs with a terminal G-U wobble pair or a carefully selected pair of terminal asymmetry-enhancing mismatches can result in an increase in potency at low doses. Importantly, we observed that improvements in silencing at the mRNA level do not necessarily translate to reductions in protein level and/or cell death. Decline in protein level is also heavily influenced by targeted protein half-life, and delivery vehicle toxicity can confound measures of cell death due to silencing. Therefore, for BCR-ABL, which has a long protein half-life that is difficult to overcome using siRNA, we also developed a nontoxic transfection vector: poly(lactic-coglycolic acid) nanoparticles that release siRNA over many days. We show that this system can achieve effective killing of leukemic cells. These findings provide insights into the implications of siRNA sequence for potency and suggest strategies for the design of more effective therapeutic siRNA molecules. Furthermore, this work points to the importance of integrating studies of siRNA design and delivery, while heeding and addressing potential limitations such as restricted targetable mRNA regions, long protein half-lives, and nonspecific toxicities.

  12. A novel BCR-ABL1 fusion gene with genetic heterogeneity indicates a good prognosis in a chronic myeloid leukemia case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Fen; Jin, Runming; Hu, Yu; Mei, Heng

    2017-01-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is a pluripotent hematopoietic stem cell disorder caused by the fusion of the BCR and ABL1 genes. Quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) is a routinely performed screening technique to identify BCR-ABL1 fusion genes, but a limitation of this method is its inability to recognize novel fusions that have not been previously characterized. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) is an effective and sensitive detection method for the determination of novel BCR-ABL1 fusion genes as well as previously characterized ones. The oncoprotein tyrosine kinase BCR-ABL1 is a constitutively active kinase involved in the activation of a number of signaling pathways, and it has been the therapeutic target for tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) such as imatinib. Reports have presented opposing viewpoints about the effect of the disrupted Src homology 3 (SH3) domain on TKI efficacy. We here report that using NGS we identified a novel BCR-ABL1 fusion gene with breakpoints in the BCR intron 14 and the ABL1 intron 2, leading to partial deletion of its SH3 domain. In the present case, the patient received targeted therapy with the TKI imatinib at 400 mg/day and no adverse reaction was reported. The patient eventually entered remission with decreased proliferation of karyocytes and granulocytes. We also identified mutations in genes, including TP53, FLT3, ASXL1, SETBP1, CEBPA and CBL, that seemed to have an influence on the outcome of TKI therapy targeting the BCR-ABL1 protein. Together with previously reported results, it is clear that the genetic heterogeneity of CML patients significantly affects the presentation of the disease and its progression and therefore should inform the design of the therapeutic strategy.

  13. Obesity and Prostate Cancer Risk According to Tumor TMPRSS2:ERG Gene Fusion Status

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Egbers, Lieke; Luedeke, Manuel; Rinckleb, Antje; Kolb, Suzanne; Wright, Jonathan L; Maier, Christiane; Neuhouser, Marian L; Stanford, Janet L

    2015-01-01

    ...) with the erythroblast transformation-specific (ETS)-related gene (ERG), is found in approximately 50% of prostate cancers and may characterize distinct molecular subtypes of prostate cancer with different etiologies...

  14. A mutation in the nuclear pore complex gene Tmem48 causes gametogenesis defects in skeletal fusions with sterility (sks) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Kouyou; Noguchi, Junko; Hirose, Michiko; Kajita, Shimpei; Katayama, Kentaro; Khalaj, Maryam; Tsuji, Takehito; Fairfield, Heather; Byers, Candice; Reinholdt, Laura; Ogura, Atsuo; Kunieda, Tetsuo

    2013-11-01

    Skeletal fusions with sterility (sks) is an autosomal recessive mutation of mouse that results in male and female sterility because of defects in gametogenesis. The mutants also have skeletal malformations with fused vertebrae and ribs. We examined testicular phenotypes of sks/sks mice to investigate the defects in spermatogenesis. Histological and immunocytochemical analyses and expression analyses of the marker genes demonstrated that spermatogenesis is arrested at mid to late pachytene stage of meiotic prophase with defective synapsis of the homologous chromosomes. Next, we determined the precise chromosomal localization of the sks locus on a 0.3-Mb region of mouse chromosome 4 by linkage analysis. By sequencing the positional candidate genes in this region and whole exome sequencing, we found a GG to TT nucleotide substitution in exon 6 of the Tmem48 gene that encodes a putative transmembrane protein with six transmembrane domains. The nucleotide substitution causes aberrant splicing, which deletes exon 6 of the Tmem48 transcript. Specific expression of TMEM48 was observed in germ cells of males and females. Furthermore, the phenotypes of the sks mutant were completely rescued by the transgenesis of a genomic fragment containing the wild-type Tmem48 gene. These findings indicate that the Tmem48 mutation is responsible for the gametogenesis defects and skeletal malformations in the sks mice. The TMEM48 protein is a nuclear membrane protein comprising the nuclear pore complex; its exact function in the nuclear pore complex is still unknown. Our finding suggested that the nuclear pore complex plays an important role in mammalian gametogenesis and skeletal development.

  15. Amplification of the Gp41 gene for detection of mutations conferring resistance to HIV-1 fusion inhibitors on genotypic assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanumihardja, J.; Bela, B.

    2017-08-01

    Fusion inhibitors have potential for future use in HIV control programs in Indonesia, so the capacity to test resistance to such drugs needs to be developed. Resistance-detection with a genotypic assay began with amplification of the target gene, gp41. Based on the sequence of the two most common HIV subtypes in Indonesia, AE and B, a primer pair was designed. Plasma samples containing both subtypes were extracted to obtain HIV RNA. Using PCR, the primer pair was used to produce the amplification product, the identity of which was checked based on length under electrophoresis. Eleven plasma samples were included in this study. One-step PCR using the primer pair was able to amplify gp41 from 54.5% of the samples, and an unspecific amplification product was seen in 1.1% of the samples. Amplification failed in 36.4% of the samples, which may be due to an inappropriate primer sequence. It was also found that the optimal annealing temperature for producing the single expected band was 57.2 °C. With one-step PCR, the designed primer pair amplified the HIV-1 gp41 gene from subtypes AE and B. However, further research should be done to determine the conditions that will increase the sensitivity and specificity of the amplification process.

  16. Plant expansins in bacteria and fungi: evolution by horizontal gene transfer and independent domain fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaidis, Nikolas; Doran, Nicole; Cosgrove, Daniel J

    2014-02-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) has been described as a common mechanism of transferring genetic material between prokaryotes, whereas genetic transfers from eukaryotes to prokaryotes have been rarely documented. Here we report a rare case of HGT in which plant expansin genes that code for plant cell-wall loosening proteins were transferred from plants to bacteria, fungi, and amoebozoa. In several cases, the species in which the expansin gene was found is either in intimate association with plants or is a known plant pathogen. Our analyses suggest that at least two independent genetic transfers occurred from plants to bacteria and fungi. These events were followed by multiple HGT events within bacteria and fungi. We have also observed that in bacteria expansin genes have been independently fused to DNA fragments that code for an endoglucanase domain or for a carbohydrate binding module, pointing to functional convergence at the molecular level. Furthermore, the functional similarities between microbial expansins and their plant xenologs suggest that these proteins mediate microbial-plant interactions by altering the plant cell wall and therefore may provide adaptive advantages to these species. The evolution of these nonplant expansins represents a unique case in which bacteria and fungi have found innovative and adaptive ways to interact with and infect plants by acquiring genes from their host. This evolutionary paradigm suggests that despite their low frequency such HGT events may have significantly contributed to the evolution of prokaryotic and eukaryotic species.

  17. Identifying Growth Conditions for Nicotiana benthimiana Resulting in Predictable Gene Expression of Promoter-Gus Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, V.; Barton, K.; Longhurst, A.

    2012-12-01

    Revoluta (Rev) is a transcription factor that establishes leaf polarity inArabidopsis thaliana. Through previous work in Dr. Barton's Lab, it is known that Revoluta binds to the ZPR3 promoter, thus activating the ZPR3 gene product inArabidopsis thaliana. Using this knowledge, two separate DNA constructs were made, one carrying revgene and in the other, the ZPR3 promoter fussed with the GUS gene. When inoculated in Nicotiana benthimiana (tobacco), the pMDC32 plasmid produces the Rev protein. Rev binds to the ZPR3 promoter thereby activating the transcription of the GUS gene, which can only be expressed in the presence of Rev. When GUS protein comes in contact with X-Gluc it produce the blue stain seen (See Figure 1). In the past, variability has been seen of GUS expression on tobacco therefore we hypothesized that changing the growing conditions and leaf age might improve how well it's expressed.

  18. Exogenous PML/RARα Fusion Gene Responds to All-trans Retinoic Acid Results in Differentiation of the Human B Cell Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumimoto, Y; Maeda, Y; Naiki, Y; Sono, H; Miyatake, J; Sakaguchi, M; Matsuda, M; Kanamaru, A

    2001-01-01

    The interaction of an exogenous PML/RARα fusion gene, associated with acute promyelocytic leukemia, with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) was examined in B-lymphoid cell lines. RPMI8866 cells were transfected with PML/RARα cDNA in the expression vector pGD and two stable transformants (RPMI8866Y-4 and RPMI8866Y-17) were established by selection with G418. ATRA inhibited the growth of those stable transformants, as assessed by [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation, but had no effect on the growth of control cells stably transformed with neomycin resistant gene alone. ATRA also increased expression of CD38 and immunoglobulin production in RPMI8866Y-4 cells but not in control cells. When these results are taken together, it can be observed that the exogenous PML/RARα fusion gene responds to ATRA, which results in cell differentiation of the human B cell line.

  19. Molecular studies reveal a MLL-MLLT3 gene fusion displaced in a case of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia with complex karyotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ney Garcia, Daniela Ribeiro; Liehr, Thomas; Emerenciano, Mariana; Meyer, Claus; Marschalek, Rolf; Pombo-de-Oliveira, Maria do Socorro; Ribeiro, Raul C; Poirot Land, Marcelo Gerardin; Macedo Silva, Maria Luiza

    2015-04-01

    Rearrangement of the mixed lineage-leukemia gene (MLL-r) is common in hematological diseases and is generally associated with poor prognosis. The mixed-lineage leukemia gene translocated to, 3 (MLLT3) gene (9p22) is a frequent MLL-r partner (∼18% of leukemias with MLL rearrangement) and is characterized by the translocation t(9;11) (p22;q23), forming an MLL-MLLT3 gene fusion. MLL-r are usually simple reciprocal translocations between two different chromosomes, although karyotypes with complex MLL-r have been observed. We present a rare case of a child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia with a complex karyotype in which the classical t(9;11) (p22;q23) was cryptically relocated into a third chromosome in a balanced three-way translocation. At the genome level, however, the MLL-MLLT3 three-way translocation still displayed both reciprocal fusion transcripts. This argues in favor for a model where a simple two-way t(9;11) (p22;q23) was likely the first step that then evolved in to a more complex karyotype. Multicolor banding techniques can be used to greatly refine complex karyotypes and its chromosomal breakpoints. Also in the presence of putative new rearrangements, Long distance inverse-PCR is an important tool to identify which gene fusion is involved. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Coexistence of p210BCR-ABLand CBFβ-MYH11 fusion genes in myeloid leukemia: A report of 4 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuan-Yuan; Ding, Wen-Jing; Jiang, Feng; Chen, Zi-Xing; Cen, Jian-Nong; Qi, Xiao-Fei; Liang, Jian-Ying; Liu, Dan-Dan; Pan, Jin-Lan; Chen, Su-Ning

    2017-11-01

    Numerous acquired molecular and cytogenetic abnormalities are strongly associated with hematological malignancies. The breakpoint cluster region-ABL proto-oncogene 1 ( BCR-ABL ) rearrangement leads to a p210 chimeric protein in typical chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), whereas 17-25% of patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia and 0.9-3% patients with de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML) carry a p190 BCR-ABL fusion protein. Cases of patients with AML/CML carrying two specific primary molecular changes, BCR-ABL and core binding factor-β-myosin heavy chain 11 ( CBFβ-MYH11 ) fusion genes have been rarely reported. The present study aimed to understand the nature and mechanism of this particular type of leukemia through case reports and literature review. A total of four patients who were diagnosed as AML/CML with BCR-ABL and CBFβ-MYH11 fusion genes in the First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University (Suzhou, China) between January 2004 and December 2012 were examined. Morphological analysis of bone marrow cells, flow cytometry, quantitative polymerase chain reaction of p 210BCR-ABL and CBFβ-MYH11 transcripts as well as cytogenetic and fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses were performed. A total of 4 patients who exhibited fusion of p 210BCR-ABL and CBFβ-MYH11 were identified. A single patient (case 1) was first diagnosed CML-acute phase (AP), which progressed rapidly to CML-blast crisis (BC), and three patients (cases 2, 3 and 4) were diagnosed with AML with bone marrow eosinophilia at first presentation with no evidence of previous onset of CML. All cases achieved remission following conventional chemotherapy/hematological stem cell transplantation combined with the inhibitor of tyrosine kinase (TKI) maintenance therapy. The patients with CML carrying and expressing BCR-ABL and CBFβ-MYH11 fusion genes appeared more likely to rapidly progress to AP or BC. Therefore, the product of the CBFβ-MYH11 fusion gene may serve an important role in the

  1. Transactivation of Ds by Ac-transposase gene fusions in tobacco

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rommens, Caius M.T.; Haaren, Mark J.J. van; Buchel, Annemarie S.; Mol, Joseph N.M.; Tunen, Arjen J. van; Nijkamp, H. John J.; Hille, Jacques

    1992-01-01

    To study regulation of the (Ds) transposition process in heterologous plant species, the transposase gene of Ac was fused to several promoters that are active late during plant development. These promoters are the flower-specific chalcone synthase A promoter (CHS A), the anther-specific chalcone

  2. Small Molecule Disrupts Abnormal Gene Fusion Associated with Leukemia | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rare chromosomal abnormalities, called chromosomal translocations, in which part of a chromosome breaks off and becomes attached to another chromosome, can result in the generation of chimeric proteins. These aberrant proteins have unpredictable, and sometimes harmful, functions, including uncontrolled cell growth that can lead to cancer. One type of translocation, in which a portion of the gene encoding nucleoporin 98 (NUP98)—one of about 50 proteins comprising the nuclear pore complex through which proteins are shuttled into and out of the nucleus—fuses with another gene, has been shown to result in improper histone modifications. These abnormalities alter the gene expression patterns of certain types of hematopoietic, or blood-forming, stem cells, resulting primarily in overexpression of the Hoxa7, Hoxa9,and Hoxa10 genes. NUP98 chromosomal translocations have been associated with many types of leukemia, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML), acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL), chronic myeloid leukemia in blast crisis (CML-bc), and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS).

  3. Enforced effect of tk-MCP-1 fusion gene in ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Shuhui

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective The efficiency of HSV-tk/GCV system is not high because of insufficient gene transfer and incompletely initiative of host antineoplastic potency. The present study was designed to assess the antitumor efficacy of tk-MCP-1 on ovarian cancer in vitro and vivo. Methods A novel bicistronic expression system can help to improve the expression level of a gene in a stable manner. pLXSN/tk-MCP-1 co-expressing tk and MCP-1 genes was constructed using a pLXSN retroviral vector and an internal ribosome entry site sequence by restriction enzyme. Western blot was performed to determine tk and MCP-1 expression in the infected SKOV3. The GCV-sensitively tumoricidal activities of SKOV3/tk-MCP-1 with or without monocytes were compared to those of SKOV3 expressing HSV-tk or MCP-1. We investigated the growth of subcutaneous tumors in SCID mice immuno-reconstituted, and evaluated the antitumor effect of MCP-1 in conjunction with suicide gene. Results The significant GCV-sensitively tumoricidal activity of pLXSN/tk-MCP-1 was observed when compared with those of pLXSN/tk, pLXSN/MCP-1 and pLXSN/neo, especially when monocytes were added. The growth of subcutaneous tumors in SCID mice immuno-reconstituted was markedly suppressed by co-delivery of HSV-tk and MCP-1 genes, and the enhanced antitumor effect was associated with the recruitment of monocytes. Conclusion These results demonstrated pLXSN/tk-MCP-1 presented an enhanced antitumor effects on ovarian cancer by orchestration of immune responses.

  4. Spinal Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... concept of fusion is similar to that of welding in industry. Spinal fusion surgery, however, does not ... are taking for other conditions, and your overall health can affect the rate of healing and fusion, ...

  5. Nuclear Fusion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ghoranneviss, Mahmood; Parashar, S. K. S; Aslan, Necdet; Aslaninejad, Morteza; Salar Elahi, A

    2014-01-01

    ... in both inertial and magnetic confinement fusion, with attendees from major fusion energy research centers worldwide. It is one of the most important issues in this field. Nuclear fusion continues t...

  6. Fusion of the TBL1XR1 and HMGA1 genes in splenic hemangioma with t(3;6)(q26;p21).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagopoulos, Ioannis; Gorunova, Ludmila; Bjerkehagen, Bodil; Lobmaier, Ingvild; Heim, Sverre

    2016-03-01

    RNA-sequencing of a splenic hemangioma with the karyotype 45~47,XX,t(3;6)(q26;p21) showed that this translocation generated a chimeric TBL1XR1-HMGA1 gene. This is the first time that this tumor has been subjected to genetic analysis, but the finding of an acquired clonal chromosome abnormality in cells cultured from the lesion and the presence of the TBL1XR1-HMGA1 fusion in them strongly favor the conclusion that splenic hemangiomas are of a neoplastic nature. Genomic PCR confirmed the presence of the TBL1XR1-HMGA1 fusion gene, and RT-PCR together with Sanger sequencing verified the presence of the fusion transcripts. The molecular consequences of the t(3;6) would be substantial. The cells carrying the translocation would retain only one functional copy of the wild-type TBL1XR1 gene while the other, rearranged allele could produce a putative truncated form of TBL1XR1 protein containing the LiSH and F-box-like domains. In the TBL1XR1-HMGA1 fusion transcript, furthermore, untranslated exons of HMGA1 are replaced by the first 5 exons of the TBL1XR1 gene. The result is that the entire coding region of HMGA1 comes under the control of the TBL1XR1 promoter, bringing about dysregulation of HMGA1. This is reminiscent of similar pathogenetic mechanisms involving high mobility genes in benign connective tissue tumors such as lipomas and leiomyomas.

  7. Renal cell carcinoma associated with Xp11.2 translocation/TFE gene fusion: imaging findings in 21 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiao; Zhou, Hao; Duan, Na; Liu, Yongkang; Wang, Zhongqiu [Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Department of Radiology, Nanjing (China); Zhu, Qingqiang [Medical School of Yangzhou University, Department of Medical Imaging, Subei People' s Hospital, Yangzhou (China); Li, Baoxin [Gulou Hospital, Department of Radiology, Nanjing (China); Cui, Wenjing [Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Department of Radiology, Nanjing (China); Nanjing University Medical School, Department of Radiology, Jinling Hospital, Nanjing (China); Kundra, Vikas [The University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, Houston, TX (United States)

    2017-02-15

    To characterize imaging features of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) associated with Xp11.2 translocation/TFE gene fusion. Twenty-one patients with Xp11.2/TFE RCC were retrospectively evaluated. Tumour location, size, density, cystic or solid appearance, calcification, capsule sign, enhancement pattern and metastases were assessed. Fourteen women and seven men were identified with 12 being 25 years old or younger. Tumours were solitary and cystic-solid (76.2 %) masses with a capsule (76.2 %); 90.5 % were located in the medulla. Calcifications and lymph node metastases were each observed in 24 %. On unenhanced CT, tumour attenuation was greater than in normal renal parenchyma (85.7 %). Tumour enhancement was less than in normal renal cortex on all enhanced phases, greater than in normal renal medulla on cortical and medullary phases, but less than in normal renal medulla on delayed phase. On MR, the tumours were isointense on T1WI, heterogeneously hypointense on T2WI and slightly hyperintense on diffusion-weighted imaging. Xp11.2/TFE RCC usually occurs in young women. It is a cystic-solid, hyperdense mass with a capsule. It arises from the renal medulla with enhancement less than in the cortex but greater than in the medulla in all phases except the delayed phase, when it is lower than in the medulla. (orig.)

  8. Ultrasonographic Findings of Renal Cell Carcinomas Associated with Xp11.2 Translocation/TFE3 Gene Fusion

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    Wenwu Ling

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study was to investigate the features of renal carcinomas associated with Xp11.2 translocations/TFE3 gene fusions (Xp11.2-RCC on conventional ultrasound (US and contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS. Methods. US and CEUS features of twenty-two cases with histopathologically proven Xp11.2-RCC were retrospectively reviewed. Results. 22 patients (11 males, 11 females were included in this study, with a mean age of 28.3 ± 20.4 years. Eight tumors (36.3%, 8/22 were in left kidney, and 14 tumors (63.7%, 14/22 were in right kidney. All tumors (100%, 22/22 were mixed echogenicity type. 13 tumors (59.1%, 13/22 presented small dotted calcifications. The boundary of 14 tumors (63.6%, 14/22 was sharp and the other 8 tumors’ (36.4%, 8/22 boundary was blurry. By CEUS, in early phase, the solid element of all tumors showed obvious enhancement. In delayed phase, 13 tumors showed hypoenhancement, seven tumors showed isoenhancement, and 2 tumors showed hyperenhancement. There were irregular nonenhancement areas in all tumors inside. Conclusions. By US and CEUS, when children and adolescents were found to have hyperechoic mixed tumor in kidney with sharp margin and calcification, and the tumors showed obvious enhancement and hypoenhancement with irregular nonenhancement areas in the tumor in early phase and delayed phase, respectively, Xp11.2-RCC should be suspected.

  9. Core Binding Factor β (CBFβ) and the Leukemogenic Fusion Protein CBFβ-Smooth Muscle Myosin Heavy Chain (SMMHC) Associate with Mitotic Chromosomes to Epigenetically Regulate Ribosomal Gene Expression*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Camacho, Cesar; van Wijnen, Andre J.; Lian, Jane B.; Stein, Janet L.; Stein, Gary S.

    2014-01-01

    Mitotic bookmarking is an epigenetic control mechanism that sustains gene expression in progeny cells; it is often found in genes related to the maintenance of cellular phenotype and growth control. RUNX transcription factors regulate a broad spectrum of RNA Polymerase (Pol II) transcribed genes important for lineage commitment but also regulate RNA Polymerase I (Pol I) driven ribosomal gene expression, thus coordinating control of cellular identity and proliferation. In this study, using fluorescence microscopy and biochemical approaches we show that the principal RUNX co-factor, CBFβ, associates with nucleolar organizing regions (NORs) during mitosis to negatively regulate RUNX-dependent ribosomal gene expression. Of clinical relevance, we establish for the first time that the leukemogenic fusion protein CBFβ-SMMHC (smooth muscle myosin heavy chain) also associates with ribosomal genes in interphase chromatin and mitotic chromosomes to promote and epigenetically sustain regulation of ribosomal genes through RUNX factor interactions. Our results demonstrate that CBFβ contributes to the transcriptional regulation of ribosomal gene expression and provide further understanding of the epigenetic role of CBFβ-SMMHC in proliferation and maintenance of the leukemic phenotype. Background Runt-related transcription factors (RUNX) bookmark genes important for phenotype, but the mitotic behavior of RUNX cofactor, Core Binding Factor β (CBFβ) is unknown. Results CBFβ and leukemogenic fusion protein CBFβ-SMMHC associate with chromosomes during mitosis and regulate ribosomal genes. Conclusion CBFβ and CBFβ-SMMHC contribute to epigenetic control of ribosomal genes. Significance CBFβ-SMMHC alters regulation linking phenotypic control with cell growth, thereby promoting cancer. PMID:25079347

  10. Clinical framework for next generation sequencing based analysis of treatment predictive mutations and multiplexed gene fusion detection in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindquist, Kajsa Ericson; Karlsson, Anna; Levéen, Per; Brunnström, Hans; Reuterswärd, Christel; Holm, Karolina; Jönsson, Mats; Annersten, Karin; Rosengren, Frida; Jirström, Karin; Kosieradzki, Jaroslaw; Ek, Lars; Borg, Åke; Planck, Maria; Jönsson, Göran; Staaf, Johan

    2017-05-23

    Precision medicine requires accurate multi-gene clinical diagnostics. We describe the implementation of an Illumina TruSight Tumor (TST) clinical NGS diagnostic framework and parallel validation of a NanoString RNA-based ALK, RET, and ROS1 gene fusion assay for combined analysis of treatment predictive alterations in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in a regional healthcare region of Sweden (Scandinavia). The TST panel was clinically validated in 81 tumors (99% hotspot mutation concordance), after which 533 consecutive NSCLCs were collected during one-year of routine clinical analysis in the healthcare region (~90% advanced stage patients). The NanoString assay was evaluated in 169 of 533 cases. In the 533-sample cohort 79% had 1-2 variants, 12% >2 variants and 9% no detected variants. Ten gene fusions (five ALK, three RET, two ROS1) were detected in 135 successfully analyzed cases (80% analysis success rate). No ALK or ROS1 FISH fusion positive case was missed by the NanoString assay. Stratification of the 533-sample cohort based on actionable alterations in 11 oncogenes revealed that 66% of adenocarcinomas, 13% of squamous carcinoma (SqCC) and 56% of NSCLC not otherwise specified harbored ≥1 alteration. In adenocarcinoma, 10.6% of patients (50.3% if including KRAS) could potentially be eligible for emerging therapeutics, in addition to the 15.3% of patients eligible for standard EGFR or ALK inhibitors. For squamous carcinoma corresponding proportions were 4.4% (11.1% with KRAS) vs 2.2%. In conclusion, multiplexed NGS and gene fusion analyses are feasible in NSCLC for clinical diagnostics, identifying notable proportions of patients potentially eligible for emerging molecular therapeutics.

  11. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells from infants with MLL-AF4+ acute leukemia harbor and express the MLL-AF4 fusion gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalina, Purificación; Rodríguez, René; Melen, Gustavo J.; Bueno, Clara; Arriero, Mar; García-Sánchez, Félix; Lassaletta, Alvaro; García-Sanz, Ramón

    2009-01-01

    MLL-AF4 fusion is a hallmark genetic abnormality in infant B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) known to arise in utero. The cellular origin of leukemic fusion genes during human development is difficult to ascertain. The bone marrow (BM) microenvironment plays an important role in the pathogenesis of several hematological malignances. BM mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSC) from 38 children diagnosed with cytogenetically different acute leukemias were screened for leukemic fusion genes. Fusion genes were absent in BM-MSCs of childhood leukemias carrying TEL-AML1, BCR-ABL, AML1-ETO, MLL-AF9, MLL-AF10, MLL-ENL or hyperdiploidy. However, MLL-AF4 was detected and expressed in BM-MSCs from all cases of MLL-AF4+ B-ALL. Unlike leukemic blasts, MLL-AF4+ BM-MSCs did not display monoclonal Ig gene rearrangements. Endogenous or ectopic expression of MLL-AF4 exerted no effect on MSC culture homeostasis. These findings suggest that MSCs may be in part tumor-related, highlighting an unrecognized role of the BM milieu on the pathogenesis of MLL-AF4+ B-ALL. MLL-AF4 itself is not sufficient for MSC transformation and the expression of MLL-AF4 in MSCs is compatible with a mesenchymal phenotype, suggesting a differential impact in the hematopoietic system and mesenchyme. The absence of monoclonal rearrangements in MLL-AF4+ BM-MSCs precludes the possibility of cellular plasticity or de-differentiation of B-ALL blasts and suggests that MLL-AF4 might arise in a population of prehematopoietic precursors. PMID:19995953

  12. The Neurospora Transcription Factor ADV-1 Transduces Light Signals and Temporal Information to Control Rhythmic Expression of Genes Involved in Cell Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekhang, Rigzin; Wu, Cheng; Smith, Kristina M.; Lamb, Teresa M.; Peterson, Matthew; Bredeweg, Erin L.; Ibarra, Oneida; Emerson, Jillian M.; Karunarathna, Nirmala; Lyubetskaya, Anna; Azizi, Elham; Hurley, Jennifer M.; Dunlap, Jay C.; Galagan, James E.; Freitag, Michael; Sachs, Matthew S.; Bell-Pedersen, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Light and the circadian clock have a profound effect on the biology of organisms through the regulation of large sets of genes. Toward understanding how light and the circadian clock regulate gene expression, we used genome-wide approaches to identify the direct and indirect targets of the light-responsive and clock-controlled transcription factor ADV-1 in Neurospora crassa. A large proportion of ADV-1 targets were found to be light- and/or clock-controlled, and enriched for genes involved in development, metabolism, cell growth, and cell fusion. We show that ADV-1 is necessary for transducing light and/or temporal information to its immediate downstream targets, including controlling rhythms in genes critical to somatic cell fusion. However, while ADV-1 targets are altered in predictable ways in Δadv-1 cells in response to light, this is not always the case for rhythmic target gene expression. These data suggest that a complex regulatory network downstream of ADV-1 functions to generate distinct temporal dynamics of target gene expression relative to the central clock mechanism. PMID:27856696

  13. The Neurospora Transcription Factor ADV-1 Transduces Light Signals and Temporal Information to Control Rhythmic Expression of Genes Involved in Cell Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rigzin Dekhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Light and the circadian clock have a profound effect on the biology of organisms through the regulation of large sets of genes. Toward understanding how light and the circadian clock regulate gene expression, we used genome-wide approaches to identify the direct and indirect targets of the light-responsive and clock-controlled transcription factor ADV-1 in Neurospora crassa. A large proportion of ADV-1 targets were found to be light- and/or clock-controlled, and enriched for genes involved in development, metabolism, cell growth, and cell fusion. We show that ADV-1 is necessary for transducing light and/or temporal information to its immediate downstream targets, including controlling rhythms in genes critical to somatic cell fusion. However, while ADV-1 targets are altered in predictable ways in Δadv-1 cells in response to light, this is not always the case for rhythmic target gene expression. These data suggest that a complex regulatory network downstream of ADV-1 functions to generate distinct temporal dynamics of target gene expression relative to the central clock mechanism.

  14. Frequency of the ETV6-RUNX1, BCR-ABL1, TCF3-PBX1, and MLL-AFF1 fusion genes in Guatemalan pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients and their ethnic associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza, Claudia; Granados, Lilian; Morales, Oneida; Jo, Wendy; Villagran, Swuanny; Tinti, Damaris; Villegas, Mauricio; Antillón, Federico; Torselli, Silvana; Silva, Gabriel

    2013-06-01

    Fusion genes involved in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) occur mostly due to genetic and environmental factors, and only a limited number of studies have reported any ethnic influence. This study assesses whether an ethnic influence has an effect on the frequency of any of the four fusion genes: BCR-ABL1, ETV6-RUNX1, TCF3-PBX1, and MLL-AFF1 found in ALL. To study this ethnic influence, mononuclear cells were obtained from bone marrow samples from 143 patients with ALL. We performed RNA extraction and reverse transcription, then assessed the quality of the cDNA by amplifying the ABL1 control gene, and finally evaluated the presence of the four transcripts by multiplex polymerase chain reaction. We found 10 patients who had the BCR-ABL1 fusion gene (7%); 3 patients (2%) were TCF3-PBX1 positive; and 6 patients (4.5%) were ETV6-RUNX1 positive. The incidence of this last fusion gene is quite low when compared to the values reported in most countries. The low incidence of the ETV6-RUNX1 fusion gene found in Guatemala matches the incidence rates that have been reported in Spain and Indian Romani. Since it is known that an ethnic resemblance exists among these three populations, as shown by ancestral marker studies, the ALL data suggests an ethnic influence on the occurrence and frequency of this particular fusion gene. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Fusion of the genes ataxin 2 like,ATXN2L, and Janus kinase 2,JAK2, in cutaneous CD4 positive T-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagopoulos, Ioannis; Gorunova, Ludmila; Spetalen, Signe; Bassarova, Assia; Beiske, Klaus; Micci, Francesca; Heim, Sverre

    2017-11-28

    Acquired mutations were recently described in cutaneous T-cell lymphomas for the JAK1 , JAK3 , STAT3 , and STAT5B genes of the JAK-STAT pathway. In the present study, RNA-sequencing of a primary cutaneous CD4 positive T-cell lymphoma carrying a three-way t(9;13;16)(p24;q34;p11) chromosome translocation showed that JAK2 from chromosome band 9p24 was rearranged and fused to a novel partner gene, ATXN2L , from 16p11. RT-PCR together with Sanger sequencing verified the presence of the ATXN2L-JAK2 fusion transcript. The ATXN2L-JAK2 fusion gene would code for a chimeric protein containing all domains of ATXN2L and the catalytic domain of the JAK2 tyrosine kinase. The ATXN2L-JAK2 chimeric protein could lead to constitutive activation of the downstream JAK-STAT signaling pathway in a manner similar to that seen for other JAK2 fusion proteins.

  16. The prognostic and predictive value of TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion and ERG protein expression in prostate cancer biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Kasper Drimer

    2016-12-01

    The clinical course of prostate carcinoma (PCa) is very heterogeneous. Consequently, a personalised approach for risk stratification and treatment planning is important. Recently, it has become evident that PCa, also at the genomic level, is heterogeneous. An early and common alteration is the gene fusion between the transmembrane protease serine 2 (TMPRSS2) gene and the v-ets avian erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog (ERG) gene resulting in expression of the oncoprotein ERG. The gene fusion is present in approximately half of PCa patients and the resultant two subgroups demonstrate marked differences in their genomic signatures. It has been hypothesised that genomic alterations can explain some of the observed heterogeneity in the clinical course of PCa. In order to conduct an analysis of the prognostic and predictive value of ERG protein expression in PCa biopsies, the thesis sought to evaluate: 1) the concordance in ERG expression between biopsies and radical prostatectomies: 2) the association between expression of ERG protein and the risk of PCa progression during active surveillance (AS), and 3) the association between ERG protein expression and response to primary castration-based treatment for advanced PCa. The included patients derived from the institutional AS cohort and an institutional cohort of advanced PCa patients undergoing first line castration-based androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). The 265 patients in the AS cohort were enrolled prospectively between October 2002 and October 2012 and were followed with regular digital rectal examinations, PSA measurements, and repeated biopsies. The advanced PCa cohort comprised of 194 patients diagnosed between January 2000 and December 2011 and was established retrospectively by a standardised extraction of patient data. Immunohistochemical (IHC) assessment for ERG protein expression was performed in all tumours containing diagnostic specimens (AS cohort: n = 459; advanced PCa cohort: n = 968), re

  17. Genetic interaction between Tmprss2-ERG gene fusion and Nkx3.1-loss does not enhance prostate tumorigenesis in mouse models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas E Linn

    Full Text Available Gene fusions involving ETS family transcription factors (mainly TMPRSS2-ERG and TMPRSS2-ETV1 fusions have been found in ~50% of human prostate cancer cases. Although expression of TMPRSS2-ERG or TMPRSS2-ETV1 fusion alone is insufficient to initiate prostate tumorigenesis, they appear to sensitize prostate epithelial cells for cooperation with additional oncogenic mutations to drive frank prostate adenocarcinoma. To search for such ETS-cooperating oncogenic events, we focused on a well-studied prostate tumor suppressor NKX3.1, as loss of NKX3.1 is another common genetic alteration in human prostate cancer. Previous studies have shown that deletions at 8p21 (harboring NKX3.1 and 21q22 (resulting in TMPRSS2-ERG fusion were both present in a subtype of prostate cancer cases, and that ERG can lead to epigenetic silencing of NKX3.1 in prostate cancer cells, whereas NKX3.1 can in turn negatively regulate TMPRSS2-ERG fusion expression via suppression of the TMPRSS2 promoter activity. We recently generated knockin mouse models for TMPRSS2-ERG and TMPRSS2-ETV1 fusions, utilizing the endogenous Tmprss2 promoter. We crossed these knockin models to an Nkx3.1 knockout mouse model. In Tmprss2-ERG;Nkx3.1+/- (or -/- male mice, although we observed a slight but significant upregulation of Tmprss2-ERG fusion expression upon Nkx3.1 loss, we did not detect any significant cooperation between these two genetic events to enhance prostate tumorigenesis in vivo. Furthermore, retrospective analysis of a previously published human prostate cancer dataset revealed that within ERG-overexpressing prostate cancer cases, NKX3.1 loss or deletion did not predict biochemical relapse after radical prostatectomy. Collectively, these data suggest that although TMPRSS2-ERG fusion and loss of NKX3.1 are among the most common mutational events found in prostate cancer, and although each of them can sensitize prostate epithelial cells for cooperating with other oncogenic events, these

  18. Mouse IP-10 Gene Delivered by Folate-modified Chitosan Nanoparticles and Dendritic/tumor Cells Fusion Vaccine Effectively Inhibit the Growth of Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zixi; Chen, Jiaojiao; Zhou, Sufang; Yang, Nuo; Duan, Siliang; Zhang, Zhenghua; Su, Jing; He, Jian; Zhang, Zhiyong; Lu, Xiaoling; Zhao, Yongxiang

    2017-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) and tumor cell fusion vaccine (DC/tumor cell fusion vaccine) is considered an effective approach in cancer biotherapy. However, its therapeutic effects in early clinical trials have been suboptimal partially due to the immunosuppressive tumor environment. In this study, we used nanoparticles of folate (FA)-modified chitosan, a non-viral vector capable of targeting tumor cells with high expression of FA receptors. FA-chitosan nanoparticles were used as biological carriers for the expression plasmid of the mouse interferon-induced protein-10 (mIP-10) gene, a potent chemoattractant for cytotoxic T cells. The combination of FA-chitosan/mIP-10 and DC/tumor cell fusion vaccine against hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) effectively inhibited the growth of implanted HCC tumors and prolonged the survival of mice. The combination therapy significantly reduced myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) in mouse spleen, local tumor, and bone marrow while increasing tumor-specific IFN-γ responses. Furthermore, the combination therapy significantly inhibited tumor cell proliferation while promoting their apoptosis. Taken together, our data illustrate that the mIP-10 enhances the anti-tumor effect of DC/tumor cell fusion vaccine by alleviating the immunosuppressive tumor environment.

  19. The role of the Aspergillus niger furin-type protease gene in processing of fungal proproteins and fusion proteins: Evidence for alternative processing of recombinant (fusion-) proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Punt, P.J.; Drint-Kuijvenhoven, A.; Lokman, B.C.; Spencer, J.A.; Jeenes, D.; Archer, D.A.; Hondel, C.A.M.J.J. van den

    2003-01-01

    We have characterized growth and protein processing characteristics of Aspergillus niger strains carrying a disrupted allele of the previously cloned and characterized kexB gene [Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 66 (2000) 363] encoding a furin-type endoprotease. Deletion of the single-copy gene confirms it

  20. Several fusion genes identified by whole transcriptome sequencing in a spindle cell sarcoma with rearrangements of chromosome arm 12q and MDM2 amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagopoulos, Ioannis; Bjerkehagen, Bodil; Gorunova, Ludmila; Berner, Jeanne-Marie; Boye, Kjetil; Heim, Sverre

    2014-11-01

    Spindle cell tumors are clinically heterogeneous but morphologically similar neoplasms that can occur anywhere, mostly in adult patients. They are treated primarily with surgery to which is often added adjuvant or neoadjuvant radiation. Sub-classification of spindle cell sarcomas requires integration of histology, clinicopathological parameters, immunohistochemistry, cytogenetics (including fluorescence in situ hybridization) and/or molecular genetics. Some of the tumor subtypes are characterized by the presence of distinct chromosomal translocations and fusion genes. When no signs of differentiation are seen, the diagnosis by exclusion becomes undifferentiated spindle cell sarcoma. Cytogenetic, RNA sequencing and RT-PCR analyses were performed on a case of spindle cell sarcoma. The karyotype of the primary tumor was 46,X,del(X)(p?11p?22), der(12)(12pter→12q?22::12q?15→q?22::16p11→16pter),-16,+r(12). MDM2 was found amplified in both the primary tumor and a meta-stasis. RNA-Seq of the primary tumor identified four fusion genes, PTGES3-PTPRB, HMGA2-DYRK2, TMBIM4-MSRB3 and USP15-CNTN1, in which all the partner genes map to the q arm of chromosome 12. In material from the metastasis, RT-PCR detected the PTGES3-PTPRB, HMGA2-DYRK2 and TMBIM4-MSRB3 whereas no USP15-CNTN1 fusion transcript was found. Because MDM2 amplification and the fusion transcripts PTGES3-PTPRB, HMGA2-DYRK2 and TMBIM4-MSRB3 were found both in the primary tumor and in the metastasis, they are components of the same clone and may be involved both in initiation and progression of the tumor. Which of them is pathogenetically primary remains unknown.

  1. PARP inhibition sensitizes to low dose-rate radiation TMPRSS2-ERG fusion gene-expressing and PTEN-deficient prostate cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payel Chatterjee

    Full Text Available Exposure to genotoxic agents, such as irradiation produces DNA damage, the toxicity of which is augmented when the DNA repair is impaired. Poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP inhibitors were found to be "synthetic lethal" in cells deficient in BRCA1 and BRCA2 that impair homologous recombination. However, since many tumors, including prostate cancer (PCa rarely have on such mutations, there is considerable interest in finding alternative determinants of PARP inhibitor sensitivity. We evaluated the effectiveness of radiation in combination with the PARP inhibitor, rucaparib in PCa cells. The combination index for clonogenic survival following radiation and rucaparib treatments revealed synergistic interactions in a panel of PCa cell lines, being strongest for LNCaP and VCaP cells that express ETS gene fusion proteins. These findings correlated with synergistic interactions for senescence activation, as indicated by β--galactosidase staining. Absence of PTEN and presence of ETS gene fusion thus facilitated activation of senescence, which contributed to decreased clonogenic survival. Increased radiosensitivity in the presence of rucaparib was associated with persistent DNA breaks, as determined by χ-H2AX, p53BP1, and Rad51 foci. VCaP cells, which harbor the TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion and PC3 cells that stably express a similar construct (fusion III showed enhanced sensitivity towards rucaparib, which, in turn, increased the radiation response to a similar extent as the DNA-PKcs inhibitor NU7441. Rucaparib radiosensitized PCa cells, with a clear benefit of low dose-rate radiation (LDR administered over a longer period of time that caused enhanced DNA damage. LDR mimicking brachytherapy, which is used successfully in the clinic, was most effective when combined with rucaparib by inducing persistent DNA damage and senescence, leading to decreased clonogenic survival. This combination was most effective in the presence of the TMPRSS2-ERG and in the

  2. The fusion partner specifies the oncogenic potential of NUP98 fusion proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Saw, Jesslyn; Curtis, David J.; Hussey, Damian J.; Dobrovic, Alexander; Aplan, Peter D.; Slape, Christopher I.

    2013-01-01

    NUP98 is among the most promiscuously translocated genes in hematological diseases. Among the 28 known fusion partners, there are two categories: homeobox genes and non-homeobox genes. The homeobox fusion partners are well-studied in animal models, resulting in HoxA cluster overexpression and hematological disease. The non- homeobox fusion partners are less well studied. We created transgenic animal models for three NUP98 fusion genes (one homeobox, two non- homeobox), and show that in this s...

  3. Pandemic H1N1 influenza A directly induces a robust and acute inflammatory gene signature in primary human bronchial epithelial cells downstream of membrane fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paquette, Stéphane G. [Division of Experimental Therapeutics, Toronto General Hospital Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Institute of Medical Science, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Banner, David [Division of Experimental Therapeutics, Toronto General Hospital Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Chi, Le Thi Bao [Department of Microbiology, Hue University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Thua Thien Hue (Viet Nam); Carlo Urbani Centre, Hue University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Thua Thien Hue (Viet Nam); Leon, Alberto J. [Division of Experimental Therapeutics, Toronto General Hospital Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); International Institute of Infection and Immunity, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong (China); Xu, Luoling; Ran, Longsi [Division of Experimental Therapeutics, Toronto General Hospital Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Huang, Stephen S.H. [Division of Experimental Therapeutics, Toronto General Hospital Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Farooqui, Amber [Division of Experimental Therapeutics, Toronto General Hospital Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); International Institute of Infection and Immunity, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong (China); and others

    2014-01-05

    Pandemic H1N1 influenza A (H1N1pdm) elicits stronger pulmonary inflammation than previously circulating seasonal H1N1 influenza A (sH1N1), yet mechanisms of inflammatory activation in respiratory epithelial cells during H1N1pdm infection are unclear. We investigated host responses to H1N1pdm/sH1N1 infection and virus entry mechanisms in primary human bronchial epithelial cells in vitro. H1N1pdm infection rapidly initiated a robust inflammatory gene signature (3 h post-infection) not elicited by sH1N1 infection. Protein secretion inhibition had no effect on gene induction. Infection with membrane fusion deficient H1N1pdm failed to induce robust inflammatory gene expression which was rescued with restoration of fusion ability, suggesting H1N1pdm directly triggered the inflammatory signature downstream of membrane fusion. Investigation of intra-virion components revealed H1N1pdm viral RNA (vRNA) triggered a stronger inflammatory phenotype than sH1N1 vRNA. Thus, our study is first to report H1N1pdm induces greater inflammatory gene expression than sH1N1 in vitro due to direct virus–epithelial cell interaction. - Highlights: • We investigated H1N1pdm/sH1N1 infection in primary epithelial cells. • H1N1pdm directly initiated a robust inflammatory gene signature, sH1N1 did not. • H1N1pdm viral RNA triggered a stronger response than sH1N1. • H1N1pdm induces greater response due to direct virus–cell interaction. • These results have potential to impact vaccine and therapeutic development.

  4. Identification of the metastasis potential and its associated genes in melanoma multinucleated giant cells using the PHA-ECM830 fusion method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Ruifang; Pan, Chunxiao; Zhou, Yiqiang; Liu, Yuanbo; Jin, Guishan; Liu, Fusheng

    2016-01-01

    Malignant melanoma causes skin cancer with high rates of mortality. Multinucleated giant cells (MGCs) are frequently observed in tumor pathological analysis, especially in metastasized sites, and are related to poor prognosis. However, the role of MGCs in melanoma development and metastasis is currently unknown. In the present study, we obtained melanoma MGCs (M-MGCs) in vitro using the modified phytohaemagglutinin (PHA)-ECM830 electronic fusion method (fusion efficiency was significantly enhanced by adding PHA to agglutinate cells before electronic fusion). We found that M-MGCs showed decreased proliferation potential but increased pulmonary metastasis ability relative to the parental B16-F10 cells. Microarray and bioinformatics analysis showed that β-tubulin gene group was significantly upregulated in MMGCs. A member of this gene group, TUBB2B, exhibited significantly enhanced expression, indicating that it may play an important role in melanoma metastasis. Our results provide novel insights into the properties of melanoma and they could contribute towards the design of new strategies for rapid diagnosis and treatment of this cancer.

  5. A case of meningeal myxoid solitary fibrous tumor/hemangiopericytoma with unique NAB2-STAT6 fusion gene and symptomatic intratumoral hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takako Kihara, MD

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We experienced a case of meningeal solitary fibrous tumor (SFT/hemangiopericytoma (HPC with symptomatic intratumoral hemorrhage in a 67-year-old Japanese woman. Her chief complaints were sudden onset of motor aphasia and right hemiparesis. Brain computed tomography showed the hemorrhagic mass adjacent to the superior sagittal sinus. The mass was resected and pathological examination of the specimen revealed a tumor that is rich in vessels and accompanied with intratumoral hemorrhage. Short spindle tumor cells were proliferating with myxoid stroma. Tumor cells appeared to be arranged around the vessels and sometimes attached to the vessel wall directly. Although hyalinization of the vessel wall was observed, neither patternless pattern nor staghorn vessels were seen. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the tumor cells were positive for both CD34 and nuclear STAT6. Moreover, gene analyses revealed unique NAB2-STAT6 fusion. Immunohistochemical findings and fusion-gene analyses enabled us to make the definite diagnosis of meningeal myxoid SFT/HPC. The present case showed the three unique features such as clinically symptomatic intratumoral hemorrhage at the onset, rare variant of myxoid SFT/HPC, and unique NAB2-STAT6 fusion.

  6. Epigenome Mapping Reveals Distinct Modes of Gene Regulation and Widespread Enhancer Reprogramming by the Oncogenic Fusion Protein EWS-FLI1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleni M. Tomazou

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Transcription factor fusion proteins can transform cells by inducing global changes of the transcriptome, often creating a state of oncogene addiction. Here, we investigate the role of epigenetic mechanisms in this process, focusing on Ewing sarcoma cells that are dependent on the EWS-FLI1 fusion protein. We established reference epigenome maps comprising DNA methylation, seven histone marks, open chromatin states, and RNA levels, and we analyzed the epigenome dynamics upon downregulation of the driving oncogene. Reduced EWS-FLI1 expression led to widespread epigenetic changes in promoters, enhancers, and super-enhancers, and we identified histone H3K27 acetylation as the most strongly affected mark. Clustering of epigenetic promoter signatures defined classes of EWS-FLI1-regulated genes that responded differently to low-dose treatment with histone deacetylase inhibitors. Furthermore, we observed strong and opposing enrichment patterns for E2F and AP-1 among EWS-FLI1-correlated and anticorrelated genes. Our data describe extensive genome-wide rewiring of epigenetic cell states driven by an oncogenic fusion protein.

  7. Global gene expression profiling of PAX-FKHR fusion-positive alveolar and PAX-FKHR fusion-negative embryonal rhabdomyosarcomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laé, M; Ahn, E H; Mercado, G E; Chuai, S; Edgar, M; Pawel, B R; Olshen, A; Barr, F G; Ladanyi, M

    2007-06-01

    Paediatric rhabdomyosarcomas (RMS) are classified into two major subtypes based on histological appearance, embryonal (ERMS) and alveolar (ARMS), but this clinically critical distinction is often difficult on morphological grounds alone. ARMS, the more aggressive subtype, is associated in most cases with unique recurrent translocations fusing the PAX3 or PAX7 transcription factor genes to FKHR. In contrast, ERMS lacks unique genetic alterations. To identify novel diagnostic markers and potential therapeutic targets, we analysed the global gene expression profiles of these two RMS subtypes in 23 ARMS (16 PAX3-FKHR, 7 PAX7-FKHR) and 15 ERMS (all PAX-FKHR-negative) using Affymetrix HG-U133A oligonucleotide arrays. A statistically stringent supervised comparison of the ARMS and ERMS expression profiles revealed 121 genes that were significantly differentially expressed, of which 112 were higher in ARMS, including genes of interest as potential diagnostic markers or therapeutic targets, such as CNR1, PIPOX (sarcosine oxidase), and TFAPbeta. Interestingly, many known or putative downstream targets of PAX3-FKHR were highly overexpressed in ARMS relative to ERMS, including CNR1, DCX, ABAT, ASS, JAKMIP2, DKFZp762M127, and NRCAM. We validated the highly differential expression of five genes, including CNR1, DKFZp762M127, DCX, PIPOX, and FOXF1 in ARMS relative to ERMS by quantitative RT-PCR on an independent set of samples. Finally, we developed a ten-gene microarray-based predictor that distinguished ARMS from ERMS with approximately 95% accuracy both in our data by cross-validation and in an independent validation using a published dataset of 26 samples. The gene expression signature of ARMS provides a source of potential diagnostic markers, therapeutic targets, and PAX-FKHR downstream genes, and can be used to reliably distinguish these sarcomas from ERMS. Copyright 2007 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Characterization of a Cellulomonas fimi exoglucanase/xylanase-endoglucanase gene fusion which improves microbial degradation of cellulosic biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duedu, Kwabena O; French, Christopher E

    2016-11-01

    Effective degradation of cellulose requires multiple classes of enzyme working together. However, naturally occurring cellulases with multiple catalytic domains seem to be rather rare in known cellulose-degrading organisms. A fusion protein made from Cellulomonas fimi exo- and endo- glucanases, Cex and CenA which improves breakdown of cellulose is described. A homologous carbohydrate binding module (CBM-2) present in both glucanases was fused to give a fusion protein CxnA. CxnA or unfused constructs (Cex+CenA, Cex, or CenA) were expressed in Escherichia coli and Citrobacter freundii. The latter recombinant strains were cultured at the expense of cellulose filter paper. The expressed CxnA had both exo- and endo- glucanase activities. It was also exported to the supernatant as were the non-fused proteins. In addition, the hybrid CBM from the fusion could bind to microcrystalline cellulose. Growth of C. freundii expressing CxnA was superior to that of cells expressing the unfused proteins. Physical degradation of filter paper was also faster with the cells expressing fusion protein than the other constructs. Our results show that fusion proteins with multiple catalytic domains can improve the efficiency of cellulose degradation. Such fusion proteins could potentially substitute cloning of multiple enzymes as well as improving product yields. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparative Assessment of Induced Immune Responses Following Intramuscular Immunization with Fusion and Cocktail of LeIF, LACK and TSA Genes Against Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in BALB/c Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maspi, Nahid; Ghaffarifar, Fatemeh; Sharifi, Zohreh; Dalimi, Abdolhossein; Dayer, Mohammad Saaid

    2018-02-01

    In the present study, we evaluated induced immune responses following DNA vaccine containing cocktail or fusion of LeIF, LACK and TSA genes or each gene alone. Mice were injected with 100 µg of each plasmid containing the gene of insert, plasmid DNA alone as the first control group or phosphate buffer saline as the second control group. Then, cellular and humoral responses, lesion size were measured for all groups. All vaccinated mice induced Th1 immune responses against Leishmania characterized by higher IFN-γ and IgG2a levels compared with control groups (p fusion and cocktail vaccines in comparison with LACK (p fusion and cocktail groups produced higher IgG2a values than groups vaccinated with a gene alone (p fusion DNA than three groups vaccinated with one gene alone (p fusion and cocktail groups. Overall, immunized mice with cocktail and fusion vaccines showed stronger Th1 response by production of higher IFN-γ and IgG2a and showed smaller mean lesion size. Therefore, use of multiple antigens can improve induced immune responses by DNA vaccination.

  10. Horizontal transmission of malignancy: in-vivo fusion of human lymphomas with hamster stroma produces tumors retaining human genes and lymphoid pathology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Goldenberg

    Full Text Available We report the in-vivo fusion of two Hodgkin lymphomas with golden hamster cheek pouch cells, resulting in serially-transplanted (over 5-6 years GW-532 and GW-584 heterosynkaryon tumor cells displaying both human and hamster DNA (by FISH, lymphoma-like morphology, aggressive metastasis, and retention of 7 human genes (CD74, CXCR4, CD19, CD20, CD71, CD79b, and VIM out of 24 tested by PCR. The prevalence of B-cell restricted genes (CD19, CD20, and CD79b suggests that this uniform population may be the clonal initiating (malignant cells of Hodgkin lymphoma, despite their not showing translation to their respective proteins by immunohistochemical analysis. This is believed to be the first report of in-vivo cell-cell fusion of human lymphoma and rodent host cells, and may be a method to disclose genes regulating both organoid and metastasis signatures, suggesting that the horizontal transfer of tumor DNA to adjacent stromal cells may be implicated in tumor heterogeneity and progression. The B-cell gene signature of the hybrid xenografts suggests that Hodgkin lymphoma, or its initiating cells, is a B-cell malignancy.

  11. Detection of Echinoderm Microtubule Associated Protein Like 4-Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase Fusion Genes in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Clinical Samples by a Real-time Quantitative Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Zhao, Jin-Yin; Chen, Zhi-Xia; Zhong, Wei; Li, Long-Yun; Liu, Li-Cheng; Hu, Xiao-Xu; Chen, Wei-Jun; Wang, Meng-Zhao

    2016-12-20

    Objective To establish a real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assay (qRT-PCR) for the rapid, sensitive, and specific detection of echinoderm microtubule associated protein like 4-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (EML4-ALK) fusion genes in non-small cell lung cancer. Methods The specific primers for the four variants of EML4-ALK fusion genes (V1, V2, V3a, and V3b) and Taqman fluorescence probes for the detection of the target sequences were carefully designed by the Primer Premier 5.0 software. Then, using pseudovirus containing EML4-ALK fusion genes variants (V1, V2, V3a, and V3b) as the study objects, we further analyzed the lower limit, sensitivity, and specificity of this method. Finally, 50 clinical samples, including 3 ALK-fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) positive specimens, were collected and used to detect EML4-ALK fusion genes using this method. Results The lower limit of this method for the detection of EML4-ALK fusion genes was 10 copies/μl if no interference of background RNA existed. Regarding the method's sensitivity, the detection resolution was as high as 1% and 0.5% in the background of 500 and 5000 copies/μl wild-type ALK gene, respectively. Regarding the method's specificity, no non-specific amplification was found when it was used to detect EML4-ALK fusion genes in leukocyte and plasma RNA samples from healthy volunteers. Among the 50 clinical samples, 47 ALK-FISH negative samples were also negative. Among 3 ALK-FISH positive samples, 2 cases were detected positive using this method, but another was not detected because of the failure of RNA extraction. Conclusion The proposed qRT-PCR assay for the detection of EML4-ALK fusion genes is rapid, simple, sensitive, and specific, which is deserved to be validated and widely used in clinical settings.

  12. Differential transactivation by orphan nuclear receptor NOR1 and its fusion gene product EWS/NOR1: possible involvement of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase I, PARP-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkura, Naganari; Nagamura, Yuko; Tsukada, Toshihiko

    2008-10-15

    In extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma, a chromosomal translocation creates a gene fusion between EWS and an orphan nuclear receptor, NOR1. The resulting fusion protein EWS/NOR1 has been believed to lead to malignant transformation by functioning as a transactivator for NOR1-target genes. By comparing the gene expression profiles of NOR1- and EWS/NOR1-overexpressing cells, we found that they largely shared up-regulated genes, but no significant correlation was observed with respect to the transactivation levels of each gene. In addition, the proteins associated with NOR1 and EWS/NOR1 were mostly the same in these cells. The results suggest that these proteins differentially transactivate overlapping target genes through a similar transcriptional machinery. To clarify the mechanisms underlying the transcriptional divergence between NOR1 and EWS/NOR1, we searched for alternatively associated proteins, and identified poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase I (PARP-1) as an NOR1-specific binding protein. Consistent with its binding properties, PARP-1 acted as a transcriptional repressor of NOR1, but not EWS/NOR1, in a luciferase reporter assay employing PARP-1(-/-) fibroblasts. Interestingly, suppressive activity of PARP-1 was observed in a DNA response element-specific manner, and in a subtype-specific manner toward the NR4A family (Nur77, Nurr1, and NOR1), suggesting that PARP-1 plays a role in the diversity of transcriptional regulation mediated by the NR4A family in normal cells. Altogether, our findings suggest that NOR1 and EWS/NOR1 regulate overlapping target genes differently by utilizing associated proteins, including PARP-1; and that EWS/NOR1 may acquire oncogenic activities by avoiding (or gaining) transcription factor-specific modulation by the associated proteins. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. EWS-Oct-4B, an alternative EWS-Oct-4 fusion gene, is a potent oncogene linked to human epithelial tumours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S; Lim, B; Kim, J

    2010-01-01

    Background: Characterisation of EWS-Oct-4 translocation fusion product in bone and soft-tissue tumours revealed a chimeric gene resulting from an in-frame fusion between EWS (Ewing's sarcoma gene) exons 1–6 and Oct-4 exons 1–4. Recently, an alternative form of the fusion protein between the EWS and Oct-4 genes, named EWS-Oct-4B, was reported in two types of epithelial tumours, a hidradenoma of the skin and a mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the salivary glands. As the N-terminal and POU domains of the EWS-Oct-4 and EWS-Oct-4B proteins are not structurally identical, we decided to investigate the functional consequences of the EWS-Oct-4B fusion. Methods: In this report, we have characterised the EWS-Oct-4B fusion protein. To investigate how the EWS-Oct-4B protein contributes to tumourigenesis in human cancers, we analysed its DNA-binding activity, subcellular localisation, transcriptional activation behaviour, and oncogenic properties. Results: We found that this new chimeric gene encodes a nuclear protein that binds DNA with the same sequence specificity as the parental Oct-4 protein or the fusion EWS-Oct-4 protein. We show that the nuclear localisation signal of EWS-Oct-4B is dependent on the POU DNA-binding domain, and we identified a cluster of basic amino acids, 269RKRKR273, in the POU domain that specifically mediates the nuclear localisation of EWS-Oct-4B. Comparison of the properties of EWS-Oct-4B and EWS-Oct-4 indicated that EWS-Oct-4B is a less-potent transcriptional activator of a reporter construct carrying the Oct-4-binding sites. Deletion analysis of the functional domains of EWS-Oct-4B revealed that the EWS N-terminal domain (NTD)B, POU, and C-terminal domain (CTD) are necessary for its full transactivation potential. Despite its reduced activity as a transcriptional activator, EWS-Oct-4B regulated the expression of fgf-4 (fibroblast growth factor-4) and nanog, which are potent mitogens, as well as of Oct-4 downstream target genes, the promoters of

  14. Osteoclast Fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marie Julie Møller, Anaïs; Delaissé, Jean-Marie; Søe, Kent

    2017-01-01

    suggesting that fusion partners may specifically select each other and that heterogeneity between the partners seems to play a role. Therefore, we set out to directly test the hypothesis that fusion factors have a heterogenic involvement at different stages of nuclearity. Therefore, we have analyzed...... on the nuclearity of fusion partners. While CD47 promotes cell fusions involving mono-nucleated pre-osteoclasts, syncytin-1 promotes fusion of two multi-nucleated osteoclasts, but also reduces the number of fusions between mono-nucleated pre-osteoclasts. Furthermore, CD47 seems to mediate fusion mostly through......Investigations addressing the molecular keys of osteoclast fusion are primarily based on end-point analyses. No matter if investigations are performed in vivo or in vitro the impact of a given factor is predominantly analyzed by counting the number of multi-nucleated cells, the number of nuclei per...

  15. Membrane fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Pól Martin

    2015-01-01

    At Stanford University, Boxer lab, I worked on membrane fusion of small unilamellar lipid vesicles to flat membranes tethered to glass surfaces. This geometry closely resembles biological systems in which liposomes fuse to plasma membranes. The fusion mechanism was studied using DNA zippering...... between complementary strands linked to the two apposing membranes closely mimicking the zippering mechanism of SNARE fusion complexes....

  16. Temsirolimus in the treatment of renal cell carcinoma associated with Xp11.2 translocation/TFE gene fusion proteins: a case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Brown

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Xp11.2 translocation renal cell carcinomas (TRCCs are a rare family of tumors newly recognized by the World Health Organization (WHO in 2004. These tumors result in the fusion of partner genes to the TFE3 gene located on Xp11.2. They are most common in the pediatric population, but have been recently implicated in adult renal cell carcinoma (RCC presenting at an early age. TFE3-mediated direct transcriptional upregulation of the Met tyrosine kinase receptor triggers dramatic activation of downstream signaling pathways including the protein kinase B (Akt/phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR pathways. Temsirolimus is an inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR kinase, a component of intracellular signaling pathways involved in the growth and proliferation of malignant cells. Here we present a case of a 22-year old female who has been treated with temsirolimus for her Xp11.2/TFE3 gene fusion RCC.

  17. BCR-ABL fusion genes and laboratory findings in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in northeast Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayatollahi, Hossein; Keramati, Mohammad Reza; Shirdel, Abbas; Kooshyar, Mohammad Mehdi; Raiszadeh, Majid; Shakeri, Sepideh; Sadeghian, Mohammad Hadi

    2018-01-01

    A specific chromosomal abnormality, the Philadelphia chromosome (BCR-ABL fusion), is present in all patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). The b2a2 and b3a2 fusion mRNAs encode p210 fusion protein p210 and e1a2 encode p190. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of BCR-ABL fusion transcript variants in Northeast of Iranian CML patients and to compare the laboratory results of our patients. This study was conducted in 85 peripheral blood and bone marrow samples of CML patients. Ribonucleic acid (RNA) was extracted by a commercial kit, RT- PCR for identifying BCR-ABL fusions was carried out by using designed primers and the PCR products were electrophoresed in agarose gels. Finally, statistical analysis was performed for variant frequency identification and their comparison was performed. All patients examined were positive for BCR/ABL rearrangement. Fusion of b3a2 was detected in 53 (62.35%) patients, b2a2 in 25 (29.41), e1a2 in 1 (1.17%) and coexpression of b3a2 and e1a2 in 6 (7.05%) patients. There were significant differences between the mean age in patients with b3a2 positive ( 44.07 years) and in b3a2 negative group (50.35 years) however, no significant differences were seen between sex and b2a2 (P=0.61), b3a2 (P=0.79) and e1a2 (P=0.20). This study showed higher frequency b3a2 than b2a2 and e1a2 transcripts in CML patients in Northeast Iran and there was no association between e1a2 transcripts frequencies and monocytosis in peripheral blood.

  18. Molecular Characterization of TMPRSS2-ERG Gene Fusion in the NCI-H660 Prostate Cancer Cell Line: A New Perspective for an Old Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten D. Mertz

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have established that a significant fraction of prostate cancers harbor a signature gene fusion between the 5' region of androgen-regulated TMPRSS2 and an ETS family transcription factor, most commonly ERG. Studies on the molecular mechanisms and functional consequences of this important chromosomal rearrangement are currently limited to the VCaP cell line derived from a vertebral bone metastasis of a hormone-refractory prostate tumor. Here we report on the NCI-H660 cell line, derived from a metastasic site of an extrapulmonary small cell carcinoma arising from the prostate. NCI-H660 harbors TMPRSS2-ERG fusion with a homozygous intronic deletion between TMPRSS2 and ERG. We demonstrate this by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, a two-stage dual-color interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH assay testing for TMPRSS2 and ERG break-aparts, and single-nucleotide polymorphism oligonucleotide arrays. The deletion is consistent with the common intronic deletion found on chromosome 21q22.2-3 in human prostate cancer samples. We demonstrate the physical juxtaposition of TMPRSS2 and ERG on the DNA level by fiber FISH. The androgen receptor-negative NCI-H660 cell line expresses ERG in an androgen-independent fashion. This in vitro model system has the potential to provide important pathobiologic insights into TMPRSS2-ERG fusion prostate cancer.

  19. Fusion rings and fusion ideals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Troels Bak

    by the so-called fusion ideals. The fusion rings of Wess-Zumino-Witten models have been widely studied and are well understood in terms of precise combinatorial descriptions and explicit generating sets of the fusion ideals. They also appear in another, more general, setting via tilting modules for quantum...

  20. Gene design, fusion technology and TEV cleavage conditions influence the purification of oxidized disulphide-rich venom peptides in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sequeira, Ana Filipa; Turchetto, Jeremy; Saez, Natalie J; Peysson, Fanny; Ramond, Laurie; Duhoo, Yoan; Blémont, Marilyne; Fernandes, Vânia O; Gama, Luís T; Ferreira, Luís M A; Guerreiro, Catarina I P I; Gilles, Nicolas; Darbon, Hervé; Fontes, Carlos M G A; Vincentelli, Renaud

    2017-01-17

    Animal venoms are large, complex libraries of bioactive, disulphide-rich peptides. These peptides, and their novel biological activities, are of increasing pharmacological and therapeutic importance. However, recombinant expression of venom peptides in Escherichia coli remains difficult due to the significant number of cysteine residues requiring effective post-translational processing. There is also an urgent need to develop high-throughput recombinant protocols applicable to the production of reticulated peptides to enable efficient screening of their drug potential. Here, a comprehensive study was developed to investigate how synthetic gene design, choice of fusion tag, compartment of expression, tag removal conditions and protease recognition site affect levels of solubility of oxidized venom peptides produced in E. coli. The data revealed that expression of venom peptides imposes significant pressure on cysteine codon selection. DsbC was the best fusion tag for venom peptide expression, in particular when the fusion was directed to the bacterial periplasm. While the redox activity of DsbC was not essential to maximize expression of recombinant fusion proteins, redox activity did lead to higher levels of correctly folded target peptides. With the exception of proline, the canonical TEV protease recognition site tolerated all other residues at its C-terminus, confirming that no non-native residues, which might affect activity, need to be incorporated at the N-terminus of recombinant peptides for tag removal. This study reveals that E. coli is a convenient heterologous host for the expression of soluble and functional venom peptides. Using the optimal construct design, a large and diverse range of animal venom peptides were produced in the µM scale. These results open up new possibilities for the high-throughput production of recombinant disulphide-rich peptides in E. coli.

  1. Fusion neutronics

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Yican

    2017-01-01

    This book provides a systematic and comprehensive introduction to fusion neutronics, covering all key topics from the fundamental theories and methodologies, as well as a wide range of fusion system designs and experiments. It is the first-ever book focusing on the subject of fusion neutronics research. Compared with other nuclear devices such as fission reactors and accelerators, fusion systems are normally characterized by their complex geometry and nuclear physics, which entail new challenges for neutronics such as complicated modeling, deep penetration, low simulation efficiency, multi-physics coupling, etc. The book focuses on the neutronics characteristics of fusion systems and introduces a series of theories and methodologies that were developed to address the challenges of fusion neutronics, and which have since been widely applied all over the world. Further, it introduces readers to neutronics design’s unique principles and procedures, experimental methodologies and technologies for fusion systems...

  2. Imaging Expression of Cytosine Deaminase-Herpes Virus Thymidine Kinase Fusion Gene (CD/TK Expression with [124I]FIAU and PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevor Hackman

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Double prodrug activation gene therapy using the Escherichia coli cytosine deaminase (CDherpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk fusion gene (CD/TK with 5-fluorocytosine (5FC, ganciclovir (GCV, and radiotherapy is currently under evaluation for treatment of different tumors. We assessed the efficacy of noninvasive imaging with [124I]FIAU (2′-fluoro-2′-deoxy-1-β-d-arabinofuranosyl-5-iodo-uracil and positron emission tomography (PET for monitoring expression of the CD/TK fusion gene. Walker-256 tumor cells were transduced with a retroviral vector bearing the CD/TK gene (W256CD/TK cells. The activity of HSV1-TK and CD subunits of the CD/TK gene product was assessed in different single cell-derived clones of W256CD/TK cells using the FIAU radiotracer accumulation assay in cells and a CD enzyme assay in cell homogenates, respectively. A linear relationship was observed between the levels of CD and HSV1-tk subunit expression in corresponding clones in vitro over a wide range of CD/TK expression levels. Several clones of W256CD/TK cells with significantly different levels of CD/TK expression were selected and used to produce multiple subcutaneous tumors in rats. PET imaging of HSV1-TK subunit activity with [124I]FIAU was performed on these animals and demonstrated that different levels of CD/TK expression in subcutaneous W256CD/TK tumors can be imaged quantitatively. CD expression in subcutaneous tumor sample homogenates was measured using a CD enzyme assay. A comparison of CD and HSV1-TK subunit enzymatic activity of the CD/TK fusion protein in vivo showed a significant correlation. Knowing this relationship, the parametric images of CD subunit activity were generated. Imaging with [124I]FIAU and PET could provide pre- and posttreatment assessments of CD/TK-based double prodrug activation in clinical gene therapy trials.

  3. CRISPR/Cas9 Engineering of Adult Mouse Liver Demonstrates That the Dnajb1-Prkaca Gene Fusion Is Sufficient to Induce Tumors Resembling Fibrolamellar Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelholm, Lars H; Riaz, Anjum; Serra, Denise; Dagnæs-Hansen, Frederik; Johansen, Jens V; Santoni-Rugiu, Eric; Hansen, Steen H; Niola, Francesco; Frödin, Morten

    2017-12-01

    Fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma (FL-HCC) is a primary liver cancer that predominantly affects children and young adults with no underlying liver disease. A somatic, 400 Kb deletion on chromosome 19 that fuses part of the DnaJ heat shock protein family (Hsp40) member B1 gene (DNAJB1) to the protein kinase cAMP-activated catalytic subunit alpha gene (PRKACA) has been repeatedly identified in patients with FL-HCC. However, the DNAJB1-PRKACA gene fusion has not been shown to induce liver tumorigenesis. We used the CRISPR/Cas9 technique to delete in mice the syntenic region on chromosome 8 to create a Dnajb1-Prkaca fusion and monitored the mice for liver tumor development. We delivered CRISPR/Cas9 vectors designed to juxtapose exon 1 of Dnajb1 with exon 2 of Prkaca to create the Dnajb1-Prkaca gene fusion associated with FL-HCC, or control Cas9 vector, via hydrodynamic tail vein injection to livers of 8-week-old female FVB/N mice. These mice did not have any other engineered genetic alterations and were not exposed to liver toxins or carcinogens. Liver tissues were collected 14 months after delivery; genomic DNA was analyzed by PCR to detect the Dnajb1-Prkaca fusion, and tissues were characterized by histology, immunohistochemistry, RNA sequencing, and whole-exome sequencing. Livers from 12 of the 15 mice given the vectors to induce the Dnajb1-Prkaca gene fusion, but none of the 11 mice given the control vector, developed neoplasms. The tumors contained the Dnajb1-Prkaca gene fusion and had histologic and cytologic features of human FL-HCCs: large polygonal cells with granular, eosinophilic, and mitochondria-rich cytoplasm, prominent nucleoli, and markers of hepatocytes and cholangiocytes. In comparing expression levels of genes between the mouse tumor and non-tumor liver cells, we identified changes similar to those detected in human FL-HCC, which included genes that affect cell cycle and mitosis regulation. Genomic analysis of mouse neoplasms induced by

  4. Renal Cell Carcinoma Associated with Xp11.2 Translocation/TFE3 Gene Fusion: A Rare Case Report with Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puneet Ahluwalia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The recently recognized renal cell carcinomas associated with Xp11.2 translocations are rare tumors predominantly reported in children. Chromosome Xp11.2 translocation results in gene fusion related to transcription factor E3 (TFE3 that plays an important role in proliferation and survival. Case Report. Herein, we present two cases of a TFE3 translocation-associated RCC in young female adults, one detected incidentally and the other one presenting with gross hematuria. Tumor is characterized by immunohistochemistry and a literature review with optimal treatment regimen is presented. Discussion. Xp11.2 translocation RCCs in adult patients are associated with advanced stages, large tumors, and extracapsular disease and usually have an aggressive clinical course. Conclusion. In TFE3 RCC, the genetic background may not only contribute to tumorigenesis, but also determine the response to chemotherapy and targeted therapy. Therefore it is necessary to diagnose this tumor entity accurately. Because of the small number of TFE3 gene fusion-related renal tumors described in the literature, the exact biologic behavior and impact of current treatment modalities remain to be uncertain.

  5. [The expression of gene related to salt tolerance from Sinorhizobium meliloti 042BM in Escherichia coli and purification of its fusion protein].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Shi-chao; Wang, Lei; Li, Xiao-hong; Qi, Su-wei; Yang, Su-sheng

    2005-06-01

    A 1.9kb DNA fragment related to salt tolerance of S. meliloti strain 042BM containing two open reading frames were obtained by PCR amplification and ligated into shuttle vector pBBR1-MCS2. The complementation experiment showed that ORF2 is related to salt tolerance and named as rstA gene. Then the gene was cloned into the expression vector pThio-HisA, B and C, respectively, and recombinant expression vectors pGSA, pGB and pGC were constructed, and transformed into E. coli Top10. Inducing by IPTG and analyzing with SDS-PAGE, the fusion protein encoded by pGSA was obtained,and it is 36% content of whole cell protein. It was isolated and purified by affinity chromography on ProBond, and the inclusion body precipitated by saturated sulfate ammonium, and 95% purity of fusion protein was obtained. The final product displayed a single band with a corresponding molecular weight 43kD in SDS-PAGE, and was verified by the Western blot.

  6. Improved immunogenicity of Newcastle disease virus inactivated vaccine following DNA vaccination using Newcastle disease virus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase and fusion protein genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firouzamandi, Masoumeh; Moeini, Hassan; Hosseini, Davood; Bejo, Mohd Hair; Omar, Abdul Rahman; Mehrbod, Parvaneh; Ideris, Aini

    2016-03-01

    The present study describes the development of DNA vaccines using the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) and fusion (F) genes from AF2240 Newcastle disease virus strain, namely pIRES/HN, pIRES/F and pIRES-F/HN. Transient expression analysis of the constructs in Vero cells revealed the successful expression of gene inserts in vitro. Moreover, in vivo experiments showed that single vaccination with the constructed plasmid DNA (pDNA) followed by a boost with inactivated vaccine induced a significant difference in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay antibody levels (p inactivated vaccine alone. Taken together, these results indicated that recombinant pDNA could be used to increase the efficacy of the inactivated vaccine immunization procedure.

  7. Characterization of a human glycoprotein with a potential role in sperm-egg fusion: cDNA cloning, immunohistochemical localization, and chromosomal assignment of the gene (AEGL1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Masaru; Fujimoto, Seiichiro; Takano, Hiroko [Hokkaido Univ. School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan)] [and others

    1996-03-05

    Acidic epididymal glycoprotein (AEG), thus far identified only in rodents, is one of the sperm surface proteins involved in the fusion of the sperm and egg plasma membranes. In the present study, we describe the isolation and characterization of cDNA encoding a human glycoprotein related to AEG. Although this protein, designated ARP (AEG-related protein), is not the ortholog of rodent AEG, it resembles AEG in that it is an epididymal secretory glycoprotein that binds to the postacrosomal region of the sperm head. The fact that no AEG mRNA can be detected in the human epididymis suggests that ARP might be the functional counterpart of rodent AEG. The gene encoding ARP (AEGL1) was mapped by fluorescence in situ hybridization to 6p21.1-p21.2. This result indicates that AEGL1 and the mouse gene for AEG are located in the chromosomal segments with conserved syntenies. 43 refs., 6 figs.

  8. Cell surface expression system for the display of heterologous gene products using chimeric flagellin fusions of bacillus halodurans isolate

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Du Plessis, A

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available N-terminal sequencing gave rise to homology to flagellin protein, product of the hag gene. protein, product of the hag gene. Gene was cloned by using degenerate primers and inverse PCR. The gene sequence as well as the up- and down- stream regions...

  9. Histological and immunohistochemical characteristics of undifferentiated small round cell sarcomas associated with CIC-DUX4 and BCOR-CCNB3 fusion genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yuichi; Kuda, Masaaki; Kohashi, Kenichi; Yamamoto, Hidetaka; Takemoto, Junkichi; Ishii, Takeaki; Iura, Kunio; Maekawa, Akira; Bekki, Hirofumi; Ito, Takamichi; Otsuka, Hiroshi; Kuroda, Makoto; Honda, Yumi; Sumiyoshi, Shinji; Inoue, Takeshi; Kinoshita, Naoe; Nishida, Atsushi; Yamashita, Kyoko; Ito, Ichiro; Komune, Shizuo; Taguchi, Tomoaki; Iwamoto, Yukihide; Oda, Yoshinao

    2017-04-01

    CIC-DUX4 and BCOR-CCNB3 fusion-gene-associated small round cell sarcomas account for a proportion of pediatric small round cell sarcomas, but their pathological features have not been sufficiently clarified. We reviewed a large number of soft tissue tumors registered at our institution, retrieved the cases of unclassified tumors with a small round cell component, and subjected them to histopathological, immunohistochemical, and gene profile analysis. We reviewed 164 cases of unclassified tumors with a small round cell component and analyzed them by RT-PCR and FISH. Tumors positive for a specific fusion-gene were also subjected to histopathological and immunohistochemical examinations. We identified 16 cases of BCOR-CCNB3/CIC-associated (CIC-DUX4 or CIC gene rearrangement-positive) sarcomas. These included seven BCOR-CCNB3 sarcomas and nine CIC-associated sarcomas. Heterogeneous elements included a myxoid spindle cell component in three BCOR-CCNB3 sarcomas and an epithelioid cell component in two CIC-associated sarcomas (one CIC-DUX4-positive and one CIC-DUX4-negative sarcomas). Mitotic activity was low in both heterogeneous components. By immunohistochemistry, in seven BCOR-CCNB3 sarcomas expression of EMA was positive in two cases, of p63 in three, of CD56 in six, of TLE1 in seven, of NKX2.2 in two, of CCNB3 in seven, and of BCOR in six cases (one case could not be tested for BCOR). In nine cases of CIC-associated sarcoma, CD56 was expressed in five, alpha-smooth muscle actin in one, ERG in three, and CD99, WT1 and TLE1 each in eight cases. Both sarcoma types showed not only a small round cell component, but also a myxoid/epithelioid component with low mitotic activity.

  10. Whole-transcriptome sequencing identifies novel IRF2BP2-CDX1 fusion gene brought about by translocation t(1;5(q42;q32 in mesenchymal chondrosarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaja B Nyquist

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal chondrosarcomas (MCs account for 3-10% of primary chondrosarcomas. The cytogenetic literature includes only ten such tumours with karyotypic information and no specific aberrations have been identified. Using a purely molecular genetic approach a HEY1-NCOA2 fusion gene was recently detected in 10 of 15 investigated MCs. The fusion probably arises through intrachromosomal rearrangement of chromosome arm 8 q. We report a new case of MC showing a t(1;5(q42;q32 as the sole karyotypic aberration. Through FISH and whole transcriptome sequencing analysis we found a novel fusion between the IRF2BP2 gene and the transcription factor CDX1 gene arising from the translocation. The IRF2BP2-CDX1 has not formerly been described in human neoplasia. In our hospital's archives three more cases of MC were found, and we examined them looking for the supposedly more common HEY1-NCOA2 fusion, finding it in all three tumours but not in the case showing t(1;5 and IRF2BP2-CDX1 gene fusion. This demonstrates that genetic heterogeneity exists in mesenchymal chondrosarcoma.

  11. Bridge-Induced Translocation betweenNUP145andTOP2Yeast Genes Models the Genetic Fusion between the Human Orthologs Associated With Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosato, Valentina; West, Nicole; Zrimec, Jan; Nikitin, Dmitri V; Del Sal, Giannino; Marano, Roberto; Breitenbach, Michael; Bruschi, Carlo V

    2017-01-01

    In mammalian organisms liquid tumors such as acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are related to spontaneous chromosomal translocations ensuing in gene fusions. We previously developed a system named bridge-induced translocation (BIT) that allows linking together two different chromosomes exploiting the strong endogenous homologous recombination system of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae . The BIT system generates a heterogeneous population of cells with different aneuploidies and severe aberrant phenotypes reminiscent of a cancerogenic transformation. In this work, thanks to a complex pop-out methodology of the marker used for the selection of translocants, we succeeded by BIT technology to precisely reproduce in yeast the peculiar chromosome translocation that has been associated with AML, characterized by the fusion between the human genes NUP98 and TOP2B . To shed light on the origin of the DNA fragility within NUP98 , an extensive analysis of the curvature, bending, thermostability, and B-Z transition aptitude of the breakpoint region of NUP98 and of its yeast ortholog NUP145 has been performed. On this basis, a DNA cassette carrying homologous tails to the two genes was amplified by PCR and allowed the targeted fusion between NUP145 and TOP2 , leading to reproduce the chimeric transcript in a diploid strain of S. cerevisiae . The resulting translocated yeast obtained through BIT appears characterized by abnormal spherical bodies of nearly 500 nm of diameter, absence of external membrane and defined cytoplasmic localization. Since Nup98 is a well-known regulator of the post-transcriptional modification of P53 target genes, and P53 mutations are occasionally reported in AML, this translocant yeast strain can be used as a model to test the constitutive expression of human P53 . Although the abnormal phenotype of the translocant yeast was never rescued by its expression, an exogenous P53 was recognized to confer increased vitality to the translocants, in spite of its

  12. Genetic variability available through cell fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, H.H.; Mastrangelo-Hough, I.A.

    1977-01-01

    Results are reported for the following studies: plant hybridization through protoplast fusion using species of Nicotiana and Petunia; chromosome instability studies on culture-induced chromosome changes and chromosome elimination; chloroplast distribution in parasexual hybrids; chromosomal introgression following fusion; plant-animal fusion; and microcell-mediated chromosome transfer and chromosome-mediated gene transfer. (HLW)

  13. Controlled fusion; La fusion controlee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bobin, J.L

    2005-07-01

    During the last fifty years the researches on controlled thermonuclear fusion reached great performance in the magnetic confinement (tokamaks) as in the inertial confinement (lasers). But the state of the art is not in favor of the apparition of the fusion in the energy market before the second half of the 21 century. To explain this opinion the author presents the fusion reactions of light nuclei and the problems bound to the magnetic confinement. (A.L.B.)

  14. Delivery of human NKG2D-IL-15 fusion gene by chitosan nanoparticles to enhance antitumor immunity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Chen; Jie, Leng; Yongqi, Wang [Department of Immunology, School of Medicine, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou, 225009 (China); Weiming, Xiao [Department of Gastroenterology, The Second Clinical Medical College, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou, 225009 (China); Juqun, Xi [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Integrated Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine for Prevention and Treatment of Senile Diseases, Yangzhou, 225009 (China); Yanbing, Ding [Department of Gastroenterology, The Second Clinical Medical College, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou, 225009 (China); Li, Qian [Department of Immunology, School of Medicine, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou, 225009 (China); Xingyuan, Pan [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Zoonosis, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou, 225009 (China); Mingchun, Ji [Department of Immunology, School of Medicine, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou, 225009 (China); Weijuan, Gong, E-mail: wjgong@yzu.edu.cn [Department of Immunology, School of Medicine, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou, 225009 (China); Department of Gastroenterology, The Second Clinical Medical College, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou, 225009 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Integrated Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine for Prevention and Treatment of Senile Diseases, Yangzhou, 225009 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Zoonosis, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou, 225009 (China); Jiangsu Co-Innovation Center for Prevention and Control of Important Animal Infectious Diseases and Zoonoses, Yangzhou, 225009 (China)

    2015-07-31

    Nanoparticles are becoming promising carriers for gene delivery because of their high capacity in gene loading and low cell cytotoxicity. In this study, a chitosan-based nanoparticle encapsulated within a recombinant pcDNA3.1-dsNKG2D-IL-15 plasmid was generated. The fused dsNKG2D-IL-15 gene fragment consisted of double extracellular domains of NKG2D with IL-15 gene at downstream. The average diameter of the gene nanoparticles ranged from 200 nm to 400 nm, with mean zeta potential value of 53.8 ± 6.56 mV. The nanoparticles which were loaded with the dsNKG2D-IL-15 gene were uptaken by tumor cells with low cytotoxicity. Tumor cells pre-transfected by gene nanopartilces stimulated NK and T cells in vitro. Intramuscular injection of gene nanoparticles suppressed tumor growth and prolonged survival of tumor-bearing mice through activation of NK and CD8{sup +} T cells. Thus, chitosan-based nanoparticle delivery of dsNKG2D-IL-15 gene vaccine can be potentially used for tumor therapy. - Highlights: • Generation of a nanoparticle for delivery of dsNKG2D-IL-15 gene. • Characterization of the gene nanoparticle. • Antitumor activity mediated by the gene nanoparticle.

  15. High-level SUMO-mediated fusion expression of ABP-dHC-cecropin A from multiple joined genes in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiaxin; Movahedi, Ali; Wei, Zhiheng; Sang, Ming; Wu, Xiaolong; Wang, Mengyang; Wei, Hui; Pan, Huixin; Yin, Tongming; Zhuge, Qiang

    2016-09-15

    The antimicrobial peptide ABP-dHC-cecropin A is a small cationic peptide with potent activity against a wide range of bacterial species. Evidence of antifungal activity has also been suggested; however, evaluation of this peptide has been limited due to the low expression of cecropin proteins in Escherichia coli. To improve the expression level of ABP-dHC-cecropin A in E. coli, tandem repeats of the ABP-dHC-cecropin A gene were constructed and expressed as fusion proteins (SUMO-nABP-dHC-cecropin, n = 1, 2, 3, 4) via pSUMO-nABP-dHC-cecropin A vectors (n = 1, 2, 3, 4). Comparison of the expression levels of soluble SUMO-nABP-dHC-cecropin A fusion proteins (n = 1, 2, 3, 4) suggested that BL21 (DE3)/pSUMO-3ABP-dHC-cecropin A is an ideal recombinant strain for ABP-dHC-cecropin A production. Under the selected conditions of cultivation and isopropylthiogalactoside (IPTG) induction, the expression level of ABP-dHC-cecropin A was as high as 65 mg/L, with ∼21.3% of the fusion protein in soluble form. By large-scale fermentation, protein production reached nearly 300 mg/L, which is the highest yield of ABP-dHC-cecropin A reported to date. In antibacterial experiments, the efficacy was approximately the same as that of synthetic ABP-dHC-cecropin A. This method provides a novel and effective means of producing large amounts of ABP-dHC-cecropin A. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Fusion physics

    CERN Document Server

    Lackner, Karl; Tran, Minh Quang

    2012-01-01

    This publication is a comprehensive reference for graduate students and an invaluable guide for more experienced researchers. It provides an introduction to nuclear fusion and its status and prospects, and features specialized chapters written by leaders in the field, presenting the main research and development concepts in fusion physics. It starts with an introduction to the case for the development of fusion as an energy source. Magnetic and inertial confinement are addressed. Dedicated chapters focus on the physics of confinement, the equilibrium and stability of tokamaks, diagnostics, heating and current drive by neutral beam and radiofrequency waves, and plasma–wall interactions. While the tokamak is a leading concept for the realization of fusion, other concepts (helical confinement and, in a broader sense, other magnetic and inertial configurations) are also addressed in the book. At over 1100 pages, this publication provides an unparalleled resource for fusion physicists and engineers.

  17. Chronic eosinophilic leukemia, NOS with t(5;12(q31;p13/ETV6-ACSL6 gene fusion: A novel variant of myeloid proliferative neoplasm with eosinophilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruijun Jeanna Su

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The 2008 World Health Organization (WHO classification of tumors of hematopoietic and lymphoid tissues introduced a category for myeloid and lymphoid neoplasms with eosinophilia and abnormalities of PDGFRA, PDGFRB or FGFR1. Many of these patients are responsive to tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI therapy. In this case report, we report a unique case of chronic eosinophilic leukemia with novel t(5;12(q23-31;p13/ETV6-ACSL6 gene fusion, in which patient was resistant to TKI therapy. This important finding is a novel addition to the above entity in WHO 2008 classification. The ACSL6 gene encodes a long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase, an enzyme that plays an essential role in lipid metabolism and ATP generation pathways in cells. The ETV6-ACSL6 rearrangement is present in diverse types of hematopoietic malignancies. As yet, it is not clear how ACSL6, a gene involved in fatty acid synthesis, contributes to clonal expansion of myeloid progenitor cells. Therefore, elucidating the contribution of ACSL6 to leukemogenesis may allow the development of novel treatment for those resistant to TKI therapy.

  18. An MSC2 Promoter-lacZ Fusion Gene Reveals Zinc-Responsive Changes in Sites of Transcription Initiation That Occur across the Yeast Genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Hsuan Wu

    Full Text Available The Msc2 and Zrg17 proteins of Saccharomyces cerevisiae form a complex to transport zinc into the endoplasmic reticulum. ZRG17 is transcriptionally induced in zinc-limited cells by the Zap1 transcription factor. In this report, we show that MSC2 mRNA also increases (~1.5 fold in zinc-limited cells. The MSC2 gene has two in-frame ATG codons at its 5' end, ATG1 and ATG2; ATG2 is the predicted initiation codon. When the MSC2 promoter was fused at ATG2 to the lacZ gene, we found that unlike the chromosomal gene this reporter showed a 4-fold decrease in lacZ mRNA in zinc-limited cells. Surprisingly, β-galactosidase activity generated by this fusion gene increased ~7 fold during zinc deficiency suggesting the influence of post-transcriptional factors. Transcription of MSC2ATG2-lacZ was found to start upstream of ATG1 in zinc-replete cells. In zinc-limited cells, transcription initiation shifted to sites just upstream of ATG2. From the results of mutational and polysome profile analyses, we propose the following explanation for these effects. In zinc-replete cells, MSC2ATG2-lacZ mRNA with long 5' UTRs fold into secondary structures that inhibit translation. In zinc-limited cells, transcripts with shorter unstructured 5' UTRs are generated that are more efficiently translated. Surprisingly, chromosomal MSC2 did not show start site shifts in response to zinc status and only shorter 5' UTRs were observed. However, the shifts that occur in the MSC2ATG2-lacZ construct led us to identify significant transcription start site changes affecting the expression of ~3% of all genes. Therefore, zinc status can profoundly alter transcription initiation across the yeast genome.

  19. Allele-specific analysis of cell fusion-mediated pluripotent reprograming reveals distinct and predictive susceptibilities of human X-linked genes to reactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantone, Irene; Dharmalingam, Gopuraja; Chan, Yi-Wah; Kohler, Anne-Celine; Lenhard, Boris; Merkenschlager, Matthias; Fisher, Amanda G

    2017-01-25

    Inactivation of one X chromosome is established early in female mammalian development and can be reversed in vivo and in vitro when pluripotency factors are re-expressed. The extent of reactivation along the inactive X chromosome (Xi) and the determinants of locus susceptibility are, however, poorly understood. Here we use cell fusion-mediated pluripotent reprograming to study human Xi reactivation and allele-specific single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to identify reactivated loci. We show that a subset of human Xi genes is rapidly reactivated upon re-expression of the pluripotency network. These genes lie within the most evolutionary recent segments of the human X chromosome that are depleted of LINE1 and enriched for SINE elements, predicted to impair XIST spreading. Interestingly, this cadre of genes displays stochastic Xi expression in human fibroblasts ahead of reprograming. This stochastic variability is evident between clones, by RNA-sequencing, and at the single-cell level, by RNA-FISH, and is not attributable to differences in repressive histone H3K9me3 or H3K27me3 levels. Treatment with the DNA demethylating agent 5-deoxy-azacytidine does not increase Xi expression ahead of reprograming, but instead reveals a second cadre of genes that only become susceptible to reactivation upon induction of pluripotency. Collectively, these data not only underscore the multiple pathways that contribute to maintaining silencing along the human Xi chromosome but also suggest that transcriptional stochasticity among human cells could be useful for predicting and engineering epigenetic strategies to achieve locus-specific or domain-specific human Xi gene reactivation.

  20. Cold fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Suk Yong; Sung, Ki Woong; Kang, Joo Sang; Lee, Jong Jik [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-02-01

    So called `cold fusion phenomena` are not confirmed yet. Excess heat generation is very delicate one. Neutron generation is most reliable results, however, the records are erratic and the same results could not be repeated. So there is no reason to exclude the malfunction of testing instruments. The same arguments arise in recording {sup 4}He, {sup 3}He, {sup 3}H, which are not rich in quantity basically. An experiment where plenty of {sup 4}He were recorded is attached in appendix. The problem is that we are trying to search cold fusion which is permitted by nature or not. The famous tunneling effect in quantum mechanics will answer it, however, the most fusion rate is known to be negligible. The focus of this project is on the theme that how to increase that negligible fusion rate. 6 figs, 4 tabs, 1512 refs. (Author).

  1. Fusion plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelmann, F.

    1995-09-01

    In the following, a synthetic review of the information reported at the Conference will be given. No attempt is made to summarize specific contributions; rather the material contributed will be looked at from a few different angles. All areas of fusion plasma physics were represented: there were experimental results on magnetic confinement (tokamaks; stellarators; mirrors; reversed field pinches; field reversed configurations; Z-pinches, with emphasis on the dense Z-pinch; plasma focus, ect.) and on inertial confinement; related modelling and diagnolstics development; theory, as well as some technological activities (power generators; RF sources, etc.) and component (e.g. antennae) development for smaller fusion devices. In particular, fusion-related research in Latin America was exhaustively covered. In addition, large future projects in fusion research were summarized. (AIP)

  2. Genomic Analysis of Homotypic Vacuole Fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Seeley, E. Scott; Kato, Masashi; Margolis, Nathan; Wickner, William; Eitzen, Gary

    2002-01-01

    Yeast vacuoles undergo fission and homotypic fusion, yielding one to three vacuoles per cell at steady state. Defects in vacuole fusion result in vacuole fragmentation. We have screened 4828 yeast strains, each with a deletion of a nonessential gene, for vacuole morphology defects. Fragmented vacuoles were found in strains deleted for genes encoding known fusion catalysts as well as 19 enzymes of lipid metabolism, 4 SNAREs, 12 GTPases and GTPase effectors, 9 additional known vacuole protein-s...

  3. Structural and functional studies of FKHR-PAX3, a reciprocal fusion gene of the t(2;13 chromosomal translocation in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiande Hu

    Full Text Available Alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (ARMS is an aggressive pediatric cancer of skeletal muscle. More than 70% of ARMS tumors carry balanced t(2;13 chromosomal translocation that leads to the production of two novel fusion genes, PAX3-FKHR and FKHR-PAX3. While the PAX3-FKHR gene has been intensely studied, the reciprocal FKHR-PAX3 gene has rarely been described. We report here the cloning and functional characterization of the FKHR-PAX3 gene as the first step towards a better understanding of its potential impact on ARMS biology. From RH30 ARMS cells, we detected and isolated three versions of FKHR-PAX3 cDNAs whose C-terminal sequences corresponded to PAX3c, PAX3d, and PAX3e isoforms. Unlike the nuclear-specific localization of PAX3-FKHR, the reciprocal FKHR-PAX3 proteins stayed predominantly in the cytoplasm. FKHR-PAX3 potently inhibited myogenesis in both non-transformed myoblast cells and ARMS cells. We showed that FKHR-PAX3 was not a classic oncogene but could act as a facilitator in oncogenic pathways by stabilizing PAX3-FKHR expression, enhancing cell proliferation, clonogenicity, anchorage-independent growth, and matrix adhesion in vitro, and accelerating the onset of tumor formation in xenograft mouse model in vivo. In addition to these pro-oncogenic behaviors, FKHR-PAX3 also negatively affected cell migration and invasion in vitro and lung metastasis in vivo. Taken together, these functional characteristics suggested that FKHR-PAX3 might have a critical role in the early stage of ARMS development.

  4. Cloning of fusion protein gene of Newcastle disease virus into a baculovirus derived bacmid shuttle vector, in order to express it in insect cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashemzadeh MS

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Newcastle disease virus (NDV is one of the major pathogens in poultry and vaccination is intended to control the disease, as an effective solution, yet. Fusion protein (F on surface of NDV, has a fundamental role in virus pathogenicity and can induce protective immunity, alone. With this background, here our aim was to construct a baculovirus derived recombinant bacmid shuttle vector (encoding F-protein in order to express it in insect cell line. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, at first complete F gene from avirulent strain La Sota of NDV was amplified by RT-PCR to produce F cDNA. The amplicon was cloned into T/A cloning vector and afterwards into pFastBac Dual donor plasmid. After the verification of cloning process by two methods, PCR and enzymatic digestion analysis, the accuracy of F gene sequence was confirmed by sequencing. Finally, F-containing recombinant bacmid was subsequently generated in DH10Bac cell and the construct production was confirmed by a special PCR panel, using F specific primers and M13 universal primers. Results: Analysis of confirmatory tests showed that the recombinant bacmid, expressing of F-protein gene in correct sequence and framework, has been constructed successfully. Conclusion: The product of this F-containing recombinant bacmid, in addition to its independent application in the induction of protective immunity, can be used with the other individual recombinant baculoviruses, expressing HN and NP genes to produce NDV-VLPs in insect cell line.

  5. Mammary analogue secretory carcinoma of salivary glands with high-grade transformation: report of 3 cases with the ETV6-NTRK3 gene fusion and analysis of TP53, β-catenin, EGFR, and CCND1 genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skálová, Alena; Vanecek, Tomas; Majewska, Hanna; Laco, Jan; Grossmann, Petr; Simpson, Roderick H W; Hauer, Lukas; Andrle, Pavel; Hosticka, Lubor; Branžovský, Jindrich; Michal, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Mammary analogue secretory carcinoma of salivary gland origin (MASC) is a recently described tumor resembling secretory carcinoma of the breast characterized by strong S-100 protein, mammaglobin, and vimentin immunoexpression and which harbors a t(12;15) (p13;q25) translocation resulting in ETV6-NTRK3 fusion product. Histologically, conventional MASC displays bland histomorphology and a lobulated growth pattern and is often composed of microcystic, tubular, and solid structures with abundant eosinophilic homogenous or bubbly secretions. Colloid-like secretory material stains positively for periodic acid-Schiff with and without diastase as well as for Alcian Blue. We present for the first time, 3 patients with MASC of the parotid gland in which high-grade (HG) transformation developed in each case characterized by an accelerated clinical course and poor outcome. The HG component revealed strong membrane staining for EGFR and β-catenin, cytoplasmic/nuclear staining for S-100 protein, and nuclear staining for cyclin-D1, whereas HER-2/neu was absent. Analysis for the presence of the ETV6-NTRK3 fusion transcript revealed positivity in both HG and low-grade component of MASC in 2 of the 3 studied cases. The tumor in case 2 was negative in both its elements for the t(12;15) translocation, but ETV6 gene rearrangement was detected in both components in all 3 cases. Analysis of TP53 and CTNNB1 gene mutations in the HG component of MASCs as well as detection of copy number aberration of EGFR and CCND1 gene did not harbor any abnormalities. All 3 patients with HG-transformed MASC died of disseminated disease within 2 to 6 years after diagnosis. Recognizing HG-transformed MASC and testing for ETV6 rearrangement may be of potential value in patient treatment, because the presence of the ETV6-NTRK3 translocation may represent a therapeutic target in MASC.

  6. Gene Amplification by PCR and Subcloning into a GFP-Fusion Plasmid Expression Vector as a Molecular Biology Laboratory Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornhorst, Joshua A.; Deibel, Michael A.; Mulnix, Amy B.

    2004-01-01

    A novel experimental sequence for the advanced undergraduate laboratory course has been developed at Earlham College. Utilizing recent improvements in molecular techniques for a time-sensitive environment, undergraduates were able to create a chimera of a selected gene and green fluorescent protein (GFP) in a bacterial expression plasmid over the…

  7. Repair of Staphylococcus aureus-infected wound with gene-modified C3H10T1/2 cells expressing BPI-BD3 fusion antibiotic peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-ran ZHANG

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To study the antibacterial and tissue reparative effect of BPI-BD3 gene-modified mesenchymal stem cells in a mouse model of wound infection. Methods C3H10T1/2 cells were transfected with recombinant adenovirus vector pAdxsi-BPI-BD3, the expression of BPI-BD3 fusion protein was verified by RT-PCR and Western blotting. Excision wound with a diameter of 1cm was inoculated with Staphylococcus aureuswas made on the back of 30 mice. The mice were randomly divided into 3 groups (10 each. Mice in group T were injected with BPI-BD3 gene-modified C3H10T1/2 cells through caudal vein, those in group C were injected with unmodified C3H10T1/2 cells, and in group N were injected with PBS as control. The wound repair result was evaluated by estimation of the percentage of remaining wound area and the amount of wound bacteria under the scar, followed by observation of pathological changes. Inflammatory reactions of the wounds were assessed accordingly. Results The amount of bacteria under the scar was less in group T than in the other two groups (P<0.05. It was also found that the wound healing process was faster in group T than in group C and group N. Pathological observation showed that the inflammatory reaction in group T was also significantly milder than in the other two groups. Conclusion BPI-BD3 gene-modified mesenchymal stem cells may enhance wound repair by controlling infection and promoting tissue regeneration, thus it may be promising in clinical application. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.09.07

  8. Fusion Machinery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jakob Balslev; Milosevic, Ira

    2015-01-01

    the vesicular SNARE VAMP2/synaptobrevin-2 and the target (plasma membrane) SNAREs SNAP25 and syntaxin-1 results in fusion and release of neurotransmitter, synchronized to the electrical activity of the cell by calcium influx and binding to synaptotagmin. Formation of the SNARE complex is tightly regulated...... and appears to start with syntaxin-1 bound to an SM (Sec1/Munc18-like) protein. Proteins of the Munc13-family are responsible for opening up syntaxin and allowing sequential binding of SNAP-25 and VAMP2/synaptobrevin-2. N- to C-terminal “zippering” of the SNARE domains leads to membrane fusion...

  9. Development of novel prime-boost strategies based on a tri-gene fusion recombinant L. tarentolae vaccine against experimental murine visceral leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saljoughian, Noushin; Taheri, Tahereh; Zahedifard, Farnaz; Taslimi, Yasaman; Doustdari, Fatemeh; Bolhassani, Azam; Doroud, Delaram; Azizi, Hiva; Heidari, Kazem; Vasei, Mohammad; Namvar Asl, Nabiollah; Papadopoulou, Barbara; Rafati, Sima

    2013-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a vector-borne disease affecting humans and domestic animals that constitutes a serious public health problem in many countries. Although many antigens have been examined so far as protein- or DNA-based vaccines, none of them conferred complete long-term protection. The use of the lizard non-pathogenic to humans Leishmania (L.) tarentolae species as a live vaccine vector to deliver specific Leishmania antigens is a recent approach that needs to be explored further. In this study, we evaluated the effectiveness of live vaccination in protecting BALB/c mice against L. infantum infection using prime-boost regimens, namely Live/Live and DNA/Live. As a live vaccine, we used recombinant L. tarentolae expressing the L. donovani A2 antigen along with cysteine proteinases (CPA and CPB without its unusual C-terminal extension (CPB(-CTE))) as a tri-fusion gene. For DNA priming, the tri-fusion gene was encoded in pcDNA formulated with cationic solid lipid nanoparticles (cSLN) acting as an adjuvant. At different time points post-challenge, parasite burden and histopathological changes as well as humoral and cellular immune responses were assessed. Our results showed that immunization with both prime-boost A2-CPA-CPB(-CTE)-recombinant L. tarentolae protects BALB/c mice against L. infantum challenge. This protective immunity is associated with a Th1-type immune response due to high levels of IFN-γ production prior and after challenge and with lower levels of IL-10 production after challenge, leading to a significantly higher IFN-γ/IL-10 ratio compared to the control groups. Moreover, this immunization elicited high IgG1 and IgG2a humoral immune responses. Protection in mice was also correlated with a high nitric oxide production and low parasite burden. Altogether, these results indicate the promise of the A2-CPA-CPB(-CTE)-recombinant L. tarentolae as a safe live vaccine candidate against VL.

  10. Development of Novel Prime-Boost Strategies Based on a Tri-Gene Fusion Recombinant L. tarentolae Vaccine against Experimental Murine Visceral Leishmaniasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saljoughian, Noushin; Taheri, Tahereh; Zahedifard, Farnaz; Taslimi, Yasaman; Doustdari, Fatemeh; Bolhassani, Azam; Doroud, Delaram; Azizi, Hiva; Heidari, Kazem; Vasei, Mohammad; Namvar Asl, Nabiollah; Papadopoulou, Barbara; Rafati, Sima

    2013-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a vector-borne disease affecting humans and domestic animals that constitutes a serious public health problem in many countries. Although many antigens have been examined so far as protein- or DNA-based vaccines, none of them conferred complete long-term protection. The use of the lizard non-pathogenic to humans Leishmania (L.) tarentolae species as a live vaccine vector to deliver specific Leishmania antigens is a recent approach that needs to be explored further. In this study, we evaluated the effectiveness of live vaccination in protecting BALB/c mice against L. infantum infection using prime-boost regimens, namely Live/Live and DNA/Live. As a live vaccine, we used recombinant L. tarentolae expressing the L. donovani A2 antigen along with cysteine proteinases (CPA and CPB without its unusual C-terminal extension (CPB-CTE)) as a tri-fusion gene. For DNA priming, the tri-fusion gene was encoded in pcDNA formulated with cationic solid lipid nanoparticles (cSLN) acting as an adjuvant. At different time points post-challenge, parasite burden and histopathological changes as well as humoral and cellular immune responses were assessed. Our results showed that immunization with both prime-boost A2-CPA-CPB-CTE-recombinant L. tarentolae protects BALB/c mice against L. infantum challenge. This protective immunity is associated with a Th1-type immune response due to high levels of IFN-γ production prior and after challenge and with lower levels of IL-10 production after challenge, leading to a significantly higher IFN-γ/IL-10 ratio compared to the control groups. Moreover, this immunization elicited high IgG1 and IgG2a humoral immune responses. Protection in mice was also correlated with a high nitric oxide production and low parasite burden. Altogether, these results indicate the promise of the A2-CPA-CPB-CTE-recombinant L. tarentolae as a safe live vaccine candidate against VL. PMID:23638195

  11. Development of novel prime-boost strategies based on a tri-gene fusion recombinant L. tarentolae vaccine against experimental murine visceral leishmaniasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noushin Saljoughian

    Full Text Available Visceral leishmaniasis (VL is a vector-borne disease affecting humans and domestic animals that constitutes a serious public health problem in many countries. Although many antigens have been examined so far as protein- or DNA-based vaccines, none of them conferred complete long-term protection. The use of the lizard non-pathogenic to humans Leishmania (L. tarentolae species as a live vaccine vector to deliver specific Leishmania antigens is a recent approach that needs to be explored further. In this study, we evaluated the effectiveness of live vaccination in protecting BALB/c mice against L. infantum infection using prime-boost regimens, namely Live/Live and DNA/Live. As a live vaccine, we used recombinant L. tarentolae expressing the L. donovani A2 antigen along with cysteine proteinases (CPA and CPB without its unusual C-terminal extension (CPB(-CTE as a tri-fusion gene. For DNA priming, the tri-fusion gene was encoded in pcDNA formulated with cationic solid lipid nanoparticles (cSLN acting as an adjuvant. At different time points post-challenge, parasite burden and histopathological changes as well as humoral and cellular immune responses were assessed. Our results showed that immunization with both prime-boost A2-CPA-CPB(-CTE-recombinant L. tarentolae protects BALB/c mice against L. infantum challenge. This protective immunity is associated with a Th1-type immune response due to high levels of IFN-γ production prior and after challenge and with lower levels of IL-10 production after challenge, leading to a significantly higher IFN-γ/IL-10 ratio compared to the control groups. Moreover, this immunization elicited high IgG1 and IgG2a humoral immune responses. Protection in mice was also correlated with a high nitric oxide production and low parasite burden. Altogether, these results indicate the promise of the A2-CPA-CPB(-CTE-recombinant L. tarentolae as a safe live vaccine candidate against VL.

  12. Effective primary isolation of wild-type canine distemper virus in MDCK, MV1 Lu and Vero cells without nucleotide sequence changes within the entire haemagglutinin protein gene and in subgenomic sections of the fusion and phospho protein genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lednicky, John A; Meehan, Thomas P; Kinsel, Michael J; Dubach, Jean; Hungerford, Laura L; Sarich, Nicolene A; Witecki, Kelley E; Braid, Michael D; Pedrak, Casandra; Houde, Christiane M

    2004-06-15

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is an important pathogen of many carnivores. We are developing a field-based model of morbillivirus virulence and pathogenesis through a study of distemper in naturally infected free-ranging raccoons. The isolation of CDV from raccoon tissues is essential for this work. CDV has often been isolated from animals only after co-cultivation of infected tissues with peripheral blood mononuclear cells derived from specific pathogen-free dogs or similar methods. We explored the utility and consequences of a simpler and cheaper alternative: CDV isolation in Vero, MDCK, and MV1 Lu cells. Virus growth was detected first in MDCK cells, whereas viral cytopathic effects were most obvious in Vero cells. CDV growth in MV1 Lu cells was relatively protracted and occurred without the formation of cytopathic effects. In primary CDV isolates, the entire nucleotide sequence of the receptor binding haemagglutinin (H) gene, and subgenomic fusion (F) and phospho (P) protein gene sequences corresponding to nt 5399-5733 and 2132-2563 of CDV reference strain Onderstepoort, respectively, were identical to those in matched infected tissues. Virus isolation confirmed the presence of CDV in instances where RT-PCR failed to detect CDV in infected tissues. Different viral phenotypes and genotypes were detected. The conservation of H gene sequences in primary CDV isolates suggests that MDCK, MV1 Lu, and Vero cells express proper receptors for wild-type CDV.

  13. Cold fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Suk Yong; You, Jae Jun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-01-01

    Nearly every technical information is chased in the world. All of them are reviewed and analyzed. Some of them are chosen to study further more to review every related documents. And a probable suggestion about the excitonic process in deuteron absorbed condensed matter is proposed a way to cold fusion. 8 refs. (Author).

  14. Fusion systems

    OpenAIRE

    Aschbacher, Michael; Oliver, Bob

    2016-01-01

    This is a survey article on the theory of fusion systems, a relatively new area of mathematics with connections to local finite group theory, algebraic topology, and modular representation theory. We first describe the general theory and then look separately at these connections.

  15. Protocol standardization for detection of TMPRSS2 fusions: ERG and gene expression of EZH2, SPINK-1 and NKX3.1 in prostate cancer (PCa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yenifer Yamile Segura Moreno

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available At present doesn't exist tool to differentiate patients with prostate cancer (PCa of poor prognosis of those with indolent disease that only require a controlled monitoring of the disease. Because of the coexistence of different premalignant and malignant foci in CaP, the understanding of the carcinogenesis process requires a better understanding. Currently, the morphological heterogeneity in PCa is evaluated with Gleason score, which is closely related to the prognosis of the disease, but this is insufficient so it is currently to work on identifying molecular alterations to identify subtypes that can establish more precisely the patient's prognosis. This preliminary study aimed to standardization of the method of quantification in prostatic samples of FFPE of expression of transcripts of possible biomarkers, such as the oncogenes, SPINK-1 y EZH2, the tumour suppressor, NKX3.1, together with the determination of the presence/absence of gene fusion, TMPRSS2:ERG, being that these transcripts are involved in apparent exclusive events of the natural evolution of PCa, that support the possibility of a molecular classification for this disease.

  16. Enhanced antitumor efficacy of an oncolytic herpes simplex virus expressing an endostatin-angiostatin fusion gene in human glioblastoma stem cell xenografts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guobin Zhang

    Full Text Available Viruses have demonstrated strong potential for the therapeutic targeting of glioblastoma stem cells (GSCs. In this study, the use of a herpes simplex virus carrying endostatin-angiostatin (VAE as a novel therapeutic targeting strategy for glioblastoma-derived cancer stem cells was investigated. We isolated six stable GSC-enriched cultures from 36 human glioblastoma specimens and selected one of the stable GSCs lines for establishing GSC-carrying orthotopic nude mouse models. The following results were obtained: (a VAE rapidly proliferated in GSCs and expressed endo-angio in vitro and in vivo 48 h and 10 d after infection, respectively; (b compared with the control gliomas treated with rHSV or Endostar, the subcutaneous gliomas derived from the GSCs showed a significant reduction in microvessel density after VAE treatment; (c compared with the control, a significant improvement was observed in the length of the survival of mice with intracranial and subcutaneous gliomas treated with VAE; (d MRI analysis showed that the tumor volumes of the intracranial gliomas generated by GSCs remarkably decreased after 10 d of VAE treatment compared with the controls. In conclusion, VAE demonstrated oncolytic therapeutic efficacy in animal models of human GSCs and expressed an endostatin-angiostatin fusion gene, which enhanced antitumor efficacy most likely by restricting tumor microvasculature development.

  17. Coupling a universal DNA circuit with graphene sheets/polyaniline/AuNPs nanocomposites for the detection of BCR/ABL fusion gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xueping [Key Laboratory of Laboratory Medical Diagnostics of Education, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Wang, Li [Key Laboratory of Laboratory Medical Diagnostics of Education, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Department of Medical Laboratory, Chongqing Emergency Medical Center (Chongqing The Fourth Hospital), Chongqing, 400016 (China); Sheng, Shangchun [The No.2 Peoples' Hospital of Yibin, Sichuan, 644000 (China); Wang, Teng; Yang, Juan [Key Laboratory of Laboratory Medical Diagnostics of Education, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Xie, Guoming, E-mail: guomingxie@cqmu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Laboratory Medical Diagnostics of Education, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Feng, Wenli, E-mail: fengwlcqmu@sina.com [Key Laboratory of Laboratory Medical Diagnostics of Education, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China)

    2015-08-19

    This article described a novel method by coupling a universal DNA circuit with graphene sheets/polyaniline/AuNPs nanocomposites (GS/PANI/AuNPs) for highly sensitive and specific detection of BCR/ABL fusion gene (bcr/abl) in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). DNA circuit known as catalyzed hairpin assembly (CHA) is enzyme-free and can be simply operated to achieve exponential amplification, which has been widely employed in biosensing. However, application of CHA has been hindered by the need of specially redesigned sequences for each single-stranded DNA input. Herein, a transducer hairpin (HP) was designed to obtain a universal DNA circuit with favorable signal-to-background ratio. To further improve signal amplification, GS/PANI/AuNPs with excellent conductivity and enlarged effective area were introduced into this DNA circuit. Consequently, by combining the advantages of CHA and GS/PANI/AuNPs, bcr/abl could be detected in a linear range from 10 pM to 20 nM with a detection limit of 1.05 pM. Moreover, this protocol showed excellent specificity, good stability and was successfully applied for the detection of real sample, which demonstrated its great potential in clinical application. - Highlights: • A transducer hairpin was designed to improve the versatility of DNA circuit. • GS/PANI/AuNPs were introduced to the DNA circuit for further signal amplification. • The established biosensor displayed high sensitivity and good specificity.

  18. Programmed cell death 4 and BCR-ABL fusion gene expression are negatively correlated in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xia; Liu, Riming; Huang, Baohua; Zhang, Xiaolu; Yu, Weijuan; Bao, Cuixia; Li, Jie; Sun, Chengming

    2016-10-01

    Programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4) is a tumor suppressor that inhibits carcinogenesis, tumor progression and invasion by preventing gene transcription and translation. Downregulation of PDCD4 expression has been identified in multiple types of human cancer, however, to date, the function of PDCD4 in leukemia has not been investigated. In the present study, PDCD4 mRNA and protein expression was investigated in 50 patients exhibiting various phases of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and 20 healthy individuals by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. PDCD4 expression and cell proliferation was also investigated following treatment with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, imatinib, in K562 cells. The results demonstrated that PDCD4 mRNA and protein expression was decreased in all CML samples when compared with healthy controls, who expressed high levels of PDCD4 mRNA and protein. No significant differences in PDCD4 expression were identified between chronic phase, accelerated phase and blast phase CML patients. In addition, PDCD4 expression was negatively correlated with BCR-ABL gene expression (r=-0.6716; P<0.001). Furthermore, K562 cells treated with imatinib exhibited significantly enhanced PDCD4 expression. These results indicate that downregulation of PDCD4 expression may exhibit a critical function in the progression and malignant proliferation of human CML.

  19. Silencing of the PiAvr3a effector-encoding gene from Phytophthora infestans by transcriptional fusion to a short interspersed element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetukuri, Ramesh R; Tian, Zhendong; Avrova, Anna O; Savenkov, Eugene I; Dixelius, Christina; Whisson, Stephen C

    2011-12-01

    Phytophthora infestans is the notorious oomycete causing late blight of potato and tomato. A large proportion of the P. infestans genome is composed of transposable elements, the activity of which may be controlled by RNA silencing. Accumulation of small RNAs is one of the hallmarks of RNA silencing. Here we demonstrate the presence of small RNAs corresponding to the sequence of a short interspersed retrotransposable element (SINE) suggesting that small RNAs might be involved in silencing of SINEs in P. infestans. This notion was exploited to develop novel tools for gene silencing in P. infestans by engineering transcriptional fusions of the PiAvr3a gene, encoding an RXLR avirulence effector, to the infSINEm retroelement. Transgenic P. infestans lines expressing either 5'-infSINEm::PiAvr3a-3' or 5'-PiAvr3a::SINEm-3' chimeric transcripts initially exhibited partial silencing of PiAvr3a. Over time, PiAvr3a either recovered wild type transcript levels in some lines, or became fully silenced in others. Introduction of an inverted repeat construct was also successful in yielding P. infestans transgenic lines silenced for PiAvr3a. In contrast, constructs expressing antisense or aberrant RNA transcripts failed to initiate silencing of PiAvr3a. Lines exhibiting the most effective silencing of PiAvr3a were either weakly or non-pathogenic on susceptible potato cv. Bintje. This study expands the repertoire of reverse genetics tools available for P. infestans research, and provides insights into a possible mode of variation in effector expression through spread of silencing from adjacent retroelements. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Magnetic fusion; La fusion magnetique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    This document is a detailed lecture on thermonuclear fusion. The basic physics principles are recalled and the technological choices that have led to tokamaks or stellarators are exposed. Different aspects concerning thermonuclear reactors such as safety, economy and feasibility are discussed. Tore-supra is described in details as well as the ITER project.

  1. Primary renal sclerosing epithelioid fibrosarcoma: report of 2 cases with EWSR1-CREB3L1 gene fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argani, Pedram; Lewin, Jack R; Edmonds, Pamela; Netto, George J; Prieto-Granada, Carlos; Zhang, Lei; Jungbluth, Achim A; Antonescu, Cristina R

    2015-03-01

    We report the first 2 genetically confirmed cases of primary renal sclerosing epithelioid fibrosarcoma (SEF), occurring in a 17-year-old boy and a 61-year-old woman. In both cases, the tumors demonstrated the typical epithelioid clear cell morphology associated with extensive hyalinizing fibrosis, raising the differential diagnosis of solitary fibrous tumor, metanephric stromal tumor, and the sclerosing variant of clear cell sarcoma of the kidney. Both neoplasms demonstrated diffuse immunoreactivity for MUC4, a highly specific marker for SEF, and both demonstrated evidence of rearrangement of both the EWSR1 and CREB3L1 genes, which have recently been shown to be fused in this entity. Both neoplasms presented with metastatic disease. Primary renal SEF represents yet another translocation-associated sarcoma now shown to arise primarily in the kidney.

  2. Primary Renal Sclerosing Epithelioid Fibrosarcoma: Report of Two Cases with EWSR1-CREB3L1 Gene Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argani, Pedram; Lewin, Jack R.; Edmonds, Pamela; Netto, George J.; Prieto-Granada, Carlos; Zhang, Lei; Jungbluth, Achim A.; Antonescu, Cristina R.

    2014-01-01

    We report the first two genetically confirmed cases of primary renal sclerosing epithelioid fibrosarcoma (SEF), occurring in a 17 year-old male and a 61 year-old female. In both cases, the tumors demonstrated the typical epithelioid clear cell morphology associated with extensive hyalinizing fibrosis, raising the differential diagnosis of solitary fibrous tumor, metanephric stromal tumor, and the sclerosing variant of clear cell sarcoma of the kidney. Both neoplasms demonstrated diffuse immunoreactivity for MUC4, a highly specific marker for SEF, and both demonstrated evidence of rearrangement of both the EWSR1 and CREB3L1 genes which have recently shown to be fused in this entity. Both neoplasms presented with metastatic disease. Primary renal SEF represents yet another translocation-associated sarcoma now shown to arise primarily in the kidney. PMID:25353281

  3. Expression of the RET/PTC fusion gene as a marker for papillary carcinoma in Hashimoto's thyroiditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wirtschafter, A; Schmidt, R; Rosen, D

    1997-01-01

    Hashimoto's thyroiditis is an inflammatory disease of the thyroid gland with autoimmune etiology. Patients afflicted with Hashimoto's have a higher risk of thyroid malignancies such as papillary thyroid carcinoma. In the present study, we investigated the frequency of papillary thyroid carcinoma...... specific genes in patients diagnosed with Hashimoto's disease. The newly identified oncogenes RET/PTC1 and RET/PTC3 provide useful and specific markers of the early stages of papillary carcinoma as they are highly specific for malignant cells. Using a sensitive and specific reverse transcriptase......-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay, we found messenger RNA (mRNA) expression for the RET/PTC1 and RET/PTC3 oncogenes in 95% of the Hashimoto's patients studied. All Hashimoto's patients presenting without histopathologic evidence of papillary thyroid cancer showed molecular genetic evidence of cancer...

  4. Splenogonadal Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Lang Chen

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Splenogonadal fusion (SGF is a rare congenital non-malignant anomaly characterized by fusion of splenic tissue to the gonad, and can be continuous or discontinuous. Very few cases have been diagnosed preoperatively, and many patients who present with testicular swelling undergo unnecessary orchiectomy under the suspicion of testicular neoplasm. A 16-year-old boy presented with a left scrotal mass and underwent total excision of a 1.6-cm tumor without damaging the testis, epididymis or its accompanying vessels. Pathologic examination revealed SFG (discontinuous type. If clinically suspected before surgery, the diagnosis may be confirmed by Tc-99m sulfur colloid imaging, which shows uptake in both the spleen and accessory splenic tissue within the scrotum. Frozen section should be considered if there remains any doubt regarding the diagnosis during operation.

  5. Fusion ambassador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Chris Llewellyn

    2009-02-01

    With his glasses and shock of thick, white hair, Chris Llewellyn Smith does not look like a superhero saving the world from peril. Yet the slim, 66-year-old physicist is seemingly becoming a potential saviour in the public eye. At least that is the reaction he says he got while recently moving house in Oxford. "I was quite surprised by my new neighbours' knowledge of energy issues when they said 'The world is relying on you to develop fusion!'."

  6. Understanding of decreased sialylation of Fc-fusion protein in hyperosmotic recombinant Chinese hamster ovary cell culture: N-glycosylation gene expression and N-linked glycan antennary profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Hyun; Jeong, Yeong Ran; Kim, Yeon-Gu; Lee, Gyun Min

    2017-08-01

    To understand the effects of hyperosmolality on protein glycosylation, recombinant Chinese hamster ovary (rCHO) cells producing the Fc-fusion protein were cultivated in hyperosmolar medium resulting from adding NaCl (415 mOsm/kg). The hyperosmotic culture showed increased specific Fc-fusion protein productivity (q Fc ) but a decreased proportion of acidic isoforms and sialic acid content of the Fc-fusion protein. The intracellular and extracellular sialidase activities in the hyperosmotic cultures were similar to those in the control culture (314 mOsm/kg), indicating that reduced sialylation of Fc-fusion protein at hyperosmolality was not due to elevated sialidase activity. Expression of 52 N-glycosylation-related genes was assessed by the NanoString nCounter system, which provides a direct digital readout using custom-designed color-coded probes. After 3 days of hyperosmotic culture, nine genes (ugp, slc35a3, slc35d2, gcs1, manea, mgat2, mgat5b, b4galt3, and b4galt4) were differentially expressed over 1.5-fold of the control, and all these genes were down-regulated. N-linked glycan analysis by anion exchange and hydrophilic interaction HPLC showed that the proportion of highly sialylated (di-, tri-, tetra-) and tetra-antennary N-linked glycans was significantly decreased upon hyperosmotic culture. Addition of betaine, an osmoprotectant, to the hyperosmotic culture significantly increased the proportion of highly sialylated and tetra-antennary N-linked glycans (P ≤ 0.05), while it increased the expression of the N-glycan branching/antennary genes (mgat2 and mgat4b). Thus, decreased expression of the genes with roles in the N-glycan biosynthesis pathway correlated with reduced sialic acid content of Fc-fusion protein caused by hyperosmolar conditions. Taken together, the results obtained in this study provide a better understanding of the detrimental effects of hyperosmolality on N-glycosylation, especially sialylation, in rCHO cells. Biotechnol. Bioeng

  7. LDL receptor-GFP fusion proteins: new tools for the characterization of disease-causing mutations in the LDL receptor gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Henrik Uffe; Dagnæs-Hansen, Frederik; Corydon, Thomas Juhl

    2001-01-01

    The function of a series of LDL receptor GFP fusion proteins with different, flexible, unstructured spacer regions was analysed. An optimised version of the fusion protein was used to analyse the effect of a LDL receptor mutation (W556S) found in FH patients and characterized as transport defective....... In cultured liver cells this mutation was found to inhibit the transport of LDL receptor GFP fusion protein to the cell surface, thus leading to impaired internalisation of fluorescent labelled LDL. Co-locallisation studies confirmed the retention of the mutant protein in the endoplasmic reticulum....

  8. Transient Co-Expression of Post-Transcriptional Gene Silencing Suppressors for Increased in Planta Expression of a Recombinant Anthrax Receptor Fusion Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kittipong Rattanaporn

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Potential epidemics of infectious diseases and the constant threat of bioterrorism demand rapid, scalable, and cost-efficient manufacturing of therapeutic proteins. Molecular farming of tobacco plants provides an alternative for the recombinant production of therapeutics. We have developed a transient production platform that uses Agrobacterium infiltration of Nicotiana benthamiana plants to express a novel anthrax receptor decoy protein (immunoadhesin, CMG2-Fc. This chimeric fusion protein, designed to protect against the deadly anthrax toxins, is composed of the von Willebrand factor A (VWA domain of human capillary morphogenesis 2 (CMG2, an effective anthrax toxin receptor, and the Fc region of human immunoglobulin G (IgG. We evaluated, in N. benthamiana intact plants and detached leaves, the expression of CMG2-Fc under the control of the constitutive CaMV 35S promoter, and the co-expression of CMG2-Fc with nine different viral suppressors of post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS: p1, p10, p19, p21, p24, p25, p38, 2b, and HCPro. Overall, transient CMG2-Fc expression was higher on intact plants than detached leaves. Maximum expression was observed with p1 co-expression at 3.5 days post-infiltration (DPI, with a level of 0.56 g CMG2-Fc per kg of leaf fresh weight and 1.5% of the total soluble protein, a ten-fold increase in expression when compared to absence of suppression. Co-expression with the p25 PTGS suppressor also significantly increased the CMG2-Fc expression level after just 3.5 DPI.

  9. Transient co-expression of post-transcriptional gene silencing suppressors for increased in planta expression of a recombinant anthrax receptor fusion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzola, Lucas; Chen, Junxing; Rattanaporn, Kittipong; Maclean, James M; McDonald, Karen A

    2011-01-01

    Potential epidemics of infectious diseases and the constant threat of bioterrorism demand rapid, scalable, and cost-efficient manufacturing of therapeutic proteins. Molecular farming of tobacco plants provides an alternative for the recombinant production of therapeutics. We have developed a transient production platform that uses Agrobacterium infiltration of Nicotiana benthamiana plants to express a novel anthrax receptor decoy protein (immunoadhesin), CMG2-Fc. This chimeric fusion protein, designed to protect against the deadly anthrax toxins, is composed of the von Willebrand factor A (VWA) domain of human capillary morphogenesis 2 (CMG2), an effective anthrax toxin receptor, and the Fc region of human immunoglobulin G (IgG). We evaluated, in N. benthamiana intact plants and detached leaves, the expression of CMG2-Fc under the control of the constitutive CaMV 35S promoter, and the co-expression of CMG2-Fc with nine different viral suppressors of post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS): p1, p10, p19, p21, p24, p25, p38, 2b, and HCPro. Overall, transient CMG2-Fc expression was higher on intact plants than detached leaves. Maximum expression was observed with p1 co-expression at 3.5 days post-infiltration (DPI), with a level of 0.56 g CMG2-Fc per kg of leaf fresh weight and 1.5% of the total soluble protein, a ten-fold increase in expression when compared to absence of suppression. Co-expression with the p25 PTGS suppressor also significantly increased the CMG2-Fc expression level after just 3.5 DPI.

  10. Renal cell carcinomas with t(6;11)(p21;q12): A clinicopathologic study emphasizing unusual morphology, novel alpha-TFEB gene fusion point, immunobiomarkers, and ultrastructural features, as well as detection of the gene fusion by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Qiu; Liu, Biao; Cheng, Liang; Zhu, Yun; Shi, Qun-Li; Wu, Bo; Jiang, Shao-Jun; Wang, Yan; Wang, Xuan; Yu, Bo; Zhang, Ru-Song; Ma, Heng-Hui; Lu, Zhen-Feng; Tu, Pin; Wang, Jian-Dong; Zhou, Xiao-Jun

    2012-09-01

    Renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) with t(6;11)(p21;q12) are extremely rare and characterized by specific chromosome translocation, involving the transcription factor EB (TFEB). Fewer than 30 cases have been described in the literature. We examined 7 additional cases of this rare tumor by clinicopathologic, immunohistochemical, molecular, and ultrastructural analyses. Four tumors had the typical morphologic features of TFEB RCCs, whereas 3 cases demonstrated uncommon morphologic features, mimicking epithelioid angiomyolipoma, chromophobe cell RCC, and clear cell RCC, respectively. Immunohistochemically, aside from TFEB and cathepsin K, kidney-specific cadherin was another sensitive and relatively specific marker for TFEB RCCs, supporting a distal nephron origin for these renal tumors. We also observed different ultrastructures including mitochondrion with areas of lipofuscin pigment in the smaller cells in these cases. An identical Alpha-TFEB fusion gene, 486 bp, was identified in 2 cases. In addition to the polymerase chain reaction method, we also developed a fluorescence in situ hybridization assay to serve as a cost-effective and time-efficient diagnostic tool. We detected a TFEB gene rearrangement in all 7 cases using the fluorescence in situ hybridization method. TFEB RCC seemed to be an indolent tumor. During a mean follow-up of 31 months, none of the cases developed tumor recurrence, progression, or metastasis.

  11. Catalysed fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Farley, Francis

    2012-01-01

    A sizzling romance and a romp with subatomic particles at CERN. Love, discovery and adventure in the city where nations meet and beams collide. Life in a large laboratory. As always, the challenges are the same. Who leads? Who follows? Who succeeds? Who gets the credit? Who gets the women or the men? Young Jeremy arrives in CERN and joins the quest for green energy. Coping with baffling jargon and manifold dangers, he is distracted by radioactive rats, lovely ladies and an unscrupulous rival. Full of doubts and hesitations, he falls for a dazzling Danish girl, who leads him astray. His brilliant idea leads to a discovery and a new route to cold fusion. But his personal life is scrambled. Does it bring fame or failure? Tragedy or triumph?

  12. Fusion cuisine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Chris; Broersma, Marcel

    2018-01-01

    the challenge of multiplicity in journalism studies by proposing an audience-centred, functional approach to scholarship. We argue this approach encourages the creative intellectual advancements afforded by interdisciplinary experimental cooking while respecting the classical intellectual questions that helped......Journalism studies as an academic field is characterized by multidisciplinarity. Focusing on one object of study, journalism and the news, it established itself by integrating and synthesizing approaches from established disciplines – a tendency that lives on today. This constant gaze...... to the outside for conceptual inspiration and methodological tools lends itself to a journalism studies that is a fusion cuisine of media, communication and related scholarship. However, what happens when this object becomes as fragmented and multifaceted as the ways we study it? This essay addresses...

  13. Novel BCOR-MAML3 and ZC3H7B-BCOR Gene Fusions in Undifferentiated Small Blue Round Cell Sarcomas

    OpenAIRE

    Specht, Katja; Zhang, Lei; Sung, Yun-Shao; Nucci, Marisa; Dry, Sarah; Vaiyapuri, Sumathi; Richter, Gunther HS; Fletcher, Christopher DM; Antonescu, Cristina R.

    2016-01-01

    Small blue round cell tumors (SBRCTs) are a heterogenous group of tumors that are difficult to diagnose due to overlapping morphologic, immunohistochemical and clinical features. About two-thirds of EWSR1-negative SBRCTs are associated with CIC-DUX4 related fusions, while another small subset shows BCOR-CCNB3 X-chromosomal paracentric inversion. Applying paired-end RNA sequencing to an SBRCT index case of a 44 year-old male, we identified a novel BCOR-MAML3 chimeric fusion, which was validate...

  14. Poultry Body Temperature Contributes to Invasion Control through Reduced Expression of Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1 Genes in Salmonella enterica Serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petri, Nicholas; Daron, Caitlyn; Pereira, Rafaela; Mendoza, Mary; Hassan, Hosni M.; Koci, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) and Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) are foodborne pathogens, and outbreaks are often associated with poultry products. Chickens are typically asymptomatic when colonized by these serovars; however, the factors contributing to this observation are uncharacterized. Whereas symptomatic mammals have a body temperature between 37°C and 39°C, chickens have a body temperature of 41°C to 42°C. Here, in vivo experiments using chicks demonstrated that numbers of viable S. Typhimurium or S. Enteritidis bacteria within the liver and spleen organ sites were ≥4 orders of magnitude lower than those within the ceca. When similar doses of S. Typhimurium or S. Enteritidis were given to C3H/HeN mice, the ratio of the intestinal concentration to the liver/spleen concentration was 1:1. In the avian host, this suggested poor survival within these tissues or a reduced capacity to traverse the host epithelial layer and reach liver/spleen sites or both. Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1) promotes localization to liver/spleen tissues through invasion of the epithelial cell layer. Following in vitro growth at 42°C, SPI-1 genes sipC, invF, and hilA and the SPI-1 rtsA activator were downregulated compared to expression at 37°C. Overexpression of the hilA activators fur, fliZ, and hilD was capable of inducing hilA-lacZ at 37°C but not at 42°C despite the presence of similar levels of protein at the two temperatures. In contrast, overexpression of either hilC or rtsA was capable of inducing hilA and sipC at 42°C. These data indicate that physiological parameters of the poultry host, such as body temperature, have a role in modulating expression of virulence. PMID:26386070

  15. Transient Co-Expression of Post-Transcriptional Gene Silencing Suppressors for Increased in Planta Expression of a Recombinant Anthrax Receptor Fusion Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Kittipong Rattanaporn; Maclean, James M.; McDonald, Karen A.; Junxing Chen; Lucas Arzola

    2011-01-01

    Potential epidemics of infectious diseases and the constant threat of bioterrorism demand rapid, scalable, and cost-efficient manufacturing of therapeutic proteins. Molecular farming of tobacco plants provides an alternative for the recombinant production of therapeutics. We have developed a transient production platform that uses Agrobacterium infiltration of Nicotiana benthamiana plants to express a novel anthrax receptor decoy protein (immunoadhesin), CMG2-Fc. This chimeric fusion protein,...

  16. The rationale for druggability of CCDC6-tyrosine kinase fusions in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerrato, Aniello; Visconti, Roberta; Celetti, Angela

    2018-02-19

    Gene fusions occur in up to 17% of solid tumours. Oncogenic kinases are often involved in such fusions. In lung cancer, almost 30% of patients carrying an activated oncogene show the fusion of a tyrosine kinase to an heterologous gene. Several genes are partner in the fusion with the three kinases ALK, ROS1 and RET in lung. The impaired function of the partner gene, in combination with the activation of the kinase, may alter the cell signaling and promote the cancer cell addiction to the oncogene. Moreover, the gene that is partner in the fusion to the kinase may affect the response to therapeutics and/or promote resistance in the cancer cells. Few genes are recurrent partners in tyrosine kinase fusions in lung cancer, including CCDC6, a recurrent partner in ROS1 and RET fusions, that can be selected as possible target for new strategies of combined therapy including TKi.

  17. PhoP-Induced Genes within Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Andrés; Cabeza, María Laura; Spinelli, Silvana V.; McClelland, Michael; García Véscovi, Eleonora; Soncini, Fernando C.

    2006-01-01

    The invasive pathogen Salmonella enterica has evolved a sophisticated device that allows it to enter nonphagocytic host cells. This process requires the expression of Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1), which encodes a specialized type III protein secretion system (TTSS). This TTSS delivers a set of effectors that produce a marked rearrangement of the host cytoskeleton, generating a profuse membrane ruffling at the site of interaction, driving bacterial entry. It has been shown that the PhoP/PhoQ two-component system represses the expression of the SPI-1 machinery by down-regulating the transcription of its master regulator, HilA. In this work, we reveal the presence of a PhoP-activated operon within SPI-1. This operon is composed of the orgB and orgC genes, which encode a protein that interacts with the InvC ATPase and a putative effector protein of the TTSS, respectively. Under PhoP-inducing conditions, expression of this operon is directly activated by the phosphorylated form of the response regulator, which recognizes a PhoP box located at the −35 region relative to the transcription start site. Additionally, under invasion-inducing conditions, orgBC expression is driven both by the prgH promoter, induced by the SPI-1 master regulator HilA, and by the directly controlled PhoP/PhoQ promoter. Together, these results indicate that in contrast to the rest of the genes encompassed in the SPI-1 locus, orgBC is expressed during and after Salmonella entry into its host cell, and they suggest a role for the products of this operon after host cell internalization. PMID:16980492

  18. Analysis of the rice Os05g0442400 gene promoter and expression of the GUS fusion gene under control of the rice Os05g0442400 gene promoter in transgenic rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SONG Yae

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The promoter sequence of the rice Os05g0442400 gene was analyzed using Plant CARE and PLACE programs.Except the basic promoter cis-acting elements,several cis-acting elements,including the elements that related to plant resistance to abiotic stress,light-inducible promoter elements,pathogen-induced factor elements and the root specific motif,were recognized in a 1500bp promoter sequence upstream of the initial codon ATG.The Os05g0442400 promoter::gus contruct was transferred into rice successfully by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated.The GUS expression in different tissues was assayed using GUS staining.The results showed that endogenous Os05g0442400 gene may mainly expressed in roots.With the continuation of rice reproductive stage,the expression area of Os05g0442400 gene in rice glume increased from top to bottom,and after heading the expression area reached the maximum.These results may have some contact with the root specific motif and light-inducible promoter elements of Os05g0442400 gene promoter.

  19. Towards cognitive image fusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toet, A.; Hogervorst, M.A.; Nikolov, S.G.; Lewis, J.; Dixon, T.; Bull, D.; Canagarajah, N.

    2007-01-01

    The increasing availability and deployment of imaging sensors operating in multiple spectral bands has led to a large research effort in image fusion, resulting in a plethora of pixel-level image fusion algorithms. However, the cognitive aspects of multisensor image fusion have not received much

  20. Towards cognitive image fusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toet, A.; Hogervorst, M.A.; Nikolov, S.G.; Lewis, J.J.; Dixon, T.D.; Bull, D.R.; Canagarajah, C.N.

    2010-01-01

    The increasing availability and deployment of imaging sensors operating in multiple spectral bands has led to a large research effort in image fusion, resulting in a plethora of pixel-level image fusion algorithms. However, the cognitive aspects of multisensor image fusion have not received much

  1. The isolation and characterization of a Neurospora crassa gene (ubi::crp-6) encoding a ubiquitin-40S ribosomal protein fusion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarawneh, K A; Anumula, K R; Free, S J

    1994-09-15

    We have isolated and sequenced a Neurospora crassa gene encoding a single copy of ubiquitin (UBI) fused to the S27a ribosomal (r) protein. We have opted to name this gene the ubiquitin/cytoplasmic r-protein gene 6 (ubi::crp-6). The ubi::crp-6 gene generates a 700-nucleotide (nt) transcript. It shares a 700-bp regulatory region with the cytoplasmic r-protein gene 5 (crp-5), a gene encoding the N. crassa S26 r-protein. The two genes are transcribed divergently from the common regulatory region and their mRNA levels are regulated in parallel during growth on a variety of carbon sources.

  2. Recurrent read-through fusion transcripts in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varley, Katherine E; Gertz, Jason; Roberts, Brian S; Davis, Nicholas S; Bowling, Kevin M; Kirby, Marie K; Nesmith, Amy S; Oliver, Patsy G; Grizzle, William E; Forero, Andres; Buchsbaum, Donald J; LoBuglio, Albert F; Myers, Richard M

    2014-07-01

    Read-through fusion transcripts that result from the splicing of two adjacent genes in the same coding orientation are a recently discovered type of chimeric RNA. We sought to determine if read-through fusion transcripts exist in breast cancer. We performed paired-end RNA-seq of 168 breast samples, including 28 breast cancer cell lines, 42 triple negative breast cancer primary tumors, 42 estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer primary tumors, and 56 non-malignant breast tissue samples. We analyzed the sequencing data to identify breast cancer associated read-through fusion transcripts. We discovered two recurrent read-through fusion transcripts that were identified in breast cancer cell lines, confirmed across breast cancer primary tumors, and were not detected in normal tissues (SCNN1A-TNFRSF1A and CTSD-IFITM10). Both fusion transcripts use canonical splice sites to join the last splice donor of the 5' gene to the first splice acceptor of the 3' gene, creating an in-frame fusion transcript. Western blots indicated that the fusion transcripts are translated into fusion proteins in breast cancer cells. Custom small interfering RNAs targeting the CTSD-IFITM10 fusion junction reduced expression of the fusion transcript and reduced breast cancer cell proliferation. Read-through fusion transcripts between adjacent genes with different biochemical functions represent a new type of recurrent molecular defect in breast cancer that warrant further investigation as potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets. Both breast cancer associated fusion transcripts identified in this study involve membrane proteins (SCNN1A-TNFRSF1A and CTSD-IFITM10), which raises the possibility that they could be breast cancer-specific cell surface markers.

  3. Identification of a sodium chloride-regulated promoter in Lactococcus lactis by single-copy chromosomal fusion with a reporter gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, J.W.; Venema, G.; Kok, J.; Leenhouts, K.

    An integration vector, pORI13, was developed to screen in Lactococcus lactis for expression signals induced by changes in the environment and to assay transcriptional activity of genes in single copy. The plasmid carries a promoterless Escherichia coli lacZ gene preceded by a start codon, a

  4. Novel ZEB2-BCL11B Fusion Gene Identified by RNA-Sequencing in Acute Myeloid Leukemia with t(2;14(q22;q32.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Synne Torkildsen

    Full Text Available RNA-sequencing of a case of acute myeloid leukemia with the bone marrow karyotype 46,XY,t(2;14(q22;q32[5]/47,XY,idem,+?4,del(6(q13q21[cp6]/46,XY[4] showed that the t(2;14 generated a ZEB2-BCL11B chimera in which exon 2 of ZEB2 (nucleotide 595 in the sequence with accession number NM_014795.3 was fused to exon 2 of BCL11B (nucleotide 554 in the sequence with accession number NM_022898.2. RT-PCR together with Sanger sequencing verified the presence of the above-mentioned fusion transcript. All functional domains of BCL11B are retained in the chimeric protein. Abnormal expression of BCL11B coding regions subjected to control by the ZEB2 promoter seems to be the leukemogenic mechanism behind the translocation.

  5. Economics of fusion research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1977-10-15

    This report provides the results of a study of methods of economic analysis applied to the evaluation of fusion research. The study recognizes that a hierarchy of economic analyses of research programs exists: standard benefit-cost analysis, expected value of R and D information, and expected utility analysis. It is shown that standard benefit-cost analysis, as commonly applied to research programs, is inadequate for the evaluation of a high technology research effort such as fusion research. A methodology for performing an expected value analysis is developed and demonstrated and an overview of an approach to perform an expected utility analysis of fusion research is presented. In addition, a potential benefit of fusion research, not previously identified, is discussed and rough estimates of its magnitude are presented. This benefit deals with the effect of a fusion research program on optimal fossil fuel consumption patterns. The results of this study indicate that it is both appropriate and possible to perform an expected value analysis of fusion research in order to assess the economics of a fusion research program. The results indicate further that the major area of benefits of fusion research is likely due to the impact of a fusion research program on optimal fossil fuel consumption patterns and it is recommended that this benefit be included in future assessments of fusion research economics.

  6. Promoter hypermethylation of the retinoic acid receptor beta2 gene is frequent in acute myeloid leukaemia and associated with the presence of CBFβ-MYH11 fusion transcripts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rethmeier, Anita; Aggerholm, Anni; Olesen, Lene Hyldahl

    2006-01-01

    Silencing of the putative tumour suppressor gene retinoic acid receptor beta2 (RARbeta2) caused by aberrant promoter hypermethylation has been identified in several solid tumours. In order to evaluate the extent of RARbeta2 hypermethylation and transcription in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML...... was unmethylated in 10/10 bone marrow and 7/7 blood samples from healthy individuals, the gene was hypermethylated in 43% of the AML patients. The RARbeta2 degree of promoter methylation differed between and within individuals, and the mRNA transcription levels of the gene varied inter-individually by a factor...... of 4000. A significant inverse correlation between promoter hypermethylation and gene expression could be established (t-test, P = 0.019). Comparison of methylation data with a series of other molecular alterations in the same patient materials revealed a correlation between hypermethylation...

  7. A sensitive HIV-1 envelope induced fusion assay identifies fusion enhancement of thrombin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, De-Chun; Zhong, Guo-Cai; Su, Ju-Xiang [Department of Microbiology, Harbin Medical University, 194 Xuefu Road, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150081 (China); Liu, Yan-Hong [Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, 246 Xuefu Road, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150081 (China); Li, Yan; Wang, Jia-Ye [Department of Microbiology, Harbin Medical University, 194 Xuefu Road, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150081 (China); Hattori, Toshio [Department of Emerging Infectious Diseases, Division of Internal Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Tohoku University, Sendai 9808574 (Japan); Ling, Hong, E-mail: lingh@ems.hrbmu.edu.cn [Department of Microbiology, Harbin Medical University, 194 Xuefu Road, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150081 (China); Department of Parasitology, Harbin Medical University, 194 Xuefu Road, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150081 (China); Key Lab of Heilongjiang Province for Infection and Immunity, Key Lab of Heilongjiang Province Education Bureau for Etiology, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150081 (China); Zhang, Feng-Min, E-mail: fengminzhang@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Microbiology, Harbin Medical University, 194 Xuefu Road, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150081 (China); Key Lab of Heilongjiang Province for Infection and Immunity, Key Lab of Heilongjiang Province Education Bureau for Etiology, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150081 (China)

    2010-01-22

    To evaluate the interaction between HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) and target cell receptors, various cell-cell-fusion assays have been developed. In the present study, we established a novel fusion system. In this system, the expression of the sensitive reporter gene, firefly luciferase (FL) gene, in the target cells was used to evaluate cell fusion event. Simultaneously, constitutively expressed Renilla luciferase (RL) gene was used to monitor effector cell number and viability. FL gave a wider dynamic range than other known reporters and the introduction of RL made the assay accurate and reproducible. This system is especially beneficial for investigation of potential entry-influencing agents, for its power of ruling out the false inhibition or enhancement caused by the artificial cell-number variation. As a case study, we applied this fusion system to observe the effect of a serine protease, thrombin, on HIV Env-mediated cell-cell fusion and have found the fusion enhancement activity of thrombin over two R5-tropic HIV strains.

  8. Maximum Likelihood Fusion Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-09

    Symposium of Robotics Re- search. Sienna, Italy: Springer, 2003. [12] D. Hall and J. Llinas, “An introduction to multisensor data fusion ,” Proceed- ings of...a data fusion approach for combining Gaussian metric models of an environment constructed by multiple agents that operate outside of a global... data fusion , hypothesis testing,maximum likelihood estimation, mobile robot navigation REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT

  9. Fusion research principles

    CERN Document Server

    Dolan, Thomas James

    2013-01-01

    Fusion Research, Volume I: Principles provides a general description of the methods and problems of fusion research. The book contains three main parts: Principles, Experiments, and Technology. The Principles part describes the conditions necessary for a fusion reaction, as well as the fundamentals of plasma confinement, heating, and diagnostics. The Experiments part details about forty plasma confinement schemes and experiments. The last part explores various engineering problems associated with reactor design, vacuum and magnet systems, materials, plasma purity, fueling, blankets, neutronics

  10. Magnetic fusion technology

    CERN Document Server

    Dolan, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic Fusion Technology describes the technologies that are required for successful development of nuclear fusion power plants using strong magnetic fields. These technologies include: ? magnet systems, ? plasma heating systems, ? control systems, ? energy conversion systems, ? advanced materials development, ? vacuum systems, ? cryogenic systems, ? plasma diagnostics, ? safety systems, and ? power plant design studies. Magnetic Fusion Technology will be useful to students and to specialists working in energy research.

  11. Filter Bank Fusion Frames

    OpenAIRE

    Chebira, Amina; Fickus, Matthew; Mixon, Dustin G.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we characterize and construct novel oversampled filter banks implementing fusion frames. A fusion frame is a sequence of orthogonal projection operators whose sum can be inverted in a numerically stable way. When properly designed, fusion frames can provide redundant encodings of signals which are optimally robust against certain types of noise and erasures. However, up to this point, few implementable constructions of such frames were known; we show how to construct them using ...

  12. Genetically Controlled Fusion, Exocytosis and Fission of Artificial Vesicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bönzli, Eva; Hadorn, Maik; De Lucrezia, Davide

    if a special class of viral proteins, termed fusogenic peptides, were added to the external medium. In the present work, we intend to develop genetically controlled fusion, fission and exocytosis of vesicles by the synthesis of peptides within vesicles. First, we enclosed synthesized peptides in vesicles...... to induce in a next step fusion of adjacent vesicles, fission and exocytosis of nested vesicles. Second, we will replace the peptides by an enclosed cell-free expression system to internally synthesize fusion peptides. To control the gene expression, different mechanisms are available, e.g. addition...... fusion, fission and exocytosis....

  13. Frontiers in fusion research

    CERN Document Server

    Kikuchi, Mitsuru

    2011-01-01

    Frontiers in Fusion Research provides a systematic overview of the latest physical principles of fusion and plasma confinement. It is primarily devoted to the principle of magnetic plasma confinement, that has been systematized through 50 years of fusion research. Frontiers in Fusion Research begins with an introduction to the study of plasma, discussing the astronomical birth of hydrogen energy and the beginnings of human attempts to harness the Sun's energy for use on Earth. It moves on to chapters that cover a variety of topics such as: * charged particle motion, * plasma kinetic theory, *

  14. Magnetic-confinement fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ongena, J.; Koch, R.; Wolf, R.; Zohm, H.

    2016-05-01

    Our modern society requires environmentally friendly solutions for energy production. Energy can be released not only from the fission of heavy nuclei but also from the fusion of light nuclei. Nuclear fusion is an important option for a clean and safe solution for our long-term energy needs. The extremely high temperatures required for the fusion reaction are routinely realized in several magnetic-fusion machines. Since the early 1990s, up to 16 MW of fusion power has been released in pulses of a few seconds, corresponding to a power multiplication close to break-even. Our understanding of the very complex behaviour of a magnetized plasma at temperatures between 150 and 200 million °C surrounded by cold walls has also advanced substantially. This steady progress has resulted in the construction of ITER, a fusion device with a planned fusion power output of 500 MW in pulses of 400 s. ITER should provide answers to remaining important questions on the integration of physics and technology, through a full-size demonstration of a tenfold power multiplication, and on nuclear safety aspects. Here we review the basic physics underlying magnetic fusion: past achievements, present efforts and the prospects for future production of electrical energy. We also discuss questions related to the safety, waste management and decommissioning of a future fusion power plant.

  15. Minimally invasive lumbar fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Kevin T; Holly, Langston T; Schwender, James D

    2003-08-01

    Review article. To provide an overview of current techniques for minimally invasive lumbar fusion. Minimally invasive techniques have revolutionized the management of pathologic conditions in various surgical disciplines. Although these same principles have been used in the treatment of lumbar disc disease for many years, minimally invasive lumbar fusion procedures have only recently been developed. The goals of these procedures are to reduce the approach-related morbidity associated with traditional lumbar fusion, yet allow the surgery to be performed in an effective and safe manner. The authors' clinical experience with minimally invasive lumbar fusion was reviewed, and the pertinent literature was surveyed. Minimally invasive approaches have been developed for common lumbar procedures such as anterior and posterior interbody fusion, posterolateral onlay fusion, and internal fixation. As with all new surgical techniques, minimally invasive lumbar fusion has a learning curve. As well, there are benefits and disadvantages associated with each technique. However, because these techniques are new and evolving, evidence to support their potential benefits is largely anecdotal. Additionally, there are few long-term studies to document clinical outcomes. Preliminary clinical results suggest that minimally invasive lumbar fusion will have a beneficial impact on the care of patients with spinal disorders. Outcome studies with long-term follow-up will be necessary to validate its success and allow minimally invasive lumbar fusion to become more widely accepted.

  16. Fusion of Nonionic Vesicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bulut, Sanja; Oskolkova, M. Z.; Schweins, R.

    2010-01-01

    We present an experimental study of vesicle fusion using light and neutron scattering to monitor fusion events. Vesicles are reproducibly formed with an extrusion procedure using an single amphiphile triethylene glycol mono-n-decyl ether in water. They show long-term stability for temperatures ar...... a barrier to fusion changing from 15 k(B)T at T = 26 degrees C to 10k(H) T at T = 35 degrees C. These results are compatible with the theoretical predictions using the stalk model of vesicle fusion....

  17. Magnetic fusion reactor economics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krakowski, R.A.

    1995-12-01

    An almost primordial trend in the conversion and use of energy is an increased complexity and cost of conversion systems designed to utilize cheaper and more-abundant fuels; this trend is exemplified by the progression fossil fission {yields} fusion. The present projections of the latter indicate that capital costs of the fusion ``burner`` far exceed any commensurate savings associated with the cheapest and most-abundant of fuels. These projections suggest competitive fusion power only if internal costs associate with the use of fossil or fission fuels emerge to make them either uneconomic, unacceptable, or both with respect to expensive fusion systems. This ``implementation-by-default`` plan for fusion is re-examined by identifying in general terms fusion power-plant embodiments that might compete favorably under conditions where internal costs (both economic and environmental) of fossil and/or fission are not as great as is needed to justify the contemporary vision for fusion power. Competitive fusion power in this context will require a significant broadening of an overly focused program to explore the physics and simbiotic technologies leading to more compact, simplified, and efficient plasma-confinement configurations that reside at the heart of an attractive fusion power plant.

  18. Novel TNS3-MAP3K3 and ZFPM2-ELF5 fusion genes identified by RNA sequencing in multicystic mesothelioma with t(7;17)(p12;q23) and t(8;11)(q23;p13).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagopoulos, Ioannis; Gorunova, Ludmila; Davidson, Ben; Heim, Sverre

    2015-02-28

    Multicystic mesothelioma is a rare disease of unknown etiology and pathogenesis. Nothing has been known about the cytogenetic and molecular genetic features of these tumors. Here we present the first cytogenetically analyzed multicystic mesothelioma with the karyotype 46,XX,t(7;17)(p13;q23),t(8;11)(q23;p13). RNA-sequencing showed that the t(7;17)(p13;q23) generated a chimeric TNS3-MAP3K3 gene, which codes for a chimeric protein kinase, as well as the reciprocal MAP3K3-TNS3 in which the region of TNS3 coding for the SH2_Tensin_like region and the tensin phosphotyrosine-binding domain is under the control of the MAP3K3 promoter. The other translocation, t(8;11)(q23;p13), generated a chimeric ZFPM2-ELF5 gene which codes for a chimeric transcription factor in which the first 40 amino acids of ELF5 are replaced by the first 100 amino acids of ZFPM2. RT-PCR together with Sanger sequencing verified the presence of the above-mentioned fusion transcripts. The finding of acquired clonal chromosome abnormalities in cells cultured from the lesion and the presence of the TNS3-MAP3K3 chimeric protein kinase and the ZFPM2-ELF5 chimeric transcription factor confirm the neoplastic nature of multicystic mesothelioma. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Novel fusion between the breakpoint cluster region and platelet-derived growth factor receptor-alpha genes in a patient with chronic myeloid leukemia-like neoplasm: undetectable residual disease after imatinib therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cluzeau, Thomas; Lippert, Eric; Cayuela, Jean-Michel; Maarek, Odile; Migeon, Marina; Noguera, Maria-Elena; Dombret, Hervé; Rea, Delphine

    2015-11-01

    Rare patients suffering from myeloid neoplasms share clinical and cytological features indistinguishable from chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) but lack the BCR-ABL1 fusion gene. Several studies provide evidence that alterations in genes encoding tyrosine kinase receptors such as the platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) may be involved in the pathogenesis of these disorders. Here we describe a patient with a rare CML-like disease in whom we identified a novel in-frame BCR-PDGFRA rearrangement joining BCR exon 17 to PDGFRA exon 13, resulting in overexpression of PDGFRA. The design of a specific quantitative PCR assay to monitor the molecular response during treatment with imatinib, a multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) with activity against ABL, c-Kit, and PDGFRA revealed an outstanding disease control with durably undetectable BCR-PDGFRA transcripts. Multiple TKIs are currently available yet with distinct target profiles; thus, accurate molecular diagnosis and monitoring tools are essential to establish tailored treatments and assess response to therapy in this type of rare hematological malignancy. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. In vitro gene fusions that join an enzymatically active beta-galactosidase segment to amino-terminal fragments of exogenous proteins: Escherichia coli plasmid vectors for the detection and cloning of translational initiation signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casadaban, M J; Chou, J; Cohen, S N

    1980-01-01

    We report the construction and use of a series of plasmid vectors suitable for the detection and cloning of translational control signals and 5' coding sequences of exogenously derived genes. In these plasmids, the first eight codons of the amino-terminal end of the lactose operon beta-galactosidase gene, lacZ, were removed, and unique BamHI, EcoRI, and SmaI (XmaI) endonuclease cleavage sites were incorporated adjacent to the eighth codon of lacZ. Introduction of deoxyribonucleic acid fragments containing appropriate regulatory signals and 5' coding sequences into such lac fusion plasmids led to the production of hybrid proteins consisting of the carboxyl-terminal segment of a beta-galactosidase remnant plus a peptide fragment that contained the amino-terminal amino acids encoded by the exogenous deoxyribonucleic acid sequence. These hybrid peptides retained beta-galactosidase enzymatic activity and yielded a Lac+ phenotype. Such hybrid proteins are useful for purifying peptide sequences encoded by exogenous deoxyribonucleic acid fragments and for studies relating the structure and function of specific peptide segments. Images PMID:6162838

  1. Identification of a sodium chloride-regulated promoter in Lactococcus lactis by single-copy chromosomal fusion with a reporter gene

    OpenAIRE

    Sanders, J.W.; Venema, G; Kok, J; Leenhouts, K.

    1998-01-01

    An integration vector, pORI13, was developed to screen in Lactococcus lactis for expression signals induced by changes in the environment and to assay transcriptional activity of genes in single copy. The plasmid carries a promoterless Escherichia coli lacZ gene preceded by a start codon, a lactococcal ribosome binding site, and a multiple cloning site. Chromosomal Sau3AI fragments of L. lactis MG1363 DNA were cloned in pORI13 using a RepA(+) E. coli as host. The resulting bank of plasmids wa...

  2. Cell fusion and nuclear fusion in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Daisuke; Ohtsu, Mina; Higashiyama, Tetsuya

    2016-12-01

    Eukaryotic cells are surrounded by a plasma membrane and have a large nucleus containing the genomic DNA, which is enclosed by a nuclear envelope consisting of the outer and inner nuclear membranes. Although these membranes maintain the identity of cells, they sometimes fuse to each other, such as to produce a zygote during sexual reproduction or to give rise to other characteristically polyploid tissues. Recent studies have demonstrated that the mechanisms of plasma membrane or nuclear membrane fusion in plants are shared to some extent with those of yeasts and animals, despite the unique features of plant cells including thick cell walls and intercellular connections. Here, we summarize the key factors in the fusion of these membranes during plant reproduction, and also focus on "non-gametic cell fusion," which was thought to be rare in plant tissue, in which each cell is separated by a cell wall. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Desarrollo y evaluación de una prueba de reacción en cadena de la polimerasa (PCR, utilizando la secuencia del gen hilA para diagnóstico de fiebre entérica por Salmonella spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miryan Margot Sánchez

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available El diagnóstico de fiebre entérica por Salmonella spp. se basa en el aislamiento de la bacteria en hemocultivos el cual consume tiempo, no siempre está disponible y tiene poca utilidad en pacientes con tratamiento antibiótico previo. Por consiguiente, se hace necesario el desarrollo de una prueba rápida, sensible y específica para el diagnóstico de fiebre entérica. Salmonella spp. utiliza el gen hilA (componente de la isla de patogenicidad I para invadir células epiteliales y producir infección. Al usar la secuencia de este gen se diseñó una prueba de PCR para detectar la bacteria en sangre y se evaluó su sensibilidad, especificidad, valor predictivo positivo y valor predictivo negativo, utilizando la metodología prueba de una prueba. La prueba de oro fue el hemocultivo. Se estudiaron 34 individuos con sintomatología de fiebre entérica con aislamiento de Salmonella serotipo Typhi en hemocultivos; 35 individuos con sepsis por otros bacilos Gram negativos aislados de hemocultivo (Klebsiella pneumoniae, 9; Serratia marcescens, 5; Escherichia coli, 4; Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 9; Providencia alcalifaciens, 4, y Enterobacter cloacae, 4 y 150 muestras de sangre de voluntarios asintomáticos. La sensibilidad, especificidad, valor pronóstico positivo y valor pronóstico negativo de la PCR fue del 100%. El número mínimo de UFC/ml que la PCR detecta en sangre es de 10.

  4. Novel RNA hybridization method for the in situ detection of ETV1, ETV4 and ETV5 gene fusions in prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunju, Lakshmi Priya; Carskadon, Shannon; Siddiqui, Javed; Tomlins, Scott A; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Palanisamy, Nallasivam

    2014-01-01

    The genetic basis of 50–60% of prostate cancer is attributable to rearrangements in ETS (ERG, ETV1, ETV4, and ETV5), BRAF and RAF1 genes and overexpression of SPINK1. The development and validation of reliable detection methods are warranted to classify various molecular subtypes of prostate cancer for diagnostic and prognostic purposes. ETS gene rearrangements are typically detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and reverse transcription PCR methods. Recently, monoclonal antibodies against ERG have been developed that detect the truncated ERG protein in immunohistochemical assays where staining levels are strongly correlated with ERG rearrangement status by FISH. However, specific antibodies for ETV1, ETV4 and ETV5 are unavailable, challenging their clinical use. We developed a novel RNA in situ hybridization based assay for the in situ detection of ETV1, ETV4, and ETV5 in formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissues from prostate needle biopsies, prostatectomy, and metastatic prostate cancer specimens using RNA probes. Further, with combined RNA in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry we identified a rare subset of prostate cancer with dual ETS gene rearrangements in collisions of independent tumor foci. The high specificity and sensitivity of RNA in situ hybridization provides an alternate method enabling bright field in situ detection of ETS gene aberrations in routine clinically available prostate cancer specimens. PMID:25203299

  5. Novel RNA hybridization method for the in situ detection of ETV1, ETV4, and ETV5 gene fusions in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunju, Lakshmi P; Carskadon, Shannon; Siddiqui, Javed; Tomlins, Scott A; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Palanisamy, Nallasivam

    2014-09-01

    The genetic basis of 50% to 60% of prostate cancer (PCa) is attributable to rearrangements in E26 transformation-specific (ETS) (ERG, ETV1, ETV4, and ETV5), BRAF, and RAF1 genes and overexpression of SPINK1. The development and validation of reliable detection methods are warranted to classify various molecular subtypes of PCa for diagnostic and prognostic purposes. ETS gene rearrangements are typically detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization and reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction methods. Recently, monoclonal antibodies against ERG have been developed that detect the truncated ERG protein in immunohistochemical assays where staining levels are strongly correlated with ERG rearrangement status by fluorescence in situ hybridization. However, specific antibodies for ETV1, ETV4, and ETV5 are unavailable, challenging their clinical use. We developed a novel RNA in situ hybridization-based assay for the in situ detection of ETV1, ETV4, and ETV5 in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues from prostate needle biopsies, prostatectomy, and metastatic PCa specimens using RNA probes. Further, with combined RNA in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry we identified a rare subset of PCa with dual ETS gene rearrangements in collisions of independent tumor foci. The high specificity and sensitivity of RNA in situ hybridization provides an alternate method enabling bright-field in situ detection of ETS gene aberrations in routine clinically available PCa specimens.

  6. [Construction of gene vaccine of myostatin fusion with T-helper epitope and its effects on forelimb grip in immunized mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Liang; Liu, Chen-Tao; Wang, Yuan-Li; Luo, Kai; Wang, Xu-Dan

    2013-01-01

    To further study the therapy of wasting muscle by myostatin as a new targets, the eucaryotic expression vector coupled the foreign T-helper epitope of tetanus toxin (TT) to the N terminus of myostatin was constructed, and the effects of the gene vaccine on forelimb grip were tested in immunized mice. A DNA fragment encoding the TT epitope followed by the N terminus of mature myostatin (330bp) was synthesized. The eucaryotic expression vector of myostatin was constructed and the chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were infected with the recombinant plasmids pVAC-TT-Ms by liposome transfection according to routine laboratory procedure. The myostatin expression was tested by cell immunofluorescence technique in transfected CHO. The forelimbs grip were tested in immunized mice with myostatin gene vaccine. The eucaryotic expression vector of myostatin coupled TT epitope was constructed successfully through the restriction analysis and sequencing. The recombinant plasmids pVAC-TT-Ms met quality criterion as gene vaccine by analysis OD260/280 and electrophoresis. The myostatin expression was detected obviously in transfected CHO. The forelimb grip in immunized mice had an obvious increase. The average value of forelimb grip of the mice immunized with pVAC-TT-Ms was about 29.88% greater than that of control mice. The construction of eucaryotic expression vector of myostatin coupled TT epitope is successful in expression for recombinant human mature peptide of myostatin. The gene vaccine of myostatin meet quality criterion. The immunized mice has an obvious increase in forelimb grip.

  7. Changes in Parthenogenetic Imprinting Patterns during Reprogramming by Cell Fusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Sik Jang

    Full Text Available Differentiated somatic cells can be reprogrammed into the pluripotent state by cell-cell fusion. In the pluripotent state, reprogrammed cells may then self-renew and differentiate into all three germ layers. Fusion-induced reprogramming also epigenetically modifies the somatic cell genome through DNA demethylation, X chromosome reactivation, and histone modification. In this study, we investigated whether fusion with embryonic stem cells (ESCs also reprograms genomic imprinting patterns in somatic cells. In particular, we examined imprinting changes in parthenogenetic neural stem cells fused with biparental ESCs, as well as in biparental neural stem cells fused with parthenogenetic ESCs. The resulting hybrid cells expressed the pluripotency markers Oct4 and Nanog. In addition, methylation of several imprinted genes except Peg3 was comparable between hybrid cells and ESCs. This finding indicates that reprogramming by cell fusion does not necessarily reverse the status of all imprinted genes to the state of pluripotent fusion partner.

  8. Fusion helps diversification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liang, S.; Ren, Z.; de Rijke, M.

    2014-01-01

    A popular strategy for search result diversification is to first retrieve a set of documents utilizing a standard retrieval method and then rerank the results. We adopt a different perspective on the problem, based on data fusion. Starting from the hypothesis that data fusion can improve performance

  9. Controlled Nuclear Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasstone, Samuel

    This publication is one of a series of information booklets for the general public published by The United States Atomic Energy Commission. Among the topics discussed are: Importance of Fusion Energy; Conditions for Nuclear Fusion; Thermonuclear Reactions in Plasmas; Plasma Confinement by Magnetic Fields; Experiments With Plasmas; High-Temperature…

  10. Controlled thermonuclear fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Bobin, Jean Louis

    2014-01-01

    The book is a presentation of the basic principles and main achievements in the field of nuclear fusion. It encompasses both magnetic and inertial confinements plus a few exotic mechanisms for nuclear fusion. The state-of-the-art regarding thermonuclear reactions, hot plasmas, tokamaks, laser-driven compression and future reactors is given.

  11. Sensor Data Fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plascencia, Alfredo; Stepán, Petr

    2006-01-01

    The main contribution of this paper is to present a sensor fusion approach to scene environment mapping as part of a Sensor Data Fusion (SDF) architecture. This approach involves combined sonar array with stereo vision readings.  Sonar readings are interpreted using probability density functions...

  12. Fusion of biological membranes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The process of membrane fusion has been examined by Monte Carlo simulation, and is found to be very different than the conventional picture. The differences in mechanism lead to several predictions, in particular that fusion is accompanied by transient leakage. This prediction has recently been verified. Self-consistent ...

  13. Fusion Science Education Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielson, C. A.; DIII-D Education Group

    1996-11-01

    This presentation will focus on education outreach activities at General Atomics that have been expanded to include the general population on science education with a focus on fusion energy. Outreach materials are distributed upon request both nationally and internationally. These materials include a notebook containing copies of DIII--D tour panels, fusion poster, new fusion energy video, new fusion energy brochure, and the electromagnetic spectrum curriculum. The 1996 Fusion Forum (held in the House Caucus Room) included a student/ teacher lunch with Energy Secretary Hazel O'Leary and a private visit to the Forum exhibits. The continuing partnership with Kearny High School includes lectures, job shadowing, internship, equipment donations and an award-winning electric car-racing program. Development of distribution by CD of the existing interactive fusion energy kiosk and a virtual reality tour of the DIII--D facility are underway. The DIII--D fusion education WWW site includes e-mail addresses to ``Ask the Wizard,'' and/or receive GA's outreach materials. Steve Rodecker, a local science teacher, aided by DIII--D fusion staff, won his second Tapestry Award; he also was named the ``1995 National Science Teacher of the Year'' and will be present to share his experiences with the DIII--D educational outreach program.

  14. Controlled thermonuclear fusion; La fusion thermonucleaire controlee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bobin, Jean-Louis

    2011-10-27

    This book presents, first, the basic nuclear physics and plasma physics principles at the origin of the researches on nuclear fusion which started in the 1950's. Then the magnetic and inertial confinement principles are described with their corresponding facilities: the tokamaks and the laser-induced inertial confinement fusion devices. After a brief outline of some exotic processes, the book describes some projects of thermonuclear power plants capable to supply electricity by the end of the 21. century. (J.S.)

  15. Compact fusion reactors

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    Fusion research is currently to a large extent focused on tokamak (ITER) and inertial confinement (NIF) research. In addition to these large international or national efforts there are private companies performing fusion research using much smaller devices than ITER or NIF. The attempt to achieve fusion energy production through relatively small and compact devices compared to tokamaks decreases the costs and building time of the reactors and this has allowed some private companies to enter the field, like EMC2, General Fusion, Helion Energy, Lawrenceville Plasma Physics and Lockheed Martin. Some of these companies are trying to demonstrate net energy production within the next few years. If they are successful their next step is to attempt to commercialize their technology. In this presentation an overview of compact fusion reactor concepts is given.

  16. Analysis artefacts of the INS-IGF2 fusion transcript

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wernersson, Rasmus; Frogne, Thomas; Rescan, Claude

    2015-01-01

    Background: In gene expression analysis, overlapping genes, splice variants, and fusion transcripts are potential sources of data analysis artefacts, depending on how the observed intensity is assigned to one, or more genes. We here exemplify this by an in-depth analysis of the INS-IGF2 fusion...... proteomics analysis we could not demonstrate INS-IGF2 protein in samples of human islets nor in EndoC-βH1. Conclusions: Sequence features, such as fusion transcripts spanning multiple genes can lead to unexpected results in gene expression analysis, and care must be taken in generating and interpreting...... is >20,000 fold lower than INS in human beta cells, and we suggest an explanation to the nature of the artefacts which have previously led to overestimation of the gene expression level in selected studies. We reinvestigated the previous reported findings of detection of INS-IGF2 using antibodies both...

  17. Genetic variability of attachment (G and Fusion (F protein genes of human metapneumovirus strains circulating during 2006-2009 in Kolkata, Eastern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chawla-Sarkar Mamta

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human metapneumovirus (hMPV is associated with the acute respiratory tract infection (ARTI in all the age groups. However, there is limited information on prevalence and genetic diversity of human metapneumovirus (hMPV strains circulating in India. Objective To study prevalence and genomic diversity of hMPV strains among ARTI patients reporting in outpatient departments of hospitals in Kolkata, Eastern India. Methods Nasal and/or throat swabs from 2309 patients during January 2006 to December 2009, were screened for the presence of hMPV by RT-PCR of nucleocapsid (N gene. The G and F genes of representative hMPV positive samples were sequenced. Results 118 of 2309 (5.11% clinical samples were positive for hMPV. The majority (≈80% of the positive cases were detected during July−November all through the study period. Genetic analysis revealed that 77% strains belong to A2 subgroup whereas rest clustered in B1 subgroup. G sequences showed higher diversity at the nucleotide and amino acid level. In contrast, less than 10% variation was observed in F gene of representative strains of all four years. Sequence analysis also revealed changes in the position of stop codon in G protein, which resulted in variable length (217-231 aa polypeptides. Conclusion The study suggests that approximately 5% of ARTI in the region were caused by hMPV. This is the first report on the genetic variability of G and F gene of hMPV strains from India which clearly shows that the G protein of hMPV is continuously evolving. Though the study partially fulfills lacunae of information, further studies from other regions are necessary for better understanding of prevalence, epidemiology and virus evolution in Indian subcontinent.

  18. RNA-seq Based Transcription Characterization of Fusion Breakpoints as a Potential Estimator for Its Oncogenic Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-lei Gu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on high-throughput sequencing technology, the detection of gene fusions is no longer a big challenge but estimating the oncogenic potential of fusion genes remains challenging. Recent studies successfully applied machine learning methods and gene structural and functional features of fusion mutation to predict their oncogenic potentials. However, the transcription characterizations features of fusion genes have not yet been studied. In this study, based on the clonal evolution theory, we hypothesized that a fusion gene is more likely to be an oncogenic genomic alteration, if the neoplastic cells harboring this fusion mutation have larger clonal size than other neoplastic cells in a tumor. We proposed a novel method, called iFCR (internal Fusion Clone Ratio, given an estimation of oncogenic potential for fusion mutations. We have evaluated the iFCR method in three public cancer transcriptome sequencing datasets; the results demonstrated that the fusion mutations occurring in tumor samples have higher internal fusion clone ratio than normal samples. And the most frequent prostate cancer fusion mutation, TMPRSS2-ERG, appears to have a remarkably higher iFCR value in all three independent patients. The preliminary results suggest that the internal fusion clone ratio might potentially advantage current fusion mutation oncogenic potential prediction methods.

  19. Fusion of a viral antigen to invariant chain leads to augmented T-cell immunity and improved protection in gene-gun DNA-vaccinated mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grujic, Mirjana; Holst, Peter J; Christensen, Jan P

    2009-01-01

    against lethal peripheral challenge. The current study questioned whether the same strategy, i.e. linkage of GP to an Ii chain, could be applied to a naked DNA vaccine. Following gene-gun immunization with the linked construct (DNA-IiGP), GP-specific CD4(+) T cells could not be detected by flow cytometry...... with the unlinked construct. In contrast, substantial protection against peripheral challenge was not observed. Additional experiments with T-cell subset-depleted or perforin-deficient mice revealed that virus control in vaccinated mice depends critically on cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells. Finally, priming with the naked...

  20. Remote sensing image fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Alparone, Luciano; Baronti, Stefano; Garzelli, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    A synthesis of more than ten years of experience, Remote Sensing Image Fusion covers methods specifically designed for remote sensing imagery. The authors supply a comprehensive classification system and rigorous mathematical description of advanced and state-of-the-art methods for pansharpening of multispectral images, fusion of hyperspectral and panchromatic images, and fusion of data from heterogeneous sensors such as optical and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images and integration of thermal and visible/near-infrared images. They also explore new trends of signal/image processing, such as

  1. Novel family of human transposable elements formed due to fusion of the first exon of gene MAST2 with retrotransposon SVA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bantysh, O B; Buzdin, A A

    2009-12-01

    We identified a novel human-specific family of transposable elements that consists of fused copies of the CpG-island containing the first exon of gene MAST2 and retrotransposon SVA. We propose a mechanism for the formation of this family termed CpG-SVA, comprising 5'-transduction by an SVA insert. After the divergence of human and chimpanzee ancestor lineages, retrotransposon SVA has inserted into the first intron of gene MAST2 in the sense orientation. Due to splicing of an aberrant RNA driven by MAST2 promoter, but terminally processed using SVA polyadenylation signal, the first exon of MAST2 has fused to a spliced 3'-terminal fragment of SVA retrotransposon. The above ancestor CpG-SVA element due to retrotranspositions of its own copies has formed a novel family represented in the human genome by 76 members. Recruitment of a MAST2 CpG island was most likely beneficial to the hybrid retrotransposons because it could significantly increase retrotransposition frequency. Also, we show that human L1 reverse transcriptase adds an extra cytosine residue to the 3' terminus of the nascent first strand of cDNA.

  2. Structure of the β-Galactosidase Gene from Thermus sp. Strain T2: Expression in Escherichia coli and Purification in a Single Step of an Active Fusion Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vian, Alejandro; Carrascosa, Alfonso V.; García, José L.; Cortés, Estrella

    1998-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of both the bgaA gene, coding for a thermostable β-galactosidase of Thermus sp. strain T2, and its flanking regions was determined. The deduced amino acid sequence of the enzyme predicts a polypeptide of 645 amino acids (Mr, 73,595). Comparative analysis of the open reading frames located in the flanking regions of the bgaA gene revealed that they might encode proteins involved in the transport and hydrolysis of sugars. The observed homology between the deduced amino acid sequences of BgaA and the β-galactosidase of Bacillus stearothermophilus allows us to classify the new enzyme within family 42 of glycosyl hydrolases. BgaA was overexpressed in its active form in Escherichia coli, but more interestingly, an active chimeric β-galactosidase was constructed by fusing the BgaA protein to the choline-binding domain of the major pneumococcal autolysin. This chimera illustrates a novel approach for producing an active and thermostable hybrid enzyme that can be purified in a single step by affinity chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, retaining the catalytic properties of the native enzyme. The chimeric enzyme showed a specific activity of 191,000 U/mg at 70°C and a Km value of 1.6 mM with o-nitrophenyl-β-d-galactopyranoside as a substrate, and it retained 50% of its initial activity after 1 h of incubation at 70°C. PMID:9603833

  3. Jamb and Jamc Are Essential for Vertebrate Myocyte Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Gareth T.; Wright, Gavin J.

    2011-01-01

    Cellular fusion is required in the development of several tissues, including skeletal muscle. In vertebrates, this process is poorly understood and lacks an in vivo-validated cell surface heterophilic receptor pair that is necessary for fusion. Identification of essential cell surface interactions between fusing cells is an important step in elucidating the molecular mechanism of cellular fusion. We show here that the zebrafish orthologues of JAM-B and JAM-C receptors are essential for fusion of myocyte precursors to form syncytial muscle fibres. Both jamb and jamc are dynamically co-expressed in developing muscles and encode receptors that physically interact. Heritable mutations in either gene prevent myocyte fusion in vivo, resulting in an overabundance of mononuclear, but otherwise overtly normal, functional fast-twitch muscle fibres. Transplantation experiments show that the Jamb and Jamc receptors must interact between neighbouring cells (in trans) for fusion to occur. We also show that jamc is ectopically expressed in prdm1a mutant slow muscle precursors, which inappropriately fuse with other myocytes, suggesting that control of myocyte fusion through regulation of jamc expression has important implications for the growth and patterning of muscles. Our discovery of a receptor-ligand pair critical for fusion in vivo has important implications for understanding the molecular mechanisms responsible for myocyte fusion and its regulation in vertebrate myogenesis. PMID:22180726

  4. Structure information from fusion barriers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    effects on the fusion excitation function. However, a simultaneous analysis of the fusion, elastic and quasi-elastic channels would fix the structure and the reaction unambiguously. Keywords. Heavy ion fusion; fusion barrier distributions; nuclear structure; coupled reaction chan- nel calculations. PACS Nos 25.70.Bc; 25.70.

  5. High frequency of fusion transcripts involving TCF7L2 in colorectal cancer: novel fusion partner and splice variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torfinn Nome

    Full Text Available VTI1A-TCF7L2 was reported as a recurrent fusion gene in colorectal cancer (CRC, found to be expressed in three out of 97 primary cancers, and one cell line, NCI-H508, where a genomic deletion joins the two genes [1]. To investigate this fusion further, we analyzed high-throughput DNA and RNA sequencing data from seven CRC cell lines, and identified the gene RP11-57H14.3 (ENSG00000225292 as a novel fusion partner for TCF7L2. The fusion was discovered from both genome and transcriptome data in the HCT116 cell line. By triplicate nested RT-PCR, we tested both the novel fusion transcript and VTI1A-TCF7L2 for expression in a series of 106 CRC tissues, 21 CRC cell lines, 14 normal colonic mucosa, and 20 normal tissues from miscellaneous anatomical sites. Altogether, 42% and 45% of the CRC samples expressed VTI1A-TCF7L2 and TCF7L2-RP11-57H14.3 fusion transcripts, respectively. The fusion transcripts were both seen in 29% of the normal colonic mucosa samples, and in 25% and 75% of the tested normal tissues from other organs, revealing that the TCF7L2 fusion transcripts are neither specific to cancer nor to the colon and rectum. Seven different splice variants were detected for the VTI1A-TCF7L2 fusion, of which three are novel. Four different splice variants were detected for the TCF7L2-RP11-57H14.3 fusion. In conclusion, we have identified novel variants of VTI1A-TCF7L2 fusion transcripts, including a novel fusion partner gene, RP11-57H14.3, and demonstrated detectable levels in a large fraction of CRC samples, as well as in normal colonic mucosa and other tissue types. We suggest that the fusion transcripts observed in a high frequency of samples are transcription induced chimeras that are expressed at low levels in most samples. The similar fusion transcripts induced by genomic rearrangements observed in individual cancer cell lines may yet have oncogenic potential as suggested in the original study by Bass et al.

  6. High frequency of fusion transcripts involving TCF7L2 in colorectal cancer: novel fusion partner and splice variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nome, Torfinn; Hoff, Andreas M; Bakken, Anne Cathrine; Rognum, Torleiv O; Nesbakken, Arild; Skotheim, Rolf I

    2014-01-01

    VTI1A-TCF7L2 was reported as a recurrent fusion gene in colorectal cancer (CRC), found to be expressed in three out of 97 primary cancers, and one cell line, NCI-H508, where a genomic deletion joins the two genes [1]. To investigate this fusion further, we analyzed high-throughput DNA and RNA sequencing data from seven CRC cell lines, and identified the gene RP11-57H14.3 (ENSG00000225292) as a novel fusion partner for TCF7L2. The fusion was discovered from both genome and transcriptome data in the HCT116 cell line. By triplicate nested RT-PCR, we tested both the novel fusion transcript and VTI1A-TCF7L2 for expression in a series of 106 CRC tissues, 21 CRC cell lines, 14 normal colonic mucosa, and 20 normal tissues from miscellaneous anatomical sites. Altogether, 42% and 45% of the CRC samples expressed VTI1A-TCF7L2 and TCF7L2-RP11-57H14.3 fusion transcripts, respectively. The fusion transcripts were both seen in 29% of the normal colonic mucosa samples, and in 25% and 75% of the tested normal tissues from other organs, revealing that the TCF7L2 fusion transcripts are neither specific to cancer nor to the colon and rectum. Seven different splice variants were detected for the VTI1A-TCF7L2 fusion, of which three are novel. Four different splice variants were detected for the TCF7L2-RP11-57H14.3 fusion. In conclusion, we have identified novel variants of VTI1A-TCF7L2 fusion transcripts, including a novel fusion partner gene, RP11-57H14.3, and demonstrated detectable levels in a large fraction of CRC samples, as well as in normal colonic mucosa and other tissue types. We suggest that the fusion transcripts observed in a high frequency of samples are transcription induced chimeras that are expressed at low levels in most samples. The similar fusion transcripts induced by genomic rearrangements observed in individual cancer cell lines may yet have oncogenic potential as suggested in the original study by Bass et al.

  7. Fusion Revisits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    It's going to be a hot summer at CERN. At least in the Main Building, where from 13 July to 20 August an exhibition is being hosted on nuclear fusion, the energy of the Stars. Nuclear fusion is the engine driving the stars but also a potential source of energy for mankind. The exhibition shows the different nuclear fusion techniques and research carried out on the subject in Europe. Inaugurated at CERN in 1993, following collaboration between Lausanne's CRPP-EPFL and CERN, with input from Alessandro Pascolini of Italy's INFN, this exhibition has travelled round Europe before being revamped and returning to CERN. 'Fusion, Energy of the Stars', from 13 July onwards, Main Building

  8. Fusion plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    Stacey, Weston M

    2012-01-01

    This revised and enlarged second edition of the popular textbook and reference contains comprehensive treatments of both the established foundations of magnetic fusion plasma physics and of the newly developing areas of active research. It concludes with a look ahead to fusion power reactors of the future. The well-established topics of fusion plasma physics -- basic plasma phenomena, Coulomb scattering, drifts of charged particles in magnetic and electric fields, plasma confinement by magnetic fields, kinetic and fluid collective plasma theories, plasma equilibria and flux surface geometry, plasma waves and instabilities, classical and neoclassical transport, plasma-materials interactions, radiation, etc. -- are fully developed from first principles through to the computational models employed in modern plasma physics. The new and emerging topics of fusion plasma physics research -- fluctuation-driven plasma transport and gyrokinetic/gyrofluid computational methodology, the physics of the divertor, neutral ...

  9. Spinal fusion - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ency/presentations/100121.htm Spinal fusion - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, ... Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page last updated: ...

  10. Cell fusions in mammals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, Lars-Inge; Bjerregaard, Bolette; Talts, Jan Fredrik

    2008-01-01

    Cell fusions are important to fertilization, placentation, development of skeletal muscle and bone, calcium homeostasis and the immune defense system. Additionally, cell fusions participate in tissue repair and may be important to cancer development and progression. A large number of factors appear...... to regulate cell fusions, including receptors and ligands, membrane domain organizing proteins, proteases, signaling molecules and fusogenic proteins forming alpha-helical bundles that bring membranes close together. The syncytin family of proteins represent true fusogens and the founding member, syncytin-1......, has been documented to be involved in fusions between placental trophoblasts, between cancer cells and between cancer cells and host ells. We review the literature with emphasis on the syncytin family and propose that syncytins may represent universal fusogens in primates and rodents, which work...

  11. Optical Fiber Fusion Splicing

    CERN Document Server

    Yablon, Andrew D

    2005-01-01

    This book is an up-to-date treatment of optical fiber fusion splicing incorporating all the recent innovations in the field. It provides a toolbox of general strategies and specific techniques that the reader can apply when optimizing fusion splices between novel fibers. It specifically addresses considerations important for fusion splicing of contemporary specialty fibers including dispersion compensating fiber, erbium-doped gain fiber, polarization maintaining fiber, and microstructured fiber. Finally, it discusses the future of optical fiber fusion splicing including silica and non-silica based optical fibers as well as the trend toward increasing automation. Whilst serving as a self-contained reference work, abundant citations from the technical literature will enable readers to readily locate primary sources.

  12. The MARVEL domain protein, Singles Bar, is required for progression past the pre-fusion complex stage of myoblast fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Beatriz; Maeland, Anne D; Gisselbrecht, Stephen S; Bloor, James W; Brown, Nicholas H; Michelson, Alan M

    2007-07-15

    Multinucleated myotubes develop by the sequential fusion of individual myoblasts. Using a convergence of genomic and classical genetic approaches, we have discovered a novel gene, singles bar (sing), that is essential for myoblast fusion. sing encodes a small multipass transmembrane protein containing a MARVEL domain, which is found in vertebrate proteins involved in processes such as tight junction formation and vesicle trafficking where--as in myoblast fusion--membrane apposition occurs. sing is expressed in both founder cells and fusion competent myoblasts preceding and during myoblast fusion. Examination of embryos injected with double-stranded sing RNA or embryos homozygous for ethane methyl sulfonate-induced sing alleles revealed an identical phenotype: replacement of multinucleated myofibers by groups of single, myosin-expressing myoblasts at a stage when formation of the mature muscle pattern is complete in wild-type embryos. Unfused sing mutant myoblasts form clusters, suggesting that early recognition and adhesion of these cells are unimpaired. To further investigate this phenotype, we undertook electron microscopic ultrastructural studies of fusing myoblasts in both sing and wild-type embryos. These experiments revealed that more sing mutant myoblasts than wild-type contain pre-fusion complexes, which are characterized by electron-dense vesicles paired on either side of the fusing plasma membranes. In contrast, embryos mutant for another muscle fusion gene, blown fuse (blow), have a normal number of such complexes. Together, these results lead to the hypothesis that sing acts at a step distinct from that of blow, and that sing is required on both founder cell and fusion-competent myoblast membranes to allow progression past the pre-fusion complex stage of myoblast fusion, possibly by mediating fusion of the electron-dense vesicles to the plasma membrane.

  13. What is Binocular Fusion?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart Wallis

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available When images in the two eyes are sufficiently similar, they are ‘fused’. Fusion has motor (vergence and sensory components. When vergence is prevented, sensory ‘fusion’ of disparate images still occurs, but the nature of this fusion has received curiously little attention. Summation of signals from the two eyes is fairly well understood and seems the obvious basis for fusion. But summation of disparate edges should cause the fused edge to appear more blurred. We tested this by studying the perceived blur of single edges with vertical disparities that spanned fusion and diplopia. Single, horizontal, Gaussian-blurred edges (blur, B=1.6 to 40 minarc were presented to each eye at various disparities (0 to 4B, or were added together in the same eye (monoptic control. Perceived blur was measured by blur-matching, using a two-interval forced-choice method. In monoptic conditions, matched blur increased with disparity in the fusional range (0 to 2B as expected. But, surprisingly, when the two edges were in different eyes (dichoptic, matched blur remained almost constant and did not increase with disparity. This shows that fusion preserves the sharpness or blur of each eye's image, and that fusion cannot easily be explained by summation or arithmetic averaging of spatial signals across the eyes. We show that fusion of this kind occurs if (a each monocular signal is the spatial derivative (gradient profile of the input edge, and (b binocular combination is the contrast-weighted geometric mean of these signals. This achieves positional averaging (‘allelotropia’ without blurring or smearing.

  14. Reconstituted Fusion Pore

    OpenAIRE

    Jeremic, Aleksandar; Kelly, Marie; Cho, Sang-Joon; Stromer, Marvin H.; Jena, Bhanu P.

    2003-01-01

    Fusion pores or porosomes are basket-like structures at the cell plasma membrane, at the base of which, membrane-bound secretory vesicles dock and fuse to release vesicular contents. Earlier studies using atomic force microscopy (AFM) demonstrated the presence of fusion pores at the cell plasma membrane in a number of live secretory cells, revealing their morphology and dynamics at nm resolution and in real time. ImmunoAFM studies demonstrated the release of vesicular contents through the por...

  15. Mitochondrial Fusion Proteins and Human Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela Ranieri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are highly dynamic, complex organelles that continuously alter their shape, ranging between two opposite processes, fission and fusion, in response to several stimuli and the metabolic demands of the cell. Alterations in mitochondrial dynamics due to mutations in proteins involved in the fusion-fission machinery represent an important pathogenic mechanism of human diseases. The most relevant proteins involved in the mitochondrial fusion process are three GTPase dynamin-like proteins: mitofusin 1 (MFN1 and 2 (MFN2, located in the outer mitochondrial membrane, and optic atrophy protein 1 (OPA1, in the inner membrane. An expanding number of degenerative disorders are associated with mutations in the genes encoding MFN2 and OPA1, including Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2A and autosomal dominant optic atrophy. While these disorders can still be considered rare, defective mitochondrial dynamics seem to play a significant role in the molecular and cellular pathogenesis of more common neurodegenerative diseases, for example, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. This review provides an overview of the basic molecular mechanisms involved in mitochondrial fusion and focuses on the alteration in mitochondrial DNA amount resulting from impairment of mitochondrial dynamics. We also review the literature describing the main disorders associated with the disruption of mitochondrial fusion.

  16. Attenuated Human Parainfluenza Virus Type 1 Expressing the Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Fusion (F) Glycoprotein from an Added Gene: Effects of Prefusion Stabilization and Packaging of RSV F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiang; Liang, Bo; Ngwuta, Joan; Liu, Xueqiao; Surman, Sonja; Lingemann, Matthias; Kwong, Peter D; Graham, Barney S; Collins, Peter L; Munir, Shirin

    2017-11-15

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most prevalent worldwide cause of severe respiratory tract infection in infants and young children. Human parainfluenza virus type 1 (HPIV1) also causes severe pediatric respiratory illness, especially croup. Both viruses lack vaccines. Here, we describe the preclinical development of a bivalent RSV/HPIV1 vaccine based on a recombinant HPIV1 vector, attenuated by a stabilized mutation, that expresses RSV F protein modified for increased stability in the prefusion (pre-F) conformation by previously described disulfide bond (DS) and hydrophobic cavity-filling (Cav1) mutations. RSV F was expressed from the first or second gene position as the full-length protein or as a chimeric protein with its transmembrane and cytoplasmic tail (TMCT) domains substituted with those of HPIV1 F in an effort to direct packaging in the vector particles. All constructs were recovered by reverse genetics. The TMCT versions of RSV F were packaged in the rHPIV1 particles much more efficiently than their full-length counterparts. In hamsters, the presence of the RSV F gene, and in particular the TMCT versions, was attenuating and resulted in reduced immunogenicity. However, the vector expressing full-length RSV F from the pre-N position was immunogenic for RSV and HPIV1. It conferred complement-independent high-quality RSV-neutralizing antibodies at titers similar to those of wild-type RSV and provided protection against RSV challenge. The vectors exhibited stable RSV F expression in vitro and in vivo In conclusion, an attenuated rHPIV1 vector expressing a pre-F-stabilized form of RSV F demonstrated promising immunogenicity and should be further developed as an intranasal pediatric vaccine.IMPORTANCE RSV and HPIV1 are major viral causes of acute pediatric respiratory illness for which no vaccines or suitable antiviral drugs are available. The RSV F glycoprotein is the major RSV neutralization antigen. We used a rHPIV1 vector, bearing a

  17. Gene

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Gene integrates information from a wide range of species. A record may include nomenclature, Reference Sequences (RefSeqs), maps, pathways, variations, phenotypes,...

  18. Fusion of SpCas9 to E. coli Rec A protein enhances CRISPR-Cas9 mediated gene knockout in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lin; Petersen, Trine Skov; Jensen, Kristopher Torp; Bolund, Lars; Kühn, Ralf; Luo, Yonglun

    2017-04-10

    Mammalian cells repair double-strand DNA breaks (DSB) by a range of different pathways following DSB induction by the engineered clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated protein Cas9. While CRISPR-Cas9 thus enables predesigned modifications of the genome, applications of CRISPR-Cas9-mediated genome-editing are frequently hampered by the unpredictable and varying pathways for DSB repair in mammalian cells. Here we present a strategy of fusing Cas9 to recombinant proteins for fine-tuning of the DSB repair preferences in mammalian cells. By fusing Streptococcus Pyogenes Cas9 (SpCas9) to the recombinant protein A (Rec A, NP_417179.1) from Escherichia coli, we create a recombinant Cas9 protein (rSpCas9) which enhances the generation of indel mutations at DSB sites in mammalian cells, increases the frequency of DSB repair by homology-directed single-strand annealing (SSA), and represses homology-directed gene conversion by approximately 33%. Our study thus proves for the first time that fusing SpCas9 to recombinant proteins can influence the balance between DSB repair pathways in mammalian cells. This approach may form the basis for further investigations of the applications of recombinant Cas9 proteins to fine-tuning DSB repair pathways in eukaryotic cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Mitochondrial fusion, fission, and mitochondrial toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Joel N; Leuthner, Tess C; Luz, Anthony L

    2017-08-05

    Mitochondrial dynamics are regulated by two sets of opposed processes: mitochondrial fusion and fission, and mitochondrial biogenesis and degradation (including mitophagy), as well as processes such as intracellular transport. These processes maintain mitochondrial homeostasis, regulate mitochondrial form, volume and function, and are increasingly understood to be critical components of the cellular stress response. Mitochondrial dynamics vary based on developmental stage and age, cell type, environmental factors, and genetic background. Indeed, many mitochondrial homeostasis genes are human disease genes. Emerging evidence indicates that deficiencies in these genes often sensitize to environmental exposures, yet can also be protective under certain circumstances. Inhibition of mitochondrial dynamics also affects elimination of irreparable mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage and transmission of mtDNA mutations. We briefly review the basic biology of mitodynamic processes with a focus on mitochondrial fusion and fission, discuss what is known and unknown regarding how these processes respond to chemical and other stressors, and review the literature on interactions between mitochondrial toxicity and genetic variation in mitochondrial fusion and fission genes. Finally, we suggest areas for future research, including elucidating the full range of mitodynamic responses from low to high-level exposures, and from acute to chronic exposures; detailed examination of the physiological consequences of mitodynamic alterations in different cell types; mechanism-based testing of mitotoxicant interactions with interindividual variability in mitodynamics processes; and incorporating other environmental variables that affect mitochondria, such as diet and exercise. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A cryptic translocation leading to NUP98-PHF23 fusion in AML.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Yi

    2016-12-01

    Chromosome translocations leading to gene fusions have emerged as important oncogenic drivers of various types of malignancies. Detection and characterization of these fusion genes not only help diagnosis and management of specific malignancies, but also contribute to our understanding of the genetic basis and pathogenesis of these diseases. NUP98 gene encodes a 98 kDa nucleoporin, which is a component of the nuclear pore complex that mediates transport of mRNA and proteins between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Due to its participation in translocations leading to the formation of fusion with at least 29 different partner genes, NUP98 is considered one of the most promiscuous fusion genes in hematologic malignancies. We discuss our identification and characterization of a NUP98-PHF23 fusion from a cryptic translocation in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Advanced fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomita, Yukihiro [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    2003-04-01

    The main subjects on fusion research are now on D-T fueled fusion, mainly due to its high fusion reaction rate. However, many issues are still remained on the wall loading by the 14 MeV neutrons. In the case of D-D fueled fusion, the neutron wall loading is still remained, though the technology related to tritium breeding is not needed. The p-{sup 6}Li and p-{sup 11}B fueled fusions are not estimated to be the next generation candidate until the innovated plasma confinement technologies come in useful to achieve the high performance plasma parameters. The fusion reactor of D-{sup 3}He fuels has merits on the smaller neutron wall loading and tritium handling. However, there are difficulties on achieving the high temperature plasma more than 100 keV. Furthermore the high beta plasma is needed to decrease synchrotron radiation loss. In addition, the efficiency of the direct energy conversion from protons coming out from fusion reaction is one of the key parameters in keeping overall power balance. Therefore, open magnetic filed lines should surround the plasma column. In this paper, we outlined the design of the commercial base reactor (ARTEMIS) of 1 GW electric output power configured by D-{sup 3}He fueled FRC (Field Reversed Configuration). The ARTEMIS needs 64 kg of {sup 3}He per a year. On the other hand, 1 million tons of {sup 3}He is estimated to be in the moon. The {sup 3}He of about 10{sup 23} kg are to exist in gaseous planets such as Jupiter and Saturn. (Y. Tanaka)

  2. The temporal expression of adipokines during spinal fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virk, Sohrab; Bertone, Alicia L; Hussein, Hayam Hamaz; Toth, Jeffrey M; Kaido, Mari; Khan, Safdar

    2017-12-01

    Adipokines are secreted by white adipose tissue and have been associated with fracture healing. Our goal was to report the temporal expression of adipokines during spinal fusion in an established rabbit model. Our goal was to report the temporal expression of adipokines during spinal fusion in an established rabbit model. The study design included a laboratory animal model. New Zealand white rabbits were assigned to either sham surgery (n=2), unilateral posterior spinal fusion (n=14), or bilateral posterior spinal fusion (n=14). Rabbits were euthanized 1-6 and 10 weeks out from surgery. Fusion was evaluated by radiographs, manual palpation, and histology. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction on the bone fusion mass catalogued the gene expression of leptin, adiponectin, resistin, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) at each time point. Results were normalized to the internal control gene, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) (2^ΔCt), and control bone sites (2^ΔΔCt). Quantitative data were analyzed by two-factor analysis of variance (pfusion over time (pfusion by palpation after 4 weeks was 68.75%. Leptin expression in decortication and bone graft sites peaked at 5 weeks after the fusion procedure (p=.0143), adiponectin expression was greatest 1 week after surgery (pfusion procedure (pfusion. Adiponectin and resistin may play a role early on during the fusion process. Our results suggest that leptin expression may be upstream of VEGF expression during spinal fusion, and both appear to play an important role in bone spinal fusion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Mammary analogue secretory carcinoma of salivary glands, containing the ETV6-NTRK3 fusion gene: a hitherto undescribed salivary gland tumor entity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skálová, Alena; Vanecek, Tomas; Sima, Radek; Laco, Jan; Weinreb, Ilan; Perez-Ordonez, Bayardo; Starek, Ivo; Geierova, Marie; Simpson, Roderrick H W; Passador-Santos, Fabricio; Ryska, Ales; Leivo, Ilmo; Kinkor, Zdenek; Michal, Michal

    2010-05-01

    We present a series of 16 salivary gland tumors with histomorphologic and immunohistochemical features reminiscent of secretory carcinoma of the breast. This is a hitherto undescribed and distinctive salivary gland neoplasm, with features resembling both salivary acinic cell carcinoma (AciCC) and low-grade cystadenocarcinoma, and displaying strong similarities to breast secretory carcinoma. Microscopically, the tumors have a lobulated growth pattern and are composed of microcystic and glandular spaces with abundant eosinophilic homogenous or bubbly secretory material positive for periodic acid-Schiff, mucicarmine, MUC1, MUC4, and mammaglobin. The neoplasms also show strong vimentin, S-100 protein, and STAT5a positivity. For this tumor, we propose a designation mammary analogue secretory carcinoma of salivary glands (MASC). The 16 patients comprised 9 men and 7 women, with a mean age of 46 years (range 21 to 75). Thirteen cases occurred in the parotid gland, and one each in the minor salivary glands of the buccal mucosa, upper lip, and palate. The mean size of the tumors was 2.1 cm (range 0.7 to 5.5 cm). The duration of symptoms was recorded in 11 cases and ranged from 2 months to 30 years. Clinical follow-up was available in 13 cases, and ranged from 3 months to 10 years. Four patients suffered local recurrences. Two patients died, 1 of them owing to multiple local recurrences with extension to the temporal bone, and another owing to metastatic dissemination to cervical lymph nodes, pleura, pericardium, and lungs. We have shown a t(12;15) (p13;q25) ETV6-NTRK3 translocation in all but one case of MASC suitable for analysis. One case was not analyzable and another was not available for testing. This translocation was not found in any conventional salivary AciCC (12 cases), nor in other tumor types including pleomorphic adenoma (1 case) and low-grade cribriform cystadenocarcinoma (1 case), whereas ETV6-NTRK3 gene rearrangements were proven in all 3 tested cases of

  4. Cell Fusion as a Cause of Prostate Cancer Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    as mitochondria -targeted mCherry (red), and fusion of lamin A to EGFP (green), or by phase microscopy as cells with multiple nuclei. C. Cell fusion...protein, a ribosomal protein, large, P1 (Rplp1) pseudogene, a carnitine deficiency-associated gene expressed in ventricle 3 (Cdv3) pseudogene, the 3’ end...4 Contains a tousled-like kinase 2 (Arabidopsis) (Tlk2) pseudogene, two novel genes, twp carnitine deficiency-associated gene 2531 2531 100% 0.0 98%

  5. Fusion genetic analysis of jasmonate-signalling mutants in Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders Bøgh; Raventos, D.; Mundy, John Williams

    2002-01-01

    Jasmonates induce plant-defence responses and act to regulate defence-related genes including positive feedback of the lipoxygenase 2 (LOX2) gene involved in jasmonate synthesis. To identify jasmonate-signalling mutants, we used a fusion genetic strategy in which the firefly luciferase (FLUC...

  6. Fusion Electra: A Krypton Fluoride Laser for Fusion Energy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sethian, J; Friedman, M; Giuliani, J; Lehmberg, R; Myers, M; Obenschain, S; Hegeler, F; Swanekamp, S

    2001-01-01

    .... We will focus on technologies that can be scalable to the 50-150 kJ energy needed for a full-size fusion power plant beam line and are projected to meet the economic requirements for fusion power...

  7. Recurrent read-through fusion transcripts in breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Varley, Katherine E.; Gertz, Jason; Roberts, Brian S.; Davis, Nicholas S.; Bowling, Kevin M.; Kirby, Marie K.; Nesmith, Amy S.; Oliver, Patsy G.; Grizzle, William E.; Forero, Andres; Buchsbaum, Donald J.; LoBuglio, Albert F.; Myers, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    Read-through fusion transcripts that result from the splicing of two adjacent genes in the same coding orientation are a recently discovered type of chimeric RNA. We sought to determine if read-through fusion transcripts exist in breast cancer. We performed paired-end RNA-seq of 168 breast samples, including 28 breast cancer cell lines, 42 triple negative breast cancer primary tumors, 42 estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer primary tumors, and 56 non-malignant breast tissue samples....

  8. Inverse fusion PCR cloning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Spiliotis

    Full Text Available Inverse fusion PCR cloning (IFPC is an easy, PCR based three-step cloning method that allows the seamless and directional insertion of PCR products into virtually all plasmids, this with a free choice of the insertion site. The PCR-derived inserts contain a vector-complementary 5'-end that allows a fusion with the vector by an overlap extension PCR, and the resulting amplified insert-vector fusions are then circularized by ligation prior transformation. A minimal amount of starting material is needed and experimental steps are reduced. Untreated circular plasmid, or alternatively bacteria containing the plasmid, can be used as templates for the insertion, and clean-up of the insert fragment is not urgently required. The whole cloning procedure can be performed within a minimal hands-on time and results in the generation of hundreds to ten-thousands of positive colonies, with a minimal background.

  9. Cryogenics for Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauguet, P.; Gistau-Baguer, G. M.; Bonneton, M.; Boissin, J. C.; Fauve, E.; Bernhardt, J. M.; Beauvisage, J.; Andrieu, F.

    2008-03-01

    Fusion of Hydrogen to produce energy is one of the technologies under study to meet the mankind raising need in energy and as a substitute to fossil fuels for the future. This technology is under investigation for more than 30 years already, with, for example, the former construction of the experimental reactors Tore Supra, DIII-D and JET. With the construction of ITER to start, the next step to "fusion for energy" will be done. In these projects, an extensive use of cryogenic systems is requested. Air Liquide has been involved as cryogenic partner in most of former and presently constructed fusion reactors. In the present paper, a review of the cryogenic systems we delivered to Tore Supra, JET, IPR and KSTAR will be presented.

  10. A dominant positive and negative selectable gene for use in mammalian cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Schwartz, F; Maeda, N; Smithies, O; Hickey, R; Edelmann, W; Skoultchi, A; Kucherlapati, R

    1991-01-01

    We have constructed three different fusion genes containing the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV tk) and the bacterial neomycin phosphotransferase (neo) genes. All three fusion genes utilize the HSV tk promoter but differ at the junction of their components. We have determined if the fusion genes are bifunctional by introducing them into mammalian cells and testing for function of the individual components. One of the fusion genes, TNFUS 69, produced a bicistronic message and a fusi...

  11. Atomic data for fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunter, H.T.; Kirkpatrick, M.I.; Alvarez, I.; Cisneros, C.; Phaneuf, R.A. (eds.); Barnett, C.F.

    1990-07-01

    This report provides a handbook of recommended cross-section and rate-coefficient data for inelastic collisions between hydrogen, helium and lithium atoms, molecules and ions, and encompasses more than 400 different reactions of primary interest in fusion research. Published experimental and theoretical data have been collected and evaluated, and the recommended data are presented in tabular, graphical and parametrized form. Processes include excitation and spectral line emission, charge exchange, ionization, stripping, dissociation and particle interchange reactions. The range of collision energies is appropriate to applications in fusion-energy research.

  12. Fusion for Space Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Schmidt, George R.; Santarius, John F.; Turchi, Peter J.; Siemon, Richard E.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The need for fusion propulsion for interplanetary flights is discussed. For a propulsion system, there are three important system attributes: (1) The absolute amount of energy available, (2) the propellant exhaust velocity, and (3) the jet power per unit mass of the propulsion system (specific power). For efficient and affordable human exploration of the solar system, propellant exhaust velocity in excess of 100 km/s and specific power in excess of 10 kW/kg are required. Chemical combustion obviously cannot meet the requirement in propellant exhaust velocity. Nuclear fission processes typically result in producing energy in the form of heat that needs to be manipulated at temperatures limited by materials to about 2,800 K. Using the fission energy to heat a low atomic weight propellant produces propellant velocity of the order of 10 kinds. Alternatively the fission energy can be converted into electricity that is used to accelerate particles to high exhaust velocity. However, the necessary power conversion and conditioning equipment greatly increases the mass of the propulsion system. Fundamental considerations in waste heat rejection and power conditioning in a fission electric propulsion system place a limit on its jet specific power to the order of about 0.2 kW/kg. If fusion can be developed for propulsion, it appears to have the best of all worlds - it can provide the largest absolute amount of energy, the propellant exhaust velocity (> 100 km/s), and the high specific jet power (> 10 kW/kg). An intermediate step towards fusion propulsion might be a bimodal system in which a fission reactor is used to provide some of the energy to drive a fusion propulsion unit. There are similarities as well as differences between applying fusion to propulsion and to terrestrial electrical power generation. The similarities are the underlying plasma and fusion physics, the enabling component technologies, the computational and the diagnostics capabilities. These physics and

  13. Workmanship standards for fusion welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, M. D.

    1967-01-01

    Workmanship standards manual defines practices, that adhere to rigid codes and specifications, for fusion welding of component piping, assemblies, and systems. With written and pictorial presentations, it is part of the operating procedure for fusion welding.

  14. Fusion in the energy system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fusion energy is the fundamental energy source of the Universe, as the energy of the Sun and the stars are produced by fusion of e.g. hydrogen to helium. Fusion energy research is a strongly international endeavor aiming at realizing fusion energy production in power plants on Earth. Reaching...... this goal, mankind will have a sustainable base load energy source with abundant resources, having no CO2 release, and with no longlived radioactive waste. This presentation will describe the basics of fusion energy production and the status and future prospects of the research. Considerations...... of integration into the future electricity system and socio-economic studies of fusion energy will be presented, referring to the programme of Socio-Economic Research on Fusion (SERF) under the European Fusion Energy Agreement (EFDA)....

  15. Multisensor data fusion algorithm development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yocky, D.A.; Chadwick, M.D.; Goudy, S.P.; Johnson, D.K.

    1995-12-01

    This report presents a two-year LDRD research effort into multisensor data fusion. We approached the problem by addressing the available types of data, preprocessing that data, and developing fusion algorithms using that data. The report reflects these three distinct areas. First, the possible data sets for fusion are identified. Second, automated registration techniques for imagery data are analyzed. Third, two fusion techniques are presented. The first fusion algorithm is based on the two-dimensional discrete wavelet transform. Using test images, the wavelet algorithm is compared against intensity modulation and intensity-hue-saturation image fusion algorithms that are available in commercial software. The wavelet approach outperforms the other two fusion techniques by preserving spectral/spatial information more precisely. The wavelet fusion algorithm was also applied to Landsat Thematic Mapper and SPOT panchromatic imagery data. The second algorithm is based on a linear-regression technique. We analyzed the technique using the same Landsat and SPOT data.

  16. The quest for fusion energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J.L. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    A brief history of the magnetic fusion program from the point of view of a stellarator enthusiast who worked at a major tokamak laboratory. The reason that success in the magnetic fusion energy program is essential is presented. (author)

  17. Fusion engineering device design description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flanagan, C.A.; Steiner, D.; Smith, G.E.

    1981-12-01

    The US Magnetic Fusion Engineering Act of 1980 calls for the operation of a Fusion Engineering Device (FED) by 1990. It is the intent of the Act that the FED, in combination with other testing facilities, will establish the engineering feasibility of magnetic fusion energy. During 1981, the Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC), under the guidance of a Technical Management Board (TMB), developed a baseline design for the FED. This design is summarized herein.

  18. Fusion Engineering Device design description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flanagan, C.A.; Steiner, D.; Smith, G.E.

    1981-12-01

    The US Magnetic Fusion Engineering Act of 1980 calls for the operation of a Fusion Engineering Device (FED) by 1990. It is the intent of the Act that the FED, in combination with other testing facilities, will establish the engineering feasibility of magnetic fusion energy. During 1981, the Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC), under the guidance of a Technical Management Board (TMB), developed a baseline design for the FED. This design is summarized herein.

  19. Membrane tension and membrane fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Kozlov, Michael M.; Chernomordik, Leonid V.

    2015-01-01

    Diverse cell biological processes that involve shaping and remodeling of cell membranes are regulated by membrane lateral tension. Here we focus on the role of tension in driving membrane fusion. We discuss the physics of membrane tension, forces that can generate the tension in plasma membrane of a cell, and the hypothesis that tension powers expansion of membrane fusion pores in late stages of cell-to-cell and exocytotic fusion. We propose that fusion pore expansion can require unusually la...

  20. The Na+/H+ exchanger Nhx1p regulates the initiation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae vacuole fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Quan-Sheng; Fratti, Rutilio A

    2010-10-01

    Nhx1p is a Na(+)(K(+))/H(+) antiporter localized at the vacuolar membrane of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Nhx1p regulates the acidification of cytosol and vacuole lumen, and is involved in membrane traffic from late endosomes to the vacuole. Deletion of the gene leads to aberrant vacuolar morphology and defective vacuolar protein sorting. These phenotypes are hallmarks of malfunctioning vacuole homeostasis and indicate that membrane fusion is probably altered. Here, we investigated the role of Nhx1p in the regulation of homotypic vacuole fusion. Vacuoles isolated from nhx1Δ yeast showed attenuated fusion. Assays configured to differentiate between the first round of fusion and ongoing rounds showed that nhx1Δ vacuoles were only defective in the first round of