WorldWideScience

Sample records for highly bright x-ray

  1. Bright circularly polarized soft X-ray high harmonics for X-ray magnetic circular dichroism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Tingting; Grychtol, Patrik; Knut, Ronny; Hernández-García, Carlos; Hickstein, Daniel D.; Zusin, Dmitriy; Gentry, Christian; Dollar, Franklin J.; Mancuso, Christopher A.; Hogle, Craig W.; Kfir, Ofer; Legut, Dominik; Carva, Karel; Ellis, Jennifer L.; Dorney, Kevin M.; Chen, Cong; Shpyrko, Oleg G.; Fullerton, Eric E.; Cohen, Oren; Oppeneer, Peter M.; Milošević, Dejan B.; Becker, Andreas; Jaroń-Becker, Agnieszka A.; Popmintchev, Tenio; Murnane, Margaret M.; Kapteyn, Henry C.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate, to our knowledge, the first bright circularly polarized high-harmonic beams in the soft X-ray region of the electromagnetic spectrum, and use them to implement X-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements in a tabletop-scale setup. Using counterrotating circularly polarized laser fields at 1.3 and 0.79 µm, we generate circularly polarized harmonics with photon energies exceeding 160 eV. The harmonic spectra emerge as a sequence of closely spaced pairs of left and right circularly polarized peaks, with energies determined by conservation of energy and spin angular momentum. We explain the single-atom and macroscopic physics by identifying the dominant electron quantum trajectories and optimal phase-matching conditions. The first advanced phase-matched propagation simulations for circularly polarized harmonics reveal the influence of the finite phase-matching temporal window on the spectrum, as well as the unique polarization-shaped attosecond pulse train. Finally, we use, to our knowledge, the first tabletop X-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements at the N4,5 absorption edges of Gd to validate the high degree of circularity, brightness, and stability of this light source. These results demonstrate the feasibility of manipulating the polarization, spectrum, and temporal shape of high harmonics in the soft X-ray region by manipulating the driving laser waveform. PMID:26534992

  2. Bright circularly polarized soft X-ray high harmonics for X-ray magnetic circular dichroism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Tingting; Grychtol, Patrik; Knut, Ronny; Hernández-García, Carlos; Hickstein, Daniel D; Zusin, Dmitriy; Gentry, Christian; Dollar, Franklin J; Mancuso, Christopher A; Hogle, Craig W; Kfir, Ofer; Legut, Dominik; Carva, Karel; Ellis, Jennifer L; Dorney, Kevin M; Chen, Cong; Shpyrko, Oleg G; Fullerton, Eric E; Cohen, Oren; Oppeneer, Peter M; Milošević, Dejan B; Becker, Andreas; Jaroń-Becker, Agnieszka A; Popmintchev, Tenio; Murnane, Margaret M; Kapteyn, Henry C

    2015-11-17

    We demonstrate, to our knowledge, the first bright circularly polarized high-harmonic beams in the soft X-ray region of the electromagnetic spectrum, and use them to implement X-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements in a tabletop-scale setup. Using counterrotating circularly polarized laser fields at 1.3 and 0.79 µm, we generate circularly polarized harmonics with photon energies exceeding 160 eV. The harmonic spectra emerge as a sequence of closely spaced pairs of left and right circularly polarized peaks, with energies determined by conservation of energy and spin angular momentum. We explain the single-atom and macroscopic physics by identifying the dominant electron quantum trajectories and optimal phase-matching conditions. The first advanced phase-matched propagation simulations for circularly polarized harmonics reveal the influence of the finite phase-matching temporal window on the spectrum, as well as the unique polarization-shaped attosecond pulse train. Finally, we use, to our knowledge, the first tabletop X-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements at the N4,5 absorption edges of Gd to validate the high degree of circularity, brightness, and stability of this light source. These results demonstrate the feasibility of manipulating the polarization, spectrum, and temporal shape of high harmonics in the soft X-ray region by manipulating the driving laser waveform.

  3. The Highly Perturbed X-ray Bright Group NGC 5044

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Laurence

    2014-09-01

    The NGC 5044 group is the X-ray brightest group in the sky and hosts many small X-ray cavities that were inflated by weak AGN outbursts. The cumulative effect of many weak AGN outbursts may be the dominant reheating mechanism in cooling flows. While AGN feedback probably prevents the bulk of gas from cooling in NGC 5044, the presence of molecular structures, Halpha filaments, [CII] emission and star formation indicates that at least some gas is able to condense out of the hot phase. The near by 5044 group is the best target for detecting small X-ray cavities with Chandra and investigating the cumulative effect of repeated weak AGN outbursts. The wealth of multi-frequency data also makes NGC 5044 an ideal target for studying gas over a broad range of temperatures in a cooling flow.

  4. Short Pulse High Brightness X-ray Production with the PLEIADES Thomson Scattering Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, S G; Barty, C P J; Betts, S M; Brown, W J; Crane, J K; Cross, R R; Fittinghoff, D N; Gibson, D J; Hartemann, F V; Kuba, J; LaSage, G P; Rosenzweig, J B; Slaughter, D R; Springer, P T; Tremaine, A M

    2003-07-01

    We describe PLEIADES, a compact, tunable, high-brightness, ultra-short pulse, Thomson x-ray source. The peak brightness of the source is expected to exceed 10{sup 20} photons/s/0.1% bandwidth/mm{sup 2}/mrad{sup 2}. Initial results are reported and compared to theoretical calculations.

  5. First results from the high-brightness x-ray spectroscopy beamline at ALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perera, R.C.C.; Ng, W.; Jones, G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Beamline 9.3.1 at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a windowless beamline, covering the 1-6 keV photon-energy range, designed to achieve the goal of high brightness at the sample for use in the X-ray Atomic and Molecular Spectroscopy (XAMS) science, surface and interface science, biology and x-ray optical development programs at ALS. X-ray absorption and time of flight photo emission measurements in 2 - 5 keV photon energy in argon along with the flux, resolution, spot size and stability of the beamline will be discussed. Prospects for future XAMS measurements will also be presented.

  6. High-brightness beamline for x-ray spectroscopy at the ALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perera, R.C.C.; Jones, G. [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Lindle, D.W. [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Beamline 9.3.1 at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a windowless beamline, covering the 1-6 keV photon-energy range, designed to achieve the goals of high energy resolution, high flux, and high brightness at the sample. When completed later this year, it will be the first ALS monochromatic hard x-ray beamline, and its brightness will be an order of magnitude higher than presently available in this energy range. In addition, it will provide flux and resolution comparable to any other beamline now in operation. To achieve these goals, two technical improvements, relative to existing x-ray beamlines, were incorporated. First, a somewhat novel optical design for x-rays, in which matched toroidal mirrors are positioned before and after the double-crystal monochromator, was adopted. This configuration allows for high resolution by passing a collimated beam through the monochromator, and for high brightness by focusing the ALS source on the sample with unit magnification. Second, a new {open_quotes}Cowan type{close_quotes} double-crystal monochromator based on the design used at NSLS beamline X-24A was developed. The measured mechanical precision of this new monochromator shows significant improvement over existing designs, without using positional feedback available with piezoelectric devices. Such precision is essential because of the high brightness of the radiation and the long distance (12 m) from the source (sample) to the collimating (focusing) mirror. This combination of features will provide a bright, high resolution, and stable x-ray beam for use in the x-ray spectroscopy program at the ALS.

  7. Efficient Pumping Schemes for High Average Brightness Collisional X-ray Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keenan, R; Dunn, J; Shlyaptsev, V N; Smith, R F; Patel, P K; Price, D F

    2003-10-07

    Advances in transient collisional x-ray lasers have been demonstrated over the last 5 years as a technique for achieving tabletop soft x-ray lasers using 2-10 J of laser pump energy. The high peak brightness of these sources operating in the high output saturation regime, in the range of 10{sup 24}-10{sup 25} ph. mm{sup -2} mrad{sup -2} s-1 (0.1% BW){sup -1}, is ideal for many applications requiring high photon fluence in a single short burst. However, the pump energy required for these x-ray lasers is still relatively high and limits the x-ray laser repetition rate to 1 shot every few minutes. Higher repetition rate collisional schemes have been reported and show some promise for high output in the future. We report a novel technique for enhancing the coupling efficiency of the laser pump into the gain medium that could lead to enhanced x-ray inversion with a factor of ten reduction in the drive energy. This has been applied to the collisional excitation scheme for Ni-like Mo at 18.9 nm and x-ray laser output has been demonstrated. Preliminary results show lasing on a single shot of the optical laser operating at 10 Hz and with 70 mJ in the short pulse. Such a proposed source would have higher average brightness, {approx}10{sup 14} ph. mm{sup -2} mrad{sup -2} s{sup -1} (0.1% BW){sup -1}, than present bending magnet 3rd generation synchrotron sources operating at the same spectral range.

  8. High-energy Neutrino Flares from X-Ray Bright and Dark Tidal Disruption Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senno, Nicholas; Murase, Kohta; Mészáros, Peter

    2017-03-01

    X-ray and γ-ray observations by the Swift satellite revealed that a fraction of tidal disruption events (TDEs) have relativistic jets. Jetted TDEs have been considered to be potential sources of very-high-energy cosmic-rays and neutrinos. In this work, using semi-analytical methods, we calculate neutrino spectra of X-ray bright TDEs with powerful jets and dark TDEs with possible choked jets, respectively. We estimate their neutrino fluxes and find that non-detection would give us an upper limit on the baryon loading of the jet luminosity contained in cosmic-rays ξ cr ≲ 20–50 for Sw J1644+57. We show that X-ray bright TDEs make a sub-dominant (≲5%–10%) contribution to IceCube’s diffuse neutrino flux, and study possible contributions of X-ray dark TDEs given that particles are accelerated in choked jets or disk winds. We discuss future prospects for multi-messenger searches of the brightest TDEs.

  9. Plasmon-enhanced photocathode for high brightness and high repetition rate x-ray sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polyakov, Aleksandr; Senft, Christoph; Thompson, K. F.; Feng, J.; Cabrini, S.; Schuck, P. J.; Padmore, Howard; Peppernick, Samuel J.; Hess, Wayne P.

    2013-02-11

    High brightness electron sources are at the heart of anew generation of x-ray sources based on the Free ElectronLaser (FEL) as well as in Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) and Inverse Compton Scattering (ICS) sources.The source of electrons consists of a photoinjector, comprised of a laser-driven photocathode in a high gradient electric field produced by an rf cavity. The function of the rf cavity is to provide a field sufficient for acceleration of electrons to relativistic velocity over a small distance, thus minimizing effects of the space-charge. Even so, the dense electron beam required for high brightness suffers from a space charge field that chirps and reshapes the electron pulse increasing beam emittance and thus reducing the overall brightness. This emittance growth can be avoided if the initial distribution of electrons is pancake shaped, with a semicircular transverse intensity profile. In this case, the electron distribution develops under its space charge field from a pancake into a uniformly filled ellipsoidal beam. This condition, referred to as the blowout regime, requires ultrashort pulses less than 100 fs long and has been successfully demonstrated recently in a high gradient photoinjector.

  10. A study on materials of steels by high brightness X-ray

    CERN Document Server

    Tsuzaki, K; Umezawa, O; Hara, T; Takahashi, T; Omura, T; Hayakawa, M; Yamauchi, Y

    2001-01-01

    As the survey study on materials analysis of steels using high brightness X-ray, under aiming to clarify direct experimental facts on deformations, failure phenomena, and metal textures forming at interior portions of bulk materials, feasibility on materials research and development using SPring-8 was surveyed. Its concrete items were summarized to fields shown as follows: 1) acquirement of foundation on synchrotron X-ray, 2) visualization of cracks and artificial cracks in metal bulk samples by using refraction imaging (point light source topography), 3) visualization of the second phase in the metal bulk samples by using refraction imaging, and 4) speciation of carbon elements in steel cords by Moessbauer spectroscopy. Together with clarifying problems more and more by the survey and some experiments, subjects and understandings vacantly considered at standpoints of materials researchers could be arranged and defined. (G.K.)

  11. Relationship Between Solar Coronal X-Ray Brightness and Active Region Magnetic Fields: A Study Using High Resolution Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Hazra, Soumitra; Ravindra, B

    2014-01-01

    By utilizing high resolution observations of nearly co-temporal and co-spatial SOT spectropolarimeter and XRT coronal X-ray data onboard Hinode, we revisit the contentious issue of the relationship between global magnetic quantities and coronal X-ray intensity. Co-aligned vector magnetogram and X-ray data are used for this study. We find that there is no pixel-to-pixel correlation between the observed loop brightness and magnetic quantities. However, the X-ray brightness is well correlated with the integrated magnetic quantities such as total unsigned magnetic flux, total unsigned vertical current, area integrated square of the vertical magnetic field and horizontal magnetic fields. Comparing all these quantities we find that the total magnetic flux correlates well with the observed integrated X-ray brightness, though there is some differences in the strength of the correlation when we use the X-ray data from different filters. While we get a good correlation between X-ray brightness and total unsigned vertic...

  12. High-Energy Density science with an ultra-bright x-ray laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenzer, Siegfried

    2015-11-01

    This talk will review recent progress in high-energy density physics using the world's brightest x-ray source, the Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC's free electron x-ray laser. These experiments investigate laser-driven matter in extreme conditions where powerful x-ray scattering and imaging techniques have been applied to resolve ionic interactions at atomic (Ångstrom) scale lengths and to visualize the formation of dense plasma states. Major research areas include dynamic compression experiments of solid targets to determine structural properties and to discover and characterize phase transitions at mega-bar pressures. A second area studies extreme fields produced by high-intensity radiation where fundamental questions of laboratory plasmas can be related to cosmological phenomena. Each of these areas takes advantage of the unique properties of the LCLS x-ray beam. They include small foci for achieving high intensity or high spatial resolution, high photon flux for dynamic structure factor measurements in single shots, and high spectral bandwidth to resolve plasmon (Langmuir) waves or ion acoustic waves in dense plasmas. We will further describe new developments of ultrafast pump-probe technique at high repetition rates. These include studies on dense cryogenic hydrogen that have begun providing fundamental insights into the physical properties of matter in extreme conditions that are important for astrophysics, fusion experiments and generation of radiation sources. This work was supported by DOE Office of Science, Fusion Energy Science under FWP 100182.

  13. High-brightness X-ray free-electron laser with an optical undulator by pulse shaping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chao; Liang, Jinyang; Hei, Dongwei; Becker, Michael F; Tang, Kelei; Feng, Yiping; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Pellegrini, Claudio; Wu, Juhao

    2013-12-30

    A normal-incident flattop laser with a tapered end is proposed as an optical undulator to achieve a high-gain and high-brightness X-ray free electron laser (FEL). The synchronic interaction of an electron bunch with the normal incident laser is realized by tilting the laser pulse front. The intensity of the flattop laser is kept constant during the interaction time of the electron bunch and the laser along the focal plane of a cylindrical lens. Optical shaping to generate the desired flattop pulse with a tapered end from an original Gaussian pulse distribution is designed and simulated. The flattop laser with a tapered end can enhance the X-ray FEL beyond the exponential growth saturation power by one order to reach 1 Gigawatt as compared to that without a tapered end. The peak brightness can reach 1030 photons/mm2/mrad2/s/0.1% bandwidth, more than 10 orders brighter than the conventional incoherent Thompson Scattering X-ray source.

  14. High-brightness laser plasma soft X-ray source using a double-stream gas puff target irradiated with the Prague Asterix Laser System (PALS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiedorowicz, H.; Bartnik, A.; Juha, L.; Jungwirth, K.; Kralikova, B.; Krasa, J.; Kubat, P.; Pfeifer, M.; Pina, L.; Prchal, P.; Rohlena, K.; Skala, J.; Ullschmied, J.; Horvath, M.; Wawer, J

    2004-01-14

    High brightness laser plasma soft X-ray source based on a recently developed double-stream gas puff target irradiated with 0.5 ns laser pulses with energies up to 700 J from the Prague Asterix Laser System (PALS) is presented. The gas puff target was created by pulsed injection of xenon into a hollow stream of helium using an electromagnetic valve system with the double-nozzle setup. Soft X-ray emission was measured using the transmission grating spectrograph coupled to a CCD camera and the calibrated silicon photodiodes. The absolute soft X-ray production was determined to be 160 J for 540 J of laser energy, giving the soft X-ray conversion efficiency of about 30%. The source has been used in initial experiments on soft X-ray ablation of organic polymers and elemental solids.

  15. Developing a bright 17 keV x-ray source for probing high-energy-density states of matter at high spatial resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huntington, C. M.; Park, H.-S.; Maddox, B. R.; Barrios, M. A.; Benedetti, R.; Braun, D. G.; Landen, O. L.; Wehrenberg, C. E.; Remington, B. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California, 94551 (United States); Hohenberger, M.; Regan, S. P. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    A set of experiments were performed on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to develop and optimize a bright, 17 keV x-ray backlighter probe using laser-irradiated Nb foils. High-resolution one-dimensional imaging was achieved using a 15 μm wide slit in a Ta substrate to aperture the Nb He{sub α} x-rays onto an open-aperture, time integrated camera. To optimize the x-ray source for imaging applications, the effect of laser pulse shape and spatial profile on the target was investigated. Two laser pulse shapes were used—a “prepulse” shape that included a 3 ns, low-intensity laser foot preceding the high-energy 2 ns square main laser drive, and a pulse without the laser foot. The laser spatial profile was varied by the use of continuous phase plates (CPPs) on a pair of shots compared to beams at best focus, without CPPs. A comprehensive set of common diagnostics allowed for a direct comparison of imaging resolution, total x-ray conversion efficiency, and x-ray spectrum between shots. The use of CPPs was seen to reduce the high-energy tail of the x-ray spectrum, whereas the laser pulse shape had little effect on the high-energy tail. The measured imaging resolution was comparably high for all combinations of laser parameters, but a higher x-ray flux was achieved without phase plates. This increased flux was the result of smaller laser spot sizes, which allowed us to arrange the laser focal spots from multiple beams and produce an x-ray source which was more localized behind the slit aperture. Our experiments are a first demonstration of point-projection geometry imaging at NIF at the energies (>10 keV) necessary for imaging denser, higher-Z targets than have previously been investigated.

  16. Systematic search for VHE gamma-ray emission from X-ray bright high-frequency BL Lac objects

    CERN Document Server

    Albert, J

    2007-01-01

    Motivated by the fact that all but two (M87, BL Lac) extragalactic sources detected so far at VHE energies belong to the so-called HBL class of high-frequency peaked BL Lac objects, a systematic scan of the compilation of X-ray blazars by Donato et al. (2001) has been performed using the MAGIC telescope. The observations took place from December 2004 to March 2006 and cover sources on the northern sky visible under small zenith distances zd 2uJy) sources emitting at least the same energy flux at 200GeV as at 1keV. In order to avoid strong gamma-ray attenuation close to the energy threshold, the redshift of the sources was constrained to values z < 0.3. Of the 14 sources observed, 1ES 1218+30.4 (for the first time at very high energies) and 1ES 2344+51.4 (strong detection in a low flux state) have been detected in addition to the known bright TeV blazars Mrk 421 and Mrk 501. For the remaining sources, we present here the 99% confidence level upper limits on the integral flux above ~200GeV. A marginal exces...

  17. Real-Time Observation of Laser Heated Metals with High Brightness Monochromatic X-Ray Techniques at Present and Their Future Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daido, H.; Shobu, T.; Yamada, T.; Yamashita, S.; Sugihara, K.; Nishimura, A.; Muramatsu, T.

    We present the x-ray techniques for characterizing laser heated metals for welding and cutting techniques. At present, with an undulator (70 keV) as well as bending magnet (30 keV) sources at SPring-8 as a probe source, CW 300 W Ytterbium fiber laser irradiates an Aluminum slab as a sample. Simultaneously the x-ray beam probes the sample for real time observation of a molten pool. We observe the convection indicated by the motion of tungsten based particles as a tracer in the molten pool. During the cooling phase, the molten metal is solidified with residual stresses which are affected by the heating and convection processes. In this experiment the time and space resolution are ˜milli-second and several tens of μm, respectively. On the other hand, microscopic short transient phenomena also play a significant role for the quality of a solidified material. For this purpose, we need high energy short pulse x-ray sources. We try to discuss on the capability and limitation of present x-ray sources and the prospect of an ultra high brightness x-ray source as a complementary source for full characterization of the laser heated and cooling processes of metals.

  18. Transform-Limited X-Ray Pulse Generation from a High Brightness Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission Free-Electron Laser

    CERN Document Server

    McNeil, B W J; Dunning, D J

    2012-01-01

    A method to achieve High-Brightness Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (HB-SASE) in the Free Electron Laser (FEL) is described. The method uses repeated non-equal electron beam delays to de-localise the collective FEL interaction and break the radiation coherence length dependence on the FEL cooperation length. The method requires no external seeding or photon optics and so is applicable at any wavelength or repetition rate. It is demonstrated using linear theory and numerical simulations that the radiation coherence length can be increased by approximately two orders of magnitude over SASE with a corresponding increase in spectral brightness. Examples are shown of HB-SASE generating transform-limited FEL pulses in the soft X-ray and near transform-limited pulses in the hard X-ray. Such pulses may greatly benefit existing applications and may also open up new areas of scientific research.

  19. The European X-ray Free-Electron Laser: toward an ultra-bright, high repetition-rate x-ray source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.Altarelli

    2015-01-01

    The status of the European X-ray Free-Electron Laser(European XFEL), under construction near Hamburg, Germany, is described. The start of operations of the LCLS at SLAC and of SACLA in Japan has already produced impressive scientific results. The European XFEL facility is powered by a 17.5 Ge V superconducting linear accelerator that,compared to these two operating facilities, will generate two orders of magnitude more pulses per second, up to 27 000.It can therefore support modes of operation switching the beam up to 30 times per second among three different experiments, providing each of them with thousands of pulses per second. The scientific possibilities opened up by these capabilities are briefly described, together with the current instrumental developments(in optics, detectors, lasers,etc.) that are necessary to implement this program.

  20. Time series analysis of bright galactic X-ray sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Priedhorsky, W. C.; Brandt, Søren; Lund, Niels

    1995-01-01

    We analyze 70 to 110 day data sets from eight bright galactic X-ray binaries observed by WATCH/Eureca, in search of periodic variations. We obtain new epochs for the orbital variation of Cyg X-3 and 4U 1700-37, and confirmation of a dip in Cyg X-1 at superior conjunction of the X-ray star. No evi...

  1. The Hamburg/RASS Catalogue of optical identifications. Northern high-galactic latitude ROSAT Bright Source Catalogue X-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Zickgraf, F J; Hagen, H J; Reimers, D; Voges, W

    2003-01-01

    We present the Hamburg/RASS Catalogue (HRC) of optical identifications of X-ray sources at high-galactic latitude. The HRC includes all X-ray sources from the ROSAT Bright Source Catalogue (RASS-BSC) with galactic latitude |b| >= 30 degr and declination delta >= 0 degr. In this part of the sky covering ~10 000 deg^2 the RASS-BSC contains 5341 X-ray sources. For the optical identification we used blue Schmidt prism and direct plates taken for the northern hemisphere Hamburg Quasar Survey (HQS) which are now available in digitized form. The limiting magnitudes are 18.5 and 20, respectively. For 82% of the selected RASS-BSC an identification could be given. For the rest either no counterpart was visible in the error circle or a plausible identification was not possible. With ~42% AGN represent the largest group of X-ray emitters, \\~31% have a stellar counterpart, whereas galaxies and cluster of galaxies comprise only ~4% and ~5%, respectively. In ~3% of the RASS-BSC sources no object was visible on our blue dire...

  2. X-ray bright groups and their galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Helsdon, S F; Helsdon, Stephen F.; Ponman, Trevor J.

    2002-01-01

    Combining X-ray data from the ROSAT PSPC and optical data drawn from the literature, we examine in detail the relationship between the X-ray and optical properties of X-ray bright galaxy groups. We find a relationship between optical luminosity and X-ray temperature consistent with that expected from self-similar scaling of galaxy systems, L_B \\propto T^{1.6 +/- 0.2}. The self-similar form and continuity of the L_B : T relation from clusters to groups and the limited scatter seen in this relation, implies that the star formation efficiency is rather similar in all these systems. We find that the bright extended X-ray components associated with many central galaxies in groups appear to be more closely related to the group than the galaxy itself, and we suggest that these are group cooling flows rather than galaxy halos. In addition we find that the optical light in these groups appears to be more centrally concentrated than the light in clusters. We also use the optical and X-ray data to investigate whether ea...

  3. Conceptual design of a high-brightness linac for soft X-ray SASE-FEL source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alesini, D.; Bertolucci, S.; Biagini, M.E.; Biscari, C.; Boni, R.; Boscolo, M.; Castellano, M.; Clozza, A.; Pirro, G.D.G. Di; Drago, A.; Esposito, A.; Ferrario, M. E-mail: massimo.ferrario@lnf.infn.it; Fusco, V.; Gallo, A.; Ghigo, A.; Guiducci, S.; Incurvati, M.; Laurelli, P.; Ligi, C.; Marcellini, F.; Migliorati, M.; Milardi, C.; Palumbo, L.; Pellegrino, L.; Preger, M.; Raimondi, P.; Ricci, R.; Sanelli, C.; Sgamma, F.; Spataro, B.; Serio, M.; Stecchi, A.; Stella, A.; Tazzioli, F.; Vaccarezza, C.; Vescovi, M.; Vicario, C.; Zobov, M.; Acerbi, E.; Alessandria, F.; Barni, D.; Bellomo, G.; Birattari, C.; Bonardi, M.; Boscolo, I.; Bosotti, A.; Broggi, F.; Cialdi, S.; DeMartinis, C.; Giove, D.; Maroli, C.; Michelato, P.; Monaco, L.; Pagani, C.; Petrillo, V.; Pierini, P.; Serafini, L.; Sertore, D.; Volpini, G.; Chiadroni, E.; Felici, G.; Levi, D.; Mastrucci, M.; Mattioli, M.; Medici, G.; Petrarca, G.S.; Catani, L.; Cianchi, A.; D' Angelo, A.; Salvo, R.D.R. Di; Fantini, A.; Moricciani, D.; Schaerf, C.; Bartolini, R.; Ciocci, F.; Dattoli, G.; Doria, A.; Flora, F.; Gallerano, G.P.; Giannessi, L.; Giovenale, E.; Messina, G.; Mezi, L.; Ottaviani, P.L.; Picardi, L.; Quattromini, M.; Renieri, A.; Ronsivalle, C.; Avaldi, L.; Carbone, C.; Cricenti, A.; Pifferi, A.; Perfetti, P.; Prosperi, T.; Albertini, V.R.V. Rossi; Quaresima, C.; Zema, N

    2003-07-11

    FELs based on SASE are believed to be powerful tools to explore the frontiers of basic sciences, from physics to chemistry to biology. Intense R and D programs have started in the USA and Europe in order to understand the SASE physics and to prove the feasibility of these sources. The allocation of considerable resources in the Italian National Research Plan (PNR) brought about the formation of a CNR-ENEA-INFN-University of Roma 'Tor Vergata' study group. A conceptual design study has been developed and possible schemes for linac sources have been investigated, leading to the SPARX proposal. We report in this paper the results of a preliminary start to end simulation concerning one option we are considering based on an S-band normal conducting linac with high-brightness photoinjector integrated in an RF compressor.

  4. Generating coherent soft x-ray pulses in the water window with a high-brightness seeded free-electron laser

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Kaishang; Deng, Haixiao; Wang, Dong

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new scheme to generate high-brightness and temporal coherent soft x-ray radiation in a seeded free-electron laser. The proposed scheme is based the coherent harmonic generation (CHG) and superradiant principles. A CHG scheme is first used to generate coherent signal at ultra-high harmonics of the seed. This coherent signal is then amplified by a series of chicane-undulator modules via the fresh bunch and superradiant processes in the following radiator. Using a representative of realistic set of parameters, three-dimensional simulations have been carried out and the simulations results demonstrated that 10 GW-level ultra-short coherent radiation pulses in the water window can be achieved by using the proposed technique.

  5. Generating high-brightness and coherent soft x-ray pulses in the water window with a seeded free-electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaishang Zhou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new scheme to generate high-brightness and temporal coherent soft x-ray radiation in a seeded free-electron laser. The proposed scheme is based on the coherent harmonic generation (CHG and superradiant principles. A CHG scheme is first used to generate a coherent signal at ultrahigh harmonics of the seed. This coherent signal is then amplified by a series of chicane-undulator modules via the fresh bunch and superradiant processes in the following radiator. Using a representative of a realistic set of parameters, three-dimensional simulations have been carried out and the simulations results demonstrated that 10 GW-level ultrashort (∼20  fs coherent radiation pulses in the water window can be achieved by using a 1.6 GeV electron beam based on the proposed technique.

  6. X-Ray bright active galactic nuclei in massive galaxy clusters - II. The fraction of galaxies hosting active nuclei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehlert, S.; von der Linden, A.; Allen, S. W.

    2013-01-01

    We present a measurement of the fraction of cluster galaxies hosting X-ray bright active galactic nuclei (AGN) as a function of clustercentric distance scaled in units of r500. Our analysis employs high-quality Chandra X-ray and Subaru optical imaging for 42 massive X-ray-selected galaxy cluster...

  7. PROFFIT: Analysis of X-ray surface-brightness profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Dominique

    2016-08-01

    PROFFIT analyzes X-ray surface-brightness profiles for data from any X-ray instrument. It can extract surface-brightness profiles in circular or elliptical annuli, using constant or logarithmic bin size, from the image centroid, the surface-brightness peak, or any user-given center, and provides surface-brightness profiles in any circular or elliptical sectors. It offers background map support to extract background profiles, can excise areas using SAO DS9-compatible (ascl:0003.002) region files to exclude point sources, provides fitting with a number of built-in models, including the popular beta model, double beta, cusp beta, power law, and projected broken power law, uses chi-squared or C statistic, and can fit on the surface-brightness or counts data. It has a command-line interface similar to HEASOFT’s XSPEC (ascl:9910.005) package, provides interactive help with a description of all the commands, and results can be saved in FITS, ROOT or TXT format.

  8. High-Resolution X-ray Emission and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, F.M.F. de

    2000-01-01

    In this review, high-resolution X-ray emission and X-ray absorption spectroscopy will be discussed. The focus is on the 3d transition-metal systems. To understand high-resolution X-ray emission and reso-nant X-ray emission, it is first necessary to spend some time discussing the X-ray absorption

  9. High-Resolution X-ray Emission and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    de Groot, F. M. F.

    2001-01-01

    In this review, high-resolution X-ray emission and X-ray absorption spectroscopy will be discussed. The focus is on the 3d transition-metal systems. To understand high-resolution X-ray emission and reso-nant X-ray emission, it is first necessary to spend some time discussing the X-ray absorption process. Section II discusses 1s X-ray absorption, i.e., the K edges, and section III deals with 2p X-ray absorption, the L edges. X-ray emission is discussed in, respectively, the L edges. X-ray emis...

  10. Final Report on DTRA Basic Research Project #BRCALL08-Per3-C-2-0006 "High-Z Non-Equilibrium Physics and Bright X-ray Sources with New Laser Targets"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colvin, Jeffrey D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-06-01

    This project had two major goals. Final Goal: obtain spectrally resolved, absolutely calibrated x-ray emission data from uniquely uniform mm-scale near-critical-density high-Z plasmas not in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) to benchmark modern detailed atomic physics models. Scientific significance: advance understanding of non-LTE atomic physics. Intermediate Goal: develop new nano-fabrication techniques to make suitable laser targets that form the required highly uniform non-LTE plasmas when illuminated by high-intensity laser light. Scientific significance: advance understanding of nano-science. The new knowledge will allow us to make x-ray sources that are bright at the photon energies of most interest for testing radiation hardening technologies, the spectral energy range where current x-ray sources are weak. All project goals were met.

  11. Optically Levitated Targets as a Source for High Brightness X-rays and a Platform for Mass-Limited Laser-interaction Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giltrap, Samuel; Stuart, Nick; Robinson, Tim; Armstrong, Chris; Hicks, George; Eardley, Sam; Gumbrell, Ed; Smith, Roland

    2016-10-01

    Here we report on the development of an optical levitation based x-ray and proton source, motivated by the requirement for a debris free, high spatial resolution, and low EMP source for x-ray radiography and proton production. Research at Imperial College has led to the development of a feedback controlled optical levitation trap which is capable of holding both solid (Glass beads) and liquid (silicon based oil) micro-targets ( 3-10um). The optical levitation trap has been successfully fielded in a high-intensity laser interaction experiment at Imperial College London and at the Vulcan Petawatt Laser system at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL). Here we report on the results from that RAL run including; an x-ray source size of 10-15um with very good spherical symmetry when compared to wire targets, secondly very low EMP signal from isolated levitated targets (9 times less RF signal than a comparable wire target). At Imperial College we were also able to record an x-ray energy spectrum which produced an electron temperature of 0.48KeV, and performed interferometry of a shock evolving into a blast wave off an optically levitated droplet which allowed us to infer the electron density within the shock front.

  12. Populations of Bright X-ray Sources in the Starburst Galaxies NGC 4038/4039

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi-Wei Liu; Xiang-Dong Li

    2007-01-01

    Assuming a naive star formation history,we construct synthetic X-ray source populations.using a population synthesis code,for comparison with the observed X-ray luminosity function (XLF) of the interacting galaxies NGC 4038/4039.We have included highand intermediate-mass X-ray binaries.young rotation-powered pulsars and fallback disk-fed black holes in modeling the bright X-ray sources detected.We find that the majority of the X-ray sources are likely to be intermediate-mass X-ray binaries.but for typical binary evolution parameters.the predicted XLF seems to be steeper than observed.We note that the shape of the XLFs depends critically on the existence of XLF break for young populations.and suggest super-Eddington accretion luminosities or the existence of intermediate-mass black holes to account for the high luminosity end and the slope of the XLF in NGC 4038/4039.

  13. X-Ray bright active galactic nuclei in massive galaxy clusters - II. The fraction of galaxies hosting active nuclei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehlert, S.; von der Linden, A.; Allen, S. W.

    2013-01-01

    We present a measurement of the fraction of cluster galaxies hosting X-ray bright active galactic nuclei (AGN) as a function of clustercentric distance scaled in units of r500. Our analysis employs high-quality Chandra X-ray and Subaru optical imaging for 42 massive X-ray-selected galaxy cluster......, both of which are also suppressed near cluster centres to a comparable extent. These results strongly support the idea that X-ray AGN activity and strong star formation are linked through their common dependence on available reservoirs of cold gas....... fields spanning the redshift range 0.2 cluster galaxy AGN fraction in the central...

  14. High Energy Vision: Processing X-rays

    CERN Document Server

    DePasquale, Joseph; Edmonds, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Astronomy is by nature a visual science. The high quality imagery produced by the world's observatories can be a key to effectively engaging with the public and helping to inspire the next generation of scientists. Creating compelling astronomical imagery can, however, be particularly challenging in the non-optical wavelength regimes. In the case of X-ray astronomy, where the amount of light available to create an image is severely limited, it is necessary to employ sophisticated image processing algorithms to translate light beyond human vision into imagery that is aesthetically pleasing while still being scientifically accurate. This paper provides a brief overview of the history of X-ray astronomy leading to the deployment of NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, followed by an examination of the specific challenges posed by processing X-ray imagery. The authors then explore image processing techniques used to mitigate such processing challenges in order to create effective public imagery for X-ray astronomy. ...

  15. A Bright Spatially-Coherent Compact X-ray Synchrotron Source

    CERN Document Server

    Kneip, S; Martins, J L; Martins, S F; Bellei, C; Chvykov, V; Dollar, F; Fonseca, R; Huntington, C; Kalintchenko, G; Maksimchuk, A; Mangles, S P D; Matsuoka, T; Nagel, S R; Palmer, C; Schreiber, J; Phuoc, K Ta; Thomas, A G R; Yanovsky, V; Silva, L O; Krushelnick, K; Najmudin, Z

    2009-01-01

    Each successive generation of x-ray machines has opened up new frontiers in science, such as the first radiographs and the determination of the structure of DNA. State-of-the-art x-ray sources can now produce coherent high brightness keV x-rays and promise a new revolution in imaging complex systems on nanometre and femtosecond scales. Despite the demand, only a few dedicated synchrotron facilities exist worldwide, partially due the size and cost of conventional (accelerator) technology. Here we demonstrate the use of a recently developed compact laser-plasma accelerator to produce a well-collimated, spatially-coherent, intrinsically ultrafast source of hard x-rays. This method reduces the size of the synchrotron source from the tens of metres to centimetre scale, accelerating and wiggling a high electron charge simultaneously. This leads to a narrow-energy spread electron beam and x-ray source that is >1000 times brighter than previously reported plasma wiggler and thus has the potential to facilitate a myri...

  16. Generation of bright isolated attosecond soft X-ray pulses driven by multicycle midinfrared lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming-Chang; Mancuso, Christopher; Hernández-García, Carlos; Dollar, Franklin; Galloway, Ben; Popmintchev, Dimitar; Huang, Pei-Chi; Walker, Barry; Plaja, Luis; Jaroń-Becker, Agnieszka A; Becker, Andreas; Murnane, Margaret M; Kapteyn, Henry C; Popmintchev, Tenio

    2014-06-10

    High harmonic generation driven by femtosecond lasers makes it possible to capture the fastest dynamics in molecules and materials. However, to date the shortest subfemtosecond (attosecond, 10(-18) s) pulses have been produced only in the extreme UV region of the spectrum below 100 eV, which limits the range of materials and molecular systems that can be explored. Here we experimentally demonstrate a remarkable convergence of physics: when midinfrared lasers are used to drive high harmonic generation, the conditions for optimal bright, soft X-ray generation naturally coincide with the generation of isolated attosecond pulses. The temporal window over which phase matching occurs shrinks rapidly with increasing driving laser wavelength, to the extent that bright isolated attosecond pulses are the norm for 2-µm driving lasers. Harnessing this realization, we experimentally demonstrate the generation of isolated soft X-ray attosecond pulses at photon energies up to 180 eV for the first time, to our knowledge, with a transform limit of 35 attoseconds (as), and a predicted linear chirp of 300 as. Most surprisingly, advanced theory shows that in contrast with as pulse generation in the extreme UV, long-duration, 10-cycle, driving laser pulses are required to generate isolated soft X-ray bursts efficiently, to mitigate group velocity walk-off between the laser and the X-ray fields that otherwise limit the conversion efficiency. Our work demonstrates a clear and straightforward approach for robustly generating bright isolated attosecond pulses of electromagnetic radiation throughout the soft X-ray region of the spectrum.

  17. ULTRA-BRIGHT X-RAY GENERATION USING INVERSE COMPTON SCATTERING OF PICOSECOND CO(2) LASER PLUSES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TSUNEMI,A.; ENDO,A.; POGORELSKY,I.; BEN-ZVI,I.; KUSCHE,K.; SKARITKA,J.; YAKIMENKO,V.; HIROSE,T.; URAKAWA,J.; OMORI,T.; WASHIO,M.; LIU,Y.; HE,P.; CLINE,D.

    1999-03-01

    Laser-Compton scattering with picosecond CO{sub 2} laser pulses is proposed for generation of high-brightness x-rays. The interaction chamber has been developed and the experiment is scheduled for the generation of the x-rays of 4.7 keV, 10{sup 7} photons in 10-ps pulse width using 50-MeV, 0.5-nC relativistic electron bunches and 6 GW CO{sub 2} laser.

  18. High duty cycle inverse Compton scattering X-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovodenko, A.; Agustsson, R.; Babzien, M.; Campese, T.; Fedurin, M.; Murokh, A.; Pogorelsky, I.; Polyanskiy, M.; Rosenzweig, J.; Sakai, Y.; Shaftan, T.; Swinson, C.

    2016-12-01

    Inverse Compton Scattering (ICS) is an emerging compact X-ray source technology, where the small source size and high spectral brightness are of interest for multitude of applications. However, to satisfy the practical flux requirements, a high-repetition-rate ICS system needs to be developed. To this end, this paper reports the experimental demonstration of a high peak brightness ICS source operating in a burst mode at 40 MHz. A pulse train interaction has been achieved by recirculating a picosecond CO2 laser pulse inside an active optical cavity synchronized to the electron beam. The pulse train ICS performance has been characterized at 5- and 15- pulses per train and compared to a single pulse operation under the same operating conditions. With the observed near-linear X-ray photon yield gain due to recirculation, as well as noticeably higher operational reliability, the burst-mode ICS offers a great potential for practical scalability towards high duty cycles.

  19. Bright X-ray source from a laser-driven micro-plasma-waveguide

    CERN Document Server

    Yi, Longqing

    2016-01-01

    Bright tunable x-ray sources have a number of applications in basic science, medicine and industry. The most powerful sources are synchrotrons, where relativistic electrons are circling in giant storage rings. In parallel, compact laser-plasma x-ray sources are being developed. Owing to the rapid progress in laser technology, very high-contrast femtosecond laser pulses of relativistic intensities become available. These pulses allow for interaction with micro-structured solid-density plasma without destroying the structure by parasitic pre-pulses. The high-contrast laser pulses as well as the manufacturing of materials at micro- and nano-scales open a new realm of possibilities for laser interaction with photonic materials at the relativistic intensities. Here we demonstrate, via numerical simulations, that when coupling with a readily available 1.8 Joule laser, a micro-plasma-waveguide (MPW) may serve as a novel compact x-ray source. Electrons are extracted from the walls by the laser field and form a dense ...

  20. Soft-X-Ray Projection Lithography Using a High-Repetition-Rate Laser-Induced X-Ray Source for Sub-100 Nanometer Lithography Processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Louis,; F. Bijkerk,; Shmaenok, L.; Voorma, H. J.; van der Wiel, M. J.; Schlatmann, R.; Verhoeven, J.; van der Drift, E. W. J. M.; Romijn, J.; Rousseeuw, B. A. C.; Voss, F.; Desor, R.; Nikolaus, B.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper we present the status of a joint development programme on soft x-ray projection lithography (SXPL) integrating work on high brightness laser plasma sources. fabrication of multilayer x-ray mirrors. and patterning of reflection masks. We are in the process of optimization of a laser-pla

  1. X-ray Polarization from High Mass X-ray Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Kallman, T; Blondin, J

    2015-01-01

    X-ray astronomy allows study of objects which may be associated with compact objects, i.e. neutron stars or black holes, and also may contain strong magnetic fields. Such objects are categorically non-spherical, and likely non-circular when projected on the sky. Polarization allows study of such geoemetric effects, and X-ray polarimetry is likely to become feasible for a significant number of sources in the future. A class of potential targets for future X-ray polarization observations is the high mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs), which consist of a compact object in orbit with an early type star. In this paper ws show that X-ray polarization from HMXBs has a distinct signature which depends on the source inclination and orbital phase. The presence of the X-ray source displaced from the star creates linear polarization even if the primary wind is spherically symmetric whenever the system is viewed away from conjunction. Direct X-rays dilute this polarization whenever the X-ray source is not eclipsed; at mid-eclips...

  2. Bright X-Ray Transients in M31: 2004 July XMM-Newton Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudolyubov, Sergey; Priedhorsky, William; Cordova, France

    2006-07-01

    We present the results of X-ray observations of four bright transients sources detected in the 2004 July XMM-Newton observations of the central bulge of M31. Two X-ray sources, XMMU J004315.5+412440 and XMMU J004144.7+411110, were discovered for the first time. Two other sources, CXOM31 J004309.9+412332 and CXOM31 J004241.8+411635, were previously detected by Chandra. The properties of the sources suggest their identification with accreting binary systems in M31. The X-ray spectra and variability of two sources, XMMU J004144.7+411110 and CXOM31 J004241.8+411635, are similar to that of the Galactic black hole transients. The X-ray source XMMU J004315.5+412440 demonstrates a dramatic decline of the X-ray flux on a timescale of three days and a remarkable flaring behavior on a timescale of tens of minutes. The X-ray data on XMMU J004315.5+412440 and CXOM31 J004309.9+412332 suggest that they can be either black hole or neutron star systems. Combining the results of 2000-2004 XMM-Newton observations of M31, we estimate the total rate of the bright transient outbursts in the central region of M31 to be 6-12 yr-1, in agreement with previous studies.

  3. Rapidly Rotating, X-ray Bright Stars in the Kepler Field

    CERN Document Server

    Howell, Steve B; Boyd, Padi; Smith, Krista Lynne; Gelino, Dawn

    2016-01-01

    We present Kepler light curves and optical spectroscopy of twenty X-ray bright stars located in the Kepler field of view. The stars, spectral type FK, show evidence for rapid rotation including chromospheric activity 100 times or more above the Sun at maximum and flaring behavior in their light curves. Eighteen of our objects appear to be (sub)giants and may belong to the class of FK Com variables, that is evolved rapidly spinning single stars with no excretion disk and high levels of chromospheric activity. Such stars are rare and are likely the result of W UMa binary mergers, a process believed to produce the FK Com class of variable and their descendants. The FK Com stage, including the presence of an excretion disk, is short-lived but leads to longer-lived stages consisting of single, rapidly rotating evolved (sub)giants with high levels of stellar activity.

  4. A comprehensive analysis of the hard X-ray spectra of bright Seyfert galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubiński, P.; Beckmann, V.; Gibaud, L.; Paltani, S.; Papadakis, I. E.; Ricci, C.; Soldi, S.; Türler, M.; Walter, R.; Zdziarski, A. A.

    2016-05-01

    Hard X-ray spectra of 28 bright Seyfert galaxies observed with INTEGRAL were analysed together with the X-ray spectra from XMM-Newton, Suzaku and RXTE. These broad-band data were fitted with a model assuming a thermal Comptonization as a primary continuum component. We tested several model options through a fitting of the Comptonized continuum accompanied by a complex absorption and a Compton reflection. Both the large data set used and the model space explored allowed us to accurately determine a mean temperature kTe of the electron plasma, the Compton parameter y and the Compton reflection strength R for the majority of objects in the sample. Our main finding is that a vast majority of the sample (20 objects) is characterized by kTe 200 keV. The median kTe for entire sample is 48_{-14}^{+57} keV. The distribution of the y parameter is bimodal, with a broad component centred at ≈0.8 and a narrow peak at ≈1.1. A complex, dual absorber model improved the fit for all data sets, compared to a simple absorption model, reducing the fitted strength of Compton reflection by a factor of about 2. Modest reflection (median R ≈ 0.32) together with a high ratio of Comptonized to seed photon fluxes point towards a geometry with a compact hard X-ray emitting region well separated from the accretion disc. Our results imply that the template Seyferts spectra used in the population synthesis models of active galactic nuclei (AGN) should be revised.

  5. The outer regions of galaxy clusters: Chandra constraints on the X-ray surface brightness

    CERN Document Server

    Ettori, S

    2008-01-01

    (Abridged version) We study the properties of the X-ray surface brightness profiles in a sample of galaxy clusters that are observed with Chandra and have emission detectable with a signal-to-noise ratio larger than 2 at a radius beyond R500 ~ 0.7 R200. Our study aims at measuring the slopes of the X-ray surface brightness and of the gas density profiles in the outskirts of massive clusters. These constraints are then compared to similar results obtained from observations and numerical simulations of the temperature and dark matter density profiles with the intention to present a consistent picture of the outer regions of galaxy clusters. We extract the surface brightness profiles S_b(r) from X-ray exposures obtained with Chandra of 52 X-ray luminous galaxy clusters at z>0.3. We estimate R200 both using a beta-model to reproduce the surface brightness profile and scaling relations from the literature, showing that the two methods converge to comparable values. We evaluate then the radius, R_S2N, at which the ...

  6. Studying a kind of portable ultra-bright microfocus x-ray source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Kai-Ge; Wang Lei; Niu Han-Ben

    2009-01-01

    This paper studies the properties of a kind of portable ultra-bright microfocus x-ray source with the Monte-Carlo method in detail. The new x-ray source consists of an electron-emission system, an electrostatic focusing system and a metal target. A crystal Lanthanum Hexaboride cathode, a Wehnelt grid and an extracted electrode compose the triode electrode electron-gun system. Two equal radius cylinder electrodes form the focusing system. The key factors determining the focus properties of the electron beam such as the ratio Dw/H, grid bias Vg, and the properties of the extracted electrode are numerically studied. The calculated results reveal that when Dw/H, Vg, the length of the extracted electrode, and the distance between the grid and the extracted electrode equals 5, -0.6 kV, 10 mm, and 8 mm respectively, the electron beam focal spot can be concentrated down to 9 μm in radius and a reasonable focal length about 72.5 mm can be achieved, at the same time, the cathode emission currents can be as high as 30 mA.

  7. Bright betatronlike x rays from radiation pressure acceleration of a mass-limited foil target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tong-Pu; Pukhov, Alexander; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Liu, Feng; Shvets, Gennady

    2013-01-25

    By using multidimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we study the electromagnetic emission from radiation pressure acceleration of ultrathin mass-limited foils. When a circularly polarized laser pulse irradiates the foil, the laser radiation pressure pushes the foil forward as a whole. The outer wings of the pulse continue to propagate and act as a natural undulator. Electrons move together with ions longitudinally but oscillate around the latter transversely, forming a self-organized helical electron bunch. When the electron oscillation frequency coincides with the laser frequency as witnessed by the electron, betatronlike resonance occurs. The emitted x rays by the resonant electrons have high brightness, short durations, and broad band ranges which may have diverse applications.

  8. Bright X-ray Transients in M31: 2004 July XMM-Newton Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Trudolyubov, S; Cordova, F; Trudolyubov, Sergey; Priedhorsky, William; Cordova, France

    2005-01-01

    We present the results of X-ray observations of four bright transients sources detected in the July 2004 XMM-Newton observations of the central bulge of M31. Two X-ray sources, XMMU J004315.5+412440 and XMMU J004144.7+411110, were discovered for the first time. Two other sources, CXOM31 J004309.9+412332 and CXOM31 J004241.8+411635, were previously detected by Chandra. The properties of the sources suggest their identification with accreting binary systems in M31. The X-ray spectra and variability of two sources, XMMU J004144.7+411110 and CXOM31 J004241.8+411635, are similar to that of the Galactic black hole transients, making them a good black hole candidates. The X-ray source XMMU J004315.5+412440 demonstrates a dramatic decline of the X-ray flux on a time scale of three days, and a remarkable flaring behavior on a short time scales. The X-ray data on XMMU J004315.5+412440 and CXOM31 J004309.9+412332 suggest that they can be either black hole or neutron star systems. Combining the results of 2000-2004 XMM o...

  9. On the Distribution of X-ray Surface Brightness from Diffuse Gas

    CERN Document Server

    Voit, G M; Bryan, Greg L.

    2001-01-01

    Hot intergalactic gas in clusters, groups, and filaments emanates a continuous background of 0.5-2.0 keV X-rays that ought to be detectable with the new generation of X-ray observatories. Here we present selected results from a program to simulate the surface-brightness distribution of this background with an adaptive-mesh cosmological hydrodynamics code. We show that the bright end of this distribution is well approximated by combining the cluster temperature function with a beta-model for surface brightness and appropriate luminosity-temperature and core radius-luminosity relations. Our simulations verify that the X-ray background from hot gas vastly exceeds observational limits if non-gravitational processes do not modify the intergalactic entropy distribution. An entropy floor of ~100 keV cm^2, which could be established by either heating or cooling, appears necessary to reconcile the simulated background with observations. Because the X-ray background distribution is so sensitive to the effects of non-gr...

  10. A High Resolution X-ray Image of the Jet in M 87

    CERN Document Server

    Marshall, H L; Davis, D S; Perlman, E S; Wise, M; Canizares, C R; Harris, D E

    2001-01-01

    We present the first high resolution X-ray image of the jet in M 87 using the Chandra X-ray Observatory. There is clear structure in the jet and almost all of the optically bright knots are detected individually. The unresolved core is the brightest X-ray feature but is only 2-3 times brighter than knot A (12.3" from the core) and the inner knot HST-1 (1.0" from the core). The X-ray and optical positions of the knots are consistent at the 0.1" level but the X-ray emission from the brightest knot (A) is marginally upstream of the optical emission peak. Detailed Gaussian fits to the X-ray jet one-dimensional profile show distinct X-ray emission that is not associated with specific optical features. The X-ray/optical flux ratio decreases systematically from the core and X-ray emission is not clearly detected beyond 20" from the core. The X-ray spectra of the core and the two brightest knots, HST-1 and A1, are consistent with a simple power law with alpha = 1.46 +/- 0.05, practically ruling out inverse Compton mo...

  11. The Halo Occupation Distribution of X-ray-Bright Active Galactic Nuclei: A Comparison with Luminous Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Richardson, Jonathan W; Zheng, Zheng; Myers, Adam; Hickox, Ryan C

    2013-01-01

    We perform halo occupation distribution (HOD) modeling of the projected two-point correlation function (2PCF) of high-redshift (z~1.2) X-ray-bright active galactic nuclei (AGN) in the XMM-COSMOS field measured by Allevato et al. The HOD parameterization is based on low-luminosity AGN in cosmological simulations. At the median redshift of z~1.2, we derive a median mass of (1.02+0.21/-0.23)x10^{13} Msun/h for halos hosting central AGN and an upper limit of ~10% on the AGN satellite fraction. Our modeling results indicate (at the 2.5-sigma level) that X-ray AGN reside in more massive halos compared to more bolometrically luminous, optically-selected quasars at similar redshift. The modeling also yields constraints on the duty cycle of the X-ray AGN, and we find that at z~1.2 the average duration of the X-ray AGN phase is two orders of magnitude longer than that of the quasar phase. Our inferred mean occupation function of X-ray AGN is similar to recent empirical measurements with a group catalog and suggests tha...

  12. X-RAY POLARIZATION FROM HIGH-MASS X-RAY BINARIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kallman, T. [NASA/GSFC, Code 662, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Dorodnitsyn, A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Blondin, J. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-8202 (United States)

    2015-12-10

    X-ray astronomy allows study of objects that may be associated with compact objects, i.e., neutron stars or black holes, and also may contain strong magnetic fields. Such objects are categorically nonspherical, and likely noncircular when projected on the sky. Polarization allows study of such geometric effects, and X-ray polarimetry is likely to become feasible for a significant number of sources in the future. Potential targets for future X-ray polarization observations are the high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs), which consist of a compact object in orbit with an early-type star. In this paper we show that X-ray polarization from HMXBs has a distinct signature that depends on the source inclination and orbital phase. The presence of the X-ray source displaced from the star creates linear polarization even if the primary wind is spherically symmetric whenever the system is viewed away from conjunction. Direct X-rays dilute this polarization whenever the X-ray source is not eclipsed; at mid-eclipse the net polarization is expected to be small or zero if the wind is circularly symmetric around the line of centers. Resonance line scattering increases the scattering fraction, often by large factors, over the energy band spanned by resonance lines. Real winds are not expected to be spherically symmetric, or circularly symmetric around the line of centers, owing to the combined effects of the compact object gravity and ionization on the wind hydrodynamics. A sample calculation shows that this creates polarization fractions ranging up to tens of percent at mid-eclipse.

  13. A bright point source of ultrashort hard x-rays from laser bioplasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Krishnamurthy, M; Lad, Amit D; Ahmad, Saima; Narayanan, V; Rajeev, R; Kundu, M; Kumar, G Ravindra; Ray, Krishanu

    2010-01-01

    Micro and nano structures scatter light and amplify local electric fields very effectively. Energy incident as intense ultrashort laser pulses can be converted to x-rays and hot electrons more efficiently with a substrate that suitably modifies the local fields. Here we demonstrate that coating a plain glass surface with a few micron thick layer of an ubiquitous microbe, {\\it Escherichia coli}, catapults the brightness of hard x-ray bremsstrahlung emission (up to 300 keV) by more than two orders of magnitude at an incident laser intensity of 10$^{16}$ W cm$^{-2}$. This increased yield is attributed to the local enhancement of electric fields around individual {\\it E. coli} cells and is reproduced by detailed particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. This combination of laser plasmas and biological targets can lead to turnkey, multi-kilohertz and environmentally safe sources of hard x-rays.

  14. The optical counterpart of the bright X-ray transient Swift J1745-26

    CERN Document Server

    Muñoz-Darias, T; Russell, D M; Guziy, S; Gorosabel, J; Casares, J; Padilla, M Armas; Charles, P A; Fender, R P; Belloni, T M; Lewis, F; Motta, S; Castro-Tirado, A; Mundell, C G; Sánchez-Ramírez, R; Thöne, C C

    2013-01-01

    We present a 30-day monitoring campaign of the optical counterpart of the bright X-ray transient Swift J1745-26, starting only 19 minutes after the discovery of the source. We observe the system peaking at i' ~17.6 on day 6 (MJD 56192) to then decay at a rate of ~0.04 mag/day. We show that the optical peak occurs at least 3 days later than the hard X-ray (15-50 keV) flux peak. Our measurements result in an outburst amplitude greater than 4.3 magnitudes, which favours an orbital period 250 km/s. The breadth of the line and the observed optical and X-ray fluxes suggest that Swift J1745-26 is a new black hole candidate located closer than ~7 kpc.

  15. Detecting edges in the X-ray surface brightness of galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Sanders, J S; Russell, H R; Walker, S A; Blundell, K M

    2016-01-01

    The effects of many physical processes in the intracluster medium of galaxy clusters imprint themselves in X-ray surface brightness images. It is therefore important to choose optimal methods for extracting information from and enhancing the interpretability of such images. We describe in detail a gradient filtering edge detection method that we previously applied to images of the Centaurus cluster of galaxies. The Gaussian gradient filter measures the gradient in the surface brightness distribution on particular spatial scales. We apply this filter on different scales to Chandra X-ray observatory images of two clusters with AGN feedback, the Perseus cluster and M87, and a merging system, A3667. By combining filtered images on different scales using radial filters spectacular images of the edges in a cluster are produced. We describe how to assess the significance of features in filtered images. We find the gradient filtering technique to have significant advantages for detecting many kinds of features compar...

  16. Stereoscopic observations of a solar flare hard X-ray source in the high corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, S. R.; Mctiernan, J.; Loran, J.; Fenimore, E. E.; Klebesadel, R. W.; Laros, J. G.

    1992-01-01

    The vertical structure of the impulsive and gradual hard X-ray sources in high coronae and the characteristics of the impulsive soft X-ray emission are investigated on the basis of PVE, ICE, and GOES observations of the energetic flare on February 16, 1984. The average photon spectra observed by these instruments during the impulsive and gradual hard X-ray bursts are summarized. A comparison of these unocculted and partially occulted spectra shows that the sources of the impulsive hard X-ray (greater than about 25 keV) and impulsive soft X-ray (2-5 keV) emissions in this flare extended to coronal altitudes greater than about 200,000 km above the photosphere. At about 100 keV, the ratio of the coronal source brightness to the total source brightness was 0.001 during the impulsive phase and less than about 0.01 during the gradual hard X-ray burst. The sources of the gradual hard X-ray burst and gradual soft X-ray burst were almost completely occulted, indicating that these sources were located at heights less than 200,000 km above the photosphere.

  17. THE HALO OCCUPATION DISTRIBUTION OF X-RAY-BRIGHT ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI: A COMPARISON WITH LUMINOUS QUASARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, Jonathan [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60605 (United States); Chatterjee, Suchetana; Myers, Adam D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82072 (United States); Zheng Zheng [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Hickox, Ryan, E-mail: jonathan.richardson@uchicago.edu, E-mail: schatte1@uwyo.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States)

    2013-09-10

    We perform halo occupation distribution (HOD) modeling of the projected two-point correlation function (2PCF) of high-redshift (z {approx} 1.2) X-ray-bright active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the XMM-COSMOS field measured by Allevato et al. The HOD parameterization is based on low-luminosity AGNs in cosmological simulations. At the median redshift of z {approx} 1.2, we derive a median mass of 1.02{sub -0.23}{sup +0.21} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} h{sup -1} M{sub sun} for halos hosting central AGNs and an upper limit of {approx}10% on the AGN satellite fraction. Our modeling results indicate (at the 2.5{sigma} level) that X-ray AGNs reside in more massive halos compared to more bolometrically luminous, optically selected quasars at similar redshift. The modeling also yields constraints on the duty cycle of the X-ray AGN, and we find that at z {approx} 1.2 the average duration of the X-ray AGN phase is two orders of magnitude longer than that of the quasar phase. Our inferred mean occupation function of X-ray AGNs is similar to recent empirical measurements with a group catalog and suggests that AGN halo occupancy increases with increasing halo mass. We project the XMM-COSMOS 2PCF measurements to forecast the required survey parameters needed in future AGN clustering studies to enable higher precision HOD constraints and determinations of key physical parameters like the satellite fraction and duty cycle. We find that N {sup 2}/A {approx} 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} deg{sup -2} (with N the number of AGNs in a survey area of A deg{sup 2}) is sufficient to constrain the HOD parameters at the 10% level, which is easily achievable by upcoming and proposed X-ray surveys.

  18. A High-Resolution X-Ray Image of the Jet in M87

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, H. L.; Miller, B. P.; Davis, D. S.; Perlman, E. S.; Wise, M.; Canizares, C. R.; Harris, D. E.

    2002-01-01

    We present the first high-resolution X-ray image of the jet in M87 using the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. There is clear structure in the jet and almost all of the optically bright knots are detected individually. The unresolved core is the brightest X-ray feature but is only 2-3 times brighter than knot A (12.3" from the core) and the inner knot HST-1 (1.0" from the core). The X-ray and optical positions of the knots are consistent at the 0.1" level, but the X-ray emission from the brightest knot (A) is marginally upstream of the optical emission peak. Detailed Gaussian fits to the X-ray jet one-dimensional profile show distinct X-ray emission that is not associated with specific optical features. The X-ray/optical flux ratio decreases systematically from the core, and X-ray emission is not clearly detected beyond 20" from the core. The X-ray spectra of the core and the two brightest knots, HST-1 and A, are consistent with a simple power law (Sν~ν-α) with α=1.46+/-0.05, practically ruling out inverse Compton models as the dominant X-ray emission mechanism. The core flux is significantly larger than expected from an advective accretion flow, and the spectrum is much steeper, indicating that the core emission may be due to synchrotron emission from a small-scale jet. The spectral energy distributions of the knots are well fitted by synchrotron models. The spectral indices in the X-ray band, however, are comparable to that expected in the Kardashev-Pacholczyk synchrotron model but are much flatter than expected in the pitch-angle isotropization model of Jaffe and Perola. The break frequencies derived from both models drop by factors of 10-100 with distance from the core.

  19. A High Resolution X-ray Image of the Jet in M 87

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, B. P.; Marshall, H. L.; Davis, D. S.; Perlman, E. S.; Wise, M.; Canizares, C. R.; Harris, D. E.

    2001-12-01

    We present the first high resolution X-ray image of the jet in M 87 using the Chandra X-ray Observatory. There is clear structure in the jet and almost all of the optically bright knots are detected individually. The unresolved core is the brightest X-ray feature but is only 2-3 times brighter than knot A (12.3" from the core) and the inner knot HST-1 (1.0" from the core). The X-ray and optical positions of the knots are consistent at the 0.1" level but the X-ray emission from the brightest knot (A) is marginally upstream of the optical emission peak. Detailed Gaussian fits to the X-ray jet one-dimensional profile show distinct X-ray emission that is not associated with specific optical features. The X-ray/optical flux ratio decreases systematically from the core and X-ray emission is not clearly detected beyond 20" from the core. The X-ray spectra of the core and the two brightest knots, HST-1 and A1, are consistent with a simple power law with alpha = 1.46 +/- 0.05, practically ruling out inverse Compton models as the dominant X-ray emission mechanism. The core flux is significantly larger than expected from an advective accretion flow and the spectrum is much steeper, indicating that the core emission may be due to synchrotron emission from a small scale jet. The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the knots are well fit by synchrotron models. The spectral indices in the X-ray band, however are comparable to that expected in the Kardashev-Pacholczyk synchrotron model but are much flatter than expected in the pitch angle isotropization model of Jaffe and Perola. The break frequencies derived from both models drop by factors of 10-100 with distance from the core.

  20. High-resolution detectors for soft X-ray spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Soman, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS) is a modern soft X-ray spectroscopy technique used to investigate the structure of and excitations in materials. It requires high resolution spectrometers and a brilliant, tunable, X-ray source and therefore is carried out at spectrometers such as SAXES at the Swiss Light Source Light, a synchrotron at the Paul Scherrer Institut.\\ud \\ud SAXES uses a grating to disperse X-rays scattered from a sample across a position sensitive detector, a Charge-Coup...

  1. Focusing high-energy x-rays by a PMMA compound x-ray lens on Beijing synchrotron radiation facility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Le Zi-Chun; Liang Jing-Qiu; Dong Wen; Zhu Pei-Ping; Peng Liang-Qiang; Wang Wei-Biao; Huang Wan-Xia; Yuan Qing-Xi; Wang Jun-Yue

    2007-01-01

    The x-ray compound lens is a novel refractive x-ray optical device. This paper reports the authors' recent research on a polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) compound x-ray lens. Firstly the designing and LIGA fabrication process for the PMMA compound x-ray lens are briefly described. Then, a method for theoretical analysis, as well as the experimental system for measurement is also introduced. Finally, the focusing spots for 8keV monochromatic x-rays by the PMMA compound x-ray lens are measured and analysed. According to the experimental results, it is concluded that the PMMA compound x-ray lens promises a good focusing performance under the high-energy x-rays.

  2. C IV absorption line variability in X-ray bright BALQSOs

    CERN Document Server

    Joshi, Ravi; Srianand, Raghunathan; Majumdar, Jhilik

    2014-01-01

    We report kinematic shift and strength variability of C IV broad absorption line (BAL) trough in two high-ionization X-ray bright QSOs SDSS J085551+375752 (at zem ~ 1.936) and SDSS J091127+055054 (at zem ~ 2.793). Both these QSOs have shown combination of profile shift, appearance and disappearance of absorption components belonging to a single BAL trough, which we argue that they can be explained by combination of transverse and curved path motion of many small clouds. Our results supports the BAL outflow models involving many small self shielded clouds with low volume filling factor rather than a conventional single homogeneous continuous radial outflows. We found an average deceleration of ~ - 0.69 \\pm 0.09 cm/s^2, - 1.96 \\pm 0.09 cm/s^2 over a rest-frame time-span of 3.11 yr and 2.34 yr for SDSS J085551+375752 and SDSS J091127+055054, respectively. To our knowledge, these are largest kinematic shifts exceeding by factor 2.8, 7.8 than the highest deceleration reported in the literature; making both of them...

  3. The Early X-ray Afterglows of Optically Bright and Dark Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-Qing Lin

    2006-01-01

    A systematic study on the early X-ray afterglows of both optically bright and dark gamma-ray bursts (B-GRBs and D-GRBs) observed by Swift is presented. Our sample includes 25 GRBs of which 13 are B-GRBs and 12 are D-GRBs. Our results show that the distributions of the X-ray afterglow fluxes (Fx), the gamma-ray fluxes (Sγ), and the ratio (Rγ,X) are similar for the two kinds of GRBs, that any observed differences should be simply statistical fluctuation. These results indicate that the progenitors of the two kinds of GRBs are of the same population with comparable total energies of explosion. The suppression of optical emission in the D-GRBs should result from circumburst but not from their central engine.

  4. High-resolution X-ray diffraction studies of multilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Finn Erland; Hornstrup, Allan; Schnopper, H. W.

    1988-01-01

    High-resolution X-ray diffraction studies of the perfection of state-of-the-art multilayers are presented. Data were obtained using a triple-axis perfect-crystal X-ray diffractometer. Measurements reveal large-scale figure errors in the substrate. A high-resolution triple-axis set up is required...

  5. High-precision x-ray polarimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, B; Schulze, K S; Uschmann, I; Kämpfer, T; Lötzsch, R; Wehrhan, O; Wagner, W; Detlefs, C; Roth, T; Härtwig, J; Förster, E; Stöhlker, T; Paulus, G G

    2013-06-21

    The polarization purity of 6.457- and 12.914-keV x rays has been improved to the level of 2.4×10(-10) and 5.7×10(-10). The polarizers are channel-cut silicon crystals using six 90° reflections. Their performance and possible applications are demonstrated in the measurement of the optical activity of a sucrose solution.

  6. High energy resolution off-resonant X-ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wojciech, Blachucki [Univ. of Fribourg (Switzerland). Dept. of Physics

    2015-10-16

    This work treats of the high energy resolution off-resonant X-ray spectroscopy (HEROS) method of determining the density of unoccupied electronic states in the vicinity of the absorption edge. HEROS is an alternative to the existing X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) methods and opens the way for new studies not achievable before.

  7. High Resolution X-ray-Induced Acoustic Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Liangzhong; Tang, Shanshan; Ahmad, Moiz; Xing, Lei

    2016-05-01

    Absorption based CT imaging has been an invaluable tool in medical diagnosis, biology, and materials science. However, CT requires a large set of projection data and high radiation dose to achieve superior image quality. In this letter, we report a new imaging modality, X-ray Induced Acoustic Tomography (XACT), which takes advantages of high sensitivity to X-ray absorption and high ultrasonic resolution in a single modality. A single projection X-ray exposure is sufficient to generate acoustic signals in 3D space because the X-ray generated acoustic waves are of a spherical nature and propagate in all directions from their point of generation. We demonstrate the successful reconstruction of gold fiducial markers with a spatial resolution of about 350 μm. XACT reveals a new imaging mechanism and provides uncharted opportunities for structural determination with X-ray.

  8. SUZAKU OBSERVATIONS OF γ-RAY BRIGHT RADIO GALAXIES: ORIGIN OF THE X-RAY EMISSION AND BROADBAND MODELING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukazawa, Yasushi; Itoh, Ryosuke; Tokuda, Shin' ya [Department of Physical Science, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Finke, Justin [U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Code 7653, 4555 Overlook Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20375-5352 (United States); Stawarz, Łukasz [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, JAXA, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Tanaka, Yasuyuki, E-mail: fukazawa@hep01.hepl.hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Hiroshima Astrophysical Science Center, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan)

    2015-01-10

    We performed a systematic X-ray study of eight nearby γ-ray bright radio galaxies with Suzaku in order to understand the origins of their X-ray emissions. The Suzaku spectra for five of those have been presented previously, while the remaining three (M87, PKS 0625–354, and 3C 78) are presented here for the first time. Based on the Fe-K line strength, X-ray variability, and X-ray power-law photon indices, and using additional information on the [O III] line emission, we argue for a jet origin of the observed X-ray emission in these three sources. We also analyzed five years of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) GeV gamma-ray data on PKS 0625–354 and 3C 78 to understand these sources within the blazar paradigm. We found significant γ-ray variability in the former object. Overall, we note that the Suzaku spectra for both PKS 0625–354 and 3C 78 are rather soft, while the LAT spectra are unusually hard when compared with other γ-ray detected low-power (FR I) radio galaxies. We demonstrate that the constructed broadband spectral energy distributions of PKS 0625–354 and 3C 78 are well described by a one-zone synchrotron/synchrotron self-Compton model. The results of the modeling indicate lower bulk Lorentz factors compared to those typically found in other BL Lacertae (BL Lac) objects, but consistent with the values inferred from modeling other LAT-detected FR I radio galaxies. Interestingly, the modeling also implies very high peak (∼10{sup 16} Hz) synchrotron frequencies in the two analyzed sources, contrary to previously suggested scenarios for Fanaroff-Riley (FR) type I/BL Lac unification. We discuss the implications of our findings in the context of the FR I/BL Lac unification schemes.

  9. A re-consideration of the HEAO-1 A2 Measurements of the Cosmic X-ray Background Surface Brightness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahoda, K.

    2005-12-01

    The HEAO-1 A2 experiment was designed to make high precision and low systematics measurements of the Cosmic X-ray Background from 0.1 - 60 keV. No subsequent experiment has been capable of similarly clean separation of cosmic and instrumental background. Most more recent measurements of the 2-10 keV surface brightness are 20% higher than values derived from the spectral parameterization of the 3-50 keV spectrum given in the original A2 analysis of Marshall et al. (1980, ApJ 235, 4 (M80)). A recent analysis of archival A2 data by Revnivtsev et al. (astro-ph/0412304 (R05)) finds a surface brightness 15-20% higher than M80, an uncomfortably large discrepancy for data taken from a single experiment. We present a third analysis of the A2 data and identify two effects neglected in the comparison of previous A2 results: (a) the extrapolation of the M80 parameterization below 3 keV fails to describe the data; (b) R05 uses an unabsorbed, and high, value for the flux from the Crab nebula plus pulsar which results in a high value for the inferred count rate to CXB surface brightness conversion. Correcting for these effects, our best estimate of the 2-10 keV surface brightness is 1.84 × 10-11 ergs cm-2 s-1 deg-2 on a flux scale where the (absorbed) 2-10 Crab flux is 2.32 × 10-8 ergs cm-2 s-1. This value is only about 10% below the average compiled by Moretti et al. (2003, ApJ, 588, 696). We discuss how well the X-ray brightness of the Crab, to which this measurement is normalized, is known. This research made use of data from the High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC), provided by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center.

  10. HIgh Rate X-ray Fluorescence Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grudberg, Peter Matthew [XIA LLC

    2013-04-30

    The purpose of this project was to develop a compact, modular multi-channel x-ray detector with integrated electronics. This detector, based upon emerging silicon drift detector (SDD) technology, will be capable of high data rate operation superior to the current state of the art offered by high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors, without the need for liquid nitrogen. In addition, by integrating the processing electronics inside the detector housing, the detector performance will be much less affected by the typically noisy electrical environment of a synchrotron hutch, and will also be much more compact than current systems, which can include a detector involving a large LN2 dewar and multiple racks of electronics. The combined detector/processor system is designed to match or exceed the performance and features of currently available detector systems, at a lower cost and with more ease of use due to the small size of the detector. In addition, the detector system is designed to be modular, so a small system might just have one detector module, while a larger system can have many you can start with one detector module, and add more as needs grow and budget allows. The modular nature also serves to simplify repair. In large part, we were successful in achieving our goals. We did develop a very high performance, large area multi-channel SDD detector, packaged with all associated electronics, which is easy to use and requires minimal external support (a simple power supply module and a closed-loop water cooling system). However, we did fall short of some of our stated goals. We had intended to base the detector on modular, large-area detectors from Ketek GmbH in Munich, Germany; however, these were not available in a suitable time frame for this project, so we worked instead with pnDetector GmbH (also located in Munich). They were able to provide a front-end detector module with six 100 m^2 SDD detectors (two monolithic arrays of three elements each) along with

  11. Joint Spectral Analysis for Early Bright X-ray Flares of -Ray Bursts with Swift BAT and XRT Data

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fang-Kun Peng; You-Dong Hu; Xiang-Gao Wang; Rui-Jing Lu; En-Wei Liang

    2014-09-01

    A joint spectral analysis for early bright X-ray flares that were simultaneously observed with Swift BAT and XRT are present. Both BAT and XRT lightcurves of these flares are correlated. Our joint spectral analysis shows that the radiations in the two energy bands are from the same spectral component, which can be well fitted with a single power-law. Except for the flares in GRBs 060904B and 100906A, the photon spectral indices are < 2.0, indicating the peak energies (p) of the prompt -rays should be above the high energy end of the BAT band.

  12. H-alpha macrospicules - Identification with EUV macrospicules and with flares in X-ray bright points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R. L.; Tang, F.; Bohlin, J. D.; Golub, L.

    1977-01-01

    The paper presents observational evidence that two newly observed transient solar phenomena, EUV macrospicules and X-ray bright-point flares, are closely related. Time-lapse H-alpha filtergram observations of the limb in quiet regions show small surgelike eruptions called H-alpha macrospicules. From the similarity of H-alpha macrospicules and EUV macrospicules, and from comparison of simultaneous H-alpha and He II 304 A observations, we conclude that H-alpha macrospicules are EUV macrospicules viewed in H-alpha, although most EUV macrospicules are too faint in H-alpha to appear on H-alpha filtergrams of normal exposure. From comparison of simultaneous X-ray and H-alpha observations of flares in X-ray bright points situated on the limb, we show that flares in X-ray bright points often produce H-alpha macrospicules.

  13. On the Lack of X-ray Bright Type IIP Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Dwarkadas, Vikram V

    2014-01-01

    Type IIP Supernovae (SNe) are expected to arise from Red Supergiant stars (RSGs). These stars have observed mass-loss rates that span more than two orders of magnitude, from $< 10^{-6}$ solar masses yr$^{-1}$ to almost $ 10^{-4} $ solar masses yr$^{-1}$. Thermal bremsstrahlung X-ray emission from at least some IIP's should reflect the larger end of the high mass-loss rates. Strangely, no IIP SNe are seen where the X-ray luminosity is large enough to suggest mass-loss rates greater than about $ 10^{-5} $ solar masses yr$^{-1}$. We investigate if this could be due to absorption of the X-ray emission. After carefully studying all the various aspects, we conclude that absorption would not be large enough to prevent us from having detected X-ray emission from high mass-loss rate IIP's. This leads us to the conclusion that there may be an upper limit of $\\sim 10^{-5} $ solar masses yr$^{-1}$ to the mass-loss rate of Type IIP progenitors, and therefore to the luminosity of RSGs that explode to form Type IIPs. Thi...

  14. Compton spectra of atoms at high x-ray intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Sang-Kil; Geffert, Otfried; Santra, Robin

    2017-03-01

    Compton scattering is the nonresonant inelastic scattering of an x-ray photon by an electron and has been used to probe the electron momentum distribution in gas-phase and condensed-matter samples. In the low x-ray intensity regime, Compton scattering from atoms dominantly comes from bound electrons in neutral atoms, neglecting contributions from bound electrons in ions and free (ionized) electrons. In contrast, in the high x-ray intensity regime, the sample experiences severe ionization via x-ray multiphoton multiple ionization dynamics. Thus, it becomes necessary to take into account all the contributions to the Compton scattering signal when atoms are exposed to high-intensity x-ray pulses provided by x-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs). In this paper, we investigate the Compton spectra of atoms at high x-ray intensity, using an extension of the integrated x-ray atomic physics toolkit, xatom. As the x-ray fluence increases, there is a significant contribution from ionized electrons to the Compton spectra, which gives rise to strong deviations from the Compton spectra of neutral atoms. The present study provides not only understanding of the fundamental XFEL-matter interaction but also crucial information for single-particle imaging experiments, where Compton scattering is no longer negligible. , which features invited work from the best early-career researchers working within the scope of J. Phys. B. This project is part of the Journal of Physics series’ 50th anniversary celebrations in 2017. Sang-Kil Son was selected by the Editorial Board of J. Phys. B as an Emerging Leader.

  15. The VLT-FLAMES Tarantula survey XX. The nature of the X-ray bright emission line star VFTS 399

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, J S; Broos, P S; Townsley, L K; Taylor, W D; Walborn, N R; Bird, A J; Sana, H; de Mink, S E; Dufton, P L; Evans, C J; Langer, N; Apellániz, J Maíz; Schneider, F R N; Soszyński, I

    2015-01-01

    The stellar population of the 30 Doradus star-forming region in the Large Magellanic Cloud contains a subset of apparently single, rapidly rotating O-type stars. The physical processes leading to the formation of this cohort are currently uncertain. One member of this group, the late O-type star VFTS 399, is found to be unexpectedly X-ray bright for its bolometric luminosity - in this study we aim to determine its physical nature and the cause of this behaviour. We find VFTS 399 to be an aperiodic photometric variable with an apparent near-IR excess. Its optical spectrum demonstrates complex emission profiles in the lower Balmer series and select HeI lines - taken together these suggest an OeBe classification. The highly variable X-ray luminosity is too great to be produced by a single star, while the hard, non-thermal nature suggests the presence of an accreting relativistic companion. Finally, the detection of periodic modulation of the X-ray lightcurve is most naturally explained under the assumption that ...

  16. High-harmonic generation: Ultrafast lasers yield X-rays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McKinnie, Iain; Kapteyn, Henry

    2010-01-01

    Table-top sources that generate both extreme ultraviolet light and soft X-rays through high-harmonic generation of ultrafast infrared laser pulses look set to perform tasks previously accessible using only large-scale synchrotrons.

  17. Pulsed x-ray imaging of high-density objects using a ten picosecond high-intensity laser driver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusby, D. R.; Brenner, C. M.; Armstrong, C.; Wilson, L. A.; Clarke, R.; Alejo, A.; Ahmed, H.; Butler, N. M. H.; Haddock, D.; Higginson, A.; McClymont, A.; Mirfayzi, S. R.; Murphy, C.; Notley, M.; Oliver, P.; Allott, R.; Hernandez-Gomez, C.; Kar, S.; McKenna, P.; Neely, D.

    2016-10-01

    Point-like sources of X-rays that are pulsed (sub nanosecond), high energy (up to several MeV) and bright are very promising for industrial and security applications where imaging through large and dense objects is required. Highly penetrating X-rays can be produced by electrons that have been accelerated by a high intensity laser pulse incident onto a thin solid target. We have used a pulse length of 10ps to accelerate electrons to create a bright x-ray source. The bremsstrahlung temperature was measured for a laser intensity from 8.5-12×1018 W/cm2. These x-rays have sequentially been used to image high density materials using image plate and a pixelated scintillator system.

  18. High resolution energy-angle correlation measurement of hard x rays from laser-Thomson backscattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jochmann, A; Irman, A; Bussmann, M; Couperus, J P; Cowan, T E; Debus, A D; Kuntzsch, M; Ledingham, K W D; Lehnert, U; Sauerbrey, R; Schlenvoigt, H P; Seipt, D; Stöhlker, Th; Thorn, D B; Trotsenko, S; Wagner, A; Schramm, U

    2013-09-13

    Thomson backscattering of intense laser pulses from relativistic electrons not only allows for the generation of bright x-ray pulses but also for the investigation of the complex particle dynamics at the interaction point. For this purpose a complete spectral characterization of a Thomson source powered by a compact linear electron accelerator is performed with unprecedented angular and energy resolution. A rigorous statistical analysis comparing experimental data to 3D simulations enables, e.g., the extraction of the angular distribution of electrons with 1.5% accuracy and, in total, provides predictive capability for the future high brightness hard x-ray source PHOENIX (photon electron collider for narrow bandwidth intense x rays) and potential gamma-ray sources.

  19. Generation of Bright Isolated Attosecond Soft X-Ray Pulses Driven by Multi-Cycle Mid-Infrared Lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, M -C; Mancuso, C; Dollar, F; Galloway, B; Popmintchev, D; Huang, P -C; Walker, B; Plaja, L; Jaron-Becker, A; Becker, A; Popmintchev, T; Murnane, M M; Kapteyn, H C

    2014-01-01

    High harmonic generation driven by femtosecond lasers makes it possible to capture the fastest dynamics in molecules and materials. However, to date the shortest attosecond (as) pulses have been produced only in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) region of the spectrum below 100 eV, which limits the range of materials and molecular systems that can be explored. Here we use advanced experiment and theory to demonstrate a remarkable convergence of physics: when mid-infrared lasers are used to drive the high harmonic generation process, the conditions for optimal bright soft X-ray generation naturally coincide with the generation of isolated attosecond pulses. The temporal window over which phase matching occurs shrinks rapidly with increasing driving laser wavelength, to the extent that bright isolated attosecond pulses are the norm for 2 \\mu m driving lasers. Harnessing this realization, we demonstrate the generation of isolated soft X-ray attosecond pulses at photon energies up to 180 eV for the first time, that e...

  20. High spectral and spatial resolution X-ray transmission radiography and tomography using a Color X-ray Camera

    OpenAIRE

    Boone, Matthieu; Garrevoet, Jan; Tack, Pieter; Scharf, Oliver; Cormode, David P.; Van Loo, Denis; Pauwels, Elin; Dierick, Manuel; Vincze, Laszlo; Van Hoorebeke, Luc

    2013-01-01

    High resolution X-ray radiography and computed tomography are excellent techniques for non-destructive characterization of an object under investigation at a spatial resolution in the micrometer range. However, as the image contrast depends on both chemical composition and material density, no chemical information is obtained from this data. Furthermore, lab-based measurements are affected by the polychromatic X-ray beam, which results in beam hardening effects. New types of X-ray detectors w...

  1. Treatment of foods with high-energy X rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleland, M. R.; Meissner, J.; Herer, A. S.; Beers, E. W.

    2001-07-01

    The treatment of foods with ionizing energy in the form of gamma rays, accelerated electrons, and X rays can produce beneficial effects, such as inhibiting the sprouting in potatoes, onions, and garlic, controlling insects in fruits, vegetables, and grains, inhibiting the growth of fungi, pasteurizing fresh meat, poultry, and seafood, and sterilizing spices and food additives. After many years of research, these processes have been approved by regulatory authorities in many countries and commercial applications have been increasing. High-energy X rays are especially useful for treating large packages of food. The most attractive features are product penetration, absorbed dose uniformity, high utilization efficiency and short processing time. The ability to energize the X-ray source only when needed enhances the safety and convenience of this technique. The availability of high-energy, high-power electron accelerators, which can be used as X-ray generators, makes it feasible to process large quantities of food economically. Several industrial accelerator facilities already have X-ray conversion equipment and several more will soon be built with product conveying systems designed to take advantage of the unique characteristics of high-energy X rays. These concepts will be reviewed briefly in this paper.

  2. High-resolution x-ray photoemission spectra of silver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrie, A.; Christensen, N. E.

    1976-01-01

    An electron spectrometer fitted with an x-ray monochromator for Al Kα1,2 radiation (1486.6 eV) has been used to record high-resolution x-ray photoelectron spectra for the 4d valence band as well as the 3d spin doublet in silver. The core-level spectrum has a line shape that can be described...

  3. Progress in high-resolution x-ray holographic microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobsen, C.; Kirz, J.; Howells, M.; McQuaid, K.; Rothman, S.; Feder, R.; Sayre, D.

    1987-07-01

    Among the various types of x-ray microscopes that have been demonstrated, the holographic microscope has had the largest gap between promise and performance. The difficulties of fabricating x-ray optical elements have led some to view holography as the most attractive method for obtaining the ultimate in high resolution x-ray micrographs; however, we know of no investigations prior to 1987 that clearly demonstrated submicron resolution in reconstructed images. Previous efforts suffered from problems such as limited resolution and dynamic range in the recording media, low coherent x-ray flux, and aberrations and diffraction limits in visible light reconstruction. We have addressed the recording limitations through the use of an undulator x-ray source and high-resolution photoresist recording media. For improved results in the readout and reconstruction steps, we have employed metal shadowing and transmission electron microscopy, along with numerical reconstruction techniques. We believe that this approach will allow holography to emerge as a practical method of high-resolution x-ray microscopy. 30 refs., 4 figs.

  4. A comprehensive analysis of the hard X-ray spectra of bright Seyfert galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Lubinski, P; Gibaud, L; Paltani, S; Papadakis, I E; Ricci, C; Soldi, S; Türler, M; Walter, R; Zdziarski, A A

    2016-01-01

    Hard X-ray spectra of 28 bright Seyfert galaxies observed with INTEGRAL were analyzed together with the X-ray spectra from XMM-Newton, Suzaku and RXTE. These broad-band data were fitted with a model assuming a thermal Comptonization as a primary continuum component. We tested several model options through a fitting of the Comptonized continuum accompanied by a complex absorption and a Compton reflection. Both the large data set used and the model space explored allowed us to accurately determine a mean temperature kTe of the electron plasma, the Compton parameter y and the Compton reflection strength R for the majority of objects in the sample. Our main finding is that a vast majority of the sample (20 objects) is characterized by kTe 200 keV. The median kTe for entire sample is 48(-14,+57) keV. The distribution of the y parameter is bimodal, with a broad component centered at ~0.8 and a narrow peak at ~1.1. A complex, dual absorber model improved the fit for all data sets, compared to a simple absorption mo...

  5. The High Energy X-ray Imager Technology (HEXITEC) for Solar Hard X-ray Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christe, Steven; Shih, Albert Y.; Gaskin, Jessica; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen; Seller, Paul; Wilson, Matthew

    2015-04-01

    High angular resolution HXR optics require detectors with a large number of fine pixels in order to adequately sample the telescope point spread function (PSF) over the entire field of view. Excessively over-sampling the PSF will increase readout noise and require more processing with no appreciable increase in image quality. An appropriate level of over-sampling is to have 3 pixels within the HPD. For current high resolution X-ray mirrors, the HPD is about 25 arcsec. Over a 6-m focal length this converts to 750 µm, the optimum pixel size is around 250 µm. Annother requirement are that the detectors must also have high efficiency in the HXR region, good energy resolution, low background, low power requirements, and low sensitivity to radiation damage. For solar observations, the ability to handle high counting rates is also extremely desirable. The Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in the UK has been developing the electronics for such a detector. Dubbed HEXITEC, for High Energy X-Ray Imaging Technology, this Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC), can be bonded to 1- or 2- mm-thick Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) or Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT), to create a fine (250 µm pitch) HXR detector. The NASA Marshall Space Flight CenterMSFC and the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has been working with RAL over the past few years to develop these detectors to be used with HXR focusing telescopes. We present on recent results and capabilities as applied to solar observations.

  6. Thermometric- and Acoustic-Based Beam Power Monitor for Ultra-Bright X-Rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bentsen, Gregory; /Rochester U. /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    A design for an average beam power monitor for ultra-bright X-ray sources is proposed that makes simultaneous use of calorimetry and radiation acoustics. Radiation incident on a solid target will induce heating and ultrasonic vibrations, both of which may be measured to give a fairly precise value of the beam power. The monitor is intended for measuring ultra-bright Free-Electron Laser (FEL) X-ray beams, for which traditional monitoring technologies such as photo-diodes or scintillators are unsuitable. The monitor consists of a Boron Carbide (B{sub 4}C) target designed to absorb most of the incident beam's energy. Resistance temperature detectors (RTD) and piezoelectric actuators are mounted on the outward faces of the target to measure the temperature changes and ultrasonic vibrations induced by the incident beam. The design was tested using an optical pulsed beam (780 nm, 120 and 360 Hz) from a Ti:sapphire oscillator at several energies between 0.8 and 2.6 mJ. The RTDs measured an increase in temperature of about 10 K over a period of several minutes. The piezoelectric sensors recorded ringing acoustic oscillations at 580 {+-} 40 kHz. Most importantly, the amplitude of the acoustic signals was observed to scale linearly with beam power up to 2 mJ of pulse energy. Above this pulse energy, the vibrational signals became nonlinear. Several causes for this nonlinearity are discussed, including amplifier saturation and piezoelectric saturation. Despite this nonlinearity, these measurements demonstrate the feasibility of such a beam power measurement device. The advantage of two distinct measurements (acoustic and thermometric) provides a useful method of calibration that is unavailable to current LCLS diagnostics tools.

  7. Development toward high-resolution X-ray phase imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momose, Atsushi

    2017-06-01

    Since the 1990s, the use of X-ray phase contrast has been extensively studied for imaging weakly absorbing objects consisting of low-Z elements such as biological soft tissues and polymers. The development of X-ray microscopy was also progressing during this time, although absorption contrast was only available. It was straightforward and important to develop phase-contrast X-ray microscopy. One characteristic in the development is that quantitative phase measurement is possible through the acquisition of phase-contrast images under a specific procedure, thanks to digital X-ray image detectors. Therefore, such a technique is called 'phase imaging' rather than phase-contrast imaging in this review. Highly sensitive three-dimensional phase imaging is feasible in combination with tomography. This article reviews the progress in X-ray phase imaging, especially with regards to X-ray microscopy. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Interstellar dust grain composition from high-resolution X-ray absorption edge structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrales, Lia

    2016-06-01

    X-ray light is sufficient to excite electrons from n=1 (K-shell) and n=2 (L-shell) energy levels of neutral interstellar metals, causing a sharp increase in the absorption cross-section. Near the ionization energy, the shape of the photoelectric absorption edge depends strongly on whether the atom is isolated or bound in molecules or minerals (dust). With high resolution X-ray spectroscopy, we can directly measure the state of metals and the mineral composition of dust in the interstellar medium. In addition, the scattering contribution to the X-ray extinction cross-section can be used to gauge grain size, shape, and filling factor. In order to fully take advantage of major advances in high resolution X-ray spectroscopy, lab measurements of X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) from suspected interstellar minerals are required. Optical constants derived from the absorption measurements can be used with Mie scattering or anomalous diffraction theory in order to model the full extinction cross-sections from the interstellar medium. Much like quasar spectra are used to probe other intergalactic gas, absorption spectroscopy of Galactic X-ray binaries and bright stars will yield key insights to the mineralogy and evolution of dust grains in the Milky Way.

  9. High-Resolution X-Ray Spectroscopy of the Bursting Pulsar GRO J1744-28

    CERN Document Server

    Degenaar, N; Harrison, F A; Kennea, J A; Kouveliotou, C; Younes, G

    2014-01-01

    The bursting pulsar GRO J1744-28 is a Galactic low-mass X-ray binary that distinguishes itself by displaying type-II X-ray bursts: brief, bright flashes of X-ray emission that likely arise from spasmodic accretion. Combined with its coherent 2.1 Hz X-ray pulsations and relatively high estimated magnetic field, it is a particularly interesting source to study the physics of accretion flows around neutron stars. Here we report on Chandra/HETG observations obtained near the peak of its bright 2014 accretion outburst. Spectral analysis suggests the presence of a broad iron emission line centered at E_l ~ 6.7 keV. Fits with a disk reflection model yield an inclination angle of i ~ 52 degrees and an inner disk radius of R_in ~ 85 GM/c^2, which is much further out than typically found for neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries. Assuming that the disk is truncated at the magnetospheric radius of the neutron star, we estimate a magnetic field strength of B ~ (2-6)E10 G. Furthermore, we identify an absorption feature nea...

  10. Diagnostic imaging of gout: comparison of high-resolution US versus conventional X-ray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rettenbacher, Thomas; Ennemoser, Sybille; Weirich, Harald [Innsbruck Medical University, Department of Radiology, Innsbruck (Austria); Ulmer, Hanno [Innsbruck Medical University, Department of Medical Statistics, Informatics, and Health Economics, Innsbruck (Austria); Hartig, Frank; Klotz, Werner; Herold, Manfred [Innsbruck Medical University, Department of Internal Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2008-03-15

    The aim was to compare X-ray and ultrasound (US) in diagnosing gout. In a prospective study, 105 consecutive patients with clinical suspicion of gout underwent conventional X-ray und high-resolution US in order to help in arriving at a definite diagnosis. X-ray findings suggestive of gout included soft-tissue opacifications with densities between soft tissue and bone, articular and periarticular bone erosions, and osteophytes at the margins of opacifications or erosions. US findings suggestive of gout included bright stippled foci and hyperechoic soft-tissue areas. Fifty-five patients had a definite diagnosis of gout (102 involved sites), 31 patients were diagnosed as having another disease (59 involved sites), and 19 patients were excluded from the study because a definite diagnosis could not be established. X-ray suggested gout with a sensitivity of 31% (32/102) and a specificity of 93% (55/59), whereas US suggested gout with a sensitivity of 96% (98/102) and a specificity of 73% (43/59). US was much more sensitive than conventional X-ray but less specific. Our data show that US often provided additional diagnostic information in patients with clinical suspicion of gout when laboratory findings and X-ray results were negative or inconclusive and should therefore be used in these cases. (orig.)

  11. Towards phasing using high X-ray intensity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Galli

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs show great promise for macromolecular structure determination from sub-micrometre-sized crystals, using the emerging method of serial femtosecond crystallography. The extreme brightness of the XFEL radiation can multiply ionize most, if not all, atoms in a protein, causing their scattering factors to change during the pulse, with a preferential `bleaching' of heavy atoms. This paper investigates the effects of electronic damage on experimental data collected from a Gd derivative of lysozyme microcrystals at different X-ray intensities, and the degree of ionization of Gd atoms is quantified from phased difference Fourier maps. A pattern sorting scheme is proposed to maximize the ionization contrast and the way in which the local electronic damage can be used for a new experimental phasing method is discussed.

  12. Focal construct geometry for high intensity energy dispersive x-ray diffraction based on x-ray capillary optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fangzuo; Liu, Zhiguo; Sun, Tianxi; Jiang, Bowen; Zhu, Yu

    2016-03-14

    We presented a focal construct geometry (FCG) method for high intensity energy dispersive X-ray diffraction by utilizing a home-made ellipsoidal single-bounce capillary (ESBC) and a polycapillary parallel X-ray lens (PPXRL). The ESBC was employed to focus the X-rays from a conventional laboratory source into a small focal spot and to produce an annular X-ray beam in the far-field. Additionally, diffracted polychromatic X-rays were confocally collected by the PPXRL attached to a stationary energy-resolved detector. Our FCG method based on ESBC and PPXRL had achieved relatively high intensity diffraction peaks and effectively narrowed the diffraction peak width which was helpful in improving the potential d-spacing resolution for material phase analysis.

  13. Observation of spatial and temporal variations in X-ray bright point emergence patterns. [at solar surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golub, L.; Krieger, A. S.; Vaiana, G. S.

    1976-01-01

    Observations of X-ray bright points (XBP) over a six-month interval in 1973 show significant variations in both the number density of XBP as a function of heliographic longitude and in the full-sun average number of XBP from one rotation to the next. The observed increases in XBP emergence are estimated to be equivalent to several large active regions emerging per day for several months. The number of XBP emerging at high latitudes varies in phase with the low-latitude variation and reaches a maximum approximately simultaneous with a major outbreak of active regions. The quantity of magnetic flux emerging in the form of XBP at high latitudes alone is estimated to be as large as the contribution from all active regions.

  14. Exploring the X-ray sky with the XMM-Newton bright serendipitous survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Ceca, R.; Maccacaro, T.; Caccianiga, A.; Severgnini, P.; Braito, V.; Barcons, X.; Carrera, F. J.; Watson, M. G.; Tedds, J. A.; Brunner, H.; Lehmann, I.; Page, M. J.; Lamer, G.; Schwope, A.

    2004-12-01

    We present here ``The XMM-Newton Bright Serendipitous Survey'', composed of two flux-limited samples: the XMM-Newton Bright Source Sample (BSS, hereafter) and the XMM-Newton ``Hard'' Bright Source Sample (HBSS, hereafter) having a flux limit of f_x≃ 7 × 10-14 erg cm-2 s-1 in the 0.5-4.5 keV and 4.5-7.5 keV energy band, respectively. After discussing the main goals of this project and the survey strategy, we present the basic data on a complete sample of 400 X-ray sources (389 of them belong to the BSS, 67 to the HBSS with 56 X-ray sources in common) derived from the analysis of 237 suitable XMM-Newton fields (211 for the HBSS). At the flux limit of the survey we cover a survey area of 28.10 (25.17 for the HBSS) sq. deg. The extragalactic number-flux relationships (in the 0.5-4.5 keV and in the 4.5-7.5 keV energy bands) are in good agreement with previous and new results making us confident about the correctness of data selection and analysis. Up to now ˜ 71% (˜ 90%) of the sources have been spectroscopically identified making the BSS (HBSS) the sample with the highest number of identified XMM-Newton sources published so far. At the X-ray flux limits of the sources studied here we found that: a) the optical counterpart in the majority (˜ 90%) of cases has a magnitude brighter than the POSS II limit (R ˜ 21mag); b) the majority of the objects identified so far are broad line AGN both in the BSS and in the HBSS. No obvious trend of the source spectra (as deduced from the Hardness Ratios analysis) as a function of the count rate is measured and the average spectra of the ``extragalactic'' population corresponds to a (0.5-4.5 keV) energy spectral index of ˜ 0.8 (˜ 0.64) for the BSS (HBSS) sample. Based on the hardness ratios we infer that about 13% (40%) of the sources in the BSS (HBSS) sample are described by an energy spectral index flatter than that of the cosmic X-ray background. Based on previous X-ray spectral results on a small subsample of objects we

  15. High-resolution accelerator alignment using x-ray optics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingxin Yang

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available We propose a novel alignment technique utilizing the x-ray beam of an undulator in conjunction with pinholes and position-sensitive detectors for positioning components of the accelerator, undulator, and beam line in an x-ray free-electron laser. Two retractable pinholes at each end of the undulator define a stable and reproducible x-ray beam axis (XBA. Targets are precisely positioned on the XBA using a pinhole camera technique. Position-sensitive detectors responding to both x-ray and electron beams enable direct transfer of the position setting from the XBA to the electron beam. This system has the potential to deliver superior alignment accuracy (1–3   μm for target pinholes in the transverse directions over a long distance (200 m or longer. It can be used to define the beam axis of the electron-beam–based alignment, enabling high reproducibility of the latter. This x-ray–based concept should complement the electron-beam–based alignment and the existing survey methods to raise the alignment accuracy of long accelerators to an unprecedented level. Further improvement of the transverse accuracy using x-ray zone plates will be discussed. We also propose a concurrent measurement scheme during accelerator operation to allow real-time feedback for transverse position correction.

  16. Highly porous nanoberyllium for X-ray beam speckle suppression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goikhman, Alexander, E-mail: agoikhman@ymail.com; Lyatun, Ivan; Ershov, Petr [Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University, Nevskogo str. 14, Kaliningrad 236041 (Russian Federation); Snigireva, Irina [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble (France); Wojda, Pawel [Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University, Nevskogo str. 14, Kaliningrad 236041 (Russian Federation); Gdańsk University of Technology, 11/12 G. Narutowicza, Gdańsk 80-233 (Poland); Gorlevsky, Vladimir; Semenov, Alexander; Sheverdyaev, Maksim; Koletskiy, Viktor [A. A. Bochvar High-Technology Scientific Research Institute for Inorganic Materials, Rogova str. 5a, Moscow 123098 (Russian Federation); Snigirev, Anatoly [Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University, Nevskogo str. 14, Kaliningrad 236041 (Russian Federation); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble (France)

    2015-04-09

    A speckle suppression device containing highly porous nanoberyllium is proposed for manipulating the spatial coherence length and removing undesirable speckle structure during imaging experiments. This paper reports a special device called a ‘speckle suppressor’, which contains a highly porous nanoberyllium plate squeezed between two beryllium windows. The insertion of the speckle suppressor in an X-ray beam allows manipulation of the spatial coherence length, thus changing the effective source size and removing the undesirable speckle structure in X-ray imaging experiments almost without beam attenuation. The absorption of the nanoberyllium plate is below 1% for 1 mm thickness at 12 keV. The speckle suppressor was tested on the ID06 ESRF beamline with X-rays in the energy range from 9 to 15 keV. It was applied for the transformation of the phase–amplitude contrast to the pure amplitude contrast in full-field microscopy.

  17. A MEMS-based high frequency x-ray chopper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siria, A; Dhez, O; Schwartz, W; Torricelli, G; Comin, F; Chevrier, J

    2009-04-29

    Time-resolved x-ray experiments require intensity modulation at high frequencies (advanced rotating choppers have nowadays reached the kHz range). We here demonstrate that a silicon microlever oscillating at 13 kHz with nanometric amplitude can be used as a high frequency x-ray chopper. We claim that using micro-and nanoelectromechanical systems (MEMS and NEMS), it will be possible to achieve higher frequencies in excess of hundreds of megahertz. Working at such a frequency can open a wealth of possibilities in chemistry, biology and physics time-resolved experiments.

  18. High-pressure-low-temperature x-ray power diffractometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syassen, K; Holzapfel, W B

    1978-08-01

    A high-pressure technique for x-ray diffraction studies at low temperatures is described. The system consists of a Bridgman anvil type high-pressure device with either tungsten carbide or boron carbide anvils, a liquid He cryostat, and x-ray diffractometer operating in Debye-Scherrer geometry. The newly developed boron carbide anvil cell is capable of containing a liquid pressure transmitting medium. The precision of the lattice parameter determination is discussed and the effect of nonisostatic stress components on the diffraction pattern is examined.

  19. A MEMS-based high frequency x-ray chopper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siria, A; Schwartz, W; Chevrier, J [Institut Neel, CNRS-Universite Joseph Fourier Grenoble, BP 166, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Dhez, O; Comin, F [ESRF, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Torricelli, G [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom)

    2009-04-29

    Time-resolved x-ray experiments require intensity modulation at high frequencies (advanced rotating choppers have nowadays reached the kHz range). We here demonstrate that a silicon microlever oscillating at 13 kHz with nanometric amplitude can be used as a high frequency x-ray chopper. We claim that using micro-and nanoelectromechanical systems (MEMS and NEMS), it will be possible to achieve higher frequencies in excess of hundreds of megahertz. Working at such a frequency can open a wealth of possibilities in chemistry, biology and physics time-resolved experiments.

  20. Correlated optical/X-ray variability in the high-mass X-ray binary SAX J2103.5+4545

    CERN Document Server

    Reig, P; Zezas, A; Blay, P

    2009-01-01

    SAX J2103.5+4545 is the Be/X-ray binary with the shortest orbital period. It shows extended bright and faint X-ray states that last for a few hundred days. The main objective of this work is to investigate the relationship between the X-ray and optical variability and to characterise the spectral and timing properties of the bright and faint states. We have found a correlation between the spectral and temporal parameters that fit the energy and power spectra. Softer energy spectra correspond to softer power spectra. That is to say, when the energy spectrum is soft the power at high frequencies is suppressed. We also present the results of our monitoring of the Halpha line of the optical counterpart since its discovery in 2003. There is a correlation between the strength and shape of the Halpha line, originated in the circumstellar envelope of the massive companion and the X-ray emission from the vicinity of the neutron star. Halpha emission, indicative of an equatorial disc around the B-type star, is detected...

  1. Bright, water-soluble CeF{sub 3} photo-, cathodo-, and X-ray luminescent nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clement, Sandhya; Deng, Wei; Drozdowicz-Tomsia, Krystyna; Liu, Deming [Macquarie University, Centre for Nanoscale BioPhotonics, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Australia); Zachreson, Cameron [University of Technology Sydney, School of Physics and Advanced Materials (Australia); Goldys, Ewa M., E-mail: ewa.goldys@mq.edu.au [Macquarie University, Centre for Nanoscale BioPhotonics, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Australia)

    2015-01-15

    Bright, water-soluble CeF{sub 3} nanoparticles with small size and narrow size distribution have been synthesized using a simple co-precipitation method without any ligands. Size control of nanoparticles from 13 ± 2 to 9 ± 2 nm was achieved by varying the reaction time. Colloidal properties have been found to vary with pH and, independently, with dilution. The photoluminescence of the as-synthesized nanoparticles shows a highly photostable UV/Visible fluorescence band due to allowed 5d–4f transitions, also observed in the X-ray luminescence spectrum. This band is suitable for X-ray excitation of a range of photosensitizers. The photoluminescence quantum yield of nanoparticles was also determined to be 31 %. Using the measured fluorescence decay time of 25 ns, the radiative lifetime of Ce in CeF{sub 3} was found to be 80.6 ns. Both photoluminescence and cathodoluminescence emission are affected by the reaction time and measurement temperature. Electron-beam-induced defect annealing is also observed.

  2. High spatial resolution soft-x-ray microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer-Ilse, W.; Medecki, H.; Brown, J.T. [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    A new soft x-ray microscope (XM-1) with high spatial resolution has been constructed by the Center for X-ray Optics. It uses bending magnet radiation from beamline 6.1 at the Advanced Light Source, and is used in a variety of projects and applications in the life and physical sciences. Most of these projects are ongoing. The instrument uses zone plate lenses and achieves a resolution of 43 nm, measured over 10% to 90% intensity with a knife edge test sample. X-ray microscopy permits the imaging of relatively thick samples, up to 10 {mu}m thick, in water. XM-1 has an easy to use interface, that utilizes visible light microscopy to precisely position and focus the specimen. The authors describe applications of this device in the biological sciences, as well as in studying industrial applications including structured polymer samples.

  3. Calculation of x-ray scattering patterns from nanocrystals at high x-ray intensity

    CERN Document Server

    Abdullah, Malik Muhammad; Son, Sang-Kil; Santra, Robin

    2016-01-01

    We present a generalized method to describe the x-ray scattering intensity of the Bragg spots in a diffraction pattern from nanocrystals exposed to intense x-ray pulses. Our method involves the subdivision of a crystal into smaller units. In order to calculate the dynamics within every unit we employ a Monte-Carlo (MC)-molecular dynamics (MD)-ab-initio hybrid framework using real space periodic boundary conditions. By combining all the units we simulate the diffraction pattern of a crystal larger than the transverse x-ray beam profile, a situation commonly encountered in femtosecond nanocrystallography experiments with focused x-ray free-electron laser radiation. Radiation damage is not spatially uniform and depends on the fluence associated with each specific region inside the crystal. To investigate the effects of uniform and non-uniform fluence distribution we have used two different spatial beam profiles, gaussian and flattop.

  4. Identification of the optical and quiescent counterparts to the bright X-ray transient in NGC 6440

    CERN Document Server

    in 't Zand, J J M; Pooley, D; Verbunt, F; Wijnands, R; Lewin, W H G

    2001-01-01

    After 3 years of quiescence, the globular cluster NGC 6440 exhibited a bright transient X-ray source turning on in August 2001, as noted with the RXTE All-Sky Monitor. We carried out a short target of opportunity observation with the Chandra X-ray Observatory and are able to associate the transient with the brightest of 24 X-ray sources detected during quiescence in July 2000 with Chandra. Furthermore, we securely identify the optical counterpart and determine that the 1998 X-ray outburst in NGC 6440 was from the same object. This is the first time that an optical counterpart to a transient in a globular cluster is securely identified. Since the transient is a type I X-ray burster, it is established that the compact accretor is a neutron star. Thus, this transient provides an ideal case to study the quiescent emission in the optical and X-ray of a transiently accreting neutron star while knowing the distance and reddening accurately. One model that fits the quiescent spectrum is an absorbed power law plus neu...

  5. X-Ray surface brightness and gas density fluctuations in the Coma cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Churazov, E; Zhuravleva, I; Schekochihin, A; Parrish, I; Sunyaev, R; Forman, W; Boehringer, H; Randall, S

    2011-01-01

    X-ray surface brightness fluctuations in the core ($650 \\times 650$ kpc) region of the Coma cluster observed with XMM-Newton and Chandra are analyzed using a 2D power spectrum approach. The resulting 2D spectra are converted to 3D power spectra of gas density fluctuations. The characteristic amplitude of the volume filling density fluctuations relative to the smooth underlying density distribution varies from 7-10% on scales of $\\sim$500 kpc down to $\\sim$5% at scales $\\sim$ 30 kpc. On smaller spatial scales, projection effects smear the density fluctuations by a large factor, precluding strong limits on the fluctuations in 3D. On the largest scales probed (hundreds of kpc), the dominant contributions to the observed fluctuations most likely arise from perturbations of the gravitational potential by the two most massive galaxies in Coma, NGC4874 and NGC4889, and the low entropy gas brought to the cluster by an infalling group. Other plausible sources of density fluctuations are discussed, including turbulence...

  6. Molecular Gas in the X-ray Bright Group NGC 5044 as Revealed by ALMA

    CERN Document Server

    David, Laurence P; Forman, William; Vrtilek, Jan; Combes, Francoise; Salome, Philippe; Edge, Alastair; Jones, Christine; Sun, Ming; O'Sullivan, Ewan; Gastaldello, Fabio; Temi, Pasquale; Schmitt, Henrique; Ohyama, Youichi; Hamer, Stephen; Mathews, William; Brighenti, Fabrizio; Giacintucci, Simona; Bardelli, Sandro; Trung, Dinh-V

    2014-01-01

    A short 30 minute ALMA observation of the early-type galaxy NGC 5044, which resides at the center of an X-ray bright group with a moderate cooling flow, has detected 24 molecular structures within the central 2.5 kpc. The masses of the molecular structures vary from 3e5 to 1e7 Mo3 and the CO(2-1) linewidths vary from 15 to 65 km/s. Given the large CO(2-1) linewidths, the observed structures are likely giant molecular associations (GMAs) and not individual molecular clouds (GMCs). Only a few of the GMAs are spatially resolved with the cycle 0 ALMA beam and the average density of these GMAs yields a GMC volume filling factor of about 15%. The observed masses of the resolved GMAs are insufficient for them to be gravitationally bound, however, the most massive GMA does contain a less massive component with a linewidth of 5.5 km/s (typical of an individual virialized GMC). We also show that the GMAs cannot be pressure confined by the hot gas. Given the observed CO(2-1) linewidths of the GMAs (i.e., the velocity di...

  7. Editorial: Focus on X-ray Beams with High Coherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Ian; Gruebel, Gerhard; Mochrie, Simon

    2010-03-01

    This editorial serves as the preface to a special issue of New Journal of Physics, which collects together solicited papers on a common subject, x-ray beams with high coherence. We summarize the issue's content, and explain why there is so much current interest both in the sources themselves and in the applications to the study of the structure of matter and its fluctuations (both spontaneous and driven). As this collection demonstrates, the field brings together accelerator physics in the design of new sources, particle physics in the design of detectors, and chemical and materials scientists who make use of the coherent beams produced. Focus on X-ray Beams with High Coherence Contents Femtosecond pulse x-ray imaging with a large field of view B Pfau, C M Günther, S Schaffert, R Mitzner, B Siemer, S Roling, H Zacharias, O Kutz, I Rudolph, R Treusch and S Eisebitt The FERMI@Elettra free-electron-laser source for coherent x-ray physics: photon properties, beam transport system and applications E Allaria, C Callegari, D Cocco, W M Fawley, M Kiskinova, C Masciovecchio and F Parmigiani Beyond simple exponential correlation functions and equilibrium dynamics in x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy Anders Madsen, Robert L Leheny, Hongyu Guo, Michael Sprung and Orsolya Czakkel The Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) Sébastien Boutet and Garth J Williams Dynamics and rheology under continuous shear flow studied by x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy Andrei Fluerasu, Pawel Kwasniewski, Chiara Caronna, Fanny Destremaut, Jean-Baptiste Salmon and Anders Madsen Exploration of crystal strains using coherent x-ray diffraction Wonsuk Cha, Sanghoon Song, Nak Cheon Jeong, Ross Harder, Kyung Byung Yoon, Ian K Robinson and Hyunjung Kim Coherence properties of the European XFEL G Geloni, E Saldin, L Samoylova, E Schneidmiller, H Sinn, Th Tschentscher and M Yurkov Fresnel coherent diffractive imaging: treatment and analysis of data G J

  8. High resolution x-ray microtomography of biological samples: Requirements and strategies for satisfying them

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loo, B.W. Jr. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)]|[Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Rothman, S.S. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-02-01

    High resolution x-ray microscopy has been made possible in recent years primarily by two new technologies: microfabricated diffractive lenses for soft x-rays with about 30-50 nm resolution, and high brightness synchrotron x-ray sources. X-ray microscopy occupies a special niche in the array of biological microscopic imaging methods. It extends the capabilities of existing techniques mainly in two areas: a previously unachievable combination of sub-visible resolution and multi-micrometer sample size, and new contrast mechanisms. Because of the soft x-ray wavelengths used in biological imaging (about 1-4 nm), XM is intermediate in resolution between visible light and electron microscopies. Similarly, the penetration depth of soft x-rays in biological materials is such that the ideal sample thickness for XM falls in the range of 0.25 - 10 {mu}m, between that of VLM and EM. XM is therefore valuable for imaging of intermediate level ultrastructure, requiring sub-visible resolutions, in intact cells and subcellular organelles, without artifacts produced by thin sectioning. Many of the contrast producing and sample preparation techniques developed for VLM and EM also work well with XM. These include, for example, molecule specific staining by antibodies with heavy metal or fluorescent labels attached, and sectioning of both frozen and plastic embedded tissue. However, there is also a contrast mechanism unique to XM that exists naturally because a number of elemental absorption edges lie in the wavelength range used. In particular, between the oxygen and carbon absorption edges (2.3 and 4.4 nm wavelength), organic molecules absorb photons much more strongly than does water, permitting element-specific imaging of cellular structure in aqueous media, with no artifically introduced contrast agents. For three-dimensional imaging applications requiring the capabilities of XM, an obvious extension of the technique would therefore be computerized x-ray microtomography (XMT).

  9. High spectral and spatial resolution X-ray transmission radiography and tomography using a Color X-ray Camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boone, Matthieu N., E-mail: matthieu.boone@ugent.be [Ghent University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Proeftuinstraat 86, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Garrevoet, Jan; Tack, Pieter [Ghent University, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Krijgslaan 281/S12, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Scharf, Oliver [IfG-Institute for Scientific Instruments GmbH, Rudower Chaussee 29/31, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Cormode, David P. [University of Pennsylvania, Departments of Radiology, Cardiology and Bioengineering, O3400 Spruce St, 1 Silverstein, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Van Loo, Denis; Pauwels, Elin; Dierick, Manuel [Ghent University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Proeftuinstraat 86, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Vincze, Laszlo [Ghent University, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Krijgslaan 281/S12, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Van Hoorebeke, Luc [Ghent University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Proeftuinstraat 86, B-9000 Gent (Belgium)

    2014-01-21

    High resolution X-ray radiography and computed tomography are excellent techniques for non-destructive characterization of an object under investigation at a spatial resolution in the micrometer range. However, as the image contrast depends on both chemical composition and material density, no chemical information is obtained from this data. Furthermore, lab-based measurements are affected by the polychromatic X-ray beam, which results in beam hardening effects. New types of X-ray detectors which provide spectral information on the measured X-ray beam can help to overcome these limitations. In this paper, an energy dispersive CCD detector with high spectral resolution is characterized for use in high resolution radiography and tomography, where a focus is put on the experimental conditions and requirements of both measurement techniques.

  10. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of Theta Car

    CERN Document Server

    Naze, Yael

    2008-01-01

    Context : The peculiar hot star Theta Car in the open cluster IC2602 is a blue straggler as well as a single-line binary of short period (2.2d). Aims : Its high-energy properties are not well known, though X-rays can provide useful constraints on the energetic processes at work in binaries as well as in peculiar, single objects. Methods : We present the analysis of a 50ks exposure taken with the XMM-Newton observatory. It provides medium as well as high-resolution spectroscopy. Results : Our high-resolution spectroscopy analysis reveals a very soft spectrum with multiple temperature components (1--6MK) and an X-ray flux slightly below the `canonical' value (log[L_X(0.1-10.)/L_{BOL}] ~ -7). The X-ray lines appear surprisingly narrow and unshifted, reminiscent of those of beta Cru and tau Sco. Their relative intensities confirm the anomalous abundances detected in the optical domain (C strongly depleted, N strongly enriched, O slightly depleted). In addition, the X-ray data favor a slight depletion in neon and ...

  11. Phase contrast imaging with coherent high energy X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snigireva, I. [ESRF, Grenoble (France)

    1997-02-01

    X-ray imaging concern high energy domain (>6 keV) like a contact radiography, projection microscopy and tomography is used for many years to discern the features of the internal structure non destructively in material science, medicine and biology. In so doing the main contrast formation is absorption that makes some limitations for imaging of the light density materials and what is more the resolution of these techniques is not better than 10-100 {mu}m. It was turned out that there is now way in which to overcome 1{mu}m or even sub-{mu}m resolution limit except phase contrast imaging. It is well known in optics that the phase contrast is realised when interference between reference wave front and transmitted through the sample take place. Examples of this imaging are: phase contrast microscopy suggested by Zernike and Gabor (in-line) holography. Both of this techniques: phase contrast x-ray microscopy and holography are successfully progressing now in soft x-ray region. For imaging in the hard X-rays to enhance the contrast and to be able to resolve phase variations across the beam the high degree of the time and more importantly spatial coherence is needed. Because of this it was reasonable that the perfect crystal optics was involved like Bonse-Hart interferometry, double-crystal and even triple-crystal set-up using Laue and Bragg geometry with asymmetrically cut crystals.

  12. X-Ray Line Measurements with High Efficiency Bragg Crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pak, A; Gregori, G; Knight, J; Campbell, K; Landen, O; Glenzer, S

    2004-04-01

    We have studied the focusing properties of two highly oriented pyrolitic graphite (HOPG) spectrometers, which differ in the degree of the mosaic spread: ZYA with a low mosaic spread ({gamma}=0.4 degrees) and ZYH with a large mosaic spread ({gamma}=3.5 degrees). In order to assess the crystal performance for a variety of different experiments, various K{alpha} and K{beta} x-ray lines have been produced using a high-intensity ({approx}>10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}) short-pulse ({approx} 100 fs) laser beam focused onto Ti, V, Zn, and Cu foils. The measured spectral resolution of the HOPG crystals in both first and second order diffraction has been compared with theoretical predictions. Using known values for the peak reflectivity of HOPG crystals, we have also computed K{alpha} x-ray conversion efficiencies of Ti, V, Zn, and Cu. These results are important to estimate the optimal conditions under which different types of HOPG monochromators can be used for the detection of weak x-ray signals as the one encountered in x-ray Thomson/Compton scattering experiments.

  13. High spatial resolution hard X-ray microscope using X-ray refractive lens and phase contrast imaging experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Kohmura, Y; Takeuchi, A; Takano, H; Suzuki, Y; Ishikawa, T; Ohigashi, T; Yokosuka, H

    2001-01-01

    A high spatial resolution X-ray microscope was constructed using an X-ray refractive lens as an objective. The spatial resolution was tested using 18 keV X-ray. A 0.4 mu m line and 0.4 mu m space tantalum test pattern was successfully resolved. Using the similar setup with the addition of a phase plate, a Zernike type phase-contrast microscopy experiment was carried out for the phase retrieval of the samples. Two-dimensional phase-contrast images were successfully taken for the first time in the hard X-ray region. Images of a gold mesh sample were analyzed and the validity of this method was indicated. An improvement of the lens, however, is required for the precise phase retrieval of the samples.

  14. High power bremsstrahlung X-ray source for radiation processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yotsumoto, K.; Sunaga, H.; Tanaka, S.; Kanazawa, T.; Agematsu, T.; Tanaka, R.; Yoshida, K.; Taniguchi, S.; Sakamoto, I.; Tamura, N.

    The high power X-ray irradiation facility designed for the sterilization of medical appliances is described. The X-ray source consists of the 5 MeV, 300 kW Cockcroft Walton type of electron accelerator and the water cooled tantalum target. Conditions necessary for designing the X-ray target are conversion efficiency from electron beam to X-ray, thermal conductivity, readiness for machining and cost of the material. The conversion efficiency was determined through the Monte Carlo type calculation and obtained as 10.8 % for 3.667 g/cm 2 thickness (1 csda range) of tantalum target. In order to obtain the data on the source design, experiments have been carried out at the JAERI TAKASAKI 2 MeV, 60 kW Cockcroft-Walton type of electron accelerator equipped with a tantalum target. The size of package and the speed of conveyor was determined through the calculation of the absorbed dose distribution in the irradiated medium and the utilization efficiency.

  15. High-resolution x-ray analysis with multilayer gratings

    CERN Document Server

    Jonnard, Philippe; André, Jean-Michel; 10.1002/xrs.1128

    2013-01-01

    Periodic multilayers are nowadays widely used to perform x-ray analysis in the soft x-ray range (photon energy lower than 1 keV). However, they do not permit to obtain high-resolution spectra like natural or synthetic crystals. Thus, multilayers cannot resolve interferences between close x-ray lines. It has been shown and demonstrated experimentally that patterning a grating profile within a multilayer structure leads to a diffractive optics with improved resolving power. We illustrate the use of a Mo/B4C multilayer grating in the Fe L and C K spectral ranges, around 700 eV and 280 eV respectively. First, in the Fe L range, the improved spectral resolution enables us to distinguish the Fe L\\alpha and L\\beta emissions (separated by 13 eV). In addition, using a sample made of a mix of LiF and an iron ore, we show that it is possible to easily resolve the F K and Fe L emissions. These examples demonstrate that an improved x-ray analysis can be obtained with multilayer gratings when there is the need to study sam...

  16. Long-term optical variability of high-mass X-ray binaries. II. Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reig, P.; Nersesian, A.; Zezas, A.; Gkouvelis, L.; Coe, M. J.

    2016-05-01

    Context. High-mass X-ray binaries are bright X-ray sources. The high-energy emission is caused by the accretion of matter from the massive companion onto a neutron star. The accreting material comes from either the strong stellar wind in binaries with supergiant companions or the cirscumstellar disk in Be/X-ray binaries. In either case, the Hα line stands out as the main source of information about the state of the accreting material. Aims: We present the results of our monitoring program to study the long-term variability of the Hα line in high-mass X-ray binaries. Our aim is to characterise the optical variability timescales and study the interaction between the neutron star and the accreting material. Methods: We fitted the Hα line with Gaussian profiles and obtained the line parameters and equivalent width. The peak separation in split profiles was used to determine the disk velocity law and estimate the disk radius. The relative intensity of the two peaks (V/R ratio) allowed us to investigate the distribution of gas particles in the disk. The equivalent width was used to characterise the degree of variability of the systems. We also studied the variability of the Hα line in correlation with the X-ray activity. Results: Our results can be summarised as follows: i) we find that Be/X-ray binaries with narrow orbits are more variable than systems with long orbital periods; ii) we show that a Keplerian distribution of gas particles provides a good description of the disks in Be/X-ray binaries, as it does in classical Be stars; iii) a decrease in the Hα equivalent width is generally observed after major X-ray outbursts; iv) we confirm that the Hα equivalent width correlates with disk radius; v) while systems with supergiant companions display multi-structured profiles, most of the Be/X-ray binaries show, at some epoch, double-peak asymmetric profiles, which indicates that density inhomogeneities is a common property in the disk of Be/X-ray binaries; vi) the

  17. Calculation of x-ray scattering patterns from nanocrystals at high x-ray intensity

    OpenAIRE

    Malik Muhammad Abdullah; Zoltan Jurek; Sang-Kil Son; Robin Santra

    2016-01-01

    We present a generalized method to describe the x-ray scattering intensity of the Bragg spots in a diffraction pattern from nanocrystals exposed to intense x-ray pulses. Our method involves the subdivision of a crystal into smaller units. In order to calculate the dynamics within every unit we employ a Monte-Carlo (MC)-molecular dynamics (MD)-ab-initio hybrid framework using real space periodic boundary conditions. By combining all the units we simulate the diffraction pattern of a crystal la...

  18. RXTE/ASM and Swift / BAT observations of spectral transitions in bright X-ray binaries in 2005-2010

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Tang; Wen-Fei Yu; Zhen Yan

    2011-01-01

    We have studied X-ray spectral state transitions that can be seen in the longterm monitoring light curves of bright X-ray binaries from the All-Sky Monitor (ASM) onboard the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) and the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) onboard Swift during a period of five years from 2005 to 2010. We have applied a program to automatically identify the hard-to-soft (H-S) spectral state transitions in the bright X-ray binaries monitored by the ASM and the BAT. In total, we identified 128 hard-to-soft transitions, of which 59 occurred after 2008. We also determined the transition fluxes and the peak fluxes of the following soft states, updated the measurements of the luminosity corresponding to the H-S transition and the peak luminosity of the following soft state in about 30 bright persistent and transient black hole and neutron star binaries following Yu &Yan, and found the luminosity correlation and the luminosity range of spectral transitions in data between 2008-2010 are about the same as those derived from data before 2008. This further strengthens the idea that the luminosity at which the H-S spectral transition occurs in the Galactic X-ray binaries is determined by non-stationary accretion parameters such as the rate-of-change of the mass accretion rate rather than the mass accretion rate itself. The correlation is also found to hold in data of individual sources 4U 1608-52 and 4U 1636-53.

  19. Generation of bright attosecond x-ray pulse trains via Thomson scattering from laser-plasma accelerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, W; Yu, T P; Chen, M; Song, Y M; Zhu, Z C; Ma, Y Y; Zhuo, H B

    2014-12-29

    Generation of attosecond x-ray pulse attracts more and more attention within the advanced light source user community due to its potentially wide applications. Here we propose an all-optical scheme to generate bright, attosecond hard x-ray pulse trains by Thomson backscattering of similarly structured electron beams produced in a vacuum channel by a tightly focused laser pulse. Design parameters for a proof-of-concept experiment are presented and demonstrated by using a particle-in-cell code and a four-dimensional laser-Compton scattering simulation code to model both the laser-based electron acceleration and Thomson scattering processes. Trains of 200 attosecond duration hard x-ray pulses holding stable longitudinal spacing with photon energies approaching 50 keV and maximum achievable peak brightness up to 1020 photons/s/mm2/mrad2/0.1%BW for each micro-bunch are observed. The suggested physical scheme for attosecond x-ray pulse trains generation may directly access the fastest time scales relevant to electron dynamics in atoms, molecules and materials.

  20. Testing the Universality of the TIS Model on Cluster Scales from the X-ray Surface Brightness Profiles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The truncated isothermal sphere (TIS) model has been recently suggested as an alternative for virialized dark halos (Shapiro et al. 1999). Both its profound theoretical motivation and its successful explanations for the galactic rotation curves and the gravitational scaling laws of clusters indicate that the TIS model is a promising candidate among other prevailing models such as the NFW profile and the Burkert profile. This promotes us to re-examine the universality of the TIS model on cluster scales from a different angle. Using an ensemble of X-ray surface brightness profiles of 45 clusters, we test the goodness of fit of the TIS predicted gas distributions to the X-ray data under the assumption of isothermal, hydrostatic equilibrium. Unlike the conventional β model or the NFW/Burkert profile, for which about half of the clusters have the reduced x2v values smaller than 2,the TIS model fails in the fitting of the X-ray surface brightness profiles of clusters in the sense that 38 out of the 45 clusters show x2v > 2. This may constitute a challenge for the universality of the TIS model unless the present analysis is seriously contaminated by other uncertainties including the negligence of non-gravitational heating processes and the unconventional sampling of the X-ray data.

  1. Focusing Optics for High-Energy X-ray Diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leinert, U.; Schulze, C.; Honkimäki, V.;

    1998-01-01

    of the different set-ups are described and potential applications are discussed. First experiments were performed, investigating with high spatial resolution the residual strain gradients in layered polycrystalline materials. The results underline that focused high-energy synchrotron radiation can provide unique...... information on the mesoscopic scale to the materials scientist, complementary to existing techniques based on conventional X-ray sources, neutron scattering or electron microscopy....

  2. Hubble Space Telescope Imaging of Bright Galactic X-Ray Binaries in Crowded Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Eric W.; Margon, Bruce; Wachter, Stefanie; Anderson, Scott F.

    1996-01-01

    We report high spatial resolution HST imagery and photometry of three well-studied, intense Galactic X-ray binaries, X2129+470, CAL 87, and GX 17+2. All three sources exhibit important anomalies that are not readily interpreted by conventional models. Each source also lies in a severely crowded field, and in all cases the anomalies would be removed if much of the light observed from the ground in fact came from a nearby, thus far unresolved superposed companion. For V1727 Cyg (X2129+470), we find no such companion. We also present an HST FOS spectrum and broadband photometry which is consistent with a single, normal star. The supersoft LMC X-ray source CAL 87 was already known from ground-based work to have a companion separated by O.9 minutes from the optical counterpart; our HST images clearly resolve these objects and yield the discovery of an even closer, somewhat fainter additional companion. Our photometry indicates that contamination is not severe outside eclipse, where the companions only contribute 20% of the light in V, but during eclipse more than half of the V light comes from the companions. The previously determined spectral type of the CAL 87 secondary may need to be reevaluated due to this significant contamination, with consequences on inferences of the mass of the components. We find no companions to NP Ser (= X1813-14, = GX 17+2). However, for this object we point out a small but possibly significant astrometric discrepancy between the position of the optical object and that of the radio source which is the basis for the identification. This discrepancy needs to be clarified.

  3. HIGH-RESOLUTION X-RAY SPECTROSCOPY OF THE BURSTING PULSAR GRO J1744-28

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degenaar, N.; Miller, J. M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 1085 South University Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Harrison, F. A. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Kennea, J. A. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Lab, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Kouveliotou, C. [Space Science Office, ZP12, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Younes, G., E-mail: degenaar@umich.edu [Universities Space Research Association, 6767 Old Madison Pike, Suite 450, Huntsville, AL 35806 (United States)

    2014-11-20

    The bursting pulsar GRO J1744-28 is a Galactic low-mass X-ray binary that distinguishes itself by displaying type-II X-ray bursts: brief, bright flashes of X-ray emission that likely arise from spasmodic accretion. Combined with its coherent 2.1 Hz X-ray pulsations and relatively high estimated magnetic field, it is a particularly interesting source to study the physics of accretion flows around neutron stars. Here we report on Chandra/High Energy Transmission Grating observations obtained near the peak of its bright 2014 accretion outburst. Spectral analysis suggests the presence of a broad iron emission line centered at E {sub l} ≅ 6.7 keV. Fits with a disk reflection model yield an inclination angle of i ≅ 52° and an inner disk radius of R {sub in} ≅ 85 GM/c {sup 2}, which is much further out than typically found for neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries. Assuming that the disk is truncated at the magnetospheric radius of the neutron star, we estimate a magnetic field strength of B ≅ (2-6) × 10{sup 10} G. Furthermore, we identify an absorption feature near ≅ 6.85 keV that could correspond to blue-shifted Fe XXV and point to a fast disk wind with an outflow velocity of v {sub out} ≅ (7.5-8.2) × 10{sup 3} km s{sup –1} (≅ 0.025c-0.027c). If the covering fraction and filling factor are large, this wind could be energetically important and perhaps account for the fact that the companion star lost significant mass while the magnetic field of the neutron star remained strong.

  4. High resolution X-ray CT for advanced electronics packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppermann, M.; Zerna, T.

    2017-02-01

    Advanced electronics packaging is a challenge for non-destructive Testing (NDT). More, smaller and mostly hidden interconnects dominate modern electronics components and systems. To solve the demands of customers to get products with a high functionality by low volume, weight and price (e.g. mobile phones, personal medical monitoring systems) often the designers use System-in-Package solutions (SiP). The non-destructive testing of such devices is a big challenge. So our paper will impart fundamentals and applications for non-destructive evaluation of inner structures of electronics packaging for quality assurance and reliability investigations with a focus on X-ray methods, especially on high resolution X-ray computed tomography (CT).

  5. High Resolution Energetic X-ray Imager (HREXI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grindlay, Jonathan

    We propose to design and build the first imaging hard X-ray detector system that incorporates 3D stacking of closely packed detector readouts in finely-spaced imaging arrays with their required data processing and control electronics. In virtually all imaging astronomical detectors, detector readout is done with flex connectors or connections that are not vertical but rather horizontal , requiring loss of focal plane area. For high resolution pixel detectors needed for high speed event-based X-ray imaging, from low energy applications (CMOS) with focusing X-ray telescopes, to hard X-ray applications with pixelated CZT for large area coded aperture telescopes, this new detector development offers great promise. We propose to extend our previous and current APRA supported ProtoEXIST program that has developed the first large area imaging CZT detectors and demonstrated their astrophysical capabilities on two successful balloon flight to a next generation High Resolution Energetic X-ray Imager (HREXI), which would incorporate microvia technology for the first time to connect the readout ASIC on each CZT crystal directly to its control and data processing system. This 3-dimensional stacking of detector and readout/control system means that large area (>2m2) imaging detector planes for a High Resolution Wide-field hard X-ray telescope can be built with initially greatly reduced detector gaps and ultimately with no gaps. This increases detector area, efficiency, and simplicity of detector integration. Thus higher sensitivity wide-field imagers will be possible at lower cost. HREXI will enable a post-Swift NASA mission such as the EREXS concept proposed to PCOS to be conducted as a future MIDEX mission. This mission would conduct a high resolution (<2 arcmin) , broad band (5 200 keV) hard X-ray survey of black holes on all scales with ~10X higher sensitivity than Swift. In the current era of Time Domain Astrophysics, such a survey capability, in conjunction with a n

  6. X-ray diffraction properties of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freund, A.K.; Munkholm, A.; Brennan, S. [Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lab., CA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The x-ray diffraction properties of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) were studied for x-ray energies ranging from 4 to 60 keV. In particular, the secondary extinction thickness was determined by recording the peak and integrated reflectivity as a function of depth below the surface. The results showed that for the high quality material investigated a thickness of 200 to 300 {micro}m was sufficient to get 80% of the maximum reflectivity that is obtained for a very thick plate. Primary extinction was important for low energy and still persisted at higher energies. Inhomogeneities of the mosaic structure were observed, too, that make this material not a truly ideal mosaic monochromator crystal. However, quite high peak reflectivities between 35% and 58% were measured at FWHM of 0.25 to 0.45 degrees. A 200 {micro}m thick plate was then prepared and glued on a bending device to manufacture a monochromator or analyzer with variable curvature that works from flat down to a minimum bending radius of 10 cm. The successful tests of this device confirmed that HOPG plates much thinner than those commonly used as x-ray monochromators and analyzers still have high efficiency and can be curved to achieve dynamical focusing.

  7. High resolution solar soft X-ray spectrometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Fei; WANG Huan-Yu; PENG Wen-Xi; LIANG Xiao-Hua; ZHANG Chun-Lei; CAO Xue-Lei; JIANG Wei-Chun; ZHANG Jia-Yu; CUI Xing-Zhu

    2012-01-01

    A high resolution solar soft X-ray spectrometer (SOX) payload onboard a satellite is developed.A silicon drift detector (SDD) is adopted as the detector of the SOX spectrometer.The spectrometer consists of the detectors and their readout electronics,a data acquisition unit and a payload data handling unit.A ground test system is also developed to test SOX.The test results show that the design goals of the spectrometer system have been achieved.

  8. Dissecting the Accretion Environments of X-ray Binaries with High Speed Coordinated Optical and X-ray Timing Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Poshak; Durant, M.; Fabian, A. C.; Malzac, J.; Miller, J. M.; Shahbaz, T.; Dhillon, V. S.; Marsh, T. R.; Spruit, H. C.; Makishima, K.

    2010-03-01

    We are uncovering significant optical variability in low/hard state observations of several X-ray binaries on the fastest time-scales of just tens of milliseconds typically probed with modern rapid imaging cameras. The optical light curves are remarkable in that they display properties very characteristic of X-ray variations: 1) power spectra with band-limited, red noise over broad time ranges of 10 ms - 1000 s, and in some cases, a low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillation; 2) an instantaneous variability amplitude linearly scaling with source flux; and, 3) log-normal distributions of fluxes. Aperiodic optical variability components can dominate over simple linear X-ray reprocessing expectations, and are much faster than viscous time-scales of the outer accretion disk or flow. Cross-correlated optical vs. X-ray time delays not only constrain emission mechanisms, but can also be used to probe characteristic size scales of the physical components (jet, corona), and to understand how they are coupled. Rapid, multiwavelength timing studies are thus opening a new window on the hearts of accreting sources, though the broad-band spectral plus timing properties remain to be unified consistently. I will briefly review recent results on rapid optical variability, including our new data on black hole and neutron star binary systems. The fact that the sources were all in typical low/hard states (with relatively-bright optical counterparts) suggests that correlated optical/X-ray activity may be a general feature, waiting to be uncovered in more systems. The continuance of RXTE is vital for such work.

  9. High Precision Assembly of Thin Mirror X-ray Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schattenburg, Mark

    Lightweight high resolution x-ray telescope optics are one of the key technologies under development for next-generation x-ray telescopes. The ultimate goal of this effort is to realize optics with spatial resolution rivaling Chandra (spindle structure. While very light weight, this process resulted in ~1 arc min resolution. We want to achieve ~100 times better with similar mass. A group at NASA GSFC has recently demonstrated an alternative thin-glass assembly procedure that has achieved ~7 arc sec resolution with x-ray tests. Further progress towards 1 arc-sec will require mirrors with improved figure, lower stress coatings, improved alignment, better metrology, and low stress bonding. Many of the difficulties with current mirror assembly practice stem from the use of epoxy as a bonding agent. Epoxy has many disadvantages, including high shrinkage, large CTE and creep, resin aging effects, water absorption, outgassing, low tensile strength, exothermicity, and requiring large amounts of time and/or heat to cure. These effects can cause errors that become â€oefrozen in― to the bond with no possibility of correction. We propose to investigate replacing epoxy with low temperature, low shrinkage solder alloys. We use these solders in conjunction with high power, millisec-long pulses from a fiber IR laser to deliver controlled amounts of heat into the bond area. We have demonstrated that laser pulses can be used to actuate carefully designed bonds by permanently compressing or expanding a very thin and brief surface melt in the solder by amounts controlled in the nanoscale range, allowing post assembly correction of the mirror mount points. We believe this technology will be one of the keys to realize a sub-1 arc-sec thin-glass x-ray telescope.

  10. Bendable X-ray Optics for High Resolution Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubarev, M.; Ramsey, B.; Kilaru, K.; Atkins, C.; Broadway, D.

    2014-01-01

    Current state-of the-art for x-ray optics fabrication calls for either the polishing of massive substrates into high-angular-resolution mirrors or the replication of thin, lower-resolution, mirrors from perfectly figured mandrels. Future X-ray Missions will require a change in this optics fabrication paradigm in order to achieve sub-arcsecond resolution in light-weight optics. One possible approach to this is to start with perfectly flat, light-weight surface, bend it into a perfect cone, form the desired mirror figure by material deposition, and insert the resulting mirror into a telescope structure. Such an approach is currently being investigated at MSFC, and a status report will be presented detailing the results of finite element analyses, bending tests and differential deposition experiments.

  11. Advances toward high spectral resolution quantum X-ray calorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseley, S. H.; Kelley, R. L.; Schoelkopf, R. J.; Szymkowiak, A. E.; Mccammon, D.

    1988-01-01

    Thermal detectors for X-ray spectroscopy combining high spectral resolution and quantum efficiency have been developed. These microcalorimeters measure the energy released in the absorption of a single photon by sensing the rise in temperature of a small absorbing structure. The ultimate energy resolution of such a device is limited by the thermodynamic power fluctuations in the thermal link between the calorimeter and isothermal bath and can in principle be made as low as 1 eV. The performance of a real device is degraded due to noise contributions such as excess 1/f noise in the thermistor and incomplete conversion of energy into phonons. The authors report some recent advances in thermometry, X-ray absorption and thermalization, fabrication techniques, and detector optimization in the presence of noise. These improvements have resulted in a device with a spectral resolution of 17 eV FWHM, measured at 6 keV.

  12. X-ray Observations of High-B Radio Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Olausen, S A; Vogel, J K; Kaspi, V M; Lyne, A G; Espinoza, C M; Stappers, B W; Manchester, R N; McLaughlin, M A

    2013-01-01

    The study of high-magnetic-field pulsars is important for examining the relationships between radio pulsars, magnetars, and X-ray-isolated neutron stars (XINSs). Here we report on X-ray observations of three such high-magnetic-field radio pulsars. We first present the results of a deep XMM-Newton observation of PSR J1734-3333, taken to follow up on its initial detection in 2009. The pulsar's spectrum is well fit by a blackbody with a temperature of 300 +/- 60 eV, with bolometric luminosity L_bb = 2.0(+2.2 -0.7)e+32 erg/s = 0.0036E_dot for a distance of 6.1 kpc. We detect no X-ray pulsations from the source, setting a 1 sigma upper limit on the pulsed fraction of 60% in the 0.5-3 keV band. We compare PSR J1734-3333 to other rotation-powered pulsars of similar age and find that it is significantly hotter, supporting the hypothesis that the magnetic field affects the observed thermal properties of pulsars. We also report on XMM-Newton and Chandra observations of PSRs B1845-19 and J1001-5939. We do not detect eit...

  13. What is the nature of the high energy X-ray sources in the galaxy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuturilo, Sophie; Tomsick, John; Clavel, Maica; Lansbury, George B.

    2017-01-01

    Finding sources of high energy “hard” X-rays allow us to probe the most extreme conditions in the Universe. Such sources include accreting black holes and neutron stars, where we find the strongest gravitational and magnetic fields, as well as pulsars and supernova remnants, where particles are accelerated to produce the hard X-rays. Over the past decade, the INTEGRAL satellite ahs been discovering new high energy sources, and this has allowed us to understand the population of bright hard X-ray sources. Over the past few years, the NuSTAR satellite, with much better sensitivity than INTEGRAL, has been allowing us to find even more hard X-ray sources, and we will present results from studies of sources discovered in the NuSTAR serendipitous source survey. We analyzed seven different potential sources looking for counterparts using NuSTAR, Chandra and ground based optical/NIR observations. Of the seven, two have confirmed counterparts and five need either an optical/NIR detection or further spectroscopy.

  14. Development of Compton X-ray spectrometer for high energy resolution single-shot high-flux hard X-ray spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Sadaoki; Ikenouchi, Takahito; Arikawa, Yasunobu; Sakata, Shohei; Zhang, Zhe; Abe, Yuki; Nakai, Mitsuo; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Ozaki, Tetsuo; Miyamoto, Shuji; Yamaguchi, Masashi; Takemoto, Akinori; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Azechi, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    Hard X-ray spectroscopy is an essential diagnostics used to understand physical processes that take place in high energy density plasmas produced by intense laser-plasma interactions. A bundle of hard X-ray detectors, of which the responses have different energy thresholds, is used as a conventional single-shot spectrometer for high-flux (>10(13) photons/shot) hard X-rays. However, high energy resolution (Δhv/hv spectrometer because its energy resolution is limited by energy differences between the response thresholds. Experimental demonstration of a Compton X-ray spectrometer has already been performed for obtaining higher energy resolution than that of DET spectrometers. In this paper, we describe design details of the Compton X-ray spectrometer, especially dependence of energy resolution and absolute response on photon-electron converter design and its background reduction scheme, and also its application to the laser-plasma interaction experiment. The developed spectrometer was used for spectroscopy of bremsstrahlung X-rays generated by intense laser-plasma interactions using a 200 μm thickness SiO2 converter. The X-ray spectrum obtained with the Compton X-ray spectrometer is consistent with that obtained with a DET X-ray spectrometer, furthermore higher certainly of a spectral intensity is obtained with the Compton X-ray spectrometer than that with the DET X-ray spectrometer in the photon energy range above 5 MeV.

  15. XID II: Statistical Cross-Association of ROSAT Bright Source Catalog X-ray Sources with 2MASS Point Source Catalog Near-Infrared Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Haakonsen, Christian Bernt; 10.1088/0067-0049/184/1/138

    2009-01-01

    The 18806 ROSAT All Sky Survey Bright Source Catalog (RASS/BSC) X-ray sources are quantitatively cross-associated with near-infrared (NIR) sources from the Two Micron All Sky Survey Point Source Catalog (2MASS/PSC). An association catalog is presented, listing the most likely counterpart for each RASS/BSC source, the probability Pid that the NIR source and X-ray source are uniquely associated, and the probability Pnoid that none of the 2MASS/PSC sources are associated with the X-ray source. The catalog includes 3853 high quality (Pid>0.98) X-ray--NIR matches, 2280 medium quality (0.98>Pid>0.9) matches, and 4153 low quality (0.9>Pid>0.5) matches. Of the high quality matches, 1418 are associations that are not listed in the SIMBAD database, and for which no high quality match with a USNO-A2 optical source was presented for the RASS/BSC source in previous work. The present work offers a significant number of new associations with RASS/BSC objects that will require optical/NIR spectroscopy for classification. For...

  16. High-energy x-ray imaging spectrometer (HEXIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteson, James L.; Gruber, Duane E.; Heindl, William A.; Pelling, Michael R.; Peterson, Laurence E.; Rothschild, Richard E.; Skelton, Robert E.; Hink, Paul L.; Slavis, Kimberly R.; Binns, W. Robert

    1998-11-01

    HEXIS is a MIDEX-class mission concept for x-ray astronomy. Its objectives are to improve our knowledge of the high energy x-ray sky by increasing the number of sources above 20 keV to > 2,000, discovering transient sources such as x-ray novae and gamma-ray bursts, and making spectral and temporal studies of the sources. With mission life > 3 years, a 1-year all-sky survey sensitivity of approximately 0.3 mCrab, and continuous monitoring of the entire visible sky, HEXIS will provide unprecedented capabilities. Source positions will be determined to accuracies of a few arcmin or better. Spectra will be determined with an energy resolution of a few keV and source variability will be studied on time scales from CZT detectors operating from approximately 5 keV to 200 keV. Detector planes are built with 41 cm(superscript 2) CZT detector modules which employ crossed-strip readout to obtain a pixel size of 0.5 mm. Nine modules are grouped in a 369 cm(superscript 2) array for each imager. In the past 2 years significant progress has been made on techniques requires for HEXIS: position-sensitive CZT detectors and ASIC readout, coded mask imaging, and background properties at balloon altitudes. Scientific and technical details of HEXIS are presented together with result form tests of detectors and a coded mask imager.

  17. A bright thermonuclear X-ray burst simultaneously observed with Chandra and RXTE

    CERN Document Server

    Zand, J J M in t; Marshall, H L; Ballantyne, D R; Jonker, P G; Paerels, F B S; Palmer, D M; Patruno, A; Weinberg, N N

    2013-01-01

    The prototypical accretion-powered millisecond pulsar SAX J1808.4-3658 was observed simultaneously with Chandra-LETGS and RXTE-PCA near the peak of a transient outburst in November 2011. A single thermonuclear (type-I) burst was detected, the brightest yet observed by Chandra from any source, and the second-brightest observed by RXTE. We found no evidence for discrete spectral features during the burst; absorption edges have been predicted to be present in such bursts, but may require a greater degree of photospheric expansion than the rather moderate expansion seen in this event (a factor of a few). These observations provide a unique data set to study an X-ray burst over a broad bandpass and at high spectral resolution (lambda/delta-lambda=200-400). We find a significant excess of photons at high and low energies compared to the standard black body spectrum. This excess is well described by a 20-fold increase of the persistent flux during the burst. We speculate that this results from burst photons being sc...

  18. Discovery of a high confidence soft lag from an X-ray flare of Markarian 421

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    We present the X-ray variability properties of the X-ray and TeV bright blazar Mrk 421 with a-60 ks long XMM-Newton observation performed on November 9-10,2005.The source experienced a pronounced flare,of which the inter-band time lags were determined with a very high confidence level.The soft(0.6-0.8 keV) X-ray variations lagged the hard(4-10 keV) ones by 1.09+0.11-0.12 ks,and the soft lag increases with increasing difference in the photon energy.The energy-dependent soft lags can be well fitted with the difference of the energy-dependent cooling timescales of the relativistic electron distribution responsible for the observed X-ray emission,which constrains the magnetic field strength and Doppler factor of the emitting region to be Bδ 1/3-1.78 Gauss.

  19. High proper motion X-ray binaries from the Yale Southern Proper Motion Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Maccarone, Thomas J; Casetti-Dinescu, Dana I

    2014-01-01

    We discuss the results of cross-correlating catalogs of bright X-ray binaries with the Yale Southern Proper Motion catalog (version 4.0). Several objects already known to have large proper motions from Hipparcos are recovered. Two additional objects are found which show substantial proper motions, both of which are unusual in their X-ray properties. One is IGR J17544-2619, one of the supergiant fast X-ray transients. Assuming the quoted distances in the literature for this source of about 3 kpc are correct, this system has a peculiar velocity of about 275 km/sec -- greater than the velocity of a Keplerian orbit at its location of the Galaxy, and in line with the expectations formed from suggestions that the supergiant fast X-ray transients should be highly eccentric. We discuss the possibility that these objects may help explain the existence of short gamma-ray bursts outside the central regions of galaxies. The other is the source 2A~1822-371, which is a member of the small class of objects which are low mas...

  20. High-Resolution X-Ray Imaging of Supernova Remnant 1987A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, C.-Y.; Gaensler, B. M.; Murray, S. S.; Slane, P. O.; Park, S.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Manchester, R. N.; Burrows, D. N.

    2009-11-01

    We report observations of the remnant of supernova 1987A with the High Resolution Camera (HRC) on board the Chandra X-ray Observatory. A direct image from the HRC resolves the annular structure of the X-ray remnant, confirming the morphology previously inferred by deconvolution of lower resolution data from the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer. Detailed spatial modeling shows that a thin ring plus a thin shell gives statistically the best description of the overall remnant structure, and suggests an outer radius of 0farcs96 ± 0farcs05 ± 0farcs03 for the X-ray-emitting region, with the two uncertainties corresponding to the statistical and systematic errors, respectively. This is very similar to the radius determined by a similar modeling technique for the radio shell at a comparable epoch, in contrast to previous claims that the remnant is 10%-15% smaller at X-rays than in the radio band. The HRC observations put a flux limit of 0.010 counts s-1 (99% confidence level, 0.08-10 keV range) on any compact source at the remnant center. Assuming the same foreground neutral hydrogen column density as toward the remnant, this allows us to rule out an unobscured neutron star with surface temperature T ∞ > 2.5 MK observed at infinity, a bright pulsar wind nebula or a magnetar.

  1. Sleeping Giants? - X-ray search for low-luminosity AGN candidates in nearby optically bright galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Kalcheva, Ivayla E

    2014-01-01

    In this Master's project, the X-ray nuclear properties of a sample of bright nearby galaxies are explored. This is done by matching their comprehensive optical spectroscopic classification to the latest available XMM-Newton catalogue - 3XMM-DR4. The good coverage (approx. 38 per cent) ensures that a statistically representative sample is investigated. All nuclear and morphological subsets found within the original sample of 486 galaxies are encompassed, but early-type galaxies and galaxies with optical features characteristic for active galactic nuclei (AGN) are favoured. The results from the investigation of the properties of our cross-matched sample are overall consistent with the presence of a large fraction of X-ray - detected low-luminosity AGN (LLAGN). The X-ray - detected galaxies within our HII and transition-LINER subsets are of particular interest, as they could harbour LLAGN missed by optical spectroscopic selection. The properties of these nuclei are explored by X-ray spectral fitting of available...

  2. High Resolution X-Ray Spectroscopy with a Microcalorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norrell, J.; Anderson, I.

    2005-01-01

    of spectral artifacts. It was found that the detector is capable of distinguishing many Lα and Lβ spectral lines, with a resolution between 13 and 17 eV. It was also observed that the background has an unusual shape, and this is largely being attributed to the variable transmission coefficient of the X-ray optic. These preliminary results suggest that the microcalorimeter has a high potential for use in microanalysis, but more work to quantify its capabilities must still be done.

  3. High-energy neutrino emission from X-ray binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Christiansen, H R; Romero, G E; Christiansen, Hugo R.; Orellana, Mariana; Romero, Gustavo E.

    2006-01-01

    We show that high-energy neutrinos can be efficiently produced in X-ray binaries with relativistic jets and high-mass primary stars. We consider a system where the star presents a dense equatorial wind and the jet has a small content of relativistic protons. In this scenario, neutrinos and correlated gamma-rays result from pp interactions and the subsequent pion decays. As a particular example we consider the microquasar LSI +61 303. Above 1 TeV, we obtain a mean-orbital $\

  4. The High Throughput X-ray Spectroscopy (HTXS) Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, N. E.; Tananbaum, H.; Kahn, S. M.

    1997-01-01

    The HTXS mission concept combines large effective area (approximately 15,000 sq cm at 1 keV), high spectral resolution (E/Delta(E) approximately 300-3000), and broad energy bandpass (0.25-40 keV and possibly up to 100 keV) by using replicated optics together with a complement of spectroscopic instrumentation including reflection gratings readout by charge-coupled device detectors (CCDs), quantum micro-calorimeters, and cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) or comparable high energy detectors. An essential feature of this concept involves minimization of cost (approximately $350M for development and approximately $500-600M including launches) and risk by building six identical modest satellites to achieve the large area. Current mission and technology studies are targeted towards a new start in the 2002 timeframe, with first launch around 2005-2006. The HTXS mission represents a major advance, providing as much as a factor of 100 increase in sensitivity over currently planned high resolution X ray spectroscopy missions. HTXS will mark the start of a new era when high quality X ray spectra will be obtained for all classes of X ray sources, over a wide range of luminosity and distance. With its increased capabilities, HTXS will address many fundamental astrophysics questions such as the origin and distribution of the elements from carbon to zinc, the formation and evolution of clusters of galaxies, the validity of general relativity in the strong gravity limit, the evolution of supermassive black holes in active galactic nuclei, the details of supernova explosions and their aftermath, and the mechanisms involved in the heating of stellar coronae and driving of stellar winds.

  5. The optical emission lines of type 1 X-ray bright Active Galactic Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    La Mura, G; Ciroi, S; Cracco, V; Di Mille, F; Rafanelli, P

    2013-01-01

    A strong X-ray emission is one of the defining signatures of nuclear activity in galaxies. According to the Unified Model for Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN), both the X-ray radiation and the prominent broad emission lines, characterizing the optical and UV spectra of Type 1 AGNs, are originated in the innermost regions of the sources, close to the Super Massive Black Holes (SMBH), which power the central engine. Since the emission is concentrated in a very compact region (with typical size $r 2000 km/s) and narrow line (1000 km/s < FWHMH$_{\\rm H\\beta}\\, \\leq$ 2000 km/s) emitting objects, it has been observed that the kinematic and ionization properties of matter close to the SMBHs are related together, and, in particular, that ionization is higher in narrow line sources. Here we report on the study of the optical and X-ray spectra of a sample of Type 1 AGNs, selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) database, within an upper redshift limit of z = 0.35, and detected at X-ray energies. We present anal...

  6. Population synthesis of high mass X-ray binaries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-Liang Lü; Chun-Hua Zhu; Zhao-Jun Wang

    2011-01-01

    By simulating the evolution of spin periods of magnetized neutron stars which interact with their environment in binary systems, we investigate the Galactic population of high mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs). The number of HMXBs in the Galaxy is between 190 and 240, and their birthrate is from 5.9 × 10-5 yr-1 to 6.3 ×10-5 yr-1. Comparing the Corbet diagram (the positions of the spin periods vs. the orbital periods of HMXBs ) in our model with the associated observations, we find that the stellar wind structure and the process of matter transfer are very important for understanding HMXBs.

  7. A final report to the Laboratory Directed Research and Development committee on Project 93-ERP-075: ``X-ray laser propagation and coherence: Diagnosing fast-evolving, high-density laser plasmas using X-ray lasers``

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, A.S.; Cauble, R.; Da Silva, L.B.; Libby, S.B.; Moreno, J.C.

    1996-02-01

    This report summarizes the major accomplishments of this three-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Exploratory Research Project (ERP) entitled ``X-ray Laser Propagation and Coherence: Diagnosing Fast-evolving, High-density Laser Plasmas Using X-ray Lasers,`` tracking code 93-ERP-075. The most significant accomplishment of this project is the demonstration of a new laser plasma diagnostic: a soft x-ray Mach-Zehnder interferometer using a neonlike yttrium x-ray laser at 155 {angstrom} as the probe source. Detailed comparisons of absolute two-dimensional electron density profiles obtained from soft x-ray laser interferograms and profiles obtained from radiation hydrodynamics codes, such as LASNEX, will allow us to validate and benchmark complex numerical models used to study the physics of laser-plasma interactions. Thus the development of soft x-ray interferometry technique provides a mechanism to probe the deficiencies of the numerical models and is an important tool for, the high-energy density physics and science-based stockpile stewardship programs. The authors have used the soft x-ray interferometer to study a number of high-density, fast evolving, laser-produced plasmas, such as the dynamics of exploding foils and colliding plasmas. They are pursuing the application of the soft x-ray interferometer to study ICF-relevant plasmas, such as capsules and hohlraums, on the Nova 10-beam facility. They have also studied the development of enhanced-coherence, shorter-pulse-duration, and high-brightness x-ray lasers. The utilization of improved x-ray laser sources can ultimately enable them to obtain three-dimensional holographic images of laser-produced plasmas.

  8. Optimizing the Search for High-z GRBs: The JANUS X-ray Coded Aperture Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Burrows, D N; Palmer, D; Romano, P; Mangano, V; La Parola, V; Falcone, A D; Roming, P W A

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the optimization of gamma-ray burst (GRB) detectors with a goal of maximizing the detected number of bright high-redshift GRBs, in the context of design studies conducted for the X-ray transient detector on the JANUS mission. We conclude that the optimal energy band for detection of high-z GRBs is below about 30 keV. We considered both lobster-eye and coded aperture designs operating in this energy band. Within the available mass and power constraints, we found that the coded aperture mask was preferred for the detection of high-z bursts with bright enough afterglows to probe galaxies in the era of the Cosmic Dawn. This initial conclusion was confirmed through detailed mission simulations that found that the selected design (an X-ray Coded Aperture Telescope) would detect four times as many bright, high-z GRBs as the lobster-eye design we considered. The JANUS XCAT instrument will detect 48 GRBs with z > 5 and fluence Sx > 3 {\\times} 10-7 erg cm-2 in a two year mission.

  9. Soft x-ray transmission grating spectrometer for X-ray Surveyor and smaller missions with high resolving power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilmann, Ralf K.; Bruccoleri, Alexander; Schattenburg, Mark; Kolodziejczak, jeffery; Gaskin, Jessica; O'Dell, Stephen L.

    2017-01-01

    A number of high priority subjects in astrophysics are addressed by a state-of-the-art soft x-ray grating spectrometer, e.g. the role of Active Galactic Nuclei in galaxy and star formation, characterization of the WHIM and the “missing baryon” problem, characterization of halos around the Milky Way and nearby galaxies, and stellar coronae and surrounding winds and disks. An Explorer-scale, large-area (A > 1,000 cm2), high resolving power (R > 3,000) soft x-ray grating spectrometer is highly feasible based on Critical-Angle Transmission (CAT) grating technology, even for telescopes with angular resolution of 5-10 arcsec. Significantly higher performance could be provided by a CAT grating spectrometer on an X-ray-Surveyor-type mission (A > 4,000 cm2, R > 5,000). CAT gratings combine advantages of blazed reflection gratings (high efficiency, use of higher orders) with those of transmission gratings (low mass, relaxed alignment tolerances and temperature requirements, transparent at higher energies) with minimal mission resource requirements. Blazing is achieved through grazing-incidence reflection off the smooth silicon grating bar sidewalls. Silicon is well matched to the soft x-ray band, and 30% absolute diffraction efficiency has been acheived with clear paths for further improvement. CAT gratings with sidewalls made of high-Z elements allow extension of blazing to higher energies and larger dispersion angles, enabling higher resolving power at shorter wavelengths. X-ray data from CAT gratings coated with a thin layer of platinum using atomic layer deposition demonstrate efficient blazing to higher energies and much larger blaze angles than possible with silicon alone. Measurements of the resolving power of a breadboard CAT grating spectrometer consisting of a Wolter-I slumped-glass focusing optic from GSFC and CAT gratings, taken at the MSFC Stray Light Facility, have demonstrated resolving power > 10,000. Thus currently fabricated CAT gratings are compatible

  10. 21 CFR 892.1700 - Diagnostic x-ray high voltage generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Diagnostic x-ray high voltage generator. 892.1700... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1700 Diagnostic x-ray high voltage generator. (a) Identification. A diagnostic x-ray high voltage generator is a device that is intended...

  11. High efficiency, multiterawatt x-ray free electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Emma

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present undulator magnet tapering methods for obtaining high efficiency and multiterawatt peak powers in x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs, a key requirement for enabling 3D atomic resolution single molecule imaging and nonlinear x-ray science. The peak power and efficiency of tapered XFELs is sensitive to time dependent effects, like synchrotron sideband growth. To analyze this dependence in detail we perform a comparative numerical optimization for the undulator magnetic field tapering profile including and intentionally disabling these effects. We show that the solution for the magnetic field taper profile obtained from time independent optimization does not yield the highest extraction efficiency when time dependent effects are included. Our comparative optimization is performed for a novel undulator designed specifically to obtain TW power x-ray pulses in the shortest distance: superconducting, helical, with short period and built-in strong focusing. This design reduces the length of the breaks between modules, decreasing diffraction effects, and allows using a stronger transverse electron focusing. Both effects reduce the gain length and the overall undulator length. We determine that after a fully time dependent optimization of a 100 m long Linac coherent light source-like XFEL we can obtain a maximum efficiency of 7%, corresponding to 3.7 TW peak radiation power. Possible methods to suppress the synchrotron sidebands, and further enhance the FEL peak power, up to about 6 TW by increasing the seed power and reducing the electron beam energy spread, are also discussed.

  12. L X-ray intensity ratios for high Z elements induced with X-ray tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xing; Xu, Zhongfeng; Zhang, Limin

    2015-07-01

    We have studied the intensity ratios I(Lα1,2)/I(Lβ1,2), I(Lα1,2)/I(Lγ) and I(Lβ1,2)/I(Lγ) for elements Ta, W, Au and Pb by 13.1 keV bremsstrahlung radiation. In this work, experimental values were compared with the theoretical results and other experimental results. Theoretical results of the intensity ratios were calculated with theoretical subshell photoionization cross sections, fractional X-ray emission rates, fluorescence yields, and Coster-Kronig transition probabilities. Good agreement can be observed between experimental values and theoretical results. Comparing with L1 and L2 subshells, the ionization cross section of L3 subshell shows a large increase for Ta and W with the variation of excitation energy from 59.5 keV to 13.1 keV.

  13. Active X-ray Optics for Generation-X, the Next High Resolution X-ray Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Elvis, M; Fabbiano, G; Schwartz, D A; Reid, P; Podgorski, W; Eisenhower, M; Juda, M; Phillips, J; Cohen, L; Wolk, S; Elvis, Martin

    2006-01-01

    X-rays provide one of the few bands through which we can study the epoch of reionization, when the first galaxies, black holes and stars were born. To reach the sensitivity required to image these first discrete objects in the universe needs a major advance in X-ray optics. Generation-X (Gen-X) is currently the only X-ray astronomy mission concept that addresses this goal. Gen-X aims to improve substantially on the Chandra angular resolution and to do so with substantially larger effective area. These two goals can only be met if a mirror technology can be developed that yields high angular resolution at much lower mass/unit area than the Chandra optics, matching that of Constellation-X (Con-X). We describe an approach to this goal based on active X-ray optics that correct the mid-frequency departures from an ideal Wolter optic on-orbit. We concentrate on the problems of sensing figure errors, calculating the corrections required, and applying those corrections. The time needed to make this in-flight calibrat...

  14. Characterization of ceramic archaeological by high resolution X ray microtomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machado, Alessandra C.; Freitas, Renato; Calza, Cristiane F.; Lopes, Ricardo T.; Lima, Inaya, E-mail: alecastro@lin.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear; Carvalho, Daniele D.; Gaspar, Maria D. [Museu Nacional (MN/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Centro de Tecnologia

    2013-07-01

    Characterization of ceramic fragments is a very important area of research in art and archeometry area because it enables a greater understanding of how ancient civilizations behave and what were their traditions and customs. Petrography and chemical analyses are commonly used, but these techniques are destructive, which is not interesting for this type of sample. Through the exchange of multidisciplinary scientific knowledge and new partnerships, high resolution X-ray microtomography has been introduced in archaeological area as a great possibility of 3D inspection in a non-destructive way. The goal of this work is to investigate the internal microstructures of four samples of archeological ceramic, from the Archaeological Site of Macacu - RJ. The X-ray microtomography were performed in a high resolution setup, and can be used to infer the nature of organic temper even with all plant remains completely burnt out during the firing process and also to ensure the homogeneity of samples envisaged for geochemical analyses, especially with respect to the distribution of chemically diverse fabric compounds. In this way this study intends to contribute to our understanding of the archaeological and historical formations of this region. (author)

  15. Workshop on high heat load x-ray optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    A workshop on High Heat Load X-Ray Optics'' was held at Argonne National Laboratory on August 3--5, 1989. The object of this workshop was to discuss recent advances in the art of cooling x-ray optics subject to high heat loads from synchrotron beams. The cooling of the first optical element in the intense photon beams that will be produced in the next generation of synchrotron sources is recognized as one of the major challenges that must be faced before one will be able to use these very intense beams in future synchrotron experiments. Considerable advances have been made in this art during the last few years, but much work remains to be done before the heating problem can be said to be completely solved. Special emphasis was placed on recent cooling experiments and detailed finite element'' and finite difference'' calculations comparing experiment with theory and extending theory to optimize performance.

  16. Increasing X-Ray Brightness of HBL Source 1ES 1727+650

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapanadze, Bidzina

    2017-02-01

    The nearby TeV-detected HBL object 1ES 1727+502 (1Zw 187, z=0.055) has been targeted 111 times by X-ray Telescope (XRT) onboard Swift since 2010 April 2. During this monitoring, the 0.3-10 keV count rate varied by a factor of 17.4 (see http://www.swift.psu.edu/monitoring/source.php?source=QSOB1727+502) and showed a prolonged X-ray flaring activity during 2015 March - 2016 February, revealed mainly via the Target of Opportunity observations performed in the framework of our request of different urgencies (Request Number 6571, 6606, 6717, 6809, 6927, 7322, 7355, 7379, 7390, 7404, 7430, 7441, 7516, 7565; see Kapanadze et al. 2015, Atel #8224, #7342).

  17. A Flaring X-ray Source with an Halpha-bright Counterpart toward the SMC

    CERN Document Server

    Laycock, Silas

    2008-01-01

    We report the discovery of a flaring X-ray source with an optical counterpart with Halpha emission and red-excess, in the direction of the SMC. A 100 ksec X-ray observation with Chandra detected a flare lasting 6 ksec in the source CXO J005428.9-723107. The X-ray spectrum during the flare was consistent with a thermal plasma of temperature kT=2.5 keV. In quiescence following the flare the spectrum was softer (kT= 0.4 keV). Timing analysis did not reveal any significant periodicities or QPOs. Optical images taken with the Magellan-Baade 6.5m telescope show a single star in the (0.9") error circle. This star has apparent magnitude V=19.17, exhibits enhanced Halpha emission (Halpha - r = -0.88), and has a large proper motion. Alternative explanations are explored, leading to identification as a relatively nearby (Galactic) coronally active star of the BY Draconis class.

  18. The Origin of Bright X-Ray Sources in Multiple Stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makarov, V V; Eggleton, P P

    2009-04-23

    Luminous X-ray stars are very often found in visual double or multiple stars. Binaries with periods of a few days possess the highest degree of coronal X-ray activity among regular, non-relativistic stars. But the orbital periods in visual double stars are too large for any direct interaction between the companions to take place. We suggest that most of the strongest X-ray components in resolved binaries are yet-undiscovered short-period binaries, and that a few are merged remnants of such binaries. The omnipresence of short-period active stars, e.g. of BY-Dra-type binaries, in multiple systems is explained via the dynamical evolution of triple stars with large mutual inclinations. The dynamical perturbation on the inner pair pumps up the eccentricity in a cyclic manner, a phenomenon known as Kozai cycling. At times of close periapsis, tidal friction reduces the angular momentum of the binary, causing it to shrink. When the orbital period of the inner pair drops to a few days, fast surface rotation of the companions is driven by tidal forces, boosting activity by a few orders of magnitude. If the period drops still further, a merger may take place leaving a rapidly-rotating active dwarf with only a distant companion.

  19. Accretion in supergiant High Mass X-ray Binaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manousakis Antonios

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Supergiant High Mass X-ray Binary systems (sgHMXBs consist of a massive, late type, star and a neutron star. The massive stars exhibits strong, radiatively driven, stellar winds. Wind accretion onto compact object triggers X-ray emission, which alters the stellar wind significantly. Hydrodynamic simulation has been used to study the neutron star - stellar wind interaction it two sgHMXBs: i A heavily obscured sgHMXB (IGR J17252–3616 discovered by INTEGRAL. To account for observable quantities (i.e., absorbing column density we have to assume a very slow wind terminal velocity of about 500 km/s and a rather massive neutron star. If confirmed in other obscured systems, this could provide a completely new stellar wind diagnostics. ii A classical sgHMXB (Vela X-1 has been studied in depth to understand the origin of the off-states observed in this system. Among many models used to account for this observed behavior (clumpy wind, gating mechanism we propose that self-organized criticality of the accretion stream is the likely reason for the observed behavior. In conclusion, the neutron star, in these two examples, acts very effciently as a probe to study stellar winds.

  20. HIGH-Z X-RAY AGN CLUSTERING & COSMOLOGICAL INFERENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Plionis

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the angular clustering of X-ray selected active galactic nuclei (AGN in di erent ux-limited sub- samples of the Chandra Deep Field North (CDF-N and South (CDF-S surveys. We nd a strong dependence of the clustering strength on the sub-sample ux-limit, a fact which explains most of the disparate clustering results of di erent XMM and Chandra surveys. At high ux-limits the clustering length increases considerably; for example, at fx;limit 1015 erg s-1 cm-2, we obtain r0 ' 17 5 and 18 3 h-1 Mpc, for the CDF-N and CDF-S, respectively. The ux-limit dependence translates into a luminosity dependent X-ray AGN clustering. Applying the standard formalism relating the theoretical CDM model clustering to the data in a at cosmology (for w =-1 and h = 0:72, we nd: m ' 0:28 0:03 and 8 ' 0:75 0:03; while utilizing also the SN Ia Hubble relation (for 8 = 0:75 and h = 0:72, we nd: m ' 0:26 0:04 and w = 0:9 0:1

  1. X-ray Diffraction Study of Arsenopyrite at High Pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D Fan; M Ma; W Zhou; S Wei; Z Chen; H Xie

    2011-12-31

    The high-pressure X-ray diffraction study of a natural arsenopyrite was investigated up to 28.2 GPa using in situ angle-dispersive X-ray diffraction and a diamond anvil cell at National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory. The 16:3:1 methanol-ethanol-water mixture was used as a pressure-transmitting medium. Pressures were measured using the ruby-fluorescence method. No phase change has been observed up to 28.2 GPa. The isothermal equation of state (EOS) was determined. The values of K{sub 0}, and K'{sub 0} refined with a third-order Birch-Murnaghan EOS are K{sub 0} = 123(9) GPa, and K'{sub 0} = 5.2(8). Furthermore, we confirm that the linear compressibilities ({beta}) along a, b and c directions of arsenopyrite is elastically isotropic ({beta}{sub a} = 6.82 x 10{sup -4}, {beta}{sub b} = 6.17 x 10{sup -4} and {beta}{sub c} = 6.57 x 10{sup -4} GPa{sup -1}).

  2. X-ray diffraction study of arsenopyrite at high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, D. W.; Ma, M. N.; Zhou, W. G.; Wei, S. Y.; Chen, Z. Q.; Xie, H. S.

    2011-02-01

    The high-pressure X-ray diffraction study of a natural arsenopyrite was investigated up to 28.2 GPa using in situ angle-dispersive X-ray diffraction and a diamond anvil cell at National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory. The 16:3:1 methanol-ethanol-water mixture was used as a pressure-transmitting medium. Pressures were measured using the ruby-fluorescence method. No phase change has been observed up to 28.2 GPa. The isothermal equation of state (EOS) was determined. The values of K 0, and K' 0 refined with a third-order Birch-Murnaghan EOS are K 0 = 123(9) GPa, and K' 0 = 5.2(8). Furthermore, we confirm that the linear compressibilities (β) along a, b and c directions of arsenopyrite is elastically isotropic (β a = 6.82 × 10-4, β b = 6.17 × 10-4 and β c = 6.57 × 10-4 GPa-1).

  3. Highly charged ion X-rays from Electron-Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources

    OpenAIRE

    Indelicato, Paul; Boucard, S.; Covita, D. S.; Gotta, D.; Gruber, A; Hirtl, A.; Fuhrmann, H.; Le Bigot, E.-O.; Schlesser, S.; dos Santos, J. M. F.; Simons, L.M.; Stingelin, L.; Trassinelli, Martino; Veloso, J.; Wasser, A.

    2006-01-01

    Radiation from the highly-charged ions contained in the plasma of Electron-Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources constitutes a very bright source of X-rays. Because the ions have a relatively low kinetic energy ($\\approx 1$~eV) transitions can be very narrow, containing only small Doppler broadening. We describe preliminary accurate measurements of two and three-electron ions with $Z=16$--18. We show how these measurement can test sensitively many-body relativistic calculations or can be used as X-...

  4. X-ray Surface Brightness Profiles of Active Galactic Nuclei in the Extended Groth Strip: Implications for AGN Feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Chatterjee, Suchetana; Jeltema, Tesla; Myers, Adam D; Aird, James; Coil, Alison L; Cooper, Michael; Finoguenov, Alexis; Laird, Elise; Montero-Dorta, Antonio; Nandra, Kripal; Willmer, Christopher; Yan, Renbin

    2013-01-01

    Using data from the All Wavelength Extended Groth Strip International Survey (AEGIS) we statistically detect the extended X-ray emission in the interstellar medium (ISM) in both active and normal galaxies at 0.3 < z < 1.3 at a scale of 40-60 kpc. We study the effect of feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) on the diffuse interstellar gas by comparing the stacked X-ray surface brightness profiles of active and normal galaxies in the same redshift range with identical properties in optical color--magnitude space. In accordance with theoretical studies we detect a slight deficit (< 1.5 \\sigma) of X-ray photons when averaged over a scale of 0-30 kpc in the profile of AGN host galaxies at 0.3 < z < 0.7. The equivalent flux deficit is (1.25 +/- 0.75) X 10^(-19) ergs/s/cm^(-2). When averaged over a scale of 30-60 kpc, beyond the PSF scales of our AGN sources, we observe a (~ 2 \\sigma) photon excess in the profile of the AGN host galaxies with an equivalent flux excess of (1.1 +/- 0.5) X 10^{-19} ...

  5. A High Precision, Optical Polarimeter to Measure Inclinations of High Mass X-Ray Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Wiktorowicz, Sloane J

    2008-01-01

    We present commissioning data for the POLISH instrument obtained on the Hale 5-m telescope. The goal of this high precision polarimeter is to constrain orbital inclination of high mass X-ray binaries and to therefore obtain independent mass estimates for their black hole companions. We have obtained photon shot noise limited precision on standard stars, and we have measured the polarization of bright stars at the part per million level on a nightly basis. Systematic effects have been reduced to less than 1% of the measured polarization for polarized sources and to the part per million level for weakly polarized sources. The high sensitivity of this instrument to asymmetry suggests that valuable contributions will be made in many other fields, including studies of extrasolar planets, debris disks, and stellar astrophysics.

  6. X-ray emission simulation from hollow atoms produced by high intensity laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moribayashi, Kengo; Sasaki, Akira; Zhidkov, A. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Kansai Research Establishment, Neyagawa, Osaka (Japan); Suto, Keiko [Nara Women' s Univ., Graduate School of Human Culture, Nara (Japan); Kagawa, Takashi [Nara Women' s Univ., Department of Physics, Nara (Japan)

    2001-10-01

    We theoretically study the x-ray emission from hollow atoms produced by collisions of multiply charged ions accelerated by a short pulse laser with a solid or foil. By using the multistep-capture-and-loss (MSCL) model a high conversion efficiency to x-rays in an ultrafast atomic process is obtained. It is also proposed to apply this x-ray emission process to the x-ray source. For a few keV x-rays this x-ray source has a clear advantage. The number of x-ray photons increases as the laser energy becomes larger. For a laser energy of 10 J, the number of x-ray photons of 3x10{sup 11} is estimated. (author)

  7. Fabricating High-Resolution X-Ray Collimators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby, Michael; Atkinson, James E.; Fraser, Iain; Klinger, Jill

    2008-01-01

    A process and method for fabricating multi-grid, high-resolution rotating modulation collimators for arcsecond and sub-arcsecond x-ray and gamma-ray imaging involves photochemical machining and precision stack lamination. The special fixturing and etching techniques that have been developed are used for the fabrication of multiple high-resolution grids on a single array substrate. This technology has application in solar and astrophysics and in a number of medical imaging applications including mammography, computed tomography (CT), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and gamma cameras used in nuclear medicine. This collimator improvement can also be used in non-destructive testing, hydrodynamic weapons testing, and microbeam radiation therapy.

  8. High pressure x-ray diffraction techniques with synchrotron radiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘景

    2016-01-01

    This article summarizes the developments of experimental techniques for high pressure x-ray diffraction (XRD) in diamond anvil cells (DACs) using synchrotron radiation. Basic principles and experimental methods for various diffraction geometry are described, including powder diffraction, single crystal diffraction, radial diffraction, as well as coupling with laser heating system. Resolution in d-spacing of different diffraction modes is discussed. More recent progress, such as extended application of single crystal diffraction for measurements of multigrain and electron density distribution, time-resolved diffraction with dynamic DAC and development of modulated heating techniques are briefl y introduced. The current status of the high pressure beamline at BSRF (Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility) and some results are also presented.

  9. Compact X-ray Source using a High Repetition Rate Laser and Copper Linac

    CERN Document Server

    Graves, W S; Brown, P; Carbajo, S; Dolgashev, V; Hong, K -H; Ihloff, E; Khaykovich, B; Lin, H; Murari, K; Nanni, E A; Resta, G; Tantawi, S; Zapata, L E; Kärtner, F X; Moncton, D E

    2014-01-01

    A design for a compact x-ray light source (CXLS) with flux and brilliance orders of magnitude beyond existing laboratory scale sources is presented. The source is based on inverse Compton scattering of a high brightness electron bunch on a picosecond laser pulse. The accelerator is a novel high-efficiency standing-wave linac and RF photoinjector powered by a single ultrastable RF transmitter at x-band RF frequency. The high efficiency permits operation at repetition rates up to 1 kHz, which is further boosted to 100 kHz by operating with trains of 100 bunches of 100 pC charge, each separated by 5 ns. The 100 kHz repetition rate is orders of magnitude beyond existing high brightness copper linacs. The entire accelerator is approximately 1 meter long and produces hard x-rays tunable over a wide range of photon energies. The colliding laser is a Yb:YAG solid-state amplifier producing 1030 nm, 100 mJ pulses at the same 1 kHz repetition rate as the accelerator. The laser pulse is frequency-doubled and stored for m...

  10. High energy X-ray phase and dark-field imaging using a random absorption mask

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongchang; Kashyap, Yogesh; Cai, Biao; Sawhney, Kawal

    2016-07-01

    High energy X-ray imaging has unique advantage over conventional X-ray imaging, since it enables higher penetration into materials with significantly reduced radiation damage. However, the absorption contrast in high energy region is considerably low due to the reduced X-ray absorption cross section for most materials. Even though the X-ray phase and dark-field imaging techniques can provide substantially increased contrast and complementary information, fabricating dedicated optics for high energies still remain a challenge. To address this issue, we present an alternative X-ray imaging approach to produce transmission, phase and scattering signals at high X-ray energies by using a random absorption mask. Importantly, in addition to the synchrotron radiation source, this approach has been demonstrated for practical imaging application with a laboratory-based microfocus X-ray source. This new imaging method could be potentially useful for studying thick samples or heavy materials for advanced research in materials science.

  11. High temperature x-ray micro-tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDowell, Alastair A., E-mail: aamacdowell@lbl.gov; Barnard, Harold; Parkinson, Dilworth Y.; Gludovatz, Bernd [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Haboub, Abdel [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); current –Lincoln Univ., Jefferson City, Missouri, 65101 (United States); Larson, Natalie; Zok, Frank [University California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara CA 93106 (United States); Panerai, Francesco; Mansour, Nagi N. [NASA Ames Research Centre, Moffett Field, CA, 94035 (United States); Bale, Hrishikesh [University California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); current - Carl Zeiss X-ray Microscopy, 4385 Hopyard Rd #100, Pleasanton, CA 94588 (United States); Acevedo, Claire [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); University California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143 (United States); Liu, Dong [University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TH (United Kingdom); Ritchie, Robert O. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); University California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2016-07-27

    There is increasing demand for 3D micro-scale time-resolved imaging of samples in realistic - and in many cases extreme environments. The data is used to understand material response, validate and refine computational models which, in turn, can be used to reduce development time for new materials and processes. Here we present the results of high temperature experiments carried out at the x-ray micro-tomography beamline 8.3.2 at the Advanced Light Source. The themes involve material failure and processing at temperatures up to 1750°C. The experimental configurations required to achieve the requisite conditions for imaging are described, with examples of ceramic matrix composites, spacecraft ablative heat shields and nuclear reactor core Gilsocarbon graphite.

  12. High temperature x-ray micro-tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDowell, Alastair A.; Barnard, Harold; Parkinson, Dilworth Y.; Haboub, Abdel; Larson, Natalie; Zok, Frank; Panerai, Francesco; Mansour, Nagi N.; Bale, Hrishikesh; Gludovatz, Bernd; Acevedo, Claire; Liu, Dong; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2016-07-01

    There is increasing demand for 3D micro-scale time-resolved imaging of samples in realistic - and in many cases extreme environments. The data is used to understand material response, validate and refine computational models which, in turn, can be used to reduce development time for new materials and processes. Here we present the results of high temperature experiments carried out at the x-ray micro-tomography beamline 8.3.2 at the Advanced Light Source. The themes involve material failure and processing at temperatures up to 1750°C. The experimental configurations required to achieve the requisite conditions for imaging are described, with examples of ceramic matrix composites, spacecraft ablative heat shields and nuclear reactor core Gilsocarbon graphite.

  13. The Soft X-ray Spectrum of the High Mass X-Ray Binary V0332+53 in Quiescence

    CERN Document Server

    Elshamouty, K; Chouinard, R

    2016-01-01

    The propeller effect should cut off accretion in fast-spinning neutron star high mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) at low mass transfer rates. However, accretion continues in some HMXBs at $L_{x} < 10^{34}$ erg s$^{-1}$, as evidenced by continuing pulsations. Indications of spectral softening in systems in the propeller regime suggest that some HMXBs are undergoing fundamental changes in their accretion regime. A 39 ks \\textit{XMM-Newton} observation of the transient HMXB V0332+53 found it at a very low X-ray luminosity ($L_{x} \\sim 4\\times 10^{32}$ erg s${^{-1}}$). A power-law spectral fit requires an unusually soft spectral index ($4.4^{+0.9}_{-0.6}$), while a magnetized neutron star atmosphere model, with temperature \\lt\\ 6.7$\\pm 0.2$ K and inferred emitting radius of $\\sim0.2-0.3$ km, gives a good fit. We suggest that the quiescent X-ray emission from V0332+53 is mainly from a hot spot on the surface of the neutron star. We could not detect pulsations from V0332+53, due to the low count rate. Due to the high...

  14. Copper L X-ray spectra measured by a high resolution ion-induced X-ray spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Ryohei; Hamaguchi, Dai; Kageyama, Hiroyoshi [Kyoto Inst. of Tech. (Japan)] [and others

    1997-03-01

    High resolution L X-ray emission spectra of Cu have been measured by 0.75 MeV/u H, He, and F, 0.73 MeV/u Ar, 0.64 MeV/u Si, and 0.073 MeV/u Si ion impacts with a crystal spectrometer. The X-ray transition energies in the Cu target for L{iota}, L{eta}, L{alpha}{sub 1,2}, L{beta}{sub 1}, and L{beta}{sub 3,4} diagram lines induced by light ion impacts are determined, which are in good agreement with those given in the reference. The difference in L X-ray emission spectra produced by H, He, F, Si, and Ar ions are considered and the L{alpha}{sub 1,2} and L{beta}{sub 1} emission spectra are compared with the calculated ones based on the multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock method. (author)

  15. Comprehensive monitoring of gamma-ray bright blazars. I. Statistical study of optical, X-ray, and gamma-ray spectral slopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williamson, Karen E.; Jorstad, Svetlana G.; Marscher, Alan P.; Agudo, Iván; Joshi, Manasvita; Malmrose, Michael P. [Institute for Astrophysical Research, Boston University, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Larionov, Valeri M.; Blinov, Dmitry A.; Efimova, Natalia V.; Hagen-Thorn, Vladimir A.; Konstantinova, Tatiana S.; Kopatskaya, Evgenia N.; Larionova, Elena G.; Larionova, Liudmilla V. [Astronomical Institute, St. Petersburg State University, Universitetskij Pr. 28, Petrodvorets, 198504 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Smith, Paul S. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721-0065 (United States); Arkharov, Arkady A. [Main (Pulkovo) Astronomical Observatory of RAS, Pulkovskoye shosse 60, 196140 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Casadio, Carolina; Gómez, José L.; Molina, Sol N. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía, CSIC, Apartado 3004, E-18080 Granada (Spain); McHardy, Ian M., E-mail: kwilliam@bu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); and others

    2014-07-10

    We present γ-ray, X-ray, ultraviolet, optical, and near-infrared light curves of 33 γ-ray bright blazars over 4 years that we have been monitoring since 2008 August with multiple optical, ground-based telescopes and the Swift satellite, and augmented by data from the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope and other publicly available data from Swift. The sample consists of 21 flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) and 12 BL Lac objects (BL Lacs). We identify quiescent and active states of the sources based on their γ-ray behavior. We derive γ-ray, X-ray, and optical spectral indices, α{sub γ}, α{sub X}, and α{sub o}, respectively (F{sub ν}∝ν{sup α}), and construct spectral energy distributions during quiescent and active states. We analyze the relationships between different spectral indices, blazar classes, and activity states. We find (1) significantly steeper γ-ray spectra of FSRQs than for BL Lacs during quiescent states, but a flattening of the spectra for FSRQs during active states while the BL Lacs show no significant change; (2) a small difference of α{sub X} within each class between states, with BL Lac X-ray spectra significantly steeper than in FSRQs; (3) a highly peaked distribution of X-ray spectral slopes of FSRQs at ∼ –0.60, but a very broad distribution of α{sub X} of BL Lacs during active states; (4) flattening of the optical spectra of FSRQs during quiescent states, but no statistically significant change of α{sub o} of BL Lacs between states; and (5) a positive correlation between optical and γ-ray spectral slopes of BL Lacs, with similar values of the slopes. We discuss the findings with respect to the relative prominence of different components of high-energy and optical emission as the flux state changes.

  16. Soft X-ray Variability of the Bright Quasar 3C273

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chulhee Kim

    2001-12-01

    We present the results from ROSAT observations of 3C273 in the soft X-ray band. The light variation of 3C273 was investigated for three different energy bands of soft, medium, and hard. The maximum variability with a factor of 2 for 551 dayswas confirmed at all three different bands. This appears to be a periodic variation within the period of roughly 6 months. However, the short-term or micro variation was not so distinct and the light variation of each band did not show any correlation between them. The hardness ratio for hard and soft bands shows irregular variation but there was no correlation between them. There is no distinct variation of the photon index in the case of simple power law model fitting. For power law + free absorption model fitting, the average photon index () is 2.08.

  17. High Resolution Adjustable Mirror Control for X-ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trolier-McKinstry, Susan

    The goal of the proposed program is to enable increased angular resolution and collection areas for future major X-ray observatories by incorporating control of the mirror surfaces after fab-rication and mounting. We propose to develop and implement a method for preparing adjustable optics with integrated control elements on curved mirror segments for future X-ray space telescopes. Development of such mirror elements will provide a major advance to the field of X-ray astronomy, by enabling mirrors with half an arcsecond angular resolution using thin, lightweight glass to significantly increase the collection area. This is an enabling technology for mission concepts such as the X-ray Surveyor. This proposal supports NASA's goals of technical advancement of technologies suitable for future missions, and training of graduate students.

  18. High-Definition X-Ray Fluorescence: Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Gibson, Walter M.; Chen, Z W; Li, Danhong

    2008-01-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) is a well-established and powerful tool for nondestructive elemental analysis of virtually any material. It is widely used for environmental, industrial, pharmaceutical, forensic, and scientific research applications to measure the concentration of elemental constituents or contaminants. The fluorescing atoms can be excited by energetic electrons, ions, or photons. A particular EDXRF method, monochromatic microbeam X-ray fluorescence (MμEDXRF), has...

  19. High Definition X-Ray Fluorescence: Principles and Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Z W; Gibson, Walter M.; Huang, Huapeng

    2008-01-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) is a well-established and powerful tool for nondestructive elemental analysis of virtually any material. It is widely used for environmental, industrial, pharmaceutical, forensic, and scientific research applications to measure the concentration of elemental constituents or contaminants. The fluorescing atoms can be excited by energetic electrons, ions, or photons. A particular EDXRF method, monochromatic microfocus X-ray fluorescence (MμEDXRF), ha...

  20. The BeppoSAX High Energy Large Area Survey. IV. On the soft X-ray properties of the hard X-ray-selected HELLAS sources

    CERN Document Server

    Vignali, C; Fiore, F; La Franca, F

    2001-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the soft X-ray properties of the BeppoSAX High-Energy Large Area Survey (HELLAS) sources. A large fraction (about 2/3) of the hard X-ray selected sources is detected by ROSAT. The soft X-ray colors for many of these objects, along with the 0.5-2 keV flux upper limits for those undetected in the ROSAT band, do imply the presence of absorption. The comparison with the ROSAT Deep Survey sources indicates that a larger fraction of absorbed objects among the HELLAS sources is present, in agreement with their hard X-ray selection and the predictions of the X-ray background synthesis models. Another striking result is the presence of a soft (additional) X-ray component in a significant fraction of absorbed objects.

  1. Review - X-ray diffraction measurements in high magnetic fields and at high temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshifuru Mitsui, Keiichi Koyama and Kazuo Watanabe

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A system was developed measuring x-ray powder diffraction in high magnetic fields up to 5 T and at temperatures from 283 to 473 K. The stability of the temperature is within 1 K over 6 h. In order to examine the ability of the system, the high-field x-ray diffraction measurements were carried out for Si and a Ni-based ferromagnetic shape-memory alloy. The results show that the x-ray powder diffraction measurements in high magnetic fields and at high temperatures are useful for materials research.

  2. A new X-ray pinhole camera for energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence imaging with high-energy and high-spatial resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romano, F.P., E-mail: romanop@lns.infn.it [IBAM, CNR, Via Biblioteca 4, 95124 Catania (Italy); INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Altana, C. [INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Cosentino, L.; Celona, L.; Gammino, S.; Mascali, D. [INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Pappalardo, L. [IBAM, CNR, Via Biblioteca 4, 95124 Catania (Italy); INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Rizzo, F. [INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy)

    2013-08-01

    A new X-ray pinhole camera for the Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (ED-XRF) imaging of materials with high-energy and high-spatial resolution, was designed and developed. It consists of a back-illuminated and deep depleted CCD detector (composed of 1024 × 1024 pixels with a lateral size of 13 μm) coupled to a 70 μm laser-drilled pinhole-collimator, positioned between the sample under analysis and the CCD. The X-ray pinhole camera works in a coaxial geometry allowing a wide range of magnification values. The characteristic X-ray fluorescence is induced on the samples by irradiation with an external X-ray tube working at a maximum power of 100 W (50 kV and 2 mA operating conditions). The spectroscopic capabilities of the X-ray pinhole camera were accurately investigated. Energy response and energy calibration of the CCD detector were determined by irradiating pure target-materials emitting characteristic X-rays in the energy working-domain of the system (between 3 keV and 30 keV). Measurements were performed by using a multi-frame acquisition in single-photon counting. The characteristic X-ray spectra were obtained by an automated processing of the acquired images. The energy resolution measured at the Fe–Kα line is 157 eV. The use of the X-ray pinhole camera for the 2D resolved elemental analysis was investigated by using reference-patterns of different materials and geometries. The possibility of the elemental mapping of samples up to an area of 3 × 3 cm{sup 2} was demonstrated. Finally, the spatial resolution of the pinhole camera was measured by analyzing the profile function of a sharp-edge. The spatial resolution determined at the magnification values of 3.2 × and 0.8 × (used as testing values) is about 90 μm and 190 μm respectively. - Highlights: • We developed an X-ray pinhole camera for the 2D X-ray fluorescence imaging. • X-ray spectra are obtained by a multi-frame acquisition in single photon mode. • The energy resolution in the X-ray

  3. On the Nature of X-ray Surface Brightness Fluctuations in M87

    CERN Document Server

    Arévalo, P; Zhuravleva, I; Forman, W R; Jones, C

    2015-01-01

    X-ray images of galaxy clusters and gas-rich elliptical galaxies show a wealth of small-scale features which reflect fluctuations in density and/or temperature of the intra-cluster medium. In this paper we study these fluctuations in M87/Virgo, to establish whether sound waves/shocks, bubbles or uplifted cold gas dominate the structure. We exploit the strong dependence of the emissivity on density and temperature in different energy bands to distinguish between these processes. Using simulations we demonstrate that our analysis recovers the leading type of fluctuation even in the presence of projection effects and temperature gradients. We confirm the isobaric nature of cool filaments of gas entrained by buoyantly rising bubbles, extending to 7' to the east and south-west, and the adiabatic nature of the weak shocks at 40" and 3' from the center. For features of 5--10 kpc, we show that the central 4'x 4' region is dominated by cool structures in pressure equilibrium with the ambient hotter gas while up to 30 ...

  4. A Search for Discrete X-Ray Spectral Features in a Sample of Bright Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sako, M

    2004-09-09

    We present uniform, detailed spectral analyses of gamma-ray burst (GRB) X-ray afterglows observed with ASCA, Beppo-SAX, Chandra, and XMM-Newton, and critically evaluate the statistical significances of X-ray emission and absorption features in these spectra. The sample consists of 21 X-ray afterglow observations up to and including that of GRB040106 with spectra of sufficient statistical quality to allow meaningful line searches, chosen here somewhat arbitrarily to be detections with more than 100 total (source plus background) counts. This sample includes all nine X-ray afterglows with published claims of line detections. Moderate resolution spectra are available for 16 of the 21 sources, and for the remaining five the Chandra transmission grating spectrometers obtained high-resolution data. All of the data are available from the public archive. We test a simple hypothesis in which the observed spectra are produced by a power-law continuum model modified by photoelectric absorption by neutral material both in our Galaxy and possibly also local to the burst. As a sample, these afterglow spectra are consistent with this relatively simple model. However, since the {chi}{sup 2} statistic is not sensitive to weak and/or localized fluctuations, we have performed Monte Carlo simulations to search for discrete features and to estimate their significances. Our analysis shows that there are four afterglows (GRB011211, GRB030227, GRB021004, and GRB040106) with line-like features that are significant at the 3 {sigma} level. We cautiously note that, in two cases, the features are associated with an unusual background feature; in the other two, the fractional magnitudes of the lines are small, and comparable to the expected level of systematic uncertainty in the spectral response. In addition, none of the statistically significant features are seen in more than one detector or spectral order where available. We conclude that, to date, no credible X-ray line feature has been

  5. High pressure x-ray diffraction techniques with synchrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Liu

    2016-07-01

    This article summarizes the developments of experimental techniques for high pressure x-ray diffraction (XRD) in diamond anvil cells (DACs) using synchrotron radiation. Basic principles and experimental methods for various diffraction geometry are described, including powder diffraction, single crystal diffraction, radial diffraction, as well as coupling with laser heating system. Resolution in d-spacing of different diffraction modes is discussed. More recent progress, such as extended application of single crystal diffraction for measurements of multigrain and electron density distribution, time-resolved diffraction with dynamic DAC and development of modulated heating techniques are briefly introduced. The current status of the high pressure beamline at BSRF (Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility) and some results are also presented. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 10875142, 11079040, and 11075175). The 4W2 beamline of BSRF was supported by the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant Nos. KJCX2-SW-N20, KJCX2-SW-N03, and SYGNS04).

  6. High Spectral Resolution, High Cadence, Imaging X-ray Microcalorimeters for Solar Physics - Phase 2 Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Microcalorimeter x-ray instruments are non-dispersive, high spectral resolution, broad-band, high cadence imaging spectrometers. We have been developing these...

  7. Fundamental properties of High-Mass X-ray Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    González-Galán, A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this PhD Thesis is to characterize a representative sample of Supergiant X-ray Binaries (SGXBs) formed by 4 sources: XTE J1855-026, a classical SGXB with long-term stable X-ray flux; AX J1841.0-0535 and AX J1845.0-0433, two supergiant fast X-ray transients (SFXTs) with the X-ray emission mostly dominated by flaring; and IGR J00370+6122, something in between these 2 sub-groups. The physical processes that produce these observable differences are still a matter of debate. In this PhD Thesis I performed a study of these 4 different systems to provide new data to constrain the models. This study consists of:(i) the determination of the orbital solution,(ii) a systematic study of the wind behavior along the orbit by the measure of Halpha variations,(iii) a model of stellar atmospheres of the donor star,(iv) establish whether there are X-ray flux variations modulated by the orbital period. The study of the wind shows that Halpha variations are dominated by intrinsic wind processes. The stellar atmosphere...

  8. ON THE NATURE OF X-RAY SURFACE BRIGHTNESS FLUCTUATIONS IN M87

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arévalo, P. [Instituto de Física y Astronomía, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Valparaíso, Gran Bretana N 1111, Playa Ancha, Valparaíso (Chile); Churazov, E. [Max-Planck-Institut für Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 1, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Zhuravleva, I. [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford University, 452 Lomita Mall, Stanford, CA 94305-4085 (United States); Forman, W. R.; Jones, C. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2016-02-10

    X-ray images of galaxy clusters and gas-rich elliptical galaxies show a wealth of small-scale features that reflect fluctuations in density and/or temperature of the intracluster medium. In this paper we study these fluctuations in M87/Virgo to establish whether sound waves/shocks, bubbles, or uplifted cold gas dominate the structure. We exploit the strong dependence of the emissivity on density and temperature in different energy bands to distinguish between these processes. Using simulations we demonstrate that our analysis recovers the leading type of fluctuation even in the presence of projection effects and temperature gradients. We confirm the isobaric nature of cool filaments of gas entrained by buoyantly rising bubbles, extending to 7′ to the east and southwest, and the adiabatic nature of the weak shocks at 40″ and 3′ from the center. For features of ∼5–10 kpc, we show that the central 4′ × 4′ region is dominated by cool structures in pressure equilibrium with the ambient hotter gas while up to 30% of the variance in this region can be ascribed to adiabatic fluctuations. The remaining part of the central 14′ × 14′ region, excluding the arms and shocks described above, is dominated by apparently isothermal fluctuations (bubbles) with a possible admixture (at the level of ∼30%) of adiabatic (sound waves) and by isobaric structures. Larger features, of about 30 kpc, show a stronger contribution from isobaric fluctuations. The results broadly agree with a model based on feedback from an active galactic nucleus mediated by bubbles of relativistic plasma.

  9. High-resolution spectroscopy and high-density monitoring in X-rays of Novae

    CERN Document Server

    Ness, Jan-Uwe

    2012-01-01

    The 21st century X-ray observatories XMM-Newton, Chandra, and Swift gave us completely new insights into the X-ray behaviour of nova outbursts. These new-generation X-ray observatories provide particularly high spectral resolution and high density in monitoring campaigns, simultaneously in X-rays and UV/optical. The entire evolution of several nova outbursts has been observed with the Swift XRT and UVOT instruments, allowing studies of the gradual shift of the peak of the SED from UV to X-rays, time scales to the onset and duration of the X-ray brightest supersoft source (SSS) phase, and pre- and post-SSS X-ray emission. In addition, XMM-Newton and Chandra observations can efficiently be scheduled, allowing deeper studies of strategically chosen evolutionary stages. Before Swift joined in 2005, Chandra and XMM-Newton blind shots in search of SSS emission unavoidably led to some underexposed observations taken before and/or after the SSS phase. More systematic Swift studies reduced this number while increasing...

  10. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy: the coming-of-age

    CERN Document Server

    Kaastra, J S

    2016-01-01

    Since the launch of Chandra and XMM-Newton, high-resolution X-ray spectra of cosmic sources of all kinds have become available. These spectra have resulted in major scientific breakthroughs. However, due to the techniques used, in general high-quality spectra can only be obtained for the brightest few sources of each class. Moreover, except for the most compact extended sources, like cool core clusters, grating spectra are limited to point sources. Hitomi made another major step forward, in yielding for the first time a high-quality spectrum of an extended source, and improved spectral sensitivity in the Fe-K band. For point sources with the proposed Arcus mission, and for all sources with the launch of Athena, X-ray spectroscopy will become mature. It allows us to extend the investigations from the few handful of brightest sources of each category to a large number of sources far away in space and time, or to get high time-resolution, high-spectral resolution spectra of bright time variable sources.

  11. Note: High-pressure in situ x-ray laminography using diamond anvil cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nomura, Ryuichi, E-mail: nomura@sci.ehime-u.ac.jp [Earth-Life Science Institute, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Uesugi, Kentaro [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI/SPring-8), 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

    2016-04-15

    A high-pressure in situ X-ray laminography technique was developed using a newly designed, laterally open diamond anvil cell. A low X-ray beam of 8 keV energy was used, aiming at future application to dual energy X-ray chemical imaging techniques. The effects of the inclination angle and the imaging angle range were evaluated at ambient pressure using the apparatus. Sectional images of ruby ball samples were successfully reconstructed at high pressures, up to approximately 50 GPa. The high-pressure in situ X-ray laminography technique is expected to provide new insights into the deep Earth sciences.

  12. Note: High-pressure in situ x-ray laminography using diamond anvil cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Ryuichi; Uesugi, Kentaro

    2016-04-01

    A high-pressure in situ X-ray laminography technique was developed using a newly designed, laterally open diamond anvil cell. A low X-ray beam of 8 keV energy was used, aiming at future application to dual energy X-ray chemical imaging techniques. The effects of the inclination angle and the imaging angle range were evaluated at ambient pressure using the apparatus. Sectional images of ruby ball samples were successfully reconstructed at high pressures, up to approximately 50 GPa. The high-pressure in situ X-ray laminography technique is expected to provide new insights into the deep Earth sciences.

  13. Amorphous silica studied by high energy x-ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, H.F.; Neuefeind, J.; Neumann, H.B.

    1995-01-01

    The use of hard X-rays (60-300 keV) for diffraction studies of disordered materials has several advantages: higher resolution in direct space, smaller correction terms, removal of truncation effects, the possibility for operating in extreme environments and for direct comparison between X-ray.......3(3)degrees with a rms value of 4.2(3)degrees. For the Si-O-Si bond angle, several types of distribution V(alpha) = V-1(alpha) sin(alpha) were investigated. Best fits were obtained for rather broad distributions with V having its maximum at 147 degrees and V-1 at 180 degrees....

  14. Topics in High-Energy Astrophysics: X-ray Time Lags and Gamma-ray Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroon, John J.

    The Universe is host to a wide variety of high-energy processes that convert gravitational potential energy or rest-mass energy into non-thermal radiation such as bremsstrahlung and synchrotron. Prevailing models of X-ray emission from accreting Black Hole Binaries (BHBs) struggle to simultaneously fit the quiescent X-ray spectrum and the transients which result in the phenomenon known as X-ray time lags. And similarly, classical models of diffusive shock acceleration in pulsar wind nebulae fail to explain the extreme particle acceleration in very short timescales as is inferred from recent gamma-ray flares from the Crab nebula. In this dissertation, I develop new exact analytic models to shed light on these intriguing processes. I take a fresh look at the formation of X-ray time lags in compact sources using a new mathematical approach in which I obtain the exact Green's function solution. The resulting Green's function allows one to explore a variety of injection scenarios, including both monochromatic and broadband (bremsstrahlung) seed photon injection. I obtain the exact solution for the dependence of the time lags on the Fourier frequency, for both homogeneous and inhomogeneous clouds. The model can successfully reproduce both the observed time lags and the quiescent X-ray spectrum using a single set of coronal parameters. I show that the implied coronal radii in the new model are significantly smaller than those obtained in the Monte Carlo simulations, hence greatly reducing the coronal heating problem. Recent bright gamma-ray flares from the Crab nebula observed by AGILE and Fermi reaching GeV energies and lasting several days challenge the contemporary model for particle acceleration in pulsar wind nebulae, specifically the diffusive shock acceleration model. Simulations indicate electron/positron pairs in the Crab nebula pulsar wind must be accelerated up to PeV energies in the presence of ambient magnetic fields with strength B ~100 microG. No

  15. Next Generation Astronomical X-ray Optics: High Angular Resolution, Light Weight, and Low Production Cost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang. W. W.; Biskach, M. P.; Blake, P. N.; Chan, K. W.; Gaskin, J. A.; Hong, M. L.; Jones, W. D.; Kolos, L. D.; Mazzarella, J. R.; McClelland, R. S.; O'Dell, S. L.; Saha, T. T.; Sharpe, M. V.

    2012-01-01

    X-ray astronomy depends on the availability of telescopes with high resolution and large photon collecting areas. Since x-ray observation can only be carried out above the atmosphere, these telescopes must be necessarily lightweight. Compounding the lightweight requirement is that an x-ray telescope consists of many nested concentric shells, which further require that x-ray mirrors must also be geometrically thin to achieve high packing efficiency. This double lightweight and geometrically thin requirement poses significant technical challenges in fabricating the mirrors and in integrating them into mirror assemblies. This paper reports on the approach, strategy and status of our x-ray optics development program whose objective is to meet these technical challenges at modest cost to enable future x-ray missions, including small Explorer missions in the near term, probe class missions in the medium term, and large flagship missions in the long term.

  16. Applications of soft x-ray lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skinner, C.H.

    1993-08-01

    The high brightness and short pulse duration of soft x-ray lasers provide unique advantages for novel applications. Imaging of biological specimens using x-ray lasers has been demonstrated by several groups. Other applications to fields such as chemistry, material science, plasma diagnostics, and lithography are beginning to emerge. We review the current status of soft x-ray lasers from the perspective of applications, and present an overview of the applications currently being developed.

  17. High-resolution X-ray imaging in fast ignition experiment using Gekko and LFEX lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koga M.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We improved diagnostic instruments to measure X-ray images in a hard X-ray harsh environment and succeeded in obtaining clear images with X-ray framing camera and X-ray streak camera in fast ignition experiment conducted in 2011 (FG-02 Experimental Campaign. We found that high-energy X-ray signals could be used as an indicator of the LFEX laser injection time relative to the imploded core. The LFEX laser injection time was estimated with better than 10 ps accuracy. Time-resolved 2D X-ray images suggested that shapes and motions of imploded core plasmas were improved by changing the configuration of the implosion lasers.

  18. The First High Resolution X-ray Spectrum of Cyg X-1 Soft X-Ray Ionization and Absorption

    CERN Document Server

    Schulz, N S; Canizares, C R; Marshall, H L; Lee, J C; Miller, J M; Lewin, W H G

    2002-01-01

    We observed the black hole candidate Cyg X-1 for 15 ks with the High-Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer aboard the CHANDRA X-ray Observatory. The source was observed during a period of intense flaring activity, so it was about a factor of 2.5 brighter than usual, with a 0.5-10 keV (1-24 A) luminosity of 1.6x10^37 erg/s (at a distance of 2.5 kpc). The spectrum of the source shows prominent absorption edges, some of which have complicated substructure. We use the most recent results from laboratory measurements and and calculations to model the observed substructure of the edges. From the model, we derive a total absorption column of 6.21+/-0.22 10^21 cm^-2. Furthermore, the results indicate that there are ~ 10 - 25% abundance variations relative to solar values for neon, oxygen and iron. The X-ray continuuum is described well by a two-component model that is often adopted for black hole candidates: a soft multicolor disk component (with kT = 203 eV) and a hard power law component (with a photon index of ...

  19. SOFT X-RAY FEL BY CASCADING STAGES OF HIGH GAIN HARMONIC GENERATION.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    YU,L.H.

    2003-04-17

    Short wavelength Free-Electron Lasers are perceived as the next generation of synchrotron light sources. In the past decade, significant advances have been made in the theory and technology of high brightness electron beams and single pass FELs. These developments facilitate the construction of practical VUV FELs and make x-ray FELs possible. Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) and High Gain Harmonic Generation (HGHG)[17-19] are the two leading candidates for x-ray FELs. The first lasing of HGHG proof-of-principle experiment succeeded in August, 1999 in Brookhaven National Laboratory. The experimental results agree with the theory prediction. Compared with SASE FEL, the following advantages of HGHG FEL were confirmed; (1) Better longitudinal coherence, and hence, much narrower bandwidth than SASE. (2) More stable central wavelength, (3) More stable output energy. In this introduction, we will first briefly describe the principle of HGHG in Section A. Then in Section B, we give a general description about how to produce soft x-ray by cascading HGHG scheme. In section 2, we give a detailed description of the system design. Then, in section 3, we give a description of an analytical estimate for the HGHG process, and the calculation of the parameters of different parts of the system. The estimate is found to agree with simulation within about a factor 2 for most cases we studied. The stability issue, the sensitivity to parameter variation, the harmonic contents of the final output, and the noise degradation issue of such HGHG scheme are discussed in Section 4. The results are presented in Section 4. Finally, in Section 5, we will give some discussion of the challenges in development of the system. The conclusion is given in Section 6.

  20. Modelling the energy dependencies of high-frequency QPO in black hole X-ray binaries

    OpenAIRE

    Zycki, P. T.; A. Niedzwiecki(University of Lodz, Poland); Sobolewska, M. A.

    2007-01-01

    We model energy dependencies of the quasi periodic oscillations (QPO) in the model of disc epicyclic motions, with X-ray modulation caused by varying relativistic effects. The model was proposed to explain the high frequency QPO observed in X-ray binaries. We consider two specific scenarios for the geometry of accretion flow and spectral formation. Firstly, a standard cold accretion disc with an active X-ray emitting corona is assumed to oscillate. Secondly, only a hot X-ray emitting accretio...

  1. X-ray spectra induced in highly charged 40Arq+ interacting with Au surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    By use of optical spectrum technology, the spectra of X-ray induced by highly charged 40Arq+ ions interacting with Au surface have been studied. The results show that the argon Kα X-ray were emitted from the hollow atoms formed below the surface. There is a process of multi-electron exciting in neutralization of the Ar16+ion, with electronic configuration 1s2 in its ground state below the solid surface. The yield of the projectile Kα X-ray is related to its initial electronic configuration, and the yield of the target X-ray is related to the projectile kinetic energy.

  2. Ultraprecision motion control technique for high-resolution x-ray instrumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shu, D.; Toellner, T. S.; Alp, E. E.

    2000-07-17

    With the availability of third-generation hard x-ray synchrotron radiation sources, such as the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory, x-ray inelastic scattering and x-ray nuclear resonant scattering provide powerful means for investigating the vibrational dynamics of a variety of materials and condensed matter systems. Novel high-resolution hard x-ray optics with meV energy resolution requires a compact positioning mechanism with 20--50-nrad angular resolution and stability. In this paper, the authors technical approach to this design challenge is presented. Sensitivity and stability test results are also discussed.

  3. Optomechanical design of a high-precision detector robot arm system for x-ray nano-diffraction with x-ray nanoprobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, D.; Kalbfleisch, S.; Kearney, S.; Anton, J.; Chu, Y. S.

    2014-03-01

    Collaboration between Argonne National Laboratory and Brookhaven National Laboratory has created a design for the high-precision detector robot arm system that will be used in the x-ray nano-diffraction experimental station at the Hard X-ray Nanoprobe (HXN) beamline for the NSLS-II project. The robot arm system is designed for positioning and manipulating an x-ray detector in three-dimensional space for nano-diffraction data acquisition with the HXN x-ray microscope. It consists of the following major component groups: a granite base with air-bearing support, a 2-D horizontal base stage, a vertical axis goniometer, a 2-D vertical plane robot arm, a 3-D fast scanning stages group, and a 2-D x-ray pixel detector. The design specifications and unique optomechanical structure of this novel high-precision detector robot arm system will be presented in this paper.

  4. Project Title: Radiochemical Analysis by High Sensitivity Dual-Optic Micro X-ray Fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Havrilla, George J.; Gao, Ning

    2003-06-01

    A novel dual-optic micro X-ray fluorescence instrument will be developed to do radiochemical analysis of high-level radioactive wastes at DOE sites such as Savannah River Site and Hanford. This concept incorporates new X-ray optical elements such as monolithic polycapillaries, which focus X-rays. The polycapillary optic can be used to focus X-rays emitted by the X-ray tube thereby increasing the X-ray flux on the sample over 1000 times. The polycapillary optic will also be used to collect the X-rays from the excitation site. This will effectively screen the radiation background from the radioactive species in the specimen. This dual-optic approach significantly reduces the background and increases the analyte signal thereby increasing the sensitivity of the analysis. This dual-capillary design is essentially a confocal (having the same foci) design, i.e. the detected X-rays are only emitted from the overlap of the two focal spots. This increases spatial resolution and reduce s background. The integration of the X-ray optics increases the signal-to-noise and thereby increases the sensitivity of the analysis for low-level analytes. This work will address a key need for radiochemical analysis of high-level waste using a non-destructive, multi-element, and rapid method in a radiation environment. There is significant potential that this instrumentation could be capable of on-line analysis for process waste stream characterization at DOE sites.

  5. Radiochemical Analysis by High Sensitivity Dual-Optic Micro X-ray Fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Havrilla, George J.; Gao, Ning

    2004-06-01

    A novel dual-optic micro X-ray fluorescence instrument will be developed to do radiochemical analysis of high-level radioactive wastes at DOE sites such as Savannah River Site and Hanford. This concept incorporates new X-ray optical elements such as monolithic polycapillaries, which focus X-rays. The polycapillary optic can be used to focus X-rays emitted by the X-ray tube thereby increasing the X-ray flux on the sample over 1000 times. The polycapillary optic will also be used to collect the X-rays from the excitation site. This will effectively screen the radiation background from the radioactive species in the specimen. This dual-optic approach significantly reduces the background and increases the analyte signal thereby increasing the sensitivity of the analysis. This dual-capillary design is essentially a confocal (having the same foci) design, i.e. the detected X-rays are only emitted from the overlap of the two focal spots. This increases spatial resolution and reduces background. The integration of the X-ray optics increases the signal-to-noise and thereby increases the sensitivity of the analysis for low-level analytes. This work will address a key need for radiochemical analysis of high-level waste using a non-destructive, multi-element, and rapid method in a radiation environment. There is significant potential that this instrumentation could be capable of on-line analysis for process waste stream characterization at DOE sites.

  6. High-resolution x-ray studies of an AXAF high-energy transmission grating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdali, S.; Christensen, Finn Erland; Schnopper, H. W.

    1993-01-01

    A triple axis X-ray diffractometer, designed and built at the Danish Space Research Institute, was used to make a high resolution study of the performance of a 2000 angstroms period, high energy X-ray transmission grating developed at MIT for one of the grating spectrometers on the Advanced X-ray...... Astrophysics Facility. Data was obtained at CuK(alpha )1 (8.048 keV) and, using single reflection asymmetric Si(044) crystals for both the monochromator and analyzer, an angular resolution of 1.5 arcsec FWHM was achieved. The efficiency of the grating in all orders up to the 15th was measured using a 12 k......W rotating anode X-ray generator. These data provided the basis for a modelling of the grating structure....

  7. High-resolution x-ray studies of an AXAF high-energy transmission grating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdali, S.; Christensen, Finn Erland; Schnopper, H. W.

    1993-01-01

    A triple axis X-ray diffractometer, designed and built at the Danish Space Research Institute, was used to make a high resolution study of the performance of a 2000 angstroms period, high energy X-ray transmission grating developed at MIT for one of the grating spectrometers on the Advanced X-ray...... Astrophysics Facility. Data was obtained at CuK(alpha )1 (8.048 keV) and, using single reflection asymmetric Si(044) crystals for both the monochromator and analyzer, an angular resolution of 1.5 arcsec FWHM was achieved. The efficiency of the grating in all orders up to the 15th was measured using a 12 k......W rotating anode X-ray generator. These data provided the basis for a modelling of the grating structure....

  8. A HIGH REPETITION RATE VUV-SOFT X-RAY FEL CONCEPT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corlett, J.; Byrd, J.; Fawley, W.M.; Gullans, M.; Li, D.; Lidia,S.M.; Padmore, H.; Penn, G.; Pogorelov, I.; Qiang, J.; Robin, D.; Sannibale, F.; Staples, J.W.; Steier, C.; Venturini, M.; Virostek, S.; Wan, W.; Wells, R.; Wilcox, R.; Wurtele, J.; Zholents, A.

    2007-06-24

    We report on design studies for a seeded FEL light source that is responsive to the scientific needs of the future. The FEL process increases radiation flux by several orders of magnitude above existing incoherent sources, and offers the additional enhancements attainable by optical manipulations of the electron beam: control of the temporal duration and bandwidth of the coherent output, reduced gain length in the FEL, utilization of harmonics to attain shorter wavelengths, and precise synchronization of the x-ray pulse with seed laser systems. We describe an FEL facility concept based on a high repetition rate RF photocathode gun, that would allow simultaneous operation of multiple independent FEL's, each producing high average brightness, tunable over the VUV-soft x-ray range, and each with individual performance characteristics determined by the configuration of the FEL. SASE, enhanced-SASE (ESASE), seeded, harmonic generation, and other configurations making use of optical manipulations of the electron beam may be employed, providing a wide range of photon beam properties to meet varied user demands.

  9. Can AGN and galaxy clusters explain the surface brightness fluctuations of the cosmic X-ray background?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolodzig, Alexander; Gilfanov, Marat; Hütsi, Gert; Sunyaev, Rashid

    2017-04-01

    Fluctuations of the surface brightness of cosmic X-ray background (CXB) carry unique information about faint and low-luminosity source populations, which is inaccessible for conventional large-scale structure (LSS) studies based on resolved sources. We used XBOOTES (5ks deep Chandra X-ray Observatory ACIS-I maps of the ˜ 9 deg2 Bootes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey) to conduct the most accurate measurement to date of the power spectrum of fluctuations of the unresolved CXB on the angular scales of 3 arcsec-17 arcmin. We find that at sub-arcmin angular scales, the power spectrum is consistent with the active galactic nucleus (AGN) shot noise, without much need for any significant contribution from their one-halo term. This is consistent with the theoretical expectation that low-luminosity AGN reside alone in their dark matter haloes. However, at larger angular scales, we detect a significant LSS signal above the AGN shot noise. Its power spectrum, obtained after subtracting the AGN shot noise, follows a power law with the slope of -0.8 ± 0.1 and its amplitude is much larger than what can be plausibly explained by the two-halo term of AGN. We demonstrate that the detected LSS signal is produced by unresolved clusters and groups of galaxies. For the flux limit of the XBOOTES survey, their flux-weighted mean redshift equals ˜ 0.3, and the mean temperature of their intracluster medium (ICM), ≈ 1.4 keV, corresponds to the mass of M500 ˜ 1013.5 M⊙. The power spectrum of CXB fluctuations carries information about the redshift distribution of these objects and the spatial structure of their ICM on the linear scales of up to ˜Mpc, i.e. of the order of the virial radius.

  10. X-ray characterization of CMOS imaging detector with high resolution for fluoroscopic imaging application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Bo Kyung; Kim, Cho Rong; Jeon, Seongchae; Kim, Ryun Kyung; Seo, Chang-Woo; Yang, Keedong; Heo, Duchang; Lee, Tae-Bum; Shin, Min-Seok; Kim, Jong-Boo; Kwon, Oh-Kyung

    2013-12-01

    This paper introduces complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel sensor (APS)-based X-ray imaging detectors with high spatial resolution for medical imaging application. In this study, our proposed X-ray CMOS imaging sensor has been fabricated by using a 0.35 μm 1 Poly 4 Metal CMOS process. The pixel size is 100 μm×100 μm and the pixel array format is 24×96 pixels, which provide a field-of-view (FOV) of 9.6 mm×2.4 mm. The 14.3-bit extend counting analog-to digital converter (ADC) with built-in binning mode was used to reduce the area and simultaneously improve the image resolution. Both thallium-doped CsI (CsI:Tl) and Gd2O2S:Tb scintillator screens were used as converters for incident X-rays to visible light photons. The optical property and X-ray imaging characterization such as X-ray to light response as a function of incident X-ray exposure dose, spatial resolution and X-ray images of objects were measured under different X-ray energy conditions. The measured results suggest that our developed CMOS-based X-ray imaging detector has the potential for fluoroscopic imaging and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging applications.

  11. Atomic physics with hard X-rays from high brilliance synchrotron light sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Southworth, S.; Gemmell, D.

    1996-08-01

    A century after the discovery of x rays, the experimental capability for studying atomic structure and dynamics with hard, bright synchrotron radiation is increasing remarkably. Tempting opportunities arise for experiments on many-body effects, aspects of fundamental photon-atom interaction processes, and relativistic and quantum-electrodynamic phenomena. Some of these possibilities are surveyed in general terms.

  12. Diffuse x-ray emission around high-redshift, radio-loud QSOs

    CERN Document Server

    Bartelmann, M; Matthias Bartelmann; Peter Schneider

    1994-01-01

    We announce the detection of correlations on angular scales of \\ga10' between optically bright, high-redshift, radio-loud QSOs with diffuse X-ray emission seen by ROSAT in the {\\it All-Sky Survey}. These correlations reach significance levels of up to 99.8\\%. A comparison of the results with a sample of control fields, bootstrapping analyses, and Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests provide unambiguous support for the statistical significance of the correlations found. We argue that the detected enhanced diffuse X-ray emission is in the foreground of the QSOs, and that it is probably due to galaxy clusters which magnify the QSOs by their gravitational lensing effect, thereby giving rise to a magnification bias in the background source sample. A comparison of the results presented below with correlations previously found between the same QSO sample and either Lick or IRAS galaxies provides further evidence for this interpretation, and identifies positions in the sky where weak gravitational lensing may be detected by sear...

  13. High quality multilayer mirrors for soft X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimmer, H.; Boeni, P.; Breitmeier, U.; Clemens, D.; Horisberger, M. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Mertins, H.C.; Schaefers, F. [BESSY, Berlin (Germany)

    1997-09-01

    In an effort to develop optical components for X-rays with wavelengths in the water window (2.3 -4.4 nm) multilayer structures have been designed for the following applications: in transmission as phase shifters to change linear into circular polarization, in reflection as mirrors close to normal incidence and as linear polarizers at an angle of incidence of 45{sup o}. (author) 1 fig., 1 tab., 1 ref.

  14. Serendipitous discovery of an extended X-ray jet without a radio counterpart in a high-redshift quasar

    CERN Document Server

    Simionescu, A; Ichinohe, Y; Cheung, C C; Jamrozy, M; Siemiginowska, A; Hagino, K; Gandhi, P; Werner, N

    2015-01-01

    A recent Chandra observation of the nearby galaxy cluster Abell 585 has led to the discovery of an extended X-ray jet associated with the high-redshift background quasar B3 0727+409, a luminous radio source at redshift z=2.5. This is one of only few examples of high-redshift X-ray jets known to date. It has a clear extension of about 10-12", corresponding to a projected length of 80-100 kpc, with a possible hot spot as far as 35" from the quasar. The archival high resolution VLA maps surprisingly reveal no extended jet emission, except for one knot about 1.4" away from the quasar. The high X-ray to radio luminosity ratio for this source appears consistent with the $\\propto (1+z)^{4}$ amplification expected from the inverse Compton radiative model. This serendipitous discovery may signal the existence of an entire population of similar systems with bright X-ray and faint radio jets at high redshift, a selection bias which must be accounted for when drawing any conclusions about the redshift evolution of jet pr...

  15. X-ray emission from a high-atomic-number z-pinch plasma created from compact wire arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Nash, T.J.; Marder, B.M. [and others

    1996-03-01

    Thermal and nonthermal x-ray emission from the implosion of compact tungsten wire arrays, driven by 5 MA from the Saturn accelerator, are measured and compared with LLNL Radiation-Hydro-Code (RHC) and SNL Hydro-Code (HC) numerical models. Multiple implosions, due to sequential compressions and expansions of the plasma, are inferred from the measured multiple x-radiation bursts. Timing of the multiple implosions and the thermal x-ray spectra measured between 1 and 10 keV are consistent with the RHC simulations. The magnitude of the nonthermal x-ray emission measured from 10 to 100 keV ranges from 0.02 to 0.08% of the total energy radiated and is correlated with bright-spot emission along the z-axis, as observed in earlier Gamble-11 single exploding-wire experiments. The similarities of the measured nonthermal spectrum and bright-spot emission with those measured at 0.8 MA on Gamble-II suggest a common production mechanism for this process. A model of electron acceleration across magnetic fields in highly-collisional, high-atomic-number plasmas is developed, which shows the existence of a critical electric field, E{sub c}, below which strong nonthermal electron creation (and the associated nonthermal x rays) do not occur. HC simulations show that significant nonthermal electrons are not expected in this experiment (as observed) because the calculated electric fields are at least one to two orders-of-magnitude below E{sub c}. These negative nonthermal results are confirmed by RHC simulations using a nonthermal model based on a Fokker-Plank analysis. Lastly, the lower production efficiency and the larger, more irregular pinch spots formed in this experiment relative to those measured on Gamble II suggest that implosion geometries are not as efficient as single exploding-wire geometries for warm x-ray production.

  16. Using GRO J1655-40 to test Swift/BAT as a monitor for bright hard X-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Senziani, F; De Luca, A; Caraveo, P A; Belloni, T; Bignami, Giovanni Fabrizio

    2007-01-01

    While waiting for new gamma-ray burst detections, the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) on board Swift covers each day ~50% of the sky in the hard X-ray band (``Survey data''). The large field of view (FOV), high sensitivity and good angular resolution make BAT a potentially powerful all-sky hard X-ray monitor, provided that mask--related systematics can be properly accounted for. We have developed and tested a complete procedure entirely based on public Swift/BAT software tools to analyse BAT Survey data, aimed at assessing the flux and spectral variability of bright sources in the 15-150 keV energy range. Detailed tests of the capabilities of our procedure were performed focusing, in particular, on the reliability of spectral measurements over the entire BAT FOV. First, we analyzed a large set of Crab observations, spread over ~7 months. Next, we studied the case of GRO J1655-40, a strongly variable source, which experienced a 9-month long outburst, beginning on February 2005. Such an outburst was systematically ...

  17. Stellar wind variations during the X-ray high and low states of Cygnus X-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gies, D.R.; Bolton, C.T.; Blake, R.M.; Caballero-Nieves, S.M.; Crenshaw, D.M.; Hadrava, P.; Herrero, A.; Hillwig, T.C.; Howell, S.B.; Huang, W.; Kaper, L.; Koubský, P.; McSwain, M.V.

    2008-01-01

    We present results from Hubble Space Telescope ultraviolet spectroscopy of the massive X-ray and black hole binary system, HD 226868 = Cyg X-1. The spectra were obtained at both orbital conjunction phases in 2002 and 2003, when the system was in the X-ray high/soft state. The UV stellar wind lines s

  18. The nuclear spectroscopic telescope array (NuSTAR) high-energy X-ray mission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kristin K.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Hongjun An

    2014-01-01

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) mission was launched on 2012 June 13 and is the first focusing high-energy X-ray telescope in orbit operating above ~10 keV. NuSTAR flies two co-aligned Wolter-I conical approximation X-ray optics, coated with Pt/C and W/Si multilayers...

  19. Discovery of extended X-ray emission around the highly magnetic RRAT J1819-1458

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rea, N.; McLaughlin, M.A.; Gaensler, B.M.; Slane, P.O.; Stella, L.; Reynolds, S.P.; Burgay, M.; Israel, G.L.; Possenti, A.; Chatterjee, S.

    2009-01-01

    We report on the discovery of extended X-ray emission around the high magnetic field rotating radio transient J1819-1458. Using a 30 ks Chandra ACIS-S observation, we found significant evidence for extended X-ray emission with a peculiar shape: a compact region out to similar to 5.'' 5, and more dif

  20. High energy x-ray reflectivity and scattering study from spectrum-x-gamma flight mirrors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Finn Erland; Budtz-Jørgensen, Carl; Frederiksen, P. Kk

    1993-01-01

    Line radiation from Fe K-alpha(1), Cu K-alpha(1), and Ag K-alpha(1) is used to study the high energy X-ray reflectivity and scattering behavior of flight-quality X-ray mirrors having various Al substrates. When both the specular and the scattered radiation are integrated, near theoretical...

  1. High energy x-ray reflectivity and scattering study from spectrum-x-gamma flight mirrors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Finn Erland; Budtz-Jørgensen, Carl; Frederiksen, P. Kk

    1993-01-01

    Line radiation from Fe K-alpha(1), Cu K-alpha(1), and Ag K-alpha(1) is used to study the high energy X-ray reflectivity and scattering behavior of flight-quality X-ray mirrors having various Al substrates. When both the specular and the scattered radiation are integrated, near theoretical...

  2. The High Time Resolution Spectrometer (HTRS) aboard the International X-ray Observatory (IXO)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barret, Didier; Ravera, Laurent; Bodin, Pierre; Amoros, Carine; Boutelier, Martin; Glorian, Jean-Michel; Godet, Olivier; Orttner, Guillaume; Lacombe, Karine; Pons, Roger; Rambaud, Damien; Ramon, Pascale; Ramchoun, Souad; Biffi, Jean-Marc; Belasic, Marielle; Clédassou, Rodolphe; Faye, Delphine; Pouilloux, Benjamin; Motch, Christian; Michel, Laurent; Lechner, Peter H.; Niculae, Adrian; Strueder, Lothar W.; Distratis, Giuseppe; Kendziorra, Eckhard; Santangelo, Andréa; Tenzer, Christoph; Wende, Henning; Wilms, Joern; Kreykenbohm, Ingo; Schmid, Christian; Paltani, Stéphane; Cadoux, Franck; Fiorini, Carlo; Bombelli, Luca; Méndez, Mariano; Mereghetti, Sandro

    2010-01-01

    The High Time Resolution Spectrometer (HTRS) is one of the five focal plane instruments of the International X-ray Observatory (IXO). The HTRS is the only instrument matching the top level mission requirement of handling a one Crab X-ray source with an efficiency greater than 10%. It will provide IX

  3. A Compact X-Ray System for Support of High Throughput Crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciszak, Ewa; Gubarev, Mikhail; Gibson, Walter M.; Joy, Marshall K.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Standard x-ray systems for crystallography rely on massive generators coupled with optics that guide X-ray beams onto the crystal sample. Optics for single-crystal diffractometry include total reflection mirrors, polycapillary optics or graded multilayer monochromators. The benefit of using polycapillary optic is that it can collect x-rays over tile greatest solid angle, and thus most efficiently, utilize the greatest portion of X-rays emitted from the Source, The x-ray generator has to have a small anode spot, and thus its size and power requirements can be substantially reduced We present the design and results from the first high flux x-ray system for crystallography that combine's a microfocus X-ray generator (40microns FWHM Spot size at a power of 45 W) and a collimating, polycapillary optic. Diffraction data collected from small test crystals with cell dimensions up to 160A (lysozyme and thaumatin) are of high quality. For example, diffraction data collected from a lysozyme crystal at RT yielded R=5.0% for data extending to 1.70A. We compare these results with measurements taken from standard crystallographic systems. Our current microfocus X-ray diffraction system is attractive for supporting crystal growth research in the standard crystallography laboratory as well as in remote, automated crystal growth laboratory. Its small volume, light-weight, and low power requirements are sufficient to have it installed in unique environments, i.e.. on-board International Space Station.

  4. Can AGN and galaxy clusters explain the surface brightness fluctuations of the cosmic X-ray background?

    CERN Document Server

    Kolodzig, Alexander; Hütsi, Gert; Sunyaev, Rashid

    2016-01-01

    Fluctuations of the surface brightness of cosmic X-ray background (CXB) carry unique information about faint and low luminosity source populations, which is inaccessible for conventional large-scale structure (LSS) studies based on resolved sources. We used Chandra data of the XBOOTES field ($\\sim9\\,\\mathrm{deg^2}$) to conduct the most accurate measurement to date of the power spectrum of fluctuations of the unresolved CXB on the angular scales of $\\sim3\\,$arcsec $-$ $\\sim17\\,$arcmin. We find that at sub-arcmin angular scales, the power spectrum is consistent with the AGN shot noise, without much need for any significant contribution from their one-halo term. This is consistent with the theoretical expectation that low-luminosity AGN reside alone in their dark matter halos. However, at larger angular scales we detect a significant LSS signal above the AGN shot noise. Its power spectrum, obtained after subtracting the AGN shot noise, follows a power law with the slope of $-0.8\\pm0.1$ and its amplitude is much ...

  5. High-Resolution X-ray Imaging of the Colliding Wind Shock in WR147

    CERN Document Server

    Pittard, J M; Williams, P M; Pollock, A M T; Skinner, S L; Corcoran, M F; Moffat, A F J

    2002-01-01

    We analyze new high-resolution Chandra X-ray images of the Wolf-Rayet binary system WR147. This system contains a WN8 star with an early-type companion located 0.6'' to its north, and is the only known early-type binary with a separation on the sky large enough for the wind-wind collision between the stars to currently be resolved at X-ray energies. The 5 ksec Chandra HRC-I image provides the first direct evidence for spatially extended X-ray emission in an early-type binary system. The X-ray emission peaks close to the position of the radio bow shock and north of the WN8 star. A deeper X-ray image is needed to accurately determine the degree of spatial extension, to exactly align the X-ray and optical/radio frames, and to determine whether part of the detected X-ray emission arises in the individual stellar winds. Simulated X-ray images of the wind-wind collision have a FWHM consistent with the data, and maximum likelihood fits suggest that a deeper observation may also constrain the inclination and wind mom...

  6. X-ray spectra induced by slow highly charged Arq+ ions in collision with Nb surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The X-ray spectra of Nb surface induced by Arq+ (q =16,17) ions with the energy range from 10 to 20 keV/q were studied by the optical spectrum technology. The experimental results indicate that the multi-electron excitation occurred as a highly charged Ar16+ ion was neutralized below the metal surface. The K shell electron of Ar16+ was excited and then de-excited cascadly to emit K X-ray. The intensity of the X-ray emitted from K shell of the hollow Ar atom decreased with the increase of projectile kinetic energy. The intensity of the X-ray emitted from L shell of the target atom Nb increased with the increase of projectile kinetic energy. The X-ray yield of Ar17+ is three magnitude orders larger than that of Ar16+.

  7. Development of online quasimonochromatic X-ray backlighter for high energy density physics studies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Chaurasia; P Leshma; D S Munda

    2013-11-01

    Monochromatic X-ray backlighting has been employed with great success in various laser plasma experiments including inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research. However, implementation of a monochromatic backlighting system typically requires extremely high quality spherically bent crystals which are difficult to manufacture and are also expensive. In this paper, we present a quasimonochromatic X-ray backlighting system using flat thallium acid pthalate (TAP) crystal. The detailed characterization of the system is discussed. The X-ray backlighter spectral range is caliberated using Cu spectrum in the spectral range 7–9 Å (1.38–1.77 keV). Gold plasma produces continuous X-ray spectrum (M band) in this range. The spectral, spatial and temporal resolutions of the system measured are 30 mÅ, 50 m and 1.5 ns respectively. The spectral width of the X-ray pulse is 2 Å ( = 0.39 keV).

  8. X-ray spectra induced by slow highly charged Arq+ ions in collision with Nb surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG ZhiHu; GAO ZhiMing; ZHANG XiaoAn; ZHU KeXin; YU DeYang; CAI XiaoHong; CUI Ying; CHEN XiMeng; SONG ZhangYong; SHAO JianXiong; RUAN FangFang; ZHANG HongQiang; DU Juan; LIU YuWen

    2008-01-01

    The X-ray spectra of Nb surface induced by Arq+ (q = 16,17) ions with the energy range from 10 to 20 keV/q were studied by the optical spectrum technology. The experimental results indicate that the multi-electron excitation occurred as a highly charged Ar16+ ion was neutralized below the metal surface. The K shell electron of Ar16+ was excited and then de-excited cascadly to emit K X-ray. The intensity of the X-ray emitted from K shell of the hollow Ar atom decreased with the increase of projectile kinetic energy. The intensity of the X-ray emitted from L shell of the target atom Nb increased with the increase of projectile kinetic energy. The X-ray yield of Ar17+ is three magnitude orders larger than that of Ar16+.

  9. Cas A: The Bright X-ray Knots and Oxygen Emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Dewey

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Los espectros de rayos X de 17 regiones brillantes y angostas de CasA se han extra do con el Chandra High- Energy Transmission Grating (HETG, los cuales proveen medidas unicas de su cinem atica y de los estados del plasma. Con las l neas de emisi on dominantes, e.g. Si tipo-He, derivamos corrimientos Doppler precisos en el rango

  10. RXTE/ASM and Swift/BAT Observations of Spectral Transitions in Bright X-ray Binaries in 2005-2010

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Jing; Yan, Zhen

    2010-01-01

    We have studied X-ray spectral state transitions that can be seen in the long- term monitoring light curves of bright X-ray binaries from the All-Sky Monitor (ASM) on board the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) and the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) on board Swift during a period of five years from 2005 to 2010. We have applied a program to automatically identify the hard-to-soft (H-S) spectral state transitions in the bright X- ray binaries monitored by the ASM and the BAT. In total we identified 128 hard-to-soft transitions, of which 59 occurred after 2008. We also determined the transition fluxes and the peak fluxes of the following soft states, updated the measurements of the luminosity corresponding to the H-S transition and the peak luminosity of the following soft state in about 30 bright persistent and transient black hole and neutron star binaries following Yu & Yan (2009), and found the luminosity correlation and the luminosity range of spectral transitions in data between 2008-2010 are about the ...

  11. Compact pnCCD-based X-ray camera with high spatial and energy resolution: a color X-ray camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharf, O; Ihle, S; Ordavo, I; Arkadiev, V; Bjeoumikhov, A; Bjeoumikhova, S; Buzanich, G; Gubzhokov, R; Günther, A; Hartmann, R; Kühbacher, M; Lang, M; Langhoff, N; Liebel, A; Radtke, M; Reinholz, U; Riesemeier, H; Soltau, H; Strüder, L; Thünemann, A F; Wedell, R

    2011-04-01

    For many applications there is a requirement for nondestructive analytical investigation of the elemental distribution in a sample. With the improvement of X-ray optics and spectroscopic X-ray imagers, full field X-ray fluorescence (FF-XRF) methods are feasible. A new device for high-resolution X-ray imaging, an energy and spatial resolving X-ray camera, is presented. The basic idea behind this so-called "color X-ray camera" (CXC) is to combine an energy dispersive array detector for X-rays, in this case a pnCCD, with polycapillary optics. Imaging is achieved using multiframe recording of the energy and the point of impact of single photons. The camera was tested using a laboratory 30 μm microfocus X-ray tube and synchrotron radiation from BESSY II at the BAMline facility. These experiments demonstrate the suitability of the camera for X-ray fluorescence analytics. The camera simultaneously records 69,696 spectra with an energy resolution of 152 eV for manganese K(α) with a spatial resolution of 50 μm over an imaging area of 12.7 × 12.7 mm(2). It is sensitive to photons in the energy region between 3 and 40 keV, limited by a 50 μm beryllium window, and the sensitive thickness of 450 μm of the chip. Online preview of the sample is possible as the software updates the sums of the counts for certain energy channel ranges during the measurement and displays 2-D false-color maps as well as spectra of selected regions. The complete data cube of 264 × 264 spectra is saved for further qualitative and quantitative processing.

  12. Project Title: Radiochemical Analysis by High Sensitivity Dual-Optic Micro X-ray Fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Havrilla, George J.; Gao, Ning

    2002-06-01

    A novel dual-optic micro X-ray fluorescence instrument will be developed to do radiochemical analysis of high-level radioactive wastes at DOE sites such as Savannah River Site and Hanford. This concept incorporates new X-ray optical elements such as monolithic polycapillaries and double bent crystals, which focus X-rays. The polycapillary optic can be used to focus X-rays emitted by the X-ray tube thereby increasing the X-ray flux on the sample over 1000 times. Polycapillaries will also be used to collect the X-rays from the excitation site and screen the radiation background from the radioactive species in the specimen. This dual-optic approach significantly reduces the background and increases the analyte signal thereby increasing the sensitivity of the analysis. A doubly bent crystal used as the focusing optic produces focused monochromatic X-ray excitation, which eliminates the bremsstrahlung background from the X-ray source. The coupling of the doubly bent crystal for monochromatic excitation with a polycapillary for signal collection can effectively eliminate the noise background and radiation background from the specimen. The integration of these X-ray optics increases the signal-to-noise and thereby increases the sensitivity of the analysis for low-level analytes. This work will address a key need for radiochemical analysis of high-level waste using a non-destructive, multi-element, and rapid method in a radiation environment. There is significant potential that this instrumentation could be capable of on-line analysis for process waste stream characterization at DOE sites.

  13. High-pressure studies with x-rays using diamond anvil cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Guoyin; Mao, Ho Kwang

    2017-01-01

    Pressure profoundly alters all states of matter. The symbiotic development of ultrahigh-pressure diamond anvil cells, to compress samples to sustainable multi-megabar pressures; and synchrotron x-ray techniques, to probe materials’ properties in situ, has enabled the exploration of rich high-pressure (HP) science. In this article, we first introduce the essential concept of diamond anvil cell technology, together with recent developments and its integration with other extreme environments. We then provide an overview of the latest developments in HP synchrotron techniques, their applications, and current problems, followed by a discussion of HP scientific studies using x-rays in the key multidisciplinary fields. These HP studies include: HP x-ray emission spectroscopy, which provides information on the filled electronic states of HP samples; HP x-ray Raman spectroscopy, which probes the HP chemical bonding changes of light elements; HP electronic inelastic x-ray scattering spectroscopy, which accesses high energy electronic phenomena, including electronic band structure, Fermi surface, excitons, plasmons, and their dispersions; HP resonant inelastic x-ray scattering spectroscopy, which probes shallow core excitations, multiplet structures, and spin-resolved electronic structure; HP nuclear resonant x-ray spectroscopy, which provides phonon densities of state and time-resolved Mössbauer information; HP x-ray imaging, which provides information on hierarchical structures, dynamic processes, and internal strains; HP x-ray diffraction, which determines the fundamental structures and densities of single-crystal, polycrystalline, nanocrystalline, and non-crystalline materials; and HP radial x-ray diffraction, which yields deviatoric, elastic and rheological information. Integrating these tools with hydrostatic or uniaxial pressure media, laser and resistive heating, and cryogenic cooling, has enabled investigations of the structural, vibrational, electronic, and

  14. High-pressure studies with x-rays using diamond anvil cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Guoyin; Mao, Ho Kwang

    2016-11-22

    Pressure profoundly alters all states of matter. The symbiotic development of ultrahigh-pressure diamond anvil cells, to compress samples to sustainable multi-megabar pressures; and synchrotron x-ray techniques, to probe materials' properties in situ, has enabled the exploration of rich high-pressure (HP) science. In this article, we first introduce the essential concept of diamond anvil cell technology, together with recent developments and its integration with other extreme environments. We then provide an overview of the latest developments in HP synchrotron techniques, their applications, and current problems, followed by a discussion of HP scientific studies using x-rays in the key multidisciplinary fields. These HP studies include: HP x-ray emission spectroscopy, which provides information on the filled electronic states of HP samples; HP x-ray Raman spectroscopy, which probes the HP chemical bonding changes of light elements; HP electronic inelastic x-ray scattering spectroscopy, which accesses high energy electronic phenomena, including electronic band structure, Fermi surface, excitons, plasmons, and their dispersions; HP resonant inelastic x-ray scattering spectroscopy, which probes shallow core excitations, multiplet structures, and spin-resolved electronic structure; HP nuclear resonant x-ray spectroscopy, which provides phonon densities of state and time-resolved Mössbauer information; HP x-ray imaging, which provides information on hierarchical structures, dynamic processes, and internal strains; HP x-ray diffraction, which determines the fundamental structures and densities of single-crystal, polycrystalline, nanocrystalline, and non-crystalline materials; and HP radial x-ray diffraction, which yields deviatoric, elastic and rheological information. Integrating these tools with hydrostatic or uniaxial pressure media, laser and resistive heating, and cryogenic cooling, has enabled investigations of the structural, vibrational, electronic, and

  15. Novel correction method for X-ray beam energy fluctuation of high energy DR system with a linear detector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Min; CHEN Hao; MENG Fan-Yong; WEI Dong-Bo

    2011-01-01

    A high energy digital radiography (DR) testing system has generated diverse scientific and technological interest in the field of industrial non-destructive testing.However,due to the limitations of manufacturing technology for accelerators,an energy fluctuation of the X-ray beam exists and leads to bright and dark streak artifacts in the DR image.Here we report the utilization of a new software-based method to correct the fluctuation artifacts.The correction method is performed using a high pass filtering operation to extract the high frequency information that reflects the X-ray beam energy fluctuation,and then subtracting it from the original image.Our experimental results show that this method is able to rule out the artifacts effectively and is readily implemented on a practical scanning system.

  16. Evidence for Accretion High-Resolution X-ray Spectroscopy of the Classical T Tauri Star TW Hydrae

    CERN Document Server

    Kästner, J H; Schulz, N S; Canizares, C R; Weintraub, D A; Kastner, Joel H.; Huenemoerder, David P.; Schulz, Norbert S.; Canizares, Claude R.; Weintraub, David A.

    2002-01-01

    We present high resolution X-ray spectra of the X-ray bright classical T Tauri star, TW Hydrae, covering the wavelength range of 1.5-25 AA. The differential emission measure derived from fluxes of temperature-sensitive emission lines shows a plasma with a sharply peaked temperature distribution, peaking at log T = 6.5. Abundance anomalies are apparent, with iron very deficient relative to oxygen, while neon is enhanced relative to oxygen. Density-sensitive line ratios of Ne IX and O VII indicate densities near log n_e = 13. A flare with rapid (~1 ks) rise time was detected during our 48 ksec observation; however, based on analysis of the emission-line spectrum during quiescent and flaring states, the derived plasma parameters do not appear strongly time-dependent. The inferred plasma temperature distribution and densities are consistent with a model in which the bulk of the X-ray emission from TW Hya is generated via mass accretion from its circumstellar disk. Assuming accretion powers the X-ray emission, our...

  17. Inelastic X-ray scattering experiments at extreme conditions: high temperatures and high pressures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.Hosokawa

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we review the present status of experimental techniques under extreme conditions of high temperature and high pressure used for inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS experiments of liquid metals, semiconductors, molten salts, molecular liquids, and supercritical water and methanol. For high temperature experiments, some types of single-crystal sapphire cells were designed depending on the temperature of interest and the sample thickness for the X-ray transmission. Single-crystal diamond X-ray windows attached to the externally heated high-pressure vessel were used for the IXS experiment of supercritical water and methanol. Some typical experimental results are also given, and the perspective of IXS technique under extreme conditions is discussed.

  18. Probing the X-ray emission of old nulling pulsars with high magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posselt, Bettina

    2013-10-01

    We propose XMM-Newton observations of two nulling radio pulsars with magnetic fields B>10^(13)G. These long-period pulsars have spin-down properties, including characteristic ages, similar to those of the Magnificent Seven which are bright thermal X-ray emitters. Nulling pulsars have been suggested as evolutionary stage where the magnetospheric emission of a pulsar ceases. In contrast, no magnetospheric emission was detected at all at X-ray or radio wavelengths for the Magnificent Seven. The proposed XMM-Newton observations will probe the magneto-thermal NS evolution model as a potential link between the radio pulsar population and the Magnificent Seven. They will also provide for the first time an X-ray characterization of nulling pulsars with large magnetic fields.

  19. The high-field magnet endstation for X-ray magnetic dichroism experiments at ESRF soft X-ray beamline ID32

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kummer, K.; Fondacaro, A.; Jimenez, E.; Velez-Fort, E.; Amorese, A.; Aspbury, M.; Yakhou-Harris, F.; van der Linden, P.; Brookes, N. B.

    2016-01-01

    A new high-field magnet endstation for X-ray magnetic dichroism experiments has been installed and commissioned at the ESRF soft X-ray beamline ID32. The magnet consists of two split-pairs of superconducting coils which can generate up to 9 T along the beam and up to 4 T orthogonal to the beam. It is connected to a cluster of ultra-high-vacuum chambers that offer a comprehensive set of surface preparation and characterization techniques. The endstation and the beam properties have been designed to provide optimum experimental conditions for X-ray magnetic linear and circular dichroism experiments in the soft X-ray range between 400 and 1600 eV photon energy. User operation started in November 2014. PMID:26917134

  20. Superiority of Low Energy 160 KV X-Rays Compared to High Energy 6 MV X-Rays in Heavy Element Radiosensitization for Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sara N.; Pradhan, Anil K.; Nahar, Sultana N.; Barth, Rolf F.; Yang, Weilian; Nakkula, Robin J.; Palmer, Alycia; Turro, Claudia

    2013-06-01

    High energy X-rays in the MeV range are generally employed in conventional radiation therapy from linear accelerators (LINAC) to ensure sufficient penetration depths. However, lower energy X-rays in the keV range may be more effective when coupled with heavy element (high-Z or HZ) radiosensitizers. Numerical simulations of X-ray energy deposition for tumor phantoms sensitized with HZ radiosensitizers were performed using the Monte Carlo code Geant4. The results showed enhancement in energy deposition to radiosensitized phantoms relative to unsensitized phantoms for low energy X-rays in the keV range. In contrast, minimal enhancement was seen using high energy X-rays in the MeV range. Dose enhancement factors (DEFs) were computed and showed radiosensitization only in the low energy range rat glioma cells following irradiation with both low energy 160 kV and high energy 6 MV X-ray sources. The platinum compound, pyridine terpyridine Pt(II) nitrate, was initially used because it was 7x less toxic that an equivalent amount of carboplatin in vitro studies. This would allow us to separate the radiotoxic and the chemotoxic effects of HZ sensitizers. Results from this study showed a 10-fold dose dependent reduction in surviving fractions (SF) of radiosensitized cells treated with low energy 160 kV X-rays compared to those treated with 6 MV X-rays. This is in agreement with our simulations that show an increase in dose deposition in radiosensitized tumors for low energy X-rays. Due to unforeen in vivo toxicity, however, another in vitro study was performed using the commonly used, Pt-based chemotherapeutic drug carboplatin which confirmed earlier results. This lays the ground work for a planned in vivo study using F98 glioma bearing rats. This study demonstrates that while high energy X-rays are commonly used in cancer radiotherapy, low energy keV X-rays might be much more effective with HZ radiosensitization.

  1. X-ray resonant photoexcitation: linewidths and energies of Kα transitions in highly charged Fe ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, J K; Bernitt, S; Epp, S W; Steinbrügge, R; Beilmann, C; Brown, G V; Eberle, S; Graf, A; Harman, Z; Hell, N; Leutenegger, M; Müller, A; Schlage, K; Wille, H-C; Yavaş, H; Ullrich, J; Crespo López-Urrutia, J R

    2013-09-06

    Photoabsorption by and fluorescence of the Kα transitions in highly charged iron ions are essential mechanisms for x-ray radiation transfer in astrophysical environments. We study photoabsorption due to the main Kα transitions in highly charged iron ions from heliumlike to fluorinelike (Fe24+ to Fe17+) using monochromatic x rays around 6.6 keV at the PETRA III synchrotron photon source. Natural linewidths were determined with hitherto unattained accuracy. The observed transitions are of particular interest for the understanding of photoexcited plasmas found in x-ray binary stars and active galactic nuclei.

  2. High Resolution X-Ray Diffraction of Macromolecules with Synchrotron Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojanoff, Vivian; Boggon, Titus; Helliwell, John R.; Judge, Russell; Olczak, Alex; Snell, Edward H.; Siddons, D. Peter; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We recently combined synchrotron-based monochromatic X-ray diffraction topography methods with triple axis diffractometry and rocking curve measurements: high resolution X-ray diffraction imaging techniques, to better understand the quality of protein crystals. We discuss these methods in the light of results obtained on crystals grown under different conditions. These non destructive techniques are powerful tools in the characterization of the protein crystals and ultimately will allow to improve, develop, and understand protein crystal growth. High resolution X-ray diffraction imaging methods will be discussed in detail in light of recent results obtained on Hen Egg White Lysozyme crystals and other proteins.

  3. Single-shot phase retrieval in high-energy X-ray grating interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Zhili, Wang

    2016-01-01

    In X-ray phase contrast imaging, phase retrieval from intensity measurements is the key for further quantitative analysis and tomographic reconstructions. In this letter, we present a single-shot approach for quantitative phase retrieval in high-energy X-ray grating interferometry. The proposed approach makes use of the phase-attenuation duality of soft tissues when being imaged with high-energy X-rays. The phase retrieval formula is derived and presented, and tested by numerical experiments including photon shot noise. The good agreement between retrieval results and theoretical values confirms the feasibility of the presented approach.

  4. [Design of a high-voltage insulation testing system of X-ray high frequency generators].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yong; Mo, Guo-Ming; Wang, Yan; Wang, Hong-Zhi; Yu, Jie-Ying; Dai, Shu-Guang

    2007-09-01

    In this paper, we analyze the transformer of X-ray high-voltage high-frequency generators and, have designed and implemented a high-voltage insulation testing system for its oil tank using full-bridge series resonant soft switching PFM DC-DC converter.

  5. Macro and micro full field x-ray fluorescence with an X-ray pinhole camera presenting high energy and high spatial resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Francesco Paolo; Caliri, Claudia; Cosentino, Luigi; Gammino, Santo; Giuntini, Lorenzo; Mascali, David; Neri, Lorenzo; Pappalardo, Lighea; Rizzo, Francesca; Taccetti, Francesco

    2014-11-01

    This work describes a tabletop (50 cm × 25 cm × 25 cm) full field X-ray pinhole camera (FF-XPC) presenting high energy- and high spatial-resolution. The FF-XPC consists of a conventional charge-coupled device (CCD) detector coupled, in a coaxial geometry, to a pinhole collimator of small diameter. The X-ray fluorescence (XRF) is induced on the samples with an external low-power X-ray tube. The use of the CCD as an energy dispersive X-ray detector was obtained by adopting a multi-image acquisition in single photon counting and by developing a processing algorithm to be applied in real-time to each of the acquired image-frames. This approach allowed the measurement of X-ray spectra with an energy resolution down to 133 eV at the reference value of 5.9 keV. The detection of the X-ray fluorescence through the pinhole-collimator allowed the two-dimensional elemental mapping of the irradiated samples. Two magnifications (M), determined by the relative sample-pinhole-CCD distances, are used in the present setup. A low value of M (equal to 0.35×) allows the macro-FF-XRF of large area samples (up to 4 × 4 cm(2)) with a spatial resolution down to 140 μm; a large magnification (M equal to 6×) is used for the micro-FF-XRF of small area samples (2.5 × 2.5 mm(2)) with a spatial resolution down to 30 μm.

  6. Exploratory X-ray monitoring of luminous radio-quiet quasars at high redshift: Initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shemmer, Ohad; Stein, Matthew S. [Department of Physics, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203 (United States); Brandt, W. N.; Schneider, Donald P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Paolillo, Maurizio [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Università Federico II di Napoli, via Cinthia 6, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Kaspi, Shai [School of Physics and Astronomy and the Wise Observatory, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Vignali, Cristian [Dipartimento di Astronomia, Università degli studi di Bologna, via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Lira, Paulina [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Chile, Camino del Observatorio 1515, Santiago (Chile); Gibson, Robert R., E-mail: ohad@unt.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2014-03-10

    We present initial results from an exploratory X-ray monitoring project of two groups of comparably luminous radio-quiet quasars (RQQs). The first consists of four sources at 4.10 ≤ z ≤ 4.35, monitored by Chandra, and the second is a comparison sample of three sources at 1.33 ≤ z ≤ 2.74, monitored by Swift. Together with archival X-ray data, the total rest-frame temporal baseline spans ∼2-4 yr and ∼5-13 yr for the first and second group, respectively. Six of these sources show significant X-ray variability over rest-frame timescales of ∼10{sup 2}-10{sup 3} days; three of these also show significant X-ray variability on rest-frame timescales of ∼1-10 days. The X-ray variability properties of our variable sources are similar to those exhibited by nearby and far less luminous active galactic nuclei (AGNs). While we do not directly detect a trend of increasing X-ray variability with redshift, we do confirm previous reports of luminous AGNs exhibiting X-ray variability above that expected from their luminosities, based on simplistic extrapolation from lower luminosity sources. This result may be attributed to luminous sources at the highest redshifts having relatively high accretion rates. Complementary UV-optical monitoring of our sources shows that variations in their optical-X-ray spectral energy distribution are dominated by the X-ray variations. We confirm previous reports of X-ray spectral variations in one of our sources, HS 1700+6416, but do not detect such variations in any of our other sources in spite of X-ray flux variations of up to a factor of ∼4. This project is designed to provide a basic assessment of the X-ray variability properties of RQQs at the highest accessible redshifts that will serve as a benchmark for more systematic monitoring of such sources with future X-ray missions.

  7. High-Flux Femtosecond X-Ray Emission from Controlled Generation of Annular Electron Beams in a Laser Wakefield Accelerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, T Z; Behm, K; Dong, C F; Davoine, X; Kalmykov, S Y; Petrov, V; Chvykov, V; Cummings, P; Hou, B; Maksimchuk, A; Nees, J A; Yanovsky, V; Thomas, A G R; Krushelnick, K

    2016-08-26

    Annular quasimonoenergetic electron beams with a mean energy in the range 200-400 MeV and charge on the order of several picocoulombs were generated in a laser wakefield accelerator and subsequently accelerated using a plasma afterburner in a two-stage gas cell. Generation of these beams is associated with injection occurring on the density down ramp between the stages. This well-localized injection produces a bunch of electrons performing coherent betatron oscillations in the wakefield, resulting in a significant increase in the x-ray yield. Annular electron distributions are detected in 40% of shots under optimal conditions. Simultaneous control of the pulse duration and frequency chirp enables optimization of both the energy and the energy spread of the annular beam and boosts the radiant energy per unit charge by almost an order of magnitude. These well-defined annular distributions of electrons are a promising source of high-brightness laser plasma-based x rays.

  8. Clumpy wind accretion in supergiant neutron star high mass X-ray binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzo, E.; Oskinova, L.; Feldmeier, A.; Falanga, M.

    2016-05-01

    The accretion of the stellar wind material by a compact object represents the main mechanism powering the X-ray emission in classical supergiant high mass X-ray binaries and supergiant fast X-ray transients. In this work we present the first attempt to simulate the accretion process of a fast and dense massive star wind onto a neutron star, taking into account the effects of the centrifugal and magnetic inhibition of accretion ("gating") due to the spin and magnetic field of the compact object. We made use of a radiative hydrodynamical code to model the nonstationary radiatively driven wind of an O-B supergiant star and then place a neutron star characterized by a fixed magnetic field and spin period at a certain distance from the massive companion. Our calculations follow, as a function of time (on a total timescale of several hours), the transitions of the system through all different accretion regimes that are triggered by the intrinsic variations in the density and velocity of the nonstationary wind. The X-ray luminosity released by the system is computed at each time step by taking into account the relevant physical processes occurring in the different accretion regimes. Synthetic lightcurves are derived and qualitatively compared with those observed from classical supergiant high mass X-ray binaries and supergiant fast X-ray transients. Although a number of simplifications are assumed in these calculations, we show that taking into account the effects of the centrifugal and magnetic inhibition of accretion significantly reduces the average X-ray luminosity expected for any neutron star wind-fed binary. The present model calculations suggest that long spin periods and stronger magnetic fields are favored in order to reproduce the peculiar behavior of supergiant fast X-ray transients in the X-ray domain.

  9. High Brightness OLED Lighting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spindler, Jeffrey [OLEDWorks LLC; Kondakova, Marina [OLEDWorks LLC; Boroson, Michael [OLEDWorks LLC; Hamer, John [OLEDWorks LLC

    2016-05-25

    In this work we describe the technology developments behind our current and future generations of high brightness OLED lighting panels. We have developed white and amber OLEDs with excellent performance based on the stacking approach. Current products achieve 40-60 lm/W, while future developments focus on achieving 80 lm/W or higher.

  10. Efficient electronic structure calculation for molecular ionization dynamics at high x-ray intensity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yajiang Hao

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We present the implementation of an electronic-structure approach dedicated to ionization dynamics of molecules interacting with x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL pulses. In our scheme, molecular orbitals for molecular core-hole states are represented by linear combination of numerical atomic orbitals that are solutions of corresponding atomic core-hole states. We demonstrate that our scheme efficiently calculates all possible multiple-hole configurations of molecules formed during XFEL pulses. The present method is suitable to investigate x-ray multiphoton multiple ionization dynamics and accompanying nuclear dynamics, providing essential information on the chemical dynamics relevant for high-intensity x-ray imaging.

  11. Efficient electronic structure calculation for molecular ionization dynamics at high x-ray intensity

    CERN Document Server

    Hao, Yajiang; Hanasaki, Kota; Son, Sang-Kil; Santra, Robin

    2015-01-01

    We present the implementation of an electronic-structure approach dedicated to ionization dynamics of molecules interacting with x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) pulses. In our scheme, molecular orbitals for molecular core-hole states are represented by linear combination of numerical atomic orbitals that are solutions of corresponding atomic core-hole states. We demonstrate that our scheme efficiently calculates all possible multiple-hole configurations of molecules formed during XFEL pulses. The present method is suitable to investigate x-ray multiphoton multiple ionization dynamics and accompanying nuclear dynamics, providing essential information on the chemical dynamics relevant for high-intensity x-ray imaging.

  12. Deposition and characterization of multilayers on thin foil x-ray mirrors for high-throughput x-ray telescopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hussain, Ahsen M.; Joensen, Karsten D.; Hoeghoej, P.;

    1996-01-01

    W/Si and Co/C multilayers have been deposited on epoxy- replicated Au mirrors from the ASTRO-E telescope project, SPectrum Roentgen Gamma (SRG) flight mirrors, DURAN glass substrates and Si witness wafers. A characterization of the multilayers with both hard x-rays and soft x-rays is presented....... This clearly indicates the effectiveness of the epoxy-replication process for the production of smooth substrates for multilayer deposition to be used in future x-ray telescopes........ The roughness value obtained from the Si wafers and the DURAN glass are in the range 3.0-4.2 angstrom and 4.4-4.6 angstrom, respectively. For the epoxy-replicated Au mirrors roughnesses of 5.0-5.8 angstrom are achieved, while the roughness of the SRG flight mirrors are in the range of 8.5-11.0 angstrom...

  13. RXTE/ASM and Swift/BAT observations of spectral transitions in bright X-ray binaries in 2005-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jing; Yu, Wen-Fei; Yan, Zhen

    2011-04-01

    We have studied X-ray spectral state transitions that can be seen in the long-term monitoring light curves of bright X-ray binaries from the All-Sky Monitor (ASM) onboard the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) and the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) onboard Swift during a period of five years from 2005 to 2010. We have applied a program to automatically identify the hard-to-soft (H-S) spectral state transitions in the bright X-ray binaries monitored by the ASM and the BAT. In total, we identified 128 hard-to-soft transitions, of which 59 occurred after 2008. We also determined the transition fluxes and the peak fluxes of the following soft states, updated the measurements of the luminosity corresponding to the H-S transition and the peak luminosity of the following soft state in about 30 bright persistent and transient black hole and neutron star binaries following Yu & Yan, and found the luminosity correlation and the luminosity range of spectral transitions in data between 2008-2010 are about the same as those derived from data before 2008. This further strengthens the idea that the luminosity at which the H-S spectral transition occurs in the Galactic X-ray binaries is determined by non-stationary accretion parameters such as the rate-of-change of the mass accretion rate rather than the mass accretion rate itself. The correlation is also found to hold in data of individual sources 4U 1608-52 and 4U 1636-53.

  14. A new high-definition microfocal X-ray unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckland-Wright, J C

    1989-03-01

    A new microfocal unit is described with an operating range up to 170 kVp (limited to 125 kVp for medical use), 0-1 mA and a maximum output of 75-80 W. The unit comprises a lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) cathode, a single electromagnetic lens and a stationary oil-cooled multifaced tungsten target. The estimated source size ranges from 6 to 20 microns between 14 and 77 W. The tube's output is x 3 to x 3.5 greater than that of a conventional X-ray unit. The use of fast rare-earth film-screen systems permits exposures of most views of the patient within 1 s. The spatial resolution within these film-screen systems is 40-30 microns diameter at magnifications of x 5-10. The tube is fixed so as to project a horizontal beam and the patient table is designed to position the patient close to the source (20-30 cm) with the film placed at a focus-film distance of 1-3 m. Stereopair macroradiographs permit greater accuracy in the identification and location of radiographic features. The large magnification and resolution of macroradiographs allow direct and accurate measurement of radiographic features.

  15. Ultra-high-resolution inelastic X-ray scattering at high-repetition-rate self-seeded X-ray free-electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chubar, Oleg [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Geloni, Gianluca [European X-ray Free-Electron Laser, Albert-Einstein-Ring 19, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Kocharyan, Vitali [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Madsen, Anders [European X-ray Free-Electron Laser, Albert-Einstein-Ring 19, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Saldin, Evgeni; Serkez, Svitozar [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Shvyd’ko, Yuri, E-mail: shvydko@aps.anl.gov [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Sutter, John [Diamond Light Source Ltd, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)

    2016-02-12

    This article explores novel opportunities for ultra-high-resolution inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) at high-repetition-rate self-seeded XFELs. These next-generation light sources are promising a more than three orders of magnitude increase in average spectral flux compared with what is possible with storage-ring-based radiation sources. In combination with the advanced IXS spectrometer described here, this may become a real game-changer for ultra-high-resolution X-ray spectroscopies, and hence for the studies of dynamics in condensed matter systems. Inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) is an important tool for studies of equilibrium dynamics in condensed matter. A new spectrometer recently proposed for ultra-high-resolution IXS (UHRIX) has achieved 0.6 meV and 0.25 nm{sup −1} spectral and momentum-transfer resolutions, respectively. However, further improvements down to 0.1 meV and 0.02 nm{sup −1} are required to close the gap in energy–momentum space between high- and low-frequency probes. It is shown that this goal can be achieved by further optimizing the X-ray optics and by increasing the spectral flux of the incident X-ray pulses. UHRIX performs best at energies from 5 to 10 keV, where a combination of self-seeding and undulator tapering at the SASE-2 beamline of the European XFEL promises up to a 100-fold increase in average spectral flux compared with nominal SASE pulses at saturation, or three orders of magnitude more than what is possible with storage-ring-based radiation sources. Wave-optics calculations show that about 7 × 10{sup 12} photons s{sup −1} in a 90 µeV bandwidth can be achieved on the sample. This will provide unique new possibilities for dynamics studies by IXS.

  16. High-resolution ab initio Three-dimensional X-ray Diffraction Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, H N; Barty, A; Marchesini, S; Noy, A; Cui, C; Howells, M R; Rosen, R; He, H; Spence, J H; Weierstall, U; Beetz, T; Jacobsen, C; Shapiro, D

    2005-08-19

    Coherent X-ray diffraction microscopy is a method of imaging non-periodic isolated objects at resolutions only limited, in principle, by the largest scattering angles recorded. We demonstrate X-ray diffraction imaging with high resolution in all three dimensions, as determined by a quantitative analysis of the reconstructed volume images. These images are retrieved from the 3D diffraction data using no a priori knowledge about the shape or composition of the object, which has never before been demonstrated on a non-periodic object. We also construct 2D images of thick objects with infinite depth of focus (without loss of transverse spatial resolution). These methods can be used to image biological and materials science samples at high resolution using X-ray undulator radiation, and establishes the techniques to be used in atomic-resolution ultrafast imaging at X-ray free-electron laser sources.

  17. A CCD area detector for X-ray diffraction under high pressure for rotating anode source

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amar Sinha; Alka B Garg; V Vijayakumar; B K Godwal; S K Sikka

    2000-04-01

    Details of a two-dimensional X-ray area detector developed using a charge coupled device, a image intensifier and a fibre optic taper are given. The detector system is especially optimized for angle dispersive X-ray diffraction set up using rotating anode generator as X-ray source. The performance of this detector was tested by successfully carrying out powder X-ray diffraction measurements on various materials such as intermetallics AuIn2, AuGa2, high material Pd and low scatterer adamantane (C10H16) at ambient conditions. Its utility for quick detection of phase transitions at high pressures with diamond anvil cell is demonstrated by reproducing the known pressure induced structural transitions in RbI, KI and a new structural phase transition in AuGa2 above 10 GPa. Various softwares have also been developed to analyze data from this detector.

  18. A high-resolving-power x-ray spectrometer for the OMEGA EP Laser (invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilson, P. M.; Ehrne, F.; Mileham, C.; Mastrosimone, D.; Jungquist, R. K.; Taylor, C.; Stillman, C. R.; Ivancic, S. T.; Boni, R.; Hassett, J.; Lonobile, D. J.; Kidder, R. W.; Shoup, M. J.; Solodov, A. A.; Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.; Froula, D. H.; Hill, K. W.; Gao, L.; Bitter, M.; Efthimion, P.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    2016-11-01

    A high-resolving-power x-ray spectrometer has been developed for the OMEGA EP Laser System based on a spherically bent Si [220] crystal with a radius of curvature of 330 mm and a Spectral Instruments (SI) 800 Series charge-coupled device. The instrument measures time-integrated x-ray emission spectra in the 7.97- to 8.11-keV range, centered on the Cu Kα1 line. To demonstrate the performance of the spectrometer under high-power conditions, Kα1,2 emission spectra were measured from Cu foils irradiated by the OMEGA EP laser with 100-J, 1-ps pulses at focused intensities above 1018 W/cm2. The ultimate goal is to couple the spectrometer to a picosecond x-ray streak camera and measure temperature-equilibration dynamics inside rapidly heated materials. The plan for these ultrafast streaked x-ray spectroscopy studies is discussed.

  19. X-ray Absorption Imaging of High-Intensity Discharge Lamps Using Monochromatic Synchrotron Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, John J.; Sansonetti, Craig J.; Hechtfischer, Ulrich; Adler, Helmar G.

    2002-10-01

    We will report results from the imaging of Hg vapor in high-intensity discharge lamps using synchrotron radiation and digital detectors. These measurements extend previous work on x-ray absorption imaging in arc lamps using an x-ray tube and a passive phosphor image plate detector^i. The large x-ray flux obtained from the Advanced Photon Source (Argonne National Laboratory) combined with the electronic gating capabilities of an intensified charge-coupled device detector have allowed us to obtain time-resolved Hg distributions with high spatial resolution. Monochromatic synchrotron radiation improves the accuracy over what can be obtained with quasi-continuum radiation from an x-ray tube source. ^iJ. J. Curry, M. Sakai, and J. E. Lawler, Journal of Applied Physics 84, 3066 (1998).

  20. Crystal optics for hard-X-ray spectroscopy of highly charged ions

    OpenAIRE

    Beyer, H. F.; Attia, D.; Banas, D; Bigot, E. -O. Le; Bosch, F.; Dousse, Jean-Claude; Förster, E.; Gumberidze, A.; Hagmann, S.; Heß, S.; J. Hoszowska; Indelicato, P.; Jagodzinski, P.; Kozhuharov, Chr.; Krings, Th.

    2009-01-01

    A twin crystal-spectrometer assembly, operated in the focusing compensated asymmetric Laue geometry has been developed for accurate spectroscopy of fast highly charged heavy ions in the hard-X-ray region. Coupled to the focusing crystal optics is a specially developed two-dimensional position-sensitive X-ray detector which is necessary for retaining spectral resolution also for fast moving sources. We summarize the crystal optics and demonstrate the usefulness of the instrument for spectrosco...

  1. Thermal expansion in UO2 determined by high-energy X-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, M.; Benmore, C. J.; Skinner, L. B.; Alderman, O. L. G.; Weber, J. K. R.; Parise, J. B.; Williamson, M.

    2016-10-01

    Here we present crystallographic analyses of high-energy X-ray diffraction data on polycrystalline UO2 up to the melting temperature. The Rietveld refinements of our X-ray data are in agreement with previous measurements, but are systematically located around the upper bound of their uncertainty, indicating a slightly steeper trend of thermal expansion compared to established values. This observation is consistent with recent first principles calculations.

  2. Experimental study of conversion from atomic high-order harmonics to x-ray emissions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王骐; 陈建新; 夏元钦; 陈德应

    2003-01-01

    There are two physical phenomena in a strong laser intensity. One is the high-order harmonic emission; the other is x-ray emission from optical-field ionized plasmas. The experiment of conversion from high-order harmonics to x-ray emissions was given with a 105fs Ti:sapphire laser by adjusting laser intensities. The ingredient in plasma was investigated by the numerical simulations. Our experimental results suggested that the free electrons have detrimental effects on harmonic generation but are favourable for x-ray emission from optical-field ionized plasmas. If we want to obtain more intense harmonic signals as a coherent light source in the soft x-ray region, we must avoid the production of free electrons in plasmas. At the same time, if we want to observe x-rays for the development of high-repetition-rate table-top soft x-ray lasers, we should strip all atoms in the plasmas to a necessary ionized stage by the optical-fieldionization in the field of a high-intensity laser pulse.

  3. High-Sensitivity X-ray Polarimetry with Amorphous Silicon Active-Matrix Pixel Proportional Counters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, J. K.; Deines-Jones, P.; Jahoda, K.; Ready, S. E.; Street, R. A.

    2003-01-01

    Photoelectric X-ray polarimeters based on pixel micropattern gas detectors (MPGDs) offer order-of-magnitude improvement in sensitivity over more traditional techniques based on X-ray scattering. This new technique places some of the most interesting astronomical observations within reach of even a small, dedicated mission. The most sensitive instrument would be a photoelectric polarimeter at the focus of 2 a very large mirror, such as the planned XEUS. Our efforts are focused on a smaller pathfinder mission, which would achieve its greatest sensitivity with large-area, low-background, collimated polarimeters. We have recently demonstrated a MPGD polarimeter using amorphous silicon thin-film transistor (TFT) readout suitable for the focal plane of an X-ray telescope. All the technologies used in the demonstration polarimeter are scalable to the areas required for a high-sensitivity collimated polarimeter. Leywords: X-ray polarimetry, particle tracking, proportional counter, GEM, pixel readout

  4. Retrograde accretion discs in high-mass Be/X-ray binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christodoulou, D. M.; Laycock, S. G. T.; Kazanas, D.

    2017-09-01

    We have compiled a comprehensive library of all X-ray observations of Magellanic pulsars carried out by XMM-Newton, Chandra and RXTE in the period 1997-2014. In this work, we use the data from 53 high-mass Be/X-ray binaries in the Small Magellanic Cloud to demonstrate that the distribution of spin-period derivatives versus spin periods of spinning-down pulsars is not at all different from that of the accreting spinning-up pulsars. The inescapable conclusion is that the up and down samples were drawn from the same continuous parent population; therefore, Be/X-ray pulsars that are spinning down over periods spanning 18 yr are, in fact, accreting from retrograde discs. The presence of prograde and retrograde discs in roughly equal numbers supports a new evolutionary scenario for Be/X-ray pulsars in their spin period-period derivative diagram.

  5. V723 Cassiopeia still on in X-rays: A bright Super Soft Source 12 years after outburst

    CERN Document Server

    Ness, J U-; Starrfield, S; Osborne, J P; Page, K L; Beardmore, A P; Wagner, R M; Woodward, C E

    2008-01-01

    We find that the classical nova V723 Cas (1995) is still an active X-ray source more than 12 years after outburst and analyze seven X-ray observations carried out with Swift between 2006 January 31 and 2007 December 3. The average count rate is 0.022+/-0.01 cts s^{-1} but the source is variable within a factor of two of the mean and does not show any signs of turning off. We present supporting optical observations which show that between 2001 and 2006 an underlying hot source was present with steadily increasing temperature. In order to confirm that the X-ray emission is from V723 Cas, we extract a ROSAT observation taken in 1990 and find that there was no X-ray source at the position of the nova. The Swift XRT spectra resemble those of the Super Soft X-ray binary Sources (SSS) which is confirmed by RXTE survey data which show no X-ray emission above 2 keV between 1996 and 2007. Using blackbody fits we constrain the effective temperature to between T_eff=(2.6-4.6)x10^5 K and a bolometric luminosity >5x10^35 e...

  6. High Spectral Resolution, High Cadence, Imaging X-Ray Microcalorimeters for Solar Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandler, Simon R.; Bailey, Catherine N.; Bookbinder, Jay A.; DeLuca, Edward E.; Chervenak, Jay A.; Eckart, Megan E.; Finkbeiner, Fred M.; Kelley, Daniel P.; Kelley, Richard L.; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Porter, Frederick S.; Sadleir, Jack E.; Smith, Stephen J.; Smith, Randall K.

    2010-01-01

    High spectral resolution, high cadence, imaging x-ray spectroscopy has the potential to revolutionize the study of the solar corona. To that end we have been developing transition-edge-sensor (TES) based x-ray micro calorimeter arrays for future solar physics missions where imaging and high energy resolution spectroscopy will enable previously impossible studies of the dynamics and energetics of the solar corona. The characteristics of these x-ray microcalorimeters are significantly different from conventional micro calorimeters developed for astrophysics because they need to accommodate much higher count rates (300-1000 cps) while maintaining high energy resolution of less than 4 eV FWHM in the X-ray energy band of 0.2-10 keV. The other main difference is a smaller pixel size (less than 75 x 75 square microns) than is typical for x-ray micro calorimeters in order to provide angular resolution less than 1 arcsecond. We have achieved at energy resolution of 2.15 eV at 6 keV in a pixel with a 12 x 12 square micron TES sensor and 34 x 34 x 9.1 micron gold absorber, and a resolution of 2.30 eV at 6 keV in a pixel with a 35 x 35 micron TES and a 57 x 57 x 9.1 micron gold absorber. This performance has been achieved in pixels that are fabricated directly onto solid substrates, ie. they are not supported by silicon nitride membranes. We present the results from these detectors, the expected performance at high count-rates, and prospects for the use of this technology for future Solar missions.

  7. Measurements of internal stresses in bond coating using high energy x-rays from synchrotron radiation source

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, K; Akiniwa, Y; Nishio, K; Kawamura, M; Okado, H

    2002-01-01

    Thermal barrier coating (TBC) techniques enable high temperature combustion of turbines made of Ni-base alloy. TBC is made of zirconia top coating on NiCoCrAlY bond coating. The internal stresses in the bond coating play essential role in the delamination or fracture of TBC in service. With the X-rays from laboratory equipments, it is impossible to measure nondestructively the internal stress in the bond coating under the top coating. synchrotron radiations with a high energy and high brightness have a large penetration depth as compared with laboratory X-rays. Using the high energy X-rays from the synchrotron radiation, it is possible to measure the internal stress in the bond coating through the top coating. In this study, the furnace, which can heat a specimen to 1473 K, was developed for the stress measurement of the thermal barrier coatings. The internal stresses in the bond coating were measured at the room temperature, 773 K, 1073 K and 1373 K by using the 311 diffraction from Ni sub 3 Al with about 73...

  8. Integration of flat panel X-ray detector for high resolution diagnostic medical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Woo; Yun, Min-Seok; Kim, Yoon-Suk; Oh, Kyung-Min; Shin, Jung-Wook; Nam, Kyung-Tae; Nam, Sang-Hee

    2011-05-01

    In these days, flat panel X-ray image detectors have shown their potential for replacing traditional screen-film systems. To detect the X-ray photon energy, there are two main methods known as a direct method and an indirect method. The X-rays are converted immediately into electrical signal with the direct method. The indirect method has two conversion steps: the scintillator absorbs the X-rays and converts them to visible light. And then the visible light is converted to electrical signal (e.g. by photodiodes). In this work, the flat panel digital X-ray image detector based on direct method with a high atomic number material was designed and evaluated. The high atomic number material for X-ray conversion is deposited by a rubbing method with about 300 μm. The rubbing method is similar to the screen printing method. It consists of two elements: the screen and the squeegee. The method uses a proper stiff bar stretched tightly over a frame made of wood or metal. Proper tension is essential for proper laminated structure. The detector prototype has 139 μm pixel pitch, total 1280×1536 pixels and 86% fill factor. Twelve readout ICs are installed on digital X-ray detector and simultaneously operated to reach short readout time. The electronics integrated: the preamplifier to amplify generated signal, the Analog to Digital converter and the source of bias voltage (1 V/μm). The system board and interface use an NI-camera program. Finally, we achieved images from this flat panel X-ray image detector.

  9. Manufacturing and testing of X-ray imaging components with high precision

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Jia-sheng; WU Xü

    2005-01-01

    In the latest 20 years, X-ray imaging technology has developed rapidly in order to meet the needs of X-ray photo-etching,spatial exploration technology, high-energy physics, procedure diagnosis of ICF,etc. Since refractive indices of materials in the X-ray region are lower than 1, and X-ray is strongly absorbed by materials, the characteristics of X-ray increase greatly difficulty to obtain X-ray image. Conventional imaging methods are hardly suitable to X-ray range. In general, grazing reflective imaging and coding aperture imaging methods have been adopted more and more.We have designed a non-coaxial grazing reflective X-ray microscope which is composed of four spherical mirrors, in order to satisfy the requirement of the diagnosis of inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The four mirrors have the same radius of curvature. The radius of each mirror is 29 000 mm and the aperture is 30 mm×15 mm. Allowable tolerance of the radius is ≤0.2% and one of surface roughness (rms) is ≤0.6 nm. Evidently it is very difficult to fabricate and test such mirrors. In order to obtain eligible mirrors, we choose 18 mirror roughcasts and array them on a round disk according to format. The combined manufacturing method can ensure high accordant quality. The fabricated mirrors are tested by both templet and double round aperture methods. Radius errors of the mirrors is about 53 mm. The surface roughness (rms) of the mirrors is inspected by the relative interferometric equipment (WYKO) and atomic force microscope. Before and after coating the measured surface roughness is averagely 0.52 nm and 0.4 nm, respectively.

  10. Investigating high speed phenomena in laser plasma interactions using dilation x-ray imager (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, S R; Hilsabeck, T J; Bell, P M; Bradley, D K; Ayers, M J; Piston, K; Felker, B; Kilkenny, J D; Chung, T; Sammuli, B; Hares, J D; Dymoke-Bradshaw, A K L

    2014-11-01

    The DIlation X-ray Imager (DIXI) is a new, high-speed x-ray framing camera at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) sensitive to x-rays in the range of ≈2-17 keV. DIXI uses the pulse-dilation technique to achieve a temporal resolution of less than 10 ps, a ≈10× improvement over conventional framing cameras currently employed on the NIF (≈100 ps resolution), and otherwise only attainable with 1D streaked imaging. The pulse-dilation technique utilizes a voltage ramp to impart a velocity gradient on the signal-bearing electrons. The temporal response, spatial resolution, and x-ray sensitivity of DIXI are characterized with a short x-ray impulse generated using the COMET laser facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. At the NIF a pinhole array at 10 cm from target chamber center (tcc) projects images onto the photocathode situated outside the NIF chamber wall with a magnification of ≈64×. DIXI will provide important capabilities for warm-dense-matter physics, high-energy-density science, and inertial confinement fusion, adding important capabilities to temporally resolve hot-spot formation, x-ray emission, fuel motion, and mix levels in the hot-spot at neutron yields of up to 10(17). We present characterization data as well as first results on electron-transport phenomena in buried-layer foil experiments.

  11. X-ray polarimetry: A new window on the high energy sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellazzini, R.; Muleri, F.

    2010-11-01

    Polarimetry is widely considered a powerful observational technique in X-ray astronomy, useful to enhance our understanding of the emission mechanisms, geometry and magnetic field arrangement of many compact objects. However, the lack of suitable sensitive instrumentation in the X-ray energy band has been the limiting factor for its development in the last three decades. Up to now, polarization measurements have been made exclusively with Bragg diffraction at 45∘ or Compton scattering at 90∘ and the only unambiguous detection of X-ray polarization has been obtained for one of the brightest object in the X-ray sky, the Crab Nebula. Only recently, with the development of a new class of high sensitivity imaging detectors, the possibility to exploit the photoemission process to measure the photon polarization has become a reality. We will report on the performance of an imaging X-ray polarimeter based on photoelectric effect. The device derives the polarization information from the track of the photoelectrons imaged by a finely subdivided Gas Pixel Detector. It has a great sensitivity even with telescopes of modest area and can perform simultaneously good imaging, moderate spectroscopy and high rate timing. Being truly 2D it is non-dispersive and does not require any rotation. This device is included in the scientific payload of many proposals of satellite mission which have the potential to unveil polarimetry also in X-rays in a few years.

  12. Observation of solar high energy gamma and X-ray emission and solar energetic particles

    CERN Document Server

    Struminsky, Alexei

    2015-01-01

    We considered 18 solar flares observed between June 2010 and July 2012, in which high energy >100 MeV {\\gamma}-emission was registered by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) aboard FermiGRO. We examined for these {\\gamma}-events soft X-ray observations by GOES, hard X-ray observations by the Anti-Coincidence Shield of the SPectrometer aboard INTEGRAL (ACS SPI) and the Gamma-Ray burst Monitor (GBM) aboard FermiGRO. Hard X-ray and {\\pi}0-decay {\\gamma}-ray emissions are used as tracers of electron and proton acceleration, respectively. Bursts of hard X-ray were observed by ACS SPI during impulsive phase of 13 events. Bursts of hard X-ray >100 keV were not found during time intervals, when prolonged hard {\\gamma}-emission was registered by LAT/FermiGRO. Those events showing prolonged high-energy gamma-ray emission not accompanied by >100 keV hard X-ray emission are interpreted as an indication of either different acceleration processes for protons and electrons or as the presence of a proton population accelerated du...

  13. Investigating high speed phenomena in laser plasma interactions using dilation x-ray imager (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagel, S. R., E-mail: nagel7@llnl.gov; Bell, P. M.; Bradley, D. K.; Ayers, M. J.; Piston, K.; Felker, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Hilsabeck, T. J.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Chung, T.; Sammuli, B. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Hares, J. D.; Dymoke-Bradshaw, A. K. L. [Kentech Instruments Ltd., Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-15

    The DIlation X-ray Imager (DIXI) is a new, high-speed x-ray framing camera at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) sensitive to x-rays in the range of ≈2–17 keV. DIXI uses the pulse-dilation technique to achieve a temporal resolution of less than 10 ps, a ≈10× improvement over conventional framing cameras currently employed on the NIF (≈100 ps resolution), and otherwise only attainable with 1D streaked imaging. The pulse-dilation technique utilizes a voltage ramp to impart a velocity gradient on the signal-bearing electrons. The temporal response, spatial resolution, and x-ray sensitivity of DIXI are characterized with a short x-ray impulse generated using the COMET laser facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. At the NIF a pinhole array at 10 cm from target chamber center (tcc) projects images onto the photocathode situated outside the NIF chamber wall with a magnification of ≈64×. DIXI will provide important capabilities for warm-dense-matter physics, high-energy-density science, and inertial confinement fusion, adding important capabilities to temporally resolve hot-spot formation, x-ray emission, fuel motion, and mix levels in the hot-spot at neutron yields of up to 10{sup 17}. We present characterization data as well as first results on electron-transport phenomena in buried-layer foil experiments.

  14. High-Mass X-ray binaries in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Haberl, Frank

    2015-01-01

    The last comprehensive catalogue of high-mass X-ray binaries in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) was published about 10 years ago. Since then new such systems were discovered, mainly by X-ray observations with Chandra and XMM-Newton. For the majority of the proposed HMXBs in the SMC no X-ray pulsations were discovered yet and unless other properties of the X-ray source and/or the optical counterpart confirm their HMXB nature, they remain only candidate HMXBs. From a literature search we collect a catalogue of 148 confirmed and candidate HMXBs in the SMC and investigate their properties to shed light on their real nature. Based on the sample of well established HMXBs (the pulsars), we investigate which observed properties are most appropriate for a reliable classification. Using spectral and temporal characteristics of the X-ray sources and colour-magnitude diagrams from the optical to the infrared of their likely counterparts and taking into account the uncertainty in the X-ray position we define different le...

  15. NASA's High Energy Vision: Chandra and the X-Ray Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mais, D. E.; Stencel, R. E.; Richards, D.

    2004-05-01

    The Chandra X-Ray Observatory is the most sophisticated X-ray observatory launched by NASA. Chandra is designed to observe X-rays from high-energy regions of the universe, such as the remnants of supernovae explosions, col- liding galaxies, black holes, pulsars, neutron stars, quasars, and X-ray bi- nary stars. The spectacular results from the first five years of Chandra ob- servations are changing and redefining theories with each observation. Every exciting new image shows glimpses of such exotic phenomena as super-massive black holes, surprising black hole activity in old galaxies, rivers of grav- ity that define the cosmic landscape, unexpected x-ray activity in proto- stars and failed stars, puzzling distributions of elements in supernovae remnants, the sound waves from a super-massive black hole, and the even the tantalizing possibility of an entirely new form of matter - the strange quark star. On September 14, 2000, triggered by alerts from amateur astron- omers worldwide, Chandra observed the outburst of the brightest northern dwarf nova SS Cygni. The cooperation of hundreds of amateur variable star astronomers and the Chandra X-Ray scientists and spacecraft specialists pro- vided proof that the collaboration of amateur and professional astronomers is a powerful tool to study cosmic phenomena.

  16. A broadband x-ray imaging spectroscopy with high-angular resolution: the FORCE mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Koji; Tsuru, Takeshi Go; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Okajima, Takashi; Murakami, Hiroshi; Awaki, Hisamitsu; Matsumoto, Hironori; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Zhang, William W.

    2016-07-01

    We are proposing FORCE (Focusing On Relativistic universe and Cosmic Evolution) as a future Japan-lead Xray observatory to be launched in the mid 2020s. Hitomi (ASTRO-H) possesses a suite of sensitive instruments enabling the highest energy-resolution spectroscopy in soft X-ray band, a broadband X-ray imaging spectroscopy in soft and hard X-ray bands, and further high energy coverage up to soft gamma-ray band. FORCE is the direct successor to the broadband X-ray imaging spectroscopy aspect of Hitomi (ASTRO-H) with significantly higher angular resolution. The current design of FORCE defines energy band pass of 1-80 keV with angular resolution of black holes" in various mass-scales: "buried supermassive black holes (SMBHs)" (> 104 M⊙) residing in the center of galaxies in a cosmological distance, "intermediate-mass black holes" (102-104 M⊙) acting as the possible seeds from which SMBHs grow, and "orphan stellar-mass black holes" (mirror and wide-band X-ray detector. The focal length is currently planned to be 10 m. The silicon mirror with multi-layer coating is our primary choice to achieve lightweight, good angular optics. The detector is a descendant of hard X-ray imager onboard Hitomi (ASTRO-H) replacing its silicon strip detector with SOI-CMOS silicon pixel detector, allowing an extension of the low energy threshold down to 1 keV or even less.

  17. Radio emission from the high-mass X-ray binary BP Cru: first detection

    CERN Document Server

    Pestalozzi, M; Hobbs, G; Lopez-Sanchez, A R

    2009-01-01

    BP Cru is a well known high-mass X-ray binary composed of a late B hypergiant (Wray 977) and a neutron star, also observed as the X-ray pulsar GX 301-2. No information about emission from BP Cru in other bands than X-rays and optical has been reported to date in the literature, though massive X-ray binaries containing black holes can have radio emission from a jet. In order to assess the presence of a radio jet, we searched for radio emission towards BP Cru using the Australia Compact Array Telescope during a survey for radio emission from Be/X-ray transients. We probed the 41.5d orbit of BP Cru with the Australia Telescope Compact Array not only close to periastron but also close to apastron. BP Cru was clearly detected in our data on 4, possibly 6, of 12 occasions at 4.8 and 8.6 GHz. Our data suggest that the spectral index of the radio emission is modulated either by the X-ray flux or the orbital phase of the system. We propose that the radio emission of BP Cru probably arises from two components: a persis...

  18. Preheating of the early universe by radiation from high-mass X-ray binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazonov, S. Yu.; Khabibullin, I. I.

    2017-04-01

    Using a reliablymeasured intrinsic (i.e., corrected for absorption effects) present-day luminosity function of high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) in the 0.25-2 keV energy band per unit star formation rate, we estimate the preheating of the early Universe by soft X-rays from such systems. We find that X-ray irradiation, mainly executed by ultraluminous and supersoft ultraluminous X-ray sources with luminosity L X > 1039 erg s-1, could significantly heat ( T > T CMB, where T CMB is the temperature of the cosmic microwave background) the intergalactic medium by z 10 if the specific X-ray emissivity of the young stellar population in the early Universe was an order of magnitude higher than at the present epoch (which is possible due to the low metallicity of the first galaxies) and the soft X-ray emission from HMXBs did not suffer strong absorption within their galaxies. This makes it possible to observe the 21 cm line of neutral hydrogen in emission from redshifts z < 10.

  19. Femtosecond X-ray magnetic circular dichroism absorption spectroscopy at an X-ray free electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higley, Daniel J., E-mail: dhigley@stanford.edu; Yuan, Edwin [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Hirsch, Konstantin; Dakovski, Georgi L.; Jal, Emmanuelle; Lutman, Alberto A.; Coslovich, Giacomo; Hart, Philip; Hoffmann, Matthias C.; Mitra, Ankush; Moeller, Stefan; Ohldag, Hendrik; Seaberg, Matthew; Stöhr, Joachim; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter; Reid, Alex H.; Dürr, Hermann A.; Schlotter, William F. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Liu, Tianmin; MacArthur, James P. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); and others

    2016-03-15

    X-ray magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy using an X-ray free electron laser is demonstrated with spectra over the Fe L{sub 3,2}-edges. The high brightness of the X-ray free electron laser combined with high accuracy detection of incident and transmitted X-rays enables ultrafast X-ray magnetic circular dichroism studies of unprecedented sensitivity. This new capability is applied to a study of all-optical magnetic switching dynamics of Fe and Gd magnetic sublattices in a GdFeCo thin film above its magnetization compensation temperature.

  20. Understanding Bright 13 keV Kr K-shell X-ray Sources at the NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, M. J.; Colvin, J. D.; Kemp, G. E.; Fournier, K. B.; Scott, H.; Patel, M.; Barrios, Widmann; Widmann, K.

    2015-11-01

    High x-ray conversion efficiency (CE) K-shell Kr sources are being investigated for High Energy Density experiments. These sources are 4.1 mm in diameter 4.4 mm tall hollow epoxy tubes having a 40 μm thick wall holding either 1.2 or 1.5 atm of Kr gas. The CE of K-shell Kr is dependent upon the peak electron temperature in the radiating plasma. In the NIF experiments, the available energy heats the source to Te = 6-7 keV, well below the temperature of Te ~25 keV needed to optimize the Kr CE. The CE is a steep function of the peak electron temperature. A spatially averaged electron temperature can be estimated from measured He(α) and Ly(α) line ratios. Some disagreement has been observed in the simulated and measured line ratios for some of these K-shell sources. Disagreements have been observed between the simulated and measured line ratios for some of these K-shell sources. To help understand this issue, Kr gas pipes have been shot with 3 ω light at ?750 kJ at ~210, ~140 TW and ~120 TW power levels with 3.7, 5.2 and 6.7 ns pulses, respectively. The power and pulse length scaling of the measured CE and K-shell line ratios and their comparison to simulations will be discussed. This work was performed under the auspic

  1. Cellulose/inorganic-composite fibers for producing textile fabrics of high X-ray absorption properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Günther, Karoline; Giebing, Christina; Askani, Antonia [FTB, Hochschule Niederrhein – University of Applied Science, Faculty of Textile and Clothing Technology, Webschulstr. 31, 41065 Mönchengladbach (Germany); Leisegang, Tilmann [Saxray GmbH, Maria-Reiche-Str. 1, 01109 Dresden (Germany); Krieg, Marcus [TITK, Thüringisches Institut für Textil- und Kunststoff-Forschung e.V., Breitscheidstraße 97, 07407 Rudolstadt (Germany); Kyosev, Yordan; Weide, Thomas [FTB, Hochschule Niederrhein – University of Applied Science, Faculty of Textile and Clothing Technology, Webschulstr. 31, 41065 Mönchengladbach (Germany); Mahltig, Boris, E-mail: Boris.Mahltig@hs-niederrhein.de [FTB, Hochschule Niederrhein – University of Applied Science, Faculty of Textile and Clothing Technology, Webschulstr. 31, 41065 Mönchengladbach (Germany)

    2015-11-01

    Common textile materials as cotton or polyester do not possess reliable X-ray absorption properties. This is due to their morphology and chemical composition in particular. Common fibers are built up from organic polymers containing mainly the elements carbon, hydrogen, oxygen and nitrogen. These “light” elements only have low X-ray absorption coefficients. In contrast, inorganic materials composed of “heavy” elements with high atomic numbers, e.g. barium or bismuth, exhibit X-ray absorption coefficients higher by up to two orders of magnitude. To obtain a flexible yarn with high X-ray absorption properties both these materials, the organic polymer and the inorganic X-ray absorber, are combined to an inorganic/organic composite fiber material. Hence, as the organic component cellulose from modified Lyocell-process is used as carrier fiber and blended with inorganic absorber particles of low toxicity and high absorption coefficients, as bariumsulphate, bariumtitanate or bismuthoxide. A content of inorganic absorber particles equally distributed in the whole fiber of up to 20% is achieved. The composite fibers are produced as staple or filament fibers and processed to multifilament or staple fiber yarns. The staple fiber yarns are rotor-spinned to increase the comfort of the subsequent textile material. Several woven fabrics, considering multilayer structure and different warp/weft density, are developed. The energy dependent X-ray shielding properties are determined in dependence on the different yarn compositions, yarn types and structural parameters of the woven fabrics. As a result, a production process of textile materials with comfortable and dedicated X-ray absorption properties is established. It offers a promising opportunity for manufacturing of specialized textiles, working clothes or uniforms applicable for medicine, air craft and security personal, mining as well as for innovative composite materials. - Highlights: • Preparation of cellulosic

  2. The chemical sensitivity of X-ray spectroscopy: high energy resolution XANES versus X-ray emission spectroscopy of substituted ferrocenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Andrew J; Bauer, Matthias; Jacob, Christoph R

    2013-06-07

    X-ray spectroscopy at the metal K-edge is an important tool for understanding catalytic processes and provides insight into the geometric and electronic structures of transition metal complexes. In particular, X-ray emission-based methods such as high-energy resolution fluorescence detection (HERFD), X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) and valence-to-core X-ray emission spectroscopy (V2C-XES) hold the promise of providing increased chemical sensitivity compared to conventional X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Here, we explore the ability of HERFD-XANES and V2C-XES spectroscopy to distinguish substitutions beyond the directly coordinated atoms for the example of ferrocene and selected ferrocene derivatives. The experimental spectra are assigned and interpreted through the use of density functional theory (DFT) calculations. We find that while the pre-edge peaks in the HERFD-XANES spectra are affected by substituents at the cyclopentadienyl ring containing π-bonds [A. J. Atkins, Ch. R. Jacob and M. Bauer, Chem.-Eur. J., 2012, 18, 7021], the V2C-XES spectra are virtually unchanged. The pre-edge in HERFD-XANES probes the weak transition to unoccupied metal d-orbitals, while the V2C-XES spectra are determined by dipole-allowed transitions from occupied ligand orbitals to the 1s core hole. The latter turn out to be less sensitive to changes beyond the first coordination shell.

  3. Characterization of metallic nanoparticles by high-resolution X-ray absorption and X-ray emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuehn, Timna-Josua

    2012-03-15

    In almost all areas of technology, metallic nanoparticles are of interest due to their special thermal, electronic, magnetic and optical properties. Their special properties are mainly due to their small size which implies the relevance of quantum effects as well as the significance of the surface: For 2 nm nanoparticles, the surface-to-volume ratio is already 1:1. However, the identification of surface-to-volume interactions - that are responsible for the new properties - is a difficult task due to the small size that inhibits a lot of 'standard' techniques to be applicable. Here X-ray absorption/emission spectroscopy (XAS/XES) is a favorable tool for the characterization of nanoparticles, independent on size, degree of crystallinity and shape/condition of the surface. Using XAS, a tempered nanosized Co{sub 3}Pt/C catalyst have been investigated. Its outstanding oxygen-reduction reaction (ORR) properties in a fuel cell could be related to a lowered Pt 5d-band center connected to a tightened Pt-Pt bonding distance, leading to a weakening of the oxygen adsorption strength so that the ORR may proceed faster. One drawback remains, however, as the properties found by (standard) XAS are summed up for different chemical environments of the chosen element. Thus, no distinction can be made between, e.g., the pure metal in a nanoparticles' interior and the ligated metal in the outer shells or surface. Here, high-resolution fluorescence-detected XAS (HRFD-XAS) provides additional opportunities as, due to its chemical sensitivity, it leads to site-selective XAS. For a system of 6 nm sized Co nanoparticles, build up of a metallic core surrounded by a protecting shell, that resulted from the 'smooth oxidation' process, this technique of site-selective XAS was proven to be applicable. For the first time, the interior and outer shell of a metallic nanoparticle could be characterized separately. In particular, the Co-hcp phase could be determined for the

  4. High-Performance X-ray Detection in a New Analytical Electron Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyman, C. E.; Goldstein, J. I.; Williams, D. B.; Ackland, D. W.; vonHarrach, S.; Nicholls, A. W.; Statham, P. J.

    1994-01-01

    X-ray detection by energy-dispersive spectrometry in the analytical electron microscope (AEM) is often limited by low collected X-ray intensity (P), modest peak-to-background (P/B) ratios, and limitations on total counting time (tau) due to specimen drift and contamination. A new AFM has been designed with maximization of P. P/B, and tau as the primary considerations. Maximization of P has been accomplished by employing a field-emission electron gun, X-ray detectors with high collection angles, high-speed beam blanking to allow only one photon into the detector at a time, and simultaneous collection from two detectors. P/B has been maximized by reducing extraneous background signals generated at the specimen holder, the polepieces and the detector collimator. The maximum practical tau has been increased by reducing specimen contamination and employing electronic drift correction. Performance improvments have been measured using the NIST standard Cr thin film. The 0-3 steradian solid angle of X-ray collection is the highest value available. The beam blanking scheme for X-ray detection provides 3-4 times greater throughput of X-rays at high count rates into a recorded spectrum than normal systems employing pulse-pileup rejection circuits. Simultaneous X-ray collection from two detectors allows the highest X-ray intensity yet recorded to be collected from the NIST Cr thin film. The measured P/B of 6300 is the highest level recorded for an AEM. In addition to collected X-ray intensity (cps/nA) and P/B measured on the standard Cr film, the product of these can be used as a figure-of-merit to evaluate instruments. Estimated minimum mass fraction (MMF) for Cr measured on the standard NIST Cr thin film is also proposed as a figure-of-merit for comparing X-ray detection in AEMs. Determinations here of the MMF of Cr detectable show at least a threefold improvement over previous instruments.

  5. X-ray and radio bright type Ic SN2002ap -- a hypernova without an associated GRB

    CERN Document Server

    Sutaria, F K; Chandra, P

    2002-01-01

    Combined X-ray (0.3 -10 keV) and Radio (0.61 and 1.42 GHz) observations of the type Ic SN 2002ap are used here, to determine the origins of the prompt X-ray and Radio emission from this source.Our analysis of the XMM-Newton observations suggests that the prompt X-ray emission originates from inverse Compton scattering of photospheric thermal emission by energetic electrons. We also compare the early radiospheric properties of SN 2002ap with those of SN 1998bw (type Ic) and SN 1993J (type IIb), to contrast the prompt emission from a GRB associated SN with other supernovae without GRB counterparts.

  6. Calculating the X-Ray Fluorescence from the Planet Mercury Due to High-Energy Electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbine, T. H.; Trombka, J. I.; Bergstrom, P. M., Jr.; Christon, S. P.

    2005-01-01

    The least-studied terrestrial planet is Mercury due to its proximity to the Sun, which makes telescopic observations and spacecraft encounters difficult. Our lack of knowledge about Mercury should change in the near future due to the recent launching of MESSENGER, a Mercury orbiter. Another mission (BepiColombo) is currently being planned. The x-ray spectrometer on MESSENGER (and planned for BepiColombo) can characterize the elemental composition of a planetary surface by measuring emitted fluorescent x-rays. If electrons are ejected from an atom s inner shell by interaction with energetic particles such as photons, electrons, or ions, electrons from an outer shell can transfer to the inner shell. Characteristic x-rays are then emitted with energies that are the difference between the binding energy of the ion in its excited state and that of the ion in its ground state. Because each element has a unique set of energy levels, each element emits x-rays at a unique set of energies. Electrons and ions usually do not have the needed flux at high energies to cause significant x-ray fluorescence on most planetary bodies. This is not the case for Mercury where high-energy particles were detected during the Mariner 10 flybys. Mercury has an intrinsic magnetic field that deflects the solar wind, resulting in a bow shock in the solar wind and a magnetospheric cavity. Electrons and ions accelerated in the magnetosphere tend to follow its magnetic field lines and can impact the surface on Mercury s dark side Modeling has been done to determine if x-ray fluorescence resulting from the impact of high-energy electrons accelerated in Mercury's magnetosphere can be detected by MESSENGER. Our goal is to understand how much bulk chemical information can be obtained from x-ray fluorescence measurements on the dark side of Mercury.

  7. A High Spectral Resolution Observation of the Soft X-ray Diffuse Background with Thermal Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    McCammon, D; Apodaca, E; Tiest, W B; Cui, W; Deiker, S W; Galeazzi, M; Juda, M; Lesser, A; Mihara, T; Morgenthaler, J P; Sanders, W T; Zhang, J; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; Kelley, R L; Moseley, S H; Mushotzky, R F; Porter, F S; Stahle, C K; Szymkowiak, A E

    2002-01-01

    A high spectral resolution observation of the diffuse X-ray background in the 60 - 1000 eV energy range has been made using an array of thirty-six 1 mm^2 micro-calorimeters flown on a sounding rocket. Detector energy resolution ranged from 5-12 eV FWHM, and a composite spectrum of ~ 1 steradian of the background centered at l = 90, b = +60 was obtained with a net resolution of ~ 9 eV. The target area includes bright 1/4 keV regions, but avoids Loop I and the North Polar Spur. Lines of C VI, O VII, and O VIII are clearly detected with intensities of 5.4 +/- 2.3, 4.8 +/- 0.8, and 1.6 +/- 0.4 photons cm^-2 s^-1 sr^-1, respectively. The oxygen lines alone account for a majority of the diffuse background observed in the ROSAT R4 band that is not due to resolved extragalactic discrete sources. We also have a positive detection of the Fe-M line complex near 70 eV at an intensity consistent with previous upper limits that indicate substantial gas phase depletion of iron. We include a detailed description of the instr...

  8. Relativistically Self-Channeled Femtosecond Terawatt Lasers for High-Field Physics and X-Ray Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borisov, A.B.; Boyer, K.; Cameron, S.M.; Luk, T.S.; McPherson, A.; Nelson, T.; Rhodes, C.K.

    1999-01-01

    Optical channeling or refractive guiding processes involving the nonlinear interaction of intense femtosecond optical pulses with matter in the self-focussing regime has created exciting opportunities for next-generation laser plasma-based x-ray sources and directed energy applications. This fundamentally new form of extended paraxial electromagnetic propagation in nonlinear dispersive media such as underdense plasma is attributed to the interplay between normal optical diffraction and intensity-dependent nonlinear focussing and refraction contributions in the dielectric response. Superposition of these mechanisms on the intrinsic index profile acts to confine the propagating energy in a dynamic self-guiding longitudinal waveguide structure which is stable for power transmission and robust compression. The laser-driven channels are hypothesized to support a degree of solitonic transport behavior, simultaneously stable in the space and time domains (group velocity dispersion balances self-phase modulation), and are believed to be self-compensating for diffraction and dispersion over many Rayleigh lengths in contrast with the defining characteristics of conventional diffractive imaging and beamforming. By combining concentrated power deposition with well-ordered spatial localization, this phenomena will also create new possibilities for production and regulation of physical interactions, including electron beams, enhanced material coupling, and self-modulated plasma wakefields, over extended gain distances with unprecedented energy densities. Harmonious combination of short-pulse x-ray production with plasma channeling resulting from a relativistic charge displacement nonlinearity mechanism in the terawatt regime (10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) has been shown to generate high-field conditions conducive to efficient multi-kilovolt x-ray amplification and peak spectral brightness. Channeled optical propagation with intense short-pulse lasers is expected to impact several

  9. Refractive X-ray lens for high pressure experiments at SPring-8

    CERN Document Server

    Ohishi, Y; Ishii, M; Ishikawa, T; Shimomura, O

    2001-01-01

    A stacked compound refractive X-ray lens was designed to produce an efficiently focused (phi (cursive,open) Greek<0.1 mm) beam for high-pressure experiments at SPring-8. High-pressure X-ray diffraction requires an intense, high-energy and monochromatic X-ray beam in order to penetrate the absorptive window of a diamond anvil cell (DAC). Our lens, producing a focal spot of 120x275 mu m sup 2 and a peak gain of 12, is well matched to these requirements. It is composed of many plastic chips made by molding, which allows many identical chips to be made precisely. Other advantages of this lens include high throughput, simple energy tunability and easy installation.

  10. Refractive X-ray lens for high pressure experiments at SPring-8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohishi, Y. E-mail: ohishi@spring8.or.jp; Baron, A.Q.R.; Ishii, M.; Ishikawa, T.; Shimomura, O

    2001-07-21

    A stacked compound refractive X-ray lens was designed to produce an efficiently focused (phi (cursive,open) Greek<0.1 mm) beam for high-pressure experiments at SPring-8. High-pressure X-ray diffraction requires an intense, high-energy and monochromatic X-ray beam in order to penetrate the absorptive window of a diamond anvil cell (DAC). Our lens, producing a focal spot of 120x275 {mu}m{sup 2} and a peak gain of 12, is well matched to these requirements. It is composed of many plastic chips made by molding, which allows many identical chips to be made precisely. Other advantages of this lens include high throughput, simple energy tunability and easy installation.

  11. A high time resolution x-ray diagnostic on the Madison Symmetric Torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuBois, Ami M.; Lee, John David; Almagri, Abdulgadar F.

    2015-07-01

    A new high time resolution x-ray detector has been installed on the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) to make measurements around sawtooth events. The detector system is comprised of a silicon avalanche photodiode, a 20 ns Gaussian shaping amplifier, and a 500 MHz digitizer with 14-bit sampling resolution. The fast shaping time diminishes the need to restrict the amount of x-ray flux reaching the detector, limiting the system dead-time. With a much higher time resolution than systems currently in use in high temperature plasma physics experiments, this new detector has the versatility to be used in a variety of discharges with varying flux and the ability to study dynamics on both slow and fast time scales. This paper discusses the new fast x-ray detector recently installed on MST and the improved time resolution capabilities compared to the existing soft and hard x-ray diagnostics. In addition to the detector hardware, improvements to the detector calibration and x-ray pulse identification software, such as additional fitting parameters and a more sophisticated fitting routine are discussed. Finally, initial data taken in both high confinement and standard reversed-field pinch plasma discharges are compared.

  12. High Resolution Triple Axis X-Ray Diffraction Analysis of II-VI Semiconductor Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volz, H. M.; Matyi, R. J.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this research program is to develop methods of structural analysis based on high resolution triple axis X-ray diffractometry (HRTXD) and to carry out detailed studies of defect distributions in crystals grown in both microgravity and ground-based environments. HRTXD represents a modification of the widely used double axis X-ray rocking curve method for the characterization of grown-in defects in nearly perfect crystals. In a double axis rocking curve experiment, the sample is illuminated by a monochromatic X-ray beam and the diffracted intensity is recorded by a fixed, wide-open detector. The intensity diffracted by the sample is then monitored as the sample is rotated through the Bragg reflection condition. The breadth of the peak, which is often reported as the full angular width at half the maximum intensity (FWHM), is used as an indicator of the amount of defects in the sample. This work has shown that high resolution triple axis X-ray diffraction is an effective tool for characterizing the defect structure in semiconductor crystals, particularly at high defect densities. Additionally, the technique is complimentary to X-ray topography for defect characterization in crystals.

  13. Bismuth Passivation Technique for High-Resolution X-Ray Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chervenak, James; Hess, Larry

    2013-01-01

    The Athena-plus team requires X-ray sensors with energy resolution of better than one part in 3,000 at 6 keV X-rays. While bismuth is an excellent material for high X-ray stopping power and low heat capacity (for large signal when an X-ray is stopped by the absorber), oxidation of the bismuth surface can lead to electron traps and other effects that degrade the energy resolution. Bismuth oxide reduction and nitride passivation techniques analogous to those used in indium passivation are being applied in a new technique. The technique will enable improved energy resolution and resistance to aging in bismuth-absorber-coupled X-ray sensors. Elemental bismuth is lithographically integrated into X-ray detector circuits. It encounters several steps where the Bi oxidizes. The technology discussed here will remove oxide from the surface of the Bi and replace it with nitridized surface. Removal of the native oxide and passivating to prevent the growth of the oxide will improve detector performance and insulate the detector against future degradation from oxide growth. Placing the Bi coated sensor in a vacuum system, a reduction chemistry in a plasma (nitrogen/hydrogen (N2/H2) + argon) is used to remove the oxide and promote nitridization of the cleaned Bi surface. Once passivated, the Bi will perform as a better X-ray thermalizer since energy will not be trapped in the bismuth oxides on the surface. A simple additional step, which can be added at various stages of the current fabrication process, can then be applied to encapsulate the Bi film. After plasma passivation, the Bi can be capped with a non-diffusive layer of metal or dielectric. A non-superconducting layer is required such as tungsten or tungsten nitride (WNx).

  14. Comprehensive Monitoring of Gamma-ray Bright Blazars. I. Statistical Study of Optical, X-ray, and Gamma-ray Spectral Slopes

    CERN Document Server

    Williamson, Karen E; Marscher, Alan P; Larionov, Valeri M; Smith, Paul S; Agudo, Iván; Arkharov, Arkady A; Blinov, Dmitry A; Casadio, Carolina; Efimova, Natalia V; Gómez, José L; Hagen-Thorn, Vladimir A; Joshi, Manasvita; Konstantinova, Tatiana S; Kopatskaya, Evgenia N; Larionova, Elena G; Larionova, Liudmilla V; Malmrose, Michael P; McHardy, Ian M; Molina, Sol N; Morozova, Daria A; Schmidt, Gary D; Taylor, Brian W; Troitsky, Ivan S

    2014-01-01

    We present $\\gamma$-ray, X-ray, ultraviolet, optical, and near-infrared light curves of 33 $\\gamma$-ray bright blazars over four years that we have been monitoring since 2008 August with multiple optical, ground-based telescopes and the Swift satellite, and augmented by data from the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope and other publicly available data from Swift. The sample consists of 21 flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) and 12 BL Lac objects (BL Lacs). We identify quiescent and active states of the sources based on their $\\gamma$-ray behavior. We derive $\\gamma$-ray, X-ray, and optical spectral indices, $\\alpha_\\gamma$, $\\alpha_X$, and $\\alpha_o$, respectively ($F_\

  15. Ultra-high-resolution inelastic X-ray scattering at high-repetition-rate self-seeded X-ray free-electron lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubar, Oleg; Geloni, Gianluca; Kocharyan, Vitali; Madsen, Anders; Saldin, Evgeni; Serkez, Svitozar; Shvyd'ko, Yuri; Sutter, John

    2016-03-01

    Inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) is an important tool for studies of equilibrium dynamics in condensed matter. A new spectrometer recently proposed for ultra-high-resolution IXS (UHRIX) has achieved 0.6 meV and 0.25 nm(-1) spectral and momentum-transfer resolutions, respectively. However, further improvements down to 0.1 meV and 0.02 nm(-1) are required to close the gap in energy-momentum space between high- and low-frequency probes. It is shown that this goal can be achieved by further optimizing the X-ray optics and by increasing the spectral flux of the incident X-ray pulses. UHRIX performs best at energies from 5 to 10 keV, where a combination of self-seeding and undulator tapering at the SASE-2 beamline of the European XFEL promises up to a 100-fold increase in average spectral flux compared with nominal SASE pulses at saturation, or three orders of magnitude more than what is possible with storage-ring-based radiation sources. Wave-optics calculations show that about 7 × 10(12) photons s(-1) in a 90 µeV bandwidth can be achieved on the sample. This will provide unique new possibilities for dynamics studies by IXS.

  16. Ultra-high-resolution inelastic X-ray scattering at high-repetition-rate self-seeded X-ray free-electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chubar, Oleg; Geloni, Gianluca; Kocharyan, Vitali; Madsen, Anders; Saldin, Evgeni; Serkez, Svitozar; Shvyd' ko, Yuri; Sutter, John

    2016-02-12

    Inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) is an important tool for studies of equilibrium dynamics in condensed matter. A new spectrometer recently proposed for ultra-high-resolution IXS (UHRIX) has achieved 0.6 meV and 0.25 nm-1spectral and momentum-transfer resolutions, respectively. However, further improvements down to 0.1 meV and 0.02 nm-1 are required to close the gap in energy–momentum space between high- and low-frequency probes. It is shown that this goal can be achieved by further optimizing the X-ray optics and by increasing the spectral flux of the incident X-ray pulses. UHRIX performs best at energies from 5 to 10 keV, where a combination of self-seeding and undulator tapering at the SASE-2 beamline of the European XFEL promises up to a 100-fold increase in average spectral flux compared with nominal SASE pulses at saturation, or three orders of magnitude more than what is possible with storage-ring-based radiation sources. Wave-optics calculations show that about 7 × 1012 photons s-1 in a 90 µeV bandwidth can be achieved on the sample. This will provide unique new possibilities for dynamics studies by IXS.

  17. High-Resolution Structure of the Photosynthetic Mn4Ca Catalyst from X-ray Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yachandra, Vittal; Yano, Junko; Kern, Jan; Pushkar, Yulia; Sauer, Kenneth; Glatzel, Pieter; Bergmann, Uwe; Messinger, Johannes; Zouni, Athina; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2007-08-01

    The application of high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy methods to study the photosynthetic water oxidizing complex, which contains a unique hetero-nuclear catalytic Mn4Ca cluster, are described. Issues of X-ray damage especially at the metal sites in the Mn4Ca cluster are discussed. The structure of the Mn4Ca catalyst at high-resolution which has so far eluded attempts of determination by X-ray diffraction, EXAFS and other spectroscopic techniques has been addressed using polarized EXAFS techniques applied to oriented PS II membrane preparations and PS II single crystals. A review of how the resolution of traditional EXAFS techniques can be improved, using methods such as range-extended EXAFS is presented, and the changes that occur in the structure of the cluster as it advances through the catalytic cycle are described. X-ray absorption and emission techniques (XANES and K? emission) have been used earlier to determine the oxidation states of the Mn4Ca cluster, and in this report we review the use of X-ray resonant Raman spectroscopy to understand the electronic structure of the Mn4Ca cluster as it cycles through the intermediate S-states.

  18. High-energy neutrino fluxes from AGN populations inferred from X-ray surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Jacobsen, Idunn B; On, Alvina Y L; Saxton, Curtis J

    2015-01-01

    High-energy neutrinos and photons are complementary messengers, probing violent astrophysical processes and structural evolution of the Universe. X-ray and neutrino observations jointly constrain conditions in active galactic nuclei (AGN) jets: their baryonic and leptonic contents, and particle production efficiency. Testing two standard neutrino production models for local source Cen A \\citep{KT2008,BB2009}, we calculate the high-energy neutrino spectra of single AGN sources and derive the flux of high-energy neutrinos expected for the current epoch. Assuming that accretion determines both X-rays and particle creation, our parametric scaling relations predict neutrino yield in various AGN classes. We derive redshift-dependent number densities of each class, from {\\it Chandra} and {\\it Swift}/BAT X-ray luminosity functions \\citep{SGB2008,ACS2009}. We integrate the neutrino spectrum expected from the cumulative history of AGN (correcting for cosmological and source effects, e.g. jet orientation and beaming). B...

  19. High Mass X-ray Binaries: Progenitors of double neutron star systems

    CERN Document Server

    Chaty, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    In this review I briefly describe the nature of the three kinds of High-Mass X-ray Binaries (HMXBs), accreting through: (i) Be circumstellar disc, (ii) supergiant stellar wind, and (iii) Roche lobe filling supergiants. A previously unknown population of HMXBs hosting supergiant stars has been revealed in the last years, with multi-wavelength campaigns including high energy (INTEGRAL, Swift, XMM, Chandra) and optical/infrared (mainly ESO) observations. This population is divided between obscured supergiant HMXBs, and supergiant fast X-ray transients (SFXTs), characterized by short and intense X-ray flares. I discuss the characteristics of these types of supergiant HMXBs, propose a scenario describing the properties of these high-energy sources, and finally show how the observations can constrain the accretion models (e.g. clumpy winds, magneto-centrifugal barrier, transitory accretion disc, etc). Because they are the likely progenitors of Luminous Blue Variables (LBVs), and also of double neutron star systems,...

  20. Cryogenic x-ray diffraction microscopy utilizing high-pressure cryopreservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Enju; Chushkin, Yuriy; van der Linden, Peter; Kim, Chae Un; Zontone, Federico; Carpentier, Philippe; Gruner, Sol M; Pernot, Petra

    2014-10-01

    We present cryo x-ray diffraction microscopy of high-pressure-cryofixed bacteria and report high-convergence imaging with multiple image reconstructions. Hydrated D. radiodurans cells were cryofixed at 200 MPa pressure into ∼10-μm-thick water layers and their unstained, hydrated cellular environments were imaged by phasing diffraction patterns, reaching sub-30-nm resolutions with hard x-rays. Comparisons were made with conventional ambient-pressure-cryofixed samples, with respect to both coherent small-angle x-ray scattering and the image reconstruction. The results show a correlation between the level of background ice signal and phasing convergence, suggesting that phasing difficulties with frozen-hydrated specimens may be caused by high-background ice scattering.

  1. Discovery of very high energy gamma-rays associated with an X-ray binary

    CERN Document Server

    Aharonian, F; Aye, K M; Bazer-Bachi, A R; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Berge, D; Berghaus, P; Bernlöhr, K; Boisson, C; Bolz, O; Borrel, V; Braun, I; Breitling, F; Brown, A M; Bussons-Gordo, J; Chadwick, P M; Chounet, L M; Cornils, R; Costamante, L; Degrange, B; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Ata, A; O'Connor-Drury, L; Dubus, G; Emmanoulopoulos, D; Espigat, P; Feinstein, F; Fleury, P; Fontaine, G; Fuchs, Y; Funk, S; Gallant, Y A; Giebels, B; Gillessen, S; Glicenstein, J F; Goret, P; Hadjichristidis, C; Hauser, M; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hinton, J A; Hofmann, W; Holleran, M; Horns, D; Jacholkowska, A; De Jager, O C; Khelifi, B; Komin, Nu; Konopelko, A; Latham, I J; Le Gallou, R; Lemiere, A; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Leroy, N; Lohse, T; Marcowith, A; Martin, J M; Martineau-Huynh, O; Masterson, C; McComb, T J L; De Naurois, Mathieu; Nolan, S J; Noutsos, A; Orford, K J; Osborne, J L; Ouchrif, M; Panter, M; Pelletier, G; Pita, S; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Raubenheimer, B C; Raue, M; Raux, J; Rayner, S M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Ripken, J; Rob, L; Rolland, L; Rowell, G; Sahakian, V V; Sauge, L; Schlenker, S; Schlickeiser, R; Schuster, C; Schwanke, U; Siewert, M; Sol, H; Spangler, D; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Tavernet, J P; Terrier, R; Theoret, C G; Tluczykont, M; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Vincent, P; Völk, H J; Wagner, S J

    2005-01-01

    X-ray binaries are composed of a normal star in orbit around a neutron star or stellar-mass black hole. Radio and X-ray observations have led to the presumption that some X-ray binaries called microquasars behave as scaled down active galactic nuclei. Microquasars have resolved radio emission that is thought to arise from a relativistic outflow akin to active galactic nuclei jets, in which particles can be accelerated to large energies. Very high energy gamma-rays produced by the interactions of these particles have been observed from several active galactic nuclei. Using the High Energy Stereoscopic System, we find evidence for gamma-ray emission >100 GeV from a candidate microquasar, LS 5039, showing that particles are also accelerated to very high energies in these systems.

  2. High-energy synchrotron X-ray radiography of shock-compressed materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Michael E.; Chapman, David J.; Collinson, Mark A.; Jones, David R.; Music, Jasmina; Stafford, Samuel J. P.; Tear, Gareth R.; White, Thomas G.; Winters, John B. R.; Drakopoulos, Michael; Eakins, Daniel E.

    2015-06-01

    This presentation will discuss the development and application of a high-energy (50 to 250 keV) synchrotron X-ray imaging method to study shock-compressed, high-Z samples at Beamline I12 at the Diamond Light Source synchrotron (Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory, UK). Shock waves are driven into materials using a portable, single-stage gas gun designed by the Institute of Shock Physics. Following plate impact, material deformation is probed in-situ by white-beam X-ray radiography and complimentary velocimetry diagnostics. The high energies, large beam size (13 x 13 mm), and appreciable sample volumes (~ 1 cm3) viable for study at Beamline I12 compliment existing in-house pulsed X-ray capabilities and studies at the Dynamic Compression Sector. The authors gratefully acknowledge the ongoing support of Imperial College London, EPSRC, STFC and the Diamond Light Source, and AWE Plc.

  3. High-gain X-ray free electron laser by beat-wave terahertz undulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Chao; Hei, DongWei [Science and Technology on High Power Microwave Laboratory, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi' an City 710024 (China); Institute of Energy, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Pellegrin, Claudio; Tantawi, Sami [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94309 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    The THz undulator has a higher gain to realize a much brighter X-ray at saturation, compared with the optical undulator under the same undulator strength and beam quality. In order to fill the high-power THz gap and realize the THz undulator, two superimposed laser pulses at normal incidence to the electron-beam moving direction form an equivalent high-field THz undulator by the frequency difference to realize the high-gain X-ray Free electron laser. The pulse front tilt of lateral fed lasers is used to realize the electron-laser synchronic interaction. By PIC simulation, a higher gain and a larger X-ray radiation power by the beat wave THz undulator could be realized, compared with the optical undulator for the same electron beam parameters.

  4. Current Problems in X-Ray Emission Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Joseph I.; Williams, David B.; Lyman, Charles E.

    1989-01-01

    Various problems that limit X-ray analysis in the analytical electron microscope are reviewed. Major emphasis is given to the trade-off between minimum mass fraction and spatial resolution. New developments such as high-brightness electron guns, new X-ray spectrometers and clean high-vacuum analysis conditions will lead to major improvements in the accuracy and detectability limits of X-ray emission spectroscopy.

  5. X-ray Polarimetry: a new window on the high energy sky

    CERN Document Server

    Bellazzini, Ronaldo; 10.1016/j.nima.2010.04.006

    2010-01-01

    Polarimetry is widely considered a powerful observational technique in X-ray astronomy, useful to enhance our understanding of the emission mechanisms, geometry and magnetic field arrangement of many compact objects. However, the lack of suitable sensitive instrumentation in the X-ray energy band has been the limiting factor for its development in the last three decades. Up to now, polarization measurements have been made exclusively with Bragg diffraction at 45 degrees or Compton scattering at 90 degrees and the only unambiguous detection of X-ray polarization has been obtained for one of the brightest object in the X-ray sky, the Crab Nebula. Only recently, with the development of a new class of high sensitivity imaging detectors, the possibility to exploit the photoemission process to measure the photon polarization has become a reality. We will report on the performance of an imaging X-ray polarimeter based on photoelectric effect. The device derives the polarization information from the track of the phot...

  6. The Astro-H high resolution soft x-ray spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Richard L.; Akamatsu, Hiroki; Azzarello, Phillipp; Bialas, Tom; Boyce, Kevin R.; Brown, Gregory V.; Canavan, Edgar; Chiao, Meng P.; Costantini, Elisa; DiPirro, Michael J.; Eckart, Megan E.; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Haas, Daniel; den Herder, Jan-Willem; Hoshino, Akio; Ishikawa, Kumi; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; Iyomoto, Naoko; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Kimball, Mark O.; Kitamoto, Shunji; Konami, Saori; Koyama, Shu; Leutenegger, Maurice A.; McCammon, Dan; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki; Moseley, Harvey; Murakami, Hiroshi; Murakami, Masahide; Noda, Hirofumi; Ogawa, Mina; Ohashi, Takaya; Okamoto, Atsushi; Ota, Naomi; Paltani, Stéphane; Porter, F. S.; Sakai, Kazuhiro; Sato, Kosuke; Sato, Yohichi; Sawada, Makoto; Seta, Hiromi; Shinozaki, Keisuke; Shirron, Peter J.; Sneiderman, Gary A.; Sugita, Hiroyuki; Szymkowiak, Andrew E.; Takei, Yoh; Tamagawa, Toru; Tashiro, Makoto; Terada, Yukikatsu; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; de Vries, Cor P.; Yamada, Shinya; Yamasaki, Noriko Y.; Yatsu, Yoichi

    2016-07-01

    We present the overall design and performance of the Astro-H (Hitomi) Soft X-Ray Spectrometer (SXS). The instrument uses a 36-pixel array of x-ray microcalorimeters at the focus of a grazing-incidence x-ray mirror Soft X-Ray Telescope (SXT) for high-resolution spectroscopy of celestial x-ray sources. The instrument was designed to achieve an energy resolution better than 7 eV over the 0.3-12 keV energy range and operate for more than 3 years in orbit. The actual energy resolution of the instrument is 4-5 eV as demonstrated during extensive ground testing prior to launch and in orbit. The measured mass flow rate of the liquid helium cryogen and initial fill level at launch predict a lifetime of more than 4 years assuming steady mechanical cooler performance. Cryogen-free operation was successfully demonstrated prior to launch. The successful operation of the SXS in orbit, including the first observations of the velocity structure of the Perseus cluster of galaxies, demonstrates the viability and power of this technology as a tool for astrophysics.

  7. Femtosecond laser-generated high-energy-density states studied by x-ray FELs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsutsumi, M.; Appel, K.; Baehtz, C.; Chen, B.; Cowan, T. E.; Göde, S.; Konopkova, Z.; Pelka, A.; Priebe, G.; Schmidt, A.; Sukharnikov, K.; Thorpe, I.; Tschentscher, Th; Zastrau, U.

    2017-01-01

    The combination of powerful optical lasers and an x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) provides unique capabilities to study the transient behaviour of matter in extreme conditions. The high energy density science instrument (HED instrument) at the European XFEL will provide the experimental platform on which an unique x-ray source can be combined with various types of high-power optical lasers. In this paper, we highlight selected scientific examples together with the associated x-ray techniques, with particular emphasis on femtosecond (fs)-timescale pump-probe experiments. Subsequently, we present the current design status of the HED instrument, outlining how the experiments could be performed. First user experiments will start at the beginning of 2018, after which various optical lasers will be commissioned and made available to the international scientific community.

  8. 25 Tesla pulsed-high-magnetic-field system for soft X-ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, M., E-mail: mhaya@imr.tohoku.ac.jp [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Narumi, Y.; Nojiri, H. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Nakamura, T.; Hirono, T.; Kinoshita, T. [JASRI/SPring-8, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Kodama, K. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Nara National College of Technology, Nara 639-1080 (Japan); Kindo, K. [Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8581 (Japan)

    2011-04-15

    Research highlights: {yields} We have developed a 25 T pulsed magnetic field system for soft X-ray MCD. {yields} The new capacitor bank can generate a field in the bipolar mode. {yields} We measured the Soft X-ray MCD of paramagnetic Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} up to 25 T. - Abstract: We have developed a 25 T pulsed high magnetic field system for soft X-ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism: XMCD. The ultra-high vacuum chamber with a pulse magnet coil is installed. By using a newly developed bipolar capacitor bank, the XMCD of paramagnetic Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} at the M{sub 5} and the M{sub 4} edges was clearly observed at low temperatures. The present system is capable of measuring XMCD of field induced moments in various compounds including paramagnets and antiferromagnets.

  9. X-ray Spectroscopy of High-Z Elements on Nike

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aglitskiy, Y.; Weaver, J. L.; Karasik, M.; Serlin, V.; Obenschain, S. P.; Ralchenko, Yu.

    2013-10-01

    Survey X-ray spectrometer covering a spectral range from 0.5 to 19.5 angstroms has been added to the spectroscopic suite of Nike diagnostics. That allows simultaneous observation of both M- and N- spectra of W, Ta and Au with high spectral resolution. Low energy test shots confirmed strong presence of 3-4 transitions of Ni-like W, Ta and Au with X-ray energies as high as 3.5 keV when above mentioned elements were used as the targets. In our continuous effort to support DOE-NNSA's inertial fusion program, the future campaign will cover a wide range of plasma conditions that result in relatively energetic X-ray production. Eventually, absolutely calibrated spectrometers of similar geometry will be fielded at NIF in cooperation with NIF diagnostic group. Work supported by US DOE, Defense Programs.

  10. Thermal X-ray emission from massive, fast rotating, highly magnetized white dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Caceres, D L; Coelho, J G; de Lima, R C R; Rueda, Jorge A

    2016-01-01

    There is solid observational evidence on the existence of massive, $M\\sim 1~M_\\odot$, highly magnetized white dwarfs (WDs) with surface magnetic fields up to $B\\sim 10^9$ G. We show that, if in addition to these features, the star is fast rotating, it can become a rotation-powered pulsar-like WD and emit detectable high-energy radiation. We infer the values of the structure parameters (mass, radius, moment of inertia), magnetic field, rotation period and spin-down rates of a WD pulsar death-line. We show that WDs above the death-line emit blackbody radiation in the soft X-ray band via the magnetic polar cap heating by back flowing pair-created particle bombardment and discuss as an example the X-ray emission of soft gamma-repeaters and anomalous X-ray pulsars within the WD model.

  11. The soft X-ray spectrum of the high-mass X-ray binary V0332+53 in quiescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshamouty, Khaled G.; Heinke, Craig O.; Chouinard, Rhys

    2016-11-01

    The behaviour of neutron stars in high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) during periods of low mass transfer is of great interest. Indications of spectral softening in systems at low mass-transfer rates suggest that some HMXBs are undergoing fundamental changes in their accretion regime, but the nature of the quiescent X-ray emission is not clear. We performed a 39 ks XMM-Newton observation of the transient HMXB V0332+53, finding it at a very low X-ray luminosity (Lx ˜ 4 × 1032 erg s-1). A power-law spectral fit requires an unusually soft spectral index (4.4^{+0.9}_{-0.6}), while a magnetized neutron star atmosphere model, with temperature LogTeff 6.7 ± 0.2 K and inferred emitting radius of ˜0.2-0.3 km, gives a good fit. We suggest that the quiescent X-ray emission from V0332+53 is mainly from a hotspot on the surface of the neutron star. No conclusions on the presence of pulsations could be drawn due to the low count rate. Due to the high absorption column, thermal emission from the rest of the neutron star could be only weakly constrained, to LogTeff <6.14^{+0.05}_{-6.14} K, or <3 × 1033 erg s-1.

  12. Very High Resolution Solar X-ray Imaging Using Diffractive Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, B. R.; Skinner, G. K.; Li, M. J.; Shih, A. Y.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the development of X-ray diffractive optics for imaging solar flares with better than 0.1 arcsec angular resolution. X-ray images with this resolution of the greater than or equal to 10 MK plasma in solar active regions and solar flares would allow the cross-sectional area of magnetic loops to be resolved and the coronal flare energy release region itself to be probed. The objective of this work is to obtain X-ray images in the iron-line complex at 6.7 keV observed during solar flares with an angular resolution as fine as 0.1 arcsec - over an order of magnitude finer than is now possible. This line emission is from highly ionized iron atoms, primarily Fe xxv, in the hottest flare plasma at temperatures in excess of approximately equal to 10 MK. It provides information on the flare morphology, the iron abundance, and the distribution of the hot plasma. Studying how this plasma is heated to such high temperatures in such short times during solar flares is of critical importance in understanding these powerful transient events, one of the major objectives of solar physics.We describe the design, fabrication, and testing of phase zone plate X-ray lenses with focal lengths of approximately equal to 100 m at these energies that would be capable of achieving these objectives. We show how such lenses could be included on a two-spacecraft formation-flying mission with the lenses on the spacecraft closest to the Sun and an X-ray imaging array on the second spacecraft in the focal plane approximately equal to 100 m away. High resolution X-ray images could be obtained when the two spacecraft are aligned with the region of interest on the Sun. Requirements and constraints for the control of the two spacecraft are discussed together with the overall feasibility of such a formation-flying mission.

  13. Fine-pitch glass GEM for high-resolution X-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, T.; Mitsuya, Y.; Toyokawa, H.

    2016-12-01

    We have developed a fine-pitch glass gas electron multiplier (G-GEM) for high-resolution X-ray imaging. The fine-pitch G-GEM is made of a 400 μm thick photo-etchable glass substrate with 150 μm pitch holes. It is fabricated using the same wet etching technique as that for the standard G-GEM. In this work, we present the experimental results obtained with a single fine-pitch G-GEM with a 50 × 50 mm2 effective area. We recorded an energy resolution of 16.2% and gas gain up to 5,500 when the detector was irradiated with 5.9 keV X-rays. We present a 50 × 50 mm2 X-ray radiograph image acquired with a scintillation gas and optical readout system.

  14. Crystal optics for precision x-ray spectroscopy on highly charged ions—conception and proof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, H. F.; Gassner, T.; Trassinelli, M.; Heß, R.; Spillmann, U.; Banaś, D.; Blumenhagen, K.-H.; Bosch, F.; Brandau, C.; Chen, W.; Dimopoulou, Chr; Förster, E.; Grisenti, R. E.; Gumberidze, A.; Hagmann, S.; Hillenbrand, P.-M.; Indelicato, P.; Jagodzinski, P.; Kämpfer, T.; Kozhuharov, Chr; Lestinsky, M.; Liesen, D.; Litvinov, Yu A.; Loetzsch, R.; Manil, B.; Märtin, R.; Nolden, F.; Petridis, N.; Sanjari, M. S.; Schulze, K. S.; Schwemlein, M.; Simionovici, A.; Steck, M.; Stöhlker, Th; Szabo, C. I.; Trotsenko, S.; Uschmann, I.; Weber, G.; Wehrhan, O.; Winckler, N.; Winters, D. F. A.; Winters, N.; Ziegler, E.

    2015-07-01

    The experimental investigation of quantum-electrodydamic contributions to the binding energies of inner shells of highly charged heavy ions requires an accurate spectroscopy in the region of hard x-rays suitable at a limited source strength. For this purpose the focusing compensated asymmetric Laue crystal optics has been developed and a twin-spectrometer assembly has been built and commissioned at the experimental storage ring of the GSI Helmholtzzentrum Darmstadt. We characterize the crystal optics and demonstrate the usefulness of the instrumentation for accurate spectroscopy of both stationary and fast moving x-ray sources. The experimental procedures discussed here may also be applied for other spectroscopic studies where a transition from conventional germanium x-ray detectors to crystal spectrometers seems too demanding because of low source intensity.

  15. High Efficiency, Multi-Terawatt X-ray free electron lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Emma, Claudio; Wu, Juhao; Pellegrini, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    We study high efficiency, multi-terawatt peak power, few angstrom wavelength, X-ray Free Electron Lasers (X-ray FELs). To obtain these characteristics we consider an optimized undulator design: superconducting, helical, with short period and built-in strong focusing. This design reduces the length of the breaks between modules, decreasing diffraction effects, and allows using a stronger transverse electron focusing. Both effects reduce the gain length and the overall undulator length. The peak power and efficiency depend on the transverse electron beam distribution and on time dependent effects, like synchrotron sideband growth. The last effect is identified as the main cause for reduction of electron beam microbunching and FEL peak power. We show that the optimal functional form for the undulator magnetic field tapering profile, yielding the maximum output power, depends significantly on these effects. The output power achieved when neglecting time dependent effects for an LCLS-like X-ray FEL with a 100 m lo...

  16. X-ray spectroscopy of highly-charged heavy ions at FAIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gumberidze, A. [Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, Universite P. et M. Curie, Paris (France)], E-mail: a.gumberidze@gsi.de; Stoehlker, Th. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung mbh, 64291 GSI-Darmstadt (Germany); Physikalisches Institut, Universitt Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Beyer, H.F.; Bosch, F.; Braeuning-Demian, A.; Hagmann, S.; Kozhuharov, C.; Kuehl, Th.; Mann, R. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung mbh, 64291 GSI-Darmstadt (Germany); Indelicato, P. [Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, Universite P. et M. Curie, Paris (France); Quint, W. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung mbh, 64291 GSI-Darmstadt (Germany); Schuch, R. [Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden); Warczak, A. [Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Cracow (Poland)

    2009-01-15

    In the current contribution, we give an overview of the envisioned X-ray spectroscopy program within the atomic physics research collaboration SPARC (Stored Particle Atomic Research Collaboration) at FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research). These activities comprise, among others, the investigation of relativistic collision dynamics, electron correlation in the presence of strong fields, the test of Quantum Electrodynamics in extremely strong electromagnetic fields, and ideas to test the predictions of fundamental theories besides Quantum Electrodynamics. The state of the art X-ray spectroscopy will be of key importance for realization of these challenging goals. The world-wide unique experimental conditions and opportunities offered by the future FAIR facility will be combined with advanced X-ray detection devices, i.e. large-area, segmented solid-state detectors, high-resolution crystal spectrometers, calorimetric detectors etc.

  17. X-ray selection of Compton Thick AGN at high redshift

    CERN Document Server

    Lanzuisi, G

    2016-01-01

    Compton Thick (CT) AGN are a key ingredient of Cosmic X-ray Background (CXB) synthesis models, but are still an elusive component of the AGN population beyond the local Universe. Multi-wavelength surveys are the only way to find them at z > 0.1, and a deep X-ray coverage is crucial in order to clearly identify them among star forming galaxies. As an example, the deep and wide COSMOS survey allowed us to select a total of 34 CT sources. This number is computed from the 64 nominal CT candidates, each counted for its N H probability distribution function. For each of these sources, rich multi-wavelength information is available, and is used to confirm their obscured nature, by comparing the expected AGN luminosity from spectral energy distribution fitting, with the absorption-corrected X-ray luminosity. While Chandra is more efficient, for a given exposure, in detecting CT candidates in current surveys (by a factor ~2), deep XMM-Newton pointings of bright sources are vital to fully characterize their properties:...

  18. Optical and X-ray Behavior of the High Mass X-ray Transient A0535+26/HDE245770 in 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannelli, F.; Bisnovatyi-Kogan, G. S.; Bruni, I.; Corfini, G.; Martinelli, F.; Rossi, C.

    2015-03-01

    The optical behavior of the Be star in the high-mass X-ray transient A0535+26/HDE245770 shows that at periastron the luminosity is typically enhanced by 0.02 mag to a few tenths mag, and the X-ray outburst occurs eight days after the periastron. Indeed, at the periastron an increase of the mass flux occurs. This sort of flush reaches the external part of the temporary accretion disk around the neutron star and moves to the hot central parts of the accretion disk and the neutron star's surface. The time necessary for this process is dependent on the turbulent viscosity in the accretion disk. In this paper we will show the behavior of this system in optical band around the predicted periastron passages in 2014, by using the ephemeris - JDopt-outb = JD0(2 444 944)±n(111.0±0.4) days - that we used to schedule our spectroscopic and photometric optical observations. Spectroscopic unusual activity detected in the Balmer lines and the enhancement in the emission in B, V, and R bands around the 106th periastron passage, and in V-band around the 108th periastron passage after the "zero event" 811205-E at JD 2 444 944, and the subsequent X-ray events definitively demonstrate the existence of a ≍8-day delay between optical and X-ray flares.

  19. The nuclear spectroscopic telescope array (NuSTAR) high-energy X-ray mission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrison, Fiona A.; Craig, William W.; Christensen, Finn Erland

    2013-01-01

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) mission, launched on 2012 June 13, is the first focusing high-energy X-ray telescope in orbit. NuSTAR operates in the band from 3 to 79 keV, extending the sensitivity of focusing far beyond the ~10 keV high-energy cutoff achieved by all previous X...

  20. An advanced high resolution x-ray imager for laser-plasma interaction observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennetiere D.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We present here the latest results obtained with our high resolution broadband X-ray microscope. These results, both spatial and spectral, were obtained in several facilities such as Berlin's synchrotron Bessy II and LULI's laser ELFIE 100TW. The results show clearly the opportunity in high resolution microscopy that offer mirror based diagnostics.

  1. Assessment of a New High-Performance Small-Animal X-Ray Tomograph

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a new X-ray cone-beam tomograph for in vivo small-animal imaging using a flat panel detector (CMOS technology with a microcolumnar CsI scintillator plate) and a microfocus X-ray source. The geometrical configuration was designed to achieve a spatial resolution of about 12 lpmm with a field of view appropriate for laboratory rodents. In order to achieve high performance with regard to per-animal screening time and cost, the acquisition software takes advantage of the highest ...

  2. X-ray characterization of surfaces irradiated with highly charged ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briand, J.P. [Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, Universite P. et M. Curie, Paris (France); Universite P. et M. Curie, Paris (France); Ion Surface Advanced Processes (ISAP) muE., 2 Square Francois Couperin, 92160 Antony (France)], E-mail: jpbriand920@aol.com; Benhachoum, M. [Universite P. et M. Curie, Paris (France)

    2009-02-15

    Highly charged ions (HCI) approaching, touching or penetrating dielectric surfaces extract many electrons of the solid leading to the formation of permanent surface modifications. The ions which capture the electrons in their outermost shells form hollow atoms which emit X-rays during their decay to the ground state. In this paper one presents experiments showing that these X-rays) allow diagnosing the electric nature of the surfaces. HCI while modifying the structure of surfaces may then also be used to diagnose these changes on line or off line.

  3. Application of X-ray microscopy in food science investigation of high pressure affected bacterial spores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mönch, Susanne; Heinz, Volker; Guttmann, Peter; Knorr, Dietrich

    2000-05-01

    Using the Göttingen transmission X-ray microscope at BESSY the effect of different pressure and temperature levels during the high hydrostatic pressure (HP) treatment was investigated. At 150 MPa and temperatures up to 50 °C the triggering of germination was observed by standard microbiological methods with Bacillus subtilis spores. Increasing the temperature to 70 °C at the same pressure level killed the spores without any indication of germination. By X-ray microscopy images it could be shown that the typical disintegration of the protoplast is inhibited. This suggests that the enzymic reaction pathway is possibly affected under specific pressure temperature conditions.

  4. Development of high-resolution x-ray CT system using parallel beam geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoneyama, Akio, E-mail: akio.yoneyama.bu@hitachi.com; Baba, Rika [Central Research Laboratory, Hitachi Ltd., Hatoyama, Saitama (Japan); Hyodo, Kazuyuki [Institute of Materials Science, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Takeda, Tohoru [School of Allied Health Sciences, Kitasato University, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Nakano, Haruhisa; Maki, Koutaro [Department of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry Showa University, Ota-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Sumitani, Kazushi; Hirai, Yasuharu [Kyushu Synchrotron Light Research Center, Tosu, Saga (Japan)

    2016-01-28

    For fine three-dimensional observations of large biomedical and organic material samples, we developed a high-resolution X-ray CT system. The system consists of a sample positioner, a 5-μm scintillator, microscopy lenses, and a water-cooled sCMOS detector. Parallel beam geometry was adopted to attain a field of view of a few mm square. A fine three-dimensional image of birch branch was obtained using a 9-keV X-ray at BL16XU of SPring-8 in Japan. The spatial resolution estimated from the line profile of a sectional image was about 3 μm.

  5. Laboratory simulation of cometary X-rays using a high-resolution microcalorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beiersdorfer, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)]. E-mail: beiersdorfer@llnl.gov; Chen, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Boyce, K.R. [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 662, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Brown, G.V. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Kelley, R.L. [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 662, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Kilbourne, C.A. [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 662, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Porter, F.S. [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 662, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Kahn, S.M. [Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA 94305 (United States)

    2005-07-01

    X-ray emission following charge exchange has been studied at the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory electron beam ion traps EBIT-I and EBIT-II using a high-resolution microcalorimeter. The measured spectra include the K-shell emission from hydrogenlike and heliumlike C, N, O, and Ne needed for simulations of cometary x-ray emission. A comparison of the spectra produced in the interaction of O{sup 8+} with N{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} is presented that illustrates the dependence of the observed spectrum on the interaction gas.

  6. Laboratory simulation of cometary x rays using a high-resolution microcalorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Beiersdorfer, P; Boyce, K R; Brown, G V; Kelley, R L; Kilbourne, C A; Porter, F S; Kahn, S M

    2005-01-01

    X-ray emission following charge exchange has been studied on the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory electron beam ion traps EBIT-I and EBIT-II using a high-resolution microcalorimeter. The measured spectra include the K-shell emission from hydrogenlike and heliumlike C, N, O, and Ne needed for simulations of cometary x-ray emission. A comparison of the spectra produced in the interaction of O8+ with N2 and CH4 is presented that illustrates the dependence of the observed spectrum on the interaction gas.

  7. Transmission diffraction-tomography system using a high-energy X-ray tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrity, D J; Jenneson, P M; Crook, R; Vincent, S M

    2010-01-01

    A high-energy bench-top energy dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXRD) system for 3-dimensional mapping of the crystalline structure and phase transformations in steel is described, for which preliminary data and system development are presented here. The use of precision tungsten slit screens with up to 225 keV X-rays allows for diffraction through samples of 304 L austenitic stainless steel of thickness 3-10 mm, while sample positioning is carried out with a precision goniometer and translation stage system.

  8. Development of the super high angular resolution principle for X-ray imaging *

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Zhang; Shuang-Nan Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Development of the Super High Angular Resolution Principle (SHARP)for coded-mask X-ray imaging is presented. We prove that SHARP can be considered as a generalized coded mask imaging method with a coding pattern comprised of diffraction-interference fringes in the mask pattern. The angular resolution of SHARP can be improved by detecting the fringes more precisely than the mask's element size,i.e. by using a detector with a pixel size smaller than the mask's element size. The proposed mission SHARP-X for solar X-ray observations is also briefly discussed.

  9. High resolution x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy - a new technique for site- and spin-selectivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xin [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Applied Science

    1996-12-01

    X-ray spectroscopy has long been used to elucidate electronic and structural information of molecules. One of the weaknesses of x-ray absorption is its sensitivity to all of the atoms of a particular element in a sample. Through out this thesis, a new technique for enhancing the site- and spin-selectivity of the x-ray absorption has been developed. By high resolution fluorescence detection, the chemical sensitivity of K emission spectra can be used to identify oxidation and spin states; it can also be used to facilitate site-selective X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) and site-selective Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS). The spin polarization in K fluorescence could be used to generate spin selective XANES or spin-polarized EXAFS, which provides a new measure of the spin density, or the nature of magnetic neighboring atoms. Finally, dramatic line-sharpening effects by the combination of absorption and emission processes allow observation of structure that is normally unobservable. All these unique characters can enormously simplify a complex x-ray spectrum. Applications of this novel technique have generated information from various transition-metal model compounds to metalloproteins. The absorption and emission spectra by high resolution fluorescence detection are interdependent. The ligand field multiplet model has been used for the analysis of K{alpha} and K{beta} emission spectra. First demonstration on different chemical states of Fe compounds has shown the applicability of site selectivity and spin polarization. Different interatomic distances of the same element in different chemical forms have been detected using site-selective EXAFS.

  10. Propagation and scattering of high-intensity X-ray pulses in dense atomic gases and plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weninger, Clemens

    2015-10-15

    Nonlinear spectroscopy in the X-ray domain is a promising technique to explore the dynamics of elementary excitations in matter. X-rays provide an element specificity that allows them to target individual chemical elements, making them a great tool to study complex molecules. The recent advancement of X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) allows to investigate non-linear processes in the X-ray domain for the first time. XFELs provide short femtosecond X-ray pulses with peak powers that exceed previous generation synchrotron X-ray sources by more than nine orders of magnitude. This thesis focuses on the theoretical description of stimulated emission processes in the X-ray regime in atomic gases. These processes form the basis for more complex schemes in molecules and provide a proof of principle for nonlinear X-ray spectroscopy. The thesis also includes results from two experimental campaigns at the Linac Coherent Light Source and presents the first experimental demonstration of stimulated X-ray Raman scattering. Focusing an X-ray free electron laser beam into an elongated neon gas target generates an intense stimulated X-ray emission beam in forward direction. If the incoming X-rays have a photon energy above the neon K edge, they can efficiently photo-ionize 1s electrons and generate short-lived core excited states. The core-excited states decay mostly via Auger decay but have a small probability to emit a spontaneous X-ray photon. The spontaneous emission emitted in forward direction can stimulate X-ray emission along the medium and generate a highly directional and intense X-ray laser pulse. If the photon energy of the incoming X-rays however is below the ionization edge in the region of the pre-edge resonance the incoming X-rays can be inelastically scattered. This spontaneous X-ray Raman scattering process has a very low probability, but the spontaneously scattered photons in the beginning of the medium can stimulate Raman scattering along the medium. The

  11. SU Lyncis, a hard X-ray bright M giant: Clues point to a large hidden population of symbiotic stars

    CERN Document Server

    Mukai, K; Cusumano, G; Segreto, A; Munari, U; Sokoloski, J L; Lucy, A B; Nelson, T; Nunez, N E

    2016-01-01

    Symbiotic star surveys have traditionally relied almost exclusively on low resolution optical spectroscopy. However, we can obtain a more reliable estimate of their total Galactic population by using all available signatures of the symbiotic phenomenon. Here we report the discovery of a hard X-ray source, 4PBC J0642.9+5528, in the Swift hard X-ray all-sky survey, and identify it with a poorly studied red giant, SU Lyn, using pointed Swift observations and ground-based optical spectroscopy. The X-ray spectrum, the optical to UV spectrum, and the rapid UV variability of SU Lyn are all consistent with our interpretation that it is a symbiotic star containing an accreting white dwarf. The symbiotic nature of SU Lyn went unnoticed until now, because it does not exhibit emission lines strong enough to be obvious in low resolution spectra. We argue that symbiotic stars without shell-burning have weak emission lines, and that the current lists of symbiotic stars are biased in favor of shell-burning systems. We conclu...

  12. SU Lyncis, a Hard X-Ray Bright M Giant: Clues Point to a Large Hidden Population of Symbiotic Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, K.; Luna, G. J. M.; Cusumano, G.; Segreto, A.; Munari, U.; Sokoloski, J. L.; Lucy, A. B.; Nelson, T.; Nunez, N. E.

    2016-01-01

    Symbiotic star surveys have traditionally relied almost exclusively on low resolution optical spectroscopy. However, we can obtain amore reliable estimate of their total Galactic population by using all available signatures of the symbiotic phenomenon. Here we report the discovery of a hard X-ray source, 4PBC J0642.9+5528, in the Swift hard X-ray all-sky survey, and identify it with a poorly studied red giant, SU Lyn, using pointed Swift observations and ground-based optical spectroscopy. The X-ray spectrum, the optical to UV spectrum, and the rapid UV variability of SU Lyn are all consistent with our interpretation that it is a symbiotic star containing an accreting white dwarf. The symbiotic nature of SU Lyn went unnoticed until now, because it does not exhibit emission lines strong enough to be obvious in low resolution spectra. We argue that symbiotic stars without shell-burning have weak emission lines, and that the current lists of symbiotic stars are biased in favour of shell-burning systems. We conclude that the true population of symbiotic stars has been underestimated, potentially by a large factor.

  13. High Pressure X-Ray Diffraction Studies on Nanocrystalline Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palosz, B.; Stelmakh, S.; Grzanka, E.; Gierlotka, S.; Pielaszek, R.; Bismayer, U.; Werner, S.; Palosz, W.

    2003-01-01

    Application of in situ high pressure powder diffraction technique for examination of specific structural properties of nanocrystals based on the experimental data of SiC nanocrystalline powders of 2 to 30 nrn diameter in diameter is presented. Limitations and capabilities of the experimental techniques themselves and methods of diffraction data elaboration applied to nanocrystals with very small dimensions (nanocrystalline powders under pressure. We offer a tentative interpretation of the distribution of macro- and micro-strains in nanoparticles of different grain size.

  14. High-energy X-ray diffraction using the Pixium 4700 flat-panel detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, J E; Drakopoulos, M

    2009-07-01

    The Pixium 4700 detector represents a significant step forward in detector technology for high-energy X-ray diffraction. The detector design is based on digital flat-panel technology, combining an amorphous Si panel with a CsI scintillator. The detector has a useful pixel array of 1910 x 2480 pixels with a pixel size of 154 microm x 154 microm, and thus it covers an effective area of 294 mm x 379 mm. Designed for medical imaging, the detector has good efficiency at high X-ray energies. Furthermore, it is capable of acquiring sequences of images at 7.5 frames per second in full image mode, and up to 60 frames per second in binned region of interest modes. Here, the basic properties of this detector applied to high-energy X-ray diffraction are presented. Quantitative comparisons with a widespread high-energy detector, the MAR345 image plate scanner, are shown. Other properties of the Pixium 4700 detector, including a narrow point-spread function and distortion-free image, allows for the acquisition of high-quality diffraction data at high X-ray energies. In addition, high frame rates and shutterless operation open new experimental possibilities. Also provided are the necessary data for the correction of images collected using the Pixium 4700 for diffraction purposes.

  15. High Pressure X-Ray Diffraction Studies of Nanocrystalline Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palosz, B.; Stel'makh, S.; Grzanka, E.; Gierlotka, S.; Palosz, W.

    2004-01-01

    Experimental evidence obtained for a variety of nanocrystalline materials suggest that the crystallographic structure of a very small size particle deviates from that in the bulk crystals. In this paper we show the effect of the surface of nanocrystals on their structure by the analysis of generation and distribution of macro- and micro-strains at high pressures and their dependence on the grain size in nanocrystalline powders of Sic. We studied the structure of Sic nanocrystals by in-situ high-pressure powder diffraction technique using synchrotron and neutron sources and hydrostatic or isostatic pressure conditions. The diffraction measurements were done in HASYLAB at DESY using a Diamond Anvil Cell (DAC) in the energy dispersive geometry in the diffraction vector range up to 3.5 - 4/A and under pressures up to 50 GPa at room temperature. In-situ high pressure neutron diffraction measurements were done at LANSCE in Los Alamos National Laboratory using the HIPD and HIPPO diffractometers with the Paris-Edinburgh and TAP-98 cells, respectively, in the diffraction vector range up to 26 Examination of the response of the material to external stresses requires nonstandard methodology of the materials characterization and description. Although every diffraction pattern contains a complete information on macro- and micro-strains, a high pressure experiment can reveal only those factors which contribute to the characteristic diffraction patterns of the crystalline phases present in the sample. The elastic properties of powders with the grain size from several nm to micrometers were examined using three methodologies: (l), the analysis of positions and widths of individual Bragg reflections (used for calculating macro- and micro-strains generated during densification) [I], (2). the analysis of the dependence of the experimental apparent lattice parameter, alp, on the diffraction vector Q [2], and (3), the atomic Pair Distribution Function (PDF) technique [3]. The results

  16. High resolution x-ray CMT: Reconstruction methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, J.K.

    1997-02-01

    This paper qualitatively discusses the primary characteristics of methods for reconstructing tomographic images from a set of projections. These reconstruction methods can be categorized as either {open_quotes}analytic{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}iterative{close_quotes} techniques. Analytic algorithms are derived from the formal inversion of equations describing the imaging process, while iterative algorithms incorporate a model of the imaging process and provide a mechanism to iteratively improve image estimates. Analytic reconstruction algorithms are typically computationally more efficient than iterative methods; however, analytic algorithms are available for a relatively limited set of imaging geometries and situations. Thus, the framework of iterative reconstruction methods is better suited for high accuracy, tomographic reconstruction codes.

  17. Microcalorimetry for High-Resolution X-Ray Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedrich, Stephen [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-01-03

    Magnetic Microcalorimeters (MMCs) are gamma-ray detectors with an energy resolution 10x higher than high-purity germanium detectors. They can increase the accuracy of non-destructive analysis of nuclear materials, enable the detection of new isotopes (e.g. Pu-242 of U-236), and improve nuclear data in cases where Ge detectors are limited by line overlap. MMCs consist of a magnetic sensor operated at temperatures below 50 mK, and they infer gamma-ray energies from the change in magnetization due to the temperature increase after gamma-ray absorption. The goal of this project is to further increase the energy resolution and sensitivity of MMC gamma detectors.

  18. High Pressure X-Ray Diffraction Studies on Nanocrystalline Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palosz, B.; Stelmakh, S.; Grzanka, E.; Gierlotka, S.; Pielaszek, R.; Bismayer, U.; Werner, S.; Palosz, W.

    2003-01-01

    Application of in situ high pressure powder diffraction technique for examination of specific structural properties of nanocrystals based on the experimental data of SiC nanocrystalline powders of 2 to 30 nrn diameter in diameter is presented. Limitations and capabilities of the experimental techniques themselves and methods of diffraction data elaboration applied to nanocrystals with very small dimensions (< 30 nm) are discussed. It is shown that due to the complex structure, constituting a two-phase, core/surface shell system, no unique lattice parameter value and, consequently, no unique compressibility coefficient can satisfactorily describe the behavior of nanocrystalline powders under pressure. We offer a tentative interpretation of the distribution of macro- and micro-strains in nanoparticles of different grain size.

  19. High-pressure X-ray diffraction studies of potassium chlorate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pravica, Michael; Bai, Ligang; Bhattacharya, Neelanjan (UNLV)

    2012-03-15

    Two static high-pressure X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies of potassium chlorate have been performed at pressures of up to {approx}14.3 GPa in a diamond anvil cell at ambient temperature using the 16 ID-B undulator beamline at the Advanced Photon Source for the X-ray source. The first experiment was conducted to ascertain decomposition rates of potassium chlorate as a function of pressure. Below 2 GPa, the sample was observed to decompose rapidly in the presence of the X-ray beam and release oxygen. Above 2 GPa (near the phase I phase II transition), the decomposition rate dramatically slowed so that good quality XRD patterns could be acquired. This suggests a phase-dependent decomposition rate. In the second study, X-ray diffraction spectra were collected at pressures from 2 to 14.3 GPa by aligning virgin portions of the sample into the focused X-ray beam at each pressure. The results suggest the co-existence of mixed monoclinic (I) and rhombohedral (II) phases of potassium chlorate near 2 GPa. At pressures beyond 4 GPa, the XRD patterns show a very good fit to KClO{sub 3} in the rhombohedral phase with space group R3m, in agreement with earlier studies. No further phase transitions were observed with pressure. Decompression of the sample to ambient pressure indicated mixed phases I and II coupled with a small amount of synchrotron X-ray-induced decomposition product. The equation of state within this pressure regime has been determined.

  20. Affordable and Lightweight High-Resolution X-ray Optics for Astronomical Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W. W.; Biskach, M. P.; Bly, V. T.; Carter, J. M.; Chan, K. W.; Gaskin, J. A.; Hong, M.; Hohl, B. R.; Jones, W. D.; Kolodziejczak, J. J.

    2014-01-01

    Future x-ray astronomical missions require x-ray mirror assemblies that provide both high angular resolution and large photon collecting area. In addition, as x-ray astronomy undertakes more sensitive sky surveys, a large field of view is becoming increasingly important as well. Since implementation of these requirements must be carried out in broad political and economical contexts, any technology that meets these performance requirements must also be financially affordable and can be implemented on a reasonable schedule. In this paper we report on progress of an x-ray optics development program that has been designed to address all of these requirements. The program adopts the segmented optical design, thereby is capable of making both small and large mirror assemblies for missions of any size. This program has five technical elements: (1) fabrication of mirror substrates, (2) coating, (3) alignment, (4) bonding, and (5) mirror module systems engineering and testing. In the past year we have made progress in each of these five areas, advancing the angular resolution of mirror modules from 10.8 arc-seconds half-power diameter reported (HPD) a year ago to 8.3 arc-seconds now. These mirror modules have been subjected to and passed all environmental tests, including vibration, acoustic, and thermal vacuum. As such this technology is ready for implementing a mission that requires a 10-arc-second mirror assembly. Further development in the next two years would make it ready for a mission requiring a 5-arc-second mirror assembly. We expect that, by the end of this decade, this technology would enable the x-ray astrophysical community to compete effectively for a major x-ray mission in the 2020s that would require one or more 1-arc-second mirror assemblies for imaging, spectroscopic, timing, and survey studies.

  1. A gas-tight Cu K alpha x-ray transparent reaction chamber for high-temperature x-ray diffraction analyses of halide gas/solid reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shian, Samuel; Sandhage, Kenneth H

    2009-11-01

    An externally heated, x-ray transparent reaction chamber has been developed to enable the dynamic high temperature x-ray diffraction (HTXRD) analysis of a gas/solid [TiF(4)(g)/SiO(2)(s)] reaction involving a halide gas reactant formed at elevated temperatures (up to 350 degrees C) from a condensed source (TiF(4) powder) sealed within the chamber. The reaction chamber possessed x-ray transparent windows comprised of a thin (13 microm) internal layer of Al foil and a thicker (125 microm) external Kapton film. After sealing the SiO(2) specimens (diatom frustules or Stober spheres) above TiF(4) powder within the reaction chamber, the chamber was heated to a temperature in the range of 160-350 degrees C to allow for internal generation of TiF(4)(g). The TiF(4)(g) underwent a metathetic reaction with the SiO(2) specimen to yield a TiOF(2)(s) product. HTXRD analysis, using Cu K alpha x rays passed through the Kapton/Al windows of the chamber, was used to track the extent of SiO(2) consumption and/or TiOF(2) formation with time. The Al foil inner layer of the windows protected the Kapton film from chemical attack by TiF(4)(g), whereas the thicker, more transparent Kapton film provided the mechanical strength needed to contain this gas. By selecting an appropriate combination of x-ray transparent materials to endow such composite windows with the required thermal, chemical, and mechanical performance, this inexpensive reaction chamber design may be applied to the HTXRD analyses of a variety of gas/solid reactions.

  2. A High-Energy, Ultrashort-Pulse X-Ray System for the Dynamic Study of Heavy, Dense Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibson, David Jeremy [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Thomson-scattering based x-ray radiation sources, in which a laser beam is scattered off a relativistic electron beam resulting in a high-energy x-ray beam, are currently being developed by several groups around the world to enable studies of dynamic material properties which require temporal resolution on the order of tens of femtoseconds to tens of picoseconds. These sources offer pulses that are shorter than available from synchrotrons, more tunable than available from so-called Ka sources, and more penetrating and more directly probing than ultrafast lasers. Furthermore, Thomson-scattering sources can scale directly up to x-ray energies in the few MeV range, providing peak brightnesses far exceeding any other sources in this regime. This dissertation presents the development effort of one such source at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the Picosecond Laser-Electron InterAction for the Dynamic Evaluation of Structures (PLEIADES) project, designed to target energies from 30 keV to 200 keV, with a peak brightness on the order of 1018 photons • s-1 • mm-2 • mrad-2 • 0.01% bandwidth-1. A 10 TW Ti:Sapphire based laser system provides the photons for the interaction, and a 100 MeV accelerator with a 1.6 cell S-Band photoinjector at the front end provides the electron beam. The details of both these systems are presented, as is the initial x-ray production and characterization, validating the theory of Thomson scattering. In addition to the systems used to enable PLEIADES, two alternative systems are discussed. An 8.5 GHz X-Band photoinjector, capable of sustaining higher accelerating gradients and producing lower emittance electron beams in a smaller space than the S-Band gun, is presented, and the initial operation and commissioning of this gun is presented. Also, a hybrid chirped-pulse amplification system is presented as an alternative to the standard regenerative amplifier technology in high

  3. Symbiotic Stars in X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, G. J. M.; Sokoloski, J. L.; Mukai, K.; Nelson, T.

    2014-01-01

    Until recently, symbiotic binary systems in which a white dwarf accretes from a red giant were thought to be mainly a soft X-ray population. Here we describe the detection with the X-ray Telescope (XRT) on the Swift satellite of 9 white dwarf symbiotics that were not previously known to be X-ray sources and one that was previously detected as a supersoft X-ray source. The 9 new X-ray detections were the result of a survey of 41 symbiotic stars, and they increase the number of symbiotic stars known to be X-ray sources by approximately 30%. Swift/XRT detected all of the new X-ray sources at energies greater than 2 keV. Their X-ray spectra are consistent with thermal emission and fall naturally into three distinct groups. The first group contains those sources with a single, highly absorbed hard component, which we identify as probably coming from an accretion-disk boundary layer. The second group is composed of those sources with a single, soft X-ray spectral component, which likely arises in a region where low-velocity shocks produce X-ray emission, i.e. a colliding-wind region. The third group consists of those sources with both hard and soft X-ray spectral components. We also find that unlike in the optical, where rapid, stochastic brightness variations from the accretion disk typically are not seen, detectable UV flickering is a common property of symbiotic stars. Supporting our physical interpretation of the two X-ray spectral components, simultaneous Swift UV photometry shows that symbiotic stars with harder X-ray emission tend to have stronger UV flickering, which is usually associated with accretion through a disk. To place these new observations in the context of previous work on X-ray emission from symbiotic stars, we modified and extended the alpha/beta/gamma classification scheme for symbiotic-star X-ray spectra that was introduced by Muerset et al. based upon observations with the ROSAT satellite, to include a new sigma classification for sources with

  4. X-Rays from Saturn and its Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Anil; Elsner, Ron F.; Waite, J. Hunter; Gladstone, G. Randall; Cravens, Tom E.; Ford, Peter G.

    2005-01-01

    In January 2004 Saturn was observed by Chandra ACIS-S in two exposures, 00:06 to 11:00 UT on 20 January and 14:32 UT on 26 January to 01:13 UT on 27 January. Each continuous observation lasted for about one full Saturn rotation. These observations detected an X-ray flare from the Saturn's disk and indicate that the entire Saturnian X-ray emission is highly variable -- a factor of $\\sim$4 variability in brightness in a week time. The Saturn X-ray flare has a time and magnitude matching feature with the solar X-ray flare, which suggests that the disk X-ray emission of Saturn is governed by processes happening on the Sun. These observations also unambiguously detected X-rays from Saturn's rings. The X-ray emissions from rings are present mainly in the 0.45-0.6 keV band centered on the atomic OK$\\alpha$ fluorescence line at 525 eV: indicating the production of X-rays due to oxygen atoms in the water icy rings. The characteristics of X-rays from Saturn's polar region appear to be statistically consistent with those from its disk X-rays, suggesting that X-ray emission from the polar cap region might be an extension of the Saturn disk X-ray emission.

  5. Constraining omega from X-ray properties of clusters of galaxies at high redshifts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sadat, R.; Blanchard, A.; Oukbir, J.

    1997-01-01

    Properties of high redshift clusters are a fundamental source of information for cosmology. It has been shown by Oukbir and Blanchard (1997) that the combined knowledge of the redshift distribution of X-ray clusters of galaxies and the luminosity-temperature correlation, L-X - T-X, provides a pow...

  6. Winds in the AGN environment : new perspectives from high resolution X-ray spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Gesu, L.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, winds were recognized as an important ingredient in the AGN picture. Outflows of photoionized gas, which produce blueshifted absorption features detectable in the X-ray and in the UV band, are present in about 50% of Seyfert 1 galaxies. Combining observations at high spectral resolu

  7. Radiochemical Analysis by High Sensitivity Micro X-Ray Fluorescence Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ning Gao

    2006-05-12

    The primary objective of the project was to develop a novel dual-optic x-ray fluorescence instrument capable of doing radiochemical analysis of high-level radioactive wastes at DOE sites such as Savannah River Site and Hanford Site.

  8. High resolution X-ray scattering studies of substrates and multilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Finn Erland

    1988-01-01

    High resolution X-ray scattering measurements on multilayer substrates and surfaces are reviewed. It is shown that the usual substrates of float glass and Si-wafers are dominated by large scale figure error, whereas samples of super polished SiC substrates are comparable in flatness and roughness...

  9. Parsec-scale X-ray Flows in High-mass Star-forming Regions

    CERN Document Server

    Townsley, L K; Feigelson, E D; Garmire, G P

    2005-01-01

    The Chandra X-ray Observatory is providing remarkable new views of massive star-forming regions, revealing all stages in the life cycle of high-mass stars and their effects on their surroundings. We present a Chandra tour of several high-mass star-forming regions, highlighting physical processes that characterize the life of a cluster of high-mass stars, from deeply-embedded cores too young to have established an HII region to superbubbles so large that they shape our views of galaxies. Along the way we see that X-ray observations reveal hundreds of stellar sources powering great HII region complexes, suffused by both hard and soft diffuse X-ray structures caused by fast O-star winds thermalized in wind-wind collisions or by termination shocks against the surrounding media. Finally, we examine the effects of the deaths of high-mass stars that remained close to their birthplaces, exploding as supernovae within the superbubbles that these clusters created. We present new X-ray results on W51 IRS2E and 30 Doradu...

  10. High-mass X-ray binaries and OB runaway stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaper, L.; van der Meer, A.; Tijani, A.H.; Allen, C.; Scarfe, C.

    2004-01-01

    High-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) represent an important phase in the evolution of massive binary systems and provide fundamental information on the properties of the OB-star primaries and their compact secondaries (neutron star, black hole). Recent observations indicate that the neutron stars in som

  11. Design and Implementation of High-speed X-ray Nondestructive Detector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Xian-yi; MIAO Chang-yun; WANG Wei; SUN Xue

    2008-01-01

    A high-speed X-ray nondestructive detector is designed in this paper. The principle of X-ray nondestructive detection is analyzed, and a general system scheme of the high-speed X-ray nondestructive detector is proposed. The Virtex-4 series Fx12 FPGA chip is used to design its hardware circuit, the PowerPC405 embedded system is developed, the high-speed image processing algorithm is applied to compile its processing software, and TCP/IP protocol is employed to compile the correspondence software, to realize high-speed X-ray signal gathering, processing and transmission. The experimental result indicated that the detector can be applied to the long-distance and on-line nondestructive detection of product line with Steel Wire Ropes in correlative industry field, such as mines, ports and wharfs. The running rate of the conveyer belt could achieve 6m/s when the survey width of the detector is 1.6 m.

  12. High Pressure X-ray Absorption Studies on Correlated-Electron Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornelius, Andrew L. [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2016-08-26

    This project used high pressure to alter the electron-electron and electron-lattice interactions in rare earth and actinide compounds. Knowledge of these properties is the starting points for a first-principles understanding of electronic and electronically related macroscopic properties. The research focused on a systematic study of x-ray absorption measurements on rare earth and actinide compounds.

  13. Windowless microfluidic platform based on capillary burst valves for high intensity x-ray measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vig, Asger Laurberg; Haldrup, Kristoffer; Enevoldsen, Nikolaj Brandt;

    2009-01-01

    We propose and describe a microfluidic system for high intensity x-ray measurements. The required open access to a microfluidic channel is provided by an out-of-plane capillary burst valve (CBV). The functionality of the out-of-plane CBV is characterized with respect to the diameter of the window...

  14. High-speed X-ray imaging of a ball impacting on loose sand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Homan, T.A.M.; Mudde, R.F.; Lohse, Detlef; van der Meer, Roger M.

    2015-01-01

    When a ball is dropped in fine very loose sand, a splash and subsequently a jet are observed above the bed, followed by a granular eruption. To directly and quantitatively determine what happens inside the sand bed, high-speed X-ray tomography measurements are carried out in a custom-made set-up

  15. High-pressure X-ray diffraction study of bulk- and nanocrystalline GaN

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, J.E.; Jakobsen, J.M.; Jiang, Jianzhong

    2003-01-01

    Bulk- and nanocrystalline GaN have been studied by high-pressure energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction. Pressure-induced structural phase transitions from the wurtzite to the NaCl phase were observed in both materials. The transition pressure was found to be 40 GPa for the bulk-crystalline GaN, while...

  16. Highly absorbed X-ray binaries in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Novara, G; Mereghetti, S; Haberl, F; Coe, M; Filipovic, M; Udalski, A; Paizis, A; Pietsch, W; Sturm, R; Gilfanov, M; Tiengo, A; Payne, J; Smits, D; De Horta, A

    2011-01-01

    Many of the high mass X-ray binaries (HMXRBs) discovered in recent years in our Galaxy are characterized by a high absorption, most likely intrinsic to the system, which hampers their detection at the softest X-ray energies. We have undertaken a search for highly-absorbed X-ray sources in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) with a systematic analysis of 62 XMM-Newton SMC observations. We obtained a sample of 30 sources showing evidence for an equivalent hydrogen column density larger than 3x10^23 cm^-2. Five of these sources are clearly identified as HMXRBs: four were already known (including three X-ray pulsars) and one, XMM J005605.8-720012, reported here for the first time. For the latter, we present optical spectroscopy confirming the association with a Be star in the SMC. The other sources in our sample have optical counterparts fainter than magnitude ~16 in the V band, and many of them have possible NIR counterparts consistent with highly reddened early type stars in the SMC. While their number is broadly ...

  17. Massive Stars and Their Compact Remnants in High-Mass X-Ray Binaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaper, L.; van der Meer, A.

    2007-01-01

    In a high-mass X-ray binary (HMXB) a massive star interacts with a neutron-star or black-hole companion in various ways. The gravitational interaction enables the measurement of fundamental parameters such as the mass of both binary components, providing important constraints on the evolutionary his

  18. High spatial resolution X-ray and gamma ray imaging system using diffraction crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smither, Robert K.

    2011-05-17

    A method and a device for high spatial resolution imaging of a plurality of sources of x-ray and gamma-ray radiation are provided. The device comprises a plurality of arrays, with each array comprising a plurality of elements comprising a first collimator, a diffracting crystal, a second collimator, and a detector.

  19. High-Resolution Chandra X-ray Imaging and Spectroscopy of the Sigma Orionis Cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Skinner, S L; Cohen, D H; Gagné, M; Owocki, S P; Townsend, R D

    2008-01-01

    We present results of a 90 ksec Chandra X-ray observation of the young sigma Orionis cluster (age ~3 Myr) obtained with the High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer. We use the high resolution grating spectrum and moderate resolution CCD spectrum of the massive central star sigma Ori AB (O9.5V + B0.5V) to test wind shock theories of X-ray emission and also analyze the high spatial resolution zero-order ACIS-S image of the central cluster region. Chandra detected 42 X-ray sources on the primary CCD (ACIS-S3). All but five have near-IR or optical counterparts and about one-fourth are variable. Notable high-mass stellar detections are sigma Ori AB, the magnetic B star sigma Ori E, and the B5V binary HD 37525. Most of the other detections have properties consistent with lower mass K or M-type stars. We present the first X-ray spectrum of the unusual infrared source IRS1 located 3.3 arc-sec north of sigma Ori AB, which is likely an embedded T Tauri star whose disk/envelope is being photoevaporated by sigma Or...

  20. Accelerator-driven X-ray Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Dinh Cong [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-09

    After an introduction which mentions x-ray tubes and storage rings and gives a brief review of special relativity, the subject is treated under the following topics and subtopics: synchrotron radiation (bending magnet radiation, wiggler radiation, undulator radiation, brightness and brilliance definition, synchrotron radiation facilities), x-ray free-electron lasers (linac-driven X-ray FEL, FEL interactions, self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE), SASE self-seeding, fourth-generation light source facilities), and other X-ray sources (energy recovery linacs, Inverse Compton scattering, laser wakefield accelerator driven X-ray sources. In summary, accelerator-based light sources cover the entire electromagnetic spectrum. Synchrotron radiation (bending magnet, wiggler and undulator radiation) has unique properties that can be tailored to the users’ needs: bending magnet and wiggler radiation is broadband, undulator radiation has narrow spectral lines. X-ray FELs are the brightest coherent X-ray sources with high photon flux, femtosecond pulses, full transverse coherence, partial temporal coherence (SASE), and narrow spectral lines with seeding techniques. New developments in electron accelerators and radiation production can potentially lead to more compact sources of coherent X-rays.

  1. Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence Analysis (TXRF) using the high flux SAXS camera

    CERN Document Server

    Wobrauschek, P; Pepponi, G; Bergmann, A; Glatter, O

    2002-01-01

    Combining the high photon flux from a rotating anode X-ray tube with an X-ray optical component to focus and monochromatize the X-ray beam is the most promising instrumentation for best detection limits in the modern XRF laboratory. This is realized by using the design of a high flux SAXS camera in combination with a 4 kW high brilliant rotating Cu anode X-ray tube with a graded elliptically bent multilayer and including a new designed module for excitation in total reflection geometry within the beam path. The system can be evacuated thus reducing absorption and scattering of air and removing the argon peak in the spectra. Another novelty is the use of a Peltier cooled drift detector with an energy resolution of 148 eV at 5.9 keV and 5 mm sup 2 area. For Co detection limits of about 300 fg determined by a single element standard have been achieved. Testing a real sample NIST 1643d led to detection limits in the range of 300 ng/l for the medium Z.

  2. On the use of CCD area detectors for high-resolution specular X-ray reflectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenter, P; Catalano, J G; Park, C; Zhang, Z

    2006-07-01

    The use and application of charge coupled device (CCD) area detectors for high-resolution specular X-ray reflectivity is discussed. Direct comparison of high-resolution specular X-ray reflectivity data measured with CCD area detectors and traditional X-ray scintillator ('point') detectors demonstrates that the use of CCD detectors leads to a substantial (approximately 30-fold) reduction in data acquisition rates because of the elimination of the need to scan the sample to distinguish signal from background. The angular resolution with a CCD detector is also improved by a factor of approximately 3. The ability to probe the large dynamic range inherent to high-resolution X-ray reflectivity data in the specular reflection geometry was demonstrated with measurements of the orthoclase (001)- and alpha-Al2O3 (012)-water interfaces, with measured reflectivity signals varying by a factor of approximately 10(6) without the use of any beam attenuators. Statistical errors in the reflectivity signal are also derived and directly compared with the repeatability of the measurements.

  3. High Angular Resolution and Lightweight X-Ray Optics for Astronomical Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W. W.; Biskach, M. P.; Blake, P. N.; Chan, K. W.; Evans, T. C.; Hong, M.; Jones, W. D.; Jones, W. D.; Kolos, L. D.; Mazzarella, J. M.; McClelland, R. S.; ODell, S. L.; Saha, T. T.; Sharpe, M. V.

    2011-01-01

    X-ray optics with both high angular resolution and lightweight is essential for further progress in x-ray astronomy. High angular resolution is important in avoiding source confusion and reducing background to enable the observation of the most distant objects of the early Universe. It is also important in enabling the use of gratings to achieve high spectral resolution to study, among other things, the myriad plasmas that exist in planetary, stellar, galactic environments, as well as interplanetary, inter-stellar, and inter-galactic media. Lightweight is important for further increase in effective photon collection area, because x-ray observations must take place on space platforms and the amount of mass that can be launched into space has always been very limited and is expected to continue to be very limited. This paper describes an x-ray optics development program and reports on its status that meets these two requirements. The objective of this program is to enable Explorer type missions in the near term and to enable flagship missions in the long term.

  4. A multiplexed high-resolution imaging spectrometer for resonant inelastic soft X-ray scattering spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warwick, Tony; Chuang, Yi De; Voronov, Dmitriy L; Padmore, Howard A

    2014-07-01

    The optical design of a two-dimensional imaging soft X-ray spectrometer is described. A monochromator will produce a dispersed spectrum in a narrow vertical illuminated stripe (∼2 µm wide by ∼2 mm tall) on a sample. The spectrometer will use inelastically scattered X-rays to image the extended field on the sample in the incident photon energy direction (vertical), resolving the incident photon energy. At the same time it will image and disperse the scattered photons in the orthogonal (horizontal) direction, resolving the scattered photon energy. The principal challenge is to design a system that images from the flat-field illumination of the sample to the flat field of the detector and to achieve sufficiently high spectral resolution. This spectrometer provides a completely parallel resonant inelastic X-ray scattering measurement at high spectral resolution (∼30,000) over the energy bandwidth (∼5 eV) of a soft X-ray absorption resonance.

  5. Large area high-resolution CCD-based X-ray detector for macromolecular crystallography

    CERN Document Server

    Pokric, M; Jorden, A R; Cox, M P; Marshall, A; Long, P G; Moon, K; Jerram, P A; Pool, P; Nave, C; Derbyshire, G E; Helliwell, J R

    2002-01-01

    An X-ray detector system for macromolecular crystallography based on a large area charge-coupled device (CCD) sensor has been developed as part of a large research and development programme for advanced X-ray sensor technology, funded by industry and the Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council (PPARC) in the UK. The prototype detector consists of two large area three-sides buttable charge-coupled devices (CCD 46-62 EEV), where the single CCD area is 55.3 mmx41.5 mm. Overall detector imaging area is easily extendable to 85 mmx110 mm. The detector consists of an optically coupled X-ray sensitive phosphor, skewed fibre-optic studs and CCDs. The crystallographic measurement requirements at synchrotron sources are met through a high spatial resolution (2048x1536 pixel array), high dynamic range (approx 10 sup 5), a fast readout (approx 1 s), low noise (<10e sup -) and much reduced parallax error. Additionally, the prototype detector system has been optimised by increasing its efficiency at low X-ray ene...

  6. Modelling the energy dependencies of high-frequency QPO in black hole X-ray binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Zycki, P T; Sobolewska, M A

    2007-01-01

    We model energy dependencies of the quasi periodic oscillations (QPO) in the model of disc epicyclic motions, with X-ray modulation caused by varying relativistic effects. The model was proposed to explain the high frequency QPO observed in X-ray binaries. We consider two specific scenarios for the geometry of accretion flow and spectral formation. Firstly, a standard cold accretion disc with an active X-ray emitting corona is assumed to oscillate. Secondly, only a hot X-ray emitting accretion flow oscillates, while the cold disc is absent at the QPO radius. We find that the QPO spectra are generally similar to the spectrum of radiation emitted at the QPO radius, and they are broadened by the relativistic effects. In particular, the QPO spectrum contains the disc component in the oscillating disc with a corona scenario. We also review the available data on energy dependencies of high frequency QPO, and we point out that they appear to lack the disc component in their energy spectra. This would suggest the hot...

  7. Focusing polycapillary to reduce parasitic scattering for inelastic x-ray measurements at high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, P.; Xiao, Y. M.; Rod, E.; Bai, L. G.; Shen, G. Y.; Sinogeikin, S.; Gao, N.; Ding, Y.; Mao, H.-K.

    2015-07-01

    The double-differential scattering cross-section for the inelastic scattering of x-ray photons from electrons is typically orders of magnitude smaller than that of elastic scattering. With samples 10-100 μm size in a diamond anvil cell at high pressure, the inelastic x-ray scattering signals from samples are obscured by scattering from the cell gasket and diamonds. One major experimental challenge is to measure a clean inelastic signal from the sample in a diamond anvil cell. Among the many strategies for doing this, we have used a focusing polycapillary as a post-sample optic, which allows essentially only scattered photons within its input field of view to be refocused and transmitted to the backscattering energy analyzer of the spectrometer. We describe the modified inelastic x-ray spectrometer and its alignment. With a focused incident beam which matches the sample size and the field of view of polycapillary, at relatively large scattering angles, the polycapillary effectively reduces parasitic scattering from the diamond anvil cell gasket and diamonds. Raw data collected from the helium exciton measured by x-ray inelastic scattering at high pressure using the polycapillary method are compared with those using conventional post-sample slit collimation.

  8. Fabrication of high resolution and lightweight monocrystalline silicon x-ray mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riveros, Raul E.; Kolos, Linette D.; Mazzarella, James R.; McKeon, Kevin P.; Zhang, William W.

    2015-09-01

    Monocrystalline silicon as an x-ray mirror substrate material promises significant improvements over the x- ray mirror technologies used to date, since it is mechanically stiff, stress-free, highly thermally conductive, and widely commercially available. Producing highly accurate and lightweight x-ray mirrors from monocrystalline silicon requires a unique and specialized manufacturing process capable of producing mirrors quickly and cost effectively. The identification, development, and testing of this process is the focus of the work described in this proceeding. Monocrystalline silicon blocks were obtained, and a variety of processes (wire electro-discharge machining, etching, polishing) were applied to generate an accurate and stress-free cylindrical or Wolter-I mirror surface. The mirror surface is then sliced off at a thickness of mirror segment with mirror production process requires ~2 days to produce a mirror segment and is easily integrated into a cost-reducing parallel processing scheme. Presently, there is strong evidence that the mirror production process described in this paper will meet the stringent requirements of future x-ray missions.

  9. High-energy x-ray detection of G359.89–0.08 (SGR A–E): magnetic flux tube emission powered by cosmic rays?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Shuo; Hailey, Charles J.; Baganoff, Frederick K.

    2014-01-01

    We report the first detection of high-energy X-ray (E > 10 keV) emission from the Galactic center non-thermal filament G359.89–0.08 (Sgr A–E) using data acquired with the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR). The bright filament was detected up to ∼50 keV during a NuSTAR Galactic center...

  10. High-resolution X-ray diffraction imaging of non-Bragg diffracting materials using phase retrieval X-ray diffractometry (PRXRD) technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikulin, A.Y.; Darahanau, A.V.; Horney, R.; Ishikawa, T

    2004-06-15

    An X-ray diffraction technique has recently been developed and successfully applied to comprehensively, including both phase and amplitude contrast, map the complex refractive index of non-crystalline materials with submicron spatial resolution. The methodology is based on the measurement of a high angular resolution X-ray Fraunhofer diffraction pattern with further application of the phase-retrieval formalism using a logarithmic dispersion relation. The technique is reviewed from the perspective of its ability to deliver ultra-high, order of several nanometres, spatial resolution and to uniquely determine both the real and imaginary components of the complex refractive index of the material under analysis. Potential niche of practical applications is discussed in terms of the spatial resolution and field of view achievable by the method.

  11. High-power laser-driven source of ultra-short X-ray and gamma-ray pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esirkepov, T.Zh.; Bulanov, S.V.; Pirozhkov, A.S.; Kando, M. [Advanced Photon Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kyoto (Japan); Zhidkov, A.G. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Yokosuka-shi, Kanagawa-Ken (Japan)

    2009-11-15

    A novel ultra-bright high-intensity source of X-ray and gamma radiation is suggested. It is based on the double Doppler effect, where a relativistic flying mirror reflects a counter-propagating electromagnetic radiation causing its frequency multiplication and intensification, and on the inverse double Doppler effect, where the mirror acquires energy from an ultra-intense co-propagating electromagnetic wave. The role of the flying mirror is played by a high-density thin plasma slab accelerating in the radiation pressure dominant regime. Frequencies of high harmonics generated at the flying mirror by a relativistically strong counter-propagating radiation undergo multiplication with the same factor as the fundamental frequency of the reflected radiation, approximately equal to the quadruple of the square of the mirror Lorentz factor. (authors)

  12. High-power laser-driven source of ultra-short X-ray and gamma-ray pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Bulanov, S. V.; Zhidkov, A. G.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Kando, M.

    2009-11-01

    A novel ultra-bright high-intensity source of X-ray and gamma radiation is suggested. It is based on the double Doppler effect, where a relativistic flying mirror reflects a counter-propagating electromagnetic radiation causing its frequency multiplication and intensification, and on the inverse double Doppler effect, where the mirror acquires energy from an ultra-intense co-propagating electromagnetic wave. The role of the flying mirror is played by a high-density thin plasma slab accelerating in the radiation pressure dominant regime. Frequencies of high harmonics generated at the flying mirror by a relativistically strong counter-propagating radiation udergo multiplication with the same factor as the fundamental frequency of the reflected radiation, approximately equal to the quadruple of the square of the mirror Lorentz factor.

  13. MAX200x: In-situ X-ray Measurements at High Pressure and High Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathe, C.; Mueller, H. J.; Wehber, M.; Lauterjung, J.; Schilling, F. R.

    2009-05-01

    Twenty years ago geoscientists from all over the world launched in-situ X-ray diffraction experiments under extreme pressure and temperature conditions at synchrotron beamlines. One of the first apparatus was installed at HASYLAB, MAX80, a single-stage multi-anvil system. MAX80 allows in-situ diffraction studies in conjunction with the simultaneous measurement of elastic properties up to 12 GPa and 1600 K. This very successful experiment, unique in Europe, is operated by Helmholtz Centre Potsdam and is used by more than twenty groups from different countries every year. Experiments for both, applied and basic research are conducted, ranging from life-sciences, chemistry, physics, over material sciences to geosciences. Today new materials and the use of high brilliant synchrotron sources allow constructing double-stage multi-anvil systems for X-ray diffraction to reach much higher pressures. The newly designed high-flux hard wiggler (HARWI-II) beamline is an ideal X-ray source for this kind of experiments. As only the uppermost few kilometres of the Earth (less than 0.1% of its radius) are accessible for direct observations (e.g. deep drilling), sophisticated techniques are required to observe and to understand the processes in the deep interior of our planet. In-situ studies are an excellent tool to investigate ongoing geodynamic processes within the laboratory. One of the fundamental regions to study geodynamic processes seems to be the so-called transition zone, the boundary between upper and lower Earth's mantle between 410 and 670 km depth. Mineral reactions, phase transitions, as wheel as fluid rock interaction in this area might have the potential to strongly influence and control the dynamic motions within our whole planet. Around 25 GPa and 2 000 K are required to simulate these processes in the laboratory. The new MAX200x will be an excellent tool for these ambitious experiments.

  14. High resolution x-ray lensless imaging by differential holographic encoding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, D.; Guizar-Sicairos, M.; Wu, B.; Scherz, A.; Acremann, Y.; Tylisczcak, T.; Fischer, P.; Friedenberger, N.; Ollefs, K.; Farle, M.; Fienup, J. R.; Stohr, J.

    2009-11-02

    X-ray free electron lasers (X-FEL{sub s}) will soon offer femtosecond pulses of laterally coherent x-rays with sufficient intensity to record single-shot coherent scattering patterns for nanoscale imaging. Pulse trains created by splitand-delay techniques even open the door for cinematography on unprecedented nanometer length and femtosecond time scales. A key to real space ultrafast motion pictures is fast and reliable inversion of the recorded reciprocal space scattering patterns. Here we for the first time demonstrate in the x-ray regime the power of a novel technique for lensless high resolution imaging, previously suggested by Guizar-Sicairos and Fienup termed holography with extended reference by autocorrelation linear differential operation, HERALD0. We have achieved superior resolution over conventional x-ray Fourier transform holography (FTH) without sacrifices in SNR or significant increase in algorithmic complexity. By combining images obtained from individual sharp features on an extended reference, we further show that the resolution can be even extended beyond the reference fabrication limits. Direct comparison to iterative phase retrieval image reconstruction and images recorded with stateof- the-art zone plate microscopes is presented. Our results demonstrate the power of HERALDO as a favorable candidate for robust inversion of single-shot coherent scattering patterns.

  15. Wind-jet interaction in high-mass X-ray binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdziarski, Andrzej

    2016-07-01

    Jets in high-mass X-ray binaries can strongly interact with the stellar wind from the donor. The interaction leads, in particular, to formation of recollimation shocks. The shocks can then accelerate electrons in the jet and lead to enhanced emission, observable in the radio and gamma-ray bands. DooSoo, Zdziarski & Heinz (2016) have formulated a condition on the maximum jet power (as a function of the jet velocity and wind rate and velocity) at which such shocks form. This criterion can explain the large difference in the radio and gamma-ray loudness between Cyg X-1 and Cyg X-3. The orbital modulation of radio emission observed in Cyg X-1 and Cyg X-3 allows a measurement of the location of the height along the jet where the bulk of emission at a given frequency occurs. Strong absorption of X-rays in the wind of Cyg X-3 is required to account for properties of the correlation of the radio emission with soft and hard X-rays. That absorption can also account for the unusual spectral and timing X-ray properties of this source.

  16. Characterization of neutron yield and x-ray spectra of a High Flux Neutron Generator (HFNG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nnamani, Nnaemeka; HFNG Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The High Flux Neutron Generator (HFNG) is a DD plasma-based source, with a self-loading target intended for fundamental science and engineering applications, including 40 Ar/39 Ar geochronology, neutron cross section measurements, and radiation hardness testing of electronics. Our first estimate of the neutron yield, based on the population of the 4.486 hour 115 In isomer gave a neutron yield of the order 108 n/sec; optimization is ongoing to achieve the design target of 1011 n/sec. Preliminary x-ray spectra showed prominent energy peaks which are likely due to atomic line-emission from back-streaming electrons accelerated up to 100 keV impinging on various components of the HFNG chamber. Our x-ray and neutron diagnostics will aid us as we continue to evolve the design to suppress back-streaming electrons, necessary to achieve higher plasma beam currents, and thus higher neutron flux. This talk will focus on the characterization of the neutron yield and x-ray spectra during our tests. A collimation system is being installed near one of the chamber ports for improved observation of the x-ray spectra. This work is supported by NSF Grant No. EAR-0960138, U.S. DOE LBNL Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231, U.S. DOE LLNL Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344, and the UC Office of the President Award 12-LR-238745.

  17. Polarization in CdTe radiation detectors at high X-ray photon fluxes (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franc, Jan; Dědič, Václav; Pekárek, Jakub; Belas, Eduard; Touš, Jan

    2016-09-01

    In this contribution we show an improvement of a spectroscopic response of CZT X-ray detector operating at high fluxes of X-ray tube by simultaneous infrared light illumination with a wavelength of 1200 nm. CZT detectors usually suffer from a polarization effect while their internal electric field can be strongly deformed due to a trapping of photogenerated holes. We describe a mechanism of an optically induced depolarization peaking at photon energy of about 1 eV ( 1240 nm) due to an optical transition of electrons from the valence band to the deep level. The depolarization effect is accompanied by a decrease of the detector current which results in a lower noise entering the preamplifier of detector readout circuit. We have observed that it is possible to restore originally distorted X-ray spectra using additional 1200 nm LED illumination with a photon flux of 10^16 cm^-2s^-1 at approximately two times higher X-ray flux than without LED. The number of detected counts was in the range of 10^5-10^6mm^2s^-1. The restoration of the spectrum by continuous infrared light is accompanied by decrease of dark current. We explain this effect by light induced changes of profile of the electric filed that leads to decrease of the electron current injected from the cathode.

  18. High Dynamic Range X-ray Detector Pixel Architectures Utilizing Charge Removal

    CERN Document Server

    Weiss, Joel T; Philipp, Hugh T; Becker, Julian; Chamberlain, Darol; Purohit, Prafull; Tate, Mark W; Gruner, Sol M

    2016-01-01

    Several charge integrating CMOS pixel front-ends utilizing charge removal techniques have been fabricated to extend dynamic range for x-ray diffraction applications at synchrotron sources and x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs). The pixels described herein build on the Mixed Mode Pixel Array Detector (MM-PAD) framework, developed previously by our group to perform high dynamic range imaging. These new pixels boast several orders of magnitude improvement in maximum flux over the MM-PAD, which is capable of measuring a sustained flux in excess of 10$^{8}$ x-rays/pixel/second while maintaining sensitivity to smaller signals, down to single x-rays. To extend dynamic range, charge is removed from the integration node of the front-end amplifier without interrupting integration. The number of times this process occurs is recorded by a digital counter in the pixel. The parameter limiting full well is thereby shifted from the size of an integration capacitor to the depth of a digital counter. The result is similar to t...

  19. The role of metallicity in high mass X-ray binaries in galaxy formation models

    CERN Document Server

    Artale, M C; Tissera, P B

    2014-01-01

    Context: Recent theoretical works claim that high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) could have been important sources of energy feedback into the interstellar and intergalactic media, playing a major role in the reionization epoch. A metallicity dependence of the production rate or luminosity of the sources is a key ingredient generally assumed but not yet probed. Aims: Our goal is to explore the relation between the X-ray luminosity (Lx) and star formation rate of galaxies as a possible tracer of a metallicity dependence of the production rates and/or X-ray luminosities of HMXBs. Methods: We developed a model to estimate the Lx of star forming galaxies based on stellar evolution models which include metallicity dependences. We applied our X-ray binary models to galaxies selected from hydrodynamical cosmological simulations which include chemical evolution of the stellar populations in a self-consistent way. Results: Our models successfully reproduce the dispersion in the observed relations as an outcome of the com...

  20. BAT AGN Spectroscopic Survey II: X-ray Emission and High Ionization Optical Emission Lines

    CERN Document Server

    Berney, Simon; Trakhtenbrot, Benny; Ricci, Claudio; Lamperti, Isabella; Schawinski, Kevin; Balokovic, Mislav; Crenshaw, D Michael; Fischer, Travis; Gehrels, Neil; Harrison, Fiona; Hashimoto, Yasuhiro; Ichikawa, Kohei; Mushotzky, Richard; Oh, Kyuseok; Stern, Daniel; Treister, Ezequiel; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Veilleux, Sylvain; Winter, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the relationship between X-ray and optical line emission in 340 nearby AGN selected above 10 keV using Swift BAT. We find a weak correlation between the extinction corrected [O III] and hard X-ray luminosity (14-195 keV) with a [OIII] large scatter (R_Pear = 0.64, sigma = 0.62 dex) and a similarly large scatter with the intrinsic 2-10 keV to [O III] luminosities (RPear=0.63, sigma = 0.63 dex). Correlations of the hard X-ray fluxes with the fluxes of high-ionization narrow lines ([O III], He II, [Ne III] and [Ne V]) are not significantly better than with the low ionization lines (Halpha, [SII]). Factors like obscuration or physical slit size are not found to be a significant part of the large scatter. In contrast, the optical emission lines show much better correlations with each other (sigma = 0.3 dex) than with the X-ray flux. The inherent large scatter questions the common usage of narrow emission lines as AGN bolometric luminosity indicators and suggests that other issues such as geometrical...

  1. High-resolution x-ray photoemission electron microscopy at the Advanced Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stammler, T.; Anders, S.; Padmore, H.A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Stoehr, J. [IBM Almaden Research Center, San Jose, CA (United States); Scheinfein, M. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Ade, H. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1998-12-31

    X-ray Photoemission Electron Microscopy (X-PEEM) is a full-field imaging technique where the sample is illuminated by an x-ray beam and the photoemitted electrons are imaged on a screen by means of an electron optics. It therefore combines two well-established materials analysis techniques--photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM) and x-ray spectroscopy such as near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. This combination opens a wide field of new applications in materials research and has proven to be a powerful tool to investigate simultaneously topological, elemental, chemical state, and magnetic properties of surfaces, thin films, and multilayers at high spatial resolution. A new X-PEEM installed at the bend magnet beamline 7.3.1.1 at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) is designed for a spatial resolution of 20 nm and is currently under commissioning. An overview of the ongoing experimental program using X-PEEM in the field of materials research at the ALS is given by elemental and chemical bonding contrast imaging of hard disk coatings and sliders, field emission studies on diamond films as possible candidates for field-emission flat-panel displays, and the study of dewetting and decomposition phenomena of thin polymer blends and bilayers.

  2. Detecting Relativistic X-ray Jets in High-Redshift Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    McKeough, Kathryn; Cheung, C C; Stawarz, Lukasz; Kashyap, Vinay L; Stein, Nathan; Stampoulis, Vasileios; van Dyk, David A; Wardle, J F C; Lee, N P; Harris, D E; Schwartz, D A; Donato, Davide; Maraschi, Laura; Tavecchio, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    We analyze Chandra X-ray images of a sample of 11 quasars that are known to contain kiloparsec scale radio jets. The sample consists of five high-redshift (z >= 3.6) flat-spectrum radio quasars, and six intermediate redshift (2.1 < z < 2.9) quasars. The dataset includes four sources with integrated steep radio spectra and seven with flat radio spectra. A total of 25 radio jet features are present in this sample. We apply a Bayesian multi-scale image reconstruction method to detect and measure the X-ray emission from the jets. We compute deviations from a baseline model that does not include the jet, and compare observed X-ray images with those computed with simulated images where no jet features exist. This allows us to compute p-value upper bounds on the significance that an X- ray jet is detected in a pre-determined region of interest. We detected 12 of the features unambiguously, and an additional 6 marginally. We also find residual emission in the cores of 3 quasars and in the background of 1 quasar...

  3. High-Resolution X-Ray Lensless Imaging by Differential Holographic Encoding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Diling [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Applied Physics; SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Stanford Inst. for Material and Energy Science; Guizar-Sicairos, Manuel [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Inst. of Optics; Wu, Benny [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Applied Physics; SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Stanford Inst. for Material and Energy Science; Scherz, Andreas [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Stanford Inst. for Material and Energy Science; Acremann, Yves [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Photon Ultrafast Laser Science and Engineering Inst. (PULSE); Tyliszczak, Tolek [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Advanced Light Source (ALS); Fischer, Peter [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Center for X-ray Optics; Friedenberger, Nina [Universitat Duisburg-Essen (Germany). Dept. of Physics and Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen (CeNIDE); Ollefs, Katharina [Universitat Duisburg-Essen (Germany). Dept. of Physics and Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen (CeNIDE); Farle, Michael [Universitat Duisburg-Essen (Germany). Dept. of Physics and Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen (CeNIDE); Fienup, James R. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Inst. of Optics; Stöhr, Joachim [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS)

    2010-07-01

    X-ray free electron lasers (X-FELs) will soon offer femtosecond pulses of laterally coherent x-rays with sufficient intensity to record single-shot coherent scattering patterns for nanoscale imaging. Pulse trains created by split and- delay techniques even open the door for cinematography on unprecedented nanometer length and femtosecond time scales. A key to real space ultrafast motion pictures is fast and reliable inversion of the recorded reciprocal space scattering patterns. Here we for the first time demonstrate in the x-ray regime the power of a novel technique for lensless high resolution imaging, previously suggested by Guizar-Sicairos and Fienup termed holography with extended reference by autocorrelation linear differential operation, HERALD0. We have achieved superior resolution over conventional x-ray Fourier transform holography (FTH) without sacrifices in SNR or significant increase in algorithmic complexity. By combining images obtained from individual sharp features on an extended reference, we further show that the resolution can be even extended beyond the reference fabrication limits. Direct comparison to iterative phase retrieval image reconstruction and images recorded with state of-the-art zone plate microscopes is presented. Our results demonstrate the power of HERALDO as a favorable candidate for robust inversion of single-shot coherent scattering patterns.

  4. High Resolution X-ray Imaging of Supernova Remnant 1987A

    CERN Document Server

    Ng, C -Y; Murray, S S; Slane, P O; Park, S; Staveley-Smith, L; Manchester, R N; Burrows, D N

    2009-01-01

    We report observations of the remnant of Supernova 1987A with the High Resolution Camera (HRC) onboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory. A direct image from the HRC resolves the annular structure of the X-ray remnant, confirming the morphology previously inferred by deconvolution of lower resolution data from the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer. Detailed spatial modeling shows that the a thin ring plus a thin shell gives statistically the best description of the overall remnant structure, and suggests an outer radius 0.96" +/- 0.05" +/- 0.03" for the X-ray-emitting region, with the two uncertainties corresponding to the statistical and systematic errors, respectively. This is very similar to the radius determined by a similar modeling technique for the radio shell at a comparable epoch, in contrast to previous claims that the remnant is 10-15% smaller at X-rays than in the radio band. The HRC observations put a flux limit of 0.010 cts/s (99% confidence level, 0.08-10 keV range) on any compact source at the rem...

  5. Development of an ultra high-precision x-ray telescope with an adaptive optics system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamoto, Shunji; Takano, Haruko; Saitoh, Harue; Yamamoto, Norimasa; Kohmura, Takayoshi; Suga, Kazuharu; Sekiguchi, Hiroyuki

    2003-06-01

    We are developing an ultra high precision Soft X-ray telescope. The design of the telescope is a normal incident one for 13.5 nm band using Mo/Si multilayers. Two ideas are introduced. One is the optical measurement system in order to monitor the prevision of the optics system. The other is the adaptive optics system with a deformable mirror. Using an x-ray optical separation filter, we can always monitor the deformation of the optics by optical light. With this information, we can control the deformable mirror to compensate the system deformation as a closed loop system. We confirmed that the absolute precision of the wave front sensor was less than 3 nm rms. The preicison of the deformable mirror was roughly 5 nm rms. The shape of the primary mirror was an off-axis paraboloide with an effective diameter of 80mm. This primary mirror was coated by Mo/Si multilayers. The reflectivity of the primary mirror at 13.5 nm was rnaging from 30 to 50%. The x-ray optical separation filter was made from Zr with a thicknness of ~170nm. The transmission of the filter for low energy x-ray was measured and was roughly 50% at 13.5nm.

  6. A New X-ray Bright Point Catalog From Honode XRT images As An Application of Feature Recognition Methods and Emerging Heliophysics Knowledge Base Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Gregory L.; Freeland, S. L.; Weber, M. A.

    2007-05-01

    A new effort is underway to process the rapidly growing volume of solar observational data by using automated feature recognition and cataloguing software (c.f., Schrijver et al SPD 2007 or Hurlburt et al, SPD 2007). We apply a particular set of feature recognition tools called FINDSTUFF, available within the SolarSoft IDL framework, to the problem of automatically extracting X-Ray Bright Point (XBP) features from images recorded by the XRT instrument aboard the recently launched Japanese Hinode satellite. The extracted events are automatically catalogued by the FINDSTUFF software. The events are converted into standardized XML format as VOEvents, and these XML event files in turn are automatically deposited in the Heliophysics Knowledge Base (HKB) being developed at Lockheed Martin in collaboration with other institutions (c.f., Hurlburt et al, SPD 2007). In addition to providing a very useful end-to-end test of the Heliophysics Knowledge Base Project (Schrijver et al), the catalogue yields a valuable scientific database of XBPs extracted from high resolution XRT images. We discuss the aspects of our processing pipeline which are generally applicable to many feature archiving projects; we demonstrate how the final Heliophysics Knowledge Base may be queried to explore the XBP archive; we compare our catalogue of XBPs with previously generated ones; and we provide examples of discoveries made with massively autonomous feature extraction (MAFE). The U.S. XRT team is supported by NASA contracts from NASA to SAO (XRT), while the SOT team is supported by NASA contract number NNM07AA01C. Hinode is an international project supported by JAXA, NASA, PPARC and ESA. We are grateful to the Hinode team for all their efforts in the design, development and operation of the mission.

  7. Design and performance of AERHA, a high acceptance high resolution soft x-ray spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiuzbăian, Sorin G., E-mail: gheorghe.chiuzbaian@upmc.fr; Hague, Coryn F.; Brignolo, Stefania; Baumier, Cédric; Lüning, Jan [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique-Matière et Rayonnement, 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, F-75005 Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique-Matière et Rayonnement, 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, F-75005 Paris (France); Synchrotron SOLEIL, L’Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin, B.P. 48, F-91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Avila, Antoine; Delaunay, Renaud; Mariot, Jean-Michel [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique-Matière et Rayonnement, 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, F-75005 Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique-Matière et Rayonnement, 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, F-75005 Paris (France); Jaouen, Nicolas; Polack, François; Thomasset, Muriel; Lagarde, Bruno; Nicolaou, Alessandro [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L’Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin, B.P. 48, F-91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Sacchi, Maurizio [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L’Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin, B.P. 48, F-91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7588, Institut des NanoSciences de Paris, 4 place Jussieu, F-75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); CNRS, UMR 7588, Institut des NanoSciences de Paris, 4 place Jussieu, F-75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

    2014-04-15

    A soft x-ray spectrometer based on the use of an elliptical focusing mirror and a plane varied line spacing grating is described. It achieves both high resolution and high overall efficiency while remaining relatively compact. The instrument is dedicated to resonant inelastic x-ray scattering studies. We set out how this optical arrangement was judged best able to guarantee performance for the 50 − 1000 eV range within achievable fabrication targets. The AERHA (adjustable energy resolution high acceptance) spectrometer operates with an effective angular acceptance between 100 and 250 μsr (energy dependent) and a resolving power well in excess of 5000 according to the Rayleigh criterion. The high angular acceptance is obtained by means of a collecting pre-mirror. Three scattering geometries are available to enable momentum dependent measurements with 135°, 90°, and 50° scattering angles. The instrument operates on the Synchrotron SOLEIL SEXTANTS beamline which serves as a high photon flux 2 × 200 μm{sup 2} focal spot source with full polarization control.

  8. The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) High-Energy X-ray Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Fiona A.; Craig, Willliam W.; Christensen, Finn E.; Hailey, Charles J.; Zhang, William W.; Boggs, Steven E.; Stern, Daniel; Cook, W. Rick; Forster, Karl; Giommi, Paolo; hide

    2013-01-01

    High-energy X-ray telescope in orbit. NuSTAR operates in the band from 3 to 79 keV, extending the sensitivity of focusing far beyond the 10 keV high-energy cutoff achieved by all previous X-ray satellites. The inherently low background associated with concentrating the X-ray light enables NuSTAR to probe the hard X-ray sky with a more than 100-fold improvement in sensitivity over the collimated or coded mask instruments that have operated in this bandpass. Using its unprecedented combination of sensitivity and spatial and spectral resolution, NuSTAR will pursue five primary scientific objectives: (1) probe obscured active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity out to thepeak epoch of galaxy assembly in the universe (at z 2) by surveying selected regions of the sky; (2) study the population of hard X-ray-emitting compact objects in the Galaxy by mapping the central regions of the Milky Way; (3) study the non-thermal radiation in young supernova remnants, both the hard X-ray continuum and the emission from the radioactive element 44Ti; (4) observe blazars contemporaneously with ground-based radio, optical, and TeV telescopes, as well as with Fermi and Swift, to constrain the structure of AGN jets; and (5) observe line and continuum emission from core-collapse supernovae in the Local Group, and from nearby Type Ia events, to constrain explosion models. During its baseline two-year mission, NuSTAR will also undertake a broad program of targeted observations. The observatory consists of two co-aligned grazing-incidence X-ray telescopes pointed at celestial targets by a three-axis stabilized spacecraft. Deployed into a 600 km, near-circular, 6 inclination orbit, the observatory has now completed commissioning, and is performing consistent with pre-launch expectations. NuSTAR is now executing its primary science mission, and with an expected orbit lifetime of 10 yr, we anticipate proposing a guest investigator program, to begin in late 2014.

  9. Impact of Supernova and Cosmic-Ray Driving on the Surface Brightness of the Galactic Halo in Soft X-Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Thomas; Girichidis, Philipp; Gatto, Andrea; Naab, Thorsten; Walch, Stefanie; Wünsch, Richard; Glover, Simon C. O.; Clark, Paul C.; Klessen, Ralf S.; Baczynski, Christian

    2015-11-01

    The halo of the Milky Way contains a hot plasma with a surface brightness in soft X-rays of the order 10-12 erg cm-2 s-1 deg-2. The origin of this gas is unclear, but so far numerical models of galactic star formation have failed to reproduce such a large surface brightness by several orders of magnitude. In this paper, we analyze simulations of the turbulent, magnetized, multi-phase interstellar medium including thermal feedback by supernova explosions as well as cosmic-ray feedback. We include a time-dependent chemical network, self-shielding by gas and dust, and self-gravity. Pure thermal feedback alone is sufficient to produce the observed surface brightness, although it is very sensitive to the supernova rate. Cosmic rays suppress this sensitivity and reduce the surface brightness because they drive cooler outflows. Self-gravity has by far the largest effect because it accumulates the diffuse gas in the disk in dense clumps and filaments, so that supernovae exploding in voids can eject a large amount of hot gas into the halo. This can boost the surface brightness by several orders of magnitude. Although our simulations do not reach a steady state, all simulations produce surface brightness values of the same order of magnitude as the observations, with the exact value depending sensitively on the simulation parameters. We conclude that star formation feedback alone is sufficient to explain the origin of the hot halo gas, but measurements of the surface brightness alone do not provide useful diagnostics for the study of galactic star formation.

  10. IMPACT OF SUPERNOVA AND COSMIC-RAY DRIVING ON THE SURFACE BRIGHTNESS OF THE GALACTIC HALO IN SOFT X-RAYS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, Thomas; Girichidis, Philipp; Gatto, Andrea; Naab, Thorsten [Max-Planck-Institut für Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Walch, Stefanie [Physikalisches Institut, Universität zu Köln, Zülpicher Str. 77, D-50937 Köln (Germany); Wünsch, Richard [Astronomical Institute, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Bocni II 1401, 141 31 Prague (Czech Republic); Glover, Simon C. O.; Klessen, Ralf S.; Baczynski, Christian [Universität Heidelberg, Zentrum für Astronomie, Institut für Theoretische Astrophysik, Albert-Ueberle-Str. 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Clark, Paul C., E-mail: tpeters@mpa-garching.mpg.de [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, 5 The Parade, Cardiff CF24 3AA, Wales (United Kingdom)

    2015-11-10

    The halo of the Milky Way contains a hot plasma with a surface brightness in soft X-rays of the order 10{sup −12} erg cm{sup −2} s{sup −1} deg{sup −2}. The origin of this gas is unclear, but so far numerical models of galactic star formation have failed to reproduce such a large surface brightness by several orders of magnitude. In this paper, we analyze simulations of the turbulent, magnetized, multi-phase interstellar medium including thermal feedback by supernova explosions as well as cosmic-ray feedback. We include a time-dependent chemical network, self-shielding by gas and dust, and self-gravity. Pure thermal feedback alone is sufficient to produce the observed surface brightness, although it is very sensitive to the supernova rate. Cosmic rays suppress this sensitivity and reduce the surface brightness because they drive cooler outflows. Self-gravity has by far the largest effect because it accumulates the diffuse gas in the disk in dense clumps and filaments, so that supernovae exploding in voids can eject a large amount of hot gas into the halo. This can boost the surface brightness by several orders of magnitude. Although our simulations do not reach a steady state, all simulations produce surface brightness values of the same order of magnitude as the observations, with the exact value depending sensitively on the simulation parameters. We conclude that star formation feedback alone is sufficient to explain the origin of the hot halo gas, but measurements of the surface brightness alone do not provide useful diagnostics for the study of galactic star formation.

  11. X-ray instrumentation for SR beamlines

    CERN Document Server

    Kovalchuk, M V; Zheludeva, S I; Aleshko-Ozhevsky, O P; Arutynyan, E H; Kheiker, D M; Kreines, A Y; Lider, V V; Pashaev, E M; Shilina, N Y; Shishkov, V A

    2000-01-01

    The main possibilities and parameters of experimental X-ray stations are presented: 'Protein crystallography', 'X-ray structure analysis', 'High-precision X-ray optics', 'X-ray crystallography and material science', 'X-ray topography', 'Photoelectron X-ray standing wave' that are being installed at Kurchatov SR source by A.V. Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography.

  12. High-speed X-ray imaging pixel array detector for synchrotron bunch isolation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philipp, Hugh T., E-mail: htp2@cornell.edu; Tate, Mark W.; Purohit, Prafull; Shanks, Katherine S.; Weiss, Joel T. [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Gruner, Sol M. [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2016-01-28

    A high-speed pixel array detector for time-resolved X-ray imaging at synchrotrons has been developed. The ability to isolate single synchrotron bunches makes it ideal for time-resolved dynamical studies. A wide-dynamic-range imaging X-ray detector designed for recording successive frames at rates up to 10 MHz is described. X-ray imaging with frame rates of up to 6.5 MHz have been experimentally verified. The pixel design allows for up to 8–12 frames to be stored internally at high speed before readout, which occurs at a 1 kHz frame rate. An additional mode of operation allows the integration capacitors to be re-addressed repeatedly before readout which can enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of cyclical processes. This detector, along with modern storage ring sources which provide short (10–100 ps) and intense X-ray pulses at megahertz rates, opens new avenues for the study of rapid structural changes in materials. The detector consists of hybridized modules, each of which is comprised of a 500 µm-thick silicon X-ray sensor solder bump-bonded, pixel by pixel, to an application-specific integrated circuit. The format of each module is 128 × 128 pixels with a pixel pitch of 150 µm. In the prototype detector described here, the three-side buttable modules are tiled in a 3 × 2 array with a full format of 256 × 384 pixels. The characteristics, operation, testing and application of the detector are detailed.

  13. High-resolution X-ray microdiffraction analysis of natural teeth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, Jing; Zhang, Linling; Zou, Ling; Liao, Yunmao; Li, Jiyao; Xiao, Liying; Li, Wei, E-mail: leewei2000@sina.com [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, Sichuan University, People’s Republic of (China)

    2008-05-01

    In situ microzone X-ray diffraction analysis of natural teeth is presented. From our experiment, layer orientation and continuous crystal variations in teeth could be conveniently studied using fast online measurements by high-resolution X-ray microdiffraction equipment. The main component of natural teeth was determined many years ago as calcium phosphate, mostly in the form of hydroxyapatite with different crystallites. In the past, the method used in tooth crystal investigation has been mainly powder X-ray diffraction analysis, but this method has its drawbacks, i.e. the destruction of the natural tooth structure and the difficulty in examining the preferred orientation in different layers of the tooth. During the last century, microzone X-ray diffraction on the tooth surface was carried out, but, as the technology was less sophisticated, the results obtained were not very detailed. The newly developed microdiffraction equipment permits analysis of the microzone of teeth in situ. To test this new microdiffraction equipment, microdiffraction analysis of one natural healthy deciduous molar tooth and one carious deciduous molar tooth has been performed, using a Bruker D8 instrument. Phase analysis of the two teeth was performed; the crystal size at six test points in the natural healthy tooth was calculated by reflection (211), and the crystal preferred orientation of reflection (300) and reflection (002) at six test points in the natural healthy tooth were compared. The results showed that the tooth was a kind of biological mixed crystal composed of several crystal phases, the main crystal phase being hydroxyapatite. The crystal size grew larger going from the dentin to the enamel. The crystal preferred orientation mainly existed in the enamel, especially in the reflection (002). From our experiment, layer orientation and continuous crystal variations in teeth could be conveniently studied using fast online measurements by high-resolution X-ray microdiffraction

  14. High pressure and high temperature in situ X-ray diffraction studies in the Paris-Edinburgh cell using a laboratory X-ray source†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toulemonde, Pierre; Goujon, Céline; Laversenne, Laetitia; Bordet, Pierre; Bruyère, Rémy; Legendre, Murielle; Leynaud, Olivier; Prat, Alain; Mezouar, Mohamed

    2014-04-01

    We have developed a new laboratory experimental set-up to study in situ the pressure-temperature phase diagram of a given pure element or compound, its associated phase transitions, or the chemical reactions involved at high pressure and high temperature (HP-HT) between different solids and liquids. This new tool allows laboratory studies before conducting further detailed experiments using more brilliant synchrotron X-ray sources or before kinetic studies. This device uses the diffraction of X-rays produced by a quasi-monochromatic micro-beam source operating at the silver radiation (λ(Ag)Kα 1, 2≈0.56 Å). The experimental set-up is based on a VX Paris-Edinburgh cell equipped with tungsten carbide or sintered diamond anvils and uses standard B-epoxy 5 or 7 mm gaskets. The diffracted signal coming from the compressed (and heated) sample is collected on an image plate. The pressure and temperature calibrations were performed by diffraction, using conventional calibrants (BN, NaCl and MgO) for determination of the pressure, and by crossing isochores of BN, NaCl, Cu or Au for the determination of the temperature. The first examples of studies performed with this new laboratory set-up are presented in the article: determination of the melting point of germanium and magnesium under HP-HT, synthesis of MgB2 or C-diamond and partial study of the P, T phase diagram of MgH2.

  15. Time-resolved and in-situ X-ray scattering methods beyond photoactivation: Utilizing high-flux X-ray sources for the study of ubiquitous non-photoactive proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Rohit; Techert, Simone

    2016-01-01

    X-ray scattering technique, comprising of small-angle/wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS/WAXS) techniques is increasingly used to characterize the structure and interactions of biological macromolecules and their complexes in solution. It is a method of choice to characterize the flexible, partially folded and unfolded protein systems. X-ray scattering is the last resort for proteins that cannot be investigated by crystallography or NMR and acts as a complementary technique with different biophysical techniques to answer challenging scientific questions. The marriage of the X-ray scattering technique with the fourth dimension "time" yields structural dynamics and kinetics information for protein motions in hierarchical timescales from picoseconds to days. The arrival of the high-flux X-ray beam at third generation synchrotron sources, exceptional X-ray optics, state-of-the-art detectors, upgradation of X-ray scattering beamlines with microfluidics devices and advanced X-ray scattering data analysis procedures are the important reasons behind the shining years of X-ray scattering technique. The best days of the X-ray scattering technique are on the horizon with the advent of the nanofocus X-ray scattering beamlines and fourth generation X-ray lightsources, i.e., free electron lasers (XFELs). Complementary to the photon-triggered time-resolved X-ray scattering techniques, we will present an overview of the time-resolved and in-situ X-ray scattering techniques for structural dynamics of ubiquitous non-photoactive proteins.

  16. X-Ray Polarimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Kaaret, Philip

    2014-01-01

    We review the basic principles of X-ray polarimetry and current detector technologies based on the photoelectric effect, Bragg reflection, and Compton scattering. Recent technological advances in high-spatial-resolution gas-filled X-ray detectors have enabled efficient polarimeters exploiting the photoelectric effect that hold great scientific promise for X-ray polarimetry in the 2-10 keV band. Advances in the fabrication of multilayer optics have made feasible the construction of broad-band soft X-ray polarimeters based on Bragg reflection. Developments in scintillator and solid-state hard X-ray detectors facilitate construction of both modular, large area Compton scattering polarimeters and compact devices suitable for use with focusing X-ray telescopes.

  17. X-ray Spectroscopy and Diffraction at HPCAT - An Integrated High Pressure Synchrotron Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, H.; Hemley, R. J.; Hausermann, D.; Hu, M.; Meng, Y.; Somayazulu, M.

    2002-05-01

    High Pressure Collaborative Access Team (HPCAT) is a new facility dedicated for high-pressure research using the high-energy synchrotron beams at the Advanced Photon Source for in-situ investigations of crystallographic, elastic, rheologic, electronic, and magnetic properties of solids, liquids, and amorphous materials at high P and simultaneous high T or cryogenic T. The HPCAT high-brilliance undulator beamline is optimized for a full range of high-pressure x-ray spectroscopy. For instance, nuclear resonant inelastic scattering measures phonon densities of state of Fe-containing samples that yield valuable information on acoustic wave velocity, elasticity, elastic anisotropy, and thermodynamic quantities (vibrational energy, heat capacity, entropy, Debye temperature, and Gr\\x81neisen parameter) of materials at high pressures. Nuclear resonant x-ray forward scattering measures M”ssbauer spectra in the time domain that yield information on magnetism, site occupancy, oxidation states, and the Lamb-M”ssbauer coefficient of Fe. Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering measures element-specific electronic transitions. The medium-resolution (10-100 meV) non-resonant x-ray inelastic scattering measures electronic energies and dispersions that yield information on plasmons, excitons, electronic band structures, and chemical bondings, and high-resolution (<10 meV) inelastic scattering measures phonon dispersions that yield information on acoustic wave velocity and elasticity as a function of crystallographic orientation. X-ray emission spectroscopy yields information on valence electrons and spin states of d-electrons. A diamond branch monochromator diverts a full-intensity undulator monochromatic beam at energies up to 35 keV for full-time x-ray diffraction studies of crystallography, phase transitions, and equations of state in a side station without affecting the simultaneous operation of the main undualtor beamline. The HPCAT bending-magnet beamline is divided into two

  18. Novel opportunities for sub-meV inelastic X-ray scattering at high-repetition rate self-seeded X-ray free-electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chubar, Oleg [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States). National Synchrotron Light Source II; Geloni, Gianluca; Madsen, Anders [European XFEL GmbH, Hamburg (Germany); Kocharyan, Vitali; Saldin, Evgeni; Serkez, Svitozar [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Shvyd' ko, Yuri [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source; Sutter, John [Diamond Light Source Ltd., Didcot (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-15

    Inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) is an important tool for studies of equilibrium dynamics in condensed matter. A new spectrometer recently proposed for ultra-high-resolution IXS (UHRIX) has achieved 0.6 meV and 0.25 nm{sup -1} spectral and momentum transfer resolutions, respectively. However, further improvements down to 0.1 meV and 0.02 nm{sup -1} are required to close the gap in energy-momentum space between high and low frequency probes. We show that this goal can be achieved by further optimizing the X-ray optics and by increasing the spectral flux of the incident X-ray pulses. UHRIX performs best at energies from 5 to 10 keV, where a combination of self-seeding and undulator tapering at the SASE-2 beamline of the European XFEL promises up to a hundred-fold increase in average spectral flux compared with nominal SASE pulses at saturation, or three orders of magnitude more than possible with storage-ring based radiation sources. Wave-optics propagation shows that about 7 x 10{sup 12} ph/s in a 90-μeV bandwidth can be achieved on the sample. This will provide unique new possibilities for dynamics studies by IXS.

  19. Novel opportunities for sub-meV inelastic X-ray scattering at high-repetition rate self-seeded X-ray free-electron lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Chubar, Oleg; Kocharyan, Vitali; Madsen, Anders; Saldin, Evgeni; Serkez, Svitozar; Shvyd'ko, Yuri; Sutter, John

    2015-01-01

    Inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) is an important tool for studies of equilibrium dynamics in condensed matter. A new spectrometer recently proposed for ultra-high-resolution IXS (UHRIX) has achieved 0.6~meV and 0.25~nm$^{-1}$ spectral and momentum transfer resolutions, respectively. However, further improvements down to 0.1~meV and 0.02~nm$^{-1}$ are required to close the gap in energy-momentum space between high and low frequency probes. We show that this goal can be achieved by further optimizing the X-ray optics and by increasing the spectral flux of the incident X-ray pulses. UHRIX performs best at energies from 5 to 10 keV, where a combination of self-seeding and undulator tapering at the SASE-2 beamline of the European XFEL promises up to a hundred-fold increase in average spectral flux compared with nominal SASE pulses at saturation, or three orders of magnitude more than possible with storage-ring based radiation sources. Wave-optics propagation shows that about $7\\times 10^{12}$~ph/s in a $90$-$\\mu$e...

  20. X-ray Conversion Efficiency of high-Z hohlraum wall materials for indirect drive ignition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewald, E; Rosen, M; Glenzer, S H; Suter, L J; Girard, F; Jadaud, J P; Schein, J; Constantin, C G; Neumayer, P; Landen, O

    2008-02-22

    We measure the conversion efficiency of 351 nm laser light to soft x-rays (0.1-5 keV) for Au, U and high Z mixtures 'cocktails' used for hohlraum wall materials in indirect drive ICF. We use spherical targets in a direct drive geometry, flattop laser pulses and laser smoothing with phase plates to achieve constant and uniform laser intensities of 10{sup 14} and 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2} over the target surface that are relevant for the future ignition experiments on NIF. The absolute time and spectrally-resolved radiation flux is measured with a multichannel soft x-ray power diagnostic. The conversion efficiency is then calculated by dividing the measured x-ray power by the incident laser power from which the measured laser backscattering losses is subtracted. After {approx}0.5 ns, the time resolved x-ray conversion efficiency reaches a slowly increasing plateau of 95% at 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} laser intensity and of 80% at 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}. The M-band flux (2-5 keV) is negligible at 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} reaching {approx}1% of the total x-ray flux for all target materials. In contrast, the M-band flux is significant and depends on the target material at 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2} laser intensity, reaching values between 10% of the total flux for U and 27% for Au. Our LASNEX simulations show good agreement in conversion efficiency and radiated spectra with data when using XSN atomic physics model and a flux limiter of 0.15, but they underestimate the generated M-band flux.

  1. Impact of supernova and cosmic-ray driving on the surface brightness of the galactic halo in soft X-rays

    CERN Document Server

    Peters, Thomas; Gatto, Andrea; Naab, Thorsten; Walch, Stefanie; Wünsch, Richard; Glover, Simon C O; Clark, Paul C; Klessen, Ralf S; Baczynski, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The halo of the Milky Way contains a hot plasma with a surface brightness in soft X-rays of the order $10^{-12}$erg cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ deg$^{-2}$. The origin of this gas is unclear, but so far numerical models of galactic star formation have failed to reproduce such a large surface brightness by several orders of magnitude. In this paper, we analyze simulations of the turbulent, magnetized, multi-phase interstellar medium including thermal feedback by supernova explosions as well as cosmic-ray feedback. We include a time-dependent chemical network, self-shielding by gas and dust, and self-gravity. Pure thermal feedback alone is sufficient to produce the observed surface brightness, although it is very sensitive to the supernova rate. Cosmic rays suppress this sensitivity and reduce the surface brightness because they drive cooler outflows. Self-gravity has by far the largest effect because it accumulates the diffuse gas in the disk in dense clumps and filaments, so that supernovae exploding in voids can eject...

  2. Spectral Variability in Hard X-rays and the Evidence for a 13.5 Years Period in the Bright Quasar 3C273

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. K. Manchanda

    2002-09-01

    We report the observation of nearest quasar 3C273 made with LASE instrument on November 20th, 1998 as a part of our continuing programme of balloon borne hard X-ray observations in the 20–200 keV band using high sensitivity Large Area Scintillation counter Experiment. Our data clearly show a steep spectrum in the 20–200 keV with power law spectral index = 226 ± 0.07. This is in complete contrast to the reported data from OSSE and BeppoSAX which suggest the value of 1.3 to 1.6 for the power law index in the X-ray energy band, but is quite consistent with the value derived for the high energy gamma ray data. A single power law fit in the X-ray and gamma ray energy bands points to a common origin of these photons and the absence of spectral break around 1 MeV as suggested in literature. We have reanalyzed the available data to study the temporal variability of the spectrum in the hard X-ray band. Our analysis reveals that 50 keV flux from the source, shows a strong modulation with a period of about 13.5 years. The analysis of the optical light curve of the source also supports the 5000 day period.We discuss the emission mechanism and the possible sites for X-ray photons along with the implications of the long term periodicity with respect to source geometry.

  3. High-resolution x-ray diffraction investigations of highly mismatched II-VI quantum wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passow, T.; Leonardi, K.; Stockmann, A.; Selke, H.; Heinke, H.; Hommel, D.

    1999-05-01

    High-resolution x-ray diffraction (HRXRD) was used to systematically investigate CdSe and ZnTe quantum wells one to three monolayers thick sandwiched between a ZnSe buffer and cap layer grown at different substrate temperatures. For comparison high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) measurements were performed which were evaluated by digital analysis of lattice images. The x-ray diffraction profiles show typically two main layer peaks. Their intensity ratio depends critically on the quantum well thickness and varies only weakly with the thickness of the ZnSe layers. The total Cd or Te content determined from comparisons of experimental and simulated (004) icons/Journals/Common/omega" ALT="omega" ALIGN="TOP"/>-2icons/Journals/Common/theta" ALT="theta" ALIGN="TOP"/> scans is well confirmed by the results from digital analysis of HRTEM lattice images. For quantum well thicknesses larger than 1.5 (ZnTe) or 2.0 (CdSe) monolayers, no simulation parameters could be found to achieve good agreement between theoretical and measured diffraction profiles. This transition is more clearly visible in diffraction profiles of asymmetrical reflections. By HRTEM measurements, this could be correlated to the occurrence of stacking faults at these thicknesses. The formation of quantum islands detected by HRTEM was not reflected in the HRXRD icons/Journals/Common/omega" ALT="omega" ALIGN="TOP"/>-2icons/Journals/Common/theta" ALT="theta" ALIGN="TOP"/> scans.

  4. Observation of material, thickness, and bremsstrahlung x-ray intensity dependent effects in moderate and high Z targets in a gamma and x-ray LIDAR experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaodong; Ayaz-Maierhafer, Birsen; Laubach, Mitchell A.; Hayward, Jason P.

    2015-06-01

    A high energy gamma and x-ray LIDAR system consisting of a fast pulse ( 50 ps, FWHM) LINAC and a Cherenkov detection system was used to investigate response differences among materials, their thicknesses, and bremsstrahlung x-ray intensities. The energies and pulse width of electrons used to produce bremsstrahlung x-rays were set at 20 or 40 MeV and 50 ps FWHM duration, respectively. The Cherenkov detector was built with a fused silica glass optically coupled to a 51 mm fast timing photomultiplier tube, which has an intrinsic energy threshold of 340.7 keV for Compton backscattered gammas. Such a fast detection system yields a coincidence resolving time of 93 ps FWHM, which is equivalent to a depth resolving capability of about 3 cm FWHM. The thicknesses of iron and lead targets were varied from 1 in. to 7 in. with a step of 1 in., and the thicknesses of DU were varied from 1/3 in. to 1 in. with a step of 1/3 in. The experimental results show that iron targets tend to produce a factor of five less observed x-rays and gammas, with less energetic photoelectron frequency distributions, compared with DU and lead targets for the same beam intensity and target thicknesses. Additionally, the self-shielding effect causes the lead to yield more gammas than the DU considering the experimental observation point. For the setup used in this study, a charge per pulse in the range of 1-2.5 nC yields the best resolving capability between the DU and lead targets.

  5. Bright X-Ray Flares from the BL Lac Object Markarian 421, Detected with MAXI in 2010 January and February

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobe, Naoki; Sugimori, Kousuke; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Negoro, Hitoshi; Sugizaki, Mutsumi; Matsuoka, Masaru; Daikyuji, Arata; Eguchi, Satoshi; Hiroi, Kazuo; Ishikawa, Masaki; Ishiwata, Ryoji; Kawasaki, Kazuyoshi; Kimura, Masashi; Kohama, Mitsuhiro; Mihara, Tatehiro; Miyoshi, Sho; Morii, Mikio; Nakagawa, Yujin E.; Nakahira, Satoshi; Nakajima, Motoki; Ozawa, Hiroshi; Sootome, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Motoko; Tomida, Hiroshi; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Ueno, Shiro; Yamamoto, Takayuki; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Yoshida, Atsumasa; MAXI Team

    2010-12-01

    Strong X-ray flares from the blazar Mrk 421 were detected in 2010 January and February through 7-month monitoring with the MAXI GSC. The maximum 2-10 keV flux in the January and February flares was measured to be 120±10 mCrab and 164±17 mCrab, respectively; the latter is the highest among those reported from the object. A comparison of the MAXI and Swift BAT data suggests a convex X-ray spectrum with an approximated photon index of Γ ≳ 2. This spectrum is consistent with a picture that MAXI is observing near the synchrotron peak frequency. The source exhibited a spectral variation during these flares, slightly different from those in previous observations, in which the positive correlation between the flux and hardness was widely reported. By equating the halving decay timescale in the January flare, td ˜ 2.5 × 104 s, to the synchrotron cooling time, the magnetic field was evaluated to be B ˜ 4.5 × 10-2G (δ/10)-1/3, where δ is the jet beaming factor. Assuming that the light crossing time of the emission region is shorter than the doubling rise time, tr ≲ 2 × 104 s, the region size was roughly estimated as R < 6 × 1015 cm (δ/10). These results are consistent with values previously reported. For the February flare, the rise time, tr < 1.3 × 105 s, gives a loose upper limit on the size as R < 4 × 1016 cm (δ/10), although the longer decay time, td ˜ 1.4 × 105s, indicates B ˜ 1.5 × 10-2G (δ/10)-1/3, which is weaker than the previous results. This could be reconciled by invoking a scenario that this flare is a superposition of unresolved events with a shorter timescale.

  6. X-Ray Spectra of The High-Mass X-RAY Binary 4U~1700-37 using BeppoSAX, Suzaku and RXTE Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Seifina, Elena; Shaposhnikov, Nikolai

    2016-01-01

    We present an X-ray spectral analysis of the high-mass binary 4U~1700-37 during its hard-soft state evolution. We use the BeppoSAX, Suzaku and RXTE (Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer), Suzaku and BeppoSAX observations for this investigation. We argue that the X-ray broad-band spectra during all spectral states can be adequately reproduced by a model, consisting of a low-temperature Blackbody component, two Comptonized components both due to the presence of a Compton cloud (CC) that up-scatters seed photons of $T_{s1}$~< 1.4 keV, and $T_{s2}<$1 keV, and an iron-line component. We find using this model that the photon power-law index is almost constant, $\\Gamma_{1}\\sim 2$ for all spectral states. However, $\\Gamma_{2}$ shows a behavior depending on the spectral state. Namely, $\\Gamma_{2}$ is quasi-constant at the level of $\\Gamma_{2}\\sim 2$ while the CC plasma temperature $kT^{(2)}_e$ is less than 40 keV; on the other hand, $\\Gamma_{2}$ is in the range of $1.3<\\Gamma_{2}<2$, when $kT^{(2)}_e$ is greater th...

  7. Calculations and surface quality measurements of high-asymmetry angle x-ray crystal monochromators for advanced x-ray imaging and metrological applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zápražný, Zdenko; Korytár, Dušan; Jergel, Matej; Šiffalovič, Peter; Dobročka, Edmund; Vagovič, Patrik; Ferrari, Claudio; Mikulík, Petr; Demydenko, Maksym; Mikloška, Marek

    2015-03-01

    We present the numerical optimization and the technological development progress of x-ray optics based on asymmetric germanium crystals. We show the results of several basic calculations of diffraction properties of germanium x-ray crystal monochromators and of an analyzer-based imaging method for various asymmetry factors using an x-ray energy range from 8 to 20 keV. The important parameter of highly asymmetric monochromators as image magnifiers or compressors is the crystal surface quality. We have applied several crystal surface finishing methods, including advanced nanomachining using single-point diamond turning (SPDT), conventional mechanical lapping, chemical polishing, and chemomechanical polishing, and we have evaluated these methods by means of atomic force microscopy, diffractometry, reciprocal space mapping, and others. Our goal is to exclude the chemical etching methods as the final processing technique because it causes surface undulations. The aim is to implement very precise deterministic methods with a control of surface roughness down to 0.1 nm. The smallest roughness (˜0.3 nm), best planarity, and absence of the subsurface damage were observed for the sample which was machined using an SPDT with a feed rate of 1 mm/min and was consequently polished using a fine polishing 15-min process with a solution containing SiO2 nanoparticles (20 nm).

  8. Complementing high-throughput X-ray powder diffraction data with quantum-chemical calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naelapaa, Kaisa; van de Streek, Jacco; Rantanen, Jukka

    2012-01-01

    High-throughput crystallisation and characterisation platforms provide an efficient means to carry out solid-form screening during the pre-formulation phase. To determine the crystal structures of identified new solid phases, however, usually requires independent crystallisation trials to produce...... single crystals or bulk samples of sufficient quantity to carry out high-quality X-ray diffraction measurements. This process could be made more efficient by a robust procedure for crystal structure determination directly from high-throughput X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) data. Quantum......-chemical calculations based on dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D) have now become feasible for typical small organic molecules used as active pharmaceutical ingredients. We demonstrate how these calculations can be applied to complement high-throughput XRPD data by determining the crystal structure...

  9. Spectroscopic observations of active solar-analog stars having high X-ray luminosity, as a proxy of superflare stars

    CERN Document Server

    Notsu, Yuta; Maehara, Hiroyuki; Notsu, Shota; Namekata, Kosuke; Nogami, Daisaku; Shibata, Kazunari

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies of solar-type superflare stars have suggested that even old slowly rotating stars similar to the Sun can have large starspots and superflares. We conducted high dispersion spectroscopy of 49 nearby solar-analog stars (G-type main sequence stars with $T_{\\rm{eff}}\\approx5,600\\sim6,000$ K) identified as ROSAT soft X-ray sources, which are not binary stars from the previous studies. We expected that these stars can be used as a proxy of bright solar-analog superflare stars, since superflare stars are expected to show strong X-ray luminosity. More than half (37) of the 49 target stars show no evidence of binarity, and their atmospheric parameters ($T_{\\rm{eff}}$, $\\log g$, and [Fe/H]) are within the range of ordinary solar-analog stars. We measured Ca II 8542 and H$\\alpha$ lines, which are good indicators of the chromospheric activity. The intensity of these lines indicates that all the target stars have large starspots. We also measured $v\\sin i$ (projected rotational velocity) and Lithium abundan...

  10. A mirror for lab-based quasi-monochromatic parallel x-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thanhhai; Lu, Xun; Lee, Chang Jun; Jung, Jin-Ho; Jin, Gye-Hwan; Kim, Sung Youb; Jeon, Insu

    2014-09-01

    A multilayered parabolic mirror with six W/Al bilayers was designed and fabricated to generate monochromatic parallel x-rays using a lab-based x-ray source. Using this mirror, curved bright bands were obtained in x-ray images as reflected x-rays. The parallelism of the reflected x-rays was investigated using the shape of the bands. The intensity and monochromatic characteristics of the reflected x-rays were evaluated through measurements of the x-ray spectra in the band. High intensity, nearly monochromatic, and parallel x-rays, which can be used for high resolution x-ray microscopes and local radiation therapy systems, were obtained.

  11. A mirror for lab-based quasi-monochromatic parallel x-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Thanhhai; Lu, Xun; Lee, Chang Jun; Jeon, Insu, E-mail: i-jeon@chonnam.ac.kr [School of Mechanical Engineering, Chonnam National University, 300 Yongbong-dong, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Jin-Ho [Pro-optics Co., Ltd., 475 Ami-ri, Bubal-eup, Icheon 467-866 (Korea, Republic of); Jin, Gye-Hwan [Department of Radiology, Nambu University, 76 Chumdan Jungang 1-ro, Gwangsan-gu, Gwangju 506-706 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Youb [School of Mechanical and Advanced Materials Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, 100 Banyeon-ri, Eonyang-eup, Ulju-gun, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    A multilayered parabolic mirror with six W/Al bilayers was designed and fabricated to generate monochromatic parallel x-rays using a lab-based x-ray source. Using this mirror, curved bright bands were obtained in x-ray images as reflected x-rays. The parallelism of the reflected x-rays was investigated using the shape of the bands. The intensity and monochromatic characteristics of the reflected x-rays were evaluated through measurements of the x-ray spectra in the band. High intensity, nearly monochromatic, and parallel x-rays, which can be used for high resolution x-ray microscopes and local radiation therapy systems, were obtained.

  12. Extremely High Current, High-Brightness Energy Recovery Linac

    CERN Document Server

    Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Beavis, Dana; Blaskiewicz, Michael; Bluem, Hans; Brennan, Joseph M; Burger, Al; Burrill, Andrew; Calaga, Rama; Cameron, Peter; Chang, Xiangyun; Cole, Michael; Connolly, Roger; Delayen, Jean R; Favale, Anthony; Gassner, David M; Grimes, Jacob T; Hahn, Harald; Hershcovitch, Ady; Holmes, Douglas; Hseuh Hsiao Chaun; Johnson, Peter; Kayran, Dmitry; Kewisch, Jorg; Kneisel, Peter; Lambiase, Robert; Litvinenko, Vladimir N; McIntyre, Gary; Meng, Wuzheng; Nehring, Thomas; Nicoletti, Tony; Oerter, Brian; Pate, David; Phillips, Larry; Preble, Joseph P; Rank, Jim; Rao, Triveni; Rathke, John; Roser, Thomas; Russo, Thomas; Scaduto, Joseph; Schultheiss, Tom; Segalov, Zvi; Smith, Kevin T; Todd, Alan M M; Warren-Funk, L; Williams, Neville; Wu, Kuo-Chen; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Yip, Kin; Zaltsman, Alex; Zhao, Yongxiang

    2005-01-01

    Next generation ERL light-sources, high-energy electron coolers, high-power Free-Electron Lasers, powerful Compton X-ray sources and many other accelerators were made possible by the emerging technology of high-power, high-brightness electron beams. In order to get the anticipated performance level of ampere-class currents, many technological barriers are yet to be broken. BNL's Collider-Accelerator Department is pursuing some of these technologies for its electron cooling of RHIC application, as well as a possible future electron-hadron collider. We will describe work on CW, high-current and high-brightness electron beams. This will include a description of a superconducting, laser-photocathode RF gun and an accelerator cavity capable of producing low emittance (about 1 micron rms normalized) one nano-Coulomb bunches at currents of the order of one ampere average.

  13. Structural studies of BSCCO/Ag-tapes by high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, H.F.; Frello, T.; Andersen, N.H.

    1998-01-01

    High-energy (100 keV) synchrotron X-ray diffraction has been identified as a powerful tool for characterizing texture and structural phases,within Ag clad high T-c, superconducting tapes of the (Bi,Pb)-Sr-Ca-Cu-O (BSSCO) type during synthesis of (Bi,Pb)(2)Sr2Ca2Cu3Ox (Bi-2223) from (Bi,Pb)(2)Sr2CaCu...

  14. High energy x-ray diffraction/x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy for high-throughput analysis of composition spread thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregoire, John M; Dale, Darren; Kazimirov, Alexander; DiSalvo, Francis J; van Dover, R Bruce

    2009-12-01

    High-throughput crystallography is an important tool in materials research, particularly for the rapid assessment of structure-property relationships. We present a technique for simultaneous acquisition of diffraction images and fluorescence spectra on a continuous composition spread thin film using a 60 keV x-ray source. Subsequent noninteractive data processing provides maps of the diffraction profiles, thin film fiber texture, and composition. Even for highly textured films, our diffraction technique provides detection of diffraction from each family of Bragg reflections, which affords direct comparison of the measured profiles with powder patterns of known phases. These techniques are important for high throughput combinatorial studies as they provide structure and composition maps which may be correlated with performance trends within an inorganic library.

  15. Soft x-ray laser spectroscopy on trapped highly charged ions at FLASH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epp, S W; López-Urrutia, J R Crespo; Brenner, G; Mäckel, V; Mokler, P H; Treusch, R; Kuhlmann, M; Yurkov, M V; Feldhaus, J; Schneider, J R; Wellhöfer, M; Martins, M; Wurth, W; Ullrich, J

    2007-05-04

    In a proof-of-principle experiment, we demonstrate high-resolution resonant laser excitation in the soft x-ray region at 48.6 eV of the 2 (2)S(1/2) to 2 (2)P(1/2) transition of Li-like Fe23+ ions trapped in an electron beam ion trap by using ultrabrilliant light from Free Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH). High precision spectroscopic studies of highly charged ions at this and upcoming x-ray lasers with an expected accuracy gain up to a factor of a thousand, become possible with our technique, thus potentially yielding fundamental insights, e.g., into basic aspects of QED.

  16. Development of high pressure apparatus for X-ray microtomography at SPring-8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urakawa, S [Department of Earth Sciences, Okayama University, 3-1-1 Tsushima-naka, Kita-ku, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Terasaki, H P [Department of Earth and Planetary Materials Science, Tohoku University, 6-3 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Funakoshi, K; Uesugi, K [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Yamamoto, S, E-mail: urakawa@cc.okayama-u.ac.j [RD Support Co., Ltd., 2-12-15-402, Nishigotanda, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo, 141-0031 (Japan)

    2010-03-01

    A new high-pressure apparatus has been developed for studies of synchrotron radiation-based X-ray microtomography at SPring-8 of Japan. The high pressure tomography apparatus at SPring-8 is a compact hydraulic press with a 0.8 MN capacity and is equipped with an opposed anvil device. It has two wide windows for X-ray access with a 160-degree opening in the equatorial plane to the compression axis. Radiographs are acquired over 180 degree rotation for reconstruction of 3D image, in which some shadows occur, because the press frame blocks a 20-degree angular region. 3D tomography image computed from radiographs obtained using the high pressure tomography apparatus has a reasonably good quality enough to measure physical properties of materials.

  17. Automated high pressure cell for pressure jump x-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Nicholas J.; Gauthe, Beatrice L. L. E.; Terrill, Nick J.; Rogers, Sarah E.; Templer, Richard H.; Ces, Oscar; Seddon, John M.

    2010-06-01

    A high pressure cell for small and wide-angle x-ray diffraction measurements of soft condensed matter samples has been developed, incorporating a fully automated pressure generating network. The system allows both static and pressure jump measurements in the range of 0.1-500 MPa. Pressure jumps can be performed as quickly as 5 ms, both with increasing and decreasing pressures. Pressure is generated by a motorized high pressure pump, and the system is controlled remotely via a graphical user interface to allow operation by a broad user base, many of whom may have little previous experience of high pressure technology. Samples are loaded through a dedicated port allowing the x-ray windows to remain in place throughout an experiment; this facilitates accurate subtraction of background scattering. The system has been designed specifically for use at beamline I22 at the Diamond Light Source, United Kingdom, and has been fully integrated with the I22 beamline control systems.

  18. Small-angle X-ray scattering at the ESRF high-brillance beamline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boesecke, P.; Diat, O. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), 38 -Grenoble (France)

    1997-10-01

    The high-brilliance beamline (BL4/ID2) at the European synchrotron radiation facility (ESRF) in Grenoble has been constructed with the emphasis on time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering and macromolecular crystallography. It has been open to users for two years. The beamline has opened up new areas in small-angle scattering research, facilitating (a) small-angle crystallography on structures with unit cells of several hundredths of nanometres, (b) overlap with the light scattering range for the study of optical systems, (c) high photon flux for time-resolved experiments and (d) a high spatial coherence allowing submicrometre imaging with X-rays. The set-up and the detector system of the small-angle scattering station are presented. A method for obtaining absolute scattering intensities is described. The parasitic background at the station is discussed in terms of absolute scattering intensities. (orig.). 22 refs.

  19. Automated high pressure cell for pressure jump x-ray diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Nicholas J; Gauthe, Beatrice L L E; Terrill, Nick J; Rogers, Sarah E; Templer, Richard H; Ces, Oscar; Seddon, John M

    2010-06-01

    A high pressure cell for small and wide-angle x-ray diffraction measurements of soft condensed matter samples has been developed, incorporating a fully automated pressure generating network. The system allows both static and pressure jump measurements in the range of 0.1-500 MPa. Pressure jumps can be performed as quickly as 5 ms, both with increasing and decreasing pressures. Pressure is generated by a motorized high pressure pump, and the system is controlled remotely via a graphical user interface to allow operation by a broad user base, many of whom may have little previous experience of high pressure technology. Samples are loaded through a dedicated port allowing the x-ray windows to remain in place throughout an experiment; this facilitates accurate subtraction of background scattering. The system has been designed specifically for use at beamline I22 at the Diamond Light Source, United Kingdom, and has been fully integrated with the I22 beamline control systems.

  20. Detection of the Second Eclipsing High-Mass X-Ray Binary in M 33

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietsch, Wolfgang; Haberl, Frank; Gaetz, Terrance J.; Hartman, Joel D.; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Tüllmann, Ralph; Williams, Benjamin F.; Shporer, Avi; Mazeh, Tsevi; Pannuti, Thomas G.

    2009-03-01

    Chandra data of the X-ray source [PMH2004] 47 were obtained in the ACIS Survey of M 33 (ChASeM33) in 2006. During one of the observations, the source varied from a high state to a low state and back, in two other observations it varied from a low state to respectively intermediate states. These transitions are interpreted as eclipse ingresses and egresses of a compact object in a high-mass X-ray binary (HMXB) system. The phase of mideclipse is given by HJD 245 3997.476 ± 0.006, the eclipse half angle is 30fdg6 ± 1fdg2. Adding XMM-Newton observations of [PMH2004] 47 in 2001 we determine the binary period to be 1.732479 ± 0.000027 days. This period is also consistent with ROSAT HRI observations of the source in 1994. No short-term periodicity compatible with a rotation period of the compact object is detected. There are indications for a long-term variability similar to that detected for Her X-1. During the high state the spectrum of the source is hard (power-law spectrum with photon index ~0.85) with an unabsorbed luminosity of 2 ×1037 erg s-1 (0.2-4.5 keV). We identify as an optical counterpart a V ~ 21.0 mag star with T eff>19000 K, log(g)>2.5. The Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope optical light curves for this star show an ellipsoidal variation with the same period as the X-ray light curve. The optical light curve together with the X-ray eclipse can be modeled by a compact object with a mass consistent with a neutron star or a black hole in an HMXB. However, the hard power-law X-ray spectrum favors a neutron star as the compact object in this second eclipsing X-ray binary in M 33. Assuming a neutron star with a canonical mass of 1.4 M sun and the best-fit companion temperature of 33,000 K, a system inclination i = 72° and a companion mass of 10.9 M sun are implied.

  1. The search for low-luminosity high-mass X-ray binaries and the study of X-ray populations in the Galactic disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornasini, Francesca; Tomsick, John; Bodaghee, Arash; Rahoui, Farid; Krivonos, Roman; Corral-Santana, Jesus; An, Hongjun; Bauer, Franz E.; Gotthelf, Eric V.; Stern, Daniel; NuSTAR Galactic Plane Survey Team

    2016-01-01

    High-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs), which consist of a neutron star (NS) or black hole (BH) accreting material from a massive stellar companion, provide valuable insights into the evolution of massive stars and the merger rates of NS/NS, NS/BH, and BH/BH binaries whose gravitational wave signatures will soon be detectable by facilities such as Advanced-LIGO. INTEGRAL discoveries of new classes of lower-luminosity HMXBs, some highly obscured and some showing extreme transient activity, as well as the recent discovery of the very quiescent and only known Be-BH binary, have considerably changed our understanding of clumping in massive stellar winds and the relative importance of different binary evolutionary channels. In order to better characterize the low-luminosity HMXB population, we have performed a survey of a square degree region in the direction of the Norma spiral arm with Chandra and NuSTAR. These surveys, combined with optical and infrared spectroscopic follow-up of the counterparts of hard X-ray sources, have yielded three HMXB candidates to date. Future radial-velocity follow-up of these candidates, as well as other Be HMXB candidates from the NuSTAR serendipitous survey, will help determine whether these sources truly are HMXBs and, if so, constrain the mass of the compact object in these systems. If confirmed, these HMXB candidates could extend our measurement of the HMXB luminosity function by about two orders of magnitude and provide important constraints on massive binary evolutionary models. In addition, the colliding wind binaries and pulsar wind nebulae discovered in the Norma X-ray survey will help shed light on other aspects of massive stellar evolution and massive stellar remnants. Finally, these surveys provide the opportunity to compare the hard X-ray populations in the Galactic disk and the Galactic Center. While the dominant hard X-ray populations in both of these Galactic regions appear to be cataclysmic variables (CVs), those in the Norma

  2. Advanced ceramic matrix composites for high energy x-ray generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Amir Azam; Labbe, Jean Claude

    2011-12-01

    High energy x-ray targets are the anodes used in high performance tubes, designed to work for long operating times and at high power. Such tubes are used in computed tomography (CT) scan machines. Usually the tubes used in CT scanners have to continuously work at high temperatures and for longer scan durations in order to get maximum information during a single scan. These anodes are composed of a refractory substrate which supports a refractory metallic coating. The present work is a review of the development of a ceramic metal composite based on aluminium nitride (AlN) and molybdenum for potential application as the substrate. This composite is surface engineered by coating with tungsten, the most popular material for high energy x-ray targets. To spray metallic coatings on the surface of ceramic matrix composites dc blown arc plasma is employed. The objective is to increase the performance and the life of an x-ray tube. Aluminium nitride-molybdenum ceramic matrix composites were produced by uniaxial hotpressing mixtures of AlN and Mo powders. These composites were characterized for their mechanical, thermal, electrical and micro-structural properties. An optimized composition was selected which contained 25 vol.% of metallic phase dispersed in the AlN matrix. These composites were produced in the actual size of an anode and coated with tungsten through dc blown arc plasma spraying. The results have shown that sintering of large size anodes is possible through uniaxial pressing, using a modified sintering cycle.

  3. X-ray selected BALQSOs

    CERN Document Server

    Page, M J; Ceballos, M; Corral, A; Ebrero, J; Esquej, P; Krumpe, M; Mateos, S; Rosen, S; Schwope, A; Streblyanska, A; Symeonidis, M; Tedds, J A; Watson, M G

    2016-01-01

    We study a sample of six X-ray selected broad absorption line (BAL) quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) from the XMM-Newton Wide Angle Survey. All six objects are classified as BALQSOs using the classic balnicity index, and together they form the largest sample of X-ray selected BALQSOs. We find evidence for absorption in the X-ray spectra of all six objects. An ionized absorption model applied to an X-ray spectral shape that would be typical for non-BAL QSOs (a power law with energy index alpha=0.98) provides acceptable fits to the X-ray spectra of all six objects. The optical to X-ray spectral indices, alpha_OX, of the X-ray selected BALQSOs, have a mean value of 1.69 +- 0.05, which is similar to that found for X-ray selected and optically selected non-BAL QSOs of similar ultraviolet luminosity. In contrast, optically-selected BALQSOs typically have much larger alpha_OX and so are characterised as being X-ray weak. The results imply that X-ray selection yields intrinsically X-ray bright BALQSOs, but their X-ray sp...

  4. High energy X-ray photon counting imaging using linear accelerator and silicon strip detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Y.; Shimazoe, K.; Yan, X.; Ueda, O.; Ishikura, T.; Fujiwara, T.; Uesaka, M.; Ohno, M.; Tomita, H.; Yoshihara, Y.; Takahashi, H.

    2016-09-01

    A photon counting imaging detector system for high energy X-rays is developed for on-site non-destructive testing of thick objects. One-dimensional silicon strip (1 mm pitch) detectors are stacked to form a two-dimensional edge-on module. Each detector is connected to a 48-channel application specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The threshold-triggered events are recorded by a field programmable gate array based counter in each channel. The detector prototype is tested using 950 kV linear accelerator X-rays. The fast CR shaper (300 ns pulse width) of the ASIC makes it possible to deal with the high instant count rate during the 2 μs beam pulse. The preliminary imaging results of several metal and concrete samples are demonstrated.

  5. High energy X-ray photon counting imaging using linear accelerator and silicon strip detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Y., E-mail: cycjty@sophie.q.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Bioengineering, the University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Shimazoe, K.; Yan, X. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, the University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Ueda, O.; Ishikura, T. [Fuji Electric Co., Ltd., Fuji, Hino, Tokyo 191-8502 (Japan); Fujiwara, T. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Uesaka, M.; Ohno, M. [Nuclear Professional School, the University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-shirane, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Tomita, H. [Department of Quantum Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo, Chikusa, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Yoshihara, Y. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, the University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Takahashi, H. [Department of Bioengineering, the University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, the University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2016-09-11

    A photon counting imaging detector system for high energy X-rays is developed for on-site non-destructive testing of thick objects. One-dimensional silicon strip (1 mm pitch) detectors are stacked to form a two-dimensional edge-on module. Each detector is connected to a 48-channel application specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The threshold-triggered events are recorded by a field programmable gate array based counter in each channel. The detector prototype is tested using 950 kV linear accelerator X-rays. The fast CR shaper (300 ns pulse width) of the ASIC makes it possible to deal with the high instant count rate during the 2 μs beam pulse. The preliminary imaging results of several metal and concrete samples are demonstrated.

  6. Study of high resolution x-ray spectrometer concepts for NIF experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, K. W.; Bitter, M.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Efthimion, P.; Gao, L.; Maddox, J.; Pablant, N. A.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Chen, H.; Coppari, F.; Ma, T.; Nora, R.; Scott, H.; Schneider, M.; Mancini, R.

    2015-11-01

    Options have been investigated for DIM-insertable (Diagnostic Instrument Manipulator) high resolution (E/ ΔE ~ 3000 - 5000) Bragg crystal x-ray spectrometers for experiments on the NIF. Of interest are time integrated Cu K- and Ta L-edge absorption spectra and time resolved Kr He- β emission from compressed symcaps for inference of electron temperature from dielectronic satellites and electron density from Stark broadening. Cylindrical and conical von Hamos, Johann, and advanced high throughput designs have been studied. Predicted x-ray intensities, spectrometer throughputs, spectral resolution, and spatial focusing properties, as well as lab evaluations of some spectrometer candidates will be presented. Performed under the auspices of the US DOE by PPPL under contract DE-AC02-09CH11466 and by LLNL under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  7. Implementation of digital multiplexing for high resolution X-ray detector arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, P; Swetadri Vasan, S N; Titus, A H; Cartwright, A N; Bednarek, D R; Rudin, S

    2012-01-01

    We describe and demonstrate for the first time the use of the novel Multiple Module Multiplexer (MMMIC) for a 2×2 array of new electron multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) based x-ray detectors. It is highly desirable for x-ray imaging systems to have larger fields of view (FOV) extensible in two directions yet to still be capable of doing high resolution imaging over regions-of-interest (ROI). The MMMIC achieves these goals by acquiring and multiplexing data from an array of imaging modules thereby enabling a larger FOV, and at the same time allowing high resolution ROI imaging through selection of a subset of modules in the array. MMMIC also supports different binning modes. This paper describes how a specific two stage configuration connecting three identical MMMICs is used to acquire and multiplex data from a 2×2 array of EMCCD based detectors. The first stage contains two MMMICs wherein each MMMIC is getting data from two EMCCD detectors. The multiplexed data from these MMMICs is then forwarded to the second stage MMMIC in the similar fashion. The second stage that has only one MMMIC gives the final 12 bit multiplexed data from four modules. This data is then sent over a high speed Camera Link interface to the image processing computer. X-ray images taken through the 2×2 array of EMCCD based detectors using this two stage configuration of MMMICs are shown successfully demonstrating the concept.

  8. Dose estimation and shielding calculation for X-ray hazard at high intensity laser facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Rui; Zhang, Hui; Yang, Bo; James, C. Liu; Sayed, H. Rokni; Michael, B. Woods; Li, Jun-Li

    2014-12-01

    An ionizing radiation hazard produced from the interaction between high intensity lasers and solid targets has been observed. Laser-plasma interactions create “hot” electrons, which generate bremsstrahlung X-rays when they interact with ions in the target. However, up to now only limited studies have been conducted on this laser-induced radiological protection issue. In this paper, the physical process and characteristics of the interaction between high intensity lasers and solid targets are analyzed. The parameters of the radiation sources are discussed, including the energy conversion efficiency from laser to hot electrons, hot electron energy spectrum and electron temperature, and the bremsstrahlung X-ray energy spectrum produced by hot electrons. Based on this information, the X-ray dose generated with high-Z targets for laser intensities between 1014 and 1020 W/cm2 is estimated. The shielding effects of common shielding items such as the glass view port, aluminum chamber wall and concrete wall are also studied using the FLUKA Monte Carlo code. This study provides a reference for the dose estimation and the shielding design of high intensity laser facilities.

  9. High-energy x-ray grating-based phase-contrast radiography of human anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Florian; Hauke, Christian; Lachner, Sebastian; Ludwig, Veronika; Pelzer, Georg; Rieger, Jens; Schuster, Max; Seifert, Maria; Wandner, Johannes; Wolf, Andreas; Michel, Thilo; Anton, Gisela

    2016-03-01

    X-ray grating-based phase-contrast Talbot-Lau interferometry is a promising imaging technology that has the potential to raise soft tissue contrast in comparison to conventional attenuation-based imaging. Additionally, it is sensitive to attenuation, refraction and scattering of the radiation and thus provides complementary and otherwise inaccessible information due to the dark-field image, which shows the sub-pixel size granularity of the measured object. Until recent progress the method has been mainly limited to photon energies below 40 keV. Scaling the method to photon energies that are sufficient to pass large and spacious objects represents a challenging task. This is caused by increasing demands regarding the fabrication process of the gratings and the broad spectra that come along with the use of polychromatic X-ray sources operated at high acceleration voltages. We designed a setup that is capable to reach high visibilities in the range from 50 to 120 kV. Therefore, spacious and dense parts of the human body with high attenuation can be measured, such as a human knee. The authors will show investigations on the resulting attenuation, differential phase-contrast and dark-field images. The images experimentally show that X-ray grating-based phase-contrast radiography is feasible with highly absorbing parts of the human body containing massive bones.

  10. High resolution Si(Li) X-ray spectrometer with high throughput rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacso, J.; Kalinka, G.; Kertesz, Zs.; Kovacs, P.; Lakatos, T. (Magyar Tudomanyos Akademia Atommag Kutato Intezete, Debrecen)

    1982-06-01

    The paper presents the description of a modern Si(Li) X-ray spectrometer developed in ATOMKI. The Si(Li) detectors are single-grooved with an active area of 20-50 mm/sup 2/. The Be window is coated with a special protective layer against corrosion. A small getter-ion pump maintains the high vacuum in the cryostat chamber. The preamplifier employs pulsed drain feedback; in its first stage selected, teflon-encapsulated field effect transistors are used. The analogue signal processor is direct coupled and employs time variant pulse shaping. This construction provides high resolution (150-170 eV), high throughput rate, excellent stability, effective pile-up elimination, accurate live-time correction and simplicity in the applications. The live-time correction is performed by a random pulse generator, its average frequency is stabilized and the corresponding peak appears at zero energy in the spectra.

  11. A high spatial resolution X-ray and H-alpha study of hot gas in the halos of star-forming disk galaxies. I. Spatial and spectral properties of the diffuse X-ray emission

    CERN Document Server

    Strickland, D K; Colbert, E J M; Hoopes, C G; Weaver, K A

    2003-01-01

    We present arcsecond resolution Chandra X-ray and ground-based optical H-alpha imaging of a sample of ten edge-on star-forming disk galaxies (seven starburst and three ``normal'' spiral galaxies), a sample which covers the full range of star-formation intensity found in disk galaxies. We use the unprecedented spatial resolution of the Chandra X-ray observatory to robustly remove point sources, and hence obtain the X-ray properties of the diffuse thermal emission alone. The X-ray observations are combined with comparable-resolution H-alpha and R-band imaging, and presented as a mini-atlas of images on a common spatial and surface brightness scale. The vertical distribution of the halo-region X-ray surface brightness is best described as an exponential, with the observed scale heights lying in the range H_eff = 2 -- 4 kpc. The ACIS X-ray spectra of extra-planar emission from all these galaxies can be fit with a common two-temperature spectral model with an enhanced alpha-to-iron element ratio. This is consisten...

  12. Residual stress measurement with high energy x-rays at the Advanced Photon Source.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winholtz, R. A.; Haeffner, D. R.; Green, R.E.L.; Varma, R.; Hammond, D.

    2000-03-02

    Preliminary measurements with high energy x-rays from the SRI CAT 1-ID beam line at the Advanced Photon show great promise for the measurement of stress and strain using diffraction. Comparisons are made with neutron measurements. Measurements of strains in a 2 mm thick 304 stainless steel weld show that excellent strain and spatial resolutions are possible. With 200 {micro}m slits, strain resolutions of 1 x 10{sup {minus}5} were achieved.

  13. High temperature monitoring of silicon carbide ceramics by confocal energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Fangzuo; Liu, Zhiguo; Sun, Tianxi, E-mail: stx@bnu.edu.cn

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • X-ray scattering was used for monitoring oxidation situation of SiC ceramics. • A calibration curve was obtained. • The confocal X-ray scattering technology was based on polycapillary X-ray optics. • The variations of contents of components of SiC ceramics were obtained. - Abstract: In the present work, we presented an alternative method for monitoring of the oxidation situation of silicon carbide (SiC) ceramics at various high temperatures in air by measuring the Compton-to-Rayleigh intensity ratios (I{sub Co}/I{sub Ra}) and effective atomic numbers (Z{sub eff}) of SiC ceramics with the confocal energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometer. A calibration curve of the relationship between I{sub Co}/I{sub Ra} and Z{sub eff} was established by using a set of 8 SiC calibration samples. The sensitivity of this approach is so high that it can be easily distinguished samples of Z{sub eff} differing from each other by only 0.01. The linear relationship between the variation of Z{sub eff} and the variations of contents of C, Si and O of SiC ceramics were found, and the corresponding calculation model of the relationship between the ΔZ and the ΔC{sub C}, ΔC{sub Si}, and ΔC{sub O} were established. The variation of contents of components of the tested SiC ceramics after oxidation at high temperature was quantitatively calculated based on the model. It was shown that the results of contents of carbon, silicon and oxygen obtained by this method were in good agreement with the results obtained by XPS, giving values of relative deviation less than 1%. It was concluded that the practicality of this proposed method for monitoring of the oxidation situation of SiC ceramics at high temperatures was acceptable.

  14. Studies of a Linac Driver for a High Repetition Rate X-Ray FEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venturini, M.; Corlett, J.; Doolittle, L.; Filippetto, D.; Papadopoulos, C.; Penn, G.; Prosnitz, D.; Qiang, J.; Reinsch, M.; Ryne, R.; Sannibale, F.; Staples, J.; Wells, R.; Wurtele, J.; Zolotorev, M.; Zholents, A.

    2011-06-01

    We report on on-going studies of a superconducting CW linac driver intended to support a high repetition rate FEL operating in the soft x-rays spectrum. We present a pointdesign for a 1.8 GeV machine tuned for 300 pC bunches and delivering low-emittance, low-energy spread beams as needed for the SASE and seeded beamlines.

  15. Development of high resolution x-ray spectrometers for the investigation of bioinorganic chemistry in metalloproteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, Owen Byron

    We have built an X-ray spectrometer for synchrotron-based high-resolution soft X-ray spectroscopy. The spectrometer uses four 9-pixel arrays of superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs) as sensors. They infer the energy of an absorbed X-ray from a temporary increase in tunneling current. The STJs are operated in a two-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) that uses liquid nitrogen and helium for precooling to 77 K and 4.2 K, and gallium gadolinium garnet and iron ammonium sulfate to attain a base temperature below 0.1 K. The sensors are held at the end of a 40-cm-long cold finger within ˜1 cm of a sample located inside the vacuum chamber of a synchrotron beam line end station. The spectrometer has an energy resolution between 10 eV and 20 eV FWHM below 1 keV, can be operated at rates up to ˜106 counts/s. STJ spectrometers are suited for chemical analysis of dilute samples by fluorescence-detected X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) in cases where conventional germanium detectors do not have enough energy resolution. We have used this STJ spectrometer at the Advanced Light Source synchrotron for spectroscopy on the lower energy X-ray absorption edges of the elements Mo, S, Fe and N. These elements play an important role in biological nitrogen fixation at the metalloprotein nitrogenase, and we have examined if STJ spectrometers can be used to provide new insights into some of the open questions regarding the reaction mechanism of this protein. We have taken X-ray absorption near-edge spectra (XANES) and extended fine structure spectra (EXAFS) of an Fe 6N(CO)15-compound containing a single N atom inside a cluster of six Fe atoms, as postulated to exist inside the Fe-S cluster of the FeMo-cofactor (FeMo-co) in nitrogenase. The STJ detector has enabled the first-ever extended range EXAFS scans on nitrogen through the oxygen K-edge, enabling a comparison with N EXAFS on FeMo-co. We have taken iron L23-edge spectra of the Fe-S cluster in FeMo-co, which can be

  16. A "high-hard" outburst of the black hole X-ray binary GS 1354-64

    CERN Document Server

    Koljonen, K I I; Corral-Santana, J M; Padilla, M Armas; Muñoz-Darias, T; Lewis, F; Coriat, M; Bauer, F E

    2016-01-01

    We study in detail the evolution of the 2015 outburst of GS 1354-64 (BW Cir) at optical, UV and X-ray wavelengths using Faulkes Telescope South, SMARTS and Swift. The outburst was found to stay in the hard X-ray state, albeit being anomalously luminous with a peak luminosity of L$_{X} >$ 0.15 L$_{Edd}$, which could be the most luminous hard state observed in a black hole X-ray binary. We found that the optical/UV emission is tightly correlated with the X-ray emission, consistent with accretion disc irradiation and/or a jet producing the optical emission. The X-ray spectra can be fitted well with a Comptonisation model, and show softening towards the end of the outburst. In addition, we detect a QPO in the X-ray lightcurves with increasing centroid frequency during the peak and decay periods of the outburst. The long-term optical lightcurves during quiescence show a statistically significant, slow rise of the source brightness over the 7 years prior to the 2015 outburst. This behaviour as well as the outburst ...

  17. The deepest X-ray view of high-redshift galaxies: constraints on low-rate black-hole accretion

    CERN Document Server

    Vito, Fabio; Vignali, Cristian; Brandt, William N; Comastri, Andrea; Yang, Guang; Lehmer, Bret D; Luo, Bin; Basu-Zych, Antara; Bauer, Franz E; Cappelluti, Nico; Koekemoer, Anton; Mainieri, Vincenzo; Paolillo, Maurizio; Ranalli, Piero; Shemmer, Ohad; Trump, Jonathan; Wang, Junxian; Xue, Yongquan

    2016-01-01

    We exploit the 7 Ms \\textit{Chandra} observations in the \\chandra\\,Deep Field-South (\\mbox{CDF-S}), the deepest X-ray survey to date, coupled with CANDELS/GOODS-S data, to measure the total X-ray emission arising from 2076 galaxies at $3.5\\leq z 3.7\\sigma$) X-ray emission from massive galaxies at $z\\approx4$. We also report the detection of massive galaxies at $z\\approx5$ at a $99.7\\%$ confidence level ($2.7\\sigma$), the highest significance ever obtained for X-ray emission from galaxies at such high redshifts. No significant signal is detected from galaxies at even higher redshifts. The stacking results place constraints on the BHAD associated with the known high-redshift galaxy samples, as well as on the SFRD at high redshift, assuming a range of prescriptions for X-ray emission due to X- ray binaries. We find that the X-ray emission from our sample is likely dominated by processes related to star formation. Our results show that low-rate mass accretion onto SMBHs in individually X-ray-undetected galaxies i...

  18. An unexpected drop in the magnetic field of the X-ray pulsar V0332+53 after the bright outburst occurred in 2015

    CERN Document Server

    Cusumano, G; D'Ai, A; Segreto, A; Tagliaferri, G; Barthelmy, S D; Gehrels, N

    2016-01-01

    How the accreted mass settling on the surface of a neutron star affects the topology of the magnetic field and how the secular evolution of the binary system depends on the magnetic field change is still an open issue. We report evidence for a clear drop in the observed magnetic field in the accreting pulsar V0332+53 after undergoing a bright 3-month long X-ray outburst. We determine the field from the position of the fundamental cyclotron line in its X-ray spectrum and relate it to the luminosity. For equal levels of luminosity, in the declining phase we measure a systematically lower value of the cyclotron line energy with respect to the rising phase. This results in a drop of ~1.7 x 10^11 G of the observed field between the onset and the end of the outburst. The settling of the accreted plasma onto the polar cap seems to induce a distortion of the magnetic field lines weakening their intensity along the accretion columns. Therefore the dissipation rate of the magnetic field could be much faster than previo...

  19. XID Cross-Association of ROSAT/Bright Source Catalog X-ray Sources with USNO A2 Optical Point Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Rutledge, R E; Prince, T A; Lonsdale, C; Rutledge, Robert E.; Brunner, Robert J.; Prince, Thomas A.; Lonsdale, Carol

    2000-01-01

    We quantitatively cross-associate the 18811 ROSAT Bright Source Catalog (RASS/BSC) X-ray sources with optical sources in the USNO-A2 catalog, calculating the the probability of unique association (Pid) between each candidate within 75 arcsec of the X-ray source position, on the basis of optical magnitude and proximity. We present catalogs of RASS/BSC sources for which the probability of association is >98%, >90%, and >50%, which contain 2705, 5492, and 11301 unique USNO-A2 optical counterparts respectively down to the stated level of significance. We include in this catalog a list of objects in the SIMBAD database within 10 arcsec of the USNO position, as an aid to identification and source classification. The catalog is more useful than previous catalogs which either rely on plausibility arguments for association, or do not aid in selecting a counterpart between multiple off-band sources in the field. We find that a fraction ~65.8% of RASS/BSC sources have an identifiable optical counterpart, down to the mag...

  20. Model Atmospheres for X-ray Bursting Neutron Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Medin, Zach; Calder, Alan C; Fontes, Christopher J; Fryer, Chris L; Hungerford, Aimee L

    2016-01-01

    The hydrogen and helium accreted by X-ray bursting neutron stars is periodically consumed in runaway thermonuclear reactions that cause the entire surface to glow brightly in X-rays for a few seconds. With models of the emission, the mass and radius of the neutron star can be inferred from the observations. By simultaneously probing neutron star masses and radii, X-ray bursts are one of the strongest diagnostics of the nature of matter at extremely high densities. Accurate determinations of these parameters are difficult, however, due to the highly non-ideal nature of the atmospheres where X-ray bursts occur. Observations from X-ray telescopes such as RXTE and NuStar can potentially place strong constraints on nuclear matter once uncertainties in atmosphere models have been reduced. Here we discuss current progress on modeling atmospheres of X-ray bursting neutron stars and some of the challenges still to be overcome.

  1. High resolution X-ray spherically bent crystal spectrometer for laser-produced plasma diagnostics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shali Xiao; Hongjian Wang; Jun Shi; Changhuan Tang; Shenye Liu

    2009-01-01

    A new high spectral resolution crystal spectrometer is designed to measure very low emissive X-ray spectra of laser-produced plasma in 0.5 - 0.9 nm range. A large open aperture (30 x 20 (mm)) mica (002) spherically bent crystal with curvature radius R = 380 mm is used as dispersive and focusing element. The imaging plate is employed to obtain high spectral resolution with effective area of 30 x 80 (mm). The long designed path of the X-ray spectrometer beam is 980 mm from the source to the detector via the crystal. Experiment is carried out at a 20-J laser facility. X-ray spectra in an absolute intensity scale is obtained from Al laser produced plasmas created by laser energy of 6.78 J. Samples of spectra obtained with spectral resolution of up to E/鈻矱 ~ 1500 are presented. The results clearly show that the device is good to diagnose laser high-density plasmas.

  2. The effects of dust scattering on high-resolution X-ray absorption edge structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrales, L.; García, J.; Wilms, J.; Baganoff, F.

    2016-06-01

    High energy studies of astrophysical dust complement observations of dusty interstellar gas at other wavelengths. With high resolution X-ray spectroscopy, dust scattering significantly enhances the total extinction optical depth and alters the shape of photoelectric absorption edges. This effect is modulated by the dust grain size distribution, spatial location along the line of sight, and the imaging resolution of the X-ray telescope. At soft energies, the spectrum of scattered light is likely to have significant features at the 0.3 keV (C-K), 0.5 keV (O-K), and 0.7 keV (Fe-L) photoelectric absorption edges. This direct probe of ISM dust grain elements will be important for (i) understanding the relative abundances of graphitic grains or PAHs versus silicates, and (ii) measuring the depletion of gas phase elements into solid form. We focus in particular on the Fe-L edge, fitting a template for the total extinction to the high resolution spectrum of three X-ray binaries from the Chandra archive: GX 9+9, XTE J1817-330, and Cyg X-1. We discuss ways in which spectroscopy with XMM can yield insight into dust obscured objects such as stars, binaries, AGN, and foreground quasar absorption line systems.

  3. Dental x-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... X-rays are a form of high energy electromagnetic radiation. The x-rays penetrate the body to form ... for detecting cavities, unless the decay is very advanced and deep. Many ... The amount of radiation given off during the procedure is less than ...

  4. The X-Ray to Mid-Infrared Relation of AGN at High Luminosity

    CERN Document Server

    Stern, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The X-ray and mid-IR emission from active galactic nuclei (AGN) are strongly correlated. However, while various published parameterizations of this correlation are consistent with the low-redshift, local Seyfert galaxy population, extrapolations of these relations to high luminosity differ by an order of magnitude at nuL(nu)(6um) = 1e47 erg/s. Using data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, we determine the mid-IR luminosities of the most luminous quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and present a revised formulation of the X-ray to mid-IR relation of AGN which is appropriate from the Seyfert regime to the powerful quasar regime.

  5. X-ray Emission Induced by Interaction of Highly Charged Ions with Solid Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhaoYongtao; XiaoGuoqing; ZhangXiaoan; YangZhihu; ChenXimeng; ZhangYanping

    2003-01-01

    The X-rays with energy from 1 keV to 60 keV in the interaction of highly charged ions (HCI) with a variety of solid surfaces were investigated at the research platform for atomic physics with the electron cyclone resonance (ECR) ion resource at IMP. We altered the projectile kinetic energy from 150 keV to about 400 keV. The X-ray excited by the projectile with the surface is shown in Fig.l, and a threshold of the projectile kinetic energy for this excitation is observed. Combining the colliding theory of classic electrodynamics with the concept of quantized orbits, we crudely give this threshold energy Tm as follows,

  6. A new solid-conversion gas detector for high energy X-ray industrial computed tomography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Ri-feng; CHEN Wei-min; DUAN Xiao-jiao

    2011-01-01

    A new type of solid-conversion gas detector is investigated for high energy X-ray industrial computed tomography(H ECT).The conversion efficiency is calculated by using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code on the Linux platform to simulate the transport process of photons and electrons in the detector.The simulation results show that the conversion efficiency could be more than 65%,if the X-ray beam width is less than about 0.2 mm,and a tungsten slab with 0.2 mum thickness and 30 mm length is employed as a radiation conversion medium.Meanwhile the results indicate that this new detector has higher conversion efficiency as well as less volume.Theoretically this new kind of detector could take place of the traditional scintillation detector for HECT.

  7. Application of a new-structure polycapillary x-ray optics in high pressure XAFS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Fei; Lin, Xiaoyan; Chen, Dongliang; Liu, Shigang; He, Jinlong; Zhao, Weilin; Liu, Zhiguo; Li, Yude

    2014-10-01

    New-structure polycapillary x-ray optics for high pressure x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) absorption spectroscopy using the diamond anvil cells (DAC) method are applied in synchrotron radiation analysis. The optics are composed of a solid glass fiber in the center and surrounded by a hollow glass capillary array. They can restrain the higher harmonic of incident synchrotron radiation and obtain smooth and clear XAFS spectra. At the biological macromolecule station in the Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility (BSRF), a method of aligning these optics was developed and the transmission efficiency for both fundamental and higher harmonic waves investigated. The XAFS spectra of topological insulator material of Bi2Se3 were obtained by combining the optics.

  8. High-Resolution X-Ray Scattering Topography Using Synchrotron Radiation Microbeam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikaura, Yoshinori; Suzuki, Yoshifumi; Kii, Hideki

    1994-02-01

    Although spatial resolution is the most essential factor determining the function of X-ray topography, it has not been improved in 30 years in spite of increasing requirements for highly-resolvable topography in materials science. X-ray scattering topography using a microbeam is a method capable of overcoming this resolution problem. Because the maximum resolution of an apparatus using a sealed-off tube is limited to 20 µ m, we designed and constructed scattering topography equipment using a synchrotron radiation microbeam. In the experiment, the slit system forms the microbeam 7 µ m in diameter. We observed a cellulose distribution in bamboo as a testing material. When the scanning step was 2 µ m, we attained spatial resolution less than 5 µ m.

  9. High-resolution x-ray scatter and reflectivity study of sputtered IR surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Finn Erland; Abdali, S.; Hornstrup, Allan

    1993-01-01

    In recent years there has been an increased interest in the possible use of Ir as the reflecting surface in X-ray telescope programs. An X-ray study of such surfaces produced by sputtering of Ir on highly polished Zerodur flats is presented here. The study was performed using Fe K(alpha) 1 (6.......404 Kev) and Cu K(alpha) 1 (8.048 keV) and includes measurement of total external reflection and scattering. The scattering measurement was made with three different instruments arrangements; one employed a 1D position sensitive detector for low resolution studies giving approximately 30 arcsec resolution...... (FWHM), and the other two arrangements employed channel cut crystals providing resolutions (FWHM) of 5 arcsec and 1 arcsec, respectively at Cu K(alpha) 1. The reflectivity study revealed a very close correspondence with a theoretical model based on recently published optical constants. This important...

  10. The high optical polarization in the Be/X-ray binary EXO 2030+375

    CERN Document Server

    Reig, P; Papadakis, I; Kylafis, N; Tassis, K

    2014-01-01

    Polarization in classical Be stars results from Thomson scattering of the unpolarized light from the Be star in the circumstellar disc. Theory and observations agree that the maximum degree of polarization from isolated Be stars is < 4%. We report on the first optical polarimetric observations of the Be/X-ray binary EXO\\,2030+375. We find that the optical (R band) light is strongly linearly polarized with a degee of polarization of 19%, the highest ever measured either in a classical or Be/X-ray binary. We argue that the interstellar medium cannot account for this high polarization degree and that a substantial amount must be intrinsic to the source. We propose that it may result from the alignment of non-spherical ferromagnetic grains in the Be star disc due to the strong neutron star magnetic field.

  11. High-resolution x-ray scatter and reflectivity study of sputtered IR surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Finn Erland; Abdali, S.; Hornstrup, Allan

    1993-01-01

    In recent years there has been an increased interest in the possible use of Ir as the reflecting surface in X-ray telescope programs. An X-ray study of such surfaces produced by sputtering of Ir on highly polished Zerodur flats is presented here. The study was performed using Fe K(alpha) 1 (6.......404 Kev) and Cu K(alpha) 1 (8.048 keV) and includes measurement of total external reflection and scattering. The scattering measurement was made with three different instruments arrangements; one employed a 1D position sensitive detector for low resolution studies giving approximately 30 arcsec resolution...... (FWHM), and the other two arrangements employed channel cut crystals providing resolutions (FWHM) of 5 arcsec and 1 arcsec, respectively at Cu K(alpha) 1. The reflectivity study revealed a very close correspondence with a theoretical model based on recently published optical constants. This important...

  12. Soft x-ray spectrometer (SXS): the high-resolution cryogenic spectrometer onboard ASTRO-H

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Kelley, Richard L.; Akamatsu, Hiroki; Bialas, Thomas; Boyce, Kevin R.; Brown, Gregory V.; Canavan, Edgar; Chiao, Meng; Costantini, Elisa; den Herder, Jan-Willem; de Vries, Cor; DiPirro, Michael J.; Eckart, Megan E.; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Haas, Daniel; Hoshino, Akio; Ishikawa, Kumi; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; Iyomoto, Naoko; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Kimball, Mark; Kitamoto, Shunji; Konami, Saori; Leutenegger, Maurice A.; McCammon, Dan; Miko, Joseph; Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki; Murakami, Hiroshi; Murakami, Masahide; Noda, Hirofumi; Ogawa, Mina; Ohashi, Takaya; Okamoto, Atsushi; Ota, Naomi; Paltani, Stéphane; Porter, F. Scott; Sato, Kosuke; Sato, Yoichi; Sawada, Makoto; Seta, Hiromi; Shinozaki, Keisuke; Shirron, Peter J.; Sneiderman, Gary A.; Sugita, Hiroyuki; Szymkowiak, Andrew; Takei, Yoh; Tamagawa, Toru; Tashiro, Makoto S.; Terada, Yukikatsu; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Yamada, Shinya; Yamasaki, Noriko Y.

    2014-07-01

    We present the development status of the Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) onboard the ASTRO-H mission. The SXS provides the capability of high energy-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of a FWHM energy resolution of operated at 50 mK. The SXS microcalorimeter subsystem is being developed in an EM-FM approach. The EM SXS cryostat was developed and fully tested and, although the design was generally confirmed, several anomalies and problems were found. Among them is the interference of the detector with the micro-vibrations from the mechanical coolers, which is the most difficult one to solve. We have pursued three different countermeasures and two of them seem to be effective. So far we have obtained energy resolutions satisfying the requirement with the FM cryostat.

  13. Structured photocathodes for improved high-energy x-ray efficiency in streak cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opachich, Y. P.; Bell, P. M.; Bradley, D. K.; Chen, N.; Feng, J.; Gopal, A.; Hatch, B.; Hilsabeck, T. J.; Huffman, E.; Koch, J. A.; Landen, O. L.; MacPhee, A. G.; Nagel, S. R.; Udin, S.

    2016-11-01

    We have designed and fabricated a structured streak camera photocathode to provide enhanced efficiency for high energy X-rays (1-12 keV). This gold coated photocathode was tested in a streak camera and compared side by side against a conventional flat thin film photocathode. Results show that the measured electron yield enhancement at energies ranging from 1 to 10 keV scales well with predictions, and that the total enhancement can be more than 3×. The spatial resolution of the streak camera does not show degradation in the structured region. We predict that the temporal resolution of the detector will also not be affected as it is currently dominated by the slit width. This demonstration with Au motivates exploration of comparable enhancements with CsI and may revolutionize X-ray streak camera photocathode design.

  14. Highly Ionized Absorption in the X-ray Spectrum of Cyg X-1

    CERN Document Server

    Marshall, H L; Fang, T; Cui, W; Canizares, C R; Miller, J M; Lewin, W H G

    2001-01-01

    Using the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (HETGS), we have found significant absorption features in the X-ray spectrum of Cyg X-1 taken in the continuous clocking mode. These features include resonance lines of He-like ions of S, Si, and Mg; the Ly alpha lines of H-like S, Si, Mg, and Ne; and several lower ionization lines of Fe XX, XXII, and XXIV. Preliminary analysis shows that the lines are resolved in many cases, giving line widths of order 300 km/s and are redshifted by 460 +/- 10 km/s. These features are interpreted in the context of an accreting stellar wind model that is ionized by the X-ray source. In addition, there are clear absorption features due to neutral Mg, Fe, and O in the interstellar medium.

  15. Constraining High Redshift X-ray Sources with Next Generation 21 cm Power Spectrum Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Ewall-Wice, Aaron; Mesinger, Andrei; Dillon, Joshua S; Liu, Adrian; Pober, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    We use the Fisher matrix formalism and semi-numerical simulations to derive quantitative predictions of the constraints that power spectrum measurements on next-generation interferometers, such as the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA) and the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), will place on the characteristics of the X-ray sources that heated the high redshift intergalactic medium. Incorporating observations between $z=5$ and $z=25$, we find that the proposed 331 element HERA and SKA phase 1 will be capable of placing $\\lesssim 10\\%$ constraints on the spectral properties of these first X-ray sources, even if one is unable to perform measurements within the foreground contaminated "wedge" or the FM band. When accounting for the enhancement in power spectrum amplitude from spin temperature fluctuations, we find that the observable signatures of reionization extend well beyond the peak in the power spectrum usually associated with it. We also find that lower redshift degeneracies between the signatures of ...

  16. NuSTAR detection of high-energy X-ray emission and rapid variability from Sagittarius A{sup *} flares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrière, Nicolas M.; Tomsick, John A.; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W.; Zoglauer, Andreas [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Baganoff, Frederick K. [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307 (United States); Christensen, Finn E. [DTU Space, National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Elektrovej 327, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Dexter, Jason [Departments of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Grefenstette, Brian; Harrison, Fiona A.; Madsen, Kristin K. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Hailey, Charles J.; Mori, Kaya; Zhang, Shuo [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Stern, Daniel [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Zhang, William W. [X-ray Astrophysics Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Sagittarius A{sup *} harbors the supermassive black hole that lies at the dynamical center of our Galaxy. Sagittarius A{sup *} spends most of its time in a low luminosity emission state but flares frequently in the infrared and X-ray, increasing up to a few hundred fold in brightness for up to a few hours at a time. The physical processes giving rise to the X-ray flares are uncertain. Here we report the detection with the NuSTAR observatory in Summer and Fall 2012 of four low to medium amplitude X-ray flares to energies up to 79 keV. For the first time, we clearly see that the power-law spectrum of Sagittarius A{sup *} X-ray flares extends to high energy, with no evidence for a cutoff. Although the photon index of the absorbed power-law fits are in agreement with past observations, we find a difference between the photon index of two of the flares (significant at the 95% confidence level). The spectra of the two brightest flares (∼55 times quiescence in the 2-10 keV band) are compared to simple physical models in an attempt to identify the main X-ray emission mechanism, but the data do not allow us to significantly discriminate between them. However, we confirm the previous finding that the parameters obtained with synchrotron models are, for the X-ray emission, physically more reasonable than those obtained with inverse Compton models. One flare exhibits large and rapid (<100 s) variability, which, considering the total energy radiated, constrains the location of the flaring region to be within ∼10 Schwarzschild radii of the black hole.

  17. High-resolution soft X-ray beamline ADRESS at the Swiss Light Source for resonant inelastic X-ray scattering and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strocov, V. N., E-mail: vladimir.strocov@psi.ch; Schmitt, T.; Flechsig, U.; Schmidt, T.; Imhof, A.; Chen, Q.; Raabe, J. [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); Betemps, R.; Zimoch, D.; Krempasky, J. [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); Wang, X. [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); Institut de Physique de la Matiére Condensé, Ecole Polytechnique Fédéderale de Lausanne (Switzerland); Grioni, M. [Institut de Physique de la Matiére Condensé, Ecole Polytechnique Fédéderale de Lausanne (Switzerland); Piazzalunga, A. [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Patthey, L. [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland)

    2010-09-01

    Concepts and technical realization of the high-resolution soft X-ray beamline ADRESS at the Swiss Light Source are described. Optimization of the optical scheme for high resolution and photon flux as well as diagnostics tools and alignment strategies are discussed. The concepts and technical realisation of the high-resolution soft X-ray beamline ADRESS operating in the energy range from 300 to 1600 eV and intended for resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) are described. The photon source is an undulator of novel fixed-gap design where longitudinal movement of permanent magnetic arrays controls not only the light polarization (including circular and 0–180° rotatable linear polarizations) but also the energy without changing the gap. The beamline optics is based on the well established scheme of plane-grating monochromator operating in collimated light. The ultimate resolving power E/ΔE is above 33000 at 1 keV photon energy. The choice of blazed versus lamellar gratings and optimization of their profile parameters is described. Owing to glancing angles on the mirrors as well as optimized groove densities and profiles of the gratings, the beamline is capable of delivering high photon flux up to 1 × 10{sup 13} photons s{sup −1} (0.01% BW){sup −1} at 1 keV. Ellipsoidal refocusing optics used for the RIXS endstation demagnifies the vertical spot size down to 4 µm, which allows slitless operation and thus maximal transmission of the high-resolution RIXS spectrometer delivering E/ΔE > 11000 at 1 keV photon energy. Apart from the beamline optics, an overview of the control system is given, the diagnostics and software tools are described, and strategies used for the optical alignment are discussed. An introduction to the concepts and instrumental realisation of the ARPES and RIXS endstations is given.

  18. Highly multiplexible thermal kinetic inductance detectors for x-ray imaging spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulbricht, Gerhard, E-mail: ulbricht@physics.ucsb.edu; Mazin, Benjamin A.; Szypryt, Paul; Walter, Alex B.; Bockstiegel, Clint [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Bumble, Bruce [NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

    2015-06-22

    For X-ray imaging spectroscopy, high spatial resolution over a large field of view is often as important as high energy resolution, but current X-ray detectors do not provide both in the same device. Thermal Kinetic Inductance Detectors (TKIDs) are being developed as they offer a feasible way to combine the energy resolution of transition edge sensors with pixel counts approaching CCDs and thus promise significant improvements for many X-ray spectroscopy applications. TKIDs are a variation of Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKIDs) and share their multiplexibility: working MKID arrays with 2024 pixels have recently been demonstrated and much bigger arrays are under development. In this work, we present a TKID prototype, which is able to achieve an energy resolution of 75 eV at 5.9 keV, even though its general design still has to be optimized. We further describe TKID fabrication, characterization, multiplexing, and working principle and demonstrate the necessity of a data fitting algorithm in order to extract photon energies. With further design optimizations, we expect to be able to improve our TKID energy resolution to less than 10 eV at 5.9 keV.

  19. A scientific case for future X-ray Astronomy: Galaxy Clusters at high redshifts

    CERN Document Server

    Tozzi, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Clusters of galaxies at high redshift (z>1) are vitally important to understand the evolution of the large scale structure of the Universe, the processes shaping galaxy populations and the cycle of the cosmic baryons, and to constrain cosmological parameters. After 13 years of operation of the Chandra and XMM-Newton satellites, the discovery and characterization of distant X-ray clusters is proceeding at a slow pace, due to the low solid angle covered so far, and the time-expensive observations needed to physically characterize their intracluster medium (ICM). At present, we know that at z>1 many massive clusters are fully virialized, their ICM is already enriched with metals, strong cool cores are already in place, and significant star formation is ongoing in their most massive galaxies, at least at z>1.4. Clearly, the assembly of a large and well characterized sample of high-z X-ray clusters is a major goal for the future. We argue that the only means to achieve this is a survey-optimized X-ray mission capa...

  20. Highly Multiplexible Thermal Kinetic Inductance Detectors for X-Ray Imaging Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Ulbricht, Gerhard; Szypryt, Paul; Walter, Alex B; Bockstiegel, Clint; Bumble, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    For X-ray imaging spectroscopy, high spatial resolution over a large field of view is often as important as high energy resolution, but current X-ray detectors do not provide both in the same device. Thermal Kinetic Inductance Detectors (TKIDs) are being developed as they offer a feasible way to combine the energy resolution of transition edge sensors with pixel counts approaching CCDs and thus promise significant improvements for many X-ray spectroscopy applications. TKIDs are a variation of Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKIDs) and share their multiplexibility: working MKID arrays with 2024 pixels have recently been demonstrated and much bigger arrays are under development. In this work, we present our first working TKID prototypes which are able to achieve an energy resolution of 75 eV at 5.9 keV, even though their general design still has to be optimized. We further describe TKID fabrication, characterization, multiplexing and working principle and demonstrate the necessity of a data fitting algo...

  1. High-Frequency X-ray Variability Detection in A Black Hole Transient with USA.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shabad, Gayane

    2000-10-16

    Studies of high-frequency variability (above {approx}100 Hz) in X-ray binaries provide a unique opportunity to explore the fundamental physics of spacetime and matter, since the orbital timescale on the order of several milliseconds is a timescale of the motion of matter through the region located in close proximity to a compact stellar object. The detection of weak high-frequency signals in X-ray binaries depends on how well we understand the level of Poisson noise due to the photon counting statistics, i.e. how well we can understand and model the detector deadtime and other instrumental systematic effects. We describe the preflight timing calibration work performed on the Unconventional Stellar Aspect (USA) X-ray detector to study deadtime and timing issues. We developed a Monte Carlo deadtime model and deadtime correction methods for the USA experiment. The instrumental noise power spectrum can be estimated within {approx}0.1% accuracy in the case when no energy-dependent instrumental effect is present. We also developed correction techniques to account for an energy-dependent instrumental effect. The developed methods were successfully tested on USA Cas A and Cygnus X-1 data. This work allowed us to make a detection of a weak signal in a black hole candidate (BHC) transient.

  2. High-resolution x-ray computed tomography to understand ruminant phylogeny

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costeur, Loic; Schulz, Georg; Müller, Bert

    2014-09-01

    High-resolution X-ray computed tomography has become a vital technique to study fossils down to the true micrometer level. Paleontological research requires the non-destructive analysis of internal structures of fossil specimens. We show how X-ray computed tomography enables us to visualize the inner ear of extinct and extant ruminants without skull destruction. The inner ear, a sensory organ for hearing and balance has a rather complex three-dimensional morphology and thus provides relevant phylogenetical information what has been to date essentially shown in primates. We made visible the inner ears of a set of living and fossil ruminants using the phoenix x-ray nanotom®m (GE Sensing and Inspection Technologies GmbH). Because of the high absorbing objects a tungsten target was used and the experiments were performed with maximum accelerating voltage of 180 kV and a beam current of 30 μA. Possible stem ruminants of the living families are known in the fossil record but extreme morphological convergences in external structures such as teeth is a strong limitation to our understanding of the evolutionary history of this economically important group of animals. We thus investigate the inner ear to assess its phylogenetical potential for ruminants and our first results show strong family-level morphological differences.

  3. Design of High Resolution Soft X-Ray Microcalorimeters Using Magnetic Penetration Thermometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch. Sarah; Balvin, Manuel; Bandler, Simon; Denis, Kevin; Finkbeiner, Fred; Porst, Jan-Patrick; Sadlier, Jack; Smith, Stephen; Stevenson, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We have designed high-resolution soft x-ray microcalorimeters using magnetic penetration thermometers (MPTs) in an array of pixels covering a total of 2 square centimeters to have a resolving power of 300 at energies around 300 eV. This performance is desirable for studying the soft x-ray background from the warm hot intergalactic medium. MPT devices have small sensor heat capacity and high responsivities, which makes them excellent detector technology for attempting to attain sub-eV resolution. We are investigating the feasibility of pixels with absorbers that are 625 x 625 square micrometers, up to 1 x 1 square millimeters in area and 0.35 micrometer thick and thinner. Our tests have shown that suspended gold absorbers 0.35 micrometers thick (RRR = 6.7) are feasible to fabricate. We modeled the thermal diffusion from such thin gold over the size of a 625 x 625 square micrometer absorber, and conclude that the effect of the thermalization on the resolution of a 300 eV photon is an additional approximately 0.2 eV FWHM of broadening. We discuss the thermal effects of small absorber attachment sterns on solid substrate, as well as considerations for multiplexed readout. We will present the progress we have made towards building and testing this soft x-ray detector.

  4. Application of soft X-ray lasers for probing high density plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Da Silva, L.B.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.; Cauble, R. [and others

    1996-08-01

    The reliability and characteristics of collisionally pumped soft x-ray lasers make them ideal for a wide variety of plasma diagnostics. These systems now operate over a wavelength range extending from 35 to 400 {Angstrom} and have output energies as high as 10 mJ in 150 ps pulses. The beam divergence of these lasers is less than 15 mrad and they have a typical linewidth of {Delta}{lambda}/{lambda} {approximately} 10{sup -4} making them the brightest xuv sources available. In this paper we will describe the use of x-ray lasers to probe high density plasmas using a variety of diagnostic techniques. Using an x-ray laser and a multilayer mirror imaging system we have studied hydrodynamic imprinting of laser speckle pattern on directly driven thin foils with 1-2 {mu}m spatial resolution. Taking advantage of recently developed multilayer beamsplitters we have constructed and used a Mach-Zehnder interferometer operating at 155 {Angstrom} to probe 1-3 mm size laser produced plasmas with peak electron densities of 4 x 10{sup 21} cm{sup -3}. A comparison of our results with computer simulations will be presented.

  5. The High Resolution X-Ray Imaging Detector Planes for the MIRAX Mission

    CERN Document Server

    Rodrigues, Barbara H G; Allen, Branden; Hong, Jaesub; Barthelmy, Scott; Braga, Joao; D'Amico, Flavio; Rothschild, Richard E

    2013-01-01

    The MIRAX X-ray observatory, the first Brazilian-led astrophysics space mission, is designed to perform an unprecedented wide-field, wide-band hard X-ray (5-200 keV) survey of Galactic X-ray transient sources. In the current configuration, MIRAX will carry a set of four coded-mask telescopes with high spatial resolution Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detector planes, each one consisting of an array of 64 closely tiled CZT pixelated detectors. Taken together, the four telescopes will have a total detection area of 959 cm^2, a large field of view (60x60 degrees FWHM), high angular resolution for this energy range (6 arcmin) and very good spectral resolution (~2 keV @ 60 keV). A stratospheric balloon-borne prototype of one of the MIRAX telescopes has been developed, tested and flown by the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) as part of the ProtoEXIST program. In this paper we show results of validation and calibration tests with individual CZT detectors of the ProtoEXIST second generation experiment ...

  6. High resolution, multiple-energy linear sweep detector for x-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Mendez, V.; Goodman, C.A.

    1996-08-20

    Apparatus is disclosed for generating plural electrical signals in a single scan in response to incident X-rays received from an object. Each electrical signal represents an image of the object at a different range of energies of the incident X-rays. The apparatus comprises a first X-ray detector, a second X-ray detector stacked upstream of the first X-ray detector, and an X-ray absorber stacked upstream of the first X-ray detector. The X-ray absorber provides an energy-dependent absorption of the incident X-rays before they are incident at the first X-ray detector, but provides no absorption of the incident X-rays before they are incident at the second X-ray detector. The first X-ray detector includes a linear array of first pixels, each of which produces an electrical output in response to the incident X-rays in a first range of energies. The first X-ray detector also includes a circuit that generates a first electrical signal in response to the electrical output of each of the first pixels. The second X-ray detector includes a linear array of second pixels, each of which produces an electrical output in response to the incident X-rays in a second range of energies, broader than the first range of energies. The second X-ray detector also includes a circuit that generates a second electrical signal in response to the electrical output of each of the second pixels. 12 figs.

  7. Soft x-ray blazed transmission grating spectrometer with high resolving power and extended bandpass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilmann, Ralf K.; Bruccoleri, Alexander Robert; Schattenburg, Mark

    2016-04-01

    A number of high priority questions in astrophysics can be addressed by a state-of-the-art soft x-ray grating spectrometer, such as the role of Active Galactic Nuclei in galaxy and star formation, characterization of the Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium and the “missing baryon” problem, characterization of halos around the Milky Way and nearby galaxies, as well as stellar coronae and surrounding winds and disks. An Explorer-scale, large-area (> 1,000 cm2), high resolving power (R = λ/Δλ > 3,000) soft x-ray grating spectrometer is highly feasible based on Critical-Angle Transmission (CAT) grating technology. Still significantly higher performance can be provided by a CAT grating spectrometer on an X-ray-Surveyor-type mission. CAT gratings combine the advantages of blazed reflection gratings (high efficiency, use of higher diffraction orders) with those of conventional transmission gratings (low mass, relaxed alignment tolerances and temperature requirements, transparent at higher energies) with minimal mission resource requirements. They are high-efficiency blazed transmission gratings that consist of freestanding, ultra-high aspect-ratio grating bars fabricated from silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers using advanced anisotropic dry and wet etch techniques. Blazing is achieved through grazing-incidence reflection off the smooth grating bar sidewalls. The reflection properties of silicon are well matched to the soft x-ray band. Nevertheless, CAT gratings with sidewalls made of higher atomic number elements allow extension of the CAT grating principle to higher energies and larger dispersion angles. We show x-ray data from metal-coated CAT gratings and demonstrate efficient blazing to higher energies and larger blaze angles than possible with silicon alone. We also report on measurements of the resolving power of a breadboard CAT grating spectrometer consisting of a Wolter-I slumped-glass focusing mirror pair from Goddard Space Flight Center and CAT gratings, to be

  8. X-Ray Detector Simulations - Oral Presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tina, Adrienne [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-08-20

    The free-electron laser at LCLS produces X-Rays that are used in several facilities. This light source is so bright and quick that we are capable of producing movies of objects like proteins. But making these movies would not be possible without a device that can detect the X-Rays and produce images. We need X-Ray cameras. The challenges LCLS faces include the X-Rays’ high repetition rate of 120 Hz, short pulses that can reach 200 femto-seconds, and extreme peak brightness. We need detectors that are compatible with this light source, but before they can be used in the facilities, they must first be characterized. My project was to do just that, by making a computer simulation program. My presentation discusses the individual detectors I simulated, the details of my program, and how my project will help determine which detector is most useful for a specific experiment.

  9. XMM-Newton observations of four high mass X-ray binaries and IGR J17348-2045

    CERN Document Server

    Bozzo, E; Ferrigno, C; Falanga, M; Campana, S; Paltani, S; Stella, L; Walter, R

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of the XMM-Newton observations of five hard X-ray emitters: IGR J08262-3736, IGR J17354-3255, IGR J16328-4726, SAX J1818.6-1703, and IGR J17348-2045. The first source is a confirmed supergiant high mass X-ray binary, the following two are candidates supergiant fast X-ray transients, SAX J1818.6-1703 is a confirmed supergiant fast X-ray transient and IGR J17348-2045 is one of the still unidentified objects discovered with INTEGRAL. The XMM-Newton observations permitted the first detailed soft X-ray spectral and timing study of IGR J08262-3736 and provided further support in favor of the association of IGR J17354-3255 and IGR J16328-4726 with the supergiant fast X-ray transients. SAX J1818.6-1703 was not detected by XMM-Newton, thus supporting the idea that this source reaches its lowest X-ray luminosity (~10^32 erg/s) around apastron. For IGR J17348-2045 we identified for the first time the soft X-ray counterpart and proposed the association with a close-by radio object, suggestive of an...

  10. Obtaining high degree of circular polarization at X-ray FELs via a reverse undulator taper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneidmiller, E.A.; Yurkov, M.V.

    2013-08-15

    Baseline design of a typical X-ray FEL undulator assumes a planar configuration which results in a linear polarization of the FEL radiation. However, many experiments at X-ray FEL user facilities would profit from using a circularly polarized radiation. As a cheap upgrade one can consider an installation of a short helical (or cross-planar) afterburner, but then one should have an efficient method to suppress powerful linearly polarized background from the main undulator. In this paper we propose a new method for such a suppression: an application of the reverse taper in the main undulator. We discover that in a certain range of the taper strength, the density modulation (bunching) at saturation is practically the same as in the case of non-tapered undulator while the power of linearly polarized radiation is suppressed by orders of magnitude. Then strongly modulated electron beam radiates at full power in the afterburner. Considering SASE3 undulator of the European XFEL as a practical example, we demonstrate that soft X-ray radiation pulses with peak power in excess of 100 GW and an ultimately high degree of circular polarization can be produced. The proposed method is rather universal, i.e. it can be used at SASE FELs and seeded (self-seeded) FELs, with any wavelength of interest, in a wide range of electron beam parameters, and with any repetition rate. It can be used at different X-ray FEL facilities, in particular at LCLS after installation of the helical afterburner in the near future.

  11. Simulations of in situ x-ray diffraction from uniaxially compressed highly textured polycrystalline targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGonegle, David, E-mail: d.mcgonegle1@physics.ox.ac.uk; Wark, Justin S.; Higginbotham, Andrew [Department of Physics, Clarendon Laboratory University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Milathianaki, Despina [Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Remington, Bruce A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2015-08-14

    A growing number of shock compression experiments, especially those involving laser compression, are taking advantage of in situ x-ray diffraction as a tool to interrogate structure and microstructure evolution. Although these experiments are becoming increasingly sophisticated, there has been little work on exploiting the textured nature of polycrystalline targets to gain information on sample response. Here, we describe how to generate simulated x-ray diffraction patterns from materials with an arbitrary texture function subject to a general deformation gradient. We will present simulations of Debye-Scherrer x-ray diffraction from highly textured polycrystalline targets that have been subjected to uniaxial compression, as may occur under planar shock conditions. In particular, we study samples with a fibre texture, and find that the azimuthal dependence of the diffraction patterns contains information that, in principle, affords discrimination between a number of similar shock-deformation mechanisms. For certain cases, we compare our method with results obtained by taking the Fourier transform of the atomic positions calculated by classical molecular dynamics simulations. Illustrative results are presented for the shock-induced α–ϵ phase transition in iron, the α–ω transition in titanium and deformation due to twinning in tantalum that is initially preferentially textured along [001] and [011]. The simulations are relevant to experiments that can now be performed using 4th generation light sources, where single-shot x-ray diffraction patterns from crystals compressed via laser-ablation can be obtained on timescales shorter than a phonon period.

  12. Bystander effect between zebrafish embryos in vivo induced by high-dose X-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, V W Y; Ng, C Y P; Kobayashi, A; Konishi, T; Suya, N; Ishikawa, T; Cheng, S H; Yu, K N

    2013-06-18

    We employed embryos of the zebrafish, Danio rerio, for our studies on the in vivo bystander effect between embryos irradiated with high-dose X-rays and naive unirradiated embryos. The effects on the naive whole embryos were studied through quantification of apoptotic signals at 25 h post fertilization (hpf) through the terminal dUTP transferase-mediated nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay followed by counting the stained cells under a microscope. We report data showing that embryos at 5 hpf subjected to a 4-Gy X-ray irradiation could release a stress signal into the medium, which could induce a bystander effect in partnered naive embryos sharing the same medium. We further demonstrated that this bystander effect (induced through partnering) could be successfully suppressed through the addition of the nitric oxide (NO) scavenger 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (cPTIO) into the medium but not through the addition of the CO liberator tricarbonylchloro(glycinato)ruthenium(II) (CORM-3). This shows that NO was involved in the bystander response between zebrafish embryos induced through X-ray irradiation. We also report data showing that the bystander effect could be successfully induced in naive embryos by introducing them into the irradiated embryo conditioned medium (IECM) alone, i.e., without partnering with the irradiated embryos. The IECM was harvested from the medium that had conditioned the zebrafish embryos irradiated at 5 hpf with 4-Gy X-ray until the irradiated embryos developed into 29 hpf. NO released from the irradiated embryos was unlikely to be involved in the bystander effect induced through the IECM because of the short life of NO. We further revealed that this bystander effect (induced through IECM) was rapidly abolished through diluting the IECM by a factor of 2× or greater, which agreed with the proposal that the bystander effect was an on/off response with a threshold.

  13. Effective attenuation lengths for photoelectrons emitted by high-energy laboratory X-ray sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jablonski, A., E-mail: ajablonski@ichf.edu.pl [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Kasprzaka 44/52, 01-224 Warsaw (Poland); Powell, C.J. [Materials Measurement Science Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MA (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Effective attenuation lengths (EALs) for high kinetic energy photoelectrons. • Weak influence of the non-dipole approximation on the EAL. • New analytical algorithm for calculating the effective attenuation length. - Abstract: We report calculations of effective attenuation lengths (EALs) for Si 2s{sub 1/2}, Cu 2p{sub 3/2}, Ag 3d{sub 5/2}, and Au 4f{sub 7/2} photoelectrons excited by Mg Kα, Al Kα, Zr Lα, and Ti Kα X-rays, where the photoelectron energies ranged from 321 eV to 4.426 keV. These EALs, appropriate for determining overlayer-film thicknesses, were calculated from the transport-approximation formalism and from Monte Carlo simulations using photoionization cross sections from the dipole and non-dipole approximations. Satisfactory consistency was found between EALs determined from the TA formalism and from MC simulations, while differences between EALs for Au 4f{sub 7/2} photoelectrons from the dipole and non-dipole approximations were between 1% (for Mg and Al Kα X-rays) and 2.5% (for Ti Kα X-rays) for photoelectron emission angles less than 50°. As in past work for electron energies less than 2 keV, we found a simple linear relation between the ratio of the average EAL (for emission angles less than 50°) to the inelastic mean free path (IMFP) and the single-scattering albedo, a function of the IMFP and the transport mean free path. The root-mean-square difference between our average EALs and those from the linear expression was 1.44%. This expression should be useful in determinations of film thicknesses by XPS with unpolarized X-rays for photoelectron energies up to about 5 keV.

  14. Tracing the Lowest Propeller Line in Magellanic High-mass X-Ray Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christodoulou, Dimitris M.; Laycock, Silas G. T.; Yang, Jun; Fingerman, Samuel

    2016-09-01

    We have combined the published observations of high-mass X-ray binary (HMXB) pulsars in the Magellanic Clouds with a new processing of the complete archival data sets from the XMM-Newton and Chandra observatories in an attempt to trace the lowest propeller line below which accretion to polar caps is inhibited by the centrifugal force and the pulsations from the most weakly magnetized pulsars cease. Previously published data reveal that some of the faster-spinning pulsars with spin periods of P S < 12 s, detected at relatively low X-ray luminosities L X , appear to define such a line in the P S -L X diagram, characterized by a magnetic moment of μ = 3 × 1029 G cm3. This value implies the presence of surface magnetic fields of B ≥ 3 × 1011 G in the compact objects of this class. Only a few quiescent HMXBs are found below the propeller line: LXP4.40 and SXP4.78, for which XMM-Newton and Chandra null detections respectively placed firm upper limits on their X-ray fluxes in deep quiescence; and A0538-66, for which many sub-Eddington detections have never measured any pulsations. On the other hand, the data from the XMM-Newton and Chandra archives show clearly that, during routine observation cycles, several sources have been detected below the propeller line in extremely faint, nonpulsating states that can be understood as the result of weak magnetospheric emission when accretion to the poles is centrifugally stalled or severely diminished. We also pay attention to the anomalous X-ray pulsar CXOU J010043.1-721134 that was reported in HMXB surveys. Its pulsations and locations near and above the propeller line indicate that this pulsar could be accreting from a fossil disk.

  15. Phase contrast imaging using Betatron x-ray beams produced by a 100 TW high intensity laser system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourmaux, Sylvain; Corde, Sebastien; Ta Phuoc, Kim; Lassonde, Philippe; Martin, Francois; Malka, Victor; Rousse, Antoine; Kieffer, Jean

    2011-10-01

    Development of x-ray phase contrast imaging applications with a laboratory scale source have been limited by the long exposure time needed to obtain one image. We demonstrate, using the Betatron x-ray radiation produced when electrons are accelerated and wiggled in the laser-wakefield cavity, the potential of Betatron x-ray radiation for femtosecond phase contrast imaging. We characterize the x-ray source using a knife edge technique and nylon wires for calibration. We then show that high-quality phase contrast images of complex objects located in air, can be obtained with only a single laser shot. The Betatron x-ray source used in this demonstration experiment has a source diameter of 1.7 microns and produces a synchrotron spectrum with critical energy Ec = 12 . 3 + / - 2 . 5 keV and 109 photons per shot in the whole spectrum.

  16. Hitomi X-ray Astronomy Satellite: Power of High-Resolution Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odaka, Hirokazu; Aff001

    2017-01-01

    Hitomi (ASTRO-H) is an X-ray observatory developed by an international collaboration led by JAXA. An X-ray microcalorimeter onboard this satellite has opened a new window of high-resolution spectroscopy with an unprecedented energy resolution of 5 eV (FWHM) at 6 keV. The spacecraft was launched on February 17, 2016 from Tanegashima Island, Japan, and we completed initial operations including deployment of the hard X-ray imagers on the extensible optical bench. All scientific instruments had successfully worked until the sudden loss of the mission on March 26. We have obtained a spectrum showing fully resolved emission lines through the first-light observation of the Perseus Cluster. The line-of-sight velocity dispersion of 164 +/- 10 km s-1 reveals the quiescent environment of intracluster medium at the cluster core, implying that measured cluster mass requires little correction for the turbulent pressure. We also discuss observations to the Galactic Center which could be performed with Hitomi.

  17. Fast plasma discharge capillary design as a high power throughput soft x-ray emission source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyndham, E S; Favre, M; Valdivia, M P; Valenzuela, J C; Chuaqui, H; Bhuyan, H

    2010-09-01

    We present the experimental details and results from a low energy but high repetition rate compact plasma capillary source for extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray research and applications. Two lengths of capillary are mounted in two versions of a closely related design. The discharge operates in 1.6 and 3.2 mm inner diameter alumina capillaries of lengths 21 and 36 mm. The use of water both as dielectric and as coolant simplifies the compact low inductance design with nanosecond discharge periods. The stored electrical energy of the discharge is approximately 0.5 J and is provided by directly charging the capacitor plates from an inexpensive insulated-gate bipolar transistor in 1 μs or less. We present characteristic argon spectra from plasma between 30 and 300 Å as well as temporally resolved x-ray energy fluence in discrete bands on axis. The spectra also allow the level of ablated wall material to be gauged and associated with useful capillary lifetime according to the chosen configuration and energy storage. The connection between the electron beams associated with the transient hollow cathode mechanism, soft x-ray output, capillary geometry, and capillary lifetime is reported. The role of these e-beams and the plasma as measured on-axis is discussed. The relation of the electron temperature and the ionization stages observed is discussed in the context of some model results of ionization in a non-Maxwellian plasma.

  18. High resolution X-ray diffraction studies on unirradiated and irradiated strontium hexaferrite crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Balwinder Kaur; Monita Bhat; F Licci; Ravi Kumar; K K Bamzai; P N Kotru

    2012-04-01

    High-resolution X-ray diffraction technique, employing a three-crystal monochromator–collimator combination is used to study the irradiation induced defects in flux grown Sr-hexaferrite crystals irradiated with 50 MeV Li3+ ion beams at room temperature with a fluence value of 1 × 1014 ions/cm2. The diffraction curves of the irradiated crystals suggest the possibility of creation of low angle grain boundaries and other point/clusters of defects causing amorphization in the irradiated crystals. The perfection of the irradiated and unirradiated (0001) cleaved surfaces of the crystals is studied using the bulk method of X-ray topography. The topographs supplement the findings suggestive of modifications in the crystalline quality of SrFe12O19 on irradiation with SHI of Li3+. Etching of the (0001) cleaved surfaces in H3PO4 at 120°C suggests that the dissolution characteristics of the surfaces get affected on irradiation with SHI of Li3+, besides supporting the findings of HRXRD and X-ray topography regarding modifications in the perfection of SrFe12O19 on irradiation.

  19. A directly converting high-resolution intra-oral X-ray imaging sensor

    CERN Document Server

    Spartiotis, K; Schulman, T; Puhakka, K; Muukkonen, K

    2003-01-01

    A digital intra-oral X-ray imaging sensor with an active area of 3.6x2.9 cm sup 2 and consisting of six charge-integrating CMOS signal readout circuits bump bonded to one high-resistivity silicon pixel detector has been developed and tested. The pixel size is 35 mu m. The X-rays entering the sensor window are converted directly to electrical charge in the depleted detector material yielding minimum lateral signal spread and maximum image sharpness. The signal charge is collected on the gates of the input field effect transistors of the CMOS signal readout circuits. The analog signal readout is performed by multiplexing in the current mode independent of the signal charge collection enabling multiple readout cycles with negligible dead time and thus imaging with wide dynamic range. Since no intermediate conversion material of X-rays to visible light is needed, the sensor structure is very compact. The analog image signals are guided from the sensor output through a thin cable to signal processing, AD conversio...

  20. Clumpy wind accretion in supergiant neutron star high mass X-ray binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Bozzo, E; Feldmeier, A; Falanga, M

    2016-01-01

    The accretion of the stellar wind material by a compact object represents the main mechanism powering the X-ray emission in classical supergiant high mass X-ray binaries and supergiant fast X-ray transients. In this work we present the first attempt to simulate the accretion process of a fast and dense massive star wind onto a neutron star, taking into account the effects of the centrifugal and magnetic inhibition of accretion ("gating") due to the spin and magnetic field of the compact object. We made use of a radiative hydrodynamical code to model the non-stationary radiatively driven wind of an O-B supergiant star and then place a neutron star characterized by a fixed magnetic field and spin period at a certain distance from the massive companion. Our calculations follow, as a function of time (on a total time scale of several hours), the transition of the system through all different accretion regimes that are triggered by the intrinsic variations in the density and velocity of the non-stationary wind. Th...

  1. Narrow Line X-Ray Calibration Source for High Resolution Microcalorimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hokin, M.S.; McCammon, D.; Morgan, K.M.; Bandler, Simon Richard; Lee, S.J.; Moseley, S.H.; Smith, S.J.

    2013-01-01

    We are developing a narrow line calibration source for use with X-ray microcalorimeters. At energies below 300 electronvolts fluorescent lines are intrinsically broad, making calibration of high resolution detectors difficult. This source consists of a 405 nanometers (3 electronvolts) laser diode coupled to an optical fiber. The diode is pulsed to create approximately one hundred photons in a few microseconds. If the pulses are short compared to the rise time of the detector, they will be detected as single events with a total energy in the soft X-ray range. Poisson fluctuations in photon number per pulse create a comb of X-ray lines with 3 electronvolts spacing, so detectors with energy resolution better than 2 electronvolts are required to resolve the individual lines. Our currently unstabilized diode has a multimode width less than 1 nanometer, giving a 300 electronvolt event a Full width at half maximum (FWHM) less than 0.1 electronvolts. By varying the driving voltage, or pulse width, the source can produce a comb centered on a wide range of energies. The calibration events are produced at precisely known times. This allows continuous calibration of a flight mission without contaminating the observed spectrum and with minimal deadtime.

  2. Medium-sized grazing incidence high-energy X-ray telescopes employing continuously graded multilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joensen, K. D.; Christensen, Finn Erland; Schnopper, H. W.;

    1993-01-01

    The authors present a concept of continuously graded multilayer structures for medium-sized X-ray telescopes which is based on several material combinations. They show that the theoretical reflectivity characteristics of these structures make them very advantageous when applied to high energy X......-ray grazing incidence telescopes. They consider the performance of continuously graded Ni/C multilayers in a multi-focus, Kirkpatrick-Baez, geometry and show a significant improvement when compared to standard coatings of gold. For a total length of 3.3 m, a total aperture of 48 cm by 48 cm and 64 foci......, an effective area of 250 cm2 at 60 keV and a FWHM field of view of 6' is obtained. It is shown that a modular array of conical telescopes (conical approximation to a Wolter-I geometry), with the same length and aperture provides similar effective areas. Energy-dispersive X-ray reflectivity data (15-70 ke...

  3. A compact high-resolution X-ray ion mobility spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinecke, T.; Kirk, A. T.; Heptner, A.; Niebuhr, D.; Böttger, S.; Zimmermann, S. [Department of Sensors and Measurement Technology, Institute of Electrical Engineering and Measurement Technology, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Appelstr. 9A, 30167 Hannover (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    For the ionization of gaseous samples, most ion mobility spectrometers employ radioactive ionization sources, e.g., containing {sup 63}Ni or {sup 3}H. Besides legal restrictions, radioactive materials have the disadvantage of a constant radiation with predetermined intensity. In this work, we replaced the {sup 3}H source of our previously described high-resolution ion mobility spectrometer with 75 mm drift tube length with a commercially available X-ray source. It is shown that the current configuration maintains the resolving power of R = 100 which was reported for the original setup containing a {sup 3}H source. The main advantage of an X-ray source is that the intensity of the radiation can be adjusted by varying its operating parameters, i.e., filament current and acceleration voltage. At the expense of reduced resolving power, the sensitivity of the setup can be increased by increasing the activity of the source. Therefore, the performance of the setup can be adjusted to the specific requirements of any application. To investigate the relation between operating parameters of the X-Ray source and the performance of the ion mobility spectrometer, parametric studies of filament current and acceleration voltage are performed and the influence on resolving power, peak height, and noise is analyzed.

  4. Numerical design of X-ray tabletop Talbot interferometer using polycapillary optics as two-dimensional gratings with high aspect ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Weiyuan; Liu, Zhiguo; Sun, Tianxi; Sun, Xuepeng; Li, Fangzuo; Jiang, Bowen; Ding, Xunliang

    2015-12-01

    The polycapillary optics was proposed to be used as two-dimensional X-ray gratings with high aspect ratios for high energy X-rays. The X-ray Talbot interferometer was designed numerically using the polycapillary X-ray gratings and a conventional X-ray source. The simulation showed that it was available to get a high-aspect-ratio pattern of the polycapillary X-ray gratings for higher energies than 60 keV. Moreover, this design of polycapillary gratings decreased the requirement for high power of the X-ray source. The polycapillary X-ray gratings had potential applications in X-ray imaging technology for medical fields, industrial nondestructive tests, public security, physical science, chemical analysis, life science, nanoscience biology and energy science.

  5. Optical and X-ray observations of the low-mass X-ray binary EXO 0748-676

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Brian; Corbet, Robin; Augusteijn, Thomas; Callanan, Paul; Smale, Alan P.

    1993-01-01

    Optical and X-ray observations of EXO-676 in late March 1989 are presented. Our optical observations provide some support for the previously observed correlation between the mean optical brightness and light curve morphology. Unexpectedly, the mean X-ray and optical flux levels during this period do not reflect similar system states. The optical counterpart is found to be in an intermediate to low state, while X-ray data imply a bright (high) state. The changed relationship between optical and X-ray fluxes is evidence showing that EXO 0748-676 has possibly evolved. We fail to find correlated variability in simultaneous X-ray and optical observations. The lack of covariability is attributed to the limited simultaneous coverage of the source and/or significant geometric modulation in the optical light curve.

  6. A new cell for X-ray absorption spectroscopy study under high pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Li-Rong; CHE Rong-Zheng; LIU Jing; DU Yong-Hua; ZHOU Ying-Li; HU Tian-Dou

    2009-01-01

    X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy is a powerful technique for the investigation of the local environment around selected atoms in condensed matter. XAFS under pressure is an important method for the synchrotron source. We design a cell for a high pressure XAFS experiment. Sintered boron carbide is used as the anvils of this high pressure cell in order to obtain a full XAFS spectrum free from diffraction peaks. In addition, a hydraulic pump was adopted to make in-suit pressure modulation. High quality XAFS spectra of ZrH2 under high pressure (up to 13 Gpa) were obtained by this cell.

  7. Current and Future X-ray Studies of High-Redshift AGNs and the First Supermassive Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Niel

    2016-01-01

    X-ray observations of high-redshift AGNs at z = 4-7 have played a critical role in understanding the physical processes at work inthese objects as well as their basic demographics. Since 2000, Chandra and XMM-Newton have provided new X-ray detections for more than 120 such objects, and well-defined samples of z > 4 AGNs now allow reliable X-ray population studies. Once luminosity effectsare considered, the basic X-ray continuum properties of most high-redshift AGNs appear remarkably similar to those of local AGNs, although there are some notable apparent exceptions (e.g., highly radio-loud quasars). Furthermore, the X-ray absorption found in some objects has been used as a diagnostic of outflowing winds and circumnuclear material. Demographically, the X-ray data now support an exponential decline in the number density of luminous AGNs above z ~ 3, and quantitative space-density comparisons for optically selected and X-ray selected quasars indicate basic statistical agreement.The current X-ray discoveries point the way toward the future breakthroughs that will be possible with, e.g., Athena and the X-raySurveyor. These missions will execute powerful blank-field surveys to elucidate the demographics of the first growing supermassive black holes (SMBHs), including highly obscured systems, up to z ~ 10. They will also carry out complementary X-ray spectroscopic and variability investigations of high-redshift AGNs by targeting the most-luminous z = 7-10 quasars found in wide-field surveys by, e.g., Euclid, LSST, and WFIRST. X-ray spectroscopic and variability studies of the X-ray continuum and reflection signatures will help determine Eddington ratios and disk/corona properties; measuring these will clarify how the first quasars grew so quickly. Furthermore, absorption line/edge studies will reveal how outflows from the first SMBHs influenced the growth of the first galaxies. I will suggest some efficient observational strategies for Athena and the X-ray Surveyor.

  8. High-Resolution Detector for At-Wavelength Metrology of X-Ray Optics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Since the launch of the first X-ray focusing telescope in 1963, the development of grazing incidence X-ray optics has been crucial to the development of the field of...

  9. High Throughput Soft X-Ray Filters with Enhanced IR-Rejection Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To fully realize the advances NASA has made in x-ray microcalorimeter detectors, x-ray filters with enhanced out-of-band performance are needed. Blocking filters are...

  10. High-Resolution Detector for At-Wavelength Metrology of X-Ray Optics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Since the launch of the first X-ray focusing telescope in 1963, the development of grazing incidence X-ray optics has been crucial to the development of the field...

  11. Theoretical Calculations and Simulations of Interaction of X-Rays with High-Z Nanomoities for Use in Cancer Radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sara N.; Pradhan, Anil K.; Nahar, Sultana N.

    2013-06-01

    When used with X-ray radiotherapy, heavy elements (high atomic number Z or HZ) such as gold(Au) and platinum(Pt) have the potential to greatly sensitize and enhance the damage to tumor tissues. While HZ radiosensitization has been shown to be higly effective in reducing tumor sizes, much work still needs to be done to determine the ideal X-ray energy/energy spectrum. The likelihood of photoelectric absorption of X-rays that result in the production of cell-killing Auger electrons relative to the photon scatter in an HZ sensitized tumor has to be determined for treatments using X-rays from various sources and energies to assess their efficacy. In this report, we present computations that outline the dependence of photoelectric absorption on X-ray energy. The relative X-ray absorption by a radiosensitized tumor was calculated to contrast the efficacy of different X-ray sources in Auger electron production at different tumor depths. Enhanced photoabsorption of low-energy X-rays from broadband sources in the keV range is shown to be much higher than from those in the MeV range. In addition, with the use of the Monte Carlo code package Geant4, we present the total X-ray energy deposited into a radiosensitized tumor located at different depths in a phantom. The enhancement in radiation dose deposition will also be analysed at the microscopic cellular level to determine the HZ radiosensitizer concentration required. Potential use of monochromatic X-rays for more precise HZ radiosensitization will also be described.

  12. Radiation effects for high-energy protons and X-ray in integrated circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silveira, M.A.G.; Santos, R.B.B. [Centro Universitario da FEI, Sao Bernardo do Campo, SP (Brazil); Medina, N.H.; Added, N.; Tabacniks, M.H. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IF/USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Lima, J.A. de [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Cirne, K.H. [Empresa Brasileira de Aeronautica S.A. (EMBRAER), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: Electronic circuits are strongly influenced by ionizing radiation. The necessity to develop integrated circuits (IC's) featuring radiation hardness is largely growing to meet the stringent environment in space electronics [1]. This work aims to development a test platform to qualify electronic devices under the influence of high radiation dose, for aerospace applications. To understand the physical phenomena responsible for changes in devices exposed to ionizing radiation several kinds of radiation should then be considered, among them heavy ions, alpha particles, protons, gamma and X-rays. Radiation effects on the ICs are usually divided into three categories: Total Ionizing Dose (TID), a cumulative dose that shifts the threshold voltage and increases transistor's off-state current; Single Events Effects (SEE), a transient effect which can deposit charge directly into the device and disturb the properties of electronic circuits and Displacement Damage (DD) which can change the arrangement of the atoms in the lattice [2]. In this study we are investigating the radiation effects in rectangular-gate and circular-gate MOSFETs, manufactured with standard CMOS fabrication process, using particle beams produced in electrostatic tandem accelerators and X-rays. Initial tests for TID effects were performed using the 1.7 MV 5SDH tandem Pelletron accelerator of the Instituto de Fisica da USP with a proton beam of 2.6 MeV. The devices were exposed to different doses, varying the beam current, and irradiation time with the accumulated dose reaching up to Grad. To study the effect of X-rays on the electronic devices, an XRD-7000 (Shimadzu) X-ray setup was used as a primary X-ray source. The devices were irradiated with a total dose from krad to Grad using different dose rates. The results indicate that changes of the I-V characteristic curve are strongly dependents on the geometry of the devices. [1] Duzellier, S., Aerospace Science and Technology 9, p. 93

  13. High intensity compact Compton X-ray sources: Challenges and potential of applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacquet, M., E-mail: mjacquet@lal.in2p3.fr

    2014-07-15

    Thanks to the exceptional development of high power femtosecond lasers in the last 15 years, Compton based X-ray sources are in full development over the world in the recent years. Compact Compton sources are able to combine the compactness of the instrument with a beam of high intensity, high quality, tunable in energy. In various fields of applications such as biomedical science, cultural heritage preservation and material science researches, these sources should provide an easy working environment and the methods currently used at synchrotrons could be largely developed in a lab-size environment as hospitals, labs, or museums.

  14. High resolution x-ray and gamma ray imaging using diffraction lenses with mechanically bent crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smither, Robert K.

    2008-12-23

    A method for high spatial resolution imaging of a plurality of sources of x-ray and gamma-ray radiation is provided. High quality mechanically bent diffracting crystals of 0.1 mm radial width are used for focusing the radiation and directing the radiation to an array of detectors which is used for analyzing their addition to collect data as to the location of the source of radiation. A computer is used for converting the data to an image. The invention also provides for the use of a multi-component high resolution detector array and for narrow source and detector apertures.

  15. Experimental study of lower mantle materials by high pressure in situ x-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yagi, Takehiko [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Inst. for Solid State Physics

    1999-10-01

    A new experimental system was constructed to make high pressure and temperature in situ X-ray diffraction study under lower mantle conditions. Behavior of silicates and oxides were studied using the new system, which consists of laser-heated diamond anvil cell combined with synchrotron radiation. It became clear that the behavior of garnet is very complicated and the high pressure phase(s) varices depending on the pressure, temperature, and compositions. Several new unquenchable high pressure phases were found through the present study. (author)

  16. Phase-contrast imaging of a soft biological object using X-pinch as X-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, R.; Wang, X. X.; Zou, X. B.; Zeng, N. G.; He, L. Y.

    2008-07-01

    The X-ray emission from an X-pinch was measured with diamond photoconducting detectors and a pinhole camera, and the results show that the X-ray source of the X-pinch is extremely small in size and high in brightness. As such, the X-pinch could be considered as an X-ray point source having a high spatial coherence that is required by a simplified scheme of X-ray phase-contrast imaging. The X-pinch was used as X-ray source for the phase-contrast imaging of a weakly X-ray-absorbing mosquito and an image with high contrast was obtained.

  17. X-ray resonant photoexcitation: line widths and energies of K{\\alpha} transitions in highly charged Fe ions

    CERN Document Server

    Rudolph, J K; Epp, S W; Steinbrügge, R; Beilmann, C; Brown, G V; Eberle, S; Graf, A; Harman, Z; Hell, N; Leutenegger, M; Müller, A; Schlage, K; Wille, H -C; Yavas, H; Ullrich, J; López-Urrutia, J R Crespo

    2013-01-01

    Photoabsorption by and fluorescence of the K{\\alpha} transitions in highly charged iron ions are essential mechanisms for X-ray radiation transfer in astrophysical environments. We study photoabsorption due to the main K{\\alpha} transitions in highly charged iron ions from heliumlike to fluorinelike (Fe 24+...17+) using monochromatic X-rays around 6.6 keV at the PETRA III synchrotron photon source. Natural linewidths were determined with hitherto unattained accuracy. The observed transitions are of particular interest for the understanding of photoexcited plasmas found in X-ray binaries and active galactic nuclei.

  18. Single shot diffraction of picosecond 8.7-keV x-ray pulses

    OpenAIRE

    F. H. O’Shea; O. Williams; Andonian, G.; Barber, S; Sakai, Y.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Pogorelsky, I.; Fedurin, M.; K. Kusche; Yakimenko, V.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate multiphoton, single shot diffraction images of x rays produced by inverse Compton scattering a high-power CO_{2} laser from a relativistic electron beam, creating a pulse of 8.7 keV x rays. The tightly focused, relatively high peak brightness electron beam and high photon density from the 2 J CO_{2} laser yielded 6×10^{7} x-ray photons over the full opening angle in a single shot. Single shot x-ray diffraction is performed by passing the x rays though a vertical slit and on to ...

  19. A high-transparency, micro-patternable chip for X-ray diffraction analysis of microcrystals under native growth conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, Thomas D. [University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Lyubimov, Artem Y. [Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Ogata, Craig M. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Vo, Huy [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin; Brunger, Axel T., E-mail: brunger@stanford.edu [Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Berger, James M., E-mail: brunger@stanford.edu [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2015-09-26

    A highly X-ray-transparent, silicon nitride-based device has been designed and fabricated to harvest protein microcrystals for high-resolution X-ray diffraction data collection using microfocus beamlines and XFELs. Microcrystals present a significant impediment to the determination of macromolecular structures by X-ray diffraction methods. Although microfocus synchrotron beamlines and X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) can enable the collection of interpretable diffraction data from microcrystals, there is a need for efficient methods of harvesting small volumes (<2 µl) of microcrystals grown under common laboratory formats and delivering them to an X-ray beam source under native growth conditions. One approach that shows promise in overcoming the challenges intrinsic to microcrystal analysis is to pair so-called ‘fixed-target’ sample-delivery devices with microbeam-based X-ray diffraction methods. However, to record weak diffraction patterns it is necessary to fabricate devices from X-ray-transparent materials that minimize background scattering. Presented here is the design of a new micro-diffraction device consisting of three layers fabricated from silicon nitride, photoresist and polyimide film. The chip features low X-ray scattering and X-ray absorption properties, and uses a customizable blend of hydrophobic and hydrophilic surface patterns to help localize microcrystals to defined regions. Microcrystals in their native growth conditions can be loaded into the chips with a standard pipette, allowing data collection at room temperature. Diffraction data collected from hen egg-white lysozyme microcrystals (10–15 µm) loaded into the chips yielded a complete, high-resolution (<1.6 Å) data set sufficient to determine a high-quality structure by molecular replacement. The features of the chip allow the rapid and user-friendly analysis of microcrystals grown under virtually any laboratory format at microfocus synchrotron beamlines and XFELs.

  20. Alternative Optimizations of X-ray TES Arrays: Soft X-rays, High Count Rates, and Mixed-Pixel Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbourne, C. A.; Bandler, S. R.; Brown, A.-D.; Chervenak, J. A.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Iyomoto, N.; Kelley, R. L.; Porter, F. S.; Smith, S. J.

    2007-01-01

    We are developing arrays of superconducting transition-edge sensors (TES) for imaging spectroscopy telescopes such as the XMS on Constellation-X. While our primary focus has been on arrays that meet the XMS requirements (of which, foremost, is an energy resolution of 2.5 eV at 6 keV and a bandpass from approx. 0.3 keV to 12 keV), we have also investigated other optimizations that might be used to extend the XMS capabilities. In one of these optimizations, improved resolution below 1 keV is achieved by reducing the heat capacity. Such pixels can be based on our XMS-style TES's with the separate absorbers omitted. These pixels can added to an array with broadband response either as a separate array or interspersed, depending on other factors that include telescope design and science requirements. In one version of this approach, we have designed and fabricated a composite array of low-energy and broad-band pixels to provide high spectral resolving power over a broader energy bandpass than could be obtained with a single TES design. The array consists of alternating pixels with and without overhanging absorbers. To explore optimizations for higher count rates, we are also optimizing the design and operating temperature of pixels that are coupled to a solid substrate. We will present the performance of these variations and discuss other optimizations that could be used to enhance the XMS or enable other astrophysics experiments.