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Sample records for highly conformal treatment

  1. Treatment accuracy of hypofractionated spine and other highly conformal IMRT treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutherland, B.; Hanlon, P.; Charles, P.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Spinal cord metastases pose difficult challenges for radiation treatment due to tight dose constraints and a concave PTY. This project aimed to thoroughly test the treatment accuracy of the Eclipse Treatment Planning System (TPS) for highly modulated IMRT treatments, in particular of the thoracic spine, using an Elekta Synergy Linear Accelerator. The increased understanding obtained through different quality assurance techniques allowed recommendations to be made for treatment site commissioning with improved accuracy at the Princess Alexandra Hospital (PAH). Three thoracic spine IMRT plans at the PAH were used for data collection. Complex phantom models were built using CT data, and fields simulated using Monte Carlo modelling. The simulated dose distributions were compared with the TPS using gamma analysis and DYH comparison. High resolution QA was done for all fields using the MatriXX ion chamber array, MapCHECK2 diode array shifted, and the EPlD to determine a procedure for commissioning new treatment sites. Basic spine simulations found the TPS overestimated absorbed dose to bone, however within spinal cord there was good agreement. High resolution QA found the average gamma pass rate of the fields to be 99.1 % for MatriXX, 96.5% for MapCHECK2 shifted and 97.7% for EPlD. Preliminary results indicate agreement between the TPS and delivered dose distributions higher than previously believed for the investigated IMRT plans. The poor resolution of the MatriXX, and normalisation issues with MapCHECK2 leads to probable recommendation of EPlD for future IMRT commissioning due to the high resolution and minimal setup required.

  2. 3D-conformal radiotherapy treatment of high grade gliomas of malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chon Rivas, Ivonne; Chi Ramirez, Daysi; Alert Silva, Jose; Roca Muchuli, Carlos; Leon Gonzalez, Roberto; Perez Penna, Lourdes

    2009-01-01

    Patients diagnosed with high grade gliomas of malignancy (A), have a high mortality rate, about 10% achieve survivals than one year due to poor local control resulting from the inability of high doses of radiation to tumor volume by dose-limiting provided by healthy peritumoral tissues and structures. 3D conformal radiotherapy (RT-3DC) achieves effective tumoricidal high doses with high precision on the tumor with minimal involvement of critical structures near the tumor target volume. From 2005 until 2008 at INOR, a total of 23 patients with histologically confirmed supratentorial gliomas location, histological subtypes of anaplastic astrocytoma (AA) in 8 patients (35%) and Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) in 15 patients (65%), aged between 18 and 65, Karnofski scale of 70 or more and total previous surgical resection in 10 patients (43%) or partial in 13 (57%) were included prospectively in this study. The total tumor dose of 66-70 Gy was prescribed with a daily fractionation of 1.8 Gy. All patients underwent CT images (CT) and MRI (MRI) cranial volumes were defined treatment planning according to the concepts of ICRU 50 and 62 with precise immobilization of the head by thermo deformed mask, CT 3mm cuts planning system and 3D treatment planning. Median survival was better in patients younger than 55 years, with high rates of Karnofski, histology of AA and higher percentage of surgical resection. Median survival (Kaplan-Meier method) obtained was 16 months. Survival at 1 and 2 years was 51% and 28% respectively. The RT-3DC can administer higher doses on the tumor with peritumoral healthy protection structures in selected patients with a diagnosis of AA or GBM, increasing local control and potentially overall survival without exacerbating toxicity, thus demonstrating the dose- response of malignant brain tumors. (Author)

  3. Chronic rectal bleeding after high dose conformal treatment of prostate cancer warrants modification of existing morbidity scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanlon, A.L.; Schulthiess, T.E.; Hunt, M.A.; Movsas, B.; Peter, R.; Hanks, G.E.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Serious late morbidity (Grade (3(4))) from the conformal treatment of prostate cancer has been reported in <1% to 6% of patients. This study demonstrates that the reported frequency of Grade (3(4)) complications varies by the morbidity scale selected and that no existing morbidity scale adequately represents chronic rectal bleeding, which is our most frequent persisting late sequela of high dose conformal treatment. Materials and Methods: Between (5(89)) and (12(93)), 352 patients with T1-3 NXM0 prostate cancers were treated with our 4-field conformal technique without special rectal blocking. This technique includes a 1 cm margin from the CTV to the PTV in all directions. The median follow-up for these patients was 38 mos (4 to 78), and the median ICRU reporting point dose was 74 Gy (63 to 81). Patients are followed at six month intervals, and no patient is lost to follow-up. Three morbidity scales are assessed, the RTOG, the late effects group (LENT), and our modification of the LENT (FC-LENT). This modification registers chronic rectal bleeding requiring more than two coagulations as a grade 3 event. Estimates for Grade (3(4)) late GI complication rates were determined using Kaplan-Meier methodology. Differences in morbidity rates were evaluated using the log-rank test and differences in time to latency of complications were evaluated using the nonparametric Wilcoxon test. The duration of severe symptoms with chronic rectal bleeding is measured from the first to the last transrectal coagulation. Results: Sixteen patients developed Grade (3(4)) complications by one of the three morbidity scales. Two patients required surgery (colostomy, sigmoid resection), 5 required a transfusion, and 9 required more than two coagulations. The median latency to the third coagulation (plus or minus transfusions) was 24 mos (17 to 40). The median duration of bleeding between the first and last coagulation was 6 mos (3 to 25), illustrating the chronicity of this problem

  4. Chronic rectal bleeding after high-dose conformal treatment of prostate cancer warrants modification of existing morbidity scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Schultheiss, Timothy E.; Hunt, Margie A.; Movsas, Benjamin; Peter, Ruth S.; Hanks, Gerald E.

    1997-01-01

    coagulations. The median duration of bleeding for those patients requiring multiple procedures was 7 months (range 3-33) and the median latency was 22 months (range 9-40). The 5-year actuarial rate of Grade (3(4)) complications by each scale are: RTOG 0.7%, LENT 2%, and FC-LENT 6%. The rate of chronic rectal bleeding increases with increasing dose and is low in patients treated with conventional techniques owing to lower doses. Conclusion: Chronic rectal bleeding requiring any blood transfusion(s) or multiple coagulation procedures is our most frequently observed complication. This complication appears late in follow-up and is present for a long duration. We believe this justifies the inclusion of chronic rectal bleeding requiring multiple coagulation procedures as a Grade 3 event in future morbidity scales. Our data illustrate that published Grade (3(4)) morbidity rates are highly dependent on the morbidity scale selected, as our data show 0.7% RTOG, 2% LENT, and 6% FC-LENT. Obviously, a uniform scale is required that includes the newly recognized serious late effects associated with the conformal treatment of prostate cancer

  5. 94: Treatment plan optimization for conformal therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, I.I.; Lane, R.G.

    1987-01-01

    Computer-controlled conformal radiation therapy techniques can deliver complex treatments utilizing large numbers of beams, gantry angles and beam shapes. Linear programming is well-suited for planning conformal treatments. Given a list of available treatment beams, linear programming calculates the relative weights of the beams such that the objective function is optimized and doses to constraint points are within the prescribed limits. 5 refs.; 3 figs

  6. 3-D conformal radiation therapy - Part I: Treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burman, Chandra M.; Mageras, Gikas S.

    1997-01-01

    Objective: In this presentation we will look into the basic components of 3-dimensional conformal treatment planning, and will discuss planning for some selected sites. We will also review some current and future trends in 3-D treatment planning. External beam radiation therapy is one of the arms of cancer treatment. In the recent years 3-D conformal therapy had significant impact on the practice of external beam radiation therapy. Conformal radiation therapy shapes the high-dose volume so as to conform to the target volume while minimizing the dose to the surrounding normal tissues. The advances that have been achieved in conformal therapy are in part due to the development of 3-D treatment planning, which in turn has capitalized on 3-D imaging for tumor and normal tissue localization, as well as on available computational power for the calculation of 3-D dose distributions, visualization of anatomical and dose volumes, and numerical evaluation of treatment plans. In this course we will give an overview of how 3-D conformal treatments are designed and transferred to the patient. Topics will include: 1) description of the major components of a 3-D treatment planning system, 2) techniques for designing treatments, 3) evaluation of treatment plans using dose distribution displays, dose-volume histograms and normal tissue complication probabilities, 4) implementation of treatments using shaped blocks and multileaf collimators, 5) verification of treatment delivery using portal films and electronic portal imaging devices. We will also discuss some current and future trends in 3-D treatment planning, such as field shaping with multileaf collimation, computerized treatment plan optimization, including the use of nonuniform beam profiles (intensity modulation), and incorporating treatment uncertainties due to patient positioning errors and organ motion into treatment planning process

  7. 3-D conformal treatment of prostate cancer to 74 Gy vs. high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost: A cross-sectional quality-of-life survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vordermark, Dirk [Univ. of Wuerzburg (DE). Dept. of Radiation Oncology] (and others)

    2006-09-15

    The effects of two modalities of dose-escalated radiotherapy on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) were compared. Forty-one consecutive patients were treated with a 3-D conformal (3-DC) boost to 74 Gy, and 43 with high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy boost (2x9 Gy), following 3-D conformal treatment to 46 Gy. Median age was 70 years in both groups, median initial PSA was 7.9 {mu}g/l in 3-DC boost patients and 8.1 {mu}g/l in HDR boost patients. Stage was 7 in 52% and 47%, respectively. HRQOL was assessed cross-sectionally using EORTC QLQ-C30 and organ-specific PR25 modules 3-32 (median 19) and 4-25 (median 14) months after treatment, respectively. Questionnaires were completed by 93% and 97% of patients, respectively. Diarrhea and insomnia scores were significantly increased in both groups. In the PR25 module, scores of 3-DC boost and HDR boost patients for urinary, bowel and treatment-related symptoms were similar. Among responders, 34% of 3-DC boost patients and 86% of HDR boost patients had severe erectile problems. Dose escalation in prostate cancer by either 3-DC boost to 74 Gy or HDR brachytherapy boost appears to result in similar HRQOL profiles.

  8. 3-D conformal treatment of prostate cancer to 74 Gy vs. high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost: A cross-sectional quality-of-life survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vordermark, Dirk

    2006-01-01

    The effects of two modalities of dose-escalated radiotherapy on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) were compared. Forty-one consecutive patients were treated with a 3-D conformal (3-DC) boost to 74 Gy, and 43 with high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy boost (2x9 Gy), following 3-D conformal treatment to 46 Gy. Median age was 70 years in both groups, median initial PSA was 7.9 μg/l in 3-DC boost patients and 8.1 μg/l in HDR boost patients. Stage was 7 in 52% and 47%, respectively. HRQOL was assessed cross-sectionally using EORTC QLQ-C30 and organ-specific PR25 modules 3-32 (median 19) and 4-25 (median 14) months after treatment, respectively. Questionnaires were completed by 93% and 97% of patients, respectively. Diarrhea and insomnia scores were significantly increased in both groups. In the PR25 module, scores of 3-DC boost and HDR boost patients for urinary, bowel and treatment-related symptoms were similar. Among responders, 34% of 3-DC boost patients and 86% of HDR boost patients had severe erectile problems. Dose escalation in prostate cancer by either 3-DC boost to 74 Gy or HDR brachytherapy boost appears to result in similar HRQOL profiles

  9. CT-image based conformal high-dose rate brachytherapy boost in the conservative treatment of stage I - II breast cancer - introducing the procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubaszewska, M.; Skowronek, J.; Chichel, A.; Kanikowski, M.; Dymnicka, M.

    2008-01-01

    Aim: Breast-conserving surgery (BCS) followed by radiotherapy (RT) has become the standard treatment for the majority of patients with early breast cancer. With regard to boost technique some disagreements are found between groups that are emphasizing the value of electron boost treatment and groups pointing out the value of interstitial brachytherapy (BT) boost treatment. We present the preliminary results in treating selected patients with early-stage breast cancer using high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HD R-BT) as a boost after breast conservation therapy (BCT). Materials/Methods: Between January 2006 and August 2007, a total of 58 female patients with first and second stage breast cancer underwent BCT. This therapeutic procedure involves BCS, whole breast radiation therapy (WBRT) and additional irradiation to the tumour bed (boost) using interstitial HDR-BT via flexible implant tubes. A 10 Gy boost dose was received by all patients. The treatment planning was based on CT-guided 3D (three-dimensional) reconstruction of the surgical clips, implant tubes and critical structures localization (skin and ribs). The accuracy of tumour bed localization, the conformity of planning target volume and treated volume were analyzed. Results: The evaluations of implant parameters involved the use of: dose volume histogram (DVH), the volume encompassed by the 100% reference isodose surface (V100%), the high dose volumecalculation (V150%, V200%, V300%), the dose non-uniformity ratio (DNR), and the conformity index (COIN). Our results were as follows: the mean PTV volume, the mean high dose volume (V150%; V200%; V300%), the DNR and COIN mean value were estimated at 57.38, 42.98, 21.38, 7.90, 0.52 and 0.83 respectively. Conclusions: CT-guided 3D HDR-BT is most appropriate for planning the boost procedure after BT especially in large breast volume, in cases with a deep seated tumour bed, as well as in patients with high risk for local recurrences. This technique reduces the

  10. Direct tumor in vivo dosimetry in highly-conformal radiotherapy: A feasibility study of implantable MOSFETs for hypofractionated extracranial treatments using the Cyberknife system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scalchi, Paolo; Righetto, Roberto; Cavedon, Carlo; Francescon, Paolo; Colombo, Federico

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: In highly-conformal radiotherapy, due to the complexity of both beam configurations and dose distributions, traditional in vivo dosimetry is unpractical or even impossible. The ideal dosimeter would be implanted inside the planning treatment volume so that it can directly measure the total delivered dose during each fraction with no additional uncertainty due to calculation models. The aim of this work is to verify if implantable metal oxide semiconductors field effect transistors (MOSFETs) can achieve a sufficient degree of dosimetric accuracy when used inside extracranial targets undergoing radiotherapy treatments using the Cyberknife system. Methods: Based on the preliminary findings of this study, new prototypes for high dose fractionations were developed to reduce the time dependence for long treatment delivery times. These dosimeters were recently cleared and are marketed as DVS-HFT. Multiple measurements were performed using both Virtual Water and water phantoms to characterize implantable MOSFETs under the Cyberknife beams, and included the reference-dosimetry consistency, the dependence of the response on the collimator size, on the daily delivered dose, and the time irradiation modality. Finally a Cyberknife prostate treatment simulation using a body phantom was conducted, and both MOSFET and ionization readings were compared to Monte Carlo calculations. The feasibility analysis was conducted based on the ratios of the absorbed dose divided by the dose reading, named as ''further calibration factor'' (FCF). Results: The average FCFs resulted to be 0.98 for the collimator dependence test, and about 1.00 for the reference-dosimetry test, the dose-dependence test, and the time-dependence test. The average FCF of the prostate treatment simulation test was 0.99. Conclusions: The obtained results are well within DVS specifications, that is, the factory calibration is still valid for such kind of treatments using the Cyberknife system, with no need of

  11. Dosimetric quality assurance of highly conformal external beam treatments: from 2D phantom comparisons to 4D patient dose reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feygelman, V; Nelms, B

    2013-01-01

    As IMRT technology continues to evolve, so do the dosimetric QA methods. A historical review of those is presented, starting with longstanding techniques such as film and ion chamber in a phantom and progressing towards 3D and 4D dose reconstruction in the patient. Regarding patient-specific QA, we envision that the currently prevalent limited comparison of dose distributions in the phantom by γ-analysis will be eventually replaced by clinically meaningful patient dose analyses with improved sensitivity and specificity. In a larger sense, we envision a future of QA built upon lessons from the rich history of ''quality'' as a science and philosophy. This future will aim to improve quality (and ultimately reduce cost) via advanced commissioning processes that succeed in detecting and rooting out systematic errors upstream of patient treatment, thus reducing our reliance on, and the resource burden associated with, per-beam/per-plan inspection.

  12. Dosimetric quality assurance of highly conformal external beam treatments: from 2D phantom comparisons to 4D patient dose reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feygelman, V.; Nelms, B.

    2013-06-01

    As IMRT technology continues to evolve, so do the dosimetric QA methods. A historical review of those is presented, starting with longstanding techniques such as film and ion chamber in a phantom and progressing towards 3D and 4D dose reconstruction in the patient. Regarding patient-specific QA, we envision that the currently prevalent limited comparison of dose distributions in the phantom by γ-analysis will be eventually replaced by clinically meaningful patient dose analyses with improved sensitivity and specificity. In a larger sense, we envision a future of QA built upon lessons from the rich history of "quality" as a science and philosophy. This future will aim to improve quality (and ultimately reduce cost) via advanced commissioning processes that succeed in detecting and rooting out systematic errors upstream of patient treatment, thus reducing our reliance on, and the resource burden associated with, per-beam/per-plan inspection.

  13. Comparing two strategies of dynamic intensity modulated radiation therapy (dIMRT with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT in the hypofractionated treatment of high-risk prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yartsev Slav

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To compare two strategies of dynamic intensity modulated radiation therapy (dIMRT with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT in the setting of hypofractionated high-risk prostate cancer treatment. Methods 3DCRT and dIMRT/Helical Tomotherapy(HT planning with 10 CT datasets was undertaken to deliver 68 Gy in 25 fractions (prostate and simultaneously delivering 45 Gy in 25 fractions (pelvic lymph node targets in a single phase. The paradigms of pelvic vessel targeting (iliac vessels with margin are used to target pelvic nodes and conformal normal tissue avoidance (treated soft tissues of the pelvis while limiting dose to identified pelvic critical structures were assessed compared to 3DCRT controls. Both dIMRT/HT and 3DCRT solutions were compared to each other using repeated measures ANOVA and post-hoc paired t-tests. Results When compared to conformal pelvic vessel targeting, conformal normal tissue avoidance delivered more homogenous PTV delivery (2/2 t-test comparisons; p dose, 1–3 Gy over 5/10 dose points; p Conclusion dIMRT/HT nodal and pelvic targeting is superior to 3DCRT in dose delivery and critical structure sparing in the setting of hypofractionation for high-risk prostate cancer. The pelvic targeting paradigm is a potential solution to deliver highly conformal pelvic radiation treatment in the setting of nodal location uncertainty in prostate cancer and other pelvic malignancies.

  14. Skull base chordomas: treatment outcome and prognostic factors in adult patients following conformal treatment with 3D planning and high dose fractionated combined proton and photon radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munzenrider, J E; Hug, E; McManus, P; Adams, J; Efird, J; Liebsch, N J

    1995-07-01

    Purpose: To report treatment outcome and prognostic factors for local recurrence-free survival and overall survival in adult patients with skull base chordomas treated with 3D planning and high dose fractionated combined proton and photon radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: From 1975 through 1993, 132 adult patients with skull base chordomas were treated with fractionated combined proton and photon radiation therapy. Seventy five patients (57%) were male and 57 (43%) female. Age ranged from 19 to 80 years (median 45.5 years). All pathology was verified at MGH by a single pathologist. Ninety six had non-chondroid (NCC) and 36 chondroid chordomas (CC), respectively. Median prescribed dose was 68.7 CGE (CGE, Cobalt Gray-equivalent: proton Gy X RBE 1.1 + photon Gy), ranging from 36 to 79.2 CGE; 95% received {>=} 66.6 CGE. Between 70 and 100% of the dose was given with the 160 MeV proton beam at the Harvard Cyclotron. 3D CT-based treatment planning has been employed in all patients treated since 1980. Median follow-up was 46 months (range 2-158 months). Results: Treatment outcome was evaluated in terms of local recurrence-free survival (LRFS) and disease specific survival (DSS), as well as treatment-related morbidity. Local failure (LF), defined as progressive neurological deficit with definite increase in tumor volume on CT or MRI scan, occurred in 39 patients (29.5%). LF was more common among women than among men:(26(57)) (46%) vs (13(75)) (17%), respectively. Thirty three of the 39 LF were seen in non-chondroid chordoma patients, with 6 occurring in patients with the chondroid variant (34% of NCC and 17% of CC), respectively. Distant metastasis was documented in 8 patients. LRFS was 81 {+-} 5.8%, 59 {+-} 8.3%, and 43 {+-} 10.4%, and DSS was 94 {+-} 3.6%, 80 {+-} 6.7%, and 50 {+-} 10.7% at 36, 60, and 96 months, respectively, for the total group. LRFS and DSS were not significantly different for patients with NCC than those with CC (p > .05). Gender was

  15. A high-precision system for conformal intracranial radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tome, Wolfgang A.; Meeks, Sanford L.; Buatti, John M.; Bova, Francis J.; Friedman, William A.; Li Zuofeng

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: Currently, optimally precise delivery of intracranial radiotherapy is possible with stereotactic radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. We report on an optimally precise optically guided system for three-dimensional (3D) conformal radiotherapy using multiple noncoplanar fixed fields. Methods and Materials: The optically guided system detects infrared light emitting diodes (IRLEDs) attached to a custom bite plate linked to the patient's maxillary dentition. The IRLEDs are monitored by a commercially available stereo camera system, which is interfaced to a personal computer. An IRLED reference is established with the patient at the selected stereotactic isocenter, and the computer reports the patient's current position based on the location of the IRLEDs relative to this reference position. Using this readout from the computer, the patient may be dialed directly to the desired position in stereotactic space. The patient is localized on the first day and a reference file is established for 5 different couch positions. The patient's image data are then imported into a commercial convolution-based 3D radiotherapy planning system. The previously established isocenter and couch positions are then used as a template upon which to design a conformal 3D plan with maximum beam separation. Results: The use of the optically guided system in conjunction with noncoplanar radiotherapy treatment planning using fixed fields allows the generation of highly conformal treatment plans that exhibit a high degree of dose homogeneity and a steep dose gradient. To date, this approach has been used to treat 28 patients. Conclusion: Because IRLED technology improves the accuracy of patient localization relative to the linac isocenter and allows real-time monitoring of patient position, one can choose treatment-field margins that only account for beam penumbra and image resolution without adding margin to account for larger and poorly defined setup uncertainty. This

  16. Conformal Radiotherapy: Physics, Treatment Planning and Verification. Proceedings book

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Wagter, C [ed.

    1995-12-01

    The goal of conformal radiotherapy is to establish radiation dose distributions that conform tightly to the target volume in view of limiting radiation to normal tissues. Conformal radiotherapy significantly improves both local control and palliation and thus contributes to increase survival and to improve the quality of life. The subjects covered by the symposium include : (1) conformal radiotherapy and multi-leaf collimation; (2) three dimensional imaging; (3) treatment simulation, planning and optimization; (4) quality assurance; and (5) dosimetry. The book of proceedings contains the abstracts of the invited lectures, papers and poster presentations as well as the full papers of these contributions.

  17. Conformal Radiotherapy: Physics, Treatment Planning and Verification. Proceedings book

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Wagter, C.

    1995-12-01

    The goal of conformal radiotherapy is to establish radiation dose distributions that conform tightly to the target volume in view of limiting radiation to normal tissues. Conformal radiotherapy significantly improves both local control and palliation and thus contributes to increase survival and to improve the quality of life. The subjects covered by the symposium include : (1) conformal radiotherapy and multi-leaf collimation; (2) three dimensional imaging; (3) treatment simulation, planning and optimization; (4) quality assurance; and (5) dosimetry. The book of proceedings contains the abstracts of the invited lectures, papers and poster presentations as well as the full papers of these contributions

  18. Conformal three dimensional radiotherapy treatment planning in Lund

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoos, T; Nilsson, P [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Radiation Physics; Anders, A [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Oncology

    1995-12-01

    The use of conformal therapy is based on 3-dimensional treatment planning as well as on methods and routines for 3-dimensional patient mapping, 3-dimensional virtual simulation and others. The management of patients at the Radiotherapy Department at the University Hospital in Lund (Sweden) is discussed. About 2100 new patients are annually treated with external radiotherapy using seven linear accelerators. Three of the accelerators have dual photon energies and electron treatment facilities. A multi-leaf collimator as well as an electronic portal imaging device are available on one machine. Two simulators and an in-house CT-scanner are used for treatment planning. From 1988 to 1992 Scandiplan (Umplan) was used. Since 1992, the treatment planning system is TMS (HELAX AB, Sweden), which is based on the pencil beam algorithm of Ahnesjo. The calculations use patient modulated accelerator specific energy fluence spectra which are compiled with pencil beams from Monte Carlo generated energy absorption kernels. Heterogeneity corrections are performed with results close to conventional algorithms. Irregular fields, either from standard or individual blocks and from multi-leaf collimators are handled by the treatment planning system. The field shape is determined conveniently using the beam`s eye view. The final field shape is exported electronically to either the block cutting machine or the multileaf collimator control computer. All patient fields are checked against the beam`s eye view during simulation using manual methods. Treatment verification is performed by portal films and in vivo dosimetry with silicon diodes or TL-dosimetry. Up to now, approximately 4400 patients have received a highly individualized 3-dimensional conformal treatment.

  19. Conformal three dimensional radiotherapy treatment planning in Lund

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoos, T.; Nilsson, P.; Anders, A.

    1995-01-01

    The use of conformal therapy is based on 3-dimensional treatment planning as well as on methods and routines for 3-dimensional patient mapping, 3-dimensional virtual simulation and others. The management of patients at the Radiotherapy Department at the University Hospital in Lund (Sweden) is discussed. About 2100 new patients are annually treated with external radiotherapy using seven linear accelerators. Three of the accelerators have dual photon energies and electron treatment facilities. A multi-leaf collimator as well as an electronic portal imaging device are available on one machine. Two simulators and an in-house CT-scanner are used for treatment planning. From 1988 to 1992 Scandiplan (Umplan) was used. Since 1992, the treatment planning system is TMS (HELAX AB, Sweden), which is based on the pencil beam algorithm of Ahnesjo. The calculations use patient modulated accelerator specific energy fluence spectra which are compiled with pencil beams from Monte Carlo generated energy absorption kernels. Heterogeneity corrections are performed with results close to conventional algorithms. Irregular fields, either from standard or individual blocks and from multi-leaf collimators are handled by the treatment planning system. The field shape is determined conveniently using the beam's eye view. The final field shape is exported electronically to either the block cutting machine or the multileaf collimator control computer. All patient fields are checked against the beam's eye view during simulation using manual methods. Treatment verification is performed by portal films and in vivo dosimetry with silicon diodes or TL-dosimetry. Up to now, approximately 4400 patients have received a highly individualized 3-dimensional conformal treatment

  20. Comparing two strategies of dynamic intensity modulated radiation therapy (dIMRT) with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) in the hypofractionated treatment of high-risk prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuen, Jasper; Rodrigues, George; Trenka, Kristina; Coad, Terry; Yartsev, Slav; D'Souza, David; Lock, Michael; Bauman, Glenn

    2008-01-01

    To compare two strategies of dynamic intensity modulated radiation therapy (dIMRT) with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) in the setting of hypofractionated high-risk prostate cancer treatment. 3DCRT and dIMRT/Helical Tomotherapy(HT) planning with 10 CT datasets was undertaken to deliver 68 Gy in 25 fractions (prostate) and simultaneously delivering 45 Gy in 25 fractions (pelvic lymph node targets) in a single phase. The paradigms of pelvic vessel targeting (iliac vessels with margin are used to target pelvic nodes) and conformal normal tissue avoidance (treated soft tissues of the pelvis while limiting dose to identified pelvic critical structures) were assessed compared to 3DCRT controls. Both dIMRT/HT and 3DCRT solutions were compared to each other using repeated measures ANOVA and post-hoc paired t-tests. When compared to conformal pelvic vessel targeting, conformal normal tissue avoidance delivered more homogenous PTV delivery (2/2 t-test comparisons; p < 0.001), similar nodal coverage (8/8 t-test comparisons; p = ns), higher and more homogenous pelvic tissue dose (6/6 t-test comparisons; p < 0.03), at the cost of slightly higher critical structure dose (D dose , 1–3 Gy over 5/10 dose points; p < 0.03). The dIMRT/HT approaches were superior to 3DCRT in sparing organs at risk (22/24 t-test comparisons; p < 0.05). dIMRT/HT nodal and pelvic targeting is superior to 3DCRT in dose delivery and critical structure sparing in the setting of hypofractionation for high-risk prostate cancer. The pelvic targeting paradigm is a potential solution to deliver highly conformal pelvic radiation treatment in the setting of nodal location uncertainty in prostate cancer and other pelvic malignancies

  1. Ultrasound-guided high dose rate conformal brachytherapy boost in prostate cancer: treatment description and preliminary results of a phase I/II clinical trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stromberg, Jannifer; Martinez, Alvaro; Gonzalez, Jose; Edmundson, Gregory; Ohanian, Neshan; Vicini, Frank; Hollander, Jay; Gustafson, Gary; Spencer, William; Di, Yan; Brabbins, Donald

    1995-08-30

    Purpose: To improve results for locally advanced prostate cancer, a prospective clinical trial of concurrent external beam irradiation and fractionated iridium-192 (Ir-192) high dose rate (HDR) conformal boost brachytherapy was initiated. Methods and Materials: Between November 1991 and February 1994, 99 implants were performed on 33 patients with prostatic adenocarcinoma at William Beaumont Hospital. Using AJCC staging criteria, 9 patients had T2b tumors, 17 patients had T2c tumors, and 7 patients had T3 disease. Patients were treated with (a) 45.6 Gy whole pelvis external irradiation and (b) three HDR fractions of 5.5 Gy each (18 patients) or 6 Gy each (15 patients) to the prostate. Transperineal needle implants using real-time ultrasound guidance with interactive on-line isodose distributions were performed on an outpatient basis during weeks 1, 2, and 3 of external irradiation. Acute toxicity was scored using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) morbidity grading system. Results: This technique of concurrent external pelvic irradiation and conformal HDR brachytherapy was well tolerated. No significant intraoperative or perioperative complications occurred. Three patients (9%) experienced Grade 3 acute toxicity (two dysuria and one diarrhea). All toxicities were otherwise Grades 1 or 2 and were primarily as expected from pelvic external irradiation. Persistent implant-related toxicities included Grades 1-2 perineal pain (12%) and hematospermia (15%). Median follow-up time was 13 months. Serum prostatic-specific antigen (PSA) levels normalized in 91% of patients (29 out of 32) within 1-14 months (median 2.8 months) after irradiation. PSA levels were progressively decreasing in the other three patients at last measurement. Prospectively planned prostatic rebiopsies done at 18 months in the first 10 patients were negative in 9 out of 10 (90%). Conclusions: Acute toxicity has been acceptable with this unique approach using conformal high dose rate Ir-192

  2. Quality assurance of a conformal treatment technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroes, A P.G.; Bruinvis, I A.D.; Lanson, J H; Uiterwaal, G J [Nederlands Kanker Inst. ` Antoni van Leeuwenhoekhuis` , Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1995-12-01

    For a parotid gland irradiation technique with a pair of oblique wedged photon beams the target coverage near the surface was investigated. The planning target volume extends to 5 millimetres under the skin; a minimum target dose of 95% is required when the dose at the centre is set to 100%. The treatment technique was simulated on a water phantom with a beam of 45 degree gantry angle, 55 degree wedge, 8 x 10 cm{sup 2} field size and the isocentre at 2 cm depth. Beam energies of 4, 6 and 8 MV were used. The dose distributions were measured in two orthogonal planes through the isocentre perpendicular to the water surface with p-type silicon diodes along lines through the isocentre every 45 degrees. Dose distributions were calculated in these planes with our 3-D planning system (U-Mplan, University of Michigan planning system), with model parameters are fitted to depth dose curves and profiles of open and wedged normally incident beams. The location of the 95% isodose was determined in five points near the surface. For 4, 6 and 8 MV the depths of the 95% isodose were 6.0, 10.3 and 11.0 mm, respectively. The depths of the 95% points of single normally incident open fields were 6.0, 9.0 and 11.5 mm, respectively. The treatment planning system (TPS) calculated the 95% isodose for the parotid technique at 5.5, 7.3 and 11.5 mm depths, for 4, 6 and 8 MV, respectively. Thus for 6 MV the 95% was 3 mm deeper than calculated by the TPS; 2 mm were caused by the inaccuracy of the open field depth dose curve fit in the build-up region. The depth near the surface of the 95% isodose for this treatment technique can be estimated from single open field depth dose curves with acceptable accuracy. This result is not obvious because the effects of the wedge and oblique incidence on the dose distribution are also involved. The TPS performed well for the 4 and 8 MV beams, but for treatments with 6 MV target under dosage could have remained undetected. (Abstract Truncated)

  3. Monte Carlo conformal treatment planning as an independent assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rincon, M.; Leal, A.; Perucha, M.; Carrasco, E.; Sanchez-Doblado, F.; Hospital Univ. Virgen Macarena, Sevilla; Arrans, R.; Sanchez-Calzado, J.A.; Errazquin, L.; Medrano, J.C.

    2001-01-01

    The wide range of possibilities available in Radiotherapy with conformal fields cannot be covered experimentally. For this reason, dosimetrical and planning procedures are based on approximate algorithms or systematic measurements. Dose distribution calculations based on Monte Carlo (MC) simulations can be used to check results. In this work, two examples of conformal field treatments are shown: A prostate carcinoma and an ocular lymphoma. The dose distributions obtained with a conventional Planning System and with MC have been compared. Some significant differences have been found. (orig.)

  4. Conformal radiation therapy with or without intensity modulation in the treatment of localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maingon, P.; Truc, G.; Bosset, M.; Peignaux, K.; Ammor, A.; Bolla, M.

    2005-01-01

    Conformal radiation therapy has now to be considered as a standard treatment of localized prostatic adenocarcinomas. Using conformational methods and intensity modulated radiation therapy requires a rigorous approach for their implementation in routine, focused on the reproducibility of the treatment, target volume definitions, dosimetry, quality control, setup positioning. In order to offer to the largest number of patients high-dose treatment, the clinicians must integrate as prognostic factors accurate definition of microscopic extension as well as the tolerance threshold of critical organs. High-dose delivery is expected to be most efficient in intermediary risks and locally advanced diseases. Intensity modulated radiation therapy is specifically dedicated to dose escalation. Perfect knowledge of classical constraints of conformal radiation therapy is required. Using such an approach in routine needs a learning curve including the physicists and a specific quality assurance program. (author)

  5. DNA oligonucleotide conformations: high resolution NMR studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mellema, J.-R.

    1984-01-01

    The present work describes a DNA double-helix model, which is well comparable with the models derived from fibre-diffraction studies. The model has a mononucleotide repeat with torsion angles in accordance with average geometries as derived from 1 H NMR studies. Special attention was paid to reduce the number of short H-H nonbonding contacts, which are abundantly present in the 'classical' fibre-diffraction models. Chapter 3 describes the first complete assignment of a 1 H NMR spectrum of a DNA tetramer, d(TAAT). Preliminary conformational data derived from the spectral parameters recorded at 27 0 C are given. A more detailed analysis employing temperature-dependence studies is given in Chapter 4. (Auth.)

  6. Three-dimensional conformal pancreas treatment: comparison of four- to six-field techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgins, Patrick D.; Sohn, Jason W.; Fine, Robert M.; Schell, Michael C.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: We compare practical conformal treatment approaches to pancreatic cancer using 6 and 18 MV photons and contrast those approaches against standard techniques. Methods and Materials: A four-field conformal technique for treating pancreas cancer has been developed using nonopposed 18 MV photons. This approach has been extended to 6 MV photon application by the addition of one to two fields. These techniques have been optimized to increase sparing of normal liver and bowel, compared with opposed-field methods, to improve patient tolerance of high doses. In this study we compare these techniques in a simulated tumor model in a cylindrical phantom. Dose-volume analysis is used to quantify differences between the conformal, nonopposed techniques with conformal, opposed field methods. This model is also used to evaluate the effect of 1-2 cm setup errors on dose-volume coverage. Results: Dose-volume analysis demonstrates that five-to-six field conformal treatments using 6 MV photons provides similar or better dose coverage and normal tissue sparing characteristics as an optimized 18 MV, four-field approach when 1-2 cm margins are included for setup uncertainty. All approaches using nonopposed beam geometry provide significant reduction in the volume of tissue encompassed by the 30-50% isodose surfaces, as compared with four-field box techniques. Conclusions: Three-dimensional (3D) conformal treatments can be designed that significantly improve dose-volume characteristics over conventional treatment designs without costing unacceptable amounts of machine time. Further, deep intraabdominal sites can be adequately accessed and treated on intermediate energy machines with a relatively moderate increase in machine time

  7. Selection of candidate wells and optimization of conformance treatment design in the Barrancas Field using a 3D conformance simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crosta, Dante; Elitseche, Luis [Repsol YPF (Argentina); Gutierrez, Mauricio; Ansah, Joe; Everett, Don [Halliburton Argentina S.A., Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2004-07-01

    Minimizing the amount of unwanted water production is an important goal at the Barrancas field. This paper describes a selection process for candidate injection wells that is part of a pilot conformance project aimed at improving vertical injection profiles, reducing water cut in producing wells, and improving ultimate oil recovery from this field. The well selection process is based on a review of limited reservoir information available for this field to determine inter-well communications. The methodology focuses on the best use of available information, such as production and injection history, well intervention files, open hole logs and injectivity surveys. After the candidate wells were selected and potential water injection channels were identified, conformance treatment design and future performance of wells in the selected pilot area were evaluated using a new 3 -D conformance simulator, developed specifically for optimization of the design and placement of unwanted fluid shut-off treatments. Thus, when acceptable history match ing of the pilot area production was obtained, the 3 -D simulator was used to: evaluate the required volume of selected conformance treatment fluid; review expected pressures and rates during placement;. model temperature behavior; evaluate placement techniques, and forecast water cut reduction and incremental oil recovery from the producers in this simulated section of the pilot area. This paper outlines a methodology for selecting candidate wells for conformance treatments. The method involves application of several engineering tools, an integral component of which is a user-friendly conformance simulator. The use of the simulator has minimized data preparation time and allows the running of sensitivity cases quickly to explore different possible scenarios that best represent the reservoir. The proposed methodology provides an efficient means of identifying conformance problems and designing optimized solutions for these individual

  8. Results of different modes conformal radiotherapy in treatment of cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranovs'ka, L.M.; Yivankova, V.S.; Khrulenko, T.V.; Skomorokhova, T.V.; Gorelyina, G.L.

    2017-01-01

    Development of techniques for cytotoxic treatment applying different modes of conformal radiotherapy, brachytherapy and high-energy (high dose rate - HDR) is one of the promising areas of optimization and efficiency of conservative treatment of patients with regional forms of cervical cancer. At Radiation Oncology Department, National Cancer Institute, 89 patients with stage 2b-3b cervical cancer, aged 29 to 70, underwent examination and combined radiotherapy course. The patients were divided into 2 main groups (56 patients) depending on the mode of developed conformal radiation therapy, and a control group made up by 33 patients (classic, default conformal radiotherapy). Results. Along with external beam radiotherapy, the patients of Group 2 were provided with conformal radiotherapy carried out by means of the linear accelerator of electrons in the mode of enhanced multi fractionation of irradiation dose applied to the small pelvis area (tumor and lymph efflux channels) with the single tumor dose 1.3 Gy twice per day once 4-6 hours up to the total radiation dose of 45 Gy applied to the small pelvis lymph nodes. The patients of Group 1 and the ones of the control group underwent conformal radiotherapy in the mode of standard fractionation applied to the small pelvis area with the single tumor dose of 1.8 Gy up to the total radiation dose of 45 Gy. Conformal radiotherapy was carried out for the patients of Group 1 associated with chemoradiomodifiers (tegafur, cisplatin). At the stage 2 of combined radiotherapy course, all patients underwent HDR brachytherapy via Co60 source in the mode of the single tumor dose of 5 Gy at point A up to the total radiation dose of 35-40 Gy. Therefore, employing accelerated mode of multifractiation in conformal radiotherapy of patients with regional cervical cancer makes it possible to enhance canrcinocidal irradiation doses applied to a tumor, and an interval between radiotherapy fractions provides conditions for initiation of

  9. The treatment of colorectal liver metastases with conformal radiation therapy and regional chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, John M; Lawrence, Theodore S; Walker, Suzette; Kessler, Marc L; Andrews, James C; Ensminger, William D

    1995-05-15

    Purpose: Whole-liver radiation, with or without chemotherapy, has been of modest benefit in the treatment of unresectable hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer. A Phase I/II study combining escalating doses of conformally planned radiation therapy (RT) with intraarterial hepatic (IAH) fluorodeoxyuridine (FdUrd) was performed. Methods and Materials: Twenty-two patients with unresectable hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer, 14 of whom had progressed after previous chemotherapy (2 with prior IAH FdUrd), were treated with concurrent IAH FdUrd (0.2 mg/kg/day) and conformal hepatic radiation therapy (1.5-1.65 Gy/fraction twice a day). The total dose of radiation given to the tumor (48-72.6 Gy) depended on the fraction of normal liver excluded from the high-dose volume. All patients were assessed for response, toxicity, hepatobiliary relapse, and survival. Median potential follow-up was 42 months. Results: Eleven of 22 patients demonstrated an objective response, with the remainder showing stable disease. Actuarial freedom from hepatic progression was 25% at 1 year. The most common acute toxicity was mild to moderate nausea and transient liver function test abnormalities. There were three patients with gastrointestinal bleeding (none requiring surgical intervention) after the completion of treatment. Overall median survival was 20 months. The presence of extrahepatic disease was associated with decreased survival (p < 0.01). Conclusions: Combined conformal radiation therapy and IAH FdUrd can produce an objective response in 50% of patients with hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer. However, response was not durable, and hepatic progression was frequent. Improvements in hepatic tumor control for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer may require higher doses of conformal radiation and/or improved radiosensitization. In an effort to increase radiosensitization, we have recently initiated a clinical trial combining IAH bromodeoxyuridine, a thymidine analog

  10. Conformable liquid metal printed epidermal electronics for smart physiological monitoring and simulation treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuelin; Zhang, Yuxin; Guo, Rui; Wang, Hongzhang; Yuan, Bo; Liu, Jing

    2018-03-01

    Conformable epidermal printed electronics enabled from gallium-based liquid metals (LMs), highly conductive and low-melting-point alloys, are proposed as the core to achieving immediate contact between skin surface and electrodes, which can avoid the skin deformation often caused by conventional rigid electrodes. When measuring signals, LMs can eliminate resonance problems with shorter time to reach steady state than Pt and gelled Pt electrodes. By comparing the contact resistance under different working conditions, it is demonstrated that both ex vivo and in vivo LM electrode-skin models have the virtues of direct and immediate contact with skin surface without the deformation encountered with conventional rigid electrodes. In addition, electrocardio electrodes composed of conformable LM printed epidermal electronics are adopted as smart devices to monitor electrocardiogram signals of rabbits. Furthermore, simulation treatment for smart defibrillation offers a feasible way to demonstrate the effect of liquid metal electrodes (LMEs) on the human body with less energy loss. The remarkable features of soft epidermal LMEs such as high conformability, good conductivity, better signal stability, and fine biocompatibility represent a critical step towards accurate medical monitoring and future smart treatments.

  11. 3-D conformal radiation therapy - Part II: Computer-controlled 3-D treatment delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benedick, A.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: This course will describe the use of computer-controlled treatment delivery techniques for treatment of patients with sophisticated conformal therapy. In particular, research and implementation issues related to clinical use of computer-controlled conformal radiation therapy (CCRT) techniques will be discussed. The possible/potential advantages of CCRT techniques will be highlighted using results from clinical 3-D planning studies. Materials and Methods: In recent years, 3-D treatment planning has been used to develop and implement 3-D conformal therapy treatment techniques, and studies based on these conformal treatments have begun to show the promise of conformal therapy. This work has been followed by the development of commercially-available multileaf collimator and computer control systems for treatment machines. Using these (and other) CCRT devices, various centers are beginning to clinically use complex computer-controlled treatments. Both research and clinical CCRT treatment techniques will be discussed in this presentation. General concepts and requirements for CCRT will be mentioned. Developmental and clinical experience with CCRT techniques from a number of centers will be utilized. Results: Treatment planning, treatment preparation and treatment delivery must be approached in an integrated fashion in order to clinically implement CCRT treatment techniques, and the entire process will be discussed. Various CCRT treatment methodologies will be reviewed from operational, dosimetric, and technical points of view. The discussion will concentrate on CCRT techniques which are likely to see rather wide dissemination over the next several years, including particularly the use of multileaf collimators (MLC), dynamic and segmental conformal therapy, conformal field shaping, and other related techniques. More advanced CCRT techniques, such as the use of individualized intensity modulation of beams or segments, and the use of computer

  12. Conformation radiotherapy and conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Kozo

    1999-01-01

    In order to coincide the high dose region to the target volume, the 'Conformation Radiotherapy Technique' using the multileaf collimator and the device for 'hollow-out technique' was developed by Prof. S. Takahashi in 1960. This technique can be classified a type of 2D-dynamic conformal RT techniques. By the clinical application of this technique, the late complications of the lens, the intestine and the urinary bladder after radiotherapy for the maxillary cancer and the cervical cancer decreased. Since 1980's the exact position and shape of the tumor and the surrounding normal tissues can be easily obtained by the tremendous development of the CT/MRI imaging technique. As a result, various kinds of new conformal techniques such as the 3D-CRT, the dose intensity modulation, the tomotherapy have been developed since the beginning of 1990'. Several 'dose escalation study with 2D-/3D conformal RT' is now under way to improve the treatment results. (author)

  13. High precision conformal radiotherapy employing conservative margins in childhood benign and low-grade brain tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalali, Rakesh; Budrukkar, Ashwini; Sarin, Rajiv; Sharma, Dayananda S.

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: To report local control and follow up outcome data of high precision conformal radiotherapy in childhood brain tumours. Materials and methods: Between December 1999 and December 2002, 26 children (17 boys and 9 girls, median age 11.5 years) with incompletely excised or recurrent benign and low-grade brain tumours [13 craniopharyngiomas, 11 low-grade gliomas (LGG) and 2 others] were treated with three-dimensional (3D) conformal radiotherapy (CRT) (12 patients) and stereotactic conformal radiotherapy (SCRT) (14 patients). Gross tumour volume (GTV) included neuro-imaging based visible tumour and/or resected tumour bed. Clinical target volume (CTV) consisted of GTV + 5 mm margin and planning target volume (PTV) consisted of additional 5 mm margin for CRT and 2 mm for SCRT. Treatment was delivered with 3-9 conformal fixed fields to a median dose of 54 Gy/30 fractions. Results: The actuarial 2 and 3 year disease free and overall survival was 96 and 100%, respectively (median follow up: 25 months, range 12-47 months). Radiological follow up available in 25 patients revealed complete response in 1, partial regression in 10, stable disease in 13 and progression in 1 patient (within the CTV). One patient with craniopharyngioma on a routine imaging revealed a mild asymptomatic cyst enlargement, which resolved with conservative management. A patient with chiasmatic glioma developed cystic degeneration and hydrocephalus 9 months after SCRT requiring cyst drainage and placement of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Conclusion: High-precision conformal techniques delivering irradiation to a computer generated target volume employing 7-10 mm 3D margins beyond the visible tumour and/or resected tumour bed appear to be safe in children with incompletely resected or recurrent benign and low-grade brain tumours, based on these data

  14. Acute toxicity in pelvic radiotherapy; a randomised trial of conformal versus conventional treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tait, Diana M.; Nahum, Alan E.; Meyer, Lesley C.; Law, Matthew; Dearnaley, David P.; Horwich, Alan; Mayles, W. Philip; Yarnold, John R.

    1997-01-01

    Background: A prospective, randomized clinical trial to assess the effect of reducing the volume of irradiated normal tissue on acute reactions in pelvic radiotherapy accrued 266 evaluable patients between 1988 and 1993. Purpose: This is the definitive analysis to assess the differences between the conformal and conventional arms of the trial. Materials and methods: In both arms, patients were treated with 6 MV X-rays using a 3-field technique (in all but 5 cases) consisting of an anterior and two wedged lateral or posterior oblique fields; in the conventional arm, rectangular fields were employed, whereas in the conformal arm, the fields were shaped with customized blocks drawn according to the beam's-eye-view of the target volume. The most common dosage was 65 Gy in 2-Gy fractions 5 times a week, although a subgroup (of ca. bladder patients) were treated with 30-36 Gy in once-a-week 6 Gy fractions. Each patient completed a comprehensive acute toxicity scoring questionnaire concentrating on bowel and bladder problems, tiredness and nausea, before the start of treatment, weekly during and for 3 weeks after the end of treatment and then monthly for a further 2 months. Compliance was excellent. Results: There were no differences between the patients in the two arms with respect to age, gender, tumour type (52% prostate, 41% bladder, 5% rectum, 2% other) fractionation/dosage, anterior field size, weight, or baseline symptoms. Substantial differences in normal-tissue volumes (rectum, bladder, etc.) were achieved: median high-dose volume (HDV) of 689 cm 3 for the conformal technique versus 792 cm 3 for the conventional. A clear pattern of an increase in symptoms during RT, followed by a decrease after RT, was observed for the patient group as a whole. However, a very extensive analysis has not revealed any (statistically) significant differences between the two arms in level of symptoms, nor in medication prescribed. The disparity between our findings and those of other

  15. Multilayer conformal applicator for microwave heating and brachytherapy treatment of superficial tissue disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juang, T; Stauffer, P R; Neuman, D G; Schlorff, J L

    2006-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to construct and perform preliminary functionality evaluations of a multilayer conformal applicator with provisions for thermal monitoring, tight conformity and simultaneous microwave heating and brachytherapy treatment of large-area contoured surfaces. The multilayer conformal applicator consists of thermal monitoring catheters for fibre-optic monitoring of skin temperatures, a waterbolus, a PCB microwave antenna array, a dielectric spacer for brachytherapy considerations, brachytherapy catheters for delivering HDR radiation and an inflatable air bladder for improving conformity to contoured surfaces. The applicator also includes an elastic attachment structure to hold the applicator securely in place on the patient. The conformity of the applicator to irregular surfaces was evaluated through CT imaging of the applicator fitted onto a life-sized human torso phantom. The fluid flow dynamics of the waterbolus, which impact the effectiveness of temperature control, were evaluated with thermometry during a 19 degrees C step change temperature of the circulating water. CT imaging showed improved conformity to the torso phantom surface following the application of gentle inward pressure from inflating the outer air bladder. Only a small number of 1-5 mm sized air gaps separated the conformal applicator and tissue surface. Thermometry testing of the bolus fluid flow dynamics demonstrated temperature uniformity within +/-0.82 degrees C across a 19 x 34 x 0.6 cm area bolus and +/-0.85 degrees C across a large 42 x 32 x 0.6 cm area bolus. CT scans of the applicator confirmed that the applicator conforms well to complex body contours and should maintain good conformity and positional stability even when worn on a mobile patient. Thermometry testing of two different waterbolus geometries demonstrated that uniform circulation and temperature control can be maintained throughout large, complex bolus shapes.

  16. Maximizing gain in high-throughput screening using conformal prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Fredrik; Afzal, Avid M; Norinder, Ulf; Bender, Andreas

    2018-02-21

    Iterative screening has emerged as a promising approach to increase the efficiency of screening campaigns compared to traditional high throughput approaches. By learning from a subset of the compound library, inferences on what compounds to screen next can be made by predictive models, resulting in more efficient screening. One way to evaluate screening is to consider the cost of screening compared to the gain associated with finding an active compound. In this work, we introduce a conformal predictor coupled with a gain-cost function with the aim to maximise gain in iterative screening. Using this setup we were able to show that by evaluating the predictions on the training data, very accurate predictions on what settings will produce the highest gain on the test data can be made. We evaluate the approach on 12 bioactivity datasets from PubChem training the models using 20% of the data. Depending on the settings of the gain-cost function, the settings generating the maximum gain were accurately identified in 8-10 out of the 12 datasets. Broadly, our approach can predict what strategy generates the highest gain based on the results of the cost-gain evaluation: to screen the compounds predicted to be active, to screen all the remaining data, or not to screen any additional compounds. When the algorithm indicates that the predicted active compounds should be screened, our approach also indicates what confidence level to apply in order to maximize gain. Hence, our approach facilitates decision-making and allocation of the resources where they deliver the most value by indicating in advance the likely outcome of a screening campaign.

  17. Comparison of Optimised Treatment Plans for Radiosurgery and Conformal Radiotherapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kulik, C

    2001-01-01

    ..., it is interesting to compare the different techniques to evaluate their effectiveness, This comparison involves 8 clinical cases, For each treatment modality, we compare indexes defined in the international...

  18. Conformal treatment of prostate cancer with improved targeting: superior prostate-specific antigen response compared to standard treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corn, Benjamin W; Hanks, Gerald E; Schultheiss, Timothy E; Hunt, Margie A; Lee, W Robert; Coia, Lawrence R

    1995-05-15

    Purpose: Conformal radiation therapy (CRT) decreases the morbidity of prostate cancer treatment, but no published data attest to the improved ability of CRT to control disease. Therefore, we compared Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) response at 1 year among similarly staged patients treated by conformal techniques to those treated with conventional approaches, looking for an early indicator of tumor response. Method and Materials: Patients with locally advanced disease were treated by pelvic fields followed by prostate field conedowns; those with early stage/low grade disease received only prostate field irradiation. Between October, 1987 and November, 1991, conventional treatments used rectangular beams with or without corner blocks. Neither urethrography nor immobilization casts were used for conventionally treated patients. Between April, 1989 and December, 1992, conformal treatments have used rigid immobilization and Computed Tomography-based, beams-eye-view field design. As such, our conformal approach allowed improved targeting. Median prescribed doses (minimal doses to the Planning Target Volume) were 70 Gy (66-73 Gy) and 70.2 Gy (64.8-75 Gy) for conventionally and conformally treated patients, respectively. Median daily fraction size was 1.8 Gy for conventional treatment and 2.0 Gy for conformal therapy. Baseline PSA data were available on 170 consecutive patients treated conformally and 90 consecutive patients treated conventionally. Results: Among those receiving only prostatic field irradiation, 12-month PSA values returned to normal in 96% and 85% of conformally and conventionally treated patients, respectively, when normalization was defined as {<=} 4 ng/ml (p < 0.03) and in 76% vs. 55% of patients when PSA normalization was defined as {<=} 1.5 ng/ml (p < 0.02). Among those receiving pelvic irradiation prior to prostatic conedown, PSA normalization ({<=} 4 ng/ml) occurred in 82% and 61% (p < 0.01) of conformally and conventionally treated patients

  19. Comparative dosimetric study of three-dimensional conformal, dynamic conformal arc, and intensity-modulated radiotherapy for brain tumor treatment using Novalis system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Meisong; Newman, Francis M.S.; Kavanagh, Brian D.; Stuhr, Kelly M.S.; Johnson, Tim K.; Gaspar, Laurie E.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric differences among three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), dynamic conformal arc therapy (DCAT), and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for brain tumor treatment. Methods and Materials: Fifteen patients treated with Novalis were selected. We performed 3D-CRT, DCAT, and IMRT plans for all patients. The margin for the planning target volume (PTV) was 1 mm, and the specific prescription dose was 90% for all plans. The target coverage at the prescription dose, conformity index (CI), and heterogeneity index were analyzed for all plans. Results: For small tumors (PTV ≤2 cm 3 ), the three dosimetric parameters had approximate values for both 3D-CRT and DCAT plans. The CI for the IMRT plans was high. For medium tumors (PTV >2 to ≤100 cm 3 ), the three plans were competitive with each other. The IMRT plans had a greater CI, better target coverage at the prescription dose, and a better heterogeneity index. For large tumors (PTV >100 cm 3 ), the IMRT plan had good target coverage at the prescription dose and heterogeneity index and approximate CI values as those in the 3D-CRT and DCAT plans. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that DCAT is suitable for most cases in the treatment of brain tumors. For a small target, 3D-CRT is useful, and IMRT is not recommended. For larger tumors, IMRT is superior to 3D-CRT and very competitive in sparing critical structures, especially for big tumors

  20. Conformable pressure vessel for high pressure gas storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Kevin L.; Johnson, Kenneth I.; Lavender, Curt A.; Newhouse, Norman L.; Yeggy, Brian C.

    2016-01-12

    A non-cylindrical pressure vessel storage tank is disclosed. The storage tank includes an internal structure. The internal structure is coupled to at least one wall of the storage tank. The internal structure shapes and internally supports the storage tank. The pressure vessel storage tank has a conformability of about 0.8 to about 1.0. The internal structure can be, but is not limited to, a Schwarz-P structure, an egg-crate shaped structure, or carbon fiber ligament structure.

  1. Trickle-Down Preferences: Preferential Conformity to High Status Peers in Fashion Choices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galak, Jeff; Gray, Kurt; Elbert, Igor; Strohminger, Nina

    2016-01-01

    How much do our choices represent stable inner preferences versus social conformity? We examine conformity and consistency in sartorial choices surrounding a common life event of new norm exposure: relocation. A large-scale dataset of individual purchases of women’s shoes (16,236 transactions) across five years and 2,007 women reveals a balance of conformity and consistency, moderated by changes in location socioeconomic status. Women conform to new local norms (i.e., average heel size) when moving to relatively higher status locations, but mostly ignore new local norms when moving to relatively lower status locations. In short, at periods of transition, it is the fashion norms of the rich that trickle down to consumers. These analyses provide the first naturalistic large-scale demonstration of the tension between psychological conformity and consistency, with real decisions in a highly visible context. PMID:27144595

  2. Trickle-Down Preferences: Preferential Conformity to High Status Peers in Fashion Choices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeff Galak

    Full Text Available How much do our choices represent stable inner preferences versus social conformity? We examine conformity and consistency in sartorial choices surrounding a common life event of new norm exposure: relocation. A large-scale dataset of individual purchases of women's shoes (16,236 transactions across five years and 2,007 women reveals a balance of conformity and consistency, moderated by changes in location socioeconomic status. Women conform to new local norms (i.e., average heel size when moving to relatively higher status locations, but mostly ignore new local norms when moving to relatively lower status locations. In short, at periods of transition, it is the fashion norms of the rich that trickle down to consumers. These analyses provide the first naturalistic large-scale demonstration of the tension between psychological conformity and consistency, with real decisions in a highly visible context.

  3. Trickle-Down Preferences: Preferential Conformity to High Status Peers in Fashion Choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galak, Jeff; Gray, Kurt; Elbert, Igor; Strohminger, Nina

    2016-01-01

    How much do our choices represent stable inner preferences versus social conformity? We examine conformity and consistency in sartorial choices surrounding a common life event of new norm exposure: relocation. A large-scale dataset of individual purchases of women's shoes (16,236 transactions) across five years and 2,007 women reveals a balance of conformity and consistency, moderated by changes in location socioeconomic status. Women conform to new local norms (i.e., average heel size) when moving to relatively higher status locations, but mostly ignore new local norms when moving to relatively lower status locations. In short, at periods of transition, it is the fashion norms of the rich that trickle down to consumers. These analyses provide the first naturalistic large-scale demonstration of the tension between psychological conformity and consistency, with real decisions in a highly visible context.

  4. A computer-controlled conformal radiotherapy system. III: graphical simulation and monitoring of treatment delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kessler, Marc L.; McShan, Daniel L.; Fraass, Benedick A.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Safe and efficient delivery of radiotherapy using computer-controlled machines requires new procedures to design and verify the actual delivery of these treatments. Graphical simulation and monitoring techniques for treatment delivery have been developed for this purpose. Methods and Materials: A graphics-based simulator of the treatment machine and a set of procedures for creating and manipulating treatment delivery scripts are used to simulate machine motions, detect collisions, and monitor machine positions during treatment. The treatment delivery simulator is composed of four components: a three-dimensional dynamic model of the treatment machine; a motion simulation and collision detection algorithm, user-interface widgets that mimic the treatment machine's control and readout devices; and an icon-based interface for creating and manipulating treatment delivery scripts. These components are used in a stand-alone fashion for interactive treatment delivery planning and integrated with a machine control system for treatment implementation and monitoring. Results: A graphics-based treatment delivery simulator and a set of procedures for planning and monitoring computer-controlled treatment delivery have been developed and implemented as part of a comprehensive computer-controlled conformal radiotherapy system. To date, these techniques have been used to design and help monitor computer-controlled treatments on a radiotherapy machine for more than 200 patients. Examples using these techniques for treatment delivery planning and on-line monitoring of machine motions during therapy are described. Conclusion: A system that provides interactive graphics-based tools for defining the sequence of machine motions, simulating treatment delivery including collision detection, and presenting the therapists with continual visual feedback from the treatment machine has been successfully implemented for routine clinical use as part of an overall system for computer

  5. Efficient free energy calculations for compounds with multiple stable conformations separated by high energy barriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hritz, J.; Oostenbrink, C.

    2009-01-01

    Compounds with high intramolecular energy barriers represent challenging targets for free energy calculations because of the difficulty to obtain sufficient conformational sampling. Existing approaches are therefore computationally very demanding, thus preventing practical applications for such

  6. Conformal Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Advanced Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma With Intracranial Extension: An Institutional Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, Santam; Ghoshal, Sushmita; Patil, Vijay Maruti; Oinam, Arun Singh; Sharma, Suresh C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the results of conformal radiotherapy in advanced juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma in a tertiary care institution. Methods and Materials: Retrospective chart review was conducted for 8 patients treated with conformal radiotherapy between 2006 and 2009. The median follow-up was 17 months. All patients had Stage IIIB disease with intracranial extension. Radiotherapy was considered as treatment because patients were deemed inoperable owing to extensive intracranial/intraorbital extension or proximity to optic nerve. All but 1 patient were treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy using seven coplanar fields. Median (range) dose prescribed was 39.6 (30-46) Gy. Actuarial analysis of local control and descriptive analysis of toxicity profile was conducted. Results: Despite the large and complex target volume (median planning target volume, 292 cm 3 ), intensity-modulated radiotherapy achieved conformal dose distributions (median van't Reit index, 0.66). Significant sparing of the surrounding organs at risk was obtained. No significant Grade 3/4 toxicities were experienced during or after treatment. Actual local control at 2 years was 87.5%. One patient died 1 month after radiotherapy secondary to massive epistaxis. The remaining 7 patients had progressive resolution of disease and were symptom-free at last follow-up. Persistent rhinitis was the only significant toxicity, seen in 1 patient. Conclusions: Conformal radiotherapy results in good local control with minimal acute and late side effects in juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas, even in the presence of advanced disease.

  7. Postoperative Chemotherapy Followed by Conformal Concomitant Chemoradiotherapy in High-Risk Gastric Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quero, Laurent; Bouchbika, Zineb; Kouto, Honorine; Baruch-Hennequin, Valerie; Gornet, Jean-Marc; Munoz, Nicolas; Cojean-Zelek, Isabelle; Houdart, Remi; Panis, Yves; Valleur, Patrice; Aparicio, Thomas; Maylin, Claude; Hennequin, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the efficacy, toxicity, and pattern of relapse after adjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy followed by three-dimensional irradiation and concomitant LV5FU2 chemotherapy (high-dose leucovorin and 5-fluorouracil bolus plus continuous infusion) in the treatment of completely resected high-risk gastric cancer. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective analysis of 52 patients with high-risk gastric cancer initially treated by total/partial gastrectomy and lymphadenectomy between January 2002 and June 2007. Median age was 54 years (range, 36–75 years). Postoperative treatment consisted of 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin chemotherapy. Adjuvant chemotherapy was followed by three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy in the tumor bed and regional lymph nodes at 4500 cGy/25 fractions in association with concomitant chemotherapy. Concomitant chemotherapy consisted of a 2-h infusion of leucovorin (200 mg/m²) followed by a bolus of 5-fluorouracil (400 mg/m²) and then a 44-h continuous infusion of 5-fluorouracil (2400–3600 mg/m²) given every 14 days, for three cycles (LV5FU2 protocol). Results: Five-year overall and disease-free survival were 50% and 48%, respectively. Distant metastases and peritoneal spread were the most frequent sites of relapse (37% each). After multivariate analysis, only pathologic nodal status was significantly associated with disease-free and overall survival. Acute toxicities were essentially gastrointestinal and hematologic. One myocardial infarction and one pulmonary embolism were also reported. Eighteen patients had a radiotherapy program interruption because of acute toxicity. All patients but 2 have completed radiotherapy. Conclusion: Postoperative cisplatin-based chemotherapy followed by conformal radiotherapy in association with concurrent 5-fluorouracil seemed to be feasible and resulted in successful locoregional control.

  8. Dose escalation using conformal high-dose-rate brachytherapy improves outcome in unfavorable prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Alvaro A; Gustafson, Gary; Gonzalez, José; Armour, Elwood; Mitchell, Chris; Edmundson, Gregory; Spencer, William; Stromberg, Jannifer; Huang, Raywin; Vicini, Frank

    2002-06-01

    To overcome radioresistance for patients with unfavorable prostate cancer, a prospective trial of pelvic external beam irradiation (EBRT) interdigitated with dose-escalating conformal high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy was performed. Between November 1991 and August 2000, 207 patients were treated with 46 Gy pelvic EBRT and increasing HDR brachytherapy boost doses (5.50-11.5 Gy/fraction) during 5 weeks. The eligibility criteria were pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level >or=10.0 ng/mL, Gleason score >or=7, or clinical Stage T2b or higher. Patients were divided into 2 dose levels, low-dose biologically effective dose 93 Gy (149 patients). No patient received hormones. We used the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology definition for biochemical failure. The median age was 69 years. The mean follow-up for the group was 4.4 years, and for the low and high-dose levels, it was 7.0 and 3.4 years, respectively. The actuarial 5-year biochemical control rate was 74%, and the overall, cause-specific, and disease-free survival rate was 92%, 98%, and 68%, respectively. The 5-year biochemical control rate for the low-dose group was 52%; the rate for the high-dose group was 87% (p failure. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3 gastrointestinal/genitourinary complications ranged from 0.5% to 9%. The actuarial 5-year impotency rate was 51%. Pelvic EBRT interdigitated with transrectal ultrasound-guided real-time conformal HDR prostate brachytherapy boost is both a precise dose delivery system and a very effective treatment for unfavorable prostate cancer. We demonstrated an incremental beneficial effect on biochemical control and cause-specific survival with higher doses. These results, coupled with the low risk of complications, the advantage of not being radioactive after implantation, and the real-time interactive planning, define a new standard for treatment.

  9. Dose escalation with 3D conformal treatment: five year outcomes, treatment optimization, and future directions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanks, Gerald E.; Hanlon, Alexandra L. M.S.; Schultheiss, Timothy E.; Pinover, Wayne H.; Movsas, Benjamin; Epstein, Barry E.; Hunt, Margie

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To report the 5-year outcomes of dose escalation with 3D conformal treatment (3DCRT) of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Two hundred thirty-two consecutive patients were treated with 3DCRT alone between 6/89 and 10/92 with ICRU reporting point dose that increased from 63 to 79 Gy. The median follow-up was 60 months, and any patient free of clinical or biochemical evidence of disease was termed bNED. Biochemical failure was defined as prostate-specific antigen (PSA) rising on two consecutive recordings and exceeding 1.5 ng/ml. Morbidity was reported by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) scale, the Late Effects Normal Tissue (LENT) scale, and a Fox Chase modification of the latter (FC-LENT). All patients were treated with a four-field technique with a 1 cm clinical target volume (CTV) to planning target volume (PTV) margin to the prostate or prostate boost; the CTV and gross tumor volume (GTV) were the same. Actuarial rates of outcome were calculated by Kaplan-Meier and cumulative incidence methods and compared using the log rank and Gray's test statistic, respectively. Cox regression models were used to establish prognostic factors predictive of the various measures of outcome. Five-year Kaplan-Meier bNED rates were utilized by dose group to estimate logit response models for bNED and late morbidity. Results: PSA 10 ng/ml based on 5-year bNED results. No dose response was observed for patients with pretreatment PSA 10 ng/ml strongly suggests that clinical trials employing radiation should investigate the use of 3DCRT and prostate doses of 76-80 Gy

  10. Bolus electron conformal therapy for the treatment of recurrent inflammatory breast cancer: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Michelle M., E-mail: mmkim@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Kanke, James E.; Zhang, Sean; Perkins, George H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The treatment of locoregionally recurrent breast cancer in patients who have previously undergone radiation therapy is challenging. Special techniques are often required that both eradicate the disease and minimize the risks of retreatment. We report the case of a patient with an early-stage left breast cancer who developed inflammatory-type recurrence requiring re-irradiation of the chest wall using bolus electron conformal therapy with image-guided treatment delivery. The patient was a 51-year-old woman who had undergone lumpectomy, axillary lymph node dissection, and adjuvant whole-breast radiation therapy for a stage I left breast cancer in June 1998. In March 2009, she presented at our institution with biopsy-proven recurrent inflammatory carcinoma and was aggressively treated with multi-agent chemotherapy followed by mastectomy that left a positive surgical margin. Given the patient's prior irradiation and irregular chest wall anatomy, bolus electron conformal therapy was used to treat her chest wall and draining lymphatics while sparing the underlying soft tissue. The patient still had no evidence of disease 21 months after treatment. Our results indicate that bolus electron conformal therapy is an accessible, effective radiation treatment approach for recurrent breast cancer in patients with irregular chest wall anatomy as a result of surgery. This approach may complement standard techniques used to reduce locoregional recurrence in the postmastectomy setting.

  11. Effect of Concurrent High-Dose Cisplatin Chemotherapy and Conformal Radiotherapy on Cervical Esophageal Cancer Survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Shaohui; Lockwood, Gina; Brierley, James; Cummings, Bernard; Kim, John; Wong, Rebecca; Bayley, Andrew; Ringash, Jolie

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether a change in treatment policy to conformal, elective nodal radiotherapy and concurrent high-dose cisplatin improved survival for cervical esophageal cancer patients. Methods and Materials: All cervical esophageal cancer patients treated between 1997 and 2005 were restaged (1983 American Joint Committee on Cancer criteria). Patients treated before 2001 (previous cohort [PC]) were compared with those treated from 2001 onward (recent cohort [RC]). The PC institutional chemoradiotherapy protocol was 54 Gy in 20 fractions within 4 weeks, with 5-fluorouracil (1,000 mg/m 2 ) on Days 1-4 and either mitomycin C (10 mg/m 2 ) or cisplatin (75 mg/m 2 ) on Day 1. The RC institutional chemoradiotherapy protocol was conformal radiotherapy, 70 Gy in 35 fractions within 7 weeks, to the primary tumor and elective nodes, with high-dose cisplatin (100 mg/m 2 ) on Days 1, 22, and 43. Results: The median follow-up was 3.1 years (PC, 8.1 and RC, 2.3). Of 71 patients (25 women and 46 men), 21 of 29 in the PC and 29 of 42 in the RC were treated curatively (curative subgroup, n = 50). Between the two groups, no differences in overall survival or locoregional relapse-free survival were seen. The overall survival rate at 2 and 5 years was 35% (range, 24-47%) and 21% (range, 12-32%) in the whole group and 46% (range 32-60%) and 28% (range, 15-42%) in the curative group, respectively. In the curative group, no statistically significant prognostic factors were found. Trends toward better locoregional relapse-free survival were seen in women (2-year rate, 73% vs. for men, 36%; p = 0.08) and in patients aged >64 years (2-year rate, 68% vs. age ≤64 years, 34%; p = 0.10). Conclusion: No survival improvement could be demonstrated after changing the treatment policy to high-dose cisplatin-based, conventionally fractionated conformal chemoradiotherapy. Female gender and older age might predict for better outcomes

  12. Rectal bleeding after conformal 3D treatment of prostate cancer: time to occurrence, response to treatment and duration of morbidity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teshina, Teruki; Hanks, Gerald E.; Peters, Ruth S.; Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Schultheiss, Timothy E.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Late rectal bleeding is the most common sequelae of high dose 3D conformal treatment (3DCRT) for prostate cancer and limits attempts to improve local control by dose escalation. The clinical course of this complication is reported including time to onset, response to treatment, duration of morbidity and risk factor analysis by multivariate analysis. Materials and Methods: From March, 1989 to June 1996, 670 patients with prostate cancer were treated with 3DCRT. Eighty-nine patients developed grade 2 or 3 complications due to rectal bleeding and are analyzed (Grade 2 LENT scale, Grade 3 Fox Chase modification of LENT including >2 coagulations as Grade 3). They are compared to 581 patients without Grade 2,3 morbidity in multivariate analysis. Time to development, response to initial and retreatment and duration of morbidity are tabulated. Results: The median time to occurrence is not significantly different (p=.09) for Grade 2 (13 mo. range 4-41 mo.) compared to Grade 3 (18 mo. range 4-40 mo.). The corresponding median duration of symptoms >Grade 1 were significantly different (p=.0001) being 1 month (range 1-<12) versus 10 months (1-34) respectively. The response to treatment and retreatment is shown in Table 1. For Grade 2 complications medication or coagulation was highly effective as initial or retreatment resolving 66 of 73 patients. For Grade 3 a few responded to only transfusion and with multiple coagulations and medication (12(16)) patients improved to ≤ Grade 1. Multivariate analysis demonstrates that dose is the only significant factor associated with Grade 2 (LENT) (p=.01) or Grade 3 (FC-LENT) (p=.01) complication. Lack of response to treatment was associated with hypertension on univariate analysis only. Of 7 non-responders to treatment of Grade 2 bleeding, 3 have died of intercurrent disease at 10, 19 and 26 months while 4 are alive with continuing Grade 2 bleeding at 26, 34, 41 and 45 months after onset. Of 4 non-responders to treatment of

  13. Rectal bleeding after conformal 3D treatment of prostate cancer: Time to occurrence, response to treatment and duration of morbidity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teshima, Teruki; Hanks, Gerald E.; Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Peter, Ruth S.; Schultheiss, Timothy E.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Rectal bleeding is the most common late sequelae of high-dose 3D conformal treatment (3DCRT) for prostate cancer and may limit attempts to improve local control by dose escalation. The clinical course of this complication is reported including time to onset, response to treatment, duration of morbidity, and multivariate analysis for predictors. Methods and Materials: From March 1989 to June 1995, 670 patients with prostate cancer were treated with 3DCRT at Fox Chase Cancer Center. Eighty-nine patients developed Grade 2 or Grade 3 complications due to rectal bleeding and are analyzed. Multivariate analysis results for predictors of Grade 2 and 3 rectal bleeding are reported as well as time to development, response to initial and retreatment, and duration of morbidity. Results: The median time to occurrence is not significantly different (p = 0.09) for Grade 2 (13 months, range 4-41 months) compared to Grade 3 rectal bleeding (18 months, range 4-40 months), while the corresponding median duration of symptoms was significantly different (p < 0.0001) being 1 month (range 1-12) vs. 10 months (1-34) for Grade 2 and Grade 3 bleeding, respectively. For Grade 2 bleeding, medication or coagulation was highly effective as initial or retreatment resolving 66 of 73 patients. For Grade 3 bleeding, three patients responded without medication following blood transfusion only, while with multiple coagulations and medication 12 of 16 patients improved to ≤ Grade 1. Multivariate analysis demonstrates that dose is the only significant factor associated with Grade 2 (p = 0.01) or Grade 3 (p = 0.01) rectal bleeding. Of seven nonresponders to treatment for Grade 2 bleeding, three have died of intercurrent disease at 10, 19, and 26 months, while four are alive with continuing Grade 2 bleeding at 12, 14, 15, and 30 months after onset. The four nonresponders to treatment for Grade 3 bleeding continue to bleed 1, 9, 32, and 35 months after the third coagulation despite continuing

  14. Factors influencing incidence of acute grade 2 morbidity in conformal and standard radiation treatment of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanks, Gerald E.; Schultheiss, Timothy E.; Hunt, Margie A.; Epstein, Barry

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: The fundament hypothesis of conformal radiation therapy is that tumor control can be increased by using conformal treatment techniques that allow a higher tumor dose while maintaining an acceptable level of complications. To test this hypothesis, it is necessary first to estimate the incidence of morbidity for both standard and conformal fields. In this study, we examine factors that influence the incidence of acute grade 2 morbidity in patients treated with conformal and standard radiation treatment for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Two hundred and forty-seven consecutive patients treated with conformal technique are combined with and compared to 162 consecutive patients treated with standard techniques. The conformal technique includes special immobilization by a cast, careful identification of the target volume in three dimensions, localization of the inferior border of the prostate using the retrograde urethrogram, and individually shaped portals that conform to the Planning Target Volume (PTV). Univariate analysis compares differences in the incidence of RTOG-EORTC grade two acute morbidity by technique, T stage, age, irradiated volume, and dose. Multivariate logistic regression includes these same variables. Results: In nearly all categories, the conformal treatment group experienced significantly fewer acute grade 2 complications than the standard treatment group. Only volume (prostate ± whole pelvis) and technique (conformal vs. standard) were significantly related to incidence of morbidity on multivariate analysis. When dose is treated as a continuous variable (rather than being dichotomized into two levels), a trend is observed on multivariate analysis, but it does not reach significant levels. The incidence of acute grade 2 morbidity in patients 65 years or older is significantly reduced by use of the conformal technique. Conclusion: The conformal technique is associated with fewer grade 2 acute toxicities for all patients. This

  15. Conformal coating of amorphous silicon and germanium by high pressure chemical vapor deposition for photovoltaic fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xiaoyu; Cheng, Hiu Yan; Grede, Alex J.; Molina, Alex; Talreja, Disha; Mohney, Suzanne E.; Giebink, Noel C.; Badding, John V.; Gopalan, Venkatraman

    2018-04-01

    Conformally coating textured, high surface area substrates with high quality semiconductors is challenging. Here, we show that a high pressure chemical vapor deposition process can be employed to conformally coat the individual fibers of several types of flexible fabrics (cotton, carbon, steel) with electronically or optoelectronically active materials. The high pressure (˜30 MPa) significantly increases the deposition rate at low temperatures. As a result, it becomes possible to deposit technologically important hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) from silane by a simple and very practical pyrolysis process without the use of plasma, photochemical, hot-wire, or other forms of activation. By confining gas phase reactions in microscale reactors, we show that the formation of undesired particles is inhibited within the microscale spaces between the individual wires in the fabric structures. Such a conformal coating approach enables the direct fabrication of hydrogenated amorphous silicon-based Schottky junction devices on a stainless steel fabric functioning as a solar fabric.

  16. Conformal sequestering simplified

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmaltz, Martin; Sundrum, Raman

    2006-01-01

    Sequestering is important for obtaining flavor-universal soft masses in models where supersymmetry breaking is mediated at high scales. We construct a simple and robust class of hidden sector models which sequester themselves from the visible sector due to strong and conformally invariant hidden dynamics. Masses for hidden matter eventually break the conformal symmetry and lead to supersymmetry breaking by the mechanism recently discovered by Intriligator, Seiberg and Shih. We give a unified treatment of subtleties due to global symmetries of the CFT. There is enough review for the paper to constitute a self-contained account of conformal sequestering

  17. Low profile conformal antenna arrays on high impedance substrate

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Hema; Jha, Rakesh Mohan

    2016-01-01

    This book presents electromagnetic (EM) design and analysis of dipole antenna array over high impedance substrate (HIS). HIS is a preferred substrate for low-profile antenna design, owing to its unique boundary conditions. Such substrates permit radiating elements to be printed on them without any disturbance in the radiation characteristics. Moreover HIS provides improved impedance matching, enhanced bandwidth, and increased broadside directivity owing to total reflection from the reactive surface and high input impedance. This book considers different configurations of HIS for array design on planar and non-planar high-impedance surfaces. Results are presented for cylindrical dipole, printed dipole, and folded dipole over single- and double-layered square-patch-based HIS and dogbone-based HIS. The performance of antenna arrays is analyzed in terms of performance parameters such as return loss and radiation pattern. The design presented shows acceptable return loss and mainlobe gain of radiation pattern. Thi...

  18. Dose escalation using conformal high-dose-rate brachytherapy improves outcome in unfavorable prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, Alvaro A.; Gustafson, Gary; Gonzalez, Jose; Armour, Elwood; Mitchell, Chris; Edmundson, Gregory; Spencer, William; Stromberg, Jannifer; Huang, Raywin; Vicini, Frank

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To overcome radioresistance for patients with unfavorable prostate cancer, a prospective trial of pelvic external beam irradiation (EBRT) interdigitated with dose-escalating conformal high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy was performed. Methods and Materials: Between November 1991 and August 2000, 207 patients were treated with 46 Gy pelvic EBRT and increasing HDR brachytherapy boost doses (5.50-11.5 Gy/fraction) during 5 weeks. The eligibility criteria were pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level ≥10.0 ng/mL, Gleason score ≥7, or clinical Stage T2b or higher. Patients were divided into 2 dose levels, low-dose biologically effective dose 93 Gy (149 patients). No patient received hormones. We used the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology definition for biochemical failure. Results: The median age was 69 years. The mean follow-up for the group was 4.4 years, and for the low and high-dose levels, it was 7.0 and 3.4 years, respectively. The actuarial 5-year biochemical control rate was 74%, and the overall, cause-specific, and disease-free survival rate was 92%, 98%, and 68%, respectively. The 5-year biochemical control rate for the low-dose group was 52%; the rate for the high-dose group was 87% (p<0.001). Improvement occurred in the cause-specific survival in favor of the brachytherapy high-dose level (p=0.014). On multivariate analysis, a low-dose level, higher Gleason score, and higher nadir value were associated with increased biochemical failure. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3 gastrointestinal/genitourinary complications ranged from 0.5% to 9%. The actuarial 5-year impotency rate was 51%. Conclusion: Pelvic EBRT interdigitated with transrectal ultrasound-guided real-time conformal HDR prostate brachytherapy boost is both a precise dose delivery system and a very effective treatment for unfavorable prostate cancer. We demonstrated an incremental beneficial effect on biochemical control and cause

  19. Study on a Novel Gelled Foam for Conformance Control in High Temperature and High Salinity Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Li

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available A novel gelled foam for conformance control was investigated for its ability to enhance oil recovery (EOR in high temperature and high salinity reservoirs. The formulation optimization, foaming performance, and core flooding performance of the gelled foam were systematically evaluated under harsh reservoir conditions. The gelled foam formulation was optimized with 0.4% polymer (hydrolyzed polyacrylamide; HPAM, 0.06% cross-linker (phenolic and 0.2% foaming agent (sulphobetaine; SB. The addition of the gel improved the stability of the foam system by 3.8 times that of traditional foam. A stabilization mechanism in the gelled foam was proposed to describe the stabilization process of the foam film. The uniformly distributed three-dimensional network structure of the gel provided a thick protective layer for the foam system that maintained the stability of the foam and improved the strength and thickness of the liquid film. The gelled foam exhibited good formation adaptability, profile control, and EOR performance. The foam flowed into the high permeability layer, plugged the dominant channel, and increased the swept volume. Oil recovery was enhanced by 29.4% under harsh high -temperature and high salinity conditions.

  20. Localized field conformation radiotherapy combined with endocrine therapy for the treatment of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karasawa, Katsuyuki; Kaizu, Toshihide; Kurosaki, Hiromasa; Tanaka, Yoshiaki

    1999-01-01

    To improve the quality of life (QOL) of the patients with prostate cancer, we limit the radiotherapy target volume to the prostate and seminal vesicles while using endocrine therapy towards the disease outside the target volume. Radiotherapy technique was rotation conformation technique with computer-controlled multileaf collimators to the total doses of up to 66-70 Gy. Among 145 evaluable cases with the median age of 74, overall and cause-specific 5-year survival rates were 59.3% and 84.1%, respectively, and the relative survival rate of the Stage A-C cases was 100%. The two thirds (33/50) of the deaths were not of prostate cancer. The rate of severe complication was 1.4%. As for QOL, the rate of impotence was 90%, however, the patients' overall satisfaction towards the treatment was 90%. From this analysis, this combined treatment seems beneficial in the treatment of prostate cancer. (author)

  1. Development of novel conformity indices for quantitative comparison of radiation treatment plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong Min; Park, So Yeon; Wu, Hong Gyun; Ye, Sung Joon; Kim, Jin Ho; Kim, Jung In [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-15

    The conformity index (CI) is an indicator to assess the degree of congruence between a shape of reference isodose volume (VRI) and a shape of the target volume (TV). Two concepts are included in the CI, which are the target coverage and the degree of normal tissue sparing in the proximity of the target. Even though this could be verified by a manual review of dose distributions calculated on patient CT images slice by slice, detailed comparisons among several treatment plans would be inconvenient. The conformity could be also verified by reviewing dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of each structure calculated by treatment planning system (TPS). The prerequisite for this is the contouring of not only organs at risk (OARs) but also every structure in a patient body, which is not practical in the clinic. Therefore, a value possible to quantify the conformity was needed, and various studies on CI have been performed. Various CIs have been developed since 1993. Most of them are based on the calculation of the volumes except for the CI suggested by Wu et al. and Cheung et al. which were based on the distance. The aim of this study was to develop new CIs based on the calculations of angles and distances. The CI angle based on the analysis of the angle differences as well as the CIabs{sub d}istance and the CIdistance based on the analysis of the distances between the TV and the VRI were developed and evaluated in this study. The CI distance with Sornatomedins better performances than the CIangle and the CIabs{sub d}istance as well as the conventional CIs in various situations.

  2. Dosimetric Factors and Toxicity in Highly Conformal Thoracic Reirradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binkley, Michael S.; Hiniker, Susan M.; Chaudhuri, Aadel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Maxim, Peter G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Diehn, Maximilian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Loo, Billy W., E-mail: BWLoo@Stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Shultz, David Benjamin, E-mail: David.Shultz@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-03-15

    } range: 207.5-302.2 Gy), brachial plexopathy (n=1; D0.2 cm{sup 3} = 242.5 Gy), and Horner's syndrome (n=1; sympathetic trunk D0.2 cm{sup 3} = 130.8 Gy). No grade ≥4 toxicity was observed. Conclusions: Overlapping courses of reirradiation can be safely delivered with acceptable toxicity. Some toxicities occurred acutely at doses considered safe for a single course of therapy (esophagus). We observed rib fracture, brachial plexopathy, and Horner's syndrome for patients receiving high cumulative doses to corresponding critical structures.

  3. Predicting treatment related imaging changes (TRICs) after radiosurgery for brain metastases using treatment dose and conformality metrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, B Frazier; Knisely, Jonathan P; Qian, Jack M; Yu, James B; Chiang, Veronica L

    2016-01-01

    Treatment-related imaging changes (TRICs) after stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) involves the benign transient enlargement of radiographic lesions after treatment. Identifying the radiation dose volumes and conformality metrics associated with TRICs for different post-treatment periods would be helpful and improve clinical decision making. 367 metastases in 113 patients were treated using Gamma Knife SRS between 1/1/2007-12/31/2009. Each metastasis was measured at each imaging follow-up to detect TRICs (defined as ≥ 20% increase in volume). Fluctuations in small volume lesions (less than 108 mm 3 ) were ignored given widely variable conformity indices (CI) for small volumes. The Karolinska Adverse Radiation Effect (KARE) factor, Paddick's CI, Shaw's CI, tumor volume (TV), 10 Gy (V10) and 12 Gy (V12) volumes, and prescription isodose volume (PIV) were calculated. From 0-6 months, all measures correlated with the incidence of TRICs (p<.001), except KARE, which was inversely correlated. During the 6-12 month period all measures except KARE were still correlated. Beyond 12 months, no correlation was found between any of the measures and the development of TRICs. All metrics except KARE were associated with TRICs from 0-12 months only. Additional patient and treatment factors may become dominant at greater times after SRS.

  4. Conformal Coating of Cobalt-Nickel Layered Double Hydroxides Nanoflakes on Carbon Fibers for High-performance Electrochemical Energy Storage Supercapacitor Devices

    KAUST Repository

    Warsi, Muhammad Farooq

    2014-07-01

    High specific capacitance coupled with the ease of large scale production is two desirable characteristics of a potential pseudo-supercapacitor material. In the current study, the uniform and conformal coating of nickel-cobalt layered double hydroxides (CoNi0.5LDH,) nanoflakes on fibrous carbon (FC) cloth has been achieved through cost-effective and scalable chemical precipitation method, followed by a simple heat treatment step. The conformally coated CoNi0.5LDH/FC electrode showed 1.5 times greater specific capacitance compared to the electrodes prepared by conventional non-conformal (drop casting) method of depositing CoNi0.5LDH powder on the carbon microfibers (1938 Fg-1 vs 1292 Fg-1). Further comparison of conformally and non-conformally coated CoNi0.5LDH electrodes showed the rate capability of 79%: 43% capacity retention at 50 Ag-1 and cycling stability 4.6%: 27.9% loss after 3000 cycles respectively. The superior performance of the conformally coated CoNi0.5LDH is mainly due to the reduced internal resistance and fast ionic mobility between electrodes as compared to non-conformally coated electrodes which is evidenced by EIS and CV studies. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Conformal Coating of Cobalt-Nickel Layered Double Hydroxides Nanoflakes on Carbon Fibers for High-performance Electrochemical Energy Storage Supercapacitor Devices

    KAUST Repository

    Warsi, Muhammad Farooq; Shakir, Imran; Shahid, Muhammad; Sarfraz, Mansoor M.; Nadeem, Muhammad Tahir; Gilani, Zaheer Abbas

    2014-01-01

    High specific capacitance coupled with the ease of large scale production is two desirable characteristics of a potential pseudo-supercapacitor material. In the current study, the uniform and conformal coating of nickel-cobalt layered double hydroxides (CoNi0.5LDH,) nanoflakes on fibrous carbon (FC) cloth has been achieved through cost-effective and scalable chemical precipitation method, followed by a simple heat treatment step. The conformally coated CoNi0.5LDH/FC electrode showed 1.5 times greater specific capacitance compared to the electrodes prepared by conventional non-conformal (drop casting) method of depositing CoNi0.5LDH powder on the carbon microfibers (1938 Fg-1 vs 1292 Fg-1). Further comparison of conformally and non-conformally coated CoNi0.5LDH electrodes showed the rate capability of 79%: 43% capacity retention at 50 Ag-1 and cycling stability 4.6%: 27.9% loss after 3000 cycles respectively. The superior performance of the conformally coated CoNi0.5LDH is mainly due to the reduced internal resistance and fast ionic mobility between electrodes as compared to non-conformally coated electrodes which is evidenced by EIS and CV studies. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Dose conformation to the spine during palliative treatments using dynamic wedges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ormsby, Matthew A., E-mail: Matthew.Ormsby@usoncology.com [West Texas Cancer Center at Medical Center Hospital, Odessa, TX (United States); Herndon, R. Craig; Kaczor, Joseph G. [West Texas Cancer Center at Medical Center Hospital, Odessa, TX (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Radiation therapy is commonly used to alleviate pain associated with metastatic disease of the spine. Often, isodose lines are manipulated using dynamic or physical wedges to encompass the section of spine needing treatment while minimizing dose to normal tissue. We will compare 2 methods used to treat the entire thoracic spine. The first method treats the thoracic spine with a single, nonwedged posterior-anterior (PA) field. Dose is prescribed to include the entire spine. Isodose lines tightly conform to the top and bottom vertebrae, but vertebrae between these 2 received more than enough coverage. The second method uses a combination of wedges to create an isodose line that mimics the curvature of the thoracic spine. This “C”-shaped curvature is created by overlapping 2 fields with opposing dynamic wedges. Machine constraints limit the treatment length and therefore 2 isocenters are used. Each of the 2 PA fields contributes a portion of the total daily dose. This technique creates a “C”-shaped isodose line that tightly conforms to the thoracic spine, minimizing normal tissue dose. Spinal cord maximum dose is reduced, as well as mean dose to the liver, esophagus, and heart.

  7. Three-dimensional (3D) real-time conformal brachytherapy - a novel solution for prostate cancer treatment Part I. Rationale and method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fijalkowski, M.; Bialas, B.; Maciejewski, B.; Bystrzycka, J.; Slosarek, K.

    2005-01-01

    Recently, the system for conformal real-time high-dose-rate brachytherapy has been developed and dedicated in general for the treatment of prostate cancer. The aim of this paper is to present the 3D-conformal real-time brachytherapy technique introduced to clinical practice at the Institute of Oncology in Gliwice. Equipment and technique of 3D-conformal real time brachytherapy (3D-CBRT) is presented in detail and compared with conventional high-dose-rate brachytherapy. Step-by-step procedures of treatment planning are described, including own modifications. The 3D-CBRT offers the following advantages: (1) on-line continuous visualization of the prostate and acquisition of the series of NS images during the entire procedure of planning and treatment; (2) high precision of definition and contouring the target volume and the healthy organs at risk (urethra, rectum, bladder) based on 3D transrectal continuous ultrasound images; (3) interactive on-line dose optimization with real-time corrections of the dose-volume histograms (DVHs) till optimal dose distribution is achieved; (4) possibility to overcome internal prostate motion and set-up inaccuracies by stable positioning of the prostate with needles fixed to the template; (5) significant shortening of overall treatment time; (6) cost reduction - the treatment can be provided as an outpatient procedure. The 3D- real time CBRT can be advertised as an ideal conformal boost dose technique integrated or interdigitated with pelvic conformal external beam radiotherapy or as a monotherapy for prostate cancer. (author)

  8. Optimal 3-D conformal treatment planning of posterior lateral supratentorial tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gius, David; Klein, Eric; Oehmke, Fred

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The ability to treat the brain to greater doses is limited by normal brain tissue tolerance. With the use of 3-dimensional treatment planning dose escalation will result in increased target dose while sparing normal tissue. Treatment of the supratentorial region of the brain presents several unique difficulties due to the changing contour of the calvarium, which are especially noticeable with treatment to the posterior lateral quadrant. The use of a single wedge beam is sub-optimal and a more appropriate solution would employ a two tier wedge arrangement to better conform the isodoses around the target volume. In the past it has only been possible to use a single wedge during treatment with a single port, however, the dynamic wedge presents the opportunity to employ a two tier wedge system by simultaneously using conventional and dynamic wedging. Methods and Materials: An anthropomorphic phantom with a lesion located in the posterior lateral aspect of the brain where the external surface slopes at a maximum was configured. CT generated contours outlined the external surface, normal anatomy, gross tumor, and target volumes. We used the beam's-eye-view projection from the 3D planning system to derive the conformal beams. A standard opposed lateral and posterior oblique wedge pair beam arrangements, were compared to a three field technique (PA, lateral, and vertex) which used both a single wedge arrangement and a two-tier wedge plan. Treatment plans were evaluated by calculating isodose distribution, DVH, TCP, and NTCP. Each beam arrangement was used to treat our phantom with film placed in between the phantom layers at the tumor levels to confirm the accuracy of the 3-D system calculations. Results: The three field, two-tier wedge technique isodose distribution was significantly superior when compared to the standard 2-D plans, and a moderate improvement over the three field, single wedge technique in terms of conforming dose to the tumor and

  9. Comparison between conventional and three-dimensional conformal treatment planning for radiotherapy of cerebral tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caudrelier, J.M.; Auliard, A.; Sarrazin, T.; Gibon, D.; Coche-Dequeant, B.; Castelain, B.

    2001-01-01

    Comparison between conventional and three-dimensional conformal treatment planning for radiotherapy of cerebral tumors. Purpose. - We prospectively compared a conventional treatment planning (PT2D) and 3-dimensional conformal treatment planning (PT3D) for radiotherapy of cerebral tumours. Patients and methods.- Patients treated between 1/10/98 and 1/4/99 by irradiation for cerebral tumours were analysed. For each case, we planned PT2D using conventional orthogonal x-ray films, and afterward, PT3D using CT scan. Gross tumor volume, planning target volume and normal tissue volumes were defined. Dose was prescribed according to report 50 of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU). We compared surfaces of sagittal view targets defined on PT2D and PT3D and called them S2D and S3D, respectively. Irradiated volumes by 90% isodoses (VE-90%) and normal tissue volumes irradiated by 20, 50, 90% isodoses were calculated and compared using Student's paired t-test. Results. -There was a concordance of 84% of target surfaces defined on PT2D and PT3D. Percentages of target surface under- or-over defined by PT2D were 16 and 13% respectively. VE-90% was decreased by 15% (p = 0.07) with PT3D. Normal brain volume irradiated by 90% isodose was decreased by 27% with PT3D (p = 0.04). Conclusion.- For radiotherapy of cerebral tumors using only coplanar beams, PT3D leads to a reduction of normal brain tissue irradiated. We recommend PT3D for radiotherapy of cerebral tumors, particularly for low-grade or benign tumors (meningiomas, neuromas, etc.). (authors)

  10. The comparison of 5-field conformal radiotherapy techniques for the treatment of prostate cancer: The best for femoral head sparing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zare, Mahkameh; Lashkari, Marzieh; Ghalehtaki, Reza; Ghasemi, Arash; Dehghan Manshadi, Hamidreza; Mir, Ali; Noorollahi, Somayeh; Alamolhoda, Mahboobeh

    2016-01-01

    External radiotherapy is a standard treatment procedure for localized prostate cancer. Given the relatively high long term survival treatment complications have been brought in center of attention. In this planning study, between 2012 and 2014, CT simulation data of 90 consecutive high-risk prostate cancer patients were collected. In the first phase, all were planned for whole pelvis irradiation up to 46Gy in 23 daily fractions. In the second phase, only the prostate gland was the target of radiation. Next, the subjects were divided randomly into three groups and each received a unique 5field conformal radiation plan including Plan A (Gantry angle: 0, 60, 120, 240, and 300), Plan B (Gantry angles: 0, 90, 120, 240, and 270) and Plan C (Gantry angles: 0, 60, 90, 270, and 300). The total dose was 70Gy. For each patient, the rectum, bladder, and both femoral heads were contoured as the at risk organs (OAR). From dose volume histograms, the proportional dose of PTV V100, the bladder and rectum V80 and V90 and femoral head V50 and V100 were calculated in all subjects and compared across plans. A statistically significant difference in the femoral head V50 and V100 was found between our studied 5field plans so that in Plan A (beam angles: 0, 60, 120, 240 and 300) less dose was received by both heads of femur. This study suggests that 5 field treatment planning including an anterior, two anterior oblique and two posterior oblique portals to be more proper for 3D conformal radiotherapy in order to spare femoral head with acceptable PTV coverage, and bladder and rectal doses.

  11. Structural investigation of ribonuclease A conformational preferences using high pressure protein crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurpiewska, Katarzyna, E-mail: kurpiews@chemia.uj.edu.pl [Jagiellonian University, Faculty of Chemistry, Department of Crystal Chemistry and Crystal Physics, Protein Crystallography Group, Ingardena 3, 30-060 Kraków (Poland); Dziubek, Kamil; Katrusiak, Andrzej [Adam Mickiewicz University, Faculty of Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Umultowska 89b, 61-61 Poznań (Poland); Font, Josep [School of Medical Science, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Ribò, Marc; Vilanova, Maria [Universitat de Girona, Laboratorid’Enginyeria de Proteïnes, Departament de Biologia, Facultat de Ciències, Campus de Montilivi, 17071 Girona (Spain); Lewiński, Krzysztof [Jagiellonian University, Faculty of Chemistry, Department of Crystal Chemistry and Crystal Physics, Protein Crystallography Group, Ingardena 3, 30-060 Kraków (Poland)

    2016-04-01

    Highlights: • A unique crystallographic studies of wild-type and mutated form of the same protein under high pressure. • Compressibility of RNase A molecule is significantly affected by a single amino acid substitution. • High pressure protein crystallography helps understanding protein flexibility and identify conformational substrates. - Abstract: Hydrostatic pressure in range 0.1–1.5 GPa is used to modify biological system behaviour mostly in biophysical studies of proteins in solution. Due to specific influence on the system equilibrium high pressure can act as a filter that enables to identify and investigate higher energy protein conformers. The idea of the presented experiments is to examine the behaviour of RNase A molecule under high pressure before and after introduction of destabilizing mutation. For the first time crystal structures of wild-type bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A and its markedly less stable variant modified at position Ile106 were determined at different pressures. X-ray diffraction experiments at high pressure showed that the secondary structure of RNase A is well preserved even beyond 0.67 GPa at room temperature. Detailed structural analysis of ribonuclease A conformation observed under high pressure revealed that pressure influences hydrogen bonds pattern, cavity size and packing of molecule.

  12. Structural investigation of ribonuclease A conformational preferences using high pressure protein crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurpiewska, Katarzyna; Dziubek, Kamil; Katrusiak, Andrzej; Font, Josep; Ribò, Marc; Vilanova, Maria; Lewiński, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A unique crystallographic studies of wild-type and mutated form of the same protein under high pressure. • Compressibility of RNase A molecule is significantly affected by a single amino acid substitution. • High pressure protein crystallography helps understanding protein flexibility and identify conformational substrates. - Abstract: Hydrostatic pressure in range 0.1–1.5 GPa is used to modify biological system behaviour mostly in biophysical studies of proteins in solution. Due to specific influence on the system equilibrium high pressure can act as a filter that enables to identify and investigate higher energy protein conformers. The idea of the presented experiments is to examine the behaviour of RNase A molecule under high pressure before and after introduction of destabilizing mutation. For the first time crystal structures of wild-type bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A and its markedly less stable variant modified at position Ile106 were determined at different pressures. X-ray diffraction experiments at high pressure showed that the secondary structure of RNase A is well preserved even beyond 0.67 GPa at room temperature. Detailed structural analysis of ribonuclease A conformation observed under high pressure revealed that pressure influences hydrogen bonds pattern, cavity size and packing of molecule.

  13. Microscopic silicon-based lateral high-aspect-ratio structures for thin film conformality analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Feng; Arpiainen, Sanna; Puurunen, Riikka L.

    2015-01-01

    Film conformality is one of the major drivers for the interest in atomic layer deposition (ALD) processes. This work presents new silicon-based microscopic lateral high-aspect-ratio (LHAR) test structures for the analysis of the conformality of thin films deposited by ALD and by other chemical vapor deposition means. The microscopic LHAR structures consist of a lateral cavity inside silicon with a roof supported by pillars. The cavity length (e.g., 20–5000 μm) and cavity height (e.g., 200–1000 nm) can be varied, giving aspect ratios of, e.g., 20:1 to 25 000:1. Film conformality can be analyzed with the microscopic LHAR by several means, as demonstrated for the ALD Al 2 O 3 and TiO 2 processes from Me 3 Al/H 2 O and TiCl 4 /H 2 O. The microscopic LHAR test structures introduced in this work expose a new parameter space for thin film conformality investigations expected to prove useful in the development, tuning and modeling of ALD and other chemical vapor deposition processes

  14. Effects of Pulsed Electric Field (PEF) Treatment on Enhancing Activity and Conformation of α-Amylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Mei-ling; Fang, Ting; Du, Mu-ying; Zhang, Fu-sheng

    2016-04-01

    To explore an efficient, safe, and speedy application of pulsed electric field (PEF) technology for enzymatic modification, effects of PEF treatment on the enzymatic activity, property and kinetic parameters of α-amylase were investigated. Conformational transitions were also studied with the aid of circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence spectra. The maximum enzymatic activity of α-amylase was obtained under 15 kV/cm electric field intensity and 100 mL/min flow velocity PEF treatment, in which the enzymatic activity increased by 22.13 ± 1.14% compared with control. The activation effect could last for 18 h at 4 °C. PEF treatment could widen the range of optimum temperature for α-amylase, however, it barely exerted any effect on the optimum pH. On the other hand, α-amylase treated by PEF showed an increase of Vmax, t1/2 and ΔG, whereas a decrease of Km and k were observed. Furthermore, it can be observed from fluorescence and CD spectra that PEF treatment had increased the number of amino acid residues, especially that of tryptophan, on α-amylase surface with enhanced α-helices by 34.76% and decreased random coil by 12.04% on α-amylase when compared with that of untreated. These changes in structure had positive effect on enhancing α-amylase activity and property.

  15. Assessing the quality of conformal treatment planning: a new tool for quantitative comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menhel, J; Levin, D; Alezra, D; Symon, Z; Pfeffer, R

    2006-01-01

    We develop a novel radiotherapy plan comparison index, critical organ scoring index (COSI), which is a measure of both target coverage and critical organ overdose. COSI is defined as COSI = 1 - (V(OAR) >tol /TC), where V(OAR) >tol is the fraction of volume of organ at risk receiving more than tolerance dose, and TC is the target coverage, V T,PI /V T , where V T,PI is the target volume receiving at a least prescription dose and V T is the total target volume. COSI approaches unity when the critical structure is completely spared and the target coverage is unity. We propose a two-dimensional, graphical representation of COSI versus conformity index (CI), where CI is a measure of a normal tissue overdose. We show that this 2D representation is a reliable, visual quantitative tool for evaluating competing plans. We generate COSI-CI plots for three sites: head and neck, cavernous sinus, and pancreas, and evaluate competing non-coplanar 3D and IMRT treatment plans. For all three sites this novel 2D representation assisted the physician in choosing the optimal plan, both in terms of target coverage and in terms of critical organ sparing. We verified each choice by analysing individual DVHs and isodose lines. Comparing our results to the widely used conformation number, we found that in all cases where there were discrepancies in the choice of the best treatment plan, the COSI-CI choice was considered the correct one, in several cases indicating that a non-coplanar 3D plan was superior to the IMRT plans. The choice of plan was quick, simple and accurate using the new graphical representation

  16. Treatment planning evaluation of non-coplanar techniques for conformal radiotherapy of the prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedford, James L.; Henrys, Anthony J.; Dearnaley, David P.; Khoo, Vincent S.

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: To evaluate the benefit of using non-coplanar treatment plans for irradiation of two different clinical treatment volumes: prostate only (PO) and the prostate plus seminal vesicles (PSV). Material and methods: An inverse planning algorithm was used to produce three-field, four-field, five-field and six-field non-coplanar treatment plans without intensity-modulation in ten patients. These were compared against a three-field coplanar plan. A dose of 74 Gy was prescribed to the isocentre. Plans were compared using the minimum dose to the planning target volume (PTV), maximum dose to the small bowel, and irradiated volumes of rectum, bladder and femoral head. Biological indices were also evaluated. Results: For the PO group, volume of rectum irradiated to 60 Gy (V 60 ) was 22.5±3.7% for the coplanar plan, and 21.5±5.3% for the five-field non-coplanar plan, which was the most beneficial (p=0.3). For the PSV group, the five-field non-coplanar plan was again the most beneficial. Rectal V 60 was in this case reduced from 41.5±10.4% for the coplanar plan to 35.2±9.3% for the non-coplanar plan (p=0.02). Conclusions: The use of non-coplanar beams in conformal prostate radiotherapy provides a small increase in rectal sparing, more significantly with PSV volumes than for PO volumes

  17. Dosimetry study on the conventional and three dimensional conformal radiation treatment planning protocols for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Yong; He Yuxiang; Han Shukui; Wu Hao; Gong Jian; Xu Bo

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To compare the dose distribution of clinical target volume (CTV), in normal tissues and organs for patients with rectal cancer on the conventional radiotherapy (2D) and three dimension- al conformal radiation treatment (3DCRT). Methods: The CT image data of 36 rectal cancer patients treated with 3DCRT were studied. The CTV, small bowel, colon, bladder, pelvic bone marrow, and femoral head and neck were contoured on consecutive axial slices of CT images. Two 3DCRT and three conventional treatment planning protocols were simulated using three dimensional treatment planning system (CMS Focus 2.31), were defined as 3D-3, 3D-4, 2D-2, 2D-3, 2D-4. The difference of five treatment planning protocols on the CTV and normal structure by analysis of dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were compared. Results: The D 95 and V 95 of these five protocols all exceeded 97%. The conformity index(CI) of 3D was obviously larger than that of 2D protocol. The dose inhomogeneity(DI) in 4 DCRT was less than that of 3 DCRT. The 3D as compared with the 2D, significantly reduced the mean dose of 45 Gy to the small bowel and colon. The 3D-3 as compared with the 2D-3, the 3D-4 as compared with the 2D-4, the mean dose of small bowel and colon was reduced by 28.5% and 25.7%, respectively. The 3D-3 as compared with the 2D-2, the 3D-3 as compared with the 2D-3 and the 3D4 as compared with the 2D-4, the percentage volume of small bowel and colon which received 45 Gy was reduced by 80.8% , 51.1% and 54.7% , respectively. Either the mean dose, or the percentage volume receiving 35 Gy and 45 Gy to the pelvic bone and bladder, the 3D planning protocols had advanage over the 2D planning protocols. The V 45 of bladder in 2D-2 planning proto- col was the highest in all planning protocols, exceeding 98%, but the highest V 45 of bladder was only 50% in the other planning protocols. Conclusions: Even though the difference in pelvic CTV of rectal cancer patients between the conventional radiotherapy and 3

  18. A study of the effects of internal organ motion on dose escalation in conformal prostate treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Happersett, Laura; Mageras, Gig S.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Burman, Chandra M.; Leibel, Steven A.; Chui Chen; Fuks, Zvi; Bull, Sarah; Ling, C. Clifton; Kutcher, Gerald J.

    2003-01-01

    Background and purpose: To assess the effect of internal organ motion on the dose distributions and biological indices for the target and non-target organs for three different conformal prostate treatment techniques. Materials and methods: We examined three types of treatment plans in 20 patients: (1) a six field plan, with a prescribed dose of 75.6 Gy; (2) the same six field plan to 72 Gy followed by a boost to 81 Gy; and (3) a five field plan with intensity modulated beams delivering 81 Gy. Treatment plans were designed using an initial CT data set (planning) and applied to three subsequent CT scans (treatment). The treatment CT contours were used to represent patient specific organ displacement; in addition, the dose distribution was convolved with a Gaussian distribution to model random setup error. Dose-volume histograms were calculated using an organ deformation model in which the movement between scans of individual points interior to the organs was tracked and the dose accumulated. The tumor control probability (TCP) for the prostate and proximal half of seminal vesicles (clinical target volume, CTV), normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for the rectum and the percent volume of bladder wall receiving at least 75 Gy were calculated. Results: The patient averaged increase in the planned TCP between plan types 2 and 1 and types 3 and 1 was 9.8% (range 4.9-12.5%) for both, whereas the corresponding increases in treatment TCP were 9.0% (1.3-16%) and 8.1% (-1.3-13.8%). In all patients, plans 2 and 3 (81 Gy) exhibited equal or higher treatment TCP than plan 1 (75.6 Gy). The maximum treatment NTCP for rectum never exceeded the planning constraint and percent volume of bladder wall receiving at least 75 Gy was similar in the planning and treatment scans for all three plans. Conclusion: For plans that deliver a uniform prescribed dose to the planning target volume (PTV) (plan 1), current margins are adequate. In plans that further escalate the dose to part

  19. A treatment planning comparison of two different 3D conformal techniques for irradiation of head and neck cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krstevska, Valentina; Lukarski, Dusko; Petkovska, Sonja

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this treatment planning study was to compare two different three dimensional conformal irradiation techniques for head and neck cancer patients. For 33 patients with head and neck carcinoma, irradiated according to the classical technique, we computed and evaluated a second irradiation technique in order to optimize the treatment planning protocol. The classical technique, termed 'electron-photon fields', employed two lateral semi-fields (23 fractions) for irradiation of the upper part of the planning target volume that should receive 50 Gy (PTV50) and an anterior and posterior field for the lower part. After the 23rd fraction the lateral fields were reduced from the dorsal side (2 fractions), in order to exclude the spinal cord from them. At the same time the dose to the shielded part of the target volume was delivered with matched electron fields. Finally, after the 25th fraction, the high risk volume was irradiated to the desired dose with plan where the spinal cord was completely shielded. In the new technique, termed 'oblique photon fields', 4 oblique isocentric photon fields were used (25 fractions): two anterior fields that covered the entire target volume that should receive 50 Gy and two posterior fields that covered only half of the target volume in order to shield the spinal cord. Thus, the necessity for using electron fields is eliminated. We kept the plan for irradiation of the high risk planning target volume the same as in the classical technique. The prescribed dose per fraction in all plans was 2 Gy. In both techniques the plans were optimized to the same maximal point dose and the same dose to the spinal cord. The oblique fields plan showed better coverage and homogeneity of the PTV50, except for the patients with positive resection margins receiving postoperative radiotherapy (receiving 66 Gy), where the coverage did not differ significantly. The conformity in both techniques did not differ significantly. The mean dose to the

  20. Incidence of and factors related to late complications in conformal and conventional radiation treatment of cancer of the prostate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultheiss, Timothy E; Hanks, Gerald E; Hunt, Margie A; Lee, W Robert

    1995-06-15

    Purpose: The fundament hypothesis of conformal radiation therapy is that tumor control can be increased by using conformal treatment techniques that allow a higher tumor dose while maintaining an acceptable level of complications. To test this hypothesis, it is necessary first to estimate the incidence of morbidity for both standard and conformal fields. In this study, we examine factors that influence the incidence of late Grade 3 and 4 morbidity in patients treated with conformal and standard radiation treatment for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Six hundred sixteen consecutive patients treated with conformal or standard techniques between 1986 and 1994 to doses greater than 65 Gy and with more than 3 months follow-up were analyzed. No patients treated with prostatectomies were included in the analysis. The conformal technique includes special immobilization by a cast, careful identification of the target volume in three dimensions, localization of the inferior border of the prostate using a retrograde urethrogram, and individually shaped portals that conform to the Planning Target Volume (PTV). Multivariate analysis using a proportional hazards model compares differences in the incidence of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Center Treatment (RTOG/EORTC) Grade 3 and 4 late gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) morbidity by technique, T-stage, grade, age, hormonal treatment, irradiated volume, dose, and comorbid conditions. Grade 3 rectal bleeding was defined as requiring three or more cautery procedures. Results: The overall actuarial incidence of genitourinary (GU) toxicities at 5 years was 3.4%, with the crude incidence being six cases in 616 patients satisfying the selection criteria; for gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities, the overall actuarial incidence was 2.7%, with the crude incidence being 13 cases out of 616 patients. The average time to complication for our patients was 12.8 months for GI toxicity and

  1. A Dualistic Conformational Response to Substrate Binding in the Human Serotonin Transporter Reveals a High Affinity State for Serotonin*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerregaard, Henriette; Severinsen, Kasper; Said, Saida; Wiborg, Ove; Sinning, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    Serotonergic neurotransmission is modulated by the membrane-embedded serotonin transporter (SERT). SERT mediates the reuptake of serotonin into the presynaptic neurons. Conformational changes in SERT occur upon binding of ions and substrate and are crucial for translocation of serotonin across the membrane. Our understanding of these conformational changes is mainly based on crystal structures of a bacterial homolog in various conformations, derived homology models of eukaryotic neurotransmitter transporters, and substituted cysteine accessibility method of SERT. However, the dynamic changes that occur in the human SERT upon binding of ions, the translocation of substrate, and the role of cholesterol in this interplay are not fully elucidated. Here we show that serotonin induces a dualistic conformational response in SERT. We exploited the substituted cysteine scanning method under conditions that were sensitized to detect a more outward-facing conformation of SERT. We found a novel high affinity outward-facing conformational state of the human SERT induced by serotonin. The ionic requirements for this new conformational response to serotonin mirror the ionic requirements for translocation. Furthermore, we found that membrane cholesterol plays a role in the dualistic conformational response in SERT induced by serotonin. Our results indicate the existence of a subpopulation of SERT responding differently to serotonin binding than hitherto believed and that membrane cholesterol plays a role in this subpopulation of SERT. PMID:25614630

  2. Selection and determination of beam weights based on genetic algorithms for conformal radiotherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xingen Wu; Zunliang Wang

    2000-01-01

    A genetic algorithm has been used to optimize the selection of beam weights for external beam three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy treatment planning. A fitness function is defined, which includes a difference function to achieve a least-square fit to doses at preselected points in a planning target volume, and a penalty item to constrain the maximum allowable doses delivered to critical organs. Adjustment between the dose uniformity within the target volume and the dose constraint to the critical structures can be achieved by varying the beam weight variables in the fitness function. A floating-point encoding schema and several operators, like uniform crossover, arithmetical crossover, geometrical crossover, Gaussian mutation and uniform mutation, have been used to evolve the population. Three different cases were used to verify the correctness of the algorithm and quality assessment based on dose-volume histograms and three-dimensional dose distributions were given. The results indicate that the genetic algorithm presented here has considerable potential. (author)

  3. Dosimetric effect on pediatric conformal treatment plans using dynamic jaw with Tomotherapy HDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Eun Young, E-mail: eyhan@uams.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Arkansas Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR (United States); Kim, Dong-Wook [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Zhang, Xin; Penagaricano, Jose; Liang, Xiaoying; Hardee, Matthew; Morrill, Steve; Ratanatharathorn, Vaneerat [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Arkansas Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR (United States)

    2015-10-01

    It is important to minimize the radiation dose delivered to healthy tissues in pediatric cancer treatment because of the risk of secondary malignancies. Tomotherapy HDA provides a dynamic jaw (DJ) delivery mode that creates a sharper penumbra at the craniocaudal ends of a target in addition to a fixed jaw (FJ) delivery mode. The purpose of this study was to evaluate its dosimetric effect on the pediatric cancer cases. We included 6 pediatric cases in this study. The dose profiles and plan statistics—target dose conformity, uniformity, organ-at-risk (OAR) mean dose, beam-on time, and integral dose—were compared for each case. Consequently, the target dose coverage and uniformity were similar for different jaw settings. The OAR dose sparing depended on its relative location to the target and disease sites. For example, in the head and neck cancer cases, the brain stem dose using DJ 2.5 was reduced by more than two-fold (2.4 Gy vs. 6.3 Gy) than that obtained with FJ 2.5. The integral dose with DJ 2.5 decreased by more than 9% compared with that with FJ 2.5. Thus, using dynamic jaw in pediatric cases could be critical to reduce a probability of a secondary malignancy.

  4. Dosimetric effect on pediatric conformal treatment plans using dynamic jaw with Tomotherapy HDA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Eun Young; Kim, Dong-Wook; Zhang, Xin; Penagaricano, Jose; Liang, Xiaoying; Hardee, Matthew; Morrill, Steve; Ratanatharathorn, Vaneerat

    2015-01-01

    It is important to minimize the radiation dose delivered to healthy tissues in pediatric cancer treatment because of the risk of secondary malignancies. Tomotherapy HDA provides a dynamic jaw (DJ) delivery mode that creates a sharper penumbra at the craniocaudal ends of a target in addition to a fixed jaw (FJ) delivery mode. The purpose of this study was to evaluate its dosimetric effect on the pediatric cancer cases. We included 6 pediatric cases in this study. The dose profiles and plan statistics—target dose conformity, uniformity, organ-at-risk (OAR) mean dose, beam-on time, and integral dose—were compared for each case. Consequently, the target dose coverage and uniformity were similar for different jaw settings. The OAR dose sparing depended on its relative location to the target and disease sites. For example, in the head and neck cancer cases, the brain stem dose using DJ 2.5 was reduced by more than two-fold (2.4 Gy vs. 6.3 Gy) than that obtained with FJ 2.5. The integral dose with DJ 2.5 decreased by more than 9% compared with that with FJ 2.5. Thus, using dynamic jaw in pediatric cases could be critical to reduce a probability of a secondary malignancy. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. CONSERVATIVE TREATMENT IN LOCALLY AND LOCALLY-ADVANCED PROSTATE CANCER USING CONFORMAL RADIOTHERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tkachev Sergey Ivanovich

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The combination of androgen deprivation and radiotherapy increase the probability of diseases full regresses and survival rate. Modern technical and technological opportunities of 3D CRT allow to increase total dose to prostate up to 72-76Gy vs. radiotherapy of 66-70Gy. In this study we compare the rates of post radiation toxicity and the efficiency of treatment for the patients receiving conventional radiotherapy and 3D CRT. The use of 3D CRT has not only result to increase of 10-years recurrence free survival rate from 74% (I grope to 86,5% (II grope, р=0,01, but also to increase of 10-years overall survival, 70% versus 78,4% (р=0,04. The proposed version of conformal 3D CRT radiation therapy made ​​it possible compared to conventional 2D RT radiation therapy by increasing SOD radiation to the tumor, accuracy and compliance with the quality assurance of radiation therapy significantly reduce rates of recurrence and significantly increase the performance of 10-year overall and disease-free survival.

  6. A dose homogeneity and conformity evaluation between ViewRay and pinnacle-based linear accelerator IMRT treatment plans

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel L Saenz; Bhudatt R Paliwal; John E Bayouth

    2014-01-01

    ViewRay, a novel technology providing soft-tissue imaging during radiotherapy is investigated for treatment planning capabilities assessing treatment plan dose homogeneity and conformity compared with linear accelerator plans. ViewRay offers both adaptive radiotherapy and image guidance. The combination of cobalt-60 (Co-60) with 0.35 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows for magnetic resonance (MR)-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) delivery with multiple beams. This ...

  7. A treatment planning study comparing whole breast radiation therapy against conformal, IMRT and tomotherapy for accelerated partial breast irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliver, Mike; Chen, Jeff; Wong, Eugene; Van Dyk, Jake; Perera, Francisco

    2007-01-01

    Purpose and background: Conventional early breast cancer treatment consists of a lumpectomy followed by whole breast radiation therapy. Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) is an investigational approach to post-lumpectomy radiation for early breast cancer. The purpose of this study is to compare four external beam APBI techniques, including tomotherapy, with conventional whole breast irradiation for their radiation conformity index, dose homogeneity index, and dose to organs at risk. Methods and materials: Small-field tangents, three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy, intensity-modulated radiation therapy and helical tomotherapy were compared for each of 15 patients (7 right, 8 left). One radiation conformity and two dose homogeneity indices were used to evaluate the dose to the target. The mean dose to organs at risk was also evaluated. Results: All proposed APBI techniques improved the conformity index significantly over whole breast tangents while maintaining dose homogeneity and without a significant increase in dose to organs at risk. Conclusion: The four-field IMRT plan produced the best dosimetric results; however this technique would require appropriate respiratory motion management. An alternative would be to use a four-field conformal technique that is less sensitive to the effects of respiratory motion

  8. A study of the radiobiological modeling of the conformal radiation therapy in cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyakuryal, Anil Prasad

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of mortalities in the world. The precise diagnosis of the disease helps the patients to select the appropriate modality of the treatments such as surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy. The physics of X-radiation and the advanced imaging technologies such as positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) plays an important role in the efficient diagnosis and therapeutic treatments in cancer. However, the accuracy of the measurements of the metabolic target volumes (MTVs) in the PET/CT dual-imaging modality is always limited. Similarly the external beam radiation therapy (XRT) such as 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is the most common modality in the radiotherapy treatment. These treatments are simulated and evaluated using the XRT plans and the standard methodologies in the commercial planning system. However, the normal organs are always susceptible to the radiation toxicity in these treatments due to lack of knowledge of the appropriate radiobiological models to estimate the clinical outcomes. We explored several methodologies to estimate MTVs by reviewing various techniques of the target volume delineation using the static phantoms in the PET scans. The review suggests that the more precise and practical method of delineating PET MTV should be an intermediate volume between the volume coverage for the standardized uptake value (SUV; 2.5) of glucose and the 50% (40%) threshold of the maximum SUV for the smaller (larger) volume delineations in the radiotherapy applications. Similarly various types of optimal XRT plans were designed using the CT and PET/CT scans for the treatment of various types of cancer patients. The qualities of these plans were assessed using the universal plan-indices. The dose-volume criteria were also examined in the targets and organs by analyzing the conventional dose-volume histograms (DVHs). The biological models such as tumor

  9. Recurrent craniopharyngioma after conformal radiation in children and the burden of treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimo, Paul; Venable, Garrett T; Boop, Frederick A; Merchant, Thomas E

    2015-05-01

    In this paper the authors present their experience treating children with recurrent craniopharyngioma who were initially managed with surgery followed by conformal radiation therapy (CRT). A departmental oncology information system was queried to identify all children (craniopharyngioma between 1998 and 2010 (inclusive) and specifically those who experienced tumor progression. For each patient, the authors recorded the type of recurrence (solid, cystic, or both), the time interval to first progression and each subsequent progression, the associated treatment complications, and disease status at last follow-up evaluation. Among the 97 patients that met criteria for entry into this study, 18 (18.6%) experienced tumor progression (9 cystic, 3 solid, 6 cystic and solid). The median time to first recurrence was 4.62 years (range 1.81-9.11 years). The subgroup included 6 female and 12 male patients with a median age of 7.54 years (range 3.61-13.83 years). Ten patients experienced first progression within 5 years of CRT. The 5- and 10-year treatment-free survival rates for the entire cohort were 89.0% (95% confidence interval [CI] 80.5%-93.9%) and 76.2% (95% CI 64%-85%), respectively. Seven patients had a single episode of progression and 11 had more than 1. The time interval between each subsequent progression was progressively shorter. The 18 patients underwent 38 procedures. The median follow-up duration for this group was 9.32 years (range 4.04-19.0 years). Three patients died, including 1 from perioperative complications. Craniopharyngioma progression after prior irradiation is exceedingly difficult to treat and local control is challenging despite repeated surgical procedures. Given our results, gross-total resection may need to be the surgical goal at the time of first recurrence, if possible. Decompressing new cyst formation alone has a low rate of long-term success.

  10. Comparative evaluation of two dose optimization methods for image-guided, highly-conformal, tandem and ovoids cervix brachytherapy planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jiyun; Menon, Geetha; Sloboda, Ron

    2013-04-01

    Although the Manchester system is still extensively used to prescribe dose in brachytherapy (BT) for locally advanced cervix cancer, many radiation oncology centers are transitioning to 3D image-guided BT, owing to the excellent anatomy definition offered by modern imaging modalities. As automatic dose optimization is highly desirable for 3D image-based BT, this study comparatively evaluates the performance of two optimization methods used in BT treatment planning—Nelder-Mead simplex (NMS) and simulated annealing (SA)—for a cervix BT computer simulation model incorporating a Manchester-style applicator. Eight model cases were constructed based on anatomical structure data (for high risk-clinical target volume (HR-CTV), bladder, rectum and sigmoid) obtained from measurements on fused MR-CT images for BT patients. D90 and V100 for HR-CTV, D2cc for organs at risk (OARs), dose to point A, conformation index and the sum of dwell times within the tandem and ovoids were calculated for optimized treatment plans designed to treat the HR-CTV in a highly conformal manner. Compared to the NMS algorithm, SA was found to be superior as it could perform optimization starting from a range of initial dwell times, while the performance of NMS was strongly dependent on their initial choice. SA-optimized plans also exhibited lower D2cc to OARs, especially the bladder and sigmoid, and reduced tandem dwell times. For cases with smaller HR-CTV having good separation from adjoining OARs, multiple SA-optimized solutions were found which differed markedly from each other and were associated with different choices for initial dwell times. Finally and importantly, the SA method yielded plans with lower dwell time variability compared with the NMS method.

  11. Impact of collimator leaf width on stereotactic radiosurgery and 3D conformal radiotherapy treatment plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, H. Dale; Wilder, Richard B.; Pappas, Conrad T.E.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: The authors undertook a study to analyze the impact of collimator leaf width on stereotactic radiosurgery and 3D conformal radiotherapy treatment plans. Methods and Materials: Twelve cases involving primary brain tumors, metastases, or arteriovenous malformations that had been planned with BrainLAB's conventional circular collimator-based radiosurgery system were re-planned using a β-version of BrainLAB's treatment planning software that is compatible with MRC Systems' and BrainLAB's micro-multileaf collimators. These collimators have a minimum leaf width of 1.7 mm and 3.0 mm, respectively, at isocenter. The clinical target volumes ranged from 2.7-26.1 cc and the number of static fields ranged from 3-5. In addition, for 4 prostate cancer cases, 2 separate clinical target volumes were planned using MRC Systems' and BrainLAB's micro-multileaf collimators and Varian's multileaf collimator: the smaller clinical target volume consisted of the prostate gland and the larger clinical target volume consisted of the prostate and seminal vesicles. For the prostate cancer cases, treatment plans were generated using either 6 or 7 static fields. A 'PITV ratio', which the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group defines as the volume encompassed by the prescription isodose surface divided by the clinical target volume, was used as a measure of the quality of treatment plans (a PITV ratio of 1.0-2.0 is desirable). Bladder and rectal volumes encompassed by the prescription isodose surface, isodose distributions and dose volume histograms were also analyzed for the prostate cancer patients. Results: In 75% of the cases treated with radiosurgery, a PITV ratio between 1.0-2.0 could be achieved using a micro-multileaf collimator with a leaf width of 1.7-3.0 mm at isocenter and 3-5 static fields. When the clinical target volume consisted of the prostate gland, the micro-multileaf collimator with a minimum leaf width of 3.0 mm allowed one to decrease the median volume of bladder and

  12. High-order discrete ordinate transport in non-conforming 2D Cartesian meshes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gastaldo, L.; Le Tellier, R.; Suteau, C.; Fournier, D.; Ruggieri, J. M.

    2009-01-01

    We present in this paper a numerical scheme for solving the time-independent first-order form of the Boltzmann equation in non-conforming 2D Cartesian meshes. The flux solution technique used here is the discrete ordinate method and the spatial discretization is based on discontinuous finite elements. In order to have p-refinement capability, we have chosen a hierarchical polynomial basis based on Legendre polynomials. The h-refinement capability is also available and the element interface treatment has been simplified by the use of special functions decomposed over the mesh entities of an element. The comparison to a classical S N method using the Diamond Differencing scheme as spatial approximation confirms the good behaviour of the method. (authors)

  13. Spectral Elements Analysis for Viscoelastic Fluids at High Weissenberg Number Using Logarithmic conformation Tensor Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Azadeh; Deville, Michel O.; Fiétier, Nicolas

    2008-09-01

    This study discusses the capability of the constitutive laws for the matrix logarithm of the conformation tensor (LCT model) within the framework of the spectral elements method. The high Weissenberg number problems (HWNP) usually produce a lack of convergence of the numerical algorithms. Even though the question whether the HWNP is a purely numerical problem or rather a breakdown of the constitutive law of the model has remained somewhat of a mystery, it has been recognized that the selection of an appropriate constitutive equation constitutes a very crucial step although implementing a suitable numerical technique is still important for successful discrete modeling of non-Newtonian flows. The LCT model formulation of the viscoelastic equations originally suggested by Fattal and Kupferman is applied for 2-dimensional (2D) FENE-CR model. The Planar Poiseuille flow is considered as a benchmark problem to test this representation at high Weissenberg number. The numerical results are compared with numerical solution of the standard constitutive equation.

  14. Conformal Brachytherapy Boost To External Beam Irradiation For Clinically Localized High Risk Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dattoli, Michael J.; Wasserman, Stuart G.; Koval, John M.; Sorace, Richard A.; Cash, Jennifer; Wallner, Kent E.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of using a Pd-103 implant as a boost in conjunction with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in patients having prostate cancer associated with adverse features. Materials and Methods: 114 consecutive high risk patients have been treated with combination EBRT and Pd-103 implant. 70 patients with follow-up range of 12-42 months (median 24 months) form the basis of this report. Each patient had at least one of the following risk factors for extra-capsular disease extension: Stage T2b or greater ((66(70))), Gleason score ≥ 7 ((38(70))), significantly elevated PSA (typically > 15 ng/ml)((30(70))) or elevated serum prostatic acid phosphatase (SPAP)((17(70))). Patients received median 4140 cGy EBRT to a limited pelvic field followed by a Pd-103 boost (median prescription dose: 8000 cGy). All patients have been followed in a prospective fashion with respect to PSA response, clinical evidence of disease progression and complications. Criteria for biochemical failure was relatively strict, and was analyzed using both, PSA > 2.0 and PSA > 1.0 as end points. Patients whose PSA was still decreasing at last follow-up were censored at that time. Freedom from failure rates were calculated by the method of Kaplan and Meier. Differences between groups were determined by the Log-rank method. Sexual potency was defined as the ability to attain and maintain an erection sufficient for intercourse. Results: Actuarial freedom from biochemical failure at 3 years after treatment was 90% and 78%, when PSA > 2 and PSA > 1 were used, respectively. There are no documented local relapses. 4 patients failed distantly, and all other failures are based solely on rising PSA values. Biochemical failure was higher in patients having Gleason score ≥ 7 (p=0.001), those with PSA >20 (p=0.014) and in those with elevated SPAP (p=0.007). The primary treatment related morbity was temporary, Grade 1-2 urinary symptoms. No patient developed rectal ulceration or prostatic

  15. Conformal Brachytherapy Boost To External Beam Irradiation For Clinically Localized High Risk Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dattoli, Michael J; Wasserman, Stuart G; Koval, John M; Sorace, Richard A; Cash, Jennifer; Wallner, Kent E

    1995-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of using a Pd-103 implant as a boost in conjunction with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in patients having prostate cancer associated with adverse features. Materials and Methods: 114 consecutive high risk patients have been treated with combination EBRT and Pd-103 implant. 70 patients with follow-up range of 12-42 months (median 24 months) form the basis of this report. Each patient had at least one of the following risk factors for extra-capsular disease extension: Stage T2b or greater ((66(70))), Gleason score {>=} 7 ((38(70))), significantly elevated PSA (typically > 15 ng/ml)((30(70))) or elevated serum prostatic acid phosphatase (SPAP)((17(70))). Patients received median 4140 cGy EBRT to a limited pelvic field followed by a Pd-103 boost (median prescription dose: 8000 cGy). All patients have been followed in a prospective fashion with respect to PSA response, clinical evidence of disease progression and complications. Criteria for biochemical failure was relatively strict, and was analyzed using both, PSA > 2.0 and PSA > 1.0 as end points. Patients whose PSA was still decreasing at last follow-up were censored at that time. Freedom from failure rates were calculated by the method of Kaplan and Meier. Differences between groups were determined by the Log-rank method. Sexual potency was defined as the ability to attain and maintain an erection sufficient for intercourse. Results: Actuarial freedom from biochemical failure at 3 years after treatment was 90% and 78%, when PSA > 2 and PSA > 1 were used, respectively. There are no documented local relapses. 4 patients failed distantly, and all other failures are based solely on rising PSA values. Biochemical failure was higher in patients having Gleason score {>=} 7 (p=0.001), those with PSA >20 (p=0.014) and in those with elevated SPAP (p=0.007). The primary treatment related morbity was temporary, Grade 1-2 urinary symptoms. No patient developed rectal ulceration or prostatic

  16. Treatment planning for conformation therapy using a multi-leaf collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boesecke, R.; Doll, J.; Bauer, B.; Schlegel, W.; Pastyr, O.; Lorenz, W.J.

    1988-01-01

    In high energy photon therapy an optimum dose distribution is achieved with an irradiation from several directions, thus adapting the field shape to the target volume. Some methods of irradiation planning using these techniques are presented. The result of such a treatment planning is demonstrated. (orig.) [de

  17. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and conventional three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for high-grade gliomas: Does IMRT increase the integral dose to normal brain?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermanto, Ulrich; Frija, Erik K.; Lii, MingFwu J.; Chang, Eric L.; Mahajan, Anita; Woo, Shiao Y.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment increases the total integral dose of nontarget tissue relative to the conventional three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) technique for high-grade gliomas. Methods and Materials: Twenty patients treated with 3D-CRT for glioblastoma multiforme were selected for a comparative dosimetric evaluation with IMRT. Original target volumes, organs at risk (OAR), and dose-volume constraints were used for replanning with IMRT. Predicted isodose distributions, cumulative dose-volume histograms of target volumes and OAR, normal tissue integral dose, target coverage, dose conformity, and normal tissue sparing with 3D-CRT and IMRT planning were compared. Statistical analyses were performed to determine differences. Results: In all 20 patients, IMRT maintained equivalent target coverage, improved target conformity (conformity index [CI] 95% 1.52 vs. 1.38, p mean by 19.8% and D max by 10.7%), optic chiasm (D mean by 25.3% and D max by 22.6%), right optic nerve (D mean by 37.3% and D max by 28.5%), and left optic nerve (D mean by 40.6% and D max by 36.7%), p ≤ 0.01. This was achieved without increasing the total nontarget integral dose by greater than 0.5%. Overall, total integral dose was reduced by 7-10% with IMRT, p < 0.001, without significantly increasing the 0.5-5 Gy low-dose volume. Conclusions: These results indicate that IMRT treatment for high-grade gliomas allows for improved target conformity, better critical tissue sparing, and importantly does so without increasing integral dose and the volume of normal tissue exposed to low doses of radiation

  18. A dose homogeneity and conformity evaluation between ViewRay and pinnacle-based linear accelerator IMRT treatment plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saenz, Daniel L.; Paliwal, Bhudatt R.; Bayouth, John E.

    2014-01-01

    ViewRay, a novel technology providing soft-tissue imaging during radiotherapy is investigated for treatment planning capabilities assessing treatment plan dose homogeneity and conformity compared with linear accelerator plans. ViewRay offers both adaptive radiotherapy and image guidance. The combination of cobalt-60 ( 60 Co) with 0.35 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows for magnetic resonance (MR)-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) delivery with multiple beams. This study investigated head and neck, lung, and prostate treatment plans to understand what is possible on ViewRay to narrow focus toward sites with optimal dosimetry. The goal is not to provide a rigorous assessment of planning capabilities, but rather a first order demonstration of ViewRay planning abilities. Images, structure sets, points, and dose from treatment plans created in Pinnacle for patients in our clinic were imported into ViewRay. The same objectives were used to assess plan quality and all critical structures were treated as similarly as possible. Homogeneity index (HI), conformity index (CI), and volume receiving 60 Co ViewRay treatments planned with its Monte Carlo treatment planning software were comparable with 6 MV plans computed with convolution superposition algorithm on Pinnacle treatment planning system. (author)

  19. A dose homogeneity and conformity evaluation between ViewRay and pinnacle-based linear accelerator IMRT treatment plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saenz, Daniel L; Paliwal, Bhudatt R; Bayouth, John E

    2014-04-01

    ViewRay, a novel technology providing soft-tissue imaging during radiotherapy is investigated for treatment planning capabilities assessing treatment plan dose homogeneity and conformity compared with linear accelerator plans. ViewRay offers both adaptive radiotherapy and image guidance. The combination of cobalt-60 (Co-60) with 0.35 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows for magnetic resonance (MR)-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) delivery with multiple beams. This study investigated head and neck, lung, and prostate treatment plans to understand what is possible on ViewRay to narrow focus toward sites with optimal dosimetry. The goal is not to provide a rigorous assessment of planning capabilities, but rather a first order demonstration of ViewRay planning abilities. Images, structure sets, points, and dose from treatment plans created in Pinnacle for patients in our clinic were imported into ViewRay. The same objectives were used to assess plan quality and all critical structures were treated as similarly as possible. Homogeneity index (HI), conformity index (CI), and volume receiving ViewRay treatments planned with its Monte Carlo treatment planning software were comparable with 6 MV plans computed with convolution superposition algorithm on Pinnacle treatment planning system.

  20. A dose homogeneity and conformity evaluation between ViewRay and pinnacle-based linear accelerator IMRT treatment plans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel L Saenz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available ViewRay, a novel technology providing soft-tissue imaging during radiotherapy is investigated for treatment planning capabilities assessing treatment plan dose homogeneity and conformity compared with linear accelerator plans. ViewRay offers both adaptive radiotherapy and image guidance. The combination of cobalt-60 (Co-60 with 0.35 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI allows for magnetic resonance (MR-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT delivery with multiple beams. This study investigated head and neck, lung, and prostate treatment plans to understand what is possible on ViewRay to narrow focus toward sites with optimal dosimetry. The goal is not to provide a rigorous assessment of planning capabilities, but rather a first order demonstration of ViewRay planning abilities. Images, structure sets, points, and dose from treatment plans created in Pinnacle for patients in our clinic were imported into ViewRay. The same objectives were used to assess plan quality and all critical structures were treated as similarly as possible. Homogeneity index (HI, conformity index (CI, and volume receiving <20% of prescription dose (DRx were calculated to assess the plans. The 95% confidence intervals were recorded for all measurements and presented with the associated bars in graphs. The homogeneity index (D5/D95 had a 1-5% inhomogeneity increase for head and neck, 3-8% for lung, and 4-16% for prostate. CI revealed a modest conformity increase for lung. The volume receiving 20% of the prescription dose increased 2-8% for head and neck and up to 4% for lung and prostate. Overall, for head and neck Co-60 ViewRay treatments planned with its Monte Carlo treatment planning software were comparable with 6 MV plans computed with convolution superposition algorithm on Pinnacle treatment planning system.

  1. Optimization of stereotactically-guided conformal treatment planning of sellar and parasellar tumors, based on normal brain dose volume histograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perks, Julian R.; Jalali, Rakesh; Cosgrove, Vivian P.; Adams, Elizabeth J.; Shepherd, Stephen F.; Warrington, Alan P.; Brada, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the optimal treatment plan for stereo tactically-guided conformal radiotherapy (SCRT) of sellar and parasellar lesions, with respect to sparing normal brain tissue, in the context of routine treatment delivery, based on dose volume histogram analysis. Methods and Materials: Computed tomography (CT) data sets for 8 patients with sellar- and parasellar-based tumors (6 pituitary adenomas and 2 meningiomas) have been used in this study. Treatment plans were prepared for 3-coplanar and 3-, 4-, 6-, and 30-noncoplanar-field arrangements to obtain 95% isodose coverage of the planning target volume (PTV) for each plan. Conformal shaping was achieved by customized blocks generated with the beams eye view (BEV) facility. Dose volume histograms (DVH) were calculated for the normal brain (excluding the PTV), and comparisons made for normal tissue sparing for all treatment plans at ≥80%, ≥60%, and ≥40% of the prescribed dose. Results: The mean volume of normal brain receiving ≥80% and ≥60% of the prescribed dose decreased by 22.3% (range 14.8-35.1%, standard deviation σ = 7.5%) and 47.6% (range 25.8-69.1%, σ 13.2%), respectively, with a 4-field noncoplanar technique when compared with a conventional 3-field coplanar technique. Adding 2 further fields, from 4-noncoplanar to 6-noncoplanar fields reduced the mean normal brain volume receiving ≥80% of the prescribed dose by a further 4.1% (range -6.5-11.8%, σ = 6.4%), and the volume receiving ≥60% by 3.3% (range -5.5-12.2%, σ = 5.4%), neither of which were statistically significant. Each case must be considered individually however, as a wide range is seen in the volume spared when increasing the number of fields from 4 to 6. Comparing the 4- and 6-field noncoplanar techniques to a 30-field conformal field approach (simulating a dynamic arc plan) revealed near-equivalent normal tissue sparing. Conclusion: Four to six widely spaced, fixed-conformal fields provide the optimum class solution

  2. Mangiferin binding to serum albumin is non-saturable and induces conformational changes at high concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitas, P.G.; Barbosa, A.F. [Biochemistry Laboratory, Institute of Exact Sciences, Federal University of Alfenas, Unifal-MG, R. Gabriel Monteiro da Silva, 700, 37130-000 Alfenas, MG (Brazil); Saraiva, L.A. [Phytochemistry and Medicinal Chemistry Laboratory, Institute of Exact Sciences, Unifal-MG (Brazil); Camps, I. [Physics Laboratory, Institute of Exact Sciences, Unifal-MG (Brazil); Silveira, N.J.F. da [Bioinformatics Laboratory, Institute of Exact Sciences, Unifal-MG (Brazil); Veloso, M.P. [Phytochemistry and Medicinal Chemistry Laboratory, Institute of Exact Sciences, Unifal-MG (Brazil); Santos, M.H., E-mail: poliany.santos@gmail.com [Phytochemistry and Medicinal Chemistry Laboratory, Institute of Exact Sciences, Unifal-MG (Brazil); Schneedorf, J.M., E-mail: zemasfs@gmail.com [Biochemistry Laboratory, Institute of Exact Sciences, Federal University of Alfenas, Unifal-MG, R. Gabriel Monteiro da Silva, 700, 37130-000 Alfenas, MG (Brazil)

    2012-11-15

    The binding interaction between mangiferin (MGF), which a natural xanthone isolated from mangoes, and bovine serum albumin (BSA) was studied with absorbance and fluorescence spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and molecular modeling. The data were analyzed to assess the binding mechanism, effect of pH and ionic strength, conformational changes in the protein and electrical charge transfer involved. The MGF-BSA complex exhibited positive cooperativity with a 1:1 stoichiometry (K{sub d}=0.38 mmol L{sup -1}) for the first binding site and a non-saturable binding at high ligand concentrations. Furthermore, the data also suggest an increase in drug bioavailability in the acidic region and relatively low ionic strength values, which are close to physiological levels. The data suggest a specific electrostatic interaction together with hydrophobic effects and H-bonding displayed in MGF binding to the BSA IIA subdomain. Synchronous fluorescence spectra indicate that there are conformational changes in the polypeptide backbone upon ligand binding. Cyclic voltammetry indicates that there is an irreversible charge transfer between MGF and BSA that is modulated by diffusion on the electrode surface, where two electrons are transferred. These results can help the knowledge of the pharmacokinetic activities of natural or chemical xanthone-based drugs. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The MGF-BSA complex exhibited positive cooperativity beyond 1:1 stoichiometry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The interaction of MGF with BSA is non-saturable at higher ligand concentration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The binding was accomplished by H-bonding, hydrophobic and electrostatic forces. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The apparent binding constant for MGF-BSA was 0.38 mmol L{sup -1}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MGF binds electrostatically to BSA, different from a hydrophobic interaction to HSA.

  3. Dual Drug Targeting of Mutant Bcr-Abl Induces Inactive Conformation: New Strategy for the Treatment of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia and Overcoming Monotherapy Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Rashedy, Ahmed A; Olotu, Fisayo A; Soliman, Mahmoud E S

    2018-03-01

    Bcr-Abl is an oncogenic fusion protein which expression enhances tumorigenesis, and has been highly associated with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Acquired drug resistance in mutant Bcr-Abl has enhanced pathogenesis with the use of single therapy agents such as nilotinib. Moreover, allosteric targeting has been identified to consequentially inhibit Bcr-Abl activity, which led to the recent development of ABL-001 (asciminib) that selectively binds the myristoyl pocket. Experimental studies have revealed that the combination of nilotinib and ABL-001 induced a 'bent' conformation in the C-terminal helix of Bcr-Abl; a benchmark of inhibition, thereby exhibiting a greater potency in the treatment of CML, surmounting the setbacks of drug resistance, disease regression and relapse. Therefore, we report the first account of the dynamics and conformational analysis of oncogenic T334I Bcr-Abl by dual targeting. Our findings revealed that unlike in the Bcr-Abl-Nilotinib complex, dual targeting by both inhibitors induced the bent conformation in the C-terminal helix that varied with time. This was coupled with significant alteration in Bcr-Abl stability, flexibility, and compactness and an overall structural re-orientation inwards towards the hydrophobic core, which reduced the solvent-exposed residues indicative of protein folding. This study will facilitate allosteric targeting and the design of more potent allosteric inhibitors for resistive target proteins in cancer. © 2018 Wiley-VHCA AG, Zurich, Switzerland.

  4. Factors related to late GI and GU complications in conformal and conventional radiation treatment of cancer of the prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultheiss, Timothy E.; Lee, W. Robert; Hunt, Margie A.; Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Peter, Ruth S.; Hanks, Gerald E.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the factors that predict for late GI and GU morbidity in radiation treatment of the prostate. Materials and Methods: Six hundred sixteen consecutive prostate cancer patients treated between 1985 and 1994 with conformal or conventional techniques were included in the analysis. All patients had at least 3 months followup (median 26 months) and received at least 65 Gy. Late GI morbidity was rectal bleeding (requiring more than 2 procedures) or proctitis. Late GU morbidity was cystitis or stricture. Univariate analysis compared the differences in the incidence of RTOG-EORTC grade 3 and 4 late morbidity by age (<60 versus ≥ 60 years), peracute side effects ≥ grade 1 (during treatment), subacute side effects ≥ grade 1 (0 to 90 days after treatment), irradiated volume parameters, and dose. Multivariate proportional hazards analysis includes these same variables in a model of time to complication. Multivariate logistic regression was used to analyze incidence of peracute and subacute GI and GU side effects by GI and GU comorbidities, performance status, pretreatment procedures (biopsy, TURP, etc.), age, treatment volume parameters, and peracute responses. Results: Peracute GI and GU side effects were noted in 441 and 442 patients, respectively. Subacute GI and GU side effects were noted in 34 and 54 patients, respectively. Subacute GI side effects were highly correlated with subacute GU side effects (p<0.00001). Late morbidities were not correlated with peracute side effects but were correlated with subacute side effects (both GI and GU). Thirteen of the 616 patients expressed grade 3 or 4 GI injuries 3 to 32 months after the end of treatment, with a mean of 13 months. The 6 GU morbidities occurred significantly later (9 - 52 months) with a mean of 33 months. Central axis dose and age less than 60 years were the only independent variables significantly related to the incidence of late GI morbidity on multivariate analysis. Subacute and peracute

  5. Conformal and highly luminescent monolayers of Alq3 prepared by gas-phase molecular layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Räupke, André; Albrecht, Fabian; Maibach, Julia; Behrendt, Andreas; Polywka, Andreas; Heiderhoff, Ralf; Helzel, Jonatan; Rabe, Torsten; Johannes, Hans-Hermann; Kowalsky, Wolfgang; Mankel, Eric; Mayer, Thomas; Görrn, Patrick; Riedl, Thomas

    2014-01-22

    The gas-phase molecular layer deposition (MLD) of conformal and highly luminescent monolayers of tris(8-hydroxyquinolinato)aluminum (Alq3) is reported. The controlled formation of Alq3 monolayers is achieved for the first time by functionalization of the substrate with amino groups, which serve as initial docking sites for trimethyl aluminum (TMA) molecules binding datively to the amine. Thereby, upon exposure to 8-hydroxyquinoline (8-HQ), the self-limiting formation of highly luminescent Alq3 monolayers is afforded. The growth process and monolayer formation were studied and verified by in situ quartz crystal monitoring, optical emission and absorption spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The nature of the MLD process provides an avenue to coat arbitrarily shaped 3D surfaces and porous structures with high surface areas, as demonstrated in this work for silica aerogels. The concept presented here paves the way to highly sensitive luminescent sensors and dye-sensitized metal oxides for future applications (e.g., in photocatalysis and solar cells).

  6. Conformal radiotherapy in the adjuvant treatment of gastric cancer: Review of 82 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassam, Zahra; Lockwood, Gina; O'Brien, Catherine; Brierley, James; Swallow, Carol; Oza, Amit; Siu, Lillian; Knox, Jennifer J.; Wong, Rebecca; Cummings, Bernard; Kim, John; Moore, Malcolm; Ringash, Jolie

    2006-01-01

    Background: The Intergroup 0116 study showed a survival benefit with adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for resected gastric cancer. We report our experience using conformal radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Eighty-two patients with resected gastric or gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) adenocarcinoma, Stage IB to IV (M0), were treated with 45 Gy in 25 fractions using a 5-field conformal technique. Chemotherapy was in accordance with the Intergroup 0116 study, or infusional 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin in a phase I/II trial. Results: Mean age was 56.4 years. Median follow-up was 22.8 months. Grade 3 or greater acute toxicity (National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria of Adverse Events, version 3.0) was noted in 57% of patients (upper gastrointestinal tract 34%, hematologic 33%). One patient died of neutropenic sepsis. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3 late toxicity included esophageal strictures (3 patients) and small bowel obstruction (1 patient). Full course CRT was completed by 67% of patients. Of 26 patients who relapsed, 20 died. Site of first relapse was available on 23 patients: 8 locoregional and distant, 4 locoregional alone, 11 distant alone. Overall and relapse-free survival were 69% and 54% at 3 years. Conclusion: Adjuvant CRT for gastric cancer, even with conformal RT, is associated with significant toxicity. Survival was comparable to that reported in the Intergroup 0116 study

  7. An Improved Methodology for Multidimensional High-Throughput Preformulation Characterization of Protein Conformational Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddux, Nathaniel R.; Rosen, Ilan T.; Hu, Lei; Olsen, Christopher M.; Volkin, David B.; Middaugh, C. Russell

    2013-01-01

    The Empirical Phase Diagram (EPD) technique is a vector-based multidimensional analysis method for summarizing large data sets from a variety of biophysical techniques. It can be used to provide comprehensive preformulation characterization of a macromolecule’s higher-order structural integrity and conformational stability. In its most common mode, it represents a type of stimulus-response diagram using environmental variables such as temperature, pH, and ionic strength as the stimulus, with alterations in macromolecular structure being the response. Until now EPD analysis has not been available in a high throughput mode because of the large number of experimental techniques and environmental stressor/stabilizer variables typically employed. A new instrument has been developed that combines circular dichroism, UV-absorbance, fluorescence spectroscopy and light scattering in a single unit with a 6-position temperature controlled cuvette turret. Using this multifunctional instrument and a new software system we have generated EPDs for four model proteins. Results confirm the reproducibility of the apparent phase boundaries and protein behavior within the boundaries. This new approach permits two EPDs to be generated per day using only 0.5 mg of protein per EPD. Thus, the new methodology generates reproducible EPDs in high-throughput mode, and represents the next step in making such determinations more routine. PMID:22447621

  8. Ru nanostructure fabrication using an anodic aluminum oxide nanotemplate and highly conformal Ru atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Woo-Hee; Park, Sang-Joon; Son, Jong-Yeog; Kim, Hyungjun [Department of Material Science and Engineering, POSTECH Pohang University of Science and Technology, San 31, Hyoja-Dong, Nam-Gu, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-01-30

    We fabricated metallic nanostructures directly on Si substrates through a hybrid nanoprocess combining atomic layer deposition (ALD) and a self-assembled anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) nanotemplate. ALD Ru films with Ru(DMPD)(EtCp) as a precursor and O{sub 2} as a reactant exhibited high purity and low resistivity with negligible nucleation delay and low roughness. These good growth characteristics resulted in the excellent conformality for nanometer-scale vias and trenches. Additionally, AAO nanotemplates were fabricated directly on Si and Ti/Si substrates through a multiple anodization process. AAO nanotemplates with various hole sizes (30-100 nm) and aspect ratios (2:1-20:1) were fabricated by controlling the anodizing process parameters. The barrier layers between AAO nanotemplates and Si substrates were completely removed by reactive ion etching (RIE) using BCl{sub 3} plasma. By combining the ALD Ru and the AAO nanotemplate, Ru nanostructures with controllable sizes and shapes were prepared on Si and Ti/Si substrates. The Ru nanowire array devices as a platform for sensor devices exhibited befitting properties of good ohmic contact and high surface/volume ratio.

  9. Dosimetric Verification and Evaluation of the 3-D Conformal Parotid Gland-Sparing Irradiation Technique for Bilateral Neck Treatment at University Hospital Centre Zagreb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacevic, N; Hrsak, H.; Bibic, J.

    2011-01-01

    3-D Conformal Parotid Gland-Sparing Irradiation Technique for Bilateral Neck (ConPas) is an alternative to Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and is in routine use at University Hospital Centre Rebro (KBC-Rebro), Zagreb. This technique includes highly asymmetric wedged conformal multi-leaf fields and demands very precise application. The aim of this paper is to present the dosimetric verification method of ConPas (and evaluation of ConPas applicability) as performed at KBC, taking into account the precision of the Treatment Planning System (TPS), possibilities of linear accelerator and patient set-up error. Results for two patients are shown in some details.ConPas is a rather sophisticated method and demands high precision in the whole radiotherapy process. Verification of ConPas using IMRT Verification Matrix Phantom shows good agreement between measured and predicted doses inside and outside PTV regions of the head and neck. Furthermore, a careful track of the positioning during the treatment shows that the overall set-up error is very small (practically negligible). When possible, one parotid gland may be partially spared, and therefore its function preserved at least to some extent. (author)

  10. Conformational Heterogeneity in Antibody-Protein Antigen Recognition IMPLICATIONS FOR HIGH AFFINITY PROTEIN COMPLEX FORMATION

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Addis, P. W.; Hall, c. J.; Bruton, S.; Veverka, Václav; Wilkinson, I. C.; Muskett, F. W.; Renshaw, P. S.; Prosser, C. E.; Carrington, B.; Lawson, A. D. G.; Griffin, R.; Taylor, R. J.; Waters, L. C.; Henry, A. J.; Carr, M. D.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 289, č. 10 (2014), s. 7200-7210 ISSN 0021-9258 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : NMR * antibody * protein-protein interaction * protein conformation Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 4.573, year: 2014

  11. Handheld highly selective plasmonic chem/biosensor using engineered binding proteins for extreme conformational changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosciolek, Derek J.; Sonar, Ajay; Lepak, Lori A.; Schnatz, Peter; Bendoym, Igor; Brown, Mia C.; Koder, Ronald L.; Crouse, David T.

    2017-08-01

    In this project we develop a handheld, portable, highly selective and sensitive chem/biosensor that has potential applications in both airborne and water-based environmental sensing. The device relies on a plasmonic chip of subwavelength-scale periodic gold rods engineered to resonate in the near infrared. The chip is functionalized with a novel class of proteins that exhibit large conformational changes upon binding to a specific target analyte. The subsequent change in local refractive index near the surface of the gold is one to two orders of magnitude greater than current conventional methods, which produces a readily measurable 5 to 10 percent difference in light transmission. This allows us to forgo traditional, bulky tabletop setups in favor of a compact form factor. Using commercially available optics to construct a transmission-based optical train, measured changes in bulk refractive index are presented here. While synthesis of binding protein efforts are focused on heme as analyte for proof of concept validation, the functionalized protein can be engineered to pair with a wide variety of analytes with minimal alterations to the plasmonic chip or device design. Such flexibility allows for this device to potentially meet the needs of first responders and health care professionals in a multitude of scenarios.

  12. Electrochemical Deposition of Conformal and Functional Layers on High Aspect Ratio Silicon Micro/Nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozel, Tuncay; Zhang, Benjamin A; Gao, Ruixuan; Day, Robert W; Lieber, Charles M; Nocera, Daniel G

    2017-07-12

    Development of new synthetic methods for the modification of nanostructures has accelerated materials design advances to furnish complex architectures. Structures based on one-dimensional (1D) silicon (Si) structures synthesized using top-down and bottom-up methods are especially prominent for diverse applications in chemistry, physics, and medicine. Yet further elaboration of these structures with distinct metal-based and polymeric materials, which could open up new opportunities, has been difficult. We present a general electrochemical method for the deposition of conformal layers of various materials onto high aspect ratio Si micro- and nanowire arrays. The electrochemical deposition of a library of coaxial layers comprising metals, metal oxides, and organic/inorganic semiconductors demonstrate the materials generality of the synthesis technique. Depositions may be performed on wire arrays with varying diameter (70 nm to 4 μm), pitch (5 μ to 15 μ), aspect ratio (4:1 to 75:1), shape (cylindrical, conical, hourglass), resistivity (0.001-0.01 to 1-10 ohm/cm 2 ), and substrate orientation. Anisotropic physical etching of wires with one or more coaxial shells yields 1D structures with exposed tips that can be further site-specifically modified by an electrochemical deposition approach. The electrochemical deposition methodology described herein features a wafer-scale synthesis platform for the preparation of multifunctional nanoscale devices based on a 1D Si substrate.

  13. Biological Modeling Based Outcome Analysis (BMOA) in 3D Conformal Radiation Therapy (3DCRT) Treatments for Lung and Breast Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyakuryal, Anil; Chen, Chiu-Hao; Dhungana, Sudarshan

    2010-03-01

    3DCRT treatments are the most commonly used techniques in the treatment of lung and breast cancers. The purpose of this study was to perform the BMOA of the 3DCRT plans designed for the treatment of breast and lung cancers utilizing HART program (Med. Phys. 36, p.2547(2009)). The BMOA parameters include normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), tumor control probability (TCP), and the complication-free tumor control probability (P+). The 3DCRT plans were designed for (i) the palliative treatment of 8 left lung cancer patients (CPs) at early stage (m=8), (ii) the curative treatment of 8 left lung CPs at stages II and III (k=8), and (iii) the curative treatment of 8 left breast CPs (n=8). The NTCPs were noticeably small (esophagus in lung CPs (k=8). Assessments of the TCPs and P+s also indicated good improvements in local tumor control in all plans. Homogeneous target coverage and improved dose conformality were the major advantages of such techniques in the treatment of breast cancer. These achievements support the efficacy of the 3DCRT techniques for the efficient treatment of various types of cancer.

  14. An accurate calibration method of the multileaf collimator valid for conformal and intensity modulated radiation treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sastre-Padro, Maria; Heide, Uulke A van der; Welleweerd, Hans [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2004-06-21

    Because for IMRT treatments the required accuracy on leaf positioning is high, conventional calibration methods may not be appropriate. The aim of this study was to develop the tools for an accurate MLC calibration valid for conventional and IMRT treatments and to investigate the stability of the MLC. A strip test consisting of nine adjacent segments 2 cm wide, separated by 1 mm and exposed on Kodak X-Omat V films at D{sub max} depth, was used for detecting leaf-positioning errors. Dose profiles along the leaf-axis were taken for each leaf-pair. We measured the dose variation on each abutment to quantify the relative positioning error (RPE) and the absolute position of the abutment to quantify the absolute positioning error (APE). The accuracy of determining the APE and RPE was 0.15 and 0.04 mm, respectively. Using the RPE and the APE the MLC calibration parameters were calculated in order to obtain a flat profile on the abutment at the correct position. A conventionally calibrated Elekta MLC was re-calibrated using the strip test. The stability of the MLC and leaf-positioning reproducibility was investigated exposing films with 25 adjacent segments 1 cm wide during three months and measuring the standard deviation of the RPE values. A maximum shift over the three months of 0.27 mm was observed and the standard deviation of the RPE values was 0.11 mm.

  15. An accurate calibration method of the multileaf collimator valid for conformal and intensity modulated radiation treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sastre-Padro, Maria; Heide, Uulke A van der; Welleweerd, Hans

    2004-01-01

    Because for IMRT treatments the required accuracy on leaf positioning is high, conventional calibration methods may not be appropriate. The aim of this study was to develop the tools for an accurate MLC calibration valid for conventional and IMRT treatments and to investigate the stability of the MLC. A strip test consisting of nine adjacent segments 2 cm wide, separated by 1 mm and exposed on Kodak X-Omat V films at D max depth, was used for detecting leaf-positioning errors. Dose profiles along the leaf-axis were taken for each leaf-pair. We measured the dose variation on each abutment to quantify the relative positioning error (RPE) and the absolute position of the abutment to quantify the absolute positioning error (APE). The accuracy of determining the APE and RPE was 0.15 and 0.04 mm, respectively. Using the RPE and the APE the MLC calibration parameters were calculated in order to obtain a flat profile on the abutment at the correct position. A conventionally calibrated Elekta MLC was re-calibrated using the strip test. The stability of the MLC and leaf-positioning reproducibility was investigated exposing films with 25 adjacent segments 1 cm wide during three months and measuring the standard deviation of the RPE values. A maximum shift over the three months of 0.27 mm was observed and the standard deviation of the RPE values was 0.11 mm

  16. Optimal hypofractionated conformal radiotherapy for large brain metastases in patients with high risk factors: a single-institutional prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Hiroshi K; Sato, Hiro; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Saitoh, Jun-ichi; Noda, Shin-ei; Seto, Ken-ichi; Torikai, Kota; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Nakano, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    A single-institutional prospective study of optimal hypofractionated conformal radiotherapy for large brain metastases with high risk factors was performed based on the risk prediction of radiation-related complications. Eighty-eight patients with large brain metastases ≥10 cm 3 in critical areas treated from January 2010 to February 2014 using the CyberKnife were evaluated. The optimal dose and number of fractions were determined based on the surrounding brain volume circumscribed with a single dose equivalent (SDE) of 14 Gy (V14) to be less than 7 cm 3 for individual lesions. Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted. As a result of optimal treatment, 92 tumors ranging from 10 to 74.6 cm 3 (median, 16.2 cm 3 ) in volume were treated with a median prescribed isodose of 57% and a median fraction number of five. In order to compare the results according to the tumor volume, the tumors were divided into the following three groups: 1) 10–19.9 cm 3 , 2) 20–29.9 cm 3 and 3) ≥30 cm 3 . The lesions were treated with a median prescribed isodose of 57%, 56% and 55%, respectively, and the median fraction number was five in all three groups. However, all tumors ≥20 cm 3 were treated with ≥ five fractions. The median SDE of the maximum dose in the three groups was 47.2 Gy, 48.5 Gy and 46.5 Gy, respectively. Local tumor control was obtained in 90.2% of the patients, and the median survival was nine months, with a median follow-up period of seven months (range, 3-41 months). There were no significant differences in the survival rates among the three groups. Six tumors exhibited marginal recurrence 7-36 months after treatment. Ten patients developed symptomatic brain edema or recurrence of pre-existing edema, seven of whom required osmo-steroid therapy. No patients developed radiation necrosis requiring surgical resection. Our findings demonstrate that the administration of optimal hypofractionated conformal radiotherapy based on the dose-volume prediction

  17. CT-image-based conformal brachytherapy of breast cancer. The significance of semi-3-D and 3-D treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polgár, C; Major, T; Somogyi, A; Takácsi-Nagy, Z; Mangel, L C; Forrai, G; Sulyok, Z; Fodor, J; Németh, G

    2000-03-01

    To compare the conventional 2-D, the simulator-guided semi-3-D and the recently developed CT-guided 3-D brachytherapy treatment planning in the interstitial radiotherapy of breast cancer. In 103 patients with T1-2, N0-1 breast cancer the tumor bed was clipped during breast conserving surgery. Fifty-two of them received boost brachytherapy after 46 to 50 Gy teletherapy and 51 patients were treated with brachytherapy alone via flexible implant tubes. Single, double and triple plane implant was used in 6, 89 and 8 cases, respectively. The dose of boost brachytherapy and sole brachytherapy prescribed to dose reference points was 3 times 4.75 Gy and 7 times 5.2 Gy, respectively. The positions of dose reference points varied according to the level (2-D, semi-3-D and 3-D) of treatment planning performed. The treatment planning was based on the 3-D reconstruction of the surgical clips, implant tubes and skin points. In all cases the implantations were planned with a semi-3-D technique aided by simulator. In 10 cases a recently developed CT-guided 3-D planning system was used. The semi-3-D and 3-D treatment plans were compared to hypothetical 2-D plans using dose-volume histograms and dose non-uniformity ratios. The values of mean central dose, mean skin dose, minimal clip dose, proportion of underdosaged clips and mean target surface dose were evaluated. The accuracy of tumor bed localization and the conformity of planning target volume and treated volume were also analyzed in each technique. With the help of conformal semi-3-D and 3-D brachytherapy planning we could define reference dose points, active source positions and dwell times individually. This technique decreased the mean skin dose with 22.2% and reduced the possibility of geographical miss. We could achieve the best conformity between the planning target volume and the treated volume with the CT-image based 3-D treatment planning, at the cost of worse dose homogeneity. The mean treated volume was reduced by 25

  18. Conformal Nets II: Conformal Blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Arthur; Douglas, Christopher L.; Henriques, André

    2017-08-01

    Conformal nets provide a mathematical formalism for conformal field theory. Associated to a conformal net with finite index, we give a construction of the `bundle of conformal blocks', a representation of the mapping class groupoid of closed topological surfaces into the category of finite-dimensional projective Hilbert spaces. We also construct infinite-dimensional spaces of conformal blocks for topological surfaces with smooth boundary. We prove that the conformal blocks satisfy a factorization formula for gluing surfaces along circles, and an analogous formula for gluing surfaces along intervals. We use this interval factorization property to give a new proof of the modularity of the category of representations of a conformal net.

  19. Radiotherapy of intensity modulated VS conformational in the treatment of carcinoma of the prostate. A dosimetric comparison; Radioterapia de intensidad modulada VS conformacional en el tratamiento de carcinoma de prostata. Una camparacion dosimetrica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez Martin, G.; Garcia Vicente, F.; Zapatero Laborda, A.; Bermudez Luna, R.; Roch Gonzalez, M.; Perez Gonzalez, L.; Torres Escobar, J. J.

    2013-07-01

    The intensity modulated (IMRT) radiation therapy is a technique of high conformation which, by its nature, has as one of its main directions prostate cancer radiotherapy treatment. The purpose of this work is presents results of the dosimetric indicators collected in our hospital a number of patients of carcinoma of the prostate with standard three-dimensional Conformal technique (3D-CRT) and IMRT. Aims to demonstrate and quantify with a statistical methodology that, establishing an adequate Protocol of IMRT, significant reductions in risk organ doses can be obtained by keeping the same prescription to the white volume. (Author)

  20. The treatment of nonpalpable PSA-detected adenocarcinoma of the prostate with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horwitz, Eric M.; Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Pinover, Wayne H.; Hanks, Gerald E.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: We reviewed our institution's experience treating patients with nonpalpable PSA-detected prostate cancer with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) to determine prognostic factors that predict for biochemical-free survival (bNED) control and present the bNED control rates. Methods and Materials: Between May 1, 1990 and November 30, 1994, 160 patients with nonpalpable PSA-detected prostate cancer received 3DCRT at Fox Chase Cancer Center (median total dose 73 Gy; range: 67-78 Gy). bNED failure was defined as three consecutive increases in posttreatment PSA after achieving a nadir. bNED failure was recorded as the time midway between the nadir and the first consecutive rising PSA. Five-year actuarial rates of bNED control were calculated for pretreatment PSA (0-9.9 vs. 10-19.9 vs. ≥ 20 ng/ml), Gleason score (2-6 vs. 7-10), treatment field size (prostate vs. small pelvis), age ( 73 Gy) using Kaplan-Meier methods and compared using the Log rank test. The Cox model was used to multivariately establish independent predictors based on significant univariate factors. Median follow-up was 39 months (range: 2-84 months). Results: The 5-year actuarial rate of bNED control was 86% for the entire group of patients. The Cox Proportional Hazards model demonstrated that pretreatment PSA was an independent predictor of bNED control. Treatment field size was marginally predictive. There was no difference in bNED control when patients were stratified by the number of lobes positive for disease. Statistically different rates of bNED control were seen when the patients with nonpalpable disease were univariately compared to T2b and T2c patients. Three patients experienced Grade 3-4 genitourinary (GU) toxicity and 3 patients experienced Grade 3-4 gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity. Conclusions: Patients with nonpalpable PSA-detected prostate cancer can be effectively treated with 3DCRT with minimal morbidity and high rates of bNED control at 5 years. Pretreatment

  1. Cost-benefit analysis of 3D conformal radiation therapy. Treatment of prostate cancer as a model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, K.H.; Khan, F.M.; Levitt, S.H.

    1999-01-01

    Three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) is a promising new treatment technique based on the principle that improved precision in both tumor definition and dose delivery will enhance outcomes by maximizing dose to the tumor area while minimizing dose to normal tissue. Using a cost-benefit analysis, in terms of outcomes, we first examined the overall risks and benefits of 3D-CRT. We then used the treatment of prostate cancer as a model to compare actual clinical outcomes reported between 3D-CRT and standard radiation therapy (SRT). Our analysis shows that application of 3D-CRT to the clinical setting remains difficult because of the continual difficulties of target definition, and that dose escalation cannot yet be justified on the basis of the lack of benefit found, and suggested increased late toxicity, in most of the dose escalation series compared with SRT. (orig.)

  2. Comparative study of four advanced 3d-conformal radiation therapy treatment planning techniques for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrassi, Mohamed Yassine; Bentayeb, Farida; Malisan, Maria Rosa

    2013-01-01

    For the head-and-neck cancer bilateral irradiation, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is the most reported technique as it enables both target dose coverage and organ-at-risk (OAR) sparing. However, during the last 20 years, three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) techniques have been introduced, which are tailored to improve the classic shrinking field technique, as regards both planning target volume (PTV) dose conformality and sparing of OARs, such as parotid glands and spinal cord. In this study, we tested experimentally in a sample of 13 patients, four of these advanced 3DCRT techniques, all using photon beams only and a unique isocentre, namely Bellinzona, Forward-Planned Multisegments (FPMS), ConPas, and field-in-field (FIF) techniques. Statistical analysis of the main dosimetric parameters of PTV and OARs DVHs as well as of homogeneity and conformity indexes was carried out in order to compare the performance of each technique. The results show that the PTV dose coverage is adequate for all the techniques, with the FPMS techniques providing the highest value for D95%; on the other hand, the best sparing of parotid glands is achieved using the FIF and ConPas techniques, with a mean dose of 26 Gy to parotid glands for a PTV prescription dose of 54 Gy. After taking into account both PTV coverage and parotid sparing, the best global performance was achieved by the FIF technique with results comparable to that of IMRT plans. This technique can be proposed as a valid alternative when IMRT equipment is not available or patient is not suitable for IMRT treatment. (author)

  3. CT-image based conformal brachytherapy of breast cancer. The significance of semi-3-D and 3-D treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polgar, C.; Major, T.; Somogyi, A.; Takacsi-Nagy, Z.; Mangel, L.C.; Fodor, J.; Nemeth, G.; Forrai, G.; Sulyok, Z.

    2000-01-01

    In 103 patients with T1-2, N0-1 breast cancer the tumor bed was clipped during breast conserving surgery. Fifty-two of them received boost brachytherapy after 46 to 50 Gy teletherapy and 51 patients were treated with brachytherapy alone via flexible implant tubes. Single double and triple plane implant was used in 6,89 and 8 cases, respectively. The dose of boost brachytherapy and sole brachytherapy prescribed to dose reference points was 3 times 4.75 Gy and 7 times 5.2 Gy, respectively. The positions of dose reference points varied according to the level (2-D, semi-3-D and 3-D) of treatment planning performed. The treatment planning was based on the 3-D reconstruction of the surgical clips, implant tubes and skin points. In all cases the implantations were planned with a semi-3-D technique aided by simulator. In 10 cases a recently developed CT-guided 3-D planning system was used. The semi-3D and 3-D treatment plans were compared to hypothetical 2-D plans using dose-volume histograms and dose non-uniformity ratios. The values of mean central dose, mean skin dose, minimal clip dose, proportion of underdosaged clips and mean target surface dose were evaluated. The accuracy of tumor bed localization and the conformity of planning target volume and treated volume were also analyzed in each technique. Results: With the help of conformal semi-3D and 3D brachytherapy planning we could define reference dose points, active source positions and dwell times individually. This technique decreased the mean skin dose with 22.2% and reduced the possibility of geographical miss. We could achieve the best conformity between the planning target volume and the treated volume with the CT-image based 3-D treatment planning, at the cost of worse dose homogeneity. The mean treated volume was reduced by 25.1% with semi-3-D planning, however, its was increased by 16.2% with 3-D planning, compared to the 2-D planning. (orig.) [de

  4. Conformity index: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feuvret, Loic; Noel, Georges; Mazeron, Jean-Jacques; Bey, Pierre

    2006-01-01

    We present a critical analysis of the conformity indices described in the literature and an evaluation of their field of application. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, with or without intensity modulation, is based on medical imaging techniques, three-dimensional dosimetry software, compression accessories, and verification procedures. It consists of delineating target volumes and critical healthy tissues to select the best combination of beams. This approach allows better adaptation of the isodose to the tumor volume, while limiting irradiation of healthy tissues. Tools must be developed to evaluate the quality of proposed treatment plans. Dosimetry software provides the dose distribution in each CT section and dose-volume histograms without really indicating the degree of conformity. The conformity index is a complementary tool that attributes a score to a treatment plan or that can compare several treatment plans for the same patient. The future of conformal index in everyday practice therefore remains unclear

  5. A study on quantitative analysis of field size and dose by using gating system in 4D conformal radiation treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Youn-Sang; Dong, Kyung-Rae; Kim, Chang-Bok; Chung, Woon-Kwan; Cho, Jae-Hwan; Lee, Hae-Kag

    2012-10-01

    This study evaluated the gating-based 4-D conformal radiation therapy (4D-CT) treatment planning by a comparison with the common 3-D conformal radiation therapy (3D-CT) treatment planning and examined the change in treatment field size and dose to the tumors and adjacent normal tissues because an unnecessary dose is also included in the 3-D treatment planning for the radiation treatment of tumors in the chest and abdomen. The 3D-CT and gating-based 4D-CT images were obtained from patients who had undergone radiation treatment for chest and abdomen tumors in the oncology department. After establishing a treatment plan, the CT treatment and planning system were used to measure the change in field size for analysis. A dose volume histogram (DVH) was used to calculate the appropriate dose to planning target volume (PTV) tumors and adjacent normal tissue. The difference in the treatment volume of the chest was 0.6 and 0.83 cm on the X- and Y-axis, respectively, for the gross tumor volume (GTV). Accordingly, the values in the 4D-CT treatment planning were smaller and the dose was more concentrated by 2.7% and 0.9% on the GTV and clinical target volume (CTV), respectively. The normal tissues in the surrounding normal tissues were reduced by 3.0%, 7.2%, 0.4%, 1.7%, 2.6% and 0.2% in the bronchus, chest wall, esophagus, heart, lung and spinal cord, respectively. The difference in the treatment volume of the abdomen was 0.72 cm on the X-axis and 0.51 cm on the Y-axis for the GTV; and 1.06 cm on the X-axis and 1.85 cm on the Y-axis for the PTV. Therefore, the values in the 4D-CT treatment planning were smaller. The dose was concentrated by 6.8% and 4.3% on the GTV and PTV, respectively, whereas the adjacent normal tissues in the cord, Lt. kidney, Rt. kidney, small bowels and whole liver were reduced by 3.2%, 4.2%, 1.5%, 6.2% and 12.7%, respectively. The treatment field size was smaller in volume in the case of the 4D-CT treatment planning. In the DVH, the 4D-CT treatment

  6. Conformal house

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryttov, Thomas Aaby; Sannino, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    fixed point. As a consistency check we recover the previously investigated bounds of the conformal windows when restricting to a single matter representation. The earlier conformal windows can be imagined to be part now of the new conformal house. We predict the nonperturbative anomalous dimensions...... at the infrared fixed points. We further investigate the effects of adding mass terms to the condensates on the conformal house chiral dynamics and construct the simplest instanton induced effective Lagrangian terms...

  7. High energy asymptotics of multi-colour QCD and two-dimensional conformal field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipatov, L.N.; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron

    1993-04-01

    In the multi-colour limit of perturbative QCD the holomorphic factorization of wave functions of compound states of n reggeized gluons in the impact parameter space is shown. The conformally invariant Hamiltonian for each holomorphic factor has a nontrivial integral of motion. The odderon in QCD is the simplest example of the composite system with these properties. (orig.)

  8. Narrowband NIR-Induced In Situ Generation of the High-Energy Trans Conformer of Trichloroacetic Acid Isolated in Solid Nitrogen and its Spontaneous Decay by Tunneling to the Low-Energy Cis Conformer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. F. G. Apóstolo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The monomeric form of trichloroacetic acid (CCl3COOH; TCA was isolated in a cryogenic nitrogen matrix (15 K and the higher energy trans conformer (O=C–O–H dihedral: 180° was generated in situ by narrowband near-infrared selective excitation the 1st OH stretching overtone of the low-energy cis conformer (O=C–O–H dihedral: 0°. The spontaneous decay, by tunneling, of the generated high-energy conformer into the cis form was then evaluated and compared with those observed previously for the trans conformers of acetic and formic acids in identical experimental conditions. The much faster decay of the high-energy conformer of TCA compared to both formic and acetic acids (by ~35 and ca. 25 times, respectively was found to correlate well with the lower energy barrier for the trans→cis isomerization in the studied compound. The experimental studies received support from quantum chemistry calculations undertaken at the DFT(B3LYP/cc-pVDZ level of approximation, which allowed a detailed characterization of the potential energy surface of the molecule and the detailed assignment of the infrared spectra of the two conformers.

  9. High Throughput Plasma Water Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujovic, Selman; Foster, John

    2016-10-01

    The troublesome emergence of new classes of micro-pollutants, such as pharmaceuticals and endocrine disruptors, poses challenges for conventional water treatment systems. In an effort to address these contaminants and to support water reuse in drought stricken regions, new technologies must be introduced. The interaction of water with plasma rapidly mineralizes organics by inducing advanced oxidation in addition to other chemical, physical and radiative processes. The primary barrier to the implementation of plasma-based water treatment is process volume scale up. In this work, we investigate a potentially scalable, high throughput plasma water reactor that utilizes a packed bed dielectric barrier-like geometry to maximize the plasma-water interface. Here, the water serves as the dielectric medium. High-speed imaging and emission spectroscopy are used to characterize the reactor discharges. Changes in methylene blue concentration and basic water parameters are mapped as a function of plasma treatment time. Experimental results are compared to electrostatic and plasma chemistry computations, which will provide insight into the reactor's operation so that efficiency can be assessed. Supported by NSF (CBET 1336375).

  10. High energy physics signatures from inflation and conformal symmetry of de Sitter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kehagias, A.; Riotto, A.

    2015-01-01

    During inflation, the geometry of spacetime is described by a (quasi-)de Sitter phase. Inflationary observables are determined by the underlying (softly broken) de Sitter isometry group SO(1, 4) which acts like a conformal group on R 3 : when the fluctuations are on super-Hubble scales, the correlators of the scalar fields are constrained by conformal invariance. Heavy fields with mass m larger than the Hubble rate H correspond to operators with imaginary dimensions in the dual Euclidean three-dimensional conformal field theory. By making use of the dS/CFT correspondence we show that, besides the Boltzmann suppression expected from the thermal properties of de Sitter space, the generic effect of heavy fields in the inflationary correlators of the light fields is to introduce power-law suppressed corrections of the form O(H 2 / m 2 ). This can be seen, for instance, at the level of the four-point correlator for which we provide the correction due to a massive scalar field exchange. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Application of super-omni wedge concept to conformal radiotherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai Jianrong; Fu Weihua; Hu Yimin

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To describe a method which can optimize beam weight, wedge angle, and wedge orientation simultaneously by combining the super-omni wedge (SOW) concept with the function of beam weight optimization provided by a commercial treatment planning system. Methods: A five-step procedure including: Step 1. To set up four 60 degree nominal wedged beams for each beam direction with the wedge orientations of 'LEFT', 'IN', 'RIGHT', 'OUT', respectively; Step 2. To define an optimization request, including an optimization goal and constraints. Authors use CMS Focus treatment planning system which allows us to choose 'maximize target dose' or 'minimize critical structure dose' as the optimization goal, and to set minimum target dose, maximum target dose, and maximum average dose of critical structures as constraints. Then the optimization process was launched as step 3; Step 4. To evaluate the plan using isodose distributions and dose-volume histograms. If acceptable, go to Step 5. Otherwise, go back to Step 2 to modify optimization constraints; and Step 5. Transform the SOW beams into the beams of omni wedge so as to reduce the number of to-be-delivered beams. Results: This procedure was found being able to demonstrate successfully in two clinical cases: an esophageal carcinoma and a brain tumor. Compared with manually designed plan, the optimized plan showed better dose homogeneity in the targets and better sparing of the critical structures. Conclusions: This method described is able to optimize beam weights while working with a treatment planning system. Not only does it improve treatment plans' quality, but also shorten the treatment planning process

  12. Transportation Conformity

    Science.gov (United States)

    This section provides information on: current laws, regulations and guidance, policy and technical guidance, project-level conformity, general information, contacts and training, adequacy review of SIP submissions

  13. Evaluation of Geometrically Optimized Single- and Double-plane Interstitial High Dose Rate Implants with Respect to Conformality and Homogeneity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Major, Tibor; Polgar, Csaba; Fodor, Janos; Takacsi-nagy, Zoltan; Mangel, Laszlo; Nemeth, Gyoergy

    2003-01-01

    The use of a stepping source in high dose rate brachytherapy supported with dwell-time optimization makes it possible to deviate from the classical dosimetry systems. Dose distributions of single- and double-plane implants were analysed for conformality and homogeneity at idealized target volumes. The Paris system was used for catheter positioning and target volume determination. Geometric optimization and individual dose prescription were applied. Volumetric indices and dose parameters were calculated at optimal active length, which was found to be equal to target volume length. The mean conformality, homogeneity, external volume and overdose volume indices were 0.78, 0.67, 0.22 and 0.13, respectively. The average minimum target and reference doses were 69% and 86%, respectively. Comparisons between the volumetric indices of geometrical optimized and non-optimized implants were also performed, and a significant difference was found regarding any index. The geometrical optimization resulted in superior conformality and slightly inferior homogeneity. At geometrically optimized implants, the active length can be reduced compared to non-optimized implants. Volumetric parameters and dose-volume histogram-based individual dose prescription are recommended for quantitative assessment of interstitial implants

  14. Evaluation of High Density Air Traffic Operations with Automation for Separation Assurance, Weather Avoidance and Schedule Conformance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevot, Thomas; Mercer, Joey S.; Martin, Lynne Hazel; Homola, Jeffrey R.; Cabrall, Christopher D.; Brasil, Connie L.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the development and evaluation of our prototype technologies and procedures for far-term air traffic control operations with automation for separation assurance, weather avoidance and schedule conformance. Controller-in-the-loop simulations in the Airspace Operations Laboratory at the NASA Ames Research Center in 2010 have shown very promising results. We found the operations to provide high airspace throughput, excellent efficiency and schedule conformance. The simulation also highlighted areas for improvements: Short-term conflict situations sometimes resulted in separation violations, particularly for transitioning aircraft in complex traffic flows. The combination of heavy metering and growing weather resulted in an increased number of aircraft penetrating convective weather cells. To address these shortcomings technologies and procedures have been improved and the operations are being re-evaluated with the same scenarios. In this paper we will first describe the concept and technologies for automating separation assurance, weather avoidance, and schedule conformance. Second, the results from the 2010 simulation will be reviewed. We report human-systems integration aspects, safety and efficiency results as well as airspace throughput, workload, and operational acceptability. Next, improvements will be discussed that were made to address identified shortcomings. We conclude that, with further refinements, air traffic control operations with ground-based automated separation assurance can routinely provide currently unachievable levels of traffic throughput in the en route airspace.

  15. 'Boomerang' technique: an improved method for conformal treatment of locally advanced nasopharyngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corry, June; D'Costa, Leta; Porceddu, Sandro; Peters, Lester J.; Hornby, Colin; Fisher, Richard; Rischin, Danny

    2004-01-01

    The primary aim of the present study was to assess radiation dosimetry and subsequent clinical outcomes in patient: with locally advanced nasopharyngeal cancer using a novel radiation technique termed the 'Boomerang'. Dosimetric comparisons were made with both conventional and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques. Thi; is a study of 22 patients treated with this technique from June 1995 to October 1998. The technique used entailec delivery of 36 Gy in 18 fractions via parallel opposed fields, then 24 Gy in 12 fractions via asymmetric rotating arc field' for a total of 60 Gy in 30 fractions. Patients also received induction and concurrent chemotherapy. The radiation dosimetry was excellent. Dose-volume histograms showed that with the arc fields, 90% of the planning target volume received 94% of the prescribed dose. Relative to other conventional radiation therapy off-cord techniques, the Boomerang technique results in a 27% greater proportion of the prescribed dose being received by 90% of the planning target volume. This translates into an overall 10% greater dose received for the same prescribed dose. At 3 years, the actuarial loco-regional control rate, the failure-free survival rate and the overall survival rate were 91, 75 and 91%, respectively. At 5 years, the actuarial loco-regional control rate, the failure-free survival rate and the overall survival rate were 74, 62 and 71%, respectively. The Boomerang technique provided excellent radiation dosimetry with correspondingly good loco-regional control rates (in conjunction with chemotherapy) and very acceptable acute and late toxicity profiles. Because treatment can be delivered with conventional standard treatment planning and delivery systems, it is a validated treatment option for centres that do not have the capability or capacity for IMRT. A derivative of the Boomerang technique, excluding the parallel opposed component, is now our standard for patients with locally advanced

  16. 'Boomerang' technique: an improved method for conformal treatment of locally advanced nasopharyngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corry, June; Hornby, Colin; Fisher, Richard; D'Costa, Ieta; Porceddu, Sandro; Rischin, Danny; Peters, Lester J

    2004-06-01

    The primary aim of the present study was to assess radiation dosimetry and subsequent clinical outcomes in patients with locally advanced nasopharyngeal cancer using a novel radiation technique termed the 'Boomerang'. Dosimetric comparisons were made with both conventional and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques. This is a study of 22 patients treated with this technique from June 1995 to October 1998. The technique used entailed delivery of 36 Gy in 18 fractions via parallel opposed fields, then 24 Gy in 12 fractions via asymmetric rotating arc fields for a total of 60 Gy in 30 fractions. Patients also received induction and concurrent chemotherapy. The radiation dosimetry was excellent. Dose-volume histograms showed that with the arc fields, 90% of the planning target volume received 94% of the prescribed dose. Relative to other conventional radiation therapy off-cord techniques, the Boomerang technique results in a 27% greater proportion of the prescribed dose being received by 90% of the planning target volume. This translates into an overall 10% greater dose received for the same prescribed dose. At 3 years, the actuarial loco-regional control rate, the failure-free survival rate and the overall survival rate were 91, 75 and 91%, respectively. At 5 years, the actuarial loco-regional control rate, the failure-free survival rate and the overall survival rate were 74, 62 and 71%, respectively. The Boomerang technique provided excellent radiation dosimetry with correspondingly good loco-regional control rates (in conjunction with chemotherapy) and very acceptable acute and late toxicity profiles. Because treatment can be delivered with conventional standard treatment planning and delivery systems, it is a validated treatment option for centres that do not have the capability or capacity for IMRT. A derivative of the Boomerang technique, excluding the parallel opposed component, is now our standard for patients with locally advanced

  17. Conservation treatment of the eye: Conformal proton reirradiation for recurrent uveal melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marucci, Laura; Lane, Anne M.; Li Wenjun; Egan, Kathleen M.; Gragoudas, Evangelos S.; Adams, Judy; Collier, John M.; Munzenrider, John E.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcomes of a second course of proton beam radiation therapy (PBRT) in patients with recurrent uveal melanoma. Methods and Materials: Thirty-one patients received a second course of PBRT. The mean interval between the first and the second PBRT course was 50.2 months (range, 8-165 months). Most patients (87%) received 70 cobalt Gray equivalent (CGE) for both courses. Visual acuity was 20/200 or better in 30 patients initially and in 22 patients at the second treatment. The mean follow-up time after the second treatment was 50 months (range, 6-164 months). Results: At the time of the last follow-up, 20 patients were classified as having no evidence of disease, defined as tumor regression or an absence of tumor progression. Nine eyes (29%) were enucleated because of local recurrence (n = 5) or intractable pain (n = 4). The 5-year eye retention rate was 55% (95% confidence interval: 25.2-77.4). Six of the 22 patients who retained the eye (27%) had useful vision (20/200 or better). Conclusions A second course of PBRT for recurrent uveal melanoma to total doses between 118 and 140 CGE was associated with a relatively good probability of local control and a low enucleation rate. Although most patients lost vision, the majority were able to retain the reirradiated eye. Further evaluation is needed to assess metastasis-free survival of additional proton irradiation vs. enucleation after local recurrence

  18. Effects of heat treatment on conformation and cell growth activity of alpha- lactalbumin and beta-lactoglobulin from market milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, Mizuho; Kawai, Shuji; Ijier, X; Fukuoka, Mayuko; Yabe, Tomio; Iwamoto, Satoshi; Kanamaru, Yoshihiro

    2017-01-01

    Heat processes, low temperature for long time (LTLT) pasteurization and ultra-heat treatment (UHT) sterilization, are essential for commercial market milk to improve the shelf life of raw milk and ensure microbial safety. We evaluated the effects of heat experience on the molecular properties of α-lactalbumin (α-LA) and β-lactoglobulin (β-LG) isolated from four types of market milk such as LTLT-A (66°C for 30 min), LTLT-B (65°C for 30 min), UHT-I (130°C for 2 s, indirect heating) and UHT-D (135°C for 2 s, direct heating) samples. We examined molecular conformations using circular dichroism spectrum measurement and cell growth activity using the WST-1 method for the proteins. α-LA isolated from each of these four types of market milk displayed no significant structural difference as compared to raw milk α-LA, while α-LA of UHT-I only inhibited cell growth of an intestinal epithelial cell line more potently than raw milk α-LA. In the case of β-LG, only the UHT-I sample demonstrated a drastic change in structure, while it did not exhibit any cytotoxicity. We found that cell viability effects of α-LA and β-LG are attributable to the type of UHT; indirect and direct. These findings indicate that the effect of heat treatment on whey proteins should carefully be investigated further.

  19. Clinical variability of target volume description and treatment plans in conformal radiotherapy in muscle invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logue, John P; Sharrock, Carole L; Cowan, Richard A.; Read, Graham; Marrs, Julie; Mott, David

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The delineation of tumor and the production of a treatment plan to encompass this is the prime step in radiotherapy planning. Conformal radiotherapy is developing rapidly and although plentiful research has addressed the implementation of the radiotherapy prescription, scant attention has been made to the fundamental step of production, by the clinician, of an appropriate target volume. As part of an ongoing randomized trial of conformal radiotherapy, in bladder cancer, we have therefore assessed the interphysician variability of radiologists and radiation oncologists (RO) in assessing Gross Tumor Volume(GTV) (ICRU 50) and the adherence of the radiation oncologists to the study protocol of producing a Planning Target Volume (PTV). Materials and Methods: Four patients with T3 carcinoma of bladder who had been entered into the trial were identified. The clinical details, MR scans and CT scans were made available. Eight RO and 3 dedicated diagnostic oncology radiologists were invited to directly outline the GTV onto CT images on a planning computer consul. The RO in addition created a PTV following the trial protocol of 15mm margin around the GTV. Three RO sub-specialized in Urological radiotherapy; all RO had completed training. Volumes were produced, for each clinician, and comparison of these volumes and their isocenters were analyzed. In addition the margins allowed were measured and compared. Results: There was a maximum variation ratio (largest to smallest volume outlined) of the GTV in the four cases of 1.74 among radiologists and 3.74 among oncologists. There was a significant difference (p=0.01) in mean GTV between RO and the radiologists. The mean GTV of the RO exceeded the radiologists by a factor of 1.29 with a mean difference of 13.4 cm 3 The between observer variance within speciality comprised only 9.9% of the total variance in the data having accounted for case and observers speciality. The variation ratio in PTV among oncologists

  20. An IHE-conform telecooperation platform supporting the treatment of dementia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleh K.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ensuring medical support of patients of advanced age in rural areas is a major challenge. Moreover, the number of registered doctors—medical specialists in particular—will decrease in such areas over the next years. These unmet medical needs in combination with communication deficiencies among different types of health-care professionals pose threats to the quality of patient treatment. This work presents a novel solution combining telemedicine, telecooperation, and IHE profiles to tackle these challenges. We present a telecooperation platform that supports longitudinal electronic patient records and allows for intersectoral cooperation based on shared electronic medication charts and other documents. Furthermore, the conceived platform allows for an integration into the planned German telematics infrastructure.

  1. Workers’ Conformism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay Ivantchev

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Conformism was studied among 46 workers with different kinds of occupations by means of two modified scales measuring conformity by Santor, Messervey, and Kusumakar (2000 – scale for perceived peer pressure and scale for conformism in antisocial situations. The hypothesis of the study that workers’ conformism is expressed in a medium degree was confirmed partly. More than a half of the workers conform in a medium degree for taking risk, and for the use of alcohol and drugs, and for sexual relationships. More than a half of the respondents conform in a small degree for anti-social activities (like a theft. The workers were more inclined to conform for risk taking (10.9%, then – for the use of alcohol, drugs and for sexual relationships (8.7%, and in the lowest degree – for anti-social activities (6.5%. The workers who were inclined for the use of alcohol and drugs tended also to conform for anti-social activities.

  2. Results of Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of a Solitary Sternal Relapse of Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hae Young; Huh, Seung Jae; Park, Won; Choi, Do Ho; Kang, Min Kyu; Yang, Jung Hyun; Nam, Seok Jin; Im, Young Hyuck

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the response and survival rate after three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) of patients with a solitary sternal relapse of breast cancer. Seventeen patients between May 1996 and June 2005 were evaluated with the salvage 3D-CRT treatment of a solitary sternal relapse of breast cancer. The treatment fields included the gross tumor volume with 2 cm margins. The total radiation dose was 35.0 ∼61.5 Gy (biologic effective dose of 43.7 ∼76.9 Gy10 using an α/β ratio of 10 Gy), with a daily dose of 1.8∼3.0 Gy. The tumor response was evaluated by the change in maximum tumor size via follow up CT scans 1∼3 months after the completion of treatment. An objective tumor response was achieved in all patients, with a complete response in 5 patients and a partial response in 12 patients. The 5-year overall survival rate was 51.9% (median survival time: 27 months), and the most important factor affecting overall survival was the disease-free interval (interval from primary surgery of breast cancer to the development of sternal metastasis): The 5-year overall survival rate was 61.8% for patients with a disease-free interval ≥12 months and 0.0% for patients < with disease-free interval <12 months (p=0.03). The response to 3D-CRT was good in patients with solitary sternal relapse of breast cancer. Particularly, patients with long disease-free interval from primary surgery survived significantly longer than patients with short disease-free interval from primary surgery

  3. Electrostatic Swelling and Conformational Variation Observed in High-Generation Polyelectrolyte Dendrimers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, Paul D.; Chen, Wei-Ren; Herwig, Kenneth W.; Hong, Kunlun; Liu, Yun; Porcar, L.; Shew, Chwen-Yang; Smith, Gregory Scott; Chen, Hsin-Lung; Chen, Chun-Yu; Li, Xin; Liu, Emily

    2010-01-01

    A coordinated study combining small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements was conducted to investigate the structural characteristics of aqueous (D2O) generation 7 and 8 (G7 and G8) PAMAM dendrimer solutions as a function of molecular protonation at room temperature. The change in intra-molecular conformation was clearly exhibited in the data analysis by separating the variation in the inter-molecular correlation. Our results unambiguously demonstrate an increased molecular size and evolved intra-molecular density profile upon increasing the molecular protonation. This is contrary to the existing understanding that in higher generation polyelectrolyte dendrimers, steric crowding stiffens the local motion of dendrimer segments exploring additional available intra-dendrimer volume and therefore inhibits the electrostatic swelling. Our observation is relevant to elucidation of the general microscopic picture of polyelectrolyte dendrimer structure, as well as the development of dendrimer-based packages with based on the stimuli-responsive principle.

  4. Adaptive Multilevel Methods with Local Smoothing for $H^1$- and $H^{\\mathrm{curl}}$-Conforming High Order Finite Element Methods

    KAUST Repository

    Janssen, Bä rbel; Kanschat, Guido

    2011-01-01

    A multilevel method on adaptive meshes with hanging nodes is presented, and the additional matrices appearing in the implementation are derived. Smoothers of overlapping Schwarz type are discussed; smoothing is restricted to the interior of the subdomains refined to the current level; thus it has optimal computational complexity. When applied to conforming finite element discretizations of elliptic problems and Maxwell equations, the method's convergence rates are very close to those for the nonadaptive version. Furthermore, the smoothers remain efficient for high order finite elements. We discuss the implementation in a general finite element code using the example of the deal.II library. © 2011 Societ y for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  5. The New Nitinol Conformable Self-Expandable Metal Stents for Malignant Colonic Obstruction: A Pilot Experience as Bridge to Surgery Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Di Mitri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Self-expandable metal stents (SEMS are a nonsurgical option for treatment of malignant colorectal obstruction also as a bridge to surgery approach. The new nitinol conformable stent has improved clinical outcomes in these kinds of patients. We report a pilot experience with nitinol conformable SEMS placement as bridge to surgery treatment in patients with colorectal obstruction. Materials and Methods. Between April and August 2012, we collected data on colonic nitinol conformable SEMS placement in a cohort of consecutive symptomatic patients, with malignant colorectal obstruction, who were treated as a bridge to surgery. Technical success, clinical success, and adverse events were recorded. Results. Ten patients (7 male (70%, with a mean age of 69.2 ± 10.1, were evaluated. The mean length of the stenosis was 3.6 ± 0.6 cm. Five patients (50% were treated on an emergency basis. The median time from stent placement to surgery was 16 days (interquartile range 7–21. Technical and clinical success was achieved in all patients with a significant early improvement of symptoms. No adverse events due to the SEMS placement were observed. Conclusion. This pilot study confirmed the important role of nitinol conformable SEMS as a bridge to surgery option in the treatment of symptomatic malignant colorectal obstruction.

  6. Conformal Infinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frauendiener Jörg

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available The notion of conformal infinity has a long history within the research in Einstein's theory of gravity. Today, ``conformal infinity'' is related with almost all other branches of research in general relativity, from quantisation procedures to abstract mathematical issues to numerical applications. This review article attempts to show how this concept gradually and inevitably evolved out of physical issues, namely the need to understand gravitational radiation and isolated systems within the theory of gravitation and how it lends itself very naturally to solve radiation problems in numerical relativity. The fundamental concept of null-infinity is introduced. Friedrich's regular conformal field equations are presented and various initial value problems for them are discussed. Finally, it is shown that the conformal field equations provide a very powerful method within numerical relativity to study global problems such as gravitational wave propagation and detection.

  7. Conformal Infinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frauendiener, Jörg

    2004-01-01

    The notion of conformal infinity has a long history within the research in Einstein's theory of gravity. Today, "conformal infinity" is related to almost all other branches of research in general relativity, from quantisation procedures to abstract mathematical issues to numerical applications. This review article attempts to show how this concept gradually and inevitably evolved from physical issues, namely the need to understand gravitational radiation and isolated systems within the theory of gravitation, and how it lends itself very naturally to the solution of radiation problems in numerical relativity. The fundamental concept of null-infinity is introduced. Friedrich's regular conformal field equations are presented and various initial value problems for them are discussed. Finally, it is shown that the conformal field equations provide a very powerful method within numerical relativity to study global problems such as gravitational wave propagation and detection.

  8. Conformal Infinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frauendiener Jörg

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The notion of conformal infinity has a long history within the research in Einstein's theory of gravity. Today, 'conformal infinity' is related to almost all other branches of research in general relativity, from quantisation procedures to abstract mathematical issues to numerical applications. This review article attempts to show how this concept gradually and inevitably evolved from physical issues, namely the need to understand gravitational radiation and isolated systems within the theory of gravitation, and how it lends itself very naturally to the solution of radiation problems in numerical relativity. The fundamental concept of null-infinity is introduced. Friedrich's regular conformal field equations are presented and various initial value problems for them are discussed. Finally, it is shown that the conformal field equations provide a very powerful method within numerical relativity to study global problems such as gravitational wave propagation and detection.

  9. General Conformity

    Science.gov (United States)

    The General Conformity requirements ensure that the actions taken by federal agencies in nonattainment and maintenance areas do not interfere with a state’s plans to meet national standards for air quality.

  10. Conformal Infinity

    OpenAIRE

    Frauendiener, J?rg

    2000-01-01

    The notion of conformal infinity has a long history within the research in Einstein's theory of gravity. Today, 'conformal infinity' is related to almost all other branches of research in general relativity, from quantisation procedures to abstract mathematical issues to numerical applications. This review article attempts to show how this concept gradually and inevitably evolved from physical issues, namely the need to understand gravitational radiation and isolated systems within the theory...

  11. Accelerated hypofractionated three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Jinming; Zheng Aiqing; Yu Yonghua; Wang Xuetao; Yuan Shuanghu; Han Dali; Li Kunhai

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect and complication of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with accelerated hypofractionated three dimensional conforms] radiation therapy (3DCRT). Methods: There were squamous carcinoma 21, adenocarcinoma 7, squamous-adenocarcinoma 4 and other cancer 3. There were 17 stage I and 18 stage II. Thirty-five patients of NSCLC were treated with a dose of 30-48 Gy in 6 or 8 Gy per fraction, 3 times a week. The outcome of these patients Was analyzed. Results: The overall 1-, 2- and 3- Year survival rate was 78.2%, 46.9% and 36.3%, respectively. The 1- and 2-year recurrence-free survival rate was 64.6 % and 39.7 %, respectively. The acute radiation pneumonitis and late lung fibrosis rates were high. Univariate analysis showed that Vm was a significant predictor of acute radiation pneumonitis. Conclusion: Compared with accelerated hypofractionated irradiation, the routine conventional fractionated radiation therapy may be preferred for more patients of NSCLC. (authors)

  12. CT-image based conformal brachytherapy of breast cancer. The significance of semi-3-D and 3-D treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polgar, C.; Major, T.; Somogyi, A.; Takacsi-Nagy, Z.; Mangel, L.C.; Fodor, J.; Nemeth, G. [Orszagos Onkologiai Intezet, Budapest (Hungary). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Forrai, G. [Haynal Imre Univ. of Health Sciences, Budapest (Hungary). Dept. of Radiology; Sulyok, Z. [Orszagos Onkologiai Intezet, Budapest (Hungary). Dept. of Surgery

    2000-03-01

    In 103 patients with T1-2, N0-1 breast cancer the tumor bed was clipped during breast conserving surgery. Fifty-two of them received boost brachytherapy after 46 to 50 Gy teletherapy and 51 patients were treated with brachytherapy alone via flexible implant tubes. Single double and triple plane implant was used in 6,89 and 8 cases, respectively. The dose of boost brachytherapy and sole brachytherapy prescribed to dose reference points was 3 times 4.75 Gy and 7 times 5.2 Gy, respectively. The positions of dose reference points varied according to the level (2-D, semi-3-D and 3-D) of treatment planning performed. The treatment planning was based on the 3-D reconstruction of the surgical clips, implant tubes and skin points. In all cases the implantations were planned with a semi-3-D technique aided by simulator. In 10 cases a recently developed CT-guided 3-D planning system was used. The semi-3D and 3-D treatment plans were compared to hypothetical 2-D plans using dose-volume histograms and dose non-uniformity ratios. The values of mean central dose, mean skin dose, minimal clip dose, proportion of underdosaged clips and mean target surface dose were evaluated. The accuracy of tumor bed localization and the conformity of planning target volume and treated volume were also analyzed in each technique. Results: With the help of conformal semi-3D and 3D brachytherapy planning we could define reference dose points, active source positions and dwell times individually. This technique decreased the mean skin dose with 22.2% and reduced the possibility of geographical miss. We could achieve the best conformity between the planning target volume and the treated volume with the CT-image based 3-D treatment planning, at the cost of worse dose homogeneity. The mean treated volume was reduced by 25.1% with semi-3-D planning, however, its was increased by 16.2% with 3-D planning, compared to the 2-D planning. (orig.) [German] Bei 103 Patientinnen mit Mammakarzinom der Stadien T1

  13. Relationship between Oversulfation and Conformation of Low and High Molecular Weight Fucoidans and Evaluation of Their in Vitro Anticancer Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myoung Lae Cho

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Low and high molecular weight fucoidans (F5-30K and F>30K were chemically modified through the addition of sulfate groups, and the effect of oversulfation on the in vitro anticancer activity was investigated. After the addition of sulfate groups, a considerable increase of 35.5 to 56.8% was observed in the sulfate content of the F5-30K fraction, while the sulfate content of the F>30K fraction increased to a lesser extent (from 31.7 to 41.2%. Significant differences in anticancer activity were observed between the oversulfated F5–30K and F>30K fractions, with activities of 37.3–68.0% and 20.6–35.8%, respectively. This variation in the anticancer activity of oversulfated fucoidan derivatives was likely due to differences in their sulfate content. The results suggest that the molecular conformation of these molecules is closely related to the extent of sulfation in the fucan backbones and that the sulfates are preferably substituted when the fucoidan polymers are in a loose molecular conformation.

  14. Effects of high pressure homogenization on the activity, stability, kinetics and three-dimensional conformation of a glucose oxidase produced by Aspergillus niger.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alline Artigiani Lima Tribst

    Full Text Available High pressure homogenization (HPH is a non-thermal method, which has been employed to change the activity and stability of biotechnologically relevant enzymes. This work investigated how HPH affects the structural and functional characteristics of a glucose oxidase (GO from Aspergillus niger. The enzyme was homogenized at 75 and 150 MPa and the effects were evaluated with respect to the enzyme activity, stability, kinetic parameters and molecular structure. The enzyme showed a pH-dependent response to the HPH treatment, with reduction or maintenance of activity at pH 4.5-6.0 and a remarkable activity increase (30-300% at pH 6.5 in all tested temperatures (15, 50 and 75°C. The enzyme thermal tolerance was reduced due to HPH treatment and the storage for 24 h at high temperatures (50 and 75°C also caused a reduction of activity. Interestingly, at lower temperatures (15°C the activity levels were slightly higher than that observed for native enzyme or at least maintained. These effects of HPH treatment on function and stability of GO were further investigated by spectroscopic methods. Both fluorescence and circular dichroism revealed conformational changes in the molecular structure of the enzyme that might be associated with the distinct functional and stability behavior of GO.

  15. Treatment Planning Study to Determine Potential Benefit of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Versus Conformal Radiotherapy for Unresectable Hepatic Malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eccles, Cynthia L.; Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre; Craig, Tim; Taremi, Mojgan; Wu Xia; Dawson, Laura A.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To compare intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with conformal RT (CRT) for hypofractionated isotoxicity liver RT and explore dose escalation using IMRT for the same/improved nominal risk of liver toxicity in a treatment planning study. Methods and Materials: A total of 26 CRT plans were evaluated. Prescription doses (24-54 Gy within six fractions) were individualized on the basis of the effective liver volume irradiated maintaining ≤5% risk of radiation-induced liver disease. The dose constraints included bowel (0.5 cm 3 ) and stomach (0.5 cm 3 ) to ≤30 Gy, spinal cord to ≤25 Gy, and planning target volume (PTV) to ≤140% of the prescribed dose. Two groups were evaluated: (1) PTV overlapping or directly adjacent to serial functioning normal tissues (n = 14), and (2) the liver as the dose-limiting normal tissue (n = 12). IMRT plans using direct machine parameter optimization maintained the CRT plan beam arrangements, an estimated radiation-induced liver disease risk of 5%, and underwent dose escalation, if all normal tissue constraints were maintained. Results: IMRT improved PTV coverage in 19 of 26 plans (73%). Dose escalation was feasible in 9 cases by an average of 3.8 Gy (range, 0.6-13.2) in six fractions. Three of seven plans without improved PTV coverage had small gross tumor volumes (≤105 cm 3 ) already receiving 54 Gy, the maximal prescription dose allowed. In the remaining cases, the PTV range was 9.6-689 cm 3 ; two had overlapped organs at risk; and one had four targets. IMRT did not improve these plans owing to poor target coverage (n = 2) and nonliver (n = 2) dose limits. Conclusion: Direct machine parameter optimization IMRT improved PTV coverage while maintaining normal tissue tolerances in most CRT liver plans. Dose escalation was possible in a minority of patients

  16. Effects of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, indensity modulated radiotherapy, and conventional radiotherapy ON treatment of esophageal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Jun Han

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare the irradiation volume, short-term and long-term efficacy of conventional radiotherapy (CR, three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT, and indensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT in the treatment of esophageal cancer. Methods: A retrospective analysis method was adopted. The patients were divided into CR group (n=42, 3D-CRT group (n=45, and IMRT group (n=40. A follow-up visit was paid to collect the short-term and long-term efficacy, and the occurrence of adverse reactions. The gross tumor voluem (GTV, clinical target volume (CTV, planning target volume (PTV, and irradiation volume of organs (bilateral lungs, spinal cord, and heart at risk (OAR in the three groups were compared. Results: It was found by target volume comparison that the mean values of GTV, CTV, and PTV in the three groups were significantly increased (P0.05. The occurrence rate of adverse reactions in 3D-CRT group and IMRT group was significantly lower than that in CR group (P0.05. The difference of 1-year survival rate among the three groups was not statistically significant (P=0.144, but 3-year and 5-year survival rates in 3D-CRT group and IMRT group were significantly higher than those in CR group (P<0.05. Conclusions: 3D-CRT and IMRT can significantly enhance the short-term and long-term efficacy for esophageal cancer patients, and alleviate the radioactive damage; therefore, they are deserved to be widely recommended in the clinic.

  17. Comparison of conformal and intensity modulated radiation therapy techniques for treatment of pelvic tumors. Analysis of acute toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrigno, Robson; Santos, Adriana; Martins, Lidiane C; Weltman, Eduardo; Chen, Michael J; Sakuraba, Roberto; Lopes, Cleverson P; Cruz, José C

    2010-01-01

    This retrospective analysis reports on the comparative outcome of acute gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicities between conformal radiation therapy (CRT) and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques in the treatment of patients with pelvic tumors. From January 2002 to December 2008, 69 patients with pelvic tumors underwent whole pelvic CRT and 65 underwent whole pelvic IMRT to treat pelvic lymph nodes and primary tumor regions. Total dose to the whole pelvis ranged from 50 to 50.4 Gy in 25 to 28 daily fractions. Chemotherapy (CT) regimen, when employed, was based upon primary tumor. Acute GI and GU toxicities were graded by RTOG/EORTC acute radiation morbidity criteria. Absence of GI symptoms during radiotherapy (grade 0) was more frequently observed in the IMRT group (43.1% versus 8.7; p < 0.001) and medication for diarrhea (Grade 2) was more frequently used in the CRT group (65.2% versus 38.5%; p = 0.002). Acute GI grade 1 and 3 side effects incidence was similar in both groups (18.5% versus 18.8%; p = 0.95 and 0% versus 7.2%; p = 0.058, respectively). Incidence of GU toxicity was similar in both groups (grade 0: 61.5% versus 66.6%, p = 0.54; grade 1: 20% versus 8.7%, p = 0.06; grade 2: 18.5% versus 23.5%, p = 0.50 and grade 3: 0% versus 1.5%, p > 0.99). This comparative case series shows less grade 2 acute GI toxicity in patients treated with whole pelvic IMRT in comparison with those treated with CRT. Incidence of acute GU toxicity was similar in both groups

  18. Interim report of image-guided conformal high-dose-rate brachytherapy for patients with unfavorable prostate cancer: the William Beaumont Phase II dose-escalating trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, Alvaro A.; Kestin, Larry L.; Stromberg, Jannifer S.; Gonzalez, Jose A.; Wallace, Michelle; Gustafson, Gary S.; Edmundson, Gregory K.; Spencer, William; Vicini, Frank A.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: We analyzed our institution's experience treating patients with unfavorable prostate cancer in a prospective Phase II dose-escalating trial of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) integrated with conformal high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy boosts. This interim report discusses treatment outcome and prognostic factors using this treatment approach. Methods and Materials: From November 1991 through February 1998, 142 patients with unfavorable prostate cancer were prospectively treated in a dose-escalating trial with pelvic EBRT in combination with outpatient HDR brachytherapy at William Beaumont Hospital. Patients with any of the following characteristics were eligible: pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) ≥ 10.0 ng/ml, Gleason score ≥ 7, or clinical stage T2b or higher. All patients received pelvic EBRT to a median total dose of 46.0 Gy. Pelvic EBRT was integrated with ultrasound-guided transperineal conformal interstitial iridium-192 HDR implants. From 1991 to 1995, 58 patients underwent three conformal interstitial HDR implants during the first, second, and third weeks of pelvic EBRT. After October 1995, 84 patients received two interstitial implants during the first and third weeks of pelvic EBRT. The dose delivered via interstitial brachytherapy was escalated from 5.50 Gy to 6.50 Gy for each implant in those patients receiving three implants, and subsequently, from 8.25 Gy to 9.50 Gy per fraction in those patients receiving two implants. To improve implant quality and reduce operator dependency, an on-line, image-guided interactive dose optimization program was utilized during each HDR implant. No patient received hormonal therapy unless treatment failure was documented. The median follow-up was 2.1 years (range: 0.2-7.2 years). Biochemical failure was defined according to the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology Consensus Panel definition. Results: The pretreatment PSA level was ≥ 10.0 ng/ml in 51% of patients. The

  19. Conformal Gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooft, G.

    2012-01-01

    The dynamical degree of freedom for the gravitational force is the metric tensor, having 10 locally independent degrees of freedom (of which 4 can be used to fix the coordinate choice). In conformal gravity, we split this field into an overall scalar factor and a nine-component remainder. All unrenormalizable infinities are in this remainder, while the scalar component can be handled like any other scalar field such as the Higgs field. In this formalism, conformal symmetry is spontaneously broken. An imperative demand on any healthy quantum gravity theory is that black holes should be described as quantum systems with micro-states as dictated by the Hawking-Bekenstein theory. This requires conformal symmetry that may be broken spontaneously but not explicitly, and this means that all conformal anomalies must cancel out. Cancellation of conformal anomalies yields constraints on the matter sector as described by some universal field theory. Thus black hole physics may eventually be of help in the construction of unified field theories. (author)

  20. The Importance of the Conformality, Heterogeneity, and Gradient Indices in Evaluating Gamma Knife Radiosurgery Treatment Plans for Intracranial Meningiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balagamwala, Ehsan H.; Suh, John H.; Barnett, Gene H.; Khan, Mohammad K.; Neyman, Gennady; Cai, Rong S.; Vogelbaum, Michael A.; Novak, Eric; Chao, Samuel T.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the relationship between the conformality index (CIn), heterogeneity index (HIn), and gradient index (GIn) and the development of toxicity in patients treated with Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) for intracranial meningiomas. Methods and Materials: Treatment records of patients treated from 1997 to 2009 with at least 6 months of follow-up were reviewed. The following parameters were collected: CIn, HIn, GIn (ratio of the volume receiving half the prescription isodose to the volume receiving the full prescription isodose), brainstem (BS) maximum dose (MD), BS volume receiving ≥12 Gy (V12), optic apparatus (OA) MD, OA V8 Gy, OA V10, number of isocenters, number of isocenters outside target volume, and the occurrence of six toxicities. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression modeling were used for analysis. Results: This study included 145 patients (148 meningiomas) with a median follow-up time of 27 months (range, 6–113.9 months). The majority of meningiomas were located in the skull base (53%). The median prescription dose was 13 Gy (range, 10–24 Gy) to the 51.50% (range, 50–92%) isodose. A lower HIn was correlated with a higher GIn (p = 0.007). CIn was not associated with any toxicity. Higher HIn was associated with the development of dizziness (odds ratio [OR] 1.9; p = 0.02), whereas a lower GIn was associated with motor deficits (OR 0.38; p = 0.04) and auditory changes (OR 0.59; p = 0.04). The OA MD, V8, and V12 were not associated with visual changes, but visual changes were associated with a higher number of isocenters outside the target volume (OR 1.93; p = 0.07). BS V12 was correlated with the development of auditory changes (OR 1.05; p = 0.05), whereas patients with higher BS MD tended to have increased toxicity. Conclusions: Close attention must be paid to all three indices (CIn, HIn, GIn) when optimal treatment plans are determined. We recommend that the target CIn should be ≤2.0, the HIn ≤2.0, and the GIn ≥3

  1. Comparison of Radiation Treatment Plans for Breast Cancer between 3D Conformal in Prone and Supine Positions in Contrast to VMAT and IMRT Supine Positions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejarano Buele, Ana Isabel

    The treatment regimen for breast cancer patients typically involves Whole Breast Irradiation (WBI). The coverage and extent of the radiation treatment is dictated by location of tumor mass, breast tissue distribution, involvement of lymph nodes, and other factors. The current standard treatment approach used at our institution is a 3D tangential beam geometry, which involves two fields irradiating the breast, or a four field beam arrangement covering the whole breast and involved nodes, while decreasing the dose to organs as risk (OARs) such as the lung and heart. The coverage of these targets can be difficult to achieve in patients with unfavorable thoracic geometries, especially in those cases in which the planning target volume (PTV) is extended to the chest wall. It is a well-known fact that exposure of the heart to ionizing radiation has been proved to increase the subsequent rate of ischemic heart disease. In these cases, inverse planned treatments have become a proven alternative to the 3D approach. The goal of this research project is to evaluate the factors that affect our current techniques as well as to adapt the development of inverse modulated techniques for our clinic, in which breast cancer patients are one of the largest populations treated. For this purpose, a dosimetric comparison along with the evaluation of immobilization devices was necessary. Radiation treatment plans were designed and dosimetrically compared for 5 patients in both, supine and prone positions. For 8 patients, VMAT and IMRT plans were created and evaluated in the supine position. Skin flash incorporation for inverse modulated plans required measurement of the surface dose as well as an evaluation of breast volume changes during a treatment course. It was found that prone 3D conformal plans as well as the VMAT and IMRT plans are generally superior in sparing OARs to supine plans with comparable PTV coverage. Prone setup leads to larger shifts in breast volume as well as in

  2. Avaliação da resposta bioquímica no câncer inicial de próstata: experiência uninstitucional comparando teleterapia exclusiva ou associada à braquiterapia de alta taxa de dose Evaluation of biochemical response on early prostate cancer: comparison between treatment with external beam radiation alone and in combination with high-dose rate conformal brachytherapy boost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Guedes de Castro

    2004-08-01

    biochemical response in patients with locally advanced prostate cancer treated with external beam radiation therapy alone or in combination with conformal brachytherapy boost. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From November 1997 to January 2000, 74 patients received 45 Gy of pelvic external irradiation and four were treated with high dose rate iridium-192 conformal boost implants of 4 Gy each (BT. These were compared with 29 other patients treated with 45 Gy of pelvic external irradiation followed by a 24 Gy of bilateral ARC boost (RT from October 1996 to February 2000. Some patients received neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy. Three-year actuarial biochemical control rates (BC3 and pretreatment biochemical response predictors such as prostate-specific antigen pretreatment (PSAi, Gleason score (GS and clinical stage (CS, were evaluated. RESULTS: Median follow-up was of 25 months for the RT group and 37 months for the BT group. BC3 was 51% versus 73% (p = 0.032 for RT and BT, respectively. Comparisons of biochemical control by treatment group stratified by PSAi showed that BC3 for RT versus BT was 85.7% versus 79.1% (p = 0.76 for PSAi 10 ng/mL, respectively. For patients with GS 6, BC3 was 78% versus 55% (p = 0.58 for RT versus BT, respectively. For patients with CS T2a, BC3 was 73% versus 69% (p = 0.692 for RT versus BT, respectively. The relative risk of biochemical relapse was 2.3 (95% IC: 1.0-5.1 for patients in RT group compared to the BT group. When adjusted for PSAi and GS, the relative risk of biochemical relapse was 2.4 (95% IC: 1.0-5.7. CONCLUSION: The treatment modality was an independent prognostic factor for biochemical relapse, with a significant improvement in the biochemical control with BT. These early results suggest that this treatment was most beneficial in patients with PSAi > 10 ng/mL, CS < T2a and GS < 6.

  3. A comparison of four patient immobilization devices in the treatment of prostate cancer patients with three dimensional conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Paul Y.; Washington, Maxine; Vaida, Florin; Hamilton, Russell; Spelbring, Danny; Wyman, Brenda; Harrison, Joanne; Chen, George T. Y.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the variability of patient positioning during three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for prostate cancer treated with no immobilization or one of four immobilization devices, and to determine the effects of patient body habitus and pelvic circumference on patient movement with each individual immobilization technique. Methods and Materials: To see whether our immobilization techniques have improved day-to-day patient movement, a retrospective analysis was carried out. A total of 62 patients treated at one facility on a single machine with 3D-CRT via a four-field box technique (anterior-posterior and opposed laterals) in the supine position with either no immobilization or one of four immobilization devices. Five groups of patients were compared: (a) group 1-no immobilization; (b) group 2-alpha cradle from the waist to upper thigh; (c) group 3-alpha cradle from waist to below the knees; (d) group 4-styrofoam leg immobilizer (below knees); and (e) group 5-aquaplast cast encompassing the entire abdomen and pelvis to midthigh with alpha cradle immobilization to their lower legs and feet. Prior to starting radiotherapy, portal films of all four treatment fields were obtained 1 day before treatment. Subsequently, portal films were then obtained at least once a week. Portal films were compared with the simulation films and appropriate changes were made and verified on the next day prior to treatment. A deviation of greater than 0.5 cm or greater was considered to be clinically significant in our analysis. We studied the difference among the types of immobilization and no immobilization by looking at the frequency of movements (overall, and on each of the three axes) that a patient had during the course of his treatment. Using a logistic regression model, the probability of overall and individual directional movement for each group was obtained. In addition, the effects of patient body habitus and pelvic circumference on movement were

  4. Evaluation of the treatment planning system of three-dimensional conformal external radiotherapy in Hospital Mexico of San Jose, Costa Rica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venegas Rojas, Deybith

    2014-01-01

    An evaluation and analysis are realized of dosimetry of the treatment planning system (TPS) of three-dimensional conformal external radiotherapy in the Servicio de Radioterapia of the Hospital Mexico of Costa Rica. An evaluation procedure is proposed based on IAEA-TECDOC-1540 document, and may continue to be applied periodically in this or other radiotherapy services. Tests realized have checked the representation of distances and electronics densities transferred to the TPS, match with those of real objects. The 16 tests applied have represented situations of real treatments with different configurations and beam modifiers in the equipment used daily. The tests have measured the absorbed dose to water in different significant points at different depths, using photon beams of 6 MeV and 18 MeV. The physical parameters of the tests were simulated. The absorbed dose has been calculated at specified points. The XiO and Eclipse TPS have been used with the calculation algorithms: Superposition, Convolution and AAA. The results of the calculations are evaluated with statistical methods and comparing them with the measurements of absorbed dose. A generalized tendency has been detected toward negative relative errors, implying an underestimation of the dose by the TPS; due to a difference found in the accelerator output factor respect to its commissioning. The AAA algorithm has determined a better performance, although with greater difficulties of calculus in the region of build-up. Convolution and Superposition algorithms have had similar performances and both have presented problems in high depths and out of edges of the fields. The result of the dosimetric evaluation has been satisfactory in real conditions of equipment; but several particularities have been found that should be reviewed and adjusted. The precision of the TPS has been adequate in the majority of situations important for treatment planning. [author] [es

  5. Highly Conformal Craniospinal Radiotherapy Techniques Can Underdose the Cranial Clinical Target Volume if Leptomeningeal Extension through Skull Base Exit Foramina is not Contoured.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, D J; Ajithkumar, T; Lambert, J; Gleeson, I; Williams, M V; Jefferies, S J

    2017-07-01

    Craniospinal irradiation (CSI) remains a crucial treatment for patients with medulloblastoma. There is uncertainty about how to manage meningeal surfaces and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) that follows cranial nerves exiting skull base foramina. The purpose of this study was to assess plan quality and dose coverage of posterior cranial fossa foramina with both photon and proton therapy. We analysed the radiotherapy plans of seven patients treated with CSI for medulloblastoma and primitive neuro-ectodermal tumours and three with ependymoma (total n = 10). Four had been treated with a field-based technique and six with TomoTherapy™. The internal acoustic meatus (IAM), jugular foramen (JF) and hypoglossal canal (HC) were contoured and added to the original treatment clinical target volume (Plan_CTV) to create a Test_CTV. This was grown to a test planning target volume (Test_PTV) for comparison with a Plan_PTV. Using Plan_CTV and Plan_PTV, proton plans were generated for all 10 cases. The following dosimetry data were recorded: conformity (dice similarity coefficient) and homogeneity index (D 2  - D 98 /D 50 ) as well as median and maximum dose (D 2% ) to Plan_PTV, V 95% and minimum dose (D 99.9% ) to Plan_CTV and Test_CTV and Plan_PTV and Test_PTV, V 95% and minimum dose (D 98% ) to foramina PTVs. Proton and TomoTherapy™ plans were more conformal (0.87, 0.86) and homogeneous (0.07, 0.04) than field-photon plans (0.79, 0.17). However, field-photon plans covered the IAM, JF and HC PTVs better than proton plans (P = 0.002, 0.004, 0.003, respectively). TomoTherapy™ plans covered the IAM and JF better than proton plans (P = 0.000, 0.002, respectively) but the result for the HC was not significant. Adding foramen CTVs/PTVs made no difference for field plans. The mean D min dropped 3.4% from Plan_PTV to Test_PTV for TomoTherapy™ (not significant) and 14.8% for protons (P = 0.001). Highly conformal CSI techniques may underdose meninges and CSF in the dural

  6. A dualistic conformational response to substrate binding in the human serotonin transporter reveals a high affinity state for serotonin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Henriette; Severinsen, Kasper; Said, Saida

    2015-01-01

    Serotonergic neurotransmission is modulated by the membrane-embedded serotonin transporter (SERT). SERT mediates the reuptake of serotonin into the presynaptic neurons. Conformational changes in SERT occur upon binding of ions and substrate and are crucial for translocation of serotonin across...... the membrane. Our understanding of these conformational changes is mainly based on crystal structures of a bacterial homolog in various conformations, derived homology models of eukaryotic neurotransmitter transporters, and substituted cysteine accessibility method of SERT. However, the dynamic changes...

  7. Bladder radiotherapy treatment: A retrospective comparison of 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, intensity-modulated radiation therapy, and volumetric-modulated arc therapy plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasciuti, Katia, E-mail: k.pasciuti@virgilio.it [Department of Radiotherapy Physics, Royal Free Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Kuthpady, Shrinivas [Department of Radiotherapy, Royal Free Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Anderson, Anne; Best, Bronagh [Department of Radiotherapy Physics, Royal Free Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Waqar, Saleem; Chowdhury, Subhra [Department of Radiotherapy, Royal Free Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2017-04-01

    To examine tumor's and organ's response when different radiotherapy plan techniques are used. Ten patients with confirmed bladder tumors were first treated using 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and subsequently the original plans were re-optimized using the intensity-modulated radiation treatment (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT)-techniques. Targets coverage in terms of conformity and homogeneity index, TCP, and organs' dose limits, including integral dose analysis were evaluated. In addition, MUs and treatment delivery times were compared. Better minimum target coverage (1.3%) was observed in VMAT plans when compared to 3DCRT and IMRT ones confirmed by a statistically significant conformity index (CI) results. Large differences were observed among techniques in integral dose results of the femoral heads. Even if no statistically significant differences were reported in rectum and tissue, a large amount of energy deposition was observed in 3DCRT plans. In any case, VMAT plans provided better organs and tissue sparing confirmed also by the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) analysis as well as a better tumor control probability (TCP) result. Our analysis showed better overall results in planning using VMAT techniques. Furthermore, a total time reduction in treatment observed among techniques including gantry and collimator rotation could encourage using the more recent one, reducing target movements and patient discomfort.

  8. Adaptive Multilevel Methods with Local Smoothing for $H^1$- and $H^{\\mathrm{curl}}$-Conforming High Order Finite Element Methods

    KAUST Repository

    Janssen, Bärbel

    2011-01-01

    A multilevel method on adaptive meshes with hanging nodes is presented, and the additional matrices appearing in the implementation are derived. Smoothers of overlapping Schwarz type are discussed; smoothing is restricted to the interior of the subdomains refined to the current level; thus it has optimal computational complexity. When applied to conforming finite element discretizations of elliptic problems and Maxwell equations, the method\\'s convergence rates are very close to those for the nonadaptive version. Furthermore, the smoothers remain efficient for high order finite elements. We discuss the implementation in a general finite element code using the example of the deal.II library. © 2011 Societ y for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  9. High Pressure Treatment in Foods

    OpenAIRE

    Edwin Fabian Torres Bello; Gerardo González Martínez; Bernadette F. Klotz Ceberio; Dolores Rodrigo; Antonio Martínez López

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: High hydrostatic pressure (HHP), a non-thermal technology, which typically uses water as a pressure transfer medium, is characterized by a minimal impact on food characteristics (sensory, nutritional, and functional). Today, this technology, present in many food companies, can effectively inactivate bacterial cells and many enzymes. All this makes HHP very attractive, with very good acceptance by consumers, who value the organoleptic characteristics of products processed by this non...

  10. High Pressure Treatment in Foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres Bello, Edwin Fabian; González Martínez, Gerardo; Klotz Ceberio, Bernadette F.; Rodrigo, Dolores; Martínez López, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    High hydrostatic pressure (HHP), a non-thermal technology, which typically uses water as a pressure transfer medium, is characterized by a minimal impact on food characteristics (sensory, nutritional, and functional). Today, this technology, present in many food companies, can effectively inactivate bacterial cells and many enzymes. All this makes HHP very attractive, with very good acceptance by consumers, who value the organoleptic characteristics of products processed by this non-thermal food preservation technology because they associate these products with fresh-like. On the other hand, this technology reduces the need for non-natural synthetic additives of low consumer acceptance. PMID:28234332

  11. High Pressure Treatment in Foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin Fabian Torres Bello

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available High hydrostatic pressure (HHP, a non-thermal technology, which typically uses water as a pressure transfer medium, is characterized by a minimal impact on food characteristics (sensory, nutritional, and functional. Today, this technology, present in many food companies, can effectively inactivate bacterial cells and many enzymes. All this makes HHP very attractive, with very good acceptance by consumers, who value the organoleptic characteristics of products processed by this non-thermal food preservation technology because they associate these products with fresh-like. On the other hand, this technology reduces the need for non-natural synthetic additives of low consumer acceptance.

  12. Treatment of primany hepatic carcinoma with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy combined with transcatheter arterial chemoembolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Li; Wen Xiaoping; Huang Wei

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) combined with transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) on stage m/IV primary hepatic carcinoma. Methods: Eighty cases of stage III/IV primary hepatic carcinoma were randomly divided into two groups: 40 cases treated with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy combined with transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (3DCRT + TACE group) and 40 cases treated with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy associated with hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (3DCRT +HAI group). Results: The response rates were 75% and 45% in 3DCRT + TACE group and 3DCRT + HAI group, respectively; and the difference between the two groups was statistically significant (P 0.05), The 0.5-, 1- and 2-year survival rates were 73% , 45% and 28% in 3DCRT + TACE group, and 45%, 25% and 13% in 3DCRT + HAI group, respectively; and the difference between the two groups was statistically significant (P 0.05). Conclusion: Three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy combined with transcatheter arterial chemoembolization improved prognosis of stage III/IV primary hepatic carcinoma. (authors)

  13. A computer-controlled high resolution micro-multi-leaf collimator for stereotactic conformal radio-therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlegel, Wolfgang; Pastyr, Otto; Kubesch, Rudolf; Diemer, Torsten; Kuester, Gunnilla; Rhein, Bernhard; Hoever, Karl-Heinz

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective In stereotactic conformal radiotherapy of irregularly shaped lesions, either multi-isocentric convergent beam treatment techniques with circular collimators or irregular shaped beams are being used. While the treatment technique with multiple isocenters has the disadvantage of producing inhomogeneous dose distributions, the use of irregular shaped fields is not yet satisfying from a technical point of view: Cerrobend blocking or the use of static micro MLCs need a long preparation time and only allow static treatment techniques, MLC collimators which are commercially available in connection with modern LINACs have leaf-thickness of at least 1 cm which is too coarse for stereotactic radiotherapy of lesions in the brain and head and neck area. For this reason, we developed a computer controlled micro-MLC with technical specifications matched to the needs of stereotactic radiotherapy and radiosurgery. Materials and Methods The mechanical specifications of the computer controlled micro-MLC were derived from our experience with stereotactic treatment techniques, from the requirement that the MLC has to be attachable as an external device to the accessory holders of standard LINACs, including cost considerations, dosimetric measurements as well as Monte Carlo calculations. The Micro-MLC is controlled by an electronic equipment consisting of a standard PC under Windows 95, an interface board, 14 Micro-controller boards, a verification system and 80 driving units equipped with DC motors and potentiometers. The control program has calibrating, operating, visualizing and test options. Irregular field data are transferred from the treatment planning computer to the control PC and distributed to the micro-controllers, which in parallel are driving three leaves each. Beside the special control unit, we are currently investigating whether the electronics of commercially available integrated large field MLCs can also be used for operating the Micro-MLC. Results

  14. High Friction Surface Treatments, Transportation Research Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-01

    MnDOT and local transportation agencies in Minnesota are considering the use of a high friction surface treatment (HFST) as a safety strategy. HFST is used as a spot pavement surfacing treatment in locations with high friction demand (for example, cr...

  15. Conkiss: Conformal Kidneys Sparing 3D Noncoplanar Radiotherapy Treatment for Pancreatic Cancer As an Alternative to IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebestyen, Zsolt; Kovacs, Peter; Gulyban, Akos; Farkas, Robert; Bellyei, Szabolcs; Liposits, Gabor; Szigeti, Andras; Esik, Olga; Derczy, Katalin; Mangel, Laszlo

    2011-01-01

    When treating pancreatic cancer using standard (ST) 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) beam arrangements, the kidneys often receive a higher dose than their probable tolerance limit. Our aim was to elaborate a new planning method that-similarly to IMRT-effectively spares the kidneys without compromising the target coverage. Conformal kidneys sparing (CONKISS) 5-field, noncoplanar plans were compared with ST plans for 23 consecutive patients retrospectively. Optimal beam arrangements were used consisting of a left- and right-wedged beam-pair and an anteroposterior beam inclined in the caudal direction. The wedge direction determination (WEDDE) algorithm was developed to adjust the adequate direction of wedges. The aimed organs at risk (OARs) mean dose limits were: kidney <12 Gy, liver <25 Gy, small bowels <30 Gy, and spinal cord maximum <45 Gy. Conformity and homogeneity indexes with z-test were used to evaluate and compare the different planning approaches. The mean dose to the kidneys decreased significantly (p < 0.05): left kidney 7.7 vs. 10.7 Gy, right kidney 9.1 vs. 11.7 Gy. Meanwhile the mean dose to the liver increased significantly (18.1 vs. 15.0 Gy). The changes in the conformity, homogeneity, and in the doses to other OARs were not significant. The CONKISS method balances the load among the OARs and significantly reduces the dose to the kidneys, without any significant change in the conformity and homogeneity. Using 3D-CRT the CONKISS method can be a smart alternative to IMRT to enhance the possibility of dose escalation.

  16. Conformational analysis by intersection: CONAN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smellie, Andrew; Stanton, Robert; Henne, Randy; Teig, Steve

    2003-01-15

    As high throughput techniques in chemical synthesis and screening improve, more demands are placed on computer assisted design and virtual screening. Many of these computational methods require one or more three-dimensional conformations for molecules, creating a demand for a conformational analysis tool that can rapidly and robustly cover the low-energy conformational spaces of small molecules. A new algorithm of intersection is presented here, which quickly generates (on average heuristics are applied after intersection to generate a small representative collection of conformations that span the conformational space. In a study of approximately 97,000 randomly selected molecules from the MDDR, results are presented that explore these conformations and their ability to cover low-energy conformational space. Copyright 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Comput Chem 24: 10-20, 2003

  17. Treatment-Related Morbidity in Prostate Cancer: A Comparison of 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy With and Without Image Guidance Using Implanted Fiducial Markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Jasmeet; Greer, Peter B.; White, Martin A.; Parker, Joel; Patterson, Jackie; Tang, Colin I.; Capp, Anne; Wratten, Christopher; Denham, James W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate the prevalence of rectal and urinary dysfunctional symptoms using image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) with fiducials and magnetic resonance planning for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: During the implementation stages of IGRT between September 2008 and March 2010, 367 consecutive patients were treated with prostatic irradiation using 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy with and without IGRT (non-IGRT). In November 2010, these men were asked to report their bowel and bladder symptoms using a postal questionnaire. The proportions of patients with moderate to severe symptoms in these groups were compared using logistic regression models adjusted for tumor and treatment characteristic variables. Results: Of the 282 respondents, the 154 selected for IGRT had higher stage tumors, received higher prescribed doses, and had larger volumes of rectum receiving high dosage than did the 128 selected for non-IGRT. The follow-up duration was 8 to 26 months. Compared with the non-IGRT group, improvement was noted in all dysfunctional rectal symptoms using IGRT. In multivariable analyses, IGRT improved rectal pain (odds ratio [OR] 0.07 [0.009-0.7], P=.02), urgency (OR 0.27 [0.11-0.63], P=<.01), diarrhea (OR 0.009 [0.02-0.35], P<.01), and change in bowel habits (OR 0.18 [0.06-0.52], P<.010). No correlation was observed between rectal symptom levels and dose-volume histogram data. Urinary dysfunctional symptoms were similar in both treatment groups. Conclusions: In comparison with men selected for non-IGRT, a significant reduction of bowel dysfunctional symptoms was confirmed in men selected for IGRT, even though they had larger volumes of rectum treated to higher doses

  18. Potential clinical efficacy of intensity-modulated conformal therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meeks, Sanford L.; Buatti, John M.; Bova, Francis J.; Friedman, William A.; Mendenhall, William M.; Zlotecki, Robert A.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the potential benefit of using intensity-modulated conformal therapy for a variety of lesions currently treated with stereotactic radiosurgery or conventional radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Intensity-modulated conformal treatment plans were generated for small intracranial lesions, as well as head and neck, lung, breast, and prostate cases, using the Peacock Plan[reg] treatment-planning system (Nomos Corporation). For small intracranial lesions, intensity-modulated conformal treatment plans were compared with stereotactic radiosurgery treatment plans generated for patient treatment at the University of Florida Shands Cancer Center. For other sites (head and neck, lung, breast, and prostate), plans generated using the Peacock Plan[reg] were compared with conventional treatment plans, as well as beam's-eye-view conformal treatment plans. Plan comparisons were accomplished through conventional qualitative review of two-dimensional (2D) dose distributions in conjunction with quantitative techniques, such as dose-volume histograms, dosimetric statistics, normal tissue complication probabilities, tumor control probabilities, and objective numerical scoring. Results: For small intracranial lesions, there is little difference between intensity-modulated conformal treatment planning and radiosurgery treatment planning in the conformation of high isodose lines with the target volume. However, stereotactic treatment planning provides a steeper dose gradient outside the target volume and, hence, a lower normal tissue toxicity index. For extracranial sites, objective numerical scores for beam's-eye-view and intensity-modulated conformal planning techniques are superior to scores for conventional treatment plans. The beam's-eye-view planning technique prevents geographic target misses and better excludes healthy tissues from the treatment portal. Compared with scores for the beam's-eye-view planning technique, scores for

  19. Estimation of the incidence of late bladder and rectum complications after high-dose (70-78 Gy) conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer, using dose-volume histograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boersma, Liesbeth J.; Brink, Mandy van den; Bruce, Allison M.; Shouman, Tarek; Gras, Luuk; Velde, Annet te; Lebesque, Joos V.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether Dose-Volume Histogram (DVH) parameters can be used to identify risk groups for developing late gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) complications after conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: DVH parameters were analyzed for 130 patients with localized prostate cancer, treated with conformal radiotherapy in a dose-escalating protocol (70-78 Gy, 2 Gy per fraction). The incidence of late (>6 months) GI and GU complications was classified using the RTOG/EORTC and the SOMA/LENT scoring system. In addition, GI complications were divided in nonsevere and severe (requiring one or more laser treatments or blood transfusions) rectal bleeding. The median follow-up time was 24 months. We investigated whether rectal and bladder wall volumes, irradiated to various dose levels, correlated with the observed actuarial incidences of GI and GU complications, using volume as a continuous variable. Subsequently, for each dose level in the DVH, the rectal wall volumes were dichotomized using different volumes as cutoff levels. The impact of the total radiation dose, and the maximum radiation dose in the rectal and bladder wall was analyzed as well. Results: The actuarial incidence at 2 years for GI complications ≥Grade II was 14% (RTOG/EORTC) or 20% (SOMA/LENT); for GU complications ≥Grade III 8% (RTOG/EORTC) or 21% (SOMA/LENT). Neither for GI complications ≥Grade II (RTOG/EORTC or SOMA/LENT), nor for GU complications ≥Grade III (RTOG/EORTC or SOMA/LENT), was a significant correlation found between any of the DVH parameters and the actuarial incidence of complications. For severe rectal bleeding (actuarial incidence at 2 years 3%), four consecutive volume cutoff levels were found, which significantly discriminated between high and low risk. A trend was observed that a total radiation dose ≥ 74 Gy (or a maximum radiation dose in the rectal wall >75 Gy) resulted in a higher incidence of severe rectal bleeding (p

  20. Treatment planning with protons for pediatric retinoblastoma, medulloblastoma, and pelvic sarcoma: How do protons compare with other conformal techniques?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Catherine T.; Bilton, Stephen D.; Famiglietti, Robin M.; Riley, Beverly A.; Mahajan, Anita; Chang, Eric L.; Maor, Moshe H.; Woo, Shiao Y.; Cox, James D.; Smith, Alfred R.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To calculate treatment plans and compare the dose distributions and dose-volume histograms (DVHs) for photon three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), electron therapy, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and standard (nonintensity modulated) proton therapy in three pediatric disease sites. Methods and Materials: The tumor volumes from 8 patients (3 retinoblastomas, 2 medulloblastomas, and 3 pelvic sarcomas) were studied retrospectively to compare DVHs from proton therapy with 3D-CRT, electron therapy, and IMRT. In retinoblastoma, several planning techniques were analyzed: A single electron appositional beam was compared with a single 3D-CRT lateral beam, a 3D-CRT anterior beam paired with a lateral beam, IMRT, and protons. In medulloblastoma, three posterior fossa irradiation techniques were analyzed: 3D-CRT, IMRT, and protons. Craniospinal irradiation (which consisted of composite plans of both the posterior fossa and craniospinal components) was also evaluated, primarily comparing spinal irradiation using 3D-CRT electrons, 3D-CRT photons, and protons. Lastly, in pelvic sarcoma, 3D-CRT, IMRT, and proton plans were assessed. Results: In retinoblastoma, protons resulted in the best target coverage combined with the most orbital bone sparing (10% was the mean orbital bone volume irradiated at ≥5 Gy for protons vs. 25% for 3D-CRT electrons, 69% for IMRT, 41% for a single 3D lateral beam, 51% for a 3D anterolateral beam with a lens block, and 65% for a 3D anterolateral beam without a lens block). A single appositional electron field was the next best technique followed by other planning approaches. In medulloblastoma, for posterior fossa and craniospinal irradiation, protons resulted in the least dose to the cochlea (for only posterior fossa irradiation at ≥20 Gy, 34% was the mean cochlear volume irradiated for protons, 87% for IMRT, 89% for 3D-CRT) and hypothalamus-pituitary axis (for only posterior fossa irradiation at ≥10 Gy

  1. Investigation of reciprocating conformal contact of piston skirt-to-surface modified cylinder liner in high performance engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balakrishnan, S.; Rahnejat, H. [Loughborough University (United Kingdom). Wolfson School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering; Howell-Smith, S. [Perfect Bore Motorsport Ltd., Andover (United Kingdom)

    2005-11-15

    The article presents detailed analysis of the conforming contact between a piston and cylinder liner in a high-speed racing engine under extreme operating conditions owing to high loads and operating speeds in excess of 19 000 r/min, resulting in a high sliding velocity of 42 m/s. The analysis indicates contact forces generated in the order of 2.5 kN. The contribution due to fluid film lubrication is found to reside in iso-viscous rigid or elastic regimes of lubrication, which is insufficient to form a coherent lubricant film during some parts of the cycle, such as at top-dead-centre (TDC). The article shows that at combustion, 95 per cent of the contact can remain in boundary or mixed regimes of lubrication. Piston skirt surface modification features are used in conjunction with an electrolytically applied composite coating, Ni[SiC]p to produce advanced cylinder liners to remedy the situation. Detailed numerical analysis shows that significant improvement is achieved in the regime of lubrication condition. (author)

  2. Hi-C 2.0: An optimized Hi-C procedure for high-resolution genome-wide mapping of chromosome conformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belaghzal, Houda; Dekker, Job; Gibcus, Johan H

    2017-07-01

    Chromosome conformation capture-based methods such as Hi-C have become mainstream techniques for the study of the 3D organization of genomes. These methods convert chromatin interactions reflecting topological chromatin structures into digital information (counts of pair-wise interactions). Here, we describe an updated protocol for Hi-C (Hi-C 2.0) that integrates recent improvements into a single protocol for efficient and high-resolution capture of chromatin interactions. This protocol combines chromatin digestion and frequently cutting enzymes to obtain kilobase (kb) resolution. It also includes steps to reduce random ligation and the generation of uninformative molecules, such as unligated ends, to improve the amount of valid intra-chromosomal read pairs. This protocol allows for obtaining information on conformational structures such as compartment and topologically associating domains, as well as high-resolution conformational features such as DNA loops. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Conformality lost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, David B.; Lee, Jong-Wan; Son, Dam T.; Stephanov, Mikhail A.

    2009-01-01

    We consider zero-temperature transitions from conformal to nonconformal phases in quantum theories. We argue that there are three generic mechanisms for the loss of conformality in any number of dimensions: (i) fixed point goes to zero coupling, (ii) fixed point runs off to infinite coupling, or (iii) an IR fixed point annihilates with a UV fixed point and they both disappear into the complex plane. We give both relativistic and nonrelativistic examples of the last case in various dimensions and show that the critical behavior of the mass gap behaves similarly to the correlation length in the finite temperature Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless (BKT) phase transition in two dimensions, ξ∼exp(c/|T-T c | 1/2 ). We speculate that the chiral phase transition in QCD at large number of fermion flavors belongs to this universality class, and attempt to identify the UV fixed point that annihilates with the Banks-Zaks fixed point at the lower end of the conformal window.

  4. The role of Cobalt-60 source in Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy: From modeling finite sources to treatment planning and conformal dose delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanesar, Sandeep Kaur

    Cobalt-60 (Co-60) units played an integral role in radiation therapy from the mid-1950s to the 1970s. Although they continue to be used to treat cancer in some parts of the world, their role has been significantly reduced due to the invention of medical linear accelerators. A number of groups have indicated a strong potential for Co-60 units in modern radiation therapy. The Medical Physics group at the Cancer Center of the Southeastern Ontario and Queen's University has shown the feasibility of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) via simple conformal treatment planning and dose delivery using a Co-60 unit. In this thesis, initial Co-60 tomotherapy planning investigations on simple uniform phantoms are extended to actual clinical cases based on patient CT data. The planning is based on radiation dose data from a clinical Co-60 unit fitted with a multileaf collimator (MLC) and modeled in the EGSnrc Monte Carlo system. An in house treatment planning program is used to calculate IMRT dose distributions. Conformal delivery in a single slice on a uniform phantom based on sequentially delivered pencil beams is verified by Gafchromic film. Volumetric dose distributions for Co-60 serial tomotherapy are then generated for typical clinical sites that had been treated at our clinic by conventional 6MV IMRT using Varian Eclipse treatment plans. The Co-60 treatment plans are compared with the clinical IMRT plans using conventional matrices such as dose volume histograms (DVH). Dose delivery based on simultaneously opened MLC leaves is also explored and a novel MLC segmentation method is proposed. In order to increase efficiency of dose calculations, a novel convolution based fluence model for treatment planning is also proposed. The ion chamber measurements showed that the Monte Carlo modeling of the beam data under the MIMiC MLC is accurate. The film measurements from the uniform phantom irradiations confirm that IMRT plans from our in-house treatment planning system

  5. SU-E-T-346: Effect of Jaw Position On Dose to Critical Structures in 3-D Conformal Radiotherapy Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paudel, N; Han, E; Liang, X; Morrill, S; Zhang, X; Hardee, M; Penagaricano, J; Ratanatharathorn, V [Vaneerat, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Three-dimensional conformal therapy remains a valid and widely used modality for pancreatic radiotherapy treatment. It usually meets dose constraints on critical structures. However, careful positioning of collimation jaws can reduce dose to the critical structures. Here we investigate the dosimetric effect of jaw position in MLC-based 3-D conformal treatment planning on critical structures. Methods: We retrospectively selected seven pancreatic cancer patients treated with 3-D conformal radiotherapy. We started with treatment plans (Varian Truebeam LINAC, Eclipse TPS, AAA, 18MV) having both x and y jaws aligned with the farthest extent of the block outline (8mm around PTV). Then we subsequently moved either both x-jaws or all x and y jaws outwards upto 3 cm in 1 cm increments and investigated their effect on average and maximum dose to neighboring critical structures keeping the same coverage to treatment volume. Results: Lateral displacement of both x-jaws by 1cm each increased kidney and spleen mean dose by as much as 1.7% and 1.3% respectively and superior inferior displacement increased liver, right kidney, stomach and spleen dose by as much as 2.1%, 2%, 5.2% and 1.6% respectively. Displacement of all x and y-jaws away by 1cm increased the mean dose to liver, right kidney, left kidney, bowels, cord, stomach and spleen by as much as 4.9%, 5.9%, 2.1%, 2.8%, 7.4%, 10.4% and 4.2% respectively. Percentage increase in mean dose due to 2 and 3cm jaw displacement increased almost linearly with the displaced distance. Changes in maximum dose were much smaller (mostly negligible) than the changes in mean dose. Conclusion: Collimation jaw position affects dose mostly to critical structures adjacent to it. Though treatment plans with MLCs conforming the block margin usually meet dose constraints to critical structures, keeping jaws all the way in, to the edge of the block reduces dose to the critical structures during radiation treatment.

  6. Effect of High-Pressure Treatment on Catalytic and Physicochemical Properties of Pepsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianan; Bai, Tenghui; Ma, Yaping; Ma, Hanjun

    2017-10-11

    For a long time, high-pressure treatment has been used to destroy the compact structures of natural proteins in order to promote subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis. However, there are few reports evaluating the feasibility of directly improving the catalytic capability of proteases by using high-pressure treatments. In this study, the effects of high-pressure treatment on the catalytic capacity and structure of pepsin were investigated, and the relationship between its catalytic properties and changes in its physicochemical properties was explored. It was found that high-pressure treatment could lead to changes of the sulfhydryl group/disulfide bond content, hydrophobicity, hydrodynamic radius, intrinsic viscosity, and subunit composition of pepsin, and the conformational change of pepsin resulted in improvement to its enzymatic activity and hydrolysis efficiency, which had an obvious relationship with the high-pressure treatment conditions.

  7. Analysis of a flip-chip bonded tunable high-temperature superconducting coplanar waveguide resonator using the conformal mapping technique

    CERN Document Server

    Misra, M; Murakami, H; Tonouchi, M

    2003-01-01

    We have studied the tuning properties of a high-temperature superconducting (HTS) half-wavelength coplanar waveguide (CPW) resonator operating at 5 GHz. The tuning schemes are based on flip-chip bonding of an electrically tunable ferroelectric (FE) thin film and a mechanically movable low-loss single crystal on top of the resonator. Using the conformal mapping method, closed-form analytical expressions have been derived for a flip-chip bonded conductor-backed and top-shielded CPW transmission line. The obtained expressions are used to analyse the volume effect of the FE thin film and the gap between the flip-chip and the CPW resonator on the tuning properties of the device. It has been found that large frequency modulation of the resonator produces impedance mismatch, which can considerably enhance the insertion loss of high-performance HTS microwave devices. Analysis also suggests that, for electrically tunable devices, flip-chip bonded FE thin films on HTS CPW devices provide a relatively higher performance...

  8. Characterizing highly dynamic conformational states: The transcription bubble in RNAP-promoter open complex as an example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Eitan; Ingargiola, Antonino; Weiss, Shimon

    2018-03-01

    Bio-macromolecules carry out complicated functions through structural changes. To understand their mechanism of action, the structure of each step has to be characterized. While classical structural biology techniques allow the characterization of a few "structural snapshots" along the enzymatic cycle (usually of stable conformations), they do not cover all (and often fast interconverting) structures in the ensemble, where each may play an important functional role. Recently, several groups have demonstrated that structures of different conformations in solution could be solved by measuring multiple distances between different pairs of residues using single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET) and using them as constrains for hybrid/integrative structural modeling. However, this approach is limited in cases where the conformational dynamics is faster than the technique's temporal resolution. In this study, we combine existing tools that elucidate sub-millisecond conformational dynamics together with hybrid/integrative structural modeling to study the conformational states of the transcription bubble in the bacterial RNA polymerase-promoter open complex (RPo). We measured microsecond alternating laser excitation-smFRET of differently labeled lacCONS promoter dsDNA constructs. We used a combination of burst variance analysis, photon-by-photon hidden Markov modeling, and the FRET-restrained positioning and screening approach to identify two conformational states for RPo. The experimentally derived distances of one conformational state match the known crystal structure of bacterial RPo. The experimentally derived distances of the other conformational state have characteristics of a scrunched RPo. These findings support the hypothesis that sub-millisecond dynamics in the transcription bubble are responsible for transcription start site selection.

  9. Structure and conformation of α-glucan extracted from Agaricus blazei Murill by high-speed shearing homogenization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Anqiang; Deng, Jiaying; Liu, Xiaoqing; He, Pengfei; He, Liang; Zhang, Fuming; Linhardt, Robert J; Sun, Peilong

    2018-07-01

    Agaricus blazei Murill is an edible and medicinal mushroom favored in many countries, by virtue of both its delicious taste and its potential health benefits such as its purported anticancer activity. A neutral α-glucan (ABM40-1) with a carbohydrate content of 96% was purified from the high-speed shearing homogenization extracts of A. Blazei Murill by ethanol precipitation and column chromatography. Methylation analysis along with nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed that ABM40-1 was an α-(1→4)-d-glucopyranan with O-6 position occasionally occupied with α-Glcp-(1→or α-Glcp-(1→6)-β-Glcp-(1→side chains. A weight-average molecular weight of 7.34×10 6 Da was determined for ABM40-1 and its chain in solution was revealed as a compact sphere by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) coupled with a laser light scattering. This spherical conformation was also further confirmed by Congo red test and using atom force microscopy. These results suggest it would be worthwhile to further study the potential bioactivities of ABM40-1. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Advanced prostate cancer: the results of a randomized comparative trial of high dose irradiation boosting with conformal protons compared with conventional dose irradiation using photons alone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shipley, William U; Verhey, Lynn J; Munzenrider, John E; Suit, Herman D; Urie, Marcia M; McManus, Patricia L; Young, Robert H; Shipley, Jenot W; Zietman, Anthony L; Biggs, Peter J; Heney, Niall M; Goitein, Michael

    1995-04-30

    Purpose: Following a thorough Phase I/II study, we evaluated by a Phase III trial high versus conventional dose external beam irradiation as mono-therapy for patients with Stage T3-T4 prostate cancer. Patient outcome following standard dose radiotherapy or following a 12.5% increase in total dose to 75.6 Cobalt Gray Equivalent (CGE) using a conformal perineal proton boost was compared for local tumor control, disease-free survival, and overall survival. Methods and Materials: Stage T3-T4, Nx, N0-2, M0 patients received 50.4 Gy by four-field photons and were randomized to receive either an additional 25.2 CGE by conformal protons (arm 1--the high dose arm, 103 patients, total dose 75.6 CGE) or an additional 16.8 Gy by photons (arm 2--the conventional dose arm, 99 patients, total dose 67.2 Gy). Actuarial overall survival (OS), disease-specific survival (DSS), total recurrence-free survival (TRFS), (clinically free, prostate specific antigen (PSA) less than 4ng/ml and a negative prostate rebiopsy, done in 38 patients without evidence of disease) and local control (digital rectal exam and rebiopsy negative) were evaluated. Results: The protocol completion rate was 90% for arm 1 and 97% for arm 2. With a median follow-up of 61 months (range 3 to 139 months) 135 patients are alive and 67 have died, 20 from causes other than prostate cancer. We found no significant differences in OS, DSS, TRFS or local control between the two arms. Among those completing randomized treatment (93 in arm 1 and 96 in arm 2), the local control at 5 and 8 years for arm 1 is 92% and 77%, respectively and is 80% and 60%, respectively for arm 2 (p = .089) and there are no significant differences in OS, DSS, and TRFS. The local control for the 57 patients with poorly differentiated (Gleason 4 or 5 of 5) tumors at 5 and 8 years for arm 1 is 94% and 84% and is 64% and 19% on arm 2 (p 0.0014). In patients whose digital rectal exam had normalized following treatment and underwent prostate rebiopsy

  11. Advanced prostate cancer: the results of a randomized comparative trial of high dose irradiation boosting with conformal protons compared with conventional dose irradiation using photons alone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shipley, William U.; Verhey, Lynn J.; Munzenrider, John E.; Suit, Herman D.; Urie, Marcia M.; McManus, Patricia L.; Young, Robert H.; Shipley, Jenot W.; Zietman, Anthony L.; Biggs, Peter J.; Heney, Niall M.; Goitein, Michael

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Following a thorough Phase I/II study, we evaluated by a Phase III trial high versus conventional dose external beam irradiation as mono-therapy for patients with Stage T3-T4 prostate cancer. Patient outcome following standard dose radiotherapy or following a 12.5% increase in total dose to 75.6 Cobalt Gray Equivalent (CGE) using a conformal perineal proton boost was compared for local tumor control, disease-free survival, and overall survival. Methods and Materials: Stage T3-T4, Nx, N0-2, M0 patients received 50.4 Gy by four-field photons and were randomized to receive either an additional 25.2 CGE by conformal protons (arm 1--the high dose arm, 103 patients, total dose 75.6 CGE) or an additional 16.8 Gy by photons (arm 2--the conventional dose arm, 99 patients, total dose 67.2 Gy). Actuarial overall survival (OS), disease-specific survival (DSS), total recurrence-free survival (TRFS), (clinically free, prostate specific antigen (PSA) less than 4ng/ml and a negative prostate rebiopsy, done in 38 patients without evidence of disease) and local control (digital rectal exam and rebiopsy negative) were evaluated. Results: The protocol completion rate was 90% for arm 1 and 97% for arm 2. With a median follow-up of 61 months (range 3 to 139 months) 135 patients are alive and 67 have died, 20 from causes other than prostate cancer. We found no significant differences in OS, DSS, TRFS or local control between the two arms. Among those completing randomized treatment (93 in arm 1 and 96 in arm 2), the local control at 5 and 8 years for arm 1 is 92% and 77%, respectively and is 80% and 60%, respectively for arm 2 (p = .089) and there are no significant differences in OS, DSS, and TRFS. The local control for the 57 patients with poorly differentiated (Gleason 4 or 5 of 5) tumors at 5 and 8 years for arm 1 is 94% and 84% and is 64% and 19% on arm 2 (p 0.0014). In patients whose digital rectal exam had normalized following treatment and underwent prostate rebiopsy

  12. Generation of a novel high-affinity monoclonal antibody with conformational recognition epitope on human IgM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarikhani, Sina; Mirshahi, Manouchehr; Gharaati, Mohammad Reza; Mirshahi, Tooran

    2010-11-01

    As IgM is the first isotype of antibody which appears in blood after initial exposure to a foreign antigen in the pattern of primary response, detection, and quantification of this molecule in blood seems invaluable. To approach these goals, generation, and characterization of a highly specific mAb (monoclonal antibody) against human IgM were investigated. Human IgM immunoglobulins were used to immunize Balb/c mice. Spleen cells taken from the immunized animals were fused with SP2/O myeloma cells using PEG (polyethylene glycol, MW 1450) as fusogen. The hybridomas were cultured in HAT containing medium and supernatants from the growing hybrids were screened by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using plates coated with pure human IgM and the positive wells were then cloned at limiting dilutions. The best clone designated as MAN-1, was injected intraperitoneally to some Pristane-injected mice. Anti-IgM mAb was purified from the animals' ascitic fluid by protein-G sepharose followed by DEAE-cellulose ion exchange chromatography. MAN-1 interacted with human IgM with a very high specificity and affinity. The purity of the sample was tested by SDS-PAGE and the affinity constant was measured (K(a) = 3.5 x 10(9)M(-1). Immunoblotting and competitive ELISA were done and the results showed that the harvested antibody recognizes a conformational epitope on the mu chain of human IgM and there was no cross-reactivity with other subclasses of immunoglobulins. Furthermore, isotyping test was done and the results showed the subclass of the obtained mAb which was IgG(1)kappa.

  13. 13CHD2–CEST NMR spectroscopy provides an avenue for studies of conformational exchange in high molecular weight proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rennella, Enrico; Huang, Rui; Velyvis, Algirdas; Kay, Lewis E.

    2015-01-01

    An NMR experiment for quantifying slow (millisecond) time-scale exchange processes involving the interconversion between visible ground state and invisible, conformationally excited state conformers is presented. The approach exploits chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) and makes use of 13 CHD 2 methyl group probes that can be readily incorporated into otherwise highly deuterated proteins. The methodology is validated with an application to a G48A Fyn SH3 domain that exchanges between a folded conformation and a sparsely populated and transiently formed unfolded ensemble. Experiments on a number of different protein systems, including a 360 kDa half-proteasome, establish that the sensitivity of this 13 CHD 2 13 C–CEST technique can be upwards of a factor of 5 times higher than for a previously published 13 CH 3 13 C–CEST approach (Bouvignies and Kay in J Biomol NMR 53:303–310, 2012), suggesting that the methodology will be powerful for studies of conformational exchange in high molecular weight proteins

  14. High power accelerators and wastewater treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, B.; Kim, J.K.; Kim, Y.R.; Kim, S.M.; Makaov, I.E.; Ponomarev, A.V.

    2006-01-01

    The problems of environmental damage and degradation of natural resources are receiving increasing attention throughout the world. The increased population, higher living standards, increased urbanization and enhanced industrial activities of humankind are all leading to degradation of the environment. Increasing urbanization has been accompanied by significant water pollution. Given the seriousness of the situation and future risk of crises, there is an urgent need to develop the water-efficient technologies including economical treatment methods of wastewater and polluted water. Therefore, cost-effective treatment of the municipal and industrial wastewater containing refractory pollutant with electron beam is actively studied in EB TECH Co.. Electron beam treatment of wastewater is caused by the decomposition of pollutants as a result of their reactions with highly reactive species formed from water radiolysis (hydrated electron, OH free radical and H atom). However, to have advantages over existing processes, the electron beam process should have cost-effective and reliable in operation. Therefore high power accelerators (400kW∼1MW) are developed for environmental application and they show the decrease in the cost of construction and operation of electron beam plant. In other way to reduce the cost for wastewater treatment, radical reactions accompanied by the other processes are introduced, and the synergistic effect upon the use of combined methods such as electron beam treatment with ozonation, biological treatment and physico-chemical adsorption and others also show the improvement of the effect of electron beam treatment for the wastewater purification. (author)

  15. Analysis of dose volume histogram parameters to estimate late bladder and rectum complications after high-dose (70-78 Gy) conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boersma, L.J.; Brink, M. van den; Bruce, A.; Gras, L.; Velde, A. te; Lebesque, J.V.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether Dose Volume Histogram (DVH) parameters can be used to identify risk groups for developing late gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) complications after conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer, and to examine the effect of using different morbidity scoring systems on the results of these analyses. Materials and Methods: DVH parameters were analyzed for 130 patients with localized prostate cancer, treated with conformal radiotherapy in a dose-escalating protocol (70-78 Gy, 2 Gy per fraction). The incidence of late (> 6 months) GI and GU complications was scored based on questionnaires and classified using the RTOG/EORTC and the SOMA/LENT scoring system. Moreover, patients were classified as being a rectal bleeder or no rectal bleeder and a distinction was made between non-severe and severe (requiring one or more laser treatments) rectal bleeding. The median follow-up time was 22 months. It was investigated whether the relative and absolute rectal wall volumes, irradiated to various dose levels (≥ 60 Gy, ≥ 65 Gy, ≥ 70 Gy and ≥ 75 Gy) were correlated with the observed actuarial incidences of GI complications. First, the analysis was performed using volume as a continuous variable. Subsequently, for each dose level in the DVH the rectal wall volumes were dichotomized using different volumes as cut-off levels. Twenty cut-off levels were tested on their ability to discriminate between high and low risk for developing GI complications (Fig.). The relationship between bladder wall volumes irradiated to various dose levels and observed actuarial GU complications was investigated using the absolute bladder wall volumes, measured as a continuous variable. For both GI and GU complications, the role of the prescribed radiation dose and the maximum radiation dose in the rectal and bladder wall was analyzed as well. Results: None of the DVH parameters of the rectal wall was significantly correlated with the actuarial incidences of

  16. Three dimensional conformal radiotherapy for the treatment of prostate cancer: low risk of chronic rectal morbidity observed in a large series of patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandler, Howard M.; McLaughlin, P. William; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Addison, Heather; Forman, Jeffrey; Lichter, Allen

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D CRT) may provide a technique to increase the dose delivered to target tissues while sparing uninvolved normal structures. To evaluate the role of 3D treatment in reducing the treatment toxicity, we analyzed the chronic rectal morbidity observed in a large group of patients undergoing radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: From 1987 through 1992, 721 prostate cancer patients were treated with 3D CRT at the University of Michigan or Providence Hospital. All had axial computed tomography (CT) specifically for RT planning, multiple structures contoured on the axial images, and beam's-eye-view conformal beams edited to provide 3D dose coverage. Using current American Joint Commission (AJCC) staging, 537 patients had T1-T2 tumors, 123 had T3-T4 tumors, and 60 were treated postprostatectomy. Pelvic lymph nodes were treated in 462 patients. Prostate boosts were delivered with four-field axial, six-field axial, or four-field oblique, nonaxial fields. The median dose was 68.40 Gy (range 59.4-80.4). Median follow-up was 20.4 months; 175 were followed more than 3 years. All complications have been graded conservatively using the RTOG system. Results: Using a Cox proportional hazard's model, patient age, T-stage, prescribed dose, pelvic treatment, and boost technique were analyzed. The factor most strongly related to risk of morbidity was dose (p = 0.05); however, the boost technique was also related: the four-field oblique field had the lowest relative risk. Most episodes of rectal morbidity have been mild: 82 Grade 1 or 2. There have been only 14 more serious complications including 12 Grade 3 and 2 Grade 4. The actuarial risk of a Grade 3 or 4 complication is 3% at 3 and 5 years. Conclusions: A very small proportion of patients treated with 3D CRT had significant rectal morbidity related to RT, supporting the use of conformal treatment planning and dose delivery as a mechanism to minimize complications

  17. High-Resolution Mapping of Chromatin Conformation in Cardiac Myocytes Reveals Structural Remodeling of the Epigenome in Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa-Garrido, Manuel; Chapski, Douglas J; Schmitt, Anthony D; Kimball, Todd H; Karbassi, Elaheh; Monte, Emma; Balderas, Enrique; Pellegrini, Matteo; Shih, Tsai-Ting; Soehalim, Elizabeth; Liem, David; Ping, Peipei; Galjart, Niels J; Ren, Shuxun; Wang, Yibin; Ren, Bing; Vondriska, Thomas M

    2017-10-24

    Cardiovascular disease is associated with epigenomic changes in the heart; however, the endogenous structure of cardiac myocyte chromatin has never been determined. To investigate the mechanisms of epigenomic function in the heart, genome-wide chromatin conformation capture (Hi-C) and DNA sequencing were performed in adult cardiac myocytes following development of pressure overload-induced hypertrophy. Mice with cardiac-specific deletion of CTCF (a ubiquitous chromatin structural protein) were generated to explore the role of this protein in chromatin structure and cardiac phenotype. Transcriptome analyses by RNA-seq were conducted as a functional readout of the epigenomic structural changes. Depletion of CTCF was sufficient to induce heart failure in mice, and human patients with heart failure receiving mechanical unloading via left ventricular assist devices show increased CTCF abundance. Chromatin structural analyses revealed interactions within the cardiac myocyte genome at 5-kb resolution, enabling examination of intra- and interchromosomal events, and providing a resource for future cardiac epigenomic investigations. Pressure overload or CTCF depletion selectively altered boundary strength between topologically associating domains and A/B compartmentalization, measurements of genome accessibility. Heart failure involved decreased stability of chromatin interactions around disease-causing genes. In addition, pressure overload or CTCF depletion remodeled long-range interactions of cardiac enhancers, resulting in a significant decrease in local chromatin interactions around these functional elements. These findings provide a high-resolution chromatin architecture resource for cardiac epigenomic investigations and demonstrate that global structural remodeling of chromatin underpins heart failure. The newly identified principles of endogenous chromatin structure have key implications for epigenetic therapy. © 2017 The Authors.

  18. Three-dimensional treatment planning for postoperative radiotherapy in patients with node-positive cervical cancer. Comparison between a conventional and a conformal technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olofsen-van Acht, M.J.J.; Quint, S.; Seven, M.; Berg, H.A. van den; Levendag, P.C. [University Hospital Rotterdam (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Santvoort, J.P.C. van [University Hospital Rotterdam (Netherlands). Subdivision of Clinical Physics; Logmans, A. [University Hospital Rotterdam (Netherlands). Dept. of Gynecologic Oncology

    1999-09-01

    Purpose: Reduction of irradiated small bowel volume, using a conformal three-dimensional treatment planning technique in postoperative radiotherapy of cervical cancer patients. Patients and Methods: Large gynecological treatment fields including the para-aortic nodes were analyzed in 15 patients. A conventional treatment plan with anterior and posterior (AP-PA) parallel opposed fields and a 3D 4-field conformal radiotherapy plan with a central blocking of small bowel were compared for each patient. Dose-volume histograms and dose parameters were established. Because of the tolerance constraints of the small bowel, the cumulative dose applied to the target was 48.6 Gy. Results: The mean Tumor Control Probability (TCP) values for both the conventional and the conformal technique were 0.60 and 0.61, respectively, with ranges of 0.56 to 0.67 and 0.57 to 0.66, respectively. The mean volume receiving 95% or more of the prescribed dose (V95) of the small bowel was 47.6% (32.5 to 66.3%) in the AP-PA technique and 14.9% (7.0 to 22.5%) in the conformal technique (p<0.001), indicating a significant reduction in irradiated volume of small bowel in the higher dose range. The mean Normal Tissue Complication Probability (NTCP) decreased from 0.11 to 0.03 with the conformal plan. In patients who received a pedicled omentoplasty during surgery, the mean V95 for small bowel could be reduced to 8.5% (7.0 to 9.9%). The mean median dose to the kidneys was only slightly elevated in the conformal treatment. Especially the mean dose to the right kidney in conventional vs conformal treatment was 3.3 vs 7.9 Gy. The mean near-minimum dose (D95) to the rectosigmoid decreased from 48.4 to 30.1 Gy in the conformal plan compared to the conventional plan. Conclusion: The small bowel dose can be significantly reduced with 3D treatment planning, particularly if a predicled omentoplasty is performed. This allows dose escalation to the tumor region without unacceptable toxicity for the small bowel

  19. High-Resolution Mapping of Chromatin Conformation in Cardiac Myocytes Reveals Structural Remodeling of the Epigenome in Heart Failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Rosa-Garrido (Manuel); Chapski, D.J. (Douglas J.); Schmitt, A.D. (Anthony D.); Kimball, T.H. (Todd H.); Karbassi, E. (Elaheh); Monte, E. (Emma); Balderas, E. (Enrique); Pellegrini, M. (Matteo); Shih, T.-T. (Tsai-Ting); Soehalim, E. (Elizabeth); D.A. Liem (David); Ping, P. (Peipei); N.J. Galjart (Niels); Ren, S. (Shuxun); Wang, Y. (Yibin); Ren, B. (Bing); Vondriska, T.M. (Thomas M.)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Cardiovascular disease is associated with epigenomic changes in the heart; however, the endogenous structure of cardiac myocyte chromatin has never been determined.METHODS: To investigate the mechanisms of epigenomic function in the heart, genome-wide chromatin conformation

  20. Perceived stigma and highly active antiretroviral treatment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Perceived stigma and highly active antiretroviral treatment adherence among persons living with HIV/AIDS in the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital. ... Data on socio-demographic characteristics, stigma and adherence to drug regimen were collected using a validated self-administered questionnaire. Data were ...

  1. High-pressure-high-temperature treatment of natural diamonds

    CERN Document Server

    Royen, J V

    2002-01-01

    The results are reported of high-pressure-high-temperature (HPHT) treatment experiments on natural diamonds of different origins and with different impurity contents. The diamonds are annealed in a temperature range up to 2000 sup o C at stabilizing pressures up to 7 GPa. The evolution is studied of different defects in the diamond crystal lattice. The influence of substitutional nitrogen atoms, plastic deformation and the combination of these is discussed. Diamonds are characterized at room and liquid nitrogen temperature using UV-visible spectrophotometry, Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometry and photoluminescence spectrometry. The economic implications of diamond HPHT treatments are discussed.

  2. Replacement between conformity and counter-conformity in consumption decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Ting-Jui; Chang, En-Chung; Dai, Qi; Wong, Veronica

    2013-02-01

    This study assessed, in a Chinese context, how self-esteem interacts with perceived similarity and uniqueness to yield cognitive dissonance, and whether the dissonance leads to self-reported conformity or counter-conformity behavior. Participants were 408 respondents from 4 major Chinese cities (M age = 33.0 yr., SD = 4.3; 48% men). Self-perceptions of uniqueness, similarity, cognitive dissonance, self-esteem and need to behave in conformity or counter-conformity were measured. A theoretical model was assessed in four situations, relating the ratings of self-esteem and perceived similarity/uniqueness to the way other people at a wedding were dressed, and the resultant cognitive dissonance and conformity/ counter-conformity behavior. Regardless of high or low self-esteem, all participants reported cognitive dissonance when they were told that they were dressed extremely similarly to or extremely differently from the other people attending the wedding. However, the conforming/counter-conforming strategies used by participants to resolve the cognitive dissonance differed. When encountering dissonance induced by the perceived extreme uniqueness of dress, participants with low self-esteem tended to say they would dress next time so as to conform with the way others were dressed, while those with high self-esteem indicated they would continue their counter-conformity in attire. When encountering dissonance induced by the perceived extreme similarity to others, both those with high and low self-esteem tended to say they would dress in an unorthodox manner to surprise other people in the future.

  3. IMRT and 3D conformal radiotherapy with or without elective nodal irradiation in locally advanced NSCLC: A direct comparison of PET-based treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleckenstein, Jochen; Kremp, Katharina; Kremp, Stephanie; Palm, Jan; Rübe, Christian

    2016-02-01

    The potential of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) as opposed to three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) is analyzed for two different concepts of fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET)-based target volume delineation in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC): involved-field radiotherapy (IF-RT) vs. elective nodal irradiation (ENI). Treatment planning was performed for 41 patients with LA-NSCLC, using four different planning approaches (3D-CRT-IF, 3D-CRT-ENI, IMRT-IF, IMRT-ENI). ENI included a boost irradiation after 50 Gy. For each plan, maximum dose escalation was calculated based on prespecified normal tissue constraints. The maximum prescription dose (PD), tumor control probability (TCP), conformal indices (CI), and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP) were analyzed. IMRT resulted in statistically significant higher prescription doses for both target volume concepts as compared with 3D-CRT (ENI: 68.4 vs. 60.9 Gy, p ENI, there was a considerable theoretical increase in TCP (IMRT: 27.3 vs. 17.7 %, p ENI: 12.3 vs. 30.9 % p < 0.0001; IF: 15.9 vs. 24.1 %; p < 0.001). The IMRT technique and IF target volume delineation allow a significant dose escalation and an increase in TCP. IMRT results in an improved sparing of OARs as compared with 3D-CRT at equivalent dose levels.

  4. Assessment of conformity and suitability for use of the energy subsystem of interoperable high-speed lines; Konformitaetsbewertung und EG-Pruefverfahren fuer das Teilsystem Energie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behrends, D. [Steglitzer Damm, Deutschen Bahn, Berlin (Germany); Brodkorb, A.; Matthes, R. [Siemens AG, Erlangen (Germany)

    2003-05-01

    The directive 96/48/EG governs the conformity assessment of conformity of interoperability constituents and of suitability for use of subsystems of the trans-European high-speed rail system. The assessment of the overhead contact line type SICAT H 1.0 and the energy subsystem of the new high-speed line Belgian boundary-Rotterdam-Hoofddop (HSL Zuid) in the Netherlands establish examples for the application of the technical specification for the energy subsystem. (orig.) [German] Die Richtlinie 96/48/EG regelt die Bewertung der Konformitaet von Komponenten und das EG-Pruefverfahren von Teilsystemen des interoperablen transeuropaeischen Hochgeschwindigkeitsbahnsystems. Beispiele fuer diese beiden Vorgaenge sind die Bewertung der Oberleitungsbauart SICAT H 1.0 und die Pruefung der Energieversorgung der Hochgeschwindigkeitsstrecke belgische Grenze-Rotterdam-Hoofddop (HSL Zuid) in den Niederlanden. (orig.)

  5. Conformal Tachyons

    CERN Document Server

    Tomaschitz, R

    2000-01-01

    We study tachyons conformally coupled to the background geometry of a Milne universe. The causality of superluminal signal transfer is scrutinized in this context. The cosmic time of the comoving frame determines a distinguished time order for events connected by superluminal signals. An observer can relate his rest frame to the galaxy frame, and compare so the time order of events in his proper time to the cosmic time order. All observers can in this way arrive at identical conclusions on the causality of events connected by superluminal signals. An unambiguous energy concept for tachyonic rays is defined by means of the cosmic time of the comoving reference frame, without resorting to an antiparticle interpretation. On that basis we give an explicit proof that no signals can be sent into the past of observers. Causality violating signals are energetically forbidden, as they would have negative energy in the rest frame of the emitting observer. If an observer emits a superluminal signal, the tachyonic respon...

  6. Improvement in toxicity in high risk prostate cancer patients treated with image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy compared to 3D conformal radiotherapy without daily image guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sveistrup, Joen; af Rosenschöld, Per Munck; Deasy, Joseph O; Oh, Jung Hun; Pommer, Tobias; Petersen, Peter Meidahl; Engelholm, Svend Aage

    2014-02-04

    Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) facilitates the delivery of a very precise radiation dose. In this study we compare the toxicity and biochemical progression-free survival between patients treated with daily image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) and 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) without daily image guidance for high risk prostate cancer (PCa). A total of 503 high risk PCa patients treated with radiotherapy (RT) and endocrine treatment between 2000 and 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. 115 patients were treated with 3DCRT, and 388 patients were treated with IG-IMRT. 3DCRT patients were treated to 76 Gy and without daily image guidance and with 1-2 cm PTV margins. IG-IMRT patients were treated to 78 Gy based on daily image guidance of fiducial markers, and the PTV margins were 5-7 mm. Furthermore, the dose-volume constraints to both the rectum and bladder were changed with the introduction of IG-IMRT. The 2-year actuarial likelihood of developing grade > = 2 GI toxicity following RT was 57.3% in 3DCRT patients and 5.8% in IG-IMRT patients (p analysis, 3DCRT was associated with a significantly increased risk of developing grade > = 2 GI toxicity compared to IG-IMRT (p analysis there was no difference in biochemical progression-free survival between 3DCRT and IG-IMRT. The difference in toxicity can be attributed to the combination of the IMRT technique with reduced dose to organs-at-risk, daily image guidance and margin reduction.

  7. High-yield pulping effluent treatment technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, W.X.; Hsieh, J.S.

    1993-03-01

    The objective of this report is to examine the high-yield (mechanical) pulp processes with respect to environmental issues affected by the discharge of their waste streams. Various statistics are given that support the view that high-yield pulping processes will have major growth in the US regions where pulp mills are located, and sites for projects in the development phase are indicated. Conventional and innovative effluent-treatment technologies applicable to these processes are reviewed. The different types of mechanical pulping or high-yield processes are explained, and the chemical additives are discussed. The important relationship between pulp yield and measure of BOD in the effluent is graphically presented. Effluent contaminants are identified, along with other important characteristics of the streams. Current and proposed environmental limitations specifically related to mechanical pulp production are reviewed. Conventional and innovative effluent-treatment technologies are discussed, along with their principle applications, uses, advantages, and disadvantages. Sludge management and disposal techniques become an intimate part of the treatment of waste streams. The conclusion is made that conventional technologies can successfully treat effluent streams under current waste-water discharge limitations, but these systems may not be adequate when stricter standards are imposed. At present, the most important issue in the treatment of pulp-mill waste is the management and disposal of the resultant sludge

  8. Dosimetric Evaluation of Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy and 4-Field 3-D Conformal Radiotherapy in Prostate Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bora Uysal

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this dosimetric study is the targeted dose homogeneity and critical organ dose comparison of 7-field Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT and 3-D 4-field conformal radiotherapy. Study Design: Cross sectional study. Material and Methods: Twenty patients with low and moderate risk prostate cancer treated at Gülhane Military Medical School Radiation Oncology Department between January 2009 and December 2009 are included in this study. Two seperate dosimetric plans both for 7-field IMRT and 3D-CRT have been generated for each patient to comparatively evaluate the dosimetric status of both techniques and all the patients received 7-field IMRT. Results: Dose-comparative evaluation of two techniques revealed the superiority of IMRT technique with statistically significantly lower femoral head doses along with reduced critical organ dose-volume parameters of bladder V60 (the volume receiving 60 Gy and rectal V40 (the volume receiving 40 Gy and V60. Conclusion: It can be concluded that IMRT is an effective definitive management tool for prostate cancer with improved critical organ sparing and excellent dose homogenization in target organs of prostate and seminal vesicles.

  9. High dose rate endobronchial brachytherapy - treatment technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, Heloisa de Andrade; Aisen, Salim; Haddad, Cecilia Maria Kalil; Nadalin, Wladimir; Pedreira Junior, Wilson Leite; Chavantes, Maria Cristina

    1998-01-01

    High dose rate endobronchial brachytherapy is efficient in symptom relief due to obstructive endobronchial malignancies. However, it's role in survival improvement for patients with lung cancer is not yet established. The use of this treatment in increasing, specially in the developing countries. The purpose of this paper is to present the treatment technique used in the Radiotherapy Department of the Hospital da Clinicas, University of Sao Paulo, based on an experience of 60 cases treated with 180 procedures. Some practical suggestions and rules adopted in the Department are described. The severe complications rate is 6.7%, demonstrating an adequate patient selection associated with the technique utilized. (author)

  10. Long-Term Results of a Highly Performing Conformal Electron Therapy Technique for Chest Wall Irradiation After Mastectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grellier Adedjouma, Noemie, E-mail: grellier.noemie@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie, Paris (France); Chevrier, Marion [Department of Biostatistics, Institut Curie, Paris (France); Fourquet, Alain; Costa, Emilie; Xu, Haoping [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie, Paris (France); Berger, Frederique [Department of Biostatistics, Institut Curie, Paris (France); Campana, Francois [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie, Paris (France); Laki, Fatima [Department of Surgical Oncology, Institut Curie, Paris (France); Beuzeboc, Philippe [Department of Medical Oncology, Institut Curie, Paris (France); Lefeuvre, Delphine [Department of Biostatistics, Institut Curie, Paris (France); Fournier-Bidoz, Nathalie; Kirova, Youlia M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie, Paris (France)

    2017-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate locoregional control and survival after mastectomy, as well as toxicity, in patients irradiated by a previously described postmastectomy highly conformal electron beam radiation therapy technique (PMERT). Methods and Materials: We included all women irradiated by postmastectomy electron beam radiation therapy for nonmetastatic breast cancer between 2007 and 2011 in our department. Acute and late toxicities were retrospectively assessed using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0 criteria. Results: Among the 796 women included, 10.1% were triple-negative, 18.8% HER2-positive, and 24.6% received neoadjuvant chemotherapy (CT). Multifocal lesions were observed in 51.3% of women, and 64.6% had at least 1 involved lymph node (LN). Internal mammary chain, supraclavicular, infraclavicular, and axillary LNs were treated in 85.6%, 88.3%, 77.9%, and 14.9% of cases, respectively. With a median follow-up of 64 months (range, 6-102 months), 5-year locoregional recurrence–free survival and overall survival were 90% (95% confidence interval 88.1%-92.4%) and 90.9% (95% confidence interval 88.9%-93%), respectively. Early skin toxicity was scored as grade 1 in 58.5% of patients, grade 2 in 35.9%, and grade 3 in 4.5%. Concomitant CT was associated with increased grade 3 toxicity (P<.001). At long-term follow-up, 29.8% of patients presented temporary or permanent hyperpigmentation or telangiectasia or fibrosis (grade 1: 23.6%; grade 2: 5.2%; grade 3: 1%), with higher rates among smokers (P=.06); 274 patients (34.4%) underwent breast reconstruction. Only 24 patients (3%) had early esophagitis of grade 1. Only 3 patients developed ischemic heart disease: all had been treated by anthracycline-based CT with or without trastuzumab, all had been irradiated to the left chest wall and LN, and all presented numerous cardiovascular risk factors (2-4 factors). Conclusions: This study demonstrated the good efficacy of this technique in terms of

  11. Major Late Toxicities After Conformal Radiotherapy for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma-Patient- and Treatment-Related Risk Factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Anne W.M.; Ng, W.T.; Hung, W.M.; Choi, C.W.; Tung, Raymond; Ling, Y.H.; Cheng, Peter T.C.; Yau, T.K.; Chang, Amy T.Y.; Leung, Samuel K.C.; Lee, Michael C.H.; Bentzen, Soren M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively analyze the factors affecting late toxicity for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2003, 422 patients were treated with a conformal technique with 2-Gy daily fractions to a total dose of 70 Gy. Conventional fractionation (5 fractions weekly) was used in 232 patients and accelerated fractionation (6 fractions weekly) in 190 patients. One hundred seventy-one patients were treated with the basic radiotherapy course alone (Group 1), 55 patients had an additional boost of 5 Gy in 2 fractions (Group 2), and 196 patients underwent concurrent cisplatin-based chemotherapy (Group 3). Results: The 5-year overall toxicity rate was significantly greater in Group 3 than in Group 1 (37% vs. 27%, p = 0.009). Although the overall rate in Group 2 was not elevated (28% vs. 27%, p = 0.697), a significant increase in temporal lobe necrosis was observed (4.8% vs. 0%, p = 0.015). Multivariate analyses showed that age and concurrent chemotherapy were significant factors. The hazard ratio of overall toxicity attributed to chemotherapy was 1.99 (95% confidence interval, 1.32-2.99, p = 0.001). The mean radiation dose to the cochlea was another significant factor affecting deafness, with a hazard ratio of 1.03 (95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.05, p = 0.005) per 1-Gy increase. The cochlea that received >50 Gy had a significantly greater deaf rate (Group 1, 18% vs. 7%; and Group 3, 22% vs. 14%). Conclusion: The therapeutic margin for nasopharyngeal carcinoma is extremely narrow, and a significant increase in brain necrosis could result from dose escalation. The significant factors affecting the risk of deafness included age, concurrent chemoradiotherapy, and greater radiation dose to the cochlea

  12. [Guideline-conform psychiatric psychotherapeutic treatment for patients with schizophrenia : A normative evaluation of necessary personnel requirements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehl, S; Falkai, P; Berger, M; Löhr, M; Rujescu, D; Wolff, J; Kircher, T

    2016-03-01

    Although national treatment guidelines and current publications of the German Federal Joint Committee (Gemeinsamer Bundesausschuss) recommend cognitive behavior therapy for all patients with schizophrenia, the implementation of these recommendations in current inpatient and outpatient treatment is only rudimentary. The aim of this study was to systematically search randomized controlled studies (RCTs), meta-analyses and the guidelines of the German Association for Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Psychosomatics and Neurology (DGPPN) and the British National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) in order to assess the number of personnel necessary for psychiatric and therapeutic inpatient treatment in line with present guidelines. Moreover, the number of staff required was compared with the personnel resources designated by the German psychiatry personnel regulations (Psych-PV). The German and NICE guidelines, RCTs and meta-analyses were analyzed and an adequate weekly treatment plan for an inpatient unit was developed. Moreover, the number of personnel necessary to realize the treatment plan was calculated. In order to realize adequate inpatient treatment approximately 107 min extra for medical psychotherapeutic personnel per patient and week (of which 72 min for psychotherapy) and another 60 min for nursing staff per patient and week are required in addition to the current Psych-PV regulations. Thus, implementation in an open ward with 20 inpatients would require 3.62 positions for physicians, 0.7 positions in psychology and 12.85 positions for nursing staff (including management positions and night shifts). These evidence-based recommendations for precise specifications of inpatient treatment should lead to improved inpatient treatment in line with present guidelines. Moreover, outpatients and day patients could be included in this treatment model. The results should be considered in the construction of the future prospective payment system for

  13. Conformal field theory in conformal space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preitschopf, C.R.; Vasiliev, M.A.

    1999-01-01

    We present a new framework for a Lagrangian description of conformal field theories in various dimensions based on a local version of d + 2-dimensional conformal space. The results include a true gauge theory of conformal gravity in d = (1, 3) and any standard matter coupled to it. An important feature is the automatic derivation of the conformal gravity constraints, which are necessary for the analysis of the matter systems

  14. High-order Div- and Quasi Curl-Conforming Basis Functions for Calderón Multiplicative Preconditioning of the EFIE

    KAUST Repository

    Valdes, Felipe; Andriulli, Francesco P.; Cools, Kristof; Michielssen, Eric

    2011-01-01

    A new high-order Calderón multiplicative preconditioner (HO-CMP) for the electric field integral equation (EFIE) is presented. In contrast to previous CMPs, the proposed preconditioner allows for high-order surface representations and current expansions by using a novel set of high-order quasi curl-conforming basis functions. Like its predecessors, the HO-CMP can be seamlessly integrated into existing EFIE codes. Numerical results demonstrate that the linear systems of equations obtained using the proposed HO-CMP converge rapidly, regardless of the mesh density and of the order of the current expansion. © 2006 IEEE.

  15. High-order Div- and Quasi Curl-Conforming Basis Functions for Calderón Multiplicative Preconditioning of the EFIE

    KAUST Repository

    Valdes, Felipe

    2011-04-01

    A new high-order Calderón multiplicative preconditioner (HO-CMP) for the electric field integral equation (EFIE) is presented. In contrast to previous CMPs, the proposed preconditioner allows for high-order surface representations and current expansions by using a novel set of high-order quasi curl-conforming basis functions. Like its predecessors, the HO-CMP can be seamlessly integrated into existing EFIE codes. Numerical results demonstrate that the linear systems of equations obtained using the proposed HO-CMP converge rapidly, regardless of the mesh density and of the order of the current expansion. © 2006 IEEE.

  16. Volumetric intensity-modulated arc therapy vs. 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for primary chemoradiotherapy of anal carcinoma. Effects on treatment-related side effects and survival

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Hanne Elisabeth; Droege, Leif Hendrik; Hennies, Steffen; Herrmann, Markus Karl; Wolff, Hendrik Andreas [University Medical Center Goettingen, Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, Goettingen (Germany); Gaedcke, Jochen [University Medical Center Goettingen, Dept. of General Surgery, Goettingen (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    Primary chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is the standard treatment for locally advanced anal carcinoma. This study compared volumetric intensity-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) to 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) in terms of treatment-related side effects and survival. From 1992-2014, 103 consecutive patients with anal carcinoma UICC stage I-III were treated. Concomitant CRT consisted of whole pelvic irradiation, including the iliac and inguinal lymph nodes, with 50.4 Gy (1.8 Gy per fractions) by VMAT (n = 17) or 3DCRT (n = 86) as well as two cycles of 5-fluorouracil and mitomycin C. Acute organ and hematological toxicity were assessed according to the Common Terminology Criteria (CTC) for Adverse Events version 3.0. Side effects ≥ grade 3 were scored as high-grade toxicity. High-grade acute organ toxicity CTC ≥ 3 (P < 0.05), especially proctitis (P = 0.03), was significantly reduced in VMAT patients. The 2-year locoregional control (LRC) and disease-free survival (DFS) were both 100 % for VMAT patients compared with 80 and 73 % for 3DCRT patients. VMAT was shown to be a feasible technique, achieving significantly lower rates of acute organ toxicity and promising results for LRC and DFS. Future investigations will aim at assessing the advantages of VMAT with respect to late toxicity and survival after a prolonged follow-up time. (orig.) [German] Die primaere Radiochemotherapie (RCT) gilt als Standardtherapie fuer lokal fortgeschrittene Analkarzinome. In dieser Studie wurde die volumetrisch modulierte Rotationstherapie (''volumetric intensity-modulated arc therapy'', VMAT) mit der klassischen dreidimensionalen konformalen Radiotherapie (3DCRT) hinsichtlich therapieassoziierter Nebenwirkungen und Ueberleben verglichen. Von 1992-2014 wurden 103 aufeinanderfolgende Patienten mit einem Analkarzinom im UICC-Stadium I-III behandelt. Die kombinierte RCT bestand aus der Bestrahlung des gesamten Beckens inklusive der iliakalen und der inguinalen

  17. Conformational studies of self-organized regioregular poly(3-dodecylthiophene)s using non-contact atomic force microscopy in ultra high vacuum condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Shukichi; Grevin, Benjamin; Rannou, Patrice; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Mashiko, Shinro

    2006-01-01

    Conformations of one of the variations of π-conjugated poly-alkylthiophene, poly(3-dodecylthiophene)s (P3DDT)s on the surface in ultra high vacuum (UHV) were investigated by non-contact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) operated by frequency-modulation mode (FM-mode). From individual molecules to several multi-layered ones, polymer chains on the surface were clearly resolved on conducting highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) substrates and insulating mica ones, respectively. Solvent evaporation was found to have two stages, which influenced the diffusion, ordering, and adhesion processes of polymer chains on the substrate. To keep the ordered conformations of deposited polymer chains when they are transferred from ambient condition to UHV, these evaporation processes should be carefully considered. The initial conformation of polymers on the substrate was found to depend strongly on the lattice matching conditions and interactions between polymers and substrates. Formations of stripe-like structures of P3DDT polymers were found on the mica substrates, which is promising for device application

  18. Potency following high-dose three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and the impact of prior major urologic surgical procedures in patients treated for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chinn, Daniel M.; Holland, John; Crownover, Richard L.; Roach, Mack

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of high-dose three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) on potency in patients treated for clinically localized prostate cancer and to identify factors that might predict the outcome of sexual function following treatment. Methods and Materials: One hundred twenty-four consecutive patients treated with 3DCRT for localized prostate cancer at UCSF between 1991-1993 were included in this retrospective analysis. Patient responses were obtained from a mailed questionnaire, telephone interviews, or departmental records. Median follow-up was 21 months. Results: Sixty patients reported having sexual function prior to 3DCRT, including 47 who were fully potent and 13 who were marginally potent. Of the remaining 64 patients, 45 were impotent, 7 were on hormones, 1 was status-postorchiectomy, and 11 were not evaluable. Following 3DCRT, 37 of 60 patients (62%) retained sexual function sufficient for intercourse. Of those with sexual function before irradiation, 33 of 47 (70%) of patients fully potent and 4 of 13 (31%) of patients marginally potent maintained function sufficient for intercourse (p < 0.01). Potency was retained in 6 of 15 (40%) patients with a history of a major urologic surgical procedure (MUSP) and in 31 of 45 (69%) with no history of a MUSP (p < 0.04). Transurethral resection of the prostate was the MUSP in eight of these patients, with four (50%) maintaining sexual function. Conclusions: Patients who receive definitive 3DCRT for localized prostate cancer appear to maintain potency similar to patients treated with conventional radiotherapy. However, patients who are marginally potent at presentation or who have a history of a MUSP appear to be at increased risk of impotence following 3DCRT

  19. Modification of a three-dimensional treatment planning system for the use of multi-leaf collimators in conformation radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boesecke, R.; Becker, G.; Alandt, K.; Pastyr, O.; Doll, J.; Schlegel, W.; Lorenz, W.J.

    1991-01-01

    The multi-leaf collimator of the DKFZ is designed as a low cost add-on device for conventional linear accelerators for radiotherapy. The technical specification of the computer controlled collimator is briefly described . A major limitation in the use of the wide capabilities of multi-leaf collimators in the clinic is still an appropriate treatment planning system. This paper describes treatment planning and dose calculation techniques for multi-leaf collimators and shows examples where the capabilities of the collimators are used extensively. (author). 18 refs.; 8 figs.; 2 tabs

  20. 4D computed tomography scans for conformal thoracic treatment planning: is a single scan sufficient to capture thoracic tumor motion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Yolanda D.; Wootton, Landon; Nyflot, Matthew; Apisarnthanarax, Smith; Rengan, Ramesh; Bloch, Charles; Sandison, George; St. James, Sara

    2018-01-01

    Four dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) scans are routinely used in radiation therapy to determine the internal treatment volume for targets that are moving (e.g. lung tumors). The use of these studies has allowed clinicians to create target volumes based upon the motion of the tumor during the imaging study. The purpose of this work is to determine if a target volume based on a single 4DCT scan at simulation is sufficient to capture thoracic motion. Phantom studies were performed to determine expected differences between volumes contoured on 4DCT scans and those on the evaluation CT scans (slow scans). Evaluation CT scans acquired during treatment of 11 patients were compared to the 4DCT scans used for treatment planning. The images were assessed to determine if the target remained within the target volume determined during the first 4DCT scan. A total of 55 slow scans were compared to the 11 planning 4DCT scans. Small differences were observed in phantom between the 4DCT volumes and the slow scan volumes, with a maximum of 2.9%, that can be attributed to minor differences in contouring and the ability of the 4DCT scan to adequately capture motion at the apex and base of the motion trajectory. Larger differences were observed in the patients studied, up to a maximum volume difference of 33.4%. These results demonstrate that a single 4DCT scan is not adequate to capture all thoracic motion throughout treatment.

  1. Benchmarking Commercial Conformer Ensemble Generators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Nils-Ole; de Bruyn Kops, Christina; Flachsenberg, Florian; Sommer, Kai; Rarey, Matthias; Kirchmair, Johannes

    2017-11-27

    We assess and compare the performance of eight commercial conformer ensemble generators (ConfGen, ConfGenX, cxcalc, iCon, MOE LowModeMD, MOE Stochastic, MOE Conformation Import, and OMEGA) and one leading free algorithm, the distance geometry algorithm implemented in RDKit. The comparative study is based on a new version of the Platinum Diverse Dataset, a high-quality benchmarking dataset of 2859 protein-bound ligand conformations extracted from the PDB. Differences in the performance of commercial algorithms are much smaller than those observed for free algorithms in our previous study (J. Chem. Inf. 2017, 57, 529-539). For commercial algorithms, the median minimum root-mean-square deviations measured between protein-bound ligand conformations and ensembles of a maximum of 250 conformers are between 0.46 and 0.61 Å. Commercial conformer ensemble generators are characterized by their high robustness, with at least 99% of all input molecules successfully processed and few or even no substantial geometrical errors detectable in their output conformations. The RDKit distance geometry algorithm (with minimization enabled) appears to be a good free alternative since its performance is comparable to that of the midranked commercial algorithms. Based on a statistical analysis, we elaborate on which algorithms to use and how to parametrize them for best performance in different application scenarios.

  2. [High frequency of ancestral allele of the TJP1 polymorphism rs2291166 in Mexican population, conformational effect and applications in surgery and medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Garcia, Sergio Alberto; Flores-Alvarado, Luis Javier; Topete-González, Luz Rosalba; Charles-Niño, Claudia; Mazariegos-Rubi, Manuel; Dávalos-Rodríguez, Nory Omayra

    2016-01-01

    TJP1 gene encodes a ZO-1 protein that is required for the recruitment of occludins and claudins in tight junction, and is involved in cell polarisation. It has different variations, the frequency of which has been studied in different populations. In Mexico there are no studies of this gene. These are required because their polymorphisms can be used in studies associated with medicine and surgery. Therefore, the aim of this study was to estimate the frequency of alleles and genotypes of rs2291166 gene polymorphism TJP1 in Mexico Mestizos population, and to estimate the conformational effect of an amino acid change. A total of 473 individuals were included. The rs2291166 polymorphism was identified PASA PCR-7% PAGE, and stained with silver nitrate. The conformational effect of amino acid change was performed in silico, and was carried out with servers ProtPraram Tool and Search Database with Fasta. The most frequent allele in the two populations is the ancestral allele (T). A genotype distribution similar to other populations was found. The polymorphism is in Hardy-Weinberg, p>0.05. Changing aspartate to alanine produced a conformational change. The study reveals a high frequency of the ancestral allele at rs2291166 polymorphism in the Mexican population. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  3. IMRT and 3D conformal radiotherapy with or without elective nodal irradiation in locally advanced NSCLC. A direct comparison of PET-based treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleckenstein, Jochen; Kremp, Katharina; Kremp, Stephanie; Palm, Jan; Ruebe, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The potential of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) as opposed to three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) is analyzed for two different concepts of fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET)-based target volume delineation in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC): involved-field radiotherapy (IF-RT) vs. elective nodal irradiation (ENI). Treatment planning was performed for 41 patients with LA-NSCLC, using four different planning approaches (3D-CRT-IF, 3D-CRT-ENI, IMRT-IF, IMRT-ENI). ENI included a boost irradiation after 50 Gy. For each plan, maximum dose escalation was calculated based on prespecified normal tissue constraints. The maximum prescription dose (PD), tumor control probability (TCP), conformal indices (CI), and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP) were analyzed. IMRT resulted in statistically significant higher prescription doses for both target volume concepts as compared with 3D-CRT (ENI: 68.4 vs. 60.9 Gy, p < 0.001; IF: 74.3 vs. 70.1 Gy, p < 0.03). With IMRT-IF, a PD of at least 66 Gy was achieved for 95 % of all plans. For IF as compared with ENI, there was a considerable theoretical increase in TCP (IMRT: 27.3 vs. 17.7 %, p < 0.00001; 3D-CRT: 20.2 vs. 9.9 %, p < 0.00001). The esophageal NTCP showed a particularly good sparing with IMRT vs. 3D-CRT (ENI: 12.3 vs. 30.9 % p < 0.0001; IF: 15.9 vs. 24.1 %; p < 0.001). The IMRT technique and IF target volume delineation allow a significant dose escalation and an increase in TCP. IMRT results in an improved sparing of OARs as compared with 3D-CRT at equivalent dose levels. (orig.) [de

  4. Three-Dimensional Non-Coplanar Conformal Radiotherapy Yields Better Results Than Traditional Beam Arrangements for Adjuvant Treatment of Gastric Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soyfer, Viacheslav; Corn, Benjamin W.; Melamud, Alex B.S.; Alani, Shlomi; Tempelhof, Haim; Agai, Reuben; Shmueli, Anat; Figer, Arie; Kovner, Felix

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The current standard of adjuvant treatment for gastric cancer after curative resection is concurrent administration of radiotherapy and 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy. The radiation fields are often arranged as anterioposterior-posteroanterior opposed parallel fields with general recommendations for sparing at least two-thirds of one kidney. We investigated whether a better radiation distribution would be achievable with three-dimensional conformal approaches compared with the classic anterioposterior-posteroanterior fields. Methods and Materials: A total of 19 patients with adenocarcinoma of the stomach were treated with adjuvant chemoradiotherapy using a non-coplanar four-field arrangement. In each case, parallel planning using an anterioposterior-posteroanterior arrangement and a four-field 'box' was performed, and the generated plans were subsequently compared for coverage of target volumes and doses to irradiated organs next to the tumor bed. A separate analysis was performed for kidneys exposed to greater and lower doses in each patient. The mean radiation dose and percentage of kidney volume receiving a dose >20 Gy were registered. Statistical analysis was performed using the two-tailed t test. Results: The clinical target volume was adequately covered in all three plans. In the greater-dose kidney group, all the differences were statistically significant with a benefit for the three-dimensional plan. In the lower-dose kidney group, the differences in the mean radiation dose did not reach the level of statistical significance, and the differences in the kidney volume receiving a dose >20 Gy showed a statistically significant benefit for the three-dimensional plan. Conclusion: Non-coplanar three-dimensional-based conformal planning for postoperative radiotherapy for gastric cancer provided the best results regarding kidney and spinal cord exposure with adequate clinical target volume coverage. This technique was readily implemented in clinical

  5. Three-dimensional non-coplanar conformal radiotherapy yields better results than traditional beam arrangements for adjuvant treatment of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soyfer, Viacheslav; Corn, Benjamin W; Melamud, Alex; Alani, Shlomi; Tempelhof, Haim; Agai, Reuben; Shmueli, Anat; Figer, Arie; Kovner, Felix

    2007-10-01

    The current standard of adjuvant treatment for gastric cancer after curative resection is concurrent administration of radiotherapy and 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy. The radiation fields are often arranged as anterioposterior-posteroanterior opposed parallel fields with general recommendations for sparing at least two-thirds of one kidney. We investigated whether a better radiation distribution would be achievable with three-dimensional conformal approaches compared with the classic anterioposterior-posteroanterior fields. A total of 19 patients with adenocarcinoma of the stomach were treated with adjuvant chemoradiotherapy using a non-coplanar four-field arrangement. In each case, parallel planning using an anterioposterior-posteroanterior arrangement and a four-field "box" was performed, and the generated plans were subsequently compared for coverage of target volumes and doses to irradiated organs next to the tumor bed. A separate analysis was performed for kidneys exposed to greater and lower doses in each patient. The mean radiation dose and percentage of kidney volume receiving a dose >20 Gy were registered. Statistical analysis was performed using the two-tailed t test. The clinical target volume was adequately covered in all three plans. In the greater-dose kidney group, all the differences were statistically significant with a benefit for the three-dimensional plan. In the lower-dose kidney group, the differences in the mean radiation dose did not reach the level of statistical significance, and the differences in the kidney volume receiving a dose >20 Gy showed a statistically significant benefit for the three-dimensional plan. Non-coplanar three-dimensional-based conformal planning for postoperative radiotherapy for gastric cancer provided the best results regarding kidney and spinal cord exposure with adequate clinical target volume coverage. This technique was readily implemented in clinical practice.

  6. Lithium Sulfide (Li2S)/Graphene Oxide Nanospheres with Conformal Carbon Coating as a High-Rate, Long-Life Cathode for Li/S Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwa, Yoon; Zhao, Juan; Cairns, Elton J

    2015-05-13

    In recent years, lithium/sulfur (Li/S) cells have attracted great attention as a candidate for the next generation of rechargeable batteries due to their high theoretical specific energy of 2600 W·h kg(-1), which is much higher than that of Li ion cells (400-600 W·h kg(-1)). However, problems of the S cathode such as highly soluble intermediate species (polysulfides Li2Sn, n = 4-8) and the insulating nature of S cause poor cycle life and low utilization of S, which prevents the practical use of Li/S cells. Here, a high-rate and long-life Li/S cell is proposed, which has a cathode material with a core-shell nanostructure comprising Li2S nanospheres with an embedded graphene oxide (GO) sheet as a core material and a conformal carbon layer as a shell. The conformal carbon coating is easily obtained by a unique CVD coating process using a lab-designed rotating furnace without any repetitive steps. The Li2S/GO@C cathode exhibits a high initial discharge capacity of 650 mA·h g(-1) of Li2S (corresponding to the 942 mA·h g(-1) of S) and very low capacity decay rate of only 0.046% per cycle with a high Coulombic efficiency of up to 99.7% for 1500 cycles when cycled at the 2 C discharge rate.

  7. SU-E-T-538: Lung SBRT Dosimetric Comparison of 3D Conformal and RapidArc Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, R; Zhan, L; Osei, E

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Dose distributions of RapidArc Plan can be quite different from standard 3D conformal radiation therapy. SBRT plans can be optimized with high conformity or mimic the 3D conformal treatment planning with very high dose in the center of the tumor. This study quantifies the dosimetric differences among 3D conformal plan; flattened beam and FFF beam RapidArc Plans for lung SBRT. Methods: Five lung cancer patients treated with 3D non-coplanar SBRT were randomly selected. All the patients were CT scanned with 4DCT to determine the internal target volume. Abdominal compression was applied to minimize respiratory motion for SBRT patients. The prescription dose was 48 Gy in 4 fractions. The PTV coverage was optimized by two groups of objective function: one with high conformity, another mimicking 3D conformal dose distribution with high dose in the center of PTV. Optimization constraints were set to meet the criteria of the RTOG-0915 protocol. All VMAT plans were optimized with the RapidArc technique using four full arcs in Eclipse treatment planning system. The RapidArc SBRT plans with flattened 6MV beam and 6MV FFF beam were generated and dosimetric results were compared with the previous treated 3D non-coplanar plans. Results: All the RapidArc plans with flattened beam and FFF beam had similar results for the PTV and OARs. For the high conformity optimization group, The DVH of PTV exhibited a steep dose fall-off outside the PTV compared to the 3D non-coplanar plan. However, for the group mimicking the 3D conformal target dose distribution, although the PTV is very similar to the 3D conformal plan, the ITV coverage is better than 3D conformal plan. Conclusion: Due to excellent clinical experiences of 3D conformal SBRT treatment, the Rapid Arc optimization mimicking 3D conformal planning may be suggested for clinical use

  8. Guideline-conformity of initiation with oral hypoglycemic treatment for patients with newly therapy-dependent type 2 diabetes mellitus in Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C; Stedman, Margaret R; Pogantsch, Michaela; Wieninger, Peter; Bucsics, Anna; Asslaber, Markus; Bauer, Rosemarie; Burkhardt, Thomas; Schautzer, Alexandra; Brookhart, M Alan

    2011-01-01

    To determine guideline conformity of initiation of oral hypoglycemic (OH) treatment for type 2 diabetes in Austria; to study patient and prescriber correlates of recommended initiation with metformin monotherapy. We used claims from 11 sickness funds that covered 7.5 million individuals, representing >90% of the Austrian population. First-time OH use was defined as a first filled prescription after one year without any OH drug or insulin. Among these incident users, we described the OH drug class used and defined correlates of initiation with metformin monotherapy. From 1/2007 to 6/2008, we identified 42,882 incident users of an OH drug: 70.8% used metformin, 24.7% used a sulfonylurea, and 4.5% initiated treatment with another class. We estimated the incidence of OH-dependent type 2 diabetes at 3.8-4.4 per 1000 patient-years. We conducted multivariate analyses among 39 077 patients with available prescriber information. Independent correlates of initiation with metformin were younger age, female gender, waived co-payment, more recent initiation, fewer hospital days and more therapeutic classes received in the year prior to first OH therapy (all p metformin initiation. Approximately 20% of metformin initiators had a second OH drug added within metformin (renal insufficiency, hepatic failure), metformin as recommended by international guidelines. At least 20% did not, taking into account possible contraindications, which provides an opportunity for intervention. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Improvement in toxicity in high risk prostate cancer patients treated with image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy compared to 3D conformal radiotherapy without daily image guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sveistrup, Joen; Rosenschöld, Per Munck af; Deasy, Joseph O; Oh, Jung Hun; Pommer, Tobias; Petersen, Peter Meidahl; Engelholm, Svend Aage

    2014-01-01

    Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) facilitates the delivery of a very precise radiation dose. In this study we compare the toxicity and biochemical progression-free survival between patients treated with daily image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) and 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) without daily image guidance for high risk prostate cancer (PCa). A total of 503 high risk PCa patients treated with radiotherapy (RT) and endocrine treatment between 2000 and 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. 115 patients were treated with 3DCRT, and 388 patients were treated with IG-IMRT. 3DCRT patients were treated to 76 Gy and without daily image guidance and with 1–2 cm PTV margins. IG-IMRT patients were treated to 78 Gy based on daily image guidance of fiducial markers, and the PTV margins were 5–7 mm. Furthermore, the dose-volume constraints to both the rectum and bladder were changed with the introduction of IG-IMRT. The 2-year actuarial likelihood of developing grade > = 2 GI toxicity following RT was 57.3% in 3DCRT patients and 5.8% in IG-IMRT patients (p < 0.001). For GU toxicity the numbers were 41.8% and 29.7%, respectively (p = 0.011). On multivariate analysis, 3DCRT was associated with a significantly increased risk of developing grade > = 2 GI toxicity compared to IG-IMRT (p < 0.001, HR = 11.59 [CI: 6.67-20.14]). 3DCRT was also associated with an increased risk of developing GU toxicity compared to IG-IMRT. The 3-year actuarial biochemical progression-free survival probability was 86.0% for 3DCRT and 90.3% for IG-IMRT (p = 0.386). On multivariate analysis there was no difference in biochemical progression-free survival between 3DCRT and IG-IMRT. The difference in toxicity can be attributed to the combination of the IMRT technique with reduced dose to organs-at-risk, daily image guidance and margin reduction

  10. Controlling Chain Conformations of High-k Fluoropolymer Dielectrics to Enhance Charge Mobilities in Rubrene Single-Crystal Field-Effect Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Jwala M; Gadinski, Matthew R; Li, Qi; Sun, Kaige G; Reyes-Martinez, Marcos A; Iagodkine, Elissei; Briseno, Alejandro L; Jackson, Thomas N; Wang, Qing; Gomez, Enrique D

    2016-12-01

    A novel photopatternable high-k fluoropolymer, poly(vinylidene fluoride-bromotrifluoroethylene) P(VDF-BTFE), with a dielectric constant (k) between 8 and 11 is demonstrated in thin-film transistors. Crosslinking P(VDF-BTFE) reduces energetic disorder at the dielectric-semiconductor interface by controlling the chain conformations of P(VDF-BTFE), thereby leading to approximately a threefold enhancement in the charge mobility of rubrene single-crystal field-effect transistors. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. High energy radiation in cancer treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1959-10-15

    Certain basic recommendations on the use of supervoltage radiation and radioisotope teletherapy in the treatment of malignant growths have been made by an expert study group which met in Vienna in August this y ear. The group, convened jointly by the International Atomic Energy Agency and the World Health Organization, was composed of 20 radiotherapists and radiation physicists from 12 countries. High energy radiation, used in the treatment of malignant tumours, can be either in the form of gamma- or X-rays or in the form of beams of accelerated electrons. The source of radiation is kept at a certain distance from the patient. The study group was agreed on the value of supervoltage radiotherapy, including gamma-ray and high voltage x-ray therapy as well as electron beam therapy. The required gamma radiation can be obtained from large sources of radioactive materials like cobalt 60 or caesium 137, while electron beams are produced by high voltage accelerators. The experts considered the sources in four broad categories: large supervoltage units, intermediate units, small isotope units and units of electron beams or very high energy x-rays. Each group of source was described including its usage. The experts made it clear that while supervoltage radiation should be a part of an organized radiotherapy department, the radiation facilities at any particular establishment should not be of the supervoltage type alone. The high energy facilities could be fruitfully used only when there was a background of general radiotherapy. The group emphasized that supervoltage radiotherapy, in common with other forms of radiotherapy, should be conducted only by adequately trained and qualified personnel, including radiation physicists, and specified the training and qualifications required of such personnel. It was felt that specialized training was one of the main requirements at the present stage and the training programmes of IAEA and WHO should be utilized extensively for this

  12. High energy radiation in cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1959-01-01

    Certain basic recommendations on the use of supervoltage radiation and radioisotope teletherapy in the treatment of malignant growths have been made by an expert study group which met in Vienna in August this y ear. The group, convened jointly by the International Atomic Energy Agency and the World Health Organization, was composed of 20 radiotherapists and radiation physicists from 12 countries. High energy radiation, used in the treatment of malignant tumours, can be either in the form of gamma- or X-rays or in the form of beams of accelerated electrons. The source of radiation is kept at a certain distance from the patient. The study group was agreed on the value of supervoltage radiotherapy, including gamma-ray and high voltage x-ray therapy as well as electron beam therapy. The required gamma radiation can be obtained from large sources of radioactive materials like cobalt 60 or caesium 137, while electron beams are produced by high voltage accelerators. The experts considered the sources in four broad categories: large supervoltage units, intermediate units, small isotope units and units of electron beams or very high energy x-rays. Each group of source was described including its usage. The experts made it clear that while supervoltage radiation should be a part of an organized radiotherapy department, the radiation facilities at any particular establishment should not be of the supervoltage type alone. The high energy facilities could be fruitfully used only when there was a background of general radiotherapy. The group emphasized that supervoltage radiotherapy, in common with other forms of radiotherapy, should be conducted only by adequately trained and qualified personnel, including radiation physicists, and specified the training and qualifications required of such personnel. It was felt that specialized training was one of the main requirements at the present stage and the training programmes of IAEA and WHO should be utilized extensively for this

  13. Theoretical investigation of the conformational space of baicalin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Medina, Juan J; Ferrer, Evelina G; Williams, Patricia A M; Okulik, Nora B

    2017-09-01

    Flavonoids are a large group of polyphenolic compounds ubiquitously present in plants. They are important components of human diet. They are recognized as potential drug candidates to be used in the treatment and prevention of a lot of pathological disorders, due to their protective effects. Baicalin (7-glucuronic acid 5, 6-dihydroxyflavone) is one of the main single active constituents isolated from the dried roots of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi. The great interest on this flavonoid is due to its various pharmacological properties, such as antioxidant, antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, anticancer and so on, and its high accumulation in the roots of S. baicalensis. The aim of our work was to analyze the geometric and electronic properties of baicalin conformers (BCL), thus performing a complete search on the conformational space of this flavonoid in gas phase and in aqueous solution. The results indicate that the conformational space of baicalin is formed by eight conformers in gas phase and five conformers in aqueous solution optimized at B3LYP/6-311++G** theory level. BCLa2 TT and BCLa1 TT conformers have low stability in gas phase and very high stability in aqueous solution. This variation is related to a modification in the τ 1 angle that represents the relative position of the glucuronide unit respect to the central rings of the flavan nucleus (A and C). This modification was successfully explained by examining the changes in the hydrogen bond (HB) interactions that occur in the region around the hydroxyl group located in position 6 of ring A. Besides, the molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) and frontier molecular orbital (FMO) analyses indicate that BCLa2 TT and BCLa1 TT conformers are the most favorable conformers for interacting with positively charged species (such as metal ions) in aqueous media (such as biological fluids). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Induction chemotherapy plus three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy in the definitive treatment of locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sim, Sang; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E.; Schindelheim, Rachel; Ng, Kenneth K.; Leibel, Steven A.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate our institution's experience using chemotherapy in conjunction with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT). Methods and Materials: From 1991 to 1998, 152 patients with Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were treated with 3D-CRT at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. A total of 137 patients (90%) were surgically staged with either thoracotomy or mediastinoscopy. The remainder were staged radiographically. Seventy patients were treated with radiation therapy alone, and 82 patients received induction chemotherapy before radiation. The majority of chemotherapy-treated patients received a platinum-containing regimen. Radiation was delivered with a 3D conformal technique using CT-based treatment planning. The median dose in the radiation alone group was 70.2 Gy, while in the combined modality group, it was 64.8 Gy. Results: The median follow-up time was 30.5 months among survivors. Stage IIIB disease was present in 36 patients (51%) in the radiation-alone group and 57 patients (70%) in the combined-modality group. Thirty-nine patients had poor prognostic factors (KPS 5%), and they were equally distributed between the two groups. The median survival times for the radiation-alone and the combined-modality groups were 11.7 months and 18.1 months, respectively (p=0.001). The 2-year rates of local control in the radiation-alone and combined-modality groups were 35.4% and 43.1%, respectively (p=0.1). Grade 3 or worse nonhematologic toxicity occurred in 20% of the patients receiving radiation alone and in 16% of those receiving chemotherapy and radiation. Overall, there were only 4 cases of Grade 3 or worse esophagitis. Conclusion: Despite more Stage IIIB patients in the combined-modality group, the addition of chemotherapy to 3D-CRT produced a survival advantage over 3D-CRT alone in Stage III NSCLC without a concomitant increase in toxicity. Chemotherapy thus appears to be beneficial, even in patients who are receiving higher

  15. Brachytherapy treatment with high dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santana Rodriguez, Sergio Marcelino; Rodriguez Rodriguez, Lissi Lisbet; Ciscal Chiclana, Onelio Alberto

    2009-01-01

    Retrospectively analyze results and prognostic factors of cervical cancer patients treated with radio concomitant cisplatin-based chemotherapy, radiation therapy combined modality. Methods: From January 2003 to December 2007, 198 patients with invasive cervical cancer were treated at the Oncology Department of Hospital Robau Celestino Hernandez (brachytherapy performed at INOR). The most common age group was 31 to 40 years. The histology in squamous cell carcinoma accounted for 84.3% of cases. The treatment consisted of external pelvic irradiation and vaginal brachytherapy, high dose rate. Concomitant chemotherapy consisted of cisplatin 40 mg/m2 weekly with a maximum of 70 mg for 5 weeks. Results: 66.2% of patients completed 5 cycles of chemotherapy. The median overall survival was 39 months, overall survival, disease-free survival and survival free of locoregional recurrence at 5 years of 78%, 76% and 78.6% respectively .. We found that clinical stage, histological type (adenocarcinoma worst outcome) were statistically related to level of response. Conclusions: Treatment with external pelvic radiation, brachytherapy and concurrent weekly cisplatin in patients with stage IIIB cervical cancer is feasible in the Chilean public health system, well tolerated and results comparable to international literature. (Author)

  16. Conformal radiotherapy: principles and classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenwald, J.C.; Gaboriaud, G.; Pontvert, D.

    1999-01-01

    'Conformal radiotherapy' is the name fixed by usage and given to a new form of radiotherapy resulting from the technological improvements observed during the last ten years. While this terminology is now widely used, no precise definition can be found in the literature. Conformal radiotherapy refers to an approach in which the dose distribution is more closely 'conformed' or adapted to the actual shape of the target volume. However, the achievement of a consensus on a more specific definition is hampered by various difficulties, namely in characterizing the degree of 'conformality'. We have therefore suggested a classification scheme be established on the basis of the tools and the procedures actually used for all steps of the process, i.e., from prescription to treatment completion. Our classification consists of four levels: schematically, at level 0, there is no conformation (rectangular fields); at level 1, a simple conformation takes place, on the basis of conventional 2D imaging; at level 2, a 3D reconstruction of the structures is used for a more accurate conformation; and level 3 includes research and advanced dynamic techniques. We have used our personal experience, contacts with colleagues and data from the literature to analyze all the steps of the planning process, and to define the tools and procedures relevant to a given level. The corresponding tables have been discussed and approved at the European level within the Dynarad concerted action. It is proposed that the term 'conformal radiotherapy' be restricted to procedures where all steps are at least at level 2. (author)

  17. Conformal spinel/layered heterostructures of Co3O4 shells grown on single-crystal Li-rich nanoplates for high-performance lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Yue; Lan, Xiwei; Chang, Peng; Huang, Yaqun; Wang, Libin; Hu, Xianluo

    2018-07-01

    Lithium-rich layered materials have received much attention because of their high specific capacity and high energy density. Unfortunately, they suffer from irreversible capacity loss, low initial Coulombic efficiency and poor cyclability. Here we report a facile co-precipitation method to synthesize uniform single-crystal Li-rich Li[Li0.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13]O2 nanoplates without using any template. Subsequently, a Co3O4 shell is in situ grown on the Li-rich nanoplates through a hydrothermal method, leading to spinel/layered heterostructures. The electrode made of conformal heterostructured Li-rich/Co3O4 nanoplates delivers a high discharge capacity of 296 mA h g-1 at 0.1 C with an initial Coulombic efficiency of 84%. The capacity retention reaches 83.2% with a discharge capacity of 223 mA h g-1 after 160 cycles at 0.2 C during the potential window ranging from 2.0 to 4.8 V. The enhanced electrochemical performance of the resulting Li-rich/Co3O4 nanoplates benefits from the unique conformal heterostructure as well as the electrochemically active LixCoOy generated between the reaction of Co3O4 shells and the extracted Li2O during charging/discharging processes.

  18. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Versus 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy for Preoperative Treatment of Extremity Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard, Patrick, E-mail: patrjr@uw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); Phillips, Mark; Smith, Wade [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); Davidson, Darin [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); Kim, Edward; Kane, Gabrielle [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Purpose: Create a cost-effectiveness model comparing preoperative intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) versus 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) for extremity soft tissue sarcomas. Methods and Materials: Input parameters included 5-year local recurrence rates, rates of acute wound adverse events, and chronic toxicities (edema, fracture, joint stiffness, and fibrosis). Health-state utilities were used to calculate quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). Overall treatment costs per QALY or incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) were calculated. Roll-back analysis was performed using average costs and utilities to determine the baseline preferred radiation technique. One-way, 2-way, and probabilistic sensitivity analyses (PSA) were performed for input parameters with the largest impact on the ICER. Results: Overall treatment costs were $17,515.58 for 3DCRT compared with $22,920.51 for IMRT. The effectiveness was higher for IMRT (3.68 QALYs) than for 3DCRT (3.35 QALYs). The baseline ICER for IMRT was $16,842.75/QALY, making it the preferable treatment. The ICER was most sensitive to the probability of local recurrence, upfront radiation costs, local recurrence costs, certain utilities (no toxicity/no recurrence, grade 1 toxicity/no local recurrence, grade 4 toxicity/no local recurrence), and life expectancy. Dominance patterns emerged when the cost of 3DCRT exceeded $15,532.05 (IMRT dominates) or the life expectancy was under 1.68 years (3DCRT dominates). Furthermore, preference patterns changed based on the rate of local recurrence (threshold: 13%). The PSA results demonstrated that IMRT was the preferred cost-effective technique for 64% of trials compared with 36% for 3DCRT. Conclusions: Based on our model, IMRT is the preferred technique by lowering rates of local recurrence, severe toxicities, and improving QALYs. From a third-party payer perspective, IMRT should be a supported approach for extremity soft tissue sarcomas.

  19. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Versus 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy for Preoperative Treatment of Extremity Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richard, Patrick; Phillips, Mark; Smith, Wade; Davidson, Darin; Kim, Edward; Kane, Gabrielle

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Create a cost-effectiveness model comparing preoperative intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) versus 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) for extremity soft tissue sarcomas. Methods and Materials: Input parameters included 5-year local recurrence rates, rates of acute wound adverse events, and chronic toxicities (edema, fracture, joint stiffness, and fibrosis). Health-state utilities were used to calculate quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). Overall treatment costs per QALY or incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) were calculated. Roll-back analysis was performed using average costs and utilities to determine the baseline preferred radiation technique. One-way, 2-way, and probabilistic sensitivity analyses (PSA) were performed for input parameters with the largest impact on the ICER. Results: Overall treatment costs were $17,515.58 for 3DCRT compared with $22,920.51 for IMRT. The effectiveness was higher for IMRT (3.68 QALYs) than for 3DCRT (3.35 QALYs). The baseline ICER for IMRT was $16,842.75/QALY, making it the preferable treatment. The ICER was most sensitive to the probability of local recurrence, upfront radiation costs, local recurrence costs, certain utilities (no toxicity/no recurrence, grade 1 toxicity/no local recurrence, grade 4 toxicity/no local recurrence), and life expectancy. Dominance patterns emerged when the cost of 3DCRT exceeded $15,532.05 (IMRT dominates) or the life expectancy was under 1.68 years (3DCRT dominates). Furthermore, preference patterns changed based on the rate of local recurrence (threshold: 13%). The PSA results demonstrated that IMRT was the preferred cost-effective technique for 64% of trials compared with 36% for 3DCRT. Conclusions: Based on our model, IMRT is the preferred technique by lowering rates of local recurrence, severe toxicities, and improving QALYs. From a third-party payer perspective, IMRT should be a supported approach for extremity soft tissue sarcomas.

  20. A computer-controlled conformal radiotherapy system. IV: Electronic chart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraass, Benedick A.; McShan, Daniel L.; Matrone, Gwynne M.; Weaver, Tamar A.; Lewis, James D.; Kessler, Marc L.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: The design and implementation of a system for electronically tracking relevant plan, prescription, and treatment data for computer-controlled conformal radiation therapy is described. Methods and Materials: The electronic charting system is implemented on a computer cluster coupled by high-speed networks to computer-controlled therapy machines. A methodical approach to the specification and design of an integrated solution has been used in developing the system. The electronic chart system is designed to allow identification and access of patient-specific data including treatment-planning data, treatment prescription information, and charting of doses. An in-house developed database system is used to provide an integrated approach to the database requirements of the design. A hierarchy of databases is used for both centralization and distribution of the treatment data for specific treatment machines. Results: The basic electronic database system has been implemented and has been in use since July 1993. The system has been used to download and manage treatment data on all patients treated on our first fully computer-controlled treatment machine. To date, electronic dose charting functions have not been fully implemented clinically, requiring the continued use of paper charting for dose tracking. Conclusions: The routine clinical application of complex computer-controlled conformal treatment procedures requires the management of large quantities of information for describing and tracking treatments. An integrated and comprehensive approach to this problem has led to a full electronic chart for conformal radiation therapy treatments

  1. Respiration-induced movement of the upper abdominal organs: a pitfall for the three-dimensional conformal radiation treatment of pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bussels, Barbara; Goethals, Laurence; Feron, Michel; Bielen, Didier; Dymarkowski, Steven; Suetens, Paul; Haustermans, Karin

    2003-01-01

    Respiration-induced movement of the upper abdominal organs (pancreas, liver and kidneys) was assessed in 12 subjects using dynamic magnetic resonance imaging. The movement of each organ in the cranio-caudal, the lateral and the anterior-posterior direction was deduced from the movement of the center of gravity on two-dimensional images. This center of gravity was computed from the volume delineated on sequential 8-mm slices of both sagittal and coronal dynamic series. The largest movements were noticed in the cranio-caudal direction for pancreas and liver (23.7±15.9 mm and 24.4±16.4 mm). The kidneys showed smaller movements in the cranio-caudal direction (left kidney 16.9±6.7 mm and right kidney 16.1±7.9 mm). The movements of the different organs in the anterior-posterior and lateral directions were less pronounced. It is of the greatest importance to be aware of these movements in the planning of a conformal radiation treatment for pancreatic cancer

  2. A note on fashion cycles, novelty and conformity

    OpenAIRE

    Federica Alberti

    2013-01-01

    We develop a model in which novelty and conformity motivate fashion behavior. Fashion cycles occur if conformity is not too high. The duration of fashion cycles depends on individual-specific conformity, novelty, and the number of available styles. The use of individual-specific novelty and conformity allows us to also identify fashion leaders.

  3. On-line estimations of delivered radiation doses in three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy treatments of carcinoma uterine cervix patients in linear accelerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putha, Suman Kumar; Saxena, P U; Banerjee, S; Srinivas, Challapalli; Vadhiraja, B M; Ravichandran, Ramamoorthy; Joan, Mary; Pai, K Dinesh

    2016-01-01

    Transmission of radiation fluence through patient's body has a correlation to the planned target dose. A method to estimate the delivered dose to target volumes was standardized using a beam level 0.6 cc ionization chamber (IC) positioned at electronic portal imaging device (EPID) plane from the measured transit signal (S t ) in patients with cancer of uterine cervix treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT). The IC with buildup cap was mounted on linear accelerator EPID frame with fixed source to chamber distance of 146.3 cm, using a locally fabricated mount. S t s were obtained for different water phantom thicknesses and radiation field sizes which were then used to generate a calibration table against calculated midplane doses at isocenter (D iso,TPS ), derived from the treatment planning system. A code was developed using MATLAB software which was used to estimate the in vivo dose at isocenter (D iso,Transit ) from the measured S t s. A locally fabricated pelvic phantom validated the estimations of D iso,Transit before implementing this method on actual patients. On-line dose estimations were made (3 times during treatment for each patient) in 24 patients. The D iso,Transit agreement with D iso,TPS in phantom was within 1.7% and the mean percentage deviation with standard deviation is -1.37% ±2.03% ( n = 72) observed in patients. Estimated in vivo dose at isocenter with this method provides a good agreement with planned ones which can be implemented as part of quality assurance in pelvic sites treated with simple techniques, for example, 3DCRT where there is a need for documentation of planned dose delivery.

  4. Viscous conformal gauge theories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toniato, Arianna; Sannino, Francesco; Rischke, Dirk H.

    2017-01-01

    We present the conformal behavior of the shear viscosity-to-entropy density ratio and the fermion-number diffusion coefficient within the perturbative regime of the conformal window for gauge-fermion theories.......We present the conformal behavior of the shear viscosity-to-entropy density ratio and the fermion-number diffusion coefficient within the perturbative regime of the conformal window for gauge-fermion theories....

  5. Conformal Einstein spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozameh, C.N.; Newman, E.T.; Tod, K.P.

    1985-01-01

    Conformal transformations in four-dimensional. In particular, a new set of two necessary and sufficient conditions for a space to be conformal to an Einstein space is presented. The first condition defines the class of spaces conformal to C spaces, whereas the last one (the vanishing of the Bach tensor) gives the particular subclass of C spaces which are conformally related to Einstein spaces. (author)

  6. Superspace conformal field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quella, Thomas [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Schomerus, Volker [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-07-15

    Conformal sigma models and WZW models on coset superspaces provide important examples of logarithmic conformal field theories. They possess many applications to problems in string and condensed matter theory. We review recent results and developments, including the general construction of WZW models on type I supergroups, the classification of conformal sigma models and their embedding into string theory.

  7. Superspace conformal field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quella, Thomas

    2013-07-01

    Conformal sigma models and WZW models on coset superspaces provide important examples of logarithmic conformal field theories. They possess many applications to problems in string and condensed matter theory. We review recent results and developments, including the general construction of WZW models on type I supergroups, the classification of conformal sigma models and their embedding into string theory.

  8. The intercomparison of the dose distributions between conformation techniques with pions and photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karasawa, K.; Nakagawa, K.; Akanuma, A.

    1990-01-01

    To compare conformation radiation treatment with pions vs photons, dose volume histograms (DVH) to the critical organs, including the spinal cord, kidney, and intestine, were examined in a patient with retroperitoneal soft tissue sarcoma. For photon conformation treatment, the following techniques were used: 360 degree rotation conformation technique (photon conformation), 4 fixed field technique (photon 4-field), and 2-axis conformation technique (photon 2-axial conformation). According to the DVH reduction method, complication probability was estimated. The concave portion of the target was conformed by pion conformation treatment, but not by photon conformation treatment. Pion conformation for the intestine showed the best DVH, whereas photon 4-field technique showed the worst DVH. For the kidney, pion conformation showed better DVH as compared with any other photon conformation treatment technique. In the spinal cord, photon 2-axial conformation was far superior, followed by pion conformation and then photon conformation and 4-field technique. A 2-axial technique showed a bigger inhomogeneity inside the target volume which is critical in curative treatment. TD 50 was 72 Gy for pion conformation, 53 Gy for photon conformation, 51 Gy for photon 4-field, and 68 Gy for photon 2-axial conformation. Complication probabilities for these conformation techniques at 60 Gy were 3%, 85%, 97%, and 9%. In view of tumor control probabilities, pion seems to have the biggest therapeutic ratio among these techniques. (N.K.)

  9. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Causes Fewer Side Effects than Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy When Used in Combination With Brachytherapy for the Treatment of Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsythe, Kevin; Blacksburg, Seth; Stone, Nelson; Stock, Richard G.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To measure the benefits of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) compared with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) when used in combination with brachytherapy for the treatment of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective review of all patients with localized prostate cancer who received external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in combination with brachytherapy with at least 1 year follow-up (n = 812). Combination therapy consisted of 103 Pd or 125 I implant, followed by a course of EBRT. From 1993 to March 2003 521 patients were treated with 3D-CRT, and from April 2003 to March 2009 291 patients were treated with IMRT. Urinary symptoms were prospectively measured with the International Prostate Symptom Score questionnaire with a single quality of life (QOL) question; rectal bleeding was assessed per the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Late Radiation Morbidity Scoring Schema. The Pearson χ 2 test was used to compare toxicities experienced by patients who were treated with either IMRT or 3D-CRT. Logistic regression analyses were also performed to rule out possible confounding factors. Results: Within the first 3 months after treatment, patients treated with 3D-CRT scored their urinary symptoms as follows: 19% mild, 44% moderate, and 37% severe; patients treated with IMRT scored their urinary symptoms as follows: 36% mild, 47% moderate, and 17% severe (p < 0.001). The 3D-CRT patients rated their QOL as follows: 35% positive, 20% neutral, and 45% negative; IMRT patients rated their QOL as follows: 51% positive, 18% neutral, and 31% negative (p < 0.001). After 1 year of follow-up there was no longer any difference in urinary morbidity between the two groups. Logistic regression confirmed the differences in International Prostate Symptom Score and QOL in the acute setting (p < 0.001 for both). Grade ≥2 rectal bleeding was reported by 11% of 3D-CRT patients and 7

  10. Non-conformable, partial and conformable transposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    König, Thomas; Mäder, Lars Kai

    2013-01-01

    and the Commission regarding a directive’s outcome, play a much more strategic role than has to date acknowledged in the transposition literature. Whereas disagreement of a member state delays conformable transposition, it speeds up non-conformable transposition. Disagreement of the Commission only prolongs...... the transposition process. We therefore conclude that a stronger focus on an effective sanctioning mechanism is warranted for safeguarding compliance with directives....

  11. Conformity index for brain cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petkovska, Sonja; Tolevska, Cveta; Kraleva, Slavica; Petreska, Elena

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to present the level of conformity achieved by using 3D conformal radiotherapy for brain cancer patients. Conformity index is a helpful quantitative tool for assessing (evaluating) the quality of a treatment plan. Treatment plans made for ninety patients with brain tumor are worked on this paper. The patients are in supine position and immobilized with thermoplastic masks for the head. Computed tomography data sets with 5 mm scan thickness are used to create a 3D image. All structures of interest are contoured. In order to obtain an optimal dose distribution, treatment fields are fit around target volume with set-up margins of 7mm in each direction. The conformity index values are between 1.21 and 2.04. Value of 1.8 is exceeded in eighteen cases; nine of them are bigger than 1.9 and only three of them are above 2. The target volume for each of these extreme CI values is ideal covered (between 95% and 105% of the prescribed dose). The most acceptable conformity index value in this paper belongs to the plan with the lowest minimal dose (84.7%). It can be concluded that conformity index is necessary but not sufficient factor for assessing radiation treatment plan conformity. To be able to estimate the acceptability of some treatment plan in daily practice, additional information as minimal, maximal and mean dose into target volume, as well as health tissues coverage must be taken into account.(Author)

  12. Applied Technologies and Prospects of Conformance Control Treatments in China Technologies et perspectives pour l’amélioration du profil de balayage dans les champs pétroliers matures produits par injection d’eau en Chine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Yuzhang

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available China is the largest user of chemical-based conformance control treatments and a series of technologies have been successfully developed and deployed in recent years. This paper first shows the milestones of development and application of conformance control technologies in China. Then integrated conformance control technologies are reviewed followed by the lessons we have learned, and then a few major specific conformance control technologies are addressed, including tracer injection and channels explanation, potentiometric testing to identify areal sweep efficiency, Pressure Index (PI decisionmaking technology to select well candidate, complementary decision-making technology to select well candidate and design application parameters, and major chemicals for in-depth fluid diversion technologies. In addition, this paper also describes the principles and applications of some promising technologies of combined chemical-based conformance treatment with other EOR/IOR process, including the combination technology of surfactant and water shutoff, profile control and mini-scale surfactant flooding, acid treatment and profile control treatment. Finally, this paper summarizes the problems and challenges faced by mature water flooded oilfields in China. Based on recent well tests, tracer testing and interpretation, and previous water control treatment experience, it appears that channels or high permeability streaks are common in mature water flooded oilfields. Some research directions and promising technologies are suggested. La Chine est le plus grand utilisateur de méthodes chimiques pour l’amélioration du profil de balayage de l’eau pour l’exploitation des champs pétroliers matures. Toute une série de technologies y ont d’ailleurs été créées et déployées avec succès ces dernières années. Cet article commence par présenter les étapes du développement et de la mise en place de ces technologies de contrôle de profil en Chine

  13. Long-term results of high-dose conformal radiotherapy for patients with medically inoperable T1-3N0 non-small-cell lung cancer: Is low incidence of regional failure due to incidental nodal irradiation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Ming; Hayman, James A.; Haken, Randall K. ten; Tatro, Daniel; Fernando, Shaneli; Kong, F.-M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To report the results of high-dose conformal irradiation and examine incidental nodal irradiation and nodal failure in patients with inoperable early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: This analysis included patients with inoperable CT-staged T1-3N0M0 NSCLC treated on our prospective dose-escalation trial. Patients were treated with radiation alone (total dose, 63-102.9 Gy in 2.1-Gy daily fractions) with a three-dimensional conformal technique without intentional nodal irradiation. Bilateral highest mediastinal and upper/lower paratracheal, prevascular and retrotracheal, sub- and para-aortic, subcarinal, paraesophageal, and ipsilateral hilar regions were delineated individually. Nodal failure and doses of incidental irradiation were studied. Results: The potential median follow-up was 104 months. For patients who completed protocol treatment, median survival was 31 months. The actuarial overall survival rate was 86%, 61%, 43%, and 21% and the cause-specific survival rate was 89%, 70%, 53%, and 35% at 1, 2, 3, and 5 years, respectively. Weight loss (p = 0.008) and radiation dose in Gy (p = 0.013) were significantly associated with overall survival. In only 22% and 13% of patients examined did ipsilateral hilar and paratracheal (and subaortic for left-sided tumor) nodal regions receive a dose of ≥40 Gy, respectively. Less than 10% of all other nodal regions received a dose of ≥40 Gy. No patients failed initially at nodal sites. Conclusions: Radiation dose is positively associated with overall survival in patients with medically inoperable T1-3N0 NSCLC, though long-term results remain poor. The nodal failure rate is low and does not seem to be due to high-dose incidental irradiation

  14. Treatment planning systems for high precision radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deshpande, D.D.

    2008-01-01

    Computerized Treatment Planning System (TPS) play an important role in radiotherapy with the intent to maximize tumor control and minimize normal tissue complications. Treatment planning during earlier days was generally carried out through the manual summations of standard isodose charts on to patient body contours that were generated by direct tracing or lead wire representation, and relied heavily on the careful choices of beam weights and wedging. Since then there had been tremendous advances in field of Radiation Oncology in last few decades. The linear accelerators had evolved from MLC's to IGRT, the techniques like 3DCRT, IMRT has become almost routine affair. The simulation has seen transition from simple 2D film/fluoroscopy localization to CT Simulator with added development in PET, PET- CT and MR imaging. The Networking and advances in computer technology has made it possible to direct transfer of Images, contours to the treatment planning systems

  15. IMRT and 3D conformal radiotherapy with or without elective nodal irradiation in locally advanced NSCLC. A direct comparison of PET-based treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleckenstein, Jochen; Kremp, Katharina; Kremp, Stephanie; Palm, Jan; Ruebe, Christian [Saarland University Medical School, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    The potential of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) as opposed to three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) is analyzed for two different concepts of fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET)-based target volume delineation in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC): involved-field radiotherapy (IF-RT) vs. elective nodal irradiation (ENI). Treatment planning was performed for 41 patients with LA-NSCLC, using four different planning approaches (3D-CRT-IF, 3D-CRT-ENI, IMRT-IF, IMRT-ENI). ENI included a boost irradiation after 50 Gy. For each plan, maximum dose escalation was calculated based on prespecified normal tissue constraints. The maximum prescription dose (PD), tumor control probability (TCP), conformal indices (CI), and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP) were analyzed. IMRT resulted in statistically significant higher prescription doses for both target volume concepts as compared with 3D-CRT (ENI: 68.4 vs. 60.9 Gy, p < 0.001; IF: 74.3 vs. 70.1 Gy, p < 0.03). With IMRT-IF, a PD of at least 66 Gy was achieved for 95 % of all plans. For IF as compared with ENI, there was a considerable theoretical increase in TCP (IMRT: 27.3 vs. 17.7 %, p < 0.00001; 3D-CRT: 20.2 vs. 9.9 %, p < 0.00001). The esophageal NTCP showed a particularly good sparing with IMRT vs. 3D-CRT (ENI: 12.3 vs. 30.9 % p < 0.0001; IF: 15.9 vs. 24.1 %; p < 0.001). The IMRT technique and IF target volume delineation allow a significant dose escalation and an increase in TCP. IMRT results in an improved sparing of OARs as compared with 3D-CRT at equivalent dose levels. (orig.) [German] Das Potenzial der intensitaetsmodulierten Strahlentherapie (IMRT) soll im Rahmen der FDG-PET basierten Bestrahlungsplanung des lokal fortgeschrittenen nichtkleinzelligen Bronchialkarzinoms (LA-NSCLC) fuer 2 Zielvolumenansaetze (Involved-Field-Bestrahlung, IF) sowie elektive Nodalbestrahlung (ENI) geprueft und mit der 3-D-konformalen Strahlentherapie (3-D

  16. Conformational Analysis of Proteins in Highly Concentrated Solutions by Dialysis-Coupled Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houde, Damian; Esmail Nazari, Zeinab; Bou-Assaf, George M

    2016-01-01

    When highly concentrated, an antibody solution can exhibit unusual behaviors, which can lead to unwanted properties, such as increased levels of protein aggregation and unusually high viscosity. Molecular modeling, along with many indirect biophysical measurements, has suggested that the cause fo...... in industry. Graphical Abstract ᅟ....

  17. Conformational Clusters of Phosphorylated Tyrosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelrasoul, Maha; Ponniah, Komala; Mao, Alice; Warden, Meghan S; Elhefnawy, Wessam; Li, Yaohang; Pascal, Steven M

    2017-12-06

    Tyrosine phosphorylation plays an important role in many cellular and intercellular processes including signal transduction, subcellular localization, and regulation of enzymatic activity. In 1999, Blom et al., using the limited number of protein data bank (PDB) structures available at that time, reported that the side chain structures of phosphorylated tyrosine (pY) are partitioned into two conserved conformational clusters ( Blom, N.; Gammeltoft, S.; Brunak, S. J. Mol. Biol. 1999 , 294 , 1351 - 1362 ). We have used the spectral clustering algorithm to cluster the increasingly growing number of protein structures with pY sites, and have found that the pY residues cluster into three distinct side chain conformations. Two of these pY conformational clusters associate strongly with a narrow range of tyrosine backbone conformation. The novel cluster also highly correlates with the identity of the n + 1 residue, and is strongly associated with a sequential pYpY conformation which places two adjacent pY side chains in a specific relative orientation. Further analysis shows that the three pY clusters are associated with distinct distributions of cognate protein kinases.

  18. High tech hypofractionation to optimise treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    Hypofractionation has lately been implemented as standard treatment in the adjuvant setting as well as in radical radiotherapy for various solid tumors such as in breast and lung carcinomas. Also for metastatic disease in the liver or brain, hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy has proven e...

  19. 77 FR 64183 - Notice of Availability of a Final General Conformity Determination for the California High-Speed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-18

    ..., operation of the Project (i.e., operation of the high-speed train, once the infrastructure was constructed... Agreement (VERA) between the Authority and the SJVAPCD. The VERA will offset the NOx and VOC emissions...

  20. A unified treatment of high energy interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drescher, H.J.; Werner, K.; Ostapchenko, S.; Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 44 - Nantes

    1999-01-01

    It is well known that high energy interactions as different as electron-positron annihilation, deep inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering, proton-proton interactions, and nucleus-nucleus collisions have many features in common. Based upon this observation, a model for all these interactions is constructed which relies on the fundamental hypothesis that the behavior of high energy interactions is universal. (author)

  1. Implementation of intensity-modulated conformational radiotherapy (IMRT) for the treatment of cervical cancers at the Alexis-Vautrin Centre; Implementation de la radiotherapie conformationnelle avec modulation d'intensite (RCMI) pour le traitement des cancers du col uterin au centre Alexis-Vautrin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renard-Oldrini, S.; Brunaud, C.; Marchesi, V.; Tournier-Rangeard, L.; Peiffert, D. [Centre Alexis-Vautrin, 54 - Nancy (France)

    2010-10-15

    The authors discuss the comparison of the treatment plans of eleven patients treated either by conformational irradiation for seven of them, or by intensity-modulated conformational irradiation (IMRT) for four of them. The IMRT results in a good target volume coverage, can better protect the intestine than the conventional irradiation, and therefore is very promising, notably in terms of digestive toxicity. Short communication

  2. Prostate and seminal vesicle volume based consideration of prostate cancer patients for treatment with 3D-conformal or intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, Nandanuri M. S.; Nori, Dattatreyudu; Chang, Hyesook; Lange, Christopher S.; Ravi, Akkamma

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article was to determine the suitability of the prostate and seminal vesicle volumes as factors to consider patients for treatment with image-guided 3D-conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) or intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), using common dosimetry parameters as comparison tools. Methods: Dosimetry of 3D and IMRT plans for 48 patients was compared. Volumes of prostate, SV, rectum, and bladder, and prescriptions were the same for both plans. For both 3D and IMRT plans, expansion margins to prostate+SV (CTV) and prostate were 0.5 cm posterior and superior and 1 cm in other dimensions to create PTV and CDPTV, respectively. Six-field 3D plans were prepared retrospectively. For 3D plans, an additional 0.5 cm margin was added to PTV and CDPTV. Prescription for both 3D and IMRT plans was the same: 45 Gy to CTV followed by a 36 Gy boost to prostate. Dosimetry parameters common to 3D and IMRT plans were used for comparison: Mean doses to prostate, CDPTV, SV, rectum, bladder, and femurs; percent volume of rectum and bladder receiving 30 (V30), 50 (V50), and 70 Gy (V70), dose to 30% of rectum and bladder, minimum and maximum point dose to CDPTV, and prescription dose covering 95% of CDPTV (D95). Results: When the data for all patients were combined, mean dose to prostate and CDPTV was higher with 3D than IMRT plans (P 0.2). On average, among all cases, the minimum point dose was less for 3D-CRT plans and the maximum point dose was greater for 3D-CRT than for IMRT (P 0.1). V30 was less (P 0.2), and V70 was more (P 0.2). Mean dose to femurs was more with 3D than IMRT plans (P 3 (39/48), respectively (P 3 , respectively, would be suitable for 3D-CRT. Patients with prostate and prostate+SV volumes >65 and 85 cm 3 , respectively, might get benefit from IMRT.

  3. Inversion theory and conformal mapping

    CERN Document Server

    Blair, David E

    2000-01-01

    It is rarely taught in an undergraduate or even graduate curriculum that the only conformal maps in Euclidean space of dimension greater than two are those generated by similarities and inversions in spheres. This is in stark contrast to the wealth of conformal maps in the plane. The principal aim of this text is to give a treatment of this paucity of conformal maps in higher dimensions. The exposition includes both an analytic proof in general dimension and a differential-geometric proof in dimension three. For completeness, enough complex analysis is developed to prove the abundance of conformal maps in the plane. In addition, the book develops inversion theory as a subject, along with the auxiliary theme of circle-preserving maps. A particular feature is the inclusion of a paper by Carath�odory with the remarkable result that any circle-preserving transformation is necessarily a M�bius transformation, not even the continuity of the transformation is assumed. The text is at the level of advanced undergr...

  4. Hydrogen abstraction from n-butanol by the methyl radical: high level ab initio study of abstraction pathways and the importance of low energy rotational conformers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsikadakos, D; Hardalupas, Y; Taylor, A M K P; Hunt, P A

    2012-07-21

    Hydrogen abstraction reactions by the methyl radical from n-butanol have been investigated at the ROCBS-QB3 level of theory. Reaction energies and product geometries for the most stable conformer of n-butanol (ROH) have been computed, the reaction energies order α channel more stable than the β-channel? Why do the two C(γ)-H H-abstraction TS differ in energy? The method and basis set dependence of the TS barriers is investigated. The Boltzmann probability distribution for the n-butanol conformers suggests that low energy conformers are present in approximately equal proportions to the most stable conformer at combustion temperatures where ĊH(3) radicals are present. Thus, the relative significance of the various H-abstraction channels has been assessed for a selection of higher energy conformers (ROH'). Key results include finding that higher energy n-butanol conformers (E(ROH') > E(ROH)) can generate lower energy product radicals, E(ROH') < E(ROH). Moreover, higher energy conformers can also have a globally competitive TS energy for H-abstraction.

  5. Nasopharynx carcinoma treatment: from the conventional radiotherapy to the conformal radiotherapy with intensity modulation; Traitement du carcinome du nasopharynx: de la radiotherapie conventionnelle a la radiotherapie conformationnelle avec modulation d'intensite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokaouim, K.; Grehange, G.; Truc, G.; Peingnaux, K.; Martin, E.; Zanetta, S.; Bruchon, Y.; Bonnetain, F.; Maingon, P. [Centre Georges-Francois Leclerc, 21 - Dijon (France)

    2009-10-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate retrospectively the impact of factors linked to the radiotherapy realisation on the local and locoregional control, the global survival, the survival without disease of patients suffering of naso-pharynx carcinoma. Conclusion: the patients suffering of a nasopharynx carcinoma treated by irradiation associated to chemotherapy have an improved global survival and an improved survival without disease. The conformal radiotherapy with or without modulated intensity reduce the risk of serous otitis, trismus and xerostomia at long term. It seems necessary to realize multi centric studies with a longer period of follow up before asserting the advantages of the I.M.R.T. in comparison to the classical and conformal technique in the treatment of naso-pharynx carcinomas. (N.C.)

  6. Temperature-sensitive gating of hCx26: high-resolution Raman spectroscopy sheds light on conformational changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kniggendorf, Ann-Kathrin; Meinhardt-Wollweber, Merve; Yuan, Xiaogang; Roth, Bernhard; Seifert, Astrid; Fertig, Niels; Zeilinger, Carsten

    2014-07-01

    The temperature-sensitive gating of human Connexin 26 (hCx26) was analyzed with confocal Raman microscopy. High-resolution Raman spectra covering the spectral range between 400 and 1500 rel. cm(-1) with a spectral resolution of 1 cm(-1) were fully annotated, revealing notable differences between the spectrum recorded from solubilized hCx26 in Ca(2+)-buffered POPC at 10°C and any other set of protein conditions (temperature, Ca(2+) presence, POPC presence). Spectral components originating from specific amino acids show that the TM1/EL1 parahelix and probably the TM4 trans-membrane helix and the plug domain are involved in the gating process responsible for fully closing the hemichannel.

  7. Conformational and Structural Properties of High Functionality Dendrimer-like Star Polymers Synthesized from Living Polymerization Techniques; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pople, John A.

    2001-01-01

    The design, synthesis and solution properties of dendritic-linear hybrid macromolecules is described. The synthetic strategy employs living ring-opening polymerization in combination with selective and quantitative organic transformations for the preparation of new molecular architectures similar to classical star polymers and dendrimers. The polymers were constructed from high molecular weight poly(e-caprolactone) initiated from the surface hydroxyl groups of dendrimers derived from bis(hydroxymethyl) propionic acid (bis-MPA) in the presence of stannous 2-ethyl hexanoate (Sn(Oct)2). In this way, star and hyperstar poly(e-caprolactones) were elaborated depending on the generation of dendrimer employed. The ROP from these hydroxy groups was found to be a facile process leading to controlled molecular weight, low dispersity products (Mw/Mn) and lt; 1.15. In addition to the use of dendrimers as building blocks to star polymers, functional dendrons derived from bis-MPA were attached to chain ends of the star polymers, yielding structures that closely resemble that of the most advanced dendrimers. Measurements of the solution properties (hydrodynamic volume vs. molecular weight) on the dendritic-linear hybrids show a deviation from linearity, with a lower than expected hydrodynamic volume, analogous to the solution properties of dendrimers of high generation number. The onset of the deviation begins with the polymers initiated from the second generation dendrimer of bis-MPA and becomes more exaggerated with the higher generations. It was found that polymerization amplifies the nonlinear solution behavior of dendrimers. Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements revealed that the radius of gyration scaled with arm functionality (f) as f 2/3, in accordance with the Daoud-Cotton model for many arm star polymer

  8. Induced quantum conformal gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novozhilov, Y.V.; Vassilevich, D.V.

    1988-11-01

    Quantum gravity is considered as induced by matter degrees of freedom and related to the symmetry breakdown in the low energy region of a non-Abelian gauge theory of fundamental fields. An effective action for quantum conformal gravity is derived where both the gravitational constant and conformal kinetic term are positive. Relation with induced classical gravity is established. (author). 15 refs

  9. Thickenings and conformal gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebrun, Claude

    1991-07-01

    A twistor correspondence is given for complex conformal space-times with vanishing Bach and Eastwood-Dighton tensors; when the Weyl curvature is algebraically general, these equations are precisely the conformal version of Einstein's vacuum equations with cosmological constant. This gives a fully curved version of the linearized correspondence of Baston and Mason [B-M].

  10. Thickenings and conformal gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LeBrun, C. (State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (USA). Dept. of Mathematics)

    1991-07-01

    A twistor correspondence is given for complex conformal space-times with vanishing Bach and Eastwood-Dighton tensors; when the Weyl curvature is algebraically general, these equations are precisely the conformal version of Einstein's vacuum equations with cosmological constant. This gives a fully curved version of the linearized correspondence of Baston and Mason (B-M). (orig.).

  11. Thickenings and conformal gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeBrun, C.

    1991-01-01

    A twistor correspondence is given for complex conformal space-times with vanishing Bach and Eastwood-Dighton tensors; when the Weyl curvature is algebraically general, these equations are precisely the conformal version of Einstein's vacuum equations with cosmological constant. This gives a fully curved version of the linearized correspondence of Baston and Mason [B-M]. (orig.)

  12. Conformal transformations in superspace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dao Vong Duc

    1977-01-01

    The spinor extension of the conformal algebra is investigated. The transformation law of superfields under the conformal coordinate inversion R defined in the superspace is derived. Using R-technique, the superconformally covariant two-point and three-point correlation functions are found

  13. Conformational stability of calreticulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, C.S.; Trandum, C.; Larsen, N.

    2005-01-01

    The conformational stability of calreticulin was investigated. Apparent unfolding temperatures (T-m) increased from 31 degrees C at pH 5 to 51 degrees C at pH 9, but electrophoretic analysis revealed that calreticulin oligomerized instead of unfolding. Structural analyses showed that the single C......-terminal a-helix was of major importance to the conformational stability of calreticulin....

  14. Prostate and seminal vesicle volume based consideration of prostate cancer patients for treatment with 3D-conformal or intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, Nandanuri M. S.; Nori, Dattatreyudu; Chang, Hyesook; Lange, Christopher S.; Ravi, Akkamma [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York Hospital Queens, Flushing, New York 11355 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, State University of New York Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York 11203 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, New York Hospital Queens, Flushing, New York 11355 (United States)

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this article was to determine the suitability of the prostate and seminal vesicle volumes as factors to consider patients for treatment with image-guided 3D-conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) or intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), using common dosimetry parameters as comparison tools. Methods: Dosimetry of 3D and IMRT plans for 48 patients was compared. Volumes of prostate, SV, rectum, and bladder, and prescriptions were the same for both plans. For both 3D and IMRT plans, expansion margins to prostate+SV (CTV) and prostate were 0.5 cm posterior and superior and 1 cm in other dimensions to create PTV and CDPTV, respectively. Six-field 3D plans were prepared retrospectively. For 3D plans, an additional 0.5 cm margin was added to PTV and CDPTV. Prescription for both 3D and IMRT plans was the same: 45 Gy to CTV followed by a 36 Gy boost to prostate. Dosimetry parameters common to 3D and IMRT plans were used for comparison: Mean doses to prostate, CDPTV, SV, rectum, bladder, and femurs; percent volume of rectum and bladder receiving 30 (V30), 50 (V50), and 70 Gy (V70), dose to 30% of rectum and bladder, minimum and maximum point dose to CDPTV, and prescription dose covering 95% of CDPTV (D95). Results: When the data for all patients were combined, mean dose to prostate and CDPTV was higher with 3D than IMRT plans (P<0.01). Mean D95 to CDPTV was the same for 3D and IMRT plans (P>0.2). On average, among all cases, the minimum point dose was less for 3D-CRT plans and the maximum point dose was greater for 3D-CRT than for IMRT (P<0.01). Mean dose to 30% rectum with 3D and IMRT plans was comparable (P>0.1). V30 was less (P<0.01), V50 was the same (P>0.2), and V70 was more (P<0.01) for rectum with 3D than IMRT plans. Mean dose to bladder was less with 3D than IMRT plans (P<0.01). V30 for bladder with 3D plans was less than that of IMRT plans (P<0.01). V50 and V70 for 3D plans were the same for 3D and IMRT plans (P>0.2). Mean dose to femurs

  15. Highly conformal SiO2/Al2O3 nanolaminate gas-diffusion barriers for large-area flexible electronics applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jin-Hwan; Kim, Young-Min; Park, Young-Wook; Park, Tae-Hyun; Jeong, Jin-Wook; Choi, Hyun-Ju; Song, Eun-Ho; Ju, Byeong-Kwon; Lee, Jin-Woo; Kim, Cheol-Ho

    2010-01-01

    The present study demonstrates a flexible gas-diffusion barrier film, containing an SiO 2 /Al 2 O 3 nanolaminate on a plastic substrate. Highly uniform and conformal coatings can be made by alternating the exposure of a flexible polyethersulfone surface to vapors of SiO 2 and Al 2 O 3 , at nanoscale thickness cycles via RF-magnetron sputtering deposition. The calcium degradation test indicates that 24 cycles of a 10/10 nm inorganic bilayer, top-coated by UV-cured resin, greatly enhance the barrier performance, with a permeation rate of 3.79 x 10 -5 g m -2 day -1 based on the change in the ohmic behavior of the calcium sensor at 20 deg. C and 50% relative humidity. Also, the permeation rate for 30 cycles of an 8/8 nm inorganic bilayer coated with UV resin was beyond the limited measurable range of the Ca test at 60 deg. C and 95% relative humidity. It has been found that such laminate films can effectively suppress the void defects of a single inorganic layer, and are significantly less sensitive against moisture permeation. This nanostructure, fabricated by an RF-sputtering process at room temperature, is verified as being useful for highly water-sensitive organic electronics fabricated on plastic substrates.

  16. The Treatment of Wealth Distribution by High School Economics Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Richard

    2014-01-01

    This article presents findings from an investigation of the treatment of wealth distribution by high school economics textbooks. The eight leading high school economics texts in the United States were examined.

  17. Clinical Applications of 3-D Conformal Radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miralbell, Raymond

    Although a significant improvement in cancer cure (i.e. 20% increment) has been obtained in the last 2-3 decades, 30-40% of patients still fail locally after curative radiotherapy. In order to improve local tumor control rates with radiotherapy high doses to the tumor volume are frequently necessary. Three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3-D CRT) is used to denote a spectrum of radiation planning and delivery techniques that rely on three-dimensional imaging to define the target (tumor) and to distinguish it from normal tissues. Modern, high-precision radiotherapy (RT) techniques are needed in order to implement the goal of optimal tumor destruction delivering minimal dose to the non-target normal tissues. A better target definition is nowadays possible with contemporary imaging (computerized tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography) and image registration technology. A highly precise dose distributions can be obtained with optimal 3-D CRT treatment delivery techniques such as stereotactic RT, intensity modulated RT (IMRT), or protontherapy (the latter allowing for in-depth conformation). Patient daily set-up repositioning and internal organ immobilization systems are necessary before considering to undertake any of the above mentioned high-precision treatment approaches. Prostate cancer, brain tumors, and base of skull malignancies are among the sites most benefitting of dose escalation approaches. Nevertheless, a significant dose reduction to the normal tissues in the vicinity of the irradiated tumor also achievable with optimal 3-D CRT may also be a major issue in the treatment of pediatric tumors in order to preserve growth, normal development, and to reduce the risk of developing radiation induced diseases such as cancer or endocrinologic disorders.

  18. Conformal invariance in supergravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergshoeff, E.A.

    1983-01-01

    In this thesis the author explains the role of conformal invariance in supergravity. He presents the complete structure of extended conformal supergravity for N <= 4. The outline of this work is as follows. In chapter 2 he briefly summarizes the essential properties of supersymmetry and supergravity and indicates the use of conformal invariance in supergravity. The idea that the introduction of additional symmetry transformations can make clear the structure of a field theory is not reserved to supergravity only. By means of some simple examples it is shown in chapter 3 how one can always introduce additional gauge transformations in a theory of massive vector fields. Moreover it is shown how the gauge invariant formulation sometimes explains the quantum mechanical properties of the theory. In chapter 4 the author defines the conformal transformations and summarizes their main properties. He explains how these conformal transformations can be used to analyse the structure of gravity. The supersymmetric extension of these results is discussed in chapter 5. Here he describes as an example how N=1 supergravity can be reformulated in a conformally-invariant way. He also shows that beyond N=1 the gauge fields of the superconformal symmetries do not constitute an off-shell field representation of extended conformal supergravity. Therefore, in chapter 6, a systematic method to construct the off-shell formulation of all extended conformal supergravity theories with N <= 4 is developed. As an example he uses this method to construct N=1 conformal supergravity. Finally, in chapter 7 N=4 conformal supergravity is discussed. (Auth.)

  19. [High voltage accidents, characteristics and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hülsbergen-Krüger, S; Pitzler, D; Partecke, B D

    1995-04-01

    High-voltage injuries cause localised entrance and exit burns, extensive arc, flame and flash burns and, even more dangerous, necrosis of the underlying muscles on the pathway of the current through the body. Therefore it should be recognized that the ensuing disease is more like a crush injury than a thermal burn. The extent of injury cannot be judged by the percentage and depth of the skin burn. Diagnostic fasciotomies, radical debridement, and in many cases early amputation are necessary to prevent life-threatening complications. Over a period of 10 years, 43 patients with high-voltage injuries have been treated at the Hamburg Burn Center, 36 of them in primary care. Common causes of injury were accidents in railway areas (28%), using portable aluminium ladders near overhead power lines (9.3%), and working on electrical equipment (30.2%). Six of the primary care patients died (16.6%), and 34.9% had an amputation of one or more extremities. Nearly all patients underwent several debridement and split-skin graft procedures. In 30% of cases additional free and pedicled flaps were needed to cover soft tissue defects. Ten patients (23.3%) sustained fractures and other injuries from falls, seven (16.3%) of them severe polytrauma. Initial cardiac arrhythmics were diagnosed in 16.6% of the primarily treated patients. Thirty per cent of our patients had neurological complications such as peripheral paresis, tetraplegia and paraplegia, 20.7% of these caused solely by the electric current.

  20. Conformational analysis of oligosaccharides and polysaccharides using molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Complex carbohydrates usually have a large number of rotatable bonds and consequently a large number of theoretically possible conformations can be generated (combinatorial explosion). The application of systematic search methods for conformational analysis of carbohydrates is therefore limited to disaccharides and trisaccharides in a routine analysis. An alternative approach is to use Monte-Carlo methods or (high-temperature) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to explore the conformational space of complex carbohydrates. This chapter describes how to use MD simulation data to perform a conformational analysis (conformational maps, hydrogen bonds) of oligosaccharides and how to build realistic 3D structures of large polysaccharides using Conformational Analysis Tools (CAT).

  1. Three dimensional variability in patient positioning using bite block immobilization in 3D-conformal radiation treatment for ENT-tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willner, Jochen; Haedinger, Ulrich; Neumann, Michael; Schwab, Franz J.; Bratengeier, Klaus; Flentje, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Background and purpose: The aim of this prospective study was to analyze the three-dimensional (3D) reproducibility of the isocenter position and of patient positioning with the use of bite block immobilization by means of a simple verification procedure for a complex beam arrangement applied for ENT-tumors. Materials and methods: We analyzed the positioning data of 29 consecutive patients treated for ENT-tumors at the Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology of the University of Wuerzburg. A total of 136 treatment sessions were analyzed. Patients were positioned and immobilized using an individualized bite block system and a head and neck support. A complex beam arrangement was applied combining two offset rotational and two oblique wedge fields on a 5 MV linear accelerator. Orthogonal verification films were taken once weekly. Four to six film pairs per patient were obtained (during 4-6 weeks) with a mean number of 4.7 film pairs per patient. These were compared to the corresponding orthogonal simulator films taken during primary simulation. Deviations of the verified isocenter from isocenter on the simulator film were measured and analyzed in three dimensions in terms of overall, systematic and random categories. A 3D-deviation vector was calculated from these 3D data as well as a 2D-deviation vector (for comparison with literature data) from the lateral verification films. Results: The overall setup deviation showed standard deviations (SD) of 2.5, 2.7 and 3.1 mm along the cranio-caudal, anterior-posterior and medio-lateral axes, respectively. The random component ranged from SD 1.9 to 2.1 mm and the systematic component ranged from SD 1.8 to 2.2 mm. The mean length of the 3D-vector was 3.1 mm for the systematic as well as the random component. Ninety percent of 3D systematic and random deviations were less than 5 mm. The mean length of the 2D-vector was 2.4 mm for the random component and 2.2 mm for the systematic component. Ninety percent of 2D-random and

  2. Beam shaping for conformal fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy: a modeling study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hacker, Fred L.; Kooy, Hanne M.; Bellerive, Marc R.; Killoran, Joseph H.; Leber, Zachary H.; Shrieve, Dennis C.; Tarbell, Nancy J.; Loeffler, Jay S.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: The patient population treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) is significantly different than that treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Generally, lesions treated with SRT are larger, less spherical, and located within critical regions of the central nervous system; hence, they offer new challenges to the treatment planner. Here a simple, cost effective, beam shaping system has been evaluated relative to both circular collimators and an ideal dynamically conforming system for effectiveness in providing conformal therapy for these lesions. Methods and Materials: We have modeled a simple system for conformal arc therapy using four independent jaws. The jaw positions and collimator angle are changed between arcs but held fixed for the duration of each arc. Eleven previously treated SRT cases have been replanned using this system. The rectangular jaw plans were then compared to the original treatment plans which used circular collimators. The plans were evaluated with respect to tissue sparing at 100%, 80%, 50%, and 20% of the prescription dose. A plan was also done for each tumor in which the beam aperture was continuously conformed to the beams eye view projection of the tumor. This was used as an ideal standard for conformal therapy in the absence of fluence modulation. Results: For tumors with a maximum extent of over 3.5 cm the rectangular jaw plans reduced the mean volume of healthy tissue involved at the prescription dose by 57% relative to the circular collimator plans. The ideal conformal plans offered no significant further improvement at the prescription dose. The relative advantage of the rectangular jaw plans decreased at lower isodoses so that at 20% of the prescription dose tissue involvement for the rectangular jaw plans was equivalent to that for the circular collimator plans. At these isodoses the ideal conformal plans gave substantially better tissue sparing. Conclusion: A simple and economical field shaping

  3. Conformal expansions and renormalons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rathsman, J.

    2000-02-07

    The coefficients in perturbative expansions in gauge theories are factorially increasing, predominantly due to renormalons. This type of factorial increase is not expected in conformal theories. In QCD conformal relations between observables can be defined in the presence of a perturbative infrared fixed-point. Using the Banks-Zaks expansion the authors study the effect of the large-order behavior of the perturbative series on the conformal coefficients. The authors find that in general these coefficients become factorially increasing. However, when the factorial behavior genuinely originates in a renormalon integral, as implied by a postulated skeleton expansion, it does not affect the conformal coefficients. As a consequence, the conformal coefficients will indeed be free of renormalon divergence, in accordance with previous observations concerning the smallness of these coefficients for specific observables. The authors further show that the correspondence of the BLM method with the skeleton expansion implies a unique scale-setting procedure. The BLM coefficients can be interpreted as the conformal coefficients in the series relating the fixed-point value of the observable with that of the skeleton effective charge. Through the skeleton expansion the relevance of renormalon-free conformal coefficients extends to real-world QCD.

  4. High Affinity vs. Native Fibronectin in the Modulation of αvβ3 Integrin Conformational Dynamics: Insights from Computational Analyses and Implications for Molecular Design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Paladino

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding how binding events modulate functional motions of multidomain proteins is a major issue in chemical biology. We address several aspects of this problem by analyzing the differential dynamics of αvβ3 integrin bound to wild type (wtFN10, agonist or high affinity (hFN10, antagonist mutants of fibronectin. We compare the dynamics of complexes from large-scale domain motions to inter-residue coordinated fluctuations to characterize the distinctive traits of conformational evolution and shed light on the determinants of differential αvβ3 activation induced by different FN sequences. We propose an allosteric model for ligand-based integrin modulation: the conserved integrin binding pocket anchors the ligand, while different residues on the two FN10's act as the drivers that reorganize relevant interaction networks, guiding the shift towards inactive (hFN10-bound or active states (wtFN10-bound. We discuss the implications of results for the design of integrin inhibitors.

  5. A 3D-structural model of unsulfated chondroitin from high-field NMR: 4-sulfation has little effect on backbone conformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattelle, Benedict M.; Shakeri, Javad; Roberts, Ian S.; Almond, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    The glycosaminoglycan chondroitin sulfate is essential in human health and disease but exactly how sulfation dictates its 3D-strucutre at the atomic level is unclear. To address this, we have purified homogenous oligosaccharides of unsulfated chondroitin (with and without 15N-enrichment) and analysed them by high-field NMR to make a comparison published chondroitin sulfate and hyaluronan 3D-structures. The result is the first full assignment of the tetrasaccharide and an experimental 3D-model of the hexasaccharide (PDB code 2KQO). In common with hyaluronan, we confirm that the amide proton is not involved in strong, persistent inter-residue hydrogen bonds. However, in contrast to hyaluronan, a hydrogen bond is not inferred between the hexosamine OH-4 and the glucuronic acid O5 atoms across the β(1→3) glycosidic linkage. The unsulfated chondroitin bond geometry differs slightly from hyaluronan by rotation about the β(1→3) ψ dihedral (as previously predicted by simulation), while the β(1→4) linkage is unaffected. Furthermore, comparison shows that this glycosidic linkage geometry is similar in chondroitin-4-sulfate. We therefore hypothesise that both hexosamine OH-4 and OH-6 atoms are solvent exposed in chondroitin, explaining why it is amenable to sulfation and hyaluronan is not, and also that 4-sulfation has little effect on backbone conformation. Our conclusions exemplify the value of the 3D-model presented here and progress our understanding of glycosaminoglycan molecular properties. PMID:20022001

  6. Conformally connected universes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantor, M.; Piran, T.

    1983-01-01

    A well-known difficulty associated with the conformal method for the solution of the general relativistic Hamiltonian constraint is the appearance of an aphysical ''bag of gold'' singularity at the nodal surface of the conformal factor. This happens whenever the background Ricci scalar is too large. Using a simple model, it is demonstrated that some of these singular solutions do have a physical meaning, and that these can be considered as initial data for Universe containing black holes, which are connected, in a conformally nonsingular way with each other. The relation between the ADM mass and the horizon area in this solution supports the cosmic censorship conjecture. (author)

  7. High dose rate brachytherapy in treatment of high grade astrocytomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Alejo, R.; Delgado, J.M.; Cerro, E. del; Torres, J.J.; Martinez, R.

    1996-01-01

    From May 1994 to June 1995, 18 patients with high grade astrocytomas were entered prospectively on a selective protocol combining surgery, external beam radiotherapy, stereotactic interstitial implantation with HDR Iridium 192 and chemotherapy. Only those patients with tumor size 100cc or less average dimension, high grade astrocytoma, Karnofsky 70 or greater, unilateral, circumscribed, unifocal, tumor stable or responding to external radiation and supratentorial were included in the study. Ages ranged from 16 to 69 years. There were 13 males and 5 females. Surgery consisted of biopsy only in 3 patients, subtotal resection in 11, and gross total resection in 4 patients. Focal external beam radiation portals included the contrast enhancing mass on CT scan plus a 3 cm margin. The protocol called for minimum tumor dose of 60 Gy to be given in 2 Gy daily fractions. An interstitial brachytherapy boost was to be performed two weeks after the conclusion of external beam radiation. The dose was 30 Gy in 4 fractions. The authors analyze on basis on their personal experience, the possibilities and the limits offered by this therapeutic procedure in neuro-oncology. Using stereotactic techniques, interstitial brachytherapy of brain tumors was technically possible with negligible acute morbidity and mortality, and appeared to be effective and may provide for an increase in tumor control in selected cases

  8. Factors influencing conformity index in radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brennan, Sinead M

    2010-01-01

    The radiotherapy conformity index (CI) is a useful tool to quantitatively assess the quality of radiotherapy treatment plans, and represents the relationship between isodose distributions and target volume. A conformity index of unity implies high planning target volume (PTV) coverage and minimal unnecessary irradiation of surrounding tissues. We performed this analysis to describe the CI for lung cancer 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and to identify clinical and technical determinants of CI, as it is not known which factors are associated with good quality 3D conformal radiotherapy treatment planning. Radiotherapy treatment plans from a database of 52 patients with inoperable Stage 1 to 3b lung cancer, on a hypofractionated 3DCRT trial were evaluated. A CI was calculated for all plans using the definition of the ICRU 62:CI = (TV\\/PTV), which is the quotient of the treated volume (TV) and the PTV. Data on patient, tumor, and planning variables, which could influence CI, were recorded and analyzed. Mean CI was 2.01 (range = 1.06-3.8). On univariate analysis, PTV (p = 0.023), number of beams (p = 0.036), medial vs. lateral tumor location (p = 0.016), and increasing tumor stage (p = 0.041) were associated with improved conformity. On multiple regression analysis, factors found to be associated with CI included central vs. peripheral tumor location (p = 0.041) and PTV size (p = 0.058). The term 3DCRT is used routinely in the literature, without any indication of the degree of conformality. We recommend routine reporting of conformity indices. Conformity indices may be affected by both planning variables and tumor factors.

  9. A comprehensive dosimetric study of pancreatic cancer treatment using three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), volumetric-modulated radiation therapy (VMAT), and passive-scattering and modulated-scanning proton therapy (PT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Xuanfeng; Dionisi, Francesco; Tang, Shikui; Ingram, Mark; Hung, Chun-Yu; Prionas, Evangelos; Lichtenwalner, Phil; Butterwick, Ian; Zhai, Huifang; Yin, Lingshu; Lin, Haibo; Kassaee, Alireza; Avery, Stephen, E-mail: stephen.avery@uphs.upenn.edu

    2014-07-01

    With traditional photon therapy to treat large postoperative pancreatic target volume, it often leads to poor tolerance of the therapy delivered and may contribute to interrupted treatment course. This study was performed to evaluate the potential advantage of using passive-scattering (PS) and modulated-scanning (MS) proton therapy (PT) to reduce normal tissue exposure in postoperative pancreatic cancer treatment. A total of 11 patients with postoperative pancreatic cancer who had been previously treated with PS PT in University of Pennsylvania Roberts Proton Therapy Center from 2010 to 2013 were identified. The clinical target volume (CTV) includes the pancreatic tumor bed as well as the adjacent high-risk nodal areas. Internal (iCTV) was generated from 4-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT), taking into account target motion from breathing cycle. Three-field and 4-field 3D conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), 5-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy, 2-arc volumetric-modulated radiation therapy, and 2-field PS and MS PT were created on the patients’ average CT. All the plans delivered 50.4 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV). Overall, 98% of PTV was covered by 95% of the prescription dose and 99% of iCTV received 98% prescription dose. The results show that all the proton plans offer significant lower doses to the left kidney (mean and V{sub 18} {sub Gy}), stomach (mean and V{sub 20} {sub Gy}), and cord (maximum dose) compared with all the photon plans, except 3-field 3DCRT in cord maximum dose. In addition, MS PT also provides lower doses to the right kidney (mean and V{sub 18} {sub Gy}), liver (mean dose), total bowel (V{sub 20} {sub Gy} and mean dose), and small bowel (V{sub 15} {sub Gy} absolute volume ratio) compared with all the photon plans and PS PT. The dosimetric advantage of PT points to the possibility of treating tumor bed and comprehensive nodal areas while providing a more tolerable treatment course that could be used for dose

  10. A comprehensive dosimetric study of pancreatic cancer treatment using three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), volumetric-modulated radiation therapy (VMAT), and passive-scattering and modulated-scanning proton therapy (PT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Xuanfeng; Dionisi, Francesco; Tang, Shikui; Ingram, Mark; Hung, Chun-Yu; Prionas, Evangelos; Lichtenwalner, Phil; Butterwick, Ian; Zhai, Huifang; Yin, Lingshu; Lin, Haibo; Kassaee, Alireza; Avery, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    With traditional photon therapy to treat large postoperative pancreatic target volume, it often leads to poor tolerance of the therapy delivered and may contribute to interrupted treatment course. This study was performed to evaluate the potential advantage of using passive-scattering (PS) and modulated-scanning (MS) proton therapy (PT) to reduce normal tissue exposure in postoperative pancreatic cancer treatment. A total of 11 patients with postoperative pancreatic cancer who had been previously treated with PS PT in University of Pennsylvania Roberts Proton Therapy Center from 2010 to 2013 were identified. The clinical target volume (CTV) includes the pancreatic tumor bed as well as the adjacent high-risk nodal areas. Internal (iCTV) was generated from 4-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT), taking into account target motion from breathing cycle. Three-field and 4-field 3D conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), 5-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy, 2-arc volumetric-modulated radiation therapy, and 2-field PS and MS PT were created on the patients’ average CT. All the plans delivered 50.4 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV). Overall, 98% of PTV was covered by 95% of the prescription dose and 99% of iCTV received 98% prescription dose. The results show that all the proton plans offer significant lower doses to the left kidney (mean and V 18 Gy ), stomach (mean and V 20 Gy ), and cord (maximum dose) compared with all the photon plans, except 3-field 3DCRT in cord maximum dose. In addition, MS PT also provides lower doses to the right kidney (mean and V 18 Gy ), liver (mean dose), total bowel (V 20 Gy and mean dose), and small bowel (V 15 Gy absolute volume ratio) compared with all the photon plans and PS PT. The dosimetric advantage of PT points to the possibility of treating tumor bed and comprehensive nodal areas while providing a more tolerable treatment course that could be used for dose escalation and combining with radiosensitizing

  11. Conformable variational iteration method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer Acan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we introduce the conformable variational iteration method based on new defined fractional derivative called conformable fractional derivative. This new method is applied two fractional order ordinary differential equations. To see how the solutions of this method, linear homogeneous and non-linear non-homogeneous fractional ordinary differential equations are selected. Obtained results are compared the exact solutions and their graphics are plotted to demonstrate efficiency and accuracy of the method.

  12. Delineating the conformal window

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Mads Toudal; Pickup, Thomas; Teper, Michael

    2011-01-01

    We identify and characterise the conformal window in gauge theories relevant for beyond the standard model building, e.g. Technicolour, using the criteria of metric confinement and causal analytic couplings, which are known to be consistent with the phase diagram of supersymmetric QCD from Seiberg...... duality. Using these criteria we find perturbation theory to be consistent throughout the predicted conformal window for several of these gauge theories and we discuss recent lattice results in the light of our findings....

  13. Lateral rectal shielding reduces late rectal morbidity after high dose three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy for clinically localized prostate cancer: further evidence for a dose effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, W Robert; Hanks, Gerald E; Hanlon, Alexandra; Schultheiss, Timothy E

    1995-07-01

    Purpose: Using conventional treatment methods for the treatment of clinically localized prostate cancer central axis doses must be limited to 65-70 Gy to prevent significant damage to nearby normal tissues. A fundamental hypothesis of three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) is that, by defining the target organ(s) accurately in three dimensions, it is possible to deliver higher doses to the target without a significant increase in normal tissue complications. This study examines whether this hypothesis holds true and whether a simple modification of treatment technique can reduce the incidence of late rectal morbidity in patients with prostate cancer treated with 3DCRT to minimum planning target volume (PTV) doses of 71-75 Gy. Materials and Methods: 257 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer completed 3DCRT by December 31, 1993 and received a minimum PTV dose of 71-75 Gy. The median follow-up time was 22 months (range 4-67 months) and 98% of patients had followup of longer than 12 months. The calculated dose at the center of the prostate was <74 Gy in 19 patients, 74-76 Gy in 206 patients and >76 Gy in 32 patients. Late rectal morbidity was graded according to the LENT scoring system. Eighty-eight consecutive patients were treated with a rectal block added to the lateral fields. In these patients the posterior margin from the prostate to the block edge was reduced from the standard 15 mm to 7.5 mm for the final 10 Gy which reduced the dose to portions of the anterior rectal wall by approximately 4-5 Gy. Estimates of rates for rectal morbidity were determined by Kaplan-Meier actuarial analyses. Differences in morbidity percentages were evaluated by the Pearson chi square test. Results: Grade 2-3 rectal morbidity developed in 46 of 257 patients (18%) and in the majority of cases consisted of rectal bleeding. No patient has developed grade 4 or 5 rectal morbidity. The actuarial rate of grade 2-3 morbidity is 22% at 24 months and the median

  14. Treatment of the prostate cancer with high dose rate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, Alvaro; Torres Silva, Felipe

    2002-01-01

    The prostate cancer treatment in early stages is controversial. The high dose rate brachytherapy has been used like monotherapy or boost with external beam radiotherapy in advanced disease. This paper describes the technique and the advantages over other modalities

  15. Conformation radiotherapy with eccentric multi-leaves, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obata, Yasunori; Sakuma, Sadayuki.

    1986-01-01

    In order to extend the application of the conformation radiotherapy, the eccentric multi-leaves are equipped with the linear accelerator. The information of the position of the collimators and the dose distribution of the eccentric conformation radiotherapy are calculated by the improved algorism of the treatment planning system. In simple cases, the dose distributions for the distant region from the rotational center are measured and compared with the calculated values. Both distributions are well coincided with the error of about 5 % in the high dose region and 10 % in the low dose region. In eccentric conformation radiotherapy, it is difficult to deliver the planned dose to the lesion. The dose increases with the distance of the target area from the rotational center. And the measured value and the calculated value are well coincided with 1 % error. So after getting the dose ratio of the rotational center to the target area, the calculated dose can be delivered to the rotational center. The advantages of the eccentric conformation radiotherapy are a good coincidence of target area and treated area, a partial shielding and a hollow out technique without absorber. The limitation of the movement of the collimator from center is 5 cm at 1 m SCD. (author)

  16. Milk yield and composition, nutrition, body conformation traits, body condition scores, fertility and diseases in high-yielding dairy cows--Part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aeberhard, K; Bruckmaier, R M; Kuepfer, U; Blum, J W

    2001-03-01

    Twenty-nine pairs of high-yielding dairy cows (HC; > or = 45 kg/day reached at least once during lactation) and corresponding control cows (CC; with milk yields representing the average yield of the herds) were examined on 29 Swiss farms from March 1995 to September 1996. The hypotheses were tested that there are differences in feed intake, body-conformation traits, body weight (BW), body condition score (BCS), fertility status and disease incidence between HC and CC cows. Cows were studied 2 weeks before and at 5, 9, 13, 17 and 40 weeks post-partum. HC cows produced more energy-corrected milk (ECM) than CC cows (10,670 +/- 321 kg in 293 +/- 5 days and 8385 +/- 283 kg in 294 +/- 4 days, respectively; P cows (46.2 +/- 1.1 and 36.2 +/- 1.0 kg ECM/day, respectively; P cows (7.6 +/- 0.5 and 5.7 +/- 0.5 kg/day, respectively) and dry matter intakes (measured in week 5 of lactation over 3 days on six farms) were greater in HC than in CC cows (24.0 +/- 1.1 and 20.3 +/- 1.1 kg/day, respectively; P cows were taller than CC cows (wither heights 143.3 +/- 0.8 and 140.1 +/- 0.8 cm, respectively; P cows was greater than in CC cows throughout the study, differences and decreases of BW during lactation were not significant. BCS at the end of pregnancy and decrements during lactation were similar in HC and CC cows. Fertility parameters were similar in HC and CC cows. Incidences of mastitis, claw and feet problems, hypocalcemia/downer cow syndrome, ovarian cysts and abortions were similar in HC and CC cows, but there were more indigestion problems in HC than in CC cows.

  17. Clinical Studies on conformal radiotherapy combined with epidermal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    in second-line treatment of non-small cell lung cancer ... receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI) in the second-line treatment of non-small cell ... were divided into two groups: 106 patients were treated with conformal ... Conformal radiotherapy, Targeted therapy, Survival rate .... regression model was used for survival.

  18. Gel dosimetry for conformal radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gambarini, G [Department of Physics of the University and INFN, Milan (Italy)

    2005-07-01

    With the continuum development of conformal radio therapies, aimed at delivering high dose to tumor tissue and low dose to the healthy tissue around, the necessities has appeared of suitable improvement of dosimetry techniques giving the possibility of obtaining dose images to be compared with diagnostic images. Also if wide software has been developed for calculating dose distributions in the fields of various radiotherapy units, experimental verifications are necessary, in particular in the case of complex geometries in conformal radiotherapy. Gel dosimetry is a promising method for imaging the absorbed dose in tissue-equivalent phantoms, with the possibility of 3D reconstruction of the spatial dose distribution, with milli metric resolution. Optical imaging of gel dosimeters, based on visible light absorbance analysis, has shown to be a reliable technique for achieving dose distributions. (Author)

  19. The Role of Conformity in Relation to Cohesiveness and Intimacy in Day-Hospital Groups of Patients with Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Il Ho; Park, Sun Young; Choi, Sulkee; Lee, Soo Young; Kim, Jae-Jin

    2017-07-01

    Conformity is defined as the act of adjusting one's behavior to match the social responses of others. Patients with schizophrenia often adjust their maladaptive behaviors by conforming in group treatment settings. This study aimed to examine whether the opinions of group members influence conformity of patients with schizophrenia who attend day-hospital programs. Nineteen patients with schizophrenia from four different day-hospital programs and 23 healthy controls from four different social clubs completed the homographic meaning choice task under conditions of prior exposure to the pseudo-opinions of their group members, strangers, and unknown information sources. Group influences on conformity were observed when the level of group cohesiveness was high and the level of intimacy was low across participant groups. Controls did not exhibit a significant effect of group influence on conformity, whereas patients were significantly influenced by their group members when making conformity-based decisions despite significantly lower intimacy and cohesiveness levels. These findings suggest that unlike controls, patients with schizophrenia tend to respond with conformity when influenced by the opinions of their affiliated group. In patients with schizophrenia group conformity may be used to select a more accurate decision and to enhance feelings of affiliation among them.

  20. Conformity and statistical tolerancing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblond, Laurent; Pillet, Maurice

    2018-02-01

    Statistical tolerancing was first proposed by Shewhart (Economic Control of Quality of Manufactured Product, (1931) reprinted 1980 by ASQC), in spite of this long history, its use remains moderate. One of the probable reasons for this low utilization is undoubtedly the difficulty for designers to anticipate the risks of this approach. The arithmetic tolerance (worst case) allows a simple interpretation: conformity is defined by the presence of the characteristic in an interval. Statistical tolerancing is more complex in its definition. An interval is not sufficient to define the conformance. To justify the statistical tolerancing formula used by designers, a tolerance interval should be interpreted as the interval where most of the parts produced should probably be located. This tolerance is justified by considering a conformity criterion of the parts guaranteeing low offsets on the latter characteristics. Unlike traditional arithmetic tolerancing, statistical tolerancing requires a sustained exchange of information between design and manufacture to be used safely. This paper proposes a formal definition of the conformity, which we apply successively to the quadratic and arithmetic tolerancing. We introduce a concept of concavity, which helps us to demonstrate the link between tolerancing approach and conformity. We use this concept to demonstrate the various acceptable propositions of statistical tolerancing (in the space decentring, dispersion).

  1. Axiomatic conformal field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaberdiel, M.R.; Goddard, P.

    2000-01-01

    A new rigourous approach to conformal field theory is presented. The basic objects are families of complex-valued amplitudes, which define a meromorphic conformal field theory (or chiral algebra) and which lead naturally to the definition of topological vector spaces, between which vertex operators act as continuous operators. In fact, in order to develop the theory, Moebius invariance rather than full conformal invariance is required but it is shown that every Moebius theory can be extended to a conformal theory by the construction of a Virasoro field. In this approach, a representation of a conformal field theory is naturally defined in terms of a family of amplitudes with appropriate analytic properties. It is shown that these amplitudes can also be derived from a suitable collection of states in the meromorphic theory. Zhu's algebra then appears naturally as the algebra of conditions which states defining highest weight representations must satisfy. The relationship of the representations of Zhu's algebra to the classification of highest weight representations is explained. (orig.)

  2. Understanding modern magnets through conformal mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halbach, K.

    1989-10-01

    I want to show with the help of a number of examples that conformal mapping is a unique and enormously powerful tool for thinking about, and solving, problems. Usually one has to write down only a few equations, and sometimes none at all exclamation point When I started getting involved in work for which conformal mapping seemed to be a powerful tool, I did not think that I would ever be able to use that technique successfully because it seemed to require a nearly encyclopedic memory, an impression that was strengthened when I saw K. Kober's Dictionary of Conformal Representations. This attitude changed when I started to realize that beyond the basics of the theory of a function of a complex variable, I needed to know only about a handful of conformal maps and procedures. Consequently, my second goal for this talk is to show that in most cases conformal mapping functions can be obtained by formulating the underlying physics appropriately. This means particularly that encyclopedic knowledge of conformal maps is not necessary for successful use of conformal mapping techniques. To demonstrate these facts I have chosen examples from an area of physics/engineering in which I am active, namely accelerator physics. In order to do that successfully I start with a brief introduction into high energy charged particle storage ring technology, even though not all examples used in this paper to elucidate my points come directly from this particular field of accelerator technology

  3. Extended conformal algebras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goddard, Peter

    1990-01-01

    The algebra of the group of conformal transformations in two dimensions consists of two commuting copies of the Virasoro algebra. In many mathematical and physical contexts, the representations of ν which are relevant satisfy two conditions: they are unitary and they have the ''positive energy'' property that L o is bounded below. In an irreducible unitary representation the central element c takes a fixed real value. In physical contexts, the value of c is a characteristic of a theory. If c < 1, it turns out that the conformal algebra is sufficient to ''solve'' the theory, in the sense of relating the calculation of the infinite set of physically interesting quantities to a finite subset which can be handled in principle. For c ≥ 1, this is no longer the case for the algebra alone and one needs some sort of extended conformal algebra, such as the superconformal algebra. It is these algebras that this paper aims at addressing. (author)

  4. Algebraic conformal field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, J.; Nationaal Inst. voor Kernfysica en Hoge-Energiefysica

    1991-11-01

    Many conformal field theory features are special versions of structures which are present in arbitrary 2-dimensional quantum field theories. So it makes sense to describe 2-dimensional conformal field theories in context of algebraic theory of superselection sectors. While most of the results of the algebraic theory are rather abstract, conformal field theories offer the possibility to work out many formulae explicitly. In particular, one can construct the full algebra A-bar of global observables and the endomorphisms of A-bar which represent the superselection sectors. Some explicit results are presented for the level 1 so(N) WZW theories; the algebra A-bar is found to be the enveloping algebra of a Lie algebra L-bar which is an extension of the chiral symmetry algebra of the WZW theory. (author). 21 refs., 6 figs

  5. Killing tensors and conformal Killing tensors from conformal Killing vectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rani, Raffaele; Edgar, S Brian; Barnes, Alan

    2003-01-01

    Koutras has proposed some methods to construct reducible proper conformal Killing tensors and Killing tensors (which are, in general, irreducible) when a pair of orthogonal conformal Killing vectors exist in a given space. We give the completely general result demonstrating that this severe restriction of orthogonality is unnecessary. In addition, we correct and extend some results concerning Killing tensors constructed from a single conformal Killing vector. A number of examples demonstrate that it is possible to construct a much larger class of reducible proper conformal Killing tensors and Killing tensors than permitted by the Koutras algorithms. In particular, by showing that all conformal Killing tensors are reducible in conformally flat spaces, we have a method of constructing all conformal Killing tensors, and hence all the Killing tensors (which will in general be irreducible) of conformally flat spaces using their conformal Killing vectors

  6. High-dose (70-78 GY) conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer; the relation between observed late bladder and rectum complications and parameters derived from the dose volume histograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebesque, J.V.; Bruce, A.; Boersma, L.J.; Velde, A. te

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the incidence of late gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) complications after conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer, and to investigate the relation between these observed incidences and parameters derived from the Dose Volume Histograms (DVHs) of rectum and bladder wall. Patients and Methods: Hundred and thirty patients with T 2-4 G 1-3 N 0 M 0 prostate cancer were treated with conformal radiotherapy with the simultaneous boost technique in a dose-escalating protocol; 78 patients received a total dose of 70 Gy, 11 patients 74 - 76 Gy and 41 patients 78 Gy, each with a dose of 2 Gy per fraction. DVHs of the rectal wall were used to calculate NTCPs according to the model of Kutcher et al. with the estimated parameter values (n = 0.12, m = 0.15, TD 50 = 80 Gy) according to Burman et al. The median follow-up was 17 months (range 6 - 72 months). The crude and actuarial incidence of late (> 6 months) GI and GU complications were determined using the RTOG/EORTC morbidity scoring system (Grade I to IV). Results: Neither for late GI nor for GU complaints, a grade IV complication was observed. GU complaints occurred in 90 patients (69%): 54 patients (42%) only experienced grade I toxicity, 26 patients (20%) had grade II toxicity, and 10 patients (8%) had grade III complications, of which 8 patients (6%) developed a urethral (7 pts) or ureteric stenosis (1 pt). The actuarial incidence of grade III GU complications was 10% at 2 years. Since bladder wall DVHs are unreliable and most grade III complications were not related to the bladder, the grade II and/or III complications were analyzed in terms of the total prescribed dose only, but no correlation could be demonstrated. GI complications occurred in 71 patients (55%): 59 patients (45%) developed a grade I complication, 11 a grade II complication and only 1 patient required laser treatment twice and blood transfusion because of rectal bleeding (grade III). The actuarial incidence of GI

  7. Integrability of conformal fishnet theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromov, Nikolay; Kazakov, Vladimir; Korchemsky, Gregory; Negro, Stefano; Sizov, Grigory

    2018-01-01

    We study integrability of fishnet-type Feynman graphs arising in planar four-dimensional bi-scalar chiral theory recently proposed in arXiv:1512.06704 as a special double scaling limit of gamma-deformed N = 4 SYM theory. We show that the transfer matrix "building" the fishnet graphs emerges from the R-matrix of non-compact conformal SU(2 , 2) Heisenberg spin chain with spins belonging to principal series representations of the four-dimensional conformal group. We demonstrate explicitly a relationship between this integrable spin chain and the Quantum Spectral Curve (QSC) of N = 4 SYM. Using QSC and spin chain methods, we construct Baxter equation for Q-functions of the conformal spin chain needed for computation of the anomalous dimensions of operators of the type tr( ϕ 1 J ) where ϕ 1 is one of the two scalars of the theory. For J = 3 we derive from QSC a quantization condition that fixes the relevant solution of Baxter equation. The scaling dimensions of the operators only receive contributions from wheel-like graphs. We develop integrability techniques to compute the divergent part of these graphs and use it to present the weak coupling expansion of dimensions to very high orders. Then we apply our exact equations to calculate the anomalous dimensions with J = 3 to practically unlimited precision at any coupling. These equations also describe an infinite tower of local conformal operators all carrying the same charge J = 3. The method should be applicable for any J and, in principle, to any local operators of bi-scalar theory. We show that at strong coupling the scaling dimensions can be derived from semiclassical quantization of finite gap solutions describing an integrable system of noncompact SU(2 , 2) spins. This bears similarities with the classical strings arising in the strongly coupled limit of N = 4 SYM.

  8. Multi-Pulsed High Hydrostatic Pressure Treatment of Foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sencer Buzrul

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Multi-pulsed high hydrostatic pressure (mpHHP treatment of foods has been investigated for more than two decades. It was reported that the mpHHP treatment, with few exceptions, is more effective than the classical or single-pulsed HHP (spHHP treatment for inactivation of microorganisms in fruit juice, dairy products, liquid whole egg, meat products, and sea foods. Moreover, the mpHHP treatment could be also used to inactivate enzymes in foods and to increase the shelf-life of foods. The effects of the mpHHP treatment of foods are summarized and the differences between the mpHHP and spHHP are also emphasized.

  9. A conformational switch high-throughput screening assay and allosteric inhibition of the flavivirus NS2B-NS3 protease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Brecher

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The flavivirus genome encodes a single polyprotein precursor requiring multiple cleavages by host and viral proteases in order to produce the individual proteins that constitute an infectious virion. Previous studies have revealed that the NS2B cofactor of the viral NS2B-NS3 heterocomplex protease displays a conformational dynamic between active and inactive states. Here, we developed a conformational switch assay based on split luciferase complementation (SLC to monitor the conformational change of NS2B and to characterize candidate allosteric inhibitors. Binding of an active-site inhibitor to the protease resulted in a conformational change of NS2B and led to significant SLC enhancement. Mutagenesis of key residues at an allosteric site abolished this induced conformational change and SLC enhancement. We also performed a virtual screen of NCI library compounds to identify allosteric inhibitors, followed by in vitro biochemical screening of the resultant candidates. Only three of these compounds, NSC135618, 260594, and 146771, significantly inhibited the protease of Dengue virus 2 (DENV2 in vitro, with IC50 values of 1.8 μM, 11.4 μM, and 4.8 μM, respectively. Among the three compounds, only NSC135618 significantly suppressed the SLC enhancement triggered by binding of active-site inhibitor in a dose-dependent manner, indicating that it inhibits the conformational change of NS2B. Results from virus titer reduction assays revealed that NSC135618 is a broad spectrum flavivirus protease inhibitor, and can significantly reduce titers of DENV2, Zika virus (ZIKV, West Nile virus (WNV, and Yellow fever virus (YFV on A549 cells in vivo, with EC50 values in low micromolar range. In contrast, the cytotoxicity of NSC135618 is only moderate with CC50 of 48.8 μM on A549 cells. Moreover, NSC135618 inhibited ZIKV in human placental and neural progenitor cells relevant to ZIKV pathogenesis. Results from binding, kinetics, Western blot, mass spectrometry and

  10. Radiation induced cancer risk estimation for contralateral breast in 3D conformal treatments of post mastectomy cancer patients: based on OED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemalatha, A.; Athiyaman, M.; Kumar, H.S.; Chougule, Arun

    2016-01-01

    A global comparison of breast cancer in India with other countries like US/China in 2012 gave a data that collectively the above countries including India account for almost one third of global breast cancer burden. According to this report for every two women newly diagnosed with breast cancer in India, one lady is dying of it. The curative radiotherapy for breast cancer treatment associated with scattered and leakage radiation exposure to critical organs like contralateral breast, lung etc. Radiation is one of the well known carcinogen of breast due its high radiosensititvity. The study done by Stovall et al concluded that the contralateral breast cancer risk is elevated for breast cancer patients of age less than 40 years if dose to health breast is greater than 1 Gy. So its necessary to evaluate dose to Contralateral Breast (ClB) for breast cancer patients for more than 1 Gy. The aim of this study is to compare the risks of secondary breast cancer from conventional wedge field and forward IMRT technique using the concept of OED-Organ Equivalent Dose/for chest wall irradiation of post mastectomy breast cancer patients

  11. Dosimetric Comparison of Three-Dimensional Conformal Proton Radiotherapy, Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy, and Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Treatment of Pediatric Craniopharyngiomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehling, Nicholas S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Grosshans, David R., E-mail: dgrossha@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Bluett, Jaques B. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Palmer, Matthew T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Song, Xiaofei; Amos, Richard A.; Sahoo, Narayan [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Meyer, Jeffrey J.; Mahajan, Anita; Woo, Shiao Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Cranial irradiation in pediatric patients is associated with serious long-term adverse effects. We sought to determine whether both three-dimensional conformal proton radiotherapy (3D-PRT) and intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) compared with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) decrease integral dose to brain areas known to harbor neuronal stem cells, major blood vessels, and other normal brain structures for pediatric patients with craniopharyngiomas. Methods and Materials: IMRT, forward planned, passive scattering proton, and IMPT plans were generated and optimized for 10 pediatric patients. The dose was 50.4 Gy (or cobalt Gy equivalent) delivered in 28 fractions with the requirement for planning target volume (PTV) coverage of 95% or better. Integral dose data were calculated from differential dose-volume histograms. Results: The PTV target coverage was adequate for all modalities. IMRT and IMPT yielded the most conformal plans in comparison to 3D-PRT. Compared with IMRT, 3D-PRT and IMPT plans had a relative reduction of integral dose to the hippocampus (3D-PRT, 20.4; IMPT, 51.3%{sup Asterisk-Operator }), dentate gyrus (27.3, 75.0%{sup Asterisk-Operator }), and subventricular zone (4.5, 57.8%{sup Asterisk-Operator }). Vascular organs at risk also had reduced integral dose with the use of proton therapy (anterior cerebral arteries, 33.3{sup Asterisk-Operator }, 100.0%{sup Asterisk-Operator }; middle cerebral arteries, 25.9%{sup Asterisk-Operator }, 100%{sup Asterisk-Operator }; anterior communicating arteries, 30.8{sup Asterisk-Operator }, 41.7%{sup Asterisk-Operator }; and carotid arteries, 51.5{sup Asterisk-Operator }, 77.6{sup Asterisk-Operator }). Relative reduction of integral dose to the infratentorial brain (190.7{sup Asterisk-Operator }, 109.7%{sup Asterisk-Operator }), supratentorial brain without PTV (9.6, 26.8%{sup Asterisk-Operator }), brainstem (45.6, 22.4%{sup Asterisk-Operator }), and whole brain without PTV (19.4{sup Asterisk

  12. HIGH-RATE ANAEROBIC TREATMENT OF ALCOHOLIC WASTEWATERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florencio L.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern high-rate anaerobic wastewater treatment processes are rapidly becoming popular for industrial wastewater treatment. However, until recently stable process conditions could not be guaranteed for alcoholic wastewaters containing higher concentrations of methanol. Although methanol can be directly converted into methane by methanogens, under specific conditions it can also be converted into acetate and butyrate by acetogens. The accumulation of volatile fatty acids can lead to reactor instability in a weakly buffered reactor. Since this process was insufficiently understood, the application of high-rate anaerobic reactors was highly questionable. This research investigated the environmental factors that are of importance in the predominance of methylotrophic methanogens over acetogens in a natural mixed culture during anaerobic wastewater treatment in upflow anaerobic sludge bed reactors. Technological and microbiological aspects were investigated. Additionally, the route by which methanol is converted into methane is also presented

  13. Massive Conformal Gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faria, F. F.

    2014-01-01

    We construct a massive theory of gravity that is invariant under conformal transformations. The massive action of the theory depends on the metric tensor and a scalar field, which are considered the only field variables. We find the vacuum field equations of the theory and analyze its weak-field approximation and Newtonian limit.

  14. Taming the conformal zoo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, G.; Seiberg, N.

    1989-01-01

    All known rational conformal field theories may be obtained from (2+1)-dimensional Chern-Simons gauge theories by appropriate choice of gauge group. We conjecture that all rational field theories are classified by groups via (2+1)-dimensional Chern-Simons gauge theories. (orig.)

  15. Conformal special relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maia, M.D.

    2006-01-01

    It is shown that the information loss/recovery theorem based on the ADS/CFT correspondence is not consistent with the stability of the Schwarzschild or Reissner-Nordstrom black holes. Nonetheless, the conformal invariance of Yang-Mills theory points to new relativity principle compatible with quantum unitarity near those black holes

  16. Animal culture: chimpanzee conformity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schaik, Carel P

    2012-05-22

    Culture-like phenomena in wild animals have received much attention, but how good is the evidence and how similar are they to human culture? New data on chimpanzees suggest their culture may even have an element of conformity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Parafermionic conformal field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurak, V.

    1989-09-01

    Conformal parafermionic field theories are reviewed with emphasis on the computation of their OPE estructure constants. It is presented a simple computational of these for the Z(N) parafermions, unveilling their Lie algebra content. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  18. Quantifying polypeptide conformational space: sensitivity to conformation and ensemble definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, David C; Lim, Carmay

    2006-08-24

    Quantifying the density of conformations over phase space (the conformational distribution) is needed to model important macromolecular processes such as protein folding. In this work, we quantify the conformational distribution for a simple polypeptide (N-mer polyalanine) using the cumulative distribution function (CDF), which gives the probability that two randomly selected conformations are separated by less than a "conformational" distance and whose inverse gives conformation counts as a function of conformational radius. An important finding is that the conformation counts obtained by the CDF inverse depend critically on the assignment of a conformation's distance span and the ensemble (e.g., unfolded state model): varying ensemble and conformation definition (1 --> 2 A) varies the CDF-based conformation counts for Ala(50) from 10(11) to 10(69). In particular, relatively short molecular dynamics (MD) relaxation of Ala(50)'s random-walk ensemble reduces the number of conformers from 10(55) to 10(14) (using a 1 A root-mean-square-deviation radius conformation definition) pointing to potential disconnections in comparing the results from simplified models of unfolded proteins with those from all-atom MD simulations. Explicit waters are found to roughen the landscape considerably. Under some common conformation definitions, the results herein provide (i) an upper limit to the number of accessible conformations that compose unfolded states of proteins, (ii) the optimal clustering radius/conformation radius for counting conformations for a given energy and solvent model, (iii) a means of comparing various studies, and (iv) an assessment of the applicability of random search in protein folding.

  19. Extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy: Evaluation of PTV coverage and dose conformity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haedinger, U.; Thiele, W.; Wulf, J.

    2002-01-01

    During the past few years the concept of cranial sterotactic radiotherapy has been successfully extended to extracranial tumoral targets. In our department, hypofractionated treatment of tumours in lung, liver, abdomen, and pelvis is performed in the Stereotactic Body Frame (ELEKTA Instrument AB) since 1997. We present the evaluation of 63 consecutively treated targets (22 lung, 21 liver, 20 abdomen/pelvis) in 58 patients with respect to dose coverage of the planning target volume (PTV) as well as conformity of the dose distribution. The mean PTV coverage was found to be 96.3%±2.3% (lung), 95.0%±4.5% (liver), and 92.1%±5.2% (abdomen/pelvis). For the so-called conformation number we obtained values of 0.73±0.09 (lung), 0.77±0.10 (liver), and 0.70±0.08 (abdomen/pelvis). The results show that highly conformal treatment techniques can be applied also in extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy. This is primarily due to the relatively simple geometrical shape of most of the targets. Especially lung and liver targets turned out to be approximately spherically/cylindrically shaped, so that the dose distribution can be easily tailored by rotational fields. (orig.) [de

  20. Quality assurance for high dose rate brachytherapy treatment planning optimization: using a simple optimization to verify a complex optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deufel, Christopher L; Furutani, Keith M

    2014-01-01

    As dose optimization for high dose rate brachytherapy becomes more complex, it becomes increasingly important to have a means of verifying that optimization results are reasonable. A method is presented for using a simple optimization as quality assurance for the more complex optimization algorithms typically found in commercial brachytherapy treatment planning systems. Quality assurance tests may be performed during commissioning, at regular intervals, and/or on a patient specific basis. A simple optimization method is provided that optimizes conformal target coverage using an exact, variance-based, algebraic approach. Metrics such as dose volume histogram, conformality index, and total reference air kerma agree closely between simple and complex optimizations for breast, cervix, prostate, and planar applicators. The simple optimization is shown to be a sensitive measure for identifying failures in a commercial treatment planning system that are possibly due to operator error or weaknesses in planning system optimization algorithms. Results from the simple optimization are surprisingly similar to the results from a more complex, commercial optimization for several clinical applications. This suggests that there are only modest gains to be made from making brachytherapy optimization more complex. The improvements expected from sophisticated linear optimizations, such as PARETO methods, will largely be in making systems more user friendly and efficient, rather than in finding dramatically better source strength distributions. (paper)

  1. Treatment of basal cell epithelioma with high energy electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Y. (Hyogo-ken Cancer Center, Kobe (Japan)); Kumano, M.; Kumano, K.

    1981-11-01

    Thirty patients with basal cell epithelioma received high energy electron beam therapy. They were irradiated with a dose ranging from 4,800 rad (24 fractions, 35 days) to 12,000 rad (40 fractions, 57 days). Tumors disappeared in all cases. These were no disease-related deaths; in one patient there was recurrence after 2 years. We conclude that radiotherapy with high energy electron beam is very effective in the treatment of basal cell epithelioma.

  2. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Treatment for Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yufeng Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is under high mortality but has few effective treatment modalities. High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU is becoming an emerging approach of noninvasively ablating solid tumor in clinics. A variety of solid tumors have been tried on thousands of patients in the last fifteen years with great success. The principle, mechanism, and clinical outcome of HIFU were introduced first. All 3022 clinical cases of HIFU treatment for the advanced pancreatic cancer alone or in combination with chemotherapy or radiotherapy in 241 published papers were reviewed and summarized for its efficacy, pain relief, clinical benefit rate, survival, Karnofsky performance scale (KPS score, changes in tumor size, occurrence of echogenicity, serum level, diagnostic assessment of outcome, and associated complications. Immune response induced by HIFU ablation may become an effective way of cancer treatment. Comments for a better outcome and current challenges of HIFU technology are also covered.

  3. High power electron accelerators for flue gas treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimek, Z.

    2011-01-01

    Flue gas treatment process based on electron beam application for SO 2 and NO x removal was successfully demonstrated in number of laboratories, pilot plants and industrial demonstration facilities. The industrial scale application of an electron beam process for flue gas treatment requires accelerators modules with a beam power 100-500 kW and electron energy range 0.8-1.5 MeV. The most important accelerator parameters for successful flue gas radiation technology implementation are related to accelerator reliability/availability, electrical efficiency and accelerator price. Experience gained in high power accelerators exploitation in flue gas treatment industrial demonstration facility was described and high power accelerator constructions have been reviewed. (author)

  4. High power electron accelerators for flue gas treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimek, Z. [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw (Poland)

    2011-07-01

    Flue gas treatment process based on electron beam application for SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} removal was successfully demonstrated in number of laboratories, pilot plants and industrial demonstration facilities. The industrial scale application of an electron beam process for flue gas treatment requires accelerators modules with a beam power 100-500 kW and electron energy range 0.8-1.5 MeV. The most important accelerator parameters for successful flue gas radiation technology implementation are related to accelerator reliability/availability, electrical efficiency and accelerator price. Experience gained in high power accelerators exploitation in flue gas treatment industrial demonstration facility was described and high power accelerator constructions have been reviewed. (author)

  5. Single-arc volumetric-modulated arc therapy (sVMAT) as adjuvant treatment for gastric cancer: Dosimetric comparisons with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xin; Li, Guangjun; Zhang, Yingjie; Bai, Sen; Xu, Feng; Wei, Yuquan; Gong, Youling

    2013-01-01

    To compare the dosimetric differences between the single-arc volumetric-modulated arc therapy (sVMAT), 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) techniques in treatment planning for gastric cancer as adjuvant radiotherapy. Twelve patients were retrospectively analyzed. In each patient's case, the parameters were compared based on the dose-volume histogram (DVH) of the sVMAT, 3D-CRT, and IMRT plans, respectively. Three techniques showed similar target dose coverage. The maximum and mean doses of the target were significantly higher in the sVMAT plans than that in 3D-CRT plans and in the 3D-CRT/IMRT plans, respectively, but these differences were clinically acceptable. The IMRT and sVMAT plans successfully achieved better target dose conformity, reduced the V 20/30 , and mean dose of the left kidney, as well as the V 20/30 of the liver, compared with the 3D-CRT plans. And the sVMAT technique reduced the V 20 of the liver much significantly. Although the maximum dose of the spinal cord were much higher in the IMRT and sVMAT plans, respectively (mean 36.4 vs 39.5 and 40.6 Gy), these data were still under the constraints. Not much difference was found in the analysis of the parameters of the right kidney, intestine, and heart. The IMRT and sVMAT plans achieved similar dose distribution to the target, but superior to the 3D-CRT plans, in adjuvant radiotherapy for gastric cancer. The sVMAT technique improved the dose sparings of the left kidney and liver, compared with the 3D-CRT technique, but showed few dosimetric advantages over the IMRT technique. Studies are warranted to evaluate the clinical benefits of the VMAT treatment for patients with gastric cancer after surgery in the future

  6. The superiority of hybrid-volumetric arc therapy (VMAT) technique over double arcs VMAT and 3D-conformal technique in the treatment of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer – A planning study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, Oscar S.H.; Lee, Michael C.H.; Hung, Albert W.M.; Chang, Amy T.Y.; Yeung, Rebecca M.W.; Lee, Anne W.M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetric performance of three different treatment techniques – conformal radiotherapy (CRT), double arcs volumetric modulated arc therapy (RapidArc, RA) and Hybrid-RapidArc (H-RA) for locally-advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Material and methods: CRT, RA and H-RA plans were optimized for 24 stage III NSCLC patients. The target prescription dose was 60 Gy. CRT consisted of 5–7 coplanar fields, while RA comprised of two 204 o arcs. H-RA referred to two 204 o arcs plus 2 static fields, which accounted for approximately half of the total dose. The plans were optimized to fulfill the departmental plan acceptance criteria. Results: RA and H-RA yielded a 20% better conformity compared with CRT. Lung volume receiving >20 Gy (V20) and mean lung dose (MLD) were the lowest in H-RA (V20 1.7% and 2.1% lower, MLD 0.59 Gy and 0.41 Gy lower than CRT and RA respectively) without jeopardizing the low-dose lung volume (V5). H-RA plans gave the lowest mean maximum spinal cord dose (34.4 Gy, 3.9 Gy < CRT and 2.2 Gy < RA plans) and NTCP of lung. Higher average MU per fraction (addition 52.4 MU) was observed with a reduced treatment time compared with CRT plans. Conclusion: The H-RA technique was superior in dosimetric outcomes for treating locally-advanced NSCLC compared to CRT and RA.

  7. Transportation Conformity Training and Presentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's OTAQ has provided multiple conformity training sessions in the past to assist state and local governments in implementing conformity requirements. As training information is prepared for other venues, it will be posted on this page.

  8. A new three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) technique for large breast and/or high body mass index patients: evaluation of a novel fields assessment aimed to reduce extra–target-tissue irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stimato, Gerardina; Ippolito, Edy; Silipigni, Sonia; Venanzio, Cristina Di; Gaudino, Diego; Fiore, Michele; Trodella, Lucio; D'Angelillo, Rolando Maria; Ramella, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To develop an alternative three-dimensional treatment plan with standardized fields class solution for whole-breast radiotherapy in patients with large/pendulous breast and/or high body mass index (BMI). Methods: Two treatment plans [tangential fields and standardized five-fields technique (S5F)] for a total dose of 50 Gy/25 fractions were generated for patients with large breasts [planning target volume (PTV) >1000 cm3 and/or BMI >25 kg m−2], supine positioned. S5F plans consist of two wedged tangential beams, anteroposterior: 20° for the right breast and 340° for the left breast, and posteroanterior: 181° for the right breast and 179° for the left breast. A field in field in medial–lateral beam and additional fields were added to reduce hot spot areas and extra–target-tissue irradiation and to improve dose distribution. The percentage of PTV receiving 95% of the prescribed dose (PTV V95%), percentage of PTV receiving 105% of the prescribed dose (PTV V105%), maximal dose to PTV (PTV Dmax), homogeneity index (HI) and conformity index were recorded. V10%, V20%, V105% and V107% of a “proper” normal tissue structure (body-PTV healthy tissue) were recorded. Statistical analyses were performed using SYSTAT v.12.0 (SPSS, Chicago, IL). Results: In 38 patients included, S5F improved HI (8.4 vs 10.1; p ≤ 0.001) and significantly reduced PTV Dmax and PTV V105%. The extra–target-tissue irradiation was significantly reduced using S5F for V105% (cm3) and V107% (cm3) with a very high difference in tissue irradiation (46.6 vs 3.0 cm3, p ≤ 0.001 for V105% and 12.2 vs 0.0 cm3, p ≤ 0.001 for V107% for tangential field and S5F plans, respectively). Only a slight increase in low-dose extra–target-tissue irradiation (V10%) was observed (2.2719 vs 1.8261 cm3, p = 0.002). Conclusion: The S5F technique in patients with large breast or high BMI increases HI and decreases hot spots in extra-target-tissues and can therefore be

  9. Hot Conformal Gauge Theories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mojaza, Matin; Pica, Claudio; Sannino, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    of flavors. Surprisingly this number, if computed to the order g^2, agrees with previous predictions for the lower boundary of the conformal window for nonsupersymmetric gauge theories. The higher order results tend to predict a higher number of critical flavors. These are universal properties, i......We compute the nonzero temperature free energy up to the order g^6 \\ln(1/g) in the coupling constant for vector like SU(N) gauge theories featuring matter transforming according to different representations of the underlying gauge group. The number of matter fields, i.e. flavors, is arranged...... in such a way that the theory develops a perturbative stable infrared fixed point at zero temperature. Due to large distance conformality we trade the coupling constant with its fixed point value and define a reduced free energy which depends only on the number of flavors, colors and matter representation. We...

  10. Conformational flexibility of aspartame.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toniolo, Claudio; Temussi, Pierandrea

    2016-05-01

    L-Aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester, better known as aspartame, is not only one of the most used artificial sweeteners, but also a very interesting molecule with respect to the correlation between molecular structure and taste. The extreme conformational flexibility of this dipeptide posed a huge difficulty when researchers tried to use it as a lead compound to design new sweeteners. In particular, it was difficult to take advantage of its molecular model as a mold to infer the shape of the, then unknown, active site of the sweet taste receptor. Here, we follow the story of the 3D structural aspects of aspartame from early conformational studies to recent docking into homology models of the receptor. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 376-384, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Conformal description of spinning particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todorov, I.T.

    1986-01-01

    This book is an introduction to the application of the conformal group to quantum field theory of particles with spin. After an introduction to the twistor representations of the conformal group of a conformally flat space-time and twistor flag manifolds with Su(2,2) orbits the classical phase space of conformal spinning particles is described. Thereafter the twistor description of classical zero mass fields is considered together with the quantization. (HSI)

  12. Conformal boundaries of warped products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kokkendorff, Simon Lyngby

    2006-01-01

    In this note we prove a result on how to determine the conformal boundary of a type of warped product of two length spaces in terms of the individual conformal boundaries. In the situation, that we treat, the warping and conformal distortion functions are functions of distance to a base point....... The result is applied to produce examples of CAT(0)-spaces, where the conformal and ideal boundaries differ in interesting ways....

  13. Conformal radiotherapy: a glossary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubray, B.; Giraud, P.; Beaudre, A.

    1999-01-01

    Most of the concepts and terms related to conformal radiotherapy were produced by English-speaking authors and eventually validated by international groups of experts, whose working language was also English. Therefore, a significant part of this literature is poorly accessible to the French-speaking radiation oncology community. The present paper gathers the 'official' definitions already published in French, along with propositions for the remaining terms which should be submitted to a more formal and representative validation process. (author)

  14. Highly Polluted Wastewaters Treatment by Improved Dissolved Air Flotation Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moga, I. C.; Covaliu, C. I.; Matache, M. G.; Doroftei, B. I.

    2017-06-01

    Numerous investigations are oriented towards the development of new wastewater treatment technologies, having high efficiencies for removing even low concentrations of pollutants found in water. These efforts were determined by the destroyer impact of the pollutants to the environment and human’s health. For this reason this paper presents our study concerning an improved dissolved air flotation technology for wastewater treatment. There is described a dissolved air flotation (DAF) installation composed by two equipments: pressurized capsule and lamellar settling. Also, there are presented some advantages of using nanoparticles as flotation collectors.

  15. High hydrostatic pressure treatment of porcine oocytes induces parthenogenetic activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Lin; Pribenszky, Csaba; Molnár, Miklós

    2010-01-01

    An innovative technique called high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) treatment has recently been reported to improve the cryosurvival of gametes and embryos in certain mammalian species, including the mouse, pig, and cattle. In the present study the parthenogenetic activation (PA) of pig oocytes caused...... by HHP treatment was investigated in different holding media with or without Ca(2+). The efficiency of activation was tested at different pressure levels and media including T2 (HEPES-buffered TCM-199 containing 2% cattle serum), and mannitol-PVA fusion medium with (MPVA + Ca(2+)) or without Ca(2...

  16. Comprehensive surface treatment of high-speed steel tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, Sergey V.; Aleshin, Sergey V.; Swe, Min Htet; Abdirova, Raushan D.; Kapitanov, Alexey V.; Egorov, Sergey B.

    2018-03-01

    One of the promising directions of hardening of high-speed steel tool is the creation on their surface of the layered structures with the gradient of physic-chemical properties between the wear-resistant coatings to the base material. Among the methods of such surface modification, a special process takes place based on the use of pulsed high-intensity charged particle beams. The high speed of heating and cooling allows structural-phase transformations in the surface layer, which cannot be realized in a stationary mode. The treatment was conducted in a RITM-SP unit, which constitutes a combination of a source of low-energy high-current electron beams "RITM" and two magnetron spraying systems on a single vacuum chamber. The unit enables deposition of films on the surface of the desired product and subsequent liquid-phase mixing of materials of the film and the substrate by an intense pulse electron beam. The article discusses features of the structure of the subsurface layer of high-speed steel M2, modified by surface alloying of a low-energy high-current electron beam, and its effect on the wear resistance of the tool when dry cutting hard to machine Nickel alloy. A significant decrease of intensity of wear of high-speed steel with combined treatment happens due to the displacement of the zone of wear and decrease the radius of rounding of the cutting edge because of changes in conditions of interaction with the material being treated.

  17. TH-EF-BRB-04: 4π Dynamic Conformal Arc Therapy Dynamic Conformal Arc Therapy (DCAT) for SBRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, T; Long, T; Tian, Z.; Yan, Y; Jiang, S; Gu, X [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Modiri, A; Sawant, A [University of Maryland in Baltimore, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop an efficient and effective trajectory optimization methodology for 4π dynamic conformal arc treatment (4π DCAT) with synchronized gantry and couch motion; and to investigate potential clinical benefits for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) to breast, lung, liver and spine tumors. Methods: The entire optimization framework for 4π DCAT inverse planning consists of two parts: 1) integer programming algorithm and 2) particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm. The integer programming is designed to find an optimal solution for arc delivery trajectory with both couch and gantry rotation, while PSO minimize a non-convex objective function based on the selected trajectory and dose-volume constraints. In this study, control point interaction is explicitly taken into account. Beam trajectory was modeled as a series of control points connected together to form a deliverable path. With linear treatment planning objectives, a mixed-integer program (MIP) was formulated. Under mild assumptions, the MIP is tractable. Assigning monitor units to control points along the path can be integrated into the model and done by PSO. The developed 4π DCAT inverse planning strategy is evaluated on SBRT cases and compared to clinically treated plans. Results: The resultant dose distribution of this technique was evaluated between 3D conformal treatment plan generated by Pinnacle treatment planning system and 4π DCAT on a lung SBRT patient case. Both plans share the same scale of MU, 3038 and 2822 correspondingly to 3D conformal plan and 4π DCAT. The mean doses for most of OARs were greatly reduced at 32% (cord), 70% (esophagus), 2.8% (lung) and 42.4% (stomach). Conclusion: Initial results in this study show the proposed 4π DCAT treatment technique can achieve better OAR sparing and lower MUs, which indicates that the developed technique is promising for high dose SBRT to reduce the risk of secondary cancer.

  18. Comparison of static conformal field with multiple noncoplanar arc techniques for stereotactic radiosurgery or stereotactic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, Russell J.; Kuchnir, Franca T.; Sweeney, Patrick; Rubin, Steven J.; Dujovny, Manuel; Pelizzari, Charles A.; Chen, George T. Y.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Compare the use of static conformal fields with the use of multiple noncoplanar arcs for stereotactic radiosurgery or stereotactic radiotherapy treatment of intracranial lesions. Evaluate the efficacy of these treatment techniques to deliver dose distributions comparable to those considered acceptable in current radiotherapy practice. Methods and Materials: A previously treated radiosurgery case of a patient presenting with an irregularly shaped intracranial lesion was selected. Using a three-dimensional (3D) treatment-planning system, treatment plans using a single isocenter multiple noncoplanar arc technique and multiple noncoplanar conformal static fields were generated. Isodose distributions and dose volume histograms (DVHs) were computed for each treatment plan. We required that the 80% (of maximum dose) isodose surface enclose the target volume for all treatment plans. The prescription isodose was set equal to the minimum target isodose. The DVHs were analyzed to evaluate and compare the different treatment plans. Results: The dose distribution in the target volume becomes more uniform as the number of conformal fields increases. The volume of normal tissue receiving low doses (> 10% of prescription isodose) increases as the number of static fields increases. The single isocenter multiple arc plan treats the greatest volume of normal tissue to low doses, approximately 1.6 times more volume than that treated by four static fields. The volume of normal tissue receiving high (> 90% of prescription isodose) and intermediate (> 50% of prescription isodose) doses decreases by 29 and 22%, respectively, as the number of static fields is increased from four to eight. Increasing the number of static fields to 12 only further reduces the high and intermediate dose volumes by 10 and 6%, respectively. The volume receiving the prescription dose is more than 3.5 times larger than the target volume for all treatment plans. Conclusions: Use of a multiple noncoplanar

  19. An introduction to conformal field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaberdiel, Matthias R.; Fitzwilliam College, Cambridge

    2000-01-01

    A comprehensive introduction to two-dimensional conformal field theory is given. The structure of the meromorphic subtheory is described in detail, and a number of examples are presented explicitly. Standard constructions such as the coset and the orbifold construction are explained. The concept of a representation of the meromorphic theory is introduced, and the role of Zhu's algebra in classifying highest weight representations is elucidated. The fusion product of two representations and the corresponding fusion rules are defined, and Verlinde's formula is explained. Finally, higher correlation functions are considered, and the polynomial relations of Moore and Seiberg and the quantum group structure of chiral conformal field theory are discussed. The treatment is relatively general and also allows for a description of less well known classes of theories such as logarithmic conformal field theories. (author)

  20. Accounting for treatment delays when treating highly proliferative tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, L.; Metcalfe, P.; Hoban, P.

    1999-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the possibility of increasing the dose per fraction or increasing the number of fractions to account for treatment delays occurring during radiotherapy treatments for highly proliferative tumours. The linear quadratic model with time was used to determine the difference in biological effective dose (BED) for the original schedule and the schedule including a treatment delay. Tables of extra fractions and extra dose per fraction required to account for a number of possible delays have been determined. It has been shown that for tumours with very short potential doubling times it is best to deliver the extra dose as an increase in dose per fraction rather than an increase in the number of fractions, while for tumours with moderately short potential doubling times (above 7 days) the reverse is true. The equivalent uninterrupted schedules, which would have delivered the same effects to the tumour, have also been determined. (author)

  1. Research on the sewage treatment in high altitude region based on Lhasa Sewage Treatment Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jin; Li, Shuwen

    2017-12-01

    Sewage treatment is of great significance to enhance environmental quality, consolidate pollution prevention and ecological protection, and ensure sustainable economic and social development in high altitude region. However, there are numerous difficulties in sewage treatment due to the alpine climate, the relatively low economic development level, and the backward operation and management styles, etc. In this study, the characteristics of influent quality in the sewage treatment plant in Lhasa are investigated by analysing the influent BOD5/COD and BOD5/TN, comparing key indexes recorded from 2014 to 2016 with the hinterland. Results show that the concentration of influent COD, BOD5, NH3-N and SS in the Lhasa sewage treatment plant, in which the sewage belongs to low-concentration urban sewage, is smaller than that in the domestic sewage treatment plants in the mainland. The concentration ratio of BOD5/COD and BOD5/TN is below 0.4 and 4, which indicates that the biodegradation is poor and the carbon sources are in bad demand. The consequences obtained play a vital role in the design, operation and management of sewage treatment plants in high altitude region.

  2. Logarithmic conformal field theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gainutdinov, Azat; Ridout, David; Runkel, Ingo

    2013-12-01

    Conformal field theory (CFT) has proven to be one of the richest and deepest subjects of modern theoretical and mathematical physics research, especially as regards statistical mechanics and string theory. It has also stimulated an enormous amount of activity in mathematics, shaping and building bridges between seemingly disparate fields through the study of vertex operator algebras, a (partial) axiomatisation of a chiral CFT. One can add to this that the successes of CFT, particularly when applied to statistical lattice models, have also served as an inspiration for mathematicians to develop entirely new fields: the Schramm-Loewner evolution and Smirnov's discrete complex analysis being notable examples. When the energy operator fails to be diagonalisable on the quantum state space, the CFT is said to be logarithmic. Consequently, a logarithmic CFT is one whose quantum space of states is constructed from a collection of representations which includes reducible but indecomposable ones. This qualifier arises because of the consequence that certain correlation functions will possess logarithmic singularities, something that contrasts with the familiar case of power law singularities. While such logarithmic singularities and reducible representations were noted by Rozansky and Saleur in their study of the U (1|1) Wess-Zumino-Witten model in 1992, the link between the non-diagonalisability of the energy operator and logarithmic singularities in correlators is usually ascribed to Gurarie's 1993 article (his paper also contains the first usage of the term 'logarithmic conformal field theory'). The class of CFTs that were under control at this time was quite small. In particular, an enormous amount of work from the statistical mechanics and string theory communities had produced a fairly detailed understanding of the (so-called) rational CFTs. However, physicists from both camps were well aware that applications from many diverse fields required significantly more

  3. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy in the treatment of prostate cancer in Australia and New Zealand: Report on a survey of radiotherapy centres and the proceedings of a consensus workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tai, K.-H.; Duchesne, G.; See, A.; Berry, M.

    2004-01-01

    There is an increasing use of 3-D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) in the radiotherapeutic management of prostate cancer. The Faculty of Radiation Oncology Genito-Urinary Group carried out a survey of Australian and New Zealand radiotherapy centres in the preparation of a consensus workshop. Of the 19 centres that were represented, there were 24 radiation oncologists, 16 radiation therapists and 12 medical physicists. The survey collected demographic information and data on the practices undertaken at those centres when delivering curative radiotherapy in the treatment of prostate cancer. There was much variation in the delivery of treatment in the areas of patient set-up, contouring of target volumes and organs of interest during computer planning, the techniques and the dose constraints used in these techniques, the use of adjuvant androgen deprivation therapy and the quality assurance processes used in monitoring effects of treatment. This variability reflects the range of data in the published literature. Emerging trends of practices were also identified. This is a first report on a multi-disciplinary approach to the development of guidelines in 3DCRT of prostate cancer. Copyright (2004) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  4. Preliminary Toxicity Analysis of 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy Versus Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy on the High-Dose Arm of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0126 Prostate Cancer Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michalski, Jeff M., E-mail: jmichalski@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology Washington University Medical Center, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Yan, Yan [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Watkins-Bruner, Deborah [Emory University School of Nursing, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Bosch, Walter R. [Department of Radiation Oncology Washington University Medical Center, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Winter, Kathryn [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Galvin, James M. [Department of Radiation Oncology Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Bahary, Jean-Paul [Department of Radiation Oncology Centre Hospitalier de l' Université de Montréal-Notre Dame, Montreal, QC (Canada); Morton, Gerard C. [Department of Radiation Oncology Toronto-Sunnybrook Regional Cancer Centre, Toronto, ON (Canada); Parliament, Matthew B. [Department of Oncology Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Sandler, Howard M. [Department of Radiation Oncology Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To give a preliminary report of clinical and treatment factors associated with toxicity in men receiving high-dose radiation therapy (RT) on a phase 3 dose-escalation trial. Methods and Materials: The trial was initiated with 3-dimensional conformal RT (3D-CRT) and amended after 1 year to allow intensity modulated RT (IMRT). Patients treated with 3D-CRT received 55.8 Gy to a planning target volume that included the prostate and seminal vesicles, then 23.4 Gy to prostate only. The IMRT patients were treated to the prostate and proximal seminal vesicles to 79.2 Gy. Common Toxicity Criteria, version 2.0, and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer late morbidity scores were used for acute and late effects. Results: Of 763 patients randomized to the 79.2-Gy arm of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0126 protocol, 748 were eligible and evaluable: 491 and 257 were treated with 3D-CRT and IMRT, respectively. For both bladder and rectum, the volumes receiving 65, 70, and 75 Gy were significantly lower with IMRT (all P<.0001). For grade (G) 2+ acute gastrointestinal/genitourinary (GI/GU) toxicity, both univariate and multivariate analyses showed a statistically significant decrease in G2+ acute collective GI/GU toxicity for IMRT. There were no significant differences with 3D-CRT or IMRT for acute or late G2+ or 3+ GU toxicities. Univariate analysis showed a statistically significant decrease in late G2+ GI toxicity for IMRT (P=.039). On multivariate analysis, IMRT showed a 26% reduction in G2+ late GI toxicity (P=.099). Acute G2+ toxicity was associated with late G3+ toxicity (P=.005). With dose–volume histogram data in the multivariate analysis, RT modality was not significant, whereas white race (P=.001) and rectal V70 ≥15% were associated with G2+ rectal toxicity (P=.034). Conclusions: Intensity modulated RT is associated with a significant reduction in acute G2+ GI/GU toxicity. There is a trend for a

  5. Conformation, orientation and interaction in molecular monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Superfine, R.; Huang, J.Y.; Shen, Y.R.

    1989-01-01

    Knowledge of the conformation and ordering of molecular monolayers is essential for a detailed understanding of a wide variety of surface and interfacial phenomena. Over the past several years, surface second harmonic generation (SHG) has proven to be a valuable and versatile probe of monolayer systems. Our group has recently extended the technique to infrared-visible sum frequency generation (SFG) which has unique capabilities for surface vibrational spectroscopy. Like second harmonic generation, SFG is highly surface specific with submonolayer sensitivity at all interfaces accessible by light. The orientation of individual groups within an adsorbate molecule can be deduced by a polarization analysis of the SFG signal from the vibrational modes of the groups. The authors have used SHG and SFG to study orientations and conformations of surfactant and liquid crystal (LC) monolayers and their interaction on a substrate. The interfacial properties of LC are of great interest to many researchers for both basic science understanding and practical application to LC devices. It is well known that the bulk alignment of a liquid crystal in a cell is strongly affected by the surface treatment of the cell walls. The reason behind it is not yet clear. The theoretical background and experimental arrangement of SHG and SFG have been described elsewhere. In the setup, a 30 psec. Nd:YAG mode-locked laser system together with nonlinear accessories generates a visible beam at .532μm and an infrared beam tunable about 3.4μm. Both beams are focused to a common spot of 300μm dia. The typical signal off the surface from a compact ordered alkyl chain monolayer is ∼500 photons per pulse, easily detected with a photomultiplier tube

  6. The study of treatment value of concurrent chemotherapy for patients with esophageal carcinoma received three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy or intensity modulated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Lan; Wang Jun; Han Chun; Zhang Jing; Li Xiaoning; Gao Chao

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To observe the acute side effects, local control rate and survival rate of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CC) and radiotherapy alone (R) for patients with esophageal carcinoma. Methods: From June 2006 to February 2009, 209 patients with esophageal carcinoma were observed, 105 of them were treated with CC. Of all the patients, 117 received three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, 92 received intensity modulated radiotherapy, the median prescription dose was 60 Gy. The regimen of LFP (5-FU, cisplatin and calcium folinate) was selected for this study, side effects, local control rate and survival rate were observed and subsets analysis were performed. Results: The overall follow-up rate was 99.0%,there were 99 and 44 patients whose follow-up time was more than 2 and 3 years, respectively;for the CC group, the data were 45 and 14, respectively; and for the R group, 54 and 30, respectively. The 1-, 2-, 3-year local control rates of CC group and R group were 88.1%, 69.2%, 66.2% and 81.0%, 64.0%, 54.9% (χ 2 =2.31, P=0.128), respectively. The 1-, 2-, 3-year overall survival rates of CC group and R group were 84.4%, 52.9%, 45.6% and 75.2%, 50.7%, 37.0%(χ 2 =1.57, P=0.210), respectively. Subset analysis indicated that for the patients of N 0 group and whose length of GTV >7 cm, the local control rate of CC was significantly higher than that of radiotherapy alone (χ 2 =5.11, 7.66; P=0.024, 0.006). For N 0 group, the survival rate of CC was higher than that of R alone. (χ 2 =5.07, P=0.024). The incidence of WBC, PLT and HGB reduction for the two groups were 81.9% and 49.0% (χ 2 =36.45, P=0.000), 14.3% and 1.9% (χ 2 =10.54, P=0.006), and 24.8% and 2.9% (χ 2 =22.95, P=0.000), respectively. The incidence of nausea, vomiting and constipation for the two groups were 63.8% and 7.7% (χ 2 =71.52, P=0.000), respectively. The incidence of ≥2 grade esophagitis of CC group and R group were 48.57% and 38.46% (χ 2 =2.17, P=0.141), respectively. The incidence of ≥2

  7. High energy transurethral thermotherapy in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia: criteria to predict treatment outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D'Ancona, F. C. H.; Francisca, E. A. E.; Hendriks, J. C. M.; Debruyne, F. M. J.; de la Rosette, J. J. M. C. H.

    1999-01-01

    In this study we analyzed the individual value of baseline parameters to predict the outcome of high energy transurethral microwave thermotherapy in the treatment of patients with lower urinary tract symptoms and benign prostatic hyperplasia. Two hundred and forty-seven patients with symptomatic

  8. Structure of maraging steel after thermomechanical treatment at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prokoshkina, V.G.; Kaputkina, L.M.; Mozzhukhin, V.E.

    1981-01-01

    Developed polygonized substructure is formed in austenite of maraging Cr-Ni steels under the selected conditions of hot deformation during high temperature mechanical treatment (HTMT). Substructure of hot deformed austenite is inherited by packet martensite during cooling. Presence of developed polygonized substructure in austenite results in grinding and high uniformity of packet sizes of martensite crystals. Substructure of α-phase of the investigated steels after HTMT, as well as the one inherited from hot deformed austenite, is inherited at α→γ-transformation in the process of repetitive austenization, and it can be preserved within a limited temperature-time range of heating in γ-region [ru

  9. HIGH VELOCITY THERMAL GUN FOR SURFACE PREPARATION AND TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.A. Gorlach

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many surface preparation and treatment processes utilise compressed air to propel particles against surfaces in order to clean and treat them. The effectiveness of the processes depends on the velocity of the particles, which in turn depends on the pressure of the compressed air. This paper describes a thermal gun built on the principles of High Velocity Air Fuel (HVAF and High Velocity Oxy Fuel (HVOF processes. The designed apparatus can be used for abrasive blasting, coating of surfaces, cutting of rocks, removing rubber from mining equipment, cleaning of contaminations etc.

  10. Precision, high dose radiotherapy: helium ion treatment of uveal melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saunders, W.M.; Char, D.H.; Quivey, J.M.; Castro, J.R.; Chen, G.T.Y.; Collier, J.M.; Cartigny, A.; Blakely, E.A.; Lyman, J.T.; Zink, S.R.

    1985-02-01

    The authors report on 75 patients with uveal melanoma who were treated by placing the Bragg peak of a helium ion beam over the tumor volume. The technique localizes the high dose region very tightly around the tumor volume. This allows critical structures, such as the optic disc and the macula, to be excluded from the high dose region as long as they are 3 to 4 mm away from the edge of the tumor. Careful attention to tumor localization, treatment planning, patient immobilization and treatment verification is required. With a mean follow-up of 22 months (3 to 60 months) the authors have had only five patients with a local recurrence, all of whom were salvaged with another treatment. Pretreatment visual acuity has generally been preserved as long as the tumor edge is at least 4 mm away from the macula and optic disc. The only serious complication to date has been an 18% incidence of neovascular glaucoma in the patients treated at our highest dose level. Clinical results and details of the technique are presented to illustrate potential clinical precision in administering high dose radiotherapy with charged particles such as helium ions or protons.

  11. Precision, high dose radiotherapy: helium ion treatment of uveal melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saunders, W.M.; Char, D.H.; Quivey, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    The authors report on 75 patients with uveal melanoma who were treated by placing the Bragg peak of a helium ion beam over the tumor volume. The technique localizes the high dose region very tightly around the tumor volume. This allows critical structures, such as the optic disc and the macula, to be excluded from the high dose region as long as they are 3 to 4 mm away from the edge of the tumor. Careful attention to tumor localization, treatment planning, patient immobilization and treatment verification is required. With a mean follow-up of 22 months (3 to 60 months) the authors have had only five patients with a local recurrence, all of whom were salvaged with another treatment. Pretreatment visual acuity has generally been preserved as long as the tumor edge is at least 4 mm away from the macula and optic disc. The only serious complication to date has been an 18% incidence of neovascular glaucoma in the patients treated at our highest dose level. Clinical results and details of the technique are presented to illustrate potential clinical precision in administering high dose radiotherapy with charged particles such as helium ions or protons

  12. Conformal superalgebras via tractor calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lischewski, Andree

    2015-01-01

    We use the manifestly conformally invariant description of a Lorentzian conformal structure in terms of a parabolic Cartan geometry in order to introduce a superalgebra structure on the space of twistor spinors and normal conformal vector fields formulated in purely algebraic terms on parallel sections in tractor bundles. Via a fixed metric in the conformal class, one reproduces a conformal superalgebra structure that has been considered in the literature before. The tractor approach, however, makes clear that the failure of this object to be a Lie superalgebra in certain cases is due to purely algebraic identities on the spinor module and to special properties of the conformal holonomy representation. Moreover, it naturally generalizes to higher signatures. This yields new formulas for constructing new twistor spinors and higher order normal conformal Killing forms out of existing ones, generalizing the well-known spinorial Lie derivative. Moreover, we derive restrictions on the possible dimension of the space of twistor spinors in any metric signature.

  13. Head and neck cancers: clinical benefits of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and of intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giraud, P.; Jaulerry, C.; Brunin, F.; Zefkili, S.; Helfre, S.; Chauvet, I.; Rosenwald, J.C.; Cosset, J.M.

    2002-01-01

    The conformal radiotherapy approach, three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) or intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), is based on modern imaging modalities, efficient 3-D treatment planning systems, sophisticated immobilization systems and rigorous quality assurance and treatment verification. The central objective of conformal radiotherapy is to ensure a high dose distribution tailored to the limits of the target volume while reducing exposure of normal tissues. These techniques would then allow further tumor dose escalation. Head-and-neck tumors are some of the most attractive localizations to test conformal radiotherapy. They combine ballistic difficulties due to particularly complex shapes (nasopharynx, ethmoid) and problems due to the number and low tolerance of neighbouring organs like parotids, eyes, brainstem and spinal cord. The therapeutic irradiation of head-and-neck tumors thus remains a challenge for the radiation oncologist. Conformal radiotherapy does have a significant potential for improving local control and reducing toxicity when compared to standard radiotherapy. However, in the absence of prospective randomized trials, it is somewhat difficult at present to evaluate the real benefits drawn from 3DCRT and IMRT. The published clinical reports on the use of conformal radiotherapy are essentially dealing with dosimetric comparisons on relatively small numbers of patients. Recently, a few publications have emphasized the clinical experience several precursor teams with a suitable follow-up. This paper describes the current state-of-the-art of 3DCRT and IMRT in order to evaluate the impact of these techniques on head-and-neck cancers irradiation. (authors)

  14. Pulmonary Toxicity in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated With High-Dose (74 Gy) 3-Dimensional Conformal Thoracic Radiotherapy and Concurrent Chemotherapy Following Induction Chemotherapy: A Secondary Analysis of Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) Trial 30105

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salama, Joseph K.; Stinchcombe, Thomas E.; Gu Lin; Wang Xiaofei; Morano, Karen; Bogart, Jeffrey A.; Crawford, Jeffrey C.; Socinski, Mark A.; Blackstock, A. William; Vokes, Everett E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) 30105 tested two different concurrent chemoradiotherapy platforms with high-dose (74 Gy) three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) after two cycles of induction chemotherapy for Stage IIIA/IIIB non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients to determine if either could achieve a primary endpoint of >18-month median survival. Final results of 30105 demonstrated that induction carboplatin and gemcitabine and concurrent gemcitabine 3D-CRT was not feasible because of treatment-related toxicity. However, induction and concurrent carboplatin/paclitaxel with 74 Gy 3D-CRT had a median survival of 24 months, and is the basis for the experimental arm in CALGB 30610/RTOG 0617/N0628. We conducted a secondary analysis of all patients to determine predictors of treatment-related pulmonary toxicity. Methods and Materials: Patient, tumor, and treatment-related variables were analyzed to determine their relation with treatment-related pulmonary toxicity. Results: Older age, higher N stage, larger planning target volume (PTV)1, smaller total lung volume/PTV1 ratio, larger V20, and larger mean lung dose were associated with increasing pulmonary toxicity on univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis confirmed that V20 and nodal stage as well as treatment with concurrent gemcitabine were associated with treatment-related toxicity. A high-risk group comprising patients with N3 disease and V20 >38% was associated with 80% of Grades 3-5 pulmonary toxicity cases. Conclusions: Elevated V20 and N3 disease status are important predictors of treatment related pulmonary toxicity in patients treated with high-dose 3D-CRT and concurrent chemotherapy. Further studies may use these metrics in considering patients for these treatments.

  15. Pulmonary Toxicity in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated With High-Dose (74 Gy) 3-Dimensional Conformal Thoracic Radiotherapy and Concurrent Chemotherapy Following Induction Chemotherapy: A Secondary Analysis of Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) Trial 30105

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salama, Joseph K., E-mail: joseph.salama@duke.edu [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Stinchcombe, Thomas E. [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Gu Lin; Wang Xiaofei [CALGB Statistical Center, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Morano, Karen [Quality Assurance Review Center, Lincoln, RI (United States); Bogart, Jeffrey A. [State University of New York Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY (United States); Crawford, Jeffrey C. [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Socinski, Mark A. [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Blackstock, A. William [Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Vokes, Everett E. [University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) 30105 tested two different concurrent chemoradiotherapy platforms with high-dose (74 Gy) three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) after two cycles of induction chemotherapy for Stage IIIA/IIIB non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients to determine if either could achieve a primary endpoint of >18-month median survival. Final results of 30105 demonstrated that induction carboplatin and gemcitabine and concurrent gemcitabine 3D-CRT was not feasible because of treatment-related toxicity. However, induction and concurrent carboplatin/paclitaxel with 74 Gy 3D-CRT had a median survival of 24 months, and is the basis for the experimental arm in CALGB 30610/RTOG 0617/N0628. We conducted a secondary analysis of all patients to determine predictors of treatment-related pulmonary toxicity. Methods and Materials: Patient, tumor, and treatment-related variables were analyzed to determine their relation with treatment-related pulmonary toxicity. Results: Older age, higher N stage, larger planning target volume (PTV)1, smaller total lung volume/PTV1 ratio, larger V20, and larger mean lung dose were associated with increasing pulmonary toxicity on univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis confirmed that V20 and nodal stage as well as treatment with concurrent gemcitabine were associated with treatment-related toxicity. A high-risk group comprising patients with N3 disease and V20 >38% was associated with 80% of Grades 3-5 pulmonary toxicity cases. Conclusions: Elevated V20 and N3 disease status are important predictors of treatment related pulmonary toxicity in patients treated with high-dose 3D-CRT and concurrent chemotherapy. Further studies may use these metrics in considering patients for these treatments.

  16. Treatment planning for radiotherapy with very high-energy electron beams and comparison of VHEE and VMAT plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena; Qu, Bradley; Palma, Bianey; Jensen, Christopher; Maxim, Peter G.; Loo, Billy W.; Hårdemark, Björn; Hynning, Elin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this work was to develop a treatment planning workflow for rapid radiotherapy delivered with very high-energy electron (VHEE) scanning pencil beams of 60–120 MeV and to study VHEE plans as a function of VHEE treatment parameters. Additionally, VHEE plans were compared to clinical state-of-the-art volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) photon plans for three cases. Methods: VHEE radiotherapy treatment planning was performed by linking EGSnrc Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations with inverse treatment planning in a research version of RayStation. In order to study the effect of VHEE treatment parameters on VHEE dose distributions, a MATLAB graphical user interface (GUI) for calculation of VHEE MC pencil beam doses was developed. Through the GUI, pediatric case MC simulations were run for a number of beam energies (60, 80, 100, and 120 MeV), number of beams (13, 17, and 36), pencil beam spot (0.1, 1.0, and 3.0 mm) and grid (2.0, 2.5, and 3.5 mm) sizes, and source-to-axis distance, SAD (40 and 50 cm). VHEE plans for the pediatric case calculated with the different treatment parameters were optimized and compared. Furthermore, 100 MeV VHEE plans for the pediatric case, a lung, and a prostate case were calculated and compared to the clinically delivered VMAT plans. All plans were normalized such that the 100% isodose line covered 95% of the target volume. Results: VHEE beam energy had the largest effect on the quality of dose distributions of the pediatric case. For the same target dose, the mean doses to organs at risk (OARs) decreased by 5%–16% when planned with 100 MeV compared to 60 MeV, but there was no further improvement in the 120 MeV plan. VHEE plans calculated with 36 beams outperformed plans calculated with 13 and 17 beams, but to a more modest degree (<8%). While pencil beam spacing and SAD had a small effect on VHEE dose distributions, 0.1–3 mm pencil beam sizes resulted in identical dose distributions. For the 100 MeV VHEE pediatric

  17. Classical extended conformal symmetries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viswanathan, R.

    1990-02-01

    Extensions of the Virasoro algebra are constructed as Poisson brackets of higher spin fields which appear as coefficient fields in certain covariant derivative operators of order N. These differential operators are constructed so as to be covariant under reparametrizations on fields of definite conformal dimension. Factorization of such an N-th order operator in terms of first order operators, together with the inclusion of a spin one U(1) current, is shown to lead to a two-parameter W-algebra. One of these parameters plays the role of interpolating between W-algebras based on different Lie algebras of the same rank. (author). 11 refs

  18. Focused conformational sampling in proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacci, Marco; Langini, Cassiano; Vymětal, Jiří; Caflisch, Amedeo; Vitalis, Andreas

    2017-11-01

    A detailed understanding of the conformational dynamics of biological molecules is difficult to obtain by experimental techniques due to resolution limitations in both time and space. Computer simulations avoid these in theory but are often too short to sample rare events reliably. Here we show that the progress index-guided sampling (PIGS) protocol can be used to enhance the sampling of rare events in selected parts of biomolecules without perturbing the remainder of the system. The method is very easy to use as it only requires as essential input a set of several features representing the parts of interest sufficiently. In this feature space, new states are discovered by spontaneous fluctuations alone and in unsupervised fashion. Because there are no energetic biases acting on phase space variables or projections thereof, the trajectories PIGS generates can be analyzed directly in the framework of transition networks. We demonstrate the possibility and usefulness of such focused explorations of biomolecules with two loops that are part of the binding sites of bromodomains, a family of epigenetic "reader" modules. This real-life application uncovers states that are structurally and kinetically far away from the initial crystallographic structures and are also metastable. Representative conformations are intended to be used in future high-throughput virtual screening campaigns.

  19. High-Altitude Illnesses: Physiology, Risk Factors, Prevention, and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew T. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available High-altitude illnesses encompass the pulmonary and cerebral syndromes that occur in non-acclimatized individuals after rapid ascent to high altitude. The most common syndrome is acute mountain sickness (AMS which usually begins within a few hours of ascent and typically consists of headache variably accompanied by loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, disturbed sleep, fatigue, and dizziness. With millions of travelers journeying to high altitudes every year and sleeping above 2,500 m, acute mountain sickness is a wide-spread clinical condition. Risk factors include home elevation, maximum altitude, sleeping altitude, rate of ascent, latitude, age, gender, physical condition, intensity of exercise, pre-acclimatization, genetic make-up, and pre-existing diseases. At higher altitudes, sleep disturbances may become more profound, mental performance is impaired, and weight loss may occur. If ascent is rapid, acetazolamide can reduce the risk of developing AMS, although a number of high-altitude travelers taking acetazolamide will still develop symptoms. Ibuprofen can be effective for headache. Symptoms can be rapidly relieved by descent, and descent is mandatory, if at all possible, for the management of the potentially fatal syndromes of high-altitude pulmonary and cerebral edema. The purpose of this review is to combine a discussion of specific risk factors, prevention, and treatment options with a summary of the basic physiologic responses to the hypoxia of altitude to provide a context for managing high-altitude illnesses and advising the non-acclimatized high-altitude traveler.

  20. Dosimetric comparison of helical tomotherapy, intensity-modulated radiation therapy, volumetric-modulated arc therapy, and 3-dimensional conformal therapy for the treatment of T1N0 glottic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekici, Kemal; Pepele, Eda K.; Yaprak, Bahaddin; Temelli, Oztun; Eraslan, Aysun F.; Kucuk, Nadir; Altınok, Ayse Y.; Sut, Pelin A.; Alpak, Ozlem D.; Colak, Cemil; Mayadagli, Alpaslan

    2016-01-01

    Various radiotherapy planning methods for T1N0 laryngeal cancer have been proposed to decrease normal tissue toxicity. We compare helical tomotherapy (HT), linac-based intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT), and 3-D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) techniques for T1N0 laryngeal cancer. Overall, 10 patients with T1N0 laryngeal cancer were selected and evaluated. Furthermore, 10 radiotherapy treatment plans have been created for all 10 patients, including HT, IMRT, VMAT, and 3D-CRT. IMRT, VMAT, and HT plans vs 3D-CRT plans consistently provided superior planning target volume (PTV) coverage. Similar target coverage was observed between the 3 IMRT modalities. Compared with 3D-CRT, IMRT, HT, and VMAT significantly reduced the mean dose to the carotid arteries. VMAT resulted in the lowest mean dose to the submandibular and thyroid glands. Compared with 3D-CRT, IMRT, HT, and VMAT significantly increased the maximum dose to the spinal cord It was observed that the 3 IMRT modalities studied showed superior target coverage with less variation between each plan in comparison with 3D-CRT. The 3D-CRT plans performed better at the D max of the spinal cord. Clinical investigation is warranted to determine if these treatment approaches would translate into a reduction in radiation therapy–induced toxicities.

  1. Highly selective electrocoagulation therapy: an innovative treatment for lymphangioma circumscriptum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xi; Jin, Yunbo; Chen, Hui; Li, Suolan; Ma, Gang; Hu, Xiaojie; Qiu, Yajing; Yu, Wenxin; Chang, Lei; Wang, Tianyou; Lin, Xiaoxi

    2014-08-01

    Lymphangioma circumscriptum (LC) is a type of microcystic lymphatic malformation involving the skin and mucosa that presents as translucent vesicles of varying size with a pink, red, or black hue. Lymphangioma circumscriptum causes not only cosmetic problems but also refractory rupture, infection, lymphorrhea, and bleeding. Various invasive methods, such as surgical excision, lasers, and sclerotherapy, have been used in the past to treat LC with varying success. Herein, we report a new treatment for the management of LC. This study reports the outcomes of 12 patients (aged 4-31 years) with LC treated by electrocoagulation using a special isolated needle. Patient demographics, lesion characteristics, radiologic findings, treatment course, and clinical responses are recorded. All 12 patients who were treated with the highly selective electrocoagulation therapy achieved near-complete clearance. Minimal intra- and postoperative sequelae were observed. The local complications included mild pain (n = 9), proliferous scarring (n = 1), and ulceration (n = 1) with no systemic side effects. The mean follow-up period was 8.25 months (3-14 months). Highly selective electrocoagulation therapy is an innovative, minimally invasive technique that seems to be safe and effective for the treatment of LC; the results from our limited study population seem promising, and the observed complications are acceptable.

  2. Treatment of Highly Turbid Water by Polyaluminum Ferric Chloride (PAFCL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fazel Fazel Mohammadi-Moghaddam

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims of the Study: In some situation like rainfall seasons raw water become very turbid so it affected the water treatment plant processes and quality of produced water. Treatment of very high turbid water has some concerns like precursors for disinfection by-products and very loading rate of particle on filter's media and consequently increases in water consumption for filter backwash. This paper investigates the performance of a composite inorganic polymer of aluminium and ferric salt, Polyaluminium ferric chloride (PAFCl, for the removal of turbidity, color and natural organic matter (NOM from high turbid water. Materials and Methods: Experiments were carried out by Jar test experiment by synthetic water samples with 250 and 500 NTU turbidity that prepared in laboratory. Results: The results of conventional jar test showed that the optimum pH for coagulation of water sample was 7.5 to 8 and optimum dosage of the coagulant was 10 mg/L. Removal efficiency of turbidity, color and UV adsorbent at 254 nm at optimum dose and pH without filtration was 99.92%, 100% and 80.6% respectively for first sample (250 NTU and 99.95%, 99.49% and 84.77 for second sample (500 NTU respectively. Conclusion: It concluded that polyaluminium ferric chloride has a very good efficiency for the removal of turbidity, color and organic matter in high turbid water. Also it can be select as a coagulant for high turbid water and some waste water from water treatment plant like filter backwash water.

  3. Riverbank filtration for the treatment of highly turbid Colombian rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Juan Pablo; van Halem, Doris; Rietveld, Luuk

    2017-05-01

    The poor quality of many Colombian surface waters forces us to seek alternative, sustainable treatment solutions with the ability to manage peak pollution events and to guarantee the uninterrupted provision of safe drinking water to the population. This review assesses the potential of using riverbank filtration (RBF) for the highly turbid and contaminated waters in Colombia, emphasizing water quality improvement and the influence of clogging by suspended solids. The suspended sediments may be favorable for the improvement of the water quality, but they may also reduce the production yield capacity. The cake layer must be balanced by scouring in order for an RBF system to be sustainable. The infiltration rate must remain high enough throughout the river-aquifer interface to provide the water quantity needed, and the residence time of the contaminants must be sufficient to ensure adequate water quality. In general, RBF seems to be a technology appropriate for use in highly turbid and contaminated surface rivers in Colombia, where improvements are expected due to the removal of turbidity, pathogens and to a lesser extent inorganics, organic matter and micro-pollutants. RBF has the potential to mitigate shock loads, thus leading to the prevention of shutdowns of surface water treatment plants. In addition, RBF, as an alternative pretreatment step, may provide an important reduction in chemical consumption, considerably simplifying the operation of the existing treatment processes. However, clogging and self-cleansing issues must be studied deeper in the context of these highly turbid waters to evaluate the potential loss of abstraction capacity yield as well as the development of different redox zones for efficient contaminant removal.

  4. Induction therapy with carboplatin/paclitaxel followed by concurrent carboplatin/paclitaxel and dose-escalating conformal radiotherapy in the treatment of locally advanced, unresectable non-small cell lung cancer: preliminary report of a phase I trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socinski, M A; Clark, J A; Halle, J; Steagall, A; Kaluzny, B; Rosenman, J G

    1997-08-01

    Locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer is optimally managed with chemotherapy and thoracic irradiation, although the most appropriate strategy is not yet defined. In this phase I trial, we use two 21-day cycles of induction chemotherapy with paclitaxel (Taxol; Bristol-Myers Squibb Company, Princeton, NJ) (225 mg/m2 over 3 hours) and carboplatin (area under the concentration-time curve = 6) followed by concurrent weekly paclitaxel (45 mg/m2/wk x 6) and carboplatin (area under the concentration-time curve = 2/wk x 6) and thoracic irradiation. Patients undergo three-dimensional treatment planning (conformal radiotherapy) to define the cancer target volume precisely. The phase I question being addressed in this study is the maximum tolerated radiation dose given concurrently with low-dose paclitaxel and carboplatin. The initial radiation dose is 60 Gy, with dose escalations to 66 Gy, 70 Gy, and 74 Gy being planned. Ten patients have been entered thus far (eight men and two women). Their median age is 67 years (range, 59 to 78 years), and none of the patients has had greater than 5% pretreatment weight loss. Seven of 10 are evaluable for response to induction carboplatin and paclitaxel, with a response rate of 57% (three partial responses and one minor response). Three patients had stable disease and none of the patients had evidence of progressive disease during induction chemotherapy. Three patients have completed all treatment at 60 Gy and one has completed all treatment at 66 Gy. Three of the four patients have had partial responses (75%), with the remaining patient having stable disease. Toxicity in the concurrent chemoradiotherapy portion of the trial thus far has consisted of grade 3 neutropenia in one patient and grade 4 lymphocytopenia in all four patients. No grade 3 or 4 nonhematologic toxicity has been seen. The trial data are not yet mature enough to report on survival. Accrual and treatment is continuing at the 66 Gy radiation dose level.

  5. Conformally symmetric traversable wormholes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehmer, Christian G.; Harko, Tiberiu; Lobo, Francisco S. N.

    2007-01-01

    Exact solutions of traversable wormholes are found under the assumption of spherical symmetry and the existence of a nonstatic conformal symmetry, which presents a more systematic approach in searching for exact wormhole solutions. In this work, a wide variety of solutions are deduced by considering choices for the form function, a specific linear equation of state relating the energy density and the pressure anisotropy, and various phantom wormhole geometries are explored. A large class of solutions impose that the spatial distribution of the exotic matter is restricted to the throat neighborhood, with a cutoff of the stress-energy tensor at a finite junction interface, although asymptotically flat exact solutions are also found. Using the 'volume integral quantifier', it is found that the conformally symmetric phantom wormhole geometries may, in principle, be constructed by infinitesimally small amounts of averaged null energy condition violating matter. Considering the tidal acceleration traversability conditions for the phantom wormhole geometry, specific wormhole dimensions and the traversal velocity are also deduced

  6. Supergravitational conformal Galileons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deen, Rehan; Ovrut, Burt

    2017-08-01

    The worldvolume actions of 3+1 dimensional bosonic branes embedded in a five-dimensional bulk space can lead to important effective field theories, such as the DBI conformal Galileons, and may, when the Null Energy Condition is violated, play an essential role in cosmological theories of the early universe. These include Galileon Genesis and "bouncing" cosmology, where a pre-Big Bang contracting phase bounces smoothly to the presently observed expanding universe. Perhaps the most natural arena for such branes to arise is within the context of superstring and M -theory vacua. Here, not only are branes required for the consistency of the theory, but, in many cases, the exact spectrum of particle physics occurs at low energy. However, such theories have the additional constraint that they must be N = 1 supersymmetric. This motivates us to compute the worldvolume actions of N = 1 supersymmetric three-branes, first in flat superspace and then to generalize them to N = 1 supergravitation. In this paper, for simplicity, we begin the process, not within the context of a superstring vacuum but, rather, for the conformal Galileons arising on a co-dimension one brane embedded in a maximally symmetric AdS 5 bulk space. We proceed to N = 1 supersymmetrize the associated worldvolume theory and then generalize the results to N = 1 supergravity, opening the door to possible new cosmological scenarios

  7. Treatment Protocol for High Velocity/High Energy Gunshot Injuries to the Face

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peled, Micha; Leiser, Yoav; Emodi, Omri; Krausz, Amir

    2011-01-01

    Major causes of facial combat injuries include blasts, high-velocity/high-energy missiles, and low-velocity missiles. High-velocity bullets fired from assault rifles encompass special ballistic properties, creating a transient cavitation space with a small entrance wound and a much larger exit wound. There is no dispute regarding the fact that primary emergency treatment of ballistic injuries to the face commences in accordance with the current advanced trauma life support (ATLS) recommendations; the main areas in which disputes do exist concern the question of the timing, sequence, and modes of surgical treatment. The aim of the present study is to present the treatment outcome of high-velocity/high-energy gunshot injuries to the face, using a protocol based on the experience of a single level I trauma center. A group of 23 injured combat soldiers who sustained bullet and shrapnel injuries to the maxillofacial region during a 3-week regional military conflict were evaluated in this study. Nine patients met the inclusion criteria (high-velocity/high-energy injuries) and were included in the study. According to our protocol, upon arrival patients underwent endotracheal intubation and were hemodynamically stabilized in the shock-trauma unit and underwent total-body computed tomography with 3-D reconstruction of the head and neck and computed tomography angiography. All patients underwent maxillofacial surgery upon the day of arrival according to the protocol we present. In view of our treatment outcomes, results, and low complication rates, we conclude that strict adherence to a well-founded and structured treatment protocol based on clinical experience is mandatory in providing efficient, appropriate, and successful treatment to a relatively large group of patients who sustain various degrees of maxillofacial injuries during a short period of time. PMID:23449809

  8. Robustness of IPSA optimized high-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy treatment plans to catheter displacements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poder, Joel; Whitaker, May

    2016-06-01

    Inverse planning simulated annealing (IPSA) optimized brachytherapy treatment plans are characterized with large isolated dwell times at the first or last dwell position of each catheter. The potential of catheter shifts relative to the target and organs at risk in these plans may lead to a more significant change in delivered dose to the volumes of interest relative to plans with more uniform dwell times. This study aims to determine if the Nucletron Oncentra dwell time deviation constraint (DTDC) parameter can be optimized to improve the robustness of high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy plans to catheter displacements. A set of 10 clinically acceptable prostate plans were re-optimized with a DTDC parameter of 0 and 0.4. For each plan, catheter displacements of 3, 7, and 14 mm were retrospectively applied and the change in dose volume histogram (DVH) indices and conformity indices analyzed. The robustness of clinically acceptable prostate plans to catheter displacements in the caudal direction was found to be dependent on the DTDC parameter. A DTDC value of 0 improves the robustness of planning target volume (PTV) coverage to catheter displacements, whereas a DTDC value of 0.4 improves the robustness of the plans to changes in hotspots. The results indicate that if used in conjunction with a pre-treatment catheter displacement correction protocol and a tolerance of 3 mm, a DTDC value of 0.4 may produce clinically superior plans. However, the effect of the DTDC parameter in plan robustness was not observed to be as strong as initially suspected.

  9. Could 3-D conformal radiotherapy improve the overall survival for non-small cell lung cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giraud, P.; Helfre, S.; Lavole, A.; Rosenwald, J.C.; Cosset, J.M.

    2002-01-01

    The conformal radiotherapy approach, three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), is based on modern imaging modalities, efficient 3-D treatment planning systems, sophisticated immobilization devices and demanding quality assurance and treatment verification. The main goal of conformal radiotherapy is to ensure a high dose distribution tailored to the limits of the target volume while reducing exposure of healthy tissues. These techniques would then allow a further dose escalation increasing local control and survival. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is one of the most difficult malignant tumors to be treated. It combines geometrical difficulties due to respiratory motion, and number of low tolerance neighboring organs, and dosimetric difficulties because of the presence of huge inhomogeneities. This localization is an attractive and ambitious example for the evaluation of new techniques. However, the published clinical reports in the last years described very heterogeneous techniques and, in the absence of prospective randomized trials, it is somewhat difficult at present to evaluate the real benefits drawn from those conformal radiotherapy techniques. After reviewing the rationale for 3DCRT for NSCLC, this paper will describe the main studies of 3DCRT, in order to evaluate its impact on lung cancer treatment Then the current state-of-the-art of IMRT and the last technical and therapeutic innovations in NSCL will be discussed. (authors)

  10. Conformational intermediate of the amyloidogenic protein beta 2-microglobulin at neutral pH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heegaard, N H; Sen, J W; Kaarsholm, N C

    2001-01-01

    electrophoresis that two conformers spontaneously exist in aqueous buffers at neutral pH. Upon treatment of wild-type beta(2)-microglobulin with acetonitrile or trifluoroethanol, two conformations were also observed. These conformations were in equilibrium dependent on the sample temperature and the percentage...

  11. Ward identities for conformal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazzarini, S.; Stora, R.

    1988-01-01

    Ward identities which express the symmetry of conformal models are treated. Diffeomorphism invariance or locally holomorphic coordinate transformations are used. Diffeomorphism invariance is then understood in terms of Riemannian geometry. Two different sets of Ward identities expressing diffeomorphism invariance in a conformally invariant way are found for the free bosonic string. Using a geometrical argument, the correct invariance for a large class of conformal models is given

  12. Conformational analysis of lignin models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Helio F. dos

    2001-01-01

    The conformational equilibrium for two 5,5' biphenyl lignin models have been analyzed using a quantum mechanical semiempirical method. The gas phase and solution structures are discussed based on the NMR and X-ray experimental data. The results obtained showed that the observed conformations are solvent-dependent, being the geometries and the thermodynamic properties correlated with the experimental information. This study shows how a systematic theoretical conformational analysis can help to understand chemical processes at a molecular level. (author)

  13. On the linear conformal gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pal'chik, M.Ya.; Fradkin, E.S.

    1984-01-01

    Conformal gravitation is analyzed under the assumption that its solution possesses the property of conformal symmetry. This assumption has sense in the case of small distances and only for definite types of matter fields, namely: at special choice of matter fields and their interactions, providing a lack of conformal anomalies; or at definite magnitudes of binding constants, coinciding with the zeroes of the Gell-Mann-Low function. The field equations, of the group-theoretical natura are obtained

  14. Fermion-scalar conformal blocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iliesiu, Luca [Joseph Henry Laboratories, Princeton University,Washington Road, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Kos, Filip [Department of Physics, Yale University,217 Prospect Street, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Poland, David [Department of Physics, Yale University,217 Prospect Street, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); School of Natural Sciences, Institute for Advanced Study,1 Einstein Dr, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States); Pufu, Silviu S. [Joseph Henry Laboratories, Princeton University,Washington Road, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Simmons-Duffin, David [School of Natural Sciences, Institute for Advanced Study,1 Einstein Dr, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States); Yacoby, Ran [Joseph Henry Laboratories, Princeton University,Washington Road, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2016-04-13

    We compute the conformal blocks associated with scalar-scalar-fermion-fermion 4-point functions in 3D CFTs. Together with the known scalar conformal blocks, our result completes the task of determining the so-called ‘seed blocks’ in three dimensions. Conformal blocks associated with 4-point functions of operators with arbitrary spins can now be determined from these seed blocks by using known differential operators.

  15. Treatment of foods with high-energy X rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleland, M.R.; Meissner, J.; Herer, A.S.; Beers, E.W.

    2001-01-01

    The treatment of foods with ionizing energy in the form of gamma rays, accelerated electrons, and X rays can produce beneficial effects, such as inhibiting the sprouting in potatoes, onions, and garlic, controlling insects in fruits, vegetables, and grains, inhibiting the growth of fungi, pasteurizing fresh meat, poultry, and seafood, and sterilizing spices and food additives. After many years of research, these processes have been approved by regulatory authorities in many countries and commercial applications have been increasing. High-energy X rays are especially useful for treating large packages of food. The most attractive features are product penetration, absorbed dose uniformity, high utilization efficiency and short processing time. The ability to energize the X-ray source only when needed enhances the safety and convenience of this technique. The availability of high-energy, high-power electron accelerators, which can be used as X-ray generators, makes it feasible to process large quantities of food economically. Several industrial accelerator facilities already have X-ray conversion equipment and several more will soon be built with product conveying systems designed to take advantage of the unique characteristics of high-energy X rays. These concepts will be reviewed briefly in this paper

  16. Treatment of foods with high-energy X rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleland, M. R.; Meissner, J.; Herer, A. S.; Beers, E. W.

    2001-07-01

    The treatment of foods with ionizing energy in the form of gamma rays, accelerated electrons, and X rays can produce beneficial effects, such as inhibiting the sprouting in potatoes, onions, and garlic, controlling insects in fruits, vegetables, and grains, inhibiting the growth of fungi, pasteurizing fresh meat, poultry, and seafood, and sterilizing spices and food additives. After many years of research, these processes have been approved by regulatory authorities in many countries and commercial applications have been increasing. High-energy X rays are especially useful for treating large packages of food. The most attractive features are product penetration, absorbed dose uniformity, high utilization efficiency and short processing time. The ability to energize the X-ray source only when needed enhances the safety and convenience of this technique. The availability of high-energy, high-power electron accelerators, which can be used as X-ray generators, makes it feasible to process large quantities of food economically. Several industrial accelerator facilities already have X-ray conversion equipment and several more will soon be built with product conveying systems designed to take advantage of the unique characteristics of high-energy X rays. These concepts will be reviewed briefly in this paper.

  17. Comparison of anisotropic aperture based intensity modulated radiotherapy with 3D-conformal radiotherapy for the treatment of large lung tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeonova, Anna; Abo-Madyan, Yasser; El-Haddad, Mostafa; Welzel, Grit; Polednik, Martin; Boggula, Ramesh; Wenz, Frederik; Lohr, Frank

    2012-02-01

    IMRT allows dose escalation for large lung tumors, but respiratory motion may compromise delivery. A treatment plan that modulates fluence predominantly in the transversal direction and leaves the fluence identical in the direction of the breathing motion may reduce this problem. Planning-CT-datasets of 20 patients with Stage I-IV non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) formed the basis of this study. A total of two IMRT plans and one 3D plan were created for each patient. Prescription dose was 60 Gy to the CTV and 70 Gy to the GTV. For the 3D plans an energy of 18 MV photons was used. IMRT plans were calculated for 6 MV photons with 13 coplanar and with 17 noncoplanar beams. Robustness of the used method of anisotropic modulation toward breathing motion was tested in a 13-field IMRT plan. As a consequence of identical prescription doses, mean target doses were similar for 3D and IMRT. Differences between 3D and 13- and 17-field IMRT were significant for CTV Dmin (43 Gy vs. 49.1 Gy vs. 48.6 Gy; p3D: 12.5 Gy vs. 14.8 Gy vs. 15.8 Gy: p3D-plans. Heart D(max) was only marginally reduced with IMRT (3D vs. 13- vs. 17-field IMRT: 38.2 Gy vs. 36.8 Gy vs. 37.8 Gy). Simulated breathing motion caused only minor changes in the IMRT dose distribution (~0.5-1 Gy). Anisotropic modulation of IMRT improves dose delivery over 3D-RT and renders IMRT plans robust toward breathing induced organ motion, effectively preventing interplay effects. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Very high-energy electron (VHEE) beams in radiation therapy; Treatment plan comparison between VHEE, VMAT, and PPBS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüler, Emil; Eriksson, Kjell; Hynning, Elin; Hancock, Steven L; Hiniker, Susan M; Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena; Wong, Tony; Le, Quynh-Thu; Loo, Billy W; Maxim, Peter G

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of very high-energy electron beams (VHEE) in comparison to clinically derived treatment plans generated with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and proton pencil beam scanning (PPBS) technology. We developed a custom optimization script that could be applied automatically across modalities to eliminate operator bias during IMRT optimization. Four clinical cases were selected (prostate cancer, lung cancer, pediatric brain tumor, and head and neck cancer (HNC)). The VHEE beams were calculated in the EGSnrc/DOSXYZnrc Monte Carlo code for 100 and 200 MeV beams. Treatment plans with VHEE, VMAT, and PPBS were optimized in a research version of RayStation using an in-house developed script to minimize operator bias between the different techniques. The in-house developed script generated similar or superior plans to the clinically used plans. In the comparisons between the modalities, the integral dose was lowest for the PPBS-generated plans in all cases. For the prostate case, the 200 MeV VHEE plan showed reduced integral dose and reduced organ at risk (OAR) dose compared to the VMAT plan. For all other cases, both the 100 and the 200 MeV VHEE plans were superior to the VMAT plans, and the VHEE plans showed better conformity and lower spinal cord dose in the pediatric brain case and lower brain stem dose in the HNC case when compared to the PPBS plan. The automated optimization developed in this study generated similar or superior plans as compared to the clinically used plan and represents an unbiased approach to compare treatment plans generated for different modalities. In the present study, we also show that VHEE plans are similar or superior to VMAT plans with reduced mean OAR dose and increased target conformity for a variety of clinical cases, and VHEE plans can even achieve reductions in OAR doses compared to PPBS plans for shallow targets. With increased VHEE energy, better conformity and even higher

  19. Instantons in conformal gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strominger, A.; Horowitz, G.T.; Perry, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    Fe study extrema of the general conformally invariant action: Ssub(c)=∫1/sub(α) 2 Csup(abcd)Csub(abcd)+γRsup(abcd*)Rsup(*)sub(abcd)+iTHETARsup(abcd)*Rsub(abcd). We find the first examples in four dimensions of asymptotically euclidean gravitational instantons. These have arbitrary Euler number and Hirzebruch signature. Some of these instantons represent tunneling between zero-curvature vacua that are not related by small gauge transformations. Others represent tunneling between flat space and topologically non-trivial zero-energy initial data. A general formula for the one-loop determinant is derived in terms of the renormalization group invariant masses, the volume of space-time, the Euler number and the Hirzebruch signature. (orig.)

  20. Conformance and Deviance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerdrum Pedersen, Esben Rahbek; Neergaard, Peter; Thusgaard Pedersen, Janni

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyses how large Danish companies are responding to new governmental regulation which requires them to report on corporate social responsibility (CSR). The paper is based on an analysis of 142 company annual reports required by the new Danish regulation regarding CSR reporting, plus 10...... interviews with first-time reporting companies and six interviews with companies that failed to comply with the new law. It is concluded that coercive pressures from government have an impact on CSR reporting practices. Further, the analysis finds traces of mimetic isomorphism which inspires a homogenisation...... in CSR reporting practices. Finally, it is argued that non-conformance with the new regulatory requirements is not solely about conscious resistance but may also be caused by, for example, lack of awareness, resource limitations, misinterpretations, and practical difficulties....

  1. Reflections on Conformal Spectra

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    We use modular invariance and crossing symmetry of conformal field theory to reveal approximate reflection symmetries in the spectral decompositions of the partition function in two dimensions in the limit of large central charge and of the four-point function in any dimension in the limit of large scaling dimensions Δ0 of external operators. We use these symmetries to motivate universal upper bounds on the spectrum and the operator product expansion coefficients, which we then derive by independent techniques. Some of the bounds for four-point functions are valid for finite Δ0 as well as for large Δ0. We discuss a similar symmetry in a large spacetime dimension limit. Finally, we comment on the analogue of the Cardy formula and sparse light spectrum condition for the four-point function. (based on 1510.08772 with Kim & Ooguri). This seminar will be given via videolink

  2. Biologically relevant conformational features of linear and cyclic proteolipid protein (PLP) peptide analogues obtained by high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance and molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordopati, Golfo G.; Tzoupis, Haralambos; Troganis, Anastassios N.; Tsivgoulis, Gerasimos M.; Golic Grdadolnik, Simona; Simal, Carmen; Tselios, Theodore V.

    2017-09-01

    Proteolipid protein (PLP) is one of the main proteins of myelin sheath that are destroyed during the progress of multiple sclerosis (MS). The immunodominant PLP139-151 epitope is known to induce experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, animal model of MS), wherein residues 144 and 147 are recognized by T cell receptor (TCR) during the formation of trimolecular complex with peptide-antigen and major histocompability complex. The conformational behavior of linear and cyclic peptide analogues of PLP, namely PLP139-151 and cyclic (139-151) (L144, R147) PLP139-151, have been studied in solution by means of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods in combination with unrestrained molecular dynamics simulations. The results indicate that the side chains of mutated amino acids in the cyclic analogue have different spatial orientation compared with the corresponding side chains of the linear analogue, which can lead to reduced affinity to TCR. NMR experiments combined with theoretical calculations pave the way for the design and synthesis of potent restricted peptides of immunodominant PLP139-151 epitope as well as non peptide mimetics that rises as an ultimate goal.

  3. Conformal boundary loop models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobsen, Jesper Lykke; Saleur, Hubert

    2008-01-01

    We study a model of densely packed self-avoiding loops on the annulus, related to the Temperley-Lieb algebra with an extra idempotent boundary generator. Four different weights are given to the loops, depending on their homotopy class and whether they touch the outer rim of the annulus. When the weight of a contractible bulk loop x≡q+q -1 element of (-2,2], this model is conformally invariant for any real weight of the remaining three parameters. We classify the conformal boundary conditions and give exact expressions for the corresponding boundary scaling dimensions. The amplitudes with which the sectors with any prescribed number and types of non-contractible loops appear in the full partition function Z are computed rigorously. Based on this, we write a number of identities involving Z which hold true for any finite size. When the weight of a contractible boundary loop y takes certain discrete values, y r ≡([r+1] q )/([r] q ) with r integer, other identities involving the standard characters K r,s of the Virasoro algebra are established. The connection with Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions in the O(n) model is discussed in detail, and new scaling dimensions are derived. When q is a root of unity and y=y r , exact connections with the A m type RSOS model are made. These involve precise relations between the spectra of the loop and RSOS model transfer matrices, valid in finite size. Finally, the results where y=y r are related to the theory of Temperley-Lieb cabling

  4. Conformal Aspects of QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, S

    2003-11-19

    Theoretical and phenomenological evidence is now accumulating that the QCD coupling becomes constant at small virtuality; i.e., {alpha}{sub s}(Q{sup 2}) develops an infrared fixed point in contradiction to the usual assumption of singular growth in the infrared. For example, the hadronic decays of the {tau} lepton can be used to determine the effective charge {alpha}{sub {tau}}(m{sub {tau}{prime}}{sup 2}) for a hypothetical {tau}-lepton with mass in the range 0 < m{sub {tau}{prime}} < m{sub {tau}}. The {tau} decay data at low mass scales indicates that the effective charge freezes at a value of s = m{sub {tau}{prime}}{sup 2} of order 1 GeV{sup 2} with a magnitude {alpha}{sub {tau}} {approx} 0.9 {+-} 0.1. The near-constant behavior of effective couplings suggests that QCD can be approximated as a conformal theory even at relatively small momentum transfer and why there are no significant running coupling corrections to quark counting rules for exclusive processes. The AdS/CFT correspondence of large N{sub c} supergravity theory in higher-dimensional anti-de Sitter space with supersymmetric QCD in 4-dimensional space-time also has interesting implications for hadron phenomenology in the conformal limit, including an all-orders demonstration of counting rules for exclusive processes and light-front wavefunctions. The utility of light-front quantization and light-front Fock wavefunctions for analyzing nonperturbative QCD and representing the dynamics of QCD bound states is also discussed.

  5. High risk HPV testing following treatment for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molloy, M; Comer, R; Rogers, P; Dowling, M; Meskell, P; Asbury, K; O'Leary, M

    2016-11-01

    To determine the results of combined cytology and high-risk human papilloma virus (HR HPV) tests at 6 and 18 months postcolposcopy treatment at one Irish colposcopy centre. All women who attended the centre's colposcopy smear clinic for a co-test 6 months (initial test) posttreatment were included in the audit (n = 251). The results revealed negative HR HPV for 79 % (n = 198) of women tested 6 months after treatment and positive results for 21 % (n = 53). HR HPV testing was more sensitive than cytology and led to early detection of residual disease. No women with negative HR HPV had high-grade cytology. HR HPV is more sensitive than cytology for detection of persistent CIN. However, 19 women with positive HR HPV had normal colposcopy with no persistent CIN detected. A national cost-benefit analysis is recommended to determine the value of the second co-test.

  6. Treatment of Wastewater with High Conductivity by Pulsed Discharge Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaojun; Jiang, Song; Liu, Kefu

    2014-07-01

    A wastewater treatment system was established by means of pulsed dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). The main advantage of this system is that the wastewater is employed as one of the electrodes for the degradation of rhodamine B, which makes use of the high conductivity and lessenes its negative influence on the discharge process. At the same time, the reactive species like ozone and ultraviolet (UV) light generated by the DBD can be utilized for the treatment of wastewater. The effects of some factors like conductivity, peak pulse voltage, discharge frequency and pH values were investigated. The results show that the combination of these reactive species could enhance the degradation of the dye while the ozone played the most important role in the process. The degradation efficiency was enhanced with the increase of energy supplied. The reduction in the concentration of rhodamine B was much more effective with high solution conductivity; under the highest conductivity condition, the degradation rate could rise to 99%.

  7. Treatment of Wastewater with High Conductivity by Pulsed Discharge Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhaojun; Jiang Song; Liu Kefu

    2014-01-01

    A wastewater treatment system was established by means of pulsed dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). The main advantage of this system is that the wastewater is employed as one of the electrodes for the degradation of rhodamine B, which makes use of the high conductivity and lessenes its negative influence on the discharge process. At the same time, the reactive species like ozone and ultraviolet (UV) light generated by the DBD can be utilized for the treatment of wastewater. The effects of some factors like conductivity, peak pulse voltage, discharge frequency and pH values were investigated. The results show that the combination of these reactive species could enhance the degradation of the dye while the ozone played the most important role in the process. The degradation efficiency was enhanced with the increase of energy supplied. The reduction in the concentration of rhodamine B was much more effective with high solution conductivity; under the highest conductivity condition, the degradation rate could rise to 99%. (plasma technology)

  8. Assessments for high dose radionuclide therapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, D.R.

    2003-01-01

    Advances in the biotechnology of cell specific targeting of cancer and the increased number of clinical trials involving treatment of cancer patients with radiolabelled antibodies, peptides, and similar delivery vehicles have led to an increase in the number of high dose radionuclide therapy procedures. Optimised radionuclide therapy for cancer treatment is based on the concept of absorbed dose to the dose limiting normal organ or tissue. The limiting normal tissue is often the red marrow, but it may sometimes be the lungs, liver, intestinal tract, or kidneys. Appropriate treatment planning requires assessment of radiation dose to several internal organs and tissues, and usually involves biodistribution studies in the patient using a tracer amount of radionuclide bound to the targeting agent and imaged at sequential timepoints using a planar gamma camera. Time-activity curves are developed from the imaging data for the major organ tissues of concern, for the whole body and sometimes for selected tumours. Patient specific factors often require that dose estimates be customised for each patient. In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration regulates the experimental use of investigational new drugs and requires 'reasonable calculation of radiation absorbed dose to the whole body and to critical organs' using the methods prescribed by the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) Committee of the Society of Nuclear Medicine. Review of high dose studies shows that some are conducted with minimal dosimetry, that the marrow dose is difficult to establish and is subject to large uncertainties. Despite the general availability of software, internal dosimetry methods often seem to be inconsistent from one clinical centre to another. (author)

  9. Logarithmic conformal field theory through nilpotent conformal dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moghimi-Araghi, S.; Rouhani, S.; Saadat, M.

    2001-01-01

    We study logarithmic conformal field theories (LCFTs) through the introduction of nilpotent conformal weights. Using this device, we derive the properties of LCFTs such as the transformation laws, singular vectors and the structure of correlation functions. We discuss the emergence of an extra energy momentum tensor, which is the logarithmic partner of the energy momentum tensor

  10. On Associative Conformal Algebras of Linear Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Retakh, Alexander

    2000-01-01

    Lie conformal algebras appear in the theory of vertex algebras. Their relation is similar to that of Lie algebras and their universal enveloping algebras. Associative conformal algebras play a role in conformal representation theory. We introduce the notions of conformal identity and unital associative conformal algebras and classify finitely generated simple unital associative conformal algebras of linear growth. These are precisely the complete algebras of conformal endomorphisms of finite ...

  11. Recent advancements in conformal gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O’Brien, James G.; Chaykov, Spasen S.; Moss, Robert J.; Dentico, Jeremy; Stulge, Modestas; Stefanski, Brian

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, due to the lack of direct observed evidence of cold dark matter, coupled with the shrinking parameter space to search for new dark matter particles, there has been increased interest in Alternative Gravitational theories. This paper, addresses three recent advances in conformal gravity, a fourth order renormalizable metric theory of gravitation originally formulated by Weyl, and later advanced by Mannheim and Kazanas. The first section of the paper applies conformal gravity to the rotation curves of the LITTLE THINGS survey, extending the total number of rotation curves successfully fit by conformal gravity to well over 200 individual data sets without the need for additional dark matter. Further, in this rotation curve study, we show how MOND and conformal gravity compare for each galaxy in the sample. Second, we look at the original Zwicky problem of applying the virial theorem to the Coma cluster in order to get an estimate for the cluster mass. However, instead of using the standard Newtonian potential, here we use the weak field approximation of conformal gravity. We show that in the conformal case we can get a much smaller mass estimate and thus there is no apparent need to include dark matter. We then show that this calculation is in agreement with the observational data from other well studied clusters. Last, we explore the calculation of the deflection of starlight through conformal gravity, as a first step towards applying conformal gravity to gravitaitonal lensing. (paper)

  12. Conformal invariance in harmonic superspace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galperin, A.; Ivanov, E.; Ogievetsky, V.; Sokatchev, E.

    1985-01-01

    N=2 conformal supersymmetry is realized in harmonic superspace, its peculiarities are analyzed. The coordinate group and analytical prepotentials for N=2 conformal supergravity are found. A new version of the N=2 Einstein supergravity with infinite number of auxiliary fields is suggested. A hypermultiplet without central charges and constraints is used as a compensator

  13. Counselor Identity: Conformity or Distinction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Jerry E.; Boettcher, Kathryn

    2009-01-01

    The authors explore 3 debates in other disciplines similar to counseling's identity debate in order to learn about common themes and outcomes. Conformity, distinction, and cohesion emerged as common themes. They conclude that counselors should retain their distinctive, humanistic approach rather than conforming to the dominant, medical approach.

  14. MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF HEATING RATE PRODUCT AT HIGH HEAT TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Akhmedova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Methods of computing and mathematical modeling are all widely used in the study of various heat exchange processes that provide the ability to study the dynamics of the processes, as well as to conduct a reasonable search for the optimal technological parameters of heat treatment.This work is devoted to the identification of correlations among the factors that have the greatest effect on the rate of heating of the product at hightemperature heat sterilization in a stream of hot air, which are chosen as the temperature difference (between the most and least warming up points and speed cans during heat sterilization.As a result of the experimental data warming of the central and peripheral layers compote of apples in a 3 liter pot at high-temperature heat treatment in a stream of hot air obtained by the regression equation in the form of a seconddegree polynomial, taking into account the effects of pair interaction of these parameters. 

  15. Treatment of solid waste highly contaminated by alpha emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madic, C.; Breschet, C.; Vigreaux, B.

    1990-01-01

    In the recent years, efforts have been made in order to reduce the amount of alpha emitters essentially plutonium isotopes present in the solid wastes produced either during research experiments on fuel reprocessing, done in the Radiochemistry building in the centre d'etudes nuclearires de FONTENAY-AUX-ROSES (CEA, FRANCE), or in the MARCOULE reprocessing plant (COGEMA, FRANCE). The goals defined for the treatments of these different wastes were: to reduce their α and β, γ, contamination levels. and to recover the plutonium, an highly valuable material, and to minimize its quantity to be discharged with the wastes. To achieve these goals leaching processes using electrogenerated Ag (II (a very aggressive agent for PuO 2 )) in nitric acid solutions, were developed and several facilities were designed and built to operate the processes: ELISE and PROLIXE facilities: PILOT ASHES FACILITY for delete, the treatment of plutonium contaminated ashes (COGEMA, MARCOULE). A brief description of the process and of the different facilities will be presented in this paper; the main results obtained in ELISE and PROLIXE are also summarized

  16. Precipitation of hydrides in high purity niobium after different treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barkov, F.; Romanenko, A.; Trenikhina, Y.; Grassellino, A.

    2013-01-01

    Precipitation of lossy non-superconducting niobium hydrides represents a known problem for high purity niobium in superconducting applications. Using cryogenic optical and laser confocal scanning microscopy we have directly observed surface precipitation and evolution of niobium hydrides in samples after different treatments used for superconducting RF cavities for particle acceleration. Precipitation is shown to occur throughout the sample volume, and the growth of hydrides is well described by the fast diffusion-controlled process in which almost all hydrogen is precipitated at $T=140$~K within $\\sim30$~min. 120$^{\\circ}$C baking and mechanical deformation are found to affect hydride precipitation through their influence on the number of nucleation and trapping centers.

  17. Recursion Relations for Conformal Blocks

    CERN Document Server

    Penedones, João; Yamazaki, Masahito

    2016-09-12

    In the context of conformal field theories in general space-time dimension, we find all the possible singularities of the conformal blocks as functions of the scaling dimension $\\Delta$ of the exchanged operator. In particular, we argue, using representation theory of parabolic Verma modules, that in odd spacetime dimension the singularities are only simple poles. We discuss how to use this information to write recursion relations that determine the conformal blocks. We first recover the recursion relation introduced in 1307.6856 for conformal blocks of external scalar operators. We then generalize this recursion relation for the conformal blocks associated to the four point function of three scalar and one vector operator. Finally we specialize to the case in which the vector operator is a conserved current.

  18. Conformal algebra of Riemann surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vafa, C.

    1988-01-01

    It has become clear over the last few years that 2-dimensional conformal field theories are a crucial ingredient of string theory. Conformal field theories correspond to vacuum solutions of strings; or more precisely we know how to compute string spectrum and scattering amplitudes by starting from a formal theory (with a proper value of central charge of the Virasoro algebra). Certain non-linear sigma models do give rise to conformal theories. A lot of progress has been made in the understanding of conformal theories. The author discusses a different view of conformal theories which was motivated by the development of operator formalism on Riemann surfaces. The author discusses an interesting recent work from this point of view

  19. The logarithmic conformal field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahimi Tabar, M.R.; Aghamohammadi, A.; Khorrami, M.

    1997-01-01

    We study the correlation functions of logarithmic conformal field theories. First, assuming conformal invariance, we explicitly calculate two- and three-point functions. This calculation is done for the general case of more than one logarithmic field in a block, and more than one set of logarithmic fields. Then we show that one can regard the logarithmic field as a formal derivative of the ordinary field with respect to its conformal weight. This enables one to calculate any n-point function containing the logarithmic field in terms of ordinary n-point functions. Finally, we calculate the operator product expansion (OPE) coefficients of a logarithmic conformal field theory, and show that these can be obtained from the corresponding coefficients of ordinary conformal theory by a simple derivation. (orig.)

  20. High-power ultrasonic treatment of contaminated soils and sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collings, A.F.; Gwan, P.B.; Sosa Pintos, A.P.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The propagation of high-power ultrasound through a liquid can initiate the phenomenon of cavitation. This occurs with the collapse of gas bubbles formed during the rarefaction phase of the ultrasonic wave either from the dissolution of air or vaporisation of the liquid. Bubble collapse can generate localised temperatures up to 5,000 K and pressures up to 1,000 atmospheres. Solid particles in slurry have been shown to act as foci for the nucleation and collapse of bubbles. Theory and experiment have confirmed that the rupture of a bubble on a solid surface generates a high speed jet directed towards the surface. In this case, the extreme conditions generated by the non-linear shock wave produced by bubble collapse are localised on the solid surface. Since Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) are hydrophobic and are also readily absorbed on the surface of soil particles, the energy released by cavitation in a soil or sediment slurry is selectively directed towards them. The temperatures are sufficient to decompose these molecules. However, the extreme conditions are highly localised and the bulk solution temperature is essentially unaffected. Any decomposition products are immediately quenched and recombination reactions are avoided. Recent advances in ultrasound technology have produced commercial equipment capable of high power which has enabled us to remediate soils and sediments containing Organochlorine Pesticides (OCPs), Polyaromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) and Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs). With reductions greater than 80% within minutes, this technique shows great promise with advantages of on-site treatment and reduced operating and capital costs compared with conventional methods

  1. Investigating ion channel conformational changes using voltage clamp fluorometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talwar, Sahil; Lynch, Joseph W

    2015-11-01

    Ion channels are membrane proteins whose functions are governed by conformational changes. The widespread distribution of ion channels, coupled with their involvement in most physiological and pathological processes and their importance as therapeutic targets, renders the elucidation of these conformational mechanisms highly compelling from a drug discovery perspective. Thanks to recent advances in structural biology techniques, we now have high-resolution static molecular structures for members of the major ion channel families. However, major questions remain to be resolved about the conformational states that ion channels adopt during activation, drug modulation and desensitization. Patch-clamp electrophysiology has long been used to define ion channel conformational states based on functional criteria. It achieves this by monitoring conformational changes at the channel gate and cannot detect conformational changes occurring in regions distant from the gate. Voltage clamp fluorometry involves labelling cysteines introduced into domains of interest with environmentally sensitive fluorophores and inferring structural rearrangements from voltage or ligand-induced fluorescence changes. Ion channel currents are monitored simultaneously to verify the conformational status. By defining real time conformational changes in domains distant from the gate, this technique provides unexpected new insights into ion channel structure and function. This review aims to summarise the methodology and highlight recent innovative applications of this powerful technique. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Fluorescent Tools in Neuropharmacology'. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Conformal solids and holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, A.; Garcia-Saenz, S.; Nicolis, A.; Penco, R.

    2017-12-01

    We argue that a SO( d) magnetic monopole in an asymptotically AdS space-time is dual to a d-dimensional strongly coupled system in a solid state. In light of this, it would be remiss of us not to dub such a field configuration solidon. In the presence of mixed boundary conditions, a solidon spontaneously breaks translations (among many other symmetries) and gives rise to Goldstone excitations on the boundary — the phonons of the solid. We derive the quadratic action for the boundary phonons in the probe limit and show that, when the mixed boundary conditions preserve conformal symmetry, the longitudinal and transverse sound speeds are related to each other as expected from effective field theory arguments. We then include backreaction and calculate the free energy of the solidon for a particular choice of mixed boundary conditions, corresponding to a relevant multi-trace deformation of the boundary theory. We find such free energy to be lower than that of thermal AdS. This suggests that our solidon undergoes a solid-to-liquid first order phase transition by melting into a Schwarzschild-AdS black hole as the temperature is raised.

  3. Intensity modulated conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noel, Georges; Moty-Monnereau, Celine; Meyer, Aurelia; David, Pauline; Pages, Frederique; Muller, Felix; Lee-Robin, Sun Hae; David, Denis Jean

    2006-12-01

    This publication reports the assessment of intensity-modulated conformal radiotherapy (IMCR). This assessment is based on a literature survey which focussed on indications, efficiency and safety on the short term, on the risk of radio-induced cancer on the long term, on the role in the therapeutic strategy, on the conditions of execution, on the impact on morbidity-mortality and life quality, on the impact on the health system and on public health policies and program. This assessment is also based on the opinion of a group of experts regarding the technical benefit of IMCR, its indications depending on the cancer type, safety in terms of radio-induced cancers, and conditions of execution. Before this assessment, the report thus indicates indications for which the use of IMCR can be considered as sufficient or not determined. It also proposes a technical description of IMCR and helical tomo-therapy, discusses the use of this technique for various pathologies or tumours, analyses the present situation of care in France, and comments the identification of this technique in foreign classifications

  4. 6d Conformal matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zotto, Michele Del; Heckman, Jonathan J.; Tomasiello, Alessandro; Vafa, Cumrun

    2015-01-01

    A single M5-brane probing G, an ADE-type singularity, leads to a system which has G×G global symmetry and can be viewed as “bifundamental” (G,G) matter. For the A N series, this leads to the usual notion of bifundamental matter. For the other cases it corresponds to a strongly interacting (1,0) superconformal system in six dimensions. Similarly, an ADE singularity intersecting the Hořava-Witten wall leads to a superconformal matter system with E 8 ×G global symmetry. Using the F-theory realization of these theories, we elucidate the Coulomb/tensor branch of (G,G ′ ) conformal matter. This leads to the notion of fractionalization of an M5-brane on an ADE singularity as well as fractionalization of the intersection point of the ADE singularity with the Hořava-Witten wall. Partial Higgsing of these theories leads to new 6d SCFTs in the infrared, which we also characterize. This generalizes the class of (1,0) theories which can be perturbatively realized by suspended branes in IIA string theory. By reducing on a circle, we arrive at novel duals for 5d affine quiver theories. Introducing many M5-branes leads to large N gravity duals.

  5. High temperature slagging incinerator for TRU-waste treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van De Voorde, N.; Hennart, D.; Gijbels, J.; Mergan, L.

    1984-01-01

    Since 1974 the Belgian Nuclear Study Center (SCK/CEN) at Mol, with the support of the European Communities, has developed an ''integral'' system for the treatment and the conditioning of radioactive contaminated wastes. The system converts directly, at high temperature (1500 0 C), mixtures of combustibles (paper, plastics, rubber etc.) and non-combustibles (metals, soil, sludge, concrete.) contaminated with transuranium elements as well as beta-gamma emitting isotopes, into a chemically inert and physically stable slag. More than 4000 hours of successful operation, with wide variety of simulated waste composition as well as real waste, have confirmed the safe operability of the high temperature sl'Gging incinerator and the connected installations, such as sorting cells, waste shredder, off-gas purification train, slag extraction system, remoted control, and the alpha-containment building. During the fall of 1983, a final confirmation of the performance of the installation was given by the successful accomplishment of an incineration campaign of 16 to 17 tons of simulated solid plutonium contaminated wastes

  6. Towards conformal loop quantum gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Charles H-T

    2006-01-01

    A discussion is given of recent developments in canonical gravity that assimilates the conformal analysis of gravitational degrees of freedom. The work is motivated by the problem of time in quantum gravity and is carried out at the metric and the triad levels. At the metric level, it is shown that by extending the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner (ADM) phase space of general relativity (GR), a conformal form of geometrodynamics can be constructed. In addition to the Hamiltonian and Diffeomorphism constraints, an extra first class constraint is introduced to generate conformal transformations. This phase space consists of York's mean extrinsic curvature time, conformal three-metric and their momenta. At the triad level, the phase space of GR is further enlarged by incorporating spin-gauge as well as conformal symmetries. This leads to a canonical formulation of GR using a new set of real spin connection variables. The resulting gravitational constraints are first class, consisting of the Hamiltonian constraint and the canonical generators for spin-gauge and conformorphism transformations. The formulation has a remarkable feature of being parameter-free. Indeed, it is shown that a conformal parameter of the Barbero-Immirzi type can be absorbed by the conformal symmetry of the extended phase space. This gives rise to an alternative approach to loop quantum gravity that addresses both the conceptual problem of time and the technical problem of functional calculus in quantum gravity

  7. Ras conformational switching: simulating nucleotide-dependent conformational transitions with accelerated molecular dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry J Grant

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Ras mediates signaling pathways controlling cell proliferation and development by cycling between GTP- and GDP-bound active and inactive conformational states. Understanding the complete reaction path of this conformational change and its intermediary structures is critical to understanding Ras signaling. We characterize nucleotide-dependent conformational transition using multiple-barrier-crossing accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD simulations. These transitions, achieved for the first time for wild-type Ras, are impossible to observe with classical molecular dynamics (cMD simulations due to the large energetic barrier between end states. Mapping the reaction path onto a conformer plot describing the distribution of the crystallographic structures enabled identification of highly populated intermediate structures. These structures have unique switch orientations (residues 25-40 and 57-75 intermediate between GTP and GDP states, or distinct loop3 (46-49, loop7 (105-110, and alpha5 C-terminus (159-166 conformations distal from the nucleotide-binding site. In addition, these barrier-crossing trajectories predict novel nucleotide-dependent correlated motions, including correlations of alpha2 (residues 66-74 with alpha3-loop7 (93-110, loop2 (26-37 with loop10 (145-151, and loop3 (46-49 with alpha5 (152-167. The interconversion between newly identified Ras conformations revealed by this study advances our mechanistic understanding of Ras function. In addition, the pattern of correlated motions provides new evidence for a dynamic linkage between the nucleotide-binding site and the membrane interacting C-terminus critical for the signaling function of Ras. Furthermore, normal mode analysis indicates that the dominant collective motion that occurs during nucleotide-dependent conformational exchange, and captured in aMD (but absent in cMD simulations, is a low-frequency motion intrinsic to the structure.

  8. A computer-controlled conformal radiotherapy system I: overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraass, Benedick A.; McShan, Daniel L.; Kessler, Marc L.; Matrone, Gwynne M.; Lewis, James D.; Weaver, Tamar A.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Equipment developed for use with computer-controlled conformal radiotherapy (CCRT) treatment techniques, including multileaf collimators and/or computer-control systems for treatment machines, are now available. The purpose of this work is to develop a system that will allow the safe, efficient, and accurate delivery of CCRT treatments as routine clinical treatments, and permit modifications of the system so that the delivery process can be optimized. Methods and Materials: The needs and requirements for a system that can fully support modern computer-controlled treatment machines equipped with multileaf collimators and segmental or dynamic conformal therapy capabilities have been analyzed and evaluated. This analysis has been used to design and then implement a complete approach to the delivery of CCRT treatments. Results: The computer-controlled conformal radiotherapy system (CCRS) described here consists of a process for the delivery of CCRT treatments, and a complex software system that implements the treatment process. The CCRS system described here includes systems for plan transfer, treatment delivery planning, sequencing of the actual treatment delivery process, graphical simulation and verification tools, as well as an electronic chart that is an integral part of the system. The CCRS system has been implemented for use with a number of different treatment machines. The system has been used clinically for more than 2 years to perform CCRT treatments for more than 200 patients. Conclusions: A comprehensive system for the implementation and delivery of computer-controlled conformal radiation therapy (CCRT) plans has been designed and implemented for routine clinical use with multisegment, computer-controlled, multileaf-collimated conformal therapy. The CCRS system has been successfully implemented to perform these complex treatments, and is considered quite important to the clinical use of modern computer-controlled treatment techniques

  9. Conformational determinants of phosphotyrosine peptides complexed with the Src SH2 domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Nachman

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The inhibition of specific SH2 domain mediated protein-protein interactions as an effective chemotherapeutic approach in the treatment of diseases remains a challenge. That different conformations of peptide-ligands are preferred by different SH2 domains is an underappreciated observation from the structural analysis of phosphotyrosine peptide binding to SH2 domains that may aid in future drug design. To explore the nature of ligand binding, we use simulated annealing (SA to sample the conformational space of phosphotyrosine-containing peptides complexed with the Src SH2 domain. While in good agreement with the crystallographic and NMR studies of high-affinity phosphopeptide-SH2 domain complexes, the results suggest that the structural basis for phopsphopeptide- Src SH2 interactions is more complex than the "two-pronged plug two-hole socket" model. A systematic study of peptides of type pYEEX, where pY is phosphotyrosine and X is a hydrophobic residue, indicates that these peptides can assume two conformations, one extended and one helical, representing the balance between the interaction of residue X with the hydrophobic hole on the surface of the Src SH2 domain, and its contribution to the inherent tendency of the two glutamic acids to form an alpha-helix. In contrast, a beta-turn conformation, almost identical to that observed in the crystal structure of pYVNV bound to the Grb2 SH2 domain, predominates for pYXNX peptides, even in the presence of isoleucine at the third position. While peptide binding affinities, as measured by fluorescence polarization, correlate with the relative proportion of extended peptide conformation, these results suggest a model where all three residues C-terminal to the phosphotyrosine determine the conformation of the bound phosphopeptide. The information obtained in this work can be used in the design of specific SH2 domain inhibitors.

  10. Cyndi: a multi-objective evolution algorithm based method for bioactive molecular conformational generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaofeng; Bai, Fang; Ouyang, Sisheng; Wang, Xicheng; Li, Honglin; Jiang, Hualiang

    2009-03-31

    Conformation generation is a ubiquitous problem in molecule modelling. Many applications require sampling the broad molecular conformational space or perceiving the bioactive conformers to ensure success. Numerous in silico methods have been proposed in an attempt to resolve the problem, ranging from deterministic to non-deterministic and systemic to stochastic ones. In this work, we described an efficient conformation sampling method named Cyndi, which is based on multi-objective evolution algorithm. The conformational perturbation is subjected to evolutionary operation on the genome encoded with dihedral torsions. Various objectives are designated to render the generated Pareto optimal conformers to be energy-favoured as well as evenly scattered across the conformational space. An optional objective concerning the degree of molecular extension is added to achieve geometrically extended or compact conformations which have been observed to impact the molecular bioactivity (J Comput -Aided Mol Des 2002, 16: 105-112). Testing the performance of Cyndi against a test set consisting of 329 small molecules reveals an average minimum RMSD of 0.864 A to corresponding bioactive conformations, indicating Cyndi is highly competitive against other conformation generation methods. Meanwhile, the high-speed performance (0.49 +/- 0.18 seconds per molecule) renders Cyndi to be a practical toolkit for conformational database preparation and facilitates subsequent pharmacophore mapping or rigid docking. The copy of precompiled executable of Cyndi and the test set molecules in mol2 format are accessible in Additional file 1. On the basis of MOEA algorithm, we present a new, highly efficient conformation generation method, Cyndi, and report the results of validation and performance studies comparing with other four methods. The results reveal that Cyndi is capable of generating geometrically diverse conformers and outperforms other four multiple conformer generators in the case of

  11. Cyndi: a multi-objective evolution algorithm based method for bioactive molecular conformational generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Honglin

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conformation generation is a ubiquitous problem in molecule modelling. Many applications require sampling the broad molecular conformational space or perceiving the bioactive conformers to ensure success. Numerous in silico methods have been proposed in an attempt to resolve the problem, ranging from deterministic to non-deterministic and systemic to stochastic ones. In this work, we described an efficient conformation sampling method named Cyndi, which is based on multi-objective evolution algorithm. Results The conformational perturbation is subjected to evolutionary operation on the genome encoded with dihedral torsions. Various objectives are designated to render the generated Pareto optimal conformers to be energy-favoured as well as evenly scattered across the conformational space. An optional objective concerning the degree of molecular extension is added to achieve geometrically extended or compact conformations which have been observed to impact the molecular bioactivity (J Comput -Aided Mol Des 2002, 16: 105–112. Testing the performance of Cyndi against a test set consisting of 329 small molecules reveals an average minimum RMSD of 0.864 Å to corresponding bioactive conformations, indicating Cyndi is highly competitive against other conformation generation methods. Meanwhile, the high-speed performance (0.49 ± 0.18 seconds per molecule renders Cyndi to be a practical toolkit for conformational database preparation and facilitates subsequent pharmacophore mapping or rigid docking. The copy of precompiled executable of Cyndi and the test set molecules in mol2 format are accessible in Additional file 1. Conclusion On the basis of MOEA algorithm, we present a new, highly efficient conformation generation method, Cyndi, and report the results of validation and performance studies comparing with other four methods. The results reveal that Cyndi is capable of generating geometrically diverse conformers and outperforms

  12. Conformal invariance in harmonic superspace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galperin, A.; Ivanov, E.; Ogievetsky, V.; Sokatchev, E.

    1987-01-01

    In the present paper we show how the N = 2 superconformal group is realised in harmonic superspace and examine conformal invariance of N = 2 off-shell theories. We believe that the example of N = O self-dual Yang-Mills equations can serve as an instructive introduction to the subject of harmonic superspace and this is examined. The rigid N = 2 conformal supersymmetry and its local version, i.e. N = 2 conformal supergravity is also discussed. The paper is a contribution to the book commemorating the sixtieth birthday of E.S. Fradkin. (author)

  13. Two dimensional infinite conformal symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohanta, N.N.; Tripathy, K.C.

    1993-01-01

    The invariant discontinuous (discrete) conformal transformation groups, namely the Kleinian and Fuchsian groups Gamma (with an arbitrary signature) of H (the Poincare upper half-plane l) and the unit disc Delta are explicitly constructed from the fundamental domain D. The Riemann surface with signatures of Gamma and conformally invariant automorphic forms (functions) with Peterson scalar product are discussed. The functor, where the category of complex Hilbert spaces spanned by the space of cusp forms constitutes the two dimensional conformal field theory. (Author) 7 refs

  14. Harmony of spinning conformal blocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schomerus, Volker [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group; Sobko, Evgeny [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden); Nordita, Stockholm (Sweden); Isachenkov, Mikhail [Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovoth (Israel). Dept. of Particle Physics and Astrophysics

    2016-12-07

    Conformal blocks for correlation functions of tensor operators play an increasingly important role for the conformal bootstrap programme. We develop a universal approach to such spinning blocks through the harmonic analysis of certain bundles over a coset of the conformal group. The resulting Casimir equations are given by a matrix version of the Calogero-Sutherland Hamiltonian that describes the scattering of interacting spinning particles in a 1-dimensional external potential. The approach is illustrated in several examples including fermionic seed blocks in 3D CFT where they take a very simple form.

  15. Harmony of spinning conformal blocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schomerus, Volker [DESY Hamburg, Theory Group,Notkestraße 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Sobko, Evgeny [Nordita and Stockholm University,Roslagstullsbacken 23, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Isachenkov, Mikhail [Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, Weizmann Institute of Science,Rehovot 7610001 (Israel)

    2017-03-15

    Conformal blocks for correlation functions of tensor operators play an increasingly important role for the conformal bootstrap programme. We develop a universal approach to such spinning blocks through the harmonic analysis of certain bundles over a coset of the conformal group. The resulting Casimir equations are given by a matrix version of the Calogero-Sutherland Hamiltonian that describes the scattering of interacting spinning particles in a 1-dimensional external potential. The approach is illustrated in several examples including fermionic seed blocks in 3D CFT where they take a very simple form.

  16. Mass generation within conformal invariant theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flato, M.; Guenin, M.

    1981-01-01

    The massless Yang-Mills theory is strongly conformally invariant and renormalizable; however, when masses are introduced the theory becomes nonrenormalizable and weakly conformally invariant. Conditions which recover strong conformal invariance are discussed in the letter. (author)

  17. Omethoate treatment mitigates high salt stress inhibited maize seed germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kejun; Zhang, Yifei; Zhu, Lianhua; Li, Zuotong; Deng, Benliang

    2018-01-01

    Omethoate (OM) is a highly toxic organophophate insecticide, which is resistant to biodegradation in the environment and is widely used for pest control in agriculture. The effect of OM on maize seed germination was evaluated under salt stress. Salt (800mM) greatly reduced germination of maize seed and this could be reversed by OM. Additionally, H 2 O 2 treatment further improved the effect of OM on seed germination. Higher H 2 O 2 content was measured in OM treated seed compared to those with salt stress alone. Dimethylthiourea (DTMU), a specific scavenger of reactive oxygen species (ROS), inhibited the effect of OM on seed germination, as did IMZ (imidazole), an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase. Abscisic acid (ABA) inhibited the effect of OM on seed germination, whereas fluridone, a specific inhibitor of ABA biosynthesis, enhanced the effect of OM. Taken together, these findings suggest a role of ROS and ABA in the promotion of maize seed germination by OM under salt stress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Treatment of solid waste highly contaiminated by alpha emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madic, C.; Breschet, C.; Vigreux, B.

    1990-01-01

    In the recent years, efforts have been made in order to reduce the amount of alpha emitters essentially plutonium isotopes present in the solid wastes produced either during research experiments on fuel reprocessing, done in the Radiochemistry building in the centre d'etudes nucleaires de FONTENAY-AUX-ROSES (CEA, FRANCE), or in the MARCOULE reprocessing plant (COGEMA, FRANCE). The goals defined for the treatments of these different wastes were: to reduce their α and β, Y contamination levels; to recover the plutonium, a highly valuable material, and to minimize its quantity to be discharged with the wastes. To achieve these goals leaching processes using electrogenerated Ag (II(a very aggressive agent for PuO 2 )) in nitric acid solutions, were developed and several facilities were designed and built to operate the processes. A brief description of the process and of the different facilities will be presented in this paper; the main results obtained in ELISE and PROLIXE are also summarized

  19. Enhanced conformational sampling using enveloping distribution sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhixiong; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F

    2013-10-14

    To lessen the problem of insufficient conformational sampling in biomolecular simulations is still a major challenge in computational biochemistry. In this article, an application of the method of enveloping distribution sampling (EDS) is proposed that addresses this challenge and its sampling efficiency is demonstrated in simulations of a hexa-β-peptide whose conformational equilibrium encompasses two different helical folds, i.e., a right-handed 2.7(10∕12)-helix and a left-handed 3(14)-helix, separated by a high energy barrier. Standard MD simulations of this peptide using the GROMOS 53A6 force field did not reach convergence of the free enthalpy difference between the two helices even after 500 ns of simulation time. The use of soft-core non-bonded interactions in the centre of the peptide did enhance the number of transitions between the helices, but at the same time led to neglect of relevant helical configurations. In the simulations of a two-state EDS reference Hamiltonian that envelops both the physical peptide and the soft-core peptide, sampling of the conformational space of the physical peptide ensures that physically relevant conformations can be visited, and sampling of the conformational space of the soft-core peptide helps to enhance the transitions between the two helices. The EDS simulations sampled many more transitions between the two helices and showed much faster convergence of the relative free enthalpy of the two helices compared with the standard MD simulations with only a slightly larger computational effort to determine optimized EDS parameters. Combined with various methods to smoothen the potential energy surface, the proposed EDS application will be a powerful technique to enhance the sampling efficiency in biomolecular simulations.

  20. Higher-derivative generalization of conformal mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranovsky, Oleg

    2017-08-01

    Higher-derivative analogs of multidimensional conformal particle and many-body conformal mechanics are constructed. Their Newton-Hooke counterparts are derived by applying appropriate coordinate transformations.

  1. Naturality in conformal field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, G.; Seiberg, N.

    1989-01-01

    We discuss constraints on the operator product coefficients in diagonal and nondiagonal rational conformal field theories. Nondiagonal modular invariants always arise from automorphisms of the fusion rule algebra or from extensions of the chiral algebra. Moreover, when the chiral algebra has been maximally extended a strong form of the naturality principle of field theory can be proven for rational conformal field theory: operator product coefficients vanish if and only if the corresponding fusion rules vanish; that is, if and only if the vanishing can be understood in terms of a symmetry. We illustrate these ideas with several examples. We also generalize our ideas about rational conformal field theories to a larger class of theories: 'quasi-rational conformal field theories' and we explore some of their properties. (orig.)

  2. Steady states in conformal theories

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    A novel conjecture regarding the steady state behavior of conformal field theories placed between two heat baths will be presented. Some verification of the conjecture will be provided in the context of fluid dynamics and holography.

  3. National Automated Conformity Inspection Process -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The National Automated Conformity Inspection Process (NACIP) Application is intended to expedite the workflow process as it pertains to the FAA Form 81 0-10 Request...

  4. Aspect of the conformal invariance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, M.

    1990-11-01

    This thesis is about the study of several physical and mathematical aspects of critical phenomena at two dimensions. These phenomena have remarkable symmetry properties in the coordonnates changes keeping the angles. They are named conformal theories

  5. Some Progress in Conformal Geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun-Yung A. Chang

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This is a survey paper of our current research on the theory of partial differential equations in conformal geometry. Our intention is to describe some of our current works in a rather brief and expository fashion. We are not giving a comprehensive survey on the subject and references cited here are not intended to be complete. We introduce a bubble tree structure to study the degeneration of a class of Yamabe metrics on Bach flat manifolds satisfying some global conformal bounds on compact manifolds of dimension 4. As applications, we establish a gap theorem, a finiteness theorem for diffeomorphism type for this class, and diameter bound of the $sigma_2$-metrics in a class of conformal 4-manifolds. For conformally compact Einstein metrics we introduce an eigenfunction compactification. As a consequence we obtain some topological constraints in terms of renormalized volumes.

  6. Conformity Adequacy Review: Region 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resources are for air quality and transportation government and community leaders. Information on the conformity SIP adequacy/inadequacy of state implementation plans (SIPs) in EPA Region 5 (IL, IN, MI, OH, WI) is provided here.

  7. Inverse bootstrapping conformal field theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenliang

    2018-01-01

    We propose a novel approach to study conformal field theories (CFTs) in general dimensions. In the conformal bootstrap program, one usually searches for consistent CFT data that satisfy crossing symmetry. In the new method, we reverse the logic and interpret manifestly crossing-symmetric functions as generating functions of conformal data. Physical CFTs can be obtained by scanning the space of crossing-symmetric functions. By truncating the fusion rules, we are able to concentrate on the low-lying operators and derive some approximate relations for their conformal data. It turns out that the free scalar theory, the 2d minimal model CFTs, the ϕ 4 Wilson-Fisher CFT, the Lee-Yang CFTs and the Ising CFTs are consistent with the universal relations from the minimal fusion rule ϕ 1 × ϕ 1 = I + ϕ 2 + T , where ϕ 1 , ϕ 2 are scalar operators, I is the identity operator and T is the stress tensor.

  8. Dosimetric Evaluation of High-Dose-Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy Boost Treatments for Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froehlich, Georgina; Agoston, Peter; Loevey, Jozsef; Somogyi, Andras; Fodor, Janos; Polgar, Csaba; Major, Tibor

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: to quantitatively evaluate the dose distributions of high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate implants regarding target coverage, dose homogeneity, and dose to organs at risk. Material and methods: treatment plans of 174 implants were evaluated using cumulative dose-volume histograms (DVHs). The planning was based on transrectal ultrasound (US) imaging, and the prescribed dose (100%) was 10 Gy. The tolerance doses to rectum and urethra were 80% and 120%, respectively. Dose-volume parameters for target (V90, V100, V150, V200, D90, D min ) and quality indices (DNR [dose nonuniformity ratio], DHI [dose homogeneity index], CI [coverage index], COIN [conformal index]) were calculated. Maximum dose in reference points of rectum (D r ) and urethra (D u ), dose to volume of 2 cm 3 of the rectum (D 2ccm ), and 0.1 cm 3 and 1% of the urethra (D 0.1ccm and D1) were determined. Nonparametric correlation analysis was performed between these parameters. Results: the median number of needles was 16, the mean prostate volume (V p ) was 27.1 cm 3 . The mean V90, V100, V150, and V200 were 90%, 97%, 39% and 13%, respectively. The mean D90 was 109%, and the D min was 87%. The mean doses in rectum and urethra reference points were 75% and 119%, respectively. The mean volumetric doses were D 2ccm = 49% for the rectum, D 0.1ccm = 126%, and D1 = 140% for the urethra. The mean DNR was 0.37, while the DHI was 0.60. The mean COIN was 0.66. The Spearman rank order correlation coefficients for volume doses to rectum and urethra were R(D r , D 2ccm ) = 0.69, R(D u , D 0.1ccm ) = 0.64, R(D u , D1) = 0.23. Conclusion: US-based treatment plans for HDR prostate implants based on the real positions of catheters provided acceptable dose distributions. In the majority of the cases, the doses to urethra and rectum were kept below the defined tolerance levels. For rectum, the dose in reference points correlated well with dose-volume parameters. For urethra dose characterization, the use of D1 volumetric

  9. Long-Term Outcomes After High-Dose Postprostatectomy Salvage Radiation Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goenka, Anuj; Magsanoc, Juan Martin; Pei Xin; Schechter, Michael; Kollmeier, Marisa; Cox, Brett [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Scardino, Peter T.; Eastham, James A. [Urology Service, Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Zelefsky, Michael J., E-mail: zelefskm@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To review the impact of high-dose radiotherapy (RT) in the postprostatectomy salvage setting on long-term biochemical control and distant metastases-free survival, and to identify clinical and pathologic predictors of outcomes. Methods and Materials: During 1988-2007, 285 consecutive patients were treated with salvage RT (SRT) after radical prostatectomy. All patients were treated with either three-dimensional conformal RT or intensity-modulated RT. Two hundred seventy patients (95%) were treated to a dose {>=}66 Gy, of whom 205 (72%) received doses {>=}70 Gy. Eighty-seven patients (31%) received androgen-deprivation therapy as a component of their salvage treatment. All clinical and pathologic records were reviewed to identify treatment risk factors and response. Results: The median follow-up time after SRT was 60 months. Seven-year actuarial prostate-specific antigen (PSA) relapse-free survival and distant metastases-free survival were 37% and 77%, respectively. Independent predictors of biochemical recurrence were vascular invasion (p < 0.01), negative surgical margins (p < 0.01), presalvage PSA level >0.4 ng/mL (p < 0.01), androgen-deprivation therapy (p = 0.03), Gleason score {>=}7 (p = 0.02), and seminal vesicle involvement (p = 0.05). Salvage RT dose {>=}70 Gy was not associated with improvement in biochemical control. A doubling time <3 months was the only independent predictor of metastatic disease (p < 0.01). There was a trend suggesting benefit of SRT dose {>=}70 Gy in preventing clinical local failure in patients with radiographically visible local disease at time of SRT (7 years: 90% vs. 79.1%, p = 0.07). Conclusion: Salvage RT provides effective long-term biochemical control and freedom from metastasis in selected patients presenting with detectable PSA after prostatectomy. Androgen-deprivation therapy was associated with improvement in biochemical progression-free survival. Clinical local failures were rare but occurred most commonly in

  10. Dosimetric Evaluation of High-Dose-Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy Boost Treatments for Localized Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froehlich, Georgina [Semmelweis Univ., Budapest (Hungary); Dept. of Radiotherapy, National Inst. of Oncology, Budapest (Hungary); Agoston, Peter; Loevey, Jozsef; Somogyi, Andras; Fodor, Janos; Polgar, Csaba; Major, Tibor [Dept. of Radiotherapy, National Inst. of Oncology, Budapest (Hungary)

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: to quantitatively evaluate the dose distributions of high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate implants regarding target coverage, dose homogeneity, and dose to organs at risk. Material and methods: treatment plans of 174 implants were evaluated using cumulative dose-volume histograms (DVHs). The planning was based on transrectal ultrasound (US) imaging, and the prescribed dose (100%) was 10 Gy. The tolerance doses to rectum and urethra were 80% and 120%, respectively. Dose-volume parameters for target (V90, V100, V150, V200, D90, D{sub min}) and quality indices (DNR [dose nonuniformity ratio], DHI [dose homogeneity index], CI [coverage index], COIN [conformal index]) were calculated. Maximum dose in reference points of rectum (D{sub r}) and urethra (D{sub u}), dose to volume of 2 cm{sup 3} of the rectum (D{sub 2ccm}), and 0.1 cm{sup 3} and 1% of the urethra (D{sub 0.1ccm} and D1) were determined. Nonparametric correlation analysis was performed between these parameters. Results: the median number of needles was 16, the mean prostate volume (V{sub p}) was 27.1 cm{sup 3}. The mean V90, V100, V150, and V200 were 90%, 97%, 39% and 13%, respectively. The mean D90 was 109%, and the D{sub min} was 87%. The mean doses in rectum and urethra reference points were 75% and 119%, respectively. The mean volumetric doses were D{sub 2ccm} = 49% for the rectum, D{sub 0.1ccm} = 126%, and D1 = 140% for the urethra. The mean DNR was 0.37, while the DHI was 0.60. The mean COIN was 0.66. The Spearman rank order correlation coefficients for volume doses to rectum and urethra were R(D{sub r}, D{sub 2ccm}) = 0.69, R(D{sub u}, D{sub 0.1ccm}) = 0.64, R(D{sub u}, D1) = 0.23. Conclusion: US-based treatment plans for HDR prostate implants based on the real positions of catheters provided acceptable dose distributions. In the majority of the cases, the doses to urethra and rectum were kept below the defined tolerance levels. For rectum, the dose in reference points correlated well with dose

  11. Dosimetric evaluation of high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy boost treatments for localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröhlich, Georgina; Agoston, Péter; Lövey, József; Somogyi, András; Fodor, János; Polgár, Csaba; Major, Tibor

    2010-07-01

    To quantitatively evaluate the dose distributions of high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate implants regarding target coverage, dose homogeneity, and dose to organs at risk. Treatment plans of 174 implants were evaluated using cumulative dose-volume histograms (DVHs). The planning was based on transrectal ultrasound (US) imaging, and the prescribed dose (100%) was 10 Gy. The tolerance doses to rectum and urethra were 80% and 120%, respectively. Dose-volume parameters for target (V90, V100, V150, V200, D90, D(min)) and quality indices (DNR [dose nonuniformity ratio], DHI [dose homogeneity index], CI [coverage index], COIN [conformal index]) were calculated. Maximum dose in reference points of rectum (D(r)) and urethra (D(u)), dose to volume of 2 cm(3) of the rectum (D(2ccm)), and 0.1 cm(3) and 1% of the urethra (D(0.1ccm) and D1) were determined. Nonparametric correlation analysis was performed between these parameters. The median number of needles was 16, the mean prostate volume (V(p)) was 27.1 cm(3). The mean V90, V100, V150, and V200 were 99%, 97%, 39%, and 13%, respectively. The mean D90 was 109%, and the D(min) was 87%. The mean doses in rectum and urethra reference points were 75% and 119%, respectively. The mean volumetric doses were D(2ccm) = 49% for the rectum, D(0.1ccm) = 126%, and D1 = 140% for the urethra. The mean DNR was 0.37, while the DHI was 0.60. The mean COIN was 0.66. The Spearman rank order correlation coefficients for volume doses to rectum and urethra were R(D(r),D(2ccm)) = 0.69, R(D(u),D0.(1ccm)) = 0.64, R(D(u),D1) = 0.23. US-based treatment plans for HDR prostate implants based on the real positions of catheters provided acceptable dose distributions. In the majority of the cases, the doses to urethra and rectum were kept below the defined tolerance levels. For rectum, the dose in reference points correlated well with dose-volume parameters. For urethra dose characterization, the use of D1 volumetric parameter is recommended.

  12. Drugs for treatment of very high blood pressure during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duley, Lelia; Meher, Shireen; Jones, Leanne

    2013-07-31

    Very high blood pressure during pregnancy poses a serious threat to women and their babies. The aim of antihypertensive therapy is to lower blood pressure quickly but safety, to avoid complications. Antihypertensive drugs lower blood pressure but their comparative effectiveness and safety, and impact on other substantive outcomes is uncertain. To compare different antihypertensive drugs for very high blood pressure during pregnancy. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group Trials Register (9 January 2013). Studies were randomised trials. Participants were women with severe hypertension during pregnancy. Interventions were comparisons of one antihypertensive drug with another. Two review authors independently assessed trials for inclusion and assessed trial quality. Two review authors extracted data and checked them for accuracy. Thirty-five trials (3573 women) with 15 comparisons were included. Women allocated calcium channel blockers were less likely to have persistent high blood pressure compared to those allocated hydralazine (six trials, 313 women; 8% versus 22%; risk ratio (RR) 0.37, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.21 to 0.66). Ketanserin was associated with more persistent high blood pressure than hydralazine (three trials, 180 women; 27% versus 6%; RR 4.79, 95% CI 1.95 to 11.73), but fewer side-effects (three trials, 120 women; RR 0.32, 95% CI 0.19 to 0.53) and a lower risk of HELLP (haemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and lowered platelets) syndrome (one trial, 44 women; RR 0.20, 95% CI 0.05 to 0.81).Labetalol was associated with a lower risk of hypotension compared to diazoxide (one trial 90 women; RR 0.06, 95% CI 0.00 to 0.99) and a lower risk of caesarean section (RR 0.43, 95% CI 0.18 to 1.02), although both were borderline for statistical significance.Both nimodipine and magnesium sulphate were associated with a high incidence of persistent high blood pressure, but this risk was lower for nimodipine compared to magnesium sulphate (one trial

  13. Conformal Cosmology and Supernova Data

    OpenAIRE

    Behnke, Danilo; Blaschke, David; Pervushin, Victor; Proskurin, Denis

    2000-01-01

    We define the cosmological parameters $H_{c,0}$, $\\Omega_{m,c}$ and $\\Omega_{\\Lambda, c}$ within the Conformal Cosmology as obtained by the homogeneous approximation to the conformal-invariant generalization of Einstein's General Relativity theory. We present the definitions of the age of the universe and of the luminosity distance in the context of this approach. A possible explanation of the recent data from distant supernovae Ia without a cosmological constant is presented.

  14. Scalar perturbations and conformal transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabris, J.C.; Tossa, J.

    1995-11-01

    The non-minimal coupling of gravity to a scalar field can be transformed into a minimal coupling through a conformal transformation. We show how to connect the results of a perturbation calculation, performed around a Friedman-Robertson-Walker background solution, before and after the conformal transformation. We work in the synchronous gauge, but we discuss the implications of employing other frames. (author). 16 refs

  15. [Results of treatment for high-pressure injection hand injuries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyluk, A; Walaszek, I

    2000-01-01

    High-pressure injection injuries of the hand have a reputation for being dangerous for individual fingers and even for whole hand. Usually appearing innocuous at presentation because of small puncture entry wound, these injuries result in severe damage of most internal structures in finger and hand due to extensive penetration of injected substance. This paper reviews the outcome of the treatment of such injuries in 10 patients: 9 sustained injection of toxic paint, and one lead shot. All the patients were operated on: eight a few hours after injury and two with 3 days delay. The surgical technique included wide exposure from site of injection up to the farthest place in which foreign substance was seen. Thorough debridment of injected material and contaminated tissue was performed with careful preservation of neurovascular structures and tendons. Wounds were not closed, but managed by open technique. In all patients wounds healed well: in 3 by secondary intention, in 6 by delayed closure and 2 were covered by skin grafts. No amputation was performed. Final results were assessed form 1.5 to 3.5 years after initial injury (mean at 2.5 years). Two patients complained of moderate pain related to the weather, five of cold intolerance and two of impaired sensation on fingertips. Active range of motion of affected fingers was in whole group from 90% to 104% (mean 97%) of the range of motion of unaffected fingers from the other side. Range of motion of the wrist (2 patients) was 76% and 117% of range of motion of the other side. Pinch grip strength was from 81% to 116% (mean 99%), and global grip strength from 77% to 119% (mean 97%) of the other side. All patients went back to their previous jobs and periods of sick leave were from 2 weeks to 6 months (mean 3 mo). Excellent results achieved in this study--full functional recovery in 9 of 10 patients confirm the effectiveness of aggressive treatment by open wound technique of such injuries.

  16. Conformal atomic layer deposition of alumina on millimeter tall, vertically-aligned carbon nanotube arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stano, Kelly L; Carroll, Murphy; Padbury, Richard; McCord, Marian; Jur, Jesse S; Bradford, Philip D

    2014-11-12

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) can be used to coat high aspect ratio and high surface area substrates with conformal and precisely controlled thin films. Vertically aligned arrays of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with lengths up to 1.5 mm were conformally coated with alumina from base to tip. The nucleation and growth behaviors of Al2O3 ALD precursors on the MWCNTs were studied as a function of CNT surface chemistry. CNT surfaces were modified through a series of post-treatments including pyrolytic carbon deposition, high temperature thermal annealing, and oxygen plasma functionalization. Conformal coatings were achieved where post-treatments resulted in increased defect density as well as the extent of functionalization, as characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Using thermogravimetric analysis, it was determined that MWCNTs treated with pyrolytic carbon and plasma functionalization prior to ALD coating were more stable to thermal oxidation than pristine ALD coated samples. Functionalized and ALD coated arrays had a compressive modulus more than two times higher than a pristine array coated for the same number of cycles. Cross-sectional energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy confirmed that Al2O3 could be uniformly deposited through the entire thickness of the vertically aligned MWCNT array by manipulating sample orientation and mounting techniques. Following the ALD coating, the MWCNT arrays demonstrated hydrophilic wetting behavior and also exhibited foam-like recovery following compressive strain.

  17. Literature-based recommendations for treatment planning and execution in high-dose radiotherapy for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senan, Suresh; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Giraud, Philippe; Mirimanoff, Rene; Budach, Volker

    2004-01-01

    Background and purpose: To review the literature on techniques used in high-dose radiotherapy of lung cancer in order to develop recommendations for clinical practice and for use in research protocols. Patients and methods: A literature search was performed for articles and abstracts that were considered both clinically relevant and practical to use. The relevant information was arbitrarily categorized under the following headings: patient positioning, CT scanning, incorporating tumour mobility, definition of target volumes, radiotherapy planning, treatment delivery, and scoring of response and toxicity. Results: Recommendations were made for each of the above steps from the published literature. Although most of the recommended techniques have yet to be evaluated in multicenter clinical trials, their use in high-dose radiotherapy to the thorax appears to be rational on the basis of current evidence. Conclusions: Recommendations for the clinical implementation of high-dose conformal radiotherapy for lung tumours were identified in the literature. Procedures that are still considered to be investigational were also highlighted

  18. Quantum Conformal Algebras and Closed Conformal Field Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Anselmi, D

    1999-01-01

    We investigate the quantum conformal algebras of N=2 and N=1 supersymmetric gauge theories. Phenomena occurring at strong coupling are analysed using the Nachtmann theorem and very general, model-independent, arguments. The results lead us to introduce a novel class of conformal field theories, identified by a closed quantum conformal algebra. We conjecture that they are the exact solution to the strongly coupled large-N_c limit of the open conformal field theories. We study the basic properties of closed conformal field theory and work out the operator product expansion of the conserved current multiplet T. The OPE structure is uniquely determined by two central charges, c and a. The multiplet T does not contain just the stress-tensor, but also R-currents and finite mass operators. For this reason, the ratio c/a is different from 1. On the other hand, an open algebra contains an infinite tower of non-conserved currents, organized in pairs and singlets with respect to renormalization mixing. T mixes with a se...

  19. New insight in the structural features of haloadaptation in α-amylases from halophilic Archaea following homology modeling strategy: folded and stable conformation maintained through low hydrophobicity and highly negative charged surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorgani, Mohamed Amine; Patron, Kevin; Desvaux, Mickaël

    2014-07-01

    Proteins from halophilic archaea, which live in extreme saline conditions, have evolved to remain folded, active and stable at very high ionic strengths. Understanding the mechanism of haloadaptation is the first step toward engineering of halostable biomolecules. Amylases are one of the main enzymes used in industry. Yet, no three-dimensional structure has been experimentally resolved for α-amylases from halophilic archaea. In this study, homology structure modeling of α-amylases from the halophilic archaea Haloarcula marismortui, Haloarcula hispanica, and Halalkalicoccus jeotgali were performed. The resulting models were subjected to energy minimization, evaluation, and structural analysis. Calculations of the amino acid composition, salt bridges and hydrophobic interactions were also performed and compared to a set of non-halophilic counterparts. It clearly appeared that haloarchaeal α-amylases exhibited lower propensities for helix formation and higher propensities for coil-forming regions. Furthermore, they could maintain a folded and stable conformation in high salt concentration through highly negative charged surface with over representation of acidic residues, especially Asp, and low hydrophobicity with increase of salt bridges and decrease in hydrophobic interactions on the protein surface. This study sheds some light on the stability of α-amylases from halophilic archaea and provides strong basis not only to understand haloadaptation mechanisms of proteins in microorganisms from hypersalines environments but also for biotechnological applications.

  20. HIGH ALUMINUM HLW (HIGH LEVEL WASTE) GLASSES FOR HANFORD'S WTP (WASTE TREATMENT PROJECT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, A.A.; Bowan, B.W.; Joseph, I.; Gan, H.; Kot, W.K.; Matlack, K.S.; Pegg, I.L.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the results of glass formulation development and melter testing to identify high waste loading glasses to treat high-Al high level waste (HLW) at Hanford. Previous glass formulations developed for this HLW had high waste loadings but their processing rates were lower that desired. The present work was aimed at improving the glass processing rate while maintaining high waste loadings. Glass formulations were designed, prepared at crucible-scale and characterized to determine their properties relevant to processing and product quality. Glass formulations that met these requirements were screened for melt rates using small-scale tests. The small-scale melt rate screening included vertical gradient furnace (VGF) and direct feed consumption (DFC) melter tests. Based on the results of these tests, modified glass formulations were developed and selected for larger scale melter tests to determine their processing rate. Melter tests were conducted on the DuraMelter 100 (DMIOO) with a melt surface area of 0.11 m 2 and the DuraMelter 1200 (DMI200) HLW Pilot Melter with a melt surface area of 1.2 m 2 . The newly developed glass formulations had waste loadings as high as 50 wt%, with corresponding Al 2 O 3 concentration in the glass of 26.63 wt%. The new glass formulations showed glass production rates as high as 1900 kg/(m 2 .day) under nominal melter operating conditions. The demonstrated glass production rates are much higher than the current requirement of 800 kg/(m 2 .day) and anticipated future enhanced Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) requirement of 1000 kg/(m 2 .day).

  1. The effects of information and social conformity on opinion change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatemi, Peter K.

    2018-01-01

    Extant research shows that social pressures influence acts of political participation, such as turning out to vote. However, we know less about how conformity pressures affect one’s deeply held political values and opinions. Using a discussion-based experiment, we untangle the unique and combined effects of information and social pressure on a political opinion that is highly salient, politically charged, and part of one’s identity. We find that while information plays a role in changing a person’s opinion, the social delivery of that information has the greatest effect. Thirty three percent of individuals in our treatment condition change their opinion due to the social delivery of information, while ten percent respond only to social pressure and ten percent respond only to information. Participants that change their opinion due to social pressure in our experiment are more conservative politically, conscientious, and neurotic than those that did not. PMID:29718958

  2. The effects of information and social conformity on opinion change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallinson, Daniel J; Hatemi, Peter K

    2018-01-01

    Extant research shows that social pressures influence acts of political participation, such as turning out to vote. However, we know less about how conformity pressures affect one's deeply held political values and opinions. Using a discussion-based experiment, we untangle the unique and combined effects of information and social pressure on a political opinion that is highly salient, politically charged, and part of one's identity. We find that while information plays a role in changing a person's opinion, the social delivery of that information has the greatest effect. Thirty three percent of individuals in our treatment condition change their opinion due to the social delivery of information, while ten percent respond only to social pressure and ten percent respond only to information. Participants that change their opinion due to social pressure in our experiment are more conservative politically, conscientious, and neurotic than those that did not.

  3. 3-D conformal HDR brachytherapy as monotherapy for localized prostate cancer. A pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, T.; Baltas, D.; Kurek, R.; Roeddiger, S.; Kontova, M.; Anagnostopoulos, G.; Skazikis, G.; Zamboglou, N.; Dannenberg, T.; Buhleier, T.; Tunn, U.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: pilot study to evaluate feasibility, acute toxicity and conformal quality of three-dimensional (3-D) conformal high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy as monotherapy for localized prostate cancer using intraoperative real-time planning. Patients and methods: between 05/2002 and 05/2003, 52 patients with prostate cancer, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) ≤ 10 ng/ml, Gleason score ≤ 7 and clinical stage ≤ T2a were treated. Median PSA was 6.4 ng/ml and median Gleason score 5. 24/52 patients had stage T1c and 28/52 stage T2a. For transrectal ultrasound-(TRUS-)guided transperineal implantation of flexible plastic needles into the prostate, the real-time HDR planning system SWIFT trademark was used. After implantation, CT-based 3-D postplanning was performed. All patients received one implant for four fractions of HDR brachytherapy in 48 h using a reference dose (D ref ) of 9.5 Gy to a total dose of 38.0 Gy. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were analyzed to evaluate the conformal quality of each implant using D 90 , D 10 urethra, and D 10 rectum. Acute toxicity was evaluated using the CTC (common toxicity criteria) scales. Results: median D 90 was 106% of D ref (range: 93-115%), median D 10 urethra 159% of D ref (range: 127-192%), and median D 10 rectum 55% of D ref (range: 35-68%). Median follow-up is currently 8 months. In 2/52 patients acute grade 3 genitourinary toxicity was observed. No gastrointestinal toxicity > grade 1 occurred. Conclusion: 3-D conformal HDR brachytherapy as monotherapy using intraoperative real-time planning is a feasible and highly conformal treatment for localized prostate cancer associated with minimal acute toxicity. Longer follow-up is needed to evaluate late toxicity and biochemical control. (orig.)

  4. AASM standards of practice compliant validation of actigraphic sleep analysis from SOMNOwatch(TM) versus polysomnographic sleep diagnostics shows high conformity also among subjects with sleep disordered breathing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dick, R; Schulz, J; Penzel, T; Fietze, I; Partinen, M; Hein, H

    2010-01-01

    In recent AASM practice, parameter actimetry is cited to measure total sleep time in obstructive sleep apnoea patients, when polysomnography is not available. An actigraph was therefore compared to polysomnographic data in 28 subjects with known sleep disordered breathing. Total sleep time (TST), sleep period time (SPT), sleep efficiency (SE), sustained sleep efficiency (SSE), sleep onset latency (SL) and sleep/wake pattern were compared to gold standard polysomnography. The results of an epoch-by-epoch comparison of sleep/wake from actigraphy to sleep stages from polysomnography gave a sensitivity of 90.2%, a specificity of 95.2% and an overall accuracy of 85.9%. Correlations were moderately strong for SE (0.71, p < 0.001) and SSE (0.65, p < 0.001) and high for TST (0.89, p < 0.001), SPT (0.91, p < 0.001) and SL (0.89, p < 0.001). It was concluded that actigraphy is not identical with PSG recording but gives good results in sleep/wake patterns and predicting TST, SPT, SSE, SE and SL also in sleep apnoea patients not suffering from other sleep disorders. The difficult detection of correct sleep onset causes SSE and SL to be less predictable. Therefore a 15-epoch criterion was introduced and resulted in high correlation of 0.89 for sleep latency, but has to be tested on a bigger population

  5. Gauge fixing problem in the conformal QED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichinose, Shoichi

    1986-01-01

    The gauge fixing problem in the conformal (spinor and scalar) QED is examined. For the analysis, we generalize Dirac's manifestly conformal-covariant formalism. It is shown that the (vector and matter) fields must obey a certain mixed (conformal and gauge) type of transformation law in order to fix the local gauge symmetry preserving the conformal invariance in the Lagrangian. (orig.)

  6. 40 CFR 93.154 - Conformity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Conformity analysis. 93.154 Section 93...) DETERMINING CONFORMITY OF FEDERAL ACTIONS TO STATE OR FEDERAL IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Determining Conformity of General Federal Actions to State or Federal Implementation Plans § 93.154 Conformity analysis. Any Federal...

  7. Dosimetric comparison of standard three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy followed by intensity-modulated radiotherapy boost schedule (sequential IMRT plan) with simultaneous integrated boost-IMRT (SIB IMRT) treatment plan in patients with localized carcinoma prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, A; Kapoor, R; Singh, S K; Kumar, N; Oinam, A S; Sharma, S C

    2012-07-01

    DOSIMETERIC AND RADIOBIOLOGICAL COMPARISON OF TWO RADIATION SCHEDULES IN LOCALIZED CARCINOMA PROSTATE: Standard Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy (3DCRT) followed by Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) boost (sequential-IMRT) with Simultaneous Integrated Boost IMRT (SIB-IMRT). Thirty patients were enrolled. In all, the target consisted of PTV P + SV (Prostate and seminal vesicles) and PTV LN (lymph nodes) where PTV refers to planning target volume and the critical structures included: bladder, rectum and small bowel. All patients were treated with sequential-IMRT plan, but for dosimetric comparison, SIB-IMRT plan was also created. The prescription dose to PTV P + SV was 74 Gy in both strategies but with different dose per fraction, however, the dose to PTV LN was 50 Gy delivered in 25 fractions over 5 weeks for sequential-IMRT and 54 Gy delivered in 27 fractions over 5.5 weeks for SIB-IMRT. The treatment plans were compared in terms of dose-volume histograms. Also, Tumor Control Probability (TCP) and Normal Tissue Complication Probability (NTCP) obtained with the two plans were compared. The volume of rectum receiving 70 Gy or more (V > 70 Gy) was reduced to 18.23% with SIB-IMRT from 22.81% with sequential-IMRT. SIB-IMRT reduced the mean doses to both bladder and rectum by 13% and 17%, respectively, as compared to sequential-IMRT. NTCP of 0.86 ± 0.75% and 0.01 ± 0.02% for the bladder, 5.87 ± 2.58% and 4.31 ± 2.61% for the rectum and 8.83 ± 7.08% and 8.25 ± 7.98% for the bowel was seen with sequential-IMRT and SIB-IMRT plans respectively. For equal PTV coverage, SIB-IMRT markedly reduced doses to critical structures, therefore should be considered as the strategy for dose escalation. SIB-IMRT achieves lesser NTCP than sequential-IMRT.

  8. Conformational dynamics data bank: a database for conformational dynamics of proteins and supramolecular protein assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do-Nyun; Altschuler, Josiah; Strong, Campbell; McGill, Gaël; Bathe, Mark

    2011-01-01

    The conformational dynamics data bank (CDDB, http://www.cdyn.org) is a database that aims to provide comprehensive results on the conformational dynamics of high molecular weight proteins and protein assemblies. Analysis is performed using a recently introduced coarse-grained computational approach that is applied to the majority of structures present in the electron microscopy data bank (EMDB). Results include equilibrium thermal fluctuations and elastic strain energy distributions that identify rigid versus flexible protein domains generally, as well as those associated with specific functional transitions, and correlations in molecular motions that identify molecular regions that are highly coupled dynamically, with implications for allosteric mechanisms. A practical web-based search interface enables users to easily collect conformational dynamics data in various formats. The data bank is maintained and updated automatically to include conformational dynamics results for new structural entries as they become available in the EMDB. The CDDB complements static structural information to facilitate the investigation and interpretation of the biological function of proteins and protein assemblies essential to cell function.

  9. Treatment of high-energy pilon fractures using the ILIZAROV treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Walid; Alaya, Zeineb; Kaziz, Hamdi; Hassini, Lassad; Braiki, Meriem; Naouar, Nader; Ben Ayeche, Mohamed Laaziz

    2017-01-01

    The management of high-energy pilon fractures is still controversial. Open reduction and internal fixation are often associated with serious complications. Various methods have been used to treat these injuries, with variable results. The aim of this retrospective study was to analyze the clinical and radiographic outcome of the ILIZAROV technique in patients with high-energy pilon fractures. Thirty cases of distal tibia epiphysis fractures (pilon fractures) were managed from 1999 to 2012. The study group included 5 cases of open fractures. The mean age was 47 years. According to Rüedi and Algower classification; 11 fractures were type II, and 19 type III. All fractures were a consequence of high-energy trauma. Fractures of the lower fibula were present in 28 of the patients. An external Fixator was applied for open fractures. Closed injuries were operated on 3 to 13 days after injury, with an average of 8 days. The mean follow-up was 48 months. All fractures united. The external fixator was removed after a mean of 22 weeks (10 - 28 weeks). Two patients with a type III fracture had a delayed union and were treated with corticotomy and dynamisation of the ILIZAROV fixator. Only one secondary displacement of a type III fracture was noted after two months and was treated by adjuction of 2 olive wires. There were no cases of osteomyelitis or deep infections. Pin-tract infections occurred in ten patients. We had not any case of nervous injury due to introduction of the pins. Using radiological criteria for assessement of reduction of the articular fragments, there was excellent and good restoration of articular structure in 24 cases. The average American Orthopeadic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hind foot score was excellent in 16, good in 6, fair in 6 and poor in 2. Soft tissue healing occurred without need for plastic surgery in all cases. The movements of the ankle ranged from 0 to 20° of dorsiflexion and 5° to 40° of plantar flexion. Twenty patients had gone back

  10. Explicit mentalizing mechanisms and their adaptive role in memory conformity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Wheeler

    Full Text Available Memory conformity occurs when an individual endorses what other individuals remember about past events. Research on memory conformity is currently dominated by a 'forensic' perspective, which views the phenomenon as inherently undesirable. This is because conformity not only distorts the accuracy of an individual's memory, but also produces false corroboration between individuals, effects that act to undermine criminal justice systems. There is growing awareness, however, that memory conformity may be interpreted more generally as an adaptive social behavior regulated by explicit mentalizing mechanisms. Here, we provide novel evidence in support of this emerging alternative theoretical perspective. We carried out a memory conformity experiment which revealed that explicit belief-simulation (i.e. using one's own beliefs to model what other people believe systematically biases conformity towards like-minded individuals, even when there is no objective evidence that they have a more accurate memory than dissimilar individuals. We suggest that this bias is functional, i.e. adaptive, to the extent that it fosters trust, and hence cooperation, between in-group versus out-group individuals. We conclude that memory conformity is, in more fundamental terms, a highly desirable product of explicit mentalizing mechanisms that promote adaptive forms of social learning and cooperation.

  11. Explicit mentalizing mechanisms and their adaptive role in memory conformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Rebecca; Allan, Kevin; Tsivilis, Dimitris; Martin, Douglas; Gabbert, Fiona

    2013-01-01

    Memory conformity occurs when an individual endorses what other individuals remember about past events. Research on memory conformity is currently dominated by a 'forensic' perspective, which views the phenomenon as inherently undesirable. This is because conformity not only distorts the accuracy of an individual's memory, but also produces false corroboration between individuals, effects that act to undermine criminal justice systems. There is growing awareness, however, that memory conformity may be interpreted more generally as an adaptive social behavior regulated by explicit mentalizing mechanisms. Here, we provide novel evidence in support of this emerging alternative theoretical perspective. We carried out a memory conformity experiment which revealed that explicit belief-simulation (i.e. using one's own beliefs to model what other people believe) systematically biases conformity towards like-minded individuals, even when there is no objective evidence that they have a more accurate memory than dissimilar individuals. We suggest that this bias is functional, i.e. adaptive, to the extent that it fosters trust, and hence cooperation, between in-group versus out-group individuals. We conclude that memory conformity is, in more fundamental terms, a highly desirable product of explicit mentalizing mechanisms that promote adaptive forms of social learning and cooperation.

  12. Induction chemotherapy with carboplatin, irinotecan, and paclitaxel followed by high dose three-dimension conformal thoracic radiotherapy (74 Gy) with concurrent carboplatin, paclitaxel, and gefitinib in unresectable stage IIIA and stage IIIB non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinchcombe, Thomas E; Morris, David E; Lee, Carrie B; Moore, Dominic T; Hayes, D Neil; Halle, Jan S; Rivera, M Patricia; Rosenman, Julian G; Socinski, Mark A

    2008-03-01

    Combined modality therapy is a standard therapy for patients with unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Gefitinib is active in advanced NSCLC, and in preclinical models, it potentiates the activity of radiation therapy. We investigate the tolerability of gefitinib in combined modality therapy in combination with three-dimensional thoracic conformal radiation therapy (3-dimensional TCRT). Stage III patients with a good performance status were treated with induction chemotherapy (carboplatin area under the curve [AUC] of 5, irinotecan 100 mg/m(2), and paclitaxel 175 mg/m(2) days 1 and 22) with pegfilgrastim support followed by concurrent chemotherapy (carboplatin AUC 2, and paclitaxel 45 mg/m(2) weekly) and gefitinib 250 mg daily beginning on day 43 with 3-dimensional TCRT to 74 Gy. Between March 2004 and January 2006, 23 patients received treatment on the trial: median age 62 years (range 44-82), 52% female, 61% stage IIIA, 61% performance status 0, 17% > or =5% weight loss, and 91% underwent positron emission tomography staging. Induction chemotherapy with pegfilgrastim support was well tolerated and active (partial response rate, 24%; stable disease, 76%; and early progression, 0%). Twenty-one patients initiated the concurrent chemoradiation, and 20 patients completed therapy to 74 Gy. The primary toxicities of concurrent chemoradiation were grade 3 esophagitis (19.5%) and cardiac arrhythmia (atrial fibrillation) (9.5%). The median progression-free survival and overall survival were 9 months (95% confidence intervals [CI]: 7-13 months) and 16 months (95% CI: 10-20 months), respectively. Treatment with induction chemotherapy and gefitinib concurrent with 3-dimensional TCRT has an acceptable toxicity and tolerability, but the survival results were disappointing.

  13. Conformational flexibility in the catalytic triad revealed by the high-resolution crystal structure of Streptomyces erythraeus trypsin in an unliganded state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blankenship, Elise; Vukoti, Krishna [Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Miyagi, Masaru, E-mail: mxm356@cwru.edu [Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Lodowski, David T., E-mail: mxm356@cwru.edu [Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States)

    2014-03-01

    This work reports the first sub-angstrom resolution structure of S. erythraeus trypsin. The detailed model of a prototypical serine protease at a catalytically relevant pH with an unoccupied active site is presented and is compared with other high-resolution serine protease structures. With more than 500 crystal structures determined, serine proteases make up greater than one-third of all proteases structurally examined to date, making them among the best biochemically and structurally characterized enzymes. Despite the numerous crystallographic and biochemical studies of trypsin and related serine proteases, there are still considerable shortcomings in the understanding of their catalytic mechanism. Streptomyces erythraeus trypsin (SET) does not exhibit autolysis and crystallizes readily at physiological pH; hence, it is well suited for structural studies aimed at extending the understanding of the catalytic mechanism of serine proteases. While X-ray crystallographic structures of this enzyme have been reported, no coordinates have ever been made available in the Protein Data Bank. Based on this, and observations on the extreme stability and unique properties of this particular trypsin, it was decided to crystallize it and determine its structure. Here, the first sub-angstrom resolution structure of an unmodified, unliganded trypsin crystallized at physiological pH is reported. Detailed structural analysis reveals the geometry and structural rigidity of the catalytic triad in the unoccupied active site and comparison to related serine proteases provides a context for interpretation of biochemical studies of catalytic mechanism and activity.

  14. Conformational flexibility in the catalytic triad revealed by the high-resolution crystal structure of Streptomyces erythraeus trypsin in an unliganded state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blankenship, Elise; Vukoti, Krishna; Miyagi, Masaru; Lodowski, David T.

    2014-01-01

    This work reports the first sub-angstrom resolution structure of S. erythraeus trypsin. The detailed model of a prototypical serine protease at a catalytically relevant pH with an unoccupied active site is presented and is compared with other high-resolution serine protease structures. With more than 500 crystal structures determined, serine proteases make up greater than one-third of all proteases structurally examined to date, making them among the best biochemically and structurally characterized enzymes. Despite the numerous crystallographic and biochemical studies of trypsin and related serine proteases, there are still considerable shortcomings in the understanding of their catalytic mechanism. Streptomyces erythraeus trypsin (SET) does not exhibit autolysis and crystallizes readily at physiological pH; hence, it is well suited for structural studies aimed at extending the understanding of the catalytic mechanism of serine proteases. While X-ray crystallographic structures of this enzyme have been reported, no coordinates have ever been made available in the Protein Data Bank. Based on this, and observations on the extreme stability and unique properties of this particular trypsin, it was decided to crystallize it and determine its structure. Here, the first sub-angstrom resolution structure of an unmodified, unliganded trypsin crystallized at physiological pH is reported. Detailed structural analysis reveals the geometry and structural rigidity of the catalytic triad in the unoccupied active site and comparison to related serine proteases provides a context for interpretation of biochemical studies of catalytic mechanism and activity

  15. Application of a high-throughput relative chemical stability assay to screen therapeutic protein formulations by assessment of conformational stability and correlation to aggregation propensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Joseph M; Shi, Shuai; Li, Yunsong; Semple, Andrew; Esposito, Jessica J; Yu, Shenjiang; Richardson, Daisy; Antochshuk, Valentyn; Shameem, Mohammed

    2015-05-01

    In this study, an automated high-throughput relative chemical stability (RCS) assay was developed in which various therapeutic proteins were assessed to determine stability based on the resistance to denaturation post introduction to a chaotrope titration. Detection mechanisms of both intrinsic fluorescence and near UV circular dichroism (near-UV CD) are demonstrated. Assay robustness was investigated by comparing multiple independent assays and achieving r(2) values >0.95 for curve overlays. The complete reversibility of the assay was demonstrated by intrinsic fluorescence, near-UV CD, and biologic potency. To highlight the method utility, we compared the RCS assay with differential scanning calorimetry and dynamic scanning fluorimetry methodologies. Utilizing C1/2 values obtained from the RCS assay, formulation rank-ordering of 12 different mAb formulations was performed. The prediction of long-term stability on protein aggregation is obtained by demonstrating a good correlation with an r(2) of 0.83 between RCS and empirical aggregation propensity data. RCS promises to be an extremely useful tool to aid in candidate formulation development efforts based on the complete reversibility of the method to allow for multiple assessments without protein loss and the strong correlation between the C1/2 data obtained and accelerated stability under stressed conditions. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  16. A Nutritional Strategy for the Treatment of High Blood Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podell, Richard N.

    1984-01-01

    Some physicians wonder if high blood pressure can be controlled without the use of drugs and their potential side effects. Current findings concerning nutrition and high blood pressure are presented. (RM)

  17. Color changes in pork in relation to high pressure treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Kathrine Holmgaard

    treatment and during a six-day storage period was investigated via surface reflectance. Spectroscopic studies (in the form of surface reflectance, UV-vis, and circular dichroism) on the effect of HP treatment on the soluble protein fraction of porcine LD were conducted attempting to explain the color......-denatured ferric myoglobin species was not similar to the heat-denatured pigment, ferrihemochrome, but instead a closely related species sharing features of denatured gobin, ferric iron, and brown color. The reversibility of the pressure-induced changes often observed for various myoglobin forms in solution were...

  18. [High complication rate after surgical treatment of ankle fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjørslev, Naja; Ebskov, Lars; Lind, Marianne; Mersø, Camilla

    2014-08-04

    The purpose of this study was to determine the quality and re-operation rate of the surgical treatment of ankle fractures at a large university hospital. X-rays and patient records of 137 patients surgically treated for ankle fractures were analyzed for: 1) correct classification according to Lauge-Hansen, 2) if congruity of the ankle joint was achieved, 3) selection and placement of the hardware, and 4) the surgeon's level of education. Totally 32 of 137 did not receive an optimal treatment, 11 were re-operated. There was no clear correlation between incorrect operation and the surgeon's level of education.

  19. Renyi entropy and conformal defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bianchi, Lorenzo [Humboldt-Univ. Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik; Hamburg Univ. (Germany). II. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Meineri, Marco [Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa (Italy); Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Pisa (Italy); Myers, Robert C. [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Smolkin, Michael [California Univ., Berkely, CA (United States). Center for Theoretical Physics and Department of Physics

    2016-04-18

    We propose a field theoretic framework for calculating the dependence of Renyi entropies on the shape of the entangling surface in a conformal field theory. Our approach rests on regarding the corresponding twist operator as a conformal defect and in particular, we define the displacement operator which implements small local deformations of the entangling surface. We identify a simple constraint between the coefficient defining the two-point function of the displacement operator and the conformal weight of the twist operator, which consolidates a number of distinct conjectures on the shape dependence of the Renyi entropy. As an example, using this approach, we examine a conjecture regarding the universal coefficient associated with a conical singularity in the entangling surface for CFTs in any number of spacetime dimensions. We also provide a general formula for the second order variation of the Renyi entropy arising from small deformations of a spherical entangling surface, extending Mezei's results for the entanglement entropy.

  20. Conformal dimension theory and application

    CERN Document Server

    Mackay, John M

    2010-01-01

    Conformal dimension measures the extent to which the Hausdorff dimension of a metric space can be lowered by quasisymmetric deformations. Introduced by Pansu in 1989, this concept has proved extremely fruitful in a diverse range of areas, including geometric function theory, conformal dynamics, and geometric group theory. This survey leads the reader from the definitions and basic theory through to active research applications in geometric function theory, Gromov hyperbolic geometry, and the dynamics of rational maps, amongst other areas. It reviews the theory of dimension in metric spaces and of deformations of metric spaces. It summarizes the basic tools for estimating conformal dimension and illustrates their application to concrete problems of independent interest. Numerous examples and proofs are provided. Working from basic definitions through to current research areas, this book can be used as a guide for graduate students interested in this field, or as a helpful survey for experts. Background needed ...

  1. Elementary introduction to conformal invariance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grandati, Y.

    1992-01-01

    These notes constitute an elementary introduction to the concept of conformal invariance and its applications to the study of bidimensional critical phenomena. The aim is to give an access as pedestrian as possible to this vast subject. After a brief account of the general properties of conformal transformation in D dimensions, we study more specifically the case D = 2. The center of the discussion is then the consequences of the action of this symmetry group on bidimensional field theories, and in particular the links between the representations of the Virasoro algebra and the structure of the correlation functions of conformal field theories. Finally after showing how the Ising model reduces to a Majorana fermionic field theory, we see how the general formalism previously discussed can be applied to the Ising case at the critical point. (orig.)

  2. Conformal geometry and quasiregular mappings

    CERN Document Server

    Vuorinen, Matti

    1988-01-01

    This book is an introduction to the theory of spatial quasiregular mappings intended for the uninitiated reader. At the same time the book also addresses specialists in classical analysis and, in particular, geometric function theory. The text leads the reader to the frontier of current research and covers some most recent developments in the subject, previously scatterd through the literature. A major role in this monograph is played by certain conformal invariants which are solutions of extremal problems related to extremal lengths of curve families. These invariants are then applied to prove sharp distortion theorems for quasiregular mappings. One of these extremal problems of