WorldWideScience

Sample records for higher velocity impact

  1. Velocity distribution of fragments of catastrophic impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Yasuhiko; Kato, Manabu; Mizutani, Hitoshi

    1992-01-01

    Three dimensional velocities of fragments produced by laboratory impact experiments were measured for basalts and pyrophyllites. The velocity distribution of fragments obtained shows that the velocity range of the major fragments is rather narrow, at most within a factor of 3 and that no clear dependence of velocity on the fragment mass is observed. The NonDimensional Impact Stress (NDIS) defined by Mizutani et al. (1990) is found to be an appropriate scaling parameter to describe the overall fragment velocity as well as the antipodal velocity.

  2. High velocity impact experiment (HVIE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toor, A.; Donich, T.; Carter, P.

    1998-02-01

    The HVIE space project was conceived as a way to measure the absolute EOS for approximately 10 materials at pressures up to {approximately}30 Mb with order-of-magnitude higher accuracy than obtainable in any comparable experiment conducted on earth. The experiment configuration is such that each of the 10 materials interacts with all of the others thereby producing one-hundred independent, simultaneous EOS experiments The materials will be selected to provide critical information to weapons designers, National Ignition Facility target designers and planetary and geophysical scientists. In addition, HVIE will provide important scientific information to other communities, including the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization and the lethality and vulnerability community. The basic HVIE concept is to place two probes in counter rotating, highly elliptical orbits and collide them at high velocity (20 km/s) at 100 km altitude above the earth. The low altitude of the experiment will provide quick debris strip-out of orbit due to atmospheric drag. The preliminary conceptual evaluation of the HVIE has found no show stoppers. The design has been very easy to keep within the lift capabilities of commonly available rides to low earth orbit including the space shuttle. The cost of approximately 69 million dollars for 100 EOS experiment that will yield the much needed high accuracy, absolute measurement data is a bargain!

  3. Mean Velocity vs. Mean Propulsive Velocity vs. Peak Velocity: Which Variable Determines Bench Press Relative Load With Higher Reliability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ramos, Amador; Pestaña-Melero, Francisco L; Pérez-Castilla, Alejandro; Rojas, Francisco J; Gregory Haff, G

    2018-05-01

    García-Ramos, A, Pestaña-Melero, FL, Pérez-Castilla, A, Rojas, FJ, and Haff, GG. Mean velocity vs. mean propulsive velocity vs. peak velocity: which variable determines bench press relative load with higher reliability? J Strength Cond Res 32(5): 1273-1279, 2018-This study aimed to compare between 3 velocity variables (mean velocity [MV], mean propulsive velocity [MPV], and peak velocity [PV]): (a) the linearity of the load-velocity relationship, (b) the accuracy of general regression equations to predict relative load (%1RM), and (c) the between-session reliability of the velocity attained at each percentage of the 1-repetition maximum (%1RM). The full load-velocity relationship of 30 men was evaluated by means of linear regression models in the concentric-only and eccentric-concentric bench press throw (BPT) variants performed with a Smith machine. The 2 sessions of each BPT variant were performed within the same week separated by 48-72 hours. The main findings were as follows: (a) the MV showed the strongest linearity of the load-velocity relationship (median r = 0.989 for concentric-only BPT and 0.993 for eccentric-concentric BPT), followed by MPV (median r = 0.983 for concentric-only BPT and 0.980 for eccentric-concentric BPT), and finally PV (median r = 0.974 for concentric-only BPT and 0.969 for eccentric-concentric BPT); (b) the accuracy of the general regression equations to predict relative load (%1RM) from movement velocity was higher for MV (SEE = 3.80-4.76%1RM) than for MPV (SEE = 4.91-5.56%1RM) and PV (SEE = 5.36-5.77%1RM); and (c) the PV showed the lowest within-subjects coefficient of variation (3.50%-3.87%), followed by MV (4.05%-4.93%), and finally MPV (5.11%-6.03%). Taken together, these results suggest that the MV could be the most appropriate variable for monitoring the relative load (%1RM) in the BPT exercise performed in a Smith machine.

  4. Considerations on Velocities and Accelerations in Higher Pairs Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florina-Carmen Ciornei

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposes a method for finding the velocities and accelerations in the pairs from a mechanism with higher pairs in the case when the curvature radii of the curves achieving the higher pair are finite. There are obtained the characteristic equations of the motion in the higher pair for the case that one of the curves has zero curvature radius, condition characteristic to the knife edge follower. The relations are required to justify the difference between the particular cases of knife edge follower and flat face follower. The methodology is exemplified through an actual example.

  5. Fatigue Performance of Composite Laminates After Low-velocity Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIANG Xiao-lin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Compression-compression fatigue tests were carried out on T300/5405 composite laminates after low-velocity impact, compression performance of the laminates with different impact damages was studied together with its fatigue life and damage propagation under different stress levels, then the effects of impact energy, stress level and damage propagation on fatigue life of laminates were discussed. The results indicate that impact damage can greatly reduce the residual strength of laminates; under low fatigue load levels, the higher impact energy is, the shorter the fatigue life of laminates with impact damage will be; damage propagation undergoes two stages during the fatigue test, namely the steady propagation and the rapid propagation, accounting for 80% and 20% of the overall fatigue life, respectively; damage propagation rate decreases with the reduction of stress level.

  6. Mass spectrometry of hyper-velocity impacts of organic micrograins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srama, Ralf; Woiwode, Wolfgang; Postberg, Frank; Armes, Steven P; Fujii, Syuji; Dupin, Damien; Ormond-Prout, Jonathan; Sternovsky, Zoltan; Kempf, Sascha; Moragas-Klostermeyer, Georg; Mocker, Anna; Grün, Eberhard

    2009-12-01

    The study of hyper-velocity impacts of micrometeoroids is important for the calibration of dust sensors in space applications. For this purpose, submicron-sized synthetic dust grains comprising either polystyrene or poly[bis(4-vinylthiophenyl)sulfide] were coated with an ultrathin overlayer of an electrically conductive organic polymer (either polypyrrole or polyaniline) and were accelerated to speeds between 3 and 35 km s(-1) using the Heidelberg Dust Accelerator facility. Time-of-flight mass spectrometry was applied to analyse the resulting ionic impact plasma using a newly developed Large Area Mass Analyser (LAMA). Depending on the projectile type and the impact speed, both aliphatic and aromatic molecular ions and cluster species were identified in the mass spectra with masses up to 400 u. Clusters resulting from the target material (silver) and mixed clusters of target and projectile species were also observed. Impact velocities of between 10 and 35 km s(-1) are suitable for a principal identification of organic materials in micrometeoroids, whereas impact speeds below approximately 10 km s(-1) allow for an even more detailed analysis. Molecular ions and fragments reflect components of the parent molecule, providing determination of even complex organic molecules embedded in a dust grain. In contrast to previous measurements with the Cosmic Dust Analyser instrument, the employed LAMA instrument has a seven times higher mass resolution--approximately 200--which allowed for a detailed analysis of the complex mass spectra. These fundamental studies are expected to enhance our understanding of cometary, interplanetary and interstellar dust grains, which travel at similar hyper-velocities and are known to contain both aliphatic and aromatic organic compounds. Copyright 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Low Velocity Sphere Impact of a Borosilicate Glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrissey, Timothy G [ORNL; Ferber, Mattison K [ORNL; Wereszczak, Andrew A [ORNL; Fox, Ethan E [ORNL

    2012-05-01

    This report summarizes US Army TARDEC sponsored work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) involving low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) ball impact testing of Borofloat borosilicate glass, and is a follow-up to a similar study completed by the authors on Starphire soda-lime silicate glass last year. The response of the borosilicate glass to impact testing at different angles was also studied. The Borofloat glass was supplied by the US Army Research Laboratory and its tin-side was impacted or indented. The intent was to better understand low velocity impact response in the Borofloat. Seven sphere materials were used whose densities bracket that of rock: borosilicate glass, soda-lime silicate glass, silicon nitride, aluminum oxide, zirconium oxide, carbon steel, and a chrome steel. A gas gun or a ball-drop test setup was used to produce controlled velocity delivery of the spheres against the glass tile targets. Minimum impact velocities to initiate fracture in the Borofloat were measured and interpreted in context to the kinetic energy of impact and the elastic property mismatch between the seven sphere-Borofloat-target combinations. The primary observations from this low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) testing were: (1) BS glass responded similarly to soda-lime silicate glass when spherically indented but quite differently under sphere impact conditions; (2) Frictional effects contributed to fracture initiation in BS glass when it spherically indented. This effect was also observed with soda-lime silicate glass; (3) The force necessary to initiate fracture in BS glass under spherical impact decreases with increasing elastic modulus of the sphere material. This trend is opposite to what was observed with soda-lime silicate glass. Friction cannot explain this trend and the authors do not have a legitimate explanation for it yet; (4) The force necessary to initiate contact-induced fracture is higher under dynamic conditions than under quasi-static conditions. That

  8. Beyond velocity and acceleration: jerk, snap and higher derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eager, David; Pendrill, Ann-Marie; Reistad, Nina

    2016-11-01

    The higher derivatives of motion are rarely discussed in the teaching of classical mechanics of rigid bodies; nevertheless, we experience the effect not only of acceleration, but also of jerk and snap. In this paper we will discuss the third and higher order derivatives of displacement with respect to time, using the trampolines and theme park roller coasters to illustrate this concept. We will also discuss the effects on the human body of different types of acceleration, jerk, snap and higher derivatives, and how they can be used in physics education to further enhance the learning and thus the understanding of classical mechanics concepts.

  9. Low velocity impact of 6082-T6 aluminum plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocian, Oana Alexandra; Constantinescu, Dan Mihai; Sandu, Marin; Sorohan, Ştefan

    2018-02-01

    The low velocity domain covers vehicle impacts, ship collisions and even accidentally tool drops. Even though more and more research is needed into these fields, most of the papers concerning impact problems focus on impact at medium and high velocities. Understanding the behavior of structures subjected to low velocity impact is of major importance when referring to impact resistance and damage tolerance. The paper presents an experimental and numerical investigation on the low velocity behavior of 6082-T6 aluminum plates. Impact tests were performed using an Instron Ceast 9340 drop-weight testing machine. In the experimental procedure, square plates were mounted on a circular support, fixed with a pneumatic clamping system and impacted with a hemispherical steel projectile. Specimens were impacted at constant weight and different impact velocities. The effect of different impact energies was investigated. The impact event was then simulated using the nonlinear finite element code LS_DYNA in order to determine the effect of strain rate upon the mechanical behavior of the aluminum plates. Moreover, in order to capture the exact behavior of the material, a special attention has been given to the selection of the correct material model and its parameters, which, in large extent, depend on the observed behavior of the aluminum plate during the test and the actual response of the plate under simulation. The numerical predictions are compared with the experimental observations and the applicability of the numerical model for further researches is analyzed.

  10. Investigation on low velocity impact resistance of SMA composite material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Dianyin; Zhang, Long; Wang, Rongqiao; Zhang, Xiaoyong

    2016-04-01

    A method to improve low velocity impact resistance of aeroengine composite casing using shape memory alloy's properties of shape memory(SM) and super-elasticity(SE) is proposed in this study. Firstly, a numerical modeling of SMA reinforced composite laminate under low velocity impact load with impact velocity of 10 m/s is established based on its constitutive model implemented by the VUMAT subroutine of commercial software ABAQUS. Secondly, the responses of SMA composite laminate including stress and deflection distributions were achieved through transient analysis under low velocity impact load. Numerical results show that both peak stress and deflection values of SMA composite laminate are less than that without SMA, which proves that embedding SMA into the composite structure can effectively improve the low velocity impact performance of composite structure. Finally, the influence of SM and SE on low velocity impact resistance is quantitatively investigated. The values of peak stress and deflection of SMA composite based on SM property decrease by 18.28% and 9.43% respectively, compared with those without SMA, instead of 12.87% and 5.19% based on SE. In conclusion, this proposed model described the impact damage of SMA composite structure and turned to be a more beneficial method to enhance the impact resistance by utilizing SM effect.

  11. Wave velocity characteristic for Kenaf natural fibre under impact damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaleha, M.; Mahzan, S.; Fitri, Muhamad; Kamarudin, K. A.; Eliza, Y.; Tobi, A. L. Mohd

    2017-01-01

    This paper aims to determining the wave velocity characteristics for kenaf fibre reinforced composite (KFC) and it includes both experimental and simulation results. Lead zirconate titanate (PZT) sensor were proposed to be positioned to corresponding locations on the panel. In order to demonstrate the wave velocity, an impacts was introduced onto the panel. It is based on a classical sensor triangulation methodology, combines with experimental strain wave velocity analysis. Then the simulation was designed to replicate panel used in the experimental impacts test. This simulation was carried out using ABAQUS. It was shown that the wave velocity propagates faster in the finite element simulation. Although the experimental strain wave velocity and finite element simulation results do not match exactly, the shape of both waves is similar.

  12. A study of the impact properties of adhesively-bonded aluminum alloy based on impact velocity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Teng; Cheon, Seong Sik; Cho, Jae Ung [Kongju National University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Kinloch, Anthony J.; Blackman, Bamber R. K.; Sanchez, F. S. Rodriguez [Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom); Bang, Hye Jin; Lee, Sang Kyo; Cho, Chong Du [Inha University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    In this study, an experiment and a simulation were carried out on colliding an adhesively-bonded tapered double cantilever beam (TDCB) at the impact velocities of 5 m/s, 7.5 m/s and 12.5 m/s. The analysis method of the corrected beam theory (CBT) was used to obtain the rate of energy release in the bonded area according to the crack progression, and a simulation was performed to determine the maximum strain energy during the impact analysis as a means to examine the mechanical properties of aluminium alloy. The experimental data were found to be higher than the simulation data. This is deemed to explicable by the fact that the adhesive strength was maintained even after the specimen separated in the experiment. Crack progression occurred, irrespective of the impact velocity, and high strain energy occurred at the end of the bonded region, thereby causing the strain energy to increase in the final stages. Also, the maximum load applied on the pin and the maximum strain energy in the bonded area were shown increase at higher impact velocities. The results of the experiment and simulation performed in this study are expected to serve as important data in developing a safety design for composite materials that can help prevent the progression of cracks caused by impact.

  13. Initial Examination of Low Velocity Sphere Impact of Glass Ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrissey, Timothy G [ORNL; Fox, Ethan E [ORNL; Wereszczak, Andrew A [ORNL; Ferber, Mattison K [ORNL

    2012-06-01

    This report summarizes US Army TARDEC sponsored work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) involving low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) sphere impact testing of two materials from the lithium aluminosilicate family reinforced with different amounts of ceramic particulate, i.e., glass-ceramic materials, SCHOTT Resistan{trademark}-G1 and SCHOTT Resistan{trademark}-L. Both materials are provided by SCHOTT Glass (Duryea, PA). This work is a follow-up to similar sphere impact studies completed by the authors on PPG's Starphire{reg_sign} soda-lime silicate glass and SCHOTT BOROFLOAT{reg_sign} borosilicate glass. A gas gun or a sphere-drop test setup was used to produce controlled velocity delivery of silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) spheres against the glass ceramic tile targets. Minimum impact velocities to initiate fracture in the glass-ceramics were measured and interpreted in context to the kinetic energy of impact and the elastic property mismatch between sphere and target material. Quasistatic spherical indentation was also performed on both glass ceramics and their contact damage responses were compared to those of soda-lime silicate and borosilicate glasses. Lastly, variability of contact damage response was assessed by performing spherical indentation testing across the area of an entire glass ceramic tile. The primary observations from this low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) testing were: (1) Resistan{trademark}-L glass ceramic required the highest velocity of sphere impact for damage to initiate. Starphire{reg_sign} soda-lime silicate glass was second best, then Resistan{trademark}-G1 glass ceramic, and then BOROFLOAT{reg_sign} borosilicate glass. (2) Glass-ceramic Resistan{trademark}-L also required the largest force to initiate ring crack from quasi-static indentation. That ranking was followed, in descending order, by Starphire{reg_sign} soda-lime silicate glass, Resistan{trademark}-G1 glass ceramic, and BOROFLOAT{reg_sign} borosilicate glass

  14. Isolated Bacterial Spores at High-velocity Survive Surface Impacts in Vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Daniel; Barney, Brandon

    We present experiments in which bacterial spores were found to survive being accelerated in vacuum to velocities in the range 30-120 m/s and impacted on a dense target. In these experiments, spores of Bacillus subtilis spores were charged using electrospray at atmospheric pressure, dried, and then introduced into high vacuum. Through choice of skimmers and beam tubes, different velocity ranges were achieved. An image-charge detector observed the charged spores, providing total charge and velocity. The spores then impacted a glass target within a collection vessel. After the experiment, the collection vessel contents were extracted and cultured. Several positive and negative controls were used, including the use of antibiotic-resistant spores and antibiotic-containing (rifampicin) agar for culturing. These impact velocities are of particular interest for possible transport of bacterial spores from Mars to Phobos, and may have implications for planetary protection in a Phobos sample return mission. In addition, bacteria may reach similar velocities during a spacecraft crash (e.g., within components, or from spacecraft to surface materials during impact, etc.), raising concerns about forward contamination. The velocities of interest to transport of life between planets (panspermia) are somewhat higher, but these results complement shock-based experiments and contribute to the general discussion of impact survivability of organisms.

  15. Low Velocity Impact Behavior of Basalt Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishevan, Farzin Azimpour; Akbulut, Hamid; Mohtadi-Bonab, M. A.

    2017-06-01

    In this research, we studied low velocity impact response of homogenous basalt fiber-reinforced polymer (BFRP) composites and then compared the impact key parameters with carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) homogenous composites. BFRPs and CFRPs were fabricated by vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) method. Fabricated composites included 60% fiber and 40% epoxy matrix. Basalt and carbon fibers used as reinforcement materials were weaved in 2/2 twill textile tip in the structures of BFRP and CFRP composites. We also utilized the energy profile method to determine penetration and perforation threshold energies. The low velocity impact tests were carried out in 30, 60, 80, 100, 120 and 160 J energy magnitudes, and impact response of BFRPs was investigated by related force-deflection, force-time, deflection-time and absorbed energy-time graphics. The related impact key parameters such as maximum contact force, absorbed energy, deflection and duration time were compared with CFRPs for various impact energy levels. As a result, due to the higher toughness of basalt fibers, a better low velocity impact performance of BFRP than that of CFRP was observed. The effects of fabrication parameters, such as curing process, were studied on the low velocity impact behavior of BFRP. The results of tested new fabricated materials show that the change of fabrication process and curing conditions improves the impact behavior of BFRPs up to 13%.

  16. Dangerous Climate Velocities from Geoengineering Termination: Potential Biodiversity Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trisos, C.; Gurevitch, J.; Zambri, B.; Xia, L.; Amatulli, G.; Robock, A.

    2016-12-01

    Geoengineering has been suggested as a potential societal response to the impacts of ongoing global warming. If ongoing mitigation and adaptation measures do not prevent the most dangerous consequences of climate change, it is important to study whether solar radiation management would make the world less dangerous. While impacts of albedo modification on temperature, precipitation, and agriculture have been studied before, here for the first time we investigate its potential ecological impacts. We estimate the speeds marine and terrestrial ecosystems will need to move to remain in their current climate conditions (i.e., climate velocities) in response to the implementation and subsequent termination of geoengineering. We take advantage of climate model simulations conducted using the G4 scenario of the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project, in which increased radiative forcing from the RCP4.5 scenario is balanced by a stratospheric aerosol cloud produced by an injection of 5 Tg of SO2 per year into the lower stratosphere for 50 years, and then stopped. The termination of geoengineering is projected to produce a very rapid warming of the climate, resulting in climate velocities much faster than those that will be produced from anthropogenic global warming. Should ongoing geoengineering be terminated abruptly due to society losing the means or will to continue, the resulting ecological impacts, as measured by climate velocities, could be severe for many terrestrial and marine biodiversity hotspots. Thus, the implementation of solar geoengineering represents a potential danger not just to humans, but also to biodiversity globally.

  17. Experimental and numerical studies of high-velocity impact fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kipp, M.E.; Grady, D.E.; Swegle, J.W.

    1993-08-01

    Developments are reported in both experimental and numerical capabilities for characterizing the debris spray produced in penetration events. We have performed a series of high-velocity experiments specifically designed to examine the fragmentation of the projectile during impact. High-strength, well-characterized steel spheres (6.35 mm diameter) were launched with a two-stage light-gas gun to velocities in the range of 3 to 5 km/s. Normal impact with PMMA plates, thicknesses of 0.6 to 11 mm, applied impulsive loads of various amplitudes and durations to the steel sphere. Multiple flash radiography diagnostics and recovery techniques were used to assess size, velocity, trajectory and statistics of the impact-induced fragment debris. Damage modes to the primary target plate (plastic) and to a secondary target plate (aluminum) were also evaluated. Dynamic fragmentation theories, based on energy-balance principles, were used to evaluate local material deformation and fracture state information from CTH, a three-dimensional Eulerian solid dynamics shock wave propagation code. The local fragment characterization of the material defines a weighted fragment size distribution, and the sum of these distributions provides a composite particle size distribution for the steel sphere. The calculated axial and radial velocity changes agree well with experimental data, and the calculated fragment sizes are in qualitative agreement with the radiographic data. A secondary effort involved the experimental and computational analyses of normal and oblique copper ball impacts on steel target plates. High-resolution radiography and witness plate diagnostics provided impact motion and statistical fragment size data. CTH simulations were performed to test computational models and numerical methods.

  18. Fuel bundle impact velocities due to reverse flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahba, N.N.; Locke, K.E.

    1996-01-01

    If a break should occur in the inlet feeder or inlet header of a CANDU reactor, the rapid depressurization will cause the channel flow(s) to reverse. Depending on the gap between the upstream bundle and shield plug, the string of bundles will accelerate in the reverse direction and impact with the upstream shield plug. The reverse flow impact velocities have been calculated for various operating states for the Bruce NGS A reactors. The sensitivity to several analysis assumptions has been determined. (author)

  19. Modeling delamination of FRP laminates under low velocity impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Z.; Wen, H. M.; Ren, S. L.

    2017-09-01

    Fiber reinforced plastic laminates (FRP) have been increasingly used in various engineering such as aeronautics, astronautics, transportation, naval architecture and their impact response and failure are a major concern in academic community. A new numerical model is suggested for fiber reinforced plastic composites. The model considers that FRP laminates has been constituted by unidirectional laminated plates with adhesive layers. A modified adhesive layer damage model that considering strain rate effects is incorporated into the ABAQUS / EXPLICIT finite element program by the user-defined material subroutine VUMAT. It transpires that the present model predicted delamination is in good agreement with the experimental results for low velocity impact.

  20. Damage in woven CFRP laminates subjected to low velocity impacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullah, H; Abdel-Wahab, A A; Harland, A R; Silberschmidt, V V

    2012-01-01

    Carbon fabric-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites used in sports products can be exposed to different in-service conditions such as large dynamic bending deformations caused by impact loading. Composite materials subjected to such loads demonstrate various damage modes such as matrix cracking, delamination and, ultimately, fabric fracture. Damage evolution in these materials affects both their in-service properties and performance that can deteriorate with time. These processes need adequate means of analysis and investigation, the major approaches being experimental characterisation and non-destructive examination of internal damage in composite laminates. This research deals with a deformation behaviour and damage in woven composite laminates due to low-velocity dynamic out-of-plane bending. Experimental tests are carried out to characterise the behaviour of such laminates under large-deflection dynamic bending in un-notched specimens in Izod tests using a Resil Impactor. A series of low-velocity impact tests is carried out at various levels of impact energy to assess the energy absorbed and force-time response of CFRP laminates. X-ray micro computed tomography (micro-CT) is used to investigate material damage modes in the impacted specimens. X-ray tomographs revealed that through-thickness matrix cracking, inter-ply delamination and intra-ply delamination, such as tow debonding and fabric fracture, were the prominent damage modes.

  1. Modelling low velocity impact induced damage in composite laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yu; Soutis, Constantinos

    2017-12-01

    The paper presents recent progress on modelling low velocity impact induced damage in fibre reinforced composite laminates. It is important to understand the mechanisms of barely visible impact damage (BVID) and how it affects structural performance. To reduce labour intensive testing, the development of finite element (FE) techniques for simulating impact damage becomes essential and recent effort by the composites research community is reviewed in this work. The FE predicted damage initiation and propagation can be validated by Non Destructive Techniques (NDT) that gives confidence to the developed numerical damage models. A reliable damage simulation can assist the design process to optimise laminate configurations, reduce weight and improve performance of components and structures used in aircraft construction.

  2. Low Velocity Impact Properties of Aluminum Foam Sandwich Structural Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHAO Jin-hua

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Sandwich structural composites were prepared by aluminum foam as core materials with basalt fiber(BF and ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene(UHMWPE fiber composite as faceplate. The effect of factors of different fiber type faceplates, fabric layer design and the thickness of the corematerials on the impact properties and damage mode of aluminum foam sandwich structure was studied. The impact properties were also analyzed to compare with aluminum honeycomb sandwich structure. The results show that BF/aluminum foam sandwich structural composites has bigger impact damage load than UHMWPE/aluminum foam sandwich structure, but less impact displacement and energy absorption. The inter-layer hybrid fabric design of BF and UHMWPE has higher impact load and energy absorption than the overlay hybrid fabric design faceplate sandwich structure. With the increase of the thickness of aluminum foam,the impact load of the sandwich structure decreases, but the energy absorption increases. Aluminum foam sandwich structure has higher impact load than the aluminum honeycomb sandwich structure, but smaller damage energy absorption; the damage mode of aluminum foam core material is mainly the fracture at the impact area, while aluminum honeycomb core has obvious overall compression failure.

  3. Rebound mechanics of micrometre-scale, spherical particles in high-velocity impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Baran; Yang, Hankang; Gouldstone, Andrew; Müftü, Sinan

    2017-08-01

    The impact mechanics of micrometre-scale metal particles with flat metal surfaces is investigated for high-velocity impacts ranging from 50 m s -1 to more than 1 km s -1 , where impact causes predominantly plastic deformation. A material model that includes high strain rate and temperature effects on the yield stress, heat generation due to plasticity, material damage due to excessive plastic strain and heat transfer is used in the numerical analysis. The coefficient of restitution e is predicted by the classical work using elastic-plastic deformation analysis with quasi-static impact mechanics to be proportional to [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] for the low and moderate impact velocities that span the ranges of 0-10 and 10-100 m s -1 , respectively. In the elastic-plastic and fully plastic deformation regimes the particle rebound is attributed to the elastic spring-back that initiates at the particle-substrate interface. At higher impact velocities (0.1-1 km s -1 ) e is shown to be proportional to approximately [Formula: see text]. In this deeply plastic deformation regime various deformation modes that depend on plastic flow of the material including the time lag between the rebound instances of the top and bottom points of particle and the lateral spreading of the particle are identified. In this deformation regime, the elastic spring-back initiates subsurface, in the substrate.

  4. RESPONSE OF STRUCTURES TO HIGH VELOCITY IMPACTS: A GENERALIZED ALGORITHM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aversh'ev Anatoliy Sergeevich

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a high velocity impact produced by a spherical striker and a target are considered; different stages of loading and unloading, target deformations and propagation of non-stationary wave surfaces within the target are analyzed. The problem of the strike modeling and subsequent deformations is solved by using not only the equations of mechanics of deformable rigid bodies, but also fluid mechanics equations. The target material is simulated by means of an ideal "plastic gas". Modeling results and theoretical calculations are compared to the experimental results. The crater depth, its correlation with the striker diameter, values of the pressure and deformations of the target underneath the contact area are determined as the main characteristics of dynamic interaction.

  5. Time-resolved wave-profile measurements at impact velocities of 10 km/s

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chhabildas, L.C.; Furnish, M.D.; Reinhart, W.D.

    1998-06-01

    Development of well-controlled hypervelocity launch capabilities is the first step to understand material behavior at extreme pressures and temperatures not available using conventional gun technology. In this paper, techniques used to extend both the launch capabilities of a two-stage light-gas gun to 10 km/s and their use to determine material properties at pressures and temperature states higher than those ever obtained in the laboratory are summarized. Time-resolved interferometric techniques have been used to determine shock loading and release characteristics of materials impacted by titanium and aluminum fliers launched by the only developed three-stage light-gas gun at 10 km/s. In particular, the Sandia three stage light gas gun, also referred to as the hypervelocity launcher, HVL, which is capable of launching 0.5 mm to 1.0 mm thick by 6 mm to 19 mm diameter plates to velocities approaching 16 km/s has been used to obtain the necessary impact velocities. The VISAR, interferometric particle-velocity techniques has been used to determine shock loading and release profiles in aluminum and titanium at impact velocities of 10 km/s.

  6. Impacts into Coarse-Grained Spheres at Moderate Impact Velocities: Implications for Cratering on Asteroids and Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnouin, Olivier S.; Daly, R. Terik; Cintala, Mark J.; Crawford, David A.

    2018-01-01

    The surfaces of many planets and asteroids contain coarsely fragmental material generated by impacts or other geologic processes. The presence of such pre-existing structures may affect subsequent impacts, particularly when the width of the shock is comparable to or smaller than the size of pre-existing structures. Reasonable theoretical predictions and low speed (<300m/s) impact experiments suggest that in such targets the cratering process should be highly dissipative, which would reduce cratering efficiencies and cause a rapid decay in ejection velocity as a function of distance from the impact point. In this study, we assess whether these results apply at higher impact speeds between 0.5 and 2.5 km s-1. This study shows little change in cratering efficiency when 3.18 mm diameter glass beads are launched into targets composed of these same beads. These impacts are very efficient, and ejection velocity decays slowly as function of distance from the impact point. This slow decay in ejection velocity probably indicates a correspondingly slow decay of the shock stresses. However, these experiments reveal that initial interactions between projectile and target strongly influence the cratering process and lead to asymmetries in crater shape and ejection angles, as well as significant variations in ejection velocity at a given launch position. Such effects of asymmetric coupling could be further enhanced by heterogeneity in the initial distribution of grains in the target and by mechanical collisions between grains. These experiments help to explain why so few craters are seen on the rubble-pile asteroid Itokawa: impacts into its coarsely fragmental surface by projectiles comparable to or smaller than the size of these fragments likely yield craters that are not easily recognizable.

  7. Microparticle impacts at ultrahigh velocities and their relation to macroparticle impacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsh, J.M.; Stradling, G.L.; Idzorek, G.C.; Shafer, B.P.; Curling, H.L. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The Hypervelocity Microparticle Impact project at Los Alamos has utilized electrostatically accelerated iron spheres of microscopic dimensions to generate ultra-high velocity impact experiments to about 100 km/S, an order of magnitude beyond data range for precisely controlled impact tests with ordinary macroscopic projectiles. Extreme smallness of the micro impact events brings into question whether usual shock-hydrodynamic size scaling can be assumed. Validity of size scaling (and its refinement) is questioned in the present study. Impact experiments are compared in which two impact events at a given velocity, a microscopic impact and a macroscopic impact, are essentially identical except that the projectile masses and crater volumes differ by nearly 12 orders of magnitude -- linear dimensions and times differing by 4 orders of magnitude. Strain rates at corresponding points in a deforming crater increase 4 orders of magnitude with the size reduction. Departures from exact scaling, by a factor of 3.7 in crater volume, are observed for copper targets -- with micro craters being smaller than scaling would predict. Measurement of impact craters for very small impact events leads to determination of metal yield stresses at strain rates more than two orders of magnitude greater than have been obtained by other methods. Determination of material strengths at these exceedingly high strain rates is important. Results are compared to recent theoretical models by Follansbee, Kochs and Rollett. The problem is addressed of predicting crater sizes in a target material with strain rate effects. Basic results are recalled on the late stage equivalence of hypervelocity impacts. For the strain rate dependent material to show that the curve of dimensionless crater volume versus impact velocity is replaced by a family of curves, each member of which is for one final crater size. The spacing of the curves is determined by the stress versus strain properties of the material

  8. Low-velocity impact cratering experiments in granular slopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Kosuke; Sumita, Ikuro

    2017-07-01

    Low-velocity impact cratering experiments are conducted in sloped granular targets to study the effect of the slope angle θ on the crater shape and its scales. We use two types of granular matter, sand and glass beads, former of which has a larger friction coefficient μs = tanθr , where θr is the angle of repose. Experiments show that as θ increases, the crater becomes shallower and elongated in the direction of the slope. Furthermore the crater floor steepens in the upslope side and a thick rim forms in the downslope side, thus forming an asymmetric profile. High-speed images show that these features are results of ejecta being dispersed farther towards the downslope side and the subsequent avalanche which buries much of the crater floor. Such asymmetric ejecta dispersal can be explained by combining the Z-model and a ballistic model. Using the topographic maps of the craters, we classify crater shape regimes I-III, which transition with increasing θ : a full-rim crater (I), a broken-rim crater (II), and a depression (III). The critical θ for the regime transitions are larger for sand compared to glass beads, but collapse to close values when we use a normalized slope θ^ = tanθ / tanθr . Similarly we derive θ^-dependences of the scaled crater depth, length, width and their ratios which collapse the results for different targets and impact energies. We compare the crater profiles formed in our experiments with deep craters on asteroid Vesta and find that some of the scaled profiles nearly overlap and many have similar depth / length ratios. This suggests that these Vestan craters may also have formed in the gravity regime and that the formation process can be approximated by a granular flow with a similar effective friction coefficient.

  9. Low-velocity Impact Response of a Nanocomposite Beam Using an Analytical Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Heydari Meybodi

    Full Text Available AbstractLow-velocity impact of a nanocomposite beam made of glass/epoxy reinforced with multi-wall carbon nanotubes and clay nanoparticles is investigated in this study. Exerting modified rule of mixture (MROM, the mechanical properties of nanocomposite including matrix, nanoparticles or multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT, and fiber are attained. In order to analyze the low-velocity impact, Euler-Bernoulli beam theory and Hertz's contact law are simultaneously employed to govern the equations of motion. Using Ritz's variational approximation method, a set of nonlinear equations in time domain are obtained, which are solved using a fourth order Runge-Kutta method. The effect of different parameters such as adding nanoparticles or MWCNT's on maximum contact force and energy absorption, stacking sequence, geometrical dimensions (i.e., length, width and height, and initial velocity of the impactor have been studied comprehensively on dynamic behavior of the nanocomposite beam. In addition, the result of analytical model is compared with Finite Element Modeling (FEM.The results reveal that the effect of nanoparticles on energy absorption is more considerable at higher impact energies.

  10. Deposition velocities and impact of physical properties on ozone removal for building materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chi-Chi; Hsu, Shu-Chen

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to estimate the ozone deposition velocities of eight commonly used building materials (BMs) which include calcium silicate board (CSB), green calcium silicate board (GCSB), mineral fiber ceiling (MFC), green mineral fiber ceiling (GMFC), gypsum board (GB), green gypsum board (GGB), wooden flooring (WF) and green wooden flooring (GWF). In addition, the impact of physical properties (specific surface area and total pore volume of BM) on ozone removal ability was also explored and discussed. Studies were conducted in a small-scale environmental stainless steel chamber. CSB and GCSB showed the highest ozone deposition velocities, while WF and GWF showed the lowest ozone deposition velocities among test BMs materials. All reaction probabilities were estimated to fall within the order of magnitude of 10-6. Green BMs showed lower reaction probabilities with ozone comparing with non-green BMs except for GGB. Consistent with the trends for deposition velocity, fleecy and porous materials exhibit higher reaction probabilities than smooth, non-porous surfaces. Specific surface area of BM is more closely related to ozone removal than total pore volume of BM with R2 of 0.93 vs. R2 of 0.84. Discussion of Thiele modulus for all test BMs indicates surface reactions are occurring quickly relative to internal diffusion and ozone removal is internal diffusion-limited.

  11. Impact velocity vs. target hardness relationships for equivalent response of cask structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, T.F.; Chen, J.C.; Witte, M.C.; Fischer, L.E.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, impact velocity vs. target hardness relationships for cask structures are reviewed. The relationships are based on equivalent cask responses in terms of equal deceleration or similar cask damages. By examining several past cask or container tests as well as some analytical results, some conclusions can be drawn about the relationship between target hardness and equivalent impact velocities. This relationship clearly shows that the cask response to impact is cask-dependent and that the rigid sphere impact model results in an unconservative estimate of equivalent velocity

  12. Acceleration to High Velocities and Heating by Impact Using Nike KrF laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasik, Max

    2009-11-01

    Shock ignition, impact ignition, as well as higher intensity conventional hot spot ignition designs reduce driver energy requirement by pushing the envelope in laser intensity and target implosion velocities. This talk will describe experiments that for the first time reach target velocities in the range of 700 -- 1000 km/s. The highly accelerated planar foils of deuterated polystyrene, some with bromine doping, are made to collide with a witness foil to produce extreme shock pressures and result in heating of matter to thermonuclear temperatures. Target acceleration and collision are diagnosed using large field of view monochromatic x-ray imaging with backlighting as well as bremsstrahlung self-emission. The impact conditions are diagnosed using DD fusion neutron yield, with over 10^6 neutrons produced during the collision. Time-of-flight neutron detectors are used to measure the ion temperature upon impact, which reaches 2 -- 3 keV. The experiments are performed on the Nike facility, reconfigured specifically for high intensity operation. The short wavelength and high illumination uniformity of Nike KrF laser uniquely enable access to this new parameter regime. Intensities of (0.4 -- 1.2) x 10^15 W/cm^2 and pulse durations of 0.4 -- 2 ns were utilized. Modeling of the target acceleration, collision, and neutron production is performed using the FAST3D radiation hydrodynamics code with a non-LTE radiation model. Work is supported by US Department of Energy.

  13. Low velocity impact behaviour of ultra high strength concrete panels

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ultra high strength concrete; panel; drop weight test; impact analysis;. ABAQUS. 1. Introduction. Ultra high strength concrete ... Knight (2012) investigated the dynamic behaviour of steel fibre reinforced concrete plates under impact loading with ...

  14. Increasing Impact of Technology in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utah System of Higher Education, 2016

    2016-01-01

    For Fall 2016, of the 175,509 students enrolled in the Utah System of Higher Education at third week, 69,535 (39.6 %) are participating in some form of technology delivered instruction. Of that total, 54,269 (30.9%) enrolled in at least one online class. Despite availability of online courses and degrees, students prefer using online courses to…

  15. Theoretical Research Progress in High-Velocity/Hypervelocity Impact on Semi-Infinite Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunhou Sun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the hypervelocity kinetic weapon and hypersonic cruise missiles research projects being carried out, the damage mechanism for high-velocity/hypervelocity projectile impact on semi-infinite targets has become the research keystone in impact dynamics. Theoretical research progress in high-velocity/hypervelocity impact on semi-infinite targets was reviewed in this paper. The evaluation methods for critical velocity of high-velocity and hypervelocity impact were summarized. The crater shape, crater scaling laws and empirical formulae, and simplified analysis models of crater parameters for spherical projectiles impact on semi-infinite targets were reviewed, so were the long rod penetration state differentiation, penetration depth calculation models for the semifluid, and deformed long rod projectiles. Finally, some research proposals were given for further study.

  16. The size distributions of fragments ejected at a given velocity from impact craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keefe, John D.; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1987-01-01

    The mass distribution of fragments that are ejected at a given velocity for impact craters is modeled to allow extrapolation of laboratory, field, and numerical results to large scale planetary events. The model is semi-empirical in nature and is derived from: (1) numerical calculations of cratering and the resultant mass versus ejection velocity, (2) observed ejecta blanket particle size distributions, (3) an empirical relationship between maximum ejecta fragment size and crater diameter, (4) measurements and theory of maximum ejecta size versus ejecta velocity, and (5) an assumption on the functional form for the distribution of fragments ejected at a given velocity. This model implies that for planetary impacts into competent rock, the distribution of fragments ejected at a given velocity is broad, e.g., 68 percent of the mass of the ejecta at a given velocity contains fragments having a mass less than 0.1 times a mass of the largest fragment moving at that velocity. The broad distribution suggests that in impact processes, additional comminution of ejecta occurs after the upward initial shock has passed in the process of the ejecta velocity vector rotating from an initially downward orientation. This additional comminution produces the broader size distribution in impact ejecta as compared to that obtained in simple brittle failure experiments.

  17. Ballistic resistance of honeycomb sandwich panels under in-plane high-velocity impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Chang; Yang, Shu; Wang, Dong; Yang, Li-Jun

    2013-01-01

    The dynamic responses of honeycomb sandwich panels (HSPs) subjected to in-plane projectile impact were studied by means of explicit nonlinear finite element simulations using LS-DYNA. The HSPs consisted of two identical aluminum alloy face-sheets and an aluminum honeycomb core featuring three types of unit cell configurations (regular, rectangular-shaped, and reentrant hexagons). The ballistic resistances of HSPs with the three core configurations were first analyzed. It was found that the HSP with the reentrant auxetic honeycomb core has the best ballistic resistance, due to the negative Poisson's ratio effect of the core. Parametric studies were then carried out to clarify the influences of both macroscopic (face-sheet and core thicknesses, core relative density) and mesoscopic (unit cell angle and size) parameters on the ballistic responses of the auxetic HSPs. Numerical results show that the perforation resistant capabilities of the auxetic HSPs increase as the values of the macroscopic parameters increase. However, the mesoscopic parameters show nonmonotonic effects on the panels' ballistic capacities. The empirical equations for projectile residual velocities were formulated in terms of impact velocity and the structural parameters. It was also found that the blunter projectiles result in higher ballistic limits of the auxetic HSPs.

  18. Low-velocity impact on fibre-metal laminates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moriniere, F.D.

    2014-01-01

    Generating high-energy absorbing FML concepts is challenging because aluminium and composite failure mechanisms are acting concurrently during the impact process. Because the impact process involves energy transformation, an analytical energy balance method was used to assess the contribution of the

  19. Simulation and low velocity impact testing on confined explosives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtes, J.H.G.; Verbeek, H.J.

    2010-01-01

    TNO Defence Security and Safety, performs in depth research in energetic material responses to several Insensitive Munitions (IM) stimuli like cook-off, bullet-fragment impact and shaped charge impact. The response of energetic materials to these stimuli depends strongly on the properties of these

  20. Antipodal fragment velocities for porous and weak targets at catastrophic impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagisawa, M.; Itoi, T.

    1993-03-01

    Mortar, porous alumina, and sand targets, which were spherical in shape and from 11 to 15 cm in diameter, were impacted normally by plastic (polycarbonate) projectiles of nearly 1 g in mass at velocities about 6 km/s. Fragment velocity at the antipole of impact site (antipodal velocity, V(sub a)), for each experiment, was obtained from two Flash X-ray images recorded prior to and at predetermined delayed time after impact event. It has been revealed that the velocities for the same E/M(sub t) (impact energy divided by target mass) depend strongly on target material, and differ about an order of magnitude between the sand and basalt.

  1. Effect of low velocity impact damage on the natural frequency of composite plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chok, E. Y. L.; Majid, D. L. A. A.; Harmin, M. Y.

    2017-12-01

    Biodegradable natural fibers have been suggested to replace the hazardous synthetic fibers in many aerospace applications. However, this notion has been limited due to their low mechanical properties, which leads to the idea of hybridizing the two materials. Many aircraft components such as radome, aft body and wing are highly susceptible to low velocity impact damage while in-service. The damages degrade the structural integrity of the components and change their dynamic characteristics. In worst case scenario, the changes can lead to resonance, which is an excessive vibration. This research is conducted to study the dynamic characteristic changes of low velocity impact damaged hybrid composites that is designed for aircraft radome applications. Three materials, which are glass fiber, kenaf fiber and kenaf/glass fiber hybrid composites, have been impacted with 3J, 6J and 9J of energy. Cantilevered and also vertically clamped boundary conditions are used and the natural frequencies are extracted for each of the specimens. The obtained results show that natural frequency decreases with increasing impact level. Cantilevered condition is found to induce lower modes due to the gravitational pull. To eliminate mass and geometrical effects, normalized modes are computed. Among the three materials considered, glass fiber composites have displayed the highest normalized frequency that reflects on its higher stiffness compared to the other two materials. As the damage level is increased, glass fiber composites have shown the highest frequency reduction to a maximum of 35% while kenaf composites have the least frequency reduction in the range of 1 - 18%. Thus, kenaf fiber is taken to be helpful in stalling the damage progression and reducing the effect of damage. This has been proven when the percentage frequency decrement shown by kenaf/glass fiber composite lies between glass fiber and kenaf fiber composites.

  2. A study on the high velocity impact behavior of titanium alloy by PVD method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohn, Se Won; Lee, Doo Sung; Hong, Sung Hee

    2001-01-01

    In order to investigate the fracture behaviors(penetration modes) and resistance to penetration during ballistic impact of titanium alloy laminates and nitrified titanium alloy laminates which were treated by PVD(Physical Vapor Deposition) method, ballistic tests were conducted. Evaporation, sputtering, and ion plating are three kinds of PVD method. In this research, ion plating was used to achieve higher surface hardness and surface hardness test were conducted using a micro Vicker's hardness tester. Resistance to penetration is determined by the protection ballistic limit(V 50 ), a statistical velocity with 50% probability for complete penetration. Fracture behaviors and ballistic tolerance, described by penetration modes, are respectfully observed at and above ballistic limit velocities, as a result of V 50 test and Projectile Through Plates(PTP) test methods. PTP tests were conducted with 0 .deg. obliquity at room temperature using 5.56mm ball projectile. V 50 tests with 0 .deg. obliquity at room temperature were conducted with projectiles that were able to achieve near or complete penetration during PTP tests. Surface hardness, resistance to penetration, and penetration modes of titanium alloy laminates are compared to those of nitrified titanium alloy laminates

  3. Transparent Higher Order Sliding Mode Control for Nonlinear Master-Slave Systems without Velocity Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis G. Garcia-Valdovinos

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Transparency has been a major objective in bilateral teleoperation systems, even in the absence of time delay induced by the communication channel, since a high degree of transparency would allow humans to drive the remote teleoperator as if he or she were directly interacting with the remote environment, with the remote teleoperator as a physical and sensorial extension of the operator. When fast convergence of position and force tracking errors are ensured by the control system, then complete transparency is obtained, which would ideally guarantee humans to be tightly kinaesthetically coupled. In this paper a model-free Cartesian second order sliding mode (SOSM PD control scheme for nonlinear master-slave systems is presented. The proposed scheme does not rely on velocity measurements and attains very fast convergence of position trajectories, with bounded tracking of force trajectories, rendering a high degree of transparency with lesser knowledge of the system. The degree of transparency can easily be improved by tuning a feedback gain in the force loop. A unique energy storage function is introduced; such that a similar Cartesian-based controller is implemented in the master and slave sides. The resulting properties of the Cartesian control structure allows the human operator to input directly Cartesian variables, which makes clearer the kinaesthetic coupling, thus the proposed controller becomes a suitable candidate for practical implementation. The performance of the proposed scheme is evaluated in a semi-experimental setup.

  4. Gender Disparity and Its Impact on Higher Education | Deepika ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper “Gender Disparity and Its Impact on Higher Education” reviews a diverse literature on gender and higher education. Gender inequality is more pronounced in some aspects of the educational systems than in others. Explanations of gender inequality in higher education should distinguish between these different ...

  5. Ballistic impact velocity response of carbon fibre reinforced aluminium alloy laminates for aero-engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, I.; Abu Talib, A. R.; Sultan, M. T. H.; Saadon, S.

    2017-12-01

    Aerospace and other industries use fibre metal laminate composites extensively due to their high specific strength, stiffness and fire resistance, in addition to their capability to be tailored into different forms for specific purposes. The behaviours of such composites under impact loading is another factor to be considered due to the impacts that occur in take-off, landing, during maintenance and operations. The aim of the study is to determine the specific perforation energy and impact strength of the fibre metal laminates of different layering pattern of carbon fibre reinforced aluminium alloy and hybrid laminate composites of carbon fibre and natural fibres (kenaf and flax). The composites are fabricated using the hand lay-up method in a mould with high bonding polymer matrix and compressed by a compression machine, cured at room temperature for one day and post cure in an oven for three hours. The impact tests are conducted using a gun tunnel system with a flat cylindrical bullet fired using a helium gas at a distance of 14 inches to the target. Impact and residual velocity of the projectile are recorded by high speed video camera. Specific perforation energy of carbon fibre reinforced aluminium alloy (CF+AA) for both before and after fire test are higher than the specific perforation energy of the other composites considered before and after fire test respectively. CF +AA before fire test is 55.18% greater than after. The same thing applies to impact strength of the composites where CF +AA before the fire test has the highest percentage of 11.7%, 50.0% and 32.98% as respectively compared to carbon fibre reinforced aluminium alloy (CARALL), carbon fibre reinforced flax aluminium alloy (CAFRALL) and carbon fibre reinforced kenaf aluminium alloy (CAKRALL), and likewise for the composites after fire test. The considered composites in this test can be used in the designated fire zone of an aircraft engine to protect external debris from penetrating the engine

  6. Low velocity impact on polymer composite plates in contact with water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y Kwon

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, composite materials were tested in two different environments to determine the role of Fluid Structure Interaction with composites under a low velocity impact. This was done using a low velocity impact machine and polymer composite plates. The composite is made of laminated symmetrical plain weave E-glass fabrics. The test area of the composite plates is 30.5 cm by 30.5 cm with clamped boundary conditions. The testing was done using a drop weight system to impact the center of the test area. One testing was performed with composite plates in air, called dry impact. The other testing was conducted while composite plates were submerged in water, called wet impact. A Plexiglas box in conjunction with the impact machine was used to keep the top of the composite sample dry while it was submerged in an anechoic water tank, so called water-backed air impact. Output from the tests was recorded using strain gauges and a force impact sensor. The results show that an added mass effect from the water plays a large role in the Fluid Structure Interaction with composites due to the similar densities of water and the composites. The wet impact results in a larger impact force and damage than the dry impact under the same impact condition, i.e., the same impact mass and drop height.

  7. Gender Disparity and Its Impact on Higher Education | Deepika ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gender Disparity and Its Impact on Higher Education. ... AFRREV LALIGENS: An International Journal of Language, Literature and Gender Studies ... Alternatively, you can download the PDF file directly to your computer, from where it can be ...

  8. Experimental Investigation on Low-velocity Impact and Compression After Impact Properties of Three-dimensional Five-directional Braided Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YAN Shi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The low-velocity impact and compression after impact (CAI properties of three-dimensional (3D five-directional carbon fiber/epoxy resin braided composites were experimentally investigated. Specimens prepared with different braiding angles were tested at the same impact energy level. Residual post-impact mechanical properties of the different configurations were characterized by compression after impact tests. Results show that the specimens with bigger braiding angle sustain higher peak loads, and smaller impact damage area, mainly attributes to a more compact space construction. The CAI strength and damage mechanism are found to be mainly dependent on the axial support of the braiding fiber tows. With the increase of braiding angle, the CAI strength decreases, and the damage mode of the composites is changed from transverse fracture to shear failure.

  9. Low-velocity impact damage of woven fabric composites: Finite element simulation and experimental verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, M.A.; Naderi, S.; Bushroa, A.R.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Low-velocity impact test on GFRP with different energy levels and thicknesses. • Using force–deflection curve to determine critical energy for penetration threshold. • Reflection of damage processes to different type of diagrams. • Significant influence of Initial energy and thickness on dynamic response of plates. • Good agreements between experimental and FEM models for the force history data. - Abstract: This paper addresses the response of Glass Fiber Reinforced Plastic laminates (GFRPs) under low-velocity impact. Experimental tests were performed according to ASTM: D5628 for different initial impact energy levels ranging from 9.8 J to 29.4 J and specimen thicknesses of 2, 3 and 4 mm. The impact damage process and contact stiffness were studied incrementally until a perforation phase of the layered compounds occurred, in line with a force–deflection diagram and imaging of impacted laminates. The influence that impact parameters such as velocity and initial energy had on deflection and damage of the test specimens was investigated. Finite Element Simulation (FES) was done using MSC. MARC® was additionally carried out to understand the impact mechanism and correlation between these parameters and the induced damage. The simulation and experimental results reached good accord regarding maximum contact force and contact time with insignificant amount of damage

  10. Impact of laminar flow velocity of different acids on enamel calcium loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attin, T; Becker, K; Wiegand, A; Tauböck, T T; Wegehaupt, F J

    2013-03-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of flow velocity under laminar flow conditions of different acidic solutions on enamel erosion. A total of 240 bovine enamel specimens were prepared and allocated to 30 groups (n = 8 each). Samples of 18 groups were superfused in a flow chamber system with laminar flow behavior using 1 ml of citric acid or hydrochloric acid (HCl) of pH 2.0, 2.6 or 3.0. Flow rates in the sample chamber were adjusted to 10, 60 or 100 μl/min. To simulate turbulent flow behavior, samples of six groups were immersed in 1 ml of the respective solution, which was vortexed (15 min, 600 rpm). For simulating non-agitated conditions, specimens of the remaining six groups were immersed in 1 ml of the respective solution without stirring. Calcium in the solutions, released from the enamel samples, was determined using Arsenazo III method. For acidic solutions of pH 2.6 and 3.0, erosive potential of citric acid was equivalent to that of HCl at a flow of 100 μl/min. The same observation was made for the samples subjected to turbulent conditions at pH 3. At all other conditions, citric acid induced a significantly higher calcium loss than HCl. It is concluded that under slow laminar flow conditions, flow rate variations lead to higher erosive impact of citric acid compared to hydrochloric acid at pH 2.0, but not at pH ≥ 2.6 and increasing laminar flow or turbulent conditions. Erosive enamel dissolution under laminar flow conditions is a complex issue influenced by flow rate and acidic substrate.

  11. CHARACTERIZATION OF 6061 T651 ALUMINUM PLATES SUBJECTED TO HIGH-VELOCITY IMPACT LOADS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evren ÖZŞAHİN

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Ballistic response of single or multi-layered metal armor systems subjected to kinetic energy pro-jectiles was investigated in many experimental, theoretical and numerical studies.In this study, 6061 T651 aluminum plates impacted by 9 mm bullets were investigated. Microstructural investigations have been carried out using optical microscopy. Microhardness values were used to determine the strength behavior of the plates. Influence of the plate thickness and impact velocity on the microstructure has been evaluated. It was concluded from the study that thinner plates are more prone to deformation hardening with high penetration depth values even at low impact velocities while thick plates are more susceptible to thermal softening with less penetration depths. Maximum hardness values were obtained just below the impact zone in both plate thicknesses.

  12. Scaling invariance of spherical projectile fragmentation upon high-velocity impact on a thin continuous shield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myagkov, N. N., E-mail: nn-myagkov@mail.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Applied Mechanics (Russian Federation)

    2017-01-15

    The problem of aluminum projectile fragmentation upon high-velocity impact on a thin aluminum shield is considered. A distinctive feature of this description is that the fragmentation has been numerically simulated using the complete system of equations of deformed solid mechanics by a method of smoothed particle hydrodynamics in three-dimensional setting. The transition from damage to fragmentation is analyzed and scaling relations are derived in terms of the impact velocity (V), ratio of shield thickness to projectile diameter (h/D), and ultimate strength (σ{sub p}) in the criterion of projectile and shield fracture. Analysis shows that the critical impact velocity V{sub c} (separating the damage and fragmentation regions) is a power function of σ{sub p} and h/D. In the supercritical region (V > V{sub c}), the weight-average fragment mass asymptotically tends to a power function of the impact velocity with exponent independent of h/D and σ{sub p}. Mean cumulative fragment mass distributions at the critical point are scale-invariant with respect to parameters h/D and σ{sub p}. Average masses of the largest fragments are also scale-invariant at V > V{sub c}, but only with respect to variable parameter σ{sub p}.

  13. A comparative study on low-velocity impact response of fabric composite laminates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Diantang; Sun, Ying; Chen, Li; Pan, Ning

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • We examine the low-velocity behavior of single-ply 3D orthogonal woven fabric composites. • Three-coordinate measuring device was used to acquire the 3D topographies. • Single-ply 3D orthogonal woven fabric composites show better impact performance. • Impact properties will increase if in-plane yarns and Z-yarns of single-ply 3D orthogonal woven fabric are optimized. - Abstract: Impact behaviors at low velocity of composite laminates reinforced with fabrics of different architectures are investigated. Unidirectional prepreg, 2D woven and 3D orthogonal fabrics, all formed of Ultrahigh Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE) filaments, were selected as reinforcements to form composite laminates using hot pressing technology. Low velocity impact tests were conducted using a drop-weight impact equipment at the energy level of 35 J. A three-coordinate measuring device was employed to determine the volume of plastic deformation and surface dent diameter. The results show that the composite laminates of single-ply 3D orthogonal woven fabric exhibit better energy absorbed capacity and impact damage resistance as compared to those of unidirectional and 2D plain-woven fabric

  14. Survivability of bare, individual Bacillus subtilis spores to high-velocity surface impact: Implications for microbial transfer through space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barney, Brandon L.; Pratt, Sara N.; Austin, Daniel E.

    2016-06-01

    Laboratory experiments show that endospores of Bacillus subtilis survive impact against a solid surface at velocities as high as 299 ±28 m/s. During impact, spores experience and survive accelerations of at least 1010 m/s2. The spores were introduced into a vacuum chamber using an electrospray source and accelerated to a narrow velocity distribution by entrainment in a differentially pumped gas flow. Different velocity ranges were studied by modifying the gas flow parameters. The spores were electrically charged, allowing direct measurement of the velocity of each spore as it passed through an image charge detector prior to surface impact. Spores impacted a glass surface and were collected for subsequent analysis by culturing. Most spores survived impact at all measured velocities. These experiments differ fundamentally from other studies that show either shock or impact survivability of bacteria embedded within or on the surface of a projectile. Bacteria in the present experiments undergo a single interaction with a solid surface at the full impact velocity, in the absence of any other effects such as cushioning due to microbe agglomerations, deceleration due to air or vapor, or transfer of impact shock through solid or liquid media. During these full-velocity impact events, the spores experience extremely high decelerations. This study is the first reported instance of accelerations of this magnitude experienced during a bacteria impact event. These results are discussed in the context of potential transfer of viable microbes in space and other scenarios involving surface impacts at high velocities.

  15. Characterization on impact damage resistance of CF/PEEK laminates under low and high velocity impact tests; Teisoku/kosoku shogeki shiken ni yoru CF/PEEK no taishogeki sonshosei no hyoka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morita, H; Hamamoto, A [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Adachi, T; Nishimori, K; Matsumoto, H [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan)

    1995-04-15

    Experiments were conducted to learn the impact damage on jet engine CFRP components for sucking birds or others. A great mass low velocity collision experiment using a falling weight and a small mass high velocity collision experiment using an air gun were conducted. The damages inflicted upon CF/PEEK (polyetheretherketone) laminates in the respective experiments were compared with each other by using the ultrasonic flaw detection method (C-Scan). There was a linear relationship in both experiments between the projected damaged area DA measured by C-Scan and the impact energy IE, enabling the relative evaluation of impact-withstanding damage characteristics by using the DA/IE ratios. DA/IE in the high velocity impact was higher than that in the low velocity impact, but the DA/IE ratio between the high velocity impact and the low velocity impact remained approximately the same, not dependent on the fiber orientation. The lamination parameter {beta} defined on the basis of the difference in-plane rigidity between the layers constituting the laminate is proportional to DA/IE, with {beta} enabling the generalized numerical expression of the impact of the fiber orientation upon the impact-withstanding damage characteristics. 9 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Impact of biofilm accumulation on transmembrane and feed channel pressure drop: Effects of crossflow velocity, feed spacer and biodegradable nutrient

    KAUST Repository

    Dreszer, C.

    2014-03-01

    Biofilm formation causes performance loss in spiral-wound membrane systems. In this study a microfiltration membrane was used in experiments to simulate fouling in spiral-wound reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF) membrane modules without the influence of concentration polarization. The resistance of a microfiltration membrane is much lower than the intrinsic biofilm resistance, enabling the detection of biofilm accumulation in an early stage. The impact of biofilm accumulation on the transmembrane (biofilm) resistance and feed channel pressure drop as a function of the crossflow velocity (0.05 and 0.20ms-1) and feed spacer presence was studied in transparent membrane biofouling monitors operated at a permeate flux of 20Lm-2h-1. As biodegradable nutrient, acetate was dosed to the feed water (1.0 and 0.25mgL-1 carbon) to enhance biofilm accumulation in the monitors. The studies showed that biofilm formation caused an increased transmembrane resistance and feed channel pressure drop. The effect was strongest at the highest crossflow velocity (0.2ms-1) and in the presence of a feed spacer. Simulating conditions as currently applied in nanofiltration and reverse osmosis installations (crossflow velocity 0.2ms-1 and standard feed spacer) showed that the impact of biofilm formation on performance, in terms of transmembrane and feed channel pressure drop, was strong. This emphasized the importance of hydrodynamics and feed spacer design. Biomass accumulation was related to the nutrient load (nutrient concentration and linear flow velocity). Reducing the nutrient concentration of the feed water enabled the application of higher crossflow velocities. Pretreatment to remove biodegradable nutrient and removal of biomass from the membrane elements played an important part to prevent or restrict biofouling. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Experimental and analytical study of high velocity impact on Kevlar/Epoxy composite plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikarwar, Rahul S.; Velmurugan, Raman; Madhu, Velmuri

    2012-12-01

    In the present study, impact behavior of Kevlar/Epoxy composite plates has been carried out experimentally by considering different thicknesses and lay-up sequences and compared with analytical results. The effect of thickness, lay-up sequence on energy absorbing capacity has been studied for high velocity impact. Four lay-up sequences and four thickness values have been considered. Initial velocities and residual velocities are measured experimentally to calculate the energy absorbing capacity of laminates. Residual velocity of projectile and energy absorbed by laminates are calculated analytically. The results obtained from analytical study are found to be in good agreement with experimental results. It is observed from the study that 0/90 lay-up sequence is most effective for impact resistance. Delamination area is maximum on the back side of the plate for all thickness values and lay-up sequences. The delamination area on the back is maximum for 0/90/45/-45 laminates compared to other lay-up sequences.

  18. Prediction of drop time and impact velocity of rod cluster control assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Kee Sung; Yim, Jeong Sik; Kim, Il Kon; Kim, Kyu Tae

    1992-01-01

    This paper deals with the drop modelling of rod cluster control assembly(RCCA) and the prediction of drop time and impact velocity of RCCA at scram event. On the scram, RCCA, dropping into the guide thimble of fuel assembly by the gravity, is subject to retarding forces such as hydraulic resistance, mechanical friction and buoyancy. Considering these retarding forces RCCA dynamic equation is derived and computerized it to solve the equation in conjunction with fluid equation which is coupled with the motion of the RCCA. Because the equation is nonlinear, coupled with fluid equations, the program is written in FORTRAN using numerical method in order to calculate the drop distance and velocity with time increment. To verify the program, its results are compared with those of other fuel vendors. Predicting identical tendency as other fuel vendors and the deviation is insignificant in values this program is expected to be used for predicting the drop time and impact velocity of RCCA when the parameters affecting the control rod drop time and impact velocity changes are occurred

  19. Numerical simulation of a high velocity impact on fiber reinforced materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoma, Klaus; Vinckier, David

    1994-01-01

    Whereas the calculation of a high velocity impact on isotropical materials can be done on a routine basis, the simulation of the impact and penetration process into nonisotropical materials such as reinforced concrete or fiber reinforced materials still is a research task.We present the calculation of an impact of a metallic fragment on a modern protective wall structure. Such lightweight protective walls typically consist of two layers, a first outer layer made out of a material with high hardness and a backing layer. The materials for the backing layer are preferably fiber reinforced materials. Such types of walls offer a protection against fragments in a wide velocity range.For our calculations we used a non-linear finite element Lagrange code with explicit time integration. To be able to simulate the high velocity penetration process with a continuous erosion of the impacting metallic fragment, we used our newly developed contact algorithm with eroding surfaces. This contact algorithm is vectorized to a high degree and especially robust as it was developed to work for a wide range of contact-impact problems. To model the behavior of the fiber reinforced material under the highly dynamic loads, we present a material model which initially was developed to calculate the crash behavior (automotive applications) of modern high strength fiber-matrix systems. The model can describe the failure and the postfailure behavior up to complete material crushing.A detailed simulation shows the impact of a metallic fragment with a velocity of 750ms -1 on a protective wall with two layers, the deformation and erosion of fragment and wall material and the failure of the fiber reinforced material. ((orig.))

  20. Low velocity instrumented impact testing of four new damage tolerant carbon/epoxy composite systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lance, D. G.; Nettles, A. T.

    1990-01-01

    Low velocity drop weight instrumented impact testing was utilized to examine the damage resistance of four recently developed carbon fiber/epoxy resin systems. A fifth material, T300/934, for which a large data base exists, was also tested for comparison purposes. A 16-ply quasi-isotropic lay-up configuration was used for all the specimens. Force/absorbed energy-time plots were generated for each impact test. The specimens were cross-sectionally analyzed to record the damage corresponding to each impact energy level. Maximum force of impact versus impact energy plots were constructed to compare the various systems for impact damage resistance. Results show that the four new damage tolerant fiber/resin systems far outclassed the T300/934 material. The most damage tolerant material tested was the IM7/1962 fiber/resin system.

  1. IMPACT OF FOREIGN DIRECT INVESTMENT ON HIGHER EDUCATION

    OpenAIRE

    Kalpana Singh; Dr. Alka Awasthi

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine how Foreign Direct investment (FDI) can be leveraged to enhance its impact on Higher Education. This paper attempts to discuss the possibilities of bringing quality, excellence and more opportunities in “Higher education” through the FDI route. FOREIGN DIRECT INVESTMENT: Education sector is growing day by day and gaining lots of importance in the world and India as well. Education Industry is likely to grow by the Gross Enrolment Ratio (GER) by 2020. Fo...

  2. Ultrasonic detection of spall damage nucleation under low-velocity repeated impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watanabe T.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Repeated plate impact testing with impact stress well below the threshold spall-stress (2.6 GPa on medium carbon steel was carried out to the identical target plate by impacting the flyer plate. Occurrence of spall damage under low-velocity repeated impact was evaluated nondestructively with a low frequency scanning acoustic microscope. We observed the spall damage distribution by the B- and C-scan images. In order to initiate the spall damage (voids in a ductile material or cracks in a brittle one the particular value of threshold spall-stress should be exceeded what already belongs to a commonly accepted knowledge. Generally, the spall damage development is dependent on the amplitude and the duration of the stress pulse. If the stress is high and duration is long enough to create tensile failure of material, the voids or cracks nucleate along the spall plane, and consequently, they form macrocracks. Therefore, the spall damage does not create when the first impact stress is less than the threshold spall-stress. However, after the fifth low-velocity repeated impact test, the generation of the spall damage was detected, even if the impact stress (1.1–1.7 GPa was lower than the threshold spall-stress (2.6 GPa.

  3. Perceived HIV/AIDS impact among higher education institutions in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It can be concluded that HIV/AIDS is having a serious impact on the fiscal situation of tertiary institutions in much the same ways as it does on other institutions. It is, therefore, imperative for higher education institutions to respond to HIV/AIDS for their own benefit and that of their broader stakeholders. Early action will reap ...

  4. Increasing Impact of Economic Conditions upon Higher Education Enrollments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusk, James J.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    To assess the impact of economic conditions on enrollment in higher education, researchers used time series analysis on national data for 1966-78 and on 1972-78 data from all eight regions of the country and the University of Arizona. The findings indicate enrollment has gone up during economic downturns. (Author/RW)

  5. The Impact of Funding Policies on Higher Education in Jamaica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkrumah-Young, Kofi K.; Huisman, Jeroen; Powell, Philip

    2008-01-01

    This paper analyses the changes in the higher education funding policies and resource allocation models of the Jamaican government in the period 1962-2003. Throughout these four decades, four different systems were in force. This paper focuses particularly on the arguments for the funding policies and models and the impact of the models on the…

  6. Ultra-high velocity impacts: Cratering studies of microscopic impacts from 3 km/s to 30 km/s

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stradling, G.L.; Idzorek, G.C.; Shafer, B.P.; Curling, H.L. Jr.; Collopy, M.T.; Hopkins Blossom, A.A.; Fuerstenau, S.

    1992-01-01

    Cratering experiments performed under carefully controlled conditions at impact velocities ranging from 3 km/s to 30 km/s into a wide variety of target materials are presented. These impact experiments use the 6 MV vertical Van de Graaff accelerator of the Ion Beam Facility at the Los Alamos National Laboratory to electrostatically accelerate highly charged iron microspheres. The sub-micron spheres, from a random size distribution, are shocklessly accelerated along an 8 m flight path. Ultra-sensitive charge detectors monitor the passage of the projectiles at a rate of up to 100 projectiles/second. An online computer records and displays in real time the charge, velocity and mass of the projectiles and provides cross correlation between the events observed by the several in-flight charge detectors and impact detectors. Real-time logic controls an electrostatic kicker which deflects projectiles of selected charge and velocity onto the target. Thus each experiment consists of an ensemble of 10 to 40 impacts onto a single target within a narrow window of the projectile parameter space, providing excellent statistical resolution of each data point. The target materials used include single crystal copper and single crystal aluminum, gold, and quartz as well as pyrolytic graphic and epoxy used in composite materials of interest to space applications. We also conducted impact experiments onto thin Mylar and nickel foils. This paper presents these experiments and summarizes the cratering characterization performed to date. Emphasis is placed on cratering results in several materials over a range of impact velocities

  7. Time dependent response of low velocity impact induced composite conical shells under multiple delamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Sudip; Karmakar, Amit

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents the time dependent response of multiple delaminated angle-ply composite pretwisted conical shells subjected to low velocity normal impact. The finite element formulation is based on Mindlin's theory incorporating rotary inertia and effects of transverse shear deformation. An eight-noded isoparametric plate bending element is employed to satisfy the compatibility of deformation and equilibrium of resultant forces and moments at the delamination crack front. A multipoint constraint algorithm is incorporated which leads to asymmetric stiffness matrices. The modified Hertzian contact law which accounts for permanent indentation is utilized to compute the contact force, and the time dependent equations are solved by Newmark's time integration algorithm. Parametric studies are conducted with respect to triggering parameters like laminate configuration, location of delamination, angle of twist, velocity of impactor, and impactor's displacement for centrally impacted shells.

  8. High-Velocity Impact Behaviour of Prestressed Composite Plates under Bird Strike Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Heimbs

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental and numerical analysis of the response of laminated composite plates under high-velocity impact loads of soft body gelatine projectiles (artificial birds is presented. The plates are exposed to tensile and compressive preloads before impact in order to cover realistic loading conditions of representative aeronautic structures under foreign object impact. The modelling methodology for the composite material, delamination interfaces, impact projectile, and preload using the commercial finite element code Abaqus are presented in detail. Finally, the influence of prestress and of different delamination modelling approaches on the impact response is discussed and a comparison to experimental test data is given. Tensile and compressive preloading was found to have an influence on the damage pattern. Although this general behaviour could be predicted well by the simulations, further numerical challenges for improved bird strike simulation accuracy are highlighted.

  9. Research on carbon fiber–reinforced plastic bumper beam subjected to low-velocity frontal impact

    OpenAIRE

    Yefa Hu; Can Liu; Jinguang Zhang; Guoping Ding; Qiong Wu

    2015-01-01

    Lightweight and safety performance of automobiles are two important factors for automobile designs. In this article, a research on lightweight and crashworthiness of automotive bumper has been conducted. The carbon fiber–reinforced plastic bumper beam is considered to replace the traditional high-strength steel one. The low-velocity impact finite element simulations for the above two bumper beams are performed via LS-DYNA. Furthermore, the energy absorption capabilities and dynamic response c...

  10. Numerical Material Model for Composite Laminates in High-Velocity Impact Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Liu

    Full Text Available Abstract A numerical material model for composite laminate, was developed and integrated into the nonlinear dynamic explicit finite element programs as a material user subroutine. This model coupling nonlinear state of equation (EOS, was a macro-mechanics model, which was used to simulate the major mechanical behaviors of composite laminate under high-velocity impact conditions. The basic theoretical framework of the developed material model was introduced. An inverse flyer plate simulation was conducted, which demonstrated the advantage of the developed model in characterizing the nonlinear shock response. The developed model and its implementation were validated through a classic ballistic impact issue, i.e. projectile impacting on Kevlar29/Phenolic laminate. The failure modes and ballistic limit velocity were analyzed, and a good agreement was achieved when comparing with the analytical and experimental results. The computational capacity of this model, for Kevlar/Epoxy laminates with different architectures, i.e. plain-woven and cross-plied laminates, was further evaluated and the residual velocity curves and damage cone were accurately predicted.

  11. Acceleration to high velocities and heating by impact using Nike KrF laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karasik, Max; Weaver, J. L.; Velikovich, A. L.; Zalesak, S. T.; Bates, J. W.; Obenschain, S. P.; Schmitt, A. J.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Watari, T.; Arikawa, Y.; Sakaiya, T.; Murakami, M.; Azechi, H.; Oh, J.

    2010-01-01

    The Nike krypton fluoride laser [S. P. Obenschain, S. E. Bodner, D. Colombant, et al., Phys. Plasmas 3, 2098 (1996)] is used to accelerate planar plastic foils to velocities that for the first time reach 1000 km/s. Collision of the highly accelerated deuterated polystyrene foil with a stationary target produces ∼Gbar shock pressures and results in heating of the foil to thermonuclear temperatures. The impact conditions are diagnosed using DD fusion neutron yield, with ∼10 6 neutrons produced during the collision. Time-of-flight neutron detectors are used to measure the ion temperature upon impact, which reaches 2-3 keV.

  12. Acceleration to high velocities and heating by impact using Nike KrF lasera)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasik, Max; Weaver, J. L.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Watari, T.; Arikawa, Y.; Sakaiya, T.; Oh, J.; Velikovich, A. L.; Zalesak, S. T.; Bates, J. W.; Obenschain, S. P.; Schmitt, A. J.; Murakami, M.; Azechi, H.

    2010-05-01

    The Nike krypton fluoride laser [S. P. Obenschain, S. E. Bodner, D. Colombant, et al., Phys. Plasmas 3, 2098 (1996)] is used to accelerate planar plastic foils to velocities that for the first time reach 1000 km/s. Collision of the highly accelerated deuterated polystyrene foil with a stationary target produces ˜Gbar shock pressures and results in heating of the foil to thermonuclear temperatures. The impact conditions are diagnosed using DD fusion neutron yield, with ˜106 neutrons produced during the collision. Time-of-flight neutron detectors are used to measure the ion temperature upon impact, which reaches 2-3 keV.

  13. The Impacts of Bologna Process on European Higher Education Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zafer ÇELİK

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to examine the impact of Bologna Process on European higher education systems. It focuses on the influences of the main components of Bologna Process (i.e., implementing two-cycle system, increasing the student and academic staffs' mobility, European Credit Transfer System, quality assurance and qualification framework on the transformation of higher education systems. Although Bologna Process is perceived as a move to increase the quality of higher education system in Turkey, there are very serious criticisms from academics, students, and businessmen to the Bologna Process in various European countries. This study claims that the Process did not achieve its goals, more importantly the main instruments of the Process (qualifications, quality assurance agency etc. brought about hyper-bureaucratization, hierarchization and standardization of European higher education systems.

  14. Engineering model for low-velocity impacts of multi-material cylinder on a rigid boundary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delvare F.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Modern ballistic problems involve the impact of multi-material projectiles. In order to model the impact phenomenon, different levels of analysis can be developed: empirical, engineering and simulation models. Engineering models are important because they allow the understanding of the physical phenomenon of the impact materials. However, some simplifications can be assumed to reduce the number of variables. For example, some engineering models have been developed to approximate the behavior of single cylinders when impacts a rigid surface. However, the cylinder deformation depends of its instantaneous velocity. At this work, an analytical model is proposed for modeling the behavior of a unique cylinder composed of two different metals cylinders over a rigid surface. Material models are assumed as rigid-perfectly plastic. Differential equation systems are solved using a numerical Runge-Kutta method. Results are compared with computational simulations using AUTODYN 2D hydrocode. It was found a good agreement between engineering model and simulation results. Model is limited by the impact velocity which is transition at the interface point given by the hydro dynamical pressure proposed by Tate.

  15. Simulation of High-Speed Droplet Impact Against Dry Substrates with Partial Velocity Slip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Tomoki; Ando, Keita

    2017-11-01

    High-speed droplet impact can be used to clean substrates such as silicon wafers. Radially spreading shear flow after the impact may allow for mechanically removing contaminant particles at substrate surfaces. Since it is a big challenge to experimentally explore such complicated flow that exhibits contact line motion and water hammer, its flow feature is not well understood. Here, we aim to numerically evaluate shear flow caused by the impact of a spherical water droplet (of submillimeter sizes) at high speed (up to 50 m/s) against a dry rigid wall. We model the flow based on compressible Navier-Stokes equations with Stokes' hypothesis and solve them by a high-order-accurate finite volume method equipped with shock and interface capturing. To treat the motion of a contact line between the three phases (the droplet, the rigid wall, and the ambient air) in a robust manner, we permit velocity slip at the wall with Navier's model, for wall slip is known to come into play under steep velocity gradients that can arise from high-speed droplet impact. In our presentation, we will examine radially spreading flow after the droplet impact and the resulting wall shear stress generation from the simulation. This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number JP17J02211.

  16. Impact of wind velocity on the performance of the RVACS decay heat removal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzanos, C.P.

    1997-01-01

    The impact of wind velocity on the performance of the reactor vessel auxiliary cooling system (RVACS) of an advanced liquid-metal reactor design is analyzed, and design modifications that mitigate adverse wind effects are investigated. In the reference design, the reactor is served by four communicating RVACS stacks, and each stack has two air inlets. In this two-inlet stack design, winds blowing in a direction 90 deg from the axis formed by the two stack inlets result in pressure distributions around the stacks that drastically change the desired airflow pattern in the RVACS. This leads to significantly elevated RVACS air temperatures and significant azimuthal guard vessel temperature variations. For example, a 27 m/s (60 mph) wind leads to an air temperature at the exit of the RVACS heated section that is ∼115 C higher than that under no-wind conditions. The addition of two more inlets per stack, one inlet per stack side, significantly improves RVACS performance. The air temperature at the exit of the heated RVACS section is significantly reduced below that of the two-inlet design, and this temperature decreases as the wind speed increases. An increase in wind speed from 3 to 27 m/s leads to an air temperature change from 186 to 165 C. The azimuthal temperature variation is also improved. At the top of the guard vessel, this variation is reduced from 62.5 to 8.5 C at the low wind speed of 3 m/s and from 85.0 to 30.5 C at the high wind speed of 27 m/s

  17. The impact of draught related to air velocity, air temperature and workload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griefahn, B; Künemund, C; Gehring, U

    2001-08-01

    This experimental study was designed to test the hypotheses that the effects of draught increase with higher air velocity, with lower air temperature, and with lower workload. Thirty healthy young males were exposed to horizontal draught during 55 min while they operated an arm ergometer in a standing posture. Air velocity, air temperature, and workload were varied in 3 steps each, between 11 and 23 degrees C, 0.1 and 0.3 m/s, and 104 to 156 W/m2, respectively. The 27 combinations were distributed over subjects in a fractional factorial 3(3)-design. The participants were clothed for thermal neutrality. Workload was measured at the end of the sessions by respirometry. Draught-induced annoyance was determined every 5 min, separately for 10 body sites. Corresponding skin temperature was also recorded. The hypotheses were verified for the influence of air velocity and air temperature. Regarding workload, local heat production is probably decisive, meaning that draft-induced local annoyance is inversely related to workload in active but independent from workload in non-active body areas. To improve the situation for the workers concerned it is suggested to apply protective gloves that cover an as great area of the forearms as possible and to limit airflows to mean velocities of less than 0.2 m/s (with turbulence intensities of 50%).

  18. IMPACT OF ROMANIAN HIGHER EDUCATION FUNDING POLICY ON UNIVERSITY EFFICIENCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CRETAN Georgiana Camelia

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The issues of higher education funding policy and university operating efficiency are hot points on the actual public agenda worldwide as the pressures exercised upon the public resources increased, especially in the aftermath of the last economic crisis. Concerned with the improvement of the funding mechanism through which government allocates the public funds in order to meet the national core objectives within the area of higher education, the policy makers adjusted the funding policy by diversifying the criteria used in distributing the funds to public universities. Thus, the aim of this research is to underline both the impact and the consequences the public funding patterns of higher education have on the relative efficiency of public funded higher education institutions, across time. Moreover, the research conducted aims to determine whether the changes occurred within the Romanian public funding methodology of higher education institutions improved the relative efficiency scores of public funded universities, before and after the economic crisis of 2008. Thus, on one hand we have underlined the changes brought to the Romanian public funding mechanism of higher education during the years of 2007, 2009 and 2010 compared to the year of 2006, using the content analysis, and on the other hand we assessed and compared the relative efficiency scores of each selected public funded university using a multiple input - multiple output linear programming model, by employing the Data Envelopment Analysis technique. The findings of the research undertaken emphasized that a more performance oriented funding mechanism improves the efficiency scores of public universities. The results of the research undertaken could be used either by the policy makers within the area of higher education or by the administrative management of public universities in order to correlate the funding with the results obtained and/or the objectives assumed by both the

  19. Current injection phase thermography for low-velocity impact damage identification in composite laminates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grammatikos, S.A.; Kordatos, E.Z.; Matikas, T.E.; David, C.; Paipetis, A.S.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel Current injection phase thermography NDE method has been developed. • Blind impact damage has been successfully detected in composite laminates. • Carbon nanotubes enhance detection by improving of through thickness conductivity. • Detection is feasible with considerably less energy than for IR excited thermography. - Abstract: An innovative non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technique is presented based on current stimulated thermography. Modulated electric current is injected to Carbon Fibre Reinforced Plastics (CFRP) laminates as an external source of thermal excitation. Pulsed Phase Thermography (PPT) is concurrently employed to identify low velocity impact induced (LVI) damage. The efficiency of the proposed method is demonstrated for both plain and with Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) modified laminates, which are subjected to low-velocity impact damaged composite laminates at different energy levels. The presence of the nano reinforcing phase is important in achieving a uniform current flow along the laminate, as it improves the through thickness conductivity. The acquired thermographs are compared with optical PPT, C-scan images and Computer Tomography (CT) representations. The typical energy input for successful damage identification with current injection is three to four orders of magnitude less compared to the energy required for optical PPT

  20. Variational approach to excitation of atomic hydrogen atoms by impacts of protons at intermediate velocities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lasri, B.; Bouamoud, M.; Gayet, R.

    2006-01-01

    A variational approach to the excitation of atoms by ion impacts at intermediate velocities is re-examined. Contributions from intermediate states of the target continuum, that were ignored in previous applications of this approach, are taken into account. With this improved variational approach, excitation cross sections of hydrogen atoms by intermediate energy protons are calculated and compared to recent experimental data and to previous theoretical cross sections. The influence of the intermediate target continuum is found to be very weak. In addition, the present approach is shown to apply as long as the capture process is negligible

  1. Analytical and Numerical Study of Foam-Filled Corrugated Core Sandwich Panels under Low Velocity Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Nouri Damghani

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Analytical and finite element simulations are used to predict the effect of core density on the energy absorption of composite sandwich panels under low-velocity impact. The composite sandwich panel contains two facesheets and a foam-filled corrugated core. Analytical model is defined as a two degree-of-freedom system based on equivalent mass, spring, and dashpot to predict the local and global deformation response of a simply supported panel. The results signify a good agreement between analytical and numerical predictions.

  2. Modeling the Impacts of Suspended Sediment Concentration and Current Velocity on Submersed Vegetation in an Illinois River Pool, USA

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Best, Elly

    2004-01-01

    This technical note uses a modeling approach to examine the impacts of suspended sediment concentrations and current velocity on the persistence of submersed macrophytes in a shallow aquatic system...

  3. Simulation of High Velocity Impact on Composite Structures - Model Implementation and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schueler, Dominik; Toso-Pentecôte, Nathalie; Voggenreiter, Heinz

    2016-08-01

    High velocity impact on composite aircraft structures leads to the formation of flexural waves that can cause severe damage to the structure. Damage and failure can occur within the plies and/or in the resin rich interface layers between adjacent plies. In the present paper a modelling methodology is documented that captures intra- and inter-laminar damage and their interrelations by use of shell element layers representing sub-laminates that are connected with cohesive interface layers to simulate delamination. This approach allows the simulation of large structures while still capturing the governing damage mechanisms and their interactions. The paper describes numerical algorithms for the implementation of a Ladevèze continuum damage model for the ply and methods to derive input parameters for the cohesive zone model. By comparison with experimental results from gas gun impact tests the potential and limitations of the modelling approach are discussed.

  4. Study of low-velocity impact response of sandwich panels with shear-thickening gel cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunpeng; Gong, Xinglong; Xuan, Shouhu

    2018-06-01

    The low-velocity impact response of sandwich panels with shear-thickening gel cores was studied. The impact tests indicated that the sandwich panels with shear-thickening gel cores showed excellent properties of energy dissipation and stress distribution. In comparison to the similar sandwich panels with chloroprene rubber cores and ethylene-propylene-diene monomer cores, the shear-thickening gel cores led to the obviously smaller contact forces and the larger energy absorptions. Numerical modelling with finite element analysis was used to investigate the stress distribution of the sandwich panels with shear-thickening gel cores and the results agreed well with the experimental results. Because of the unique mechanical property of the shear-thickening gel, the concentrated stress on the front facesheets were distributed to larger areas on the back facesheets and the peak stresses were reduced greatly.

  5. Verification and Validation of Carbon-Fiber Laminate Low Velocity Impact Simulations.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    English, Shawn Allen; Nelson, Stacy Michelle; Briggs, Timothy; Brown, Arthur A.

    2014-10-01

    Presented is a model verification and validation effort using low - velocity impact (LVI) of carbon fiber reinforced polymer laminate experiments. A flat cylindrical indenter impacts the laminate with enough energy to produce delamination, matrix cracks and fiber breaks. Included in the experimental efforts are ultrasonic scans of the damage for qualitative validation of the models. However, the primary quantitative metrics of validation are the force time history measured through the instrumented indenter and initial and final velocities. The simulations, whi ch are run on Sandia's Sierra finite element codes , consist of all physics and material parameters of importance as determined by a sensitivity analysis conducted on the LVI simulation. A novel orthotropic damage and failure constitutive model that is cap able of predicting progressive composite damage and failure is described in detail and material properties are measured, estimated from micromechanics or optimized through calibration. A thorough verification and calibration to the accompanying experiment s are presented. Specia l emphasis is given to the four - point bend experiment. For all simulations of interest, the mesh and material behavior is verified through extensive convergence studies. An ensemble of simulations incorporating model parameter unc ertainties is used to predict a response distribution which is then compared to experimental output. The result is a quantifiable confidence in material characterization and model physics when simulating this phenomenon in structures of interest.

  6. Finite element simulation of low velocity impact loading on a sandwich composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishwas M.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Sandwich structure offer more advantage in bringing flexural stiffness and energy absorption capabilities in the application of automobile and aerospace components. This paper presents comparison study and analysis of two types of composite sandwich structures, one having Jute Epoxy skins with rubber core and the other having Glass Epoxy skins with rubber core subjected to low velocity normal impact loading. The behaviour of sandwich structure with various parameters such as energy absorption, peak load developed, deformation and von Mises stress and strain, are analyzed using commercially available analysis software. The results confirm that sandwich composite with jute epoxy skin absorbs approximately 20% more energy than glass epoxy skin. The contact force developed in jute epoxy skin is approximately 2.3 times less when compared to glass epoxy skin. von Mises stress developed is less in case of jute epoxy. The sandwich with jute epoxy skin deforms approximately 1.6 times more than that of same geometry of sandwich with glass epoxy skin. Thus exhibiting its elastic nature and making it potential candidate for low velocity impact application.

  7. Research on carbon fiber–reinforced plastic bumper beam subjected to low-velocity frontal impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yefa Hu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Lightweight and safety performance of automobiles are two important factors for automobile designs. In this article, a research on lightweight and crashworthiness of automotive bumper has been conducted. The carbon fiber–reinforced plastic bumper beam is considered to replace the traditional high-strength steel one. The low-velocity impact finite element simulations for the above two bumper beams are performed via LS-DYNA. Furthermore, the energy absorption capabilities and dynamic response characteristics of the carbon fiber–reinforced plastic bumper beam are investigated and compared with the steel one. The results show that the carbon fiber–reinforced plastic bumper beam is of the better energy absorption capabilities and dynamic response characteristics than those of the steel one; the weight has decreased remarkably close to 50%. Meanwhile, the effect of lay-up and wall thickness on the crashworthiness of the carbon fiber–reinforced plastic bumper beam under low-velocity impact is also studied in this article to select appropriate design schemes.

  8. On the Behavior of Fiberglass Epoxy Composites under Low Velocity Impact Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gautam S. Chandekar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Response of fiberglass epoxy composite laminates under low velocity impact loading is investigated using LS-DYNA®, and the results are compared with experimental analysis performed using an instrumented impact test setup (Instron dynatup 8250. The composite laminates are manufactured using H-VARTM© process with basket weave E-Glass fabrics. Epon 862 is used as a resin system and Epicure-W as a hardening agent. Composite laminates, with 10 layers of fiberglass fabrics, are modeled using 3D solid elements in a mosaic fashion to represent basket weave pattern. Mechanical properties are calculated by using classical micromechanical theory and assigned to the elements using ORTHOTROPIC ELASTIC material model. The damage occurred since increasing impact energy is incorporated using ADVANCED COMPOSITE DAMAGE material model in LS-DYNA®. Good agreements are obtained with the failure damage results in LS-DYNA® and experimental results. Main considerations for comparison are given to the impact load carrying capacity and the amount of impact energy absorbed by the laminates.

  9. Effect of temperature on composite sandwich structures subjected to low velocity impact. [aircraft construction materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, A. V.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of low velocity projectile impact on sandwich-type structural components was investigated. The materials used in the fabrication of the impact surface were graphite-, Kevlar-, and boron-fibers with appropriate epoxy matrices. The testing of the specimens was performed at moderately low- and high-temperatures as well as at room temperature to assess the impact-initiated strength degradation of the laminates. Eleven laminates with different stacking sequences, orientations, and thicknesses were tested. The low energy projectile impact is considered to simulate the damage caused by runway debris, the dropping of the hand tools during servicing, etc., on the secondary aircraft structures fabricated with the composite materials. The results show the preload and the impact energy combinations necessary to cause catastrophic failure in the laminates tested. A set of faired curves indicating the failure thresholds is shown separately for the tension-and compression-loaded laminates. The specific-strengths and -modulii for the various laminates tested are also given.

  10. Deformations on Hole and Projectile Surfaces Caused By High Velocity Friction During Ballistic Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamış, M. B.

    2018-01-01

    In this study, the deformations caused by the ballistic impact on the MM composites and on projectile surfaces are examined. The hole section and grain deformation of unreinforced targets are also examined after impact. The relatively high complexity of impact problems is caused by the large number of intervening parameters like relative velocity of projectile and target, shape of colliding objects, relative stiffness and masses, time-dependent surface of contact, geometry and boundary conditions and material characteristics. The material used in this investigation are 2024 and 7075 aluminum alloys as matrix reinforced with SiC and Al2O3 particles. The matrix materials are extensively used in defense applications due to its favorable ballistic properties, moderate strength, high corrosion resistance and super plastic potential. Two different composites were produced; one by casting and the other by lamination. The ballistic tests of the composite targets were carried out according to NIJ Standard-0101.04, Temperature 21 °C, RH=65% with 7.62 mm projectiles. The bullet weight was 9.6 g and their muzzle velocities were in the range of 770-800 m/s. The projectiles consisted of a steel core, copper jacket and lead material. The composite targets were positioned 15 m from the rifle. The interaction between projectiles and the target hole created after impact were examined by light microscopy and photography. Different damage and failure mechanisms such as petalling, cracking, spalling, dishing, etc., were observed on the target body. On the other hand, dramatic wear and damages on the projectile surface were also observed. The targets were supported with Al-5083 backing blocks having 40 mm thickness.

  11. Numerical and Experimental Low-Velocity Impact Behaivor of Sandwich Plates with Viscoelastic Core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soroush Sadeghnejad

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A numerical and experimental low-velocity impact behavior of sandwich plates have been presently studied with regard to the compressibility and viscoelasticity features of their cores. Face sheets were assumed to be anisotropic composites or isotropic aluminum materials and a viscoelastic behavior has been considered for core. The boundary conditions are assumed to be simply supported or rigid. Abaqus, as FEM software, and its python script programming feature, have been used to model the specimens. To model hyper-viscoelastic nonlinear behavior of the core, Ogden hyper-foam elasticity and Prony series approach are manipulated. To solve the numerical problem, dynamic explicit solver option with sufficient solving amplitude has been used. Prony series have been used to model the core time-dependent behavior. In conjunction with a simple indentation experiment, FEM used to formulate a novel method for finding the Prony series coefficients. By performing some low-velocity impact experiments, the impact force and displacement of the composite sandwich plates have been investigated. The results indicate that increasing the structural damping increases the contact time and missing energy and decreases the stored energy of the system. The structures with composite face sheets have a minimum ratio of upper face sheet displacement to lower face sheet displacement in comparison to those with the isotropic face sheets. Impact behavior of isotropic face sheet specimens are more flattened than that of the composite face sheets. In addition, the specific energy stored in the sandwich plates with composite face sheets, on different supports, is greater than that stored in the aluminum face sheets.

  12. Management and outcome of low velocity penetrating head injury caused by impacted foreign bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussa, Wael Mohamed Mohamed; Abbas, Mohamed

    2016-05-01

    Penetrating head injuries with impacted foreign bodies are rare, associated with a high incidence of morbidity and potentially life-threatening. In this study, we aimed at investigating the outcome of these cases as well as analyzing the factors affecting the prognosis. A retrospective study in which the records of 16 patients who had penetrating head injuries caused by low-velocity impacted foreign bodies were revised. All patients were males with a mean age of 28.9 years (range, 18 to 50 years). The follow-up period ranged from 4 to 13 months with a mean of 8.1 months. Causes of injury were construction accidents in 6 (37.5 %) patients, assault in 6 (37.5 %) and road traffic accidents in 4 (25 %). The impacted objects included a bar of iron, a piece of wood, a nail, a sickle and a piece of glass. Diagnostic computerized tomography (CT) of the brain was carried out on admission in all patients. Thirteen (81.3 %) patients were submitted to surgery, and all had the appropriate management in the form of antibiotics and dehydrating measures as required. The primary outcome measure was the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) at the end of follow-up. At the end of follow-up, ten (62.5 %) patients had a GOS score of 5, two (12.5 %) patients had a score of 4, and four (25 %) patients had a score of 1. Low-velocity penetrating head injuries are most common in young adult males. With the appropriate management, a majority of even the most severe cases can have a favorable outcome.

  13. Effect of impact energy on damage resistance and mechanical property of C/SiC composites under low velocity impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mei, Hui, E-mail: phdhuimei@yahoo.com; Yu, Changkui; Xu, Yawei; Han, Daoyang; Cheng, Laifei

    2017-02-27

    The present study investigated the damage resistance of two dimensional carbon fiber reinforced silicon carbide (C/SiCs) composites subjected to low velocity impact (LVI). Damage microstructures of specimens under different impact energies (E{sub i}) were characterized by infrared thermography, X-ray computed tomography and scanning electron microscopy. The real damage radii of specimens were found to change slightly with E{sub i}, whereas apparent damage radii where much larger. Overall, the fabricated 2D C/SiC composites exhibited good damage resistance to LVI with nominal post-impact tensile strengths remaining at 89.4%, 83.35%, 76.97%, and 74.84% of their pre-impacted counterpart of 158 MPa, for impact energies of 3, 4, 5, and 6 J, respectively. Compared with the as-received one, after LVI real tensile strengths of the C/SiC composite specimens increased by 5.84% for the E{sub i} of 3 J, 9.27% for 4 J, −1.83% for 5 J, −3.16% for 6 J.

  14. THE IMPACTS OF SOCIAL NETWORKING SITES IN HIGHER LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Ishak Bin Ismail

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Social networking sites, a web-based application have permeated the boundary between personal lives and student lives. Nowadays, students in higher learning used social networking site such as Facebook to facilitate their learning through the academic collaboration which it further enhances students’ social capital. Social networking site has many advantages to improve students’ learning. To date, Facebook is the leading social networking sites at this time which it being widely used by students in higher learning to communicate to each other, to carry out academic collaboration and sharing resources. Learning through social networking sites is based on the social interaction which learning are emphasizing on students, real world resources, active students` participation, diversity of learning resources and the use of digital tools to deliver meaningful learning. Many studies found the positive, neutral and negative impact of social networking sites on academic performance. Thus, this study will determine the relationship between Facebook usage and academic achievement. Also, it will investigate the association of social capital and academic collaboration to Facebook usage.

  15. Behavior of composite sandwich panels with several core designs at different impact velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiga, Gabriel; Stamin, Ştefan; Dinu, Gabriela

    2018-02-01

    A sandwich composite represents a special class of composite materials that is manufactured by bonding two thin but stiff faces to a low density and low strength but thick core. The distance between the skins given by the core increases the flexural modulus of the panel with a low mass increase, producing an efficient structure able to resist at flexural and buckling loads. The strength of sandwich panels depends on the size of the panel, skins material and number or density of the cells within it. Sandwich composites are used widely in several industries, such as aerospace, automotive, medical and leisure industries. The behavior of composite sandwich panels with different core designs under different impact velocities are analyzed in this paper by numerical simulations performed on sandwich panels. The modeling was done in ANSYS and the analysis was performed through LS-DYNA.

  16. Validating Material Modelling of OFHC Copper Using Dynamic Tensile Extrusion (DTE) Test at Different Impact Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonora, Nicola; Testa, Gabriel; Ruggiero, Andrew; Iannitti, Gianluca; Hörnqvist, Magnus; Mortazavi, Nooshin

    2015-06-01

    In the Dynamic Tensile Extrusion (DTE) test, the material is subjected to very large strain, high strain rate and elevated temperature. Numerical simulation, validated comparing with measurements obtained on soft-recovered extruded fragments, can be used to probe material response under such extreme conditions and to assess constitutive models. In this work, the results of a parametric investigation on the simulation of DTE test of annealed OFHC copper - at impact velocity ranging from 350 up to 420 m/s - using phenomenological and physically based models (Johnson-Cook, Zerilli-Armstrong and Rusinek-Klepaczko), are presented. Preliminary simulation of microstructure evolution was performed using crystal plasticity package CPFEM, providing, as input, the strain history obtained with FEM at selected locations along the extruded fragments. Results were compared with EBSD investigation.

  17. A method for predicting the impact velocity of a projectile fired from a compressed air gun facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attwood, G.J.

    1988-03-01

    This report describes the development and use of a method for calculating the velocity at impact of a projectile fired from a compressed air gun. The method is based on a simple but effective approach which has been incorporated into a computer program. The method was developed principally for use with the Horizontal Impact Facility at AEE Winfrith but has been adapted so that it can be applied to any compressed air gun of a similar design. The method has been verified by comparison of predicted velocities with test data and the program is currently being used in a predictive manner to specify test conditions for the Horizontal Impact Facility at Winfrith. (author)

  18. Hyper-velocity impacts on the molten silica of the LMJ facility: experimental results and related simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertron, I.; Chevalier, J.M.; Malaise, F.; Barrio, A.; Courchinoux, R.

    2003-01-01

    This work presents a damaging study of the molten silica splinter-guards of the experiment chamber of the Megajoule laser facility. Damaging is due to the impact of hyper-velocity particulates coming from the interaction between X-rays and the diagnostic supports. Experiments have been carried out with the light-gas dual-stage launcher MICA in parallel with numerical simulations using a silica fragmentation and fissuring model embedded in the HESIONE code. First tests concern hyper-velocity impacts of steel balls of 550 μm diameter on silica samples. Samples are expertized to measure the craters and damaging characteristics generated by the impact. Experimental results are compared to numerical simulations in order to check the capability of the model to reproduce the effect of hyper-velocity impacts on molten silica. The final goal is to evaluate the lifetime of splinter-guards. (J.S.)

  19. Summary and evaluation of low-velocity impact tests of solid steel billet onto concrete pads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witte, M.C.; Hovingh, W.J.; Mok, G.C.; Murty, S.S.; Chen, T.F.; Fischer, L.E.

    1998-02-01

    Spent fuel storage casks intended for use at independent spent fuel storage installations are evaluated during the application and review process for low-velocity impacts representative of possible handling accidents. In the past, the analyses involved in these evaluations have assumed that the casks dropped or tipped onto an unyielding surface - a conservative and simplifying assumption. Since 10 CFR Part 72, the regulation imposed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), does not require this assumption, applicants are currently seeking a more realistic model for the analyses to predict the effect of a cask dropping onto a reinforced concrete pad, including energy absorbing aspects such as cracking and flexure. To develop data suitable for benchmarking these analyses, the NRC has conducted several series of drop-test studies of a solid steel billet and of a near-full-scale empty cask. This report contains a summary and evaluation of all steel billet testing conducted by Sandia National Laboratories and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A series of finite element analyses of the billet testing is described and benchmarked against the test data. A method to apply the benchmarked finite element model of the soil and concrete pad to an analysis of a full-size storage cask is provided. In addition, an application to a open-quotes genericclose quotes full-size cask is presented for side and end drops, and tipover events. The primary purpose of this report is to provide applicants for an NRC license under 10 CFR Part 72 with a method for evaluating storage casks for low-velocity impact conditions

  20. TOPICAL REVIEW Warm spraying—a novel coating process based on high-velocity impact of solid particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seiji Kuroda et al

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, coating processes based on the impact of high-velocity solid particles such as cold spraying and aerosol deposition have been developed and attracting much industrial attention. A novel coating process called 'warm spraying' has been developed, in which coatings are formed by the high-velocity impact of solid powder particles heated to appropriate temperatures below the melting point of the powder material. The advantages of such process are as follows: (1 the critical velocity needed to form a coating can be significantly lowered by heating, (2 the degradation of feedstock powder such as oxidation can be significantly controlled compared with conventional thermal spraying where powder is molten, and (3 various coating structures can be realized from porous to dense ones by controlling the temperature and velocity of the particles. The principles and characteristics of this new process are discussed in light of other existing spray processes such as high-velocity oxy-fuel spraying and cold spraying. The gas dynamics of particle heating and acceleration by the spraying apparatus as well as the high-velocity impact phenomena of powder particles are discussed in detail. Several examples of depositing heat sensitive materials such as titanium, metallic glass, WC–Co cermet and polymers are described with potential industrial applications.

  1. Low-Velocity Impact Behavior of Sandwich Structures with Additively Manufactured Polymer Lattice Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Andrew J.; Al Rifaie, Mohammed; Mian, Ahsan; Srinivasan, Raghavan

    2018-05-01

    Sandwich panel structures are widely used in aerospace, marine, and automotive applications because of their high flexural stiffness, strength-to-weight ratio, good vibration damping, and low through-thickness thermal conductivity. These structures consist of solid face sheets and low-density cellular core structures, which are traditionally based upon honeycomb folded-sheet topologies. The recent advances in additive manufacturing (AM) or 3D printing process allow lattice core configurations to be designed with improved mechanical properties. In this work, the sandwich core is comprised of lattice truss structures (LTS). Two different LTS designs are 3D-printed using acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) and are tested under low-velocity impact loads. The absorption energy and the failure mechanisms of lattice cells under such loads are investigated. The differences in energy-absorption capabilities are captured by integrating the load-displacement curve found from the impact response. It is observed that selective placement of vertical support struts in the unit-cell results in an increase in the absorption energy of the sandwich panels.

  2. Integrity of high-velocity water slug generated by an impacting technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehkhoda, Sevda; Bourne, Neil

    2013-06-01

    A pulsed water jet is a series of discrete water slugs travelling at high velocity. Immediately after striking a target, these slugs apply high-intensity, short-duration transient stress known as the water hammer pressure, followed by low-intensity, long-duration stationary stress at the stagnation pressure. The magnitude and duration of the water hammer and stagnation pressures are controlled by the size and quality of the water slugs. The use of water jets for rock cutting in mining operations is a centuries-old technology; however, practical methods for producing high-energy water slugs repeatedly have proven difficult. This can be partly due to the fact that the geometrical properties of a jet and so its effectiveness in creating damage is controlled and influenced by the method that is employed to generate the water slugs. This paper investigates the integrity of a single water slug produced using an impacting technique where a hammer strikes a piston, resting on top of a water-filled chamber. The coherence of the generated water pulse was of concern in this study. If repeated shock reflections within the chamber were transmitted or were carried into the internal geometry of nozzle, the emerging jet could pulsate. The impact impulse of the formed water jet was measured in a Kel-F target material using an embedded PVDF (Polyvinylidene fluoride) shock gauge. The recorded stress waveform was then used to study the quality and endurance of the water pulse stream as it travelled through air.

  3. Production of a high-velocity water slug using an impacting technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehkhoda, S.; Bourne, N. K.

    2014-02-01

    A pulsed water jet consists of a series of discrete water slugs travelling at high velocity. Immediately after striking a target, these slugs apply high-intensity, short-duration transient stress pulses reaching an amplitude known as the water hammer pressure, followed by low-intensity, long-duration stationary stress at a lower stagnation pressure. The magnitude and duration of the water hammer and stagnation pressures are controlled by the size and quality of the water slugs. The use of water jets for rock cutting in mining operations is a centuries-old technology; however, practical methods for producing high-energy water slugs repeatedly have proven difficult. This can be partly due to the fact that the geometrical properties of a jet and so its effectiveness in creating damage is controlled and influenced by the method that is employed to generate the water slugs. This paper investigates the quality of a single water slug produced using an impacting technique where a hammer strikes a piston, resting on top of a water-filled chamber. The coherence and integrity of the jet core was of concern in this study. The impact impulse of the formed water jet was measured in a Kel-F target material using an embedded PVDF (Polyvinylidene fluoride) shock gauge. The recorded stress waveform was then used to determine the unity and endurance of the water slug stream once travelled through air.

  4. Low-Velocity Impact Behavior of Sandwich Structures with Additively Manufactured Polymer Lattice Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Andrew J.; Al Rifaie, Mohammed; Mian, Ahsan; Srinivasan, Raghavan

    2018-04-01

    Sandwich panel structures are widely used in aerospace, marine, and automotive applications because of their high flexural stiffness, strength-to-weight ratio, good vibration damping, and low through-thickness thermal conductivity. These structures consist of solid face sheets and low-density cellular core structures, which are traditionally based upon honeycomb folded-sheet topologies. The recent advances in additive manufacturing (AM) or 3D printing process allow lattice core configurations to be designed with improved mechanical properties. In this work, the sandwich core is comprised of lattice truss structures (LTS). Two different LTS designs are 3D-printed using acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) and are tested under low-velocity impact loads. The absorption energy and the failure mechanisms of lattice cells under such loads are investigated. The differences in energy-absorption capabilities are captured by integrating the load-displacement curve found from the impact response. It is observed that selective placement of vertical support struts in the unit-cell results in an increase in the absorption energy of the sandwich panels.

  5. Numerical simulating and experimental study on the woven carbon fiber-reinforced composite laminates under low-velocity impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hanyang; Tang, Zhanwen; Pan, Lingying; Zhao, Weidong; Sun, Baogang; Jiang, Wenge

    2016-05-01

    Impact damage has been identified as a critical form of the defects that constantly threatened the reliability of composite structures, such as those used in the aerospace structures and systems. Low energy impacts can introduce barely visible damage and cause the degradation of structural stiffness, furthermore, the flaws caused by low-velocity impact are so dangerous that they can give rise to the further extended delaminations. In order to improve the reliability and load carrying capacity of composite laminates under low-velocity impact, in this paper, the numerical simulatings and experimental studies on the woven fiber-reinforced composite laminates under low-velocity impact with impact energy 16.7J were discussed. The low velocity impact experiment was carried out through drop-weight system as the reason of inertia effect. A numerical progressive damage model was provided, in which the damages of fiber, matrix and interlamina were considered by VUMT subroutine in ABAQUS, to determine the damage modes. The Hashin failure criteria were improved to cover the failure modes of fiber failure in the directions of warp/weft and delaminations. The results of Finite Element Analysis (FEA) were compared with the experimental results of nondestructive examination including the results of ultrasonic C-scan, cross-section stereomicroscope and contact force - time history curves. It is found that the response of laminates under low-velocity impact could be divided into stages with different damage. Before the max-deformation of the laminates occurring, the matrix cracking, fiber breakage and delaminations were simulated during the impactor dropping. During the releasing and rebounding period, matrix cracking and delaminations areas kept increasing in the laminates because of the stress releasing of laminates. Finally, the simulating results showed the good agreements with the results of experiment.

  6. Void Measurements in the Regions of Sub-Cooled and Low-Quality Boiling. Part 2. Higher Mass Velocities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rouhani, S Z

    1966-07-15

    This report consists mostly of tables of experimental data obtained in void measurements. It is a continuation and the completing part of a previous report with the same title. The data are from the measurements in a vertical annular channel with 25 mm O.D. and 12 mm I.D. at a heated length of 1090 mm. These experiments covered pressures from 10 to 50 bars, mass velocities from 650 to 1450 kg/m -sec., heat fluxes from 60 to 120 W/cm{sup 2}, sub-coolings from 30 to 0 C, and steam qualities from 0 to 12 %. The tables include the inlet temperatures and measured wall super-heat.

  7. Strain rate dependency of bovine trabecular bone under impact loading at sideways fall velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enns-Bray, William S; Ferguson, Stephen J; Helgason, Benedikt

    2018-05-03

    There is currently a knowledge gap in scientific literature concerning the strain rate dependent properties of trabecular bone at intermediate strain rates. Meanwhile, strain rates between 10 and 200/s have been observed in previous dynamic finite element models of the proximal femur loaded at realistic sideways fall speeds. This study aimed to quantify the effect of strain rate (ε̇) on modulus of elasticity (E), ultimate stress (σ u ), failure energy (U f ), and minimum stress (σ m ) of trabecular bone in order to improve the biofidelity of material properties used in dynamic simulations of sideways fall loading on the hip. Cylindrical cores of trabecular bone (D = 8 mm, L gauge  = 16 mm, n = 34) from bovine proximal tibiae and distal femurs were scanned in µCT (10 µm), quantifying apparent density (ρ app ) and degree of anisotropy (DA), and subsequently impacted within a miniature drop tower. Force of impact was measured using a piezoelectric load cell (400 kHz), while displacement during compression was measured from high speed video (50,000 frames/s). Four groups, with similar density distributions, were loaded at different impact velocities (0.84, 1.33, 1.75, and 2.16 m/s) with constant kinetic energy (0.4 J) by adjusting the impact mass. The mean strain rates of each group were significantly different (p < 0.05) except for the two fastest impact speeds (p = 0.09). Non-linear regression models correlated strain rate, DA, and ρ app with ultimate stress (R 2  = 0.76), elastic modulus (R 2  = 0.63), failure energy (R 2  = 0.38), and minimum stress (R 2  = 0.57). These results indicate that previous estimates of σ u could be under predicting the mechanical properties at strain rates above 10/s. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. [Biomechanical behaviors of cervical spinal cord injury related to various bone fragment impact velocities: a finite element study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, S; Zhu, Z Q; Wang, K F; Liu, C J; Xu, S; Xia, W W; Liu, H Y

    2018-03-20

    Objective: To establish a three-dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) model of the whole cervical spinal cord (WSCS) and explore the biomechanical behaviors of cervical spinal cord injury related to different bone fragment impact velocities by FE analysis. Methods: A 3D FE model of WCSC was established based on the morphologic data of each segment of the human cervical cord. The reconstruction structures, which included the dura mater, the cerebrospinal fluid, the gray and white matter in the C(2) to C(7) cervical vertebrae, were validated.On the validated WCSC model, three kinds of pellets with same mass (7 g) but different impact areas (314, 157 and 78.5 mm(2)) were created to represent the bone fragments.These were positioned in the middle of the spinal cord to impact at various initial velocities.The maximum of von Mises stress and the reduction of the cross-sectional area (CSA) of the spinal cord were measured from each impact. Results: The compression of WCSC (percentage) and the time to reach maximum compression were similar with the results reported in literatures, indicating the validity of the model.Regardless of the impact areas of the pellet, the maximum of von Mises stress and the reduction of CSA of the spinal cord increased with the increased velocity.The maximum of von Mises stress was 5.0-7.0 kPa at a pellet velocity of 1.5 m/s, and the reduction of CSA was 9.3%-12.3%.At a velocity of 3.5 m/s, the maximum of von Mises stress was 42-54 kPa and the reduction of CSA was over 30%.The stress of the spinal cord significantly increased when pellet velocity exceeded 3.5 m/s, and the fastest increase was recorded at 4.5 m/s.The von Mises stress of the spinal cord ranged between 240 and 320 kPa at a velocity of 6.0 m/s, and CSA decreased by more than 50%. Conclusion: The 3D FE model of WSCS could provide more insights on the biomechanical mechanisms of spinal cord injury through various bone fragment impacts in burst fracture.When the impact velocity of the

  9. Comics as Research, Comics for Impact: The Case of Higher Fees, Higher Debts

    OpenAIRE

    Ernesto Priego

    2016-01-01

    Researchers have turned to comics as outputs incorporating their research findings. These comics are print and/or online publications that can lead to the wider adoption of research and enhance educational practices, widen public engagement, and improve the possibilities for research to influence public policy.  This article presents an interview with Professor Katy Vigurs about 'Higher Fees, Higher Debts: Greater Expectations of Graduate Futures?', a comic based on a research report produced...

  10. A High-velocity Cloud Impact Forming a Supershell in the Milky Way

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Geumsook; Koo, Bon-Chul; Kang, Ji-hyun; Gibson, Steven J.; Peek, J. E. G.; Douglas, Kevin A.; Korpela, Eric J.; Heiles, Carl E.

    2016-08-01

    Neutral atomic hydrogen (H I) gas in interstellar space is largely organized into filaments, loops, and shells, the most prominent of which are “supershells.” These gigantic structures, which require ≳ 3× {10}52 erg to form, are generally thought to be produced by either the explosion of multiple supernovae (SNe) in OB associations or, alternatively, by the impact of high-velocity clouds (HVCs) falling into the Galactic disk. Here, we report the detection of a kiloparsec (kpc)-size supershell in the outskirts of the Milky Way with the compact HVC 040 + 01-282 (hereafter, CHVC040) at its geometrical center using the “Inner-Galaxy Arecibo L-band Feed Array” H I 21 cm survey data. The morphological and physical properties of both objects suggest that CHVC040, which is either a fragment of a nearby disrupted galaxy or a cloud that originated from an intergalactic accreting flow, collided with the disk ˜5 Myr ago to form the supershell. Our results show that some compact HVCs can survive their trip through the Galactic halo and inject energy and momentum into the Milky Way disk.

  11. A one-dimensional model to describe flow localization in viscoplastic slender bars subjected to super critical impact velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz-Romero, A.; Rodríguez-Martínez, J. A.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper we investigate flow localization in viscoplastic slender bars subjected to dynamic tension. We explore loading rates above the critical impact velocity: the wave initiated in the impacted end by the applied velocity is the trigger for the localization of plastic deformation. The problem has been addressed using two kinds of numerical simulations: (1) one-dimensional finite difference calculations and (2) axisymmetric finite element computations. The latter calculations have been used to validate the capacity of the finite difference model to describe plastic flow localization at high impact velocities. The finite difference model, which highlights due to its simplicity, allows to obtain insights into the role played by the strain rate and temperature sensitivities of the material in the process of dynamic flow localization. Specifically, we have shown that viscosity can stabilize the material behavior to the point of preventing the appearance of the critical impact velocity. This is a key outcome of our investigation, which, to the best of the authors' knowledge, has not been previously reported in the literature.

  12. Destruction of rocks by low velocity impact and its implications for accretion and fragmentation processes of planetesimals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, T.; Waza, T.

    1984-02-01

    Empirical relations linking the mass of the largest fragment, the kinetic energy released divided by the target mass, and the work done during impact are presented. It is found that the relation between the mass of the largest fragment, the mass of the target, and the work done during impact is not affected by the impact velocity. This work is seen as a useful means of describing phenomena associated with the impact destruction of rocks. On the basis of the empirical relations discussed here, a fragmentation model of the parent bodies of Eos and Koronis families is presented.

  13. Impact of Incidents on Enrollments at Higher Education Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'Orange, Hans P.

    2010-01-01

    Higher education is a remarkably consistent enterprise. The same general pattern, by and large, has existed since the enactment of the G.I. Bill in 1944 and large numbers of returning veterans began enrolling in American higher education. Although the definition of a traditional student is changing, many students still enroll in the fall to begin…

  14. Comics as Research, Comics for Impact: The Case of Higher Fees, Higher Debts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Priego

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Researchers have turned to comics as outputs incorporating their research findings. These comics are print and/or online publications that can lead to the wider adoption of research and enhance educational practices, widen public engagement, and improve the possibilities for research to influence public policy.  This article presents an interview with Professor Katy Vigurs about 'Higher Fees, Higher Debts: Greater Expectations of Graduate Futures?', a comic based on a research report produced for the Society for Research into Higher Education (2016.  In order to contextualize the interview, this article also provides an introduction to non-fiction comics research, and concludes with reflections on comics as a way of doing research. This article seeks to document and encourage further knowledge-exchange between the higher education sector and comics practitioners, and between researchers using comics in their research or as a means to disseminate their own research and those scholars who research comics as their main object of study.

  15. THE PHYSICS OF PROTOPLANETESIMAL DUST AGGLOMERATES. V. MULTIPLE IMPACTS OF DUSTY AGGLOMERATES AT VELOCITIES ABOVE THE FRAGMENTATION THRESHOLD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kothe, Stefan; Guettler, Carsten; Blum, Juergen

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, a number of new experiments have advanced our knowledge on the early growth phases of protoplanetary dust aggregates. Some of these experiments have shown that collisions between porous and compacted agglomerates at velocities above the fragmentation threshold velocity can lead to growth of the compact body, when the porous collision partner fragments upon impact and transfers mass to the compact agglomerate. To obtain a deeper understanding of this potentially important growth process, we performed laboratory and drop tower experiments to study multiple impacts of small, highly porous dust-aggregate projectiles onto sintered dust targets. The projectile and target consisted of 1.5 μm monodisperse, spherical SiO 2 monomers with volume filling factors of 0.15 ± 0.01 and 0.45 ± 0.05, respectively. The fragile projectiles were accelerated by a solenoid magnet and combined with a projectile magazine with which 25 impacts onto the same spot on the target could be performed in vacuum. We measured the mass-accretion efficiency and the volume filling factor for different impact velocities between 1.5 and 6.0 m s -1 . The experiments at the lowest impact speeds were performed in the Bremen drop tower under microgravity conditions to allow partial mass transfer also for the lowest adhesion case. Within this velocity range, we found a linear increase of the accretion efficiency with increasing velocity. In the laboratory experiments, the accretion efficiency increases from 0.12 to 0.21 in units of the projectile mass. The recorded images of the impacts showed that the mass transfer from the projectile to the target leads to the growth of a conical structure on the target after less than 100 impacts. From the images, we also measured the volume filling factors of the grown structures, which ranged from 0.15 (uncompacted) to 0.40 (significantly compacted) with increasing impact speed. The velocity dependency of the mass-transfer efficiency and the packing

  16. Influence of the Metal Volume Fraction on the maximum deflection and impact load of GLARE plates subjected to low velocity impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikakis, GSE; Savaidis, A.; Zalimidis, P.; Tsitos, S.

    2016-11-01

    Fiber-metal laminates are hybrid composite materials, consisting of alternating metal layers bonded to fiber-reinforced prepreg layers. GLARE (GLAss REinforced) belongs to this new family of materials. GLARE is the most successful fiber-metal laminate up to now and is currently being used for the construction of primary aerospace structures, such as the fuselage of the Airbus A380 air plane. Impact properties are very important in aerospace structures, since impact damage is caused by various sources, such as maintenance damage from dropped tools, collision between service cars or cargo and the structure, bird strikes and hail. The principal objective of this article is to evaluate the influence of the Metal Volume Fraction (MVF) on the low velocity impact response of GLARE fiber-metal laminates. Previously published differential equations of motion are employed for this purpose. The low velocity impact behavior of various circular GLARE plates is predicted and characteristic values of impact variables, which represent the impact phenomenon, are evaluated versus the corresponding MVF of the examined GLARE material grades. The considered GLARE plates are subjected to low velocity impact under identical impact conditions. A strong effect of the MVF on the maximum impact load and a significant effect on the maximum plate deflection of GLARE plates has been found.

  17. The Impact of Historical Expectations on Women's Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenmann, Linda

    2007-01-01

    This paper explores ways in which gendered approaches have limited women's experience of higher education. Using a historical lens with primary examples from the United States and Britain, it demonstrates how beliefs about women over time led to three expectations about their educational participation: initially, that women were not interested in…

  18. Neoliberal Competition in Higher Education Today: Research, Accountability and Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olssen, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Drawing on Foucault's elaboration of neoliberalism as a positive form of state power, the ascendancy of neoliberalism in higher education in Britain is examined in terms of the displacement of public good models of governance, and their replacement with individualised incentives and performance targets, heralding new and more stringent conceptions…

  19. Impact Bias in Student Evaluations of Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, Anthony; Medway, Dominic; Foos, Adrienne; Goatman, Anna

    2017-01-01

    In the context of higher education, this study examines the extent to which affective evaluations of the student experience are influenced by the point at which they are made (i.e. before the experience begins, whilst it is happening and after it has ended). It adopts a between-groups quantitative analysis of the affective evaluations made by 360…

  20. The Impact of Digital Mobile Devices in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevillano-García, M.ª Luisa; Vázquez-Cano, Esteban

    2015-01-01

    This research examined the acceptance, incidence, and use of digital mobile devices (tablets and smartphones) among university students in the European Higher Education Area (EHEA). The research was contextualized in a sample of 419 students from three Spanish public universities. Through a quantitative methodology, we identified the factors and…

  1. Calculation and measurement of a neutral air flow velocity impacting a high voltage capacitor with asymmetrical electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Malík

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the effects surrounding phenomenon of a mechanical force generated on a high voltage asymmetrical capacitor (the so called Biefeld-Brown effect. A method to measure this force is described and a formula to calculate its value is also given. Based on this the authors derive a formula characterising the neutral air flow velocity impacting an asymmetrical capacitor connected to high voltage. This air flow under normal circumstances lessens the generated force. In the following part this velocity is measured using Particle Image Velocimetry measuring technique and the results of the theoretically calculated velocity and the experimentally measured value are compared. The authors found a good agreement between the results of both approaches.

  2. Impact of On-line Education on Higher Education System

    OpenAIRE

    Sreeramana Aithal; Shubhrajyotsna Aithal

    2016-01-01

    Education is the most important thing for any country to develop and prosper. Education moulds the character and intelligence of individuals. It also provides the talent and motivation to every person. The conventional education system at higher education level is analogous to brick and mortar type business system, where a student gets a systematic education from college/University by personally attending required courses regularly (Full time/part Time). However, the conventional education sy...

  3. THE IMPACTS OF SOCIAL NETWORKING SITES IN HIGHER LEARNING

    OpenAIRE

    Mohd Ishak Bin Ismail; Ruzaini Bin Abdullah Arshah

    2016-01-01

    Social networking sites, a web-based application have permeated the boundary between personal lives and student lives. Nowadays, students in higher learning used social networking site such as Facebook to facilitate their learning through the academic collaboration which it further enhances students’ social capital. Social networking site has many advantages to improve students’ learning. To date, Facebook is the leading social networking sites at this time which it being widely used by stude...

  4. Impact of On-line Education on Higher Education System

    OpenAIRE

    Sreeramana Aithal; Shubhrajyotsna Aithal

    2016-01-01

    Education is the most important thing for any country to develop and prosper. Education moulds the character and intelligence of individuals. It also provides the talent and motivation to every person. The conventional education system at higher education level is analogous to brick and mortar type business system, where a student gets systematic education from college/University by personally attending required courses regularly (Full time/part Time). However, the conventional education syst...

  5. The Higher Essence of Economic Convergence Regarding Monetary Impacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hudec Martin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The increasing pace of achieving socio-economic growth and convergence into developed structures represents the main desire of most countries. Moreover, membership in monetary unions has quite a significant impact on the economies of participating countries, since integration processes have become undoubtedly the undisputed accelerator of convergence and integration catalyst, reflecting on the development of the world economy. The growing intensity of world trade, the ever-deepening division of labor and specialization, international movement of capital and labor mobility as wells as investments into education, research and development, innovations are among the factors that lead to the creation of increasingly closer ties between economies, deepening their mutual dependence, further reflected in knowledge-based societies. Thus, the close ties between national economies themselves represent a further incentive for more intensive cooperation through the different stages of economic integration. International economic integration is an objective to promote a gradual process of linking and connecting existing economic units, i.e. national economies to the greater interconnected units in the global economy. The aim of our research paper, by using the methods of analysis and comparison, is to closely present the issue of monetary integration, focusing on the impact of monetary integration on countries’ economy, resulting in the issue of benefits and costs of the countries’ entry into the monetary union, associated with initial economic shocks.

  6. Quantifying the Effects of the Influence of a Tungsten Long-rod Projectile into Confined Ceramics at High-velocity Impact

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gorsich, Tara J; Templeton, Douglas W

    2008-01-01

    .... The finite element simulations were performed using Elastic Plastic Impact Code (EPIC) [Johnson (2006)], which simulates the failure and particle breakup of the target once the long-rod penetrator strikes at high-velocity impact...

  7. IMPACT OF GRANT PROJECTS IMPLEMENTATION IN ROMANIAN HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlad S. PETCU

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Romanian Higher Education Institutions were one of the main beneficiaries of European funding in the 2007-2013 funding excercise, especially in the Sectoral Operational Programme Human Resources Development. Analyzing the data provided by 21 public universities in Romania, we find that Universities have accessed in a significant proportion two types of projects: those dedicated to transition from school to active life and those dedicated to doctoral studies. Also, the proportion of the European funds attracted by HEIs is an overwhelming part of the allocation of reference (over 40% since 2011, and also a significant proportion of total revenues universities (~15.5 % for 2011-2014.

  8. THE IMPACT OF INTERNET-OF-THINGS IN HIGHER EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Logica BANICA

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims to present a new concept in IT&C (Information Technology and Communications, namely Internet-of-Things (IoT. Starting from a short introduction on the basics of this concept, a study is conducted to demonstrate the importance of introducing IoT in higher education. Also, there are identified several practical methods identified for integrating IoT features in academia, especially in the areas of teaching and learning enhancements. Even if important IT&C companies launched and implemented projects in this area, a model for “smart universities” is no well-defined. In our study, we demonstrate that the optimal technical solution for academia are IoT Platforms with real-time, limited-area service provision using Cloud Computing services.

  9. The efficiency of ceramic-faced metal targets at high-velocity impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolkachev, V. F.; Konyaev, A. A.; Pakhnutova, N. V.

    2017-11-01

    The paper represents experimental results and engineering evaluation concerning the efficiency of composite materials to be used as an additional protection during the high- velocity interaction of a tungsten rod with a target in the velocity range of 1...5 km/s. The main parameter that characterizes the high-velocity interaction of a projectile with a layered target is the penetration depth. Experimental data, numerical simulation and engineering evaluation by modified models are used to determine the penetration depth. Boron carbide, aluminum oxide, and aluminum nickelide are applied as a front surface of targets. Based on experimental data and numerical simulation, the main characteristics of ceramics are determined, which allows composite materials to be effectively used as additional elements of protection.

  10. Development of a computer program for drop time and impact velocity of the rod cluster control assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, K.-S.; Yim, J.-S.; Kim, I.-K.; Kim, K.-T.

    1993-01-01

    In PWR the rod cluster control assembly (RCCA) for shutdown is released upon the action of the control drive mechanism and falls down through the guide thimble by its weight. Drop time and impact velocity of the RCCA are two key parameters with respect to reactivity insertion time and the mechanical integrity of fuel assembly. Therefore, the precise control of the drop time and impact velocity is prerequisite to modifying the existing design features of the RCCA and guide thimble or newly designing them. During its falling down into the core, the RCCA is retarded by various forces acting on it such as flow resistance and friction caused by the RCCA movement, buoyancy mechanical friction caused by contacting inner surface of the guide thimble, etc. However, complicated coupling of the various forces makes it difficult to derive an analytical dynamic equation for the drop time and impact velocity. This paper deals with the development of a computer program containing an analytical dynamic equation applicable to the Korean Fuel Assembly (KOFA) loaded in the Korean nuclear power plants. The computer program is benchmarked with an available single control rod drop tests. Since the predicted values are in good agreements with the test results, the computer program developed in this paper can be employed to modify the existing design features of the RCCA and guide thimble and to develop their new design features for advanced nuclear reactors. (author)

  11. Impact of axial velocity and transmembrane pressure (TMP) on ARP filter performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poirier, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Burket, P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-02-29

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is currently treating radioactive liquid waste with the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). Recently, the low filter flux through the ARP of approximately 5 gallons per minute has limited the rate at which radioactive liquid waste can be treated. Salt Batch 6 had a lower processing rate and required frequent filter cleaning. Savannah River Remediation (SRR) has a desire to understand the causes of the low filter flux and to increase ARP/MCU throughput. One potential method for increasing filter flux is to adjust the axial velocity and transmembrane pressure (TMP). SRR requested SRNL to conduct bench-scale filter tests to evaluate the effects of axial velocity and transmembrane pressure on crossflow filter flux. The objective of the testing was to determine whether increasing the axial velocity at the ARP could produce a significant increase in filter flux. The authors conducted the tests by preparing slurries containing 6.6 M sodium Salt Batch 6 supernate and 2.5 g MST/L, processing the slurry through a bench-scale crossflow filter unit at varying axial velocity and TMP, and measuring filter flux as a function of time.

  12. Mechanical and chemical responses of low-velocity impacted RDX and HMX explosive powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yanqing; Guo, Hongfu; Huang, Fenglei; Bao, Xiaowei; Explosion; damage Team

    2017-06-01

    The experimental analyses of mechanical and chemical responses of RDX and HMX particles were performed based on the optimized drop-weight experimental system equipped with the High-Speed Camera (HSC). It has been found that Jetting phenomenon observed by HSC is the result of the energy released by gaseous products, which push the pulverized or melted explosives to splash radially. Jetting is the only and the most obvious difference between reactive and inert particles prior to combustion so that jetting can be regarded as the sign of ignition. Area expansion velocity, jetting velocity, and flame propagation velocity have been estimated via image processing, making it possible to characterize mechanical deformation and violence of reaction of each stage. Hot-spots coalescence promotes flame propagation whose velocity reflects the violence of deflagration reaction. Jetting appearance time can be used to determine time-to-ignition more accurately than other ways. For RDX, molten phase plays an important role to the formation of the hot-spots. Multiple particles experienced more severe burning reactions than an individual particle. China National Nature Science Foundation (11572045), ``Science Challenging Program'' (JCKY2016212A501),opening fund from Safety ammunition research and Development Center (RMC2015B03).

  13. Experimental Investigation of Multi-layer Insulation Effect on Damage of Stuffed Shield by High-velocity Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GUAN Gong-shun

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The stuffed shield with multi-layer insulation(MLI was designed by improving on Al Whipple shield, and a series of high-velocity impact tests were practiced with a two-stage light gas gun facility at vacuum environment. The damage model of the stuffed shield with different MLI location by Al-sphere projectile impacting was obtained. The effect of MLI on damage of the stuffed shield by high-velocity impact was studied. The results indicate when the MLI is located at front side of the first Al-plate, the protection performance of the stuffed shield is improved with the larger perforation diameter of the first Al-plate and more impact kinetic energy dissipation of the projectile. When MLI is arranged at back side of the first Al-plate, the expansion of the secondary debris cloud from projectile impacting the first Al-plate is restrained, it is not good to improve the protection performance of the stuffed shield. When MLI is arranged at front side of the stuffed wall, the perforation size of the stuffed wall increases; when MLI is arranged at front side of the rear wall, the distribution range of crater on the rear wall decreases.

  14. A Microchannel Inlet to Reduce High-Velocity Impact Fragmentation of Molecules in Orbital and Fly-by Mass Spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Brandon; Anupriya, Anupriya; Sevy, Eric; Austin, Daniel E.

    2017-10-01

    Closed source neutral mass spectrometers are often used on flyby missions to characterize the molecular components of planetary exospheres. In a typical closed source, neutrals are thermalized as they deflect off the walls within a spherical antechamber prior to ionization and mass analysis. However, the high kinetic energy of each molecule as it impacts the chamber can lead to fragmentation before the ionization region is reached. Due to this fragmentation, the original composition of the molecule can be altered, leading to ambiguous identification.Even knowing the fragmentation pathways that occur may not allow deconvolution of data to give the correct composition. Only stable, volatile fragments will be observed in the subsequent mass spectrometer and different organic compounds likely give similar fragmentation products. Simply detecting these products will not lead to unambiguous identication of the precursor molecules. Here, we present a hardware solution to this problem—an inlet that reduces the fragmentation of molecules that impact at high velocities.We present a microchannel inlet that reduces the impact fragmentation by allowing the molecules to dissipate kinetic energy faster than their respective dissociation lifetimes. Preliminary calculations indicate that impact-induced fragmentation will be reduced up to three orders of magnitude compared with conventional closed sources by using this inlet. The benefits of such an inlet apply to any orbital or flyby velocity. The microchannel inlet enables detection of semi-volatile molecules that were previously undetectable due to impact fragmentation.

  15. Low velocity impact properties of intra-ply hybrid composites based on basalt and nylon woven fabrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehkordi, Majid Tehrani; Nosraty, Hooshang; Shokrieh, Mahmood Mehrdad; Minak, Giangiacomo; Ghelli, Daniele

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the low velocity impact behavior of homogenous and hybrid composite laminates reinforced by basalt-nylon intra-ply fabrics was experimentally investigated. Epoxy resin was used as matrix material. The purpose of using this hybrid composite is to combine the good mechanical properties of basalt fiber with the excellent impact resistant of nylon fiber. Five different types of woven fabrics were used as reinforcement with different volume percentages of nylon (0%, 25%, 33.3%, 50% and 100%). The effect of nylon/basalt fiber content on maximum force, maximum deflection, residual deflection, total absorbed energy, elastic energy, size and type of damage were studied at several low velocity impact nominal energy levels (16, 30 and 40 J). The results indicate that impact performance of these composites is significantly affected by the nylon/basalt fiber content. The visual inspection and ultrasonic C-scan of the impact damaged specimens reveals that content of nylon/basalt fiber controls the type and size of damage.

  16. High-Pressure Shock Compression of Solids VIII The Science and Technology of High-Velocity Impact

    CERN Document Server

    Chhabildas, Lalit C; Horie, Yasuyuki

    2005-01-01

    Research in the field of shock physics and ballistic impact has always been intimately tied to progress in development of facilities for accelerating projectiles to high velocity and instrumentation for recording impact phenomena. The chapters of this book, written by leading US and European experts, cover a broad range of topics and address researchers concerned with questions of material behaviour under impulsive loading and the equations of state of matter, as well as the design of suitable instrumentation such as gas guns and high-speed diagnostics. Applications include high-speed impact dynamics, the inner composition of planets, syntheses of new materials and materials processing. Among the more technologically-oriented applications treated is the testing of the flight characteristics of aeroballistic models and the assessment of impacts in the aerospace industry.

  17. On the time and temperature dependent behaviour of laminated amorphous polymers subjected to low-velocity impact

    CERN Document Server

    Rühl, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    The thesis investigates a polymeric laminate consisting of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) experimentally and numerically with regard to its impact behaviour and applicability. After a basic characterization of the monolithic materials, PMMA-TPU-PMMA laminates were subjected to impact loadings at velocities up to 5 m/s using threepoint bending and dart impact tests. Based on the experimental basis, different material models for the Finite Element simulation are presented, which are able to capture the time and temperature dependent behaviour of the laminate. Final validation experiments, consisting of head-dummy impacts at 10 m/s on automotive side windows, were conducted for PMMA and the laminate in order to investigate their applicability as glass substitution products. The Content Introduction · Fundamentals · Experimental Investigation · Material Modelling of PMMA · Material Modelling of TPU · Simulation of PMMA-TPU Laminate · Component Tests and Validation · S...

  18. Evaluation of mechanical properties and low velocity impact characteristics of balsa wood and urethane foam applied to impact limiter of nuclear spent fuel shipping cask

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goo, Junsung; Shin, Kwangbok [Hanbat Nat' l Univ., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Woosuk [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    The paper aims to evaluate the low velocity impact responses and mechanical properties of balsa wood and urethane foam core materials and their sandwich panels, which are applied as the impact limiter of a nuclear spent fuel shipping cask. For the urethane foam core, which is isotropic, tensile, compressive, and shear mechanical tests were conducted. For the balsa wood core, which is orthotropic and shows different material properties in different orthogonal directions, nine mechanical properties were determined. The impact test specimens for the core material and their sandwich panel were subjected to low velocity impact loads using an instrumented testing machine at impact energy levels of 1, 3, and 5J. The experimental results showed that both the urethane foam and the balsa wood core except in the growth direction (z-direction) had a similar impact response for the energy absorbing capacity, contact force, and indentation. Furthermore, it was found that the urethane foam core was suitable as an impact limiter material owing to its resistance to fire and low cost, and the balsa wood core could also be strongly considered as an impact limiter material for a lightweight nuclear spent fuel shipping cask.

  19. Multiple ionization of noble gases by 2.0 MeV proton impact: comparison with equi-velocity electron impact ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melo, W.S.; Santos, A.C.F.; Sant'Anna, M.M.; Sigaud, G.M.; Montenegro, E.C.

    2002-01-01

    Absolute single- and multiple-ionization cross sections of rare gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe) have been measured for collisions with 2.0 MeV p + . A comparison is made with equi-velocity electron impact ionization cross sections as well as with the available proton impact data. For the light rare gases the single-ionization cross sections are essentially the same for both proton and electron impacts, but increasing differences appear for the heavier targets. (author). Letter-to-the-editor

  20. Behind-armour Debris Modelling for High- velocity Fragment Impact (Part 2)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Verolme, J

    1997-01-01

    This report presents the results of impact experiments and a parallel simulation modelling thereof, with the main objective to study the fragmentation properties of tungsten and steel projectiles at impact...

  1. Factor 10 Visions project: Higher Education Sector Towards Sustainable Higher Education: Environmental impacts of campus-based and distance higher education systems

    OpenAIRE

    Roy, Robin; Potter, Stephen; Yarrow, Karen; Smith, Mark

    2005-01-01

    This report gives the findings of a major UK study of the environmental impacts of four different methods of providing higher education (HE) courses: Conventional campus-based full-time courses; Conventional campus-based part-time courses; Print-based distance taught courses; Part electronically-delivered distance taught courses.\\ud This is an environmental assessment of these different HE systems and does not assess their educational effectiveness or socio-economic costs and benefits.\\ud KEY...

  2. Numerical simulations of mechanical and ignition-deflagration responses for PBXs under low-to-medium-level velocity impact loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kun; Wu, Yanqing; Huang, Fenglei; Li, Ming

    2017-09-05

    An effective computational model is required to accurately predict the dynamic responses in accidental initiations of explosives. The present work uses a series of two-dimensional mechanical-chemical simulations performed via a hydrodynamic-code, DREXH-2D, to efficiently describe the mechanical and ignition-deflagration responses of cased cylindrical polymer-bonded explosives (PBXs) undergoing a low-to-medium-level impact (70-350m/s) in longitudinal direction. The ignition response was predicted based on an ignition criterion of effective plastic work. Slow burning and its growth to deflagration were described through a pressure-dependent reaction rate equation. The extreme value of effective plastic work was found to be useful to determine the ignition threshold velocity for PBXs. For low-level velocity impact, the incident stress wave reflection from lateral surfaces contributed to the formation of ignition regions. After the ignition, the deflagration was induced in the medium-level impact, and its violence was related to the shock strength. However, the low-strength stress wave only induced reaction at local regions, and sequent burning was no longer sensitive to the strength of incident wave. The predicted pressure and temperature results of PBXs were consistent with the medium-level impact tests performed by China Academy of Engineering Physics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The Impact of the Global Financial Crisis on Japan's Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Futao

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with the impact of the global financial crisis on Japan's economy, especially on its higher education. The first section provides an overview of Japan's national economy with a focus on the impact of the global financial crisis on the national economy, then the author touches on the impact on the Japanese government's finances,…

  4. The Expenditure Impacts of London's Higher Education Institutions: The Role of Diverse Income Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermannsson, Kristinn; Lisenkova, Katerina; McGregor, Peter G.; Swales, J. Kim

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyses the impact of London-based higher education institutions (HEIs) on the English economy. When we treat each of the HEIs as separate sectors in conventional input-output analysis, their expenditure impacts appear rather homogenous, with the apparent heterogeneity of their overall impacts being primarily driven by scale. However,…

  5. Experimental Study and Numerical Modelling of Low Velocity Impact on Laminated Composite Reinforced with Thin Film Made of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Moumen, A.; Tarfaoui, M.; Hassoon, O.; Lafdi, K.; Benyahia, H.; Nachtane, M.

    2018-04-01

    In this work, polymer laminated composites based on Epon 862 Epoxy resin, T300 6 k carbon fibers and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were tested with the aim to elucidate the effect of CNTs on impact properties including impact force and capacity to absorb impact energy. The polymer matrix was reinforced by a random distribution of CNTs with fraction ranging from 0.5 to 4.wt%. Composite panels were manufactured by using the infusion process. Taylor impact test was used to obtain the impact response of specimens. Projectile manufactured from a high strength and hardened steel with a diameter of 20 mm and 1.5 kg of mass was launched by a compressed gas gun within the velocity of 3 m/s. Impact force histories and absorbed energy of specimens were recorded. A numerical model was employed to simulate the impact performance. This model has been accomplished by forming a user established subroutine (VUMAT) and executing it in ABAQUS software. Finally, the effect of CNTs amount on dynamic properties of laminated composites was discussed.

  6. Impact Of Microcredit Programs On Higher Income Borrowers: Evidence From Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Sayma Rahman; Rafiqul Bhuyan Rafiq; Mohammad A. Momen

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the impact of microcredit on economic indicators of borrowers in Bangladesh and compare if the impact is same across borrowers having different income levels. Our estimation results show that the microcredit programs are effective in generating higher income and assets for borrowers in general. However, the impact is not found to be uniform across income levels of borrowers. Higher income borrowers seem to be better off compared to the middle and lower income bor...

  7. Global and local re-impact and velocity regime of ballistic ejecta of boulder craters on Ceres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulzeck, F.; Schröder, S. E.; Schmedemann, N.; Stephan, K.; Jaumann, R.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    2018-04-01

    Imaging by the Dawn-spacecraft reveals that fresh craters on Ceres below 40 km often exhibit numerous boulders. We investigate how the fast rotating, low-gravity regime on Ceres influences their deposition. We analyze size-frequency distributions of ejecta blocks of twelve boulder craters. Global and local landing sites of boulder crater ejecta and boulder velocities are determined by the analytical calculation of elliptic particle trajectories on a rotating body. The cumulative distributions of boulder diameters follow steep-sloped power-laws. We do not find a correlation between boulder size and the distance of a boulder to its primary crater. Due to Ceres' low gravitational acceleration and fast rotation, ejecta of analyzed boulder craters (8-31 km) can be deposited across the entire surface of the dwarf planet. The particle trajectories are strongly influenced by the Coriolis effect as well as the impact geometry. Fast ejecta of high-latitude craters accumulate close to the pole of the opposite hemisphere. Fast ejecta of low-latitude craters wraps around the equator. Rotational effects are also relevant for the low-velocity regime. Boulders are ejected at velocities up to 71 m/s.

  8. The MASSIVE Survey - V. Spatially resolved stellar angular momentum, velocity dispersion, and higher moments of the 41 most massive local early-type galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veale, Melanie; Ma, Chung-Pei; Thomas, Jens; Greene, Jenny E.; McConnell, Nicholas J.; Walsh, Jonelle; Ito, Jennifer; Blakeslee, John P.; Janish, Ryan

    2017-01-01

    We present spatially resolved two-dimensional stellar kinematics for the 41 most massive early-type galaxies (ETGs; MK ≲ -25.7 mag, stellar mass M* ≳ 1011.8 M⊙) of the volume-limited (D McDonald Observatory, covering a 107 arcsec × 107 arcsec field of view (often reaching 2 to 3 effective radii). We measure the 2D spatial distribution of each galaxy's angular momentum (λ and fast or slow rotator status), velocity dispersion (σ), and higher order non-Gaussian velocity features (Gauss-Hermite moments h3 to h6). Our sample contains a high fraction (˜80 per cent) of slow and non-rotators with λ ≲ 0.2. When combined with the lower mass ETGs in the ATLAS3D survey, we find the fraction of slow rotators to increase dramatically with galaxy mass, reaching ˜50 per cent at MK ˜ -25.5 mag and ˜90 per cent at MK ≲ -26 mag. All of our fast rotators show a clear anticorrelation between h3 and V/σ, and the slope of the anticorrelation is steeper in more round galaxies. The radial profiles of σ show a clear luminosity and environmental dependence: the 12 most luminous galaxies in our sample (MK ≲ -26 mag) are all brightest cluster/group galaxies (except NGC 4874) and all have rising or nearly flat σ profiles, whereas five of the seven `isolated' galaxies are all fainter than MK = -25.8 mag and have falling σ. All of our galaxies have positive average h4; the most luminous galaxies have average h4 ˜ 0.05, while less luminous galaxies have a range of values between 0 and 0.05. Most of our galaxies show positive radial gradients in h4, and those galaxies also tend to have rising σ profiles. We discuss the implications for the relationship among dynamical mass, σ, h4, and velocity anisotropy for these massive galaxies.

  9. Study of Impact Damage in PVA-ECC Beam under Low-Velocity Impact Loading Using Piezoceramic Transducers and PVDF Thin-Film Transducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Baoxin; Kong, Qingzhao; Qian, Hui; Patil, Devendra; Lim, Ing; Li, Mo; Liu, Dong; Song, Gangbing

    2018-02-24

    Compared to conventional concrete, polyvinyl alcohol fiber reinforced engineering cementitious composite (PVA-ECC) offers high-strength, ductility, formability, and excellent fatigue resistance. However, impact-induced structural damage is a major concern and has not been previously characterized in PVA-ECC structures. We investigate the damage of PVA-ECC beams under low-velocity impact loading. A series of ball-drop impact tests were performed at different drop weights and heights to simulate various impact energies. The impact results of PVA-ECC beams were compared with mortar beams. A combination of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) thin-film sensors and piezoceramic-based smart aggregate were used for impact monitoring, which included impact initiation and crack evolution. Short-time Fourier transform (STFT) of the signal received by PVDF thin-film sensors was performed to identify impact events, while active-sensing approach was utilized to detect impact-induced crack evolution by the attenuation of a propagated guided wave. Wavelet packet-based energy analysis was performed to quantify failure development under repeated impact tests.

  10. The Economic Impact of Higher Education Institutions in Ireland: Evidence from Disaggregated Input-Output Tables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiantao; Larkin, Charles; Lucey, Brian M.

    2017-01-01

    While there has been a long history of modelling the economic impact of higher education institutions (HEIs), little research has been undertaken in the context of Ireland. This paper provides, for the first time, a disaggregated input-output table for Ireland's higher education sector. The picture painted overall is a higher education sector that…

  11. Higher glucose level and systemic oxidative stress decrease the mean velocity index of the retinal artery during flickering light stimulation in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debelić, Vladimir; Drnovšek Olup, Brigita; Žižek, Bogomir; Skitek, Milan; Jerin, Aleš

    2016-10-31

    To determine whether higher glucose level and systemic oxidative stress decrease mean velocity (MV) index of the central retinal artery (CRA) during flickering light stimulation in type 1 diabetes (T1D). The study was performed in the period from 2008 to 2015 at the University Eye Clinic in Ljubljana. 41 patients with T1D and 37 participants without diabetes were included. MV in the CRA was measured using Doppler ultrasound diagnostics in basal conditions and during 8 Hz flickering light irritation. The plasma levels of glucose, fructosamine, 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), triglycerides, cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) were measured. Patients with T1D had significantly higher levels of blood glucose (Ptriglycerides (P=0.108), cholesterol (P=0.531), and LDL (P=0.645) between the groups. Patients with T1D also had a significantly lower MV index in the CRA (1.11±0.15 vs 1.24±0.23; P=0.010). In the T1D group, a significant negative correlation was found between the level of glucose (r=0.58; Pindex in the CRA. At the same time, in this group fructosamine and 8-OHdG levels had a separate effect on the MV index (adjusted R2=0.38, Pglucose levels, the medium-term glucose level, and systemic oxidative stress could importantly reduce retinal vasodilatation during flickering light irritation in patients with T1D.

  12. Unified Impact Theory for Velocity-Changing Effects and Speed Dependencies in Neutral Species Lineshapes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herman, R.M.

    2011-01-01

    A dole correlation function which incorporates velocity-changing (motional narrowing) effects and the effects of speed-dependent Lorentz relaxation rates into otherwise Voigt profile correlation functions is developed, based partly upon previous work by the author. For the first time simple closed expressions, which lend themselves to elementary calculation beginning only with the relevant parts of intermolecular interaction energies, are developed for the cubic time-dependent term within the exponent describing the decay of the correlation function. This term is of first order in perturbers number density, as are the Lorentz parameters, and is complex, thereby allowing for narrowing, changing in shape and asymmetry in the line profile. Soft and hard collisions play no explicit role, though both are variously present for each line. Quartic time dependencies are also discussed, though they are thought to be negligible in non hydrogen molecular spectroscopy. Finally, some comments are added about a relevant technique for hydrogen spectra

  13. THE INFLUENCE OF VISCOELASTICITY ON VELOCITY-DEPENDENT RESTITUTIONS IN THE OBLIQUE IMPACT OF SPHERES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuel Willert

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available We analyse the oblique impact of linear-viscoelastic spheres by numerical models based on the Method of Dimensionality Reduction and the Boundary Element Method. Thereby we assume quasi-stationarity, the validity of the half-space hypothesis, short impact times and Amontons-Coulomb friction with a constant coefficient for both static and kinetic friction. As under these assumptions both methods are equivalent, their results differ only within the margin of a numerical error. The solution of the impact problem written in proper dimensionless variables will only depend on the two parameters necessary to describe the elastic problem and a sufficient set of variables to describe the influence of viscoelastic material behaviour; in the case of a standard solid this corresponds to two additional variables. The full solution of the impact problem is finally determined by comprehensive parameter studies and partly approximated by simple analytic expressions.

  14. Numerical Study of the Critical Impact Velocity in Shear. Appendix Number 1

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Klosak, M

    1996-01-01

    .... A numerical study of impact shearing of a layer has been performed by the FE code ABAQUS. It was intended to verify available experimental results for VAR 4340 steel 52 HRC, obtained by direct...

  15. Fundamental studies of low velocity impact resistance of graphite fiber reinforced polymer matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowles, K.J.

    1985-01-01

    A study was conducted to relate the impact resistance of graphite fiber reinforced composites with matrix properties through gaining an understanding of the basic mechanics involved in the deformation and fracture process, and the effect of the polymer matrix structure on these mechanisms. It was found that the resin matrix structure influences the composite impact resistance in at least two ways. The integration of flexibilizers into the polymer chain structure tends to reduce the T/sub G/ and the mechanical properties of the polymer. The reduction in the mechanical properties of the matrix does not enhance the composite impact resistance because it allows matrix controlled failure to initiate impact damage. Linear polymers, which contain no active groups for cross-linking, do not toughen composites because the fiber-matrix interfacial bond is not of sufficient strength to prevent interfacial failure from occurring. Toughness must be built into the basic polymer backbone and cross-linking structure

  16. Role of awareness in head-neck acceleration in low velocity rear-end impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S; Narayan, Y; Amell, T

    2000-03-01

    Fourteen normal healthy seated and restrained young adults were delivered rear-end impacts of four intensities of acceleration. The chair was delivered a regulated and controlled pneumatic blow using a 30 cm cylinder to cause an acceleration of 0.5, 0.9, 1.1 and 1.4g. The accelerated chair was stopped suddenly by impacting the stopper at the other end of the 2 m long friction reduced track. In one set of trials, subjects were informed about the impending impact and in the other they were blindfolded and provided with loud auditory input to eliminate cues of the impact. The accelerations of the chair, shoulder and head of the participating subjects were measured triaxially and compared between levels of acceleration and expectation. The multiple analyses of variance revealed that the peak acceleration was significantly affected by the gender (P < 0.01), intensity of impact (P < 0.001), and expectation (P < 0.0001). The accelerations were significantly different in different axes (P < 0.001). A significant two-way interaction between acceleration and expectation (P < 0.03), and expectation and axes of acceleration (P < 0.02) would imply that awareness of the impending impact serves to significantly reduce the level of accelerations of head and neck.

  17. Low-Velocity Impact Wear Behavior of Ball-to-Flat Contact Under Constant Kinetic Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhang; Cai, Zhen-bing; Chen, Zhi-qiang; Sun, Yang; Zhu, Min-hao

    2017-11-01

    The impact tests were conducted on metallic materials with different bulk hardness and Young's moduli. Analysis of the dynamics response during the tribological process showed that the tested materials had similar energy absorption, where the peak contact force increased as the tests continued. Moreover, wear volume decreased with the increase in Young's modulus of metals, except for Cr with a relatively low hardness. Wear rate was gradually reduced to a steady stage with increasing cycles, which was attributed to the decrease in contact stress and work-hardening effect. The main wear mechanism of impact was characterized by delamination, and the specific surface degradation mechanisms were depending on the mechanical properties of materials. The absorbed energy was used to the propagation of micro-cracks in the subsurface instead of plastic deformation, when resistance of friction wear and plastic behavior was improved. Hence, both the hardness and Young's modulus played important roles in the impact wear of metallic materials.

  18. Seismic velocity structure of the crust in NW Namibia: Impact of rifting and mantle plume activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, K.; Heit, B.; Muksin, U.; Yuan, X.

    2017-12-01

    The continental crust in northwestern Namibiamainly was formed during to the Neoproterozoic assembly of Gondwana. The collision of old African and South American cratonic coressuch as the Congo, Kalahari and Rio de la Plata cratons led tothe development of the Pan-African Damara orogen. The fold systemconsists of an intracratonic branch in northern central Namibia (named Damara Belt), and two coast-parallel branches, the Kaoko Belt in northern Namibia and the Gariep Belt in the border region between Namibia and theRepublic of South Africa. During the Early Cretaceous opening of the South Atlantic ocean, the crust in NW Namibia was prominently affected by the Tristan da Cunha mantle plume, as evidenced by the emplacement of the Etendeka continental flood basalts.A local earthquake tomography was carried out in NW Namibia to investigateif and to what degree the deeper continental crust was modified by the magmaticactivity during rifting and the impingement of the Tristan da Cunhamantle plume. We analyzed data from 28 onshore stations of the temporaryWALPASS seismic network. Stations were covering the continental marginaround the landfall of the Walvis Ridge, parts of the Kaoko Belt and Damara Belt,and marginally the southwestern edges of the Congo craton.First arrivals of P and S waves were identified and travel times werepicked manually. 1D inversion was carried out with VELEST to derivestarting models and the initial seismicity distribution, and SIMUL2000was used for the subsequent 3D tomographic inversion. The resultingseismicity distribution mainly follows the structures of the Pan-Africanorogenic belts. The majority of events was localized in the upper crust,but additional seismicity was also found in the deeper crust.An anomaly of increased P velocities is revealed in the deep crust under the Etendekaflood basalt province. Increased P velocities can be explained by mafic and ultra-maficmaterial which intruded in the lower crust. The anomaly appears to be rather

  19. Numerical Calculation and Experiment of Coupled Dynamics of the Differential Velocity Vane Pump Driven by the Hybrid Higher-order Fourier Non-circular Gears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Gaohuan; Chen, Jianneng; Zhao, Huacheng

    2018-06-01

    The transmission systems of the differential velocity vane pumps (DVVP) have periodic vibrations under loads. And it is not easy to find the reason. In order to optimize the performance of the pump, the authors proposed DVVP driven by the hybrid Higher-order Fourier non-circular gears and tested it. There were also similar periodic vibrations and noises under loads. Taking into account this phenomenon, the paper proposes fluid mechanics and solid mechanics simulation methodology to analyze the coupling dynamics between fluid and transmission system and reveals the reason. The results show that the pump has the reverse drive phenomenon, which is that the blades drive the non-circular gears when the suction and discharge is alternating. The reverse drive phenomenon leads the sign of the shaft torque to be changed in positive and negative way. So the transmission system produces torsional vibrations. In order to confirm the simulation results, micro strains of the input shaft of the pump impeller are measured by the Wheatstone bridge and wireless sensor technology. The relationships between strain and torque are obtained by experimental calibration, and then the true torque of input shaft is calculated indirectly. The experimental results are consistent to the simulation results. It is proven that the periodic vibrations are mainly caused by fluid solid coupling, which leads to periodic torsional vibration of the transmission system.

  20. The Impact of Governance on the Performance of the Higher Education Sector in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Silva Lokuwaduge, Chitra; Armstrong, Anona

    2015-01-01

    Australian government concern for improved governance in the higher education sector over recent years has driven the implementation of governance protocols. However, there has been little evidence of any evaluation of the impact of the governance structures on the performance of universities. This paper presents an analysis of the impact of the…

  1. Damage characterization of E-glass and C-glass fibre polymer composites after high velocity impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razali, N.; Sultan, M. T. H.; Cardona, F.; Jawaid, M.

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this work is to identify impact damage on glass fibre reinforced polymer composite structures after high velocity impact. In this research, Type C-glass (600 g/m2) and Type E-glass (600 g/m2) were used to fabricate Glass Fibre-Reinforced Polymer composites (GFRP) plates. The panels were fabricated using a vacuum bagging and hot bounder method. Single stage gas gun (SSGG) was used to do the testing and data acquisition system was used to collect the damage data. Different types of bullets and different pressure levels were used for the experiment. The obtained results showed that the C-glass type of GFRP experienced more damage in comparison to E-glass type of materials based on the amount of energy absorbed on impact and the size of the damage area. All specimens underwent a partial fibre breakage but the laminates were not fully penetrated by the bullets. This indicated that both types of materials have high impact resistance even though the applied pressures of the gas gun were on the high range. We concluded that within the material specifications of the laminates including the type of glass fibre reinforcement and the thickness of the panels, those composite materials are safe to be applied in structural and body armour applications as an alternative to more expensive materials such as Kevlar and type S-glass fibre based panels.

  2. Absolute total and partial dissociative cross sections of pyrimidine at electron and proton intermediate impact velocities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolff, Wania, E-mail: wania@if.ufrj.br; Luna, Hugo; Sigaud, Lucas; Montenegro, Eduardo C. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, PO 68528, 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Tavares, Andre C. [Departamento de Física, Pontificia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro, PO 38071, Rua Marquês de São Vicente 225, 22453-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-02-14

    Absolute total non-dissociative and partial dissociative cross sections of pyrimidine were measured for electron impact energies ranging from 70 to 400 eV and for proton impact energies from 125 up to 2500 keV. MOs ionization induced by coulomb interaction were studied by measuring both ionization and partial dissociative cross sections through time of flight mass spectrometry and by obtaining the branching ratios for fragment formation via a model calculation based on the Born approximation. The partial yields and the absolute cross sections measured as a function of the energy combined with the model calculation proved to be a useful tool to determine the vacancy population of the valence MOs from which several sets of fragment ions are produced. It was also a key point to distinguish the dissociation regimes induced by both particles. A comparison with previous experimental results is also presented.

  3. Alterations of Blood Flow Through Arteries Following Atherectomy and the Impact on Pressure Variation and Velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plourde, Brian D; Vallez, Lauren J; Sun, Biyuan; Nelson-Cheeseman, Brittany B; Abraham, John P; Staniloae, Cezar S

    2016-09-01

    Simulations were made of the pressure and velocity fields throughout an artery before and after removal of plaque using orbital atherectomy plus adjunctive balloon angioplasty or stenting. The calculations were carried out with an unsteady computational fluid dynamic solver that allows the fluid to naturally transition to turbulence. The results of the atherectomy procedure leads to an increased flow through the stenotic zone with a coincident decrease in pressure drop across the stenosis. The measured effect of atherectomy and adjunctive treatment showed decrease the systolic pressure drop by a factor of 2.3. Waveforms obtained from a measurements were input into a numerical simulation of blood flow through geometry obtained from medical imaging. From the numerical simulations, a detailed investigation of the sources of pressure loss was obtained. It is found that the major sources of pressure drop are related to the acceleration of blood through heavily occluded cross sections and the imperfect flow recovery downstream. This finding suggests that targeting only the most occluded parts of a stenosis would benefit the hemodynamics. The calculated change in systolic pressure drop through the lesion was a factor of 2.4, in excellent agreement with the measured improvement. The systolic and cardiac-cycle-average pressure results were compared with measurements made in a multi-patient study treated with orbital atherectomy and adjunctive treatment. The agreements between the measured and calculated systolic pressure drop before and after the treatment were within 3%. This excellent agreement adds further confidence to the results. This research demonstrates the use of orbital atherectomy to facilitate balloon expansion to restore blood flow and how pressure measurements can be utilized to optimize revascularization of occluded peripheral vessels.

  4. The impact of red noise in radial velocity planet searches: only three planets orbiting GJ 581?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baluev, Roman V.

    2013-03-01

    We perform a detailed analysis of the latest HARPS and Keck radial velocity data for the planet-hosting red dwarf GJ 581, which attracted a lot of attention in recent time. We show that these data contain important correlated noise component (`red noise') with the correlation time-scale of the order of 10 d. This red noise imposes a lot of misleading effects while we work in the traditional white-noise model. To eliminate these misleading effects, we propose a maximum-likelihood algorithm equipped by an extended model of the noise structure. We treat the red noise as a Gaussian random process with an exponentially decaying correlation function. Using this method we prove that (i) planets b and c do exist in this system, since they can be independently detected in the HARPS and Keck data, and regardless of the assumed noise models; (ii) planet e can also be confirmed independently by both the data sets, although to reveal it in the Keck data it is mandatory to take the red noise into account; (iii) the recently announced putative planets f and g are likely just illusions of the red noise; (iv) the reality of the planet candidate GJ 581 d is questionable, because it cannot be detected from the Keck data, and its statistical significance in the HARPS data (as well as in the combined data set) drops to a marginal level of ˜2σ, when the red noise is taken into account. Therefore, the current data for GJ 581 really support the existence of no more than four (or maybe even only three) orbiting exoplanets. The planet candidate GJ 581 d requests serious observational verification.

  5. Review of the Research Literature on Defining and Demonstrating Quality Teaching and Impact in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strang, Lucy; Bélanger, Julie; Manville, Catriona; Meads, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    In March 2016, the Higher Education Academy (HEA) commissioned RAND Europe to conduct a literature review of research published since 2012, with the aim of identifying and summarising the key trends and issues in the literature on how "quality teaching" and its impact are currently being defined and demonstrated at higher education…

  6. The Impact of Regional Higher Education Spaces on the Security of International Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes-Mewett, Helen

    2016-01-01

    The security of international students in regional higher education spaces in Australia has been overlooked. Contingency theory provides the framework for this case study to explore the organisational structure and support services relevant to a regional higher education space and how this impacts the security of international students. In-depth…

  7. Impact Evaluation of Quality Assurance in Higher Education: Methodology and Causal Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiber, Theodor; Stensaker, Bjørn; Harvey, Lee

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the theoretical perspectives and general methodological elements of impact evaluation of quality assurance in higher education institutions are discussed, which should be a cornerstone of quality development in higher education and contribute to improving the knowledge about the effectiveness (or ineffectiveness) of quality…

  8. Demonstrating the Impact of a Distributed Leadership Approach in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sandra; Harvey, Marina; Hamilton, Jillian; Bevacqua, John; Egea, Kathy; McKenzie, Jo

    2017-01-01

    Higher education is under pressure to advance from a singular focus on assessment of outputs (measurements) to encompass the impact (influence) of initiatives across all aspects of academic endeavour (research, learning and teaching, and leadership). This paper focuses on the implications of this shift for leadership in higher education.…

  9. Randomized trials published in higher vs. lower impact journals differ in design, conduct, and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bala, Malgorzata M; Akl, Elie A; Sun, Xin; Bassler, Dirk; Mertz, Dominik; Mejza, Filip; Vandvik, Per Olav; Malaga, German; Johnston, Bradley C; Dahm, Philipp; Alonso-Coello, Pablo; Diaz-Granados, Natalia; Srinathan, Sadeesh K; Hassouneh, Basil; Briel, Matthias; Busse, Jason W; You, John J; Walter, Stephen D; Altman, Douglas G; Guyatt, Gordon H

    2013-03-01

    To compare methodological characteristics of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published in higher vs. lower impact Core Clinical Journals. We searched MEDLINE for RCTs published in 2007 in Core Clinical Journals. We randomly sampled 1,140 study reports in a 1:1 ratio in higher (five general medicine journals with the highest total citations in 2007) and lower impact journals. Four hundred sixty-nine RCTs proved eligible: 219 in higher and 250 in lower impact journals. RCTs in higher vs. lower impact journals had larger sample sizes (median, 285 vs. 39), were more likely to receive industry funding (53% vs. 28%), declare concealment of allocation (66% vs. 36%), declare blinding of health care providers (53% vs. 41%) and outcome adjudicators (72% vs. 54%), report a patient-important primary outcome (69% vs. 50%), report subgroup analyses (64% vs. 26%), prespecify subgroup hypotheses (42% vs. 20%), and report a test for interaction (54% vs. 27%); P journals were more likely to report methodological safeguards against bias and patient-important outcomes than those published in lower impact journals. However, sufficient limitations remain such that publication in a higher impact journal does not ensure low risk of bias. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Energy performance and thermal impact of a Borehole Heat Exchanger in a sandy aquifer: Influence of the groundwater velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelotti, A.; Alberti, L.; La Licata, I.; Antelmi, M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A numerical model of a Borehole Heat Exchanger with groundwater flow is created. • The model is carefully validated against analytical solutions. • The mutual influence of the BHE heat rate and the ground temperature field is shown. • For 10 −1 ⩽ Pe ⩽ 1 the heat rate increase with respect to null velocity is 11–105%. • Large groundwater velocities reduce the benefits of operating in both seasons. - Abstract: In a saturated soil, the groundwater flow affects both the energy performance and the thermal impact on the surrounding soil of Borehole Heat Exchangers linked to Ground-Source Heat Pumps. In this paper a numerical model in MODFLOW/MT3DMS of a single U-pipe in a sandy aquifer is proposed in order to investigate the two issues in a coupled approach. After validating the model, the typical yearly operation of a Borehole Heat Exchanger extracting and injecting heat into the ground is simulated. For 0.1 ⩽ Pe ⩽ 1 cold and warm plumes develop and the heat rate increases non linearly from 11% to 105%

  11. A modified compressible smoothed particle hydrodynamics method and its application on the numerical simulation of low and high velocity impacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amanifard, N.; Haghighat Namini, V.

    2012-01-01

    In this study a Modified Compressible Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics method is introduced which is applicable in problems involving shock wave structures and elastic-plastic deformations of solids. As a matter of fact, algorithm of the method is based on an approach which descritizes the momentum equation into three parts and solves each part separately and calculates their effects on the velocity field and displacement of particles. The most exclusive feature of the method is exactly removing artificial viscosity of the formulations and representing good compatibility with other reasonable numerical methods without any rigorous numerical fractures or tensile instabilities while Modified Compressible Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics does not use any extra modifications. Two types of problems involving elastic-plastic deformations and shock waves are presented here to demonstrate the capability of Modified Compressible Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics in simulation of such problems and its ability to capture shock. The problems that are proposed here are low and high velocity impacts between aluminum projectiles and semi infinite aluminum beams. Elastic-perfectly plastic model is chosen for constitutive model of the aluminum and the results of simulations are compared with other reasonable studies in these cases.

  12. Quality Education and the Marketplace: An Exploration of Neoliberalism and its Impact on Higher Education

    OpenAIRE

    Mandy Frake

    2008-01-01

    This paper is an in attempt to open discussion about the impact of globalization and theories of neoliberalism on higher education. More specifically, viewing higher education institutions as a market place, where the more a product costs, the greater supply and quality of the product should be received; the quality of education received by university students should also reflect this. Considering the conflict between teaching and research in higher education, quality of education beco...

  13. Impact of demographic changes on higher education institutions : Llithuania in a global context

    OpenAIRE

    Grebliauskas, Artūras; Leskauskaitė, Aušra

    2012-01-01

    The present article raises the following problematic questions: how have higher education institutions prepared themselves for facing challenges coming from the environment modified by demographic changes? What new strategic directions in higher education institutions operation are determined by a steadily-decreasing number of students? This research purposes: firstly, to inquire into the impact of demographic changes on higher education institutions activities, and, secondly, to determine ho...

  14. Simulation of Low Velocity Impact Induced Inter- and Intra-Laminar Damage of Composite Beams Based on XFEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Guan, Zhidong; Li, Zengshan

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, the Inter-Fiber Fracture (IFF) criterion of Puck failure theory based on the eXtended Finite Element Method (XFEM) was implemented in ABAQUS code to predict the intra-laminar crack initiation of unidirectional (UD) composite laminate. The transverse crack path in the matrix can be simulated accurately by the presented method. After the crack initiation, the propagation of the crack is simulated by Cohesive Zoom Model (CZM), in which the displacement discontinuities and stress concentration caused by matrix crack is introduced into the finite element (FE) model. Combined with the usage of the enriched element interface, which can be used to simulate the inter-laminar delamination crack, the Low Velocity Impact (LVI) induced damage of UD composite laminate beam with a typical stacking of composite laminates [05/903]S is studied. A complete crack initiation and propagation process was simulated and the numerical results obtained by the XFEM are consistent with the experimental results.

  15. Quality Education and the Marketplace: An Exploration of Neoliberalism and its Impact on Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandy Frake

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper is an in attempt to open discussion about the impact of globalization and theories of neoliberalism on higher education. More specifically, viewing higher education institutions as a market place, where the more a product costs, the greater supply and quality of the product should be received; the quality of education received by university students should also reflect this. Considering the conflict between teaching and research in higher education, quality of education becomes questionable. This paper explores issues of neoliberalism resulting in a greater demand for the completion of research in higher education institutions. Furthermore, the imperialism of higher education leading towards the demand for more research, the teaching versus research nexus within universities, and discussion of how these theories impact international students will be examined throughout this paper

  16. Environmental impact assessment in higher education institutions in East Africa: the case of Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabera, Telesphore

    2017-03-01

    Due to the pressure on limited resources produced by a growing population and due to a decade of war, Rwanda is facing a major problem in environmental protection. Because of such problems, it seems only reasonable that environment-related courses should play an important role in the curricula of institutions of higher learning. The main aim of this research is to present a comprehensive picture of Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) integration in graduate and undergraduate programs in Rwandese higher education institutions and to make recommendations for its improvement. During this study, two surveys were conducted: the first survey targeted Environmental Impact Assessment lecturers and the second survey was for Environmental Impact Assessment practitioners (including EIA certified experts and competent authorities). The study found that Environmental Impact Assessment is not well established in these institutions and it is not taught in some programs; civil engineering, for example, has no Environmental Impact Assessment courses. Recommendations to improve EIA education are proposed, such as requiring that a common core course in Environmental Impact Assessment be made available in Rwandese higher learning institutions.

  17. Influence of the Metal Volume Fraction on the permanent dent depth and energy absorption of GLARE plates subjected to low velocity impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikakis, GSE; Savaidis, A.; Zalimidis, P.; Tsitos, S.

    2016-11-01

    Fiber-metal laminates are hybrid composite materials, consisting of alternating metal layers bonded to fiber-reinforced prepreg layers. GLARE (GLAss REinforced) belongs to this new family of materials. GLARE is the most successful fiber-metal laminate up to now and is currently being used for the construction of primary aerospace structures, such as the fuselage of the Airbus A380 air plane. Impact properties are very important in aerospace structures, since impact damage is caused by various sources, such as maintenance damage from dropped tools, collision between service cars or cargo and the structure, bird strikes and hail. The principal objective of this article is to evaluate the influence of the Metal Volume Fraction (MVF) on the low velocity impact response of GLARE fiber-metal laminates. Previously published differential equations of motion are employed for this purpose. The low velocity impact behavior of various circular GLARE plates is predicted and characteristic values of impact variables, which represent the impact phenomenon, are evaluated versus the corresponding MVF of the examined GLARE material grades. The considered GLARE plates are subjected to low velocity impact under identical impact conditions. A strong effect of the MVF on the maximum impact load and a significant effect on the maximum plate deflection of GLARE plates has been found.

  18. Impact of higher twist terms on the analysis of scaling violation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, R.M.

    1979-09-01

    A critical discussion is given of analyses of scaling violation in deep-inelastic scattering in the context of QCD. Several possible approaches are examined. Higher twist contributions are defined, and it is shown that they can have a crucial impact on tests of QCD. Higher twist terms can dramatically affect R = sigma/sub L//sigma/sub T/. QCD may be harder to test than previously realized. 17 references

  19. Self-healing of low-velocity impact damage in glass fabric/epoxy composites using an epoxy–mercaptan healing agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Yan Chao; Qin, Shi Xiang; Ye, Yueping; Chen, Haibin; Wu, Jingshen; Rong, Min Zhi; Zhang, Ming Qiu; Yang, Gui Cheng

    2011-01-01

    Self-healing woven glass fabric-reinforced epoxy composite laminates were made by embedding epoxy- and mercaptan-loaded microcapsules. After being subjected to low-velocity impact, the laminates were able to heal the damage in an autonomic way at room temperature. The healing-induced reduction in the damaged areas was visualized using a scanning acoustic microscope. The rate of damage area reduction, which is closely related to the effect of crack rehabilitation and mechanical recovery, is a function of impact energy, content and size of the healing microcapsules. Minor damage, such as microcracks in the matrix, can be completely repaired by the healing system without manual intervention, including external pressure. Microcapsules with larger size and/or higher concentration are propitious for delivering more healing agent to cracked portions, while imposition of lateral pressure on damaged specimens forces the separated faces to approach each other. Both can improve the rate of damage area reduction in the case of severe damage

  20. Trance, Transparency and Transformation: The Impact of External Quality Monitoring on Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stensaker, Bjorn

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the impact of external quality monitoring (EQM) on higher education and identifies areas in which changes have taken place as a result of such external initiatives. Suggests that the lack of effects related directly to quality improvement should not be conceived as an EQM design error, but rather as a misconception of how organizational…

  1. Factors that Impact Quality of E-Teaching/Learning Technologies in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daukilas, Sigitas; Kaciniene, Irma; Vaisnoriene, Daiva; Vascila, Vytautas

    2008-01-01

    The article analyzes and assesses factors that have impact upon the quality of eTeaching/learning technologies in higher education; it is on their basis that the concept of eTeaching/learning quality is denied. Research data about the students' motives in choosing various teaching/learning technologies for the development of their competence are…

  2. Impact of Confucian Concepts of Feelings on Organizational Culture in Korean Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong-Kyu

    2001-01-01

    This paper discusses the impact of Confucian concepts of feelings, especially paternalism and favoritism, on the organizational culture of current higher education in South Korea. A descriptive analysis approach is taken through the lens of a cross cultural perspective. The influence of paternalism and favoritism on Korean institutional…

  3. Quality Assurance and Its Impact from Higher Education Institutions' Perspectives: Methodological Approaches, Experiences and Expectations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejan, Stelian Andrei; Janatuinen, Tero; Jurvelin, Jouni; Klöpping, Susanne; Malinen, Heikki; Minke, Bernhard; Vacareanu, Radu

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on methodological approaches, experiences and expectations referring to impact analysis of quality assurance from the perspective of three higher education institutions (students, teaching staff, quality managers) from Germany, Finland and Romania. The presentations of the three sample institutions focus on discussing the core…

  4. Impacts of Insufficient Instructional Materials on Teaching Biology: Higher Education Systems in Focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edessa, Sutuma

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess and determine impacts of insufficient instructional materials and ineffective lesson delivery methods on teaching in biology higher education. The participants of this study were 60 trainees who graduated in Bachelor of Sciences from eight public universities in majoring biology. Data for the study was…

  5. Case Study on the Impact of Technology on Incivility in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Michelle E.; Bartlett, James E.

    2016-01-01

    A qualitative case study research design provided an in-depth perspective of the participants in relation to understanding the holistic impact technology has on the incivility of student-to-student and student-to-faculty interactions in higher education. The conceptual framework by Twale and Deluca (2008), based upon Salin's (2003) proposed model…

  6. Quantifying the impact of scholarly papers based on higher-order weighted citations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xiaomei; Zhang, Fuli; Hou, Jie; Lee, Ivan; Kong, Xiangjie; Tolba, Amr; Xia, Feng

    2018-01-01

    Quantifying the impact of a scholarly paper is of great significance, yet the effect of geographical distance of cited papers has not been explored. In this paper, we examine 30,596 papers published in Physical Review C, and identify the relationship between citations and geographical distances between author affiliations. Subsequently, a relative citation weight is applied to assess the impact of a scholarly paper. A higher-order weighted quantum PageRank algorithm is also developed to address the behavior of multiple step citation flow. Capturing the citation dynamics with higher-order dependencies reveals the actual impact of papers, including necessary self-citations that are sometimes excluded in prior studies. Quantum PageRank is utilized in this paper to help differentiating nodes whose PageRank values are identical.

  7. Quantifying the impact of scholarly papers based on higher-order weighted citations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xiaomei; Zhang, Fuli; Hou, Jie; Kong, Xiangjie; Tolba, Amr; Xia, Feng

    2018-01-01

    Quantifying the impact of a scholarly paper is of great significance, yet the effect of geographical distance of cited papers has not been explored. In this paper, we examine 30,596 papers published in Physical Review C, and identify the relationship between citations and geographical distances between author affiliations. Subsequently, a relative citation weight is applied to assess the impact of a scholarly paper. A higher-order weighted quantum PageRank algorithm is also developed to address the behavior of multiple step citation flow. Capturing the citation dynamics with higher-order dependencies reveals the actual impact of papers, including necessary self-citations that are sometimes excluded in prior studies. Quantum PageRank is utilized in this paper to help differentiating nodes whose PageRank values are identical. PMID:29596426

  8. Doppler ultrasound for detection of renal transplant artery stenosis - Threshold peak systolic velocity needs to be higher in a low-risk or surveillance population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, U.; Khaw, K.K.; Hughes, N.C.

    2003-01-01

    AIMS: To establish the ideal threshold arterial velocity for the diagnosis of renal transplant artery stenosis in a surveillance population with a low pre-test probability of stenosis. METHODS: Retrospective review of Doppler ultrasound, angiographic and clinical outcome data of patients transplanted over a 3-year period. Data used to calculate sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive values (PPV) and negative predictive values (NPV) for various threshold peak systolic velocity values. RESULTS: Of 144 patients transplanted, full data were available in 117 cases. Five cases had renal transplant artery stenosis--incidence 4.2% [stenosis identified at a mean of 6.5 months (range 2-10 months)]. All five cases had a significant arterial pressure gradient across the narrowing and underwent angioplasty. Threshold peak systolic velocity of ≥2.5 m/s is not ideal [specificity=79% (CI 65-82%), PPV=18% (CI 6-32%), NPV=100% (CI 94-100%)], subjecting many patients to unnecessary angiography--8/117 (6%) in our population. Comparable values if the threshold is set at ≥3.0 m/s are 93% (CI 77-96%), 33% (CI 7-44%) and 99% (CI 93-100%), respectively. The clinical outcome of all patients was satisfactory, with no unexplained graft failures or loss. CONCLUSIONS: In a surveillance population with a low pre-test probability of stenosis, absolute renal artery velocity ≥2.5 m/s is a limited surrogate marker for significant renal artery stenosis. The false-positive rate is high, and ≥3.0 m/s is a better choice which will halve the number of patients enduring unnecessary angiography. Close clinical follow-up of patients in the 2.5-3.0 m/s range, with repeat Doppler ultrasound if necessary, will identify the test false-negatives

  9. Impact velocities of the teeth after a sudden unloading at various initial bite forces, degrees of mouth opening, and distances of travel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagashima, T; Slager, GEC; Broekhuijsen, ML; vanWilligen, JD

    A potentially dangerous situation arises when an individual bites on hard and brittle food which suddenly breaks, since the impact velocity of the lower teeth onto the upper teeth after the food is broken can be high and may cause dental damage. The present experiments were designed to study the

  10. Ghost peaks observed after AP-MALDI experiment may disclose new ionization mechanism of matrix assisted hypersonic velocity impact ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskovets, Eugene

    2015-01-01

    the supersonic jet from the inlet capillary accelerating detached particles to kinetic energies suitable for matrix-assisted hypersonic-velocity impact ionization. PMID:26212165

  11. Impact of Fibrotic Tissue on Shear Wave Velocity in Thyroid: An Ex Vivo Study with Fresh Thyroid Specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Fukuhara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We sought to elucidate the correlation between shear wave velocity (SWV and fibrosis in thyroid by precisely assessing pathological structures inside 5 × 5 mm2 regions of interest (ROIs of resected specimens, under conditions that excluded physical artifacts. The materials were unselected thyroid and lymph node specimens resected during thyroid surgery. Immediately after surgery, fresh unfixed thyroid and metastatic lymph node specimens were suspended in gel phantoms, and SWV was measured. Upon pathological examination of each specimen, the extent of fibrosis was graded as none, moderate, or severe. A total of 109 specimens were evaluated: 15 normal thyroid, 16 autoimmune thyroiditis, 40 malignant nodules, 19 benign thyroid nodules, and 19 metastatic lymph nodes. When all specimens were classified according to the degree of fibrosis determined by pathological imaging, the mean SWV was 1.49±0.39 m/s for no fibrosis, 2.13±0.66 m/s for moderate fibrosis, and 2.68±0.82 m/s for severe fibrosis. The SWVs of samples with moderate and severe fibrosis were significantly higher than those of samples without fibrosis. The results of this study demonstrate that fibrosis plays an important role in determining stiffness, as measured by SWV in thyroid.

  12. Characterization of carbon fiber polymer matrix composites subjected to simultaneous application of electric current pulse and low velocity impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Robert James

    2011-12-01

    The use of composite materials in aerospace, electronics, and wind industries has become increasingly common, and these composite components are required to carry mechanical, electrical, and thermal loads simultaneously. A unique property of carbon fiber composites is that when an electric current is applied to the specimen, the mechanical strength of the specimen increases. Previous studies have shown that the higher the electric current, the greater the increase in impact strength. However, as current passes through the composite, heat is generated through Joule heating. This Joule heating can cause degradation of the composite and thus a loss in strength. In order to minimize the negative effects of heating, it is desired to apply a very high current for a very short duration of time. This thesis investigated the material responses of carbon fiber composite plates subjected to electrical current pulse loads of up to 1700 Amps. For 32 ply unidirectional IM7/977-3 specimens, the peak impact load and absorbed energy increased slightly with the addition of a current pulse at the time of an impact event. In 16 ply cross-ply IM7/977-2 specimens, the addition of the current pulse caused detrimental effects due to electrical arcing at the interface between the composite and electrodes. Further refinement of the experimental setup should minimize the risk of electrical arcing and should better elucidate the effects of a current pulse on the impact strength of the specimens.

  13. Carbon Break Even Analysis: Environmental Impact of Tablets in Higher Education

    OpenAIRE

    Fadi Safieddine; Imad Nakhoul

    2016-01-01

    With the growing pace of tablets use and the large focus it is attracting especially in higher education, this paper looks at an important aspect of tablets; their carbon footprint. Studies have suggested that tablets have positive impact on the environment; especially since tablets use less energy than laptops or desktops. Recent manufacturers’ reports on the carbon footprint of tablets have revealed that a significant portion, as much as 80%, of the carbon footprint of tablets comes from pr...

  14. Impact of the digital divide on information literacy training in a higher education context

    OpenAIRE

    Segarani Naidoo; Jaya Raju

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on a master’s study undertaken to investigate the impact of the digital divide on information literacy(IL) training of Extended Curriculum Programme (ECP) students at the Durban University of Technology (DUT). Since1994 the demographics of higher education institutions in South Africa have changed. Today these institutions compriseheterogeneous groups of students, by race, economic background, digital background, etc. and consequently with differentlevels of literacy, infor...

  15. The impact of attaining the Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced Diploma on academic performance in bioscience higher education

    OpenAIRE

    Yhnell, E; Wood, H; Baker, M.D; Amici-Dargan, S; Taylor, C; Randerson, P; Shore, A

    2016-01-01

    Since the introduction of the Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced Diploma Qualification (WBQ) in 2003, an increasing number of students are applying to higher education institutions (HEIs) with this qualification. The advanced-level WBQ is regarded as equivalent to one General Certificate of Education A-Level (GCE A-Level). This study assesses the impact of attaining the WBQ in addition to three GCE A-Levels on overall university degree performance in comparison to attaining four GCE A-Levels, in th...

  16. Impacts of UV radiation and photomodification on the toxicity of PAHs to the higher plant Lemna gibba (duckweed)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, X.D.; Dixon, D.G.; Greenberg, B.M.

    1993-01-01

    The toxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) can be enhanced by both biotic and abiotic processes. This is exemplified by light, which, by virtue of the extensive π-orbital systems of PAHs, can be a major factor in PAH toxicity. Light activation of PAHs is known to occur via photosensitization reactions (generation of singlet oxygen and superoxide) and potentially by photomodification of the chemicals (photooxidation and/or photolysis) to more toxic species. To examine the modes of PAH action in the light and determine if the photomodified compounds are hazardous, we investigated the photoinduced toxicity of anthracene, phenanthrene and benzo[a]pyrene to the aquatic higher plant Lemna gibba (a duckweed). Toxicity end points were inhibition of growth and extent of chlorosis. Light did indeed activate the phytotoxicity of PAHs, with UV radiation more effective than visible light. Dose-response curves based on chemical concentration and light intensity revealed the order of phytotoxic strength to be anthracene > phenanthrene > benzo[a]pyrene. To explore whether photomodified PAHs were contributing to toxicity, the chemicals were irradiated before toxicity testing. The rates of photomodification of the three PAHs were rapid (half-lives in hours), and the relative velocities were coincident with the order of toxic strength. Furthermore, the photomodified PAHs were more hazardous to Lemna than the intact compounds. Because interpretations of the potential impacts of PAHs in the environment are based mostly on measurements of the structurally intact chemicals, the severity of PAH hazards is possibly underestimated

  17. Olfactory Impact of Higher Alcohols on Red Wine Fruity Ester Aroma Expression in Model Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameleyre, Margaux; Lytra, Georgia; Tempere, Sophie; Barbe, Jean-Christophe

    2015-11-11

    This study focused on the impact of five higher alcohols on the perception of fruity aroma in red wines. Various aromatic reconstitutions were prepared, consisting of 13 ethyl esters and acetates and 5 higher alcohols, all at the average concentrations found in red wine. These aromatic reconstitutions were prepared in several matrices. Sensory analysis revealed the interesting behavior of certain compounds among the five higher alcohols following their individual addition or omission. The "olfactory threshold" of the fruity pool was evaluated in several matrices: dilute alcohol solution, dilute alcohol solution containing 3-methylbutan-1-ol or butan-1-ol individually, and dilute alcohol solution containing the mixture of five higher alcohols, blended together at various concentrations. The presence of 3-methylbutan-1-ol or butan-1-ol alone led to a significant decrease in the "olfactory threshold" of the fruity reconstitution, whereas the mixture of alcohols raised the olfactory threshold. Sensory profiles highlighted changes in the perception of fruity nuances in the presence of the mixture of higher alcohols, with specific perceptive interactions, including a relevant masking effect on fresh- and jammy-fruit notes of the fruity mixture in both dilute alcohol solution and dearomatized red wine matrices. When either 3-methylbutan-1-ol or butan-1-ol was added to the fruity reconstitution in dilute alcohol solution, an enhancement of butyric notes was reported with 3-methylbutan-1-ol and fresh- and jammy-fruit with butan-1-ol. This study, the first to focus on the impact of higher alcohols on fruity aromatic expression, revealed that these compounds participate, both quantitatively and qualitatively, in masking fruity aroma perception in a model fruity wine mixture.

  18. The impact of groundwater velocity fields on streamlines in an aquifer system with a discontinuous aquitard (Inner Mongolia, China)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qiang; Zhao, Yingwang; Xu, Hua

    2018-04-01

    Many numerical methods that simulate groundwater flow, particularly the continuous Galerkin finite element method, do not produce velocity information directly. Many algorithms have been proposed to improve the accuracy of velocity fields computed from hydraulic potentials. The differences in the streamlines generated from velocity fields obtained using different algorithms are presented in this report. The superconvergence method employed by FEFLOW, a popular commercial code, and some dual-mesh methods proposed in recent years are selected for comparison. The applications to depict hydrogeologic conditions using streamlines are used, and errors in streamlines are shown to lead to notable errors in boundary conditions, the locations of material interfaces, fluxes and conductivities. Furthermore, the effects of the procedures used in these two types of methods, including velocity integration and local conservation, are analyzed. The method of interpolating velocities across edges using fluxes is shown to be able to eliminate errors associated with refraction points that are not located along material interfaces and streamline ends at no-flow boundaries. Local conservation is shown to be a crucial property of velocity fields and can result in more accurate streamline densities. A case study involving both three-dimensional and two-dimensional cross-sectional models of a coal mine in Inner Mongolia, China, are used to support the conclusions presented.

  19. Impacts of insufficient instructional materials on teaching biology: Higher education systems in focus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutuma Edessa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The purpose of this study was to assess and determine impacts of insufficient instructional materials and ineffective lesson delivery methods on teaching in biology higher education. The participants of this study were 60 trainees who graduated in Bachelor of Sciences from eight public universities in majoring biology. Data for the study was collected while these trainees were attending the course of Biology Teaching Methods in the Post Graduate Diploma in Teaching, both in the regular and summer 2015/2016 training programs at Addis Ababa University. The study employs a mixed method design of both qualitative and quantitative data evaluations. Data was collected through classroom observations and interviews with the trainees. The findings indicated that insufficient instructional materials and ineffective teaching methods in higher education had negative impacts; that have affected the skills of performing biological tasks of graduates 71%. In the course of the Post Graduate Diploma in Teaching training, trainees were unsuccessful to conduct essential biological tasks expected from graduates of biology upon the completion of their undergraduate study program. The study was concluded with emphasis on the need to integrate theory and practice through using adequate instructional materials and proper teaching methods in the higher education biology teaching.

  20. La Universidad conectada The wired tower perspectives on the impact of the Internet on higher education.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guevara Cruz Horacio

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available La universidad conectada, Perspectivas del impacto de Internet en la educación superior de Matthew Serbin nos acerca a los líderes de opinión (y protagonistas en acción de los Estados Unidos en este campo desde una visión global y sin divagaciones abordan el impacto del internet con sus transformaciones y desafíos. The wired tower perspectives on the impact of the Internet on higher education of Matthew Serbin us to opinion leaders (and players in action of the United States in this field from an overall and ramblings without addressing the impact of the internet with their transformations and challenges.

  1. Development of the experimental procedure to examine the response of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer composites subjected to a high-intensity pulsed electric field and low-velocity impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Robert J; Zhupanska, Olesya I

    2016-01-01

    A new fully automated experimental setup has been developed to study the response of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites subjected to a high-intensity pulsed electric field and low-velocity impact. The experimental setup allows for real-time measurements of the pulsed electric current, voltage, impact load, and displacements on the CFRP composite specimens. The setup includes a new custom-built current pulse generator that utilizes a bank of capacitor modules capable of producing a 20 ms current pulse with an amplitude of up to 2500 A. The setup enabled application of the pulsed current and impact load and successfully achieved coordination between the peak of the current pulse and the peak of the impact load. A series of electrical, impact, and coordinated electrical-impact characterization tests were performed on 32-ply IM7/977-3 unidirectional CFRP composites to assess their ability to withstand application of a pulsed electric current and determine the effects of the pulsed current on the impact response. Experimental results revealed that the electrical resistance of CFRP composites decreased with an increase in the electric current magnitude. It was also found that the electrified CFRP specimens withstood higher average impact loads compared to the non-electrified specimens.

  2. The impact of social anxiety on student learning and well-being in higher education

    OpenAIRE

    Russell, G.; Topham, P.

    2012-01-01

    Background: This paper reports findings from two complementary web-surveys conducted in the UK, in\\ud which 787 university students described their experiences of social anxiety.\\ud \\ud Aims: The aim was to explore the impact of social anxiety on student learning and well-being in the context of higher education.\\ud \\ud Method: Participants self-selected using a screening tool and completed a web-based questionnaire.\\ud \\ud Results: The findings are consistent with previous research on social...

  3. Impact of CLAS and COMPASS data on polarized parton densities and higher twist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leader, Elliot; Sidorov, Aleksander V.; Stamenov, Dimiter B.

    2007-01-01

    We have reanalyzed the world data on inclusive polarized deep inelastic scattering (DIS) including the very precise CLAS proton and deuteron data, as well as the latest COMPASS data on the asymmetry A 1 d , and have studied the impact of these data on polarized parton densities and higher twist effects. We demonstrate that the low Q 2 CLAS data improve essentially our knowledge of higher twist corrections to the spin structure function g 1 , while the large Q 2 COMPASS data influence mainly the strange quark density. In our new analysis we find that a negative polarized gluon density, or one that changes sign as a function of x, cannot be ruled out on the basis of the present DIS data

  4. Impact of Policies for Plagiarism in Higher Education Across Europe: Results of the Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Foltýnek

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Exploring policies and systems for assuring academic integrity and deterring plagiarism in different higher education institutions was the subject of a three-year project funded by the European Union (EU. The research for Impact of Policies for Plagiarism in Higher Education Across Europe (IPPHEAE, completed in November 2013, was conducted by teams at five higher education institutions from UK, Poland, Lithuania, Cyprus and Czech Republic. The research included an EU-wide survey of higher education institutions across 27 EU member states. Separate reports were prepared for the countries surveyed, each containing details of findings and recommendations for what could and should be done to improve academic quality and integrity at national, institutional and individual levels. An EU-wide comparative study provided an assessment of the maturity of policies and processes for academic integrity in each country, based on the data collected and the research conducted for each national report.This paper presents selected comparisons of results from the research, especially looking at evidence for maturity of policies, consistency of approach, examples of good practice and highlighting where serious effort is needed to strengthen current policies and practices.

  5. Incorporating social groups' responses in a descriptive model for second- and higher-order impact identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutheerawatthana, Pitch; Minato, Takayuki

    2010-01-01

    The response of a social group is a missing element in the formal impact assessment model. Previous discussion of the involvement of social groups in an intervention has mainly focused on the formation of the intervention. This article discusses the involvement of social groups in a different way. A descriptive model is proposed by incorporating a social group's response into the concept of second- and higher-order effects. The model is developed based on a cause-effect relationship through the observation of phenomena in case studies. The model clarifies the process by which social groups interact with a lower-order effect and then generate a higher-order effect in an iterative manner. This study classifies social groups' responses into three forms-opposing, modifying, and advantage-taking action-and places them in six pathways. The model is expected to be used as an analytical tool for investigating and identifying impacts in the planning stage and as a framework for monitoring social groups' responses during the implementation stage of a policy, plan, program, or project (PPPPs).

  6. Skeletal muscle ATP turnover and muscle fiber conduction velocity are elevated at higher muscle temperatures during maximal power output development in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Stuart R; De Vito, Giuseppe; Nimmo, Myra A; Farina, Dario; Ferguson, Richard A

    2006-02-01

    The effect of temperature on skeletal muscle ATP turnover and muscle fiber conduction velocity (MFCV) was studied during maximal power output development in humans. Eight male subjects performed a 6-s maximal sprint on a mechanically braked cycle ergometer under conditions of normal (N) and elevated muscle temperature (ET). Muscle temperature was passively elevated through the combination of hot water immersion and electric blankets. Anaerobic ATP turnover was calculated from analysis of muscle biopsies obtained before and immediately after exercise. MFCV was measured during exercise using surface electromyography. Preexercise muscle temperature was 34.2 degrees C (SD 0.6) in N and 37.5 degrees C (SD 0.6) in ET. During ET, the rate of ATP turnover for phosphocreatine utilization [temperature coefficient (Q10) = 3.8], glycolysis (Q10 = 1.7), and total anaerobic ATP turnover [Q10 = 2.7; 10.8 (SD 1.9) vs. 14.6 mmol x kg(-1) (dry mass) x s(-1) (SD 2.3)] were greater than during N (P < 0.05). MFCV was also greater in ET than in N [3.79 (SD 0.47) to 5.55 m/s (SD 0.72)]. Maximal power output (Q10 = 2.2) and pedal rate (Q10 = 1.6) were greater in ET compared with N (P < 0.05). The Q10 of maximal and mean power were correlated (P < 0.05; R = 0.82 and 0.85, respectively) with the percentage of myosin heavy chain type IIA. The greater power output obtained with passive heating was achieved through an elevated rate of anaerobic ATP turnover and MFCV, possibly due to a greater effect of temperature on power production of fibers, with a predominance of myosin heavy chain IIA at the contraction frequencies reached.

  7. Impact of common cytostatic drugs on pollen fertility in higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mišík, Miroslav; Kundi, Michael; Pichler, Clemens; Filipic, Metka; Rainer, Bernhard; Mišíková, Katarina; Nersesyan, Armen; Knasmueller, Siegfried

    2016-08-01

    Cytostatic drugs are among the most toxic chemicals which are produced. Many of them cause damage of the genetic material which may affect the fertility of higher organisms. To study the impact of the widely used anticancer drugs [cisplatin (CisPt), etoposide (Et), and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)] on the reproduction of higher plants, pollen abortion experiments were conducted with species which belong to major plant families, namely with Tradescantia paludosa (Commelinaceae), Arabidopsis thaliana (Brassicaceae), Chelidonium majus (Papaveraceae), and Alisma plantago-aquatica (Alismataceae). All compounds increased the frequencies of abortive grains. The lowest effective doses were in general in a narrow range (i.e., 1 and 10 mg/kg of dry soil). The effects of the individual drugs were similar in T. paludosa, A. plantago-aquatica, and Ch. majus, while A. thaliana was consistently less sensitive. The highest abortion rate was obtained in most experiments with CisPt, followed by 5-FU and Et. Comparisons of the doses which caused effects in the present experiments in the different species with the predicted environment concentrations and with the levels of the cytostatics which were detected in hospital wastewaters show that the realistic environmental concentrations of the drugs are 4-6 orders of magnitude lower. Therefore, it is unlikely that these drugs affect the fertility of higher plants in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems.

  8. Taking the Perfect Selfie: Investigating the Impact of Perspective on the Perception of Higher Cognitive Variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias M. Schneider

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Taking selfies is now becoming a standard human habit. However, as a social phenomenon, research is still in the fledgling stage and the scientific framework is sparse. Selfies allow us to share social information with others in a compact format. Furthermore, we are able to control important photographic and compositional aspects, such as perspective, which have a strong impact on the assessment of a face (e.g., demonstrated by the height-weight illusion, effects of gaze direction, faceism-index. In Study 1, we focused on the impact of perspective (left/right hemiface, above/below vs. frontal presentation on higher cognitive variables and let 172 participants rate the perceived attractiveness, helpfulness, sympathy, dominance, distinctiveness, and intelligence, plus important information on health issues (e.g., body weight, on the basis of 14 3D faces. We could show that lateral snapshots yielded higher ratings for attractiveness compared to the classical frontal view. However, this effect was more pronounced for left hemifaces and especially female faces. Compared to the frontal condition, 30° right hemifaces were rated as more helpful, but only for female faces while faces viewed from above were perceived as significant less helpful. Direct comparison between left vs. right hemifaces revealed no effect. Relating to sympathy, we only found a significant effect for 30° right male hemifaces, but only in comparison to the frontal condition. Furthermore, female 30° right hemifaces were perceived as more intelligent. Relating to body weight, we replicated the so-called “height-weight illusion.” Other variables remained unaffected. In Study 2, we investigated the impact of a typical selfie-style condition by presenting the respective faces from a lateral (left/right and tilted (lower/higher vantage point. Most importantly, depending on what persons wish to express with a selfie, a systematic change of perspective can strongly optimize their

  9. Impact of Assimilating Surface Velocity Observations on the Model Sea Surface Height Using the NCOM-4DVAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-26

    the ensemble Kalman filter and the ensemble Kalman smoother: A comparison study using a nonlinear reduced gravity ocean model.OceanModell., 12, 378...using local ensemble transform Kalman filter and optimum-interpolation assimilation schemes. Ocean Modell., 69, 22–38, doi:10.1016/j.ocemod.2013.05.002...observations are assimi- lated. This gives a sense of the added value from the inclusion of velocity observations with the standard set of temperature

  10. Impact and Implementation of Higher-Order Ionospheric Effects on Precise GNSS Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadas, T.; Krypiak-Gregorczyk, A.; Hernández-Pajares, M.; Kaplon, J.; Paziewski, J.; Wielgosz, P.; Garcia-Rigo, A.; Kazmierski, K.; Sosnica, K.; Kwasniak, D.; Sierny, J.; Bosy, J.; Pucilowski, M.; Szyszko, R.; Portasiak, K.; Olivares-Pulido, G.; Gulyaeva, T.; Orus-Perez, R.

    2017-11-01

    High precision Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) positioning and time transfer require correcting signal delays, in particular higher-order ionospheric (I2+) terms. We present a consolidated model to correct second- and third-order terms, geometric bending and differential STEC bending effects in GNSS data. The model has been implemented in an online service correcting observations from submitted RINEX files for I2+ effects. We performed GNSS data processing with and without including I2+ corrections, in order to investigate the impact of I2+ corrections on GNSS products. We selected three time periods representing different ionospheric conditions. We used GPS and GLONASS observations from a global network and two regional networks in Poland and Brazil. We estimated satellite orbits, satellite clock corrections, Earth rotation parameters, troposphere delays, horizontal gradients, and receiver positions using global GNSS solution, Real-Time Kinematic (RTK), and Precise Point Positioning (PPP) techniques. The satellite-related products captured most of the impact of I2+ corrections, with the magnitude up to 2 cm for clock corrections, 1 cm for the along- and cross-track orbit components, and below 5 mm for the radial component. The impact of I2+ on troposphere products turned out to be insignificant in general. I2+ corrections had limited influence on the performance of ambiguity resolution and the reliability of RTK positioning. Finally, we found that I2+ corrections caused a systematic shift in the coordinate domain that was time- and region-dependent and reached up to -11 mm for the north component of the Brazilian stations during the most active ionospheric conditions.

  11. Digital technologies and their impact on Higher Education. The new mediations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan de Pablos Pons

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This work proposes a reflection on the evolution of media in the digital age, requires us to advance in knowledge about mediation and remediation processes, favored by technologies, differentiating them from those generated so far by traditional analogue media (printed book, film, television. Digitization has given rise to new realities and proposals, such as video games, social networks or augmented reality applications. The next step in our media culture is the multiplication and continuous diversification of formats, but also new forms of mediated interaction. The mediation processes generated contribute to the modification of communication models and teaching methods. And this has an impact on educational institutions, and also on higher education. As a contribution to its analysis, the concept of technological remediation is provided and defined. The new information and communication technologies (ICT represent, under the considerations formulated here, an opportunity for change some forms and procedures of main areas of the higher education: teaching, research and management. Being proactive in this new reality is relevant, since the adaptation effort is linked to the survival of the university itself.

  12. Precarious Pedagogies? The Impact of Casual and Zero-Hour Contracts in Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lopes

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Precarious work is associated with and characterizes the effects of neoliberal policy—the transference of economic risk onto workers, the erosion of workers’ rights, the flexibilization and casualization of work contracts, self-responsibility, financial insecurity, and emotional stress. In the Higher Education (HE sector, the number of insecure academic jobs, especially zero-hour contracts for hourly paid teaching and short-term contract research, has grown exponentially in recent years in response to the structural and fiscal changes within universities, which reflect these global shifts. This paper presents findings from a pilot study conducted with academics on casual contracts in HE institutions in England and Wales. Qualitative interviews and focus groups were undertaken with teachers (lecturers and tutors on hourly paid and zero-hour contracts to examine the relationship between their contractual situations and pedagogical practices. The research broadly seeks to contribute to ongoing discussions concerned with the impact of neoliberalism on higher education and specifically highlights the case of contingent lecturers as casualties of the casualization of the academic labor force.

  13. The critical ionization velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raadu, M.A.

    1980-06-01

    The critical ionization velocity effect was first proposed in the context of space plasmas. This effect occurs for a neutral gas moving through a magnetized plasma and leads to rapid ionization and braking of the relative motion when a marginal velocity, 'the critical velocity', is exceeded. Laboratory experiments have clearly established the significance of the critical velocity and have provided evidence for an underlying mechanism which relies on the combined action of electron impact ionization and a collective plasma interaction heating electrons. There is experimental support for such a mechanism based on the heating of electrons by the modified two-stream instability as part of a feedback process. Several applications to space plasmas have been proposed and the possibility of space experiments has been discussed. (author)

  14. The Coulomb deflection effect on the L3-subshell alignment in low-velocity proton impact ionisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palinkas, J.; Schlenk, B.; Valek, A.

    1981-01-01

    The alignment parameter of the L 3 subshell of gold has been determined by measuring the angular distribution of the Lsub(l)/Lsub(γ) intensity ratio following proton impact ionisation in the 0.25-0.60 MeV energy range. The experimental results make it clear that the minimum of the alignment parameter at low energies found earlier for He + impact also exists in the case of proton impact ionisation. (author)

  15. The Impact of Dissociator Cooling on the Beam Intensity and Velocity in the SpinLab ABS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stancari, M.; Barion, L.; Bonomo, C.; Capiluppi, M.; Contalbrigo, M.; Ciullo, G.; Dalpiaz, P. F.; Giordano, F.; Lenisa, P.; Pappalardo, L.; Statera, M.; Wang, M.

    2007-06-01

    At the SpinLab laboratory (University of Ferrara, Italy), a three stage cooling system was installed along the dissociator tube of an atomic beam source (ABS). With this tool, it is possible to observe correlations between the measured temperatures and the atomic beam intensity. The existence of such correlations is suggested by the larger intensity of the RHIC ABS, the only other source with additional cooling stages. An increased intensity at lower cooling temperatures was observed in SpinLab, while no change in the beam's velocity distribution was observed.

  16. Impact of the digital divide on information literacy training in a higher education context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Segarani Naidoo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on a master’s study undertaken to investigate the impact of the digital divide on information literacy(IL training of Extended Curriculum Programme (ECP students at the Durban University of Technology (DUT. Since1994 the demographics of higher education institutions in South Africa have changed. Today these institutions compriseheterogeneous groups of students, by race, economic background, digital background, etc. and consequently with differentlevels of literacy, information and otherwise. The problem that this study addressed was the impact of having both digitallyadvantaged and digitally disadvantaged students in the same information literacy classroom, expecting them to reachlearning outcomes without frustrating students from either group. The objective of the study was to investigate the impactof the digital divide on IL training of ECP students at the DUT and to recommend guidelines for teaching and learning of ILthat would accommodate both digitally advantaged and digitally disadvantaged students. The study employed a mixedmethod approach in its research design. Data was collected from ECP students (of 2010 by means of a questionnaire; aninterview schedule was used to collect data from Subject Librarians involved in teaching the IL module to ECP students; aseparate interview schedule was used to collect data from the ECP Coordinator. Qualitative and quantitative datacollected were prepared for analysis by means of content analysis and numerical coding, respectively and then subjectedto statistical analysis via SPSS, which produced percentage and frequency distributions to ascertain findings. The findingsof the study revealed that the digital divide does impact on IL training in ways such as: slowing down the progress of ILlessons; basic computer skills need to be taught in the IL classroom; and that digitally disadvantaged students find itdifficult to follow online lessons while advantaged students already have the

  17. Characterization of commercially cold sprayed copper coatings and determination of the effects of impacting copper powder velocities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakupi, P. [Western University, Dept. of Chemistry, London Ontario, N6A 3K7 (Canada); Keech, P.G. [Nuclear Waste Management Organization, 22 St. Clair Ave. E., Toronto Ontario, M4T 2S3 (Canada); Barker, I. [Western University, Dept. of Earth Sciences, London Ontario, N6A 3K7 (Canada); Ramamurthy, S.; Jacklin, R.L. [Western University, Surface Science Western, 999 Collip Circle, LL31 (Lower), London, Ontario, N6G OJ3 (Canada); Shoesmith, D.W., E-mail: dwshoesm@uwo.ca [Western University, Surface Science Western, 999 Collip Circle, LL31 (Lower), London, Ontario, N6G OJ3 (Canada); Moser, D.E. [Western University, Dept. of Earth Sciences, London Ontario, N6A 3K7 (Canada)

    2015-11-15

    Copper coated steel containers are being developed for the disposal of high level nuclear waste using processes such as cold spray and electrodeposition. Electron Back-Scatter Diffraction has been used to determine the microstructural properties and the quality of the steel-copper coating interface. The influence of the nature of the cold-spray carrier gas as well as its temperature and pressure (velocity) on the coating's plastic strain and recrystallization behaviour have been investigated, and one commercially-produced electrodeposited coating characterized. The quality of the coatings was assessed using the coincident site lattice model to analyse the properties of the grain boundaries. For cold spray coatings the grain size and number of coincident site lattice grain boundaries increased, and plastic strain decreased, with carrier gas velocity. In all cases annealing improved the quality of the coatings by increasing texture and coincidence site-lattices, but also increased the number of physical voids, especially when a low temperature cold spray carrier gas was used. Comparatively, the average grain size and number of coincident site-lattices was considerably larger for the strongly textured electrodeposited coating. Tensile testing showed the electrodeposited coating was much more strongly adherent to the steel substrate.

  18. Characterization of commercially cold sprayed copper coatings and determination of the effects of impacting copper powder velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakupi, P.; Keech, P. G.; Barker, I.; Ramamurthy, S.; Jacklin, R. L.; Shoesmith, D. W.; Moser, D. E.

    2015-11-01

    Copper coated steel containers are being developed for the disposal of high level nuclear waste using processes such as cold spray and electrodeposition. Electron Back-Scatter Diffraction has been used to determine the microstructural properties and the quality of the steel-copper coating interface. The influence of the nature of the cold-spray carrier gas as well as its temperature and pressure (velocity) on the coating's plastic strain and recrystallization behaviour have been investigated, and one commercially-produced electrodeposited coating characterized. The quality of the coatings was assessed using the coincident site lattice model to analyse the properties of the grain boundaries. For cold spray coatings the grain size and number of coincident site lattice grain boundaries increased, and plastic strain decreased, with carrier gas velocity. In all cases annealing improved the quality of the coatings by increasing texture and coincidence site-lattices, but also increased the number of physical voids, especially when a low temperature cold spray carrier gas was used. Comparatively, the average grain size and number of coincident site-lattices was considerably larger for the strongly textured electrodeposited coating. Tensile testing showed the electrodeposited coating was much more strongly adherent to the steel substrate.

  19. The correlation of low-velocity impact resistance of graphite-fiber-reinforced composites with matrix properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, Kenneth J.

    1988-01-01

    Summarized are basic studies that were conducted to correlate the impact resistance of graphite-fiber-reinforced composites with polymer matrix properties. Three crosslinked epoxy resins and a linear polysulfone were selected as composite matrices. As a group, these resins possess a significantly large range of mechanical properties. The mechanical properties of the resins and their respective composites were measured. Neat resin specimens and unidirectional and crossply composite specimens were impact tested with an instrumented dropweight tester. Impact resistances of the specimens were assesseed on the basis of loading capability, energy absorption, and extent of damage.

  20. Impact of ADMA, endothelial progenitor cells and traditional cardiovascular risk factors on pulse wave velocity among prediabetic individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Protopsaltis Ioannis

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Central arterial stiffness represents a well-established predictor of cardiovascular disease. Decreased circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs, increased asymmetric dimethyl-arginine (ADMA levels, traditional cardiovascular risk factors and insulin resistance have all been associated with increased arterial stiffness. The correlations of novel and traditional cardiovascular risk factors with central arterial stiffness in prediabetic individuals were investigated in the present study. Methods The study population consisted of 53 prediabetic individuals. Individuals were divided into groups of isolated impaired fasting glucose (IFG, isolated impaired glucose tolerance (IGT and combined IGT-IFG. Age, sex, family history of diabetes, smoking history, body mass index (BMI, waist to hip ratio (WHR, waist circumference (WC, blood pressure, lipid profile, levels of high sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP, glomerular filtration rate (GFR, and history of antihypertensive or statin therapy were obtained from all participants. Insulin resistance was evaluated using the Homeostatic Model Assessment (HOMA-IR. Carotid -femoral pulse wave velocity was used as an index of arterial stiffness. Circulating EPC count and ADMA serum levels were also determined. Results Among studied individuals 30 (56.6% subjects were diagnosed with isolated IFG, 9 (17% with isolated IGT (17% and 14 with combined IFG-IGT (26.4%. In univariate analysis age, mean blood pressure, fasting glucose, total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and ADMA levels positively correlated with pulse-wave velocity while exercise and GFR correlated negatively. EPC count did not correlate with PWV. In multivariate stepwise regression analysis PWV correlated independently and positively with LDL-Cholesterol (low density lipoprotein and ADMA levels and negatively with exercise. Conclusions Elevated ADMA and LDL-C levels are strongly associated with increased arterial stiffness among

  1. The impact of the European health and safety directives on engineering in higher education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisp, Alan Roy

    This thesis examines the effect that six sets of Health and Safety legislation introduced in 1993 have had on working practices at the University, particularly within the Engineering Departments. The legislation, collectively known colloquially as "the six pack", had much in common with extant United Kingdom (UK) law but, because it emanated from the European Union (EU), it appears to be viewed in the UK as unduly restrictive and time consuming. Much of the thesis is therefore devoted to examining this suspicion in which the EU and its legislation is held by UK employers and employees. The thesis begins by examining the general background and recent history of the EU, before going on to look in greater detail at the development of Health and Safety legislation in particular. The area of interest is then further narrowed to look at the impact of this legislation on Higher Education Institutions by comparing recent accident statistics with those for industry and commerce. The main outcome of this section is that Higher Education has a similar accident profile by 'type' to industry and commerce and therefore would act in a similar manner when implementing the legislation. It is argued that industry and commerce can benefit from this similarity by emulating two case studies at the University where legislation is applied to some engineering equipment and procedures. These are described in detail and the point is made that safety is an approach that pervades all stages of an engineering process, commencing with the design or ordering of equipment. This is reinforced with the results of a primary survey of purchasing at similar institutions with regards to observance of current safety practices. It is concluded that suspicion of the "six pack" legislation is largely the result of overloading of those people responsible for safety by the arrival of a plethora of legislation all at once. Ironically this overloading appears to have influenced safety officers to pay attention

  2. Analytical and Mathematical Modeling and Optimization of Fiber Metal Laminates (FMLs subjected to low-velocity impact via combined response surface regression and zero-One programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faramarz Ashenai Ghasemi

    Full Text Available This paper presents analytical and mathematical modeling and optimization of the dynamic behavior of the fiber metal laminates (FMLs subjected to low-velocity impact. The deflection to thickness (w/h ratio has been identified through the governing equations of the plate that are solved using the first-order shear deformation theory as well as the Fourier series method. With the help of a two degrees-of-freedom system, consisting of springs-masses, and the Choi's linearized Hertzian contact model the interaction between the impactor and the plate is modeled. Thirty-one experiments are conducted on samples of different layer sequences and volume fractions of Al plies in the composite Structures. A reliable fitness function in the form of a strict linear mathematical function constructed. Using an ordinary least square method, response regression coefficients estimated and a zero-one programming technique proposed to optimize the FML plate behavior subjected to any technological or cost restrictions. The results indicated that FML plate behavior is highly affected by layer sequences and volume fractions of Al plies. The results also showed that, embedding Al plies at outer layers of the structure significantly results in a better response of the structure under low-velocity impact, instead of embedding them in the middle or middle and outer layers of the structure.

  3. Fortune favours the bold: a higher predator reduces the impact of a native but not an invasive intermediate predator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios-O'Neill, Daniel; Dick, Jaimie T A; Emmerson, Mark C; Ricciardi, Anthony; MacIsaac, Hugh J; Alexander, Mhairi E; Bovy, Helene C

    2014-05-01

    Emergent multiple predator effects (MPEs) might radically alter predictions of predatory impact that are based solely on the impact of individuals. In the context of biological invasions, determining if and how the individual-level impacts of invasive predators relates to their impacts in multiple-individual situations will inform understanding of how such impacts might propagate through recipient communities. Here, we use functional responses (the relationship between prey consumption rate and prey density) to compare the impacts of the invasive freshwater mysid crustacean Hemimysis anomala with a native counterpart Mysis salemaai when feeding on basal cladoceran prey (i) as individuals, (ii) in conspecific groups and (iii) in conspecific groups in the presence of a higher fish predator, Gasterosteus aculeatus. In the absence of the higher predator, the invader consumed significantly more basal prey than the native, and consumption was additive for both mysid species - that is, group consumption was predictable from individual-level consumption. Invaders and natives were themselves equally susceptible to predation when feeding with the higher fish predator, but an MPE occurred only between the natives and higher predator, where consumption of basal prey was significantly reduced. In contrast, consumption by the invaders and higher predator remained additive. The presence of a higher predator serves to exacerbate the existing difference in individual-level consumption between invasive and native mysids. We attribute the mechanism responsible for the MPE associated with the native to a trait-mediated indirect interaction, and further suggest that the relative indifference to predator threat on the part of the invader contributes to its success and impacts within invaded communities. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2013 British Ecological Society.

  4. The Impact of Digital Games on Student Persistence and Retention in an Online Higher Education Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Randall E.

    2013-01-01

    Enrollment in online higher education programs has been climbing for the past decade but research suggests that online courses exhibit significantly higher attrition rates than their face-to-face counterparts. Consequently, while significantly more students are enrolling in higher education programs, far too few are graduating. Self-determination…

  5. The impact of Christian Higher Education on the lives of students and societies in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petria M. Theron

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Corruption is a worldwide problem. Authors do not only agree that it should be addressed at a personal level, but they encourage everyone to become involved in the fight against corruption. For this to happen, individual transformation is a prerequisite. In this article, Chipapata, Fátima and Jacinto’s personal stories will bear witness to the potential role of Christian Higher Education (CHE in the moral and spiritual transformation of individuals in local African communities. These three persons were extra-mural students enrolled at Hefsiba in Mozambique. That the impact of these three persons’ studies goes beyond the personal level is seen in the community in which they live and work. They consented to tell their stories starting with events before they commenced their studies, sharing experiences they had during their studies and describing how their studies impacted their lives, families, work and the community in which they live. In this article, the essence, purpose and content of CHE are addressed. It is argued that through CHE, students’ faith and education could be integrated. Apart from being competent in their professions, students would be committed to apply their competency to deal with the spiritual and material conditions of their communities. This might bring about a transformation of society.Die impak van Christelike Hoër Onderwys op die lewens van studente en gemeenskappe in Afrika. Korrupsie is ’n wêreldwye probleem. Outeurs stem nie net saam dat dit op persoonlike vlak aangespreek moet word nie, maar hulle moedig almal ook aan om betrokke te raak in die stryd teen korrupsie. Dit kan net gebeur as individuele transformasie reeds plaasgevind het. In hierdie artikel lewer Chipapata, Fátima en Jacinto se persoonlike verhale getuienis van die potensiële waarde van Christelike Hoër Onderwys (CHO met betrekking tot die morele en geestelike transformasie van individue in plaaslike Afrikagemeenskappe. Hierdie drie

  6. Impact of carbon dioxide level, water velocity, and feeding regimen on growth and fillet attributes of cultured rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazik, Patricia M.; Mazik, P.M.; Kenney, P.B.; Silverstein, J.T

    2016-01-01

    Production and management variables such as carbon dioxide (CO2) level, water velocity, and feeding frequency influence the growth and fillet attributes of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), as well as cost of production. More information is needed to determine the contributions of these variables to growth and fillet attributes to find the right balance between input costs and fish performance. Two studies, of 84 and 90 days duration, were conducted to determine the effects of CO2 level, water velocity, and feed frequency on rainbow trout growth, fillet yield, and fillet quality. In the first study, two CO2levels (30 and 49 mg/L) and two velocity levels (0.5 and 2.0 body lengths/s) were tested. In the second study two CO2 levels (30 and 49 mg/L) and two feeding regimens (fed once daily to satiation or three times daily to satiation) were tested. In the first study, after 84 days, fillet weight from high CO2 tanks was 13.5% lower than the fillet weights of fish from low CO2 tanks. Percent fat of fillets was higher in low CO2 fish (P = 0.05) after 84 days and, fish from the low CO2 treatment were larger (P < 0.01). Both studies had similar results in regards to fat content and weight of fillets in response to elevated CO2levels. Velocity had little affect on either whole wet weight or fillet attributes of rainbow trout in this study. Muscle tissue contained more (P < 0.01) fat when fish were fed three times daily (7.3%; day 90) compared to once daily (5.4%; day 90). Also, fish were larger (P < 0.05) when fed 3 times per day (1079 g; day 90) in comparison to only one daily feeding (792 g; day 90). Fish in high feed/high CO2 tanks were larger and had more fillet fat than fish from low feed/low CO2 tanks. To maximize rainbow trout growth at aquaculture facilities, management strategies should attempt to keep CO2 levels below 30 mg/L when cost efficient. However, feeding 2–3 times daily should reduce production losses if CO2 cannot be minimized. The

  7. Measuring the Impact of ICTs on Academic Performance: Evidence from Higher Education in Tunisia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamti, Chiraz

    2016-01-01

    Measuring the impact of information and communication technologies (ICTs) is a contemporary question of interest. Despite the general acceptance that ICTs are changing ways of learning, empirical research conducted to date does not consistently verify the efficacy of such changes. Several studies supporting positive impacts of ICTs on achievement…

  8. Gaps in Sustainability Education: The Impact of Higher Education Coursework on Perceptions of Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, P. Brian; McAdams, Erin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to examine how both the amount and type of coursework impact students' conceptualizations of sustainability. Previous research demonstrates that academic coursework influences students' environmental attitudes, yet few studies have examined the impact of coursework on how students conceptualize "sustainability".…

  9. Financing Public Higher Education: The Impact of Responsibility Center Management on a Public Research University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappone, David J.

    2016-01-01

    To explore the impacts on public universities of implementing an incentive-based budgeting system, this dissertation focuses on one university's extensive experience with Responsibility Center Management. The financial and non-financial impacts of Responsibility Center Management will be considered by examining the extent to which commonly held…

  10. Irradiation of biological molecules (DNA and RNA bases) by proton impact in the velocity range of the Bragg peak (20-150 keV/amu)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabet, J.

    2007-11-01

    The aim of this work was to study the ionization of DNA and RNA base molecules by proton impact at energies between 20 and 150 keV/amu. The experiments developed over the course of this project made it possible not only to study the fragmentation of uracil, thymine, adenine, and cytosine, but also to measure absolute cross sections for different ionization processes initiated by proton interactions with these important biological molecules. Firstly, the experimental system enabled the contributions of two key ionization processes to be separated: direct ionization and electron capture. The corresponding mass spectra were measured and analyzed on an event-by-event basis. For uracil, the branching ratios for these two processes were measured as function of the projectile velocity. Secondly, we have developed a system to measure absolute cross sections for the electron capture process. The production rate of neutral atoms compared to protons was measured for the four biological molecules: uracil, cytosine, thymine, and adenine at different vaporization temperatures. This production rate varies as a function of the thickness of the target jet traversed by the protons. Accordingly, a deposit experiment was developed in order to characterize the density of molecules in the targeted gas jets. Theoretical and experimental study of the total effusion and density-profile of the gaseous molecular beams enabled us to deduce the thickness of the target jets traversed by the protons. Thus it was possible to determine absolute cross sections for the ionization of each of the four isolated biological molecules by 80 keV protons impact. To our knowledge, this work provides the first experimental absolute cross sections for DNA and RNA base ionization processes initiated by proton impact in the velocity range corresponding to the Bragg peak. (author)

  11. EnKF OSSE Experiments Assessing the Impact of HIRAD Wind Speed and HIWRAP Radial Velocity Data on Analysis of Hurricane Karl (2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, Cerese; Sippel, Jason A.; Braun, Scott A.; Miller, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies (e.g., Zhang et al. 2009, Weng et al. 2011) have shown that radial velocity data from airborne and ground-based radars can be assimilated into ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) systems to produce accurate analyses of tropical cyclone vortices, which can reduce forecast intensity error. Recently, wind speed data from SFMR technology has also been assimilated into the same types of systems and has been shown to improve the forecast intensity of mature tropical cyclones. Two instruments that measure these properties were present during the NASA Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) field experiment in 2010 which sampled Hurricane Karl, and will next be co-located on the same aircraft for the subsequent NASA HS3 experiment. The High Altitude Wind and Rain Profiling Radar (HIWRAP) is a conically scanning Doppler radar mounted upon NASAs Global Hawk unmanned aerial vehicle, and the usefulness of its radial velocity data for assimilation has not been previously examined. Since the radar scans from above with a fairly large fixed elevation angle, it observes a large component of the vertical wind, which could degrade EnKF analyses compared to analyses with data taken from lesser elevation angles. The NASA Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) is a passive microwave radiometer similar to SFMR, and measures emissivity and retrieves hurricane surface wind speeds and rain rates over a much wider swath. Thus, this study examines the impact of assimilating simulated HIWRAP radial velocity data into an EnKF system, simulated HIRAD wind speed, and HIWRAP+HIRAD with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and compares the results to no data assimilation and also to the Truth from which the data was simulated for both instruments.

  12. Impact of Income on Customers' Loyalty: Are Customers with Higher Income more Loyal?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klopotan Igor

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recent research on customers’ loyalty mostly focuses on several indicators, such as price, income and promotion. However, the level of income and its impacts on customers' loyalty have not been investigated in greater details.

  13. Work-based learning in Higher Education – impact on learning and employability.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evers, Arnoud

    2018-01-01

    The main theme: Work-based learning in higher education has been emphasised while changes at work and in society have challenged knowledge and competencies. Learning in higher education is needed to be seen differently, and more attention is paid to students’ employability and the sustainability of

  14. Critical Thinking in College Freshmen: The Impact of Secondary and Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evens, Marie; Verburgh, An; Elen, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Critical thinking helps students to confront a multitude of challenges they will face in their careers and personal lives. It is therefore an important task of higher education to promote students' critical thinking. However, students do not enter higher education with a blank page. Background characteristics of students are important in…

  15. Internationalization of Higher Education and the Impacts on Academic Faculty Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedenlier, Svenja; Zawacki-Richter, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    Research on internationalization processes in higher education has steadily increased over the past decades. However, there is still a lack of analysis of how these developments have affected higher education and, specifically, the group of academic faculty members. To close this gap, this study explores the effects of internationalization on this…

  16. Assessing the Impact of Higher Education on Regional Development: Using a Realist Approach for Policy Enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higher Education Management and Policy, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Higher Education is widely seen as a crucial ingredient in the regional economic development mix, and as fundamental to the development of the knowledge economy (Barclays, 2002). Indeed the Higher Education Funding Council for England has issued broad guidelines for benchmarking good practice in assessing regional development contribution of a…

  17. The effect of interlaminar graphene nano-sheets reinforced e-glass fiber/ epoxy on low velocity impact response of a composite plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Maharma, A. Y.; Sendur, P.

    2018-05-01

    In this study, we compare the inter-laminar effect of graphene nano-sheets (GNSs) and CNTs on the single and multiple dynamic impact response of E-glass fiber reinforced epoxy composite (GFEP). In the comparisons, raw GFEP composite is used as baseline for quantifying the improvement on the dynamic impact response. For that purpose, finite element based models are developed for GNSs on GFEP, graphene coating on glass fibers, inter-laminar composite of CNTs reinforced polyester at 7.5 vol%, and combinations of all these reinforcements. Comparisons are made on three metrics: (i) total deformation, (ii) the contact force, and (iii) internal energy of the composite plate. The improvement on axial modulus (E1) of GFEP reinforced with one layer of GNS (0.5 wt%) without polyester at lamination sequence of [0]8 is 29.4%, which is very close to the improvement of 31% on storage modulus for multi-layer graphene with 0.5 wt% reinforced E-glass/epoxy composite at room temperature. Using three GNSs (1.5 wt%) reinforced polyester composite as interlaminar layer results in an improvement of 57.1% on E1 of GFEP composite. The simulation results reveal that the interlaminar three GNSs/polyester composite at mid-plane of GFEP laminated composite can significantly improve the dynamic impact resistance of GFEP structure compared to the other aforementioned structural reinforcements. Reinforcing GFEP composite with three layers of GNSs/polyester composite at mid-plane results in an average of 35% improvement on the dynamic impact resistance for healthy and damaged composite plate under low velocity impacts of single and multiple steel projectiles. This model can find application in various areas including structural health monitoring, fire retardant composite, and manufacturing of high strength and lightweight mechanical parts such as gas tank, aircraft wings and wind turbine blades.

  18. Does Interdisciplinary Research Lead to Higher Citation Impact? The Different Effect of Proximal and Distal Interdisciplinarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yegros-Yegros, Alfredo; Rafols, Ismael; D’Este, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    This article analyses the effect of degree of interdisciplinarity on the citation impact of individual publications for four different scientific fields. We operationalise interdisciplinarity as disciplinary diversity in the references of a publication, and rather than treating interdisciplinarity as a monodimensional property, we investigate the separate effect of different aspects of diversity on citation impact: i.e. variety, balance and disparity. We use a Tobit regression model to examine the effect of these properties of interdisciplinarity on citation impact, controlling for a range of variables associated with the characteristics of publications. We find that variety has a positive effect on impact, whereas balance and disparity have a negative effect. Our results further qualify the separate effect of these three aspects of diversity by pointing out that all three dimensions of interdisciplinarity display a curvilinear (inverted U-shape) relationship with citation impact. These findings can be interpreted in two different ways. On the one hand, they are consistent with the view that, while combining multiple fields has a positive effect in knowledge creation, successful research is better achieved through research efforts that draw on a relatively proximal range of fields, as distal interdisciplinary research might be too risky and more likely to fail. On the other hand, these results may be interpreted as suggesting that scientific audiences are reluctant to cite heterodox papers that mix highly disparate bodies of knowledge—thus giving less credit to publications that are too groundbreaking or challenging. PMID:26266805

  19. Impact of layer and substrate properties on the surface acoustic wave velocity in scandium doped aluminum nitride based SAW devices on sapphire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillinger, M., E-mail: manuel.gillinger@tuwien.ac.at; Knobloch, T.; Schneider, M.; Schmid, U. [Institute of Sensor and Actuator Systems, TU Wien, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Shaposhnikov, K.; Kaltenbacher, M. [Institute of Mechanics and Mechatronics, TU Wien, 1040 Vienna (Austria)

    2016-06-06

    This paper investigates the performance of surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices consisting of reactively sputter deposited scandium doped aluminum nitride (Sc{sub x}Al{sub 1-x}N) thin films as piezoelectric layers on sapphire substrates for wireless sensor or for RF-MEMS applications. To investigate the influence of piezoelectric film thickness on the device properties, samples with thickness ranging from 500 nm up to 3000 nm are fabricated. S{sub 21} measurements and simulations demonstrate that the phase velocity is predominantly influenced by the mass density of the electrode material rather than by the thickness of the piezoelectric film. Additionally, the wave propagation direction is varied by rotating the interdigital transducer structures with respect to the crystal orientation of the substrate. The phase velocity is about 2.5% higher for a-direction compared to m-direction of the sapphire substrate, which is in excellent agreement with the difference in the anisotropic Young's modulus of the substrate corresponding to these directions.

  20. Impacts of supersymmetric higher derivative terms on inflation models in supergravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Shuntaro; Yamada, Yusuke

    2015-01-01

    We show the effects of supersymmetric higher derivative terms on inflation models in supergravity. The results show that such terms generically modify the effective kinetic coefficient of the inflaton during inflation if the cut off scale of the higher derivative operators is sufficiently small. In such a case, the η-problem in supergravity does not occur, and we find that the effective potential of the inflaton generically becomes a power type potential with a power smaller than two

  1. Impact of Globalization on Higher Education: An Empirical Study of Education Policy & Planning of Design Education in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Yan Yan

    2010-01-01

    This paper focuses on the impact of globalization in the domain of higher education, particularly, design education. It reviews how globalization may affect educational policy and planning in Hong Kong by drawing on an empirical study involving senior management, a course leader and a design trainer/facilitator. This paper not only illustrates the…

  2. Higher Education Marketing Strategies Based on Factors Impacting the Enrollees' Choice of a University and an Academic Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalimullin, Aydar M.; Dobrotvorskaya, Svetlana G.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of studying the stated problem is due to the fact that for increasing the efficiency of higher education marketing it is necessary to take into account several factors, namely, factors that impact the choice of a university and an academic program by enrollees, as well as socio-psychological characteristics of the latter, while…

  3. The Impact of Learning about Technology via Action Research as a Professional Development Activity on Higher Education: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premdas, Leisa

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this mixed method study was to determine the perceived impact of learning about technology via action research as a professional development activity on faculty and students in higher education. Nine faculty members--also Teaching and Technology Fellows representing various disciplines at St. John's University--were selected based…

  4. The Impact of a Peer-Tutoring Program on Quality Standards in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arco-Tirado, Jose L.; Fernandez-Martin, Francisco D.; Fernandez-Balboa, Juan-Miguel

    2011-01-01

    The purposes of this study were, on one had, to determine the impact of a peer tutoring program on preventing academic failure and dropouts among first-year students (N = 100), from Civil Engineering, Economics, Pharmacy, and Chemical Engineering careers; while, on the other hand, to identify the potential benefits of such tutoring program on the…

  5. The more publication, the higher impact factor: citation analysis of top nine gastroenterology and hepatology journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi Elizee, Pegah; Karimzadeh Ghassab, Romina; Raoofi, Azam; Miri, Seyyed Mohammad

    2012-12-01

    The impact factor (IF), as the most important criterion for journal's quality measurement, is affected by the self-citation and number of publications in each journal. To find out the relationship between the number of publications and self-citations in a journal, and their correlations with IF. Self-citations and impact factors of nine top gastroenterology and hepatology journals were assessed during the seven recent years (2005-2011) through Journal Citation Reports (JCR, ISI Thomson Reuters). Although impact factors of all journals increased during the study, five out of nine journals increased the number of publications from 2005 to 2011. There was an increase in self-citation only in the journal of HEPATOLOGY (499 in 2005 vs. 707 in 2011). Impact factors of journals (6.5 ± 3.5) were positively correlated with total number of publications (248.6 ± 91.7) (R: 0.688, P citation rate (238.73 ± 195.317) was highly correlated with total number of publications in each journal (248.6 ± 91.7) (R: 0.861, P citation (6.08 ± 3.3) had a correlation (R: 0.672, P citation have definite effects on IF of a journal and because IF is the most prominent criterion for journal's quality measurement, it would be a good idea to consider factors affecting on IF such as self-citation.

  6. Faculty Development in Higher Education: Long-Term Impact of a Summer Teaching and Learning Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persellin, Diane; Goodrick, Terry

    2010-01-01

    Past participants of the Associated Colleges of the South Summer Teaching and Learning Workshop were surveyed to determine long-term impact of this type of professional development experience. Results indicate a large majority of participants across rank and academic discipline continued to view the workshop as effective and valued feedback from…

  7. Leadership Development in Higher Education: Exploring Model Impact among Students and Alumni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bommarito, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of an institution-wide leadership development model on students at a private Christian university. The university being studied in this research made a significant commitment to the principles of servant-leadership as well as Kouzes and Posner's (2002) Leadership Challenge development…

  8. Growth of higher fungi on wheat straw and their impact on the digestibility of the substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moyson, E.; Verachtert, H. (Catholic Univ. of Leuven (Belgium). Faculty of Agriculture)

    1991-12-01

    The influence of the growth of three higher fungi on the composition of wheat straw was investigated. Pleurotus pulmonarius, P. sajor-caju and Lentinus edodes grew very well on lignocellulosic substrates, breaking down a considerable amount of lignin. The initial lignin concentration of straw was halved after 12 weeks of fungal growth, doubling the enzymic digestibility. Together with lignin, the higher fungi consumed half of the amount of hemicellulose (i.e. 15%), leaving cellulose fairly intact, which should remain as an energy source for ruminants. (orig.).

  9. High-velocity basal sediment package atop oceanic crust, offshore Cascadia: Impacts on plate boundary processes and fluid migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, D. E.; Keranen, K. M.

    2017-12-01

    Differences in fluid pressure and mechanical properties at megathrust boundaries in subduction zones have been proposed to create varying seismogenic behavior. In Cascadia, where large ruptures are possible but little seismicity occurs presently, new seismic transects across the deformation front (COAST cruise; Holbrook et al., 2012) image an unusually high-wavespeed sedimentary unit directly overlying oceanic crust. Wavespeed increases before sediments reach the deformation front, and the well-laminated unit, consistently of 1 km thickness, can be traced for 50 km beneath the accretionary prism before imaging quality declines. Wavespeed is modeled via iterative prestack time migration (PSTM) imaging and increases from 3.5 km/sec on the seaward end of the profile to >5.0 km/s near the deformation front. Landward of the deformation front, wavespeed is low along seaward-dipping thrust faults in the Quaternary accretionary prism, indicative of rapid dewatering along faults. The observed wavespeed of 5.5 km/sec just above subducting crust is consistent with porosity intersects the plate boundary at an oblique angle and changes the degree of hydration of the oceanic plate as it subducts within our area. Fluid flow out of oceanic crust is likely impeded by the low-porosity basal sediment package except along the focused thrust faults. Decollements are present at the top of oceanic basement, at the top of the high-wavespeed basal unit, and within sedimentary strata at higher levels; the decollement at the top of oceanic crust is active at the toe of the deformation front. The basal sedimentary unit appears to be mechanically strong, similar to observations from offshore Sumatra, where strongly consolidated sediments at the deformation front are interpreted to facilitate megathrust rupture to the trench (Hupers et al., 2017). A uniformly strong plate interface at Cascadia may inhibit microseismicity while building stress that is released in great earthquakes.

  10. Impact of strong geomagnetic storms on total ozone at southern higher middle latitudes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Laštovička, Jan; Križan, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 1 (2009), s. 151-156 ISSN 0039-3169 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1P05OC030 Grant - others:European Commission(XE) COST 724 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : ozone * Southern Hemisphere * geomagnetic storms * Forbush decreases of cosmic rays Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 1.000, year: 2009

  11. Impacts of Institutional Characteristics on International Students' Choice of Private Higher Education Institutions in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migin, Melissa W.; Falahat, Mohammad; Yajid, Mohd Shukri Ab; Khatibi, Ali

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, Malaysia has witnessed an influx of foreign students in the local higher education institutions with the aggressive support from the Malaysian government to build Malaysia as the educational hub within the region. This is in line with Malaysia's aspiration to be a global education hub by year 2020. Besides the country level…

  12. The Impact of Career Exploration upon the Success of Underrepresented Students in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Elaine J.

    2012-01-01

    Factors that contribute to college student success are multiple. Career exploration as a student success strategy was explored in this study. The purpose of this exploratory mixed-methods study was to explore whether there was a relationship between career exploration and the success of underrepresented students in higher education. Quantitative…

  13. The Impact of Attaining the Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced Diploma on Academic Performance in Bioscience Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yhnell, Emma; Wood, Heather; Baker, Mathew; Amici-Dargan, Sheila; Taylor, Chris; Randerson, Peter; Shore, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Since the introduction of the Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced Diploma Qualification (WBQ) in 2003, an increasing number of students are applying to higher education institutions (HEIs) with this qualification. The advanced-level WBQ is regarded as equivalent to one General Certificate of Education A-Level (GCE A-Level). This study assesses the impact…

  14. Disruptive Conduct: The Impact of Disruptive Technologies on Social Relations in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flavin, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Higher education institutions (HEIs) have invested significantly in digital technologies for learning and teaching. However, technologies provided by HEIs have not been universally successful in terms of adoption and usage. Meanwhile, both students and lecturers use disruptive technologies to support learning and teaching. This article examines…

  15. "Low-Impact Communities" and Their Value to Experiential Education for Sustainability in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Robert; Cutting, Roger

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on a year-long research project that investigated the value of experiential engagement with "alternative" communities which derive a high degree of self-reliance from working closely with their own local natural resources. Opportunities for higher education students to explore these communities were developed and the…

  16. Impact of Learning Organization Culture on Performance in Higher Education Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponnuswamy, Indra; Manohar, Hansa Lysander

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, an adapted version of the Dimensions of Learning Organization Questionnaire (DLOQ) was employed to investigate the perception of academic staff on learning organization culture in Indian higher education institutions. The questionnaire was sent to 700 faculty members of different universities using a non-probability purposive…

  17. The Impact of Higher Fixed Pay and Lower Bonuses on Productivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bun, M.J.G.; Huberts, L.C.E.

    This study analyzes the effects of performance related pay on productivity exploiting a change in the payment structure of a large Dutch marketing company. Specifically, we investigate the consequences for company sales of higher fixed pay in combination with lower bonuses. Exploiting shift level

  18. How Digital Technologies, Blended Learning and MOOCs Will Impact the Future of Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Neil P.

    2014-01-01

    Digital technologies are revolutionizing all parts of society, including higher education. Universities are rapidly adapting to the prevalence of staff and student mobile devices, digital tools and services on campus, and are developing strategies to harness these technologies to enhance student learning. In this paper, I explore the use of…

  19. Performance Funding in Higher Education: Do Financial Incentives Impact College Completions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillman, Nicholas W.; Tandberg, David A.; Gross, Jacob P. K.

    2014-01-01

    In 2000, the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education introduced a performance-based funding model aimed at increasing degree productivity among the state's public colleges. This study examines how the new policy affected undergraduate degree completions. Using a difference-in-differences estimation strategy, results suggest the policy has…

  20. Funding Systems for Higher Education and Their Impacts on Institutional Strategies and Academia: A Comparative Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolich, Nicoline; Kalpazidou Schmidt, Evanthia; Rosa, Maria J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to discuss how funding systems influence higher education institutions and their strategies and core tasks. Design/methodology/approach: Taking the results of a comparative study between Denmark, Norway and Portugal as a point of departure, the paper identifies and analyses the main features of these state…

  1. Learning Analytics and Digital Badges: Potential Impact on Student Retention in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mah, Dana-Kristin

    2016-01-01

    Learning analytics and digital badges are emerging research fields in educational science. They both show promise for enhancing student retention in higher education, where withdrawals prior to degree completion remain at about 30% in Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development member countries. This integrative review provides an…

  2. Higher Education Scholarships: A Review of Their Impact on Workplace Retention and Career Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, Emma; Perry, Carolyn; Wheeler, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    The community-managed mental health sector is facing a crisis. Funding is less certain, demand for services is increasing, and retaining a skilled and competent workforce is proving a challenge. In order to respond to this workforce crisis a literature review was conducted on the effectiveness of higher education scholarship programmes, as a…

  3. Recessions and Tax-Cuts: Economic Cycles' Impact on Individual Giving, Philanthropy, and Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drezner, Noah D.

    2006-01-01

    Few researchers have examined how individual giving to higher education is effected by the economy, specifically during downturns and periodic changes in tax laws. Further understanding the relationship between the economy's cycles and philanthropic giving, including the correlation of tax cuts to donations, will help colleges and universities…

  4. Evidence for higher-order effects in L-shell ionization by proton impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkadi, L.; Mukoyama, T.

    1988-01-01

    It is widely believed that higher order processes of ion-atom collisions are negligible in cases of light projectiles like proton. Recent refined experiments tried to prove that the existence of such effects were comperable with the experimental errors, and they showed the unexpected relative importance of the higher order processes. Thus a new coupled channel calculation was performed for proton-gold atom collision in the energy range of 0.15-3.0 MeV, including dynamical subshell coupling effects. The results show that the deviations from the first order cross sections reach 40% at low collision energy. This result made necessary to correct the calculations of L-shell X-ray production cross sections. (D.G.) 6 refs

  5. Do generic strategies impact performance in higher educational institutions? A SEM-based investigation

    OpenAIRE

    Ahlam Mohammad Alzoubi; Okechukwu Lawrence Emeagwali

    2016-01-01

    This study set out to initiate an investigation into the linkage between generic strategy and performance in higher educational institutions and the moderating effect of institution-type. Using structural equation modeling (SEM), it examined the responses of a stratified sample of academics and administrative staff (n= 333) randomly selected from eight universities in northern Cyprus. Findings suggest that while there is a weak effect of differentiation strategy on performance, a strong effec...

  6. Planning for Higher Oil Prices : Power Sector Impact in Latin America and the Caribbean

    OpenAIRE

    Yépez-García, Rigoberto Ariel; San Vicente Portes, Luis; García, Luis Enrique

    2013-01-01

    A scenario with higher oil prices has important implications for diverting from oil-based technologies to renewables, as well as gas, coal, and nuclear alternatives. By 2030, energy demand in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) is expected to double from 2008 levels. A key issue is deciding on the most appropriate mix of fuels for power generation, given the various prices of energy sour...

  7. Coulomb correlations in electron and positron impact ionization of hydrogen at intermediate and higher energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jetzke, S.; Faisal, F.H.M.

    1992-01-01

    Investigating the relation between the asymptotic condition and the dynamic Coulomb correlation for single and multiple ionization we discuss a complete set of spatially separable N-electrons final-state wavefunctions, satisfying multiple ionization boundary conditions. We apply these results to electron and positron impact ionization of atomic hydrogen in the energy range 54.4 and 250 eV on the basis of a parameter-free model formulated within the scope of the multiple scattering approach. A comparison between our results and available experimental data and alternative theoretical calculations are made and discussed. (Author)

  8. Economic impacts of higher oil and gas prices. The role of international trade for Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutz, Christian; Meyer, Bernd

    2009-01-01

    The analysis concentrates on direct and indirect price increases, induced shifts in international trade and structural changes in the oil importing economies. The paper at hand asks, whether a stabilizing effect via international trade and domestic structural change on the GDP of oil importing countries can be observed, if a permanent oil price increase occurs. At least for Germany, structural change from consumer goods to investment goods industry and an improvement of international competitiveness limit negative impacts of increased energy prices. Analysis is based on the extensive and disaggregated global GINFORS model and the detailed INFORGE model for the German economy. (author)

  9. The impact of an international online accreditation system on pedagogical models and strategies in higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garista Patrizia

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Health promotion practice is characterised by a diverse workforce drawn from a broad range of disciplines, bringing together an extensive breadth of knowledge, skills, abilities, attitudes and values stemming from biomedical and social science frameworks. One of the goals of the CompHP Project was to ensure that higher education training would not only reach competency-based standards necessary for best practice, but also facilitate mobility within the EU and beyond through the accreditation of professional practitioners and educational courses. As a result, higher education institutions in Italy and elsewhere are requested to shift the focus from the definition of learning objectives to the identification of teaching strategies and assessment measures to guarantee that students have acquired the competencies identified. This requires reflection on the pedagogical models underpinning course curricula and teaching–learning approaches in higher education, not only to meet the competency-based standards but also to incorporate overarching transversal competencies inherent to the profession and, more specifically, to the online accreditation procedure. Professionals applying for registration require competence in foreign languages, metacognition and be digitally literate. The article provides a brief overview of the development and structure of the International Union for Health Promotion and Education online accreditation system and proposes a pedagogical reflection on course curricula.

  10. Impact of higher energy efficiency standards on housing affordability in Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-07-01

    As a result of changes to provincial and national building and energy costs, the impact of increasing energy efficiency standards on housing affordability has been questioned. Determining housing affordability is a complicated process. This report presented the results of a costing analysis completed for upgrades of EnerGuide 80 levels of energy efficiency in homes in Calgary and Edmonton, Alberta. The elements of residential construction were identified. In order to better understand the cost impact of energy efficiency upgrades on a home, pricing data was obtained. Costing elements that were examined included housing price indexes; construction material price indexes; unionized trade wages; and land value. Specifically, the report presented the new housing price index analysis using material and labour costs. An analysis of energy efficiency improvement was then presented in terms of lifecycle costs (capital costs and life cycle costing results). It was concluded that although the price of labour and materials is increasing, the value of land is the primary driver for rising house prices. The price of housing is strongly correlated to the price of land and not the price of labour or materials. In addition, moving to EnerGuide 80 levels of energy efficiency for housing in Alberta made homes more affordable for homebuyers by lowering their total monthly housing costs. 4 tabs., 3 figs., 3 appendices.

  11. Information Technology Integration in Higher Education: A Novel Approach for Impact Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulkareem Al-Alwani

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the current technological world of Information services, academic systems are also in the process of adapting information technology solutions. Information systems vary for different applications and specifically in academia domain, a range of information systems are available for different institutions worldwide. Integration of e-learning can optimize implementation of computer-based and computer-assisted educational processes at all levels. Therefore it is imperative to assess and evaluate integration of these information systems because they have serious impact on e-learning processes. In this study an instrument survey is presented for evaluating integration of information technology systems and practices in an educational environment. Survey is constructed using descriptive questions related to information technology tools to assess qualitative impact and usage of such tools. Critical feedback, analysis and suggestions from 25 educationists played a pivotal role in finalizing proposed survey questionnaire. A subsequent test evaluation by teachers and students is also carried out to assess adequate utilization of information systems in Yanbu University College. The results showed that feedback using this survey can help in identifying technological gaps and facilitate effective integration of information technology in an educational environment. Survey instrument proposed in this research can greatly enhance integration of IT tools as it can identify shortcomings by collecting statistical data from feedback of both faculty and students. Solution to these problems is deterministic and can be easily implemented to optimize overall performance of e-learning systems.

  12. Effects of trochanteric soft tissue thickness and hip impact velocity on hip fracture in sideways fall through 3D finite element simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Santanu; Roychowdhury, Amit; Pal, Subrata

    2008-09-18

    A major worldwide health problem is hip fracture due to sideways fall among the elderly population. The effects of sideways fall on the hip are required to be investigated thoroughly. The objectives of this study are to evaluate the responses to trochanteric soft tissue thickness (T) variations and hip impact velocity (V) variations during sideways fall based on a previously developed CT scan derived 3D non-linear and non-homogeneous finite element model of pelvis-femur-soft tissue complex with simplified biomechanical representation of the whole body. This study is also aimed at quantifying the effects [peak impact force (F(max)), time to F(max), acceleration and peak principal compressive strain (epsilon(max))] of these variations (T,V) on hip fracture. It was found that under constant impact energy, for 81% decrease in T (26-5mm), F(max) and epsilon(max) increased by 38% and 97%, respectively. Hence, decrease in T (as in slimmer persons) strongly correlated to risk for hip fracture (phi) and strain ratio (SR) by 0.972 and 0.988, respectively. Also under same T and body weight, for 75% decrease in V (4.79-1.2m/s), F(max) and epsilon(max) decreased by 70% and 86%, respectively. Hence, increase in V (as in taller persons) strongly correlated to phi and SR by 0.995 and 0.984, respectively. For both variations in T and V, inter-trochanteric fracture situations were well demonstrated by phi as well as by SR and strain contours, similar to clinically observed fractures. These quantifications would be helpful for effective design of person-specific hip protective devices.

  13. Generation of sub-gigabar-pressure shocks by a hyper-velocity impact in the collider driven by laser-induced cavity pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badziak, J.; Kucharik, M.; Liska, R.

    2018-02-01

    The generation of high-pressure shocks in the newly proposed collider in which the projectile impacting a solid target is driven by the laser-induced cavity pressure acceleration (LICPA) mechanism is investigated using two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations. The dependence of parameters of the shock generated in the target by the impact of a gold projectile on the impacted target material and the laser driver energy is examined. It is found that both in case of low-density (CH, Al) and high-density (Au, Cu) solid targets the shock pressures in the sub-Gbar range can be produced in the LICPA-driven collider with the laser energy of only a few hundreds of joules, and the laser-to-shock energy conversion efficiency can reach values of 10 - 20 %, by an order of magnitude higher than the conversion efficiencies achieved with other laser-based methods used so far.

  14. The Impact of Lecturers’ Thinking Styles on Students’ Creativity in Distance Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza SARMADI

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the group creativity on thinking styles in distance education based on collaborative learning. Sample included 120 students from three intact classes of the College of education were selected as the participants for the main study. The instruments of measurement were the thinking styles inventory and the creative product semantic scale. Using the factorial quasi-experimental design, impact of thinking styles in the group creativity was tested. The results of the present study showed that male students tended to prefer the legislative thinking style more than the female students. There was no significant difference between male and female students in the overall creative ability. In addition, this study found that there was no significant association between the average group member creative ability and the overall group creative performance. The findings also supported Sternberg’s argument that ability is different from style.

  15. Consumption of Alcopops During Brain Maturation Period: Higher Impact of Fructose Than Ethanol on Brain Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dounia El Hamrani

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Alcopops are flavored alcoholic beverages sweetened by sodas, known to contain fructose. These drinks have the goal of democratizing alcohol among young consumers (12–17 years old and in the past few years have been considered as fashionable amongst teenagers. Adolescence, however, is a key period for brain maturation, occurring in the prefrontal cortex and limbic system until 21 years old. Therefore, this drinking behavior has become a public health concern. Despite the extensive literature concerning the respective impacts of either fructose or ethanol on brain, the effects following joint consumption of these substrates remains unknown. Our objective was to study the early brain modifications induced by a combined diet of high fructose (20% and moderate amount of alcohol in young rats by 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR spectroscopy. Wistar rats had isocaloric pair-fed diets containing fructose (HF, 20%, ethanol (Et, 0.5 g/day/kg or both substrates at the same time (HFEt. After 6 weeks of diet, the rats were infused with 13C-glucose and brain perchloric acid extracts were analyzed by NMR spectroscopy (1H and 13C. Surprisingly, the most important modifications of brain metabolism were observed under fructose diet. Alterations, observed after only 6 weeks of diet, show that the brain is vulnerable at the metabolic level to fructose consumption during late-adolescence throughout adulthood in rats. The main result was an increase in oxidative metabolism compared to glycolysis, which may impact lactate levels in the brain and may, at least partially, explain memory impairment in teenagers consuming alcopops.

  16. A STUDY ON SOCIAL ADJUSTMENT AMONG HIGHER SECONDARY SCHOOL STUDENTS AND ITS IMPACT ON THEIR ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT IN COIMBATORE DISTRICT

    OpenAIRE

    P.Priya Packiaselvi; Ms.Malathi.V.A

    2017-01-01

    Every human being seeks adjustment to various situations. He constantly makes efforts to adjustment himself to his surroundings because a wholesome adjustment is essential for leading a happy life and going satisfaction. Social adjustment to other people is general and to the group with which they are identified is particular. The main motive of the study is to find out the social adjustment among higher secondary school students and its impact on academic achievement in Coimbatore Educationa...

  17. Impact of higher n-butanol addition on combustion and performance of GDI engine in stoichiometric combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Zheng; Yang, Feng; Xue, Shuo; Wu, Zhenkuo; Liu, Jingping

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Effects of 0–50% n-butanol addition on GDI engine are experimentally studied. • Higher n-butanol fractions increase combustion pressure and fasten burning rate. • Higher n-butanol fractions increase BSFC but improve BTE. • Higher n-butanol fractions enhance combustion stability but increase knock intensity. • Higher n-butanol fractions reduce exhaust temperature and NOx emissions. - Abstract: An experimental study was carried out on a turbocharged gasoline direct injection (GDI) engine fueled by n-butanol/gasoline blends. Effects of n-butanol percents (15%, 30%, and 50%) on combustion and performance of the engine operating on stoichiometric combustion condition were discussed and also compared with pure gasoline in this paper. The results indicate that n-butanol/gasoline blends increase combustion pressure and pressure rise rate, fasten burning rate, and shorten ignition delay and combustion duration, as compared to pure gasoline. Moreover, these trends are impacted more evidently with increased n-butanol fraction in the blends. In addition, higher n-butanol percent of gasoline blends increase combustion temperature but decrease the temperature in the later stage of expansion stroke, which contributes to the control of exhaust temperature at high-load. With regards to engine performance, higher n-butanol percent in the blends results in increased brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) and higher brake thermal efficiency (BTE). However, higher n-butanol addition helps to improve combustion stability but shows slightly higher knock possibility in high-load. In that case, the knock trend could be weakened by retarding ignition timing. Moreover, higher n-butanol addition significantly decreases NOx emissions, but it increases CO emissions obviously.

  18. Rational Design Approach for Enhancing Higher-Mode Response of a Microcantilever in Vibro-Impacting Mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ieva Migliniene

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an approach for designing an efficient vibration energy harvester based on a vibro-impacting piezoelectric microcantilever with a geometric shape that has been rationally modified in accordance with results of dynamic optimization. The design goal is to increase the amplitudes of higher-order vibration modes induced during the vibro-impact response of the piezoelectric transducer, thereby providing a means to improve the energy conversion efficiency and power output. A rational configuration of the energy harvester is proposed and it is demonstrated that the new design retains essential modal characteristics of the optimal microcantilever structures, further providing the added benefit of less costly fabrication. The effects of structural dynamics associated with advantageous exploitation of higher vibration modes are analyzed experimentally by means of laser vibrometry as well as numerically via transient simulations of microcantilever response to random excitation. Electrical characterization results indicate that the proposed harvester outperforms its conventional counterpart (based on the microcantilever of the constant cross-section in terms of generated electrical output. Reported results may serve for the development of impact-type micropower generators with harvesting performance that is enhanced by virtue of self-excitation of large intensity higher-order mode responses when the piezoelectric transducer is subjected to relatively low-frequency excitation with strongly variable vibration magnitudes.

  19. Impact evaluation for University-Business Cooperation and Technology Transfer in higher education systems: cluster analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoe Daniela Hamanaka Gusberti

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Higher education systems evolved in recent decades. Universities must not only provide society with capable professionals but also act in the market for technologies, knowledge, and ideas to promote technological development. This paper discusses the motivational performance evaluation system for technology transfer process, specifically the patterns’ evaluation of academic units considering micro-cultures and idiosyncrasies’ analysis, in the academic context of autonomy. Based on action research, the existing performance evaluation system was assessed, and multivariate cluster analysis was proposed and tested as a method to enable micro cultures’ identification and evaluation. The analysis proposed enabled a tool for reflexive discussion regarding the effectiveness of the institutional innovation system in academic units and Engineering Education, and its implications for social and technological development of industry and society enabled action proposals for improvement in the university’s technology transfer management process.

  20. Resolution of low-velocity control in golf putting differentiates professionals from amateurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Yumiko; Fujii, Keisuke; Miura, Akito; Yamamoto, Yuji

    2017-07-01

    It is difficult for humans to apply small amounts of force precisely during motor control. However, experts who have undergone extended training are thought to be able to control low-velocity movement with precision. We investigated the resolution of motor control in golf putting. A total of 10 professional and 10 high-level amateur golfers participated. Putting distances were 0.6-3.3 m, in increments of 0.3 m. We measured the impact velocity and the club-face angle at impact, and the acceleration profile of the downswing. The professionals showed significantly smaller coefficients of variation with respect to impact velocity and smaller root mean square errors in relation to acceleration profiles than did the amateurs. To examine the resolution of motor control for impact velocity, we investigated intra-participant differences in the impact velocity of the club head at two adjacent distances. We found that professionals had higher velocity precision when putting small distance intervals than did amateurs. That is, professionals had higher resolution of low-velocity control than did high-level amateurs. Our results suggest that outstanding performance at a task involves the ability to recognise small distinctions and to produce appropriate movements.

  1. Impact of a systolic parameter, defined as the ratio of right brachial pre-ejection period to ejection time, on the relationship between brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity and left ventricular diastolic function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Po-Chao; Lin, Tsung-Hsien; Lee, Chee-Siong; Chu, Chun-Yuan; Su, Ho-Ming; Voon, Wen-Chol; Lai, Wen-Ter; Sheu, Sheng-Hsiung

    2011-04-01

    Arterial stiffness is correlated with left ventricular (LV) diastolic function as well as susceptibility to LV systolic function. Therefore, if LV systolic function is not known, the relationship between arterial stiffness and LV diastolic function is difficult to determine. A total of 260 patients were included in the study. The brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) and the ratio of right brachial pre-ejection period to ejection time (rbPEP/rbET) were measured using an ABI-form device. Patients were classified into four groups. Groups 1, 2, 3 and 4 were patients with rbPEP/rbET and baPWV below the median, rbPEP/rbET above but baPWV below the median, rbPET/rbET below but baPWV above the median, and rbPET/rbET and baPWV above the median, respectively. The LV ejection fractions in groups 1 and 3 were higher than those in groups 2 and 4 (Pwave velocity to Ea that were comparable to those in groups 3 and 4. In conclusion, rbPEP/rbET had an impact on the relationship between baPWV and LV diastolic function. In patients with high rbPEP/rbET but low baPWV, low baPWV may not indicate good LV diastolic function but implies that cardiac dysfunction may precede vascular dysfunction in such patients. When interpreting the relationship between baPWV and LV diastolic function, the rbPEP/rbET value obtained from the same examination should be considered.

  2. The impact of constructivist teaching strategies on the acquisition of higher order cognition and learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Alison Saricks

    The purpose of this quasi-experimental quantitative mixed design study was to compare the effectiveness of brain-based teaching strategies versus a traditional lecture format in the acquisition of higher order cognition as determined by test scores. A second purpose was to elicit student feedback about the two teaching approaches. The design was a 2 x 2 x 2 factorial design study with repeated measures on the last factor. The independent variables were type of student, teaching method, and a within group change over time. Dependent variables were a between group comparison of pre-test, post-test gain scores and a within and between group comparison of course examination scores. A convenience sample of students enrolled in medical-surgical nursing was used. One group (n=36) was made up of traditional students and the other group (n=36) consisted of second-degree students. Four learning units were included in this study. Pre- and post-tests were given on the first two units. Course examinations scores from all four units were compared. In one cohort two of the units were taught via lecture format and two using constructivist activities. These methods were reversed for the other cohort. The conceptual basis for this study derives from neuroscience and cognitive psychology. Learning is defined as the growth of new dendrites. Cognitive psychologists view learning as a constructive activity in which new knowledge is built on an internal foundation of existing knowledge. Constructivist teaching strategies are designed to stimulate the brain's natural learning ability. There was a statistically significant difference based on type of teaching strategy (t = -2.078, df = 270, p = .039, d = .25)) with higher mean scores on the examinations covering brain-based learning units. There was no statistical significance based on type of student. Qualitative data collection was conducted in an on-line forum at the end of the semester. Students had overall positive responses about the

  3. Impact of higher-order flows in the moment equations on Pfirsch-Schlüter friction coefficients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honda, M., E-mail: honda.mitsuru@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan)

    2014-09-15

    The impact of the higher-order flows in the moment approach on an estimate of the friction coefficients is numerically examined. The higher-order flows are described by the lower-order hydrodynamic flows using the collisional plasma assumption. Their effects have not been consistently taken into account thus far in the widely used neoclassical transport codes based on the moment equations in terms of the Pfirsch-Schlüter flux. Due to numerically solving the friction-flow matrix without using the small-mass ratio expansion, it is clearly revealed that incorporating the higher-order flow effects is of importance especially for plasmas including multiple hydrogenic ions and other lighter species with similar masses.

  4. Leveraging Field Trips in Higher Education for Local Engagement and Impact: An Example from Guatemala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riker, J.; Watson, M.; Liu, E. J.; Chigna, G.; Purvis, M.; Naismith, A.

    2016-12-01

    For over ten years, the University of Bristol (U.K.) has run a field trip for masters students in Natural Hazards in the volcanically active areas of southern Guatemala, home to more than 13 million people. This trip has obvious benefits to its participants - it serves as an immersive and formative experience for students studying volcanic hazard, as well as a springboard for the work of the researchers who lead it. Over the years, it has helped to build strong collaborative ties between academic researchers at Bristol and Guatemala's geologic survey (INSIVUMEH) and emergency management agency (CONRED), facilitating the sharing of data, expertise, and monitoring equipment. The students' regular presence has also enabled infrastructure improvements at Fuego Volcano Observatory, which is itself hosted and partly staffed by the residents of Panimache, a small village just a few miles from the volcano's summit. This field trip does raise challenges, however - an influx of foreign students can draw questions from community members for whom the benefits are indirect (i.e., local job creation or infrastructure improvement) or intangible (i.e., incremental contributions to the body of knowledge regarding volcanic hazard). In this presentation, we'll share stories of our experiences of effective community collaboration in Guatemala. In the spirit of discussion, we would also like to explore the opportunities that exist to better utilise this trip, along with the energy and expertise of its participants, to maximise the positive impact on (and resilience of) local communities, particularly those in the small and largely indigenous villages that populate Fuego Volcano's flanks.

  5. Impact of OpenCourseWare Publication on Higher Education Participation and Student Recruitment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Carson

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The free and open publication of course materials (OpenCourseWare or OCW was initially undertaken by Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT and other universities primarily to share educational resources among educators (Abelson, 2007. OCW, however, and more in general open educational resources (OER1, have also provided well-documented opportunities for all learners, including the so-called “informal learners” and “independent learners” (Carson, 2005; Mulder, 2006, p. 35. Universities have also increasingly documented clear benefits for specific target groups such as secondary education students and lifelong learners seeking to enter formal postsecondary education programs.In addition to benefitting learners, OCW publication has benefitted the publishing institutions themselves by providing recruiting advantages. Finally enrollment figures from some institutions indicate that even in the case of the free and open publication of materials from online programs, OCW does not negatively affect enrollment. This paper reviews evaluation conducted at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health (JHSPH, and Open Universiteit Nederland (OUNL concerning OCW effects on higher education participation and student recruitment.

  6. The Relationship Between Latent Heating, Vertical Velocity, and Precipitation Processes: the Impact of Aerosols on Precipitation in Organized Deep Convective Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Li, Xiaowen

    2016-01-01

    A high-resolution, two-dimensional cloud-resolving model with spectral-bin microphysics is used to study the impact of aerosols on precipitation processes in both a tropical oceanic and a midlatitude continental squall line with regard to three processes: latent heating (LH), cold pool dynamics, and ice microphysics. Evaporative cooling in the lower troposphere is found to enhance rainfall in low cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentration scenarios in the developing stages of a midlatitude convective precipitation system. In contrast, the tropical case produced more rainfall under high CCN concentrations. Both cold pools and low-level convergence are stronger for those configurations having enhanced rainfall. Nevertheless, latent heat release is stronger (especially after initial precipitation) in the scenarios having more rainfall in both the tropical and midlatitude environment. Sensitivity tests are performed to examine the impact of ice and evaporative cooling on the relationship between aerosols, LH, and precipitation processes. The results show that evaporative cooling is important for cold pool strength and rain enhancement in both cases. However, ice microphysics play a larger role in the midlatitude case compared to the tropics. Detailed analysis of the vertical velocity-governing equation shows that temperature buoyancy can enhance updraftsdowndrafts in the middlelower troposphere in the convective core region; however, the vertical pressure gradient force (PGF) is of the same order and acts in the opposite direction. Water loading is small but of the same order as the net PGF-temperature buoyancy forcing. The balance among these terms determines the intensity of convection.

  7. Questioning the Role of Internationalization in the Nationalization of Higher Education: The Impact of the EU TEMPUS Programme on Higher Education in Syria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayoubi, Rami M.; Massoud, Hiba K.

    2011-01-01

    Given the need for major reform of the higher education programmes in Syria, and answering the voices that question the role of European Union (EU) in assisting the development of the higher education sector, this study presents an analysis of the contribution of (TEMPUS) Programme in modernising higher education in Syria. The study compares the…

  8. Sodium Velocity Maps on Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, A. E.; Killen, R. M.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the current work was to measure two-dimensional maps of sodium velocities on the Mercury surface and examine the maps for evidence of sources or sinks of sodium on the surface. The McMath-Pierce Solar Telescope and the Stellar Spectrograph were used to measure Mercury spectra that were sampled at 7 milliAngstrom intervals. Observations were made each day during the period October 5-9, 2010. The dawn terminator was in view during that time. The velocity shift of the centroid of the Mercury emission line was measured relative to the solar sodium Fraunhofer line corrected for radial velocity of the Earth. The difference between the observed and calculated velocity shift was taken to be the velocity vector of the sodium relative to Earth. For each position of the spectrograph slit, a line of velocities across the planet was measured. Then, the spectrograph slit was stepped over the surface of Mercury at 1 arc second intervals. The position of Mercury was stabilized by an adaptive optics system. The collection of lines were assembled into an images of surface reflection, sodium emission intensities, and Earthward velocities over the surface of Mercury. The velocity map shows patches of higher velocity in the southern hemisphere, suggesting the existence of sodium sources there. The peak earthward velocity occurs in the equatorial region, and extends to the terminator. Since this was a dawn terminator, this might be an indication of dawn evaporation of sodium. Leblanc et al. (2008) have published a velocity map that is similar.

  9. Ghost peaks observed after atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization experiments may disclose new ionization mechanism of matrix-assisted hypersonic velocity impact ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskovets, Eugene

    2015-08-30

    with a model of the supersonic jet from the inlet capillary accelerating detached particles to kinetic energies suitable for matrix-assisted hypersonic-velocity impact ionization. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. The impact of CO2 emissions on economic growth: evidence from selected higher CO2 emissions economies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azam, Muhammad; Khan, Abdul Qayyum; Bin Abdullah, Hussin; Qureshi, Muhammad Ejaz

    2016-04-01

    The main purpose of this work is to analyze the impact of environmental degradation proxied by CO2 emissions per capita along with some other explanatory variables namely energy use, trade, and human capital on economic growth in selected higher CO2 emissions economies namely China, the USA, India, and Japan. For empirical analysis, annual data over the period spanning between 1971 and 2013 are used. After using relevant and suitable tests for checking data properties, the panel fully modified ordinary least squares (FMOLS) method is employed as an analytical technique for parameter estimation. The panel group FMOLS results reveal that almost all variables are statistically significant, whereby test rejects the null hypotheses of non cointegration, demonstrating that all variables play an important role in affecting the economic growth role across countries. Where two regressors namely CO2 emissions and energy use show significantly negative impacts on economic growth, for trade and human capital, they tend to show the significantly positive impact on economic growth. However, for the individual analysis across countries, the panel estimate suggests that CO2 emissions have a significant positive relationship with economic growth for China, Japan, and the USA, while it is found significantly negative in case of India. The empirical findings of the study suggest that appropriate and prudent policies are required in order to control pollution emerging from areas other than liquefied fuel consumption. The ultimate impact of shrinking pollution will help in supporting sustainable economic growth and maturation as well as largely improve society welfare.

  11. Plantar impact causing midfoot fractures result in higher forces in Chopart's joint than in the ankle joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, M; Wippermann, B; Thermann, H; Schroeder, G; Otte, D; Troeger, H D; Krettek, C

    2002-03-01

    Force effect (impact, extent of foot compartment deformation) and result (fracture pattern) for midfoot fractures in car occupants is known. An analysis of the processes in the foot was intended to improve car safety. Eleven fresh, unfrozen, unpreserved intact human cadavers (age: 36.8 (16-61) years, gender: male, race: Caucasian) were studied 24-72 h after death. In 3 cadavers (5 feet) the experimental design was established: entire cadaver fixed on a special tray in supine position, pendulum with bar impactor hitting the foot plantar to Lisfranc's joint. A custom-made pressure sensor was inserted in the ankle (A), talonavicular (TN) and calcaneocuboid (CC) joints (resolution: 1 cm2, sampling rate: 500/s). Sixteen feet were measured: midfoot fractures were induced in 11 feet. The maximum pressure amounted to 1.22-2.55 MPa (2.04+/-0.412) at 0.005 0.195 s (0.067+/-0.059) after impact. The maximum pressure occurred in 8 (50%) cases in the ankle, in 7 (44%) of the TN and 1 (6%) of the CC joints. A comparison of the first 200 pressure samples after impact of all sensor fields resulted in higher forces in Chopart's joint than in the ankle (t-test: p < 0.001). These force differences were higher in cases with midfoot fractures (mixed model analysis of variance: p = 0.003). Due to considerable forces in Chopart's joint we recommend a modification of the actual crash test dummy lower extremity model with an additional load cell that detects forces in the longitudinal direction of the foot axis.

  12. Physical Activity Producing Low, but Not Medium or Higher, Vertical Impacts Is Inversely Related to BMI in Older Adults: Findings From a Multicohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhakeem, Ahmed; Hannam, Kimberly; Deere, Kevin C; Hartley, April; Clark, Emma M; Moss, Charlotte; Edwards, Mark H; Dennison, Elaine; Gaysin, Tim; Kuh, Diana; Wong, Andrew; Cooper, Cyrus; Cooper, Rachel; Tobias, Jon H

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Background High impact physical activity (PA) is thought to improve skeletal health, but its relation to other health outcomes are unclear. We investigated associations between PA impact magnitude and body mass index (BMI) in older adults. Methods Data were taken from the Cohort for Skeletal Health in Bristol and Avon (COSHIBA), Hertfordshire Cohort Study, and MRC National Survey of Health and Development. Vertical acceleration peaks from 7-day hip-worn accelerometer recordings were used to classify PA as low (0.5 impact. Cohort-specific associations of low, medium, and higher impact PA with BMI were examined using linear regressions and estimates combined using random-effects meta-analysis. Results A total of 1182 participants (mean age = 72.7 years, 68% female) were included. Low, medium, and higher impact PA were inversely related to BMI in initial models. After adjustment for confounders and other impacts, low, but not medium or higher, impacts were inversely related to BMI (−0.31, p impacts). In adjusted analyses of body composition measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry in COSHIBA, low, but not medium or higher, impacts were inversely related to total body fat mass (−0.19, p impact PA was weakly and positively associated with lean mass (0.05, p = .06). Conclusions Greater exposure to PA producing low magnitude vertical impacts was associated with lower BMI and fat mass at older age. Low impact PA may help reduce obesity risk in older adults. PMID:29028919

  13. Velocity distribution in snow avalanches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, K.; Ito, Y.

    1997-12-01

    In order to investigate the detailed structure of snow avalanches, we have made snow flow experiments at the Miyanomori ski jump in Sapporo and systematic observations in the Shiai-dani, Kurobe Canyon. In the winter of 1995-1996, a new device to measure static pressures was used to estimate velocities in the snow cloud that develops above the flowing layer of avalanches. Measurements during a large avalanche in the Shiai-dani which damaged and destroyed some instruments indicate velocities increased rapidly to more than 50 m/s soon after the front. Velocities decreased gradually in the following 10 s. Velocities of the lower flowing layer were also calculated by differencing measurement of impact pressure. Both recordings in the snow cloud and in the flowing layer changed with a similar trend and suggest a close interaction between the two layers. In addition, the velocity showed a periodic change. Power spectrum analysis of the impact pressure and the static pressure depression showed a strong peak at a frequency between 4 and 6 Hz, which might imply the existence of either ordered structure or a series of surges in the flow.

  14. Development of a high velocity rain erosion test method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Dong Teak; Jin, Doo Han [Korea University of Technology and Education, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Hyung [Agency for Defense Development, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-07-01

    The nose of a missile, flying through raining region with a supersonic speed, is subjected to the rain erosion because the nose is made of a brittle ceramic material. A simple yet very effective rain erosion test method is developed. The sabot assembly similar to the hypodermic syringe carries specific amount of water is launched by a low pressure air gun. After the stopper stop the sabot assembly by impact, the steel plunger continues moving toward to squeeze the silicon rubber in front. The pressurized silicon rubber then is squeezed through the orifice in front of the sabot at high velocity, thus, accelerates the water droplet to higher velocity. The droplet velocity up to 800m/s is successfully attained using a low pressure air gun. The ceramic specimen assembly is placed in front of the high speed water droplet and the rain erosion damage on the surface of the specimen is observed.

  15. Nerve conduction velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003927.htm Nerve conduction velocity To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Nerve conduction velocity (NCV) is a test to see ...

  16. Does the application of gadolinium-DTPA have an impact on magnetic resonance phase contrast velocity measurements? Results from an in vitro study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heverhagen, J.T. E-mail: heverhag@post.med.uni-marburg.de; Hoppe, M.; Klose, K.-J.; Wagner, H.-J

    2002-10-01

    Introduction/objective: To evaluate the potential influence of various concentrations of gadolinium (Gd)-DTPA on magnetic resonance phase contrast (MR PC) velocimetry. Material and methods: Imaging was done with a 1.0 T scanner using a standard Flash 2D sequence and a circular polarized extremity coil. In a validated flow phantom with a defined 75% area stenosis different concentrations of Gd-DTPA, diluted in a 10:1 water-yogurt mixture, MR PC measurements were correlated with a Doppler guide wire as gold standard. Results: MR PC measurements correlated well with the Doppler derived data (r=0.99; P<0.01; maximum pre-stenotic velocity: 21.6{+-}0.5 cm/s; maximum intra-stenotic velocity: 81.7{+-}0.6 cm/s). Following Gd-DTPA administration no significant (P>0.05; Student's t-test) flow measurement changes were noted (maximum pre-stenotic velocity: 21.3{+-}1.3 cm/s; maximum intra-stenotic velocity: 84.0{+-}3.6 cm/s). However, delineation of the perfused lumen was enhanced after the application of Gd-DTPA. Discussions and conclusion: The application of Gd-DTPA does not affect MR PC velocimetry. However, the application of contrast media allowed a more accurate vessel segmentation. MR PC measurements can be reliably carried out after application of Gd-DTPA.

  17. The velocity of sound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyer, R.T.

    1985-01-01

    The paper reviews the work carried out on the velocity of sound in liquid alkali metals. The experimental methods to determine the velocity measurements are described. Tables are presented of reported data on the velocity of sound in lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium and caesium. A formula is given for alkali metals, in which the sound velocity is a function of shear viscosity, atomic mass and atomic volume. (U.K.)

  18. The economic impact of higher education institutions on regional development: the case of the Polytechnic Institute of Bragança

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes, Joana

    2010-01-01

    Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) are considered, usually, important mechanisms for regional development. However, it is essential that they can quantify the impact that their activities have in surrounding communities and in regional economic development.

  19. Assessing the potential impact of increased participation in higher education on mortality: evidence from 21 European populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulhánová, Ivana; Hoffmann, Rasmus; Judge, Ken; Looman, Caspar W N; Eikemo, Terje A; Bopp, Matthias; Deboosere, Patrick; Leinsalu, Mall; Martikainen, Pekka; Rychtaříková, Jitka; Wojtyniak, Bogdan; Menvielle, Gwenn; Mackenbach, Johan P

    2014-09-01

    Although higher education has been associated with lower mortality rates in many studies, the effect of potential improvements in educational distribution on future mortality levels is unknown. We therefore estimated the impact of projected increases in higher education on mortality in European populations. We used mortality and population data according to educational level from 21 European populations and developed counterfactual scenarios. The first scenario represented the improvement in the future distribution of educational attainment as expected on the basis of an assumption of cohort replacement. We estimated the effect of this counterfactual scenario on mortality with a 10-15-year time horizon among men and women aged 30-79 years using a specially developed tool based on population attributable fractions (PAF). We compared this with a second, upward levelling scenario in which everyone has obtained tertiary education. The reduction of mortality in the cohort replacement scenario ranged from 1.9 to 10.1% for men and from 1.7 to 9.0% for women. The reduction of mortality in the upward levelling scenario ranged from 22.0 to 57.0% for men and from 9.6 to 50.0% for women. The cohort replacement scenario was estimated to achieve only part (4-25% (men) and 10-31% (women)) of the potential mortality decrease seen in the upward levelling scenario. We concluded that the effect of on-going improvements in educational attainment on average mortality in the population differs across Europe, and can be substantial. Further investments in education may have important positive side-effects on population health. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Differential use of learning strategies in first-year higher education: the impact of personality, academic motivation, and teaching strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donche, Vincent; De Maeyer, Sven; Coertjens, Liesje; Van Daal, Tine; Van Petegem, Peter

    2013-06-01

    Although the evidence in support of the variability of students' learning strategies has expanded in recent years, less is known about the explanatory base of these individual differences in terms of the joint influences of personal and contextual characteristics. Previous studies have often investigated how student learning is associated with either personal or contextual factors. This study takes an integrative research perspective into account and examines the joint effects of personality, academic motivation, and teaching strategies on students' learning strategies in a same educational context in first-year higher education. In this study, 1,126 undergraduate students and 90 lecturers from eight professional bachelor programmes in a university college participated. Self-report measures were used to measure students' personality, academic motivation, and learning strategies. Students' processing and regulation strategies are mapped using the Inventory of Learning Styles. Key characteristics of more content-focused versus learning-focused teaching strategies were measured. Multivariate multi-level analysis was used to take the nested data structure and interrelatedness of learning strategies into account. Different personality traits (openness, conscientiousness, and neuroticism) and academic motivation (amotivation, autonomous, and controlled motivation) were found to be independently associated with student learning strategies. Besides these student characteristics, also teaching strategies were found to be directly associated with learning strategies. The study makes clear that the impact of teaching strategies on learning strategies in first-year higher education cannot be overlooked nor overinterpreted, due to the importance of students' personality and academic motivation which also partly explain why students learn the way they do. © 2013 The British Psychological Society.

  1. A Meta-Analysis of the Impact of Universal and Indicated Preventive Technology-Delivered Interventions for Higher Education Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, Colleen S; Durlak, Joseph A; Shapiro, Jenna B; Kirsch, Alexandra C; Zahniser, Evan

    2016-08-01

    The uses of technology-delivered mental health treatment options, such as interventions delivered via computer, smart phone, or other communication or information devices, as opposed to primarily face-to-face interventions, are proliferating. However, the literature is unclear about their effectiveness as preventive interventions for higher education students, a population for whom technology-delivered interventions (TDIs) might be particularly fitting and beneficial. This meta-analytic review examines technological mental health prevention programs targeting higher education students either without any presenting problems (universal prevention) or with mild to moderate subclinical problems (indicated prevention). A systematic literature search identified 22 universal and 26 indicated controlled interventions, both published and unpublished, involving 4763 college, graduate, or professional students. As hypothesized, the overall mean effect sizes (ESs) for both universal (0.19) and indicated interventions (0.37) were statistically significant and differed significantly from each other favoring indicated interventions. Skill-training interventions, both universal (0.21) and indicated (0.31), were significant, whereas non-skill-training interventions were only significant among indicated (0.25) programs. For indicated interventions, better outcomes were obtained in those cases in which participants had access to support during the course of the intervention, either in person or through technology (e.g., email, online contact). The positive findings for both universal and indicated prevention are qualified by limitations of the current literature. To improve experimental rigor, future research should provide detailed information on the level of achieved implementation, describe participant characteristics and intervention content, explore the impact of potential moderators and mechanisms of success, collect post-intervention and follow-up data regardless of

  2. Middle cerebral artery blood velocity during running

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngeraa, Tobias; Pedersen, Lars Møller; Mantoni, T

    2013-01-01

    for eight subjects, respectively, were excluded from analysis because of insufficient signal quality. Running increased mean arterial pressure and mean MCA velocity and induced rhythmic oscillations in BP and in MCA velocity corresponding to the difference between step rate and heart rate (HR) frequencies....... During running, rhythmic oscillations in arterial BP induced by interference between HR and step frequency impact on cerebral blood velocity. For the exercise as a whole, average MCA velocity becomes elevated. These results suggest that running not only induces an increase in regional cerebral blood flow...

  3. The effect of thermal velocities on structure formation in N-body simulations of warm dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leo, Matteo; Baugh, Carlton M.; Li, Baojiu; Pascoli, Silvia

    2017-11-01

    We investigate the impact of thermal velocities in N-body simulations of structure formation in warm dark matter models. Adopting the commonly used approach of adding thermal velocities, randomly selected from a Fermi-Dirac distribution, to the gravitationally-induced velocities of the simulation particles, we compare the matter and velocity power spectra measured from CDM and WDM simulations, in the latter case with and without thermal velocities. This prescription for adding thermal velocities introduces numerical noise into the initial conditions, which influences structure formation. At early times, the noise affects dramatically the power spectra measured from simulations with thermal velocities, with deviations of the order of ~ Script O(10) (in the matter power spectra) and of the order of ~ Script O(102) (in the velocity power spectra) compared to those extracted from simulations without thermal velocities. At late times, these effects are less pronounced with deviations of less than a few percent. Increasing the resolution of the N-body simulation shifts these discrepancies to higher wavenumbers. We also find that spurious haloes start to appear in simulations which include thermal velocities at a mass that is ~3 times larger than in simulations without thermal velocities.

  4. The impact of the language barrier on the success of Hungarian minority women in the higher education system of Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lendák-Kabók Karolina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The subject of the paper is to analyze the impact of the language barrier faced by Hungarian minority female professors and students in the higher education sys­tem of Serbia. The aim of this paper is to propose measures which might allow Hungarian minority students to overcome the language barrier more easily and to raise awareness for the need of more Hungarian women in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM. The analysis is based on twenty four semi-structured interviews conducted with minority Hungarian female professors and students, who are working or studying at the University of Novi Sad, Serbia. Interviews were conducted with a pre-composed questionnaire between the end of 2014 and the beginning of 2015. Interviewees were chosen with a snowball sampling method. Results of analysis show that the majority of Hungarian women face a language barrier at the start of their studies, mostly because of their limited knowledge of the majority’s language. These barriers were more pronounced in Hungarian female students than with professor. This phenomenon can be attributed to the time in which they grew up, or to a different social environment of the twentieth century, when bilingualism was completely natural, from which, less segregation of the nations resulted and a better knowledge of the Serbian language. The professors particularly point out that being bilingual is a great advantage and that their knowledge of several languages was a key advantage in their academic careers. With the analysis of the interviews it was determined that the language barrier was mostly pronounced for students of social sciences and humanities (SSH, where language is the primary tool of communication. The language barrier was less important for the students studying in STEM sciences, where students and professors interact through formulas and written exams.

  5. Differential Nongenetic Impact of Birth Weight Versus Third-Trimester Growth Velocity on Glucose Metabolism and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Abdominal Obesity in Young Healthy Twins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilgaard, Kasper; Mosbech, Thomas Hammershaimb; Grunnet, Louise

    2011-01-01

    Context: Low birth weight is associated with type 2 diabetes, which to some extent may be mediated via abdominal adiposity and insulin resistance. Fetal growth velocity is high during the third trimester, constituting a potential critical window for organ programming. Intra-pair differences among......-pair differences in young healthy twins.Methods: Fifty-eight healthy twins (42 monozygotic/16 dizygotic) aged 18-24 yr participated. Insulin sensitivity was assessed using hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps. Whole-body fat was assessed by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scan, whereas abdominal visceral and sc fat...

  6. Does the application of gadolinium-DTPA have an impact on magnetic resonance phase contrast velocity measurements? Results from an in vitro study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heverhagen, J.T.; Hoppe, M.; Klose, K.-J.; Wagner, H.-J.

    2002-01-01

    Introduction/objective: To evaluate the potential influence of various concentrations of gadolinium (Gd)-DTPA on magnetic resonance phase contrast (MR PC) velocimetry. Material and methods: Imaging was done with a 1.0 T scanner using a standard Flash 2D sequence and a circular polarized extremity coil. In a validated flow phantom with a defined 75% area stenosis different concentrations of Gd-DTPA, diluted in a 10:1 water-yogurt mixture, MR PC measurements were correlated with a Doppler guide wire as gold standard. Results: MR PC measurements correlated well with the Doppler derived data (r=0.99; P 0.05; Student's t-test) flow measurement changes were noted (maximum pre-stenotic velocity: 21.3±1.3 cm/s; maximum intra-stenotic velocity: 84.0±3.6 cm/s). However, delineation of the perfused lumen was enhanced after the application of Gd-DTPA. Discussions and conclusion: The application of Gd-DTPA does not affect MR PC velocimetry. However, the application of contrast media allowed a more accurate vessel segmentation. MR PC measurements can be reliably carried out after application of Gd-DTPA

  7. A Generalized Version of a Low Velocity Impact between a Rigid Sphere and a Transversely Isotropic Strain-Hardening Plate Supported by a Rigid Substrate Using the Concept of Noninteger Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdon Atangana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A low velocity impact between a rigid sphere and transversely isotropic strain-hardening plate supported by a rigid substrate is generalized to the concept of noninteger derivatives order. A brief history of fractional derivatives order is presented. The fractional derivatives order adopted is in Caputo sense. The new equation is solved via the analytical technique, the Homotopy decomposition method (HDM. The technique is described and the numerical simulations are presented. Since it is very important to accurately predict the contact force and its time history, the three stages of the indentation process, including (1 the elastic indentation, (2 the plastic indentation, and (3 the elastic unloading stages, are investigated.

  8. Water velocity meter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, C. W.; Smith, D. L.

    1970-01-01

    Simple, inexpensive drag sphere velocity meter with a zero to 6 ft/sec range measures steady-state flow. When combined with appropriate data acquisition system, it is suited to applications where large numbers of simultaneous measurements are needed for current mapping or velocity profile determination.

  9. Estimation of vector velocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    Using a pulsed ultrasound field, the two-dimensional velocity vector can be determined with the invention. The method uses a transversally modulated ultrasound field for probing the moving medium under investigation. A modified autocorrelation approach is used in the velocity estimation. The new...

  10. Preliminary investigation into the impacts of assimilating SST and SLA on the surface velocities in a HYCOM of the Agulhas Current

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Rapeti, T

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Data assimilative ocean models play crucial roles in furthering the understanding, and providing forecasts of the Agulhas Current system. This study investigates the impact that assimilating sea surface temperatures (SST) combined with sea level...

  11. Impacts of tourism hotspots on vegetation communities show a higher potential for self-propagation along roads than hiking trails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Isabelle D; Croft, David B

    2014-10-01

    Vegetation communities along recreational tracks may suffer from substantial edge-effects through the impacts of trampling, modified environmental conditions and competition with species that benefit from disturbance. We assessed impacts on trackside vegetation by comparing high and low usage tourism sites at a 1-10 m distance from recreational tracks in a popular arid-lands tourism destination in South Australia. The central aim was quantification of the strengths and spatial extent of tourism impacts along recreational tracks with a qualitative comparison of roads and trails. Track-distance gradients were most prevalent at high usage sites. There, species community composition was altered, total plant cover decreased, non-native species cover increased, plant diversity increased or decreased (depending on the distance) and soil compaction increased towards recreational tracks. Roadside effects were greater and more pervasive than trailside effects. Further, plant diversity did not continuously increase towards the road verge as it did along trails but dropped sharply in the immediate road shoulder which indicated high disturbance conditions that few species were able to tolerate. To our knowledge, we are the first to demonstrate that the access mode to a recreation site influences the potential of certain impacts, such as the increase of non-native species, to self-perpetuate from their points of introduction to disjointed sites with a predisposition to disturbance. Due to this propulsion of impacts, the overall spatial extent of roadside impacts was far greater than initially apparent from assessments at the road verge. We discuss possible means of mitigating these impacts. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Flow Velocities After Carotid Artery Stenting: Impact of Stent Design. A Fluid Dynamics Study in a Carotid Artery Model with Laser Doppler Anemometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greil, Oliver; Kleinschmidt, Thomas; Weiss, Wolfgang; Wolf, Oliver; Heider, Peter; Schaffner, Silvio; Gianotti, Marc; Schmid, Thomas; Liepsch, Dieter; Berger, Hermann

    2005-01-01

    Purpose. To study the influence of a newly developed membrane stent design on flow patterns in a physiologic carotid artery model. Methods. Three different stents were positioned in silicone models of the carotid artery: a stainless steel stent (Wall-stent), a nitinol stent (SelfX), and a nitinol stent with a semipermeable membrane (MembraX). To increase the contact area of the membrane with the vessel wall, another MembranX model was modified at the outflow tract. The membrane consists of a biocompatible silicone-polyurethane copolymer (Elast-Eon) with a pore size of 100 μm. All stents were deployed across the bifurcation and the external carotid artery origin. Flow velocity measurements were performed with laser Doppler anemometry (LDA), using pulsatile flow conditions (Re = 220; flow 0.39 l/min; flow rate ratio ICA:ECA = 70:30) in hemodynamically relevant cross-sections. The hemodynamic changes were analyzed by comparing velocity fluctuations of corresponding flow profiles. Results. The flow rate ratio ICA:ECA shifted significantly from 70/30 to 73.9/26.1 in the MembraX and remained nearly unchanged in the SelfX and Wallstent. There were no changes in the flow patterns at the inflow proximal to the stents. In the stent no relevant changes were found in the SelfX. In the Wallstent the separation zone shifted from the orifice of the ICA to the distal end of the stent. Four millimeters distal to the SelfX and the Wallstent the flow profile returned to normal. In the MembraX an increase in the central slipstreams was found with creation of a flow separation distal to the stent. With a modification of the membrane this flow separation vanished. In the ECA flow disturbances were seen at the inner wall distal to the stent struts in the SelfX and the Wallstent. With the MembraX a calming of flow could be observed in the ECA with a slight loss of flow volume. Conclusions. Stent placement across the carotid artery bifurcation induces alterations of the physiologic flow

  13. Historical and logical approach of the strategic planning impact evaluation for the Higher Politehcnical Institute of Guayaquil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Rodríguez-Herkt

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In the article the logical historical behavior of the impact assessment of institutional development plan in the Bolivarian Polytechnic Institute in Guayaquil, Ecuador, preceded by the assessment of the most relevant models that have marked the course of history of this process is addressed, on the basis of the key indicators fundamental stages that this process has gone characterized. The historical and logical analysis of the impact assessment of strategic planning requires a raid needed in the different models associated with this process, so as to allow the orientation contextualize the options made in this investigation.

  14. The Impact of ERASMUS on European Higher Education: Quality, Openness and Internationalisation; Final Report by the consortium of CHEPS, INCHER-Kassel and ECOTEC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vossensteyn, Johan J.; Beerkens-Soo, M.; Cremonini, Leon; Antonowitsch, Dominic; Epping, Elisabeth

    2008-01-01

    This study explores the impact of the ERASMUS programme on quality improvement in European higher education in particular in the areas of teaching, research, student services and the openness to society with a focus at the institutional and system level. The study puts an emphasis on the

  15. Assessing the Impact of a Program Designed to Develop Sustainability Leadership amongst Staff Members in Higher Education Institutes: A Case Study from a Community of Practice Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkaher, Iris; Avissar, Ilana

    2018-01-01

    This study focuses on the impact of a sustainability leadership development program (SLDP) designed to develop staff members as leaders who encourage sustainability practices within institutions of higher education (IHE). Using the framework of community of practice (CoP), we explored the program's contribution by interviewing 16 staff members who…

  16. Velocity Feedback Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiu Choi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Transient response such as ringing in a control system can be reduced or removed by velocity feedback. It is a useful control technique that should be covered in the relevant engineering laboratory courses. We developed velocity feedback experiments using two different low cost technologies, viz., operational amplifiers and microcontrollers. These experiments can be easily integrated into laboratory courses on feedback control systems or microcontroller applications. The intent of developing these experiments was to illustrate the ringing problem and to offer effective, low cost solutions for removing such problem. In this paper the pedagogical approach for these velocity feedback experiments was described. The advantages and disadvantages of the two different implementation of velocity feedback were discussed also.

  17. High Velocity Gas Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    A video tape related to orbital debris research is presented. The video tape covers the process of loading a High Velocity Gas Gun and firing it into a mounted metal plate. The process is then repeated in slow motion.

  18. Impact of bandwidth for various services in heterogeneous network and quality of service via communication technologies in Malaysian higher educational

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Nazri ISMAIL

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on heterogeneous services and communication technologies for retrieving and sending information between students and lecturers in Malaysian higher educational institutes. It intends to investigate pattern and significant level of various services implementation, convergence of communication technologies and bandwidth capacity for last mile users (students and lecturers. It is designed to determine which communication technologies, services, bandwidth capacity and QoS will achieve the highest level acceptance in Malaysian higher educational institutes. Heterogeneous environment can also generate mobility approaches. A survey method is used to collect data from respondents (System Network Administrator in Malaysian higher educational institutes. Statistical Analysis using t-test shows that implementation of high speed bandwidth for Internet (WAN achieved significant level. Frequency test are used to analyze the various services implementation via convergence of communication technologies in heterogeneous environment for retrieving information. The most apparent finding of this study is that various services implementation in higher educational institutes can affect convergence of communication technologies usage in accessing information over heterogeneous network environment between students and lecturers. The study or analysis confirms that Malaysia higher educational institutes have not achieved a maximum level of various services implementation via convergence of communication technologies between students and lecturers in heterogeneous network environment. Therefore, low convergence of communication technologies can produce a low mobility and ubiquitous interaction between students and lectures in Malaysian higher educational institutes.

  19. The Impact of Selected Higher Education Institutions on Single Family Home Values: A Hedonic Approach with GIS Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Spencer Daniel

    2010-01-01

    The presence of a college or university in a community can be a source of great pride and economic vitality. An institution's presence, however, may also generate unintended off-site impacts, such as traffic congestion, inadequate parking, heightened crime, insufficient taxable property, and deteriorating neighborhoods, which strain local…

  20. Impact of Recent Trends in Information and Communication Technology on the Validity of the Construct Information Literacy in Higher Education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.A.J. (Jos) van Helvoort

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this paper is a reflective discussion on the validity of the construct Information Literacy in the perspective of changing information and communication technologies. The research question that will be answered is: what is the impact of technological developments on the relevance of

  1. From Passive to Active: The Impact of the Flipped Classroom through Social Learning Platforms on Higher Education Students' Creative Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Zahrani, Abdulrahman M.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the impact of the flipped classroom on the promotion of students' creative thinking. Students were recruited from the Faculty of Education at King Abdulaziz University in Saudi Arabia during the first semester of 2014. A multiple method research design was used to address the research questions. First, a two-group…

  2. Examining the Potential Impact of Full Tuition Fees on Mature Part-Time Students in English Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Angela

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines current part-time mature learners' views on the potential impact upon future students as full fees are introduced from 2012. It investigates the problems which part-time mature learners may face with the advent of student loans and subsequent debt, given that they are usually combining complex lives with their studies, with…

  3. Shuttlecock Velocity of a Badminton Drop Shot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ampharin Ongvises

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In a badminton ‘drop shot’, the shuttlecock is struck by a non-rotating racquet at low speed. In this investigation, a shuttlecock was hit by a badminton racquet in a linear collision, simulating a drop shot. The collision was recorded with high-speed video and the velocities of the racquet and shuttlecock determined. The relationship between the impact velocity of the racquet and the velocity of the shuttlecock as it leaves the badminton racquet after collision was found to be proportional over the range tested.

  4. Shuttlecock Velocity of a Badminton Drop Shot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ampharin Ongvises

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In a badminton ‘drop shot’, the shuttlecock is struck by a non-rotating racquet at low speed. In this investigation, a shuttlecock was hit by a badminton racquet in a linear collision, simulating a drop shot. The collision was recorded with high-speed video and the velocities of the racquet and shuttlecock determined. The relationship between the impact velocity of the racquet and the velocity of the shuttlecock as it leaves the badminton racquet after collision was found to be proportional over the range tested.

  5. A glance at velocity structure of Izmir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Özer, Çağlar, E-mail: caglar.ozer@deu.edu.tr [Dokuz Eylul University, Faculty of Engineering, Geophysical Engineering Department, Izmir (Turkey); Dokuz Eylul University, The Graduate School of Natural and Applied Sciences, Department of Geophysical Engineering, Izmir (Turkey); Polat, Orhan, E-mail: orhan.polat@deu.edu.tr [Dokuz Eylul University, Faculty of Engineering, Geophysical Engineering Department, Izmir (Turkey)

    2016-04-18

    In this study; we investigated velocity structure of Izmir and surroundings. We used local earthquake data which was recorded by different type of instruments and obtained high resolution 3D sections. We selected more than 400 earthquakes which were occurred between 2010 and 2013. Examined tomographic sections especially in Izmir along coastal areas (Mavisehir-Inciraltı); revealed the low speed zone. Along this low-speed zone; it is consistent with the results obtained from the stratigraphic section and surface geology. While; low velocity zones are associated with faults and water content; high velocity is related to magmatic rocks or compact rocks. Along Karsıyaka, Seferihisar, Orhanlı, Izmir fault zones; low P velocity was observed. When examined higher elevations of the topography; which are composed of soured magmatic material is dominated by high P velocity. In all horizontal sections; resolution decreasing with increasing depth. The reason for this; the reduction of earthquakes causes ray tracing problems.

  6. Impact of emotional intelligence on teacher׳s performance in higher education institutions of Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Asrar-ul-Haq

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This research paper aims at investigating the impact of emotional intelligence on teacher׳s job performance in the education sector of Pakistan. Sample size consists of 166 teachers from universities in the area of central Punjab, Pakistan. Theories of emotional intelligence proposed by Salovey and Mayer (1989–1990 were used as the conceptual framework and its relationship with the job performance of teachers was examined. Reliability and validity of variables was tested through measurement model of PLS-SEM. The result indicated that emotional intelligence has a significant impact on the teacher׳s job performance. Key research finding revealed that emotional self-awareness, self-confidence, achievement, developing others and conflict management have a positive and significant relationship with the teacher׳s job performance. Keywords: Emotional intelligence, Performance, Teachers, Pakistan

  7. Optimizing pulse shaping and zooming for acceleration to high velocities and fusion neutron production on the Nike laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasik, Max; Weaver, J. L.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Zalesak, S. T.; Velikovich, A. L.; Oh, J.; Obenschain, S. P.; Arikawa, Y.; Watari, T.

    2010-11-01

    We will present results from follow-on experiments to the record-high velocities of 1000 km/s achieved on Nike [Karasik et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056317 (2010) ], in which highly accelerated planar foils of deuterated polystyrene were made to collide with a witness foil to produce extreme shock pressures and result in heating of matter to thermonuclear temperatures. Still higher velocities and higher target densities are required for impact fast ignition. The aim of these experiments is shaping the driving pulse to minimize shock heating of the accelerated target and using the focal zoom capability of Nike to achieve higher densities and velocities. Spectroscopic measurements of electron temperature achieved upon impact will complement the neutron time-of-flight ion temperature measurement. Work is supported by US DOE and Office of Naval Research.

  8. Explaining participation differentials in Dutch higher education: The impact of subjective success probabilities on level choice and field choice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tolsma, J.; Need, A.; Jong, U. de

    2010-01-01

    In this article we examine whether subjective estimates of success probabilities explain the effect of social origin, sex, and ethnicity on students' choices between different school tracks in Dutch higher education. The educational options analysed differ in level (i.e. university versus

  9. The Impact of Mass and Universal Higher Education on Curriculum and Instruction: Case Studies of China and Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Futao

    2017-01-01

    Based on case studies of China and Japan, this study undertakes comparative research on major aspects of university curriculum and instruction-teaching activities of academics, their role in curriculum development, and their perceptions of these activities--between a mass and a universal higher education system. Major findings from the APA…

  10. The Impact of CMS Quality on the Outcomes of E-Learning Systems in Higher Education: An Empirical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kihyun; Trimi, Silvana; Park, Hyesung; Rhee, Shanggeun

    2012-01-01

    Course Management Systems (CMSs) in higher education have emerged as one of the most widely adopted e-learning platforms. This study examines the success of e-learning CMSs based on user satisfaction and benefits. Using DeLone and McLean's information system success model as a theoretical framework, we analyze the success of e-learning CMSs in…

  11. The Impact of the Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) to the management of the higher education institutions

    CERN Document Server

    Ganev, P

    1998-01-01

    The paper is aiming to consider the benefits of the using of the newest ICT , that follow for the management of the higher education. The main theme of the forum is directed to the fact that the Higher Education Institutions should be open to innovation and should express a willing to learn. One of the most innovative area is the area of the Information and Communication Technologies. Almost every month is announced a new ICT that facilitates the effectiveness of the management and of the performed business and educational activities at all. That is why the Higher Education Institutions must be open to the innovation and in the field of ICT, because this technology requires special skills and every one that would like to profit from this technology must have a willing to learn. Definitely the higher education institutions should synchronize with the rhythm of the changing technologies, including ICT. They have to consider the changing of the market, they have to meet the business needs. It is obvious that tod...

  12. To Bargain or Govern: The Impact of Yeshiva on Private and Public Sector Collective Bargaining in Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Dena Elliott

    1980-01-01

    The history of excluding supervisory employees from National Labor Relations Board protection is traced and the Yeshiva University case and implications for higher education are outlined. It is concluded that further court action is needed so as not to further undermine the university's effectiveness. (Journal availability: Ohio N. Univ. Law…

  13. The Impact Discounts and the Price-Quality Effect Have on the Choice of an Institution of Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigley, Charles J., Jr.; Bingham, Frank G., Jr.; Notarantonio, Elaine M.; Murray, Keith

    1999-01-01

    A survey of 303 potential college students and their parents found that high price and low price institutions are evaluated higher on quality attributes than are moderately priced institutions. Further, discounts (such as financial aid) were found to have little effect on the attendance decision. Implications for the pricing strategies used by…

  14. The Impact of the Reform of the Italian Higher Education System on the Labour Market for Young Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potestio, Paola

    2014-01-01

    This article assesses the effectiveness of a reform of the higher education system aimed at stimulating employability and faster access to the labour market for Italian graduates. Using the Taylor formula, the evolution of the employment rates has been followed through the movements and interaction of activity and unemployment rates. The progress…

  15. Funding Public Higher Education in Colorado: How Has the College Opportunity Funding Model Impacted Educational Funding and Performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middlemist, George Edward

    2017-01-01

    During the 2004 legislative session, the Colorado General Assembly enacted Senate Bill 189 (SB189), which established the first system of college vouchers in the United States. The supporters of SB189 hoped that the voucher system, called the College Opportunity Fund (COF), would: 1) stabilize the flow of state funding to higher education; 2)…

  16. Higher Education Transformations for Global Competitiveness: Policy Responses, Social Consequences and Impact on the Academic Profession in Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, Ka Ho

    2015-01-01

    Since the mid-1990s, the pressure of globalization and the pressing demands of a knowledge economy led to a series of educational reforms. The focus of these was the promotion of quality education and massification of higher education. After the Asian financial crisis in 1997, the governments in different parts of Asia have implemented…

  17. Explaining participation differentials in Dutch higher education : the impact of subjective success probabilities on level choice and field choice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tolsma, J.; Need, A.; Jong, U. de

    2010-01-01

    In this article we examine whether subjective estimates of success probabilities explain the effect of social origin, sex, and ethnicity on students’ choices between different school tracks in Dutch higher education. The educational options analysed differ in level (i.e. university versus

  18. The SCEC Unified Community Velocity Model (UCVM) Software Framework for Distributing and Querying Seismic Velocity Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maechling, P. J.; Taborda, R.; Callaghan, S.; Shaw, J. H.; Plesch, A.; Olsen, K. B.; Jordan, T. H.; Goulet, C. A.

    2017-12-01

    Crustal seismic velocity models and datasets play a key role in regional three-dimensional numerical earthquake ground-motion simulation, full waveform tomography, modern physics-based probabilistic earthquake hazard analysis, as well as in other related fields including geophysics, seismology, and earthquake engineering. The standard material properties provided by a seismic velocity model are P- and S-wave velocities and density for any arbitrary point within the geographic volume for which the model is defined. Many seismic velocity models and datasets are constructed by synthesizing information from multiple sources and the resulting models are delivered to users in multiple file formats, such as text files, binary files, HDF-5 files, structured and unstructured grids, and through computer applications that allow for interactive querying of material properties. The Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) has developed the Unified Community Velocity Model (UCVM) software framework to facilitate the registration and distribution of existing and future seismic velocity models to the SCEC community. The UCVM software framework is designed to provide a standard query interface to multiple, alternative velocity models, even if the underlying velocity models are defined in different formats or use different geographic projections. The UCVM framework provides a comprehensive set of open-source tools for querying seismic velocity model properties, combining regional 3D models and 1D background models, visualizing 3D models, and generating computational models in the form of regular grids or unstructured meshes that can be used as inputs for ground-motion simulations. The UCVM framework helps researchers compare seismic velocity models and build equivalent simulation meshes from alternative velocity models. These capabilities enable researchers to evaluate the impact of alternative velocity models in ground-motion simulations and seismic hazard analysis applications

  19. The impact of marketization on higher education genres - the international student prospectus as a case in point

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Askehave, Inger

    2007-01-01

    This paper is a contribution to the existing debate about the marketization of higher education and offers a detailed study of the way the practises of marketization manifest themselves at the level of discourse in higher education. Taking its point of departure in Critical Discourse Analysis...... and using a text-driven procedure for genre analysis, the paper describes and analyses the international student prospectus as an instance of a highly promotional genre which clearly reflects the values and forces of the free market. The paper contains two analyses. The first analysis compares four...... instances of the international student prospectus genre from Finland, Scotland, Australia and Japan and tries to establish genre membership and genre characteristics by considering the overall text structure, and by looking for similarities in content and ‘rhetorical moves'. The second analysis is an in...

  20. Higher Education Marketing: A Study on the Impact of Social Media on Study Selection and University Choice.

    OpenAIRE

    Constantinides, Efthymios; Zinck Stagno, M.

    2012-01-01

    The importance of the Internet as commercial platform is by now universally recognized, and businesses increasingly adopt online marketing channels at the cost of traditional ones. The social media, being second generation (Web 2.0) internet applications, allow interaction, one-to-one communication, customer engagement, and user generated content. The interest of higher education institutions in social media as part of the marketing toolkit is increasing, but little is known about the potenti...

  1. Impact of bandwidth for various services in heterogeneous network and quality of service via communication technologies in Malaysian higher educational

    OpenAIRE

    Mohd Nazri ISMAIL; Abdullah Mohd ZIN

    2007-01-01

    This study focuses on heterogeneous services and communication technologies for retrieving and sending information between students and lecturers in Malaysian higher educational institutes. It intends to investigate pattern and significant level of various services implementation, convergence of communication technologies and bandwidth capacity for last mile users (students and lecturers). It is designed to determine which communication technologies, services, bandwidth capacity and QoS will ...

  2. Distinguishing zero-group-velocity modes in photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghebrebrhan, M.; Ibanescu, M.; Johnson, Steven G.; Soljacic, M.; Joannopoulos, J. D.

    2007-01-01

    We examine differences between various zero-group-velocity modes in photonic crystals, including those that arise from Bragg diffraction, anticrossings, and band repulsion. Zero-group velocity occurs at points where the group velocity changes sign, and therefore is conceptually related to 'left-handed' media, in which the group velocity is opposite to the phase velocity. We consider this relationship more quantitatively in terms of the Fourier decomposition of the modes, by defining a measure of how much the ''average'' phase velocity is parallel to the group velocity--an anomalous region is one in which they are mostly antiparallel. We find that this quantity can be used to qualitatively distinguish different zero-group-velocity points. In one dimension, such anomalous regions are found never to occur. In higher dimensions, they are exhibited around certain zero-group-velocity points, and lead to unusual enhanced confinement behavior in microcavities

  3. Modified circular velocity law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djeghloul, Nazim

    2018-05-01

    A modified circular velocity law is presented for a test body orbiting around a spherically symmetric mass. This law exhibits a distance scale parameter and allows to recover both usual Newtonian behaviour for lower distances and a constant velocity limit at large scale. Application to the Galaxy predicts the known behaviour and also leads to a galactic mass in accordance with the measured visible stellar mass so that additional dark matter inside the Galaxy can be avoided. It is also shown that this circular velocity law can be embedded in a geometrical description of spacetime within the standard general relativity framework upon relaxing the usual asymptotic flatness condition. This formulation allows to redefine the introduced Newtonian scale limit in term of the central mass exclusively. Moreover, a satisfactory answer to the galactic escape speed problem can be provided indicating the possibility that one can also get rid of dark matter halo outside the Galaxy.

  4. Electron-impact excitation cross sections of the higher argon 3p5np (n=5,6,7) levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, Tobin; Boffard, John B.; Lin, Chun C.

    2003-01-01

    We have measured the electron-impact excitation cross sections for argon into the ten levels of 3p 5 5p configuration, as well as numerous levels of the 3p 5 6p and 3p 5 7p configurations. Fluorescence from the decay of the excited atoms to the levels of 3p 5 4s configuration was used to determine the optical-emission cross sections. These results were combined with transition probabilities to find apparent cross sections into the 3p 5 5p and 3p 5 6p levels. These new cross sections of the Ar(3p 5 np) levels along with the available Ne(2p 5 3p), Kr(4p 5 5p), and Xe(5p 5 6p) data help provide a global view of the excitation behaviors of the np 5 n ' p levels of the rare-gas series

  5. Ionization and excitation of lithium atoms by fast charged particle impact: identification of mechanisms for double K-shell vacancy production as a function of the projectile charge and velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rangama, J.

    2002-11-01

    Ionization and excitation of lithium atoms by fast charged particle impact: identification of mechanisms for double K-shell vacancy production as a function of projectile charge and velocity. Auger electron spectroscopy is used for an experimental investigation of ionization and excitation of lithium atoms by ions (Kr34 + and Ar18 + ) and electrons at high impact velocities (from 6 to 60 a.u.). In particular, relative contributions of the mechanisms responsible for lithium K-shell ionization-excitation are determined for various projectile charges Zp and velocities vp. A large range of perturbation parameters |Zp|/vp is explored (|Zp|/vp = 0,05 - 0,7 a.u.). From single K-shell excitation results, it appears that the projectile-electron interaction gives mainly rise to a dipole-like transition 1s -> np Concerning K-shell ionization-excitation, the separation of the TS2 (two independent projectile-electron interactions) and TS1 (one projectile-electron interaction) mechanisms responsible for the formation of the 2snp 1,3P and 2sns 1,3S lithium states is performed. In TS1 process, the projectile-electron interaction can be followed by an electron-electron interaction (dielectronic process) or by an internal rearrangement of the residual target after a sudden potential change (shake process). From Born theory, ab initio calculations are performed. The good agreement between theoretical and experimental results confirms the mechanism identification. For the production of P states, TS1 is found to be strongly dominant for small |Zp|/vp values and TS2 is found to be most important for large |Zp|/vp values. Since P states cannot be formed significantly via a shake process, the TS1 and TS2 separation provides a direct signature of the dielectronic process. On the other hand, the TS1 process is shown to be the unique process for producing the S states. At the moment, only the shake aspect of the TS1 process can explain the fact that the 2s3s configuration is preferentially

  6. CT-Based Micro-Mechanical Approach to Predict Response of Closed-Cell Porous Biomaterials to Low-Velocity Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdad Koloushani

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a new numerical approach based on CT-scan images and finite element (FE method has been used to predict the mechanical behavior of closed-cell foams under impact loading. Micro-structural FE models based on CT-scan images of foam specimens (elastic-plastic material model with material constants of bulk aluminum and macro-mechanical FE models (with crushable foam material model with material constants of foams were constructed. Several experimental tests were also conducted to see which of the two noted (micro- or macro- mechanical FE models can better predict the deformation and force-displacement curves of foams. Compared to the macro-structural models, the results of the micro-structural models were much closer to the corresponding experimental results. This can be explained by the fact that the micro-structural models are able to take into account the interaction of stress waves with cell walls and the complex pathways the stress waves have to go through, while the macro-structural models do not have such capabilities. Despite their high demand for computational resources, using micro-scale FE models is very beneficial when one needs to understand the failure mechanisms acting in the micro-structure of a foam in order to modify or diminish them.

  7. The Prescribed Velocity Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm

    The- velocity level in a room ventilated by jet ventilation is strongly influenced by the supply conditions. The momentum flow in the supply jets controls the air movement in the room and, therefore, it is very important that the inlet conditions and the numerical method can generate a satisfactory...

  8. Multidisc neutron velocity selector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosta, L.; Zsigmond, Gy.; Farago, B.; Mezei, F.; Ban, K.; Perendi, J.

    1987-12-01

    The prototype of a velocity selector for neutron monochromatization in the 4-20 A wavelength range is presented. The theoretical background of the multidisc rotor system is given together with a description of the mechanical construction and electronic driving system. The first tests and neutron measurements prove easy handling and excellent parameters. (author) 6 refs.; 7 figs.; 2 tabs

  9. A novel approach for evaluating the impact of fixed variables on photovoltaic (PV) solar installations using enhanced meta data analysis among higher education institutions in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Hoyos, Diane N.

    The global demand for electric energy has continuously increased over the last few decades. Some mature, alternative generation methods are wind, power, photovoltaic panels, biogas and fuel cells. In order to find alternative sources of energy to aid in the reduction of our nation's dependency on non-renewable fuels, energy sources include the use of solar energy panels. The intent of these initiatives is to provide substantial energy savings and reduce dependence on the electrical grid and net metering savings during the peak energy-use hours. The focus of this study explores and provides a clearer picture of the adoption of solar photovoltaic technology in institutions of higher education. It examines the impact of different variables associated with a photovoltaic installation in an institutions of higher education in the United States on the production generations for universities. Secondary data was used with permission from the Advancement of Suitability in Higher Education (AASHE). A multiple regression analysis was performed to determine the impact of different variables on the energy generation production. A Meta Data transformation analysis offered a deeper investigation into the impact of the variables on the photovoltaic installations. Although a review of a significant number of journal articles, dissertations and thesis in the area of photovoltaic solar installations are available, there were limited studies of actual institutions of higher education with the significant volume of institutions. However a study where the database included a significant number of data variables is unique and provides a researcher the opportunity to investigate different facets of a solar installation. The data of the installations ranges from 1993-2015. Included in this observation are the researcher's experience both in the procurement industry and as a team member of a solar institution of higher education in the southern portion of the United States.

  10. Auditory velocity discrimination in the horizontal plane at very high velocities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frissen, Ilja; Féron, François-Xavier; Guastavino, Catherine

    2014-10-01

    We determined velocity discrimination thresholds and Weber fractions for sounds revolving around the listener at very high velocities. Sounds used were a broadband white noise and two harmonic sounds with fundamental frequencies of 330 Hz and 1760 Hz. Experiment 1 used velocities ranging between 288°/s and 720°/s in an acoustically treated room and Experiment 2 used velocities between 288°/s and 576°/s in a highly reverberant hall. A third experiment addressed potential confounds in the first two experiments. The results show that people can reliably discriminate velocity at very high velocities and that both thresholds and Weber fractions decrease as velocity increases. These results violate Weber's law but are consistent with the empirical trend observed in the literature. While thresholds for the noise and 330 Hz harmonic stimulus were similar, those for the 1760 Hz harmonic stimulus were substantially higher. There were no reliable differences in velocity discrimination between the two acoustical environments, suggesting that auditory motion perception at high velocities is robust against the effects of reverberation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Traditional acupuncturists and higher education in Britain: the dual, paradoxical impact of biomedical alignment on the holistic view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Givati, Assaf; Hatton, Kieron

    2015-04-01

    Traditional acupuncturists' quest for external legitimacy in Britain involves the standardization of their knowledge bases through the development of training schools and syllabi, formal educational structures, and, since the 1990s, the teaching of undergraduate courses within (or validated by) Higher Education Institutions (HEIs), a process which entails biomedical alignment of the curriculum. However, as holistic discourses were commonly used as a rhetorical strategy by CAM practitioners to distance themselves from biomedicine and as a source of public appeal, this 'mainstreaming' process evoked practitioners' concerns that their holistic claims are being compromised. An additional challenge is being posed by a group of academics and scientists in Britain who launched an attack on CAM courses taught in HEIs, accusing them of being 'unscientific' and 'non-academic' in nature. This paper explores the negotiation of all these challenges during the formalization of traditional acupuncture education in Britain, with a particular focus on the role of HEIs. The in-depth qualitative investigation draws on several data sets: participant observation in a university validated acupuncture course; in-depth interviews; and documentary analysis. The findings show how, as part of the formalization process, acupuncturists in Britain (re)negotiate their holistic, anti-reductionist discourses and claims in relation to contemporary societal, political and cultural forces. Moreover, the teaching and validation of acupuncture courses by HEIs may contribute to broadening acupuncturists' 'holistic awareness' of societal and cultural influences on individuals' and communities' ill-health. This investigation emphasises the dynamic and context-specific (rather than fixed and essentialized) nature of acupuncture practice and knowledge. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluation of the impact of higher-order energy enhancement characteristics of solitons in strongly dispersion-managed optical fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz-Otero, Francisco J.; Guillán-Lorenzo, Omar; Pedrosa-Rodríguez, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Empirical model describing the pulse energy enhancement required to obtain stable pulses to higher-order polynomial equations • An improvement in the accuracy is obtained through the addition of a new quartic addend dependent on the map strength. • This conclusion is validated through a comparison in a commercial DM soliton submarine network. • The error in the interaction distance for two adjacent pulses in the same channel is of the same order as the energy error - Abstract: We study the propagation properties of nonlinear pulses with periodic evolution in a dispersion-managed transmission link by means of a variational approach. We fit the energy enhancement required for stable propagation of a single soliton in a prototypical commercial link to a polynomial approximation that describes the dependence of the energy on the map strength of the normalized unit cell. We present an improvement of a relatively old and essential result, namely, the dependence of the energy-enhancement factor of dispersion-management solitons with the square of the map strength of the fiber link. We find that adding additional corrections to the conventional quadratic formula up to the fourth order results in an improvement in the accuracy of the description of the numerical results obtained with the variational approximation. Even a small error in the energy is found to introduce large deviations in the pulse parameters during its evolution. The error in the evaluation of the interaction distance between two adjacent time division multiplexed pulses propagating in the same channel in a prototypical submarine link is of the same order as the error in the energy.

  13. Multidisk neutron velocity selectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammouda, B.

    1992-01-01

    Helical multidisk velocity selectors used for neutron scattering applications have been analyzed and tested experimentally. Design and performance considerations are discussed along with simple explanation of the basic concept. A simple progression is used for the inter-disk spacing in the 'Rosta' design. Ray tracing computer investigations are presented in order to assess the 'coverage' (how many absorbing layers are stacked along the path of 'wrong' wavelength neutrons) and the relative number of neutrons absorbed in each disk (and therefore the relative amount of gamma radiation emitted from each disk). We discuss whether a multidisk velocity selector can be operated in the 'reverse' configuration (i.e. the selector is turned by 180 0 around a vertical axis with the rotor spun in the reverse direction). Experimental tests and calibration of a multidisk selector are reported together with evidence that a multidisk selector can be operated in the 'reverse' configuration. (orig.)

  14. Bubble Swarm Rise Velocity in Fluidized Beds.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Punčochář, Miroslav; Růžička, Marek; Šimčík, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 152, OCT 2 (2016), s. 84-94 ISSN 0009-2509 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-05534S Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : bubbling fluidized bed * gas-solid * bubble swarm velocity Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 2.895, year: 2016

  15. The species velocity of trees in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, B. D.; Napier, J.; de Lafontaine, G.; Heath, K.; Li, B.; Hu, F.; Greenberg, J. A.

    2017-12-01

    Anthropogenic climate change has motivated interest in the paleo record to enhance our knowledge about past vegetation responses to climate change and help understand potential responses in the future. Additionally, polar regions currently experience the most rapid rates of climate change globally, prompting concern over changes in the ecological composition of high latitude ecosystems. Recent analyses have attempted to construct methods to estimate a species' ability to track climate change by computing climate velocity; a measure of the rate of climate displacement across a landscape which may indicate the speed an organism must migrate to keep pace with climate change. However, a challenge to using climate velocity in understanding range shifts is a lack of species-specificity in the velocity calculations: climate velocity does not actually use any species data in its analysis. To solve the shortcomings of climate velocity in estimating species displacement rates, we computed the "species velocity" of white spruce, green and grey alder populations across the state of Alaska from the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) to today. Species velocity represents the rate and direction a species is required to migrate to keep pace with a changing climate following the LGM. We used a species distribution model to determine past and present white spruce and alder distributions using statistically downscaled climate data at 60m. Species velocity was then derived from the change in species distribution per year by the change in distribution over Alaska (km/yr). High velocities indicate locations where the species environmental envelope is changing drastically and must disperse rapidly to survive climate change. As a result, high velocity regions are more vulnerable to distribution shifts and higher risk of local extinction. Conversely, low species velocities indicate locations where the local climate envelope is shifting relatively slowly, reducing the stress to disperse quickly

  16. Propagation Velocity of Solid Earth Tides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, S.

    2017-12-01

    One of the significant considerations in most of the geodetic investigations is to take into account the outcome of Solid Earth tides on the location and its consequent impact on the time series of coordinates. In this research work, the propagation velocity resulting from the Solid Earth tides between the Indian stations is computed. Mean daily coordinates for the stations have been computed by applying static precise point positioning technique for a day. The computed coordinates are used as an input for computing the tidal displacements at the stations by Gravity method along three directions at 1-minute interval for 24 hours. Further the baseline distances are computed between four Indian stations. Computation of the propagation velocity for Solid Earth tides can be done by the virtue of study of the concurrent effect of it in-between the stations of identified baseline distance along with the time consumed by the tides for reaching from one station to another. The propagation velocity helps in distinguishing the impact at any station if the consequence at a known station for a specific time-period is known. Thus, with the knowledge of propagation velocity, the spatial and temporal effects of solid earth tides can be estimated with respect to a known station. As theoretically explained, the tides generated are due to the position of celestial bodies rotating about Earth. So the need of study is to observe the correlation of propagation velocity with the rotation speed of the Earth. The propagation velocity of Solid Earth tides comes out to be in the range of 440-470 m/s. This velocity comes out to be in a good agreement with the Earth's rotation speed.

  17. Critical velocities for deflagration and detonation triggered by voids in a REBO high explosive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herring, Stuart Davis [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Germann, Timothy C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jensen, Niels G [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    The effects of circular voids on the shock sensitivity of a two-dimensional model high explosive crystal are considered. We simulate a piston impact using molecular dynamics simulations with a Reactive Empirical Bond Order (REBO) model potential for a sub-micron, sub-ns exothermic reaction in a diatomic molecular solid. The probability of initiating chemical reactions is found to rise more suddenly with increasing piston velocity for larger voids that collapse more deterministically. A void with radius as small as 10 nm reduces the minimum initiating velocity by a factor of 4. The transition at larger velocities to detonation is studied in a micron-long sample with a single void (and its periodic images). The reaction yield during the shock traversal increases rapidly with velocity, then becomes a prompt, reliable detonation. A void of radius 2.5 nm reduces the critical velocity by 10% from the perfect crystal. A Pop plot of the time-to-detonation at higher velocities shows a characteristic pressure dependence.

  18. The electromagnetic rocket gun - a means to reach ultrahigh velocities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winterberg, F.

    1983-01-01

    A novel kind of electromagnetic launcher for the acceleration of multigram-size macroparticles, up to velocities required for impact fusion, is proposed. The novel launcher concept combines the efficiency of a gun with the much higher velocities attainable by a rocket. In the proposed concept a rocket-like projectile is launched inside a gun barrel, drawing its energy from a travelling magnetic wave. The travelling magnetic wave heats and ionizes the exhaust jet of the rocket. As a result, the projectile i propelled both by the recoil from the jet and the magnetic pressure of the travelling magnetic wave. In comparison to magnetic linear accelerators, accelerating either superconducting or ferromagnetic projectiles, the proposed concept has several important advantages. First, the exhaust jet is much longer than the rocket-like projectile and which permits a much longer switching time to turn on the travelling magnetic wave. Second, the proposed concept does not require superconducting projectiles, or projectiles made from expensive ferromagnetic material. Third, unlike in railgun accelerators, the projectile can be kept away from the wall, and thereby can reach much larger velocities. (orig.)

  19. Use of zooming and pulseshaping for acceleration to high velocities and fusion neutron production on the Nike laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasik, Max; Weaver, J. L.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Kehne, D. M.; Zalesak, S. T.; Velikovich, A. L.; Oh, J.; Obenschain, S. P.; Arikawa, Y.

    2011-10-01

    We will present results from follow-on experiments to the record-high velocities of 1000 km/s achieved on Nike [Karasik et al, Phys. Plasmas 17, 056317(2010)], in which highly accelerated planar foils of deuterated polystyrene were made to collide with a witness foil to produce ~ 1 Gbar shock pressures and result in heating of matter to thermonuclear temperatures. Still higher velocities and higher target densities are required for impact fast ignition. The aim of these experiments is using the focal zoom capability of Nike and shaping the driving pulse to minimize shock heating of the accelerated target to achieve higher densities and velocities. In-flight target density is inferred from target heating upon collision via DD neutron time-of-flight ion temperature measurement. Work is supported by US DOE (NNSA) and Office of Naval Research. SAIC

  20. On butterfly effect in higher derivative gravities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alishahiha, Mohsen [School of Physics, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM),P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Davody, Ali; Naseh, Ali; Taghavi, Seyed Farid [School of Particles and Accelerators, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM),P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-11-07

    We study butterfly effect in D-dimensional gravitational theories containing terms quadratic in Ricci scalar and Ricci tensor. One observes that due to higher order derivatives in the corresponding equations of motion there are two butterfly velocities. The velocities are determined by the dimension of operators whose sources are provided by the metric. The three dimensional TMG model is also studied where we get two butterfly velocities at generic point of the moduli space of parameters. At critical point two velocities coincide.

  1. On butterfly effect in higher derivative gravities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alishahiha, Mohsen; Davody, Ali; Naseh, Ali; Taghavi, Seyed Farid

    2016-01-01

    We study butterfly effect in D-dimensional gravitational theories containing terms quadratic in Ricci scalar and Ricci tensor. One observes that due to higher order derivatives in the corresponding equations of motion there are two butterfly velocities. The velocities are determined by the dimension of operators whose sources are provided by the metric. The three dimensional TMG model is also studied where we get two butterfly velocities at generic point of the moduli space of parameters. At critical point two velocities coincide.

  2. High-velocity frictional properties of gabbro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsumi, Akito; Shimamoto, Toshihiko

    High-velocity friction experiments have been performed on a pair of hollow-cylindrical specimens of gabbro initially at room temperature, at slip rates from 7.5 mm/s to 1.8 m/s, with total circumferential displacements of 125 to 174 m, and at normal stresses to 5 MPa, using a rotary-shear high-speed friction testing machine. Steady-state friction increases slightly with increasing slip rate at slip rates to about 100 mm/s (velocity strengthening) and it decreases markedly with increasing slip rate at higher velocities (velocity weakening). Steady-state friction in the velocity weakening regime is lower for the non-melting case than the frictional melting case, due perhaps to severe thermal fracturing. A very large peak friction is always recognized upon the initiation of visible frictional melting, presumably owing to the welding of fault surfaces upon the solidification of melt patches. Frictional properties thus change dramatically with increasing displacement at high velocities, and such a non-linear effect must be incorporated into the analysis of earthquake initiation processes.

  3. Influences of the Air in Metal Powder High Velocity Compaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Jun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available During the process of metal powder high velocity impact compaction, the air is compressed sharply and portion remains in the compacts. In order to study the Influences, a discrete density volleyball accumulation model for aluminium powder was established with the use of ABAQUS. Study found that the powder porosity air obstruct the pressing process because remaining air reduced strength and density of the compacts in the current high-speed pressing (V≤100m/s. When speed further increased (V≥100m/s, the temperature of the air increased sharply, and was even much higher than the melting point of the material. When aluminium powder was compressed at a speed of 200m/s, temperatures of air could reach 2033 K, far higher than the melting point of 877 K. Increased density of powders was a result of local softening and even melt adhesive while air between particles with high temperature and pressure flowed past.

  4. Keynesian multiplier versus velocity of money

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yougui; Xu, Yan; Liu, Li

    2010-08-01

    In this paper we present the relation between Keynesian multiplier and the velocity of money circulation in a money exchange model. For this purpose we modify the original exchange model by constructing the interrelation between income and expenditure. The random exchange yields an agent's income, which along with the amount of money he processed determines his expenditure. In this interactive process, both the circulation of money and Keynesian multiplier effect can be formulated. The equilibrium values of Keynesian multiplier are demonstrated to be closely related to the velocity of money. Thus the impacts of macroeconomic policies on aggregate income can be understood by concentrating solely on the variations of money circulation.

  5. Investigations into the influence of the tup velocity and the heat treatment on the dynamic fracture toughness of Inconel 625

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krompholz, K.; Tipping, P.; Ullrich, G.

    1983-09-01

    Experiments were performed with an instrumented impact machine using different drop heights, on the nickel base alloy Inconel 625 in the as received state and after heat treatment for about 1000 h at 923 K. The absorbed impact energy can be obtained either by the direct dial reading, by the integration of the load versus load point displacement diagram or by the integration of the load versus time diagram, knowing the initial impact velocity of the tup. In all cases the agreement was excellent. It is shown that, (i) the dynamic fracture toughness is dependent on the tup velocity and as a consequence on the total energy of the hammer at the different drop heights; (ii) the embrittlement during heat treatment is not combined with a decrease in the fracture toughness although a strong decrease in the absorbed impact energy is observed; (iii) defining a dynamic stress from the velocity dependence of the fracture toughness, the stress is higher for the embrittled material - a tendency verified by tensile tests; (iv) the dynamic fracture toughness can be correlated with the absorbed impact energy up to the load maximum for the heat treated material while the as received material exhibits no such dependency. The change in the tup velocity during the impact process is only small for this type of material. (Auth.)

  6. Examples of Vector Velocity Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peter M.; Pedersen, Mads M.; Hansen, Kristoffer L.

    2011-01-01

    To measure blood flow velocity in vessels with conventional ultrasound, the velocity is estimated along the direction of the emitted ultrasound wave. It is therefore impossible to obtain accurate information on blood flow velocity and direction, when the angle between blood flow and ultrasound wa...

  7. Critical ionisation velocity effects in astrophysical plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raadu, M.A.

    1979-08-01

    Critical ionisation velocity effects are relevant to astrophysical situations where neutral gas moves through a magnetised plasma. The experimental significance of the critical velocity is well established and the physical basis is now becoming clear. The underlying mechanism depends on the combined effects of electron impact ionisation and electron energisation by collective plasma interactions. For low density plasmas a theory based on a circular process involving electron heating through a modified two stream instability has been developed. Several applications of critical velocity effects to astrophysical plasmas have been discussed in the literature. The importance of the effect in any particular case may be determined from a detailed consideration of energy and momentum balance, using appropriate atomic rate coefficients and taking full account of collective plasma processes. (Auth.)

  8. Characterizing the original ejection velocity field of the Koronis family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carruba, V.; Nesvorný, D.; Aljbaae, S.

    2016-06-01

    An asteroid family forms as a result of a collision between an impactor and a parent body. The fragments with ejection speeds higher than the escape velocity from the parent body can escape its gravitational pull. The cloud of escaping debris can be identified by the proximity of orbits in proper element, or frequency, domains. Obtaining estimates of the original ejection speed can provide valuable constraints on the physical processes occurring during collision, and used to calibrate impact simulations. Unfortunately, proper elements of asteroids families are modified by gravitational and non-gravitational effects, such as resonant dynamics, encounters with massive bodies, and the Yarkovsky effect, such that information on the original ejection speeds is often lost, especially for older, more evolved families. It has been recently suggested that the distribution in proper inclination of the Koronis family may have not been significantly perturbed by local dynamics, and that information on the component of the ejection velocity that is perpendicular to the orbital plane (vW), may still be available, at least in part. In this work we estimate the magnitude of the original ejection velocity speeds of Koronis members using the observed distribution in proper eccentricity and inclination, and accounting for the spread caused by dynamical effects. Our results show that (i) the spread in the original ejection speeds is, to within a 15% error, inversely proportional to the fragment size, and (ii) the minimum ejection velocity is of the order of 50 m/s, with larger values possible depending on the orbital configuration at the break-up.

  9. Surface Velocities and Hydrology at Engabreen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Messerli, Alexandra

    complicates comparisons with other surface-oriented glaciohydrological studies. One major aim of this thesis is to provide a longer record of surface velocity, enabling a more complete understanding of the glacial hydro-mechanical relationship at Engabreen. In order to extend the velocity dataset here, a time...... the lower tongue of Engabreen are analysed in detail alongside the hydro-meteorological time-series. The higher temporal resolution of the GPS allows the effect of short-term hydrological forcings on ice flow to be assessed. Two key events: the spring-speed up event (P1a) and a short-term rain induced event...

  10. On the velocity distributions of granular gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polito, A.M.M.; Rocha Filho, T.M.; Figueiredo, A.

    2009-01-01

    We present a new approach to determine velocity distributions in granular gases to improve the Sonine polynomial expansion of the velocity distribution function, at higher inelasticities, for the homogeneous cooling regime of inelastic hard spheres. The perturbative consistency is recovered using a new set of dynamical variables based on the characteristic function and we illustrate our approach by computing the first four Sonine coefficients for moderate and high inelasticities. The analytical coefficients are compared with molecular dynamics simulations results and with a previous approach by Huthmann et al.

  11. Measuring surface current velocities in the Agulhas region with ASAR

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Rouault, MJ

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available is known to perform well. Although radial velocities derived from ASAR are on occasion able to represent the measured flow with incredible accuracy, the overall performance of the ASAR radial velocity product is negatively impacted by a few very large...

  12. Climate change velocity underestimates climate change exposure in mountainous regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon Z. Dobrowski; Sean A. Parks

    2016-01-01

    Climate change velocity is a vector depiction of the rate of climate displacement used for assessing climate change impacts. Interpreting velocity requires an assumption that climate trajectory length is proportional to climate change exposure; longer paths suggest greater exposure. However, distance is an imperfect measure of exposure because it does not...

  13. Indentation of aluminium foam at low velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Xiaopeng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The indentation behaviour of aluminium foams at low velocity (10 m/s ∼ 30 m/s was investigated both in experiments and numerical simulation in this paper. A flat-ended indenter was used and the force-displacement history was recorded. The Split Hopkinson Pressure bar was used to obtain the indentation velocity and forces in the dynamic experiments. Because of the low strength of the aluminium foam, PMMA bar was used, and the experimental data were corrected using Bacon's method. The energy absorption characteristics varying with impact velocity were then obtained. It was found that the energy absorption ability of aluminium foam gradually increases in the quasi-static regime and shows a significant increase at ∼10 m/s velocity. Numerical simulation was also conducted to investigate this process. A 3D Voronoi model was used and models with different relative densities were investigated as well as those with different failure strain. The indentation energy increases with both the relative density and failure strain. The analysis of the FE model implies that the significant change in energy absorption ability of aluminium foam in indentation at ∼10 m/s velocity may be caused by plastic wave effect.

  14. Temperature dependence of sound velocity in yttrium ferrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L'vov, V.A.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of the phonon-magnon and phonon-phonon interoctions on the temperature dependence of the longitudinal sound velocity in yttrium ferrite is considered. It has been shown that at low temperatures four-particle phonon-magnon processes produce the basic contribution to renormalization of the sound velocity. At higher temperatures the temperature dependence of the sound velocity is mainly defined by phonon-phonon processes

  15. Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Their Parents in the Transition into Higher Education: Impact on Dynamics in the Parent-Child Relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hees, Valérie; Roeyers, Herbert; De Mol, Jan

    2018-05-02

    This study examined how 34 senior students and first-year college students with autism spectrum disorder, their mothers (n = 34) and fathers (n = 26) navigate the higher education transition, and how this context impacts on dynamics in the parent-child relationships. Semi-structured interviews were analyzed based on grounded theory and dyadic analysis principles. Both parties were confronted with an abundance of challenges and experienced strong feelings of ambivalence, stress and anxiety. Differences in perspectives occurred regarding the construction of adulthood, the acquisition of autonomy, disclosure and subscribing to support services. These differences caused tensions in the parent-child relationship, hindering the transformation of the relationship into an adult-like mutual relationship. Clinical implications are extrapolated on the basis of these findings.

  16. Paintball velocity as a function of distance traveled

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pat Chiarawongse

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between the distance a paintball travels through air and its velocity is investigated by firing a paintball into a ballistic pendulum from a range of distances. The motion of the pendulum was filmed and analyzed by using video analysis software. The velocity of the paintball on impact was calculated from the maximum horizontal displacement of the pendulum. It is shown that the velocity of a paintball decreases exponentially with distance traveled, as expected. The average muzzle velocity of the paint balls is found with an estimate of the drag coefficient.

  17. Paintball velocity as a function of distance traveled

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pat Chiarawongse

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between the distance a paintball travels through air and its velocity is investigated by firing a paintball into a ballistic pendulum from a range of distances. The motion of the pendulum was filmed and analyzed by using video analysis software. The velocity of the paintball on impact was calculated from the maximum horizontal displacement of the pendulum. It is shown that the velocity of a paintball decreases exponentially with distance traveled, as expected. The average muzzle velocity of the paint balls is found with an estimate of the drag coefficient

  18. Development of an optimal velocity selection method with velocity obstacle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Geuk; Oh, Jun Ho [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    The Velocity obstacle (VO) method is one of the most well-known methods for local path planning, allowing consideration of dynamic obstacles and unexpected obstacles. Typical VO methods separate a velocity map into a collision area and a collision-free area. A robot can avoid collisions by selecting its velocity from within the collision-free area. However, if there are numerous obstacles near a robot, the robot will have very few velocity candidates. In this paper, a method for choosing optimal velocity components using the concept of pass-time and vertical clearance is proposed for the efficient movement of a robot. The pass-time is the time required for a robot to pass by an obstacle. By generating a latticized available velocity map for a robot, each velocity component can be evaluated using a cost function that considers the pass-time and other aspects. From the output of the cost function, even a velocity component that will cause a collision in the future can be chosen as a final velocity if the pass-time is sufficiently long enough.

  19. A classical model explaining the OPERA velocity paradox

    CERN Document Server

    Broda, Boguslaw

    2011-01-01

    In the context of the paradoxical results of the OPERA Collaboration, we have proposed a classical mechanics model yielding the statistically measured velocity of a beam higher than the velocity of the particles constituting the beam. Ingredients of our model necessary to obtain this curious result are a non-constant fraction function and the method of the maximum-likelihood estimation.

  20. Higher Education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kunle Amuwo: Higher Education Transformation: A Paradigm Shilt in South Africa? ... ty of such skills, especially at the middle management levels within the higher ... istics and virtues of differentiation and diversity. .... may be forced to close shop for lack of capacity to attract ..... necessarily lead to racial and gender equity,.

  1. The effect of cyanotic and acyanotic congenital heart disease on children’s growth velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewi Awaliyah Ulfah

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Congenital heart disease (CHD can lead to failure to thrive. Decreased energy intake, malabsorption, increased energy requirements, and decreased growth factors (growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor 1 axis are related to malnutrition and growth retardation in children with CHD. Objective Tocompare the impact of cyanotic and acyanotic CHD on children’s growth velocity (using the 2009 WHO growth velocity chart. Methods This study was conducted in patients less than 24 months of age with CHD in the Pediatric Cardiology Specialist Unit Dr. Moewardi Hospital, Surakarta, Central Java, from December 2016 to February 2017. Subjects’ weights were evaluated at the beginning of the study and two months later. Data were compared to the WHO Growth Velocity chart and analyzed by Chi-square test. Results Of 46 patients with CHD (23 cyanotic, 23 acyanotic, 10 patients (21.7% were identified with failure to thrive, i.e., 5th percentile for growth velocity than were children with cyanotic CHD (OR 5.600; 95%CI 1.038 to 30.204; P=0.032. Acute upper respiratory tract infection was not significantly associated with growth velocity (OR 2.273; 95%CI 0.545 to 9.479; P=0.253. Conclusion Children with cyanotic CHD have 5.6 times higher risk of failure to thrive than children with acyanotic CHD.

  2. Preferred Air Velocity and Local Cooling Effect of desk fans in warm environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simone, Angela; Olesen, Bjarne W.

    2013-01-01

    to compensate for higher environmental temperatures at the expense of no or relatively low energy consumption. When using desk fans, local air movement is generated around the occupant and a certain cooling effect is perceived. The impact of the local air movement generated by different air flow patterns......Common experiences, standards, and laboratory studies show that increased air velocity helps to offset warm sensation due to high environmental temperatures. In warm climate regions the opening of windows and the use of desk or ceiling fans are the most common systems to generate increased airflows......, and the possibility to keep comfortable conditions for the occupants in warm environments were evaluated in studies with human subjects. In an office-like climatic chamber, the effect of higher air velocity was investigated at room temperatures between 26°C to 34°C and at constant absolute humidity of 12.2 g...

  3. Control rod velocity limiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cearley, J.E.; Carruth, J.C.; Dixon, R.C.; Spencer, S.S.; Zuloaga, J.A. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    This patent describes a velocity control arrangement for a reciprocable, vertically oriented control rod for use in a nuclear reactor in a fluid medium, the control rod including a drive hub secured to and extending from one end therefrom. The control device comprises: a toroidally shaped control member spaced from and coaxially positioned around the hub and secured thereto by a plurality of spaced radial webs thereby providing an annular passage for fluid intermediate the hub and the toroidal member spaced therefrom in coaxial position. The side of the control member toward the control rod has a smooth generally conical surface. The side of the control member away from the control rod is formed with a concave surface constituting a single annular groove. The device also comprises inner and outer annular vanes radially spaced from one another and spaced from the side of the control member away from the control rod and positioned coaxially around and spaced from the hub and secured thereto by spaced radial webs thereby providing an annular passage for fluid intermediate the hub and the vanes. The vanes are angled toward the control member, the outer edge of the inner vane being closer to the control member and the inner edge of the outer vane being closer to the control member. When the control rod moves in the fluid in the direction toward the drive hub the vanes direct a flow of fluid turbulence which provides greater resistance to movement of the control rod in the direction toward the drive hub than in the other direction

  4. Velocity Dispersions Across Bulge Types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabricius, Maximilian; Bender, Ralf; Hopp, Ulrich; Saglia, Roberto; Drory, Niv; Fisher, David

    2010-01-01

    We present first results from a long-slit spectroscopic survey of bulge kinematics in local spiral galaxies. Our optical spectra were obtained at the Hobby-Eberly Telescope with the LRS spectrograph and have a velocity resolution of 45 km/s (σ*), which allows us to resolve the velocity dispersions in the bulge regions of most objects in our sample. We find that the velocity dispersion profiles in morphological classical bulge galaxies are always centrally peaked while the velocity dispersion of morphologically disk-like bulges stays relatively flat towards the center--once strongly barred galaxies are discarded.

  5. On linear relationship between shock velocity and particle velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dandache, H.

    1986-11-01

    We attempt to derive the linear relationship between shock velocity U s and particle velocity U p from thermodynamic considerations, taking into account an ideal gas equation of state and a Mie-Grueneisen equation of state for solids. 23 refs

  6. Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    & Development (LDRD) National Security Education Center (NSEC) Office of Science Programs Richard P Databases National Security Education Center (NSEC) Center for Nonlinear Studies Engineering Institute Scholarships STEM Education Programs Teachers (K-12) Students (K-12) Higher Education Regional Education

  7. Gender and Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bank, Barbara J., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    This comprehensive, encyclopedic review explores gender and its impact on American higher education across historical and cultural contexts. Challenging recent claims that gender inequities in U.S. higher education no longer exist, the contributors--leading experts in the field--reveal the many ways in which gender is embedded in the educational…

  8. Ice Velocity Variations of the Polar Record Glacier (East Antarctica Using a Rotation-Invariant Feature-Tracking Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingting Liu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the ice velocity changes from 2004 to 2015 of the Polar Record Glacier (PRG in East Antarctica were investigated based on a feature-tracking method using Landsat-7 enhanced thematic mapper plus (ETM+ and Landsat-8 operational land imager (OLI images. The flow field of the PRG curves make it difficult to generate ice velocities in some areas using the traditional normalized cross-correlation (NCC-based feature-tracking method. Therefore, a rotation-invariant parameter from scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT is introduced to build a novel rotation-invariant feature-tracking approach. The validation was performed based on multi-source images and the making earth system data records for use in research environments (MEaSUREs interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR-based Antarctica ice velocity map data set. The results indicate that the proposed method is able to measure the ice velocity in more areas and performs as well as the traditional NCC-based feature-tracking method. The sequential ice velocities obtained present the variations in the PRG during this period. Although the maximum ice velocity of the frontal margin of the PRG and the frontal iceberg reached about 900 m/a and 1000 m/a, respectively, the trend from 2004 to 2015 showed no significant change. Under the interaction of the Polar Times Glacier and the Polarforschung Glacier, both the direction and the displacement of the PRG were influenced. This impact also led to higher velocities in the western areas of the PRG than in the eastern areas. In addition, elevation changes and frontal iceberg calving also impacted the ice velocity of the PRG.

  9. Surface Wave Velocity-Stress Relationship in Uniaxially Loaded Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shokouhi, Parisa; Zoëga, Andreas; Wiggenhauser, Herbert

    2012-01-01

    The sonic surface wave (or Rayleigh wave) velocity measured on prismatic concrete specimens under uniaxial compression was found to be highly stress-dependent. At low stress levels, the acoustoelastic effect and the closure of existing microcracks results in a gradual increase in surface wave...... velocities. At higher stress levels, concrete suffers irrecoverable damage: the existing microcracks widen and coalesce and new microcracks form. This progressive damage process leads first to the flattening and eventually the drop in the velocity-stress curves. Measurements on specimens undergoing several...... loading cycles revealed that the velocities show a stress-memory effect in good agreement with the Kaiser effect. Comparing the velocities measured during loading and unloading, the effects of stress and damage on the measured velocities could be differentiated. Moreover, the stress dependency of surface...

  10. Doppler velocity measurements from large and small arteries of mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Anilkumar K.; Madala, Sridhar; Entman, Mark L.; Michael, Lloyd H.; Taffet, George E.

    2011-01-01

    With the growth of genetic engineering, mice have become increasingly common as models of human diseases, and this has stimulated the development of techniques to assess the murine cardiovascular system. Our group has developed nonimaging and dedicated Doppler techniques for measuring blood velocity in the large and small peripheral arteries of anesthetized mice. We translated technology originally designed for human vessels for use in smaller mouse vessels at higher heart rates by using higher ultrasonic frequencies, smaller transducers, and higher-speed signal processing. With these methods one can measure cardiac filling and ejection velocities, velocity pulse arrival times for determining pulse wave velocity, peripheral blood velocity and vessel wall motion waveforms, jet velocities for the calculation of the pressure drop across stenoses, and left main coronary velocity for the estimation of coronary flow reserve. These noninvasive methods are convenient and easy to apply, but care must be taken in interpreting measurements due to Doppler sample volume size and angle of incidence. Doppler methods have been used to characterize and evaluate numerous cardiovascular phenotypes in mice and have been particularly useful in evaluating the cardiac and vascular remodeling that occur following transverse aortic constriction. Although duplex ultrasonic echo-Doppler instruments are being applied to mice, dedicated Doppler systems are more suitable for some applications. The magnitudes and waveforms of blood velocities from both cardiac and peripheral sites are similar in mice and humans, such that much of what is learned using Doppler technology in mice may be translated back to humans. PMID:21572013

  11. Particle velocity measurements in laser irradiated foils using ORVIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheffield, S.A.; Fisk, G.A.

    1983-01-01

    Aluminum foils from 2- to 200-μm thick have been subjected to a Nd:YAG laser pulse of low irradiance (10 9 W/cm 2 , approx. 10 ns pulse) to produce laser-driven shocks in the foils. The particle velocity history of the foil side opposite the laser deposition was monitored with nanosecond resolution by a velocity interferometer system called ORVIS. These histories indicate a shock reverberation process accelerates the foil. Peak foil velocities can be adequately calculated using a ricket propulsion model developed from experiments at much higher irradiances. A velocity of 1 km/s was developed in a 2-μm-thick free foil in a time of 50 ns. Water-confined foils attained peak particle velocities about three times higher than those of free foils

  12. Introduction to vector velocity imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Udesen, Jesper; Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov

    Current ultrasound scanners can only estimate the velocity along the ultrasound beam and this gives rise to the cos() factor on all velocity estimates. This is a major limitation as most vessels are close to perpendicular to the beam. Also the angle varies as a function of space and time making ...

  13. The Impacts of Adopting Active Methods in the Performance of Accounting Students at a Higher Education Institution in the State of Minas Gerais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cicero Jose Oliveira Guerra

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The scientific community has discussed a reformulation in education in order to meet new goals in the learning processes. It is a challenge for universities to modify their social role by adding new teaching methods in their undergraduate programs to fit into this current context. The motivation of this study is to verify if the adoption of active teaching methods in the Accounting course at a private Higher Education Institution located in the region of the Zona da Mata, State of Minas Gerais, contributed to the performance of its students. In this research, performance is characterized at the improvement in students' grades. The active methods, in response to this educational reformulation, are concerned with preparing a critical student, capable of acting in the contemporary market, subject to constant changes. The study period covers the years between 2011 and 2014. We sought to answer the following question: Is there an impact on the performance of accounting students after the implementation of active methods at the HEI investigated? To test the proposed hypothesis, we used Student's T test and regression methods. The analyzed data were collected from documents provided by the institution's employees. The results show that there is evidence that the use of active methods in the accounting course contributed to the students' performance in the period studied.

  14. Factores que inciden en el financiamiento de los estudios Universitarios en Chile Factors that impact on funding for higher education in Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Schmal

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available El artículo da cuenta de los principales factores que inciden en el financiamiento de los estudios universitarios en Chile, exponiéndose los fundamentos y relaciones de un modelo para estimar el volumen de los recursos comprometidos y sus opciones de provisión. En las últimas dos década el mercado universitario ha duplicando su masa de estudiantes fenómeno que continuará por esta senda, implicando serias presiones sobre el financiamiento público, en un sistema que ya tiene una elevada participación financiera privada. El modelo que se propone apunta a proveer un enfoque sistémico para abordar la problemática planteada.The article covers the main factors that impact on funding higher education in Chile, presenting the fundaments and relations of a model to estimate the volume of resources committed and options for provision. In the last two decades the university market has doubled its total of students - a phenomenon that should continue, entailing serious pressures on public funding. The model proposed here points to a systems approach to the problem.

  15. Diffraction imaging and velocity analysis using oriented velocity continuation

    KAUST Repository

    Decker, Luke

    2014-08-05

    We perform seismic diffraction imaging and velocity analysis by separating diffractions from specular reflections and decomposing them into slope components. We image slope components using extrapolation in migration velocity in time-space-slope coordinates. The extrapolation is described by a convection-type partial differential equation and implemented efficiently in the Fourier domain. Synthetic and field data experiments show that the proposed algorithm is able to detect accurate time-migration velocities by automatically measuring the flatness of events in dip-angle gathers.

  16. Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrickson, Robert M.

    This chapter reports 1982 cases involving aspects of higher education. Interesting cases noted dealt with the federal government's authority to regulate state employees' retirement and raised the questions of whether Title IX covers employment, whether financial aid makes a college a program under Title IX, and whether sex segregated mortality…

  17. Radial velocity asymmetries from jets with variable velocity profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerqueira, A. H.; Vasconcelos, M. J.; Velazquez, P. F.; Raga, A. C.; De Colle, F.

    2006-01-01

    We have computed a set of 3-D numerical simulations of radiatively cooling jets including variabilities in both the ejection direction (precession) and the jet velocity (intermittence), using the Yguazu-a code. In order to investigate the effects of jet rotation on the shape of the line profiles, we also introduce an initial toroidal rotation velocity profile. Since the Yguazu-a code includes an atomic/ionic network, we are able to compute the emission coefficients for several emission lines, and we generate line profiles for the Hα, [O I]λ6300, [S II]λ6716 and [N II]λ6548 lines. Using initial parameters that are suitable for the DG Tau microjet, we show that the computed radial velocity shift for the medium-velocity component of the line profile as a function of distance from the jet axis is strikingly similar for rotating and non-rotating jet models

  18. Production Function Analysis in Higher Education: General Methodology and Applications to Four Year Black Colleges: Appendix G. The Development of Institutions of Higher Education: Theory and Assessment of Impact of Four Possible Areas of Federal Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weathersby, George B.; Trueheart, William E.

    Many colleges and universities have claimed some degree of financial distress, have sought increased federal, state, and philanthropic assistance, and have agonized over predicted declines in youth demand for higher education. In response to these concerns, numerous cost studies have been conducted but little is known of the relative efficiency of…

  19. Fractals control in particle's velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yongping; Liu Shutang; Shen Shulan

    2009-01-01

    Julia set, a fractal set of the literature of nonlinear physics, has significance for the engineering applications. For example, the fractal structure characteristics of the generalized M-J set could visually reflect the change rule of particle's velocity. According to the real world requirement, the system need show various particle's velocity in some cases. Thus, the control of the nonlinear behavior, i.e., Julia set, has attracted broad attention. In this work, an auxiliary feedback control is introduced to effectively control the Julia set that visually reflects the change rule of particle's velocity. It satisfies the performance requirement of the real world problems.

  20. Southern high-velocity stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Augensen, H.J.; Buscombe, W.

    1978-01-01

    Using the model of the Galaxy presented by Eggen, Lynden-Bell and Sandage (1962), plane galactic orbits have been calculated for 800 southern high-velocity stars which possess parallax, proper motion, and radial velocity data. The stars with trigonometric parallaxes were selected from Buscombe and Morris (1958), supplemented by more recent spectroscopic data. Photometric parallaxes from infrared color indices were used for bright red giants studied by Eggen (1970), and for red dwarfs for which Rodgers and Eggen (1974) determined radial velocities. A color-color diagram based on published values of (U-B) and (B-V) for most of these stars is shown. (Auth.)

  1. Impacts of Perinatal Dioxin Exposure on Motor Coordination and Higher Cognitive Development in Vietnamese Preschool Children: A Five-Year Follow-Up.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nghi Ngoc Tran

    Full Text Available Dioxin concentrations remain elevated in the environment and in humans residing near former US Air Force bases in South Vietnam. Our previous epidemiological studies showed adverse effects of dioxin exposure on neurodevelopment for the first 3 years of life. Subsequently, we extended the follow-up period and investigated the influence of perinatal dioxin exposure on neurodevelopment, including motor coordination and higher cognitive ability, in preschool children. Presently, we investigated 176 children in a hot spot of dioxin contamination who were followed up from birth until 5 years old. Perinatal dioxin exposure levels were estimated by measuring dioxin levels in maternal breast milk. Dioxin toxicity was evaluated using two indices; toxic equivalent (TEQ-polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/furans (PCDDs/Fs and concentration of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD. Coordinated movements, including manual dexterity, aiming and catching, and balance, were assessed using the Movement Assessment Battery for Children, Second Edition (Movement ABC-2. Cognitive ability was assessed using the nonverbal index (NVI of the Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children, Second Edition (KABC-II. In boys, total test and balance scores of Movement ABC-2 were significantly lower in the high TEQ- PCDDs/Fs group compared with the moderate and low exposure groups. NVI scores and the pattern reasoning subscale of the KABC-II indicating planning ability were also significantly lower in the high TCDD exposure group compared with the low exposure group of boys. However, in girls, no significant differences in Movement ABC-2 and KABC-II scores were found among the different TEQ-PCDDs/Fs and TCDD exposure groups. Furthermore, in high risk cases, five boys and one girl highly exposed to TEQ-PCDDs/Fs and TCDD had double the risk for difficulties in both neurodevelopmental skills. These results suggest differential impacts of TEQ-PCDDs/Fs and TCDD exposure on motor

  2. Impacts of Perinatal Dioxin Exposure on Motor Coordination and Higher Cognitive Development in Vietnamese Preschool Children: A Five-Year Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Nghi Ngoc; Pham, Tai The; Ozawa, Kyoko; Nishijo, Muneko; Nguyen, Anh Thi Nguyet; Tran, Tuong Quy; Hoang, Luong Van; Tran, Anh Hai; Phan, Vu Huy Anh; Nakai, Akio; Nishino, Yoshikazu; Nishijo, Hisao

    2016-01-01

    Dioxin concentrations remain elevated in the environment and in humans residing near former US Air Force bases in South Vietnam. Our previous epidemiological studies showed adverse effects of dioxin exposure on neurodevelopment for the first 3 years of life. Subsequently, we extended the follow-up period and investigated the influence of perinatal dioxin exposure on neurodevelopment, including motor coordination and higher cognitive ability, in preschool children. Presently, we investigated 176 children in a hot spot of dioxin contamination who were followed up from birth until 5 years old. Perinatal dioxin exposure levels were estimated by measuring dioxin levels in maternal breast milk. Dioxin toxicity was evaluated using two indices; toxic equivalent (TEQ)-polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/furans (PCDDs/Fs) and concentration of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Coordinated movements, including manual dexterity, aiming and catching, and balance, were assessed using the Movement Assessment Battery for Children, Second Edition (Movement ABC-2). Cognitive ability was assessed using the nonverbal index (NVI) of the Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children, Second Edition (KABC-II). In boys, total test and balance scores of Movement ABC-2 were significantly lower in the high TEQ- PCDDs/Fs group compared with the moderate and low exposure groups. NVI scores and the pattern reasoning subscale of the KABC-II indicating planning ability were also significantly lower in the high TCDD exposure group compared with the low exposure group of boys. However, in girls, no significant differences in Movement ABC-2 and KABC-II scores were found among the different TEQ-PCDDs/Fs and TCDD exposure groups. Furthermore, in high risk cases, five boys and one girl highly exposed to TEQ-PCDDs/Fs and TCDD had double the risk for difficulties in both neurodevelopmental skills. These results suggest differential impacts of TEQ-PCDDs/Fs and TCDD exposure on motor coordination and

  3. Flood Water Crossing: Laboratory Model Investigations for Water Velocity Reductions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasnon N.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of floods may give a negative impact towards road traffic in terms of difficulties in mobilizing traffic as well as causing damage to the vehicles, which later cause them to be stuck in the traffic and trigger traffic problems. The high velocity of water flows occur when there is no existence of objects capable of diffusing the water velocity on the road surface. The shape, orientation and size of the object to be placed beside the road as a diffuser are important for the effective flow attenuation of water. In order to investigate the water flow, a laboratory experiment was set up and models were constructed to study the flow velocity reduction. The velocity of water before and after passing through the diffuser objects was investigated. This paper focuses on laboratory experiments to determine the flow velocity of the water using sensors before and after passing through two best diffuser objects chosen from a previous flow pattern experiment.

  4. Dispersion upscaling from a pore scale characterization of Lagrangian velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turuban, Régis; de Anna, Pietro; Jiménez-Martínez, Joaquín; Tabuteau, Hervé; Méheust, Yves; Le Borgne, Tanguy

    2013-04-01

    Mixing and reactive transport are primarily controlled by the interplay between diffusion, advection and reaction at pore scale. Yet, how the distribution and spatial correlation of the velocity field at pore scale impact these processes is still an open question. Here we present an experimental investigation of the distribution and correlation of pore scale velocities and its relation with upscaled dispersion. We use a quasi two-dimensional (2D) horizontal set up, consisting of two glass plates filled with cylinders representing the grains of the porous medium : the cell is built by soft lithography technique, wich allows for full control of the system geometry. The local velocity field is quantified from particle tracking velocimetry using microspheres that are advected with the pore scale flow. Their displacement is purely advective, as the particle size is chosen large enough to avoid diffusion. We thus obtain particle trajectories as well as lagrangian velocities in the entire system. The measured velocity field shows the existence of a network of preferential flow paths in channels with high velocities, as well as very low velocity in stagnation zones, with a non Gaussian distribution. Lagrangian velocities are long range correlated in time, which implies a non-fickian scaling of the longitudinal variance of particle positions. To upscale this process we develop an effective transport model, based on correlated continous time random walk, which is entirely parametrized by the pore scale velocity distribution and correlation. The model predictions are compared with conservative tracer test data for different Peclet numbers. Furthermore, we investigate the impact of different pore geometries on the distribution and correlation of Lagrangian velocities and we discuss the link between these properties and the effective dispersion behavior.

  5. Sound Velocity in Soap Foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Gong-Tao; Lü Yong-Jun; Liu Peng-Fei; Li Yi-Ning; Shi Qing-Fan

    2012-01-01

    The velocity of sound in soap foams at high gas volume fractions is experimentally studied by using the time difference method. It is found that the sound velocities increase with increasing bubble diameter, and asymptotically approach to the value in air when the diameter is larger than 12.5 mm. We propose a simple theoretical model for the sound propagation in a disordered foam. In this model, the attenuation of a sound wave due to the scattering of the bubble wall is equivalently described as the effect of an additional length. This simplicity reasonably reproduces the sound velocity in foams and the predicted results are in good agreement with the experiments. Further measurements indicate that the increase of frequency markedly slows down the sound velocity, whereas the latter does not display a strong dependence on the solution concentration

  6. Settling velocities in batch sedimentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fricke, A.M.; Thompson, B.E.

    1982-10-01

    The sedimentation of mixtures containing one and two sizes of spherical particles (44 and 62 μm in diameter) was studied. Radioactive tracing with 57 Co was used to measure the settling velocities. The ratio of the settling velocity U of uniformly sized particles to the velocity predicted to Stokes' law U 0 was correlated to an expression of the form U/U 0 = epsilon/sup α/, where epsilon is the liquid volume fraction and α is an empirical constant, determined experimentally to be 4.85. No effect of viscosity on the ratio U/U 0 was observed as the viscosity of the liquid medium was varied from 1x10 -3 to 5x10 -3 Pa.s. The settling velocities of particles in a bimodal mixture were fit by the same correlation; the ratio U/U 0 was independent of the concentrations of different-sized particles

  7. Free-surface velocity measurements using an optically recording velocity interferometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Jianxin; Wang Zhao; Liang Jing; Shan Yusheng; Zhou Chuangzhi; Xiang Yihuai; Lu Ze; Tang Xiuzhang

    2006-01-01

    An optically recording velocity interferometer system (ORVIS) was developed for the free-surface velocity measurements in the equation of state experiments. The time history of free-surface velocity could be recorded by the electronic streak camera. In the experiments, ORVIS got a 179 ps time resolution, and a higher time resolution could be got by minimizing the delay time. The equation of state experiments were carried out on the high power excimer laser system called 'Heaven I' with laser wavelength of 248.4 nm, pulse duration of 25 ns and maximum energy 158 J. Free-surface velocity of 20 μm thick iron got 3.86 km/s with laser intensity of 6.24 x 10 11 W·cm -2 , and free-surface velocity of 100 μm thick aluminum with 100 μm CH foil at the front got 2.87 km/s with laser intensity 7.28 x 10 11 W·cm -2 . (authors)

  8. Online Wavelet Complementary velocity Estimator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righettini, Paolo; Strada, Roberto; KhademOlama, Ehsan; Valilou, Shirin

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, we have proposed a new online Wavelet Complementary velocity Estimator (WCE) over position and acceleration data gathered from an electro hydraulic servo shaking table. This is a batch estimator type that is based on the wavelet filter banks which extract the high and low resolution of data. The proposed complementary estimator combines these two resolutions of velocities which acquired from numerical differentiation and integration of the position and acceleration sensors by considering a fixed moving horizon window as input to wavelet filter. Because of using wavelet filters, it can be implemented in a parallel procedure. By this method the numerical velocity is estimated without having high noise of differentiators, integration drifting bias and with less delay which is suitable for active vibration control in high precision Mechatronics systems by Direct Velocity Feedback (DVF) methods. This method allows us to make velocity sensors with less mechanically moving parts which makes it suitable for fast miniature structures. We have compared this method with Kalman and Butterworth filters over stability, delay and benchmarked them by their long time velocity integration for getting back the initial position data. Copyright © 2017 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Streaming Velocities and the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazek, Jonathan A; McEwen, Joseph E; Hirata, Christopher M

    2016-03-25

    At the epoch of decoupling, cosmic baryons had supersonic velocities relative to the dark matter that were coherent on large scales. These velocities subsequently slow the growth of small-scale structure and, via feedback processes, can influence the formation of larger galaxies. We examine the effect of streaming velocities on the galaxy correlation function, including all leading-order contributions for the first time. We find that the impact on the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) peak is dramatically enhanced (by a factor of ∼5) over the results of previous investigations, with the primary new effect due to advection: if a galaxy retains memory of the primordial streaming velocity, it does so at its Lagrangian, rather than Eulerian, position. Since correlations in the streaming velocity change rapidly at the BAO scale, this advection term can cause a significant shift in the observed BAO position. If streaming velocities impact tracer density at the 1% level, compared to the linear bias, the recovered BAO scale is shifted by approximately 0.5%. This new effect, which is required to preserve Galilean invariance, greatly increases the importance of including streaming velocities in the analysis of upcoming BAO measurements and opens a new window to the astrophysics of galaxy formation.

  10. Doppler Lidar Vertical Velocity Statistics Value-Added Product

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newsom, R. K. [DOE ARM Climate Research Facility, Washington, DC (United States); Sivaraman, C. [DOE ARM Climate Research Facility, Washington, DC (United States); Shippert, T. R. [DOE ARM Climate Research Facility, Washington, DC (United States); Riihimaki, L. D. [DOE ARM Climate Research Facility, Washington, DC (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Accurate height-resolved measurements of higher-order statistical moments of vertical velocity fluctuations are crucial for improved understanding of turbulent mixing and diffusion, convective initiation, and cloud life cycles. The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility operates coherent Doppler lidar systems at several sites around the globe. These instruments provide measurements of clear-air vertical velocity profiles in the lower troposphere with a nominal temporal resolution of 1 sec and height resolution of 30 m. The purpose of the Doppler lidar vertical velocity statistics (DLWSTATS) value-added product (VAP) is to produce height- and time-resolved estimates of vertical velocity variance, skewness, and kurtosis from these raw measurements. The VAP also produces estimates of cloud properties, including cloud-base height (CBH), cloud frequency, cloud-base vertical velocity, and cloud-base updraft fraction.

  11. Systematic review and meta-analysis links autism and toxic metals and highlights the impact of country development status: Higher blood and erythrocyte levels for mercury and lead, and higher hair antimony, cadmium, lead, and mercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saghazadeh, Amene; Rezaei, Nima

    2017-10-03

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a heterogeneous neurodevelopmental disorder that affects cognitive and higher cognitive functions. Increasing prevalence of ASD and high rates of related comorbidities has caused serious health loss and placed an onerous burden on the supporting families, caregivers, and health care services. Heavy metals are among environmental factors that may contribute to ASD. However, due to inconsistencies across studies, it is still hard to explain the association between ASD and toxic metals. Therefore the objective of this study was to investigate the difference in heavy metal measures between patients with ASD and control subjects. We included observational studies that measured levels of toxic metals (antimony, arsenic, cadmium, lead, manganese, mercury, nickel, silver, and thallium) in different specimens (whole blood, plasma, serum, red cells, hair and urine) for patients with ASD and for controls. The main electronic medical database (PubMed and Scopus) were searched from inception through October 2016. 52 studies were eligible to be included in the present systematic review, of which 48 studies were included in the meta-analyses. The hair concentrations of antimony (standardized mean difference (SMD)=0.24; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.03 to 0.45) and lead (SMD=0.60; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.17 to 1.03) in ASD patients were significantly higher than those of control subjects. ASD patients had higher erythrocyte levels of lead (SMD=1.55, CI: 0.2 to 2.89) and mercury (SMD=1.56, CI: 0.42 to 2.70). There were significantly higher blood lead levels in ASD patients (SMD=0.43, CI: 0.02 to 0.85). Sensitivity analyses showed that ASD patients in developed but not in developing countries have lower hair concentrations of cadmium (SMD=-0.29, CI: -0.46 to -0.12). Also, such analyses indicated that ASD patients in developing but not in developed lands have higher hair concentrations of lead (SMD=1.58, CI: 0.80 to 2.36) and mercury (SMD=0

  12. Estimated carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity has similar predictive value as measured carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Sara V; Blicher, Marie K; Kruger, Ruan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) adds significantly to traditional cardiovascular risk prediction, but is not widely available. Therefore, it would be helpful if cfPWV could be replaced by an estimated carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (ePWV) using age and mean blood pres...... that these traditional risk scores have underestimated the complicated impact of age and blood pressure on arterial stiffness and cardiovascular risk....

  13. The relationship of seismic velocity structure and surface fracture characteristics of basalt outcrops to rippability estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kay, S.E.; Dougherty, M.E.; Pelton, J.R.

    1994-01-01

    Seismic velocity has been shown in previous engineering studies to be related to the fracture characteristics and rippability of rock outcrops. However, common methods of measuring seismic velocity in outcrops do not take into account the many possible travel paths for wave propagation and the fact that velocity zones may exist within an outcrop. Presented here are the results of using raytracing inversion of first-arrival travel-time data to map P-velocity structure in basalt outcrops, and also the investigation of the relationship of the mapped velocities to observed surface fractures and hand-sample P-velocities. It is shown that basalt outcrops commonly consist of an irregular near-surface low-velocity zone underlain by higher velocity material; that velocity gradients can exist in outcrops; that hand-sample velocity measurements are typically higher than outcrop-scale measurements; and that the characteristics of surface fractures are empirically related to near-surface P-velocity. All of these findings are relevant to the estimated rippability of rock in geotechnical engineering. The data for this study are derived from eleven sites on basalt outcrops of the Troodos Ophiolite in Cyprus. The basalt types include pillow basalts, massive flows, and a pillow breccia. A commonly available raytracing inversion program (RAYINVR) was used to produce a velocity profile of each outcrop. Different velocity zones were detailed by inverting observed travel times to produce a model of outcrop velocity structure which produces rippability profiles for each outcrop. 16 refs., 9 figs

  14. Spatially-resolved velocities of thermally-produced spray droplets using a velocity-divided Abel inversion of photographed streaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Y.; Kobayashi, N.; Yamagata, Y.; Miyazaki, F.; Yamasaki, M.; Muraoka, K.

    2017-10-01

    Droplet velocities of thermal spray are known to have profound effects on important coating qualities, such as adhesive strength, porosity, and hardness, for various applications. For obtaining the droplet velocities, therefore, the TOF (time-of-flight) technique has been widely used, which relies on observations of emitted radiation from the droplets, where all droplets along the line-of-sight contribute to signals. Because droplets at and near the flow axis mostly contribute coating layers, it has been hoped to get spatially resolved velocities. For this purpose, a velocity-divided Abel inversion was devised from CMOS photographic data. From this result, it has turned out that the central velocity is about 25% higher than that obtained from the TOF technique for the case studied (at the position 150 mm downstream of the plasma spray gun, where substrates for spray coatings are usually placed). Further implications of the obtained results are discussed.

  15. Phase velocity enhancement of linear explosive shock tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loiseau, Jason; Serge, Matthew; Szirti, Daniel; Higgins, Andrew; Tanguay, Vincent

    2011-06-01

    Strong, high density shocks can be generated by sequentially detonating a hollow cylinder of explosives surrounding a thin-walled, pressurized tube. Implosion of the tube results in a pinch that travels at the detonation velocity of the explosive and acts like a piston to drive a shock into the gas ahead of it. In order to increase the maximum shock velocities that can be obtained, a phase velocity generator can be used to drag an oblique detonation wave along the gas tube at a velocity much higher than the base detonation velocity of the explosive. Since yielding and failure of the gas tube is the primary limitation of these devices, it is desirable to retain the dynamic confinement effects of a heavy-walled tamper without interfering with operation of the phase velocity generator. This was accomplished by cutting a slit into the tamper and introducing a phased detonation wave such that it asymmetrically wraps around the gas tube. This type of configuration has been previously experimentally verified to produce very strong shocks but the post-shock pressure and shock velocity limits have not been investigated. This study measured the shock trajectory for various fill pressures and phase velocities to ascertain the limiting effects of tube yield, detonation obliquity and pinch aspect ratio.

  16. Numerical modeling of probe velocity effects for electromagnetic NDE methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Y. K.; Lord, W.

    The present discussion of magnetic flux (MLF) leakage inspection introduces the behavior of motion-induced currents. The results obtained indicate that velocity effects exist at even low probe speeds for magnetic materials, compelling the inclusion of velocity effects in MLF testing of oil pipelines, where the excitation level and pig speed are much higher than those used in the present work. Probe velocity effect studies should influence probe design, defining suitable probe speed limits and establishing training guidelines for defect-characterization schemes.

  17. The velocity field induced by a helical vortex tube

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fukumoto, Y.; Okulov, Valery

    2005-01-01

    The influence of finite-core thickness on the velocity field around a vortex tube is addressed. An asymptotic expansion of the Biot-Savart law is made to a higher order in a small parameter, the ratio of core radius to curvature radius, which consists of the velocity field due to lines of monopoles...... and dipoles arranged on the centerline of the tube. The former is associated with an infinitely thin core and is featured by the circulation alone. The distribution of vorticity in the core reflects on the strength of dipole. This result is applied to a helical vortex tube, and the induced velocity due...

  18. Velocity Estimate Following Air Data System Failure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McLaren, Scott A

    2008-01-01

    .... A velocity estimator (VEST) algorithm was developed to combine the inertial and wind velocities to provide an estimate of the aircraft's current true velocity to be used for command path gain scheduling and for display in the cockpit...

  19. A study on the velocity characteristics of the spray formed by two impinging jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choo, Yeon Jun; Seo, Kwi Hyun; Kang, Bo Seon

    2001-01-01

    In this study, the velocity characteristics of liquid elements formed by two impinging jets is analysed using double pulse image capturing technique. For the droplets formed by low speed impinging jets, the droplet velocities are higher with smaller azimuthal and impingement angle. The maximum droplet velocities are about 25% lower than jet velocity. With an increase of azimuthal angle, the shedding angles increases but remains lower than azimuthal angle. The velocities of ligaments formed by high speed impinging jets gradually decreases with an increase of azimuthal angle. The maximum ligament velocities are about 40% lower than jet velocity. Higher impingement angles produce lower ligament velocities. The shedding angles of ligament almost increases with the same value of azimuthal angle, which implies that the moving direction of ligaments is radial from the origin as the impingement point

  20. The system-wide impacts of the external benefits to higher education on the Scottish economy: An exploratory “micro-to-macro" approach

    OpenAIRE

    Kristinn Hermannsson; Katerina Lisenkova; Patrizio Lecca; Peter McGregor; Kim Swales

    2012-01-01

    The private market benefits of education, i.e. the wage premia of graduates, are widely studied at the micro level, although the magnitude of their macroeconomic impact is disputed. However, there are additional benefits of education, which are less well understood but could potentially drive significant macroeconomic impacts. Following the taxonomy of McMahon (2009) we identify four different types of benefits of education. These are: private market benefits (wage premia); private non market...

  1. Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities (HACU) Hispanic Higher Education Research Collective (H3ERC) Research Agenda: Impacting Education and Changing Lives through Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities, 2011

    2011-01-01

    With support from the Lumina Foundation, the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities (HACU) has launched HACU's Hispanic Higher Education Research Collective (H3ERC). The first major task of this virtual gathering of researchers and practitioners in Hispanic higher education has been to assess the state of our knowledge of the key issues…

  2. Cosmic string induced peculiar velocities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Dalen, A.; Schramm, D.N.

    1987-02-01

    We calculate analytically the probability distribution for peculiar velocities on scales from 10h -1 to 60h -1 Mpc with cosmic string loops as the dominant source of primordial gravitational perturbations. We consider a range of parameters βGμ appropriate for both hot (HDM) and cold (CDM) dark matter scenarios. An Ω = 1 CDM Universe is assumed with the loops randomly placed on a smooth background. It is shown how the effects can be estimated of loops breaking up and being born with a spectrum of sizes. It is found that to obtain large scale streaming velocities of at least 400 km/s it is necessary that either a large value for βGμ or the effect of loop fissioning and production details be considerable. Specifically, for optimal CDM string parameters Gμ = 10 -6 , β = 9, h = .5, and scales of 60h -1 Mpc, the parent size spectrum must be 36 times larger than the evolved daughter spectrum to achieve peculiar velocities of at least 400 km/s with a probability of 63%. With this scenario the microwave background dipole will be less than 800 km/s with only a 10% probability. The string induced velocity spectrum is relatively flat out to scales of about 2t/sub eq//a/sub eq/ and then drops off rather quickly. The flatness is a signature of string models of galaxy formation. With HDM a larger value of βGμ is necessary for galaxy formation since accretion on small scales starts later. Hence, with HDM, the peculiar velocity spectrum will be larger on large scales and the flat region will extend to larger scales. If large scale peculiar velocities greater than 400 km/s are real then it is concluded that strings plus CDM have difficulties. The advantages of strings plus HDM in this regard will be explored in greater detail in a later paper. 27 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  3. Angle independent velocity spectrum determination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    An ultrasound imaging system (100) includes a transducer array (102) that emits an ultrasound beam and produces at least one transverse pulse-echo field that oscillates in a direction transverse to the emitted ultrasound beam and that receive echoes produced in response thereto and a spectral vel...... velocity estimator (110) that determines a velocity spectrum for flowing structure, which flows at an angle of 90 degrees and flows at angles less than 90 degrees with respect to the emitted ultrasound beam, based on the received echoes....

  4. Low velocity collisions of porous planetesimals in the early solar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Niem, D.; Kührt, E.; Hviid, S.; Davidsson, B.

    2018-02-01

    The ESA Rosetta mission has shown that Comet 67P/Churuymov-Gerasimenko is bi-lobed, has a high average porosity of around 70%, does not have internal cavities on size scales larger than 10 m, the lobes could have individual sets of onion shell-like layering, and the nucleus surface contains 100 m-scale cylindrical pits. It is currently debated whether these properties are consistent with high-velocity collisional evolution or if they necessarily are surviving signatures of low-velocity primordial accretion. We use an Eulerian hydrocode to study collisions between highly porous bodies of different sizes, material parameters and relative velocities with emphasis on 5-100 m/s to characterize the effects of collisions in terms of deformation, compaction, and heating. We find that accretion of 1 km cometesimals by 3 km nuclei at 13.5 m/s flattens and partially buries the cometesimal with ∼ 1% reduction of the bulk porosity. This structure locally becomes more dense but the global effect of compaction is minor, suggesting that low-velocity accretion does not lead to a 'bunch of grapes' structure with large internal cavities but a more homogeneous interior, consistent with Rosetta findings. The mild local compaction associated with accretion is potentially the origin of the observed nucleus layering. In 2D axially symmetric impacts hit-and-stick collisions of similarly-sized nuclei are possible at velocities up to 30 m/s where deformation becomes severe. The bulk porosity is reduced significantly, even at 30-50 m/s relative velocity. To avoid hit-and-run collisions the impact angle must be less than 35°-45° from the surface normal at 10 m/s, and even smaller at higher velocities. Impact heating is insignificant. We find that the small cross section of the 67P neck may require a ≤ 5 m/s impact, unless the cohesion exceeds 10 kPa. We conclude that bi-lobe nucleus formation is possible at velocities typically discussed in hierarchical growth scenarios. Impacts of a 7 m

  5. Higher Order Mode Fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Israelsen, Stine Møller

    This PhD thesis considers higher order modes (HOMs) in optical fibers. That includes their excitation and characteristics. Within the last decades, HOMs have been applied both for space multiplexing in optical communications, group velocity dispersion management and sensing among others......-radial polarization as opposed to the linear polarization of the LP0X modes. The effect is investigated numerically in a double cladding fiber with an outer aircladding using a full vectorial modesolver. Experimentally, the bowtie modes are excited using a long period grating and their free space characteristics...... and polarization state are investigated. For this fiber, the onset of the bowtie effect is shown numerically to be LP011. The characteristics usually associated with Bessel-likes modes such as long diffraction free length and selfhealing are shown to be conserved despite the lack of azimuthal symmetry...

  6. VELOCITY VARIATIONS IN THE PHOENIX–HERMUS STAR STREAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlberg, R. G. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Grillmair, C. J., E-mail: carlberg@astro.utoronto.ca, E-mail: carl@ipac.caltech.edu [Spitzer Science Center, 1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2016-10-20

    Measurements of velocity and density perturbations along stellar streams in the Milky Way provide a time-integrated measure of dark matter substructure at larger galactic radius than the complementary instantaneous inner-halo strong lensing detection of dark matter sub-halos in distant galaxies. An interesting case to consider is the proposed Phoenix–Hermus star stream, which is long, thin, and on a nearly circular orbit, making it a particular good target to study for velocity variations along its length. In the presence of dark matter sub-halos, the stream velocities are significantly perturbed in a manner that is readily understood with the impulse approximation. A set of simulations shows that only sub-halos above a few 10{sup 7} M {sub ⊙} lead to reasonably long-lived observationally detectable velocity variations of amplitude of order 1 km s{sup −1}, with an average of about one visible hit per (two-armed) stream over a 3 Gyr interval. An implication is that globular clusters themselves will not have a visible impact on the stream. Radial velocities have the benefit of being completely insensitive to distance errors. Distance errors scatter individual star velocities perpendicular and tangential to the mean orbit, but their mean values remain unbiased. Calculations like these help build the quantitative case to acquire large, fairly deep, precision velocity samples of stream stars.

  7. ROTATIONAL VELOCITIES FOR M DWARFS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, J. S.; Ramsey, L. W.; Jones, H. R. A.; Pavlenko, Y.; Barnes, J. R.; Pinfield, D. J.; Gallardo, J.

    2009-01-01

    We present spectroscopic rotation velocities (v sin i) for 56 M dwarf stars using high-resolution Hobby-Eberly Telescope High Resolution Spectrograph red spectroscopy. In addition, we have also determined photometric effective temperatures, masses, and metallicities ([Fe/H]) for some stars observed here and in the literature where we could acquire accurate parallax measurements and relevant photometry. We have increased the number of known v sin i values for mid M stars by around 80% and can confirm a weakly increasing rotation velocity with decreasing effective temperature. Our sample of v sin is peak at low velocities (∼3 km s -1 ). We find a change in the rotational velocity distribution between early M and late M stars, which is likely due to the changing field topology between partially and fully convective stars. There is also a possible further change in the rotational distribution toward the late M dwarfs where dust begins to play a role in the stellar atmospheres. We also link v sin i to age and show how it can be used to provide mid-M star age limits. When all literature velocities for M dwarfs are added to our sample, there are 198 with v sin i ≤ 10 km s -1 and 124 in the mid-to-late M star regime (M3.0-M9.5) where measuring precision optical radial velocities is difficult. In addition, we also search the spectra for any significant Hα emission or absorption. Forty three percent were found to exhibit such emission and could represent young, active objects with high levels of radial-velocity noise. We acquired two epochs of spectra for the star GJ1253 spread by almost one month and the Hα profile changed from showing no clear signs of emission, to exhibiting a clear emission peak. Four stars in our sample appear to be low-mass binaries (GJ1080, GJ3129, Gl802, and LHS3080), with both GJ3129 and Gl802 exhibiting double Hα emission features. The tables presented here will aid any future M star planet search target selection to extract stars with low v

  8. Lecturers' Leadership Practices and Their Impact on Students' Experiences of Participation with Implications for Marketing Higher Education Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andy-Wali, Hope Adanne; Wali, Andy Fred

    2018-01-01

    This study investigates the impact of lecturers' leadership practices on students' experiences of participation within a case university in the UK's HE sector. The qualitative phenomenological research strategy, specifically the focus group interview approach, was used for data collection. Two key focus group interviews were conducted with a total…

  9. The Role of Academic Developers in Embedding High-Impact Undergraduate Research and Inquiry in Mainstream Higher Education: Twenty Years' Reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healey, Mick; Jenkins, Alan

    2018-01-01

    The focus of this article is on the role of academic developers in supporting and influencing undergraduate research and inquiry, a high-impact activity. We examine the levels at which academic developers can influence undergraduate research and inquiry practices by distinguishing between staff and student practices; disciplinary and departmental…

  10. Maximal intended velocity training induces greater gains in bench press performance than deliberately slower half-velocity training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Badillo, Juan José; Rodríguez-Rosell, David; Sánchez-Medina, Luis; Gorostiaga, Esteban M; Pareja-Blanco, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effect on strength gains of two isoinertial resistance training (RT) programmes that only differed in actual concentric velocity: maximal (MaxV) vs. half-maximal (HalfV) velocity. Twenty participants were assigned to a MaxV (n = 9) or HalfV (n = 11) group and trained 3 times per week during 6 weeks using the bench press (BP). Repetition velocity was controlled using a linear velocity transducer. A complementary study (n = 10) aimed to analyse whether the acute metabolic (blood lactate and ammonia) and mechanical response (velocity loss) was different between the MaxV and HalfV protocols used. Both groups improved strength performance from pre- to post-training, but MaxV resulted in significantly greater gains than HalfV in all variables analysed: one-repetition maximum (1RM) strength (18.2 vs. 9.7%), velocity developed against all (20.8 vs. 10.0%), light (11.5 vs. 4.5%) and heavy (36.2 vs. 17.3%) loads common to pre- and post-tests. Light and heavy loads were identified with those moved faster or slower than 0.80 m · s(-1) (∼ 60% 1RM in BP). Lactate tended to be significantly higher for MaxV vs. HalfV, with no differences observed for ammonia which was within resting values. Both groups obtained the greatest improvements at the training velocities (≤ 0.80 m · s(-1)). Movement velocity can be considered a fundamental component of RT intensity, since, for a given %1RM, the velocity at which loads are lifted largely determines the resulting training effect. BP strength gains can be maximised when repetitions are performed at maximal intended velocity.

  11. Generation of the auroral electron velocity distribution by stochastic acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryant, D.A.; Cook, A.C.; Wang, Z.-S.; Angelis, U. de.

    1990-07-01

    In a further development of the wave theory of the aurora, it is demonstrated, using a Monte-Carlo numerical model, that the characteristic peak in the auroral electron velocity distribution can be generated stochastically through resonant interactions between an initially monotonic distribution and lower-hybrid electrostatic turbulence. The principal requirement is that the velocity spectrum of resonant waves has a sharp cut-off at high velocity. It is then shown that a cut-off is expected as a natural consequence of the difference between the phase and group velocities of lower-hybrid waves. The possibility is considered that a second peak, sometimes observed at lower velocities, is due to the same statistical mechanism, arising from the damping of waves of low phase velocity. An enhancement of wave intensity is found at higher velocities, where momentum flows preferentially from electrons to waves. The relation between the wave theory and the currently prevailing potential-difference theory emerges clearly from the analysis. (author)

  12. Burning velocity measurements of nitrogen-containing compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takizawa, Kenji; Takahashi, Akifumi; Tokuhashi, Kazuaki; Kondo, Shigeo; Sekiya, Akira

    2008-06-30

    Burning velocity measurements of nitrogen-containing compounds, i.e., ammonia (NH3), methylamine (CH3NH2), ethylamine (C2H5NH2), and propylamine (C3H7NH2), were carried out to assess the flammability of potential natural refrigerants. The spherical-vessel (SV) method was used to measure the burning velocity over a wide range of sample and air concentrations. In addition, flame propagation was directly observed by the schlieren photography method, which showed that the spherical flame model was applicable to flames with a burning velocity higher than approximately 5 cm s(-1). For CH3NH2, the nozzle burner method was also used to confirm the validity of the results obtained by closed vessel methods. We obtained maximum burning velocities (Su0,max) of 7.2, 24.7, 26.9, and 28.3 cm s(-1) for NH3, CH3NH2, C2H5NH2, and C3H7NH2, respectively. It was noted that the burning velocities of NH3 and CH3NH2 were as high as those of the typical hydrofluorocarbon refrigerants difluoromethane (HFC-32, Su0,max=6.7 cm s(-1)) and 1,1-difluoroethane (HFC-152a, Su0,max=23.6 cm s(-1)), respectively. The burning velocities were compared with those of the parent alkanes, and it was found that introducing an NH2 group into hydrocarbon molecules decreases their burning velocity.

  13. Ceramic bar impact experiments for improved material model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brar, N.S.; Proud, W.G.; Rajendran, A.M.

    2004-01-01

    Ceramic bar-on-bar (uniaxial stress) experiments are performed to extend uniaxial strain deformation states imposed in flyer plate impact experiments. A number of investigators engaged in modeling the bar-on-bar experiments have varying degrees of success in capturing the observed fracture modes in bars and correctly simulating the measured in-situ axial stress or free surface velocity histories. The difficulties encountered are related to uncertainties in understanding the dominant failure mechanisms as a function of different stress states imposed in bar impacts. Free surface velocity of the far end of the target AD998 bar were measured using a VISAR in a series of bar-on-bar impact experiments at nominal impact speeds of 100 m/s, 220 m/s, and 300 m/s. Velocity history data at an impact of 100 m/s show the material response as elastic. At higher impact velocities of 200 m/s and 300 m/s the velocity history data suggest an inelastic material response. A high-speed (Imacon) camera was employed to examine the fracture and failure of impactor and target bars. High speed photographs provide comprehensive data on geometry of damage and failure patterns as a function of time to check the validity of a particular constitutive material model for AD998 alumina used in numerical simulations of fracture and failure of the bars on impact

  14. Reputation in Higher Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plewa, Carolin; Ho, Joanne; Conduit, Jodie

    2016-01-01

    Reputation is critical for institutions wishing to attract and retain students in today's competitive higher education setting. Drawing on the resource based view and configuration theory, this research proposes that Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) need to understand not only the impact...... of independent resources but of resource configurations when seeking to achieve a strong, positive reputation. Utilizing fuzzy set qualitative comparative analysis (fsQCA), the paper provides insight into different configurations of resources that HEIs can utilize to build their reputation within their domestic...

  15. Fear, Sadness and Hope: Which Emotions Maximize Impact of Anti-Tobacco Mass Media Advertisements among Lower and Higher SES Groups?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durkin, Sarah; Bayly, Megan; Brennan, Emily; Biener, Lois; Wakefield, Melanie

    2018-01-01

    Emotive anti-tobacco advertisements can increase quitting. Discrete emotion theories suggest evoking fear may be more effective than sadness; less research has focused on hope. A weekly cross-sectional survey of smokers and recent quitters (N = 7683) measured past-month quit attempts. The main predictor was level of exposure to four different types of anti-tobacco advertisements broadcast in the two months prior to quit attempts: advertisements predominantly evoking fear, sadness, hope, or evoking multiple negative emotions (i.e., fear, guilt, and/or sadness). Greater exposure to fear-evoking advertisements (OR = 2.16, p < .01) increased odds of making a quit attempt and showed similar effectiveness among those in lower and higher SES areas. Greater exposure to advertisements evoking multiple negative emotions increased quit attempts (OR = 1.70, p < .01), but interactions indicated this was driven by those in lower SES, but not higher SES areas. Greater exposure to hope-evoking advertisements enhanced effects of fear-evoking advertisements among those in higher SES, but not lower SES areas. Findings suggest to be maximally effective across the whole population avoid messages evoking sadness and use messages eliciting fear. If the aim is to specifically motivate those living in lower SES areas where smoking rates are higher, multiple negative emotion messages, but not hope-evoking messages, may also be effective.

  16. The Impact of Peer Mentoring on Levels of Student Wellbeing, Integration and Retention: A Controlled Comparative Evaluation of Residential Students in UK Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collings, R.; Swanson, V.; Watkins, R.

    2014-01-01

    Peer mentoring is becoming increasingly popular in UK higher education, however, there remains little good quality, theoretically driven and evaluative research. The current study aims to bridge the gap between theory, practice and evaluation by providing a controlled evaluation of a peer mentoring scheme within UK universities. 109 first year…

  17. Assessing the Impact of a Statewide STEM Investment on K-12, Higher Education, and Business/Community STEM Awareness over Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sondergeld, Toni A.; Johnson, Carla C.; Walten, Janet B.

    2016-01-01

    Despite monetary and educational investments in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) being at record high levels, little attention has been devoted to generating a common understanding of STEM. In addition, working with business, K-12 schools, and/or institutions of higher education to establish a grassroots effort to help…

  18. The Impact of Economic, Political, and Social Factors on Recent Overt Black/White Racial Conflict in Higher Education in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Evonne Parker

    1991-01-01

    Addresses the following: (1) what recent literature reveals about overt racial conflict in higher education between whites and African Americans; (2) how different factors influence this conflict; (3) an extensive listing of racism incidents; (4) rising economic anxiety and the nation's political climate; and (5) suggestions for alleviating the…

  19. Factors Affecting the State Anxiety Level of Higher Education Students in Macau: The Impact of Trait Anxiety and Self-Esteem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Hoi-Yan

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study is to find out the levels of anxiety of 589 day- and night-class students in higher education in Macau two weeks before the final examination period. The Chinese version of the 40-item Spielberger's State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (Spielberger, Gorsuch & Lusherier, 1970) was applied in this study. The two anxiety scales are…

  20. The Impacts of State Performance Funding Systems on Higher Education Institutions: Research Literature Review and Policy Recommendations. CCRC Working Paper No. 37

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Kevin J.; Reddy, Vikash

    2011-01-01

    Over the past three decades policymakers have been seeking new ways to secure improved performance from higher education institutions. One popular approach has been performance funding, which involves use of a formula to tie funding to institutional performance on specified indicators. This report reviews findings from studies on performance…

  1. A Legal Analysis of the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment and Its Impact on Ballot Initiatives and Affirmative Action Programs in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Harold Davon

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation explores the controversial issues surrounding affirmative action in higher education. Are anti-affirmative action ballot initiatives in violation of the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment by restructuring the political process of minorities in such a way that places special burden on their ability to secure…

  2. Adopting Self-Accreditation in Response to the Diversity of Higher Education: Quality Assurance in Taiwan and Its Impact on Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Karen Hui-Jung; Hou, Angela Yung-Chi

    2016-01-01

    In 2012, Taiwan implemented a dual-track quality assurance system comprising accreditation and self-accreditation in higher education institutions. Self-accrediting institutions can accredit their programs without requiring approval from external quality assurance agencies. In contrast to other countries, the Ministry of Education of Taiwan…

  3. Convenience Matters: A Qualitative Study on the Impact of Use of Social Media and Collaboration Technologies on Learning Experience and Performance in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Yeona

    2015-01-01

    Social media and collaboration technologies are viewed as valuable tools for creating a new reality of collaborative learning, particularly in higher education facing millennials growing up with various technologies in their daily lives. Using the example of an undergraduate course taught on-campus, this study examines how millennial students in…

  4. A method for comparing impacts with real targets to impacts onto the IAEA unyielding target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammerman, D.J.

    1991-01-01

    The severity of the IAEA accident conditions test requirement (IAEA 1990) of an impact onto an essentially unyielding target from a drop height of 9 meters encompasses a large fraction of all real world impacts. This is true, in part, because of the unyielding nature of the impact target. Impacts onto the unyielding target have severities equivalent to higher velocity impacts onto real targets which are not unyielding. The severity of impacts with yielding targets is decreased by the amount of the impact energy absorbed in damaging the target. In demonstrating the severity of the regulatory impact event it is advantageous to be able to relate this impact onto an essentially unyielding target to impacts with yielding targets

  5. Bubble Coalescence: Effect of Bubble Approach Velocity and Liquid Viscosity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Orvalho, Sandra; Růžička, Marek; Olivieri, G.; Marzocchella, A.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 134, SEP 29 (2015), s. 205-216 ISSN 0009-2509 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD13018 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : bubble coalescence * bubble approach velocity * liquid viscosity Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 2.750, year: 2015

  6. Radial velocities for the HIPPARCOS-Gaia Hundred-Thousand-Proper-Motion project

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruijne, J. H. J.; Eilers, A.-C.

    2012-10-01

    Context. The Hundred-Thousand-Proper-Motion (HTPM) project will determine the proper motions of ~113 500 stars using a ~23-year baseline. The proper motions will be based on space-based measurements exclusively, with the Hipparcos data, with epoch 1991.25, as first epoch and with the first intermediate-release Gaia astrometry, with epoch ~2014.5, as second epoch. The expected HTPM proper-motion standard errors are 30-190 μas yr-1, depending on stellar magnitude. Aims: Depending on the astrometric characteristics of an object, in particular its distance and velocity, its radial velocity can have a significant impact on the determination of its proper motion. The impact of this perspective acceleration is largest for fast-moving, nearby stars. Our goal is to determine, for each star in the Hipparcos catalogue, the radial-velocity standard error that is required to guarantee a negligible contribution of perspective acceleration to the HTPM proper-motion precision. Methods: We employ two evaluation criteria, both based on Monte-Carlo simulations, with which we determine which stars need to be spectroscopically (re-)measured. Both criteria take the Hipparcos measurement errors into account. The first criterion, the Gaussian criterion, is applicable to nearby stars. For distant stars, this criterion works but returns overly pessimistic results. We therefore use a second criterion, the robust criterion, which is equivalent to the Gaussian criterion for nearby stars but avoids biases for distant stars and/or objects without literature radial velocity. The robust criterion is hence our prefered choice for all stars, regardless of distance. Results: For each star in the Hipparcos catalogue, we determine the confidence level with which the available radial velocity and its standard error, taken from the XHIP compilation catalogue, are acceptable. We find that for 97 stars, the radial velocities available in the literature are insufficiently precise for a 68.27% confidence

  7. Shear wave crustal velocity model of the Western Bohemian Massif from Love wave phase velocity dispersion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolínský, Petr; Málek, Jiří; Brokešová, J.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 1 (2011), s. 81-104 ISSN 1383-4649 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300460602; GA AV ČR IAA300460705; GA ČR(CZ) GA205/06/1780 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : love waves * phase velocity dispersion * frequency-time analysis Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 1.326, year: 2011 www.springerlink.com/content/w3149233l60111t1/

  8. Linking high parity and maternal and child mortality: what is the impact of lower health services coverage among higher order births?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonneveldt, Emily; DeCormier Plosky, Willyanne; Stover, John

    2013-01-01

    A number of data sets show that high parity births are associated with higher child mortality than low parity births. The reasons for this relationship are not clear. In this paper we investigate whether high parity is associated with lower coverage of key health interventions that might lead to increased mortality. We used DHS data from 10 high fertility countries to examine the relationship between parity and coverage for 8 child health intervention and 9 maternal health interventions. We also used the LiST model to estimate the effect on maternal and child mortality of the lower coverage associated with high parity births. Our results show a significant relationship between coverage of maternal and child health services and birth order, even when controlling for poverty. The association between coverage and parity for maternal health interventions was more consistently significant across countries all countries, while for child health interventions there were fewer overall significant relationships and more variation both between and within countries. The differences in coverage between children of parity 3 and those of parity 6 are large enough to account for a 12% difference in the under-five mortality rate and a 22% difference in maternal mortality ratio in the countries studied. This study shows that coverage of key health interventions is lower for high parity children and the pattern is consistent across countries. This could be a partial explanation for the higher mortality rates associated with high parity. Actions to address this gap could help reduce the higher mortality experienced by high parity birth.

  9. Scientific Objectives of Small Carry-on Impactor (SCI) and Deployable Camera 3 Digital (DCAM3-D): Observation of an Ejecta Curtain and a Crater Formed on the Surface of Ryugu by an Artificial High-Velocity Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, M.; Wada, K.; Saiki, T.; Kadono, T.; Takagi, Y.; Shirai, K.; Okamoto, C.; Yano, H.; Hayakawa, M.; Nakazawa, S.; Hirata, N.; Kobayashi, M.; Michel, P.; Jutzi, M.; Imamura, H.; Ogawa, K.; Sakatani, N.; Iijima, Y.; Honda, R.; Ishibashi, K.; Hayakawa, H.; Sawada, H.

    2017-07-01

    The Small Carry-on Impactor (SCI) equipped on Hayabusa2 was developed to produce an artificial impact crater on the primitive Near-Earth Asteroid (NEA) 162173 Ryugu (Ryugu) in order to explore the asteroid subsurface material unaffected by space weathering and thermal alteration by solar radiation. An exposed fresh surface by the impactor and/or the ejecta deposit excavated from the crater will be observed by remote sensing instruments, and a subsurface fresh sample of the asteroid will be collected there. The SCI impact experiment will be observed by a Deployable CAMera 3-D (DCAM3-D) at a distance of ˜1 km from the impact point, and the time evolution of the ejecta curtain will be observed by this camera to confirm the impact point on the asteroid surface. As a result of the observation of the ejecta curtain by DCAM3-D and the crater morphology by onboard cameras, the subsurface structure and the physical properties of the constituting materials will be derived from crater scaling laws. Moreover, the SCI experiment on Ryugu gives us a precious opportunity to clarify effects of microgravity on the cratering process and to validate numerical simulations and models of the cratering process.

  10. High velocity collisions between large dust aggregates at the limit for growing planetesimals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurm, G.; Teiser, J.; Paraskov, G.

    2007-08-01

    Planetesimals are km-size bodies supposed to be formed in protoplanetary disks as planetary precursors [1]. The most widely considered mechanism for their formation is based on mutual collisions of smaller bodies, a process which starts with the aggregation of (sub)-micron size dust particles. In the absence of events that lithify the growing dust aggregates, only the surface forces between dust particles provide adhesion and internal strength of the objects. It has been assumed that this might be a disadvantage as dust aggregates are readily destroyed by rather weak collisions. In fact, experimental research on dust aggregation showed that for collisions in the m/s range (sub)-mm size dust aggregates impacting a larger body do show a transition from sticking to rebound and/or fragmentation in collisions and no growth occurs at the large velocities [2, 3]. This seemed to be incompatible with typical collision velocities of small dust aggregates with m-size bodies which are expected to be on the order 50 m/s in protoplanetary disks [4]. We recently found that the experimental results cannot be scaled from m/s to tens of m/s collisions. In contrast to the assumptions and somewhat counterintuitive, it is the fragility of dust aggregates that allows growth at higher collision velocities. In impact experiments Wurm et al. [5] showed that between 13 m/s and 25 m/s a larger compact (target) body consisting of micron-size SiO2 dust particles accreted 50 % of the mass of a 1 cm dust projectile consisting of the same dust. For slower impacts the projectile only rebounded or fragmented slightly.

  11. Momentum and Angular Momentum Transfer in Oblique Impacts: Implications for Asteroid Rotations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagisawa, Masahisa; Hasegawa, Sunao; Shirogane, Nobutoshi

    1996-09-01

    We conducted a series of high velocity oblique impact experiments (0.66-6.7 km/s) using polycarbonate (plastic) projectiles and targets made of mortar, aluminum alloy, and mild steel. We then calculated the efficiencies of momentum transfer for small cratering impacts. They are η = (M‧Vn‧)/(mvn) and ζ = (M‧Vt‧)/(mvt), wheremandvare the mass and velocity of a projectile, andM‧ andV‧ represent those of a postimpact target. Subscripts “n” and “t” denote the components normal and tangential to the target surface at the impact point, respectively. The main findings are: (1) η increases with increasing impact velocity; (2) η is larger for mortar than for ductile metallic targets; (3) ζ for mortar targets seems to increase with the impact velocity in the velocity range less than about 2 km/s and decrease with it in the higher velocity range; (4) ζ for the aluminum alloy targets correlates negatively with incident zenith angle of the projectile. In addition to these findings on the momentum transfer, we show theoretically that “ζL” can be expressed by η and ζ for small cratering impact. Here, ζLis the spin angular momentum that the target acquires at impact divided by the collisional angular momentum due to the projectile. This is an important parameter to study the collisional evolution of asteroid rotation. For a spherical target, ζLis shown to be well approximated by ζ.

  12. Electron velocity and momentum density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, G.A.

    1978-01-01

    A null 4-vector eta + sigma/sub μ/based on Dirac's relativistic electron equation, is shown explicitly for a plane wave and various Coulomb states. This 4-vector constitutes a mechanical ''model'' for the electron in those staes, and expresses the important spinor quantities represented conventionally by n, f, g, m, j, kappa, l, and s. The model for a plane wave agrees precisely with the relation between velocity and phase gradient customarily used in quantum theory, but the models for Coulomb states contradict that relation

  13. Sound velocity of tantalum under shock compression in the 18–142 GPa range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xi, Feng, E-mail: xifeng@caep.cn; Jin, Ke; Cai, Lingcang, E-mail: cai-lingcang@aliyun.com; Geng, Huayun; Tan, Ye; Li, Jun [National Key Laboratory of Shock Waves and Detonation Physics, Institute of Fluid Physics, CAEP, P.O. Box 919-102 Mianyang, Sichuan 621999 (China)

    2015-05-14

    Dynamic compression experiments of tantalum (Ta) within a shock pressure range from 18–142 GPa were conducted driven by explosive, a two-stage light gas gun, and a powder gun, respectively. The time-resolved Ta/LiF (lithium fluoride) interface velocity profiles were recorded with a displacement interferometer system for any reflector. Sound velocities of Ta were obtained from the peak state time duration measurements with the step-sample technique and the direct-reverse impact technique. The uncertainty of measured sound velocities were analyzed carefully, which suggests that the symmetrical impact method with step-samples is more accurate for sound velocity measurement, and the most important parameter in this type experiment is the accurate sample/window particle velocity profile, especially the accurate peak state time duration. From these carefully analyzed sound velocity data, no evidence of a phase transition was found up to the shock melting pressure of Ta.

  14. Impacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellmuth, M.; Kabat, P.

    2003-01-01

    Even without the impacts of climate change, water managers face prodigious challenges in meeting sustainable development goals. Growing populations need affordable food, water and energy. Industrial development demands a growing share of water resources and contaminates those same resources with its

  15. Identification of the contributors (Ag-110m) for higher radiation field on Primary Heat Transport System of TAPS-3 and its impact on collective dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonwalkar, V.M.; Mohanta, S.; Pal, S.K.; Rajagopalan, H.; Venkataramana, K.

    2018-01-01

    TAPS-3 and 4, First Indian PHWR of capacity 540 MWe, attained first criticality on 21 st May 2006 and 6 th March 2005 respectively. TAPS-3 and 4 are under commercial operation since August 2006 and September 2005. The PHT circuit pipeline/equipment exhibit higher radiation filed in accessible area of Reactor building due to presence of fission product and corrosion produces in the PHT system water and their deposition on the pipeline surface. The radiological monitoring of various equipment/area is performed routinely to detect the deviation and initiate corrective actions. During such routine measurements, it was noted that PHT D 2 O lines at 104 m El. of TAPS-3 were showing increasing trend of radiation field. The radiation field on the PHT D 2 O lines increased from 1 mSv/hr to 10 mSv/hr. The radiation filed at the same location of TAPS-4 was 1mSv/hr

  16. An experimental study of low concentration sludge settling velocity under turbulent condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lisha; Zhang, Daijun; Xu, Danyu; Chen, Yuan

    2009-05-01

    Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) was used to study the settling of activated sludge flocs under turbulent flow conditions. Experimental results showed that a larger particle diameter led to a higher settling velocity while the higher turbulence intensity led to lower settling velocity. Based on the measurements a mathematical relation has been derived which correlates the settling velocity for individual sludge flocs under turbulent conditions through a modified Vesilind equation. Settling velocity shows a power-type relation to sludge particle diameter and an exponential-type relation with turbulence intensity and sludge concentration.

  17. Instrument for measuring flow velocities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffo, J.

    1977-01-01

    The design described here means to produce a 'more satisfying instrument with less cost' than comparable instruments known up to now. Instead of one single turbine rotor, two similar ones but with opposite blade inclination and sense of rotation are to be used. A cylindrical measuring body is carrying in its axis two bearing blocks whose shape is offering little flow resistance. On the shaft, supported by them, the two rotors run in opposite direction a relatively small axial distance apart. The speed of each rotor is picked up as pulse recurrence frequency by a transmitter and fed to an electronic measuring unit. Measuring errors as they are caused for single rotors by turbulent flow, profile distortion of the velocity, or viscous flow are to be eliminated by means of the contrarotating turbines and the subsequently added electronic unit, because in these cases the adulterating increase of the angular velocity of one rotor is compensated by a corresponding deceleration of the other rotor. The mean value then indicated by the electronic unit has high accurancy of measurement. (RW) [de

  18. Shear velocity structure of the laterally heterogeneous crust and uppermost mantle beneath the Indian region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, G.; Rai, S. S.; Panza, G. F.

    1997-08-01

    The shear velocity structure of the Indian lithosphere is mapped by inverting regionalized Rayleigh wave group velocities in time periods of 15-60 s. The regionalized maps are used to subdivide the Indian plate into several geologic units and determine the variation of velocity with depth in each unit. The Hedgehog Monte Carlo technique is used to obtain the shear wave velocity structure for each geologic unit, revealing distinct velocity variations in the lower crust and uppermost mantle. The Indian shield has a high-velocity (4.4-4.6 km/s) upper mantle which, however, is slower than other shields in the world. The central Indian platform comprised of Proterozoic basins and cratons is marked by a distinct low-velocity (4.0-4.2 km/s) upper mantle. Lower crustal velocities in the Indian lithosphere generally range between 3.8 and 4.0 km/s with the oceanic segments and the sedimentary basins marked by marginally higher and lower velocities, respectively. A remarkable contrast is observed in upper mantle velocities between the northern and eastern convergence fronts of the Indian plate. The South Bruma region along the eastern subduction front of the Indian oceanic lithosphere shows significant velocity enhancement in the lower crust and upper mantle. High velocities (≈4.8 km/s) are also observed in the upper mantle beneath the Ninetyeast ridge in the northeastern Indian Ocean.

  19. Objective assessment of surgical performance and its impact on a national selection programme of candidates for higher surgical training in plastic surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carroll, Sean M

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to develop and validate a transparent, fair and objective assessment programme for the selection of surgical trainees into higher surgical training (HST) in plastic surgery in the Republic of Ireland. METHODS: Thirty-four individuals applied for HST in plastic surgery at the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI) in the academic years 2005-2006 and 2006-2007. Eighteen were short-listed for interview and further assessment. All applicants were required to report on their undergraduate educational performance and their postgraduate professional development. Short-listed applicants completed validated objective assessment simulations of surgical skills, an interview and assessment of their suitability for a career in surgery. RESULTS: When applicants\\' short-listing scores were combined with their interview scores and assessment of their suitability for a career in surgery, individuals who were selected for HST in plastic surgery performed significantly better than those who were not (P<0.002). However, when the assessment of technical skills scores were added the significance level of this difference increased further (P<0.0001) as did the statistical power of the difference to 99.9%, thus increasing the robustness of the selection package. CONCLUSION: The results from this study suggest that the assessment protocol we used to select individuals for HST in plastic surgery reliably and statistically significantly discriminated between the performances of candidates.

  20. IMPACTS !

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    (Photo courtesy of Don Davis / NASA)The University of Geneva (UNIGE) and the Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale of Lausanne (EPFL) are organising the 4th series of public lectures on astronomy, on the theme of "Impacts". The schedule is as follows: Il y a 100 ans : une explosion dans la Tunguska – Dr. Frédéric COURBIN, EPFL Les impacts sur Terre – Prof. Didier Queloz, UNIGE La fin des dinosaures – Dr. Stéphane Paltani, UNIGE Wednesday 7 May 2008, from 7.00 p.m. to 9.00 p.m. Auditoire CO1, EPFL, Ecublens Thursday 08 May 2008, from 7.00 p.m. to 9.00 p.m. Auditoire Rouiller, Uni-Dufour, Genève All 3 lectures will be givent each evening! Admission free Information: 022 379 22 00

  1. Application of Vectors to Relative Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tin-Lam, Toh

    2004-01-01

    The topic 'relative velocity' has recently been introduced into the Cambridge Ordinary Level Additional Mathematics syllabus under the application of Vectors. In this note, the results of relative velocity and the 'reduction to rest' technique of teaching relative velocity are derived mathematically from vector algebra, in the hope of providing…

  2. Questions Students Ask: About Terminal Velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Earl R.; Nelson, Jim

    1984-01-01

    If a ball were given an initial velocity in excess of its terminal velocity, would the upward force of air resistance (a function of velocity) be greater than the downward force of gravity and thus push the ball back upwards? An answer to this question is provided. (JN)

  3. Balance velocities of the Greenland ice sheet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joughin, I.; Fahnestock, M.; Ekholm, Simon

    1997-01-01

    We present a map of balance velocities for the Greenland ice sheet. The resolution of the underlying DEM, which was derived primarily from radar altimetery data, yields far greater detail than earlier balance velocity estimates for Greenland. The velocity contours reveal in striking detail......, the balance map is useful for ice-sheet modelling, mass balance studies, and field planning....

  4. Topology dependent epidemic spreading velocity in weighted networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan, Wei; Qiu, Xiaogang; Quax, Rick; Lees, Michael; Sloot, Peter M A

    2014-01-01

    Many diffusive processes occur on structured networks with weighted links, such as disease spread by airplane transport or information diffusion in social networks or blogs. Understanding the impact of weight-connectivity correlations on epidemic spreading in weighted networks is crucial to support decision-making on disease control and other diffusive processes. However, a real understanding of epidemic spreading velocity in weighted networks is still lacking. Here we conduct a numerical study of the velocity of a Reed–Frost epidemic spreading process in various weighted network topologies as a function of the correlations between edge weights and node degrees. We find that a positive weight-connectivity correlation leads to a faster epidemic spreading compared to an unweighted network. In contrast, we find that both uncorrelated and negatively correlated weight distributions lead to slower spreading processes. In the case of positive weight-connectivity correlations, the acceleration of spreading velocity is weak when the heterogeneity of weight distribution increases. (paper)

  5. Higher Education in Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jørgen Lerche; Andreasen, Lars Birch

    2015-01-01

    Higher education systems around the world have been undergoing fundamental changes through the last 50 years from more narrow self-sustaining universities for the elite and into mass universities, where new groups of students have been recruited and the number of students enrolled has increased...... an impact on the educational systems in Scandinavia, and what possible futures can be envisioned?...... dramatically. In adjusting to the role of being a mass educational institution, universities have been challenged on how to cope with external pressures, such as forces of globalization and international markets, increased national and international competition for students and research grants, increased...

  6. Velocity dependence of enhanced dynamic hyperfine field for Pd ions swiftly recoiling in magnetized Fe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuchbery, A.E.; Ryan, G.C.; Bolotin, H.H.; Sie, S.H.

    1980-01-01

    The velocity-dependence of the magnitude of the enchanced dynamic hyperfine magnetic field (EDF) manifest at nuclei of 108 Pd ions swiftly recoiling through thin magnetized Fe has been investigated at ion velocities higher than have heretofore been examined for the heavier nuclides (i.e., at initial recoil velocities (v/Zv 0 )=0.090 and 0.160, v 0 =c/137). These results for 108 Pd, when taken in conjunction with those of prior similar measurements for 106 Pd at lower velocities, and fitted to a velocity dependence for the EDF, give for the Pd isotopes over the extended velocity range 1.74 0 )<=7.02, p=0.41+-0.15; a result incompatible with previous attributions of a linear velocity dependence for the field

  7. Critical velocities in He II for independently varied superfluid and normal fluid velocities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baehr, M.L.

    1984-01-01

    Experiments were performed to measure the critical velocity in pure superflow and compare to the theoretical prediction; to measure the first critical velocity for independently varied superfluid and normal fluid velocities; and to investigate the propagation of the second critical velocity from the thermal counterflow line through the V/sub n/,-V/sub s/ quadrant. The experimental apparatus employed a thermal counterflow heater to adjust the normal fluid velocity, a fountain pump to vary the superfluid velocity, and a level sensing capacitor to measure the superfluid velocity. The results of the pure superfluid critical velocity measurements indicate that this velocity is temperature independent contrary to Schwarz's theory. It was found that the first critical velocity for independently varied V/sub n/ and V/sub s/ could be described by a linear function of V/sub n/ and was otherwise temperature independent. It was found that the second critical velocity could only be distinguished near the thermal counterflow line

  8. Threshold friction velocity influenced by wetness of soils within the Columbia Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windblown dust impacts air quality in the Columbia Plateau of the U.S. Pacific Northwest. Wind erosion of agricultural lands, which is the predominate source of windblown dust in the region, occurs when the friction velocity exceeds the threshold friction velocity (TFV) of the surface. Soil moisture...

  9. Temperature effects on sinking velocity of different Emiliania huxleyi strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas-Navarro, Anaid; Langer, Gerald; Ziveri, Patrizia

    2018-01-01

    The sinking properties of three strains of Emiliania huxleyi in response to temperature changes were examined. We used a recently proposed approach to calculate sinking velocities from coccosphere architecture, which has the advantage to be applicable not only to culture samples, but also to field samples including fossil material. Our data show that temperature in the sub-optimal range impacts sinking velocity of E. huxleyi. This response is widespread among strains isolated in different locations and moreover comparatively predictable, as indicated by the similar slopes of the linear regressions. Sinking velocity was positively correlated to temperature as well as individual cell PIC/POC over the sub-optimum to optimum temperature range in all strains. In the context of climate change our data point to an important influence of global warming on sinking velocities. It has recently been shown that seawater acidification has no effect on sinking velocity of a Mediterranean E. huxleyi strain, while nutrient limitation seems to have a small negative effect on sinking velocity. Given that warming, acidification, and lowered nutrient availability will occur simultaneously under climate change scenarios, the question is what the net effect of different influential factors will be. For example, will the effects of warming and nutrient limitation cancel? This question cannot be answered conclusively but analyses of field samples in addition to laboratory culture studies will improve predictions because in field samples multi-factor influences and even evolutionary changes are not excluded. As mentioned above, the approach of determining sinking rate followed here is applicable to field samples. Future studies could use it to analyse not only seasonal and geographic patterns but also changes in sinking velocity over geological time scales.

  10. Effect of flow velocity on erosion-corrosion behaviour of QSn6 alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Weijiu; Zhou, Yongtao; Wang, Zhenguo; Li, Zhijun; Zheng, Ziqing

    2018-05-01

    The erosion-corrosion behaviour of QSn6 alloy used as propellers in marine environment was evaluated by erosion-corrosion experiments with/without cathodic protection, electrochemical tests and scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations. The analysis was focused on the effect of flow velocity. The dynamic polarization curves showed that the corrosion rate of the QSn6 alloy increased as the flow velocity increased, due to the protective surface film removal at higher velocities. The lowest corrosion current densities of 1.26 × 10‑4 A cm‑2 was obtained at the flow velocity of 7 m s‑1. Because of the higher particle kinetic energies at higher flow velocity, the mass loss rate of the QSn6 alloy increased as the flow velocity increased. The mass loss rate with cathodic protection was lower than that without cathodic protection under the same conditions. Also, the lowest mass loss rate of 0.7 g m‑2 · h‑1 was acquired at the flow velocity of 7 m s‑1 with cathodic protection. However, the increase rate of corrosion rate and mass loss were decreased with increasing the flow velocity. Through observation the SEM morphologies of the worn surfaces, the main wear mechanism was ploughing with/without cathodic protection. The removal rates of the QSn6 alloy increased as the flow velocity increased in both pure erosion and erosion-corrosion, whereas the erosion and corrosion intensified each other. At the flow velocity of 7 m s‑1, the synergy rate (ΔW) exceeded by 5 times the erosion rate (Wwear). Through establishment and observation the erosion-corrosion mechanism map, the erosion-corrosion was the dominant regime in the study due to the contribution of erosion on the mass loss rate exceeded the corrosion contribution. The QSn6 alloy with cathodic protection is feasible as propellers, there are higher security at lower flow velocity, such as the flow velocity of 7 m s‑1 in the paper.

  11. Influence of Flow Velocity on Tsunami Loss Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Song

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Inundation depth is commonly used as an intensity measure in tsunami fragility analysis. However, inundation depth cannot be taken as the sole representation of tsunami impact on structures, especially when structural damage is caused by hydrodynamic and debris impact forces that are mainly determined by flow velocity. To reflect the influence of flow velocity in addition to inundation depth in tsunami risk assessment, a tsunami loss estimation method that adopts both inundation depth and flow velocity (i.e., bivariate intensity measures in evaluating tsunami damage is developed. To consider a wide range of possible tsunami inundation scenarios, Monte Carlo-based tsunami simulations are performed using stochastic earthquake slip distributions derived from a spectral synthesis method and probabilistic scaling relationships of earthquake source parameters. By focusing on Sendai (plain coast and Onagawa (ria coast in the Miyagi Prefecture of Japan in a case study, the stochastic tsunami loss is evaluated by total economic loss and its spatial distribution at different scales. The results indicate that tsunami loss prediction is highly sensitive to modelling resolution and inclusion of flow velocity for buildings located less than 1 km from the sea for Sendai and Onagawa of Miyagi Prefecture.

  12. Functional analysis of third ventriculostomy patency with phase-contrast MRI velocity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lev, S.; Bhadelia, R.A.; Estin, D.; Heilman, C.B.; Wolpert, S.M.

    1997-01-01

    Our purpose was to explore the utility of cine phase-contrast MRI velocity measurements in determining the functional status of third ventriculostomies, and to correlate the quantitative velocity data with clinical follow-up. We examined six patients with third ventriculostomies and 12 normal subjects by phase-contrast MRI. The maximum craniocaudal to maximum caudocranial velocity range was measured at regions of interest near the third ventricular floor, and in cerebrospinal fluid anterior to the upper pons and spinal cord on midline sagittal images. Ratios of the velocities of both the third ventricle and prepontine space to the space anterior to the spinal cord were obtained. The velocities near the third ventricular floor and in the pontine cistern were significantly higher in patients than in normal subjects, but the velocity anterior to the spinal cord was similar between the groups. The velocity ratios, used to normalize individual differences, were also higher in patients than in controls. Two patients had lower velocity ratios than their fellows at the third ventricular floor and in the pontine cistern; one required a shunt 11 months later, while in the other, who had a third ventricular/thalamic tumor, the lower values probably reflect distortion of the third ventricular floor. We conclude that phase-contrast MR velocity measurements, specifically the velocity ratio between the high pontine cistern and the space anterior to the spinal cord, can help determine the functional status of third ventriculostomies. (orig.)

  13. Fast Slip Velocity in a High-Entropy Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzardi, Q.; Sparks, G.; Maaß, R.

    2018-04-01

    Due to fluctuations in nearest-neighbor distances and chemistry within the unit cell, high-entropy alloys are believed to have a much higher resistance to dislocation motion than pure crystals. Here, we investigate the coarse-grained dynamics of a number of dislocations being active during a slip event. We found that the time-resolved dynamics of slip is practically identical in Au and an Al0.3CoCrFeNi high-entropy alloy, but much faster than in Nb. Differences between the FCC-crystals are seen in the spatiotemporal velocity profile, with faster acceleration and slower velocity relaxation in the high-entropy alloy. Assessing distributions that characterize the intermittently evolving plastic flow reveals material-dependent scaling exponents for size, duration, and velocity-size distributions. The results are discussed in view of the underlying dislocation mobility.

  14. Muscle fiber velocity and electromyographic signs of fatigue in fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaver-Król, Ewa G; Rasker, Johannes J; Henriquez, Nizare R; Verheijen, Wilma G; Zwarts, Machiel J

    2012-11-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a disorder of widespread muscular pain. We investigated possible differences in surface electromyography (sEMG) in clinically unaffected muscle between patients with FM and controls. sEMG was performed on the biceps brachii muscle of 13 women with FM and 14 matched healthy controls during prolonged dynamic exercises, unloaded, and loaded up to 20% of maximum voluntary contraction. The sEMG parameters were: muscle fiber conduction velocity (CV); skewness of motor unit potential (peak) velocities; peak frequency (PF) (number of peaks per second); and average rectified voltage (ARV). There was significantly higher CV in the FM group. Although the FM group performed the tests equally well, their electromyographic fatigue was significantly less expressed compared with controls (in CV, PF, and ARV). In the patients with FM, we clearly showed functional abnormalities of the muscle membrane, which led to high conduction velocity and resistance to fatigue in electromyography. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. P-wave ray velocities and the inverse acoustic problem for anisotropic media

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zel, I. Yu.; Ivankina, T. I.; Levin, D.M.; Lokajíček, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 4 (2016), s. 633-639 ISSN 1063-7745 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : anisotropic media * P-Wawe velocities * elasticity Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 0.563, year: 2016

  16. Velocity and stress autocorrelation decay in isothermal dissipative particle dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhri, Anuj; Lukes, Jennifer R.

    2010-02-01

    The velocity and stress autocorrelation decay in a dissipative particle dynamics ideal fluid model is analyzed in this paper. The autocorrelation functions are calculated at three different friction parameters and three different time steps using the well-known Groot/Warren algorithm and newer algorithms including self-consistent leap-frog, self-consistent velocity Verlet and Shardlow first and second order integrators. At low friction values, the velocity autocorrelation function decays exponentially at short times, shows slower-than exponential decay at intermediate times, and approaches zero at long times for all five integrators. As friction value increases, the deviation from exponential behavior occurs earlier and is more pronounced. At small time steps, all the integrators give identical decay profiles. As time step increases, there are qualitative and quantitative differences between the integrators. The stress correlation behavior is markedly different for the algorithms. The self-consistent velocity Verlet and the Shardlow algorithms show very similar stress autocorrelation decay with change in friction parameter, whereas the Groot/Warren and leap-frog schemes show variations at higher friction factors. Diffusion coefficients and shear viscosities are calculated using Green-Kubo integration of the velocity and stress autocorrelation functions. The diffusion coefficients match well-known theoretical results at low friction limits. Although the stress autocorrelation function is different for each integrator, fluctuates rapidly, and gives poor statistics for most of the cases, the calculated shear viscosities still fall within range of theoretical predictions and nonequilibrium studies.

  17. Cold dark matter. 2: Spatial and velocity statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelb, James M.; Bertschinger, Edmund

    1994-01-01

    We examine high-resolution gravitational N-body simulations of the omega = 1 cold dark matter (CDM) model in order to determine whether there is any normalization of the initial density fluctuation spectrum that yields acceptable results for galaxy clustering and velocities. Dense dark matter halos in the evolved mass distribution are identified with luminous galaxies; the most massive halos are also considered as sites for galaxy groups, with a range of possibilities explored for the group mass-to-light ratios. We verify the earlier conclusions of White et al. (1987) for the low-amplitude (high-bias) CDM model-the galaxy correlation function is marginally acceptable but that there are too many galaxies. We also show that the peak biasing method does not accurately reproduce the results obtained using dense halos identified in the simulations themselves. The Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) anisotropy implies a higher normalization, resulting in problems with excessive pairwise galaxy velocity dispersion unless a strong velocity bias is present. Although we confirm the strong velocity bias of halos reported by Couchman & Carlberg (1992), we show that the galaxy motions are still too large on small scales. We find no amplitude for which the CDM model can reconcile simultaneously and galaxy correlation function, the low pairwise velocity dispersion, and the richness distribution of groups and clusters. With the normalization implied by COBE, the CDM spectrum has too much power on small scales if omega = 1.

  18. VELOCITY EVOLUTION AND THE INTRINSIC COLOR OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, Ryan J.; Sanders, Nathan E.; Kirshner, Robert P.

    2011-01-01

    To understand how best to use observations of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) to obtain precise and accurate distances, we investigate the relations between spectra of SNe Ia and their intrinsic colors. Using a sample of 1630 optical spectra of 255 SNe, based primarily on data from the CfA Supernova Program, we examine how the velocity evolution and line strengths of Si II λ6355 and Ca II H and K are related to the B – V color at peak brightness. We find that the maximum-light velocity of Si II λ6355 and Ca II H and K and the maximum-light pseudo-equivalent width of Si II λ6355 are correlated with intrinsic color, with intrinsic color having a linear relation with the Si II λ6355 measurements. Ca II H and K does not have a linear relation with intrinsic color, but lower-velocity SNe tend to be intrinsically bluer. Combining the spectroscopic measurements does not improve intrinsic color inference. The intrinsic color scatter is larger for higher-velocity SNe Ia—even after removing a linear trend with velocity—indicating that lower-velocity SNe Ia are more 'standard crayons'. Employing information derived from SN Ia spectra has the potential to improve the measurements of extragalactic distances and the cosmological properties inferred from them.

  19. Tuning the Fano factor of graphene via Fermi velocity modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Jonas R. F.; Barbosa, Anderson L. R.; Bezerra, C. G.; Pereira, Luiz Felipe C.

    2018-03-01

    In this work we investigate the influence of a Fermi velocity modulation on the Fano factor of periodic and quasi-periodic graphene superlattices. We consider the continuum model and use the transfer matrix method to solve the Dirac-like equation for graphene where the electrostatic potential, energy gap and Fermi velocity are piecewise constant functions of the position x. We found that in the presence of an energy gap, it is possible to tune the energy of the Fano factor peak and consequently the location of the Dirac point, by a modulation in the Fermi velocity. Hence, the peak of the Fano factor can be used experimentally to identify the Dirac point. We show that for higher values of the Fermi velocity the Fano factor goes below 1/3 at the Dirac point. Furthermore, we show that in periodic superlattices the location of Fano factor peaks is symmetric when the Fermi velocity vA and vB is exchanged, however by introducing quasi-periodicity the symmetry is lost. The Fano factor usually holds a universal value for a specific transport regime, which reveals that the possibility of controlling it in graphene is a notable result.

  20. Migration velocity analysis using pre-stack wave fields

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2016-08-25

    Using both image and data domains to perform velocity inversion can help us resolve the long and short wavelength components of the velocity model, usually in that order. This translates to integrating migration velocity analysis into full waveform inversion. The migration velocity analysis part of the inversion often requires computing extended images, which is expensive when using conventional methods. As a result, we use pre-stack wavefield (the double-square-root formulation) extrapolation, which includes the extended information (subsurface offsets) naturally, to make the process far more efficient and stable. The combination of the forward and adjoint pre-stack wavefields provides us with update options that can be easily conditioned to improve convergence. We specifically use a modified differential semblance operator to split the extended image into a residual part for classic differential semblance operator updates and the image (Born) modelling part, which provides reflections for higher resolution information. In our implementation, we invert for the velocity and the image simultaneously through a dual objective function. Applications to synthetic examples demonstrate the features of the approach.

  1. Determination of velocity correction factors for real-time air velocity monitoring in underground mines

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Lihong; Yuan, Liming; Thomas, Rick; Iannacchione, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    When there are installations of air velocity sensors in the mining industry for real-time airflow monitoring, a problem exists with how the monitored air velocity at a fixed location corresponds to the average air velocity, which is used to determine the volume flow rate of air in an entry with the cross-sectional area. Correction factors have been practically employed to convert a measured centerline air velocity to the average air velocity. However, studies on the recommended correction fac...

  2. Blanking Clearance and Punch Velocity Effects on The Sheared Edge Characteristic in Micro-Blanking of Commercially Pure Copper Sheet

    OpenAIRE

    Didin Zakaria Lubis; Ichsan Ristiawan

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to identify the influences between clearance and punch velocity on the part edge quality of blanked parts. Experiments have been conducted using material copper, punch-die clearance and punch velocity variations. In order to determine the reachable punch-die clearance and punch velocity required for blanking. The quality of the part-edge characteristics shows that higher punch velocity and decreases clearance value can improve the part-edge quality, resulting in smaller burr h...

  3. Higher derivative corrections to incoherent metallic transport in holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baggioli, Matteo [Institut de Física d’Altes Energies (IFAE), Universitat Autónoma de Barcelona,The Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology,Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Crete Center for Theoretical Physics and I.P.P., Department of Physics, University of Crete,71003 Heraklion (Greece); Goutéraux, Blaise [Nordita, KTH Royal Institute of Technology and Stockholm University,Roslagstullsbacken 23, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics, Stanford University,Varian Laboratory of Physics, 382 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, CA 94305-4060 (United States); APC, Université Paris 7, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/IRFU, Obs. de Paris,Sorbonne Paris Cité (UMR du CNRS 7164),Bâtiment Condorcet, 10, rue Alice Domon et Léonie Duquet, F-75205, Paris Cedex 13 (France); Kiritsis, Elias [APC, Université Paris 7, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/IRFU, Obs. de Paris,Sorbonne Paris Cité (UMR du CNRS 7164),Bâtiment Condorcet, 10, rue Alice Domon et Léonie Duquet, F-75205, Paris Cedex 13 (France); Crete Center for Theoretical Physics and I.P.P., Department of Physics, University of Crete,71003 Heraklion (Greece); Crete Center for Quantum Complexity and Nanotechnology, University of Crete,71003 Heraklion (Greece); Li, Wei-Jia [Institute of Theoretical Physics, School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology,Dalian University of Technology, 214 School of Physics,2 Linggong road, Ganjingzi District, Dalian 116024, Liaoning Province (China); Crete Center for Theoretical Physics and I.P.P., Department of Physics, University of Crete,71003 Heraklion (Greece)

    2017-03-31

    Transport in strongly-disordered, metallic systems is governed by diffusive processes. Based on quantum mechanics, it has been conjectured that these diffusivities obey a lower bound D/v{sup 2}≳ℏ/k{sub B}T, the saturation of which provides a mechanism for the T-linear resistivity of bad metals. This bound features a characteristic velocity v, which was later argued to be the butterfly velocity v{sub B}, based on holographic models of transport. This establishes a link between incoherent metallic transport, quantum chaos and Planckian timescales. Here we study higher derivative corrections to an effective holographic action of homogeneous disorder. The higher derivative terms involve only the charge and translation symmetry breaking sector. We show that they have a strong impact on the bound on charge diffusion D{sub c}/v{sub B}{sup 2}≳ℏ/k{sub B}T, by potentially making the coefficient of its right-hand side arbitrarily small. On the other hand, the bound on energy diffusion is not affected.

  4. Characteristic wave velocities in spherical electromagnetic cloaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaghjian, A D; Maci, S; Martini, E

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the characteristic wave velocities in spherical electromagnetic cloaks, namely, phase, ray, group and energy-transport velocities. After deriving explicit expressions for the phase and ray velocities (the latter defined as the phase velocity along the direction of the Poynting vector), special attention is given to the determination of group and energy-transport velocities, because a cursory application of conventional formulae for local group and energy-transport velocities can lead to a discrepancy between these velocities if the permittivity and permeability dyadics are not equal over a frequency range about the center frequency. In contrast, a general theorem can be proven from Maxwell's equations that the local group and energy-transport velocities are equal in linear, lossless, frequency dispersive, source-free bianisotropic material. This apparent paradox is explained by showing that the local fields of the spherical cloak uncouple into an E wave and an H wave, each with its own group and energy-transport velocities, and that the group and energy-transport velocities of either the E wave or the H wave are equal and thus satisfy the general theorem.

  5. Geotail observations of FTE velocities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. I. Korotova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the plasma velocity signatures expected in association with flux transfer events (FTEs. Events moving faster than or opposite the ambient media should generate bipolar inward/outward (outward/inward flow perturbations normal to the nominal magnetopause in the magnetosphere (magnetosheath. Flow perturbations directly upstream and downstream from the events should be in the direction of event motion. Flows on the flanks should be in the direction opposite the motion of events moving at subsonic and subAlfvénic speeds relative to the ambient plasma. Events moving with the ambient flow should generate no flow perturbations in the ambient plasma. Alfvén waves propagating parallel (antiparallel to the axial magnetic field of FTEs may generate anticorrelated (correlated magnetic field and flow perturbations within the core region of FTEs. We present case studies illustrating many of these signatures. In the examples considered, Alfvén waves propagate along event axes away from the inferred reconnection site. A statistical study of FTEs observed by Geotail over a 3.5-year period reveals that FTEs within the magnetosphere invariably move faster than the ambient flow, while those in the magnetosheath move both faster and slower than the ambient flow.

  6. Reciprocally-Rotating Velocity Obstacles

    KAUST Repository

    Giese, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    © 2014 IEEE. Modern multi-agent systems frequently use highlevel planners to extract basic paths for agents, and then rely on local collision avoidance to ensure that the agents reach their destinations without colliding with one another or dynamic obstacles. One state-of-the-art local collision avoidance technique is Optimal Reciprocal Collision Avoidance (ORCA). Despite being fast and efficient for circular-shaped agents, ORCA may deadlock when polygonal shapes are used. To address this shortcoming, we introduce Reciprocally-Rotating Velocity Obstacles (RRVO). RRVO generalizes ORCA by introducing a notion of rotation for polygonally-shaped agents. This generalization permits more realistic motion than ORCA and does not suffer from as much deadlock. In this paper, we present the theory of RRVO and show empirically that it does not suffer from the deadlock issue ORCA has, permits agents to reach goals faster, and has a comparable collision rate at the cost of performance overhead quadratic in the (typically small) user-defined parameter δ.

  7. Group Velocity for Leaky Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzeznik, Andrew; Chumakova, Lyubov; Rosales, Rodolfo

    2017-11-01

    In many linear dispersive/conservative wave problems one considers solutions in an infinite medium which is uniform everywhere except for a bounded region. In general, localized inhomogeneities of the medium cause partial internal reflection, and some waves leak out of the domain. Often one only desires the solution in the inhomogeneous region, with the exterior accounted for by radiation boundary conditions. Formulating such conditions requires definition of the direction of energy propagation for leaky waves in multiple dimensions. In uniform media such waves have the form exp (d . x + st) where d and s are complex and related by a dispersion relation. A complex s is required since these waves decay via radiation to infinity, even though the medium is conservative. We present a modified form of Whitham's Averaged Lagrangian Theory along with modulation theory to extend the classical idea of group velocity to leaky waves. This allows for solving on the bounded region by representing the waves as a linear combination of leaky modes, each exponentially decaying in time. This presentation is part of a joint project, and applications of these results to example GFD problems will be presented by L. Chumakova in the talk ``Leaky GFD Problems''. This work is partially supported by NSF Grants DMS-1614043, DMS-1719637, and 1122374, and by the Hertz Foundation.

  8. Computing discharge using the index velocity method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levesque, Victor A.; Oberg, Kevin A.

    2012-01-01

    Application of the index velocity method for computing continuous records of discharge has become increasingly common, especially since the introduction of low-cost acoustic Doppler velocity meters (ADVMs) in 1997. Presently (2011), the index velocity method is being used to compute discharge records for approximately 470 gaging stations operated and maintained by the U.S. Geological Survey. The purpose of this report is to document and describe techniques for computing discharge records using the index velocity method. Computing discharge using the index velocity method differs from the traditional stage-discharge method by separating velocity and area into two ratings—the index velocity rating and the stage-area rating. The outputs from each of these ratings, mean channel velocity (V) and cross-sectional area (A), are then multiplied together to compute a discharge. For the index velocity method, V is a function of such parameters as streamwise velocity, stage, cross-stream velocity, and velocity head, and A is a function of stage and cross-section shape. The index velocity method can be used at locations where stage-discharge methods are used, but it is especially appropriate when more than one specific discharge can be measured for a specific stage. After the ADVM is selected, installed, and configured, the stage-area rating and the index velocity rating must be developed. A standard cross section is identified and surveyed in order to develop the stage-area rating. The standard cross section should be surveyed every year for the first 3 years of operation and thereafter at a lesser frequency, depending on the susceptibility of the cross section to change. Periodic measurements of discharge are used to calibrate and validate the index rating for the range of conditions experienced at the gaging station. Data from discharge measurements, ADVMs, and stage sensors are compiled for index-rating analysis. Index ratings are developed by means of regression

  9. Ionization and excitation of lithium atoms by fast charged particle impact: identification of mechanisms for double K-shell vacancy production as a function of the projectile charge and velocity; Ionisation et excitation de l'atome de lithium par impact de particules chargees rapides: Identification des mecanismes de creation de deux lacunes en couche K du lithium en fonction de la charge et de la vitesse du projectile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangama, J

    2002-11-01

    Ionization and excitation of lithium atoms by fast charged particle impact: identification of mechanisms for double K-shell vacancy production as a function of projectile charge and velocity. Auger electron spectroscopy is used for an experimental investigation of ionization and excitation of lithium atoms by ions (Kr34{sup +} and Ar18{sup +}) and electrons at high impact velocities (from 6 to 60 a.u.). In particular, relative contributions of the mechanisms responsible for lithium K-shell ionization-excitation are determined for various projectile charges Zp and velocities vp. A large range of perturbation parameters |Zp|/vp is explored (|Zp|/vp = 0,05 - 0,7 a.u.). From single K-shell excitation results, it appears that the projectile-electron interaction gives mainly rise to a dipole-like transition 1s -> np Concerning K-shell ionization-excitation, the separation of the TS2 (two independent projectile-electron interactions) and TS1 (one projectile-electron interaction) mechanisms responsible for the formation of the 2snp 1,3P and 2sns 1,3S lithium states is performed. In TS1 process, the projectile-electron interaction can be followed by an electron-electron interaction (dielectronic process) or by an internal rearrangement of the residual target after a sudden potential change (shake process). From Born theory, ab initio calculations are performed. The good agreement between theoretical and experimental results confirms the mechanism identification. For the production of P states, TS1 is found to be strongly dominant for small |Zp|/vp values and TS2 is found to be most important for large |Zp|/vp values. Since P states cannot be formed significantly via a shake process, the TS1 and TS2 separation provides a direct signature of the dielectronic process. On the other hand, the TS1 process is shown to be the unique process for producing the S states. At the moment, only the shake aspect of the TS1 process can explain the fact that the 2s3s configuration is

  10. Vector blood velocity estimation in medical ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Gran, Fredrik; Udesen, Jesper

    2006-01-01

    Two methods for making vector velocity estimation in medical ultrasound are presented. All of the techniques can find both the axial and transverse velocity in the image and can be used for displaying both the correct velocity magnitude and direction. The first method uses a transverse oscillation...... in the ultrasound field to find the transverse velocity. In-vivo examples from the carotid artery are shown, where complex turbulent flow is found in certain parts of the cardiac cycle. The second approach uses directional beam forming along the flow direction to estimate the velocity magnitude. Using a correlation...... search can also yield the direction, and the full velocity vector is thereby found. An examples from a flow rig is shown....

  11. Algorithms for estimating blood velocities using ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2000-01-01

    Ultrasound has been used intensively for the last 15 years for studying the hemodynamics of the human body. Systems for determining both the velocity distribution at one point of interest (spectral systems) and for displaying a map of velocity in real time have been constructed. A number of schemes...... have been developed for performing the estimation, and the various approaches are described. The current systems only display the velocity along the ultrasound beam direction and a velocity transverse to the beam is not detected. This is a major problem in these systems, since most blood vessels...... are parallel to the skin surface. Angling the transducer will often disturb the flow, and new techniques for finding transverse velocities are needed. The various approaches for determining transverse velocities will be explained. This includes techniques using two-dimensional correlation (speckle tracking...

  12. An Approach to Predict Debris Flow Average Velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Cao

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Debris flow is one of the major threats for the sustainability of environmental and social development. The velocity directly determines the impact on the vulnerability. This study focuses on an approach using radial basis function (RBF neural network and gravitational search algorithm (GSA for predicting debris flow velocity. A total of 50 debris flow events were investigated in the Jiangjia gully. These data were used for building the GSA-based RBF approach (GSA-RBF. Eighty percent (40 groups of the measured data were selected randomly as the training database. The other 20% (10 groups of data were used as testing data. Finally, the approach was applied to predict six debris flow gullies velocities in the Wudongde Dam site area, where environmental conditions were similar to the Jiangjia gully. The modified Dongchuan empirical equation and the pulled particle analysis of debris flow (PPA approach were used for comparison and validation. The results showed that: (i the GSA-RBF predicted debris flow velocity values are very close to the measured values, which performs better than those using RBF neural network alone; (ii the GSA-RBF results and the MDEE results are similar in the Jiangjia gully debris flow velocities prediction, and GSA-RBF performs better; (iii in the study area, the GSA-RBF results are validated reliable; and (iv we could consider more variables in predicting the debris flow velocity by using GSA-RBF on the basis of measured data in other areas, which is more applicable. Because the GSA-RBF approach was more accurate, both the numerical simulation and the empirical equation can be taken into consideration for constructing debris flow mitigation works. They could be complementary and verified for each other.

  13. Carbonaceous Survivability on Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunch, T. E.; Becker, Luann; Morrison, David (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    In order to gain knowledge about the potential contributions of comets and cosmic dust to the origin of life on Earth, we need to explore the survivability of their potential organic compounds on impact and the formation of secondary products that may have arisen from the chaotic events sustained by the carriers as they fell to Earth. We have performed a series of hypervelocity impact experiments using carbon-bearing impactors (diamond, graphite, kerogens, PAH crystals, and Murchison and Nogoya meteorites) into Al plate targets at velocities - 6 km/s. Estimated peak shock pressures probably did not exceed 120 GPa and peak shock temperatures were probably less than 4000 K for times of nano- to microsecs. Nominal crater dia. are less than one mm. The most significant results of these experiments are the preservation of the higher mass PAHs (e. g., pyrene relative to napthalene) and the formation of additional alkylated PAHs. We have also examined the residues of polystyrene projectiles impacted by a microparticle accelerator into targets at velocities up to 15 km/s. This talk will discuss the results of these experiments and their implications with respect to the survival of carbonaceous deliverables to early Earth. The prospects of survivability of organic molecules on "intact" capture of cosmic dust in space via soft: and hard cosmic dust collectors will also be discussed.

  14. Progress of impact ignition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, M.; Nagatomo, H.; Johzaki, T.

    2010-11-01

    In impact ignition scheme, a portion of the fuel (the impactor) is accelerated to a super-high velocity, compressed by convergence, and collided with a precompressed main fuel. This collision generates shock waves in both the impactor and the main fuel. Since the density of the impactor is generally much lower than that of the main fuel, the pressure balance ensures that the shock-heated temperature of the impactor is significantly higher than that of the main fuel. Hence, the impactor can reach ignition temperature and thus become an igniter. Here we report major new results on recent impact ignition research: (1) A maximum velocity ∼ 1000 km/s has been achieved under the operation of NIKE KrF laser at Naval Research Laboratory (laser wavelength=0.25μm) in the use of a planar target made of plastic and (2) We have performed two-dimensional simulation for burn and ignition to show the feasibility of the impact ignition. (author)

  15. Hip joint kinetics in the table tennis topspin forehand: relationship to racket velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iino, Yoichi

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine hip joint kinetics during a table tennis topspin forehand, and to investigate the relationship between the relevant kinematic and kinetic variables and the racket horizontal and vertical velocities at ball impact. Eighteen male advanced table tennis players hit cross-court topspin forehands against backspin balls. The hip joint torque and force components around the pelvis coordinate system were determined using inverse dynamics. Furthermore, the work done on the pelvis by these components was also determined. The peak pelvis axial rotation velocity and the work done by the playing side hip pelvis axial rotation torque were positively related to the racket horizontal velocity at impact. The sum of the work done on the pelvis by the backward tilt torques and the upward joint forces was positively related to the racket vertical velocity at impact. The results suggest that the playing side hip pelvis axial rotation torque exertion is important for acquiring a high racket horizontal velocity at impact. The pelvis backward tilt torques and upward joint forces at both hip joints collectively contribute to the generation of the racket vertical velocity, and the mechanism for acquiring the vertical velocity may vary among players.

  16. Remote determination of the velocity index and mean streamwise velocity profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, E. D.; Cowen, E. A.

    2017-09-01

    When determining volumetric discharge from surface measurements of currents in a river or open channel, the velocity index is typically used to convert surface velocities to depth-averaged velocities. The velocity index is given by, k=Ub/Usurf, where Ub is the depth-averaged velocity and Usurf is the local surface velocity. The USGS (United States Geological Survey) standard value for this coefficient, k = 0.85, was determined from a series of laboratory experiments and has been widely used in the field and in laboratory measurements of volumetric discharge despite evidence that the velocity index is site-specific. Numerous studies have documented that the velocity index varies with Reynolds number, flow depth, and relative bed roughness and with the presence of secondary flows. A remote method of determining depth-averaged velocity and hence the velocity index is developed here. The technique leverages the findings of Johnson and Cowen (2017) and permits remote determination of the velocity power-law exponent thereby, enabling remote prediction of the vertical structure of the mean streamwise velocity, the depth-averaged velocity, and the velocity index.

  17. Demonstration of a Vector Velocity Technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peter Møller; Pedersen, Mads M.; Hansen, Kristoffer L.

    2011-01-01

    With conventional Doppler ultrasound it is not possible to estimate direction and velocity of blood flow, when the angle of insonation exceeds 60–70°. Transverse oscillation is an angle independent vector velocity technique which is now implemented on a conventional ultrasound scanner. In this pa......With conventional Doppler ultrasound it is not possible to estimate direction and velocity of blood flow, when the angle of insonation exceeds 60–70°. Transverse oscillation is an angle independent vector velocity technique which is now implemented on a conventional ultrasound scanner...

  18. On whistler-mode group velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sazhin, S.S.

    1986-01-01

    An analytical of the group velocity of whistler-mode waves propagating parallel to the magnetic field in a hot anisotropic plasma is presented. Some simple approximate formulae, which can be used for the magnetospheric applications, are derived. These formulae can predict some properties of this group velocity which were not previously recognized or were obtained by numerical methods. In particular, it is pointed out that the anisotropy tends to compensate for the influence of the electron temperature on the value of the group velocity when the wave frequency is well below the electron gyrofrequency. It is predicted, that under conditions at frequencies near the electron gyrofrequency, this velocity tends towards zero

  19. Velocity measurement of conductor using electromagnetic induction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Gu Hwa; Kim, Ho Young; Park, Joon Po; Jeong, Hee Tae; Lee, Eui Wan

    2002-01-01

    A basic technology was investigated to measure the speed of conductor by non-contact electromagnetic method. The principle of the velocity sensor was electromagnetic induction. To design electromagnet for velocity sensor, 2D electromagnetic analysis was performed using FEM software. The sensor output was analyzed according to the parameters of velocity sensor, such as the type of magnetizing currents and the lift-off. Output of magnetic sensor was linearly depended on the conductor speed and magnetizing current. To compensate the lift-off changes during measurement of velocity, the other magnetic sensor was put at the pole of electromagnet.

  20. Conduction velocity of antigravity muscle action potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christova, L; Kosarov, D; Christova, P

    1992-01-01

    The conduction velocity of the impulses along the muscle fibers is one of the parameters of the extraterritorial potentials of the motor units allowing for the evaluation of the functional state of the muscles. There are no data about the conduction velocities of antigravity muscleaction potentials. In this paper we offer a method for measuring conduction velocity of potentials of single MUs and the averaged potentials of the interference electromiogram (IEMG) lead-off by surface electrodes from mm. sternocleidomastoideus, trapezius, deltoideus (caput laterale) and vastus medialis. The measured mean values of the conduction velocity of antigravity muscles potentials can be used for testing the functional state of the muscles.