WorldWideScience

Sample records for highly ionized potassium

  1. Development of a Compact Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometer for Trace Element Analysis of Potassium

    CERN Document Server

    Iwata, Yoshihiro; Minowa, Makoto

    2010-01-01

    A compact resonance ionization mass spectrometer is developed using two laser diodes and a quadrupole mass spectrometer to perform trace element analysis of potassium. With the help of a narrow linewidth of the laser diode, the isotope shifts of $^{40}{\\rm K}$ and $^{41}{\\rm K}$ of the 405~nm line with respect to $^{39}{\\rm K}$, corresponding to the transition of $4\\,^2$S$_{1/2}\\rightarrow$ $5\\,^2$P$^\\circ_{1/2}$, are measured to be $207\\pm13$~MHz and $451\\pm10$~MHz, respectively, by comparing them to the known hyperfine splitting widths of the $4\\,^2{\\rm S}_{1/2}$ ground state of each potassium isotope. The overall detection efficiency of an order of $\\sim10^{-6}$ in our setup indicates the availability of RIMS to the analysis of the trace metal impurities on or in a certain material such as the contamination assessment of semiconductor wafers.

  2. Potassium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and blackberries Root vegetables, such as carrots and potatoes Citrus fruits, such as oranges and grapefruit Your kidneys help to keep the right amount of potassium in your body. If you have chronic kidney disease, your kidneys may not remove extra potassium from ...

  3. High order fluid model for ionization fronts in streamer discharges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Markosyan (Aram); S. Dujko (Sasa); W. Hundsdorfer (Willem); U. Ebert (Ute)

    2011-01-01

    htmlabstractWhen non-ionized or lowly ionized matter is exposed to high electric fields, non-equilibrium ionization processes, streamer discharges, can develop. Streamers occur in nature and as well in many industrial applications such as the treatment of exhaust gasses, polluted water or biogas. A

  4. High-Resolution Spectroscopic Observations of Potassium Emissions in the Lunar Exosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Sarena D.; Oliversen, Ronald J.; Mierkiewicz, Edwin J.; Kuruppuaratchi, Dona Chathuni P.; Derr, Nicholas James; Gallant, Margaret A.; McFarland, Christina G.; Sarantos, Menelaos

    2018-01-01

    We investigate lunar exospheric potassium D1 emissions (7698.9646 Å) using high-resolution (R = 180,000 or 1.7 km/s) spectroscopy with our dual-etalon Fabry-Perot instrument to measure line widths and radial velocities. The Field of View (FOV) is 2 arcmins (~224 km at the mean lunar distance of 384,400 km) positioned tangent to the sunlit limb. The FOV placements are at cardinal directions from a variety of reference craters. All observations are collected at the National Solar Observatory McMath-Pierce Telescope in Kitt Peak, Arizona. The data are from several observations from 2014 through 2017 at various times of the year. Results are produced via a newly created automated data reduction using Python. Python was chosen as an open-source alternative to the previously used IDL and MATLAB scripts to decrease the cost of software licenses and maintenance. The potassium spectral line profiles provide a direct method to track exospheric effective temperatures and velocities. By monitoring the state of the potassium emissions over different lunar phases, solar activity, and the influx of meteor streams, we can constrain physical processes of sources and sinks at the lunar surface. Mechanisms that create the exosphere include photon-stimulated desorption, thermal evaporation, meteoroid impact vaporization, and ion sputtering via solar wind. In contrast, the exosphere is diminished due to the low lunar escape velocity, solar radiation pressure, and neutral gas being ionized and swept away by the interplanetary and terrestrial magnetic field. Preliminary analysis of 2017 data (January through June, excluding February) indicates an average potassium temperature of 1140 K but varying over the range of 550 K to 2000 K. Preliminary results from 2014 data depict a similar range of temperatures to that of 2017. Further analysis is expected for additional data from 2014 to later observations in 2017 that were not included in the initial set of models.

  5. Ionizing wave via high-power HF acceleration

    OpenAIRE

    Mishin, Evgeny; Pedersen, Todd

    2010-01-01

    Recent ionospheric modification experiments with the 3.6 MW transmitter at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility in Alaska led to discovery of artificial ionization descending from the nominal interaction altitude in the background F-region ionosphere by ~60 km. This paper presents a physical model of an ionizing wavefront created by suprathermal electrons accelerated by the HF-excited plasma turbulence.

  6. Highly accelerated lifetime testing of potassium sodium niobate thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wanlin; Akkopru-Akgun, Betul; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan

    2017-11-01

    Highly accelerated lifetime tests of 2 and 3 μm thick potassium sodium niobate [(K0.5, Na0.5)NbO3, KNN] films with different thicknesses were measured under electric fields ranging from 160 to 350 kV/cm and temperatures ranging from 90 to 210 °C. The medium time to failure (t50) was determined from a lognormal distribution plot of failure times of up to 22 electrodes per measurement condition. The activation energy (Ea) for failure was 0.74 ± 0.04 eV and 0.92 ± 0.05 eV for the 2 μm and 3 μm KNN films, respectively. The voltage acceleration factor was 3.5 ± 0.34 for the 3 μm film. But the electric field dependence of t50 for the 2 μm film showed two regions with similar N, 6.67 and 6.94 ± 0.23, respectively. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy was employed to investigate the Na+ and K+ ion distributions in KNN films.

  7. Swelling properties of cassava starch grafted with poly (potassium acrylate-co-acrylamide) superabsorbent hydrogel prepared by ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barleany, Dhena Ria; Ulfiyani, Fida; Istiqomah, Shafina; Heriyanto, Heri; Rahmayetty, Erizal

    2015-12-01

    Natural and synthetic hydrophylic polymers can be phisically or chemically cross-linked in order to produce hydrogels. Starch based hydrogels grafted with copolymers from acrylic acid or acrylamide have become very popular for water absorbent application. Superabsorbent hydrogels made from Cassava starch grafted with poly (potassium acrylate-co-acrylamide) were prepared by using of ϒ-irradiation method. Various important parameters such as irradiation doses, monomer to Cassava starch ratio and acrylamide content were investigated. The addition of 7,5 % w w-1 acrylamide into the reaction mixture generated a starch graft copolymer with a water absorption in distilled water as high as 460 g g-1 of its dried weight. The effectivity of hydrogel as superabsorbent for aqueous solutions of NaCl and urea was evaluated. The obtained hydrogel showed the maximum absorptions of 317 g g-1 and 523 g g-1 for NaCl and urea solution, respectively (relative to its own dry weight). The structure of the graft copolymer was analyzed by using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM).

  8. Swelling properties of cassava starch grafted with poly (potassium acrylate-co-acrylamide) superabsorbent hydrogel prepared by ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barleany, Dhena Ria, E-mail: dbarleany@yahoo.com; Ulfiyani, Fida; Istiqomah, Shafina; Rahmayetty [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Sultan Ageng Tirtayasa, Cilegon, Banten (Indonesia); Heriyanto, Heri; Erizal [Centre for Application of Isotopes and Radiation, Jakarta (Indonesia)

    2015-12-29

    Natural and synthetic hydrophylic polymers can be phisically or chemically cross-linked in order to produce hydrogels. Starch based hydrogels grafted with copolymers from acrylic acid or acrylamide have become very popular for water absorbent application. Superabsorbent hydrogels made from Cassava starch grafted with poly (potassium acrylate-co-acrylamide) were prepared by using of ϒ-irradiation method. Various important parameters such as irradiation doses, monomer to Cassava starch ratio and acrylamide content were investigated. The addition of 7,5 % w w{sup −1} acrylamide into the reaction mixture generated a starch graft copolymer with a water absorption in distilled water as high as 460 g g{sup −1} of its dried weight. The effectivity of hydrogel as superabsorbent for aqueous solutions of NaCl and urea was evaluated. The obtained hydrogel showed the maximum absorptions of 317 g g{sup −1} and 523 g g{sup −1} for NaCl and urea solution, respectively (relative to its own dry weight). The structure of the graft copolymer was analyzed by using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM)

  9. Electron impact ionization of highly charged lithiumlike ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, K L

    1992-10-01

    Electron impact ionization cross sections can provide valuable information about the charge-state and power balance of highly charged ions in laboratory and astrophysical plasmas. In the present work, a novel technique based on x-ray measurements has been used to infer the ionization cross section of highly charged lithiumlike ions on the Livermore electron beam ion trap. In particular, a correspondence is established between an observed x ray and an ionization event. The measurements are made at one energy corresponding to approximately 2.3 times the threshold energy for ionization of lithiumlike ions. The technique is applied to the transition metals between Z=22 (titanium, Ti[sup 19+]) and Z=26 (iron, Fe[sup 23+]) and to Z=56 (barium, Ba[sup 53+]). The results for the transition metals, which have an estimated 17-33% uncertainty, are in good overall agreement with a relativistic distorted-wave calculation. However, less good agreement is found for barium, which has a larger uncertainty. Methods for properly accounting for the polarization in the x-ray intensities and for inferring the charge-state abundances from x-ray observations, which were developed for the ionization measurements, as well as an x-ray model that assists in the proper interpretation of the data are also presented.

  10. The Formation and Physical Origin of Highly Ionized Cooling Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordoloi, Rongmon; Wagner, Alexander Y.; Heckman, Timothy M.; Norman, Colin A.

    2017-10-01

    We present a simple model that explains the origin of warm, diffuse gas seen primarily as highly ionized absorption-line systems in the spectra of background sources. We predict the observed column densities of several highly ionized transitions such as O vi, O vii, Ne viii, N v, and Mg x, and we present a unified comparison of the model predictions with absorption lines seen in the Milky Way disk, Milky Way halo, starburst galaxies, the circumgalactic medium, and the intergalactic medium at low and high redshifts. We show that diffuse gas seen in such diverse environments can be simultaneously explained by a simple model of radiatively cooling gas. We show that most such absorption-line systems are consistent with being collisionally ionized, and we estimate the maximum-likelihood temperature of the gas in each observation. This model satisfactorily explains why O vi is regularly observed around star-forming low-z L* galaxies, and why N v is rarely seen around the same galaxies. We further present some consequences of this model in quantifying the dynamics of the cooling gas around galaxies and predict the shock velocities associated with such flows. A unique strength of this model is that while it has only one free (but physically well-constrained) parameter, it nevertheless successfully reproduces the available data on O vi absorbers in the interstellar, circumgalactic, intragroup, and intergalactic media, as well as the available data on other absorption lines from highly ionized species.

  11. 'And then there were three': highly efficient uptake of potassium by foliar trichomes of epiphytic bromeliads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Uwe; Zotz, Gerhard

    2010-09-01

    Vascular epiphytes have to acquire nutrients from atmospheric wash out, stem-flow, canopy soils and trapped litter. Physiological studies on the adaptations to nutrient acquisition and plant utilization of nutrients have focused on phosphorus and nitrogen; potassium, as a third highly abundant nutrient element, has received minor attention. In the present study, potassium uptake kinetics by leaves, within-plant distribution and nutrient accumulation were analysed to gain an improved understanding of physiological adaptations to non-terrestrial nutrient supply of plants. Radioactively labelled (86)RbCl was used as an analogue to study uptake kinetics of potassium absorbed from tanks of epiphytes, its plant distribution and the correlation between uptake efficiency and abundance of trichomes, functioning as uptake organs of leaves. Potassium in leaves was additionally analysed by atomic absorption spectroscopy to assess plant responses to potassium deficiency. Labelled rubidium was taken up from tanks over a wide range of concentrations, 0.01-90 mm, which was achieved by two uptake systems. In four tank epiphytes, the high-affinity transporters had average K(m) values of 41.2 microm, and the low-affinity transporters average K(m) values of 44.8 mm. Further analysis in Vriesea splenriet showed that high-affinity uptake of rubidium was an ATP-dependent process, while low-affinity uptake was mediated by a K(+)-channel. The kinetic properties of both types of transporters are comparable with those of potassium transporters in roots of terrestrial plants. Specific differences in uptake velocities of epiphytes are correlated with the abundance of trichomes on their leaf surfaces. The main sinks for potassium were fully grown leaves. These leaves thus function as internal potassium sources, which allow growth to be maintained during periods of low external potassium availability. Vascular epiphytes possess effective mechanisms to take up potassium from both highly diluted

  12. High structural complexity of potassium uranyl borates derived from high-temperature/high-pressure reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shijun; Wang, Shuao; Polinski, Matthew; Beermann, Oliver; Kegler, Philip; Malcherek, Thomas; Holzheid, Astrid; Depmeier, Wulf; Bosbach, Dirk; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E; Alekseev, Evgeny V

    2013-05-06

    Three new potassium uranyl borates, K12[(UO2)19(UO4)(B2O5)2(BO3)6(BO2OH)O10] ·nH2O (TPKBUO-1), K4[(UO2)5(BO3)2O4]·H2O (TPKBUO-2), and K15[(UO2)18(BO3)7O15] (TPKBUO-3), were synthesized under high-temperature/high-pressure conditions. In all three compounds, the U/B ratio exceeds 1. Boron exhibits BO3 coordination only, which is different from other uranyl borates prepared at room temperature or under mild hydrothermal conditions. A rare uranium(VI) tetraoxide core UO4O2, which is coordinated by two BO3 groups, is observed in the structure of TPKBUO-1. Both structures of TPKBUO-1 and TPKBUO-3 contain three different coordination environments of uranium, namely, UO4O2, UO2O4, and UO2O5 and UO2O4, UO2O5, and UO2O6 bipyramids in TPKBUO-1 and TPKBUO-3, respectively.

  13. High Resolution-Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy on uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakimi, Amin, E-mail: hakimi@uni-mainz.de; Fischbach, Thomas [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Physik (Germany); Raeder, Sebastian [TRIUMF (Canada); Trautmann, Norbert [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Kernchemie (Germany); Wendt, Klaus [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Physik (Germany)

    2013-04-15

    High Resolution-Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (HR-RIS) allows for sensitive probing of atomic structures and energy level schemes even for highly complex systems. This work explores the applicability of commercial diode lasers for isotope selective spectroscopy of uranium. Using narrow bandwidth continuous-wave (cw) diode lasers, multi step excitation processes were investigated involving levels which could be populated with the radiation of 405 nm BluRay{sup Copyright-Sign} laser diodes as a first step for ultra trace analysis of uranium.

  14. High-Speed Tandem Mass Spectrometric in Situ Imaging by Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanekoff, Ingela T.; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Thomas, Mathew; Short, Joshua TL; Carson, James P.; Cha, Jeeyeon; Dey, Sudhansu K.; Yang, Pengxiang; Prieto Conaway, Maria C.; Laskin, Julia

    2013-10-15

    Nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI) combined with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), high-resolution mass analysis (m/m=17,500 at m/z 200), and rapid spectral acquisition enabled simultaneous imaging and identification of more than 300 molecules from 92 selected m/z windows (± 1 Da) with a spatial resolution of better than 150 um. Uterine sections of implantation sites on day 6 of pregnancy were analyzed in the ambient environment without any sample pre-treatment. MS/MS imaging was performed by scanning the sample under the nano-DESI probe at 10 um/s while acquiring higher-energy collision-induced dissociation (HCD) spectra for a targeted inclusion list of 92 m/z values at a rate of ~6.3 spectra/s. Molecular ions and their corresponding fragments, separated using high-resolution mass analysis, were assigned based on accurate mass measurement. Using this approach, we were able to identify and image both abundant and low-abundance isobaric species within each m/z window. MS/MS analysis enabled efficient separation and identification of isobaric sodium and potassium adducts of phospholipids. Furthermore, we identified several metabolites associated with early pregnancy and obtained the first 2D images of these molecules.

  15. Large fluctuations in the high-redshift metagalactic ionizing background

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Aloisio, Anson; McQuinn, Matthew; Davies, Frederick B.; Furlanetto, Steven R.

    2018-01-01

    Recent observations have shown that the scatter in opacities amongst coeval segments of the Ly α forest increases rapidly at z > 5. In this paper, we assess whether the large scatter can be explained by fluctuations in the ionizing background in the post-reionization intergalactic medium. We find that matching the observed scatter at z ≈ 5.5 requires a short spatially averaged mean free path of 〈λmfp912〉 ≲ 15 h- 1 comoving Mpc, a factor of ≳3 shorter than direct measurements at z = 5.2. We argue that such rapid evolution in the mean free path is difficult to reconcile with our measurements of the global H I photoionization rate, which stay approximately constant over the interval z ≈ 4.8-5.5. However, we also show that measurements of the mean free path at z > 5 are likely biased towards higher values by the quasar proximity effect. This bias can reconcile the short values of 〈λmfp912〉 that are required to explain the large scatter in opacities. We discuss the implications of this scenario for cosmological reionization. Finally, we investigate whether other statistics applied to the z > 5 Ly α forest can shed light on the origin of the scatter. Compared to a model with a uniform ionizing background, models that successfully account for the scatter lead to enhanced power in the line-of-sight flux power spectrum on scales k ≲0.1 h Mpc-1. We find tentative evidence for this enhancement in observations of the high-redshift Ly α forest.

  16. Ionization processes in combined high-voltage nanosecond - laser discharges in inert gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starikovskiy, Andrey; Shneider, Mikhail; PU Team

    2016-09-01

    Remote control of plasmas induced by laser radiation in the atmosphere is one of the challenging issues of free space communication, long-distance energy transmission, remote sensing of the atmosphere, and standoff detection of trace gases and bio-threat species. Sequences of laser pulses, as demonstrated by an extensive earlier work, offer an advantageous tool providing access to the control of air-plasma dynamics and optical interactions. The avalanche ionization induced in a pre-ionized region by infrared laser pulses where investigated. Pre-ionization was created by an ionization wave, initiated by high-voltage nanosecond pulse. Then, behind the front of ionization wave extra avalanche ionization was initiated by the focused infrared laser pulse. The experiment was carried out in argon. It is shown that the gas pre-ionization inhibits the laser spark generation under low pressure conditions.

  17. Improved design for high resolution electrospray ionization ion mobility spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, M T

    2009-03-15

    An improved design for high resolution electrospray ionization ion mobility spectrometry (ESI-IMS) was developed by making some salient modifications to the IMS cell and its performance was investigated. To enhance desolvation of electrospray droplets at high sample flow rates in this new design, volume of the desolvation region was decreased by reducing its diameter and the entrance position of the desolvation gas was shifted to the end of the desolvation region (near the ion gate). In addition, the ESI source (both needle and counter electrode) was positioned outside of the heating oven of the IMS. This modification made it possible to use the instrument at higher temperatures, and preventing needle clogging in the electrospray process. The ion mobility spectra of different chemical compounds were obtained. The resolving power and resolution of the instrument were increased by about 15-30% relative to previous design. In this work, the baseline separation of the two adjacent ion peaks of morphine and those of codeine was achieved for the first time with resolutions of 1.5 and 1.3, respectively. These four ion peaks were well separated from each other using carbon dioxide (CO(2)) rather than nitrogen as the drift gas. Finally, the analytical parameters obtained for ethion, metalaxyl, and tributylamine indicated the high performance of the instrument for quantitative analysis.

  18. Does the schock wave in a highly ionized non-isothermal plasma really exist ?

    CERN Document Server

    Rukhadze, A A; Samkharadze, T

    2015-01-01

    Here we study the structure of a highly ionizing shock wave in a gas of high atmospheric pressure. We take into account the gas ionization when the gas temperature reaches few orders of an ionization potential. It is shown that after gasdynamic temperature-raising shock and formation of a highly-ionized nonisothermal plasma $T_e>>T_i$ only the solitary ion-sound wave (soliton) can propagate in this plasma. In such a wave the charge separation occurs: electrons and ions form the double electric layer with the electric field. The shock wave form, its amplitude and front width are obtained.

  19. Does the schock wave in a highly ionized non-isothermal plasma really exist ?

    OpenAIRE

    Rukhadze, A. A.; Sadykova, S.; Samkharadze, T.

    2015-01-01

    Here we study the structure of a highly ionizing shock wave in a gas of high atmospheric pressure. We take into account the gas ionization when the gas temperature reaches few orders of an ionization potential. It is shown that after gasdynamic temperature-raising shock and formation of a highly-ionized nonisothermal plasma $T_e>>T_i$ only the solitary ion-sound wave (soliton) can propagate in this plasma. In such a wave the charge separation occurs: electrons and ions form the double electri...

  20. Does the shock wave in a highly ionized non-isothermal plasma really exist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rukhadze, A. A.; Sadykova, S. P.; Samkharadze, T. G.

    2015-09-01

    Here, we study the structure of a highly ionizing shock wave in a gas of high atmospheric pressure. We take into account the gas ionization when the gas temperature reaches few orders above ionization potential. It is shown that after gasdynamic temperature-raising shock and formation of a highly-ionized nonisothermal collisionless plasma Te≫Ti , only the solitary ion-sound wave (soliton) can propagate in this plasma. In such a wave, the charge separation occurs: electrons and ions form the double electric layer with the electric field. The shock wave form, its amplitude, and front width are derived.

  1. Ionizing potential waves and high-voltage breakdown streamers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albright, N. W.; Tidman, D. A.

    1972-01-01

    The structure of ionizing potential waves driven by a strong electric field in a dense gas is discussed. Negative breakdown waves are found to propagate with a velocity proportional to the electric field normal to the wavefront. This causes a curved ionizing potential wavefront to focus down into a filamentary structure, and may provide the reason why breakdown in dense gases propagates in the form of a narrow leader streamer instead of a broad wavefront.

  2. Influence of atoms with high ionization potentials on a discharge in crossed E and H fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, A.A.; Timchenko, N.N.; Khripunov, B.I.; Shapkin, V.V.

    1980-11-01

    We consider processes connected with the separation of elements in a fully ionized plasma centrifuge with a plasma gun discharge in crossed E and H fields. We analyze the influence of atoms with high ionization potentials on the separation parameters, the value of the transverse ion current, and the separation coefficient. We not the role played by the radial electric field in the gas ionization processes and in the resulting growth of ion acoustic instabilities.

  3. Multi-phase ionization dynamics of carbon thin film irradiated by high power short pulse laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahito, Daiki; Kishimoto, Yasuaki

    2017-10-01

    The ionization dynamics of a carbon thin film irradiated by a high power short pulse laser in the range of 1019-20 W/cm2 are studied using the extended particle-based integrated code (EPIC), which includes atomic and collisional processes. Two types of ionization dynamics exhibiting different spatio-temporal structures are found to predominantly regulate the process, and arise depending on the laser amplitude. The first is a fast convective propagation for charge states up to C4+, which keeps a steep ionization front. The velocity of the front is of the order of the speed of light. The front formation results from the localized longitudinal electrostatic field and associated field ionization, which in turn propagates inside the film. This convective propagation is triggered when the laser field becomes high enough that electron bunches accelerated by the laser ponderomotive force reach relativistic energies and penetrate inside the film across the surface. The second dynamics is a fast non-diffusive propagation of ionization showing a long plasma density scale length for C5+ and C6+. This process results predominantly from electron impact ionization by high energy electron bunches successively produced by the laser. These electron bunches also excite wake fields that propagate inside the film and contribute to ionizing the film to higher charge states, i.e., C5+ and C6+, especially near the front surface. The effect of field ionization loss, which sensitively influences the ionization dynamics in the relatively low laser power regime, is also discussed.

  4. A highly selective, colorimetric, and environment-sensitive optical potassium ion sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Guangjie; Sun, Ruofan; Du, Jiqing; Chen, Meiwan; Tian, Yanqing

    2017-05-18

    Potassium ions (K+) play vital roles in many biological processes and thus highly selective sensors for K+ are critical for disease diagnosis and health monitoring. Herein, we report a colorimetric K+ sensor (KS7) in which a hemicyanine dye was used as a fluorophore and phenylaza-[18]crown-6 lariat ether (ACLE) was utilized as a K+ ligand. The maximum absorption peak of KS7 shifted hypsochromically by 77 nm (from 515 to 438 nm) with an isosbestic point at 452 nm upon the addition of K+ to its aqueous solution accompanied by a color change from red to yellow. This sensor exhibited a linear response range to K+ from 1 to 200 mM, indicating its wide detection range for cellular, urinary, and environmental potassium ions. Further, this sensor is solvent-sensitive, implying its environmental sensitivity. For the demonstration of its applications, we prepared filter paper-based K+ test strips, which were used to detect K+ in urine conveniently.

  5. Electron Impact Ionization of Stored Highly Charged Ions

    CERN Document Server

    Hahn, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Accurate cross section data for electron impact ionization (EII) are needed in order to interpret the spectra of collisionally ionized plasmas both in astrophysics and in the laboratory. Models and spectroscopic diagnostics of such plasmas rely on accurate ionization balance calculations, which depend, in turn, on the underlying rates for EII and electron-ion recombination. EII measurements have been carried out using the TSR storage ring located at the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik in Heidelberg, Germany. Storage ring measurements are largely free of metastable contamination, resulting in unambiguous EII data, unlike what is encountered with other experimental geometries. As it is impractical to perform experiments for every ion, theory must provide the bulk of the necessary EII data. In order to guide theory, TSR experiments have focused on providing at least one measurement for every isoelectronic sequence. EII data have been measured for ions from 13 isoelectronic sequences: Li-like silicon and chlo...

  6. Highly ionized xenon and volumetric weighting in restricted focal geometries

    CERN Document Server

    Strohaber, J; Schuessler, H A

    2015-01-01

    The ionization of xenon atoms subjected to 42fs, 800nm pulses of radiation from a Ti:Sapphire laser was investigated. In our experiments a maximum laser intensity of $\\sim2\\times 10^{15} \\textrm{W}/\\textrm{cm}^2$ was used. Xenon ions were measured using a time-of-flight ion mass spectrometer having an entrance slit with dimensions of $12\\mu \\textrm{m} \\times 400\\mu \\textrm{m}$. The observed yields $\\textrm{Xe}^{n+} (n=1-7)$ were partially free of spatial averaging. The ion yields showed sequential and nonsequential multiple ionization and dip structures following saturation. To investigate the dip structures and to perform a comparison between experimental and simulated data, with the goal of clarifying the effects of residual spatial averaging, we derived a hybrid analytical-numerical solution for the integration kernel in restricted focal geometries. We simulated xenon ionization using Ammosov-Delone-Krainov and Perelomov-Popov-Terent'ev theories and obtained agreement with the results of observations. Sinc...

  7. Influence of partial ionization on the energy loss of fast ions in high- Z material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter, T. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemie, D-6500 Mainz, Germany (DE)); Kaercher, B. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, D-8046 Garching, Germany (DE))

    1991-04-01

    Analytical and simple numerical calculations of the stopping power of partially ionized high-{ital Z} targets are presented. Up to now such calculations are difficult, mainly because of lacking precise average ionization potentials of the target ions. The aim of this paper is both to clarify the importance of a suitable treatment of target ions in different ionization stages and to show by means of general scaling laws and explicit examples, that high-{ital Z} plasmas of high density and low ionization degree may have smaller stopping powers than cold matter. The resulting range lengthening of the projectile ions might be of crucial importance for a proper design of pellets in inertial confinement fusion.

  8. Sodium-potassium balance in the regulation of high blood pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Hernán Zárate Méndez

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The World Health Organization considers essential hypertension as a primary cause of death. Twenty-five percent of the population over 15 has high blood pressure (HBP, equivalent to a billion people. It has been predicted that this group will increase by 60%, lineal with age increase in the overall population. Unfortunately, detection, treatment and effective control of HBP, are deficient both in Chile and in the rest of the world, making it an unresolved health problem demanding urgent attention. The recently conducted Chilean National Health Survey (2009-2010 revealed a 26.9% prevalence of this condition in the population, sixty-five percent of individuals are aware of their condition, 37.6% are in treatment and only 16,49% are effectively controlled. Furthermore, the survey reveals unhealthy life-style markers, which explains the epidemic that besets the country as there are multiple risk factors at stake. This review focuses mainly on the importance of the sodium-potassium relationship in the regulation of high blood pressure. It must be pointed out that all of the studies underscore the importance of sodium in the genesis of hypertension because of its effects of blood pressure, especially in sensitive individuals, while little attention has been given to the manifold beneficial actions of potassium in the regulation of blood pressure.

  9. Development of a highly-sensitive Penning ionization electron spectrometer using the magnetic bottle effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ota, Masahiro; Ishiguro, Yuki; Nakajima, Yutaro; Miyauchi, Naoya; Yamakita, Yoshihiro, E-mail: yamakita@uec.ac.jp [Department of Engineering Science, Graduate School of Informatics and Engineering The University of Electro-Communications 1-5-1 Chofugaoka, Chofu, Tokyo 182-8585 (Japan)

    2016-02-01

    This paper reports on a highly-sensitive retarding-type electron spectrometer for a continuous source of electrons, in which the electron collection efficiency is increased by utilizing the magnetic bottle effect. This study demonstrates an application to Penning ionization electron spectroscopy using collisional ionization with metastable He*(2{sup 3}S) atoms. Technical details and performances of the instrument are presented. This spectrometer can be used for studies of functional molecules and assemblies, and exterior electron densities are expected to be selectively observed by the Penning ionization.

  10. Potassium Secondary Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eftekhari, Ali; Jian, Zelang; Ji, Xiulei

    2017-02-08

    Potassium may exhibit advantages over lithium or sodium as a charge carrier in rechargeable batteries. Analogues of Prussian blue can provide millions of cyclic voltammetric cycles in aqueous electrolyte. Potassium intercalation chemistry has recently been demonstrated compatible with both graphite and nongraphitic carbons. In addition to potassium-ion batteries, potassium-O2 (or -air) and potassium-sulfur batteries are emerging. Additionally, aqueous potassium-ion batteries also exhibit high reversibility and long cycling life. Because of potentially low cost, availability of basic materials, and intriguing electrochemical behaviors, this new class of secondary batteries is attracting much attention. This mini-review summarizes the current status, opportunities, and future challenges of potassium secondary batteries.

  11. On line high dose static position monitoring by ionization chamber detector for industrial gamma irradiators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Ary A. [Universidade Estadual de Londrina-Depto de Fisica, Rodovia Celso Garcia Cid, km 38, 086051-990 Londrina (Brazil); Vieira, Jose M. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares-IPEN/CNEN-SP, Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2242-Cidade Universitaria, 05508-900 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Hamada, Margarida M. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares-IPEN/CNEN-SP, Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2242-Cidade Universitaria, 05508-900 Sao Paulo (Brazil)], E-mail: mmhamada@ipen.br

    2010-04-15

    A 1 cm{sup 3} cylindrical ionization chamber was developed to measure high doses on line during the sample irradiation in static position, in a {sup 60}Co industrial plant. The developed ionization chamber showed to be suitable for use as a dosimeter on line. A good linearity of the detector was found between the dose and the accumulated charge, independently of the different dose rates caused by absorbing materials.

  12. High Spectral Resolution Lidar Based on a Potassium Faraday Dispersive Filter for Daytime Temperature Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abo Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new high-spectral-resolution lidar technique is proposed for measuring the profiles of atmospheric temperature in daytime. Based on the theory of high resolution Rayleigh scattering, the feasibility and advantages of using potassium (K Faraday dispersive optical filters as blocking filters for measuring atmospheric temperature are demonstrated with a numerical simulation. It was found that temperature profiles could be measured within 1K error for the height of 9 km with a 500 m range resolution in 60 min by using laser pulses with 1mJ/pulse and 1 kHz, and a 50 cm diameter telescope. Furthermore, we are developing compact pulsed laser system for temperature lidar transmitter.

  13. Structural water engaged disordered vanadium oxide nanosheets for high capacity aqueous potassium-ion storage

    OpenAIRE

    Charles, Daniel Scott; Feygenson, Mikhail; Page, Katharine; Neuefeind, Joerg; Xu, Wenqian; Teng, Xiaowei

    2017-01-01

    Aqueous electrochemical energy storage devices using potassium-ions as charge carriers are attractive due to their superior safety, lower cost and excellent transport properties compared to other alkali ions. However, the accommodation of potassium-ions with satisfactory capacity and cyclability is difficult because the large ionic radius of potassium-ions causes structural distortion and instabilities even in layered electrodes. Here we report that water induces structural rearrangements of ...

  14. Gas ionization induced by a high speed plasma injection in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, S.; Kawashima, N.; Kuriki, K.; Yanagisawa, M.; Obayashi, T.; Roberts, W. T.; Reasoner, D. L.; Taylor, W. W. L.

    1986-01-01

    Gas ionization induced by a fast plasma injection has been observed with the Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators (SEPAC) Experiment on Spacelab-1. When an impulsive high-density plasma was injected from the orbiter, waves near the lower-hybrid frequency were enhanced, and the surrounding gas drifting with the orbiter was ionized for several tens of milliseconds after the plasma injection. The long-duration gas ionization was observed only when the plasma flux incoming to the orbiter cargo bay and the orbital velocity perpendicular to the magnetic field were relatively large. This effect has been explained by the concept of critical velocity ionization (CVI) for the gas drifting with the orbiter, although the gas velocity perpendicular to the magnetic field was less than the Alfven critical velocity.

  15. Contribution of high-nl shells to electron-impact ionization processes

    CERN Document Server

    Jonauskas, V; Merkelis, G; Gaigalas, G; Kisielius, R; Kučas, S; Masys, Š; Radžiūtė, L; Rynkun, P

    2015-01-01

    The contribution to electron-impact ionization cross sections from excitations to high-nl shells and a consequent autoionization is investigated. We perform relativistic subconfiguration-average and detailed level-to-level calculations for this process. Ionization cross sections for the W27+ ion are presented to illustrate the large influence of the high shells (n >= 9) and orbitals (l >= 4) in the excitation-autoionization process. The obtained results show that the excitations to the high shells (n >= 9) increase cross sections of the indirect ionization process by a factor of 2 compared to the excitations to the lower shells (n <= 8). The excitations to the shells with orbital quantum number l = 4 give the largest contribution comparedwith the other orbital quantum numbers l. Radiative damping reduces the cross sections of the indirect process approximately twofold in the case of the level-to-level calculations. Determined data show that the excitation-autoionization process contributes approximately 40...

  16. A kinetic study of gaseous potassium capture by coal minerals in a high temperature fixed-bed reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Yuanjing; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Jensen, Anker Degn

    2008-01-01

    The reactions between gaseous potassium chloride and coal minerals were investigated in a lab-scale high temperature fixed-bed reactor using single sorbent pellets. The applied coal minerals included kaolin, mullite, silica, alumina, bituminous coal ash, and lignite coal ash that were formed...... when heated at temperatures above 450°C. The amounts of potassium captured by metakaolin pellet decreases with increasing reaction temperature in the range of 900-1300°C and increases again with further increasing the temperature up to 1500°C. There is no reaction of pre-made mullite with KCl...

  17. ARE MOLECULAR OUTFLOWS AROUND HIGH-MASS STARS DRIVEN BY IONIZATION FEEDBACK?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, Thomas; Klessen, Ralf S. [Institut fuer Theoretische Astrophysik, Universitaet Heidelberg, Zentrum fuer Astronomie, Albert-Ueberle-Str. 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Klaassen, Pamela D. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, 79th Street at Central Park West, New York, NY 10024-5192 (United States); Banerjee, Robi, E-mail: tpeters@physik.uzh.ch [Hamburger Sternwarte, Gojenbergsweg 112, D-21029 Hamburg (Germany)

    2012-11-20

    The formation of massive stars exceeding 10 M {sub Sun} usually results in large-scale molecular outflows. Numerical simulations, including ionization, of the formation of such stars show evidence for ionization-driven molecular outflows. Here we examine whether the outflows seen in these models reproduce the observations. We compute synthetic ALMA and CARMA maps of CO emission lines of the outflows, and compare their signatures to existing single-dish and interferometric data. We find that the ionization-driven models can only reproduce weak outflows around high-mass star-forming regions. We argue that expanding H II regions probably do not represent the dominant mechanism for driving observed outflows. We suggest instead that observed outflows are driven by the collective action of the outflows from the many lower-mass stars that inevitably form around young massive stars in a cluster.

  18. Effect of moderate high temperature on the vegetative growth and potassium allocation in olive plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benlloch-González, María; Quintero, José Manuel; Suárez, María Paz; Sánchez-Lucas, Rosa; Fernández-Escobar, Ricardo; Benlloch, Manuel

    2016-12-01

    There is little information about the prolonged effect of a moderately high temperature on the growth of olive (Olea europaea L.). It has been suggested that when the temperature of the air rises above 35°C the shoot growth of olive is inhibited while there is any reference on how growth is affected when the soil is warmed. In order to examine these effects, mist-cuttings and young plants generated from seeds were grown under moderate high temperature (37°C) for 64 and 42days respectively. In our study, plant dry matter accumulation was reduced when the temperature of both the air and the root medium was moderately high. However, when the temperature of the root medium was 25°C, the inhibitory effect of air high temperature on plant growth was not observed. The exposure of both the aerial part and the root to moderate high temperature also reduced the accumulation of K(+) in the stem and the root, the water use efficiency and leaf relative water content. However, when only the aerial part was exposed to moderate high temperature, the accumulation of K(+) in the stem, the water use efficiency and leaf relative water content were not modified. The results from this study suggest that the olive is very efficient in regulating the water and potassium transport through the plant when only the atmosphere surrounding the aerial part is warmed up. However, an increase in the soil temperature decrease root K(+) uptake and its transport to the aerial parts resulting in a reduction in shoot water status and growth. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. High efficiency resonance ionization of palladium with Ti:sapphire lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kron, T.; Liu, Y.; Richter, S.; Schneider, F.; Wendt, K.

    2016-09-01

    This work presents the development and testing of highly efficient excitation schemes for resonance ionization of palladium. To achieve the highest ionization efficiencies, a high-power, high repetition rate Ti:sapphire laser system was used and 2-step, 3-step and 4-step schemes were investigated and compared. Starting from different excited steps, the frequencies of the final ionization steps were tuned across the full accessible spectral range of the laser system, revealing several autoionizing Rydberg series, which converge towards the energetically higher lying state 4{{{d}}}9{}2{{{D}}}3/2 of the Pd+ ion ground state configuration. Through proper choice of these excitation steps, we developed a highly efficient, fully resonant 3-step excitation scheme, which lead to overall efficiencies of 54.3(1.4) % and 59.7(2.1) %, measured at two independent mass separator setups. To our knowledge, these are presently the highest efficiency values ever achieved with a resonance ionization laser ion source.

  20. Anionic forensic signatures for sample matching of potassium cyanide using high performance ion chromatography and chemometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraga, Carlos G; Farmer, Orville T; Carman, April J

    2011-01-30

    Potassium cyanide was used as a model toxicant to determine the feasibility of using anionic impurities as a forensic signature for matching cyanide salts back to their source. In this study, portions of eight KCN stocks originating from four countries were separately dissolved in water and analyzed by high performance ion chromatography (HPIC) using an anion exchange column and conductivity detection. Sixty KCN aqueous samples were produced from the eight stocks and analyzed for 11 anionic impurities. Hierarchal cluster analysis and principal component analysis were used to demonstrate that KCN samples cluster according to source based on the concentrations of their anionic impurities. The Fisher-ratio method and degree-of-class separation (DCS) were used for feature selection on a training set of KCN samples in order to optimize sample clustering. The optimal subset of anions needed for sample classification was determined to be sulfate, oxalate, phosphate, and an unknown anion named unk5. Using K-nearest neighbors (KNN) and the optimal subset of anions, KCN test samples from different KCN stocks were correctly determined to be manufactured in the United States. In addition, KCN samples from stocks manufactured in Belgium, Germany, and the Czech Republic were all correctly matched back to their original stocks because each stock had a unique anionic impurity profile. The application of the Fisher-ratio method and DCS for feature selection improved the accuracy and confidence of sample classification by KNN. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. High molecular weight non-polar hydrocarbons as pure model substances and in motor oil samples can be ionized without fragmentation by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hourani, Nadim; Kuhnert, Nikolai

    2012-10-15

    High molecular weight non-polar hydrocarbons are still difficult to detect by mass spectrometry. Although several studies have targeted this problem, lack of good self-ionization has limited the ability of mass spectrometry to examine these hydrocarbons. Failure to control ion generation in the atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source hampers the detection of intact stable gas-phase ions of non-polar hydrocarbon in mass spectrometry. Seventeen non-volatile non-polar hydrocarbons, reported to be difficult to ionize, were examined by an optimized APCI methodology using nitrogen as the reagent gas. All these analytes were successfully ionized as abundant and intact stable [M-H](+) ions without the use of any derivatization or adduct chemistry and without significant fragmentation. Application of the method to real-life hydrocarbon mixtures like light shredder waste and car motor oil was demonstrated. Despite numerous reports to the contrary, it is possible to ionize high molecular weight non-polar hydrocarbons by APCI, omitting the use of additives. This finding represents a significant step towards extending the applicability of mass spectrometry to non-polar hydrocarbon analyses in crude oil, petrochemical products, waste or food. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Effects of high-intensity intermittent training on potassium kinetics and performance in human skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Jens Jung; Mohr, Magni; Klarskov, Christina; Kristensen, Michael; Krustrup, Peter; Juel, Carsten; Bangsbo, Jens

    2004-01-01

    A rise in extracellular potassium concentration in human skeletal muscle may play an important role in development of fatigue during intense exercise. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of intense intermittent training on muscle interstitial potassium kinetics and its relationship to the density of Na+,K+-ATPase subunits and KATP channels, as well as exercise performance, in human skeletal muscle. Six male subjects performed intense one-legged knee-extensor training for 7 weeks. On separate days the trained leg (TL) and the control leg (CL) performed a 30 min exercise period of 30 W and an incremental test to exhaustion. At frequent intervals during the exercise periods interstitial potassium ([K+]I) was determined by microdialysis, femoral arterial and venous blood samples were drawn and thigh blood flow was measured. Time to fatigue for TL was 28% longer (P < 0.05) than for CL (10.6 ± 0.7 (mean ±s.e.m.) versus 8.2 ± 0.7 min). The amounts of Na+,K+-ATPase α1 and α2 subunits were, respectively, 29.0 ± 8.4 and 15.1 ± 2.7% higher (P < 0.05) in TL than in CL, while the amounts of β1 subunits and ATP-dependent K+ (KATP) channels were the same. In CL [K+]I increased more rapidly and was higher (P < 0.05) throughout the 30 W exercise bout, as well at 60 and 70 W, compared to TL, whereas [K+]I was similar at the point of fatigue (9.9 ± 0.7 and 9.1 ± 0.5 mmol l−1, respectively). During the 30 W exercise bouts and at 70 W during the incremental exercise femoral venous potassium concentration ([K+]v) was higher (P < 0.05) in CL than in TL, but identical at exhaustion (6.2 ± 0.2 mmol l−1). Release of potassium to the blood was not different in the two legs. The present data demonstrated that intense intermittent training reduce accumulation of potassium in human skeletal muscle interstitium during exercise, probably through a larger re-uptake of potassium due to greater activity of the muscle Na+,K+-ATPase pumps. The lower accumulation of

  3. Quasar Black Hole Mass Estimates from High-Ionization Lines: Breaking a Taboo?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Marziani

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Can high ionization lines such as CIV λ 1549 provide useful virial broadening estimators for computing the mass of the supermassive black holes that power the quasar phenomenon? The question has been dismissed by several workers as a rhetorical one because blue-shifted, non-virial emission associated with gas outflows is often prominent in CIV λ 1549 line profiles. In this contribution, we first summarize the evidence suggesting that the FWHM of low-ionization lines like H β and MgII λ 2800 provide reliable virial broadening estimators over a broad range of luminosity. We confirm that the line widths of CIV λ 1549 is not immediately offering a virial broadening estimator equivalent to the width of low-ionization lines. However, capitalizing on the results of Coatman et al. (2016 and Sulentic et al. (2017, we suggest a correction to FWHM CIV λ 1549 for Eddington ratio and luminosity effects that, however, remains cumbersome to apply in practice. Intermediate ionization lines (IP ∼ 20–30 eV; AlIII λ 1860 and SiIII] λ 1892 may provide a better virial broadening estimator for high redshift quasars, but larger samples are needed to assess their reliability. Ultimately, they may be associated with the broad-line region radius estimated from the photoionization method introduced by Negrete et al. (2013 to obtain black hole mass estimates independent from scaling laws.

  4. Possible standoff detection of ionizing radiation using high-power THz electromagnetic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nusinovich, Gregory S.; Sprangle, Phillip; Romero-Talamas, Carlos A.; Rodgers, John; Pu, Ruifeng; Kashyn, Dmytro G.; Antonsen, Thomas M., Jr.; Granatstein, Victor L.

    2012-06-01

    Recently, a new method of remote detection of concealed radioactive materials was proposed. This method is based on focusing high-power short wavelength electromagnetic radiation in a small volume where the wave electric field exceeds the breakdown threshold. In the presence of free electrons caused by ionizing radiation, in this volume an avalanche discharge can then be initiated. When the wavelength is short enough, the probability of having even one free electron in this small volume in the absence of additional sources of ionization is low. Hence, a high breakdown rate will indicate that in the vicinity of this volume there are some materials causing ionization of air. To prove this concept a 0.67 THz gyrotron delivering 200-300 kW power in 10 microsecond pulses is under development. This method of standoff detection of concealed sources of ionizing radiation requires a wide range of studies, viz., evaluation of possible range, THz power and pulse duration, production of free electrons in air by gamma rays penetrating through container walls, statistical delay time in initiation of the breakdown in the case of low electron density, temporal evolution of plasma structure in the breakdown and scattering of THz radiation from small plasma objects. Most of these issues are discussed in the paper.

  5. High-Ionization Gas Associated with a Supershell Surrounding the Perseus OB1 Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knauth, D. C.; Howk, J. C.; Sembach, K. R.; Lauroesch, J. T.; Meyer, D. M.

    2002-05-01

    We present Far-Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) and Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) observations of high-ionization interstellar absorption toward HD 14434, an O5.5 V star in the Per OB1 Association. This star lies in the direction of the H I supershell GS139-03-69 (Heiles 1979, ApJ, 229, 533). In addition, a supershell-like bubble is detected from WHAM maps of the Perseus arm (Madsen, Haffner, & Reynolds astro-ph/0112232). We detect intermediate velocity interstellar Si IV and C IV absorption centered at VLSR = -73 km s-1, while low-ionization Perseus arm gas is detected at approximately -50 km s-1. Neither N V nor O VI is detected at these velocities, although Fe III, a tracer of warm ionized gas, is seen. The column densities in the -73 km s-1 component are log N(C IV}) = 13.93 +/- 0.02, log N(Si IV}) = 13.35 +/- 0.02, log N(N V}) models for the origins of the intermediate velocity C IV and Si IV absorption: photoionization or non-equilibrium collisional processes. Either of these could be related to the origins of the high-ionization gas with a supershell. This work is based on data obtained for the Guaranteed Time Team by the NASA-CNES-CSA FUSE mission. Financial support has been provided by NASA contract NAS5-32985.

  6. FIRST SPECTROSCOPIC EVIDENCE FOR HIGH IONIZATION STATE AND LOW OXYGEN ABUNDANCE IN Ly{alpha} EMITTERS ,

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, Kimihiko; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Hashimoto, Takuya; Ono, Yoshiaki [Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Ouchi, Masami [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Lee, Janice C., E-mail: nakajima@astron.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2013-05-20

    We present results from Keck/NIRSPEC and Magellan/MMIRS follow-up spectroscopy of Ly{alpha} emitters (LAEs) at z = 2.2 identified in our Subaru narrowband survey. We successfully detect H{alpha} emission from seven LAEs, and perform a detailed analysis of six LAEs free from active galactic nucleus activity, two out of which, CDFS-3865 and COSMOS-30679, have [O II] and [O III] line detections. They are the first [O II]-detected LAEs at high-z, and their [O III]/[O II] ratios and R23-indices provide the first simultaneous determinations of ionization parameter and oxygen abundance for LAEs. CDFS-3865 has a very high ionization parameter (q{sub ion}=2.5{sup +1.7}{sub -0.8} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} cm s{sup -1}) and a low oxygen abundance (12+ log (O/H)=7.84{sup +0.24}{sub -0.25}) in contrast with moderate values of other high-z galaxies such as Lyman break galaxies (LBGs). COSMOS-30679 also possesses a relatively high ionization parameter (q{sub ion}=8{sup +10}{sub -4} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} cm s{sup -1}) and a low oxygen abundance (12+ log (O/H)=8.18{sup +0.28}{sub -0.28}). Both LAEs appear to fall below the mass-metallicity relation of z {approx} 2 LBGs. Similarly, a low metallicity of 12 + log (O/H) < 8.4 is independently indicated for typical LAEs from a composite spectrum and the [N II]/H{alpha} index. Such high ionization parameters and low oxygen abundances can be found in local star-forming galaxies, but this extreme local population occupies only {approx}0.06% of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectroscopic galaxy sample with a number density {approx}100 times smaller than that of LAEs. With their high ionization parameters and low oxygen abundances, LAEs would represent an early stage of galaxy formation dominated by massive stars in compact star-forming regions. High-q{sub ion} galaxies like LAEs would produce ionizing photons efficiently with a high escape fraction achieved by density-bounded H II regions, which would significantly contribute to

  7. Distribution of high-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels in rat vestibular epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, Felix E; Savin, David; Luu, Cindy; Sultemeier, David R; Hoffman, Larry F

    2009-11-10

    Voltage- and calcium-activated potassium channels (BK) are important regulators of neuronal excitability. BK channels seem to be crucial for frequency tuning in nonmammalian vestibular and auditory hair cells. However, there are a paucity of data concerning BK expression in mammalian vestibular hair cells. We therefore investigated the localization of BK channels in mammalian vestibular hair cells, specifically in rat vestibular neuroepithelia. We find that only a subset of hair cells in the utricle and the crista ampullaris express BK channels. BK-positive hair cells are located mainly in the medial striolar region of the utricle, where they constitute at most 12% of hair cells, and in the central zone of the horizontal crista. A majority of BK-positive hair cells are encapsulated by a calretinin-positive calyx defining them as type I cells. The remainder are either type I cells encapsulated by a calretinin-negative calyx or type II hair cells. Surprisingly, the number of BK-positive hair cells in the utricle peaks in juvenile rats and declines in early adulthood. BK channels were not found in vestibular afferent dendrites or somata. Our data indicate that BK channel expression in the mammalian vestibular system differs from the expression pattern in the mammalian auditory and the nonmammalian vestibular system. The molecular diversity of vestibular hair cells indicates a functional diversity that has not yet been fully characterized. The predominance of BK-positive hair cells within the medial striola of juvenile animals suggests that they contribute to a scheme of highly lateralized coding of linear head movements during late development.

  8. Graphene coated silica applied for high ionization matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry: A novel approach for environmental and biomolecule analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasser Abdelhamid, Hani; Wu, Bo-Sgum; Wu, Hui-Fen

    2014-08-01

    The integration of nanotechnology with mass spectrometry for sensitive and selective detection of molecules is a hot/important field of research. Synthesis of graphene (G) coated with mesoporous silica (SiO2, G@SiO2) for mass spectrometric application has been demonstrated. For the first time, we proposed the significant role of surfactant that used during the synthesis of mesorporous silicate (SiO2) in mass spectrometry. It was noticed that G could initiate SiO2 via surfactants which work as initiators for further ionization. The porosity of SiO2 trapped the analytes that was released and ionized with the surfactant fragments. Undoubtedly, strong background interferences were present in the case of organic matrix, which greatly obscured the detection of low molecular weight compounds. G@SiO2 nanocomposite affords several advantages, such as the ability to detect small molecules (silica mesoporosity, and high ionization efficiency over than G or conventional matrices. The high performance of G@SiO2 is not only due to the large surface area but also due to high desorption/ionization efficiency of inevitably surfactant (cetyltrimethylammonium chloride, CATB). Unlike the conventional MALDI-MS, the G@SiO2-MS is capable of generating multiply charged polysaccharides. The present method was validated to detect surfactants with low limits of detection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Rapid fingerprinting of lignin by ambient ionization high resolution mass spectrometry and simplified data mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Elizabeth A; Gerbig, Stefanie; Spengler, Bernhard; Volmer, Dietrich A

    2017-11-22

    Ambient ionization techniques are typically used to analyze samples in their native states with minimal or no sample pretreatment prior to mass spectrometric (MS) analysis. Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) and direct analysis in real time (DART) were systematically investigated in this work for direct solid analysis of depolymerized lignin samples, with the goal of rapidly fingerprinting these samples, to efficiently characterize the subunits of this renewable energy source. High resolution MS was required for enhanced selectivity in this study due to the inherent structural complexity of lignin. DESI provided results across a broader mass range (up to m/z 700) than DART and also ionized saturated compounds of low oxygen-to-carbon (O/C) ratios and low double bond equivalents (DBE). While DART detected the same core lignin monomeric and dimeric compounds as seen with DESI and electrospray ionization (ESI), results were restricted to a narrower mass range to m/z 500, due to thermal degradation and losses of methoxy groups. In contrast to DESI and ESI, the DART spectra were nearly void of saturated components. On a structural level, the core lignin compounds were visually fingerprinted and ionization method performances critically assessed by employing simplified Kendrick-based data mining approaches. A novel simplified data visualization approach was developed in this work based on modified Kendrick mass defect (KMD) filtering for lignin subunits and plotting the mass defect values against the degree of unsaturation. Direct visualization of monomeric, dimeric and trimeric lignin species was simplified by the KMD separation plots, easily allowing the core lignin compounds to be visually identified and compared. Modified KMD bases, namely methoxy and phenol bases, which represent monomer-specific lignin constituents, were successfully used to classify and group the complex mixture of lignin species. Further separation of methoxy-related lignin species was

  10. Radiation sterilization of medical devices. Effects of ionizing radiation on ultra-high molecular-weight polyethylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchalla, R.; Schüttler, C.; Bögl, K. W.

    1995-02-01

    Sterilization by ionizing radiation has become, next to ethylene oxide treament, the most important "cold" sterilization process for medical devices made from plastics. The effects of ionizing radiation on the most important polymer for medical devices, ultra-high molecular-weight polyethylene, are briefly described in this review.

  11. Ionizing Radiation Measurements Using Low Cost Instruments for Teaching in College or High-School in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, M. C.; Vilela, D. C.; Migoto, V. G.; Gomes, M. P.; Martin, I. M.; Germano, J. S. E.

    2017-01-01

    Ionizing radiation one of modern physics experimental teaching in colleges and high school can be easily implemented today due to low coasts of detectors and also electronic circuits and data acquisition interfaces. First it is interesting to show to young's students what is ionizing radiation and from where they appears near ground level? How it…

  12. A possibility of local measurements of ion temperature in a high-temperature plasma by laser induced ionization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kantor, M.

    2012-01-01

    A new diagnostic for local measurements of ion temperature and drift velocity in fusion plasmas is proposed in the paper. The diagnostic is based on laser induced ionization of excited hydrogen and deuterium atoms from the levels which ionization energy less than the laser photon energy. A high

  13. Portable meter study of ionizing radiation Teletector in high rates of air kerma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damatto, Willian Behling; Potiens, Maria da Penha A.; Vivolo, Vitor, E-mail: willbdamatto@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleres (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    A set of portable meters of ionizing radiation high rates of air kerma (teletectors) commonly used in emergencies in Brazil and sent to the Calibration Laboratory of IPEN were under several tests and analyst is parameters for the detectors behavior were established. Applied tests were: energy dependence and primarily overload with the new irradiation system. Thus it was possible to determine the most common characteristic found in these equipment (quality control programs) and new calibration criteria were established following international recommendations. (author)

  14. Ionization effects on spectral signatures of quantum-path interference in high-harmonic generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holler, M; Zaïr, A; Schapper, F; Auguste, T; Cormier, E; Wyatt, A; Monmayrant, A; Walmsley, I A; Gallmann, L; Salières, P; Keller, U

    2009-03-30

    The interference between the emission originating from the short and long electron quantum paths is intrinsic to the high harmonic generation process. We investigate the universal properties of these quantum-path interferences in various generation media and discuss how ionization effects influence the observed interference structures. Our comparison of quantum-path interferences observed in xenon, argon, and neon demonstrates that our experimental tools are generally applicable and should also allow investigating more complex systems such as molecules or clusters.

  15. Strong directional out-of-plane scattering in multiple ionizing highly charged ion-atom collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, A.; Hagmann, S.; Quinteros, T. [Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States). J.R. MacDonald Lab.; Kraessig, B. [Freiburg Univ. (Germany). Fakultaet fuer Physik; Koch, R.; Schmidt-Boecking, H. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik; Skutlartz, A. [East Carolina Univ., Greenville, NC (United States)

    1990-12-31

    The azimuthal ({phi}{sub r}) and polar angle ({theta}{sub r}) scattering of projectiles in coincidence with recoil ions has been studied for 0.53 MeV/u F{sup 8+} + Ne. For high degree of ionization of the target we find the resultant transverse momentum of all electrons emitted into the continuum to increase with the number of ejected electrons and to have a direction mostly not co-planar with the scattering plane.

  16. Ionization energy shift of characteristic K x-ray lines from high-Z materials for plasma diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Słabkowska, K.; Szymańska, E.; Polasik, M. [Faculty of Chemistry, Nicholas Copernicus University, 87-100 Toruń (Poland); Pereira, N. R. [Ecopulse, Inc., 7844 Vervain Ct, Springfield, Virginia 22152 (United States); Rzadkiewicz, J. [National Centre for Nuclear Research, 05-400 Otwock (Poland); Seely, J. F. [Artep, Inc., 2922 Excelsior Springs Ct, Ellicott, Maryland 21042 (United States); Weber, B. V.; Schumer, J. W. [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    The energy of the characteristic x-rays emitted by high atomic number atoms in a plasma that contains energetic electrons depends on the atom's ionization. For tungsten, the ionization energy shift of the L-lines has recently been used to diagnose the plasma's ionization; the change in energy of a K-line has been measured for iridium and observed for ytterbium. Here, we present detailed computations of the ionization energy shift to K-lines of these and an additional element, dysprosium; for these atoms, some K-lines nearly coincide in energy with K-edges of slightly lower Z atoms so that a change in transmission behind a K-edge filter betrays a change in energy. The ionization energy shift of such high-energy K-lines may enable a unique diagnostic when the plasma is inside an otherwise opaque enclosure such as hohlraums used on the National Ignition Facility.

  17. Computer-guided normal-low versus normal-high potassium control after cardiac surgery: No impact on atrial fibrillation or atrial flutter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoekstra, Miriam; Hessels, Lara; Rienstra, Michiel; Yeh, Lu; Lansink, Annemieke Oude; Vogelzang, Mathijs; van der Horst, Iwan C C; van der Maaten, Joost M A A; Mariani, Massimo A; de Smet, Anne Marie G A; Struys, Michel M R F; Zijlstra, Felix; Nijsten, Maarten W

    2016-02-01

    This study was designed to determine the effect of 2 different potassium regulation strategies with different targets (within the reference range) on atrial fibrillation (AF) or atrial flutter (AFL) in a cohort of intensive care unit patients after cardiac surgery. The GRIP-COMPASS study was a prospective double-blinded interventional study in 910 patients after cardiac surgery (coronary artery bypass grafting and/or valvular surgery). Patients were assigned to either the normal-low potassium target (nLP group, 4.0 mmol/L) or the normal-high potassium target (nHP group, 4.5 mmol/L) in alternating blocks of 50 patients. Potassium levels were regulated using a validated computer-assisted potassium replacement protocol (GRIP-II). The primary end point was the incidence of AF/AFL on a 12-lead electrocardiogram during the first postoperative week. Of the 910 patients, 447 were assigned to the nLP group; and 463, to the nHP group, with no baseline differences between the 2 groups. The mean daily administered dose of potassium was 30 ± 23 mmol (nLP) versus 52 ± 27 mmol (nHP) (P < .001), which resulted in mean intensive care unit potassium concentration of 4.22 ± 0.36 mmol/L and 4.33 ± 0.34 mmol/L, respectively (P < .001). The incidence of AF/AFL after cardiac surgery did not differ: 38% in the nLP group and 41% in the nHP group. Also in several subgroups (eg, patients not known with prior AF/AFL or with valve surgery), there were no differences. There were no differences in incidence of AF/AFL with 2 potassium regulation strategies with different potassium targets and different amounts of potassium administered in patients after cardiac surgery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect Of Feedback On The Escape Of Ionizing Radiation From High-Z Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trebitsch, Maxime; Blaizot, Jérémy; Rosdahl, Joakim; Devriendt, Julien; Slyz, Adrianne

    2017-06-01

    Quantifying how much of the ionizing radiation produced in high-redshift galaxies escapes in the IGM is one of the main challenges in understanding the sources of reionization. We investigate the radiative properties of simulated low mass galaxies (halos of a few 109 Msun at z=6), where radiation is modelled on-the-fly, and different sources of feedback (from stars and AGN) are included. Using radiation-hydrodynamic simulations performed with Ramses-RT we study how the energy and momentum input from supernovae and black hole activity modulates the properties of the interstellar medium and therefore how, and how many, photons can escape from the galaxy. I will present simulations showing (Trebitsch et al. 2017, https://arxiv.org/abs/1705.00941) that stellar feedback has a pivotal role in regulating the escape fraction in dwarf galaxies. Supernovae carve holes in the gas distribution, through which ionizing photons can escape.

  19. Laser-enhanced ionization detection of trace copper in high salt matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havrilla, G J; Carter, C C

    1987-09-01

    Laser-enhanced ionization (LEI) is used to determine trace levels of metals in high salt matrices, an analysis that is difficult by conventional methods. Copper is presented in detail to demonstrate the capability of the method. Three-dimensional spectra of the stepwise excitation of copper are presented which illustrate the one photon, stepwise, and two-photon transitions. Seven copper transitions have been studied for analytical utility, and detection limits have been determined for each. Ionization interferences were accommodated by both matrix matching and separation of the interferences using ion exchange resin. Absolute determinations at the 0.05-ng level are possible with the use of a Teflon microsampling cup for low volume quantitative analysis. In addition to copper, silver, cobalt, iron, and nickel have been detected within the same dye tuning range. Twelve new LEI transitions have been identified for these elements along with detection limits.

  20. Biofouling-Resistant Impedimetric Sensor for Array High-Resolution Extracellular Potassium Monitoring in the Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruben Machado

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular potassium concentration, [K+]o, plays a fundamental role in the physiological functions of the brain. Studies investigating changes in [K+]o have predominantly relied upon glass capillary electrodes with K+-sensitive solution gradients for their measurements. However, such electrodes are unsuitable for taking spatio-temporal measurements and are limited by the surface area of their tips. We illustrate seizures invoked chemically and in optogenetically modified mice using blue light exposure while impedimetrically measuring the response. A sharp decrease of 1–2 mM in [K+]o before each spike has shown new physiological events not witnessed previously when measuring extracellular potassium concentrations during seizures in mice. We propose a novel approach that uses multichannel monolayer coated gold microelectrodes for in vivo spatio-temporal measurements of [K+]o in a mouse brain as an improvement to the conventional glass capillary electrode.

  1. Thermodynamics of the hydrogen dominant potassium hydride superconductor at high pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Szczȩśniak, D.; Szczȩśniak, R.

    2015-01-01

    In the present paper we report comprehensive analysis of the thermodynamic properties of novel hydrogen dominant potassium hydride superconductor (KH$_{6}$). Our computations are conducted within the Eliashberg theory which yields quantitative estimations of the most important thermodynamic properties of superconducting phase. In particular, we observe, that together with the increasing pressure all the thermodynamic properties decrease, e.g. $T_{C} \\in \\left$ K for $p ...

  2. Potassium as a Radioactive Heat Source in the Core? A High Pressure Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corgne, A.; Keshav, S.; Fei, Y.

    2004-12-01

    The presence of potassium (K) in the core as a significant heat source was suggested over three decades ago. Experimental studies on K partitioning between metal and silicate have provided ambiguous results, because of experimental and analytical artefacts. It has been recognized that polishing of a run product for chemical analysis using water or oil lubricants results in substantial K loss from the metallic phase [Murthy et al., 2003, Nature 423]. Using a dry polishing technique, Murthy et al showed that K enters sulfide-rich metallic liquids with a strong dependence on temperature and silicate melt composition, but without a significant dependence on pressure over the range of their study (1-3 GPa). Extrapolating their data to conditions of pressure, temperature and melt structure, appropriate to core segregation, Murthy et al concluded that K is a substantial radioactive heat source in planetary cores. Their extrapolation technique is debatable, however, notably concerning the effects of composition and pressure on the partitioning. The aim of our study is therefore to reexamine the factors that can affect K partitioning between metallic liquid and silicate melt. We have performed multi-anvil experiments on a relatively wide pressure range, between 3 and 8 GPa, using graphite capsule. In contrast to Murthy et al who used compositions with high S and K contents, we used a CI-chondrite model composition (containing about 4000 ppm K) as starting material in order to obtain partitioning data directly applicable to planetary differentiation processes. Run products were analyzed by electron microprobe. Time-series experiments at 8 GPa reveal that equilibrium conditions are reached rapidly, within 10 s. The effect of temperature was investigated at 8 GPa on the 2000-2200 C temperature range. Results shows that over this temperature range, partition coefficients for K (DK) remain almost identical. The influence of pressure was investigated at 2000 C (3-8 GPa range

  3. Potassium test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... also be done if your provider suspects metabolic acidosis (for example, caused by uncontrolled diabetes) or alkalosis ( ... Hypoaldosteronism (very rare) Kidney failure Metabolic or respiratory acidosis Red blood cell destruction Too much potassium in ...

  4. Observation of new high-lying odd levels of U I in a two-color multiphoton ionization spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suri, B.M.; Dasgupta, K.; Bajaj, P.N.; Manohar, K.G.; Talukdar, R.; Chakraborti, P.K.; Rao, P.R.K.

    1987-11-01

    A two-color three-photon ionization technique, using two pulsed dye lasers, was employed to explore the high-lying energy levels of U I. A number of new U I levels in the 34 290--35 120-cm/sup -1/ region was observed. Uncertainty in the assignment of J values to some levels known from earlier studies was also reduced or removed.

  5. The Effects of Different Tillage Methods on Available Soil Potassium Measured by Various Extractors in a Soil with High Specific Surface Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hosseini

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The effects of any tillage method on soil properties, depends on location (soil, water and air and the number of (years their implementation. Soil compaction reduces yield through increased soil mechanical resistance against root growth and lower water and nutrient use efficiency (Gamda et al. 18 & Ishagh et al 23. Soil surface and sub surface compaction both reduce yield due to limited root growth and plant potassium uptake (Doulan et al. 14. Sabt et al. (50 reported that in the study area, which the lands are mostly illite clay (high specific surface area with sufficient nitrogen, soil potassium is the most important limiting factor for the growth of wheat.Considering the point that loess soils in Golestan Province have a high specific surface area,they can provide potassium for plants to produce crop, but for a higher production, potassium fertilizers should be used. Previous studies indicated that production of wheat is limited due to potassium deficiency (4, 49, 54 and 57. In these soils with a high specific surface area, the speed of movement of potassium from the soil solution is low, and doing solimits wheat yield.In loess soils containing high illite and high specific surface area (eg, soilsin the series of Rahmat Abad of Gorgan, ammonium acetate measured potassium on exchange and solution surfaces, which is highly correlated with grain yield (54 . There is a high correlation between grain yield with overload of potassium and Na TPB extraction (57. The aim of this study was to absorb potassium (limiting factor for plant growth with different tillage systemsat different depths. International recommendations towards reducing the depth and intensity of tillage (from minimum tillage to no-tillage in order to reduce erosion and oxidation of organic substances plays an important role in determining the amount of greenhouse gases. If potassium absorption does not reduceafter reducing tillage intensity,low or no-tillage methods

  6. Development of a new biofertilizer with a high capacity for N2 fixation, phosphate and potassium solubilization and auxin production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaungvutiviroj, Chaveevan; Ruangphisarn, Pimtida; Hansanimitkul, Pikul; Shinkawa, Hidenori; Sasaki, Ken

    2010-01-01

    Biofertilizers that possess a high capacity for N(2) fixation (Azotobacter tropicalis), and consist of phosphate solubilizing bacteria (Burkhoderia unamae), and potassium solubilizing bacteria (Bacillus subtilis) and produce auxin (KJB9/2 strain), have a high potential for growth and yield enhancement of corn and vegetables (Chinese kale). For vegetables, the addition of biofertilizer alone enhanced growth 4 times. Moreover, an enhancement of growth by 7 times was observed due to the addition of rock phosphate and K-feldspar, natural mineral fertilizers, in combination with the biofertilizer.

  7. High and Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation Induce Different Secretome Profiles in a Human Skin Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qibin; Matzke, Melissa M.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Moore, Ronald J.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Hu, Zeping; Monroe, Matthew E.; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.; Morgan, William F.

    2014-03-18

    It is postulated that secreted soluble factors are important contributors of bystander effect and adaptive responses observed in low dose ionizing radiation. Using multidimensional liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry based proteomics, we quantified the changes of skin tissue secretome – the proteins secreted from a full thickness, reconstituted 3-dimensional skin tissue model 48 hr after exposure to 3, 10 and 200 cGy of X-rays. Overall, 135 proteins showed statistical significant difference between the sham (0 cGy) and any of the irradiated groups (3, 10 or 200 cGy) on the basis of Dunnett adjusted t-test; among these, 97 proteins showed a trend of downregulation and 9 proteins showed a trend of upregulation with increasing radiation dose. In addition, there were 21 and 8 proteins observed to have irregular trends with the 10 cGy irradiated group either having the highest or the lowest level among all three radiated doses. Moreover, two proteins, carboxypeptidase E and ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase isozyme L1 were sensitive to ionizing radiation, but relatively independent of radiation dose. Conversely, proteasome activator complex subunit 2 protein appeared to be sensitive to the dose of radiation, as rapid upregulation of this protein was observed when radiation doses were increased from 3, to 10 or 200 cGy. These results suggest that different mechanisms of action exist at the secretome level for low and high doses of ionizing radiation.

  8. Two-step ionization in non-equilibrium SF sub 6 discharges at high current density

    CERN Document Server

    Bychkov, Yu A; Lacour, B; Pasquiers, S; Puech, V; Yastremski, A

    2003-01-01

    In the pressure range 10-100 mbar, the discharge development in SF sub 6 has been investigated in the photo-triggered excitation scheme for current density in the range 10-1000 A cm sup - sup 2 and pulse duration of about 60 ns. Thanks to the homogeneity of the photo-triggered discharge, a self-consistent zero-dimensional model can be used to predict the temporal evolution of the electrical parameters. From a detailed comparison between the experimental results and the modelling predictions, evidence for the occurrence of a two-step ionization process in high current density discharges in SF sub 6 is reported and the corresponding collision cross-section is estimated. Moreover, it is shown that the amount of the two-step ionization is directly correlated to the density of the electrical charge transferred to the plasma per unit surface. This two-step ionization becomes the main source of electron multiplication whenever the transferred charge per unit surface is higher than 15 mu C cm sup - sup 2.

  9. Elliptical polarization favors long quantum orbits in high-order above-threshold ionization of noble gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, XuanYang; Wang, ChuanLiang; Chen, YongJu; Hu, ZiLong; Quan, Wei; Liu, XiaoJun; Chen, Jing; Cheng, Ya; Xu, ZhiZhan; Becker, Wilhelm

    2013-01-25

    We demonstrate the significant role of long quantum orbits in strong-field atomic processes by investigating experimentally and theoretically the above-threshold ionization spectra of noble gases in intense elliptically polarized laser pulses. With increasing laser ellipticity, the yields of different energy regions of the measured electron spectrum in high-order above-threshold ionization drop at different rates. The experimental features can be reproduced by a theoretical simulation based on quantum-orbit theory, revealing that increasing ellipticity favors the contributions of the long quantum orbits in the high-order above-threshold ionization process.

  10. Grotrian diagrams for highly ionized titanium, Ti III through Ti XXII

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirai, Toshizo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Sugar, J.; Wiese, W.L.

    1997-07-01

    Grotrian diagrams are presented to provide graphical overviews for 2,762 spectral lines of highly ionized titanium, Ti III through Ti XXII. In the usual diagram display such as that by Bashkin and Stoner (North-Holland, Amsterdam, 1975), the density of transitions is often too high to allow each transition to be drawn separately. Here in our modified diagrams, the transitions are also represented by lines connecting the upper and lower energy levels, but the lower energy levels are extended and repeated for successive configurations as needed. As a sequence, dense packing is avoided and all lines in a multiplet can be accommodated. (author)

  11. Grotrian diagrams for highly ionized iron Fe VII through Fe XXVI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirai, Toshizo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Sugar, J.; Wiese, W.L.

    1997-07-01

    Grotrian diagrams are presented to provide graphical overviews for 2,201 spectral lines of highly ionized iron, Fe VII through Fe XXVI. In the usual diagram display such as that by Bashkin and Stoner (North-Holland, Amsterdam, 1975), the density of transitions is often too high to allow each transition to be drawn separately. Here in our modified diagrams, the transitions are also represented by lines connecting the upper and lower energy levels, but the lower energy levels are extended and repeated for successive configurations as needed. As a sequence, dense packing is avoided and all lines in a multiplet can be accommodated. (author)

  12. Grotrian diagrams for highly ionized copper Cu X through Cu XXIX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirai, Toshizo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Sugar, J.; Wiese, W.L.

    1997-07-01

    Grotrian diagrams are presented to provide graphical overviews for 775 spectral lines of highly ionized copper, Cu X through Cu XXIX. In the usual diagram display such as that by Bashkin and Stoner (North-Holland, Amsterdam, 1975), the density of transitions is often too high to allow each transition to be drawn separately. Here in our modified diagrams, the transitions are also represented by lines connecting the upper and lower energy levels, but the lower energy levels are extended and repeated for successive configurations as needed. As a sequence, dense packing is avoided and all lines in a multiplet can be accommodated. (author)

  13. Grotrian diagrams for highly ionized chromium Cr V through Cr XXIV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirai, Toshizo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Sugar, J.; Wiese, W.L.

    1997-07-01

    Grotrian diagrams are presented to provide graphical overviews for 1,640 spectral lines of highly ionized chromium, Cr V through Cr XXIV. In the usual diagram display such as that by Bashkin and Stoner (North-Holland, Amsterdam, 1975), the density of transitions is often too high to allow each transition to be drawn separately. Here in our modified diagrams, the transitions are also represented by lines connecting the upper and lower energy levels, but the lower energy levels are extended and repeated for successive configurations as needed. As a sequence, dense packing is avoided and all lines in a multiplet can be accommodated. (author)

  14. THE CURIOUS CASE OF GLASS I: HIGH IONIZATION AND VARIABILITY OF DIFFERENT TYPES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, Andrew J. [Department of Physical Science, Wilbur Wright College, 4300 N. Narragansett Ave., Chicago, IL 60634 (United States); Richter, Matthew J. [Department of Physics, University of California at Davis, One Shields Ave., Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Carr, John S. [Remote Sensing Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Code 7210, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Najita, Joan R. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Moerchen, Margaret M. [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Cordova 3107, Santiago (Chile); Doppmann, Greg W. [W. M. Keck Observatory, 65-1120 Mamalahoa Hwy, Kamuela, HI 96743 (United States); Seifahrt, Andreas [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, 5640 S. Ellis Ave., Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2013-02-20

    Our Spitzer IRS observation of the infrared companion Glass Ib revealed fine-structure emission with high ionization ([Ne III]/[Ne II] = 2.1 and [S IV]/[S III] = 0.6) that indicates that the gas is likely illuminated by hard radiation. While models suggest that extreme-ultraviolet radiation could be present in T Tauri stars, this is the first detection of [S IV] and such a high [Ne III]/[Ne II] ratio in a young star. We also find that Glass Ib displays the molecules HCN, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}O in emission. Here we investigate the Glass I binary system and consider possible mechanisms that may have caused the high ionization, whether from an outflow or disk irradiation. We also model the spectral energy distributions of Glass Ia and Ib to test if the system is a young member of the Chameleon I star-forming region, and we consider other possible classifications for the system. We find that Glass Ib is highly variable, showing changes in continuum strength and emission features at optical, near-infrared, and mid-infrared wavelengths. The optical light curve indicates that a central stellar component in Glass Ib became entirely visible for 2.5 years beginning in mid-2002 and possibly displayed periodic variability with repeated, short-period dimming during that time. As the fine-structure emission was not detected in observations before or after our Spitzer IRS observation, we explore whether the variable nature of Glass Ib is related to the gas being highly ionized, possibly due to variable accretion or an X-ray flare.

  15. Potassium nickel hexacyanoferrate as a high-voltage cathode material for nonaqueous magnesium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Munseok S.; Hyoung, Jooeun; Jang, Minchul; Lee, Hochun; Hong, Seung-Tae

    2017-09-01

    The magnesium insertion capability of Prussian blue (PB) analogue, potassium nickel hexacyanoferrate K0.86Ni[Fe(CN)6]0.954(H2O)0.766 (KNF-086), is demonstrated as a cathode material for rechargeable magnesium-ion batteries using a conventional organic electrolyte. K1.51Ni[Fe(CN)6]0.954(H2O)0.766 is synthesized first, and potassium ions are electrochemically extracted to prepare the KNF-086 cathode. The electrochemical test cell is composed of KNF-086 as the working electrode, an activated carbon as the counter and reference electrode, and 0.5 M Mg(ClO4)2 in acetonitrile as the electrolyte. The cell shows a reversible magnesium insertion/extraction reaction with a discharge capacity of 48.3 mAh g-1 at a 0.2 C rate, and an average discharge voltage at 2.99 V (vs. Mg/Mg2+) that is the highest among the cathode materials ever reported for magnesium-ion batteries. Elemental analysis and Fourier electron-density map analysis from powder X-ray diffraction data confirm that the magnesium-inserted phase is Mg0.27K0.86Ni[Fe(CN)6]0.954(H2O)0.766 (MKNF-086), and the magnesium ions in MKNF-086 are positioned at the center of the large interstitial cavities of cubic PB. Compared to KNF-086, MKNF-086 exhibits a decreased unit cell parameter (0.8%) and volume (2.4%). These results demonstrate that a PB analogue, potassium nickel hexacyanoferrate, could be utilized as a potential cathode material for conventional organic electrolyte-based magnesium-ion batteries.

  16. Atomic data for integrated tokamak modelling – Fermi-shuttle type ionization as a possible source of high energy electrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tőkési K.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The ionization of Ar by 15 keV N+ ion is studied theoretically. The energy distributions of the ejected electrons as a function of the scattering angle were calculated using the classical trajectory Monte Carlo method. We identify the signature of the Fermi-shuttle type ionization in the double differential cross sections which should be a possible source of the high energy electrons in the plasma. Our classical calculation also describes the previously measured data with high accuracy.

  17. High explosives vapor detection by atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization/tandem mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLuckey, S.A.; Goeringer, D.E.; Asano, K.G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Chemical and Analytical Sciences Div.

    1996-02-01

    The combination of atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization with tandem mass spectrometry for the detection of traces of high explosives is described. Particular emphasis is placed on use of the quadrupole ion trap as the type of tandem mass spectrometer. Atmospheric sampling glow discharge provides a simple, rugged, and efficient means for anion formation while the quadrupole ion trap provides for efficient tandem mass spectrometry. Mass selective ion accumulation and non-specific ion activation methods can be used to overcome deleterious effects arising from ion/ion interactions. Such interactions constitute the major potential technical barrier to the use of the ion trap for real-time monitoring of targeted compounds in uncontrolled and highly variable matrices. Tailored waveforms can be used to effect both mass selective ion accumulation and ion activation. Concatenated tailored waveforms allow for both functions in a single experiment thereby providing the capability for monitoring several targeted species simultaneously. The combination of atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization with a state-of-the-art analytical quadrupole ion trap is a highly sensitive and specific detector for traces of high explosives. The combination is also small and inexpensive relative to virtually any other form of tandem mass spectrometry. The science and technology underlying the glow discharge/ion trap combination is sufficiently mature to form the basis for an engineering effort to make the detector portable. 85 refs.

  18. Efficient generation of high beam-quality attosecond pulse with polarization-gating Bessel-Gauss beam from highly-ionized media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Zhang, Qingbin; Hong, Weiyi; Wang, Shaoyi; Wang, Zhe; Lu, Peixiang

    2012-07-02

    Single attosecond pulse generation with polarization gating Bessel-Gauss beam in relatively strongly-ionized media is investigated. The results show that Bessel-Gauss beam has the ability to suppress the spatial plasma dispersion effects caused by high density of free electrons, thus the laser field can maintain its spatial profile through highly-ionized medium. This indicates the use of Bessel-Gauss beam has advantages over Gaussian beam in high harmonic generation under high ionization conditions. In our scheme, significant improvement of spatiotemporal properties of harmonics is achieved and an isolated attosecond pulse with high beam quality is filtered out using polarization gating.

  19. Ultra-light and flexible pencil-trace anode for high performance potassium-ion and lithium-ion batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhixin Tai

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Engineering design of battery configurations and new battery system development are alternative approaches to achieve high performance batteries. A novel flexible and ultra-light graphite anode is fabricated by simple friction drawing on filter paper with a commercial 8B pencil. Compared with the traditional anode using copper foil as current collector, this innovative current-collector-free design presents capacity improvement of over 200% by reducing the inert weight of the electrode. The as-prepared pencil-trace electrode exhibits excellent rate performance in potassium-ion batteries (KIBs, significantly better than in lithium-ion batteries (LIBs, with capacity retention of 66% for the KIB vs. 28% for the LIB from 0.1 to 0.5 A g−1. It also shows a high reversible capacity of ∼230 mAh g−1 at 0.2 A g−1, 75% capacity retention over 350 cycles at 0.4 A g−1and the highest rate performance (based on the total electrode weight among graphite electrodes for K+ storage reported so far. Keywords: Current-collector-free, Flexible pencil-trace electrode, Potassium-ion battery, Lithium-ion battery, Layer-by-layer interconnected architecture

  20. The Effect of High-Dose Ionizing Radiation on the Astrobiological Model Lichen Circinaria gyrosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Torre, Rosa; Zélia Miller, Ana; Cubero, Beatriz; Martín-Cerezo, M. Luisa; Raguse, Marina; Meeßen, Joachim

    2017-02-01

    The lichen Circinaria gyrosa is an astrobiological model defined by its high capacity of resistance to space conditions and to a simulated martian environment. Therefore, it became part of the currently operated BIOMEX experiment on board the International Space Station and the recent STARLIFE campaign to study the effects of four types of space-relevant ionizing radiation. The samples were irradiated with helium and iron ions at doses up to 2 kGy, with X-rays at doses up to 5 kGy and with γ rays at doses from 6 to 113 kGy. Results on C. gyrosa's resistance to simulated space ionizing radiation and its post-irradiation viability were obtained by (i) chlorophyll a fluorescence of photosystem II (PSII), (ii) epifluorescence microscopy, (iii) confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), and (iv) field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). Results of photosynthetic activity and epifluorescence show no significant changes up to a dose of 1 kGy (helium ions), 2 kGy (iron ions), 5 kGy (X-rays) - the maximum doses applied for those radiation qualities - as well as a dose of 6 kGy of γ irradiation, which was the lowest dose applied for this low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation. Significant damage in a dose-related manner was observed only at much higher doses of γ irradiation (up to 113 kGy). These data corroborate the findings of the parallel STARLIFE studies on the effects of ionizing radiation on the lichen Circinaria gyrosa, its isolated photobiont, and the lichen Xanthoria elegans.

  1. Metal-silicate partitioning of potassium at high pressure and temperature conditions and implications for thermal history of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, R.; Hirose, K.

    2011-12-01

    The possible presence of potassium in the Earth's core as a radioactive heat source can have a significant influence on the thermal evolution of the Earth (Buffett, 2002 GRL; Labrosse, 2003 PEPI). Core-mantle equilibration at high P-T (e.g. ~30 GPa, ~3450 K [Righter, 2011 EPSL]) was suggested from the mantle contents of siderophile elements. Basal magma ocean (Labrosse et al., 2007 Nature) also should be equilibrated with molten iron at the core-mantle boundary (CMB) (~135 GPa) due to its gravitational stability (Nomura et al., 2011 Nature). Previous experimental studies on potassium partitioning between liquid metal and silicate melt showed contradictory results on the concentration of potassium in the Earth's core because of experimental artifacts (K loss in metal phase), different (simplified) chemical compositions for study and large extrapolations to high P-T which suits for core-mantle equilibration at the base of the magma ocean. Recently, Corgne et al. (2007 EPSL) performed the partitioning experiments up to 7.7 GPa and 2200°C with chemical compositions of CI chondrite doped with moderate amount of S and K and revealed a significant effect of O contents in molten alloy on K partition coefficient while with negligible effect of P-T and S and C contents. The change in electronic structure of potassium from 4s- to 3d-like was predicted by theory (Bukowinski, 1976 GRL) and potassium alloying with nickel and iron was reported by experiments using diamond anvil cell at ~30 GPa and 2200 K (Parker et al., 1997 Science; Lee and Jeanloz, 2003 GRL). So, it is important to investigate the effect of pressure on K partition coefficient at the pressure conditions above ~30 GPa up to 135 GPa. Hirao et al. (2006 GRL) performed melting experiment at 135 GPa and 3500 K using laser-heated diamond anvil cell (LHDAC) and showed the value of partition coefficient Dk is 0.15, but their results lack the elemental mass balances between run products and starting materials. Our

  2. Using a low-sodium, high-potassium salt substitute to reduce blood pressure among Tibetans with high blood pressure: a patient-blinded randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xingshan; Yin, Xuejun; Li, Xian; Yan, Lijing L; Lam, Christopher T; Li, Shenshen; He, Feng; Xie, Wuxiang; Sang, Ba; Luobu, Gesang; Ke, Liang; Wu, Yangfeng

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of a low-sodium and high-potassium salt-substitute on lowering blood pressure (BP) among Tibetans living at high altitude (4300 meters). The study was a patient-blinded randomized controlled trial conducted between February and May 2009 in Dangxiong County, Tibetan Autonomous Region, China. A total of 282 Tibetans aged 40 or older with known hypertension (systolic BP≥140 mmHg) were recruited and randomized to intervention (salt-substitute, 65% sodium chloride, 25% potassium chloride and 10% magnesium sulfate) or control (100% sodium chloride) in a 1: 1 allocation ratio with three months' supply. Primary outcome was defined as the change in BP levels measured from baseline to followed-up with an automated sphygmomanometer. Per protocol (PP) and intention to treat (ITT) analyses were conducted. After the three months' intervention period, the net reduction in SBP/DBP in the intervention group in comparison to the control group was -8.2/-3.4 mmHg (all pLow sodium high potassium salt-substitute is effective in lowering both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and offers a simple, low-cost approach for hypertension control among Tibetans in China. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01429246.

  3. Potassium in diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... diet; Hypokalemia - potassium in the diet; Chronic kidney disease - potassium in diet; Kidney failure - potassium in diet ... potassium. Vegetables including broccoli, peas, lima beans, tomatoes, potatoes (especially their skins), sweet potatoes, and winter squash ...

  4. Localized traveling ionization zones and their importance for the high power impulse magnetron sputtering process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maszl, Christian

    2016-09-01

    High power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) is a technique to deposit thin films with superior quality. A high ionization degree up to 90% and the natural occurence of high energetic metal ions are the reason why HiPIMS exceeds direct current magnetron sputtering in terms of coating quality. On the other hand HiPIMS suffers from a reduced efficiency, especially if metal films are produced. Therefore, a lot of research is done by experimentalists and theoreticians to clarify the transport mechanisms from target to substrate and to identify the energy source of the energetic metal ions. Magnetron plasmas are prone to a wide range of wave phenomena and instabilities. Especially, during HiPIMS at elevated power/current densities, symmetry breaks and self-organization in the plasma torus are observed. In this scenario localized travelling ionization zones with certain quasi-mode numbers are present which are commonly referred to as spokes. Because of their high rotation speed compared to typical process times of minutes their importance for thin film deposition was underestimated at first. Recent investigations show that spokes have a strong impact on particle transport, are probably the source of the high energetic metal ions and are therefore the essence of HiPIMS plasmas. In this contribution we will describe the current understanding of spokes, discuss implications for thin film synthesis and highlight open questions. This project is supported by the DFG (German Science Foundation) within the framework of the Coordinated Research Center SFB-TR 87 and the Research Department ``Plasmas with Complex Interactions'' at Ruhr-University Bochum.

  5. The carcinogenic risks of low-LET and high-LET ionizing radiations. Revision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabrikant, J.I. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)]|[California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1991-08-01

    This report presents a discussion on risk from ionizing radiations to human populations. Important new information on human beings has come mainly from further follow-up of existing epidemiological studies, notably the Japanese atomic bomb survivors and the ankylosing spondylitis patients; from new epidemiological surveys, such as the patients treated for cancer of the uterine cervix; and from combined surveys, including workers exposed in underground mines. Since the numerous and complex differences among the different study populations introduce factors that influence the risk estimates derived in ways that are not completely understood, it is not clear how to combine the different risk estimates obtained. These factors involve complex biological and physical variables distributed over time. Because such carcinogenic effects occur too infrequently to be demonstrated at low doses, the risks of low-dose radiation can be estimated only by interpolation from observations at high doses on the basis of theoretical concepts, mathematical models and available empirical evidence, primarily the epidemiological surveys of large populations exposed to ionizing radiation. In spite of a considerable amount of research, only recently has there has been efforts to apply the extensive laboratory data in animals to define the dose-incidence relationship in the low dose region. There simply are insufficient data in the epidemiological studies of large human populations to estimate risk coefficients directly from exposure to low doses. The risk estimates for the carcinogenic effects of radiation have been, in the past, somewhat low and reassessment of the numerical values is now necessary.

  6. The carcinogenic risks of low-LET and high-LET ionizing radiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabrikant, J.I. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States) California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States))

    1991-08-01

    This report presents a discussion on risk from ionizing radiations to human populations. Important new information on human beings has come mainly from further follow-up of existing epidemiological studies, notably the Japanese atomic bomb survivors and the ankylosing spondylitis patients; from new epidemiological surveys, such as the patients treated for cancer of the uterine cervix; and from combined surveys, including workers exposed in underground mines. Since the numerous and complex differences among the different study populations introduce factors that influence the risk estimates derived in ways that are not completely understood, it is not clear how to combine the different risk estimates obtained. These factors involve complex biological and physical variables distributed over time. Because such carcinogenic effects occur too infrequently to be demonstrated at low doses, the risks of low-dose radiation can be estimated only by interpolation from observations at high doses on the basis of theoretical concepts, mathematical models and available empirical evidence, primarily the epidemiological surveys of large populations exposed to ionizing radiation. In spite of a considerable amount of research, only recently has there has been efforts to apply the extensive laboratory data in animals to define the dose-incidence relationship in the low dose region. There simply are insufficient data in the epidemiological studies of large human populations to estimate risk coefficients directly from exposure to low doses. The risk estimates for the carcinogenic effects of radiation have been, in the past, somewhat low and reassessment of the numerical values is now necessary.

  7. High resolution collinear resonance ionization spectroscopy of neutron-rich $^{76,77,78}$Cu isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2083035

    In this work, nuclear magnetic dipole moments, electric quadrupole moments, nuclear spins and changes in the mean-squared charge radii of radioactive copper isotopes are presented. Reaching up to $^{78}$Cu ($Z=29$, $N=49$), produced at rates of only 10 particles per second, these measurements represent the most exotic laser spectroscopic investigations near the doubly-magic and very exotic $^{78}$Ni ($Z=28$,$N=50$) to date. This thesis outlines the technical developments and investigations of laser-atom interactions that were performed during this thesis. These developments were crucial for establishing a high-resolution, high sensitivity collinear resonance ionization spectroscopy experiment at ISOLDE, CERN. This thesis furthermore provides a detailed description of the analysis tools that were implemented and applied to extract the nuclear observables from the experimental data. The results were compared to several large-scale shell model calculations, and provide deep insight into the structure of $^{78}$N...

  8. Air filled ionization chambers and their response to high LET radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaiser, Franz-Joachim; Bassler, Niels; Tölli, Heikki

    Background Air filled ionization chambers (ICs) are widely used for absolute dosimetry, not only in photon beams but also in beams of heavy charged particles. Within the IC, electron hole pairs are generated by the energy deposition originating from incoming radiation. High-LET particles create...... a high density of charge carriers in the core of particle tracks. As a consequence an increased (so called "initial") recombination of the charge carriers takes place, besides of the general (volume) recombination described by the Boag theory. A theory for a sub-type of initial recombination ("columnar......" recombination) is the Jaffe theory, which was developed in 1913 by Jaffe. He solved a differential equation by applying several simplifications and approximations such as a Gaussian shaped track whose width serves as free parameter. These simplifications and the use of an simplified charge carrier distribution...

  9. Elemental stoichiometry indicates predominant influence of potassium and phosphorus limitation on arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis in acidic soil at high altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohammad Haneef; Meghvansi, Mukesh K; Gupta, Rajeev; Veer, Vijay

    2015-09-15

    The functioning of high-altitude agro-ecosystems is constrained by the harsh environmental conditions, such as low temperatures, acidic soil, and low nutrient supply. It is therefore imperative to investigate the site-specific ecological stoichiometry with respect to AM symbiosis in order to maximize the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) benefits for the plants in such ecosystems. Here, we assess the elemental stoichiometry of four Capsicum genotypes grown on acidic soil at high altitude in Arunachal Pradesh, India. Further, we try to identify the predominant resource limitations influencing the symbioses of different Capsicum genotypes with the AM fungi. Foliar and soil elemental stoichiometric relations of Capsicum genotypes were evaluated with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) colonization and occurrence under field conditions. AM fungal diversity in rhizosphere, was estimated through PCR-DGGE profiling. Results demonstrated that the symbiotic interaction of various Capsicum genotypes with the AM fungi in acidic soil was not prominent in the study site as evident from the low range of root colonization (21-43.67%). In addition, despite the rich availability of carbon in plant leaves as well as in soil, the carbon-for-phosphorus trade between AMF and plants appeared to be limited. Our results provide strong evidences of predominant influence of the potassium-limitation, in addition to phosphorus-limitation, on AM symbiosis with Capsicum in acidic soil at high altitude. We also conclude that the potassium should be considered in addition to carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus in further studies investigating the stoichiometric relationships with the AMF symbioses in high altitude agro-ecosystems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. High-throughput identification of ionizing radiation-sensitive plant genes and development of radiation indicator plant and radiation sensing Genechip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Sub; Kim, Jinbaek; Ha, Bokeun; Kim, Sang Hoon; Kim, Sunhee

    2013-05-15

    Physiological analysis of monocot model plant (rice) in response to ionizing radiation (cosmic-ray, gamma-ray, Ion beam). - Identification of antioxidant characters through cytochemical analysis. - Comparison of antioxidant activities in response to ionizing irradiation. - Evaluation of anthocyanin quantity in response to ionizing irradiation. Ionization energy response gene family analysis via bioinformatic validation. - Expression analysis of monocot and dicot gene families. - In silico and bioinformatic approach to elucidate gene function. Characterization and functional analysis of genes specifically expressed in response to ionizing irradiation (cosmic-ray, gamma-ray, Ion beam). - High throughput trancriptomic analysis of plants under ionizing radiation using microarray. - Promotor and cis-element analysis of genes specifically expressed in response to ionizing radiation. - Validation and function analysis of candidate genes. - Elucidation of plant mechanism of sensing and response to ionization energy. Development of bioindicator plants detecting ionization energy. - Cloning and identification of 'Radio marker genes (RMG)'. - Development of Over-expression (O/E) or Knock-out (K/O) plant using RMG. Development of Genechip as an ionization energy detector. - Expression profiling analysis of genes specifically expression in response to ionization energy. - Prepare high-conserved gene specific oligomer. - Development of ionization energy monitoring Genechip and application.

  11. The MARIACHI Project: Mixed Apparatus for Radio Investigation of Atmospheric Cosmic Rays of High Ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inglis, M. D.; Takai, H.; Warasia, R.; Sundermier, J.

    2005-12-01

    Extreme Energy Cosmic Rays are nuclei that have been accelerated to kinetic energies in excess of 1020 eV. Where do they come from? How are they produced? Are they survivors of the early universe? Are they remnants of supernovas? MARIACHI, a unique collaboration between scientists, physics teachers and students, is an innovative technique that allows us to detect and study them. The Experiment MARIACHI is a unique research experiment that seeks the detection of extreme energy cosmic rays (EECRs), with E >1020 eV. It is an exciting project with many aspects: Research: It investigates an unconventional way of detecting EECRs based upon a method successfully used to detect meteors entering the upper atmosphere. The method was developed by planetary astronomers listening to radio signals reflected off the ionization trail. MARIACHI seeks to listen to TV signals reflected off the ionization trail of an EECR. The unique experiment topology will also permit the study of meteors, exotic forms of lightning, and atmospheric science. Computing and Technology: It uses radio detection stations, along with mini shower arrays hooked up to GPS clocks. Teachers and students build the arrays. It implements the Internet and the GRID as means of communication, data transfer, data processing, and for hosting a public educational outreach web site. Outreach and Education: It is an open research project with the active participation of a wide audience of astronomers, physicists, college professors, high school teachers and students. Groups representing high schools, community colleges and universities all collaborate in the project. The excitement of a real experiment motivates the science and technology classroom, and incorporates several high school physical science topics along with material from other disciplines such as astronomy, electronics, radio, optics.

  12. Spectra of High-Ionization Seyfert 1 Galaxies: Implications for the Narrow-Line Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, David; Cohen, Ross D.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.

    1996-01-01

    We present line profiles and profile parameters for the Narrow-Line Regions (NLRs) of six Seyfert 1 galaxies with high-ionization lines: MCG 8-11-11, Mrk 79, Mrk 704, Mrk 841, NGC 4151, and NGC 5548. The sample was chosen primarily with the goal of obtaining high-quality [Fe VII] lambda6087 and, when possible, [Fe X] lambda6374 profiles to determine if these lines are more likely formed in a physically distinct 'coronal line region' or are formed throughout the NLR along with lines of lower critical density (n(sub cr)) and/or Ionization Potential (IP). We discuss correlations of velocity shift and width with n(sub cr) and IP. In some objects, lines of high IP and/or n(sub cr) are systematically broader than those of low IP/n(sub cr). Of particular interest, however, are objects that show no correlations of line width with either IP or n(sub cr). In these objects, lines of high and low IP/n(sub cr), are remarkably similar, which is difficult to reconcile with the classical picture of the NLR, in which lines of high and low IP/n(sub cr) are formed in physically distinct regions. We argue for similar spatial extents for the flux in lines with similar profiles. Here, as well as in a modeling-oriented companion paper, we develop further an idea suggested by Moore & Cohen that objects that do and do not show line width correlations with IP/n(sub cr) can both be explained in terms of a single NLR model with only a small difference in the cloud column density distinguishing the two types of object. Overall, our objects do not show correlations between the Full Width at Half-Maximum (FWHM) and IP and/or n(sub cr). The width must be defined by a parameter that is sensitive to extended profile wings in order for the correlations to result. We present models in which FWHM correlations with IP and/or n(sub cr) result only after simulating the lower spectral resolution used in previous observational studies. The models that simulate the higher spectral resolution of our

  13. Can Diuretics Decrease Your Potassium Level?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diseases and Conditions High blood pressure (hypertension) Can diuretics decrease your potassium level? Answers from Sheldon G. Sheps, M.D. Yes, some diuretics — also called water pills — decrease potassium in the ...

  14. High efficiency direct detection of ions from resonance ionization of sputtered atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruen, Dieter M.; Pellin, Michael J.; Young, Charles E.

    1986-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for trace and other quantitative analysis with high efficiency of a component in a sample, with the analysis involving the removal by ion or other bombardment of a small quantity of ion and neutral atom groups from the sample, the conversion of selected neutral atom groups to photoions by laser initiated resonance ionization spectroscopy, the selective deflection of the photoions for separation from original ion group emanating from the sample, and the detection of the photoions as a measure of the quantity of the component. In some embodiments, the original ion group is accelerated prior to the RIS step for separation purposes. Noise and other interference are reduced by shielding the detector from primary and secondary ions and deflecting the photoions sufficiently to avoid the primary and secondary ions.

  15. Radiation effects in Caenorhabditis elegans - Mutagenesis by high and low LET ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Gregory A.; Schubert, Wayne W.; Marshall, Tamara M.; Benton, Eric R.; Benton, Eugene V.

    1989-01-01

    The nematode C. elegans was used to measure the effectiveness of high-energy ionized particles in the induction of three types of genetic lesions. Recessive lethal mutations in a 40-map unit autosomal region, sterility, and X-chromosome nondisjunction or damage were investigated. Induction rates were measured as a function of linear energy transfer, LET(infinity), for nine ions of atomic nunmber 1-57 accelerated at the BEVALAC accelerator. Linear kinetics were observed for all three types of lesions within the dose/fluence ranges tested and were found to vary strongly as a function of particle LET(infinity). Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values of up to 4.2 were measured, and action cross sections were calculated and compared to mutagenic responses in other systems.

  16. Spectroscopy and atomic physics of highly ionized Cr, Fe, and Ni for tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, U.; Doschek, G. A.; Cheng, C.-C.; Bhatia, A. K.

    1980-01-01

    The paper considers the spectroscopy and atomic physics for some highly ionized Cr, Fe, and Ni ions produced in tokamak plasmas. Forbidden and intersystem wavelengths for Cr and Ni ions are extrapolated and interpolated using the known wavelengths for Fe lines identified in solar-flare plasmas. Tables of transition probabilities for the B I, C I, N I, O I, and F I isoelectronic sequences are presented, and collision strengths and transition probabilities for Cr, Fe, and Ni ions of the Be I sequence are given. Similarities of tokamak and solar spectra are discussed, and it is shown how the atomic data presented may be used to determine ion abundances and electron densities in low-density plasmas.

  17. Requirements for a high rate of potassium excretion in rats consuming a low electrolyte diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheema-Dhadli, Surinder; Lin, Shih-Hua; Keong-Chong, Chee; Kamel, Kamel S; Halperin, Mitchell L

    2006-04-15

    Control mechanisms for potassium (K(+)) excretion in humans developed in Palaeolithic times when diets were sodium poor and episodically K(+) rich. Nevertheless, our understanding of the regulation of K(+) excretion comes from experiments in rats with large sodium and K(+) intakes. Our objective was to identify how K(+) excretion was regulated when rats consumed a low NaCl diet to reflect Palaeolithic conditions. Rats that were given mineralocorticoids plus either NaCl, mannitol, or NaHCO(3) had a small kaliuresis. In contrast, KCl load induced a large kaliuresis and a near-maximal luminal [K(+)] in the terminal cortical collecting duct ([K(+)](CCD)). The time course of events was important. The rise in the [K(+)](CCD) was prompt, but the initial kaliuresis was only modest. Over the next 4 h, kaliuresis increased markedly due solely to a higher calculated distal flow rate, which appeared to be due to diminished reabsorption of NaCl in the loop of Henle; of note, the measured papillary [K(+)] rose. In summary, the increase in the [K(+)](CCD) in rats given KCl is likely to be due to an increase in the number of luminal K(+) channels rather than to mechanisms that are known to induce a lumen-negative voltage in cortical distal nephron segments. The higher distal flow rate might be due to a higher interstitial [K(+)], which inhibited NaCl reabsorption in the loop of Henle. Thus, to understand which of the potential control mechanisms are operating, one must look very closely at the conditions imposed by the experimental setting.

  18. Evaluation of High Performance Converters Under Low Dose Rate Total Ionizing Dose (TID) Testing for NASA Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ashok K.; Sahu, Kusum

    1998-01-01

    This paper reports the results of low dose rate (0.01-0.18 rads(Si)/sec) total ionizing dose (TID) tests performed on several types of high performance converters. The parts used in this evaluation represented devices such as a high speed flash converter, a 16-bit ADC and a voltage-to-frequency converter.

  19. Understanding ternary poly(potassium benzimidazolide)-based polymer electrolytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aili, David; Jankova Atanasova, Katja; Han, Junyoung

    2016-01-01

    in fuel cell catalyst layers. This work focuses on the chemistry of m-PBI in aqueous potassium hydroxide. Equilibration in aqueous KOH with concentrations of 15e20 wt.% was found to result in ionization of the polymer, causing released intermolecular hydrogen bonding. This allowed for extensive volume......Poly(2,20-(m-phenylene)-5,50-bisbenzimidazole) (m-PBI) can dissolve large amounts of aqueous electrolytes to give materials with extraordinary high ion conductivity and the practical applicability has been demonstrated repeatedly in fuel cells, water electrolysers and as anion conducting component...... swelling, high electrolyte uptake, dramatic plasticization and increase of the ion conductivity for the formed poly(potassium benzimidazolide)-based structure. Further increasing the concentration of the bulk solution to 50 wt.% resulted in dehydration and extensive crystallization of the polymer matrix...

  20. Understanding ternary poly(potassium benzimidazolide)-based polymer electrolytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aili, David; Jankova Atanasova, Katja; Han, Junyoung

    2016-01-01

    in fuel cell catalyst layers. This work focuses on the chemistry of m-PBI in aqueous potassium hydroxide. Equilibration in aqueous KOH with concentrations of 15e20 wt.% was found to result in ionization of the polymer, causing released intermolecular hydrogen bonding. This allowed for extensive volume...... swelling, high electrolyte uptake, dramatic plasticization and increase of the ion conductivity for the formed poly(potassium benzimidazolide)-based structure. Further increasing the concentration of the bulk solution to 50 wt.% resulted in dehydration and extensive crystallization of the polymer matrix......Poly(2,20-(m-phenylene)-5,50-bisbenzimidazole) (m-PBI) can dissolve large amounts of aqueous electrolytes to give materials with extraordinary high ion conductivity and the practical applicability has been demonstrated repeatedly in fuel cells, water electrolysers and as anion conducting component...

  1. Characterization of phosphoantigens by high-performance anion-exchange chromatography-electrospray ionization ion trap mass spectrometry and nanoelectrospray ionization ion trap mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pont, F; Luciani, B; Belmant, C; Fournié, J J

    2001-08-01

    New phosphorylated microbial metabolites referred to as phosphoantigens activate immune responses in humans. Although these molecules have leading applications in medical research, no direct method allows their rapid and unambiguous structural identification. Here, we interfaced online HPAEC (high performance anion-exchange chromatography) with ESI-ITMS (electrospray ionization ion trap mass spectrometry) to identify such pyrophosphorylated molecules. A self-regenerating anion suppressor located upstream of electrospray ionization enabled the simultaneous detection of pyrophosphoester by conductimetry, UV and MS. By HPAEC-ITMS and HPAEC-ITMS2, a single run permitted characterization of reference phosphoantigens and of related structures. Although all compounds were resolved by HPAEC, MS enabled their detection and identification by [M-H]- and fragment ions. Isobaric phosphoantigen analogues were also separated by HPAEC and distinguished by MS2. The relevance of this device was demonstrated for phosphoantigens analysis in human urine and plasma. Furthermore, identification of natural phosphoantigens by automatically generated 2D mass spectra from nano-ESI-ITMS is presented. This last technique permits the simultaneous performance of molecular screening of natural phosphoantigen extracts and their identification.

  2. Ion production and ionization effect in the atmosphere during the Bastille day GLE 59 due to high energy SEPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishev, A. L.; Velinov, P. I. Y.

    2018-01-01

    The influence of high energy particles, specifically cosmic rays, on atmospheric physics and chemistry is highly discussed. In most of the proposed models the role of ionization in the atmosphere due to cosmic rays is not negligible. Moreover, effect(s) on minor constituents and aerosols are recently observed, specifically over the polar regions during strong solar particle events. According to the recent findings for such effects it is necessary an essential increase of ion production, specifically during the winter period. The galactic cosmic rays are the main source of ionization in the Earth's stratosphere and troposphere. Occasionally, the atmospheric ionization is significantly enhanced during strong solar energetic particles events, specifically over the polar caps. During the solar cycle 23 several strong ground level enhancements were observed. One of the strongest was the Bastille day event occurred on 14 July 2000. Using a full Monte Carlo 3-D model, we compute the atmospheric ionization, considering explicitly the contribution of cosmic rays with galactic and solar origin, focusing on high energy particles. The model is based on atmospheric cascade simulation with the PLANETOCOSMICS code. The ion production rate is computed as a function of the altitude above the sea level. The ion production rate is computed on a step ranging from 10 to 30 min throughout the event, considering explicitly the spectral and angular characteristics of the high energy part of solar protons as well as their time evolution. The corresponding event averaged ionization effect relative to the average due to galactic cosmic rays is computed in lower stratosphere and upper troposphere at various altitudes, namely 20 km, 15 km, 12 km and 8 km above the sea level in a sub-polar and polar regions. The 24h and the weekly ionization effects are also computed in the troposphere and low stratosphere. Several applications are discussed.

  3. Using a low-sodium, high-potassium salt substitute to reduce blood pressure among Tibetans with high blood pressure: a patient-blinded randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingshan Zhao

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effects of a low-sodium and high-potassium salt-substitute on lowering blood pressure (BP among Tibetans living at high altitude (4300 meters. METHOD: The study was a patient-blinded randomized controlled trial conducted between February and May 2009 in Dangxiong County, Tibetan Autonomous Region, China. A total of 282 Tibetans aged 40 or older with known hypertension (systolic BP≥140 mmHg were recruited and randomized to intervention (salt-substitute, 65% sodium chloride, 25% potassium chloride and 10% magnesium sulfate or control (100% sodium chloride in a 1: 1 allocation ratio with three months' supply. Primary outcome was defined as the change in BP levels measured from baseline to followed-up with an automated sphygmomanometer. Per protocol (PP and intention to treat (ITT analyses were conducted. RESULTS: After the three months' intervention period, the net reduction in SBP/DBP in the intervention group in comparison to the control group was -8.2/-3.4 mmHg (all p<0.05 in PP analysis, after adjusting for baseline BP and other variables. ITT analysis showed the net reduction in SBP/DBP at -7.6/-3.5 mmHg with multiple imputations (all p<0.05. Furthermore, the whole distribution of blood pressure showed an overall decline in SBP/DBP and the proportion of patients with BP under control (SBP/DBP<140 mmHg was significantly higher in salt-substitute group in comparison to the regular salt group (19.2% vs. 8.8%, p = 0.027. CONCLUSION: Low sodium high potassium salt-substitute is effective in lowering both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and offers a simple, low-cost approach for hypertension control among Tibetans in China. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01429246.

  4. An Automated Platform for High-Resolution Tissue Imaging Using Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanekoff, Ingela T.; Heath, Brandi S.; Liyu, Andrey V.; Thomas, Mathew; Carson, James P.; Laskin, Julia

    2012-10-02

    An automated platform has been developed for acquisition and visualization of mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) data using nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI). The new system enables robust operation of the nano-DESI imaging source over many hours. This is achieved by controlling the distance between the sample and the probe by mounting the sample holder onto an automated XYZ stage and defining the tilt of the sample plane. This approach is useful for imaging of relatively flat samples such as thin tissue sections. Custom software called MSI QuickView was developed for visualization of large data sets generated in imaging experiments. MSI QuickView enables fast visualization of the imaging data during data acquisition and detailed processing after the entire image is acquired. The performance of the system is demonstrated by imaging rat brain tissue sections. High resolution mass analysis combined with MS/MS experiments enabled identification of lipids and metabolites in the tissue section. In addition, high dynamic range and sensitivity of the technique allowed us to generate ion images of low-abundance isobaric lipids. High-spatial resolution image acquired over a small region of the tissue section revealed the spatial distribution of an abundant brain metabolite, creatine, in the white and gray matter that is consistent with the literature data obtained using magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

  5. Static diode pumped alkali lasers: Model calculations of the effects of heating, ionization, high electronic excitation and chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmashenko, B. D.; Rosenwaks, S.; Heaven, M. C.

    2013-04-01

    The effects of heating, ionization, high electronic excitation and chemical reactions on the operation of diode pumped alkali lasers (DPALs) with a static, non-flowing gain medium are calculated using a semi-analytical model. Unlike other models, assuming a three-level scheme of the laser and neglecting influence of the temperature on the lasing power, it takes into account the temperature rise and losses of neutral alkali atoms due to ionization and chemical reactions, resulting in decrease of the pump absorption and slope efficiency. Good agreement with measurements in a static DPAL [B.V. Zhdanov, J. Sell, R.J. Knize, Electron. Lett. 44 (2008) 582] is obtained. It is found that the ionization processes have a small effect on the laser operation, whereas the chemical reactions of alkali atoms with hydrocarbons strongly affect the lasing power.

  6. Separation of Opiate Isomers Using Electrospray Ionization and Paper Spray Coupled to High-Field Asymmetric Waveform Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manicke, Nicholas E.; Belford, Michael

    2015-05-01

    One limitation in the growing field of ambient or direct analysis methods is reduced selectivity caused by the elimination of chromatographic separations prior to mass spectrometric analysis. We explored the use of high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS), an ambient pressure ion mobility technique, to separate the closely related opiate isomers of morphine, hydromorphone, and norcodeine. These isomers cannot be distinguished by tandem mass spectrometry. Separation prior to MS analysis is, therefore, required to distinguish these compounds, which are important in clinical chemistry and toxicology. FAIMS was coupled to a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer, and ionization was performed using either a pneumatically assisted heated electrospray ionization source (H-ESI) or paper spray, a direct analysis method that has been applied to the direct analysis of dried blood spots and other complex samples. We found that FAIMS was capable of separating the three opiate structural isomers using both H-ESI and paper spray as the ionization source.

  7. Salt Tolerance of Desorption Electrospray Ionization (DESI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, Ayanna U. [Purdue University; Talaty, Nari [Purdue University; Cooks, R G [Purdue University; Van Berkel, Gary J [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    Suppression of ion intensity in the presence of high salt matrices is common in most mass spectrometry ionization techniques. Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) is an ionization method that exhibits salt tolerance, and this is investigated. DESI analysis was performed on three different drug mixtures in the presence of 0, 0.2, 2, 5, 10, and 20% NaCl:KCl weight by volume from seven different surfaces. At physiological concentrations individual drugs in each mixture were observed with each surface. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) was used to provide additional confirmation for select compounds. Multiple stage experiments, to MS5, were performed for select compounds. Even in the absence of added salt, the benzodiazepine containing mixture yielded sodium and potassium adducts of carbamazepine which masked the ions of interest. These adducts were eliminated by adding 0.1% 7M ammonium acetate to the standard methanol:water (1:1) spray solvent. Comparison of the salt tolerance of DESI with that of electrospray ionization (ESI) demonstrated much better signal/noise characteristics for DESI in this study. The salt tolerance of DESI was also studied by performing limit of detection and dynamic range experiments. Even at a salt concentration significantly above physiological concentrations, select surfaces were effective in providing spectra that allowed the ready identification of the compounds of interest. The already high salt tolerance of DESI can be optimized further by appropriate choices of surface and spray solution.

  8. Impact ionization in high resistivity silicon induced by an intense terahertz field enhanced by an antenna array

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarekegne, Abebe Tilahun; Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Zalkovskij, Maksim

    2015-01-01

    We report on the observation of ultrafast impact ionization and carrier generation in high resistivity silicon induced by intense subpicosecond terahertz transients. Local terahertz peak electric fields of several MV cm−1 are obtained by field enhancement in the near field of a resonant metallic...

  9. Detection systems for high energy particle producing gaseous ionization; Sistemas de deteccion de particulas de alta energia mediante ionizacion gaseosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, L.; Duran, I.

    1985-07-01

    This report contains a review on the most used detectors based on the collection of the ionization produced by high energy particles: proportional counters, multiwire proportional chambers, Geiger-Muller counters and drift chambers. In six sections, the fundamental principles, the field configuration and useful gas mixtures, are discussed, most relevant devices are reported along 90 pages with 98 references. (Author) 98 refs.

  10. Evaluation of gas chromatography – electron ionization – full scan high resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry for pesticide residue analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mol, Hans G.J.; Tienstra, Marc; Zomer, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Gas chromatography with electron ionization and full scan high resolution mass spectrometry with an Orbitrap mass analyzer (GC-EI-full scan Orbitrap HRMS) was evaluated for residue analysis. Pesticides in fruit and vegetables were taken as an example application. The relevant aspects for GC-MS

  11. Redox enhanced energy storage in an aqueous high-voltage electrochemical capacitor with a potassium bromide electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qi; Haque, Mazharul; Kuzmenko, Volodymyr; Ramani, Namrata; Lundgren, Per; Smith, Anderson D.; Enoksson, Peter

    2017-04-01

    This paper reports a detailed electrochemical investigation of a symmetric carbon-carbon electrochemical device with a potassium bromide (KBr) electrolyte. Below 1.6 V, KBr gives electrochemical double layer behavior. At higher voltages the Br- / Br3- redox reaction comes into effect and enhances the energy storage. The redox-enhanced device has a high energy density, excellent stability, as well as high coulombic and energy efficiencies even at 1.9 V. More importantly, the redox contribution can be ;triggered; by pre-cycling at 1.9 V, and remains beneficial after switching to 1.6 V. The triggering operation leads to a 22% increase in stored energy with negligible sacrifice of power. The intriguing behavior is accompanied by a series of complex variations including the shifts of electrode potential limits and the shift of potential of zero voltage. The electro-oxidation of the positive electrode and kinetics of the Br- /Br3- electrode reactions are proposed to be the main causes for the triggering phenomenon. These findings provide means to improve the design and operation of devices that contain bromine, or other redox species with a comparably high electrode potential.

  12. Commercializing potassium terbium fluoride, KTF (KTb3F10) faraday crystals for high laser power optical isolator applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlichting, Wolfgang; Stevens, Kevin; Foundos, Greg; Payne, Alexis

    2017-10-01

    Many scientific lasers and increasingly industrial laser systems operate in power regime, require high-performance optical isolators to prevent disruptive light feedback into the laser cavity. The optically active Faraday material is the key optical element inside the isolator. SYNOPTICS has been supplying the laser market with Terbium Gallium Garnet (TGG - Tb3Ga5O12) for many years. It is the most commonly used material for the 650-1100nm range and the key advantages for TGG include its cubic crystal structure for alignment free processing, little to no intrinsic birefringence, and ease of manufacture. However, for high-power laser applications TGG is limited by its absorption at 1064nm and its thermo-optic coefficient, dn/dT. Specifically, thermal lensing and depolarization effects become a limiting factor at high laser powers. While TGG absorption has improved significantly over the past few years, there is an intrinsic limit. Now, SYNOPTICS is commercializing the enhanced new crystal Potassium Terbium Fluoride KTF (KTb3F10) that exhibits much smaller nonlinear refractive index and thermo-optic coefficients, and still exhibits a Verdet constant near that of TGG. This cubic crystal has relatively low absorption and thermo-optic coefficients. It is now fully characterized and available for select production orders. At OPTIFAB in October 2017 we present recent results comparing the performance of KTF to TGG in optical isolators and show SYNOPTICS advances in large volume crystal growth and the production ramp up.

  13. Free-Space Quantum Key Distribution with a High Generation Rate Potassium Titanyl Phosphate Waveguide Photon-Pair Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Chaffee, Dalton W.; Wilson, Nathaniel C.; Lekki, John D.; Tokars, Roger P.; Pouch, John J.; Roberts, Tony D.; Battle, Philip; Floyd, Bertram M.; Lind, Alexander J.; hide

    2016-01-01

    A high generation rate photon-pair source using a dual element periodically-poled potassium titanyl phosphate (PP KTP) waveguide is described. The fully integrated photon-pair source consists of a 1064-nanometer pump diode laser, fiber-coupled to a dual element waveguide within which a pair of 1064-nanometer photons are up-converted to a single 532-nanometer photon in the first stage. In the second stage, the 532-nanometer photon is down-converted to an entangled photon-pair at 800 nanometer and 1600 nanometer which are fiber-coupled at the waveguide output. The photon-pair source features a high pair generation rate, a compact power-efficient package, and continuous wave (CW) or pulsed operation. This is a significant step towards the long term goal of developing sources for high-rate Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) to enable Earth-space secure communications. Characterization and test results are presented. Details and preliminary results of a laboratory free-space QKD experiment with the B92 protocol are also presented.

  14. Potassium Blood Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/labtests/potassiumbloodtest.html Potassium Blood Test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. What is a Potassium Blood Test? A potassium blood test measures the amount of ...

  15. [Field observation on the effect of low-sodium and high-potassium salt substitute on blood pressure in the rural community-based population in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gao-hui; Ma, Ji-xiang; Guo, Xiao-lei; Dong, Jing; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Ji-yu; Su, Jun-ying; Tang, Jun-li; Xu, Ai-qiang

    2011-09-01

    To investigate the effect of commercial low-sodium and high-potassium salt substitutes on blood pressure in the rural community-based population in China. We conducted a quasi-experiment on 411 adults, who were 30 to 60 years of age, in 2 rural communities from Laiwu city in Shandong province of China on data from blood pressure screening. The subjects were divided into 2 groups: high blood pressure (HBP) and non-HBP (NHBP). Both groups and their family members took a low-sodium and high-potassium salt substitute for 3 months to replace the normal salt in their bodies. Blood pressure (BP) and 24-hour urinary sodium and potassium were measured regularly in the 2 groups. There was a continuously decreasing trend for BP at the end of the first month. Three months later, the mean BP decreased by 7.4 mm Hg (1 mm Hg = 0.133 kPa, t = 10.096, P = 0.000) for SBP and 3.8 mm Hg (t = 8.017, P = 0.000) for DBP in the HBP group, when compared to a 1.2 mm Hg (t = 2.507, P = 0.007) decrease on SBP and 1.0 mm Hg (t = 2.987, P = 0.002) on DBP in the NHBP group. The mean urinary sodium had a decrease of 15.5 mmol/24 h (t = 1.803, P = 0.037), but the urinary potassium increased by 4.2 mmol/24 h (t' = 2.132, P = 0.018). The result of urinary sodium appeared to be as follows: potassium ratio (Na(+)/K(+)) decreased by 1.2 (t = 2.786, P = 0.003) in the HBP group. However, in NHBP group, the mean urinary sodium decreased by 1.7 mmol/24 h (t = 0.211, P = 0.417) and urinary potassium increased by 3.7 mmol/24 h (t' = 2.207, P = 0.015), together with the decrease of Na(+)/K(+) by 0.7 (t = 1.818, P = 0.036). Results from our study clearly demonstrated that the intake of low-sodium and high-potassium salt substitute could effectively reduce the BP with good compliance among adults in the rural community-based population in China. This was an effective but non-medical method to prevent and control the high blood pressure.

  16. Charge collection efficiency in ionization chambers exposed to electron beams with high dose per pulse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laitano, R F; Guerra, A S; Pimpinella, M; Caporali, C; Petrucci, A

    2006-12-21

    The correction for charge recombination was determined for different plane-parallel ionization chambers exposed to clinical electron beams with low and high dose per pulse, respectively. The electron energy was nearly the same (about 7 and 9 MeV) for any of the beams used. Boag's two-voltage analysis (TVA) was used to determine the correction for ion losses, k(s), relevant to each chamber considered. The presence of free electrons in the air of the chamber cavity was accounted for in determining k(s) by TVA. The determination of k(s) was made on the basis of the models for ion recombination proposed in past years by Boag, Hochhäuser and Balk to account for the presence of free electrons. The absorbed dose measurements in both low-dose-per-pulse (less than 0.3 mGy per pulse) and high-dose-per-pulse (20-120 mGy per pulse range) electron beams were compared with ferrous sulphate chemical dosimetry, a method independent of the dose per pulse. The results of the comparison support the conclusion that one of the models is more adequate to correct for ion recombination, even in high-dose-per-pulse conditions, provided that the fraction of free electrons is properly assessed. In this respect the drift velocity and the time constant for attachment of electrons in the air of the chamber cavity are rather critical parameters because of their dependence on chamber dimensions and operational conditions. Finally, a determination of the factor k(s) was also made by zero extrapolation of the 1/Q versus 1/V saturation curves, leading to the conclusion that this method does not provide consistent results in high-dose-per-pulse beams.

  17. Ionization Capabilities of Hydronium Ions and High Electric Fields Produced by Atmospheric Pressure Corona Discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Natsuhiko; Sekimoto, Kanako; Takayama, Mitsuo

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure corona discharge (APCD) was applied to the ionization of volatile organic compounds. The mass spectra of analytes having aromatic, phenolic, anilinic, basic and aliphatic in nature were obtained by using vapor supply and liquid smear supply methods. The vapor supply method mainly gave protonated analytes [A+H]+ caused by proton transfer from hydronium ion H3O+, except for benzene, toluene and n-hexane that have lower proton affinity. The use of the liquid smear supply method resulted in the formation of molecular ion A·+ and/or dehydride analyte [A-H]+, according to the nature of analytes used. The formation of A·+ without fragment ions could be explained by the electron tunneling via high electric fields 108 V/m at the tip of the corona needle. The dehydride analytes [A-H]+ observed in the mass spectra of n-hexane, di- and tributylamines may be explained by the hydride abstraction from the alkyl chains by the hydronium ion. The hydronium ion can play the two-roles for analytes, i.e., the proton donor to form [A+H]+ and the hydride acceptor to form [A-H]+.

  18. Suppression of diamagnetism by neutrals pressure in partially ionized, high-beta plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Shunjiro; Kuwahara, Daisuke; Yano, Kazuki; Fruchtman, Amnon

    2016-12-01

    Suppression of diamagnetism in a partially ionized plasma with high beta was experimentally investigated by the use of Langmuir and Hall sensor probes, focusing on a neutrals pressure effect. The plasma beta, which is the ratio of plasma to vacuum magnetic pressures, varied from ˜1% to >100% while the magnetic field varied from ˜120 G to ˜1 G. Here, a uniform magnetized argon plasma was operated mostly in an inductive mode, using a helicon plasma source of the Large Helicon Plasma Device [S. Shinohara et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 057104 (2009)] with a diameter of 738 mm and an axial length of 4860 mm. Electron density varied from 5 × 1015 m-3 to diamagnetic effect was smaller than that expected by the plasma beta. This suppressed diamagnetism is explained by the neutrals pressure replacing magnetic pressure in balancing plasma pressure. Diamagnetism is weakened if neutrals pressure is comparable to the plasma pressure and if the coupling of plasma and neutrals pressures by ion-neutral collisions is strong enough.

  19. High-quality electron beams from beam-driven plasma accelerators by wakefield-induced ionization injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez de la Ossa, A; Grebenyuk, J; Mehrling, T; Schaper, L; Osterhoff, J

    2013-12-13

    We propose a new and simple strategy for controlled ionization-induced trapping of electrons in a beam-driven plasma accelerator. The presented method directly exploits electric wakefields to ionize electrons from a dopant gas and capture them into a well-defined volume of the accelerating and focusing wake phase, leading to high-quality witness bunches. This injection principle is explained by example of three-dimensional particle-in-cell calculations using the code OSIRIS. In these simulations a high-current-density electron-beam driver excites plasma waves in the blowout regime inside a fully ionized hydrogen plasma of density 5×10(17)cm-3. Within an embedded 100  μm long plasma column contaminated with neutral helium gas, the wakefields trigger ionization, trapping of a defined fraction of the released electrons, and subsequent acceleration. The hereby generated electron beam features a 1.5 kA peak current, 1.5  μm transverse normalized emittance, an uncorrelated energy spread of 0.3% on a GeV-energy scale, and few femtosecond bunch length.

  20. Simple and rapid method on High Performance Liquid Chromatography for simultaneous determination of benzylpenicillin potassium, streptomycin sulphate and related substances in Ascomicin – a veterinary use ointment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neagu Maria

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A new simple, rapid, accurate and precise High – Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC method for determination of benzylpenicillin potassium and streptomycin sulphate in Ascomicin ointment was developed and validated. The method can be used for the detection and quantification of known and unknown impurities and degradation products in this pharmaceutical product during routine analysis and also for stability studies in view of its capability to separate degradation products. The method was validated for accuracy, precision, specificity, robustness and quantification limits according to ICH Guidelines. The estimation of benzylpenicillin potassium and streptomycin sulphate was done by Waters HPLC 2695. The chromatographic conditions comprised a reverse-phased C18 column (5 µm particle size, 250 mm×4.6 mm i.d. with a mobile phase consisting of a mixture of solution in water containing 0.025 M of sodium phosphate dibasic and 0.02 of sodium hexansulfonate adjusted to pH 6.0 with 22.5 g/lsolution of phosphoric acid and acetonitrile in gradient elution. The flow rate was 0.8 ml/min. Standard curves were linear over the concentration range of 5.00 µg/ml to 5.00 mg/ml for streptomycin sulphate and 3.26 µg/ml to 3.26 mg/ml for benzylpenicillin potassium. Statistical analyses proved the method was precise, reproducible, selective, specific and accurate for analysis of benzylpenicillin potassium, streptomycin sulphate and related substances.

  1. Ionizing radiation measurements using low cost instruments for teaching in college or high-school in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, M. C.; Vilela, D. C.; Migoto, V. G.; Gomes, M. P.; Martin, I. M.; Germano, J. S. E.

    2017-11-01

    Ionizing radiation one of modern physics experimental teaching in colleges and high school can be easily implemented today due to low coasts of detectors and also electronic circuits and data acquisition interfaces. First it is interesting to show to young’s students what is ionizing radiation and from where they appears near ground level? How it is possible to measure these radiations and how to check intensities variation during day, night, dry and wet periods in the same school? For increasing interest and stimulation in others students how to proceed in making the graphics of the ionizing radiation and presenting him in real time using Web internet facilities? Many others facilities like calibration of the detector using low intensities radioactive ionizing radiation sources, make comparison of the measurements and discussions of the results should be possible between many groups of students from several schools in the region of Brazil. This paper presents the experimental procedures including detectors and associated electronic including data acquisition, graphics elaboration and Web internet procedures to discuss and exchanging data measurements from several schools.

  2. Use of a Continuous Wave Laser and Pockels Cell for Sensitive High-Resolution Collinear Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groote, R. P.; Budinčević, I.; Billowes, J.; Bissell, M. L.; Cocolios, T. E.; Farooq-Smith, G. J.; Fedosseev, V. N.; Flanagan, K. T.; Franchoo, S.; Garcia Ruiz, R. F.; Heylen, H.; Li, R.; Lynch, K. M.; Marsh, B. A.; Neyens, G.; Rossel, R. E.; Rothe, S.; Stroke, H. H.; Wendt, K. D. A.; Wilkins, S. G.; Yang, X.

    2015-09-01

    New technical developments have led to a 2 orders of magnitude improvement of the resolution of the collinear resonance ionization spectroscopy (CRIS) experiment at ISOLDE, CERN, without sacrificing the high efficiency of the CRIS technique. Experimental linewidths of 20(1) MHz were obtained on radioactive beams of francium, allowing us for the first time to determine the electric quadrupole moment of the short lived [t1 /2=22.0 (5 ) ms ] 219Fr Qs=-1.21 (2 ) eb , which would not have been possible without the advantages offered by the new method. This method relies on a continuous-wave laser and an external Pockels cell to produce narrow-band light pulses, required to reach the high resolution in two-step resonance ionization. Exotic nuclei produced at rates of a few hundred ions/s can now be studied with high resolution, allowing detailed studies of the anchor points for nuclear theories.

  3. Effect of high dose natural ionizing radiation on the immune system of the exposed residents of Ramsar Town, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attar, Massoud; Molaie Kondolousy, Yaghob; Khansari, Nemat

    2007-06-01

    Iran is one of several countries that has regions of high dose natural ionizing radiation. Two well-known villages in the suburb of Ramsar Town in the Caspian Sea strip, Taleshmahaleh and Chaparsar, have background radiation that is 13 times higher than normal. This radiation is the result of Radium 226 and Radon gas both of which are highly water soluble. While people living in these regions do not suffer from any major health problems, we decided to study the their immune responses to infection and inflammation in order to determine if their habitat affects their immune defense mechanisms as a way of compensating for their exposure to high dose environmental ionizing radiation. Our results showed that the total serum antioxidant level in the exposed people was significantly lower than the individuals not exposed to high dose natural ionizing radiation. The exposed individuals also had higher lymphocyte-induced IL-4 and IL-10 production, and lower IL-2 and IFN-gamma production. In addition, neutrophil NBT, phagocytosis, and locomotion were higher in the exposed group. In contrast, lymphocyte proliferation in response to PHA was unaffected. We conclude that the immune system of individuals exposed to high dose ionizing radiation has adapted to its environment by shifting from a Type 1 to a Type 2 response to promote anti-inflammation. This may be because inflammatory Type 1 responses generate more free radicals than Type 2 responses, in addition to the free radicals generated as a result of high environmental radiation. Thus, the serum total antioxidant level in the exposed residents was lower than the unexposed group.

  4. Two-dimensional high spatial-resolution dosimeter using europium doped potassium chloride: a feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H. Harold; Driewer, Joseph P.; Han, Zhaohui; Low, Daniel A.; Yang, Deshan; Xiao, Zhiyan

    2014-01-01

    Recent research has shown that KCl:Eu2+ has great potential for use in megavoltage radiation therapy dosimetry because this material exhibits excellent storage performance and is reusable due to strong radiation hardness. This work reports the authors’ attempts to fabricate 2D KCl:Eu2+ storage phosphor films (SPFs) using both a physical vapor deposition (PVD) method and a tape casting method. X ray diffraction analysis showed that a 10 µm thick PVD sample was composed of highly crystalline KCl. No additional phases were observed, suggesting that the europium activator had completed been incorporated into the KCl matrix. Photostimulated luminescence and photoluminescence spectra suggested that F (Cl-) centers were the electron storage centers post×ray irradiation and that Eu2+ cations acted as luminescence centers in the photostimulation process. The 150-µm thick casted KCl:Eu2+ SPF showed sub-millimeter spatial resolution. Monte Carlo simulations further demonstrated that the admixture of 20% KCl:Eu2+ and 80% low Z polymer binder exhibited almost no energy dependence in a 6 MV beam. KCl:Eu2+ pellet samples showed a large dynamic range from 0.01 cGy to 60 Gy dose-to-water, and saturated at approximately 500 Gy as a result of KCl’s intrinsic high radiation hardness. Taken together, this work provides strong evidence that KCl:Eu2+ based SPF with associated readout apparatus could result in a novel electronic film system that has all the desirable features associated with classic radiographic film and, importantly, water equivalence and the capability of permanent identification of each detector. PMID:24651448

  5. Direct analysis of triterpenes from high-salt fermented cucumbers using infrared matrix-assisted laser desorption electrospray ionization (IR-MALDESI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    High-salt samples present a challenge to mass spectrometry (MS) analysis, particularly when electrospray ionization (ESI) is used, requiring extensive sample preparation steps such as desalting, extraction, and purification. In this study, infrared matrix-assisted laser desorption electrospray ioniz...

  6. OsHAK1, a High-Affinity Potassium Transporter, Positively Regulates Responses to Drought Stress in Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang Chen

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Drought is one of the environmental factors that severely restrict plant distribution and crop production. Recently, we reported that the high-affinity potassium transporter OsHAK1 plays important roles in K acquisition and translocation in rice over low and high K concentration ranges, however, knowledge on the regulatory roles of OsHAK1 in osmotic/drought stress is limited. Here, transcript levels of OsHAK1 were found transiently elevated by water deficit in roots and shoots, consistent with the enhanced GUS activity in transgenic plants under stress. Under drought conditions, OsHAK1 knockout mutants (KO presented lower tolerance to the stress and displayed stunted growth at both the vegetative and reproductive stages. Phenotypic analysis of OsHAK1 overexpression seedlings (Ox demonstrated that they present better tolerance to drought stress than wild-type (WT. Compared to WT seedlings, OsHAK1 overexpressors had lower level of lipid peroxidation, higher activities of antioxidant enzymes (POX and CAT and higher proline accumulation. Furthermore, qPCR analysis revealed that OsHAK1 act as a positive regulator of the expression of stress-responsive genes as well as of two well-known rice channel genes (OsTPKb and OsAKT1 involved in K homeostasis and stress responses in transgenic plants under dehydration. Most important, OsHAK1-Ox plants displayed enhanced drought tolerance at the reproductive stage, resulting in 35% more grain yield than WT under drought conditions, and without exhibiting significant differences under normal growth conditions. Consequently, OsHAK1 can be considered to be used in molecular breeding for improvement of drought tolerance in rice.

  7. Cluster excitation and ionization in high velocity collisions:the atomic approach

    OpenAIRE

    Mezdari, Férid; Wohrer-Béroff, Karine; Chabot, Marin

    2004-01-01

    NIM; The independent atom and electron model [1] is introduced in a quantum context and associated approximations tentatively estimated. Confrontation of the model to measured ionization and excitation cross sections of small ionic carbon clusters Cn+ in collisions with helium at an impact velocity of 2.6 a.u is presented.

  8. Present-day Galactic Evolution: Low-metallicity, Warm, Ionized Gas Inflow Associated with High-velocity Cloud Complex A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barger, K. A.; Haffner, L. M.; Wakker, B. P.; Hill, Alex. S.; Madsen, G. J.; Duncan, A. K.

    2012-12-01

    The high-velocity cloud Complex A is a probe of the physical conditions in the Galactic halo. The kinematics, morphology, distance, and metallicity of Complex A indicate that it represents new material that is accreting onto the Galaxy. We present Wisconsin Hα Mapper kinematically resolved observations of Complex A over the velocity range of -250 to -50 km s-1 in the local standard of rest reference frame. These observations include the first full Hα intensity map of Complex A across (\\mathit {l, b}) = (124{^\\circ }, 18{^\\circ }) to (171°, 53°) and deep targeted observations in Hα, [S II] λ6716, [N II] λ6584, and [O I] λ6300 toward regions with high H I column densities, background quasars, and stars. The Hα data imply that the masses of neutral and ionized material in the cloud are similar, both being greater than 106 M ⊙. We find that the Bland-Hawthorn & Maloney model for the intensity of the ionizing radiation near the Milky Way is consistent with the known distance of the high-latitude part of Complex A and an assumed cloud geometry that puts the lower-latitude parts of the cloud at a distance of 7-8 kpc. This compatibility implies a 5% ionizing photon escape fraction from the Galactic disk. We also provide the nitrogen and sulfur upper abundance solutions for a series of temperatures, metallicities, and cloud configurations for purely photoionized gas; these solutions are consistent with the sub-solar abundances found by previous studies, especially for temperatures above 104 K or for gas with a high fraction of singly ionized nitrogen and sulfur.

  9. Nuclear microprobe investigation of the effects of ionization and displacement damage in vertical, high voltage GaN diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizkelethy, G.; King, M. P.; Aktas, O.; Kizilyalli, I. C.; Kaplar, R. J.

    2017-08-01

    Radiation responses of high-voltage, vertical gallium-nitride (GaN) diodes were investigated using Sandia National Laboratories' nuclear microprobe. Effects of the ionization and the displacement damage were studied using various ion beams. We found that the devices show avalanche effect for heavy ions operated under bias well below the breakdown voltage. The displacement damage experiments showed a surprising effect for moderate damage: the charge collection efficiency demonstrated an increase instead of a decrease for higher bias voltages.

  10. High potassium level

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the blood. This buildup can be due to: Addison disease . Disease in which the adrenal glands do not ... used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed ...

  11. High sodium and low potassium intake among Italian children: relationship with age, body mass and blood pressure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Campanozzi

    Full Text Available Hypertension is the leading cause of death in developed countries and reduction of salt intake is recommended as a key preventive measure.To assess the dietary sodium and potassium intakes in a national sample of Italian children and adolescents and to examine their relationships with BMI and blood pressure (BP in the framework of the MINISAL survey, a program supported by the Italian Ministry of Health.The study population included 1424 healthy subjects (766 boys, 658 girls aged 6-18 years (mean age: 10.1±2.9 who were consecutively recruited in participating National Health Service centers in 10 Italian regions. Electrolyte intake was estimated from 24 hour urine collections tested for completeness by the concomitant measurement of creatinine content. Anthropometric indices and BP were measured with standardized procedures.The average estimated sodium intake was 129 mmol (7.4 g of salt per day among boys and 117 mmol (6.7 g of salt among girls. Ninety-three percent of the boys and 89% of the girls had a consumption higher than the recommended age-specific standard dietary target. The estimated average daily potassium intakes were 39 mmol (1.53 g and 36 mmol (1.40 g, respectively, over 96% of the boys and 98% of the girls having a potassium intake lower than the recommended adequate intake. The mean sodium/potassium ratio was similar among boys and girls (3.5 and 3.4, respectively and over 3-fold greater than the desirable level. Sodium intake was directly related to age, body mass and BP in the whole population.The Italian pediatric population is characterized by excessive sodium and deficient potassium intake. These data suggest that future campaigns should focus on children and adolescents as a major target in the framework of a population strategy of cardiovascular prevention.

  12. Near-coincident K-line and K-edge energies as ionization diagnostics for some high atomic number plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, N. R. [Ecopulse, Inc., P.O. Box 528, Springfield, Virginia 22150 (United States); Weber, B. V.; Phipps, D. G.; Schumer, J. W. [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Seely, J. F. [Artep, Inc., 2922 Excelsior Springs Court, Ellicott City, Maryland 21042 (United States); Carroll, J. J. [Army Research Laboratory, Adelphi, Maryland 20873 (United States); Vanhoy, J. R. [United States Naval Academy, Annapolis, Maryland 21402 (United States); Slabkowska, K.; Polasik, M. [Faculty of Chemistry, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Gagarina 7, 87-100 Torun (Poland)

    2012-10-15

    For some high atomic number atoms, the energy of the K-edge is tens of eVs higher than the K-line energy of another atom, so that a few eV increase in the line's energy results in a decreasing transmission of the x-ray through a filter of the matching material. The transmission of cold iridium's Asymptotically-Equal-To 63.287 keV K{alpha}{sub 2} line through a lutetium filter is 7% lower when emitted by ionized iridium, consistent with an energy increase of {Delta}{epsilon} Asymptotically-Equal-To 10{+-}1 eV associated with the ionization. Likewise, the transmission of the K{beta}{sub 1} line of ytterbium through a near-coincident K-edge filter changes depending on plasma parameters that should affect the ionization. Systematic exploration of filter-line pairs like these could become a unique tool for diagnostics of suitable high energy density plasmas.

  13. Analysis of rabbit tear proteins by high-pressure liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lei; Beuerman, Roger W; Barathi, Amutha; Tan, Donald

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a fast and reliable analytical procedure for the display of the protein components of tears that can be used to differentiate the status of the ocular surface. Using this new procedure, we analyzed the tear protein components following a corneal wound in the rabbit. Calibrated 10-microL glass, fire-polished capillary micropipettes were used to collect tears from New Zealand White rabbits prior to and daily for 9 days following a unilateral 6-mm diameter centrally placed anterior keratectomy. Tear proteins were eluted by a reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) column and the tear protein profile was monitored by electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry positive total ion current (TIC) chromatography. Tear proteins were reliably separated into 17 peaks, each of which contained one or a number of protein components. The molecular weight of each protein component was determined by on-line ESI. Major tear protein components, lactoferrin, lysozyme (minimally detectable in rabbit tears), albumin, lipocalin, lipophilin and beta2-microglobulin, were tentatively identified by this method. Based on the mass spectrometric data, beta2-microglobulin was found to be glycosylated with N-acetylhexosamine. ESI-positive TIC chromatograms and mass spectra revealed comparative differences in the tear protein spectra after corneal wounding. One day after wounding, rabbit lysozyme with a molecular weight of 14,717 Da was found to be 8-fold higher in the tears of wounded eyes when compared with tears from unwounded eyes. It dropped back to normal 3 days after wounding. The expression of an unidentified tear protein with the molecular weight of 16,060 Da was also elevated after corneal wounding and returned to normal level by day 5. In this study, LC/ESI-MS was developed as a fast, reproducible and simple method for the identification and analysis of many of the protein components of the tears. Importantly, this

  14. X-ray and Auger transition from highly-ionized Ca ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karim, K.R.; Logan, L. [Department of Physics, Illinois State University, Normal, Illinois 61790-4560 (United States)] Bhalla, C.P. [Department of Physics, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas 66506 (United States)

    1999-06-01

    We have calculated radiative and Auger transition rates, x-ray wavelengths, lifetimes, and fluorescence yields of variously ionized calcium atoms with electronic configurations 1s2s{sup m}2p{sup n}, (m=0{minus}2, n=1{minus}6) with all allowed values of the orbital angular momentum quantum number {ital l}. The calculation was performed in the intermediate coupling scheme using the Hartree-Fock atomic model. The results from the present calculation have been compared with those available in the literature. Excellent agreement is found in calculated transition energies among the various calculations. The agreement in transition rates is generally good for prominent lines. The radiative and Auger transition rates decrease as electrons are removed from the outer shells. The rate of decrease of Auger transition rates, however, is faster than that of radiative transition rates. The fluorescence yields are found to increase with ionization. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Development of residual gas ionization profile monitor for high intensity proton beams

    CERN Document Server

    Sato, Y; Hirose, E; Ieiri, M; Igarashi, Y; Inaba, S; Katoh, Y; Minakawa, M; Noumi, H; Saitó, M; Suzuki, Y; Takahashi, H; Takasaki, M; Tanaka, K; Toyoda, A; Yamada, Y; Yamanoi, Y; Watanabe, H

    2006-01-01

    Nondestructive beam profile monitor utilizing ionizations of residual gas has been developed for continuous monitoring of 3?0(J-PARC). Knock-on electrons produced in the ionizations of residual gas vacuumed to 1 Pa are collected with a uniform electric field applied between electrodes. Applying a uniform electric field parallel to the electric field is essential to reduce diffusion of electrons crossing over magnetic flux. A prototype monitor has been constructed and installed in EP2-C beam line at KEK 12 GeV proton synchrotron (12 Ge V-PS). The profiles measured with the present monitor agree with the ones measured with the existing destructive profile monitor. The present monitor shows sufficient performances as a candidate of the profile monitor at J-PARC. In the present article, the working principle of the present monitor, the results of test experiments, and further developments are described in detail.

  16. Wannier threshold ionization triple differential cross sections using highly correlated initial- and final-state wavefunctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copeland, F.B.M.; Crothers, D.S.F. (Queen' s Univ., Belfast, Nothern Ireland (United Kingdom). Dept. of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics)

    1994-05-28

    The uniform semiclassical approximation is used to evaluate a final-state wavefunction for the electron-impact threshold ionization of helium, and using an explicitly correlated initial bound-state wavefunction for helium, absolute singlet triple-differential cross sections are calculated. These results are compared favourably with the original results, and with experiment for excess-of-threshold energy E = 1 eV and for E = 2 eV. (author).

  17. Field ionization of high-Rydberg fragments produced after inner-shell photoexcitation and photoionization of the methane molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kivimäki, A., E-mail: kivimaki@iom.cnr.it [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche–Istituto Officina dei Materiali, Laboratorio TASC, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Sankari, A. [Department of Physics, Lund University, P.O. Box 118, 22100 Lund (Sweden); Kettunen, J. A. [Department of Physics, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 3000, 90014 Oulu (Finland); Stråhlman, C. [MAX IV Laboratory, Lund University, P.O. Box 118, 22100 Lund (Sweden); Álvarez Ruiz, J. [Colegio Los Naranjos, Fuenlabrada, 28941 Madrid (Spain); Richter, R. [Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste, Area Science Park Basovizza, 34149 Trieste (Italy)

    2015-09-21

    We have studied the production of neutral high-Rydberg (HR) fragments from the CH{sub 4} molecule at the C 1s → 3p excitation and at the C 1s ionization threshold. Neutral fragments in HR states were ionized using a pulsed electric field and the resulting ions were mass-analyzed using an ion time-of-flight spectrometer. The atomic fragments C(HR) and H(HR) dominated the spectra, but molecular fragments CH{sub x}(HR), x = 1-3, and H{sub 2}(HR) were also observed. The production of HR fragments is attributed to dissociation of CH{sub 4}{sup +} and CH{sub 4}{sup 2+} ions in HR states. Just above the C 1s ionization threshold, such molecular ionic states are created when the C 1s photoelectron is recaptured after single or double Auger decay. Similar HR states may be reached directly following resonant Auger decay at the C 1s → 3p resonance. The energies and geometries of the parent and fragment ions have been calculated in order to gain insight into relevant dissociation pathways.

  18. Development of High Resolution Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry for Neutron Dosimetry Technique with93Nb(n,n'93mNb Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomita Hideki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We have proposed an advanced technique to measure the 93mNb yield precisely by Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry, instead of conventional characteristic X-ray spectroscopy. 93mNb-selective resonance ionization is achievable by distinguishing the hyperfine splitting of the atomic energy levels between 93Nb and 93mNb at high resolution. In advance of 93mNb detection, we could successfully demonstrate high resolution resonant ionization spectroscopy of stable 93Nb using an all solid-state, narrow-band and tunable Ti:Sapphire laser system operated at 1 kHz repetition rate.

  19. NGC 6302: high-ionization permitted lines. Applying X-SSN synthesis to VLT-UVES spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Péquignot, Daniel; Morisset, Christophe; Casassus, Simon

    2012-08-01

    A preliminary VLT-UVES spectrum of NGC 6302 (Casassus et al. 2002, MN), which hosts one of the hottest PN nuclei known (T eff ~ 220000 K; Wright et al. 2011, MN), has been recently analysed by means of X-SSN, a spectrum synthesis code for nebulae (Morisset and Péquignot). Permitted recombination lines from highly-ionized species are detected/identified for the first time in a PN, and some of them probably for the first time in (astro)physics. The need for a homogeneous, high signal-to-noise UVES spectrum for NGC 6302 is advocated.

  20. Simultaneous Analysis of Losartan Potassium, Amlodipine Besylate, and Hydrochlorothiazide in Bulk and in Tablets by High-Performance Thin Layer Chromatography with UV-Absorption Densitometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karunanidhi Santhana Lakshmi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A Simple high-performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC method for separation and quantitative analysis of losartan potassium, amlodipine, and hydrochlorothiazide in bulk and in pharmaceutical formulations has been established and validated. After extraction with methanol, sample and standard solutions were applied to silica gel plates and developed with chloroform : methanol : acetone : formic acid 7.5 : 1.3 : 0.5 : 0.03 (/// as mobile phase. Zones were scanned densitometrically at 254 nm. The values of amlodipine besylate, hydrochlorothiazide, and losartan potassium were 0.35, 0.57, and 0.74, respectively. Calibration plots were linear in the ranges 500–3000 ng per spot for losartan potassium, amlodipine and hydrochlorothiazide, the correlation coefficients, r, were 0.998, 0.998, and 0.999, respectively. The suitability of this method for quantitative determination of these compounds was by validation in accordance with the requirements of pharmaceutical regulatory standards. The method can be used for routine analysis of these drugs in bulk and in formulation.

  1. Observation of different ceramide species from crude cellular extracts by normal-phase high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pettus, BJ; Bielawska, A; Kroesen, BJ; Moeller, PDR; Szulc, ZM; Hannun, YA; Busman, M

    2003-01-01

    Normal-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (NP-HPLC) coupled to atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (APCI-MS) allows qualitative analysis of endogenous ceramide and dihydroceramide species from crude lipid extracts utilizing chromatographic methods readily adaptable

  2. Penicillin V Potassium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penicillin V potassium is an antibiotic used to treat certain infections caused by bacteria such as pneumonia, ... Penicillin V potassium comes as a tablet and liquid to take by mouth. It is usually taken ...

  3. Quantum interferences in single ionization of He by highly charged dressed-ions impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monti, J M; Rivarola, R D [Instituto de Fisica Rosario (CONICET-UNR) and Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, IngenierIa y Agrimensura, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Pellegrini 250, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Fainstein, P D, E-mail: rivarola@fceia.unr.edu.ar [Comision Nacional de EnergIa Atomica, Centro Atomico Bariloche, Av. Bustillo 9500, 8400 San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina)

    2011-06-15

    Ionization of He targets by impact of partially stripped ions is investigated by means of an extension to the continuum distorted wave-eikonal initial state model with a particular representation of the projectile potential. Structures appearing superimposed on the binary encounter peak are interpreted in terms of coherent interference of short- and long-range contributions of the perturbative projectile potential. The case of 600 keV u{sup -1}Au{sup 11+} ions impinging on He is presented and discussed.

  4. A TIMS-based method for the high precision measurements of the three-isotope potassium composition of small samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wielandt, Daniel Kim Peel; Bizzarro, Martin

    2011-01-01

    A novel thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) method for the three-isotope analysis of K has been developed, and ion chromatographic methods for the separation of K have been adapted for the processing of small samples. The precise measurement of K-isotopes is challenged by the presence of ...... extra-terrestrial materials....

  5. KV7 potassium channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stott, Jennifer B; Jepps, Thomas Andrew; Greenwood, Iain A

    2014-01-01

    Potassium channels are key regulators of smooth muscle tone, with increases in activity resulting in hyperpolarisation of the cell membrane, which acts to oppose vasoconstriction. Several potassium channels exist within smooth muscle, but the KV7 family of voltage-gated potassium channels have been...

  6. New Atomic Data for Doubly Ionized Iron Group Atoms by High Resolution UV Fourier Transform Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Peter L.; Pickering, Juliet C.; Thorne, A. P.

    2002-01-01

    Currently available laboratory spectroscopic data of doubly ionized iron-group element were obtained about 50 years ago using spectrographs of modest dispersion, photographic plates, and eye estimates of intensities. The accuracy of the older wavelength data is about 10 mAngstroms at best, whereas wavelengths are now needed to an accuracy of 1 part in 10(exp 6) to 10(exp 7) (0.2 to 2 mAngstroms at 2000 Angstroms). The Fourier transform (FT) spectroscopy group at Imperial College, London, and collaborators at the Harvard College Observatory have used a unique VUV FT spectrometer in a program focussed on improving knowledge of spectra of many neutral and singly and doubly ionized, astrophysically important, iron group elements. Spectra of Fe II and Fe III have been recorded at UV and VUV wavelengths with signal-to-noise ratios of several hundred for the stronger lines. Wavelengths and energy levels for Fe III are an order of magnitude more accurate than previous work; analysis is close to completion. f-values for Fe II have been published.

  7. Highly sensitive detection of ionizing radiations by a photoluminescent uranyl organic framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Jian; Wang, Yaxing; Liu, Wei; Yin, Xuemiao; Chen, Lanhua; Diwu, Juan; Chai, Zhifang; Wang, Shuao [School for Radiological and interdisciplinary Sciences (RAD-X) and Collaborative Innovation Center of Radiation Medicine of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions, Soochow University, Suzhou (China); Zou, Youming [High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui (China); Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL (United States); Liu, Guokui [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-06-19

    Precise detection of low-dose X- and γ-radiations remains a challenge and is particularly important for studying biological effects under low-dose ionizing radiation, safety control in medical radiation treatment, survey of environmental radiation background, and monitoring cosmic radiations. We report here a photoluminescent uranium organic framework, whose photoluminescence intensity can be accurately correlated with the exposure dose of X- or γ-radiations. This allows for precise and instant detection of ionizing radiations down to the level of 10{sup -4} Gy, representing a significant improvement on the detection limit of approximately two orders of magnitude, compared to other chemical dosimeters reported up to now. The electron paramagnetic resonance analysis suggests that with the exposure to radiations, the carbonyl double bonds break affording oxo-radicals that can be stabilized within the conjugated uranium oxalate-carboxylate sheet. This gives rise to a substantially enhanced equatorial bonding of the uranyl(VI) ions as elucidated by the single-crystal structure of the γ-ray irradiated material, and subsequently leads to a very effective photoluminescence quenching through phonon-assisted relaxation. The quenched sample can be easily recovered by heating, enabling recycled detection for multiple runs. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  8. Identification of Ceftiofur Oxidation Products by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography/Electrospray Ionization/Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye-Sung Cho

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Oxidation products of ceftiofur were formed in hydrogen peroxide solution. The structures of the ceftiofur oxidationproducts were characterized by high-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization/tandem mass spectrometry(HPLC/ESI/MS/MS. The products were identified as compounds oxidized at the sulfur of a cephem ring. For further analysis,experiments were performed using O18-labeled hydrogen peroxide. In addition, density-functional calculations were carried out forsix possible oxidation products to support the experimental results.

  9. Potassium carbonate as a cation source for early-lactation dairy cows fed high-concentrate diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonso-Avila, A R; Charbonneau, É; Chouinard, P Y; Tremblay, G F; Gervais, R

    2017-03-01

    Previous studies reported that addition of K2CO3 to high-concentrate diets improved milk fat synthesis, although the mechanism is yet to be established. The objective of the current experiment was to investigate the effects of dietary cation-anion difference (DCAD), cation source, and buffering ability of the mineral supplement on rumen biohydrogenation of fatty acids and production performance in dairy cows fed a high-concentrate diet. Thirty-five early-lactation Holstein cows (25 multiparous ruminally fistulated and 10 primiparous nonfistulated) were used in a randomized complete block design (7 blocks) with 33-d periods, including a 5-d pre-treatment collection period used as a covariate. Diets were (1) control, a basal diet [47% nonfibrous carbohydrates, DCAD (Na + K - Cl - S) = 65 mEq/kg of dry matter (DM)] containing 40% forage (including 60% corn silage) and 60% concentrate, (2) K2CO3 (control + K2CO3, 1.8% of DM, DCAD = 326 mEq/kg of DM), (3) KHCO3 (control + KHCO3, 2.6% of DM, DCAD = 324 mEq/kg of DM), (4) KCl (control + KCl, 2.0% of DM, DCAD = 64 mEq/kg of DM), and (5) Na2CO3 (control + Na2CO3, 1.4% of DM, DCAD = 322 mEq/kg of DM). Pre-planned orthogonal contrasts were used to assess the effects of K2CO3 (control vs. K2CO3), buffering ability (K2CO3 vs. KHCO3), DCAD (K2CO3 vs. KCl), and cation type (K2CO3 vs. Na2CO3). Supplementing K2CO3 in a high-concentrate diet did not improve milk fat yield or 4% fat-corrected milk yield. Milk fat concentration was greater in cows fed K2CO3 compared with control (4.03 vs. 3.26%). Milk yield tended to decrease (34.5 vs. 38.8 kg/d) and lactose yield decreased in cows fed K2CO3 as compared with KCl (1.64 vs. 1.87 kg/d). Milk fat concentration of trans-10 18:1 was increased when cows were fed Na2CO3 as compared with K2CO3. A positive relationship was observed between concentrations of anteiso 15:0 and trans-10,cis-12 18:2 in milk fat from cows receiving K2CO3. Milk Na concentration was increased, whereas milk Cl was

  10. Femtosecond Coherent Spectroscopy at 800nm: MI-FROG Measures High-Field Ionization Rates in Gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siders, C.W.; Siders, J.L.W.; Taylor, A.J.

    1999-05-24

    The authors report the first quantitative phase-sensitive measurement of ultrafast ionization rates in gases using Multi-phase Interferometric Frequency-Resolved Optical Gating. Ultrafast probe depletion via frequency mixing in the ionization front is observed.

  11. Probing Conditions at Ionized/Molecular Gas Interfaces With High Resolution Near-Infrared Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Kyle Franklin

    2017-08-01

    Regions of star formation and star death in our Galaxy trace the cycle of gas and dust in the interstellar medium (ISM). Gas in dense molecular clouds collapses to form stars, and stars at the end of their lives return the gas that made up their outer layers back out into the Galaxy. Hot stars generate copious amounts of ultraviolet photons which interact with the surrounding medium and dominate the energetics, ionization state, and chemistry of the gas. The interface where molecular gas is being dissociated into neutral atomic gas by far-UV photons from a nearby hot source is called a photodissociation or photon-dominated region (PDR). PDRs are found primarily in star forming regions where O and B stars serve as the source of UV photons, and in planetary nebulae where the hot core of the dying star acts as the UV source. The main target of this dissertation is molecular hydrogen (H2), the most abundant molecule in the Universe, made from hydrogen formed during the Big Bang. H2 makes up the overwhelming majority of molecules found in the ISM and in PDRs. Far-UV radiation absorbed by H2 will excite an electron in the molecule. The molecule then either dissociates ( 10% of the time; Field et al. 1966) or decays into excited rotational and vibrational ("rovibrational") levels of the electronic ground state. These excited rovibrational levels then decay via a radiative cascade to the ground rovibrational state (v = 0, J = 0), giving rise to a large number of transitions observable in emission from the mid-IR to the optical (Black & van Dishoeck, 1987). These transitions provide an excellent probe of the excitation and conditions within the gas. These transitions are also observed in warm H2, such as in shocks, where collisions excite H2 to higher rovibrational levels. High resolution near-infrared spectroscopy, with its ability to see through dust, and avoid telluric absorption and emission, serves as an effective tool to detect emission from ions, atoms, and molecules

  12. Analysis of the transmission characteristics of radio waves in inhomogeneous weakly ionized dusty plasma sheath based on high order SO-DGTD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Wei

    Full Text Available Based on high order hierarchical basis function and the ideal of shift operator, shift operator discontinuous Galerkin time domain (SO-DGTD technique for dealing with weakly ionized dusty plasma electromagnetic problems is proposed. Lagrange interpolation is used to transform the metallic blunt cone aircraft with weakly ionized dusty plasma sheath from geometric model built by COMSOL to electromagnetic computational model. In the case of two-dimensional transverse magnetic (TM wave, the electromagnetic wave propagation in weakly ionized dusty plasma sheath is calculated by SO-DGTD technique. And then, the influence of dust particle concentration and dust radius on the radio wave transmission is analyzed, and the radio wave propagation characteristics pass through the sheath is compared with the flight speed and height change. Keywords: SO-DGTD, Weakly ionized dusty plasma sheath, High order hierarchical basis function

  13. Fluctuating feedback-regulated escape fraction of ionizing radiation in low-mass, high-redshift galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trebitsch, Maxime; Blaizot, Jérémy; Rosdahl, Joakim; Devriendt, Julien; Slyz, Adrianne

    2017-09-01

    Low-mass galaxies are thought to provide the bulk of the ionizing radiation necessary to reionize the Universe. The amount of photons escaping the galaxies is poorly constrained theoretically, and difficult to measure observationally. Yet it is an essential parameter of reionization models. We study in detail how ionizing radiation can leak from high-redshift galaxies. For this purpose, we use a series of high-resolution radiation hydrodynamics simulations, zooming on three dwarf galaxies in a cosmological context. We find that the energy and momentum input from the supernova explosions has a pivotal role in regulating the escape fraction by disrupting dense star-forming clumps, and clearing sightlines in the halo. In the absence of supernovae, photons are absorbed very locally, within the birth clouds of massive stars. We follow the time evolution of the escape fraction and find that it can vary by more than six orders of magnitude. This explains the large scatter in the value of the escape fraction found by previous studies. This fast variability also impacts the observability of the sources of reionization: a survey even as deep as M1500 = -14 would miss about half of the underlying population of Lyman-continuum emitters.

  14. Potassium nutrition of heat-stressed lactating

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    measure of dry bulb air temperature, wind velocity and solar radiation ... high milk potassium content (0,15-0,17%), (b) heat stress owing to increased ... level) as sub plots. All cows received different dietary potassium treatments in each 30-day period. Basal diet was 52% ground corn, 9,5% corn gluten meal, 1,0% urea,.

  15. Battery-powered pulsed high density inductively coupled plasma source for pre-ionization in laboratory astrophysics experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaplin, Vernon H; Bellan, Paul M

    2015-07-01

    An electrically floating radiofrequency (RF) pre-ionization plasma source has been developed to enable neutral gas breakdown at lower pressures and to access new experimental regimes in the Caltech laboratory astrophysics experiments. The source uses a customized 13.56 MHz class D RF power amplifier that is powered by AA batteries, allowing it to safely float at 3-6 kV with the electrodes of the high voltage pulsed power experiments. The amplifier, which is capable of 3 kW output power in pulsed (<1 ms) operation, couples electrical energy to the plasma through an antenna external to the 1.1 cm radius discharge tube. By comparing the predictions of a global equilibrium discharge model with the measured scalings of plasma density with RF power input and axial magnetic field strength, we demonstrate that inductive coupling (rather than capacitive coupling or wave damping) is the dominant energy transfer mechanism. Peak ion densities exceeding 5 × 10(19) m(-3) in argon gas at 30 mTorr have been achieved with and without a background field. Installation of the pre-ionization source on a magnetohydrodynamically driven jet experiment reduced the breakdown time and jitter and allowed for the creation of hotter, faster argon plasma jets than was previously possible.

  16. Effects of nodal planes on strong-field ionization and high-order-harmonic generation in ring-type molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alharbi, A. F.; Boguslavskiy, A. E.; Thiré, N.; Thekkadath, G. S.; Patchkovskii, S.; Schmidt, B. E.; Légaré, F.; Brabec, T.; Bhardwaj, V. R.; Spanner, M.

    2017-10-01

    We measure the ellipticity dependence of high-harmonic generation (HHG) from unaligned gas-phase ensembles of the five-membered ring molecules 2,3-dihydrofuran (C4H6O ), furan (C4H4O ), and thiophene (C4H4S ). As is normally the case, the HHG emission is suppressed for increased ellipticity since the recollision wave packet leading to HHG is steered away from the parent ion for large ellipticity. However, through comparison with computations of the first step in HHG, namely, strong-field ionization (SFI), we show that the observed differences in the ellipticity dependence for the three molecular species reflect the lateral momentum distributions of the continuum electron responsible for HHG, which in turn provides information about the particular orientation between the molecular axis and the laser field that maximizes the SFI probability. Strikingly, and contrary to the conventional wisdom in the strong-field community, we find that for furan and thiophene the most probable orientation for SFI occurs when the electric field of the laser is aligned near a nodal plane of the corresponding ionizing orbital. 2,3-dihydrofuran, on the other hand, follows the standard expectation that the most probable orientation for SFI occurs when the electric field is aligned away from any nodal plane.

  17. Simulated Space Radiation: Impact of Four Different Types of High-Dose Ionizing Radiation on the Lichen Xanthoria elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Annette; Meeßen, Joachim; Jänicke, Reiner U.; Raguse, Marina; Ott, Sieglinde

    2017-02-01

    This study addresses the viability of the lichen Xanthoria elegans after high-dose ionizing irradiation in the frame of the STARLIFE campaign. The first set of experiments was intended to resemble several types of galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) as present beyond the magnetic shield of Earth. In the second set of experiments, γ radiation up to 113 kGy was applied to test the limit of lichen resistance to ionizing radiation. Entire thalli of Xanthoria elegans were irradiated in the anhydrobiotic state. After STARLIFE 1, the metabolic activity of both symbionts was quantified by live/dead staining with confocal laser scanning microscopy. The photosynthetic activity was measured after the respective irradiation to assess the ability of the symbiotic green algae to restore photosynthesis after irradiation. The STARLIFE campaign complements the results of the LIFE experiments at the EXPOSE-E facility on the International Space Station by testing the model organism Xanthoria elegans on its resistance to hazardous radiation that might be accumulated during long-term space exposure. In addition, the photosynthetic activity of metabolically active lichen was investigated after X-ray irradiation up to 100 Gy (3.3 Gy/min). Since previous astrobiological experiments were mostly performed with anhydrobiotic lichen, these experiments will broaden our knowledge on the correlation of physiological state and astrobiological stressors.

  18. Separation and Analysis of Boron Isotope in High Plant by Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingcai Xu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of boron and its isotope in plants is useful to better understand the transposition and translocation of boron within plant, the geochemical behavior in the interface between soil and plant, and the biogeochemical cycle of boron. It is critical to develop a useful method to separate boron from the plant for the geochemical application of boron and its isotope. A method was developed for the extraction of boron in plant sample, whose isotope was determined by thermal ionization mass spectrometry. The results indicated that this method of dry ashing coupled with two-step ion-exchange chromatography is powerful for the separation of boron in plant sample with large amounts of organic matters completely. The ratios of boron isotope composition in those plant tissue samples ranged from -19.45‰ to +28.13‰ (total range: 47.58‰ with a mean value of 2.61±11.76‰ SD. The stem and root isotopic compositions were lower than those in flower and leaf. The molecular mechanism of boron isotope may be responsible for the observed variation of boron isotopic composition and are considered as a useful tool for the better understanding of boron cycling process in the environment and for the signature of living systems.

  19. Membrane Signaling Induced by High Doses of Ionizing Radiation in the Endothelial Compartment. Relevance in Radiation Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Corre

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Tumor areas can now be very precisely delimited thanks to technical progress in imaging and ballistics. This has also led to the development of novel radiotherapy protocols, delivering higher doses of ionizing radiation directly to cancer cells. Despite this, radiation toxicity in healthy tissue remains a major issue, particularly with dose-escalation in these new protocols. Acute and late tissue damage following irradiation have both been linked to the endothelium irrigating normal tissues. The molecular mechanisms involved in the endothelial response to high doses of radiation are associated with signaling from the plasma membrane, mainly via the acid sphingomyelinase/ceramide pathway. This review describes this signaling pathway and discusses the relevance of targeting endothelial signaling to protect healthy tissues from the deleterious effects of high doses of radiation.

  20. Identification of plasmalogen cardiolipins from Pectinatus by liquid chromatography-high resolution electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Řezanka, Tomáš; Matoulková, Dagmar; Kyselová, Lucie; Sigler, Karel

    2013-12-01

    High resolution electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (HR-ESI-MS/MS) was used to analyze cardiolipins (Ptd2Gro) including their plasmalogen forms from three species of the anaerobic beer-spoilage bacterial genus Pectinatus. Cardiolipins including their plasmalogens were analyzed by HR-ESI-MS/MS on Orbitrap and almost 100 cardiolipins (i.e. tetra-acyl--Ptd2Gro, plasmenyl-tri-acyl--PlsPtd2Gro, and di-plasmenyl-di-acyl--Pls2Ptd2Gro) of three classes were identified. The structures of the molecular species that consist of various regioisomers and structurally similar compounds were revealed in detail. The high resolution mass spectrometry allowed the unambiguous structural assignment of Ptd2Gro, PlsPtd2Gro, and Pls2Ptd2Gro in the three species of Pectinatus, which contain predominantly odd numbered fatty acids.

  1. Mechanism of dehydroxylation temperature decrease and high temperature phase transition of coal-bearing strata kaolinite intercalated by potassium acetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hongfei; Liu, Qinfu; Cui, Xiaonan; Zhang, Qian; Zhang, Zhiliang; Frost, Ray L

    2012-06-15

    The thermal decomposition and dehydroxylation process of coal-bearing strata kaolinite-potassium acetate intercalation complex (CSKK) has been studied using X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared spectroscopy (IR), thermal analysis, mass spectrometric analysis and infrared emission spectroscopy. The XRD results showed that the potassium acetate (KAc) have been successfully intercalated into coal-bearing strata kaolinite with an obvious basal distance increase of the first basal peak, and the positive correlation was found between the concentration of intercalation regent KAc and the degree of intercalation. As the temperature of the system is raised, the formation of KHCO(3), KCO(3) and KAlSiO(4), which is derived from the thermal decomposition or phase transition of CSKK, is observed in sequence. The IR results showed that new bands appeared, the position and intensities shift can also be found when the concentration of intercalation agent is raised. The thermal analysis and mass spectrometric analysis results revealed that CSKK is stable below 300°C, and the thermal decomposition products (H(2)O and CO(2)) were further proved by the mass spectrometric analysis. A comparison of thermal analysis results of original coal-bearing strata kaolinite and its intercalation complex gives new discovery that not only a new mass loss peak is observed at 285 °C, but also the temperature of dehydroxylation and dehydration of coal bearing strata kaolinite is decreased about 100 °C. This is explained on the basis of the interlayer space of the kaolinite increased obviously after being intercalated by KAc, which led to the interlayer hydrogen bonds weakened, enables the dehydroxylation from kaolinite surface more easily. Furthermore, the possible structural model for CSKK has been proposed, with further analysis required in order to prove the most possible structures. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Testosterone reduces vascular relaxation by altering cyclic adenosine monophosphate pathway and potassium channel activation in male Sprague Dawley rats fed a high-salt diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oloyo, Ahmed K; Sofola, Olusoga A; Anigbogu, Chikodi N; Nair, Renuka R; Vijayakumar, Harikrishnan S; Fernandez, Adelaide C

    2013-04-01

    Male gender and high-salt diet are risk factors for hypertension. The effect of chronic exposure to testosterone is an increase in vascular tone but its influence upon responses induced by other vasoactive agents is not clear. We considered the possibility of interactions between testosterone and a high-salt diet in the mechanisms that are involved in the regulation of vascular tone. Therefore, we designed experiments to assess the involvement of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) pathway and potassium channel activation on vascular relaxation elicited by testosterone deficiency that was induced by orchidectomy in Sprague Dawley rats on a normal or high-salt diet. Weanling male rats were randomly divided into eight groups (n = 6 each) that were either orchidectomized or sham operated with or without testosterone replacement (10 mg/kg body weight of Sustanon 250 intramuscularly, Organon, Holland) and were placed on a normal or high-salt (0.3% or 8% NaCl) diet, respectively, for 6 weeks. Arterial blood pressure was determined before and weekly throughout the experiment using the tail-cuff method. Relaxation responses to forskolin and diazoxide were studied in noradrenaline (0.1 µM) precontracted aortic rings. There was an increase in the systolic blood pressure of rats placed on a high-salt diet compared with control or orchidectomized rats. Orchidectomy elicited a reduction in the systolic blood pressure while testosterone replacement restored systolic blood pressure to values seen in intact rats. A high-salt diet reduced the relaxation response to forskolin and diazoxide but not in orchidectomized rats while testosterone replacement re-established the blunted relaxation response to forskolin and diazoxide. Inhibition of potassium channel or adenylyl cyclase activation appears to contribute to the mechanisms by which a high-salt diet increases vascular tone. These effects were counteracted by orchidectomy in male Sprague Dawley rats.

  3. The Effect of High-Dose Ionizing Radiation on the Isolated Photobiont of the Astrobiological Model Lichen Circinaria gyrosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeßen, Joachim; Backhaus, Theresa; Brandt, Annette; Raguse, Marina; Böttger, Ute; de Vera, Jean-Pierre; de la Torre, Rosa

    2017-02-01

    Lichen symbioses between fungi and algae represent successful life strategies to colonize the most extreme terrestrial habitats. Consequently, space exposure and simulation experiments have demonstrated lichens' high capacity for survival, and thus, they have become models in astrobiological research with which to discern the limits and limitations of terrestrial life. In a series of ground-based irradiation experiments, the STARLIFE campaign investigated the resistance of astrobiological model organisms to galactic cosmic radiation, which is one of the lethal stressors of extraterrestrial environments. Since previous studies have identified that the alga is the more sensitive lichen symbiont, we chose the isolated photobiont Trebouxia sp. of the astrobiological model Circinaria gyrosa as a subject in the campaign. Therein, γ radiation was used to exemplify the deleterious effects of low linear energy transfer (LET) ionizing radiation at extremely high doses up to 113 kGy in the context of astrobiology. The effects were analyzed by chlorophyll a fluorescence of photosystem II (PSII), cultivation assays, live/dead staining and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), and Raman laser spectroscopy (RLS). The results demonstrate dose-dependent impairment of photosynthesis, the cessation of cell proliferation, cellular damage, a decrease in metabolic activity, and degradation of photosynthetic pigments. While previous investigations on other extraterrestrial stressors have demonstrated a high potential of resistance, results of this study reveal the limits of photobiont resistance to ionizing radiation and characterize γ radiation-induced damages. This study also supports parallel STARLIFE studies on the lichens Circinaria gyrosa and Xanthoria elegans, both of which harbor a Trebouxia sp. photobiont.

  4. Carbon-Nitrogen-Oxygen Line Radiation and the X-ray Bowen Fluorescence Mechanism in Optically Thick, Highly Ionized Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sako, Masao

    2003-01-01

    Radiative transfer effects due to overlapping X-ray lines in a high-temperature, optically thick, highly ionized medium are investigated. One particular example, in which the O VIII Lyalpha doublet (2(sup 2) P(sub 1/2,3/2)-1(sup 2) S(sub 1/2) coincides in frequency with the N VII Lyzeta lines (7(sup 2) P(sub 1/2,3/2)-1(sup 2) S(sub 1/2) is studied in detail to illustrate the effects on the properties of the emergent line spectrum. We solve the radiative transfer equation to study the energy transport of resonance-line radiation in a static, infinite, plane-parallel geometry, which is used to compute the destruction/escape probabilities for each of the lines for various total optical thicknesses of the medium, as well as destruction probabilities by sources of underlying photoelectric opacity. It is found that a large fraction of the O vIII Lyalpha line radiation can be destroyed by N VII, which can result in a reversal of the O VIII Lyalpha/N VII Lyalpha line intensity ratio similar to what may be seen under nonsolar abundances. Photoelectric absorption by ionized carbon and nitrogen can also subsequently increase the emission-line intensities of these ions. We show that line ratios, which are directly proportional to the abundance ratios in optically thin plasmas, are not good indicators of the true CNO abundances. Conversely, global spectral modeling that assumes optically thin conditions may yield incorrect abundance estimates when compared with observations, especially if the optical depth is large. Other potentially important overlapping lines and continua in the X-ray band are also identified, and their possible relevance to recent high-resolution spectroscopic observations with Chandra and XMM-Newton are briefly discussed.

  5. Trial design: Computer guided normal-low versus normal-high potassium control in critically ill patients: Rationale of the GRIP-COMPASS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoekstra, Miriam; Vogelzang, Mathijs; van der Horst, Iwan Cc; Lansink, Annemieke Oude; van der Maaten, Joost Maa; Ismael, Farouq; Zijlstra, Felix; Nijsten, Maarten Wn

    2010-12-31

    Potassium depletion is common in hospitalized patients and can cause serious complications such as cardiac arrhythmias. In the intensive care unit (ICU) the majority of patients require potassium suppletion. However, there are no data regarding the optimal control target in critically ill patients. After open-heart surgery, patients have a strongly increased risk of atrial fibrillation or atrial flutter (AFF). In a novel trial design, we examined if in these patients different potassium control-targets within the normal range may have different effects on the incidence of AFF. The "computer-driven Glucose and potassium Regulation program in Intensive care Patients with COMparison of PotASSium targets within normokalemic range (GRIP-COMPASS) trial" is a single-center prospective trial in which a total of 1200 patients are assigned to either a potassium control-target of 4.0 mmol/L or 4.5 mmol/L in consecutive alternating blocks of 50 patients each. Potassium levels are regulated by the computer-assisted potassium suppletion algorithm called GRIP-II (Glucose and potassium regulation for Intensive care Patients). Primary endpoint is the in-hospital incidence of AFF after cardiac surgery. Secondary endpoints are: in-hospital AFF in medical patients or patients after non-cardiac surgery, actually achieved potassium levels and their variation, electrolyte and glucose levels, potassium and insulin requirements, cumulative fluid balance, (ICU) length of stay, ICU mortality, hospital mortality and 90-day mortality. The GRIP-COMPASS trial is the first controlled clinical trial to date that compares potassium targets. Other novel methodological elements of the study are that it is performed in ICU patients where both targets are within the normal range and that a computer-assisted potassium suppletion algorithm is used. NCT 01085071 at ClinicalTrials.gov.

  6. Trial design: Computer guided normal-low versus normal-high potassium control in critically ill patients: Rationale of the GRIP-COMPASS study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Maaten Joost MAA

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Potassium depletion is common in hospitalized patients and can cause serious complications such as cardiac arrhythmias. In the intensive care unit (ICU the majority of patients require potassium suppletion. However, there are no data regarding the optimal control target in critically ill patients. After open-heart surgery, patients have a strongly increased risk of atrial fibrillation or atrial flutter (AFF. In a novel trial design, we examined if in these patients different potassium control-targets within the normal range may have different effects on the incidence of AFF. Methods/Design The "computer-driven Glucose and potassium Regulation program in Intensive care Patients with COMparison of PotASSium targets within normokalemic range (GRIP-COMPASS trial" is a single-center prospective trial in which a total of 1200 patients are assigned to either a potassium control-target of 4.0 mmol/L or 4.5 mmol/L in consecutive alternating blocks of 50 patients each. Potassium levels are regulated by the computer-assisted potassium suppletion algorithm called GRIP-II (Glucose and potassium regulation for Intensive care Patients. Primary endpoint is the in-hospital incidence of AFF after cardiac surgery. Secondary endpoints are: in-hospital AFF in medical patients or patients after non-cardiac surgery, actually achieved potassium levels and their variation, electrolyte and glucose levels, potassium and insulin requirements, cumulative fluid balance, (ICU length of stay, ICU mortality, hospital mortality and 90-day mortality. Discussion The GRIP-COMPASS trial is the first controlled clinical trial to date that compares potassium targets. Other novel methodological elements of the study are that it is performed in ICU patients where both targets are within the normal range and that a computer-assisted potassium suppletion algorithm is used. Trial registration NCT 01085071 at ClinicalTrials.gov

  7. Electron capture and ionization processes in high-velocity Cn+ , C–Ar and Cn+ , C–He collisions

    OpenAIRE

    Labaigt, G; Jorge, A; Illescas, C; Béroff, K; Dubois, Alain; Pons, B; Chabot, M

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Single-electron and double-electron capture as well as projectile single-ionization and multiple-ionization processes in 125 keV u−1 C$_{n}^{+}$–He (n = 1–5) and C$_{n}^{+}$–Ar ($n=1,2,4$) collisions have been studied experimentally and theoretically. Helium target single-ionization and double-ionization cross sections are also reported for C$_{n}^{+}$–He (n = 1, 4) collisions in the 100–400 keV u−1 impact energy domain. These results are compared with predictions from...

  8. Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Uncomplexed Highly Sulfated Oligosaccharides Using Ionic Liquid Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laremore, Tatiana N.; Murugesan, Saravanababu; Park, Tae-Joon; Avci, Fikri Y.; Zagorevski, Dmitri V.; Linhardt, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Direct UV matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometric analysis of uncomplexed, underivatized, highly sulfated oligosaccharides has been carried out using ionic liquids as matrices. Under conventionally used MALDI time-of-flight experimental conditions, uncomplexed polysulfated oligosaccharides do not produce any signal. We report that 1-methylimidazolium α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamate and butylammonium 2,5-dihydroxybenzoate ionic liquid matrices allow the detection of picomole amounts of the sodium salts of a disaccharide, sucrose octasulfate, and an octasulfated pentasaccharide, Arixtra. The experimental results indicate that both analytes undergo some degree of thermal fragmentation with a mass loss corresponding to cleavage of O–SO3Na bonds in the matrix upon laser irradiation, reflecting lability of sulfo groups. PMID:16536411

  9. The variance of dispersion measure of high-redshift transient objects as a probe of ionized bubble size during reionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshiura, Shintaro; Takahashi, Keitaro

    2018-01-01

    The dispersion measure (DM) of high-redshift (z ≳ 6) transient objects such as fast radio bursts can be a powerful tool to probe the intergalactic medium during the Epoch of Reionization. In this paper, we study the variance of the DMs of objects with the same redshift as a potential probe of the size distribution of ionized bubbles. We calculate the DM variance with a simple model with randomly distributed spherical bubbles. It is found that the DM variance reflects the characteristics of the probability distribution of the bubble size. We find that the variance can be measured precisely enough to obtain the information on the typical size with a few hundred sources at a single redshift.

  10. The Search for Highly Ionizing Particles in e$^{+}$e$^{-}$ Collisions at LEP using (MODAL) (MOnopole Detector At Lep)

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The experiment is designed to search for highly ionizing particles such as the monopole and the dyon. On the assumption that monopole-antimonopole pairs are produced via a virtual photon intermediate state, and have a mass in the range 0-100~GeV, a direct search for Dirac monopoles using e$^+$e$^-$ annihilation carries a distinct cross-sectional advantage over a search using hadron colliders.\\\\ \\\\ The MODAL detector is formed from Lexan/CR-39 dielectric track detector modules arranged in a polyhedral configuration outside of the vacuum pipe and around the intersection region, as shown on the opposite page. Etchable track detectors are more sensitive to particles at normal incidence, the shape of the detector was chosen with this fact in mind to allow for maximum acceptance of monopoles which leave the beam pipe. These dielectric track detectors will enable us to detect particles with magnetic charge: 20e$<$g$ _{d}

  11. High-precision measurements of seawater Pb isotope compositions by double spike thermal ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Maxence; Bridgestock, Luke; Rehkämper, Mark; van DeFlierdt, Tina; Weiss, Dominik

    2015-03-10

    A new method for the determination of seawater Pb isotope compositions and concentrations was developed, which combines and optimizes previously published protocols for the separation and isotopic analysis of this element. For isotopic analysis, the procedure involves initial separation of Pb from 1 to 2L of seawater by co-precipitation with Mg hydroxide and further purification by a two stage anion exchange procedure. The Pb isotope measurements are subsequently carried out by thermal ionization mass spectrometry using a (207)Pb-(204)Pb double spike for correction of instrumental mass fractionation. These methods are associated with a total procedural Pb blank of 28±21 pg (1sd) and typical Pb recoveries of 40-60%. The Pb concentrations are determined by isotope dilution (ID) on 50 mL of seawater, using a simplified version of above methods. Analyses of multiple aliquots of six seawater samples yield a reproducibility of about ±1 to ±10% (1sd) for Pb concentrations of between 7 and 50 pmol/kg, where precision was primarily limited by the uncertainty of the blank correction (12±4 pg; 1sd). For the Pb isotope analyses, typical reproducibilities (±2sd) of 700-1500 ppm and 1000-2000 ppm were achieved for (207)Pb/(206)Pb, (208)Pb/(206)Pb and (206)Pb/(204)Pb, (207)Pb/(204)Pb, (208)Pb/(204)Pb, respectively. These results are superior to literature data that were obtained using plasma source mass spectrometry and they are at least a factor of five more precise for ratios involving the minor (204)Pb isotope. Both Pb concentration and isotope data, furthermore, show good agreement with published results for two seawater intercomparison samples of the GEOTRACES program. Finally, the new methods were applied to a seawater depth profile from the eastern South Atlantic. Both Pb contents and isotope compositions display a smooth evolution with depth, and no obvious outliers. Compared to previous Pb isotope data for seawater, the (206)Pb/(204)Pb ratios are well correlated

  12. Matrix-assisted ionization vacuum for protein detection, fragmentation and PTM analysis on a high resolution linear ion trap-orbitrap platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bingming; Lietz, Christopher B; OuYang, Chuanzi; Zhong, Xuefei; Xu, Meng; Li, Lingjun

    2016-04-15

    Matrix-assisted ionization vacuum (MAIV) is a novel ionization technique that generates multiply charged ions in vacuum without the use of laser ablation or high voltage. MAIV can be achieved in intermediate-vacuum and high-vacuum matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) sources and electrospray ionization (ESI) sources without instrument modification. Herein, we adapt MAIV onto the MALDI-LTQ-Orbitrap XL platform for biomolecule analysis. As an attractive alternative to MALDI for in solution and in situ analysis of biomolecules, MAIV coupling to high resolution and accurate mass (HRAM) MS instrument has successfully expanded the mass detection range and improved the fragmentation efficiency due to the generation of multiply charged ions. Additionally, the softness of MAIV enables potential application in labile post-translational modification (PTM) analysis. In this study, proteins as large as 18.7 kDa were detected with up to 18 charges; intact peptides with labile PTM were well preserved during the ionization process and characterized MS/MS; peptides and proteins in complex tissue samples were detected and identified both in liquid extracts and in situ. Moreover, we demonstrated that this method facilitates MS/MS analysis with improved fragmentation efficiency compared to MALDI-MS/MS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. People with the major alleles of ATP2B1 rs17249754 increases the risk of hypertension in high ratio of sodium and potassium, and low calcium intakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daily, J W; Kim, B C; Liu, M; Park, S

    2017-12-01

    It is important to understand what genetic risk factors lead to hypertension and how genotype-specific dietary and lifestyle modification can mitigate the risk of developing hypertension. The ATP2B1 rs17249754 gene, which encodes a calcium pump expressed in vascular smooth muscle was identified as having variants that conferred higher or lower risk of hypertension-with the major allele carriers being increased at risk. However, the effects of dietary intakes on risk of hypertension among carriers of the different alleles have not been fully elucidated. Therefore, we evaluated ATP2B1 rs17249754 and its interaction with dietary intakes of sodium (Na), potassium (K) and calcium (Ca) on the risk of developing hypertension using the Ansan/Ansung (n=8842) and City-Rural (n=5512) cohorts from the Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study. Carriers of the major allele of ATP2B1 rs17249754 were at greater risk of developing hypertension and high Na intake and low Ca increased the risk more in major allele than among minor allele carriers. High potassium intake was more protective against hypertension in the subjects expressing minor alleles and a low Na/K intake ratio was the most consistently beneficial to the subjects expressing the minor allele. When controlling for Na and K, low Ca intake was associated with a substantially higher risk for high systolic blood pressure in the major allele carriers compared with minor allele, suggesting good calcium status is especially important for the major allele carriers. In conclusion, people with the major allele of ATP2B1 rs17249754 are susceptible to hypertension especially in low intake of Ca and high ratio of Na and K.

  14. Potassium maldistribution revisited

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Medication errors contribute significantly to human and financial costs.1-4 One of these errors involves incorrect identification of concentrated potassium chloride ampoules. After coronary artery bypass grafting, potassium concentrations lower and higher than 3.3 and 5.2 mmol per liter respectively have been associated ...

  15. Potassium food supplement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourland, C. T.; Huber, C. S.; Rambaut, C.; Heidelbaugh, N. D.

    1973-01-01

    Potassium gluconate is considered best supplementary source for potassium. Gluconate consistently received highest taste rating and was indistinguishable from nonsupplemented samples. No unfavorable side effects were found during use, and none are reported in literature. Gluconate is normal intermediary metabolite that is readily adsorbed and produces no evidence of gastrointestinal ulcerations.

  16. Coupling of gas chromatography and electrospray ionization high resolution mass spectrometry for the analysis of anabolic steroids as trimethylsilyl derivatives in human urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Eunju; Jeong, Eun Sook; Cha, Sangwon; Lee, Jaeick

    2017-04-29

    In this study, gas chromatography (GC) was interfaced with high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) with electrospray ionization source (ESI) and the relevant parameters were investigated to enhance the ionization efficiency. In GC-ESI, the distances (x-, y- and z) and angle between the ESI needle, GC capillary column and MS orifice were set to 7 (x-distance), 4 (y-distance), and 1 mm (z-distance). The ESI spray solvent, acid modifier and nebulizer gas flow were methanol, 0.1% formic acid and 5 arbitrary units, respectively. Based on these results, analytical conditions for GC-ESI/HRMS were established. In particular, the results of spray solvent flow indicated a concentration-dependent mechanism (peak dilution effect), and other parameters also greatly influenced the ionization performance. The developed GC-ESI/HRMS was then applied to the analysis of anabolic steroids as trimethylsilyl (TMS) derivatives in human urine to demonstrate its application. The ionization profiles of TMS-derivatized steroids were investigated and compared with those of underivatized steroids obtained from gas chromatography-electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry (GC-ESI/MS) and liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry (LC-ESI/MS). The steroids exhibited ionization profiles based on their structural characteristics, regardless of the analyte phase or derivatization. Groups I and II with conjugated or unconjugated keto functional groups at C3 generated the [M+H] + and [M+H-TMS] + ions, respectively. On the other hand, Groups III and IV gave rise to the characteristic fragment ions [M+H-TMS-H 2 O] + and [M+H-2TMS-H 2 O] + , corresponding to loss of a neutral TMS·H 2 O moiety from the protonated molecular ion by in-source dissociation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to successfully ionize and analyze steroids as TMS derivatives using ESI coupled with GC. The present system has enabled the ionization of TMS derivatives under ESI conditions

  17. Total Ionizing Dose Effects on High Resolution (12-/14-bit) Analog-to-Digital Converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C. I.; Rax, B. G.; Johnson, A. H.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reports total dose radiation test results for high resolution 12-/14-bit A/D converters. Small changes in internal components can cause these devices to fail their specifications at relatively low total dose levels. Degradation of signal-to-noise ratio becomes increasingly importamt for high accuracy converters. Rebound effects in the thick-oxide MOS devices causes these responses to be different at low and high dose rates, which is a major concern for space applications.

  18. High Power Microwave (HPM) and Ionizing Radiation Effects on CMOS Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    24 xviii Symbol Page VIH minimum input voltage for proper high voltage output...38 VOH output voltage corresponding to VIH ...design. The high level at the input, VIH , along with VDD, define the maximum permitted “Logic 1” region, which allows for proper state change for a

  19. High impact ionization rate in silicon by sub-picosecond THz electric field pulses (Conference Presentation)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarekegne, Abebe Tilahun; Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Hirori, Hideki

    2017-01-01

    Summary form only given. Metallic antenna arrays fabricated on high resistivity silicon are used to localize and enhance the incident THz field resulting in high electric field pulses with peak electric field strength reaching several MV/cm on the silicon surface near the antenna tips. In such hi...... carrier dynamics in other semiconductors....

  20. High-connectivity networks and hybrid inorganic rod materials built from potassium and rubidium p-halide-substituted aryloxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, J Jacob; Noll, Bruce C; Henderson, Kenneth W

    2008-10-20

    A series of complex networks have been synthesized from the association of potassium and rubidium p-halide-substituted aryloxides using 1,4-dioxane molecules as neutral linkers. The crystalline polymers [(4-F-C6H4OK)6 x (dioxane)4]infinity (1), [(4-I-C6H4OK)6 x (dioxane)6]infinity (2), and [(4-I-C6H4ORb)6 x (dioxane)6]infinity (3) are built from discreet, hexameric M6O6 aggregates. Compound 1 forms an unusual 16-connected framework involving both K-F and K-O(diox) interactions. Each hexamer connects to eight neighboring aggregates through double-bridging contacts, resulting in a body-centered cubic (bcu) topology. Compounds 2 and 3 are isostructural, 12-connected networks, where each aggregate utilizes six dioxane double bridges to form primitive cubic (pcu) nets. In contrast, the complexes [(4-Cl-C6H4OK)3 x (dioxane)]infinity (4), [(4-Br-C6H4OK)2 x (dioxane)0.5]infinity (5), and [(4-Br-C6H4ORb)5 x (dioxane)5]infinity (6) are built from one-dimensional (1D) inorganic rods composed solely of M-O(Ar) interactions. The extended structures of both 4 and 5 can be described as pcu nets, where parallel 1D inorganic pillars are connected through dioxane bridges. Compound 6 is also composed of parallel 1D inorganic rods, but in this instance the coordinated dioxane molecules do not bridge, resulting in isolated, close-packed chains in the solid state.

  1. Association analysis of a highly polymorphic CAG Repeat in the human potassium channel gene KCNN3 and migraine susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ovcaric Mick

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Migraine is a polygenic multifactorial disease, possessing environmental and genetic causative factors with multiple involved genes. Mutations in various ion channel genes are responsible for a number of neurological disorders. KCNN3 is a neuronal small conductance calcium-activated potassium channel gene that contains two polyglutamine tracts, encoded by polymorphic CAG repeats in the gene. This gene plays a critical role in determining the firing pattern of neurons and acts to regulate intracellular calcium channels. Methods The present association study tested whether length variations in the second (more 3' polymorphic CAG repeat in exon 1 of the KCNN3 gene, are involved in susceptibility to migraine with and without aura (MA and MO. In total 423 DNA samples from unrelated individuals, of which 202 consisted of migraine patients and 221 non-migraine controls, were genotyped and analysed using a fluorescence labelled primer set on an ABI310 Genetic Analyzer. Allele frequencies were calculated from observed genotype counts for the KCNN3 polymorphism. Analysis was performed using standard contingency table analysis, incorporating the chi-squared test of independence and CLUMP analysis. Results Overall, there was no convincing evidence that KCNN3 CAG lengths differ between Caucasian migraineurs and controls, with no significant difference in the allelic length distribution of CAG repeats between the population groups (P = 0.090. Also the MA and MO subtypes did not differ significantly between control allelic distributions (P > 0.05. The prevalence of the long CAG repeat (>19 repeats did not reach statistical significance in migraineurs (P = 0.15, nor was there a significant difference between the MA and MO subgroups observed compared to controls (P = 0.46 and P = 0.09, respectively, or between MA vs MO (P = 0.40. Conclusion This association study provides no evidence that length variations of the second polyglutamine array in

  2. Desorption electrospray ionization-high resolution mass spectrometry for the screening of veterinary drugs in cross-contaminated feedstuffs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seró, Raquel; Núñez, Oscar; Bosch, Jaume; Grases, José M; Rodríguez, Pilar; Moyano, Encarnacion; Galceran, Martia Teresa

    2015-09-01

    In this study, a desorption electrospray ionization-high resolution mass spectrometry (DESI-HRMS) screening method was developed for fast identification of veterinary drugs in cross-contaminated feedstuffs. The reliable detection was performed working at high resolution (70,000 full width half maximum, FWHM) using an orbitrap mass analyzer. Among the optimized DESI parameters, the solvent (acetonitrile/water, 80:20, v/v) and the sample substrate (poly-tetrafluoroethylene, PTFE) were critical to obtain the best sensitivity. To analyze the solid feed samples, different approaches were tested and a simple solid-liquid extraction and the direct analysis of an aliquot (2 μL) of the extract after letting it dry on the PTFE printed spot provided the best results. The identification of the veterinary drugs (target and non-target) in the cross-contaminated feedstuffs based on the accurate mass measurement and the isotopic pattern fit was performed automatically using a custom-made database. The positive cross-contaminated feed samples were quantified by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS). The results obtained demonstrate that DESI-HRMS can be proposed as a fast and suitable screening method to identify positive cross-contaminated feedstuffs reducing the number of samples to be subsequently quantified by UHPLC-MS/MS, thus improving the productivity in quality control laboratories.

  3. Drifting localization of ionization runaway: Unraveling the nature of anomalous transport in high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ni, Pavel; Rauch, Albert

    2011-12-04

    The plasma over the magnetron’s erosion “racetrack” is not azimuthally uniform but concentrated in distinct dense plasma zones which move in the {vector E}×{vector B} direction with about 10% of the electrons’ {vector E}×{vector B}/B{sup 2} drift velocity. The plasma zones are investigated with a gated camera working in concert with a streak camera for Al, Nb, Cu, and W targets in Ar or Kr background gas. It is found that each plasma zone has a high density edge which is the origin of a plasma-generating electron jet leaving the target zone. Each region of strong azimuthal density gradient generates an azimuthal electric field which promotes the escape of magnetized electrons and the formation of electron jets and plasma flares. The phenomena are proposed to be caused by an ionization instability where each dense plasma zone exhibits a high stopping power for drifting high energy electrons, thereby enhancing itself.

  4. Trial design : Computer guided normal-low versus normal-high potassium control in critically ill patients: Rationale of the GRIP-COMPASS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, Miriam; Vogelzang, Mathijs; van der Horst, Iwan C. C.; Oude Lansink, Annemieke; van der Maaten, Joost M. A. A.; Ismael, Farouq; Zijlstra, Felix; Nijsten, Maarten W. N.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Potassium depletion is common in hospitalized patients and can cause serious complications such as cardiac arrhythmias. In the intensive care unit (ICU) the majority of patients require potassium suppletion. However, there are no data regarding the optimal control target in critically

  5. Analysis of the transmission characteristics of radio waves in inhomogeneous weakly ionized dusty plasma sheath based on high order SO-DGTD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Bing; Li, Linqian; Yang, Qian; Ge, Debiao

    Based on high order hierarchical basis function and the ideal of shift operator, shift operator discontinuous Galerkin time domain (SO-DGTD) technique for dealing with weakly ionized dusty plasma electromagnetic problems is proposed. Lagrange interpolation is used to transform the metallic blunt cone aircraft with weakly ionized dusty plasma sheath from geometric model built by COMSOL to electromagnetic computational model. In the case of two-dimensional transverse magnetic (TM) wave, the electromagnetic wave propagation in weakly ionized dusty plasma sheath is calculated by SO-DGTD technique. And then, the influence of dust particle concentration and dust radius on the radio wave transmission is analyzed, and the radio wave propagation characteristics pass through the sheath is compared with the flight speed and height change.

  6. Automated work-flow for processing high-resolution direct infusion electrospray ionization mass spectral fingerprints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael Adsetts Edberg; Smedsgaard, Jørn

    2007-01-01

    an automated data processing pipeline to compare large numbers of fingerprint spectra from direct infusion experiments analyzed by high resolution MS. We describe some of the intriguing problems that have to be addressed. starting with the conversion and pre-processing of the raw data to the final data...... analysis. Illustrated on the direct infusion analysis (ESI-TOF-MS) of complex mixtures the method exploits the full quality of the high-resolution present in the mass spectra. Although the method is illustrated as a new library search method for high resolution MS, we demonstrate that the output...... of the preprocessing is applicable to cluster-, discriminant analysis, and related multivariate methods applied directly to mass spectra from direct infusion analysis of crude extracts. This is done to find the relationship between several terverticillate Penicillium species and identify the ions responsible...

  7. Development of a method for quantitation of retinol and retinyl palmitate in human serum using high-performance liquid chromatography atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breemen, van R.B.; Nikolic, D.; Xu, X.Y.; Xiong, Y.S.; Lieshout, van M.; West, C.E.; Schilling, A.B.

    1998-01-01

    A method for the quantitative analysis of the vitamin A compounds all-trans-retinol and all-trans-retinyl palmitate was developed using high-performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (APCI-LC-MS). Unlike previous quantitative mass spectrometric

  8. Efficacy of thermal treatment and copper-silver ionization for controlling Legionella pneumophila in high-volume hot water plumbing systems in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mietzner, S; Schwille, R C; Farley, A; Wald, E R; Ge, J H; States, S J; Libert, T; Wadowsky, R M; Miuetzner, S

    1997-12-01

    Thermal treatment and copper-silver ionization are often used for controlling Legionella pneumophila in high-volume hospital plumbing systems, although the comparative efficacies of these measures in high-volume systems are unknown. Thermal treatment of a hot water circuit was accomplished by flushing hot water (> 60 degrees C) through distal fixtures for 10 minutes. Copper-silver ionization was conducted in three circuits by installing units into return lines immediately upstream from hot water tanks. Recovery rates of L. pneumophila were monitored by culturing swab samples from faucets. Concentrations of copper and silver in water samples were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Four heat-flush treatments failed to provide long-term control of L. pneumophila. In contrast, ionization treatment reduced the rate of recovery of L. pneumophila from 108 faucets from 72% to 2% within 1 month and maintained effective control for at least 22 months. Only three samples (1.9%) of hot water from faucets exceeded Environmental Protection Agency standards for silver, and none exceeded the standards for copper. Of 24 samples obtained from hot water tanks, 42% and 50% exceeded the silver and copper standards, respectively. Copper-silver ionization effectively controls L. pneumophila in high-volume plumbing systems and is superior to thermal treatment; however, high concentrations of copper and silver can accumulate at the bottom of hot water tanks.

  9. Atmospheric-Pressure Chemical Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometry (APGC/MS/MS) an Alternative to High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry (HRGC/HRMS) for the Determination of Dioxins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bavel, Van Bert; Geng, Dawei; Cherta, Laura; Nácher-Mestre, Jaime; Portolés, Tania; Ábalos, Manuela; Sauló, Jordi; Abad, Esteban; Dunstan, Jody; Jones, Rhys; Kotz, Alexander; Winterhalter, Helmut; Malisch, Rainer; Traag, Wim; Hagberg, Jessika; Ericson Jogsten, Ingrid; Beltran, Joaquim; Hernández, Félix

    2015-01-01

    The use of a new atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization source for gas chromatography (APGC) coupled with a tandem quadrupole mass spectrometry (MS/MS) system, as an alternative to high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS), for the determination of PCDDs/PCDFs is described. The potential of

  10. Plasma production via field ionization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. L. O’Connell

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Plasma production via field ionization occurs when an incoming particle beam is sufficiently dense that the electric field associated with the beam ionizes a neutral vapor or gas. Experiments conducted at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center explore the threshold conditions necessary to induce field ionization by an electron beam in a neutral lithium vapor. By independently varying the transverse beam size, number of electrons per bunch, or bunch length, the radial component of the electric field is controlled to be above or below the threshold for field ionization. Additional experiments ionized neutral xenon and neutral nitric oxide by varying the incoming beam’s bunch length. A self-ionized plasma is an essential step for the viability of plasma-based accelerators for future high-energy experiments.

  11. Analytical Validation of a Portable Mass Spectrometer Featuring Interchangeable, Ambient Ionization Sources for High Throughput Forensic Evidence Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, Zachary E; Traub, Angelica; Fatigante, William L; Mancias, Jose; O'Leary, Adam E; Hall, Seth E; Wieland, Jamie R; Oberacher, Herbert; Gizzi, Michael C; Mulligan, Christopher C

    2017-06-01

    Forensic evidentiary backlogs are indicative of the growing need for cost-effective, high-throughput instrumental methods. One such emerging technology that shows high promise in meeting this demand while also allowing on-site forensic investigation is portable mass spectrometric (MS) instrumentation, particularly that which enables the coupling to ambient ionization techniques. While the benefits of rapid, on-site screening of contraband can be anticipated, the inherent legal implications of field-collected data necessitates that the analytical performance of technology employed be commensurate with accepted techniques. To this end, comprehensive analytical validation studies are required before broad incorporation by forensic practitioners can be considered, and are the focus of this work. Pertinent performance characteristics such as throughput, selectivity, accuracy/precision, method robustness, and ruggedness have been investigated. Reliability in the form of false positive/negative response rates is also assessed, examining the effect of variables such as user training and experience level. To provide flexibility toward broad chemical evidence analysis, a suite of rapidly-interchangeable ion sources has been developed and characterized through the analysis of common illicit chemicals and emerging threats like substituted phenethylamines. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  12. Analytical Validation of a Portable Mass Spectrometer Featuring Interchangeable, Ambient Ionization Sources for High Throughput Forensic Evidence Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, Zachary E.; Traub, Angelica; Fatigante, William L.; Mancias, Jose; O'Leary, Adam E.; Hall, Seth E.; Wieland, Jamie R.; Oberacher, Herbert; Gizzi, Michael C.; Mulligan, Christopher C.

    2017-06-01

    Forensic evidentiary backlogs are indicative of the growing need for cost-effective, high-throughput instrumental methods. One such emerging technology that shows high promise in meeting this demand while also allowing on-site forensic investigation is portable mass spectrometric (MS) instrumentation, particularly that which enables the coupling to ambient ionization techniques. While the benefits of rapid, on-site screening of contraband can be anticipated, the inherent legal implications of field-collected data necessitates that the analytical performance of technology employed be commensurate with accepted techniques. To this end, comprehensive analytical validation studies are required before broad incorporation by forensic practitioners can be considered, and are the focus of this work. Pertinent performance characteristics such as throughput, selectivity, accuracy/precision, method robustness, and ruggedness have been investigated. Reliability in the form of false positive/negative response rates is also assessed, examining the effect of variables such as user training and experience level. To provide flexibility toward broad chemical evidence analysis, a suite of rapidly-interchangeable ion sources has been developed and characterized through the analysis of common illicit chemicals and emerging threats like substituted phenethylamines. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  13. Towards High-Resolution Tissue Imaging Using Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Coupled to Shear Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Son N.; Sontag, Ryan L.; Carson, James P.; Corley, Richard A.; Ansong, Charles; Laskin, Julia

    2017-07-01

    Constant mode ambient mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) of tissue sections with high lateral resolution of better than 10 μm was performed by combining shear force microscopy with nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI). Shear force microscopy enabled precise control of the distance between the sample and nano-DESI probe during MSI experiments and provided information on sample topography. Proof-of-concept experiments were performed using lung and brain tissue sections representing spongy and dense tissues, respectively. Topography images obtained using shear force microscopy were comparable to the results obtained using contact profilometry over the same region of the tissue section. Variations in tissue height were found to be dependent on the tissue type and were in the range of 0-5 μm for lung tissue and 0-3 μm for brain tissue sections. Ion images of phospholipids obtained in this study are in good agreement with literature data. Normalization of nano-DESI MSI images to the signal of the internal standard added to the extraction solvent allowed us to construct high-resolution ion images free of matrix effects. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  14. Quantitative analysis of cytokinins in plants by high performance liquid chromatography: electronspray ionization ion trap mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weiqi; Gai, Ying; Liu, Shichang; Wang, Renxiao; Jiang, Xiangning

    2010-10-01

    The present paper introduces a highly sensitive and selective method for simultaneous quantification of 12 cytokinins (free form and their conjugates). The method includes a protocol of extraction with methanol/water/formic acid (15/4/1, v/v/v) to the micro-scale samples, pre-purification with solid phase extraction (SPE) cartridges of the extracts, separation with a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and detection by an electrospray ionization ion trap mass spectrometry (ESI-Ion trap-MS) system in a consecutive ion monitoring (CRM) mode at the three stage fragmentation of mass spectrometry (MS(3) ). The lowest detection level of the cytokinins of the method reaches 0.1-2.0 pg with a very wide range of linear regression from 1-512 pg, at the coefficient factors of 0.98-0.99. The feasibility of this method has been proven in the application of the method to the analysis of the trace-amount contents of cytokinins in the micro-scale samples of various types of plant materials, such as aerial parts of rice and poplar leaves etc. 12 endogenous cytokinins had been identified and quantified in the plant tissues, with an acceptable relatively higher recovery rate from 40% to 70%. © 2010 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  15. [Identification of triacylglycerols in coix oil by high performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Zhi-Min; Zhu, Ming; Chen, Bi-Lian; Chen, Yong

    2005-09-01

    To identify triacylglycerols in coix oil. High performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry was used for identification. The experiment was operated under the conditions: spray voltage at 3 000 V, capillary temperature at 250 degrees C, APCI vaporizer temperature at 400 degrees C, and corona current of 4 microA. Sheath gas pressure (high purity liquid nitrogen) was 35 kPa. Mass spectra were obtained over the m/e range of 300 to 900 amu, scan duration of 1s and Q1 peak width at 0.7. The stationary phase was Zorbax Extend C18 column (4.6 mm x 250 mm, 5 microm). The mobile phase: dichloromethane-acetonitrile (35:65), flow rate: 1 mL x min(-1); column temperature: 25 degrees C. 12 triacylglycerols were identified by HPLC-MS method. The result can be used to identify the components in a fingerprint chromatogram of coix oil and its related injection product.

  16. Experimental discrimination of ion stopping models near the Bragg peak in highly ionized matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayzac, W; Frank, A; Ortner, A; Bagnoud, V; Basko, M M; Bedacht, S; Bläser, C; Blažević, A; Busold, S; Deppert, O; Ding, J; Ehret, M; Fiala, P; Frydrych, S; Gericke, D O; Hallo, L; Helfrich, J; Jahn, D; Kjartansson, E; Knetsch, A; Kraus, D; Malka, G; Neumann, N W; Pépitone, K; Pepler, D; Sander, S; Schaumann, G; Schlegel, T; Schroeter, N; Schumacher, D; Seibert, M; Tauschwitz, An; Vorberger, J; Wagner, F; Weih, S; Zobus, Y; Roth, M

    2017-06-01

    The energy deposition of ions in dense plasmas is a key process in inertial confinement fusion that determines the α-particle heating expected to trigger a burn wave in the hydrogen pellet and resulting in high thermonuclear gain. However, measurements of ion stopping in plasmas are scarce and mostly restricted to high ion velocities where theory agrees with the data. Here, we report experimental data at low projectile velocities near the Bragg peak, where the stopping force reaches its maximum. This parameter range features the largest theoretical uncertainties and conclusive data are missing until today. The precision of our measurements, combined with a reliable knowledge of the plasma parameters, allows to disprove several standard models for the stopping power for beam velocities typically encountered in inertial fusion. On the other hand, our data support theories that include a detailed treatment of strong ion-electron collisions.

  17. Development of high resolution resonance ionization mass spectrometry for trace analysis of {sup 93m}Nb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takatsuka, Takaaki; Tomita, Hideki, E-mail: tomita@nagoya-u.jp [Nagoya University (Japan); Sonoda, Tetsu [RIKEN Nishina Center (Japan); Sonnenschein, Volker [Johannes Gutenberg University (Germany); Sakamoto, Chika [Nagoya University (Japan); Mita, Hiroki [University of Tsukuba, Institute of Physics (Japan); Noto, Takuma [Nagoya University (Japan); Ito, Chikara; Maeda, Shigetaka [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Oarai Research and Development Center (Japan); Iguchi, Tetsuo [Nagoya University (Japan); Wada, Michiharu [RIKEN Nishina Center (Japan); Wendt, Klaus [Johannes Gutenberg University (Germany); Moore, Iain [University of Jyvaeskylae, Department of Physics (Finland)

    2013-04-15

    {sup 93}Nb(n, n Prime ){sup 93m}Nb reaction allows retrospective estimation of integrated fast neutron dose in nuclear reactor. We proposed isomer-selective trace analysis of {sup 93m}Nb by Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry (RIMS) combined with a gas-jet atomic source and an injection locked Ti:Sapphire laser system operated at several kHz. Resonant ionization spectroscopy of Nb in gas-jet using Ti:Sapphire laser was demonstrated.

  18. Search for Massive Long-lived Highly Ionizing Particles with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Abdesselam, Abdelouahab; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Acerbi, Emilio; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adams, David; Addy, Tetteh; Adelman, Jahred; Aderholz, Michael; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adragna, Paolo; Adye, Tim; Aefsky, Scott; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Aharrouche, Mohamed; Ahlen, Steven; Ahles, Florian; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahsan, Mahsana; Aielli, Giulio; Akdogan, Taylan; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Alam, Mohammad; Alam, Muhammad Aftab; Albrand, Solveig; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Aleppo, Mario; Alessandria, Franco; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Aliyev, Magsud; Allport, Phillip; Allwood-Spiers, Sarah; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alon, Raz; Alonso, Alejandro; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral, Pedro; Amelung, Christoph; Ammosov, Vladimir; Amorim, Antonio; Amorós, Gabriel; Amram, Nir; Anastopoulos, Christos; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Andrieux, Marie-Laure; Anduaga, Xabier; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonelli, Stefano; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoun, Sahar; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Arce, Ayana; Archambault, John-Paul; Arfaoui, Samir; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Arik, Engin; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Armstrong, Stephen Randolph; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnault, Christian; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Arutinov, David; Asai, Shoji; Asfandiyarov, Ruslan; Ask, Stefan; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astbury, Alan; Astvatsatourov, Anatoli; Atoian, Grigor; Aubert, Bernard; Auerbach, Benjamin; Auge, Etienne; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Austin, Nicholas; Avramidou, Rachel Maria; Axen, David; Ay, Cano; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Baccaglioni, Giuseppe; Bacci, Cesare; Bach, Andre; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Bachy, Gerard; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bahinipati, Seema; Bai, Yu; Bailey, David; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baker, Mark; Baker, Sarah; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, Fernando; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Piyali; Banerjee, Swagato; Banfi, Danilo; Bangert, Andrea Michelle; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barashkou, Andrei; Barbaro Galtieri, Angela; Barber, Tom; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Bardin, Dmitri; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Barrillon, Pierre; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartsch, Detlef; Bates, Richard; Batkova, Lucia; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Andreas; Battistin, Michele; Battistoni, Giuseppe; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beare, Brian; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Beckingham, Matthew; Becks, Karl-Heinz; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Begel, Michael; Behar Harpaz, Silvia; Behera, Prafulla; Beimforde, Michael; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellina, Francesco; Bellomo, Giovanni; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belloni, Alberto; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Ben Ami, Sagi; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Benchouk, Chafik; Bendel, Markus; Benedict, Brian Hugues; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benjamin, Douglas; Benoit, Mathieu; Bensinger, James; Benslama, Kamal; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Berglund, Elina; Beringer, Jürg; Bernardet, Karim; Bernat, Pauline; Bernhard, Ralf; Bernius, Catrin; Berry, Tracey; Bertin, Antonio; Bertinelli, Francesco; Bertolucci, Federico; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besson, Nathalie; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biscarat, Catherine; Bitenc, Urban; Black, Kevin; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blanchot, Georges; Blocker, Craig; Blocki, Jacek; Blondel, Alain; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocci, Andrea; Bock, Rudolf; Boddy, Christopher Richard; Boehler, Michael; Boek, Jennifer; Boelaert, Nele; Böser, Sebastian; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bogouch, Andrei; Bohm, Christian; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Bona, Marcella; Boonekamp, Maarten; Boorman, Gary; Booth, Chris; Booth, Peter; Bordoni, Stefania; Borer, Claudia; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Borjanovic, Iris; Borroni, Sara; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boterenbrood, Hendrik; Botterill, David; Bouchami, Jihene; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boulahouache, Chaouki; Bourdarios, Claire; Bousson, Nicolas; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bozhko, Nikolay; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, Ivanka; Bracinik, Juraj; Braem, André; Brambilla, Elena; Branchini, Paolo; Brandenburg, George; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Brelier, Bertrand; Bremer, Johan; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Breton, Dominique; Brett, Nicolas; Bright-Thomas, Paul; Britton, Dave; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Brodbeck, Timothy; Brodet, Eyal; Broggi, Francesco; Bromberg, Carl; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, William; Brown, Gareth; Brubaker, Erik; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Brunet, Sylvie; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Buanes, Trygve; Bucci, Francesca; Buchanan, James; Buchanan, Norman; Buchholz, Peter; Buckingham, Ryan; Buckley, Andrew; Buda, Stelian Ioan; Budagov, Ioulian; Budick, Burton; Büscher, Volker; Bugge, Lars; Buira-Clark, Daniel; Buis, Ernst-Jan; Bulekov, Oleg; Bunse, Moritz; Buran, Torleiv; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burgess, Thomas; Burke, Stephen; Busato, Emmanuel; Bussey, Peter; Buszello, Claus-Peter; Butin, François; Butler, Bart; Butler, John; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Buttinger, William; Byatt, Tom; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caccia, Massimo; Caforio, Davide; Cakir, Orhan; Calafiura, Paolo; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Calkins, Robert; Caloba, Luiz; Caloi, Rita; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camard, Arnaud; Camarri, Paolo; Cambiaghi, Mario; Cameron, David; Cammin, Jochen; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Canale, Vincenzo; Canelli, Florencia; Canepa, Anadi; Cantero, Josu; Capasso, Luciano; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capriotti, Daniele; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Caramarcu, Costin; Cardarelli, Roberto; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Bryan; Caron, Sascha; Carpentieri, Carmen; Carrillo Montoya, German D; Carron Montero, Sebastian; Carter, Antony; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Cascella, Michele; Caso, Carlo; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo Martin; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Cataldi, Gabriella; Cataneo, Fernando; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Cattani, Giordano; Caughron, Seth; Cauz, Diego; Cavallari, Alvise; Cavalleri, Pietro; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Cazzato, Antonio; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerqueira, Augusto Santiago; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Cevenini, Francesco; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chan, Kevin; Chapleau, Bertrand; Chapman, John Derek; Chapman, John Wehrley; Chareyre, Eve; Charlton, Dave; Chavda, Vikash; Cheatham, Susan; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Li; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Tingyang; Chen, Xin; Cheng, Shaochen; Cheplakov, Alexander; Chepurnov, Vladimir; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Cheung, Sing-Leung; Chevalier, Laurent; Chevallier, Florent; Chiefari, Giovanni; Chikovani, Leila; Childers, John Taylor; Chilingarov, Alexandre; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chizhov, Mihail; Choudalakis, Georgios; Chouridou, Sofia; Christidi, Illectra-Athanasia; Christov, Asen; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chu, Ming-Lee; Chudoba, Jiri; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Ciftci, Rena; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Ciobotaru, Matei Dan; Ciocca, Claudia; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirilli, Manuela; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Philip James; Cleland, Bill; Clemens, Jean-Claude; Clement, Benoit; Clement, Christophe; Clifft, Roger; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coe, Paul; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Coggeshall, James; Cogneras, Eric; Cojocaru, Claudiu; Colas, Jacques; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collard, Caroline; Collins, Neil; Collins-Tooth, Christopher; Collot, Johann; Colon, German; Coluccia, Rita; Comune, Gianluca; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Conidi, Maria Chiara; Consonni, Michele; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conventi, Francesco; Cook, James; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cooper-Smith, Neil; Copic, Katherine; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Costin, Tudor; Côté, David; Coura Torres, Rodrigo; Courneyea, Lorraine; Cowan, Glen; Cowden, Christopher; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Cristinziani, Markus; Crosetti, Giovanni; Crupi, Roberto; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Cuenca Almenar, Cristóbal; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cuneo, Stefano; Curatolo, Maria; Curtis, Chris; Cwetanski, Peter; Czirr, Hendrik; Czyczula, Zofia; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; D'Orazio, Alessia; Da Rocha Gesualdi Mello, Aline; Da Silva, Paulo Vitor; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dahlhoff, Andrea; Dai, Tiesheng; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dallison, Steve; Dam, Mogens; Dameri, Mauro; Damiani, Daniel; Danielsson, Hans Olof; Dankers, Reinier; Dannheim, Dominik; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darlea, Georgiana Lavinia; Daum, Cornelis; Dauvergne, Jean-Pierre; Davey, Will; Davidek, Tomas; Davidson, Nadia; Davidson, Ruth; Davies, Merlin; Davison, Adam; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Dawson, John; Daya, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Castro, Stefano; De Castro Faria Salgado, Pedro; De Cecco, Sandro; de Graat, Julien; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De La Taille, Christophe; De Lotto, Barbara; De Mora, Lee; De Nooij, Lucie; De Oliveira Branco, Miguel; De Pedis, Daniele; de Saintignon, Paul; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Dean, Simon; Dedes, George; Dedovich, Dmitri; Degenhardt, James; Dehchar, Mohamed; Deile, Mario; Del Papa, Carlo; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delpierre, Pierre; Delruelle, Nicolas; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demirkoz, Bilge; Deng, Jianrong; Denisov, Sergey; Dennis, Chris; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Devetak, Erik; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; DeWilde, Burton; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Dhullipudi, Ramasudhakar; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Luise, Silvestro; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diblen, Faruk; Diehl, Edward; Dietl, Hans; Dietrich, Janet; Dietzsch, Thorsten; Diglio, Sara; Dindar Yagci, Kamile; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dionisi, Carlo; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djilkibaev, Rashid; Djobava, Tamar; do Vale, Maria Aline Barros; Do Valle Wemans, André; Doan, Thi Kieu Oanh; Dobbs, Matt; Dobinson, Robert; Dobos, Daniel; Dobson, Ellie; Dobson, Marc; Dodd, Jeremy; Dogan, Ozgen Berkol; Doglioni, Caterina; Doherty, Tom; Doi, Yoshikuni; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolenc, Irena; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Dohmae, Takeshi; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donega, Mauro; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dos Anjos, Andre; Dosil, Mireia; Dotti, Andrea; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Dowell, John; Doxiadis, Alexander; Doyle, Tony; Drasal, Zbynek; Drees, Jürgen; Dressnandt, Nandor; Drevermann, Hans; Driouichi, Chafik; Dris, Manolis; Drohan, Janice; Dubbert, Jörg; Dubbs, Tim; Dube, Sourabh; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Dudarev, Alexey; Dudziak, Fanny; Dührssen, Michael; Duerdoth, Ian; Duflot, Laurent; Dufour, Marc-Andre; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Duxfield, Robert; Dwuznik, Michal; Dydak, Friedrich; Dzahini, Daniel; Düren, Michael; Ebke, Johannes; Eckert, Simon; Eckweiler, Sebastian; Edmonds, Keith; Edwards, Clive; Efthymiopoulos, Ilias; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Ehrich, Thies; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Eisenhandler, Eric; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Ellis, Katherine; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Ely, Robert; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Engelmann, Roderich; Engl, Albert; Epp, Brigitte; Eppig, Andrew; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Eriksson, Daniel; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Ernwein, Jean; Errede, Deborah; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Escobar, Carlos; Espinal Curull, Xavier; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienne, Francois; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evangelakou, Despoina; Evans, Hal; Fabbri, Laura; Fabre, Caroline; Facius, Katrine; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Falou, Alain; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farley, Jason; Farooque, Trisha; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fasching, Damon; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Fatholahzadeh, Baharak; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Fazio, Salvatore; Febbraro, Renato; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Ivan; Fedorko, Woiciech; Fehling-Kaschek, Mirjam; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Fellmann, Denis; Felzmann, Ulrich; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Fenyuk, Alexander; Ferencei, Jozef; Ferland, Jonathan; Fernandes, Bruno; Fernando, Waruna; Ferrag, Samir; Ferrando, James; Ferrara, Valentina; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrer, Maria Lorenza; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filippas, Anastasios; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Gordon; Fischer, Peter; Fisher, Matthew; Fisher, Steve; Flammer, Joachim; Flechl, Martin; Fleck, Ivor; Fleckner, Johanna; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Flick, Tobias; Flores Castillo, Luis; Flowerdew, Michael; Föhlisch, Florian; Fokitis, Manolis; Fonseca Martin, Teresa; Forbush, David Alan; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fortin, Dominique; Foster, Joe; Fournier, Daniel; Foussat, Arnaud; Fowler, Andrew; Fowler, Ken; Fox, Harald; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchino, Silvia; Francis, David; Frank, Tal; Franklin, Melissa; Franz, Sebastien; Fraternali, Marco; Fratina, Sasa; French, Sky; Froeschl, Robert; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gadfort, Thomas; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallas, Manuel; Gallo, Valentina Santina; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galyaev, Eugene; Gan, KK; Gao, Yongsheng; Gapienko, Vladimir; Gaponenko, Andrei; Garberson, Ford; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garitaonandia, Hegoi; Garonne, Vincent; Garvey, John; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaumer, Olivier; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gayde, Jean-Christophe; Gazis, Evangelos; Ge, Peng; Gee, Norman; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Gellerstedt, Karl; Gemme, Claudia; Gemmell, Alistair; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Gentile, Simonetta; Georgatos, Fotios; George, Simon; Gerlach, Peter; Gershon, Avi; Geweniger, Christoph; Ghazlane, Hamid; Ghez, Philippe; Ghodbane, Nabil; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giakoumopoulou, Victoria; Giangiobbe, Vincent; Gianotti, Fabiola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Adam; Gibson, Stephen; Gieraltowski, Gerry; Gilbert, Laura; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gilewsky, Valentin; Gillberg, Dag; Gillman, Tony; Gingrich, Douglas; Ginzburg, Jonatan; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordano, Raffaele; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giovannini, Paola; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giugni, Danilo; Giusti, Paolo; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glazov, Alexandre; Glitza, Karl-Walter; Glonti, George; Godfrey, Jennifer; Godlewski, Jan; Goebel, Martin; Göpfert, Thomas; Goeringer, Christian; Gössling, Claus; Göttfert, Tobias; Goldfarb, Steven; Goldin, Daniel; Golling, Tobias; Gollub, Nils Peter; Golovnia, Serguei; Gomes, Agostinho; Gomez Fajardo, Luz Stella; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Gonella, Laura; Gonidec, Allain; Gonzalez, Saul; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Silva, Laura; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goodson, Jeremiah Jet; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorfine, Grant; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Gorokhov, Serguei; Goryachev, Vladimir; Gosdzik, Bjoern; Gosselink, Martijn; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Gouanère, Michel; Gough Eschrich, Ivo; Gouighri, Mohamed; Goujdami, Driss; Goulette, Marc Phillippe; Goussiou, Anna; Goy, Corinne; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Grabski, Varlen; Grafström, Per; Grah, Christian; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Grancagnolo, Francesco; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Grassi, Valerio; Gratchev, Vadim; Grau, Nathan; Gray, Heather; Gray, Julia Ann; Graziani, Enrico; Grebenyuk, Oleg; Greenfield, Debbie; Greenshaw, Timothy; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griesmayer, Erich; Griffiths, Justin; Grigalashvili, Nugzar; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grishkevich, Yaroslav; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Grognuz, Joel; Groh, Manfred; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Groth-Jensen, Jacob; Gruwe, Magali; Grybel, Kai; Guarino, Victor; Guicheney, Christophe; Guida, Angelo; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Guler, Hulya; Gunther, Jaroslav; Guo, Bin; Guo, Jun; Gupta, Ambreesh; Gusakov, Yury; Gushchin, Vladimir; Gutierrez, Andrea; Gutierrez, Phillip; Guttman, Nir; Gutzwiller, Olivier; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haas, Stefan; Haber, Carl; Hackenburg, Robert; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Hadley, David; Haefner, Petra; Hahn, Ferdinand; Haider, Stefan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haller, Johannes; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamilton, Samuel; Han, Hongguang; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hance, Michael; Handel, Carsten; Hanke, Paul; Hansen, Christian Johan; Hansen, John Renner; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hansson, Per; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hare, Gabriel; Harenberg, Torsten; Harper, Devin; Harrington, Robert; Harris, Orin; Harrison, Karl; Hartert, Jochen; Hartjes, Fred; Haruyama, Tomiyoshi; Harvey, Alex; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hassani, Samira; Hatch, Mark; Hauff, Dieter; Haug, Sigve; Hauschild, Michael; Hauser, Reiner; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawes, Brian; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Donovan; Hayakawa, Takashi; Hayden, Daniel; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Hazen, Eric; He, Mao; Head, Simon; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heinemann, Beate; Heisterkamp, Simon; Helary, Louis; Heldmann, Michael; Heller, Mathieu; Hellman, Sten; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, Robert; Henke, Michael; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Henry-Couannier, Frédéric; Hensel, Carsten; Henß, Tobias; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herrberg, Ruth; Hershenhorn, Alon David; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hessey, Nigel; Hidvegi, Attila; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Daniel; Hill, John; Hill, Norman; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillert, Sonja; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hirose, Minoru; Hirsch, Florian; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoffman, Julia; Hoffmann, Dirk; Hohlfeld, Marc; Holder, Martin; Holmes, Alan; Holmgren, Sven-Olof; Holy, Tomas; Holzbauer, Jenny; Homer, Jim; Homma, Yasuhiro; Hooft van Huysduynen, Loek; Horazdovsky, Tomas; Horn, Claus; Horner, Stephan; Horton, Katherine; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hott, Thomas; Hou, Suen; Houlden, Michael; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howarth, James; Howell, David; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hruska, Ivan; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Huang, Guang Shun; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Hughes-Jones, Richard; Huhtinen, Mika; Hurst, Peter; Hurwitz, Martina; Husemann, Ulrich; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibbotson, Michael; Ibragimov, Iskander; Ichimiya, Ryo; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Idarraga, John; Idzik, Marek; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Yuri; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Imbault, Didier; Imhaeuser, Martin; Imori, Masatoshi; Ince, Tayfun; Inigo-Golfin, Joaquin; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Ionescu, Gelu; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Ishii, Koji; Ishikawa, Akimasa; Ishino, Masaya; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Isobe, Tadaaki; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Itoh, Yuki; Ivashin, Anton; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, John; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakubek, Jan; Jana, Dilip; Jankowski, Ernest; Jansen, Eric; Jantsch, Andreas; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Jeanty, Laura; Jelen, Kazimierz; Jen-La Plante, Imai; Jenni, Peter; Jeremie, Andrea; Jež, Pavel; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Ji, Haoshuang; Ji, Weina; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jimenez Belenguer, Marcos; Jin, Ge; Jin, Shan; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Joffe, David; Johansen, Lars; Johansen, Marianne; Johansson, Erik; Johansson, Per; Johnert, Sebastian; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tegid; Jones, Tim; Jonsson, Ove; Joram, Christian; Jorge, Pedro; Joseph, John; Ju, Xiangyang; Juranek, Vojtech; Jussel, Patrick; Kabachenko, Vasily; Kabana, Sonja; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kadlecik, Peter; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kaiser, Steffen; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalinin, Sergey; Kalinovskaya, Lidia; Kama, Sami; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneda, Michiru; Kanno, Takayuki; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kapliy, Anton; Kaplon, Jan; Kar, Deepak; Karagoz, Muge; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karr, Kristo; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kasmi, Azzedine; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Mayuko; Kataoka, Yousuke; Katsoufis, Elias; Katzy, Judith; Kaushik, Venkatesh; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kayl, Manuel; Kazanin, Vassili; Kazarinov, Makhail; Kazi, Sandor Istvan; Keates, James Robert; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keil, Markus; Kekelidze, George; Kelly, Marc; Kennedy, John; Kenney, Christopher John; Kenyon, Mike; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerschen, Nicolas; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Kessoku, Kohei; Ketterer, Christian; Khakzad, Mohsen; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Kharchenko, Dmitri; Khodinov, Alexander; Kholodenko, Anatoli; Khomich, Andrei; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khoriauli, Gia; Khovanskiy, Nikolai; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kilvington, Graham; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Min Suk; Kim, Peter; Kim, Shinhong; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Robert Steven Beaufoy; Kirk, Julie; Kirsch, Guillaume; Kirsch, Lawrence; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kittelmann, Thomas; Kiver, Andrey; Kiyamura, Hironori; Kladiva, Eduard; Klaiber-Lodewigs, Jonas; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klemetti, Miika; Klier, Amit; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinkby, Esben; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Klok, Peter; Klous, Sander; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluge, Thomas; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knobloch, Juergen; Knue, Andrea; Ko, Byeong Rok; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Koblitz, Birger; Kocian, Martin; Kocnar, Antonin; Kodys, Peter; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; Koenig, Sebastian; König, Stefan; Köpke, Lutz; Koetsveld, Folkert; Koevesarki, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kohn, Fabian; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kokott, Thomas; Kolachev, Guennady; Kolanoski, Hermann; Kolesnikov, Vladimir; Koletsou, Iro; Koll, James; Kollar, Daniel; Kollefrath, Michael; Kolya, Scott; Komar, Aston; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Kondo, Takahiko; Kono, Takanori; Kononov, Anatoly; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kootz, Andreas; Koperny, Stefan; Kopikov, Sergey; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Koreshev, Victor; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Korotkov, Vladislav; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotamäki, Miikka Juhani; Kotov, Serguei; Kotov, Vladislav; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kral, Vlastimil; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasel, Olaf; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, James; Kreisel, Arik; Krejci, Frantisek; Kretzschmar, Jan; Krieger, Nina; Krieger, Peter; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Krumshteyn, Zinovii; Kruth, Andre; Kubota, Takashi; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kuhn, Dietmar; Kukhtin, Victor; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kummer, Christian; Kuna, Marine; Kundu, Nikhil; Kunkle, Joshua; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurata, Masakazu; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuykendall, William; Kuze, Masahiro; Kuzhir, Polina; Kvasnicka, Ondrej; Kwee, Regina; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rotonda, Laura; Labarga, Luis; Labbe, Julien; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Rémi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Laisne, Emmanuel; Lamanna, Massimo; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lancon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Landsman, Hagar; Lane, Jenna; Lange, Clemens; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Lapin, Vladimir; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Larionov, Anatoly; Larner, Aimee; Lasseur, Christian; Lassnig, Mario; Lau, Wing; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavorato, Antonia; Lavrijsen, Wim; Laycock, Paul; Lazarev, Alexandre; Lazzaro, Alfio; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Maner, Christophe; Le Menedeu, Eve; Leahu, Marius; Lebedev, Alexander; Lebel, Céline; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Hurng-Chun; Lee, Jason; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Michel; Legendre, Marie; Leger, Annie; LeGeyt, Benjamin; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehmacher, Marc; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lehto, Mark; Lei, Xiaowen; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lellouch, Jeremie; Leltchouk, Mikhail; Lendermann, Victor; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatiana; Lenzen, Georg; Lenzi, Bruno; Leonhardt, Kathrin; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Leroy, Claude; Lessard, Jean-Raphael; Lesser, Jonas; Lester, Christopher; Leung Fook Cheong, Annabelle; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levitski, Mikhail; Lewandowska, Marta; Lewis, George; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bo; Li, Haifeng; Li, Shu; Li, Xuefei; Liang, Zhihua; Liang, Zhijun; Liberti, Barbara; Lichard, Peter; Lichtnecker, Markus; Lie, Ki; Liebig, Wolfgang; Lifshitz, Ronen; Lilley, Joseph; Limosani, Antonio; Limper, Maaike; Lin, Simon; Linde, Frank; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipinsky, Lukas; Lipniacka, Anna; Liss, Tony; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Chuanlei; Liu, Dong; Liu, Hao; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Shengli; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Livermore, Sarah; Lleres, Annick; Lloyd, Stephen; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Lockwitz, Sarah; Loddenkoetter, Thomas; Loebinger, Fred; Loginov, Andrey; Loh, Chang Wei; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Loken, James; Lombardo, Vincenzo Paolo; Long, Robin Eamonn; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Losada, Marta; Loscutoff, Peter; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Losty, Michael; Lou, Xinchou; Lounis, Abdenour; Loureiro, Karina; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lowe, Andrew; Lu, Feng; Lu, Jiansen; Lu, Liang; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Ludwig, Andreas; Ludwig, Dörthe; Ludwig, Inga; Ludwig, Jens; Luehring, Frederick; Luijckx, Guy; Lumb, Debra; Luminari, Lamberto; Lund, Esben; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lundberg, Björn; Lundberg, Johan; Lundquist, Johan; Lungwitz, Matthias; Lupi, Anna; Lutz, Gerhard; Lynn, David; Lys, Jeremy; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Macana Goia, Jorge Andres; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Maček, Boštjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Macina, Daniela; Mackeprang, Rasmus; Madaras, Ronald; Mader, Wolfgang; Maenner, Reinhard; Maeno, Tadashi; Mättig, Peter; Mättig, Stefan; Magalhaes Martins, Paulo Jorge; Magnoni, Luca; Magradze, Erekle; Magrath, Caroline; Mahalalel, Yair; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahout, Gilles; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Mal, Prolay; Malecki, Pawel; Malecki, Piotr; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mameghani, Raphael; Mamuzic, Judita; Manabe, Atsushi; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Mangeard, Pierre-Simon; Manjavidze, Ioseb; Mann, Alexander; Manning, Peter; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Manz, Andreas; Mapelli, Alessandro; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchand, Jean-Francois; Marchese, Fabrizio; Marchesotti, Marco; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marin, Alexandru; Marino, Christopher; Marroquim, Fernando; Marshall, Robin; Marshall, Zach; Martens, Kalen; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Andrew; Martin, Brian; Martin, Brian; Martin, Franck Francois; Martin, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Philippe; Martin, Tim; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Mario; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Maß, Martin; Massa, Ignazio; Massaro, Graziano; Massol, Nicolas; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mathes, Markus; Matricon, Pierre; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Matsunaga, Hiroyuki; Matsushita, Takashi; Mattravers, Carly; Maugain, Jean-Marie; Maxfield, Stephen; May, Edward; Mayne, Anna; Mazini, Rachid; Mazur, Michael; Mazzanti, Marcello; Mazzoni, Enrico; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; McGlone, Helen; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McLaren, Robert Andrew; Mclaughlan, Tom; McMahon, Steve; McMahon, Tom; McPherson, Robert; Meade, Andrew; Mechnich, Joerg; Mechtel, Markus; Medinnis, Mike; Meera-Lebbai, Razzak; Meguro, Tatsuma; Mehdiyev, Rashid; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meinhardt, Jens; Meirose, Bernhard; Melachrinos, Constantinos; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Mendoza Navas, Luis; Meng, Zhaoxia; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Menot, Claude; Meoni, Evelin; Merkl, Doris; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meuser, Stefan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer, Joerg; Meyer, Thomas Christian; Meyer, W Thomas; Miao, Jiayuan; Michal, Sebastien; Micu, Liliana; Middleton, Robin; Miele, Paola; Migas, Sylwia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikulec, Bettina; Mikuž, Marko; Miller, David; Miller, Robert; Mills, Bill; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Milstein, Dmitry; Minaenko, Andrey; Miñano, Mercedes; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mirabelli, Giovanni; Miralles Verge, Lluis; Misiejuk, Andrzej; Mitra, Ankush; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitrofanov, Gennady; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Mitsui, Shingo; Miyagawa, Paul; Miyazaki, Kazuki; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Mockett, Paul; Moed, Shulamit; Moeller, Victoria; Mönig, Klaus; Möser, Nicolas; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohn, Bjarte; Mohr, Wolfgang; Mohrdieck-Möck, Susanne; Moisseev, Artemy; Moles-Valls, Regina; Molina-Perez, Jorge; Moneta, Lorenzo; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montesano, Simone; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Moorhead, Gareth; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Moraes, Arthur; Morais, Antonio; Morange, Nicolas; Morel, Julien; Morello, Gianfranco; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morii, Masahiro; Morin, Jerome; Morita, Youhei; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morone, Maria-Christina; Morris, John; Moser, Hans-Guenther; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Mudrinic, Mihajlo; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Klemens; Müller, Thomas; Muenstermann, Daniel; Muijs, Sandra; Muir, Alex; Munwes, Yonathan; Murakami, Koichi; Murray, Bill; Mussche, Ido; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakano, Itsuo; Nanava, Gizo; Napier, Austin; Nash, Michael; Nation, Nigel; Nattermann, Till; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Neal, Homer; Nebot, Eduardo; Nechaeva, Polina; Negri, Andrea; Negri, Guido; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nelson, Andrew; Nelson, Silke; Nelson, Timothy Knight; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Nesterov, Stanislav; Neubauer, Mark; Neusiedl, Andrea; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicolas, Ludovic; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Niedercorn, Francois; Nielsen, Jason; Niinikoski, Tapio; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolaev, Kirill; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Henrik; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nishiyama, Tomonori; Nisius, Richard; Nodulman, Lawrence; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Nomoto, Hiroshi; Nordberg, Markus; Nordkvist, Bjoern; Norton, Peter; Novakova, Jana; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nožička, Miroslav; Nugent, Ian Michael; Nuncio-Quiroz, Adriana-Elizabeth; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; Nyman, Tommi; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'Neale, Steve; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Odier, Jerome; Odino, Gian Andrea; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohshima, Takayoshi; Ohshita, Hidetoshi; Ohska, Tokio Kenneth; Ohsugi, Takashi; Okada, Shogo; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olcese, Marco; Olchevski, Alexander; Oliveira, Miguel Alfonso; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olivito, Dominick; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Omachi, Chihiro; Onofre, António; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Ordonez, Gustavo; Oreglia, Mark; Orellana, Frederik; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlov, Iliya; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Ortega, Eduardo; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Osuna, Carlos; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Ottersbach, John; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Ouyang, Qun; Owen, Mark; Owen, Simon; Oyarzun, Alejandro; Øye, Ola; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Paganis, Efstathios; Paige, Frank; Pajchel, Katarina; Palestini, Sandro; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Palmer, Jody; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Panes, Boris; Panikashvili, Natalia; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Panuskova, Monika; Paolone, Vittorio; Paoloni, Alessandro; Papadelis, Aras; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Paramonov, Alexander; Park, Woochun; Parker, Andy; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passeri, Antonio; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Patricelli, Sergio; Pauly, Thilo; Pecsy, Martin; Pedraza Morales, Maria Isabel; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Peng, Haiping; Pengo, Ruggero; Penson, Alexander; Penwell, John; Perantoni, Marcelo; Perez, Kerstin; Perez Cavalcanti, Tiago; Perez Codina, Estel; Pérez García-Estañ, María Teresa; Perez Reale, Valeria; Peric, Ivan; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrino, Roberto; Perrodo, Pascal; Persembe, Seda; Perus, Antoine; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Onne; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Jorgen; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Petschull, Dennis; Petteni, Michele; Pezoa, Raquel; Phan, Anna; Phillips, Alan; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Pickford, Andrew; Piec, Sebastian Marcin; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinder, Alex; Pinfold, James; Ping, Jialun; Pinto, Belmiro; Pirotte, Olivier; Pizio, Caterina; Placakyte, Ringaile; Plamondon, Mathieu; Plano, Will; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskach, Anatoly; Poblaguev, Andrei; Poddar, Sahill; Podlyski, Fabrice; Poggioli, Luc; Poghosyan, Tatevik; Pohl, Martin; Polci, Francesco; Polesello, Giacomo; Policicchio, Antonio; Polini, Alessandro; Poll, James; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pomarede, Daniel Marc; Pomeroy, Daniel; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Portell Bueso, Xavier; Porter, Robert; Posch, Christoph; Pospelov, Guennady; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Prabhu, Robindra; Pralavorio, Pascal; Prasad, Srivas; Pravahan, Rishiraj; Prell, Soeren; Pretzl, Klaus Peter; Pribyl, Lukas; Price, Darren; Price, Lawrence; Price, Michael John; Prichard, Paul; Prieur, Damien; Primavera, Margherita; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Prudent, Xavier; Przysiezniak, Helenka; Psoroulas, Serena; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Purdham, John; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Pylypchenko, Yuriy; Qian, Jianming; Qian, Zuxuan; Qin, Zhonghua; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Quinonez, Fernando; Raas, Marcel; Radescu, Voica; Radics, Balint; Rador, Tonguc; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rahimi, Amir; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rajek, Silke; Rammensee, Michael; Rammes, Marcus; Ramstedt, Magnus; Randrianarivony, Koloina; Ratoff, Peter; Rauscher, Felix; Rauter, Emanuel; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Reichold, Armin; Reinherz-Aronis, Erez; Reinsch, Andreas; Reisinger, Ingo; Reljic, Dusan; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Zhongliang; Renaud, Adrien; Renkel, Peter; Rensch, Bertram; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Resende, Bernardo; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richards, Alexander; Richter, Robert; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Ridel, Melissa; Rieke, Stefan; Rijpstra, Manouk; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Rios, Ryan Randy; Riu, Imma; Rivoltella, Giancesare; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robinson, Mary; Robson, Aidan; Rocha de Lima, Jose Guilherme; Roda, Chiara; Roda Dos Santos, Denis; Rodier, Stephane; Rodriguez, Diego; Rodriguez Garcia, Yohany; Roe, Adam; Roe, Shaun; Røhne, Ole; Rojo, Victoria; Rolli, Simona; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romanov, Victor; Romeo, Gaston; Romero Maltrana, Diego; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rose, Matthew; Rosenbaum, Gabriel; Rosenberg, Eli; Rosendahl, Peter Lundgaard; Rosselet, Laurent; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rossi, Lucio; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rottländer, Iris; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexander; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubinskiy, Igor; Ruckert, Benjamin; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Gerald; Rühr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rulikowska-Zarebska, Elzbieta; Rumiantsev, Viktor; Rumyantsev, Leonid; Runge, Kay; Runolfsson, Ogmundur; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Rust, Dave; Rutherfoord, John; Ruwiedel, Christoph; Ruzicka, Pavel; Ryabov, Yury; Ryadovikov, Vasily; Ryan, Patrick; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryder, Nick; Rzaeva, Sevda; Saavedra, Aldo; Sadeh, Iftach; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Saleem, Muhammad; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvachua Ferrando, Belén; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Samset, Björn Hallvard; Sandaker, Heidi; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandhu, Pawan; Sandoval, Tanya; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sandvoss, Stephan; Sankey, Dave; Sansoni, Andrea; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Saraiva, João; Sarangi, Tapas; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, Edward; Sarri, Francesca; Sartisohn, Georg; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Takashi; Sasao, Noboru; Satsounkevitch, Igor; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Savard, Pierre; Savinov, Vladimir; Savu, Dan Octavian; Savva, Panagiota; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, David; Says, Louis-Pierre; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scallon, Olivia; Scannicchio, Diana; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schäfer, Uli; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R~Dean; Schamov, Andrey; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Scherzer, Max; Schiavi, Carlo; Schieck, Jochen; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schlereth, James; Schmidt, Evelyn; Schmidt, Michael; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitz, Martin; Schöning, André; Schott, Matthias; Schouten, Doug; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schram, Malachi; Schroeder, Christian; Schroer, Nicolai; Schuh, Silvia; Schuler, Georges; Schultes, Joachim; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Jan; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwierz, Rainer; Schwindling, Jerome; Scott, Bill; Searcy, Jacob; Sedykh, Evgeny; Segura, Ester; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Sellden, Bjoern; Sellers, Graham; Seman, Michal; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sevior, Martin; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shamim, Mansoora; Shan, Lianyou; Shank, James; Shao, Qi Tao; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaver, Leif; Shaw, Christian; Shaw, Kate; Sherman, Daniel; Sherwood, Peter; Shibata, Akira; Shimizu, Shima; Shimojima, Makoto; Shin, Taeksu; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shochet, Mel; Short, Daniel; Shupe, Michael; Sicho, Petr; Sidoti, Antonio; Siebel, Anca-Mirela; Siegert, Frank; Siegrist, James; Sijacki, Djordje; Silbert, Ohad; Silva, José; Silver, Yiftah; Silverstein, Daniel; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simard, Olivier; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simmons, Brinick; Simonyan, Margar; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sipica, Valentin; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sisakyan, Alexei; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skinnari, Louise Anastasia; Skovpen, Kirill; Skubic, Patrick; Skvorodnev, Nikolai; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Sloan, Terrence; Sloper, John erik; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Ben Campbell; Smith, Douglas; Smith, Kenway; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snow, Steve; Snow, Joel; Snuverink, Jochem; Snyder, Scott; Soares, Mara; Sobie, Randall; Sodomka, Jaromir; Soffer, Abner; Solans, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Solc, Jaroslav; Soldevila, Urmila; Solfaroli Camillocci, Elena; Solodkov, Alexander; Solovyanov, Oleg; Sondericker, John; Soni, Nitesh; Sopko, Vit; Sopko, Bruno; Sorbi, Massimo; Sosebee, Mark; Soukharev, Andrey; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spanò, Francesco; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spila, Federico; Spiriti, Eleuterio; Spiwoks, Ralf; Spousta, Martin; Spreitzer, Teresa; Spurlock, Barry; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stahl, Thorsten; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Staude, Arnold; Stavina, Pavel; Stavropoulos, Georgios; Steele, Genevieve; Steinbach, Peter; Steinberg, Peter; Stekl, Ivan; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stevenson, Kyle; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockmanns, Tobias; Stockton, Mark; Stoerig, Kathrin; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stonjek, Stefan; Strachota, Pavel; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strang, Michael; Strauss, Emanuel; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Strong, John; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Strube, Jan; Stugu, Bjarne; Stumer, Iuliu; Stupak, John; Sturm, Philipp; Soh, Dart-yin; Su, Dong; Subramania, Siva; Sugaya, Yorihito; Sugimoto, Takuya; Suhr, Chad; Suita, Koichi; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Sushkov, Serge; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Yu; Sviridov, Yuri; Swedish, Stephen; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Szeless, Balazs; Sánchez, Javier; Ta, Duc; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taga, Adrian; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takahashi, Yuta; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tamsett, Matthew; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Satoshi; Tanaka, Shuji; Tanaka, Yoshito; Tani, Kazutoshi; Tannoury, Nancy; Tappern, Geoffrey; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tardif, Dominique; Tarem, Shlomit; Tarrade, Fabien; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tassi, Enrico; Tatarkhanov, Mous; Taylor, Christopher; Taylor, Frank; Taylor, Gary; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Wendy; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, Matilde; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Tennenbaum-Katan, Yaniv-David; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terwort, Mark; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Tevlin, Christopher; Thadome, Jocelyn; Therhaag, Jan; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thioye, Moustapha; Thoma, Sascha; Thomas, Juergen; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Peter; Thompson, Stan; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Thun, Rudolf; Tic, Tomas; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timmermans, Charles; Tipton, Paul; Tique Aires Viegas, Florbela De Jes; Tisserant, Sylvain; Tobias, Jürgen; Toczek, Barbara; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Toggerson, Brokk; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokunaga, Kaoru; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tollefson, Kirsten; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Tonazzo, Alessandra; Tong, Guoliang; Tonoyan, Arshak; Topfel, Cyril; Topilin, Nikolai; Torchiani, Ingo; Torrence, Eric; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Traynor, Daniel; Trefzger, Thomas; Treis, Johannes; Tremblet, Louis; Tricoli, Alesandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Trinh, Thi Nguyet; Tripiana, Martin; Triplett, Nathan; Trischuk, William; Trivedi, Arjun; Trocmé, Benjamin; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trzupek, Adam; Tsarouchas, Charilaos; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiakiris, Menelaos; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsionou, Dimitra; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsung, Jieh-Wen; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tua, Alan; Tuggle, Joseph; Turala, Michal; Turecek, Daniel; Turk Cakir, Ilkay; Turlay, Emmanuel; Tuts, Michael; Tykhonov, Andrii; Tylmad, Maja; Tyndel, Mike; Typaldos, Dimitrios; Tyrvainen, Harri; Tzanakos, George; Uchida, Kirika; Ueda, Ikuo; Ueno, Ryuichi; Ugland, Maren; Uhlenbrock, Mathias; Uhrmacher, Michael; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Underwood, David; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Unno, Yoshinobu; Urbaniec, Dustin; Urkovsky, Evgeny; Urquijo, Phillip; Urrejola, Pedro; Usai, Giulio; Uslenghi, Massimiliano; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Vahsen, Sven; Valderanis, Chrysostomos; Valenta, Jan; Valente, Paolo; Valentinetti, Sara; Valkar, Stefan; Valladolid Gallego, Eva; Vallecorsa, Sofia; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; van der Graaf, Harry; van der Kraaij, Erik; van der Poel, Egge; van der Ster, Daniel; Van Eijk, Bob; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; van Kesteren, Zdenko; van Vulpen, Ivo; Vandelli, Wainer; Vandoni, Giovanna; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vankov, Peter; Vannucci, Francois; Varela Rodriguez, Fernando; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vassilakopoulos, Vassilios; Vazeille, Francois; Vegni, Guido; Veillet, Jean-Jacques; Vellidis, Constantine; Veloso, Filipe; Veness, Raymond; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Ventura, Daniel; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinek, Elisabeth; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Virchaux, Marc; Viret, Sébastien; Virzi, Joseph; Vitale, Antonio; Vitells, Ofer; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vives Vaque, Francesc; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vlasak, Michal; Vlasov, Nikolai; Vogel, Adrian; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Matteo; Volpini, Giovanni; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Loeben, Joerg; von Radziewski, Holger; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorobiev, Alexander; Vorwerk, Volker; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Voss, Thorsten Tobias; Vossebeld, Joost; Vovenko, Anatoly; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vu Anh, Tuan; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wagner, Peter; Wahlen, Helmut; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walbersloh, Jorg; Walch, Shannon; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wall, Richard; Waller, Peter; Wang, Chiho; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Joshua C; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Warsinsky, Markus; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Anthony; Waugh, Ben; Weber, Jens; Weber, Marc; Weber, Michele; Weber, Pavel; Weidberg, Anthony; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Wellenstein, Hermann; Wells, Phillippa; Wen, Mei; Wenaus, Torre; Wendler, Shanti; Weng, Zhili; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Per; Werth, Michael; Wessels, Martin; Whalen, Kathleen; Wheeler-Ellis, Sarah Jane; Whitaker, Scott; White, Andrew; White, Martin; White, Sebastian; Whitehead, Samuel Robert; Whiteson, Daniel; Whittington, Denver; Wicek, Francois; Wicke, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik, Liv Antje Mari; Wildauer, Andreas; Wildt, Martin Andre; Wilhelm, Ivan; Wilkens, Henric George; Will, Jonas Zacharias; Williams, Eric; Williams, Hugh; Willis, William; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, John; Wilson, Michael Galante; Wilson, Alan; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winkelmann, Stefan; Winklmeier, Frank; Wittgen, Matthias; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Wooden, Gemma; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wraight, Kenneth; Wright, Catherine; Wrona, Bozydar; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wulf, Evan; Wunstorf, Renate; Wynne, Benjamin; Xaplanteris, Leonidas; Xella, Stefania; Xie, Song; Xie, Yigang; Xu, Chao; Xu, Da; Xu, Guofa; Yabsley, Bruce; Yamada, Miho; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Kyoko; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamamura, Taiki; Yamaoka, Jared; Yamazaki, Takayuki; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Un-Ki; Yang, Yi; Yang, Yi; Yang, Zhaoyu; Yanush, Serguei; Yao, Weiming; Yao, Yushu; Yasu, Yoshiji; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yilmaz, Metin; Yoosoofmiya, Reza; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Riktura; Young, Charles; Youssef, Saul; Yu, Dantong; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yurkewicz, Adam; Zaets, Vassilli; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zajacova, Zuzana; Zalite, Youris; Zanello, Lucia; Zarzhitsky, Pavel; Zaytsev, Alexander; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeller, Michael; Zema, Pasquale Federico; Zemla, Andrzej; Zendler, Carolin; Zenin, Anton; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zenonos, Zenonas; Zenz, Seth; Zerwas, Dirk; Zevi della Porta, Giovanni; Zhan, Zhichao; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Long; Zhao, Tianchi; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zheng, Shuchen; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Ning; Zhou, Yue; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhuravlov, Vadym; Zieminska, Daria; Zilka, Branislav; Zimmermann, Robert; Zimmermann, Simone; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Ziolkowski, Michael; Zitoun, Robert; Živković, Lidija; Zmouchko, Viatcheslav; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; Zolnierowski, Yves; Zsenei, Andras; zur Nedden, Martin; Zutshi, Vishnu; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2011-01-01

    A search is made for massive long-lived highly ionising particles with the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider, using 3.1 pb-1 of pp collision data taken at sqrt(s)=7 TeV. The signature of energy loss in the ATLAS inner detector and electromagnetic calorimeter is used. No such particles are found and limits on the production cross section for electric charges 6e <= |q| <= 17e and masses 200 GeV <= m <= 1000 GeV are set in the range 1-12 pb for different hypotheses on the production mechanism.

  19. Search for Massive Long-lived Highly Ionizing Particles with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

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Amorim, Antonio; Amoros, Gabriel; Amram, Nir; Anastopoulos, Christos; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Andrieux, Marie-Laure; Anduaga, Xabier; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonelli, Stefano; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoun, Sahar; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Arce, Ayana; Archambault, John-Paul; Arfaoui, Samir; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Arik, Engin; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Armstrong, Stephen Randolph; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnault, Christian; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Arutinov, David; Asai, Shoji; Asfandiyarov, Ruslan; Ask, Stefan; Asman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astbury, Alan; Astvatsatourov, Anatoli; Atoian, Grigor; Aubert, Bernard; Auerbach, Benjamin; Auge, Etienne; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Austin, Nicholas; Avramidou, Rachel Maria; Axen, David; Ay, Cano; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Baccaglioni, Giuseppe; Bacci, Cesare; Bach, Andre; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Bachy, Gerard; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bahinipati, Seema; Bai, Yu; Bailey, David; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baker, Mark; Baker, Sarah; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, Fernando; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Piyali; Banerjee, Swagato; Banfi, Danilo; Bangert, Andrea Michelle; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barashkou, Andrei; Galtieri, Angela Barbaro; Barber, Tom; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Bardin, Dmitri; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimaraes da Costa, Joao; Barrillon, Pierre; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartsch, Detlef; Bates, Richard; Batkova, Lucia; Batley, Richard; 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Cheatham, Susan; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Li; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Tingyang; Chen, Xin; Cheng, Shaochen; Cheplakov, Alexander; Chepurnov, Vladimir; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Cheung, Sing-Leung; Chevalier, Laurent; Chevallier, Florent; Chiefari, Giovanni; Chikovani, Leila; Childers, John Taylor; Chilingarov, Alexandre; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chizhov, Mihail; Choudalakis, Georgios; Chouridou, Sofia; Christidi, Illectra-Athanasia; Christov, Asen; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chu, Ming-Lee; Chudoba, Jiri; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Ciftci, Rena; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Ciobotaru, Matei Dan; Ciocca, Claudia; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirilli, Manuela; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G.; Clark, Philip; Cleland, Bill; Clemens, Jean-Claude; Clement, Benoit; Clement, Christophe; Clifft, Roger; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H.; Coe, Paul; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Coggeshall, James; 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Deile, Mario; del Papa, Carlo; del Peso, Jose; del Prete, Tarcisio; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delpierre, Pierre; Delruelle, Nicolas; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demirkoz, Bilge; Deng, Jianrong; Denisov, Sergey; Dennis, Chris; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Devetak, Erik; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; DeWilde, Burton; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Dhullipudi, Ramasudhakar; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Luise, Silvestro; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diblen, Faruk; Diehl, Edward; Dietl, Hans; Dietrich, Janet; Dietzsch, Thorsten; Diglio, Sara; Yagci, Kamile Dindar; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dionisi, Carlo; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; 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Eckweiler, Sebastian; Edmonds, Keith; Edwards, Clive; Efthymiopoulos, Ilias; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Ehrich, Thies; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Eisenhandler, Eric; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Ellis, Katherine; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Ely, Robert; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Engelmann, Roderich; Engl, Albert; Epp, Brigitte; Eppig, Andrew; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Eriksson, Daniel; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Ernwein, Jean; Errede, Deborah; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Escobar, Carlos; Espinal Curull, Xavier; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienne, Francois; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evangelakou, Despoina; Evans, Hal; Fabbri, Laura; Fabre, Caroline; Facius, Katrine; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Falou, Alain; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farley, Jason; Farooque, Trisha; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fasching, Damon; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Fatholahzadeh, Baharak; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Fazio, Salvatore; Febbraro, Renato; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Ivan; Fedorko, Woiciech; Fehling-Kaschek, Mirjam; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Fellmann, Denis; Felzmann, Ulrich; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Fenyuk, Alexander; Ferencei, Jozef; Ferland, Jonathan; Fernandes, Bruno; Fernando, Waruna; Ferrag, Samir; Ferrando, James; Ferrara, Valentina; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrer, Maria Lorenza; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filipcic, Andrej; Filippas, Anastasios; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Gordon; Fischer, Peter; Fisher, Matthew; Fisher, Steve; Flammer, Joachim; Flechl, Martin; Fleck, Ivor; Fleckner, Johanna; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Flick, Tobias; Flores Castillo, Luis; Flowerdew, Michael; Fohlisch, Florian; Fokitis, Manolis; Fonseca Martin, Teresa; Forbush, David Alan; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fortin, Dominique; Foster, Joe; Fournier, Daniel; Foussat, Arnaud; Fowler, Andrew; Fowler, Ken; Fox, Harald; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchino, Silvia; Francis, David; Frank, Tal; Franklin, Melissa; Franz, Sebastien; Fraternali, Marco; Fratina, Sasa; French, Sky; Froeschl, Robert; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gadfort, Thomas; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallas, Manuel; Gallo, Valentina Santina; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galyaev, Eugene; Gan, K.K.; Gao, Yongsheng; Gapienko, Vladimir; Gaponenko, Andrei; Garberson, Ford; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Garcia, Carmen; Garcia Navarro, Jose Enrique; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garitaonandia, Hegoi; Garonne, Vincent; Garvey, John; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaumer, Olivier; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gayde, Jean-Christophe; Gazis, Evangelos; Ge, Peng; Gee, Norman; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Gellerstedt, Karl; Gemme, Claudia; Gemmell, Alistair; Genest, Marie-Helene; Gentile, Simonetta; Georgatos, Fotios; George, Simon; Gerlach, Peter; Gershon, Avi; Geweniger, Christoph; Ghazlane, Hamid; Ghez, Philippe; Ghodbane, Nabil; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giakoumopoulou, Victoria; Giangiobbe, Vincent; Gianotti, Fabiola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Adam; Gibson, Stephen; Gieraltowski, Gerry; Gilbert, Laura; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gilewsky, Valentin; Gillberg, Dag; Gillman, Tony; Gingrich, Douglas; Ginzburg, Jonatan; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordano, Raffaele; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giovannini, Paola; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giugni, Danilo; Giusti, Paolo; Gjelsten, Borge Kile; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glazov, Alexandre; Glitza, Karl-Walter; Glonti, George; Godfrey, Jennifer; Godlewski, Jan; Goebel, Martin; Gopfert, Thomas; Goeringer, Christian; Gossling, Claus; Gottfert, Tobias; Goldfarb, Steven; Goldin, Daniel; Golling, Tobias; Gollub, Nils Peter; Golovnia, Serguei; Gomes, Agostinho; Gomez Fajardo, Luz Stella; Goncalo, Ricardo; Gonella, Laura; Gonidec, Allain; Gonzalez, Saul; Gonzalez de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Silva, Laura; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goodson, Jeremiah Jet; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorfine, Grant; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorisek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Gorokhov, Serguei; Goryachev, Vladimir; Gosdzik, Bjoern; Gosselink, Martijn; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Gouanere, Michel; Gough Eschrich, Ivo; Gouighri, Mohamed; Goujdami, Driss; Goulette, Marc Phillippe; Goussiou, Anna; Goy, Corinne; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Grabski, Varlen; Grafstrom, Per; Grah, Christian; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Grancagnolo, Francesco; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Grassi, Valerio; Gratchev, Vadim; Grau, Nathan; Gray, Heather; Gray, Julia Ann; Graziani, Enrico; Grebenyuk, Oleg; Greenfield, Debbie; Greenshaw, Timothy; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griesmayer, Erich; Griffiths, Justin; Grigalashvili, Nugzar; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grishkevich, Yaroslav; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Grognuz, Joel; Groh, Manfred; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Groth-Jensen, Jacob; Gruwe, Magali; Grybel, Kai; Guarino, Victor; Guicheney, Christophe; Guida, Angelo; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Guler, Hulya; Gunther, Jaroslav; Guo, Bin; Guo, Jun; Gupta, Ambreesh; Gusakov, Yury; Gushchin, Vladimir; Gutierrez, Andrea; Gutierrez, Phillip; Guttman, Nir; Gutzwiller, Olivier; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haas, Stefan; Haber, Carl; Hackenburg, Robert; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Hadley, David; Haefner, Petra; Hahn, Ferdinand; Haider, Stefan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haller, Johannes; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamilton, Samuel; Han, Hongguang; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hance, Michael; Handel, Carsten; Hanke, Paul; Hansen, Christian Johan; Hansen, John Renner; Hansen, Jorgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hansson, Per; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hare, Gabriel; Harenberg, Torsten; Harper, Devin; Harrington, Robert; Harris, Orin; Harrison, Karl; Hartert, Jochen; Hartjes, Fred; Haruyama, Tomiyoshi; Harvey, Alex; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hassani, Samira; Hatch, Mark; Hauff, Dieter; Haug, Sigve; Hauschild, Michael; Hauser, Reiner; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawes, Brian; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Donovan; Hayakawa, Takashi; Hayden, Daniel; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Hazen, Eric; He, Mao; Head, Simon; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heinemann, Beate; Heisterkamp, Simon; Helary, Louis; Heldmann, Michael; Heller, Mathieu; Hellman, Sten; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, Robert; Henke, Michael; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Henry-Couannier, Frederic; Hensel, Carsten; Henss, Tobias; Hernandez Jimenez, Yesenia; Herrberg, Ruth; Hershenhorn, Alon David; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hessey, Nigel; Hidvegi, Attila; Higon-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Daniel; Hill, John; Hill, Norman; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillert, Sonja; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hirose, Minoru; Hirsch, Florian; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoffman, Julia; Hoffmann, Dirk; Hohlfeld, Marc; Holder, Martin; Holmes, Alan; Holmgren, Sven-Olof; Holy, Tomas; Holzbauer, Jenny; Homer, Jim; Homma, Yasuhiro; Hooft van Huysduynen, Loek; Horazdovsky, Tomas; Horn, Claus; Horner, Stephan; Horton, Katherine; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hott, Thomas; Hou, Suen; Houlden, Michael; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howarth, James; Howell, David; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hruska, Ivan; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Huang, Guang Shun; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Hughes-Jones, Richard; Huhtinen, Mika; Hurst, Peter; Hurwitz, Martina; Husemann, Ulrich; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibbotson, Michael; Ibragimov, Iskander; Ichimiya, Ryo; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Idarraga, John; Idzik, Marek; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Yuri; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Imbault, Didier; Imhaeuser, Martin; Imori, Masatoshi; Ince, Tayfun; Inigo-Golfin, Joaquin; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Ionescu, Gelu; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Ishii, Koji; Ishikawa, Akimasa; Ishino, Masaya; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Isobe, Tadaaki; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Itoh, Yuki; Ivashin, Anton; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, John; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakubek, Jan; Jana, Dilip; Jankowski, Ernest; Jansen, Eric; Jantsch, Andreas; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Goran; Jeanty, Laura; Jelen, Kazimierz; Jen-La Plante, Imai; Jenni, Peter; Jeremie, Andrea; Jez, Pavel; Jezequel, Stephane; Ji, Haoshuang; Ji, Weina; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jimenez Belenguer, Marcos; Jin, Ge; Jin, Shan; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Joffe, David; Johansen, Lars; Johansen, Marianne; Johansson, Erik; Johansson, Per; Johnert, Sebastian; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tegid; Jones, Tim; Jonsson, Ove; Joram, Christian; Jorge, Pedro; Joseph, John; Ju, Xiangyang; Juranek, Vojtech; Jussel, Patrick; Kabachenko, Vasily; Kabana, Sonja; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kadlecik, Peter; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kaiser, Steffen; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalinin, Sergey; Kalinovskaya, Lidia; Kama, Sami; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneda, Michiru; Kanno, Takayuki; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kapliy, Anton; Kaplon, Jan; Kar, Deepak; Karagoz, Muge; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karr, Kristo; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kasmi, Azzedine; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Mayuko; Kataoka, Yousuke; Katsoufis, Elias; Katzy, Judith; Kaushik, Venkatesh; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kayl, Manuel; Kazanin, Vassili; Kazarinov, Makhail; Kazi, Sandor Istvan; Keates, James Robert; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keil, Markus; Kekelidze, George; Kelly, Marc; Kennedy, John; Kenney, Christopher John; Kenyon, Mike; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerschen, Nicolas; Kersevan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Kessoku, Kohei; Ketterer, Christian; Khakzad, Mohsen; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Kharchenko, Dmitri; Khodinov, Alexander; Kholodenko, Anatoli; Khomich, Andrei; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khoriauli, Gia; Khovanskiy, Nikolai; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kilvington, Graham; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Min Suk; Kim, Peter; Kim, Shinhong; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Robert Steven Beaufoy; Kirk, Julie; Kirsch, Guillaume; Kirsch, Lawrence; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kittelmann, Thomas; Kiver, Andrey; Kiyamura, Hironori; Kladiva, Eduard; Klaiber-Lodewigs, Jonas; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klemetti, Miika; Klier, Amit; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinkby, Esben; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Klok, Peter; Klous, Sander; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluge, Thomas; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knobloch, Juergen; Knue, Andrea; Ko, Byeong Rok; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Koblitz, Birger; Kocian, Martin; Kocnar, Antonin; Kodys, Peter; Koneke, Karsten; Konig, Adriaan; Koenig, Sebastian; Konig, Stefan; Kopke, Lutz; Koetsveld, Folkert; Koevesarki, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kohn, Fabian; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kokott, Thomas; Kolachev, Guennady; Kolanoski, Hermann; Kolesnikov, Vladimir; Koletsou, Iro; Koll, James; Kollar, Daniel; Kollefrath, Michael; Kolya, Scott; Komar, Aston; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Kondo, Takahiko; Kono, Takanori; Kononov, Anatoly; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kootz, Andreas; Koperny, Stefan; Kopikov, Sergey; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Koreshev, Victor; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Korotkov, Vladislav; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotamaki, Miikka Juhani; Kotov, Serguei; Kotov, Vladislav; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kral, Vlastimil; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasel, Olaf; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, James; Kreisel, Arik; Krejci, Frantisek; Kretzschmar, Jan; Krieger, Nina; Krieger, Peter; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Kruger, Hans; Krumshteyn, Zinovii; Kruth, Andre; Kubota, Takashi; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kuhn, Dietmar; Kukhtin, Victor; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kummer, Christian; Kuna, Marine; Kundu, Nikhil; Kunkle, Joshua; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurata, Masakazu; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuykendall, William; Kuze, Masahiro; Kuzhir, Polina; Kvasnicka, Ondrej; Kwee, Regina; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rotonda, Laura; Labarga, Luis; Labbe, Julien; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramon; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Laisne, Emmanuel; Lamanna, Massimo; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lancon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Landsman, Hagar; Lane, Jenna; Lange, Clemens; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Lapin, Vladimir; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Larionov, Anatoly; Larner, Aimee; Lasseur, Christian; Lassnig, Mario; Lau, Wing; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavorato, Antonia; Lavrijsen, Wim; Laycock, Paul; Lazarev, Alexandre; Lazzaro, Alfio; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Maner, Christophe; Le Menedeu, Eve; Leahu, Marius; Lebedev, Alexander; Lebel, Celine; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Hurng-Chun; Lee, Jason; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Michel; Legendre, Marie; Leger, Annie; LeGeyt, Benjamin; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehmacher, Marc; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lehto, Mark; Lei, Xiaowen; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lellouch, Jeremie; Leltchouk, Mikhail; Lendermann, Victor; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatiana; Lenzen, Georg; Lenzi, Bruno; Leonhardt, Kathrin; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Leroy, Claude; Lessard, Jean-Raphael; Lesser, Jonas; Lester, Christopher; Leung Fook Cheong, Annabelle; Leveque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levitski, Mikhail; Lewandowska, Marta; Lewis, George; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bo; Li, Haifeng; Li, Shu; Li, Xuefei; Liang, Zhihua; Liang, Zhijun; Liberti, Barbara; Lichard, Peter; Lichtnecker, Markus; Lie, Ki; Liebig, Wolfgang; Lifshitz, Ronen; Lilley, Joseph; Limosani, Antonio; Limper, Maaike; Lin, Simon; Linde, Frank; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipinsky, Lukas; Lipniacka, Anna; Liss, Tony; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Chuanlei; Liu, Dong; Liu, Hao; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Shengli; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Livermore, Sarah; Lleres, Annick; Lloyd, Stephen; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Lockwitz, Sarah; Loddenkoetter, Thomas; Loebinger, Fred; Loginov, Andrey; Loh, Chang Wei; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Loken, James; Lombardo, Vincenzo Paolo; Long, Robin Eamonn; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Losada, Marta; Loscutoff, Peter; Sterzo, Francesco Lo; Losty, Michael; Lou, Xinchou; Lounis, Abdenour; Loureiro, Karina; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lowe, Andrew; Lu, Feng; Lu, Jiansen; Lu, Liang; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Ludwig, Andreas; Ludwig, Dorthe; Ludwig, Inga; Ludwig, Jens; Luehring, Frederick; Luijckx, Guy; Lumb, Debra; Luminari, Lamberto; Lund, Esben; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lundberg, Bjorn; Lundberg, Johan; Lundquist, Johan; Lungwitz, Matthias; Lupi, Anna; Lutz, Gerhard; Lynn, David; Lys, Jeremy; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Macana Goia, Jorge Andres; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Macek, Bostjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Macina, Daniela; Mackeprang, Rasmus; Madaras, Ronald; Mader, Wolfgang; Maenner, Reinhard; Maeno, Tadashi; Mattig, Peter; Mattig, Stefan; Magalhaes Martins, Paulo Jorge; Magnoni, Luca; Magradze, Erekle; Magrath, Caroline; Mahalalel, Yair; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahout, Gilles; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maio, Amelia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Mal, Prolay; Malecki, Pawel; Malecki, Piotr; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mameghani, Raphael; Mamuzic, Judita; Manabe, Atsushi; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandic, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, Jose; Mangeard, Pierre-Simon; Manjavidze, Ioseb; Mann, Alexander; Manning, Peter; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Manz, Andreas; Mapelli, Alessandro; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchand, Jean-Francois; Marchese, Fabrizio; Marchesotti, Marco; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marin, Alexandru; Marino, Christopher; Marroquim, Fernando; Marshall, Robin; Marshall, Zach; Martens, Kalen; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Andrew; Martin, Brian; Martin, Brian Thomas; Martin, Franck Francois; Martin, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Philippe; Martin, Tim; Martin Dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Mario; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Mass, Martin; Massa, Ignazio; Massaro, Graziano; Massol, Nicolas; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mathes, Markus; Matricon, Pierre; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Matsunaga, Hiroyuki; Matsushita, Takashi; Mattravers, Carly; Maugain, Jean-Marie; Maxfield, Stephen; May, Edward; Mayne, Anna; Mazini, Rachid; Mazur, Michael; Mazzanti, Marcello; Mazzoni, Enrico; Kee, Shawn Patrick Mc; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; McGlone, Helen; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McLaren, Robert Andrew; Mclaughlan, Tom; McMahon, Steve; McMahon, Tom; McPherson, Robert; Meade, Andrew; Mechnich, Joerg; Mechtel, Markus; Medinnis, Mike; Meera-Lebbai, Razzak; Meguro, Tatsuma; Mehdiyev, Rashid; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meinhardt, Jens; Meirose, Bernhard; Melachrinos, Constantinos; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Mendoza Navas, Luis; Meng, Zhaoxia; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Menot, Claude; Meoni, Evelin; Merkl, Doris; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meuser, Stefan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer, Joerg; Meyer, Thomas Christian; Meyer, W.Thomas; Miao, Jiayuan; Michal, Sebastien; Micu, Liliana; Middleton, Robin; Miele, Paola; Migas, Sylwia; Mijovic, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikulec, Bettina; Mikuz, Marko; Miller, David; Miller, Robert; Mills, Bill; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Milstein, Dmitry; Minaenko, Andrey; Minano, Mercedes; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mirabelli, Giovanni; Miralles Verge, Lluis; Misiejuk, Andrzej; Mitra, Ankush; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitrofanov, Gennady; Mitsou, Vasiliki A.; Mitsui, Shingo; Miyagawa, Paul; Miyazaki, Kazuki; Mjornmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Mockett, Paul; Moed, Shulamit; Moeller, Victoria; Monig, Klaus; Moser, Nicolas; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohn, Bjarte; Mohr, Wolfgang; Mohrdieck-Mock, Susanne; Moisseev, Artemy; Moles-Valls, Regina; Molina-Perez, Jorge; Moneta, Lorenzo; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montesano, Simone; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Moorhead, Gareth; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Moraes, Arthur; Morais, Antonio; Morange, Nicolas; Morel, Julien; Morello, Gianfranco; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morii, Masahiro; Morin, Jerome; Morita, Youhei; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morone, Maria-Christina; Morris, John; Moser, Hans-Guenther; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Mudrinic, Mihajlo; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Klemens; Muller, Thomas; Muenstermann, Daniel; Muijs, Sandra; Muir, Alex; Munwes, Yonathan; Murakami, Koichi; Murray, Bill; Mussche, Ido; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakano, Itsuo; Nanava, Gizo; Napier, Austin; Nash, Michael; Nation, Nigel; Nattermann, Till; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Neal, Homer; Nebot, Eduardo; Nechaeva, Polina; Negri, Andrea; Negri, Guido; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nelson, Andrew; Nelson, Silke; Nelson, Timothy Knight; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Nesterov, Stanislav; Neubauer, Mark; Neusiedl, Andrea; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicolas, Ludovic; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Niedercorn, Francois; Nielsen, Jason; Niinikoski, Tapio; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolaev, Kirill; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Henrik; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nishiyama, Tomonori; Nisius, Richard; Nodulman, Lawrence; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Nomoto, Hiroshi; Nordberg, Markus; Nordkvist, Bjoern; Norton, Peter; Novakova, Jana; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozicka, Miroslav; Nugent, Ian Michael; Nuncio-Quiroz, Adriana-Elizabeth; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; Nyman, Tommi; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'Neale, Steve; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Odier, Jerome; Odino, Gian Andrea; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohshima, Takayoshi; Ohshita, Hidetoshi; Ohska, Tokio Kenneth; Ohsugi, Takashi; Okada, Shogo; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olcese, Marco; Olchevski, Alexander; Oliveira, Miguel Alfonso; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olivito, Dominick; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Omachi, Chihiro; Onofre, Antonio; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Ordonez, Gustavo; Oreglia, Mark; Orellana, Frederik; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlov, Iliya; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Ortega, Eduardo; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Osuna, Carlos; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Ottersbach, John; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Ouyang, Qun; Owen, Mark; Owen, Simon; Oyarzun, Alejandro; Oye, Ola; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Paganis, Efstathios; Paige, Frank; Pajchel, Katarina; Palestini, Sandro; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Palmer, Jody; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Panes, Boris; Panikashvili, Natalia; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Panuskova, Monika; Paolone, Vittorio; Paoloni, Alessandro; Papadelis, Aras; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Paramonov, Alexander; Park, Woochun; Parker, Andy; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passeri, Antonio; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pasztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Patricelli, Sergio; Pauly, Thilo; Pecsy, Martin; Pedraza Morales, Maria Isabel; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Peng, Haiping; Pengo, Ruggero; Penson, Alexander; Penwell, John; Perantoni, Marcelo; Perez, Kerstin; Cavalcanti, Tiago Perez; Perez Codina, Estel; Perez Garcia-Estan, Maria Teresa; Perez Reale, Valeria; Peric, Ivan; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrino, Roberto; Perrodo, Pascal; 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Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Bueso, Xavier Portell; Porter, Robert; Posch, Christoph; Pospelov, Guennady; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Prabhu, Robindra; Pralavorio, Pascal; Prasad, Srivas; Pravahan, Rishiraj; Prell, Soeren; Pretzl, Klaus Peter; Pribyl, Lukas; Price, Darren; Price, Lawrence; Price, Michael John; Prichard, Paul; Prieur, Damien; Primavera, Margherita; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Prudent, Xavier; Przysiezniak, Helenka; Psoroulas, Serena; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Purdham, John; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Pylypchenko, Yuriy; Qian, Jianming; Qian, Zuxuan; Qin, Zhonghua; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Quinonez, Fernando; Raas, Marcel; Radescu, Voica; Radics, Balint; Rador, Tonguc; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rahimi, Amir; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rajek, Silke; Rammensee, Michael; 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    2013-07-16

    A search is made for massive long-lived highly ionising particles with the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider, using 3.1 pb-1 of pp collision data taken at sqrt(s)=7 TeV. The signature of energy loss in the ATLAS inner detector and electromagnetic calorimeter is used. No such particles are found and limits on the production cross section for electric charges 6e <= |q| <= 17e and masses 200 GeV <= m <= 1000 GeV are set in the range 1-12 pb for different hypotheses on the production mechanism.

  20. Consistency of spherical, gravity-dominated dynamics with quasar high-ionization emission-line profiles

    OpenAIRE

    Kallman, T. R.; Wilkes, Belinda Jane; Krolik, J. H.; Green, Richard

    1993-01-01

    Line profile data are used to test a simple kinematic model - spherically symmetric gravitational free fall - in which the number of free parameters is limited by requiring physical self-consistency. The predictions of this model are fitted to high-resolution spectra of the stronger rest-frame UV emission lines in 12 quasars with z of about 2. It is found that if all the lines are radiated predominantly from the illuminated faces of the emission-line clouds, the profiles of Ly-alpha, N V 1240...

  1. Derivation of radiation quality average parameters in neutron-gamma radiation fields with the high-pressure ionization chamber: theory and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makrigiorgos, G M

    1989-06-01

    The established radiation quality parameters in mixed neutron-gamma radiation fields may be measured by applying the initial (columnar) recombination of ions in tissue-equivalent (TE) high-pressure ionization chambers (recombination chambers). The mean quality factor can be determined to within 10-15% for mixed fields with neutrons ranging from thermal to 10 MeV, and the dose mean LET of the proton component can be determined to within 10-15% if the gamma-ray absorbed dose fraction is known. These average parameters are derived by measuring the ratio of the ionization currents collected at two high-field strengths and constant gas pressure applied to the ionization chamber. By utilizing approximate correlations between physical parameters in the neutron energy region from thermal to 10 MeV, the dose mean LET of the heavy ion component, the overall dose mean LET, and the microdosimetric parameter y0,D of the mixed field can also be derived. Experimental verification of the method is presented for various neutron-gamma radiation spectra in air and in water by comparison to theoretical calculations and results from low-pressure proportional counter measurements. Good agreement is shown. The TE high-pressure ionization chamber appears to have wide potential for use as a dose-equivalent meter in radiation protection or as a beam characterization device in radiobiology.

  2. What is Potassium?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Workout Nutrition Timing Your Pre- and Post-Workout Nutrition weights and fruits Building Muscle on a Vegetarian Diet For Kids For Parents For Men For Women For Seniors What Is Potassium? Reviewed by Taylor Wolfram, MS, ...

  3. Spectral investigation of highly ionized bismuth plasmas produced by subnanosecond Nd:YAG laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tao; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Li, Bowen; Arai, Goki; Hara, Hiroyuki; Kondo, Yoshiki; Miyazaki, Takanori; Dinh, Thanh-Hung; Dunne, Padraig; O'Reilly, Fergal; Sokell, Emma; O'Sullivan, Gerry

    2016-02-01

    The unresolved transition arrays (UTAs) emitted from laser produced bismuth (Bi) plasma sources show potential for single-shot live cell imaging. We have measured extreme ultraviolet spectra from bismuth laser produced plasmas in the 1-7 nm region using a λ = 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser with a pulse duration of 150 ps. Comparison of spectra obtained under different laser power densities with calculations using the Hartree-Fock with configuration interaction Cowan suite of codes and the UTA formalism, as well as consideration of previous predictions of isoelectronic trends, are employed to identify lines and a number of new features in spectra from Bi XXIII to Bi XLVII. The results show that Δn = 0, n = 4-4 emission from highly charged ions merges to form intense UTAs in the 4 nm region and Δn = 1, n = 4-5 resonance transitions UTAs dominate the 1-3 nm region of the Bi spectrum.

  4. Oligomers, organosulfates, and nitrooxy organosulfates in rainwater identified by ultra-high resolution electrospray ionization FT-ICR mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. E. Altieri

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Wet deposition is an important removal mechanism for atmospheric organic matter, and a potentially important input for receiving ecosystems, yet less than 50% of rainwater organic matter is considered chemically characterized. Precipitation samples collected in New Jersey, USA, were analyzed by negative ion ultra-high resolution electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS. Elemental compositions of 552 unique molecular species were determined in the mass range 50–500 Da in the rainwater. Four main groups of organic compounds were identified: compounds containing carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen (CHO only, sulfur (S containing CHOS compounds, nitrogen (N containing CHON compounds, and S- and N- containing CHONS compounds. Organic acids commonly identified in precipitation were detected in the rainwater. Within the four main groups of compounds detected in the rainwater, oligomers, organosulfates, and nitrooxy-organosulfates were assigned based on elemental formula comparisons. The majority of the compounds identified are products of atmospheric reactions and are known contributors to secondary organic aerosol (SOA formed from gas phase, aerosol phase, and in-cloud reactions in the atmosphere. It is suggested that the large uncharacterized component of SOA is the main contributor to the large uncharacterized component of rainwater organic matter.

  5. Highly sensitive determination of estrone and estradiol in human serum by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Kouwa; Okuyama, Mitsunobu; Watanabe, Yoko; Honma, Seijiro; Kobayashi, Sayuri; Numazawa, Mitsuteru

    2007-10-01

    A highly sensitive and specific quantification method of estrone and estradiol in human serum was described based upon the use of picolinoyl derivatization and liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS) in a positive mode. Estrogens were treated with picolinoyl chloride hydrochloride or picolinic acid and 2-methyl-6-nitrobenzoic anhydride followed by a solid-phase extraction with ODS cartridge. Picolinoyl derivatization proceeded quantitatively even in a microscale, and the picolinoyl esters provided simple positive ESI-mass spectra showing [M+H](+) as base peaks for these estrogens. The picolinoyl derivatives of these estrogens showed 100-fold higher detection response compared to underivatized intact molecules by LC-ESI-MS (selected reaction monitoring). Using this derivatization, estrogens spiked in the charcoal treated human serum samples were analyzed with limit of quantification (LOQ), intra-day accuracy and precision of 1.0pg/ml, 96.0% and 9.9% for estrone, and 0.5pg/ml, 84.4% and 12.8% for estradiol, respectively. Estrone and estradiol added to the crude serum samples were recovered with comparable LOQ and accuracy obtained for the charcoal treated serum samples as well.

  6. Enhanced sensitivity for high spatial resolution lipid analysis by negative ion mode matrix assisted laser desorption ionization imaging mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angel, Peggi M; Spraggins, Jeffrey M; Baldwin, H Scott; Caprioli, Richard

    2012-02-07

    We have achieved enhanced lipid imaging to a ~10 μm spatial resolution using negative ion mode matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) imaging mass spectrometry, sublimation of 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid as the MALDI matrix, and a sample preparation protocol that uses aqueous washes. We report on the effect of treating tissue sections by washing with volatile buffers at different pHs prior to negative ion mode lipid imaging. The results show that washing with ammonium formate, pH 6.4, or ammonium acetate, pH 6.7, significantly increases signal intensity and number of analytes recorded from adult mouse brain tissue sections. Major lipid species measured were glycerophosphoinositols, glycerophosphates, glycerolphosphoglycerols, glycerophosphoethanolamines, glycerophospho-serines, sulfatides, and gangliosides. Ion images from adult mouse brain sections that compare washed and unwashed sections are presented and show up to 5-fold increases in ion intensity for washed tissue. The sample preparation protocol has been found to be applicable across numerous organ types and significantly expands the number of lipid species detectable by imaging mass spectrometry at high spatial resolution. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  7. Star-forming galactic contrails as a source of metal enrichment and ionizing radiation at high redshift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauch, Michael; Becker, George D.; Haehnelt, Martin G.; Gauthier, Jean-Rene

    2014-06-01

    A spectroscopically detected Lyman α emitting halo at redshift 3.216 in the GOODS-N field is found to reside at the convergence of several line-emitting filaments. Spatially extended emission apparently by He II 1640 Å and several metal transitions is seen within several arcseconds from the position of the central galaxy. The V = 24.9 galaxy mainly responsible for the continuum emission at the centre of the halo has broad-band colours and spectral features consistent with a z = 3.216 star-forming galaxy. Hubble Space Telescope images show that some of the filaments coincide, in projection, with several, mostly blue galaxies, with pronounced head-tail structures partly aligned with each other. These objects, for which we cannot rule that they are foreground, chance projections in front of the high-redshift halo, are seen over an area with a linear extent of at least 12 arcsec. The broad-band images of some galaxies suggest the presence of ram-pressure stripping, including possible evidence for recent star formation in the stripped contrails. Spatial gradients in the appearance of several galaxies may represent a stream of galaxies passing from a colder to a hotter intergalactic medium. The release of the enriched interstellar medium from galaxies and the occurrence of star formation and stellar feedback in the galactic contrails suggest a mechanism for the metal enrichment of the high-redshift intergalactic medium that does not require long-range galactic winds. If these galaxies are at the same redshift as the Lyα halo, their very blue colours may be a consequence of the stripping of gas. A stripped stellar population and star formation in galactic contrails suggest promising sites for the escape of ionizing radiation from high-redshift galaxies.

  8. Adaptation of Bacillus subtilis to Life at Extreme Potassium Limitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Gundlach

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Potassium is the most abundant metal ion in every living cell. This ion is essential due to its requirement for the activity of the ribosome and many enzymes but also because of its role in buffering the negative charge of nucleic acids. As the external concentrations of potassium are usually low, efficient uptake and intracellular enrichment of the ion is necessary. The Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis possesses three transporters for potassium, KtrAB, KtrCD, and the recently discovered KimA. In the absence of the high-affinity transporters KtrAB and KimA, the bacteria were unable to grow at low potassium concentrations. However, we observed the appearance of suppressor mutants that were able to overcome the potassium limitation. All these suppressor mutations affected amino acid metabolism, particularly arginine biosynthesis. In the mutants, the intracellular levels of ornithine, citrulline, and arginine were strongly increased, suggesting that these amino acids can partially substitute for potassium. This was confirmed by the observation that the supplementation with positively charged amino acids allows growth of B. subtilis even at the extreme potassium limitation that the bacteria experience if no potassium is added to the medium. In addition, a second class of suppressor mutations allowed growth at extreme potassium limitation. These mutations result in increased expression of KtrAB, the potassium transporter with the highest affinity and therefore allow the acquisition and accumulation of the smallest amounts of potassium ions from the environment.

  9. Time-resolved molecular characterization of limonene/ozone aerosol using high-resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, Adam P; Nizkorodov, Sergey A; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander

    2009-09-28

    Molecular composition of limonene/O3 secondary organic aerosol (SOA) was investigated using high-resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HR-ESI-MS) as a function of reaction time. SOA was generated by ozonation of D-limonene in a reaction chamber and sampled at different time intervals using a cascade impactor. The SOA samples were extracted into acetonitrile and analyzed using a HR-ESI-MS instrument with a resolving power of 100,000 (m/Deltam). The resulting mass spectra provided detailed information about the extent of oxidation inferred from the O:C ratios, double bond equivalency (DBE) factors, and aromaticity index (AI) values in hundreds of identified individual SOA species. The chemical composition of SOA was approximately the same for all size-fractionated samples studied in this experiment (0.05 to 0.5 microm range). The SOA constituents quickly reached an average O:C ratio of 0.43, which grew to 0.46 after one hour of additional oxidation of particles by the excess ozone. The dominant mechanism of oligomerization, inferred from high resolution ESI-MS data, was reaction between Criegee intermediates and stable first-generation products of limonene ozonolysis. Although the SOA composition was dominated by various oxidized aliphatic compounds, a small fraction of products appeared to contain aromatic rings. SOA generation was also studied in the presence of UV radiation and at elevated relative humidity (RH). The presence of UV radiation had a negligible effect on the SOA composition. The presence of water vapor resulted in a slight redistribution of peak intensities in the mass spectrum likely arising from hydration of certain SOA constituents. The data are consistent with fast production of the first-generation SOA constituents, including oligomers, followed by very slow aging processes that have a relatively small effect on the average molecular composition on the timescale of our experiments.

  10. GoAmazon 2014/15 Thermal Desorption Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (TDCIMS) Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, JN [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2016-04-01

    The Thermal Desorption Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (TDCIMS) deployment to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility T3 site in Manacapuru, Brazil, was motivated by two main scientific objectives of the Green Ocean Amazon (GoAmazon) 2014/15 field campaign. 1) Study the interactions between anthropogenic and biogenic emissions by determining important molecular species in ambient nanoparticles. To address this, TDCIMS data will be combined with coincident measurements such as gas-phase sulfuric acid to determine the contribution of sulfuric acid condensation to nucleation and growth. We can then compare that result to TDCIMS-derived nanoparticle composition to determine the fraction of growth that can be attributed to the uptake of organic compounds. The molecular composition of sampled particles will also be used to attribute specific chemical species and mechanisms to growth, such as the condensation of low-volatility species or the oligomerization of α-dicarbonyl compounds. 2) Determine the source of new ambient nanoparticles in the Amazon. The hypothesis prior to measurements was that potassium salts formed from the evaporation of primary particles emitted by fungal spores can provide a unique and important pathway for new particle production in the Amazon basin. To explore this hypothesis, the TDCIMS recorded the mass spectra of sampled ambient particles using a protonated water cluster Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS). Laboratory tests performed using potassium salts show that the TDCIMS can detect potassium with high sensitivity with this technique.

  11. Coupling matrix-assisted ionization with high resolution mass spectrometry and electron transfer dissociation to characterize intact proteins and post-translational modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bingming; Lietz, Christopher B; Li, Lingjun

    2017-09-12

    Matrix-assisted ionization (MAI) is a recently developed ionization technique that produces multiply charged ions on either electrospray ionization (ESI) or matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) platform without the need of high voltage or laser ablation. In this study, MAI has been coupled to a high resolution accurate mass (HRAM) hybrid instrument, the Orbitrap Elite mass spectrometer, with electron transfer dissociation (ETD) module for fast peptide and intact protein characterization. The softness of MAI process preserves labile post-translational modifications (PTM) and allows fragmentation and localization by ETD. Moreover, MAI on ESI platform allows rapid sample preparation and analysis (~ 1 min/sample) due to the easiness of sample introduction. It significantly improves the throughput compared to ESI direct infusion and MAI on MALDI platform, which usually takes more than 10 min/sample. Intact protein standards, protein mixtures, and neural tissue extracts have been characterized using this instrument platform with both full MS and MS/MS (CID, HCD, and ETD) analyses. Furthermore, the performances of ESI, MALDI, and MAI on both platforms have been tested to provide a systematic comparison among these techniques. With improved ETD performance and PTM analysis capabilities, we anticipate that the HRAM MAI-MS with ETD module will offer greater utilities in large molecule characterization with enhanced speed and coverage. These advancements will enable promising applications in bottom-up and top-down protein analyses. Graphical abstract Matrix-assisted ionization (MAI) for characterizing intact proteins and post-translational modifications with representative mass spectra from intact proteins.

  12. Applications of high-resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry to measurements of average oxygen to carbon ratios in secondary organic aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, Adam P; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander; Nizkorodov, Sergey A

    2012-08-07

    The applicability of high-resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HR ESI-MS) to measurements of the average oxygen to carbon ratio (O/C) in secondary organic aerosols (SOAs) was investigated. Solutions with known average O/C containing up to 10 standard compounds representative of low-molecular-weight SOA constituents were analyzed and the corresponding electrospray ionization efficiencies were quantified. The assumption of equal ionization efficiency commonly used in estimating O/C ratios of SOAs was found to be reasonably accurate. We found that the accuracy of the measured O/C ratios increases by averaging the values obtained from both the posive and negative modes. A correlation was found between the ratio of the ionization efficiencies in the positive (+) and negative (-) ESI modes and the octanol-water partition constant and, more importantly, the compound's O/C. To demonstrate the utility of this correlation for estimating average O/C values of unknown mixtures, we analyzed the ESI (+) and ESI (-) data for SOAs produced by oxidation of limonene and isoprene and compared them online to O/C measurements using an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS). This work demonstrates that the accuracy of the HR ESI-MS method is comparable to that of the AMS with the added benefit of molecular identification of the aerosol constituents.

  13. Applications of High-Resolution Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry to Measurements of Average Oxygen to Carbon Ratios in Secondary Organic Aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bateman, Adam P.; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander; Nizkorodov, Sergey

    2012-07-02

    The applicability of high resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HR ESI-MS) to measurements of the average oxygen to carbon ratio (O/C) in organic aerosols was investigated. Solutions with known average O/C containing up to 10 standard compounds representative of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) were analyzed and corresponding electrospray ionization efficiencies were quantified. The assumption of equal ionization efficiency commonly used in estimating O/C ratios of organic aerosols was found to be reasonably accurate. We found that the accuracy of the measured O/C ratios increases by averaging the values obtained from both (+) and (-) modes. A correlation was found between the ratio of the ionization efficiencies in the positive and negative ESI modes with the octanol-water partition constant, and more importantly, with the compound's O/C. To demonstrate the utility of this correlation for estimating average O/C values of unknown mixtures, we analyzed the ESI (+) and ESI (-) data for SOA produced by oxidation of limonene and isoprene and compared to online O/C measurements using an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS). This work demonstrates that the accuracy of the HR ESI-MS methods is comparable to that of the AMS, with the added benefit of molecular identification of the aerosol constituents.

  14. High-Spatial and High-Mass Resolution Imaging of Surface Metabolites of Arabidopsis thaliana by Laser Desorption-Ionization Mass Spectrometry Using Colloidal Silver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jun, Ji Hyun; Song, Zhihong; Liu, Zhenjiu; Nikolau, Basil J.; Yeung, Edward S.; and Lee, Young Jin

    2010-03-17

    High-spatial resolution and high-mass resolution techniques are developed and adopted for the mass spectrometric imaging of epicuticular lipids on the surface of Arabidopsis thaliana. Single cell level spatial resolution of {approx}12 {micro}m was achieved by reducing the laser beam size by using an optical fiber with 25 {micro}m core diameter in a vacuum matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-linear ion trap (vMALDI-LTQ) mass spectrometer and improved matrix application using an oscillating capillary nebulizer. Fine chemical images of a whole flower were visualized in this high spatial resolution showing substructure of an anther and single pollen grains at the stigma and anthers. The LTQ-Orbitrap with a MALDI ion source was adopted to achieve MS imaging in high mass resolution. Specifically, isobaric silver ion adducts of C29 alkane (m/z 515.3741) and C28 aldehyde (m/z 515.3377), indistinguishable in low-resolution LTQ, can now be clearly distinguished and their chemical images could be separately constructed. In the application to roots, the high spatial resolution allowed molecular MS imaging of secondary roots and the high mass resolution allowed direct identification of lipid metabolites on root surfaces.

  15. Experimental determination of the effective point of measurement of cylindrical ionization chambers for high-energy photon and electron beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yanxiao; Willomitzer, Christian; Zakaria, Golam Abu; Hartmann, Guenther H

    2010-01-01

    Measurements of depth-dose curves in water phantom using a cylindrical ionization chamber require that its effective point of measurement is located at the measuring depth. Recommendations for the position of the effective point of measurement with respect to the central axis valid for high-energy electron and photon beams are given in dosimetry protocols. According to these protocols, the use of a constant shift P(eff) is currently recommended. However, this is still based on a very limited set of experimental results. It is therefore expected that an improved knowledge of the exact position of the effective point of measurement will further improve the accuracy of dosimetry. Recent publications have revealed that the position of the effective point of measurement is indeed varying with beam energy, field size and also with chamber geometry. The aim of this study is to investigate whether the shift of P(eff) can be taken to be constant and independent from the beam energy. An experimental determination of the effective point of measurement is presented based on a comparison between cylindrical chambers and a plane-parallel chamber using conventional dosimetry equipment. For electron beams, the determination is based on the comparison of halfvalue depth R(50) between the cylindrical chamber of interest and a well guarded plane-parallel Roos chamber. For photon beams, the depth of dose maximum, d(max), the depth of 80% dose, d(80), and the dose parameter PDD(10) were used. It was again found that the effective point of measurement for both, electron and photon beams Dosimetry, depends on the beam energy. The deviation from a constant value remains very small for photons, whereas significant deviations were found for electrons. It is therefore concluded that use of a single upstream shift value from the centre of the cylindrical chamber as recommended in current dosimetry protocols is adequate for photons, however inadequate for accurate electron beam dosimetry.

  16. Single-particle characterization of biomass burning organic aerosol (BBOA: evidence for non-uniform mixing of high molecular weight organics and potassium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Y. Lee

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Biomass burning organic aerosol (BBOA can be emitted from natural forest fires and human activities such as agricultural burning and domestic energy generation. BBOA is strongly associated with atmospheric brown carbon (BrC that absorbs near-ultraviolet and visible light, resulting in significant impacts on regional visibility degradation and radiative forcing. The mixing state of BBOA can play a critical role in the prediction of aerosol optical properties. In this work, single-particle measurements from a Soot-Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer coupled with a light scattering module (LS-SP-AMS were performed to examine the mixing state of BBOA, refractory black carbon (rBC, and potassium (K, a tracer for biomass burning aerosol in an air mass influenced by wildfire emissions transported from northern Québec to Toronto, representing aged biomass burning plumes. Cluster analysis of single-particle measurements identified five BBOA-related particle types. rBC accounted for 3–14 wt % of these particle types on average. Only one particle type exhibited a strong ion signal for K+, with mass spectra characterized by low molecular weight organic species. The remaining four particle types were classified based on the apparent molecular weight of the BBOA constituents. Two particle types were associated with low potassium content and significant amounts of high molecular weight (HMW organic compounds. Our observations indicate non-uniform mixing of particles within a biomass burning plume in terms of molecular weight and illustrate that HMW BBOA can be a key contributor to low-volatility BrC observed in BBOA particles. The average mass absorption efficiency of low-volatility BBOA is about 0.8–1.1 m2 g−1 based on a theoretical closure calculation. Our estimates indicate that low-volatility BBOA contributes ∼ 33–44 % of thermo-processed particle absorption at 405 nm; and almost all of the BBOA absorption was associated with low

  17. High index contrast potassium double tungstate waveguides towards efficient rare-earth ion amplification on-chip

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sefünç, Mustafa; Segerink, Franciscus B.; García Blanco, Sonia Maria

    2015-01-01

    Rare-earth ion doped KY(WO4)2 amplifiers are proposed to be a good candidate for many future applications by benefiting from the excellent gain characteristics of rare-earth ions, namely high bit rate amplification (

  18. Direct Analysis of Triterpenes from High-Salt Fermented Cucumbers Using Infrared Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Electrospray Ionization (IR-MALDESI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekelöf, Måns; McMurtrie, Erin K.; Nazari, Milad; Johanningsmeier, Suzanne D.; Muddiman, David C.

    2017-02-01

    High-salt samples present a challenge to mass spectrometry (MS) analysis, particularly when electrospray ionization (ESI) is used, requiring extensive sample preparation steps such as desalting, extraction, and purification. In this study, infrared matrix-assisted laser desorption electrospray ionization (IR-MALDESI) coupled to a Q Exactive Plus mass spectrometer was used to directly analyze 50-μm thick slices of cucumber fermented and stored in 1 M sodium chloride brine. From the several hundred unique substances observed, three triterpenoid lipids produced by cucumbers, β-sitosterol, stigmasterol, and lupeol, were putatively identified based on exact mass and selected for structural analysis. The spatial distribution of the lipids were imaged, and the putative assignments were confirmed by tandem mass spectrometry performed directly on the same cucumber, demonstrating the capacity of the technique to deliver confident identifications from highly complex samples in molar concentrations of salt without the need for sample preparation.

  19. Evaluation of gas chromatography – electron ionization – full scan high resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry for pesticide residue analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mol, Hans G.J., E-mail: hans.mol@wur.nl; Tienstra, Marc; Zomer, Paul

    2016-09-07

    Gas chromatography with electron ionization and full scan high resolution mass spectrometry with an Orbitrap mass analyzer (GC-EI-full scan Orbitrap HRMS) was evaluated for residue analysis. Pesticides in fruit and vegetables were taken as an example application. The relevant aspects for GC-MS based residue analysis, including the resolving power (15,000 to 120,000 FWHM at m/z 200), scan rate, dynamic range, selectivity, sensitivity, analyte identification, and utility of existing EI-libraries, are assessed and discussed in detail. The optimum acquisition conditions in full scan mode (m/z 50–500) were a resolving power of 60,000 and an automatic-gain-control target value of 3E6. These conditions provided (i) an optimum mass accuracy: within 2 ppm over a wide concentration range, with/without matrix, enabling the use of ±5 ppm mass extraction windows (ii) adequate scan speed: minimum 12 scans/peak, (iii) an intra-scan dynamic range sufficient to achieve LOD/LOQs ≤0.5 pg in fruit/vegetable matrices (corresponding to ≤0.5 μg kg{sup −1}) for most pesticides. EI-Orbitrap spectra were consistent over a very wide concentration range (5 orders) with good match values against NIST (EI-quadrupole) spectra. The applicability for quantitative residue analysis was verified by validation of 54 pesticides in three matrices (tomato, leek, orange) at 10 and 50 μg/kg. The method involved a QuEChERS-based extraction with a solvent switch into iso-octane, and 1 μL hot splitless injection into the GC-HRMS system. A recovery between 70 and 120% and a repeatability RSD <10% was obtained in most cases. Linearity was demonstrated for the range ≤5–250 μg kg{sup −1}. The pesticides could be identified according to the applicable EU criteria for GC-HRMS (SANTE/11945/2015). GC-EI-full scan Orbitrap HRMS was found to be highly suited for quantitative pesticide residue analysis. The potential of qualitative screening to extend the scope makes it an attractive

  20. The slow ionized wind and rotating disklike system that are associated with the high-mass young stellar object G345.4938+01.4677

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzmán, Andrés E.; Garay, Guido; Bronfman, Leonardo; Mardones, Diego [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Camino el Observatorio 1515, Las Condes, Santiago (Chile); Rodríguez, Luis F. [Centro de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica (UNAM), Morelia 58089 (Mexico); Moran, James [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA (United States); Brooks, Kate J. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping, 1710 NSW (Australia); Nyman, Lars-Åke [Joint ALMA Observatory (JAO), Alonso de Córdova 3107, Vitacura, Santiago (Chile); Sanhueza, Patricio [Institute for Astrophysical Research, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    We report the detection, made using ALMA, of the 92 GHz continuum and hydrogen recombination lines (HRLs) H40α, H42α, and H50β emission toward the ionized wind associated with the high-mass young stellar object G345.4938+01.4677. This is the luminous central dominating source located in the massive and dense molecular clump associated with IRAS 16562–3959. The HRLs exhibit Voigt profiles, which is a strong signature of Stark broadening. We successfully reproduce the observed continuum and HRLs simultaneously using a simple model of a slow ionized wind in local thermodynamic equilibrium, with no need for a high-velocity component. The Lorentzian line wings imply electron densities of 5 × 10{sup 7} cm{sup –3} on average. In addition, we detect SO and SO{sub 2} emission arising from a compact (∼3000 AU) molecular core associated with the central young star. The molecular core exhibits a velocity gradient that is perpendicular to the jet-axis, which we interpret as evidence of rotation. The set of observations toward G345.4938+01.4677 are consistent with it being a young high-mass star associated with a slow photo-ionized wind.

  1. PHOSPHATE AND POTASSIUM FERTILIZATION FOR RADISH GROWN IN A LATOSOL WITH A HIGH CONTENT OF THESE NUTRIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ARTHUR BERNARDES CECÍLIO FILHO

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The intensive cultivation of vegetables with frequent chemical fertilization may cause accumulation of nutrients in the soil. This, in turn, may reduce crop yields and damage the environment due to contamination of ground water and rivers. Thus, to increase the effects of P (0, 100, 200, 300 and 400 kg ha - 1 of P 2 O 5 and K (0, 60, 120, 180 and 240 kg ha - 1 of K 2 O doses on the growth and productivity of radish cultivars (Sakata 19 and Sakata 25 in a soil with high levels of these nutrients, two experiments were conducted in randomized blocks with the factors cultivars and doses arranged in a 2 x 5 factorial design with three replications. Number of leaves per plant, leaf area, shoot and root dry mass, total and commercial productivity, percentage of cracked roots and P and K contents in the plant and in the soil were evaluated. The Sakata 19 cultivar performed better than the Sakata 25 in both experiments. The fertilization with P or K did not influence the growth and the productivity of both radish cultivars. Therefore, both cultivars of radish evaluated do not need to be fertilized with P and K when planted in a Latosol with high levels of these nutrients.

  2. Evaluation of gas chromatography - electron ionization - full scan high resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry for pesticide residue analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mol, Hans G J; Tienstra, Marc; Zomer, Paul

    2016-09-07

    Gas chromatography with electron ionization and full scan high resolution mass spectrometry with an Orbitrap mass analyzer (GC-EI-full scan Orbitrap HRMS) was evaluated for residue analysis. Pesticides in fruit and vegetables were taken as an example application. The relevant aspects for GC-MS based residue analysis, including the resolving power (15,000 to 120,000 FWHM at m/z 200), scan rate, dynamic range, selectivity, sensitivity, analyte identification, and utility of existing EI-libraries, are assessed and discussed in detail. The optimum acquisition conditions in full scan mode (m/z 50-500) were a resolving power of 60,000 and an automatic-gain-control target value of 3E6. These conditions provided (i) an optimum mass accuracy: within 2 ppm over a wide concentration range, with/without matrix, enabling the use of ±5 ppm mass extraction windows (ii) adequate scan speed: minimum 12 scans/peak, (iii) an intra-scan dynamic range sufficient to achieve LOD/LOQs ≤0.5 pg in fruit/vegetable matrices (corresponding to ≤0.5 μg kg(-1)) for most pesticides. EI-Orbitrap spectra were consistent over a very wide concentration range (5 orders) with good match values against NIST (EI-quadrupole) spectra. The applicability for quantitative residue analysis was verified by validation of 54 pesticides in three matrices (tomato, leek, orange) at 10 and 50 μg/kg. The method involved a QuEChERS-based extraction with a solvent switch into iso-octane, and 1 μL hot splitless injection into the GC-HRMS system. A recovery between 70 and 120% and a repeatability RSD pesticides could be identified according to the applicable EU criteria for GC-HRMS (SANTE/11945/2015). GC-EI-full scan Orbitrap HRMS was found to be highly suited for quantitative pesticide residue analysis. The potential of qualitative screening to extend the scope makes it an attractive alternative to GC-triple quadrupole MS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. SU-C-201-03: Ionization Chamber Collection Efficiency in Pulsed Radiation Fields of High Pulse Dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gotz, M; Karsch, L [Oncoray - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden - Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Pawelke, J [Oncoray - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden - Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden - Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the reduction of collection efficiency of ionization chambers (IC) by volume recombination and its correction in pulsed fields of very high pulse dose. Methods: Measurements of the collection efficiency of a plane-parallel advanced Markus IC (PTW 34045, 1mm electrode spacing, 300V nominal voltage) were obtained for collection voltages of 100V and 300V by irradiation with a pulsed electron beam (20MeV) of varied pulse dose up to approximately 600mGy (0.8nC liberated charge). A reference measurement was performed with a Faraday cup behind the chamber. It was calibrated for the liberated charge in the IC by a linear fit of IC measurement to reference measurement at low pulse doses. The results were compared to the commonly used two voltage approximation (TVA) and to established theories for volume recombination, with and without considering a fraction of free electrons. In addition, an equation system describing the charge transport and reactions in the chamber was solved numerically. Results: At 100V collection voltage and moderate pulse doses the established theories accurately predict the observed collection efficiency, but at extreme pulse doses a fraction of free electrons needs to be considered. At 300V the observed collection efficiency deviates distinctly from that predicted by any of the established theories, even at low pulse doses. However, the numeric solution of the equation system is able to reproduce the measured collection efficiency across the entire dose range of both voltages with a single set of parameters. Conclusion: At high electric fields (3000V/cm here) the existing theoretical descriptions of collection efficiency, including the TVA, are inadequate to predict pulse dose dependency. Even at low pulse doses they might underestimate collection efficiency. The presented, more accurate numeric solution, which considers additional effects like electric shielding by the charges, might provide a valuable tool for future

  4. High resolution detection of high mass proteins up to 80,000 Da via multifunctional CdS quantum dots in laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Yaotang; Kailasa, Suresh Kumar; Wu, Hui-Fen; Chen, Zhen-Yu

    2010-11-15

    CdS quantum dots (∼ 5 nm) are used as multifunctional nanoprobes as an effective matrix for large proteins, peptides and as affinity probes for the enrichment of tryptic digest proteins (lysozyme, myoglobin and cytochrome c) in laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LDI-TOF MS). The use of CdS quantum dots (CdS QDs) as the matrix allows acquisition of high resolution LDI mass spectra for large proteins (5000-80,000 Da). The enhancement of mass resolution is especially notable for large proteins such as BSA, HSA and transferrin (34-49 times) when compared with those obtained by using SA as the matrix. This technique demonstrates the potentiality of LDI-TOF-MS as an appropriate analytical tool for the analysis of high-molecular-weight biomolecules with high mass resolution. In addition, CdS QDs are also used as matrices for background-free detection of small biomolecules (peptides) and as affinity probes for the enrichment of tryptic digest proteins in LDI-TOF-MS. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Adaptation of Bacillus subtilis to Life at Extreme Potassium Limitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundlach, Jan; Herzberg, Christina; Hertel, Dietrich; Thürmer, Andrea; Daniel, Rolf; Link, Hannes; Stülke, Jörg

    2017-07-05

    Potassium is the most abundant metal ion in every living cell. This ion is essential due to its requirement for the activity of the ribosome and many enzymes but also because of its role in buffering the negative charge of nucleic acids. As the external concentrations of potassium are usually low, efficient uptake and intracellular enrichment of the ion is necessary. The Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis possesses three transporters for potassium, KtrAB, KtrCD, and the recently discovered KimA. In the absence of the high-affinity transporters KtrAB and KimA, the bacteria were unable to grow at low potassium concentrations. However, we observed the appearance of suppressor mutants that were able to overcome the potassium limitation. All these suppressor mutations affected amino acid metabolism, particularly arginine biosynthesis. In the mutants, the intracellular levels of ornithine, citrulline, and arginine were strongly increased, suggesting that these amino acids can partially substitute for potassium. This was confirmed by the observation that the supplementation with positively charged amino acids allows growth of B. subtilis even at the extreme potassium limitation that the bacteria experience if no potassium is added to the medium. In addition, a second class of suppressor mutations allowed growth at extreme potassium limitation. These mutations result in increased expression of KtrAB, the potassium transporter with the highest affinity and therefore allow the acquisition and accumulation of the smallest amounts of potassium ions from the environment.IMPORTANCE Potassium is essential for every living cell as it is required for the activity for many enzymes and for maintaining the intracellular pH by buffering the negative charge of the nucleic acids. We have studied the adaptation of the soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis to life at low potassium concentrations. If the major high-affinity transporters are missing, the bacteria are unable to grow unless

  6. Method for detecting and distinguishing between specific types of environmental radiation using a high pressure ionization chamber with pulse-mode readout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degtiarenko, Pavel V.

    2017-12-19

    An environmental radiation detector for detecting and distinguishing between all types of environmental radiation, including photons, charged particles, and neutrons. A large volume high pressure ionization chamber (HPIC) includes BF.sub.3 gas at a specific concentration to render the radiation detector sensitive to the reactions of neutron capture in Boron-10 isotope. A pulse-mode readout is connected to the ionization chamber capable of measuring both the height and the width of the pulse. The heavy charged products of the neutron capture reaction deposit significant characteristic energy of the reaction in the immediate vicinity of the reaction in the gas, producing a signal with a pulse height proportional to the reaction energy, and a narrow pulse width corresponding to the essentially pointlike energy deposition in the gas. Readout of the pulse height and the pulse width parameters of the signals enables distinguishing between the different types of environmental radiation, such as gamma (x-rays), cosmic muons, and neutrons.

  7. X-RAY HIGH-RESOLUTION SPECTROSCOPY REVEALS FEEDBACK IN A SEYFERT GALAXY FROM AN ULTRA-FAST WIND WITH COMPLEX IONIZATION AND VELOCITY STRUCTURE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longinotti, A. L. [Catedrática CONACYT—Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Óptica y Electrónica, Luis E. Erro 1, Tonantzintla, Puebla, C.P. 72840, México (Mexico); Krongold, Y. [Instituto de Astronomia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 70264, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Guainazzi, M.; Santos-Lleo, M.; Rodriguez-Pascual, P. [ESAC, P.O. Box, 78 E-28691 Villanueva de la Cañada, Madrid (Spain); Giroletti, M. [INAF Osservatorio di Radioastronomia, via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Panessa, F. [INAF—Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali di Roma (IAPS), Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Costantini, E. [SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, Sorbonnelaan 2, 3584 CA Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2015-11-10

    Winds outflowing from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) may carry significant amounts of mass and energy out to their host galaxies. In this paper we report the detection of a sub-relativistic outflow observed in the narrow line Seyfert 1 galaxy IRAS 17020+4544 as a series of absorption lines corresponding to at least five absorption components with an unprecedented wide range of associated column densities and ionization levels and velocities in the range of 23,000–33,000 km s{sup −1}, detected at X-ray high spectral resolution (E/ΔE ∼ 1000) with the ESA's observatory XMM-Newton. The charge states of the material constituting the wind clearly indicate a range of low to moderate ionization states in the outflowing gas and column densities that are significantly lower than observed in highly ionized ultra-fast outflows. We estimate that at least one of the outflow components may carry sufficient energy to substantially suppress star formation and heat the gas in the host galaxy. IRAS 17020+4544 therefore provides an interesting example of feedback by a moderately luminous AGN that is hosted in a spiral galaxy, a case barely envisaged in most evolution models, which often predict that feedback processes take place in massive elliptical galaxies hosting luminous quasars in a post-merger phase.

  8. A highly polarized excitable cell separates sodium channels from sodium-activated potassium channels by more than a millimeter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, Yue; Smith, Benjamin E; Markham, Michael R

    2015-07-01

    The bioelectrical properties and resulting metabolic demands of electrogenic cells are determined by their morphology and the subcellular localization of ion channels. The electric organ cells (electrocytes) of the electric fish Eigenmannia virescens generate action potentials (APs) with Na(+) currents >10 μA and repolarize the AP with Na(+)-activated K(+) (KNa) channels. To better understand the role of morphology and ion channel localization in determining the metabolic cost of electrocyte APs, we used two-photon three-dimensional imaging to determine the fine cellular morphology and immunohistochemistry to localize the electrocytes' ion channels, ionotropic receptors, and Na(+)-K(+)-ATPases. We found that electrocytes are highly polarized cells ∼ 1.5 mm in anterior-posterior length and ∼ 0.6 mm in diameter, containing ∼ 30,000 nuclei along the cell periphery. The cell's innervated posterior region is deeply invaginated and vascularized with complex ultrastructural features, whereas the anterior region is relatively smooth. Cholinergic receptors and Na(+) channels are restricted to the innervated posterior region, whereas inward rectifier K(+) channels and the KNa channels that terminate the electrocyte AP are localized to the anterior region, separated by >1 mm from the only sources of Na(+) influx. In other systems, submicrometer spatial coupling of Na(+) and KNa channels is necessary for KNa channel activation. However, our computational simulations showed that KNa channels at a great distance from Na(+) influx can still terminate the AP, suggesting that KNa channels can be activated by distant sources of Na(+) influx and overturning a long-standing assumption that AP-generating ion channels are restricted to the electrocyte's posterior face. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  9. Neural synchronization via potassium signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postnov, Dmitry E; Ryazanova, Ludmila S; Mosekilde, Erik

    2006-01-01

    Using a relatively simple model we examine how variations of the extracellular potassium concentration can give rise to synchronization of two nearby pacemaker cells. With the volume of the extracellular space and the rate of potassium diffusion as control parameters, the dual nature...... junctional coupling, potassium signaling gives rise to considerable changes of the cellular response to external stimuli....

  10. Electron capture and ionization processes in high velocity Cn+, C-Ar and Cn+, C-He collisions

    OpenAIRE

    Labaigt, G; Jorge, A; Illescas, C; Béroff, K; Dubois, A; Pons, B; Chabot, M

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Single and double electron capture as well as projectile single and multiple ionization processes occurring in 125keV/u Cn+-He, Ar collisions have been studied experimentally and theoretically for 1 ≤ n ≤ 5. The Independent atom and electron (IAE) model has been used to describe the cluster-atom collision. The ion/atom-atom probabilities required for the IAE simulations have been determined by classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) and semiclassical atomic orbital clo...

  11. Simultaneous determination of thirteen flavonoids from Xiaobuxin-Tang extract using high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cen, Meifeng; Ruan, Jinxiu; Huang, Lihua; Zhang, Zhenqing; Yu, Nengjiang; Zhang, Youzhi; Cheng, Xuange; Xiong, Xiaohong; Wang, Guixiang; Zang, Linquan; Wang, Sujun

    2015-11-10

    A simple and reliable high performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS) analysis method was established to simultaneously determine thirteen flavonoids of Xiaobuxing-Tang in intestine perfusate, namely onpordin, 3'-O-methylorobol, glycitein, patuletin, genistein, luteolin, quercetin, nepitrin, quercimeritrin, daidzin, patulitrin, quercetagitrin and 3-glucosylisorhamnetin. Detection was performed on a quadrupole mass spectrometer equipped with an electrospray ionization (ESI) source operating in negative ionization mode. Negative ion ESI was used to form deprotonated molecules at m/z 315 for onpordin, m/z 299 for 3'-O-methylorobol, m/z 283 for glycitein, m/z 331 for patuletin, m/z 269 for genistein, m/z 285 for luteolin, m/z 301 for quercetin, m/z 477 for nepitrin, m/z 463 for quercimeritrin, m/z 461 for daidzin, m/z 493 for patulitrin, m/z 479 for quercetagitrin, m/z 477 for 3-glucosylisorhamnetin and m/z 609.2 for rutin. The linearity, sensitivity, selectivity, repeatability, accuracy, precision, recovery and matrix effect of the assay were evaluated. The proposed method was successfully applied to simultaneous determination of these thirteen flavonoids, and using this method, the intestinal absorption profiles of thirteen flavonoids were preliminarily predicted. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Marsh, B

    2013-01-01

    The application of the technique of laser resonance ionization to the production of singly charged ions at radioactive ion beam facilities is discussed. The ability to combine high efficiency and element selectivity makes a resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) an important component of many radioactive ion beam facilities. At CERN, for example, the RILIS is the most commonly used ion source of the ISOLDE facility, with a yearly operating time of up to 3000 hours. For some isotopes the RILIS can also be used as a fast and sensitive laser spectroscopy tool, provided that the spectral resolution is sufficiently high to reveal the influence of nuclear structure on the atomic spectra. This enables the study of nuclear properties of isotopes with production rates even lower than one ion per second and, in some cases, enables isomer selective ionization. The solutions available for the implementation of resonance laser ionization at radioactive ion beam facilities are summarized. Aspects such as the laser r...

  13. Ionization potentials some variations, implications and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Ahrens, L H

    1983-01-01

    Ionization Potentials: Some Variations, Implications and Applications covers several aspects of ionization potential that is a highly significant parameter in controlling the properties of electric discharge. Comprised of 17 chapters, the book covers topic relevant to ionization potentials, such as properties, concepts, and applications, in order to understand and fully comprehend all aspects of ionization potential. The opening chapter is a review of ionization potentials and a discussion of trends and features. The succeeding chapters then tackle complex topics such as the s and p electrons;

  14. Transcriptome Analysis of Differentially Expressed Genes Induced by Low and High Potassium Levels Provides Insight into Fruit Sugar Metabolism of Pear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Changwei; Wang, Jie; Shi, Xiaoqian; Kang, Yalong; Xie, Changyan; Peng, Lirun; Dong, Caixia; Shen, Qirong; Xu, Yangchun

    2017-01-01

    Potassium (K) deficiency is a common abiotic stress that can inhibit the growth of fruit and thus reduce crop yields. Little research has been conducted on pear transcriptional changes under low and high K conditions. Here, we performed an experiment with 7-year-old pot-grown “Huangguan” pear trees treated with low, Control or high K levels (0, 0.4, or 0.8 g·K2O/kg soil, respectively) during fruit enlargement and mature stages. We identified 36,444 transcripts from leaves and fruit using transcriptome sequencing technology. From 105 days after full blooming (DAB) to 129 DAB, the number of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in leaves and fruit in response to low K increased, while in response to high K, the number of DEGs in leaves and fruit decreased. We selected 17 of these DEGs for qRT-PCR analysis to confirm the RNA sequencing results. Based on GO enrichment and KEGG pathway analysis, we found that low-K treatment significantly reduced K nutrient and carbohydrate metabolism of the leaves and fruit compared with the Control treatment. During the fruit development stages, AKT1 (gene39320) played an important role on K+ transport of the leaves and fruit response to K stress. At maturity, sucrose and acid metabolic pathways were inhibited by low K. The up-regulation of the expression of three SDH and two S6PDH genes involved in sorbitol metabolism was induced by low K, promoting the fructose accumulation. Simultaneously, higher expression was found for genes encoding amylase under low K, promoting the decomposition of the starch and leading the glucose accumulation. High K could enhance leaf photosynthesis, and improve the distribution of the nutrient and carbohydrate from leaf to fruit. Sugar components of the leaves and fruit under low K were regulated by the expression of genes encoding 8 types of hormone signals and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Our data revealed the gene expression patterns of leaves and fruit in response to different K levels during

  15. Synthesis and Characterization of Copper(II), Zinc(II), and Potassium Complexes of a Highly Fluorinated Bis(pyrazolyl)borate Ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, H. V. Rasika; Gorden, John D.

    1996-01-17

    Highly fluorinated, dihydridobis(3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)pyrazolyl)borate ligand, [H(2)B(3,5-(CF(3))(2)Pz)(2)](-) has been synthesized and characterized as its potassium salt. The copper(II) and zinc(II) complexes, [H(2)B(3,5-(CF(3))(2)Pz)(2)](2)Cu and [H(2)B(3,5-(CF(3))(2)Pz)(2)](2)Zn, have been prepared by metathesis of [H(2)B(3,5-(CF(3))(2)Pz)(2)]K with Cu(OTf)(2) and Zn(OTf)(2), respectively. All the new metal adducts have been characterized by X-ray diffraction. The potassium salt is polymeric and shows several K.F interactions. The Cu center of [H(2)B(3,5-(CF(3))(2)Pz)(2)](2)Cu adopts a square planar geometry, whereas the Zn atom in [H(2)B(3,5-(CF(3))(2)Pz)(2)](2)Zn displays a tetrahedral coordination. Bis(pyrazolyl)borate ligands in the Zn adduct show a significantly distorted boat conformation. The nature and extent of this distortion is similar to that observed for the methylated analog, [H(2)B(3,5-(CH(3))(2)Pz)(2)](2)Zn. This ligand allows a comparison of electronic effects of bis(pyrazolyl)borate ligands with similar steric properties. Crystallographic data for [H(2)B(3,5-(CF(3))(2)Pz)(2)]K: triclinic, space group P&onemacr;, with a = 8.385(1) Å, b = 10.097(2) Å, c = 10.317(1) Å, alpha = 104.193(9) degrees, beta = 104.366(6) degrees, gamma = 91.733(9) degrees, V = 816.5(3) Å(3), and Z = 2. [H(2)B(3,5-(CF(3))(2)Pz)(2)](2)Cu is monoclinic, space group C2/c with a = 25.632(3) Å, b = 9.197(1) Å, c = 17.342(2) Å, beta = 129.292(5) degrees, V = 3164.0(6) Å(3), and Z = 4. [H(2)B(3,5-(CF(3))(2)Pz)(2)](2)Zn is triclinic, space group P&onemacr;, with a = 9.104(1) Å, b = 9.278(1) Å, c = 18.700(2) Å, alpha = 83.560(6) degrees, beta = 88.200(10) degrees, gamma = 78.637(9) degrees, V = 1538.8(3) Å(3), and Z = 2. [H(2)B(3,5-(CH(3))(2)Pz)(2)](2)Zn is monoclinic, space group C2/c with a = 8.445(1) Å, b = 14.514(2) Å, c = 19.983(3) Å, beta = 90.831(8) degrees, V = 2449.1(6) Å(3), and Z = 4.

  16. Atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry (APGC/MS/MS) an alternative to high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRGC/HRMS) for the determination of dioxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bavel, Bert; Geng, Dawei; Cherta, Laura; Nácher-Mestre, Jaime; Portolés, Tania; Ábalos, Manuela; Sauló, Jordi; Abad, Esteban; Dunstan, Jody; Jones, Rhys; Kotz, Alexander; Winterhalter, Helmut; Malisch, Rainer; Traag, Wim; Hagberg, Jessika; Ericson Jogsten, Ingrid; Beltran, Joaquim; Hernández, Félix

    2015-09-01

    The use of a new atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization source for gas chromatography (APGC) coupled with a tandem quadrupole mass spectrometry (MS/MS) system, as an alternative to high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS), for the determination of PCDDs/PCDFs is described. The potential of using atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization (APCI) coupled to a tandem quadrupole analyzer has been validated for the identification and quantification of dioxins and furans in different complex matrices. The main advantage of using the APCI source is the soft ionization at atmospheric pressure, which results in very limited fragmentation. APCI mass spectra are dominated by the molecular ion cluster, in contrast with the high energy ionization process under electron ionization (EI). The use of the molecular ion as the precursor ion in MS/MS enhances selectivity and, consequently, sensitivity by increasing the signal-to-noise ratios (S/N). For standard solutions of 2,3,7,8-TCDD, injections of 10 fg in the splitless mode on 30- or 60-m-length, 0.25 mm inner diameter (id), and 25 μm film thickness low-polarity capillary columns (DB5MS type), signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios of >10:1 were routinely obtained. Linearity was achieved in the region (correlation coefficient of r(2) > 0.998) for calibration curves ranging from 100 fg/μL to 1000 pg/μL. The results from a wide variety of complex samples, including certified and standard reference materials and samples from several QA/QC studies, which were previously analyzed by EI HRGC/HRMS, were compared with the results from the APGC/MS/MS system. Results between instruments showed good agreement both in individual congeners and toxic equivalence factors (TEQs). The data show that the use of APGC in combination with MS/MS for the analysis of dioxins has the same potential, in terms of sensitivity and selectivity, as the traditional HRMS instrumentation used for this analysis. However, the APCI/MS/MS system, as a benchtop system, is

  17. High-resolution emission-line imaging of Seyfert galaxies. I - Observations. II - Evidence for anisotropic ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haniff, Christopher A.; Wilson, Andrew S.; Ward, Martin J.

    1988-01-01

    A CCD direct imaging survey of 11 Seyfert galaxies with a mean seeing of 1.3 arcsec FWHM is presented. It is found that the major axes and spatial scales of the circumnuclear emission-line gas are very similar to those of the radio continuum sources. In the second part, this close connection between thermal and relativistic gases is examined. A scenario is proposed in which the radio jets and plasmoids shock, accelerate, and compress ambient and entrained gas, with the dominant source of ionization being the nonstellar nuclear UV continuum.

  18. Haemoglobin and potassium polymorphism in agro-pastoral goats ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Chi-square test revealed that the population of goats in the study area was in Hardy- Weinberg equilibrium. The gene frequencies of potassium polymorphism were 0.844 and 0.156 for high (HK) and low potassium (LK) types, respectively. The genotypic frequencies were 0.91 for HK and 0.01 for LK in the overall ...

  19. Potassium silicate-zinc oxide solution for metal finishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutt, J. B.

    1970-01-01

    Examples of zinc dust formulations, which are not subject to cracking or crazing, are fire retardant, and have high adhesive qualities, are listed. The potassium silicate in these formulations has mol ratios of dissolved silica potassium oxide in the range 4.8 to 1 - 5.3 to 1.

  20. Potassium permanganate ingestion as a suicide attempt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuba Cimilli Ozturk

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Potassium permanganate is a highly corrosive, water-soluble oxidizing antiseptic. A 68- year-old female patient was admitted to our Emergency Department after ingestion of 3 tablets of 250 mg potassium permanganate as a suicide attempt. The physical exam revealed brown stained lesions in the oropharynx. Emergency endoscopy was performed by the gastroenterologist after the third hour of ingestion. Emergency endoscopy revealed multiple superficial (Grade I-II lesions on the esophagus and cardia, which were considered secondary to the caustic substance. The mainstay in the treatment of potassium permanganate is supportive and the immediate priority is to secure the airway. Emergency endoscopy is an important tool used to evaluate the location and severity of injury to the esophagus, stomach and duodenum after caustic ingestion. Patients with signs and symptoms of intentional ingestion should undergo endoscopy within 12 to 24 h to define the extent of the disease.

  1. Physics of partially ionized plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Krishan, Vinod

    2016-01-01

    Plasma is one of the four fundamental states of matter; the other three being solid, liquid and gas. Several components, such as molecular clouds, diffuse interstellar gas, the solar atmosphere, the Earth's ionosphere and laboratory plasmas, including fusion plasmas, constitute the partially ionized plasmas. This book discusses different aspects of partially ionized plasmas including multi-fluid description, equilibrium and types of waves. The discussion goes on to cover the reionization phase of the universe, along with a brief description of high discharge plasmas, tokomak plasmas and laser plasmas. Various elastic and inelastic collisions amongst the three particle species are also presented. In addition, the author demonstrates the novelty of partially ionized plasmas using many examples; for instance, in partially ionized plasma the magnetic induction is subjected to the ambipolar diffusion and the Hall effect, as well as the usual resistive dissipation. Also included is an observation of kinematic dynam...

  2. An high-performance liquid chromatographic method for the simultaneous analysis of acetylcarnitine taurinate, carnosine, asparagine and potassium aspartate and for the analysis of phosphoserine in alimentary supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatti, R; Andreatta, P; Boschetti, S

    2013-07-12

    A RP-HPLC method with pre-column derivatization was developed and validated for the simultaneous quantification of carnosine (Carn), acetylcarnitine taurinate (AC-Tau), asparagine (Asn), potassium aspartate (Asp) and for the determination of phosphoserine (p-Ser) in new and commercial alimentary supplements. The effect of complex matrices was evaluated by the study of the amino acid derivatization reaction with 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB) both in standard and placebo solutions. The reaction was carried out for 20 min at 70 °C in alkaline medium (pH10) for p-Ser analysis, whereas for 60 min in the case of Carn, AC-Tau, Asn and Asp analysis. The adducts have been separated on a Discovery RP Amide C16 (250 mm×4.6mm, i.d.) column using a mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile (ACN) and triethylammonium (TEA) phosphate buffer (pH 3, 0.05 M) under gradient elution conditions at a flow-rate of 0.8 mL/min. Detection was set at λ=360 nm. The validation parameters such as linearity, sensitivity, accuracy, precision and specificity were found to be highly satisfactory. Linear responses were observed by placebo solutions (determination coefficient ≤0.9996). Intra-day precision (relative standard deviation, RSD) was ≤1.06% for corrected peak area and ≤0.99% for retention times (tR) without significant differences between intra- and inter-day data. Recovery studies showed good results for all examined compounds (from 97.7% to 101.5%) with RSD ranging from 0.5% to 1.3%). The high stability of derivatized compound solutions at room temperature means an undoubted advantage of the method allowing the simultaneous preparation of a large number of samples and consecutive chromatographic analyses by the use of an autosampler. The developed method can be considered suitable for the quality control of new and commercial products. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Detection of Mercury's Potassium Tail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Carl; Leblanc, Francois; Moore, Luke; Bida, Thomas A.

    2017-10-01

    Ground-based observations of Mercury's exosphere bridge the gap between the MESSENGER and BepiColombo missions and provide a broad counterpart to their in situ measurements. Here we report the first detection of Mercury's potassium tail in both emission lines of the D doublet. The sodium to potassium abundance ratio at 5 planetary radii down-tail is approximately 95, near the mid-point of a wide range of values that have been quoted over the planet's disk. This is several times the Na/K present in atmospheres of the Galilean satellites and more than an order of magnitude above Mercury's usual analogue, the Moon. The observations confirm that Mercury's anomalously high Na/K ratios cannot be explained by differences in neutral loss rates. The width and structure of the Na and K tails is comparable and both exhibit a persistent enhancement in their northern lobe. We interpret this as a signature of Mercury's offset magnetosphere; the exosphere's source rates are locally enhanced at the southern surface, and sloshing from radiation pressure and gravity guides this population into the northern region of the tail.

  4. Validity of factorization of the high-energy photoelectron yield in above-threshold ionization of an atom by a short laser pulse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolov, M V; Knyazeva, D V; Manakov, N L; Popov, A M; Tikhonova, O V; Volkova, E A; Xu, Ming-Hui; Peng, Liang-You; Pi, Liang-Wen; Starace, Anthony F

    2012-05-25

    An analytic description for the yield, P(p), of high-energy electrons ionized from an atom by a short (few-cycle) laser pulse is obtained quantum mechanically. Factorization of P(p) in terms of an electron wave packet and the cross section for elastic electron scattering (EES) is shown to occur only for an ultrashort pulse, while in general P(p) involves interference of EES amplitudes with laser-field-dependent momenta. The analytic predictions agree well with accurate numerical results.

  5. Ionization-based detectors for gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Colin F

    2015-11-20

    The gas phase ionization detectors are the most widely used detectors for gas chromatography. The column and makeup gases commonly used in gas chromatography are near perfect insulators. This facilitates the detection of a minute number of charge carriers facilitating the use of ionization mechanisms of low efficiency while providing high sensitivity. The main ionization mechanism discussed in this report are combustion in a hydrogen diffusion flame (flame ionization detector), surface ionization in a plasma (thermionic ionization detector), photon ionization (photoionization detector and pulsed discharge helium ionization detector), attachment of thermal electrons (electron-capture detector), and ionization by collision with metastable helium species (helium ionization detector). The design, response characteristics, response mechanism, and suitability for fast gas chromatography are the main features summarized in this report. Mass spectrometric detection and atomic emission detection, which could be considered as ionization detectors of a more sophisticated and complex design, are not discussed in this report. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Dialysate Potassium, Serum Potassium, Mortality, and Arrhythmia Events in Hemodialysis: Results From the Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Patterns Study (DOPPS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaboyas, Angelo; Zee, Jarcy; Brunelli, Steven M; Usvyat, Len A; Weiner, Daniel E; Maddux, Franklin W; Nissenson, Allen R; Jadoul, Michel; Locatelli, Francesco; Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C; Port, Friedrich K; Robinson, Bruce M; Tentori, Francesca

    2017-02-01

    prescription of potassium-binding medications) may merit further attention to reduce risks associated with high serum potassium levels. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. METHODS OF AVAILABLE POTASSIUM ASSESSMENT IN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AGROSEARCH UIL

    Thus, it is considered important to study methods of available K extraction for better understanding of the ... response to potassium, soil test methods should have a high correlation with crop performance. (Ekpete, 1972). Also ... The bulk samples were air-dried, ground and sieved to pass through 2 mm sieve. Sub samples of.

  8. High-resolution measurements of the K-alpha spectra of low-ionizationm species of iron: A new spectral signature of nonequilibrium ionization conditions in young supernova remnants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decaux, V.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Osterheld, A.; Chen, M.; Kahn, S. M.

    1995-01-01

    We present the first systematic laboratory measurements of high-resolution K-alpha spectra of intermediate ions of iron, Fe X-XVII. These lines are not produced in collisional equilibrium plasmas because of the relevant charge states cannot exist at the high electron temperatures required for appreciable excitation of the K-alpha transitions. However, they can provide excellent spectral diagnostics for nonequilibrium ionization conditions, such the ionizing plasmas of young supernova remnants. To facilitate the line identifications, we compare our spectra with theoretical atomic calculations performed using multiconfiguration parametric potential and Dirac-Fock atomic codes. Our measurements also allow direct comparison with time-dependent ionization balance calculations for ionizing plasmas, and good agreement is found.

  9. High performance electrospray ionization mass spectrometry in the study of the noncovalent associations of proteins and DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, R.D.; Hofstadler, S.A.; Bruce, J.A. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-01

    The ability to study the non-covalent associations of biopolymers under near physiological conditions using electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry has opened new opportunities for the study of a range of crucial biological processes. The use of new instrumentation based upon Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry will also be presented, and shown to open new opportunities and applications based upon improved resolution, sensitivity, and extended multi-dimensional mass spectrometric capabilities. In this presentation, studies showing the broad utility of ESI-MS for studies of binding and stoichiometry of biomolecular structure and interactions will be presented. The conditions under which quantitative data can be obtained in such studies will be discussed. Systems described will include protein quaternary structure, protein-protein complexes of relevance to DNA repair, oligonucleotide duplexes and quadruplexes, and the interaction of smaller molecules with these biopolymers (e.g., protein inhibitors).

  10. A highly sensitive carbapenemase assay using laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry based on a parylene-matrix chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong-Min; Kim, Jo-Il; Noh, Joo-Yoon; Kim, Mira; Kang, Min-Jung; Pyun, Jae-Chul

    2017-09-01

    A quantitative carbapenemase assay was developed using laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS) based on a parylene-matrix chip. As a first step, the reproducibility (spot-to-spot, shot-to-shot, and day-to-day) of LDI-MS based on a parylene-matrix chip and the quantification ranges for four carbapenem antibiotics (doripenem, ertapenem, imipenem, and meropenem) were determined. A carbapenem-susceptibility test was performed using the four carbapenems and 51 bacterial strains that displayed (1) carbapenem resistance with carbapenemase, (2) carbapenem resistance without carbapenemase, or (3) carbapenem susceptibility. The susceptibility test results showed that LDI-MS based on a parylene-matrix chip was more sensitive and selective for detecting the carbapenemase reaction than conventional MALDI-TOF MS based on a 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid matrix. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Simultaneous determination of fluoxetine, citalopram, paroxetine, venlafaxine in plasma by high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/ESI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan, He; Zhiling, Zhou; Huande, Li

    2005-06-05

    Fluoxetine, citalopram, paroxetine and venlafaxine have been widely used in the treatment of depression. However, no study has been conducted to determine the four drugs simultaneously by high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/ESI). To establish a new, rapid and sensitive HPLC-MS/ESI method for simultaneous determination and screening in human plasma of the four most commonly prescribed nontricyclic antidepressants: fluoxetine, citalopram, paroxetine and venlafaxine. The analytes in plasma were extracted by solid-phase-extraction column after samples had been alkalinized. The HPLC separation of the analytes was performed on a MACHEREY-NAGEL C(18) (250 mmx4.6 mm, 5 microm, Germany) column, using water (formic acid 0.6 per thousand, ammonium acetate: 30 mmol/l)-acetonitrile (35:65, v/v) as mobile phase, with a flow-rate of 0.85 ml/min. The compounds were ionized in the electrospray ionization (ESI) ion source of the mass spectrometer and were detected in the selected ion recording (SIR) mode. The calibration curves were linear in the 5.0-1000.0 ng/ml range for all compounds, all of them with coefficients of determination above 0.9900. The average extraction recoveries for all the four analytes were above 73.2%. The methodology recoveries were higher than 95.0%. The limits of detection (LODs) were 0.5, 0.3, 0.3 and 0.1 ng/ml for fluoxetine, citalopram, paroxetine and venlafaxine, respectively. The intra- and inter-day variation coefficients were less than 15.0%. The method is accurate, sensitive and simple for routine therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) as well as toxicologic screening, and for the study of the pharmacokinetics and metabolism of the four drugs.

  12. [Assessment of total body potassium and water for therapeutic control of maldigestion syndromes (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehr, L; Schober, O; Pichlmayr, R

    1980-01-01

    Severe intracellular potassium depletion was found with maldigestion (short bowel, high output fistula, M. Crohn, colitis ulcerativa) when total body potassium and water measurement were taken. Serum potassium levels were misleading. These methods are of particular value in planning and conducting a preoperative infusion therapy to correct the documented deficit.

  13. [Separation and identification of bovine lactoferricin by high performance liquid chromatography-matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight/ time of flight mass spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Meichen; Liu, Ning

    2010-02-01

    A high performance liquid chromatography-matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight/time of flight mass spectrometry (HPLC-MALDI-TOF/TOF MS) method was developed for the separation and identification of bovine lactoferricin (LfcinB). Bovine lactoferrin was hydrolyzed by pepsin and then separated by ion exchange chromatography and reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RP-LC). The antibacterial activities of the fractions from RP-LC separation were determined and the protein concentration of the fraction with the highest activity was measured, whose sequence was indentified by MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. The relative molecular mass of LfcinB was 3 124.89 and the protein concentration was 18.20 microg/mL. The method of producing LfcinB proposed in this study has fast speed, high accuracy and high resolution.

  14. Ionization Energies of Lanthanides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Peter F.; Smith, Barry C.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes how data are used to analyze the pattern of ionization energies of the lanthanide elements. Different observed pathways of ionization between different ground states are discussed, and the effects of pairing, exchange, and orbital interactions on ionization energies of the lanthanides are evaluated. When all the above…

  15. Determination of torasemide in human plasma and its bioequivalence study by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Zhang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A sensitive and selective method using high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC–ESI–MS to determine the concentration of torasemide in human plasma samples was developed and validated. Tolbutamide was chosen as the internal standard (IS. The chromatography was performed on a Gl Sciences Inertsil ODS-3 column (100 mm×2.1 mm i.d., 5.0 µm within 5 min, using methanol with 10 mM ammonium formate (60:40, v/v as mobile phase at a flow rate of 0.2 mL/min. The targeted compound was detected in negative ionization at m/z 347.00 for torasemide and 269.00 for IS. The linearity range of this method was found to be within the concentration range of 1–2500 ng/mL (r=0.9984 for torasemide in human plasma. The accuracy of this measurement was between 94.05% and 103.86%. The extracted recovery efficiency was from 84.20% to 86.47% at three concentration levels. This method was also successfully applied in pharmacokinetics and bioequivalence studies in Chinese volunteers.

  16. Differentiation between exposures to high or low ionizing radiation by means of Triage type analysis; Diferenciacion entre exposicion a radiacion ionizante alta o baja mediante analisis tipo Triage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerrero C, C.; Arceo M, C.; Martinez A, J.; Cortina R, E., E-mail: citlali.guerrero@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2016-09-15

    According to a culture of disaster prevention, in this case a radiological emergency, in which a large number of people are exposed to high doses of ionizing radiation, is necessary to make urgent decisions regarding the appropriate treatment, which for each case is required. In this regard, chromosomal analysis may provide additional information to that obtained from clinical observations confirming cases that suffered severe partial exposure and at the same time discriminating against false positives attributable to previous infections or hysterical behavior. The ionizing radiation causes different types of aberrations in the chromosomes, but one of the most characteristic is dicentric. The analysis of these in lymphocytes is a good indicator of the degree of exposure, because apart from being easily recognizable, the basal frequency in the population is low (1 x 10{sup 3} cells) and increases in proportion to the dose. In order to establish the exposure dose, is usually necessary to analyze 1000 cells, a procedure that in an emergency, is very slow since is necessary to make rapid decisions to apply the appropriate treatment to the patient. The results of this intercalibration exercise demonstrate that the analysis of 20, 30 or 50 metaphases is sufficient to separate the cases of overexposure from the non-radio exposed ones and to the first ones by gravity category. (Author)

  17. Characterization of a pulsed injection-locked Ti:sapphire laser and its application to high resolution resonance ionization spectroscopy of copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenschein, V.; Moore, I. D.; Raeder, S.; Reponen, M.; Tomita, H.; Wendt, K.

    2017-08-01

    A high repetition rate pulsed Ti:sapphire laser injection-locked to a continuous wave seed source is presented. A spectral linewidth of 20 MHz at an average output power of 4 W is demonstrated. An enhanced tuning range from 710-920 nm with a single broadband mirror set is realized by the inclusion of a single thin birefringent quartz plate for suppression of unseeded emission. The spectral properties have been analyzed using both a scanning Fabry-Pérot interferometer as well as crossed beam resonance ionization spectroscopy of the hyperfine levels of natural copper. Delayed ionization of the long-lived excited state is demonstrated for increased resolution. For the excited state hyperfine coupling constant of the 244 nm 4s 2S1/2→ 4s4p4P°1/2 ground-state transition in {\\hspace{0pt}}63 Cu, a factor of ten reduction in error compared to previous literature was achieved. The described laser system has been in operation at several radioactive ion beam facilities.

  18. Simultaneous quantification of 25 active constituents in the total flavonoids extract from Herba Desmodii Styracifolii by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Panpan; Yan, Wenying; Han, Qingjie; Wang, Chunying; Zhang, Zijian

    2015-04-01

    A sensitive and selective high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry method has been developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of 25 active constituents, including 21 flavonoids and four phenolic acids in the total flavonoids extract from Herba Desmodii Styracifolii for the first time. Among the 25 compounds, seven compounds including caffeic acid, acacetin, genistein, genistin, diosmetin, diosmin and hesperidin were identified and quantified for the first time in Herba Desmodii Styracifolii. Chromatographic separation was accomplished on a ZORBAX SB-C18 (250 mm×4.6 mm, 5.0 μm) column using gradient elution of methanol and 0.1‰ acetic acid v/v at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. The identification and quantification of the analytes were achieved using negative electrospray ionization mass spectrometry in multiple-reaction monitoring mode. The method was fully validated in terms of limits of detection and quantification, linearity, precision and accuracy. The results indicated that the developed method is simple, rapid, specific and reliable. Furthermore, the developed method was successfully applied to quantify the 25 active components in six batches of total flavonoids extract from Herba Desmodii Styracifolii. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. High-energy and low-energy collision-induced dissociation of protonated flavonoids generated by MALDI and by electrospray ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    March, Raymond E.; Li, Hongxia; Belgacem, Omar; Papanastasiou, Dimitris

    2007-04-01

    Product ion mass spectra of a series of nine protonated flavonoids have been observed by electrospray ionization combined with quadrupole/time-of-flight (ESI QTOF), and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization combined either with quadrupole ion trap (MALDI QIT) tandem mass spectrometry or time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (MALDI TOF ReTOF). The compounds examined are 3,6-, 3,2'-, and 3,3'-dihydoxyflavone, apigenin (5,7,4'-trihydroxyflavone), luteolin (5,7,3',4'-tetrahydroxyflavone), apigenin-7-O-glucoside, hesperidin (5,7,3'-trihydroxy-4'-methoxyflavanone), daidzen (7,4'-dihydroxyisoflavone), and rutin (quercitin-3-O-rutinoside) where quercitin is 3,5,7,3',4'-pentahydroxyflavone; sodiated rutin was examined also. The center-of-mass energies in ESI QTOF and MALDI QIT are similar (1-4 eV) and their product ion mass spectra are virtually identical. In the MALDI TOF ReTOF instrument, center-of-mass energies range from 126-309 eV for sodiated rutin to protonated dihydroxyflavones, respectively. Due to the high center-of-mass energies available with the MALDI TOF ReTOF instrument, some useful structural information may be obtained; however, with increasing precursor mass/charge ratio, product ion mass spectra become simplified so as to be of limited structural value. Electronic excitation of the protonated (and sodiated) species examined here offers an explanation for the very simple product ion mass spectra observed particularly for glycosylated flavonoids.

  20. Analysis of brain lipids by directly coupled matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and high-performance thin-layer chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Beate; Nimptsch, Ariane; Suss, Rosmarie; Schiller, Jürgen

    2008-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) is a soft ionization MS technique providing only minor fragmentation of the analyte. Therefore, the method is basically suitable for mixture analysis, although the ion yields strongly depend on the basicity/acidity of the analyte in relation to the applied matrix. Accordingly, less sensitively detectable compounds may be suppressed by more sensitively detectable compounds. Thus, separation of the mixture into the individual compounds is normally indispensable. This paper demonstrates the capabilities and limitations of a direct, simple, and inexpensive MALDI-high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC) coupling for the analysis of a crude lipid extract from porcine brain. Brain lipids were chosen because they represent a rather complex mixture and are of currently significant research interest. It was found that normal-phase HPTLC-separated lipids can be easily characterized by direct MALDI-TOF-MS analysis with sufficient resolution to allow the assignment of virtually all lipid classes, even rather minor species such as phosphorylated phosphoinositides or complex glycolipids as gangliosides. Advantages and disadvantages of this approach are discussed.

  1. High-throughput quantitative analysis of domoic acid directly from mussel tissue using Laser Ablation Electrospray Ionization - tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Daniel G; Walsh, Callee M; McCarron, Pearse

    2014-12-15

    Eliminating sample extraction or liquid chromatography steps from methods for analysis of the neurotoxin Domoic Acid (DA) in shellfish could greatly increase throughput in food safety testing laboratories worldwide. To this end, we have investigated the use of Laser Ablation Electrospray Ionization (LAESI) with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) detection for DA analysis directly from mussel tissue homogenates without sample extraction, cleanup or separation. DA could be selectively detected directly from mussel tissue homogenates using MS/MS in selected reaction monitoring scan mode. The quantitative capabilities of LAESI-MS/MS for DA analysis from mussel tissue were evaluated by analysis of four mussel tissue reference materials using matrix-matched calibration. Linear response was observed from 1 mg/kg to 40 mg/kg and the method limit of detection was 1 mg/kg. Results for DA analysis in tissue within the linear range were in good agreement with two established methods, LC-UV and LC-MS/MS (recoveries from 103 to 125%). Beyond the linear range, extraction and clean-up were required to achieve good quantitation. Most notable is the extremely rapid analysis time of about 10 s per sample by LAESI-MS/MS, which corresponds to a significant increase in sample throughput compared with existing methodology for routine DA analysis. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Dietary reference values for potassium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjödin, Anders Mikael

    2016-01-01

    Following a request from the European Commission, the EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) derives dietary reference values (DRVs) for potassium. The Panel decides to set DRVs on the basis of the relationships between potassium intake and blood pressure and stroke...

  3. Potassium supplementation and heart rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijsbers, L.; Molenberg, Famke; Bakker, S.J.L.; Geleijnse, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims: Increasing the intake of potassium has been shown to lower blood pressure, but whether it also affects heart rate (HR) is largely unknown. We therefore assessed the effect of potassium supplementation on HR in a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Methods and

  4. Development of highly sensitive quantification method for testosterone and dihydrotestosterone in human serum and prostate tissue by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Kouwa; Miyashiro, Yoshimichi; Maekubo, Hitoe; Okuyama, Mitsunobu; Honma, Seijiro; Takahashi, Madoka; Numazawa, Mitsuteru

    2009-11-01

    We developed highly sensitive detection of testosterone (T) and 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry using high proton affinitive derivatization of 17beta-hydroxyl group of T and DHT with picolinic acid, mobile phase consisting of MeCN-MeOH-H(2)O-formic acid and conventional octadecylsilica (ODS) column. Purification of the derivatives was carried out using solid-phase extraction with ODS cartridge. By this method, T and DHT were determined simultaneously with limits of quantification (LOQs) of 1 pg/0.2 ml in serum, and T and DHT with LOQs of 0.5 pg and 1 pg/3mg in prostate tissue, respectively, under acceptable assay performance (intra-assay and inter-assay accuracy and precision). The present method provides reliable and reproducible results for quantification of T and DHT in small volumes of serum and prostate samples for diagnosis in prostatic disorders and male climacteric.

  5. Achieving Stable Radiation Pressure Acceleration of Heavy Ions via Successive Electron Replenishment from Ionization of a High-Z Material Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, X. F.; Qiao, B.; Zhang, H.; Kar, S.; Zhou, C. T.; Chang, H. X.; Borghesi, M.; He, X. T.

    2017-05-01

    A method to achieve stable radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) of heavy ions from laser-irradiated ultrathin foils is proposed, where a high-Z material coating in front is used. The coated high-Z material, acting as a moving electron repository, continuously replenishes the accelerating heavy ion foil with comoving electrons in the light-sail acceleration stage due to its successive ionization under laser fields with Gaussian temporal profile. As a result, the detrimental effects such as foil deformation and electron loss induced by the Rayleigh-Taylor-like and other instabilities in RPA are significantly offset and suppressed so that stable acceleration of heavy ions are maintained. Particle-in-cell simulations show that a monoenergetic Al13 + beam with peak energy 3.8 GeV and particle number 1 010 (charge >20 nC ) can be obtained at intensity 1 022 W /cm2 .

  6. Effect of Organic Acids and Vermicompost on Potassium Transformations in Calcareous Soils of Southern Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niloofar Sadri

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Potassium is an essential element for plant growth and exists as four forms in soils: soluble, exchangeable, non-exchangeable, and mineral. Soluble and exchangeable K are considered as readily available and non-exchangeable K as slowly available. Organic matters and acids play an important role in increasing the bioavailability of nutrients especially potassium in the soils. Organic acids are low-molecular weight CHO containing compounds which are found in all organisms and which are characterized by the possession of one or more carboxyl groups. Depending on the dissociation properties and number of these carboxylic groups, organic acids can carry varying negative charge, thereby allowing the complexation of metal cations in solution and the displacement of anions from the soil matrix.The ability of an organic acid to release K from soils depends on some factors such as: diffusion rate of the organic acid in soil, the diffusion capability of organic acid-element complexes, the contact time of the organic acid on a mineral surface, the ionization of the organic acid, the functional group of the organic acid and its position, and the chemical affinity between the organic acid and the mineral elements. This study was conducted in order to evaluate the effect of organic acids and vermicompost on transformation of K in some selected soils of Fars Province, southern Iran. Materials and Methods: In this study, nine soils with enough diversity were selected from different parts of Fars Province. The experiment was done as a completely randomized design with three replications, consisting of three incubation times (5, 15 and 60 days and four organic compounds (including 2% vermicompost, three acids of citric, malic and oxalic acid eachat a concentration of 250 mmolkg-1and one control. The samples were incubated at 50% of saturation moisture at 22°C. Routine physicochemical analyses and clay mineralogy were performed on soil samples. Soil

  7. Spectrophotometric Determination of Losartan Potassium in Tablets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arianne Diane A. Aniñon

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the quality control of pharmaceutical products, it is of utmost importance that validated analytical methods are used to ensure the credibility of the results generated. At the time of the study, official monographs from the United States Pharmacopeia and National Formulary (USP-NF for the quantification of Losartan potassium in tablets were unavailable, denoting the need for a validated analytical procedure for the analysis of the drug. The study adapted direct and first-derivative UV spectrophotometry methods proposed by Bonfilio and others (2010 for the assay of Losartan potassium in Losartan 50 mg. capsules, then modified and validated the said procedures for the assay of Losartan potassium in Losartan 100 mg. tablets following the International Conference on Harmonisation of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use (ICH guidelines on method validation for accuracy, precision, specificity, linearity, limit of detection, and limit of quantitation. Results demonstrated that all the performance characteristics of both methods were highly satisfactory and confirmed the possible application of the methods in routine analysis of Losartan potassium tablets.

  8. Application of flowerlike MgO for highly sensitive determination of lead via matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jian; Chen, Suming; Cao, Changyan; Liu, Huihui; Xiong, Caiqiao; Zhang, Ning; He, Qing; Song, Weiguo; Nie, Zongxiu

    2016-08-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS) is a high-throughput method to achieve fast and accurate identification of lead (Pb) exposure, but is seldom used because of low ionization efficiency and insufficient sensitivity. Nanomaterials applied in MS are a promising technique to overcome the obstacles of MALDI. Flowerlike MgO nanostructures are applied for highly sensitive lead profiling in real samples. They can be used in two ways: (a) MgO is mixed with N-naphthylethylenediamine dihydrochloride (NEDC) as a novel matrix MgO/NEDC; (b) MgO is applied as an absorbent to enrich Pb ions in very dilute solution. The signal intensities of lead by MgO/NEDC were ten times higher than the NEDC matrix. It also shows superior anti-interference ability when analyzing 10 μmol/L Pb ions in the presence of organic substances or interfering metal ions. By applying MgO as adsorbent, the LOD of lead before enrichment is 1 nmol/L. Blood lead test can be achieved using this enrichment process. Besides, MgO can play the role of internal standard to achieve quantitative analysis. Flowerlike MgO nanostructures were applied for highly sensitive lead profiling in real samples. The method is helpful to prevent Pb contamination in a wide range. Further, the combination of MgO with MALDI MS could inspire more nanomaterials being applied in highly sensitive profiling of pollutants. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Cardiac potassium channel subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitt, Nicole; Grunnet, Morten; Olesen, Søren-Peter

    2014-01-01

    About 10 distinct potassium channels in the heart are involved in shaping the action potential. Some of the K(+) channels are primarily responsible for early repolarization, whereas others drive late repolarization and still others are open throughout the cardiac cycle. Three main K(+) channels...... drive the late repolarization of the ventricle with some redundancy, and in atria this repolarization reserve is supplemented by the fairly atrial-specific KV1.5, Kir3, KCa, and K2P channels. The role of the latter two subtypes in atria is currently being clarified, and several findings indicate...... that they could constitute targets for new pharmacological treatment of atrial fibrillation. The interplay between the different K(+) channel subtypes in both atria and ventricle is dynamic, and a significant up- and downregulation occurs in disease states such as atrial fibrillation or heart failure...

  10. Determination of patulin in apple juice by high-performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewram, V; Nair, J J; Nieuwoudt, T W; Leggott, N L; Shephard, G S

    2000-11-03

    An HPLC-MS-MS method with selected reaction monitoring (SRM) for the determination of patulin in apple juice samples is described. Mass spectrometric detection was accomplished following atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) in both positive and negative ion modes. Collision induced dissociation (CID) of the protonated molecular ion led initially to the loss of H2O (fragment m/z 137). At higher energies CO is lost from both the protonated parent molecule (fragment m/z 127) and the dehydrated molecular ion (fragment m/z 109). In contrast, CID of the deprotonated molecular ion led initially to the fragment at m/z 109 corresponding to the loss of either CO2 or acetaldehyde, followed at higher CID energy by the loss of H2O (fragment m/z 135) and CO (fragment m/z 125) from the deprotonated molecular ion. Detection in the negative ion mode proved superior and a linear response was observed over the injected range from 6 to 200 ng patulin. Apple juice samples spiked with patulin between 10 and 135 microg/l were analyzed following liquid-liquid extraction with ethyl acetate and clean up with sodium carbonate. Utilizing reversed-phase HPLC with acetonitrile-water (10:90) at 0.5 ml/min, levels down to 10 microg/l were readily quantified and a detection limit of 4 microg/l was attainable at a signal-to-noise (SIN) ratio of 4. The MS data for the spiked samples compared well to the UV data and when plotted against each other displayed a correlation coefficient (R) of 0.99.

  11. Potassium Ferrate: A Novel Chemical Warfare Agent Decontaminant

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Greene, Russell; von Fahnestock, F. M; Monzyk, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    ..., and/or unsatisfactory CWA destruction efficiencies. Potassium ferrate (K2FeO4) addresses all of these issues through its high oxidation potential, stable shelf life, and benign reduced state, namely iron oxide...

  12. High-performance ion mobility spectrometry with direct electrospray ionization (ESI-HPIMS) for the detection of additives and contaminants in food

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Midey, Anthony J., E-mail: anthony.midey@excellims.com; Camacho, Amanda; Sampathkumaran, Jayanthi; Krueger, Clinton A.; Osgood, Mark A.; Wu, Ching

    2013-12-04

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •A new ESI source was built for direct ionization from syringe. •Phthalates, food dyes, and sweeteners detected with high-performance IMS. •Phthalates directly detected in cola, soy bubble tea matrices with simple treatment. -- Abstract: High-performance ion mobility spectrometry (HPIMS) with an electrospray ionization (ESI) source detected a series of food contaminants and additive compounds identified as critical to monitoring the safety of food samples. These compounds included twelve phthalate plasticizers, legal and illegal food and cosmetic dyes, and artificial sweeteners that were all denoted as detection priorities. HPIMS separated and detected the range of compounds with a resolving power better than 60 in both positive and negative ion modes, comparable to the commonly used high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) methods, but with most acquisition times under a minute. The reduced mobilities, K{sub 0}, have been determined, as have the linear response ranges for ESI-HPIMS, which are 1.5–2 orders of magnitude for concentrations down to sub-ng μL{sup −1} levels. At least one unique mobility peak was seen for two subsets of the phthalates grouped by the country where they were banned. Furthermore, ESI-HPIMS successfully detected low nanogram levels of a phthalate at up to 30 times lower concentration than international detection levels in both a cola matrix and a soy-based bubble tea beverage using only a simplified sample treatment. A newly developed direct ESI source (Directspray) was combined with HPIMS to detect food-grade dyes and industrial dye adulterants, as well as the sweeteners sodium saccharin and sodium cyclamate, with the same good performance as with the phthalates. However, the Directspray method eliminated sources of carryover and decreased the time between sample runs. Limits-of-detection (LOD) for the analyte standards were estimated to be sub-ng μL{sup −1} levels without extensive

  13. Availability and Release Kinetics of Nonexchangeable Potassium in Some Calcareous Soils of Fars Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Abdi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Sum of exchangeable and solution forms of soil potassium is widely used to determine potassium availability for plants. Reliability of these methods is not enough in soils that contain 2:1 phyllosilicates. Additional to exchangeable potassium, nonexchamgeable potassium also has an important role in plant nutrition. Limited information about availability and release kinetics of nonexchangeable potassium in calcareous soils of Fars province is available. For this purpose, some extractants including ammonium acetate, boiling nitric acid, 0.1M nitric acid, 2M sodium chloride and water were evaluated to prediction of potassium availability for corn in 10 calcareous soils of Fars province. Release kinetics of nonexchangeable potassium was studied using 15 successive 15-min extraction with 0.01M calcium chloride. Kinetics models describing nonexchangeable potassium release rate including zero order, first order, second order, third order, parabolic diffusion, power function and ellovich were evaluated. Results showed that 1M neutral amonium acetate, 0.1M aitric acid, water and 2M sodium chloride extractants had high correlation with corn potassium uptake. Amount of potassium released among studied soils was vary in the range of 243 to 814 mg kg-1. According to R2 and SE, kinetics of nonexchangeable potassium release was described with power function, parabolic diffusion and ellovich equations satisfactorily. According to this fact that constant rate of parabolic diffusion and ellovich models had significant correlations with corn potassium uptake, it is recommended that these two models are suitable for use in these studied soils.

  14. Fingerprint analysis of the fruits of Cnidium monnieri extract by high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi; Fan, Guorong; Zhang, Qiaoyan; Wu, Huiling; Wu, Yutian

    2007-02-19

    A method incorporating high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with electrospray ionization (ESI) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS), with parallel analysis by HPLC with UV detection using a diode-array detector (DAD) was developed for the qualitative characterization of coumarin and chromone constituents in the fruits of Cnidium monnieri. The chromatographic separations were performed on a Diamonsil C18 column (4.6 mm x 200 mm, 5 microm) with water with 50 mM ammonium acetate and 2% acetic acid (A) and acetonitrile (B) as the mobile phase. According to the characteristic UV spectra, the information of molecular weight and structure provided by ESI-MS/MS, 13 coumarin and 7 chromone components were detected and identified. This method is rapid and reliable for identification of the constituents in the complex herbal system, and the fragmentation patterns proposed could be extended to the similar compounds.

  15. A microbore high performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry method for the determination of the phytoestrogens genistein and daidzein in comminuted baby foods and soya flour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, K A; Smith, R A; Williams, K; Damant, A P; Shepherd, M J

    1998-01-01

    A microbore high performance liquid chromatographic/electrospray/mass spectrometric (HPLC/ESI-MS) method has been developed for the determination of the phytoestrogens daidzein and genistein in soya flours and baby foods. The samples were hydrolysed and extracted with acetonitrile-water prior to analysis. LC was performed on a microbore Primesphere 5C8 column using a water/acetonitrile/acetic acid mobile phase at a flow rate of 60 microliters/min. Atmospheric pressure ionization in the form of pneumatically assisted electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) was used as the method of detection. The limit of detection was 0.2 mg/ kg for daidzein and 0.7 mg/kg for genistein in the flour and food samples. The method proved both robust and reliable when operated over a long time period (10 days, 463 injections) generating precision data with a coefficient of variation of 4-15%.

  16. Characterization of spirostanol saponins in Solanum torvum by high-performance liquid chromatography/evaporative light scattering detector/electrospray ionization with multi-stage tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yuanyuan; Luo, Jianguang; Xu, Deran; Huang, Xuefeng; Kong, Lingyi

    2008-08-01

    High-performance liquid chromatography with an evaporative light scattering detector and electrospray ionization multistage tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC/ELSD/ESI-MS(n)) was used to identify spirostanol saponins in a saponin extract of Solanum torvum. The fragmentation behavior of saponins was studied using ESI-MS(1-3) in positive ion mode. The MS(n) spectra of the [M+H](+) ions provide structural information including aglycone type and the nature and sequence of sugars. The use of ELSD allowed the profiling of the nonchromophore-containing saponins in this plant. The MS analysis established in this study with known saponins was successfully applied to tentatively identify two new siprostanol glycosides, neosolaspigenin 6-O-beta-D-quinovopyranoside and solagenin 6-O-[beta-D-xylopyranosyl-(1 --> 3)-O-beta-D-quinovopyranoside]. Copyright (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Direct Infusion Electrospray Ionization - Ion Mobility - High Resolution Mass Spectrometry (DIESI-IM-HRMS) for Rapid Characterization of Potential Bioprocess Streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munisamy, Sharon M.; Chambliss, C. Kevin; Becker, Christopher

    2012-07-01

    Direct infusion electrospray ionization - ion mobility - high resolution mass spectrometry (DIESI-IM-HRMS) has been utilized as a rapid technique for the characterization of total molecular composition in "whole-sample" biomass hydrolysates and extracts. IM-HRMS data reveal a broad molecular weight distribution of sample components (up to 1100 m/z) and provide trendline isolation of feedstock components from those introduced "in process." Chemical formulas were obtained from HRMS exact mass measurements (with typical mass error less than 5 ppm) and were consistent with structural carbohydrates and other lignocellulosic degradation products. Analyte assignments are supported via IM-MS collision-cross-section measurements and trendline analysis (e.g., all carbohydrate oligomers identified in a corn stover hydrolysate were found to fall within 6 % of an average trendline). These data represent the first report of collision cross sections for several negatively charged carbohydrates and other acidic species occurring natively in biomass hydrolysates.

  18. Identification of flavonol and xanthone glycosides from mango (Mangifera indica L. Cv. "Tommy Atkins") peels by high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schieber, Andreas; Berardini, Nicolai; Carle, Reinhold

    2003-08-13

    Flavonol O- and xanthone C-glycosides were extracted from mango (Mangifera indica L. cv. "Tommy Atkins") peels and characterized by high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Among the fourteen compounds analyzed, seven quercetin O-glycosides, one kaempferol O-glycoside, and four xanthone C-glycosides were found. On the basis of their fragmentation pattern, the latter were identified as mangiferin and isomangiferin and their respective galloyl derivatives. A flavonol hexoside with m/z 477 was tentatively identified as a rhamnetin glycoside, which to the best of our knowledge, has not yet been reported in mango peels. The results obtained in the present study confirm that peels originating from mango fruit processing are a promising source of phenolic compounds that might be recovered and used as natural antioxidants or functional food ingredients.

  19. High-throughput walkthrough detection portal for counter terrorism: detection of triacetone triperoxide (TATP) vapor by atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Yasuaki; Nagano, Hisashi; Suzuki, Yasutaka; Sugiyama, Masuyuki; Nakajima, Eri; Hashimoto, Yuichiro; Sakairi, Minoru

    2011-09-15

    With the aim of improving security, a high-throughput portal system for detecting triacetone triperoxide (TATP) vapor emitted from passengers and luggage was developed. The portal system consists of a push-pull air sampler, an atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization (APCI) ion source, and an explosives detector based on mass spectrometry. To improve the sensitivity of the explosives detector, a novel linear ion trap mass spectrometer with wire electrodes (wire-LIT) is installed in the portal system. TATP signals were clearly obtained 2 s after the subject under detection passed through the portal system. Preliminary results on sensitivity and throughput show that the portal system is a useful tool for preventing the use of TATP-based improvised explosive devices by screening persons in places where many people are coming and going. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. The dosimetry of ionizing radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Bjaerngard, Bengt E; Kase, Kenneth R

    1987-01-01

    The Dosimetry of Ionizing Radiation, Volume II, attempts to fill the need for updated reference material on the field of radiation dosimetry. This book presents some broad topics in dosimetry and a variety of radiation dosimetry instrumentation and its application. The book opens with a chapter that extends and applies the concepts of microdosimetry to biological systems. This is followed by separate chapters on the state- of-the-art equipment and techniques used to determine neutron spectra; studies to determine recombination effects in ionization chambers exposed to high-intensity pulsed ra

  1. Determination of red blood cell fatty acid profiles: Rapid and high-confident analysis by chemical ionization-gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schober, Yvonne; Wahl, Hans Günther; Renz, Harald; Nockher, Wolfgang Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Cellular fatty acid (FA) profiles have been acknowledged as biomarkers in various human diseases. Nevertheless, common FA analysis by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) requires long analysis time. Hence, there is a need for feasible methods for high throughput analysis in clinical studies. FA was extracted from red blood cells (RBC) and derivatized to fatty acid methyl esters (FAME). A method using gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) with ammonia-induced chemical ionization (CI) was developed for the analysis of FA profiles in human RBC. We compared this method with classical single GC-MS using electron impact ionization (EI). The FA profiles of 703 RBC samples were determined by GC-MS/MS. In contrast to EI ammonia-induced CI resulted in adequate amounts of molecular ions for further fragmentation of FAME. Specific fragments for confident quantification and fragmentation were determined for 45 FA. The GC-MS/MS method has a total run time of 9min compared to typical analysis times of up to 60min in conventional GC-MS. Intra and inter assay variations were Analysis of RBC FA composition revealed an age-dependent increase of the omega-3 eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acid, and a decline of the omega-6 linoleic acid with a corresponding rise of the omega-3 index. The combination of ammonia-induced CI and tandem mass spectrometry after GC separation allows for high-throughput, robust and confident analysis of FA profiles in the clinical laboratory. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Matrix Assisted Ionization Vacuum (MAIV), a New Ionization Method for Biological Materials Analysis Using Mass Spectrometry*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inutan, Ellen D.; Trimpin, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of electrospray ionization (ESI) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) for the mass spectrometric analysis of peptides and proteins had a dramatic impact on biological science. We now report that a wide variety of compounds, including peptides, proteins, and protein complexes, are transported directly from a solid-state small molecule matrix to gas-phase ions when placed into the vacuum of a mass spectrometer without the use of high voltage, a laser, or added heat. This ionization process produces ions having charge states similar to ESI, making the method applicable for high performance mass spectrometers designed for atmospheric pressure ionization. We demonstrate highly sensitive ionization using intermediate pressure MALDI and modified ESI sources. This matrix and vacuum assisted soft ionization method is suitable for the direct surface analysis of biological materials, including tissue, via mass spectrometry. PMID:23242551

  3. Genetic disorders of potassium homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Gaurav; Ong, Song; Warnock, David G

    2013-05-01

    Hereditary disorders of potassium homeostasis are an interesting group of disorders, affecting people from the newborn period to adults of all ages. The clinical presentation varies from severe hypotension at birth to uncontrolled hypertension in adults, often associated with abnormal potassium values, although many patients may have a normal serum potassium concentration despite being affected by the genetic disorder. A basic understanding of these disorders and their underlying mechanisms has significant clinical implications, especially in the few patients with subtle clinical signs and symptoms. We present a summary of these disorders, with emphasis on the clinical presentation and genetic mechanisms of these disorders. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Determination of selected antibiotics in the Victoria Harbour and the Pearl River, South China using high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Weihai [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou, Guangzhou 510640 (China); School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Zhongshan University, Guangzhou 510250 (China); Department of Civil and Structural Engineering, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Post-graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Zhang Gan [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou, Guangzhou 510640 (China)]. E-mail: zhanggan@gig.ac.cn; Zou Shichun [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Zhongshan University, Guangzhou 510250 (China); Li Xiangdong [Department of Civil and Structural Engineering, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Liu Yuchun [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Zhongshan University, Guangzhou 510250 (China)

    2007-02-15

    Nine selected antibiotics in the Victoria Harbour of Hong Kong and the Pearl River at Guangzhou, South China, were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. The results showed that the concentrations of antibiotics were mainly below the limit of quantification (LOQ) in the marine water of Victoria Harbour. However, except for amoxicillin, all of the antibiotics were detected in the Pearl River during high and low water seasons with the median concentrations ranging from 11 to 67 ng/L, and from 66 to 460 ng/L, respectively; and the concentrations in early spring were about 2-15 times higher than that in summer with clearer diurnal variations. It was suggested that the concentrations of antibiotics in the high water season were more affected by wastewater production cycles due to quick refreshing rate, while those in the low water season may be more sensitive to the water column dynamics controlled by tidal processes in the river. - Antibiotics were found at high concentrations in an urban reach of Pearl River in southern China with contrast diurnal variations between the high and low water seasons.

  5. Potassium 4-azidobenzenesulfonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Biesemeier

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In, K+·SO3–p-C6H4–N3−, the conformation angle of the azido group with respect to the benzene ring is 19.1 (3°, so that the anion is chiral within the crystal structure. In addition, the crystal structure is also chiral (Sohncke space group. The potassium ion is coordinated by three closer O atoms from three different sulfonyl groups [K...O 2.6486 (17 to 2.7787 (17 Å], three more distant O atoms [K...O 2.959 (2 to 3.206 (2 Å] and three N atoms at 3.073 (2 to 3.268 (2 Å. The anions are packed into layers perpendicular to b, only O and N atoms being at the surface of the layers. The K+ ions are located between the layers.

  6. Determination of pharmaceutical compounds in surface- and ground-water samples by solid-phase extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, J.D.; Furlong, E.T.; Burkhardt, M.R.; Kolpin, D.; Anderson, L.G.

    2004-01-01

    Commonly used prescription and over-the-counter pharmaceuticals are possibly present in surface- and ground-water samples at ambient concentrations less than 1 μg/L. In this report, the performance characteristics of a combined solid-phase extraction isolation and high-performance liquid chromatography–electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC–ESI-MS) analytical procedure for routine determination of the presence and concentration of human-health pharmaceuticals are described. This method was developed and used in a recent national reconnaissance of pharmaceuticals in USA surface waters. The selection of pharmaceuticals evaluated for this method was based on usage estimates, resulting in a method that contains compounds from diverse chemical classes, which presents challenges and compromises when applied as a single routine analysis. The method performed well for the majority of the 22 pharmaceuticals evaluated, with recoveries greater than 60% for 12 pharmaceuticals. The recoveries of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, a histamine (H2) receptor antagonist, and antihypoglycemic compound classes were less than 50%, but were retained in the method to provide information describing the potential presence of these compounds in environmental samples and to indicate evidence of possible matrix enhancing effects. Long-term recoveries, evaluated from reagent-water fortifications processed over 2 years, were similar to initial method performance. Method detection limits averaged 0.022 μg/L, sufficient for expected ambient concentrations. Compound-dependent matrix effects on HPLC/ESI-MS analysis, including enhancement and suppression of ionization, were observed as a 20–30% increase in measured concentrations for three compounds and greater than 50% increase for two compounds. Changing internal standard and more frequent ESI source maintenance minimized matrix effects. Application of the method in the national survey demonstrates that several

  7. Potassium Channels in Neurofbromatosis-1

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen, Mingkui

    2006-01-01

    .... We were the first to investigate potential mechanisms of cognitive impairment in NF-1 at the molecular level involving potassium channels, and demonstrated a possible mechanism for the learning deficits seen in NF1...

  8. 21 CFR 184.1610 - Potassium alginate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Potassium alginate. 184.1610 Section 184.1610 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1610 Potassium alginate. (a) Potassium alginate (CAS Reg. No... algae. Potassium alginate is prepared by the neutralization of purified alginic acid with appropriate pH...

  9. Role of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Trk1 in stabilization of intracellular potassium content upon changes in external potassium levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Rito; Alvarez, María C; Gelis, Samuel; Kodedová, Marie; Sychrová, Hana; Kschischo, Maik; Ramos, José

    2014-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells are able to grow at very different potassium concentrations adapting its intracellular cation levels to changes in the external milieu. Potassium homeostasis in wild type cells resuspended in media with low potassium is an example of non-perfect adaptation since the same intracellular concentration is not approached irrespective of the extracellular levels of the cation. By using yeasts lacking the Trk1,2 system or expressing different versions of the mutated main plasma membrane potassium transporter (Trk1), we show that Trk1 is not essential for adaptation to potassium changes but the dynamics of potassium loss is very different in the wild type and in trk1,2 mutant or in yeasts expressing Trk1 versions with highly impaired transport characteristics. We also show that the pattern here described can be also fulfilled by heterologous expression of NcHAK1, a potassium transporter not belonging to the TRK family. Hyperpolarization and cationic drugs sensitivity in mutants with defective transport capacity provide additional support to the hypothesis of connections between the activity of the Trk system and the plasma membrane H(+) ATPase (Pma1) in the adaptive process. © 2013.

  10. Potassium Silicate Foliar Fertilizer Grade from Geothermal Sludge and Pyrophyllite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muljani Srie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Potassium silicate fertilizer grade were successfully produced by direct fusion of silica (SiO2 and potasium (KOH and K2CO3 in furnaces at temperatures up to melting point of mixture. The geothermal sludge (98% SiO2 and the pyrophyllite (95% SiO2 were used as silica sources. The purposes of the study was to synthesise potassium silicate fertilizer grade having solids concentrations in the range of 31-37% K2O, and silica in the range of 48-54% SiO2. The weight ratio of silicon dioxide/potasium solid being 1:1 to 5:1. Silica from geothermal sludge is amorphous, whereas pyrophylite is crystalline phase. The results showed that the amount of raw materials needed to get the appropriate molar ratio of potassium silicate fertilizer grade are different, as well as the fusion temperature of the furnace. Potassium silicate prepared from potassium hydroxide and geothermal sludge produced a low molar ratio (2.5: 1 to 3: 1. The potassium required quite small (4:1 in weight ratio, and on a fusion temperature of about 900 °C. Meanwhile, the potassium silicate prepared from pyrophyllite produced a high molar ratio (1.4 - 9.4 and on a fusion temperature of about 1350 °C, so that potassium needed large enough to meet the required molar ratio for the fertilizer grade. The product potassium silicate solid is amorphous with a little trace of crystalline.

  11. Applications of ionizing radiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-07-01

    Developments in standard applications and brand new nuclear technologies, with high impact on the future of the agriculture, medicine, industry and the environmental preservation. The Radiation Technology Center (CTR) mission is to apply the radiation and radioisotope technologies in Industry, Health, Agriculture, and Environmental Protection, expanding the scientific knowledge, improving human power resources, transferring technology, generating products and offering services for the Brazilian society. The CTR main R and D activities are in consonance with the IPEN Director Plan (2011-2013) and the Applications of Ionizing Radiation Program, with four subprograms: Irradiation of Food and Agricultural Products; Radiation and Radioisotopes Applications in Industry and Environment; Radioactive Sources and Radiation Applications in Human Health; and Radioactive Facilities and Equipment for the Applications of Nuclear Techniques.

  12. Resonance ionization spectroscopy in dysprosium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Studer, D., E-mail: dstuder@uni-mainz.de; Dyrauf, P.; Naubereit, P.; Heinke, R.; Wendt, K. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, Institut für Physik (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    We report on resonance ionization spectroscopy (RIS) of high-lying energy levels in dysprosium. We developed efficient excitation schemes and re-determined the first ionization potential (IP) via analysis of Rydberg convergences. For this purpose both two- and three-step excitation ladders were investigated. An overall ionization efficiency of 25(4) % could be demonstrated in the RISIKO mass separator of Mainz University, using a three-step resonance ionization scheme. Moreover, an extensive analysis of the even-parity 6sns- and 6snd-Rydberg-series convergences, measured via two-step excitation was performed. To account for strong perturbations in the observed s-series, the approach of multichannel quantum defect theory (MQDT) was applied. Considering all individual series limits we extracted an IP-value of 47901.76(5) cm{sup −1}, which agrees with the current literature value of 47901.7(6) cm{sup −1}, but is one order of magnitude more precise.

  13. Differences in fundamental reaction mechanisms between high and low-LET in recent advancements and applications of ionizing radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Farahani, Mahnaz; Clochard, Marie-Claude; Gifford, Ian; Barkatt, Aaron; Al-Sheikhly, Mohamad

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Recent applications of high-LET radiation include boron neutron capture therapy. UV treatment of electron-irradiated UHMWPE impedes degradation caused by allyl radicals. Radiation synthesis of PVP nanogels above 55 1C leads to intra-molecular crosslinking. PCBs in contaminated sediments can be dechlorinated by reactions with hydrated electrons. a b s t r a c t Differences among the mechanisms of energy deposition by high-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation, consisti...

  14. On-line high-performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence detection-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry profiling of human milk oligosaccharides derivatized with 2-aminoacridone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeotti, Fabio; Coppa, Giovanni V; Zampini, Lucia; Maccari, Francesca; Galeazzi, Tiziana; Padella, Lucia; Santoro, Lucia; Gabrielli, Orazio; Volpi, Nicola

    2012-11-01

    A high-resolution normal-phase high-performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence detection-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry separation and structural characterization of the main oligosaccharides along with lactose from human milk samples is described. A total of 22 commercially available oligosaccharides were fluorotagged with 2-aminoacridone and separated on an amide column and identified on the basis of their retention times and mass spectra. Derivatized species having mass lower than approximately 800 to 900 exhibited mainly [M-H](-1) anions, oligomers with mass up to approximately 1000 to 1100 were represented by both [M-H](-1) and [M-2H](-2) anions, and oligomers greater than approximately 1200 to 1300 were characterized by a charge state of -3. Furthermore, the retention times were directly related to the glycans' molecular mass. Human milk samples from the four groups of donors (Se±/Le±) were analyzed for their composition and amount of free oligosaccharides after rapid and simple prepurification and derivatization steps also in the presence of lactose in high content. This analytical approach enabled us to perform the determination of species not detected by traditional techniques, such as sialic acid, as well as of species present in low content easily mistaken with other peaks. Finally, labeled human milk oligosaccharides were analyzed without any interference from excess fluorophore or interference from proteins, peptides, salts, and other impurities normally present in this complex biological fluid. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Measurement of ethyl methanesulfonate in human plasma and breast milk samples using high-performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montesano, M Angela; Whitehead, Ralph D; Jayatilaka, Nayana K; Kuklenyik, Peter; Davis, Mark D; Needham, Larry L; Barr, Dana Boyd

    2010-06-05

    Ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) is a mesylate ester, which is known to be a potent mutagen, teratogen, and possibly carcinogen. Mesylate esters have been found in pharmaceuticals as contaminants formed during the manufacturing process and may potentially pose an exposure hazard to humans. We have developed and validated a method for detection of trace amounts (ng/ml levels) of EMS in human plasma and breast milk. The samples were extracted by matrix solid-phase dispersion with ethyl acetate using Hydromatrix and the ASE 200 Accelerated Solvent Extractor. The extracts were separated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) using a HILIC column. The detection was performed with a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer (TSQ Quantum Ultra, Thermo Electron Corporation) using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization in negative-ion mode and multiple reaction monitoring. The use of a surrogate internal standard in combination with HPLC-MS/MS provided a high degree of accuracy and precision. The extraction efficiency was greater than 70%. Repeated analyses of plasma and breast milk samples spiked with high (100 ng/ml), medium (50 ng/ml) and low (5 ng/ml) concentrations of the analytes gave relative standard deviations of less than 12%. The limits of detection were in the range of 0.5-0.9 ng/ml for both matrices. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Achieving Stable Radiation Pressure Acceleration of Heavy Ions via Successive Electron Replenishment from Ionization of a High-Z Material Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Bin; Shen, X. F.; Zhang, H.; Kar, S.; Zhou, C. T.; Chang, H. X.; Borghesi, M.; He, X. T.

    2017-10-01

    Among various laser-driven acceleration schemes, radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) is regarded as one of the most promising schemes to obtain high-quality ion beams. Although RPA is very attractive in principle, it is difficult to be achieved experimentally. One of the most important reasons is the dramatic growth of the multi-dimensional Rayleigh-Taylor-like (RT) instabilities. In this talk, we report a novel method to achieve stable RPA of ions from laser-irradiated ultrathin foils, where a high-Z material coating in front is used. The coated high-Z material, acting as a moving electron repository, continuously replenishes the accelerating ion foil with comoving electrons in the light-sail acceleration stage due to its successive ionization under laser fields with Gaussian temporal profile. As a result, the detrimental effects such as electron loss induced by the RT and other instabilities are significantly offset and suppressed so that stable acceleration of ions are maintained. Supported by the NSAF, Grant No. U1630246; the NNSF China Grants No. 11575298; and the National Key Program of S&T Research and Development, Grant No. 2016YFA0401100.

  17. Potassium Permanganate Poisoning: A Nonfatal Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzan M. Eteiwi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Acute poisoning by potassium permanganate is a rare condition with high morbidity and mortality. Diagnosis of the condition relies on a history of exposure or ingestion and a high degree of clinical suspicion. Oxygen desaturation and the presence of methemoglobin are also helpful indicators. Since no specific antidote is available, treatment is mainly supportive. Few cases have been reported in the literature following potassium permanganate ingestion, whether intentional or accidental, and most of the patients in these cases had unfavorable outcomes, which was not the case in our patient. Our patient, a 73-year-old male, purchased potassium permanganate over the counter mistaking it for magnesium salt, which he frequently used as a laxative. Several hours after he ingested it, he was admitted to the endocrine department at King Hussein Medical Center, Jordan, with acute rapidly evolving shortness of breath. During hospitalization, his liver function tests deteriorated. Since he was diagnosed early and managed promptly he had a favorable outcome.

  18. Partial substitution of sodium with potassium in white bread: feasibility and bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braschi, Alessandro; Gill, Lakhwinder; Naismith, Donald J

    2009-09-01

    A high sodium intake, to which bread makes a major contribution, and a low potassium intake are believed to be important factors in the promotion of cardiovascular disease. Our aims was to determine to what extent salts of potassium could substitute sodium chloride and potassium-rich soya flour could replace wheat flour without detrimental effect on acceptability, and to measure the bioavailability of a potassium salt added to bread. A single-blind organoleptic evaluation was carried out on eight different potassium-enriched breads by 41 panellists. Thereafter, six volunteers consumed standard or potassium-chloride-fortified bread in an 11-day single-blind cross-over feeding trial to determine the bioavailability of the supplemental potassium. Two breads in which 30% of the sodium was replaced by potassium salts, and bread in which 10% of wheat flour was replaced with soy flour, had acceptability scores similar to the standard bread. In the metabolic study a supplement of 22 mmol/day potassium chloride incorporated into the bread was found to be wholly bioavailable. A substantial reduction in sodium and an increase in potassium intake could be achieved by substituting potassium salts for sodium chloride in bread.

  19. Target-guided separation of Bougainvillea glabra betacyanins by direct coupling of preparative ion-pair high-speed countercurrent chromatography and electrospray ionization mass-spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerz, Gerold; Wybraniec, Sławomir; Gebers, Nadine; Winterhalter, Peter

    2010-07-02

    In this study, preparative ion-pair high-speed countercurrent chromatography was directly coupled to an electrospray ionization mass-spectrometry device (IP-HSCCC/ESI-MS-MS) for target-guided fractionation of high molecular weight acyl-oligosaccharide linked betacyanins from purple bracts of Bougainvillea glabra (Nyctaginaceae). The direct identification of six principal acyl-oligosaccharide linked betacyanins in the mass range between m/z 859 and m/z 1359 was achieved by positive ESI-MS ionization and gave access to the genuine pigment profile already during the proceeding of the preparative separation. Inclusively, all MS/MS-fragmentation data were provided during the chromatographic run for a complete analysis of substitution pattern. On-line purity evaluation of the recovered fractions is of high value in target-guided screening procedures and for immediate decisions about suitable fractions used for further structural analysis. The applied preparative hyphenation was shown to be a versatile screening method for on-line monitoring of countercurrent chromatographic separations of polar crude pigment extracts and also traced some minor concentrated compounds. For the separation of 760mg crude pigment extract the biphasic solvent system tert.-butylmethylether/n-butanol/acetonitrile/water 2:2:1:5 (v/v/v/v) was used with addition of ion-pair forming reagent trifluoroacetic acid. The preparative HSCCC-eluate had to be modified by post-column addition of a make-up solvent stream containing formic acid to reduce ion-suppression caused by trifluoroacetic acid and later significantly maximized response of ESI-MS/MS detection of target substances. A variable low-pressure split-unit guided a micro-eluate to the ESI-MS-interface for sensitive and direct on-line detection, and the major volume of the effluent stream was directed to the fraction collector for preparative sample recovery. The applied make-up solvent mixture significantly improved smoothness of the continuously

  20. Differences in fundamental reaction mechanisms between high and low-LET in recent advancements and applications of ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahani, Mahnaz; Clochard, Marie-Claude; Gifford, Ian; Barkatt, Aaron; Al-Sheikhly, Mohamad

    2014-12-01

    Differences among the mechanisms of energy deposition by high-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation, consisting of neutrons, protons, alpha particles, and heavy ions on one hand, and low-LET radiation, exemplified by electron beam and gamma radiation on the other, are utilized in the selection of types of radiation used for specific applications. Thus, high-LET radiation is used for modification of carbon nanotubes, ion track grafting, and the synthesis of membranes and nanowires, as well as for characterization of materials by means of neutron scattering. Recent applications of low-LET irradiation include minimization of radiolytic degradation upon sterilization of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE), radiolytic synthesis of nanogels for drug delivery systems, grafting of polymers in the synthesis of adsorbents for uranium from seawater, and reductive remediation of PCBs.1

  1. Triacylglycerols profiling in plant oils important in food industry, dietetics and cosmetics using high-performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lísa, Miroslav; Holcapek, Michal

    2008-07-11

    Optimized non-aqueous reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography method using acetonitrile-2-propanol gradient elution and the column coupling in the total length of 45 cm has been applied for the high resolution separation of plant oils important in food industry, dietetics and cosmetics. Positive-ion atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry is used for the unambiguous identification and also the reliable quantitation with the response factors approach. Based on the precise determination of individual triacyglycerol concentrations, the calculation of average parameters important in the nutrition is performed, i.e. average carbon number, average double bond number, relative concentrations of essential, saturated, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids. Results are reported in the form of both chromatographic fingerprints and tables containing relative concentrations for all triacylglycerols and fatty acids in individual samples. In total, 264 triacylglycerols consisting of 28 fatty acids with the alkyl chain length from 6 to 26 carbon atoms and 0 to 4 double bonds have been identified in 26 industrial important plant oils.

  2. Quantifying protein-ligand interactions by direct electrospray ionization-MS analysis: evidence of nonuniform response factors induced by high molecular weight molecules and complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hong; Kitova, Elena N; Klassen, John S

    2013-10-01

    The deleterious effects of high molecular weight (MW) solute (polymers and noncovalent assemblies) on protein-ligand (PL) affinity measurements carried out using the direct electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) assay are described. The presence of high MW solute, that do not interact with the protein (P) or ligand (L) of interest, is shown to result in a decrease in the abundance (Ab) ratio (R) of ligand-bound to free protein ions (i.e., Ab(PL)/Ab(P)) measured for protein-carbohydrate complexes. This effect, which can reduce the apparent association constant by more than 60%, is found to be more pronounced as the differences in the surface properties of P and PL become more significant. It is proposed that the decrease in R reflects a reduction in the number of available surface sites in the ESI droplets upon introduction of large solute and increased competition between P and the more hydrophilic PL for these sites. That a similar decrease in R is observed upon introduction of surfactants to solution provides qualitative support for this hypothesis.

  3. Ionization and NO production in the polar mesosphere during high-speed solar wind streams. Model validation and comparison with NO enhancements observed by Odin-SMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkwood, S.; Belova, E. [Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Kiruna (Sweden). Polar Atmospheric Research; Osepian, A. [Polar Geophysical Institute, Murmansk (Russian Federation); Urban, J.; Perot, K. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Gothenburg (Sweden). Dept. of Radio and Space Science; Sinha, A.K. [Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, Navi Mumbai (India)

    2015-09-01

    Precipitation of high-energy electrons (EEP) into the polar middle atmosphere is a potential source of significant production of odd nitrogen, which may play a role in stratospheric ozone destruction and in perturbing large-scale atmospheric circulation patterns. High-speed streams of solar wind (HSS) are a major source of energization and precipitation of electrons from the Earth's radiation belts, but it remains to be determined whether these electrons make a significant contribution to the odd-nitrogen budget in the middle atmosphere when compared to production by solar protons or by lower-energy (auroral) electrons at higher altitudes, with subsequent downward transport. Satellite observations of EEP are available, but their accuracy is not well established. Studies of the ionization of the atmosphere in response to EEP, in terms of cosmic-noise absorption (CNA), have indicated an unexplained seasonal variation in HSS-related effects and have suggested possible order-of-magnitude underestimates of the EEP fluxes by the satellite observations in some circumstances. Here we use a model of ionization by EEP coupled with an ion chemistry model to show that published average EEP fluxes, during HSS events, from satellite measurements (Meredith et al., 2011), are fully consistent with the published average CNA response (Kavanagh et al., 2012). The seasonal variation of CNA response can be explained by ion chemistry with no need for any seasonal variation in EEP. Average EEP fluxes are used to estimate production rate profiles of nitric oxide between 60 and 100 km heights over Antarctica for a series of unusually well separated HSS events in austral winter 2010. These are compared to observations of changes in nitric oxide during the events, made by the sub-millimetre microwave radiometer on the Odin spacecraft. The observations show strong increases of nitric oxide amounts between 75 and 90 km heights, at all latitudes poleward of 60 S, about 10 days after the

  4. Characterization of aromatic organosulfur model compounds relevant to fossil fuels by using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization with CS2 and high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Weijuan; Sheng, Huaming; Jin, Chunfen; Riedeman, James S; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I

    2016-04-15

    The chemistry of desulfurization involved in processing crude oil is greatly dependent on the forms of sulfur in the oil. Sulfur exists in different chemical bonding environments in fossil fuels, including those in thiophenes and benzothiophenes, thiols, sulfides, and disulfides. In this study, the fragmentation behavior of the molecular ions of 17 aromatic organosulfur compounds with various functionalities was systematically investigated by using high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry. Multiple-stage tandem mass spectrometric experiments were carried out using a linear quadrupole ion trap (LQIT) equipped with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source. (+)APCI/CS2 was used to generate stable dominant molecular ions for all the compounds studied except for three sulfides that also showed abundant fragment ions. The LQIT coupled with an orbitrap mass spectrometer was used for elemental composition analysis, which facilitated the identification of the neutral molecules lost during fragmentation. The characteristic fragment ions generated in MS(2) and MS(3) experiments provide clues for the chemical bonding environment of sulfur atoms in the examined compounds. Upon collision-induced dissociation (CID), the molecular ions can lose the sulfur atom in a variety of ways, including as S (32 Da), HS(•) (33 Da), H2 S (34 Da), CS (44 Da), (•) CHS (45 Da) and CH2 S (46 Da). These neutral fragments are not only indicative of the presence of sulfur, but also of the type of sulfur present in the compound. Generally, losses of HS(•) and H2 S were found to be associated with compounds containing saturated sulfur functionalities, while losses of S, CS and (•) CHS were more common for heteroaromatic sulfur compounds. High-resolution tandem mass spectrometry with APCI/CS2 ionization is a viable approach to determining the types of organosulfur compounds. It can potentially be applied to analysis of complex mixtures, which is beneficial to improving the

  5. Identification of Differential Gene Expression Patterns after Acute Exposure to High and Low Doses of Low-LET Ionizing Radiation in a Reconstituted Human Skin Tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tilton, Susan C.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Hays, Spencer; Taylor, Ronald C.; Stenoien, David L.

    2016-11-01

    Our goal here was to identify dose and temporal dependent radiation responses in a complex tissue, reconstituted human skin. Direct sequencing of RNA (RNA-seq) was used to quantify altered transcripts following exposure to 0.1, 2 and 10 Gy of ionizing radiation at 3 and 8 hours. These doses include a low dose in the range of some medical diagnostic procedures (0.1 Gy), a dose typically received during radiotherapy (2.0 Gy) and a lethal dose (10 Gy). These doses could be received after an intentional or accidental radiation exposure and biomarkers are needed to rapidly and accurately triage exposed individuals. A total of 1701 genes were deemed to be significantly affected by high dose radiation exposure with the majority of genes affected at 10 Gy. A group of 29 genes including GDF15, BBC3, PPM1D, FDXR, GADD45A, MDM2, CDKN1A, TP53INP1, CYCSP27, SESN1, SESN2, PCNA, and AEN were similarly altered at both 2 and 10 Gy, but not 0.1 Gy, at multiple time points. A much larger group of up regulated genes, including those involved in inflammatory responses, was significantly altered only after a 10 Gy exposure. At high doses, down regulated genes were associated with cell cycle regulation and exhibited an apparent linear response between 2 and 10 Gy. While only a handful of genes were significantly affected by 0.1 Gy exposure using stringent statistical filters, groups of related genes regulating cell cycle progression and inflammatory responses consistently exhibited opposite trends in their regulation compared to the high dose exposures. Differential regulation of PLK1 signaling at low and high doses was confirmed using qRT-PCR. These results indicate that some alterations in gene expression are qualitatively different at low and high doses of radiation in this model system.

  6. The acetonitrile shortage: is reversed HILIC with water an alternative for the analysis of highly polar ionizable solutes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos Pereira, Alberto; David, Frank; Vanhoenacker, Gerd; Sandra, Pat

    2009-06-01

    In hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC), best results are obtained with high concentrations of ACN. In the framework of green chromatography and the present shortage and very high price of this hazardous solvent, reversing the stationary phase to apolar and the mobile phase to aqueous can be of interest for several applications. The features of the aqueous RP technique called per aqueous LC (PALC) are illustrated with the analysis of catecholamines, nucleobases, acids, and amino acids. The ca. three-fold higher viscosity of water compared to ACN has consequences on the shape of the Van Deemter plot. For dopamine (N = 26.450 on a 25 cm x 4.6 mm id, 5 microm bare silica column), a reduced plate height of 1.9 at an u(opt) of 0.3 mm/s was calculated. The plate number, however, strongly depends on pH and ionic strength. As in RP separations, retention is shortened by adding an organic modifier. In the framework of green chromatography, the biodegradable ethanol was used. On the other hand, retention increased by lengthening the carbon chain of ion-pair reagents supporting the RP mechanism as well.

  7. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, M.; Mason, W. B.; Whipple, G. H.; Howland, J. W.

    1952-04-07

    This report presents a review of present knowledge and concepts of the biological effects of ionizing radiations. Among the topics discussed are the physical and chemical effects of ionizing radiation on biological systems, morphological and physiological changes observed in biological systems subjected to ionizing radiations, physiological changes in the intact animal, latent changes following exposure of biological systems to ionizing radiations, factors influencing the biological response to ionizing radiation, relative effects of various ionizing radiations, and biological dosimetry.

  8. A single-electron picture based on the multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree–Fock method: application to the anisotropic ionization and subsequent high-harmonic generation of the CO molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmura, S.; Kato, T.; Oyamada, T.; Koseki, S.; Ohmura, H.; Kono, H.

    2018-02-01

    The mechanisms of anisotropic near-IR tunnel ionization and high-order harmonic generation (HHG) in a CO molecule are theoretically investigated by using the multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree–Fock (MCTDHF) method developed for the simulation of multielectron dynamics of molecules. The multielectron dynamics obtained by numerically solving the equations of motion (EOMs) in the MCTDHF method is converted to a single orbital picture in the natural orbital representation where the first-order reduced density matrix is diagonalized. The ionization through each natural orbital is examined and the process of HHG is classified into different optical paths designated by a combinations of initial, intermediate and final natural orbitals. The EOMs for natural spin-orbitals are also derived within the framework of the MCTDHF, which maintains the first-order reduced density matrix to be a diagonal one throughout the time propagation of a many-electron wave function. The orbital dependent, time-dependent effective potentials that govern the dynamics of respective time-dependent natural orbitals are deduced from the derived EOMs, of which the temporal variation can be used to interpret the motion of the electron density associated with each natural spin-orbital. The roles of the orbital shape, multiorbital ionization, linear Stark effect and multielectron interaction in the ionization and HHG of a CO molecule are revealed by the effective potentials obtained. When the laser electric field points to the nucleus O from C, tunnel ionization from the C atom side is enhanced; a hump structure originating from multielectron interaction is then formed on the top of the field-induced distorted barrier of the HOMO effective potential. This hump formation, responsible for the directional anisotropy of tunnel ionization, restrains the influence of the linear Stark effect on the energy shifts of bound states.

  9. Sub-cycle ionization dynamics revealed by trajectory resolved, elliptically-driven high-order harmonic generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, E. W.; Carlström, S.; Lorek, E.; Heyl, C. M.; Paleček, D.; Schafer, K. J.; L’Huillier, A.; Zigmantas, D.; Mauritsson, J.

    2016-01-01

    The sub-cycle dynamics of electrons driven by strong laser fields is central to the emerging field of attosecond science. We demonstrate how the dynamics can be probed through high-order harmonic generation, where different trajectories leading to the same harmonic order are initiated at different times, thereby probing different field strengths. We find large differences between the trajectories with respect to both their sensitivity to driving field ellipticity and resonant enhancement. To accurately describe the ellipticity dependence of the long trajectory harmonics we must include a sub-cycle change of the initial velocity distribution of the electron and its excursion time. The resonant enhancement is observed only for the long trajectory contribution of a particular harmonic when a window resonance in argon, which is off-resonant in the field-free case, is shifted into resonance due to a large dynamic Stark shift. PMID:27991521

  10. Ionizing Radiation Potentiates High Fat Diet-Induced Insulin Resistance and Reprograms Skeletal Muscle and Adipose Progenitor Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nylander, Vibe; Ingerslev, Lars R; Andersen, Emil

    2016-01-01

    . C57Bl/6 mice were treated with a single dose of irradiation and subjected to high fat diet (HFD). RNA Sequencing and Reduced Representation Bisulfite Sequencing were used to create transcriptomic and epigenomic profiles of preadipocytes and skeletal muscle satellite cells collected from irradiated...... mice. Mice subjected to total body irradiation showed alterations in glucose metabolism and, when challenged with HFD, marked hyperinsulinemia. Insulin signaling was chronically disrupted in skeletal muscle and adipose progenitor cells collected from irradiated mice and differentiated in culture....... Epigenomic profiling of skeletal muscle and adipose progenitor cells from irradiated animals revealed substantial DNA methylation changes, notably for genes regulating the cell cycle, glucose/lipid metabolism and expression of epigenetic modifiers. Our results show that total body irradiation alters...

  11. Kelvin spray ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdemir, Abdil; Lin, Jung-Lee; Gillig, Kent J; Chen, Chung-Hsuan

    2013-11-21

    A novel self-powered dual spray ionization source has been developed for applications in mass spectrometry. This new source does not use any power supply and produces both positive and negative ions simultaneously. The idea behind this ionization source comes from the Kelvin water dropper. The source employs one or two syringes, two pneumatic sprays operated over a range of flow rates (0.15-15 μL min(-1)) and gas pressures (0-150 psi), and two double layered metal screens for ion formation. A variable electrostatic potential from 0 to 4 kV can be produced depending on solvent and gas flow rates that allow gentle ionization of compounds. There are several parameters that affect the performance during ionization of molecules including the flow rate of solvent, gas pressure, solvent acidity, position of spray and metal screens with respect to each other and distance between metal screens and the counter electrode. This ionization method has been successfully applied to solutions of peptides, proteins and non-covalent complexes. In comparison with ESI, the charge number of the most populated state is lower than that from ESI. It indicates that this is a softer ionization technique and it produces more protein ions with folded structures. The unique features of Kelvin spray ionization (KeSI) are that the method is self-powered and ionization occurs at very low potentials by providing very low internal energy to the ions. This advantage can be used for the ionization of very fragile molecules and investigation of non-covalent interactions.

  12. Analysis of phenolic compounds in commercial dried grape pomace by high-performance liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Lopez, Lina M; DeWitt, Christina A M

    2014-09-01

    By-products obtained from winemaking processes still contain large amounts of phenolic compounds, especially phenolic acids, flavanols, flavonols, stilbenes, and flavonoids. Enzymatic hydrolysis was used for determination and characterization of phenolic acids, flavanols, flavonols, and stilbenes. Characterization of the flavonoids was achieved using acid hydrolysis with 0.1% hydrochloric acid. In addition, organic solvents as 50% methanol, 70% methanol, 50% acetone, 0.01% pectinase, and 100% petroleum ether were also evaluated. Reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) with diode array detector was used to identify phenolic compounds. Internal standard quantification was implemented using a five points of the UV-visible absorption data collected at the wavelength of maximum absorbance. A total of 16 phenolic compounds were determined. The content differed from 1.19 to 1124 mg kg(-1). Outcomes from HPLC study showed that gallic acid, (+) catechin hydrate, and (-) epicatechin gallate were the major phenolic compounds presented in the sample. Malvidin and pelargonidin 3-O-glucoside were the major anthocyanins monoglucosides.

  13. The interstellar medium and the highly ionized species observed in the spectrum of the nearby white dwarf G191-B2B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruhweiler, F. C.; Kondo, Y.

    1981-01-01

    High-resolution spectra of the nearby (48 pc) white dwarf G191-B2B, obtained with the International Ultraviolet Explorer, reveal sharp resonance lines of N V, C IV, and Si IV. The origin of these features is most likely linked to the white dwarf, possibly being formed in an expanding halo around the star. Interstellar lines of C II, N I, Mg II, Si II, and Fe II are also seen in the spectrum. Analysis of these features indicates an average neutral hydrogen number density of 0.064 for this line of sight. In combination with the recent EUV and soft X-ray results, this is interpreted to mean that the interstellar medium in the most immediate solar vicinity is of the normal density n approximately equal to 0.1/cu cm of lower ionization, while just beyond it, at least in some directions, is a hot lower density plasma. These results are apparently in conflict with the model of the interstellar medium by McKee and Ostriker (1977) in its present form.

  14. A novel high-performance liquid chromatography-electron spray ionization-mass spectrometry method for simultaneous determination of guggulsterones, piperine and gallic acid in Triphala guggulu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muguli, Ganesh; Vadaparthi, P R Rao; Ramesh, B; Gowda, Vishakante; Paramesh, Rangesh; Jadhav, Atul N; Babu, K Suresh

    2015-05-01

    "Triphalaguggulu" is an important Ayurvedic formulation comprising of Guggulu, that is, Commiphora wightii (Arn.) Bhandari as a base wherein powdered fruits of triphala, that is, Phyllanthus emblica L., Terminalia bellirica (Gaertn.) Roxb and Terminalia chebula Retz, along with powdered fruit of Piper longum L. are compounded. This polyherbal preparation has been strongly recommended in chronic inflammation, piles, and fistula. However, due to the complexity of compound formulation standardization of commercial products is challenging. In the present communication marker-based standardization of "Triphalaguggulu" preparation using gallic acid (for triphala), piperine (for P. longum L.) and guggulsterones (for guggulu) is reported. These compounds of diverse chemistry were successfully separated on a Waters HR-C18 column by isocratic elution with methanol and water (80:20 v/v) as mobile phase at the flow rate of 1.0 mL/min coupled with photodiode array detector. These optimal chromatographic conditions were used for simultaneous quantification of gallic acid, guggulsterones (E and Z) and piperine in commercial samples by high-performance liquid chromatography-electron spray ionization-mass spectrometry and method was validated as per ICH guidelines.

  15. Quantification of Antioxidant Phenolic Compounds in a New Chrysanthemum Cultivar by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography with Diode Array Detection and Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyo Young; So, Yangkang; Nam, Bomi; Lee, Ik-Soo; Nam, Joo-Won; Jo, Yeong Deuk; Kim, Sang Hoon; Kim, Jin-Baek; Kang, Si-Yong; Jin, Chang Hyun

    2017-01-01

    The flowers of Chrysanthemum morifolium Ramat. have been used as an herbal tea and in traditional medicine, and the plant has been developed to produce horticultural cultivars of various colors and shapes. In this study, a new chrysanthemum cultivar with dark purple petals (C. morifolium cv. ARTI-Dark Chocolate; ADC) was developed by radiation-induced mutation breeding of its original cultivar with purple striped white petals (C. morifolium cv. Noble Wine, NW). The phenolic profile and antioxidant property of ADC were investigated and compared with NW and the commercially available medicinal herb, C. morifolium with yellow petals (CM), in order to find a scientific support to produce a new source of natural antioxidant. Flavonoid and phenolic acid profiles of the ethanol extracts of the three flowers were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detector-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC-DAD-ESIMS), while antioxidant properties were evaluated using the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH) and 2,2-azino-bis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) radical scavenging assay. Among the tested flowers, ADC possessed the strongest antioxidant capacity and the highest phenolic contents. Flavonoids (acacetin, apigenin, luteolin, acacetin-7-O-β-glucoside, apigenin-7-O-β-glucoside, luteolin-7-O-β-glucoside, and linarin) and phenolic acids (chlorogenic acid and mixture of 1,4-, 1,5-, and 3,5-dicaffeoylquinic acids) were identified and quantified. PMID:28630625

  16. High-performance thin-layer chromatography screening of multi class antibiotics in animal food by bioluminescent bioautography and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yisheng; Schwack, Wolfgang

    2014-08-22

    The world-wide usage and partly abuse of veterinary antibiotics resulted in a pressing need to control residues in animal-derived foods. Large-scale screening for residues of antibiotics is typically performed by microbial agar diffusion tests. This work employing high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC) combined with bioautography and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry introduces a rapid and efficient method for a multi-class screening of antibiotic residues. The viability of the bioluminescent bacterium Aliivibrio fischeri to the studied antibiotics (16 species of 5 groups) was optimized on amino plates, enabling detection sensitivity down to the strictest maximum residue limits. The HPTLC method was developed not to separate the individual antibiotics, but for cleanup of sample extracts. The studied antibiotics either remained at the start zones (tetracyclines, aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, and macrolides) or migrated into the front (amphenicols), while interfering co-extracted matrix compounds were dispersed at hRf 20-80. Only after a few hours, the multi-sample plate image clearly revealed the presence or absence of antibiotic residues. Moreover, molecular information as to the suspected findings was rapidly achieved by HPTLC-mass spectrometry. Showing remarkable sensitivity and matrix-tolerance, the established method was successfully applied to milk and kidney samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Simultaneous analysis of 28 urinary VOC metabolites using ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-ESI/MSMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alwis, K Udeni; Blount, Benjamin C; Britt, April S; Patel, Dhrusti; Ashley, David L

    2012-10-31

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are ubiquitous in the environment, originating from many different natural and anthropogenic sources, including tobacco smoke. Long-term exposure to certain VOCs may increase the risk for cancer, birth defects, and neurocognitive impairment. Therefore, VOC exposure is an area of significant public health concern. Urinary VOC metabolites are useful biomarkers for assessing VOC exposure because of non-invasiveness of sampling and longer physiological half-lives of urinary metabolites compared with VOCs in blood and breath. We developed a method using reversed-phase ultra high performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) coupled with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI/MSMS) to simultaneously quantify 28 urinary VOC metabolites as biomarkers of exposure. We describe a method that monitors metabolites of acrolein, acrylamide, acrylonitrile, benzene, 1-bromopropane, 1,3-butadiene, carbon-disulfide, crotonaldehyde, cyanide, N,N-dimethylformamide, ethylbenzene, ethylene oxide, propylene oxide, styrene, tetrachloroethylene, toluene, trichloroethylene, vinyl chloride and xylene. The method is accurate (mean accuracy for spiked matrix ranged from 84 to 104%), sensitive (limit of detection ranged from 0.5 to 20 ng mL(-1)) and precise (the relative standard deviations ranged from 2.5 to 11%). We applied this method to urine samples collected from 1203 non-smokers and 347 smokers and demonstrated that smokers have significantly elevated levels of tobacco-related biomarkers compared to non-smokers. We found significant (pVOC metabolites in a population exposed to volatile organics. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Measurement of serum estrogen and estrogen metabolites in pre- and postmenopausal women with osteoarthritis using high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.L. Gao

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Although 17β-estradiol (E2 deficiency has been linked to the development of osteoarthritis (OA in middle-aged women, there are few studies relating other estrogens and estrogen metabolites (EMs to this condition. We developed a high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS method to measure the levels of six EMs (i.e., estrone, E2, estriol, 2-hydroxyestrone, 2-hydroxyestradiol, and 16a-hydroxyestrone in healthy pre- and postmenopausal women and women with OA. This method had a precision ranging from 1.1 to 3.1% and a detection limit ranging from 10 to 15 pg. Compared to healthy women, serum-free E2 was lower in the luteal and postmenopausal phases in women with OA, and total serum E2 was lower in postmenopausal women with OA. Moreover, compared to healthy women, total serum 2-hydroxyestradiol was higher in postmenopausal women with OA and total serum 2-hydroxyestrone was lower in both the luteal and follicular phases in women with OA. In conclusion, our HPLC-ESI-MS/MS method allowed the measurement of multiple biochemical targets in a single assay, and, given its increased cost-effectiveness, simplicity, and speed relative to previous methods, this method is suitable for clinical studies.

  19. Chemical analysis of raw and processed Fructus arctii by high-performance liquid chromatography/diode array detection-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Kunming; Liu, Qidi; Cai, Hao; Cao, Gang; Lu, Tulin; Shen, Baojia; Shu, Yachun; Cai, Baochang

    2014-01-01

    Background: In traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), raw and processed herbs are used to treat the different diseases. Fructus Arctii, the dried fruits of Arctium lappa l. (Compositae), is widely used in the TCM. Stir-frying is the most common processing method, which might modify the chemical compositions in Fructus Arctii. Materials and Methods: To test this hypothesis, we focused on analysis and identification of the main chemical constituents in raw and processed Fructus Arctii (PFA) by high-performance liquid chromatography/diode array detection-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry. Results: The results indicated that there was less arctiin in stir-fried materials than in raw materials. however, there were higher levels of arctigenin in stir-fried materials than in raw materials. Conclusion: We suggest that arctiin reduced significantly following the thermal conversion of arctiin to arctigenin. In conclusion, this finding may shed some light on understanding the differences in the therapeutic values of raw versus PFA in TCM. PMID:25422559

  20. Localization of double bonds in triacylglycerols using high-performance liquid chromatography/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion-trap mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Háková, Eva; Vrkoslav, Vladimír; Míková, Radka; Schwarzová-Pecková, Karolina; Bosáková, Zuzana; Cvačka, Josef

    2015-07-01

    A method for localizing double bonds in triacylglycerols using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) was developed. The technique was based on collision-induced dissociation or pulsed Q collision-induced dissociation of the C3H5N(+•) adducts ([M + 55](+•)) formed in the presence of acetonitrile in the APCI source. The spectra were investigated using a large series of standards obtained from commercial sources and prepared by randomization. The fragmentation spectra made it possible to determine (i) the total number of carbons and double bonds in the molecule, (ii) the number of carbons and double bonds in acyls, (iii) the acyl in the sn-2 position on the glycerol backbone, and (iv) the double-bond positions in acyls. The double-bond positions were determined based on two types of fragments (alpha and omega ions) formed by cleavages of C-C bonds vinylic to the original double bond. The composition of the acyls and their positions on glycerol were established from the masses and intensities of the ions formed by the elimination of fatty acids from the [M + 55](+•) precursor. The method was applied for the analysis of triacylglycerols in olive oil and vernix caseosa.

  1. Forensic Analysis of Stains on Fabric Using Direct Analysis in Real-time Ionization with High-Resolution Accurate Mass-Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Sara E; Crowe, John B; Litzau, Jonathan J; Heitkemper, Douglas T

    2017-06-12

    A rapid technique using direct analysis in real-time (DART) ambient ionization coupled to a high-resolution accurate mass-mass spectrometer (HRAM-MS) was employed to analyze stains on an individual's pants suspected to have been involved in a violent crime. The victim was consuming chocolate ice cream at the time of the attack, and investigators recovered the suspect's pants exhibiting splatter stains. Liquid chromatography with mass spectral detection (LC-MS) and stereoscopic light microscopy (SLM) were also utilized in this analysis. It was determined that the stains on the pants contained theobromine and caffeine, known components of chocolate. A shard from the ceramic bowl that contained the victim's ice cream and a control chocolate ice cream sample were also found to contain caffeine and theobromine. The use of DART-HRAM-MS was useful in this case due to its rapid analysis capability and because of the limited amount of sample present as a stain. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  2. Characterization of eight terpenoids from tissue cultures of the Chinese herbal plant, Tripterygium wilfordii, by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ping; Cheng, Qiqing; Wang, Xiujuan; Cheng, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Meng; Tong, Yuru; Li, Fei; Gao, Wei; Huang, Luqi

    2014-09-01

    In this study, a reliable method for analysis and identification of eight terpenoids in tissue cultures of Tripterygium wilfordii has been established using high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS). Our study indicated that sterile seedlings, callus cultures and cell-suspension cultures can rapidly increase the amount of biological materials. HPLC-ESI-MS was used to identify terpenoids from the extracts of these tissue cultures. Triptolide, triptophenolide, celastrol and wilforlide A were unambiguously determined by comparing the retention times, UV spectral data, and mass fragmentation behaviors with those of the reference compounds. Another four compounds were tentatively identified as triptonoterpenol, triptonoterpene, 22β-hydroxy-3-oxoolean-12-en-29-oic acid and wilforlide B, based on their UV and mass spectrometry spectra. The quantitative analysis showed that all three materials contain triptolide, triptophenolide, celastrol, wilforlide A, and the contents of the four compounds in the cell-suspension cultures were 53.1, 240, 129 and 964 µg/g, respectively, which were at least 2.0-fold higher than these in the sterile seedlings and callus cultures. Considering the known pharmacological activity of triptolide and celastrol, we recommend the cell-suspension cultures as biological materials for future studies, such as clinical and toxicological studies. The developed method was validated by the evaluation of its precision, linearity, detection limits and recovery, and it was successfully used to identify and quantify the terpenoids in the tissue cultures.

  3. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC fingerprints and primary structure identification of corn peptides by HPLC-diode array detection and HPLC-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Corn peptides (CPs are reported to have many biological functions, such as facilitating alcohol metabolism, antioxidation, antitumor, antihypertension, and hepatoprotection. To develop a method for quality control, the high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC system was applied. Twenty-eight common peaks were found in all the CPs of corn samples from Enshi, China, based on which, a fingerprinting chromatogram was established for use in quality control in future research. Subsequently, the major chemical constituents of these common peaks were identified respectively using the HPLC-diode-array detection electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (DAD-ESI-MS/MS system, and 48 peptide fractions were determined ultimately. This was the first time for the majority of these peptides to be reported, and many of them contained amino acids of glutamine (Q, L and A, which might play an important role in the exhibition of the bioactivities of CPs. Many peptides had a similar primary structure to the peptides which had been proven to be bioactive such as facilitating alcohol metabolism, scavenging free radicals, and inhibiting lipid peroxidation. This systematical analysis of the primary structure of CPs facilitated subsequent studies on the relationship between the structures and functions, and could accelerate holistic research on CPs.

  4. Quantification of Antioxidant Phenolic Compounds in a New Chrysanthemum Cultivar by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography with Diode Array Detection and Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ah-Reum Han

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The flowers of Chrysanthemum morifolium Ramat. have been used as an herbal tea and in traditional medicine, and the plant has been developed to produce horticultural cultivars of various colors and shapes. In this study, a new chrysanthemum cultivar with dark purple petals (C. morifolium cv. ARTI-Dark Chocolate; ADC was developed by radiation-induced mutation breeding of its original cultivar with purple striped white petals (C. morifolium cv. Noble Wine, NW. The phenolic profile and antioxidant property of ADC were investigated and compared with NW and the commercially available medicinal herb, C. morifolium with yellow petals (CM, in order to find a scientific support to produce a new source of natural antioxidant. Flavonoid and phenolic acid profiles of the ethanol extracts of the three flowers were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detector-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC-DAD-ESIMS, while antioxidant properties were evaluated using the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH and 2,2-azino-bis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS radical scavenging assay. Among the tested flowers, ADC possessed the strongest antioxidant capacity and the highest phenolic contents. Flavonoids (acacetin, apigenin, luteolin, acacetin-7-O-β-glucoside, apigenin-7-O-β-glucoside, luteolin-7-O-β-glucoside, and linarin and phenolic acids (chlorogenic acid and mixture of 1,4-, 1,5-, and 3,5-dicaffeoylquinic acids were identified and quantified.

  5. Characterization of major and minor alk(en)ylresorcinols from mango (Mangifera indica L.) peels by high-performance liquid chromatography/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knödler, Matthias; Berardini, Nicolai; Kammerer, Dietmar R; Carle, Reinhold; Schieber, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    5-Alkyl- and 5-alkenylresorcinols, as well as their hydroxylated derivatives, were extracted from mango (Mangifera indica L.) peels, purified on polyamide and characterized by high-performance liquid chromatography/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC/APcI-MS) for the first time. Among the 15 compounds analyzed, 3 major and 12 minor C(15)-, C(17)-, and C(19)-substituted resorcinols and related analogues, showing varying degrees of unsaturation, were characterized by their specific fragmentation patterns in collision-induced dissociation experiments. This marks the first report on the occurrence of mono-, di-, and triunsaturated C(15)-homologues, saturated and triunsaturated C(17)-homologues, and mono- and diunsaturated C(19)-homologues in mango peels. Additionally, several hydroxylated C(15)- and C(17)-homologues, also not yet described in mango, and a C(14)-monoene, unique because of its even-numbered side chain, were tentatively identified on the basis of their fragmentation patterns. The results obtained in the present study indicate that HPLC-DAD-APcI-MS(n), combined with the newly developed solid-phase extraction, is a powerful tool for the analysis of alk(en)ylresorcinols and could therefore be used for their determination in various matrices.

  6. Metabolite fingerprinting of Punica granatum L. (pomegranate) polyphenols by means of high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array and electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brighenti, Virginia; Groothuis, Sebastiaan Frearick; Prencipe, Francesco Pio; Amir, Rachel; Benvenuti, Stefania; Pellati, Federica

    2017-01-13

    The present study was aimed at the development of a new analytical method for the comprehensive multi-component analysis of polyphenols in Punica granatum L. (pomegranate) juice and peel. While pomegranate juice was directly analysed after simple centrifugation, different extraction techniques, including maceration, heat reflux extraction, ultrasound-assisted extraction and microwave-assisted extraction, were compared in order to obtain a high yield of the target analytes from pomegranate peel. Dynamic maceration with a mixture of water and ethanol 80:20 (v/v) with 0.1% of hydrochloric acid as the extraction solvent provided the best result in terms of recovery of pomegranate secondary metabolites. The quali- and quantitative analysis of pomegranate polyphenols was performed by high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array and electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry detection. The application of fused-core column technology allowed us to obtain an improvement of the chromatographic performance in comparison with that of conventional particulate stationary phases, thus enabling a good separation of all constituents in a shorter time and with low solvent usage. The analytical method was completely validated to show compliance with the International Conference on Harmonization of Technical Requirements for the Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use guidelines and successfully applied to the characterisation of commercial and experimental pomegranate samples, thus demonstrating its efficiency as a tool for the fingerprinting of this plant material. The quantitative data collected were submitted to principal component analysis, in order to highlight the possible presence of pomegranate samples with high content of secondary metabolites. From the statistical analysis, four experimental samples showed a notable content of bioactive compounds in the peels, while commercial ones still represent the best source of healthy juice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier

  7. Analysis and fragmentation mechanisms of hirsutinolide-type sesquiterpene lactones by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization linear ion trap Orbitrap mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girardi, Cynthia; Jullian, Valérie; Haddad, Mohamed; Vansteelandt, Marieke; Cabanillas, Billy Joel; Kapanda, Coco N; Herent, Marie-France; Quetin-Leclercq, Joëlle; Fabre, Nicolas

    2016-03-15

    Hirsutinolide-type sesquiterpene lactones (SLs) are natural biologically active compounds mainly found in the genus Vernonia. Very few studies have been published about the fragmentation mechanisms of SLs generally and none about hirsutinolides, although they have drawn attention through their biological and taxonomical interest. This work aims to propose a mass spectrometry fragmentation pattern for hirsutinolides in order to detect and to identify them in a botanical extract. The fragmentation pathways of six pure hirsutinolides isolated from Pseudelephantopus spiralis were established by positive ion electrospray high-resolution linear ion trap Orbitrap tandem mass spectrometry (ESI(+)-HRMS(n) ). A resolutive, hyphenated ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) coupled to diode array detection (DAD) and ESI(+)-HRMS(n) method was then implemented to separate and analyze them. The ionization behaviour and diagnostic product ions were investigated by both methods. The UHPLC/DAD-ESI-HRMS(n) method was applied for the dereplication of a plant extract. For the six standard compounds, the main fragmentation pattern consists first in the loss of the side chain in the C-8 position followed by the loss of the substituent in the C-13 position. UHPLC/HRMS analyses of hirsutinolides mainly produced sodiated molecules or [M+H-H2 O](+) ions. The high-abundance product ions at m/z 299 and 259 were established to be the characteristic diagnostic ions of the hirsutinolide core. The analysis of a P. spiralis extract further led to the identification of two putative hirsutinolides. The UHPLC/DAD-HRMS(n) method combining characteristic fragmentation patterns and the profiles of the product ions generated in the MS and MS/MS spectra is an effective technique for characterizing hirsutinolide-type SLs. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. The Limitation Amount of Available Potassium for Wheat in a Loess Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Vafakhah

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was determining the most limiting plant growth factor in the wheat root zone dominated by illite in clay fraction and a high specific surface with ample ammonium acetate extractible potassium. A completely randomized block design with 4 replicates was used in Seyed Miran Research Farm (Gorgan during 2009-2010 growing season. Treatments were mineral fertilizers (to achieve different levels of yields, gypsum (1000 Kg/ha calcium, calcium chloride (1000 Kg ha-1 Ca, urea (93 Kg ha-1 N and potassium chloride (105 Kg ha-1 K combined, gypsum (1000 Kg ha-1 Ca and potassium chloride (105 Kg ha-1 K combined, calcium chloride (1000 Kg ha-1 Ca and potassium chloride (105 Kg ha-1 K combined and control. Wheat cultivar (N-80-19 was planted in experimental site at 2009/12/9. The results showed that potassium is the most limiting plant growth factor in the site of the experiment. Electric diffuse double layer is expected to be truncated with a high specific surface soil in this area minimizing the soil solution-diffuse double layer interface for rapid potassium diffusion. The highest yield grain and straw with urea and potassium chloride showed a greater effect on plant and soil potassium concentrations. A greater potassium diffusion rate may be achieved as a result of greater concentration gradients between the exchange sites and soil solution by potassium fertilization and more potassium excess. Ammonium from urea diminished potassium fixation with illite and increased potassium root uptake.

  9. Gliucose-insulin-potassium and reperfusion in acute myocardial infarction : Rationale and design of the glucose insulin-potassium study-2 (GIPS-2)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Horst, ICC; Timmer, [No Value; Ottervanger, JP; Bilo, HJG; Gans, ROB; de Boer, MJ; Zijlstra, F

    Background The combination of reperfusion therapy and high-dose glucose-insulin-potassium (GIK) infusion seems beneficial in acute myocardial infarction (MI). Current evidence, however, is not considered conclusive. Study Design The Glucose-Insulin-Potassium Study-2 (GIPS-2) will investigate whether

  10. Profiling of Microbial Colonies for High-Throughput Engineering of Multistep Enzymatic Reactions via Optically Guided Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Tong; Li, Bin; Comi, Troy J; Wu, Yuwei; Hu, Pingfan; Wu, Yuying; Min, Yuhao; Mitchell, Douglas A; Zhao, Huimin; Sweedler, Jonathan V

    2017-09-13

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-ToF) mass spectrometry (MS) imaging has been used for rapid phenotyping of enzymatic activities, but is mainly limited to single-step conversions. Herein we report a label-free method for high-throughput engineering of multistep biochemical reactions based on optically guided MALDI-ToF MS analysis of bacterial colonies. The bacterial cells provide containment of multiple enzymes and access to substrates and cofactors via metabolism. Automated MALDI-ToF MS acquisition from randomly distributed colonies simplifies procedures to prepare strain libraries without liquid handling. MALDI-ToF MS profiling was utilized to screen both substrate and enzyme libraries for natural product biosynthesis. Computational algorithms were developed to process and visualize the resulting mass spectral data sets. For analogues of the peptidic antibiotic plantazolicin, multivariate analyses by t-distributed stochastic neighbor embedding were used to group similar spectra for rapid identification of nonisobaric variants. After MALDI-ToF MS screening, follow-up analyses using high-resolution MS and tandem MS were readily performed on the same sample target. Separately, relative ion intensities of rhamnolipid congeners with various lipid moieties were evaluated to engineer enzymatic specificity. The glycolipid profiles of each colony were overlaid with optical images to facilitate the recovery of desirable mutants. For both the antibiotic and rhamnolipid cases, large populations of colonies were rapidly surveyed at the molecular level, providing information-rich insights not easily obtained with traditional screening assays. Utilizing standard microbiological techniques with routine microscopy and MALDI-ToF MS instruments, this simple yet effective workflow is applicable for a wide range of screening campaigns targeting multistep enzymatic reactions.

  11. Determination of fucoxanthin isomers in microalgae (Isochrysis sp.) by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with diode-array detector multistage mass spectrometry coupled with positive electrospray ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crupi, Pasquale; Toci, Aline Theodore; Mangini, Silvio; Wrubl, Federico; Rodolfi, Liliana; Tredici, Mario R; Coletta, Antonio; Antonacci, Donato

    2013-05-15

    Due to their health benefits, there is growing interest in the production and use of carotenoids from natural sources, e.g. microalgae. To date, only Haematococcus pluvialis and Dunaliella, that accumulate, respectively, astaxanthin and β-carotene in large quantities, are grown commercially. However, interest is also being focused on other xanthophylls, such as (all-E)-fucoxanthin characterized by anti-obesity and anti-carcinogenic effects. In this regard, rigorous chemical and analytical techniques following preparative isolation of components are needed to unequivocally identify individual carotenoids in microalgae. The carotenoid profile of Isochrysis sp. biomass, produced in closed photobioreactors, was determined by reversed-phase C30 (RP-30) high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with diode-array detector mass spectrometry using positive electrospray ionization (HPLC/DAD-MS/ESI(+) ) analysis. Additionally, multistage mass spectrometry (MS(n) ) analyses, together with fine structures of the UV-vis spectra, were used to differentiate structural and geometrical isomers. This technique allowed the simultaneous determination of geometrical, isomers of fucoxanthin (all-E-fucoxanthin, 13Z-, 13'Z- and 9'Z-fucoxanthin), diatoxanthin and 5,8-epoxydiadinoxanthin diasteroisomers (R/S). The analyzed extracts contained fucoxanthin isomers as the major carotenoids and, in particular, (all-E)-fucoxanthin was the main geometrical isomer (~85%) found at a concentration of 17 mg/g of the lyophilized biomass. Considering the high content of fucoxanthin in Isochrysis sp. biomass, the microalga could be proposed as a source of this compound for nutraceutical and pharmaceutical applications. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Development of a method for comprehensive and quantitative analysis of plant hormones by highly sensitive nanoflow liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-ion trap mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izumi, Yoshihiro; Okazawa, Atsushi; Bamba, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Akio [Department of Biotechnology, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Fukusaki, Eiichiro, E-mail: fukusaki@bio.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Biotechnology, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2009-08-26

    In recent plant hormone research, there is an increased demand for a highly sensitive and comprehensive analytical approach to elucidate the hormonal signaling networks, functions, and dynamics. We have demonstrated the high sensitivity of a comprehensive and quantitative analytical method developed with nanoflow liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-ion trap mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-IT-MS/MS) under multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) in plant hormone profiling. Unlabeled and deuterium-labeled isotopomers of four classes of plant hormones and their derivatives, auxins, cytokinins (CK), abscisic acid (ABA), and gibberellins (GA), were analyzed by this method. The optimized nanoflow-LC-ESI-IT-MS/MS method showed ca. 5-10-fold greater sensitivity than capillary-LC-ESI-IT-MS/MS, and the detection limits (S/N = 3) of several plant hormones were in the sub-fmol range. The results showed excellent linearity (R{sup 2} values of 0.9937-1.0000) and reproducibility of elution times (relative standard deviations, RSDs, <1.1%) and peak areas (RSDs, <10.7%) for all target compounds. Further, sample purification using Oasis HLB and Oasis MCX cartridges significantly decreased the ion-suppressing effects of biological matrix as compared to the purification using only Oasis HLB cartridge. The optimized nanoflow-LC-ESI-IT-MS/MS method was successfully used to analyze endogenous plant hormones in Arabidopsis and tobacco samples. The samples used in this analysis were extracted from only 17 tobacco dry seeds (1 mg DW), indicating that the efficiency of analysis of endogenous plant hormones strongly depends on the detection sensitivity of the method. Our analytical approach will be useful for in-depth studies on complex plant hormonal metabolism.

  13. The stretch-activated potassium channel TREK-1 in rat cardiac ventricular muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xiantao

    2005-01-01

    Cardiac TREK-1 like potassium channels play an important role in the function of cardiomyocytes. A novel low-conductance TREK-1 like potassium channel and a high-conductance TREK-1 like potassium channel in rat cardiomyocytes are described in this thesis. The biophysical properties of the two cardiac TREK-like channels were similar to those of TREK-1a or TREK-1b channels expressed in HEK293 cells, which both displayed a low- and a...

  14. Directed Field Ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregoric, Vincent C.; Kang, Xinyue; Liu, Zhimin Cheryl; Rowley, Zoe A.; Carroll, Thomas J.; Noel, Michael W.

    2017-04-01

    Selective field ionization is an important experimental technique used to study the state distribution of Rydberg atoms. This is achieved by applying a steadily increasing electric field, which successively ionizes more tightly bound states. An atom prepared in an energy eigenstate encounters many avoided Stark level crossings on the way to ionization. As it traverses these avoided crossings, its amplitude is split among multiple different states, spreading out the time resolved electron ionization signal. By perturbing the electric field ramp, we can change how the atoms traverse the avoided crossings, and thus alter the shape of the ionization signal. We have used a genetic algorithm to evolve these perturbations in real time in order to arrive at a target ionization signal shape. This process is robust to large fluctuations in experimental conditions. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grants No. 1607335 and No. 1607377 and used the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE), which is supported by National Science Foundation Grant Number OCI-1053575.

  15. Radiation dosimetry by potassium feldspar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Radiation dosimetry by potassium feldspar. ARUN PANDYA*, S G VAIJAPURKAR and P K BHATNAGAR. Defence Laboratory, Jodhpur 342 011, India. MS received 12 July 1999; revised 15 February 2000. Abstract. The thermoluminescence (TL) properties of raw and annealed feldspar have been studied for their.

  16. Increased serum potassium affects renal outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miao, Y; Dobre, D; Heerspink, H J Lambers

    2011-01-01

    To assess the effect of an angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) on serum potassium and the effect of a serum potassium change on renal outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes and nephropathy.......To assess the effect of an angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) on serum potassium and the effect of a serum potassium change on renal outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes and nephropathy....

  17. Ionization equilibrium of a magnetized quantum plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinberg, M.; Ortner, J.; Ebeling, W. [Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik

    2001-07-01

    The influence of a constant uniform magnetic field on the ionization equilibrium and the thermodynamic properties of a nondegenerate partially ionized hydrogen plasma is studied for weak and strong magnetic fields. A simple interpolation formula for an effective partition function is proposed, connecting the the low- and high-field results. Furthermore, a closed analytical approximation for the thermodynamic functions in the chemical picture and a Saha equation for weakly and strongly magnetized plasmas are presented. (orig.)

  18. INFLUENCE OF EXTERNAL POTASSIUM ON THE SYNTHESIS AND DEPOSITION OF MATRIX COMPONENTS BY CHONDROCYTES IN VITRO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Jon C.; Kosher, Robert A.; Hamos, James E.; Lash, James W.

    1974-01-01

    The effect of a high external potassium concentration on the synthesis and deposition of matrix components by chondrocytes in cell culture was determined. There is a twofold increase in the amount of chondroitin 4- and 6-sulfate accumulated by chondrocytes grown in medium containing a high potassium concentration. There is also a comparable increase in the production of other sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAG) including heparan sulfate and uncharacterized glycoprotein components. The twofold greater accumulation of GAG in the high potassium medium is primarily the result of a decrease in their rate of degradation. In spite of this increased accumulation of GAG, the cells in high potassium fail to elaborate appreciable quantities of visible matrix, although they do retain the typical chondrocytic polygonal morphology. Although most of the products are secreted into the culture medium in the high potassium environment, the cell layer retains the same amount of glycosaminoglycan as the control cultures. The inability of chondrocytes grown in high potassium to elaborate the typical hyaline cartilage matrix is not a consequence of an impairment in collagen synthesis, since there is no difference in the total amount of collagen synthesized by high potassium or control cultures. There is, however, a slight increase in the proportion of collagen that is secreted into the medium by chondrocytes in high potassium. Synthesis of the predominant cartilage matrix molecules is not sufficient in itself to ensure that these molecules will be assembled into a hyaline matrix. PMID:4279924

  19. 21 CFR 582.7610 - Potassium alginate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Potassium alginate. 582.7610 Section 582.7610 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Potassium alginate. (a) Product. Potassium alginate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  20. 21 CFR 582.1613 - Potassium bicarbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Potassium bicarbonate. 582.1613 Section 582.1613 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1613 Potassium bicarbonate. (a) Product. Potassium bicarbonate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  1. 21 CFR 184.1613 - Potassium bicarbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Potassium bicarbonate. 184.1613 Section 184.1613... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1613 Potassium bicarbonate. (a) Potassium bicarbonate (KHCO3, CAS Reg. No. 298-14-6) is made by the following processes: (1) By treating a solution of...

  2. 21 CFR 172.730 - Potassium bromate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Potassium bromate. 172.730 Section 172.730 Food and... Specific Usage Additives § 172.730 Potassium bromate. The food additive potassium bromate may be safely... malt from the treatment does not exceed 75 parts per million of bromate (calculated as Br), and the...

  3. Thanatochemistry: Study of vitreous humor potassium | Tumram ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study has been carried out to determine the death interval from the biochemical parameter of vitreous potassium. In 308 medicolegal cases vitreous humor was taken and analyzed for potassium with known time of death. There was a linear rise in potassium concentration with increasing death interval. Regression ...

  4. High-throughput identification of bacteria and yeast by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry in conventional medical microbiology laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Veen, S Q; Claas, E C J; Kuijper, Ed J

    2010-03-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is suitable for high-throughput and rapid diagnostics at low costs and can be considered an alternative for conventional biochemical and molecular identification systems in a conventional microbiological laboratory. First, we evaluated MALDI-TOF MS using 327 clinical isolates previously cultured from patient materials and identified by conventional techniques (Vitek-II, API, and biochemical tests). Discrepancies were analyzed by molecular analysis of the 16S genes. Of 327 isolates, 95.1% were identified correctly to genus level, and 85.6% were identified to species level by MALDI-TOF MS. Second, we performed a prospective validation study, including 980 clinical isolates of bacteria and yeasts. Overall performance of MALDI-TOF MS was significantly better than conventional biochemical systems for correct species identification (92.2% and 83.1%, respectively) and produced fewer incorrect genus identifications (0.1% and 1.6%, respectively). Correct species identification by MALDI-TOF MS was observed in 97.7% of Enterobacteriaceae, 92% of nonfermentative Gram-negative bacteria, 94.3% of staphylococci, 84.8% of streptococci, 84% of a miscellaneous group (mainly Haemophilus, Actinobacillus, Cardiobacterium, Eikenella, and Kingella [HACEK]), and 85.2% of yeasts. MALDI-TOF MS had significantly better performance than conventional methods for species identification of staphylococci and genus identification of bacteria belonging to HACEK group. Misidentifications by MALDI-TOF MS were clearly associated with an absence of sufficient spectra from suitable reference strains in the MALDI-TOF MS database. We conclude that MALDI-TOF MS can be implemented easily for routine identification of bacteria (except for pneumococci and viridans streptococci) and yeasts in a medical microbiological laboratory.

  5. Assay of labile estrogen o-quinones, potent carcinogenic molecular species, by high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry with phenazine derivatization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Kouwa; Masuda, Akina; Hoshino, Yuka; Komatsu, Sachiko; Numazawa, Mitsuteru

    2010-04-01

    A sensitive and selective assay method for labile estrogen o-quinones, estrone (E(1))-2,3-quinone (Q), E(1)-3,4-Q, estradiol (E(2))-2,3-Q and E(2)-3,4-Q, based on the use of phenazine (Phz) derivatization with o-phenylenediamine and high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS) was described. The Phz derivatives of four estrogen o-quinones were purified by solid phase extraction and analyzed by HPLC-ESI-MS/MS. The protonated molecule was observed as a base peak for all Phz derivatives in their ESI-mass spectra (positive mode). In multiple reaction monitoring, the transition from [M+H]+ to m/z 231 was chosen for quantification. Calibration curves for the o-quinones were obtained using standard catechol estrogens after sodium metaperiodate treatment and Phz derivatization. Using this method, these four estrogen o-quinones were analyzed with the limit of quantification of 5 ng/ml in acetonitrile (MeCN)-blank matrix (1:4, v/v), respectively, on a basis of the weight of catechol estrogens. Assay accuracy and precision for four estrogen o-quinones were 89.6-113.0% and 3.1-12.6% (5, 125 and 2000 ng/ml in MeCN-blank matrix). Applications of this method enabled to determine the catalytic activities on hydroxylation and subsequent oxidation of E(1) and E(2) of Mushroom tyrosinase and rat liver microsomal fraction. It was confirmed by this method that tyrosinase exhibited 2- and 4-hydroxylation and further oxidation activities for catechols in the ring-A of estrogens. Whereas rat liver microsomal fraction possessed only 2- and 4-hydroxylation activities, and further oxidation activity for catechol estrogens was low. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Fuel cell with ionization membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Frank T. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A fuel cell is disclosed comprising an ionization membrane having at least one area through which gas is passed, and which ionizes the gas passing therethrough, and a cathode for receiving the ions generated by the ionization membrane. The ionization membrane may include one or more openings in the membrane with electrodes that are located closer than a mean free path of molecules within the gas to be ionized. Methods of manufacture are also provided.

  7. Screening of additives in plastics with high resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry and different ionization sources: direct probe injection (DIP)-APCI, LC-APCI, and LC-ion booster ESI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballesteros-Gómez, Ana; Jonkers, Tim; Covaci, Adrian; de Boer, Jacob

    2016-04-01

    Plastics are complex mixtures consisting of a polymer and additives with different physico-chemical properties. We developed a broad screening method to elucidate the nature of compounds present in plastics used in electrical/electronic equipment commonly found at homes (e.g., electrical adaptors, computer casings, heaters). The analysis was done by (a) solvent extraction followed by liquid chromatography coupled to high accuracy/resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS) with different ionization sources or (b) direct analysis of the solid by ambient mass spectrometry high accuracy/resolution TOFMS. The different ionization methods showed different selectivity and sensitivity for the different compound classes and were complementary. A variety of antioxidants, phthalates, UV filters, and flame retardants were found in most samples. Furthermore, some recently reported impurities or degradation products derived from flame retardants were identified, such as hydroxylated triphenyl phosphate and tetrabromobisphenol A monoglycidyl ether.

  8. Terawatt Post compression of high energy fs pulses using ionization: A way to overcome the conventional limitation in energy of few optical cycle pulses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Descamps D.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available By using optical-field-ionization of helium we postcompress 50 fs pulses to 8 fs with a pulse energy of 8,7 mJ. Hence few cycle pulses were obtained with TW peak power and a good shot-to-shot stability.

  9. State-selective electron transfer and ionization in collisions of highly charged ions with ground-state Na(3s) and laser-excited Na*(3p)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blank, I.; Otranto, S.; Meinema, C.; Olson, R. E.; Hoekstra, R.

    2012-01-01

    Single electron transfer and ionization in collisions of N5+ and Ne8+ with ground state Na(3s) and laser excited Na*(3p) are investigated both experimentally and theoretically at collision energies from 1 to 10 keV/amu, which includes the classical orbital velocity of the valence electron.

  10. Potassium channel family in giant motor axons of Aglantha digitale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meech, R W; Mackie, G O

    1993-03-01

    1. The simplicity of the jellyfish nervous system makes it an ideal preparation to assess the contributions of different ion channels to behavior. In the giant motor axons of the jellyfish Aglantha digitale, low-threshold spikes elicit slow swimming, whereas escape swimming depends on a higher-threshold, overshooting sodium-dependent action potential. At least three kinetically distinct transient potassium channels (fast, intermediate, and slow) are concerned with spike management in this preparation. 2. In situ recording with patch-clamp micropipettes from clusters of potassium channels provides a means of studying their properties in isolation. The three classes of ion channel were identified in ensemble current averages by their kinetics, their response to a conditioning prepulse and their voltage dependence. All three were highly selective for potassium, and the reversal potential of their unitary currents depended on the level of potassium used to fill the patch pipette. 3. A single potassium permeability coefficient (PK) calculated from the Goldman, Hodgkin, Katz "constant field" equation was used to fit unitary current data from all three channels in concentrations of external potassium < or = 500 mM. 4. Data from ensemble tail currents in seawater indicated that the sodium permeability coefficient (PNa) of channels with either intermediate or slow kinetics was < or = 0.015 PK; preliminary data from channels with fast kinetics suggested that they too had a PNa/PK selectivity of approximately 0.01. 5. We propose that spike management in the giant motor axons of Aglantha depends on three members of a family of potassium-selective ion channels that seem likely to be structurally related.

  11. Identification of intact high molecular weight glutenin subunits from the wheat proteome using combined liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bert Lagrain

    Full Text Available The present paper describes a method for the identification of intact high molecular weight glutenin subunits (HMW-GS, the quality determining proteins from the wheat storage proteome. The method includes isolation of HMW-GS from wheat flour, further separation of HMW-GS by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC, and their subsequent molecular identification with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry using a quadrupole-time-of-flight mass analyzer. For HMW-GS isolation, wheat proteins were reduced and extracted from flour with 50% 1-propanol containing 1% dithiothreitol. HMW-GS were then selectively precipitated from the protein mixture by adjusting the 1-propanol concentration to 60%. The composition of the precipitated proteins was first evaluated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with Coomassie staining and RP-HPLC with ultraviolet detection. Besides HMW-GS (≥65%, the isolated proteins mainly contained ω5-gliadins. Secondly, the isolated protein fraction was analyzed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Optimal chromatographic separation of HMW-GS from the other proteins in the isolated fraction was obtained when the mobile phase contained 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid as ion-pairing agent. Individual HMW-GS were then identified by determining their molecular masses from the high-resolution mass spectra and comparing these with theoretical masses calculated from amino acid sequences. Using formic acid instead of trifluoroacetic acid in the mobile phase increased protein peak intensities in the base peak mass chromatogram. This allowed the detection of even traces of other wheat proteins than HMW-GS in the isolated fraction, but the chromatographic separation was inferior with a major overlap between the elution ranges of HMW-GS and ω-gliadins. Overall, the described method allows a rapid assessment of wheat quality through the direct determination of the HMW-GS composition and

  12. Influence of potassium loading at different reaction temperatures on the NOx reduction process by potassium-containing coal pellets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agustin Bueno-Lopez; Avelina Garcia-Garcia; Jose Antonio Caballero; A. Linares-Solano [Universidad de Alicante, Alicante (Spain). Departamento de Quimica Inorganica

    2003-02-01

    The activity of potassium-containing coal pellets and the corresponding free-metal char for NOx reduction in an oxygen-rich environment has been investigated by temperature-programmed reactions (TPRs) up to 750{sup o}C, 2 h isothermal reactions in the range of 250 475{sup o}C and lifetime tests, (until the samples were completely consumed), for selected samples and temperatures. An interesting 'reactivity window', where NOx reduction is observed, but carbon conversion is negligible, was found from TPRs experiment for a high potassium content sample, at moderate temperatures. This interval was not observed for the char. The catalytic effect of potassium is more dramatic at high temperatures, therefore, metal loading and reaction temperature are very much interrelated. Lifetime tests provide a very valuable information (average selectivity, profitable use of samples for NOx reduction, etc.), allowing us to check the whole efficiency of the samples. The progressive addition of potassium to the pellets makes samples more effective in terms of: (i) capacity to reduce higher NOx amounts; (ii) maximum NOx conversion values and (iii) higher values of average selectivity. In general, the samples studied, exhibit a maximum temperature, very much dependent on their potassium contents, that must not be exceeded with a view to practical applications. 24 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Urinary potassium to urinary potassium plus sodium ratio can accurately identify hypovolemia in nephrotic syndrome: a provisional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenswijk, Werner; Ilias, Mohamad Ikram; Raes, Ann; Donckerwolcke, Raymond; Walle, Johan Vande

    2018-01-01

    There is evidence pointing to a decrease of the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in a subgroup of nephrotic children, likely secondary to hypovolemia. The aim of this study is to validate the use of urinary potassium to the sum of potassium plus sodium ratio (UK/UK+UNa) as an indicator of hypovolemia in nephrotic syndrome, enabling detection of those patients who will benefit from albumin infusion. We prospectively studied 44 nephrotic children and compared different parameters to a control group (36 children). Renal perfusion and glomerular permeability were assessed by measuring clearance of para-aminohippurate and inulin. Vaso-active hormones and urinary sodium and potassium were also measured. Subjects were grouped into low, normal, and high GFR groups. In the low GFR group, significantly lower renal plasma flow (p = 0.01), filtration fraction (p = 0.01), and higher UK/UK+UNa (p = 0.03) ratio were noted. In addition, non-significant higher plasma renin activity (p = 0.11) and aldosteron (p = 0.09) were also seen in the low GFR group. A subgroup of patients in nephrotic syndrome has a decrease in glomerular filtration, apparently related to hypovolemia which likely can be detected by a urinary potassium to potassium plus sodium ratio > 0.5-0.6 suggesting benefit of albumin infusion in this subgroup. What is Known: • Volume status can be difficult to assess based on clinical parameters in nephrotic syndrome, and albumin infusion can be associated with development of pulmonary edema and fluid overload in these patients. What is New: • Urinary potassium to the sum of urinary potassium plus sodium ratio can accurately detect hypovolemia in nephrotic syndrome and thus identify those children who would probably respond to albumin infusion.

  14. DNA damage response proteins and oxygen modulate prostaglandin E2 growth factor release in response to low and high LET ionizing radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher P. Allen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Common cancer therapies employ chemicals or radiation that damage DNA. Cancer and normal cells respond to DNA damage by activating complex networks of DNA damage sensor, signal transducer, and effector proteins that arrest cell cycle progression, and repair damaged DNA. If damage is severe enough, the DNA damage response (DDR triggers programmed cell death by apoptosis or other pathways. Caspase 3 is a protease that is activated upon damage and triggers apoptosis, and production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, a potent growth factor that can enhance growth of surviving cancer cells leading to accelerated tumor repopulation. Thus, dying tumor cells can promote growth of surviving tumor cells, a pathway aptly named Phoenix Rising. In the present study we surveyed Phoenix Rising responses in a variety of normal and established cancer cell lines, and in cancer cell lines freshly derived from patients. We demonstrate that IR induces a Phoenix Rising response in many, but not all cell lines, and that PGE2 production generally correlates with enhanced growth of cells that survive irradiation, and of unirradiated cells co-cultured with irradiated cells. We show that PGE2 production is stimulated by low and high LET ionizing radiation, and can be enhanced or suppressed by inhibitors of key DNA damage response proteins. PGE2 is produced downstream of Caspase 3 and the cyclooxygenases COX1 and COX2, and we show that the pan COX1-2 inhibitor indomethacin blocks IR-induced PGE2 production in the presence or absence of DDR inhibitors. COX1-2 require oxygen for catalytic activity, and we further show that PGE2 production is markedly suppressed in cells cultured under low (1% oxygen concentration. Thus, Phoenix Rising is most likely to cause repopulation of tumors with relatively high oxygen, but not in hypoxic tumors. This survey lays a foundation for future studies to further define tumor responses to radiation and inhibitors of the DDR and Phoenix Rising to

  15. Beam cooling with ionization losses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubbia, C. [INFN, Sezione di Pavia (Italy) and CERN AB Department, Geneva (Switzerland)]. E-mail: Carlo.Rubbia@cern.ch; Ferrari, A. [CERN AB Department, Geneva (Switzerland); Kadi, Y. [CERN AB Department, Geneva (Switzerland); Vlachoudis, V. [CERN AB Department, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2006-12-01

    This novel type of Ionization Cooling is an effective method in order to enhance the (strong) interaction probability of slow (few MeV/A) ions stored in a small ring. The many traversals through a thin target strongly improve the nuclear reaction rate with respect to a single-pass collision, in a steady configuration in which ionization losses of a target 'foil' (typically few hundred {mu}g/cm{sup 2} thick) are continuously recovered by an RF-cavity. With a flat foil, betatron oscillations are 'cooled', but the momentum spread diverges exponentially, since faster (slower) particles ionize less (more) than the average. In order to 'cool' the beam also longitudinally, a chromaticity has to be introduced with a wedge-shaped 'foil'. Therefore, in equilibrium conditions, multiple scattering and straggling are both balanced by phase-space compression. Classic Ionization Cooling [A.A. Kolomensky, Atomnaya Energiya 19 (1965) 534; Yu.M. Ado, V.I. Balbekov, Atomnaya Energiya 31(1) (1971) 40-44; A.N. Skrinsky, V.V. Parkhomchuk, Sov. J. Nucl. Phys. 12 (1981) 3; E.A. Perevendentsev, A.N. Skrinsky, in: Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on High Energy Acceleration, 1983, p. 485] is designed to cool the direct beam until it has been compressed and extracted for further use. In practice, this limits its applicability to non-interacting muon beams. Instead, in this new method, applicable to strongly interacting collisions, the circulating beam is not extracted. Ionization cooling provides 'in situ' storage of the beam until it is converted by a nuclear interaction with the target. Simple reactions-for instance {sup 7}Li+D->{sup 8}Li+p-are more favourably produced in the 'mirror' kinematical frame, namely with a heavier ion colliding against a gas-jet D{sub 2} target. Kinematics is generally very favourable, with angles in a narrow angular cone (around {approx}10{sup o} for the mentioned reaction) and with a

  16. Ambient ionization mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedev, A. T.

    2015-07-01

    Ambient ionization mass spectrometry emerged as a new scientific discipline only about ten years ago. A considerable body of information has been reported since that time. Keeping the sensitivity, performance and informativity of classical mass spectrometry methods, the new approach made it possible to eliminate laborious sample preparation procedures and triggered the development of miniaturized instruments to work directly in the field. The review concerns the theoretical foundations and design of ambient ionization methods. Their advantages and drawbacks, as well as prospects for application in chemistry, biology, medicine, environmetal analysis, etc., are discussed. The bibliography includes 194 references.

  17. Hierarchically porous nitrogen-doped carbon derived from the activation of agriculture waste by potassium hydroxide and urea for high-performance supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Kaixiang; Deng, Yuanfu; Chen, Juping; Qian, Yunqian; Yang, Yuewang; Li, Yingwei; Chen, Guohua

    2018-02-01

    Nitrogen-doped carbon with an ultra-high specific surface area and a hierarchically interconnected porous structure is synthesized in large scale from a green route, that is, the activation of bagasse via a one-step method using KOH and urea. KOH and urea play a synergistic effect for the enhancement of the specific surface area and the modification of pore size of the as-prepared material. Benefiting from the multiple synergistic roles originated from an ultra-high specific area (2905.4 m2 g-1), a high porous volume (2.05 mL g-1 with 75.6 vol% micropores, which is an ideal proportion of micropores for obtaining high specific capacitance), a suitable nitrogen content (2.63 wt%), and partial graphitization, the hierarchically interconnected porous N-doped carbon exhibits an excellent electrochemical performance with a high specific capacitance (350.8, 301.9, and 259.5 F g-1 at 1.0 A g-1 in acidic, alkaline, and neutral electrolytes, respectively), superior rate capability and excellent cycling stability (almost no capacitance loss up to 5000 cycles). Furthermore, the symmetric device assembled by this material achieves high energy densities of 39.1 and 23.5 Wh kg-1 at power densities of 1.0 and 20 kW kg-1, respectively, and exhibits an excellent long-term cycling stability (with capacitance retention above 95.0% after 10 000 cycles).

  18. Effects of potassium on kesterite solar cells: Similarities, differences and synergies with sodium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. G. Haass

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Addition of alkali dopants is essential for achieving high-efficiency conversion efficiency of thin film solar cells based on chalcogenide semiconductors like Cu(In,GaSe2 (CIGS and Cu2ZnSn(S,Se4 (CZTSSe also called kesterite. Whereas the treatment with potassium allows boosting the performance of CIGS solar cells as compared to the conventional sodium doping, it is debated if similar effects can be expected for kesterite solar cells. Here the influence of potassium is investigated by introducing the dopant during the solution processing of kesterite absorbers. It is confirmed that the presence of potassium leads to an enhanced grain growth and a ten-fold lower potassium concentration is sufficient for obtaining grain size similar to sodium-containing absorbers. Potassium is located predominantly at grain boundaries and it suppresses incorporation of sodium into the absorber layer. The potassium doping increases the apparent carrier concentration to ∼2×1016 cm-3 for a potassium concentration of 0.2 at%. The potassium-doped solar cells yield conversion efficiency close to 10%, on par with only sodium-doped samples. Co-doping with potassium and sodium has not revealed any beneficial synergetic effects and it is concluded that both dopants exhibit similar effects on the kesterite solar cell performance.

  19. The importance of potassium in resistance to crown rot disease in alfalfa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitrogen, phosphate, and potassium (potash, K2O) are the three most important nutrients in alfalfa growth and development. Nitrogen fertilization is not required because alfalfa has a high rate of biological nitrogen fixation. Phosphorus and potassium are frequently applied as fertilizer, but potass...

  20. Hydrocyanation of sulfonylimines using potassium hexacyanoferrate(II) as an eco-friendly cyanide source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zheng; Li, Rongzhi; Zheng, Huanhuan; Wen, Fei; Li, Hongbo; Yin, Junjun; Yang, Jingya, E-mail: lizheng@nwnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Eco-Environment-Related Polymer Materials for Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Gansu (China)

    2013-11-15

    An efficient and eco-friendly method for hydrocyanation of sulfonylimines via one-pot two-step procedure using potassium hexacyanoferrate)II) as cyanide source, benzoyl chloride as a promoter, and potassium carbonate as a base is described. This protocol has the features of using nontoxic, nonvolatile and inexpensive cyanide source, high yield, and simple work-up procedure. (author)

  1. Data on electrical properties of nickel modified potassium polytitanates compacted powders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.G. Goffman

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Potassium polytitanates are new promising type of ferroelectric ceramic materials with high ionic conductivity, highly polarizable structure and extremely high permittivity. Its structure is formed by [TiO6] octahedral units to layers with mobile potassium and hydroxonium ions in-between. The treatment in solutions containing nickel ions allows forming heterostructured materials which consist of potassium polytitanate particles intercalated by Ni2+ ions and/or decorated by nickel oxides NiOx. This modification route is fully dependant on solution pH, i.e. in acidic solutions the intercalation process prevails, in alkaline solutions potassium polytitanate is mostly decorated by the oxides. Therefore, electronic structure and electrical properties can be regulated depending on modification conditions, pH and ions concentration. Here we report the data on electric properties of potassium titanate modified in nickel sulfate solutions at different pH.

  2. Determination of gardenia yellow colorants in soft drink, pastry, instant noodles with ultrasound-assisted extraction by high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei-E; Zhang, Yuan; Li, Yang; Ling, Yun; Li, Hong-Na; Li, Shao-Hui; Jiang, Shou-Jun; Ren, Zhi-Qin; Huang, Zhi-Qiang; Zhang, Feng

    2016-05-13

    A novel, rapid and simple analytical method was developed for the quantitative determination of crocin, crocetin and geniposide in soft drink, pastry and instant noodles. The solid samples were relatively homogenized into powders and fragments. The gardenia yellow colorants were successively extracted with methanol using ultrasound-assisted extraction. The analytes were quantitatively measured in the extracts by liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. High correlation coefficients (r(2)>0.995) of crocin, crocetin and geniposide were obtained within their linear ranges respectively (50-1000ng/mL, 50-1000ng/mL, 15-240ng/mL) by external standard method. The limits of detection (LODs) were 0.02μg/g for crocin, 0.01μg/g for crocetin and 0.002μg/g for geniposide. And the limits of quantitation (LOQs) were in the ranges of 0.05-0.45μg/g for crocin, and in the ranges of 0.042-0.32μg/g for crocetin, and in the ranges of 0.02-0.15μg/g for geniposide in soft drink, pastry and instant noodles samples. The average recoveries of crocin, crocetin and geniposide ranged from 81.3% to 117.6% in soft drink, pastry and instant noodles. The intra- and inter-day precisions were respectively in the range of 1.3-4.8% and 1.7-11.8% in soft drink, pastry and instant noodle. The developed methods were successfully validated and applied to the soft drink, pastry, and instant noodles collected from the located market in Beijing from China. Crocin, crocetin and geniposide were detected in the collected samples. The average concentrations ranged from 0.84 to 4.20mg/g for crocin, and from 0.62 to 3.11mg/g for crocetin, and from 0.18 to 0.79mg/g for gardenia in various food samples. The method can provide evidences for government to determine gardenia yellow pigments and geniposide in food. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Accurate Mass Fragment Library for Rapid Analysis of Pesticides on Produce Using Ambient Pressure Desorption Ionization with High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Sara E.; Lin, Lora A.; Fricke, Frederick L.

    2014-08-01

    U.S. food imports have been increasing steadily for decades, intensifying the need for a rapid and sensitive screening technique. A method has been developed that uses foam disks to sample the surface of incoming produce. This work provides complimentary information to the extensive amount of published pesticide fragmentation data collected using LCMS systems (Sack et al. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 59, 6383-6411, 2011; Mol et al. Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, 403, 2891-2908, 2012). The disks are directly analyzed using transmission-mode direct analysis in real time (DART) ambient pressure desorption ionization coupled to a high resolution accurate mass-mass spectrometer (HRAM-MS). In order to provide more certainty in the identification of the pesticides detected, a library of accurate mass fragments and isotopes of the protonated parent molecular ion (the [M+H]+) has been developed. The HRAM-MS is equipped with a quadrupole mass filter, providing the capability of "data-dependent" fragmentation, as opposed to "all -ion" fragmentation (where all of the ions enter a collision chamber and are fragmented at once). A temperature gradient for the DART helium stream and multiple collision energies were employed to detect and fragment 164 pesticides of varying chemical classes, sizes, and polarities. The accurate mass information of precursor ([M+H]+ ion) and fragment ions is essential in correctly identifying chemical contaminants on the surface of imported produce. Additionally, the inclusion of isotopes of the [M+H]+ in the database adds another metric to the confirmation process. The fragmentation data were collected using a Q-Exactive mass spectrometer and were added to a database used to process data collected with an Exactive mass spectrometer, an instrument that is more readily available for this screening application. The commodities investigated range from smooth-skinned produce such as apples to rougher surfaces like broccoli. The

  4. The inhibitory effects of potassium chloride versus potassium silicate application on (137)Cs uptake by rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimura, Shigeto; Yoshioka, Kunio; Ota, Takeshi; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Sato, Makoto; Satou, Mutsuto

    2016-03-01

    After the accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant owned by the Tokyo Electric Power Company on 11 March 2011, potassium fertilizer was applied to agricultural fields in the southern Tohoku and northern Kanto regions of Japan to reduce the uptake of radiocesium by crops. In this study, we examined the effects of two types of potassium fertilizers, potassium chloride (a readily available potassium fertilizer) and potassium silicate (a slow-release potassium fertilizer), as well as a split application of potassium, on the accumulation of (137)Cs by rice plants in two pot experiments. The (137)Cs concentrations in the brown rice and in the above-ground plants were significantly lower after potassium chloride application than after potassium silicate application. The potassium ion (K(+)) concentrations in soil solutions sampled 9 and 21 d after transplanting were significantly higher for the potassium chloride application than for the potassium silicate application. The K(+) concentrations in soil solutions observed in the application of potassium silicate were similar to those in the treatment when no potassium was applied. This finding indicates that the application of potassium silicate did not sufficiently increase the available K(+) for rice plants in the soil, which led to a greater uptake of (137)Cs after the potassium silicate application than after the application of potassium chloride. The (137)Cs concentration in brown rice was higher in the split application of potassium fertilizer with the second application at the full heading stage than that without split application and the split application with the second application before heading. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. High-Resolution Height-Profile Analysis and Laser-Ionization Characterization of a Wide Range of Fullerenes in Laminar Diffusion Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegmann, K.; Hepp, H.; Sattler, K.

    Neutral fullerenes are detected online in laminar, atmospheric pressure methane diffusion flames using time-of-flight mass spectrometry combined with laser ionization. The intensity of the C60 signal shows a quadratic dependence of the laser-pulse energy, which is consistent with two-photon ionization. Poly-cyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are also found in these flames. Height profiles of fullerenes are compared with height profiles of PAH and it is found that the concentration of fullerenes most strongly at a height where the concentration of PAH decreases the most. This height in the flame probably marks the burnout of the available hydrogen. Since all fullerenes, independent of their number of carbons, peak at the same height above burner, we conclude that fullerenes in flames do not grow by the addition of small molecules.

  6. Potassium Intake, Bioavailability, Hypertension, and Glucose Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S. Stone

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Potassium is an essential nutrient. It is the most abundant cation in intracellular fluid where it plays a key role in maintaining cell function. The gradient of potassium across the cell membrane determines cellular membrane potential, which is maintained in large part by the ubiquitous ion channel the sodium-potassium (Na+-K+ ATPase pump. Approximately 90% of potassium consumed (60–100 mEq is lost in the urine, with the other 10% excreted in the stool, and a very small amount lost in sweat. Little is known about the bioavailability of potassium, especially from dietary sources. Less is understood on how bioavailability may affect health outcomes. Hypertension (HTN is the leading cause of cardiovascular disease (CVD and a major financial burden ($50.6 billion to the US public health system, and has a significant impact on all-cause morbidity and mortality worldwide. The relationship between increased potassium supplementation and a decrease in HTN is relatively well understood, but the effect of increased potassium intake from dietary sources on blood pressure overall is less clear. In addition, treatment options for hypertensive individuals (e.g., thiazide diuretics may further compound chronic disease risk via impairments in potassium utilization and glucose control. Understanding potassium bioavailability from various sources may help to reveal how specific compounds and tissues influence potassium movement, and further the understanding of its role in health.

  7. Evaluation of the potassium adsorption capacity of a potassium adsorption filter during rapid blood transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, H; Akatsuka, Y; Muramatsu, C; Isogai, S; Sugiura, Y; Arakawa, S; Murayama, M; Kurahashi, M; Takasuga, H; Oshige, T; Yuba, T; Mizuta, S; Emi, N

    2015-05-01

    The concentration of extracellular potassium in red blood cell concentrates (RCCs) increases during storage, leading to risk of hyperkalemia. A potassium adsorption filter (PAF) can eliminate the potassium at normal blood transfusion. This study aimed to investigate the potassium adsorption capacity of a PAF during rapid blood transfusion. We tested several different potassium concentrations under a rapid transfusion condition using a pressure bag. The adsorption rates of the 70-mEq/l model were 76·8%. The PAF showed good potassium adsorption capacity, suggesting that this filter may provide a convenient method to prevent hyperkalemia during rapid blood transfusion. © 2015 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  8. Space Flight Ionizing Radiation Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, Steve

    2017-01-01

    The space-flight ionizing radiation (IR) environment is dominated by very high-kinetic energy-charged particles with relatively smaller contributions from X-rays and gamma rays. The Earth's surface IR environment is not dominated by the natural radioisotope decay processes. Dr. Steven Koontz's lecture will provide a solid foundation in the basic engineering physics of space radiation environments, beginning with the space radiation environment on the International Space Station and moving outward through the Van Allen belts to cislunar space. The benefits and limitations of radiation shielding materials will also be summarized.

  9. XUV ionization of aligned molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelkensberg, F.; Siu, W.; Gademann, G. [FOM Institute AMOLF, Science Park 104, NL-1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rouzee, A.; Vrakking, M. J. J. [FOM Institute AMOLF, Science Park 104, NL-1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born Strasse 2A, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Johnsson, P. [FOM Institute AMOLF, Science Park 104, NL-1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Physics, Lund University, Post Office Box 118, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Lucchini, M. [Department of Physics, Politecnico di Milano, Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie CNR-IFN, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Lucchese, R. R. [Department of Chemistry, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843-3255 (United States)

    2011-11-15

    New extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) light sources such as high-order-harmonic generation (HHG) and free-electron lasers (FELs), combined with laser-induced alignment techniques, enable novel methods for making molecular movies based on measuring molecular frame photoelectron angular distributions. Experiments are presented where CO{sub 2} molecules were impulsively aligned using a near-infrared laser and ionized using femtosecond XUV pulses obtained by HHG. Measured electron angular distributions reveal contributions from four orbitals and the onset of the influence of the molecular structure.

  10. The crustacean gill (Na+,K+)-ATPase: allosteric modulation of high- and low-affinity ATP-binding sites by sodium and potassium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masui, D C; Silva, E C C; Mantelatto, F L M; McNamara, J C; Barrabin, H; Scofano, H M; Fontes, C F L; Furriel, R P M; Leone, F A

    2008-11-15

    The blue crab, Callinectes danae, tolerates exposure to a wide salinity range employing mechanisms of compensatory ion uptake when in dilute media. Although the gill (Na+,K+)-ATPase is vital to hyperosmoregulatory ability, the interactions occurring at the sites of ATP binding on the molecule itself are unknown. Here, we investigate the modulation by Na+ and K+ of homotropic interactions between the ATP-binding sites, and of phosphoenzyme formation of the (Na+,K+)-ATPase from the posterior gills of this euryhaline crab. The contribution of the high- and low-affinity ATP-binding sites to maximum velocity was similar for both Na+ and K+. However, in contrast to Na+, a threshold K+ concentration triggers the appearance of the high-affinity binding sites, displacing the saturation curve to lower ATP concentrations.Further, a low-affinity site for phosphorylation is present on the enzyme. These findings reveal notable differences in the catalytic mechanism of the crustacean (Na+,K+)-ATPase compared to the vertebrate enzyme.

  11. Extractahility of Potassium from Some Organic Manures in Aqueous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fig l: (imitative Pl\\1mctittn of Native it” from Marlin: Sanples. The usually high solubility and mobility of potassium in aqueous solution is a useful property in its release phenomenon with respect to fertilizer application in crop production, but which could also be a disadvantage since its effect may be short-lived. l'lowever, it is ...

  12. Transmission spectra study of sulfate substituted potassium dihydrogen phosphate

    KAUST Repository

    LI, LIANG

    2013-04-18

    Potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystals with different amounts of sulfate concentration were grown and the transmittance spectrum was studied. A crystal with high sulfate replacement density exhibits heavy absorption property in the ultraviolet region which confirms and agrees well with former results. © 2013 Astro Ltd.

  13. Effect of nitrogen and potassium fertilization on morpho-agronomic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Elephant grass has been proposed for the energy sector as a possible source of renewable energy, because of its high biomass production. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the mineral nutrients nitrogen and potassium on the morpho-agronomic traits (dry mater yield (DMY), percentage of DM (%DM), ...

  14. Yield response of soybeans to levels of nitrogen and potassium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A field trail was conducted at the University of Uyo Teaching and Research Farm in a high rainfall area of South eastern Nigeria to assess the yield response soybeans [ Glycine max (L.) Merrill ] to different levels of nitrogen and potassium fertilizers. The results showed that the number of pods/ plant, threshing percentage ...

  15. Research and development of a gaseous detector PIM (parallel ionization multiplier) dedicated to particle tracking under high hadron rates; Recherche et developpement d'un detecteur gazeux PIM (Parallel Ionization Multiplier) pour la trajectographie de particules sous un haut flux de hadrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beucher, J

    2007-10-15

    PIM (Parallel Ionization Multiplier) is a multi-stage micro-pattern gaseous detector using micro-meshes technology. This new device, based on Micromegas (micro-mesh gaseous structure) detector principle of operation, offers good characteristics for minimum ionizing particles track detection. However, this kind of detectors placed in hadron environment suffers discharges which degrade sensibly the detection efficiency and account for hazard to the front-end electronics. In order to minimize these strong events, it is convenient to perform charges multiplication by several successive steps. Within the framework of a European hadron physics project we have investigated the multi-stage PIM detector for high hadrons flux application. For this part of research and development, a systematic study for many geometrical configurations of a two amplification stages separated with a transfer space operated with the gaseous mixture Ne + 10% CO{sub 2} has been performed. Beam tests realised with high energy hadrons at CERN facility have given that discharges probability could be strongly reduced with a suitable PIM device. A discharges rate lower to 10{sup 9} by incident hadron and a spatial resolution of 51 {mu}m have been measured at the beginning efficiency plateau (>96 %) operating point. (author)

  16. Potassium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Don't Work Out Alone - Fitness Peer Support Breaking Down Barriers to Fitness Overcoming a Fitness Plateau Celebrating Your Fitness Success Step It Up - Tips to Pump Up Your Workout Walking Walking ...

  17. Potassium bromate treatment predominantly causes large deletions, but not GC > TA transversion in human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luan, Yang [Div. of Cellular and Gene Therapy Products, National Inst. of Health Sciences, 1-18-1 Kamiyoga, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 158-8501 (Japan)]|[Div. of Genetics and Mutagenesis, National Inst. of Health Sciences, 1-18-1 Kamiyoga, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 158-8501 (Japan)]|[Center for Drug Safety Evaluation, Shanghai Inst. of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 294 Tai-Yuan Road, Shanghai 200031 (China); Suzuki, Takayoshi [Div. of Cellular and Gene Therapy Products, National Inst. of Health Sciences, 1-18-1 Kamiyoga, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 158-8501 (Japan); Palanisamy, Rajaguru [Div. of Cellular and Gene Therapy Products, National Inst. of Health Sciences, 1-18-1 Kamiyoga, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 158-8501 (Japan)]|[Department of Biotechnology, School of Engineering and Technology, Bharathidasan Univ., Palkalaiperur, Tiruchirappalli 620024 (India); Takashima, Yoshio; Sakamoto, Hiroko; Sakuraba, Mayumi; Koizumi, Tomoko; Hayashi, Makoto [Div. of Genetics and Mutagenesis, National Inst. of Health Sciences, 1-18-1 Kamiyoga, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 158-8501 (Japan); Saito, Mika [Div. of Genetics and Mutagenesis, National Inst. of Health Sciences, 1-18-1 Kamiyoga, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 158-8501 (Japan)]|[Dept. of Food Science and Technology, College of Bioresource Sciences, Nihon Univ., 1866 Kameino, Fujisawa-shi, Kanagawa 252-8510 (Japan); Matsufuji, Hiroshi; Yamagata, Kazuo [Dept. of Food Science and Technology, College of Bioresource Sciences, Nihon Univ., 1866 Kameino, Fujisawa-shi, Kanagawa 252-8510 (Japan); Yamaguchi, Teruhide [Div. of Cellular and Gene Therapy Products, National Inst. of Health Sciences, 1-18-1 Kamiyoga, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 158-8501 (Japan); Honma, Masamitsu [Div. of Genetics and Mutagenesis, National Inst. of Health Sciences, 1-18-1 Kamiyoga, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 158-8501 (Japan)]. E-mail: honma@nihs.go.jp

    2007-06-01

    Potassium bromate (KBrO{sub 3}) is strongly carcinogenic in rodents and mutagenic in bacteria and mammalian cells in vitro. The proposed genotoxic mechanism for KBrO{sub 3} is oxidative DNA damage. KBrO{sub 3} can generate high yields of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8OHdG) DNA adducts, which cause GC > TA transversions in cell-free systems. In this study, we investigated the in vitro genotoxicity of KBrO{sub 3} in human lymphoblastoid TK6 cells using the comet (COM) assay, the micronucleus (MN) test, and the thymidine kinase (TK) gene mutation assay. After a 4 h treatment, the alkaline and neutral COM assay demonstrated that KBrO{sub 3} directly yielded DNA damages including DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). KBrO{sub 3} also induced MN and TK mutations concentration-dependently. At the highest concentration (5 mM), KBrO{sub 3} induced MN and TK mutation frequencies that were over 30 times the background level. Molecular analysis revealed that 90% of the induced mutations were large deletions that involved loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at the TK locus. Ionizing-irradiation exhibited similar mutational spectrum in our system. These results indicate that the major genotoxicity of KBrO{sub 3} may be due to DSBs that lead to large deletions rather than to 8OHdG adducts that lead to GC > TA transversions, as is commonly believed. To better understand the genotoxic mechanism of KBrO{sub 3}, we analyzed gene expression profiles of TK6 cells using Affymetrix Genechip. Some genes involved in stress, apoptosis, and DNA repair were up-regulated by the treatment of KBrO{sub 3}. However, we could not observe the similarity of gene expression profile in the treatment of KBrO{sub 3} to ionizing-irradiation as well as oxidative damage inducers.

  18. Pathogenic Candida species differ in the ability to grow at limiting potassium concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hušeková, B; Elicharová, H; Sychrová, H

    2016-05-01

    A high intracellular concentration of potassium (200-300 mmol/L) is essential for many yeast cell functions, such as the regulation of cell volume and pH, maintenance of membrane potential, and enzyme activation. Thus, cells use high-affinity specific transporters and expend a lot of energy to acquire the necessary amount of potassium from their environment. In Candida genomes, genes encoding 3 types of putative potassium uptake systems were identified: Trk uniporters, Hak symporters, and Acu ATPases. Tests of the tolerance and sensitivity of C. albicans, C. dubliniensis, C. glabrata, C. krusei, C. parapsilosis, and C. tropicalis to various concentrations of potassium showed significant differences among the species, and these differences were partly dependent on external pH. The species most tolerant to potassium-limiting conditions were C. albicans and C. krusei, while C. parapsilosis tolerated the highest KCl concentrations. Also, the morphology of cells changed with the amount of potassium available, with C. krusei and C. tropicalis being the most influenced. Taken together, our results confirm potassium uptake and accumulation as important factors for Candida cell growth and suggest that the sole (and thus probably indispensable) Trk1 potassium uptake system in C. krusei and C. glabrata may serve as a target for the development of new antifungal drugs.

  19. A simple and fast method for assessment of the nitrogen-phosphorus-potassium rating of fertilizers using high-resolution continuum source atomic and molecular absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechlin, Marcos André; Fortunato, Felipe Manfroi; da Silva, Ricardo Moutinho; Ferreira, Edilene Cristina; Gomes Neto, José Anchieta

    2014-11-01

    The determination of N, P, and K in fertilizers by high-resolution continuum source flame atomic and molecular absorption spectrometry is proposed. Under optimized conditions, measurements of the diatomic molecules NO and PO at 215.360 and 247.620 nm, respectively, and K using the wing of the alternative line at 404.722 nm allowed calibration curves to be constructed in the ranges 500-5000 mg L- 1 N (r = 0.9994), 100-2000 mg L- 1 P (r = 0.9946), and 100-2500 mg L- 1 K (r = 0.9995). Commercial fertilizers were analyzed by the proposed method and the concentrations of N, P, and K were found to be in agreement with those obtained by Kjeldahl, spectrophotometric, and flame atomic emission spectrometry methods, respectively, at a 95% confidence level (paired t-test). A phosphate rock certified reference material (CRM) was analyzed and the results for P and K were in agreement with the reference values. Recoveries from spiked CRM were in the ranges 97-105% (NO3--N), 95-103% (NH4+-N), 93-103% (urea-N), 99-108% (P), and 99-102% (K). The relative standard deviations (n = 12) for N, P, and K were 6, 4, and 2%, respectively.

  20. A simple and fast method for assessment of the nitrogen–phosphorus–potassium rating of fertilizers using high-resolution continuum source atomic and molecular absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechlin, Marcos André; Fortunato, Felipe Manfroi; Moutinho da Silva, Ricardo; Ferreira, Edilene Cristina; Gomes Neto, José Anchieta, E-mail: anchieta@iq.unesp.br

    2014-11-01

    The determination of N, P, and K in fertilizers by high-resolution continuum source flame atomic and molecular absorption spectrometry is proposed. Under optimized conditions, measurements of the diatomic molecules NO and PO at 215.360 and 247.620 nm, respectively, and K using the wing of the alternative line at 404.722 nm allowed calibration curves to be constructed in the ranges 500–5000 mg L{sup −1} N (r = 0.9994), 100–2000 mg L{sup −1} P (r = 0.9946), and 100–2500 mg L{sup −1} K (r = 0.9995). Commercial fertilizers were analyzed by the proposed method and the concentrations of N, P, and K were found to be in agreement with those obtained by Kjeldahl, spectrophotometric, and flame atomic emission spectrometry methods, respectively, at a 95% confidence level (paired t-test). A phosphate rock certified reference material (CRM) was analyzed and the results for P and K were in agreement with the reference values. Recoveries from spiked CRM were in the ranges 97–105% (NO{sub 3}{sup −}-N), 95–103% (NH{sub 4}{sup +}-N), 93–103% (urea-N), 99–108% (P), and 99–102% (K). The relative standard deviations (n = 12) for N, P, and K were 6, 4, and 2%, respectively. - Highlights: • A single technique is proposed to analyze NPK fertilizer. • HR-CS FAAS is proposed for the first time for N, P and K determination in fertilizers. • The method employs the same sample preparation and dilution for the three analytes. • Addition of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} allows analysis of fertilizers with different nitrogen species. • Proposal provides advantages over traditional methods in terms of cost and time.

  1. A sodium-activated potassium channel supports high-frequency firing and reduces energetic costs during rapid modulations of action potential amplitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, Michael R; Kaczmarek, Leonard K; Zakon, Harold H

    2013-04-01

    We investigated the ionic mechanisms that allow dynamic regulation of action potential (AP) amplitude as a means of regulating energetic costs of AP signaling. Weakly electric fish generate an electric organ discharge (EOD) by summing the APs of their electric organ cells (electrocytes). Some electric fish increase AP amplitude during active periods or social interactions and decrease AP amplitude when inactive, regulated by melanocortin peptide hormones. This modulates signal amplitude and conserves energy. The gymnotiform Eigenmannia virescens generates EODs at frequencies that can exceed 500 Hz, which is energetically challenging. We examined how E. virescens meets that challenge. E. virescens electrocytes exhibit a voltage-gated Na(+) current (I(Na)) with extremely rapid recovery from inactivation (τ(recov) = 0.3 ms) allowing complete recovery of Na(+) current between APs even in fish with the highest EOD frequencies. Electrocytes also possess an inwardly rectifying K(+) current and a Na(+)-activated K(+) current (I(KNa)), the latter not yet identified in any gymnotiform species. In vitro application of melanocortins increases electrocyte AP amplitude and the magnitudes of all three currents, but increased I(KNa) is a function of enhanced Na(+) influx. Numerical simulations suggest that changing I(Na) magnitude produces corresponding changes in AP amplitude and that K(Na) channels increase AP energy efficiency (10-30% less Na(+) influx/AP) over model cells with only voltage-gated K(+) channels. These findings suggest the possibility that E. virescens reduces the energetic demands of high-frequency APs through rapidly recovering Na(+) channels and the novel use of KNa channels to maximize AP amplitude at a given Na(+) conductance.

  2. The resonant multi-pulse ionization injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomassini, Paolo; De Nicola, Sergio; Labate, Luca; Londrillo, Pasquale; Fedele, Renato; Terzani, Davide; Gizzi, Leonida A.

    2017-10-01

    The production of high-quality electron bunches in Laser Wake Field Acceleration relies on the possibility to inject ultra-low emittance bunches in the plasma wave. In this paper, we present a new bunch injection scheme in which electrons extracted by ionization are trapped by a large-amplitude plasma wave driven by a train of resonant ultrashort pulses. In the Resonant Multi-Pulse Ionization injection scheme, the main portion of a single ultrashort (e.g., Ti:Sa) laser system pulse is temporally shaped as a sequence of resonant sub-pulses, while a minor portion acts as an ionizing pulse. Simulations show that high-quality electron bunches with normalized emittance as low as 0.08 mm × mrad and 0.65% energy spread can be obtained with a single present-day 100TW-class Ti:Sa laser system.

  3. Ionizing radiation and orthopaedic prostheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimnac, Clare M.; Kurtz, Steven M.

    2005-07-01

    Ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) materials have been used successfully as one half of the bearing couple (against metallic alloys or ceramics) in total hip and total knee joint replacements for four decades. This review describes the impact of ionizing radiation (used for sterilization and for microstructural modification via crosslinking) on the performance of UHMWPE total joint replacement components. Gamma radiation sterilization in air leads to oxidative degradation of UHMWPE joint components that occurs during shelf-aging and also during in vivo use. Efforts to mitigate oxidative degradation of UHMWPE joint components include gamma radiation sterilization in inert barrier-packaging and processing treatments to reduce free radicals. Ionizing radiation (both gamma and electron-beam) has recently been used to form highly crosslinked UHMWPEs that have better adhesive and abrasive wear resistance than non-crosslinked UHMWPE, thereby potentially improving the long-term performance of total joint replacements. Along with increased wear resistance, however, there are deleterious changes to ductility and fracture resistance of UHMWPE, and an increased risk of fracture of these components remains a clinical concern.

  4. NMR Metabolomics in Ionizing Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Jian Z.; Xiao, Xiongjie; Hu, Mary Y.

    2016-09-08

    Ionizing radiation is an invisible threat that cannot be seen, touched or smelled and exist either as particles or waves. Particle radiation can take the form of alpha, beta or neutrons, as well as high energy space particle radiation such as high energy iron, carbon and proton radiation, etc. (1) Non-particle radiation includes gamma- and x-rays. Publically, there is a growing concern about the adverse health effects due to ionizing radiation mainly because of the following facts. (a) The X-ray diagnostic images are taken routinely on patients. Even though the overall dosage from a single X-ray image such as a chest X-ray scan or a CT scan, also called X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT), is low, repeated usage can cause serious health consequences, in particular with the possibility of developing cancer (2, 3). (b) Human space exploration has gone beyond moon and is planning to send human to the orbit of Mars by the mid-2030s. And a landing on Mars will follow.

  5. Influence of Plasma Environment on K-Line Emission in Highly Ionized Iron Atoms Evaluated Using a Debye-Huckel Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deprince, J.; Fritzsche, S.; Kallman, T. R.; Palmeri, P.; Quinet, P.

    2017-01-01

    The influence of plasma environment on the atomic parameters associated with the K-vacancy states has been investigated theoretically for several iron ions. To do this, a time-averaged Debye-Huckel potential for both the electron-nucleus and electron-electron interactions has been considered in the framework of relativistic multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock computations. More particularly, the plasma screening effects on ionization potentials, K-thresholds, transition energies, and radiative rates have been estimated in the astrophysical context of accretion disks around black holes. In the present paper, we describe the behavior of those atomic parameters for Ne-, Na-, Ar-, and K-like iron ions.

  6. Preparation of a Ni-MgO-Al2O3 catalyst with high activity and resistance to potassium poisoning during direct internal reforming of methane in molten carbonate fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Won-Jun; Jung, You-Shick; Shim, Jae-Oh; Roh, Hyun-Seog; Yoon, Wang Lai

    2018-02-01

    Steam reforming of methane (SRM) is conducted using a series of Ni-MgO-Al2O3 catalysts for direct internal reforming (DIR) in molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFCs). Ni-MgO-Al2O3 catalysts are prepared by the homogeneous precipitation method with a variety of MgO loading amounts ranging from 3 to 15 wt%. In addition, each precursor concentrations are systemically changed (Ni: 1.2-4.8 mol L-1; Mg: 0.3-1.2 mol L-1; Al: 0.4-1.6 mol L-1) at the optimized composition (10 wt% MgO). The effects of MgO loading and precursor concentration on the catalytic performance and resistance against poisoning of the catalyst by potassium (K) are investigated. The Ni-MgO-Al2O3 catalyst with 10 wt% MgO and the original precursor concentration (Ni: 1.2 mol L-1; Mg: 0.3 mol L-1; Al: 0.4 mol L-1) exhibits the highest CH4 conversion and resistance against K poisoning even at the extremely high gas space velocity (GHSV) of 1,512,000 h-1. Excellent SRM performance of the Ni-MgO-Al2O3 catalyst is attributed to strong metal (Ni) to alumina support interaction (SMSI) when magnesium oxide (MgO) is co-precipitated with the Ni-Al2O3. The enhanced interaction of the Ni with MgO-Al2O3 support is found to protect the active Ni species against K poisoning.

  7. Potassium loss with tissue potassium deficiency in rats during hypokinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiamis, Costas B; Kakuris, Kostas K; Deogenov, Viktor A; Yerullis, Kosmas B

    2008-04-01

    This study aims at showing the effect of hypokinesia (HK) on tissue potassium (K(+)) loss with different tissue K(+) depletion and tissue K(+) deficiency with different K(+) intake. To this end, tissue K(+) content, plasma K(+) level, and K(+) loss with and without K(+) supplements during HK were measured. Studies were conducted on male Wistar rats during a pre-experimental and an experimental period. Animals were equally divided into four groups: unsupplemented vivarium control rats (UVCR), unsupplemented hypokinetic rats (UHKR), supplemented vivarium control rats (SVCR), and supplemented hypokinetic rats (SHKR). SVCR and SHKR were supplemented daily with 2.50 mEq potassium chloride (KCl). Gastrocnemius muscle and right femur bone K(+) content reduced significantly, whereas plasma K(+) level and urine and fecal K(+) loss increased significantly in SHKR and UHKR compared with their pre-experimental values and the values in their respective vivarium controls (SVCR and UVCR). Bone and muscle K(+) content decreased more significantly, and plasma K(+) level and urine and fecal K(+) loss increased more significantly in SHKR than in UHKR. The greater tissue K(+) deficiency with higher than lower K(+) intake shows that the risk of higher tissue K(+) deficiency is directly related to K(+) intake. The higher K(+) loss with higher tissue K(+) deficiency and the lower K(+) loss with lower K(+) tissue deficiency shows that the risk of greater K(+) loss is directly related to tissue K(+) deficiency. Tissue K(+) deficiency increases more when the K(+) intake is higher and K(+) loss increases more with higher than lower tissue K(+) deficiency indicating that, during HK, tissue K(+) deficiency is due to the inability of the body to use K(+) but not to K(+) shortage in the diet.

  8. Radiolysis of Potassium Picrate in 77 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakubik, D. G.; Pak, V. Kh; Anan'ev, V. A.; Ghyngazov, S. A.

    2016-02-01

    The formation of paramagnetic centers in potassium picrate under irradiation at low temperature was investigated. The heating irradiated at 77 K potassium picrate crystal to room temperature results in paramagnetic centers - 2,6-dinitro-para-quinone radicals, ortho- and para-iminoxyl radicals and atomic oxygen. These products are formed under irradiation at room temperature.

  9. Genetics Home Reference: potassium-aggravated myotonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... eating potassium-rich foods such as bananas and potatoes. Stiffness occurs in skeletal muscles throughout the body. Potassium-aggravated myotonia ranges in severity from mild episodes of muscle stiffness to severe, disabling disease with frequent attacks. Unlike some other forms of ...

  10. Erythrocyte potassium and glutathione polymorphism determination ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research is aimed at determining the erythrocyte potassium and glutathione polymorphisms and also to identify the relationship among the various blood parameters in Saanen x Malta crossbred goat raised in Turkey. The allele gene frequencies of KH and KL associated with the potassium concentration were ...

  11. Thanatochemistry: Study of synovial fluid potassium | Tumram ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this paper is to test previously developed regression formulae for estimating death interval based on synovial fluid potassium and to assess its reliability in estimating death interval. Synovial fluid potassium was measured on a sample of 308 individuals. Death interval was regressed on synovial fluid ...

  12. CANCER RISKS ATTRIBUTABLE TO LOW DOSES OF IONIZING RADIATION - ASSESSING WHAT WE REALLY KNOW?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer Risks Attributable to Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation - What Do We Really Know?AbstractHigh doses of ionizing radiation clearly produce deleterious consequences in humans including, but not exclusively, cancer induction. At very low radiation doses the situatio...

  13. [Topology of the mitochondrial potassium ion channels].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskowski, Michał; Kulawiak, Bogusz

    In the inner mitochondrial membrane several potassium channels have been identified whose activation lead to cytoprotection during ischemic event. It was found that activation of mitochondrial large conductance calcium activated potassium channel (mitoBKCa) and ATP regulated potassium channel (mitoKATP) preserves brain and heart muscle cells against ischemia/reperfusion induced damage. However the detailed cytoprotection mechanism remains unclear. Similarly, the molecular structures and protein interactions of the mitochondrial potassium channels are still unknown. In this article, we summarize the current knowledge of the mitoKATP and mitoBKCa channels topology. Different aspects of this topic are discussed like import and assembly of the channel subunits and biophysical properties of mitochondrial compartments. Additionally, the consequences of different topology models on the cytoprotective function of the mitochondrial potassium channels were analyzed.

  14. A possible low intracellular potassium in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colt, E W; Wang, J; Stallone, F; Van Itallie, T B; Pierson, R N

    1981-03-01

    In comparison with lean marathon runners whose fat content was 15%, obese subjects with a fat content of 55% showed a 36% reduction in intracellular potassium. It is hypothesized that as much as 60% of this decrease may have been due to the lower proportion of muscle (which has the highest intracellular potassium of any tissue) in the fat free mass of very obese subjects. The remainder of the decrease seems to have been a measurement artefact owing to self-absorption of gamma rays by adipose tissue, most of which is distributed over potassium rich lean tissue. The low intracellular potassium values found in obesity should not be interpreted as necessarily signifying potassium deficiency.

  15. [Sodium, potassium and calcium content in regional dishes consumed in Sonora, Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grijalva Haro, M I; Valencia, M E; Wyatt, J

    1990-06-01

    The content of sodium, potassium and calcium was determined in 15 regional dishes, by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The Na:K ratio was high in most of the dishes due to the high sodium content and low content of potassium found. The higher sources of the studied minerals were "tortilla de harina" with 1,372.8 mg/100 g of sodium; "chorizo con papas" with 466 mg/100 g of potassium, and "calabacitas con queso" with 244.1 mg/100 g of calcium. Two of the dishes considered as desserts, "capirotada" and "arroz con leche" showed the lowest Na:K ratio (0.66 and 0.81, respectively).

  16. Comprehensive Characterization of Extractable and Nonextractable Phenolic Compounds by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography-Electrospray Ionization-Quadrupole Time-of-Flight of a Grape/Pomegranate Pomace Dietary Supplement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Ramírez, Iza F; Reynoso-Camacho, Rosalía; Saura-Calixto, Fulgencio; Pérez-Jiménez, Jara

    2018-01-24

    Grape and pomegranate are rich sources of phenolic compounds, and their derived products could be used as ingredients for the development of functional foods and dietary supplements. However, the profile of nonextractable or macromolecular phenolic compounds in these samples has not been evaluated. Here, we show a comprehensive characterization of extractable and nonextractable phenolic compounds of a grape/pomegranate pomace dietary supplement using high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-quadrupole time-of-flight (HPLC-ESI-QTOF) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-TOF techniques. The main extractable phenolic compounds were several anthocyanins (principally malvidin 3-O-glucoside) as well as gallotannins and gallagyl derivatives; some phenolic compounds were reported in grape or pomegranate for the first time. Additionally, there was a high proportion of nonextractable phenolic compounds, including vanillic acid, and dihydroxybenzoic acid. Unidentified polymeric structures were detected by MALDI-TOF MS analysis. This study shows that mixed grape and pomegranate pomaces are a source of different classes of phenolic compounds including a high proportion of nonextractable phenolic compounds.

  17. Potassium evaluation in blood of Brazilian athletes using NAA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovacs, L.; Zamboni, C.B. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Nunes, L.A.S.; Lourenco, T.F.; Macedo, D. Vaz de [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    Full text: According to nutrition sources an athlete needs per day at least one gram of potassium for keeping the correct mineral balance in the organism. Its deficiency or even instantaneous low concentration in blood can diminish the athlete performance originating nervous irritability, muscular weakness, and mental disorientation and in more several causes cardiac arrhythmias. In this study the K levels in blood were determined in athletes submitted to constant load exercise at treadmill at LABEX (Laboratorio de Bioquimica do Exercicio - UNICAMP, Brazil) using Neutron Activation Analyses (NAA). The blood samples were collected from male athletes, age 18 to 26 years, before and after the physical training. Immediately after the collection an amount of 10 micro liters of whole blood was transferred to the filter paper and dried for a few minutes using an infrared lamp. To determine the concentration of potassium each sample was irradiated in the nuclear reactor (IEA-R1, 2-4MW, pool type) at IPEN and was gamma counted using an HPGe Spectrometer of High Energy Resolution. The concentrations of the selected element, 1525keV related to the potassium activated {sup 42}K, were calculated using in -house software. The potassium levels were evaluated before and after the physical exercise and the data were compared with the normal range. (author)

  18. Characterization of verdete rock as a potential source of potassium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wedisson Oliveira Santos

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Potassium is a nutrient found at low levels in Brazilian soils, requiring large inputs of fertilizers to achieve satisfactory crop yields. Brazil has high external dependence and limited reserves of soluble K mineral, which is traditionally exploited for the production of fertilizers. On the other hand, it is common the occurrence in the country of potassium-rich silicate minerals which are not commercially exploited. This study aimed to characterize mineralogically and chemically samples of verdete rock separated into size fractions and evaluate its potential as potassium fertilizer. The mineral composition of verdete rock is based on glauconite, quartz and feldspar. The total K2O content in verdete rock ranged from 5.18 to 9.0 dag/kg. The K content extracted in water or 2% citric acid was 2.4% below the total of K, indicating low reactivity of verdete rock and limitations for direct use as K source. The processes of physical fractionation and sedimentation in water are inefficient to promote the concentration of K in the different verdete rock fractions. The total K content in some samples are considerable and may enable the use of this rock as raw material for production of more reactive potassium fertilizers.

  19. Infrared resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization of fullerenes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    von Helden, G.; Holleman, I.; Knippels, G.M.H.; van der Meer, A. F. G.; Meijer, G.

    1997-01-01

    Gas-phase fullerenes are resonantly heated by a train of high power subpicosecond pulses from a free electron laser (FEL) to internal energies at which they efficiently undergo delayed ionization. When the laser is tuned from 6-20 mu m while the amount of laser produced parent ions is recorded,

  20. IKAR, a ionization chamber for WA9

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1976-01-01

    This ionization chamber arrived at CERN from Leningrad for a high precision study of hadron elastic scattering by a CERN-Clermont-Ferrand-Leningrad-Lyon-Uppsala Collaboration in the H3 beam (WA9). G.A. Korolev (third from right) looks at the drawings.

  1. Ionization cross section of partially ionized hydrogen plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baimbetov, F B; Kudyshev, Z A [Department of Physics, al - Farabi Kazakh National University, Almaty (Kazakhstan)], E-mail: Bfb77@kazsu.kz, E-mail: Z.Kudyshev@mail.ru

    2008-05-01

    In present work the electron impact ionization cross section is considered. The electron impact ionization cross section is calculated, based on pseudopotential model of interaction between plasma particles which accounts correlation effects. It is calculated with help of two methods: classical and quantum - mechanical (Born approximation). The ionization cross section is compared with corresponding results of other authors and experimental data. It has been shown that it is very important to take into account an influence of the surrounding during consideration of ionization processes.

  2. Bioinspired Artificial Sodium and Potassium Ion Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Vázquez, Nuria; Fuertes, Alberto; Amorín, Manuel; Granja, Juan R

    2016-01-01

    In Nature, all biological systems present a high level of compartmentalization in order to carry out a wide variety of functions in a very specific way. Hence, they need ways to be connected with the environment for communication, homeostasis equilibrium, nutrition, waste elimination, etc. The biological membranes carry out these functions; they consist of physical insulating barriers constituted mainly by phospholipids. These amphipathic molecules spontaneously aggregate in water to form bilayers in which the polar groups are exposed to the aqueous media while the non-polar chains self-organize by aggregating to each other to stay away from the aqueous media. The insulating properties of membranes are due to the formation of a hydrophobic bilayer covered at both sides by the hydrophilic phosphate groups. Thus, lipophilic molecules can permeate the membrane freely, while the small charged or very hydrophilic molecules require the assistance of other membrane components in order to overcome the energetic cost implied in crossing the non-polar region of the bilayer. Most of the large polar species (such as oligosaccharides, polypeptides or nucleic acids) cross into and out of the cell via endocytosis and exocytosis, respectively. Nature has created a series of systems (carriers and pores) in order to control the balance of small hydrophilic molecules and ions. The most important structures to achieve these goals are the ionophoric proteins that include the channel proteins, such as the sodium and potassium channels, and ionic transporters, including the sodium/potassium pumps or calcium/sodium exchangers among others. Inspired by these, scientists have created non-natural synthetic transporting structures to mimic the natural systems. The progress in the last years has been remarkable regarding the efficient transport of Na(+) and K(+) ions, despite the fact that the selectivity and the ON/OFF state of the non-natural systems remain a present and future challenge.

  3. Urinary sodium and potassium excretion, mortality, and cardiovascular events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Martin; Mente, Andrew; Rangarajan, Sumathy; McQueen, Matthew J; Wang, Xingyu; Liu, Lisheng; Yan, Hou; Lee, Shun Fu; Mony, Prem; Devanath, Anitha; Rosengren, Annika; Lopez-Jaramillo, Patricio; Diaz, Rafael; Avezum, Alvaro; Lanas, Fernando; Yusoff, Khalid; Iqbal, Romaina; Ilow, Rafal; Mohammadifard, Noushin; Gulec, Sadi; Yusufali, Afzal Hussein; Kruger, Lanthe; Yusuf, Rita; Chifamba, Jephat; Kabali, Conrad; Dagenais, Gilles; Lear, Scott A; Teo, Koon; Yusuf, Salim

    2014-08-14

    The optimal range of sodium intake for cardiovascular health is controversial. We obtained morning fasting urine samples from 101,945 persons in 17 countries and estimated 24-hour sodium and potassium excretion (used as a surrogate for intake). We examined the association between estimated urinary sodium and potassium excretion and the composite outcome of death and major cardiovascular events. The mean estimated sodium and potassium excretion was 4.93 g per day and 2.12 g per day, respectively. With a mean follow-up of 3.7 years, the composite outcome occurred in 3317 participants (3.3%). As compared with an estimated sodium excretion of 4.00 to 5.99 g per day (reference range), a higher estimated sodium excretion (≥ 7.00 g per day) was associated with an increased risk of the composite outcome (odds ratio, 1.15; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02 to 1.30), as well as increased risks of death and major cardiovascular events considered separately. The association between a high estimated sodium excretion and the composite outcome was strongest among participants with hypertension (P=0.02 for interaction), with an increased risk at an estimated sodium excretion of 6.00 g or more per day. As compared with the reference range, an estimated sodium excretion that was below 3.00 g per day was also associated with an increased risk of the composite outcome (odds ratio, 1.27; 95% CI, 1.12 to 1.44). As compared with an estimated potassium excretion that was less than 1.50 g per day, higher potassium excretion was associated with a reduced risk of the composite outcome. In this study in which sodium intake was estimated on the basis of measured urinary excretion, an estimated sodium intake between 3 g per day and 6 g per day was associated with a lower risk of death and cardiovascular events than was either a higher or lower estimated level of intake. As compared with an estimated potassium excretion that was less than 1.50 g per day, higher potassium excretion was

  4. Development of a Multivariate Predictive Model to Estimate Ionized Calcium Concentration from Serum Biochemical Profile Results in Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danner, J; Ridgway, M D; Rubin, S I; Le Boedec, K

    2017-09-01

    Ionized calcium concentration is the gold standard to assess calcium status in dogs, but measurement is not always available. (1) To predict ionized calcium concentration from biochemical results and compare the diagnostic performance of predicted ionized calcium concentration (piCa) to those of total calcium concentration (tCa) and 2 corrected tCa formulas; and (2) to study the relationship between biochemical results and variation of measured ionized calcium concentration (miCa). A total of 1,719 dogs with both miCa and biochemical profile results available. Cross-sectional study. Using 1,200 dogs, piCa was determined using a multivariate adaptive regression splines model. Its accuracy and performance were tested on the remaining 519 dogs. The final model included creatinine, albumin, tCa, phosphorus, sodium, potassium, chloride, alkaline phosphatase, triglycerides, and age, with tCa, albumin, and chloride having the highest impact on miCa variation. Measured ionized calcium concentration was better correlated with piCa than with tCa and corrected tCa and had higher overall diagnostic accuracy to diagnose hypocalcemia and hypercalcemia, but not significantly for hypercalcemia. For hypercalcemia, piCa was as sensitive (64%) but more specific (99.6%) than tCa and corrected tCa. For hypocalcemia, piCa was more sensitive (21.8%) and as specific (98.4%) as tCa. Positive and negative predictive values of piCa were high for both hypercalcemia (90% and 98%, respectively) and hypocalcemia (70.8% and 87.7%, respectively). Predicted ionized calcium concentration can be obtained from readily available biochemical and patient results and seems more useful than tCa and corrected tCa to assess calcium disorders in dogs when miCa is unavailable. Validation on external data, however, is warranted. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  5. VKCDB: Voltage-gated potassium channel database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gallin Warren J

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The family of voltage-gated potassium channels comprises a functionally diverse group of membrane proteins. They help maintain and regulate the potassium ion-based component of the membrane potential and are thus central to many critical physiological processes. VKCDB (Voltage-gated potassium [K] Channel DataBase is a database of structural and functional data on these channels. It is designed as a resource for research on the molecular basis of voltage-gated potassium channel function. Description Voltage-gated potassium channel sequences were identified by using BLASTP to search GENBANK and SWISSPROT. Annotations for all voltage-gated potassium channels were selectively parsed and integrated into VKCDB. Electrophysiological and pharmacological data for the channels were collected from published journal articles. Transmembrane domain predictions by TMHMM and PHD are included for each VKCDB entry. Multiple sequence alignments of conserved domains of channels of the four Kv families and the KCNQ family are also included. Currently VKCDB contains 346 channel entries. It can be browsed and searched using a set of functionally relevant categories. Protein sequences can also be searched using a local BLAST engine. Conclusions VKCDB is a resource for comparative studies of voltage-gated potassium channels. The methods used to construct VKCDB are general; they can be used to create specialized databases for other protein families. VKCDB is accessible at http://vkcdb.biology.ualberta.ca.

  6. [Determination of melamine residue in plant origin protein powders using high performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection and high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Tao; Xu, Jinzhong; Li, Jianzhong; Shen, Chongyu; Wu, Bin; Chen, Huilan; Li, Shujuan

    2008-01-01

    A method for the determination of melamine residue in plant origin protein powders was developed using high performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection (HPLC-DAD) and HPLC-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS). HPL-DAD was used in preliminary screening of the samples for melamine, and HPLC-MS/MS was used in the confirmatory of melamine. Trichloroacetic acid solution was used to precipitate proteins and to dissociate the target analyte from the sample matrix. The supernatant was cleaned up with strong cation exchange column for HPLC-MS/MS. The HPLC-DAD separation was carried out on a C18 column (250 mm x 4.6 mm, 5 microm) with 0.01 mol/L sodium n-heptanesulfate (pH adjusted to 4.5 with citric acid)-acetonitrile (90:10, v/v) as mobile phase at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min, and detected at 240 nm. HPLC-MS/MS was performed in selected ion monitoring mode with trichloroacetic acid solution as ion pair reagent. The limits of detection were 10 mg/kg and 0.5 mg/kg for HPLC-DAD and HPLC-MS/MS, respectively. The mean recoveries were 76%-88% for HPLC-DAD and 72%-82% (matrix match calibration curve) for HPLC-MS/MS and the relative standard deviations were 3.4%-6.4% for both HPLC-DAD and HPLC-MS/MS.

  7. Excitation block in a nerve fibre model owing to potassium-dependent changes in myelin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brazhe, Alexey; Maksimov, G. V.; Mosekilde, Erik

    2011-01-01

    . Uptake of potassium leads to Schwann cell swelling and myelin restructuring that impacts the electrical properties of the myelin. In order to further understand the dynamic interaction that takes place between the myelin and the axon, we have modelled submyelin potassium accumulation and related changes...... in myelin resistance during prolonged high-frequency stimulation. We predict that potassium-mediated decrease in myelin resistance leads to a functional excitation block with various patterns of altered spike trains. The patterns are found to depend on stimulation frequency and amplitude and to range from...

  8. Serum potassium concentrations: Importance of normokalaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heras, Manuel; Fernández-Reyes, María José

    2017-06-21

    Abnormalities in potassium concentrations are associated with morbidity and mortality. In recent years it has been considered that small variations in serum potassium concentrations within normal intervals may also be associated with mortality. Strategies for achieving normokalaemia include dietary measures, limiting the use of potassium retaining drugs, and use of conventional cation exchange resins (calcium/sodium polystyrene sulfonate) and/or the new non-absorbed cation exchange polymer (patiromer). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Sodium and potassium urinary excretion and dietary intake: a cross-sectional analysis in adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Gonçalves

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypertension is the leading cause for heart disease and stroke, for mortality and morbidity worldwide, and a high sodium-to-potassium intake ratio is considered a stronger risk factor for hypertension than sodium alone. Objective: This study aims to evaluate sodium and potassium urinary excretion, and assess the food sources of these nutrients in a sample of Portuguese adolescents. Design: A cross-sectional study with a sample of 250 Portuguese adolescents. Sodium and potassium excretion were measured by one 24-h urinary collection, and the coefficient of creatinine was used to validate completeness of urine collections. Dietary sources of sodium and potassium were assessed using a 24-h dietary recall. Results: Valid urine collections were provided by 200 adolescents (118 girls with a median age of 14.0 in both sexes (p=0.295. Regarding sodium, the mean urinary excretion was 3,725 mg/day in boys and 3,062 mg/day in girls (p<0.01, and 9.8% of boys and 22% of girls met the World Health Organization (WHO recommendations for sodium intake. Concerning potassium, the mean urinary excretion was 2,237 mg/day in boys and 1,904 mg/day in girls (p<0.01, and 6.1% of boys and 1.7% of girls met the WHO recommendations for potassium intake. Major dietary sources for sodium intake were cereal and cereal products (41%, meat products (16%, and milk and milk products (11%; and for potassium intake, main sources were milk and milk products (21%, meat products (17%, and vegetables (15%. Conclusions: Adolescents had a high-sodium and low-potassium diet, well above the WHO recommendations. Health promotion interventions are needed in order to decrease sodium and increase potassium intake.

  10. Soil transport parameters of potassium under a tropical saline soil condition using STANMOD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzanye da Silva Santos, Rafaelly; Honorio de Miranda, Jarbas; Previatello da Silva, Livia

    2015-04-01

    Environmental responsibility and concerning about the final destination of solutes in soil, so more studies allow a better understanding about the solutes behaviour in soil. Potassium is a macronutrient that is required in high concentrations, been an extremely important nutrient for all agricultural crops. It plays essential roles in physiological processes vital for plant growth, from protein synthesis to maintenance of plant water balance, and is available to plants dissolved in soil water while exchangeable K is loosely held on the exchange sites on the surface of clay particles. K will tend to be adsorbed onto the surface of negatively charged soil particles. Potassium uptake is vital for plant growth but in saline soils sodium competes with potassium for uptake across the plasma membrane of plant cells. This can result in high Na+:K+ ratios that reduce plant growth and eventually become toxic. This study aimed to obtain soil transport parameters of potassium in saline soil, such as: pore water velocity in soil (v), retardation factor (R), dispersivity (λ) and dispersion coefficient (D), in a disturbed sandy soil with different concentrations of potassium chlorate solution (KCl), which is one of the most common form of potassium fertilizer. The experiment was carried out using soil samples collected in a depth of 0 to 20 cm, applying potassium chlorate solution containing 28.6, 100, 200 and 500 mg L-1 of K. To obtain transport parameters, the data were adjusted with the software STANMOD. At low concentrations, interaction between potassium and soil occur more efficiently. It was observed that only the breakthrough curve prepared with solution of 500 mg L-1 reached the applied concentration, and the solution of 28.6 mg L-1 overestimated the parameters values. The STANMOD proved to be efficient in obtaining potassium transport parameters; KCl solution to be applied should be greater than 500 mg L-1; solutions with low concentrations tend to overestimate

  11. Schinus terebinthifolius scale-up countercurrent chromatography (Part I): High performance countercurrent chromatography fractionation of triterpene acids with off-line detection using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Mariana Neves; Costa, Fernanda das Neves; Leitão, Gilda Guimarães; Garrard, Ian; Hewitson, Peter; Ignatova, Svetlana; Winterhalter, Peter; Jerz, Gerold

    2015-04-10

    'Countercurrent chromatography' (CCC) is an ideal technique for the recovery, purification and isolation of bioactive natural products, due to the liquid nature of the stationary phase, process predictability and the possibility of scale-up from analytical to preparative scale. In this work, a method developed for the fractionation of Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi berries dichloromethane extract was thoroughly optimized to achieve maximal throughput with minimal solvent and time consumption per gram of processed crude extract, using analytical, semi-preparative and preparative 'high performance countercurrent chromatography' (HPCCC) instruments. The method using the biphasic solvent system composed of n-heptane-ethyl acetate-methanol-water (6:1:6:1, v/v/v/v) was volumetrically scaled up to increase sample throughput up to 120 times, while maintaining separation efficiency and time. As a fast and specific detection alternative, the fractions collected from the CCC-separations were injected to an 'atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass-spectrometer' (APCI-MS/MS) and reconstituted molecular weight MS-chromatograms of the APCI-ionizable compounds from S. terebinthifolius were obtained. This procedure led to the direct isolation of tirucallane type triterpenes such as masticadienonic and 3β-masticadienolic acids. Also oleanonic and moronic acids have been identified for the first time in the species. In summary, this approach can be used for other CCC scale-up processes, enabling MS-target-guided isolation procedures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. DMSO Assisted Electrospray Ionization for the Detection of Small Peptide Hormones in Urine by Dilute-and-Shoot-Liquid-Chromatography-High Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judák, Péter; Grainger, Janelle; Goebel, Catrin; Van Eenoo, Peter; Deventer, Koen

    2017-08-01

    The mobile phase additive (DMSO) has been described as a useful tool to enhance electrospray ionization (ESI) of peptides and proteins. So far, this technique has mainly been used in proteomic/peptide research, and its applicability in a routine clinical laboratory setting (i.e., doping control analysis) has not been described yet. This work provides a simple, easy to implement screening method for the detection of doping relevant small peptides (GHRPs, GnRHs, GHS, and vasopressin-analogues) with molecular weight less than 2 kDa applying DMSO in the mobile phase. The gain in sensitivity was sufficient to inject the urine samples after a 2-fold dilution step omitting a time consuming sample preparation. The employed analytical procedure was validated for the qualitative determination of 36 compounds, including 13 metabolites. The detection limits (LODs) ranged between 50 and 1000 pg/mL and were compliant with the 2 ng/mL minimum detection level required by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) for all the target peptides. To demonstrate the feasibility of the work, urine samples obtained from patients who have been treated with desmopressin or leuprolide and urine samples that have been declared as adverse analytical findings were analyzed.

  13. New Automated and High-Throughput Quantitative Analysis of Urinary Ketones by Multifiber Exchange-Solid Phase Microextraction Coupled to Fast Gas Chromatography/Negative Chemical-Electron Ionization/Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacenti, Marco; Dugheri, Stefano; Traldi, Pietro; Degli Esposti, Filippo; Perchiazzi, Nicola; Franchi, Elena; Calamante, Massimo; Kikic, Ireneo; Alessi, Paolo; Bonacchi, Alice; Salvadori, Edoardo; Arcangeli, Giulio; Cupelli, Vincenzo

    2010-01-01

    The present research is focused on automation, miniaturization, and system interaction with high throughput for multiple and specific Direct Immersion-Solid Phase Microextraction/Fast Gas Chromatography analysis of the urinary ketones. The specific Mass Spectrometry instrumentation, capable of supporting such the automated changeover from Negative Chemical to Electron Ionization mode, as well as the automation of the preparation procedure by new device called MultiFiber Exchange, through change of the fibers, allowed a friendly use of mass spectrometry apparatus with a number of advantages including reduced analyst time and greater reproducibility (2.01–5.32%). The detection limits for the seven ketones were less than 0.004 mg/L. For an innovative powerful meaning in high-throughput routine, the generality of the structurally informative Mass Spectrometry fragmentation patterns together with the chromatographic separation and software automation are also investigated. PMID:20628512

  14. Alloy nanoparticle synthesis using ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenoff, Tina M [Sandia Park, NM; Powers, Dana A [Albuquerque, NM; Zhang, Zhenyuan [Durham, NC

    2011-08-16

    A method of forming stable nanoparticles comprising substantially uniform alloys of metals. A high dose of ionizing radiation is used to generate high concentrations of solvated electrons and optionally radical reducing species that rapidly reduce a mixture of metal ion source species to form alloy nanoparticles. The method can make uniform alloy nanoparticles from normally immiscible metals by overcoming the thermodynamic limitations that would preferentially produce core-shell nanoparticles.

  15. Qualitative Carbohydrate Analysis using Alkaline Potassium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 21; Issue 3. Qualitative Carbohydrate Analysis using Alkaline Potassium Ferricyanide. Sangeeta Pandita Saral Baweja. Classroom Volume 21 Issue 3 March 2016 pp 285-288 ...

  16. Bystander Effects of Ionizing Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Little, John B. [Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Genetics and Complex Diseases

    2017-01-17

    The objectives of this grant renewal are to provide administrative support and travel funds to allow the continued participation of the principal investigator (Dr. John B. Little) as an advisor to research initiated by several research fellows from his laboratory. The actual research will be carried out under the direction of Dr. Hatsumi Nagasawa with the collaboration of Dr. Joel Bedford at the Colorado State University, and by Drs. Edouard Azzam and Sonia de Toledo at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey. Dr. Little will advise on the planning of experiments and development of experimental protocols, the analysis of data, and the preparation of manuscripts for publication. The Specific Aims for several of the planned experiments include: 1) to extend studies of the role of recombinational repair in the bystander effect by examining other genes in this pathway and cell lines deficient in excision repair; 2) to continue studies to determine the nature of the damage signal transmitted to bystander cells including the expression of several connexins in the bystander response, and the extent to which the enhanced oxidative metabolism observed in bystander cells may relate to the nature of the transmitted bystander signal; 3) to utilize a genome-wide approach to examine the genetic basis for the hypersensitivity to ionization we have observed in unaffected parents of patients with hereditary retinoblastoma, as well as from a group of apparently normal individuals that show similar radiosensitivity; 4) to complete studies concerning the induction of high frequencies of cells with massive chromosome damage in clonal derivatives of p53 and p21 knockout mouse cell lines; in particular to examine the role of telomere changes in this phenomenon. Overall, the results of these studies should enhance our understanding of the risk of low-dose exposures to ionizing radiation, including human populations to residential radon as well as occupational exposures.

  17. Dietary sodium and potassium intakes: Data from urban and rural areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizéhoun-Adissoda, Carmelle; Houinato, Dismand; Houehanou, Corine; Chianea, Thierry; Dalmay, François; Bigot, André; Aboyans, Victor; Preux, Pierre-Marie; Bovet, Pascal; Desport, Jean-Claude

    2017-01-01

    Hypertension is highly prevalent in West African populations, but little data is available on salt and potassium intake in these populations. We assumed in this study that sodium and potassium intake might be high and low, respectively, in the Beninese population in view of the emerging nutritional transition. The aim of this study was to estimate dietary sodium and potassium intakes based on 24-h urine collections. We selected 420 individuals (ages 25-64 y), representative of the population, from urban and rural areas in Benin. Urine was collected over 24 h, and sodium, potassium, and creatinine were quantified. Blood pressure was measured on the left arm using a validated electronic oscillometric monitor. Adequate data were available for 354 participants. Mean dietary intake of sodium and potassium were 4.4 ± 2.1 and 1.8 ± 0.9 g/24 h, respectively. High intake of sodium was associated with urban area, age Sodium intake was associated with high systolic and diastolic blood pressures. In multivariate analysis, only age sodium intake, whereas male sex and a BMI ≥25 kg/m(2) were associated with high potassium intake. Large proportions of the population had sodium intake higher, and potassium intake lower, than dietary recommendations. These results suggest that interventions to reduce salt consumption and promote potassium-rich foods, including fruits and vegetables, are needed in Benin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. New constraints on the escape of ionizing photons from starburst galaxies using ionization-parameter mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zastrow, Jordan; Oey, M. S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, 830 Dennison, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1042 (United States); Veilleux, Sylvain [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); McDonald, Michael, E-mail: jazast@umich.edu [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2013-12-10

    The fate of ionizing radiation in starburst galaxies is key to understanding cosmic reionization. However, the galactic parameters on which the escape fraction of ionizing radiation depend are not well understood. Ionization-parameter mapping provides a simple, yet effective, way to study the radiative transfer in starburst galaxies. We obtain emission-line ratio maps of [S III]/[S II] for six, nearby, dwarf starbursts: NGC 178, NGC 1482, NGC 1705, NGC 3125, NGC 7126, and He 2-10. The narrowband images are obtained with the Maryland-Magellan Tunable Filter at Las Campanas Observatory. Using these data, we previously reported the discovery of an optically thin ionization cone in NGC 5253, and here we also discover a similar ionization cone in NGC 3125. This latter cone has an opening angle of 40° ± 5° (0.4 sr), indicating that the passageways through which ionizing radiation may travel correspond to a small solid angle. Additionally, there are three sample galaxies that have winds and/or superbubble activity, which should be conducive to escaping radiation, yet they are optically thick. These results support the scenario that an orientation bias limits our ability to directly detect escaping Lyman continuum in many starburst galaxies. A comparison of the star formation properties and histories of the optically thin and thick galaxies is consistent with the model that high escape fractions are limited to galaxies that are old enough (≳3 Myr) for mechanical feedback to have cleared optically thin passageways in the interstellar medium, but young enough (≲5 Myr) that the ionizing stars are still present.

  19. Connexin 43 impacts on mitochondrial potassium uptake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin eBoengler

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In cardiomyocytes, connexin 43 (Cx43 forms gap junctions and unopposed hemichannels at the plasma membrane, but the protein is also present at the inner membrane of subsarcolemmal mitochondria. Both inhibition and genetic ablation of Cx43 reduce ADP-stimulated complex 1 respiration. Since mitochondrial potassium influx impacts on oxygen consumption, we investigated whether or not inhibition or ablation of mitochondrial Cx43 alters mitochondrial potassium uptake.Subsarcolemmal mitochondria were isolated from rat left ventricular (LV myocardium and loaded with the potassium-sensitive dye PBFI. Intramitochondrial potassium was replaced by TEA (tetraethylammonium. Mitochondria were incubated under control conditions or treated with 250 µM Gap19, a peptide that specifically inhibits Cx43-dependent hemichannels at plasma membranes. Subsequently, 140 mM KCl was added and the slope of the increase in PBFI fluorescence over time was calculated. The slope of the PBFI fluorescence of the control mitochondria was set to 100%. In the presence of Gap19, the mitochondrial potassium influx was reduced from 100±11.6 % in control mitochondria to 65.5±10.7 % (n=6, p<0.05. In addition to the pharmacological inhibition of Cx43, potassium influx was studied in mitochondria isolated from conditional Cx43 knockout mice. Here, the ablation of Cx43 was achieved by the injection of 4-hydroxytamoxifen (Cx43Cre-ER(T/fl + 4-OHT. The mitochondria of the Cx43Cre-ER(T/fl + 4-OHT mice contained 3±1% Cx43 (n=6 of that in control mitochondria (100±11%, n=8, p<0.05. The ablation of Cx43 (n=5 reduced the velocity of the potassium influx from 100±11.2 % in control mitochondria (n=9 to 66.6±5.5 % (p<0.05.Taken together, our data indicate that both pharmacological inhibition and genetic ablation of Cx43 reduce mitochondrial potassium influx.

  20. The Ketogenic Diet and Potassium Channel Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0463 TITLE: The Ketogenic Diet and Potassium Channel Function PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Geoffrey Murphy...NUMBER The Ketogenic Diet and Potassium Channel Function 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0463 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Geoffrey Murphy...The overall objective of this Discovery Award was to explore the hypothesis the ketogenic diet (KD) regulates neuronal excitability by influencing

  1. 21 CFR 181.34 - Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... fixatives and preservative agents, with or without sodium or potassium nitrate, in the curing of red meat... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite. 181.34...-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.34 Sodium nitrite and potassium nitrite. Sodium nitrite and potassium...

  2. How does ionizing radiation escape from galaxies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlitova, Ivana

    2016-10-01

    Search for sources that reionized the Universe from z 15 to z 6 is one of the main drivers of present-day astronomy. Low-mass star-forming galaxies are the most favoured sources of ionizing photons, but the searches of escaping Lyman continuum (LyC) have not been extremely successful. Our team has recently detected prominent LyC escape from five Green Pea galaxies at redshift 0.3, using the HST/COS spectrograph, which represents a significant breakthrough. We propose here to study the LyC escape of the strongest among these leakers, J1152, with spatial resolution. From the comparison of the ionizing and non-ionizing radiation maps, and surface brightness profiles, we will infer the major mode in which LyC is escaping: from the strongest starburst, from the galaxy edge, through a hole along our line-of-sight, through clumpy medium, or directly from all the production sites due to highly ionized medium in the entire galaxy. In parallel, we will test the predictive power of two highly debated indirect indicators of LyC leakage: the [OIII]5007/[OII]3727 ratio, and Lyman-alpha. We predict that their spatial distribution should closely follow that of the ionizing continuum if column densities of the neutral gas are low. This combined study, which relies on the HST unique capabilities, will bring crucial information on the structure of the leaking galaxies, provide constraints for hydrodynamic simulations, and will lead to efficient future searches for LyC leakers across a large range of redshifts.

  3. The GBT Diffuse Ionized Gas Survey (GDIGS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luisi, Matteo; Anderson, Loren Dean; Liu, Bin; Bania, Thomas; Balser, Dana; Wenger, Trey; Haffner, Lawrence Matthew

    2018-01-01

    Diffuse ionized gas in the Galactic mid-plane known as the "Warm Ionized Medium" (WIM) makes up ~20% of the gas mass of the Milky Way and >90% of its ionized gas. It is the last major component of the interstellar medium (ISM) that has not yet been studied at high spatial and spectral resolution, and therefore many of its fundamental properties remain unclear. The Green Bank Telescope (GBT) Diffuse Ionized Gas Survey (GDIGS) is a new large survey of the Milky Way disk at C-band (4-8 GHz). The main goals of GDIGS are to investigate the properties of the WIM and to determine the connection between the WIM and high-mass star formation over the Galactic longitude and latitude range of 32 deg > l > -5 deg, |b| < 0.5 deg. We use the new VEGAS spectrometer to simultaneously observe 22 Hn-alpha radio recombination lines, 25 Hn-beta lines, 8 Hn-gamma lines, and 9 molecular lines (namely CH3OH and H2CO), and also continuum at ~60 frequencies. We average the Hn-alpha lines to produce Nyquist-sampled maps on a spatial grid of 1 arcmin, a velocity resolution of 0.5 km/s and rms sensitivities of ~3 mJy per beam. GDIGS observations are currently underway and are expected to be completed by late 2018. These data will allow us to: 1) Study for the first time the inner-Galaxy WIM unaffected by confusion from discrete HII regions, 2) determine the distribution of the inner Galaxy WIM, 3) investigate the ionization state of the WIM, 4) explore the connection between the WIM and HII regions, and 5) analyze the effect of leaked photons from HII regions on ISM dust temperatures.

  4. Potassium chloride production by microcline chlorination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orosco, Pablo, E-mail: porosco@unsl.edu.ar [Instituto de Investigaciones en Tecnología Química (INTEQUI), Chacabuco y Pedernera, San Luis (Argentina); Facultad de Química, Bioquímica y Farmacia, Universidad Nacional de San Luis, Chacabuco y Pedernera, San Luis (Argentina); Ruiz, María del Carmen [Instituto de Investigaciones en Tecnología Química (INTEQUI), Chacabuco y Pedernera, San Luis (Argentina)

    2015-08-10

    Highlights: • Use of chlorination for the KCl production. • The reagents used were microcline, hydromagnesite and chlorine. • Isothermal and non-isothermal assays were performed in Cl{sub 2}–N{sub 2} mixture. • The chlorination generated KCl at 700 °C. • The chlorination products promote KCl formation. - Abstract: The potassium chloride is one of the most important fertilizers used in agriculture. The current demand of this salt makes interesting the study of potassium chloride production from unconventional potassium resources. In this work the potassium chloride production by chlorination of microcline was investigated. The starting reagents were microcline, hydromagnesite and chlorine. Non-isothermal and isothermal chlorination assays were carried out in a thermogravimetric device adapted to work in corrosive atmospheres. The temperature effect on potassium extraction and the phase transformations produced during chlorination of microcline were studied. The reagents and reaction products were analyzed by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The experimental results indicated that by chlorination of microcline an important extraction of potassium in the temperature range from 800 to 900 °C was produced. Moreover, at 800 °C the forsterite, enstatite and magnesium aluminate spinel phases were generated.

  5. Identification and quantification of glucosamine in rabbit cartilage and correlation with plasma levels by high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastorini, Elisabetta; Vecchiotti, Stefania; Colliva, Carolina; Persiani, Stefano; Rotini, Roberto; Roatti, Giulia; Zaccarelli, Lorenzo; Rovati, Lucio Claudio; Roda, Aldo

    2011-06-10

    A new HPLC-ESI-MS/MS method for the determination of glucosamine (2-amino-2-deoxy-d-glucose) in rabbit cartilage was developed and optimized. Glucosamine was extracted from cartilage by cryogenic grinding followed by protein precipitation with trichloroacetic acid. The HPLC separation was achieved with a polymer-based amino column using a mobile phase composed of 10mM ammonium acetate (pH 7.5)-acetonitrile (20:80%, v/v) at 0.3 mL min flow rate. d-[1-(13)C]Glucosamine was used as internal standard. Selective detection was performed by tandem mass spectrometry with electrospray source, operating in positive ionization mode and in multiple reaction monitoring acquisition (m/z 180→72 and 181→73 for glucosamine and internal standard, respectively). Limit of quantification was 0.045 ng injected, corresponding to 0.25 μg g⁻¹ in cartilage. Linearity was obtained up to 20 μg g⁻¹ (R(2)>0.991). Precision values (%R.S.D.) were <10%. Accuracy (% bias) ranged from -6.0% to 12%. Mean recoveries obtained at 3 concentration levels were higher than 81% (%R.S.D.≤8%). The method was applied to measure glucosamine levels in rabbit cartilage and plasma after single oral administration of glucosamine sulfate at a dose of 98 mg kg⁻¹(n=6). Glucosamine was present in cartilage in physiological condition before the treatment. After dosing, mean concentration of cartilage glucosamine significantly increased from 461 to 1040 ng g⁻¹. Cartilage glucosamine levels resulted to be well correlated with plasma concentrations, which therefore are useful to predict the target cartilage concentration and its pharmacological activity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Resonant three-photon ionization spectroscopy of atomic Fe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Gottwald, T.; Havener, C. C.; Mattolat, C.; Vane, C. R.; Wendt, K.

    2013-12-01

    Laser spectroscopic investigations on high-lying states around the ionization potential (IP) in the atomic spectrum of Fe have been carried out for the development of a practical three-step resonance ionization scheme accessible by Ti: sapphire lasers. A hot cavity laser ion source, typically used at on-line radioactive ion beam production facilities, was employed in this work. Ionization schemes employing high-lying Rydberg and autoionizing states populated by three-photon excitations were established. Five new Rydberg and autoionizing Rydberg series converging to the ground and to the first four excited states of Fe II are reported. Analyses of the Rydberg series yield the value 63 737.686 ± 0.068 cm-1 for the ionization potential of iron.

  7. Thermodynamic properties of potassium oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byker, H.J. (Montana State Univ., Bozeman); Eliezer, I.; Howald, R.C.; Ehlert, T.C.

    1979-09-01

    KO/sub 0/ /sub 5/ has been prepared by the reaction of excess potassium with KNO/sub 3/ in an effusion cell. Observations of the 2KO/sub 0/ /sub 5/ ..-->.. K/sub 2/O(g) equilibrium mass spectrometrically give a new value for the enthalpy of solid KO/sub 0/ /sub 5/, ..delta..H/sub f,298//sup 0/ = -170 +- 5 kJ mol/sup -1/. Observations on KO/sup +/ in the same series of experiments give good estimates for the thermodynamic properties of K/sub 2/O/sub 2/(g). This leads to an improved interpretation of data on the vaporization of KO/sub 0/ /sub 5/-K/sub 2/O/sub 2/ mixtures and solutions. Similarly literature data on the K/sub 2/O/sub 2/-KO/sub 2/ system have been collected and reexamined, leading to the values ..delta..H/sub f,298//sup 0/ = -495.4 kJ mol/sup -1/ and S/sub 298//sup 0/ = 110.1 J mol/sup -1/ K/sup -1/ for K/sub 2/O/sub 2/(s). We have calculated a preliminary phase diagram for the entire region from KO/sub 0/ /sub 5/ to KO/sub 2/, treating the liquid as solutions of O (1) in KO/sub 0/ /sub 5/ (1). Differential thermal analysis data supporting the calculated phase diagram are reported.

  8. Basic non-linear effects in silicon radiation detector in detection of highly ionizing particles: registration of ultra rare events of superheavy nuclei in the long-term experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Tsyganov, Y S

    2015-01-01

    Sources of non-linear response of PIPS detector, when detecting highly ionizing particles like recoils (EVR), fission fragments and heavy ions, including formation of large pulse-height defect (PHD) are considered. An analytical formula to calculate the recombination component of EVR PHD is proposed on the base of surface recombination model with some empirical correction. PC-based simulation code for generating the spectrum of the measured recoil signal amplitudes of the heavy implanted nuclei is presented. The simulated spectra are compared with the experimental ones for the different facilities: the Dubna Gas Filled Recoil Separator (DGFRS), SHIP and RIKEN gas-filled separator. After the short reviewing of the detection system of the DGFRS, is considered the real-time matrix algorithm application aimed to the radical background suppression in the complete-fusion heavy-ion induced nuclear reactions. Typical examples of application in the long term experiments aimed to the synthesis of superheavy elements Z=...

  9. Characterization of gallotannins and benzophenone derivatives from mango (Mangifera indica L. cv. 'Tommy Atkins') peels, pulp and kernels by high-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berardini, Nicolai; Carle, Reinhold; Schieber, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    Polyphenolics were extracted from peels, pulp and kernels of mango fruits (Mangifera indica L. cv. 'Tommy Atkins') and characterized by high-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. In the peel 18 gallotannins and five benzophenone derivatives were detected which were tentatively identified as galloylated maclurin and iriflophenone glucosides. Twenty-one and eight gallotannins were found in the kernels and pulp, respectively, whereas no evidence for the presence of benzophenone derivatives was obtained. Gallotannins quantified by the rhodanine assay amounted to 1.4 mg/g dm in the peels (expressed as gallic acid), while only small amounts (0.2 mg/g dm) were found in the pulp. In contrast, mango kernels contained 15.5 mg/g dm and thus proved to be a rich source of gallotannins. Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Patterns in potassium dynamics in forest ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripler, Christopher E; Kaushal, Sujay S; Likens, Gene E; Walter, M Todd

    2006-04-01

    The biotic cycling of potassium (K) in forest systems has been relatively understudied in comparison with nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) despite its critical roles in maintaining the nutrition of primary production in forests. We investigated the ecological significance of K in forests from a literature review and data synthesis. We focused on (1) describing patterns of the effects of K availability on aboveground growth and change in foliar tissue of tree species from a variety of forests; and (2) documenting previously unreported relationships between hydrologic losses of K and N in forested watersheds from the Americas. In a review of studies examining tree growth under K manipulations/fertilizations, a high percentage (69% of studies) showed a positive response to increases in K availability in forest soils. In addition, 76% of the tree studies reviewed showed a positive and significant increase in K concentrations in plant tissue after soil K manipulation/fertilization. A meta-analysis on a subset of the reviewed studies was found to provide further evidence that potassium effects tree growth and increased tissue [K] with an effect size of 0.709 for growth and an overall effect size of 0.56. In our review of watershed studies, we observed that concentrations of K typically decreased during growing seasons in streams draining forested areas in the Temperate Zones and were responsive to vegetation disturbance in both temperate and tropical regions. We found a strong relationship (r2 = 0.42-0.99) between concentrations of K and N (another critical plant nutrient) in stream water, suggesting that similar mechanisms of biotic retention may control the flow of these nutrients. Furthermore, K dynamics appear to be unique among the base cations, e.g. calcium, magnesium, and sodium, because the others do not show similar seasonal patterns to K. We suggest that K may be important to the productivity and sustenance of many forests, and its dynamics and ecological

  11. Ionization Mechanism of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, I.-Chung; Lee, Chuping; Lee, Yuan-Tseh; Ni, Chi-Kung

    2015-07-01

    In past studies, mistakes in determining the ionization mechanism in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) were made because an inappropriate ion-to-neutral ratio was used. The ion-to-neutral ratio of the analyte differs substantially from that of the matrix in MALDI. However, these ratios were not carefully distinguished in previous studies. We begin by describing the properties of ion-to-neutral ratios and reviews early experimental measurements. A discussion of the errors committed in previous theoretical studies and a comparison of recent experimental measurements follow. We then describe a thermal proton transfer model and demonstrate how the model appropriately describes ion-to-neutral ratios and the total ion intensity. Arguments raised to challenge thermal ionization are then discussed. We demonstrate how none of the arguments are valid before concluding that thermal proton transfer must play a crucial role in the ionization process of MALDI.

  12. Solenoidal ionization cooling lattices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Fernow

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available We explore a practical approach for designing ionization cooling channels with periodic solenoidal focusing. We examine the lattice characteristics in terms of the properties of the coils and the cell geometry. The peak magnetic field in the coils is an important engineering constraint in lattice design. We examine the dependence of the peak field, momentum passband locations, and the beta function on the coil parameters. We make a systematic examination of all allowed lattice configurations taking into account the symmetry properties of the current densities and the beta function. We introduce a unique classification for comparing cooling lattice configurations. While solutions with a single coil per cell illustrate most of the effects that are important for cooling channel design, the introduction of additional coils allows more flexibility in selecting the lattice properties. We look at example solutions for the problem of the initial transverse cooling stage of a neutrino factory or muon collider and compare our results with the properties of some published cooling lattice designs. Scaling laws are used to compare solutions from different symmetry classes.

  13. Atrial Na,K-ATPase increase and potassium dysregulation accentuate the risk of postoperative atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tran, Cao Thach; Schmidt, Thomas Andersen; Christensen, John Brochorst

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Postoperative atrial fibrillation is a common complication to cardiac surgery. Na,K-ATPase is of major importance for the resting membrane potential and action potential. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the importance of Na,K-ATPase concentrations in human atrial...... biopsies and plasma potassium concentrations for the development of atrial fibrillation. METHODS: Atrial myocardial biopsies were obtained from 67 patients undergoing open chest cardiac surgery. Na,K-ATPase was quantified using vanadate-facilitated 3H-ouabain binding. Plasma potassium concentration...... with postoperative atrial fibrillation. CONCLUSIONS: The present study supports the increasing evidence of dysregulation of the potassium homeostasis as an important factor in the development of cardiac arrhythmias. High atrial Na,K-ATPase and sudden plasma potassium concentration increase may contribute...

  14. Tunnel ionization, population trapping, filamentation and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leang Chin, See; Xu, Huailiang

    2016-11-01

    The advances in femtosecond Ti-sapphire laser technology have led to the discovery of a profusion of new physics. This review starts with a brief historical account of the experimental realization of tunnel ionization, followed by high harmonic generation and the prediction of attosecond pulses. Then, the unique phenomenon of dynamic population trapping during the ionization of atoms and molecules in intense laser fields is introduced. One of the consequences of population trapping in the highly excited states is the neutral dissociation into simple molecular fragments which fluoresce. Such fluorescence could be amplified in femtosecond laser filamentation in gases. The experimental observations of filament-induced fluorescence and lasing in the atmosphere and combustion flames are given. Excitation of molecular rotational wave packets (molecular alignment) and their relaxation and revival in a gas filament are described. Furthermore, filament-induced condensation and precipitation inside a cloud chamber is explained. Lastly, a summary and future outlook is given.

  15. Extracellular potassium inhibits Kv7.1 potassium channels by stabilizing an inactivated state

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anders Peter; Steffensen, Annette Buur; Grunnet, Morten

    2011-01-01

    Kv7.1 (KCNQ1) channels are regulators of several physiological processes including vasodilatation, repolarization of cardiomyocytes, and control of secretory processes. A number of Kv7.1 pore mutants are sensitive to extracellular potassium. We hypothesized that extracellular potassium also...

  16. A review of the fate of potassium in the soil-plant system after land application of wastewaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arienzo, M; Christen, E W; Quayle, W; Kumar, A

    2009-05-30

    Irrigation with wastewaters from agri-industry processes such as milk factories, piggeries, wineries and abattoirs is commonplace. These wastewaters all have high levels of potassium (K). Potassium concentration in effluents from domestic wastewater sources are relatively low, reported to vary between 10 and 30 mg L(-1). Higher levels of potassium are reported for effluents from olive oil mills, 10,000-20,000 mg KL(-1), wool scouring, 4200-13,000 mg KL(-1), cheese and lactic whey and potato processing, approximately 1800 mg KL(-1), piggery effluent, 500-1000 mg KL(-1) and winery wastewaters, up to 1000 mg KL(-1). Application of wastewaters with these high potassium levels has been found to increase the overall level of soil fertility, with the exception of alkaline effluents which can dissolve soil organic carbon. Long-term application of such wastewater may cause the build-up of soil potassium and decrease the hydraulic conductivity of the receiving soils. These potential impacts are uncertain and have been inadequately researched. Regulatory limits for potassium in drinking water have been set only by the European Union with no toxicological or physiological justification. The literature shows that grasses and legume herbages accumulate high levels of potassium, up to 5% dry weight, and some grasses, such as turfgrass are particularly tolerant to high levels of potassium, even under saline conditions. This adaptation is considered useful for increasing potassium immobilization and sustainable practices of land wastewater disposal. Potassium availability is significantly affected by the cation ratios of the wastewater, the existing soil water solution and of soil exchange sites.

  17. Biomedical Sensors of Ionizing Radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Pani, S; Speller, R; Royle, G; Olivo, A

    2010-01-01

    Sensors Technology Series Editor-in-Chief's Preface vii Preface ix 1 Biomedical Sensors: Temperature Sensor ... G. Kim Prisk 4 Biomedical Sensors of Ionizing Radiation 129 Robert Speller, Alessandro Olivo, Silvia Pani, and Gary Royle 5 ...

  18. Redox-controlled potassium intercalation into two polyaromatic hydrocarbon solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, F. Denis; Pitcher, M. J.; Hiley, C. I.; Whitehead, G. F. S.; Kar, S.; Ganin, A. Y.; Antypov, D.; Collins, C.; Dyer, M. S.; Klupp, G.; Colman, R. H.; Prassides, K.; Rosseinsky, M. J.

    2017-07-01

    Alkali metal intercalation into polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) has been studied intensely after reports of superconductivity in a number of potassium- and rubidium-intercalated materials. There are, however, no reported crystal structures to inform our understanding of the chemistry and physics because of the complex reactivity of PAHs with strong reducing agents at high temperature. Here we present the synthesis of crystalline K2Pentacene and K2Picene by a solid-solid insertion protocol that uses potassium hydride as a redox-controlled reducing agent to access the PAH dianions, and so enables the determination of their crystal structures. In both cases, the inserted cations expand the parent herringbone packings by reorienting the molecular anions to create multiple potassium sites within initially dense molecular layers, and thus interact with the PAH anion π systems. The synthetic and crystal chemistry of alkali metal intercalation into PAHs differs from that into fullerenes and graphite, in which the cation sites are pre-defined by the host structure.

  19. Effects of top excision on the potassium accumulation and expression of potassium channel genes in tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xiao Yan; Su, Yi Rong; Wei, Wen Xue; Wu, Jin Shui; Fan, Ye Kuan

    2009-01-01

    The effects of the removal of the shoot apex of tobacco on the relative transcript levels of potassium channel genes, determined by real-time PCR, and on the relationship between the expression of genes encoding potassium channels and potassium concentration, were studied. The results from the study indicated that comparatively more assimilates of photosynthesis were allocated to the apex in control plants than in both decapitated and IAA-treated decapitated plants. By contrast, dry matter in the upper leaves, roots, and stems in both decapitated and IAA-treated plants was significantly increased relative to control plants. The potassium level in whole plants decreased post-decapitation compared with control plants, and so did the potassium concentration in middle and upper leaves, stem, and roots. Expression of NKT1, NtKC1, NTORK1, and NKT2 was inhibited by decapitation in tobacco leaves with a gradual reduction after decapitation, but was induced in roots. The relative expression of NKT1, NTORK1, and NKT2 in tobacco leaves was higher than that in roots, whereas the expression of NtKC1 was higher in roots. The levels of inhibition and induction of NKT1, NtKC1, NTORK1, and NKT2 in leaves and roots, respectively, associated with decapitation were reduced by the application of IAA on the cut surface of the decapitated stem. Further results showed that the level of endogenous auxin IAA in decapitated plants, which dropped in leaves and increased in roots by 140.7% at 14 d compared with the control plant, might be attributed to the change in the expression of potassium channel genes. The results suggest that there is a reciprocal relationship among endogenous auxin IAA, expression of potassium channel genes and potassium accumulation. They further imply that the endogenous IAA probably plays a role in regulating the expression of potassium channel genes, and that variations in expression of these genes affected the accumulation and distribution of potassium in tobacco.

  20. Association of urinary sodium and potassium excretion with blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mente, Andrew; O'Donnell, Martin J; Rangarajan, Sumathy; McQueen, Matthew J; Poirier, Paul; Wielgosz, Andreas; Morrison, Howard; Li, Wei; Wang, Xingyu; Di, Chen; Mony, Prem; Devanath, Anitha; Rosengren, Annika; Oguz, Aytekin; Zatonska, Katarzyna; Yusufali, Afzal Hussein; Lopez-Jaramillo, Patricio; Avezum, Alvaro; Ismail, Noorhassim; Lanas, Fernando; Puoane, Thandi; Diaz, Rafael; Kelishadi, Roya; Iqbal, Romaina; Yusuf, Rita; Chifamba, Jephat; Khatib, Rasha; Teo, Koon; Yusuf, Salim

    2014-08-14

    Higher levels of sodium intake are reported to be associated with higher blood pressure. Whether this relationship varies according to levels of sodium or potassium intake and in different populations is unknown. We studied 102,216 adults from 18 countries. Estimates of 24-hour sodium and potassium excretion were made from a single fasting morning urine specimen and were used as surrogates for intake. We assessed the relationship between electrolyte excretion and blood pressure, as measured with an automated device. Regression analyses showed increments of 2.11 mm Hg in systolic blood pressure and 0.78 mm Hg in diastolic blood pressure for each 1-g increment in estimated sodium excretion. The slope of this association was steeper with higher sodium intake (an increment of 2.58 mm Hg in systolic blood pressure per gram for sodium excretion >5 g per day, 1.74 mm Hg per gram for 3 to 5 g per day, and 0.74 mm Hg per gram for 55 years of age, 2.43 mm Hg per gram at 45 to 55 years of age, and 1.96 mm Hg per gram at <45 years of age; P<0.001 for interaction). Potassium excretion was inversely associated with systolic blood pressure, with a steeper slope of association for persons with hypertension than for those without it (P<0.001) and a steeper slope with increased age (P<0.001). In this study, the association of estimated intake of sodium and potassium, as determined from measurements of excretion of these cations, with blood pressure was nonlinear and was most pronounced in persons consuming high-sodium diets, persons with hypertension, and older persons. (Funded by the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario and others.).

  1. Dielectric barrier discharges applied for soft ionization and their mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, Sebastian; Klute, Felix David; Schütz, Alexander; Franzke, Joachim, E-mail: joachim.franzke@isas.de

    2017-01-25

    Dielectric barrier discharges are used for analytical applications as dissociative source for optical emission spectrometry and for ambient-ionization techniques. In the range of ambient-ionization techniques it has attracted much attention in fields like food safety, biological analysis, mass spectrometry for reaction monitoring and imaging forensic identification. In this review some examples are given for the application as desorption/ionization source as well as for the sole application as ionization source with different sample introductions. It will be shown that the detection might depend on the certain distance of the plasma in reference to the sample or the kind of discharge which might be produced by different shapes of the applied high voltage. Some attempts of characterization are presented. A more detailed characterization of the dielectric barrier discharge realized with two ring electrodes, each separately covered with a dielectric layer, is described. - Highlights: • Dielectric barrier discharge applied as desorption/ionization source. • Dielectric barrier discharge applied solely as ionization source. • Different geometries in order to maintain soft ionization. • Characterization of the LTP probe. • Dielectric barrier discharges with two dielectric barriers (ring-ring shape).

  2. Analytical Properties of Solid-substrate Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bin; So, Pui-Kin; Yao, Zhong-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Conventional electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) uses a capillary for sample loading and ionization. Along with the development of ambient ionization techniques, ESI-MS using noncapillary emitters has attracted more interest in recent years. Following our recent report on ESI-MS using wooden tips ( Anal. Chem. 83, 8201-8207 (2011)), the technique was further investigated and extended in this study. Our results revealed that the wooden tips could serve as a chromatographic column for separation of sample components. Sequential and exhaustive ionization was observed for proteins and salts on wooden tips with salts ionized sooner and proteins later. Nonconductive materials that contain microchannels/pores could be used as tips for ESI-MS analysis with sample solutions loaded to the sharp-ends only, since rapid diffusion of sample solutions by capillary action would enable the tips to become conductive. Tips of inert materials such as bamboo, fabrics, and sponge could be used for sample loading and ionization, while samples such as tissue, mushroom, and bone could form tips to induce ionization for direct analysis with application of a high voltage. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  3. A Novel Method for Profiling and Quantifying Short- and Medium-Chain Chlorinated Paraffins in Environmental Samples Using Comprehensive Two-Dimensional Gas Chromatography-Electron Capture Negative Ionization High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Dan; Gao, Lirong; Zheng, Minghui; Tian, Qichang; Huang, Huiting; Qiao, Lin

    2016-07-19

    Chlorinated paraffins (CPs) are complex technical mixtures containing thousands of isomers. Analyzing CPs in environmental matrices is extremely challenging. CPs have broad, unresolved profiles when analyzed by one-dimensional gas chromatography (GC). Comprehensive two-dimensional GC (GC×GC) can separate CPs with a high degree of orthogonality. A novel method for simultaneously profiling and quantifying short- and medium-chain CPs, using GC×GC coupled with electron capture negative ionization high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry, was developed. The method allowed 48 CP formula congener groups to be analyzed highly selectively in one injection through accurate mass measurements of the [M - Cl](-) ions in full scan mode. The correlation coefficients (R(2)) for the linear calibration curves for different chlorine contents were 0.982 for short-chain CPs and 0.945 for medium-chain CPs. The method was successfully used to determine CPs in sediment and fish samples. By using this method, with enhanced chromatographic separation and high mass resolution, interferences between CP congeners and other organohalogen compounds, such as toxaphene, are minimized. New compounds, with the formulas C9H14Cl6 and C9H13Cl7, were found in sediment and biological samples for the first time. The method was shown to be a powerful tool for the analysis of CPs in environmental samples.

  4. Shock Wave Dynamics in Weakly Ionized Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Joseph A., III

    1999-01-01

    An investigation of the dynamics of shock waves in weakly ionized argon plasmas has been performed using a pressure ruptured shock tube. The velocity of the shock is observed to increase when the shock traverses the plasma. The observed increases cannot be accounted for by thermal effects alone. Possible mechanisms that could explain the anomalous behavior include a vibrational/translational relaxation in the nonequilibrium plasma, electron diffusion across the shock front resulting from high electron mobility, and the propagation of ion-acoustic waves generated at the shock front. Using a turbulence model based on reduced kinetic theory, analysis of the observed results suggest a role for turbulence in anomalous shock dynamics in weakly ionized media and plasma-induced hypersonic drag reduction.

  5. Ionized calcium serum evaluation in unilateral thyroidectomized cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katia Barão Corgozinho

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. Corgozinho K.B., Cunha S.C.S., Neves A.P., Belchior C., Damico C.B., Silva C.A., Souza H.J.M.& Ferreira A.M.R. [Ionized calcium serum evaluation in unilateral thyroidectomized cats.] Avaliação do cálcio ionizado em gatos submetidos a tireoidectomia unilateral. Revista Brasileira de Medicina Veterinária 37(4:345-349, 2015. Pós-Graduação em Clínica e Reprodução Animal, Faculdade de Veterinária, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Rua Vital Brasil Filho, 64, Niterói, RJ 24230-340, Brasil. E-mail: katia.barao@gmail.com Seventeen hyperthyroid cats with cervical palpable nodules were submitted to clinical and laboratorial examination and they were prepared to surgery. Unilateral thyroparathyroidectomy with parathyroid gland autotransplantation was performed. Concentrations of serum urea, creatinine, alkaline phosphatase, alanine aminotransferase, phosphorus, potassium, total thyroxine and hematologic profile were determined before and seven days after surgery. Blood samples for serum ionized calcium concentration were collected before and after surgery on days 1, 2, 7, 15, 21. All cats had ionized calcium concentration within the reference range before surgery. Serum calcium concentration fell significantly in all cats within 24 hours after surgery. Hypocalcemia occurred in two cats without clinical signs. Ionized calcium concentration decreased after surgery and returned to normal levels on day 7 postoperatively. The results of this study suggest that calcium concentration must be measured before surgery in cats submitted to thyroidectomy even if they are submitted to unilateral technique.

  6. Potassium and magnesium distribution, ECG changes, and ventricular ectopic beats during beta 2-adrenergic stimulation with terbutaline in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tveskov, C; Djurhuus, M S; Klitgaard, N A

    1994-01-01

    .001). The urinary excretion of potassium decreased from 0.077 mmol/min (0.052 to 0.102) to 0.038 mmol/min (0.025 to 0.051) (p sodium potassium pumps from 1,104.1 nmol/kg dry weight (1,030.6 to 1,177.5) to 1,273.3 nmol/kg dry weight (1,193.5 to 1,353.2) (p ... of sodium-potassium pumps. Furthermore, terbutaline induced changes in ECG with a highly significant lengthening of the QTc interval but with an unchanged number of ventricular ectopic beats in healthy subjects....... or terbutaline (bolus, 0.25 mg; maintenance dose, 5 micrograms/min). SETTING: University Department of Clinical Chemistry. PARTICIPANTS: Ten healthy male volunteers. Mean age was 24.1 (range, 20 to 31) years. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Serum potassium and magnesium muscle potassium and magnesium, and muscle sodium...

  7. Graphene-based filament material for thermal ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hewitt, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Shick, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Siegfried, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-09-19

    The use of graphene oxide materials for thermal ionization mass spectrometry analysis of plutonium and uranium has been investigated. Filament made from graphene oxide slurries have been 3-D printed. A method for attaching these filaments to commercial thermal ionization post assemblies has been devised. Resistive heating of the graphene based filaments under high vacuum showed stable operation in excess of 4 hours. Plutonium ion production has been observed in an initial set of filaments spiked with the Pu 128 Certified Reference Material.

  8. Degradation Effect of Sulfa Antibiotics by Potassium Ferrate Combined with Ultrasound (Fe(VI-US

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kejia Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sulfa antibiotics are a family of typical broad-spectrum antibiotics, which have become one of the most frequently detected antibiotics in water, posing a great threat to human health and ecosystem. Potassium ferrate is a new type of high-efficiency multifunctional water treatment agent, collecting the effects of oxidation, adsorption, flocculation, coagulation, sterilization, and deodorization. Performance and mechanism of degradation of typical broad-spectrum antibiotics by Fe(VI-US were further studied, investigating the degradation effect of sulfa antibiotics by single ultrasound, single potassium ferrate, and potassium ferrate-ultrasound (Fe(VI-US. It was found that Fe(VI-US technology had a significant role in promoting the degradation of sulfa antibiotics via orthogonal experiments. Factors evaluated included sulfa antibiotics type, pH value, potassium ferrate dosage, ultrasonic frequency, and ultrasonic power, with the pH value and potassium ferrate dosage being affected most significantly. One reason for synergy facilitating the degradation is the common oxidation of potassium ferrate and ultrasound, and the other is that Fe(III produced promotes the degradation rate. According to the product analysis and degradation pathways of three sulfa antibiotics, ferrate-sonication sulfa antibiotics are removed by hydroxyl radical oxidation.

  9. Comparative Study of Sodium and Potassium in Different Types of Gallstones and in Serum of Subjects with Gallstones and Controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Mohammad Soomro

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The study comprises evaluation of sodium and potassium in the pathogenesis of human gallstones as well as measurement of the concentration of these elements in gallstones and in sera of 109 gallstone subjects and 100 controls (age and sex matched with no personal or family history of gallstone disease. It was observed that serum concentrations for both sodium and potassium were comparable (p>0.05 between gallstone subjects and control subjects. In gallstones the concentration of sodium was significantly higher as compared to potassium (p<0.05. Normal sodium to potassium ratio was seen in serum of gallstone subjects, whereas, low sodium to potassium ratio was seen in gallstone carriers. Amongst the different types of gallstones, significantly high (p<0.05 concentrations of sodium and potassium were seen in calcium bilirubinate gallstones. The levels for these mineral elements were also raised in serum of pure calcium carbonate gallstone subjects.The results demonstrate that the higher concentration of sodium and potassium in gallstones may involve in both calcium bilirubinate gallstones and in serum of calcium carbonate gallstone subjects, which indicate their association with calcium in the precipitation of calcium bilirubinate and calcium carbonate in bile. Furthermore, low sodium to potassium ratio in gallstones indicates low ratio in bile of gallstone subjects.

  10. Resonance ionization spectroscopy in dysprosium. Excitation scheme development and re-determination of the first ionization potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studer, D.; Dyrauf, P.; Naubereit, P.; Heinke, R.; Wendt, K.

    2017-11-01

    We report on resonance ionization spectroscopy (RIS) of high-lying energy levels in dysprosium. We developed efficient excitation schemes and re-determined the first ionization potential (IP) via analysis of Rydberg convergences. For this purpose both two- and three-step excitation ladders were investigated. An overall ionization efficiency of 25(4) % could be demonstrated in the RISIKO mass separator of Mainz University, using a three-step resonance ionization scheme. Moreover, an extensive analysis of the even-parity 6s ns- and 6s nd-Rydberg-series convergences, measured via two-step excitation was performed. To account for strong perturbations in the observed s-series, the approach of multichannel quantum defect theory (MQDT) was applied. Considering all individual series limits we extracted an IP-value of 47901.76(5) cm-1, which agrees with the current literature value of 47901.7(6) cm-1, but is one order of magnitude more precise.

  11. [The technological progress in haemodialysis: potassium profiling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kes, Petar; Racki, Sanjin; Basić-Jukić, Nikolina; Ratković-Gusić, Iva

    2008-01-01

    Patients with the end-stage renal disease often suffer from numerous concomitant diseases. The most common are complications of the cardiovascular system. During the haemodialysis treatment, rapid changes in volume status, osmolality and electrolyte composition of the blood, cause disturbances which manifest as haemodynamic instability, hypotension and cardiac arrhythmias. Especially vulnerable are elderly patients and patients with generalized atherosclerosis, diabetes mellitus, and severe anaemia. Rapid decrease in serum potassium concentration may cause fatal arrhythmias. Contemporary dialysis machines enable slow lowering of potassium concentration during the haemodialysis session (or during the acetate-free biofiltration), what significantly decreases incidence of cardiac arrhythmias and improve cardiovascular stability.

  12. Improved Synthesis Of Potassium Beta' '-Alumina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Roger M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara; Ryan, Margaret A.; O'Connor, Dennis E.; Kisor, Adam; Underwood, Mark

    1996-01-01

    Improved formulations of precursor materials synthesize nearly-phase-pure potassium beta' '-alumina solid electrolyte (K-BASE) powder. Materials are microhomogeneous powders (or, alternatively, gels) containing K(+,) Mg(2+), and Al(3+). K-BASE powder produced used in potassium-working-fluid alkali-metal thermal-to-electric conversion (K-AMTEC), in which heat-input and heat-rejection temperatures lower than sodium-working-fluid AMTEC (Na-AMTEC). Additional potential use lies in purification of pottassium by removal of sodium and calcium.

  13. Coupling of Phosphate-Imprinted Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles-Based Selective Enrichment with Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry for Highly Efficient Analysis of Protein Phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yang; Li, Daojin; Bie, Zijun; He, Xinpei; Liu, Zhen

    2016-01-19

    Protein phosphorylation is a major post-translational modification and represents a ubiquitous mechanism for the cellular signaling of many different biological processes. Selective enrichment of phosphopeptides from the complex biological samples is a key step for the mass spectrometric (MS) analysis of protein phosphorylation. Herein, we present phosphate-imprinted mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) as an ideal sorbent for selective enrichment of phosphopeptides and an off-line combination with matrix-asisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for highly efficient analysis of protein phosphorylation. The phosphate-imprinted MSNs were prepared according to a newly reported strategy called dual-template docking oriented molecular imprinting (DTD-OMI). The prepared molecularly imprinted mesoporous material exhibited several significant merits, such as excellent selectivity toward phosphopeptides, tolerance to interference, fast binding equilibrium, and large binding capacity, which made the molecularly imprinted mesoporous material an ideal sorbent for selective enrichment of phosphopeptides. Using β-casein as a representative phosphoprotein, highly efficient phosphorylation analysis by the off-line platform was verified. Phosphorylation analysis of a nonfat milk sample was also well demonstrated. Because of their highly desirable properties, the phosphate-imprinted MSNs could find more applications in the analysis of protein phosphorylation.

  14. Resonance ionization scheme development for europium

    CERN Document Server

    Chrysalidis, K; Fedosseev, V N; Marsh, B A; Naubereit, P; Rothe, S; Seiffert, C; Kron, T; Wendt, K

    2017-01-01

    Odd-parity autoionizing states of europium have been investigated by resonance ionization spectroscopy via two-step, two-resonance excitations. The aim of this work was to establish ionization schemes specifically suited for europium ion beam production using the ISOLDE Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source (RILIS). 13 new RILIS-compatible ionization schemes are proposed. The scheme development was the first application of the Photo Ionization Spectroscopy Apparatus (PISA) which has recently been integrated into the RILIS setup.

  15. Resonance ionization scheme development for europium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chrysalidis, K., E-mail: katerina.chrysalidis@cern.ch; Goodacre, T. Day; Fedosseev, V. N.; Marsh, B. A. [CERN (Switzerland); Naubereit, P. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, Institiut für Physik (Germany); Rothe, S.; Seiffert, C. [CERN (Switzerland); Kron, T.; Wendt, K. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, Institiut für Physik (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    Odd-parity autoionizing states of europium have been investigated by resonance ionization spectroscopy via two-step, two-resonance excitations. The aim of this work was to establish ionization schemes specifically suited for europium ion beam production using the ISOLDE Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source (RILIS). 13 new RILIS-compatible ionization schemes are proposed. The scheme development was the first application of the Photo Ionization Spectroscopy Apparatus (PISA) which has recently been integrated into the RILIS setup.

  16. Comparison of ultra-high performance methods in liquid and supercritical fluid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization - mass spectrometry for impurity profiling of drug candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemasson, Elise; Bertin, Sophie; Hennig, Philippe; Lesellier, Eric; West, Caroline

    2016-11-11

    Impurity profiling of organic products synthesized as possible drug candidates represents a major analytical challenge. Complementary analytical methods are required to ensure that all impurities are detected. Both high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) can be used for this purpose. In this study, we compared ultra-high performance HPLC (UHPLC) and ultra-high performance SFC (UHPSFC) using a large dataset of 140 pharmaceutical compounds. Four previously optimized methods (two on each technique) were selected to ensure fast high-resolution separations. The four methods were evaluated based on response rate, peak capacity, peak shape and capability to detect impurities (UV). The orthogonality between all methods was also assessed. The best UHPLC method and UHPSFC methods provided comparable quality for the 140 compounds included in this study. Moreover, they were found to be highly orthogona