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Sample records for highly pathogenic rna

  1. Oligonucleotide Antiviral Therapeutics: Antisense and RNA Interference for Highly Pathogenic RNA Viruses

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Spurgers, Kevin B; Sharkey, C. M; Warfield, Kelly L; Bavari, Sina

    2008-01-01

    .... Important advances in the field include the characterization of RNA interference in mammalian cells and chemical modifications that can dramatically increase the in vivo stability of therapeutic oligonucleotides...

  2. MicroRNA expression in mice infected with seasonal H1N1, swine H1N1 or highly pathogenic H5N1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vela, Eric M; Kasoji, Manjula D; Wendling, Morgan Q; Price, Jennifer A; Knostman, Katherine A B; Bresler, Herbert S; Long, James P

    2014-09-01

    Influenza virus infections in humans remain a healthcare concern, and the need for vaccines, therapeutics and prophylactics remains a high priority. Understanding the molecular events associated with influenza-virus-induced pathology may lead to the identification of clinical disease biomarkers and novel antiviral targets. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are well-conserved endogenous non-coding RNAs known to regulate post-transcriptional gene expression as well as play a major role in many biological processes and pathways. Animal studies have demonstrated that miRNAs are involved in viral disease and controlling inflammation. In this study, we examined the differences in the miRNA expression profiles associated with the lung in mice infected with influenza viruses that varied in virulence and pathogenicity. A statistical model was employed that utilized changes in miRNA expression to identify the virus that was used to infect the mice. This study identified a unique fingerprint of viral pathogenicity associated with seasonal H1N1, swine H1N1 and highly pathogenic H5N1 in the mouse model, and may lead to the identification of novel therapeutic and prophylactic targets. © 2014 The Authors.

  3. Vaccination with recombinant RNA replicon particles protects chickens from H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbherr, Stefan J; Brostoff, Terza; Tippenhauer, Merve; Locher, Samira; Berger Rentsch, Marianne; Zimmer, Gert

    2013-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIV) of subtype H5N1 not only cause a devastating disease in domestic chickens and turkeys but also pose a continuous threat to public health. In some countries, H5N1 viruses continue to circulate and evolve into new clades and subclades. The rapid evolution of these viruses represents a problem for virus diagnosis and control. In this work, recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) vectors expressing HA of subtype H5 were generated. To comply with biosafety issues the G gene was deleted from the VSV genome. The resulting vaccine vector VSV*ΔG(HA) was propagated on helper cells providing the VSV G protein in trans. Vaccination of chickens with a single intramuscular dose of 2×10⁸ infectious replicon particles without adjuvant conferred complete protection from lethal H5N1 infection. Subsequent application of the same vaccine strongly boosted the humoral immune response and completely prevented shedding of challenge virus and transmission to sentinel birds. The vaccine allowed serological differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA) by employing a commercially available ELISA. Immunized chickens produced antibodies with neutralizing activity against multiple H5 viruses representing clades 1, 2.2, 2.5, and low-pathogenic avian influenza viruses (classical clade). Studies using chimeric H1/H5 hemagglutinins showed that the neutralizing activity was predominantly directed against the globular head domain. In summary, these results suggest that VSV replicon particles are safe and potent DIVA vaccines that may help to control avian influenza viruses in domestic poultry.

  4. Vaccination with recombinant RNA replicon particles protects chickens from H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan J Halbherr

    Full Text Available Highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIV of subtype H5N1 not only cause a devastating disease in domestic chickens and turkeys but also pose a continuous threat to public health. In some countries, H5N1 viruses continue to circulate and evolve into new clades and subclades. The rapid evolution of these viruses represents a problem for virus diagnosis and control. In this work, recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV vectors expressing HA of subtype H5 were generated. To comply with biosafety issues the G gene was deleted from the VSV genome. The resulting vaccine vector VSV*ΔG(HA was propagated on helper cells providing the VSV G protein in trans. Vaccination of chickens with a single intramuscular dose of 2×10⁸ infectious replicon particles without adjuvant conferred complete protection from lethal H5N1 infection. Subsequent application of the same vaccine strongly boosted the humoral immune response and completely prevented shedding of challenge virus and transmission to sentinel birds. The vaccine allowed serological differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA by employing a commercially available ELISA. Immunized chickens produced antibodies with neutralizing activity against multiple H5 viruses representing clades 1, 2.2, 2.5, and low-pathogenic avian influenza viruses (classical clade. Studies using chimeric H1/H5 hemagglutinins showed that the neutralizing activity was predominantly directed against the globular head domain. In summary, these results suggest that VSV replicon particles are safe and potent DIVA vaccines that may help to control avian influenza viruses in domestic poultry.

  5. High content image-based screening of a protease inhibitor library reveals compounds broadly active against Rift Valley fever virus and other highly pathogenic RNA viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudhasani, Rajini; Kota, Krishna P; Retterer, Cary; Tran, Julie P; Whitehouse, Chris A; Bavari, Sina

    2014-08-01

    High content image-based screening was developed as an approach to test a protease inhibitor small molecule library for antiviral activity against Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) and to determine their mechanism of action. RVFV is the causative agent of severe disease of humans and animals throughout Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. Of the 849 compounds screened, 34 compounds exhibited ≥ 50% inhibition against RVFV. All of the hit compounds could be classified into 4 distinct groups based on their unique chemical backbone. Some of the compounds also showed broad antiviral activity against several highly pathogenic RNA viruses including Ebola, Marburg, Venezuela equine encephalitis, and Lassa viruses. Four hit compounds (C795-0925, D011-2120, F694-1532 and G202-0362), which were most active against RVFV and showed broad-spectrum antiviral activity, were selected for further evaluation for their cytotoxicity, dose response profile, and mode of action using classical virological methods and high-content imaging analysis. Time-of-addition assays in RVFV infections suggested that D011-2120 and G202-0362 targeted virus egress, while C795-0925 and F694-1532 inhibited virus replication. We showed that D011-2120 exhibited its antiviral effects by blocking microtubule polymerization, thereby disrupting the Golgi complex and inhibiting viral trafficking to the plasma membrane during virus egress. While G202-0362 also affected virus egress, it appears to do so by a different mechanism, namely by blocking virus budding from the trans Golgi. F694-1532 inhibited viral replication, but also appeared to inhibit overall cellular gene expression. However, G202-0362 and C795-0925 did not alter any of the morphological features that we examined and thus may prove to be good candidates for antiviral drug development. Overall this work demonstrates that high-content image analysis can be used to screen chemical libraries for new antivirals and to determine their mechanism of action and

  6. High content image-based screening of a protease inhibitor library reveals compounds broadly active against Rift Valley fever virus and other highly pathogenic RNA viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajini Mudhasani

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available High content image-based screening was developed as an approach to test a protease inhibitor small molecule library for antiviral activity against Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV and to determine their mechanism of action. RVFV is the causative agent of severe disease of humans and animals throughout Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. Of the 849 compounds screened, 34 compounds exhibited ≥ 50% inhibition against RVFV. All of the hit compounds could be classified into 4 distinct groups based on their unique chemical backbone. Some of the compounds also showed broad antiviral activity against several highly pathogenic RNA viruses including Ebola, Marburg, Venezuela equine encephalitis, and Lassa viruses. Four hit compounds (C795-0925, D011-2120, F694-1532 and G202-0362, which were most active against RVFV and showed broad-spectrum antiviral activity, were selected for further evaluation for their cytotoxicity, dose response profile, and mode of action using classical virological methods and high-content imaging analysis. Time-of-addition assays in RVFV infections suggested that D011-2120 and G202-0362 targeted virus egress, while C795-0925 and F694-1532 inhibited virus replication. We showed that D011-2120 exhibited its antiviral effects by blocking microtubule polymerization, thereby disrupting the Golgi complex and inhibiting viral trafficking to the plasma membrane during virus egress. While G202-0362 also affected virus egress, it appears to do so by a different mechanism, namely by blocking virus budding from the trans Golgi. F694-1532 inhibited viral replication, but also appeared to inhibit overall cellular gene expression. However, G202-0362 and C795-0925 did not alter any of the morphological features that we examined and thus may prove to be good candidates for antiviral drug development. Overall this work demonstrates that high-content image analysis can be used to screen chemical libraries for new antivirals and to determine their

  7. Ribosomal small-subunit RNA gene-sequence analysis of Theileria lestoquardi and a Theileria species highly pathogenic for small ruminants in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnittger, L; Yin, H; Jianxun, L; Ludwig, W; Shayan, P; Rahbari, S; Voss-Holtmann, A; Ahmed, J S

    2000-05-01

    A fatal disease of sheep and goats in the northwestern part of China has been reported to be due to Theileria lestoquardi (syn. T. hirci). However, some characteristics of the causative agent are not in accordance with attributes ascribed to this parasite. We therefore determined the nucleotide sequence of the small-subunit ribosomal RNA (srRNA) gene of T. lestoquardi and the parasite identified in China and compared it with that of other Theileria and Babesia species. In the inferred phylogenetic tree the srRNA sequence of the Chinese parasite was found to be most closely related to T. buffeli and clearly divergent from T. lestoquardi, suggesting that it is an as yet unrecognized Theileria species. Extensive structural similarities were observed between the srRNA sequences of T. lestoquardi and T. annulata, revealing a close phylogenetic relationship between these two Theileria species. On the basis of the srRNA nucleotide sequence, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers were designed that specifically amplified genomic DNA of the Chinese Theileria species. These primers may be valuable tools in future epidemiology studies.

  8. Interferon Induction by RNA Viruses and Antagonism by Viral Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuchen Nan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Interferons are a group of small proteins that play key roles in host antiviral innate immunity. Their induction mainly relies on host pattern recognition receptors (PRR. Host PRR for RNA viruses include Toll-like receptors (TLR and retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I like receptors (RLR. Activation of both TLR and RLR pathways can eventually lead to the secretion of type I IFNs, which can modulate both innate and adaptive immune responses against viral pathogens. Because of the important roles of interferons, viruses have evolved multiple strategies to evade host TLR and RLR mediated signaling. This review focuses on the mechanisms of interferon induction and antagonism of the antiviral strategy by RNA viruses.

  9. Phylogenetic analysis by rRNA comparison of the highly pathogenic sheep-infecting parasites Theileria lestoquardi and a Theileria species identified in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnittger, L; Hong, Y; Jianxun, L; Ludwig, W; Shayan, P; Rahbari, S; Voss-Holtmann, A; Ahmed, J S

    2000-01-01

    In the Northwestern part of China there have been reports of clinical cases in small ruminants of a haemoparasite with the characteristics of Theileria hirci (T. lestoquardi). However, some properties of this parasites argue against its classification as T. lestoquardi. In this paper, we present evidence that T. lestoquardi and the Chinese Theileria isolate are distinct parasite species. Phylogenetic analysis of determined nucleotide sequences of small subunit ribosomal RNA (srRNA) genes of T. lestoquardi and the Chinese Theileria parasite show that they belong to different clades within the phylogenetic tree of piroplasms. The srRNA sequence of the Chinese parasite was found to be most closely related to T. buffeli, which, with T. sergenti, belongs to an evolutionary lineage of non-lymphoproliferative Theileria species. On the other hand, it was clearly divergent to a lineage of lymphoproliferative Theileria species; T. annulata, T. parva, T. taurotragi, and T. lestoquardi, the latter being most closely related to T. annulata.

  10. RNA Editing of the GP Gene of Ebola Virus is an Important Pathogenicity Factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volchkova, Valentina A; Dolnik, Olga; Martinez, Mikel J; Reynard, Olivier; Volchkov, Viktor E

    2015-10-01

    Synthesis of the surface glycoprotein GP of Ebola virus (EBOV) is dependent on transcriptional RNA editing, whereas direct expression of the GP gene results in synthesis of nonstructural secreted glycoprotein sGP. In this study, we investigate the role of RNA editing in the pathogenicity of EBOV using a guinea pig model and recombinant guinea pig-adapted EBOV containing mutations at the editing site, allowing expression of surface GP without the need for RNA editing, and also preventing synthesis of sGP. We demonstrate that the elimination of the editing site leads to EBOV attenuation in vivo, explained by lower virus spread caused by the higher virus cytotoxicity and, most likely, by an increased ability of the host defense systems to recognize and eliminate virus-infected cells. We also demonstrate that expression of sGP does not affect pathogenicity of EBOV in guinea pigs. In conclusion, data obtained indicate that downregulation of the level of surface GP expression through a mechanism of GP gene RNA editing plays an important role in the high pathogenicity of EBOV. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. 76 FR 24793 - Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-03

    ... Inspection Service 9 CFR Parts 93, 94, and 95 RIN 0579-AC36 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza AGENCY: Animal... products from regions where any subtype of highly pathogenic avian influenza is considered to exist. The... vaccinated for certain types of avian influenza, or that have moved through regions where any subtype of...

  12. 77 FR 34783 - Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-12

    ... Avian Influenza AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA. ACTION: Interim rule... importation of bird and poultry products from regions where any subtype of highly pathogenic avian influenza... avian influenza (HPAI). On January 24, 2011, we published in the Federal Register (76 FR 4046-4056...

  13. Low-Incidence, High-Consequence Pathogens

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-02-21

    Dr. Stephan Monroe, a deputy director at CDC, discusses the impact of low-incidence, high-consequence pathogens globally.  Created: 2/21/2014 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 2/26/2014.

  14. Predicting the pathogenicity of novel variants in mitochondrial tRNA with MitoTIP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Sonney

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Novel or rare variants in mitochondrial tRNA sequences may be observed after mitochondrial DNA analysis. Determining whether these variants are pathogenic is critical, but confirmation of the effect of a variant on mitochondrial function can be challenging. We have used available databases of benign and pathogenic variants, alignment between diverse tRNAs, structural information and comparative genomics to predict the impact of all possible single-base variants and deletions. The Mitochondrial tRNA Informatics Predictor (MitoTIP is available through MITOMAP at www.mitomap.org. The source code for MitoTIP is available at www.github.com/sonneysa/MitoTIP.

  15. Dual RNA-seq of the plant pathogen phytophthora ramorum and its tanoak host

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katherine J. Hayden; Matteo Garbelotto; Brian J. Knaus; Richard C. Cronn; Hardeep Rai; Jessica W. Wright

    2014-01-01

    Emergent diseases are an ever-increasing threat to forests and forest ecosystems and necessitate the development of research tools for species that often may have few preexisting resources. We sequenced the mRNA expressed by the sudden oak death pathogen Phytophthora ramorum and its most susceptible forest host, tanoak, within the same tissue at two time points after...

  16. Non-coding RNA regulation in pathogenic bacteria located inside eukaryotic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvaro D. Ortega

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular bacterial pathogens have evolved distinct lifestyles inside eukaryotic cells. Some pathogens coexist with the infected cell in an obligate intracellular state, whereas others transit between the extracellular and intracellular environment. Adaptation to these intracellular lifestyles is regulated in both space and time. Non-coding small RNAs (sRNAs are post-transcriptional regulatory molecules that fine-tune important processes in bacterial physiology including cell envelope architecture, intermediate metabolism, bacterial communication, biofilm formation and virulence. Recent studies have shown production of defined sRNA species by intracellular bacteria located inside eukaryotic cells. The molecules targeted by these sRNAs and their expression dynamics along the intracellular infection cycle remain, however, poorly characterized. Technical difficulties linked to the isolation of ‘intact’ intracellular bacteria from infected host cells might explain why sRNA regulation in these specialized pathogens is still a largely unexplored field. Transition from the extracellular to the intracellular lifestyle provides an ideal scenario in which regulatory sRNAs are intended to participate; so much work must be done in this direction. This review focuses on sRNAs expressed by intracellular bacterial pathogens during the infection of eukaryotic cells, strategies used with these pathogens to identify sRNAs required for virulence, and the experimental technical challenges associated to this type of studies. We also discuss varied techniques for their potential application to study RNA regulation in intracellular bacterial infections.

  17. Taxonomer: an interactive metagenomics analysis portal for universal pathogen detection and host mRNA expression profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flygare, Steven; Simmon, Keith; Miller, Chase; Qiao, Yi; Kennedy, Brett; Di Sera, Tonya; Graf, Erin H; Tardif, Keith D; Kapusta, Aurélie; Rynearson, Shawn; Stockmann, Chris; Queen, Krista; Tong, Suxiang; Voelkerding, Karl V; Blaschke, Anne; Byington, Carrie L; Jain, Seema; Pavia, Andrew; Ampofo, Krow; Eilbeck, Karen; Marth, Gabor; Yandell, Mark; Schlaberg, Robert

    2016-05-26

    High-throughput sequencing enables unbiased profiling of microbial communities, universal pathogen detection, and host response to infectious diseases. However, computation times and algorithmic inaccuracies have hindered adoption. We present Taxonomer, an ultrafast, web-tool for comprehensive metagenomics data analysis and interactive results visualization. Taxonomer is unique in providing integrated nucleotide and protein-based classification and simultaneous host messenger RNA (mRNA) transcript profiling. Using real-world case-studies, we show that Taxonomer detects previously unrecognized infections and reveals antiviral host mRNA expression profiles. To facilitate data-sharing across geographic distances in outbreak settings, Taxonomer is publicly available through a web-based user interface. Taxonomer enables rapid, accurate, and interactive analyses of metagenomics data on personal computers and mobile devices.

  18. Co-transcriptomic Analysis by RNA Sequencing to Simultaneously Measure Regulated Gene Expression in Host and Bacterial Pathogen

    KAUST Repository

    Ravasi, Timothy

    2016-01-24

    Intramacrophage pathogens subvert antimicrobial defence pathways using various mechanisms, including the targeting of host TLR-mediated transcriptional responses. Conversely, TLR-inducible host defence mechanisms subject intramacrophage pathogens to stress, thus altering pathogen gene expression programs. Important biological insights can thus be gained through the analysis of gene expression changes in both the host and the pathogen during an infection. Traditionally, research methods have involved the use of qPCR, microarrays and/or RNA sequencing to identify transcriptional changes in either the host or the pathogen. Here we describe the application of RNA sequencing using samples obtained from in vitro infection assays to simultaneously quantify both host and bacterial pathogen gene expression changes, as well as general approaches that can be undertaken to interpret the RNA sequencing data that is generated. These methods can be used to provide insights into host TLR-regulated transcriptional responses to microbial challenge, as well as pathogen subversion mechanisms against such responses.

  19. Characterization of the tRNA ligases of pathogenic fungi Aspergillus fumigatus and Coccidioides immitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remus, Barbara S; Schwer, Beate; Shuman, Stewart

    2016-10-01

    Yeast tRNA ligase (Trl1) is an essential trifunctional enzyme that repairs RNA breaks with 2',3'-cyclic-PO4 and 5'-OH ends. Trl1 is composed of C-terminal cyclic phosphodiesterase and central polynucleotide kinase domains that heal the broken ends to generate the 3'-OH, 2'-PO4, and 5'-PO4 termini required for sealing by an N-terminal ligase domain. Trl1 enzymes are found in all human fungal pathogens and they are promising targets for antifungal drug discovery because: (i) their domain structures and biochemical mechanisms are unique compared to the mammalian RtcB-type tRNA splicing enzyme; and (ii) there are no obvious homologs of the Trl1 ligase domain in mammalian proteomes. Here we characterize the tRNA ligases of two human fungal pathogens: Coccidioides immitis and Aspergillus fumigatus The biological activity of CimTrl1 and AfuTrl1 was verified by showing that their expression complements a Saccharomyces cerevisiae trl1Δ mutant. Purified recombinant AfuTrl1 and CimTrl1 proteins were catalytically active in joining 2',3'-cyclic-PO4 and 5'-OH ends in vitro, either as full-length proteins or as a mixture of separately produced healing and sealing domains. The biochemical properties of CimTrl1 and AfuTrl1 are similar to those of budding yeast Trl1, particularly with respect to their preferential use of GTP as the phosphate donor for the polynucleotide kinase reaction. Our findings provide genetic and biochemical tools to screen for inhibitors of tRNA ligases from pathogenic fungi. © 2016 Remus et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  20. RNA Enrichment Method for Quantitative Transcriptional Analysis of Pathogens In Vivo Applied to the Fungus Candida albicans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorim-Vaz, Sara; Tran, Van Du T.; Pradervand, Sylvain; Pagni, Marco; Coste, Alix T.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In vivo transcriptional analyses of microbial pathogens are often hampered by low proportions of pathogen biomass in host organs, hindering the coverage of full pathogen transcriptome. We aimed to address the transcriptome profiles of Candida albicans, the most prevalent fungal pathogen in systemically infected immunocompromised patients, during systemic infection in different hosts. We developed a strategy for high-resolution quantitative analysis of the C. albicans transcriptome directly from early and late stages of systemic infection in two different host models, mouse and the insect Galleria mellonella. Our results show that transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) libraries were enriched for fungal transcripts up to 1,600-fold using biotinylated bait probes to capture C. albicans sequences. This enrichment biased the read counts of only ~3% of the genes, which can be identified and removed based on a priori criteria. This allowed an unprecedented resolution of C. albicans transcriptome in vivo, with detection of over 86% of its genes. The transcriptional response of the fungus was surprisingly similar during infection of the two hosts and at the two time points, although some host- and time point-specific genes could be identified. Genes that were highly induced during infection were involved, for instance, in stress response, adhesion, iron acquisition, and biofilm formation. Of the in vivo-regulated genes, 10% are still of unknown function, and their future study will be of great interest. The fungal RNA enrichment procedure used here will help a better characterization of the C. albicans response in infected hosts and may be applied to other microbial pathogens. PMID:26396240

  1. USGS highly pathogenic avian influenza research strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, M. Camille; Miles, A. Keith; Pearce, John M.; Prosser, Diann J.; Sleeman, Jonathan M.; Whalen, Mary E.

    2015-09-09

    Avian influenza viruses are naturally occurring in wild birds such as ducks, geese, swans, and gulls. These viruses generally do not cause illness in wild birds, however, when spread to poultry they can be highly pathogenic and cause illness and death in backyard and commercial farms. Outbreaks may cause devastating agricultural economic losses and some viral strains have the potential to infect people directly. Furthermore, the combination of avian influenza viruses with mammalian viruses can result in strains with the ability to transmit from person to person, possibly leading to viruses with pandemic potential. All known pandemic influenza viruses have had some genetic material of avian origin. Since 1996, a strain of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus, H5N1, has caused infection in wild birds, losses to poultry farms in Eurasia and North Africa, and led to the deaths of several hundred people. Spread of the H5N1 virus and other influenza strains from China was likely facilitated by migratory birds. In December 2014, HPAI was detected in poultry in Canada and migratory birds in the United States. Since then, HPAI viruses have spread to large parts of the United States and will likely continue to spread through migratory bird flyways and other mechanisms throughout North America. In the United States, HPAI viruses have severely affected the poultry industry with millions of domestic birds dead or culled. These strains of HPAI are not known to cause disease in humans; however, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) advise caution when in close contact with infected birds. Experts agree that HPAI strains currently circulating in wild birds of North America will likely persist for the next few years. This unprecedented situation presents risks to the poultry industry, natural resource management, and potentially human health. Scientific knowledge and decision support tools are urgently needed to understand factors affecting the persistence

  2. RNA CoMPASS: a dual approach for pathogen and host transcriptome analysis of RNA-seq datasets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guorong Xu

    Full Text Available High-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-seq has become an instrumental assay for the analysis of multiple aspects of an organism's transcriptome. Further, the analysis of a biological specimen's associated microbiome can also be performed using RNA-seq data and this application is gaining interest in the scientific community. There are many existing bioinformatics tools designed for analysis and visualization of transcriptome data. Despite the availability of an array of next generation sequencing (NGS analysis tools, the analysis of RNA-seq data sets poses a challenge for many biomedical researchers who are not familiar with command-line tools. Here we present RNA CoMPASS, a comprehensive RNA-seq analysis pipeline for the simultaneous analysis of transcriptomes and metatranscriptomes from diverse biological specimens. RNA CoMPASS leverages existing tools and parallel computing technology to facilitate the analysis of even very large datasets. RNA CoMPASS has a web-based graphical user interface with intrinsic queuing to control a distributed computational pipeline. RNA CoMPASS was evaluated by analyzing RNA-seq data sets from 45 B-cell samples. Twenty-two of these samples were derived from lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs generated by the infection of naïve B-cells with the Epstein Barr virus (EBV, while another 23 samples were derived from Burkitt's lymphomas (BL, some of which arose in part through infection with EBV. Appropriately, RNA CoMPASS identified EBV in all LCLs and in a fraction of the BLs. Cluster analysis of the human transcriptome component of the RNA CoMPASS output clearly separated the BLs (which have a germinal center-like phenotype from the LCLs (which have a blast-like phenotype with evidence of activated MYC signaling and lower interferon and NF-kB signaling in the BLs. Together, this analysis illustrates the utility of RNA CoMPASS in the simultaneous analysis of transcriptome and metatranscriptome data. RNA CoMPASS is freely

  3. Rescue of foot-and-mouth disease viruses that are pathogenic for cattle from preserved viral RNA samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belsham, Graham; Jamal, Syed Muhammad; Tjørnehøj, Kirsten

    2011-01-01

    of the rescued viruses (of serotype O and Asia 1) were inoculated into bull calves under high containment conditions. Acute clinical disease was observed in each case which spread rapidly from the inoculated calves to in-contact animals. Thus the rescued viruses were highly pathogenic. The availability......Background: Foot and mouth disease is an economically important disease of cloven-hoofed animals including cattle, sheep and pigs. It is caused by a picornavirus, foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), which has a positive sense RNA genome which, when introduced into cells, can initiate virus...... replication. Principal Findings: A system has been developed to rescue infectious FMDV from RNA preparations generated from clinical samples obtained under experimental conditions and then applied to samples collected in the ‘‘field’’. Clinical samples from suspect cases of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) were...

  4. Genomic reassortment of barley mild mosaic virus: evidence for the involvement of RNA1 in pathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiwazaki, S; Hibino, H

    1996-04-01

    A reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was developed for specific detection of RNA1 and RNA2 of two barely mild mosaic virus strains (BaMMV-Ka1 and BaMMV-Na1) and a barley yellow mosaic virus strain (BaYMV-II-1). Mechanical inoculation of barley cultivars with a mixture of BaMMV-Ka1 and BaMMV-Na1, followed by RT-PCR to detect RNA components in infected plants, revealed that the RNAs of the two strains were exchangeable in vivo to generate all nine possible combinations containing at least one RNA1 and one RNA2. Infected plants with mixed or reassorted RNAs were selected and used as inocula for further analysis of cultivar reactions. The results demonstrate that the pathogenicity and symptomatology are determined solely by RNA1. In contrast, following inoculation with mixtures of BaYMV-II-1 and either BaMMV-Ka1 or BaMMV-Na1, no heterologous combinations of their RNAs were observed.

  5. 16S rRNA PCR for differentiation of pathogenic and non-pathogenic leptospira isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shukla J

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To determine the risk factors, microbiological features, clinical features and other epidemiological characteristics of Nocardia keratitis seen at a tertiary eye care centre in south India. METHODS: We evaluated 31 patients with Nocardia keratitis seen over two years, from September 1999 to September 2001. Corneal scrapings were subjected to microscopy and culture using standard protocols. RESULTS: Out of 2184 corneal ulcers cultured, 31(1.42% were found to be Nocardia asteroides. All 31(100% were detected correctly by 10% potassium hydroxide wet mount preparation. The highest percentage of isolates was susceptible to gentamicin (100% followed by ciprofloxacin(93.55%. Twenty four (77.42% patients were from rural areas; 22(70.97% were agricultural workers; 29(93.55% had history of trauma; 2(6.45% had previous ocular surgery; 28(90.32% had ocular injury with soil and sand; and 22(70.97% had ocular injury while working in the agricultural fields. Ten (32.26% patients presented at our institute between 15 to 35 days of onset of illness, 26(83.87% had previous medical treatment, and 15(48.39% patients had used traditional eye medicines. The average age of the patients was 46.16 years, with a range of 11 to 75 years. No seasonal variation was observed. CONCLUSIONS: A high index of suspicion of Nocardia infection should exist in patients with a history of trauma to the eye by soil or sand. The organisms are sensitive to commonly used topical ocular antibiotics.

  6. RNA interference technology in crop protection against arthropod pests, pathogens and nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zotti, Moises; Dos Santos, Ericmar Avila; Cagliari, Deise; Christiaens, Olivier; Taning, Clauvis Nji Tizi; Smagghe, Guy

    2017-11-30

    Scientists have made significant progress in understanding and unraveling several aspects of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-mediated gene silencing during the last two decades. Now that the RNA interference (RNAi) mechanism is well understood, it is time to consider how to apply the acquired knowledge to agriculture and crop protection. Some RNAi-based products are already available for farmers and more are expected to reach the market soon. Tailor-made dsRNA as an active ingredient for biopesticide formulations is considered a raw material that can be used for diverse purposes, from pest control and bee protection against viruses to pesticide resistance management. The RNAi mechanism works at the messenger RNA (mRNA) level, exploiting a sequence-dependent mode of action, which makes it unique in potency and selectivity compared with conventional agrochemicals. Furthermore, the use of RNAi in crop protection can be achieved by employing plant-incorporated protectants through plant transformation, but also by non-transformative strategies such as the use of formulations of sprayable RNAs as direct control agents, resistance factor repressors or developmental disruptors. In this review, RNAi is presented in an agricultural context (discussing products that have been launched on the market or will soon be available), and we go beyond the classical presentation of successful examples of RNAi in pest-insect control and comprehensively explore its potential for the control of plant pathogens, nematodes and mites, and to fight against diseases and parasites in beneficial insects. Moreover, we also discuss its use as a repressor for the management of pesticide-resistant weeds and insects. Finally, this review reports on the advances in non-transformative dsRNA delivery and the production costs of dsRNA, and discusses environmental considerations. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  7. The epizootiology of the highly pathogenic avian influenza prior to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The importance of the highly pathogenic avian influenza (AI) as a devastating disease of poultry has markedly increased during the last decade. By April 2006, it has become clear that the highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses of the H5N1 subtype are circulating in Asia, Africa (including Nigeria), Europe and the ...

  8. If it transcribes, we can sequence it: mining the complexities of host-pathogen-environment interactions using RNA-seq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colgan, Aoife M; Cameron, Andrew Ds; Kröger, Carsten

    2017-04-01

    Host-pathogen interactions are exceedingly complex because they involve multiple host tissues, often occur in the context of normal microflora, and can span diverse microenvironments. Although decades of gene expression studies have provided detailed insights into infection processes, technical challenges have restricted experiments to single pathogenic species or host tissues. RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) has revolutionized the study of gene expression because in addition to quantifying transcriptional output, it allows detection and characterization of all transcripts in a genome. Here, we review how refined approaches to RNA-seq are used to map the transcriptional networks that control host-pathogen interactions. These enhanced techniques include dRNA-seq and term-seq for the fine-scale mapping of transcriptional start and termination sites, and dual RNA-seq for simultaneous sequencing of host and bacterial pathogen transcriptomes. Dual RNA-seq experiments are currently limited to in vitro infection systems that do not fully reflect the complexities of the in vivo environment, thus a challenge is to develop in vivo model systems and experimental approaches that address the biological heterogeneity of host environments, followed by the integration of RNA-seq with other genome-scale datasets to identify the transcriptional networks that mediate host-pathogen interactions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Novel hypovirulence-associated RNA mycovirus in the plant pathogenic fungus botrytis cinerea: molecular and biological characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botrytis cinerea is a pathogenic fungus causing gray mold disease on numerous economically important crops and ornamental plants. This study was conducted to characterize the biological and molecular features of a novel RNA mycovirus, Botrytis cinerea RNA virus 1 (BcRV1), in the hypovirulent strain ...

  10. Genetic Predisposition To Acquire a Polybasic Cleavage Site for Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus Hemagglutinin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naganori Nao

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses with H5 and H7 hemagglutinin (HA subtypes evolve from low-pathogenic precursors through the acquisition of multiple basic amino acid residues at the HA cleavage site. Although this mechanism has been observed to occur naturally only in these HA subtypes, little is known about the genetic basis for the acquisition of the polybasic HA cleavage site. Here we show that consecutive adenine residues and a stem-loop structure, which are frequently found in the viral RNA region encoding amino acids around the cleavage site of low-pathogenic H5 and H7 viruses isolated from waterfowl reservoirs, are important for nucleotide insertions into this RNA region. A reporter assay to detect nontemplated nucleotide insertions and deep-sequencing analysis of viral RNAs revealed that an increased number of adenine residues and enlarged stem-loop structure in the RNA region accelerated the multiple adenine and/or guanine insertions required to create codons for basic amino acids. Interestingly, nucleotide insertions associated with the HA cleavage site motif were not observed principally in the viral RNA of other subtypes tested (H1, H2, H3, and H4. Our findings suggest that the RNA editing-like activity is the key mechanism for nucleotide insertions, providing a clue as to why the acquisition of the polybasic HA cleavage site is restricted to the particular HA subtypes.

  11. Rapidly expanding range of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Jeffrey S.; Dusek, Robert J.; Spackman, Erica

    2015-01-01

    The movement of highly pathogenic avian influenza (H5N8) virus across Eurasia and into North America and the virus’ propensity to reassort with co-circulating low pathogenicity viruses raise concerns among poultry producers, wildlife biologists, aviculturists, and public health personnel worldwide. Surveillance, modeling, and experimental research will provide the knowledge required for intelligent policy and management decisions.

  12. Modulation of RNA polymerase II phosphorylation downstream of pathogen perception orchestrates plant immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fangjun; Cheng, Cheng; Cui, Fuhao; de Oliveira, Marcos V V; Yu, Xiao; Meng, Xiangzong; Intorne, Aline C; Babilonia, Kevin; Li, Maoying; Li, Bo; Chen, Sixue; Ma, Xianfeng; Xiao, Shunyuan; Zheng, Yi; Fei, Zhangjun; Metz, Richard P; Johnson, Charles D; Koiwa, Hisashi; Sun, Wenxian; Li, Zhaohu; de Souza Filho, Gonçalo A; Shan, Libo; He, Ping

    2014-12-10

    Perception of microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) elicits host transcriptional reprogramming as part of the immune response. Although pathogen perception is well studied, the signaling networks orchestrating immune gene expression remain less clear. In a genetic screen for components involved in the early immune gene transcription reprogramming, we identified Arabidopsis RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain (CTD) phosphatase-like 3 (CPL3) as a negative regulator of immune gene expression. MAMP perception induced rapid and transient cyclin-dependent kinase C (CDKC)-mediated phosphorylation of Arabidopsis CTD. The CDKCs, which are in turn phosphorylated and activated by a canonical MAP kinase (MAPK) cascade, represent a point of signaling convergence downstream of multiple immune receptors. CPL3 directly dephosphorylated CTD to counteract MAPK-mediated CDKC regulation. Thus, modulation of the phosphorylation dynamics of eukaryotic RNA polymerase II transcription machinery by MAPKs, CTD kinases, and phosphatases constitutes an essential mechanism for rapid orchestration of host immune gene expression and defense upon pathogen attacks. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The RNA-binding protein tristetraprolin schedules apoptosis of pathogen-engaged neutrophils during bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebner, Florian; Sedlyarov, Vitaly; Tasciyan, Saren; Ivin, Masa; Kratochvill, Franz; Gratz, Nina; Kenner, Lukas; Villunger, Andreas; Sixt, Michael; Kovarik, Pavel

    2017-06-01

    Protective responses against pathogens require a rapid mobilization of resting neutrophils and the timely removal of activated ones. Neutrophils are exceptionally short-lived leukocytes, yet it remains unclear whether the lifespan of pathogen-engaged neutrophils is regulated differently from that in the circulating steady-state pool. Here, we have found that under homeostatic conditions, the mRNA-destabilizing protein tristetraprolin (TTP) regulates apoptosis and the numbers of activated infiltrating murine neutrophils but not neutrophil cellularity. Activated TTP-deficient neutrophils exhibited decreased apoptosis and enhanced accumulation at the infection site. In the context of myeloid-specific deletion of Ttp, the potentiation of neutrophil deployment protected mice against lethal soft tissue infection with Streptococcus pyogenes and prevented bacterial dissemination. Neutrophil transcriptome analysis revealed that decreased apoptosis of TTP-deficient neutrophils was specifically associated with elevated expression of myeloid cell leukemia 1 (Mcl1) but not other antiapoptotic B cell leukemia/lymphoma 2 (Bcl2) family members. Higher Mcl1 expression resulted from stabilization of Mcl1 mRNA in the absence of TTP. The low apoptosis rate of infiltrating TTP-deficient neutrophils was comparable to that of transgenic Mcl1-overexpressing neutrophils. Our study demonstrates that posttranscriptional gene regulation by TTP schedules the termination of the antimicrobial engagement of neutrophils. The balancing role of TTP comes at the cost of an increased risk of bacterial infections.

  14. RNA in development: how ribonucleoprotein granules regulate the life cycles of pathogenic protozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Ribonucleoprotein (RNP) granules are important posttranscriptional regulators of messenger RNA (mRNA) fate. Several types of RNP granules specifically regulate gene expression during development of multicellular organisms and are commonly referred to as germ granules. The function of germ granules is not entirely understood and probably diverse, but it is generally agreed that one main function is posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression during early development, when transcription is silent. One example is the translational repression of maternally derived mRNAs in oocytes. Here, I hope to show that the need for regulation of gene expression by RNP granules is not restricted to animal development, but plays an equally important role during the development of pathogenic protozoa. Apicomplexa and Trypanosomatidae have complex life cycles with frequent host changes. The need to quickly adapt gene expression to a new environment as well as the ability to suppress translation to survive latencies is critical for successful completion of life cycles. Posttranscriptional gene regulation is not necessarily simpler in protozoa. Apicomplexa surprise with the presence of micro RNA (miRNAs) and upstream open reading frames (µORFs). Trypanosomes have an unusually large repertoire of different RNP granule types. A better understanding of RNP granules in protozoa may help to gain insight into the evolutionary origin of RNP granules: Trypanosomes for example have two types of granules with interesting similarities to animal germ granules. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Characterization of an Hfq dependent antisense sRNA in the Gram-positive human pathogen Listeria monocytogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jesper Sejrup; Lei Kristensen, Lisbeth; Hanghøj Chrisitansen, Mie

    between sRNA and target mRNA rely on the RNA chaperone Hfq. Hfq is a ubiquitous protein found in almost all genres of bacterial life. However, so far its role as an RNA chaperone has only been described in Gram-negative species such as Escherichia coli and Salmonella (Vogel, J. 2009). We previously...... identified several Hfq-binding sRNAs in the Gram-positive human pathogen L. monocytogenes (Christiansen et al 2006). Through bioinformatics, we have identified a number of candidate targets for one of these sRNAs (LhrA). Here, we present the characterization of one of these targets. Our results suggest...

  16. RNA-mediated thermoregulation of iron-acquisition genes in Shigella dysenteriae and pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouse, Andrew B; Righetti, Francesco; Kortmann, Jens; Narberhaus, Franz; Murphy, Erin R

    2013-01-01

    The initiation, progression and transmission of most bacterial infections is dependent upon the ability of the invading pathogen to acquire iron from each of the varied environments encountered during the course of a natural infection. In total, 95% of iron within the human body is complexed within heme, making heme a potentially rich source of host-associated nutrient iron for invading bacteria. As heme is encountered only within the host, pathogenic bacteria often regulate synthesis of heme utilization factors such that production is maximal under host-associated environmental conditions. This study examines the regulated production of ShuA, an outer-membrane receptor required for the utilization of heme as a source of nutrient iron by Shigella dysenteriae, a pathogenic bacterium that causes severe diarrheal diseases in humans. Specifically, the impact of the distinct environmental temperatures encountered during infection within a host (37°C) and transmission between hosts (25°C) on shuA expression is investigated. We show that shuA expression is subject to temperature-dependent post-transcriptional regulation resulting in increased ShuA production at 37°C. The observed thermoregulation is mediated by nucleic acid sequences within the 5' untranslated region. In addition, we have identified similar nucleotide sequences within the 5' untranslated region of the orthologous chuA transcript of enteropathogenic E. coli and have demonstrated that it also functions to confer temperature-dependent post-transcriptional regulation. In both function and predicted structure, the regulatory element within the shuA and chuA 5' untranslated regions closely resembles a FourU RNA thermometer, a zipper-like RNA structure that occludes the Shine-Dalgarno sequence at low temperatures. Increased production of ShuA and ChuA in response to the host body temperature allows for maximal production of these heme acquisition factors within the environment where S. dysenteriae and

  17. Pathogenicity and transmission of H5 and H7 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses in mallards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild aquatic birds have been associated with the intercontinental spread of H5 subtype highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses of the A/goose/Guangdong/1/96 (Gs/GD) lineage during 2005, 2010 and 2014, but dispersion by wild waterfowl has not been implicated with spread of other HPAI viruses...

  18. 16S rRNA-based detection of oral pathogens in coronary atherosclerotic plaque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahendra Jaideep

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Atherosclerosis develops as a response of the vessel wall to injury. Chronic bacterial infections have been associated with an increased risk for atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease. The ability of oral pathogens to colonize in coronary atheromatous plaque is well known. Aim: The aim of this study was to detect the presence of Treponema denticola, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Campylobacter rectus in the subgingival and atherosclerotic plaques of patients with coronary artery disease. Materials and Methods: Fifty-one patients in the age group of 40-80 years with coronary artery disease were selected for the study. DNA was extracted from the plaque samples. The specific primers for T. denticola, C. rectus and P. gingivalis were used to amplify a part of the 16S rRNA gene by polymerase chain reaction. Statistical Analysis Used: Chi-square analysis, correlation coefficient and prevalence percentage of the microorganisms were carried out for the analysis. Results: Of the 51 patients, T. denticola, C. rectus and P. gingivalis were detected in 49.01%, 21.51% and 45.10% of the atherosclerotic plaque samples. Conclusions: Our study revealed the presence of bacterial DNA of the oral pathogenic microorganisms in coronary atherosclerotic plaques. The presence of the bacterial DNA in the coronary atherosclerotic plaques in significant proportion may suggest the possible relationship between periodontal bacterial infection and genesis of coronary atherosclerosis.

  19. Structure of the prolyl-tRNA synthetase from the eukaryotic pathogen Giardia lamblia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, Eric T.; Kim, Jessica E.; Napuli, Alberto J.; Verlinde, Christophe L. M. J.; Fan, Erkang; Zucker, Frank H.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Buckner, Frederick S.; Hol, Wim G. J.; Merritt, Ethan A., E-mail: merritt@u.washington.edu [Medical Structural Genomics of Pathogenic Protozoa, (United States); University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2012-09-01

    The structure of Giardia prolyl-tRNA synthetase cocrystallized with proline and ATP shows evidence for half-of-the-sites activity, leading to a corresponding mixture of reaction substrates and product (prolyl-AMP) in the two active sites of the dimer. The genome of the human intestinal parasite Giardia lamblia contains only a single aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase gene for each amino acid. The Giardia prolyl-tRNA synthetase gene product was originally misidentified as a dual-specificity Pro/Cys enzyme, in part owing to its unexpectedly high off-target activation of cysteine, but is now believed to be a normal representative of the class of archaeal/eukaryotic prolyl-tRNA synthetases. The 2.2 Å resolution crystal structure of the G. lamblia enzyme presented here is thus the first structure determination of a prolyl-tRNA synthetase from a eukaryote. The relative occupancies of substrate (proline) and product (prolyl-AMP) in the active site are consistent with half-of-the-sites reactivity, as is the observed biphasic thermal denaturation curve for the protein in the presence of proline and MgATP. However, no corresponding induced asymmetry is evident in the structure of the protein. No thermal stabilization is observed in the presence of cysteine and ATP. The implied low affinity for the off-target activation product cysteinyl-AMP suggests that translational fidelity in Giardia is aided by the rapid release of misactivated cysteine.

  20. Dual RNA-sequencing of Eucalyptus nitens during Phytophthora cinnamomi challenge reveals pathogen and host factors influencing compatibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Febe Elizabeth Meyer

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Damage caused by Phytophthora cinnamomi Rands remains an important concern on forest tree species. The pathogen causes root and collar rot, stem cankers and dieback of various economically important Eucalyptus spp. In South Africa, susceptible cold tolerant Eucalyptus plantations have been affected by various Phytophthora spp. with P. cinnamomi considered one of the most virulent. The molecular basis of this compatible interaction is poorly understood. In this study, susceptible Eucalyptus nitens plants were stem inoculated with P. cinnamomi and tissue was harvested five days post inoculation. Dual RNA-sequencing, a technique which allows the concurrent detection of both pathogen and host transcripts during infection, was performed. Approximately 1% of the reads mapped to the draft genome of P. cinnamomi while 78% of the reads mapped to the Eucalyptus grandis genome. The highest expressed P. cinnamomi gene in planta was a putative crinkler effector (CRN1. Phylogenetic analysis indicated the high similarity of this P. cinnamomi CRN1 to that of Phytophthora infestans. Some CRN effectors are known to target host nuclei to suppress defense. In the host, over 1400 genes were significantly differentially expressed in comparison to mock inoculated trees, including suites of pathogenesis related (PR genes. In particular, a PR-9 peroxidase gene with a high similarity to a Carica papaya PR-9 ortholog previously shown to be suppressed upon infection by Phytophthora palmivora was down-regulated two-fold. This PR-9 gene may represent a cross-species effector target during P. cinnamomi infection. This study identified pathogenicity factors, potential manipulation targets and attempted host defense mechanisms activated by E. nitens that contributed to the susceptible outcome of the interaction.

  1. Highly repetitive tRNA(Pro)-tRNA(His) gene cluster from Photobacterium phosphoreum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giroux, S; Beaudet, J; Cedergren, R

    1988-01-01

    A DNA fragment comprising the four tRNA gene sequences of the Escherichia coli argT locus hybridized with two Sau3A-generated DNA fragments from the vibrio Photobacterium phosphoreum (ATCC 11040). Detailed sequence analysis of the longer fragment shows the following gene organization: 5'-promoter-tRNA(Pro)-tRNAPro-tRNA(Pro)-tRNA(His)-tRNA(Pro)-tRNA(Pro)- tRNA(His)-tRNA(Pro)-five pseudogenes derived from the upstream tRNAPro interspersed by putative Rho-independent terminators. This sequence demonstrates the presence of highly repetitive, tandem tRNA genes in a bacterial genome. Furthermore, a stretch of 304 nucleotides from this cluster was found virtually unchanged in the other (shorter) fragment which was previously sequenced. The two clusters together contain eight tRNA(Pro) pseudogenes and eight fully intact tRNA(Pro) genes, an unusually high number for a single eubacterial isoacceptor tRNA. These results show that the organization of some tRNA operons is highly variable in eubacteria. Images PMID:3056906

  2. Prevention And Control Of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza In Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) is a zoonotic trans-boundary disease. Its occurrence in a country constitutes a major constraint to profitable livestock operations and poses a high public health risk at regional and global levels. Since February 2006, HPAI has infected eleven African countries (Nigeria, Egypt, Niger, ...

  3. The high-pathogenicity island (HPI promotes flagellum-mediated motility in extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Magistro

    Full Text Available The key of success of extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC to colonize niches outside the intestinal tract and to establish infection is the coordinated action of numerous virulence and fitness factors. The so-called high-pathogenicity island (HPI, responsible for synthesis, secretion and uptake of the siderophore yersiniabactin, proved to be an important virulence determinant. In this study we investigated the interaction of the flagellum-mediated motility and the HPI. The impairment of yersiniabactin production by deletion of irp2 or ybtA affected significantly motility. The gain of yersiniabactin production improved motility in both pathogenic and non-pathogenic E. coli strains. The loss of flagella expression had no adverse effect on the HPI. Strikingly, external iron abundance was not able to suppress activation of the HPI during motility. The HPI activity of swarming bacteria was comparable to iron deplete conditions, and could even be maximized by supplementing excessive iron. This fact is the first description of a regulatory mechanism, which does not follow the known hierarchical regulation of siderophore systems. Transcriptional reporter fusions of the ybtA promoter demonstrated that the entire promoter region with all YbtA binding sites is necessary for complete induction in both HPI-positive and HPI-negative strains. Altogether, these results suggest that the HPI is part of a complex regulatory network, which orchestrates various virulence mechanisms to optimize the overall fitness of ExPEC.

  4. Visual and sensitive detection of viable pathogenic bacteria by sensing of RNA markers in gold nanoparticles based paper platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongxing; Zhan, Fangfang; Liu, Fang; Zhu, Minjun; Zhou, Xiaoming; Xing, Da

    2014-12-15

    Food-borne pathogens have been recognized as a major cause of human infections worldwide. Their identification needs to be simpler, cheaper and more reliable than the traditional methods. Here, we constructed a low-cost paper platform for viable pathogenic bacteria detection with the naked eye. In this study, an effective isothermal amplification method was used to amplify the hlyA mRNA gene, a specific RNA marker in Listeria monocytogenes. The amplification products were applied to the paper-based platform to perform a visual test using sandwich hybridization assays. When the RNA products migrated along the platform by capillary action, the gold nanoparticles accumulated at the designated area. Under optimized experimental conditions, as little as 0.5 pg/μL genomic RNA from L. monocytogenes could be detected. It could also be used to specifically detect 20 CFU/mL L. monocytogenes from actual samples. The whole assay process, including RNA extraction, amplification, and visualization, can be completed within several hours. This method is suitable for point-of-care applications to detect food-borne pathogens, as it can overcome the false-positive results caused by amplifying nonviable L. monocytogenes. Furthermore, the results can be imaged and transformed into a two-dimensional bar code through an Android-based smart phone for further analysis or in-field food safety tracking. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Characterizing ncRNAs in human pathogenic protists using high-throughput sequencing technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesley Joan Collins

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available ncRNAs are key genes in many human diseases including cancer and viral infection, as well as providing critical functions in pathogenic organisms such as fungi, bacteria, viruses and protists. Until now the identification and characterization of ncRNAs associated with disease has been slow or inaccurate requiring many years of testing to understand complicated RNA and protein gene relationships. High-throughput sequencing now offers the opportunity to characterize miRNAs, siRNAs, snoRNAs and long ncRNAs on a genomic scale making it faster and easier to clarify how these ncRNAs contribute to the disease state. However, this technology is still relatively new, and ncRNA discovery is not an application of high priority for streamlined bioinformatics. Here we summarize background concepts and practical approaches for ncRNA analysis using high-throughput sequencing, and how it relates to understanding human disease. As a case study, we focus on the parasitic protists Giardia lamblia and Trichomonas vaginalis, where large evolutionary distance has meant difficulties in comparing ncRNAs with those from model eukaryotes. A combination of biological, computational and sequencing approaches has enabled easier classification of ncRNA classes such as snoRNAs, but has also aided the identification of novel classes. It is hoped that a higher level of understanding of ncRNA expression and interaction may aid in the development of less harsh treatment for protist-based diseases.

  6. Risk factors for the occurrence and spread of Highly Pathogenic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Outbreaks of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) subtype H5N1 occurred previously for three consecutive years, 2006, 2007 and 2008 in Kano State, Nigeria, causing heavy economic losses to farmers and the government. It was against this background that risk factors for the occurrence and spread of HPAI H5N1 ...

  7. Review of highly pathogenic avian influenza outbreaks in poultry in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    All the confirmed highly pathogenic avian influenza cases that were diagnosed in Zaria at the Veterinary Teaching Hospital, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria, were reviewed in this study. The outbreaks occurred between the months of December, 2006 and March, 2007. The clinical signs and postmortem lesions ...

  8. Imperfect Vaccination Can Enhance the Transmission of Highly Virulent Pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew F Read

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Could some vaccines drive the evolution of more virulent pathogens? Conventional wisdom is that natural selection will remove highly lethal pathogens if host death greatly reduces transmission. Vaccines that keep hosts alive but still allow transmission could thus allow very virulent strains to circulate in a population. Here we show experimentally that immunization of chickens against Marek's disease virus enhances the fitness of more virulent strains, making it possible for hyperpathogenic strains to transmit. Immunity elicited by direct vaccination or by maternal vaccination prolongs host survival but does not prevent infection, viral replication or transmission, thus extending the infectious periods of strains otherwise too lethal to persist. Our data show that anti-disease vaccines that do not prevent transmission can create conditions that promote the emergence of pathogen strains that cause more severe disease in unvaccinated hosts.

  9. Three-dimensional structure of a protozoal double-stranded RNA virus that infects the enteric pathogen Giardia lamblia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Mandy E W; Takagi, Yuko; Parent, Kristin N; Cardone, Giovanni; Nibert, Max L; Baker, Timothy S

    2015-01-15

    Giardia lamblia virus (GLV) is a small, nonenveloped, nonsegmented double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) virus infecting Giardia lamblia, the most common protozoan pathogen of the human intestine and a major agent of waterborne diarrheal disease worldwide. GLV (genus Giardiavirus) is a member of family Totiviridae, along with several other groups of protozoal or fungal viruses, including Leishmania RNA viruses and Trichomonas vaginalis viruses. Interestingly, GLV is more closely related than other Totiviridae members to a group of recently discovered metazoan viruses that includes penaeid shrimp infectious myonecrosis virus (IMNV). Moreover, GLV is the only known protozoal dsRNA virus that can transmit efficiently by extracellular means, also like IMNV. In this study, we used transmission electron cryomicroscopy and icosahedral image reconstruction to examine the GLV virion at an estimated resolution of 6.0 Å. Its outermost diameter is 485 Å, making it the largest totivirus capsid analyzed to date. Structural comparisons of GLV and other totiviruses highlighted a related "T=2" capsid organization and a conserved helix-rich fold in the capsid subunits. In agreement with its unique capacity as a protozoal dsRNA virus to survive and transmit through extracellular environments, GLV was found to be more thermoresistant than Trichomonas vaginalis virus 1, but no specific protein machinery to mediate cell entry, such as the fiber complexes in IMNV, could be localized. These and other structural and biochemical findings provide a basis for future work to dissect the cell entry mechanism of GLV into a "primitive" (early-branching) eukaryotic host and an important enteric pathogen of humans. Numerous pathogenic bacteria, including Corynebacterium diphtheriae, Salmonella enterica, and Vibrio cholerae, are infected with lysogenic bacteriophages that contribute significantly to bacterial virulence. In line with this phenomenon, several pathogenic protozoa, including Giardia lamblia

  10. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis between the Fungal Plant Pathogens Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and S. trifoliorum Using RNA Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Dan; Xu, Liangsheng; Vandemark, George; Chen, Weidong

    2016-03-01

    The fungal plant pathogens Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and S. trifoliorum are morphologically similar, but differ considerably in host range. In an effort to elucidate mechanisms of the host range difference, transcriptomes of the 2 species at vegetative growth stage were compared to gain further insight into commonality and uniqueness in gene expression and pathogenic mechanisms of the 2 closely related pathogens. A total of 23133 and 21043 unique transcripts were obtained from S. sclerotiorum and S. trifoliorum, respectively. Approximately 43% of the transcripts were genes with known functions for both species. Among 1411 orthologous contigs, about 10% (147) were more highly (>3-fold) expressed in S. trifoliorum than in S. sclerotiorum, and about 12% (173) of the orthologs were more highly (>3-fold) expressed in S. sclerotiorum than in S. trifoliorum. The expression levels of genes on the supercontig 30 have the highest correlation coefficient value between the 2 species. Twenty-seven contigs were found to be new and unique for S. trifoliorum. Additionally, differences in expressed genes involved in pathogenesis like oxalate biosynthesis and endopolygalacturonases were detected between the 2 species. The analyses of the transcriptomes not only discovered similarities and uniqueness in gene expression between the 2 closely related species, providing additional information for annotation the S. sclerotiorum genome, but also provided foundation for comparing the transcriptomes with host-infecting transcriptomes. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Genetic Association 2015. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  11. High quality RNA isolation from Aedes aegypti midguts using laser microdissection microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gobert Geoffrey N

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Laser microdissection microscopy (LMM has potential as a research tool because it allows precise excision of target tissues or cells from a complex biological specimen, and facilitates tissue-specific sample preparation. However, this method has not been used in mosquito vectors to date. To this end, we have developed an LMM method to isolate midgut RNA using Aedes aegypti. Results Total RNA was isolated from Ae. aegypti midguts that were either fresh-frozen or fixed with histological fixatives. Generally, fresh-frozen tissue sections are a common source of quality LMM-derived RNA; however, our aim was to develop an LMM protocol that could inactivate pathogenic viruses by fixation, while simultaneously preserving RNA from arbovirus-infected mosquitoes. Three groups (10 - 15 mosquitoes per group of female Ae. aegypti at 24 or 48-hours post-blood meal were intrathoracically injected with one of seven common fixatives (Bouin's, Carnoy's, Formoy's, Cal-Rite, 4% formalin, 10% neutral buffered formalin, or zinc formalin to evaluate their effect on RNA quality. Total RNA was isolated from the fixed abdomens using a Trizol® method. The results indicated that RNA from Carnoy's and Bouin's fixative samples was comparable to that of fresh frozen midguts (control in duplicate experiments. When Carnoy's and Bouin's were used to fix the midguts for the LMM procedure, however, Carnoy's-fixed RNA clearly showed much less degradation than Bouin's-fixed RNA. In addition, a sample of 5 randomly chosen transcripts were amplified more efficiently using the Carnoy's treated LMM RNA than Bouin's-fixed RNA in quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR assays, suggesting there were more intact target mRNAs in the Carnoy's fixed RNA. The yields of total RNA ranged from 0.3 to 19.0 ng per ~3.0 × 106 μm2 in the LMM procedure. Conclusions Carnoy's fixative was found to be highly compatible with LMM, producing high quality RNA from Ae. aegypti midguts while

  12. Non-coding RNA regulation in pathogenic bacteria located inside eukaryotic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ortega, Alvaro D.; Quereda, Juan J; Pucciarelli, M Graciela; García-del Portillo, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular bacterial pathogens have evolved distinct lifestyles inside eukaryotic cells. Some pathogens coexist with the infected cell in an obligate intracellular state, whereas others transit between the extracellular and intracellular environment. Adaptation to these intracellular lifestyles

  13. Decontamination of High-risk Animal and Zoonotic Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menrath, Andrea; Tomuzia, Katharina; Braeunig, Juliane; Appel, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    Preparedness for the decontamination of affected environments, premises, facilities, and products is one prerequisite for an immediate response to an animal disease outbreak. Various information sources provide recommendations on how to proceed in an outbreak situation to eliminate biological contaminants and to stop the spread of the disease. In order to facilitate the identification of the right decontamination strategy, we present an overview of relevant references for a collection of pathogenic agents. The choice of pathogens is based on a survey of lists containing highly pathogenic agents and/or biological agents considered to be potential vehicles for deliberate contamination of food, feed, or farm animals. European legislation and guidelines from national and international institutions were screened to find decontamination protocols for each of the agents. Identified recommendations were evaluated with regard to their area of application, which could be facilities and equipment, wastes, food, and other animal products. The requirements of a disinfectant for large-scale incidents were gathered, and important characteristics (eg, inactivating spectrum, temperature range, toxicity to environment) of the main recommended disinfectants were summarized to assist in the choice of a suitable and efficient approach in a crisis situation induced by a specific high-risk animal or zoonotic pathogen. The literature search revealed numerous relevant recommendations but also legal gaps for certain diseases, such as Q fever or brucellosis, and legal difficulties for the use of recommended disinfectants. A lack of information about effective disinfectants was identified for some agents. PMID:23971795

  14. Enhancement of the pathogenicity of Staphylococcus aureus strain Newman by a small noncoding RNA SprX1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathirvel, Manikandan; Buchad, Hasmatbanu; Nair, Mrinalini

    2016-12-01

    The pathogenesis of Staphylococcus aureus from local infection to systemic dissemination involves a range of virulence factors including structural and secreted products. Among various control mechanisms, small noncoding RNAs are involved in the regulation of multiple pathogenicity factors in S. aureus. The sRNA SprX which is encoded in the pathogenicity island of methicillin-susceptible S. aureus strain Newman and was shown to influence antibiotic resistance previously, upregulated the expression of virulence genes, especially the cell wall-associated clumping factor B (ClfB) and delta hemolysin (Hld). Bioinformatic analysis revealed several multiple mRNAs associated with pathogenicity as targets for SprX1, one of the three copies of sprX. Both overexpression and chromosomal disruption of sprX1 supported the scheme of upregulation of clfB and hld expression. Altered expression of SprX1 altered the levels of Hld and ClfB mRNAs, hemolysis, clumping of cells, biofilm formation by plate adhesion studies and confocal microscopic analysis as well as infection pathology of modified strains in mice models. ClfB and Hld mRNAs interacted directly with SprX1 in in vitro assays. Increased level of the regulatory RNA, namely RNAIII, that comprises Hld mRNA and also regulates the biofilm formation, indicates that SprX1 may also function through RNAIII for regulating virulence factors. An immunodominant protein, antigen A, was downregulated by SprX1 in two-dimensional electrophoresis. Taken together, these results signify the role of sRNA SprX in the pathogenicity of S. aureus Newman.

  15. Identification of peptidases in highly pathogenic vs. weakly pathogenic Naegleria fowleri amebae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Ishan K; Jamerson, Melissa; Cabral, Guy A; Marciano-Cabral, Francine

    2015-01-01

    Naegleria fowleri, a free-living ameba, is the causative agent of Primary Amebic Meningoencephalitis. Highly pathogenic mouse-passaged amebae (Mp) and weakly pathogenic axenically grown (Ax) N. fowleri were examined for peptidase activity. Zymography and azocasein peptidase activity assays demonstrated that Mp and Ax N. fowleri exhibited a similar peptidase pattern. Prominent for whole cell lysates, membranes and conditioned medium (CM) from Mp and Ax amebae was the presence of an activity band of approximately 58 kDa that was sensitive to E64, a cysteine peptidase inhibitor. However, axenically grown N. fowleri demonstrated a high level of this peptidase activity in membrane preparations. The inhibitor E64 also reduced peptidase activity in ameba-CM consistent with the presence of secreted cysteine peptidases. Exposure of Mp amebae to E64 reduced their migration through matrigel that was used as an extracellular matrix, suggesting a role for cysteine peptidases in invasion of the central nervous system (CNS). The collective results suggest that the profile of peptidases is not a discriminative marker for distinguishing Mp from Ax N. fowleri. However, the presence of a prominent level of activity for cysteine peptidases in N. fowleri membranes and CM, suggests that these enzymes may serve to facilitate passage of the amebae into the CNS. © 2014 The Author(s) Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2014 International Society of Protistologists.

  16. Fire blight disease reactome: RNA-seq transcriptional profile of apple host plant defense responses to Erwinia amylovora pathogen infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamber, Tim; Buchmann, Jan P; Pothier, Joël F; Smits, Theo H M; Wicker, Thomas; Duffy, Brion

    2016-02-17

    The molecular basis of resistance and susceptibility of host plants to fire blight, a major disease threat to pome fruit production globally, is largely unknown. RNA-sequencing data from challenged and mock-inoculated flowers were analyzed to assess the susceptible response of apple to the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora. In presence of the pathogen 1,080 transcripts were differentially expressed at 48 h post inoculation. These included putative disease resistance, stress, pathogen related, general metabolic, and phytohormone related genes. Reads, mapped to regions on the apple genome where no genes were assigned, were used to identify potential novel genes and open reading frames. To identify transcripts specifically expressed in response to E. amylovora, RT-PCRs were conducted and compared to the expression patterns of the fire blight biocontrol agent Pantoea vagans strain C9-1, another apple pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. papulans, and mock inoculated apple flowers. This led to the identification of a peroxidase superfamily gene that was lower expressed in response to E. amylovora suggesting a potential role in the susceptibility response. Overall, this study provides the first transcriptional profile by RNA-seq of the host plant during fire blight disease and insights into the response of susceptible apple plants to E. amylovora.

  17. Characterization of a novel single-stranded RNA mycovirus related to invertebrate viruses from the plant pathogen Verticillium dahliae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañizares, M Carmen; López-Escudero, Francisco J; Pérez-Artés, Encarnación; García-Pedrajas, María D

    2017-11-16

    Fungal viruses, also known as mycoviruses, are widespread in all major groups of fungi. Mycoviruses from plant pathogens can reduce the virulence of their host fungus and have therefore potential as biological control agents. This has spurred the identification of novel mycoviruses in plant pathogens, research which is greatly contributing to our understanding of these organisms. In this work, we report the characterization of a novel monopartite mycovirus from Verticillium dahliae, the main causal agent of Verticillium wilt. This novel mycovirus, which we termed Verticillium dahliae RNA virus 1 (VdRV1), was identified in three different isolates of V. dahliae collected in olive growing areas of the Guadalquivir valley, southern Spain. We determined that the VdRV1 genome is a positive (+) single-stranded (ss) RNA, 2631 nucleotides in length, containing two open reading frames. VdRV1 showed few similarities with known mycoviruses, only with a group of unassigned (+) ssRNA mycoviruses which are related to plant viruses classified within the family Tombusviridae. However, phylogenetic analysis revealed that VdRV1 and the unassigned (+) ssRNA mycoviruses have a closer relationship with recently reported invertebrate viruses. This result indicates that as more viral sequences become available, the relationships of mycoviruses with viruses from other hosts should be reexamined. Additionally, the work supports the hypothesis of a heterogeneous origin for mycoviruses.

  18. Novel hypovirulence-associated RNA mycovirus in the plant-pathogenic fungus Botrytis cinerea: molecular and biological characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lin; Sang, Wen; Wu, Ming-De; Zhang, Jing; Yang, Long; Zhou, Ying-Jun; Chen, Wei-Dong; Li, Guo-Qing

    2015-04-01

    Botrytis cinerea is a pathogenic fungus causing gray mold on numerous economically important crops and ornamental plants. This study was conducted to characterize the biological and molecular features of a novel RNA mycovirus, Botrytis cinerea RNA virus 1 (BcRV1), in the hypovirulent strain BerBc-1 of B. cinerea. The genome of BcRV1 is 8,952 bp long with two putative overlapped open reading frames (ORFs), ORF1 and ORF2, coding for a hypothetical polypeptide (P1) and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), respectively. A -1 frameshifting region (designated the KNOT element) containing a shifty heptamer, a heptanucleotide spacer, and an H-type pseudoknot was predicted in the junction region of ORF1 and ORF2. The -1 frameshifting role of the KNOT element was experimentally confirmed through determination of the production of the fusion protein red fluorescent protein (RFP)-green fluorescent protein (GFP) by the plasmid containing the construct dsRed-KNOT-eGFP in Escherichia coli. BcRV1 belongs to a taxonomically unassigned double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) mycovirus group. It is closely related to grapevine-associated totivirus 2 and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum nonsegmented virus L. BcRV1 in strain BerBc-1 was found capable of being transmitted vertically through macroconidia and horizontally to other B. cinerea strains through hyphal contact. The presence of BcRV1 was found to be positively correlated with hypovirulence in B. cinerea, with the attenuation effects of BcRV1 on mycelial growth and pathogenicity being greatly affected by the accumulation level of BcRV1. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. IGS Minisatellites Useful for Race Differentiation in Colletotrichum lentis and a Likely Site of Small RNA Synthesis Affecting Pathogenicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durkin, Jonathan; Bissett, John; Pahlavani, Mohammadhadi; Mooney, Brent; Buchwaldt, Lone

    2015-01-01

    Colletotrichum lentis is a fungal pathogen of lentil in Canada but rarely reported elsewhere. Two races, Ct0 and Ct1, have been identified using differential lines. Our objective was to develop a PCR-probe differentiating these races. Sequences of the translation elongation factor 1α (tef1α), RNA polymerase II subunit B2 (rpb2), ATP citrate lyase subunit A (acla), and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions were monomorphic, while the intergenic spacer (IGS) region showed length polymorphisms at two minisatellites of 23 and 39 nucleotides (nt). A PCR-probe (39F/R) amplifying the 39 nt minisatellite was developed which subsequently revealed 1–5 minisatellites with 1–12 repeats in C. lentis. The probe differentiated race Ct1 isolates having 7, 9 or 7+9 repeats from race Ct0 having primarily 2 or 4 repeats, occasionally 5, 6, or 8, but never 7 or 9 repeats. These isolates were collected between 1991 and 1999. In a 2012 survey isolates with 2 and 4 repeats increased from 34% to 67%, while isolated with 7 or 9 repeats decreased from 40 to 4%, likely because Ct1 resistant lentil varieties had been grown. The 39 nt repeat was identified in C. gloeosporioides, C. trifolii, Ascochyta lentis, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and Botrytis cinerea. Thus, the 39F/R PCR probe is not species specific, but can differentiate isolates based on repeat number. The 23 nt minisatellite in C. lentis exists as three length variants with ten sequence variations differentiating race Ct0 having 14 or 19 repeats from race Ct1 having 17 repeats, except for one isolate. RNA-translation of 23 nt repeats forms hairpins and has the appropriate length to suggest that IGS could be a site of small RNA synthesis, a hypothesis that warrants further investigation. Small RNA from fungal plant pathogens able to silence genes either in the host or pathogen thereby aiding infection have been reported. PMID:26340001

  20. IGS Minisatellites Useful for Race Differentiation in Colletotrichum lentis and a Likely Site of Small RNA Synthesis Affecting Pathogenicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Durkin

    Full Text Available Colletotrichum lentis is a fungal pathogen of lentil in Canada but rarely reported elsewhere. Two races, Ct0 and Ct1, have been identified using differential lines. Our objective was to develop a PCR-probe differentiating these races. Sequences of the translation elongation factor 1α (tef1α, RNA polymerase II subunit B2 (rpb2, ATP citrate lyase subunit A (acla, and internal transcribed spacer (ITS regions were monomorphic, while the intergenic spacer (IGS region showed length polymorphisms at two minisatellites of 23 and 39 nucleotides (nt. A PCR-probe (39F/R amplifying the 39 nt minisatellite was developed which subsequently revealed 1-5 minisatellites with 1-12 repeats in C. lentis. The probe differentiated race Ct1 isolates having 7, 9 or 7+9 repeats from race Ct0 having primarily 2 or 4 repeats, occasionally 5, 6, or 8, but never 7 or 9 repeats. These isolates were collected between 1991 and 1999. In a 2012 survey isolates with 2 and 4 repeats increased from 34% to 67%, while isolated with 7 or 9 repeats decreased from 40 to 4%, likely because Ct1 resistant lentil varieties had been grown. The 39 nt repeat was identified in C. gloeosporioides, C. trifolii, Ascochyta lentis, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and Botrytis cinerea. Thus, the 39F/R PCR probe is not species specific, but can differentiate isolates based on repeat number. The 23 nt minisatellite in C. lentis exists as three length variants with ten sequence variations differentiating race Ct0 having 14 or 19 repeats from race Ct1 having 17 repeats, except for one isolate. RNA-translation of 23 nt repeats forms hairpins and has the appropriate length to suggest that IGS could be a site of small RNA synthesis, a hypothesis that warrants further investigation. Small RNA from fungal plant pathogens able to silence genes either in the host or pathogen thereby aiding infection have been reported.

  1. Specific Delivery of MiRNA for High Efficient Inhibition of Prostate Cancer by RNA Nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binzel, Daniel W; Shu, Yi; Li, Hui; Sun, Meiyan; Zhang, Qunshu; Shu, Dan; Guo, Bin; Guo, Peixuan

    2016-08-01

    Both siRNA and miRNA can serve as powerful gene-silencing reagents but their specific delivery to cancer cells in vivo without collateral damage to healthy cells remains challenging. We report here the application of RNA nanotechnology for specific and efficient delivery of anti-miRNA seed-targeting sequence to block the growth of prostate cancer in mouse models. Utilizing the thermodynamically ultra-stable three-way junction of the pRNA of phi29 DNA packaging motor, RNA nanoparticles were constructed by bottom-up self-assembly containing the anti-prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) RNA aptamer as a targeting ligand and anti-miR17 or anti-miR21 as therapeutic modules. The 16 nm RNase-resistant and thermodynamically stable RNA nanoparticles remained intact after systemic injection in mice and strongly bound to tumors with little or no accumulation in healthy organs 8 hours postinjection, and subsequently repressed tumor growth at low doses with high efficiency.

  2. High-level fluorescence labeling of gram-positive pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Aymanns

    Full Text Available Fluorescence labeling of bacterial pathogens has a broad range of interesting applications including the observation of living bacteria within host cells. We constructed a novel vector based on the E. coli streptococcal shuttle plasmid pAT28 that can propagate in numerous bacterial species from different genera. The plasmid harbors a promoterless copy of the green fluorescent variant gene egfp under the control of the CAMP-factor gene (cfb promoter of Streptococcus agalactiae and was designated pBSU101. Upon transfer of the plasmid into streptococci, the bacteria show a distinct and easily detectable fluorescence using a standard fluorescence microscope and quantification by FACS-analysis demonstrated values that were 10-50 times increased over the respective controls. To assess the suitability of the construct for high efficiency fluorescence labeling in different gram-positive pathogens, numerous species were transformed. We successfully labeled Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium, Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus anginosus and Staphylococcus aureus strains utilizing the EGFP reporter plasmid pBSU101. In all of these species the presence of the cfb promoter construct resulted in high-level EGFP expression that could be further increased by growing the streptococcal and enterococcal cultures under high oxygen conditions through continuous aeration.

  3. Transcription and processing of mitochondrial RNA in the human pathogen Acanthamoeba castellanii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accari, Jessica; Barth, Christian

    2015-07-01

    The size, structure, gene content and organisation of mitochondrial genomes can be highly diverse especially amongst the protists. We investigated the transcription and processing of the mitochondrial genome of the opportunistic pathogen Acanthamoeba castellanii and here we present a detailed transcription map of the 41.6 kb genome that encodes 33 proteins, 16 tRNAs and 2 rRNAs. Northern hybridisation studies identified six major polycistronic transcripts, most of which are co-transcriptionally processed into smaller mono-, di- and tricistronic RNAs. The maturation of the polycistronic transcripts is likely to involve endonucleolytic cleavage where tRNAs serve as processing signals. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reactions across the intervening regions between the six major polycistronic transcripts suggest that these transcripts were once part of an even larger transcript. Our findings indicate that the mitochondrial genome of A. castellanii is transcribed from only one or two promoters, very similar to the mode of transcription in the mitochondria of its close relative Dictyostelium discoideum, where transcription is known to occur from only a single transcription initiation site. Transcription initiation from a minimal number of promoters despite a large genome size may be an emerging trend in the mitochondria of protists. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Novel MicroRNA Involved in Host Response to Avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli Identified by Deep Sequencing and Integration Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xinzheng; Nie, Qinghua; Zhang, Xiquan; Nolan, Lisa K; Lamont, Susan J

    2017-01-01

    Avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) causes one of the most common bacterial diseases of poultry worldwide. Effective control methods are therefore desirable and will be facilitated by a better understanding of the host response to the pathogen. Currently, microRNAs (miRNAs) involved in host resistance to APEC are unknown. Here, we applied RNA sequencing to explore the changed miRNAs and deregulated genes in the spleen of three groups of broilers: nonchallenged (NC), APEC-challenged with mild pathology (CM), and APEC-challenged with severe pathology (CS). Twenty-seven differentially expressed miRNAs (fold change >1.5; P value APEC infection, which may help to shed light on the roles of these recently identified genetic elements in the mechanisms of host resistance and susceptibility to APEC. Copyright © 2016 Jia et al.

  5. Population abundance of potentially pathogenic organisms in intestinal microbiome of jungle crow (Corvus macrorhynchos) shown with 16S rRNA gene-based microbial community analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Isamu; Siddiki, Mohammad Shohel Rana; Nozawa-Takeda, Tsutomu; Tsukahara, Naoki; Tani, Yuri; Naito, Taki; Sugita, Shoei

    2013-01-01

    Jungle Crows (Corvus macrorhynchos) prefer human habitats because of their versatility in feeding accompanied with human food consumption. Therefore, it is important from a public health viewpoint to characterize their intestinal microbiota. However, no studies have been involved in molecular characterization of the microbiota based on huge and reliable number of data acquisition. In this study, 16S rRNA gene-based microbial community analysis coupled with the next-generation DNA sequencing techniques was applied to the taxonomic classification of intestinal microbiome for three jungle crows. Clustering of the reads into 130 operational taxonomic units showed that at least 70% of analyzed sequences for each crow were highly homologous to Eimeria sp., which belongs to the protozoan phylum Apicomplexa. The microbiotas of three crows also contained potentially pathogenic bacteria with significant percentages, such as the genera Campylobacter and Brachyspira. Thus, the profiling of a large number of 16S rRNA gene sequences in crow intestinal microbiomes revealed the high-frequency existence or vestige of potentially pathogenic microorganisms.

  6. Population Abundance of Potentially Pathogenic Organisms in Intestinal Microbiome of Jungle Crow (Corvus macrorhynchos Shown with 16S rRNA Gene-Based Microbial Community Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isamu Maeda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Jungle Crows (Corvus macrorhynchos prefer human habitats because of their versatility in feeding accompanied with human food consumption. Therefore, it is important from a public health viewpoint to characterize their intestinal microbiota. However, no studies have been involved in molecular characterization of the microbiota based on huge and reliable number of data acquisition. In this study, 16S rRNA gene-based microbial community analysis coupled with the next-generation DNA sequencing techniques was applied to the taxonomic classification of intestinal microbiome for three jungle crows. Clustering of the reads into 130 operational taxonomic units showed that at least 70% of analyzed sequences for each crow were highly homologous to Eimeria sp., which belongs to the protozoan phylum Apicomplexa. The microbiotas of three crows also contained potentially pathogenic bacteria with significant percentages, such as the genera Campylobacter and Brachyspira. Thus, the profiling of a large number of 16S rRNA gene sequences in crow intestinal microbiomes revealed the high-frequency existence or vestige of potentially pathogenic microorganisms.

  7. Molecular characterization of double-stranded RNA virus in Trichomonas vaginalis Egyptian isolates and its association with pathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Gayar, Eman K; Mokhtar, Amira B; Hassan, Wael A

    2016-10-01

    Trichomoniasis is a common human sexually transmitted infection caused by Trichomonas vaginalis. The parasite can be infected with double-stranded RNA viruses (TVV). This viral infection may have important implications on trichomonal virulence and disease pathogenesis. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of T. vaginalis virus among isolates obtained from infected (symptomatic and asymptomatic) women in Ismailia City, Egypt, and to correlate the virus-infected isolates with the clinical manifestations of patients. In addition, the pathogenicity of TVV infected isolates on mice was also evaluated. T. vaginalis isolates were obtained from symptomatic and asymptomatic female patients followed by axenic cultivation in Diamond's TYM medium. The presence of T. vaginalis virus was determined from total extraction of nucleic acids (DNA-RNA) followed by reverse transcriptase-PCR. Representative samples were inoculated intraperitoneally in female albino/BALB mice to assess the pathogenicity of different isolates. A total of 110 women were examined; 40 (36.3 %) samples were positive for T. vaginalis infection. Of these 40 isolates, 8 (20 %) were infected by TVV. Five isolates contained TVV-2 virus species, and the remaining three isolates were infected withTVV-4 variant. A significant association was found between the presence of TVV and particular clinical manifestations of trichomoniasis. Experimental mice infection showed varying degrees of pathogenicity. This is the first report on T. vaginalis infection by TVV in Egypt. The strong association detected between TVV and particular clinical features of trichomoniasis and also the degree of pathogenicity in experimentally infected mice may indicate a possible clinical significance of TVV infection of T. vaginalis isolates.

  8. Identification of Rare Bacterial Pathogens by 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing and MALDI-TOF MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröttner, Percy; Gunzer, Florian; Schüppel, Jana; Rudolph, Wolfram W

    2016-07-11

    There are a number of rare and, therefore, insufficiently described bacterial pathogens which are reported to cause severe infections especially in immunocompromised patients. In most cases only few data, mostly published as case reports, are available which investigate the role of such pathogens as an infectious agent. Therefore, in order to clarify the pathogenic character of such microorganisms, it is necessary to conduct epidemiologic studies which include large numbers of these bacteria. The methods used in such a surveillance study have to meet the following criteria: the identification of the strains has to be accurate according to the valid nomenclature, they should be easy to handle (robustness), economical in routine diagnostics and they have to generate comparable results among different laboratories. Generally, there are three strategies for identifying bacterial strains in a routine setting: 1) phenotypic identification characterizing the biochemical and metabolic properties of the bacteria, 2) molecular techniques such as 16S rRNA gene sequencing and 3) mass spectrometry as a novel proteome based approach. Since mass spectrometry and molecular approaches are the most promising tools for identifying a large variety of bacterial species, these two methods are described. Advances, limitations and potential problems when using these techniques are discussed.

  9. Relationship of SARS-CoV to other pathogenic RNA viruses explored by tetranucleotide usage profiling

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    Danchin Antoine

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The exact origin of the cause of the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS is still an open question. The genomic sequence relationship of SARS-CoV with 30 different single-stranded RNA (ssRNA viruses of various families was studied using two non-standard approaches. Both approaches began with the vectorial profiling of the tetra-nucleotide usage pattern V for each virus. In approach one, a distance measure of a vector V, based on correlation coefficient was devised to construct a relationship tree by the neighbor-joining algorithm. In approach two, a multivariate factor analysis was performed to derive the embedded tetra-nucleotide usage patterns. These patterns were subsequently used to classify the selected viruses. Results Both approaches yielded relationship outcomes that are consistent with the known virus classification. They also indicated that the genome of RNA viruses from the same family conform to a specific pattern of word usage. Based on the correlation of the overall tetra-nucleotide usage patterns, the Transmissible Gastroenteritis Virus (TGV and the Feline CoronaVirus (FCoV are closest to SARS-CoV. Surprisingly also, the RNA viruses that do not go through a DNA stage displayed a remarkable discrimination against the CpG and UpA di-nucleotide (z = -77.31, -52.48 respectively and selection for UpG and CpA (z = 65.79,49.99 respectively. Potential factors influencing these biases are discussed. Conclusion The study of genomic word usage is a powerful method to classify RNA viruses. The congruence of the relationship outcomes with the known classification indicates that there exist phylogenetic signals in the tetra-nucleotide usage patterns, that is most prominent in the replicase open reading frames.

  10. Molecular Characterization of a Novel Positive-Sense, Single-Stranded RNA Mycovirus Infecting the Plant Pathogenic Fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum

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    Rong Liu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have demonstrated that a diverse array of mycoviruses infect the plant pathogenic fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Here, we report the molecular characterization of a newly identified mycovirus, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum fusarivirus 1 (SsFV1, which was isolated from a sclerotia-defective strain JMTJ14 of S. sclerotiorum. Excluding a poly (A tail, the genome of SsFV1 comprises 7754 nucleotides (nts in length with 83 and 418 nts for 5'- and 3'-untranslated regions, respectively. SsFV1 has four non-overlapping open reading frames (ORFs: ORF1 encodes a 191 kDa polyprotein (1664 amino acid residues in length containing conserved RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp and helicase domains; the other three ORFs encode three putative hypothetical proteins of unknown function. Phylogenetic analysis, based on RdRp and Helicase domains, indicated that SsFV1 is phylogenetically related to Rosellinia necatrix fusarivirus 1 (RnFV1, Fusarium graminearum virus-DK21 (FgV1, and Penicillium roqueforti RNA mycovirus 1 (PrRV1, a cluster of an independent group belonging to a newly proposed family Fusarividae. However, SsFV1 is markedly different from FgV1 and RnFV1 in genome organization and nucleotide sequence. SsFV1 was transmitted successfully to two vegetatively incompatible virus-free strains. SsFV1 is not responsible for the abnormal phenotype of strain JMTJ14.

  11. Molecular Characterization of a Novel Positive-Sense, Single-Stranded RNA Mycovirus Infecting the Plant Pathogenic Fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rong; Cheng, Jiasen; Fu, Yanping; Jiang, Daohong; Xie, Jiatao

    2015-05-21

    Recent studies have demonstrated that a diverse array of mycoviruses infect the plant pathogenic fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Here, we report the molecular characterization of a newly identified mycovirus, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum fusarivirus 1 (SsFV1), which was isolated from a sclerotia-defective strain JMTJ14 of S. sclerotiorum. Excluding a poly (A) tail, the genome of SsFV1 comprises 7754 nucleotides (nts) in length with 83 and 418 nts for 5'- and 3'-untranslated regions, respectively. SsFV1 has four non-overlapping open reading frames (ORFs): ORF1 encodes a 191 kDa polyprotein (1664 amino acid residues in length) containing conserved RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) and helicase domains; the other three ORFs encode three putative hypothetical proteins of unknown function. Phylogenetic analysis, based on RdRp and Helicase domains, indicated that SsFV1 is phylogenetically related to Rosellinia necatrix fusarivirus 1 (RnFV1), Fusarium graminearum virus-DK21 (FgV1), and Penicillium roqueforti RNA mycovirus 1 (PrRV1), a cluster of an independent group belonging to a newly proposed family Fusarividae. However, SsFV1 is markedly different from FgV1 and RnFV1 in genome organization and nucleotide sequence. SsFV1 was transmitted successfully to two vegetatively incompatible virus-free strains. SsFV1 is not responsible for the abnormal phenotype of strain JMTJ14.

  12. Lipophorins can adhere to dsRNA, bacteria and fungi present in the hemolymph of the desert locust: a role as general scavenger for pathogens in the open body cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynant, Niels; Duressa, Tewodros F; Santos, Dulce; Van Duppen, Joost; Proost, Paul; Huybrechts, Roger; Vanden Broeck, Jozef

    2014-05-01

    Desert locusts are characterized by a highly sensitive and effective RNA interference (RNAi) response. Moreover, delivery of dsRNA into the open body cavity will elicit potent silencing effects throughout the body. On the other hand, many other insect species, such as Bombyx mori and Drosophila melanogaster, lack the ability to efficiently spread the RNAi-signal. In this study, we demonstrated that, in the serum of the desert locust, lipophorins adhere to dsRNA-fragments. Lipophorins can be subdivided into high density and low density lipophorins (HDLp and LDLp), according to their buoyant density, and we showed that both types of lipophorins can interact with dsRNA fragments. Furthermore, in the presence of (gram-positive) bacteria or fungi, LDLp induce the formation of pathogen aggregates, while no clear aggregation effects were detected in the presence of HDLp. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Control of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza; Epidemiological and economic aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Backer, J.A.; Bergevoet, R.H.M.; Fischer, E.A.J.; Nodelijk, G.; Bosman, K.J.; Saatkamp, H.W.; Roermund, van H.J.W.

    2011-01-01

    Epidemieën van hoog pathogene aviaire influenza (HPAI) kunnen een grote invloed hebben op het dierenwelzijn, de pluimveesector en, vanwege de zoönotische aard, ook op de volksgezondheid. Vanwege de vele mogelijke insleeproutes, reservoirs en mutaties in laag pathogene AI (LPAI) loopt het pluimvee in

  14. High throughput 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nierychlo, Marta; Larsen, Poul; Jørgensen, Mads Koustrup

    S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing has been developed over the past few years and is now ready to use for more comprehensive studies related to plant operation and optimization thanks to short analysis time, low cost, high throughput, and high taxonomic resolution. In this study we show how 16S r...

  15. Identification of pathogenic Nocardia species by reverse line blot hybridization targeting the 16S rRNA and 16S-23S rRNA gene spacer regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Meng; Kong, Fanrong; Sorrell, Tania C; Cao, Yongyan; Lee, Ok Cha; Liu, Ying; Sintchenko, Vitali; Chen, Sharon C A

    2010-02-01

    Although 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis is employed most often for the definitive identification of Nocardia species, alternate molecular methods and polymorphisms in other gene targets have also enabled species determinations. We evaluated a combined Nocardia PCR-based reverse line blot (RLB) hybridization assay based on 16S and 16S-23S rRNA gene spacer region polymorphisms to identify 12 American Type Culture Collection and 123 clinical Nocardia isolates representing 14 species; results were compared with results from 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Thirteen 16S rRNA gene-based (two group-specific and 11 species-specific) and five 16S-23S spacer-targeted (two taxon-specific and three species-specific) probes were utilized. 16S rRNA gene-based probes correctly identified 124 of 135 isolates (sensitivity, 92%) but were unable to identify Nocardia paucivorans strains (n = 10 strains) and a Nocardia asteroides isolate with a novel 16S rRNA gene sequence. Nocardia farcinica and Nocardia cyriacigeorgica strains were identified by the sequential use of an N. farcinica-"negative" probe and a combined N. farcinica/N. cyriacigeorgica probe. The assay specificity was high (99%) except for weak cross-reactivity between the Nocardia brasiliensis probe with the Nocardia thailandica DNA product; however, cross-hybridization with closely related nontarget species may occur. The incorporation of 16S-23S rRNA gene spacer-based probes enabled the identification of all N. paucivorans strains. The overall sensitivity using both probe sets was >99%. Both N. farcinica-specific 16S-23S rRNA gene spacer-directed probes were required to identify all N. farcinica stains by using this probe set. The study demonstrates the utility of a combined PCR/RLB assay for the identification of clinically relevant Nocardia species and its potential for studying subtypes of N. farcinica. Where species assignment is ambiguous or not possible, 16S rRNA gene sequencing is recommended.

  16. ABCE1 is a highly conserved RNA silencing suppressor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kairi Kärblane

    Full Text Available ATP-binding cassette sub-family E member 1 (ABCE1 is a highly conserved protein among eukaryotes and archaea. Recent studies have identified ABCE1 as a ribosome-recycling factor important for translation termination in mammalian cells, yeast and also archaea. Here we report another conserved function of ABCE1. We have previously described AtRLI2, the homolog of ABCE1 in the plant Arabidopsis thaliana, as an endogenous suppressor of RNA silencing. In this study we show that this function is conserved: human ABCE1 is able to suppress RNA silencing in Nicotiana benthamiana plants, in mammalian HEK293 cells and in the worm Caenorhabditis elegans. Using co-immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry, we found a number of potential ABCE1-interacting proteins that might support its function as an endogenous suppressor of RNA interference. The interactor candidates are associated with epigenetic regulation, transcription, RNA processing and mRNA surveillance. In addition, one of the identified proteins is translin, which together with its binding partner TRAX supports RNA interference.

  17. USGS role and response to highly pathogenic avian influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, M. Camille; Miles, A. Keith; Pearce, John M.; Prosser, Diann J.; Sleeman, Jonathan M.; Whalen, Mary E.

    2015-09-09

    Avian influenza viruses are naturally occurring in wild birds such as ducks, geese, swans, and gulls. These viruses generally do not cause illness in wild birds, however, when spread to poultry they can be highly pathogenic and cause illness and death in backyard and commercial farms. Outbreaks may cause devastating agricultural economic losses and some viral strains have the potential to infect people directly. Furthermore, the combination of avian influenza viruses with mammalian viruses can result in strains with the ability to transmit from person to person, possibly leading to viruses with pandemic potential. All known pandemic influenza viruses have had some genetic material of avian origin. Since 1996, a strain of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus, H5N1, has caused infection in wild birds, losses to poultry farms in Eurasia and North Africa, and led to the deaths of several hundred people. Spread of the H5N1 virus and other influenza strains from China was likely facilitated by migratory birds. In December 2014, HPAI was detected in poultry in Canada and migratory birds in the United States. Since then, HPAI viruses have spread to large parts of the United States and will likely continue to spread through migratory bird flyways and other mechanisms throughout North America. In the United States, HPAI viruses have severely affected the poultry industry with millions of domestic birds dead or culled. These strains of HPAI are not known to cause disease in humans; however, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) advise caution when in close contact with infected birds. Experts agree that HPAI strains currently circulating in wild birds of North America will likely persist for the next few years. This unprecedented situation presents risks to the poultry industry, natural resource management, and potentially human health. Scientific knowledge and decision support tools are urgently needed to understand factors affecting the persistence

  18. Immunostimulatory motifs enhance antiviral siRNAs targeting highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron R Stewart

    Full Text Available Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI H5N1 virus is endemic in many regions around the world and remains a significant pandemic threat. To date H5N1 has claimed almost 300 human lives worldwide, with a mortality rate of 60% and has caused the death or culling of hundreds of millions of poultry since its initial outbreak in 1997. We have designed multi-functional RNA interference (RNAi-based therapeutics targeting H5N1 that degrade viral mRNA via the RNAi pathway while at the same time augmenting the host antiviral response by inducing host type I interferon (IFN production. Moreover, we have identified two factors critical for maximising the immunostimulatory properties of short interfering (siRNAs in chicken cells (i mode of synthesis and (ii nucleoside sequence to augment the response to virus. The 5-bp nucleoside sequence 5'-UGUGU-3' is a key determinant in inducing high levels of expression of IFN-α, -β, -λ and interleukin 1-β in chicken cells. Positioning of this 5'-UGUGU-3' motif at the 5'-end of the sense strand of siRNAs, but not the 3'-end, resulted in a rapid and enhanced induction of type I IFN. An anti-H5N1 avian influenza siRNA directed against the PB1 gene (PB1-2257 tagged with 5'-UGUGU-3' induced type I IFN earlier and to a greater extent compared to a non-tagged PB1-2257. Tested against H5N1 in vitro, the tagged PB1-2257 was more effective than non-tagged PB1-2257. These data demonstrate the ability of an immunostimulatory motif to improve the performance of an RNAi-based antiviral, a finding that may influence the design of future RNAi-based anti-influenza therapeutics.

  19. Highly pathogenic influenza A(H5N1 virus survival in complex artificial aquatic biotopes.

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    Viseth Srey Horm

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Very little is known regarding the persistence of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI H5N1 viruses in aquatic environments in tropical countries, although environmental materials have been suggested to play a role as reservoirs and sources of transmission for H5N1 viruses. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The survival of HPAI H5N1 viruses in experimental aquatic biotopes (water, mud, aquatic flora and fauna relevant to field conditions in Cambodia was investigated. Artificial aquatic biotopes, including simple ones containing only mud and water, and complex biotopes involving the presence of aquatic flora and fauna, were set up. They were experimentally contaminated with H5N1 virus. The persistence of HPAI H5N1 virus (local avian and human isolates was determined by virus isolation in embryonated chicken eggs and by real-time reverse-polymerase chain reaction. Persistence of infectious virus did not exceed 4 days, and was only identified in rain water. No infectious virus particles were detected in pond and lake water or mud even when high inoculum doses were used. However, viral RNA persisted up to 20 days in rain water and 7 days in pond or lake water. Viral RNA was also detected in mud samples, up to 14 days post-contamination in several cases. Infectious virus and viral RNA was detected in few cases in the aquatic fauna and flora, especially in bivalves and labyrinth fish, although these organisms seemed to be mostly passive carriers of the virus rather than host allowing virus replication. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Although several factors for the survival and persistence of HPAI viruses in the environment are still to be elucidated, and are particularly hard to control in laboratory conditions, our results, along with previous data, support the idea that environmental surveillance is of major relevance for avian influenza control programs.

  20. A Novel Pathogenic BRCA1 Splicing Variant Produces Partial Intron Retention in the Mature Messenger RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Valeria Esposito

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available About 10% of all breast cancers arise from hereditary mutations that increase the risk of breast and ovarian cancers; and about 25% of these are associated with the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes. The identification of BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations can enable physicians to better tailor the clinical management of patients; and to initiate preventive measures in healthy carriers. The pathophysiological significance of newly identified variants poses challenges for genetic counseling. We characterized a new BRCA1 variant discovered in a breast cancer patient during BRCA1/2 screening by next-generation sequencing. Bioinformatic predictions; indicating that the variant is probably pathogenetic; were verified using retro-transcription of the patient’s RNA followed by PCR amplifications performed on the resulting cDNA. The variant causes the loss of a canonic donor splice site at position +2 in BRCA1 intron 21; and consequently the partial retention of 156 bp of intron 21 in the patient’s transcript; which demonstrates that this novel BRCA1 mutation plays a pathogenetic role in breast cancer. These findings enabled us to initiate appropriate counseling and to tailor the clinical management of this family. Lastly; these data reinforce the importance of studying the effects of sequence variants at the RNA level to verify their potential role in disease onset.

  1. High prevalence of pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica in pig cheeks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laukkanen-Ninios, Riikka; Fredriksson-Ahomaa, Maria; Maijala, Riitta; Korkeala, Hannu

    2014-10-01

    Samples from pork cuts for minced meat and cheeks from processing plants and a slaughterhouse, and modified atmosphere (MA) packaged pork from retail were studied to estimate the prevalence of pathogenic, i.e. virulence plasmid bearing, Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis in pork, as well as to quantify pathogenic Y. enterocolitica in pork cuts. Pathogenic (virF-positive) Y. enterocolitica was isolated from 17 pig cheeks (23%) but not from any of the MA-packaged 54 retail pork samples and only from one of the 155 pork cut (0.6%). Most (16/17) of the cheek samples were contaminated with pathogenic Y. enterocolitica 4/O:3 and one with bioserotype 2/O:9. No Y. pseudotuberculosis was isolated. The prevalence of pathogenic Y. enterocolitica was clearly higher (39%) in 155 pork cuts when studied with nested PCR targeting yadA on the virulence plasmid pYV although the contamination level was low varying between 0.1 and 1.6 MPN/g. Raw pork cuts and especially pig cheeks may serve as possible sources for yersiniosis caused by pathogenic Y. enterocolitica. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. High Throughput Sequencing of Extracellular RNA from Human Plasma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsty M Danielson

    Full Text Available The presence and relative stability of extracellular RNAs (exRNAs in biofluids has led to an emerging recognition of their promise as 'liquid biopsies' for diseases. Most prior studies on discovery of exRNAs as disease-specific biomarkers have focused on microRNAs (miRNAs using technologies such as qRT-PCR and microarrays. The recent application of next-generation sequencing to discovery of exRNA biomarkers has revealed the presence of potential novel miRNAs as well as other RNA species such as tRNAs, snoRNAs, piRNAs and lncRNAs in biofluids. At the same time, the use of RNA sequencing for biofluids poses unique challenges, including low amounts of input RNAs, the presence of exRNAs in different compartments with varying degrees of vulnerability to isolation techniques, and the high abundance of specific RNA species (thereby limiting the sensitivity of detection of less abundant species. Moreover, discovery in human diseases often relies on archival biospecimens of varying age and limiting amounts of samples. In this study, we have tested RNA isolation methods to optimize profiling exRNAs by RNA sequencing in individuals without any known diseases. Our findings are consistent with other recent studies that detect microRNAs and ribosomal RNAs as the major exRNA species in plasma. Similar to other recent studies, we found that the landscape of biofluid microRNA transcriptome is dominated by several abundant microRNAs that appear to comprise conserved extracellular miRNAs. There is reasonable correlation of sets of conserved miRNAs across biological replicates, and even across other data sets obtained at different investigative sites. Conversely, the detection of less abundant miRNAs is far more dependent on the exact methodology of RNA isolation and profiling. This study highlights the challenges in detecting and quantifying less abundant plasma miRNAs in health and disease using RNA sequencing platforms.

  3. REDItools: high-throughput RNA editing detection made easy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picardi, Ernesto; Pesole, Graziano

    2013-07-15

    The reliable detection of RNA editing sites from massive sequencing data remains challenging and, although several methodologies have been proposed, no computational tools have been released to date. Here, we introduce REDItools a suite of python scripts to perform high-throughput investigation of RNA editing using next-generation sequencing data. REDItools are in python programming language and freely available at http://code.google.com/p/reditools/. ernesto.picardi@uniba.it or graziano.pesole@uniba.it Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  4. Analysis of clinical isolates of Helicobacter pylori in Pakistan reveals high degrees of pathogenicity and high frequencies of antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasheed, Faisal; Campbell, Barry James; Alfizah, Hanafiah; Varro, Andrea; Zahra, Rabaab; Yamaoka, Yoshio; Pritchard, David Mark

    2014-10-01

    Antibiotic resistance in Helicobacter pylori contributes to failure in eradicating the infection and is most often due to point and missense mutations in a few key genes. The antibiotic susceptibility profiles of H. pylori isolates from 46 Pakistani patients were determined by Etest. Resistance and pathogenicity genes were amplified, and sequences were analyzed to determine the presence of mutations. A high percentage of isolates (73.9%) were resistant to metronidazole (MTZ), with considerable resistance to clarithromycin (CLR; 47.8%) and amoxicillin (AML; 54.3%) also observed. Relatively few isolates were resistant to tetracycline (TET; 4.3%) or to ciprofloxacin (CIP; 13%). However, most isolates (n = 43) exhibited resistance to one or more antibiotics. MTZ-resistant isolates contained missense mutations in oxygen-independent NADPH nitroreductase (RdxA; 8 mutations found) and NADH flavin oxidoreductase (FrxA; 4 mutations found). In the 23S rRNA gene, responsible for CLR resistance, a new point mutation (A2181G) and 4 previously reported mutations were identified. Pathogenicity genes cagA, dupA, and vacA s1a/m1 were detected frequently in isolates which were also found to be resistant to MTZ, CLR, and AML. A high percentage of CagA and VacA seropositivity was also observed in these patients. Phylogenetic analysis of partial sequences showed uniform distribution of the 3' region of cagA throughout the tree. We have identified H. pylori isolates in Pakistan which harbor pathogenicity genes and worrying antibiotic resistance profiles as a result of having acquired multiple point and missense mutations. H. pylori eradication regimens should therefore be reevaluated in this setting. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Evaluation of alignment algorithms for discovery and identification of pathogens using RNA-Seq.

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    Ivan Borozan

    Full Text Available Next-generation sequencing technologies provide an unparallelled opportunity for the characterization and discovery of known and novel viruses. Because viruses are known to have the highest mutation rates when compared to eukaryotic and bacterial organisms, we assess the extent to which eleven well-known alignment algorithms (BLAST, BLAT, BWA, BWA-SW, BWA-MEM, BFAST, Bowtie2, Novoalign, GSNAP, SHRiMP2 and STAR can be used for characterizing mutated and non-mutated viral sequences--including those that exhibit RNA splicing--in transcriptome samples. To evaluate aligners objectively we developed a realistic RNA-Seq simulation and evaluation framework (RiSER and propose a new combined score to rank aligners for viral characterization in terms of their precision, sensitivity and alignment accuracy. We used RiSER to simulate both human and viral read sequences and suggest the best set of aligners for viral sequence characterization in human transcriptome samples. Our results show that significant and substantial differences exist between aligners and that a digital-subtraction-based viral identification framework can and should use different aligners for different parts of the process. We determine the extent to which mutated viral sequences can be effectively characterized and show that more sensitive aligners such as BLAST, BFAST, SHRiMP2, BWA-SW and GSNAP can accurately characterize substantially divergent viral sequences with up to 15% overall sequence mutation rate. We believe that the results presented here will be useful to researchers choosing aligners for viral sequence characterization using next-generation sequencing data.

  6. RNA-seq Transcriptome Response of Flax (Linum usitatissimum L. to the Pathogenic Fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lini.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Miguel Galindo-González

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lini is a hemibiotrophic fungus that causes wilt in flax. Along with rust, fusarium wilt has become an important factor in flax production worldwide. Resistant flax cultivars have been used to manage the disease, but the resistance varies, depending on the interactions between specific cultivars and isolates of the pathogen. This interaction has a strong molecular basis, but no genomic information is available on how the plant responds to attempted infection, to inform breeding programs on potential candidate genes to evaluate or improve resistance across cultivars. In the current study, disease progression in two flax cultivars (CDC Bethune and Lutea, showed earlier disease symptoms and higher susceptibility in the later cultivar. Chitinase gene expression was also divergent and demonstrated and earlier molecular response in Lutea. The most resistant cultivar (CDC Bethune was used for a full RNA-seq transcriptome study through a time-course at 2, 4, 8 and 18 days post-inoculation (DPI. While over 100 genes were significantly differentially expressed at both 4 and 8 DPI, the broadest deployment of plant defense responses was evident at 18 DPI with transcripts of more than 1,000 genes responding to the treatment. These genes evidenced a reception and transduction of pathogen signals, a large transcriptional reprogramming, induction of hormone signalling, activation of pathogenesis-related (PR genes, and changes in secondary metabolism. Among these several key genes, that consistently appear in studies of plant-pathogen interactions, had increased transcript abundance in our study, and constitute suitable candidates for resistance breeding programs. These included: an induced RPMI-induced protein kinase (RIPK; transcription factors WRKY3, WRKY70, WRKY75, MYB113 and MYB108; the ethylene response factors ERF1 and ERF14; two genes involved in auxin/glucosinolate precursor synthesis (CYP79B2 and CYP79B3; the flavonoid

  7. Rapid and high-throughput detection of highly pathogenic bacteria by Ibis PLEX-ID technology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Jacob

    Full Text Available In this manuscript, we describe the identification of highly pathogenic bacteria using an assay coupling biothreat group-specific PCR with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (PCR/ESI-MS run on an Ibis PLEX-ID high-throughput platform. The biothreat cluster assay identifies most of the potential bioterrorism-relevant microorganisms including Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis, Yersinia pestis, Burkholderia mallei and pseudomallei, Brucella species, and Coxiella burnetii. DNA from 45 different reference materials with different formulations and different concentrations were chosen and sent to a service screening laboratory that uses the PCR/ESI-MS platform to provide a microbial identification service. The standard reference materials were produced out of a repository built up in the framework of the EU funded project "Establishment of Quality Assurances for Detection of Highly Pathogenic Bacteria of Potential Bioterrorism Risk" (EQADeBa. All samples were correctly identified at least to the genus level.

  8. Molecular investigation of tRNA genes integrity and its relation to pathogenicity islands in Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains

    OpenAIRE

    Novais,Rogério Carlos; Chaves,Marcela Cassin; Gonzalez,Alice Gonçalves Martins; Andrade,João Ramos Costa

    2004-01-01

    tRNA genes are known target sites for the integration of pathogenicity islands (PAI) and other genetic elements, such as bacteriophages, into bacterial genome. In most STEC (Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli), the PAI called LEE (locus of enterocyte effacement) is related to bacterial virulence and is mostly associated to the tRNA genes selC and pheU. In this work, we first investigated the relationship of LEE with tRNA genes selC and pheU in 43 STEC strains. We found that 28 strains (65...

  9. Highly Pathogenic New World Arenavirus Infection Activates the Pattern Recognition Receptor Protein Kinase R without Attenuating Virus Replication in Human Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Cheng; Kolokoltsova, Olga A; Mateer, Elizabeth J; Koma, Takaaki; Paessler, Slobodan

    2017-10-15

    The arenavirus family consists of several highly pathogenic viruses, including the Old World (OW) arenavirus Lassa fever virus (LASV) and the New World (NW) Junin virus (JUNV) and Machupo virus (MACV). Host response to infection by these pathogenic arenaviruses is distinct in many aspects. JUNV and MACV infections readily induce an interferon (IFN) response in human cells, while LASV infection usually triggers an undetectable or weak IFN response. JUNV induces an IFN response through RIG-I, suggesting that the host non-self RNA sensor readily detects JUNV viral RNAs (vRNAs) during infection and activates IFN response. Double-stranded-RNA (dsRNA)-activated protein kinase R (PKR) is another host non-self RNA sensor classically known for its vRNA recognition activity. Here we report that infection with NW arenaviruses JUNV and MACV, but not OW LASV, activated PKR, concomitant with elevated phosphorylation of the translation initiation factor α subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF2α). Host protein synthesis was substantially suppressed in MACV- and JUNV-infected cells but was only marginally reduced in LASV-infected cells. Despite the antiviral activity known for PKR against many other viruses, the replication of JUNV and MACV was not impaired but was slightly augmented in wild-type (wt) cells compared to that in PKR-deficient cells, suggesting that PKR or PKR activation did not negatively affect JUNV and MACV infection. Additionally, we found an enhanced IFN response in JUNV- or MACV-infected PKR-deficient cells, which was inversely correlated with virus replication.IMPORTANCE The detection of viral RNA by host non-self RNA sensors, including RIG-I and MDA5, is critical to the initiation of the innate immune response to RNA virus infection. Among pathogenic arenaviruses, the OW LASV usually does not elicit an interferon response. However, the NW arenaviruses JUNV and MACV readily trigger an IFN response in a RIG-I-dependent manner. Here, we demonstrate for

  10. RNA secondary structure prediction using highly parallel computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaya, A; Yamamoto, K; Yonezawa, A

    1995-12-01

    An RNA secondary structure prediction method using a highly parallel computer is reported. We focus on finding thermodynamically stable structures of a single-stranded RNA molecule. Our approach is based on a parallel combinatorial method which calculates the free energy of a molecule as the sum of the free energies of all the physically possible hydrogen bonds. Our parallel algorithm finds many highly stable structures all at once, while most of the conventional prediction methods find only the most stable structure. The important idea in our algorithm is search tree pruning, with dynamic load balancing across the processor elements in a parallel computer. Software tools for visualization and classification of secondary structures are also presented using the sequence of cadang-cadang coconut viroid as an example. Our software system runs on CM-5.

  11. Evolution, global spread, and pathogenicity of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5Nx clade 2.3.4.4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novel subtypes of Eurasian-origin (Goose/Guangdong lineage) H5 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses belonging to clade 2.3.4 such as H5N2, H5N5, H5N6, and H5N8 have been identified in China since 2008 and subsequently evolved into four genetically distinct groups (A – D) of clade 2.3.4.4...

  12. Rapid Sanger sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene for identification of some common pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linxiang Chen

    Full Text Available Conventional Sanger sequencing remains time-consuming and laborious. In this study, we developed a rapid improved sequencing protocol of 16S rRNA for pathogens identification by using a new combination of SYBR Green I real-time PCR and Sanger sequencing with FTA® cards. To compare the sequencing quality of this method with conventional Sanger sequencing, 12 strains, including three kinds of strains (1 reference strain and 3 clinical strains, which were previously identified by biochemical tests, which have 4 Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 4 Staphyloccocus aureus and 4 Escherichia coli, were targeted. Additionally, to validate the sequencing results and bacteria identification, expanded specimens with 90 clinical strains, also comprised of the three kinds of strains which included 30 samples respectively, were performed as just described. The results showed that although statistical differences (P<0.05 were found in sequencing quality between the two methods, their identification results were all correct and consistent. The workload, the time consumption and the cost per batch were respectively light versus heavy, 8 h versus 11 h and $420 versus $400. In the 90 clinical strains, all of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphyloccocus aureus strains were correctly identified, but only 26.7% of the Escherichia coli strains were recognized as Escherichia coli, while 33.3% as Shigella sonnei and 40% as Shigella dysenteriae. The protocol described here is a rapid, reliable, stable and convenient method for 16S rRNA sequencing, and can be used for Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphyloccocus aureus identification, yet it is not completely suitable for discriminating Escherichia coli and Shigella strains.

  13. Molecular inversion probe: a new tool for highly specific detection of plant pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Yih Lau

    Full Text Available Highly specific detection methods, capable of reliably identifying plant pathogens are crucial in plant disease management strategies to reduce losses in agriculture by preventing the spread of diseases. We describe a novel molecular inversion probe (MIP assay that can be potentially developed into a robust multiplex platform to detect and identify plant pathogens. A MIP has been designed for the plant pathogenic fungus Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. conglutinans and the proof of concept for the efficiency of this technology is provided. We demonstrate that this methodology can detect as little as 2.5 ng of pathogen DNA and is highly specific, being able to accurately differentiate Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. conglutinans from other fungal pathogens such as Botrytis cinerea and even pathogens of the same species such as Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici. The MIP assay was able to detect the presence of the pathogen in infected Arabidopsis thaliana plants as soon as the tissues contained minimal amounts of pathogen. MIP methods are intrinsically highly multiplexable and future development of specific MIPs could lead to the establishment of a diagnostic method that could potentially screen infected plants for hundreds of pathogens in a single assay.

  14. Molecular inversion probe: a new tool for highly specific detection of plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Han Yih; Palanisamy, Ramkumar; Trau, Matt; Botella, Jose R

    2014-01-01

    Highly specific detection methods, capable of reliably identifying plant pathogens are crucial in plant disease management strategies to reduce losses in agriculture by preventing the spread of diseases. We describe a novel molecular inversion probe (MIP) assay that can be potentially developed into a robust multiplex platform to detect and identify plant pathogens. A MIP has been designed for the plant pathogenic fungus Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. conglutinans and the proof of concept for the efficiency of this technology is provided. We demonstrate that this methodology can detect as little as 2.5 ng of pathogen DNA and is highly specific, being able to accurately differentiate Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. conglutinans from other fungal pathogens such as Botrytis cinerea and even pathogens of the same species such as Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici. The MIP assay was able to detect the presence of the pathogen in infected Arabidopsis thaliana plants as soon as the tissues contained minimal amounts of pathogen. MIP methods are intrinsically highly multiplexable and future development of specific MIPs could lead to the establishment of a diagnostic method that could potentially screen infected plants for hundreds of pathogens in a single assay.

  15. The emergence of Nipah virus, a highly pathogenic paramyxovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Michael K; Rota, Paul A

    2008-12-01

    Nipah virus first emerged in Malaysia and Singapore between 1998 and 1999, causing severe febrile encephalitis in humans with a mortality rate of close to 40%. In addition, a significant portion of those recovering from acute infection had relapse encephalitis and long-term neurological defects. Since its initial outbreak, there have been numerous outbreaks in Bangladesh and India, in which the mortality rate rose to approximately 70%. These subsequent outbreaks were distinct from the initial outbreak, both in their epidemiology and in their clinical presentations. Recent developments in diagnostics may expedite disease diagnosis and outbreak containment, while progress in understanding the molecular biology of Nipah virus could lead to novel therapeutics and vaccines for this deadly pathogen.

  16. Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) contingency plan for Rocky Mountain Arsenal NWR

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Disease contingency plan to reduce avian mortality from highly pathogenic avian influenza (HAPI) outbreaks at Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge. This...

  17. Complete mitochondrial genomes and nuclear ribosomal RNA operons of two species of Diplostomum (Platyhelminthes: Trematoda): a molecular resource for taxonomy and molecular epidemiology of important fish pathogens

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brabec, Jan; Kostadinova, Aneta; Scholz, Tomáš; Littlewood, D. T. J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 8, JUN 19 2015 (2015), s. 336 ISSN 1756-3305 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0032; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-14198S Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LM2010005 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Diplostomum (Platyhelminthes: Trematoda) * fish pathogens * mitochondrial genome * ribosomal RNA * illumina next-generation sequencing * phylogeny Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 3.234, year: 2015

  18. Development of sensitive, high-throughput one-tube RT-PCR-enzyme hybridisation assay to detect selected bacterial fish pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, T; Carson, J

    2003-03-31

    Bacterial monitoring and surveillance is critical for the early detection of pathogens to avoid the spread of disease. To facilitate this, an efficient, high-performance and high-throughput method to detect the presence of femotgram amounts of ribosomal RNA from 4 bacterial fish pathogens: Aeromonas salmonicida; Tenacibaculum maritimum (formerly Flexibacter maritimus); Lactococcus garvieae; and Yersinia ruckeri was developed. The system uses NucleoLink strips for liquid- and solid-phase PCR in 1 tube, to perform RT-PCR-enzyme hybridisation assays (RT-PCR-EHA) detecting 4 fg or less of rRNA from pure cultures and between 1 and 9 CFU per 200 microl sample volume from selective-enrichment culture media. The liquid-phase amplicons were visualised by gel electrophoresis and the solid-phase amplicons detected using internal probes and visualised using colorimetric detection and p-nitrophenylphosphate.

  19. Sugar beet-associated bacterial and fungal communities show a high indigenous antagonistic potential against plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachow, Christin; Tilcher, Ralf; Berg, Gabriele

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze microbial communities in/on sugar beet with special focus on antagonists toward plant pathogens. For this purpose, the composition of microorganisms isolated from the rhizosphere, phyllosphere, endorhiza, and endosphere of field-grown sugar beet plants was analyzed by a multiphasic approach at three different plant development stages at six locations in Europe. The analysis of microbial communities by Single Strand Conformation Polymorphism (SSCP) of 16S/18S rRNA clearly revealed the existence of discrete microenvironment- and site-specific patterns. A total of 1952 bacterial and 1344 fungal isolates screened by dual testing for antagonism toward the pathogens Aphanomyces cochlioides, Phoma betae, Pythium ultimum, and Rhizoctonia solani resulted in 885 bacterial (=45%) and 437 fungal (=33%) antagonists. In general, the indigenous antagonistic potential was very high and influenced by (a) the location, (b) the plant developmental stage, and (3) the microenvironment. Furthermore, we showed for the first time that the antagonistic potential was highly specific for each target pathogen. The majority of antagonistic microorganisms suppressed only one pathogen (bacteria: 664 = 75%; fungi: 256 = 59%), whereas the minority showed a broad host range (bacteria: 4 = 0.5%; fungi: 7 = 1.6%). The bacterial communities harbored the highest antagonistic potential against P. ultimum, whereas the fungal communities contained more antagonists against A. cochlioides and R. solani. In contrast to their high proportion, only a low diversity of antagonists at genotypic and species level was found. Novel antagonistic species, e.g., Subtercola pratensis or Microbacterium testaceum were found in the internal part of the sugar beet body.

  20. An efficient strategy of screening for pathogens in wild-caught ticks and mosquitoes by reusing small RNA deep sequencing data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Zhuang

    Full Text Available This paper explored our hypothesis that sRNA (18 ∼ 30 bp deep sequencing technique can be used as an efficient strategy to identify microorganisms other than viruses, such as prokaryotic and eukaryotic pathogens. In the study, the clean reads derived from the sRNA deep sequencing data of wild-caught ticks and mosquitoes were compared against the NCBI nucleotide collection (non-redundant nt database using Blastn. The blast results were then analyzed with in-house Python scripts. An empirical formula was proposed to identify the putative pathogens. Results showed that not only viruses but also prokaryotic and eukaryotic species of interest can be screened out and were subsequently confirmed with experiments. Specially, a novel Rickettsia spp. was indicated to exist in Haemaphysalis longicornis ticks collected in Beijing. Our study demonstrated the reuse of sRNA deep sequencing data would have the potential to trace the origin of pathogens or discover novel agents of emerging/re-emerging infectious diseases.

  1. Chinese highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus exhibits more extensive tissue tropism for pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Limin

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV emerging in China exhibits high fatality to pigs. However, the mechanism related to the increased pathogenicity of the virus remains unclear. In the present study, the differences in tissue tropism between the highly pathogenic PRRSV strain (JXwn06 and the low pathogenic PRRSV strain (HB-1/3.9 were investigated using PRRSV-specific immunohistochemistry (IHC staining to provide evidence for elucidating possible mechanism of the pathogenicity of Chinese highly pathogenic PRRSV. Findings IHC examination showed that PRRSV antigen in the tissues including spleen, tonsil, thymus, kidney, cerebellum, stomach, small intestine, large intestine, turbinal bone and laryngeal cartilage was positive in more pigs inoculated with JXwn06 than HB-1/3.9, and the tissues including trachea, esophagus, liver, mandibular gland and thyroid gland were positive for viral antigen in the pigs inoculated with JXwn06, but not in the pigs inoculated with HB-1/3.9. Meanwhile, we observed that epithelium in tissues including interlobular bile duct in liver, distal renal tubule of kidney, esophageal gland and tracheal gland were positive for viral antigen only in JXwn06-inoculated pigs, and epithelium of gastric mucosa and fundic gland, and intestinal gland were positive for viral antigen in both JXwn06- and HB-1/3.9-inoculated pigs, using monoclonal antibodies to N and Nsp2 proteins. Conclusions Taken together, these findings indicate that the highly pathogenic PRRSV JXwn06 displays an expanded tissue tropism in vivo, suggesting this may contribute to its high pathogenicity to pigs.

  2. Highly pathogenic or low pathogenic avian influenza virus subtype H7N1 infection in chicken lungs: small differences in general acute responses.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rebel, J.M.J.; Peeters, B.P.H.; Fijten, H.P.D.; Post, J.; Cornelissen, J.B.W.J.; Vervelde, L.

    2011-01-01

    Avian influenza virus can be divided into two groups, highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAI) and low pathogenic avian influenza virus (LPAI) based on their difference in virulence. To investigate if the difference in clinical outcome between LPAI and HPAI in chickens is due to immunological

  3. Exploring the polyadenylated RNA virome of sweet potato through high-throughput sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Hong Gu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Viral diseases are the second most significant biotic stress for sweet potato, with yield losses reaching 20% to 40%. Over 30 viruses have been reported to infect sweet potato around the world, and 11 of these have been detected in China. Most of these viruses were detected by traditional detection approaches that show disadvantages in detection throughput. Next-generation sequencing technology provides a novel, high sensitive method for virus detection and diagnosis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report the polyadenylated RNA virome of three sweet potato cultivars using a high throughput RNA sequencing approach. Transcripts of 15 different viruses were detected, 11 of which were detected in cultivar Xushu18, whilst 11 and 4 viruses were detected in Guangshu 87 and Jingshu 6, respectively. Four were detected in sweet potato for the first time, and 4 were found for the first time in China. The most prevalent virus was SPFMV, which constituted 88% of the total viral sequence reads. Virus transcripts with extremely low expression levels were also detected, such as transcripts of SPLCV, CMV and CymMV. Digital gene expression (DGE and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR analyses showed that the highest viral transcript expression levels were found in fibrous and tuberous roots, which suggest that these tissues should be optimum samples for virus detection. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A total of 15 viruses were presumed to present in three sweet potato cultivars growing in China. This is the first insight into the sweet potato polyadenylated RNA virome. These results can serve as a basis for further work to investigate whether some of the 'new' viruses infecting sweet potato are pathogenic.

  4. Exploring the polyadenylated RNA virome of sweet potato through high-throughput sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Ying-Hong; Tao, Xiang; Lai, Xian-Jun; Wang, Hai-Yan; Zhang, Yi-Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Viral diseases are the second most significant biotic stress for sweet potato, with yield losses reaching 20% to 40%. Over 30 viruses have been reported to infect sweet potato around the world, and 11 of these have been detected in China. Most of these viruses were detected by traditional detection approaches that show disadvantages in detection throughput. Next-generation sequencing technology provides a novel, high sensitive method for virus detection and diagnosis. We report the polyadenylated RNA virome of three sweet potato cultivars using a high throughput RNA sequencing approach. Transcripts of 15 different viruses were detected, 11 of which were detected in cultivar Xushu18, whilst 11 and 4 viruses were detected in Guangshu 87 and Jingshu 6, respectively. Four were detected in sweet potato for the first time, and 4 were found for the first time in China. The most prevalent virus was SPFMV, which constituted 88% of the total viral sequence reads. Virus transcripts with extremely low expression levels were also detected, such as transcripts of SPLCV, CMV and CymMV. Digital gene expression (DGE) and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analyses showed that the highest viral transcript expression levels were found in fibrous and tuberous roots, which suggest that these tissues should be optimum samples for virus detection. A total of 15 viruses were presumed to present in three sweet potato cultivars growing in China. This is the first insight into the sweet potato polyadenylated RNA virome. These results can serve as a basis for further work to investigate whether some of the 'new' viruses infecting sweet potato are pathogenic.

  5. Reproducibility of high-throughput mRNA and small RNA sequencing across laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    't Hoen, Peter A C; Friedländer, Marc R; Almlöf, Jonas; Sammeth, Michael; Pulyakhina, Irina; Anvar, Seyed Yahya; Laros, Jeroen F J; Buermans, Henk P J; Karlberg, Olof; Brännvall, Mathias; den Dunnen, Johan T; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B; Gut, Ivo G; Guigó, Roderic; Estivill, Xavier; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T; Lappalainen, Tuuli

    2013-11-01

    RNA sequencing is an increasingly popular technology for genome-wide analysis of transcript sequence and abundance. However, understanding of the sources of technical and interlaboratory variation is still limited. To address this, the GEUVADIS consortium sequenced mRNAs and small RNAs of lymphoblastoid cell lines of 465 individuals in seven sequencing centers, with a large number of replicates. The variation between laboratories appeared to be considerably smaller than the already limited biological variation. Laboratory effects were mainly seen in differences in insert size and GC content and could be adequately corrected for. In small-RNA sequencing, the microRNA (miRNA) content differed widely between samples owing to competitive sequencing of rRNA fragments. This did not affect relative quantification of miRNAs. We conclude that distributing RNA sequencing among different laboratories is feasible, given proper standardization and randomization procedures. We provide a set of quality measures and guidelines for assessing technical biases in RNA-seq data.

  6. Highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses and generation of novel reassortants,United States, 2014–2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong-Hun Lee,; Justin Bahl,; Mia Kim Torchetti,; Mary Lea Killian,; Ip, Hon S.; David E Swayne,

    2016-01-01

    Asian highly pathogenic avian influenza A(H5N8) viruses spread into North America in 2014 during autumn bird migration. Complete genome sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of 32 H5 viruses identified novel H5N1, H5N2, and H5N8 viruses that emerged in late 2014 through reassortment with North American low-pathogenicity avian influenza viruses.

  7. Functional and Structural Analysis of a Highly-Expressed Yersinia pestis Small RNA following Infection of Cultured Macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Li

    Full Text Available Non-coding small RNAs (sRNAs are found in practically all bacterial genomes and play important roles in regulating gene expression to impact bacterial metabolism, growth, and virulence. We performed transcriptomics analysis to identify sRNAs that are differentially expressed in Yersinia pestis that invaded the human macrophage cell line THP-1, compared to pathogens that remained extracellular in the presence of host. Using ultra high-throughput sequencing, we identified 37 novel and 143 previously known sRNAs in Y. pestis. In particular, the sRNA Ysr170 was highly expressed in intracellular Yersinia and exhibited a log2 fold change ~3.6 higher levels compared to extracellular bacteria. We found that knock-down of Ysr170 expression attenuated infection efficiency in cell culture and growth rate in response to different stressors. In addition, we applied selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension (SHAPE analysis to determine the secondary structure of Ysr170 and observed structural changes resulting from interactions with the aminoglycoside antibiotic gentamycin and the RNA chaperone Hfq. Interestingly, gentamicin stabilized helix 4 of Ysr170, which structurally resembles the native gentamicin 16S ribosomal binding site. Finally, we modeled the tertiary structure of Ysr170 binding to gentamycin using RNA motif modeling. Integration of these experimental and structural methods can provide further insight into the design of small molecules that can inhibit function of sRNAs required for pathogen virulence.

  8. High-quality complete genome sequence of Microbacterium sp. SUBG005, a plant pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakhashiya, Purvi M; Patel, Pooja P; Thaker, Vrinda S

    2015-09-01

    Microbacterium sp. SUBG005 is a Gram positive bacterium, isolated from infected leaf of Mangifera indica L. in Rajkot (22.30°N, 70.78°E), Gujarat, India. The genome sequencing of Microbacterium sp. SUBG005 is having type I secretion system genes of pathogenicity as well as heavy metal resistance unique genes. The genome size is 7.01 Mb with G + C content of 64.80% and contains rRNA sequences. Genome sequencing analysis provides information about the microbe role in host-pathogen interaction. The whole genome sequencing has been deposited in DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank under the accession number JNNT00000000.

  9. RNA-Seq of early-infected poplar leaves by the rust pathogen Melampsora larici-populina uncovers PtSultr3;5, a fungal-induced host sulfate transporter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Petre

    Full Text Available Biotroph pathogens establish intimate interactions with their hosts that are conditioned by the successful secretion of effectors in infected tissues and subsequent manipulation of host physiology. The identification of early-expressed pathogen effectors and early-modulated host functions is currently a major goal to understand the molecular basis of biotrophy. Here, we report the 454-pyrosequencing transcriptome analysis of early stages of poplar leaf colonization by the rust fungus Melampsora larici-populina. Among the 841,301 reads considered for analysis, 616,879 and 649 were successfully mapped to Populus trichocarpa and M. larici-populina genome sequences, respectively. From a methodological aspect, these results indicate that this single approach is not appropriate to saturate poplar transcriptome and to follow transcript accumulation of the pathogen. We identified 19 pathogen transcripts encoding early-expressed small-secreted proteins representing candidate effectors of interest for forthcoming studies. Poplar RNA-Seq data were validated by oligoarrays and quantitatively analysed, which revealed a highly stable transcriptome with a single transcript encoding a sulfate transporter (herein named PtSultr3;5, POPTR_0006s16150 showing a dramatic increase upon colonization by either virulent or avirulent M. larici-populina strains. Perspectives connecting host sulfate transport and biotrophic lifestyle are discussed.

  10. Using RNA-seq to determine the transcriptional landscape and the hypoxic response of the pathogenic yeast Candida parapsilosis

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Guida, Alessandro

    2011-12-22

    Abstract Background Candida parapsilosis is one of the most common causes of Candida infection worldwide. However, the genome sequence annotation was made without experimental validation and little is known about the transcriptional landscape. The transcriptional response of C. parapsilosis to hypoxic (low oxygen) conditions, such as those encountered in the host, is also relatively unexplored. Results We used next generation sequencing (RNA-seq) to determine the transcriptional profile of C. parapsilosis growing in several conditions including different media, temperatures and oxygen concentrations. We identified 395 novel protein-coding sequences that had not previously been annotated. We removed > 300 unsupported gene models, and corrected approximately 900. We mapped the 5\\' and 3\\' UTR for thousands of genes. We also identified 422 introns, including two introns in the 3\\' UTR of one gene. This is the first report of 3\\' UTR introns in the Saccharomycotina. Comparing the introns in coding sequences with other species shows that small numbers have been gained and lost throughout evolution. Our analysis also identified a number of novel transcriptional active regions (nTARs). We used both RNA-seq and microarray analysis to determine the transcriptional profile of cells grown in normoxic and hypoxic conditions in rich media, and we showed that there was a high correlation between the approaches. We also generated a knockout of the UPC2 transcriptional regulator, and we found that similar to C. albicans, Upc2 is required for conferring resistance to azole drugs, and for regulation of expression of the ergosterol pathway in hypoxia. Conclusion We provide the first detailed annotation of the C. parapsilosis genome, based on gene predictions and transcriptional analysis. We identified a number of novel ORFs and other transcribed regions, and detected transcripts from approximately 90% of the annotated protein coding genes. We found that the transcription factor

  11. High temperature and bacteriophages can indirectly select for bacterial pathogenicity in environmental reservoirs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ville-Petri Friman

    Full Text Available The coincidental evolution hypothesis predicts that traits connected to bacterial pathogenicity could be indirectly selected outside the host as a correlated response to abiotic environmental conditions or different biotic species interactions. To investigate this, an opportunistic bacterial pathogen, Serratia marcescens, was cultured in the absence and presence of the lytic bacteriophage PPV (Podoviridae at 25°C and 37°C for four weeks (N = 5. At the end, we measured changes in bacterial phage-resistance and potential virulence traits, and determined the pathogenicity of all bacterial selection lines in the Parasemia plantaginis insect model in vivo. Selection at 37°C increased bacterial motility and pathogenicity but only in the absence of phages. Exposure to phages increased the phage-resistance of bacteria, and this was costly in terms of decreased maximum population size in the absence of phages. However, this small-magnitude growth cost was not greater with bacteria that had evolved in high temperature regime, and no trade-off was found between phage-resistance and growth rate. As a result, phages constrained the evolution of a temperature-mediated increase in bacterial pathogenicity presumably by preferably infecting the highly motile and virulent bacteria. In more general perspective, our results suggest that the traits connected to bacterial pathogenicity could be indirectly selected as a correlated response by abiotic and biotic factors in environmental reservoirs.

  12. Extraction of high quality of RNA and construction of a suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) library from chestnut rose (Rosa roxburghii Tratt).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qiang; Wen, Xiaopeng; Tao, Nengguo; Hu, Zhiyong; Yue, Hailin; Deng, Xiuxin

    2006-04-01

    Chestnut rose (Rosa roxburghii Tratt) is a rare fruit crop of promising economical importance in fruit and ornamental exploitation in China. Isolation of high quality RNA from chestnut rose is difficult due to its high levels of polyphenols, polysaccharides and other compounds, but a modified CTAB extraction procedure without phenol gave satisfactory results. High concentrations of PVP (2%, w/v), CTAB (2%, w/v) and beta-mercaptoethanol (4%, v/v) were used in the extraction buffer to improve RNA quality. The average yield was about 200 microg RNA g(-1) fresh leaves. The isolated RNA was of sufficient quality for construction of suppression subtraction hybridization (SSH) library, which allowed the isolation of several pathogen-induced defense genes.

  13. Alternative Pre-mRNA Splicing in Mammals and Teleost Fish: A Effective Strategy for the Regulation of Immune Responses Against Pathogen Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ming Xian; Zhang, Jie

    2017-07-15

    Pre-mRNA splicing is the process by which introns are removed and the protein coding elements assembled into mature mRNAs. Alternative pre-mRNA splicing provides an important source of transcriptome and proteome complexity through selectively joining different coding elements to form mRNAs, which encode proteins with similar or distinct functions. In mammals, previous studies have shown the role of alternative splicing in regulating the function of the immune system, especially in the regulation of T-cell activation and function. As lower vertebrates, teleost fish mainly rely on a large family of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) to recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) from various invading pathogens. In this review, we summarize recent advances in our understanding of alternative splicing of piscine PRRs including peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGRPs), nucleotide binding and oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptors (NLRs), retinoic acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I)-like receptors (RLRs) and their downstream signaling molecules, compared to splicing in mammals. We also discuss what is known and unknown about the function of splicing isoforms in the innate immune responses against pathogens infection in mammals and teleost fish. Finally, we highlight the consequences of alternative splicing in the innate immune system and give our view of important directions for future studies.

  14. Molecular investigation of tRNA genes integrity and its relation to pathogenicity islands in Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério Carlos Novais

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available tRNA genes are known target sites for the integration of pathogenicity islands (PAI and other genetic elements, such as bacteriophages, into bacterial genome. In most STEC (Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli, the PAI called LEE (locus of enterocyte effacement is related to bacterial virulence and is mostly associated to the tRNA genes selC and pheU. In this work, we first investigated the relationship of LEE with tRNA genes selC and pheU in 43 STEC strains. We found that 28 strains (65% had a disrupted selC and/or pheU. Three of these strains (637/1, 650/5 and 654/3 were chosen to be submitted to a RAPD-PCR technique modified by the introduction of specific primers (corresponding to the 5'end of genes selC and pheU into the reaction, which we called "anchored RAPD-PCR". The PCR fragments obtained were transferred onto membranes, and those fragments which hybridized to selC and pheU probes were isolated. One of these fragments from strain 637/1 was partially sequenced. An 85-nucleotide sequence was found to be similar to the cfxA2 gene that encodes a beta-lactamase and is part of transposon Tn4555, a pathogenicity island originally integrated into the Bacteroides genome.

  15. Bringing RNA Interference (RNAi) into the High School Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Sibani

    2013-01-01

    RNA interference (abbreviated RNAi) is a relatively new discovery in the field of mechanisms that serve to regulate gene expression (a.k.a. protein synthesis). Gene expression can be regulated at the transcriptional level (mRNA production, processing, or stability) and at the translational level (protein synthesis). RNAi acts in a gene-specific…

  16. A method for high-quality RNA extraction from tall fescue | Zhen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The isolation of high-quality RNA was a precondition in molecular biology research of tall fescue. Two common approaches were adopted for the total RNA extraction by using leaves of tall fescue as the material in this experiment in order to seek the optimized total RNA extraction method of tall fescue, as well as the ...

  17. Candida auris: emergence and epidemiology of a highly pathogenic yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Slomp Santos

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Candida auris is a multidrug-resistant emerging yeast, which was responsible for healthcare-associated infection outbreaks, and was cataloged as a new species in 2009, after being isolated from a patient’s ear canal secretion in Japan. Since the notification of this first occurrence, numerous cases have been reported throughout the world, including Brazil. C. auris affects mainly inpatients, patients in intensive care units, exposed to broad-spectrum antifungal medications and who make use of vascular catheters. Currently, this yeast is one of the main responsible for invasive infections in hospitals and has been cause of concern by authorities and organs due to its rapid dissemination and difficult treatment caused by its low susceptibility to antifungal agents traditionally used in clinical practice. As a contributor to the severity of infections associated with C. auris, the transmission mechanism is still unknown, which implies in a lack of control of the microorganism and high mortality rates. Thus, this literature review presents relevant information in order to alert the importance of C. auris as an etiological agent of systemic infections, as well as its epidemiology and the real challenges of the treatment. Keywords: Candida auris; candidiasis; candidemia; multidrug-resistance; biofilm; epidemiology; diagnosis

  18. High prevalence of the amphibian chytrid pathogen in Gabon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Rayna C; Gata Garcia, Adriana V; Stuart, Bryan L; Zamudio, Kelly R

    2011-03-01

    Amphibian chytridiomycosis is an infectious disease caused by the fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) that is implicated in the worldwide decline and extinction of amphibians. Africa has been proposed as a potential source for the global expansion of Bd, yet the distribution of Bd across the continent remains largely unexplored. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), we screened for the presence of Bd in 166 adult anurans from two national parks in Gabon (Monts de Cristal and Ivindo). Bd was detected in 20 of the 42 species and was present at all three sites surveyed (two in Monts de Cristal, and one in Ivindo) with high prevalence (19.6%-36.0%). Both national parks were Bd-positive at all elevations and across habitat types, though no dead or dying frogs were encountered. To our knowledge, this study presents the first evidence of Bd in Gabon and the first record of infection for 19 of the 20 species that were Bd-positive. Documenting the distribution and virulence of Bd across Africa will be essential for understanding the dynamics of amphibian chytridiomycosis across the globe.

  19. Bacillus cereus from the environment is genetically related to the highly pathogenic B. cereus in Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    OGAWA, Hirohito; OHNUMA, Miyuki; SQUARRE, David; MWEENE, Aaron Simanyengwe; EZAKI, Takayuki; FUJIKURA, Daisuke; OHNISHI, Naomi; THOMAS, Yuka; HANG’OMBE, Bernard Mudenda; HIGASHI, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    To follow-up anthrax in Zambia since the outbreak in 2011, we have collected samples from the environment and the carcasses of anthrax-suspected animals, and have tried to isolate Bacillus anthracis. In the process of identification of B. anthracis, we collected two isolates, of which colonies were similar to B. anthracis; however, from the results of identification using the molecular-based methods, two isolates were genetically related to the highly pathogenic B. cereus, of which clinical manifestation is severe and fatal (e.g., pneumonia). In this study, we showed the existence of bacteria suspected to be highly pathogenic B. cereus in Zambia, indicating the possibility of an outbreak caused by highly pathogenic B. cereus. PMID:25797134

  20. Bacillus cereus from the environment is genetically related to the highly pathogenic B. cereus in Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Hirohito; Ohnuma, Miyuki; Squarre, David; Mweene, Aaron Simanyengwe; Ezaki, Takayuki; Fujikura, Daisuke; Ohnishi, Naomi; Thomas, Yuka; Hang'ombe, Bernard Mudenda; Higashi, Hideaki

    2015-08-01

    To follow-up anthrax in Zambia since the outbreak in 2011, we have collected samples from the environment and the carcasses of anthrax-suspected animals, and have tried to isolate Bacillus anthracis. In the process of identification of B. anthracis, we collected two isolates, of which colonies were similar to B. anthracis; however, from the results of identification using the molecular-based methods, two isolates were genetically related to the highly pathogenic B. cereus, of which clinical manifestation is severe and fatal (e.g., pneumonia). In this study, we showed the existence of bacteria suspected to be highly pathogenic B. cereus in Zambia, indicating the possibility of an outbreak caused by highly pathogenic B. cereus.

  1. Screening of siRNA Nanoparticles for Delivery to Airway Epithelial Cells Using High Content Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Hibbitts, Alan; Lieggi, Nora; McCabe, Olive; Thomas, Warren; Barlow, James; O'Brien, Fiona; Cryan, Sally-Ann

    2011-01-01

    Background: Delivery of siRNA to the lungs via inhalation offers a unique opportunity to develop novel methods of treating a range of poorly treated respiratory conditions. However progress has been greatly hindered by safety and delivery issues. This study developed a high-throughput method for screening novel nanotechnologies for pulmonary siRNA delivery Methodology: Following physico-chemical analysis, the ability of PEI-PEG/siRNA nanoparticles to facilitate siRNA delivery was det...

  2. The PAPI-1 pathogenicity island-encoded small RNA PesA influences Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence and modulates pyocin S3 production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, Silvia; Falcone, Marilena; Macchi, Raffaella; Bragonzi, Alessandra; Girelli, Daniela; Cariani, Lisa; Cigana, Cristina; Bertoni, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    Small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) are post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression that have been recognized as key contributors to bacterial virulence and pathogenic mechanisms. In this study, we characterized the sRNA PesA of the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We show that PesA, which is transcribed within the pathogenicity island PAPI-1 of P. aeruginosa strain PA14, contributes to P. aeruginosa PA14 virulence. In fact, pesA gene deletion resulted in a less pathogenic strain, showing higher survival of cystic fibrosis human bronchial epithelial cells after infection. Moreover, we show that PesA influences positively the expression of pyocin S3 whose genetic locus comprises two structural genes, pyoS3A and pyoS3I, encoding the killing S3A and the immunity S3I proteins, respectively. Interestingly, the deletion of pesA gene results in increased sensitivity to UV irradiation and to the fluoroquinolone antibiotic ciprofloxacin. The degree of UV sensitivity displayed by the PA14 strain lacking PesA is comparable to that of a strain deleted for pyoS3A-I. These results suggest an involvement of pyocin S3 in DNA damage repair and a regulatory role of PesA on this function.

  3. Simultaneous isolation of high-quality DNA, RNA, miRNA and proteins from tissues for genomic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Llopis, Samuel; Brugarolas, James

    2013-11-01

    Genomic technologies have revolutionized our understanding of complex Mendelian diseases and cancer. Solid tumors present several challenges for genomic analyses, such as tumor heterogeneity and tumor contamination with surrounding stroma and infiltrating lymphocytes. We developed a protocol to (i) select tissues of high cellular purity on the basis of histological analyses of immediately flanking sections and (ii) simultaneously extract genomic DNA (gDNA), mRNA, noncoding RNA (ncRNA; enriched in miRNA) and protein from the same tissues. After tissue selection, about 12-16 extractions of DNA, RNA or protein can be obtained per day. Compared with other similar approaches, this fast and reliable methodology allowed us to identify mutations in tumors with remarkable sensitivity and to perform integrative analyses of whole-genome and exome data sets, DNA copy numbers (by single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays), gene expression data (by transcriptome profiling and quantitative PCR (qPCR)) and protein levels (by western blotting and immunohistochemical analysis) from the same samples. Although we focused on renal cell carcinoma, this protocol may be adapted with minor changes to any human or animal tissue to obtain high-quality and high-yield nucleic acids and proteins.

  4. A novel mitochondrial DNA m.7507A>G mutation is only pathogenic at high levels of heteroplasmy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, Beverly Jo; Tuppen, Helen A L; Küsters, Benno; Lammens, Martin; Smeitink, Jan A M; Taylor, Robert W; Rodenburg, Richard J; Wortmann, Saskia B

    2015-03-01

    We present a Dutch family with a novel disease-causing mutation in the mitochondrial tRNA(Ser(UCN)) gene, m.7507A>G. The index patient died during the neonatal period due to cardio-respiratory failure and fatal lactic acidosis. A second patient, his cousin, has severe hearing loss necessitating cochlear implants and progressive exercise intolerance. Laboratory investigations of both patients revealed combined deficiencies of the enzyme complexes of the mitochondrial respiratory chain in several tissues. Reduced levels of fully assembled complexes I and IV in fibroblasts by BN-PAGE associated with (near) homoplasmic levels of the m.7507A>G mutation in several tissues and a severe reduction in the steady-state level of mt-tRNA(Ser(UCN)) in fibroblasts were observed. The novel mitochondrial DNA mutation was shown to segregate with disease; several healthy maternal family members showed high heteroplasmy levels (up to 76 ± 4% in blood and 68 ± 4% in fibroblasts) which did not lead to any alterations in the activities of the enzyme complexes of the respiratory chain in fibroblasts or clinical signs and symptoms. We hereby conclude that the m.7507A>G mutation causes a heterogeneous clinical phenotype and is only pathogenic at very high levels of mtDNA heteroplasmy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. High Variety of Known and New RNA and DNA Viruses of Diverse Origins in Untreated Sewage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Terry Fei Fan; Marine, Rachel; Wang, Chunlin; Simmonds, Peter; Kapusinszky, Beatrix; Bodhidatta, Ladaporn; Oderinde, Bamidele Soji; Wommack, K. Eric

    2012-01-01

    Deep sequencing of untreated sewage provides an opportunity to monitor enteric infections in large populations and for high-throughput viral discovery. A metagenomics analysis of purified viral particles in untreated sewage from the United States (San Francisco, CA), Nigeria (Maiduguri), Thailand (Bangkok), and Nepal (Kathmandu) revealed sequences related to 29 eukaryotic viral families infecting vertebrates, invertebrates, and plants (BLASTx E score, 90% protein identities) in numerous viral families infecting humans (Adenoviridae, Astroviridae, Caliciviridae, Hepeviridae, Parvoviridae, Picornaviridae, Picobirnaviridae, and Reoviridae), plants (Alphaflexiviridae, Betaflexiviridae, Partitiviridae, Sobemovirus, Secoviridae, Tombusviridae, Tymoviridae, Virgaviridae), and insects (Dicistroviridae, Nodaviridae, and Parvoviridae). The full and partial genomes of a novel kobuvirus, salivirus, and sapovirus are described. A novel astrovirus (casa astrovirus) basal to those infecting mammals and birds, potentially representing a third astrovirus genus, was partially characterized. Potential new genera and families of viruses distantly related to members of the single-stranded RNA picorna-like virus superfamily were genetically characterized and named Picalivirus, Secalivirus, Hepelivirus, Nedicistrovirus, Cadicistrovirus, and Niflavirus. Phylogenetic analysis placed these highly divergent genomes near the root of the picorna-like virus superfamily, with possible vertebrate, plant, or arthropod hosts inferred from nucleotide composition analysis. Circular DNA genomes distantly related to the plant-infecting Geminiviridae family were named Baminivirus, Nimivirus, and Niminivirus. These results highlight the utility of analyzing sewage to monitor shedding of viral pathogens and the high viral diversity found in this common pollutant and provide genetic information to facilitate future studies of these newly characterized viruses. PMID:22933275

  6. Infectivity and transmissibility of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses in mallards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild aquatic birds have been associated with the intercontinental spread of H5 subtype highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses, but wild waterfowl have not been implicated in the spread of other HPAI viruses. In a previous study we demonstrated that many H5 and H7 HPAI viruses could infect...

  7. Oseltamivir reduces transmission, morbidity, and mortality of highly pathogenic avian influenza in chickens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, A.; Goot, van der J.A.; Koch, G.; Boven, van M.; Kimman, T.G.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of the neuraminidase inhibitors zanamivir and oseltamivir on the transmission of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) in chickens was studied. Per group, five chickens inoculated with HPAI A/Chicken/Pennsylvania/1370/83 H5N2 virus were placed 1 day post-inoculation (p.i.) in one cage

  8. Use of Epidemiologic Models in the Control of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stegeman, J.A.; Bouma, A.; Jong, de M.C.M.

    2010-01-01

    In the past decades, mathematical models have become more and more accepted as a tool to develop surveillance programs and to evaluate the efficacy of intervention measures for the control of infectious diseases such as highly pathogenic avian influenza. Predictive models are used to simulate the

  9. Epidemiological models to assist the management of highly pathogenic avian influenza

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stegeman, J.A.; Bouma, A.; Jong, de M.C.M.

    2011-01-01

    In recent decades, epidemiological models have been used more and more frequently as a tool for the design of programmes for the management of infectious diseases such as highly pathogenic avian influenza. Predictive models are used to simulate the effects of various control measures on the spread

  10. Genetic versus antigenic differences among highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza A viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, Ben; Reemers, Sylvia; Dortmans, Jos; Vries, de Erik; Jong, de Mart; Zande, van de Saskia; Rottier, Peter J.M.; Haan, de Cornelis A.M.

    2017-01-01

    Highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza A viruses display a remarkable genetic and antigenic diversity. We examined to what extent genetic distances between several H5N1 viruses from different clades correlate with antigenic differences and vaccine performance. H5-specific antisera were generated,

  11. Serosurvey of antibody to highly pathogenic avian influenza (H5N1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Avian influenza is a disease of economic and public health importance that has been described in most domestic animals and humans. Highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 epidemic in Nigeria was observed in agro-ecological zones where pigs and chickens are raised in shared environment with chances of ...

  12. Novel Reassortant Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (H5N8) Virus in Zoos, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, Shanmugasundaram; Kumar, Manoj; Murugkar, Harshad V; Tripathi, Sushil; Shukla, Shweta; Agarwal, Sonam; Dubey, Garima; Nagi, Raunaq Singh; Singh, Vijendra Pal; Tosh, Chakradhar

    2017-04-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza (H5N8) viruses were detected in waterfowl at 2 zoos in India in October 2016. Both viruses were different 7:1 reassortants of H5N8 viruses isolated in May 2016 from wild birds in the Russian Federation and China, suggesting virus spread during southward winter migration of birds.

  13. Novel Eurasian Highly Pathogenic Influenza A H5 Viruses in Wild Birds, Washington, USA, 2014

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-03-24

    Sarah Gregory reads an abridged version of the article, Novel Eurasian Highly Pathogenic Influenza A H5 Viruses in Wild Birds, Washington, USA, 2014.  Created: 3/24/2015 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 4/13/2015.

  14. Evolutionary Analysis of Inter-Farm Transmission Dynamics in a Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Epidemic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bataille, A.; Meer, van der F.; Stegeman, A.; Koch, G.

    2011-01-01

    Phylogenetic studies have largely contributed to better understand the emergence, spread and evolution of highly pathogenic avian influenza during epidemics, but sampling of genetic data has never been detailed enough to allow mapping of the spatiotemporal spread of avian influenza viruses during a

  15. Inactivation of high concentration of pathogens in land-applied food ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In Mexico, as in other developing countries, the most important pollution and management problems of food-processing sludge are the high levels of pathogen microorganisms within the sludge and the lack of sites for its disposal. The aims of this study were to evaluate the effect of calcium oxide in the inactivation of ...

  16. An Outbreak Of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (Hpai) In A Mixed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An Outbreak Of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (Hpai) In A Mixed Farm By The Introduction Of A Water Fowl. ... The transmission and spread of AI in Nigeria has been primarily associated with wild and feral birds (Ducatez et al, 2006) while secondary spread possibly caused by human related activities sustain the virus in ...

  17. Mycobacterial RNA isolation optimized for non-coding RNA: high fidelity isolation of 5S rRNA from Mycobacterium bovis BCG reveals novel post-transcriptional processing and a complete spectrum of modified ribonucleosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hia, Fabian; Chionh, Yok Hian; Pang, Yan Ling Joy; DeMott, Michael S; McBee, Megan E; Dedon, Peter C

    2015-03-11

    A major challenge in the study of mycobacterial RNA biology is the lack of a comprehensive RNA isolation method that overcomes the unusual cell wall to faithfully yield the full spectrum of non-coding RNA (ncRNA) species. Here, we describe a simple and robust procedure optimized for the isolation of total ncRNA, including 5S, 16S and 23S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and tRNA, from mycobacteria, using Mycobacterium bovis BCG to illustrate the method. Based on a combination of mechanical disruption and liquid and solid-phase technologies, the method produces all major species of ncRNA in high yield and with high integrity, enabling direct chemical and sequence analysis of the ncRNA species. The reproducibility of the method with BCG was evident in bioanalyzer electrophoretic analysis of isolated RNA, which revealed quantitatively significant differences in the ncRNA profiles of exponentially growing and non-replicating hypoxic bacilli. The method also overcame an historical inconsistency in 5S rRNA isolation, with direct sequencing revealing a novel post-transcriptional processing of 5S rRNA to its functional form and with chemical analysis revealing seven post-transcriptional ribonucleoside modifications in the 5S rRNA. This optimized RNA isolation procedure thus provides a means to more rigorously explore the biology of ncRNA species in mycobacteria. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  18. Active Ingredients Combinations for Pathogens Control on Cucumber Crops under High Plastic Tunnels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela ŞOVĂREL

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In Romania, Pseudoperonospora cubensis and Sphaerotheca fuligineaare the most important pathogens on cucumber crops under high plastic tunnels. For controlling these pathogens there are applied products with different active ingredients: dimethomorph 9 %, mancozeb 60 %,  myclobutanil 240 g/l, penconazole 100 g/l, iprovalicarb 8,4 %, cupper oxychloride 40%. The best efficacy for controlling Pseudoperonospora cubensis andSphaerotheca fuligineawas obtained both combinations  foseyl aluminium 80% 0.2% + penconazole 100 g/l  0.025%(84.8%. 100%and fosetyl aluminium 80% 0.2% + myclobutanil 240 g/l 0.02% (83.7%, 100%.

  19. Evaluation of batch and semicontinuous application of high hydrostatic pressure on foodborne pathogens in salsa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghubeer, E V; Dunne, C P; Farkas, D F; Ting, E Y

    2000-12-01

    The effects of high hydrostatic pressure (HPP; 545 MPa) on strains of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, enterotoxigenic Staphylococcus aureus, and nonpathogenic microorganisms were studied in tomato-based salsa. Products were evaluated for the survival of the inoculated pathogens following HPP treatment and after storage at 4 degrees C and 21 to 23 degrees C for up to 2 months. Inoculated samples without HPP treatment, stored under the same conditions, were also evaluated to determine the effects of the acid environment of salsa on the survival of inoculated strains. None of the inoculated pathogens were detected in the HPP-treated samples for all treatments throughout the storage period. Inoculated pathogens were detected in the non-HPP-treated samples stored at 4 degrees C after 1 month, with L. monocytogenes showing the highest level of survivors. In the non-HPP-treated samples stored at 21 to 23 degrees C, E. coli and S. aureus were not detected after 1 week, but L. monocytogenes was detected in low levels. Studies with nonpathogenic strains of the pathogens were conducted at Oregon State University using HPP treatments in a semicontinuous production system. The nonpathogenic microorganisms (E. coli, Listeria innocua, Listeria welshimeri, and nonenterotoxigenic S. aureus) were inoculated together into a feeder tank containing 100 liters of salsa. Microbiological results of samples collected before HPP treatment and from the aseptic filler were similar to those obtained for the pathogenic strains. No survivors were detected in any of the HPP-treated samples.

  20. Rapid Detection and Identification of Infectious Pathogens Based on High-throughput Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Xiang Ni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The dilemma of pathogens identification in patients with unidentified clinical symptoms such as fever of unknown origin exists, which not only poses a challenge to both the diagnostic and therapeutic process by itself, but also to expert physicians. Methods: In this report, we have attempted to increase the awareness of unidentified pathogens by developing a method to investigate hitherto unidentified infectious pathogens based on unbiased high-throughput sequencing. Results: Our observations show that this method supplements current diagnostic technology that predominantly relies on information derived five cases from the intensive care unit. This methodological approach detects viruses and corrects the incidence of false positive detection rates of pathogens in a much shorter period. Through our method is followed by polymerase chain reaction validation, we could identify infection with Epstein-Barr virus, and in another case, we could identify infection with Streptococcus viridians based on the culture, which was false positive. Conclusions: This technology is a promising approach to revolutionize rapid diagnosis of infectious pathogens and to guide therapy that might result in the improvement of personalized medicine.

  1. Horizontal transfer and functional evaluation of high pathogenicity islands in Avian Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, J; Qi, K; Song, X; Xue, T; Ji, H; Shao, Y; Liu, H; Zhou, X; Zhu, L

    2017-03-01

    High pathogenicity islands (HPIs) in Escherichia coli encode genes that are primarily involved in iron uptake and regulation, and confer virulence and pathogenicity. The aim of this study was to investigate the transfer of HPIs in avian E. coli and identify the function of HPI in the acceptor strain. The HPI transfer strain was obtained under conditions of low temperature and low iron abundance, and the donor and acceptor strains were confirmed. E. coli HPIs are transferred by horizontal gene transfer events, which are likely mediated primarily by homologous recombination in HPI-adjacent sequences. Assays for biological activity and pathogenicity changes in the acceptor strain indicated that HPIs might not be involved in pathogenesis in avian E. coli, and thus the main function of HPIs in this strain of bacteria may be to regulate iron nutrition.

  2. Isolation of high quality RNA from pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) and other woody plants high in secondary metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moazzam Jazi, Maryam; Rajaei, Saideh; Seyedi, Seyed Mahdi

    2015-10-01

    The quality and quantity of RNA are critical for successful downstream transcriptome-based studies such as microarrays and RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). RNA isolation from woody plants, such as Pistacia vera, with very high amounts of polyphenols and polysaccharides is an enormous challenge. Here, we describe a highly efficient protocol that overcomes the limitations posed by poor quality and low yield of isolated RNA from pistachio and various recalcitrant woody plants. The key factors that resulted in a yield of 150 μg of high quality RNA per 200 mg of plant tissue include the elimination of phenol from the extraction buffer, raising the concentration of β-mercaptoethanol, long time incubation at 65 °C, and nucleic acid precipitation with optimized volume of NaCl and isopropyl alcohol. Also, the A260/A280 and A260/A230 of extracted RNA were about 1.9-2.1and 2.2-2.3, respectively, revealing the high purity. Since the isolated RNA passed highly stringent quality control standards for sensitive reactions, including RNA sequencing and real-time PCR, it can be considered as a reliable and cost-effective method for RNA extraction from woody plants.

  3. Dissemination of a highly virulent pathogen: tracking the early events that define infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo J Gonzalez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The series of events that occurs immediately after pathogen entrance into the body is largely speculative. Key aspects of these events are pathogen dissemination and pathogen interactions with the immune response as the invader moves into deeper tissues. We sought to define major events that occur early during infection of a highly virulent pathogen. To this end, we tracked early dissemination of Yersinia pestis, a highly pathogenic bacterium that causes bubonic plague in mammals. Specifically, we addressed two fundamental questions: (1 do the bacteria encounter barriers in disseminating to draining lymph nodes (LN, and (2 what mechanism does this nonmotile bacterium use to reach the LN compartment, as the prevailing model predicts trafficking in association with host cells. Infection was followed through microscopy imaging in addition to assessing bacterial population dynamics during dissemination from the skin. We found and characterized an unexpected bottleneck that severely restricts bacterial dissemination to LNs. The bacteria that do not pass through this bottleneck are confined to the skin, where large numbers of neutrophils arrive and efficiently control bacterial proliferation. Notably, bottleneck formation is route dependent, as it is abrogated after subcutaneous inoculation. Using a combination of approaches, including microscopy imaging, we tested the prevailing model of bacterial dissemination from the skin into LNs and found no evidence of involvement of migrating phagocytes in dissemination. Thus, early stages of infection are defined by a bottleneck that restricts bacterial dissemination and by neutrophil-dependent control of bacterial proliferation in the skin. Furthermore, and as opposed to current models, our data indicate an intracellular stage is not required by Y. pestis to disseminate from the skin to draining LNs. Because our findings address events that occur during early encounters of pathogen with the immune response

  4. Dissemination of a highly virulent pathogen: tracking the early events that define infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Rodrigo J; Lane, M Chelsea; Wagner, Nikki J; Weening, Eric H; Miller, Virginia L

    2015-01-01

    The series of events that occurs immediately after pathogen entrance into the body is largely speculative. Key aspects of these events are pathogen dissemination and pathogen interactions with the immune response as the invader moves into deeper tissues. We sought to define major events that occur early during infection of a highly virulent pathogen. To this end, we tracked early dissemination of Yersinia pestis, a highly pathogenic bacterium that causes bubonic plague in mammals. Specifically, we addressed two fundamental questions: (1) do the bacteria encounter barriers in disseminating to draining lymph nodes (LN), and (2) what mechanism does this nonmotile bacterium use to reach the LN compartment, as the prevailing model predicts trafficking in association with host cells. Infection was followed through microscopy imaging in addition to assessing bacterial population dynamics during dissemination from the skin. We found and characterized an unexpected bottleneck that severely restricts bacterial dissemination to LNs. The bacteria that do not pass through this bottleneck are confined to the skin, where large numbers of neutrophils arrive and efficiently control bacterial proliferation. Notably, bottleneck formation is route dependent, as it is abrogated after subcutaneous inoculation. Using a combination of approaches, including microscopy imaging, we tested the prevailing model of bacterial dissemination from the skin into LNs and found no evidence of involvement of migrating phagocytes in dissemination. Thus, early stages of infection are defined by a bottleneck that restricts bacterial dissemination and by neutrophil-dependent control of bacterial proliferation in the skin. Furthermore, and as opposed to current models, our data indicate an intracellular stage is not required by Y. pestis to disseminate from the skin to draining LNs. Because our findings address events that occur during early encounters of pathogen with the immune response, this work can

  5. High-Throughput Sequencing Based Methods of RNA Structure Investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kielpinski, Lukasz Jan

    In this thesis we describe the development of four related methods for RNA structure probing that utilize massive parallel sequencing. Using them, we were able to gather structural data for multiple, long molecules simultaneously. First, we have established an easy to follow experimental and comp......In this thesis we describe the development of four related methods for RNA structure probing that utilize massive parallel sequencing. Using them, we were able to gather structural data for multiple, long molecules simultaneously. First, we have established an easy to follow experimental...... with known priming sites....

  6. Use of a capture-based pathogen transcript enrichment strategy for RNA-Seq analysis of the Francisella tularensis LVS transcriptome during infection of murine macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary W Bent

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis is a zoonotic intracellular pathogen that is capable of causing potentially fatal human infections. Like all successful bacterial pathogens, F. tularensis rapidly responds to changes in its environment during infection of host cells, and upon encountering different microenvironments within those cells. This ability to appropriately respond to the challenges of infection requires rapid and global shifts in gene expression patterns. In this study, we use a novel pathogen transcript enrichment strategy and whole transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq to perform a detailed characterization of the rapid and global shifts in F. tularensis LVS gene expression during infection of murine macrophages. We performed differential gene expression analysis on all bacterial genes at two key stages of infection: phagosomal escape, and cytosolic replication. By comparing the F. tularensis transcriptome at these two stages of infection to that of the bacteria grown in culture, we were able to identify sets of genes that are differentially expressed over the course of infection. This analysis revealed the temporally dynamic expression of a number of known and putative transcriptional regulators and virulence factors, providing insight into their role during infection. In addition, we identified several F. tularensis genes that are significantly up-regulated during infection but had not been previously identified as virulence factors. These unknown genes may make attractive therapeutic or vaccine targets.

  7. Complete mitochondrial genomes and nuclear ribosomal RNA operons of two species of Diplostomum (Platyhelminthes: Trematoda): a molecular resource for taxonomy and molecular epidemiology of important fish pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brabec, Jan; Kostadinova, Aneta; Scholz, Tomáš; Littlewood, D Timothy J

    2015-06-19

    The genus Diplostomum (Platyhelminthes: Trematoda: Diplostomidae) is a diverse group of freshwater parasites with complex life-cycles and global distribution. The larval stages are important pathogens causing eye fluke disease implicated in substantial impacts on natural fish populations and losses in aquaculture. However, the problematic species delimitation and difficulties in the identification of larval stages hamper the assessment of the distributional and host ranges of Diplostomum spp. and their transmission ecology. Total genomic DNA was isolated from adult worms and shotgun sequenced using Illumina MiSeq technology. Mitochondrial (mt) genomes and nuclear ribosomal RNA (rRNA) operons were assembled using established bioinformatic tools and fully annotated. Mt protein-coding genes and nuclear rRNA genes were subjected to phylogenetic analysis by maximum likelihood and the resulting topologies compared. We characterised novel complete mt genomes and nuclear rRNA operons of two closely related species, Diplostomum spathaceum and D. pseudospathaceum. Comparative mt genome assessment revealed that the cox1 gene and its 'barcode' region used for molecular identification are the most conserved regions; instead, nad4 and nad5 genes were identified as most promising molecular diagnostic markers. Using the novel data, we provide the first genome wide estimation of the phylogenetic relationships of the order Diplostomida, one of the two fundamental lineages of the Digenea. Analyses of the mitogenomic data invariably recovered the Diplostomidae as a sister lineage of the order Plagiorchiida rather than as a basal lineage of the Diplostomida as inferred in rDNA phylogenies; this was concordant with the mt gene order of Diplostomum spp. exhibiting closer match to the conserved gene order of the Plagiorchiida. Complete sequences of the mt genome and rRNA operon of two species of Diplostomum provide a valuable resource for novel genetic markers for species delineation and

  8. Segal's Law, 16S rRNA gene sequencing, and the perils of foodborne pathogen detection within the American Gut Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettengill, James B; Rand, Hugh

    2017-01-01

    Obtaining human population level estimates of the prevalence of foodborne pathogens is critical for understanding outbreaks and ameliorating such threats to public health. Estimates are difficult to obtain due to logistic and financial constraints, but citizen science initiatives like that of the American Gut Project (AGP) represent a potential source of information concerning enteric pathogens. With an emphasis on genera Listeria and Salmonella, we sought to document the prevalence of those two taxa within the AGP samples. The results provided by AGP suggest a surprising 14% and 2% of samples contained Salmonella and Listeria, respectively. However, a reanalysis of those AGP sequences described here indicated that results depend greatly on the algorithm for assigning taxonomy and differences persisted across both a range of parameter settings and different reference databases (i.e., Greengenes and HITdb). These results are perhaps to be expected given that AGP sequenced the V4 region of 16S rRNA gene, which may not provide good resolution at the lower taxonomic levels (e.g., species), but it was surprising how often methods differ in classifying reads-even at higher taxonomic ranks (e.g., family). This highlights the misleading conclusions that can be reached when relying on a single method that is not a gold standard; this is the essence of Segal's Law: an individual with one watch knows what time it is but an individual with two is never sure. Our results point to the need for an appropriate molecular marker for the taxonomic resolution of interest, and calls for the development of more conservative classification methods that are fit for purpose. Thus, with 16S rRNA gene datasets, one must be cautious regarding the detection of taxonomic groups of public health interest (e.g., culture independent identification of foodborne pathogens or taxa associated with a given phenotype).

  9. Bacterial diversity analysis of Huanglongbing pathogen-infected citrus, using PhyloChip and 16S rRNA gene clone library sequencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shankar Sagaram, U.; DeAngelis, K.M.; Trivedi, P.; Andersen, G.L.; Lu, S.-E.; Wang, N.

    2009-03-01

    The bacterial diversity associated with citrus leaf midribs was characterized 1 from citrus groves that contained the Huanglongbing (HLB) pathogen, which has yet to be cultivated in vitro. We employed a combination of high-density phylogenetic 16S rDNA microarray and 16S rDNA clone library sequencing to determine the microbial community composition of symptomatic and asymptomatic citrus midribs. Our results revealed that citrus leaf midribs can support a diversity of microbes. PhyloChip analysis indicated that 47 orders of bacteria from 15 phyla were present in the citrus leaf midribs while 20 orders from phyla were observed with the cloning and sequencing method. PhyloChip arrays indicated that nine taxa were significantly more abundant in symptomatic midribs compared to asymptomatic midribs. Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (Las) was detected at a very low level in asymptomatic plants, but was over 200 times more abundant in symptomatic plants. The PhyloChip analysis was further verified by sequencing 16S rDNA clone libraries, which indicated the dominance of Las in symptomatic leaves. These data implicate Las as the pathogen responsible for HLB disease. Citrus is the most important commercial fruit crop in Florida. In recent years, citrus Huanglongbing (HLB), also called citrus greening, has severely affected Florida's citrus production and hence has drawn an enormous amount of attention. HLB is one of the most devastating diseases of citrus (6,13), characterized by blotchy mottling with green islands on leaves, as well as stunting, fruit decline, and small, lopsided fruits with poor coloration. The disease tends to be associated with a phloem-limited fastidious {alpha}-proteobacterium given a provisional Candidatus status (Candidatus Liberobacter spp. later changed to Candidatus Liberibacter spp.) in nomenclature (18,25,34). Previous studies indicate that HLB infection causes disorder in the phloem and severely impairs the translocation of assimilates in

  10. Multiple introductions of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 viruses into Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinova-Petkova, Atanaska; Feeroz, Mohammed M; Rabiul Alam, SM; Kamrul Hasan, M; Akhtar, Sharmin; Jones-Engel, Lisa; Walker, David; McClenaghan, Laura; Rubrum, Adam; Franks, John; Seiler, Patrick; Jeevan, Trushar; McKenzie, Pamela; Krauss, Scott; Webby, Richard J; Webster, Robert G

    2014-01-01

    Highly pathogenic H5N1 and low pathogenic H9N2 influenza viruses are endemic to poultry markets in Bangladesh and have cocirculated since 2008. H9N2 influenza viruses circulated constantly in the poultry markets, whereas highly pathogenic H5N1 viruses occurred sporadically, with peaks of activity in cooler months. Thirty highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza viruses isolated from poultry were characterized by antigenic, molecular, and phylogenetic analyses. Highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza viruses from clades 2.2.2 and 2.3.2.1 were isolated from live bird markets only. Phylogenetic analysis of the 30 H5N1 isolates revealed multiple introductions of H5N1 influenza viruses in Bangladesh. There was no reassortment between the local H9N2 influenza viruses and H5N1 genotype, despite their prolonged cocirculation. However, we detected two reassortant H5N1 viruses, carrying the M gene from the Chinese H9N2 lineage, which briefly circulated in the Bangladesh poultry markets and then disappeared. On the other hand, interclade reassortment occurred within H5N1 lineages and played a role in the genesis of the currently dominant H5N1 viruses in Bangladesh. Few ‘human-like' mutations in H5N1 may account for the limited number of human cases. Antigenically, clade 2.3.2.1 H5N1 viruses in Bangladesh have evolved since their introduction and are currently mainly homogenous, and show evidence of recent antigenic drift. Although reassortants containing H9N2 genes were detected in live poultry markets in Bangladesh, these reassortants failed to supplant the dominant H5N1 lineage. PMID:26038508

  11. Detection and typing of highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus by multiplex real-time rt-PCR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Wernike

    Full Text Available Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS causes economic losses in the pig industry worldwide, and PRRS viruses (PRRSV are classified into the two distinct genotypes "North American (NA, type 2" and "European (EU, type 1". In 2006, a highly pathogenic NA strain of PRRSV (HP-PRRSV, characterized by high fever as well as high morbidity and mortality, emerged in swine farms in China. Therefore, a real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR assay specific for HP-PRRSV was developed and combined with type 1- and type 2-specific RT-qPCR systems. Furthermore, an internal control, based on a heterologous RNA, was successfully introduced. This final multiplex PRRSV RT-qPCR, detecting and typing PRRSV, had an analytical sensitivity of less than 200 copies per µl for the type 1-assay and 20 copies per µl for the type 2- and HP assays and a high diagnostic sensitivity. A panel of reference strains and field isolates was reliably detected and samples from an animal trial with a Chinese HP-PRRS strain were used for test validation. The new multiplex PRRSV RT-qPCR system allows for the first time the highly sensitive detection and rapid differentiation of PRRSV of both genotypes as well as the direct detection of HP-PRRSV.

  12. Characterization of a novel single-stranded RNA virus, closely related to fusariviruses, infecting the plant pathogenic fungus Alternaria brassicicola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jie; Shang, Hong Hong; Zhu, Chuan Xia; Zhu, Jun Zi; Zhu, Hong Jian; Hu, Yan; Gao, Bi Da

    2016-06-02

    The alternaria blackspot of rapeseed is one of the most prominent diseases of rapeseed. It is caused by three species of the genus Alternaria: Alternaria brassicicola, Alternaria brassicae, and Alternaria raphanin. Here we report a novel positive-sense RNA virus from an A. brassicicola strain 817-14. The virus has a 6639 nucleotide (nt) long genome, excluding a poly (A)-tail, and was predicted to contain three putative open reading frames (ORF1, ORF2, and ORF3). The large ORF1 encoded a 174-kDa polyprotein (composed of 1522 amino acid residues) containing a conserved RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) domain and a helicase domain. The other two smaller ORFs encoded polypeptides with unknown function. Homology search and phylogenetic analysis, based on the RdRp and helicase domains, suggest that this virus is related to and grouped with Sclerotinia sclerotiorum fusarivirus 1 (SsFV1), Rosellinia necatrix fusarivirus 1 (RnFV1), Fusarium graminearum virus-DK21 (FgV1), and Penicillium roqueforti RNA mycovirus 1 (PrRV1), all of which belong to a newly proposed family Fusariviridae. For this study, we designed the virus as "Alternaria brassicicola fusarivirus 1" (AbFV1). Virus elimination revealed that AbFV1 has no conspicuous impact on the biological properties of its host. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. RNA-seq analysis reveals new gene models and alternative splicing in the fungal pathogen Fusarium graminearum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, C.; Waalwijk, C.; Wit, de P.J.G.M.; Tang, D.; Lee, van der T.A.J.

    2013-01-01

    Background The genome of Fusarium graminearum has been sequenced and annotated previously, but correct gene annotation remains a challenge. In addition, posttranscriptional regulations, such as alternative splicing and RNA editing, are poorly understood in F. graminearum. Here we took advantage of

  14. Unusually High Mortality in Waterfowl Caused by Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza A(H5N1) in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, N.; Sturm-Ramirez, K.; Khan, S. U.; Rahman, M. Z.; Sarkar, S.; Poh, M. K.; Shivaprasad, H. L.; Kalam, M. A.; Paul, S. K.; Karmakar, P. C.; Balish, A.; Chakraborty, A.; Mamun, A. A.; Mikolon, A. B.; Davis, C. T.; Rahman, M.; Donis, R. O.; Heffelfinger, J. D.; Luby, S. P.; Zeidner, N.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Mortality in ducks and geese caused by highly pathogenic avian influenza A (H5N1) infection had not been previously identified in Bangladesh. In June–July 2011, we investigated mortality in ducks, geese and chickens with suspected H5N1 infection in a north-eastern district of the country to identify the aetiologic agent and extent of the outbreak and identify possible associated human infections. We surveyed households and farms with affected poultry flocks in six villages in Netrokona district and collected cloacal and oropharyngeal swabs from sick birds and tissue samples from dead poultry. We conducted a survey in three of these villages to identify suspected human influenza-like illness cases and collected nasopharyngeal and throat swabs. We tested all swabs by real-time RT-PCR, sequenced cultured viruses, and examined tissue samples by histopathology and immunohistochemistry to detect and characterize influenza virus infection. In the six villages, among the 240 surveyed households and 11 small-scale farms, 61% (1789/2930) of chickens, 47% (4816/10 184) of ducks and 73% (358/493) of geese died within 14 days preceding the investigation. Of 70 sick poultry swabbed, 80% (56/70) had detectable RNA for influenza A/H5, including 89% (49/55) of ducks, 40% (2/5) of geese and 50% (5/10) of chickens. We isolated virus from six of 25 samples; sequence analysis of the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase gene of these six isolates indicated clade 2.3.2.1a of H5N1 virus. Histopathological changes and immunohistochemistry staining of avian influenza viral antigens were recognized in the brain, pancreas and intestines of ducks and chickens. We identified ten human cases showing signs compatible with influenza-like illness; four were positive for influenza A/H3; however, none were positive for influenza A/H5. The recently introduced H5N1 clade 2.3.2.1a virus caused unusually high mortality in ducks and geese. Heightened surveillance in poultry is warranted to guide

  15. Unusually High Mortality in Waterfowl Caused by Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza A(H5N1) in Bangladesh

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haider, Najmul; Sturm-Ramirez, K.; Khan, S. U.

    2017-01-01

    Mortality in ducks and geese caused by highly pathogenic avian influenza A(H5N1) infection had not been previously identified in Bangladesh. In June-July 2011, we investigated mortality in ducks, geese and chickens with suspected H5N1 infection in a north-eastern district of the country to identify...

  16. The irp2 and fyuA genes in High Pathogenicity Islands are involved in the pathogenesis of infections caused by avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Jian; Xue, Ting; Qi, Kezong; Shao, Ying; Huang, Boyan; Wang, Xueyan; Zhou, Xiuhong

    2016-01-01

    Avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) is a major bacterial infectious disease that may lead to local or systemic infections in chickens with clinical manifestations. The irp2-fyuA gene cluster has been confirmed to be the main genes involved in the synthesis of HPI. The objective of this study was to determine the influence of the irp2 and fyuA genes in the high pathogenicity island (HPI) of avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) on its pathogenicity by knocking out these genes. The ΔAE17 (lacking irp2) and ΔΔAE17 (lacking irp2 and fyuA) strains of APEC were constructed. The ΔAE17 and ΔΔAE17 strains showed significantly impaired capacity to adhere onto DF-1 cells. The LD50 results indicated that the virulence of the ΔAE17 and ΔΔAE17 strains was decreased in comparison with that of the AE17 strain. We concluded that the knock-out of the core HPI genes weakened APEC adhesion onto DF-1 cells, inhibited transcription of virulence genes, and reduced pathogenicity in chicks. The effects of genetic deletion of irp2 and fyuA on APEC were more severe than those produced by deletion of irp2 only, indicating that irp2 and fyuA co-regulate APEC pathogenicity.

  17. Isolation of high-quality RNA from gymnosperm and angiosperm trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolosova, Natalia; Miller, Barbara; Ralph, Steven; Ellis, Brian E; Douglas, Carl; Ritland, Kermit; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2004-05-01

    An improved protocol was developed for efficient and reliable extraction of high-quality total RNA and mRNA from various tissues of spruce (Picea spp.) and poplar (Populus spp.) trees, as well as other plant species. This method was specifically optimized for tissues with high content of polysaccharides, oleoresin terpenoids, and phenolic secondary metabolites, which often co-precipitate with RNA and inhibit subsequent reverse transcription. The improved protocol yielded up to 600 micrograms of total RNA per gram of tissue suitable for standard expressed sequence tags (ESTs), full-length cDNA library construction, and for microarray applications.

  18. High Quality RNA Isolation from Leaf, Shell, Root Tissues and Callus of Hazelnut (Corylus avellana L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Khosravi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Extraction of high quality RNA is a critical step in molecular genetics studies. Hazelnut is one of the most important nuts plants in the world. The presence of the taxol and other taxanes in hazelnut plant necessitates explaining their biosynthesis pathway and identifying the candidate genes. Therefore, an easy and practical method is necessary for RNA extraction from hazelnuts. Hazelnut has high levels of phenolic compounds. High amounts of polyphenolic and polysaccharide compounds in plants could be causing problems in RNA extraction procedures.  To avoid these problems, a simple and efficient method can be used based on cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB extraction buffer and lithium chloride for extraction of high quality RNA from different parts of hazelnut plant. Using this method, a high-quality RNA sample (light absorbed in the A260/A280 was 2.04

  19. Isolation of high-quality RNA from grains of different maize varieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messias, Rafael da Silva; Galli, Vanessa; Buss, Julieti Huch; Borowski, Joyce Moura; Nora, Leonardo; e Silva, Sérgio Delmar dos Anjos; Margis, Rogério; Rombaldi, Cesar Valmor

    2014-10-03

    The study of gene expression in maize varieties represents a powerful tool aiming to increase vitamin A precursors. However, the isolation of RNA from different maize varieties is challenging because these varieties show different levels of polysaccharides, and most methods available for RNA isolation are inappropriate for grain samples. The polysaccharides co-purify and co-precipitate with RNA during isolation, resulting in low-quality RNA, compromising the use of RNA in subsequent applications. Thus, a cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB)-based method was adapted in this study and compared with six methods for RNA isolation, including commercial reagents and RNA and DNA isolation kits, in order to identify the most appropriate for maize grains from different varieties. Most of the methods evaluated were considered inadequate due to limitations in terms of purity and/or quantity of the isolated RNA, which affected the efficiency of subsequent RT-qPCR analysis, resulting in nonamplification of β-carotene hydroxylase gene (HYD3) or high deviation among replicates. However, the CTAB modified method allowed the study to obtain intact RNA, with high quality and quantity, from 25 maize varieties. Furthermore, this RNA was successfully used to evaluate the expression of HYD3 gene by real-time qualitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), and thus represents a simple, efficient, and low-cost strategy.

  20. Signatures of Nucleotide Analog Incorporation by an RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase Revealed Using High-Throughput Magnetic Tweezers

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    David Dulin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available RNA viruses pose a threat to public health that is exacerbated by the dearth of antiviral therapeutics. The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp holds promise as a broad-spectrum, therapeutic target because of the conserved nature of the nucleotide-substrate-binding and catalytic sites. Conventional, quantitative, kinetic analysis of antiviral ribonucleotides monitors one or a few incorporation events. Here, we use a high-throughput magnetic tweezers platform to monitor the elongation dynamics of a prototypical RdRp over thousands of nucleotide-addition cycles in the absence and presence of a suite of nucleotide analog inhibitors. We observe multiple RdRp-RNA elongation complexes; only a subset of which are competent for analog utilization. Incorporation of a pyrazine-carboxamide nucleotide analog, T-1106, leads to RdRp backtracking. This analysis reveals a mechanism of action for this antiviral ribonucleotide that is corroborated by cellular studies. We propose that induced backtracking represents a distinct mechanistic class of antiviral ribonucleotides.

  1. Visualization of RNA secondary structures using highly parallel computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaya, A; Taura, K; Yamamoto, K; Yonezawa, A

    1996-06-01

    Results of RNA secondary structure prediction algorithm are usually given as a set of hydrogen bonds between bases. However, we cannot know the precise structure of an RNA molecule by only knowing which bases form hydrogen bonds. One way to understand the structure of an RNA molecule is to visualize it using a planar graph so that we can easily know the geometric relations among the substructures such as stacking regions and loops. To do this, we consider bases to be particles on a plane and introduce a repulsive force and an attractive force among these particles and determine their positions according to these forces. A naive algorithm requires O(N2) time but we can reduce it to O(NlogN) with an approximation algorithm which is often used in the area of N-body simulation. Our program is written in parallel object-oriented language 'Schematic' which is recently developed. Efficiency of our implementation on a parallel computer and results of visualization of secondary structures are presented using cadang-cadang coconut viroid as an example.

  2. Towards pathogen inactivation of red blood cells and whole blood targeting viral DNA/RNA: design, technologies, and future prospects for developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Victor J; Barro, Lassina; Seghatchian, Jerard; Burnouf, Thierry

    2017-10-01

    Over 110 million units of blood are collected yearly. The need for blood products is greater in developing countries, but so is the risk of contracting a transfusion-transmitted infection. Without efficient donor screening/viral testing and validated pathogen inactivation technology, the risk of transfusion-transmitted infections correlates with the infection rate of the donor population. The World Health Organization has published guidelines on good manufacturing practices in an effort to ensure a strong global standard of transfusion and blood product safety. Sub-Saharan Africa is a high-risk region for malaria, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus and syphilis. Southeast Asia experiences high rates of hepatitis C virus. Areas with a tropical climate have an increased risk of Zika virus, Dengue virus, West Nile virus and Chikungunya, and impoverished countries face economical limitations which hinder efforts to acquire the most modern pathogen inactivation technology. These systems include Mirasol® Pathogen Reduction Technology, INTERCEPT®, and THERAFLEX®. Their procedures use a chemical and ultraviolet or visible light for pathogen inactivation and significantly decrease the threat of pathogen transmission in plasma and platelets. They are licensed for use in Europe and are used in several other countries. The current interest in the blood industry is the development of pathogen inactivation technologies that can treat whole blood (WB) and red blood cell (RBC). The Mirasol system has recently undergone phase III clinical trials for treating WB in Ghana and has demonstrated some efficacy toward malaria inactivation and low risk of adverse effects. A 2nd-generation of the INTERCEPT® S-303 system for WB is currently undergoing a phase III clinical trial. Both methodologies are applicable for WB and components derived from virally reduced WB or RBC.

  3. Towards pathogen inactivation of red blood cells and whole blood targeting viral DNA/RNA: design, technologies, and future prospects for developing countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Victor J.; Barro, Lassina; Seghatchian, Jerard; Burnouf, Thierry

    2017-01-01

    Over 110 million units of blood are collected yearly. The need for blood products is greater in developing countries, but so is the risk of contracting a transfusion-transmitted infection. Without efficient donor screening/viral testing and validated pathogen inactivation technology, the risk of transfusion-transmitted infections correlates with the infection rate of the donor population. The World Health Organization has published guidelines on good manufacturing practices in an effort to ensure a strong global standard of transfusion and blood product safety. Sub-Saharan Africa is a high-risk region for malaria, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus and syphilis. Southeast Asia experiences high rates of hepatitis C virus. Areas with a tropical climate have an increased risk of Zika virus, Dengue virus, West Nile virus and Chikungunya, and impoverished countries face economical limitations which hinder efforts to acquire the most modern pathogen inactivation technology. These systems include Mirasol® Pathogen Reduction Technology, INTERCEPT®, and THERAFLEX®. Their procedures use a chemical and ultraviolet or visible light for pathogen inactivation and significantly decrease the threat of pathogen transmission in plasma and platelets. They are licensed for use in Europe and are used in several other countries. The current interest in the blood industry is the development of pathogen inactivation technologies that can treat whole blood (WB) and red blood cell (RBC). The Mirasol system has recently undergone phase III clinical trials for treating WB in Ghana and has demonstrated some efficacy toward malaria inactivation and low risk of adverse effects. A 2nd-generation of the INTERCEPT® S-303 system for WB is currently undergoing a phase III clinical trial. Both methodologies are applicable for WB and components derived from virally reduced WB or RBC. PMID:28488960

  4. A rapid, highly sensitive and culture-free detection of pathogens from blood by positive enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vutukuru, Manjula Ramya; Sharma, Divya Khandige; Ragavendar, M S; Schmolke, Susanne; Huang, Yiwei; Gumbrecht, Walter; Mitra, Nivedita

    2016-12-01

    Molecular diagnostics is a promising alternative to culture based methods for the detection of bloodstream infections, notably due to its overall lower turnaround time when starting directly from patient samples. Whole blood is usually the starting diagnostic sample in suspected bloodstream infections. The detection of low concentrations of pathogens in blood using a molecular assay necessitates a fairly high starting volume of blood sample in the range of 5-10mL. This large volume of blood sample has a substantial accompanying human genomic content that interferes with pathogen detection. In this study, we have established a workflow using magnetic beads coated with Apolipoprotein H that makes it possible to concentrate pathogens from a 5.0mL whole blood sample, thereby enriching pathogens from whole blood background and also reducing the sample volume to ~200μL or less. We have also demonstrated that this method of enrichment allows detection of 1CFU/mL of Escherichia coli, Enterococcus gallinarum and Candida tropicalis from 5mL blood using quantitative PCR; a detection limit that is not possible in unenriched samples. The enrichment method demonstrated here took 30min to complete and can be easily integrated with various downstream molecular and microbiological techniques. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Risk maps for the spread of highly pathogenic avian influenza in poultry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gert Jan Boender

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Devastating epidemics of highly contagious animal diseases such as avian influenza, classical swine fever, and foot-and-mouth disease underline the need for improved understanding of the factors promoting the spread of these pathogens. Here the authors present a spatial analysis of the between-farm transmission of a highly pathogenic H7N7 avian influenza virus that caused a large epidemic in The Netherlands in 2003. The authors developed a method to estimate key parameters determining the spread of highly transmissible animal diseases between farms based on outbreak data. The method allows for the identification of high-risk areas for propagating spread in an epidemiologically underpinned manner. A central concept is the transmission kernel, which determines the probability of pathogen transmission from infected to uninfected farms as a function of interfarm distance. The authors show how an estimate of the transmission kernel naturally provides estimates of the critical farm density and local reproduction numbers, which allows one to evaluate the effectiveness of control strategies. For avian influenza, the analyses show that there are two poultry-dense areas in The Netherlands where epidemic spread is possible, and in which local control measures are unlikely to be able to halt an unfolding epidemic. In these regions an epidemic can only be brought to an end by the depletion of susceptible farms by infection or massive culling. The analyses provide an estimate of the spatial range over which highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses spread between farms, and emphasize that control measures aimed at controlling such outbreaks need to take into account the local density of farms.

  6. RNA-Seq analysis reveals insight into enhanced rice Xa7-mediated bacterial blight resistance at high temperature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen P Cohen

    Full Text Available Plant disease is a major challenge to agriculture worldwide, and it is exacerbated by abiotic environmental factors. During some plant-pathogen interactions, heat stress allows pathogens to overcome host resistance, a phenomenon which could severely impact crop productivity considering the global warming trends associated with climate change. Despite the importance of this phenomenon, little is known about the underlying molecular mechanisms. To better understand host plant responses during simultaneous heat and pathogen stress, we conducted a transcriptomics experiment for rice plants (cultivar IRBB61 containing Xa7, a bacterial blight disease resistance (R gene, that were infected with Xanthomonas oryzae, the bacterial blight pathogen of rice, during high temperature stress. Xa7-mediated resistance is unusual relative to resistance mediated by other R genes in that it functions better at high temperatures. Using RNA-Seq technology, we identified 8,499 differentially expressed genes as temperature responsive in rice cultivar IRBB61 experiencing susceptible and resistant interactions across three time points. Notably, genes in the plant hormone abscisic acid biosynthesis and response pathways were up-regulated by high temperature in both mock-treated plants and plants experiencing a susceptible interaction and were suppressed by high temperature in plants exhibiting Xa7-mediated resistance. Genes responsive to salicylic acid, an important plant hormone for disease resistance, were down-regulated by high temperature during both the susceptible and resistant interactions, suggesting that enhanced Xa7-mediated resistance at high temperature is not dependent on salicylic acid signaling. A DNA sequence motif similar to known abscisic acid-responsive cis-regulatory elements was identified in the promoter region upstream of genes up-regulated in susceptible but down-regulated in resistant interactions. The results of our study suggest that the plant

  7. RNA-Seq analysis reveals insight into enhanced rice Xa7-mediated bacterial blight resistance at high temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Stephen P; Liu, Hongxia; Argueso, Cristiana T; Pereira, Andy; Vera Cruz, Casiana; Verdier, Valerie; Leach, Jan E

    2017-01-01

    Plant disease is a major challenge to agriculture worldwide, and it is exacerbated by abiotic environmental factors. During some plant-pathogen interactions, heat stress allows pathogens to overcome host resistance, a phenomenon which could severely impact crop productivity considering the global warming trends associated with climate change. Despite the importance of this phenomenon, little is known about the underlying molecular mechanisms. To better understand host plant responses during simultaneous heat and pathogen stress, we conducted a transcriptomics experiment for rice plants (cultivar IRBB61) containing Xa7, a bacterial blight disease resistance (R) gene, that were infected with Xanthomonas oryzae, the bacterial blight pathogen of rice, during high temperature stress. Xa7-mediated resistance is unusual relative to resistance mediated by other R genes in that it functions better at high temperatures. Using RNA-Seq technology, we identified 8,499 differentially expressed genes as temperature responsive in rice cultivar IRBB61 experiencing susceptible and resistant interactions across three time points. Notably, genes in the plant hormone abscisic acid biosynthesis and response pathways were up-regulated by high temperature in both mock-treated plants and plants experiencing a susceptible interaction and were suppressed by high temperature in plants exhibiting Xa7-mediated resistance. Genes responsive to salicylic acid, an important plant hormone for disease resistance, were down-regulated by high temperature during both the susceptible and resistant interactions, suggesting that enhanced Xa7-mediated resistance at high temperature is not dependent on salicylic acid signaling. A DNA sequence motif similar to known abscisic acid-responsive cis-regulatory elements was identified in the promoter region upstream of genes up-regulated in susceptible but down-regulated in resistant interactions. The results of our study suggest that the plant hormone abscisic

  8. Isolation of high-quality total RNA from leaves of Myrciaria dubia "CAMU CAMU".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Juan Carlos Castro; Reátegui, Alina Del Carmen Egoavil; Flores, Julián Torres; Saavedra, Roberson Ramírez; Ruiz, Marianela Cobos; Correa, Sixto Alfredo Imán

    2013-01-01

    Myrciaria dubia is a main source of vitamin C for people in the Amazon region. Molecular studies of M. dubia require high-quality total RNA from different tissues. So far, no protocols have been reported for total RNA isolation from leaves of this species. The objective of this research was to develop protocols for extracting high-quality total RNA from leaves of M. dubia. Total RNA was purified following two modified protocols developed for leaves of other species (by Zeng and Yang, and by Reid et al.) and one modified protocol developed for fruits of the studied species (by Silva). Quantity and quality of purified total RNA were assessed by spectrophotometric and electrophoretic analysis. Additionally, quality of total RNA was evaluated with reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). With these three modified protocols we were able to isolate high-quality RNA (A260nm/A280nm >1.9 and A260nm/A230nm >2.0). Highest yield was produced with the Zeng and Yang modified protocol (384±46µg ARN/g fresh weight). Furthermore, electrophoretic analysis showed the integrity of isolated RNA and the absence of DNA. Another proof of the high quality of our purified RNA was the successful cDNA synthesis and amplification of a segment of the M. dubia actin 1 gene. We report three modified protocols for isolation total RNA from leaves of M. dubia. The modified protocols are easy, rapid, low in cost, and effective for high-quality and quantity total RNA isolation suitable for cDNA synthesis and polymerase chain reaction.

  9. Imaging mass spectrometry and genome mining reveal highly antifungal virulence factor of mushroom soft rot pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graupner, Katharina; Scherlach, Kirstin; Bretschneider, Tom; Lackner, Gerald; Roth, Martin; Gross, Harald; Hertweck, Christian

    2012-12-21

    Caught in the act: imaging mass spectrometry of a button mushroom infected with the soft rot pathogen Janthinobacterium agaricidamnosum in conjunction with genome mining revealed jagaricin as a highly antifungal virulence factor that is not produced under standard cultivation conditions. The structure of jagaricin was rigorously elucidated by a combination of physicochemical analyses, chemical derivatization, and bioinformatics. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Experimental vaccines against potentially pandemic and highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Mooney, Alaina J; Tompkins, S Mark

    2013-01-01

    Influenza A viruses continue to emerge and re-emerge, causing outbreaks, epidemics and occasionally pandemics. While the influenza vaccines licensed for public use are generally effective against seasonal influenza, issues arise with production, immunogenicity, and efficacy in the case of vaccines against pandemic and emerging influenza viruses, and highly pathogenic avian influenza virus in particular. Thus, there is need of improved influenza vaccines and vaccination strategies. This review...

  11. NMR spectra of PB2 627, the RNA-binding domain in influenza A virus RNA polymerase that contains the pathogenicity factor lysine 627, and improvement of the spectra by small osmolytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke S. Kato

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The influenza A virus, which has an RNA genome, requires RNA-dependent RNA polymerase for transcription and replication. The polymerase is comprised of the subunits PA, PB1, and PB2. The C-terminal RNA-binding domain in PB2 contains lysine 627 (PB2 627, which is associated with pathogenicity and host range. However, the structure and molecular mechanism of PB2 627 in solution remain obscure. Here, we investigated PB2 627 in solution by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR and detected inhomogeneity in the intensities of backbone amide proton signals due to local fluctuations in structure. To characterize the effects of chemical chaperones on spectral data and improve the data quality, we tested 20 different additives, including L-arginine L-glutamate salt, (L-arginine2SO4, glycerol, β-octylglucoside, 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl dimethylammonio]-1-propanesulfonate, Na2SO4, 1,5-diaminopentane, 1,4-diaminobutane, trehalose, sucrose, glycine, trimethylamine N-oxide, β-alanine, L-α-alanine, hydroxyectoine, betaine, L-proline, and non-detergent sulfobetaine 195, 201, and 256. We evaluated the quality of the resulting spectra by calculating the standard deviation and average of the ratio of signal intensities to noise level of amide peaks, as well as the ratio of the standard deviation to the average. NMR-profile analysis revealed diverse effects of additives on the dynamic properties of PB2 627. Based on such criteria, we found that small osmolytes such as glycine and L-α-alanine reduced structural fluctuations and improved the quality of spectral data, which is likely to facilitate a detailed NMR-based structural analysis. The methodology developed here may also be more generally useful for evaluating the effects of chemical chaperones on the structural integrity of proteins.

  12. Handling High-Dimension (High-Feature) MicroRNA Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yue; Lan, Wenjun; Miller, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    High-dimensional data, or high-feature variables, are often used to describe the characteristics of microRNA sequence and microarray data. As a consequence, the curse of high dimension often becomes a problem. High-dimension variables lead to many difficulties in processing and can be hard to understand. On the other aspect, as the sample size rather limited, the more variables, the more statistical error would be produced in the data processing. For the purpose of decreasing the dimension of variables, a degenerated k-mer method was suggested. To enhance the statistical robustness, the gapped k-mer method was introduced. In the last part of this chapter, some traditional supervised and unsupervised mathematical methods that used to decrease the dimensionality of the data are also described.

  13. Analysis of the crow lung transcriptome in response to infection with highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumar, Periyasamy; Mishra, Anamika; Ranaware, Pradip B; Kolte, Atul P; Kulkarni, Diwakar D; Burt, David W; Raut, Ashwin Ashok

    2015-03-15

    The highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus, currently circulating in Asia, causes severe disease in domestic poultry as well as wild birds like crow. However, the molecular pathogenesis of HPAIV infection in crows and other wild birds is not well known. Thus, as a step to explore it, a comprehensive global gene expression analysis was performed on crow lungs, infected with HPAI H5N1 crow isolate (A/Crow/India/11TI11/2011) using high throughput next generation sequencing (NGS) (GS FLX Titanium XLR70). The reference genome of crow is not available, so RNA seq analysis was performed on the basis of a de novo assembled transcriptome. The RNA seq result shows, 4052 genes were expressed uniquely in noninfected, 6277 genes were expressed uniquely in HPAIV infected sample and of the 6814 genes expressed in both samples, 2279 genes were significantly differentially expressed. Our transcriptome profile data allows for the ability to understand the molecular mechanism behind the recent lethal HPAIV outbreak in crows which was, until recently, thought to cause lethal infections only in gallinaceous birds such as chickens, but not in wild birds. The pattern of differentially expressed genes suggest that this isolate of H5N1 virus evades the host innate immune response by attenuating interferon (IFN)-inducible signalling possibly by down regulating the signalling from type I IFN (IFNAR1 and IFNAR2) and type II IFN receptors, upregulation of the signalling inhibitors suppressor of cytokine signalling 1 (SOCS1) and SOCS3 and altering the expression of toll-like receptors (TLRs). This may be the reason for disease and mortality in crows. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Molecular analysis of 16S rRNA genes identifies potentially periodontal pathogenic bacteria and archaea in the plaque of partially erupted third molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, J M; Campbell, J H; Bhandari, A R; Jesionowski, A M; Vickerman, M M

    2012-07-01

    Small subunit rRNA sequencing and phylogenetic analysis were used to identify cultivable and uncultivable microorganisms present in the dental plaque of symptomatic and asymptomatic partially erupted third molars to determine the prevalence of putative periodontal pathogens in pericoronal sites. Template DNA prepared from subgingival plaque collected from partially erupted symptomatic and asymptomatic mandibular third molars and healthy incisors was used in polymerase chain reaction with broad-range oligonucleotide primers to amplify 16S rRNA bacterial and archaeal genes. Amplicons were cloned, sequenced, and compared with known nucleotide sequences in online databases to identify the microorganisms present. Two thousand three hundred two clones from the plaque of 12 patients carried bacterial sequences from 63 genera belonging to 11 phyla, including members of the uncultivable TM7, SR1, and Chloroflexi, and difficult-to-cultivate Synergistetes and Spirochaetes. Dialister invisus, Filifactor alocis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas endodontalis, Prevotella denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Treponema denticola, which have been associated with periodontal disease, were found in significantly greater abundance in pericoronal compared with incisor sites. Dialister invisus and F nucleatum were found in greater abundance in sites exhibiting clinical symptoms. The archaeal species, Methanobrevibacter oralis, which has been associated with severe periodontitis, was found in 3 symptomatic patients. These findings have provided new insights into the complex microbiota of pericoronitis. Several bacterial and archaeal species implicated in periodontal disease were recovered in greater incidence and abundance from the plaque of partially erupted third molars compared with incisors, supporting the hypothesis that the pericoronal region may provide a favored niche for periodontal pathogens in otherwise healthy mouths. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Oral and

  15. Preparation of highly multiplexed small RNA sequencing libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Helena; Søkilde, Rolf; Pirona, Anna Chiara; Rovira, Carlos

    2017-08-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are ~22-nucleotide-long small non-coding RNAs that regulate the expression of protein-coding genes by base pairing to partially complementary target sites, preferentially located in the 3´ untranslated region (UTR) of target mRNAs. The expression and function of miRNAs have been extensively studied in human disease, as well as the possibility of using these molecules as biomarkers for prognostication and treatment guidance. To identify and validate miRNAs as biomarkers, their expression must be screened in large collections of patient samples. Here, we develop a scalable protocol for the rapid and economical preparation of a large number of small RNA sequencing libraries using dual indexing for multiplexing. Combined with the use of off-the-shelf reagents, more samples can be sequenced simultaneously on large-scale sequencing platforms at a considerably lower cost per sample. Sample preparation is simplified by pooling libraries prior to gel purification, which allows for the selection of a narrow size range while minimizing sample variation. A comparison with publicly available data from benchmarking of miRNA analysis platforms showed that this method captures absolute and differential expression as effectively as commercially available alternatives.

  16. A Role for Nonsense-Mediated mRNA Decay in Plants: Pathogen Responses Are Induced in Arabidopsis thaliana NMD Mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayson, Samantha; Arciga-Reyes, Luis; Wootton, Lucie; De Torres Zabala, Marta; Truman, William; Graham, Neil; Grant, Murray; Davies, Brendan

    2012-01-01

    Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) is a conserved mechanism that targets aberrant mRNAs for destruction. NMD has also been found to regulate the expression of large numbers of genes in diverse organisms, although the biological role for this is unclear and few evolutionarily conserved targets have been identified. Expression analyses of three Arabidopsis thaliana lines deficient in NMD reveal that the vast majority of NMD-targeted transcripts are associated with response to pathogens. Congruently, NMD mutants, in which these transcripts are elevated, confer partial resistance to Pseudomonas syringae. These findings suggest a biological rationale for the regulation of gene expression by NMD in plants and suggest that manipulation of NMD could offer a new approach for crop protection. Amongst the few non-pathogen responsive NMD-targeted genes, one potential NMD targeted signal, the evolutionarily conserved upstream open reading frame (CuORF), was found to be hugely over-represented, raising the possibility that this feature could be used to target specific physiological mRNAs for control by NMD. PMID:22384098

  17. Isolation and characterization of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus subtype H5N1 from donkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel-Ghany Ahmad E

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The highly pathogenic H5N1 is a major avian pathogen that crosses species barriers and seriously affects humans as well as some mammals. It mutates in an intensified manner and is considered a potential candidate for the possible next pandemic with all the catastrophic consequences. Methods Nasal swabs were collected from donkeys suffered from respiratory distress. The virus was isolated from the pooled nasal swabs in specific pathogen free embryonated chicken eggs (SPF-ECE. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and sequencing of both haemagglutingin and neuraminidase were performed. H5 seroconversion was screened using haemagglutination inhibition (HI assay on 105 donkey serum samples. Results We demonstrated that H5N1 jumped from poultry to another mammalian host; donkeys. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the virus clustered within the lineage of H5N1 from Egypt, closely related to 2009 isolates. It harboured few genetic changes compared to the closely related viruses from avian and humans. The neuraminidase lacks oseltamivir resistant mutations. Interestingly, HI screening for antibodies to H5 haemagglutinins in donkeys revealed high exposure rate. Conclusions These findings extend the host range of the H5N1 influenza virus, possess implications for influenza virus epidemiology and highlight the need for the systematic surveillance of H5N1 in animals in the vicinity of backyard poultry units especially in endemic areas.

  18. Giardia: a pathogen or commensal for children in high-prevalence settings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartelt, Luther A; Platts-Mills, James A

    2016-10-01

    Giardia is a common intestinal parasite worldwide, and infection can be associated with clear and sometimes persistent symptomatology. However, in children in high-prevalence settings, it is not associated with or is perhaps even protective against acute diarrhea, and the association with long-term outcomes has been difficult to discern. Recent studies have made progress in helping us disentangle this apparent paradox. First, prospective, well-characterized cohort studies have added to the data on the association between Giardia and diarrhea in these settings and have further characterized associations between Giardia infection and nutrition, gut function, and growth. Second, animal models have further characterized the host response to Giardia and helped elucidate mechanisms by which Giardia could impair child development. Finally, new work has shed light on the heterogeneity of human Giardia strains, which may both explain discrepant findings in the literature and help guide higher-resolution analyses of this pathogen in the future. The true clinical impact of endemic pediatric giardiasis remains unclear, but recent prospective studies have confirmed a high prevalence of persistent, subclinical Giardia infections and associated growth shortfalls. Integrating how nutritional, microbial, metabolic, and pathogen-strain variables influence these outcomes could sharpen delineations between pathogenic and potentially beneficial attributes of this enigmatic parasite.

  19. Escherichia coli O78 isolated from septicemic lambs shows high pathogenicity in a zebrafish model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjelstrup, Cecilie K; Barber, Amelia E; Norton, J Paul; Mulvey, Matthew A; L'Abée-Lund, Trine M

    2017-01-25

    The pathogenicity of Escherichia coli O78 strain K46, originally isolated from an outbreak of septicemia in neonatal lambs, was investigated in zebrafish embryo and murine models of infection. Its biofilm potential, cellulose production, and the expression of type 1 pili and curli fimbriae were measured by in vitro assays. The strain was highly pathogenic in the zebrafish embryo model of infection, where it killed all embryos within 24 h post inoculation (hpi) at doses as low as 1000 colony forming units. Zebrafish embryos inoculated with similar doses of commensal E. coli strains showed no signs of disease, and cleared the bacteria within 24 h. E. coli K46 colonized the murine gut at the same level as the uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) reference strain CFT073 in CBA/J mice after oral inoculation, but infected the murine bladder significantly less than CFT073 after transurethral inoculation. Type 1 pili were clearly expressed by E. coli K46, while curli fimbriae and cellulose production were weakly expressed. The ability to produce biofilm varied in different growth media, but overall E. coli K46 was a poorer biofilm producer compared to the reference strain E. coli UTI89. In conclusion, the zebrafish lethality model provides further evidence that E. coli K46 is highly pathogenic and might be useful in future studies to identify bacterial virulence factors.

  20. High-throughput construction of intron-containing hairpin RNA vectors for RNAi in plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pu Yan

    Full Text Available With the wide use of double-stranded RNA interference (RNAi for the analysis of gene function in plants, a high-throughput system for making hairpin RNA (hpRNA constructs is in great demand. Here, we describe a novel restriction-ligation approach that provides a simple but efficient construction of intron-containing hpRNA (ihpRNA vectors. The system takes advantage of the type IIs restriction enzyme BsaI and our new plant RNAi vector pRNAi-GG based on the Golden Gate (GG cloning. This method requires only a single PCR product of the gene of interest flanked with BsaI recognition sequence, which can then be cloned into pRNAi-GG at both sense and antisense orientations simultaneously to form ihpRNA construct. The process, completed in one tube with one restriction-ligation step, produced a recombinant ihpRNA with high efficiency and zero background. We demonstrate the utility of the ihpRNA constructs generated with pRNAi-GG vector for the effective silencing of various individual endogenous and exogenous marker genes as well as two genes simultaneously. This method provides a novel and high-throughput platform for large-scale analysis of plant functional genomics.

  1. International biosecurity symposium : securing high consequence pathogens and toxins : symposium summary.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2004-06-01

    The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Office of Nonproliferation Policy sponsored an international biosecurity symposium at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The event, entitled 'Securing High Consequence Pathogens and Toxins', took place from February 1 to February 6, 2004 and was hosted by Dr. Reynolds M. Salerno, Principal Member of the Technical Staff and Program Manager of the Biosecurity program at Sandia. Over 60 bioscience and policy experts from 14 countries gathered to discuss biosecurity, a strategy aimed at preventing the theft and sabotage of dangerous pathogens and toxins from bioscience facilities. Presentations delivered during the symposium were interspersed with targeted discussions that elucidated, among other things, the need for subsequent regional workshops on biosecurity, and a desire for additional work toward developing international biosecurity guidelines.

  2. Characterization of a highly pathogenic molecular clone of feline immunodeficiency virus clade C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rozières, Sohela; Mathiason, Candace K; Rolston, Matthew R; Chatterji, Udayan; Hoover, Edward A; Elder, John H

    2004-09-01

    We have derived and characterized a highly pathogenic molecular isolate of feline immunodeficiency virus subtype C (FIV-C) CABCpady00C. Clone FIV-C36 was obtained by lambda cloning from cats that developed severe immunodeficiency disease when infected with CABCpady00C (Abbotsford, British Columbia, Canada). Clone FIV-C36 Env is 96% identical to the noninfectious FIV-C isolate sequence deposited in GenBank (FIV-Cgb; GenBank accession number AF474246) (A. Harmache et al.) but is much more divergent in Env when compared to the subgroup A clones Petaluma (34TF10) and FIV-PPR (76 and 78% divergence, respectively). Clone FIV-C36 was able to infect freshly isolated feline peripheral blood mononuclear cells and primary T-cell lines but failed to productively infect CrFK cells, as is typical of FIV field isolates. Two-week-old specific-pathogen-free cats infected with FIV-C36 tissue culture supernatant became PCR positive and developed severe acute immunodeficiency disease similar to that caused by the uncloned CABCpady00C parent. At 4 to 5 weeks postinfection (PI), 3 of 4 animals developed CD4(+)-T-cell depletion, fever, weight loss, diarrhea, and opportunistic infections, including ulcerative stomatitis and tonsillitis associated with abundant bacterial growth, pneumonia, and pyelonephritis, requiring euthanasia. Histopathology confirmed severe thymic and systemic lymphoid depletion. Interestingly, the dam also became infected with a high viral load at 5 weeks PI of the kittens and developed a similar disease syndrome, requiring euthanasia at 11 weeks PI of the kittens. This constitutes the first report of a replication-competent, infectious, and pathogenic molecular clone of FIV-C. Clone FIV-C36 will facilitate dissection of the pathogenic determinants of FIV.

  3. Pathobiological features of a novel, highly pathogenic avian influenza A(H5N8) virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Il; Pascua, Philippe Noriel Q; Kwon, Hyeok-Il; Lim, Gyo-Jin; Kim, Eun-Ha; Yoon, Sun-Woo; Park, Su-Jin; Kim, Se Mi; Choi, Eun-Ji; Si, Young-Jae; Lee, Ok-Jun; Shim, Woo-Sub; Kim, Si-Wook; Mo, In-Pil; Bae, Yeonji; Lim, Yong Taik; Sung, Moon Hee; Kim, Chul-Joong; Webby, Richard J; Webster, Robert G; Choi, Young Ki

    2014-01-01

    The endemicity of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) A(H5N1) viruses in Asia has led to the generation of reassortant H5 strains with novel gene constellations. A newly emerged HPAI A(H5N8) virus caused poultry outbreaks in the Republic of Korea in 2014. Because newly emerging high-pathogenicity H5 viruses continue to pose public health risks, it is imperative that their pathobiological properties be examined. Here, we characterized A/mallard duck/Korea/W452/2014 (MDk/W452(H5N8)), a representative virus, and evaluated its pathogenic and pandemic potential in various animal models. We found that MDk/W452(H5N8), which originated from the reassortment of wild bird viruses harbored by migratory waterfowl in eastern China, replicated systemically and was lethal in chickens, but appeared to be attenuated, albeit efficiently transmitted, in ducks. Despite predominant attachment to avian-like virus receptors, MDk/W452(H5N8) also exhibited detectable human virus-like receptor binding and replicated in human respiratory tract tissues. In mice, MDk/W452(H5N8) was moderately pathogenic and had limited tissue tropism relative to previous HPAI A(H5N1) viruses. It also induced moderate nasal wash titers in inoculated ferrets; additionally, it was recovered in extrapulmonary tissues and one of three direct-contact ferrets seroconverted without shedding. Moreover, domesticated cats appeared to be more susceptible than dogs to virus infection. With their potential to become established in ducks, continued circulation of A(H5N8) viruses could alter the genetic evolution of pre-existing avian poultry strains. Overall, detailed virological investigation remains a necessity given the capacity of H5 viruses to evolve to cause human illness with few changes in the viral genome. PMID:26038499

  4. Surfaces Presenting α-Phenyl Mannoside Derivatives Enable Formation of Stable, High Coverage, Non-pathogenicEscherichia coliBiofilms against Pathogen Colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhiling; Wang, Jun; Lopez, Analette I; Yu, Fei; Huang, Yongkai; Kumar, Amit; Li, Siheng; Zhang, Lijuan; Cai, Chengzhi

    2015-06-01

    Prevention of pathogenic colonization on medical devices over a long period of time remains a great challenge, especially in a high-nutrient environment that accelerates production of biomass leading to biofouling of the device. Since biofouling and the subsequent pathogen colonization is eventually inevitable, a new strategy using non-pathogenic bacteria as living guards against pathogenic colonization on medical devices has attracted increasing interest. Crucial to the success of this strategy is to pre-establish a high coverage and stable biofilm of benign bacteria on the surface. Silicone elastomers are one of the most widely used materials in biomedical devices. In this work, we modified silicone surfaces to promote formation of high coverage and stable biofilms by a non-pathogenic Escherichia coli strain 83972 with type 1 fimbriae ( fim+ ) to interfere the colonization of an aggressive biofilm-forming, uropathogenic Enterococcus faecalis . Although it is well known that mannoside surfaces promote the initial adherence of fim+ E. coli through binding to the FimH receptor at the tip of the type 1 fimbriae, it is not clear whether the fast initial adherence could lead to a high coverage and stable protective biofilm. To explore the role of mannoside ligands, we synthesized a series of alkyl and aryl mannosides varied in structure and immobilized them on silicone surfaces pre-coated with poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimer. We found that stable and densely packed benign E. coli biofilms were formed on the surfaces presenting biphenyl mannoside with the highest initial adherence of fim+ E. coli . These non-pathogenic biofilms prevented the colonization of E. faecalis for 11 days at a high concentration (10 8 CFU mL -1 , 100,000 times above the diagnostic threshold for urinary tract infection) in the nutrient-rich Lysogeny Broth (LB) media. The result shows a correlation among the initial adherence of fim+ E. coli 83972, the coverage and long-term stability of the

  5. In Silico Identification of RNA Modifications from High-Throughput Sequencing Data Using HAMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuksa, Pavel P; Leung, Yuk Yee; Vandivier, Lee E; Anderson, Zachary; Gregory, Brian D; Wang, Li-San

    2017-01-01

    RNA molecules are often altered post-transcriptionally by the covalent modification of their nucleotides. These modifications are known to modulate the structure, function, and activity of RNAs. When reverse transcribed into cDNA during RNA sequencing library preparation, atypical (modified) ribonucleotides that affect Watson-Crick base pairing will interfere with reverse transcriptase (RT), resulting in cDNA products with mis-incorporated bases or prematurely terminated RNA products. These interactions with RT can therefore be inferred from mismatch patterns in the sequencing reads, and are distinguishable from simple base-calling errors, single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), or RNA editing sites. Here, we describe a computational protocol for the in silico identification of modified ribonucleotides from RT-based RNA-seq read-out using the High-throughput Analysis of Modified Ribonucleotides (HAMR) software. HAMR can identify these modifications transcriptome-wide with single nucleotide resolution, and also differentiate between different types of modifications to predict modification identity. Researchers can use HAMR to identify and characterize RNA modifications using RNA-seq data from a variety of common RT-based sequencing protocols such as Poly(A), total RNA-seq, and small RNA-seq.

  6. Small regulatory RNAs of the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway as a prophylactic treatment against fish pathogenic viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schyth, Brian Dall; Hajiabadi, Seyed Amir Hossein Jalali; Kristensen, Lasse Bøgelund Juel

    2011-01-01

    Small RNAs acting in the recently discovered gene regulatory mechanism called RNA interference has a potential as diagnostic signatures of disease and immunological state and when produced synthetically as prophylactic treatment of such diseases. In the RNAi mechanism the cell produces different...... small RNAs which inhibit gene expression through more or less specific interaction with messenger RNAs resulting in repression of translation to protein. In this way cells can turn of genes of specific pathways thereby leading to altered physiological stages of tissues and possibly of whole organisms....... The mechanism can be programmed with several types of small double stranded RNAs - the type of which defines the destiny of the target. One such class of regulatory RNAs called microRNAs are upregulated due to various physiological responses of the cell and they suppress many genes simultaneously believed...

  7. Immunologic evaluation of 10 different adjuvants for use in vaccines for chickens against highly pathogenic avian influenza virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avian influenza viruses (AIV) are a threat to poultry production worldwide. Vaccination is utilized as a component of control programs for both high pathogenicity (HP) and low pathogenicity (LP) AIV. Over 95% of all AIV vaccine used in poultry are inactivated, adjuvanted products. To identify the be...

  8. An emerging avian influenza A virus H5N7 is a genetic reassortant of highly pathogenic genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bragstad, K.; Jørgensen, Poul Henrik; Handberg, Kurt

    2006-01-01

    We full genome characterised the newly discovered avian influenza virus H5N7 subtype combination isolated from a stock of Danish game ducks to investigate the composition of the genome and possible features of high pathogenicity. It was found that the haemagglutinin and the acidic polymerase genes...... low pathogenic avian influenza A viruses. (c) 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  9. High-throughput and reliable protocols for animal microRNA library cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Caide

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs are short single-stranded RNA molecules (18-25 nucleotides). Because of their ability to silence gene expressions, they can be used to diagnose and treat tumors. Experimental construction of microRNA libraries was the most important step to identify microRNAs from animal tissues. Although there are many commercial kits with special protocols to construct microRNA libraries, this chapter provides the most reliable, high-throughput, and affordable protocols for microRNA library construction. The high-throughput capability of our protocols came from a double concentration (3 and 15%, thickness 1.5 mm) polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), which could directly extract microRNA-size RNAs from up to 400 μg total RNA (enough for two microRNA libraries). The reliability of our protocols was assured by a third PAGE, which selected PCR products of microRNA-size RNAs ligated with 5' and 3' linkers by a miRCat™ kit. Also, a MathCAD program was provided to automatically search short RNAs inserted between 5' and 3' linkers from thousands of sequencing text files.

  10. Targeted delivery of small interfering RNA using reconstituted high-density lipoprotein nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahzad, Mian M K; Mangala, Lingegowda S; Han, Hee Dong; Lu, Chunhua; Bottsford-Miller, Justin; Nishimura, Masato; Mora, Edna M; Lee, Jeong-Won; Stone, Rebecca L; Pecot, Chad V; Thanapprapasr, Duangmani; Roh, Ju-Won; Gaur, Puja; Nair, Maya P; Park, Yun-Yong; Sabnis, Nirupama; Deavers, Michael T; Lee, Ju-Seog; Ellis, Lee M; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; McConathy, Walter J; Prokai, Laszlo; Lacko, Andras G; Sood, Anil K

    2011-04-01

    RNA interference holds tremendous potential as a therapeutic approach, especially in the treatment of malignant tumors. However, efficient and biocompatible delivery methods are needed for systemic delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA). To maintain a high level of growth, tumor cells scavenge high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles by overexpressing its receptor: scavenger receptor type B1 (SR-B1). In this study, we exploited this cellular characteristic to achieve efficient siRNA delivery and established a novel formulation of siRNA by incorporating it into reconstituted HDL (rHDL) nanoparticles. Here, we demonstrate that rHDL nanoparticles facilitate highly efficient systemic delivery of siRNA in vivo, mediated by the SR-B1. Moreover, in therapeutic proof-of-concept studies, these nanoparticles were effective in silencing the expression of two proteins that are key to cancer growth and metastasis (signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 and focal adhesion kinase) in orthotopic mouse models of ovarian and colorectal cancer. These data indicate that an rHDL nanoparticle is a novel and highly efficient siRNA carrier, and therefore, this novel technology could serve as the foundation for new cancer therapeutic approaches.

  11. Targeted Delivery of Small Interfering RNA Using Reconstituted High-Density Lipoprotein Nanoparticles12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahzad, Mian MK; Mangala, Lingegowda S; Han, Hee Dong; Lu, Chunhua; Bottsford-Miller, Justin; Nishimura, Masato; Mora, Edna M; Lee, Jeong-Won; Stone, Rebecca L; Pecot, Chad V; Thanapprapasr, Duangmani; Roh, Ju-Won; Gaur, Puja; Nair, Maya P; Park, Yun-Yong; Sabnis, Nirupama; Deavers, Michael T; Lee, Ju-Seog; Ellis, Lee M; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; McConathy, Walter J; Prokai, Laszlo; Lacko, Andras G; Sood, Anil K

    2011-01-01

    RNA interference holds tremendous potential as a therapeutic approach, especially in the treatment of malignant tumors. However, efficient and biocompatible delivery methods are needed for systemic delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA). To maintain a high level of growth, tumor cells scavenge high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles by overexpressing its receptor: scavenger receptor type B1 (SR-B1). In this study, we exploited this cellular characteristic to achieve efficient siRNA delivery and established a novel formulation of siRNA by incorporating it into reconstituted HDL (rHDL) nanoparticles. Here, we demonstrate that rHDL nanoparticles facilitate highly efficient systemic delivery of siRNA in vivo, mediated by the SR-B1. Moreover, in therapeutic proof-of-concept studies, these nanoparticles were effective in silencing the expression of two proteins that are key to cancer growth and metastasis (signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 and focal adhesion kinase) in orthotopic mouse models of ovarian and colorectal cancer. These data indicate that an rHDL nanoparticle is a novel and highly efficient siRNA carrier, and therefore, this novel technology could serve as the foundation for new cancer therapeutic approaches. PMID:21472135

  12. Targeted Delivery of Small Interfering RNA Using Reconstituted High-Density Lipoprotein Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mian M.K. Shahzad

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available RNA interference holds tremendous potential as a therapeutic approach, especially in the treatment of malignant tumors. However, efficient and biocompatible delivery methods are needed for systemic delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA. To maintain a high level of growth, tumor cells scavenge high-density lipoprotein (HDL particles by overexpressing its receptor: scavenger receptor type B1 (SR-B1. In this study, we exploited this cellular characteristic to achieve efficient siRNA delivery and established a novel formulation of siRNA by incorporating it into reconstituted HDL (rHDL nanoparticles. Here, we demonstrate that rHDL nanoparticles facilitate highly efficient systemic delivery of siRNA in vivo, mediated by the SR-B1. Moreover, in therapeutic proof-of-concept studies, these nanoparticles were effective in silencing the expression of two proteins that are key to cancer growth and metastasis (signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 and focal adhesion kinase in orthotopic mouse models of ovarian and colorectal cancer. These data indicate that an rHDL nanoparticle is a novel and highly efficient siRNA carrier, and therefore, this novel technology could serve as the foundation for new cancer therapeutic approaches.

  13. Rapid screening for entry inhibitors of highly pathogenic viruses under low-level biocontainment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aparna Talekar

    Full Text Available Emerging viruses including Nipah, Hendra, Lujo, and Junin viruses have enormous potential to spread rapidly. Nipah virus, after emerging as a zoonosis, has also evolved the capacity for human-to-human transmission. Most of the diseases caused by these pathogens are untreatable and require high biocontainment conditions. Universal methods for rapidly identifying and screening candidate antivirals are urgently needed. We have developed a modular antiviral platform strategy that relies on simple bioinformatic and genetic information about each pathogen. Central to this platform is the use of envelope glycoprotein cDNAs to establish multi-cycle replication systems under BSL2 conditions for viral pathogens that normally require BSL3 and BSL4 facilities. We generated monoclonal antibodies against Nipah G by cDNA immunization in rats, and we showed that these antibodies neutralize both Nipah and Hendra live viruses. We then used these effective Henipavirus inhibitors to validate our screening strategy. Our proposed strategy should contribute to the response capability for emerging infectious diseases, providing a way to initiate antiviral development immediately upon identifying novel viruses.

  14. Rapid Screening for Entry Inhibitors of Highly Pathogenic Viruses under Low-Level Biocontainment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talekar, Aparna; Pessi, Antonello; Glickman, Fraser; Sengupta, Uttara; Briese, Thomas; Whitt, Michael A.; Mathieu, Cyrille; Horvat, Branka; Moscona, Anne; Porotto, Matteo

    2012-01-01

    Emerging viruses including Nipah, Hendra, Lujo, and Junin viruses have enormous potential to spread rapidly. Nipah virus, after emerging as a zoonosis, has also evolved the capacity for human-to-human transmission. Most of the diseases caused by these pathogens are untreatable and require high biocontainment conditions. Universal methods for rapidly identifying and screening candidate antivirals are urgently needed. We have developed a modular antiviral platform strategy that relies on simple bioinformatic and genetic information about each pathogen. Central to this platform is the use of envelope glycoprotein cDNAs to establish multi-cycle replication systems under BSL2 conditions for viral pathogens that normally require BSL3 and BSL4 facilities. We generated monoclonal antibodies against Nipah G by cDNA immunization in rats, and we showed that these antibodies neutralize both Nipah and Hendra live viruses. We then used these effective Henipavirus inhibitors to validate our screening strategy. Our proposed strategy should contribute to the response capability for emerging infectious diseases, providing a way to initiate antiviral development immediately upon identifying novel viruses. PMID:22396728

  15. Comparing viral metagenomics methods using a highly multiplexed human viral pathogens reagent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Linlin; Deng, Xutao; Mee, Edward T; Collot-Teixeira, Sophie; Anderson, Rob; Schepelmann, Silke; Minor, Philip D; Delwart, Eric

    2015-03-01

    Unbiased metagenomic sequencing holds significant potential as a diagnostic tool for the simultaneous detection of any previously genetically described viral nucleic acids in clinical samples. Viral genome sequences can also inform on likely phenotypes including drug susceptibility or neutralization serotypes. In this study, different variables of the laboratory methods often used to generate viral metagenomics libraries were compared for their abilities to detect multiple viruses and generate full genome coverage. A biological reagent consisting of 25 different human RNA and DNA viral pathogens was used to estimate the effect of filtration and nuclease digestion, DNA/RNA extraction methods, pre-amplification and the use of different library preparation kits on the detection of viral nucleic acids. Filtration and nuclease treatment led to slight decreases in the percentage of viral sequence reads and number of viruses detected. For nucleic acid extractions silica spin columns improved viral sequence recovery relative to magnetic beads and Trizol extraction. Pre-amplification using random RT-PCR while generating more viral sequence reads resulted in detection of fewer viruses, more overlapping sequences, and lower genome coverage. The ScriptSeq library preparation method retrieved more viruses and a greater fraction of their genomes than the TruSeq and Nextera methods. Viral metagenomics sequencing was able to simultaneously detect up to 22 different viruses in the biological reagent analyzed including all those detected by qPCR. Further optimization will be required for the detection of viruses in biologically more complex samples such as tissues, blood, or feces. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. An RNA replication-center assay for high content image-based quantifications of human rhinovirus and coxsackievirus infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lötzerich Mark

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Picornaviruses are common human and animal pathogens, including polio and rhinoviruses of the enterovirus family, and hepatits A or food-and-mouth disease viruses. There are no effective countermeasures against the vast majority of picornaviruses, with the exception of polio and hepatitis A vaccines. Human rhinoviruses (HRV are the most prevalent picornaviruses comprising more than one hundred serotypes. The existing and also emerging HRVs pose severe health risks for patients with asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Here, we developed a serotype-independent infection assay using a commercially available mouse monoclonal antibody (mabJ2 detecting double-strand RNA. Results Immunocytochemical staining for RNA replication centers using mabJ2 identified cells that were infected with either HRV1A, 2, 14, 16, 37 or coxsackievirus (CV B3, B4 or A21. MabJ2 labeled-cells were immunocytochemically positive for newly synthesized viral capsid proteins from HRV1A, 14, 16, 37 or CVB3, 4. We optimized the procedure for detection of virus replication in settings for high content screening with automated fluorescence microscopy and single cell analysis. Our data show that the infection signal was dependent on multiplicity, time and temperature of infection, and the mabJ2-positive cell numbers correlated with viral titres determined in single step growth curves. The mabJ2 infection assay was adapted to determine the efficacy of anti-viral compounds and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs blocking enterovirus infections. Conclusions We report a broadly applicable, rapid protocol to measure infection of cultured cells with enteroviruses at single cell resolution. This assay can be applied to a wide range of plus-sense RNA viruses, and hence allows comparative studies of viral infection biology without dedicated reagents or procedures. This protocol also allows to directly compare results from small compound or siRNA infection screens

  17. RNA isolation from loquat and other recalcitrant woody plants with high quality and yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morante-Carriel, Jaime; Sellés-Marchart, Susana; Martínez-Márquez, Ascensión; Martínez-Esteso, María José; Luque, Ignacio; Bru-Martínez, Roque

    2014-05-01

    RNA isolation is difficult in plants that contain large amounts of polysaccharides and polyphenol compounds. To date, no commercial kit has been developed for the isolation of high-quality RNA from tissues with these characteristics, especially for fruit. The common protocols for RNA isolation are tedious and usually result in poor yields when applied to recalcitrant plant tissues. Here an efficient RNA isolation protocol based on cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and two successive precipitations with 10 M lithium chloride (LiCl) was developed specifically for loquat fruits, but it was proved to work efficiently in other tissues of loquat and woody plants. The RNA isolated by this improved protocol was not only of high purity and integrity (A260/A280 ratios ranged from 1.90 to 2.04 and A260/A230 ratios were>2.0) but also of high yield (up to 720 μg on average [coefficient of variation=21%] total RNA per gram fresh tissue). The protocol was tested on loquat fruit (different stages of development, postharvest, ripening, and bruising), leaf, root, flower, stem, and bud; quince fruit and root; grapevine cells in liquid culture; and rose petals. The RNA obtained with this method is amenable to enzymatic treatments and can be efficiently applied for research on gene characterization, expression, and function. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. High-quality total RNA isolation from melon (Cucumis melo L. fruits rich in polysaccharides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabrielle Silveira de Campos

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Melon, a member of the family Cucurbitaceae, is the fourth most important fruit in the world market and, on a volume basis, is Brazil’s main fresh fruit export. Many molecular techniques used to understand the maturation of these fruits require high concentrations of highly purified RNA. However, melons are rich in polyphenolic compounds and polysaccharides, which interfere with RNA extraction. This study aimed to determine the most appropriate method for total RNA extraction from melon fruits. Six extraction buffers were tested: T1 guanidine thiocyanate/phenol/chloroform; T2 sodium azide/?-mercaptoethanol; T3 phenol/guanidine thiocyanate; T4 CTAB/PVP/?-mercaptoethanol; T5 SDS/sodium perchlorate/PVP/?-mercaptoethanol, and T6 sarkosyl/PVP/guanidine thiocyanate, using the AxyPrepTM Multisource Total RNA Miniprep Kit. The best method for extracting RNA from both mature and green fruit was based on the SDS/PVP/?-mercaptoethanol buffer, because it rapidly generated a high quality and quantity of material. In general, higher amounts of RNA were obtained from green than mature fruits, probably due to the lower concentration of polysaccharides and water. The purified material can be used as a template in molecular techniques, such as microarrays, RT-PCR, and in the construction of cDNA and RNA-seq data.

  19. Host-pathogen metapopulation dynamics suggest high elevation refugia for boreal toads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosher, Brittany A.; Bailey, Larissa L.; Muths, Erin L.; Huyvaert, Kathryn P

    2018-01-01

    Emerging infectious diseases are an increasingly common threat to wildlife. Chytridiomycosis, caused by the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), is an emerging infectious disease that has been linked to amphibian declines around the world. Few studies exist that explore amphibian-Bd dynamics at the landscape scale, limiting our ability to identify which factors are associated with variation in population susceptibility and to develop effective in situdisease management. Declines of boreal toads (Anaxyrus boreas boreas) in the Southern Rocky Mountains are largely attributed to chytridiomycosis but variation exists in local extinction of boreal toads across this metapopulation. Using a large-scale historic dataset, we explored several potential factors influencing disease dynamics in the boreal toad-Bd system: geographic isolation of populations, amphibian community richness, elevational differences, and habitat permanence. We found evidence that boreal toad extinction risk was lowest at high elevations where temperatures may be sub-optimal for Bd growth and where small boreal toad populations may be below the threshold needed for efficient pathogen transmission. In addition, boreal toads were more likely to recolonize high elevation sites after local extinction, again suggesting that high elevations may provide refuge from disease for boreal toads. We illustrate a modeling framework that will be useful to natural resource managers striving to make decisions in amphibian-Bdsystems. Our data suggest that in the southern Rocky Mountains high elevation sites should be prioritized for conservation initiatives like reintroductions.

  20. High-quality RNA extraction from the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruocco, Nadia; Costantini, Susan; Zupo, Valerio; Romano, Giovanna; Ianora, Adrianna; Fontana, Angelo; Costantini, Maria

    2017-01-01

    The sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus (Lamarck, 1816) is a keystone herbivore in the Mediterranean Sea due to its ability to transform macroalgal-dominated communities into barren areas characterized by increased cover of bare substrates and encrusting coralline algae, reduced biodiversity and altered ecosystem functions. P. lividus is also an excellent animal model for toxicology, physiology and biology investigations having been used for more than a century as a model for embryological studies with synchronously developing embryos which are easy to manipulate and analyze for morphological aberrations. Despite its importance for the scientific community, the complete genome is still not fully annotated. To date, only a few molecular tools are available and a few Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) studies have been performed. Here we aimed at setting-up an RNA extraction method to obtain high quality and sufficient quantity of RNA for NGS from P. lividus embryos at the pluteus stage. We compared five different RNA extraction protocols from four different pools of plutei (500, 1000, 2500 and 5000 embryos): TRIzol®, and four widely-used Silica Membrane kits, GenElute™ Mammalian Total RNA Miniprep Kit, RNAqueous® Micro Kit, RNeasy® Micro Kit and Aurum™ Total RNA Mini Kit. The quantity of RNA isolated was evaluated using NanoDrop. The quality, considering the purity, was measured as A260/A280 and A260/230 ratios. The integrity was measured by RNA Integrity Number (RIN). Our results demonstrated that the most efficient procedures were GenElute, RNeasy and Aurum, producing a sufficient quantity of RNA for NGS. The Bioanalyzer profiles and RIN values revealed that the most efficient methods guaranteeing for RNA integrity were RNeasy and Aurum combined with an initial preservation in RNAlater. This research represents the first attempt to standardize a method for high-quality RNA extraction from sea urchin embryos at the pluteus stage, providing a new resource for this

  1. High-quality RNA extraction from the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus embryos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Ruocco

    Full Text Available The sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus (Lamarck, 1816 is a keystone herbivore in the Mediterranean Sea due to its ability to transform macroalgal-dominated communities into barren areas characterized by increased cover of bare substrates and encrusting coralline algae, reduced biodiversity and altered ecosystem functions. P. lividus is also an excellent animal model for toxicology, physiology and biology investigations having been used for more than a century as a model for embryological studies with synchronously developing embryos which are easy to manipulate and analyze for morphological aberrations. Despite its importance for the scientific community, the complete genome is still not fully annotated. To date, only a few molecular tools are available and a few Next Generation Sequencing (NGS studies have been performed. Here we aimed at setting-up an RNA extraction method to obtain high quality and sufficient quantity of RNA for NGS from P. lividus embryos at the pluteus stage. We compared five different RNA extraction protocols from four different pools of plutei (500, 1000, 2500 and 5000 embryos: TRIzol®, and four widely-used Silica Membrane kits, GenElute™ Mammalian Total RNA Miniprep Kit, RNAqueous® Micro Kit, RNeasy® Micro Kit and Aurum™ Total RNA Mini Kit. The quantity of RNA isolated was evaluated using NanoDrop. The quality, considering the purity, was measured as A260/A280 and A260/230 ratios. The integrity was measured by RNA Integrity Number (RIN. Our results demonstrated that the most efficient procedures were GenElute, RNeasy and Aurum, producing a sufficient quantity of RNA for NGS. The Bioanalyzer profiles and RIN values revealed that the most efficient methods guaranteeing for RNA integrity were RNeasy and Aurum combined with an initial preservation in RNAlater. This research represents the first attempt to standardize a method for high-quality RNA extraction from sea urchin embryos at the pluteus stage, providing a new

  2. Integrated siRNA design based on surveying of features associated with high RNAi effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Dong

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Short interfering RNAs have allowed the development of clean and easily regulated methods for disruption of gene expression. However, while these methods continue to grow in popularity, designing effective siRNA experiments can be challenging. The various existing siRNA design guidelines suffer from two problems: they differ considerably from each other, and they produce high levels of false-positive predictions when tested on data of independent origins. Results Using a distinctly large set of siRNA efficacy data assembled from a vast diversity of origins (the siRecords data, containing records of 3,277 siRNA experiments targeting 1,518 genes, derived from 1,417 independent studies, we conducted extensive analyses of all known features that have been implicated in increasing RNAi effectiveness. A number of features having positive impacts on siRNA efficacy were identified. By performing quantitative analyses on cooperative effects among these features, then applying a disjunctive rule merging (DRM algorithm, we developed a bundle of siRNA design rule sets with the false positive problem well curbed. A comparison with 15 online siRNA design tools indicated that some of the rule sets we developed surpassed all of these design tools commonly used in siRNA design practice in positive predictive values (PPVs. Conclusion The availability of the large and diverse siRNA dataset from siRecords and the approach we describe in this report have allowed the development of highly effective and generally applicable siRNA design rule sets. Together with ever improving RNAi lab techniques, these design rule sets are expected to make siRNAs a more useful tool for molecular genetics, functional genomics, and drug discovery studies.

  3. Characterization of a Highly Pathogenic Molecular Clone of Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Clade C

    OpenAIRE

    de Rozières, Sohela; Mathiason, Candace K.; Rolston, Matthew R.; Chatterji, Udayan; Edward A. Hoover; Elder, John H

    2004-01-01

    We have derived and characterized a highly pathogenic molecular isolate of feline immunodeficiency virus subtype C (FIV-C) CABCpady00C. Clone FIV-C36 was obtained by lambda cloning from cats that developed severe immunodeficiency disease when infected with CABCpady00C (Abbotsford, British Columbia, Canada). Clone FIV-C36 Env is 96% identical to the noninfectious FIV-C isolate sequence deposited in GenBank (FIV-Cgb; GenBank accession number AF474246) (A. Harmache et al.) but is much more diver...

  4. Assessment of vaccination strategies against highly pathogenic avian influenza in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honglei SUN,Jinhua LIU

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Vaccination for highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI has been implemented in China for a decade, however, the virus is still present in poultry. A series of recombinant vaccines, Re-1 to Re-7, have been developed and used, and Re-8 will also be used in clinical settings to prevent the prevailing flu strains. The question remains, when can China eradicate the disease? Here, we review the epidemiology of H5 HPAI along with the development, usage and problems of vaccines. Further suggestions for controlling the disease in China are provided.

  5. Highly Pathogenic Leptospira Found in Urban Brown Rats (Rattus norvegicus) in the Largest Cities of Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, Tanja M; Löhmus, Mare; Persson Vinnersten, Thomas; Råsbäck, Therese; Sundström, Karin; Bergström, Tomas; Lundkvist, Åke

    2015-12-01

    Leptospirosis is an emerging zoonosis of global concern; however, its contemporary occurrence in Sweden, a European country partly located north of the Arctic Circle, is poorly known. Four out of 30 brown rats, captured within urban districts in Sweden, were found to be positive for antibodies to Leptospira interrogans serovar Icterohaemorrhagiae. This serovar causes Weil's disease in humans, a severe infection with jaundice, renal failure, and hemorrhage. Our study is the first finding of this highly pathogenic serovar in Swedish rats since the 1930s.

  6. High-risk periodontal pathogens contribute to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bale, Bradley Field; Doneen, Amy Lynn; Vigerust, David John

    2017-04-01

    Periodontal disease (PD) is generated by microorganisms. These microbes can enter the general circulation causing a bacteraemia. The result can be adverse systemic effects, which could promote conditions such as cardiovascular disease. Level A evidence supports that PD is independently associated with arterial disease. PD is a common chronic condition affecting the majority of Americans 30 years of age and older. Atherosclerosis remains the largest cause of death and disability. Studies indicate that the adverse cardiovascular effects from PD are due to a few putative or high-risk bacteria: Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans , Porphyromonas gingivalis , Tannerella forsythia , Treponema denticola or Fusobacterium nucleatum There are three accepted essential elements in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis: lipoprotein serum concentration, endothelial permeability and binding of lipoproteins in the arterial intima. There is scientific evidence that PD caused by the high-risk pathogens can influence the pathogenesis triad in an adverse manner. With this appreciation, it is reasonable to state PD, due to high-risk pathogens, is a contributory cause of atherosclerosis. Distinguishing this type of PD as causal provides a significant opportunity to reduce arterial disease. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  7. Mortality surveillance for Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) at Kulm Wetland Management District : 2009-2010 proposal

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Proposal for 2009-2010 mortality surveillance for Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) at Kulm Wetland Management District in North Dakota. Surveillance will...

  8. Mortality surveillance for Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) at Kulm Wetland Management District : 2010-2011 proposal

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Proposal for 2010-2011 mortality surveillance for Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) at Kulm Wetland Management District in North Dakota. Surveillance will...

  9. Mortality surveillance for Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) at Kulm Wetland Management District : 2008-2009 proposal

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Proposal for 20082009 mortality surveillance for Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza HPAI at Kulm Wetland Management District in North Dakota. Surveillance will focus...

  10. Mortality surveillance for Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) at Kulm Wetland Management District : 2010-2011 proposal

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Proposal for 20102011 mortality surveillance for Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza HPAI at Kulm Wetland Management District in North Dakota. Surveillance will focus...

  11. Mortality surveillance for Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) at Kulm Wetland Management District : 2008-2009 proposal

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Proposal for 2008-2009 mortality surveillance for Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) at Kulm Wetland Management District in North Dakota. Surveillance will...

  12. eRNA: a graphic user interface-based tool optimized for large data analysis from high-throughput RNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Tiezheng; Huang, Xiaoyi; Dittmar, Rachel L; Du, Meijun; Kohli, Manish; Boardman, Lisa; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Wang, Liang

    2014-03-05

    RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) is emerging as a critical approach in biological research. However, its high-throughput advantage is significantly limited by the capacity of bioinformatics tools. The research community urgently needs user-friendly tools to efficiently analyze the complicated data generated by high throughput sequencers. We developed a standalone tool with graphic user interface (GUI)-based analytic modules, known as eRNA. The capacity of performing parallel processing and sample management facilitates large data analyses by maximizing hardware usage and freeing users from tediously handling sequencing data. The module miRNA identification" includes GUIs for raw data reading, adapter removal, sequence alignment, and read counting. The module "mRNA identification" includes GUIs for reference sequences, genome mapping, transcript assembling, and differential expression. The module "Target screening" provides expression profiling analyses and graphic visualization. The module "Self-testing" offers the directory setups, sample management, and a check for third-party package dependency. Integration of other GUIs including Bowtie, miRDeep2, and miRspring extend the program's functionality. eRNA focuses on the common tools required for the mapping and quantification analysis of miRNA-seq and mRNA-seq data. The software package provides an additional choice for scientists who require a user-friendly computing environment and high-throughput capacity for large data analysis. eRNA is available for free download at https://sourceforge.net/projects/erna/?source=directory.

  13. High-throughput sequencing of RNA silencing-associated small RNAs in olive (Olea europaea L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia Donaire

    Full Text Available Small RNAs (sRNAs of 20 to 25 nucleotides (nt in length maintain genome integrity and control gene expression in a multitude of developmental and physiological processes. Despite RNA silencing has been primarily studied in model plants, the advent of high-throughput sequencing technologies has enabled profiling of the sRNA component of more than 40 plant species. Here, we used deep sequencing and molecular methods to report the first inventory of sRNAs in olive (Olea europaea L.. sRNA libraries prepared from juvenile and adult shoots revealed that the 24-nt class dominates the sRNA transcriptome and atypically accumulates to levels never seen in other plant species, suggesting an active role of heterochromatin silencing in the maintenance and integrity of its large genome. A total of 18 known miRNA families were identified in the libraries. Also, 5 other sRNAs derived from potential hairpin-like precursors remain as plausible miRNA candidates. RNA blots confirmed miRNA expression and suggested tissue- and/or developmental-specific expression patterns. Target mRNAs of conserved miRNAs were computationally predicted among the olive cDNA collection and experimentally validated through endonucleolytic cleavage assays. Finally, we use expression data to uncover genetic components of the miR156, miR172 and miR390/TAS3-derived trans-acting small interfering RNA (tasiRNA regulatory nodes, suggesting that these interactive networks controlling developmental transitions are fully operational in olive.

  14. The hidden face of academic researches on classified highly pathogenic microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devaux, Christian A

    2015-01-01

    Highly pathogenic microorganisms and toxins are manipulated in academic laboratories for fundamental research purposes, diagnostics, drugs and vaccines development. Obviously, these infectious pathogens represent a potential risk for human and/or animal health and their accidental or intentional release (biosafety and biosecurity, respectively) is a major concern of governments. In the past decade, several incidents have occurred in laboratories and reported by media causing fear and raising a sense of suspicion against biologists. Some scientists have been ordered by US government to leave their laboratory for long periods of time following the occurrence of an incident involving infectious pathogens; in other cases laboratories have been shut down and universities have been forced to pay fines and incur a long-term ban on funding after gross negligence of biosafety/biosecurity procedures. Measures of criminal sanctions have also been taken to minimize the risk that such incidents can reoccur. As United States and many other countries, France has recently strengthened its legal measures for laboratories' protection. During the past two decades, France has adopted a series of specific restriction measures to better protect scientific discoveries with a potential economic/social impact and prevent their misuse by ill-intentioned people without affecting the progress of science through fundamental research. French legal regulations concerning scientific discoveries have progressively strengthened since 2001, until the publication in November 2011 of a decree concerning the "PPST" (for "Protection du Potentiel Scientifique et Technique de la nation", the protection of sensitive scientific data). Following the same logic of protection of sensitive scientific researches, regulations were also adopted in an order published in April 2012 concerning the biology and health field. The aim was to define the legal framework that precise the conditions for authorizing

  15. Highly efficient siRNA delivery system into human and murine cells using single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladeira, M. S.; Andrade, V. A.; Gomes, E. R. M.; Aguiar, C. J.; Moraes, E. R.; Soares, J. S.; Silva, E. E.; Lacerda, R. G.; Ladeira, L. O.; Jorio, A.; Lima, P.; Leite, M. Fatima; Resende, R. R.; Guatimosim, S.

    2010-09-01

    Development of RNA interference (RNAi) technology utilizing short interfering RNA sequences (siRNA) has focused on creating methods for delivering siRNAs to cells and for enhancing siRNA stability in vitro and in vivo. Here, we describe a novel approach for siRNA cellular delivery using siRNA coiling into carboxyl-functionalized single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). The CNT-siRNA delivery system successfully demonstrates nonspecific toxicity and transfection efficiency greater than 95%. This approach offers the potential for siRNA delivery into different types of cells, including hard-to-transfect cells, such as neuronal cells and cardiomyocytes. We also tested the CNT-siRNA system in a non-metastatic human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (SKHep1). In all types of cells used in this work the CNT-siRNA delivery system showed high efficiency and apparent no side effects for various in vitro applications.

  16. Highly efficient siRNA delivery system into human and murine cells using single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladeira, M S; Andrade, V A; Gomes, E R M; Aguiar, C J; Moraes, E R; Fatima Leite, M; Guatimosim, S [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG, 31270-901 (Brazil); Soares, J S; Silva, E E; Lacerda, R G; Ladeira, L O; Jorio, A; Resende, R R [Department of Physics, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG, 31270-901 (Brazil); Lima, P, E-mail: rrresende@hotmail.com, E-mail: guatimosim@icb.ufmg.br [Department of Biosystems Engineering, Federal University of Sao Joao Del Rei, Sao Joao Del Rei, MG, 36307-352 (Brazil)

    2010-09-24

    Development of RNA interference (RNAi) technology utilizing short interfering RNA sequences (siRNA) has focused on creating methods for delivering siRNAs to cells and for enhancing siRNA stability in vitro and in vivo. Here, we describe a novel approach for siRNA cellular delivery using siRNA coiling into carboxyl-functionalized single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). The CNT-siRNA delivery system successfully demonstrates nonspecific toxicity and transfection efficiency greater than 95%. This approach offers the potential for siRNA delivery into different types of cells, including hard-to-transfect cells, such as neuronal cells and cardiomyocytes. We also tested the CNT-siRNA system in a non-metastatic human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (SKHep1). In all types of cells used in this work the CNT-siRNA delivery system showed high efficiency and apparent no side effects for various in vitro applications.

  17. Signatures of Nucleotide Analog Incorporation by an RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase Revealed Using High-Throughput Magnetic Tweezers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dulin, D.; Arnold, Jamie J.; van Laar, T.; Oh, Hyung Suk; Lee, Cheri; Perkins, Angela L.; Harki, Daniel A.; Depken, S.M.; Cameron, Craig E.; Dekker, N.H.

    2017-01-01

    RNA viruses pose a threat to public health that is exacerbated by the dearth of antiviral therapeutics. The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) holds promise as a broad-spectrum, therapeutic target because of the conserved nature of the nucleotide-substrate-binding and catalytic sites.

  18. Exposing the Three-Dimensional Biogeography and Metabolic States of Pathogens in Cystic Fibrosis Sputum via Hydrogel Embedding, Clearing, and rRNA Labeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William H. DePas

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Physiological resistance to antibiotics confounds the treatment of many chronic bacterial infections, motivating researchers to identify novel therapeutic approaches. To do this effectively, an understanding of how microbes survive in vivo is needed. Though much can be inferred from bulk approaches to characterizing complex environments, essential information can be lost if spatial organization is not preserved. Here, we introduce a tissue-clearing technique, termed MiPACT, designed to retain and visualize bacteria with associated proteins and nucleic acids in situ on various spatial scales. By coupling MiPACT with hybridization chain reaction (HCR to detect rRNA in sputum samples from cystic fibrosis (CF patients, we demonstrate its ability to survey thousands of bacteria (or bacterial aggregates over millimeter scales and quantify aggregation of individual species in polymicrobial communities. By analyzing aggregation patterns of four prominent CF pathogens, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcus sp., and Achromobacter xylosoxidans, we demonstrate a spectrum of aggregation states: from mostly single cells (A. xylosoxidans, to medium-sized clusters (S. aureus, to a mixture of single cells and large aggregates (P. aeruginosa and Streptococcus sp.. Furthermore, MiPACT-HCR revealed an intimate interaction between Streptococcus sp. and specific host cells. Lastly, by comparing standard rRNA fluorescence in situ hybridization signals to those from HCR, we found that different populations of S. aureus and A. xylosoxidans grow slowly overall yet exhibit growth rate heterogeneity over hundreds of microns. These results demonstrate the utility of MiPACT-HCR to directly capture the spatial organization and metabolic activity of bacteria in complex systems, such as human sputum.

  19. Development of a high- versus low-pathogenicity model of the free-living amoeba Naegleria fowleri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burri, Denise C; Gottstein, Bruno; Zumkehr, Béatrice; Hemphill, Andrew; Schürch, Nadia; Wittwer, Matthias; Müller, Norbert

    2012-10-01

    Species in the genus Naegleria are free-living amoebae of the soil and warm fresh water. Although around 30 species have been recognized, Naegleria fowleri is the only one that causes primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) in humans. PAM is an acute and fast progressing disease affecting the central nervous system. Most of the patients die within 1-2 weeks of exposure to the infectious water source. The fact that N. fowleri causes such fast progressing and highly lethal infections has opened many questions regarding the relevant pathogenicity factors of the amoeba. In order to investigate the pathogenesis of N. fowleri under defined experimental conditions, we developed a novel high- versus low-pathogenicity model for this pathogen. We showed that the composition of the axenic growth media influenced growth behaviour and morphology, as well as in vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo pathogenicity of N. fowleri. Trophozoites maintained in Nelson's medium were highly pathogenic for mice, demonstrated rapid in vitro proliferation, characteristic expression of surface membrane vesicles and a small cell diameter, and killed target mouse fibroblasts by both contact-dependent and -independent destruction. In contrast, N. fowleri cultured in PYNFH medium exhibited a low pathogenicity, slower growth, increased cell size and contact-dependent target cell destruction. However, cultivation of the amoeba in PYNFH medium supplemented with liver hydrolysate (LH) resulted in trophozoites that were highly pathogenic in mice, and demonstrated an intermediate proliferation rate in vitro, diminished cell diameter and contact-dependent target cell destruction. Thus, in this model, the presence of LH resulted in increased proliferation of trophozoites in vitro and enhanced pathogenicity of N. fowleri in mice. However, neither in vitro cytotoxicity mechanisms nor the presence of membrane vesicles on the surface correlated with the pathologic potential of the amoeba. This indicated that the

  20. Comparative genomics of Burkholderia multivorans, a ubiquitous pathogen with a highly conserved genomic structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Peeters

    Full Text Available The natural environment serves as a reservoir of opportunistic pathogens. A well-established method for studying the epidemiology of such opportunists is multilocus sequence typing, which in many cases has defined strains predisposed to causing infection. Burkholderia multivorans is an important pathogen in people with cystic fibrosis (CF and its epidemiology suggests that strains are acquired from non-human sources such as the natural environment. This raises the central question of whether the isolation source (CF or environment or the multilocus sequence type (ST of B. multivorans better predicts their genomic content and functionality. We identified four pairs of B. multivorans isolates, representing distinct STs and consisting of one CF and one environmental isolate each. All genomes were sequenced using the PacBio SMRT sequencing technology, which resulted in eight high-quality B. multivorans genome assemblies. The present study demonstrated that the genomic structure of the examined B. multivorans STs is highly conserved and that the B. multivorans genomic lineages are defined by their ST. Orthologous protein families were not uniformly distributed among chromosomes, with core orthologs being enriched on the primary chromosome and ST-specific orthologs being enriched on the second and third chromosome. The ST-specific orthologs were enriched in genes involved in defense mechanisms and secondary metabolism, corroborating the strain-specificity of these virulence characteristics. Finally, the same B. multivorans genomic lineages occur in both CF and environmental samples and on different continents, demonstrating their ubiquity and evolutionary persistence.

  1. Comparative genomics of Burkholderia multivorans, a ubiquitous pathogen with a highly conserved genomic structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, Charlotte; Cooper, Vaughn S; Hatcher, Philip J; Verheyde, Bart; Carlier, Aurélien; Vandamme, Peter

    2017-01-01

    The natural environment serves as a reservoir of opportunistic pathogens. A well-established method for studying the epidemiology of such opportunists is multilocus sequence typing, which in many cases has defined strains predisposed to causing infection. Burkholderia multivorans is an important pathogen in people with cystic fibrosis (CF) and its epidemiology suggests that strains are acquired from non-human sources such as the natural environment. This raises the central question of whether the isolation source (CF or environment) or the multilocus sequence type (ST) of B. multivorans better predicts their genomic content and functionality. We identified four pairs of B. multivorans isolates, representing distinct STs and consisting of one CF and one environmental isolate each. All genomes were sequenced using the PacBio SMRT sequencing technology, which resulted in eight high-quality B. multivorans genome assemblies. The present study demonstrated that the genomic structure of the examined B. multivorans STs is highly conserved and that the B. multivorans genomic lineages are defined by their ST. Orthologous protein families were not uniformly distributed among chromosomes, with core orthologs being enriched on the primary chromosome and ST-specific orthologs being enriched on the second and third chromosome. The ST-specific orthologs were enriched in genes involved in defense mechanisms and secondary metabolism, corroborating the strain-specificity of these virulence characteristics. Finally, the same B. multivorans genomic lineages occur in both CF and environmental samples and on different continents, demonstrating their ubiquity and evolutionary persistence.

  2. An improved and reproducible protocol for the extraction of high quality fungal RNA from plant biomass substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patyshakuliyeva, Aleksandrina; Mäkelä, Miia R; Sietiö, Outi-Maaria; de Vries, Ronald P; Hildén, Kristiina S

    2014-11-01

    Isolation of high quantity and quality RNA is a crucial step in the detection of meaningful gene expression data. Obtaining intact fungal RNA from complex lignocellulosic substrates is often difficult, producing low integrity RNA which perform poorly in downstream applications. In this study we developed an RNA extraction method using CsCl centrifugation procedure, modified from previous reports and adapted for isolation of RNA from plant biomass. This method provided high level of integrity and good quantity of RNA which were suitable for reliable analyses of gene expression and produced consistent and reproducible results. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Low-pathogenic influenza A viruses in North American diving ducks contribute to the emergence of a novel highly pathogenic influenza A(H7N8) virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yifei; Ramey, Andrew M.; Bowman, Andrew S; DeLiberto, Thomas J.; Killian, Mary Lea; Krauss, Scott; Nolting, Jacqueline M.; Torchetti, Mia Kim; Reeves, Andrew B.; Webby, Richard J.; Stallknecht, David E.; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2017-01-01

    Introductions of low-pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) viruses of subtypes H5 and H7 into poultry from wild birds have the potential to mutate to highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses, but such viruses' origins are often unclear. In January 2016, a novel H7N8 HPAI virus caused an outbreak in turkeys in Indiana, USA. To determine the virus's origin, we sequenced the genomes of 441 wild-bird origin influenza A viruses (IAVs) from North America and subjected them to evolutionary analyses. The results showed that the H7N8 LPAI virus most likely circulated among diving ducks in the Mississippi flyway during autumn 2015 and was subsequently introduced to Indiana turkeys, in which it evolved high pathogenicity. Preceding the outbreak, an isolate with six gene segments (PB2, PB1, PA, HA, NA, and NS) sharing >99% sequence identity with those of H7N8 turkey isolates was recovered from a diving duck sampled in Kentucky, USA. H4N8 IAVs from other diving ducks possessed five H7N8-like gene segments (PB2, PB1, NA, MP, and NS; >98% sequence identity). Our findings suggest that viral gene constellations circulating among diving ducks can contribute to the emergence of IAVs that affect poultry. Therefore, diving ducks may serve an important and understudied role in the maintenance, diversification, and transmission of IAVs in the wild-bird reservoir.

  4. Model-based evaluation of highly and low pathogenic avian influenza dynamics in wild birds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Hénaux

    Full Text Available There is growing interest in avian influenza (AI epidemiology to predict disease risk in wild and domestic birds, and prevent transmission to humans. However, understanding the epidemic dynamics of highly pathogenic (HPAI viruses remains challenging because they have rarely been detected in wild birds. We used modeling to integrate available scientific information from laboratory and field studies, evaluate AI dynamics in individual hosts and waterfowl populations, and identify key areas for future research. We developed a Susceptible-Exposed-Infectious-Recovered (SEIR model and used published laboratory challenge studies to estimate epidemiological parameters (rate of infection, latency period, recovery and mortality rates, considering the importance of age classes, and virus pathogenicity. Infectious contact leads to infection and virus shedding within 1-2 days, followed by relatively slower period for recovery or mortality. We found a shorter infectious period for HPAI than low pathogenic (LP AI, which may explain that HPAI has been much harder to detect than LPAI during surveillance programs. Our model predicted a rapid LPAI epidemic curve, with a median duration of infection of 50-60 days and no fatalities. In contrast, HPAI dynamics had lower prevalence and higher mortality, especially in young birds. Based on field data from LPAI studies, our model suggests to increase surveillance for HPAI in post-breeding areas, because the presence of immunologically naïve young birds is predicted to cause higher HPAI prevalence and bird losses during this season. Our results indicate a better understanding of the transmission, infection, and immunity-related processes is required to refine predictions of AI risk and spread, improve surveillance for HPAI in wild birds, and develop disease control strategies to reduce potential transmission to domestic birds and/or humans.

  5. High throughput, multiplexed pathogen detection authenticates plague waves in medieval Venice, Italy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thi-Nguyen-Ny Tran

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Historical records suggest that multiple burial sites from the 14th-16th centuries in Venice, Italy, were used during the Black Death and subsequent plague epidemics. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: High throughput, multiplexed real-time PCR detected DNA of seven highly transmissible pathogens in 173 dental pulp specimens collected from 46 graves. Bartonella quintana DNA was identified in five (2.9% samples, including three from the 16th century and two from the 15th century, and Yersinia pestis DNA was detected in three (1.7% samples, including two from the 14th century and one from the 16th century. Partial glpD gene sequencing indicated that the detected Y. pestis was the Orientalis biotype. CONCLUSIONS: These data document for the first time successive plague epidemics in the medieval European city where quarantine was first instituted in the 14th century.

  6. High throughput, multiplexed pathogen detection authenticates plague waves in medieval Venice, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Thi-Nguyen-Ny; Signoli, Michel; Fozzati, Luigi; Aboudharam, Gérard; Raoult, Didier; Drancourt, Michel

    2011-03-10

    Historical records suggest that multiple burial sites from the 14th-16th centuries in Venice, Italy, were used during the Black Death and subsequent plague epidemics. High throughput, multiplexed real-time PCR detected DNA of seven highly transmissible pathogens in 173 dental pulp specimens collected from 46 graves. Bartonella quintana DNA was identified in five (2.9%) samples, including three from the 16th century and two from the 15th century, and Yersinia pestis DNA was detected in three (1.7%) samples, including two from the 14th century and one from the 16th century. Partial glpD gene sequencing indicated that the detected Y. pestis was the Orientalis biotype. These data document for the first time successive plague epidemics in the medieval European city where quarantine was first instituted in the 14th century.

  7. Pseudotyping of vesicular stomatitis virus with the envelope glycoproteins of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Gert; Locher, Samira; Berger Rentsch, Marianne; Halbherr, Stefan J

    2014-08-01

    Pseudotype viruses are useful for studying the envelope proteins of harmful viruses. This work describes the pseudotyping of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) with the envelope glycoproteins of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses. VSV lacking the homotypic glycoprotein (G) gene (VSVΔG) was used to express haemagglutinin (HA), neuraminidase (NA) or the combination of both. Propagation-competent pseudotype viruses were only obtained when HA and NA were expressed from the same vector genome. Pseudotype viruses containing HA from different H5 clades were neutralized specifically by immune sera directed against the corresponding clade. Fast and sensitive reading of test results was achieved by vector-mediated expression of GFP. Pseudotype viruses expressing a mutant VSV matrix protein showed restricted spread in IFN-competent cells. This pseudotype system will facilitate the detection of neutralizing antibodies against virulent influenza viruses, circumventing the need for high-level biosafety containment. © 2014 The Authors.

  8. Small RNAs and the competing endogenous RNA network in high grade serous ovarian cancer tumor spread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmayr-Heyda, Anna; Auer, Katharina; Sukhbaatar, Nyamdelger; Aust, Stefanie; Deycmar, Simon; Reiner, Agnes T; Polterauer, Stephan; Dekan, Sabine; Pils, Dietmar

    2016-06-28

    High grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC) is among the most deadly malignancies in women, frequently involving peritoneal tumor spread. Understanding molecular mechanisms of peritoneal metastasis is essential to develop urgently needed targeted therapies. We described two peritoneal tumor spread types in HGSOC apparent during surgery: miliary (numerous millet-sized implants) and non-miliary (few big, bulky implants). The former one is defined by a more epithelial-like tumor cell characteristic with less immune cell reactivity and with significant worse prognosis, even if corrected for typical clinicopathologic factors.23 HGSOC patients were enrolled in this study. Isolated tumor cells from fresh tumor tissues of ovarian and peritoneal origin and from ascites were used for ribosomal RNA depleted RNA and small RNA sequencing. RT-qPCR was used to validate results and an independent cohort of 32 patients to validate the impact on survival. Large and small RNA sequencing data were integrated and a new gene-miRNA set analysis method was developed.Thousands of new small RNAs (miRNAs and piwi-interacting RNAs) were predicted and a 13 small RNA signature was developed to predict spread type from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues. Furthermore, integrative analyses of RNA sequencing and small RNA sequencing data revealed a global upregulation of the competing endogenous RNA network in tumor tissues of non-miliary compared to miliary spread, i.e. higher expression of circular RNAs and long non-coding RNAs compared to coding RNAs but unchanged abundance of small RNAs. This global deregulated expression pattern could be co-responsible for the spread characteristic, miliary or non-miliary, in ovarian cancer.

  9. High-yield extraction of Escherichia coli RNA from human whole blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennecke, Johannes; Kraut, Simone; Zwadlo, Klara; Gandi, Senthil Kumar; Pritchard, David; Templeton, Kate; Bachmann, Till

    2017-03-01

    Studies of bacterial transcriptomics during bloodstream infections are limited to-date because unbiased extraction of bacterial mRNA from whole blood in sufficient quantity and quality has proved challenging. Problems include the high excess of human cells, the presence of PCR inhibitors and the short intrinsic half-life of bacterial mRNA. This study aims to provide a framework for the choice of the most suitable sample preparation method. Escherichia coli cells were spiked into human whole blood and the bacterial gene expression was stabilized with RNAprotect either immediately or after lysis of the red blood cells with Triton X-100, saponin, ammonium chloride or the commercial MolYsis buffer CM. RNA yield, purity and integrity were assessed by absorbance measurements at 260 and 280 nm, real-time PCR and capillary electrophoresis. For low cell numbers, the best mRNA yields were obtained by adding the commercial RNAprotect reagent directly to the sample without prior lyses of the human blood cells. Using this protocol, significant amounts of human RNA were co-purified, however, this had a beneficial impact on the yields of bacterial mRNA. Among the tested lysis agents, Triton X-100 was the most effective and reduced the human RNA background by three to four orders of magnitude. For most applications, lysis of the human blood cells is not required. However, co-purified human RNA may interfere with some downstream processes such as RNA sequencing. In this case, blood cell lysis with Triton X-100 is desirable.

  10. A Modified Protocol for High-Quality RNA Extraction from Oleoresin-Producing Adult Pines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima, Júlio César; Füller, Thanise Nogueira; de Costa, Fernanda; Rodrigues-Corrêa, Kelly C S; Fett-Neto, Arthur G

    2016-01-01

    RNA extraction resulting in good yields and quality is a fundamental step for the analyses of transcriptomes through high-throughput sequencing technologies, microarray, and also northern blots, RT-PCR, and RTqPCR. Even though many specific protocols designed for plants with high content of secondary metabolites have been developed, these are often expensive, time consuming, and not suitable for a wide range of tissues. Here we present a modification of the method previously described using the commercially available Concert™ Plant RNA Reagent (Invitrogen) buffer for field-grown adult pine trees with high oleoresin content.

  11. Nanoliter high-throughput PCR for DNA and RNA profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenan, Colin J H; Roberts, Douglas; Hurley, James

    2009-01-01

    The increasing emphasis in life science research on utilization of genetic and genomic information underlies the need for high-throughput technologies capable of analyzing the expression of multiple genes or the presence of informative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in large-scale, population-based applications. Human disease research, disease diagnosis, personalized therapeutics, environmental monitoring, blood testing, and identification of genetic traits impacting agricultural practices, both in terms of food quality and production efficiency, are a few areas where such systems are in demand. This has stimulated the need for PCR technologies that preserves the intrinsic analytical benefits of PCR yet enables higher throughputs without increasing the time to answer, labor and reagent expenses and workflow complexity. An example of such a system based on a high-density array of nanoliter PCR assays is described here. Functionally equivalent to a microtiter plate, the nanoplate system makes possible up to 3,072 simultaneous end-point or real-time PCR measurements in a device, the size of a standard microscope slide. Methods for SNP genotyping with end-point TaqMan PCR assays and quantitative measurement of gene expression with SYBR Green I real-time PCR are outlined and illustrative data showing system performance is provided.

  12. Multiplex mRNA assay using electrophoretic tags for high-throughput gene expression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Huan; Cao, Liching; Tan, Yuping; Williams, Stephen; Chen, Lili; Matray, Tracy; Chenna, Ahmed; Moore, Sean; Hernandez, Vincent; Xiao, Vivian; Tang, Mengxiang; Singh, Sharat

    2004-09-08

    We describe a novel multiplexing technology using a library of small fluorescent molecules, termed eTag molecules, to code and quantify mRNA targets. eTag molecules, which have the same fluorometric property, but distinct charge-to-mass ratios possess pre-defined electrophoretic characteristics and can be resolved using capillary electrophoresis. Coupled with primary Invader mRNA assay, eTag molecules were applied to simultaneously quantify up to 44 mRNA targets. This multiplexing approach was validated by examining a panel of inflammation responsive genes in human umbilical vein endothelial cells stimulated with inflammatory cytokine interleukin 1beta. The laser-induced fluorescence detection and electrokinetic sample injection process in capillary electrophoresis allows sensitive quantification of thousands of copies of mRNA molecules in a reaction. The assay is precise, as evaluated by measuring qualified Z' factor, a dimensionless and simple characteristic for applications in high-throughput screening using mRNA assays. Our data demonstrate the synergy between the multiplexing capability of eTag molecules by sensitive capillary electrophoresis detection and the isothermal linear amplification characteristics of the Invader assay. eTag multiplex mRNA assay presents a unique platform for sensitive, high sample throughput and multiplex gene expression analysis.

  13. Selenazolinium Salts as “Small Molecule Catalysts” with High Potency against ESKAPE Bacterial Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Witek

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In view of the pressing need to identify new antibacterial agents able to combat multidrug-resistant bacteria, we investigated a series of fused selenazolinium derivatives (1–8 regarding their in vitro antimicrobial activities against 25 ESKAPE-pathogen strains. Ebselen was used as reference compound. Most of the selenocompounds demonstrated an excellent in vitro activity against all S. aureus strains, with activities comparable to or even exceeding the one of ebselen. In contrast to ebselen, some selenazolinium derivatives (1, 3, and 7 even displayed significant actions against all Gram-negative pathogens tested. The 3-bromo-2-(1-hydroxy-1-methylethyl[1,2]selenazolo[2,3-a]pyridinium chloride (1 was particularly active (minimum inhibitory concentrations, MICs: 0.31–1.24 µg/mL for MRSA, and 0.31–2.48 µg/mL for Gram-negative bacteria and devoid of any significant mutagenicity in the Ames assay. Our preliminary mechanistic studies in cell culture indicated that their mode of action is likely to be associated with an alteration of intracellular levels of glutathione and cysteine thiols of different proteins in the bacterial cells, hence supporting the idea that such compounds interact with the intracellular thiolstat. This alteration of pivotal cysteine residues is most likely the result of a direct or catalytic oxidative modification of such residues by the highly reactive selenium species (RSeS employed.

  14. Modelling the wind-borne spread of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus between farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ssematimba, Amos; Hagenaars, Thomas J; de Jong, Mart C M

    2012-01-01

    A quantitative understanding of the spread of contaminated farm dust between locations is a prerequisite for obtaining much-needed insight into one of the possible mechanisms of disease spread between farms. Here, we develop a model to calculate the quantity of contaminated farm-dust particles deposited at various locations downwind of a source farm and apply the model to assess the possible contribution of the wind-borne route to the transmission of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza virus (HPAI) during the 2003 epidemic in the Netherlands. The model is obtained from a Gaussian Plume Model by incorporating the dust deposition process, pathogen decay, and a model for the infection process on exposed farms. Using poultry- and avian influenza-specific parameter values we calculate the distance-dependent probability of between-farm transmission by this route. A comparison between the transmission risk pattern predicted by the model and the pattern observed during the 2003 epidemic reveals that the wind-borne route alone is insufficient to explain the observations although it could contribute substantially to the spread over short distance ranges, for example, explaining 24% of the transmission over distances up to 25 km.

  15. H7N7 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza in Poultry Farms in Italy in 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulatti, P; Zecchin, B; Monne, I; Vieira, J T; Dorotea, T; Terregino, C; Lorenzetto, M; Piccolomini, L Loli; Santi, A; Massi, P; Bonfanti, L; Marangon, S

    2017-06-01

    After the H7N7 highly pathogenic (HP) avian influenza (AI) outbreak in 2013, and a single case of H5N8 HPAI in 2014, in April 2016, a H7N7 HPAI virus was detected in northeastern Italy. The case occurred in an organic free-range laying hen farm located in proximity with one of the highest densely populated poultry areas (DPPAs) in Italy. Control measures provided by the Council of the European Union in directive 2005/94/CE were promptly applied, and enhanced surveillance activities were implemented in the DPPAs. On May 16, 2016, a second case was confirmed in a fattening turkey farm within the protection zone of the previous outbreak. Following an epidemiologic inquiry, another turkey farm was considered at risk of transmission and was subjected to preemptive culling. Epidemiologic data and phylogenetic analyses indicated that the virus was likely introduced from wild birds as a low pathogenicity AI strain, through direct contact. The rapid containment of the outbreak proves the level of preparedness of the veterinary public health sector in Italy. Nevertheless, the recurrent introductions from wild birds indicate the need of improving both the biosecurity levels in the DPPA and the surveillance activities in wild birds to quickly detect the presence of AI in the territory.

  16. Identifying highly connected counties compensates for resource limitations when evaluating national spread of an invasive pathogen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sweta Sutrave

    Full Text Available Surveying invasive species can be highly resource intensive, yet near-real-time evaluations of invasion progress are important resources for management planning. In the case of the soybean rust invasion of the United States, a linked monitoring, prediction, and communication network saved U.S. soybean growers approximately $200 M/yr. Modeling of future movement of the pathogen (Phakopsora pachyrhizi was based on data about current disease locations from an extensive network of sentinel plots. We developed a dynamic network model for U.S. soybean rust epidemics, with counties as nodes and link weights a function of host hectarage and wind speed and direction. We used the network model to compare four strategies for selecting an optimal subset of sentinel plots, listed here in order of increasing performance: random selection, zonal selection (based on more heavily weighting regions nearer the south, where the pathogen overwinters, frequency-based selection (based on how frequently the county had been infected in the past, and frequency-based selection weighted by the node strength of the sentinel plot in the network model. When dynamic network properties such as node strength are characterized for invasive species, this information can be used to reduce the resources necessary to survey and predict invasion progress.

  17. Direct metagenomic detection of viral pathogens in nasal and fecal specimens using an unbiased high-throughput sequencing approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shota Nakamura

    Full Text Available With the severe acute respiratory syndrome epidemic of 2003 and renewed attention on avian influenza viral pandemics, new surveillance systems are needed for the earlier detection of emerging infectious diseases. We applied a "next-generation" parallel sequencing platform for viral detection in nasopharyngeal and fecal samples collected during seasonal influenza virus (Flu infections and norovirus outbreaks from 2005 to 2007 in Osaka, Japan. Random RT-PCR was performed to amplify RNA extracted from 0.1-0.25 ml of nasopharyngeal aspirates (N = 3 and fecal specimens (N = 5, and more than 10 microg of cDNA was synthesized. Unbiased high-throughput sequencing of these 8 samples yielded 15,298-32,335 (average 24,738 reads in a single 7.5 h run. In nasopharyngeal samples, although whole genome analysis was not available because the majority (>90% of reads were host genome-derived, 20-460 Flu-reads were detected, which was sufficient for subtype identification. In fecal samples, bacteria and host cells were removed by centrifugation, resulting in gain of 484-15,260 reads of norovirus sequence (78-98% of the whole genome was covered, except for one specimen that was under-detectable by RT-PCR. These results suggest that our unbiased high-throughput sequencing approach is useful for directly detecting pathogenic viruses without advance genetic information. Although its cost and technological availability make it unlikely that this system will very soon be the diagnostic standard worldwide, this system could be useful for the earlier discovery of novel emerging viruses and bioterrorism, which are difficult to detect with conventional procedures.

  18. Production of high-amylose maize lines using RNA interference in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To regulate the biosynthetic process of maize starch and produce high-amylose transgenic maize, RNA interference was used to inhibit the starch branching enzyme gene Sbe2. A construct with a 562 bp segment of Sbe2 (pRSBE2a) was cloned as inverted repeats. Highly efficient RNAi vector pRSBE2a was transferred to ...

  19. Waterfowl potential as resevoirs of high pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Susanti

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The high population of waterfowl subsequently with the high case fatality of poultry and people in West Java regency caused by HPAI H5N1 can raise possibility that waterfowl was a natural reservoir. This research aimed to prove that waterfowl in West Java served as reservoir of AI virus (primarily H5N1 and also identify the virus pathotype based on cleavage site of amino acid sequence. Cloacal swab sample was obtained from healthy and unvaccinated waterfowl from Sukabumi and Bogor Regency. Cloacal swab was propagated in 9 days old embryonic chicken eggs. Allantoic fluid was harvested at the 4th day of incubation and then tested for hemagglutination, and positive isolate continued with virus sub-typing using PCR method. H5 gene from H5N1 isolate then sequenced using dideoxy termination method. Multiple alignment of nucleotide sequences were analysed using MEGA-3.1 program. Sub-typing using PCR method indicated the existence of 25 strain H5N1, 16 strain HxN1, 4 strain H5Nx and 9 virus ND. Characterization of cleavage site amino acid sequence indicated that all H5N1 sample were pathogenic with sequence QRERRRKKR (23 sample dan QRESRRKKR (2 sample. Waterfowl was HPAI H5N1 virus reservoir. Asymptomatic infection in waterfowl, but the virus shedding gradually occurred and therefore it became potential source of H5N1 virus infection. Our findings suggest that immediate action is needed to prevent the transmission of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses from the apparently healthy waterfowl into terrestrial poultry or human.

  20. Constitutional high expression of an APC mRNA isoform in a subset of attenuated familial adenomatous polyposis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venesio, Tiziana; Balsamo, Antonella; Sfiligoi, Christian; Fuso, Luca; Molatore, Sara; Ranzani, Guglielmina Nadia; Risio, Mauro

    2007-03-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis is an inherited condition associated with hundreds to thousands of colorectal adenomas conferring a very high risk of cancer at a young age. In addition to "classical" form, there is also an attenuated polyposis, with fewer than 100 polyps and a delayed age of cancer onset. Both classical and attenuated polyposis are characterized by a relevant phenotypic heterogeneity. The disease has been linked to constitutive mutations of either APC tumor suppressor gene, or less frequently, MYH base-excision repair gene. However, the genetic cause remains undetected in up to 70-80% of patients with the attenuated form. This analysis was performed on 26 polyposis patients with the attenuated phenotype. All patients had formerly proven to be negative for APC truncating mutations that typically represent the majority of APC gene alterations. We evaluated the APC mRNA constitutional level by real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Eleven patients (42%) showed an anomalous APC transcription level. One patient with reduced mRNA was a carrier of a whole APC gene deletion. In seven out of the ten remaining cases, we found the increased expression of an APC mRNA isoform resulting from exon 10/15 connection and giving rise to a stable truncated peptide. Mutations neither in the invariant splice sites nor in the known transcription regulatory signals were found. Our results support the notion that in attenuated polyposis patients, a detailed investigation of APC transcription can allow detection of rare alterations. Although functional data are required, the isoform we observed might have some pathogenic role, accounting for the heterogeneous phenotype that characterizes the polyposis syndrome.

  1. siRNAs targeting PB2 and NP genes potentially inhibit replication of Highly Pathogenic H5N1 Avian Influenza Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behera, Padmanava; Nagarajan, Shanmugasundaram; Murugkar, Harshad V; Kalaiyarasu, Semmannan; Prakash, Anil; Gothalwal, Ragini; Dubey, Shiv Chandra; Kulkarni, Diwakar D; Tosh, Chakradhar

    2015-06-01

    Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus is a threat to animal and public health worldwide. Till date, the H5N1 virus has claimed 402 human lives, with a mortality rate of 58 percent and has caused the death or culling of millions of poultry since 2003. In this study, we have designed three siRNAs (PB2-2235, PB2-479 and NP-865) targeting PB2 and NP genes of avian influenza virus and evaluated their potential, measured by hemagglutination (HA), plaque reduction and Real time RT-PCR assay, in inhibiting H5N1 virus (A/chicken/Navapur/7972/2006) replication in MDCK cells. The siRNAs caused 8- to 16-fold reduction in virus HA titers at 24 h after challenged with 100TCID50 of virus. Among these siRNAs, PB2-2235 offered the highest inhibition of virus replication with 16-fold reduction in virus HA titer, 80 percent reduction in viral plaque counts and 94 percent inhibition in expression of specific RNA at 24 h. The other two siRNAs had 68-73 percent and 87-88 percent reduction in viral plaque counts and RNA copy number, respectively. The effect of siRNA on H5N1 virus replication continued till 48h (maximum observation period). These findings suggest that PB2-2235 could efficiently inhibit HPAI H5N1 virus replication.

  2. Highly divergent 16S rRNA sequences in ribosomal operons of Scytonema hyalinum (Cyanobacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey R Johansen

    Full Text Available A highly divergent 16S rRNA gene was found in one of the five ribosomal operons present in a species complex currently circumscribed as Scytonema hyalinum (Nostocales, Cyanobacteria using clone libraries. If 16S rRNA sequence macroheterogeneity among ribosomal operons due to insertions, deletions or truncation is excluded, the sequence heterogeneity observed in S. hyalinum was the highest observed in any prokaryotic species thus far (7.3-9.0%. The secondary structure of the 16S rRNA molecules encoded by the two divergent operons was nearly identical, indicating possible functionality. The 23S rRNA gene was examined for a few strains in this complex, and it was also found to be highly divergent from the gene in Type 2 operons (8.7%, and likewise had nearly identical secondary structure between the Type 1 and Type 2 operons. Furthermore, the 16S-23S ITS showed marked differences consistent between operons among numerous strains. Both operons have promoter sequences that satisfy consensus requirements for functional prokaryotic transcription initiation. Horizontal gene transfer from another unknown heterocytous cyanobacterium is considered the most likely explanation for the origin of this molecule, but does not explain the ultimate origin of this sequence, which is very divergent from all 16S rRNA sequences found thus far in cyanobacteria. The divergent sequence is highly conserved among numerous strains of S. hyalinum, suggesting adaptive advantage and selective constraint of the divergent sequence.

  3. Isolation of high quality RNA from bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus L.) fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaakola, L; Pirttilä, A M; Halonen, M; Hohtola, A

    2001-10-01

    A simple and efficient method is described for isolating high quality RNA from bilberry fruit. The procedure is based on the use of hexadecyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB), polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), and beta-mercaptoethanol in an extraction buffer in order to eliminate the polysaccharides and prevent the oxidation of phenolic compounds. This method is a modification of the one described for pine trees, and yields high-quality RNA suitable for cDNA based methodologies. This method is applicable for a variety of plant tissues.

  4. Analysis of high-affinity binding of protein kinase R to double-stranded RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, Bushra; Mukerji, Ishita; Cole, James L

    2012-11-06

    Protein kinase R (PKR) is an interferon-induced kinase that plays a pivotal role in the innate immunity response to viral infection. PKR is activated upon binding to double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). Our previous analysis of binding of PKR to dsRNAs ranging from 20 to 40 bp supports a dimerization model for activation in which 30 bp represents the minimal length required to bind two PKR monomers and activate PKR via autophosphorylation. These studies were complicated by the formation of protein-RNA aggregates, particularly at low salt concentrations using longer dsRNAs. Here, we have taken advantage of the enhanced sensitivity afforded using fluorescence-detected analytical ultracentrifugation to reduce the RNA concentrations from micromolar to nanomolar. Under these conditions, we are able to characterize high-affinity binding of PKR to longer dsRNAs in 75 mM NaCl. The PKR binding stoichiometries are increased at lower salt concentrations but remain lower than those previously obtained for the dsRNA binding domain. The dependence of the limiting PKR binding stoichiometries on dsRNA length does not conform to standard models for nonspecific binding and suggests that binding to longer sequences occurs via a different binding mode with a larger site size. Although dimerization plays a key role in the PKR activation mechanism, the ability of shorter dsRNAs to bind two PKR monomers is not sufficient to induce autophosphorylation. We propose that activation of PKR by longer RNAs is correlated with an alternative binding mode in which both of the dsRNA binding motifs contact the RNA, inducing PKR to dimerize via a direct interaction of the kinase domains.

  5. From SARS to MERS: 10 years of research on highly pathogenic human coronaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilgenfeld, Rolf; Peiris, Malik

    2013-10-01

    This article introduces a series of invited papers in Antiviral Research marking the 10th anniversary of the outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), caused by a novel coronavirus that emerged in southern China in late 2002. Until that time, coronaviruses had not been recognized as agents causing severe disease in humans, hence, the emergence of the SARS-CoV came as a complete surprise. Research during the past ten years has revealed the existence of a diverse pool of coronaviruses circulating among various bat species and other animals, suggesting that further introductions of highly pathogenic coronaviruses into the human population are not merely probable, but inevitable. The recent emergence of another coronavirus causing severe disease, Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS), in humans, has made it clear that coronaviruses pose a major threat to human health, and that more research is urgently needed to elucidate their replication mechanisms, identify potential drug targets, and develop effective countermeasures. In this series, experts in many different aspects of coronavirus replication and disease will provide authoritative, up-to-date reviews of the following topics: - clinical management and infection control of SARS; - reservoir hosts of coronaviruses; - receptor recognition and cross-species transmission of SARS-CoV; - SARS-CoV evasion of innate immune responses; - structures and functions of individual coronaviral proteins; - anti-coronavirus drug discovery and development; and - the public health legacy of the SARS outbreak. Each article will be identified in the last line of its abstract as belonging to the series "From SARS to MERS: 10years of research on highly pathogenic human coronaviruses." Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. High-antibacterial activity of Urtica spp. seed extracts on food and plant pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körpe, Didem Aksoy; İşerı, Özlem Darcansoy; Sahin, Feride Iffet; Cabi, Evren; Haberal, Mehmet

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to comparatively evaluate antibacterial activities of methanol (MetOH) and aqueous (dw) leaf (L), root (R) and seed (S) extracts of Urtica dioica L. (Ud; stinging nettle) and Urtica pilulifera L. (Up; Roman nettle) on both food- and plant-borne pathogens, with total phenolic contents and DPPH radical scavenging activities (DRSA). MetOH extracts of leaves and roots of U. dioica had the highest DRSA. Extracts with high antibacterial activity were in the order Up-LMetOH (13/16) > Ud-SMetOH (11/16) > Up-SMetOH (9/16). Results obtained with Up-SMetOH against food spoiling Bacillus pumilus, Shigella spp. and Enterococcus gallinarum with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) in 128-1024 μg/ml range seem to be promising. Up-SMetOH also exerted strong inhibition against Clavibacter michiganensis with a considerably low MIC (32 μg/ml). Ud-SMetOH and Up-LMetOH were also effective against C. michiganensis (MIC = 256 and 1024 μg/ml, respectively). Ud-SMetOH and Ud-RMetOH had also antimicrobial activity against Xanthomonas vesicatoria (MIC = 512 and 1024 μg/ml, respectively). Results presented here demonstrate high-antibacterial activity of U. pilulifera extracts and U. dioica seed extract against phytopathogens for the first time, and provide the most comprehensive data on the antibacterial activity screening of U. pilulifera against food-borne pathogens. Considering limitations in plant disease control, antibacterial activities of these extracts would be of agricultural importance.

  7. Experimental annotation of the human pathogen Histoplasma capsulatum transcribed regions using high-resolution tiling arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sil Anita

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The fungal pathogen Histoplasma capsulatum is thought to be the most common cause of fungal respiratory infections in immunocompetent humans, yet little is known about its biology. Here we provide the first genome-wide studies to experimentally validate its genome annotation. A functional interrogation of the Histoplasma genome provides critical support for continued investigation into the biology and pathogenesis of H. capsulatum and related fungi. Results We employed a three-pronged approach to provide a functional annotation for the H. capsulatum G217B strain. First, we probed high-density tiling arrays with labeled cDNAs from cells grown under diverse conditions. These data defined 6,172 transcriptionally active regions (TARs, providing validation of 6,008 gene predictions. Interestingly, 22% of these predictions showed evidence of anti-sense transcription. Additionally, we detected transcription of 264 novel genes not present in the original gene predictions. To further enrich our analysis, we incorporated expression data from whole-genome oligonucleotide microarrays. These expression data included profiling under growth conditions that were not represented in the tiling experiment, and validated an additional 2,249 gene predictions. Finally, we compared the G217B gene predictions to other available fungal genomes, and observed that an additional 254 gene predictions had an ortholog in a different fungal species, suggesting that they represent genuine coding sequences. Conclusions These analyses yielded a high confidence set of validated gene predictions for H. capsulatum. The transcript sets resulting from this study are a valuable resource for further experimental characterization of this ubiquitous fungal pathogen. The data is available for interactive exploration at http://histo.ucsf.edu.

  8. Experimental annotation of the human pathogen Histoplasma capsulatum transcribed regions using high-resolution tiling arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorhies, Mark; Foo, Catherine K; Sil, Anita

    2011-09-29

    The fungal pathogen Histoplasma capsulatum is thought to be the most common cause of fungal respiratory infections in immunocompetent humans, yet little is known about its biology. Here we provide the first genome-wide studies to experimentally validate its genome annotation. A functional interrogation of the Histoplasma genome provides critical support for continued investigation into the biology and pathogenesis of H. capsulatum and related fungi. We employed a three-pronged approach to provide a functional annotation for the H. capsulatum G217B strain. First, we probed high-density tiling arrays with labeled cDNAs from cells grown under diverse conditions. These data defined 6,172 transcriptionally active regions (TARs), providing validation of 6,008 gene predictions. Interestingly, 22% of these predictions showed evidence of anti-sense transcription. Additionally, we detected transcription of 264 novel genes not present in the original gene predictions. To further enrich our analysis, we incorporated expression data from whole-genome oligonucleotide microarrays. These expression data included profiling under growth conditions that were not represented in the tiling experiment, and validated an additional 2,249 gene predictions. Finally, we compared the G217B gene predictions to other available fungal genomes, and observed that an additional 254 gene predictions had an ortholog in a different fungal species, suggesting that they represent genuine coding sequences. These analyses yielded a high confidence set of validated gene predictions for H. capsulatum. The transcript sets resulting from this study are a valuable resource for further experimental characterization of this ubiquitous fungal pathogen. The data is available for interactive exploration at http://histo.ucsf.edu.

  9. Screening of siRNA nanoparticles for delivery to airway epithelial cells using high-content analysis

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hibbitts, Alan

    2011-08-01

    Aims: Delivery of siRNA to the lungs via inhalation offers a unique opportunity to develop a new treatment paradigm for a range of respiratory conditions. However, progress has been greatly hindered by safety and delivery issues. This study developed a high-throughput method for screening novel nanotechnologies for pulmonary siRNA delivery. Methodology: Following physicochemical analysis, the ability of PEI–PEG–siRNA nanoparticles to facilitate siRNA delivery was determined using high-content analysis (HCA) in Calu-3 cells. Results obtained from HCA were validated using confocal microscopy. Finally, cytotoxicity of the PEI–PEG–siRNA particles was analyzed by HCA using the Cellomics® multiparameter cytotoxicity assay. Conclusion: PEI–PEG–siRNA nanoparticles facilitated increased siRNA uptake and luciferase knockdown in Calu-3 cells compared with PEI–siRNA.

  10. An improved and reproducible protocol for the extraction of high quality fungal RNA from plant biomass substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patyshakuliyeva, Aleksandrina; Mäkelä, Miia R; Sietiö, Outi-Maaria; de Vries, Ronald P; Hildén, Kristiina S; van den Brink, J.

    2014-01-01

    Isolation of high quantity and quality RNA is a crucial step in the detection of meaningful gene expression data. Obtaining intact fungal RNA from complex lignocellulosic substrates is often difficult, producing low integrity RNA which perform poorly in downstream applications. In this study we

  11. High-throughput RNA structure probing reveals critical folding events during early 60S ribosome assembly in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlacu, Elena; Lackmann, Fredrik; Aguilar, Lisbeth-Carolina; Belikov, Sergey; Nues, Rob van; Trahan, Christian; Hector, Ralph D; Dominelli-Whiteley, Nicholas; Cockroft, Scott L; Wieslander, Lars; Oeffinger, Marlene; Granneman, Sander

    2017-09-28

    While the protein composition of various yeast 60S ribosomal subunit assembly intermediates has been studied in detail, little is known about ribosomal RNA (rRNA) structural rearrangements that take place during early 60S assembly steps. Using a high-throughput RNA structure probing method, we provide nucleotide resolution insights into rRNA structural rearrangements during nucleolar 60S assembly. Our results suggest that many rRNA-folding steps, such as folding of 5.8S rRNA, occur at a very specific stage of assembly, and propose that downstream nuclear assembly events can only continue once 5.8S folding has been completed. Our maps of nucleotide flexibility enable making predictions about the establishment of protein-rRNA interactions, providing intriguing insights into the temporal order of protein-rRNA as well as long-range inter-domain rRNA interactions. These data argue that many distant domains in the rRNA can assemble simultaneously during early 60S assembly and underscore the enormous complexity of 60S synthesis.Ribosome biogenesis is a dynamic process that involves the ordered assembly of ribosomal proteins and numerous RNA structural rearrangements. Here the authors apply ChemModSeq, a high-throughput RNA structure probing method, to quantitatively measure changes in RNA flexibility during the nucleolar stages of 60S assembly in yeast.

  12. Secretome of fungus-infected aphids documents high pathogen activity and weak host response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grell, Morten Nedergaard; Jensen, Annette Bruun; Olsen, Peter B.

    2011-01-01

    Discovery of novel secretome proteins contributes to the understanding of host-pathogen interactions. Here we report a rich diversity of secreted proteins from the interaction between grain aphids (host, insect order Hemiptera) and fungi of the order Entomophthorales (insect pathogens), made...... in the interaction, indicating that aphids only respond weakly to the presence of the pathogens and supporting recent findings that aphids have a reduced immune repertoire....

  13. Unravelling the complexity of microRNA-mediated gene regulation in black pepper (Piper nigrum L.) using high-throughput small RNA profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asha, Srinivasan; Sreekumar, Sweda; Soniya, E V

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of high-throughput small RNA deep sequencing data, in combination with black pepper transcriptome sequences revealed microRNA-mediated gene regulation in black pepper ( Piper nigrum L.). Black pepper is an important spice crop and its berries are used worldwide as a natural food additive that contributes unique flavour to foods. In the present study to characterize microRNAs from black pepper, we generated a small RNA library from black pepper leaf and sequenced it by Illumina high-throughput sequencing technology. MicroRNAs belonging to a total of 303 conserved miRNA families were identified from the sRNAome data. Subsequent analysis from recently sequenced black pepper transcriptome confirmed precursor sequences of 50 conserved miRNAs and four potential novel miRNA candidates. Stem-loop qRT-PCR experiments demonstrated differential expression of eight conserved miRNAs in black pepper. Computational analysis of targets of the miRNAs showed 223 potential black pepper unigene targets that encode diverse transcription factors and enzymes involved in plant development, disease resistance, metabolic and signalling pathways. RLM-RACE experiments further mapped miRNA-mediated cleavage at five of the mRNA targets. In addition, miRNA isoforms corresponding to 18 miRNA families were also identified from black pepper. This study presents the first large-scale identification of microRNAs from black pepper and provides the foundation for the future studies of miRNA-mediated gene regulation of stress responses and diverse metabolic processes in black pepper.

  14. The use of high-throughput small RNA sequencing reveals differentially expressed microRNAs in response to aster yellows phytoplasma-infection in Vitis vinifera cv. 'Chardonnay'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyman, Marius C; Solofoharivelo, Marie-Chrystine; Souza-Richards, Rose; Stephan, Dirk; Murray, Shane; Burger, Johan T

    2017-01-01

    Phytoplasmas are cell wall-less plant pathogenic bacteria responsible for major crop losses throughout the world. In grapevine they cause grapevine yellows, a detrimental disease associated with a variety of symptoms. The high economic impact of this disease has sparked considerable interest among researchers to understand molecular mechanisms related to pathogenesis. Increasing evidence exist that a class of small non-coding endogenous RNAs, known as microRNAs (miRNAs), play an important role in post-transcriptional gene regulation during plant development and responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. Thus, we aimed to dissect complex high-throughput small RNA sequencing data for the genome-wide identification of known and novel differentially expressed miRNAs, using read libraries constructed from healthy and phytoplasma-infected Chardonnay leaf material. Furthermore, we utilised computational resources to predict putative miRNA targets to explore the involvement of possible pathogen response pathways. We identified multiple known miRNA sequence variants (isomiRs), likely generated through post-transcriptional modifications. Sequences of 13 known, canonical miRNAs were shown to be differentially expressed. A total of 175 novel miRNA precursor sequences, each derived from a unique genomic location, were predicted, of which 23 were differentially expressed. A homology search revealed that some of these novel miRNAs shared high sequence similarity with conserved miRNAs from other plant species, as well as known grapevine miRNAs. The relative expression of randomly selected known and novel miRNAs was determined with real-time RT-qPCR analysis, thereby validating the trend of expression seen in the normalised small RNA sequencing read count data. Among the putative miRNA targets, we identified genes involved in plant morphology, hormone signalling, nutrient homeostasis, as well as plant stress. Our results may assist in understanding the role that miRNA pathways play

  15. Low-Pathogenic Influenza A Viruses in North American Diving Ducks Contribute to the Emergence of a Novel Highly Pathogenic Influenza A(H7N8) Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yifei; Ramey, Andrew M; Bowman, Andrew S; DeLiberto, Thomas J; Killian, Mary L; Krauss, Scott; Nolting, Jacqueline M; Torchetti, Mia Kim; Reeves, Andrew B; Webby, Richard J; Stallknecht, David E; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2017-05-01

    Introductions of low-pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) viruses of subtypes H5 and H7 into poultry from wild birds have the potential to mutate to highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses, but such viruses' origins are often unclear. In January 2016, a novel H7N8 HPAI virus caused an outbreak in turkeys in Indiana, USA. To determine the virus's origin, we sequenced the genomes of 441 wild-bird origin influenza A viruses (IAVs) from North America and subjected them to evolutionary analyses. The results showed that the H7N8 LPAI virus most likely circulated among diving ducks in the Mississippi flyway during autumn 2015 and was subsequently introduced to Indiana turkeys, in which it evolved high pathogenicity. Preceding the outbreak, an isolate with six gene segments (PB2, PB1, PA, HA, NA, and NS) sharing >99% sequence identity with those of H7N8 turkey isolates was recovered from a diving duck sampled in Kentucky, USA. H4N8 IAVs from other diving ducks possessed five H7N8-like gene segments (PB2, PB1, NA, MP, and NS; >98% sequence identity). Our findings suggest that viral gene constellations circulating among diving ducks can contribute to the emergence of IAVs that affect poultry. Therefore, diving ducks may serve an important and understudied role in the maintenance, diversification, and transmission of IAVs in the wild-bird reservoir.IMPORTANCE In January 2016, a novel H7N8 HPAI virus caused a disease outbreak in turkeys in Indiana, USA. To determine the origin of this virus, we sequenced and analyzed 441 wild-bird origin influenza virus strains isolated from wild birds inhabiting North America. We found that the H7N8 LPAI virus most likely circulated among diving ducks in the Mississippi flyway during autumn 2015 and was subsequently introduced to Indiana turkeys, in which it evolved high pathogenicity. Our results suggest that viral gene constellations circulating among diving ducks can contribute to the emergence of IAVs that affect poultry. Therefore

  16. Unraveling long non-coding RNAs through analysis of high-throughput RNA-sequencing data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi Tripathi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Extensive genome-wide transcriptome study mediated by high throughput sequencing technique has revolutionized the study of genetics and epigenetic at unprecedented resolution. The research has revealed that besides protein-coding RNAs, large proportions of mammalian transcriptome includes a heap of regulatory non protein-coding RNAs, the number encoded within human genome is enigmatic. Many taboos developed in the past categorized these non-coding RNAs as ‘‘dark matter” and “junks”. Breaking the myth, RNA-seq-- a recently developed experimental technique is widely being used for studying non-coding RNAs which has acquired the limelight due to their physiological and pathological significance. The longest member of the ncRNA family-- long non-coding RNAs, acts as stable and functional part of a genome, guiding towards the important clues about the varied biological events like cellular-, structural- processes governing the complexity of an organism. Here, we review the most recent and influential computational approach developed to identify and quantify the long non-coding RNAs serving as an assistant for the users to choose appropriate tools for their specific research. Keywords: Transcriptome, High throughput sequencing, Genetic and epigenetic, Long non-coding RNA, RNA-sequencing, RNA-seq

  17. Finding sRNA generative locales from high-throughput sequencing data with NiBLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moulton Vincent

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Next-generation sequencing technologies allow researchers to obtain millions of sequence reads in a single experiment. One important use of the technology is the sequencing of small non-coding regulatory RNAs and the identification of the genomic locales from which they originate. Currently, there is a paucity of methods for finding small RNA generative locales. Results We describe and implement an algorithm that can determine small RNA generative locales from high-throughput sequencing data. The algorithm creates a network, or graph, of the small RNAs by creating links between them depending on their proximity on the target genome. For each of the sub-networks in the resulting graph the clustering coefficient, a measure of the interconnectedness of the subnetwork, is used to identify the generative locales. We test the algorithm over a wide range of parameters using RFAM sequences as positive controls and demonstrate that the algorithm has good sensitivity and specificity in a range of Arabidopsis and mouse small RNA sequence sets and that the locales it generates are robust to differences in the choice of parameters. Conclusions NiBLS is a fast, reliable and sensitive method for determining small RNA locales in high-throughput sequence data that is generally applicable to all classes of small RNA.

  18. High-Salt Intake Suppressed MicroRNA-133a Expression in Dahl SS Rat Myocardium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong-Shuai Guo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Salt-sensitive individuals show earlier and more serious cardiac damage than nonsalt-sensitive ones. Some studies have suggested that microRNA-133a could reduce cardiac hypertrophy and myocardial fibrosis. The current study aims to investigate the different functions of high-salt intake on salt-sensitive (SS rats and Sprague-Dawley (SD rats and the involvement of microRNA-133a in these roles. After high-salt intervention, the left ventricular mass (LVW and left ventricular mass index (LVMI of the salt-sensitive high salt (SHS group were obviously higher than those of the salt-sensitive low salt (SLS group. However, the difference between the Sprague-Dawley high salt (DHS group and the Sprague-Dawley low salt (DLS group was not significant. Compared with SLS group, collagen I and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF in the heart of SHS group were significantly higher, whereas no statistical difference was observed between the DHS group and the DLS group. Compared with low-salt diet, microRNA-133a in the heart of both strains were significantly decreased, but that in the SHS group decreased more significantly. These results suggest that high salt intervention could down-regulate the expression of myocardial microRNA-133a, which may be one of the mechanisms involved in myocardial fibrosis in salt-sensitive hypertension.

  19. Features of CRISPR-Cas Regulation Key to Highly Efficient and Temporally-Specific crRNA Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andjela Rodic

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial immune systems, such as CRISPR-Cas or restriction-modification (R-M systems, affect bacterial pathogenicity and antibiotic resistance by modulating horizontal gene flow. A model system for CRISPR-Cas regulation, the Type I-E system from Escherichia coli, is silent under standard laboratory conditions and experimentally observing the dynamics of CRISPR-Cas activation is challenging. Two characteristic features of CRISPR-Cas regulation in E. coli are cooperative transcription repression of cas gene and CRISPR array promoters, and fast non-specific degradation of full length CRISPR transcripts (pre-crRNA. In this work, we use computational modeling to understand how these features affect the system expression dynamics. Signaling which leads to CRISPR-Cas activation is currently unknown, so to bypass this step, we here propose a conceptual setup for cas expression activation, where cas genes are put under transcription control typical for a restriction-modification (R-M system and then introduced into a cell. Known transcription regulation of an R-M system is used as a proxy for currently unknown CRISPR-Cas transcription control, as both systems are characterized by high cooperativity, which is likely related to similar dynamical constraints of their function. We find that the two characteristic CRISPR-Cas control features are responsible for its temporally-specific dynamical response, so that the system makes a steep (switch-like transition from OFF to ON state with a time-delay controlled by pre-crRNA degradation rate. We furthermore find that cooperative transcription regulation qualitatively leads to a cross-over to a regime where, at higher pre-crRNA processing rates, crRNA generation approaches the limit of an infinitely abrupt system induction. We propose that these dynamical properties are associated with rapid expression of CRISPR-Cas components and efficient protection of bacterial cells against foreign DNA. In terms of synthetic

  20. eRNA: a graphic user interface-based tool optimized for large data analysis from high-throughput RNA sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) is emerging as a critical approach in biological research. However, its high-throughput advantage is significantly limited by the capacity of bioinformatics tools. The research community urgently needs user-friendly tools to efficiently analyze the complicated data generated by high throughput sequencers. Results We developed a standalone tool with graphic user interface (GUI)-based analytic modules, known as eRNA. The capacity of performing parallel processing and sample management facilitates large data analyses by maximizing hardware usage and freeing users from tediously handling sequencing data. The module miRNA identification” includes GUIs for raw data reading, adapter removal, sequence alignment, and read counting. The module “mRNA identification” includes GUIs for reference sequences, genome mapping, transcript assembling, and differential expression. The module “Target screening” provides expression profiling analyses and graphic visualization. The module “Self-testing” offers the directory setups, sample management, and a check for third-party package dependency. Integration of other GUIs including Bowtie, miRDeep2, and miRspring extend the program’s functionality. Conclusions eRNA focuses on the common tools required for the mapping and quantification analysis of miRNA-seq and mRNA-seq data. The software package provides an additional choice for scientists who require a user-friendly computing environment and high-throughput capacity for large data analysis. eRNA is available for free download at https://sourceforge.net/projects/erna/?source=directory. PMID:24593312

  1. Critical pathogenic steps to high risk Helicobacter pylori gastritis and gastric carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Inchul

    2014-06-07

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) gastritis may progress to high risk gastropathy and cancer. However, the pathological progression has not been characterized in detail. H. pylori induce persistent inflammatory infiltration. Neutrophils are unique in that they directly infiltrate into foveolar epithelium aiming the proliferative zone specifically. Neutrophilic proliferative zone foveolitis is a critical pathogenic step in H. pylori gastritis inducing intensive epithelial damage. Epithelial cells carrying accumulated genomic damage and mutations show the Malgun (clear) cell change, characterized by large clear nucleus and prominent nucleolus. Malgun cells further undergo atypical changes, showing nuclear folding, coarse chromatin, and multiple nucleoli. The atypical Malgun cell (AMC) change is a novel premalignant condition in high risk gastropathy, which may progress and undergo malignant transformation directly. The pathobiological significance of AMC in gastric carcinogenesis is reviewed. A new diagnosis system of gastritis is proposed based on the critical pathologic steps classifying low and high risk gastritis for separate treatment modality. It is suggested that the regulation of H. pylori-induced neutrophilic foveolitis might be a future therapeutic goal replacing bactericidal antibiotics approach.

  2. Benefits of a European project on diagnostics of highly pathogenic agents and assessment of potential dual use issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland eGrunow

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available R. Grunow1 (Coordinator, G. Ippolito2 (Co-Coordinator, D. Jacob1, U. Sauer1, A. Rohleder1, A. Di Caro2, R. Iacovino2, and on behalf of the QUANDHIP partners31-Robert Koch Institute, Berlin, Germany; 2- L. Spallanzani National Institute for Infectious Diseases, Rome, Italy; 3- http://www.quandhip.info/Quandhip/EN/Home/Homepage_node.htmlQUANDHIP (Quality Assurance Exercises and Networking on the Detection of Highly Infectious Pathogens is a Joint Action initiative set up in 2011 that has successfully unified the primary objectives of the European Networks on Highly Pathogenic Bacteria (ENHPB and of P4 laboratories (ENP4 both of which aimed to improve the efficiency, effectiveness and response capabilities of laboratories directed at protecting the health of European citizens against high consequence bacteria and viruses of significant public health concern. Both networks have established a common collaborative consortium of 37 nationally and internationally recognized institutions with laboratory facilities from 22 European countries.The specific objectives and achievements include the initiation and establishment of-a recognized and acceptable quality assurance scheme, including practical External Quality Assurance Exercises, comprising living agents, that aim to improve laboratory performance, accuracy and detection capabilities in support of patient management and public health responses.-recognized training schemes for diagnostics and handling of highly pathogenic agents-an international repository comprising highly pathogenic bacteria and viruses for the development of standardized reference material-a standardized and transparent biosafety and biosecurity strategy safeguarding healthcare personnel and the community in dealing with high consequence pathogens-the design and organisation of response capabilities dealing with cross border events with highly infectious pathogens including the consideration of diagnostic capabilities of European

  3. Highly pathogenic avian influenza A (H5N1) virus in wildlife: diagnostics, epidemiology and molecular characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keawcharoen, J.

    2010-01-01

    Since 2003, highly pathogenic avian influenza virus subtype H5N1 outbreaks have been reported in Southeast Asia causing high mortality in poultry and have also been found to cross the species barrier infecting human and other mammalian species. Thailand is one of the countries severely affected by

  4. A method for high-quality RNA extraction from tall fescue

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-07-20

    Jul 20, 2011 ... other proteins with genomic DNA go into the organic phase (Chomczynski and Sacchi, 1987). We can get high-quality RNA when the aqueous phase which was extracted repeatedly by chlorophenols was precipitated with isopropanol. The advantage of this method is simple and time-saving, and can ...

  5. Co-extraction of high-quality RNA and DNA from rubber tree (Hevea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR TONUKARI NYEROVWO

    2012-05-15

    May 15, 2012 ... efficient method was developed for co-extracting high-quality DNA and RNA from rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis) in this ... ratios), agarose electrophoresis analysis and reverse transcription (RT-PCR) of isolated nucleic acids indicate that ... isolate DNA from bacterium and viruses (Lewis and. Metcalf, 1988 ...

  6. High-throughput siRNA screening applied to the ubiquitin-proteasome system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Esben Guldahl; Nielsen, Sofie V.; Pietras, Elin J.

    2016-01-01

    that are not genetically tractable as, for instance, a yeast model system. Here, we describe a method relying on high-throughput cellular imaging of cells transfected with a targeted siRNA library to screen for components involved in degradation of a protein of interest. This method is a rapid and cost-effective tool...

  7. Comprehensive processing of high-throughput small RNA sequencing data including quality checking, normalization, and differential expression analysis using the UEA sRNA Workbench.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckers, Matthew; Mohorianu, Irina; Stocks, Matthew; Applegate, Christopher; Dalmay, Tamas; Moulton, Vincent

    2017-06-01

    Recently, high-throughput sequencing (HTS) has revealed compelling details about the small RNA (sRNA) population in eukaryotes. These 20 to 25 nt noncoding RNAs can influence gene expression by acting as guides for the sequence-specific regulatory mechanism known as RNA silencing. The increase in sequencing depth and number of samples per project enables a better understanding of the role sRNAs play by facilitating the study of expression patterns. However, the intricacy of the biological hypotheses coupled with a lack of appropriate tools often leads to inadequate mining of the available data and thus, an incomplete description of the biological mechanisms involved. To enable a comprehensive study of differential expression in sRNA data sets, we present a new interactive pipeline that guides researchers through the various stages of data preprocessing and analysis. This includes various tools, some of which we specifically developed for sRNA analysis, for quality checking and normalization of sRNA samples as well as tools for the detection of differentially expressed sRNAs and identification of the resulting expression patterns. The pipeline is available within the UEA sRNA Workbench, a user-friendly software package for the processing of sRNA data sets. We demonstrate the use of the pipeline on a H. sapiens data set; additional examples on a B. terrestris data set and on an A. thaliana data set are described in the Supplemental Information A comparison with existing approaches is also included, which exemplifies some of the issues that need to be addressed for sRNA analysis and how the new pipeline may be used to do this. © 2017 Beckers et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  8. One-step scalable preparation method for non-cationic liposomes with high siRNA content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somiya, Masaharu; Yamaguchi, Kotomi; Liu, Qiushi; Niimi, Tomoaki; Maturana, Andrés Daniel; Iijima, Masumi; Yoshimoto, Nobuo; Kuroda, Shun'ichi

    2015-07-25

    Cationic liposomes (LPs) have been utilized for short interfering RNA (siRNA) delivery in vitro and in vivo owing to their high affinity for siRNA via electrostatic binding. However, both cytotoxicity and non-specific adsorption of cationic LPs in the body have prevented clinical siRNA applications. These situations have led to siRNA encapsulation in non-cationic LPs. We found that the instillation of neutral phospholipids dissolved in ethanol into aqueous solutions containing siRNA and CaCl2 resulted in high siRNA encapsulation (siRNA encapsulation efficiency: ∼ 80%; siRNA weight ratio: ∼ 10 wt% of LPs). The products were monodispersed, ∼ 200 nm, and negatively charged. Furthermore, when phospholipids with a high-phase transition temperature or cholesterol were used, the encapsulation efficiency and siRNA content remained high. Although anionic LPs could not encapsulate siRNAs using this method, the use of cholesterol-conjugated siRNA helped achieve substantial siRNA encapsulation in anionic LPs. These non-cationic siRNA-containing LPs did not show cytotoxicity in vitro, and could be formed with polyethylene glycol-conjugated phospholipids. When conjugated with targeting ligand, the non-cationic siRNA-containing LPs could suppress the expression of target gene in vitro. These data demonstrate that our preparation method would be suitable for large-scale LP production for systemic siRNA delivery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. High Frequency of Enteric Protozoan, Viral, and Bacterial Potential Pathogens in Community-Acquired Acute Diarrheal Episodes: Evidence Based on Results of Luminex Gastrointestinal Pathogen Panel Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawash, Yousry A; Ismail, Khadiga A; Almehmadi, Mazen

    2017-10-01

    Infectious diarrhea is endemic in most developing countries. We aimed to investigate the protozoan, viral, and bacterial causes of acute diarrhea in Taif, Saudi Arabia. A cross-sectional prospective 1-year study was conducted on 163 diarrheal patients of various ages. Stool samples were collected, 1 per patient, and tested for 3 protozoa, 3 viruses, and 9 bacteria with the Luminex Gastrointestinal Pathogen Panel. Overall, 53.4% (87/163) of samples were positives (20.8% protozoa, 19.6% viruses, 2.8% bacteria, and 9.8% mixed). Rotavirus (19.6%), Giardia duodenalis (16.5%), and Cryptosporidium spp. (8.5%) were the mostly detected pathogens. Adenovirus 40/41 (4.2%), Salmonella (3%), Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (3%), and Entamoeba histolytica (2.4%) were also detected. Norovirus GI/II, Vibrio cholerae, Yersinia enterocolitica, and Clostridium difficile toxin A/B were not detected in any patients. All pathogens were involved in coinfections except E. histolytica. Giardia (5.5%) and rotavirus (3%) were the most commonly detected in co-infections. Enterotoxigenic E. coli (2.4%), Campylobacter spp. (2.4%), E. coli 0157 (1.8%), and Shigella spp. (1.2%) were detected in patients only as co-infections. Infections were more in children 0-4 years, less in adults 40 years, with statistically significant differences in risk across age groups observed with rotavirus (P<0.001), Giardia (P=0.006), and Cryptosporidium (P=0.036) infections. Lastly, infections were not significantly more in the spring. This report demonstrates the high burden of various enteropathogens in the setting. Further studies are needed to define the impact of these findings on the clinical course of the disease.

  10. EBARDenovo: highly accurate de novo assembly of RNA-Seq with efficient chimera-detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Hsueh-Ting; Hsiao, William W L; Chen, Jen-Chih; Yeh, Tze-Jung; Tsai, Mong-Hsun; Lin, Han; Liu, Yen-Wenn; Lee, Sheng-An; Chen, Chaur-Chin; Tsao, Theresa T H; Kao, Cheng-Yan

    2013-04-15

    High-accuracy de novo assembly of the short sequencing reads from RNA-Seq technology is very challenging. We introduce a de novo assembly algorithm, EBARDenovo, which stands for Extension, Bridging And Repeat-sensing Denovo. This algorithm uses an efficient chimera-detection function to abrogate the effect of aberrant chimeric reads in RNA-Seq data. EBARDenovo resolves the complications of RNA-Seq assembly arising from sequencing errors, repetitive sequences and aberrant chimeric amplicons. In a series of assembly experiments, our algorithm is the most accurate among the examined programs, including de Bruijn graph assemblers, Trinity and Oases. EBARDenovo is available at http://ebardenovo.sourceforge.net/. This software package (with patent pending) is free of charge for academic use only. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  11. Is mitochondrial tRNA(phe) variant m.593T>C a synergistically pathogenic mutation in Chinese LHON families with m.11778G>A?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, A-Mei; Bandelt, Hans-Jürgen; Jia, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Wen; Li, Shiqiang; Yu, Dandan; Wang, Dong; Zhuang, Xin-Ying; Zhang, Qingjiong; Yao, Yong-Gang

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial transfer RNA (mt-tRNA) mutations have been reported to be associated with a variety of diseases. In a previous paper that studied the mtDNA background effect on clinical expression of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) in 182 Chinese families with m.11778G>A, we found a strikingly high frequency (7/182) of m.593T>C in the mitochondrially encoded tRNA phenylalanine (MT-TF) gene in unrelated LHON patients. To determine the potential role of m.593T>C in LHON, we compared the frequency of this variant in 479 LHON patients with m.11778G>A, 843 patients with clinical features of LHON but without the three known primary mutations, and 2374 Han Chinese from the general populations. The frequency of m.593T>C was higher in LHON patients (14/479) than in suspected LHON subjects (12/843) or in general controls (49/2374), but the difference was not statistically significant. The overall penetrance of LHON in families with both m.11778G>A and m.593T>C (44.6%) was also substantially higher than that of families with only m.11778G>A (32.9%) (P = 0.083). Secondary structure prediction of the MT-TF gene with the wild type or m.593T>C showed that this nucleotide change decreases the free energy. Electrophoretic mobility of the MT-TF genes with the wild type or m.593T>C transcribed in vitro further confirmed the change of secondary structure in the presence of this variant. Although our results could suggest a modest synergistic effect of variant m.593T>C on the LHON causing mutation m.11778G>A, the lack of statistical significance probably due to the relatively small sample size analyzed, makes necessary more studies to confirm this effect.

  12. Is mitochondrial tRNA(phe variant m.593T>C a synergistically pathogenic mutation in Chinese LHON families with m.11778G>A?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A-Mei Zhang

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial transfer RNA (mt-tRNA mutations have been reported to be associated with a variety of diseases. In a previous paper that studied the mtDNA background effect on clinical expression of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON in 182 Chinese families with m.11778G>A, we found a strikingly high frequency (7/182 of m.593T>C in the mitochondrially encoded tRNA phenylalanine (MT-TF gene in unrelated LHON patients. To determine the potential role of m.593T>C in LHON, we compared the frequency of this variant in 479 LHON patients with m.11778G>A, 843 patients with clinical features of LHON but without the three known primary mutations, and 2374 Han Chinese from the general populations. The frequency of m.593T>C was higher in LHON patients (14/479 than in suspected LHON subjects (12/843 or in general controls (49/2374, but the difference was not statistically significant. The overall penetrance of LHON in families with both m.11778G>A and m.593T>C (44.6% was also substantially higher than that of families with only m.11778G>A (32.9% (P = 0.083. Secondary structure prediction of the MT-TF gene with the wild type or m.593T>C showed that this nucleotide change decreases the free energy. Electrophoretic mobility of the MT-TF genes with the wild type or m.593T>C transcribed in vitro further confirmed the change of secondary structure in the presence of this variant. Although our results could suggest a modest synergistic effect of variant m.593T>C on the LHON causing mutation m.11778G>A, the lack of statistical significance probably due to the relatively small sample size analyzed, makes necessary more studies to confirm this effect.

  13. Technical brief: Optimized pipeline for isolation of high-quality RNA from corneal cell subpopulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bath, Chris; Fink, Trine; Vorum, Henrik; Hjortdal, Jesper; Zachar, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Attempts to determine the transcriptional profile of discrete subsets of limbal epithelial cells in situ using laser capture microdissection (LCM) face two major challenges. First, the transcriptional profile of cells within a tissue may rapidly change as the tissue is excised and exposed to cold ischemia. Second, there is a risk of degradation of the RNA as the cellular compartment is separated from the remaining tissue. An optimized protocol for LCM of corneal epithelium is presented to address these issues. Experiments using porcine eye globes were carried out to determine both optimal procedures and settings for tissue harvest, transport, storage, histology, LCM, and RNA isolation. The optimized protocol was validated using human corneal epithelium. To facilitate preservation of the gene expression profile, we have developed a mechanical tool for dissection of cornea that, in combination with flash freezing, enables tissue to be stored within 5 min of enucleation of the eye. Furthermore, we describe how RNA from limbal crypt cells may be obtained using a procedure involving cryosectioning, histological staining, and LCM. In this paper, we describe an optimized method for isolating high-quality RNA from cellular subpopulations confined to the limbal crypts of the cornea. The procedure yields RNA in amounts and quality suitable for downstream gene expression analyses, such as microarrays or next generation sequencing.

  14. RNA genetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domingo, E. (Instituto de Biologia Molecular, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Canto Blanco, Madrid (ES)); Holland, J.J. (California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla, CA (USA). Dept. of Biology); Ahlquist, P. (Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (USA). Dept. of Plant Pathology)

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings on RNA gentics: Variability of RNA genomes, Volume III. Topics covered include: High error rate, population equilibrium, and evolution of RNA replication systems; Influenza viruses; High rate of nutation and evolution; and Sequence space and quasi species distribution.

  15. The innate immunity of guinea pigs against highly pathogenic avian influenza virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kun; Xu, Wei Wei; Zhang, Zhaowei; Liu, Jing; Li, Jing; Sun, Lijuan; Sun, Weiyang; Jiao, Peirong; Sang, Xiaoyu; Ren, Zhiguang; Yu, Zhijun; Li, Yuanguo; Feng, Na; Wang, Tiecheng; Wang, Hualei; Yang, Songtao; Zhao, Yongkun; Zhang, Xuemei; Wilker, Peter R; Liu, WenJun; Liao, Ming; Chen, Hualan; Gao, Yuwei; Xia, Xianzhu

    2017-05-02

    H5N1 avian influenza viruses are a major pandemic concern. In contrast to the highly virulent phenotype of H5N1 in humans and many animal models, guinea pigs do not typically display signs of severe disease in response to H5N1 virus infection. Here, proteomic and transcriptional profiling were applied to identify host factors that account for the observed attenuation of A/Tiger/Harbin/01/2002 (H5N1) virulence in guinea pigs. RIG-I and numerous interferon stimulated genes were among host proteins with altered expression in guinea pig lungs during H5N1 infection. Overexpression of RIG-I or the RIG-I adaptor protein MAVS in guinea pig cell lines inhibited H5N1 replication. Endogenous GBP-1 expression was required for RIG-I mediated inhibition of viral replication upstream of the activity of MAVS. Furthermore, we show that guinea pig complement is involved in viral clearance, the regulation of inflammation, and cellular apoptosis during influenza virus infection of guinea pigs. This work uncovers features of the guinea pig innate immune response to influenza that may render guinea pigs resistant to highly pathogenic influenza viruses.

  16. Use of a New High Resolution Melting Method for Genotyping Pathogenic Leptospira spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence Naze

    Full Text Available Leptospirosis is a worldwide zoonosis that is endemic in tropical areas, such as Reunion Island. The species Leptospira interrogans is the primary agent in human infections, but other pathogenic species, such as L. kirschner and L. borgpetersenii, are also associated with human leptospirosis.In this study, a melting curve analysis of the products that were amplified with the primer pairs lfb1 F/R and G1/G2 facilitated an accurate species classification of Leptospira reference strains. Next, we combined an unsupervised high resolution melting (HRM method with a new statistical approach using primers to amplify a two variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR for typing at the subspecies level. The HRM analysis, which was performed with ScreenClust Software, enabled the identification of genotypes at the serovar level with high resolution power (Hunter-Gaston index 0.984. This method was also applied to Leptospira DNA from blood samples that were obtained from Reunion Island after 1998. We were able to identify a unique genotype that is identical to that of the L. interrogans serovars Copenhageni and Icterohaemorrhagiae, suggesting that this genotype is the major cause of leptospirosis on Reunion Island.Our simple, rapid, and robust genotyping method enables the identification of Leptospira strains at the species and subspecies levels and supports the direct genotyping of Leptospira in biological samples without requiring cultures.

  17. Use of a New High Resolution Melting Method for Genotyping Pathogenic Leptospira spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naze, Florence; Desvars, Amélie; Picardeau, Mathieu; Bourhy, Pascale; Michault, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Background Leptospirosis is a worldwide zoonosis that is endemic in tropical areas, such as Reunion Island. The species Leptospira interrogans is the primary agent in human infections, but other pathogenic species, such as L. kirschner and L. borgpetersenii, are also associated with human leptospirosis. Methods and Findings In this study, a melting curve analysis of the products that were amplified with the primer pairs lfb1 F/R and G1/G2 facilitated an accurate species classification of Leptospira reference strains. Next, we combined an unsupervised high resolution melting (HRM) method with a new statistical approach using primers to amplify a two variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) for typing at the subspecies level. The HRM analysis, which was performed with ScreenClust Software, enabled the identification of genotypes at the serovar level with high resolution power (Hunter-Gaston index 0.984). This method was also applied to Leptospira DNA from blood samples that were obtained from Reunion Island after 1998. We were able to identify a unique genotype that is identical to that of the L. interrogans serovars Copenhageni and Icterohaemorrhagiae, suggesting that this genotype is the major cause of leptospirosis on Reunion Island. Conclusions Our simple, rapid, and robust genotyping method enables the identification of Leptospira strains at the species and subspecies levels and supports the direct genotyping of Leptospira in biological samples without requiring cultures. PMID:26154161

  18. Greater virulence of highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza virus in cats than in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Heui Man; Park, Eun Hye; Yum, Jung; Kim, Hyun Soo; Seo, Sang Heui

    2015-01-01

    Highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza virus continues to infect animals and humans. We compared the infectivity and pathogenesis of H5N1 virus in domestic cats and dogs to find out which animal is more susceptible to H5N1 influenza virus. When cats and dogs were infected with the H5N1 virus, cats suffered from severe outcomes including death, whereas dogs did not show any mortality. Viruses were shed in the nose and rectum of cats and in the nose of dogs. Viruses were detected in brain, lung, kidney, intestine, liver, and serum in the infected cats, but only in the lung in the infected dogs. Genes encoding inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, Toll-like receptors, and apoptotic factors were more highly expressed in the lungs of cats than in those of dogs. Our results suggest that the intensive monitoring of dogs is necessary to prevent human infection by H5N1 influenza virus, since infected dogs may not show clear clinical signs, in contrast to infected cats.

  19. Optimizing preservation protocols to extract high-quality RNA from different tissues of echinoderms for next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Portela, Rocío; Riesgo, Ana

    2013-09-01

    Transcriptomic information provides fundamental insights into biological processes. Extraction of quality RNA is a challenging step, and preservation and extraction protocols need to be adjusted in many cases. Our objectives were to optimize preservation protocols for isolation of high-quality RNA from diverse echinoderm tissues and to compare the utility of parameters as absorbance ratios and RIN values to assess RNA quality. Three different tissues (gonad, oesophagus and coelomocytes) were selected from the sea urchin Arbacia lixula. Solid tissues were flash-frozen and stored at -80 °C until processed. Four preservation treatments were applied to coelomocytes: flash freezing and storage at -80 °C, RNAlater and storage at -20 °C, preservation in TRIzol reagent and storage at -80 °C and direct extraction with TRIzol from fresh cells. Extractions of total RNA were performed with a modified TRIzol protocol for all tissues. Our results showed high values of RNA quantity and quality for all tissues, showing nonsignificant differences among them. However, while flash freezing was effective for solid tissues, it was inadequate for coelomocytes because of the low quality of the RNA extractions. Coelomocytes preserved in RNAlater displayed large variability in RNA integrity and insufficient RNA amount for further isolation of mRNA. TRIzol was the most efficient system for stabilizing RNA which resulted on high RNA quality and quantity. We did not detect correlation between absorbance ratios and RNA integrity. The best strategies for assessing RNA integrity was the visualization of 18S rRNA and 28S rRNA bands in agarose gels and estimation of RIN values with Agilent Bioanalyzer chips. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Clinical Evaluation of the New High-Throughput Luminex NxTAG Respiratory Pathogen Panel Assay for Multiplex Respiratory Pathogen Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jonathan H K; Lam, Ho-Yin; Yip, Cyril C Y; Wong, Sally C Y; Chan, Jasper F W; Ma, Edmond S K; Cheng, Vincent C C; Tang, Bone S F; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2016-07-01

    A broad range of viral and bacterial pathogens can cause acute respiratory tract infection. For rapid detection of a broad respiratory pathogen spectrum, multiplex real-time PCR is ideal. This study evaluated the performance of the new Luminex NxTAG Respiratory Pathogen Panel (NxTAG-RPP) in comparison with the BioFire FilmArray Respiratory Panel (FA-RP) or singleplex real-time PCR as reference. A total of 284 clinical respiratory specimens and 3 influenza A/H7N9 viral culture samples were tested. All clinical specimens were processed and analyzed in parallel using NxTAG-RPP and the reference standard method. The H7N9 viral culture samples were tested using NxTAG-RPP only. Overall, the NxTAG-RPP demonstrated ≥93% sensitivity and specificity for all respiratory targets except human coronavirus OC43 (HCoV-OC43) and HCoV-HKU1. The H7N9 virus was detected by the influenza A virus matrix gene target, while other influenza A virus subtyping gene targets in the panel remained negative. Complete concordance between NxTAG-RPP and FA-RP was observed in 98.8% (318/322) of positive results (kappa = 0.92). Substantial agreement was found for most respiratory targets, but significant differences were observed in human metapneumovirus (P = 0.001) and parainfluenza virus type 3 (P = 0.031). NxTAG-RPP has a higher sample throughput than FA-RP (96 samples versus 1 sample per run) while the turnaround times for NxTAG-RPP and FA-RP were 5 h (up to 96 samples) and 1 h (for one sample), respectively. Overall, NxTAG-RPP demonstrated good diagnostic performance for most respiratory pathogens. The high sample throughput with reasonable turnaround time of this new assay makes it a suitable multiplex platform for routine screening of respiratory specimens in hospital-based laboratories. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Smartphone-Based Fluorescent Diagnostic System for Highly Pathogenic H5N1 Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Seon-Ju; Choi, Kyunghan; Cuc, Bui Thi; Hong, Nguyen Ngoc; Bao, Duong Tuan; Ngoc, Nguyen Minh; Le, Mai Quynh; Hang, Nguyen Le Khanh; Thach, Nguyen Co; Mallik, Shyam Kumar; Kim, Hak Sung; Chong, Chom-Kyu; Choi, Hak Soo; Sung, Haan Woo; Yu, Kyoungsik; Park, Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Field diagnostic tools for avian influenza (AI) are indispensable for the prevention and controlled management of highly pathogenic AI-related diseases. More accurate, faster and networked on-site monitoring is demanded to detect such AI viruses with high sensitivity as well as to maintain up-to-date information about their geographical transmission. In this work, we assessed the clinical and field-level performance of a smartphone-based fluorescent diagnostic device with an efficient reflective light collection module using a coumarin-derived dendrimer-based fluorescent lateral flow immunoassay. By application of an optimized bioconjugate, a smartphone-based diagnostic device had a two-fold higher detectability as compared to that of the table-top fluorescence strip reader for three different AI subtypes (H5N3, H7N1, and H9N2). Additionally, in a clinical study of H5N1-confirmed patients, the smartphone-based diagnostic device showed a sensitivity of 96.55% (28/29) [95% confidence interval (CI): 82.24 to 99.91] and a specificity of 98.55% (68/69) (95% CI: 92.19 to 99.96). The measurement results from the distributed individual smartphones were wirelessly transmitted via short messaging service and collected by a centralized database system for further information processing and data mining. Smartphone-based diagnosis provided highly sensitive measurement results for H5N1 detection within 15 minutes. Because of its high sensitivity, portability and automatic reporting feature, the proposed device will enable agile identification of patients and efficient control of AI dissemination. PMID:26877781

  2. An Efficient Method for the Isolation of Highly Purified RNA from Seeds for Use in Quantitative Transcriptome Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanai, Masatake; Mano, Shoji; Nishimura, Mikio

    2017-01-11

    Plant seeds accumulate large amounts of storage reserves comprising biodegradable organic matter. Humans rely on seed storage reserves for food and as industrial materials. Gene expression profiles are powerful tools for investigating metabolic regulation in plant cells. Therefore, detailed, accurate gene expression profiles during seed development are required for crop breeding. Acquiring highly purified RNA is essential for producing these profiles. Efficient methods are needed to isolate highly purified RNA from seeds. Here, we describe a method for isolating RNA from seeds containing large amounts of oils, proteins, and polyphenols, which have inhibitory effects on high-purity RNA isolation. Our method enables highly purified RNA to be obtained from seeds without the use of phenol, chloroform, or additional processes for RNA purification. This method is applicable to Arabidopsis, rapeseed, and soybean seeds. Our method will be useful for monitoring the expression patterns of low level transcripts in developing and mature seeds.

  3. Unraveling the Architecture and Structural Dynamics of Pathogens by High-Resolution in vitro Atomic Force Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malkin, A J; Plomp, M; Leighton, T J; McPherson, A; Wheeler, K E

    2005-04-12

    Progress in structural biology very much depends upon the development of new high-resolution techniques and tools. Despite decades of study of viruses, bacteria and bacterial spores and their pressing importance in human medicine and biodefense, many of their structural properties are poorly understood. Thus, characterization and understanding of the architecture of protein surface and internal structures of pathogens is critical to elucidating mechanisms of disease, immune response, physicochemical properties, environmental resistance and development of countermeasures against bioterrorist agents. Furthermore, even though complete genome sequences are available for various pathogens, the structure-function relationships are not understood. Because of their lack of symmetry and heterogeneity, large human pathogens are often refractory to X-ray crystallographic analysis or reconstruction by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM). An alternative high-resolution method to examine native structure of pathogens is atomic force microscopy (AFM), which allows direct visualization of macromolecular assemblies at near-molecular resolution. The capability to image single pathogen surfaces at nanometer scale in vitro would profoundly impact mechanistic and structural studies of pathogenesis, immunobiology, specific cellular processes, environmental dynamics and biotransformation.

  4. Extraction of High Quality RNA from Cannabis sativa Bast Fibres: A Vademecum for Molecular Biologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gea Guerriero

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In plants there is no universal protocol for RNA extraction, since optimizations are required depending on the species, tissues and developmental stages. Some plants/tissues are rich in secondary metabolites or synthesize thick cell walls, which hinder an efficient RNA extraction. One such example is bast fibres, long extraxylary cells characterized by a thick cellulosic cell wall. Given the economic importance of bast fibres, which are used in the textile sector, as well as in biocomposites as green substitutes of glass fibres, it is desirable to better understand their development from a molecular point of view. This knowledge favours the development of biotechnological strategies aimed at improving specific properties of bast fibres. To be able to perform high-throughput analyses, such as, for instance, transcriptomics of bast fibres, RNA extraction is a crucial and limiting step. We here detail a protocol enabling the rapid extraction of high quality RNA from the bast fibres of textile hemp, Cannabis sativa L., a multi-purpose fibre crop standing in the spotlight of research.

  5. High-throughput quantification of chloroplast RNA editing extent using multiplex RT-PCR mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germain, Arnaud; Hanson, Maureen R; Bentolila, Stéphane

    2015-08-01

    RNA editing in plants, animals, and humans modifies genomically encoded cytidine or adenosine nucleotides to uridine or inosine, respectively, in mRNAs. We customized the MassARRAY System (Sequenom Inc., San Diego, CA, USA, www.sequenom.com) to assay multiplex PCR-amplified single-stranded cDNAs and easily analyse and display the captured data. By using appropriate oligonucleotide probes, the method can be tailored to any organism and gene where RNA editing occurs. Editing extent of up to 40 different nucleotides in each of either 94 or 382 different samples (3760 or 15 280 editing targets, respectively) can be examined by assaying a single plate and by performing one repetition. We have established this mass spectrometric method as a dependable, cost-effective and time-saving technique to examine the RNA editing efficiency at 37 Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplast editing sites at a high level of multiplexing. The high-throughput editing assay, named Multiplex RT-PCR Mass Spectrometry (MRMS), is ideal for large-scale experiments such as identifying population variation, examining tissue-specific changes in editing extent, or screening a mutant or transgenic collection. Moreover, the required amount of starting material is so low that RNA from fewer than 50 cells can be examined without amplification. We demonstrate the use of the method to identify natural variation in editing extent of chloroplast C targets in a collection of Arabidopsis accessions. © 2015 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Identification of Highly Variable Supernumerary Chromosome Segments in an Asexual Pathogen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqiu Huang

    Full Text Available Supernumerary chromosome segments are known to harbor different transposons from their essential counterparts. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of transposons in the origin and evolution of supernumerary segments in the asexual fungal pathogen Fusarium virguliforme. We compared the genomes of 11 isolates comprising six Fusarium species that cause soybean sudden death syndrome (SDS or bean root rot (BRR, and identified significant levels of genetic variation in A+T-rich repeat blocks of the essential chromosomes and in A+T-neutral regions of the supernumerary segments. The A+T-rich repeat blocks in the essential chromosomes were highly variable between F. virguliforme and non-F. virguliforme isolates, but were scarcely variable between F. virguliforme isolates. The A+T-neutral regions in the supernumerary segments, however, were highly variable between F. virguliforme isolates, with a statistically significant number (21 standard deviations above the mean of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. And supernumerary sequence types and rearrangement patterns of some F. virguliforme isolates were present in an isolate of F. cuneirostrum but not in the other F. virguliforme isolates. The most variable and highly expressed region in the supernumerary segments contained an active DNA transposon that was a most conserved match between F. virguliforme and the unrelated fungus Tolypocladium inflatum. This transposon was absent from two of the F. virguliforme isolates. Furthermore, transposons in the supernumerary segments of some F. virguliforme isolates were present in non-F. virguliforme isolates, but were absent from the other F. virguliforme isolates. Two supernumerary P450 enzymes were 43% and 57% identical to their essential counterparts. This study has raised the possibility that transposons generate genetic variation in supernumerary chromosome segments by frequent horizontal transfer within and between closely related species.

  7. Sample Preservation, DNA or RNA Extraction and Data Analysis for High-Throughput Phytoplankton Community Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Mäki

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton is the basis for aquatic food webs and mirrors the water quality. Conventionally, phytoplankton analysis has been done using time consuming and partly subjective microscopic observations, but next generation sequencing (NGS technologies provide promising potential for rapid automated examination of environmental samples. Because many phytoplankton species have tough cell walls, methods for cell lysis and DNA or RNA isolation need to be efficient to allow unbiased nucleic acid retrieval. Here, we analyzed how two phytoplankton preservation methods, three commercial DNA extraction kits and their improvements, three RNA extraction methods, and two data analysis procedures affected the results of the NGS analysis. A mock community was pooled from phytoplankton species with variation in nucleus size and cell wall hardness. Although the study showed potential for studying Lugol-preserved sample collections, it demonstrated critical challenges in the DNA-based phytoplankton analysis in overall. The 18S rRNA gene sequencing output was highly affected by the variation in the rRNA gene copy numbers per cell, while sample preservation and nucleic acid extraction methods formed another source of variation. At the top, sequence-specific variation in the data quality introduced unexpected bioinformatics bias when the sliding-window method was used for the quality trimming of the Ion Torrent data. While DNA-based analyses did not correlate with biomasses or cell numbers of the mock community, rRNA-based analyses were less affected by different RNA extraction procedures and had better match with the biomasses, dry weight and carbon contents, and are therefore recommended for quantitative phytoplankton analyses.

  8. Annotation of primate miRNAs by high throughput sequencing of small RNA libraries

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    Dannemann Michael

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In addition to genome sequencing, accurate functional annotation of genomes is required in order to carry out comparative and evolutionary analyses between species. Among primates, the human genome is the most extensively annotated. Human miRNA gene annotation is based on multiple lines of evidence including evidence for expression as well as prediction of the characteristic hairpin structure. In contrast, most miRNA genes in non-human primates are annotated based on homology without any expression evidence. We have sequenced small-RNA libraries from chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan and rhesus macaque from multiple individuals and tissues. Using patterns of miRNA expression in conjunction with a model of miRNA biogenesis we used these high-throughput sequencing data to identify novel miRNAs in non-human primates. Results We predicted 47 new miRNAs in chimpanzee, 240 in gorilla, 55 in orangutan and 47 in rhesus macaque. The algorithm we used was able to predict 64% of the previously known miRNAs in chimpanzee, 94% in gorilla, 61% in orangutan and 71% in rhesus macaque. We therefore added evidence for expression in between one and five tissues to miRNAs that were previously annotated based only on homology to human miRNAs. We increased from 60 to 175 the number miRNAs that are located in orthologous regions in humans and the four non-human primate species studied here. Conclusions In this study we provide expression evidence for homology-based annotated miRNAs and predict de novo miRNAs in four non-human primate species. We increased the number of annotated miRNA genes and provided evidence for their expression in four non-human primates. Similar approaches using different individuals and tissues would improve annotation in non-human primates and allow for further comparative studies in the future.

  9. Molecular structure and thermodynamic predictions to create highly sensitive microRNA biosensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larkey, Nicholas E.; Brucks, Corinne N.; Lansing, Shan S.; Le, Sophia D.; Smith, Natasha M.; Tran, Victoria; Zhang, Lulu; Burrows, Sean M., E-mail: sean.burrows@oregonstate.edu

    2016-02-25

    Many studies have established microRNAs (miRNAs) as post-transcriptional regulators in a variety of intracellular molecular processes. Abnormal changes in miRNA have been associated with several diseases. However, these changes are sometimes subtle and occur at nanomolar levels or lower. Several biosensing hurdles for in situ cellular/tissue analysis of miRNA limit detection of small amounts of miRNA. Of these limitations the most challenging are selectivity and sensor degradation creating high background signals and false signals. Recently we developed a reporter+probe biosensor for let-7a that showed potential to mitigate false signal from sensor degradation. Here we designed reporter+probe biosensors for miR-26a-2-3p and miR-27a-5p to better understand the effect of thermodynamics and molecular structures of the biosensor constituents on the analytical performance. Signal changes from interactions between Cy3 and Cy5 on the reporters were used to understand structural aspects of the reporter designs. Theoretical thermodynamic values, single stranded conformations, hetero- and homodimerization structures, and equilibrium concentrations of the reporters and probes were used to interpret the experimental observations. Studies of the sensitivity and selectivity revealed 5–9 nM detection limits in the presence and absence of interfering off-analyte miRNAs. These studies will aid in determining how to rationally design reporter+probe biosensors to overcome hurdles associated with highly sensitive miRNA biosensing. - Highlights: • Challenges facing highly sensitive miRNA biosensor designs are addressed. • Thermodynamic and molecular structure design metrics for reporter+probe biosensors are proposed. • The influence of ideal and non-ideal reporter hairpin structures on reporter+probe formation and signal change are discussed. • 5–9 nM limits of detection were observed with no interference from off-analytes.

  10. Immune responses in piglets infected with highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gang; Song, Tengfei; Yu, Ying; Liu, Yonggang; Shi, Wenda; Wang, Shujie; Rong, Fulong; Dong, Jianguo; Liu, He; Cai, Xuehui; Zhou, En-Min

    2011-08-15

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) infection compromises the host's innate and adaptive immunity. The aim of this study was to investigate the immune responses of piglets infected with highly pathogenic (HP) PRRSV (HuN4 strain) with or without the immunization with CH-1R attenuated PRRSV vaccine. The response was evaluated for the clinical signs, pathological changes and virus load in immune organs, antibody responses and levels of serum IFN-γ, IL-4 and IL-10. The result showed that in comparison with the piglets received the immunization, the piglets infected with HP-PRRSV alone had the thymus atrophy, decreased serum levels of IL-4 and increased serum levels of IL-10 and INF-γ. These results suggest that elevated IL-10 levels at the early stage of the infection may enhance virus survival and delay the induction of protective immunity, while increased levels of IL-4 induce the effective immune responses and increase the animals' health status. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Animal health policy principles for highly pathogenic avian influenza: shared experience from China and Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, C; Ninghui, L; Yeh, F; Zhang, L

    2011-08-01

    Animal health policy for highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) must, for the time being, be based on expert opinion and shared international experience. We used the intellectual capital and knowledge of experienced Chinese and Canadian practitioners and policy makers to inform policy options for China and find shared policy elements applicable to both countries. No peer-reviewed comprehensive evaluations or systematic regulatory impact assessments of animal health policies were found. Sixteen guiding policy principles emerged from our thematic analysis of Chinese and Canadian policies. We provide a list of shared policy goals, targets and elements for HPAI preparedness, response and recovery. Policy elements clustered in a manner consistent with core public health competencies. Complex situations like HPAI require complex and adaptive policies, yet policies that cross jurisdictions and are fully integrated across agencies are rare. We encourage countries to develop or deploy capacity to undertake and publish regulatory impact assessments and policy evaluation to identify policy needs and provide a basis for evidence-based policy development. © 2010 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  12. Emergence and Stability of High-Pressure Resistance in Different Food-Borne Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanlint, Dietrich; Rutten, Nele; Michiels, Chris W.

    2012-01-01

    High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) processing is becoming a valuable nonthermal food pasteurization technique, although there is reasonable concern that bacterial HHP resistance could compromise the safety and stability of HHP-processed foods. While the degree of natural HHP resistance has already been shown to vary greatly among and within bacterial species, a still unresolved question remains as to what extent different food-borne pathogens can actually develop HHP resistance. In this study, we therefore examined and compared the intrinsic potentials for HHP resistance development among strains of Escherichia coli, Shigella flexneri, Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis, Yersinia enterocolitica, Aeromonas hydrophila, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Listeria innocua using a selective enrichment approach. Interestingly, of all strains examined, the acquisition of extreme HHP resistance could be detected in only some of the E. coli strains, indicating that a specific genetic predisposition might be required for resistance development. Furthermore, once acquired, HHP resistance proved to be a very stable trait that was maintained for >80 generations in the absence of HHP exposure. Finally, at the mechanistic level, HHP resistance was not necessarily linked to derepression of the heat shock genes and was not related to the phenomenon of persistence. PMID:22344661

  13. Emergence and stability of high-pressure resistance in different food-borne pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanlint, Dietrich; Rutten, Nele; Michiels, Chris W; Aertsen, Abram

    2012-05-01

    High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) processing is becoming a valuable nonthermal food pasteurization technique, although there is reasonable concern that bacterial HHP resistance could compromise the safety and stability of HHP-processed foods. While the degree of natural HHP resistance has already been shown to vary greatly among and within bacterial species, a still unresolved question remains as to what extent different food-borne pathogens can actually develop HHP resistance. In this study, we therefore examined and compared the intrinsic potentials for HHP resistance development among strains of Escherichia coli, Shigella flexneri, Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis, Yersinia enterocolitica, Aeromonas hydrophila, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Listeria innocua using a selective enrichment approach. Interestingly, of all strains examined, the acquisition of extreme HHP resistance could be detected in only some of the E. coli strains, indicating that a specific genetic predisposition might be required for resistance development. Furthermore, once acquired, HHP resistance proved to be a very stable trait that was maintained for >80 generations in the absence of HHP exposure. Finally, at the mechanistic level, HHP resistance was not necessarily linked to derepression of the heat shock genes and was not related to the phenomenon of persistence.

  14. Application of reverse genetics for producing attenuated vaccine strains against highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Yuko; Takemae, Nobuhiro; Saito, Takehiko

    2014-08-01

    In this study, reverse genetics was applied to produce vaccine candidate strains against highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIVs) of the H5N1 subtype. The H5 subtype vaccine strains were generated by a reverse genetics method in a biosafety level 2 facility. The strain contained the HA gene from the H5N1 subtype HPAIV attenuated by genetic modification at the cleavage site, the NA gene derived from the H5N1 subtype HPAI or the H5N3 subtype of avian influenza virus and internal genes from A/Puerto Rico/8/34. Vaccination with an inactivated recombinant virus with oil-emulsion completely protected chickens from a homologous viral challenge with a 640 HAU or 3,200 HAU/vaccination dose. Vaccination with a higher dose of antigen, 3,200 HAU, was effective at increasing survival and efficiently reduced viral shedding even when challenged by a virus of a different HA clade. The feasibility of differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA) was demonstrated against a challenge with H5N1 HPAIVs when the recombinant H5N3 subtype viruses were used as the antigens of the vaccine. Our study demonstrated that the use of reverse genetics would be an option to promptly produce an inactivated vaccine with better matching of antigenicity to a circulating strain.

  15. New Reassortant H5N8 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus from Waterfowl in Southern China

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    Yafen eSong

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available New reassortant highly pathogenic H5N8 avian influenza viruses were isolated from waterfowl in Southern China. Blast analysis demonstrated that the PB2 gene in these viruses were most closely related to A/wild duck/Shangdong/628/2011 (H5N1, while their NP genes were both more closely related to A/wild duck/Shandong/1/2011 (H5N1 and A/duck/Jiangsu/k1203/2010 (H5N8. However, the HA, NA, PB1, PA, M, and NS genes had the highest homology with A/duck/Jiangsu/k1203/2010 (H5N8. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that their HA genes belonged to the same GsGd H5 clade 2.3.4.4 detected in China in 2010. Therefore, we supposed that these H5N8 viruses might be novel reassortant viruses that have a H5N8 backbone while acquiring PB2 and NP genes from H5N1 viruses. This study is useful for better understanding the genetic and antigenic evolution of H5 avian influenza viruses in Southern China.

  16. Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (H5N1) in frozen duck carcasses, Germany, 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harder, Timm C; Teuffert, Jürgen; Starick, Elke; Gethmann, Jörn; Grund, Christian; Fereidouni, Sasan; Durban, Markus; Bogner, Karl Heinz; Neubauer-Juric, Antonie; Repper, Reinhard; Hlinak, Andreas; Engelhardt, Andreas; Nöckler, Axel; Smietanka, Krzysztof; Minta, Zenon; Kramer, Matthias; Globig, Anja; Mettenleiter, Thomas C; Conraths, Franz J; Beer, Martin

    2009-02-01

    We conducted phylogenetic and epidemiologic analyses to determine sources of outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV), subtype H5N1, in poultry holdings in 2007 in Germany, and a suspected incursion of HPAIV into the food chain through contaminated deep-frozen duck carcasses. In summer 2007, HPAIV (H5N1) outbreaks in 3 poultry holdings in Germany were temporally, spatially, and phylogenetically linked to outbreaks in wild aquatic birds. Detection of HPAIV (H5N1) in frozen duck carcass samples of retained slaughter batches of 1 farm indicated that silent infection had occurred for some time before the incidental detection. Phylogenetic analysis established a direct epidemiologic link between HPAIV isolated from duck meat and strains isolated from 3 further outbreaks in December 2007 in backyard chickens that had access to uncooked offal from commercial deep-frozen duck carcasses. Measures that will prevent such undetected introduction of HPAIV (H5N1) into the food chain are urgently required.

  17. Optimal immunization cocktails can promote induction of broadly neutralizing Abs against highly mutable pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, J Scott; Moore, Penny L; Kardar, Mehran; Chakraborty, Arup K

    2016-10-24

    Strategies to elicit Abs that can neutralize diverse strains of a highly mutable pathogen are likely to result in a potent vaccine. Broadly neutralizing Abs (bnAbs) against HIV have been isolated from patients, proving that the human immune system can evolve them. Using computer simulations and theory, we study immunization with diverse mixtures of variant antigens (Ags). Our results show that particular choices for the number of variant Ags and the mutational distances separating them maximize the probability of inducing bnAbs. The variant Ags represent potentially conflicting selection forces that can frustrate the Darwinian evolutionary process of affinity maturation. An intermediate level of frustration maximizes the chance of evolving bnAbs. A simple model makes vivid the origin of this principle of optimal frustration. Our results, combined with past studies, suggest that an appropriately chosen permutation of immunization with an optimally designed mixture (using the principles that we describe) and sequential immunization with variant Ags that are separated by relatively large mutational distances may best promote the evolution of bnAbs.

  18. Unifying the analysis of high-throughput sequencing datasets: characterizing RNA-seq, 16S rRNA gene sequencing and selective growth experiments by compositional data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Andrew D; Reid, Jennifer Ns; Macklaim, Jean M; McMurrough, Thomas A; Edgell, David R; Gloor, Gregory B

    2014-01-01

    Experimental designs that take advantage of high-throughput sequencing to generate datasets include RNA sequencing (RNA-seq), chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq), sequencing of 16S rRNA gene fragments, metagenomic analysis and selective growth experiments. In each case the underlying data are similar and are composed of counts of sequencing reads mapped to a large number of features in each sample. Despite this underlying similarity, the data analysis methods used for these experimental designs are all different, and do not translate across experiments. Alternative methods have been developed in the physical and geological sciences that treat similar data as compositions. Compositional data analysis methods transform the data to relative abundances with the result that the analyses are more robust and reproducible. Data from an in vitro selective growth experiment, an RNA-seq experiment and the Human Microbiome Project 16S rRNA gene abundance dataset were examined by ALDEx2, a compositional data analysis tool that uses Bayesian methods to infer technical and statistical error. The ALDEx2 approach is shown to be suitable for all three types of data: it correctly identifies both the direction and differential abundance of features in the differential growth experiment, it identifies a substantially similar set of differentially expressed genes in the RNA-seq dataset as the leading tools and it identifies as differential the taxa that distinguish the tongue dorsum and buccal mucosa in the Human Microbiome Project dataset. The design of ALDEx2 reduces the number of false positive identifications that result from datasets composed of many features in few samples. Statistical analysis of high-throughput sequencing datasets composed of per feature counts showed that the ALDEx2 R package is a simple and robust tool, which can be applied to RNA-seq, 16S rRNA gene sequencing and differential growth datasets, and by extension to other techniques that use a

  19. High throughput sequencing and proteomics to identify immunogenic proteins of a new pathogen: the dirty genome approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilbert Greub

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: With the availability of new generation sequencing technologies, bacterial genome projects have undergone a major boost. Still, chromosome completion needs a costly and time-consuming gap closure, especially when containing highly repetitive elements. However, incomplete genome data may be sufficiently informative to derive the pursued information. For emerging pathogens, i.e. newly identified pathogens, lack of release of genome data during gap closure stage is clearly medically counterproductive. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We thus investigated the feasibility of a dirty genome approach, i.e. the release of unfinished genome sequences to develop serological diagnostic tools. We showed that almost the whole genome sequence of the emerging pathogen Parachlamydia acanthamoebae was retrieved even with relatively short reads from Genome Sequencer 20 and Solexa. The bacterial proteome was analyzed to select immunogenic proteins, which were then expressed and used to elaborate the first steps of an ELISA. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This work constitutes the proof of principle for a dirty genome approach, i.e. the use of unfinished genome sequences of pathogenic bacteria, coupled with proteomics to rapidly identify new immunogenic proteins useful to develop in the future specific diagnostic tests such as ELISA, immunohistochemistry and direct antigen detection. Although applied here to an emerging pathogen, this combined dirty genome sequencing/proteomic approach may be used for any pathogen for which better diagnostics are needed. These genome sequences may also be very useful to develop DNA based diagnostic tests. All these diagnostic tools will allow further evaluations of the pathogenic potential of this obligate intracellular bacterium.

  20. Surveillance for highly pathogenic avian influenza virus in wild birds during outbreaks in domestic poultry, Minnesota, 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennelle, Christopher S.; Carstensen, Michelle; Hildebrand, Erik C.; Cornicelli, Louis; Wolf, Paul C.; Grear, Daniel A.; Ip, Hon S.; VanDalen, Kaci K.; Minicucci, Larissa A.

    2016-01-01

    In 2015, a major outbreak of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) infection devastated poultry facilities in Minnesota, USA. To clarify the role of wild birds, we tested 3,139 waterfowl fecal samples and 104 sick and dead birds during March 9–June 4, 2015. HPAIV was isolated from a Cooper’s hawk but not from waterfowl.

  1. Influence of maternal immunity on vaccine efficacy and susceptibility of commercial broilers against highly pathogenic avian influenza virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maternal antibodies provide early protection from disease, but may interfere with the vaccination efficacy in short-lived broilers. This study seeks to assess how maternal immunity can interfere with vaccine efficacy against clade 2.3.4.4 H5N2 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) and how ...

  2. Surveillance for highly pathogenic H5 avian influenza virus in synanthropic wildlife associated with poultry farms during an acute outbreak

    Science.gov (United States)

    In November 2014, a Eurasian strain H5N8 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus was detected in poultry in Canada. Introduced viruses were soon detected in the United States and within six months had spread to 21 states with more than 48 million poultry affected. In an effort to study potential mec...

  3. Differences in highly pathogenic avian influenza viral pathogenesis and associated early inflammatory response in chickens and ducks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelissen, J.B.W.J.; Vervelde, L.; Post, J.; Rebel, J.M.J.

    2013-01-01

    We studied the immunological responses in the lung, brain and spleen of ducks and chickens within the first 7 days after infection with H7N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI). Infection with HPAI caused significant morbidity and mortality in chickens, while in ducks the infection was

  4. Immunity to current H5 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses: From vaccines to adaptive immunity in wild birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Following the 2014-2015 outbreaks of H5N2 and H5N8 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) in the U.S., studies were performed to assess the immunity required for protection against future outbreaks should they occur. We assessed the ability of vaccines to induce protection of chickens and turkeys...

  5. Bronchointerstitial pneumonia in guinea pigs following inoculation with H5N1 high pathogenicity avian influenza virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    The H5N1 high pathogenicity avian influenza (HPAI) viruses have caused widespread disease of poultry in Asia, Africa and the Middle East, and sporadic human infections. The guinea pig model has been used to study human H3N2 and H1N1 influenza viruses, but knowledge is lacking on H5N1 HPAI virus inf...

  6. Marked endotheliotropism of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1 following intestinal inoculation in cats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reperant, Leslie A; van de Bildt, Marco W G; van Amerongen, Geert; Leijten, Lonneke M E; Watson, Simon; Palser, Anne; Kellam, Paul; Eissens, Anko C; Frijlink, Hendrik W; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Kuiken, Thijs; Frijlink, Henderik

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) H5N1 can infect mammals via the intestine; this is unusual since influenza viruses typically infect mammals via the respiratory tract. The dissemination of HPAIV H5N1 following intestinal entry and associated pathogenesis are largely unknown. To assess

  7. Vaccine protection of poultry against H5 clade 2.3.4.4 highly pathogenic avian influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    Following the 2014-2015 outbreaks of H5N2 and H5N8 (clade 2.3.4.4) highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) in the U.S., studies were performed to identify vaccines with potential to be used as a control mechanism in the event of future outbreaks. We tested both inactivated and recombinant vaccine...

  8. Different environmental drivers of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 outbreaks in poultry and wild birds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Si, Y.; Boer, de W.F.; Gong, P.

    2013-01-01

    A large number of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 outbreaks in poultry and wild birds have been reported in Europe since 2005. Distinct spatial patterns in poultry and wild birds suggest that different environmental drivers and potentially different spread mechanisms are operating.

  9. Inhibition of enteric pathogens and surrogates using integrated, high intensity 405nm led light on the surface of almonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    The disinfecting properties of 405 nm light were investigated against Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella, and their non-pathogenic surrogate bacteria on the surface of almonds. High intensity monochromatic blue light (MBL) was generated from an array of narrow-band 405 nm light-emitting diodes (LE...

  10. Marked endotheliotropism of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1 following intestinal inoculation in cats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.A. Reperant (Leslie); M.W.G. van de Bildt (Marco); G. van Amerongen (Geert); L.M.E. Leijten (Lonneke); S. Watson (Sarah)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractHighly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) H5N1 can infect mammals via the intestine; this is unusual since influenza viruses typically infect mammals via the respiratory tract. The dissemination of HPAIV H5N1 following intestinal entry and associated pathogenesis are largely

  11. Experimental infection of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1 in black-headed gulls (Chroicocephalus ridibundus)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Ramis (Antonio); G. van Amerongen (Geert); M.W.G. van de Bildt (Marco); L.M.E. Leijten (Lonneke); R. Vanderstichel (R.); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); T. Kuiken (Thijs)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractHistorically, highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIV) rarely resulted in infection or clinical disease in wild birds. However, since 2002, disease and mortality from natural HPAIV H5N1 infection have been observed in wild birds including gulls. We performed an experimental

  12. Automated Methods for Multiplexed Pathogen Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straub, Tim M.; Dockendorff, Brian P.; Quinonez-Diaz, Maria D.; Valdez, Catherine O.; Shutthanandan, Janani I.; Tarasevich, Barbara J.; Grate, Jay W.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.

    2005-09-01

    Detection of pathogenic microorganisms in environmental samples is a difficult process. Concentration of the organisms of interest also co-concentrates inhibitors of many end-point detection methods, notably, nucleic acid methods. In addition, sensitive, highly multiplexed pathogen detection continues to be problematic. The primary function of the BEADS (Biodetection Enabling Analyte Delivery System) platform is the automated concentration and purification of target analytes from interfering substances, often present in these samples, via a renewable surface column. In one version of BEADS, automated immunomagnetic separation (IMS) is used to separate cells from their samples. Captured cells are transferred to a flow-through thermal cycler where PCR, using labeled primers, is performed. PCR products are then detected by hybridization to a DNA suspension array. In another version of BEADS, cell lysis is performed, and community RNA is purified and directly labeled. Multiplexed detection is accomplished by direct hybridization of the RNA to a planar microarray. The integrated IMS/PCR version of BEADS can successfully purify and amplify 10 E. coli O157:H7 cells from river water samples. Multiplexed PCR assays for the simultaneous detection of E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella, and Shigella on bead suspension arrays was demonstrated for the detection of as few as 100 cells for each organism. Results for the RNA version of BEADS are also showing promising results. Automation yields highly purified RNA, suitable for multiplexed detection on microarrays, with microarray detection specificity equivalent to PCR. Both versions of the BEADS platform show great promise for automated pathogen detection from environmental samples. Highly multiplexed pathogen detection using PCR continues to be problematic, but may be required for trace detection in large volume samples. The RNA approach solves the issues of highly multiplexed PCR and provides ''live vs. dead

  13. Using extreme value theory approaches to forecast the probability of outbreak of highly pathogenic influenza in Zhejiang, China.

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    Jiangpeng Chen

    Full Text Available Influenza is a contagious disease with high transmissibility to spread around the world with considerable morbidity and mortality and presents an enormous burden on worldwide public health. Few mathematical models can be used because influenza incidence data are generally not normally distributed. We developed a mathematical model using Extreme Value Theory (EVT to forecast the probability of outbreak of highly pathogenic influenza.The incidence data of highly pathogenic influenza in Zhejiang province from April 2009 to November 2013 were retrieved from the website of Health and Family Planning Commission of Zhejiang Province. MATLAB "VIEM" toolbox was used to analyze data and modelling. In the present work, we used the Peak Over Threshold (POT model, assuming the frequency as a Poisson process and the intensity to be Pareto distributed, to characterize the temporal variability of the long-term extreme incidence of highly pathogenic influenza in Zhejiang, China.The skewness and kurtosis of the incidence of highly pathogenic influenza in Zhejiang between April 2009 and November 2013 were 4.49 and 21.12, which indicated a "fat tail" distribution. A QQ plot and a mean excess plot were used to further validate the features of the distribution. After determining the threshold, we modeled the extremes and estimated the shape parameter and scale parameter by the maximum likelihood method. The results showed that months in which the incidence of highly pathogenic influenza is about 4462/2286/1311/487 are predicted to occur once every five/three/two/one year, respectively.Despite the simplicity, the present study successfully offers the sound modeling strategy and a methodological avenue to implement forecasting of an epidemic in the midst of its course.

  14. A cell-based high-throughput protocol to screen entry inhibitors of highly pathogenic viruses with Traditional Chinese Medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yong; Cheng, Han; Yan, Hui; Wang, Peng-Zhan; Rong, Rong; Zhang, Ying-Ying; Zhang, Cheng-Bo; Du, Rui-Kun; Rong, Li-Jun

    2017-05-01

    Emerging viruses such as Ebola virus (EBOV), Lassa virus (LASV), and avian influenza virus H5N1 (AIV) are global health concerns. Since there is very limited options (either vaccine or specific therapy) approved for humans against these viruses, there is an urgent need to develop prophylactic and therapeutic treatments. Previously we reported a high-throughput screening (HTS) protocol to identify entry inhibitors for three highly pathogenic viruses (EBOV, LASV, and AIV) using a human immunodeficiency virus-based pseudotyping platform which allows us to perform the screening in a BSL-2 facility. In this report, we have adopted this screening protocol to evaluate traditional Chinese Medicines (TCMs) in an effort to discover entry inhibitors against these viruses. Here we show that extracts of the following Chinese medicinal herbs exhibit potent anti-Ebola viral activities: Gardenia jasminoides Ellis, Citrus aurantium L., Viola yedoensis Makino, Prunella vulgaris L., Coix lacryma-jobi L. var. mayuen (Roman.) Stapf, Pinellia ternata (Thunb.) Breit., and Morus alba L. This study represents a proof-of-principle investigation supporting the suitability of this assay for rapid screening TCMs and identifying putative entry inhibitors for these viruses. J. Med. Virol. 89:908-916, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Pathophysiology of Escherichia coli ventilator-associated pneumonia: implication of highly virulent extraintestinal pathogenic strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messika, Jonathan; Magdoud, Fatma; Clermont, Olivier; Margetis, Dimitri; Gaudry, Stéphane; Roux, Damien; Branger, Catherine; Dreyfuss, Didier; Denamur, Erick; Ricard, Jean-Damien

    2012-12-01

    To characterize Escherichia coli ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) in intensive care unit (ICU) patients by determining antibioresistance and genotypic characteristics of E. coli isolates responsible for VAP or lung colonization, by comparing them with their oropharyngeal and rectal counterparts and by assessing representative isolates' virulence in a pneumonia mouse model. Patients under mechanical ventilation for more than 72 h were screened for simultaneous presence of E. coli in rectal, oropharyngeal, and respiratory samples (colonization or VAP). If present, E. coli isolates were characterized by antimicrobial susceptibility, phylogenetic grouping, and virulence factor (VF) gene content determination. BALB/c mice were challenged intranasally with 3.6 × 10(8) colony-forming units (CFU) of patients' E. coli isolates. Multisite E. coli colonization was observed in 19 % of patients (25 patients, 12 with E. coli VAP). One hundred fifteen distinct E. coli isolates were analyzed. B2 phylogenetic group was predominant, with high VF gene content and low antimicrobial resistance. Antimicrobial resistance diversity was observed in four patients with VAP. E. coli isolates from VAP patients were more frequently B2 isolates, with significantly greater VF gene content than lung colonization isolates. Among screened VF genes, iroN and sfa appeared important for lung infection. A very strong correlation (R (2) = 0.99) was found between VF gene content and mortality in the mouse model. This is the first study establishing antibioresistance and genotypic characteristics of E. coli isolates responsible for VAP in adult ICU patients. These isolates are highly virulent specific extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli strains expressing virulence factors, representing potential targets for new therapies.

  16. Intersubtype Reassortments of H5N1 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Viruses Isolated from Quail.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tinh Huu Nguyen

    Full Text Available H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI viruses are considered a threat to national animal industries, causing production losses and high mortality in domestic poultry. In recent years, quail has become a popular terrestrial poultry species raised for production of meat and eggs in Asia. In this study, to better understand the roles of quail in H5N1 viral evolution, two H5N1-positive samples, designated A/quail/Vietnam/CVVI-49/2010 (CVVI-49/2010 and A/quail/Vietnam/CVVI-50/2014 (CVVI-50/2014, were isolated from quail during H5N1 outbreaks in Vietnam, and their whole genome were analyzed. The phylogenetic analysis reveals new evolutionary variation in the worldwide H5N1 viruses. The quail HA genes were clustered into clades 1.1.1 (CVVI-49/2010 and clade 2.3.2.1c (CVVI-50/2014, which may have evolved from viruses circulating from chickens and/or ducks in Cambodia, mainland of China, Taiwan, Indonesia, and South Korea in recent years. Interestingly, the M2 gene of the CVVI-49/2010 strain contained amino acid substitutions at position 26L-I and 31S-N that are related to amantadine-resistance. In particular, the CVVI-50/2014 strain revealed evidence of multiple intersubtype reassortment events between virus clades 2.3.2.1c, 2.3.2.1b, and 2.3.2.1a. Data from this study supports the possible role of quail as an important intermediate host in avian influenza virus evolution. Therefore, additional surveillance is needed to monitor these HPAI viruses both serologically and virologically in quail.

  17. The complete genome sequence and comparative genome analysis of the high pathogenicity Yersinia enterocolitica strain 8081.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas R Thomson

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The human enteropathogen, Yersinia enterocolitica, is a significant link in the range of Yersinia pathologies extending from mild gastroenteritis to bubonic plague. Comparison at the genomic level is a key step in our understanding of the genetic basis for this pathogenicity spectrum. Here we report the genome of Y. enterocolitica strain 8081 (serotype 0:8; biotype 1B and extensive microarray data relating to the genetic diversity of the Y. enterocolitica species. Our analysis reveals that the genome of Y. enterocolitica strain 8081 is a patchwork of horizontally acquired genetic loci, including a plasticity zone of 199 kb containing an extraordinarily high density of virulence genes. Microarray analysis has provided insights into species-specific Y. enterocolitica gene functions and the intraspecies differences between the high, low, and nonpathogenic Y. enterocolitica biotypes. Through comparative genome sequence analysis we provide new information on the evolution of the Yersinia. We identify numerous loci that represent ancestral clusters of genes potentially important in enteric survival and pathogenesis, which have been lost or are in the process of being lost, in the other sequenced Yersinia lineages. Our analysis also highlights large metabolic operons in Y. enterocolitica that are absent in the related enteropathogen, Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, indicating major differences in niche and nutrients used within the mammalian gut. These include clusters directing, the production of hydrogenases, tetrathionate respiration, cobalamin synthesis, and propanediol utilisation. Along with ancestral gene clusters, the genome of Y. enterocolitica has revealed species-specific and enteropathogen-specific loci. This has provided important insights into the pathology of this bacterium and, more broadly, into the evolution of the genus. Moreover, wider investigations looking at the patterns of gene loss and gain in the Yersinia have highlighted common

  18. Highly conserved type 1 pili promote enterotoxigenic E. coli pathogen-host interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaullah Sheikh

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC, defined by their elaboration of heat-labile (LT and/or heat-stable (ST enterotoxins, are a common cause of diarrheal illness in developing countries. Efficient delivery of these toxins requires ETEC to engage target host enterocytes. This engagement is accomplished using a variety of pathovar-specific and conserved E. coli adhesin molecules as well as plasmid encoded colonization factors. Some of these adhesins undergo significant transcriptional modulation as ETEC encounter intestinal epithelia, perhaps suggesting that they cooperatively facilitate interaction with the host. Among genes significantly upregulated on cell contact are those encoding type 1 pili. We therefore investigated the role played by these pili in facilitating ETEC adhesion, and toxin delivery to model intestinal epithelia. We demonstrate that type 1 pili, encoded in the E. coli core genome, play an essential role in ETEC virulence, acting in concert with plasmid-encoded pathovar specific colonization factor (CF fimbriae to promote optimal bacterial adhesion to cultured intestinal epithelium (CIE and to epithelial monolayers differentiated from human small intestinal stem cells. Type 1 pili are tipped with the FimH adhesin which recognizes mannose with stereochemical specificity. Thus, enhanced production of highly mannosylated proteins on intestinal epithelia promoted FimH-mediated ETEC adhesion, while conversely, interruption of FimH lectin-epithelial interactions with soluble mannose, anti-FimH antibodies or mutagenesis of fimH effectively blocked ETEC adhesion. Moreover, fimH mutants were significantly impaired in delivery of both heat-stable and heat-labile toxins to the target epithelial cells in vitro, and these mutants were substantially less virulent in rabbit ileal loop assays, a classical model of ETEC pathogenesis. Collectively, our data suggest that these highly conserved pili play an essential role in virulence of these

  19. Slower decline of plasma HIV-1 RNA following highly suppressive antiretroviral therapy in primary compared with chronic infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putter, H.; Prins, J. M.; Jurriaans, S.; Roos, M.; Ferguson, N. M.; van Praag, R.; van der Hoek, L.; Schuitemaker, H.; Anderson, R. M.; Goudsmit, J.; Lange, J. M.; de Wolf, F.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study the effect of highly suppressive antiretroviral therapy on the slopes of HIV-1 RNA decline in primary compared with chronic HIV-1 infection. METHODS: Slopes of HIV-1 RNA decline in plasma were compared before and after the start of highly suppressive antiretroviral therapy from

  20. An RNA-based signature enables high specificity detection of circulating tumor cells in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinich, Mark; Bhan, Irun; Kwan, Tanya T; Miyamoto, David T; Javaid, Sarah; LiCausi, Joseph A; Milner, John D; Hong, Xin; Goyal, Lipika; Sil, Srinjoy; Choz, Melissa; Ho, Uyen; Kapur, Ravi; Muzikansky, Alona; Zhang, Huidan; Weitz, David A; Sequist, Lecia V; Ryan, David P; Chung, Raymond T; Zhu, Andrew X; Isselbacher, Kurt J; Ting, David T; Toner, Mehmet; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Haber, Daniel A

    2017-01-31

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are shed into the bloodstream by invasive cancers, but the difficulty inherent in identifying these rare cells by microscopy has precluded their routine use in monitoring or screening for cancer. We recently described a high-throughput microfluidic CTC-iChip, which efficiently depletes hematopoietic cells from blood specimens and enriches for CTCs with well-preserved RNA. Application of RNA-based digital PCR to detect CTC-derived signatures may thus enable highly accurate tissue lineage-based cancer detection in blood specimens. As proof of principle, we examined hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), a cancer that is derived from liver cells bearing a unique gene expression profile. After identifying a digital signature of 10 liver-specific transcripts, we used a cross-validated logistic regression model to identify the presence of HCC-derived CTCs in nine of 16 (56%) untreated patients with HCC versus one of 31 (3%) patients with nonmalignant liver disease at risk for developing HCC (P digital CTC scoring was not correlated with the standard HCC serum protein marker alpha fetoprotein (P = 0.57). Modeling the sequential use of these two orthogonal markers for liver cancer screening in patients with high-risk cirrhosis generates positive and negative predictive values of 80% and 86%, respectively. Thus, digital RNA quantitation constitutes a sensitive and specific CTC readout, enabling high-throughput clinical applications, such as noninvasive screening for HCC in populations where viral hepatitis and cirrhosis are prevalent.

  1. High levels of DNA polymerase β mRNA corresponding with the high activity in Graves' thyroid tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, N; Sato, Y; Nagasaka, A; Mano, Y; Nagasaka, T; Nakai, A; Iwase, K; Yoshida, S

    2017-04-01

    High DNA polymerase β activity has been observed in the thyroid tissue of patients with Graves' disease (Nagasaka et al. in Metabolism 37:1051-1054, 1988). This fact aroused our interest in whether the alteration of DNA polymerase β activity depends on DNA polymerase β (DNA poly β) mRNA levels, which may be modulated by thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) or thyroid-stimulating substances, i.e. TSH receptor antibody (TRAb). Addition of TSH or TRAb to primary cultures of Graves' disease thyroid cells for 4 h led to no increase in DNA poly β mRNA levels. In contrast, thyroid hormone synthesizing enzyme, peroxidase, mRNA levels increased fivefold after coculture with TSH and TRAb, even though DNA poly β activity and mRNA levels are already significantly higher in Graves' disease thyroid tissues, compared with normal thyroid tissue. These results indicate that DNA poly β expression in Graves' disease thyroid cells may be maximally activated or plateau in response to thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulins, or that the activation of to poly β expression may occur via pathways other than the G protein and cyclic AMP system.

  2. A novel approach for differentiating pathogenic and non-pathogenic Leptospira based on molecular fingerprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Di; Zhang, Cuicai; Zhang, Huifang; Li, Xiuwen; Jiang, Xiugao; Zhang, Jianzhong

    2015-04-24

    disease that has become an important public health problem. Traditional serological methods are the gold standard for the detection of pathogenic strains of Leptospira. However, serological procedures are cumbersome, require more complex experimental techniques, and are based on a large number of international and domestic reference strains. Additionally, these experiments involve the immunization of animals with antigens from different serotypes to produce immune serum, and improper techniques may result in a rapid decrease in antibody titer, which would affect the final results. It is difficult to perform cumbersome detection procedures in a basic laboratory. Therefore, the use of conventional serological methods is limited, which significantly impacts daily leptospirosis epidemic surveillance, prevention, and control. Molecular biology methods, such as 16S rRNA and PCR-based methods, can be used to identify the pathogenic Leptospira. However, DNA extraction and gene sequencing methods are laborious and time consuming. Therefore, more rapid and reliable high-throughput identification methods are urgently needed for the clinical diagnosis of leptospirosis to improve epidemic control. Here, molecular fingerprinting technique was use to identify the pathogenicity. We constructed the reference spectra database and the super reference spectra of pathogenic and non-pathogenic Leptospira, which can rapidly identified Leptospira at the species level and the pathogenicity of these isolates can be simultaneously confirmed. Furthermore, the protein components of Leptospira pathogenicity were revealed. These findings thus provide a new way for Leptospira pathogenicity identification. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Extra double-stranded RNA binding domain (dsRBD) in a squid RNA editing enzyme confers resistance to high salt environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palavicini, Juan Pablo; Correa-Rojas, Rodrigo A; Rosenthal, Joshua J C

    2012-05-18

    A-to-I RNA editing is particularly common in coding regions of squid mRNAs. Previously, we isolated a squid editing enzyme (sqADAR2) that shows a unique structural feature when compared with other ADAR2 family members: an additional double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) binding domain (dsRBD). Alternative splicing includes or excludes this motif, generating a novel or a conventional variant termed sqADAR2a and sqADAR2b, respectively. The extra dsRBD of sqADAR2a increases its editing activity in vitro. We hypothesized that the high activity is due to an increase in the affinity of the enzyme for dsRNA. This may be important because protein-RNA interactions can be influenced by physical factors. We became particularly interested in analyzing the effects of salt on interactions between sqADAR2 and RNA because squid cells have a ∼3-fold higher ionic strength and proportionally more Cl(-) than vertebrate cells. To date, in vitro biochemical analyses of adenosine deamination have been conducted using vertebrate-like ionic strength buffers containing chloride as the major anion, although the vast majority of cellular anions are known to be organic. We found that squid-like salt conditions severely impair the binding affinity of conventional ADAR2s for dsRNA, leading to a decrease in nonspecific and site-specific editing activity. Inhibition of editing was mostly due to high Cl(-) levels and not to the high concentrations of K(+), Na(+), and organic anions like glutamate. Interestingly, the extra dsRBD in sqADAR2a conferred resistance to the high Cl(-) levels found in squid neurons. It does so by increasing the affinity of sqADAR2 for dsRNA by 30- or 100-fold in vertebrate-like or squid-like conditions, respectively. Site-directed mutagenesis of squid ADAR2a showed that its increased affinity and editing activity are directly attributable to the RNA binding activity of the extra dsRBD.

  4. Extra Double-stranded RNA Binding Domain (dsRBD) in a Squid RNA Editing Enzyme Confers Resistance to High Salt Environment*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palavicini, Juan Pablo; Correa-Rojas, Rodrigo A.; Rosenthal, Joshua J. C.

    2012-01-01

    A-to-I RNA editing is particularly common in coding regions of squid mRNAs. Previously, we isolated a squid editing enzyme (sqADAR2) that shows a unique structural feature when compared with other ADAR2 family members: an additional double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) binding domain (dsRBD). Alternative splicing includes or excludes this motif, generating a novel or a conventional variant termed sqADAR2a and sqADAR2b, respectively. The extra dsRBD of sqADAR2a increases its editing activity in vitro. We hypothesized that the high activity is due to an increase in the affinity of the enzyme for dsRNA. This may be important because protein-RNA interactions can be influenced by physical factors. We became particularly interested in analyzing the effects of salt on interactions between sqADAR2 and RNA because squid cells have a ∼3-fold higher ionic strength and proportionally more Cl− than vertebrate cells. To date, in vitro biochemical analyses of adenosine deamination have been conducted using vertebrate-like ionic strength buffers containing chloride as the major anion, although the vast majority of cellular anions are known to be organic. We found that squid-like salt conditions severely impair the binding affinity of conventional ADAR2s for dsRNA, leading to a decrease in nonspecific and site-specific editing activity. Inhibition of editing was mostly due to high Cl− levels and not to the high concentrations of K+, Na+, and organic anions like glutamate. Interestingly, the extra dsRBD in sqADAR2a conferred resistance to the high Cl− levels found in squid neurons. It does so by increasing the affinity of sqADAR2 for dsRNA by 30- or 100-fold in vertebrate-like or squid-like conditions, respectively. Site-directed mutagenesis of squid ADAR2a showed that its increased affinity and editing activity are directly attributable to the RNA binding activity of the extra dsRBD. PMID:22457361

  5. High-content analysis screening for cell cycle regulators using arrayed synthetic crRNA libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strezoska, Žaklina; Perkett, Matthew R; Chou, Eldon T; Maksimova, Elena; Anderson, Emily M; McClelland, Shawn; Kelley, Melissa L; Vermeulen, Annaleen; Smith, Anja van Brabant

    2017-06-10

    The CRISPR-Cas9 system has been utilized for large-scale, loss-of-function screens mainly using lentiviral pooled formats and cell-survival phenotypic assays. Screening in an arrayed format expands the types of phenotypic readouts that can be used to now include high-content, morphology-based assays, and with the recent availability of synthetic crRNA libraries, new studies are emerging. Here, we use a cell cycle reporter cell line to perform an arrayed, synthetic crRNA:tracrRNA screen targeting 169 genes (>600 crRNAs) and used high content analysis (HCA) to identify genes that regulate the cell cycle. Seven parameters were used to classify cells into cell cycle categories and multiple parameters were combined using a new analysis technique to identify hits. Comprehensive hit follow-up experiments included target gene expression analysis, confirmation of DNA insertions/deletions, and validation with orthogonal reagents. Our results show that most hits had three or more independent crRNAs per gene that demonstrated a phenotype with consistent individual parameters, indicating that our screen produced high-confidence hits with low off-target effects and allowed us to identify hits with more subtle phenotypes. The results of our screen demonstrate the power of using arrayed, synthetic crRNAs for functional phenotypic screening using multiparameter HCA assays. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. [High expression of p15 antisense RNA is a frequent event in acute myeloid leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yufeng; Le, Donghai; Zhu, Zhankun

    2016-04-01

    To detect the presence of p15 antisense RNA(p15AS) in acute myeloid leukemia(AML). p15AS and p15 mRNA in two leukemia cell lines was detected with strand-specific primer RT-qPCR. To explore the connection between p15AS and AML, 43 patients with newly diagnosed AML and 21 patients with benign diseases (Iron deficiency anemia) as controls were enrolled. The expression level of p15AS in bone marrow cells derived from the patients and the controls were determined by strand-specific primer RT-qPCR, and its relationship with clinical features was analyzed. The two AML lines displayed high p15AS and low p15 expression. Samples derived from the AML patients showed relatively increased expression of p15AS and down-regulated p15 expression in their bone cells. In contrast, the 21 controls showed high expression of p15 but relatively low expression of the p15AS. Compared with the normal controls, the expression levels of p15 protein were significantly lower among the AML patients (PFAB subtype, total white blood cell count, platelet count, proliferative degree of bone marrow cell and karyotype classification (P>0.05 for all comparisons). High expression of p15 antisense RNA was frequently found among AML patients, and may play an important role in epigenetic silencing of p15.

  7. Dimeric CRISPR RNA-guided FokI nucleases for highly specific genome editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Shengdar Q; Wyvekens, Nicolas; Khayter, Cyd; Foden, Jennifer A; Thapar, Vishal; Reyon, Deepak; Goodwin, Mathew J; Aryee, Martin J; Joung, J Keith

    2014-06-01

    Monomeric CRISPR-Cas9 nucleases are widely used for targeted genome editing but can induce unwanted off-target mutations with high frequencies. Here we describe dimeric RNA-guided FokI nucleases (RFNs) that can recognize extended sequences and edit endogenous genes with high efficiencies in human cells. RFN cleavage activity depends strictly on the binding of two guide RNAs (gRNAs) to DNA with a defined spacing and orientation substantially reducing the likelihood that a suitable target site will occur more than once in the genome and therefore improving specificities relative to wild-type Cas9 monomers. RFNs guided by a single gRNA generally induce lower levels of unwanted mutations than matched monomeric Cas9 nickases. In addition, we describe a simple method for expressing multiple gRNAs bearing any 5' end nucleotide, which gives dimeric RFNs a broad targeting range. RFNs combine the ease of RNA-based targeting with the specificity enhancement inherent to dimerization and are likely to be useful in applications that require highly precise genome editing.

  8. Agents that activate the High Osmolarity Glycerol pathway as a means to combat pathogenic molds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedemann, Annegret; Spadinger, Anja; Löwe, Axel; Seeger, Allison; Ebel, Frank

    2016-12-01

    Treatment of invasive fungal infections often fails due to the limited number of therapeutic options. In this study, we have analyzed the impact of agents activating the High Osmolarity Glycerol (HOG) pathway on molds that cause infections in humans and livestock. We found that agents like fludioxonil and iprodione, have a clear anti-fungal activity against pathogenic Aspergillus, Lichtheimia, Rhizopus and Scedosporium species. Only A. terreus turned out to be resistant to fludioxonil, even though it is sensitive to iprodione and able to adapt to hyperosmotic conditions. Moreover, the A. terreus tcsC gene can fully complement an A. fumigatus ΔtcsC mutant, thereby also restoring its sensitivity to fludioxonil. The particular phenotype of A. terreus is therefore likely to be independent of its TcsC kinase. In a second part of this study, we further explored the impact of fludioxonil using A. fumigatus as a model organism. When applied in concentrations of 1-2μg/ml, fludioxonil causes an immediate growth arrest and, after longer exposure, a quantitative killing. Hyphae respond to fludioxonil by the formation of new septa and closure of nearly all septal pores. Mitosis occurs in all compartments and is accompanied by a re-localization of the NimA kinase to the cytoplasm. In the swollen compartments, the massive extension of the cell wall triggers a substantial reorganization resulting in an enhanced incorporation of chitin and, most strikingly, a massive loss of galactomannan. Hence, HOG-activating agents have dramatic cell biological consequences and may represent a valuable, future element in the armory that can be used to combat mold infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Depression as sickness behavior? A test of the host defense hypothesis in a high pathogen population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieglitz, Jonathan; Trumble, Benjamin C; Thompson, Melissa Emery; Blackwell, Aaron D; Kaplan, Hillard; Gurven, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Sadness is an emotion universally recognized across cultures, suggesting it plays an important functional role in regulating human behavior. Numerous adaptive explanations of persistent sadness interfering with daily functioning (hereafter "depression") have been proposed, but most do not explain frequent bidirectional associations between depression and greater immune activation. Here we test several predictions of the host defense hypothesis, which posits that depression is part of a broader coordinated evolved response to infection or tissue injury (i.e. "sickness behavior") that promotes energy conservation and reallocation to facilitate immune activation. In a high pathogen population of lean and relatively egalitarian Bolivian forager-horticulturalists, we test whether depression and its symptoms are associated with greater baseline concentration of immune biomarkers reliably associated with depression in Western populations (i.e. tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α], interleukin-1 beta [IL-1β], interleukin-6 [IL-6], and C-reactive protein [CRP]). We also test whether greater pro-inflammatory cytokine responses to ex vivo antigen stimulation are associated with depression and its symptoms, which is expected if depression facilitates immune activation. These predictions are largely supported in a sample of older adult Tsimane (mean±SD age=53.2±11.0, range=34-85, n=649) after adjusting for potential confounders. Emotional, cognitive and somatic symptoms of depression are each associated with greater immune activation, both at baseline and in response to ex vivo stimulation. The association between depression and greater immune activation is therefore not unique to Western populations. While our findings are not predicted by other adaptive hypotheses of depression, they are not incompatible with those hypotheses and future research is necessary to isolate and test competing predictions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Preventing highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) at the rural community level: a case study from Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Dilip P; Wollen, Terry S; Lohani, Mahendra N

    2011-08-01

    Poultry is an integral part of the rural livelihoods in Cambodia, with more than half of the households keeping poultry in their small-scale, traditional, and extensive backyards. More than 20 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) outbreaks have been reported since 2004 with deaths of over 21,000 birds. During the HPAI outbreaks, some of the flocks in the rural areas were culled without compensation and producers were not allowed to sell outside of the community. Heifer International worked with 2,000 rural families through local project partners in the target communities to develop an effective intervention mechanism to mitigate the impact of the HPAI crisis. Heifer International provided training, public education, and networking as well as promoting model farms based on improved scavenging poultry management. Each community selected one farm family to serve as a model farm. They were trained in Heifer's working approach and committed to practicing integrated farming systems based on scavenging poultry management. One Village Animal Health Worker (VAHW) in each community participated during the project implementation, playing a key role in the information exchange and the interaction between the communities and the avian influenza experts. Formal and informal trainings were conducted for all project partners and project recipients through experts and VAHWs, respectively. There have been no outbreaks reported in the communities in the project areas. Farmers have started using appropriate techniques to maintain biosecurity. They are passing on the knowledge and the skills to the surrounding communities. This participatory approach in educating rural farmers can serve as a model to mitigate HPAI in the developing countries around the world.

  11. Public health concerns of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 endemicity in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olubunmi Gabriel Fasanmi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV H5N1 was first officially reported in Africa in 2006; thereafter this virus has spread rapidly from Nigeria to 11 other African countries. This study was aimed at utilizing data from confirmed laboratory reports to carry out a qualitative evaluation of the factors responsible for HPAI H5N1 persistence in Africa and the public health implications; and to suggest appropriate control measures. Relevant publications were sought from data banks and repositories of FAO, OIE, WHO, and Google scholars. Substantiated data on HPAI H5N1 outbreaks in poultry in Africa and in humans across the world were mined. HPAI H5N1 affects poultry and human populations, with Egypt having highest human cases (346 globally. Nigeria had a reinfection from 2014 to 2015, with outbreaks in Cote d'Ivoire, Ghana, Niger, Nigeria, and Burkina Faso throughout 2016 unabated. The persistence of this virus in Africa is attributed to the survivability of HPAIV, ability to evolve other subtypes through genetic reassortment, poor biosecurity compliance at the live bird markets and poultry farms, husbandry methods and multispecies livestock farming, poultry vaccinations, and continuous shedding of HPAIV, transboundary transmission of HPAIV through poultry trades; and transcontinental migratory birds. There is, therefore, the need for African nations to realistically reassess their status, through regular surveillance and be transparent with HPAI H5N1 outbreak data. Also, it is important to have an understanding of HPAIV migration dynamics which will be helpful in epidemiological modeling, disease prevention, control and eradication measures.

  12. [A case of human highly pathogenic avian influenza in Shenzhen, China: application of field epidemiological study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shun-Xiang; Cheng, Jin-Quan; Ma, Han-Wu; He, Jian-Fan; Cheng, Xiao-Wen; Jiang, Li-Juan; Mou, Jin; Wu, Chun-Li; Lv, Xing; Zhang, Shao-Hua; Zhang, Ya-De; Wu, Yong-Sheng; Wang, Xin

    2008-03-01

    Based on analyzing the characteristics of a case with human avian influenza and the effects of field epidemiological study. An emergency-response-system was started up to follow the probable human Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza case initially detected by the "Undefined Pneumonia Surveillance System of Shenzhen". Public health professionals administered several epidemiologic investigations and giving all the contacts of the patient with a 7-day-long medical observation for temporally related influenza-like illness. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with primers for H5 and N1 was applied to test respiratory tract samples and/or throat swabs of the patient and all his contacts specific for the hemagglutinin gene of influenza A H5N1. Activities and strategies such as media response,notification in the public, communications with multiple related sectors, social participation and information exchange with Hong Kong were involved in field control and management. The patient was a male, 31 years old,with an occupation as a truck driver in a factory,and had been residing in Shenzhen for 7 years. Started with an influenza-like syndrome, the patient received treatment on the 4th day of the onset, from a clinic and on the 6th day from a regular hospital. On the 8th day of the disease course, he was confirmed by Shenzhen Center for Disease Control and Prevention as human avian flu case and was then transferred to Intensive Care Unit (ICU). On the 83rd day of commence, the patients was healed and released from the hospital. The patient had no significant exposure to sick poultry or poultry that died from the illness before the onset of the disease. The patient and five family members lived together, but no family member was affected and no contact showed positive results for H5N1. A small food market with live poultry, which was under formal supervision and before illness the patient once visited, located near his apartment. Totally, 35 swabs from live

  13. Rapid Detection of Pathogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Perlin

    2005-08-14

    Pathogen identification is a crucial first defense against bioterrorism. A major emphasis of our national biodefense strategy is to establish fast, accurate and sensitive assays for diagnosis of infectious diseases agents. Such assays will ensure early and appropriate treatment of infected patients. Rapid diagnostics can also support infection control measures, which monitor and limit the spread of infectious diseases agents. Many select agents are highly transmissible in the early stages of disease, and it is critical to identify infected patients and limit the risk to the remainder of the population and to stem potential panic in the general population. Nucleic acid-based molecular approaches for identification overcome many of the deficiencies associated with conventional culture methods by exploiting both large- and small-scale genomic differences between organisms. PCR-based amplification of highly conserved ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes, intergenic sequences, and specific toxin genes is currently the most reliable approach for bacterial, fungal and many viral pathogenic agents. When combined with fluorescence-based oligonucleotide detection systems, this approach provides real-time, quantitative, high fidelity analysis capable of single nucleotide allelic discrimination (4). These probe systems offer rapid turn around time (<2 h) and are suitable for high throughput, automated multiplex operations that are critical for clinical diagnostic laboratories. In this pilot program, we have used molecular beacon technology invented at the Public health Research Institute to develop a new generation of molecular probes to rapidly detect important agents of infectious diseases. We have also developed protocols to rapidly extract nucleic acids from a variety of clinical specimen including and blood and tissue to for detection in the molecular assays. This work represented a cooperative research development program between the Kramer-Tyagi/Perlin labs on probe development

  14. Multiplexed Spliced-Leader Sequencing: A high-throughput, selective method for RNA-seq in Trypanosomatids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuypers, Bart; Domagalska, Malgorzata A; Meysman, Pieter; Muylder, Géraldine de; Vanaerschot, Manu; Imamura, Hideo; Dumetz, Franck; Verdonckt, Thomas Wolf; Myler, Peter J; Ramasamy, Gowthaman; Laukens, Kris; Dujardin, Jean-Claude

    2017-06-16

    High throughput sequencing techniques are poorly adapted for in vivo studies of parasites, which require prior in vitro culturing and purification. Trypanosomatids, a group of kinetoplastid protozoans, possess a distinctive feature in their transcriptional mechanism whereby a specific Spliced Leader (SL) sequence is added to the 5'end of each mRNA by trans-splicing. This allows to discriminate Trypansomatid RNA from mammalian RNA and forms the basis of our new multiplexed protocol for high-throughput, selective RNA-sequencing called SL-seq. We provided a proof-of-concept of SL-seq in Leishmania donovani, the main causative agent of visceral leishmaniasis in humans, and successfully applied the method to sequence Leishmania mRNA directly from infected macrophages and from highly diluted mixes with human RNA. mRNA profiles obtained with SL-seq corresponded largely to those obtained from conventional poly-A tail purification methods, indicating both enumerate the same mRNA pool. However, SL-seq offers additional advantages, including lower sequencing depth requirements, fast and simple library prep and high resolution splice site detection. SL-seq is therefore ideal for fast and massive parallel sequencing of parasite transcriptomes directly from host tissues. Since SLs are also present in Nematodes, Cnidaria and primitive chordates, this method could also have high potential for transcriptomics studies in other organisms.

  15. High-Resolution Phenotypic Landscape of the RNA Polymerase II Trigger Loop.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenxi Qiu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The active sites of multisubunit RNA polymerases have a "trigger loop" (TL that multitasks in substrate selection, catalysis, and translocation. To dissect the Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNA polymerase II TL at individual-residue resolution, we quantitatively phenotyped nearly all TL single variants en masse. Three mutant classes, revealed by phenotypes linked to transcription defects or various stresses, have distinct distributions among TL residues. We find that mutations disrupting an intra-TL hydrophobic pocket, proposed to provide a mechanism for substrate-triggered TL folding through destabilization of a catalytically inactive TL state, confer phenotypes consistent with pocket disruption and increased catalysis. Furthermore, allele-specific genetic interactions among TL and TL-proximal domain residues support the contribution of the funnel and bridge helices (BH to TL dynamics. Our structural genetics approach incorporates structural and phenotypic data for high-resolution dissection of transcription mechanisms and their evolution, and is readily applicable to other essential yeast proteins.

  16. High interleukin-6 mRNA expression is a predictor of relapse in colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Jesper; Kirkeby, Lene T.; Olsen, Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the expression of interleukin-6 (IL6) in colon cancer tissue, and to examine if the risk of relapse is influenced by IL6 expression. Materials and Methods: Fresh-frozen biopsies from tumor and normal adjacent tissues were taken from patients with colon cancer during surgery...... and stored at −80°C. mRNA expression for interleukin-6 was evaluated with reverse transcription real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Survival analyses were carried-out using a Cox competing risk regression model. Results: IL6 mRNA was significantly more highly expressed in tumor tissue compared...... for clinicopathological characteristics (Hazard Ratio=2.16, 95% CI=1.07-4.40; pInterleukin-6 is up-regulated in colon cancer tissue at the transcriptional level and is significantly associated with increased risk of relapse....

  17. High interleukin-6 mRNA expression is a predictor of relapse in colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Jesper; Kirkeby, Lene T; Olsen, Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression of interleukin-6 (IL6) in colon cancer tissue, and to examine if the risk of relapse is influenced by IL6 expression. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fresh-frozen biopsies from tumor and normal adjacent tissues were taken from patients with colon cancer during surgery...... and stored at -80 °C. mRNA expression for interleukin-6 was evaluated with reverse transcription real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Survival analyses were carried-out using a Cox competing risk regression model. RESULTS: IL6 mRNA was significantly more highly expressed in tumor tissue compared...... for clinicopathological characteristics (Hazard Ratio=2.16, 95% CI=1.07-4.40; pInterleukin-6 is up-regulated in colon cancer tissue at the transcriptional level and is significantly associated with increased risk of relapse....

  18. High-resolution transcript profiling of the atypical biotrophic interaction between Theobroma cacao and the fungal pathogen Moniliophthora perniciosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Paulo José Pereira Lima; Thomazella, Daniela Paula de Toledo; Reis, Osvaldo; do Prado, Paula Favoretti Vital; do Rio, Maria Carolina Scatolin; Fiorin, Gabriel Lorencini; José, Juliana; Costa, Gustavo Gilson Lacerda; Negri, Victor Augusti; Mondego, Jorge Maurício Costa; Mieczkowski, Piotr; Pereira, Gonçalo Amarante Guimarães

    2014-11-01

    Witches' broom disease (WBD), caused by the hemibiotrophic fungus Moniliophthora perniciosa, is one of the most devastating diseases of Theobroma cacao, the chocolate tree. In contrast to other hemibiotrophic interactions, the WBD biotrophic stage lasts for months and is responsible for the most distinctive symptoms of the disease, which comprise drastic morphological changes in the infected shoots. Here, we used the dual RNA-seq approach to simultaneously assess the transcriptomes of cacao and M. perniciosa during their peculiar biotrophic interaction. Infection with M. perniciosa triggers massive metabolic reprogramming in the diseased tissues. Although apparently vigorous, the infected shoots are energetically expensive structures characterized by the induction of ineffective defense responses and by a clear carbon deprivation signature. Remarkably, the infection culminates in the establishment of a senescence process in the host, which signals the end of the WBD biotrophic stage. We analyzed the pathogen's transcriptome in unprecedented detail and thereby characterized the fungal nutritional and infection strategies during WBD and identified putative virulence effectors. Interestingly, M. perniciosa biotrophic mycelia develop as long-term parasites that orchestrate changes in plant metabolism to increase the availability of soluble nutrients before plant death. Collectively, our results provide unique insight into an intriguing tropical disease and advance our understanding of the development of (hemi)biotrophic plant-pathogen interactions. © 2014 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  19. Dimeric CRISPR RNA-guided FokI nucleases for highly specific genome editing

    OpenAIRE

    Tsai, Shengdar Q.; Wyvekens, Nicolas; Khayter, Cyd; Foden, Jennifer A.; Thapar, Vishal; Reyon, Deepak; Goodwin, Mathew J.; Aryee, Martin J.; Joung, J. Keith

    2014-01-01

    Monomeric CRISPR-Cas9 nucleases are widely used for targeted genome editing but can induce unwanted off-target mutations with high frequencies. Here we describe dimeric RNA-guided FokI Nucleases (RFNs) that recognize extended sequences and can edit endogenous genes with high efficiencies in human cells. The cleavage activity of an RFN depends strictly on the binding of two guide RNAs (gRNAs) to DNA with a defined spacing and orientation and therefore show improved specificities relative to wi...

  20. Stimulation of growth of the human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori by atmospheric level of oxygen under high carbon dioxide tension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Na

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Helicobacter pylori (Hp, a human pathogen that is associated with gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric cancer, has been considered a microaerophile, but there is no general consensus about its specific O2 requirements. A clear understanding of Hp physiology is needed to elucidate the pathogenic mechanism(s of Hp infection. Results We cultured Hp under a range of O2 levels with or without 10% CO2 and evaluated growth profiles, morphology, intracellular pH, and energy metabolism. We found that, in the presence of 10% CO2, the normal atmospheric level of O2 inhibited Hp growth at low density but stimulated growth at a higher density. Field emission scanning electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy of Hp cells cultured under 20% O2 tension revealed live spiral-shaped bacteria with outer membrane vesicles on a rugged cell surface, which became smooth during the stationary phase. Fermentation products including acetate, lactate, and succinate were detected in cell culture media grown under microaerobic conditions, but not under the aerobic condition. CO2 deprivation for less than 24 h did not markedly change cytoplasmic or periplasmic pH, suggesting that cellular pH homeostasis alone cannot account for the capnophilic nature of Hp. Further, CO2 deprivation significantly increased intracellular levels of ppGpp and ATP but significantly decreased cellular mRNA levels, suggesting induction of the stringent response. Conclusions We conclude, unlike previous reports, that H. pylori may be a capnophilic aerobe whose growth is promoted by atmospheric oxygen levels in the presence of 10% CO2. Our data also suggest that buffering of intracellular pH alone cannot account for the CO2 requirement of H. pylori and that CO2 deprivation initiates the stringent response in H. pylori. Our findings may provide new insight into the physiology of this fastidious human pathogen.

  1. Maternal high-fat diet consumption modulates hepatic lipid metabolism and microRNA-122 (miR-122) and microRNA-370 (miR-370) expression in offspring

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Benatti, R O; Melo, A M; Borges, F O; Ignacio-Souza, L M; Simino, L A P; Milanski, M; Velloso, L A; Torsoni, M A; Torsoni, A S

    2014-01-01

    Maternal consumption of a high-fat diet (HFD) during pregnancy and lactation is closely related to hepatic lipid accumulation, insulin resistance and increased serum cytokine levels in offspring and into their adulthood. MicroRNA (miRNA...

  2. High-throuhgput screening of tick-borne pathogens in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michelet, L.; Delannoy, S.; Devillers, E.; Umhang, G.; Aspan, A.; Juremalm, M.; Chirico, J.; Wal, van der F.J.; Sprong, H.; Boye Pihl, T.P.; Klitgaard, K.; Bodker, R.; Fach, P.; Moutailler, S.

    2014-01-01

    Due to increased travel, climatic, and environmental changes, the incidence of tick-borne disease in both humans and animals is increasing throughout Europe. Therefore, extended surveillance tools are desirable. To accurately screen tick-borne pathogens (TBPs), a large scale epidemiological study

  3. High-throughput screening of tick-borne pathogens in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelet, Lorraine; Delannoy, Sabine; Devillers, Elodie

    2014-01-01

    Due to increased travel, climatic, and environmental changes, the incidence of tick-borne disease in both humans and animals is increasing throughout Europe. Therefore, extended surveillance tools are desirable. To accurately screen tick-borne pathogens, a large scale epidemiological study was co...

  4. High-content live cell imaging with RNA probes: advancements in high-throughput antimalarial drug discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cervantes Serena

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria, a major public health issue in developing nations, is responsible for more than one million deaths a year. The most lethal species, Plasmodium falciparum, causes up to 90% of fatalities. Drug resistant strains to common therapies have emerged worldwide and recent artemisinin-based combination therapy failures hasten the need for new antimalarial drugs. Discovering novel compounds to be used as antimalarials is expedited by the use of a high-throughput screen (HTS to detect parasite growth and proliferation. Fluorescent dyes that bind to DNA have replaced expensive traditional radioisotope incorporation for HTS growth assays, but do not give additional information regarding the parasite stage affected by the drug and a better indication of the drug's mode of action. Live cell imaging with RNA dyes, which correlates with cell growth and proliferation, has been limited by the availability of successful commercial dyes. Results After screening a library of newly synthesized stryrl dyes, we discovered three RNA binding dyes that provide morphological details of live parasites. Utilizing an inverted confocal imaging platform, live cell imaging of parasites increases parasite detection, improves the spatial and temporal resolution of the parasite under drug treatments, and can resolve morphological changes in individual cells. Conclusion This simple one-step technique is suitable for automation in a microplate format for novel antimalarial compound HTS. We have developed a new P. falciparum RNA high-content imaging growth inhibition assay that is robust with time and energy efficiency.

  5. High-content live cell imaging with RNA probes: advancements in high-throughput antimalarial drug discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes, Serena; Prudhomme, Jacques; Carter, David; Gopi, Krishna G; Li, Qian; Chang, Young-Tae; Le Roch, Karine G

    2009-01-01

    Background Malaria, a major public health issue in developing nations, is responsible for more than one million deaths a year. The most lethal species, Plasmodium falciparum, causes up to 90% of fatalities. Drug resistant strains to common therapies have emerged worldwide and recent artemisinin-based combination therapy failures hasten the need for new antimalarial drugs. Discovering novel compounds to be used as antimalarials is expedited by the use of a high-throughput screen (HTS) to detect parasite growth and proliferation. Fluorescent dyes that bind to DNA have replaced expensive traditional radioisotope incorporation for HTS growth assays, but do not give additional information regarding the parasite stage affected by the drug and a better indication of the drug's mode of action. Live cell imaging with RNA dyes, which correlates with cell growth and proliferation, has been limited by the availability of successful commercial dyes. Results After screening a library of newly synthesized stryrl dyes, we discovered three RNA binding dyes that provide morphological details of live parasites. Utilizing an inverted confocal imaging platform, live cell imaging of parasites increases parasite detection, improves the spatial and temporal resolution of the parasite under drug treatments, and can resolve morphological changes in individual cells. Conclusion This simple one-step technique is suitable for automation in a microplate format for novel antimalarial compound HTS. We have developed a new P. falciparum RNA high-content imaging growth inhibition assay that is robust with time and energy efficiency. PMID:19515257

  6. High-stearic and High-oleic cottonseed oils produced by hairpin RNA-mediated post-transcriptional gene silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qing; Singh, Surinder P; Green, Allan G

    2002-08-01

    We have genetically modified the fatty acid composition of cottonseed oil using the recently developed technique of hairpin RNA-mediated gene silencing to down-regulate the seed expression of two key fatty acid desaturase genes, ghSAD-1-encoding stearoyl-acyl-carrier protein Delta 9-desaturase and ghFAD2-1-encoding oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine omega 6-desaturase. Hairpin RNA-encoding gene constructs (HP) targeted against either ghSAD-1 or ghFAD2-1 were transformed into cotton (Gossypium hirsutum cv Coker 315). The resulting down-regulation of the ghSAD-1 gene substantially increased stearic acid from the normal levels of 2% to 3% up to as high as 40%, and silencing of the ghFAD2-1 gene resulted in greatly elevated oleic acid content, up to 77% compared with about 15% in seeds of untransformed plants. In addition, palmitic acid was significantly lowered in both high-stearic and high-oleic lines. Similar fatty acid composition phenotypes were also achieved by transformation with conventional antisense constructs targeted against the same genes, but at much lower frequencies than were achieved with the HP constructs. By intercrossing the high-stearic and high-oleic genotypes, it was possible to simultaneously down-regulate both ghSAD-1 and ghFAD2-1 to the same degree as observed in the individually silenced parental lines, demonstrating for the first time, to our knowledge, that duplex RNA-induced posttranslational gene silencing in independent genes can be stacked without any diminution in the degree of silencing. The silencing of ghSAD-1 and/or ghFAD2-1 to various degrees enables the development of cottonseed oils having novel combinations of palmitic, stearic, oleic, and linoleic contents that can be used in margarines and deep frying without hydrogenation and also potentially in high-value confectionery applications.

  7. Ecological Determinants of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (H5N1) Outbreaks in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Syed S. U.; Ersbøll, Annette K.; Biswas, Paritosh K.; Christensen, Jens P.; Hannan, Abu S. M. A.; Toft, Nils

    2012-01-01

    Background The agro-ecology and poultry husbandry of the south Asian and south-east Asian countries share common features, however, with noticeable differences. Hence, the ecological determinants associated with risk of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI-H5N1) outbreaks are expected to differ between Bangladesh and e.g., Thailand and Vietnam. The primary aim of the current study was to establish ecological determinants associated with the risk of HPAI-H5N1 outbreaks at subdistrict level in Bangladesh. The secondary aim was to explore the performance of two different statistical modeling approaches for unmeasured spatially correlated variation. Methodology/Principal Findings An ecological study at subdistrict level in Bangladesh was performed with 138 subdistricts with HPAI-H5N1 outbreaks during 2007–2008, and 326 subdistricts with no outbreaks. The association between ecological determinants and HPAI-H5N1 outbreaks was examined using a generalized linear mixed model. Spatial clustering of the ecological data was modeled using 1) an intrinsic conditional autoregressive (ICAR) model at subdistrict level considering their first order neighbors, and 2) a multilevel (ML) model with subdistricts nested within districts. Ecological determinants significantly associated with risk of HPAI-H5N1 outbreaks at subdistrict level were migratory birds' staging areas, river network, household density, literacy rate, poultry density, live bird markets, and highway network. Predictive risk maps were derived based on the resulting models. The resulting models indicate that the ML model absorbed some of the covariate effect of the ICAR model because of the neighbor structure implied in the two different models. Conclusions/Significance The study identified a new set of ecological determinants related to river networks, migratory birds' staging areas and literacy rate in addition to already known risk factors, and clarified that the generalized concept of free grazing duck and

  8. Rapid RNA-ligand interaction analysis through high-information content conformational and stability landscapes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baird, Nathan J. [National Inst. of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD (United States); Inglese, James [National Inst. of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD (United States); Ferré-D’Amaré, Adrian R. [National Inst. of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2015-12-07

    The structure and biological properties of RNAs are a function of changing cellular conditions, but comprehensive, simultaneous investigation of the effect of multiple interacting environmental variables is not easily achieved. We have developed an efficient, high-throughput method to characterize RNA structure and thermodynamic stability as a function of multiplexed solution conditions using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). In a single FRET experiment using conventional quantitative PCR instrumentation, 19,400 conditions of MgCl2, ligand and temperature are analysed to generate detailed empirical conformational and stability landscapes of the cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) riboswitch. This method allows rapid comparison of RNA structure modulation by cognate and non-cognate ligands. Landscape analysis reveals that kanamycin B stabilizes a non-native, idiosyncratic conformation of the riboswitch that inhibits c-di-GMP binding. Our research demonstrates that allosteric control of folding, rather than direct competition with cognate effectors, is a viable approach for pharmacologically targeting riboswitches and other structured RNA molecules.

  9. High levels of genetic and genotypic diversity in field populations of the barley pathogen Ramularia collo-cygni

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortshøj, R L; Ravnshøj, A R; Nyman, M

    2013-01-01

    Fragment Length Polymorphism) markers to investigate population genetic structure in two Northern European populations of R. collo-cygni. The distribution of AFLP alleles revealed low levels of population subdivision and high levels of genetic diversity at both locations. Our analyses included 87 isolates......The ascomycete pathogen Ramularia collo-cygni causes Ramularia leaf spot (RLS) on barley. Although R. collo-cygni is considerd an emerging disease of barley, little is known about genetic diversity or population genetic structure of this pathogen. We applied a set of polymorphic AFLP (Amplified...... and of these 84 showed a unique genotype pattern. The genetic structure of populations in Scotland and Denmark is highly similar and we find no evidence of population sub-division. An analysis of molecular variance was used to show that 86 % of the variance is attributable to within field genetic variance...

  10. Simple G-quadruplex-based 2-aminopurine fluorescence probe for highly sensitive and amplified detection of microRNA-21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shiyu; Liu, Chan; Gong, Hang; Chen, Chunyan; Chen, Xiaoming; Cai, Changqun

    2018-02-01

    Based on 2-aminopurine (2-AP) probe in conjunction with a G-quadruplex structure and signal amplification technique, a simple and highly sensitive fluorescence sensor for detecting microRNA (miRNA) is developed for high signal-to-background ratio and wide linear range. The proposed sensor contains two hairpins DNA: H1 and H2. H1 is labeled by 2-AP incorporated into a G-rich sequence. Upon the addition of a target miRNA, H1 is unfolded and forms DNA/RNA complexes that contain a G-quadruplex, thereby significantly enhancing 2-AP fluorescence due to the protection provided by the G-quadruplex. Subsequently, H2 can displace the miRNA from the DNA/RNA complexes and induce signal amplification, resulting in further enhanced fluorescence intensity. Hence, the sensor is highly sensitive and its low limit of detection (L.O.D.) can reach as low as 1.48pM. Furthermore, the proposed sensor is used to detect overexpressed miRNA-21 from human breast cancer cell lysate. The result demonstrates the potential of the proposed sensor to monitor different miRNA biomarkers for the early diagnosis of various cancers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Next generation sequencing-based multigene panel for high throughput detection of food-borne pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrario, Chiara; Lugli, Gabriele Andrea; Ossiprandi, Maria Cristina; Turroni, Francesca; Milani, Christian; Duranti, Sabrina; Mancabelli, Leonardo; Mangifesta, Marta; Alessandri, Giulia; van Sinderen, Douwe; Ventura, Marco

    2017-09-01

    Contamination of food by chemicals or pathogenic bacteria may cause particular illnesses that are linked to food consumption, commonly referred to as foodborne diseases. Bacteria are present in/on various foods products, such as fruits, vegetables and ready-to-eat products. Bacteria that cause foodborne diseases are known as foodborne pathogens (FBPs). Accurate detection methods that are able to reveal the presence of FBPs in food matrices are in constant demand, in order to ensure safe foods with a minimal risk of causing foodborne diseases. Here, a multiplex PCR-based Illumina sequencing method for FBP detection in food matrices was developed. Starting from 25 bacterial targets and 49 selected PCR primer pairs, a primer collection called foodborne pathogen - panel (FPP) consisting of 12 oligonucleotide pairs was developed. The FPP allows a more rapid and reliable identification of FBPs compared to classical cultivation methods. Furthermore, FPP permits sensitive and specific FBP detection in about two days from food sample acquisition to bioinformatics-based identification. The FPP is able to simultaneously identify eight different bacterial pathogens, i.e. Listeria monocytogenes, Campylobacter jejuni, Campylobacter coli, Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar enteritidis, Escherichia coli, Shigella sonnei, Staphylococcus aureus and Yersinia enterocolitica, in a given food matrix at a threshold contamination level of 10 1 cell/g. Moreover, this novel detection method may represent an alternative and/or a complementary approach to PCR-based techniques, which are routinely used for FBP detection, and could be implemented in (parts of) the food chain as a quality check. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Isolation and characterization of virus of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5 subtype of chicken from outbreaks in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Wiyono

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available A study on the isolation and characterization of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza of chicken from outbreaks in Indonesia was conducted at Indonesian Research Institute for Veterinary Science. Outbreaks of avian disease had been reported in Indonesia since August 2003 affecting commercial layer, broiler, quail, and ostrich and also native chicken with showing clinical signs such as cyanosis of wattle and comb, nasal discharges and hypersalivation, subcutaneous ptechiae on foot and leg, diarre and sudden high mortality. The aim of this study is to isolate and characterize the causal agent of the disease. Samples of serum, feather follicle, tracheal swab, as well as organs of proventriculus, intestine, caecal tonsil, trachea and lungs were collected from infected animals. Serum samples were tested haemaglutination/haemaglutination inhibition to Newcastle Disease and Egg Drop Syndrome viruses. Isolation of virus of the causal agent of the outbreak was conducted from samples of feather follicle, tracheal swab, and organs using 11 days old specific pathogen free (SPF embryonated eggs. The isolated viruses were then characterised by agar gel precipitation test using swine influenza reference antisera, by haemaglutination inhibition using H1 to H15 reference antisera, and by electron microscope examination. The pathogenicity of the viruses was confirmed by intravenous pathogenicity index test and its culture in Chicken Embryo Fibroblast primary cell culture without addition of trypsin. The study revealed that the causative agent of the outbreaks of avian disease in Indonesia was avian influenza H5 subtype virus based upon serological tests, virus isolation and characterization using swine influenza reference antisera, and electron microscope examination. While subtyping of the viruses using H1 to H15 reference antisera suggested that the virus is very likely to be an avian influenza H5N1 subtype virus. The pathogenicity test confirmed that the viruses

  13. Construction of a highly flexible and comprehensive gene collection representing the ORFeome of the human pathogen Chlamydia pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maier Christina J

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Gram-negative bacterium Chlamydia pneumoniae (Cpn is the leading intracellular human pathogen responsible for respiratory infections such as pneumonia and bronchitis. Basic and applied research in pathogen biology, especially the elaboration of new mechanism-based anti-pathogen strategies, target discovery and drug development, rely heavily on the availability of the entire set of pathogen open reading frames, the ORFeome. The ORFeome of Cpn will enable genome- and proteome-wide systematic analysis of Cpn, which will improve our understanding of the molecular networks and mechanisms underlying and governing its pathogenesis. Results Here we report the construction of a comprehensive gene collection covering 98.5% of the 1052 predicted and verified ORFs of Cpn (Chlamydia pneumoniae strain CWL029 in Gateway® ‘entry’ vectors. Based on genomic DNA isolated from the vascular chlamydial strain CV-6, we constructed an ORFeome library that contains 869 unique Gateway® entry clones (83% coverage and an additional 168 PCR-verified ‘pooled’ entry clones, reaching an overall coverage of ~98.5% of the predicted CWL029 ORFs. The high quality of the ORFeome library was verified by PCR-gel electrophoresis and DNA sequencing, and its functionality was demonstrated by expressing panels of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli and by genome-wide protein interaction analysis for a test set of three Cpn virulence factors in a yeast 2-hybrid system. The ORFeome is available in different configurations of resource stocks, PCR-products, purified plasmid DNA, and living cultures of E. coli harboring the desired entry clone or pooled entry clones. All resources are available in 96-well microtiterplates. Conclusion This first ORFeome library for Cpn provides an essential new tool for this important pathogen. The high coverage of entry clones will enable a systems biology approach for Cpn or host–pathogen analysis. The high yield of

  14. Direct isolation of high-quality low molecular weight RNA of pear peel from the extraction mixture containing nucleic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin-wei; Xiong, Ai-sheng; Yao, Quan-hong; Zhang, Zhen; Qiao, Yu-shan

    2010-01-01

    Low molecular weight RNA (LMW RNA) is generally obtained either from the total RNA or from total nucleic acids solution. Many steps and chemical reagents are involved in traditional methods for LMW RNA isolation where degradation of LMW RNA often occurs, especially for plant materials with high levels of secondary catabolites. In this study, an efficient method was developed to directly isolate pure LMW RNA from pear peel, a material rich in polyphenolics that is covered with a layer of wax. The method was based on polyethylene glycol (PEG) precipitation combining CTAB buffer which is often used to isolate RNA from polysaccharide-rich and polyphenolics-rich materials. The entire procedure could be completed within 6 h and many samples could be processed at the same time. Few and common chemicals are used with this method. Hence, it could be used as an ordinary method in the laboratory. The developed method was further tested by isolating LMW RNA from Arabidopsis. Using the isolated LMW RNA samples, microRNAs were successfully detected and characterized.

  15. Unprecedented high-resolution view of bacterial operon architecture revealed by RNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Tyrrell; Creecy, James P; Maddox, Scott M; Grissom, Joe E; Conkle, Trevor L; Shadid, Tyler M; Teramoto, Jun; San Miguel, Phillip; Shimada, Tomohiro; Ishihama, Akira; Mori, Hirotada; Wanner, Barry L

    2014-07-08

    We analyzed the transcriptome of Escherichia coli K-12 by strand-specific RNA sequencing at single-nucleotide resolution during steady-state (logarithmic-phase) growth and upon entry into stationary phase in glucose minimal medium. To generate high-resolution transcriptome maps, we developed an organizational schema which showed that in practice only three features are required to define operon architecture: the promoter, terminator, and deep RNA sequence read coverage. We precisely annotated 2,122 promoters and 1,774 terminators, defining 1,510 operons with an average of 1.98 genes per operon. Our analyses revealed an unprecedented view of E. coli operon architecture. A large proportion (36%) of operons are complex with internal promoters or terminators that generate multiple transcription units. For 43% of operons, we observed differential expression of polycistronic genes, despite being in the same operons, indicating that E. coli operon architecture allows fine-tuning of gene expression. We found that 276 of 370 convergent operons terminate inefficiently, generating complementary 3' transcript ends which overlap on average by 286 nucleotides, and 136 of 388 divergent operons have promoters arranged such that their 5' ends overlap on average by 168 nucleotides. We found 89 antisense transcripts of 397-nucleotide average length, 7 unannotated transcripts within intergenic regions, and 18 sense transcripts that completely overlap operons on the opposite strand. Of 519 overlapping transcripts, 75% correspond to sequences that are highly conserved in E. coli (>50 genomes). Our data extend recent studies showing unexpected transcriptome complexity in several bacteria and suggest that antisense RNA regulation is widespread. Importance: We precisely mapped the 5' and 3' ends of RNA transcripts across the E. coli K-12 genome by using a single-nucleotide analytical approach. Our resulting high-resolution transcriptome maps show that ca. one-third of E. coli operons are

  16. In C. elegans, high levels of dsRNA allow RNAi in the absence of RDE-4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey W Habig

    Full Text Available C. elegans Dicer requires an accessory double-stranded RNA binding protein, RDE-4, to enact the first step of RNA interference, the cleavage of dsRNA to produce siRNA. While RDE-4 is typically essential for RNAi, we report that in the presence of high concentrations of trigger dsRNA, rde-4 deficient animals are capable of silencing a transgene. By multiple criteria the silencing occurs by the canonical RNAi pathway. For example, silencing is RDE-1 dependent and exhibits a decrease in the targeted mRNA in response to an increase in siRNA. We also find that high concentrations of dsRNA trigger lead to increased accumulation of primary siRNAs, consistent with the existence of a rate-limiting step during the conversion of primary to secondary siRNAs. Our studies also revealed that transgene silencing occurs at low levels in the soma, even in the presence of ADARs, and that at least some siRNAs accumulate in a temperature-dependent manner. We conclude that an RNAi response varies with different conditions, and this may allow an organism to tailor a response to specific environmental signals.

  17. iMir: an integrated pipeline for high-throughput analysis of small non-coding RNA data obtained by smallRNA-Seq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giurato, Giorgio; De Filippo, Maria Rosaria; Rinaldi, Antonio; Hashim, Adnan; Nassa, Giovanni; Ravo, Maria; Rizzo, Francesca; Tarallo, Roberta; Weisz, Alessandro

    2013-12-13

    Qualitative and quantitative analysis of small non-coding RNAs by next generation sequencing (smallRNA-Seq) represents a novel technology increasingly used to investigate with high sensitivity and specificity RNA population comprising microRNAs and other regulatory small transcripts. Analysis of smallRNA-Seq data to gather biologically relevant information, i.e. detection and differential expression analysis of known and novel non-coding RNAs, target prediction, etc., requires implementation of multiple statistical and bioinformatics tools from different sources, each focusing on a specific step of the analysis pipeline. As a consequence, the analytical workflow is slowed down by the need for continuous interventions by the operator, a critical factor when large numbers of datasets need to be analyzed at once. We designed a novel modular pipeline (iMir) for comprehensive analysis of smallRNA-Seq data, comprising specific tools for adapter trimming, quality filtering, differential expression analysis, biological target prediction and other useful options by integrating multiple open source modules and resources in an automated workflow. As statistics is crucial in deep-sequencing data analysis, we devised and integrated in iMir tools based on different statistical approaches to allow the operator to analyze data rigorously. The pipeline created here proved to be efficient and time-saving than currently available methods and, in addition, flexible enough to allow the user to select the preferred combination of analytical steps. We present here the results obtained by applying this pipeline to analyze simultaneously 6 smallRNA-Seq datasets from either exponentially growing or growth-arrested human breast cancer MCF-7 cells, that led to the rapid and accurate identification, quantitation and differential expression analysis of ~450 miRNAs, including several novel miRNAs and isomiRs, as well as identification of the putative mRNA targets of differentially expressed mi

  18. Investigating the Influence of Ribavirin on Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus RNA Synthesis by Using a High-Resolution Transcriptome Sequencing Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljabr, Waleed; Touzelet, Olivier; Pollakis, Georgios; Wu, Weining; Munday, Diane C; Hughes, Margaret; Hertz-Fowler, Christiane; Kenny, John; Fearns, Rachel; Barr, John N; Matthews, David A; Hiscox, Julian A

    2016-05-15

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is a major cause of serious respiratory tract infection. Treatment options include administration of ribavirin, a purine analog, although the mechanism of its anti-HRSV activity is unknown. We used transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) to investigate the genome mutation frequency and viral mRNA accumulation in HRSV-infected cells that were left untreated or treated with ribavirin. In the absence of ribavirin, HRSV-specific transcripts accounted for up to one-third of total RNA reads from the infected-cell RNA population. Ribavirin treatment resulted in a >90% reduction in abundance of viral mRNA reads, while at the same time no such reduction was detected for the abundance of cellular transcripts. The presented data reveal that ribavirin significantly increases the frequency of HRSV-specific RNA mutations, suggesting a direct influence on the fidelity of the HRSV polymerase. The presented data show that transitions and transversions occur during HRSV replication and that these changes occur in hot spots along the HRSV genome. Examination of nucleotide substitution rates in the viral genome indicated an increase in the frequency of transition but not transversion mutations in the presence of ribavirin. In addition, our data indicate that in the continuous cell types used and at the time points analyzed, the abundances of some HRSV mRNAs do not reflect the order in which the mRNAs are transcribed. Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is a major pediatric pathogen. Ribavirin can be used in children who are extremely ill to reduce the amount of virus and to lower the burden of disease. Ribavirin is used as an experimental therapy with other viruses. The mechanism of action of ribavirin against HRSV is not well understood, although it is thought to increase the mutation rate of the viral polymerase during replication. To investigate this hypothesis, we used a high-resolution approach that allowed us to determine the genetic

  19. Low pathogenic avian influenza viruses in wild migratory waterfowl in a region of high poultry production, Delmarva, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosser, Diann J.; Densmore, Christine L.; Hindman, Larry J.; Iwanowicz, Deborah; Ottinger, Christopher A.; Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Driscoll, Cindy P.; Nagel, Jessica L.

    2017-01-01

    Migratory waterfowl are natural reservoirs for low pathogenic avian influenza viruses (AIVs) and may contribute to the long-distance dispersal of these pathogens as well as spillover into domestic bird populations. Surveillance for AIVs is critical to assessing risks for potential spread of these viruses among wild and domestic bird populations. The Delmarva Peninsula on the east coast of the United States is both a key convergence point for migratory Atlantic waterfowl populations and a region with high poultry production (>4,700 poultry meat facilities). Sampling of key migratory waterfowl species occurred at 20 locations throughout the Delmarva Peninsula in fall and winter of 2013–14. Samples were collected from 400 hunter-harvested or live-caught birds via cloacal and oropharyngeal swabs. Fourteen of the 400 (3.5%) birds sampled tested positive for the AIV matrix gene using real-time reverse transcriptase PCR, all from five dabbling duck species. Further characterization of the 14 viral isolates identified two hemagglutinin (H3 and H4) and four neuraminidase (N2, N6, N8, and N9) subtypes, which were consistent with isolates reported in the Influenza Research Database for this region. Three of 14 isolates contained multiple HA or NA subtypes. This study adds to the limited baseline information available for AIVs in migratory waterfowl populations on the Delmarva Peninsula, particularly prior to the highly pathogenic AIV A(H5N8) and A(H5N2) introductions to the United States in late 2014.

  20. Pseudomonas aeruginosa identified as a key pathogen in hospitalised children with aspiration pneumonia and a high aspiration risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashkenazi-Hoffnung, Liat; Ari, Anne; Bilavsky, Efraim; Scheuerman, Oded; Amir, Jacob; Prais, Dario

    2016-12-01

    Data on the causative pathogens and optimal empirical therapy of aspiration pneumonia in children are limited. This study sought to describe the bacteriology of aspiration pneumonia in hospitalised children with a high aspiration risk. Respiratory tract specimens were prospectively collected using the induced sputum technique from children with a high aspiration risk who were hospitalised for aspiration pneumonia in a tertiary paediatric medical centre from 2009 to 2014. Clinical, microbiological and treatment data were recorded and analysed for each admission. The cohort comprised 50 children with 235 hospital admissions. Of the 183 respiratory tract cultures performed, 110 were positive for bacteria, with 169 isolates, mostly Gram-negative. The most common Gram-negative pathogen was Pseudomonas aeruginosa. If patients had Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolation, the risk of them having the pathogen again was 81%. The multivariate analysis showed that the use of antibiotic prophylaxis and number of hospitalisations were significantly associated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolation. Gram-negative bacilli, especially Pseudomonas aeruginosa, were the major causative agents of paediatric aspiration pneumonia in our study. Empiric antipseudomonas treatment should be considered, particularly in patients who are receiving antibiotic prophylaxis, have experienced recurrent hospitalisations or with previous respiratory cultures that showed Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolation. ©2016 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Isolation of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza H5N1 Virus from Saker Falcons (Falco cherrug in the Middle East

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henju Marjuki

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available There is accumulating evidence that birds of prey are susceptible to fatal infection with highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI virus. We studied the antigenic, molecular, phylogenetic, and pathogenic properties of 2 HPAI H5N1 viruses isolated from dead falcons in Saudi Arabia and Kuwait in 2005 and 2007, respectively. Phylogenetic and antigenic analyses grouped both isolates in clade 2.2 (Qinghai-like viruses. However, the viruses appeared to have spread westward via different flyways. It remains unknown how these viruses spread so rapidly from Qinghai after the 2005 outbreak and how they were introduced into falcons in these two countries. The H5N1 outbreaks in the Middle East are believed by some to be mediated by wild migratory birds. However, sporting falcons may be at additional risk from the illegal import of live quail to feed them.

  2. Analysis of EZH2: micro-RNA network in low and high grade astrocytic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vikas; Purkait, Suvendu; Takkar, Sonam; Malgulwar, Prit Benny; Kumar, Anupam; Pathak, Pankaj; Suri, Vaishali; Sharma, Mehar C; Suri, Ashish; Kale, Shashank Sharad; Kulshreshtha, Ritu; Sarkar, Chitra

    2016-04-01

    Enhancer of Zeste homologue2 (EZH2) is an epigenetic regulator that functions as oncogene in astrocytic tumors, however, EZH2 regulation remains little studied. In this study, we measured EZH2 levels in low (Gr-II,DA) and high grade (Gr-IV,GBM) astrocytic tumors and found significant increased EZH2 transcript level with grade(median DA-8.5, GBM-28.9).However, a different trend was reflected in protein levels, with GBMs showing high EZH2 LI(median-26.5) compared to DA (median 0.3). This difference in correlation of EZH2 protein and RNA levels suggested post-transcriptional regulation of EZH2, likely mediated by miRNAs. We selected eleven miRNAs that strongly predicted to target EZH2 and measured their expression. Three miRNAs (miR-26a-5p,miR27a-3p and miR-498) showed significant correlation with EZH2 protein, suggesting them as regulators of EZH2, however miR-26a-5p levels decreased with grade. ChIP analyses revealed H3K27me3 modifications in miR-26a promoter suggesting feedback loop between EZH2 and miR26a. We further measured six downstream miRNA targets of EZH2 and found significant downregulation of four (miR-181a/b and 200b/c) in GBM. Interestingly, EZH2 associated miRNAs were predicted to target 25 genes in glioma-pathway, suggesting their role in tumor formation or progression. Collectively, our work suggests EZH2 and its miRNA interactors may serve as promising biomarkers for progression of astrocytic tumors and may offer novel therapeutic strategies.

  3. Transcriptomic analysis of Petunia hybrida in response to salt stress using high throughput RNA sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo H Villarino

    Full Text Available Salinity and drought stress are the primary cause of crop losses worldwide. In sodic saline soils sodium chloride (NaCl disrupts normal plant growth and development. The complex interactions of plant systems with abiotic stress have made RNA sequencing a more holistic and appealing approach to study transcriptome level responses in a single cell and/or tissue. In this work, we determined the Petunia transcriptome response to NaCl stress by sequencing leaf samples and assembling 196 million Illumina reads with Trinity software. Using our reference transcriptome we identified more than 7,000 genes that were differentially expressed within 24 h of acute NaCl stress. The proposed transcriptome can also be used as an excellent tool for biological and bioinformatics in the absence of an available Petunia genome and it is available at the SOL Genomics Network (SGN http://solgenomics.net. Genes related to regulation of reactive oxygen species, transport, and signal transductions as well as novel and undescribed transcripts were among those differentially expressed in response to salt stress. The candidate genes identified in this study can be applied as markers for breeding or to genetically engineer plants to enhance salt tolerance. Gene Ontology analyses indicated that most of the NaCl damage happened at 24 h inducing genotoxicity, affecting transport and organelles due to the high concentration of Na+ ions. Finally, we report a modification to the library preparation protocol whereby cDNA samples were bar-coded with non-HPLC purified primers, without affecting the quality and quantity of the RNA-seq data. The methodological improvement presented here could substantially reduce the cost of sample preparation for future high-throughput RNA sequencing experiments.

  4. Extractions of High Quality RNA from the Seeds of Jerusalem Artichoke and Other Plant Species with High Levels of Starch and Lipid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanupat Mornkham

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L. is an important tuber crop. However, Jerusalem artichoke seeds contain high levels of starch and lipid, making the extraction of high-quality RNA extremely difficult and the gene expression analysis challenging. This study was aimed to improve existing methods for extracting total RNA from Jerusalem artichoke dry seeds and to assess the applicability of the improved method in other plant species. Five RNA extraction methods were evaluated on Jerusalem artichoke seeds and two were modified. One modified method with the significant improvement was applied to assay seeds of diverse Jerusalem artichoke accessions, sunflower, rice, maize, peanut and marigold. The effectiveness of the improved method to extract total RNA from seeds was assessed using qPCR analysis of four selected genes. The improved method of Ma and Yang (2011 yielded a maximum RNA solubility and removed most interfering substances. The improved protocol generated 29 to 41 µg RNA/30 mg fresh weight. An A260/A280 ratio of 1.79 to 2.22 showed their RNA purity. Extracted RNA was effective for downstream applications such as first-stranded cDNA synthesis, cDNA cloning and qPCR. The improved method was also effective to extract total RNA from seeds of sunflower, rice, maize and peanut that are rich in polyphenols, lipids and polysaccharides.

  5. Extractions of High Quality RNA from the Seeds of Jerusalem Artichoke and Other Plant Species with High Levels of Starch and Lipid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mornkham, Tanupat; Wangsomnuk, Preeya Puangsomlee; Fu, Yong-Bi; Wangsomnuk, Pinich; Jogloy, Sanun; Patanothai, Aran

    2013-04-29

    Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) is an important tuber crop. However, Jerusalem artichoke seeds contain high levels of starch and lipid, making the extraction of high-quality RNA extremely difficult and the gene expression analysis challenging. This study was aimed to improve existing methods for extracting total RNA from Jerusalem artichoke dry seeds and to assess the applicability of the improved method in other plant species. Five RNA extraction methods were evaluated on Jerusalem artichoke seeds and two were modified. One modified method with the significant improvement was applied to assay seeds of diverse Jerusalem artichoke accessions, sunflower, rice, maize, peanut and marigold. The effectiveness of the improved method to extract total RNA from seeds was assessed using qPCR analysis of four selected genes. The improved method of Ma and Yang (2011) yielded a maximum RNA solubility and removed most interfering substances. The improved protocol generated 29 to 41 µg RNA/30 mg fresh weight. An A260/A280 ratio of 1.79 to 2.22 showed their RNA purity. Extracted RNA was effective for downstream applications such as first-stranded cDNA synthesis, cDNA cloning and qPCR. The improved method was also effective to extract total RNA from seeds of sunflower, rice, maize and peanut that are rich in polyphenols, lipids and polysaccharides.

  6. A high diversity of Eurasian lineage low pathogenicity avian influenza A viruses circulate among wild birds sampled in Egypt.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy A Gerloff

    Full Text Available Surveillance for influenza A viruses in wild birds has increased substantially as part of efforts to control the global movement of highly pathogenic avian influenza A (H5N1 virus. Studies conducted in Egypt from 2003 to 2007 to monitor birds for H5N1 identified multiple subtypes of low pathogenicity avian influenza A viruses isolated primarily from migratory waterfowl collected in the Nile Delta. Phylogenetic analysis of 28 viral genomes was performed to estimate their nearest ancestors and identify possible reassortants. Migratory flyway patterns were included in the analysis to assess gene flow between overlapping flyways. Overall, the viruses were most closely related to Eurasian, African and/or Central Asian lineage low pathogenicity viruses and belonged to 15 different subtypes. A subset of the internal genes seemed to originate from specific flyways (Black Sea-Mediterranean, East African-West Asian. The remaining genes were derived from a mixture of viruses broadly distributed across as many as 4 different flyways suggesting the importance of the Nile Delta for virus dispersal. Molecular clock date estimates suggested that the time to the nearest common ancestor of all viruses analyzed ranged from 5 to 10 years, indicating frequent genetic exchange with viruses sampled elsewhere. The intersection of multiple migratory bird flyways and the resulting diversity of influenza virus gene lineages in the Nile Delta create conditions favoring reassortment, as evident from the gene constellations identified by this study. In conclusion, we present for the first time a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of full genome sequences from low pathogenic avian influenza viruses circulating in Egypt, underscoring the significance of the region for viral reassortment and the potential emergence of novel avian influenza A viruses, as well as representing a highly diverse influenza A virus gene pool that merits continued monitoring.

  7. The pH-Triggered Triblock Nanocarrier Enabled Highly Efficient siRNA Delivery for Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Lili; Zhou, Junhui; Meng, Lingwei; Wang, Xiaoxia; Wang, Changrong; Huang, Yuanyu; Zheng, Shuquan; Deng, Liandong; Cao, Huiqing; Liang, Zicai; Dong, Anjie; Cheng, Qiang

    2017-01-01

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA) therapies have been hampered by lack of delivery systems in the past decades. Nowadays, a few promising vehicles for siRNA delivery have been developed and it is gradually revealed that enhancing siRNA release from endosomes into cytosol is a very important factor for successful delivery. Here, we designed a novel pH-sensitive nanomicelle, PEG-PTTMA-P(GMA-S-DMA) (PTMS), for siRNA delivery. Owing to rapid hydrolysis in acidic environment, PTMS NPs underwent hydrophobic-to-hydrophilic transition in endosomes that enabled combination of proton sponge effect and raised osmotic pressure in endosomes, resulting in vigorous release of siRNAs from endosomes into cytosol. In vitro results demonstrated that PTMS/siRNA complexes exhibited excellent gene silencing effects in several cell lines. Their gene silencing efficiency could reach ~91%, ~87% and ~90% at the N/P ratio of 50/1 in MDA-MB-231, A549 and Hela cells respectively, which were better than that obtained with Lipofectamine 2000. The highly efficient gene silencing was then proven from enhanced siRNA endosomal release, which is mainly attributed to pH-triggered degradation of polymer and acid-accelerated siRNA release. In vivo experiments indicated that NPs/siRNA formulation rapidly accumulated in tumor sites after i.v. injection. Tumor growth was effectively inhibited and ~45% gene knockdown efficacy was determined at the siRRM2 dose of 1mg/kg. Meanwhile, no significant toxicity was observed during the whole treatment. We also found that PTMS/siRNA formulations could lead to significant gene silencing effects in liver (~63%) and skin (~80%) when injected by i.v. and s.c., respectively. This research work gives a rational strategy to optimize siRNA delivery systems for tumor treatments. PMID:28912886

  8. Expression of H5 hemagglutinin vaccine antigen in common duckweed (Lemna minor) protects against H5N1 high pathogenicity avian influenza virus challenge in immunized chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    A synthetic hemagglutinin (HA) gene from the highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus A/chicken/Indonesia/7/2003 (H5N1) (Indo/03) was expressed in aquatic plant Lemna minor (rLemna-HA). In Experiment 1, efficacy of rLemna-HA was tested on specific pathogen free (SPF) birds immunized with 0.2 ...

  9. Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1 infection in a long-distance migrant shorebird under migratory and non-migratory states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reperant, Leslie A.; Bildt, Marco W.G. van de; Amerongen, Geert van; Buehler, Deborah; Osterhaus, Albert D.M.E.; Jenni-Eiermann, Susi; Piersma, Theunis; Kuiken, Thijs

    2011-01-01

    Corticosterone regulates physiological changes preparing wild birds for migration. It also modulates the immune system and may lead to increased susceptibility to infection, with implications for the spread of pathogens, including highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) H5N1. The red knot

  10. Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1 infection in a long-distance migrant shorebird under migratory and non-migratory states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.A. Reperant (Leslie); M.W.G. van de Bildt (Marco); G. van Amerongen (Geert); D.M. Buehler (Debbie); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); S. Jenni-Eiermann (Susi); T. Piersma (Theunis); T. Kuiken (Thijs)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractCorticosterone regulates physiological changes preparing wild birds for migration. It also modulates the immune system and may lead to increased susceptibility to infection, with implications for the spread of pathogens, including highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) H5N1. The

  11. EuPaGDT: a web tool tailored to design CRISPR guide RNAs for eukaryotic pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Duo; Tarleton, Rick

    2015-10-01

    Recent development of CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing has enabled highly efficient and versatile manipulation of a variety of organisms and adaptation of the CRISPR-Cas9 system to eukaryotic pathogens has opened new avenues for studying these otherwise hard to manipulate organisms. Here we describe a webtool, Eukaryotic Pathogen gRNA Design Tool (EuPaGDT; available at http://grna.ctegd.uga.edu), which identifies guide RNA (gRNA) in input gene(s) to guide users in arriving at well-informed and appropriate gRNA design for many eukaryotic pathogens. Flexibility in gRNA design, accommodating unique eukaryotic pathogen (gene and genome) attributes and high-throughput gRNA design are the main features that distinguish EuPaGDT from other gRNA design tools. In addition to employing an array of known principles to score and rank gRNAs, EuPaGDT implements an effective on-target search algorithm to identify gRNA targeting multi-gene families, which are highly represented in these pathogens and play important roles in host-pathogen interactions. EuPaGDT also identifies and scores microhomology sequences flanking each gRNA targeted cut-site; these sites are often essential for the microhomology-mediated end joining process used for double-stranded break repair in these organisms. EuPaGDT also assists users in designing single-stranded oligonucleotides for homology directed repair. In batch processing mode, EuPaGDT is able to process genome-scale sequences, enabling preparation of gRNA libraries for large-scale screening projects.

  12. On the optimal trimming of high-throughput mRNA sequence data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew D MacManes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The widespread and rapid adoption of high-throughput sequencing technologies has afforded researchers the opportunity to gain a deep understanding of genome level processes that underlie evolutionary change, and perhaps more importantly, the links between genotype and phenotype. In particular, researchers interested in functional biology and adaptation have used these technologies to sequence mRNA transcriptomes of specific tissues, which in turn are often compared to other tissues, or other individuals with different phenotypes. While these techniques are extremely powerful, careful attention to data quality is required. In particular, because high-throughput sequencing is more error-prone than traditional Sanger sequencing, quality trimming of sequence reads should be an important step in all data processing pipelines. While several software packages for quality trimming exist, no general guidelines for the specifics of trimming have been developed. Here, using empirically derived sequence data, I provide general recommendations regarding the optimal strength of trimming, specifically in mRNA-Seq studies. Although very aggressive quality trimming is common, this study suggests that a more gentle trimming, specifically of those nucleotides whose Phred score < 2 or < 5, is optimal for most studies across a wide variety of metrics.

  13. Highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza viruses carry virulence determinants beyond the polybasic hemagglutinin cleavage site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Bogs

    Full Text Available Highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIV originate from avirulent precursors but differ from all other influenza viruses by the presence of a polybasic cleavage site in their hemagglutinins (HA of subtype H5 or H7. In this study, we investigated the ability of a low-pathogenic avian H5N1 strain to transform into an HPAIV. Using reverse genetics, we replaced the monobasic HA cleavage site of the low-pathogenic strain A/Teal/Germany/Wv632/2005 (H5N1 (TG05 by a polybasic motif from an HPAIV (TG05(poly. To elucidate the virulence potential of all viral genes of HPAIV, we generated two reassortants carrying the HA from the HPAIV A/Swan/Germany/R65/06 (H5N1 (R65 plus the remaining genes from TG05 (TG05-HA(R65 or in reversed composition the mutated TG05 HA plus the R65 genes (R65-HA(TG05poly. In vitro, TG05(poly and both reassortants were able to replicate without the addition of trypsin, which is characteristic for HPAIV. Moreover, in contrast to avirulent TG05, the variants TG05(poly, TG05-HA(R65, and R65-HA(TG05poly are pathogenic in chicken to an increasing degree. Whereas the HA cleavage site mutant TG05(poly led to temporary non-lethal disease in all animals, the reassortant TG05-HA(R65 caused death in 3 of 10 animals. Furthermore, the reassortant R65-HA(TG05poly displayed the highest lethality as 8 of 10 chickens died, resembling "natural" HPAIV strains. Taken together, acquisition of a polybasic HA cleavage site is only one necessary step for evolution of low-pathogenic H5N1 strains into HPAIV. However, these low-pathogenic strains may already have cryptic virulence potential. Moreover, besides the polybasic cleavage site, the additional virulence determinants of H5N1 HPAIV are located within the HA itself and in other viral proteins.

  14. High-throughput sequencing of human plasma RNA by using thermostable group II intron reverse transcriptases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yidan; Yao, Jun; Wu, Douglas C; Nottingham, Ryan M; Mohr, Sabine; Hunicke-Smith, Scott; Lambowitz, Alan M

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) has revolutionized transcriptome profiling, gene expression analysis, and RNA-based diagnostics. Here, we developed a new RNA-seq method that exploits thermostable group II intron reverse transcriptases (TGIRTs) and used it to profile human plasma RNAs. TGIRTs have higher thermostability, processivity, and fidelity than conventional reverse transcriptases, plus a novel template-switching activity that can efficiently attach RNA-seq adapters to target RNA sequences without RNA ligation. The new TGIRT-seq method enabled construction of RNA-seq libraries from RNA in RNA in 1-mL plasma samples from a healthy individual revealed RNA fragments mapping to a diverse population of protein-coding gene and long ncRNAs, which are enriched in intron and antisense sequences, as well as nearly all known classes of small ncRNAs, some of which have never before been seen in plasma. Surprisingly, many of the small ncRNA species were present as full-length transcripts, suggesting that they are protected from plasma RNases in ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes and/or exosomes. This TGIRT-seq method is readily adaptable for profiling of whole-cell, exosomal, and miRNAs, and for related procedures, such as HITS-CLIP and ribosome profiling. © 2015 Qin et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  15. RNA-Sequencing of Drosophila melanogaster Head Tissue on High-Sugar and High-Fat Diets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemphill, Wayne; Rivera, Osvaldo; Talbert, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    Obesity has been shown to increase risk for cardiovascular disease and type-2 diabetes. In addition, it has been implicated in aggravation of neurological conditions such as Alzheimer’s. In the model organism Drosophila melanogaster, a physiological state mimicking diet-induced obesity can be induced by subjecting fruit flies to a solid medium disproportionately higher in sugar than protein, or that has been supplemented with a rich source of saturated fat. These flies can exhibit increased circulating glucose levels, increased triglyceride content, insulin-like peptide resistance, and behavior indicative of neurological decline. We subjected flies to variants of the high-sugar diet, high-fat diet, or normal (control) diet, followed by a total RNA extraction from fly heads of each diet group for the purpose of Poly-A selected RNA-Sequencing. Our objective was to identify the effects of obesogenic diets on transcriptome patterns, how they differed between obesogenic diets, and identify genes that may relate to pathogenesis accompanying an obesity-like state. Gene ontology analysis indicated an overrepresentation of affected genes associated with immunity, metabolism, and hemocyanin in the high-fat diet group, and CHK, cell cycle activity, and DNA binding and transcription in the high-sugar diet group. Our results also indicate differences in the effects of the high-fat diet and high-sugar diet on expression profiles in head tissue of flies, despite the reportedly similar phenotypic impacts of the diets. The impacted genes, and how they may relate to pathogenesis in the Drosophila obesity-like state, warrant further experimental investigation. PMID:29141990

  16. RNA-Sequencing of Drosophila melanogaster Head Tissue on High-Sugar and High-Fat Diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne Hemphill

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity has been shown to increase risk for cardiovascular disease and type-2 diabetes. In addition, it has been implicated in aggravation of neurological conditions such as Alzheimer’s. In the model organism Drosophila melanogaster, a physiological state mimicking diet-induced obesity can be induced by subjecting fruit flies to a solid medium disproportionately higher in sugar than protein, or that has been supplemented with a rich source of saturated fat. These flies can exhibit increased circulating glucose levels, increased triglyceride content, insulin-like peptide resistance, and behavior indicative of neurological decline. We subjected flies to variants of the high-sugar diet, high-fat diet, or normal (control diet, followed by a total RNA extraction from fly heads of each diet group for the purpose of Poly-A selected RNA-Sequencing. Our objective was to identify the effects of obesogenic diets on transcriptome patterns, how they differed between obesogenic diets, and identify genes that may relate to pathogenesis accompanying an obesity-like state. Gene ontology analysis indicated an overrepresentation of affected genes associated with immunity, metabolism, and hemocyanin in the high-fat diet group, and CHK, cell cycle activity, and DNA binding and transcription in the high-sugar diet group. Our results also indicate differences in the effects of the high-fat diet and high-sugar diet on expression profiles in head tissue of flies, despite the reportedly similar phenotypic impacts of the diets. The impacted genes, and how they may relate to pathogenesis in the Drosophila obesity-like state, warrant further experimental investigation.

  17. Inference of high resolution HLA types using genome-wide RNA or DNA sequencing reads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yu; Ni, Min; Cooper, Blerta; Wei, Yi; Fury, Wen

    2014-05-01

    Accurate HLA typing at amino acid level (four-digit resolution) is critical in hematopoietic and organ transplantations, pathogenesis studies of autoimmune and infectious diseases, as well as the development of immunoncology therapies. With the rapid adoption of genome-wide sequencing in biomedical research, HLA typing based on transcriptome and whole exome/genome sequencing data becomes increasingly attractive due to its high throughput and convenience. However, unlike targeted amplicon sequencing, genome-wide sequencing often employs a reduced read length and coverage that impose great challenges in resolving the highly homologous HLA alleles. Though several algorithms exist and have been applied to four-digit typing, some deliver low to moderate accuracies, some output ambiguous predictions. Moreover, few methods suit diverse read lengths and depths, and both RNA and DNA sequencing inputs. New algorithms are therefore needed to leverage the accuracy and flexibility of HLA typing at high resolution using genome-wide sequencing data. We have developed a new algorithm named PHLAT to discover the most probable pair of HLA alleles at four-digit resolution or higher, via a unique integration of a candidate allele selection and a likelihood scoring. Over a comprehensive set of benchmarking data (a total of 768 HLA alleles) from both RNA and DNA sequencing and with a broad range of read lengths and coverage, PHLAT consistently achieves a high accuracy at four-digit (92%-95%) and two-digit resolutions (96%-99%), outcompeting most of the existing methods. It also supports targeted amplicon sequencing data from Illumina Miseq. PHLAT significantly leverages the accuracy and flexibility of high resolution HLA typing based on genome-wide sequencing data. It may benefit both basic and applied research in immunology and related fields as well as numerous clinical applications.

  18. Inertial-ordering-assisted droplet microfluidics for high-throughput single-cell RNA-sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Hui-Sung; Je, Kwanghwi; Min, Jae-Woong; Park, Donghyun; Han, Kyung-Yeon; Shin, Seung-Ho; Park, Woong-Yang; Yoo, Chang Eun; Kim, Shin-Hyun

    2018-02-27

    Single-cell RNA-seq reveals the cellular heterogeneity inherent in the population of cells, which is very important in many clinical and research applications. Recent advances in droplet microfluidics have achieved the automatic isolation, lysis, and labeling of single cells in droplet compartments without complex instrumentation. However, barcoding errors occurring in the cell encapsulation process because of the multiple-beads-in-droplet and insufficient throughput because of the low concentration of beads for avoiding multiple-beads-in-a-droplet remain important challenges for precise and efficient expression profiling of single cells. In this study, we developed a new droplet-based microfluidic platform that significantly improved the throughput while reducing barcoding errors through deterministic encapsulation of inertially ordered beads. Highly concentrated beads containing oligonucleotide barcodes were spontaneously ordered in a spiral channel by an inertial effect, which were in turn encapsulated in droplets one-by-one, while cells were simultaneously encapsulated in the droplets. The deterministic encapsulation of beads resulted in a high fraction of single-bead-in-a-droplet and rare multiple-beads-in-a-droplet although the bead concentration increased to 1000 μl -1 , which diminished barcoding errors and enabled accurate high-throughput barcoding. We successfully validated our device with single-cell RNA-seq. In addition, we found that multiple-beads-in-a-droplet, generated using a normal Drop-Seq device with a high concentration of beads, underestimated transcript numbers and overestimated cell numbers. This accurate high-throughput platform can expand the capability and practicality of Drop-Seq in single-cell analysis.

  19. Synthetic RNA Polymerase III Promoters Facilitate High-Efficiency CRISPR-Cas9-Mediated Genome Editing in Yarrowia lipolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Cory M; Hussain, Murtaza Shabbir; Blenner, Mark; Wheeldon, Ian

    2016-04-15

    The oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica is a valuable microbial host for chemical production because it has a high capacity to synthesize, modify, and store intracellular lipids; however, rapid strain development has been hampered by the limited availability of genome engineering tools. We address this limitation by adapting the CRISPR-Cas9 system from Streptococcus pyogenes for markerless gene disruption and integration in Y. lipolytica. Single gene disruption efficiencies of 92% and higher were achieved when single guide RNAs (sgRNA) were transcribed with synthetic hybrid promoters that combine native RNA polymerase III (Pol III) promoters with tRNA. The Pol III-tRNA hybrid promoters exploit endogenous tRNA processing to produce mature sgRNA for Cas9 targeting. The highest efficiencies were achieved with a SCR1'-tRNA(Gly) promoter and Y. lipolytica codon-optimized Cas9 expressed from a UAS1B8-TEF promoter. Cotransformation of the Cas9 and sgRNA expressing plasmid with a homologous recombination donor plasmid resulted in markerless homologous recombination efficiency of over 64%. Homologous recombination was observed in 100% of transformants when nonhomologous end joining was disrupted. The end result of these studies was the development of pCRISPRyl, a modular tool for markerless gene disruption and integration in Y. lipolytica.

  20. Highly stable aptamers selected from a 2'-fully modified fGmH RNA library for targeting biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Adam D; Kim, Dongwook; Liu, Rihe

    2015-01-01

    When developed as targeting ligands for the in vivo delivery of biomaterials to biological systems, RNA aptamers immediately face numerous obstacles, in particular nuclease degradation and post-selection 2' modification. This study aims to develop a novel class of highly stable, 2'-fully modified RNA aptamers that are ideal for the targeted delivery of biomaterials. We demonstrated the facile transcription of a fGmH (2'-F-dG, 2'-OMe-dA/dC/dU) RNA library with unexpected hydrophobicity, the direct selection of aptamers from a fGmH RNA library that bind Staphylococcus aureus Protein A (SpA) as a model target, and the superior nuclease and serum stability of these aptamers compared to 2'-partially modified RNA variants. Characterizations of fGmH RNA aptamers binding to purified SpA and to endogenous SpA present on the surface of S. aureus cells demonstrate fGmH RNA aptamer selectivity and stability. Significantly, fGmH RNA aptamers were able to functionalize, stabilize, and specifically deliver aggregation-prone silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) to S. aureus with SpA-dependent antimicrobial effects. This study describes a novel aptamer class with considerable potential to improve the in vivo applicability of nucleic acid-based affinity molecules to biomaterials.

  1. Research Regarding the Simultaneous Control of the Pathogens on Tomatoes Crops under High Plastic Tunnels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela ŞOVĂREL

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In Romania the most important pathogens on tomatoes crops are Alternaria porri f.sp. solani, Botrytis cinerea, Fulvia fulva, Phytophthora infestans and Erysiphe sp. During period of vegetation, the attack of mentioned pathogens are frequently overlapping. For simultaneously control of pathogenswere used some combination with different active substances (chlorothalonil 500g/l, iprodione 500 g/l, fenhexamid 500 g/l, thiophanate methyl 500g/l, metiram 80%, dimethomorph 9%, mancozeb 60%, difenoconazole 250 g/l , fenamidone 75g/l, propamocarb HCL 375 g/l. The best results for controlling Alternaria porri f.sp. solani, Botrytis cinerea and Fulvia fulva are metiram 80% 0.2% + thiophanate methyl 500g/l 0.14% with 93.5% efficacy. In the untreated check the degree of attack was 78.6% (44.3% A.solani, 7.0% B.cinerea and 27.3% F. Fulva. For controlling Phytophthora infestans, Erysiphe sp. and Fulvia fulva (fenamidone 75g/l + propamocarb HCL 375 g/l    0.2% +  difenoconazole 250 g/l 0.05% with 94.5% efficacy. In the untreated check the degree of attack is 81.2% (38.4% P. infestans, 27.4% Erysiphe sp. , 15.4% F. fulva.

  2. High levels of diversity and population structure in the potato late blight pathogen at the Mexico centre of origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianan; Fernández-Pavía, Sylvia P; Larsen, Meredith M; Garay-Serrano, Edith; Gregorio-Cipriano, Rosario; Rodríguez-Alvarado, Gerardo; Grünwald, Niklaus J; Goss, Erica M

    2017-02-01

    Globally destructive crop pathogens often emerge by migrating out of their native ranges. These pathogens are often diverse at their centre of origin and may exhibit adaptive variation in the invaded range via multiple introductions from different source populations. However, source populations are generally unidentified or poorly studied compared to invasive populations. Phytophthora infestans, the causal agent of late blight, is one of the most costly pathogens of potato and tomato worldwide. Mexico is the centre of origin and diversity of P. infestans and migration events out of Mexico have enormously impacted disease dynamics in North America and Europe. The debate over the origin of the pathogen, and population studies of P. infestans in Mexico, has focused on the Toluca Valley, whereas neighbouring regions have been little studied. We examined the population structure of P. infestans across central Mexico, including samples from Michoacán, Tlaxcala and Toluca. We found high levels of diversity consistent with sexual reproduction in Michoacán and Tlaxcala and population subdivision that was strongly associated with geographic region. We determined that population structure in central Mexico has contributed to diversity in introduced populations based on relatedness of U.S. clonal lineages to Mexican isolates from different regions. Our results suggest that P. infestans exists as a metapopulation in central Mexico, and this population structure could be contributing to the repeated re-emergence of P. infestans in the United States and elsewhere. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. The RNA synthesis machinery of negative-stranded RNA viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortín, Juan, E-mail: jortin@cnb.csic.es [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Centro Nacional de Biotecnología (CSIC) and CIBER de Enfermedades Respiratorias (ISCIII), Madrid (Spain); Martín-Benito, Jaime, E-mail: jmartinb@cnb.csic.es [Department of Macromolecular Structures, Centro Nacional de Biotecnología (CSIC), Madrid (Spain)

    2015-05-15

    The group of Negative-Stranded RNA Viruses (NSVs) includes many human pathogens, like the influenza, measles, mumps, respiratory syncytial or Ebola viruses, which produce frequent epidemics of disease and occasional, high mortality outbreaks by transmission from animal reservoirs. The genome of NSVs consists of one to several single-stranded, negative-polarity RNA molecules that are always assembled into mega Dalton-sized complexes by association to many nucleoprotein monomers. These RNA-protein complexes or ribonucleoproteins function as templates for transcription and replication by action of the viral RNA polymerase and accessory proteins. Here we review our knowledge on these large RNA-synthesis machines, including the structure of their components, the interactions among them and their enzymatic activities, and we discuss models showing how they perform the virus transcription and replication programmes. - Highlights: • Overall organisation of NSV RNA synthesis machines. • Structure and function of the ribonucleoprotein components: Atomic structure of the RNA polymerase complex. • Commonalities and differences between segmented- and non-segmented NSVs. • Transcription versus replication programmes.

  4. Initiator tRNA genes template the 3' CCA end at high frequencies in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardell, David H; Hou, Ya-Ming

    2016-12-08

    While the CCA sequence at the mature 3' end of tRNAs is conserved and critical for translational function, a genetic template for this sequence is not always contained in tRNA genes. In eukaryotes and Archaea, the CCA ends of tRNAs are synthesized post-transcriptionally by CCA-adding enzymes. In Bacteria, tRNA genes template CCA sporadically. In order to understand the variation in how prokaryotic tRNA genes template CCA, we re-annotated tRNA genes in tRNAdb-CE database version 0.8. Among 132,129 prokaryotic tRNA genes, initiator tRNA genes template CCA at the highest average frequency (74.1%) over all functional classes except selenocysteine and pyrrolysine tRNA genes (88.1% and 100% respectively). Across bacterial phyla and a wide range of genome sizes, many lineages exist in which predominantly initiator tRNA genes template CCA. Convergent and parallel retention of CCA templating in initiator tRNA genes evolved in independent histories of reductive genome evolution in Bacteria. Also, in a majority of cyanobacterial and actinobacterial genera, predominantly initiator tRNA genes template CCA. We also found that a surprising fraction of archaeal tRNA genes template CCA. We suggest that cotranscriptional synthesis of initiator tRNA CCA 3' ends can complement inefficient processing of initiator tRNA precursors, "bootstrap" rapid initiation of protein synthesis from a non-growing state, or contribute to an increase in cellular growth rates by reducing overheads of mass and energy to maintain nonfunctional tRNA precursor pools. More generally, CCA templating in structurally non-conforming tRNA genes can afford cells robustness and greater plasticity to respond rapidly to environmental changes and stimuli.

  5. Using machine learning and high-throughput RNA sequencing to classify the precursors of small non-coding RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryvkin, Paul; Leung, Yuk Yee; Ungar, Lyle H; Gregory, Brian D; Wang, Li-San

    2014-05-01

    Recent advances in high-throughput sequencing allow researchers to examine the transcriptome in more detail than ever before. Using a method known as high-throughput small RNA-sequencing, we can now profile the expression of small regulatory RNAs such as microRNAs and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) with a great deal of sensitivity. However, there are many other types of small RNAs (small nucleolar RNAs), snRNAs (small nuclear RNAs), scRNAs (small cytoplasmic RNAs), tRNAs (transfer RNAs), and transposon-derived RNAs. Here, we present a user's guide for CoRAL (Classification of RNAs by Analysis of Length), a computational method for discriminating between different classes of RNA using high-throughput small RNA-sequencing data. Not only can CoRAL distinguish between RNA classes with high accuracy, but it also uses features that are relevant to small RNA biogenesis pathways. By doing so, CoRAL can give biologists a glimpse into the characteristics of different RNA processing pathways and how these might differ between tissue types, biological conditions, or even different species. CoRAL is available at http://wanglab.pcbi.upenn.edu/coral/. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Divergence between the Highly Virulent Zoonotic Pathogen Helicobacter heilmannii and Its Closest Relative, the Low-Virulence “Helicobacter ailurogastricus” sp. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joosten, Myrthe; Lindén, Sara; Rossi, Mirko; Skoog, Emma; Padra, Médea; Peters, Fanny; Perkins, Tim; Vandamme, Peter; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip; D'Herde, Katharina; Van den Broeck, Wim; Flahou, Bram; Deforce, Dieter; Ducatelle, Richard; Marshall, Barry; Haesebrouck, Freddy

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter heilmannii naturally colonizes the stomachs of dogs and cats and has been associated with gastric disorders in humans. Nine feline Helicobacter strains, classified as H. heilmannii based on ureAB and 16S rRNA gene sequences, were divided into a highly virulent and a low-virulence group. The genomes of these strains were sequenced to investigate their phylogenetic relationships, to define their gene content and diversity, and to determine if the differences in pathogenicity were associated with the presence or absence of potential virulence genes. The capacities of these helicobacters to bind to the gastric mucosa were investigated as well. Our analyses revealed that the low-virulence strains do not belong to the species H. heilmannii but to a novel, closely related species for which we propose the name Helicobacter ailurogastricus. Several homologs of H. pylori virulence factors, such as IceA1, HrgA, and jhp0562-like glycosyltransferase, are present in H. heilmannii but absent in H. ailurogastricus. Both species contain a VacA-like autotransporter, for which the passenger domain is remarkably larger in H. ailurogastricus than in H. heilmannii. In addition, H. ailurogastricus shows clear differences in binding to the gastric mucosa compared to H. heilmannii. These findings highlight the low-virulence character of this novel Helicobacter species. PMID:26527212

  7. Alu sequences in undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells display high levels of A-to-I RNA editing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivan Osenberg

    Full Text Available Adenosine to Inosine (A-to-I RNA editing is a site-specific modification of RNA transcripts, catalyzed by members of the ADAR (Adenosine Deaminase Acting on RNA protein family. RNA editing occurs in human RNA in thousands of different sites. Some of the sites are located in protein-coding regions but the majority is found in non-coding regions, such as 3'UTRs, 5'UTRs and introns - mainly in Alu elements. While editing is found in all tissues, the highest levels of editing are found in the brain. It was shown that editing levels within protein-coding regions are increased during embryogenesis and after birth and that RNA editing is crucial for organism viability as well as for normal development. In this study we characterized the A-to-I RNA editing phenomenon during neuronal and spontaneous differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs. We identified high editing levels of Alu repetitive elements in hESCs and demonstrated a global decrease in editing levels of non-coding Alu sites when hESCs are differentiating, particularly into the neural lineage. Using RNA interference, we showed that the elevated editing levels of Alu elements in undifferentiated hESCs are highly dependent on ADAR1. DNA microarray analysis showed that ADAR1 knockdown has a global effect on gene expression in hESCs and leads to a significant increase in RNA expression levels of genes involved in differentiation and development processes, including neurogenesis. Taken together, we speculate that A-to-I editing of Alu sequences plays a role in the regulation of hESC early differentiation decisions.

  8. High-throughput functional microRNAs profiling by recombinant AAV-based microRNA sensor arrays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenhong Tian

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: microRNAs (miRNAs are small and non-coding RNAs which play critical roles in physiological and pathological processes. A number of methods have been established to detect and quantify miRNA expression. However, method for high-throughput miRNA function detection is still lacking. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We describe an adeno-associated virus (AAV vector-based microRNA (miRNA sensor (Asensor array for high-throughput functional miRNA profiling. Each Asensor contains a Gaussia luciferase (Gluc and a firefly luciferase (Fluc expression cassette to sense functional miRNA and to serve as an internal control respectively. Using this array, we acquired functional profiles of 115 miRNAs for 12 cell lines and found "functional miRNA signatures" for several specific cell lines. The activities of specific miRNAs including the let-7 family, miR-17-92 cluster, miR-221, and miR-222 in HEK 293 cells were compared with their expression levels determined by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (QRT-PCR. We also demonstrate two other practical applications of the array, including a comparison of the miRNA activity between HEK293 and HEK293T cells and the ability to monitor miRNA activity changes in K562 cells treated with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our approach has potential applications in the identification of cell types, the characterization of biological and pathological processes, and the evaluation of responses to interventions.

  9. Population Abundance of Potentially Pathogenic Organisms in Intestinal Microbiome of Jungle Crow (Corvus macrorhynchos) Shown with 16S rRNA Gene-Based Microbial Community Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Isamu Maeda; Mohammad Shohel Rana Siddiki; Tsutomu Nozawa-Takeda; Naoki Tsukahara; Yuri Tani; Taki Naito; Shoei Sugita

    2013-01-01

    Jungle Crows (Corvus macrorhynchos) prefer human habitats because of their versatility in feeding accompanied with human food consumption. Therefore, it is important from a public health viewpoint to characterize their intestinal microbiota. However, no studies have been involved in molecular characterization of the microbiota based on huge and reliable number of data acquisition. In this study, 16S rRNA gene-based microbial community analysis coupled with the next-generation DNA sequencing t...

  10. Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza A(H5N1) Virus Struck Migratory Birds in China in 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Yuhai; Zhang, Zhenjie; Liu, Wenjun; Yin, Yanbo; Hong, Jianmin; Li, Xiangdong; Wang, Haiming; Wong, Gary; Chen, Jianjun; Li, Yunfeng; Ru, Wendong; Gao, Ruyi; Liu, Di; Liu, Yingxia; Zhou, Boping; Gao, George F; Shi, Weifeng; Lei, Fumin

    2015-08-11

    Approximately 100 migratory birds, including whooper swans and pochards, were found dead in the Sanmenxia Reservoir Area of China during January 2015. The causative agent behind this outbreak was identified as H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV). Genetic and phylogenetic analyses revealed that this Sanmenxia H5N1 virus was a novel reassortant, possessing a Clade 2.3.2.1c HA gene and a H9N2-derived PB2 gene. Sanmenxia Clade 2.3.2.1c-like H5N1 viruses possess the closest genetic identity to A/Alberta/01/2014 (H5N1), which recently caused a fatal respiratory infection in Canada with signs of meningoencephalitis, a highly unusual symptom with influenza infections in humans. Furthermore, this virus was shown to be highly pathogenic to both birds and mammals, and demonstrate tropism for the nervous system. Due to the geographical location of Sanmenxia, these novel H5N1 viruses also have the potential to be imported to other regions through the migration of wild birds, similar to the H5N1 outbreak amongst migratory birds in Qinghai Lake during 2005. Therefore, further investigation and monitoring is required to prevent this novel reassortant virus from becoming a new threat to public health.

  11. Deep RNA sequencing at single base-pair resolution reveals high complexity of the rice transcriptome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Guojie; Guo, Guangwu; Hu, Xueda

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics of eukaryotic transcriptome is essential for studying the complexity of transcriptional regulation and its impact on phenotype. However, comprehensive studies of transcriptomes at single base resolution are rare, even for modern organisms, and lacking for rice. Here, we...... present the first transcriptome atlas for eight organs of cultivated rice. Using high-throughput paired-end RNA-seq, we unambiguously detected transcripts expressing at an extremely low level, as well as a substantial number of novel transcripts, exons, and untranslated regions. An analysis of alternative...... splicing in the rice transcriptome revealed that alternative cis-splicing occurred in approximately 33% of all rice genes. This is far more than previously reported. In addition, we also identified 234 putative chimeric transcripts that seem to be produced by trans-splicing, indicating that transcript...

  12. ssHMM: extracting intuitive sequence-structure motifs from high-throughput RNA-binding protein data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, David; Krestel, Ralf; Ohler, Uwe; Vingron, Martin; Marsico, Annalisa

    2017-11-02

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play an important role in RNA post-transcriptional regulation and recognize target RNAs via sequence-structure motifs. The extent to which RNA structure influences protein binding in the presence or absence of a sequence motif is still poorly understood. Existing RNA motif finders either take the structure of the RNA only partially into account, or employ models which are not directly interpretable as sequence-structure motifs. We developed ssHMM, an RNA motif finder based on a hidden Markov model (HMM) and Gibbs sampling which fully captures the relationship between RNA sequence and secondary structure preference of a given RBP. Compared to previous methods which output separate logos for sequence and structure, it directly produces a combined sequence-structure motif when trained on a large set of sequences. ssHMM's model is visualized intuitively as a graph and facilitates biological interpretation. ssHMM can be used to find novel bona fide sequence-structure motifs of uncharacterized RBPs, such as the one presented here for the YY1 protein. ssHMM reaches a high motif recovery rate on synthetic data, it recovers known RBP motifs from CLIP-Seq data, and scales linearly on the input size, being considerably faster than MEMERIS and RNAcontext on large datasets while being on par with GraphProt. It is freely available on Github and as a Docker image. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  13. Common fusion transcripts identified in colorectal cancer cell lines by high-throughput RNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nome, Torfinn; Thomassen, Gard Os; Bruun, Jarle; Ahlquist, Terje; Bakken, Anne C; Hoff, Andreas M; Rognum, Torleiv; Nesbakken, Arild; Lorenz, Susanne; Sun, Jinchang; Barros-Silva, João Diogo; Lind, Guro E; Myklebost, Ola; Teixeira, Manuel R; Meza-Zepeda, Leonardo A; Lothe, Ragnhild A; Skotheim, Rolf I

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer disease in the Western world, and about 40% of the patients die from this disease. The cancer cells are commonly genetically unstable, but only a few low-frequency recurrent fusion genes have so far been reported for this disease. In this study, we present a thorough search for novel fusion transcripts in CRC using high-throughput RNA sequencing. From altogether 220 million paired-end sequence reads from seven CRC cell lines, we identified 3391 candidate fused transcripts. By stringent requirements, we nominated 11 candidate fusion transcripts for further experimental validation, of which 10 were positive by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Sanger sequencing. Six were intrachromosomal fusion transcripts, and interestingly, three of these, AKAP13-PDE8A, COMMD10-AP3S1, and CTB-35F21.1-PSD2, were present in, respectively, 18, 18, and 20 of 21 analyzed cell lines and in, respectively, 18, 61, and 48 (17%-58%) of 106 primary cancer tissues. These three fusion transcripts were also detected in 2 to 4 of 14 normal colonic mucosa samples (14%-28%). Whole-genome sequencing identified a specific genomic breakpoint in COMMD10-AP3S1 and further indicates that both the COMMD10-AP3S1 and AKAP13-PDE8A fusion transcripts are due to genomic duplications in specific cell lines. In conclusion, we have identified AKAP13-PDE8A, COMMD10-AP3S1, and CTB-35F21.1-PSD2 as novel intrachromosomal fusion transcripts and the most highly recurring chimeric transcripts described for CRC to date. The functional and clinical relevance of these chimeric RNA molecules remains to be elucidated.

  14. Common Fusion Transcripts Identified in Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines by High-Throughput RNA Sequencing12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nome, Torfinn; Thomassen, Gard OS; Bruun, Jarle; Ahlquist, Terje; Bakken, Anne C; Hoff, Andreas M; Rognum, Torleiv; Nesbakken, Arild; Lorenz, Susanne; Sun, Jinchang; Barros-Silva, João Diogo; Lind, Guro E; Myklebost, Ola; Teixeira, Manuel R; Meza-Zepeda, Leonardo A; Lothe, Ragnhild A; Skotheim, Rolf I

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer disease in the Western world, and about 40% of the patients die from this disease. The cancer cells are commonly genetically unstable, but only a few low-frequency recurrent fusion genes have so far been reported for this disease. In this study, we present a thorough search for novel fusion transcripts in CRC using high-throughput RNA sequencing. From altogether 220 million paired-end sequence reads from seven CRC cell lines, we identified 3391 candidate fused transcripts. By stringent requirements, we nominated 11 candidate fusion transcripts for further experimental validation, of which 10 were positive by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Sanger sequencing. Six were intrachromosomal fusion transcripts, and interestingly, three of these, AKAP13-PDE8A, COMMD10-AP3S1, and CTB-35F21.1-PSD2, were present in, respectively, 18, 18, and 20 of 21 analyzed cell lines and in, respectively, 18, 61, and 48 (17%-58%) of 106 primary cancer tissues. These three fusion transcripts were also detected in 2 to 4 of 14 normal colonic mucosa samples (14%–28%). Whole-genome sequencing identified a specific genomic breakpoint in COMMD10-AP3S1 and further indicates that both the COMMD10-AP3S1 and AKAP13-PDE8A fusion transcripts are due to genomic duplications in specific cell lines. In conclusion, we have identified AKAP13-PDE8A, COMMD10-AP3S1, and CTB-35F21.1-PSD2 as novel intrachromosomal fusion transcripts and the most highly recurring chimeric transcripts described for CRC to date. The functional and clinical relevance of these chimeric RNA molecules remains to be elucidated. PMID:24151535

  15. Destruction of gram-negative food-borne pathogens by high pH involves disruption of the cytoplasmic membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonca, A F; Amoroso, T L; Knabel, S J

    1994-11-01

    High pH has been shown to rapidly destroy gram-negative food-borne pathogens; however, the mechanism of destruction has not yet been elucidated. Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella enteritidis ATCC 13706, and Listeria monocytogenes F5069 were suspended in NaHCO3-NaOH buffer solutions at pH 9, 10, 11, or 12 to give a final cell concentration of approximately 5.2 x 10(8) CFU/ml and then held at 37 or 45 degrees C. At 0, 5, 10, and 15 min the suspensions were sterilely filtered and each filtrate was analyzed for material with A260. Viability of the cell suspensions was evaluated by enumeration on nonselective and selective agars. Cell morphology was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. A260 increased dramatically with pH and temperature for both E. coli and S. enteritidis; however, with L. monocytogenes material with A260 was not detected at any of the pHs tested. At pH 12, numbers of E. coli and S. enteritidis decreased at least 8 logs within 15 s, whereas L. monocytogenes decreased by only 1 log in 10 min. There was a very strong correlation between the initial rate of release of material with A260 and death rate of the gram-negative pathogens (r = 0.997). At pH 12, gram-negative test cells appeared collapsed and showed evidence of lysis while gram-positive L. monocytogenes did not, when observed by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. It was concluded that destruction of gram-negative food-borne pathogens by high pH involves disruption of the cytoplasmic membrane.

  16. Combating highly resistant emerging pathogen Mycobacterium abscessus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis with novel salicylanilide esters and carbamates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranyai, Zsuzsa; Krátký, Martin; Vinšová, Jarmila; Szabó, Nóra; Senoner, Zsuzsanna; Horváti, Kata; Stolaříková, Jiřina; Dávid, Sándor; Bősze, Szilvia

    2015-08-28

    In the Mycobacterium genus over one hundred species are already described and new ones are periodically reported. Species that form colonies in a week are classified as rapid growers, those requiring longer periods (up to three months) are the mostly pathogenic slow growers. More recently, new emerging species have been identified to lengthen the list, all rapid growers. Of these, Mycobacterium abscessus is also an intracellular pathogen and it is the most chemotherapy-resistant rapid-growing mycobacterium. In addition, the cases of multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection are also increasing. Therefore there is an urgent need to find new active molecules against these threatening strains. Based on previous results, a series of salicylanilides, salicylanilide 5-chloropyrazinoates and carbamates was designed, synthesized and characterised. The compounds were evaluated for their in vitro activity on M. abscessus, susceptible M. tuberculosis H37Rv, multidrug-resistant (MDR) M. tuberculosis MDR A8, M. tuberculosis MDR 9449/2006 and on the extremely-resistant Praha 131 (XDR) strains. All derivatives exhibited a significant activity with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) in the low micromolar range. Eight salicylanilide carbamates and two salicylanilide esters exhibited an excellent in vitro activity on M. abscessus with MICs from 0.2 to 2.1 μM, thus being more effective than ciprofloxacin and gentamicin. This finding is potentially promising, particularly, as M. abscessus is a threateningly chemotherapy-resistant species. M. tuberculosis H37Rv was inhibited with MICs from 0.2 μM, and eleven compounds have lower MICs than isoniazid. Salicylanilide esters and carbamates were found that they were effective also on MDR and XDR M. tuberculosis strains with MICs ≥1.0 μM. The in vitro cytotoxicity (IC50) was also determined on human MonoMac-6 cells, and selectivity index (SI) of the compounds was established. In general, salicylanilide

  17. Optimized paired-sgRNA/Cas9 cloning and expression cassette triggers high-efficiency multiplex genome editing in kiwifruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zupeng; Wang, Shuaibin; Li, Dawei; Zhang, Qiong; Li, Li; Zhong, Caihong; Liu, Yifei; Huang, Hongwen

    2018-01-13

    Kiwifruit is an important fruit crop; however, technologies for its functional genomic and molecular improvement are limited. The clustered regulatory interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein (Cas) system has been successfully applied to genetic improvement in many crops, but its editing capability is variable depending on the different combinations of the synthetic guide RNA (sgRNA) and Cas9 protein expression devices. Optimizing conditions for its use within a particular species is therefore needed to achieve highly efficient genome editing. In this study, we developed a new cloning strategy for generating paired-sgRNA/Cas9 vectors containing four sgRNAs targeting the kiwifruit phytoene desaturase gene (AcPDS). Comparing to the previous method of paired-sgRNA cloning, our strategy only requires the synthesis of two gRNA-containing primers which largely reduces the cost. We further compared efficiencies of paired-sgRNA/Cas9 vectors containing different sgRNA expression devices, including both the polycistronic tRNA-sgRNA cassette (PTG) and the traditional CRISPR expression cassette. We found the mutagenesis frequency of the PTG/Cas9 system was 10-fold higher than that of the CRISPR/Cas9 system, coinciding with the relative expressions of sgRNAs in two different expression cassettes. In particular, we identified large chromosomal fragment deletions induced by the paired-sgRNAs of the PTG/Cas9 system. Finally, as expected, we found both systems can successfully induce the albino phenotype of kiwifruit plantlets regenerated from the G418-resistance callus lines. We conclude that the PTG/Cas9 system is a more powerful system than the traditional CRISPR/Cas9 system for kiwifruit genome editing, which provides valuable clues for optimizing CRISPR/Cas9 editing system in other plants. © 2018 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons

  18. Pathogen Webs in Collapsing Honey Bee Colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornman, R. Scott; Tarpy, David R.; Chen, Yanping; Jeffreys, Lacey; Lopez, Dawn; Pettis, Jeffery S.; vanEngelsdorp, Dennis; Evans, Jay D.

    2012-01-01

    Recent losses in honey bee colonies are unusual in their severity, geographical distribution, and, in some cases, failure to present recognized characteristics of known disease. Domesticated honey bees face numerous pests and pathogens, tempting hypotheses that colony collapses arise from exposure to new or resurgent pathogens. Here we explore the incidence and abundance of currently known honey bee pathogens in colonies suffering from Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD), otherwise weak colonies, and strong colonies from across the United States. Although pathogen identities differed between the eastern and western United States, there was a greater incidence and abundance of pathogens in CCD colonies. Pathogen loads were highly covariant in CCD but not control hives, suggesting that CCD colonies rapidly become susceptible to a diverse set of pathogens, or that co-infections can act synergistically to produce the rapid depletion of workers that characterizes the disorder. We also tested workers from a CCD-free apiary to confirm that significant positive correlations among pathogen loads can develop at the level of individual bees and not merely as a secondary effect of CCD. This observation and other recent data highlight pathogen interactions as important components of bee disease. Finally, we used deep RNA sequencing to further characterize microbial diversity in CCD and non-CCD hives. We identified novel strains of the recently described Lake Sinai viruses (LSV) and found evidence of a shift in gut bacterial composition that may be a biomarker of CCD. The results are discussed with respect to host-parasite interactions and other environmental stressors of honey bees. PMID:22927991

  19. Pathogen webs in collapsing honey bee colonies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Scott Cornman

    Full Text Available Recent losses in honey bee colonies are unusual in their severity, geographical distribution, and, in some cases, failure to present recognized characteristics of known disease. Domesticated honey bees face numerous pests and pathogens, tempting hypotheses that colony collapses arise from exposure to new or resurgent pathogens. Here we explore the incidence and abundance of currently known honey bee pathogens in colonies suffering from Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD, otherwise weak colonies, and strong colonies from across the United States. Although pathogen identities differed between the eastern and western United States, there was a greater incidence and abundance of pathogens in CCD colonies. Pathogen loads were highly covariant in CCD but not control hives, suggesting that CCD colonies rapidly become susceptible to a diverse set of pathogens, or that co-infections can act synergistically to produce the rapid depletion of workers that characterizes the disorder. We also tested workers from a CCD-free apiary to confirm that significant positive correlations among pathogen loads can develop at the level of individual bees and not merely as a secondary effect of CCD. This observation and other recent data highlight pathogen interactions as important components of bee disease. Finally, we used deep RNA sequencing to further characterize microbial diversity in CCD and non-CCD hives. We identified novel strains of the recently described Lake Sinai viruses (LSV and found evidence of a shift in gut bacterial composition that may be a biomarker of CCD. The results are discussed with respect to host-parasite interactions and other environmental stressors of honey bees.

  20. Human Upf1 is a highly processive RNA helicase and translocase with RNP remodelling activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorini, Francesca; Bagchi, Debjani; Le Hir, Hervé; Croquette, Vincent

    2015-07-03

    RNA helicases are implicated in most cellular RNA-dependent events. In eukaryotes however, only few have been functionally characterized. Upf1 is a RNA helicase essential for nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD). Here, using magnetic tweezers and bulk assays, we observe that human Upf1 is able to translocate slowly over long single-stranded nucleic acids with a processivity >10 kb. Upf1 efficiently translocates through double-stranded structures and protein-bound sequences, demonstrating that Upf1 is an efficient ribonucleoprotein complex remodeler. Our observation of processive unwinding by an eukaryotic RNA helicase reveals that Upf1, once recruited onto NMD mRNA targets, can scan the entire transcript to irreversibly remodel the mRNP, facilitating its degradation by the NMD machinery.

  1. Determination of gene expression patterns using high-throughput RNA in situ hybridizaion to whole-mount Drosophila embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiszmann, R.; Hammonds, A.S.; Celniker, S.E.

    2009-04-09

    We describe a high-throughput protocol for RNA in situ hybridization (ISH) to Drosophila embryos in a 96-well format. cDNA or genomic DNA templates are amplified by PCR and then digoxigenin-labeled ribonucleotides are incorporated into antisense RNA probes by in vitro transcription. The quality of each probe is evaluated before ISH using a RNA probe quantification (dot blot) assay. RNA probes are hybridized to fixed, mixed-staged Drosophila embryos in 96-well plates. The resulting stained embryos can be examined and photographed immediately or stored at 4oC for later analysis. Starting with fixed, staged embryos, the protocol takes 6 d from probe template production through hybridization. Preparation of fixed embryos requires a minimum of 2 weeks to collect embryos representing all stages. The method has been used to determine the expression patterns of over 6,000 genes throughout embryogenesis.

  2. Photoluminescent and biodegradable polycitrate-polyethylene glycol-polyethyleneimine polymers as highly biocompatible and efficient vectors for bioimaging-guided siRNA and miRNA delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Min; Guo, Yi; Yu, Meng; Ma, Peter X; Mao, Cong; Lei, Bo

    2017-05-01

    Development of biodegradable and biocompatible non-viral vectors with intrinsical multifunctional properties such as bioimaging ability for highly efficient nucleic acids delivery still remains a challenge. Here, a biodegradable poly (1,8-octanedio-citric acid)-co-polyethylene glycol grafted with polyethyleneimine (PEI) (POCG-PEI) polymers with the photoluminescent capacity were synthesized for nucleic acids delivery (siRNA and miRNA). POCG-PEI polymers can efficiently bind various nucleic acids, protect them against enzymatic degradation and release the genes in the presence of polyanionic heparin. POCG-PEI also showed a significantly low cytotoxicity, enhanced cellular uptake and high transfection efficiency of nucleic acids, as compared to commercial transfection agents, lipofectamine 2000 (Lipo) and polyethylenimine (PEI 25K). POCG-PEI polymers demonstrate an excellent photostability, which allows for imaging the cells and real-time tracking the nucleic acids delivery. The photoluminescent property, low cytotoxicity, biodegradation, good gene binding and protection ability and high genes delivery efficiency make POCG-PEI highly competitive as a non-virus vector for genes delivery and real-time bioimaging applications. Our results may be also an important step for designing biodegradable biomaterials with multifunctional properties towards bioimaging-guided genes therapeutic applications. Here, a biodegradable poly (1,8-octanedio-citric acid)-co-polyethylene glycol grafted with polyethyleneimine (PEI) (POCG-PEI) polymers with controlled photoluminescent capacity were synthesized for nucleic acids delivery (siRNA and miRNA). POCG-PEI polymers can efficiently bind various nucleic acids, protect them against enzymatic degradation and release the genes in the presence of polyanionic heparin. POCG-PEI also showed a significantly low cytotoxicity, enhanced cellular uptake and high transfection efficiency of nucleic acids, as compared to commercial transfection agents

  3. Highly drug-resistant pathogens implicated in burn-associated bacteremia in an Iraqi burn care unit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Baptiste Ronat

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: In low- and middle-income countries, bloodstream infections are an important cause of mortality in patients with burns. Increasingly implicated in burn-associated infections are highly drug-resistant pathogens with limited treatment options. We describe the epidemiology of bloodstream infections in patients with burns in a humanitarian surgery project in Iraq. METHODS: We performed a retrospective, descriptive study of blood culture isolates identified between July 2008 and September 2009 among patients with burns in a single hospital in Iraq who developed sepsis. RESULTS: In 1169 inpatients admitted to the burn unit during the study period, 212 (18% had suspected sepsis, and 65 (6% had confirmed bacteremia. Sepsis was considered the primary cause of death in 198 patients (65%; 95% CI 65-70 of the 304 patients that died. The most commonly isolated organisms were Pseudomonas aeruginosa (22 isolates [34%], Staphylococcus aureus (17 [26%], Klebsiella pneumoniae (8 [12%], Staphylococcus epidermidis (7 [11%], Acinetobacter baumannii (6 [9%], and Enterobacter cloacae (5 [8%]. A high proportion of Enterobacteriaceae strains produced extended-spectrum beta-lactamase and S. aureus isolates were uniformly methicillin-resistant. For gram-negative bacteria, the most reliably active antibiotics were imipenen and amikacin. CONCLUSIONS: Burn patients with sepsis in Iraq were commonly found to have bloodstream pathogens resistant to most antibiotics available locally. Effective empirical therapy of burn sepsis in this region of Iraq would consist of vancomycin or teicoplanin and a carbapenem-class antibiotic with antipseudomonal activity.

  4. Victims and vectors: highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 and the ecology of wild birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takekawa, John Y.; Prosser, Diann J.; Newman, Scott H.; Muzaffar, Sabir Bin; Hill, Nichola J.; Yan, Baoping; Xiao, Xiangming; Lei, Fumin; Li, Tianxian; Schwarzbach, Steven E.; Howell, Judd A.

    2010-01-01

    The emergence of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses has raised concerns about the role of wild birds in the spread and persistence of the disease. In 2005, an outbreak of the highly pathogenic subtype H5N1 killed more than 6,000 wild waterbirds at Qinghai Lake, China. Outbreaks have continued to periodically occur in wild birds at Qinghai Lake and elsewhere in Central China and Mongolia. This region has few poultry but is a major migration and breeding area for waterbirds in the Central Asian Flyway, although relatively little is known about migratory movements of different species and connectivity of their wetland habitats. The scientific debate has focused on the role of waterbirds in the epidemiology, maintenance and spread of HPAI H5N1: to what extent are they victims affected by the disease, or vectors that have a role in disease transmission? In this review, we summarise the current knowledge of wild bird involvement in the ecology of HPAI H5N1. Specifically, we present details on: (1) origin of HPAI H5N1; (2) waterbirds as LPAI reservoirs and evolution into HPAI; (3) the role of waterbirds in virus spread and persistence; (4) key biogeographic regions of outbreak; and (5) applying an ecological research perspective to studying AIVs in wild waterbirds and their ecosystems.

  5. Practices associated with Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza spread in traditional poultry marketing chains: Social and economic perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Mathilde; Baritaux, Virginie; Wongnarkpet, Sirichai; Poolkhet, Chaithep; Thanapongtharm, Weerapong; Roger, François; Bonnet, Pascal; Ducrot, Christian

    2013-04-01

    In developing countries, smallholder poultry production contributes to food security and poverty alleviation in rural areas. However, traditional poultry marketing chains have been threatened by the epidemics caused by the Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (H5N1) virus. The article presents a value chain analysis conducted on the traditional poultry marketing chain in the rural province of Phitsanulok, Thailand. The analysis is based on quantitative data collected on 470 backyard chicken farms, and on qualitative data collected on 28 poultry collectors, slaughterhouses and market retailers, using semi-structured interviews. The article examines the organization of poultry marketing chains in time and space, and shows how this may contribute to the spread of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza H5N1 in the small-scale poultry sector. The article also discusses the practices and strategies developed by value chain actors facing poultry mortality, with their economic and social determinants. More broadly, this study also illustrates how value chain analysis can contribute to a better understanding of the complex mechanisms associated with the spread of epidemics in rural communities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. High-yield production of a stable Vero cell-based vaccine candidate against the highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Fangye; Zhou, Jian; Ma, Lei; Song, Shaohui; Zhang, Xinwen; Li, Weidong; Jiang, Shude [No. 5, Department of Bioproducts, Institute of Medical Biology, Chinese Academy of Medical Science and Pecking Union Medical College, Jiaoling Avenue 935, Kunming, Yunnan Province 650102, People' s Republic of China (China); Wang, Yue, E-mail: euy-tokyo@umin.ac.jp [National Institute for Viral Disease Control and Prevention, China Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Yingxin Lane 100, Xicheng District, Beijing 100052, People' s Republic of China (China); Liao, Guoyang, E-mail: liaogy@21cn.com [No. 5, Department of Bioproducts, Institute of Medical Biology, Chinese Academy of Medical Science and Pecking Union Medical College, Jiaoling Avenue 935, Kunming, Yunnan Province 650102, People' s Republic of China (China)

    2012-05-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Vero cell-based HPAI H5N1 vaccine with stable high yield. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stable high yield derived from the YNVa H3N2 backbone. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H5N1/YNVa has a similar safety and immunogenicity to H5N1delta. -- Abstract: Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses pose a global pandemic threat, for which rapid large-scale vaccine production technology is critical for prevention and control. Because chickens are highly susceptible to HPAI viruses, the supply of chicken embryos for vaccine production might be depleted during a virus outbreak. Therefore, developing HPAI virus vaccines using other technologies is critical. Meeting vaccine demand using the Vero cell-based fermentation process has been hindered by low stability and yield. In this study, a Vero cell-based HPAI H5N1 vaccine candidate (H5N1/YNVa) with stable high yield was achieved by reassortment of the Vero-adapted (Va) high growth A/Yunnan/1/2005(H3N2) (YNVa) virus with the A/Anhui/1/2005(H5N1) attenuated influenza vaccine strain (H5N1delta) using the 6/2 method. The reassorted H5N1/YNVa vaccine maintained a high hemagglutination (HA) titer of 1024. Furthermore, H5N1/YNVa displayed low pathogenicity and uniform immunogenicity compared to that of the parent virus.

  7. Comprehensive high-resolution analysis of the role of an Arabidopsis gene family in RNA editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentolila, Stéphane; Oh, Julyun; Hanson, Maureen R; Bukowski, Robert

    2013-06-01

    In flowering plants, mitochondrial and chloroplast mRNAs are edited by C-to-U base modification. In plant organelles, RNA editing appears to be generally a correcting mechanism that restores the proper function of the encoded product. Members of the Arabidopsis RNA editing-Interacting Protein (RIP) family have been recently shown to be essential components of the plant editing machinery. We report the use of a strand- and transcript-specific RNA-seq method (STS-PCRseq) to explore the effect of mutation or silencing of every RIP gene on plant organelle editing. We confirm RIP1 to be a major editing factor that controls the editing extent of 75% of the mitochondrial sites and 20% of the plastid C targets of editing. The quantitative nature of RNA sequencing allows the precise determination of overlapping effects of RIP factors on RNA editing. Over 85% of the sites under the influence of RIP3 and RIP8, two moderately important mitochondrial factors, are also controlled by RIP1. Previously uncharacterized RIP family members were found to have only a slight effect on RNA editing. The preferential location of editing sites controlled by RIP7 on some transcripts suggests an RNA metabolism function for this factor other than editing. In addition to a complete characterization of the RIP factors for their effect on RNA editing, our study highlights the potential of RNA-seq for studying plant organelle editing. Unlike previous attempts to use RNA-seq to analyze RNA editing extent, our methodology focuses on sequencing of organelle cDNAs corresponding to known transcripts. As a result, the depth of coverage of each editing site reaches unprecedented values, assuring a reliable measurement of editing extent and the detection of numerous new sites. This strategy can be applied to the study of RNA editing in any organism.

  8. Comprehensive high-resolution analysis of the role of an Arabidopsis gene family in RNA editing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Bentolila

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In flowering plants, mitochondrial and chloroplast mRNAs are edited by C-to-U base modification. In plant organelles, RNA editing appears to be generally a correcting mechanism that restores the proper function of the encoded product. Members of the Arabidopsis RNA editing-Interacting Protein (RIP family have been recently shown to be essential components of the plant editing machinery. We report the use of a strand- and transcript-specific RNA-seq method (STS-PCRseq to explore the effect of mutation or silencing of every RIP gene on plant organelle editing. We confirm RIP1 to be a major editing factor that controls the editing extent of 75% of the mitochondrial sites and 20% of the plastid C targets of editing. The quantitative nature of RNA sequencing allows the precise determination of overlapping effects of RIP factors on RNA editing. Over 85% of the sites under the influence of RIP3 and RIP8, two moderately important mitochondrial factors, are also controlled by RIP1. Previously uncharacterized RIP family members were found to have only a slight effect on RNA editing. The preferential location of editing sites controlled by RIP7 on some transcripts suggests an RNA metabolism function for this factor other than editing. In addition to a complete characterization of the RIP factors for their effect on RNA editing, our study highlights the potential of RNA-seq for studying plant organelle editing. Unlike previous attempts to use RNA-seq to analyze RNA editing extent, our methodology focuses on sequencing of organelle cDNAs corresponding to known transcripts. As a result, the depth of coverage of each editing site reaches unprecedented values, assuring a reliable measurement of editing extent and the detection of numerous new sites. This strategy can be applied to the study of RNA editing in any organism.

  9. Comprehensive High-Resolution Analysis of the Role of an Arabidopsis Gene Family in RNA Editing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentolila, Stéphane; Oh, Julyun; Hanson, Maureen R.; Bukowski, Robert

    2013-01-01

    In flowering plants, mitochondrial and chloroplast mRNAs are edited by C-to-U base modification. In plant organelles, RNA editing appears to be generally a correcting mechanism that restores the proper function of the encoded product. Members of the Arabidopsis RNA editing-Interacting Protein (RIP) family have been recently shown to be essential components of the plant editing machinery. We report the use of a strand- and transcript-specific RNA-seq method (STS-PCRseq) to explore the effect of mutation or silencing of every RIP gene on plant organelle editing. We confirm RIP1 to be a major editing factor that controls the editing extent of 75% of the mitochondrial sites and 20% of the plastid C targets of editing. The quantitative nature of RNA sequencing allows the precise determination of overlapping effects of RIP factors on RNA editing. Over 85% of the sites under the influence of RIP3 and RIP8, two moderately important mitochondrial factors, are also controlled by RIP1. Previously uncharacterized RIP family members were found to have only a slight effect on RNA editing. The preferential location of editing sites controlled by RIP7 on some transcripts suggests an RNA metabolism function for this factor other than editing. In addition to a complete characterization of the RIP factors for their effect on RNA editing, our study highlights the potential of RNA-seq for studying plant organelle editing. Unlike previous attempts to use RNA-seq to analyze RNA editing extent, our methodology focuses on sequencing of organelle cDNAs corresponding to known transcripts. As a result, the depth of coverage of each editing site reaches unprecedented values, assuring a reliable measurement of editing extent and the detection of numerous new sites. This strategy can be applied to the study of RNA editing in any organism. PMID:23818871

  10. RNA-Seq Analysis of Gene Expression, Viral Pathogen, and B-Cell/T-Cell Receptor Signatures in Complex Chronic Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouquet, Jerome; Gardy, Jennifer L; Brown, Scott; Pfeil, Jacob; Miller, Ruth R; Morshed, Muhammad; Avina-Zubieta, Antonio; Shojania, Kam; McCabe, Mark; Parker, Shoshana; Uyaguari, Miguel; Federman, Scot; Tang, Patrick; Steiner, Ted; Otterstater, Michael; Holt, Rob; Moore, Richard; Chiu, Charles Y; Patrick, David M

    2017-02-15

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) remains poorly understood. Although infections are speculated to trigger the syndrome, a specific infectious agent and underlying pathophysiological mechanism remain elusive. In a previous study, we described similar clinical phenotypes in CFS patients and alternatively diagnosed chronic Lyme syndrome (ADCLS) patients—individuals diagnosed with Lyme disease by testing from private Lyme specialty laboratories but who test negative by reference 2-tiered serologic analysis. Here, we performed blinded RNA-seq analysis of whole blood collected from 25 adults diagnosed with CFS and 13 ADCLS patients, comparing these cases to 25 matched controls and 11 patients with well-controlled systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Samples were collected at patient enrollment and not during acute symptom flares. RNA-seq data were used to study host gene expression, B-cell/T-cell receptor profiles (BCR/TCR), and potential viral infections. No differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were found to be significant when CFS or ADCLS cases were compared to controls. Forty-two DEGs were found when SLE cases were compared to controls, consistent with activation of interferon signaling pathways associated with SLE disease. BCR/TCR repertoire analysis did not show significant differences between CFS and controls or ADCLS and controls. Finally, viral sequences corresponding to anelloviruses, human pegivirus 1, herpesviruses, and papillomaviruses were detected in RNA-seq data, but proportions were similar (P = .73) across all genus-level taxonomic categories. Our observations do not support a theory of transcriptionally mediated immune cell dysregulation in CFS and ADCLS, at least outside of periods of acute symptom flares.

  11. Small RNA deep sequencing reveals role for Arabidopsis thaliana RNA-dependent RNA polymerases in viral siRNA biogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaopeng Qi

    Full Text Available RNA silencing functions as an important antiviral defense mechanism in a broad range of eukaryotes. In plants, biogenesis of several classes of endogenous small interfering RNAs (siRNAs requires RNA-dependent RNA Polymerase (RDR activities. Members of the RDR family proteins, including RDR1and RDR6, have also been implicated in antiviral defense, although a direct role for RDRs in viral siRNA biogenesis has yet to be demonstrated. Using a crucifer-infecting strain of Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV-Cg and Arabidopsis thaliana as a model system, we analyzed the viral small RNA profile in wild-type plants as well as rdr mutants by applying small RNA deep sequencing technology. Over 100,000 TMV-Cg-specific small RNA reads, mostly of 21- (78.4% and 22-nucleotide (12.9% in size and originating predominately (79.9% from the genomic sense RNA strand, were captured at an early infection stage, yielding the first high-resolution small RNA map for a plant virus. The TMV-Cg genome harbored multiple, highly reproducible small RNA-generating hot spots that corresponded to regions with no apparent local hairpin-forming capacity. Significantly, both the rdr1 and rdr6 mutants exhibited globally reduced levels of viral small RNA production as well as reduced strand bias in viral small RNA population, revealing an important role for these host RDRs in viral siRNA biogenesis. In addition, an informatics analysis showed that a large set of host genes could be potentially targeted by TMV-Cg-derived siRNAs for posttranscriptional silencing. Two of such predicted host targets, which encode a cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor (CPSF30 and an unknown protein similar to translocon-associated protein alpha (TRAP alpha, respectively, yielded a positive result in cleavage validation by 5'RACE assays. Our data raised the interesting possibility for viral siRNA-mediated virus-host interactions that may contribute to viral pathogenicity and host specificity.

  12. High-throughput and quantitative genome-wide messenger RNA sequencing for molecular phenotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, John E; Wali, Neha; Sealy, Ian M; Morris, James A; White, Richard J; Leonard, Steven R; Jackson, David K; Jones, Matthew C; Smerdon, Nathalie C; Zamora, Jorge; Dooley, Christopher M; Carruthers, Samantha N; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Stemple, Derek L; Busch-Nentwich, Elisabeth M

    2015-08-05

    We present a genome-wide messenger RNA (mRNA) sequencing technique that converts small amounts of RNA from many samples into molecular phenotypes. It encompasses all steps from sample preparation to sequence analysis and is applicable to baseline profiling or perturbation measurements. Multiplex sequencing of transcript 3' ends identifies differential transcript abundance independent of gene annotation. We show that increasing biological replicate number while maintaining the total amount of sequencing identifies more differentially abundant transcripts. This method can be implemented on polyadenylated RNA from any organism with an annotated reference genome and in any laboratory with access to Illumina sequencing.

  13. High throughput digital quantification of mRNA abundance in primary human acute myeloid leukemia samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payton, Jacqueline E.; Grieselhuber, Nicole R.; Chang, Li-Wei; Murakami, Mark; Geiss, Gary K.; Link, Daniel C.; Nagarajan, Rakesh; Watson, Mark A.; Ley, Timothy J.

    2009-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is characterized by the t(15;17) chromosomal translocation, which results in fusion of the retinoic acid receptor α (RARA) gene to another gene, most commonly promyelocytic leukemia (PML). The resulting fusion protein, PML-RARA, initiates APL, which is a subtype (M3) of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In this report, we identify a gene expression signature that is specific to M3 samples; it was not found in other AML subtypes and did not simply represent the normal gene expression pattern of primary promyelocytes. To validate this signature for a large number of genes, we tested a recently developed high throughput digital technology (NanoString nCounter). Nearly all of the genes tested demonstrated highly significant concordance with our microarray data (P < 0.05). The validated gene signature reliably identified M3 samples in 2 other AML datasets, and the validated genes were substantially enriched in our mouse model of APL, but not in a cell line that inducibly expressed PML-RARA. These results demonstrate that nCounter is a highly reproducible, customizable system for mRNA quantification using limited amounts of clinical material, which provides a valuable tool for biomarker measurement in low-abundance patient samples. PMID:19451695

  14. Survival and High-Hydrostatic Pressure Inactivation of Foodborne Pathogens in Salmorejo, a Traditional Ready-to-Eat Food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo Del Árbol, Julia; Pérez Pulido, Rubén; Grande, Ma José; Gálvez, Antonio; Lucas, Rosario

    2015-11-01

    Salmorejo is a traditional tomato-based creamy product. Because salmorejo is not heat-processed, there is a risk of contamination with foodborne pathogens from raw materials. Even though bacterial growth in salmorejo is strongly inhibited because of its acidic pH (close to 3.9), the growth and survival of 3 foodborne pathogens in this food has not been studied before. In this study, 3 cocktails consisting of Escherichia coli O157, Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis, and Listeria monocytogenes strains were inoculated in freshly prepared salmorejo. The food was treated by high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) at 400, 500, or 600 MPa for 8 min, or left untreated, and stored at 4 °C for 30 d. Viable cell counts were determined on selective media and also by the triple-layer agar method in order to detect sublethally injured cells. In control samples, L. monocytogenes viable cells decreased by 2.4 log cycles at day 7 and were undetectable by day 15. S. enterica cells decreased by 0.5 or 2.4 log cycles at days 7 and 15 respectively, but still were detectable at day 30. E. coli O157 cells survived much better in salmorejo, decreasing only by 1.5 log cycles at day 30. Treatments at pressures of 400 MPa or higher reduced viable counts of L. monocytogenes and S. enterica to undetectable levels. HHP treatments significantly (P food, usually produced on a small scale. HHP treatment at 600 MPa for 8 min can be an efficient nonthermal method for industrial-scale preparation of preservative-free salmorejo with improved safety against transmission of foodborne pathogens L. monocytogenes serotyes 4a and 4b, S. enterica serovar Enteritidis, and E. coli O157. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  15. Protocol: A simple phenol-based method for 96-well extraction of high quality RNA from Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coustham Vincent

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many experiments in modern plant molecular biology require the processing of large numbers of samples for a variety of applications from mutant screens to the analysis of natural variants. A severe bottleneck to many such analyses is the acquisition of good yields of high quality RNA suitable for use in sensitive downstream applications such as real time quantitative reverse-transcription-polymerase chain reaction (real time qRT-PCR. Although several commercial kits are available for high-throughput RNA extraction in 96-well format, only one non-kit method has been described in the literature using the commercial reagent TRIZOL. Results We describe an unusual phenomenon when using TRIZOL reagent with young Arabidopsis seedlings. This prompted us to develop a high-throughput RNA extraction protocol (HTP96 adapted from a well established phenol:chloroform-LiCl method (P:C-L that is cheap, reliable and requires no specialist equipment. With this protocol 192 high quality RNA samples can be prepared in 96-well format in three hours (less than 1 minute per sample with less than 1% loss of samples. We demonstrate that the RNA derived from this protocol is of high quality and suitable for use in real time qRT-PCR assays. Conclusion The development of the HTP96 protocol has vastly increased our sample throughput, allowing us to fully exploit the large sample capacity of modern real time qRT-PCR thermocyclers, now commonplace in many labs, and develop an effective high-throughput gene expression platform. We propose that the HTP96 protocol will significantly benefit any plant scientist with the task of obtaining hundreds of high quality RNA extractions.

  16. High-Throughput Detection of Pathogenic Yeasts of the Genus Trichosporon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Mara R.; Fell, Jack W.

    2004-01-01

    The need for a rapid and accurate method for the detection of fungal pathogens has become imperative as the incidence of fungal infections has increased dramatically. Herein, we tested the Luminex 100, a novel flow cytometer, for the detection of the medically important genus Trichosporon. This genus was selected as our proof-of-concept model due to the close phylogenetic relationship between the species. The method, which is based on a nucleotide hybridization assay, consists of a combination of different sets of fluorescent beads covalently bound to species-specific capture probes. Upon hybridization, the beads bearing the target amplicons are classified by their spectral addresses with a 635-nm laser. Quantitation of the hybridized biotinylated amplicon is based on fluorescence detection with a 532-nm laser. We tested in various multiplex formats 48 species-specific and group-specific capture probes designed in the D1/D2 region of ribosomal DNA, internal transcribed spacer regions, and intergenic spacer region. Species-specific biotinylated amplicons were generated with three sets of primers to yield fragments from the three regions. The assay was specific and fast, as it discriminated species differing by 1 nucleotide and required less than 50 min following amplification to process a 96-well plate. The sensitivity of the assay allowed the detection of 102 genome molecules in PCRs and 107 to 108 molecules of biotinylated amplification product. This technology provided a rapid means of detection of Trichosporon species with the flexibility to identify species in a multiplex format by combining different sets of beads. PMID:15297519

  17. Tomato bushy stunt virus and DI RNAs as a model for studying mechanisms of RNA virus replication, pathogenicity and recombination. Final technical report for 1994--1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, T.J. [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States). School of Biological Sciences; Jackson, A.O. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Plant Biology

    1997-12-31

    Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) is a small icosahedral virus with a very broad host-range. The symptoms of systemic infection range from mild mosaic to severe necrosis that often results in death. The genome of TBSV is composed of a single plus stranded RNA molecule with five genes. Two 5 inch genes are translated from the viral RNA, and the remaining three are translated from two subgenomic RNAs. Prior to the DOE supported studies, TBSV gene function had been assigned solely on the basis of sequence similarity with other virus genes of known function. The two 5 inch proximal genes (p33 and p92) were thought to be involved in viral replication, the middle gene encoded the capsid protein (p41), but no clear function was assigned to two nested 3 inch genes (p19 and p22), although it was suggested that at least one could be involved in movement. This research has determined the roles of each of the viral genes in the infection process, and the authors have obtained considerable genetic information pertinent to the contributions of the coat protein and the nested genes to the disease phenotypes observed in several host plants. They have also identified another genetic element with a short open reading frame in the 3 inch-noncoding region of the genome that provides a host-dependent replication function.

  18. Pathogenicity of Alternanthera mosaic virus is affected by determinants in RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and by reduced efficacy of silencing suppression in a movement-competent TGB1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hyoun-Sub; Vaira, Anna Maria; Reinsel, Michael D; Bae, Hanhong; Bailey, Bryan A; Domier, Leslie L; Hammond, John

    2010-01-01

    Four biologically active cDNA clones were derived from the Alternanthera mosaic virus (AltMV; genus Potexvirus) isolate, AltMV-SP, which differ in symptoms in infected Nicotiana benthamiana plants. Two clones induced necrosis and plant death; a mixture of all four clones induced milder symptoms than AltMV-SP. Replication of all clones was enhanced by a minimum of fourfold at 15 degrees C. A mixture of clones 4-7 (severe) and 3-1 (mild) was indistinguishable from AltMV-SP, but the ratio of 4-7 to 3-1 differed at 25 and 15 degrees C. RNA copy numbers of mixed infections were always below those of 4-7 alone. Determinants of symptom severity were identified in both Pol and TGB1; the mildest (4-1) and most severe (3-7) clones differed at three residues in the 'core' Pol domain [R(1110)P, K(1121)R, R(1255)K] and one [S(1535)P] in the C-terminal Pol domain of RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, and one in TGB1 [P(88)L]. Pol [P(1110),R(1121),K(1255)]+TGB1(L(88))] always induced systemic necrosis at 15 degrees C. Gene exchanges of Pol and TGB1 each affected replication and symptom expression, with TGB1(P(88)) significantly reducing silencing suppression. The difference in silencing suppression between TGB1(P(88)) and TGB1(L(88)) was confirmed by an agroinfiltration assay. Further, co-expression of TGB1(P(88)) and TGB1(L(88)) resulted in interference in the suppression of silencing by TGB1(L(88)). Yeast two-hybrid analysis confirmed that TGB1(P(88)) and TGB1(L(88)) interact. These results identify a TGB1 residue that significantly affects replication and silencing suppression, but maintains full movement functions.

  19. Complete genome analysis of a highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza A virus isolated from a tiger in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushtaq, Muhammad Hassan; Juan, Huang; Jiang, Ping; Li, Yufeng; Li, TianXian; Du, Yijun; Mukhtar, Muhammad Mahmood

    2008-01-01

    An influenza A virus (A/Tig/SH/01/2005 (H5N1) was isolated from lung tissue samples of a dead zoo tiger with respiratory disease in China in July 2005. Complete genome analysis indicated that the isolate was highly identical to an H5N1 virus isolated from a migratory duck at Poyang lake in China in that year. The genotype of the isolate was K,G,D,5J,F,1J,F,1E, and phylogenetically it was a clade 2.2 virus. Molecular characterization of all of the gene segments revealed characteristics of highly pathogenic influenza A viruses. These results may help to identify molecular determinants of virulence and highlight the necessity for continuous surveillance.

  20. High Frequency of Enteric Protozoan, Viral, and Bacterial Potential Pathogens in Community-Acquired Acute Diarrheal Episodes: Evidence Based on Results of Luminex Gastrointestinal Pathogen Panel Assay

    OpenAIRE

    Hawash, Yousry A.; Ismail, Khadiga A.; Almehmadi, Mazen

    2017-01-01

    Infectious diarrhea is endemic in most developing countries. We aimed to investigate the protozoan, viral, and bacterial causes of acute diarrhea in Taif, Saudi Arabia. A cross-sectional prospective 1-year study was conducted on 163 diarrheal patients of various ages. Stool samples were collected, 1 per patient, and tested for 3 protozoa, 3 viruses, and 9 bacteria with the Luminex Gastrointestinal Pathogen Panel. Overall, 53.4% (87/163) of samples were positives (20.8% protozoa, 19.6% viruses...

  1. Viral pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragni, M V; Sherman, K E; Jordan, J A

    2010-07-01

    Despite continuous improvement in safety and purity of blood products for individuals with haemophilia, transmissible agents continue to affect individuals with haemophilia. This chapter addresses three viral pathogens with significant clinical impact: HIV, hepatitis C and parvovirus B19. Hepatitis C is the leading cause of chronic hepatitis and the major co-morbid complication of haemophilia treatment. Clinically, asymptomatic intermittent alanine aminotransferase elevation is typical, with biopsy evidence of advanced fibrosis currently in 25%. Current treatment is effective in up to 70%, and many new agents are in development. For those progressing to end-stage liver disease, liver transplantation outcomes are similar to those in non-haemophilia subjects, although pretransplant mortality is higher. HIV infection, the second leading co-morbid condition in haemophilia, is managed as a chronic infection with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). HAART also slows hepatitis C virus (HCV) progression in those with HIV/HCV co-infection. Viral inactivation and recombinant technologies have effectively prevented transfusion-transmitted viral pathogens in haemophilia. Human parvovirus B19 infection, typically associated with anaemia or, rarely severe aplastic crisis, is a non-lipid enveloped virus, for which standard inactivation techniques are ineffective. Thus, nucleic acid testing (NAT) to screen the blood supply for B19 DNA is currently under consideration by the Food and Drug Administration. To the extent, viral inactivation, recombinant, and NAT technologies are available worldwide, and the lifespan for those with haemophilia is approaching that of the normal population. The purpose of this chapter is to provide an update on three clinically significant transfusion-transmitted viral pathogens.

  2. Optimized high-throughput microRNA expression profiling provides novel biomarker assessment of clinical prostate and breast cancer biopsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedele Vita

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies indicate that microRNAs (miRNAs are mechanistically involved in the development of various human malignancies, suggesting that they represent a promising new class of cancer biomarkers. However, previously reported methods for measuring miRNA expression consume large amounts of tissue, prohibiting high-throughput miRNA profiling from typically small clinical samples such as excision or core needle biopsies of breast or prostate cancer. Here we describe a novel combination of linear amplification and labeling of miRNA for highly sensitive expression microarray profiling requiring only picogram quantities of purified microRNA. Results Comparison of microarray and qRT-PCR measured miRNA levels from two different prostate cancer cell lines showed concordance between the two platforms (Pearson correlation R2 = 0.81; and extension of the amplification, labeling and microarray platform was successfully demonstrated using clinical core and excision biopsy samples from breast and prostate cancer patients. Unsupervised clustering analysis of the prostate biopsy microarrays separated advanced and metastatic prostate cancers from pooled normal prostatic samples and from a non-malignant precursor lesion. Unsupervised clustering of the breast cancer microarrays significantly distinguished ErbB2-positive/ER-negative, ErbB2-positive/ER-positive, and ErbB2-negative/ER-positive breast cancer phenotypes (Fisher exact test, p = 0.03; as well, supervised analysis of these microarray profiles identified distinct miRNA subsets distinguishing ErbB2-positive from ErbB2-negative and ER-positive from ER-negative breast cancers, independent of other clinically important parameters (patient age; tumor size, node status and proliferation index. Conclusion In sum, these findings demonstrate that optimized high-throughput microRNA expression profiling offers novel biomarker identification from typically small clinical samples such as breast

  3. [Correlation between high risk type human papillomavirus E6/E7 mRNA and cervical cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X H; Qian, Y M; Miao, L; Le, Y; Du, J

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the correlation between the positive rate of high risk human papillomavirus(HPV)mRNA E6/E7 and cervical cancer, and provide evidence for the prevention and treatment of cervical cancer. A total of 100 cervical cancer cases and 100 healthy controls were selected in our hospital from January 2015 to December 2015. The fluorescence quantitative PCR and pathological examination on HPV E6/E7 mRNA were carried out. The correlation between HPV E6/E7 mRNA and cervical squamous epithelial lesions were analyzed. In case group, the positive rate of HPV E6/E7 mRNA was 76.0%(76/100). In control group, the positive rate was 13.0%(13/100). The positive rate in case group was significantly higher than that in control group, and the difference was statistically significant(χ(2)=24.522, P0.05). The positive rate of HPV E6/E7 mRNA was significantly higher than high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion(SIL)rate(26.1%), low-grade SIL rate(17.6%)and atypical squamous cell hyperplasia rate(6.7%), the difference was statistically significant(χ(2)=7.615, P= 0.001; χ(2) =9.114, P=0.001; χ(2)=18.241, Pdetection rate of HPV E6/E7 mRNA in cervical cancer patients was high. And with the increased severity of cervical squamous epithelial lesions, the positive rate of HPV E6/E7 mRNA increased.

  4. Noncoding Subgenomic Flavivirus RNA: Multiple Functions in West Nile Virus Pathogenesis and Modulation of Host Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin A. Roby

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Flaviviruses are a large group of positive strand RNA viruses transmitted by arthropods that include many human pathogens such as West Nile virus (WNV, Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV, yellow fever virus, dengue virus, and tick-borne encephalitis virus. All members in this genus tested so far are shown to produce a unique subgenomic flavivirus RNA (sfRNA derived from the 3' untranslated region (UTR. sfRNA is a product of incomplete degradation of genomic RNA by the cell 5'–3' exoribonuclease XRN1 which stalls at highly ordered secondary RNA structures at the beginning of the 3'UTR. Generation of sfRNA results in inhibition of XRN1 activity leading to an increase in stability of many cellular mRNAs. Mutant WNV deficient in sfRNA generation was highly attenuated displaying a marked decrease in cytopathicity in cells and pathogenicity in mice. sfRNA has also been shown to inhibit the antiviral activity of IFN-α/β by yet unknown mechanism and of the RNAi pathway by likely serving as a decoy substrate for Dicer. Thus, sfRNA is involved in modulating multiple cellular pathways to facilitate viral pathogenicity; however the overlying mechanism linking all these multiple functions of sfRNA remains to be elucidated.

  5. Elevated microRNA-126 is associated with high vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 expression levels and high microvessel density in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Torben Frøstrup; Andersen, Claus Lindbjerg; Nielsen, Boye Schnack

    2011-01-01

    the median as the cut-off. The median gene expression levels of VEGFR-2 were significantly lower in the tumours expressing low levels of miRNA-126, 0.30 (95% CI, 0.24‑0.36), compared to those expressing high levels of miRNA-126, 0.48 (95% CI, 0.28-0.60), p=0.02. A positive association was observed with VEGFR...

  6. High-Resolution RNA Maps Suggest Common Principles of Splicing and Polyadenylation Regulation by TDP-43

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor Rot

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Many RNA-binding proteins (RBPs regulate both alternative exons and poly(A site selection. To understand their regulatory principles, we developed expressRNA, a web platform encompassing computational tools for integration of iCLIP and RNA motif analyses with RNA-seq and 3′ mRNA sequencing. This reveals at nucleotide resolution the “RNA maps” describing how the RNA binding positions of RBPs relate to their regulatory functions. We use this approach to examine how TDP-43, an RBP involved in several neurodegenerative diseases, binds around its regulated poly(A sites. Binding close to the poly(A site generally represses, whereas binding further downstream enhances use of the site, which is similar to TDP-43 binding around regulated exons. Our RNAmotifs2 software also identifies sequence motifs that cluster together with the binding motifs of TDP-43. We conclude that TDP-43 directly regulates diverse types of pre-mRNA processing according to common position-dependent principles.

  7. High-affinity RNA aptamers to C-reactive protein (CRP): newly developed pre-elution methods for aptamer selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orito, N.; Umekage, S.; Sato, K.; Kawauchi, S.; Tanaka, H.; Sakai, E.; Tanaka, T.; Kikuchi, Y.

    2012-03-01

    We have developed a modified SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) method to obtain RNA aptamers with high affinity to C-reactive protein (CRP). CRP is a clinical biomarker present in plasma, the level of which increases in response to infections and noninfectious inflammation. The CRP level is also an important prognostic indicator in patients with several syndromes. At present, CRP content in blood is measured immunochemically using antibodies. To develop a more sensitive method using RNA aptamers, we have attempted to obtain high-affinity RNA aptamers to CRP. We succeeded in obtaining an RNA aptamer with high affinity to CRP using a CRP-immobilized Sepharose column and pre-elution procedure. Pre-elution is a method that removes the weak binding portion from a selected RNA population by washing for a short time with buffer containing CRP. By surface plasmon-resonance (SPR) analysis, the affinity constant of this aptamer for CRP was calculated to be KD = 2.25×10-9 (M). The secondary structure, contact sites with CRP protein, and application of this aptamer will be described.

  8. Organ-targeted high-throughput in vivo biologics screen identifies materials for RNA delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Tsung-Yao; Shi, Peng; Steinmeyer, Joseph D; Chatnuntawech, Itthi; Tillberg, Paul; Love, Kevin T; Eimon, Peter M; Anderson, Daniel G; Yanik, Mehmet Fatih

    2014-10-01

    Therapies based on biologics involving delivery of proteins, DNA, and RNA are currently among the most promising approaches. However, although large combinatorial libraries of biologics and delivery vehicles can be readily synthesized, there are currently no means to rapidly characterize them in vivo using animal models. Here, we demonstrate high-throughput in vivo screening of biologics and delivery vehicles by automated delivery into target tissues of small vertebrates with developed organs. Individual zebrafish larvae are automatically oriented and immobilized within hydrogel droplets in an array format using a microfluidic system, and delivery vehicles are automatically microinjected to target organs with high repeatability and precision. We screened a library of lipid-like delivery vehicles for their ability to facilitate the expression of protein-encoding RNAs in the central nervous system. We discovered delivery vehicles that are effective in both larval zebrafish and rats. Our results showed that the in vivo zebrafish model can be significantly more predictive of both false positives and false negatives in mammals than in vitro mammalian cell culture assays. Our screening results also suggest certain structure-activity relationships, which can potentially be applied to design novel delivery vehicles.

  9. Dose-Response of High-Intensity Training (HIT) on Atheroprotective miRNA-126 Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Boris; Schelleckes, Katrin; Nedele, Johanna; Thorwesten, Lothar; Klose, Andreas; Lenders, Malte; Krüger, Michael; Brand, Eva; Brand, Stefan-Martin

    2017-01-01

    Aim: MicroRNA-126 (miR-126) exerts beneficial effects on vascular integrity, angiogenesis, and atherosclerotic plaque stability. The purpose of this investigation was to analyze the dose-response relationship of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) on miR-126-3p and -5p levels. Methods: Sixty-one moderately trained individuals (females = 31 [50.8%]; 22.0 ± 1.84 years) were consecutively recruited and allocated into three matched groups using exercise capacity. During a 4-week intervention a HIIT group performed three exercise sessions/week of 4 × 30 s at maximum speed (all-out), a progressive HIIT (proHIIT) group performed three exercise sessions/week of 4 × 30 s at maximum speed (all-out) with one extra session every week (up to 7 × 30 s) and a low-intensity training (LIT) control group performed three exercise sessions/week for 25 min HIIT groups (after 4 min of high-intensity running). After the intervention, the LIT group presented an increase in miR-126-3p, while in the HIIT group, miR-126-3p levels were still reduced (all p HIIT (−1.05 ± 2.6 units). Conclusions: LIT and proHIIT may be performed to increase individual miR-126 levels. HIIT without progression was less effective in increasing miR-126. PMID:28611681

  10. Engineering a promiscuous pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase by a high throughput FACS screen

    KAUST Repository

    Hohl, Adrian

    2017-12-06

    The Pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase (PylRS) and its cognate tRNAPyl are used to facilitate the incorporation of non-canonical amino acids (ncAAs) into the genetic code of bacterial and eukaryotic cells by orthogonally reassigning the amber codon. Currently, the incorporation of new ncAAs requires a cumbersome engineering process composed of several positive and negative selection rounds to select the appropriate PylRS/tRNAPyl pair. Our fast and sensitive engineering approach required only a single FACS selection round to identify 110 orthogonal PylRS variants for the aminoacylation of 20 ncAAs. Pocket-substrate relationship from these variants led to the design of a highly promiscuous PylRS (HpRS), which catalyzed the aminoacylation of 31 structurally diverse lysine derivatives bearing clickable, fluorinated, fluorescent, and biotinylated entities. The high speed and sensitivity of our approach provides a competitive alternative to existing screening methodologies, and delivers insights into the complex PylRS-substrate interactions to facilitate the generation of additional promiscuous variants.

  11. Modeling and roles of meteorological factors in outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Paritosh K; Islam, Md Zohorul; Debnath, Nitish C; Yamage, Mat

    2014-01-01

    The highly pathogenic avian influenza A virus subtype H5N1 (HPAI H5N1) is a deadly zoonotic pathogen. Its persistence in poultry in several countries is a potential threat: a mutant or genetically reassorted progenitor might cause a human pandemic. Its world-wide eradication from poultry is important to protect public health. The global trend of outbreaks of influenza attributable to HPAI H5N1 shows a clear seasonality. Meteorological factors might be associated with such trend but have not been studied. For the first time, we analyze the role of meteorological factors in the occurrences of HPAI outbreaks in Bangladesh. We employed autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) and multiplicative seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average (SARIMA) to assess the roles of different meteorological factors in outbreaks of HPAI. Outbreaks were modeled best when multiplicative seasonality was incorporated. Incorporation of any meteorological variable(s) as inputs did not improve the performance of any multivariable models, but relative humidity (RH) was a significant covariate in several ARIMA and SARIMA models with different autoregressive and moving average orders. The variable cloud cover was also a significant covariate in two SARIMA models, but air temperature along with RH might be a predictor when moving average (MA) order at lag 1 month is considered.

  12. A Novel High-Affinity Sucrose Transporter Is Required for Virulence of the Plant Pathogen Ustilago maydis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goos, Sarah; Kämper, Jörg; Sauer, Norbert

    2010-01-01

    Plant pathogenic fungi cause massive yield losses and affect both quality and safety of food and feed produced from infected plants. The main objective of plant pathogenic fungi is to get access to the organic carbon sources of their carbon-autotrophic hosts. However, the chemical nature of the carbon source(s) and the mode of uptake are largely unknown. Here, we present a novel, plasma membrane-localized sucrose transporter (Srt1) from the corn smut fungus Ustilago maydis and its characterization as a fungal virulence factor. Srt1 has an unusually high substrate affinity, is absolutely sucrose specific, and allows the direct utilization of sucrose at the plant/fungal interface without extracellular hydrolysis and, thus, without the production of extracellular monosaccharides known to elicit plant immune responses. srt1 is expressed exclusively during infection, and its deletion strongly reduces fungal virulence. This emphasizes the central role of this protein both for efficient carbon supply and for avoidance of apoplastic signals potentially recognized by the host. PMID:20161717

  13. A novel high-affinity sucrose transporter is required for virulence of the plant pathogen Ustilago maydis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon Wahl

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Plant pathogenic fungi cause massive yield losses and affect both quality and safety of food and feed produced from infected plants. The main objective of plant pathogenic fungi is to get access to the organic carbon sources of their carbon-autotrophic hosts. However, the chemical nature of the carbon source(s and the mode of uptake are largely unknown. Here, we present a novel, plasma membrane-localized sucrose transporter (Srt1 from the corn smut fungus Ustilago maydis and its characterization as a fungal virulence factor. Srt1 has an unusually high substrate affinity, is absolutely sucrose specific, and allows the direct utilization of sucrose at the plant/fungal interface without extracellular hydrolysis and, thus, without the production of extracellular monosaccharides known to elicit plant immune responses. srt1 is expressed exclusively during infection, and its deletion strongly reduces fungal virulence. This emphasizes the central role of this protein both for efficient carbon supply and for avoidance of apoplastic signals potentially recognized by the host.

  14. Modeling and roles of meteorological factors in outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paritosh K Biswas

    Full Text Available The highly pathogenic avian influenza A virus subtype H5N1 (HPAI H5N1 is a deadly zoonotic pathogen. Its persistence in poultry in several countries is a potential threat: a mutant or genetically reassorted progenitor might cause a human pandemic. Its world-wide eradication from poultry is important to protect public health. The global trend of outbreaks of influenza attributable to HPAI H5N1 shows a clear seasonality. Meteorological factors might be associated with such trend but have not been studied. For the first time, we analyze the role of meteorological factors in the occurrences of HPAI outbreaks in Bangladesh. We employed autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA and multiplicative seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average (SARIMA to assess the roles of different meteorological factors in outbreaks of HPAI. Outbreaks were modeled best when multiplicative seasonality was incorporated. Incorporation of any meteorological variable(s as inputs did not improve the performance of any multivariable models, but relative humidity (RH was a significant covariate in several ARIMA and SARIMA models with different autoregressive and moving average orders. The variable cloud cover was also a significant covariate in two SARIMA models, but air temperature along with RH might be a predictor when moving average (MA order at lag 1 month is considered.

  15. RNA oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, L. K.; Cejvanovic, V.; Henriken, T.

    2015-01-01

    RNA modification has attracted increasing interest as it is realized that epitranscriptomics is important in disease development. In type 2 diabetes we have suggested that high urinary excretion of 8-oxo-2'-Guanosine (8oxoGuo), as a measure of global RNA oxidation, is associated with poor survival.......9 significant hazard ratio for death compared with the quartile with the lowest 8oxoGuo excretion when adjusted for age, sex, BMI, smoker status, s-HbA1c, urine protein excretion and s-cholesterol. We conclude that it is now established that RNA oxidation is an independent risk factor for death in type 2...... diabetes. In agreement with our previous finding, DNA oxidation did not show any prognostic value. RNA oxidation represents oxidative stress intracellularly, presumably predominantly in the cytosol. The mechanism of RNA oxidation is not clear, but hypothesized to result from mitochondrial dysfunction...

  16. Mammalian tissues defective in nonsense-mediated mRNA decay display highly aberrant splicing patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weischenfeldt, Joachim Lütken; Waage, Johannes Eichler; Tian, Geng

    2012-01-01

    a bioinformatic pipeline that maps RNA-seq data to a combinatorial exon database, predicts NMD-susceptibility for mRNA isoforms and calculates the distribution of major splice isoform classes. We present a catalog of NMD-regulated alternative splicing events, showing that isoforms of 30% of all expressed genes......ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) affects the outcome of alternative splicing by degrading mRNA isoforms with premature termination codons. Splicing regulators constitute important NMD targets; however, the extent to which loss of NMD causes extensive deregulation...... of alternative splicing has not previously been assayed in a global, unbiased manner. Here, we combine mouse genetics and RNA-seq to provide the first in vivo analysis of the global impact of NMD on splicing patterns in two primary mouse tissues ablated for the NMD factor UPF2. RESULTS: We developed...

  17. RAPD analysis and sequencing of ITS1/5.8S rRNA/ITS2 and Fe-hydrogenase as tools for genetic classification of potentially pathogenic isolates of Trichomonas gallinae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansano-Maestre, José; Martínez-Herrero, María Del Carmen; Garijo-Toledo, María Magdalena; Gómez-Muñoz, María Teresa

    2016-08-01

    Trichomonas gallinae is a worldwide parasite that causes oropharyngeal avian trichomonosis. During eight years, 60 axenic isolates were obtained from different bird species and characterized by three molecular methods: RAPD analysis and PCR-sequencing of ITS1/5.8S rRNA/ITS2 fragment and Fe-hydrogenase gene. We have found two genotypes of ITS1/5.8S rRNA/ITS2 widely distributed among bird populations, a new variant and also two sequences with mixed pattern. Genotype ITS-OBT-Tg-1 was associated with the presence of gross lesions in birds. We have found eight genotypes of the Fe-hydrogenase (A1, A2, C2, C2.1, C4, C5, C6 and C7), three of them are new reports (C5, C6 and C7), and also three sequences with mixed pattern. Subtype A1 of the Fe-hydrogenase was also related with the presence of lesions. RAPD analyses included most of the strains isolated from animals with lesions in one of the sub-clusters. Potentially pathogenic isolates of T. gallinae obtained in this study fulfill the following criteria with one exception: isolated from lesions+ITS-OBT-Tg-1 genotype+FeHyd A1+RAPD sub-cluster I2. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparative profiling of miRNA expression in developing seeds of high linoleic and high oleic safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L. plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shijiang eCao

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Vegetable oils high in oleic acid are considered to be advantageous because of their better nutritional value and potential industrial applications. The oleic acid content in the classic safflower oil is normally 10-15% while a natural mutant (ol accumulates elevated oleic acid up to 70% in seed oil. As a part of our investigation into the molecular features of the high oleic (HO trait in safflower we have profiled the microRNA (miRNA populations in developing safflower seeds expressing the ol allele in comparison to the wild type high linoleic (HL safflower using deep sequencing technology. The small RNA populations of the mid-maturity developing embryos of homozygous ol HO and wild type HL safflower had a very similar size distribution pattern, however, only ~16.5% of the unique small RNAs were overlapping in these two genotypes. From these two small RNA populations we have found 55 known miRNAs and identified two candidate novel miRNA families to be likely unique to the developing safflower seeds. Target genes with conserved as well as novel functions were predicted for the conserved miRNAs. We have also identified 13 miRNAs differentially expressed between the HO and HL safflower genotypes. The results may lay a foundation for unravelling the miRNA-mediated molecular processes that regulate oleic acid accumulation in the HO safflower mutant and developmental processes in safflower embryos in general.

  19. Thousands of primer-free, high-quality, full-length SSU rRNA sequences from all domains of life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karst, Soeren M; Dueholm, Morten S; McIlroy, Simon J

    2016-01-01

    Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes are the consensus marker for determination of microbial diversity on the planet, invaluable in studies of evolution and, for the past decade, high-throughput sequencing of variable regions of ribosomal RNA genes has become the backbone of most microbial ecology studies...

  20. Columbia University: Computational Human High-grade Glioblastoma Multiforme Interactome - miRNA (Post-transcriptional) Layer | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Human High-Grade Glioma Interactome (HGi) contains a genome-wide complement of molecular interactions that are Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM)-specific. HGi v3 contains the post-transcriptional layer of the HGi, which includes the miRNA-target (RNA-RNA) layer of the interactome. Read the Abstract

  1. Molecular evidence that the opportunistic fungal pathogen Trichosporon asahii is part of the normal fungal microbiota of the human gut based on rRNA genotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Otomi; Matsukura, Manami; Sugita, Takashi

    2015-10-01

    The fungus Trichosporon asahii is distributed widely in the environment and is frequently isolated from clinical specimens. It can cause life-threatening disseminated infections, including breakthrough infection after the administration of candin antifungal drugs. However, the definitive infection route is still unclear. In this study, 43 T. asahii genotypes were detected in 72 fecal samples from healthy subjects. The rRNA genotypes of the species were determined using a culture-independent method. The genotypes of T. asahii were almost identical to those of reported clinical isolates. Therefore, T. asahii colonizing the gastrointestinal tract might be associated with the development of trichosporonosis, and not environmental isolates. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Rapid Detection and Statistical Differentiation of KPC Gene Variants in Gram-Negative Pathogens by Use of High-Resolution Melting and ScreenClust Analyses

    OpenAIRE

    Roth, Amanda L.; Hanson, Nancy D.

    2013-01-01

    In the United States, the production of the Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC) is an important mechanism of carbapenem resistance in Gram-negative pathogens. Infections with KPC-producing organisms are associated with increased morbidity and mortality; therefore, the rapid detection of KPC-producing pathogens is critical in patient care and infection control. We developed a real-time PCR assay complemented with traditional high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis, as well as statisticall...

  3. Highly efficient eradication of intracranial glioblastoma using Eg5 siRNA combined with HVJ envelope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, M; Yamamoto, T; Matsumura, A; Kaneda, Y

    2009-12-01

    Hemagglutinating virus of Japan envelope (HVJ-E) vector with inactivated replication-defective Sendai virus was originally developed as a versatile drug delivery system. Recently, we have shown the direct tumor-killing activity of HVJ-E itself without therapeutic molecules in prostate cancer cells. Although human glioblastoma cells were also sensitive to HVJ-E treatment, complete eradication was not achieved using HVJ-E alone. Here, to develop more effective therapeutic strategy of glioblastoma, we enhanced the anti-tumor activity by incorporating Short interfering RNA (siRNA) of mitotic motor protein Eg5 into HVJ-E. Treatment with HVJ-E-containing Eg5 siRNA induced monopolar spindle formation and resulted in cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis. When HVJ-E-containing Eg5 siRNA was directly injected into an intradermal tumor xenograft, all mice became tumor-free. Similar results were observed in the intracranial tumor xenografts. The survival time of treated mice was significantly prolonged when HVJ-E was used. Histological examination showed that tumors remained in the brain after treatment with HVJ-E-containing negative control siRNA, but no tumors were detected after treatment with HVJ-E-containing Eg5 siRNA. This remarkable anti-tumor response was likely due to a synergistic effect of Eg5 siRNA and HVJ-E. Thus, this combination shows promise as an attractive novel therapy for glioblastoma.

  4. Production and processing of siRNA precursor transcripts from the highly repetitive maize genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Hale

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Mutations affecting the maintenance of heritable epigenetic states in maize identify multiple RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM factors including RMR1, a novel member of a plant-specific clade of Snf2-related proteins. Here we show that RMR1 is necessary for the accumulation of a majority of 24 nt small RNAs, including those derived from Long-Terminal Repeat (LTR retrotransposons, the most common repetitive feature in the maize genome. A genetic analysis of DNA transposon repression indicates that RMR1 acts upstream of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, RDR2 (MOP1. Surprisingly, we show that non-polyadenylated transcripts from a sampling of LTR retrotransposons are lost in both rmr1 and rdr2 mutants. In contrast, plants deficient for RNA Polymerase IV (Pol IV function show an increase in polyadenylated LTR RNA transcripts. These findings support a model in which Pol IV functions independently of the small RNA accumulation facilitated by RMR1 and RDR2 and support that a loss of Pol IV leads to RNA Polymerase II-based transcription. Additionally, the lack of changes in general genome homeostasis in rmr1 mutants, despite the global loss of 24 nt small RNAs, challenges the perceived roles of siRNAs in maintaining functional heterochromatin in the genomes of outcrossing grass species.

  5. Enhancement of innate immunity with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor did not prevent disease in pigs infected with a highly pathogenic Chinese PRRSV strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinese highly pathogenic PRRSV (HP-PRRSV) strain JXwn06 has been shown to produce high fevers, loss of body condition, respiratory distress and death in pigs. Necropsy reveals extensive interstitial pneumonia, multi-systemic pathology and a high occurrence of secondary bacterial infections. The ful...

  6. A novel hemagglutinin protein produced in bacteria protects chickens against H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses by inducing H5 subtype-specific neutralizing antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sączyńska, Violetta; Romanik, Agnieszka; Florys, Katarzyna; Cecuda-Adamczewska, Violetta; Kęsik-Brodacka, Małgorzata; Śmietanka, Krzysztof; Olszewska, Monika; Domańska-Blicharz, Katarzyna; Minta, Zenon; Szewczyk, Bogusław; Płucienniczak, Grażyna; Płucienniczak, Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    The highly pathogenic (HP) H5N1 avian influenza viruses (AIVs) cause a mortality rate of up to 100% in infected chickens and pose a permanent pandemic threat. Attempts to obtain effective vaccines against H5N1 HPAIVs have focused on hemagglutinin (HA), an immunodominant viral antigen capable of eliciting neutralizing antibodies. The vast majority of vaccine projects have been performed using eukaryotic expression systems. In contrast, we used a bacterial expression system to produce vaccine HA protein (bacterial HA) according to our own design. The HA protein with the sequence of the H5N1 HPAIV strain was efficiently expressed in Escherichia coli, recovered in the form of inclusion bodies and refolded by dilution between two chromatographic purification steps. Antigenicity studies showed that the resulting antigen, referred to as rH5-E. coli, preserves conformational epitopes targeted by antibodies specific for H5-subtype HAs, inhibiting hemagglutination and/or neutralizing influenza viruses in vitro. The proper conformation of this protein and its ability to form functional oligomers were confirmed by a hemagglutination test. Consistent with the biochemical characteristics, prime-boost immunizations with adjuvanted rH5-E. coli protected 100% and 70% of specific pathogen-free, layer-type chickens against challenge with homologous and heterologous H5N1 HPAIVs, respectively. The observed protection was related to the positivity in the FluAC H5 test (IDVet) but not to hemagglutination-inhibiting antibody titers. Due to full protection, the effective contact transmission of the homologous challenge virus did not occur. Survivors from both challenges did not or only transiently shed the viruses, as established by viral RNA detection in oropharyngeal and cloacal swabs. Our results demonstrate that vaccination with rH5-E. coli could confer control of H5N1 HPAIV infection and transmission rates in chicken flocks, accompanied by reduced virus shedding. Moreover, the role of

  7. Multiplex mRNA assay using electrophoretic tags for high-throughput gene expression analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Tian, Huan; Cao, Liching; Tan, Yuping; Williams, Stephen; Chen, Lili; Matray, Tracy; Chenna, Ahmed; Moore, Sean; Hernandez, Vincent; Xiao, Vivian; Tang, Mengxiang; Singh, Sharat

    2004-01-01

    We describe a novel multiplexing technology using a library of small fluorescent molecules, termed eTag molecules, to code and quantify mRNA targets. eTag molecules, which have the same fluorometric property, but distinct charge-to-mass ratios possess pre-defined electrophoretic characteristics and can be resolved using capillary electrophoresis. Coupled with primary Invader® mRNA assay, eTag molecules were applied to simultaneously quantify up to 44 mRNA targets. This multiplexing approach w...

  8. High-resolution melt-curve analysis of random-amplified-polymorphic-DNA markers, for the characterisation of pathogenic Leptospira

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tulsiani, Suhella; Craig, S B; Graham, G C

    2010-01-01

    A new test for pathogenic Leptospira isolates, based on RAPD-PCR and high-resolution melt (HRM) analysis (which measures the melting temperature of amplicons in real time, using a fluorescent DNA-binding dye), has recently been developed. A characteristic profile of the amplicons can be used...... to define serovars or detect genotypes. Ten serovars, of leptospires from the species Leptospira interrogans (serovars Australis, Robinsoni, Hardjo, Pomona, Zanoni, Copenhageni and Szwajizak), L. borgpetersenii (serovar Arborea), L. kirschneri (serovar Cynopteri) and L. weilii (serovar Celledoni), were...... of Leptospira serotypes using a DNA-based methodology is now possible. As an objective and relatively inexpensive and rapid method of serovar identification, at least for cultured isolates, RAPD-HRM assays show convincing potential....

  9. Genome-wide Single-Molecule Footprinting Reveals High RNA Polymerase II Turnover at Paused Promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, Arnaud R; Imanci, Dilek; Hoerner, Leslie; Gaidatzis, Dimos; Burger, Lukas; Schübeler, Dirk

    2017-08-03

    Transcription initiation entails chromatin opening followed by pre-initiation complex formation and RNA polymerase II recruitment. Subsequent polymerase elongation requires additional signals, resulting in increased residence time downstream of the start site, a phenomenon referred to as pausing. Here, we harnessed single-molecule footprinting to quantify distinct steps of initiation in vivo throughout the Drosophila genome. This identifies the impact of promoter structure on initiation dynamics in relation to nucleosomal occupancy. Additionally, perturbation of transcriptional initiation reveals an unexpectedly high turnover of polymerases at paused promoters-an observation confirmed at the level of nascent RNAs. These observations argue that absence of elongation is largely caused by premature termination rather than by stable polymerase stalling. In support of this non-processive model, we observe that induction of the paused heat shock promoter depends on continuous initiation. Our study provides a framework to quantify protein binding at single-molecule resolution and refines concepts of transcriptional pausing. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. High-efficiency targeted editing of large viral genomes by RNA-guided nucleases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanwei Bi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A facile and efficient method for the precise editing of large viral genomes is required for the selection of attenuated vaccine strains and the construction of gene therapy vectors. The type II prokaryotic CRISPR-Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR-associated (Cas RNA-guided nuclease system can be introduced into host cells during viral replication. The CRISPR-Cas9 system robustly stimulates targeted double-stranded breaks in the genomes of DNA viruses, where the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ and homology-directed repair (HDR pathways can be exploited to introduce site-specific indels or insert heterologous genes with high frequency. Furthermore, CRISPR-Cas9 can specifically inhibit the replication of the original virus, thereby significantly increasing the abundance of the recombinant virus among progeny virus. As a result, purified recombinant virus can be obtained with only a single round of selection. In this study, we used recombinant adenovirus and type I herpes simplex virus as examples to demonstrate that the CRISPR-Cas9 system is a valuable tool for editing the genomes of large DNA viruses.

  11. MirPlex: a tool for identifying miRNAs in high-throughput sRNA datasets without a genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapleson, Daniel; Moxon, Simon; Dalmay, Tamas; Moulton, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small non-coding RNA (sRNA) involved in gene regulation through mRNA decay and translational repression. In animals, miRNAs have crucial regulatory functions during embryonic development and they have also been implicated in several diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative disorders. As such, it is of importance to successfully characterize new miRNAs in order to further study their function. Recent advances in sequencing technologies have made it possible to capture a high-resolution snapshot of the complete sRNA content of an organism or tissue. A common approach to miRNA detection involves searching such data for telltale miRNA signatures. However, current miRNA prediction tools usually require a sequenced genome to analyse regions flanking aligned sRNA reads in order to identify characteristic miRNA hairpin secondary structures. Since only a handful of published genomes are available, there is a need for novel methods to identify miRNAs in sRNA datasets from high-throughput sequencing devices without requiring a reference genome. This paper presents miRPlex, a tool for miRNA prediction that requires only sRNA datasets as input. Mature miRNAs are predicted from such datasets through a multi-stage process, involving filtering, miRNA:miRNA* duplex generation and duplex classification using a support vector machine. Tests on sRNA datasets from model animals demonstrate that the tool is effective at predicting genuine miRNA duplexes, and, for some sets, achieves a high degree of precision when considering only the mature sequence. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. The performance characteristics of lateral flow devices with 2 strains of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lateral flow devices (LFD) are commercially available and provide a fast, highly specific, on-site test for avian influenza. Because of the low analytic sensitivity of LFD tests at low virus concentrations, targeted sampling of sick and dead birds has been proposed in order to increase detection pr...

  13. Invasive pathogen threatens bird-pine mutualism: Implications for sustaining a high-elevation ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawn T. McKinney; Carl E. Fiedler; Diana F. Tomback

    2009-01-01

    Human-caused disruptions to seed-dispersal mutualisms increase the extinction risk for both plant and animal species. Large-seeded plants can be particularly vulnerable due to highly specialized dispersal systems and no compensatory regeneration mechanisms. Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis), a keystone subalpine species, obligately depends upon the Clark's...

  14. Comparison of Illumina de novo assembled and Sanger sequenced viral genomes: A case study for RNA viruses recovered from the plant pathogenic fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalifa, Mahmoud E; Varsani, Arvind; Ganley, Austen R D; Pearson, Michael N

    2016-07-02

    The advent of 'next generation sequencing' (NGS) technologies has led to the discovery of many novel mycoviruses, the majority of which are sufficiently different from previously sequenced viruses that there is no appropriate reference sequence on which to base the sequence assembly. Although many new genome sequences are generated by NGS, confirmation of the sequence by Sanger sequencing is still essential for formal classification by the International Committee for the Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV), although this is currently under review. To empirically test the validity of de novo assembled mycovirus genomes from dsRNA extracts, we compared the results from Illumina sequencing with those from random cloning plus targeted PCR coupled with Sanger sequencing for viruses from five Sclerotinia sclerotiorum isolates. Through Sanger sequencing we detected nine viral genomes while through Illumina sequencing we detected the same nine viruses plus one additional virus from the same samples. Critically, the Illumina derived sequences share >99.3 % identity to those obtained by cloning and Sanger sequencing. Although, there is scope for errors in de novo assembled viral genomes, our results demonstrate that by maximising the proportion of viral sequence in the data and using sufficiently rigorous quality controls, it is possible to generate de novo genome sequences of comparable accuracy from Illumina sequencing to those obtained by Sanger sequencing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. High SINE RNA Expression Correlates with Post-Transcriptional Downregulation of BRCA1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Bosco

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Short Interspersed Nuclear Elements (SINEs are non-autonomous retrotransposons that comprise a large fraction of the human genome. SINEs are demethylated in human disease, but whether SINEs become transcriptionally induced and how the resulting transcripts may affect the expression of protein coding genes is unknown. Here, we show that downregulation of the mRNA of the tumor suppressor gene BRCA1 is associated with increased transcription of SINEs and production of sense and antisense SINE small RNAs. We find that BRCA1 mRNA is post-transcriptionally down-regulated in a Dicer and Drosha dependent manner and that expression of a SINE inverted repeat with sequence identity to a BRCA1 intron is sufficient for downregulation of BRCA1 mRNA. These observations suggest that transcriptional activation of SINEs could contribute to a novel mechanism of RNA mediated post-transcriptional silencing of human genes.

  16. Investigation of RNA Structure by High-Throughput SHAPE-Based Probing Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Line Dahl

    of highthroughput SHAPE-based approaches to investigate RNA structure based on novel SHAPE reagents that permit selection of full-length cDNAs. The SHAPE Selection (SHAPES) method is applied to the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) plus strand RNA genome, and the data is used to construct a genome-wide structural...... map of the virus. I have used the data to discover stable structures de novo, including previously characterized structural elements, such as the internal ribosome entry site (IRES), and I show that three of the novel structures have been conserved through evolution, indicating...... that they are functional. The SHAPES method is further applied to the hepatitis C virus (HCV), where the data is used to refine known and predicted structures. Over the past years, the interest of studying RNA structure in their native environment has been increased, and to allow studying RNA structure inside living cells...

  17. Using High-Powered Laser, Scientists Record Images of Chemical Interactions in RNA | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    A recent study at the Department of Energy’s Stanford Linear Accelerator Center National Accelerator Laboratory has literally shed new light on the structural interactions between RNA and another biomolecule.

  18. Formation of telomeric repeat-containing RNA (TERRA) foci in highly proliferating mouse cerebellar neuronal progenitors and medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zhong; Wang, Zhuo; Xiang, Chaomei; Molczan, Aliah; Baubet, Valérie; Conejo-Garcia, Jose; Xu, Xiaowei; Lieberman, Paul M; Dahmane, Nadia

    2012-09-15

    Telomeres play crucial roles in the maintenance of genome integrity and control of cellular senescence. Most eukaryotic telomeres can be transcribed to generate a telomeric repeat-containing RNA (TERRA) that persists as a heterogeneous nuclear RNA and can be developmentally regulated. However, the precise function and regulation of TERRA in normal and cancer cell development remains poorly understood. Here, we show that TERRA accumulates in highly proliferating normal and cancer cells, and forms large nuclear foci, which are distinct from previously characterized markers of DNA damage or replication stress. Using a mouse model for medulloblastoma driven by chronic Sonic hedgehog (SHH) signaling, TERRA RNA was detected in tumor, but not adjacent normal cells using both RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and northern blotting. RNA FISH revealed the formation of TERRA foci (TERFs) in the nuclear regions of rapidly proliferating tumor cells. In the normal developing cerebellum, TERRA aggregates could also be detected in highly proliferating zones of progenitor neurons. SHH could enhance TERRA expression in purified granule progenitor cells in vitro, suggesting that proliferation signals contribute to TERRA expression in responsive tissue. TERRA foci did not colocalize with γH2AX foci, promyelocytic leukemia (PML) or Cajal bodies in mouse tumor tissue. We also provide evidence that TERRA is elevated in a variety of human cancers. These findings suggest that elevated TERRA levels reflect a novel early form of telomere regulation during replication stress and cancer cell evolution, and the TERRA RNA aggregates may form a novel nuclear body in highly proliferating mammalian cells.

  19. From Glacier to Sauna: RNA-Seq of the Human Pathogen Black Fungus Exophiala dermatitidis under Varying Temperature Conditions Exhibits Common and Novel Fungal Response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Blasi

    Full Text Available Exophiala dermatitidis (Wangiella dermatitidis belongs to the group of the so-called black yeasts. Thanks in part to its thick and strongly melanized cell walls, E. dermatitidis is extremely tolerant to various kinds of stress, including extreme pH, temperature and desiccation. E. dermatitidis is also the agent responsible for various severe illnesses in humans, such as pneumonia and keratitis, and might lead to fatal brain infections. Due to its association with the human environment, its poly-extremophilic lifestyle and its pathogenicity in humans, E. dermatitidis has become an important model organism. In this study we present the functional analysis of the transcriptional response of the fungus at 1°C and 45°C, in comparison with that at 37°C, for two different exposition times, i.e. 1 hour and 1 week. At 1°C, E. dermatitidis uses a large repertoire of tools to acclimatize, such as lipid membrane fluidization, trehalose production or cytoskeleton rearrangement, which allows the fungus to remain metabolically active. At 45°C, the fungus drifts into a replicative state and increases the activity of the Golgi apparatus. As a novel finding, our study provides evidence that, apart from the protein coding genes, non-coding RNAs, circular RNAs as well as fusion-transcripts are differentially regulated and that the function of the fusion-transcripts can be related to the corresponding temperature condition. This work establishes that E. dermatitidis adapts to its environment by modulating coding and non-coding gene transcription levels and through the regulation of chimeric and circular RNAs.

  20. A Method for Extracting High-Quality RNA from Diverse Plants for Next-Generation Sequencing and Gene Expression Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxana Yockteng

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: To study gene expression in plants, high-quality RNA must be extracted in quantities sufficient for subsequent cDNA library construction. Field-based collections are often limited in quantity and quality of tissue and are typically preserved in RNAlater. Obtaining sufficient and high-quality yield from variously preserved samples is essential to studies of comparative biology. We present a protocol for the extraction of high-quality RNA from even the most recalcitrant plant tissues. Methods and Results: Tissues from mosses, cycads, and angiosperm floral organs and leaves were preserved in RNAlater or frozen fresh at −80°C. Extractions were performed and quality was measured for yield and purity. Conclusions: This protocol results in the extraction of high-quality RNA from a variety of plant tissues representing vascular and nonvascular plants. RNA was used for cDNA synthesis to generate libraries for next-generation sequencing and for expression studies using quantitative PCR (qPCR and semiquantitative reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR.

  1. Neuroinvasion of the Highly Pathogenic Influenza Virus H7N1 Is Caused by Disruption of the Blood Brain Barrier in an Avian Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Aida J.; Vergara-Alert, Júlia; Busquets, Núria; Valle, Rosa; Rivas, Raquel; Ramis, Antonio; Darji, Ayub; Majó, Natàlia

    2014-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) causes central nervous system (CNS) lesions in avian and mammalian species, including humans. However, the mechanism used by IAV to invade the brain has not been determined. In the current work, we used chickens infected with a highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus as a model to elucidate the mechanism of entry of IAV into the brain. The permeability of the BBB was evaluated in fifteen-day-old H7N1-infected and non-infected chickens using three different methods: (i) detecting Evans blue (EB) extravasation into the brain, (ii) determining the leakage of the serum protein immunoglobulin Y (IgY) into the brain and (iii) assessing the stability of the tight-junction (TJ) proteins zonula occludens-1 and claudin-1 in the chicken brain at 6, 12, 18, 24, 36 and 48 hours post-inoculation (hpi). The onset of the induced viremia was evaluated by quantitative real time RT-PCR (RT-qPCR) at the same time points. Viral RNA was detected from 18 hpi onward in blood samples, whereas IAV antigen was detected at 24 hpi in brain tissue samples. EB and IgY extravasation and loss of integrity of the TJs associated with the presence of viral antigen was first observed at 36 and 48 hpi in the telencephalic pallium and cerebellum. Our data suggest that the mechanism of entry of the H7N1 HPAI into the brain includes infection of the endothelial cells at early stages (24 hpi) with subsequent disruption of the TJs of the BBB and leakage of virus and serum proteins into the adjacent neuroparenchyma. PMID:25506836

  2. Advanced high-power pulsed light device to decontaminate food from pathogens: effects on Salmonella typhimurium viability in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luksiene, Z; Gudelis, V; Buchovec, I; Raudeliuniene, J

    2007-11-01

    The aim of this study was to construct an advanced high-power pulsed light device for decontamination of food matrix and to evaluate its antibacterial efficiency. Key parameters of constructed device-emitted light spectrum, pulse duration, pulse power density, frequency of pulses, dependence of emitted spectrum on input voltage, irradiation homogenicity, possible thermal effects as well as antimicrobial efficiency were evaluated. Antimicrobial efficiency of high-power pulsed light technique was demonstrated and evaluated by two independent methods - spread plate and Miles-Misra method. Viability of Salmonella typhimurium as function of a given light dose (number of pulses) and pulse frequency was examined. According to the data obtained, viability of Salmonella typhimurium reduced by 7 log order after 100 light pulses with power density 133 W cm(-2). In addition, data indicate, that the pulse frequency did not influence the outcome of pathogen inactivation in the region 1-5 Hz. Moreover, no hyperthermic effect was detected during irradiation even after 500 pulses on all shelves with different distance from light source and subsequently different pulse power density (0-252 W cm(-2)). Newly constructed high-power pulsed light technique is effective nonthermal tool for inactivation of Salmonella typhimurium even by 7 log order in vitro. Novel advanced high-power pulsed light device can be a useful tool for development of nonthermal food decontamination technologies.

  3. Whole genome transcriptomics reveals global effects including up-regulation of Francisella pathogenicity island gene expression during active stringent response in the highly virulent Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis SCHU S4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murch, Amber L; Skipp, Paul J; Roach, Peter L; Oyston, Petra C F

    2017-11-01

    During conditions of nutrient limitation bacteria undergo a series of global gene expression changes to survive conditions of amino acid and fatty acid starvation. Rapid reallocation of cellular resources is brought about by gene expression changes coordinated by the signalling nucleotides' guanosine tetraphosphate or pentaphosphate, collectively termed (p)ppGpp and is known as the stringent response. The stringent response has been implicated in bacterial virulence, with elevated (p)ppGpp levels being associated with increased virulence gene expression. This has been observed in the highly pathogenic Francisella tularensis sub spp. tularensis SCHU S4, the causative agent of tularaemia. Here, we aimed to artificially induce the stringent response by culturing F. tularensis in the presence of the amino acid analogue l-serine hydroxamate. Serine hydroxamate competitively inhibits tRNAser aminoacylation, causing an accumulation of uncharged tRNA. The uncharged tRNA enters the A site on the translating bacterial ribosome and causes ribosome stalling, in turn stimulating the production of (p)ppGpp and activation of the stringent response. Using the essential virulence gene iglC, which is encoded on the Francisella pathogenicity island (FPI) as a marker of active stringent response, we optimized the culture conditions required for the investigation of virulence gene expression under conditions of nutrient limitation. We subsequently used whole genome RNA-seq to show how F. tularensis alters gene expression on a global scale during active stringent response. Key findings included up-regulation of genes involved in virulence, stress responses and metabolism, and down-regulation of genes involved in metabolite transport and cell division. F. tularensis is a highly virulent intracellular pathogen capable of causing debilitating or fatal disease at extremely low infectious doses. However, virulence mechanisms are still poorly understood. The stringent response is widely

  4. Rapid Generation of miRNA Inhibitor Leads by Bioinformatics and Efficient High-Throughput Screening Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haga, Christopher L; Velagapudi, Sai Pradeep; Childs-Disney, Jessica L; Strivelli, Jacqueline; Disney, Matthew D; Phinney, Donald G

    2017-01-01

    The discovery of microRNAs (miRNAs) has opened an entire new avenue for drug development. These short (15-22 nucleotides) noncoding RNAs, which function in RNA silencing and posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression, have been shown to critically affect numerous pathways in both development and disease progression. Current miRNA drug development focuses on either reintroducing the miRNA into cells through the use of a miRNA mimic or inhibiting its function via use of a synthetic antagomir. Although these methods have shown some success as therapeutics, they face challenges particularly with regard to cellular uptake and for use as systemic reagents. We recently presented a novel mechanism of inhibiting miR-544 by directed inhibition of miRNA biogenesis. We found that inhibition of DICER processing of miR-544 through the use of a small molecule abolished miR-544 function in regulating adaptation of breast cancer cells to hypoxic stress. Herein, we describe a protocol that utilizes bioinformatics to first identify lead small molecules that bind to DICER cleavage sites in pre-miRNAs and then employ an efficient, high-throughput fluorescent-based screening system to determine the inhibitory potential of the lead compounds and their derivatives.

  5. An expost economic assessment of the intervention against highly pathogenic avian influenza in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamadou L. Fadiga

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This study assesses the intervention against avian influenza in Nigeria. It applied a simple compartmental model to define endemic and burn-out scenarios for the risk of spread of HPAI in Nigeria. It followed with the derivation of low and high mortality risks associated to each scenario. The estimated risk parameters were subsequently used to stochastically simulate the trajectory of the disease, had no intervention been carried out. Overall, the intervention costs US$ 41 million, which was yearly dis- bursed in various amounts over the 2006-2010 period. The key output variables (incremental net benefit, disease cost, and benefit cost ratio were estimated for each randomly drawn risk parameter. With a 12% annual discount rate, the results show that the intervention was economically justified under the endemic scenario with high mortality risk. On average, incremental benefit under this scenario amounted to US$ 63.7 million, incremental net benefit to US$27.2 million, and benefit cost ratio estimated to 1.75.

  6. Short Communication An efficient method for simultaneous extraction of high-quality RNA and DNA from various plant tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, R R; Viana, A J C; Reátegui, A C E; Vincentz, M G A

    2015-12-29

    Determination of gene expression is an important tool to study biological processes and relies on the quality of the extracted RNA. Changes in gene expression profiles may be directly related to mutations in regulatory DNA sequences or alterations in DNA cytosine methylation, which is an epigenetic mark. Correlation of gene expression with DNA sequence or epigenetic mark polymorphism is often desirable; for this, a robust protocol to isolate high-quality RNA and DNA simultaneously from the same sample is required. Although commercial kits and protocols are available, they are mainly optimized for animal tissues and, in general, restricted to RNA or DNA extraction, not both. In the present study, we describe an efficient and accessible method to extract both RNA and DNA simultaneously from the same sample of various plant tissues, using small amounts of starting material. The protocol was efficient in the extraction of high-quality nucleic acids from several Arabidopsis thaliana tissues (e.g., leaf, inflorescence stem, flower, fruit, cotyledon, seedlings, root, and embryo) and from other tissues of non-model plants, such as Avicennia schaueriana (Acanthaceae), Theobroma cacao (Malvaceae), Paspalum notatum (Poaceae), and Sorghum bicolor (Poaceae). The obtained nucleic acids were used as templates for downstream analyses, such as mRNA sequencing, quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction, bisulfite treatment, and others; the results were comparable to those obtained with commercial kits. We believe that this protocol could be applied to a broad range of plant species, help avoid technical and sampling biases, and facilitate several RNA- and DNA-dependent analyses.

  7. MicroRNA from Moringa oleifera: Identification by High Throughput Sequencing and Their Potential Contribution to Plant Medicinal Value.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Pirrò

    Full Text Available Moringa oleifera is a widespread plant with substantial nutritional and medicinal value. We postulated that microRNAs (miRNAs, which are endogenous, noncoding small RNAs regulating gene expression at the post-transcriptional level, might contribute to the medicinal properties of plants of this species after ingestion into human body, regulating human gene expression. However, the knowledge is scarce about miRNA in Moringa. Furthermore, in order to test the hypothesis on the pharmacological potential properties of miRNA, we conducted a high-throughput sequencing analysis using the Illumina platform. A total of 31,290,964 raw reads were produced from a library of small RNA isolated from M. oleifera seeds. We identified 94 conserved and two novel miRNAs that were validated by qRT-PCR assays. Results from qRT-PCR trials conducted on the expression of 20 Moringa miRNA showed that are conserved across multiple plant species as determined by their detection in tissue of other common crop plants. In silico analyses predicted target genes for the conserved miRNA that in turn allowed to relate the miRNAs to the regulation of physiological processes. Some of the predicted plant miRNAs have functional homology to their mammalian counterparts and regulated human genes when they were transfected into cell lines. To our knowledge, this is the first report of discovering M. oleifera miRNAs based on high-throughput sequencing and bioinformatics analysis and we provided new insight into a potential cross-species control of human gene expression. The widespread cultivation and consumption of M. oleifera, for nutritional and medicinal purposes, brings humans into close contact with products and extracts of this plant species. The potential for miRNA transfer should be evaluated as one possible mechanism of action to account for beneficial properties of this valuable species.

  8. MicroRNA from Moringa oleifera: Identification by High Throughput Sequencing and Their Potential Contribution to Plant Medicinal Value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirrò, Stefano; Zanella, Letizia; Kenzo, Maurice; Montesano, Carla; Minutolo, Antonella; Potestà, Marina; Sobze, Martin Sanou; Canini, Antonella; Cirilli, Marco; Muleo, Rosario; Colizzi, Vittorio; Galgani, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Moringa oleifera is a widespread plant with substantial nutritional and medicinal value. We postulated that microRNAs (miRNAs), which are endogenous, noncoding small RNAs regulating gene expression at the post-transcriptional level, might contribute to the medicinal properties of plants of this species after ingestion into human body, regulating human gene expression. However, the knowledge is scarce about miRNA in Moringa. Furthermore, in order to test the hypothesis on the pharmacological potential properties of miRNA, we conducted a high-throughput sequencing analysis using the Illumina platform. A total of 31,290,964 raw reads were produced from a library of small RNA isolated from M. oleifera seeds. We identified 94 conserved and two novel miRNAs that were validated by qRT-PCR assays. Results from qRT-PCR trials conducted on the expression of 20 Moringa miRNA showed that are conserved across multiple plant species as determined by their detection in tissue of other common crop plants. In silico analyses predicted target genes for the conserved miRNA that in turn allowed to relate the miRNAs to the regulation of physiological processes. Some of the predicted plant miRNAs have functional homology to their mammalian counterparts and regulated human genes when they were transfected into cell lines. To our knowledge, this is the first report of discovering M. oleifera miRNAs based on high-throughput sequencing and bioinformatics analysis and we provided new insight into a potential cross-species control of human gene expression. The widespread cultivation and consumption of M. oleifera, for nutritional and medicinal purposes, brings humans into close contact with products and extracts of this plant species. The potential for miRNA transfer should be evaluated as one possible mechanism of action to account for beneficial properties of this valuable species.