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Sample records for highly active carbon

  1. High activity carbon sorbents for mercury capture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stavropoulos George G.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available High efficiency activated carbons have been prepared for removing mercury from gas streams. Starting materials used were petroleum coke, lignite, charcoal and olive seed waste, and were chemically activated with KOH. Produced adsorbents were primarily characterized for their porosity by N2 adsorption at 77 K. Their mercury retention capacity was characterized based on the breakthrough curves. Compared with typical commercial carbons, they have exhibited considerably enhanced mercury adsorption capacity. An attempt has been made to correlate mercury entrapment and pore structure. It has been shown that physical surface area is increased during activation in contrast to the mercury adsorption capacity that initially increases and tends to decrease at latter stages. Desorption of active sites may be responsible for this behavior.

  2. High hydrogen storage capacity of porous carbons prepared by using activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huanlei; Gao, Qiuming; Hu, Juan

    2009-05-27

    A kind of activated carbon with further carbon dioxide and potassium hydroxide activations for hydrogen storage was investigated. The carbon dioxide and potassium hydroxide activations have apparently different effects on the pore structures and textures of the activated carbon which closely associated with the hydrogen storage properties. The potassium hydroxide activation can remarkably donate microporosity to the frameworks of the activated carbon. One of the resultant porous carbons exhibited a high surface area of up to 3190 m(2) g(-1) and large gravimetric hydrogen uptake capacity of 7.08 wt % at 77 K and 20 bar, which is one of the largest data reported for the porous carbon materials. This result suggests that the porous carbon with large amounts of active sites, high surface area, and high micropore volume related to optimum pore size could achieve high gravimetric hydrogen storage.

  3. Highly porous activated carbons prepared from carbon rich Mongolian anthracite by direct NaOH activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byamba-Ochir, Narandalai [School of Chemical Engineering, Chonnam National University, 77 Yongbong-Ro, Gwangju 61186 (Korea, Republic of); Shim, Wang Geun [Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, Sunchon National University, 255 Jungang-Ro, Suncheon, Jeollanam-Do 57922 (Korea, Republic of); Balathanigaimani, M.S., E-mail: msbala@rgipt.ac.in [Department of Chemical Engineering, Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Petroleum Technology, Ratapur Chowk, Rae Bareli, 229316 Uttar Pradesh (India); Moon, Hee, E-mail: hmoon@jnu.ac.kr [School of Chemical Engineering, Chonnam National University, 77 Yongbong-Ro, Gwangju 61186 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-30

    Highlights: • Highly porous carbon materials from Mongolian anthracite by chemical activation. • Cheaper and eco-friendly activation process has been employed. • Activated carbons with graphitic structure and energetically heterogeneous surface. • Surface hydrophobicity and porosity of the activated carbons can be controlled. - Abstract: Highly porous activated carbons (ACs) were prepared from Mongolian raw anthracite (MRA) using sodium hydroxide as an activation agent by varying the mass ratio (powdered MRA/NaOH) as well as the mixing method of chemical agent and powdered MRA. The specific BET surface area and total pore volume of the prepared MRA-based activated carbons (MACs) are in the range of 816–2063 m{sup 2}/g and of 0.55–1.61 cm{sup 3}/g, respectively. The pore size distribution of MACs show that most of the pores are in the range from large micropores to small mesopores and their distribution can be controlled by the mass ratio and mixing method of the activating agent. As expected from the intrinsic property of the MRA, the highly graphitic surface morphology of prepared carbons was confirmed from Raman spectra and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies. Furthermore the FTIR and XPS results reveal that the preparation of MACs with hydrophobic in nature is highly possible by controlling the mixing conditions of activating agent and powdered MRA. Based on all the results, it is suggested that the prepared MACs could be used for many specific applications, requiring high surface area, optimal pore size distribution, proper surface hydrophobicity as well as strong physical strength.

  4. Highly porous activated carbons prepared from carbon rich Mongolian anthracite by direct NaOH activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byamba-Ochir, Narandalai; Shim, Wang Geun; Balathanigaimani, M. S.; Moon, Hee

    2016-08-01

    Highly porous activated carbons (ACs) were prepared from Mongolian raw anthracite (MRA) using sodium hydroxide as an activation agent by varying the mass ratio (powdered MRA/NaOH) as well as the mixing method of chemical agent and powdered MRA. The specific BET surface area and total pore volume of the prepared MRA-based activated carbons (MACs) are in the range of 816-2063 m2/g and of 0.55-1.61 cm3/g, respectively. The pore size distribution of MACs show that most of the pores are in the range from large micropores to small mesopores and their distribution can be controlled by the mass ratio and mixing method of the activating agent. As expected from the intrinsic property of the MRA, the highly graphitic surface morphology of prepared carbons was confirmed from Raman spectra and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies. Furthermore the FTIR and XPS results reveal that the preparation of MACs with hydrophobic in nature is highly possible by controlling the mixing conditions of activating agent and powdered MRA. Based on all the results, it is suggested that the prepared MACs could be used for many specific applications, requiring high surface area, optimal pore size distribution, proper surface hydrophobicity as well as strong physical strength.

  5. Design of Low Cost, Highly Adsorbent Activated Carbon Fibers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mangun, Christian

    2003-01-01

    .... EKOS has developed a novel activated carbon fiber - (ACF) that combines the low cost and durability of GAC with tailored pore size and pore surface chemistry for improved defense against chemical agents...

  6. Highly porous activated carbons from resource-recovered Leucaena leucocephala wood as capacitive deionization electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Chia-Hung; Liu, Nei-Ling; Hsi, Hsing-Cheng

    2015-12-01

    Highly porous activated carbons were resource-recovered from Leucaena leucocephala (Lam.) de Wit. wood through combined chemical and physical activation (i.e., KOH etching followed by CO2 activation). This invasive species, which has severely damaged the ecological economics of Taiwan, was used as the precursor for producing high-quality carbonaceous electrodes for capacitive deionization (CDI). Carbonization and activation conditions strongly influenced the structure of chars and activated carbons. The total surface area and pore volume of activated carbons increased with increasing KOH/char ratio and activation time. Overgasification induced a substantial amount of mesopores in the activated carbons. In addition, the electrochemical properties and CDI electrosorptive performance of the activated carbons were evaluated; cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge/discharge measurements revealed a typical capacitive behavior and electrical double layer formation, confirming ion electrosorption in the porous structure. The activated-carbon electrode, which possessed high surface area and both mesopores and micropores, exhibited improved capacitor characteristics and high electrosorptive performance. Highly porous activated carbons derived from waste L. leucocephala were demonstrated to be suitable CDI electrode materials. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Activated carbon fibers with a high heteroatom content by chemical activation of PBO with phosphoric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Santos, M B; Suárez-García, F; Martínez-Alonso, A; Tascón, J M D

    2012-04-03

    The preparation of activated carbon fibers (ACFs) by phosphoric acid activation of poly(p-phenylene benzobisoxazole) (PBO) fibers was studied, with particular attention to the effects of impregnation ratio and carbonization temperature on porous texture. Phosphoric acid has a strong effect on PBO degradation, lowering the temperature range at which the decomposition takes place and changing the number of mass loss steps. Chemical analysis results indicated that activation with phosphoric acid increases the concentration of oxygenated surface groups; the resulting materials also exhibiting high nitrogen content. ACFs are obtained with extremely high yields; they have well-developed porosity restricted to the micropore and narrow mesopore range and with a significant concentration of phosphorus incorporated homogeneously in the form of functional groups. An increase in the impregnation ratio leads to increases in both pore volume and pore size, maximum values of surface area (1250 m(2)/g) and total pore volume (0.67 cm(3)/g) being attained at the highest impregnation ratio (210 wt % H(3)PO(4)) and lowest activation temperature (650 °C) used; the corresponding yield was as large as 83 wt %. The obtained surface areas and pore volumes were higher than those achieved in previous works by physical activation with CO(2) of PBO chars.

  8. Activated carbon derived from chitosan as air cathode catalyst for high performance in microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Zhao, Yong; Li, Kexun; Wang, Zhong; Tian, Pei; Liu, Di; Yang, Tingting; Wang, Junjie

    2018-02-01

    Chitosan with rich of nitrogen is used as carbon precursor to synthesis activated carbon through directly heating method in this study. The obtained carbon is activated by different amount of KOH at different temperatures, and then prepared as air cathodes for microbial fuel cells. Carbon sample treated with double amount of KOH at 850 °C exhibits maximum power density (1435 ± 46 mW m-2), 1.01 times improved, which ascribes to the highest total surface area, moderate micropore and mesoporous structure and the introduction of nitrogen. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and powder resistivity state that carbon treated with double amount of KOH at 850 °C possesses lower resistance. The other electrochemical measurements demonstrate that the best kinetic activity make the above treated sample to show the best oxygen reduction reaction activity. Besides, the degree of graphitization of samples increases with the activated temperature increasing, which is tested by Raman. According to elemental analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, all chitosan samples are nitrogen-doped carbon, and high content nitrogen (pyridinic-N) improves the electrochemical activity of carbon treated with KOH at 850 °C. Thus, carbon materials derived from chitosan would be an optimized catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction in microbial fuel cell.

  9. Nanoporous Activated Carbon Derived from Rice Husk for High Performance Supercapacitor

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    Huaxing Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoporous activated carbon material was produced from the waste rice husks (RHs by precarbonizing RHs and activating with KOH. The morphology, structure, and specific surface area were investigated. The nanoporous carbon has the average pore size of 2.2 nm and high specific area of 2523.4 m2 g−1. The specific capacitance of the nanoporous carbon is calculated to be 250 F g−1 at the current density of 1 A g−1 and remains 80% for 198 F g−1 at the current density of 20 A g−1. The nanoporous carbon electrode exhibits long-term cycle life and could keep stable capacitance till 10,000 cycles. The consistently high specific capacitance, rate capacity, and long-term cycle life ability makes it a potential candidate as electrode material for supercapacitor.

  10. Activated Carbon Fiber Paper Based Electrodes with High Electrocatalytic Activity for Vanadium Flow Batteries with Improved Power Density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tao; Li, Xianfeng; Xu, Chi; Zhang, Huamin

    2017-02-08

    Vanadium flow batteries (VFBs) have received high attention for large-scale energy storage due to their advantages of flexibility design, long cycle life, high efficiency, and high safety. However, commercial progress of VFBs has so far been limited by its high cost induced by its low power density. Ultrathin carbon paper is believed to be a very promising electrode for VFB because it illustrates super-low ohmic polarization, however, is limited by its low electrocatalytic activity. In this paper, a kind of carbon paper (CP) with super-high electrocatalytic activity was fabricated via a universal and simple CO2 activation method. The porosity and oxygen functional groups can be easily tuned via this method. The charge transfer resistance (denoting the electrochemical polarization) of a VFB with CP electrode after CO2 activation decreased dramatically from 970 to 120 mΩcm2. Accordingly, the energy efficiency of a VFB with activated carbon paper as the electrode increased by 13% as compared to one without activation and reaches nearly 80% when the current density is 140 mAcm-2. This paper provides an effective way to prepare high-performance porous carbon electrodes for VFBs and even for other battery systems.

  11. Low powdered activated carbon concentrations to improve MBR sludge filterability at high salinity and low temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Remy, M.J.J.; Temmink, B.G.; Brink, van den P.; Rulkens, W.H.

    2011-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that powdered activated carbon (PAC), when applied at very low dosages and long SRTs, reduces membrane fouling in membrane bioreactor (MBRs). This effect was related to stronger flocs which are less sensitive to shear. Low temperature and high salt concentration

  12. Tyrosine nitration provokes inhibition of sunflower carbonic anhydrase (β-CA) activity under high temperature stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaki, Mounira; Carreras, Alfonso; López-Jaramillo, Javier; Begara-Morales, Juan C; Sánchez-Calvo, Beatriz; Valderrama, Raquel; Corpas, Francisco J; Barroso, Juan B

    2013-02-28

    Protein tyrosine nitration is a post-translational modification (PTM) mediated by reactive nitrogen species (RNS) and it is a new area of research in higher plants. Previously, it was demonstrated that the exposition of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) seedlings to high temperature (HT) caused both oxidative and nitrosative stress. The nitroproteome analysis under this stress condition showed the induction of 13 tyrosine-nitrated proteins being the carbonic anhydrase (CA) one of these proteins. The analysis of CA activity under high temperature showed that this stress inhibited the CA activity by a 43%. To evaluate the effect of nitration on the CA activity in sunflower it was used 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1) (peroxynitrite donor) as the nitrating agent. Thus the CA activity was inhibited by 41%. In silico analysis of the pea CA protein sequence suggests that Tyr(205) is the most likely potential target for nitration. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Preparation, Surface and Pore Structure of High Surface Area Activated Carbon Fibers from Bamboo by Steam Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojun Ma

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available High surface area activated carbon fibers (ACF have been prepared from bamboo by steam activation after liquefaction and curing. The influences of activation temperature on the microstructure, surface area and porosity were investigated. The results showed that ACF from bamboo at 850 °C have the maximum iodine and methylene blue adsorption values. Aside from the graphitic carbon, phenolic and carbonyl groups were the predominant functions on the surface of activated carbon fiber from bamboo. The prepared ACF from bamboo were found to be mainly type I of isotherm, but the mesoporosity presented an increasing trend after 700 °C. The surface area and micropore volume of samples, which were determined by application of the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET and t-plot methods, were as high as 2024 m2/g and 0.569 cm3/g, respectively. It was also found that the higher activation temperature produced the more ordered microcrystalline structure of ACF from bamboo.

  14. Cobalt-doped graphitic carbon nitride photocatalysts with high activity for hydrogen evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Pei-Wen; Li, Kui; Yu, Yu-Xiang; Zhang, Wei-De, E-mail: zhangwd@scut.edu.cn

    2017-01-15

    Graphical abstract: Cobalt-doped graphitic carbon nitride (Co−CN) was synthesized by one-step thermal polycondensation using cobalt phthalocyanine and melamine as precursors. The obtained photocatalysts display high and stable activity for photocatalytic generation of hydrogen through water splitting. - Highlights: • Cobalt-doped g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} photocatalysts were prepared. • High and stable visible light photocatalytic activity for H{sub 2} evolution. • Efficient separation and transfer of photo-induced electron-hole pairs. - Abstract: Cobalt-doped graphitic carbon nitride (Co−CN) was synthesized by one-step thermal polycondensation using cobalt phthalocyanine (CoPc) and melamine as precursors. The π-π interaction between melamine and CoPc promotes cobalt doping into the framework of g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}. The prepared samples were carefully characterized and the results demonstrated that Co-doped graphitic carbon nitride inhibited the crystal growth of graphitic carbon nitride (CN), leading to larger specific surface area (33.1 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}) and abundant Co-N{sub x} active sites, narrower band gap energy and more efficient separation of photogenerated electrons and holes. 0.46% Co−CN exhibited higher hydrogen evolution rate (28.0 μmol h{sup −1}) under visible light irradiation, which is about 3.0 times of that over the pure CN and about 2.2 times of that over cobalt-doped CN using CoCl{sub 2} ∙ 6H{sub 2}O as a cobalt source. This study provides a valuable strategy to modify CN with enhanced photocatalytic performance.

  15. Highly active carbon supported Pd cathode catalysts for direct formic acid fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikolajczuk-Zychora, A., E-mail: amikolajczuk@ichf.edu.pl [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kasprzaka 44/52, 01-224 Warsaw (Poland); Borodzinski, A.; Kedzierzawski, P.; Mierzwa, B. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kasprzaka 44/52, 01-224 Warsaw (Poland); Mazurkiewicz-Pawlicka, M. [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Wołoska 141, 02-507 Warsaw (Poland); Faculty of Chemical and Process Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Warynskiego 1, Warsaw (Poland); Stobinski, L. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kasprzaka 44/52, 01-224 Warsaw (Poland); Faculty of Chemical and Process Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Warynskiego 1, Warsaw (Poland); Ciecierska, E. [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Wołoska 141, 02-507 Warsaw (Poland); Zimoch, A.; Opałło, M. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kasprzaka 44/52, 01-224 Warsaw (Poland)

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • Palladium catalyst used on the cathode DFAFC is comparable to commercial platinum catalyst. • The treatment of carbon supports in nitric acid(V) increases the electrochemically available metal surface area and the catalytic activity in oxygen reduction reaction of catalysts. - Abstract: One of the drawbacks of low-temperature fuel cells is high price of platinum-based catalysts used for the electroreduction of oxygen at the cathode of the fuel cell. The aim of this work is to develop the palladium catalyst that will replace commonly used platinum cathode catalysts. A series of palladium catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) were prepared and tested on the cathode of Direct Formic Acid Fuel Cell (DFAFC). Palladium nanoparticles were deposited on the carbon black (Vulcan) and on multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) surface by reduction of palladium(II) acetate dissolved in ethanol. Hydrazine was used as a reducing agent. The effect of functionalization of the carbon supports on the catalysts physicochemical properties and the ORR catalytic activity on the cathode of DFAFC was studied. The supports were functionalized by treatment in nitric acid for 4 h at 80 °C. The structure of the prepared catalysts has been characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). Hydrophilicity of the catalytic layers was determined by measuring contact angles of water droplets. The performance of the prepared catalysts has been compared with that of the commercial 20 wt.% Pt/C (Premetek) catalyst. The maximum power density obtained for the best palladium catalyst, deposited on the surface of functionalized carbon black, is the same as that for the commercial Pt/C (Premetek). Palladium is cheaper than platinum, therefore the developed cathode catalyst is promising for future applications.

  16. High energy density supercapacitors from lignin derived submicron activated carbon fibers in aqueous electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Sixiao; Zhang, Sanliang; Pan, Ning; Hsieh, You-Lo

    2014-12-01

    Highly porous submicron activated carbon fibers (ACFs) were robustly generated from low sulfonated alkali lignin and fabricated into supercapacitors for capacitive energy storage. The hydrophilic and high specific surface ACFs exhibited large-size nanographites and good electrical conductivity to demonstrate outstanding electrochemical performance. ACFs from KOH activation, in particular, showed very high 344 F g-1 specific capacitance at low 1.8 mg cm-2 mass loading and 10 mV s-1 scan rate in aqueous electrolytes. Even at relatively high scan rate of 50 mV s-1 and mass loading of 10 mg cm-2, a decent specific capacitance of 196 F g-1 and a remarkable areal capacitance of 0.55 F cm-2 was obtained, leading to high energy density of 8.1 Wh kg-1 based on averaged electrodes mass. Furthermore, over 96% capacitance retention rates were achieved after 5000 charge/discharge cycles. Such excellent performance demonstrated great potential of lignin derived carbons for electrical energy storage.

  17. Highly active carbon supported Pd cathode catalysts for direct formic acid fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikolajczuk-Zychora, A.; Borodzinski, A.; Kedzierzawski, P.; Mierzwa, B.; Mazurkiewicz-Pawlicka, M.; Stobinski, L.; Ciecierska, E.; Zimoch, A.; Opałło, M.

    2016-12-01

    One of the drawbacks of low-temperature fuel cells is high price of platinum-based catalysts used for the electroreduction of oxygen at the cathode of the fuel cell. The aim of this work is to develop the palladium catalyst that will replace commonly used platinum cathode catalysts. A series of palladium catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) were prepared and tested on the cathode of Direct Formic Acid Fuel Cell (DFAFC). Palladium nanoparticles were deposited on the carbon black (Vulcan) and on multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) surface by reduction of palladium(II) acetate dissolved in ethanol. Hydrazine was used as a reducing agent. The effect of functionalization of the carbon supports on the catalysts physicochemical properties and the ORR catalytic activity on the cathode of DFAFC was studied. The supports were functionalized by treatment in nitric acid for 4 h at 80 °C. The structure of the prepared catalysts has been characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). Hydrophilicity of the catalytic layers was determined by measuring contact angles of water droplets. The performance of the prepared catalysts has been compared with that of the commercial 20 wt.% Pt/C (Premetek) catalyst. The maximum power density obtained for the best palladium catalyst, deposited on the surface of functionalized carbon black, is the same as that for the commercial Pt/C (Premetek). Palladium is cheaper than platinum, therefore the developed cathode catalyst is promising for future applications.

  18. Flute type micropores activated carbon from cotton stalk for high performance supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xun; Ma, Hongru; Li, Zhe; Yan, Shaocun; Ma, Lei; Yu, Feng; Wang, Gang; Guo, Xuhong; Ma, Yanqing; Wong, Chingping

    2017-08-01

    Flute type micropores activated carbon (FTMAC) has been successfully obtained from cotton stalk via KOH-chemical activation method. The synthesized carbon material exhibits an ordered pore structure with high specific surface area of 1964.46 m2 g-1 and pore volume of 1.03 m3 g-1. The assembled FTMAC-based electrode delivers a high specific capacitance of 254 F g-1 at a current density of 0.2 A g-1 in 1 M H2SO4 aqueous electrolyte. It still can maintain 221 F g-1at a current density of 10 A g-1, demonstrating a good rate capacity (87% retention), as well as long cyclic stability of 96% capacitance retention after 10000 charging and discharging cycles at current density of 1 A g-1. Moreover, the symmetric supercapacitor can deliver a high energy density of 18.14 W h kg-1 and a power density of 450.37 W kg-1 which is operated in the voltage range of 0-1.8 V.

  19. Preparation of Nano-Porous Activated Carbon Aerogel Using a Single-Step Activation Method for Use as High-Power EDLC Electrode in Organic Electrolyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Soon Hyung; Kim, Bum-Soo; Kim, Sang-Gil; Lee, Byung-Jun; Kim, Myung-Soo; Jung, Ji Chul

    2016-05-01

    Carbon aerogel was chemically activated with KOH using two different activation methods (conventional activation method and single-step activation method) to yield the nano-porous activated carbon aerogel. Both nano-porous activated carbon aerogels exhibited a better capacitive behavior than carbon aerogel in organic electrolyte. However, a drastic decrease in the specific capacitance with increasing current density was observed in the ACA_C (activated carbon aerogel prepared by a conventional activation method), which is a general tendency of carbon electrode for EDLC in organic electrolyte. Interestingly, the specific capacitance of ACA_S electrode (activated carbon aerogel prepared by a single-step activation method) decreased slowly with increasing current density and its CV curve maintained a rectangular shape well even at a high scan rate of 500 mV/s. The enhanced electrochemical performance of ACA_S at a high current density was attributed to its low ionic resistance caused by the well-developed pore structure with appropriate pore size for easy moving of organic electrolyte ion. Therefore, it can be concluded that single-step activation method could be one of the efficient methods for preparation of nano-porous activated carbon aerogel electrode for high-power EDLC in organic electrolyte.

  20. Hierarchically porous carbons with optimized nitrogen doping as highly active electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hai-Wei; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Brüller, Sebastian; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus

    2014-09-01

    Development of efficient, low-cost and stable electrocatalysts as the alternative to platinum for the oxygen reduction reaction is of significance for many important electrochemical devices, such as fuel cells, metal-air batteries and chlor-alkali electrolysers. Here we report a highly active nitrogen-doped, carbon-based, metal-free oxygen reduction reaction electrocatalyst, prepared by a hard-templating synthesis, for which nitrogen-enriched aromatic polymers and colloidal silica are used as precursor and template, respectively, followed by ammonia activation. Our protocol allows for the simultaneous optimization of both porous structures and surface functionalities of nitrogen-doped carbons. Accordingly, the prepared catalysts show the highest oxygen reduction reaction activity (half-wave potential of 0.85 V versus reversible hydrogen electrode with a low loading of 0.1 mg cm-2) in alkaline media among all reported metal-free catalysts. Significantly, when used for constructing the air electrode of zinc-air battery, our metal-free catalyst outperforms the state-of the-art platinum-based catalyst.

  1. Design of Low Cost, Highly Adsorbent Activated Carbon Fibers for Air/Water Purification

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mangun, Christian

    1999-01-01

    .... proposes a novel activated carbon fiber (ACF) that will combine the low cost and durability of GAC with tailored pore size and pore surface chemistry for improved defense against chemical weapons...

  2. Preparation and Adsorption Performances of Phragmites australis Activated Carbon with High Acidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FU Cheng-kai

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available For removal of heavy metals from wastewater and recycling the wetland plants, the present study investigated the viability of using silage of Phragmites australis (PA to prepare activated carbons (ACs with high acidity. BET surface area, porous texture and surface functional characteristics of ACs were analyzed by N2 adsorption/desorption, elemental analysis and Boehm titration method. ACs presented well-developed micro-porosity and favorable surface acidity. The sorption equilibrium data for Ni (Ⅱ and Cd (Ⅱ sorption onto ACs were analyzed by the Langmuir and Freundlich models. The Langmuir model was fitted well to the adsorption behavior. The properties of high surface acidity promoted the adsorption of heavy metals by the silage-treated ACs and the chemical sorption played the key role in the sorption process.

  3. Characterization and use of high surface area activated carbons prepared from cane pith for liquid-phase adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tseng, R.-L. [Graduate Institute of Environmental Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taiwan (China) and Department of Safety, Health and Environmental Engineering, National United University, Miao-Li 360, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: trl@nuu.edu.tw; Tseng, S.-K. [Graduate Institute of Environmental Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taiwan (China)

    2006-08-25

    Carbonaceous adsorbents with controllable surface areas were chemically activated with KOH at 780 deg. C from char that had been carbonized from cane pith at 450 deg. C. The pore properties including the BET surface area, pore volume, pore size distribution, and mean pore diameter of these activated carbons were characterized and derived using the t-plot method based on N{sub 2} adsorption isotherms. The activated cane pith carbons, with KOH/char ratios of 2-6, exhibited BET surface areas ranging from 912 to 2299 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}. The scanning electron microscopic (SEM) observations revealed that the surface morphology of honeycombed holes on all activated cane pith carbons was significantly influenced by the KOH/char ratio. The adsorption kinetics and equilibrium isotherms of acid blue 74, methylene blue, basic brown 1, p-nitrophenol, p-chlorophenol, p-cresol, and phenol from water at 30 deg. C on the activated carbons were studied. The adsorption kinetics were suitably described by a simplified kinetic model, the Elovich equation. All adsorption equilibrium isotherms were in agreement with the Langmuir equation, and were used to compare the covered area (S {sub c}/S {sub p}) of the activated carbons at different KOH/char ratios. The high-surface-area activated carbons were proven to be promising adsorbents for pollution control and for other applications.

  4. Near-infrared light controlled photocatalytic activity of carbon quantum dots for highly selective oxidation reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haitao; Liu, Ruihua; Lian, Suoyuan; Liu, Yang; Huang, Hui; Kang, Zhenhui

    2013-03-01

    Selective oxidation of alcohols is a fundamental and significant transformation for the large-scale production of fine chemicals, UV and visible light driven photocatalytic systems for alcohol oxidation have been developed, however, the long wavelength near infrared (NIR) and infrared (IR) light have not yet fully utilized by the present photocatalytic systems. Herein, we reported carbon quantum dots (CQDs) can function as an effective near infrared (NIR) light driven photocatalyst for the selective oxidation of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde. Based on the NIR light driven photo-induced electron transfer property and its photocatalytic activity for H2O2 decomposition, this metal-free catalyst could realize the transformation from benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde with high selectivity (100%) and conversion (92%) under NIR light irradiation. HO&z.rad; is the main active oxygen specie in benzyl alcohol selective oxidative reaction confirmed by terephthalic acid photoluminescence probing assay (TA-PL), selecting toluene as the substrate. Such metal-free photocatalytic system also selectively converts other alcohol substrates to their corresponding aldehydes with high conversion, demonstrating a potential application of accessing traditional alcohol oxidation chemistry.Selective oxidation of alcohols is a fundamental and significant transformation for the large-scale production of fine chemicals, UV and visible light driven photocatalytic systems for alcohol oxidation have been developed, however, the long wavelength near infrared (NIR) and infrared (IR) light have not yet fully utilized by the present photocatalytic systems. Herein, we reported carbon quantum dots (CQDs) can function as an effective near infrared (NIR) light driven photocatalyst for the selective oxidation of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde. Based on the NIR light driven photo-induced electron transfer property and its photocatalytic activity for H2O2 decomposition, this metal-free catalyst could realize

  5. A high voltage supercapacitor based on ionic liquid with an activated carbon electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilathottathil, Shabeeba; Thasneema, K. K.; Shahin Thayyil, Mohamed; Pillai, M. P.; Niveditha, C. V.

    2017-07-01

    A symmetric supercapacitor with porous activated carbon as the active material and trihexyl (tetradecyl) phosphonium bis (trifluoromethanesulfonyl) imide [PC6C6C6C14][Tf2N] as the electrolyte was fabricated. Scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, x-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and a zeta particle size analysis were conducted to examine the surface morphology and other physical properties. Differential scanning calorimetry and a thermal gravimetric analysis were performed to study the thermal stability of the ionic liquid based electrolyte. The binary mixture route was taken with acetonitrile and ionic liquid for reducing the viscosity to enhance the ionic mobility. Cyclic voltammetry, impedance spectroscopy and charge-discharge investigations were conducted to assess the performance of the supercapacitor. A very high specific capacitance of 300 F g-1, an ultra high energy density of 110 Wh kg-1, a high rate scalability (up to 1000 cycles) and an increased operation voltage of 3.5 V were achieved to propose this electrode electrolyte combination as a potential candidate for future ionic liquid based supercapacitor.

  6. Ultrahigh gas storage both at low and high pressures in KOH-activated carbonized porous aromatic frameworks.

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yanqiang

    2013-01-01

    The carbonized PAF-1 derivatives formed by high-temperature KOH activation showed a unique bimodal microporous structure located at 0.6 nm and 1.2 nm and high surface area. These robust micropores were confirmed by nitrogen sorption experiment and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Carbon dioxide, methane and hydrogen sorption experiments indicated that these novel porous carbon materials have significant gas sorption abilities in both low-pressure and high-pressure environments. Moreover the methane storage ability of K-PAF-1-750 is among the best at 35 bars, and its low-pressure gas adsorption abilities are also comparable to the best porous materials in the world. Combined with excellent physicochemical stability, these materials are very promising for industrial applications such as carbon dioxide capture and high-density clean energy storage.

  7. Increase of porosity by combining semi-carbonization and KOH activation of formaldehyde resins to prepare high surface area carbons for supercapacitor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimböckel, Ruben; Kraas, Sebastian; Hoffmann, Frank; Fröba, Michael

    2018-01-01

    A series of porous carbon samples were prepared by combining a semi-carbonization process of acidic polymerized phenol-formaldehyde resins and a following chemical activation with KOH used in different ratios to increase specific surface area, micropore content and pore sizes of the carbons which is favourable for supercapacitor applications. Samples were characterized by nitrogen physisorption, powder X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The results show that the amount of KOH, combined with the semi-carbonization step had a remarkable effect on the specific surface area (up to SBET: 3595 m2 g-1 and SDFT: 2551 m2 g-1), pore volume (0.60-2.62 cm3 g-1) and pore sizes (up to 3.5 nm). The carbons were tested as electrode materials for electrochemical double layer capacitors (EDLC) in a two electrode setup with tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate in acetonitrile as electrolyte. The prepared carbon material with the largest surface area, pore volume and pore sizes exhibits a high specific capacitance of 145.1 F g-1 at a current density of 1 A g-1. With a high specific energy of 31 W h kg-1 at a power density of 33028 W kg-1 and a short time relaxation constant of 0.29 s, the carbon showed high power capability as an EDLC electrode material.

  8. Preparation of High Surface Area Activated Carbon from Spent Phenolic Resin by Microwave Heating and KOH Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Song; Zhang, Libo; Zhang, Shengzhou; Xia, Hongying; Peng, Jinhui

    2018-01-01

    The spent phenolic resin is as raw material for preparing high surface area activated carbon (HSAAC) by microwave-assisted KOH activation. The effects of microwave power, activation duration and impregnation ratio (IR) on the iodine adsorption capability and yield of HSAAC were investigated. The surface characteristics of HSAAC were characterized by nitrogen adsorption isotherms, FTIR, SEM and TEM. The operating variables were optimized utilizing the response surface methodology (RSM) and were identified to be microwave power of 700 W, activation duration of 15 min and IR of 4, corresponding to a yield of 51.25 % and an iodine number of 2,384 mg/g. The pore structure parameters of the HSAAC, i. e., Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area, total pore volume, and average pore diameter were estimated to be 4,269 m2/g, 2.396 ml/g and 2.25 nm, respectively, under optimum conditions. The findings strongly support the feasibility of microwave-assisted KOH activation for preparation of HSAAC from spent phenolic resin.

  9. Facile and Green Synthesis of Palladium Nanoparticles-Graphene-Carbon Nanotube Material with High Catalytic Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tai; Zhang, Zheye; Xiao, Junwu; Chen, Chen; Xiao, Fei; Wang, Shuai; Liu, Yunqi

    2013-01-01

    We report a facile and green method to synthesize a new type of catalyst by coating Pd nanoparticles (NPs) on reduced graphene oxide (rGO)-carbon nanotube (CNT) nanocomposite. An rGO–CNT nanocomposite with three-dimensional microstructures was obtained by hydrothermal treatment of an aqueous dispersion of graphene oxide (GO) and CNTs. After the rGO–CNT composites have been dipped in K2PdCl4 solution, the spontaneous redox reaction between the GO–CNT and PdCl42− led to the formation of nanohybrid materials consisting rGO–CNT decorated with 4 nm Pd NPs, which exhibited excellent and stable catalytic activity: the reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol using NaBH4 as a catalyst was completed in only 20 s at room temperature, even when the Pd content of the catalyst was 1.12 wt%. This method does not require rigorous conditions or toxic agents and thus is a rapid, efficient, and green approach to the fabrication of highly active catalysts. PMID:23982312

  10. Sulfur-doped nanoporous carbon spheres with ultrahigh specific surface area and high electrochemical activity for supercapacitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Simin; Cai, Yijin; Zhao, Xiao; Liang, Yeru; Zheng, Mingtao; Hu, Hang; Dong, Hanwu; Jiang, Sanping; Liu, Yingliang; Xiao, Yong

    2017-08-01

    Development of facile and scalable synthesis process for the fabrication of nanoporous carbon materials with large specific surface areas, well-defined nanostructure, and high electrochemical activity is critical for the high performance energy storage applications. The key issue is the dedicated balance between the ultrahigh surface area and highly porous but interconnected nanostructure. Here, we demonstrate the fabrication of new sulfur doped nanoporous carbon sphere (S-NCS) with the ultrahigh surface area up to 3357 m2 g-1 via a high-temperature hydrothermal carbonization and subsequent KOH activation process. The as-prepared S-NCS which integrates the advantages of ultrahigh porous structure, well-defined nanospherical and modification of heteroatom displays excellent electrochemical performance. The best performance is obtained on S-NCS prepared by the hydrothermal carbonization of sublimed sulfur and glucose, S-NCS-4, reaching a high specific capacitance (405 F g-1 at a current density of 0.5 A g-1) and outstanding cycle stability. Moreover, the symmetric supercapacitor is assembled by S-NCS-4 displays a superior energy density of 53.5 Wh kg-1 at the power density of 74.2 W kg-1 in 1.0 M LiPF6 EC/DEC. The synthesis method is simple and scalable, providing a new route to prepare highly porous and heteroatom-doped nanoporous carbon spheres for high performance energy storage applications.

  11. Tuning of ZIF-Derived Carbon with High Activity, Nitrogen Functionality, and Yield - A Case for Superior CO2 Capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadipelli, Srinivas; Guo, Zheng Xiao

    2015-06-22

    A highly effective and facile synthesis route is developed to create and tailor metal-decorated and nitrogen-functionalized active microporous carbon materials from ZIF-8. Clear metal- and pyrrolic-N-induced enhancements of the cyclic CO2 uptake capacities and binding energies are achieved, particularly at a much lower carbonization temperature of 700 °C than those often reported (1000 °C). The high-temperature carbonization can enhance the porosity but only at the expense of considerable losses of sample yield and metal and N functional sites. The findings are comparatively discussed with carbons derived from metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) reported previously. Furthermore, the porosity of the MOF-derived carbon is critically dependent on the structure of the precursor MOF and the crystal growth. The current strategy offers a new and effective route for the creation and tuning of highly active and functionalized carbon structures in high yields and with low energy consumption. © 2015 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

  12. Highly Active, Carbon-supported, PdSn Nano-core, Partially ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Carbon-supported, Pt partially covered, PdSn alloy nanoparticles (Pt-PdSn/C) were synthesized via a metathetical reaction of PdSn alloy nanoparticles, and a platinum precursor. The electrochemical activity was evaluated by methanol oxidation. The Pt-PdSn/C catalysts were characterized by transmission electron ...

  13. Nanostructured composite TiO{sub 2}/carbon catalysts of high activity for dehydration of n-butanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cyganiuk, Aleksandra [Faculty of Chemistry, Nicolaus Copernicus University, 87-100 Torun (Poland); Klimkiewicz, Roman [Institute of Low Temperature and Structure Research PAN, 50-422 Wroclaw (Poland); Bumajdad, Ali [Faculty of Science, Kuwait University, PO Box 5969 Safat, Kuwait 13060 (Kuwait); Ilnicka, Anna [Faculty of Chemistry, Nicolaus Copernicus University, 87-100 Torun (Poland); Lukaszewicz, Jerzy P., E-mail: jerzy_lukaszewicz@o2.pl [Faculty of Chemistry, Nicolaus Copernicus University, 87-100 Torun (Poland)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • New biotechnological method for fabrication of composite catalysts. • In situ synthesis of nanosized TiO{sub 2} clusters in the carbon matrix. • High dispersion of TiO{sub 2} in carbon matrix. • High catalytic activity achieved for very low active phase content. • Efficient dehydration of n-butanol to butane-1. - Abstract: A novel method of wood impregnation with titanium ions is presented. Titanium(IV) ions were complexed to peroxo/hydroxo complexes which were obtained by treating a TiCl{sub 4} water solution with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The solution of chelated titanium ions was used for the impregnation of living stems of Salix viminalis wood. Saturated stems were carbonized at 600–800 °C, yielding a microporous carbon matrix, in which nanoparticles of TiO{sub 2} were uniformly distributed. A series of composite TiO{sub 2}–carbon catalysts was manufactured and tested in the process of n-butanol conversion to butane-1. The composite catalysts exhibited very high selectivity (ca. 80%) and yield (ca. 30%) despite a low content of titanium (ca. 0.5% atomic). The research proved that the proposed functionalization led to high dispersion of the catalytic phase (TiO{sub 2}), which played a crucial role in the catalyst performance. High dispersion of TiO{sub 2} was achieved due to a natural transport of complexed titanium ions in living plant stems.

  14. Dendritic Tip-on Polytriazine-Based Carbon Nitride Photocatalyst with High Hydrogen Evolution Activity

    KAUST Repository

    Bhunia, Manas Kumar

    2015-11-23

    Developing stable, ubiquitous and efficient water-splitting photocatalyst material that has extensive absorption in the visible-light range is desired for a sustainable solar energy-conversion device. We herein report a triazine-based carbon nitride (CN) material with different C/N ratios achieved by varying the monomer composition ratio between melamine (Mel) and 2,4,6-triaminopyrimidine (TAP). The CN material with a different C/N ratio was obtained through a two-step synthesis protocol: starting with the solution state dispersion of the monomers via hydrogen-bonding supramolecular aggregate, followed by a salt-melt high temperature polycondensation. This protocol ensures the production of a highly crystalline polytriazine imide (PTI) structure con-sisting of a copolymerized Mel-TAP network. The observed bandgap narrowing with an increasing TAP/Mel ratio is well simulated by density functional theory (DFT) calculations, revealing a positive shift in the valence band upon substitution of N with CH in the aromatic rings. Increasing the TAP amount could not maintain the crystalline PTI structure, consistent with DFT calculation showing the repulsion associated with additional C-H introduced in the aromatic rings. Due to the high exciton binding energy calculated by DFT for the obtained CN, the cocatalyst must be close to any portion of the material to assist the separation of excit-ed charge carriers for an improved photocatalytic performance. The photocatalytic activity was improved by providing a dendritic tip-on-like shape grown on a porous fibrous silica KCC-1 spheres, and highly dispersed Pt nanoparticles (<5 nm) were photodepos-ited to introduce heterojunction. As a result, the Pt/CN/KCC-1 photocatalyst exhibited an apparent quantum efficiency (AQE) as high as 22.1 ± 3% at 400 nm and the silica was also beneficial for improving photocatalytic stability. The results obtained by time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy measurements were consistent with

  15. Activated carbon derived from harmful aquatic plant for high stable supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiangfeng; Wu, Qingsheng

    2018-01-01

    Considering cost and environmental protection, the harmful aquatic plant altemanthera philoxeroides derived carbon material with super high specific surface area (2895 m2 g-1) is an ideal electrode material for supercapacitor. The structure and composition of these carbon materials were characterized by SEM, EDS, XPS and BET measurements. The obtained material exhibits a maximum specific capacitance of 275 F g-1 at 0.5 A g-1 and retains a capacitance of 210 F g-1 even at 50 A g-1. In addition, it also shows excellent capacity retention of 5000 cycles at 10 A g-1.

  16. High-Surface-Area, Emulsion-Templated Carbon Foams by Activation of polyHIPEs Derived from Pickering Emulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert T. Woodward

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbon foams displaying hierarchical porosity and excellent surface areas of >1400 m2/g can be produced by the activation of macroporous poly(divinylbenzene. Poly(divinylbenzene was synthesized from the polymerization of the continuous, but minority, phase of a simple high internal phase Pickering emulsion. By the addition of KOH, chemical activation of the materials is induced during carbonization, producing Pickering-emulsion-templated carbon foams, or carboHIPEs, with tailorable macropore diameters and surface areas almost triple that of those previously reported. The retention of the customizable, macroporous open-cell structure of the poly(divinylbenzene precursor and the production of a large degree of microporosity during activation leads to tailorable carboHIPEs with excellent surface areas.

  17. Highly selective and active CO2 reduction electrocatalysts based on cobalt phthalocyanine/carbon nanotube hybrid structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xing; Wu, Zishan; Zhang, Xiao; Li, Liewu; Li, Yanyan; Xu, Haomin; Li, Xiaoxiao; Yu, Xiaolu; Zhang, Zisheng; Liang, Yongye; Wang, Hailiang

    2017-03-01

    Electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide with renewable energy is a sustainable way of producing carbon-neutral fuels. However, developing active, selective and stable electrocatalysts is challenging and entails material structure design and tailoring across a range of length scales. Here we report a cobalt-phthalocyanine-based high-performance carbon dioxide reduction electrocatalyst material developed with a combined nanoscale and molecular approach. On the nanoscale, cobalt phthalocyanine (CoPc) molecules are uniformly anchored on carbon nanotubes to afford substantially increased current density, improved selectivity for carbon monoxide, and enhanced durability. On the molecular level, the catalytic performance is further enhanced by introducing cyano groups to the CoPc molecule. The resulting hybrid catalyst exhibits >95% Faradaic efficiency for carbon monoxide production in a wide potential range and extraordinary catalytic activity with a current density of 15.0 mA cm-2 and a turnover frequency of 4.1 s-1 at the overpotential of 0.52 V in a near-neutral aqueous solution.

  18. PT AND PT/NI "NEEDLE" ELETROCATALYSTS ON CARBON NANOTUBES WITH HIGH ACTIVITY FOR THE ORR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colon-Mercado, H.

    2011-11-10

    Platinum and platinum/nickel alloy electrocatalysts supported on graphitized (gCNT) or nitrogen doped carbon nanotubes (nCNT) are prepared and characterized. Pt deposition onto carbon nanotubes results in Pt 'needle' formations that are 3.5 nm in diameter and {approx}100 nm in length. Subsequent Ni deposition and heat treatment results in PtNi 'needles' with an increased diameter. All Pt and Pt/Ni materials were tested as electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The Pt and Pt/Ni catalysts showed excellent performance for the ORR, with the heat treated PtNi/gCNT (1.06 mA/cm{sup 2}) and PtNi/nCNT (0.664 mA/cm{sup 2}) showing the highest activity.

  19. High concentrations of single-walled carbon nanotubes lower soil enzyme activity and microbial biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Lixia; Son, Yowhan; Yoon, Tae Kyung; Kang, Yu Jin; Kim, Woong; Chung, Haegeun

    2013-02-01

    Nanomaterials such as single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) may enter the soil environment with unknown consequences resulting from the development of nanotechnology for a variety of applications. We determined the effects of SWCNTs on soil enzyme activity and microbial biomass through a 3-week incubation of urban soils treated with different concentrations of SWCNTs ranging from 0 to 1000 μg g(-1) soil. The activities of cellobiohydrolase, β-1,4-glucosidase, β-1,4-xylosidase, β-1,4-N-acetylglucosaminidase, L-leucine aminopeptidase, and acid phosphatase and microbial biomass were measured in soils treated with powder and suspended forms of SWCNTs. SWCNTs of concentrations at 300-1000 μg g(-1) soil significantly lowered activities of most enzymes and microbial biomass. It is noteworthy that the SWCNTs showed similar effects to that of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), but at a concentration approximately 5 times lower; we suggest that this is mainly due to the higher surface area of SWCNTs than that of MWCNTs. Indeed, our results show that surface area of CNTs has significant negative relationship with relative enzyme activity and biomass, which suggests that greater microorganism-CNT interactions could increase the negative effect of CNTs on microorganisms. Current work may contribute to the preparation of a regulatory guideline for the release of CNTs to the soil environment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Activated Carbon Fibers with Hierarchical Nanostructure Derived from Waste Cotton Gloves as High-Performance Electrodes for Supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chao; Yu, Jianlin; Yang, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Guoqing

    2017-06-01

    One of the most challenging issues that restrict the biomass/waste-based nanocarbons in supercapacitor application is the poor structural inheritability during the activating process. Herein, we prepare a class of activated carbon fibers by carefully selecting waste cotton glove (CG) as the precursor, which mainly consists of cellulose fibers that can be transformed to carbon along with good inheritability of their fiber morphology upon activation. As prepared, the CG-based activated carbon fiber (CGACF) demonstrates a surface area of 1435 m2 g-1 contributed by micropores of 1.3 nm and small mesopores of 2.7 nm, while the fiber morphology can be well inherited from the CG with 3D interconnected frameworks created on the fiber surface. This hierarchically porous structure and well-retained fiber-like skeleton can simultaneously minimize the diffusion/transfer resistance of the electrolyte and electron, respectively, and maximize the surface area utilization for charge accumulation. Consequently, CGACF presents a higher specific capacitance of 218 F g-1 and an excellent high-rate performance as compared to commercial activated carbon.

  1. Au nanoparticles attached carbon nanotubes as a high performance active element in field effect transistor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Myeongsoon; Kim, Don, E-mail: donkim@pknu.ac.kr

    2016-08-15

    The Au nanoparticles attached carbon nanotubes (Au-CNTs), diameter ranged from 40 to 250 nm, were prepared and discussed their chemical and electrical properties. The shape and crystallinity of the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) phase depended main2ly on the diameter of CNTs (r{sub Au-CNT}). Highly crystalline, straight CNTs were observed when the r{sub Au-CNT} exceeded 80 nm, and less crystalline noodle-shaped CNTs were observed when the r{sub Au-CNT} was smaller than 80 nm. The crystallinity of the CNT phase was confirmed by analyzing the G and D bands in their Raman spectra and the electrical conductivities of the Au-CNTs. The electrical conductivity of the highly crystalline carbon phase of Au-CNTs (r{sub Au-CNT} = 250 nm) was ∼10{sup 4} S/cm. The back-gated field effect transistors (FETs) based on the Au-CNTs, which were assembled on a SiO{sub 2}/Si wafer using the dielectrophoresis technique, showed that the Au-CNTs would be a good functional electronic material for future electronic and sensing applications. The transconductance and hole mobility of the FETs, which were assembled with the highly crystalline Au-CNTs (r{sub Au-CNT} = 250 nm), reached to 3.6 × 10{sup −4} A/V and 3.1 × 10{sup 4} cm{sup 2}/V s, respectively. These values are in the middle of those of reported for single walled carbon nanotubes and graphene. However, we could not find any field effect in a CNTFET, which assembled without Au nanoparticles, through the same process. - Highlights: • The shape and crystallinity of the CNTs depended mainly on the diameter of CNTs. • The electrical conductivity of the highly crystalline Au-CNTs was ∼10{sup 4} S/cm. • The Au-CNT FET shows typical p-channel gate effect with the on/off ratio of ∼10{sup 4}. • The Au-CNT FET shows very high transconductance (g{sub m}) and carrier mobility (μ{sub h}).

  2. Pomelo peels-derived porous activated carbon microsheets dual-doped with nitrogen and phosphorus for high performance electrochemical capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen; Tan, Yongtao; Yang, Yunlong; Zhao, Xiaoning; Liu, Ying; Niu, Lengyuan; Tichnell, Brandon; Kong, Lingbin; Kang, Long; Liu, Zhen; Ran, Fen

    2018-02-01

    In this work, biomass pomelo peel is used to fabricate the porous activated carbon microsheets, and diammonium hydrogen phosphate (DHP) is employed to dual-dope carbon with nitrogen and phosphorus elements. With the benefit of DHP inducement and dual-doping of nitrogen and phosphorus, the prepared carbon material has a higher carbon yield, and exhibits higher specific surface area (about 807.7 m2/g), and larger pore volume (about 0.4378 cm3/g) with hierarchically structure of interconnected thin microsheets compared to the pristine carbon. The material exhibits not only high specific capacitance (240 F/g at 0.5 A/g), but also superior cycling performance (approximately 100% of capacitance retention after 10,000 cycles at 2 A/g) in 2 M KOH aqueous electrolyte. Furthermore, the assembled symmetric electrochemical capacitor in 1 M Na2SO4 aqueous electrolyte exhibits a high energy density of 11.7 Wh/kg at a power density of 160 W/kg.

  3. Coffee Waste-Derived Hierarchical Porous Carbon as a Highly Active and Durable Electrocatalyst for Electrochemical Energy Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Dong Young; Son, Yoon Jun; Yoo, Ji Mun; Kang, Jin Soo; Ahn, Chi-Yeong; Park, Subin; Sung, Yung-Eun

    2017-11-14

    Nitrogen-doped porous carbon materials have been highlighted as promising alternatives to high-cost platinum in various electrochemical energy applications. However, protocols to generate effective pore structure are still challenging, which hampers mass production and utilization of carbon materials. Here, we suggest a facile and effective method for hierarchical porous carbon by a single-step carbonization of coffee waste (CW) with ZnCl2. The CW, which is one of the most earth-abundant organic waste, can be successfully converted to nitrogen-doped porous carbon. It shows outstanding oxygen reduction activity and durability comparable to the state-of-the-art platinum, and the half-wave potential is also comparable to the best metal-free electrocatalysts in alkaline media. Finally, we apply it to counter electrode of dye-sensitized solar cell, whose photovoltaic efficiency surpasses the one made with conventional platinum electrode. We demonstrate the feasibility of our strategies for highly efficient, cheap, and environment-friendly electrocatalyst to replace platinum in various electrochemical energy applications.

  4. Nitrogen-doped porous carbon nanosheets made from biomass as highly active electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Fuping; Cao, Zhongyue; Zhao, Qiuping; Liang, Hongyu; Zhang, Junyan

    2014-12-01

    The successful commercialization of fuel cells requires the efficient electrocatalyst to make the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) fast because of the sluggish nature of ORR and the high cost of the platinum catalysts. In this work, we report the excellent performance of metal-free nitrogen-doped porous carbon nanosheets (NPCN) with hierarchical porous structure and a high surface area of 1436.02 m2 g-1 for catalyzing ORR. The active NPCN is synthesized via facile high-temperature carbonization of natural ginkgo leaves followed by purification and ammonia post-treatment without using additional supporting templates and activation processes. In O2-saturated 0.1 M KOH solution, the resultant NPCN exhibits a high kinetic-limiting current density of 13.57 mA cm-2 at -0.25 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) approaching that of the commercial Pt/C catalyst (14 mA cm-2) and long-term electrochemical stability. Notably, the NPCN shows a slightly negative ORR half-wave potential in comparison with Pt/C (ΔE1/2 = 19 mV). The excellent electrocatalytic properties of NPCN originate from the combined effect of optimal nitrogen doping, high surface area, and porous architecture, which induce the high-density distribution of highly active and stable catalytic sites.

  5. Modeling high-pressure adsorption of gas mixtures on activated carbon and coal using a simplified local-density model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, James E; Robinson, Robert L; Gasem, Khaled A M

    2006-11-07

    The simplified local-density (SLD) theory was investigated regarding its ability to provide accurate representations and predictions of high-pressure supercritical adsorption isotherms encountered in coalbed methane (CBM) recovery and CO2 sequestration. Attention was focused on the ability of the SLD theory to predict mixed-gas adsorption solely on the basis of information from pure gas isotherms using a modified Peng-Robinson (PR) equation of state (EOS). An extensive set of high-pressure adsorption measurements was used in this evaluation. These measurements included pure and binary mixture adsorption measurements for several gas compositions up to 14 MPa for Calgon F-400 activated carbon and three water-moistened coals. Also included were ternary measurements for the activated carbon and one coal. For the adsorption of methane, nitrogen, and CO2 on dry activated carbon, the SLD-PR can predict the component mixture adsorption within about 2.2 times the experimental uncertainty on average solely on the basis of pure-component adsorption isotherms. For the adsorption of methane, nitrogen, and CO2 on two of the three wet coals, the SLD-PR model can predict the component adsorption within the experimental uncertainties on average for all feed fractions (nominally molar compositions of 20/80, 40/60, 60/40, and 80/20) of the three binary gas mixture combinations, although predictions for some specific feed fractions are outside of their experimental uncertainties.

  6. Using microwave heating to improve the desorption efficiency of high molecular weight VOC from beaded activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayaz, Mohammadreza; Shariaty, Pooya; Atkinson, John D; Hashisho, Zaher; Phillips, John H; Anderson, James E; Nichols, Mark

    2015-04-07

    Incomplete regeneration of activated carbon loaded with organic compounds results in heel build-up that reduces the useful life of the adsorbent. In this study, microwave heating was tested as a regeneration method for beaded activated carbon (BAC) loaded with n-dodecane, a high molecular weight volatile organic compound. Energy consumption and desorption efficiency for microwave-heating regeneration were compared with conductive-heating regeneration. The minimum energy needed to completely regenerate the adsorbent (100% desorption efficiency) using microwave regeneration was 6% of that needed with conductive heating regeneration, owing to more rapid heating rates and lower heat loss. Analyses of adsorbent pore size distribution and surface chemistry confirmed that neither heating method altered the physical/chemical properties of the BAC. Additionally, gas chromatography (with flame ionization detector) confirmed that neither regeneration method detectably altered the adsorbate composition during desorption. By demonstrating improvements in energy consumption and desorption efficiency and showing stable adsorbate and adsorbent properties, this paper suggests that microwave heating is an attractive method for activated carbon regeneration particularly when high-affinity VOC adsorbates are present.

  7. Polyaniline-Coated Activated Carbon Aerogel/Sulfur Composite for High-performance Lithium-Sulfur Battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhiwei; Jiang, Jinglin; Liu, Shaohong; Chen, Luyi; Liu, Ruliang; Zheng, Bingna; Fu, Ruowen; Wu, Dingcai

    2017-12-12

    An activated carbon aerogel (ACA-500) with high surface area (1765 m2 g-1), pore volume (2.04 cm3 g-1), and hierarchical porous nanonetwork structure is prepared through direct activation of organic aerogel (RC-500) with a low potassium hydroxide ratio (1:1). Based on this substrate, a polyaniline (PANi)-coated activated carbon aerogel/sulfur (ACA-500-S@PANi) composite is prepared via a simple two-step procedure, including melt-infiltration of sublimed sulfur into ACA-500, followed by an in situ polymerization of aniline on the surface of ACA-500-S composite. The obtained ACA-500-S@PANi composite delivers a high reversible capacity up to 1208 mAh g-1 at 0.2C and maintains 542 mAh g-1 even at a high rate (3C). Furthermore, this composite exhibits a discharge capacity of 926 mAh g-1 at the initial cycle and 615 mAh g-1 after 700 cycles at 1C rate, revealing an extremely low capacity decay rate (0.48‰ per cycle). The excellent electrochemical performance of ACA-500-S@PANi can be attributed to the synergistic effect of hierarchical porous nanonetwork structure and PANi coating. Activated carbon aerogels with high surface area and unique three-dimensional (3D) interconnected hierarchical porous structure offer an efficient conductive network for sulfur, and a highly conductive PANi-coating layer further enhances conductivity of the electrode and prevents the dissolution of polysulfide species.

  8. Multifunctional electrocatalytic hybrid carbon nanocables with highly active edges on their walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusmão, Rui; Sofer, Zdeněk; Nováček, Michal; Luxa, Jan; Matějková, Stanislava; Pumera, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Graphene sheets exhibit fast heterogeneous electron transfer at the edges while at the basal plane the electron transfer is much slower. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) represent fascinating quasi-1-dimensional materials due to their electronic and mechanical properties which enable the formation of (unlike graphene) robust, flexible and well defined three dimensional structures. Because CNTs are created from ``rolled up'' graphene sheets, exposing mostly inactive walls, they generally exhibit poor electrochemical properties. In contrast, graphene sheets can exhibit fast electron transfer rates but are often prone to ``restacking'' which hinders their true electrochemical potential. Here we obviate this problem by partial unzipping of CNTs, where their inner core creates nanocables with high electrical conductivity while the outer unzipped graphene layers full of edges and defects act as highly electroactive materials. Metallic nanoparticles are introduced into graphene oxide/CNT hybrid structures (GOCNT), so they do catalyze reactions which are not catalyzed by carbon. We show that in combination with trace metal doping, these nanocables act as efficient electrocatalysts towards oxidation of biomarkers and energy related applications, such as hydrogen evolution reaction. Such hybrid graphene/CNT/metallic nanoparticles present universal well-structured catalysts which should find wide applications in electrochemical devices. GOCNTs rich in oxygenated groups show much promise in pollution management, thus their adsorption behaviour was investigated to establish their ability to remove harmful heavy-metal pollutants. The results show an increasing trend in the concentration of oxygen functional groups, directly correlated with the GOCNT adsorption capacity.Graphene sheets exhibit fast heterogeneous electron transfer at the edges while at the basal plane the electron transfer is much slower. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) represent fascinating quasi-1-dimensional materials due to

  9. Tandem Nitrogen Functionalization of Porous Carbon: Toward Immobilizing Highly Active Palladium Nanoclusters for Dehydrogenation of Formic Acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhangpeng [National Inst. of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Ikeda, Osaka (Japan). Research Inst. of Electrochemical Energy; Yang, Xinchun [National Inst. of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Ikeda, Osaka (Japan). Research Inst. of Electrochemical Energy; Tsumori, Nobuko [Toyama National College of Technology (Japan); Liu, Zheng [National Inst. of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Nagoya, Aichi (Japan). Inorganic Functional Materials Research Inst.; Himeda, Yuichiro [National Inst. of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba (Japan). Research Inst. of Energy Frontier; Autrey, Tom [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xu, Qiang [National Inst. of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Ikeda, Osaka (Japan). Research Inst. of Electrochemical Energy

    2017-03-10

    Highly dispersed palladium nanoclusters (Pd NCs) immobilized by a nitrogen (N)-functionalized porous carbon support (N-MSC-30) are synthesized by a wet chemical reduction method, wherein the N-MSC-30 prepared by a tandem low temperature heat-treatment approach proved to be a distinct support for stabilizing the Pd NCs. The prepared Pd/N-MSC-30 shows extremely high catalytic activity and recyclability for the dehydrogenation of formic acid (FA), affording the highest turnover frequency (TOF = 8414 h-1) at 333 K, which is much higher than that of the Pd catalyst supported on the N-MSC-30 prepared via a one-step process. This tandem heat treatment strategy provides a facile and effective synthetic methodology to immobilize ultrafine metal NPs on N-functionalized carbon materials, which have tremendous application prospects in various catalytic fields.

  10. Programmable high crystallinity carbon patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuewen; Wang, Hong; Gu, Yang; Fu, Wei; Zheng, Lu; Liu, Guowei; He, Yongmin; Long, Yi; Zhao, Wu; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Ting; Liu, Zheng

    2017-06-01

    Carbon nanomaterials such as carbon nanotube and graphene are promising candidates for next-generation flexible electronics. However, the practical application of carbon electronics requires controlled fabrication of those materials with micro-patterned structures on flexible substrate at wafer-scale and low cost. Inspiring from the conventional photolithography process and pyrolysis of photoresist, herein, we demonstrate the synthesis of high-quality micro-patterned high crystallinity carbon. The method employed pre-patterned pyrolyzed photoresist as carbon precursors, in order to minimize the mobility of carbon during the high temperature growth, which results into high quality carbon patterns with a lateral resolution up to ~2 µm. The flexible carbon electronics are demonstrated by transferring the as-patterned high crystallinity carbon patterns to the flexible substrate, and showing asymmetric tensile-compressive response with high output resolution. These results will pave the way to the next-generation carbon-based flexible electronics and mechanical sensors.

  11. Highly uniform and monodisperse carbon nanospheres enriched with cobalt-nitrogen active sites as a potential oxygen reduction electrocatalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xing; Wang, Hongjuan; Yu, Hao; Peng, Feng

    2017-04-01

    Uniform cobalt and nitrogen co-doped carbon nanospheres (CoN-CNS) with high specific surface area (865 m2 g-1) have been prepared by a simple but efficient method. The prepared CoN-CNS catalyst exhibits outstanding catalytic performance for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in both alkaline and acidic electrolytes. In alkaline electrolyte, the prepared CoN-CNS has more positive half-wave potential and larger kinetic current density than commercial Pt/C. In acidic electrolyte, CoN-CNS also shows good ORR activity with high electron transfer number, its onset and half-wave potentials are all close to those of commercial carbon supported platinum catalyst (Pt/C). CoN-CNS catalyst shows more superior stability and higher methanol-tolerance than commercial Pt/C both in alkaline and in acidic electrolytes. The potassium thiocyanate-poisoning test further confirms that the cobalt-nitrogen active sites exist in CoN-CNS, which are dominating to endow high ORR catalytic activity in acidic electrolyte. This study develops a new method to prepare non-precious metal catalyst with excellent ORR performances for direct methanol fuel cells.

  12. Studies of activated carbon and carbon black for supercapacitor applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richner, R.; Mueller, S.; Koetz, R.; Wokaun, A. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    Carbon Black and activated carbon materials providing high surface areas and a distinct pore distribution are prime materials for supercapacitor applications at frequencies < 0.5 Hz. A number of these materials were tested for their specific capacitance, surface and pore size distribution. High capacitance electrodes were manufactured on the laboratory scale with attention to ease of processability. (author) 1 fig., 1 ref.

  13. Chaetomium thermophilum formate dehydrogenase has high activity in the reduction of hydrogen carbonate (HCO3 -) to formate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, Aşkın Sevinç; Valjakka, Jarkko; Ruupunen, Jouni; Yildirim, Deniz; Turner, Nicholas J; Turunen, Ossi; Binay, Barış

    2017-01-01

    While formate dehydrogenases (FDHs) have been used for cofactor recycling in chemoenzymatic synthesis, the ability of FDH to reduce CO2 could also be utilized in the conversion of CO2 to useful products via formate (HCOO-). In this study, we investigated the reduction of CO2 in the form of hydrogen carbonate (HCO3-) to formate by FDHs from Candida methylica (CmFDH) and Chaetomium thermophilum (CtFDH) in a NADH-dependent reaction. The catalytic performance with HCO3- as a substrate was evaluated by measuring the kinetic rates and conducting productivity assays. CtFDH showed a higher efficiency in converting HCO3- to formate than CmFDH, whereas CmFDH was better in the oxidation of formate. The pH optimum of the reduction was at pH 7-8. However, the high concentrations of HCO3- reduced the reaction rate. CtFDH was modeled in the presence of HCO3- showing that it fits to the active site. The active site setting for hydride transfer in CO2 reduction was modeled. The hydride donated by NADH would form a favorable contact to the carbon atom of HCO3-, resulting in a surplus of electrons within the molecule. This would cause the complex formed by hydrogen carbonate and the hydride to break into formate and hydroxide ions. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Comment on 'Novel synthesis of highly durable and active Pt catalyst encapsulated in nitrogen containing carbon for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollet, Bruno G.

    2017-09-01

    I read with interest the manuscript entitled 'Novel synthesis of highly durable and active Pt catalyst encapsulated in nitrogen containing carbon for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell' by Lee et al. recently published in your journal [1] describing a one-step process for fabricating a Pt catalyst encapsulated with N-containing carbon by using ultrasound (20 kHz).

  15. Dispersion-precipitation synthesis of highly active nanosized Co3O4 for catalytic oxidation of carbon monoxide and propane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weidong; Wu, Feng; Li, Jinjun; You, Zhixiong

    2017-07-01

    Nanosized Co3O4 catalyst was prepared through a dispersion-precipitation method involving a reaction between wet cobalt hydroxide and acetic acid, which forms a colloidal dispersion, and subsequent dilution, which destabilizes and precipitates the colloidal particles. The catalyst had a particle size of 5-15 nm and a specific surface area of 82 m2/g. Compared with the analogue prepared by conventional alkali-induced precipitation method, the nanosized catalyst was more reducible and contained a larger amount of active surface oxygen species, as revealed by experiments using temperature-programmed reduction in hydrogen and temperature-programmed desorption of oxygen. The oxygen species could contribute to the observed higher activity in the catalytic oxidation of carbon monoxide and propane. In addition, a kinetics study revealed that the apparent activation energies for carbon monoxide and propane oxidation over the catalyst were 34.0 and 49.5 kJ/mol, respectively, much lower than those over the analogue (54.7 and 71.1 kJ/mol, respectively). Furthermore, a long-term test (76 h) showed that the nanosized catalyst is highly stable.

  16. Evaluation of an activated carbon-based deactivation system for the disposal of highly abused opioid medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xinyi; Bakshi, Pooja; Sunkara Ganti, Sindhu; Manian, Mahima; Korey, Andrew; Fowler, William; Banga, Ajay K

    2018-01-01

    The improper disposal of unused prescription opioids has a potential for abuse as well as environmental contamination. Consequently, there is an imperative need for an environmentally safe, convenient, and effective drug disposal system. The objective of this study is to analyze the deactivation efficiency of the disposal system employing four model opioid drugs of high abuse potential. The deactivation system used in this investigation is an activated granular carbon based disposal system in the form of a pouch, which can be used to safely and effectively deactivate unused or expired medications. HPLC method validation for each drug was performed prior to analyzing drug content in the deactivation study. Opioid drugs in different dosage forms were added to individual pouches in the presence of warm water. Pouches were shaken and sealed, then stored at room temperature. The deactivation efficiency of the system was tested by collecting samples at different time points up to 28 d. An average of 98.72% of medications were adsorbed by activated carbon within 8 h and continued to do so over time. At the end of the 28-d study, more than 99.99% of all drugs were deactivated. In the desorption study, almost no drug leached out from the activated carbon in larger volume of water and less than 1.3% leached out on extraction with ethanol. This unique drug disposal system successfully adsorbed and deactivated the model opioid medications by the end of 28 d, offering a safe and convenient route of disposal of unused or residual opioid drugs.

  17. Photoconductivity of Activated Carbon Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriyama, K.; Dresselhaus, M. S.

    1990-08-01

    The photoconductivity is measured on a high-surface-area disordered carbon material, namely activated carbon fibers, to investigate their electronic properties. Measurements of decay time, recombination kinetics and temperature dependence of the photoconductivity generally reflect the electronic properties of a material. The material studied in this paper is a highly disordered carbon derived from a phenolic precursor, having a huge specific surface area of 1000--2000m{sup 2}/g. Our preliminary thermopower measurements suggest that this carbon material is a p-type semiconductor with an amorphous-like microstructure. The intrinsic electrical conductivity, on the order of 20S/cm at room temperature, increases with increasing temperature in the range 30--290K. In contrast with the intrinsic conductivity, the photoconductivity in vacuum decreases with increasing temperature. The recombination kinetics changes from a monomolecular process at room temperature to a biomolecular process at low temperatures. The observed decay time of the photoconductivity is {approx equal}0.3sec. The magnitude of the photoconductive signal was reduced by a factor of ten when the sample was exposed to air. The intrinsic carrier density and the activation energy for conduction are estimated to be {approx equal}10{sup 21}/cm{sup 3} and {approx equal}20meV, respectively. The majority of the induced photocarriers and of the intrinsic carriers are trapped, resulting in the long decay time of the photoconductivity and the positive temperature dependence of the conductivity.

  18. Dewatering Peat With Activated Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohatgi, N. K.

    1984-01-01

    Proposed process produces enough gas and carbon to sustain itself. In proposed process peat slurry is dewatered to approximately 40 percent moisture content by mixing slurry with activated carbon and filtering with solid/liquid separation techniques.

  19. Highly n-Type Titanium Oxide as an Electronically Active Support for Platinum in the Catalytic Oxidation of Carbon Monoxide

    KAUST Repository

    Baker, L. Robert

    2011-08-18

    The role of the oxide-metal interface in determining the activity and selectivity of chemical reactions catalyzed by metal particles on an oxide support is an important topic in science and industry. A proposed mechanism for this strong metal-support interaction is electronic activation of surface adsorbates by charge carriers. Motivated by the goal of using electronic activation to drive nonthermal chemistry, we investigated the ability of the oxide support to mediate charge transfer. We report an approximately 2-fold increase in the turnover rate of catalytic carbon monoxide oxidation on platinum nanoparticles supported on stoichiometric titanium dioxide (TiO2) when the TiO2 is made highly n-type by fluorine (F) doping. However, for nonstoichiometric titanium oxide (TiOX<2) the effect of F on the turnover rate is negligible. Studies of the titanium oxide electronic structure show that the energy of free electrons in the oxide determines the rate of reaction. These results suggest that highly n-type TiO2 electronically activates adsorbed oxygen (O) by electron spillover to form an active O- intermediate. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  20. Ultra-fine grinding and mechanical activation of mine waste rock using a high-speed stirred mill for mineral carbonation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia-jie; Hitch, Michael

    2015-10-01

    CO2 sequestration by mineral carbonation can permanently store CO2 and mitigate climate change. However, the cost and reaction rate of mineral carbonation must be balanced to be viable for industrial applications. In this study, it was attempted to reduce the carbonation costs by using mine waste rock as a feed stock and to enhance the reaction rate using wet mechanical activation as a pre-treatment method. Slurry rheological properties, particle size distribution, specific surface area, crystallinity, and CO2 sequestration reaction efficiency of the initial and mechanically activated mine waste rock and olivine were characterized. The results show that serpentine acts as a catalyst, increasing the slurry yield stress, assisting new surface formation, and hindering the size reduction and structure amorphization. Mechanically activated mine waste rock exhibits a higher carbonation conversion than olivine with equal specific milling energy input. The use of a high-speed stirred mill may render the mineral carbonation suitable for mining industrial practice.

  1. Effects of Combined High Hydrostatic Pressure and Dense Phase Carbon Dioxide on the Activity, Structure and Size of Polyphenoloxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, Trang; Balaban, Murat; Perera, Conrad

    2015-11-01

    High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) may activate undesirable enzymes such as polyphenoloxidase (PPO). Carbon dioxide (CO2 ) addition to HHP could increase enzyme inactivation. We investigated the inactivation of combined HHP and dense phase carbon dioxide process on activity, secondary conformation and size of pure PPO from mushroom. Solutions (2.35μM, in phosphate buffer pH 6.8) were treated with HHP alone (HHP), or 3.6% w/w of CO2 was injected into the package (HHP+CO2). Treatment conditions were 600 MPa, 20 °C, for 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9 min. HHP+CO2 treatment significantly decreased residual enzyme activity (REA) to 30% to 12% after 1 to 9 min, respectively, whereas only HHP had no significant effect. Both HHP and HHP+CO2 treatments caused changes in secondary conformations, however HHP+CO2 changes were more extensive. Alpha-helix fractions were reduced by 32% and 41%, while β sheet, turn and unordered increased by 63% and 213%, 100% and 71%, and 118% and 82% for HHP and HHP+CO2, respectively after 9 min. The protein size in HHP+CO2 samples was 5- to 6-fold larger than that of Control and HHP treatment, and this increase was inversely correlated with REA. The best inactivation kinetics of HHP+CO2 model was the 2-fractional model with 2 simultaneous 1st-order steps, contributing 70% and 30% to original enzyme activity, with k(labile) = 12.15 min(-1) and k(stable) = 0.07 min(-1), respectively. No recovery in activity, secondary conformation and size in all samples were observed after 1-mo storage. Addition of CO2 in HHP treatment can improve enzyme inactivation, and therefore product shelf-life and quality. High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) achieves the safety of foods as a nonthermal method, but it may activate undesirable enzymes resulting in short shelf life due to, for example flavor and color changes. Our study determined that addition of CO2 to HHP has significant effects on enzyme inactivation, secondary conformational and molecular size changes of mushroom PPO

  2. Direct observation of solid-phase adsorbate concentration profile in powdered activated carbon particle to elucidate mechanism of high adsorption capacity on super-powdered activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Naoya; Matsui, Yoshihiko; Matsushita, Taku; Ohno, Koichi

    2011-01-01

    Decreasing the particle size of powdered activated carbon (PAC) by pulverization increases its adsorption capacities for natural organic matter (NOM) and polystyrene sulfonate (PSS, which is used as a model adsorbate). A shell adsorption mechanism in which NOM and PSS molecules do not completely penetrate the adsorbent particle and instead preferentially adsorb near the outer surface of the particle has been proposed as an explanation for this adsorption capacity increase. In this report, we present direct evidence to support the shell adsorption mechanism. PAC particles containing adsorbed PSS were sectioned with a focused ion beam, and the solid-phase PSS concentration profiles of the particle cross-sections were directly observed by means of field emission-scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (FE-SEM/EDXS). X-ray emission from sulfur, an index of PSS concentration, was higher in the shell region than in the inner region of the particles. The X-ray emission profile observed by EDXS did not agree completely with the solid-phase PSS concentration profile predicted by shell adsorption model analysis of the PSS isotherm data, but the observed and predicted profiles were not inconsistent when the analytical errors were considered. These EDXS results provide the first direct evidence that PSS is adsorbed mainly in the vicinity of the external surface of the PAC particles, and thus the results support the proposition that the increase in NOM and PSS adsorption capacity with decreasing particle size is due to the increase in external surface area on which the molecules can be adsorbed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Highly stable and active Ni-doped ordered mesoporous carbon catalyst on the steam reforming of ethanol application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josh Y.Z. Chiou

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A novel one-step direct synthesis of nickel embedded in an ordered mesoporous carbon catalyst (NiOMC is done in a basic medium of nonaqueous solution by a solvent evaporation-induced self-assembly process. The NiOMC sample is characterized by a variety of analytical and spectroscopy techniques, e.g., N2 adsorption/desorption isotherm measurement, X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and temperature-programed reduction (TPR. In this study, the NiOMC catalyst is found to exhibit superior catalytic activity for the steam reforming of ethanol (SRE, showing high hydrogen selectivity and durability. Ethanol can be completely converted at 350 °C over the NiOMC catalyst. Also, the durability of the NiOMC catalyst on the SRE reaction exceeds 100 h at 450 °C, with SH2 approaching 65% and SCO of less than 1%.

  4. Novel synthesis of highly durable and active Pt catalyst encapsulated in nitrogen containing carbon for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunjoon; Sung, Yung-Eun; Choi, Insoo; Lim, Taeho; Kwon, Oh Joong

    2017-09-01

    Novel synthesis of a Pt catalyst encapsulated in a N-containing carbon layer for use in a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell is described in this study. A Pt-aniline complex, formed by mixing Pt precursor and aniline monomer, was used as the source of Pt, C, and N. Heat treatment of the Pt-aniline complex with carbon black yielded 5 nm Pt nanoparticles encapsulated by a N-containing carbon layer originating from aniline carbonization. The synthesized Pt catalyst exhibited higher mass specific activity to oxygen reduction reaction than that shown by conventional Pt/C catalyst because pyridinic N with graphitic carbon in the carbon layer provided active sites for oxygen reduction reaction in addition to those provided by Pt. In single cell testing, initial performance of the synthesized catalyst was limited because the thick catalyst layer increased resistance related to mass transfer. However, it was observed that the carbon layer successfully prevented Pt nanoparticles from growing via agglomeration and Ostwald ripening under fuel cell operation, thereby improving durability. Furthermore, a mass specific performance of the synthesized catalyst higher than that of a conventional Pt/C catalyst was achieved by modifying the synthesized catalyst's layer thickness.

  5. ACTIVATED CARBON FROM LIGNITE FOR WATER TREATMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwin S. Olson; Daniel J. Stepan

    2000-07-01

    High concentrations of humate in surface water result in the formation of excess amounts of chlorinated byproducts during disinfection treatment. These precursors can be removed in water treatment prior to disinfection using powdered activated carbon. In the interest of developing a more cost-effective method for removal of humates in surface water, a comparison of the activities of carbons prepared from North Dakota lignites with those of commercial carbons was conducted. Previous studies indicated that a commercial carbon prepared from Texas lignite (Darco HDB) was superior to those prepared from bituminous coals for water treatment. That the high alkali content of North Dakota lignites would result in favorable adsorptive properties for the very large humate molecules was hypothesized, owing to the formation of larger pores during activation. Since no standard humate test has been previously developed, initial adsorption testing was performed using smaller dye molecules with various types of ionic character. With the cationic dye, methylene blue, a carbon prepared from a high-sodium lignite (HSKRC) adsorbed more dye than the Darco HDB. The carbon from the low-sodium lignite was much inferior. With another cationic dye, malachite green, the Darco HDB was slightly better. With anionic dyes, methyl red and azocarmine-B, the results for the HSKRC and Darco HDB were comparable. A humate test was developed using Aldrich humic acid. The HSKRC and the Darco HDB gave equally high adsorption capacities for the humate (138 mg/g), consistent with the similarities observed in earlier tests. A carbon prepared from a high-sodium lignite from a different mine showed an outstanding improvement (201 mg/g). The carbons prepared from the low-sodium lignites from both mines showed poor adsorption capacities for humate. Adsorption isotherms were performed for the set of activated carbons in the humate system. These exhibited a complex behavior interpreted as resulting from two types

  6. High surface area carbon and process for its production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanos, Jimmy; Burress, Jacob; Pfeifer, Peter; Rash, Tyler; Shah, Parag; Suppes, Galen

    2016-12-13

    Activated carbon materials and methods of producing and using activated carbon materials are provided. In particular, biomass-derived activated carbon materials and processes of producing the activated carbon materials with prespecified surface areas and pore size distributions are provided. Activated carbon materials with preselected high specific surface areas, porosities, sub-nm (<1 nm) pore volumes, and supra-nm (1-5 nm) pore volumes may be achieved by controlling the degree of carbon consumption and metallic potassium intercalation into the carbon lattice during the activation process.

  7. (PSLW) Activated Carbon

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    2017-12-02

    Dec 2, 2017 ... ABSTRACT: Silver-impregnated carbon (SIC) and its precursor (un-impregnated) derived from an easily available low cost plant material Prosopis spicigera L. wood (PSLW) carbon was investigated for their ability to remove arsenic from aqueous solutions in batch and column experiments. Arsenic uptake ...

  8. High-rate activated sludge system for carbon management--Evaluation of crucial process mechanisms and design parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Jose; Miller, Mark; Bott, Charles; Murthy, Sudhir; De Clippeleir, Haydee; Wett, Bernhard

    2015-12-15

    The high-rate activated sludge (HRAS) process is a technology suitable for the removal and redirection of organics from wastewater to energy generating processes in an efficient manner. A HRAS pilot plant was operated under controlled conditions resulting in concentrating the influent particulate, colloidal, and soluble COD to a waste solids stream with minimal energy input by maximizing sludge production, bacterial storage, and bioflocculation. The impact of important process parameters such as solids retention time (SRT), hydraulic residence time (HRT) and dissolved oxygen (DO) levels on the performance of a HRAS system was demonstrated in a pilot study. The results showed that maximum removal efficiencies of soluble COD were reached at a DO > 0.3 mg O2/L, SRT > 0.5 days and HRT > 15 min which indicates that minimizing the oxidation of the soluble COD in the high-rate activated sludge process is difficult. The study of DO, SRT and HRT exhibited high degree of impact on the colloidal and particulate COD removal. Thus, more attention should be focused on controlling the removal of these COD fractions. Colloidal COD removal plateaued at a DO > 0.7 mg O2/L, SRT > 1.5 days and HRT > 30 min, similar to particulate COD removal. Concurrent increase in extracellular polymers (EPS) production in the reactor and the association of particulate and colloidal material into sludge flocs (bioflocculation) indicated carbon capture by biomass. The SRT impacted the overall mass and energy balance of the high-rate process indicating that at low SRT conditions, lower COD mineralization or loss of COD content occurred. In addition, the lower SRT conditions resulted in higher sludge yields and higher COD content in the WAS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Making Activated Carbon by Wet Pressurized Pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, John W.; Pisharody, Suresh; Wignarajah, K.; Moran, Mark

    2006-01-01

    A wet pressurized pyrolysis (wet carbonization) process has been invented as a means of producing activated carbon from a wide variety of inedible biomass consisting principally of plant wastes. The principal intended use of this activated carbon is room-temperature adsorption of pollutant gases from cooled incinerator exhaust streams. Activated carbon is highly porous and has a large surface area. The surface area depends strongly on the raw material and the production process. Coconut shells and bituminous coal are the primary raw materials that, until now, were converted into activated carbon of commercially acceptable quality by use of traditional production processes that involve activation by use of steam or carbon dioxide. In the wet pressurized pyrolysis process, the plant material is subjected to high pressure and temperature in an aqueous medium in the absence of oxygen for a specified amount of time to break carbon-oxygen bonds in the organic material and modify the structure of the material to obtain large surface area. Plant materials that have been used in demonstrations of the process include inedible parts of wheat, rice, potato, soybean, and tomato plants. The raw plant material is ground and mixed with a specified proportion of water. The mixture is placed in a stirred autoclave, wherein it is pyrolized at a temperature between 450 and 590 F (approximately between 230 and 310 C) and a pressure between 1 and 1.4 kpsi (approximately between 7 and 10 MPa) for a time between 5 minutes and 1 hour. The solid fraction remaining after wet carbonization is dried, then activated at a temperature of 500 F (260 C) in nitrogen gas. The activated carbon thus produced is comparable to commercial activated carbon. It can be used to adsorb oxides of sulfur, oxides of nitrogen, and trace amounts of hydrocarbons, any or all of which can be present in flue gas. Alternatively, the dried solid fraction can be used, even without the activation treatment, to absorb

  10. Investigation of cryogenic hydrogen storage on high surface area activated carbon. Equilibrium and dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paggiaro, Ricardo Gaspar

    2008-11-29

    This thesis investigates cryo-adsorptive systems for hydrogen storage for mobile applications. By means of macroscopic and microscopic balance models, an extensive analysis is carried out, including among others the investigation of the thermal effects during high-pressure system filling, venting losses during normal operation and inactivity, time-course of system pressure and temperature and gas delivery under various operating conditions. Model results were compared with experimental data, good agreement was obtained. The analysis also includes a comparison to other storage technologies such as cryo-compressed gas and liquefaction storage. The results show that cryo-adsorptive systems have storage characteristics comparable to compressed gas systems, but at a much lower pressure. They are also energetically more efficient than liquid hydrogen systems. However, the necessity of cryotemperatures and thermal management during operation and filling might limit their application. (orig.)

  11. Highly Stable and Active Pt/Nb-TiO2 Carbon-Free Electrocatalyst for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhui Sun

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The current materials used in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs are not sufficiently durable for commercial deployment. One of the major challenges lies in the development of an inexpensive, efficient, and highly durable and active electrocatalyst. Here a new type of carbon-free Pt/Nb-TiO2 electrocatalyst has been reported. Mesoporous Nb-TiO2 hollow spheres were synthesized by the sol-gel method using polystyrene (PS sphere templates. Pt nanoparticles (NPs were then deposited onto mesoporous Nb-TiO2 hollow spheres via a simple wet-chemical route in aqueous solution, without the need for surfactants or potentiostats. The growth densities of Pt NPs on Nb-TiO2 supports could be easily modulated by simply adjusting the experimental parameters. Electrochemical studies of Pt/Nb-TiO2 show much enhanced activity and stability than commercial E-TEK Pt/C catalyst. PtNP/Nb-TiO2 is a promising new cathode catalyst for PEMFC applications.

  12. A novel route to graphite-like carbon supporting SnO{sub 2} with high electron transfer and photocatalytic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xianjie; Liu, Fenglin; Liu, Bing [Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organochemical Materials, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Ministry of Education Key Laboratory for the Synthesis and Applications of Organic Functional Molecules, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Tian, Lihong, E-mail: tian7978@hubu.edu.cn [Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organochemical Materials, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Ministry of Education Key Laboratory for the Synthesis and Applications of Organic Functional Molecules, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Hu, Wei; Xia, Qinghua [Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organochemical Materials, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Ministry of Education Key Laboratory for the Synthesis and Applications of Organic Functional Molecules, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China)

    2015-04-28

    Highlights: • Mesoporous nanocomposites that graphite-like carbon supporting SnO{sub 2} are prepared by solvothermal method combined with a post- calcination. • The polyvinylpyrrolidone not only promotes the nucleation and crystallization but also provides the carbon source in the process. • The graphite-like carbon hinders the recombination of photogenerated electron and holes efficiently. • The mesoporous carbon–SnO{sub 2} nanocomposite shows high photocatalytic activity on the degradation of Rhodamine B and glyphosate under simulated sunlight. - Abstract: Mesoporous graphite-like carbon supporting SnO{sub 2} (carbon–SnO{sub 2}) nanocomposites were prepared by a modified solvothermal method combined with a post-calcination at 500 °C under a nitrogen atmosphere. The polyvinylpyrrolidone not only promotes the nucleation and crystallization, but also provides the carbon source in the process. The results of scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy show a uniform distribution of SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles on the graphite- like carbon surface. Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectra indicate the presence of strong C–Sn interaction between SnO{sub 2} and graphite-like carbon. Photoelectrochemical measurements confirm that the effective separation of electron–hole pairs on the carbon–SnO{sub 2} nanocomposite leads to a high photocatalytic activity on the degradation of Rhodamine B and glyphosate under simulated sunlight irradiation. The nanocomposite materials show a potential application in dealing with the environmental and industrial contaminants under sunlight irradiation.

  13. A facile route for preparation of magnetic biomass activated carbon with high performance for removal of dye pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hao; Zhang, Shengxiao; Li, Xiaoyan; Xu, Qiang; Liu, Junshen; Wang, Zhenhua

    2017-06-01

    A novel and simple method for preparing magnetic biomass activated carbon (BAC) was developed. The BAC was prepared by decomposing fallen leaves, and magnetic nanoparticles were grown in situ on BAC using solvothermal method. The prepared magnetic BAC was characterized with FT-IR, XRD, vibrating sample magnetometer, thermo-gravimetric apparatus, SEM, and high-resolution transmission electron microscope, and results indicate that BAC and magnetic nanoparticles were combined together successfully. To investigate the adsorption ability of the composites, several dyes were selected as sample pollutants, and the sorbent showed high adsorption capacity for the dyes. The solution pH had no significant effect on the adsorption in the range of 5-9. The adsorption behavior of magnetic BAC for dyes followed the Langmuir isotherm model, and the adsorption capacity of congo red, neutral red, and methyl green were 396.8, 171.2, and 403.2 mg/g, respectively. The maximum adsorption capacity in natural water showed no obvious decrease, indicating the strong anti-interference ability of the sorbents. The Gibbs free energy calculated from the thermodynamics data was negative, demonstrating that the adsorption of these dyes on the magnetic BAC was spontaneous. The magnetic BAC showed a great potential for the removal of dye pollutants from environment water.

  14. Converting Poultry Litter into Activated Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disposal of animal manure is one of the biggest problems facing agriculture today. Now new technology has been designed to covert manure into environmentally friendly and highly valued activated carbon. When pelletized and activated under specific conditions, the litter becomes a highly porous mat...

  15. Spatial representation of organic carbon and active-layer thickness of high latitude soils in CMIP5 earth system models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, Umakant; Drewniak, Beth; Jastrow, Julie D.; Matamala, Roser M.; Vitharana, U. W. A.

    2017-08-01

    Soil properties such as soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks and active-layer thickness are used in earth system models (F.SMs) to predict anthropogenic and climatic impacts on soil carbon dynamics, future changes in atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations, and associated climate changes in the permafrost regions. Accurate representation of spatial and vertical distribution of these soil properties in ESMs is a prerequisite for redudng existing uncertainty in predicting carbon-climate feedbacks. We compared the spatial representation of SOC stocks and active-layer thicknesses predicted by the coupled Modellntercomparison Project Phase 5 { CMIP5) ESMs with those predicted from geospatial predictions, based on observation data for the state of Alaska, USA. For the geospatial modeling. we used soil profile observations {585 for SOC stocks and 153 for active-layer thickness) and environmental variables (climate, topography, land cover, and surficial geology types) and generated fine-resolution (50-m spatial resolution) predictions of SOC stocks (to 1-m depth) and active-layer thickness across Alaska. We found large inter-quartile range (2.5-5.5 m) in predicted active-layer thickness of CMIP5 modeled results and small inter-quartile range (11.5-22 kg m-2) in predicted SOC stocks. The spatial coefficient of variability of active-layer thickness and SOC stocks were lower in CMIP5 predictions compared to our geospatial estimates when gridded at similar spatial resolutions (24.7 compared to 30% and 29 compared to 38%, respectively). However, prediction errors. when calculated for independent validation sites, were several times larger in ESM predictions compared to geospatial predictions. Primaly factors leading to observed differences were ( 1) lack of spatial heterogeneity in ESM predictions, (2) differences in assumptions concerning environmental controls, and (3) the absence of pedogenic processes in ESM model structures. Our results suggest that efforts to incorporate

  16. Carbon nanotubes decorated with CoP nanocrystals: a highly active non-noble-metal nanohybrid electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qian; Tian, Jingqi; Cui, Wei; Jiang, Ping; Cheng, Ningyan; Asiri, Abdullah M; Sun, Xuping

    2014-06-23

    The development of effective and inexpensive hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) electrocatalysts for future renewable energy systems is highly desired. The strongly acidic conditions in proton exchange membranes create a need for acid-stable HER catalysts. A nanohybrid that consists of carbon nanotubes decorated with CoP nanocrystals (CoP/CNT) was prepared by the low-temperature phosphidation of a Co3O4/CNT precursor. As a novel non-noble-metal HER catalyst operating in acidic electrolytes, the nanohybrid exhibits an onset overpotential of as low as 40 mV, a Tafel slope of 54 mV dec(-1), an exchange current density of 0.13 mA cm(-2), and a Faradaic efficiency of nearly 100 %. This catalyst maintains its catalytic activity for at least 18 hours and only requires overpotentials of 70 and 122 mV to attain current densities of 2 and 10 mA cm(-2), respectively. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Enhanced electrochemical performance of porous activated carbon by forming composite with graphene as high-performance supercapacitor electrode material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhi-Hang; Yang, Jia-Ying [Central South University, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan Provincial Key Laboratory of Efficient and Clean Utilization of Manganese Resources (China); Wu, Xiong-Wei [Hunan Agricultural University, College of Science (China); Chen, Xiao-Qing; Yu, Jin-Gang, E-mail: yujg@csu.edu.cn [Central South University, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan Provincial Key Laboratory of Efficient and Clean Utilization of Manganese Resources (China); Wu, Yu-Ping, E-mail: wuyp@fudan.edu.cn [Fudan University, New Energy and Materials Laboratory (NEML), Department of Chemistry and Shanghai Key Laboratory of Molecular Catalysis and Innovative Materials (China)

    2017-02-15

    In this work, a novel activated carbon containing graphene composite was developed using a fast, simple, and green ultrasonic-assisted method. Graphene is more likely a framework which provides support for activated carbon (AC) particles to form hierarchical microstructure of carbon composite. Scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) surface area measurement, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Raman spectra analysis, XRD, and XPS were used to analyze the morphology and surface structure of the composite. The electrochemical properties of the supercapacitor electrode based on the as-prepared carbon composite were investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), charge/discharge, and cycling performance measurements. It exhibited better electrochemical performance including higher specific capacitance (284 F g{sup −1} at a current density of 0.5 A g{sup −1}), better rate behavior (70.7% retention), and more stable cycling performance (no capacitance fading even after 2000 cycles). It is easier for us to find that the composite produced by our method was superior to pristine AC in terms of electrochemical performance due to the unique conductive network between graphene and AC.

  18. High activity and low temperature optima of extracellular enzymes in Arctic sediments: implications for carbon cycling by heterotrophic microbial communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnosti, C.; Jørgensen, BB

    2003-01-01

    The rate of the initial step in microbial remineralization of organic carbon, extracellular enzymatic hydrolysis, was investigated as a function of temperature in permanently cold sediments from 2 fjords on the west coast of Svalbard (Arctic Ocean). We used 4 structurally distinct polysaccharides...... hydrolysis in order to determine the relative temperature responses of the initial and terminal steps in microbial remineralization of carbon. The temperature optimum of sulfate reduction, 21degreesC, was considerably lower than previous reports of sulfate reduction in marine sediments, but is consistent...... (chondroitin sulfate, fucoidan, xylan and pullulan) to determine the temperature-activity responses of hydrolysis of a related class of compounds. All 4 enzyme activities showed similarly low temperature optima in the range of 15 to 18degreesC. These temperature optima are considerably lower than most previous...

  19. Electrochemical Hydrogen Storage in a Highly Ordered Mesoporous Carbon

    OpenAIRE

    Dan eLiu; Chao eZeng; Haolin eTan; Dong eZheng; Rong eLi; Deyu eQu; zhizhong eXie; Jiahen eLei; Liang eXiao; Deyang eQu

    2014-01-01

    A highly ordered mesoporous carbon (HOMC) has been synthesized through a strongly acidic, aqueous cooperative assembly route. The structure and morphology of the carbon material were investigated using TEM, SEM, and nitrogen adsorption–desorption isotherms. The carbon was proven to be meso-structural and consisted of graphitic micro-domain with larger interlayer space. Active carbon impedance and electrochemical measurements reveal that the synthesized highly ordered mesoporous carbon (HOMC) ...

  20. Highly efficient degradation of thidiazuron with Ag/AgCl- activated carbon composites under LED light irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yisi [College of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha 410128 (China); Hubei Key Laboratory for Processing and Application of Catalytic Materials, Huanggang Normal University, Huanggang 438000 (China); College of Chemical Engineering, Huanggang Normal University, Huanggang 438000 (China); Zhang, Yan [Hubei Key Laboratory for Processing and Application of Catalytic Materials, Huanggang Normal University, Huanggang 438000 (China); College of Chemical Engineering, Huanggang Normal University, Huanggang 438000 (China); Dong, Mingguang; Yan, Ting; Zhang, Maosheng [College of Chemical Engineering, Huanggang Normal University, Huanggang 438000 (China); Zeng, Qingru, E-mail: 40083763@qq.com [College of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha 410128 (China)

    2017-08-05

    Highlights: • Photocatalytic degradation of thidiazuron was performed in a neutral water matrix. • This was carried out in the presence of Ag/AgCl-activated carbon composites and LED light. • The pH effect and the dominant active species were explored. • Degradation products and pathways in water were studied for the first time. - Abstract: Thidiazuron (TDZ; 1-phenyl-3-(1,2,3-thiadiazol-5-yl)urea) is one of the most widely used defoliant and easy to dissolve in surface water. Risk associated with the pesticide is not clearly defined, so it is important to remove/degrade TDZ with an efficient and environment friendly technology. Here, we investigated the use of Ag/AgCl-activated carbon (Ag/AgCl–AC) composites in photocatalytic degradation of TDZ under LED light. By the synergic effect of Ag/AgCl and AC, the optimum Ag/carbon weight ratio of 2:1 exhibited superior visible-light photocatalytic activity, the highest removal efficiency was close to 91% in pH 7 matrix. Different types of Ag/AgCl–AC composites were tested, all showed much faster photodegradation kinetics than bare Ag/AgCl in 210 min. The degradation products as identified by HPLC–MS revealed that the hydroxylation by hydroxyl radicals and that of oxidation by superoxide radicals as well as holes were the two main pathways for TDZ degradation. Results revealed that the adsorption concentrated TDZ molecules and the photocatalytically generated radicals rapidly degradated TDZ, the two contributions functioned together for removal of the pollutant from water.

  1. Microwave activation of electrochemical processes: High temperature phenol and triclosan electro-oxidation at carbon and diamond electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghanem, Mohamed A.; Marken, Frank [Department of Chemistry, University of Bath, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom); Compton, Richard G.; Coles, Barry A. [Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory, Oxford University, Oxford OX1 3QZ (United Kingdom); Psillakis, Elefteria [Laboratory of Aquatic Chemistry, Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Crete, Polytechnioupolis, 73100 Chania-Crete (Greece); Kulandainathan, M. Anbu [Central Electrochemical Research Institute, Karaikudi (India)

    2007-12-20

    The electrochemical oxidation of phenolic compounds in aqueous media is known to be affected by the formation of electro-polymerized organic layers which lead to partial or complete electrode blocking. In this study the effect of high intensity microwave radiation applied locally at the electrode surface is investigated for the oxidation of phenol and triclosan in alkaline solution at a 500 {mu}m diameter glassy carbon or at a 500 {mu}m x 500 {mu}m boron-doped diamond electrode. The temperature at the electrode surface and mass transport enhancement are determined by calibration with the Fe(CN){sub 6}{sup 3-/4-} redox system in aqueous 0.3 M NaOH and 0.2 NaCl (pH 12) solution. The calibration shows that strong thermal and mass transport effects occur at both glassy carbon and boron-doped diamond electrodes. The average electrode temperature reaches up to 390 K and mass transport enhancements of more than 20-fold are possible. For the phenol electro-oxidation at glassy carbon electrodes and at a concentration below 2 mM a multi-electron oxidation (ca. 4 electrons) occurs in the presence of microwave radiation. For the electro-oxidation of the more hydrophobic triclosan only the one-electron oxidation occurs. Although currents are enhanced in presence of microwave radiation, rapid blocking of the electrode surface in particular at high phenol concentrations still occurs. (author)

  2. Influence of tungsten, carbon and nitrogen on toughness and weldability of low activation austenitic high manganese stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosoi, H.; Abraham, M.; Kutsuna, M.; Miyahara, K. (Nagoya Univ., Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, Chikusa (Japan)); Shimoide, Y. (Daido Inst. of Technology, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Nagoya (Japan))

    1992-09-01

    The effect of alloying elements of tungsten, carbon and nitrogen on high temperature strength, toughness and weldability of Fe-12Cr-15Mn alloy has been investigated. The high temperature strength of Fe-12Cr-15Mn-0.2C-0.1N at 873 K increases with the addition of 2-300W without affecting ductility. The toughness as estimated by Charpy tests, is also not influenced by the addition of 2-3%W, while the increase of carbon content decreases the absorbed energy. The transition temperature shifts to higher temperature by aging at 873 K for 3600 ks, but it is still lower than room temperature. The degradation of toughness after aging is considered to be related to the precipitation of M[sub 23]C[sub 6] on grain boundaries. The weldability evaluated by hot cracking susceptibility is not affected by alloying of tungsten and carbon in this alloy system. It is noted that the alloys studied show less hot cracking susceptibility than commercial AISI 316L stainless steel. (orig.).

  3. Antimicrobial Activity of Carbon-Based Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solmaz Maleki Dizaj

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to the vast and inappropriate use of the antibiotics, microorganisms have begun to develop resistance to the commonly used antimicrobial agents. So therefore, development of the new and effective antimicrobial agents seems to be necessary. According to some recent reports, carbon-based nanomaterials such as fullerenes, carbon nanotubes (CNTs (especially single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs and graphene oxide (GO nanoparticles show potent antimicrobial properties. In present review, we have briefly summarized the antimicrobial activity of carbon-based nanoparticles together with their mechanism of action. Reviewed literature show that the size of carbon nanoparticles plays an important role in the inactivation of the microorganisms. As major mechanism, direct contact of microorganisms with carbon nanostructures seriously affects their cellular membrane integrity, metabolic processes and morphology. The antimicrobial activity of carbon-based nanostructures may interestingly be investigated in the near future owing to their high surface/volume ratio, large inner volume and other unique chemical and physical properties. In addition, application of functionalized carbon nanomaterials as carriers for the ordinary antibiotics possibly will decrease the associated resistance, enhance their bioavailability and provide their targeted delivery.

  4. Production and characterization of granular activated carbon from activated sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Al-Qodah

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, activated sludge was used as a precursor to prepare activated carbon using sulfuric acid as a chemical activation agent. The effect of preparation conditions on the produced activated carbon characteristics as an adsorbent was investigated. The results indicate that the produced activated carbon has a highly porous structure and a specific surface area of 580 m²/g. The FT-IR analysis depicts the presence of a variety of functional groups which explain its improved adsorption behavior against pesticides. The XRD analysis reveals that the produced activated carbon has low content of inorganic constituents compared with the precursor. The adsorption isotherm data were fitted to three adsorption isotherm models and found to closely fit the BET model with R² equal 0.948 at pH 3, indicating a multilayer of pesticide adsorption. The maximum loading capacity of the produced activated carbon was 110 mg pesticides/g adsorbent and was obtained at this pH value. This maximum loading was found experimentally to steeply decrease as the solution pH increases. The obtained results show that activated sludge is a promising low cost precursor for the production of activated carbon.

  5. Highly efficient degradation of thidiazuron with Ag/AgCl- activated carbon composites under LED light irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yisi; Zhang, Yan; Dong, Mingguang; Yan, Ting; Zhang, Maosheng; Zeng, Qingru

    2017-08-05

    Thidiazuron (TDZ; 1-phenyl-3-(1,2,3-thiadiazol-5-yl)urea) is one of the most widely used defoliant and easy to dissolve in surface water. Risk associated with the pesticide is not clearly defined, so it is important to remove/degrade TDZ with an efficient and environment friendly technology. Here, we investigated the use of Ag/AgCl-activated carbon (Ag/AgCl-AC) composites in photocatalytic degradation of TDZ under LED light. By the synergic effect of Ag/AgCl and AC, the optimum Ag/carbon weight ratio of 2:1 exhibited superior visible-light photocatalytic activity, the highest removal efficiency was close to 91% in pH 7 matrix. Different types of Ag/AgCl-AC composites were tested, all showed much faster photodegradation kinetics than bare Ag/AgCl in 210min. The degradation products as identified by HPLC-MS revealed that the hydroxylation by hydroxyl radicals and that of oxidation by superoxide radicals as well as holes were the two main pathways for TDZ degradation. Results revealed that the adsorption concentrated TDZ molecules and the photocatalytically generated radicals rapidly degradated TDZ, the two contributions functioned together for removal of the pollutant from water. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Filling carbon nanotubes with Prussian blue nanoparticles of high peroxidase-like catalytic activity for colorimetric chemo- and biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting; Fu, Yingchun; Chai, Liyuan; Chao, Long; Bu, Lijuan; Meng, Yue; Chen, Chao; Ma, Ming; Xie, Qingji; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2014-02-24

    Facile filling of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with Prussian blue nanoparticles (PBNPs) of high peroxidase-like catalytic activity was performed to develop novel colorimetric sensing protocols for assaying H2O2 and glucose. Fine control of PBNP growth was achieved by modulating the concentration ratio of K3 [Fe(CN)6] and FeSO4 precursors in an acidic solution containing ultrasonically dispersed MWCNTs, and thus size-matched PBNPs could be robustly immobilized in the cavities of the MWCNTs (MWCNT-PBin). Unlike other reported methods involving complicated procedures and rigorous preparation/separation conditions, this mild one-pot filling method has advantages of easy isolation of final products by centrifugation, good retention of the pristine outer surface of the MWCNT shell, and satisfactory filling yield of (24±2) %. In particular, encapsulation of PBNPs of poor dispersibility and limited functionality in dispersible and multifunctional MWCNT shells creates new and valuable opportunities for quasihomogeneous-phase applications of PB in liquid solutions. The MWCNT-PBin nanocomposites were exploited as a peroxidase mimic for the colorimetric assay of H2O2 in solution by using 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) as reporter, and they gave a linear absorbance response from 1 μM to 1.5 mM with a limit of detection (LOD) of 100 nM. Moreover, glucose oxidase (GOx) was anchored on the outer surface of MWCNT-PBin to form GOx/MWCNT-PBin bionanocomposites. The cooperation of outer-surface biocatalysis with peroxidase-like catalysis of interior PB resulted in a novel cooperative colorimetric biosensing mode for glucose assay. The use of GOx/MWCNT-PBin for colorimetric biosensing of glucose gave a linear absorbance response from 1 μM to 1.0 mM and an LOD of 200 nM. The presented protocols may be extended to other multifunctional nanocomposite systems for broad applications in catalysis and biotechnology. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co

  7. Assembling formation of highly dispersed Pd nanoparticles supported 1D carbon fiber electrospun with excellent catalytic active and recyclable performance for Suzuki reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dongdong; Bai, Jie; Wang, Junzhong; Liang, Haiou; Li, Chunping

    2017-03-01

    In this work, the preparation of the palladium nanoparticles with carbon nanofibers (Pd NPs/CNFs) catalyst for the Suzuki reaction was described. In the process, palladium nanoparticles were formed in the reaction of palladium chloride and glucose. The Pd NPs/CNFs complex catalyst was prepared in subsequent calcination processes, a series of characterization revealed that the Pd NPs were well-dispersed on the surfaces of the carbon nanofibers or embedded in the carbon nanofibers. This catalyst showed high catalytic activity for the Suzuki reaction of aryl halide and aryl boronic acid in the ethanol/water (v/v = 4/3) solution, and the catalyst still had good stability after 10 cycles.

  8. Production of activated carbons from almond shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nabais, Joao M. Valente; Laginhas, Carlos Eduardo C.; Carrott, P.J.M.; Ribeiro Carrott, M.M.L. [Evora Univ. (Portugal). Centro de Quimica de Evora

    2011-02-15

    The production of activated carbons from almond shell, using physical activation by CO{sub 2} is reported in this work. The used method has produced activated carbons with apparent BET surface areas and micropore volume as high as 1138 m{sup 2} g{sup -1} and 0.49 cm{sup 3} g{sup -1}, respectively. The activated carbons produced have essentially primary micropores and only a small volume of wider micropores. By FTIR analysis it was possible to identify, in the surface of the activated carbons, several functional groups, namely hydroxyls (free and phenol), ethers, esters, lactones, pyrones and Si-H bonds. By the analysis of the XRD patterns it was possible to calculate the microcrystallites dimensions with height between 1.178 and 1.881 nm and width between 3.106 and 5.917 nm. From the XRD it was also possible to identify the presence of traces of inorganic heteroatoms such as Si, Pb, K, Fe and P. All activated carbons showed basic characteristics with point of zero charge between 9.42 and 10.43. (author)

  9. Self-assembly of cobalt-centered metal organic framework and multiwalled carbon nanotubes hybrids as a highly active and corrosion-resistant bifunctional oxygen catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yiyun; Li, Xinzhe; Li, Feng; Lin, Xiaoqing; Tian, Min; Long, Xuefeng; An, Xingcai; Fu, Yan; Jin, Jun; Ma, Jiantai

    2016-09-01

    Metal organic frameworks (MOF) derived carbonaceous materials have emerged as promising bifunctional oxygen evolution reaction (OER) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalysts for electrochemical energy conversion and storage. But previous attempts to overcome the poor electrical conductivity of MOFs hybrids involve a harsh high-template pyrolytic process to in situ form carbon, which suffer from extremely complex operation and inevitable carbon corrosion at high positive potentials when OER is operated. Herein, a self-assembly approach is presented to synthesize a non-precious metal-based, high active and strong durable Co-MOF@CNTs bifunctional catalyst for OER and ORR. CNTs not only improve the transportation of the electrons but also can sustain the harsh oxidative environment of OER without carbon corrosion. Meanwhile, the unique 3D hierarchical structure offers a large surface area and stable anchoring sites for active centers and CNTs, which enables the superior durability of hybrid. Moreover, a synergistic catalysis of Co(II), organic ligands and CNTs will enhance the bifunctional electrocatalytic performance. Impressively, the hybrid exhibits comparable OER and ORR catalytic activity to RuO2 and 20 wt% Pt/C catalysts and superior stability. This facile and versatile strategy to fabricating MOF-based hybrids may be extended to other electrode materials for fuel cell and water splitting applications.

  10. Fast Degradation for High Activity: Oxygen- and Nitrogen-Functionalised Carbon Nanotubes in Solid-Acid Fuel-Cell Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumov, Olga; Naumov, Sergej; Flyunt, Roman; Abel, Bernd; Varga, Aron

    2016-12-08

    Similar to polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells, the widespread application of solid acid fuel cells (SAFCs) has been hindered partly by the necessity of the use of the precious-metal catalyst Pt in the electrodes. Here we investigate multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) for their potential catalytic activity by using symmetric cell measurements of solid-acid-based electrochemical cells in a cathodic environment. For all measurements, the carbon nanotubes were Pt free and subject to either nitrogen or oxygen plasma treatment. AC impedance spectroscopy of the electrochemical cells, with and without a DC bias, was performed and showed significantly lower initial impedances for oxygen-plasma-treated MWCNTs compared to those treated with a nitrogen plasma. In symmetric cell measurements with a DC bias, the current declines quickly for oxygen-plasma-treated MWCNTs and more slowly, over 12 days, for nitrogen-plasma-treated MWCNTs. To elucidate the degradation mechanisms of the oxygen-plasma-treated MWCNTs under SAFC operating conditions, theoretical calculations were performed using DFT. The results indicate that several degradation mechanisms are likely to occur in parallel through the reduction of the surface oxygen groups that were introduced by the plasma treatment. This finally leads to an inert MWCNT surface and a very low electrode performance. Nitrogen-plasma-treated MWCNTs appear to have a higher stability and may be worthwhile for future investigations. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. High surface area microporous carbon materials for cryogenic hydrogen storage synthesized using new template-based and activation-based approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisner, Gregory P; Hu, Qingyuan

    2009-05-20

    High surface area microporous carbon materials were synthesized using new, simple, and innovative approaches based on traditional template and chemical activation methods. The resulting surface area and porosity were characterized using Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET)-type measurements and analysis, and the hydrogen storage capacity was determined using excess hydrogen adsorption measurements at 77 K and up to 40 bar hydrogen pressure. For our direct one-step aerosol-assisted template-based synthesis method of mixing the template precursor and carbon precursor solutions, a specific surface area value of up to nearly 2000 m(2) g(-1) and an excess hydrogen storage capacity of 4.2 wt% was observed. For our chemical activation-based synthesis method of homogeneously mixing the chemical activation reagent into the carbon precursor solution, a specific surface area value of nearly 3000 m(2) g(-1) and an excess hydrogen adsorption capacity of nearly 5.8 wt% were observed. The surface area and hydrogen uptake results varied systematically with the synthesis parameters, and we observed a strong correlation between the BET values of the specific surface area and the excess hydrogen adsorption capacity.

  12. High performance asymmetric supercapacitor based on molybdenum disulphide/graphene foam and activated carbon from expanded graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masikhwa, Tshifhiwa M; Madito, Moshawe J; Bello, Abdulhakeem; Dangbegnon, Julien K; Manyala, Ncholu

    2017-02-15

    Molybdenum disulphide which has a graphene-like single layer structure has excellent mechanical and electrical properties and unique morphology, which might be used with graphene foam as composite in supercapacitor applications. In this work, Molybdenum disulphide (MoS2)/graphene foam (GF) composites with different graphene foam loading were synthesized by the hydrothermal process to improve on specific capacitance of the composites. Asymmetric supercapacitor device was fabricated using the best performing MoS2/GF composite and activated carbon derived from expanded graphite (AEG) as positive and negative electrodes, respectively, in 6M KOH electrolyte. The asymmetric MoS2/GF//AEG device exhibited a maximum specific capacitance of 59Fg-1 at a current density of 1Ag-1 with maximum energy and power densities of 16Whkg-1 and 758Wkg-1, respectively. The supercapacitor also exhibited a good cyclic stability with 95% capacitance retention over 2000 constant charge-discharge cycles. The results obtained demonstrate the potential of MoS2/GF//AEG as a promising material for electrochemical energy storage application. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. High pressure adsorption isotherms of nitrogen onto granular activated carbon for a single bed pressure swing adsorption refrigeration system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palodkar, Avinash V.; Anupam, Kumar; Roy, Zunipa; Saha, B. B.; Halder, G. N.

    2017-10-01

    Adsorption characteristics of nitrogen onto granular activated carbon for the wide range of temperature (303-323 K) and pressure (0.2027-2.0265 MPa) have been reported for a single bed pressure swing adsorption refrigeration system. The experimental data were fitted to Langmuir, Dubinin-Astakhov and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherms. The Langmuir and D-R isotherm models were found appropriate in correlating experimental adsorption data with an average relative error of ±2.0541% and ±0.6659% respectively. The isosteric heat of adsorption data were estimated as a function of surface coverage of nitrogen and temperature using D-R isotherm. The heat of adsorption was observed to decrease from 12.65 to 6.98 kJ.mol-1 with an increase in surface concentration at 303 K and it followed the same pattern for other temperatures. It was found that an increase in temperature enhances the magnitude of the heat of adsorption.

  14. Highly porous activated carbon based adsorption cooling system employing difluoromethane and a mixture of pentafluoroethane and difluoromethane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askalany, Ahmed A.; Saha, Bidyut B.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a simulation for a low-grade thermally powered two-beds adsorption cooling system employing HFC-32 and a mixture of HFC-32 and HFC-125 (HFC-410a) with activated carbon of type Maxsorb III. The present simulation model adopts experimentally measured adsorption isotherms, adsorption kinetics and isosteric heat of adsorption data. Effect of operating conditions (mass flow rate of hot water, driving heat source temperature and evaporator temperature) on the system performance has been studied in detail. The simulation results showed that the system could be powered by low-grade heat source temperature (below 85 °C). AC/HFC-32 and AC/HFC-410a adsorption cooling cycles achieved close specific cooling power and coefficient of performance values of 0.15 kW/kg and 0.3, respectively at a regeneration temperature of 90 °C along with evaporator temperature of 10 °C. The investigated semi continuous adsorption cooling system could produce a cooling power of 9 kW.

  15. Preparation of Active Carbon by Additional Activation with Potassium Hydroxide and Characterization of Their Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bronislaw Buczek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A commercially available activated carbon was used to prepare active carbon via reactivation with KOH at 750°C. Active carbon was obtained with 60.5% yield. The resulting active carbon showed a well-developed porous structure with specific surface area 2939 m2/g, total pore volume 1.488 cm3/g, and micropore volume 1.001 cm3/g. Process reactivation of carbon changes its particle size as well as density properties and increases by nearly twice the amounts of methane and carbon dioxide adsorbed under high pressure conditions. Such active carbon may be used to enrich methane or carbon dioxide by pressure swing adsorption technique. Other possible applications of reactivated carbon are storage of hydrogen and methane and sequestration of carbon dioxide.

  16. Enhanced capacitive properties of commercial activated carbon by re-activation in molten carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Beihu; Xiao, Zuoan; Zhu, Hua; Xiao, Wei; Wu, Wenlong; Wang, Dihua

    2015-12-01

    Simple, affordable and green methods to improve capacitive properties of commercial activated carbon (AC) are intriguing since ACs possess a predominant role in the commercial supercapacitor market. Herein, we report a green reactivation of commercial ACs by soaking ACs in molten Na2CO3-K2CO3 (equal in mass ratios) at 850 °C combining the merits of both physical and chemical activation strategies. The mechanism of molten carbonate treatment and structure-capacitive activity correlations of the ACs are rationalized. Characterizations show that the molten carbonate treatment increases the electrical conductivity of AC without compromising its porosity and wettability of electrolytes. Electrochemical tests show the treated AC exhibited higher specific capacitance, enhanced high-rate capability and excellent cycle performance, promising its practical application in supercapacitors. The present study confirms that the molten carbonate reactivation is a green and effective method to enhance capacitive properties of ACs.

  17. High concentration powdered activated carbon-membrane bioreactor (PAC-MBR) for slightly polluted surface water treatment at low temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Cong; Yu, Shuili; Shi, Wenxin; Tian, Wende; Heijman, S G J; Rietveld, L C

    2012-06-01

    In this study, different concentrations of PAC combined with MBR were carried out to treat slightly polluted surface water (SPSW) at low temperature (10°C). Effects of PAC on the efficiencies of operation, treatment, and the performance of the process were investigated. It was found that the effluent quality, performance efficiency, resistance of shock load were all enhanced and chemical irreversible membrane fouling was reduced with increasing dosage of PAC in MBR. Only when the concentration of PAC which acted as biological carriers was high enough (i.g., 50 g/L), nitrification without initial inoculation in the filtration tank could start within 19 days and be completed within 35 days at 10°C. Fifty grams per liter PAC was the optimal dosage in MBR for stable and extended operation. Under this condition, mean removal efficiencies of ammonia nitrogen (NH(3)-N), dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and UV(254) were 93%, 75%, and 85%, respectively. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Activated, coal-based carbon foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Darren Kenneth; Plucinski, Janusz Wladyslaw

    2004-12-21

    An ablation resistant, monolithic, activated, carbon foam produced by the activation of a coal-based carbon foam through the action of carbon dioxide, ozone or some similar oxidative agent that pits and/or partially oxidizes the carbon foam skeleton, thereby significantly increasing its overall surface area and concurrently increasing its filtering ability. Such activated carbon foams are suitable for application in virtually all areas where particulate or gel form activated carbon materials have been used. Such an activated carbon foam can be fabricated, i.e. sawed, machined and otherwise shaped to fit virtually any required filtering location by simple insertion and without the need for handling the "dirty" and friable particulate activated carbon foam materials of the prior art.

  19. Hierarchically porous nitrogen-doped carbon derived from the activation of agriculture waste by potassium hydroxide and urea for high-performance supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Kaixiang; Deng, Yuanfu; Chen, Juping; Qian, Yunqian; Yang, Yuewang; Li, Yingwei; Chen, Guohua

    2018-02-01

    Nitrogen-doped carbon with an ultra-high specific surface area and a hierarchically interconnected porous structure is synthesized in large scale from a green route, that is, the activation of bagasse via a one-step method using KOH and urea. KOH and urea play a synergistic effect for the enhancement of the specific surface area and the modification of pore size of the as-prepared material. Benefiting from the multiple synergistic roles originated from an ultra-high specific area (2905.4 m2 g-1), a high porous volume (2.05 mL g-1 with 75.6 vol% micropores, which is an ideal proportion of micropores for obtaining high specific capacitance), a suitable nitrogen content (2.63 wt%), and partial graphitization, the hierarchically interconnected porous N-doped carbon exhibits an excellent electrochemical performance with a high specific capacitance (350.8, 301.9, and 259.5 F g-1 at 1.0 A g-1 in acidic, alkaline, and neutral electrolytes, respectively), superior rate capability and excellent cycling stability (almost no capacitance loss up to 5000 cycles). Furthermore, the symmetric device assembled by this material achieves high energy densities of 39.1 and 23.5 Wh kg-1 at power densities of 1.0 and 20 kW kg-1, respectively, and exhibits an excellent long-term cycling stability (with capacitance retention above 95.0% after 10 000 cycles).

  20. An Asymmetric Supercapacitor with Both Ultra-High Gravimetric and Volumetric Energy Density Based on 3D Ni(OH)2/MnO2@Carbon Nanotube and Activated Polyaniline-Derived Carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Juanjuan; Li, Xiaocheng; Wan, Liu; Liang, Kun; Tay, Beng Kang; Kong, Lingbin; Yan, Xingbin

    2017-01-11

    Development of a supercapacitor device with both high gravimetric and volumetric energy density is one of the most important requirements for their practical application in energy storage/conversion systems. Currently, improvement of the gravimetric/volumetric energy density of a supercapacitor is restricted by the insufficient utilization of positive materials at high loading density and the inferior capacitive behavior of negative electrodes. To solve these problems, we elaborately designed and prepared a 3D core-shell structured Ni(OH) 2 /MnO 2 @carbon nanotube (CNT) composite via a facile solvothermal process by using the thermal chemical vapor deposition grown-CNTs as support. Owing to the superiorities of core-shell architecture in improving the service efficiency of pseudocapacitive materials at high loading density, the prepared Ni(OH) 2 /MnO 2 @CNT electrode demonstrated a high capacitance value of 2648 F g -1 (1 A g -1 ) at a high loading density of 6.52 mg cm -2 . Coupled with high-performance activated polyaniline-derived carbon (APDC, 400 F g -1 at 1 A g -1 ), the assembled Ni(OH) 2 /MnO 2 @CNT//APDC asymmetric device delivered both high gravimetric and volumetric energy density (126.4 Wh kg -1 and 10.9 mWh cm -3 , respectively), together with superb rate performance and cycling lifetime. Moreover, we demonstrate an effective approach for building a high-performance supercapacitor with high gravimetric/volumetric energy density.

  1. Burner Characteristics for Activated Carbon Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    zakaria Supaat

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbonization process has become an important stage in developing activated carbon. However, existing burner are not efficient in time production which take 24 hours to15 days for charcoal production. Therefore, new design of burner/kilns is quite needed in order to produce larger number of charcoal in short time production, to improve charcoal quality regarding to the smooth surface area and pore volume. This research proposed new design burner which divided into two types which are vertical and horizontal types. Vertical is not completed by auto-rotating system while horizontal type is complete by auto-rotating and fume handling system. It developed using several equipment such as welding, oxy-cutting, drilling grinding and cutting machine. From the result of carbonization process shows that coconut shell charcoal need shorter time of 30 minutes as compared to palm shell charcoal of 2 h to completely carbonized. This result claim that the new design better than existing kiln that need longer time up to 24 h. The result of the palm and coconut shell charcoal believe will produce better properties of activated carbon in large surface area and higher total volume of pores. Therefore, this burner is high recommended for producing palm and coconut shell charcoal as well as other bio-based material.

  2. Production of activated carbon from a new precursor: Molasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legrouri, K.; Ezzine, M.; Ichcho, S.; Hannache, H.; Denoyel, R.; Pailler, R.; Naslain, R.

    2005-03-01

    Activated carbon has been prepared from molasses, a natural precursor of vegetable origin resulting from the sugar industry in Morocco. The preparation of the activated carbon from the molasses has been carried out by impregnation of the precursor with sulfuric acid, followed by carbonization. The adsorption capacity, the BET surface area, and the pore volume of the activated carbon were determined. The micropore volume was assessed by Dubinin- Radushkevich (DR) equation. The activated materials are mainly microporous and show the type I isotherm of the Brunauer classification for nitrogen adsorption. The activation in steam yielded a carbon that contains both micropores and supermicropores. Analysis of the nitrogen isotherm by BET and DR methods established that most of obtained carbons are highly microporous, with high surface areas (≥ 1200 m2/g) and very low mesoporosity.

  3. Phenol adsorption by activated carbon produced from spent coffee grounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Cínthia S; Abreu, Anelise L; Silva, Carmen L T; Guerreiro, Mário C

    2011-01-01

    The present work highlights the preparation of activated carbons (ACs) using spent coffee grounds, an agricultural residue, as carbon precursor and two different activating agents: water vapor (ACW) and K(2)CO(3) (ACK). These ACs presented the microporous nature and high surface area (620-950 m(2) g(-1)). The carbons, as well as a commercial activated carbon (CAC) used as reference, were evaluated as phenol adsorbent showing high adsorption capacity (≈150 mg g(-1)). The investigation of the pH solution in the phenol adsorption was also performed. The different activating agents led to AC with distinct morphological properties, surface area and chemical composition, although similar phenol adsorption capacity was verified for both prepared carbons. The production of activated carbons from spent coffee grounds resulted in promising adsorbents for phenol removal while giving a noble destination to the residue.

  4. Composite supercapacitor electrodes made of activated carbon ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 36; Issue 4. Composite supercapacitor electrodes made of activated carbon/PEDOT:PSS and activated carbon/doped PEDOT. T S Sonia P A ... Carbon materials; composite materials; electrodeposition; energy storage and conversion; thin films; conducting polymers.

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF ACTIVATED CARBONS FROM COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harold H. Schobert; M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; Zhe Lu

    2003-09-30

    inferred from their physical and chemical properties. The developed porosity of the activated carbon was a function of the oxygen content, porosity and H/C ratio of the parent unburned carbon feedstock. It was observed that extended activation times and high activation temperatures increased the porosity of the produced activated carbon at the expense of the solid yield. The development of activated carbon from unburned carbon in fly ash has been proven to be a success by this study in terms of the higher surface areas of the resultant activated carbons, which are comparable with commercial activated carbons. However, unburned carbon samples obtained from coal-fired power plants as by-product have high ash content, which is unwanted for the production of activated carbons. Therefore, the separation of unburned carbon from the fly ash is expected to be beneficial for the utilization of unburned carbon to produce activated carbons with low ash content.

  6. Production and Characterization of Activated Carbon Fiber from Textile PAN Fiber

    OpenAIRE

    Amaral Junior,Miguel Angelo do; Matsushima,Jorge Tadao; Rezende,Mirabel Cerqueira; Gonçalves,Emerson Sarmento; Marcuzzo,Jossano Saldanha; Baldan,Maurício Ribeiro

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT: This paper presents the preparation and characterization of carbon fiber felt and activated carbon fiber felt from textile polyacrylonitrile fiber. Carbon fibers are usually related to aircraft manufacturing or high mechanical purposes. Activated carbon fibers are known as excellent adsorbent materials. Despite all advantages, carbon fiber and activated carbon fiber are expensive materials because of their raw material cost. On the other hand, in this study, carbon fiber felt and ac...

  7. N/S/B-doped graphitized carbon encased Fe species as a highly active and durable catalyst towards oxygen reduction reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guang-Lan; Cheng, Guang-Chun; Chen, Wen-Wen; Liu, Cai-Di; Yuan, Li-Fang; Yang, Bei-Bei; Hao, Ce

    2018-03-15

    Exploring cost-effective, high-performance and durable non-precious metal catalysts is of great significance for the acceleration of sluggish oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Here, we report an intriguing heteroatom-doped graphitized carbon encased Fe species composite by introducing N, S and B sequentially. The experimental approach was designed ingeniously for that the FeCl 3 ·6H 2 O could catalyze thiourea to synthesize N, S co-doped carbon materials which would further react with H 3 BO 3 and NH 3 (emerged at the heat-treatment process) to prepare N, S and B co-doped carbon materials (Fe-N/S/B-C). The Fe-N/S/B-C exhibits an impressive ORR activity for its half-wave potential of -0.1 V, which is 36 mV or 19 mV higher than that of the corresponding single or dual doped counterparts (Fe-N-C or Fe-N/S-C) and 31 mV positive than that of Pt/C catalyst, respectively. Further chronoamperometric measurement and accelerated aging test confirm the excellent electrochemical durability of Fe-N/S/B-C with the stable core-shell structure. The remarkable ORR performance and facile preparation method enable Fe-N/S/B-C as a potential candidate in electrochemical energy devices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Branchial carbonic anhydrase activity and ninhydrin positive substances in the Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei, acclimated to low and high salinities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Luke A; Davis, D Allen; Saoud, I Patrick; Henry, Raymond P

    2007-06-01

    The Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei, acclimated to 30 ppt salinity, was transferred to either low (15 and 5 ppt), or high (45 ppt) salinity for 7 days. Hemolymph osmolality, branchial carbonic anhydrase activity, and total ninhydrin-positive substances (TNPS) in abdominal muscle were then measured for each condition. Hemolymph osmotic concentration was regulated slightly below ambient water osmolality in shrimp acclimated to 30 ppt. At 15 and 5 ppt, shrimp were strong hyper-osmotic regulators, maintaining hemolymph osmolality between 200 and 400 mOsm above ambient. Shrimp acclimated to 30 ppt and transferred to 45 ppt salinity were strong hypo-osmotic and hypo-ionic regulators, maintaining hemolymph osmolality over 400 mOsm below ambient. Branchial carbonic anhydrase (CA) activity was low (approximately 100 micromol CO(2) mg protein(-1) min(-1)) and uniform across all 8 gills in shrimp acclimated to 30 ppt, but CA activity increased in all gills after exposure to both low and high salinities. Anterior gills had the largest increases in CA activity, and levels of increase were approximately the same for low and high salinity exposure. Branchial CA induction appears to be functionally important in both hyper- and hypo-osmotic regulations of hemolymph osmotic concentrations. Abdominal muscle TNPS made up between 19 and 38% of the total intracellular osmotic concentration in shrimp acclimated to 5, 15, and 30 ppt. TNPS levels did not change across this salinity range, over which hemolymph osmotic concentrations were tightly regulated. At 45 ppt, hemolymph osmolality increased, and muscle TNPS also increased, presumably to counteract intracellular water loss and restore cell volume. L. vannamei appears to employ mechanisms of both extracellular osmoregulation and intracellular volume regulation as the basis of its euryhalinity.

  9. High power density carbonate fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuh, C.; Johnsen, R.; Doyon, J.; Allen, J. [Energy Research Corp., Danbury, CT (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Carbonate fuel cell is a highly efficient and environmentally clean source of power generation. Many organizations worldwide are actively pursuing the development of the technology. Field demonstration of multi-MW size power plant has been initiated in 1996, a step toward commercialization before the turn of the century, Energy Research Corporation (ERC) is planning to introduce a 2.85MW commercial fuel cell power plant with an efficiency of 58%, which is quite attractive for distributed power generation. However, to further expand competitive edge over alternative systems and to achieve wider market penetration, ERC is exploring advanced carbonate fuel cells having significantly higher power densities. A more compact power plant would also stimulate interest in new markets such as ships and submarines where space limitations exist. The activities focused on reducing cell polarization and internal resistance as well as on advanced thin cell components.

  10. Carbon-Carbon High Melt Coating for Nozzle Extensions Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The High Melt Coating system is applied to a carbon-carbon structure and embeds HfC, ZrB2 in the outer layers. ACC High Melt builds on the time tested base material...

  11. Preparation and characterization of activated carbon produced from pomegranate seeds by ZnCl 2 activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uçar, Suat; Erdem, Murat; Tay, Turgay; Karagöz, Selhan

    2009-08-01

    In this study, pomegranate seeds, a by-product of fruit juice industry, were used as precursor for the preparation of activated carbon by chemical activation with ZnCl 2. The influence of process variables such as the carbonization temperature and the impregnation ratio on textural and chemical-surface properties of the activated carbons was studied. When using the 2.0 impregnation ratio at the carbonization temperature of 600 °C, the specific surface area of the resultant carbon is as high as 978.8 m 2 g -1. The results showed that the surface area and total pore volume of the activated carbons at the lowest impregnation ratio and the carbonization temperature were achieved as high as 709.4 m 2 g -1 and 0.329 cm 3 g -1. The surface area was strongly influenced by the impregnation ratio of activation reagent and the subsequent carbonization temperature.

  12. Cryogenic Adsorption of Nitrogen and Carbon Dioxide in Activated Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Fuzhi; Liu, Huiming; Xu, Dong; Zhang, Hengcheng; Lu, Junfeng; Li, Laifeng

    2017-09-01

    Activated carbon have been used for a long time at low temperature for cryogenic applications. The knowledge of adsorption characteristics of activated carbon at cryogenic temperature is essential for some specific applications. However, such experimental data are very scare in the literature. In order to measure the adsorption characteristics of activated carbon under variable cryogenic temperatures, an adsorption measurement device was presented. The experiment system is based on the commercially available PCT-pro adsorption analyzer coupled to a two-stage Gifford McMahon refrigerator, which allows the sample to be cooled to 4.2K. Cryogenic environment can be maintained steadily without the cryogenic liquid through the cryocooler and temperature can be controlled precisely between 5K and 300K by the temperature controller. Adsorption measurements were performed in activated carbon for carbon dioxide and nitrogen and the adsorption isotherm were obtained.

  13. Carbon nanomaterials for high-performance supercapacitors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen, Tao; Dai, Liming

    2013-01-01

    .... Recently, carbon nanomaterials (especially, carbon nanotubes and graphene) have been widely investigated as effective electrodes in supercapacitors due to their high specific surface area, excellent electrical and mechanical properties...

  14. Active Sites Intercalated Ultrathin Carbon Sheath on Nanowire Arrays as Integrated Core-Shell Architecture: Highly Efficient and Durable Electrocatalysts for Overall Water Splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jungang; Wu, Yunzhen; Cao, Shuyan; Sun, Yiqing; Sun, Licheng

    2017-12-01

    The development of active bifunctional electrocatalysts with low cost and earth-abundance toward oxygen evolution reaction (OER) and hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) remains a great challenge for overall water splitting. Herein, metallic Ni 4 Mo nanoalloys are firstly implanted on the surface of NiMoO x nanowires array (NiMo/NiMoO x ) as metal/metal oxides hybrid. Inspired by the superiority of carbon conductivity, an ultrathin nitrogen-doped carbon sheath intercalated NiMo/NiMoO x (NC/NiMo/NiMoO x ) nanowires as integrated core-shell architecture are constructed. The integrated NC/NiMo/NiMoO x array exhibits an overpotential of 29 mV at 10 mA cm -2 and a low Tafel slope of 46 mV dec -1 for HER due to the abundant active sites, fast electron transport, low charge-transfer resistance, unique architectural structure and synergistic effect of carbon sheath, nanoalloys, and oxides. Moreover, as OER catalysts, the NC/NiMo/NiMoO x hybrids require an overpotential of 284 mV at 10 mA cm -2 . More importantly, the NC/NiMo/NiMoO x array as a highly active and stable electrocatalyst approaches ≈10 mA cm -2 at a voltage of 1.57 V, opening an avenue to the rational design and fabrication of the promising electrode materials with architecture structures toward the electrochemical energy storage and conversion. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Record Methane Storage in Monolithic and Powdered Activated Carbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soo, Yuchoong; Nordwald, E.; Hester, B.; Romanos, J.; Isaacson, B.; Stalla, D.; Moore, D.; Kraus, M.; Burress, J.; Dohnke, E.; Pfeifer, P.

    2010-03-01

    The Alliance for Collaborative Research in Alternative Fuel Technology (ALL-CRAFT) has developed activated carbons from corn cob as adsorbent materials for methane gas storage by physisorption at low pressures. KOH activated carbons were compressed into carbon monolith using chemical binders. High pressure methane isotherms up to 250 bar at room temperature on monolithic and powdered activated carbons were measured gravimetrically and volumetrically. Record methane storage capacities of 250 g CH4/kg carbon and 130 g CH4/liter carbon at 35 bar and 293 K have been achieved. BET surface area, porosity, and pore size distributions were measured from sub-critical nitrogen isotherms. Pore entrances were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A prototype adsorbed natural gas (ANG) tank, loaded with carbon monoliths, was tested in Kansas City.

  16. HYDROGEN SULFIDE ADSORPTION BY ALKALINE IMPREGNATED COCONUT SHELL ACTIVATED CARBON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HUI SUN CHOO

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Biogas is one type of renewable energy which can be burnt to produce heat and electricity. However, it cannot be burnt directly due to the presence of hydrogen sulfide (H2S which is highly corrosive to gas engine. In this study, coconut shell activated carbon (CSAC was applied as a porous adsorbent for H2S removal. The effect of amount of activated carbon and flow rate of gas stream toward adsorption capacity were investigated. Then, the activated carbons were impregnated by three types of alkaline (NaOH, KOH and K2CO3 with various ratios. The effects of various types of alkaline and their impregnation ratio towards adsorption capacity were analysed. In addition, H2S influent concentration and the reaction temperature on H2S adsorption were also investigated. The result indicated that adsorption capacity increases with the amount of activated carbon and decreases with flow rate of gas stream. Alkaline impregnated activated carbons had better performance than unimpregnated activated carbon. Among all impregnated activated carbons, activated carbon impregnated by K2CO3 with ratio 2.0 gave the highest adsorption capacity. Its adsorption capacity was 25 times higher than unimpregnated activated carbon. The result also indicated that the adsorption capacity of impregnated activated carbon decreased with the increment of H2S influent concentration. Optimum temperature for H2S adsorption was found to be 50˚C. In this study, the adsorption of H2S on K2CO3 impregnated activated carbon was fitted to the Langmuir isotherm. The fresh and spent K2CO3 impregnated activated carbon were characterized to study the adsorption process.

  17. Achieving high-powered Zn/air fuel cell through N and S co-doped hierarchically porous carbons with tunable active-sites as oxygen electrocatalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Qiaowei; Wang, Luming; Wu, Mingjie; Xu, Nengneng; Jiang, Lei; Qiao, Jinli

    2017-10-01

    Electrochemical reduction of oxygen is the heart of the next-generation energy technologies to fuel cells and metal-air batteries, of which the reference catalysts suffer from two critical bottlenecks lying in their insufficient electroactivities and unclear active site structures. Herein, we introduce the effectively hierarchically porous carbons (HPCs) as the active-sites enriched platform for oxygen electroreduction. Three quaternized copolymers (PUB, PAADDA and PICP) with different chemical structures are used to pursue Fe/N/S-tailored ORR electrocatalysts. The most efficient one prepared by PAADDA gives the onset potential of 0.94 V and a half-wave potential of 0.85 V in basic solution, as well as superb electroactivities of low H2O2% and high electron transfer number in both alkaline and acidic medium. Surprisingly, they all display high discharge power density as applied to Zn-air fuel cells, and the HPCs-PAADDA catalyst thrillingly reaches 516.3 mW cm-2 when catalyst loading is optimized to 5.0 mg cm-2. The results elucidate that the polymer with long aliphatic chain is propitious to trap metals to create active sites and enwrap silica template to construct uniform pore structure. Only two kinds of nitrogen configuration (pyridinic-N and graphitic-N) are found with distinct structure in these HPCs, which happens to be active sites.

  18. Activated Carbon Preparation and Modification for Adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yuhe

    . The adsorption capacities of these active carbon samples were almost three times that of zeolite. However, the un-modified active carbon had the highest adsorption capacity for butanol vapor (259.6 mg g-1), compared to 222.4 mg g-1 after 10% H2O2 hydrothermal treatment. Both modified and un-modified active carbon can be easily regenerated for repeatable adsorption by heating to 150 °C. Therefore, surface oxygen groups significantly reduced the adsorption capacity of active carbons for butanol vapor. In addition, original active carbon and AC samples modified by nitric acid hydrothermal modification were assessed for their ability to adsorb butanol vapor. The specific surface area and oxygen-containing functional groups of AC were tested before and after modification. The adsorption capacity of unmodified AC samples were the highest. Hydrothermal oxidation of AC with HNO3 increased the surface oxygen content, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area, micropore, mesopore and total pore volume of AC. Although the pore structure and specific surface area were greatly improved after hydrothermal oxidization with 4 M HNO3, the increased oxygen on the surface of AC decreased the dynamic adsorption capacity. In order to get high adsorption capacity adsorbents, we used corn stalk as precursor to fabricate porous carbon. ACs were prepared through chemical activation of biochar from whole corn stalk (WCS) and corn stalk pith (CSP) at varying temperatures using potassium hydroxide as the activating agent. ACs were characterized via pore structural analysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). These adsorbents were then assessed for their adsorption capacity for butanol vapor. It was found that WCS activated at 900 °C for 1 h (WCS-900) had optimal butanol adsorption characteristics. The BET surface area and total pore volume of the WCS-900 were 2330 m2 g-1 and 1.29 cm3 g-1, respectively. The dynamic adsorption capacity of butanol vapor was 410.0 mg g-1, a 185.1 % increase

  19. Preparation of highly developed mesoporous activated carbon fiber from liquefied wood using wood charcoal as additive and its adsorption of methylene blue from solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaojun; Zhang, Fan; Zhu, Junyan; Yu, Lili; Liu, Xinyan

    2014-07-01

    Activated carbon fiber (C-WACF) with super high surface area and well-developed small mesopores were prepared by liquefied wood and uses wood charcoal (WC) as additive. The characterization and properties of C-WACF were investigated by XRD, XPS and N2 adsorption. Results showed the pore development was significant at temperatures >750°C, and reached a maximum BET surface area (2604.7 m(2)/g) and total pore volume (1.433 cm(3)/g) at 850°C, of which 86.8% was from the contribution of the small mesopores of 2-4 nm. It was also found that the mesopore volume and methylene blue adsorption of C-WACF were highly increased as the temperature increases from 750 to 850°C. Additionally, the reduction of graphitic layers, the obvious changes of functional groups and the more unstable carbons on the surface of C-WACF, which played important roles in the formation of mesopores, were also observed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. production and characterization of activated carbon from leather ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dell

    ABSTRACT. Powdered activated carbon (PAC) was prepared from leather buffing waste, sawdust and lignite by carbonization ... Key words: Activated carbon, carbonization, Steam activation, Adsorption efficiency, Leather buffing waste. INTRODUCTION ..... Distribution Measurement” Separation Science and Technology 28 ...

  1. The Adsorption Mechanism of Modified Activated Carbon on Phenol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin J. Q.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Modified activated carbon was prepared by thermal treatment at high temperature under nitrogen flow. The surface properties of the activated carbon were characterized by Boehm titration, BET and point of zero charge determination. The adsorption mechanism of phenol on modified activated carbon was explained and the adsorption capacity of modified activated carbon for phenol when compared to plain activated carbon was evaluated through the analysis of adsorption isotherms, thermodynamic and kinetic properties. Results shows that after modification the surface alkaline property and pHpzc value of the activated carbon increase and the surface oxygen-containing functional groups decrease. The adsorption processes of the plain and modified carbon fit with Langmuir isotherm equation well, and the maximum adsorption capacity increase from 123.46, 111.11, 103.09mg/g to 192.31, 178.57, 163,93mg/g under 15, 25 and 35°C after modification, respectively. Thermodynamic parameters show that the adsorption of phenol on activated carbon is a spontaneously exothermic process of entropy reduction, implying that the adsorption is a physical adsorption. The adsorption of phenol on activated carbon follows the pseudo-second-order kinetics (R2>0.99. The optimum pH of adsorption is 6~8.

  2. MOF-derived crumpled-sheet-assembled perforated carbon cuboids as highly effective cathode active materials for ultra-high energy density Li-ion hybrid electrochemical capacitors (Li-HECs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Abhik; Upadhyay, Kush Kumar; Puthusseri, Dhanya; Aravindan, Vanchiappan; Madhavi, Srinivasan; Ogale, Satishchandra

    2014-03-01

    Lithium ion hybrid capacitors (Li-HECs) have attracted significant attention for use in next generation advanced energy storage technologies to satisfy the demand of both high power density as well as energy density. Herein we demonstrate the use of very high surface area 3D carbon cuboids synthesized from a metal-organic framework (MOF) as a cathode material with Li4Ti5O12 as the anode for high performance Li-HECs. The energy density of the cell is ~65 W h kg-1 which is significantly higher than that achievable with commercially available activated carbon (~36 W h kg-1) and a symmetric supercapacitor based on the same MOF-derived carbon (MOF-DC ~20 W h kg-1). The MOF-DC/Li4Ti5O12 Li-HEC assembly also shows good cyclic performance with ~82% of the initial value (~25 W h kg-1) retained after 10 000 galvanostatic cycles under high rate cyclic conditions. This result clearly indicates that MOF-DC is a very promising candidate for future P-HEVs in a Li-HEC configuration.Lithium ion hybrid capacitors (Li-HECs) have attracted significant attention for use in next generation advanced energy storage technologies to satisfy the demand of both high power density as well as energy density. Herein we demonstrate the use of very high surface area 3D carbon cuboids synthesized from a metal-organic framework (MOF) as a cathode material with Li4Ti5O12 as the anode for high performance Li-HECs. The energy density of the cell is ~65 W h kg-1 which is significantly higher than that achievable with commercially available activated carbon (~36 W h kg-1) and a symmetric supercapacitor based on the same MOF-derived carbon (MOF-DC ~20 W h kg-1). The MOF-DC/Li4Ti5O12 Li-HEC assembly also shows good cyclic performance with ~82% of the initial value (~25 W h kg-1) retained after 10 000 galvanostatic cycles under high rate cyclic conditions. This result clearly indicates that MOF-DC is a very promising candidate for future P-HEVs in a Li-HEC configuration. Electronic supplementary information

  3. Fabrication of highly electro catalytic active layer of multi walled carbon nanotube/enzyme for Pt-free dye sensitized solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbab, Alvira Ayoub, E-mail: alvira_arbab@yahoo.com [Department of Organic and Nano Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Sun, Kyung Chul, E-mail: hytec@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Fuel cells and hydrogen technology, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Sahito, Iftikhar Ali, E-mail: iftikhar.sahito@faculty.muet.edu.pk [Department of Organic and Nano Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Qadir, Muhammad Bilal, E-mail: bilal_ntu81@hotmail.com [Department of Organic and Nano Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Sung Hoon, E-mail: shjeong@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Organic and Nano Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We prepared three different types of enzyme dispersed multiwall carbon nanotube (E-MWCNT) layer for application in Pt-free dye sensitized solar cell (DSSCs). • E-MWCNT catalysts exhibited an extremely good electro-catalytic activity (ECA), compared with the conventional catalyst, when synthesized with lipase enzyme. • E-MWCNT as counter electrode exhibits a high power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 7.5%, which can be compared to 8% efficiency of Pt catalyst. - Abstract: Highly dispersed conductive suspensions of multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) can have intrinsic electrical and electrochemical characteristics, which make them useful candidate for platinum (Pt)-free, dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). High energy conversion efficiency of 7.52% is demonstrated in DSSCs, based on enzyme dispersed MWCNT (E-MWCNT) layer deposited on fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) glass. The E-MWCNT layer shows a pivotal role as platform to reduce large amount of iodide species via electro catalytically active layer, fabricated by facile tape casting under air drying technique. The E-MWCNT layer with large surface area, high mechanical adhesion, and good interconnectivity is derived from an appropriate enzyme dispersion, which provides not only enhanced interaction sites for the electrolyte/counter electrode interface but also improved electron transport mechanism. The surface morphology and structural characterization were investigated using field emission-scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy and electronic microscopy techniques. Electro catalytic activity (ECA) and electrochemical properties of E-MWCNT counter electrode (CE) were investigated using cyclic voltammetry (CV), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements. The high power conversion efficiency (PCE) of E-MWCNT CE is associated with the low charge transfer

  4. High-Melt Carbon-Carbon Coating for Nozzle Extensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, James

    2015-01-01

    Carbon-Carbon Advanced Technologies, Inc. (C-CAT), has developed a high-melt coating for use in nozzle extensions in next-generation spacecraft. The coating is composed primarily of carbon-carbon, a carbon-fiber and carbon-matrix composite material that has gained a spaceworthy reputation due to its ability to withstand ultrahigh temperatures. C-CAT's high-melt coating embeds hafnium carbide (HfC) and zirconium diboride (ZrB2) within the outer layers of a carbon-carbon structure. The coating demonstrated enhanced high-temperature durability and suffered no erosion during a test in NASA's Arc Jet Complex. (Test parameters: stagnation heat flux=198 BTD/sq ft-sec; pressure=.265 atm; temperature=3,100 F; four cycles totaling 28 minutes) In Phase I of the project, C-CAT successfully demonstrated large-scale manufacturability with a 40-inch cylinder representing the end of a nozzle extension and a 16-inch flanged cylinder representing the attach flange of a nozzle extension. These demonstrators were manufactured without spalling or delaminations. In Phase II, C-CAT worked with engine designers to develop a nozzle extension stub skirt interfaced with an Aerojet Rocketdyne RL10 engine. All objectives for Phase II were successfully met. Additional nonengine applications for the coating include thermal protection systems (TPS) for next-generation spacecraft and hypersonic aircraft.

  5. Coating with mesoporous silica remarkably enhances the stability of the highly active yet fragile flower-like MgO catalyst for dimethyl carbonate synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Zhi-Min; Chen, Zhe; Cao, Chang-Yan; Song, Wei-Guo; Jiang, Lei

    2013-07-11

    Flower-like MgO is a highly effective catalyst for the synthesis of dimethyl carbonate through the transesterification method, and coating the catalyst with mesoporous silica significantly enhances the stability of the MgO catalyst.

  6. High performance carbon nanocomposites for ultracapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wen

    2012-10-02

    The present invention relates to composite electrodes for electrochemical devices, particularly to carbon nanotube composite electrodes for high performance electrochemical devices, such as ultracapacitors.

  7. Effect of elemental sulfur in precursors on the pore structure and surface chemical characteristics of high-surface area activated carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zhao

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Analog sulfur-containing precursors (ASCPs have been prepared by adding a certain amount of elemental sulfur (ES into petroleum coke (PC for synthesis of high-surface area activated carbon (HAC. ASCPs make it feasible to control the speciation and content of sulfur in ASCPs, so as to accurately investigate the influence of ES on the pore structure and surface chemical characteristics of the resultant HAC. The results indicate that ES in ASCPs can react with activator KOH and consume a part of KOH amount, thus leading to the deficiency of actual KOH amount for PC activation, eventually making a decrease in the specific surface area and pore volume of HAC. Interestingly, some of ES in ASCPs is transformed into organic sulfur thioether (C–S–C and sulfate (C–SO4–C or sulfonate (C–SO3–C on HAC surface during the activation process. Therefore, the surface chemical characteristics of HAC are modified correspondingly.

  8. Synthesized Magnetic Activated Carbon for Phosphate Removal from Aqueous Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emad Dehghanifard

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: The high efficacy of the adsorption process in this study showed that magnetic activated carbon had good capability in the removal of phosphate and can be used as an appropriate and new method for phosphate removal from aqueous solutions

  9. (Hevea brasiliensis) SEED PERICARP-ACTIVATED CARBON

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-11-03

    Nov 3, 2012 ... abattoir waste water, activated carbon, adsorption isotherms, iron (III) chloride, lagergren equations, rubber seed pericarp. 1. ... threat to the environment, due to their acute toxic- ity to many life ... Wastewater Treatment Adsorption Potential of Rubber Seed Pericarp-Activated Carbon 347 and adsorption [10] ...

  10. REMOVAL OF IMIDACLOPRID USING ACTIVATED CARBON ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    wastewater. KEY WORDS: Chemical activation, Adsorption, Activated carbon, Pesticide removal, Waste treatment. INTRODUCTION. Pesticides (insecticide, weed-killer, fungicide, etc.) are substances used in a wide range of applications especially in agriculture and households to eradicate pests including insects, wild.

  11. A novel high energy hybrid Li-ion capacitor with a three-dimensional hierarchical ternary nanostructure of hydrogen-treated TiO2 nanoparticles/conductive polymer/carbon nanotubes anode and an activated carbon cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Gang; Cao, Liujun; Xiao, Peng; Zhang, Yunhuai; Liu, Hao

    2017-07-01

    Lithium ion capacitors (LICs) are considered to be high-performance energy storage devices that have stimulated intense attention to bridge the gap between lithium ion battery and supercapacitor. Currently, the major challenge for LICs has been to improve the energy density without sacrificing the high rate of power output performance. Herein, we designed a three-dimensional (3D) hierarchical porous nanostructure of hydrogen-treated TiO2 nanoparticles wrapped conducting polymer polypyrrole (PPy) framework with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) hybrid (denoted as, H-TiO2/PPy/SWCNTs) anode material for LICs through a conventional and green approach. Such a unique network can offer continuous electron transport and reduce the diffusion length of lithium ions. A greatly lithium storage specific capacity is achieved with reversible discharge capacity ∼213 mA h g-1 (based on the mass of TiO2) over 50 cycles (@ 0.1 A g-1), which is almostly three times compared with raw TiO2 (a commercial TiO2 nanoparticles powder). In addition, coupled with commercial activated carbon (AC) cathode, the fully assembled H-TiO2/PPy/SWCNTs//AC LICs delivers a maximum energy and power densities of 31.3 Wh kg-1 and 4 kW kg-1, a reasonably good cycling stability (∼77.8% retention after 3000 cycles) within the voltage range of 1.0-3.0 V.

  12. High capacity carbon dioxide sorbent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietz, Steven Dean; Alptekin, Gokhan; Jayaraman, Ambalavanan

    2015-09-01

    The present invention provides a sorbent for the removal of carbon dioxide from gas streams, comprising: a CO.sub.2 capacity of at least 9 weight percent when measured at 22.degree. C. and 1 atmosphere; an H.sub.2O capacity of at most 15 weight percent when measured at 25.degree. C. and 1 atmosphere; and an isosteric heat of adsorption of from 5 to 8.5 kilocalories per mole of CO.sub.2. The invention also provides a carbon sorbent in a powder, a granular or a pellet form for the removal of carbon dioxide from gas streams, comprising: a carbon content of at least 90 weight percent; a nitrogen content of at least 1 weight percent; an oxygen content of at most 3 weight percent; a BET surface area from 50 to 2600 m.sup.2/g; and a DFT micropore volume from 0.04 to 0.8 cc/g.

  13. Percolated pore networks of oxygen plasma-activated multi-walled carbon nanotubes for fast response, high sensitivity capacitive humidity sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, H. P.; Jung, K. H.; Kim, J. H.; Kwon, K. H.; Lee, C. J.; Yun, K. N.; Min, N. K.

    2013-03-01

    We report on the preparation of capacitive-type relative humidity sensors incorporating plasma-activated multi-wall carbon nanotube (p-MWCNT) electrodes and on their performance compared with existing commercial technology. Highly open porous conductive electrodes, which are almost impossible to obtain with conventional metal electrodes, are fabricated by spray-depositing MWCNT networks on a polyimide layer. Oxygen plasma activation of the MWCNTs is also explored to improve the water adsorption of the MWCNT films, by introducing oxygen-containing functional groups on the CNT surface. Polyimide humidity sensors with optimized p-MWCNT network electrodes exhibit exceptionally fast response times (1.5 for adsorption and 2 s for desorption) and high sensitivity (0.75 pF/% RH). These results may be partially due to their percolated pore structure being more accessible for water molecules, expending the diffusion of moisture to the polyimide sensing film, and partially due to the oxygenated surface of p-MWCNT films, allocating more locations for adsorption or attraction of water molecules to contribute to the sensitivity.

  14. Ear-like poly (acrylic acid)-activated carbon nanocomposite: A highly efficient adsorbent for removal of Cd(II) from aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Huacai; Wang, Jincui

    2017-02-01

    Poly (acrylic acid) modified activated carbon nanocomposite (PAA-AC) was synthesized. The structure and morphology of this nanocomposite were characterized by FTIR, SEM, TEM, XRD and Zeta potential. The adsorption of some heavy metal ions on PAA-AC was studied. The characterization results indicated that PAA-AC was a novel and ear-like nanosheet material with the thickness of about 40 nm and the diameter of about 300 nm. The adsorption results exhibited that the introduction of carboxyl groups into activated carbon evidently increased the uptake for heavy metal ions and the nanocomposite had maximum uptake for Cd(II). Various variables affecting adsorption of PAA-AC for Cd(II) were systematically explored. The maximum capacity and equilibrium time for adsorption of Cd(II) by PAA-AC were 473.2 mg g(-1) and 15 min. Moreover, the removal of Cd(II) for real electroplating wastewater by PAA-AC could reach 98.5%. These meant that the removal of Cd(II) by PAA-AC was highly efficient and fast. The sorption kinetics and isotherm fitted well with the pseudo-second-order model and Langmuir model, respectively. The adsorption mainly was a chemical process by chelation. Thermodynamic studies revealed that the adsorption was a spontaneous and endothermic process. The results revealed that PAA-AC could be considered as a potential candidate for Cd(II) removal. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Activated carbon briquettes from biomass materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaya, Alejandro; Medero, Natalia; Tancredi, Néstor; Silva, Hugo; Deiana, Cristina

    2007-05-01

    Disposal of biomass wastes, produced in different agricultural activities, is frequently an environmental problem. A solution for such situation is the recycling of these residues for the production of activated carbon, an adsorbent which has several applications, for instance in the elimination of contaminants. For some uses, high mechanical strength and good adsorption characteristics are required. To achieve this, carbonaceous materials are conformed as pellets or briquettes, in a process that involves mixing and pressing of char with adhesive materials prior to activation. In this work, the influence of the operation conditions on the mechanical and surface properties of briquettes was studied. Eucalyptus wood and rice husk from Uruguay were used as lignocellulosic raw materials, and concentrated grape must from Cuyo Region-Argentina, as a binder. Different wood:rice and solid:binder ratios were used to prepare briquettes in order to study their influence on mechanical and surface properties of the final products.

  16. Production and characterization of lignocellulosic biomass-derived activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namazi, A B; Jia, C Q; Allen, D G

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this work is to establish the technical feasibility of producing activated carbon from pulp mill sludges. KOH chemical activation of four lignocellulosic biomass materials, two sludges from pulp mills, one sludge for a linerboard mill, and cow manure, were investigated experimentally, with a focus on the effects of KOH/biomass ratio (1/1, 1.5/1 and 2/1), activation temperature (400-600 °C) and activation time (1 to 2 h) on the development of porosity. The activation products were characterized for their physical and chemical properties using a surface area analyzer, scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Experiments were carried out to establish the effectiveness of the lignocellulosic biomass-derived activated carbon in removing methylene blue (MB), a surrogate of large organic molecules. The results show that the activated carbon are highly porous with specific surface area greater than 500 m²/g. The yield of activated carbon was greater than the percent of fixed carbon in the dry sludge, suggesting that the activation process was able to capture a substantial amount of carbon from the organic matter in the sludge. While 400 °C was too low, 600 °C was high enough to sustain a substantial rate of activation for linerboard sludge. The KOH/biomass ratio, activation temperature and time all play important roles in pore development and yield control, allowing optimization of the activation process. MB adsorption followed a Langmuir isotherm for all four activated carbon, although the adsorption capacity of NK-primary sludge-derived activated carbon was considerably lower than the rest, consistent with its lower specific surface area.

  17. Microstructure and surface properties of lignocellulosic-based activated carbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-García, P.; Centeno, T. A.; Urones-Garrote, E.; Ávila-Brande, D.; Otero-Díaz, L. C.

    2013-01-01

    Low cost activated carbons have been produced via chemical activation, by using KOH at 700 °C, from the bamboo species Guadua Angustifolia and Bambusa Vulgaris Striata and the residues from shells of the fruits of Castanea Sativa and Juglans Regia as carbon precursors. The scanning electron microscopy micrographs show the conservation of the precursor shape in the case of the Guadua Angustifolia and Bambusa Vulgaris Striata activated carbons. Transmission electron microscopy analyses reveal that these materials consist of carbon platelet-like particles with variable length and thickness, formed by highly disordered graphene-like layers with sp2 content ≈ 95% and average mass density of 1.65 g/cm3 (25% below standard graphite). Textural parameters indicate a high porosity development with surface areas ranging from 850 to 1100 m2/g and average pore width centered in the supermicropores range (1.3-1.8 nm). The electrochemical performance of the activated carbons shows specific capacitance values at low current density (1 mA/cm2) as high as 161 F/g in the Juglans Regia activated carbon, as a result of its textural parameters and the presence of pseudocapacitance derived from surface oxygenated acidic groups (mainly quinones and ethers) identified in this activated carbon.

  18. Urea hydrogen bond donor-mediated synthesis of high-index faceted platinum concave nanocubes grown on multi-walled carbon nanotubes and their enhanced electrocatalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lu; Liu, Kai; Mao, Yu-Jie; Sheng, Tian; Wei, Yong-Sheng; Li, Jian-Wei; Zhao, Xin-Sheng; Zhu, Fu-Chun; Xu, Bin-Bin; Sun, Shi-Gang

    2017-11-08

    We have reported, for the first time, in situ growth of high-index {hk0} faceted concave Pt nanocubes on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) via an electrochemical method in choline chloride-urea (ChCl-U) based deep eutectic solvents (DESs). Mechanistic studies indicate that a urea hydrogen bond donor (HBD) plays a key role in the formation of concave Pt nanocubes, in which the urea HBD preferentially adsorbs onto the {100} faces and blocks the growth of nanocrystals along the 〈100〉 axis. The as-prepared concave Pt nanocubes are characterized to be enclosed mainly with high-index {710}, {610} and {510} facets. It has been determined that the concave cubic Pt/CNT exhibits higher catalytic activity and stability than the flower-like Pt/CNT and commercial Pt/C catalysts, and this is ascribed to its high density of surface atomic steps and the synergistic effect between the CNT and Pt nanocubes.

  19. Microstructure and surface properties of lignocellulosic-based activated carbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Garcia, P., E-mail: pegonzal@quim.ucm.es [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Complutense, E-28040, Madrid (Spain); Centeno, T.A. [Instituto Nacional del Carbon-CSIC, Apartado 73, E-33080 Oviedo (Spain); Urones-Garrote, E. [Centro Nacional de Microscopia Electronica, Universidad Complutense, E-28040, Madrid (Spain); Avila-Brande, D.; Otero-Diaz, L.C. [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Complutense, E-28040, Madrid (Spain)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Activated carbons were produced by KOH activation at 700 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The observed nanostructure consists of highly disordered graphene-like layers with sp{sup 2} bond content Almost-Equal-To 95%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Textural parameters show high surface area ( Almost-Equal-To 1000 m{sup 2}/g) and pore width of 1.3-1.8 nm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Specific capacitance reaches values as high as 161 F/g. - Abstract: Low cost activated carbons have been produced via chemical activation, by using KOH at 700 Degree-Sign C, from the bamboo species Guadua Angustifolia and Bambusa Vulgaris Striata and the residues from shells of the fruits of Castanea Sativa and Juglans Regia as carbon precursors. The scanning electron microscopy micrographs show the conservation of the precursor shape in the case of the Guadua Angustifolia and Bambusa Vulgaris Striata activated carbons. Transmission electron microscopy analyses reveal that these materials consist of carbon platelet-like particles with variable length and thickness, formed by highly disordered graphene-like layers with sp{sup 2} content Almost-Equal-To 95% and average mass density of 1.65 g/cm{sup 3} (25% below standard graphite). Textural parameters indicate a high porosity development with surface areas ranging from 850 to 1100 m{sup 2}/g and average pore width centered in the supermicropores range (1.3-1.8 nm). The electrochemical performance of the activated carbons shows specific capacitance values at low current density (1 mA/cm{sup 2}) as high as 161 F/g in the Juglans Regia activated carbon, as a result of its textural parameters and the presence of pseudocapacitance derived from surface oxygenated acidic groups (mainly quinones and ethers) identified in this activated carbon.

  20. TiO2-Containing Carbon Derived from a Metal-Organic Framework Composite: A Highly Active Catalyst for Oxidative Desulfurization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhadra, Biswa Nath; Song, Ji Yoon; Khan, Nazmul Abedin; Jhung, Sung Hwa

    2017-09-13

    A new metal-organic framework (MOF) composite consisting of Ti- and Zn-based MOFs (ZIF-8(x)@H2N-MIL-125; in brief, ZIF(x)@MOF) was designed and synthesized. The pristine MOF [H2N-MIL-125 (MOF)]- and an MOF-composite [ZIF(30)@MOF]-derived mesoporous carbons consisting of TiO2 nanoparticles were prepared by pyrolysis (named MDC-P and MDC-C, respectively). MDC-C showed a higher surface area, larger pore sizes, and larger mesopore volumes than MDC-P. In addition, the TiO2 nanoparticles on MDC-C have more uniform shapes and sizes and are smaller than those of MDC-P. The obtained MDC-C and MDC-P [together with MOF, ZIF(30)@MOF, pure/nanocrystalline TiO2, and activated carbon] were applied in the oxidative desulfurization reaction of dibenzothiophene in a model fuel. The MDC-C, even with a lower TiO2 content than that of MDC-P, showed an outstanding catalytic performance, especially with a very low catalyst dose (i.e., a very high quantity of dibenzothiophene was converted per unit weight of the catalyst), fast kinetics (∼3 times faster than that for MDC-P), and a low activation energy (lower than that for any reported catalyst) for the oxidation of dibenzothiophene. The large mesopores of MDC-C and the well-dispersed/small TiO2 might be the dominant factors for the superior catalytic conversions. The oxidative desulfurization of other sulfur-containing organic compounds with various electron densities was also studied with MDC-C to understand the mechanism of catalysis. Moreover, the MDC-C catalyst can be reused many times in the oxidative desulfurization reaction after a simple washing with acetone. Finally, composing MOFs and subsequent pyrolysis is suggested as an effective way to prepare a catalyst with well-dispersed active sites, large pores, and high mesoporosity.

  1. Surface-oxidized cobalt phosphide used as high efficient electrocatalyst in activated carbon air-cathode microbial fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tingting; Wang, Zhong; Li, Kexun; Liu, Yi; Liu, Di; Wang, Junjie

    2017-09-01

    Herein, we report a simplistic method to fabricate the surface-oxidized cobalt phosphide (CoP) nanocrystals (NCs), which is used as electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in microbial fuel cell (MFC) for the first time. The corallite-like CoP NCs are successfully prepared by a hydrothermal reaction following a phosphating treatment in N2 atmosphere. When used as an ORR catalyst, cobalt phosphide shows comparable onset potential, inferior resistance, as well as a small Tafel slope with long-term stability in neutral media. The maximum power density of MFC embellished with 10% CoP reached 1914.4 ± 59.7 mW m-2, which is 108.5% higher than the control. The four-electron pathway, observed by the RDE, plays a crucial role in electrochemical catalytic activity. In addition, material characterizations indicate that the surface oxide layer (CoOx) around the metallic CoP core is important and beneficial for ORR. Accordingly, it can be expected that the as-synthesized CoP will be a promising candidate of the non-precious metal ORR electrocatalysts for electrochemical energy applications.

  2. Authors' reply to the comment on 'Novel synthesis of highly durable and active Pt catalyst encapsulated in nitrogen containing carbon for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunjoon; Sung, Yung-Eun; Choi, Insoo; Lim, Taeho; Kwon, Oh Joong

    2017-09-01

    The key point of our study is the pyrolisis of a Pt-aniline complex. During pyrolysis, Pt ions are reduced while aniline is forming a carbon shell around the metal particles, simultaneously, yielding Pt nanoparticle encapsulated by carbon shell. We have shown these results in the manuscript. The ultrasound treatment introduced in our study has nothing to do with the above-mentioned mechanism. It was performed only for the improvement of dispersion and mixing of Pt-aniline and carbon support, not for the synthesis of the Pt-aniline complex. Pt-aniline complexes and Pt encapsulated by carbon shell are formed even without ultrasonic irradiation. Therefore, we did not pay much attention to the ultrasonic parameters used in this study. Making a Pt catalyst encapsulated by carbon shell originated from Pt-aniline complex is still investigated in various aspects and shows outstanding enhancement in activity and durability. The effect of ultrasound on the synthesis of Pt nanoparticle encapsulated by carbon shell will be also investigated in detail to properly address the comments of Dr. Pollet.

  3. Activated Carbon Textile via Chemistry of Metal Extraction for Supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Do Van; Jo, Kyungmin; Kim, Chang-Hyun; Kim, Jae-Hyun; Lee, Hak-Joo; Lee, Seung-Mo

    2016-12-27

    Carbothermic reduction in the chemistry of metal extraction (MO(s) + C(s) → M(s) + CO(g)) using carbon as a sacrificial agent has been used to smelt metals from diverse oxide ores since ancient times. Here, we paid attention to another aspect of the carbothermic reduction to prepare an activated carbon textile for high-rate-performance supercapacitors. On the basis of thermodynamic reducibility of metal oxides reported by Ellingham, we employed not carbon, but metal oxide as a sacrificial agent in order to prepare an activated carbon textile. We conformally coated ZnO on a bare cotton textile using atomic layer deposition, followed by pyrolysis at high temperature (C(s) + ZnO(s) → C'(s) + Zn(g) + CO(g)). We figured out that it leads to concurrent carbonization and activation in a chemical as well as mechanical way. Particularly, the combined effects of mechanical buckling and fracture that occurred between ZnO and cotton turned out to play an important role in carbonizing and activating the cotton textile, thereby significantly increasing surface area (nearly 10 times) compared with the cotton textile prepared without ZnO. The carbon textiles prepared by carbothermic reduction showed impressive combination properties of high power and energy densities (over 20-fold increase) together with high cyclic stability.

  4. The Transport Properties of Activated Carbon Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Vittorio, S. L.; Dresselhaus, M. S.; Endo, M.; Issi, J-P.; Piraux, L.

    1990-07-01

    The transport properties of activated isotropic pitch-based carbon fibers with surface area 1000 m{sup 2}/g have been investigated. We report preliminary results on the electrical conductivity, the magnetoresistance, the thermal conductivity and the thermopower of these fibers as a function of temperature. Comparisons are made to transport properties of other disordered carbons.

  5. Superhydrophobic activated carbon-coated sponges for separation and absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hanxue; Li, An; Zhu, Zhaoqi; Liang, Weidong; Zhao, Xinhong; La, Peiqing; Deng, Weiqiao

    2013-06-01

    Highly porous activated carbon with a large surface area and pore volume was synthesized by KOH activation using commercially available activated carbon as a precursor. By modification with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), highly porous activated carbon showed superhydrophobicity with a water contact angle of 163.6°. The changes in wettability of PDMS- treated highly porous activated carbon were attributed to the deposition of a low-surface-energy silicon coating onto activated carbon (confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy), which had microporous characteristics (confirmed by XRD, SEM, and TEM analyses). Using an easy dip-coating method, superhydrophobic activated carbon-coated sponges were also fabricated; those exhibited excellent absorption selectivity for the removal of a wide range of organics and oils from water, and also recyclability, thus showing great potential as efficient absorbents for the large-scale removal of organic contaminants or oil spills from water. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Performance evaluation of granular activated carbon system at Pantex: Rapid small-scale column tests to simulate removal of high explosives from contaminated groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henke, J.L.; Speitel, G.E. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1998-08-01

    A granular activated carbon (GAC) system is now in operation at Pantex to treat groundwater from the perched aquifer that is contaminated with high explosives. The main chemicals of concern are RDX and HMX. The system consists of two GAC columns in series. Each column is charged with 10,000 pounds of Northwestern LB-830 GAC. At the design flow rate of 325 gpm, the hydraulic loading is 6.47 gpm/ft{sup 2}, and the empty bed contact time is 8.2 minutes per column. Currently, the system is operating at less than 10% of its design flow rate, although flow rate increases are expected in the relatively near future. This study had several objectives: Estimate the service life of the GAC now in use at Pantex; Screen several GACs to provide a recommendation on the best GAC for use at Pantex when the current GAC is exhausted and is replaced; Determine the extent to which natural organic matter in the Pantex groundwater fouls GAC adsorption sites, thereby decreasing the adsorption capacity for high explosives; and Determine if computer simulation models could match the experimental results, thereby providing another tool to follow system performance.

  7. Reuse performance of granular-activated carbon and activated carbon fiber in catalyzed peroxymonosulfate oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shiying; Li, Lei; Xiao, Tuo; Zhang, Jun; Shao, Xueting

    2017-03-01

    Recently, activated carbon was investigated as an efficient heterogeneous metal-free catalyst to directly activate peroxymonosulfate (PMS) for degradation of organic compounds. In this paper, the reuse performance and the possible deactivation reasons of granular-activated carbon (GAC) and activated carbon fiber (ACF) in PMS activation were investigated. As results indicated, the reusability of GAC, especially in the presence of high PMS dosage, was relatively superior to ACF in catalyzed PMS oxidation of Acid Orange 7 (AO7), which is much more easily adsorbed by ACF than by GAC. Pre-oxidation experiments were studied and it was demonstrated that PMS oxidation on ACF would retard ACF's deactivation to a big extent. After pre-adsorption with AO7, the catalytic ability of both GAC and ACF evidently diminished. However, when methanol was employed to extract the AO7-spent ACF, the catalytic ability could recover quite a bit. GAC and ACF could also effectively catalyze PMS to degrade Reactive Black 5 (RB5), which is very difficult to be adsorbed even by ACF, but both GAC and ACF have poor reuse performance for RB5 degradation. The original organic compounds or intermediate products adsorbed by GAC or ACF would be possibly responsible for the deactivation.

  8. Simulating reactive nitrogen, carbon monoxide, and ozone in California during ARCTAS-CARB 2008 with high wildfire activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Chenxia; Kulkarni, Sarika; Zhao, Zhan; Kaduwela, Ajith P.; Avise, Jeremy C.; DaMassa, John A.; Singh, Hanwant B.; Weinheimer, Andrew J.; Cohen, Ronald C.; Diskin, Glenn S.; Wennberg, Paul; Dibb, Jack E.; Huey, Greg; Wisthaler, Armin; Jimenez, Jose L.; Cubison, Michael J.

    2016-03-01

    Predictions of O3, CO, total NOy and individual NOy species (NO, NO2, HNO3, PAN, alkyl nitrates and aerosol nitrate) from a fine resolution regional air quality modeling system for the South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB) and San Joaquin Valley Air Basin (SJVAB) of California are presented and evaluated for the 2008 ARCTAS-CARB campaign. The measurements of the chemical compounds from the fire plumes during the field campaign allow for the evaluation of the model's ability to simulate fire-influenced air masses as well. In general, the model successfully simulated the broad spatial distribution of chemical compounds in both air basins as well as the variation within the basins. Using inventories that reflect 2008 emissions levels, the model performed well in simulating NOx (NO + NO2) in SoCAB. Therefore, the under prediction of O3 over these areas is more likely caused by uncertainties with the VOC emissions, chemistry, or discrepancies in the meteorology. The model did not capture the relatively high levels of O3, and some reactive nitrogen species that were measured off shore of the SoCAB, indicating potential missing sources or the transport from on shore to off shore was not successfully captured. In SJVAB, the model had good performance in simulating different chemical compounds in the Fresno and Arvin areas. However, enhanced concentrations of O3, NOx, HNO3 and PAN near dairy farms were significantly underestimated in the model. Negative biases also exist for O3 and HNO3 near oil fields, suggesting larger uncertainties associated with these emission sources. While the model simulated the total NOy mixing ratios reasonably well, the prediction for partitioning between individual compounds showed larger uncertainties in the model simulation. Although the fire emissions inventory was updated to include the latest emissions estimates and speciation profiles, our model shows limited improvement in simulating the enhancement of O3, CO, and PAN under fire impact as

  9. Carbon dioxide adsorption in chemically activated carbon from sewage sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Andrés, Juan Manuel; Orjales, Luis; Narros, Adolfo; de la Fuente, María del Mar; Encarnación Rodríguez, María

    2013-05-01

    In this work, sewage sludge was used as precursor in the production of activated carbon by means of chemical activation with KOH and NaOH. The sludge-based activated carbons were investigated for their gaseous adsorption characteristics using CO2 as adsorbate. Although both chemicals were effective in the development of the adsorption capacity, the best results were obtained with solid NaOH (SBA(T16)). Adsorption results were modeled according to the Langmuir and Freundlich models, with resulting CO2 adsorption capacities about 56 mg/g. The SBA(T16) was characterized for its surface and pore characteristics using continuous volumetric nitrogen gas adsorption and mercury porosimetry. The results informed about the mesoporous character of the SBA(T16) (average pore diameter of 56.5 angstroms). The Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area of the SBA(T16) was low (179 m2/g) in comparison with a commercial activated carbon (Airpel 10; 1020 m2/g) and was mainly composed of mesopores and macropores. On the other hand, the SBA(T16) adsorption capacity was higher than that of Airpel 10, which can be explained by the formation of basic surface sites in the SBA(T16) where CO2 experienced chemisorption. According to these results, it can be concluded that the use of sewage-sludge-based activated carbons is a promising option for the capture of CO2. Adsorption methods are one of the current ways to reduce CO2 emissions. Taking this into account, sewage-sludge-based activated carbons were produced to study their CO2 adsorption capacity. Specifically, chemical activation with KOH and NaOH of previously pyrolyzed sewage sludge was carried out. The results obtained show that even with a low BET surface area, the adsorption capacity of these materials was comparable to that of a commercial activated carbon. As a consequence, the use of sewage-sludge-based activated carbons is a promising option for the capture of CO2 and an interesting application for this waste.

  10. Monitoring by Control Technique - Activated Carbon Adsorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stationary source emissions monitoring is required to demonstrate that a source is meeting the requirements in Federal or state rules. This page is about Activated Carbon Adsorber control techniques used to reduce pollutant emissions.

  11. nanoparticles-decorated activated carbon nanocomposite based ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T K APARNA

    2018-02-07

    decorated activated carbon. (AC) nanocomposite for selective detection of dopamine (DA) in the presence of uric acid (UA) and ascorbic acid (AA). The nanocomposite was prepared by a simple hydrothermal method and the ...

  12. SILOXANES REMOVAL FROM BIOGAS USING ACTIVATED CARBON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Vagenknechtová

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available SiO2 deposits which cause technical problems on combustion equipment are built by combustion of biogas containing siloxanes. Therefore, in these cases, the siloxanes must be removed from the biogas. For siloxane removal from biogas, its adsorption on activated carbon is often used. After saturation, the saturated adsorbent must be replaced. The adsorbent cost constitutes the main part of the operational costs of the purification equipment. Therefore it is necessary to find an adsorbent having high adsorption capacity for siloxane at a possible low price. Using laboratory apparatus and biogas produced from waste-water treatment sludge at the wastewater treatment plant Prague Bubenec various activated carbons were tested for siloxane removal and their adsorption capacities for siloxanes were estimated, and the adsorbent cost relative to 1 kg of siloxanes removed from biogas were calculated. The lowest price for the removal of 1 kg of siloxanes was determined by Chezacarb, Sil Extra 40 AP and 4–60 adsorbents. Another important information obtained from the test is that the weakly adsorbed siloxane (OMCTS is displaced by the larger molecule of DMCPCS during adsorption.

  13. High performance hydrophobic solvent, carbon dioxide capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nulwala, Hunaid; Luebke, David

    2017-05-09

    Methods and compositions useful, for example, for physical solvent carbon capture. A method comprising: contacting at least one first composition comprising carbon dioxide with at least one second composition to at least partially dissolve the carbon dioxide of the first composition in the second composition, wherein the second composition comprises at least one siloxane compound which is covalently modified with at least one non-siloxane group comprising at least one heteroatom. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) materials and ethylene-glycol based materials have high carbon dioxide solubility but suffer from various problems. PDMS is hydrophobic but suffers from low selectivity. Ethylene-glycol based systems have good solubility and selectivity, but suffer from high affinity to water. Solvents were developed which keep the desired combinations of properties, and result in a simplified, overall process for carbon dioxide removal from a mixed gas stream.

  14. An electron-rich free-standing carbon@Au core-shell nanofiber network as a highly active and recyclable catalyst for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Shao, Changlu; Li, Xinghua; Zhang, Mingyi; Zhang, Xin; Su, Chunyan; Lu, Na; Wang, Kexin; Liu, Yichun

    2013-07-07

    A three-dimensional (3D) free-standing network composed of cross-linked carbon@Au core-shell nanofibers was fabricated by combining the electrospinning technique and an in situ reduction approach. The results showed that a uniform Au layer of approximately 5 nm thickness was formed around the electrospun carbon nanofiber. What's more, it's interesting to note that the Au layer was composed of small Au nanoparticles. And, the as-prepared CNFs@Au network exhibited excellent catalytic activity for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) based on the electron-rich catalytic platform arising from the synergistic effect between carbon and Au. Notably, the free-standing 3D nanofibrous cross-linked network structure could improve the catalyst's performance in separation and reuse.

  15. Activated carbon fiber composite material and method of making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchell, Timothy D.; Weaver, Charles E.; Chilcoat, Bill R.; Derbyshire, Frank; Jagtoyen, Marit

    2000-01-01

    An activated carbon fiber composite for separation and purification, or catalytic processing of fluids is described. The activated composite comprises carbon fibers rigidly bonded to form an open, permeable, rigid monolith capable of being formed to near-net-shape. Separation and purification of gases are effected by means of a controlled pore structure that is developed in the carbon fibers contained in the composite. The open, permeable structure allows the free flow of gases through the monolith accompanied by high rates of adsorption. By modification of the pore structure and bulk density the composite can be rendered suitable for applications such as gas storage, catalysis, and liquid phase processing.

  16. Carbon-based Supercapacitors Produced by Activation of Graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y Zhu; S Murali; M Stoller; K Ganesh; W Cai; P Ferreira; A Pirkle; R Wallace; K Cychosz; et al.

    2011-12-31

    Supercapacitors, also called ultracapacitors or electrochemical capacitors, store electrical charge on high-surface-area conducting materials. Their widespread use is limited by their low energy storage density and relatively high effective series resistance. Using chemical activation of exfoliated graphite oxide, we synthesized a porous carbon with a Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area of up to 3100 square meters per gram, a high electrical conductivity, and a low oxygen and hydrogen content. This sp{sup 2}-bonded carbon has a continuous three-dimensional network of highly curved, atom-thick walls that form primarily 0.6- to 5-nanometer-width pores. Two-electrode supercapacitor cells constructed with this carbon yielded high values of gravimetric capacitance and energy density with organic and ionic liquid electrolytes. The processes used to make this carbon are readily scalable to industrial levels.

  17. Carbon-Carbon High Melt Coating for Nozzle and Nozzle Extensions Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — C-CAT, which has proven carbon-carbon fabrication capabilities, will investigate use of ACC-6 High Melt oxidation protective system on carbon-carbon for use on the...

  18. Quality of poultry litter-derived granular activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Guannan; Guo, Mingxin

    2010-01-01

    Utilization of poultry litter as a source material for generating activated carbon is a value-added and environmentally beneficial approach to recycling organic waste. In this study, the overall quality of poultry litter-derived granular activated carbon was systematically evaluated based on its various physical and chemical properties. Granular activated carbon generated from pelletized poultry litter following a typical steam-activation procedure possessed numerous micropores in the matrix. The product exhibited a mean particle diameter of 2.59 mm, an apparent density of 0.45 g cm(-3), a ball-pan hardness of 91.0, an iodine number of 454 mg g(-1), and a BET surface area of 403 m(2) g(-1). It contained high ash, nitrogen, phosphorus contents and the trace elements Cu, Zn, and As. Most of the nutrients and toxic elements were solidified and solution-unextractable. In general, poultry litter-based activated carbon demonstrated overall quality comparable to that of low-grade commercial activated carbon derived from coconut shell and bituminous coal. It is promising to use poultry litter as a feedstock to manufacture activated carbon for wastewater treatment.

  19. Activated coconut shell charcoal carbon using chemical-physical activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budi, Esmar; Umiatin, Nasbey, Hadi; Bintoro, Ridho Akbar; Wulandari, Futri; Erlina

    2016-02-01

    The use of activated carbon from natural material such as coconut shell charcoal as metal absorbance of the wastewater is a new trend. The activation of coconut shell charcoal carbon by using chemical-physical activation has been investigated. Coconut shell was pyrolized in kiln at temperature about 75 - 150 °C for about 6 hours in producing charcoal. The charcoal as the sample was shieved into milimeter sized granule particle and chemically activated by immersing in various concentration of HCl, H3PO4, KOH and NaOH solutions. The samples then was physically activated using horizontal furnace at 400°C for 1 hours in argon gas environment with flow rate of 200 kg/m3. The surface morphology and carbon content of activated carbon were characterized by using SEM/EDS. The result shows that the pores of activated carbon are openned wider as the chemical activator concentration is increased due to an excessive chemical attack. However, the pores tend to be closed as further increasing in chemical activator concentration due to carbon collapsing.

  20. SU-8 photoresist-derived electrospun carbon nanofibres as high ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-06-09

    Jun 9, 2017 ... Carbon nanofibres (CNF), due to their advantages like large surface area and thus enhanced interface of electrolyte and active material surface, short Li ion transport distances and high resilience to volume expansion during cycling even at high current densities, have drawn a great attention for being used ...

  1. Magneto-carbonization method for production of carbon fiber, and high performance carbon fibers made thereby

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naskar, Amit K.; Ozcan, Soydan; Eberle, Claude C.; Abdallah, Mohamed Gabr; Mackiewicz, Ludtka Gail; Ludtka, Gerard Michael; Paulauskas, Felix Leonard; Rivard, John Daniel Kennedy

    2017-08-08

    Method for the preparation of carbon fiber from fiber precursor, wherein the fiber precursor is subjected to a magnetic field of at least 3 Tesla during a carbonization process. The carbonization process is generally conducted at a temperature of at least 400.degree. C. and less than 2200.degree. C., wherein, in particular embodiments, the carbonization process includes a low temperature carbonization step conducted at a temperature of at least or above 400.degree. C. or 500.degree. C. and less than or up to 1000.degree. C., 1100.degree. C., or 1200.degree. C., followed by a high temperature carbonization step conducted at a temperature of at least or above 1200.degree. C. In particular embodiments, particularly in the case of a polyacrylonitrile (PAN) fiber precursor, the resulting carbon fiber may possess a minimum tensile strength of at least 600 ksi, a tensile modulus of at least 30 Msi, and an ultimate elongation of at least 1.5%.

  2. TESTING GUIDELINES FOR TECHNETIUM-99 ABSORPTION ON ACTIVATED CARBON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BYRNES ME

    2010-09-08

    CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is currently evaluating the potential use of activated carbon adsorption for removing technetium-99 from groundwater as a treatment method for the Hanford Site's 200 West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system. The current pump-and-treat system design will include an ion-exchange (IX) system for selective removal of technetium-99 from selected wells prior to subsequent treatment of the water in the central treatment system. The IX resin selected for technetium-99 removal is Purolite A530E. The resin service life is estimated to be approximately 66.85 days at the design technetium-99 loading rate, and the spent resin must be replaced because it cannot be regenerated. The resulting operating costs associated with resin replacement every 66.85 days are estimated at $0.98 million/year. Activated carbon pre-treatment is being evaluated as a potential cost-saving measure to offset the high operating costs associated with frequent IX resin replacement. This document is preceded by the Literature Survey of Technetium-99 Groundwater Pre-Treatment Option Using Granular Activated Carbon (SGW-43928), which identified and evaluated prior research related to technetium-99 adsorption on activated carbon. The survey also evaluated potential operating considerations for this treatment approach for the 200 West Area. The preliminary conclusions of the literature survey are as follows: (1) Activated carbon can be used to selectively remove technetium-99 from contaminated groundwater. (2) Technetium-99 adsorption onto activated carbon is expected to vary significantly based on carbon types and operating conditions. For the treatment approach to be viable at the Hanford Site, activated carbon must be capable of achieving a designated minimum technetium-99 uptake. (3) Certain radionuclides known to be present in 200 West Area groundwater are also likely to adsorb onto activated carbon. (4) Organic solvent contaminants of concern (COCs

  3. High surface area silicon carbide-coated carbon aerogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsley, Marcus A; Kuntz, Joshua D; Baumann, Theodore F; Satcher, Jr, Joe H

    2014-01-14

    A metal oxide-carbon composite includes a carbon aerogel with an oxide overcoat. The metal oxide-carbon composite is made by providing a carbon aerogel, immersing the carbon aerogel in a metal oxide sol under a vacuum, raising the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol to atmospheric pressure, curing the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol at room temperature, and drying the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol to produce the metal oxide-carbon composite. The step of providing a carbon aerogel can provide an activated carbon aerogel or provide a carbon aerogel with carbon nanotubes that make the carbon aerogel mechanically robust. Carbon aerogels can be coated with sol-gel silica and the silica can be converted to silicone carbide, improved the thermal stability of the carbon aerogel.

  4. Development of porosity and surface chemistry of textile waste jute-based activated carbon by physical activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weifang; He, Feifei; Zhang, Sijia; Xv, Hui; Xv, Zhihua

    2018-01-25

    Two-step physical activation was used to prepare activated carbon from textile waste jute. Raw material was first carbonized under nitrogen and then activated by CO 2 . Based on yield and pore structure, the optimal carbonization temperature and time were 500 °C and 60 min, respectively. Carbonized sample was next activated. The development of porosity and surface chemistry was highly dependent on activation temperature and time. Activated carbon produced at 800 °C was predominantly microporous while that produced at 900 °C was more mesoporous and macroporous. The shift from microporosity to mesoporosity could be used to produce either microporous or mesoporous carbon just by changing the activation temperature. Activation also changed the surface chemistry and created a more carbonaceous structure. The jute-based activated carbon was mostly powdered in form, slightly acidic and effective in adsorbing both heavy metals and organics.

  5. High frequency conductivity in carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Abukari

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We report on theoretical analysis of high frequency conductivity in carbon nanotubes. Using the kinetic equation with constant relaxation time, an analytical expression for the complex conductivity is obtained. The real part of the complex conductivity is initially negative at zero frequency and become more negative with increasing frequency, until it reaches a resonance minimum at ω ∼ ωB for metallic zigzag CNs and ω < ωB for armchair CNs. This resonance enhancement is indicative for terahertz gain without the formation of current instabilities induced by negative dc conductivity. We noted that due to the high density of states of conduction electrons in metallic zigzag carbon nanotubes and the specific dispersion law inherent in hexagonal crystalline structure result in a uniquely high frequency conductivity than the corresponding values for metallic armchair carbon nanotubes. We suggest that this phenomenon can be used to suppress current instabilities that are normally associated with a negative dc differential conductivity.

  6. Activated Carbon, Carbon Nanofiber and Carbon Nanotube Supported Molybdenum Carbide Catalysts for the Hydrodeoxygenation of Guaiacol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Santillan-Jimenez

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Molybdenum carbide was supported on three types of carbon support—activated carbon; multi-walled carbon nanotubes; and carbon nanofibers—using ammonium molybdate and molybdic acid as Mo precursors. The use of activated carbon as support afforded an X-ray amorphous Mo phase, whereas crystalline molybdenum carbide phases were obtained on carbon nanofibers and, in some cases, on carbon nanotubes. When the resulting catalysts were tested in the hydrodeoxygenation (HDO of guaiacol in dodecane, catechol and phenol were obtained as the main products, although in some instances significant amounts of cyclohexane were produced. The observation of catechol in all reaction mixtures suggests that guaiacol was converted into phenol via sequential demethylation and HDO, although the simultaneous occurrence of a direct demethoxylation pathway cannot be discounted. Catalysts based on carbon nanofibers generally afforded the highest yields of phenol; notably, the only crystalline phase detected in these samples was Mo2C or Mo2C-ζ, suggesting that crystalline Mo2C is particularly selective to phenol. At 350 °C, carbon nanofiber supported Mo2C afforded near quantitative guaiacol conversion, the selectivity to phenol approaching 50%. When guaiacol HDO was performed in the presence of acetic acid and furfural, guaiacol conversion decreased, although the selectivity to both catechol and phenol was increased.

  7. Carbon nanostructures under high pressure

    CERN Document Server

    Sundqvist, B

    2002-01-01

    Results from recent high-pressure experiments in the field of fullerenes are briefly reviewed. In particular, new results on one-, two- and three-dimensional polymerized C sub 6 sub 0 and C sub 7 sub 0 are discussed. Results discussed include the first synthesis of a well defined, one-dimensional polymer based on C sub 7 sub 0 , transformations from two-dimensional (2D) to three-dimensional phases in C sub 6 sub 0 , and doping of 2D C sub 6 sub 0 polymers.

  8. MO-Co@N-Doped Carbon (M = Zn or Co): Vital Roles of Inactive Zn and Highly Efficient Activity toward Oxygen Reduction/Evolution Reactions for Rechargeable Zn-Air Battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Biaohua [State Key Laboratory of Organic-Inorganic Composites, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 P. R. China; Beijing Key Laboratory of Energy Environmental Catalysis, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 P. R. China; He, Xiaobo [Changzhou Institute of Advanced Materials, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Changzhou 213164 P. R. China; Yin, Fengxiang [State Key Laboratory of Organic-Inorganic Composites, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 P. R. China; Beijing Key Laboratory of Energy Environmental Catalysis, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 P. R. China; Changzhou Institute of Advanced Materials, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Changzhou 213164 P. R. China; Wang, Hao [State Key Laboratory of Organic-Inorganic Composites, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 P. R. China; Beijing Key Laboratory of Energy Environmental Catalysis, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 P. R. China; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA; Liu, Di-Jia [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA; Shi, Ruixing [State Key Laboratory of Organic-Inorganic Composites, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 P. R. China; Chen, Jinnan [State Key Laboratory of Organic-Inorganic Composites, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 P. R. China; Yin, Hongwei [State Key Laboratory of Organic-Inorganic Composites, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 P. R. China

    2017-06-14

    A highly efficient bifunctional oxygen catalyst is required for practical applications of fuel cells and metal-air batteries, as oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER) are their core electrode reactions. Here, the MO-Co@ N-doped carbon (NC, M = Zn or Co) is developed as a highly active ORR/OER bifunctional catalyst via pyrolysis of a bimetal metal-organic framework containing Zn and Co, i.e., precursor (CoZn). The vital roles of inactive Zn in developing highly active bifunctional oxygen catalysts are unraveled. When the precursors include Zn, the surface contents of pyridinic N for ORR and the surface contents of Co-N-x and Co3+/Co2+ ratios for OER are enhanced, while the high specific surface areas, high porosity, and high electrochemical active surface areas are also achieved. Furthermore, the synergistic effects between Zn-based and Co-based species can promote the well growth of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) at high pyrolysis temperatures (>= 700 degrees C), which is favorable for charge transfer. The optimized CoZn-NC-700 shows the highly bifunctional ORR/OER activity and the excellent durability during the ORR/OER processes, even better than 20 wt% Pt/C (for ORR) and IrO2 (for OER). CoZn-NC-700 also exhibits the prominent Zn-air battery performance and even outperforms the mixture of 20 wt% Pt/C and IrO2.

  9. Methane adsorption on activated carbon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marietta de Rooij; Peter Jansen; Folkert Koopman; Andras Perl; prof. dr. Wim van Gemert

    2014-01-01

    Methane storage in adsorbed form is a promising way to effectively and safely store fuel for vehicular transportation or for any other potential application. In a solid adsorbent, nanometer wide pores can trap methane by van der Waals forces as high density fluid at low pressure and room

  10. Making Activated Carbon for Storing Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtowicz, Marek A.; Serio, Michael A.; Suuberg, Eric M.

    2005-01-01

    Solid disks of microporous activated carbon, produced by a method that enables optimization of pore structure, have been investigated as means of storing gas (especially hydrogen for use as a fuel) at relatively low pressure through adsorption on pore surfaces. For hydrogen and other gases of practical interest, a narrow distribution of pore sizes carbon is alternately (1) heated to the lower of two elevated temperatures in air or other oxidizing gas, causing the formation of stable carbon/oxygen surface complexes; then (2) heated to the higher of the two elevated temperatures in flowing helium or other inert gas, causing the desorption of the surface complexes in the form of carbon monoxide. In the present method, pore structure is optimized partly by heating to a temperature of 1,100 C during carbonization. Another aspect of the method exploits the finding that for each gas-storage pressure, gas-storage capacity can be maximized by burning off a specific proportion (typically between 10 and 20 weight percent) of the carbon during the cyclic chemisorption/desorption process.

  11. ACTIVATED CARBON/REFRIGERANT COMBINATIONS FOR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ES Obe

    No. 1, March, 2001. 53. ACTIVATED CARBON/REFRIGERANT COMBINATIONS. FOR SOLAR REFRIGERATION APPLICATION. By. E.E. ANYANWU. 1. AND N.V. .... may be assumed that the perfect gas law is obeyed approximately by the vapour. Thus,. (2). Hence by integrating,. This linear relationship between log P and.

  12. Beef-derived Mesoporous Carbon as Highly Efficient Support for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NICO

    PtRuIr/C-Beef was highly active for methanol electro-oxidation. PtRuIr/C-Beef showed superior catalytic ... Carbon materials, electrocatalysts, support, beef, methanol oxidation. 1. Introduction. The binary PtRu alloy is ..... support for electrocatalysts used in direct methanol fuel cells. Acknowledgements. The authors would ...

  13. Effect of characteristics of activated carbon on removal of bromate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, W.J.; Cheng, Y.L. [Hung Kuang University, Taichung (Taiwan). Dept. of Environmental Engineering

    2008-02-15

    This study evaluates how the characteristics of activated carbon (AC) influence the adsorption-reduction of bromate (BrO{sup 3-}) by performing kinetic and isotherm tests. Experimental results reveal that both physical and chemical effects simultaneously affect the adsorption-reduction process. The wood-based carbons contained more mesopores than coconut- and coal-based carbons, resulting in the adsorption of more BrO{sup 3-}. The equilibrium- and maximum-adsorption capacities were calculated as a function of the effect of mesopore volume. The carbon surface chemistry seems to be significant in the adsorption-reduction process. Activated carbons with high pH(zpc) values and many basic groups exhibit a neutral or positive charge under typical pH conditions, promoting BrO{sup 3-} adsorption-reduction at the carbon surface. The kinetic data obtained from three forms of carbons have been analyzed using three kinetic models-pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order and intraparticle diffusion models. Among the kinetic models studied, the intraparticle diffusion was the best applicable model to describe the adsorption of BrO{sup 3-} onto AC.

  14. Preparation of activated carbons from macadamia nut shell and coconut shell by air activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tam, M.S.; Antal, M.J. Jr.

    1999-11-01

    A novel, three-step process for the production of high-quality activated carbons from macadamia nut shell and coconut shell charcoals is described. In this process the charcoal is (1) heated to a high temperature (carbonized), (2) oxidized in air following a stepwise heating program from low (ca. 450 K) to high (ca. 660 K) temperatures (oxygenated), and (3) heated again in an inert environment to a high temperature (activated). By use of this procedure, activated carbons with surface areas greater than 1,000 m{sub 2}/g are manufactured with an overall yield of 15% (based on the dry shell feed). Removal of carbon mass by the development of mesopores and macropores is largely responsible for increases in the surface area of the carbons above 600 m{sub 2}/g. Thus, the surface area per gram of activated carbon can be represented by an inverse function of the yield for burnoffs between 15 and 60%. These findings are supported by mass-transfer calculations and pore-size distribution measurements. A kinetic model for gasification of carbon by oxygen, which provides for an Eley-Rideal type reaction of a surface oxide with oxygen in air, fits the measured gasification rates reasonably well over the temperature range of 550--660 K.

  15. Ammonia Activation of Carbonized Polysaccharides and their Application for the Carbon Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Tae Youl; Park, Seo Kyoung; Lee, Je Seung [Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Porous carbons derived from polysaccharides (cellulose, chitosan, and alginic acid) have been prepared by heat treatment under N{sub 2} atmosphere and activated at high temperature under ammonia gas atmosphere. The CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities of prepared porous carbon materials and their dependence on the surface area and pore volume were investigated. The surface area of pristine carbon from cellulose, chitosan, and alginic acid at 800 .deg. C was measured as 406.5, 206.8, and 258.2 m{sup 2}/g with the pore volume of 0.27, 0.14, and 0.15 cm{sup 3}/g, respectively. The surface area and pore volume of carbons derived from cellulose, chitosan, and alginic acid further increased up to 976.6, 883.4, and 1031.9 m{sup 2}/g and 0.54, 0.45, and 0.65 cm{sup 3}/g, respectively, after the activation at high temperature under ammonia gas environment. The CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities of pristine carbons were measured as high as 1.85 mmol/g and further increased up to 2.44 mmol/g by ammonia activation.

  16. Promoting direct interspecies electron transfer with activated carbon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Fanghua; Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Shrestha, Pravin M.

    2012-01-01

    Granular activated carbon (GAC) is added to methanogenic digesters to enhance conversion of wastes to methane, but the mechanism(s) for GAC’s stimulatory effect are poorly understood. GAC has high electrical conductivity and thus it was hypothesized that one mechanism for GAC stimulation...

  17. Study of lead adsorption on activated carbons | Kouakou ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Powder and granular activated carbons showed different adsorption capacity. The amount of Pb2+ adsorbed reached44.58, 38.96 and 39.06 mg/g for CPA, CGA 830 and CGA 1230 respectively at 25 °C. Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models were used to represent the equilibrium data. Despite the high value of ...

  18. Carbon sink activity of managed grasslands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klumpp, Katja; Chabbi, Abad; Gastal, Francois; Senapati, Nimai; Charrier, Xavier; Darsonville, Olivier; Creme, Alexandra

    2017-04-01

    In agriculture, a large proportion of GHG emission saving potential may be achieved by means of soil C sequestration. Recent demonstrations of carbon sink activities however, often questioned the existence of C storing grasslands, as uncertainty surrounding estimates are often larger than the sink itself. Besides climate, key components of the carbon sink activity in grasslands are type and intensity of management practices. Here, we analysed long term data on C flux and soil organic carbon stocks for two long term (>13yrs) national observation sites in France (SOERE-ACBB). These sites comprise a number of grassland fields and managements options (i.e. permanent, sowing, grazing, mowing, and fertilization) offering an opportunity to study carbon offsets (i.e. compensation of CH4 and N2O emissions), climatic-management interactions and trade-offs concerning ecosystem services (e.g. production). Furthermore, for some grassland fields, the carbon sink activity was compared using two methods; repeated soil inventory and estimation of the ecosystem C budget by continuous measurement of CO2 exchange (i.e. eddy covariance) in combination with quantification of other C imports and exports, necessary to estimate net C storage. In general grasslands, were a potential sink of C (i.e. net ecosystem exchange, NEE), where grazed sites had lower NEE compared the cut site. However, when it comes to net C storage (NCS), mowing reduced markedly potential sink leading to very low NCS compared to grazed sites. Including non-CO2 fluxes (CH4 and N2O emission) in the budget, revealed that GHG emissions were offset by C sink activity.

  19. Cooperative redox activation for carbon dioxide conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Zhong; Nielsen, Dennis U; Lindhardt, Anders T; Daasbjerg, Kim; Skrydstrup, Troels

    2016-12-16

    A longstanding challenge in production chemistry is the development of catalytic methods for the transformation of carbon dioxide into useful chemicals. Silane and borane promoted reductions can be fined-tuned to provide a number of C1-building blocks under mild conditions, but these approaches are limited because of the production of stoichiometric waste compounds. Here we report on the conversion of CO2 with diaryldisilanes, which through cooperative redox activation generate carbon monoxide and a diaryldisiloxane that actively participate in a palladium-catalysed carbonylative Hiyama-Denmark coupling for the synthesis of an array of pharmaceutically relevant diarylketones. Thus the disilane reagent not only serves as the oxygen abstracting agent from CO2, but the silicon-containing 'waste', produced through oxygen insertion into the Si-Si bond, participates as a reagent for the transmetalation step in the carbonylative coupling. Hence this concept of cooperative redox activation opens up for new avenues in the conversion of CO2.

  20. Cooperative redox activation for carbon dioxide conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Zhong; Nielsen, Dennis U.; Lindhardt, Anders T.; Daasbjerg, Kim; Skrydstrup, Troels

    2016-12-01

    A longstanding challenge in production chemistry is the development of catalytic methods for the transformation of carbon dioxide into useful chemicals. Silane and borane promoted reductions can be fined-tuned to provide a number of C1-building blocks under mild conditions, but these approaches are limited because of the production of stoichiometric waste compounds. Here we report on the conversion of CO2 with diaryldisilanes, which through cooperative redox activation generate carbon monoxide and a diaryldisiloxane that actively participate in a palladium-catalysed carbonylative Hiyama-Denmark coupling for the synthesis of an array of pharmaceutically relevant diarylketones. Thus the disilane reagent not only serves as the oxygen abstracting agent from CO2, but the silicon-containing `waste', produced through oxygen insertion into the Si-Si bond, participates as a reagent for the transmetalation step in the carbonylative coupling. Hence this concept of cooperative redox activation opens up for new avenues in the conversion of CO2.

  1. Soil carbon content and relative abundance of high affinity H2-oxidizing bacteria predict atmospheric H2 soil uptake activity better than soil microbial community composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khdhiri, Mondher; Hesse, Laura; Popa, Maria Elena; Quiza, Liliana; Lalonde, Isabelle; Meredith, Laura K.; Röckmann, Thomas; Constant, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Soil-atmosphere exchange of H2 is controlled by gas diffusion and the microbial production and oxidation activities in soil. Among these parameters, the H2 oxidation activity catalyzed by soil microorganisms harboring high affinity hydrogenase is the most difficult variable to parameterize because

  2. The roles and electrochemical characterizations of activated carbon in zinc air battery cathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eom, Seung-Wook; Lee, Chang-Woo; Yun, Mun-Soo [Battery Research Group, Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute (KERI), P.O. Box 20, Changwon 641-600 (Korea, Republic of); Sun, Yang-Kook [Department of Chemical Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-12-01

    We prepared cathodes with various types of activated carbon and measured the cathodes' electrochemical performance according to the kind of activated carbon. Activated carbon supplies airflow channels and reaction sites in the cathode of zinc air batteries. When we use activated carbon with a high specific surface area as the cathode's catalyst substrate, we expect high electrochemical performance because this type of carbon provides more air flow channels and reaction sites. We focused on investigating the relationship between the cathode's pore structure and its electrochemical characterizations. We also studied the effects of the various activated carbon materials on the zinc air batteries' performance. Increasing the macropores or mesopores in the activated carbon resulted in achieving more power from the battery. (author)

  3. High pressure solubility of carbon dioxide (CO2) in aqueous solution of piperazine (PZ) activated N-methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) solvent for CO2 capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Saleem Nawaz; Hailegiorgis, Sintayehu Mekuria; Man, Zakaria; Shariff, Azmi Mohd

    2017-10-01

    In this study, the solubility of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the aqueous solution of piperazine (PZ) activated N-methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) was investigated. In the aqueous solution the concentrations of the N-methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) and piperazine (PZ) were kept constant at 30 wt. % and 3 wt. %, respectively. The solubility experiments were carried out between the temperatures ranges of 303.15 to 333.15 K. The pressure range was selected as 2-50 bar for solubility of carbon dioxide in the aqueous solution. The solubility of the CO2 is reported in terms of CO2 loading capacity of the solvent. The loading capacity of the solvent is the ratio between the numbers of moles of CO2 absorbed to the numbers of moles of solvent used. The experimental data showed that the CO2 loading increased with increase in CO2 partial pressure, while it decreased with increase in system's temperature. It was also observed from the experimental data that the higher pressure favors the absorption process while the increased temperature hinders the absorption process of CO2 capture. The loading capacity of the investigated solvent was compared with the loading capacity of the solvents reported in the literature. The investigated solvent showed better solubility in terms of loading capacity.

  4. A Magnesium-Activated Carbon Hybrid Capacitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, HD; Shterenberg, I; Gofer, Y; Doe, RE; Fischer, CC; Ceder, G; Aurbach, D

    2013-12-11

    Prototype cells of hybrid capacitor were developed, comprising activated carbon (AC) cloth and magnesium (Mg) foil as the positive and negative electrodes, respectively. The electrolyte solution included ether solvent (TBF) and a magnesium organo-halo-aluminate complex 0.25 M Mg2Cl3+-Ph2AlCl2-. In this solution Mg can be deposited/dissolved reversibly for thousands of cycles with high reversibility (100% cycling efficiency). The main barrier for integrating porous AC electrodes with this electrolyte solution was the saturation of the pores with the large ions in the AC prior to reaching the potential limit. This is due to the existence of bulky Mg and Al based ionic complexes consisting Cl, alkyl or aryl (R), and THF ligands. This problem was resolved by adding 0.5 M of lithium chloride (LiCl), thus introducing smaller ionic species to the solution. This Mg hybrid capacitor system demonstrated a stable cycle performance for many thousands of cycles with a specific capacitance of 90 Fg(-1) for the AC positive electrodes along a potential range of 2.4 V. (C) 2014 The Electrochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  5. Production and characterization of activated carbon from leather ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Powdered activated carbon (PAC) was prepared from leather buffing waste, sawdust and lignite by carbonization at temperatures between 500 – 800oC followed by steam activation. Experimental results reveal a general decrease in yield of carbon residue with increase in temperature of carbonization. Samples of lignite ...

  6. High Density Methane Storage in Nanoporous Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rash, Tyler; Dohnke, Elmar; Soo, Yuchoong; Maland, Brett; Doynov, Plamen; Lin, Yuyi; Pfeifer, Peter; Mriglobal Collaboration; All-Craft Team

    2014-03-01

    Development of low-pressure, high-capacity adsorbent based storage technology for natural gas (NG) as fuel for advanced transportation (flat-panel tank for NG vehicles) is necessary in order to address the temperature, pressure, weight, and volume constraints present in conventional storage methods (CNG & LNG.) Subcritical nitrogen adsorption experiments show that our nanoporous carbon hosts extended narrow channels which generate a high surface area and strong Van der Waals forces capable of increasing the density of NG into a high-density fluid. This improvement in storage density over compressed natural gas without an adsorbent occurs at ambient temperature and pressures ranging from 0-260 bar (3600 psi.) The temperature, pressure, and storage capacity of a 40 L flat-panel adsorbed NG tank filled with 20 kg of nanoporous carbon will be featured.

  7. Stereocontrolled generation of nucleophilic (Z)- or (E)-α-fluoroalkenylchromium reagents via carbon-fluorine bond activation: highly stereoselective synthesis of (E)- or (Z)-β-fluoroallylic alcohols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nihei, Takashi; Yokotani, Saya; Ishihara, Takashi; Konno, Tsutomu

    2014-02-14

    Highly nucleophilic (Z)- or (E)-α-fluoroalkenylchromium species could be generated in a stereoselective manner via C-F bond activation of CBrF2-containing molecules, and they reacted smoothly with various aldehydes to give (E)- or (Z)-β-fluoroallylic alcohol derivatives in high yields, respectively.

  8. Carbon nanomaterials: Biologically active fullerene derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanović, Gordana; Djordjević, Aleksandar

    2016-01-01

    Since their discovery, fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, and graphene attract significant attention of researches in various scientific fields including biomedicine. Nano-scale size and a possibility for diverse surface modifications allow carbon nanoallotropes to become an indispensable nanostructured material in nanotechnologies, including nanomedicine. Manipulation of surface chemistry has created diverse populations of water-soluble derivatives of fullerenes, which exhibit different behaviors. Both non-derivatized and derivatized fullerenes show various biological activities. Cellular processes that underline their toxicity are oxidative, genotoxic, and cytotoxic responses.The antioxidant/cytoprotective properties of fullerenes and derivatives have been considered in the prevention of organ oxidative damage and treatment. The same unique physiochemical properties of nanomaterials may also be associated with potential health hazards. Non-biodegradability and toxicity of carbon nanoparticles still remain a great concern in the area of biomedical application. In this review, we report on basic physical and chemical properties of carbon nano-clusters--fullerenes, nanotubes, and grapheme--their specificities, activities, and potential application in biological systems. Special emphasis is given to our most important results obtained in vitro and in vivo using polyhydroxylated fullerene derivative C₆₀(OH)₂₄.

  9. Carbon nanomaterials: Biologically active fullerene derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdanović Gordana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Since their discovery, fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, and graphene attract significant attention of researches in various scientific fields including biomedicine. Nano-scale size and a possibility for diverse surface modifications allow carbon nanoallotropes to become an indispensable nanostructured material in nanotechnologies, including nanomedicine. Manipulation of surface chemistry has created diverse populations of water-soluble derivatives of fullerenes, which exhibit different behaviors. Both non-derivatized and derivatized fullerenes show various biological activities. Cellular processes that underline their toxicity are oxidative, genotoxic, and cytotoxic responses. The antioxidant/cytoprotective properties of fullerenes and derivatives have been considered in the prevention of organ oxidative damage and treatment. The same unique physiochemical properties of nanomaterials may also be associated with potential health hazards. Non-biodegradability and toxicity of carbon nanoparticles still remain a great concern in the area of biomedical application. In this review, we report on basic physical and chemical properties of carbon nano-clusters - fullerenes, nanotubes, and graphene - their specificities, activities, and potential application in biological systems. Special emphasis is given to our most important results obtained in vitro and in vivo using polyhydroxylated fullerene derivative C60(OH24. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III45005

  10. Bimodal activated carbons derived from resorcinol-formaldehyde cryogels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szczurek, Andrzej; Amaral-Labat, Gisele; Fierro, Vanessa; Celzard, Alain [Institut Jean Lamour-UMR CNRS 7198, CNRS-Nancy-Universite-UPV-Metz, Departement Chimie et Physique des Solides et des Surfaces. ENSTIB, 27 rue Philippe Seguin, BP 1041, 88051 Epinal cedex 9 (France); Pizzi, Antonio, E-mail: Alain.Celzard@enstib.uhp-nancy.fr [ENSTIB-LERMAB, Nancy-Universite, 27 rue Philippe Seguin, BP1041, 88051 Epinal cedex 9 (France)

    2011-06-15

    Resorcinol-formaldehyde cryogels prepared at different dilution ratios have been activated with phosphoric acid at 450 deg. C and compared with their carbonaceous counterparts obtained by pyrolysis at 900 deg. C. Whereas the latter were, as expected, highly mesoporous carbons, the former cryogels had very different pore textures. Highly diluted cryogels allowed preparation of microporous materials with high surface areas, but activation of initially dense cryogels led to almost non-porous carbons, with much lower surface areas than those obtained by pyrolysis. The optimal acid concentration for activation, corresponding to stoichiometry between molecules of acid and hydroxyl groups, was 2 M l{sup -1}, and the acid-cryogel contact time also had an optimal value. Such optimization allowed us to achieve surface areas and micropore volumes among the highest ever obtained by activation with H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}, close to 2200 m{sup 2} g{sup -1} and 0.7 cm{sup 3} g{sup -1}, respectively. Activation of diluted cryogels with a lower acid concentration of 1.2 M l{sup -1} led to authentic bimodal activated carbons, having a surface area as high as 1780 m{sup 2} g{sup -1} and 0.6 cm{sup 3} g{sup -1} of microporous volume easily accessible through a widely developed macroporosity.

  11. Bimodal activated carbons derived from resorcinol-formaldehyde cryogels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Szczurek, Gisele Amaral-Labat, Vanessa Fierro, Antonio Pizzi and Alain Celzard

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Resorcinol-formaldehyde cryogels prepared at different dilution ratios have been activated with phosphoric acid at 450 °C and compared with their carbonaceous counterparts obtained by pyrolysis at 900 °C. Whereas the latter were, as expected, highly mesoporous carbons, the former cryogels had very different pore textures. Highly diluted cryogels allowed preparation of microporous materials with high surface areas, but activation of initially dense cryogels led to almost non-porous carbons, with much lower surface areas than those obtained by pyrolysis. The optimal acid concentration for activation, corresponding to stoichiometry between molecules of acid and hydroxyl groups, was 2 M l−1, and the acid–cryogel contact time also had an optimal value. Such optimization allowed us to achieve surface areas and micropore volumes among the highest ever obtained by activation with H3PO4, close to 2200 m2 g−1 and 0.7 cm3 g−1, respectively. Activation of diluted cryogels with a lower acid concentration of 1.2 M l−1 led to authentic bimodal activated carbons, having a surface area as high as 1780 m2 g−1 and 0.6 cm3 g−1 of microporous volume easily accessible through a widely developed macroporosity.

  12. Activation and micropore structure of carbon-fiber composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagtoyen, M.; Derbyshire, F.; Kimber, G. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research

    1997-12-01

    Rigid, high surface area activated carbon fiber composites have been produced with high permeabilities for environmental applications in gas and water purification. The project involves a collaboration between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER), University of Kentucky. The main focus of recent work has been to find a satisfactory means to uniformly activate large samples of carbon fiber composites to produce controlled pore structures. Processes have been developed using activation in steam and CO{sub 2}, and a less conventional method involving oxygen chemisorption and subsequent heat treatment. Another objective has been to explore applications for the activated composites in environmental applications related to fossil energy production.

  13. Rational design of high-surface-area carbon nanotube/microporous carbon core-shell nanocomposites for supercapacitor electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yuanyuan; Ma, Cheng; Wang, Jitong; Qiao, Wenming; Ling, Licheng; Long, Donghui

    2015-03-04

    All-carbon-based carbon nanotube (CNT)/microporous carbon core-shell nanocomposites, in which a CNT as the core and high-surface-area microporous carbon as the shell, have been prepared by in situ resorcinol-formaldehyde resin coating of CNTs, followed by carbonization and controlled KOH activation. The obtained nanocomposites have very high Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface areas (up to 1700 m(2)/g), narrow pore size distribution (microporous carbon shell can be easily tuned from 20 to 215 nm by changing the carbon precursor/CNT mass ratio. In such a unique core-shell structure, the CNT core could mitigate the key issue related to the low electronic conductivity of microporous carbons. On the other hand, the 1D tubular structure with a short pore-pathway micropore as well as a 3D entangled network could increase the utilization degree of the overall porosity and improve the electrode kinetics. Thus, these CNT/microporous carbon core-shell nanocomposites exhibit a great potential as an electrode material for supercapacitors, which could deliver high specific capacitance of 237 F/g, excellent rate performance with 75% maintenance from 0.1 to 50 A/g, and high cyclability in H2SO4 electrolyte. Moreover, the precisely controlled microporous carbon shells may allow them to serve as excellent model systems for microporous carbons, in general, to illustrate the role of the pore length on the diffusion and kinetics inside the micropores.

  14. Enhancing anaerobic digestion of poultry blood using activated carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria José Cuetos

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The potential of using anaerobic digestion for the treatment of poultry blood has been evaluated in batch assays at the laboratory scale and in a mesophilic semi-continuous reactor. The biodegradability test performed on residual poultry blood was carried out in spite of high inhibitory levels of acid intermediaries. The use of activated carbon as a way to prevent inhibitory conditions demonstrated the feasibility of attaining anaerobic digestion under extreme ammonium and acid conditions. Batch assays with higher carbon content presented higher methane production rates, although the difference in the final cumulative biogas production was not as sharp. The digestion of residual blood was also studied under semi-continuous operation using granular and powdered activated carbon. The average specific methane production was 216 ± 12 mL CH4/g VS. This result was obtained in spite of a strong volatile fatty acid (VFA accumulation, reaching values around 6 g/L, along with high ammonium concentrations (in the range of 6–8 g/L. The use of powdered activated carbon resulted in a better assimilation of C3-C5 acid forms, indicating that an enhancement in syntrophic metabolism may have taken place. Thermal analysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM were applied as analytical tools for measuring the presence of organic material in the final digestate and evidencing modifications on the carbon surface. The addition of activated carbon for the digestion of residual blood highly improved the digestion process. The adsorption capacity of ammonium, the protection this carrier may offer by limiting mass transfer of toxic compounds, and its capacity to act as a conductive material may explain the successful digestion of residual blood as the sole substrate.

  15. In vitro adsorption study of fluoxetine in activated carbons and activated carbon fibres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nabais, J.M. Valente; Mouquinho, A.; Galacho, C.; Carrott, P.J.M.; Ribeiro Carrott, M.M.L. [Centro de Quimica de Evora e Departamento de Quimica da Universidade de Evora, Rua Romao Ramalho no. 59, 7000-671 Evora (Portugal)

    2008-05-15

    We study the in vitro adsorption of fluoxetine hydrochloride by different adsorbents in simulated gastric and intestinal fluid, pH 1.2 and 7.5, respectively. The tested materials were two commercial activated carbons, carbomix and maxsorb MSC30, one activated carbon fibre produced in our laboratory and also three MCM-41 samples, also produced by us. Selected samples were modified by liquid phase oxidation and thermal treatment in order to change the surface chemistry without significant modifications to the porous characteristics. The fluoxetine adsorption follows the Langmuir model. The calculated Q{sub 0} values range from 54 to 1112 mg/g. A different adsorption mechanism was found for the adsorption of fluoxetine in activated carbon fibres and activated carbons. In the first case the most relevant factors are the molecular sieving effect and the dispersive interactions whereas in the activated carbons the mechanism seams to be based on the electrostatic interactions between the fluoxetine molecules and the charged carbon surface. Despite the different behaviours most of the materials tested have potential for treating potential fluoxetine intoxications. (author)

  16. Urea adsorption by activated carbon prepared from palm kernel shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, Chee-Heong; Sim, Yoke-Leng; Yeoh, Fei-Yee

    2017-07-01

    Dialysis treatment is crucial for patients suffer from renal failure. The dialysis system removes the uremic toxin to a safe level in a patient's body. One of the major limitations of the current hemodialysis system is the capability to efficiently remove uremic toxins from patient's body. Nanoporous materials can be applied to improve the treatment. Palm kernel shell (PKS) biomass generated from palm oil mills can be utilized to prepare high quality nanoporous activated carbon (AC) and applied for urea adsorption in the dialysis system. In this study, AC was prepared from PKS via different carbonization temperatures and followed by carbon dioxide gas activation processes. The physical and chemical properties of the samples were studied. The results show that the porous AC with BET surface areas ranging from 541 to 622 m2g-1 and with total pore volumes varying from 0.254 to 0.297 cm3g-1, are formed with different carbonization temperatures. The equilibrium constant for urea adsorption by AC samples carbonized at 400, 500 and 600 °C are 0.091, 0.287 and 0.334, respectively. The increase of carbonization temperatures from 400 to 600 °C resulted in the increase in urea adsorption by AC predominantly due to increase in surface area. The present study reveals the feasibility of preparing AC with good porosity from PKS and potentially applied in urea adsorption application.

  17. Interactions of xanthines with activated carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarrete Casas, R. [Inorganic Chemistry Department, Granada University (Ugr), E-18071 Granada (Spain)]. E-mail: rncasas@ugr.es; Garcia Rodriguez, A. [Inorganic Chemistry Department, Granada University (Ugr), E-18071 Granada (Spain); Rey Bueno, F. [Inorganic Chemistry Department, Granada University (Ugr), E-18071 Granada (Spain); Espinola Lara, A. [Inorganic Chemistry Department, Granada University (Ugr), E-18071 Granada (Spain); Valenzuela Calahorro, C. [Inorganic Chemistry Department, Granada University (Ugr), E-18071 Granada (Spain); Navarrete Guijosa, A. [Inorganic Chemistry Department, Granada University (Ugr), E-18071 Granada (Spain)

    2006-06-30

    Because of their pharmaceutical and industrial applications, we have studied the adsorption of xanthine derivates (caffeine and theophylline) by activated carbon. To this end, we examined kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic aspects of the process. This paper reports the kinetics results. The experimental results indicate that the process was first order in C and the overall process was assumed to involve a single, reversible adsorption-desorption process obeying a kinetic law postulated by us.

  18. Aqueous mercury adsorption by activated carbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadi, Pejman; To, Ming-Ho; Hui, Chi-Wai; Lin, Carol Sze Ki; McKay, Gordon

    2015-04-15

    Due to serious public health threats resulting from mercury pollution and its rapid distribution in our food chain through the contamination of water bodies, stringent regulations have been enacted on mercury-laden wastewater discharge. Activated carbons have been widely used in the removal of mercuric ions from aqueous effluents. The surface and textural characteristics of activated carbons are the two decisive factors in their efficiency in mercury removal from wastewater. Herein, the structural properties and binding affinity of mercuric ions from effluents have been presented. Also, specific attention has been directed to the effect of sulfur-containing functional moieties on enhancing the mercury adsorption. It has been demonstrated that surface area, pore size, pore size distribution and surface functional groups should collectively be taken into consideration in designing the optimal mercury removal process. Moreover, the mercury adsorption mechanism has been addressed using equilibrium adsorption isotherm, thermodynamic and kinetic studies. Further recommendations have been proposed with the aim of increasing the mercury removal efficiency using carbon activation processes with lower energy input, while achieving similar or even higher efficiencies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Elastic Pore Structure in Activated Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, M. J.; Wexler, Carlos

    2011-11-01

    Adsorbent materials such as activated carbon and Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs) have received significant attention as a potential storage material for hydrogen and natural gas. Typically the adsorbent material is assumed to consist of rigid slit- or cylindrical-shaped pores. Recent work, for MOFs in particular, revealed the importance of the mechanical response of the adsorbent in the presence of an adsorbate. In the absence of an adsorbate the pore structure is defined by the size, shape and inter-molecular interactions of the constituent parts of the solid. Here, we demonstrate the flexibility of pore walls in activated carbon and the effect this has on the pore structure of the bulk samples. The interaction is modeled as a competition between Van der Waals interactions between neighboring walls and a resistance to bending due to the rigidity of graphene. Minimal energy configurations were calculated analytically for a simplified potential and numerically for a more realistic potential. The pore structures are discussed in the context of pore measurements on activated carbon samples.

  20. Development of Low-Cost DDGS-Based Activated Carbons and Their Applications in Environmental Remediation and High-Performance Electrodes for Supercapacitors

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Yong

    2015-08-28

    Abstract: A one-step, facile method to produce 3-dimensional porous activated carbons (ACs) from corn residual dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS) by microwave-assisted chemical activation was developed. The ACs’ application potentials in dye removal and supercapacitor electrodes were also demonstrated. The porous structure and surface properties of the ACs were characterized by N2 adsorption/desorption isotherms and scanning electron microscopy. The results showed that the surface area of the as-prepared ACs was up to 1000 m2/g. In the dye removal tests, these DDGS-based ACs exhibited a maximum adsorption ratio of 477 mg/g on methylene blue. In electric double layer capacitors, electrochemical tests indicated that the ACs had ideal capacitive and reversible behaviors and exhibited excellent electrochemical performance. The specific capacitance varied between 120 and 210 F/g under different scan rates and current densities. In addition, the capacitors showed excellent stability even after one thousand charge–discharge cycles. The specific capacitance was further increased up to 300 F/g by in situ synthesis of MnO2 particles in the ACs to induce pseudo-capacitance. This research showed that the DDGS-based ACs had great potentials in environmental remediation and energy storage applications. Graphical Abstract: [Figure not available: see fulltext.] © 2015 Springer Science+Business Media New York

  1. Activated carbon from baobab fruit shells through domestic processes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Commercially produced activated carbon is expensive. The aim of the research was to investigate the production of activated carbon from baobab fruit shells (a cheap raw material) using a method that can be employed at rural homesteads in removing organic pollutants. Two methods of producing activated carbon were ...

  2. 78 FR 13894 - Certain Activated Carbon From China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    ... COMMISSION Certain Activated Carbon From China Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the... antidumping duty order on certain activated carbon from China would be likely to lead to continuation or... USITC Publication 4381 (February 2013), entitled Certain Activated Carbon from China: Investigation No...

  3. Less-costly activated carbon for sewage treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingham, J. D.; Kalvinskas, J. J.; Mueller, W. A.

    1977-01-01

    Lignite-aided sewage treatment is based on absorption of dissolved pollutants by activated carbon. Settling sludge is removed and dried into cakes that are pyrolyzed with lignites to yield activated carbon. Lignite is less expensive than activated carbon previously used to supplement pyrolysis yield.

  4. Porous carbon with a large surface area and an ultrahigh carbon purity via templating carbonization coupling with KOH activation as excellent supercapacitor electrode materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Fei; Gao, Jihui, E-mail: gaojh@hit.edu.cn; Liu, Xin; Pi, Xinxin; Yang, Yuqi; Wu, Shaohua

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • Simple templating carbonization method was developed to obtain porous carbons. • Surface etching by KOH activation greatly boosts surface area and carbon purity. • The as-obtained porous carbon delivers a high capacitance of 275 F g{sup −1}. • Symmetric supercapacitor can achieved high energy density and power density. - Abstract: Large surface area and good structural stability, for porous carbons, are two crucial requirements to enable the constructed supercapacitors with high capacitance and long cycling lifespan. Herein, we successfully prepare porous carbon with a large surface area (3175 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}) and an ultrahigh carbon purity (carbon atom ratio of 98.25%) via templating carbonization coupling with KOH activation. As-synthesized MTC-KOH exhibits excellent performances as supercapacitor electrode materials in terms of high specific capacitance and ultrahigh cycling stability. In a three electrode system, MTC-KOH delivers a high capacitance of 275 F g{sup −1} at 0.5 A g{sup −1} and still 120 F g{sup −1} at a high rate of 30 A g{sup −1}. There is almost no capacitance decay even after 10,000 cycles, demonstrating outstanding cycling stability. In comparison, pre-activated MTC with a hierarchical pore structure shows a better rate capability than microporous MTC-KOH. Moreover, the constructed symmetric supercapacitor using MTC-KOH can achieve high energy densities of 8.68 Wh kg{sup −1} and 4.03 Wh kg{sup −1} with the corresponding power densities of 108 W kg{sup −1} and 6.49 kW kg{sup −1}, respectively. Our work provides a simple design strategy to prepare highly porous carbons with high carbon purity for supercapacitors application.

  5. Experimental design to optimize preparation of activated carbons for use in water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baçaoui, Abdelaziz; Dahbi, Abderrahman; Yaacoubi, Abdelrani; Bennouna, Chakib; Maldonado-Hódar, Francisco J; Rivera-Utrilla, José; Carrasco-Marín, Francisco; Moreno-Castilla, Carlos

    2002-09-01

    A series of seven activated carbons was obtained for use in drinking water treatments by steam-activation of olive-waste cakes. This raw material is an abundant and cheap waste byproduct of oil production, making these activated carbons economically feasible. The activated carbons, prepared by the one step method, were characterized, and the evolution of their characteristics (yield, adsorption capacities, and porosity) was analyzed as a function of the experimental parameters (activation temperature and activation time), using the Doehlert matrix. The Doehlert matrix allows the response surface to be studied with a good quality parameter estimation of the quadratic model. Each response has been described by a second order model that was adequate to predict responses in all experimental regions. The coefficients of the postulated model were calculated from the experimental responses by means of least squares regression, using the NEMROD software. We determined the region in which the optimum values of both activation temperature and activation time were achieved for the preparation of activated carbons suitable for use in water treatments. The "optimal activated carbon" was experimentally obtained, and its characteristic parameters showed a good agreement with those calculated from the model. The results obtained for activated carbons prepared by the one-step method were compared with those for activated carbons prepared by the two-step method. The characteristics of activated carbons obtained by the one-step and two-step methods showed that "one-step" activated carbons have a highly developed porous texture formed mainly of large macropores and micropores, whereas "two-step" activated carbons have a predominance of mesopores and narrow micropores. These activated carbons from olive-waste cakes showed a high capacity to adsorb herbicides (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, 2,4-D; and 2-methyl, 4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid, MCPA) from water, with adsorption capacity

  6. High capacitance of coarse-grained carbide derived carbon electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyatkin, Boris; Gogotsi, Oleksiy; Malinovskiy, Bohdan; Zozulya, Yuliya; Simon, Patrice; Gogotsi, Yury

    2016-02-01

    We report exceptional electrochemical properties of supercapacitor electrodes composed of large, granular carbide-derived carbon (CDC) particles. Using a titanium carbide (TiC) precursor, we synthesized 70-250 μm sized particles with high surface area and a narrow pore size distribution. Electrochemical cycling of these coarse-grained powders defied conventional wisdom that a small particle size is strictly required for supercapacitor electrodes and allowed high charge storage densities, rapid transport, and good rate handling ability. The material showcased capacitance above 100 F g-1 at sweep rates as high as 250 mV s-1 in organic electrolyte. 250-1000 micron thick dense CDC films with up to 80 mg cm-2 loading showed superior areal capacitances. The material significantly outperformed its activated carbon counterpart in organic electrolytes and ionic liquids. Furthermore, large internal/external surface ratio of coarse-grained carbons allowed the resulting electrodes to maintain high electrochemical stability up to 3.1 V in ionic liquid electrolyte. In addition to presenting novel insights into the electrosorption process, these coarse-grained carbons offer a pathway to low-cost, high-performance implementation of supercapacitors in automotive and grid-storage applications.

  7. Activation and micropore structure determination of activated carbon-fiber composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagtoyen, M.; Derbyshire, F.; Kimber, G. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research

    1997-09-05

    Rigid, high surface area activated carbon fiber composites have been produced with high permeabilities for environmental applications in gas and water purification. These novel monolithic adsorbents can be produced in single pieces to a given size and shape. The project involves a collaboration between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER), University of Kentucky. The carbon fiber composites are produced at the ORNL and activated at the CAER using different methods, with the aims of producing a uniform degree of activation, and of closely controlling pore structure and adsorptive properties. The main focus of the present work has been to find a satisfactory means to uniformly activate large samples of carbon fiber composites and produce controlled pore structures. Several environmental applications have been explored for the activated carbon fiber composites. One of these was to evaluate the activated composites for the separation of CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} mixtures, and an apparatus was constructed specifically for this purpose. The composites were further evaluated in the cyclic recovery of volatile organics. The activated carbon fiber composites have also been tested for possible water treatment applications by studying the adsorption of sodium pentachlorophenolate, PCP.

  8. Preparation of activated carbons from walnut wood: a study of microporosity and fractal dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Serrano, Vicente; Cuerda-Correa, Eduardo M.; Fernández-González, M. Carmen; Alexandre-Franco, María F.; Macías-García, Antonio

    2005-04-01

    Agricultural and forest residues constitute an extraordinarily important source of precursors for the manufacture of activated carbons. Activated carbons are well known as porous solids with a highly developed apparent surface area. In the present work, activated carbon has been prepared from forest residues of walnut tree wood (a raw material not studied until now) by physical activation. Raw material has been carbonized between 573 and 1073 K and afterwards activated in air at temperatures between 623 and 823 K. The apparent surface area, micropore volume, mesopore volume and fractal dimension of the samples prepared have been calculated.

  9. Photoredox activation of carbon dioxide for amino acid synthesis in continuous flow

    OpenAIRE

    Seo, Hyowon; Katcher, Matthew H.; Timothy F. Jamison

    2016-01-01

    Although carbon dioxide (CO2) is highly abundant, its low reactivity has limited its use in chemical synthesis. In particular, methods for carbon?carbon bond formation generally rely on two-electron mechanisms for CO2 activation and require highly activated reaction partners. Alternatively, radical pathways accessed via photoredox catalysis could provide new reactivity under milder conditions. Here we demonstrate the direct coupling of CO2 and amines via the single-electron reduction of CO2 f...

  10. Biomass-based palm shell activated carbon and palm shell carbon molecular sieve as gas separation adsorbents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethupathi, Sumathi; Bashir, Mohammed Jk; Akbar, Zinatizadeh Ali; Mohamed, Abdul Rahman

    2015-04-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass has been widely recognised as a potential low-cost source for the production of high added value materials and proved to be a good precursor for the production of activated carbons. One of such valuable biomasses used for the production of activated carbons is palm shell. Palm shell (endocarp) is an abundant by-product produced from the palm oil industries throughout tropical countries. Palm shell activated carbon and palm shell carbon molecular sieve has been widely applied in various environmental pollution control technologies, mainly owing to its high adsorption performance, well-developed porosity and low cost, leading to potential applications in gas-phase separation using adsorption processes. This mini-review represents a comprehensive overview of the palm shell activated carbon and palm shell carbon molecular sieve preparation method, physicochemical properties and feasibility of palm shell activated carbon and palm shell carbon molecular sieve in gas separation processes. Some of the limitations are outlined and suggestions for future improvements are pointed out. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. Activated Carbon Fiber Monoliths as Supercapacitor Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gelines Moreno-Fernandez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Activated carbon fibers (ACF are interesting candidates for electrodes in electrochemical energy storage devices; however, one major drawback for practical application is their low density. In the present work, monoliths were synthesized from two different ACFs, reaching 3 times higher densities than the original ACFs’ apparent densities. The porosity of the monoliths was only slightly decreased with respect to the pristine ACFs, the employed PVDC binder developing additional porosity upon carbonization. The ACF monoliths are essentially microporous and reach BET surface areas of up to 1838 m2 g−1. SEM analysis reveals that the ACFs are well embedded into the monolith structure and that their length was significantly reduced due to the monolith preparation process. The carbonized monoliths were studied as supercapacitor electrodes in two- and three-electrode cells having 2 M H2SO4 as electrolyte. Maximum capacitances of around 200 F g−1 were reached. The results confirm that the capacitance of the bisulfate anions essentially originates from the double layer, while hydronium cations contribute with a mixture of both, double layer capacitance and pseudocapacitance.

  12. Production of activated carbon from TCR char

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenzel, Fabian; Heberlein, Markus; Klinner, Tobias; Hornung, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    The utilization of char for adsorptive purposes is known since the 18th century. At that time the char was made of wood or bones and used for decoloration of fluids. In the 20th century the production of activated carbon in an industrial scale was started. The today's raw materials for activated carbon production are hard coal, peat, wood or coconut shells. All these materials entail costs especially the latter. Thus, the utilization of carbon rich residues (biomass) is an interesting economic opportunity because it is available for no costs or even can create income. The char is produced by thermo-catalytic reforming (TCR®). This process is a combination of an intermediate pyrolysis and subsequently a reforming step. During the pyrolysis step the material is decomposed in a vapor and a solid carbon enriched phase. In the second step the vapor and the solid phase get in an intensive contact and the quality of both materials is improved via the reforming process. Subsequently, the condensables are precipitated from the vapor phase and a permanent gas as well as oil is obtained. Both are suitable for heat and power production which is a clear advantage of the TCR® process. The obtained biochar from the TCR® process has special properties. This material has a very low hydrogen and oxygen content. Its stability is comparable to hard coal or anthracite. Therefore it consists almost only of carbon and ash. The latter depends from input material. Furthermore the surface structure and area can be influenced during the reforming step. Depending from temperature and residence time the number of micro pores and the surface area can be increased. Preliminary investigations with methylene blue solution have shown that a TCR® char made of digestate from anaerobic digestion has adsorptive properties. The decoloration of the solution was achieved. A further influencing factor of the adsorption performance is the particle size. Based on the results of the preliminary tests a

  13. Highly Efficient Procedure for the Synthesis of Fructone Fragrance Using a Novel Carbon based Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuezheng Liang

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The novel carbon based acid has been synthesized via one-step hydrothermal carbonization of furaldehyde and hydroxyethylsulfonic acid. A highly efficient procedure for the synthesis of fructone has been developed using the novel carbon based acid. The results showed that the catalyst possessed high activity for the reaction, giving a yield of over 95%. The advantages of high activity, stability, reusability and low cost for a simple synthesis procedure and wide applicability to various diols and β-keto esters make this novel carbon based acid one of the best choices for the reaction.

  14. Method for manufacturing high quality carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavides, Jeanette M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A non-catalytic process for the production of carbon nanotubes includes supplying an electric current to a carbon anode and a carbon cathode which have been securely positioned in the open atmosphere with a gap between them. The electric current creates an electric arc between the carbon anode and the carbon cathode, which causes carbon to be vaporized from the carbon anode and a carbonaceous residue to be deposited on the carbon cathode. Inert gas is pumped into the gap to flush out oxygen, thereby preventing interference with the vaporization of carbon from the anode and preventing oxidation of the carbonaceous residue being deposited on the cathode. The anode and cathode are cooled while electric current is being supplied thereto. When the supply of electric current is terminated, the carbonaceous residue is removed from the cathode and is purified to yield carbon nanotubes.

  15. Formation of continuous activated carbon fibers for barrier fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ying

    1997-08-01

    Commercial protective suits made of active carbon granules or nonwoven fabrics are heavy, have low moisture vapor transport rate, and are uncomfortable. Inherent problems due to construction of barrier fabrics lead to severe heat stress when worn for even short time in warm environments. One proposed method to eliminate these problems is to facilitate the construction of a fabric made of continuous activated carbon fibers (CACF). This study is directed toward investigating the possibility of developing CAFC from two precursors: aramid and fibrillated PAN fiber. It was shown in this study that Kevlar-29 fibers could be quickly carbonized and activated to CACF with high adsorptivity and relatively low weight loss. CACF with high surface area (>500 msp2/g) and reasonable tenacity (≈1g/denier) were successfully prepared from Kevlar fibers through a three-step process: pretreatment, carbonization, and activation. X-ray diffraction, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), and thermal analysis were conducted to understand the evolution of physical and chemical properties during pretreatment. The influence of temperature, heating rate, and pyrolysis environment on the thermal behavior was determined by DSC and TGA/DTA and used as an indicator for optimizing the pyrolysis conditions. Surface analysis by nitrogen isotherms indicated that the resultant fibers had micropores and mesopores on the surface of CACF. This was also inferred by studies on the surface morphology through Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM). An investigation of the surface chemical structure by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) before and after activation and elemental analysis confirmed that adsorption of Kevlar based CACF mainly arises due to the physisorption instead of chemisorption. A multistep stabilization along with carbonization and activation was used to prepare active carbon fiber from fibrillated PAN fiber. The resultant fiber retained

  16. The regeneration of polluted activated carbon by radiation techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Minghong; Bao Borong [Shanghai Institute of Nuclear Research, Academia Sinica, Shanghai (China); Zhou Ruimin; Zhu Jinliang; Hu Longxin [Shanghai University, Shanghai (China)

    1998-10-01

    In this paper, the regeneration of used activated carbon from monosodium glutamate factory was experimented using radiation and acid-alkali chemical cleaning method. Results showed that the activated carbon saturated with pollutants can be wash away easily by flushing with chemical solution prior irradiation. DSC was used to monitor the change of carbon adsorption.

  17. Significance of the carbonization of volatile pyrolytic products on the properties of activated carbons from phosphoric acid activation of lignocellulosic material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuo, Songlin; Yang, Jianxiao; Cai, Xuan [Faculty of Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Forestry University, Nanjing 210037 (China); Liu, Junli [Institute of Chemical Industry of Forest Products, CAF, Nanjing 210042 (China)

    2009-07-15

    Two series of activated carbons derived from China fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata) wood impregnated with phosphoric acid were prepared in a cylindrical container that was kept in a closed state covered with a lid (the covered case) or in an open state. The effects of the carbonization of volatile pyrolytic products of starting materials on the properties of activated carbon were investigated in the process of phosphoric acid activation. Elemental analysis and SEM observation showed that both activating in the covered case and increasing the mass of starting material used favored the carbonization of volatile pyrolytic products. An investigation of N{sub 2} adsorption isotherms revealed that the carbonization of volatile pyrolytic products significantly enhanced mesopore development in the final carbons, especially pores with a size range from 2.5 to 30 nm, with little influence on micropores, and therefore produced a large increase in the adsorption capacity to Vitamin B12 (with a molecular size of 2.09 nm). Activated carbons with highly developed mesopores could be obtained in the covered case. The carbonization mechanism of volatiles was discussed and two different carbonization pathways (in solid and gas phases) were proposed during phosphoric acid activation. (author)

  18. Interaction forces between waterborne bacteria and activated carbon particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busscher, Henk J.; Dijkstra, Rene J. B.; Langworthy, Don E.; Collias, Dimitris I.; Bjorkquist, David W.; Mitchell, Michael D.; Van der Mei, Henny C.

    2008-01-01

    Activated carbons remove waterborne bacteria from potable water systems through attractive Lifshitz-van der Waals forces despite electrostatic repulsion between negatively charged cells and carbon surfaces. In this paper we quantify the interaction forces between bacteria with negatively and

  19. The Influence of Calcium Carbonate Composition and Activated Carbon in Pack Carburizing Low Carbon Steel Process in The Review of Hardness and Micro Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafni; Hadi, Syafrul; Edison

    2017-12-01

    Carburizing is a way of hardening the surface by heating the metal (steel) above the critical temperature in an environment containing carbon. Steel at a temperature of the critical temperature of affinity to carbon. Carbon is absorbed into the metal form a solid solution of carbon-iron and the outer layer has high carbon content. When the composition of the activator and the activated charcoal is right, it will perfect the carbon atoms to diffuse into the test material to low carbon steels. Thick layer of carbon Depending on the time and temperature are used. Pack carburizing process in this study, using 1 kg of solid carbon derived from coconut shell charcoal with a variation of 20%, 10% and 5% calcium carbonate activator, burner temperature of 950 0C, holding time 4 hours. The test material is low carbon steel has 9 pieces. Each composition has three specimens. Furnace used in this study is a pack carburizing furnace which has a designed burner box with a volume of 1000 x 600 x 400 (mm3) of coal-fired. Equipped with a circulation of oxygen from the blower 2 inches and has a wall of refractory bricks. From the variation of composition CaCO3, microstructure formed on the specimen with 20% CaCO3, better diffusion of carbon into the carbon steel, it is seen by the form marten site structure after quenching, and this indicates that there has been an increase of or adding carbon to in the specimen. This led to the formation of marten site specimen into hard surfaces, where the average value of hardness at one point side (side edge) 31.7 HRC

  20. Activated Carbon Fibers For Gas Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL; Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL; Gallego, Nidia C [ORNL

    2017-01-01

    The advantages of Activated Carbon Fibers (ACF) over Granular Activated Carbon (GAC) are reviewed and their relationship to ACF structure and texture are discussed. These advantages make ACF very attractive for gas storage applications. Both adsorbed natural gas (ANG) and hydrogen gas adsorption performance are discussed. The predicted and actual structure and performance of lignin-derived ACF is reviewed. The manufacture and performance of ACF derived monolith for potential automotive natural gas (NG) storage applications is reported Future trends for ACF for gas storage are considered to be positive. The recent improvements in NG extraction coupled with the widespread availability of NG wells means a relatively inexpensive and abundant NG supply in the foreseeable future. This has rekindled interest in NG powered vehicles. The advantages and benefit of ANG compared to compressed NG offer the promise of accelerated use of ANG as a commuter vehicle fuel. It is to be hoped the current cost hurdle of ACF can be overcome opening ANG applications that take advantage of the favorable properties of ACF versus GAC. Lastly, suggestions are made regarding the direction of future work.

  1. Nanocomposites of tantalum-based pyrochlore and indium hydroxide showing high and stable photocatalytic activities for overall water splitting and carbon dioxide reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Meng-Chun; Wu, Guan-Chang; Liu, Wei-Guang; Goddard, William A; Yang, Chia-Min

    2014-12-15

    Nanocomposites of tantalum-based pyrochlore nanoparticles and indium hydroxide were prepared by a hydrothermal process for UV-driven photocatalytic reactions including overall water splitting, hydrogen production from photoreforming of methanol, and CO2 reduction with water to produce CO. The best catalyst was more than 20 times more active than sodium tantalate in overall water splitting and 3 times more active than Degussa P25 TiO2 in CO2 reduction. Moreover, the catalyst was very stable while generating stoichiometric products of H2 (or CO) and O2 throughout long-term photocatalytic reactions. After the removal of In(OH)3, the pyrochlore nanoparticles remained highly active for H2 production from pure water and aqueous methanol solution. Both experimental studies and density functional theory calculations suggest that the pyrochlore nanoparticles catalyzed the water reduction to produce H2, whereas In(OH)3 was the major active component for water oxidation to produce O2. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Volumetric and superficial characterization of carbon activated; Caracterizacion volumetrica y superficial de carbon activado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrera G, L.M.; Garcia S, I.; Jimenez B, J.; Solache R, M.; Lopez M, B.; Bulbulian G, S.; Olguin G, M.T. [Departamento de Quimica, Gerencia de Ciencias Basicas, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    The activated carbon is the resultant material of the calcination process of natural carbonated materials as coconut shells or olive little bones. It is an excellent adsorbent of diluted substances, so much in colloidal form, as in particles form. Those substances are attracted and retained by the carbon surface. In this work is make the volumetric and superficial characterization of activated carbon treated thermically (300 Centigrade) in function of the grain size average. (Author)

  3. Removal of Heavy Metal Ions with Acid Activated Carbons Derived from Oil Palm and Coconut Shells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokhlesur M. Rahman

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work, batch adsorption experiments were carried out to investigate the suitability of prepared acid activated carbons in removing heavy metal ions such as nickel(II, lead(II and chromium(VI. Acid activated carbons were obtained from oil palm and coconut shells using phosphoric acid under similar activation process while the differences lie either in impregnation condition or in both pretreatment and impregnation conditions. Prepared activated carbons were modified by dispersing hydrated iron oxide. The adsorption equilibrium data for nickel(II and lead(II were obtained from adsorption by the prepared and commercial activated carbons. Langmuir and Freundlich models fit the data well. Prepared activated carbons showed higher adsorption capacity for nickel(II and lead(II. The removal of chromium(VI was studied by the prepared acid activated, modified and commercial activated carbons at different pH. The isotherms studies reveal that the prepared activated carbon performs better in low concentration region while the commercial ones in the high concentration region. Thus, a complete adsorption is expected in low concentration by the prepared activated carbon. The kinetics data for Ni(II, Pb(II and Cr(VI by the best selected activated carbon fitted very well to the pseudo-second-order kinetic model.

  4. Structure and electrochemical properties of activated polyacrylonitrile based carbon fibers containing carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagannathan, Sudhakar; Chae, Han Gi; Jain, Rahul; Kumar, Satish [School of Polymer, Textile and Fiber Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States)

    2008-12-01

    Solution spun polyacrylonitrile (PAN), PAN/multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT), and PAN/single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) fibers containing 5 wt.% carbon nanotubes were stabilized in air and activated using CO{sub 2} and KOH. The surface area as determined by nitrogen gas adsorption was an order of magnitude higher for KOH activated fibers as compared to the CO{sub 2} activated fibers. The specific capacitance of KOH activated PAN/SWCNT samples was as high as 250 F g{sup -1} in 6 M KOH electrolyte. Under the comparable KOH activation conditions, PAN and PAN/SWCNT fibers had comparable surface areas (BET surface area about 2200 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}) with pore size predominantly in the range of 1-5 nm, while surface area of PAN/MWCNT samples was significantly lower (BET surface area 970 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}). The highest capacitance and energy density was obtained for PAN/SWCNT samples, suggesting SWCNT advantage in charge storage. The capacitance behavior of these electrodes has also been tested in ionic liquids, and the energy density in ionic liquid is about twice the value obtained using KOH electrolyte. (author)

  5. Preparation and characterization of active carbon using palm kernel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chemical activation was done by heating a mixture of carbonized material and the activating agents at a temperature of 700C to form a paste, followed by subsequent cooling and using the active carbon to purify effluents from a Bottling Company. NaCl, KOH, H2SO4 and H3PO4 were used as the activating agents at 1M ...

  6. Production of activated carbon from a new precursor molasses by activation with sulphuric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legrouri, K; Khouya, E; Ezzine, M; Hannache, H; Denoyel, R; Pallier, R; Naslain, R

    2005-02-14

    Activated carbon has been prepared from molasses, a natural precursor of vegetable origin resulting from the sugar industry in Morocco. The preparation of the activated carbon from the molasses has been carried out by impregnation of the precursor with sulphuric acid, followed by carbonisation at varying conditions (temperature and gas coverage) in order to optimize preparation parameters. The influence of activation conditions was investigated by determination of adsorption capacity of methylene blue and iodine, the BET surface area, and the pore volume of the activated carbon were determined while the micropore volume was determined by the Dubinin-Radushkevich (DR) equation. The activated materials are mainly microporous and reveal the type I isotherm of the Brunauer classification for nitrogen adsorption. The activated carbons properties in this study were found for activation of the mixture (molasses/sulphuric acid) in steam at 750 degrees C. The samples obtained in this condition were highly microporous, with high surface area (> or =1200 m2/g) and the maximum adsorption capacity of methylene blue and iodine were 435 and 1430 mg/g, respectively.

  7. Synthesis of carbon nanofibers on impregnated powdered activated carbon as cheap substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Mamun

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The catalysis and characterization of carbon nanofibers (CNFs composite are reported in this work. Carbon nanofibers were produced on oil palm shell powdered activated carbon (PAC, which was impregnated with nickel. Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD of C2H2 was used in the presence of hydrogen at ∼650 °C. The flow rates of carbon source and hydrogen were fixed. The CNFs formed directly on the surface of the impregnated PAC. Variable weight percentages (1%, 3%, 5%, 7% and 9% of the catalyst salt (Ni+2 were used for the impregnation. However, the best catalysis was observed on the substrate with 3% Ni+2. The product displayed a relatively high surface area, essentially constituted by the external surface. New functional groups also appeared compared to those in the PAC. Field Emission Scanning Microscopy (FESEM, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM, Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR, BET surface area analysis and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX were used for the characterization of the new carbon nano product, which was produced through a clean novel process.

  8. Activation of peroxymonosulfate by graphitic carbon nitride loaded on activated carbon for organic pollutants degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Mingyu; Gao, Long; Li, Jun [School of Environmental Engineering, Wuhan Textile University, Wuhan 430073 (China); Fang, Jia [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Wuhan Textile University, Wuhan 430073 (China); Cai, Wenxuan [School of Environmental Engineering, Wuhan Textile University, Wuhan 430073 (China); Li, Xiaoxia [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Wuhan Textile University, Wuhan 430073 (China); Xu, Aihua, E-mail: xahspinel@sina.com [School of Environmental Engineering, Wuhan Textile University, Wuhan 430073 (China); Engineering Research Center for Clean Production of Textile Dyeing and Printing, Ministry of Education, Wuhan 430073 (China)

    2016-10-05

    Highlights: • Supported g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} on AC catalysts with different loadings were prepared. • The metal free catalysts exhibited high efficiency for dyes degradation with PMS. • The catalyst presented a long-term stability for multiple runs. • The C=O groups played a key role in the oxidation process. - Abstract: Graphitic carbon nitride supported on activated carbon (g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}/AC) was prepared through an in situ thermal approach and used as a metal free catalyst for pollutants degradation in the presence of peroxymonosulfate (PMS) without light irradiation. It was found that g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} was highly dispersed on the surface of AC with the increase of surface area and the exposition of more edges and defects. The much easier oxidation of C species in g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} to C=O was also observed from XPS spectra. Acid Orange 7 (AO7) and other organic pollutants could be completely degraded by the g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}/AC catalyst within 20 min with PMS, while g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}+PMS and AC+PMS showed no significant activity for the reaction. The performance of the catalyst was significantly influenced by the amount of g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} loaded on AC; but was nearly not affected by the initial solution pH and reaction temperature. In addition, the catalysts presented good stability. A nonradical mechanism accompanied by radical generation (HO· and SO{sub 4}·{sup −}) in AO7 oxidation was proposed in the system. The C=O groups play a key role in the process; while the exposure of more N-(C){sub 3} group can further increase its electron density and basicity. This study can contribute to the development of green materials for sustainable remediation of aqueous organic pollutants.

  9. Activated carbon derived from marine Posidonia Oceanica for electric energy storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Boukmouche

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the synthesis and characterization of activated carbon from marine Posidonia Oceanica were studied. The activated carbon was prepared by a simple process namely pyrolysis under inert atmosphere. The activated carbon can be used as electrodes for supercapacitor devices. X-ray diffraction result revealed a polycrystalline graphitic structure. While scanning electron microscope investigation showed a layered structure with micropores. The EDS analysis showed that the activated carbon contains the carbon element in high atomic percentage. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy revealed a capacitive behavior (electrostatic phenomena. The specific capacity per unit area of the electrochemical double layer of activated carbon electrode in sulfuric acid electrolyte was 3.16 F cm−2. Cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic chronopotentiometry demonstrated that the electrode has excellent electrochemical reversibility. It has been found that the surface capacitance was strongly related to the specific surface area and pore size.

  10. Activated Carbon Composites for Air Separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Frederick S [ORNL; Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL; Tsouris, Costas [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL

    2011-09-01

    Coal-derived synthesis gas is a potential major source of hydrogen for fuel cells. Oxygen-blown coal gasification is an efficient approach to achieving the goal of producing hydrogen from coal, but a cost-effective means of enriching O2 concentration in air is required. A key objective of this project is to assess the utility of a system that exploits porous carbon materials and electrical swing adsorption to produce an O2-enriched air stream for coal gasification. As a complement to O2 and N2 adsorption measurements, CO2 was used as a more sensitive probe molecule for the characterization of molecular sieving effects. To further enhance the potential of activated carbon composite materials for air separation, work was implemented on incorporating a novel twist into the system; namely the addition of a magnetic field to influence O2 adsorption, which is accompanied by a transition between the paramagnetic and diamagnetic states. The preliminary findings in this respect are discussed.

  11. The mechanism of elution of gold cyanide from activated carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Deventer, J. S. J.; van der Merwe, P. F.

    1994-12-01

    Numerous articles have appeared on the mechanism of the adsorption of gold cyanide onto activated carbon. In contrast, little information is available on the mechanism of elution of the adsorbed gold. It is the objective of this article to formulate such a mechanism on the basis of batch and column elution tests without analyzing adsorbed species on the carbon directly. The presence of spectator cations (M n+) enhances the formation of M n+{Au(CN){2/-}} n ion pairs on the carbon, which in turn suppress the elution of gold cyanide. The dynamics of removal of these cations determine the horizontal position of the gold peak in an elution profile. When the concentration of cations in the eluant is high and no cyanide is present in the solution or on the carbon, very little desorption of gold is observed. The quantitative effect of the concentration of spectator cations on the equilibrium for desorption of aurocyanide can be estimated from the elution profiles for gold and cations. Free cyanide in the eluant, which causes some competitive adsorption of cyanide with aurocyanide, therefore plays a minor role at the elevated temperatures used in industry. A more important effect of cyanide is its reaction with functional groups on the carbon, the products of which passivate the surface for adsorption of aurocyanide, and thereby cyanide promotes the elution of aurocyanide. The degree of passivation, which is determined to a large extent by the temperature of pretreatment, also affects the elution of cations and the degradation/adsorption of cyanide itself. Reactivation of the carbon surface occurs when the adsorbed/decomposed cyanide is removed by the eluant. At high temperatures of pretreatment, such as used in practice, it is not necessary to include a reactivation term in the mathematical model for elution.

  12. Comparison on pore development of activated carbon produced by chemical and physical activation from palm empty fruit bunch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidayat, A.; Sutrisno, B.

    2016-11-01

    It is well-known that activated carbon is considered to be the general adsorbent due to the large range of applications. Numerous works are being continuously published concerning its use as adsorbent for: treatment of potable water; purification of air; retention of toxins by respirators; removal of organic and inorganic pollutants from flue gases and industrial waste gases and water; recuperation of solvents and hydrocarbons volatilized from petroleum derivatives; catalysis; separation of gas mixtures (molecularsieve activated carbons); storage of natural gas and hydrogen; energy storage in supercapacitors; recovery of gold, silver and othernoble metals; etc. This work presents producing activated carbons from palm empty fruit bunch using both physical activation with CO2 and chemical activation with KOH. The resultant activated carbons were characterized by measuring their porosities and pore size distributions. A comparison of the textural characteristics and surface chemistry of the activated carbon from palm empty fruit bunch by the CO2 and the KOH activation leads to the following findings: An activated carbon by the CO2 activation under the optimum conditions has a BET surface area of 717 m2/g, while that by the KOH activation has a BET surface area of 613 m2/g. The CO2 activation generated a highly microporous carbon (92%) with a Type-I isotherm, while the KOH activation generated a mesoporous one (70%) with a type-IV isotherm, the pore volumes are 0.2135 and 0.7426 cm3.g-1 respectively. The average pore size of the activated carbons is 2.72 and 2.56 nm for KOH activation and CO2 activation, respectively. The FT-IR spectra indicated significant variation in the surface functional groups are quite different for the KOH activated and CO2 activated carbons.

  13. Mercury Emissions Capture Efficiency with Activated Carbon ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    This EPA-led project, conducted in collaboration with UNEP, the Swedish Environmental Institute and various Russian Institutes, that demonstrates that the mercury emission control efficiencies of activated carbon injection technologies applied at a Russian power plant burning Russian coals are similar to those found at U.S. plants burning US coals. (The US funding was from funds provided to the EPA by the Department of State pursuant to the Bio-Chemical Redirect Program which engages former Russian (and other former Soviet) weapons scientists in research projects with US collaborators.) Among other things, this report will aid the major task, of developing guidance on best available mercury control technology/best environmental practices (BAT/BEP) for coal-fired power plants, a major source a global anthropogenic emissions. (The new Minamata Convention requires BAT/BEP for new power plants and other major emission sources within five years of treaty ratification.)

  14. Single and Mixed Gas Adsorption Equilibria of Carbon Dioxide/Methane on Activated Carbon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vaart, R.; van der Vaart, Rick; Huiskes, Cindy; Bosch, H.; Reith, T.

    2000-01-01

    Single gas adsorption isotherms of methane and carbon dioxide on micro-porous Norit RB1 activated carbon were determined in a gravimetric analyser in the temperature range of 292 to 349 K and pressures to 0.8 Mpa. Furthermore binary isotherms of carbon dioxide and methane mixtures were determined at

  15. THE ROLE OF ACTIVATED CARBON IN SOLVING ECOLOGICAL PROBLEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Mukhin

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The authors present a brief analysis of the current global situation concerning the utilization of activated carbon in various fields. The article presents data concerning the synthesis and adsorption and structure properties of new activated carbons, used for solving ecological problems. The authors investigated the newly obtained activated carbons in comparison with several AC marks known in the world. It has been shown that currently synthesized AC are competitive with foreign marks.

  16. Activated Carbon Composites for Air Separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL; Baker, Frederick S [ORNL; Tsouris, Costas [ORNL; McFarlane, Joanna [ORNL

    2008-03-01

    In continuation of the development of composite materials for air separation based on molecular sieving properties and magnetic fields effects, several molecular sieve materials were tested in a flow system, and the effects of temperature, flow conditions, and magnetic fields were investigated. New carbon materials adsorbents, with and without pre-loaded super-paramagnetic nanoparticles of Fe3O4 were synthesized; all materials were packed in chromatographic type columns which were placed between the poles of a high intensity, water-cooled, magnet (1.5 Tesla). In order to verify the existence of magnetodesorption effect, separation tests were conducted by injecting controlled volumes of air in a flow of inert gas, while the magnetic field was switched on and off. Gas composition downstream the column was analyzed by gas chromatography and by mass spectrometry. Under the conditions employed, the tests confirmed that N2 - O2 separation occurred at various degrees, depending on material's intrinsic properties, temperature and flow rate. The effect of magnetic fields, reported previously for static conditions, was not confirmed in the flow system. The best separation was obtained for zeolite 13X at sub-ambient temperatures. Future directions for the project include evaluation of a combined system, comprising carbon and zeolite molecular sieves, and testing the effect of stronger magnetic fields produced by cryogenic magnets.

  17. Preparation of a MFI zeolite coating on activated carbon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vaart, R; van der Vaart, R.; Bosch, H.; Keizer, Klaas; Reith, T.

    1997-01-01

    A new and simple method for the preparation of MFI zeolite coated activated carbon is presented. Suitable nucleation sites for the growth of zeolites were introduced to the carbon by adding hydrophilic montmorillonite clay to the carbon substrate. A gas tight MFI zeolite coating was obtained on this

  18. Preparation of a MFI zeolite coating on activated carbon

    OpenAIRE

    van der Vaart, R.; Bosch, H.; Keizer, Klaas; Reith, T.

    1997-01-01

    A new and simple method for the preparation of MFI zeolite coated activated carbon is presented. Suitable nucleation sites for the growth of zeolites were introduced to the carbon by adding hydrophilic montmorillonite clay to the carbon substrate. A gas tight MFI zeolite coating was obtained on this modified substrate by hydrothermal growth.

  19. Activated carbons from African oil palm waste shells and fibre for hydrogen storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Giraldo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We prepared a series of activated carbons by chemical activation with two strong bases in-group that few use, and I with waste from shell and fibers and oil-palm African. Activated carbons are obtained with relatively high surface areas (1605 m2/g. We study the textural and chemical properties and its effect on hydrogen storage. The activated carbons obtained from fibrous wastes exhibit a high hydrogen storage capacity of 6.0 wt % at 77 K and 12 bar.

  20. Effectiveness of activated carbon masks in preventing anticancer drug inhalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Junya; Kogure, Atushi; Kudo, Kenzo

    2016-01-01

    The exposure of healthcare workers to anticancer drugs such as cyclophosphamide (CPA) is a serious health concern. Anticancer drug pollution may spread outside biological safety cabinets even when a closed system is used. The inhalation of vaporized anticancer drugs is thought to be the primary route of exposure. Therefore, it is important that healthcare workers wear masks to prevent inhalation of anticancer drugs. However, the permeability of medical masks to vaporized anticancer drugs has not been examined. Furthermore, the performance differences between masks including activated carbon with chemical adsorptivity and non-activated carbon masks are uncertain. We investigated activated carbon mask permeability to vaporized CPA, and assessed whether inhibition of vaporized CPA permeability was attributable to the masks' adsorption abilities. A CPA solution (4 mg) was vaporized in a chamber and passed through three types of masks: Pleated-type cotton mask (PCM), pleated-type activated carbon mask (PAM), and stereoscopic-type activated carbon mask (SAM); the flow rate was 1.0 L/min for 1 h. The air was then recovered in 50 % ethanol. CPA quantities in the solution were determined by liquid chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry. To determine CPA adsorption by the mask, 5 cm 2 of each mask was immersed in 10 mL of CPA solution (50-2500 μg/mL) for 1 h. CPA concentrations were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection. For the control (no mask), 3.735 ± 0.543 μg of CPA was recovered from the aerated solution. Significantly lower quantities were recovered from PCM (0.538 ± 0.098 μg) and PAM (0.236 ± 0.193 μg) ( p  SAM samples were below the quantification limit. When a piece of the SAM was immersed in the CPA solution, a marked decrease to less than 3.1 % of the initial CPA concentration was observed. The SAM exhibited good adsorption ability, and this characteristic may contribute to avoiding

  1. Production and characterization of activated carbon from a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, the use of a bituminous coal for the production of activated carbons with chemical activation was investigated. The effects of process variables such as chemical reagents, activation temperature, impregnation ratio and carbonization temperature were investigated to optimize these parameters. The resultant ...

  2. Removal of imidacloprid using activated carbon produced from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, Ricinodendron heudelotii (akpi) shells are used as precursor to prepare activated carbon via chemical activation using phosphoric acid. The characterization of the obtained activated carbon is performed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Boehm titration method and adsorption of acetic acid. The results show that ...

  3. Synthesis of High-Surface-Area Nitrogen-Doped Porous Carbon Microflowers and Their Efficient Carbon Dioxide Capture Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yao; Cao, Minhua

    2015-07-01

    Sustainable carbon materials have received particular attention in CO2 capture and storage owing to their abundant pore structures and controllable pore parameters. Here, we report high-surface-area hierarchically porous N-doped carbon microflowers, which were assembled from porous nanosheets by a three-step route: soft-template-assisted self-assembly, thermal decomposition, and KOH activation. The hydrazine hydrate used in our experiment serves as not only a nitrogen source, but also a structure-directing agent. The activation process was carried out under low (KOH/carbon=2), mild (KOH/carbon=4) and severe (KOH/carbon=6) activation conditions. The mild activated N-doped carbon microflowers (A-NCF-4) have a hierarchically porous structure, high specific surface area (2309 m(2)  g(-1)), desirable micropore size below 1 nm, and importantly large micropore volume (0.95 cm(3)  g(-1)). The remarkably high CO2 adsorption capacities of 6.52 and 19.32 mmol g(-1) were achieved with this sample at 0 °C (273 K) and two pressures, 1 bar and 20 bar, respectively. Furthermore, this sample also exhibits excellent stability during cyclic operations and good separation selectivity for CO2 over N2. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Activated-Carbon Sorbent With Integral Heat-Transfer Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jack A.; Yavrouian, Andre

    1996-01-01

    Prototype adsorption device used, for example, in adsorption heat pump, to store natural gas to power automobile, or to separate components of fluid mixtures. Device includes activated carbon held together by binder and molded into finned heat-transfer device providing rapid heating or cooling to enable rapid adsorption or desorption of fluids. Concepts of design and fabrication of device equally valid for such other highly thermally conductive devices as copper-finned tubes, and for such other high-surface-area sorbents as zeolites or silicates.

  5. Production of activated carbons from pyrolysis of waste tires impregnated with potassium hydroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, H; Lin, Y C; Hsu, L Y

    2000-11-01

    Activated carbons were produced from waste tires using a chemical activation method. The carbon production process consisted of potassium hydroxide (KOH) impregnation followed by pyrolysis in N2 at 600-900 degrees C for 0-2 hr. The activation method can produce carbons with a surface area (SA) and total pore volume as high as 470 m2/g and 0.57 cm3/g, respectively. The influence of different parameters during chemical activation, such as pyrolysis temperature, holding time, and KOH/tire ratio, on the carbon yield and the surface characteristics was explored, and the optimum preparation conditions were recommended. The pore volume of the resulting carbons generally increases with the extent of carbon gasified by KOH and its derivatives, whereas the SA increases with degree of gasification to reach a maximum value, and then decreases upon further gasification.

  6. Preparation and Characterization of Activated Carbon Obtained from Plantain (Musa paradisiaca Fruit Stem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Ekpete

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbonization of carbon obtained from plantain (Musa paradisiaca stem was achieved at a temperature of 400°C for one hour. The carbonized carbon was divided into two parts to be activated separately. The activated carbon CPPAC (carbonized plantain phosphoric acid activated carbon and CPZAC (carbonized plantain zinc chloride activated carbon were produced via the chemical activation process using H3PO4 and ZnCl2. Characterization of pH, bulk density, moisture content, ash content, volatile matter, iodine number, and oxygen functional group was conducted. When comparing the surface properties of both CPPAC and CPZAC with the untreated plantain carbon (UPC, it was observed that there existed significant differences in all properties with the exemption of carboxylic group for CPPAC and phenolic group for both CPPAC and CPZAC, thus signifying that a chemical transformation did occur. When comparing the results obtained from CPPAC to that of CPZAC, CPPAC was more preferable for adsorption due to its low bulk density, low ash content, and high iodine value, signifying thus that the activating agents both reacted differently with the plantain stem.

  7. [Effects of different fertilizer application on soil active organic carbon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Gui-Long; Ji, Yan-Yan; Li, Gang; Chang, Hong; Yang, Dian-Lin

    2013-01-01

    The variation characteristics of the content and components of soil active organic carbon under different fertilizer application were investigated in samples of calcareous fluvo-aquic soil from a field experiment growing winter wheat and summer maize in rotation in the North China Plain. The results showed that RF (recommended fertilization), CF (conventional fertilization) and NPK (mineral fertilizer alone) significantly increased the content of soil dissolved organic carbon and easily oxidized organic carbon by 24.92-38.63 mg x kg(-1) and 0.94-0.58 mg x kg(-1) respectively compared to CK (unfertilized control). The soil dissolved organic carbon content under OM (organic manure) increased greater than those under NPK and single fertilization, soil easily oxidized organic carbon content under OM and NPK increased greater than that under single chemical fertilization. OM and NPK showed no significant role in promoting the soil microbial biomass carbon, but combined application of OM and NPK significantly increased the soil microbial biomass carbon content by 36.06% and 20.69%, respectively. Soil easily oxidized organic carbon, dissolved organic carbon and microbial biomass carbon accounted for 8.41% - 14.83%, 0.47% - 0.70% and 0.89% - 1.20% of the total organic carbon (TOC), respectively. According to the results, the fertilizer application significantly increased the proportion of soil dissolved organic carbon and easily oxidized organic carbon, but there was no significant difference in the increasing extent of dissolved organic carbon. The RF and CF increased the proportion of soil easily oxidized organic carbon greater than OM or NPK, and significantly increased the proportion of microbial biomass carbon. OM or RF had no significant effect on the proportion of microbial biomass carbon. Therefore, in the field experiment, appropriate application of organic manure and chemical fertilizers played an important role for the increase of soil active organic carbon

  8. Adsorption kinetics of aromatic compounds on carbon nanotubes and activated carbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shujuan; Shao, Ting; Kose, H Selcen; Karanfil, Tanju

    2012-01-01

    Adsorption kinetics of two organic compounds on four types of carbonaceous adsorbents (a granular activated carbon [HD4000], an activated carbon fiber [ACF10], a single-walled carbon nanotube [SWNT], and a multiwalled carbon nanotube [MWNT]) was examined in aqueous solutions. The times needed for the adsorption to reach apparent equilibrium on the four carbons followed the order of ACF10 > HD4000 > SWNT > MWNT. Ultrasonication of the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) accelerated their adsorption kinetics but had no effect on their equilibrium adsorption capacities. The pseudo-second order model (PSOM) provided good fitting for the kinetic data. The fitting of kinetic data with the intraparticle diffusion model indicated that external mass transfer controls the sorption process in the organic compound-CNT systems, whereas intraparticle diffusion dominates in the sorption of organic compounds onto activated carbons. Copyright © 2011 SETAC.

  9. Single, competitive, and dynamic adsorption on activated carbon of compounds used as plasticizers and herbicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel daiem, Mahmoud M; Rivera-Utrilla, José; Sánchez-Polo, Manuel; Ocampo-Pérez, Raúl

    2015-12-15

    The main aim of this study was to investigate the single, competitive, and dynamic adsorption of phthalic acid (PA), bisphenol A (BPA), diphenolic acid (DPA), 2,4-dichlorophenoxy-acetic acid (2,4-D), and 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) on two activated carbons with different chemical natures and similar textural characteristics. The adsorption mechanism was also elucidated by analyzing the influence of solution pH and ionic strength. The activated carbons demonstrated high adsorption capacity to remove all micropollutants due to the presence of active sites on their surfaces, which increase dispersive interactions between the activated carbon graphene layers and the aromatic ring of pollutants. The adsorption capacity of the activated carbons increased in the order: DPAadsorption of contaminants is favored at acid pH (pHadsorption sites of the activated carbon. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Preparation and Characterization of Activated Carbon from Household Waste Foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iman Hussein Zainulabdeen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Waste food residues are considered as suitable raw materials for the production of low cost adsorbents. In this work, activated carbons was perpetrating from household waste food (orange peels, banana peels, walnut shells, olive stones and their mixture.  Chemical carbonization at 500?C for 1.5hr was used to prepare carbons and their activation by KOH and CaCl2 solutions for 24h. Then added 0.1g of activated carbons to the solution of blue dyeprepared laboratory to demonstrate the activation of the types of activated carbons prepared toremove the blue dye. The results indicated that characteristics (yield, burn off, density, moisturecontent, ash content, pore volume, porosity percent, Iodine number, methyl blue number andremoval percent of methyl blue for all activated carbons were compared with commercialactivated carbon. It has been found that activated carbon from orange peels and mixturesactivated with CaCl2 had the best adsorption properties reach to the (80, 77.5% removal bluedye respectively and iodine numbers (741, 735mg/g . This low coast activated carbons can beused for wastewater treatment.

  11. Adsorption of aromatic compounds by carbonaceous adsorbents: a comparative study on granular activated carbon, activated carbon fiber, and carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shujuan; Shao, Ting; Kose, H Selcen; Karanfil, Tanju

    2010-08-15

    Adsorption of three aromatic organic compounds (AOCs) by four types of carbonaceous adsorbents [a granular activated carbon (HD4000), an activated carbon fiber (ACF10), two single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT, SWNT-HT), and a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT)] with different structural characteristics but similar surface polarities was examined in aqueous solutions. Isotherm results demonstrated the importance of molecular sieving and micropore effects in the adsorption of AOCs by carbonaceous porous adsorbents. In the absence of the molecular sieving effect, a linear relationship was found between the adsorption capacities of AOCs and the surface areas of adsorbents, independent of the type of adsorbent. On the other hand, the pore volume occupancies of the adsorbents followed the order of ACF10 > HD4000 > SWNT > MWNT, indicating that the availability of adsorption site was related to the pore size distributions of the adsorbents. ACF10 and HD4000 with higher microporous volumes exhibited higher adsorption affinities to low molecular weight AOCs than SWNT and MWNT with higher mesopore and macropore volumes. Due to their larger pore sizes, SWNTs and MWNTs are expected to be more efficient in adsorption of large size molecules. Removal of surface oxygen-containing functional groups from the SWNT enhanced adsorption of AOCs.

  12. Preparation of steam activated carbon from rubberwood sawdust (Hevea brasiliensis) and its adsorption kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash Kumar, B G; Shivakamy, K; Miranda, Lima Rose; Velan, M

    2006-08-25

    Activated carbon was produced from a biowaste product, rubberwood sawdust (RWSD) using steam in a high temperature fluidized bed reactor. Experiments were carried out to investigate the influence of various process parameters such as activation time, activation temperature, particle size and fluidising velocity on the quality of the activated carbon. The activated carbon was characterized based on its iodine number, methylene blue number, Brauner Emmet Teller (BET) surface area and surface area obtained using the ethylene glycol mono ethyl ether (EGME) retention method. The best quality activated carbon was obtained at an activation time and temperature of 1h and 750 degrees C for an average particle size of 0.46 mm. The adsorption kinetics shows that pseudo-second-order rate fitted the adsorption kinetics better than pseudo-first-order rate equation. The adsorption capacity of carbon produced from RWSD was found to be 1250 mg g(-1) for the Bismark Brown dye. The rate constant and diffusion coefficient for intraparticle transport were determined for steam activated carbon. The characteristic of the prepared activated carbon was found comparable to the commercial activated carbon.

  13. Preparation of steam activated carbon from rubberwood sawdust (Hevea brasiliensis) and its adsorption kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prakash Kumar, B.G. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Alagappa College of Technology, Anna University, Chennai 600 025 (India); Shivakamy, K. [Centralised Waste Management Facility, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Miranda, Lima Rose [Department of Chemical Engineering, Alagappa College of Technology, Anna University, Chennai 600 025 (India); Velan, M. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Alagappa College of Technology, Anna University, Chennai 600 025 (India)]. E-mail: velan@annauniv.edu

    2006-08-25

    Activated carbon was produced from a biowaste product, rubberwood sawdust (RWSD) using steam in a high temperature fluidized bed reactor. Experiments were carried out to investigate the influence of various process parameters such as activation time, activation temperature, particle size and fluidising velocity on the quality of the activated carbon. The activated carbon was characterized based on its iodine number, methylene blue number, Brauner Emmet Teller (BET) surface area and surface area obtained using the ethylene glycol mono ethyl ether (EGME) retention method. The best quality activated carbon was obtained at an activation time and temperature of 1 h and 750 deg. C for an average particle size of 0.46 mm. The adsorption kinetics shows that pseudo-second-order rate fitted the adsorption kinetics better than pseudo-first-order rate equation. The adsorption capacity of carbon produced from RWSD was found to be 1250 mg g{sup -1} for the Bismark Brown dye. The rate constant and diffusion coefficient for intraparticle transport were determined for steam activated carbon. The characteristic of the prepared activated carbon was found comparable to the commercial activated carbon.

  14. Efficient L-lactic acid fermentation by the mold Rhizopus oryzae using activated carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koide, M.; Hirata, M.; Gaw, M.; Takanashi, H.; Hano, T. [Oita Univ, Oita (Japan). Dept. of Applied Chemistry

    2004-11-01

    Batch fermentations of Rhizopus oryzae AHU 6537 in medium containing granular activated carbon from coal, powder activated carbon from coal or granular activated carbon from coconut were carried out in an airlift bioreactor. As a result, fermentation broths were decolorized by activated carbon, and clearer fermentation broths were obtained than in fermentation without activated carbon. With activated carbon from coal, the cells formed smaller pellets than in fermentation without activated carbon, and fermentation performance was improved. Productivity was further improved by increasing the amount of activated carbon from coal. Therefore, the productivity of lactic acid fermentation could be improved by selecting a suitable activated carbon and by controlling the amount of activated carbon.

  15. Activation and Micropore Structure Determination of Activated Carbon-Fiber Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagtoyen, M.; Derbyshire, F.

    1999-04-23

    Previous work focused on the production of carbon fiber composites and subsequently activating them to induce adsorbent properties. One problem related to this approach is the difficulty of uniformly activating large composites. In order to overcome this problem, composites have been made from pre-activated fibers. The loss of surface area upon forming the composites after activation of the fibers was investigated. The electrical resistivity and strength of these composites were compared to those made by activation after forming. It was found that the surface area is reduced by about 35% by forming the composite from pre-activated fibers. However, the properties of the activated sample are very uniform: the variation in surface area is less than {+-}0.5%. So, although the surface area is somewhat reduced, it is believed that making composites from pre-activated fibers could be useful in applications where the BET surface area is not required to be very high. The strength of the composites produced from pre-activated fibers is lower than for composites activated after forming when the carbon burnoff is below 45%. For higher burnoffs, the strength of composites made with pre-activated fibers is as good or better. In both cases, there is a dramatic decrease in strength when the fiber:binder ratio is reduced below 4:1. The electrical resistivity is slightly higher for composites made from pre-activated fibers than for composites that are activated after forming, other parameters being constant (P-200 fibers, similar carbon burnoffs). For both types of composite the resistivity was also found to increase with carbon burnoff. This is attributed to breakage of the fiber causing shorter conductive paths. The electrical resistivity also increases when the binder content is lowered, which suggests that there are fewer solid contact points between the fibers.

  16. A high-performance mesoporous carbon supported nitrogen-doped carbon electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jingjing; Lu, Shiyao; Chen, Xu; Wang, Jianan; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Xinyu; Xiao, Chunhui; Ding, Shujiang

    2017-12-01

    Investigating low-cost and highly active electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reactions (ORR) is of crucial importance for energy conversion and storage devices. Herein, we design and prepare mesoporous carbon supported nitrogen-doped carbon by pyrolysis of polyaniline coated on CMK-3. This electrocatalyst exhibits excellent performance towards ORR in alkaline media. The optimized nitrogen-doped mesoporous electrocatalyst show an onset potential (E onset) of 0.95 V (versus reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE)) and half-wave potential (E 1/2) of 0.83 V (versus RHE) in 0.1 M KOH. Furthermore, the as-prepared catalyst presents superior durability and methanol tolerance compared to commercial Pt/C indicating its potential applications in fuel cells and metal–air batteries.

  17. The reversibility of adsorption of gold cyanide on activated carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Deventer, J. S. J.; van der Merwe, P. F.

    1993-06-01

    Much controversy exists about the mechanism by which gold cyanide adsorbs on activated carbon. It is not the purpose of this article to explain the exact adsorption mechanism but, rather, to investigate the factors affecting the reversibility of adsorbed gold cyanide. Whereas Au(CN){2/-} is soluble in water, AuCN and Au require the addition of cyanide to form Au(CN){2/-}. The reversibility of the adsorption of gold onto carbon is a function of the nature of the adsorbed gold and determines the need for cyanide in the elution process, which affects the operating costs of a carbon-in-pulp (CIP) plant. The fraction of adsorbed Au(CN){2/-} that will be decomposed to AuCN was found to be a function of the pH and temperature of the solution and the type of activated carbon used. It was observed that two different batches of carbon from the same manufacturer yielded widely different ratios of AuCN to Au(CN){2/-}, although their specifications did not differ much. These results were confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). A combination of low pH and high temperature, as is found in the hot acid wash step of an AARL elution, leads to the reduction of both Au(1) species to metallic gold, Au(0). The fraction of the adsorbed Au(CN){2/-} that is converted to AuCN or Au(0) no longer participates in the equilibrium between Au(CN){2/-} in solution and Au(CN){2/-} in the adsorbed phase. It was observed that the isotherm for desorption is higher than the isotherm for adsorption by a percentage which is, on average, equal to the percentage of Au(CN){2/-} converted to AuCN or Au(0).

  18. Development of Formaldehyde Adsorption using Modified Activated Carbon – A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.D.P Rengga

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Gas storage is a technology developed with an adsorptive storage method, in which gases are stored as adsorbed components on the certain adsorbent. Formaldehyde is one of the major indoor gaseous pollutants. Depending on its concentration, formaldehyde may cause minor disorder symptoms to a serious injury. Some of the successful applications of technology for the removal of formaldehyde have been reported. However, this paper presents an overview of several studies on the elimination of formaldehyde that has been done by adsorption method because of its simplicity. The adsorption method does not require high energy and the adsorbent used can be obtained from inexpensive materials. Most researchers used activated carbon as an adsorbent for removal of formaldehyde because of its high adsorption capacity. Activated carbons can be produced from many materials such as coals, woods, or agricultural waste. Some of them were prepared by specific activation methods to improve the surface area. Some researchers also used modified activated carbon by adding specific additive to improve its performance in attracting formaldehyde molecules. Proposed modification methods on activation and additive impregnated carbon are thus discussed in this paper for future development and improvement of formaldehyde adsorption on activated carbon. Specifically, a waste agricultural product is chosen for activated carbon raw material because it is renewable and gives an added value to the materials. The study indicates that the performance of the adsorption of formaldehyde might be improved by using modified activated carbon. Bamboo seems to be the most appropriate raw materials to produce activated carbon combined with applying chemical activation method and addition of metal oxidative catalysts such as Cu or Ag in nano size particles. Bamboo activated carbon can be developed in addition to the capture of formaldehyde as well as the storage of adsorptive hydrogen gas that

  19. Effects of microwave heating on porous structure of regenerated powdered activated carbon used in xylose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Wang, Xinying; Peng, Jinhui

    2014-01-01

    The regeneration of spent powdered activated carbons used in xylose decolourization by microwave heating was investigated. Effects of microwave power and microwave heating time on the adsorption capacity of regenerated activated carbons were evaluated. The optimum conditions obtained are as follows: microwave power 800W; microwave heating time 30min. Regenerated activated carbon in this work has high adsorption capacities for the amount of methylene blue of 16 cm3/0.1 g and the iodine number of 1000.06mg/g. The specific surface areas of fresh commercial activated carbon, spent carbon and regenerated activated carbon were calculated according to the Brunauer, Emmett and Teller method, and the pore-size distributions of these carbons were characterized by non-local density functional theory (NLDFT). The results show that the specific surface area and the total pore volume of regenerated activated carbon are 1064 m2/g and 1.181 mL/g, respectively, indicating the feasibility of regeneration of spent powdered activated carbon used in xylose decolourization by microwave heating. The results of surface fractal dimensions also confirm the results of isotherms and NLDFT.

  20. A high-porosity carbon molybdenum sulphide composite with enhanced electrochemical hydrogen evolution and stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Anders B.; Vesborg, Peter C. K.; Chorkendorff, Ib

    2013-01-01

    This work describes a highly active and stable acid activated carbon fibre and amorphous MoSx composite hydrogen evolution catalyst. The increased electrochemical-surface area is demonstrated to cause increased catalyst electrodeposition and activity. These composite electrodes also show an impro......This work describes a highly active and stable acid activated carbon fibre and amorphous MoSx composite hydrogen evolution catalyst. The increased electrochemical-surface area is demonstrated to cause increased catalyst electrodeposition and activity. These composite electrodes also show...

  1. Activated Carbon-Supported Tetrapropylammonium Perruthenate Catalysts for Acetylene Hydrochlorination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Li

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The Ru-based catalysts, including Ru/AC (activated carbon, TPAP (tetrapropylammonium perruthenate/AC, TPAP/AC-HNO3, and TPAP/AC-HCl, were prepared and assessed for the direct synthesis of vinyl chloride monomer. The results indicate that the TPAP/AC-HCl catalyst exhibits the best performance with the conversion falling from 97% to 91% in 48 hours’ reaction under the conditions of 180 °C, a GHSV(C2H2 of 180 h−1, and the feed ratio VHCl/VC2H2 of 1.15. The substitution of RuCl3 precursor with high valent TPAP species leads to more ruthenium oxides active species in the catalysts; the acidification treatment of carrier in TPAP/AC catalyst can produce an enhanced interaction between the active species and the modified functional groups on the carrier, and it is beneficial to inhibit the carbon deposition and sintering of ruthenium species in the reaction process, greatly increase the adsorption ability of reactants, and further increase the amount of dominating active species in the catalysts, thus improving the catalytic performance. This also provides a promising strategy to explore high efficient and economic mercury-free catalysts for the hydrochlorination of acetylene.

  2. Highly porous carbon with large electrochemical ion absorption capability for high-performance supercapacitors and ion capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shijie; Wang, Rutao; Zhang, Yabin; Zhang, Li

    2017-11-01

    Carbon-based supercapacitors have attracted extensive attention as the complement to batteries, owing to their durable lifespan and superiority in high-power-demand fields. However, their widespread use is limited by the low energy storage density; thus, a high-surface-area porous carbon is urgently needed. Herein, a highly porous carbon with a Brunauer-Emmett-Teller specific surface area up to 3643 m2 g-1 has been synthesized by chemical activation of papayas for the first time. This sp2-bonded porous carbon has a continuous three-dimensional network of highly curved, atom-thick walls that form narrow mesopores of 2 ˜ 5 nm in width, which can be systematically tailored with varied activation levels. Two-electrode symmetric supercapacitors constructed by this porous carbon achieve energy density of 8.1 Wh kg-1 in aqueous electrolyte and 65.5 Wh kg-1 in ionic-liquid electrolyte. Furthermore, half-cells (versus Li or Na metal) using this porous carbon as ion sorption cathodes yield high specific capacity, e.g., 51.0 and 39.3 mAh g-1 in Li+ and Na+ based organic electrolyte. These results underline the possibility of obtaining the porous carbon for high-performance carbon-based supercapacitors and ion capacitors in a readily scalable and economical way.

  3. Effect of high pressurized carbon dioxide on Escherichia coli ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Carbon dioxide at high pressure can retard microbial growth and sometimes kill microorganisms depending on values of applied pressure, temperature and exposure time. In this study the effect of high pressurised carbon dioxide (HPCD) on Escherichia coli was investigated. Culture of E. coli was subjected to high ...

  4. JPL Activated Carbon Treatment System (ACTS) for sewage

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    An Activated Carbon Treatment System (ACTS) was developed for sewage treatment and is being applied to a one-million gallon per day sewage treatment pilot plant in Orange County California. Activities reported include pyrolysis and activation of carbon-sewage sludge, and activated carbon treatment of sewage to meet ocean discharge standards. The ACTS Sewage treatment operations include carbon-sewage treatment, primary and secondary clarifiers, gravity (multi-media) filter, filter press dewatering, flash drying of carbon-sewage filter cake, and sludge pyrolysis and activation. Tests were conducted on a laboratory scale, 10,000 gallon per day demonstration plant and pilot test equipment. Preliminary economic studies are favorable to the ACTS process relative to activated sludge treatment for a 175,000,000 gallon per day sewage treatment plant.

  5. High-Flux Carbon Molecular Sieve Membranes for Gas Separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Hannes; Voss, Hartwig; Kaltenborn, Nadine; Kämnitz, Susanne; Wollbrink, Alexander; Feldhoff, Armin; Caro, Jürgen; Roitsch, Stefan; Voigt, Ingolf

    2017-06-26

    Carbon membranes have great potential for highly selective and cost-efficient gas separation. Carbon is chemically stable and it is relative cheap. The controlled carbonization of a polymer coating on a porous ceramic support provides a 3D carbon material with molecular sieving permeation performance. The carbonization of the polymer blend gives turbostratic carbon domains of randomly stacked together sp2 hybridized carbon sheets as well as sp3 hybridized amorphous carbon. In the evaluation of the carbon molecular sieve membrane, hydrogen could be separated from propane with a selectivity of 10 000 with a hydrogen permeance of 5 m3 (STP)/(m2 hbar). Furthermore, by a post-synthesis oxidative treatment, the permeation fluxes are increased by widening the pores, and the molecular sieve carbon membrane is transformed from a molecular sieve carbon into a selective surface flow carbon membrane with adsorption controlled performance and becomes selective for carbon dioxide. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Preconcentration and extraction of copper(II) on activated carbon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Activated carbon modified method was used for the preconcentration and determination of copper content in real samples such as tap water, wastewater and a synthetic water sample by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The copper(II) was adsorbed quantitatively on activated carbon due to its complexation with ...

  7. Activated Carbon Prepared in a Novel Gas Fired Static Bed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael O. Mensah

    2015-12-02

    Dec 2, 2015 ... The problem of gold recovery from their ores by adsorption onto activated carbon is complex and a number of adsorption mechanisms of gold adsorption from potassium or sodium aurocyanide solutions and gold chloride solutions onto activated carbons have been proposed over the years in the literature ...

  8. Treatment of ammonia in liquid hospital waste using activated carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riyanto, Hayati, Lena

    2017-12-01

    In this research study of the treatment of ammonia in liquid hospitals waste using activated carbon. This study aims to the effect of activated carbon weight and precipitation time to the treatment of ammonia in liquid hospitals waste. Hospital liquid waste has been taken from Jogja International Hospital (JIH) Yogyakarta, Indonesia. Hospital liquid waste 100 mL is mixed with activated carbon with the varied weight that is 15, 30 and 60 g. After added with activated carbon then stirred with a magnetic stirrer for 15 minutes and a precipitation time of 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 hours. The next step is the filtrate analyzed ammonia concentrations before and after treatment using UV-Vis Spectrophotometer. The results showed that activated carbon can reduce ammonia concentration in hospital liquid waste. The amount of the active carbon and the time of stirring, the greater the ammonia concentration decreases in hospital liquid waste. The best condition for the decrease of the ammonia concentration was obtained with active carbon and precipitation time is 60 g and 1.0 hours, respectively with ammonia decrease of 95.93%. The conclusion is that activated carbon can reduce ammonia concentration in hospital liquid waste.

  9. Lead removal in aqueous solution by activated carbons prepared ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJL

    and battery manufacturing, paint, paper and pulp industries. ... metals aqueous solutions is realizable using many methods such as: ion exchange, .... Table 1. Characteristics of the activated carbon. Activated carbons. Ash (%). Acidity neutralizations (meq/L). Surface area (m2/g). NaOH. NaHCO3. Na2CO3. CAo. 1.3. 0.8.

  10. Determination of activities of human carbonic anhydrase II inhibitors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the activities of new curcumin analogs as carbonic anhydrase II (CA-II) inhibitor. Methods: Carbonic anhydrase II (CA-II) inhibition was determined by each ligand capability to inhibit the esterase activity of CA-II using 4-NPA as a substrate in 96-well plates. Dimethyl sulfoxide was used to dissolve each ...

  11. Microbial Enzyme Activity and Carbon Cycling in Grassland Soil Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, S. D.; Jastrow, J. D.

    2004-12-01

    Extracellular enzymes are necessary to degrade complex organic compounds present in soils. Using physical fractionation procedures, we tested whether old soil carbon is spatially isolated from degradative enzymes across a prairie restoration chronosequence in Illinois, USA. We found that carbon-degrading enzymes were abundant in all soil fractions, including macroaggregates, microaggregates, and the clay fraction, which contains carbon with a mean residence time of ~200 years. The activities of two cellulose-degrading enzymes and a chitin-degrading enzyme were 2-10 times greater in organic matter fractions than in bulk soil, consistent with the rapid turnover of these fractions. Polyphenol oxidase activity was 3 times greater in the clay fraction than in the bulk soil, despite very slow carbon turnover in this fraction. Changes in enzyme activity across the restoration chronosequence were small once adjusted for increases in soil carbon concentration, although polyphenol oxidase activity per unit carbon declined by 50% in native prairie versus cultivated soil. These results are consistent with a `two-pool' model of enzyme and carbon turnover in grassland soils. In light organic matter fractions, enzyme production and carbon turnover both occur rapidly. However, in mineral-dominated fractions, both enzymes and their carbon substrates are immobilized on mineral surfaces, leading to slow turnover. Soil carbon accumulation in the clay fraction and across the prairie restoration chronosequence probably reflects increasing physical isolation of enzymes and substrates on the molecular scale, rather than the micron to millimeter scale.

  12. Plasma Treated Active Carbon for Capacitive Deionization of Saline Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiping Zeng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The plasma treatment on commercial active carbon (AC was carried out in a capacitively coupled plasma system using Ar + 10% O2 at pressure of 4.0 Torr. The RF plasma power ranged from 50 W to 100 W and the processing time was 10 min. The carbon film electrode was fabricated by electrophoretic deposition. Micro-Raman spectroscopy revealed the highly increased disorder of sp2 C lattice for the AC treated at 75 W. An electrosorption capacity of 6.15 mg/g was recorded for the carbon treated at 75 W in a 0.1 mM NaCl solution when 1.5 V was applied for 5 hours, while the capacity of the untreated AC was 1.01 mg/g. The plasma treatment led to 5.09 times increase in the absorption capacity. The jump of electrosorption capacity by plasma treatment was consistent with the Raman spectra and electrochemical double layer capacitance. This work demonstrated that plasma treatment was a potentially efficient approach to activating biochar to serve as electrode material for capacitive deionization (CDI.

  13. Ozone Removal by Filters Containing Activated Carbon: A Pilot Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisk, William; Spears, Mike; Sullivan, Douglas; Mendell, Mark

    2009-09-01

    This study evaluated the ozone removal performance of moderate-cost particle filters containing activated carbon when installed in a commercial building heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) system. Filters containing 300 g of activated carbon per 0.09 m2 of filter face area were installed in two 'experimental' filter banks within an office building located in Sacramento, CA. The ozone removal performance of the filters was assessed through periodic measurements of ozone concentrations in the air upstream and downstream of the filters. Ozone concentrations were also measured upstream and downstream of a 'reference' filter bank containing filters without any activated carbon. The filter banks with prefilters containing activated carbon were removing 60percent to 70percent of the ozone 67 and 81 days after filter installation. In contrast, there was negligible ozone removal by the reference filter bank without activated carbon.

  14. Bioregeneration of spent mercury bearing sulfur-impregnated activated carbon adsorbent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shen-Yi; Hsi, Hsing-Cheng; Shih, Min-Yu

    2018-02-01

    Among various adsorbents studied, sulfur-impregnated activated carbon is one of the most promising adsorbents for mercury removal from flue gas. However, a large amount of spent activated carbons containing high content of mercury are generated after adsorption. To make the adsorption a more viable option, the regeneration and reuse of the spent activated carbon should be considered. The purpose of this study is to develop a novel technique for bioregeneration of sulfur-impregnated activated carbons after adsorption of mercury from flue gases by sulfur-oxidizing bacteria. The optimal operating parameters for this bioregeneration process were studied using central composite design (CCD) and response surface methodology (RSM). Results showed that the sulfur oxidation rate was increased with increasing activated carbon dosage. Furthermore, the increase of inoculum size only caused a slight increase of sulfur oxidation rate in the bioregeneration. The maximum mercury removal efficiency of more than 50% was obtained at 10% (w/v) activated carbon dosage and 20% (v/v) inoculum size. After the bioregeneration process, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area and micropore volume of spent activated carbon increased due to the bio-oxidation of mercury bearing sulfur on the surface of activated carbons.

  15. Preparation of porous bio-char and activated carbon from rice husk by leaching ash and chemical activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahiduzzaman, Md; Sadrul Islam, A K M

    2016-01-01

    Preparation porous bio-char and activated carbon from rice husk char study has been conducted in this study. Rice husk char contains high amount silica that retards the porousness of bio-char. Porousness of rice husk char could be enhanced by removing the silica from char and applying heat at high temperature. Furthermore, the char is activated by using chemical activation under high temperature. In this study no inert media is used. The study is conducted at low oxygen environment by applying biomass for consuming oxygen inside reactor and double crucible method (one crucible inside another) is applied to prevent intrusion of oxygen into the char. The study results shows that porous carbon is prepared successfully without using any inert media. The adsorption capacity of material increased due to removal of silica and due to the activation with zinc chloride compared to using raw rice husk char. The surface area of porous carbon and activated carbon are found to be 28, 331 and 645 m(2) g(-1) for raw rice husk char, silica removed rice husk char and zinc chloride activated rice husk char, respectively. It is concluded from this study that porous bio-char and activated carbon could be prepared in normal environmental conditions instead of inert media. This study shows a method and possibility of activated carbon from agro-waste, and it could be scaled up for commercial production.

  16. The absorption of gases in aqueous activated carbon slurries enhanced by adsorbing or catalytic particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holstvoogd, R.D.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria; van Dierendonck, L.L.

    1988-01-01

    The enhanced absorption of gases in aqueous activated carbon slurries of fine particles is studied with an instationary absorption model taking into account the finite adsorption capacity of the carbon particles, and with a stationary geometrical model, which describes the absorption into a highly

  17. Importance of fullerenic active sites in surface modification of carbon black by plasma polymerisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mathew, T.; Datta, Rabin; Dierkes, Wilma K.; Ooij, W.J.; Noordermeer, Jacobus W.M.; Probst, N.; Gruenberger, T.M.; Probst, N.

    2009-01-01

    Carbon black is widely used as an active filler in rubber to improve the physical properties. The surface energy of carbon black is high compared to that of various elastomers like Styrene–Butadiene rubber, Butadiene rubber and Ethylene–Propylene Diene rubber. Reducing the surface energy and

  18. Enhanced adsorption of perfluorooctane sulfonate and perfluorooctanoate by bamboo-derived granular activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Shubo; Nie, Yao; Du, Ziwen; Huang, Qian; Meng, Pingping; Wang, Bin; Huang, Jun; Yu, Gang

    2015-01-23

    A bamboo-derived granular activated carbon with large pores was successfully prepared by KOH activation, and used to remove perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) from aqueous solution. The granular activated carbon prepared at the KOH/C mass ratio of 4 and activation temperature of 900°C had fast and high adsorption for PFOS and PFOA. Their adsorption equilibrium was achieved within 24h, which was attributed to their fast diffusion in the micron-sized pores of activated carbon. This granular activated carbon exhibited the maximum adsorbed amount of 2.32mmol/g for PFOS and 1.15mmol/g for PFOA at pH 5.0, much higher than other granular and powdered activated carbons reported. The activated carbon prepared under the severe activation condition contained many enlarged pores, favorable for the adsorption of PFOS and PFOA. In addition, the spent activated carbon was hardly regenerated in NaOH/NaCl solution, while the regeneration efficiency was significantly enhanced in hot water and methanol/ethanol solution, indicating that hydrophobic interaction was mainly responsible for the adsorption. The regeneration percent was up to 98% using 50% ethanol solution at 45°C. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Cellulosic carbon fibers with branching carbon nanotubes for enhanced electrochemical activities for bioprocessing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xueyan; Lu, Xin; Tze, William Tai Yin; Kim, Jungbae; Wang, Ping

    2013-09-25

    Renewable biobased carbon fibers are promising materials for large-scale electrochemical applications including chemical processing, energy storage, and biofuel cells. Their performance is, however, often limited by low activity. Herein we report that branching carbon nanotubes can enhance the activity of carbonized cellulosic fibers, such that the oxidation potential of NAD(H) was reduced to 0.55 V from 0.9 V when applied for bioprocessing. Coordinating with enzyme catalysts, such hierarchical carbon materials effectively facilitated the biotransformation of glycerol, with the total turnover number of NAD(H) over 3500 within 5 h of reaction.

  20. A novel poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/iron phthalocyanine/multi-wall carbon nanotubes nanocomposite with high electrocatalytic activity for nitrite oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chia-Yu; Balamurugan, A; Lai, Yi-Hsuan; Ho, Kuo-Chuan

    2010-10-15

    In the present work, the oxidative electrochemistry of nitrite on the poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/iron phthalocyanine/multi-wall carbon nanotubes-(PEDOT/FePc/MWCNT) modified screen-printed carbon electrodes (SPCE) has been investigated. The parameters, such as overpotential, current density and rate constant at PEDOT/FePc/MWCNT-modified SPCE, were compared with an un-modified, FePc-, and FePc/MWCNT-modified SPCE for electro-oxidation of nitrite. As compared with the un-modified SPCE, an increase in the anodic peak current density (J(pa)) (∼100%) along with a decrease in the anodic peak potential (E(pa)) of ∼150mV for electro-oxidation of nitrite at the FePc-modified SPCE was observed. When an under-layer of MWCNT was introduced onto FePc-modified SPCE, denoted as FePc/MWCNT-modified SPCE, and the number of FePc/MWCNT bilayer was optimized, the heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant (k) at FePc/MWCNT-modified SPCE was enhanced about 7.8 times as compared with that at FePc-modified SPCE. Moreover, as a layer of PEDOT film was electrodeposited onto the FePc/MWCNT-modified SPCE, denoted as PEDOT/FePc/MWCNT-modified SPCE, a significant increase in current response along with a remarkable decrease in E(pa) were noticed. This can be attributed to the pre-concentration effect induced by the electrostatic interaction between the negatively charged nitrite and oxidized PEDOT film. On the whole, the PEDOT/FePc/MWCNT-modified SPCE greatly reduces the overpotential of ∼330mV along with 3.5 times enhanced the peak current density for the electro-oxidation of nitrite as compared with un-modified SPCE. The sensitivity and limit of detection (S/N=3) for the PEDOT/FePc/MWCNT-modified SPCE were found to be as 638mAcm(-2)M(-1) and 71nM, respectively. Notably, PEDOT/FePc/MWCNT-modified SPCE has a lower sensing potential than compared to several other modified electrodes. The developed sensor was also applied for the determination of nitrite in tap water sample

  1. Particle emissions from laboratory activities involving carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Li-Ming; Tsai, Candace S.-J.; Heitbrink, William A.; Dunn, Kevin H.; Topmiller, Jennifer; Ellenbecker, Michael

    2017-08-01

    This site study was conducted in a chemical laboratory to evaluate nanomaterial emissions from 20-30-nm-diameter bundles of single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) during product development activities. Direct-reading instruments were used to monitor the tasks in real time, and airborne particles were collected using various methods to characterize released nanomaterials using electron microscopy and elemental carbon (EC) analyses. CNT clusters and a few high-aspect-ratio particles were identified as being released from some activities. The EC concentration (0.87 μg/m3) at the source of probe sonication was found to be higher than other activities including weighing, mixing, centrifugation, coating, and cutting. Various sampling methods all indicated different levels of CNTs from the activities; however, the sonication process was found to release the highest amounts of CNTs. It can be cautiously concluded that the task of probe sonication possibly released nanomaterials into the laboratory and posed a risk of surface contamination. Based on these results, the sonication of CNT suspension should be covered or conducted inside a ventilated enclosure with proper filtration or a glovebox to minimize the potential of exposure.

  2. Electrochemical Hydrogen Storage in a Highly Ordered Mesoporous Carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan eLiu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A highly order mesoporous carbon has been synthesized through a strongly acidic, aqueous cooperative assembly route. The structure and morphology of the carbon material were investigated using TEM, SEM and nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms. The carbon was proven to be meso-structural and consisted of graphitic micro-domain with larger interlayer space. AC impedance and electrochemical measurements reveal that the synthesized highly ordered mesoporous carbon exhibits a promoted electrochemical hydrogen insertion process and improved capacitance and hydrogen storage stability. The meso-structure and enlarged interlayer distance within the highly ordered mesoporous carbon are suggested as possible causes for the enhancement in hydrogen storage. Both hydrogen capacity in the carbon and mass diffusion within the matrix were improved.

  3. An assessment methodology for determining pesticides adsorption on granulated activated carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barthélemy J.-P.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In many countries, water suppliers add granular activated carbon reactor in the drinking water treatment notably in order to remove pesticides residues. In Europe, their concentrations must lie below the values imposed by the EU directives (98/83/EC. Acouple of years ago, some mini-column tests were developed to improve the use of the activated carbon reactor in relation with lab experiments. Modelling, which was elaborated to predict the lifetime of reactors, did not bring validated results. Nevertheless, this kind of experiment allows us to assess the adsorption performances of an activated carbon for different pesticides. Because of the lack of comparable available results, we have eveloped a standardized methodology based on the experiment in mini-column of granular activated carbon. The main experimental conditions are activated carbon: Filtrasorb 400 (Chemviron Carbon; water: mineral and organic reconstituted water (humic acid concentration: 0,5 mg/l; influent concentration 500 g . l -1 ; activated carbon weight: 200 mg; EBCT (Empty Bed Contact Time: 0.16 min.; linear speed: 0.15 m . s -1 . In these conditions, it appears that diuron is highly adsorbed in comparison with other active substances like chloridazon, atrazine or MCPA. From the ratio of effluent volume for the breakthrough point with respect to diuron, it is suggested that products of which the difference factor ratio is – (a below 0.40: may be reckoned as weakly adsorbed (MCPA; (b from 0.41 to 0.80: may be reckoned as moderately adsorbed (chloridazon and atrazine; (c above 0.80: as highly adsorbed on granular activated carbon. Active substances that are weakly adsorbed and have to be removed from drinking water, may highly reduce the lifetime of an activated carbon bed. This kind of information is particularly useful for water suppliers and for regulatory authorities.

  4. Photocatalytic Activity and Characterization of Carbon-Modified Titania for Visible-Light-Active Photodegradation of Nitrogen Oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Hung Huang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A variety of carbon-modified titania powders were prepared by impregnation method using a commercial available titania powder, Hombikat UV100, as matrix material while a range of alcohols from propanol to hexanol were used as precursors of carbon sources. Rising the carbon number of alcoholic precursor molecule, the modified titania showed increasing visible activities of NOx photodegradation. The catalyst modified with cyclohexanol exhibited the best activities of 62%, 62%, 59%, and 54% for the total NOx removal under UV, blue, green, and red light irradiation, respectively. The high activity with long wavelength irradiation suggested a good capability of photocatalysis in full visible light spectrum. Analysis of UV-visible spectrum indicated that carbon modification promoted visible light absorption and red shift in band gap. XPS spectroscopic analysis identified the existence of carbonate species (C=O, which increased with the increasing carbon number of precursor molecule. Photoluminescence spectra demonstrated that the carbonate species suppressed the recombination rate of electron-hole pair. As a result, a mechanism of visible-light-active photocatalyst was proposed according to the formation of carbonate species on carbon-modified TiO2.

  5. Photoredox activation of carbon dioxide for amino acid synthesis in continuous flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Hyowon; Katcher, Matthew H.; Jamison, Timothy F.

    2017-05-01

    Although carbon dioxide (CO2) is highly abundant, its low reactivity has limited its use in chemical synthesis. In particular, methods for carbon-carbon bond formation generally rely on two-electron mechanisms for CO2 activation and require highly activated reaction partners. Alternatively, radical pathways accessed via photoredox catalysis could provide new reactivity under milder conditions. Here we demonstrate the direct coupling of CO2 and amines via the single-electron reduction of CO2 for the photoredox-catalysed continuous flow synthesis of α-amino acids. By leveraging the advantages of utilizing gases and photochemistry in flow, a commercially available organic photoredox catalyst effects the selective α-carboxylation of amines that bear various functional groups and heterocycles. The preliminary mechanistic studies support CO2 activation and carbon-carbon bond formation via single-electron pathways, and we expect that this strategy will inspire new perspectives on using this feedstock chemical in organic synthesis.

  6. NITROGEN, WATER AND BENZENE ADSORPTION IN MESOPOROUS CARBON (CMK-1 AND COMMERCIAL ACTIVATED CARBON (NORIT SX22

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Taba

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Adsorption at various interfaces has attracted the attention of many scientists. This article discusses gas-solid and vapour-solid adsorption in CMK-1 and Norit SX22 using nitrogen, water and benzene as adsorbates. For comparison, MCM-48 used as template in synthesizing CMK-1 was also utilized as adsorbent. Results showed that the shape of nitrogen isotherm for CMK-1 is categorized as Type IV shape, whereas activated carbon (Norit SX2 has Type I shape with a hysteresis loop at P/P0 > 0.5, which is a H4 type of hysteresis. The shape of nitrogen isotherm for MCM-48 is categorized as Type IV shape with small hysteresis loop observed at P/P0 above 0.45, indicating that the larger pores are filled at high P/P0, which is typical of an H3 hysteresis loop The amount of nitrogen adsorbed in activated carbon at the high relative pressure is considerably smaller than that in CMK-1. The hydrophobicity feature of CMK-1 is the same as activated carbon (Norit SX2, but slightly different to the template MCM-48. The affinity of CMK-1 to benzene is considerably higher than activated carbon, suggesting the promising future of CMK-1 to be used as a selective adsorbent for the removal of organic compounds from water environment.   Keywords: Adsorption, water, benzene, CMK-1, activated carbon

  7. Highly Loaded Carbon Black Supported Platinum Catalysts for Fuel Batteries

    OpenAIRE

    Kaluža, Luděk

    2014-01-01

    Carbon supported Pt represents conventional catalyst in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel battery (PEM fuel cell). The aim of this work was to elucidate on the methods of Pt deposition on carbon black to achieve high loadings of Pt of about 60 wt.% in highly dispersed form.

  8. Beef-derived Mesoporous Carbon as Highly Efficient Support for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this work, a low-cost and nitrogen-containing carbon with mesoporous pores and high surface area was synthesized by carbonizing a natural biomass precursor, i.e. beef. It is found that the prepared material has excellent textural properties such as high specific surface areas and large pore diameters. TEM images ...

  9. Activated carbon derived from waste coffee grounds for stable methane storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, K Christian; Baek, Seung Bin; Lee, Wang-Geun; Meyyappan, M; Kim, Kwang S

    2015-09-25

    An activated carbon material derived from waste coffee grounds is shown to be an effective and stable medium for methane storage. The sample activated at 900 °C displays a surface area of 1040.3 m(2) g(-1) and a micropore volume of 0.574 cm(3) g(-1) and exhibits a stable CH4 adsorption capacity of ∼4.2 mmol g(-1) at 3.0 MPa and a temperature range of 298 ± 10 K. The same material exhibits an impressive hydrogen storage capacity of 1.75 wt% as well at 77 K and 100 kPa. Here, we also propose a mechanism for the formation of activated carbon from spent coffee grounds. At low temperatures, the material has two distinct types with low and high surface areas; however, activation at elevated temperatures drives off the low surface area carbon, leaving behind the porous high surface area activated carbon.

  10. JV Task 119 - Effects of Aging on Treated Activated Carbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwin Olson; Lucinda Hamre; John Pavlish; Blaise Mibeck

    2009-03-25

    For both the United States and Canada, testing has been under way for electric utilities to find viable and economical mercury control strategies to meet pending future mercury emission limits. The technology that holds the most promise for mercury control in low-chlorine lignite to meet the needs of the Clean Air Act in the United States and the Canada-Wide Standards in Canada is injection of treated activated carbon (AC) into the flue gas stream. Most of the treated carbons are reported to be halogenated, often with bromine. Under a previous multiyear project headed by the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), testing was performed on a slipstream unit using actual lignite-derived flue gas to evaluate various sorbent technologies for their effectiveness, performance, and cost. Testing under this project showed that halogenated ACs performed very well, with mercury capture rates often {ge} 90%. However, differences were noted between treated ACs with respect to reactivity and capacity, possibly as a result of storage conditions. Under certain conditions (primarily storage in ambient air), notable performance degradation had occurred in mercury capture efficiency. Therefore, a small exploratory task within this project evaluated possible differences resulting from storage conditions and subsequent effects of aging that might somehow alter their chemical or physical properties. In order to further investigate this potential degradation of treated (halogenated) ACs, the EERC, together with DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory, the North Dakota Industrial Commission (NDIC), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), SaskPower, and Otter Tail Power Company, assessed the aging effects of brominated ACs for the effect that different storage durations, temperatures, and humidity conditions have on the mercury sorption capacity of treated ACs. No aging effects on initial capture activity were observed for any carbons or conditions in the

  11. Optimisation and significance of ATP analysis for measuring active biomass in granular activated carbon filters used in water treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Magic-Knezev, A.; Kooij, van der D.

    2004-01-01

    A method for determining the concentration of active microbial biomass in granular activated carbon (GAC) filters used in water treatment was developed to facilitate studies on the interactions between adsorption processes and biological activity in such filters. High-energy sonication at a power

  12. Beef-derived Mesoporous Carbon as Highly Efficient Support for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NICO

    particle, which results in aggregation of Pt nanoparticles and further reducing the Pt active surface and fuel cell perfor- mance.14. Recently, nitrogen-doped carbon materials as support for. Pt-based catalysts have attracted great attention.15–18 The literature shows that nitrogen-doped carbons possesses n-type or metallic.

  13. CARBON FIBER COMPOSITES IN HIGH VOLUME

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Charles David [ORNL; Das, Sujit [ORNL; Jeon, Dr. Saeil [Volvo Trucks North America

    2014-01-01

    Vehicle lightweighting represents one of several design approaches that automotive and heavy truck manufacturers are currently evaluating to improve fuel economy, lower emissions, and improve freight efficiency (tons-miles per gallon of fuel). With changes in fuel efficiency and environmental regulations in the area of transportation, the next decade will likely see considerable vehicle lightweighting throughout the ground transportation industry. Greater use of carbon fiber composites and light metals is a key component of that strategy. This paper examines the competition between candidate materials for lightweighting of heavy vehicles and passenger cars. A 53-component, 25 % mass reduction, body-in-white cost analysis is presented for each material class, highlighting the potential cost penalty for each kilogram of mass reduction and then comparing the various material options. Lastly, as the cost of carbon fiber is a major component of the elevated cost of carbon fiber composites, a brief look at the factors that influence that cost is presented.

  14. Utilization of turkey manure as granular activated carbon: physical, chemical and adsorptive properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Isabel; Marshall, Wayne E

    2005-01-01

    The high availability of large quantities of turkey manure generated from turkey production makes it an attractive feedstock for carbon production. Pelletized samples of turkey litter and cake were converted to granular activated carbons (GACs) by steam activation. Water flow rate and activation time were changed to produce a range of activation conditions. The GACs were characterized for select physical (yield, surface area, bulk density, attrition), chemical (pH, surface charge) and adsorptive properties (copper ion uptake). Carbon physical and adsorptive properties were dependent on activation time and quantity of steam used as activant. Yields varied from 23% to 37%, surface area varied from 248 to 472 m(2)/g and copper ion adsorption varied from 0.72 to 1.86 mmol Cu(2+)/g carbon. Copper ion adsorption greatly exceeded the values for two commercial GACs. GACs from turkey litter and cake show considerable potential to remove metal ions from water.

  15. Preparation of activated carbon from waste plastics polyethylene terephthalate as adsorbent in natural gas storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuliusman; Nasruddin; Sanal, A.; Bernama, A.; Haris, F.; Ramadhan, I. T.

    2017-02-01

    The main problem is the process of natural gas storage and distribution, because in normal conditions of natural gas in the gas phase causes the storage capacity be small and efficient to use. The technology is commonly used Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) and Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG). The weakness of this technology safety level is low because the requirement for high-pressure CNG (250 bar) and LNG requires a low temperature (-161°C). It takes innovation in the storage of natural gas using the technology ANG (Adsorbed Natural Gas) with activated carbon as an adsorbent, causing natural gas can be stored in a low pressure of about 34.5. In this research, preparation of activated carbon using waste plastic polyethylene terephthalate (PET). PET plastic waste is a good raw material for making activated carbon because of its availability and the price is a lot cheaper. Besides plastic PET has the appropriate characteristics as activated carbon raw material required for the storage of natural gas because the material is hard and has a high carbon content of about 62.5% wt. The process of making activated carbon done is carbonized at a temperature of 400 ° C and physical activation using CO2 gas at a temperature of 975 ° C. The parameters varied in the activation process is the flow rate of carbon dioxide and activation time. The results obtained in the carbonization process yield of 21.47%, while the yield on the activation process by 62%. At the optimum process conditions, the CO2 flow rate of 200 ml/min and the activation time of 240 minutes, the value % burn off amounted to 86.69% and a surface area of 1591.72 m2/g.

  16. Production of granular activated carbon from food-processing wastes (walnut shells and jujube seeds) and its adsorptive properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Wookeun; Kim, Jongho; Chung, Jinwook

    2014-08-01

    Commercial activated carbon is a highly effective absorbent that can be used to remove micropollutants from water. As a result, the demand for activated carbon is increasing. In this study, we investigated the optimum manufacturing conditions for producing activated carbon from ligneous wastes generated from food processing. Jujube seeds and walnut shells were selected as raw materials. Carbonization and steam activation were performed in a fixed-bed laboratory electric furnace. To obtain the highest iodine number, the optimum conditions for producing activated carbon from jujube seeds and walnut shells were 2 hr and 1.5 hr (carbonization at 700 degrees C) followed by 1 hr and 0.5 hr (activation at 1000 degrees C), respectively. The surface area and iodine number of activated carbon made from jujube seeds and walnut shells were 1,477 and 1,184 m2/g and 1,450 and 1,200 mg/g, respectively. A pore-distribution analysis revealed that most pores had a pore diameter within or around 30-40 angstroms, and adsorption capacity for surfactants was about 2 times larger than the commercial activated carbon, indicating that waste-based activated carbon can be used as alternative. Implications: Wastes discharged from agricultural and food industries results in a serious environmental problem. A method is proposed to convert food-processing wastes such as jujube seeds and walnut shells into high-grade granular activated carbon. Especially, the performance of jujube seeds as activated carbon is worthy of close attention. There is little research about the application ofjujube seeds. Also, when compared to two commercial carbons (Samchully and Calgon samples), the results show that it is possible to produce high-quality carbon, particularly from jujube seed, using a one-stage, 1,000 degrees C, steam pyrolysis. The preparation of activated carbon from food-processing wastes could increase economic return and reduce pollution.

  17. Preparation of sodium dodecyl sulphate-functionalized activated carbon from Gnetum gnemon shell for dye adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatimah, Is; Yahya, Amri; Sasti, Rilis Akista Tria

    2017-03-01

    Preparation of functionalized activated carbon from Gnetum gnemon shell was investigated. This work aimed to prepare highly active adsorbent for dye adsorption process by carbonization of Gnetum gnemon shell followed by functionalization using sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) to form SDS-modified activated carbon (SDS-AC). The study of physicochemical character change was performed by SEM and FTIR analysis while the adsorptivity of the materials was tested in methylene blue adsorption. According to the results, it is found that SDS-AC exhibits the greater adsorptivity compared to AC.

  18. Photolytic insertion of albumin on activated carbon modified with ozone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta Muniz Moreira, Regina de Fátima; Humeres, Eduardo; Berger, Carolina; Isabel Fernández, M; Santaballa, J A; Canle, Moisés

    2017-09-01

    254nm photolyses of bovine serum albumin [BSA] in aqueous solutions, were carried out in the presence of activated carbons modified by reaction with ozone. The photolyses were monitored by fluorescence spectroscopy and UV spectrophotometry, and the products were characterized by elemental analysis, FTIR, TGA, total organic carbon analyses [TOC], and XPS. The ozonation reaction was carried out at room temperature with O 3 under dry and wet conditions. The carbon characterization showed that the reaction increased the amount of epoxide and carbonyl groups on the carbon matrix. The activated carbon modified with dry O 3 exhibited higher concentration of oxidized groups in its surface, smaller surface area and lower thermal stability. Characterization of the photolysis of ozonized carbons pointed to a small release of carbon organic groups during the reaction with elimination of epoxide groups and increase of carbonyl groups without change of thermal stability. Photolysis of BSA in aqueous solution occurred with fluorescence quenching due to changes of the local microenvironment and/or macromolecular conformational changes. Absorbance increase of the UV spectrum indicated a hyperchromic effect due to albumin structure modifications during photolysis. TGA analysis of the photolysed activated carbons in the presence of BSA suggested that ozonized carbon samples underwent insertion of BSA upon photolysis, in particular the sample ozonized under dry conditions. The changes observed for the FTIR and elemental analysis agreed with this conclusion, which was further supported by 13 C SS-NMR, fluorescence emission and XPS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Single Carbon Fibers with a Macroscopic-Thickness, 3D Highly Porous Carbon Nanotube Coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Mingchu; Zhao, Wenqi; Wu, Huaisheng; Zhang, Hui; Xu, Wenjing; Yang, Liusi; Wu, Shiting; Wang, Yunsong; Chen, Yijun; Xu, Lu; Cao, Anyuan

    2018-02-19

    Carbon fiber (CF) grafted with a layer of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) plays an important role in composite materials and other fields; to date, the applications of CNTs@CF multiscale fibers are severely hindered by the limited amount of CNTs grafted on individual CFs and the weak interfacial binding force. Here, monolithic CNTs@CF fibers consisting of a 3D highly porous CNT sponge layer with macroscopic-thickness (up to several millimeters), which is directly grown on a single CF, are fabricated. Mechanical tests reveal high sponge-CF interfacial strength owing to the presence of a thin transitional layer, which completely inhibits the CF slippage from the matrix upon fracture in CNTs@CF fiber-epoxy composites. The porous conductive CNTs@CF hybrid fibers also act as a template for introducing active materials (pseudopolymers and oxides), and a solid-state fiber-shaped supercapacitor and a fiber-type lithium-ion battery with high performances are demonstrated. These CNTs@CF fibers with macroscopic CNT layer thickness have many potential applications in areas such as hierarchically reinforced composites and flexible energy-storage textiles. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Activated carbon from sugarcane bagasse ash for melanoidins recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, A; Basu, S; Singh, K; Batra, V S; Balakrishnan, M

    2017-09-15

    This work investigates the value added utilization of two sugar-distillery wastes: (i) melanoidins, which are complex Maillard reaction products in molasses distillery wastewater, and (ii) unburnt carbon in sugarcane bagasse ash. Activated unburnt carbon (AUC), prepared by deashing and steam activation, had properties comparable to commercial activated carbon (CAC). Both carbons are suitable for melanoidins adsorption followed by desorption using 25% pyridine solution. For AUC, the equilibrium adsorption data is well described by Langmuir isotherm up to 35 °C while Freundlich model fits better at higher temperature. Adsorption using CAC followed Freundlich isotherm at all temperatures. Both carbons followed pseudo second order kinetics and displayed endothermic physisorption. Recovery of melanoidins from AUC (78%) was close to that observed with CAC (80%). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. JV Task 90 - Activated Carbon Production from North Dakota Lignite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven Benson; Charlene Crocker; Rokan Zaman; Mark Musich; Edwin Olson

    2008-03-31

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has pursued a research program for producing activated carbon from North Dakota lignite that can be competitive with commercial-grade activated carbon. As part of this effort, small-scale production of activated carbon was produced from Fort Union lignite. A conceptual design of a commercial activated carbon production plant was drawn, and a market assessment was performed to determine likely revenue streams for the produced carbon. Activated carbon was produced from lignite coal in both laboratory-scale fixed-bed reactors and in a small pilot-scale rotary kiln. The EERC was successfully able to upgrade the laboratory-scale activated carbon production system to a pilot-scale rotary kiln system. The activated carbon produced from North Dakota lignite was superior to commercial grade DARCO{reg_sign} FGD and Rheinbraun's HOK activated coke product with respect to iodine number. The iodine number of North Dakota lignite-derived activated carbon was between 600 and 800 mg I{sub 2}/g, whereas the iodine number of DARCO FGD was between 500 and 600 mg I{sub 2}/g, and the iodine number of Rheinbraun's HOK activated coke product was around 275 mg I{sub 2}/g. The EERC performed both bench-scale and pilot-scale mercury capture tests using the activated carbon made under various optimization process conditions. For comparison, the mercury capture capability of commercial DARCO FGD was also tested. The lab-scale apparatus is a thin fixed-bed mercury-screening system, which has been used by the EERC for many mercury capture screen tests. The pilot-scale systems included two combustion units, both equipped with an electrostatic precipitator (ESP). Activated carbons were also tested in a slipstream baghouse at a Texas power plant. The results indicated that the activated carbon produced from North Dakota lignite coal is capable of removing mercury from flue gas. The tests showed that activated carbon with the greatest

  2. Activated carbon fibers and engineered forms from renewable resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Frederick S

    2013-02-19

    A method of producing activated carbon fibers (ACFs) includes the steps of providing a natural carbonaceous precursor fiber material, blending the carbonaceous precursor material with a chemical activation agent to form chemical agent-impregnated precursor fibers, spinning the chemical agent-impregnated precursor material into fibers, and thermally treating the chemical agent-impregnated precursor fibers. The carbonaceous precursor material is both carbonized and activated to form ACFs in a single step. The method produces ACFs exclusive of a step to isolate an intermediate carbon fiber.

  3. Adsorption of anthracene using activated carbon and Posidonia oceanica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mouhamed El Khames Saad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to examine the static capacity of adsorption of anthracene by Posidonia oceanica and activated carbon. The effect of experimental parameters pH and contact time on the anthracene adsorption onto cited materials was investigated in detail. The results showed that the anthracene removal on both P. oceanica and activated carbon was unaffected in the pH range of 2–12. The equilibrium data fit well to the Langmuir model with a maximum adsorption capacity of 8.35 mg/g and 0.14 mg/g, respectively with activated carbon and P. oceanica.

  4. Nickel adsorption by sodium polyacrylate-grafted activated carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewecharoen, A. [Division of Biotechnology, School of Bioresources and Technology, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, 83 Moo 8 Thakham, Bangkhuntien, Bangkok 10150 (Thailand); Thiravetyan, P., E-mail: paitip@hotmail.com [Division of Biotechnology, School of Bioresources and Technology, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, 83 Moo 8 Thakham, Bangkhuntien, Bangkok 10150 (Thailand); Wendel, E.; Bertagnolli, H. [Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie, Universitaet Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 55, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2009-11-15

    A novel sodium polyacrylate grafted activated carbon was produced by using gamma radiation to increase the number of functional groups on the surface. After irradiation the capacity for nickel adsorption was studied and found to have increased from 44.1 to 55.7 mg g{sup -1}. X-ray absorption spectroscopy showed that the adsorbed nickel on activated carbon and irradiation-grafted activated carbon was coordinated with 6 oxygen atoms at 2.04-2.06 A. It is proposed that this grafting technique could be applied to other adsorbents to increase the efficiency of metal adsorption.

  5. Nickel adsorption by sodium polyacrylate-grafted activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewecharoen, A; Thiravetyan, P; Wendel, E; Bertagnolli, H

    2009-11-15

    A novel sodium polyacrylate grafted activated carbon was produced by using gamma radiation to increase the number of functional groups on the surface. After irradiation the capacity for nickel adsorption was studied and found to have increased from 44.1 to 55.7 mg g(-1). X-ray absorption spectroscopy showed that the adsorbed nickel on activated carbon and irradiation-grafted activated carbon was coordinated with 6 oxygen atoms at 2.04-2.06 A. It is proposed that this grafting technique could be applied to other adsorbents to increase the efficiency of metal adsorption.

  6. Activated carbon fibers and engineered forms from renewable resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Frederick S.

    2010-06-01

    A method of producing activated carbon fibers (ACFs) includes the steps of providing a natural carbonaceous precursor fiber material, blending the carbonaceous precursor material with a chemical activation agent to form chemical agent-impregnated precursor fibers, spinning the chemical agent-impregnated precursor material into fibers, and thermally treating the chemical agent-impregnated precursor fibers. The carbonaceous precursor material is both carbonized and activated to form ACFs in a single step. The method produces ACFs exclusive of a step to isolate an intermediate carbon fiber.

  7. Palygorskite Hybridized Carbon Nanocomposite as a High ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NICO

    A nanocomposite, in which acid-treated palygorskite was hybridized with carbon, was prepared and designed as an efficient support for electrocatatlysts. Pd nanoparticles were deposited on the hybrid support as an electrocatalyst for formic acid oxida- tion. The hybrid supports and electrocatalysts were characterized by ...

  8. Palygorskite Hybridized Carbon Nanocomposite as a High ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A nanocomposite, in which acid-treated palygorskite was hybridized with carbon, was prepared and designed as an efficient support for electrocatatlysts. Pd nanoparticles were deposited on the hybrid support as an electrocatalyst for formic acid oxidation. The hybrid supports and electrocatalysts were characterized by ...

  9. Production and characterization of activated carbon from a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-10-20

    Oct 20, 2008 ... mixing with oxidizing chemicals like ZnCl2, H3PO4, KOH,. NaOH etc. in low temperatures. Then, this activated product is carbonized in an airless environment at 400 -. 1000°C and thus pyrolitic disintegration is reached. In this process, substances charge to the surface to restore the carbon structure and ...

  10. Adsorption efficiency of coconut shell-based activated carbons on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The adsorption efficiency of FeCl3, CaCl2 and K2CO3-activated carbon for the 500μm particle size produced from previously carbonized coconut shell on some adsorbates obtained from an industrial effluent and wastewaters as well as the colour of molasses has been studied. The adsorbates include oil and grease, ...

  11. Activated Carbon Nanochains with Tailored Micro-Meso Pore Structures and Their Application for Supercapacitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Miao; He, Chunnian; Liu, Enzuo

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanochains (CNCs) were synthesized by a facile chemical vapor deposition process consisting of a 1D chain of interconnected carbon nano-onions for potential application in supercapacitors. In this study, the CNCs were further activated by a chemical method using potassium hydroxide (KOH...... that CNCs with a hierarchical pore structure and high SSA could be achieved using an activation process with a KOH-to-CNC ratio of 2 at 900 degrees C for 20 h. The mechanism is also discussed. The activation temperature and duration affect the promotion of the carbon graphitization and exaggeration...... of the carbon etching. The CNCs activated using the optimal parameters exhibited a high capacitance performance of 112.7 F g(-1) at 50 mV s(-1) with excellent stability in 6 M KOH electrolyte, which was due to the improved surface and micromesoporosity without sacrificing their electronic transmission...

  12. Characteristics of an activated carbon monolith for a helium adsorption compressor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lozano-Castello, D.; Jorda-Beneyto, M.; Cazorla-Amoros, D.; Linares-Solano, A.; Burger, Johannes Faas; ter Brake, Hermanus J.M.; Holland, Herman J.

    2010-01-01

    An activated carbon monolith (ACM) with a high helium adsorption/desorption capacity, high density, low pressure drop, low thermal expansion and good mechanical properties was prepared and applied successfully in a helium adsorption compressor as a part of a 4.5 K sorption cooler. The activated

  13. Intact tropical forests, new evidence they uptake carbon actively

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available According to a paper recently published on Nature, tropical forests play as active carbon sink, absorbing 1.3·109 tons of carbon per year on a global scale. Functional interpretation is not clear yet, but a point is quite easy to realize: tropical forests accumulate and contain more carbon than any other vegetation cover and, if their disruption goes on at current rates, these ecosystems could revert to be a “carbon bomb”, releasing huge amount of CO2 to the atmosphere.

  14. Closeout of Advanced Boron and Metal Loaded High Porosity Carbons.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter C. Eklund (deceased); T. C. Mike Chung; Henry C. Foley; Vincent H. Crespi

    2011-05-01

    The Penn State effort explored the development of new high-surface-area materials for hydrogen storage, materials that could offer enhancement in the hydrogen binding energy through a direct chemical modification of the framework in high specific-surface-area platforms. The team chemically substituted boron into the hexagonal sp2 carbon framework, dispersed metal atoms bound to the boro-carbon structure, and generated the theory of novel nanoscale geometries that can enhance storage through chemical frustration, sheet curvature, electron deficiency, large local fields and mixed hybridization states. New boro-carbon materials were synthesized by high temperature plasma, pyrolysis of boron-carbon precursor molecules, and post-synthesis modification of carbons. Hydrogen uptake has been assessed, and several promising leads have been identified, with the requirement to simultaneously optimize total surface area while maintaining the enhanced hydrogen binding energies already demonstrated.

  15. Hypothetical high-surface-area carbons with exceptional hydrogen storage capacities: open carbon frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchta, Bogdan; Firlej, Lucyna; Mohammadhosseini, Ali; Boulet, Pascal; Beckner, Matthew; Romanos, Jimmy; Pfeifer, Peter

    2012-09-12

    A class of high-surface-area carbon hypothetical structures has been investigated that goes beyond the traditional model of parallel graphene sheets hosting layers of physisorbed hydrogen in slit-shaped pores of variable width. The investigation focuses on structures with locally planar units (unbounded or bounded fragments of graphene sheets), and variable ratios of in-plane to edge atoms. Adsorption of molecular hydrogen on these structures was studied by performing grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations with appropriately chosen adsorbent-adsorbate interaction potentials. The interaction models were tested by comparing simulated adsorption isotherms with experimental isotherms on a high-performance activated carbon with well-defined pore structure (approximately bimodal pore-size distribution), and remarkable agreement between computed and experimental isotherms was obtained, both for gravimetric excess adsorption and for gravimetric storage capacity. From this analysis and the simulations performed on the new structures, a rich spectrum of relationships between structural characteristics of carbons and ensuing hydrogen adsorption (structure-function relationships) emerges: (i) Storage capacities higher than in slit-shaped pores can be obtained by fragmentation/truncation of graphene sheets, which creates surface areas exceeding of 2600 m(2)/g, the maximum surface area for infinite graphene sheets, carried mainly by edge sites; we call the resulting structures open carbon frameworks (OCF). (ii) For OCFs with a ratio of in-plane to edge sites ≈1 and surface areas 3800-6500 m(2)/g, we found record maximum excess adsorption of 75-85 g of H(2)/kg of C at 77 K and record storage capacity of 100-260 g of H(2)/kg of C at 77 K and 100 bar. (iii) The adsorption in structures having large specific surface area built from small polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons cannot be further increased because their energy of adsorption is low. (iv) Additional increase of hydrogen

  16. Experiments on the defluoridation of water by means of activated carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balinski, W.

    1977-01-01

    The adsorption of fluoride on activated carbons of different origins and particle size was investigated using tap water and well waters of high fluoride content under different conditions of pH value and hydraulic loading. Certain samples of Polish origin (Carbopol Z-3 and Z-4) were found to be unsatisfactory. It is concluded that adsorption on activated carbon could be successfully employed for reducing the fluoride content of natural waters containing unacceptably large amounts.

  17. Preparation of carbon nanoparticles and carbon nitride from high nitrogen compound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huynh, My Hang V [Los Alamos, NM; Hiskey, Michael A [Los Alamos, NM

    2009-09-01

    The high-nitrogen compound 3,6-di(azido)-1,2,4,5-tetrazine (DiAT) was synthesized by a relatively simple method and used as a precursor for the preparation of carbon nanospheres and nanopolygons, and nitrogen-rich carbon nitrides.

  18. ADSORPTION OF FOOD COLORING ALLURA RED DYE (E129 FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS USING ACTIVATED CARBON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saad A Alkahtani

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption behavior of Allura red (E129 from aqueous solutions onto activated carbon was successfully investigated. All factors affecting the adsorption process were carefully studied and the conditions were optimized. Adsorption of E129 onto activated carbon was found to increase by decreasing the mass of activated carbon, pH and ionic strength of the solution and by increasing temperature. The adsorption capacity of the activated carbon for Allura red was relatively high. Under the optimum conditions, the maximum adsorption capacity for E129 dye was 72.85 mg/g. Three adsorption models; Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin model were investigated regarding the adsorption of E129. The models’ parameters KL, qm, R2, (n were determined and found to be 0.0222, 72.85 mg/g, 0.9057-0.9984, and 0.992, respectively. Also, pseudo first and second-order kinetic models were tested to determine the best-fit model to the adsorption of E129 dye onto activated carbon. The results showed that the adsorption of E129 onto activated carbon obeyed both the Freundlich isotherm and pseudo second-order kinetic models. Moreover, thermodynamic studies indicated that the adsorption of E129 dye onto the activated carbon was spontaneous. 

  19. Cold catalytic recovery of loaded activated carbon using iron oxide-based nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Altai; Zelmanov, Grigory; Semiat, Raphael

    2008-01-01

    A novel approach for the recovery of spent activated carbon by an advanced oxidation process using iron oxide-based nanocatalysts was proposed and investigated. Model organic contaminants, such as ethylene glycol and phenol, were chosen for this study as water pollutants. It was shown that there are several advantages in using catalytic oxidation recovery of activated carbon with iron oxide-based nanocatalysts: low temperature reactivity of catalytic recovery without heating; and a relatively large number of adsorption-recovery cycles, without a reduction in the adsorptive properties of the virgin activated carbon or without a performance decrease from the first adsorption-recovery cycle of the new modified adsorptive properties of the activated carbon. The catalytic recovery takes place without ultraviolet light or any visible radiation sources. Results show a high efficiency of catalytic recovery of spent activated carbon using iron oxide-based nanocatalysts. A 97-99% efficiency of spent activated carbon catalytic regeneration was achieved under chosen conditions after 15-20 min of reaction. The process may be also considered as cold in situ recovery of active carbon.

  20. Adsorption Studies of Chromium(VI) on Activated Carbon Derived from Mangifera indica (Mango) Seed Shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mise, Shashikant; Patil, Trupti Nagendra

    2015-09-01

    The removal of chromium(VI) from synthetic sample by adsorption on activated carbon prepared from Mangifera indica (mango) seed shell have been carried out at room temperature 32 ± 1 °C. The removal of chromium(VI) from synthetic sample by adsorption on two types of activated carbon, physical activation and chemical activation (Calcium chloride and Sodium chloride), Impregnation Ratio's (IR) 0.25, 0.50, 0.75 for optimum time, optimum dosages and variation of pH were studied. It is observed that contact time differs for different carbons i.e. for physically and chemically activated carbons. The contact time decreases for chemically activated carbon compared to the physically activated carbon. It was observed that as dosage increases the adsorption increased along with the increase in impregnation ratio. It was also noted that as I.R. increases the surface area of Mangifera indica shell carbon increased. These dosage data were considered in the construction of isotherms and it was found that adsorption obeys Freundlich Isotherm and does not obey Langmuir Isotherm. The maximum removal of chromium (VI) was obtained in highly acidic medium at a pH of 1.50.

  1. Functionalized Activated Carbon Derived from Biomass for Photocatalysis Applications Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira Bagheri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This review highlighted the developments of safe, effective, economic, and environmental friendly catalytic technologies to transform lignocellulosic biomass into the activated carbon (AC. In the photocatalysis applications, this AC can further be used as a support material. The limits of AC productions raised by energy assumption and product selectivity have been uplifted to develop sustainable carbon of the synthesis process, where catalytic conversion is accounted. The catalytic treatment corresponding to mild condition provided a bulk, mesoporous, and nanostructure AC materials. These characteristics of AC materials are necessary for the low energy and efficient photocatalytic system. Due to the excellent oxidizing characteristics, cheapness, and long-term stability, semiconductor materials have been used immensely in photocatalytic reactors. However, in practical, such conductors lead to problems with the separation steps and loss of photocatalytic activity. Therefore, proper attention has been given to develop supported semiconductor catalysts and certain matrixes of carbon materials such as carbon nanotubes, carbon microspheres, carbon nanofibers, carbon black, and activated carbons have been recently considered and reported. AC has been reported as a potential support in photocatalytic systems because it improves the transfer rate of the interface charge and lowers the recombination rate of holes and electrons.

  2. Electrothermal Desorption of CWA Simulants from Activated Carbon Cloth

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sullivan, Patrick D; Wander, Joseph D; Newsome, Kolin C

    2006-01-01

    The use of activated carbon fabrics (ACFs) that are desorbed electrothermally, also known as the Joule effect, is explored as a potential method to create a regenerating chemical warfare agent (CWA) filter...

  3. The Regeneration of Granular Activated Carbon Using Hydrothermal Technology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sufnarski, Michael

    1999-01-01

    The economic feasibility of using granular activated carbon (GAC) to remove organic contaminants from industrial and municipal wastewater is contingent upon its reuse during multiple adsorption-regeneration cycles (Van Vliet, 1991...

  4. Electrothermal Desorption of CWA Simulants From Activated Carbon Cloth

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sullivan, Patrick D; Wander, Joseph D; Newsome, Kolin C

    2004-01-01

    The use of activated carbon fabrics (ACEs) that are desorbed electrothermally, also known as the Joule effect, is explored as a potential method to create a regenerating chemical warfare agent (CWA) filter...

  5. Sustainable Regeneration of Nanoparticle Enhanced Activated Carbon in Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    The regeneration and reuse of exhausted granular activated carbon (GAC) is an appropriate method for lowering operational and environmental costs. Advanced oxidation is a promising environmental friendly technique for GAC regeneration. The main objective of this research was to ...

  6. Preparation And Characterization Of Cr/Activated Carbon Catalyst From Palm Empty Fruit Bunch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainal Fanani

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Preparation and characterization of Cr/activated carbon catalyst from palm empty fruit bunch had been done. The research were to determine the effect of carbonization temperature towards adsorption of ammonia, iodine number, metilen blue number, and porosity of activated carbon and Cr/activated carbon catalyst. The determination of porosity include surface area, micropore volume and total pore volume. The results showed the best carbonization temperature activated carbon and Cr/activated carbon catalyst at 700°C. The adsorption ammonia of activated carbon and Cr/activated carbon catalyst as 6.379 mmol/g and 8.1624 mmol/g. The iodine number of activated carbon and Cr/activated carbon catalyst as 1520.16 mg/g and 1535.67 mg/g. The metilen blue number of activated carbon and Cr/activated carbon catalyst as 281.71 mg/g and 319.18 mg/g. The surface area of activated carbon and Cr/activated carbon catalyst as 1527.80 m2/g and 1652.58 m2/g. The micropore volume of activated carbon and Cr/activated carbon catalyst as 0.7460 cm3/g and 0.8670 cm3/g. The total pore volume of activated carbon and Cr/activated carbon catalyst as 0.8243 cm3/g and 0.8970 cm3/g.

  7. EFFECTS OF SODIUM AND CALCIUM IN LIGNITE ON THE PERFORMANCE OF ACTIVATED CARBON PRODUCTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwin S. Olson; Kurt E. Eylands; Daniel J. Stepan

    2001-12-01

    Powdered activated carbon (PAC) has traditionally been used by the water treatment industry for the removal of compounds contributing to taste and odor problems. PAC also has the potential to remove naturally occurring organic matter (NOM) from raw waters prior to disinfection, thus controlling the formation of regulated disinfection by-products (DBPs). Many small water systems are currently using PAC for taste and odor control and have the potential to use PAC for controlling DBPs. The Energy & Environmental Research Center has been working on the development of a PAC product to remove NOM from surface water supplies to prevent the formation of carcinogenic DBPs during chlorination. During previous studies, the sodium and calcium content of the lignites showed a significant effect on the sorption capacity of the activated carbon product. As much as a 130% increase in the humic acid sorption capacity of a PAC produced from a high-sodium-content lignite was observed. During this study, activated carbons were prepared from three coals representing high-sodium, low-sodium--low-calcium, and high-calcium compositions in two steps, an initial char formation followed by mild activation with steam to avoid excessive burnout. This set of carbons was characterized with respect to physical and chemical properties. The BET (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller) nitrogen adsorption isotherms gave relatively low surface areas (ranging from 245 to 370 m{sup 2}/g). The lowest-BET area was obtained for the high-sodium carbon, which can be attributed to enlargement of micropores as a result of sodium-catalyzed gasification reaction of the carbon structure. This hypothesis is consistent with the scanning electron microscopy microprobe analyses, which show that in both the coal and the activated carbon from this coal, the sodium is distributed over both the carbon structure and the mineral particles. Thus it is initially associated with carboxylate groups on the coal and then as sodium oxide or

  8. Selective adsorption of aqueous Hg{sup 2+}, Pb{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+}, As{sup 3+} and Au{sup +} onto activated carbon derived from high sulphur coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, J.; Liu, C.; Jia, C.Q. [Toronto Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Tong, S. [Wuhan Univ. of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2008-07-01

    Heavy metals, such as mercury (Hg), cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb), arsenic (As), and gold (Au) are highly toxic because of their tendency to bioaccumulate. Accumulation of these metals over time in mammals can cause serious illnesses and their presence in the aquatic environment has raised environmental concerns. Heavy metals cannot be degraded chemically or biologically and can only be transformed into other forms with different oxidation states. Many methods have been developed to remove metals from aquatic environments. This paper presented an investigation into the adsorption of aqueous Hg{sup 2+}, Pb{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+}, As{sup 3+}, and Au{sup +} onto sulphur-impregnated activated carbon (SIAC). The purpose of the study was to determine the selective adsorption behaviour of SIACs derived from high sulphur coal. The species of interest included gold, mercury, lead, cadmium, and a metalloid, arsenic. The paper described the experiment including the preparation and characterization of SIACs and the adsorption experiments. Results that were presented for the adsorption from single ion solutions included Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms; temperature effect on adsorption; and effect of SIAC properties on adsorption. A comparison of ion uptake from single solutions and mixtures was also presented. It was concluded that with the same initial concentrations, gold was best adsorbed by SIAC from mixtures containing gold, mercury, lead, arsenic and cadmium cations. 14 refs., 4 tabs., 4 figs.

  9. Low content of Pt supported on Ni-MoC{sub x}/carbon black as a highly durable and active electrocatalyst for methanol oxidation, oxygen reduction and hydrogen evolution reactions in acidic condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yan; Zang, Jianbing; Jia, Shaopei; Tian, Pengfei; Han, Chan; Wang, Yanhui, E-mail: diamond_wangyanhui@163.com

    2017-08-01

    Highlights: • Ni-MoC{sub x}/C catalyst support was synthesized by a two-step method. • 10Pt/Ni-MoC{sub x}/C was an active and durable low Pt catalyst for MOR, ORR and HER. • The high stability of 10Pt/Ni-MoC{sub x}/C was ascribed to the anchoring effect of MoC{sub x}. • High activity of 10Pt/Ni-MoC{sub x}/C was due to a synergistic of Pt, Ni, MoO{sub x} and MoC{sub x}. - Abstract: Nickel and molybdenum carbide modified carbon black (Ni-MoC{sub x}/C) was synthesized by a two-step microwave-assisted deposition/carbonthermal reduction method and characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The as-prepared Ni-MoC{sub x}/C supported Pt (10 wt%) electrocatalyst (10Pt/Ni-MoC{sub x}/C) was synthesized through a microwave-assisted reduction method and 10Pt/Ni-MoC{sub x}/C exhibited high electrocatalytic activity for methanol oxidation, oxygen reduction and hydrogen evolution reactions. Results showed that 10Pt/Ni-MoC{sub x}/C electrocatalyst had better electrocatalytic activity and stability performance than 20 wt% Pt/C (20Pt/C) electrocatalyst. Among them, the electrochemical surface area of 10Pt/Ni-MoC{sub x}/C reached 68.4 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}, which was higher than that of 20Pt/C (63.2 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}). The enhanced stability and activity of 10Pt/Ni-MoC{sub x}/C electrocatalyst were attributed to: (1) an anchoring effect of Ni and MoC{sub x} formed during carbonthermal reduction process; (2) a synergistic effect among Pt, Ni, MoO{sub x} and MoC{sub x}. These findings indicated that 10Pt/Ni-MoC{sub x}/C was a promising electrocatalyst for direct methanol fuel cells.

  10. Grafting of activated carbon cloths for selective adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gineys, M.; Benoit, R.; Cohaut, N.; Béguin, F.; Delpeux-Ouldriane, S., E-mail: delpeux@cnrs-orleans.fr

    2016-05-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A controlled grafting of carboxylic functions on activated carbon fibers. • The carbon material nanotextural properties preservation after grafting. • An identification of the grafting mechanism through ToF SIMS analysis. • A chemical mapping of the grafted surface using ToF SIMS technique and imaging. - Abstract: Chemical functionalization of an activated carbon cloth with 3-aminophthalic acid and 4-aminobenzoic acid groups by the in situ formation of the corresponding diazonium salt in aqueous acidic solution is reported. The nature and amount of selected functions on an activated carbon surface, in particular the grafted density, were determined by potentiometric titration, elemental analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The nanotextural properties of the modified carbon were explored by gas adsorption. Functionalized activated carbon cloth was obtained at a discrete grafting level while preserving interesting textural properties and a large porous volume. Finally, the grafting homogeneity of the carbon surface and the nature of the chemical bonding were investigated using Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) technique.

  11. Active chemisorption sites in functionalized ionic liquids for carbon capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Guokai; Wang, Jianji; Zhang, Suojiang

    2016-07-25

    Development of novel technologies for the efficient and reversible capture of CO2 is highly desired. In the last decade, CO2 capture using ionic liquids has attracted intensive attention from both academia and industry, and has been recognized as a very promising technology. Recently, a new approach has been developed for highly efficient capture of CO2 by site-containing ionic liquids through chemical interaction. This perspective review focuses on the recent advances in the chemical absorption of CO2 using site-containing ionic liquids, such as amino-based ionic liquids, azolate ionic liquids, phenolate ionic liquids, dual-functionalized ionic liquids, pyridine-containing ionic liquids and so on. Other site-containing liquid absorbents such as amine-based solutions, switchable solvents, and functionalized ionic liquid-amine blends are also investigated. Strategies have been discussed for how to activate the existent reactive sites and develop novel reactive sites by physical and chemical methods to enhance CO2 absorption capacity and reduce absorption enthalpy. The carbon capture mechanisms of these site-containing liquid absorbents are also presented. Particular attention has been paid to the latest progress in CO2 capture in multiple-site interactions by amino-free anion-functionalized ionic liquids. In the last section, future directions and prospects for carbon capture by site-containing ionic liquids are outlined.

  12. Thermal characteristics of spent activated carbon generated from air cleaning units in Korean nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Hang Rae; So, Ji Yang [KHNP Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    To identify the feasibility of disposing of spent activated carbon as a clearance level waste, we performed characterization of radioactive pollution for spent activated carbon through radioisotope analysis; results showed that the C-14 concentrations of about half of the spent activated carbon samples taken from Korean NPPs exceeded the clearance level limit. In this situation, we selected thermal treatment technology to remove C-14 and analyzed the moisture content and thermal characteristics. The results of the moisture content analysis showed that the moisture content of the spent activated carbon is in the range of 1.2–23.9 wt% depending on the operation and storage conditions. The results of TGA indicated that most of the spent activated carbon lost weight in 3 temperature ranges. Through py-GC/MS analysis based on the result of TGA, we found that activated carbon loses weight rapidly with moisture desorption reaching to 100°C and desorbs various organic and inorganic carbon compounds reaching to 200°C. The result of pyrolysis analysis showed that the experiment of C-14 desorption using thermal treatment technology requires at least 3 steps of heat treatment, including a heat treatment at high temperature over 850°C, in order to reduce the C-14 concentration below the clearance level.

  13. Thermal characteristics of spent activated carbon generated from air cleaning units in korean nuclear power plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Yang So

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available To identify the feasibility of disposing of spent activated carbon as a clearance level waste, we performed characterization of radioactive pollution for spent activated carbon through radioisotope analysis; results showed that the C-14 concentrations of about half of the spent activated carbon samples taken from Korean NPPs exceeded the clearance level limit. In this situation, we selected thermal treatment technology to remove C-14 and analyzed the moisture content and thermal characteristics. The results of the moisture content analysis showed that the moisture content of the spent activated carbon is in the range of 1.2–23.9 wt% depending on the operation and storage conditions. The results of TGA indicated that most of the spent activated carbon lost weight in 3 temperature ranges. Through py-GC/MS analysis based on the result of TGA, we found that activated carbon loses weight rapidly with moisture desorption reaching to 100°C and desorbs various organic and inorganic carbon compounds reaching to 200°C. The result of pyrolysis analysis showed that the experiment of C-14 desorption using thermal treatment technology requires at least 3 steps of heat treatment, including a heat treatment at high temperature over 850°C, in order to reduce the C-14 concentration below the clearance level.

  14. Comparisons of porous and adsorption properties of carbons activated by steam and KOH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Feng-Chin; Tseng, Ru-Ling; Juang, Ruey-Shin

    2005-03-01

    In this work, fir woods and pistachio shells were used as source materials to prepare porous carbons, which were activated by physical (steam) and chemical (KOH) methods. Pore properties of these activated carbons including the BET surface area, pore volume, pore size distribution, and pore diameter were first characterized by a t-plot method based on N(2) adsorption isotherms. Highly porous activated carbons with BET surface area up to 1009-1096 m(2)/g were obtained. The steam and KOH activation methods produced carbons with mesopore content in the range 9-15 and 33-49%, respectively. The adsorption equilibria and kinetics of tannic acid, methylene blue, 4-chlorophenol, and phenol from water on such carbons at 30 degrees C were then investigated to check their chemical characteristics. The Freundlich equation gave a better fit to all adsorption isotherms than the Langmuir equation. On the other hand, the intraparticle diffusion model could best follow all adsorption processes. In comparison with KOH-activated carbons, it was shown that the rate of external surface adsorption with steam-activated carbons was significantly higher but the rate of intraparticle diffusion was much lower.

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF ACTIVATED CARBONS FROM COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prof. Harold H. Schobert; Dr. M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; Ms. Zhe Lu

    2002-09-27

    The increasing role of coal as a source of energy in the 21st century will demand environmental and cost-effective strategies for the use of coal combustion by-products (CCBPs), mainly unburned carbon in fly ash. Unburned carbon is nowadays regarded as a waste product and its fate is mainly disposal, due to the present lack of efficient routes for its utilization. However, unburned carbon is a potential precursor for the production of adsorbent carbons, since it has gone through a devolatilization process while in the combustor, and therefore, only requires to be activated. Accordingly, this report evaluates and compares several routes for the production of activated carbons from unburned carbon in fly ash, including physical and chemical activation methods. During the present reporting period (June 30, 2001-June 29, 2002), additional characterization work was conducted under Task 1 ''Procurement and characterization of CCBPs''. The suite collected includes samples from pulverized utility boilers, a utility cyclone unit equipped with a beneficiation technology, a stoker, and a fluidized bed combustor. Proximate, ultimate, and petrographic analyses of the fly ash samples previously collected were measured. Furthermore, the surface areas of the samples assembled were characterized by N{sub 2} adsorption isotherms at 77 K. The proximate analyses showed that all the samples had very low moisture contents (0.17 to 3.39 wt%), while volatile matter contents of the samples varied between 0.45 to 24.8 wt%. The ultimate analyses of all the fly ash samples showed that they contained primarily carbon, while the hydrogen contents of all the samples were very low. In addition, during the current reporting period, also Task 2 ''Development of activated carbons'' and Task 3 ''Characterization of activated carbons'' were continued.

  16. Comparison of toluene adsorption among granular activated carbon and different types of activated carbon fibers (ACFs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balanay, Jo Anne G; Crawford, Shaun A; Lungu, Claudiu T

    2011-10-01

    Activated carbon fiber (ACF) has been demonstrated to be a good adsorbent for the removal of organic vapors in air. Some ACF has a comparable or larger surface area and higher adsorption capacity when compared with granular activated carbon (GAC) commonly used in respiratory protection devices. ACF is an attractive alternative adsorbent to GAC because of its ease of handling, light weight, and decreasing cost. ACF may offer the potential for short-term respiratory protection for first responders and emergency personnel. This study compares the critical bed depths and adsorption capacities for toluene among GAC and ACF of different forms and surface areas. GAC and ACF in cloth (ACFC) and felt (ACFF) forms were challenged in stainless steel chambers with a constant concentration of 500 ppm toluene via conditioned air at 25°C, 50% RH, and constant airflow (7 L/min). Breakthrough data were obtained for each adsorbent using gas chromatography with flame ionization detector. Surface areas of each adsorbent were determined using a physisorption analyzer. Results showed that the critical bed depth of GAC is 275% higher than the average of ACFC but is 55% lower than the average of ACFF. Adsorption capacity of GAC (with a nominal surface area of 1800 m(2)/g) at 50% breakthrough is 25% higher than the average of ACF with surface area of 1000 m(2)/g, while the rest of ACF with surface area of 1500 m(2)/g and higher have 40% higher adsorption capacities than GAC. ACFC with higher surface area has the smallest critical bed depth and highest adsorption capacity, which makes it a good adsorbent for thinner and lighter respirators. We concluded that ACF has great potential for application in respiratory protection considering its higher adsorption capacity and lower critical bed depth in addition to its advantages over GAC, particularly for ACF with higher surface area.

  17. High-Conductance Thermal Interfaces Based on Carbon Nanotubes Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop a novel thermal interface material (TIM) that is based on an array of vertical carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for high heat flux applications. For...

  18. Fabrication of Highly Stable and Efficient PtCu Alloy Nanoparticles on Highly Porous Carbon for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Inayat Ali; Qian, Yuhong; Badshah, Amin; Zhao, Dan; Nadeem, Muhammad Arif

    2016-08-17

    Boosting the durability of Pt nanoparticles by controlling the composition and morphology is extremely important for fuel cells commercialization. We deposit the Pt-Cu alloy nanoparticles over high surface area carbon in different metallic molar ratios and optimize the conditions to achieve desired material. The novel bimetallic electro-catalyst {Pt-Cu/PC-950 (15:15%)} offers exceptional electrocatalytic activity when tested for both oxygen reduction reaction and methanol oxidation reactions. A high mass activity of 0.043 mA/μgPt (based on Pt mass) is recorded for ORR. An outstanding longevity of this electro-catalyst is noticed when compared to 20 wt % Pt loaded either on PC-950 or commercial carbon. The high surface area carbon support offers enhanced activity and prevents the nanoparticles from agglomeration, migration, and dissolution as evident by TEM analysis.

  19. A highly permeable and enhanced surface area carbon-cloth electrode for vanadium redox flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, X. L.; Zhao, T. S.; Zeng, Y. K.; An, L.; Wei, L.

    2016-10-01

    In this work, a high-performance porous electrode, made of KOH-activated carbon-cloth, is developed for vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFBs). The macro-scale porous structure in the carbon cloth formed by weaving the carbon fibers in an ordered manner offers a low tortuosity (∼1.1) and a broad pore distribution from 5 μm to 100 μm, rendering the electrode a high hydraulic permeability and high effective ionic conductivity, which are beneficial for the electrolyte flow and ion transport through the porous electrode. The use of KOH activation method to create nano-scale pores on the carbon-fiber surfaces leads to a significant increase in the surface area for redox reactions from 2.39 m2 g-1 to 15.4 m2 g-1. The battery assembled with the present electrode delivers an energy efficiency of 80.1% and an electrolyte utilization of 74.6% at a current density of 400 mA cm-2, as opposed to an electrolyte utilization of 61.1% achieved by using a conventional carbon-paper electrode. Such a high performance is mainly attributed to the combination of the excellent mass/ion transport properties and the high surface area rendered by the present electrode. It is suggested that the KOH-activated carbon-cloth electrode is a promising candidate in redox flow batteries.

  20. Performance of Spent Mushroom Farming Waste (SMFW) Activated Carbon for Ni (II) Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desa, N. S. Md; Ghani, Z. Ab; Talib, S. Abdul; Tay, C. C.

    2016-07-01

    The feasibility of a low cost agricultural waste of spent mushroom farming waste (SMFW) activated carbon for Ni(II) removal was investigated. The batch adsorption experiments of adsorbent dosage, pH, contact time, metal concentration, and temperature were determined. The samples were shaken at 125 rpm, filtered and analyzed using ICP-OES. The fifty percent of Ni(II) removal was obtained at 0.63 g of adsorbent dosage, pH 5-6 (unadjusted), 60 min contact time, 50 mg/L Ni(II) concentration and 25 °C temperature. The evaluated SMFW activated carbon showed the highest performance on Ni(II) removal compared to commercial Amberlite IRC86 resin and zeolite NK3. The result indicated that SMFW activated carbon is a high potential cation exchange adsorbent and suitable for adsorption process for metal removal. The obtained results contribute toward application of developed SMFW activated carbon in industrial pilot study.

  1. The effect of gamma radiation on the properties of activated carbon cloth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DANIJELA R. SEKULIĆ

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Activated carbon cloth dressing is an appropriate wound healing material due to its biocompatibility and adsorption characteristics. The in-fluence of gamma radiation as a sterilization process on the adsorption and mechanical properties of activated carbon cloth was investigated. The specific surface area, micropore volume, pore size distribution, surface chemistry as well as the breaking load of activated carbon cloth before and after gamma radiation were examined. Characterization by nitrogen adsorption showed that the activated carbon cloth was a microporous material with a high specific surface area and micropores smaller than 1 nm. Gamma radiation decreased the specific surface area and micropore volume but increased the pore width. The sterilization process changed the surface chemistry quantitatively, but not qualitatively. In addition, the breaking load decreased but without any influence considering the further application of this material.

  2. Evaluation for characteristics of active carbon electrodes air cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kano, Gentaro; Horita, Kiyoshi; Nishino, Hiromi

    1988-04-15

    Characteristics as an air electrode in alkali solutions were investigated in connection with catalyst effect of manganese oxides, on Teflon-bonded active carbon electrodes prepared with Pittsburg active carbon, acetylene black and manganese oxide consisting of Mn/sub 5/O/sub 8/ and Mn/sub 3/O/sub 4/. As the results, the active carbon electrode containing 20wt% acethylene black and heat treated at 400C exhibited lower resistance polarization and better carbon electrode characteristics than same active carcon electrode heat treated at lower temperatures. The carbon electrode to which 20wt% manganese oxide was added, exhibited about two times larger exchange current density than that without manganese oxide. The voltage-recovery characteristics of the active carbon electrode was greatlty improved in the presence of manganese oxide because the catalytic effect of manganese oxide contributed to the decomposition of HO/sub 2//sup -/ ion on the electrode interface just after the circiut was opened. (10 figs, 2 tabs, 10 refs)

  3. Hierarchical porous carbon aerogel derived from bagasse for high performance supercapacitor electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Pin; Zhao, Zhenhuan; Tian, Jian; Li, Haidong; Sang, Yuanhua; Yu, Guangwei; Cai, Huaqiang; Liu, Hong; Wong, C P; Umar, Ahmad

    2014-10-21

    Renewable, cost-effective and eco-friendly electrode materials have attracted much attention in the energy conversion and storage fields. Bagasse, the waste product from sugarcane that mainly contains cellulose derivatives, can be a promising candidate to manufacture supercapacitor electrode materials. This study demonstrates the fabrication and characterization of highly porous carbon aerogels by using bagasse as a raw material. Macro and mesoporous carbon was first prepared by carbonizing the freeze-dried bagasse aerogel; consequently, microporous structure was created on the walls of the mesoporous carbon by chemical activation. Interestingly, it was observed that the specific surface area, the pore size and distribution of the hierarchical porous carbon were affected by the activation temperature. In order to evaluate the ability of the hierarchical porous carbon towards the supercapacitor electrode performance, solid state symmetric supercapacitors were assembled, and a comparable high specific capacitance of 142.1 F g(-1) at a discharge current density of 0.5 A g(-1) was demonstrated. The fabricated solid state supercapacitor displayed excellent capacitance retention of 93.9% over 5000 cycles. The high energy storage ability of the hierarchical porous carbon was attributed to the specially designed pore structures, i.e., co-existence of the micropores and mesopores. This research has demonstrated that utilization of sustainable biopolymers as the raw materials for high performance supercapacitor electrode materials is an effective way to fabricate low-cost energy storage devices.

  4. Surface modification of activated carbon for enhanced adsorption of perfluoroalkyl acids from aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Yue; Liu, Jinxia

    2016-02-01

    The objective of the research was to examine the effect of increasing carbon surface basicity on uptake of perfluorooctane sulfonic (PFOS) and carboxylic acids (PFOA) by activated carbon. Granular activated carbons made from coal, coconut shell, wood, and phenolic-polymer-based activated carbon fibers were modified through high-temperature and ammonia gas treatments to facilitate systematical evaluation of the impact of basicity of different origins. Comparison of adsorption isotherms and adsorption distribution coefficients showed that the ammonia gas treatment was more effective than the high-temperature treatment in enhancing surface basicity. The resultant higher point of zero charges and total basicity (measured by total HCl uptake) correlated with improved adsorption affinity for PFOS and PFOA. The effectiveness of surface modification to enhance adsorption varied with carbon raw material. Wood-based carbons and activated carbon fibers showed enhancement by one to three orders of magnitudes while other materials could experience reduction in adsorption towards either PFOS or PFOA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Preparation And Characterization Of Cr/Activated Carbon Catalyst From Palm Empty Fruit Bunch

    OpenAIRE

    Zainal Fanani; Dedi Rohendi; Tri Kurnia Dewi; Muhammad Dzulfikar A

    2016-01-01

    Preparation and characterization of Cr/activated carbon catalyst from palm empty fruit bunch had been done. The research were to determine the effect of carbonization temperature towards adsorption of ammonia, iodine number, metilen blue number, and porosity of activated carbon and Cr/activated carbon catalyst. The determination of porosity include surface area, micropore volume and total pore volume. The results showed the best carbonization temperature activated carbon and Cr/activated carb...

  6. High dispersity of carbon nanotubes diminishes immunotoxicity in spleen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soyoung; Khang, Dongwoo; Kim, Sang-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    From the various physiochemical material properties, the chemical functionalization order of single-walled carbon nanotubes (swCNTs) has not been considered as a critical factor for modulating immunological responses and toxicological aspects in drug delivery applications. Although most nanomaterials, including carbon nanotubes, are specifically accumulated in spleen, few studies have focused on spleen immunotoxicity. For this reason, this study demonstrated that the dispersity of swCNTs significantly influenced immunotoxicity in vitro and in vivo. For cytotoxicity of swCNTs, MTT assay, reactive oxygen species production, superoxide dismutase activity, cellular uptake, and confocal microscopy were used in macrophages. In the in vivo study, female BALB/c mice were intravenously administered with 1 mg/kg/day of swCNTs for 2 weeks. The body weight, organ weight, hematological change, reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, and lymphocyte population were evaluated. Different orders of chemical functionalization of swCNTs controlled immunotoxicity. In short, less-dispersed swCNTs caused cytotoxicity in macrophages and abnormalities in immune organs such as spleen, whereas highly dispersed swCNTs did not result in immunotoxicity. This study clarified that increasing carboxyl groups on swCNTs significantly mitigated immunotoxicity in vitro and in vivo. Our findings clarified the effective immunotoxicological factors of swCNTs by increasing dispersity of swCNTs and provided useful guidelines for the effective use of nanomaterials.

  7. Activation of polymer blend carbon nanofibres by alkaline hydroxides and their hydrogen storage performances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suarez-Garcia, F.; Vilaplana-Ortego, E.; Kunowsky, M.; Linares-Solano, A. [Grupo de Materiales Carbonosos y Medio Ambiente, Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Universidad de Alicante, E-03080 Alicante (Spain); Kimura, M. [Gun Ei Chemical Ind. Co., Ltd., Takasaki, Gunma 370-0032 (Japan); Oya, A. [Graduate School of Engineering, Gunma University, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan)

    2009-11-15

    In the present work we study the hydroxide activation (NaOH and KOH) of phenol-formaldehyde resin derived CNFs prepared by a polymer blend technique to prepare highly porous activated carbon nanofibres (ACNFs). Morphology and textural characteristics of these ACNFs were studied and their hydrogen storage capacities at 77 K (at 0.1 MPa and at high pressures up to 4 MPa) were assessed, and compared, with reported capacities of other porous carbon materials. Phenol-formaldehyde resin derived carbon fibres were successfully activated with these two alkaline hydroxides rendering highly microporous ACNFs with reasonable good activation process yields up to 47 wt.% compared to 7 wt.% yields from steam activation for similar surface areas of 1500 m{sup 2}/g or higher. These nano-sized activated carbons present interesting H{sub 2} storage capacities at 77 K which are comparable, or even higher, to other high quality microporous carbon materials. This observation is due, in part, to their nano-sized diameters allowing to enhance their packing densities to 0.71 g/cm{sup 3} and hence their resulting hydrogen storage capacities. (author)

  8. Production of activated carbon from peanut hill using phosphoric acid and microwave activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weerawat Clowutimon

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The optimum conditions for preparing activated carbon from peanut hulls by phosphoric acid and microwave activation were studied. Factors investigated in this study were temperature of carbonization at 300, 350, 400 and 450๐ C, and time of carbonization at 30, 60 and 90 minutes. The optimum yield was observed that carbonization temperature of 400๐ C and time at 60 minutes, respectively. The yield of charcoal was 39% and the f ix carbon was 69%. Then the charcoal was activated by phosphoric acid and microwave irradiation, respectively. The effect of the weight per volume ratios of charcoal to activating acid (1:1, 1:2 and 2:1(W/V, microwave power at (activated 300, 500 and 700 watts, and activated time (30, 60 and 90 seconds were studied. The results showed that the optimum conditions for activating peanut charcoal were 1:2 (W/V charcoal per activating acid, microwave power 700 watts for 90 seconds. The results yielding maximum surface area by BET method was 303.1 m2 /g and pore volume was 0.140 cm3 /g. An efficiency of maximum iodine adsorption was 418 mg iodine/g activated carbon. Comparing the adsorption efficiency of non- irradiated and irradiated activated carbon, the efficiency of irradiated activated carbon improved up to 31%, due to its larger surface area and pore volume.

  9. Selective Removal of Nitrosamines from a Model Amine Carbon-Capture Waterwash Using Low-Cost Activated-Carbon Sorbents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widger, Leland R; Combs, Megan; Lohe, Amit R; Lippert, Cameron A; Thompson, Jesse G; Liu, Kunlei

    2017-09-19

    Nitrosamines generated in the amine solvent loop of postcombustion carbon capture systems are potent carcinogens, and their emission could pose a serious threat to the environment or human health. Nitrosamine emission control strategies are critical for the success of amine-based carbon capture as the technology approaches industrial-scale deployment. Waterwash systems have been used to control volatile and aerosol emissions, including nitrosamines, from carbon-capture plants, but it is still necessary to remove or destroy nitrosamines in the circulating waterwash to prevent their subsequent emission into the environment. In this study, a cost-effective method for selectively removing nitrosamines from the absorber waterwash effluent with activated-carbon sorbents was developed to reduce the environmental impact associated with amine-based carbon capture. The results show that the commercial activated-carbon sorbents tested have a high capacity and selectivity for nitrosamines over the parent solvent amines, with capacities up to 190 mg/g carbon, under simulated amine waterwash conditions. To further reduce costs, an aerobic thermal sorbent regeneration step was also examined due to the low thermal stability of nitrosamines. To model the effect of oxidation on the sorbent performance, thermal- and acid-oxidized sorbents were also prepared from the commercial sorbents and analyzed. The chemical and physical properties of nitrosamines, the parent amine, and the influence of the physical properties of the carbon sorbents on nitrosamine adsorption was examined. Key sorbent properties included the sorbent hydrophilicity and hydrophobicity, surface pK a of the sorbent, and chemical structure of the parent amine and nitrosamine.

  10. Extramitochondrial domain rich in carbonic anhydrase activity improves myocardial energetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Marie A; Ali, Mohammad A; Hulikova, Alzbeta; Supuran, Claudiu T; Clarke, Kieran; Vaughan-Jones, Richard D; Tyler, Damian J; Swietach, Pawel

    2013-03-05

    CO2 is produced abundantly by cardiac mitochondria. Thus an efficient means for its venting is required to support metabolism. Carbonic anhydrase (CA) enzymes, expressed at various sites in ventricular myocytes, may affect mitochondrial CO2 clearance by catalyzing CO2 hydration (to H(+) and HCO3(-)), thereby changing the gradient for CO2 venting. Using fluorescent dyes to measure changes in pH arising from the intracellular hydration of extracellularly supplied CO2, overall CA activity in the cytoplasm of isolated ventricular myocytes was found to be modest (2.7-fold above spontaneous kinetics). Experiments on ventricular mitochondria demonstrated negligible intramitochondrial CA activity. CA activity was also investigated in intact hearts by (13)C magnetic resonance spectroscopy from the rate of H(13)CO3(-) production from (13)CO2 released specifically from mitochondria by pyruvate dehydrogenase-mediated metabolism of hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate. CA activity measured upon [1-(13)C]pyruvate infusion was fourfold higher than the cytoplasm-averaged value. A fluorescent CA ligand colocalized with a mitochondrial marker, indicating that mitochondria are near a CA-rich domain. Based on immunoreactivity, this domain comprises the nominally cytoplasmic CA isoform CAII and sarcoplasmic reticulum-associated CAXIV. Inhibition of extramitochondrial CA activity acidified the matrix (as determined by fluorescence measurements in permeabilized myocytes and isolated mitochondria), impaired cardiac energetics (indexed by the phosphocreatine-to-ATP ratio measured by (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy of perfused hearts), and reduced contractility (as measured from the pressure developed in perfused hearts). These data provide evidence for a functional domain of high CA activity around mitochondria to support CO2 venting, particularly during elevated and fluctuating respiratory activity. Aberrant distribution of CA activity therefore may reduce the heart's energetic

  11. High strength and low weight hollow carbon fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, T.; Brüll, R.; Pursche, F.; Langgartner, J.; Seide, G.; Gries, T.

    2017-10-01

    Carbon fibres have strengths of 2.5 to 5 GPa in the fibre direction and an elastic modulus of 200 to 500 GPa. Carbon fibres have equal mechanical properties as steel but 20% of the weight. But the material is more expensive than steel. Therefore, they are only used in industry sectors where the benefits legitimate the high costs. The use of hollow rather than solid fibres allows an even lower weight of the components. At the same time, similar mechanical properties are achieved by the circular cross section. Carbon fibres are obtained from polyacrylonitrile fibers (PAN). These can be produced as hollow fibres. As a first step stabilization and carbonization of hollow PAN precursors is investigated to produce hollow carbon fibres.

  12. Highly efficient simultaneous ultrasonic assisted adsorption of brilliant green and eosin B onto ZnS nanoparticles loaded activated carbon: Artificial neural network modeling and central composite design optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamshidi, M.; Ghaedi, M.; Dashtian, K.; Ghaedi, A. M.; Hajati, S.; Goudarzi, A.; Alipanahpour, E.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, central composite design (CCD) combined with response surface methodology (RSM) and desirability function approach (DFA) gives useful information about operational condition and also to obtain useful information about interaction and main effect of variables concerned to simultaneous ultrasound-assisted removal of brilliant green (BG) and eosin B (EB) by zinc sulfide nanoparticles loaded on activated carbon (ZnS-NPs-AC). Spectra overlap between BG and EB dyes was extensively reduced and/or omitted by derivative spectrophotometric method, while multi-layer artificial neural network (ML-ANN) model learned with Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) algorithm was used for building up a predictive model and prediction of the BG and EB removal. The ANN efficiently was able to forecast the simultaneous BG and EB removal that was confirmed by reasonable numerical value i.e. MSE of 0.0021 and R2 of 0.9589 and MSE of 0.0022 and R2 of 0.9455 for testing data set, respectively. The results reveal acceptable agreement among experimental data and ANN predicted results. Langmuir as the best model for fitting experimental data relevant to BG and EB removal indicates high, economic and profitable adsorption capacity (258.7 and 222.2 mg g- 1) that supports and confirms its applicability for wastewater treatment.

  13. Oxygen-18 incorporation into malic acid during nocturnal carbon dioxide fixation in crassulacean acid metabolism plants: a new approach to estimating in vivo carbonic anhydrase activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holtum, J.A.M.; Summons, R.; Roeske, C.A.; Comins, H.N.; O' Leary, M.H.

    1984-01-01

    Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants fix carbon dioxide at night by the carboxylation of phosphoenolpyruvate. If CO2 fixation is conducted with TC YO2, then in the absence of carbonic anhydrase, the malate formed by dark CO2 fixation should also contain high levels of carbon-13 and oxygen-18. Conversely, if carbonic anhydrase is present and highly active, oxygen exchange between CO2 and cellular H2O will occur more rapidly than carboxylation, and the ( TC) malate formed will contain little or no oxygen-18 above the natural abundance level. The presence of oxygen-18 in these molecules can be detected either by nuclear magnetic resonance or by mass spectrometry. Studies of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in the presence and absence of carbonic anhydrase in vitro confirm the validity of the method. When CAM plants are studied by this method, we find that most species show incorporation of a significant amount of oxygen-18. Comparison of these results with results of isotope fractionation and gas exchange studies permits calculation of the in vivo activity of carbonic anhydrase toward HCO3 compared with that of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase. The ratio (carbonic anhydrase activity/phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity) is species dependent and varies from a low of about 7 for Ananas comosus to values near 20 for Hoya carnosa and Bryophyllum pinnatum, 40 for Kalanchoee daigremontiana, and 100 or greater for Bryophyllum tubiflorum, Kalanchoee serrata, and Kalanchoae tomentosa. Carbonic anhydrase activity increases relative to phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity at higher temperature. 37 references, 2 figures, 8 tables.

  14. Chlorine-functionalized carbon dots for highly efficient photodegradation of pollutants under visible-light irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Shengliang, E-mail: hsliang@yeah.net [School of Material Science and Engineering, North University of China, Taiyuan 030051 (China); Ding, Yanli [School of Material Science and Engineering, North University of China, Taiyuan 030051 (China); Chang, Qing, E-mail: changneu@gmail.com [School of Material Science and Engineering, North University of China, Taiyuan 030051 (China); Yang, Jinlong [State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Lin, Kui, E-mail: linkui@tju.edu.cn [Analytical Instrumentation Center, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2015-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Chlorine-functionalized carbon dots (Cl-CDs) were synthesized through the substitution reaction. Cl-CDs show highly photocatalytic activity under visible-light irradiation, and can quickly degrade phthalocyanine with the thermal and chemical stability. This work suggests that surface engineering of carbon dots with heteroatoms can be used to enhance their photochemical properties. - Highlights: • Chlorine-functionalized carbon dots (Cl-CDs) were synthesized by substitution reaction. • Cl-CDs show highly photocatalytic activity under visible-light irradiation. • The thermally and chemically stable phthalocyanine is even photodegraded by Cl-CDs. - Abstract: Chlorine-functionalized carbon dots (Cl-CDs) were prepared by the substitution reaction between Cl radicals into thionyl chloride molecules and carbon dots with containing OH/COOH groups at their surface (O-CDs). The obtained Cl-CDs with a size of 2–5 nm contain 2–3% Cl atoms and emit blue light. Compared with amine-functionalzed carbon dots (N-CDs) and O-CDs, Cl-CDs exhibit much higher photocatalytic activity under visible-light irradiation. The thermally and chemically stable phthalocyanine can be even degraded quickly through Cl-CDs. This work suggests that surface engineering of carbon dots with heteroatoms can be used to enhance their photochemical properties.

  15. Invertebrate community characteristics in biologically active carbon filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaowei; Yang, Yufeng; Liu, Lijun; Zhang, Jinsong; Wang, Qing

    2010-01-01

    Biologically active carbon (BAC) system was set up in a water plant of South China during January to December 2007, to study the invertebrate community characteristics of BAC filter. Thirty-seven invertebrate species were found, of which 28 belonging to rotifers. Filter operation could lead to an output of invertebrates in high abundances with the filtrate, and the maximum density could reach 5608 individuals/m3. Average abundances in the effluent water increased in 27-33 folds in comparison to the influent water during the sampling period. Invertebrate community succession had the following trend: filter-feeding animals-->small benthic invertebrates-->large benthic and resistant invertebrates. Abundances of large-sized invertebrates (copepod adult and oligochaete) at bigger-media column were significantly higher than that at small-media column. The results implied the abundant species diversity of invertebrate in BAC filter. The relationship between invertebrate and biofilm still remain to be studied in detail.

  16. Adsorption Properties of Lignin-derived Activated Carbon Fibers (LACF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contescu, Cristian I. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gallego, Nidia C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Thibaud-Erkey, Catherine [United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), East Hartford, CT (United States); Karra, Reddy [United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), East Hartford, CT (United States)

    2016-04-01

    The object of this CRADA project between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) is the characterization of lignin-derived activated carbon fibers (LACF) and determination of their adsorption properties for volatile organic compounds (VOC). Carbon fibers from lignin raw materials were manufactured at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) using the technology previously developed at ORNL. These fibers were physically activated at ORNL using various activation conditions, and their surface area and pore-size distribution were characterized by gas adsorption. Based on these properties, ORNL did down-select five differently activated LACF materials that were delivered to UTRC for measurement of VOC adsorption properties. UTRC used standard techniques based on breakthrough curves to measure and determine the adsorption properties of indoor air pollutants (IAP) - namely formaldehyde and carbon dioxide - and to verify the extent of saturated fiber regenerability by thermal treatments. The results are summarized as follows: (1) ORNL demonstrated that physical activation of lignin-derived carbon fibers can be tailored to obtain LACF with surface areas and pore size distributions matching the properties of activated carbon fibers obtained from more expensive, fossil-fuel precursors; (2) UTRC investigated the LACF potential for use in air cleaning applications currently pursued by UTRC, such as building ventilation, and demonstrated their regenerability for CO2 and formaldehyde, (3) Both partners agree that LACF have potential for possible use in air cleaning applications.

  17. Biofuel intercropping effects on soil carbon and microbial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Michael S; Leggett, Zakiya H; Sucre, Eric B; Bradford, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Biofuels will help meet rising demands for energy and, ideally, limit climate change associated with carbon losses from the biosphere to atmosphere. Biofuel management must therefore maximize energy production and maintain ecosystem carbon stocks. Increasingly, there is interest in intercropping biofuels with other crops, partly because biofuel production on arable land might reduce availability and increase the price of food. One intercropping approach involves growing biofuel grasses in forest plantations. Grasses differ from trees in both their organic inputs to soils and microbial associations. These differences are associated with losses of soil carbon when grasses become abundant in forests. We investigated how intercropping switchgrass (Panicum virgalum), a major candidate for cellulosic biomass production, in loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) plantations affects soil carbon, nitrogen, and microbial dynamics. Our design involved four treatments: two pine management regimes where harvest residues (i.e., biomass) were left in place or removed, and two switchgrass regimes where the grass was grown with pine under the same two biomass scenarios (left or removed). Soil variables were measured in four 1-ha replicate plots in the first and second year following switchgrass planting. Under switchgrass intercropping, pools of mineralizable and particulate organic matter carbon were 42% and 33% lower, respectively. These declines translated into a 21% decrease in total soil carbon in the upper 15 cm of the soil profile, during early stand development. The switchgrass effect, however, was isolated to the interbed region where switchgrass is planted. In these regions, switchgrass-induced reductions in soil carbon pools with 29%, 43%, and 24% declines in mineralizable, particulate, and total soil carbon, respectively. Our results support the idea that grass inputs to forests can prime the activity of soil organic carbon degrading microbes, leading to net reductions in stocks

  18. High power and high energy electrodes using carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Fabrizio; Brambilla, Nicolo Michele; Signorelli, Riccardo

    2015-04-07

    An electrode useful in an energy storage system, such as a capacitor, includes an electrode that includes at least one to a plurality of layers of compressed carbon nanotube aggregate. Methods of fabrication are provided. The resulting electrode exhibits superior electrical performance in terms of gravimetric and volumetric power density.

  19. Bacteria associated with granular activated carbon particles in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camper, A K; LeChevallier, M W; Broadaway, S C; McFeters, G A

    1986-09-01

    A sampling protocol was developed to examine particles released from granular activated carbon filter beds. A gauze filter/Swinnex procedure was used to collect carbon fines from 201 granular activated carbon-treated drinking water samples over 12 months. Application of a homogenization procedure (developed previously) indicated that 41.4% of the water samples had heterotrophic plate count bacteria attached to carbon particles. With the enumeration procedures described, heterotrophic plate count bacteria were recovered at an average rate of 8.6 times higher than by conventional analyses. Over 17% of the samples contained carbon particles colonized with coliform bacteria as enumerated with modified most-probable-number and membrane filter techniques. In some instances coliform recoveries were 122 to 1,194 times higher than by standard procedures. Nearly 28% of the coliforms attached to these particles in drinking water exhibited the fecal biotype. Scanning electron micrographs of carbon fines from treated drinking water showed microcolonies of bacteria on particle surfaces. These data indicate that bacteria attached to carbon fines may be an important mechanism by which microorganisms penetrate treatment barriers and enter potable water supplies.

  20. Persulfate Oxidation Regeneration of Granular Activated Carbon: Reversible Impacts on Sorption Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemical oxidation regeneration of granular activated carbon (GAC) is a developing technology that can be carried out utilizing thermally-activated persulfate. During chemical regeneration of GAC, aggressive oxidative conditions lead to high acidity (pH < 2) and the accumulation ...

  1. Elimination of textile dyes using activated carbons prepared from vegetable residues and their characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peláez-Cid, Alejandra-Alicia; Herrera-González, Ana-María; Salazar-Villanueva, Martín; Bautista-Hernández, Alejandro

    2016-10-01

    In this study, three mesoporous activated carbons prepared from vegetable residues were used to remove acid, basic, and direct dyes from aqueous solutions, and reactive and vat dyes from textile wastewater. Granular carbons obtained by chemical activation at 673 K with phosphoric acid from prickly pear peels (CarTunaQ), broccoli stems (CarBrocQ), and white sapote seeds (CarZapQ) were highly efficient for the removal of dyes. Adsorption equilibrium studies were carried out in batch systems and treated with Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The maximum adsorption capacities calculated from the Langmuir isotherms ranged between 131.6 and 312.5 mg/g for acid dyes, and between 277.8 and 500.0 mg/g for basic dyes at 303 K. Our objective in this paper was to show that vegetable wastes can serve as precursors for activated carbons that can be used for the adsorption of dyes. Specifically CarBrocQ was the best carbon produced for the removal of textile dyes. The color removal of dyes present in textile wastewaters was compared with that of a commercial powdered carbon, and it was found that the carbons produced using waste material reached similar efficiency levels. Carbon samples were characterized by bulk density, point of zero charge, thermogravimetric analysis, elemental analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, methylene blue adsorption isotherms at 303 K, and nitrogen adsorption isotherms at 77 K (SBET). The results show that the activated carbons possess a large specific surface area (1025-1177 m(2)/g) and high total pore volume (1.06-2.16 cm(3)/g) with average pore size diameters between 4.1 and 8.4 nm. Desorption and regeneration tests were made to test the viability of reusing the activated carbons. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A General Methodology for Evaluation of Carbon Sequestration Activities and Carbon Credits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klasson, KT

    2002-12-23

    A general methodology was developed for evaluation of carbon sequestration technologies. In this document, we provide a method that is quantitative, but is structured to give qualitative comparisons despite changes in detailed method parameters, i.e., it does not matter what ''grade'' a sequestration technology gets but a ''better'' technology should receive a better grade. To meet these objectives, we developed and elaborate on the following concepts: (1) All resources used in a sequestration activity should be reviewed by estimating the amount of greenhouse gas emissions for which they historically are responsible. We have done this by introducing a quantifier we term Full-Cycle Carbon Emissions, which is tied to the resource. (2) The future fate of sequestered carbon should be included in technology evaluations. We have addressed this by introducing a variable called Time-adjusted Value of Carbon Sequestration to weigh potential future releases of carbon, escaping the sequestered form. (3) The Figure of Merit of a sequestration technology should address the entire life-cycle of an activity. The figures of merit we have developed relate the investment made (carbon release during the construction phase) to the life-time sequestration capacity of the activity. To account for carbon flows that occur during different times of an activity we incorporate the Time Value of Carbon Flows. The methodology we have developed can be expanded to include financial, social, and long-term environmental aspects of a sequestration technology implementation. It does not rely on global atmospheric modeling efforts but is consistent with these efforts and could be combined with them.

  3. Porous texture evolution in Nomex-derived activated carbon fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar-Rodil, S; Denoyel, R; Rouquerol, J; Martínez-Alonso, A; Tascón, J M D

    2002-08-01

    In the present work, the textural evolution of a series of activated carbon fibers with increasing burn-off degree, prepared by the pyrolysis and steam activation of Nomex aramid fibers, is followed by measurements of physical adsorption of N(2) (77 K) and CO(2) (273 K) and immersion calorimetry into different liquids (dichloromethane, benzene, cyclohexane). The immersion calorimetry results are discussed in depth, paying special attention to the choice of the reference material. The activated carbon fibers studied possess an essentially homogeneous microporous texture, which suggests that these materials may be applied in gas separation, either directly or with additional CVD treatment.

  4. Hybrid carbon nanostructure assemblage for high performance pseudo-capacitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Mishra

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Investigation of novel nanocomposites for pseudo-capacitors with high capacitance and energy density is the spotlight of current energy research. In the present work, hybrid carbon nanostructure assemblage of graphene and multiwalled carbon nanotubes has been used as carbon support to nanostructured RuO2 and polyaniline for high energy supercapacitors. Maximum specific capacitances of 110, 235 and 440 F g−1 at the voltage sweep rate of 10 mV s−1 and maximum energy densities of 7, 12.5 and 20.5 Wh kg−1 were observed for carbon assemblage and its RuO2 and polyanilne decorated nanocomposites, respectively, with 1M H2SO4 as electrolyte.

  5. Preparation of activated carbon from a renewable agricultural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, element composition of pruning mulberry shoot was evaluated by element analysis. On the basis of this, pruning mulberry shoot–based activated carbon was prepared from by chemical activation with phosphoric acid (H3PO4), which particles were displayed by the scanning electron microscope (SEM) ...

  6. Preparation and characterization of activated carbon from water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Water hyacinth and water spinach were used as novel precursor materials for the production of powdered activated carbons. They were activated chemically with H3PO4, KOH, H2O2 pyrolyzed at 4500C and characterized in terms of pH, density, surface area, iodine number, porosity, ash content and moisture content.

  7. Pesticide Removal by Combined Ozonation and Granular Activated Carbon Filtration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orlandini, E.

    1999-01-01

    This research aimed to idendfy and understand mechanisms that underlie the beneficial effect of ozonation on removal of pesdcides and other micropoUutants by Granular Activated Carbon (GAC) filtradon. This allows optimization of the combination of these two processes, termed Biological Activated

  8. Properties of Activated Carbon Prepared from Coconut Shells in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Materials commonly used for preparation of activated carbons include coal and coconut shells. Ghana generates over 30,000 tonnes of coconut shells annually from coconut oil processing activities but apart from a small percentage of the shells, which is burned as fuel, the remaining is usually dumped as waste.

  9. Decolorization of Cheddar cheese whey by activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue; Campbell, Rachel; Drake, MaryAnne; Zhong, Qixin

    2015-05-01

    Colored Cheddar whey is a source for whey protein recovery and is decolorized conventionally by bleaching, which affects whey protein quality. Two activated carbons were studied in the present work as physical means of removing annatto (norbixin) in Cheddar cheese whey. The color and residual norbixin content of Cheddar whey were reduced by a higher level of activated carbon at a higher temperature between 25 and 55°C and a longer time. Activated carbon applied at 40g/L for 2h at 30°C was more effective than bleaching by 500mg/L of hydrogen peroxide at 68°C. The lowered temperature in activated-carbon treatments had less effect on protein structure as investigated for fluorescence spectroscopy and volatile compounds, particularly oxidation products, based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Activated carbon was also reusable, removing more than 50% norbixin even after 10 times of regeneration, which showed great potential for decolorizing cheese whey. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity of carbon-silica hybrid catalyst from rice straw

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janaun, J.; Safie, N. N.; Siambun, N. J.

    2016-07-01

    The hybrid-carbon catalyst has been studied because of its promising potential to have high porosity and surface area to be used in biodiesel production. Silica has been used as the support to produce hybrid carbon catalyst due to its mesoporous structure and high surface area properties. The chemical synthesis of silica-carbon hybrid is expensive and involves more complicated preparation steps. The presence of natural silica in rice plants especially rice husk has received much attention in research because of the potential as a source for solid acid catalyst synthesis. But study on rice straw, which is available abundantly as agricultural waste is limited. In this study, rice straw undergone pyrolysis and functionalized using fuming sulphuric acid to anchor -SO3H groups. The presence of silica and the physiochemical properties of the catalyst produced were studied before and after sulphonation. The catalytic activity of hybrid carbon silica acid catalyst, (H-CSAC) in esterification of oleic acid with methanol was also studied. The results showed the presence of silica-carbon which had amorphous structure and highly porous. The carbon surface consisted of higher silica composition, had lower S element detected as compared to the surface that had high carbon content but lower silica composition. This was likely due to the fact that Si element which was bonded to oxygen was highly stable and unlikely to break the bond and react with -SO3H ions. H-CSAC conversions were 23.04 %, 35.52 % and 34.2 7% at 333.15 K, 343.15 K and 353.15 K, respectively. From this research, rice straw can be used as carbon precursor to produce hybrid carbon-silica catalyst and has shown catalytic activity in biodiesel production. Rate equation obtained is also presented.

  11. Porous structure and surface chemistry of phosphoric acid activated carbon from corncob

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sych, N.V.; Trofymenko, S.I.; Poddubnaya, O.I.; Tsyba, M.M. [Institute for Sorption and Endoecology Problems, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 13 General Naumov St., 03164 Kyiv (Ukraine); Sapsay, V.I.; Klymchuk, D.O. [M.G. Kholodny Institute of Botany, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 2 Tereshchenkivska St., 01601 Kyiv (Ukraine); Puziy, A.M., E-mail: alexander.puziy@ispe.kiev.ua [Institute for Sorption and Endoecology Problems, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 13 General Naumov St., 03164 Kyiv (Ukraine)

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phosphoric acid activation results in formation of carbons with acidic surface groups. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Maximum amount of surface groups is introduced at impregnation ratio 1.25. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phosphoric acid activated carbons show high capacity to copper. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phosphoric acid activated carbons are predominantly microporous. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Maximum surface area and pore volume achieved at impregnation ratio 1.0. - Abstract: Active carbons have been prepared from corncob using chemical activation with phosphoric acid at 400 Degree-Sign C using varied ratio of impregnation (RI). Porous structure of carbons was characterized by nitrogen adsorption and scanning electron microscopy. Surface chemistry was studied by IR and potentiometric titration method. It has been shown that porosity development was peaked at RI = 1.0 (S{sub BET} = 2081 m{sup 2}/g, V{sub tot} = 1.1 cm{sup 3}/g), while maximum amount of acid surface groups was observed at RI = 1.25. Acid surface groups of phosphoric acid activated carbons from corncob includes phosphate and strongly acidic carboxylic (pK = 2.0-2.6), weakly acidic carboxylic (pK = 4.7-5.0), enol/lactone (pK = 6.7-7.4; 8.8-9.4) and phenol (pK = 10.1-10.7). Corncob derived carbons showed high adsorption capacity to copper, especially at low pH. Maximum adsorption of methylene blue and iodine was observed for carbon with most developed porosity (RI = 1.0).

  12. Carbon Nanotubes as Active Components for Gas Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-De Zhang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The unique structure of carbon nanotubes endows them with fantastic physical and chemical characteristics. Carbon nanotubes have been widely studied due to their potential applications in many fields including conductive and high-strength composites, energy storage and energy conversion devices, sensors, field emission displays and radiation sources, hydrogen storage media, and nanometer-sized semiconductor devices, probes, and quantum wires. Some of these applications have been realized in products, while others show great potentials. The development of carbon nanotubes-based sensors has attracted intensive interest in the last several years because of their excellent sensing properties such as high selectivity and prompt response. Carbon nanotube-based gas sensors are summarized in this paper. Sensors based on single-walled, multiwalled, and well-aligned carbon nanotubes arrays are introduced. Modification of carbon nanotubes with functional groups, metals, oxides, polymers, or doping carbon nanotubes with other elements to enhance the response and selectivity of the sensors is also discussed.

  13. Highly N-doped microporous carbon nanospheres with high energy storage and conversion efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Cheolho; Kim, Kiwon; Moon, Jun Hyuk

    2017-10-31

    Porous carbon spheres (CSs) have distinct advantages in energy storage and conversion applications. We report the preparation of highly monodisperse N-doped microporous CSs through the carbonization of polystyrene-based polymer spheres and subsequent activation. The N-doped microporous CSs have a remarkably high N-doping content, over 10%, and high BET surface area of 884.9 m2 g-1. We characterize the synergistic effects of the micropores and N doping on the energy storage performance of a supercapacitor electrode consisting of the CSs and on the performance in an electrocatalytic reaction of a CS counter electrode in a photovoltaic cell. The N-doped microporous CSs exhibit a maximum capacitance of 373 F g-1 at a current density of 0.2 Ag-1, a high capacitance retention up to 62% with a 10-fold increase in current density, and excellent stability over 10,000 charge/discharge cycles. A counter electrode consisting of N-doped microporous CSs was found to exhibit superior electrocatalytic behavior to an electrode consisting of conventional Pt nanoparticles. These CSs derived from polymer spheres synthesized by addition polymerization will be new platform materials with high electrochemical performance.

  14. Preparation and Characterization of Activated Carbons from Parthenium biomass by Physical and Chemical Activation Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeshwari Sivaraj

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Parthenium hysterphorous (Linn, a perennial weed of no known beneficial use was introduced as a containment of food grains imported from US with P1480 scheme. The colonization efficiency of the weed was much higher than other indigenous weeds resulting in the reduction of cultivable areas of agricultural lands. Therefore, attention was focused to find out the potential use of its biomass. In the present study the preparation and characterization of activated carbons by physical and chemical activation methods are reported and aims to prepare relatively well developed porous activated carbons as well as study various conditions and parameters that were involved during the process. Among the carbons prepared Zncl2 impregnated carbon at the ratio of 1 was found to possess the characteristic features of an efficient adsorbent. Experimental results showed that pyrolytic and activation conditions leading to various final average temperatures had significant effect on the properties of activated carbons prepared.

  15. Laser-engraved carbon nanotube paper for instilling high sensitivity, high stretchability, and high linearity in strain sensors

    KAUST Repository

    Xin, Yangyang

    2017-06-29

    There is an increasing demand for strain sensors with high sensitivity and high stretchability for new applications such as robotics or wearable electronics. However, for the available technologies, the sensitivity of the sensors varies widely. These sensors are also highly nonlinear, making reliable measurement challenging. Here we introduce a new family of sensors composed of a laser-engraved carbon nanotube paper embedded in an elastomer. A roll-to-roll pressing of these sensors activates a pre-defined fragmentation process, which results in a well-controlled, fragmented microstructure. Such sensors are reproducible and durable and can attain ultrahigh sensitivity and high stretchability (with a gauge factor of over 4.2 × 10(4) at 150% strain). Moreover, they can attain high linearity from 0% to 15% and from 22% to 150% strain. They are good candidates for stretchable electronic applications that require high sensitivity and linearity at large strains.

  16. Novel Activated Carbons from Agricultural Wastes and their Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Karthikeyan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Solid waste disposal has become a major problem in India, Either it has to be disposed safely or used for the recovery of valuable materials as agricultural wastes like turmeric waste, ferronia shell waste, jatropha curcus seed shell waste, delonix shell waste and ipomea carnia stem. Therefore these wastes have been explored for the preparation of activated carbon employing various techniques. Activated carbons prepared from agricultural solid wastes by chemical activation processes shows excellent improvement in the surface characteristics. Their characterization studies such as bulk density, moisture content, ash content, fixed carbon content, matter soluble in water, matter soluble in acid, pH, decolourising power, phenol number, ion exchange capacity, ion content and surface area have been carried out to assess the suitability of these carbons as absorbents in the water and wastewater. For anionic dyes (reactive, direct, acid a close relationship between the surface area and surface chemical groups of the modified activated carbon and percentage of dye removal by adsorption can be observed. Cationic dyes large amount of surface chemical groups present in the sample (mainly carboxylic, anhydrides, lactones and phenols etc. are good anchoring sites for adsorption. The present study reveals the recovery of valuable adsorbents from readily and cheaply available agriculture wastes.

  17. Polanyi Evaluation of Adsorptive Capacities of Commercial Activated Carbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monje, Oscar; Surma, Jan M.

    2017-01-01

    Commercial activated carbons from Calgon (207C and OVC) and Cabot Norit (RB2 and GCA 48) were evaluated for use in spacecraft trace contaminant control filters. The Polanyi potential plots of the activated carbons were compared using to those of Barnebey-Cheney Type BD, an untreated activated carbon with similar properties as the acid-treated Barnebey-Sutcliffe Type 3032 utilized in the TCCS. Their adsorptive capacities under dry conditions were measured in a closed loop system and the sorbents were ranked for their ability to remove common VOCs found in spacecraft cabin air. This comparison suggests that these sorbents can be ranked as GCA 48 207C, OVC RB2 for the compounds evaluated.

  18. Comparison of sorption capacity and surface area of activated carbon prepared from Jatropha curcas fruit pericarp and seed coat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.M. Ameen

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Activated carbons were prepared from fruit pericarp and seed coat of Jatropha curcas using KOH and NaCl as activating agents leading to the production of four samples of activated carbons JPS, JPP, JCS and JCP. The adsorption capacity based on adsorption of methylene blue was determined for each sample. A further study of adsorptive properties of the most efficient activated carbon (JPS was made by contacting it with standard solutions of methylene blue, acetic acid and potassium permanganate. The effects of mass of active carbon used, initial concentration of the solute and the pH of the solution on adsorption performance were investigated. Ash content and percentage fixed carbon were determined for two of the activated carbons (JPS and JCS with the highest adsorptive capacity. Equilibrium study on adsorption was carried out and the adsorption data were analyzed using the Langmuir isotherm. The results obtained indicate that activated carbons from the fruit pericarp and the seed coat of J. curcas can be used as high performance adsorbents with the fruit pericarp activated carbon showing the higher adsorption capacity. The adsorption data fitted well to the Langmuir model and adsorptive area of 824–910 m2/g was obtained for the activated carbon.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/bcse.v26i2.2

  19. The Effect of Caramelization and Carbonization Temperatures toward Structural Properties of Mesoporous Carbon from Fructose with Zinc Borosilicate Activator

    OpenAIRE

    Tutik Setianingsih; Indriana Kartini; Yateman Arryanto

    2014-01-01

    Mesoporous carbon was prepared from fructose using zinc borosilicate (ZBS) activator. The synthesis involves caramelization and carbonization processes. The effect of both process temperature toward porosity and functional group of carbon surface are investigated in this research. The caramelization was conducted hydrothermally at 85 and 100 °C, followed by thermally 130 °C. The carbonization was conducted at various temperatures (450–750 °C). The carbon-ZBS composite were washed by using HF ...

  20. Removal of benzocaine from water by filtration with activated carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, G.E.; Bills, T.D.; Marking, L.L.

    1990-01-01

    Benzocaine is a promising candidate for registration with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use as an anesthetic in fish culture, management, and research. A method for the removal of benzocaine from hatchery effluents could speed registration of this drug by eliminating requirements for data on its residues, tolerances, detoxification, and environmental hazards. Carbon filtration effectively removes many organic compounds from water. This study tested the effectiveness of three types of activated carbon for removing benzocaine from water by column filtration under controlled laboratory conditions. An adsorptive capacity was calculated for each type of activated carbon. Filtrasorb 400 (12 x 40 mesh; U.S. standard sieve series) showed the greatest capacity for benzocaine adsorption (76.12 mg benzocaine/g carbon); Filtrasorb 300 (8 x 30 mesh) ranked next (31.93 mg/g); and Filtrasorb 816 (8 x 16 mesh) absorbed the least (1.0 mg/g). Increased adsorptive capacity was associated with smaller carbon particle size; however, smaller particle size also impeded column flow. Carbon filtration is a practical means for removing benzocaine from treated water.

  1. Preparation and characterization of activated carbon from castor de-oiled cake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviana M. Ospina-Guarín

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomass residues have been used to produce activated carbons. On this process, the activation method and the raw composition determine the properties as porosity and surface area of the charcoal. After the extraction of castor oil, there is a solid byproduct (cake of low added value, which was used in the production of activated carbon to add value to this waste. For this purpose two traditional methods were used, first, physical activation using as activating agents steam, CO2 and mixture of both, and additionally chemical activation using K2CO3 as the activating agent. Some activated carbons were characterized using N2 adsorption isotherms, BET surface areas varied between 255.98 (m2/g and 1218.43 (m2/g. By SEM and EDS analysis was possible to observe that materials obtained by the two types of activation are principally amorphous and morphological characteristics of the carbon obtained by physical activation are very different from those obtained by chemical activation. Finally, through impregnation of inorganic phases of Ni and Mo was revealed that the high dispersion characteristics, these carbonaceous materials will have potential to be used as catalyst support.

  2. Nucleophilic β-Carbon Activation of Propionic Acid as a 3-Carbon Synthon by Carbene Organocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Zhichao; Jiang, Ke; Fu, Zhenqian; Torres, Jaume; Zheng, Pengcheng; Yang, Song; Song, Bao-An; Chi, Yonggui Robin

    2015-06-22

    Direct β-carbon activation of propionic acid (C2H5CO2H) by carbene organocatalysis has been developed. This activation affords the smallest azolium homoenolate intermediate (without any substituent) as a 3-carbon nucleophile for enantioselective reactions. Propionic acid is an excellent raw material because it is cheap, stable, and safe. This approach provides a much better solution to azolium homoenolate synthesis than the previously established use of acrolein (enal without any substituent), which is expensive, unstable, and toxic. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Tc-99 Adsorption on Selected Activated Carbons - Batch Testing Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Cordova, Elsa A.; Smith, Ronald M.

    2010-12-01

    CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is currently developing a 200-West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system as the remedial action selected under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Record of Decision for Operable Unit (OU) 200-ZP-1. This report documents the results of treatability tests Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers conducted to quantify the ability of selected activated carbon products (or carbons) to adsorb technetium-99 (Tc-99) from 200-West Area groundwater. The Tc-99 adsorption performance of seven activated carbons (J177601 Calgon Fitrasorb 400, J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, J177612 Norit GAC830, J177613 Norit GAC830, and J177617 Nucon LW1230) were evaluated using water from well 299-W19-36. Four of the best performing carbons (J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, and J177613 Norit GAC830) were selected for batch isotherm testing. The batch isotherm tests on four of the selected carbons indicated that under lower nitrate concentration conditions (382 mg/L), Kd values ranged from 6,000 to 20,000 mL/g. In comparison. Under higher nitrate (750 mg/L) conditions, there was a measureable decrease in Tc-99 adsorption with Kd values ranging from 3,000 to 7,000 mL/g. The adsorption data fit both the Langmuir and the Freundlich equations. Supplemental tests were conducted using the two carbons that demonstrated the highest adsorption capacity to resolve the issue of the best fit isotherm. These tests indicated that Langmuir isotherms provided the best fit for Tc-99 adsorption under low nitrate concentration conditions. At the design basis concentration of Tc 0.865 µg/L(14,700 pCi/L), the predicted Kd values from using Langmuir isotherm constants were 5,980 mL/g and 6,870 mL/g for for the two carbons. These Kd values did not meet the target Kd value of 9,000 mL/g. Tests

  4. Active carbon supported molybdenum carbides for higher alcohols synthesis from syngas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Qiongxiao; Chiarello, Gian Luca; Christensen, Jakob Munkholt

    This work provides an investigation of the high pressure CO hydrogenation to higher alcohols on K2CO3 promoted active carbon supported molybdenum carbide. Both activity and selectivity to alcohols over supported molybdenum carbides increased significantly compared to bulk carbides in literatures....... The optimal loadings of both molybdenum carbide and the K2CO3 promoter on active carbon have been investigated. The catalysts were characterized using BET surface area measurements, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Additionally, in-situ X-ray diffraction and in-situ X-ray absorption...

  5. ACTIVATED CARBONS FROM VEGETAL RAW MATERIALS TO SOLVE ENVIRONMENTAL PROBLEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Mukhin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Technologies for active carbons obtaining from vegetable byproducts such as straw, nut shells, fruit stones, sawdust, hydrolysis products of corn cobs and sunflower husks have been developed. The physico-chemical characteristics, structural parameters and sorption characteristics of obtained active carbons were determined. The ability of carbonaceous adsorbents for detoxification of soil against pesticides, purification of surface waters and for removal of organic pollutants from wastewaters has been evaluated. The obtained results reveal the effectiveness of their use in a number of environmental technologies.

  6. Adsorption of Remazol Black B dye on Activated Carbon Felt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donnaperna Lucio

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption of Remazol Black B (anionic dye on a microporous activated carbon felt is investigated from its aqueous solution. The surface chemistry of activated carbon is studied using X-ray microanalysis, "Boehm" titrations and pH of PZC measurements which indicates that the surface oxygenated groups are mainly acidic in nature. The kinetics of Remazol Black B adsorption is observed to be pH dependent and governed by the diffusion of the dye molecules. The experimental data can be explained by "intra-particle diffusion model". For Remazol Black B, the Khan model is best suited to simulate the adsorption isotherms.

  7. Water Pollutants Adsorption through an Enhanced Activated Carbon Derived from Agriculture Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Fazeli

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims of the Study: A high nitrate and arsenic concentration in water resources represent a potential risk to the environment and public health. The present work improved a chemo-physically modified activated carbon derived from walnut shells as an adsorbent to improve nitrate and arsenic removal ability from water. Materials & Methods: To increase removal efficiency, activated carbon surface characteristics were improved by acidification. Chemical activation was achieved when the carbon was mixed with water and 5% (v/v phosphoric acid. After adsorbent preparation, the contact time, pH and the initial concentration were studied as variables. Results:  The effective pH for adsorption onto activated carbon was 6.5. The results indicated that 70 s and 3 mins was the sufficient time to attain equilibrium for a maximum removal efficiency of 78.44% and 98% for nitrate and arsenic, respectively. The adsorption capacity of the adsorbent was 10.60 mg nitrate/g carbon and 120 μg arsenic/g carbon. Removal obeyed the Langmuir isotherm and pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Conclusion: The results showed a noticeable improvement in activated walnut-shell carbon absorbance (improvement in crystalline structure, chemical bonds, and morphology of micropores by chemo-physical activation. Chemo-physical activation increased the surface area of the adsorbent from 1067 to 1437 m2g‒1 and decreased the mean pore size from 3.28 to 2.08 nm. The characterization results showed the major reasons of adsorption could be structure, size and distributions of pores, high surface area and chemical bonds.

  8. Removal of perfluorinated surfactants by sorption onto granular activated carbon, zeolite and sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa-Herrera, Valeria; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes

    2008-08-01

    Perfluorinated surfactants are emerging pollutants of increasing public health and environmental concern due to recent reports of their world-wide distribution, environmental persistence and bioaccumulation potential. Treatment methods for the removal of anionic perfluorochemical (PFC) surfactants from industrial effluents are needed to minimize the environmental release of these pollutants. Removal of PFC surfactants from aqueous solutions by sorption onto various types of granular activated carbon was investigated. Three anionic PFC surfactants, i.e., perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorobutane sulfonate (PFBS), were evaluated for the ability to adsorb onto activated carbon. Additionally, the sorptive capacity of zeolites and sludge for PFOS was compared to that of granular activated carbon. Adsorption isotherms were determined at constant ionic strength in a pH 7.2 phosphate buffer at 30 degrees C. Sorption of PFOS onto activated carbon was stronger than PFOA and PFBS, suggesting that the length of the fluorocarbon chain and the nature of the functional group influenced sorption of the anionic surfactants. Among all adsorbents evaluated in this study, activated carbon (Freundlich K(F) values=36.7-60.9) showed the highest affinity for PFOS at low aqueous equilibrium concentrations, followed by the hydrophobic, high-silica zeolite NaY (Si/Al 80, K(F)=31.8), and anaerobic sludge (K(F)=0.95-1.85). Activated carbon also displayed a superior sorptive capacity at high soluble concentrations of the surfactant (up to 80 mg l(-1)). These findings indicate that activated carbon adsorption is a promising treatment technique for the removal of PFOS from dilute aqueous streams.

  9. Confinement of hydrogen at high pressure in carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassila, David H [Aptos, CA; Bonner, Brian P [Livermore, CA

    2011-12-13

    A high pressure hydrogen confinement apparatus according to one embodiment includes carbon nanotubes capped at one or both ends thereof with a hydrogen-permeable membrane to enable the high pressure confinement of hydrogen and release of the hydrogen therethrough. A hydrogen confinement apparatus according to another embodiment includes an array of multi-walled carbon nanotubes each having first and second ends, the second ends being capped with palladium (Pd) to enable the high pressure confinement of hydrogen and release of the hydrogen therethrough as a function of palladium temperature, wherein the array of carbon nanotubes is capable of storing hydrogen gas at a pressure of at least 1 GPa for greater than 24 hours. Additional apparatuses and methods are also presented.

  10. High pressure layered structure of carbon disulfide

    OpenAIRE

    Naghavi, S. Shahab; Crespo, Yanier; Martonak, Roman; Tosatti, Erio

    2015-01-01

    Solid CS$_{2}$ is superficially similar to CO$_{2}$, with the same $Cmca$ molecular crystal structure at low pressures, which has suggested similar phases also at high pressures. We carried out an extensive first principles evolutionary search in order to identify the zero temperature lowest enthalpy structures of CS$_{2}$ for increasing pressure up to 200\\,GPa. Surprisingly, the molecular $Cmca$ phase does not evolve into $\\beta$-cristobalite as in CO$_{2}$, but transforms instead into phase...

  11. Hepatoprotective activity of polyherbal formulation against carbon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The ethanolic extract of polyherbal formulation at 250 mg/kg b.w. exhibited a significant protective effect by lowering serum and liver activities of aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT), acid phosphatase (ACP), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), lactate dehydrogenase(LDH), serum bilirubin, serum cholesterol ...

  12. Adsorptive removal of sulfate from acid mine drainage by polypyrrole modified activated carbons: Effects of polypyrrole deposition protocols and activated carbon source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Siqi; Cannon, Fred S; Hou, Pin; Byrne, Tim; Nieto-Delgado, Cesar

    2017-10-01

    Polypyrrole modified activated carbon was used to remove sulfate from acid mine drainage water. The polypyrrole modified activated carbon created positively charged functionality that offered elevated sorption capacity for sulfate. The effects of the activated carbon type, approach of polymerization, preparation temperature, solvent, and concentration of oxidant solution over the sulfate adsorption capacity were studied at an array of initial sulfate concentrations. A hardwood based activated carbon was the more favorable activated carbon template, and this offered better sulfate removal than when using bituminous based activated carbon or oak wood activated carbon as the template. The hardwood-based activated carbon modified with polypyrrole removed 44.7 mg/g sulfate, and this was five times higher than for the pristine hardwood-based activated carbon. Various protocols for depositing the polypyrrole onto the activated carbon were investigated. When ferric chloride was used as an oxidant, the deposition protocol that achieved the most N + atomic percent (3.35%) while also maintaining the least oxygen atomic percent (6.22%) offered the most favorable sulfate removal. For the rapid small scale column tests, when processing the AMD water, hardwood-based activated carbon modified with poly pyrrole exhibited 33 bed volume compared to the 5 bed volume of pristine activated carbons. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. An efficient and economical treatment for batik textile wastewater containing high levels of silicate and organic pollutants using a sequential process of acidification, magnesium oxide, and palm shell-based activated carbon application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birgani, Payam Moradi; Ranjbar, Navid; Abdullah, Rosniah Che; Wong, Kien Tiek; Lee, Gooyong; Ibrahim, Shaliza; Park, Chulhwan; Yoon, Yeomin; Jang, Min

    2016-12-15

    Considering the chemical properties of batik effluents, an efficient and economical treatment process was established to treat batik wastewater containing not only high levels of Si and chemical oxygen demand (COD), but also toxic heavy metals. After mixing the effluents obtained from the boiling and soaking steps in the batik process, acidification using concentrated hydrochloric acid (conc. HCl) was conducted to polymerize the silicate under acidic conditions. Consequently, sludge was produced and floated. XRD and FT-IR analyses showed that wax molecules were coordinated by hydrogen bonding with silica (SiO2). The acidification process removed ∼78-95% of COD and ∼45-50% of Si, depending on the pH. In the next stage, magnesium oxide (MgO) was applied to remove heavy metals completely and almost 90% of the Si in the liquid phase. During this step, about 70% of COD was removed in the hydrogel that arose as a consequence of the crosslinking characteristics of the formed nano-composite, such as magnesium silicate or montmorillonite. The hydrogel was composed mainly of waxes with polymeric properties. Then, the remaining Si (∼300 mg/L) in the wastewater combined with the effluents from the rinsing steps was further treated using 50 mg/L MgO. As a final step, palm-shell activated carbon (PSAC) was used to remove the remaining COD to < 50 mg/L at pH 3. Overall, the sequential process of acidification and MgO/PSAC application developed could serve as an economical and effective treatment option for treating heavily polluted batik effluents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Preparation of a Ni-MgO-Al2O3 catalyst with high activity and resistance to potassium poisoning during direct internal reforming of methane in molten carbonate fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Won-Jun; Jung, You-Shick; Shim, Jae-Oh; Roh, Hyun-Seog; Yoon, Wang Lai

    2018-02-01

    Steam reforming of methane (SRM) is conducted using a series of Ni-MgO-Al2O3 catalysts for direct internal reforming (DIR) in molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFCs). Ni-MgO-Al2O3 catalysts are prepared by the homogeneous precipitation method with a variety of MgO loading amounts ranging from 3 to 15 wt%. In addition, each precursor concentrations are systemically changed (Ni: 1.2-4.8 mol L-1; Mg: 0.3-1.2 mol L-1; Al: 0.4-1.6 mol L-1) at the optimized composition (10 wt% MgO). The effects of MgO loading and precursor concentration on the catalytic performance and resistance against poisoning of the catalyst by potassium (K) are investigated. The Ni-MgO-Al2O3 catalyst with 10 wt% MgO and the original precursor concentration (Ni: 1.2 mol L-1; Mg: 0.3 mol L-1; Al: 0.4 mol L-1) exhibits the highest CH4 conversion and resistance against K poisoning even at the extremely high gas space velocity (GHSV) of 1,512,000 h-1. Excellent SRM performance of the Ni-MgO-Al2O3 catalyst is attributed to strong metal (Ni) to alumina support interaction (SMSI) when magnesium oxide (MgO) is co-precipitated with the Ni-Al2O3. The enhanced interaction of the Ni with MgO-Al2O3 support is found to protect the active Ni species against K poisoning.

  15. Synthesis of sulfonated porous carbon nanospheres solid acid by a facile chemical activation route

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Binbin, E-mail: changbinbin806@163.com; Guo, Yanzhen; Yin, Hang; Zhang, Shouren; Yang, Baocheng, E-mail: baochengyang@yahoo.com

    2015-01-15

    Generally, porous carbon nanospheres materials are usually prepared via a template method, which is a multi-steps and high-cost strategy. Here, we reported a porous carbon nanosphere solid acid with high surface area and superior porosity, as well as uniform nanospheical morphology, which prepared by a facile chemical activation with ZnCl{sub 2} using resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) resins spheres as precursor. The activation of RF resins spheres by ZnCl{sub 2} at 400 °C brought high surface area and large volume, and simultaneously retained numerous oxygen-containing and hydrogen-containing groups due to the relatively low processing temperature. The presence of these functional groups is favorable for the modification of –SO{sub 3}H groups by a followed sulfonation treating with sulphuric acid and organic sulfonic acid. The results of N{sub 2} adsorption–desorption and electron microscopy clearly showed the preservation of porous structure and nanospherical morphology. Infrared spectra certified the variation of surface functional groups after activation and the successful modification of –SO{sub 3}H groups after sulfonation. The acidities of catalysts were estimated by an indirect titration method and the modified amount of –SO{sub 3}H groups were examined by energy dispersive spectra. The results suggested sulfonated porous carbon nanospheres catalysts possessed high acidities and –SO{sub 3}H densities, which endowed their significantly catalytic activities for biodiesel production. Furthermore, their excellent stability and recycling property were also demonstrated by five consecutive cycles. - Graphical abstract: Sulfonated porous carbon nanospheres with high surface area and superior catalytic performance were prepared by a facile chemical activation route. - Highlights: • Porous carbon spheres solid acid prepared by a facile chemical activation. • It owns high surface area, superior porosity and uniform spherical morphology. • It possesses

  16. Amorphous carbon nanofibres inducing high specific capacitance of deposited hydrous ruthenium oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barranco, V. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Sor Juan Ines de la Cruz 3, Cantoblanco, E-28049-Madrid (Spain); Pico, F.; Ibanez, J. [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalurgicas, CSIC, Avda. Gregorio del Amo 8, E-28040-Madrid (Spain); Lillo-Rodenas, M.A.; Linares-Solano, A. [MCMA, Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Universidad de Alicante, P.O. Box 99, E-03080-Alicante (Spain); Kimura, M. [Gun Ei Chemical Ind. Co., Ltd., Takasaki, Gunma 370 (Japan); Oya, A. [Faculty of Engineering, Gunma University, Gunma 376 (Japan); Rojas, R.M.; Amarilla, J.M. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Sor Juan Ines de la Cruz 3, Cantoblanco, E-28049-Madrid (Spain); Rojo, J.M., E-mail: jmrojo@icmm.csic.e [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Sor Juan Ines de la Cruz 3, Cantoblanco, E-28049-Madrid (Spain)

    2009-12-01

    Composites consisting of ruthenium oxide particles deposited on amorphous carbon nanofibres are prepared by a repetitive impregnation procedure. The choice of amorphous carbon nanofibres as support of amorphous ruthenium oxide leads to composites in which the deposited oxide consists of aggregates of extremely small primary particles (1-1.5 nm-size) and showing high porosity (specific surface area of 450 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}). This special deposition of the oxide seems to favour: (i) high oxide capacitance (1000 Fg{sup -1}) at high oxide loadings (up to 20 wt%) and (ii) high capacitance retention (ca. 80% from the initial oxide capacitance) at high current densities (200 mA cm{sup -2}). Amorphous carbon nanofibres are suitable supports for amorphous ruthenium oxide and perhaps for other amorphous oxides acting as active electrode materials.

  17. Carbon Textile Decorated with Pseudocapacitive VC/VxOyfor High-Performance Flexible Supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Lam, Do; Shim, Hyung Cheoul; Kim, Jae-Hyun; Lee, Hak-Joo; Lee, Seung-Mo

    2017-11-01

    It is demonstrated that, via V 2 O 5 coating by low temperature atomic layer deposition and subsequent pyrolysis, ubiquitous cotton textile can readily turn into high-surface-area carbon textile fully decorated with pseudocapacitive V x O y /VC widely usable as electrodes of high-performance supercapacitor. It is found that carbothermic reduction of V 2 O 5 (C + V 2 O 5 → C' + VC + CO/CO 2 (g)) leads to chemical/mechanical activation of carbon textile, thereby producing high-surface-area conductive carbon textile. In addition, sequential phase transformation and carbide formation (V 2 O 5 → V x O y → VC) occurred by carbothermic reduction trigger decoration of the carbon textile with redox-active V x O y /VC. Thanks to the synergistic effect of electrical double layer and pseudocapacitance, the supercapacitors made of the hybrid carbon textile exhibit far better energy density (over 30-fold increase) with excellent cycling stability than the carbon textile simply undergone pyrolysis. The method can open up a promising and facile way to synthesize hybrid electrode materials for electrochemical energy storages possessing advantages of both electrical double layer and pseudocapacitive material. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Activity of catalase adsorbed to carbon nanotubes: effects of carbon nanotube surface properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chengdong; Luo, Shuiming; Chen, Wei

    2013-09-15

    Nanomaterials have been studied widely as the supporting materials for enzyme immobilization. However, the interactions between enzymes and carbon nanotubes (CNT) with different morphologies and surface functionalities may vary, hence influencing activities of the immobilized enzyme. To date how the adsorption mechanisms affect the activities of immobilized enzyme is not well understood. In this study the adsorption of catalase (CAT) on pristine single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT), oxidized single-walled carbon nanotubes (O-SWNT), and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) was investigated. The adsorbed enzyme activities decreased in the order of O-SWNT>SWNT>MWNT. Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and circular dichrois (CD) analyses reveal more significant loss of α-helix and β-sheet of MWNT-adsorbed than SWNT-adsorbed CAT. The difference in enzyme activities between MWNT-adsorbed and SWNT-adsorbed CAT indicates that the curvature of surface plays an important role in the activity of immobilized enzyme. Interestingly, an increase of β-sheet content was observed for CAT adsorbed to O-SWNT. This is likely because as opposed to SWNT and MWNT, O-SWNT binds CAT largely via hydrogen bonding and such interaction allows the CAT molecule to maintain the rigidity of enzyme structure and thus the biological function. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Pore structure of the activated coconut shell charcoal carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budi, E.; Nasbey, H.; Yuniarti, B. D. P.; Nurmayatri, Y.; Fahdiana, J.; Budi, A. S.

    2014-09-01

    The development of activated carbon from coconut shell charcoal has been investigated by using physical method to determine the influence of activation parameters in term of temperature, argon gas pressure and time period on the pore structure of the activated carbon. The coconut shell charcoal was produced by pyrolisis process at temperature of about 75 - 150 °C for 6 hours. The charcoal was activated at various temperature (532, 700 and 868 °C), argon gas pressure (6.59, 15 and 23.4 kgf/cm2) and time period of (10, 60 and 120 minutes). The results showed that the pores size were reduced and distributed uniformly as the activation parameters are increased.

  20. Effects of organic carbon sequestration strategies on soil enzymatic activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puglisi, E.; Suciu, N.; Botteri, L.; Ferrari, T.; Coppolecchia, D.; Trevisan, M.; Piccolo, A.

    2009-04-01

    Greenhouse gases emissions can be counterbalanced with proper agronomical strategies aimed at sequestering carbon in soils. These strategies must be tested not only for their ability in reducing carbon dioxide emissions, but also for their impact on soil quality: enzymatic activities are related to main soil ecological quality, and can be used as early and sensitive indicators of alteration events. Three different strategies for soil carbon sequestration were studied: minimum tillage, protection of biodegradable organic fraction by compost amendment and oxidative polimerization of soil organic matter catalyzed by biometic porfirins. All strategies were compared with a traditional agricultural management based on tillage and mineral fertilization. Experiments were carried out in three Italian soils from different pedo-climatic regions located respectively in Piacenza, Turin and Naples and cultivated with maize or wheat. Soil samples were taken for three consecutive years after harvest and analyzed for their content in phosphates, ß-glucosidase, urease and invertase. An alteration index based on these enzymatic activities levels was applied as well. The biomimetic porfirin application didn't cause changes in enzymatic activities compared to the control at any treatment or location. Enzymatic activities were generally higher in the minimum tillage and compost treatment, while differences between location and date of samplings were limited. Application of the soil alteration index based on enzymatic activities showed that soils treated with compost or subjected to minimum tillage generally have a higher biological quality. The work confirms the environmental sustainability of the carbon sequestering agronomical practices studied.

  1. One-pot protection and activation of amino acids using pentafluorophenyl carbonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramapanicker, Ramesh; Baig, Nasir Baig Rashid; De, Kavita; Chandrasekaran, Srinivasan

    2009-12-01

    Protection of the amino group and activation of the carboxylic acid groups are the most important steps associated with any peptide synthesis protocol; hence, a one-pot process to achieve these is highly desirable. A possible strategy is to use pentafluorophenyl carbonates to simultaneously protect the amino group as a carbamate derivative and activate the carboxylic acid group as a pentafluorophenyl ester. A detailed study is carried out to understand the scope and limitations of this method using five different pentaflurophenyl carbonates. The efficiency of these one-pot reactions depends largely on the nature of the pentafluorophenyl carbonates and also on the nature of the amino acids. Electron deficient and sterically less demanding carbonates reacted faster than the others, whereas amino acids with longer aliphatic side chains gave better yields than more polar amino acids. (c) 2009 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Calcium carbonate as a possible dosimeter for high irradiation doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Negron M, A.; Ramos B, S.; Camargo R, C. [UNAM, Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Uribe, R. M. [Kent State University, College of Technology, Kent OH (United States); Gomez V, V. [UNAM, Instituto de Quimica, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Kobayashi, K., E-mail: negron@nucleares.unam.mx [Yokohama National University (Japan)

    2014-08-15

    The aim of this work is to analyze the interactions of 5 MeV electron beam radiation and a 290 MeV/u Carbon beam with calcium carbonate (powder) at 298 K and at different irradiation doses, for the potential use of calcium carbonate as a high-dose dosimeter. The irradiation doses with the electron beam were from 0.015 to 9 MGy, and with Carbon beam from 1.5 kGy to 8 kGy. High-energy radiation induces the formation of free radicals in solid calcium carbonate that can be detected and measured by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). An increase of the EPR response for some of the free radicals produced in the sample was observed as a function of the irradiation dose. The response of one of the radicals decreased with the dose. These measurements are reproducible; the preparation of the sample is simple and inexpensive; and the signal is stable for several months. The response curves show that the dosimeter tends to saturate at 10 MGy. Based on these properties, we propose this chemical compound as a high-dose dosimeter, mainly for electron irradiation. (author)

  3. Characteristics of activated carbon and carbon nanotubes as adsorbents to remove annatto (norbixin) in cheese whey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue; Pan, Kang; Zhong, Qixin

    2013-09-25

    Removing annatto from cheese whey without bleaching has potential to improve whey protein quality. In this work, the potential of two activated carbon products and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNT) was studied for extracting annatto (norbixin) in aqueous solutions. Batch adsorption experiments were studied for the effects of solution pH, adsorbent mass, contact duration, and ionic strength. The equilibrium adsorption data were observed to fit both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. The thermodynamic parameters estimated from adsorption isotherms demonstrated that the adsorption of norbixin on three adsorbents is exothermic, and the entropic contribution differs with adsorbent structure. The adsorption kinetics, with CNT showing a higher rate than activated carbon, followed the pseudo first order and second order rate expressions and demonstrated the significance of intraparticle diffusion. Electrostatic interactions were observed to be significant in the adsorption. The established adsorption parameters may be used in the dairy industry to decolorize cheese whey without applying bleaching agents.

  4. MoS2/MoOx-Nanostructure-Decorated Activated Carbon Cloth for Enhanced Supercapacitor Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Fitri Nur Indah; Ting, Jyh-Ming

    2018-01-04

    MoS 2 /MoO x nanostructures were grown on activated carbon cloth through a facile one-step microwave-assisted hydrothermal method. The growth of MoS 2 /MoO x on activated carbon cloth creates a unique structure that favors ion intercalation. The conductive activated carbon cloth, MoO 3-x , and monoclinic MoO 2 provide fast electron transport, whereas the MoS 2 nanosheets/MoO 3-x nanoparticles structure improves the capacitance. As a result, MoS 2 /MoO x -nanostructure-decorated activated carbon cloth shows a high specific capacitance of 230 F g -1 at a scan rate of 5 mV s -1 with a low contact resistance of approximately 1.91 Ω. Moreover, the activated carbon cloth acts as a template for the growth of a perpendicular MoS 2 layer, which gives an excellent utilization rate of the active MoS 2 /MoO x material. We also demonstrate that the MoS 2 /MoO x /activated carbon cloth nanocomposite shows excellent electrochemical stability with retention up to 128 % after 1500 cycles. Finally, we show the use of a microwave-assisted hydrothermal method for the synthesis of the MoS 2 /MoO x /activated carbon cloth nanocomposite as an alternative and clean route to improve the kinetics of the intercalation redox reaction. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Visible-Light-Activated Bactericidal Functions of Carbon "Quantum" Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meziani, Mohammed J; Dong, Xiuli; Zhu, Lu; Jones, Les P; LeCroy, Gregory E; Yang, Fan; Wang, Shengyuan; Wang, Ping; Zhao, Yiping; Yang, Liju; Tripp, Ralph A; Sun, Ya-Ping

    2016-05-04

    Carbon dots, generally defined as small carbon nanoparticles with various surface passivation schemes, have emerged as a new class of quantum-dot-like nanomaterials, with their optical properties and photocatalytic functions resembling those typically found in conventional nanoscale semiconductors. In this work, carbon dots were evaluated for their photoinduced bactericidal functions, with the results suggesting that the dots were highly effective in bacteria-killing with visible-light illumination. In fact, the inhibition effect could be observed even simply under ambient room lighting conditions. Mechanistic implications of the results are discussed and so are opportunities in the further development of carbon dots into a new class of effective visible/natural light-responsible bactericidal agents for a variety of bacteria control applications.

  6. 40 CFR 60.1820 - How do I monitor the injection rate of activated carbon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... activated carbon? 60.1820 Section 60.1820 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... activated carbon? If your municipal waste combustion unit uses activated carbon to control dioxins/furans or mercury emissions, you must meet three requirements: (a) Select a carbon injection system operating...

  7. Heavily Graphitic-Nitrogen Self-doped High-porosity Carbon for the Electrocatalysis of Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Tong; Liao, Wenli; Li, Zhongbin; Sun, Lingtao; Shi, Dongping; Guo, Chaozhong; Huang, Yu; Wang, Yi; Cheng, Jing; Li, Yanrong; Diao, Qizhi

    2017-11-01

    Large-scale production of active and stable porous carbon catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) from protein-rich biomass became a hot topic in fuel cell technology. Here, we report a facile strategy for synthesis of nitrogen-doped porous nanocarbons by means of a simple two-step pyrolysis process combined with the activation of zinc chloride and acid-treatment process, in which kidney bean via low-temperature carbonization was preferentially adopted as the only carbon-nitrogen sources. The results show that this carbon material exhibits excellent ORR electrocatalytic activity, and higher durability and methanol-tolerant property compared to the state-of-the-art Pt/C catalyst for the ORR, which can be mainly attributed to high graphitic-nitrogen content, high specific surface area, and porous characteristics. Our results can encourage the synthesis of high-performance carbon-based ORR electrocatalysts derived from widely-existed natural biomass.

  8. Activated carbon for the removal of pharmaceutical residues from treated wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ek, Mats; Baresel, Christian; Magnér, Jörgen; Bergström, Rune; Harding, Mila

    2014-01-01

    Pharmaceutical residues, which pass naturally through the human body into sewage, are in many cases virtually unaffected by conventional wastewater treatment. Accumulated in the environment, however, they can significantly impact aquatic life. The present study indicates that many pharmaceutical residues found in wastewater can be removed with activated carbon in a cost-efficient system that delivers higher resource utilisation and security than other carbon systems. The experiment revealed a substantial separation of the analysed compounds, notwithstanding their relatively high solubility in water and dissimilar chemical structures. This implies that beds of activated carbon may be a competitive alternative to treatment with ozone. The effluent water used for the tests, performed over 20 months, originated from Stockholm's largest sewage treatment plant. Passing through a number of different filters with activated carbon removed 90-98% of the pharmaceutical residues from the water. This paper describes pilot-scale tests performed by IVL and the implications for an actual treatment plant that has to treat up to several thousand litres of wastewater per second. In addition, the advantages, disadvantages and costs of the method are discussed. This includes, for example, the clogging of carbon filters and the associated hydraulic capacity limits of the activated carbon.

  9. Engineering of High-Toughness Carbon Nanotubes Hierarchically Laminated Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-27

    the design and manufacturing of high-toughness materials quite challenging. Review of the current achievements and failures in this field give strongest...reaching high values of strain, Young’s modulus, and ultimate strength, simultaneously, which makes the design and manufacturing of high-toughness...Sapelkin, A.V.; Shim, B. S.; Khomutov, G. B.; Kotov, N. A.; Sukhorukov, G. B.; Moehwald, H.; Skirtach, A. G. Carbon Nanotubes on Polymeric Microcapsules

  10. Method for creating high carbon content products from biomass oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Reginald; Seames, Wayne

    2012-12-18

    In a method for producing high carbon content products from biomass, a biomass oil is added to a cracking reactor vessel. The biomass oil is heated to a temperature ranging from about 100.degree. C. to about 800.degree. C. at a pressure ranging from about vacuum conditions to about 20,700 kPa for a time sufficient to crack the biomass oil. Tar is separated from the cracked biomass oil. The tar is heated to a temperature ranging from about 200.degree. C. to about 1500.degree. C. at a pressure ranging from about vacuum conditions to about 20,700 kPa for a time sufficient to reduce the tar to a high carbon content product containing at least about 50% carbon by weight.

  11. Hierarchically porous carbon with high-speed ion transport channels for high performance supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Haoyuan; Li, Qingwei; Guo, Jianhui; Song, Aixin; Gong, Chunhong; Zhang, Jiwei; Zhang, Jingwei

    2018-01-01

    Hierarchically porous carbons (HPC) are considered as promising electrode materials for supercapacitors, due to their outstanding charge/discharge cycling stabilities and high power densities. However, HPC possess a relatively low ion diffusion rate inside the materials, which challenges their application for high performance supercapacitor. Thus tunnel-shaped carbon pores with a size of tens of nanometers were constructed by inducing the self-assembly of lithocholic acid with ammonium chloride, thereby providing high-speed channels for internal ion diffusion. The as-formed one-dimensional pores are beneficial to the activation process by KOH, providing a large specific surface area, and then facilitate rapid transport of electrolyte ions from macropores to the microporous surfaces. Therefore, the HPC achieve an outstanding gravimetric capacitance of 284 F g-1 at a current density of 0.1 A g-1 and a remarkable capacity retention of 64.8% when the current density increases by 1000 times to 100 A g-1.

  12. Tertiary activated carbon treatment of paper and board industry wastewater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Temmink, B.G.; Grolle, K.C.F.

    2005-01-01

    The feasibility of activated carbon post-treatment of (biologically treated) wastewater from the paper and board industry was investigated, the goal being to remove refractory organic pollutants and produce water that can be re-used in the production process. Because closing water-circuits in the

  13. Biomodification of palm shell activated carbon using Aspergillus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adsorption of lead ions from aqueous solutions using commercial untreated granular palm shell activated carbon (PSAC) and PSAC biomodified with Bacillus subtilis and Aspergillus niger biomass, respectively, was studied. The adsorption capacity of the three biosorbents was evaluated in batch adsorption experiments at ...

  14. Preparation and characterization of activated carbons from albizia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Activated carbon was prepared from the pods of Albizia saman for the purpose of converting the waste to wealth. The pods were thoroughly washed with water to remove any dirt, air- dried and cut into sizes of 2-4 cm. The prepared pods were then carbonised in a muffle furnace at temperatures of 4000C, 5000C, 6000C ...

  15. Treatability of South African surface waters by activated carbon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Natural organic matter (NOM) in water resources for drinking purposes can be removed by different methods, including activated carbon adsorption. Due to the variability of NOM in natural waters, both in terms of its nature and its concentration, a study was undertaken to investigate NOM removal for a wide range of South ...

  16. Evaluation of the activated carbon prepared from the algae ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The batch removal of copper (II) ions from aqueous solution and wastewater using the activated carbon prepared from Gracilaria by acid decomposition was investigated. The effect of pH, biosorption time, adsorbent dose, and metal ions concentration, were considered. The most effective pH was found to be 4.0.

  17. Lead removal in aqueous solution by activated carbons prepared ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three activated carbons prepared from vegetable matters of Gabonese biomass are being investigated as adsorbents for the removal of Pb (II) ions from aqueous solutions by means of batch technique. The equilibrium adsorption level was determined to be a function of pH, contact time, temperature and adsorbent dosage.

  18. Ecotoxicological effects of activated carbon addition to sediments.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker, M.T.O.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/175518793; Suijkerbuijk, M.P.; Schmitt, H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304831042; Sinnige, T.L.

    2009-01-01

    Activated carbon (AC) addition is a recently developed technique for the remediation of sediments and soils contaminated with hydrophobic organic chemicals. Laboratory and field experiments have demonstrated that the addition of 3-4% of AC can reduce aqueous concentrations and the bioaccumulation

  19. Activated Carbon Prepared in a Novel Gas Fired Static Bed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Activated Carbon Prepared in a Novel Gas Fired Static Bed Pyrolysis-Gasification Reactor for Gold Di-Cyanide Adsorption. ... The PDF file you selected should load here if your Web browser has a PDF reader plug-in installed (for example, a recent version of Adobe Acrobat Reader). If you would like more information about ...

  20. Sorption of lead from aqueous solution by modified activated carbon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study aims to develop a simple and rapid procedure for lead (II) removal. Laboratory-scale adsorption experiments were conducted aiming to remove lead from water samples. They were based on using powdered activated carbon (PACI), which was prepared from olive stones generated, as plant wastes, and ...

  1. Application of activated carbon from empty fruit bunch (EFB) for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mercury is a heavy metal and is used widely in the industry, making it a global problem. It accounts for approximately 70% of man-made emissions. Activated carbon was found to be efficient for the adsorption of Hg(ll) in aqueous solution. The characterization of Hg(ll) uptake showed that the mercury binding is dependent ...

  2. Evaluation of single-step steam pyrolysis-activated carbons

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mgina

    Yongabi et al. 2011). The use of a natural coagulant from seeds of the Moringa oleifera tree to replace conventional coagulants such as aluminium salts in both domestic and large scale water treatment and the use of activated carbon as adsorbent in.

  3. Column removal of methylene blue using activated carbon derived ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated column and batch sorption of methylene blue from solution using activated carbon produced from water spinach. The equilibrium data of the batch sorption process was analyzed using Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models and the monolayer sorption capacity (441 mg/g) obtained from the ...

  4. Adsorptive Removal of Malachite Green with Activated Carbon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The adsorption process is controlled by both the boundary layer and intraparticle diffusion mechanisms. The thermodynamic study showed that the process is endothermic, spontaneous and feasible. Cost analysis revealed that OPFAC is 20 times cheaper than commercially available activated carbon. KEYWORDS Oil palm ...

  5. Acoustical Evaluation of Carbonized and Activated Cotton Nonwovens

    Science.gov (United States)

    An activated carbon fiber nonwoven (ACF) was manufactured from cotton nonowoven fabric. For the ACF acoustical application, a nonwoven composite of ACF with cotton nonwoven as a base layer was developed. Also produced were the composites of the cotton nonwoven base layer with a layer of glass fiber ...

  6. Practical experiences with granular activated carbon (GAC) at the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Practical experiences with granular activated carbon (GAC) at the Rietvlei Water Treatment Plant. ... Frequently moving the entire GAC inventory from the filters to an off-site regeneration plant and back requires significant operational effort and contributes a major part of the total cost of the GAC system. A number of ...

  7. Adsorption-induced Pore Expansion and Contraction in Activated Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Matthew; Wexler, Carlos

    2012-02-01

    Adsorbent materials such as activated carbon and Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs) have received significant attention as a potential storage material for hydrogen and natural gas.1 Typically the adsorbent material is assumed to consist of rigid slit- or cylindrical-shaped pores. Recent work has revealed the importance of the mechanical response of the adsorbent in the presence of an adsorbate. Here, we first demonstrate the flexibility of pore walls in activated carbon and the effect this has on the pore structure of the bulk samples. The interaction is modeled as a competition between Van der Waals interactions between neighboring walls and a resistance to bending due to the rigidity of graphene. Minimal energy configurations were calculated analytically for a simplified potential and numerically for a more realistic potential. The pore structures are discussed in the context of pore measurements on activated carbon samples. Following recent work by Cole and Neimark, large pressures due to an adsorbed film are predicted in the narrow pores of activated carbon. The coverage-dependent nature of adsorbed-film pressure, indicating a pressure-variant pore structure, is discussed in terms of adsorption isotherms.

  8. Preparation of activated carbon from a renewable agricultural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-05-10

    May 10, 2010 ... India, Korea, Japan and Thailand where the leaves are used as food for silkworms (Wang ... mulberry shoot is a normal work in mulberry field industry annually; C: Parasitic insect and ..... Figure 7. Scanning electronic micrograph for the pruning mulberry shoot-based activated carbon (A: magnification: 100× ...

  9. Adsorption characteristics of acetone, chloroform and acetonitrile on sludge-derived adsorbent, commercial granular activated carbon and activated carbon fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jiun-Horng; Chiang, Hsiu-Mei; Huang, Guan-Yinag; Chiang, Hung-Lung

    2008-06-15

    The adsorption characteristics of chloroform, acetone, and acetonitrile on commercial activated carbon (C1), two types of activated carbon fibers (F1 and F2), and sludge adsorbent (S1) was investigated. The chloroform influent concentration ranged from 90 to 7800 ppm and the acetone concentration from 80 to 6900 ppm; the sequence of the adsorption capacity of chloroform and acetone on adsorbents was F2>F1 approximately C1 approximately S1. The adsorption capacity of acetonitrile ranged from 4 to 100 mg/g, corresponding to the influent range from 43 to 2700 ppm for C1, S1, and F1. The acetonitrile adsorption capacity of F2 was approximately 20% higher than that of the other adsorbents at temperaturescarbon fibers is higher than that of the other adsorbents due to their smaller fiber diameter and higher surface area. The micropore diffusion coefficient of VOC on activated carbon and sludge adsorbent was approximately 10(-4) cm2 s(-1). The diffusion coefficient of VOC on carbon fibers ranged from 10(-8) to 10(-7) cm2 s(-1). The small carbon fiber pore size corresponds to a smaller diffusion coefficient.

  10. Physicochemical effect of activation temperature on the sorption properties of pine shell activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasim, Agha Arslan; Khan, Muhammad Nasiruddin

    2017-03-01

    Activated carbons produced from a variety of raw materials are normally selective towards a narrow range of pollutants present in wastewater. This study focuses on shifting the selectivity of activated carbon from inorganic to organic pollutants using activation temperature as a variable. The material produced from carbonization of pine shells substrate was activated at 250°C and 850°C. Both adsorbents were compared with commercial activated carbon for the sorption of lead, cadmium, methylene blue, methyl blue, xylenol orange, and crystal violet. It was observed that carbon activated at 250°C was selective for lead and cadmium whereas the one activated at 850°C was selective for the organic dyes. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy study revealed that AC850 had less surface functional groups as compared to AC250. Point of zero charge and point of zero salt effect showed that AC250 had acidic groups at its surface. Scanning electron microscopy depicted that increase in activation temperature resulted in an increase in pore size of activated carbon. Both AC250 and AC850 followed pseudo-second-order kinetics. Temkin isotherm model was a best fit for empirical data obtained at equilibrium. The model also showed that sorption process for both AC250 and AC850 was physisorption.

  11. Estimates of increased black carbon emissions from electrostatic precipitators during powdered activated carbon injection for mercury emissions control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clack, Herek L

    2012-07-03

    The behavior of mercury sorbents within electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) is not well-understood, despite a decade or more of full-scale testing. Recent laboratory results suggest that powdered activated carbon exhibits somewhat different collection behavior than fly ash in an ESP and particulate filters located at the outlet of ESPs have shown evidence of powdered activated carbon penetration during full-scale tests of sorbent injection for mercury emissions control. The present analysis considers a range of assumed differential ESP collection efficiencies for powdered activated carbon as compared to fly ash. Estimated emission rates of submicrometer powdered activated carbon are compared to estimated emission rates of particulate carbon on submicrometer fly ash, each corresponding to its respective collection efficiency. To the extent that any emitted powdered activated carbon exhibits size and optical characteristics similar to black carbon, such emissions could effectively constitute an increase in black carbon emissions from coal-based stationary power generation. The results reveal that even for the low injection rates associated with chemically impregnated carbons, submicrometer particulate carbon emissions can easily double if the submicrometer fraction of the native fly ash has a low carbon content. Increasing sorbent injection rates, larger collection efficiency differentials as compared to fly ash, and decreasing sorbent particle size all lead to increases in the estimated submicrometer particulate carbon emissions.

  12. Carbon-Based Microbial-Fuel-Cell Electrodes: From Conductive Supports to Active Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuang; Cheng, Chong; Thomas, Arne

    2017-02-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have attracted considerable interest due to their potential in renewable electrical power generation using the broad diversity of biomass and organic substrates. However, the difficulties in achieving high power densities and commercially affordable electrode materials have limited their industrial applications to date. Carbon materials, which can exhibit a wide range of different morphologies and structures, usually possess physiological activity to interact with microorganisms and are therefore fast-emerging electrode materials. As the anode, carbon materials can significantly promote interfacial microbial colonization and accelerate the formation of extracellular biofilms, which eventually promotes the electrical power density by providing a conductive microenvironment for extracellular electron transfer. As the cathode, carbon-based materials can function as catalysts for the oxygen-reduction reaction, showing satisfying activities and efficiencies nowadays even reaching the performance of Pt catalysts. Here, first, recent advancements on the design of carbon materials for anodes in MFCs are summarized, and the influence of structure and surface functionalization of different types of carbon materials on microorganism immobilization and electrochemical performance is elucidated. Then, synthetic strategies and structures of typical carbon-based cathodes in MFCs are briefly presented. Furthermore, future applications of carbon-electrode-based MFC devices in the energy, environmental, and biological fields are discussed, and the emerging challenges in transferring them from laboratory to industrial scale are described. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Reversible Storage of Hydrogen and Natural Gas in Nanospace-Engineered Activated Carbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanos, Jimmy; Beckner, Matt; Rash, Tyler; Yu, Ping; Suppes, Galen; Pfeifer, Peter

    2012-02-01

    An overview is given of the development of advanced nanoporous carbons as storage materials for natural gas (methane) and molecular hydrogen in on-board fuel tanks for next-generation clean automobiles. High specific surface areas, porosities, and sub-nm/supra-nm pore volumes are quantitatively selected by controlling the degree of carbon consumption and metallic potassium intercalation into the carbon lattice during the activation process. Tunable bimodal pore-size distributions of sub-nm and supra-nm pores are established by subcritical nitrogen adsorption. Optimal pore structures for gravimetric and volumetric gas storage, respectively, are presented. Methane and hydrogen adsorption isotherms up to 250 bar on monolithic and powdered activated carbons are reported and validated, using several gravimetric and volumetric instruments. Current best gravimetric and volumetric storage capacities are: 256 g CH4/kg carbon and 132 g CH4/liter carbon at 293 K and 35 bar; 26, 44, and 107 g H2/kg carbon at 303, 194, and 77 K respectively and 100 bar. Adsorbed film density, specific surface area, and binding energy are analyzed separately using the Clausius-Clapeyron equation, Langmuir model, and lattice gas models.

  14. Ultra High Energy Density Cathodes with Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-10

    mL of ethanol by heating to 50 °C, and evaporating to dryness. The resulting powder is then ground in an agate mortar and pestle for 30 min. In...Batteries," The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, vol. 114, pp. 15862-15867, 2010/09/23 2010. [3] J. Alvarenga, et al., "High conductivity carbon nanotube

  15. Removal of surfactants from water by adsorption on activated carbon and advanced oxidation process; Eliminacion de surfactantes de las aguas mediante adsorcion sobre carbon activado y oxidacion avanzada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendez Diaz, J. D.; Sanchez Polo, M.; Rivera Utrilla, J.; Bautista, M. I.

    2007-07-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the elimination process of surfactants from water, using sodium dode-cilbencenesulfonate (SDBS) as model compound, by means of adsorption on activated carbons as well as different processes of advanced oxidation (O{sub 3}, O{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and O{sub 3}/activated carbon). Results obtained have shown that the activated carbons used have a high efficiency to eliminate SDBS from waters which was enhanced when the adsorption process was carried out in the presence of bacteria. With regard to the oxidation processes studied, the results have indicated that the efficiency in the elimination of SDBS from water of the system based on the simultaneous use of O{sub 3} and powder activated carbon (PAC) is much higher than those of the other systems studied (O{sub 3},O{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}). (Author) 15 refs.

  16. Carbon nanofibers grown on activated carbon fiber fabrics as electrode of supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Tse-Hao; Hung, Kai-Hsuan; Tzeng, Shinn-Shyong; Shen, Jin-Wei; Hung, Cheng-Hsin

    2007-12-01

    Carbon nanofibers (CNFs) were grown directly on activated carbon fiber fabric (ACFF), which was then used as the electrode of supercapacitors. Cyclic voltammetry and ac impedance were used to characterize the electrochemical properties of ACFF and CNF/ACFF electrodes in both aqueous and organic electrolytes. ACFF electrodes show higher specific capacitance than CNF/ACFF electrodes due to larger specific surface area. However, the spaces formed between the CNFs in the CNF/ACFF electrodes are more easily accessed than the slit-type pores of ACFF, and much higher electrical-double layer capacitance was obtained for CNF/ACFF electrodes.

  17. An adsorption of carbon dioxide on activated carbon controlled by temperature swing adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomas, Korinek; Karel, Frana

    2017-09-01

    This work deals with a method of capturing carbon dioxide (CO2) in indoor air. Temperature Swing Adsorption (TSA) on solid adsorbent was chosen for CO2 capture. Commercial activated carbon (AC) in form of extruded pellets was used as a solid adsorbent. There was constructed a simple device to testing effectiveness of CO2 capture in a fixed bed with AC. The TSA cycle was also simulated using the open-source software OpenFOAM. There was a good agreement between results obtained from numerical simulations and experimental data for adsorption process.

  18. Activated carbon coated palygorskite as adsorbent by activation and its adsorption for methylene blue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xianlong; Cheng, Liping; Wu, Xueping; Tang, Yingzhao; Wu, Yucheng

    2015-07-01

    An activation process for developing the surface and porous structure of palygorskite/carbon (PG/C) nanocomposite using ZnCl2 as activating agent was investigated. The obtained activated PG/C was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller analysis (BET) techniques. The effects of activation conditions were examined, including activation temperature and impregnation ratio. With increased temperature and impregnation ratio, the collapse of the palygorskite crystal structure was found to accelerate and the carbon coated on the surface underwent further carbonization. XRD and SEM data confirmed that the palygorskite structure was destroyed and the carbon structure was developed during activation. The presence of the characteristic absorption peaks of CC and C-H vibrations in the FTIR spectra suggested the occurrence of aromatization. The BET surface area improved by more than 11-fold (1201 m2/g for activated PG/C vs. 106 m2/g for PG/C) after activation, and the material appeared to be mainly microporous. The maximum adsorption capacity of methylene blue onto the activated PG/C reached 351 mg/g. The activated PG/C demonstrated better compressive strength than activated carbon without palygorskite clay. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Modeling trapping mechanism for PCB adsorption on activated carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Bjørnar; Kvamme, Bjørn; Kuznetsova, Tatyana; Oterhals, A.˚ge

    2012-12-01

    The levels of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin, polychlorinated dibenzofuran (PCDD/F) and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyl (DL-PCB) in fishmeal and fish oil produced for use in feed for salmon is above present European legislation levels in some regions of the world and different decontamination approaches have been proposed [1]. One of these is adsorption on activated carbon. This approach appears to be efficient for adsorption of PCDD/F but less efficient for DL-PCB [2]. Activated carbon consists of slit pores with average sizes of 20 - 50 Ångstroms. One hypothesis [2] for the mechanism of trapping DL-PCB is reduced ability for intramolecular movements of the PCB molecules inside the slit pores. In order to investigate this hypothesis we have used quantum mechanics [3] to characterize two DL-PCB congeners, respectively congener 77 (3,3',4,4'-Tetrachlorobiphenyl) and congener 118 (2,3',4,4',5-Pentachlorobiphenyl) and Triolein (18:1) [4] as a major constituent of the solvent fish oil. A model for activated carbon was constructed using a crystal structure of graphite from the American Mineralogist Crystal Structure Database [5]. The crystal structure used was originally from Wyckoff [6]. A small program had to be written to generate the desired graphite structure as it contains no less than 31232 Carbon atoms. Partial atomic charges were estimated using QM with DFT/B3LYP/6-311+g** and SM6 [7].

  20. Electric conductivity of high explosives with carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubtsov, I. A.; Pruuel, E. R.; Ten, K. A.; Kashkarov, A. O.; Kremenko, S. I.

    2017-09-01

    The paper presents a technique for introducing carbon nanotubes into high explosives (HEs). For a number of explosives (trinitrotoluene, pentaerythritol tetranitrate, benzotrifuroxan), it was possible to achieve the appearance of conductivity by adding a small amount (up to 1% by mass) of single-walled carbon nanotubes TUBALL COATE H2O (CNTs) produced by OCSiAl. Thus it is possible to reduce the sensitivity of explosives to static electricity by adding an insignificant part of conductive nanotubes. This will increase safety of HEs during production and application and will reduce the number of accidents.

  1. Mechanistic Explanation of the Weak Carbonic Anhydrase’s Esterase Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Piazzetta

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to elucidate the elementary mechanism of the promiscuous esterase activity of human carbonic anhydrase (h-CA, we present an accurate theoretical investigation on the hydrolysis of fully-acetylated d-glucose functionalized as sulfamate. This h-CA’s inhibitor is of potential relevance in cancer therapy. The study has been performed within the framework of three-layer ONIOM (QM-high:QM’-medium:MM-low hybrid approach. The computations revealed that the hydrolysis process is not energetically favored, in agreement with the observed weak carbonic anhydrase’s esterase activity.

  2. Adsorption of Rhodamine B on activated carbon obtained from pericarp of rubber fruit in comparison with the commercial activated carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fareeda Hayeeye

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Adsorption of the dye, Rhodamine B, on activated carbon obtained from pericarp of rubber fruit (PrAC was investigated in comparison with the commercial activated carbon (CAC. Both activated carbons were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, specific surface area, and pH at point of zero charge (pHpzc. The effects of various experimental parameters such as contact time, dye concentration, amount of activated carbon, pH and temperature were analysed. The adsorption isotherm fitted well into the Langmuir model. By keeping pH constant at 4.0 and varying temperatures at 30, 40, 50, and 60°C, the maximum adsorption were 0.2306, 0.2356, 0.2756, and 0.2981 mmol g-1 for PrAC and 0.8957, 0.9588, 0.9841, and 1.0263 mmol g-1 for CAC, respectively. Study of the effect of temperature dependence of these adsorptions indicated that they were endothermic processes. The adsorption efficiency of Rhodamine B on PrAC is about 80-90%.

  3. Hierarchical porous carbon aerogel derived from bagasse for high performance supercapacitor electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Pin; Zhao, Zhenhuan; Tian, Jian; Li, Haidong; Sang, Yuanhua; Yu, Guangwei; Cai, Huaqiang; Liu, Hong; Wong, C. P.; Umar, Ahmad

    2014-09-01

    Renewable, cost-effective and eco-friendly electrode materials have attracted much attention in the energy conversion and storage fields. Bagasse, the waste product from sugarcane that mainly contains cellulose derivatives, can be a promising candidate to manufacture supercapacitor electrode materials. This study demonstrates the fabrication and characterization of highly porous carbon aerogels by using bagasse as a raw material. Macro and mesoporous carbon was first prepared by carbonizing the freeze-dried bagasse aerogel; consequently, microporous structure was created on the walls of the mesoporous carbon by chemical activation. Interestingly, it was observed that the specific surface area, the pore size and distribution of the hierarchical porous carbon were affected by the activation temperature. In order to evaluate the ability of the hierarchical porous carbon towards the supercapacitor electrode performance, solid state symmetric supercapacitors were assembled, and a comparable high specific capacitance of 142.1 F g-1 at a discharge current density of 0.5 A g-1 was demonstrated. The fabricated solid state supercapacitor displayed excellent capacitance retention of 93.9% over 5000 cycles. The high energy storage ability of the hierarchical porous carbon was attributed to the specially designed pore structures, i.e., co-existence of the micropores and mesopores. This research has demonstrated that utilization of sustainable biopolymers as the raw materials for high performance supercapacitor electrode materials is an effective way to fabricate low-cost energy storage devices.Renewable, cost-effective and eco-friendly electrode materials have attracted much attention in the energy conversion and storage fields. Bagasse, the waste product from sugarcane that mainly contains cellulose derivatives, can be a promising candidate to manufacture supercapacitor electrode materials. This study demonstrates the fabrication and characterization of highly porous carbon

  4. Gel nanostructure in alkali-activated binders based on slag and fly ash, and effects of accelerated carbonation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernal, Susan A., E-mail: s.bernal@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Provis, John L., E-mail: j.provis@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Walkley, Brant; San Nicolas, Rackel [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Gehman, John D. [School of Chemistry and Bio21 Institute, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Brice, David G.; Kilcullen, Adam R. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Zeobond Pty Ltd, P.O. Box 23450, Docklands, Victoria 8012 (Australia); Duxson, Peter [Zeobond Pty Ltd, P.O. Box 23450, Docklands, Victoria 8012 (Australia); Deventer, Jannie S.J. van [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Zeobond Pty Ltd, P.O. Box 23450, Docklands, Victoria 8012 (Australia)

    2013-11-15

    Binders formed through alkali-activation of slags and fly ashes, including ‘fly ash geopolymers’, provide appealing properties as binders for low-emissions concrete production. However, the changes in pH and pore solution chemistry induced during accelerated carbonation testing provide unrealistically low predictions of in-service carbonation resistance. The aluminosilicate gel remaining in an alkali-activated slag system after accelerated carbonation is highly polymerised, consistent with a decalcification mechanism, while fly ash-based binders mainly carbonate through precipitation of alkali salts (bicarbonates at elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations, or carbonates under natural exposure) from the pore solution, with little change in the binder gel identifiable by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. In activated fly ash/slag blends, two distinct gels (C–A–S–H and N–A–S–H) are formed; under accelerated carbonation, the N–A–S–H gel behaves comparably to fly ash-based systems, while the C–A–S–H gel is decalcified similarly to alkali-activated slag. This provides new scope for durability optimisation, and for developing appropriate testing methodologies. -- Highlights: •C-A-S-H gel in alkali-activated slag decalcifies during accelerated carbonation. •Alkali-activated fly ash gel changes much less under CO{sub 2} exposure. •Blended slag-fly ash binder contains two coexisting gel types. •These two gels respond differently to carbonation. •Understanding of carbonation mechanisms is essential in developing test methods.

  5. Biomass Waste Inspired Highly Porous Carbon for High Performance Lithium/Sulfur Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan; Ren, Jun; Tan, Taizhe; Babaa, Moulay-Rachid; Bakenov, Zhumabay; Liu, Ning; Zhang, Yongguang

    2017-09-06

    The synthesis of highly porous carbon (HPC) materials from poplar catkin by KOH chemical activation and hydrothermal carbonization as a conductive additive to a lithium-sulfur cathode is reported. Elemental sulfur was composited with as-prepared HPC through a melt diffusion method to form a S/HPC nanocomposite. Structure and morphology characterization revealed a hierarchically sponge-like structure of HPC with high pore volume (0.62 cm³∙g −1 ) and large specific surface area (1261.7 m²∙g −1 ). When tested in Li/S batteries, the resulting compound demonstrated excellent cycling stability, delivering a second-specific capacity of 1154 mAh∙g −1 as well as presenting 74% retention of value after 100 cycles at 0.1 C. Therefore, the porous structure of HPC plays an important role in enhancing electrochemical properties, which provides conditions for effective charge transfer and effective trapping of soluble polysulfide intermediates, and remarkably improves the electrochemical performance of S/HPC composite cathodes.

  6. Irreversible adsorption of phenolic compounds by activated carbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant, T.M.; King, C.J.

    1988-12-01

    Studies were undertaken to determine the reasons why phenolic sorbates can be difficult to remove and recover from activated carbons. The chemical properties of the sorbate and the adsorbent surface, and the influences of changes in the adsorption and desorption conditions were investigated. Comparison of isotherms established after different contact times or at different temperatures indicated that phenolic compounds react on carbon surfaces. The reaction rate is a strong function of temperature. Regeneration of carbons by leaching with acetone recovered at least as much phenol as did regeneration with other solvents or with displacers. The physiochemical properties of adsorbents influences irreversible uptakes. Sorbates differed markedly in their tendencies to undergo irreversible adsorption. 64 refs., 47 figs., 32 tabs.

  7. Sulfur cathode based on layered carbon matrix for high-performance Li–S batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Feng; Qian, Ji; Chen, Renjie; Zhao, Teng; Xu, Rui; Ye, Yusheng; Li, Wenhui; Li, Li; Lu, Jun; Amine, Khalil

    2015-03-01

    A novel carbon/sulfur composite has been fabricated by means of thermal and hydro-thermal treatments to serve as the cathode in Li -S batteries. The carbon matrix consists of graphene nanosheet (GS) and multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT). The "GS/MWCNT@S" composite allows for infiltration of electrolyte into the cathode, assists in entrapment of polysulfide intermediates, and accommodates some of the stress and volume expansion that occurs during charge discharge processes. In addition, the uniform distribution of sulfur in the conductive carbon matrix promotes utilization of the active materials. A Li-S cell containing the GS/MWCNT@S cathode delivered a capacity of 1290.8 mAh/g and exhibited stable specific capacities up to 612.1 mAh/g after 200 cycles at 0.1 C. These results demonstrate that this cathode material is a promising candidate for rechargeable lithium batteries with high energy density.

  8. Calculation of Binary Adsorption Equilibria: Hydrocarbons and Carbon Dioxide on Activated Carbon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcussen, Lis; Krøll, A.

    1999-01-01

    Binary adsorption equilibria are calculated by means of a mathematical model for multicomponent mixtures combined with the SPD (Spreading Pressure Dependent) model for calculation of activity coefficients in the adsorbed phase. The model has been applied successfully for the adsorption of binary ...... mixtures of hydrocarbons and carbon dioxide on activated carbons. The model parameters have been determined, and the model has proven to be suited for prediction of adsorption equilibria in the investigated systems.......Binary adsorption equilibria are calculated by means of a mathematical model for multicomponent mixtures combined with the SPD (Spreading Pressure Dependent) model for calculation of activity coefficients in the adsorbed phase. The model has been applied successfully for the adsorption of binary...

  9. High temperature SU-8 pyrolysis for fabrication of carbon electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassan, Yasmin Mohamed; Caviglia, Claudia; Hemanth, Suhith

    2017-01-01

    spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy were used to characterize the pyrolytic carbon. The results show that the temperature increase from 900 °C to 1100 °C improves the electrical and electrochemical properties. At 1100 °C, longer dwell time leads to lower resistivity, while the variation of the pyrolysis...... composite experimental design was used to identify the influence of dwell time at the highest pyrolysis temperature and heating rate on electrical, electrochemical and structural properties of the pyrolytic carbon: Van der Pauw sheet resistance measurements, cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance......In this work, we present the investigation of the pyrolysis parameters at high temperature (1100 °C) for the fabrication of two-dimensional pyrolytic carbon electrodes. The electrodes were fabricated by pyrolysis of lithographically patterned negative epoxy based photoresist SU-8. A central...

  10. High-Activity Dealloyed Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kongkanand, Anusorn [General Motors LLC, Pontiac, MI (United States)

    2014-09-30

    Reduction of costly Pt usage in proton exchange membrane fuel cell electrodes is one of the major challenges towards development and commercialization of fuel cell vehicles. Although few have met the initial-kinetic activity requirements in a realistic fuel cell device, no catalyst material has ever met the demanding fuel cell durability targets set by DOE. In this project, a team of 4 universities and 2 companies came together to investigate a concept that appeared promising in preliminary non-fuel cell tests then to further develop the catalyst to a mature level ready for vehicle implementation. The team consists of academia with technical leadership in their respective areas, a catalyst supplier, and a fuel cell system integrator.The tightly collaborative project enabled development of a highly active and durable catalyst with performance that significantly exceeds that of previous catalysts and meets the DOE targets for the first time (Figure 1A). The catalyst was then further evaluated in full-active-area stack in a realistic vehicle operating condition (Figure 1B). This is the first public demonstration that one can realize the performance benefit and Pt cost reduction over a conventional pure Pt catalyst in a long-term realistic PEMFC system. Furthermore, systematic analyses of a range of catalysts with different performance after fuel cell testing allowed for correlation between catalyst microstructure and its electrocatalytic activity and durability. This will in turn aid future catalyst development.

  11. Activated carbons from KOH-activation of argan (Argania spinosa) seed shells as supercapacitor electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmouwahidi, Abdelhakim; Zapata-Benabithe, Zulamita; Carrasco-Marín, Francisco; Moreno-Castilla, Carlos

    2012-05-01

    Activated carbons were prepared by KOH-activation of argan seed shells (ASS). The activated carbon with the largest surface area and most developed porosity was superficially treated to introduce oxygen and nitrogen functionalities. Activated carbons with a surface area of around 2100 m(2)/g were obtained. Electrochemical measurements were carried out with a three-electrode cell using 1M H(2)SO(4) as electrolyte and Ag/AgCl as reference electrode. The O-rich activated carbon showed the lowest capacitance (259 F/g at 125 mA/g) and the lowest capacity retention (52% at 1A/g), due to surface carboxyl groups hindering electrolyte diffusion into the pores. Conversely, the N-rich activated carbon showed the highest capacitance (355 F/g at 125 mA/g) with the highest retention (93% at 1A/g), due to its well-developed micro-mesoporosity and the pseudocapacitance effects of N functionalities. This capacitance performance was among the highest reported for other activated carbons from a large variety of biomass precursors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Scale-up activation of carbon fibres for hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunowsky, M.; Marco-Lozar, J.P.; Cazorla-Amoros, D.; Linares-Solano, A. [Grupo de Materiales Carbonosos y Medio Ambiente, Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Universidad de Alicante, Ap. 99, E-03080 Alicante (Spain)

    2010-03-15

    In a previous study, we investigated, at a laboratory scale, the chemical activation of two different carbon fibres (CF), their porosity characterization, and their optimization for hydrogen storage. In the present work, this study is extended to: (i) a larger range of KOH activated carbon fibres, (ii) a larger range of hydrogen adsorption measurements at different temperatures and pressures (i.e. at room temperature, up to 20 MPa, and at 77 K, up to 4 MPa), and (iii) a scaling-up activation approach in which the obtained activated carbon fibres (ACF) are compared with those from laboratory-scale activation. The prepared samples cover a large range of porosities, which is found to govern their ability for hydrogen adsorption. The hydrogen uptake capacities of all the prepared samples have been analysed both in volumetric and in gravimetric bases. Thus, maximum adsorption capacities of around 5 wt% are obtained at 77 K, and 1.1 wt% at room temperature, respectively. The packing densities of the materials have been measured, turning out to play an important role in order to estimate the total storage capacity of a tank volume. Maximum values of 17.4 g l{sup -1} at 298 K, and 38.6 g l{sup -1} at 77 K were obtained. (author)

  13. Ligninolytic Activity of Ganoderma strains on Different Carbon Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TYPUK ARTININGSIH

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Lignin is a phenylpropanoid polymers with only few carbon bonds might be hydrolized. Due to its complexity, lignin is particularly difficult to decompose. Ganoderma is one of white rot fungi capable of lignin degradation. The ligninolytic of several species Ganoderma growing under different carbon sources was studied under controlled conditions which P. chrysosporium was used as standard comparison.Three types of ligninolytic, namely LiP, MnP, and laccase were assessed quantitatively and qualitatively. Ratio between clear zone and diameter of fungal colony was used for measuring specific activity qualitatively.Four sspecies of Ganoderma showed positive ligninolytic qualitatively that G. lucidum KT2-32 gave the highest ligninolytic. Activity of LiP and MnP in different carbon sources was consistently resulted by G. lucidum KT2-32, while the highest activity of laccase was shown by G. ochrolaccatum SA2-14. Medium of Indulin AT affected production of protein extracellular and induced ligninolytic. Glucose, BMC, and pine sawdust did not affect the activity of ligninolytic. The specific activity of Ganoderma species was found to be higher than the one of P. chrysosporium.

  14. Ultrahigh surface area carbon from carbonated beverages: Combining self-templating process and in situ activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Pengfei; Zhang, Zhiyong; Chen, Jihua; Dai, Sheng

    2015-11-01

    Ultrahigh surface area carbons (USACs, e.g., >2000 m2/g) are attracting tremendous attention due to their outstanding performance in energy-related applications. The state-of-art approaches to USACs involve templating or activation methods and all these techniques show certain drawbacks. In this work, a series of USACs with specific surface areas up to 3633 m2/g were prepared in two steps: hydrothermal carbonization (200 °C) of carbonated beverages (CBs) and further thermal treatment in nitrogen (600–1000 °C). The rich inner porosity is formed by a self-templated process during which acids and polyelectrolyte sodium salts in the beverage formulas make some contribution. This strategy covers various CBs such as Coca Cola®, Pepsi Cola®, Dr. Pepper®, and Fanta® and it enables an acceptable product yield (based on sugars), for example: 21 wt% for carbon (2940 m2/g) from Coca Cola®. Being potential electrode materials for supercapacitors, those carbon materials possessed a good specific capacitance (57.2–185.7 F g-1) even at a scan rate of 1000 mV s-1. Thus, a simple and efficient strategy to USACs has been presented.

  15. Adsorption studies of methylene blue and phenol onto vetiver roots activated carbon prepared by chemical activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altenor, Sandro; Carene, Betty; Emmanuel, Evens; Lambert, Jacques; Ehrhardt, Jean-Jacques; Gaspard, Sarra

    2009-06-15

    Vetiver roots have been utilized for the preparation of activated carbon (AC) by chemical activation with different impregnation ratios of phosphoric acid, X(P) (gH(3)PO(4)/g precursor): 0.5:1; 1:1 and 1.5:1. Textural characterization, determined by nitrogen adsorption at 77K shows that mixed microporous and mesoporous structures activated carbons (ACs) with high surface area (>1000 m(2)/g) and high pore volume (up to 1.19 cm(3)/g) can be obtained. The surface chemical properties of these ACs were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Boehm titration. Their textural and chemical characteristics were compared to those of an AC sample obtained by steam activation of vetiver roots. Classical molecules used for characterizing liquid phase adsorption, phenol and methylene blue (MB), were used. Adsorption kinetics of MB and phenol have been studied using commonly used kinetic models, i.e., the pseudo-first-order model, the pseudo-second-order model, the intraparticle diffusion model and as well the fractal, BWS (Brouers, Weron and Sotolongo) kinetic equation. The correlation coefficients (R(2)) and the normalized standard deviation Deltaq (%) were determined showing globally, that the recently derived fractal kinetic equation could best describe the adsorption kinetics for the adsorbates tested here, indicating a complex adsorption mechanism. The experimental adsorption isotherms of these molecules on the activated carbon were as well analysed using four isotherms: the classical Freundlich, Langmuir, Redlich-Peterson equations, but as well the newly published deformed Weibull Brouers-Sotolongo isotherm. The results obtained from the application of the equations show that the best fits were achieved with the Brouers-Sotolongo equation and with the Redlich-Peterson equation. Influence of surface functional groups towards MB adsorption is as well studied using various ACs prepared from vetiver roots and sugar cane bagasse. Opposite effects governing MB

  16. Microstructure of polyacrylonitrile-based activated carbon fibers prepared from solvent-free coagulation process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norhaniza Yusof

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Polyacrylonitrile precursor fibers prepared using a solvent-free coagulation process were stabilized, carbonized, and physically activated by carbon dioxide into activated carbon fibers (ACFs. The activation temperature varied from 600 to 900 °C while the activation time was 1 h. Atomic force microscopy was used to observe the surface morphology, as well as the surface roughness of the ACFs. Higher pyrolysis temperature formed rougher surfaces, and increased the pore sizes. Meanwhile, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy revealed more conversion of oxygen containing functional groups to carbonaceous materials as the activation temperature increased. Moreover, the microstructure properties were thoroughly characterized by the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS and X-ray diffraction (XRD studies. XRD analysis showed that the activation of the ACFs shrank the ordered structure, reducing the D-spacing from 0.358 to 0.347 nm for the fibers prepared at activation temperatures of 600 to 900 °C. Meanwhile, XPS analysis concluded that that the oxygen containing functional groups were still retained even at high activation temperatures while the nitrogen containing functional groups were reduced during the high temperature activation in the CO2 atmosphere.

  17. Characterization of coal gasification slag-based activated carbon and its potential application in lead removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yiting; Chai, Xiaoli

    2017-03-23

    Highly porous activated carbons were prepared from a coal gasification slag (CGS) precursor, by KOH activation to remove Pb2+ from aqueous solution. The effects of pretreatment methods and activation parameters on the properties of the activated carbon were investigated, such as KOH/CGS mass ratio, activation temperature and activation time. The results showed that the maximum Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area and total pore volume with the value of 2481 m2 g-1 and of 1.711 cc g-1 were obtained at a KOH/CGS ratio of 3.0 by physical mixing, an activation temperature of 750°C and an activation time of 80 min. SEM, FTIR and EA analyses indicated that pronounced pores existed on the exterior surface of the activated samples, and the contents of H and O decreased due to the loss of surface chemical groups during activation. Experimental data for the Pb2+ adsorption were fitted well by Freundlich equation and a pseudo-second-order model with a maximum experimental adsorption capacity of 141 mg/g. All of the results indicated that CGS could be a promising material to prepare porous activated carbon for Pb2+ removal from wastewater.

  18. Determination of pressure drop across activated carbon fiber respirator cartridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balanay, Jo Anne G; Lungu, Claudiu T

    2016-01-01

    Activated carbon fiber (ACF) is considered as an alternative adsorbent to granular activated carbon (GAC) for the development of thinner, lighter, and efficient respirators because of their larger surface area and adsorption capacities, thinner critical bed depth, lighter weight, and fabric form. This study aims to measure the pressure drop across different types of commercially available ACFs in respirator cartridges to determine the ACF composition and density that will result in acceptably breathable respirators. Seven ACF types in cloth (ACFC) and felt (ACFF) forms were tested. ACFs in cartridges were challenged with pre-conditioned constant air flow (43 LPM, 23°C, 50% RH) at different compositions (single- or combination-ACF type) in a test chamber. Pressure drop across ACF cartridges were obtained using a micromanometer, and compared among different cartridge configurations, to those of the GAC cartridge, and to the NIOSH breathing resistance requirements for respirator cartridges. Single-ACF type cartridges filled with any ACFF had pressure drop measurements (23.71-39.93 mmH2O) within the NIOSH inhalation resistance requirement of 40 mmH2O, while those of the ACFC cartridges (85.47±3.67 mmH2O) exceeded twice the limit due possibly to the denser weaving of ACFC fibers. All single ACFF-type cartridges had higher pressure drop compared to the GAC cartridge (23.13±1.14 mmH2O). Certain ACF combinations (2 ACFF or ACFC/ACFF types) resulted to pressure drop (26.39-32.81 mmH2O) below the NIOSH limit. All single-ACFF type and all combination-ACF type cartridges with acceptable pressure drop had much lower adsorbent weights than GAC (≤15.2% of GAC weight), showing potential for light-weight respirator cartridges. 100% ACFC in cartridges may result to respirators with high breathing resistance and, thus, is not recommended. The more dense ACFF and ACFC types may still be possibly used in respirators by combining them with less dense ACFF materials and/or by

  19. Microwave pyrolysis of oily sludge with activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Rong

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study is to explore catalytic microwave pyrolysis of crude oil storage tank sludge for fuels using granular activated carbon (GAC) as a catalyst. The effect of GAC loading on the yield of pyrolysis products was also investigated. Heating rate of oily sludge and yield of microwave pyrolysis products such as oil and fuel gas was found to depend on the ratio of GAC to oily sludge. The optimal GAC loading was found to be 10%, while much smaller and larger feed sizes adversely influenced production. During oily sludge pyrolysis, a maximum oil yield of 77.5% was achieved. Pyrolytic oils with high concentrations of diesel oil and gasoline (about 70 wt% in the pyrolytic oil) were obtained. The leaching of heavy metals, such as Cr, As and Pb, was also suppressed in the solid residue after pyrolysis. This technique provides advantages such as harmless treatment of oily sludge and substantial reduction in the consumption of energy, time and cost.

  20. Increased oxidation-related glutathionylation and carbonic anhydrase activity in endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrisani, Alessandra; Donà, Gabriella; Brunati, Anna Maria; Clari, Giulio; Armanini, Decio; Ragazzi, Eugenio; Ambrosini, Guido; Bordin, Luciana

    2014-06-01

    permeability and adhesion molecule expression, thus contributing to ongoing inflammation. Due to their main cellular functions--delivery of O2 from lung to tissue and removal of CO2 from tissue to lung--red blood cells (RBC) are exposed to oxidative stress. Carbon dioxide in tissue capillaries diffuses into red cells, where it is rapidly hydrated by the action of cytosolic carbonic anhydrase. Analysis of the oxidation status of endometriotic RBC membranes showed a high content of glutathionylated proteins, indicating pre-existing oxidation-related alterations. The increase in glutathionylated proteins was correlated to increased carbonic anhydrase activity in endometriotic RBC compared with healthy controls. Carbonic anhydrase is a family of metalloenzymes involved in many physiological processes such as acid-base homeostasis, respiration, carbon dioxide and ion transport, and bone resorption, and in the regulation of ureagenesis, gluconeogenesis, lipogenesis and tumourigenesis. Due to the potential implication of carbonic anhydrase activation in many pathologies, such as glaucoma, hypertension, obesity and infections, carbonic anhydrase activity should be closely monitored in endometriosis to prevent possible complications and/or worsening of related conditions. Copyright © 2014 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Cauliflower-derived porous carbon without activation for electrochemical capacitor and CO2 capture applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Juan; Yu, Yifeng; Lv, Haijun; Chen, Chunlin; Zhang, Jian; Chen, Aibing

    2018-01-01

    Carbon materials have attracted great attention in CO2 capture and energy storage due to their excellent characteristics such as tunable pore structure, modulated surface properties and superior bulk conductivities, etc. Biomass, provided by nature with non-toxic, widespread, abundant, and sustainable advantages, is considered to be a very promising precursor of carbons for the view of economic, environmental, and societal issues. However, the preparation of high-performance biomass-derived carbons is still a big challenge because of the multistep process for their synthesis and subsequent activation. Herein, hierarchically porous structured carbon materials have been prepared by directly carbonizing dried cauliflowers without any addition of agents and activation process, featuring with large specific surface area, hierarchically porous structure and improved pore volume, as well as suitable nitrogen content. Being used as a solid-state CO2 adsorbent, the obtained product exhibited a high CO2 adsorption capacity of 3.1 mmol g-1 under 1 bar and 25 °C and a remarkable reusability of 96.7% retention after 20 adsorption/regeneration cycles. Our study reveals that choosing a good biomass source was significant as the unique structure of precursor endows the carbonized product with abundant pores without the need of any post-treatment. Used as an electrode material in electrochemical capacitor, the non-activated porous carbon displayed a fairly high specific capacitance of 228.9 F g-1 at 0.5 A g-1 and an outstanding stability of 99.2% retention after 5000 cycles at 5 A g-1. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  2. Ecological network analysis for a low-carbon and high-tech industrial park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi; Su, Meirong; Liu, Gengyuan; Chen, Bin; Zhou, Shiyi; Jiang, Meiming

    2012-01-01

    Industrial sector is one of the indispensable contributors in global warming. Even if the occurrence of ecoindustrial parks (EIPs) seems to be a good improvement in saving ecological crises, there is still a lack of definitional clarity and in-depth researches on low-carbon industrial parks. In order to reveal the processes of carbon metabolism in a low-carbon high-tech industrial park, we selected Beijing Development Area (BDA) International Business Park in Beijing, China as case study, establishing a seven-compartment- model low-carbon metabolic network based on the methodology of Ecological Network Analysis (ENA). Integrating the Network Utility Analysis (NUA), Network Control Analysis (NCA), and system-wide indicators, we compartmentalized system sectors into ecological structure and analyzed dependence and control degree based on carbon metabolism. The results suggest that indirect flows reveal more mutuality and exploitation relation between system compartments and they are prone to positive sides for the stability of the whole system. The ecological structure develops well as an approximate pyramidal structure, and the carbon metabolism of BDA proves self-mutualistic and sustainable. Construction and waste management were found to be two active sectors impacting carbon metabolism, which was mainly regulated by internal and external environment.

  3. Delivery of molecules into cells using carbon nanoparticles activated by femtosecond laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarty, Prerona; Qian, Wei; El-Sayed, Mostafa A; Prausnitz, Mark R

    2010-08-01

    A major barrier to drug and gene delivery is crossing the cell's plasma membrane. Physical forces applied to cells via electroporation, ultrasound and laser irradiation generate nanoscale holes in the plasma membrane for direct delivery of drugs into the cytoplasm. Inspired by previous work showing that laser excitation of carbon nanoparticles can drive the carbon-steam reaction to generate highly controlled shock waves, we show that carbon black nanoparticles activated by femtosecond laser pulses can facilitate the delivery of small molecules, proteins and DNA into two types of cells. Our initial results suggest that interaction between the laser energy and carbon black nanoparticles may generate photoacoustic forces by chemical reaction to create transient holes in the membrane for intracellular delivery.

  4. Active carbon filter health condition detection with piezoelectric wafer active sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Jingjing; Giurgiutiu, Victor; Rubel, Glenn O.; Peterson, Gregory W.; Ball, Thomas M.

    2011-04-01

    The impregnated active carbon used in air purification systems degrades over time due to exposure to contamination and mechanical effects (packing, settling, flow channeling, etc.). A novel approach is proposed to detect contamination in active carbon filters by combining the electromechanical impedance spectroscopy (EMIS) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (ECIS). ECIS is currently being used to evaluate active carbon filtration material; however, it cannot differentiate the impedance changes due to chemical contamination from those due to mechanical changes. EMIS can detect impedance changes due to mechanical changes. For the research work presented in this paper, Piezoelectric wafer active sensor (PWAS) was used for the EMIS method. Some remarkable new phenomena were unveiled in the detection of carbon filter status. 1. PWAS EMIS can detect the presence of contaminants, such as water and kerosene in the carbon bed 2. PWAS EMIS can monitor changes in mechanical pressure that may be associated with carbon bed packing, settling and flow channeling 3. EMIS and ECIS measurements are consistent with each other and complimentary A tentative simplified impedance model was created to simulate the PWAS-carbon bed system under increasing pressure. Similar impedance change pattern was observed when comparing the simulation results with experimental data.

  5. Modeling equilibrium adsorption of organic micropollutants onto activated carbon

    KAUST Repository

    De Ridder, David J.

    2010-05-01

    Solute hydrophobicity, polarizability, aromaticity and the presence of H-bond donor/acceptor groups have been identified as important solute properties that affect the adsorption on activated carbon. However, the adsorption mechanisms related to these properties occur in parallel, and their respective dominance depends on the solute properties as well as carbon characteristics. In this paper, a model based on multivariate linear regression is described that was developed to predict equilibrium carbon loading on a specific activated carbon (F400) for solutes reflecting a wide range of solute properties. In order to improve prediction accuracy, groups (bins) of solutes with similar solute properties were defined and solute removals were predicted for each bin separately. With these individual linear models, coefficients of determination (R2) values ranging from 0.61 to 0.84 were obtained. With the mechanistic approach used in developing this predictive model, a strong relation with adsorption mechanisms is established, improving the interpretation and, ultimately, acceptance of the model. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  6. APPLICATION OF POWDERY ACTIVATED CARBONS FOR REMOVAL IBUPROFEN FROM WATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicja Puszkarewicz

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of studies on the use of adsorptive properties of selected powdered activated carbons (Norit SA Super and Carbopol MB5 for removal of ibuprofen from water. The tests were performed on non-flow conditions, series depending on the type and dose of powdered adsorbents. The research was carried out on a model solution of ibuprofen at initial concentration C0 = 20 mg/dm3, at 200 C. Froundlich and Langmuir adsorption isotherms were used. Lagergrene kinetic models (PFO and Ho (PSO were used to describe adsorption kinetics. Both carbons exhibited a higher affinity for the adsorbent at a pH above 7. The better adsorbent was the Norit SA Super, for which, the highest adsorption capacity q = 0.448 g/g was achieved with dose D = 35 mg/dm3. The effectiveness of adsorption (decrease of ibuprofen in water was 78%. Total removal of ibuprofen was obtained for a dose of carbon D = 200 mg/dm3. With respect to Carbopol, the highest adsorption capacity (q = 0.353 g / g was achieved at a dose of 30 mg / dm3, resulting in a 53% efficiency. Studies have shown that both tested powdered activated carbons have contributed to effective cleaning of aqueous solutions containing ibuprofen.

  7. Selective and Regenerative Carbon Dioxide Capture by Highly Polarizing Porous Carbon Nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Youngtak; Le, Viet-Duc; Maiti, Uday Narayan; Hwang, Jin Ok; Park, Woo Jin; Lim, Joonwon; Lee, Kyung Eun; Bae, Youn-Sang; Kim, Yong-Hyun; Kim, Sang Ouk

    2015-09-22

    Energy-efficient CO2 capture is a stringent demand for green and sustainable energy supply. Strong adsorption is desirable for high capacity and selective capture at ambient conditions but unfavorable for regeneration of adsorbents by a simple pressure control process. Here we present highly regenerative and selective CO2 capture by carbon nitride functionalized porous reduced graphene oxide aerogel surface. The resultant structure demonstrates large CO2 adsorption capacity at ambient conditions (0.43 mmol·g(-1)) and high CO2 selectivity against N2 yet retains regenerability to desorb 98% CO2 by simple pressure swing. First-principles thermodynamics calculations revealed that microporous edges of graphitic carbon nitride offer the optimal CO2 adsorption by induced dipole interaction and allows excellent CO2 selectivity as well as facile regenerability. This work identifies a customized route to reversible gas capture using metal-free, two-dimensional carbonaceous materials, which can be extended to other useful applications.

  8. Characterization and Properties of Activated Carbon Prepared from Tamarind Seeds by KOH Activation for Fe(III) Adsorption from Aqueous Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mopoung, Sumrit; Moonsri, Phansiri; Palas, Wanwimon; Khumpai, Sataporn

    2015-01-01

    This research studies the characterization of activated carbon from tamarind seed with KOH activation. The effects of 0.5 : 1-1.5 : 1 KOH : tamarind seed charcoal ratios and 500-700°C activation temperatures were studied. FTIR, SEM-EDS, XRD, and BET were used to characterize tamarind seed and the activated carbon prepared from them. Proximate analysis, percent yield, iodine number, methylene blue number, and preliminary test of Fe(III) adsorption were also studied. Fe(III) adsorption was carried out by 30 mL column with 5-20 ppm Fe(III) initial concentrations. The percent yield of activated carbon prepared from tamarind seed with KOH activation decreased with increasing activation temperature and impregnation ratios, which were in the range from 54.09 to 82.03 wt%. The surface functional groups of activated carbon are O-H, C=O, C-O, -CO3, C-H, and Si-H. The XRD result showed high crystallinity coming from a potassium compound in the activated carbon. The main elements found in the activated carbon by EDS are C, O, Si, and K. The results of iodine and methylene blue adsorption indicate that the pore size of the activated carbon is mostly in the range of mesopore and macropore. The average BET pore size and BET surface area of activated carbon are 67.9764 Å and 2.7167 m(2)/g, respectively. Finally, the tamarind seed based activated carbon produced with 500°C activation temperature and 1.0 : 1 KOH : tamarind seed charcoal ratio was used for Fe(III) adsorption test. It was shown that Fe(III) was adsorbed in alkaline conditions and adsorption increased with increasing Fe(III) initial concentration from 5 to 20 ppm with capacity adsorption of 0.0069-0.019 mg/g.

  9. A carbon-air battery for high power generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Binbin; Ran, Ran; Zhong, Yijun; Su, Chao; Tadé, Moses O; Shao, Zongping

    2015-03-16

    We report a carbon-air battery for power generation based on a solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) integrated with a ceramic CO2-permeable membrane. An anode-supported tubular SOFC functioned as a carbon fuel container as well as an electrochemical device for power generation, while a high-temperature CO2-permeable membrane composed of a CO3(2-) mixture and an O(2-) conducting phase (Sm(0.2)Ce(0.8)O(1.9)) was integrated for in situ separation of CO2 (electrochemical product) from the anode chamber, delivering high fuel-utilization efficiency. After modifying the carbon fuel with a reverse Boudouard reaction catalyst to promote the in situ gasification of carbon to CO, an attractive peak power density of 279.3 mW cm(-2) was achieved for the battery at 850 °C, and a small stack composed of two batteries can be operated continuously for 200 min. This work provides a novel type of electrochemical energy device that has a wide range of application potentials. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Flexible Carbon Nanotube Films for High Performance Strain Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olfa Kanoun

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Compared with traditional conductive fillers, carbon nanotubes (CNTs have unique advantages, i.e., excellent mechanical properties, high electrical conductivity and thermal stability. Nanocomposites as piezoresistive films provide an interesting approach for the realization of large area strain sensors with high sensitivity and low manufacturing costs. A polymer-based nanocomposite with carbon nanomaterials as conductive filler can be deposited on a flexible substrate of choice and this leads to mechanically flexible layers. Such sensors allow the strain measurement for both integral measurement on a certain surface and local measurement at a certain position depending on the sensor geometry. Strain sensors based on carbon nanostructures can overcome several limitations of conventional strain sensors, e.g., sensitivity, adjustable measurement range and integral measurement on big surfaces. The novel technology allows realizing strain sensors which can be easily integrated even as buried layers in material systems. In this review paper, we discuss the dependence of strain sensitivity on different experimental parameters such as composition of the carbon nanomaterial/polymer layer, type of polymer, fabrication process and processing parameters. The insights about the relationship between film parameters and electromechanical properties can be used to improve the design and fabrication of CNT strain sensors.

  11. Adsorption of chlorine dioxide gas on activated carbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Joseph P; Ryan, Shawn P; Snyder, Emily Gibb; Serre, Shannon D; Touati, Abderrahmane; Clayton, Matthew J

    2010-08-01

    Research and field experience with chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas to decontaminate structures contaminated with Bacillus anthracis spores and other microorganisms have demonstrated the effectiveness of this sterilant technology. However, because of its hazardous properties, the unreacted ClO2, gas must be contained and captured during fumigation events. Although activated carbon has been used during some decontamination events to capture the ClO2 gas, no data are available to quantify the performance of the activated carbon in terms of adsorption capacity and other sorbent property operational features. Laboratory experiments were conducted to determine and compare the ClO2 adsorption capacities of five different types of activated carbon as a function of the challenge ClO2 concentration. Tests were also conducted to investigate other sorbent properties, including screening tests to determine gaseous species desorbed from the saturated sorbent upon warming (to provide an indication of how immobile the ClO2 gas and related compounds are once captured on the sorbent). In the adsorption tests, ClO2 gas was measured continuously using a photometric-based instrument, and these measurements were verified with a noncontinuous method utilizing wet chemistry analysis. The results show that the simple activated carbons (not impregnated or containing other activated sorbent materials) were the most effective, with maximum adsorption capacities of approximately 110 mg/g. In the desorption tests, there was minimal release of ClO(2) from all sorbents tested, but desorption levels of chlorine (Cl2) gas (detected as chloride) varied, with a maximum release of nearly 15% of the mass of ClO2 adsorbed.

  12. Pyrrolidone Modifying Gold Nanocatalysts for Enhanced Catalytic Activities in Aerobic Oxidation of Alcohols and Carbon Monoxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingji Song

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Enhancing the catalytic activity of supported metal nanoparticle is a great demand but extremely challenging to make. We reported a simple strategy for enhancing the activities by employing the polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP additive, where a series of supported Au nanoparticle catalysts including Au/C, Au/BN, Au/TiO2, and Au/SBA-15 exhibited significantly higher activities in the oxidation of various alcohols and carbon monoxide by molecular oxygen after adding PVP to the reaction system. The XPS study indicates that PVP could electronically interact with Au to form high active Au sites for molecular oxygen, thus causing improved activities for the various oxidation reactions.

  13. Fine Milling and Mechanochemical Activation of Mine Wastes for Enhanced CO2 Mineral Carbonation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitch, M.; Li, J.; Dipple, G. M.

    2013-12-01

    Mechanical activation is an effective method to enhancing the physical architecture of mineral grains for mineral carbonation and CO2 sequestration. The advantage of this level of comminution is the disruption of the mineral structure and increase its reactivity. This paper discusses mechanochemical activation of whole rock tailings and compares three grinding methods (stirred, planetary and vibratory mills). Physical characteristics influencing CO2 mineral carbonation were measured using gas adsorption, infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and thermal gravity analysis (TGA). Results to date have indicated that indeed the mechanochemical activation leads to microstructure, structural and chemical changes of mixtures during high-energy milling. Direct aqueous mineral carbonation helped guide the author to the most effective mineral preparation method. Finally, Reitvelt analysis was used for quantitative analysis of the carbonate product. It was found that the activation mode controls the physio-chemical efficacy of the mine waste particle and was responsible for the differences in carbonate conversion.

  14. Activated carbon from leather shaving wastes and its application in removal of toxic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantarli, Ismail Cem; Yanik, Jale

    2010-07-15

    In this study, utilization of a solid waste as raw material for activated carbon production was investigated. For this purpose, activated carbons were produced from chromium and vegetable tanned leather shaving wastes by physical and chemical activation methods. A detailed analysis of the surface properties of the activated carbons including acidity, total surface area, extent of microporosity and mesoporosity was presented. The activated carbon produced from vegetable tanned leather shaving waste produced has a higher surface area and micropore volume than the activated carbon produced from chromium tanned leather shaving waste. The potential application of activated carbons obtained from vegetable tanned shavings as adsorbent for removal of water pollutants have been checked for phenol, methylene blue, and Cr(VI). Adsorption capacities of activated carbons were found to be comparable to that of activated carbons derived from biomass. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Carbon nanocages: A new support material for Pt catalyst with remarkably high durability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao Xia; Tan, Zhe Hua; Zeng, Min; Wang, Jian Nong

    2014-01-01

    Low durability is the major challenge hindering the large-scale implementation of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) technology, and corrosion of carbon support materials of current catalysts is the main cause. Here, we describe the finding of remarkably high durability with the use of a novel support material. This material is based on hollow carbon nanocages developed with a high degree of graphitization and concurrent nitrogen doping for oxidation resistance enhancement, uniform deposition of fine Pt particles, and strong Pt-support interaction. Accelerated degradation testing shows that such designed catalyst possesses a superior electrochemical activity and long-term stability for both hydrogen oxidation and oxygen reduction relative to industry benchmarks of current catalysts. Further testing under conditions of practical fuel cell operation reveals almost no degradation over long-term cycling. Such a catalyst of high activity, particularly, high durability, opens the door for the next-generation PEMFC for “real world” application. PMID:24658614

  16. Glycerol electro-oxidation over glassy-carbon-supported Au nanoparticles: direct influence of the carbon support on the electrode catalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Janaina F; Gasparotto, Luiz H S; Tremiliosi-Filho, Germano

    2013-07-07

    Glycerol is at present abundantly co-produced in the biodiesel fabrication and can be used as fuel in Direct Glycerol Fuel Cells (DGFC) for cogeneration of electricity, value-added chemicals and heat. With this motivation, in the present work, we investigated at a fundamental level the oxidation of glycerol over glassy carbon (GC) supported Au nanoparticles in alkaline medium using cyclic voltammetry. By controlling the Au deposition time, we varied the GC supported Au coverage from 0.4% to 30% maintaining a regular particle size distribution with a mean particle size of about 200 nm. An influence of the carbon support on the activity of the GC-supported Au nanoparticles was evidenced. Results from studies on the oxidation of glycerol and ethylene glycol on Au and Pt nanoparticles supported on a glassy carbon, highly ordered pyrolytic graphite and dimensionally stable anode under different pH conditions indicate that the carbon support participates actively in the oxidation of glycerol and other alcohols. We propose that active oxygenated species are gradually formed on the glassy carbon by potential cycling (up to the saturation of the carbon area) and these oxygenated species are additional oxygen suppliers for the oxidation of glycerol residues adsorbed on the Au particles, following a mechanism consisting of the synergism of two active elements: gold and carbon.

  17. Annealing effect on the particle size and chemical composition of activated carbon obtained from vacuum furnace of teak sawdust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armynah, B., E-mail: dtahir@fmipa.unhas.ac.id; Tahir, D., E-mail: dtahir@fmipa.unhas.ac.id; Jaya, N., E-mail: dtahir@fmipa.unhas.ac.id [Department of Physics, Hasanuddin University, Makassar 90245 (Indonesia)

    2014-09-25

    Activated carbon was produced from sawdust by using physical method in a high temperature vacuum furnace without additional chemical. Fast pyrolysis process was carried out prior in fluidized a bed furnace to produce char before activation process. Experiments were conducted to investigate the influence of various process parameters such as particle size, activation temperature and activation time on the quality of the activated carbon. In addition, the chemical composition studies were done by using x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy. The crystallite sizes were calculated by using Scherer equation based on x-ray diffraction (XRD) spectroscopy data. The pyrolysis temperature and time were varied from 600°C to 900°C and from 3 hours to 6 hours, respectively. The particle size of activated carbon was increase with increasing temperature. The composition and crystallite size of the prepared activated carbon was compared with the non-activated carbon. The results indicated that the teak sawdust carbon could be employed as a low cost alternative to produce commercial activated carbon.

  18. Nitrogen-doped biomass/polymer composite porous carbons for high performance supercapacitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Yu; Maruyama, Jun; Iwasaki, Satoshi; Maruyama, Shohei; Shen, Yehua; Uyama, Hiroshi

    2017-10-01

    Nitrogen-doped porous monolithic carbon (NDPMC) is obtained from biomass-derived activated carbon/polyacrylonitrile composite for the first time via a template-free thermally induced phase separation (TIPS) approach followed by KOH activation. The electrochemical results indicate that NDPMC possesses ultrahigh specific capacitance of 442 F g-1 at 1 A g-1, excellent rate capability with 81% retention rate from 1 to 100 A g-1 and outstanding cycling stability with 98% capacitance retention at 20 A g-1 after 5000 cycles. Furthermore, the evaluation of NDPMC on the practical symmetrical system also exhibits desired electrochemical performances. The novel composite carbon displays remarkable capacitance properties and the feasible, low-cost synthetic route demonstrates great potential for large-scale production of high-performance electrode materials for supercapacitors.

  19. 75 FR 51754 - Certain Activated Carbon from the People's Republic of China: Notice of Partial Rescission of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-23

    ... Activated Carbon from the People's Republic of China: Notice of Partial Rescission of Antidumping Duty... of initiation of an administrative review of the antidumping duty order on certain activated carbon... Activated Carbon Plant; Datong Forward Activated Carbon Co., Ltd.; Datong Guanghua Activated Carbon Co., Ltd...

  20. Activated carbon treatment of municipal solid waste incineration flue gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shengyong; Ji, Ya; Buekens, Alfons; Ma, Zengyi; Jin, Yuqi; Li, Xiaodong; Yan, Jianhua

    2013-02-01

    Activated carbon injection is widely used to control dioxins and mercury emissions. Surprisingly little attention has been paid to its modelling. This paper proposes an expansion of the classical Everaerts-Baeyens model, introducing the expression of fraction of free adsorption sites, f (s), and asserting the significant contribution of fly ash to dioxins removal. Moreover, the model monitors dioxins partitioning between vapour and particulate phase, as well as removal efficiency for each congener separately. The effects of the principal parameters affecting adsorption are analysed according to a semi-analytical, semi-empirical model. These parameters include temperature, contact time during entrained-flow, characteristics (grain-size, pore structure, specific surface area) and dosage of activated carbon, lignite cokes or mineral adsorbent, fly ash characteristics and concentration, and type of incinerator plant.

  1. Characterization, preparation, and reaction mechanism of hemp stem based activated carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ji; Gao, Jianmin; Chen, Yao; Hao, Xinmin; Jin, Xiaojuan

    In this study, hemp stem was used to prepare high surface area activated carbon (AC) by KOH activation. The structure, characterization, thermal and structure analysis on reaction mechanisms of AC were investigated via N2 adsorption-desorption isotherm, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and thermogravimetric-mass (TG-MS) spectrometry. Results show that when the impregnation ratio is 4.5:1 (KOH/char), the activation temperature is 800 °C, and the activation time is 1.5 h, AC has the highest specific surface area of 2388 m2·g-1 and exhibits narrow pore size distributions with maxima in the micropore areas. The reaction mechanism of AC from hemp stems by KOH activation is as follows: In the first carbonization stage, it is primarily because of the substitution, scission, and oxidization reactions of methylene. Then in the second activation stage, it is mainly related to polycyclic reactions, reactions between carbon and KOH, and reactions between intermediate potassium oxide species and carbon.

  2. Removal of organic fractions from landfill leachate by casuarina equisetifolia activated carbon: Characteristics and adsorption mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrozi, Rasyidah; Zubir, Nor Aida; Kamaruddin, Mohamad Anuar; Yusof, Siti Noor Faizah Mohd; Yusoff, Mohd Suffian

    2017-09-01

    In this research, the activated carbon prepared from tropical plant waste based Casuarinas Equisetifolia plant was activated through chemical activation by using potassium hydroxide (KOH) as the activating agent. The raw sample was carbonized following conventional heating via electric furnace at 600˚C with the increasing temperature 30˚C/minutes in one hour which was selected as the optimum condition. The prepared activated carbons exhibit mesoporous with the pore diameter within 0.2 µm to 20 µm. From the Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) micrographs, the morphology of the activated carbon indicated that they demonstrated high pore development on it surfaces. The effects of initial pH, contact time and adsorbent dosage onto the adsorption performances were evaluated through batch adsorption study. The COD removal increased when the adsorbent dosage was increased. The adsorption of COD and colour were best fitted by the Freundlich isotherm model compared to ammonia, which the correlation regressions, R2 were 0.8451, 0.8315 and 0.6608, respectively. The result of the preliminary of the experimental indicated that the Casuarinas Equisetifolia plant is a promising raw material suitable for turning from waste into wealth.

  3. Detection of single ion channel activity with carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Weiwei; Wang, Yung Yu; Lim, Tae-Sun; Pham, Ted; Jain, Dheeraj; Burke, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Many processes in life are based on ion currents and membrane voltages controlled by a sophisticated and diverse family of membrane proteins (ion channels), which are comparable in size to the most advanced nanoelectronic components currently under development. Here we demonstrate an electrical assay of individual ion channel activity by measuring the dynamic opening and closing of the ion channel nanopores using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Two canonical dynamic ion channels (gram...

  4. Tracking small mountainous river derived terrestrial organic carbon across the active margin marine environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childress, L. B.; Blair, N. E.; Orpin, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    Active margins are particularly efficient in the burial of organic carbon due to the close proximity of highland sources to marine sediment sinks and high sediment transport rates. Compared with passive margins, active margins are dominated by small mountainous river systems, and play a unique role in marine and global carbon cycles. Small mountainous rivers drain only approximately 20% of land, but deliver approximately 40% of the fluvial sediment to the global ocean. Unlike large passive margin systems where riverine organic carbon is efficiently incinerated on continental shelves, small mountainous river dominated systems are highly effective in the burial and preservation of organic carbon due to the rapid and episodic delivery of organic carbon sourced from vegetation, soil, and rock. To investigate the erosion, transport, and burial of organic carbon in active margin small mountainous river systems we use the Waipaoa River, New Zealand. The Waipaoa River, and adjacent marine depositional environment, is a system of interest due to a large sediment yield (6800 tons km-2 yr-1) and extensive characterization. Previous studies have considered the biogeochemistry of the watershed and tracked the transport of terrestrially derived sediment and organics to the continental shelf and slope by biogeochemical proxies including stable carbon isotopes, lignin phenols, n-alkanes, and n-fatty acids. In this work we expand the spatial extent of investigation to include deep sea sediments of the Hikurangi Trough. Located in approximately 3000 m water depth 120 km from the mouth of the Waipaoa River, the Hikurangi Trough is the southern extension of the Tonga-Kermadec-Hikurangi subduction system. Piston core sediments collected by the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA, NZ) in the Hikurangi Trough indicate the presence of terrestrially derived material (lignin phenols), and suggest a continuum of deposition, resuspension, and transport across the margin

  5. Carbonation by fluid-rock interactions at High-Pressure conditions: implications for Carbon cycling in subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccoli, Francesca; Vitale Brovarone, Alberto; Beyssac, Olivier; Martinez, Isabelle; Ague, Jay J.; Chaduteau, Carine

    2016-04-01

    Carbonate-bearing lithologies are the main carbon carrier into subduction zones. Their evolution during metamorphism largely controls the fate of carbon regulating its fluxes between shallow and deep reservoirs. In subduction zones, most works have focused on subtractive processes responsible for carbon release from subducting slabs. As an example, several recent works have stressed on the importance of carbonate dissolution as a mean to mobilize large amounts of carbon in subduction zones. By contrast, little is known on additive processes such as rock carbonation at high-pressure (HP) conditions. At shallow depths (e.g. ocean floor and shallow subduction zones, i.e. geo-biosphere and the atmosphere. We report the occurrence of eclogite-facies marbles associated with metasomatic systems in HP metamorphic unit in Alpine Corsica (France). We performed a field-based study on metasomatic marbles. We will present the petrology and geochemistry that characterize carbonate metasomatism together with fluid inclusions study and pseudosection modeling. Altogether, we bring strong evidences for the precipitation of these carbonate-rich assemblages from carbonic fluids during HP metamorphism. We propose that rock carbonation can occur at HP conditions by either vein-injection or chemical replacement mechanisms. Rock carbonation indicates that carbonic fluids produced by decarbonation reactions and carbonate dissolution may not be directly transferred to the mantle wedge, but may have a preferential and complex pathway within the slab and along slab/mantle interface. Rock carbonation by fluid-rock interactions has a potentially great impact on the residence time of carbon and oxygen and on carbonates isotopic signature in subduction zones. Lastly, carbonation may modulate the emission of CO2 at volcanic arcs over geological time scales.

  6. Role of activated carbon on micropollutans degradation by different radiation processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inmaculada Velo Gala

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to analyse the influence of the presence of activated carbon on radiation processes. The triiodinated contrast medium diatrizoate was chosen as the contaminant model. We selected four commercial activated carbons and sixteen gamma radiation-modified carbons derived from these. The different advanced oxidation/reduction processes that have been studied were improved through the addition of activated carbon in the UV light and gamma radiating processes. In the UV/activated carbon process, the synergic activity of the activated carbon is enhanced in the samples with higher percentages of surface oxygen, ester/anhydride groups and carbon atoms with sp2 hybridization. Band gap determination of activated carbons revealed that they behave as semiconductor materials and, therefore, as photoactive materials in the presence of UV radiation, given that all band gap values are <4 eV. We also observed that the gamma radiation treatment reduces the band gap values of the activated carbons and that, in a single series of commercial carbons, lower band gap values correspond to higher contaminant removal rate values. We observed that the activity of the reutilized activated carbons is similar to that of the original carbons. Based on these results, we proposed that the activated carbon acts as a photocatalyst, promoting electrons of the valence band to the conduction band and increasing the generation of HO• radicals in the medium. Similarly, there was a synergic effect made by the presence of activated carbon in gamma radiation system, which favours pollutant removal. This synergic effect is independent of the textural but not the chemical characteristics of the activated carbon, observing a higher synergic activity for carbons with a higher surface content of oxygen, specifically quinone groups. We highlight that the synergic effect of the activated carbon requires adsorbent–adsorbate electrostatic interaction and is absent

  7. Converting poultry litter to activated carbon: optimal carbonization conditions and product sorption for benzene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Mingxin; Song, Weiping

    2011-12-01

    To promote utilization of poultry litter as a source material for manufacturing low-cost activated carbon (AC) that can be used in wastewater treatment, this study investigated optimal production conditions and water-borne organic sorption potential of poultry litter-based AC. Pelletized broiler litter was carbonized at different temperatures for varied time periods and activated with steam at a range of flow rate and time. The AC products were examined for quality characteristics using standard methods and for organic sorption potentials using batch benzene sorption techniques. The study shows that the yield and quality of litter AC varied with production conditions. The optimal production conditions for poultry litter-based AC were carbonization at 700 degrees C for 45 min followed by activation with 2.5 ml min(-1) steam for another 45 min. The resulting AC possessed an iodine number of 454 mg g(-1) and a specific surface area of 403 m2 g(-1). It sorbed benzene in water following sigmoidal kinetic and isothermal patterns. The sorption capacity for benzene was 23.70 mg g(-1), lower than that of top-class commercial AC. The results, together with other reported research findings, suggest that poultry litter is a reasonable feedstock for low-cost AC applicable to pre-treat wastewater contaminated by organic pollutants and heavy metals.

  8. High Gradient Accelerating Structures for Carbon Therapy Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutsaev, Sergey; Agustsson, R.; Faillace, L.; Goel, A.; Mustapha, B.; Nassiri, A.; Ostroumov, P.; Plastun, A.; Savin, E.

    2016-05-01

    Carbon therapy is the most promising among techniques for cancer treatment, as it has demonstrated significant improvements in clinical efficiency and reduced toxicity profiles in multiple types of cancer through much better localization of dose to the tumor volume. RadiaBeam, in collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory, are developing an ultra-high gradient linear accelerator, Advanced Compact Carbon Ion Linac (ACCIL), for the delivery of ion-beams with end-energies up to 450 MeV/u for 12C6+ ions and 250 MeV for protons. In this paper, we present a thorough comparison of standing and travelling wave designs for high gradient S-Band accelerating structures operating with ions at varying velocities, relative to the speed of light, in the range 0.3-0.7. In this paper we will compare these types of accelerating structures in terms of RF, beam dynamics and thermo-mechanical performance.

  9. Adsorptive performance of granular activated carbon in aquaculture and aquaria: a simplified method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taylor, Daniel; Kuhn, David D.; Smith, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    method for characterizing activated carbon quality and filter performance utilizing readily available and relatively safe indicator compounds to test adsorptive capabilities between different sources of granular activated carbon. Methylene blue and a commercial mix of humic and tannic substances were...

  10. Heterojunction nanowires having high activity and stability for the reduction of oxygen: Formation by self-assembly of iron phthalocyanine with single walled carbon nanotubes (FePc/SWNTs)

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Jia

    2014-04-01

    A self-assembly approach to preparing iron phthalocyanine/single-walled carbon nanotube (FePc/SWNT) heterojunction nanowires as a new oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) electrocatalyst has been developed by virtue of water-adjusted dispersing in 1-cyclohexyl-pyrrolidone (CHP) of the two components. The FePc/SWNT nanowires have a higher Fermi level compared to pure FePc (d-band center, DFT. =. -0.69. eV versus -0.87. eV, respectively). Consequently, an efficient channel for transferring electron to the FePc surface is readily created, facilitating the interaction between FePc and oxygen, so enhancing the ORR kinetics. This heterojunction-determined activity in ORR illustrates a new stratagem to preparing non-noble ORR electrocatalysts of significant importance in constructing real-world fuel cells. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.

  11. A highly conductive carbon-sulfur film with interconnected mesopores as an advanced cathode for lithium-sulfur batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingkai; Liu, Yuqing; Yan, Yan; Wang, Fengsheng; Liu, Jiahui; Liu, Tianxi

    2017-08-10

    A highly conductive graphene sheet-mesoporous carbon (MC) sphere/active sulfur (GMC-S) film, with MC-sulfur spheres as "active islands" and graphene sheets as "trapping nets", exhibits good cycling stability (500 cycles, with a capacity retention of 85%) with a high specific capacity of 1322 mA h g-1 at 0.1C.

  12. Highly fluorescent xerogels with entrapped carbon dots for organic scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quaranta, A., E-mail: quaranta@ing.unitn.it [University of Trento, Department of Industrial Engineering, via Mesiano, 77, 38123 Trento (Italy); Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, INFN, Viale dell' Università, 2, 35020 Legnaro (PD) (Italy); Carturan, S. [Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, INFN, Viale dell' Università, 2, 35020 Legnaro (PD) (Italy); University of Padova, Department of Physics and Astronomy “Galileo Galilei”, Via Marzolo, 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Campagnaro, A.; Dalla Palma, M. [University of Trento, Department of Industrial Engineering, via Mesiano, 77, 38123 Trento (Italy); Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, INFN, Viale dell' Università, 2, 35020 Legnaro (PD) (Italy); Giarola, M.; Daldosso, N. [University of Verona, Department of Informatics, Strada le Grazie,15, 37134 Verona (Italy); Maggioni, G. [Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, INFN, Viale dell' Università, 2, 35020 Legnaro (PD) (Italy); University of Padova, Department of Physics and Astronomy “Galileo Galilei”, Via Marzolo, 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Mariotto, G. [University of Verona, Department of Informatics, Strada le Grazie,15, 37134 Verona (Italy)

    2014-02-28

    Organically modified silicate thin film and bulk samples were prepared using [3-(2-aminoethylamino)propyl]trimethoxysilane (AEAP-TMOS) as precursor with the addition of different amounts of AEAP-TMOS functionalized C-dots, prepared by reaction of AEAP-TMOS and citric acid at high temperature. The synthesis of surface functionalized C-dots was followed by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and the C-dots optical properties were characterized by optical absorption and UV–vis fluorescence. Thin xerogel films and bulk samples were studied by FTIR, Raman and fluorescence spectroscopy. Intense blue-green emission was observed by UV excitation of functionalized C-dots. Carbon quantum dot (CQD) luminescence was preserved also in the xerogel matrices, and the energy transfer from the matrix to CQDs, which is a key characteristic for scintillation detectors, was investigated in the two systems. - Highlights: • Functionalized carbon dots were synthesized. • Carbon dots were dispersed in hybrid xerogel bulk and thin film. • Carbon dots exhibit a strong tunable blue luminescence. • Xerogels were characterized by FT-IR, Raman and fluorescence spectroscopies. • Energy transfer processes were evidenced between C-dots and xerogel matrix.

  13. Fabrication and evaluation of magnetic activated carbon as adsorbent for ultrasonic assisted magnetic solid phase dispersive extraction of bisphenol A from milk prior to high performance liquid chromatographic analysis with ultraviolet detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippou, Olga; Deliyanni, Eleni A; Samanidou, Victoria F

    2017-01-06

    In the present study, the impregnation of a micro - meso porous activated carbon with magnetite (Fe3O4) was successfully achieved by sonication and the magnetic activated carbon prepared (Bmi) was evaluated as a new adsorbent for ultrasonic assisted magnetic solid phase dispersive extraction of Bisphenol A (BPA) from cow milk and human breast milk samples, prior to the determination by HPLC with UV detection. The prepared Bmi was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The effect of pH on adsorption, initial concentration, contact time and desorption were studied. The main experimental parameters influencing extraction efficiency of BPA, such as type and amount of the adsorbent, sample amount, type of desorption solvent, time of adsorption and