WorldWideScience

Sample records for higher plant shoots

  1. A role for shoot protein in shoot-root dry matter allocation in higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, M; Raven, J A; Lea, P J; Sprent, J I

    2006-01-01

    It is stated in many recent publications that nitrate (NO3-) acts as a signal to regulate dry matter partitioning between the shoot and root of higher plants. Here we challenge this hypothesis and present evidence for the viewpoint that NO3- and other environmental effects on the shoot:root dry weight ratio (S:R) of higher plants are often related mechanistically to changes in shoot protein concentration. The literature on environmental effects on S:R is reviewed, focusing on relationships between S:R, growth and leaf NO3- and protein concentrations. A series of experiments carried out to test the proposal that S:R is dependent on shoot protein concentration is highlighted and new data are presented for tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). KEY RESULTS/EVIDENCE: Results from the literature and new data for tobacco show that S:R and leaf NO3- concentration are not significantly correlated over a range of environmental conditions. A mechanism involving the relative availability of C and N substrates for growth in shoots can explain how shoot protein concentration can influence shoot growth and hence root growth and S:R. Generally, results in the literature are compatible with the hypothesis that macronutrients, water, irradiance and CO2 affect S:R through changes in shoot protein concentration. In detailed studies on several species, including tobacco, a linear regression model incorporating leaf soluble protein concentration and plant dry weight could explain the greater proportion of the variation in S:R within and between treatments over a wide range of conditions. It is concluded that if NO3- can influence the S:R of higher plants, it does so only over a narrow range of conditions. Evidence is strong that environmental effects on S:R are often related mechanistically to their effects on shoot protein concentration.

  2. From genes to shape: understanding the control of morphogenesis at the shoot meristem in higher plants using systems biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traas, Jan; Hamant, Olivier

    2009-11-01

    The shoot apical meristem is a population of stem cells which controls the initiation of leaves, flowers and branches during the entire life of the plant. Although we have gained significant new insight in the nature of the genetic networks and cellular processes that control meristem function, major questions have remained unsolved. It has been difficult, for instance, to define the precise role of genetic determinants in controlling morphogenesis and the control of shape is currently a major and largely unresolved issue in plant biology. This is a difficult task, notably because it is close to impossible to predict the activity of a single gene, in a context where thousands of genes interact. Systems biology has emerged as a powerful tool to address this type of issue. Systems biology analyses processes such as plant development at different scales, describing not only the properties of individual cells but also their interactions. The complexity of the information involved is such, that it cannot be understood and integrated on a purely intuitive basis. For this reason, building on the acquisition of quantitative data, computer models have become more and more important. The first models have begun to reproduce gene network behaviours and dynamical shape changes, providing new insight in the control of morphogenesis.

  3. Direct shoot organogenesis and plant regeneration from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2010-12-13

    Dec 13, 2010 ... Kenaf cultivar P3B was conserved in the Laboratory of Bastfibre. Crops of Guangxi University. Seeds were ..... Planta,. 47: 585-588. Srivatanakul M, Park SH, Sanders JR, Salas MG, Smith RH (2000). Multiple shoot regeneration of kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.) from a shoot apex culture system. Plant Cell ...

  4. [Genetic regulation of plant shoot stem cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al'bert, E V; Ezhova, T A

    2013-02-01

    This article describes the main features of plant stem cells and summarizes the results of studies of the genetic control of stem cell maintenance in the apical meristem of the shoot. It is demonstrated that the WUS-CLV gene system plays a key role in the maintenance of shoot apical stem cells and the formation of adventitious buds and somatic embryos. Unconventional concepts of plant stem cells are considered.

  5. The growth and form of plant shoots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelakkot, Raghunath; Mahadevan, L.

    2015-03-01

    Growing plant stems and shoots exhibit a variety of shapes that embody growth in response to various stimuli. We provide a quantitative biophysical theory for these shapes by accounting for the inherent observed passive and active effects: (i) the passive elastic deflection of the shoot due to its own weight, and (ii) the active controllable growth response of the shoot in response to its orientation relative to gravity, and (iii) proprioception, the shoot's growth response to its own observable shape, which is itself determined by its elasticity and weight. A morphospace diagram in terms of two dimensionless parameters representing a scaled local active gravitropic sensitivity, and a scaled passive elastic sag shows how a variety of observed transient and steady morphologies with effective positive, negative and even oscillatory gravitropic behaviors arise in a sentient growing filament naturally, without the need for ad-hoc complex spatio-temporal control strategies.

  6. Adventitious shoots induction and plant regeneration from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A highly efficient regeneration system is a prerequisite step for successful genetic transformation of watermelon cultivars (Citrullus lanatus L.). The objective of this study was to establish efficient in vitro plant regeneration for three watermelon cultivars. To achieve optimal conditions for adventitious shoot induction, the ...

  7. Effects of Temperature on Growth and Constituents of New Shoots in Tea Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anan, Toyomasa; Yamaguchi, Yuichi; Tamura, Yasuaki; Mizukami, Yuzo; Sawai, Yusuke

    The effects of air temperature on growth and constituents of new shoots in tea plants were examined. In the first crop season, new shoots of tea plants grown in a hothouse from September to April of the following year were compared with those of tea plants outdoors. The average temperature in the hothouse from September to April of the following year was about 16-19°C,and the average outdoor temperature was about 9-12°C. The results indicated that the coefficients of variation of the weights and numbers of immature leaves of new shoots grown in a hothouse were greater than those of new shoots grown outdoors. Therefore, the new shoots grown in a hothouse were more uneven than those grown outdoors. The catechin contents of new shoots grown in a hothouse were higher than those of new shoots grown outdoors, and total nitrogen contents of new shoots grown in a hothouse were lower than those of new shoots grown outdoors. In the next study, young tea plants were cultivated in a hothouse and outdoors over a period of one year. The average temperature in the hothouse was about 22-23°C, and that outdoors was about 16-17°C. The growth cycles in the hothouse were shorter than those outdoors, and the number of pluckings and the yield of new shoots grown in a hothouse were more than those of new shoots grown outdoors.

  8. New pathogens of fruit plant shoots in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Dorota Król

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The studies conducted in the years 2010-2012 showed that among the fungi species inhabiting shoots of fruit plants there were cultures of Phomopsisspp. They were isolated mainly from the shoots originated from orchards without chemical protection. Moreover, isolates of Phomopsis obtained both from shoots with disease symptoms and from visually healthy ones. The morphological characteristics of isolated strains and their pathogenic abilities as well as genetic similarity suggest that they represent one species of fungus.

  9. Efficient regeneration of plants from shoot tip explants of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dendrobium densiflorum Lindl. is one of the horticulturally important orchids of Nepal due to its beautiful yellowish flower and medicinal properties. The present study was carried out for plant regeneration from shoot tip explants of D. densiflorum by tissue culture technique. The shoot tip explants of this species, obtained ...

  10. Cytokinins in shoot apices of Brassica napus plants during vernalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarkowská, Danuše; Filek, Maria; Biesaga-Kościelniak, Jolanta; Marcińska, Izabela; Macháčková, Ivana; Krekule, Jan; Strnad, Miroslav

    2012-05-01

    The putative role of cytokinins in processes leading to reproductive development of plants was investigated by analysing the shoot apical parts of a winter cultivar of oilseed rape (Brassica napus L. var. oleifera, cv. Górczański). The endogenous cytokinin levels were measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS) in the shoot apices of vegetative plants (grown at 20/17°C with a 16/8h day/night regime) and vernalized plants (56 days at 5/2°C with a 16/8h photoperiod) at different times during floral transition. During vernalization, the content of all isoprenoid cytokinins increased significantly, coinciding well with the onset of the early stages of reproductive development. Cytokinin levels reached their maxima when most of the plants became irreversibly reproductive (after 42 days of cold treatment). cis-Zeatin riboside (unequivocally identified by quadrupole-time-of-flight MS) accounted for ca. 87-89% of the total isoprenoid cytokinin content in control and vernalized plants, whilst N(6)-isopentenyladenosine ( approximately 6% in control and approximately 8% in vernalized plants) and cis-zeatin (approxiamtely 2% in control and approximately 1% in vernalized plants) were the next most abundant cytokinins. In the post-vernalization period, endogenous cytokinin levels decreased, but remained significantly higher in the reproductive plants than in the vegetative controls. These results suggest that cytokinins, especially those of the cis-zeatin type, are involved in vernalization-induced reproductive development of B. napus. © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. High frequency plant regeneration from shoot tip explants of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-08-02

    Aug 2, 2010 ... Sobhakumari VP, Lalithakumari D (2003). Direct plant regeneration from shoot tip cultures of Capsicum annuum L. cv. PLR-1. Phytomorphology, 53(3&4): 235-242. Suchitra B, Mehar Z, Susil K (1999). In vitro multiplication of Centella asiatica. Curr. Sci. 76: 147-158. Sunandakumari C, MaSurtin KP, Chithra ...

  12. Specification of Epidermal Cell Fate in Plant Shoots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinobu eTakada

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Land plants have evolved a single layer of epidermal cells, which are characterized by mostly anticlinal cell division patterns, formation of a waterproof coat called cuticle, and unique cell types such as stomatal guard cells and trichomes. The shoot epidermis plays important roles not only to protect plants from dehydration and pathogens but also to ensure their proper organogenesis and growth control. Extensive molecular genetic studies in Arabidopsis and maize have identified a number of genes that are required for epidermal cell differentiation. However, the mechanism that specifies shoot epidermal cell fate during plant organogenesis remains largely unknown. Particularly, little is known regarding positional information that should restrict epidermal cell fate to the outermost cell layer of the developing organs. Recent studies suggested that certain members of the HD-ZIP class IV homeobox genes are possible master regulators of shoot epidermal cell fate. Here, we summarize the roles of the regulatory genes that are involved in epidermal cell fate specification and discuss the possible mechanisms that limit the expression and/or activity of the master transcriptional regulators to the outermost cell layer in plant shoots.

  13. Direct shoot organogenesis and plant regeneration from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Using the whole cotyledonary node as explants, a rapid and efficient regeneration protocol was established for kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.) on Murashige and Skoog (MS) basal medium. The effects of the plant growth regulators: N6-benzyladenine (BA), indole-3-aceticacid (IAA) and the non-ironic surfactant pluronic ...

  14. Adventitious shoots induction and plant regeneration from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aghomotsegin

    2015-07-08

    Jul 8, 2015 ... A highly efficient regeneration system is a prerequisite step for successful genetic transformation of watermelon cultivars (Citrullus lanatus L.). The objective of this study was to establish efficient in vitro plant regeneration for three watermelon cultivars. To achieve optimal conditions for adventitious.

  15. GENETIC RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PLANT GROWTH, SHOOT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AISA

    Le tissu vasculaire de l'épi de maïs (Zea mays L.) transporte les nutriments utilisés dans le rendement des grains. Pour connaître l'héritabilité du développement de l'épi et de la plante, des études ont été conduites au champ pour estimer les aptitudes à la combinaison des parents qui diffèrent par la taille des graines, de.

  16. Strigolactones are a new-defined class of plant hormones which inhibit shoot branching and mediate the interaction of plant-AM fungi and plant-parasitic weeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Caiyan; Zou, Junhuang; Zhang, Shuying; Zaitlin, David; Zhu, Lihuang

    2009-08-01

    Because plants are sessile organisms, the ability to adapt to a wide range of environmental conditions is critical for their survival. As a consequence, plants use hormones to regulate growth, mitigate biotic and abiotic stresses, and to communicate with other organisms. Many plant hormones function pleiotropically in vivo, and often work in tandem with other hormones that are chemically distinct. A newly-defined class of plant hormones, the strigolactones, cooperate with auxins and cytokinins to control shoot branching and the outgrowth of lateral buds. Strigolactones were originally identified as compounds that stimulated the germination of parasitic plant seeds, and were also demonstrated to induce hyphal branching in arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. AM fungi form symbioses with higher plant roots and mainly facilitate the absorption of phosphate from the soil. Conforming to the classical definition of a plant hormone, strigolactones are produced in the roots and translocated to the shoots where they inhibit shoot outgrowth and branching. The biosynthesis of this class of compounds is regulated by soil nutrient availability, i.e. the plant will increase its production of strigolactones when the soil phosphate concentration is limited, and decrease production when phosphates are in ample supply. Strigolactones that affect plant shoot branching, AM fungal hyphal branching, and seed germination in parasitic plants facilitate chemical synthesis of similar compounds to control these and other biological processes by exogenous application.

  17. Thidiazuron-induced high frequency of shoot induction and plant regeneration in protoplast derived pea callus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhmer, P; Meyer, B; Jacobsen, H J

    1995-01-01

    Protoplasts isolated from lateral shoot buds of cotyledon-free pea embryo axes were regenerated to callus. Protoplast derived calluses with a diameter of about 1cm were transferred to shoot induction media, containing different concentrations (1-50µM) of thidiazuron. Shoot formation was observed after 16 weeks up to 12% efficiency. Thidiazuron (10µM) was the most effective concentration in all experiments. Shoot buds elongated in medium supplemented with N-isopentenyl adenine and indole-3-butyric acid. Since rooting was almost impossible in these thidiazuron-induced shoots, shoots were grafted onto young pea seedlings and regenerated to fertile plants.

  18. Accumulation of Sb, Pb, Cu, Zn and Cd by various plants species on two different relocated military shooting range soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelou, Michael W H; Hockmann, Kerstin; Pokharel, Rasesh; Jakob, Alfred; Schulin, Rainer

    2012-10-15

    Annually, more than 400 t Pb and 10 t Sb enter Swiss soils at some 2000 military shooting ranges. After the decommission of military shooting ranges, heavily contaminated soils (>2000 mg kg(-1) Pb) are landfilled or processed by soil washing, whereas for soils with less contamination, alternate strategies are sought. Although the use of military shooting ranges for grazing in Switzerland is common practice, no assessment has been done about the uptake of Sb in plants and its subsequent potential intake by grazing animals. We determined the uptake of Sb, Pb, Cu, Zn and Cd in the aboveground biomass of nine plant species growing on a calcareous (Chur) and a weakly acidic (Losone) military shooting range soil in order to assess if grazing would be safe to employ on decommissioned military shooting ranges. The two soils did not differ in their total concentrations of Cu, Zn, Sb and Cd, they differed however in the total concentration of Pb. Additionally, their physical and chemical properties were significantly different. The accumulation of Zn, Cu, Cd and Pb in the shoots of all nine plant species remained below the Swiss tolerance values for fodder plants (150 mg kg(-1) Zn, 15-35 mg kg(-1) Cu, 40 mg kg(-1) Pb, and 1 mg kg(-1) Cd DW), with the only exception of Pb in Chenopodium album shoots which reached a concentration of 62 mg kg(-1) DW. Antimony concentrations were 1.5-2.6-fold higher in plants growing on the calcareous soil than on the weakly acidic soil. Considering Cu, Zn, Pb, Sb and Cd, all plants, with the exception C. album, would be suitable for grazing on similar shooting range soils. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Plant regeneration through organogenesis and shoot proliferation in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-10-20

    Sciences, Pt. Ravishankar Shukla University, Raipur 492 010, India. .... Trichodesma indicum shoot multiplication during sub culture of nodal segments on MS + 0.23 µM. S + KIN (0.23 μM) subculture. Shoot no. Shoot length (mm).

  20. Setbacks to shoot growth are common in woody plants, so how are shoots of some species safer than others?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Don W; Gleason, Sean M; Westoby, Mark

    2012-06-01

    Tissue turnover is a critical facet of plant life history variation. This study quantifies losses from setbacks to growth of terminal woody shoots 1.2m long, across 83 species and seven sites in eastern Australia. Setbacks, where the leading meristem had been removed or died and a new leader had emerged, were common (median three per shoot). Shoots had lost an average of 0.25 m of lead-stem length for 1.2 m net shoot-length gain. Insects like girdlers and borers were prominent causes of large setbacks. The sites spanned tropical to temperate and humid to semiarid climates, but variation in stem loss was much greater across species than across sites. We measured 17 plant functional traits related to growth form, mechanics, hydraulics, and economics. Only four traits were correlated with variation across species in stem losses: stem diameter, stem nitrogen content, bark thickness, and maximum photosynthetic rate. The correlations were weak. Stem specific gravity (wood density) showed no correlation with risk. Our results suggest a pattern similar to the growth risk trade-off known for herbaceous plants, where traits associated with fast growth increase tissue turnover and herbivory, but the weak correlations leave ample scope for other influences that remain to be identified.

  1. Micropropagation of a Thai medicinal plant for women's health, Curcuma comosa Roxb., via shoot and microrhizome inductions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo-apirukkul, Sureerat; Jenjittikul, Thaya; Saralamp, Promchit; Prathanturarug, Sompop

    2012-04-01

    We studied the effects of explant types, plant growth regulators, and sucrose concentrations on shoot and microrhizome inductions of Curcuma comosa Roxb., an important Thai medicinal plant for women's health. Explant types significantly affected shoot induction of the plant. The maximum shoot multiplication rate of 11.82 ± 1.03 shoots/responding explant was obtained when culturing terminal bud explants on semi-solid Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium supplemented with 18.16 μM thidiazuron for 8 weeks. Subsequently, they were transferred to a semi-solid MS medium without plant growth regulators for 4 weeks. The regenerated shoots produced roots spontaneously. Rooted plantlets were successfully transferred to the soil. Microrhizome induction was significantly influenced by sucrose concentrations, but not by 6-benzyladenine (BA). Liquid MS medium with a combination of 17.76 μM BA and 50 g L(-1) sucrose was optimal for microrhizome induction of C. comosa. After 12 weeks of culture, the microrhizome induction rate was 3.36 ± 0.44 microrhizomes/responding explant. Starch accumulation in microrhizomes increased with higher sugar concentration and with longer duration of culture. The microrhizomes were allowed to germinate under greenhouse conditions and further developed into normal plants. The protocols established will be used for the production of uniform plantlets suitable for field plantation for the herbal industry.

  2. The functional ecology of shoot architecture in sun and shade plants of Heteromeles arbutifolia M. Roem., a Californian chaparral shrub.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valladares, Fernando; Pearcy, Robert W

    1998-03-01

    The functional roles of the contrasting morphologies of sun and shade shoots of the evergreen shrub Heteromeles arbutifolia were investigated in chaparral and understory habitats by applying a three-dimensional plant architecture simulation model, YPLANT. The simulations were shown to accurately predict the measured frequency distribution of photosynthetic photon flux density (PFD) on both the leaves and a horizontal surface in the open, and gave reasonably good agreement for the more complex light environment in the shade. The sun shoot architecture was orthotropic and characterized by steeply inclined (mean = 71o) leaves in a spiral phyllotaxy with short internodes. This architecture resulted in relatively low light absorption efficiencies (E A) for both diffuse and direct PFD, especially during the summer when solar elevation angles were high. Shade shoots were more plagiotropic with longer internodes and a pseudo-distichous phyllotaxis caused by bending of the petioles that positioned the leaves in a nearly horizontal plane (mean = 5o). This shade-shoot architecture resulted in higher E A values for both direct and diffuse PFD as compared to those of the sun shoots. Differences in E A between sun and shade shoots and between summer and winter were related to differences in projection efficiencies as determined by leaf and solar angles, and by differences in self shading resulting from leaf overlap. The leaves exhibited photosynthetic acclimation to the sun and the shade, with the sun leaves having higher photosynthetic capacities per unit area, higher leaf mass per unit area and lower respiration rates per unit area than shade leaves. Despite having 7 times greater available PFD, sun shoots absorbed only 3 times more and had daily carbon gains only double of those of shade shoots. Simulations showed that sun and shade plants performed similarly in the open light environment, but that shade shoots substantially outperformed sun shoots in the shade light

  3. High frequency plant regeneration from shoot tip explants of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A high frequency and rapid regeneration protocol was developed from shoot tip explants of Citrullus colocynthis on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium supplemented with N6-benzylamino-purine (BAP, 0.5 mg/l) and α-naphthalene acetic acid (NAA, 0.5 mg/l). Highest number of shoots (23.0 ± 0.567) was obtained on MS ...

  4. Adventitious shoot formation and plant regeneration from leaf ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    High root regeneration was obtained when the explants were cultured on medium with NAA only. Shoot regeneration was associated with callus formation. Regenerated shoots were rooted ex vitro, acclimatized and grown normally in the greenhouse. Keywords: Cytokinins, carnation, multiplication, regeneration, thidiazuron

  5. Regeneration of Dioscorea floribunda plants from cryopreserved encapsulated shoot tips: effect of plant growth regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, B B; Ahuja-Ghosh, Sangeeta

    2007-01-01

    The encapsulation-dehydration protocol for the cryopreservation of in vitro shoot tips of Dioscorea floribunda was optimized. Maximum survival of 87% was obtained when overnight pretreatment with 0.3 M sucrose was followed by encapsulation, preculture in 0.75 M sucrose for 4 d, dehydration in a laminar air flow for 5.5 h, quenching in liquid nitrogen and thawing at 40 degrees C. During recovery growth, 29% shoot formation was obtained when cryopreserved shoot tips were initially cultured for 25 d on a medium with 1.5 mg per liter (-1) BAP, 0.2 mg per liter(-1) NAA and 0.2 mg per liter(-1) GA3 followed by culturing for 15 d on a medium with reduced BAP (1 mg per liter(-1)) but increased NAA (0.5 mg per liter(-1)) and GA3 (0.3 mg per liter(-1)). Finally, transfer on to a medium with further reduced doses of BAP (0.05 mg per liter(-1)) and NAA (0.15 mg per liter(-1)) but without GA3 stimulated production of fully grown plantlets. All plants regenerated without callus formation. Modification of post-thaw culture media with plant growth regulators was essential for regrowth of shoot tips to plantlets.

  6. Rapid in vitro propagation system through shoot tip cultures of Vitex trifolia L.-an important multipurpose plant of the Pacific traditional Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Rafique; Anis, Mohammad

    2014-07-01

    A rapid and efficient plant propagation system through shoot tip explants was established in Vitex trifolia L., a medicinally important plant belonging to the family Verbenaceae. Multiple shoots were induced directly on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium consisting of different cytokinins, 6-benzyladenine (BA), kinetin (Kin) and 2-isopentenyl adenine (2-iP), BA at an optimal concentration of 5.0 μM was most effective in inducing multiple shoots where 90 % explants responded with an average shoot number (4.4±0.1) and shoot length (2.0±0.1 cm) after 6 weeks of culture. Inclusion of NAA in the culture medium along with the optimum concentration of BA promoted a higher rate of shoot multiplication and length of the shoot, where 19.2±0.3 well-grown healthy shoots with an average shoot length of 4.4±0.1 cm were obtained on completion of 12 weeks culture period. Ex vitro rooting was achieved best directly in soilrite when basal portion of the shoots were treated with 500 μM indole-3-butyric acid for 15 min which was the most effective in inducing roots, as 95 % of the microshoots produced roots. Plantlets went through a hardening phase in a controlled plant growth chamber, prior to ex-vitro transfer. Micropropagated plants grew well, attained maturity and flowered with 92 % survival rate. The results of this study provide the first report on in vitro plant regeneration of Vitex trifolia L. using shoot tip explants.

  7. Accurate inference of shoot biomass from high-throughput images of cereal plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tester Mark

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract With the establishment of advanced technology facilities for high throughput plant phenotyping, the problem of estimating plant biomass of individual plants from their two dimensional images is becoming increasingly important. The approach predominantly cited in literature is to estimate the biomass of a plant as a linear function of the projected shoot area of plants in the images. However, the estimation error from this model, which is solely a function of projected shoot area, is large, prohibiting accurate estimation of the biomass of plants, particularly for the salt-stressed plants. In this paper, we propose a method based on plant specific weight for improving the accuracy of the linear model and reducing the estimation bias (the difference between actual shoot dry weight and the value of the shoot dry weight estimated with a predictive model. For the proposed method in this study, we modeled the plant shoot dry weight as a function of plant area and plant age. The data used for developing our model and comparing the results with the linear model were collected from a completely randomized block design experiment. A total of 320 plants from two bread wheat varieties were grown in a supported hydroponics system in a greenhouse. The plants were exposed to two levels of hydroponic salt treatments (NaCl at 0 and 100 mM for 6 weeks. Five harvests were carried out. Each time 64 randomly selected plants were imaged and then harvested to measure the shoot fresh weight and shoot dry weight. The results of statistical analysis showed that with our proposed method, most of the observed variance can be explained, and moreover only a small difference between actual and estimated shoot dry weight was obtained. The low estimation bias indicates that our proposed method can be used to estimate biomass of individual plants regardless of what variety the plant is and what salt treatment has been applied. We validated this model on an independent

  8. An effective disinfection protocol for plant regeneration from shoot tip ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An effective method of disinfection protocol and micropropagation with an enhanced survival rate of explants and reduced phenol induced browning in strawberry was developed. The survival rate of three genotypes was between 89.2 - 100%. Shoot tip were able to develop into plantlet on a hormone-free MS medium when ...

  9. An effective disinfection protocol for plant regeneration from shoot tip ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-06-03

    Jun 3, 2009 ... 2 – 3 mm were again surface sterilized in sodium hypochlorite. (0.25%) containing Tween 20 for 1 min and rinsed 2 - 3 times with sterile water. The wound sites exposed to sterilization agent were trimmed and shoot tip with 1.5 - 2 mm base was used for explants and subsequently cultured onto MS medium ...

  10. Nitrate Uptake by Roots as Regulated by Nitrate Assimilation in the Shoot of Castor Oil Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkby, Ernest A.; Armstrong, Michael J.

    1980-01-01

    Ricinus communis was used to test the Ben Zioni-Dijkshoorn hypothesis that NO3 uptake by roots can be regulated by NO3 assimilation in the shoot. The rate of the anion charge from assimilated NO3− (and SO42−) was followed in its distribution between organic acid anion accumulation and HCO3− efflux into the nutrient solution. In plants adequately supplied with NO3−, HCO3− efflux accounted for between 56 and 63% of the anion charge. When the plants were subjected to a low NO3 regime HCO3− excretion accounted for only 23% of the charge. A comparison of mature plants growing for a 10-day period at the two levels of NO3 nutrition revealed that the uptake of NO3− at the higher level was increased 3-fold, whereas K uptake was unaltered. To trace ion movement within the plant, the ionic constituents of xylem and phloem sap were determined. In xylem sap these constituents were found to be predominantly K+, Ca2+, and NO3−, whereas in the phloem sap they were mainly K+ and organic acid anions. Results have been obtained which may be interpreted as providing direct evidence of NO3 uptake by roots regulated by NO3 reduction in the tops, the process being facilitated by the recirculation of K+ in the plant. PMID:16661175

  11. Unifying model of shoot gravitropism reveals proprioception as a central feature of posture control in plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bastien, Renaud; Bohr, Tomas; Moulia, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    Gravitropism, the slow reorientation of plant growth in response to gravity, is a key determinant of the form and posture of land plants. Shoot gravitropism is triggered when statocysts sense the local angle of the growing organ relative to the gravitational field. Lateral transport of the hormone...

  12. Synergistic effects of some plant growth regulators on in vitro shoot ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The synergistic effects of some plant growth regulators was investigated upon shoot proliferation and growth of korarima (Aframomum corrorima (Braun) Jansen), an important culinary and medicinal plant species native to Ethiopia. Cultures were initiated from axillary bud explants of rhizome using Murashige and Skoog ...

  13. Effects of plant growth regulators on callus, shoot and root formation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Root and stem explants of fluted pumpkin were cultured in medium containing different types and concentrations of plant growth regulators (PGRs). The explants were observed for callus, root and shoot formation parameters after four months. Differences among explants, plant growth regulators and their interaction were ...

  14. Proteomic analysis of tea plants (Camellia sinensis with purple young shoots during leaf development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiongqiong Zhou

    Full Text Available Tea products made from purple leaves are highly preferred by consumers due to the health benefits. This study developed a proteome reference map related to color changes during leaf growth in tea (Camellia sinensis plant with purple young shoots using two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE. Forty-six differentially expressed proteins were detected in the gel and successfully identified by using MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS. The pronounced changes in the proteomic profile between tender purple leaves (TPL and mature green leaves (MGL included: 1 the lower activity of proteins associated with CO2 assimilation, energy metabolism and photo flux efficiency and higher content of anthocyanins in TPL than those in MGL may protect tender leaves against photo-damage; 2 the higher abundance of chalcone synthase (CHS, chalcone isomerase (CHI and flavonol synthase (FLS likely contributes to the synthesis of anthocyanins, catechins and flavonols in TPL tissues; 3 higher abundance of stress response proteins, such as glutathione S-transferases (GST and phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase (PHGPx, could enhance the tolerance of TPL tissues to adverse condition in; and 4 the increased abundance of proteins related to protein synthesis, nucleic acids and cell wall proteins should be beneficial for the proliferation and expansion of leaf cell in TPL tissues. qPCR analysis showed that the expression of differentially abundant proteins was regulated at the transcriptional level. Therefore, the results indicated that higher abundance of CHI and CHS may account for the production of the purple-shoot phenotype in Wuyiqizhong 18 and thereby, enhancing the anthocyanin biosynthesis. The higher abundance of glutamine synthetase (GS proteins related to the theanine biosynthesis may improve the flavor of tea products from TPL materials. Thus, this work should help to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the changes in leaf color alteration.

  15. Proteomic analysis of tea plants (Camellia sinensis) with purple young shoots during leaf development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qiongqiong; Chen, Zhidan; Lee, Jinwook; Li, Xinghui; Sun, Weijiang

    2017-01-01

    Tea products made from purple leaves are highly preferred by consumers due to the health benefits. This study developed a proteome reference map related to color changes during leaf growth in tea (Camellia sinensis) plant with purple young shoots using two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE). Forty-six differentially expressed proteins were detected in the gel and successfully identified by using MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS. The pronounced changes in the proteomic profile between tender purple leaves (TPL) and mature green leaves (MGL) included: 1) the lower activity of proteins associated with CO2 assimilation, energy metabolism and photo flux efficiency and higher content of anthocyanins in TPL than those in MGL may protect tender leaves against photo-damage; 2) the higher abundance of chalcone synthase (CHS), chalcone isomerase (CHI) and flavonol synthase (FLS) likely contributes to the synthesis of anthocyanins, catechins and flavonols in TPL tissues; 3) higher abundance of stress response proteins, such as glutathione S-transferases (GST) and phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase (PHGPx), could enhance the tolerance of TPL tissues to adverse condition in; and 4) the increased abundance of proteins related to protein synthesis, nucleic acids and cell wall proteins should be beneficial for the proliferation and expansion of leaf cell in TPL tissues. qPCR analysis showed that the expression of differentially abundant proteins was regulated at the transcriptional level. Therefore, the results indicated that higher abundance of CHI and CHS may account for the production of the purple-shoot phenotype in Wuyiqizhong 18 and thereby, enhancing the anthocyanin biosynthesis. The higher abundance of glutamine synthetase (GS) proteins related to the theanine biosynthesis may improve the flavor of tea products from TPL materials. Thus, this work should help to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the changes in leaf color alteration.

  16. Influence of plant maturity, shoot reproduction and sex on vegetative growth in the dioecious plant Urtica dioica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oñate, Marta; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2009-10-01

    Stinging nettle (Urtica dioica) is a herbaceous, dioecious perennial that is widely distributed around the world, reproduces both sexually and asexually, and is characterized by rapid growth. This work was aimed at evaluating the effects of plant maturity, shoot reproduction and sex on the growth of leaves and shoots. Growth rates of apical shoots, together with foliar levels of phytohormones (cytokinins, auxins, absicisic acid, jasmonic acid and salicylic acid) and other indicators of leaf physiology (water contents, photosynthetic pigments, alpha-tocopherol and F(v)/F(m) ratios) were measured in juvenile and mature plants, with a distinction made between reproductive and non-reproductive shoots in both males and females. Vegetative growth rates were not only evaluated in field-grown plants, but also in cuttings obtained from these plants. All measurements were performed during an active vegetative growth phase in autumn, a few months after mature plants reproduced during spring and summer. Vegetative growth rates in mature plants were drastically reduced compared with juvenile ones (48 % and 78 % for number of leaves and leaf biomass produced per day, respectively), which was associated with a loss of photosynthetic pigments (up to 24 % and 48 % for chlorophylls and carotenoids, respectively) and increases of alpha-tocopherol (up to 2.7-fold), while endogenous levels of phytohormones did not differ between mature and juvenile plants. Reductions in vegetative growth were particularly evident in reproductive shoots of mature plants, and occurred similarly in both males and females. It is concluded that (a) plant maturity reduces vegetative growth in U. dioica, (b) effects of plant maturity are evident both in reproductive and non-reproductive shoots, but particularly in the former, and (c) these changes occur similarly in both male and female plants.

  17. Cellulose biosynthesis in higher plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystyna Kudlicka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the control and regulation of cellulose synthesis is fundamental to an understanding of plant development since cellulose is the primary structural component of plant cell walls. In vivo, the polymerization step requires a coordinated transport of substrates across membranes and relies on delicate orientations of the membrane-associated synthase complexes. Little is known about the properties of the enzyme complexes, and many questions about the biosynthesis of cell wall components at the cell surface still remain unanswered. Attempts to purify cellulose synthase from higher plants have not been successful because of the liability of enzymes upon isolation and lack of reliable in vitro assays. Membrane preparations from higher plant cells incorporate UDP-glucose into a glucan polymer, but this invariably turns out to be predominantly β -1,3-linked rather than β -1,4-linked glucans. Various hypotheses have been advanced to explain this phenomenon. One idea is that callose and cellulose-synthase systems are the same, but cell disruption activates callose synthesis preferentially. A second concept suggests that a regulatory protein as a part of the cellulose-synthase complex is rapidly degraded upon cell disruption. With new methods of enzyme isolation and analysis of the in vitro product, recent advances have been made in the isolation of an active synthase from the plasma membrane whereby cellulose synthase was separated from callose synthase.

  18. Gibberellin Promotes Shoot Branching in the Perennial Woody Plant Jatropha curcas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Jun; Gao, Congcong; Chen, Mao-Sheng; Pan, Bang-Zhen; Ye, Kaiqin; Xu, Zeng-Fu

    2015-08-01

    Strigolactone (SL), auxin and cytokinin (CK) interact to regulate shoot branching. CK has long been considered to be the only key phytohormone to promote lateral bud outgrowth. Here we report that gibberellin also acts as a positive regulator in the control of shoot branching in the woody plant Jatropha curcas. We show that gibberellin and CK synergistically promote lateral bud outgrowth, and that both hormones influence the expression of putative branching regulators, J. curcas BRANCHED1 and BRANCHED2, which are key transcription factors maintaining bud dormancy. Moreover, treatment with paclobutrazol, an inhibitor of de novo gibberellin biosynthesis, significantly reduced the promotion of bud outgrowth by CK, suggesting that gibberellin is required for CK-mediated axillary bud outgrowth. In addition, SL, a plant hormone involved in the repression of shoot branching, acted antagonistically to both gibberellin and CK in the control of lateral bud outgrowth. Consistent with this, the expression of JcMAX2, a J. curcas homolog of Arabidopsis MORE AXILLARY GROWTH 2 encoding an F-box protein in the SL signaling pathway, was repressed by gibberellin and CK treatment. We also provide physiological evidence that gibberellin also induces shoot branching in many other trees, such as papaya, indicating that a more complicated regulatory network occurs in the control of shoot branching in some perennial woody plants. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists.

  19. Shoot regeneration from cotyledonary leaf explants of jatropha curcas: A biodiesel plant

    KAUST Repository

    Kumar, Nitish Chandramohana

    2010-03-07

    A simple, high frequency, and reproducible method for plant regeneration through direct organogenesis from cotyledonary leaf explants of Jatropha curcas was developed using Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium supplemented with different concentrations of thidiazuron (TDZ) or 6-benzyl aminopurine (BAP). Medium containing TDZ has greater influence on regeneration as compared to BAP. The induced shoot buds were transferred to MS medium containing 10 lM kinetin (Kn), 4.5 lM BAP, and 5.5 lM a-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) for shoot proliferation. The proliferated shoots could be elongated on MS medium supplemented with different concentrations and combinations of BAP, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), NAA, and indole-3-butyric acid (IBA). MS medium with 2.25 lM BAP and 8.5 lM IAA was found to be the best combination for shoot elongation. However, significant differences in plant regeneration and shoot elongation were observed among the genotypes studied. Rooting was achieved when the basal cut end of elongated shoots were dipped in half strength MS liquid medium containing dif- ferent concentrations and combinations of IBA, IAA, and NAA for 4 days, followed by transfer to growth regulators free half strength MS medium supplemented 0.25 mg l-1 activated charcoal. Elongated shoot treated with 15 lM IBA, 5.7 lM IAA, and 11 lM NAA resulted in highest percent rooting. The rooted plants could be established in soil with more than 90% survival rate. The method developed may be useful in improvement of J. curcas through genetic modification. © Franciszek Górski Institute of Plant Physiology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kraków 2010.

  20. Morphogenesis in Plants: Modeling the Shoot Apical Meristem, and Possible Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mjolsness, Eric; Gor, Victoria; Meyerowitz, Elliot; Mann, Tobias

    1998-01-01

    A key determinant of overall morphogenesis in flowering plants such as Arabidopsis thaliana is the shoot apical meristem (growing tip of a shoot). Gene regulation networks can be used to model this system. We exhibit a very preliminary two-dimensional model including gene regulation and intercellular signaling, but omitting cell division and dynamical geometry. The model can be trained to have three stable regions of gene expression corresponding to the central zone, peripheral zone, and rib meristem. We also discuss a space-engineering motivation for studying and controlling the morphogenesis of plants using such computational models.

  1. Differences in shoot and root terpenoid profiles and plant responses to fertilisation in Tanacetum vulgare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleine, Sandra; Müller, Caroline

    2013-12-01

    Intraspecific chemical diversity is a common phenomenon especially found in shoots of essential oil-accumulating plant species. Abiotic factors can influence the concentration of essential oils, but the effects are inconsistent and little is known in how far these may vary within an individual and within species between chemotypes. Tanacetum vulgare L. occurs in various chemotypes that differ in the composition of mono- and sesquiterpenoids in their shoot tissues. We investigated how far shoot chemotype grouping is mirrored in root terpenoid profiles. Furthermore, we studied whether different fertilisation amounts influence the plant growth and morphological traits as well as the constitutive terpenoid concentration of leaves and roots of three chemotypes, trans-carvyl acetate, β-thujone, and camphor, to different degrees. Shoot terpenoids were dominated by monoterpenoids, while the roots contained mainly sesquiterpenoids. The clear grouping in three chemotypes based on leaf chemistry was weakly mirrored in the root terpenoid composition. Furthermore, the leaf C/N ratio and the stem height differed between chemotypes. All plants responded to increased nutrient availability with increased total biomass and specific leaf area but decreased C/N and root/shoot ratios. Leaf terpenoid concentrations decreased with increasing fertiliser supply, independent of chemotype. In contrast to the leaves, the terpenoid concentrations of the roots were unaffected by fertilisation. Our results demonstrate that aboveground and belowground organs within a species can be under different selection pressures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Plant regeneration via somatic embryogenesis and shoot organogenesis from immature cotyledons of Camellia nitidissima Chi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Jinfeng; Chen, Rong; Zhang, Muhan; da Silva, Jaime A Teixeira; Ma, Guohua

    2013-09-01

    Camellia nitidissima Chi (Theaceae) is a world-famous economic and ornamental plant with golden-yellow flowers. It has been classified as one of the rarest and most endangered plants in China. Our objective was to induce somatic embryogenesis, shoot organogenesis and plant regeneration for C. nitidissima. Three types of callus (whitish, reddish and yellowish) were induced from immature cotyledons on improved woody plant medium (WPM) with different plant growth regulators (PGRs). Among the callus, whitish callus was induced by 4.5 μM 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and reddish and yellowish callus were induced by strongly active cytokinins, thidiazuron (TDZ) or 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP), singly or combined with weakly active auxin, α-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA). The embryogenic callus could differentiate into somatic embryos, nodular embryogenic structures (large embryo-like structures) or adventitious shoots depending on the PGR used in WPM. BAP was best for adventitious buds and zeatin was best for somatic embryogenesis while kinetin (Kt) was best for the formation of nodular embryogenic structures. The three regeneration pathways often occurred in the same embryogenic callus clumps. Most shoots (80.0%) developed roots in WPM supplemented with 24.6 μM IBA and 0.3 μM NAA while 47.5% of somatic embryos could germinate directly and develop into plantlets on induction medium supplemented with 0.9 μM BAP and 0.1 μM NAA. The nodular embryogenic structures could be sub-cultured and cyclically developed in one of two differentiation pathways: shoot organogenesis or somatic embryogenesis. Plantlets derived from shoot buds rooted and somatic embryos germinated when transplanted into soil in a greenhouse; 66.7% of plantlets from shoot culture and 78.6% of plantlets from somatic embryos survived after 8 weeks' acclimatization. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Arsenic speciation in moso bamboo shoot - A terrestrial plant that contains organoarsenic species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Rui [Department of Chemistry, Key laboratory for Atomic and Molecular Nanosciences of Education Ministry, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, P.R. China (China); Zhao Mengxia [Department of Chemistry, Key laboratory for Atomic and Molecular Nanosciences of Education Ministry, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Wang Hui [Department of Chemistry, Key laboratory for Atomic and Molecular Nanosciences of Education Ministry, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Taneike, Yasuhito [Shimadzu Co Ltd, Spectroscopy Business Unit Analytical Instruments Div, Nakagyo Ku, Kyoto, 6048511 (Japan); Zhang Xinrong [Department of Chemistry, Key laboratory for Atomic and Molecular Nanosciences of Education Ministry, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)]. E-mail: xrzhang@chem.tsinghua.edu.cn

    2006-12-01

    Arsenic is predominantly found as an inorganic species in most terrestrial plants. However, we found that a significant proportion of organic arsenic was present in moso bamboo (Phyllostachys pubescens Mazel) shoot in a market survey of arsenic species in edible terrestrial plants. Moso bamboo shoots from different producing areas in China were collected for analysis to confirm the ubiquity of methylated arsenic species. The total arsenic concentrations of bamboo shoots were determined by hydride generation coupled atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HG-AFS), ranging from 27.7 to 94.0 {mu}g/kg. Information about arsenic species was acquired from cold trap-hydride generation-atomic absorption spectrometry (CT-HG-AAS). Dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) was present in the amount of 13.9% to 44.9% of sum of the arsenic species in all these samples. Monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and trimethylarsine oxide (TMAO) were also detected in certain samples in the range of 4.2-16.5% and 11.8-18.4%, respectively. In addition, bamboo shoots collected in winter were found to have more total arsenic and organic arsenic than those collected in spring. To investigate the source of the organic arsenic in moso bamboo shoots, arsenic species in the rhizosphere soils of the plants were examined. The absence of organic arsenic in soils would suggest the possibility of formation of methylated arsenic in the plants. In addition, studies of arsenic speciation in the peel and core of winter bamboo shoots showed that all the cores contained organic arsenic while no organic arsenic was detected in the peels. The study provides useful information for better understanding of the distribution of arsenic species in terrestrial plants.

  4. Chromosomal replicons of higher plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van' t Hof, J.

    1987-03-16

    This brief discussion of replicons of higher plants offers a glimpse into the properties of chromosomal DNA replication. It gives evidence that the S phase of unrelated plant species is comprised of temporally ordered replicon families that increase in number with genome size. This orderly process, which assures a normal inheritance of genetic material to recipient daughter cells, is maintained at the level of replicon clusters by two mutually exclusive mechanisms, one involving the rate at which single replicons replicate their allotment of DNA, and another by means of the tempo-pause. The same two mechanisms are used by cells to alter the pattern of chromosomal DNA replication just prior to and during normal development. Both mechanisms are genetically determined and produce genetic effects when disturbed of disrupted by additional non-conforming DNAs. Further insight into how these two mechanisms operate requires more molecular information about the nature of replicons and the factors that govern when a replicon family replicates. Plant material is a rich and ideal source for this information just awaiting exploitation. 63 refs.

  5. Damage to buds and shoots of coniferous woody plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Witzell, J.; Matsiakh, I.; Poljakovic Pajnik, L.

    2017-01-01

    This guide is intended as an aid for managers of sentinel plantings, botanical gardens or arboreta, as well as phytosanitary inspectors, who may have knowledge of common pests and diseases of woody plants, but may not know the likely cause of damage that they have not encountered before. It aims...

  6. Influence of plant growth regulators on indirect shoot organogenesis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    admin

    2013-10-17

    Oct 17, 2013 ... Influence of plant growth regulators on indirect regeneration and secondary metabolite production in. Aconitum violaceum Jacq. was evaluated. Among the different plant growth regulators studied, 2.5 µM. 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 0.25 µM kinetin (Kn) promoted the highest frequency of.

  7. Growth, Development, and Mineral Nutrient Accumulation and Distribution in Tulip from Planting through Postanthesis Shoot Senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl E. Niedziela

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tulips were grown under field conditions from mid-November through early-June. Plants were harvested and dissected into eight organs on twenty-one dates. These parts were dried, weighed, and analyzed for N, P, K, Ca, and Mg. A transition (as determined by curve join points from a linear to a steep negative cubic response occurred prior to shoot emergence for N (82 days after planting (DAP, at shoot emergence for K (93 DAP and Ca (94 DAP, and after shoot emergence for Mg (102 DAP and dry matter (118 DAP. A transition from a linear to a steeper linear response occurred at shoot emergence for P (93 DAP. Growth, organ development, and nutrient accumulation occurred continuously from planting to maturity (188 DAP, except for K which did not accumulate during the initial linear phase. Since the increase in accumulation of all five nutrients preceded the dry matter accumulation, these nutrients could be used as predictors in growth models. Practical implications from this study include the importance of maintaining soil Ca levels through liming and applying the N, P, and Mg as split applications with smaller rates at planting and larger rates at emergence. The entire K application may be applied at emergence.

  8. Long distance root-shoot signalling in plant-insect community interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soler, R.; Erb, M.; Kaplan, I.

    2013-01-01

    Plants mediate interactions between insects, including leaf- and root-feeders; yet the underlying mechanisms and connection with ecological theory remain unresolved. In this review, based on novel insights into long-distance (i.e., leaf-leaf, root-shoot) defence signalling, we explore the role of

  9. Influence of plant growth regulators on indirect shoot organogenesis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    admin

    2013-10-17

    Oct 17, 2013 ... Experimental design and statistical analysis .... ration process of plants in the in vitro conditions. TDZ and. BAP are the ... Exogenously applied NAA interacted with cytokinin ... Dohm A, Ludwig C, Nehring K, Debener T (2001).

  10. Diversity of Maize Shoot Apical Meristem Architecture and Its Relationship to Plant Morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Addie M.; Yu, Jianming; Timmermans, Marja C. P.; Schnable, Patrick; Crants, James E.; Scanlon, Michael J.; Muehlbauer, Gary J.

    2015-01-01

    The shoot apical meristem contains a pool of undifferentiated stem cells and controls initiation of all aerial plant organs. In maize (Zea mays), leaves are formed throughout vegetative development; on transition to floral development, the shoot meristem forms the tassel. Due to the regulated balance between stem cell maintenance and organogenesis, the structure and morphology of the shoot meristem are constrained during vegetative development. Previous work identified loci controlling meristem architecture in a recombinant inbred line population. The study presented here expanded on this by investigating shoot apical meristem morphology across a diverse set of maize inbred lines. Crosses of these lines to common parents showed varying phenotypic expression in the F1, with some form of heterosis occasionally observed. An investigation of meristematic growth throughout vegetative development in diverse lines linked the timing of reproductive transition to flowering time. Phenotypic correlations of meristem morphology with adult plant traits showed an association between the meristem and flowering time, leaf shape, and yield traits, revealing links between the control and architecture of undifferentiated and differentiated plant organs. Finally, quantitative trait loci mapping was utilized to map the genetic architecture of these meristem traits in two divergent populations. Control of meristem architecture was mainly population-specific, with 15 total unique loci mapped across the two populations with only one locus identified in both populations. PMID:25748433

  11. Differences in U root-to-shoot translocation between plant species explained by U distribution in roots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straczek, Anne; Duquene, Lise [Belgium Nuclear Research Centre (SCK.CEN), Biosphere Impact Studies, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Wegrzynek, Dariusz [IAEA, Seibersdorf Laboratories, A-2444 Seibersdorf (Austria); Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, AGH University of Science and Technology, Al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Chinea-Cano, Ernesto [IAEA, Seibersdorf Laboratories, A-2444 Seibersdorf (Austria); Wannijn, Jean [Belgium Nuclear Research Centre (SCK.CEN), Biosphere Impact Studies, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Navez, Jacques [Royal Museum of Africa, Department of Geology, Leuvensesteenweg 13, 3080 Tervuren (Belgium); Vandenhove, Hildegarde, E-mail: hvandenh@sckcen.b [Belgium Nuclear Research Centre (SCK.CEN), Biosphere Impact Studies, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2010-03-15

    Accumulation and distribution of uranium in roots and shoots of four plants species differing in their cation exchange capacity of roots (CECR) was investigated. After exposure in hydroponics for seven days to 100 mumol U L{sup -1}, distribution of uranium in roots was investigated through chemical extraction of roots. Higher U concentrations were measured in roots of dicots which showed a higher CECR than monocot species. Chemical extractions indicated that uranium is mostly located in the apoplasm of roots of monocots but that it is predominantly located in the symplasm of roots of dicots. Translocation of U to shoot was not significantly affected by the CECR or distribution of U between symplasm and apoplasm. Distribution of uranium in roots was investigated through chemical extraction of roots for all species. Additionally, longitudinal and radial distribution of U in roots of maize and Indian mustard, respectively showing the lowest and the highest translocation, was studied following X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis of specific root sections. Chemical analysis and XRF analysis of roots of maize and Indian mustard clearly indicated a higher longitudinal and radial transport of uranium in roots of Indian mustard than in roots of maize, where uranium mostly accumulated in root tips. These results showed that even if CECR could partly explain U accumulation in roots, other mechanisms like radial and longitudinal transport are implied in the translocation of U to the shoot.

  12. An effective disinfection protocol for plant regeneration from shoot tip ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-06-03

    Jun 3, 2009 ... induced to form adventitious roots. The plantlets were maintained in the same medium and extra time of illumination so that their rooting systems may be deve- loped properly. The in vitro grown plantlets were then planted in 1.5 inches plastic trays with peat moss, vermiculite and perlite mixture (1:1:1 ratio) ...

  13. Influence of plant growth regulators on axillary shoot multiplication ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-12-17

    Dec 17, 2008 ... multiplication and iron source on growth of. Scrophularia takesimensis Nakai - a rare endemic medicinal plant. Iyyakkannu Sivanesan1, Seung Jae Hwang1 and Byoung Ryong Jeong1,2*. 1Department of Horticulture, Division of Applied Life Science (BK21 Program), Graduate School, Gyeongsang ...

  14. Direct multiple shoot induction and plant regeneration from dormant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-09-07

    Sep 7, 2011 ... seedlings are raised the year before and transplanted in the next spring, which is labor intensive and time- consuming. Many successful examples for micropropagation and cryopreservation using overground dormant buds can be found in garden plants (Jacobsen and Dohmen 1990;. Mistretta et al., 1991).

  15. Classical mutagenesis in higher plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koornneef, M.

    2002-01-01

    For a long time, mutagenesis research in plants focused on crop improvement and, especially for crop plants, opimised protocols were developed with barley being one of the favourite species. However, the interest in mutagenesis has shifted to basic plant research in the last 20 years, when the power

  16. Cryopreservation of shoot tips of Picrorhiza kurroa Royle ex Benth, an indigenous endangered medicinal plant, through vitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Neelam; Sharma, Bindu

    2003-01-01

    The cryopreservation of shoot tips of Picrorhiza kurroa Royle ex Benth (IC 266698), an endangered medicinal plant of India was investigated. Shoot tips (about 1 mm in length) excised from four-week-old proliferating shoot cultures were precultured on MS medium supplemented with various osmotica before dehydrating with PVS2 solution at 0 degrees C. The dehydrated shoot tips were directly immersed in LN2. Following cryopreservation, and after rapid rewarming at 45 degrees C, shoot tips were quickly washed with 1.2 M sucrose solution and then plated on solidified shoot culture medium. Shoot tips were successfully cryopreserved by vitrification, when they were precultured on medium supplemented with 5% DMSO at 4 degrees C for two days before dehydrating in PVS2 for 10-20 minutes at 0 degrees C. Average survival in terms of normal shoot formation after 4 wks of plating was about 20% without callus formation. Cold hardening of shoot cultures for four weeks at 4 degrees C significantly improved the survival and shoot regeneration of cryopreserved shoot tips to 70% and 35%, respectively.

  17. Influence of Plant Growth Regulators on In Vitro Shoot Multiplication and Plantlet Formation in Cassia angustifolia Vahl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iram Siddique

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTAn effective and improved plant regeneration system was successfully developed using shoot tip explants taken from a two years old mature plant of Cassia angustifolia. The effect of different cytokinins, [6-benzyladenine (BA, Kinetin (Kin and thidiazuron (TDZ] at different concentrations (0.5-10 µM were evaluated as augmented with Murashige and Skoog (MS 1962 medium. Among all the cytokinins tested, TDZ (5.0 µM was optimum in inducing multiple shoots as compared to BA and Kin. The rate of shoot multiplication was increased when optimal concentration (5.0 µM of BA and Kin was tested with different concentration (0.1-1.0 µM of Indole-3- acetic acid (IAA. Among all the combinations tested, the maximum rate of shoot multiplication was obtained on MS medium supplemented with 5.0 µM BA and 0.5 µM IAA. The number of the shoots and shoot length developed in TDZ was increased when transferred to MS medium devoid of TDZ. After every subculture, rate of the shoot multiplication and shoot length showed increment and continued even after fifth subculture without any decline rate. In vitro rooting in regenerated shoots were best obtained in half-strength MS medium supplemented with 2.0 µM indole-3- butyric acid (IBA. Plantlets with well-developed shoot and roots were successfully hardened off in earthen pots containing garden soil and grown in greenhouse with 80% survival rate.

  18. Genetic relationship between plant growth, shoot and kernel sizes in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Le tissu vasculaire de l'épi de maïs (Zea mays L.) transporte les nutriments utilisés dans le rendement des grains. Pour connaître l'héritabilité du développement de l'épi et de la plante, des études ont été conduites au champ pour estimer les aptitudes à la combinaison des parents qui diffèrent par la taille des graines, ...

  19. Classical mutagenesis in higher plants

    OpenAIRE

    Koornneef, M.

    2002-01-01

    For a long time, mutagenesis research in plants focused on crop improvement and, especially for crop plants, opimised protocols were developed with barley being one of the favourite species. However, the interest in mutagenesis has shifted to basic plant research in the last 20 years, when the power of mutant approaches in combination with molecular techniques to investigate the molecular nature of the genes became fully appreciated

  20. Heterologous Expression of Pteris vittata Arsenite Antiporter PvACR3;1 Reduces Arsenic Accumulation in Plant Shoots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanshan; Hua, Chen-Yu; Jia, Meng-Ru; Fu, Jing-Wei; Liu, Xue; Han, Yong-He; Liu, Yungen; Rathinasabapathi, Bala; Cao, Yue; Ma, Lena Q

    2017-09-19

    Arsenic (As) is a toxic carcinogen so it is crucial to decrease As accumulation in crops to reduce its risk to human health. Arsenite (AsIII) antiporter ACR3 protein is critical for As metabolism in organisms, but it is lost in flowering plants. Here, a novel ACR3 gene from As-hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata, PvACR3;1, was cloned and expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast), Arabidopsis thaliana (model plant), and Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco). Yeast experiments showed that PvACR3;1 functioned as an AsIII-antiporter to mediate AsIII efflux to an external medium. At 5 μM AsIII, PvACR3;1 transgenic Arabidopsis accumulated 14-29% higher As in the roots and 55-61% lower As in the shoots compared to WT control, showing lower As translocation. Besides, transgenic tobacco under 5 μM AsIII or AsV also showed similar results, indicating that expressing PvACR3;1 gene increased As retention in plant roots. Moreover, observation of PvACR3;1-green fluorescent protein fusions in transgenic Arabidopsis showed that PvACR3;1 protein localized to the vacuolar membrane, indicating that PvACR3;1 mediated AsIII sequestration into vacuoles, consistent with increased root As. In addition, soil experiments showed ∼22% lower As in the shoots of transgenic tobacco than control. Thus, our study provides a potential strategy to limit As accumulation in plant shoots, representing the first report to decrease As translocation by sequestrating AsIII into vacuoles, shedding light on engineering low-As crops to improve food safety.

  1. Micropropagation of an elite F1 watermelon (Citrullus lanatus hybrid from the shoot tip of field grown plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Khalekuzzaman

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to develop a protocol for rapid micropropagation of an elite F1 hybrid watermelon cultivar using shoot tip of field-grown plants. Maximum frequency (73% of shoot tip showed growth response in MS medium supplemented with 5 mg l-1 benzyl adenine (BA and 0.1 mg l-1 indole-3 acetic acid (IAA. Upon transfer to cytokinin-enriched medium, the cultures produced multiple shoots and 2.0 mg l-1 BA was optimum in this respect. Addition of gibberellic acid (GA3 in the multiplication medium resulted in better growth of shoots. Rooting rate was 100% when shoots were obtained from second subculture were cultured in medium with 1.0 mg l-1 indole-3 butyric acid (IBA. The shoots produced more roots with increasing number of subcultures. About 72% of the regenerated plantlets acclimatized successfully and survived in the soil condition.

  2. Long distance root-shoot signalling in plant-insect community interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler, Roxina; Erb, Matthias; Kaplan, Ian

    2013-03-01

    Plants mediate interactions between insects, including leaf- and root-feeders; yet the underlying mechanisms and connection with ecological theory remain unresolved. In this review, based on novel insights into long-distance (i.e., leaf-leaf, root-shoot) defence signalling, we explore the role of phytohormones in driving broad-scale patterns of aboveground-belowground interactions that can be extrapolated to general plant-insect relationships. We propose that the outcome of intra-feeding guild interactions is generally negative due to induction of similar phytohormonal pathways, whereas between-guild interactions are often positive due to negative signal crosstalk. However, not all outcomes could be explained by feeding guild; we argue that future studies should target ecologically representative plant-insect systems, distinguish subguilds, and include plant growth hormones to improve our understanding of plant-mediated interactions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. EFFECTS OF PLANT GROWTH REGULATORS ON SHOOT MULTIPLICATION AND ROOT INDUCTION OF CASSAVA VARIETIES CULTURE IN VITRO

    OpenAIRE

    HERNI WIDHIASTUTI; DEDEN SUKMADJAJA

    2011-01-01

    A study on propagation of three superior cassava Manihot esculenta( Crant) varieties i.e.Darul Hidayah, Malang-6 and Adira-4 through tissue culture technique was conducted at theTissue Culture Lab of SEAMEO BIOTROP, Bogor. The objective of the experiment was tostudy effect of plant growth regulators on Manihot esculenta propagation, which can be used in cassavamicropropagation protocol. Plant materials used were auxiliary shoots of a stem node. Theexperiment consisted of (i) shoot multiplicat...

  4. Evaluation of the new vacuum infiltration vitrification (viv) cryopreservation technique for native Australian plant shoot tips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funnekotter, Bryn; Whiteley, Susan E; Turner, Shane R; Bunn, Eric; Mancera, Ricardo L

    2015-01-01

    The application of a vacuum during the incubation in cryoprotective agents such as PVS2 allows for increased penetration, reducing total incubation times required before vitrification and post-cryopreservation regeneration is achieved. This study compared a conventional droplet-vitrification protocol to the new vacuum infiltration vitrification protocol in four Australian plant species. The new vacuum infiltration vitrification applied an 80 kPa vacuum during incubations in loading solution and PVS2. Infiltration of the cryoprotective agents into shoot tips was determined by differential scanning calorimetry measuring ice formation in the thermographs comparing a range of loading solution and PVS2 incubation times. The application of the vacuum infiltration vitrification technique resulted in a significantly reduced PVS2 incubation time for cryogenic survival and regeneration for all four species, reducing the time needed to adequately protect shoot tips by half to a quarter when compared to a conventional droplet-vitrification technique.

  5. Withanolide A biogeneration in in vitro shoot cultures of ashwagandha (Withania somnifera DUNAL), a main medicinal plant in Ayurveda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangwan, Rajender Singh; Chaurasiya, Narayan Das; Lal, Payare; Misra, Laxminarain; Uniyal, Girish Chandra; Tuli, Rakesh; Sangwan, Neelam Singh

    2007-09-01

    Multiple shoot cultures of two experimental lines of Withania somnifera plants (RS-Selection-1 and RS-Selection-2) were established using nodal segments as explants. The hormonal combinations of benzyl adenine and kinetin not only influenced their morphogenetic response but also differentially modulated the level of biogeneration of withanolide A in the in vitro shoots of the two lines. Interestingly, withanolide-A, that was hardly detectable in the aerial parts of field-grown Withania somnifera (explant source), accumulated considerably in the in vitro shoot cultures of the plant. The productivity of withanolide A in the cultures varied considerably (ca. 10-fold, 0.014 to 0.14 mg per gram fresh weight) with the change in the hormone composition of the culture media as well as genotype used as source of the explant. The shoot culture of RS-Selection-1 raised at 1.00 ppm of BAP and 0.50 ppm of kinetin displayed the highest concentration of withanolide A in the green shoots of 0.238 g per 100 g dry weight tissue. This was a more analytical concentration keeping in view the isolation yields so far reported from the dried roots of the field-grown plant (ca. 0.015 g per 100 g dry weight), even if isolation losses are considered during purification. The enhanced de novo biogenesis of withanolide A in shoot cultures was corroborated with radiolabel incorporation studies using [2-(14)C] acetate as a precursor. Production of withaferin A was also found in the in vitro shoot cultures. As this compound is a predominant withanolide of native shoots as well and has been already reported to be accumulated in in vitro shoot cultures, its biogeneration observed in these shoot cultures is not discussed in detail.

  6. Silicon transporters in higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jian Feng

    2010-01-01

    Silicon (Si) is the second most abundant element in the Earth's crust and exerts beneficial effects on plant growth and production by alleviating both biotic and abiotic stresses including diseases, pests, lodging, drought and nutrient imbalance. Silicon is taken up by the roots in the form ofsilicic acid, a noncharged molecule. Recently both influx (Lsil) and efflux (Lsi2) transporters for silicic acid have been identified in gramineous plants including rice, barley and maize. Lsil and its homologs are influx Si transporters, which belong to a Nod26-like major intrinsic protein (NIP) subfamily in the aquaporin protein family. They are responsible for the transport of Si from the external solution to the root cells. On the other hand, Lsi2 and its homologs are efflux Si transporters, belonging to putative anion transporters and are responsible for the transport of Si out of the cells toward the xylem. All influx transporters show polar localization at the distal side. Among efflux transporters, Lsi2 in rice shows polar localization at the proximal side, but that in barley and maize does not show polar localization. The cell-specificity of localization of Si transporters and expression patterns are different between species. Rice Si transporters are also permeable to arsenite.

  7. Radiation hormesis in higher plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Sung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-03-01

    The most remarkable aspect in the hormesis law is that low dose of harmful agents can produce effect that are diametrically opposite to the effect found with high doses of the same agent. Minute quantities of a harmful agent bring about very small change in the organism and control mechanisms appear to subjugate normal processes to place the organism in a state of alert and repair. The stimulated organism is more responsive to changes in environmental factors than it did before being alerted. Routine functions, including repair and defense, have priority for available energy and material. The alerted organism utilizes nutrients more efficiently, grows faster, shows improved defense reactions, matures faster, reproduces more effectively, has less disease, and lives longer. Accelerated germination, sprouting, growth, development, blooming and ripening, and increased crop yield and resistance to disease are found in plants. Another concept supported by the data is that low doses of ionizing radiation provide increased resistance to subsequent high doses of radiation. The hormesis varies with subject plant, variety, state of seed, environmental and cultural conditions, physiologic function measured, dose rate and total exposure. The results of hormesis are less consistently found, probably due to the great number of uncontrolled variables in the experiments. The general dosage for radiation hormesis in about 100 times ambient or 100 times less than a definitely harmful dose, but these must be modified to the occasion. Although little is known about most mechanisms of hormesis reaction, overcompensation of repair mechanism is offered as on mechanism. Radiation hormesis can provide more efficient use of resources, maximum production of foods, and increased health by the use of ionizing radiation as a useful tool in our technologic society. Efficient utilization of nature`s resources demands support to explore the practical application of radiation hormesis.

  8. Sucrose transporters of higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühn, Christina; Grof, Christopher P L

    2010-06-01

    Recent advances have provided new insights into how sucrose is moved from sites of synthesis to sites of utilisation or storage in sink organs. Sucrose transporters play a central role, as they orchestrate sucrose allocation both intracellularly and at the whole plant level. Sucrose produced in mesophyll cells of leaves may be effluxed into the apoplasm of mesophyll or phloem parenchyma cells by a mechanism that remains elusive, but experimentally consistent with facilitated transport or energy-dependent sucrose/H(+) antiport. From the apoplasm, sucrose/H(+) symporters transport sucrose across the plasma membrane of cells making up the sieve element/companion cell (SE/CC) complex, the long distance conduits of the phloem. Phloem unloading of sucrose in key sinks such as developing seeds involves two sequential transport steps, sucrose efflux followed by sucrose influx. Besides plasma membrane specific sucrose transporters, sucrose transporters on the tonoplast contribute to the capacity for elevated sucrose accumulation in storage organs such as sugar beet roots or sugarcane culms. Except for several sucrose facilitators from seed coats of some leguminous plants all sucrose transporters cloned to date, including recently identified vacuolar sucrose transporters, have been characterised as sucrose/H(+) symporters. Transporters functioning to efflux sucrose into source or sink apoplasms as well as those supporting sucrose/H(+) antiport on tonoplasts, remain to be identified. Sucrose transporter expression and activity is tightly regulated at the transcriptional, post-transcriptional as well as post-translational levels. Light quality and phytohormones play essential regulatory roles and the sucrose molecule itself functions as a signal. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Response of a Wild Edible Plant to Human Disturbance: Harvesting Can Enhance the Subsequent Yield of Bamboo Shoots.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noboru Katayama

    Full Text Available Wild edible plants, ecological foodstuffs obtained from forest ecosystems, grow in natural fields, and their productivity depends on their response to harvesting by humans. Addressing exactly how wild edible plants respond to harvesting is critical because this knowledge will provide insights into how to obtain effective and sustainable ecosystem services from these plants. We focused on bamboo shoots of Sasa kurilensis, a popular wild edible plant in Japan. We examined the effects of harvesting on bamboo shoot productivity by conducting an experimental manipulation of bamboo shoot harvesting. Twenty experimental plots were prepared in the Teshio Experimental Forest of Hokkaido University and were assigned into two groups: a harvest treatment, in which newly emerged edible bamboo shoots were harvested (n = 10; and a control treatment, in which bamboo shoots were maintained without harvesting (n = 10. In the first year of harvesting (2013, bamboo shoot productivities were examined twice; i.e., the productivity one day after harvesting and the subsequent post-harvest productivity (2-46 days after harvesting, and we observed no difference in productivity between treatments. This means that there was no difference in original bamboo shoot productivity between treatments, and that harvesting did not influence productivity in the initial year. In contrast, in the following year (2014, the number of bamboo shoots in the harvested plots was 2.4-fold greater than in the control plots. These results indicate that over-compensatory growth occurred in the harvested plots in the year following harvesting. Whereas previous research has emphasized the negative impact of harvesting, this study provides the first experimental evidence that harvesting can enhance the productivity of a wild edible plant. This suggests that exploiting compensatory growth, which really amounts to less of a decline in productivity, may be s a key for the effective use of wild edible

  10. Cloning higher plants from aseptically cultured tissues and cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krikorian, A. D.

    1982-01-01

    A review of aseptic culture methods for higher plants is presented, which focuses on the existing problems that limit or prevent the full realization of cloning plants from free cells. It is shown that substantial progress in clonal multiplication has been made with explanted stem tips or lateral buds which can be stimulated to produce numerous precocious axillary branches. These branches can then be separated or subdivided and induced to root in order to yield populations of genetically and phenotypically uniorm plantlets. Similarly, undifferentiated calluses can sometimes be induced to form shoots and/or roots adventitiously. Although the cell culture techniques required to produce somatic embryos are presently rudimentary, steady advances are being made in learning how to stimulate formation of somatic or adventive embryos from totipotent cells grown in suspension cultures. It is concluded that many problems exist in the producing and growing of totipotent or morphogenetically competent cell suspensions, but the potential benefits are great.

  11. Micropropagation of an elite F1 watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) hybrid from the shoot tip of field grown plants

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Khalekuzzaman; Marufa Khatun; Mohammad Harunur Rashid; Mominul Islam Sheikh; Shamima Akhtar Sharmin; Iftekhar Alam

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a protocol for rapid micropropagation of an elite F1 hybrid watermelon cultivar using shoot tip of field-grown plants. Maximum frequency (73%) of shoot tip showed growth response in MS medium supplemented with 5 mg l-1 benzyl adenine (BA) and 0.1 mg l-1 indole-3 acetic acid (IAA). Upon transfer to cytokinin-enriched medium, the cultures produced multiple shoots and 2.0 mg l-1 BA was optimum in this respect. Addition of gibberellic acid (GA3) in the multipli...

  12. Plants know where it hurts: root and shoot jasmonic acid induction elicit differential responses in Brassica oleracea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom O G Tytgat

    Full Text Available Plants respond to herbivore attack by rapidly inducing defenses that are mainly regulated by jasmonic acid (JA. Due to the systemic nature of induced defenses, attack by root herbivores can also result in a shoot response and vice versa, causing interactions between above- and belowground herbivores. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying these interactions. We investigated whether plants respond differently when roots or shoots are induced. We mimicked herbivore attack by applying JA to the roots or shoots of Brassica oleracea and analyzed molecular and chemical responses in both organs. In shoots, an immediate and massive change in primary and secondary metabolism was observed. In roots, the JA-induced response was less extensive and qualitatively different from that in the shoots. Strikingly, in both roots and shoots we also observed differential responses in primary metabolism, development as well as defense specific traits depending on whether the JA induction had been below- or aboveground. We conclude that the JA response is not only tissue-specific but also dependent on the organ that was induced. Already very early in the JA signaling pathway the differential response was observed. This indicates that both organs have a different JA signaling cascade, and that the signal eliciting systemic responses contains information about the site of induction, thus providing plants with a mechanism to tailor their responses specifically to the organ that is damaged.

  13. Cryotherapy of shoot tips : a technique for pathogen eradication to produce healthy planting materials and prepare healthy plant genetic resources for cryopreservation

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Q. C.; Panis, B.; Engelmann, Florent; Lambardi, M.; Valkonen, J. P. T.

    2009-01-01

    Cryotherapy of shoot tips is a new method for pathogen eradication based on cryopreservation techniques. Cryopreservation refers to the storage of biological samples at ultra-low temperature, usually that of liquid nitrogen (-196 degrees C), and is considered as an ideal means for long-term storage of plant germplasm. In cryotherapy, plant pathogens such as viruses, phytoplasmas and bacteria are eradicated from shoot tips by exposing them briefly to liquid nitrogen. Uneven distribution of vir...

  14. The Effect of Plant Growth Regulators on Shoot Proliferation and Rooting of Crataegus Pseudohetrophylla Pojark. Via in Vitro Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Ahmadloo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Crataegus is a tree species from Rosaceae family with medicinal, ornamental and commercial utilizations. Effect of different concentrations of plant growth regulators on shoot proliferation of Crataegus pseudohetrophylla Pojark. via in vitro culture was studied using single node explants. The grown shoots were transferred to MS medium supplemented with different concentrations of cytokinins (BAP, KIN, 2iP and Zt in combination with NAA in 30 treatments, with 3 replications and each replication included 5 explants. Data were recorded after 3 subcultures. For rooting, basal end of shoots were dipped into 300mg/l of IBA at different durations (0, 5, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 and 60 minutes, then the dipped shoots were cultured on hormone free 1/2 VS medium. The results of analysis of variance showed that there were significant differences in all of the traits. Results indicated that the highest number of shoots (39.33 was obtained on medium containing 8 mg / l BAP plus 2 mg / l NAA. The highest shoot length (4.67 cm and leaf size (3.73 cm was achieved on 7 mg / l BAP plus 2 mg / l NAA and 2 mg / l Zt plus 1 mg / l NAA, respectively. The highest rate of rooting (33.33% and root number (4n were induced on shoots dipped for 40 minutes in 300 mg / l IBA.

  15. Fast High Resolution Volume Carving for 3D Plant Shoot Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanno Scharr

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Volume carving is a well established method for visual hull reconstruction and has been successfully applied in plant phenotyping, especially for 3d reconstruction of small plants and seeds. When imaging larger plants at still relatively high spatial resolution (≤1 mm, well known implementations become slow or have prohibitively large memory needs. Here we present and evaluate a computationally efficient algorithm for volume carving, allowing e.g., 3D reconstruction of plant shoots. It combines a well-known multi-grid representation called “Octree” with an efficient image region integration scheme called “Integral image.” Speedup with respect to less efficient octree implementations is about 2 orders of magnitude, due to the introduced refinement strategy “Mark and refine.” Speedup is about a factor 1.6 compared to a highly optimized GPU implementation using equidistant voxel grids, even without using any parallelization. We demonstrate the application of this method for trait derivation of banana and maize plants.

  16. Induction and inhibition of film yeast from fermented bamboo shoot by seasoning plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaruwan Maneesri

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Three samples of fermented bamboo shoot taken from a village in Amphur Kokpho, Pattani Province, were microbiologically examined. Total viable count was between at 104-105 cfu/ml while pH range was between 3.4-4.4. Isolation and identification of film yeast on surface of fermented liquid revealed Saccharomyces cerevisiae J1, Candida krusei J2 and Candida krusei J3. When film yeast was cultivated in liquid culture with different NaCl concentrations (0, 2.5, 5 and 7.5% (w/v, all species tolerated 2.5% NaCl addition. However, growth decreased depending on NaCl concentration. S. cerevisiae J1 grew faster than C. krusei J2 and C. krusei J3. The cultivation of film yeast in medium with different agar concentrations (0.3, 0.5, 1 and 1.5% (w/v within 24 h showed that 0.3% was the optimal agar concentration. Seasoning plants (garlic, ginger, galangal, lemon grass, lesser galangal, clove, kaffir lime, garcinia and shallot were extracted with water (3% (w/v and tested for growth inhibition. Results showed the clove extract inhibited all yeast strains within 12 h and after that the efficiency of inhibition was decreased. At low concentration of 0.75% (w/v clove extract could inhibit film yeast in fermented bamboo shoot.

  17. The Microvine, A Plant Model to Study the Effect of Vine-Shoot Extract on the Accumulation of Glycosylated Aroma Precursors in Grapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Gómez, Rosario; Torregrosa, Laurent; Zalacain, Amaya; Ojeda, Hernán; Bouckenooghe, Virginie; Schneider, Rémi; Alonso, Gonzalo L; Salinas, M Rosario

    2017-11-30

    Microvine plant model displays an unique reproductive organ behaviors and is suitable for grapevine fruit physiological studies: allow to undertake studies until 5 times more rapidly than the current situation with grapevines. Recently, vine-shoot aqueous extracts, which have an interesting phenolic and aroma composition, have been proposed as viticultural biostimulants, since their post-veraison foliar application to grapevines impacts on wine aroma profile. Using Microvines, the aim of this study was to determine the vine-shoot extract foliar application effect on twenty-one stages of grapes development. The application was carried out from BBCH 53 (inflorescences clearly visible) to BBCH 85 (softening of berries), to reveal stage-specific responses of the accumulation of glycosylated aroma precursors at BBCH 89 (berries ripe for harvest), phenological stage selected to study the treatment effect. Microvines use made possible to take fifteen sampling time points on eighty-six days of experiment, which were established by cumulative degree days parameter. Results confirmed that vine-shoot treatment had a positive impact on total glycosylated compounds, especially on alcohols, terpenes and C13 -norisoprenoids aglycones, with a higher effect when treatment was applied during ripening. The results extrapolation to grapevines suggests that vine-shoot treatment could modulate the synthesis of grape glycosylated aroma precursors. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. Production System of Virus-free Apple Plants Using Heat Treatment and Shoot Tip CultureShoot Tip Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Gunsup Lee; Il Sheob Shin; Kang Hee Cho; Se Hee Kim; Juhee Shin; Dae Hyun Kim; Jeong Hee Kim; Hyun Ran Kim

    2013-01-01

    In worldwide, viral diseases of apple plants has caused the serious problems like reduced production and malformation of fruits. Also, the damages of apple plants by virus and/or viroid infection (Apple chlorotic leaf spot virus, Apple stem grooving virus, Apple mosaic virus, and Apple scar skin viroid) were reported in Korea. However there is few report about the protection approach against the infection by apple viruses. Therefore, this paper introduced the experimental protocol...

  19. An efficient in vitro shoot regeneration from immature inflorescence and ex vitro rooting of Arnebia hispidissima (Lehm). DC. - A red dye (Alkannin) yielding plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phulwaria, Mahendra; Shekhawat, N S

    2013-07-01

    Arnebia hispidissima, which belongs to the family Boraginaceae, is an important medicinal and dye yielding plant. The alkannin, a red dye, are root-specific secondary metabolites of A. hispidissima. Shoots were regenerated from callus derived from immature inflorescence explants obtained from field grown plants. MS medium containing 4.52 μM 2, 4-D and 3.33 μM BAP was found to be most effective for the proliferation of callus, induced on medium containing 4.52 μM 2, 4-D. Maximum number (43.1 ± 0.25) with average length (5.2 ± 0.23) of shoots regenerated when callus was transferred to MS medium supplemented with 1.11 μM BAP, 1.16 μM Kin and 0.57 μM IAA. About 75.5 % of in vitro regenerated shoots were rooted on half-strength MS medium supplemented with 9.84 μM of IBA and 200 mg l(-1) of activated charcoal. In comparison to in vitro, higher percent (90.2 %) of shoots were rooted under ex vitro conditions when treated with IBA (0.98 mM) for 5 min. Plantlets rooted in vitro as well as ex vitro were acclimatized successfully under the green house conditions. Ex vitro rooted plants exhibited higher survival percentage (75 %) as compared to in vitro rooted plantlets (60 %). Present study may be applicable in the large-scale root-specific red dye (alkannin) production via root induction under ex vitro condition.

  20. An efficient in vitro plantlet regeneration from shoot tip cultures of Curculigo latifolia, a medicinal plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaei, Nahid; Abdullah, Nur Ashikin Psyquay; Saleh, Ghizan; Abdullah, Thohirah Lee

    2014-01-01

    A procedure was developed for in vitro propagation of Curculigo latifolia through shoot tip culture. Direct regeneration and indirect scalp induction of Curculigo latifolia were obtained from shoot tip grown on MS medium supplemented with different concentrations and combinations of thidiazuron and indole-3-butyric acid. Maximum response for direct regeneration in terms of percentage of explants producing shoot, shoot number, and shoot length was obtained on MS medium supplemented with combination of thidiazuron (0.5 mg L(-1)) and indole-3-butyric acid (0.25 mg L(-1)) after both 10 and 14 weeks of cultures. Indole-3-butyric acid in combination with thidiazuron exhibited a synergistic effect on shoot regeneration. The shoot tips were able to induce maximum scalp from basal end of explants on the medium with 2 mg L(-1) thidiazuron. Cultures showed that shoot number, shoot length, and scalp size increased significantly after 14 weeks of culture. Transferring of the shoots onto the MS medium devoid of growth regulators resulted in the highest percentage of root induction and longer roots, while medium supplemented with 0.25 mg L(-1) IBA produced more numbers of roots.

  1. Preculturing effect of thidiazuron on in vitro shoot multiplication and micropropagation round in Capparis decidua (Forsk.) an important multipurpose plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukhari, Najat A W; Siddique, Iram; Perveen, Kahkashan

    2016-09-01

    An efficient protocol was developed for clonal multiplication of an important shrub: Capparis decidua (Forsk.) Edgew, through in vitro shoot induction and multiplication from nodal explants. Pretreatment of nodal explants in a liquid Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium augmented with various thidiazuron (TDZ) concentrations at relatively high levels (5-100 μM) for different time duration (4, 8, 12 and 16 d), proved a significant approach for in vitro shoot production. After an initial exposure time to TDZ, nodal explants were inoculated onto a MS basal medium devoid of TDZ for further induction and proliferation. The highest regeneration rate (85%), average number of shoots/explant (8.7 ± 0.22) and maximum shoot length (3.9 ± 0.33 cm) were obtained from the nodal explants exposed to 50 μM TDZ for 8 d. The nodal explants excised from the proliferated cultures of TDZ (50 μM) for 8 d were used as explants and showed an enhancement rate after next three round of in vitro propagation. Best results for rooting was obtained by ex vitro treatment of shoots with 200 μM indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) for 20 min. as it produced an average of 5.7 ± 0.41 roots per microshoot with 4.4 ± 0.39 cm root length in 84% shoots. Different planting substrates was tested for maximum survival of hardening off micropropagated plantlets and soilrite proved most effective than others as 97.1 ± 7.21 plantlets survived. All micropropagated plants grew well in natural conditions and showed similar morphology to the mother plant.

  2. Dinitrogen fixation associated with shoots of aquatic carnivorous plants: is it ecologically important?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirová, Dagmara; Santrůček, Jiří; Adamec, Lubomír; Bárta, Jiří; Borovec, Jakub; Pech, Jiří; Owens, Sarah M; Santrůčková, Hana; Schäufele, Rudi; Storchová, Helena; Vrba, Jaroslav

    2014-07-01

    Rootless carnivorous plants of the genus Utricularia are important components of many standing waters worldwide, as well as suitable model organisms for studying plant-microbe interactions. In this study, an investigation was made of the importance of microbial dinitrogen (N2) fixation in the N acquisition of four aquatic Utricularia species and another aquatic carnivorous plant, Aldrovanda vesiculosa. 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing was used to assess the presence of micro-organisms with known ability to fix N2. Next-generation sequencing provided information on the expression of N2 fixation-associated genes. N2 fixation rates were measured following (15)N2-labelling and were used to calculate the plant assimilation rate of microbially fixed N2. Utricularia traps were confirmed as primary sites of N2 fixation, with up to 16 % of the plant-associated microbial community consisting of bacteria capable of fixing N2. Of these, rhizobia were the most abundant group. Nitrogen fixation rates increased with increasing shoot age, but never exceeded 1·3 μmol N g(-1) d. mass d(-1). Plant assimilation rates of fixed N2 were detectable and significant, but this fraction formed less than 1 % of daily plant N gain. Although trap fluid provides conditions favourable for microbial N2 fixation, levels of nif gene transcription comprised aquatic Utricularia, despite the large potential capacity, is the high concentration of NH4-N (2·0-4·3 mg L(-1)) in the trap fluid. Resulting from fast turnover of organic detritus, it probably inhibits N2 fixation in most of the microorganisms present. Nitrogen fixation is not expected to contribute significantly to N nutrition of aquatic carnivorous plants under their typical growth conditions; however, on an annual basis the plant-microbe system can supply nitrogen in the order of hundreds of mg m(-2) into the nutrient-limited littoral zone, where it may thus represent an important N source. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University

  3. A Unified Model of Shoot Tropism in Plants: Photo-, Gravi- and Propio-ception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastien, Renaud; Douady, Stéphane; Moulia, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Land plants rely mainly on gravitropism and phototropism to control their posture and spatial orientation. In natural conditions, these two major tropisms act concurrently to create a photogravitropic equilibrium in the responsive organ. Recently, a parsimonious model was developed that accurately predicted the complete gravitropic and proprioceptive control over the movement of different organs in different species in response to gravitational stimuli. Here we show that the framework of this unifying graviproprioceptive model can be readily extended to include phototropism. The interaction between gravitropism and phototropism results in an alignment of the apical part of the organ toward a photogravitropic set-point angle. This angle is determined by a combination of the two directional stimuli, gravity and light, weighted by the ratio between the gravi- and photo-sensitivities of the plant organ. In the model, two dimensionless numbers, the graviproprioceptive number B and the photograviceptive number M, control the dynamics and the shapes of the movement. The extended model agrees well with two sets of detailed quantitative data on photogravitropic equilibrium in oat coleoptiles. It is demonstrated that the influence of light intensity I can be included in the model in a power-law-dependent relationship M(I). The numbers B and M and the related photograviceptive number D are all quantitative genetic traits that can be measured in a straightforward manner, opening the way to the phenotyping of molecular and mechanical aspects of shoot tropism. PMID:25692607

  4. A unified model of shoot tropism in plants: photo-, gravi- and Propio-ception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renaud Bastien

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Land plants rely mainly on gravitropism and phototropism to control their posture and spatial orientation. In natural conditions, these two major tropisms act concurrently to create a photogravitropic equilibrium in the responsive organ. Recently, a parsimonious model was developed that accurately predicted the complete gravitropic and proprioceptive control over the movement of different organs in different species in response to gravitational stimuli. Here we show that the framework of this unifying graviproprioceptive model can be readily extended to include phototropism. The interaction between gravitropism and phototropism results in an alignment of the apical part of the organ toward a photogravitropic set-point angle. This angle is determined by a combination of the two directional stimuli, gravity and light, weighted by the ratio between the gravi- and photo-sensitivities of the plant organ. In the model, two dimensionless numbers, the graviproprioceptive number B and the photograviceptive number M, control the dynamics and the shapes of the movement. The extended model agrees well with two sets of detailed quantitative data on photogravitropic equilibrium in oat coleoptiles. It is demonstrated that the influence of light intensity I can be included in the model in a power-law-dependent relationship M(I. The numbers B and M and the related photograviceptive number D are all quantitative genetic traits that can be measured in a straightforward manner, opening the way to the phenotyping of molecular and mechanical aspects of shoot tropism.

  5. CO2 enrichment inhibits shoot nitrate assimilation in C3 but not C4 plants and slows growth under nitrate in C3 plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Arnold J; Asensio, Jose Salvador Rubaio; Randall, Lesley; Rachmilevitch, Shimon; Cousins, Asaph B; Carlisle, Eli A

    2012-02-01

    The CO2 concentration in Earth's atmosphere may double during this century. Plant responses to such an increase depend strongly on their nitrogen status, but the reasons have been uncertain. Here, we assessed shoot nitrate assimilation into amino acids via the shift in shoot CO2 and O2 fluxes when plants received nitrate instead of ammonium as a nitrogen source (deltaAQ). Shoot nitrate assimilation became negligible with increasing CO2 in a taxonomically diverse group of eight C3 plant species, was relatively insensitive to CO2 in three C4 species, and showed an intermediate sensitivity in two C3-C4 intermediate species. We then examined the influence of CO2 level and ammonium vs. nitrate nutrition on growth, assessed in terms of changes in fresh mass, of several C3 species and a Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) species. Elevated CO2 (720 micromol CO2/mol of all gases present) stimulated growth or had no effect in the five C3 species tested when they received ammonium as a nitrogen source but inhibited growth or had no effect if they received nitrate. Under nitrate, two C3 species grew faster at sub-ambient (approximately 310 micromol/mol) than elevated CO2. A CAM species grew faster at ambient than elevated or sub-ambient CO2 under either ammonium or nitrate nutrition. This study establishes that CO2 enrichment inhibits shoot nitrate assimilation in a wide variety of C3 plants and that this phenomenon can have a profound effect on their growth. This indicates that shoot nitrate assimilation provides an important contribution to the nitrate assimilation of an entire C3 plant. Thus, rising CO2 and its effects on shoot nitrate assimilation may influence the distribution of C3 plant species.

  6. EFFECTS OF PLANT GROWTH REGULATORS ON SHOOT MULTIPLICATION AND ROOT INDUCTION OF CASSAVA VARIETIES CULTURE IN VITRO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HERNI WIDHIASTUTI

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A study on propagation of three superior cassava ( Crant varieties i.e.Darul Hidayah, Malang-6 and Adira-4 through tissue culture technique was conducted at theTissue Culture Lab of SEAMEO BIOTROP, Bogor. The objective of the experiment was tostudy effect of plant growth regulators on propagation, which can be used in cassavamicropropagation protocol. Plant materials used were auxiliary shoots of a stem node. Theexperiment consisted of (i shoot multiplication, (ii roots induction, and (iii acclimatization.The multiple shoot regeneration was observed by using Murashige & Skoog (MS basal mediasupplemented with 0, 0.1, 1.0 and 5.0 mg/L of benzylaminopurine (BAP combined with 0.0,0.1 and 1.0 mg/L of thidiazuron. The root induction was observed by using 0.1 and 1.0 mg/Lof IBA and NAA. The resulting plantlets were transplanted into plastic polybags containingsoil mixed with organic fertilizer (1:1 covered with plastic sheets and transferred to agreenhouse. The result of the study showed that the highest number of shoots for DarulHidayah, Malang-6 and Adira-4 varieties were 4.93 shoots treated with BAP 1 mg/L +thidiazuron 0.1 mg/L, 4.20 shoots at BAP media of 1 mg/L, and 7.20 shoots at the mediaof BAP 1 mg/L + thidiazuron 0.1 mg/L respectively. The highest number of nodes producedwas 2.9 nodes for Darul Hidayah at BAP 5 mg/L, 5.13 nodes for Malang-6 at BAP 0.1 mg/L,and 6.18 nodes for Adira-4 at BAP 5 mg/L + thidiazuron 1 mg/L. The utilization of auxin IAAor NAA could induce and accelerate the growth of roots which finally could increase thesuccess of acclimatization process. With an average of four multiplication factors of eachculture period, the potency of each cassava shoot propagated through tissue culture couldproduce around 37 000 plants/year.

  7. Acentrosomal microtubule nucleation in higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmit, Anne-Catherine

    2002-01-01

    Higher plants have developed a unique pathway to control their cytoskeleton assembly and dynamics. In most other eukaryotes, microtubules are nucleated in vivo at the nucleation and organizing centers and are involved in the establishment of polarity. Although the major cytoskeletal components are common to plant and animal cells, which suggests conserved regulation mechanisms, plants do not possess centrosome-like organelles. Nevertheless, they are able to build spindles and have developed their own specific cytoskeletal arrays: the cortical arrays, the preprophase band, and the phragmoplast, which all participate in basic developmental processes, as shown by defective mutants. New approaches provide essential clues to understanding the fundamental mechanisms of microtubule nucleation. Gamma-tubulin, which is considered to be the universal nucleator, is the essential component of microtubule-nucleating complexes identified as gamma-tubulin ring complexes (gamma-TuRC) in centriolar cells. A gamma-tubulin small complex (gamma-TuSC) forms a minimal nucleating unit recruited at specific sites of activity. These components--gamma-tubulin, Spc98p, and Spc97p--are present in higher plants. They play a crucial role in microtubule nucleation at the nuclear surface, which is known as the main functional plant microtubule-organizing center, and also probably at the cell cortex and at the phragmoplast, where secondary nucleation sites may exist. Surprisingly, plant gamma-tubulin is distributed along the microtubule length. As it is not associated with Spc98p, it may not be involved in microtubule nucleation, but may preferably control microtubule dynamics. Understanding the mechanisms of microtubule nucleation is the major challenge of the current research.

  8. Simulating the partitioning of biomass and nitrogen between roots and shoot in crop and grass plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yin, X.; Schapendonk, A.H.C.M.

    2004-01-01

    Quantification of the assimilate partitioning between roots and shoot has been one of the components that need improvement in crop growth models. In this study we derived two equations for root-shoot partitioning of biomass and nitrogen (N) that hold for crops grown under steady-state conditions.

  9. Effect of plant growth regulators on in vitro shoot multiplication of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-11-16

    Nov 16, 2009 ... An efficient protocol was established for in vitro shoot multiplication from apical shoot tips derived from mature trees of almond (Amygdalus communis L.) cultivars, Yaltsinki. Explants were cultured on. Murashige and Skoog (1962) (MS) medium containing various concentrations of 6-benzyladenin (BA).

  10. An Efficient Plant Regeneration and Transformation System of Ma Bamboo (Dendrocalamus latiflorus Munro) Started from Young Shoot as Explant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Shanwen; Cai, Changyang; Ren, Huibo; Wang, Wenjia; Xiang, Mengqi; Tang, Xiaoshan; Zhu, Caiping; Yin, Tengfei; Zhang, Li; Zhu, Qiang

    2017-01-01

    Genetic engineering technology has been successfully used in many plant species, but is limited in woody plants, especially in bamboos. Ma bamboo (Dendrocalamus latiflorus Munro) is one of the most important bamboo species in Asia, and its genetic improvement was largely restricted by the lack of an efficient regeneration and transformation method. Here we reported a plantlet regeneration and Agrobacterium-mediated transformation protocol by using Ma bamboo young shoots as explants. Under our optimized conditions, embryogenic calluses were successfully induced from the excised young shoots on callus induction medium and rapidly grew on callus multiplication medium. Shoots and roots were regenerated on shoot induction medium and root induction medium, respectively, with high efficiency. An Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation protocol of Ma bamboo was established, verified by PCR and GUS staining. Furthermore, the maize Lc gene under the control of the ubiquitin promoter was successfully introduced into Ma bamboo genome and generated an anthocyanin over-accumulation phenotype. Our methods established here will facilitate the basic research as well as genetic breeding of this important bamboo species. Key achievements: A stable and high efficiency regeneration and Agrobacterium-mediated transformation protocol for Ma bamboo from vegetative organ is established. PMID:28798758

  11. Higher plant transformation: principles and molecular tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anami, Sylvester; Njuguna, Elizabeth; Coussens, Griet; Aesaert, Stijn; Van Lijsebettens, Mieke

    2013-01-01

    In higher plants, genetic transformation, which is part of the toolbox for the study of living organisms, had been reported only 30 years ago, boosting basic plant biology research, generating superior crops, and leading to the new discipline of plant biotechnology. Here, we review its principles and the corresponding molecular tools. In vitro regeneration, through somatic embryogenesis or organogenesis, is discussed because they are prerequisites for the subsequent Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transferred (T)-DNA or direct DNA transfer methods to produce transgenic plants. Important molecular components of the T-DNA are examined, such as selectable marker genes that allow the selection of transformed cells in tissue cultures and are used to follow the gene of interest in the next generations, and reporter genes that have been developed to visualize promoter activities, protein localizations, and protein-protein interactions. Genes of interest are assembled with promoters and termination signals in Escherichia coli by means of GATEWAY-derived binary vectors that represent the current versatile cloning tools. Finally, future promising developments in transgene technology are considered.

  12. The interaction with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi or Trichoderma harzianum alters the shoot hormonal profile in melon plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Medina, Ainhoa; Roldán, Antonio; Albacete, Alfonso; Pascual, Jose A

    2011-02-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and Trichoderma harzianum are known to affect plant growth and disease resistance through interaction with phytohormone synthesis or transport in the plant. Cross-talk between these microorganisms and their host plants normally occurs in nature and may affect plant resistance. Simultaneous quantification in the shoots of melon plants revealed significant changes in the levels of several hormones in response to inoculation with T. harzianum and two different AMF (Glomus intraradices and Glomus mosseae). Analysis of zeatin (Ze), indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC), salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid (JA) and abscisic acid (ABA) in the shoot showed common and divergent responses of melon plants to G. intraradices and G. mosseae. T. harzianum effected systemic increases in Ze, IAA, ACC, SA, JA and ABA. The interaction of T. harzianum and the AMF with the plant produced a characteristic hormonal profile, which differed from that produced by inoculation with each microorganism singly, suggesting an attenuation of the plant response, related to the hormones SA, JA and ethylene. These results are discussed in relation to their involvement in biomass allocation and basal resistance against Fusarium wilt. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Accumulation of cytokinins in roots and their export to the shoots of durum wheat plants treated with the protonophore carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudoyarova, Guzel R; Korobova, Alla V; Akhiyarova, Guzel R; Arkhipova, Tatiana N; Zaytsev, Denis Yu; Prinsen, Els; Egutkin, Naum L; Medvedev, Sergey S; Veselov, Stanislav Yu

    2014-06-01

    Cytokinin flow from roots to shoots can serve as a long-distance signal important for root-to-shoot communication. In the past, changes in cytokinin flow from roots to shoots have been mainly attributed to changes in the rate of synthesis or breakdown in the roots. The present research tested the possibility that active uptake of cytokinin by root cells may also influence its export to shoots. To this end, we collapsed the proton gradient across root membranes using the protonophore carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) to inhibit secondary active uptake of exogenous and endogenous cytokinins. We report the impact of CCCP on cytokinin concentrations and delivery in xylem sap and on accumulation in shoots of 7-day-old wheat plants in the presence and absence of exogenous cytokinin applied as zeatin. Zeatin treatment increased the total accumulation of cytokinin in roots and shoots but the effect was smaller for the shoots. Immunohistochemical localization of cytokinins using zeatin-specific antibodies showed an increase in immunostaining of the cells adjacent to xylem in the roots of zeatin-treated plants. Inhibition of secondary active cytokinin uptake by CCCP application decreased cytokinin accumulation in root cells but increased both flow from the roots and accumulation in the shoots. The possible importance of secondary active uptake of cytokinins by root cells for the control of their export to the shoot is discussed. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  14. Root parasitic plant Orobanche aegyptiaca and shoot parasitic plant Cuscuta australis obtained Brassicaceae-specific strictosidine synthase-like genes by horizontal gene transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Besides gene duplication and de novo gene generation, horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is another important way of acquiring new genes. HGT may endow the recipients with novel phenotypic traits that are important for species evolution and adaption to new ecological niches. Parasitic systems expectedly allow the occurrence of HGT at relatively high frequencies due to their long-term physical contact. In plants, a number of HGT events have been reported between the organelles of parasites and the hosts, but HGT between host and parasite nuclear genomes has rarely been found. Results A thorough transcriptome screening revealed that a strictosidine synthase-like (SSL) gene in the root parasitic plant Orobanche aegyptiaca and the shoot parasitic plant Cuscuta australis showed much higher sequence similarities with those in Brassicaceae than with those in their close relatives, suggesting independent gene horizontal transfer events from Brassicaceae to these parasites. These findings were strongly supported by phylogenetic analysis and their identical unique amino acid residues and deletions. Intriguingly, the nucleus-located SSL genes in Brassicaceae belonged to a new member of SSL gene family, which were originated from gene duplication. The presence of introns indicated that the transfer occurred directly by DNA integration in both parasites. Furthermore, positive selection was detected in the foreign SSL gene in O. aegyptiaca but not in C. australis. The expression of the foreign SSL genes in these two parasitic plants was detected in multiple development stages and tissues, and the foreign SSL gene was induced after wounding treatment in C. australis stems. These data imply that the foreign genes may still retain certain functions in the recipient species. Conclusions Our study strongly supports that parasitic plants can gain novel nuclear genes from distantly related host species by HGT and the foreign genes may execute certain functions in the new hosts

  15. Root parasitic plant Orobanche aegyptiaca and shoot parasitic plant Cuscuta australis obtained Brassicaceae-specific strictosidine synthase-like genes by horizontal gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dale; Qi, Jinfeng; Yue, Jipei; Huang, Jinling; Sun, Ting; Li, Suoping; Wen, Jian-Fan; Hettenhausen, Christian; Wu, Jinsong; Wang, Lei; Zhuang, Huifu; Wu, Jianqiang; Sun, Guiling

    2014-01-13

    Besides gene duplication and de novo gene generation, horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is another important way of acquiring new genes. HGT may endow the recipients with novel phenotypic traits that are important for species evolution and adaption to new ecological niches. Parasitic systems expectedly allow the occurrence of HGT at relatively high frequencies due to their long-term physical contact. In plants, a number of HGT events have been reported between the organelles of parasites and the hosts, but HGT between host and parasite nuclear genomes has rarely been found. A thorough transcriptome screening revealed that a strictosidine synthase-like (SSL) gene in the root parasitic plant Orobanche aegyptiaca and the shoot parasitic plant Cuscuta australis showed much higher sequence similarities with those in Brassicaceae than with those in their close relatives, suggesting independent gene horizontal transfer events from Brassicaceae to these parasites. These findings were strongly supported by phylogenetic analysis and their identical unique amino acid residues and deletions. Intriguingly, the nucleus-located SSL genes in Brassicaceae belonged to a new member of SSL gene family, which were originated from gene duplication. The presence of introns indicated that the transfer occurred directly by DNA integration in both parasites. Furthermore, positive selection was detected in the foreign SSL gene in O. aegyptiaca but not in C. australis. The expression of the foreign SSL genes in these two parasitic plants was detected in multiple development stages and tissues, and the foreign SSL gene was induced after wounding treatment in C. australis stems. These data imply that the foreign genes may still retain certain functions in the recipient species. Our study strongly supports that parasitic plants can gain novel nuclear genes from distantly related host species by HGT and the foreign genes may execute certain functions in the new hosts.

  16. Cytoplasniic differentiation during microsporogenesis in higher plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Dichinnson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Conspicuous cytoplasmic dedifferentiation in the pollen mother cells takes place early in the meiotic prophase of many plants. This event involves the removal of much of the cytoplasmic RNA. and the differentiation of both plastids and mitochondria to approaching the sole expression of their genomes. Much of the RNA removed from the cytoplasm passes to the nucleoplasm where it is utilised in the construction of a new `generation' of ribusomes. These new ribosomes are incorporated into cytoplasmic `nuclewhich disintegrate in the post-meiotic cytoplasm, restoring its ribosomes to pre-prophase levels. These changes are interpreted as evidence of a process by which the cytoplasm is cleansed of sporophytic control elements, both for the expression of the new gametophytic genome, and in the female cells of higher plants, for transmission to the new generation. The absence of control elements (presumably long-term messenger RNA from the cytoplasm would result in the dedifferentiation observed in the organelles, and the low levels of reserves in these cells presumably results in characteristically lengthy and unusual redifferentiation of both plastids and mitochondria, once information-carrying molecules again enter the cytosol.

  17. Mechanisms of male sterility in higher plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohta, Yasuo (Tsukuba Univ., Sakura, Ibaraki (Japan))

    1982-03-01

    The mechanisms causing male sterility in higher plants were classified into two major categories: genetic and non-genetic. The former was further divided into six classes: 1) Anomality in spindle mechanism during meiosis, 2) chromosomal anomality such as haploidy, polyploidy, aneuploidy, chromosome some deficiency, inversion and reciprocal translocation, 3) presence of male sterile genes, 4) cytoplasmic abnormality, 5) the combination of some specific cytoplasm with particular genes, and 6) infections of microorganisms or viruses. Each mechanism was briefly explained, and the methods for the maintenance of parent lines for heterosis breeding and hybrid seed production were described. The non-genetic male sterility was classified into four types, which are caused by 1) low or high temperature, 2) water deficiency, 3) application of chemicals, and 4) radiation, with a brief explanation given for each of them.

  18. Effect of free fall on higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, S. A.

    1973-01-01

    The influence of exposure to the free-fall state on the orientation, morphogenesis, physiology, and radiation response of higher plants is briefly summarized. It is proposed that the duration of the space-flight experiments has been to brief to permit meaningful effects of free fall on general biochemistry, growth, and development to appear. However, two types of significant effect did occur. The first is on differential growth - i.e., tropism and epinasty - resulting from the absence of a normal geostimulus. For these phenomena it is suggested that ground-based experiments with the clinostat would suffice to mimic the effect of the free-fall state. The second is an apparent interaction between the radiation response and some flight condition, yielding an enhanced microspore abortion, a disturbed spindle function, and a stunting of stamen hairs. It is suggested that this apparent interaction may be derived from a shift in the rhythm of the cell cycle, induced by the free fall.

  19. Effects of clone and cutting traits on shoot emergence and early growth of willow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verwijst, Theo; Lundkvist, Anneli; Edelfeldt, Stina

    2012-01-01

    To assess if size differences between plants in establishing willow stands may be caused by differences between cuttings prior to planting, plant response (survival, sprouting in terms of emergence time and shoot number, and growth in terms of shoot size, weight and leaf area) was quantified...... as a function of clone, original position on shoots from which cuttings are derived, cutting length, cutting diameter, and field storage time. Longer and thicker willow cuttings developed more and taller shoots and displayed a higher biomass production than shoots from short and thin cuttings. Cuttings derived...... from apical positions along shoots displayed for a given diameter a higher shoot biomass production than cuttings derived from the more basal parts. The effect of position was related to differences between cuttings with regard to phenology, bud burst for cuttings from high positions having progressed...

  20. Shooting mechanisms in nature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sakes, Aimée; Wiel, van der Marleen; Henselmans, Paul W.J.; Leeuwen, van Johan L.; Dodou, Dimitra; Breedveld, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Background In nature, shooting mechanisms are used for a variety of purposes, including prey capture, defense, and reproduction. This review offers insight into the working principles of shooting mechanisms in fungi, plants, and animals in the light of the specific functional demands that these

  1. High frequency direct shoot organogenesis of leaf explants and a comparative evaluation of phytochemicals, antioxidant potential of wild vs. in vitro plant extracts of Lysimachia laxa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sanjoy; Seal, Tapan; Mao, A A; Sarma, Soneswar

    2017-08-01

    The present studies were attempted to develop direct shoot organogenesis from in vitro grown leaf explants of Lysimachia laxa and comparative evaluation of phytochemical and antioxidant potential of in vitro raised and wild plants extracts. The fresh leaves of this species are used for deworming gastrointestinal worm infection in traditional medicine. Overexploitation of this species and poor regeneration has led to rapid decline in wild population, therefore, present investigation was attempted to develop an efficient rapid mass propagation protocol for this species. Our result showed significantly (P rooting induction (100%) with average root number of 11.70 and length 7.35 cm. All rooted plants were successfully acclimatized in greenhouse and transferred to field condition with a survival rate of 97%. The contents of phenolic and flavonoid were higher in in vitro raised plant in compared to wild plant extracts. Antioxidants assay showed high radical scavenging activity of IC50 1.61 ± 0.07 mg dry material and reducing power of 49.79 ± 0.11 mg/g ascorbic acid equivalent by aqueous methanol extracts of in vitro raised 3-months-old plants in compare to the wild plants. The present protocol is a viable option for pharmaceutical or nutraceutical industries for sustainable utilization of L. laxa with enhanced of phytochemical and antioxidant potency which is not reported elsewhere.

  2. A simple and efficient micrografting method for stably transformed Nicotiana attenuata plants to examine shoot-root signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Sang-Gyu

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract To adjust their development to the environment, plants rely on specific signals that travel from shoot to root and vice versa. Here we describe an efficient micrografting protocol for Nicotiana attenuata, a useful tool for identifying these signals and understanding their functions. Additionally we analyzed transcript accumulation profiles of scions and rootstocks of grafts performed with wild-type and stably transformed N. attenuata. Our results are consistent with the source-to-sink movement of an sRNA silencing signal.

  3. Field evaluation of regenerated plants by somatic embryogenesis from shoots apexes of axillary buds in ´Navolean’ (Musa spp., AAB.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge López

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of shoots apexes from axilary buds for callus induction with embryogenic structures in plantain ‘Navolean’ (Group AAB permitted to develop a plant regeneration method through out somatic embryogenesis. In order to know the phenotypic variants that may be produced with the previously mentioned method , 1000 plants were planted in field conditions in comparison to those coming from somatic embryos obtained from multibuds as initial explants and organogenesis-derived plants (shoot tipsand conventionally derived plants (corms, during two growing cycles. The main morphological characters and yield components were evaluated. The total frequency of somaclonal variation during the first growing cycle in plants coming from somatic embryos obtained from shoots apexes from axilary buds as initial explants were 1.1%, and 8,6% in regenerated plants from somatic embryos obtained from multi-buds as initial explants. Later, in this same growing cycle, plants regenerated from somatic embryos (both sources showed a similar performance between them and they were significantly superior in all evaluated variants in comparison to corm-derived plants. In the second growing cycle, significant differences were not observed in yield components of suckers from evaluated plants, in spite of the propagation method used. With regard to somaclonal variation, the best performance was obtained with shoots apexes from axilary buds as explants. Finally, the feasibility of using the new method was shown. Key words: embryogenic cell suspensions, somaclonal variation

  4. Branch architecture in Ginkgo biloba: wood anatomy and long shoot-short shoot interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Stefan A; Jacobs, Brooke; McKechnie, Steven J; Cooper, Ranessa L; Christianson, Michael L; Jernstedt, Judith A

    2013-10-01

    Ginkgo, centrally placed in seed plant phylogeny, is considered important in many phylogenetic and evolutionary studies. Shoot dimorphism of Ginkgo has been long noted, but no work has yet been done to evaluate the relationships between overall branch architecture and wood ring characters, shoot growth, and environmental conditions. • Branches, sampled from similar canopy heights, were mapped with the age of each long shoot segment determined by counting annual leaf-scar series on its short shoots. Transverse sections were made for each long shoot segment and an adjacent short shoot; wood ring thickness, number of rings, and number of tracheids/ring were determined. Using branch maps, we identified wood rings for each long shoot segment to year and developmental context of each year (distal short shoot growth only vs. at least one distal long shoot). Climate data were also analyzed in conjunction with developmental context. • Significantly thicker wood rings occur in years with distal long shoot development. The likelihood that a branch produced long shoots in a given year was lower with higher maximum annual temperature. Annual maximum temperature was negatively correlated with ring thickness in microsporangiate trees only. Annual minimum temperatures were correlated differently with ring thickness of megasporangiate and microsporangiate trees, depending on the developmental context. There were no significant effects associated with precipitation. • Overall, developmental context alone predicts wood ring thickness about as well as models that include temperature. This suggests that although climatic factors may be strongly correlated with wood ring data among many gymnosperm taxa, at least for Ginkgo, correlations with climate data are primarily due to changes in proportions of shoot developmental types (LS vs. SS) across branches.

  5. Crescimento do sistema radicular e da parte aérea em plantas jovens de cafeeiros Root and shoot growth of young coffee plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Carlos da Silva Ramos

    1982-01-01

    Full Text Available Os cultivares Catuaí e Arábica, de Coffea arabica, Guarini, de C. canephora, e Icatu, derivado de um híbrido interespecífico entre essas duas espécies, com dois retro-cruzamentos para C. arabica cv Mundo Novo, foram avaliados aos oito e 22 meses após a germinação, quanto ao comprimento e peso seco, tanto das raízes quanto da parte aérea. Aos oito meses de idade, esses dados foram comparados quanto aos efeitos do plantio direto e do transplantio de germinador de areia para sacos plásticos. O volume de raízes foi também analisado em plantas conduzidas em vasos, aos 22 meses de idade. Os cultivares Guarini, Catuaí e Icatu, mais produtivos que o Arábica, mostraram sistema radicular mais desenvolvido. No 'Guarini' e no 'Catuaí', notou-se maior desenvolvimento das raízes laterais em relação à parte aérea, característica de importância para condições hídricas desfavoráveis. Os dados indicaram que o sistema radicular dos cultivares ficou mais bem caracterizado, avaliando-se mudas aos 22 meses após a germinação, com semeadura direta, e utilizando-se recipientes de 10 litros de capacidade.Young coffee plants of Coffea arabica cv. Catuaí, cv. Arabica, C. canephora cv. Guarini and C. arabica x C. canephora cv. Icatu (BC2 C. arabica were evaluated at 8 and 22 months after germination for root and snoot length, and their dry weight. At the 8th month, the coffee germplasm were also submitted to comparisons pertaining to the effects of direct sowing or transplantation of the seedlings to plastic pots after germination in sand trays. At the 22nd month the root volume were also evaluated in coffee plants planted in plastic pots. 'Guarini', 'Catuai' and 'Icatu', having higher yielding ability than 'Arabica', showed also better root system development. 'Guarini' presented the highest lateral root and shoot values. The highest lateral root/shoot dry weight ratio was observed for 'Guarini' and 'Catuai'. This is one important feature for

  6. Infection of non-host model plant species with the narrow-host-range Cacao swollen shoot virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friscina, Arianna; Chiappetta, Laura; Jacquemond, Mireille; Tepfer, Mark

    2017-02-01

    Cacao swollen shoot virus (CSSV) is a major pathogen of cacao (Theobroma cacao) in Africa, and long-standing efforts to limit its spread by the culling of infected trees have had very limited success. CSSV is a particularly difficult virus to study, as it has a very narrow host range, limited to several tropical tree species. Furthermore, the virus is not mechanically transmissible, and its insect vector can only be used with difficulty. Thus, the only efficient means to infect cacao plants that have been experimentally described so far are by particle bombardment or the agroinoculation of cacao plants with an infectious clone. We have genetically transformed three non-host species with an infectious form of the CSSV genome: two experimental hosts widely used in plant virology (Nicotiana tabacum and N. benthamiana) and the model species Arabidopsis thaliana. In transformed plants of all three species, the CSSV genome was able to replicate, and, in tobacco, CSSV particles could be observed by immunosorbent electron microscopy, demonstrating that the complete virus cycle could be completed in a non-host plant. These results will greatly facilitate the preliminary testing of CSSV control strategies using plants that are easy to raise and to transform genetically. © 2016 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  7. The cytoskeleton and gravitropism in higher plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blancaflor, Elison B.

    2002-01-01

    The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the gravitropic response of plants have continued to elude plant biologists despite more than a century of research. Lately there has been increased attention on the role of the cytoskeleton in plant gravitropism, but several controversies and major gaps in our understanding of cytoskeletal involvement in gravitropism remain. A major question in the study of plant gravitropism is how the cytoskeleton mediates early sensing and signal transduction events in plants. Much has been made of the actin cytoskeleton as the cellular structure that sedimenting amyloplasts impinge upon to trigger the downstream signaling events leading to the bending response. There is also strong molecular and biochemical evidence that the transport of auxin, an important player in gravitropism, is regulated by actin. Organizational changes in microtubules during the growth response phase of gravitropism have also been well documented, but the significance of such reorientations in controlling differential cellular growth is unclear. Studies employing pharmacological approaches to dissect cytoskeletal involvement in gravitropism have led to conflicting results and therefore need to be interpreted with caution. Despite the current controversies, the revolutionary advances in molecular, biochemical, and cell biological techniques have opened up several possibilities for further research into this difficult area. The myriad proteins associated with the plant cytoskeleton that are being rapidly characterized provide a rich assortment of candidate regulators that could be targets of the gravity signal transduction chain. Cytoskeletal and ion imaging in real time combined with mutant analysis promises to provide a fresh start into this controversial area of research.

  8. The proteome of higher plant mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, R S P; Salvato, F; Thal, B; Eubel, H; Thelen, J J; Møller, I M

    2017-03-01

    Plant mitochondria perform a wide range of functions in the plant cell ranging from providing energy and metabolic intermediates, via coenzyme biosynthesis and their own biogenesis to retrograde signaling and programmed cell death. To perform these functions, they contain a proteome of >2000 different proteins expressed in some cells under some conditions. The vast majority of these proteins are imported, in many cases by a dedicated protein import machinery. Recent proteomic studies have identified about 1000 different proteins in both Arabidopsis and potato mitochondria, but even for energy-related proteins, the most well-studied functional protein group in mitochondria, <75% of the proteins are recognized as mitochondrial by even one of six of the most widely used prediction algorithms. The mitochondrial proteomes contain proteins representing a wide range of different functions. Some protein groups, like energy-related proteins, membrane transporters, and de novo fatty acid synthesis, appear to be well covered by the proteome, while others like RNA metabolism appear to be poorly covered possibly because of low abundance. The proteomic studies have improved our understanding of basic mitochondrial functions, have led to the discovery of new mitochondrial metabolic pathways and are helping us towards appreciating the dynamic role of the mitochondria in the responses of the plant cell to biotic and abiotic stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. All rights reserved.

  9. Root herbivore identity matters in plant-mediated interactions between root and shoot herbivores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wurst, S.; Putten, van der W.H.

    2007-01-01

    Plants are simultaneously attacked by a multitude of herbivores that affect plant responses and plant-mediated interactions in a variety of ways. So far, studies on indirect interactions between below- and aboveground herbivores have almost exclusively focused on interactions between only one root

  10. Passive CO2 concentration in higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sage, Rowan F; Khoshravesh, Roxana

    2016-06-01

    Photorespiratory limitations on C3 photosynthesis are substantial in warm, low CO2 conditions. To compensate, certain plants evolved mechanisms to actively concentrate CO2 around Rubisco using ATP-supported CO2 pumps such as C4 photosynthesis. Plants can also passively accumulate CO2 without additional ATP expenditure by localizing the release of photorespired and respired CO2 around Rubisco that is diffusively isolated from peripheral air spaces. Passive accumulation of photorespired CO2 occurs when glycine decarboxylase is localized to vascular sheath cells in what is termed C2 photosynthesis, and through forming sheaths of chloroplasts around the periphery of mesophyll cells. The peripheral sheaths require photorespired CO2 to re-enter chloroplasts where it can be refixed. Passive accumulation of respiratory CO2 is common in organs such as stems, fruits and flowers, due to abundant heterotrophic tissues and high diffusive resistance along the organ periphery. Chloroplasts within these organs are able to exploit this high CO2 to reduce photorespiration. CO2 concentration can also be enhanced passively by channeling respired CO2 from roots and rhizomes into photosynthetic cells of stems and leaves via lacunae, aerenchyma and the xylem stream. Through passive CO2 concentration, C3 species likely improved their carbon economy and maintained fitness during episodes of low atmospheric CO2. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of N6-benzylaminopurine and Indole Acetic Acid on In Vitro Shoot Multiplication, Nodule-like Meristem Proliferation and Plant Regeneration of Malaysian Bananas (Musa spp.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipen, Philip; Davey, Michael R

    2012-01-01

    Different concentrations of N6-benzylaminopurine (BAP) and indole acetic acid (IAA) in Murashige and Skoog based medium were assessed for their effects on shoot multiplication, nodule-like meristem proliferation and plant regeneration of the Malaysian banana cultivars Pisang Mas, Pisang Nangka, Pisang Berangan and Pisang Awak. BAP at 1–14 mg L−1 with or without 0.2 mg L−1 IAA, or BAP at 7–14 mg L−1 with the same concentration of IAA, was evaluated for shoot multiplication from shoot tips and the proliferation of nodule-like meristems from scalps, respectively. Plant regeneration from scalps was assessed using 1 mg L−1 BAP and 0.2 mg L−1 IAA separately, or a combination of these two growth regulators. Data on shoot multiplication, the proliferation of nodule-like meristems with associated plant regeneration were recorded after 30 days of culture. A maximum of 5 shoots per original shoot tip was achieved on medium supplemented with BAP at 5 mg L−1 (Pisang Nangka), 6 mg L−1 (Pisang Mas and Pisang Berangan), or 7 mg L−1 (Pisang Awak), with 0.2 mg L−1 IAA. BAP at 11 mg L−1 with 0.2 mg L−1 IAA induced the most highly proliferating nodule-like meristems in the four banana cultivars. Plant regeneration from scalps was optimum in all cases on medium containing 1 mg L−1 BAP and 0.2 mg L−1 IAA. This is the first report on the successful induction of highly proliferating nodule-like meristems and plant regeneration from scalps of the Malaysian banana cultivars Pisang Mas, Pisang Nangka, Pisang Berangan and Pisang Awak. PMID:24575235

  12. Study of a water electrolysis system using a compact solar cell module with a plant shoot configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obara, Shin' ya [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Kitami Institute of Technology, 165 Koen-cho, Kitami, Hokkaido 090-8507 (Japan)

    2010-01-15

    The system proposed in this paper produces hydrogen by supplying photovoltaic power to a water electrolyzer and then supplying this gas to a fuel cell with a time shift. The objective of this system is to supply power to an individual house or apartment building with only green energy. However, the solar cell module installation area is large in the proposed system. Therefore, this paper considered installing a solar cell module with a plant shoot configuration. As a result of this modification, the power generation area of the proposed system is 33-52% smaller than that of a conventional flat solar cell module. From these results, it should be possible to introduce the proposed system into an individual house. (author)

  13. Role of TDZ in the quick regeneration of multiple shoots from nodal explant of Vitex trifolia L.--an important medicinal plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Md Rafique; Anis, Mohammad

    2012-11-01

    The effect of thidiazuron (TDZ) has been investigated in shoot multiplication for a simple, efficient, rapid, and commercially applicable regeneration protocol of an important medicinal plant, Vitex trifolia. Multiple shoots were induced in nodal explants obtained from a mature tree on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium supplemented with TDZ in various concentrations (0.5, 1.0, 2.5, 5.0, 7.5, or 10.0 μM). Prolonged exposure of the culture to TDZ had an adverse affect. To avoid this, the cultures were transferred to TDZ-free MS medium or MS medium fortified with various concentrations of 6-benzyladenine (BA) alone or in combination with α-naphthalene acetic acid (NAA) to enhance multiplication, proliferation, and elongation of induced shoots. Optimum shoot multiplication and elongation was achieved when TDZ-exposed explants were repeatedly subcultured on MS media containing a combination of 1.0 μM BA and 0.5 μM NAA. The highest shoot regeneration frequency (90 %) and maximum number (22.3 ± 0.2) of shoots per explant with shoot length of (5.2 ± 0.2 cm) was recorded on MS medium fortified with 5.0 μM TDZ. In vitro rooting of isolated shoots was achieved best in half-strength MS medium containing 0.5 μM NAA. Properly rooted plantlets were successfully hardened off and acclimatized in thermocol cups containing sterile Soilrite. These plantlets were then transferred to pots containing different potting substrate; percentage survival of the plantlets was highest in vermiculite/garden soil mixture (1:1) and successfully transfer to greenhouse under sunlight.

  14. Dissecting the molecular signatures of apical cell-type shoot meristems from two ancient land plant lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Margaret H; Edwards, Molly B; Schultz, Eric R; McKain, Michael R; Fei, Zhangjun; Sørensen, Iben; Rose, Jocelyn K C; Scanlon, Michael J

    2015-08-01

    Shoot apical meristem (SAM) structure varies markedly within the land plants. The SAMs of many seedless vascular plants contain a conspicuous inverted, pyramidal cell called the apical cell (AC), which is unidentified in angiosperms. In this study, we use transcriptomic sequencing with precise laser microdissections of meristem subdomains to define the molecular signatures of anatomically distinct zones from the AC-type SAMs of a lycophyte (Selaginella moellendorffii) and a monilophyte (Equisetum arvense). The two model species for this study represent vascular plant lineages that diverged > 400 million yr ago. Our data comprise comprehensive molecular signatures for the distinct subdomains within AC-type SAMs, an anatomical anomaly whose functional significance has been debated in the botanical literature for over two centuries. Moreover, our data provide molecular support for distinct gene expression programs between the AC-type SAMs of Selaginella and Equisetum, as compared with the SAM transcriptome of the angiosperm maize. The results are discussed in light of the functional significance and evolutionary success of the AC-type SAM within the embryophytes. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  15. Molecular farming: production of drugs and vaccines in higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinmyo, Atsuhiko; Kato, Ko

    2010-08-01

    On the basis of developments in plant biotechnology, drug and vaccine production by higher plants can be added to microbial and animal cell culture processes. When genes encoding drug or vaccine formation under a suitable promoter are introduced into plants, these useful compounds can be economically produced from CO(2) and inorganic chemicals using sunlight. The merits and demerits of the plant process are discussed in this paper.

  16. Automated integrative high-throughput phenotyping of plant shoots: a case study of the cold-tolerance of pea (Pisum sativum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humplík, Jan F; Lazár, Dušan; Fürst, Tomáš; Husičková, Alexandra; Hýbl, Miroslav; Spíchal, Lukáš

    2015-01-01

    Recently emerging approaches to high-throughput plant phenotyping have discovered their importance as tools in unravelling the complex questions of plant growth, development and response to the environment, both in basic and applied science. High-throughput methods have been also used to study plant responses to various types of biotic and abiotic stresses (drought, heat, salinity, nutrient-starving, UV light) but only rarely to cold tolerance. We present here an experimental procedure of integrative high-throughput in-house phenotyping of plant shoots employing automated simultaneous analyses of shoot biomass and photosystem II efficiency to study the cold tolerance of pea (Pisum sativum L.). For this purpose, we developed new software for automatic RGB image analysis, evaluated various parameters of chlorophyll fluorescence obtained from kinetic chlorophyll fluorescence imaging, and performed an experiment in which the growth and photosynthetic activity of two different pea cultivars were followed during cold acclimation. The data obtained from the automated RGB imaging were validated through correlation of pixel based shoot area with measurement of the shoot fresh weight. Further, data obtained from automated chlorophyll fluorescence imaging analysis were compared with chlorophyll fluorescence parameters measured by a non-imaging chlorophyll fluorometer. In both cases, high correlation was obtained, confirming the reliability of the procedure described. This study of the response of two pea cultivars to cold stress confirmed that our procedure may have important application, not only for selection of cold-sensitive/tolerant varieties of pea, but also for studies of plant cold-response strategies in general. The approach, provides a very broad tool for the morphological and physiological selection of parameters which correspond to shoot growth and the efficiency of photosystem II, and is thus applicable in studies of various plant species and crops.

  17. Dinitrogen fixation associated with shoots of aquatic carnivorous plants: is it ecologically important?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sirová, Dagmara; Santrůček, Jiří; Adamec, Lubomír; Bárta, Jiří; Borovec, Jakub; Pech, Jiří; Owens, Sarah M; Santrůčková, Hana; Schäufele, Rudi; Storchová, Helena; Vrba, Jaroslav

    2014-01-01

    .... In this study, an investigation was made of the importance of microbial dinitrogen (N2) fixation in the N acquisition of four aquatic Utricularia species and another aquatic carnivorous plant, Aldrovanda vesiculosa...

  18. Effects of a Plant Growth Regulator, Prohexadione Calcium (BX-112), on the Elongation of Rice Shoots Caused by Exogenouslyl Applied Gibberellins and Helminthosporol, Part II

    OpenAIRE

    Yuji, KAMIYA; Masatomo, Kobayashi; Shozo, FUJIOKA; Hisakazu, YAMANE; Ishizue, NAKAYAMA; Akira, Sakurai; The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research:(Present)Frontier Research Program RIKEN; Department of Agricultural Chemistry, The University of Tokyo; Life Science Research Institute, Kumiai Chemical Industry Co., Ltd.; The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research

    1991-01-01

    Prohexadione calcium (BX-112) is a novel plant growth regulator that inhibits the late stages of the biosynthesis of gibberellins in plants. Fourteen kinds of gibberellin, helminthosporol and helminthosporic acid were applied simultaneously with BX-112 to rice seedlings (Oryza sativa L.), and their growth-promoting activities in terms of shoot elongation were examined. The growth-promoting activities of GA_1, GA_4, GA_, GA_, GA_, GA_, helminthosporol and helminthosporic acid were not inhibite...

  19. Morfogeneza pędów krzewiącej się pszenicy oraz dynamika ich elongacyjnego wzrostu [Morphogenesis of shoots of tillering plants of winter wheat and the dynamics of their elongation growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witold Drezner

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The morphogenesis of vegetative shoots of tillering plants of the winter wheat, the mode of identification and the description of the sequence of formation of individual shoots are presented. The average elongation growth of plants (e in the successive growth stages are described as the sum of the increase of the main shoot (a and of the side (secondary shoots (Σ b divided by the number of measured tillers (1 and by the time unit (t according to the equation. By this method the correlation between the dynamics of winter wheat growth and the grade of tillering are described for three varieties.

  20. Effects of shoot pruning and inflorescence thinning on plant growth, yield and fruit quality of greenhouse tomatoes in a tropical climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes F. J. Max

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The combined effects of shoot pruning (one or two stems and inflorescence thinning (five or ten flowers per inflorescence on greenhouse tomato yield and fruit quality were studied during the dry season (DS and rainy season (RS in Central Thailand. Poor fruit set, development of undersized (mostly parthenocarpic fruits, as well as the physiological disorders blossom-end rot (BER and fruit cracking (FC turned out to be the prevailing causes deteriorating fruit yield and quality. The proportion of marketable fruits was less than 10% in the RS and around 65% in the DS. In both seasons, total yield was significantly increased when plants were cultivated with two stems, resulting in higher marketable yields only in the DS. While the fraction of undersized fruits was increased in both seasons when plants were grown with a secondary stem, the proportions of BER and FC were significantly reduced. Restricting the number of flowers per inflorescence invariably resulted in reduced total yield. However, in neither season did fruit load considerably affect quantity or proportion of the marketable yield fraction. Inflorescence thinning tended to promote BER and FC, an effect which was only significant for BER in the RS. In conclusion, for greenhouse tomato production under climate conditions as they are prevalent in Central Thailand, the cultivation with two stems appears to be highly recommendable whereas the measures to control fruit load tested in this study did not proof to be advisable.

  1. An efficient in vitro shoot regeneration from leaf petiolar explants and ex vitro rooting of Bixa orellana L.- A dye yielding plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Arifullah; Chiruvella, Kishore K; Namsa, Nima D; Ghanta, Rama Gopal

    2015-07-01

    Bixa orellana L. (Bixaceae) is a multipurpose tree grown for the production of commercially important dyes. In the present study, an efficient, reproducible protocol was developed for direct plant regeneration from in vitro derived petiole explants of Bixa orellana L. Murashige and Skoog medium (MS) supplemented with 2-isopentenyl adenine (9.8 μM) and naphthalene acetic acid (10.7 μM) was found to be optimum for production of high frequency of shoot organogenesis. Subculturing of the shoots onto the fresh MS medium containing similar concentrations of 2-iP (9.8 μM) and NAA (10.7 μM) produced elongated shoots. Elongated shoots when placed onto MS medium supplemented with 1.7 μM indole-3-acetic acid and 14.7 μM 2-iP produced optimal rooting. Rooted plantlets were acclimatized and transplanted to the field successfully. Histological investigation revealed the origin of shoot primordia, from sub-epidermal cells of petiole explants. The regeneration protocol developed in this study can be useful for mass in vitro propagation and effective genetic transformation of commercially important edible dye yielding tree species.

  2. Do arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi affect the allometric partition of host plant biomass to shoots and roots? A meta-analysis of studies from 1990 to 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veresoglou, Stavros D; Menexes, George; Rillig, Matthias C

    2012-04-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizas (AM) are ubiquitous root symbioses with often pervasive effects on the plant host, one of which may be above- and belowground biomass allocation. A meta-analysis was conducted on 516 trials that were described in 90 available articles to examine whether AM colonization could result in a modification of partitioning of plant biomass in shoots and roots. It was hypothesized that alleviating plant nutrient limitations could result in a decrease of root to shoot (R/S) ratio in AM plants or, alternatively, the direction of shifts in the R/S ratio would be determined by the changes in total dry biomass. In our analysis, we considered four types of stresses: drought stress, single heavy metal stress, multiple heavy metal stress, and other potential abiotic plant stress factors. When disregarding any factors that could regulate effects, including stress status and mode of propagation, the overall AM effect was a significant modification of biomass towards shoot growth. However, the responses of stressed and clonally propagated plants differed from those of seed-grown unstressed plants. Our meta-analysis detected a considerable decline in the R/S ratio when plants were grown from seeds in the absence of abiotic stresses. Moreover, we demonstrate that additional regulators of the AM-mediated impact on R/S ratio were presence of competition from other plants, plant growth outcome of the symbiosis, growth substrate volume, experimental duration, and the identities of both plant and AM fungus. Our results indicate that a prediction of AM effects on R/S allocation becomes more accurate when considering regulators, most notably propagation mode and stress. We discuss possible mechanisms through which stress and other regulators may operate. © Springer-Verlag 2011

  3. A Unified Model of Shoot Tropism in Plants: Photo-, Gravi- and Propio-ception

    OpenAIRE

    Renaud Bastien; Stéphane Douady; Bruno Moulia

    2015-01-01

    Land plants rely mainly on gravitropism and phototropism to control their posture and spatial orientation. In natural conditions, these two major tropisms act concurrently to create a photogravitropic equilibrium in the responsive organ. Recently, a parsimonious model was developed that accurately predicted the complete gravitropic and proprioceptive control over the movement of different organs in different species in response to gravitational stimuli. Here we show that the framework of this...

  4. Foliar Micromorphology of In Vitro-cultured Shoots and Field-grown Plants of Passiflora foetida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manokari Mani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The present report describes the development of quantitative and qualitative foliar micromorphological and architectural features in the field environment which elucidated the adaptation of micropropagated plants of Passiflora foetida L. in the natural soil conditions. The field environment (high light intensity in comparison to in vitro culture conditions promotes the autotrophy through decrease in stomatal index (from 23.2 ± 0.15 to 21.0 ± 0.19, increased vein-islets (from 10.0 ± 0.14 to 15.6 ± 0.24 per square millimeters and veinlet terminations (from 1.6 ± 0.14 to 5.0 ± 0.20 per square millimeters, and trichome density in P. foetida plantlets. The in vitro and field grown leaves mostly possessed anomocytic and anisocytic types of stomata. Two types of trichomes were observed on the surface of leaves of in vitro as well as field transferred plants of P. foetida: the unicellular hairy trichomes (non-glandular, and the multicellular (glandular trichomes. The trichomes density was less under in vitro conditions as compared to the in vivo environments. The new leaves formed during the ex vitro rooting stage (in greenhouse and after transplantation of plantlets to the field exhibited the development of adaptive micromorphological features in micropropagated plants, which enabled them to survive under field conditions.

  5. PROPAGATION OF YERBA MATE USING SHOOTS FROM GIRDLING AND COPPICING FOR TWO STOCK PLANTS AGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos André Stuepp

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available "Yerba mate” is well know for its use as an infusion, either as tea or “chimarrão”. However, there are many other potential applications for this species, mainly in the cosmetic and drug industries. One limiting factor to the commercial vegetative propagation of “Yerba mate” is the lack of efficient methods of rejuvenation for mature plants. Juvenile propagules can be obtained by stem girdling or coppicing of mature trees. The main objective of this work was to verify the rooting ability of cuttings from 12 months old sprouts, generated after girdling and coppicing of 17 years and 80 years old trees, during winter/2006 and summer/2007 and treated with indolbutiric acid (IBA with two concentrations of 0 and 3000 mg.L-1. Planting was made in plastic containers filled with vermiculite and carbonized rice bark, in a 1:1 ratio and after 90 days in the greenhouse, the following variables were evaluated: percentage of cuttings with roots, average number of roots per cutting, length of the three longest roots per cutting and percentage of alive cuttings, with callus and dead. Results showed that rooting was not influenced by the origin of sprouts (girdling or coppicing. However, branches obtained by more juvenile trees, as well as those collected during summer, presented better results. Thus was concluded that stem cuttings with branches from girdling or coppicing is a viable technique to optimize rooting of “Yerba mate” cuttings.

  6. Warm spring temperatures induce persistent season-long changes in shoot development in grapevines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Markus; Tarara, Julie M

    2010-07-01

    The influence of temperature on the timing of budbreak in woody perennials is well known, but its effect on subsequent shoot growth and architecture has received little attention because it is understood that growth is determined by current temperature. Seasonal shoot development of grapevines (Vitis vinifera) was evaluated following differences in temperature near budbreak while minimizing the effects of other microclimatic variables. Dormant buds and emerging shoots of field-grown grapevines were heated above or cooled below the temperature of ambient buds from before budbreak until individual flowers were visible on inflorescences, at which stage the shoots had four to eight unfolded leaves. Multiple treatments were imposed randomly on individual plants and replicated across plants. Shoot growth and development were monitored during two growing seasons. Higher bud temperatures advanced the date of budbreak and accelerated shoot growth and leaf area development. Differences were due to higher rates of shoot elongation, leaf appearance, leaf-area expansion and axillary-bud outgrowth. Although shoots arising from heated buds grew most vigorously, apical dominance in these shoots was reduced, as their axillary buds broke earlier and gave rise to more vigorous lateral shoots. In contrast, axillary-bud outgrowth was minimal on the slow-growing shoots emerging from buds cooled below ambient. Variation in shoot development persisted or increased during the growing season, well after temperature treatments were terminated and despite an imposed soil water deficit. The data indicate that bud-level differences in budbreak temperature may lead to marked differences in shoot growth, shoot architecture and leaf-area development that are maintained or amplified during the growing season. Although growth rates commonly are understood to reflect current temperatures, these results demonstrate a persistent effect of early-season temperatures, which should be considered in future

  7. Water Deficit Enhances C Export to the Roots in Arabidopsis thaliana Plants with Contribution of Sucrose Transporters in Both Shoot and Roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Mickaël; Porcheron, Benoît; Hennion, Nils; Maurousset, Laurence; Lemoine, Rémi; Pourtau, Nathalie

    2016-03-01

    Root high plasticity is an adaptation to its changing environment. Water deficit impairs growth, leading to sugar accumulation in leaves, part of which could be available to roots via sucrose (Suc) phloem transport. Phloem loading is widely described in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), while unloading in roots is less understood. To gain information on leaf-to-root transport, a soil-based culture system was developed to monitor root system architecture in two dimensions. Under water deficit (50% of soil water-holding capacity), total root length was strongly reduced but the depth of root foraging and the shape of the root system were less affected, likely to improve water uptake. (14)CO2 pulse-chase experiments confirmed that water deficit enhanced carbon (C) export to the roots, as suggested by the increased root-to-shoot ratio. The transcript levels of AtSWEET11 (for sugar will eventually be exported transporter), AtSWEET12, and AtSUC2 (for Suc carrier) genes, all three involved in Suc phloem loading, were significantly up-regulated in leaves of water deficit plants, in accordance with the increase in C export from the leaves to the roots. Interestingly, the transcript levels of AtSUC2 and AtSWEET11 to AtSWEET15 were also significantly higher in stressed roots, underlying the importance of Suc apoplastic unloading in Arabidopsis roots and a putative role for these Suc transporters in Suc unloading. These data demonstrate that, during water deficit, plants respond to growth limitation by allocating relatively more C to the roots to maintain an efficient root system and that a subset of Suc transporters is potentially involved in the flux of C to and in the roots. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Shooting Mechanisms in Nature: A Systematic Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aimée Sakes

    Full Text Available In nature, shooting mechanisms are used for a variety of purposes, including prey capture, defense, and reproduction. This review offers insight into the working principles of shooting mechanisms in fungi, plants, and animals in the light of the specific functional demands that these mechanisms fulfill.We systematically searched the literature using Scopus and Web of Knowledge to retrieve articles about solid projectiles that either are produced in the body of the organism or belong to the body and undergo a ballistic phase. The shooting mechanisms were categorized based on the energy management prior to and during shooting.Shooting mechanisms were identified with projectile masses ranging from 1·10-9 mg in spores of the fungal phyla Ascomycota and Zygomycota to approximately 10,300 mg for the ballistic tongue of the toad Bufo alvarius. The energy for shooting is generated through osmosis in fungi, plants, and animals or muscle contraction in animals. Osmosis can be induced by water condensation on the system (in fungi, or water absorption in the system (reaching critical pressures up to 15.4 atmospheres; observed in fungi, plants, and animals, or water evaporation from the system (reaching up to -197 atmospheres; observed in plants and fungi. The generated energy is stored as elastic (potential energy in cell walls in fungi and plants and in elastic structures in animals, with two exceptions: (1 in the momentum catapult of Basidiomycota the energy is stored in a stalk (hilum by compression of the spore and droplets and (2 in Sphagnum energy is mainly stored in compressed air. Finally, the stored energy is transformed into kinetic energy of the projectile using a catapult mechanism delivering up to 4,137 J/kg in the osmotic shooting mechanism in cnidarians and 1,269 J/kg in the muscle-powered appendage strike of the mantis shrimp Odontodactylus scyllarus. The launch accelerations range from 6.6g in the frog Rana pipiens to 5,413,000g in

  9. Shooting Mechanisms in Nature: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakes, Aimée; van der Wiel, Marleen; Henselmans, Paul W J; van Leeuwen, Johan L; Dodou, Dimitra; Breedveld, Paul

    2016-01-01

    In nature, shooting mechanisms are used for a variety of purposes, including prey capture, defense, and reproduction. This review offers insight into the working principles of shooting mechanisms in fungi, plants, and animals in the light of the specific functional demands that these mechanisms fulfill. We systematically searched the literature using Scopus and Web of Knowledge to retrieve articles about solid projectiles that either are produced in the body of the organism or belong to the body and undergo a ballistic phase. The shooting mechanisms were categorized based on the energy management prior to and during shooting. Shooting mechanisms were identified with projectile masses ranging from 1·10-9 mg in spores of the fungal phyla Ascomycota and Zygomycota to approximately 10,300 mg for the ballistic tongue of the toad Bufo alvarius. The energy for shooting is generated through osmosis in fungi, plants, and animals or muscle contraction in animals. Osmosis can be induced by water condensation on the system (in fungi), or water absorption in the system (reaching critical pressures up to 15.4 atmospheres; observed in fungi, plants, and animals), or water evaporation from the system (reaching up to -197 atmospheres; observed in plants and fungi). The generated energy is stored as elastic (potential) energy in cell walls in fungi and plants and in elastic structures in animals, with two exceptions: (1) in the momentum catapult of Basidiomycota the energy is stored in a stalk (hilum) by compression of the spore and droplets and (2) in Sphagnum energy is mainly stored in compressed air. Finally, the stored energy is transformed into kinetic energy of the projectile using a catapult mechanism delivering up to 4,137 J/kg in the osmotic shooting mechanism in cnidarians and 1,269 J/kg in the muscle-powered appendage strike of the mantis shrimp Odontodactylus scyllarus. The launch accelerations range from 6.6g in the frog Rana pipiens to 5,413,000g in cnidarians, the

  10. Shooting Mechanisms in Nature: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakes, Aimée; van der Wiel, Marleen; Henselmans, Paul W. J.; van Leeuwen, Johan L.; Dodou, Dimitra; Breedveld, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Background In nature, shooting mechanisms are used for a variety of purposes, including prey capture, defense, and reproduction. This review offers insight into the working principles of shooting mechanisms in fungi, plants, and animals in the light of the specific functional demands that these mechanisms fulfill. Methods We systematically searched the literature using Scopus and Web of Knowledge to retrieve articles about solid projectiles that either are produced in the body of the organism or belong to the body and undergo a ballistic phase. The shooting mechanisms were categorized based on the energy management prior to and during shooting. Results Shooting mechanisms were identified with projectile masses ranging from 1·10−9 mg in spores of the fungal phyla Ascomycota and Zygomycota to approximately 10,300 mg for the ballistic tongue of the toad Bufo alvarius. The energy for shooting is generated through osmosis in fungi, plants, and animals or muscle contraction in animals. Osmosis can be induced by water condensation on the system (in fungi), or water absorption in the system (reaching critical pressures up to 15.4 atmospheres; observed in fungi, plants, and animals), or water evaporation from the system (reaching up to −197 atmospheres; observed in plants and fungi). The generated energy is stored as elastic (potential) energy in cell walls in fungi and plants and in elastic structures in animals, with two exceptions: (1) in the momentum catapult of Basidiomycota the energy is stored in a stalk (hilum) by compression of the spore and droplets and (2) in Sphagnum energy is mainly stored in compressed air. Finally, the stored energy is transformed into kinetic energy of the projectile using a catapult mechanism delivering up to 4,137 J/kg in the osmotic shooting mechanism in cnidarians and 1,269 J/kg in the muscle-powered appendage strike of the mantis shrimp Odontodactylus scyllarus. The launch accelerations range from 6.6g in the frog Rana pipiens to 5

  11. European Pine Shoot Moth

    Science.gov (United States)

    William E. Miller; Arthur R. Hastings; John F. Wootten

    1961-01-01

    In the United States, the European pine shoot moth has caused much damage in young, plantations of red pine. It has been responsible for reduced planting of red pine in many areas. Although attacked trees rarely if ever die, their growth is inhibited and many are, deformed. Scotch pine and Austrian pine (Pinus nigra Arnold) are usually not so badly damaged. Swiss...

  12. Fractionation of metal stable isotopes by higher plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Blanckenburg, F.; Von Wiren, N.; Guelke, M.; Weiss, D.J.; Bullen, T.D.

    2009-01-01

    Higher plants induce chemical reactions in the rhizosphere, facilitating metal uptake by roots. Fractionation of the isotopes in nutrients such as calcium, iron, magnesium, and zinc produces a stable isotope composition in the plants that generally differs from that of the growth medium. Isotope fractionation also occurs during transport of the metals within most plants, but its extent depends on plant species and on the metal, in particular, on the metal's redox state and what ligand it is bound to. The metal stable isotope variations observed in plants create an isotope signature of life at the Earth's surface, contributing substantially to our understanding of metal cycling processes in the environment and in individual organisms.

  13. Computational identification of candidate nucleotide cyclases in higher plants

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Aloysius Tze

    2013-09-03

    In higher plants guanylyl cyclases (GCs) and adenylyl cyclases (ACs) cannot be identified using BLAST homology searches based on annotated cyclic nucleotide cyclases (CNCs) of prokaryotes, lower eukaryotes, or animals. The reason is that CNCs are often part of complex multifunctional proteins with different domain organizations and biological functions that are not conserved in higher plants. For this reason, we have developed CNC search strategies based on functionally conserved amino acids in the catalytic center of annotated and/or experimentally confirmed CNCs. Here we detail this method which has led to the identification of >25 novel candidate CNCs in Arabidopsis thaliana, several of which have been experimentally confirmed in vitro and in vivo. We foresee that the application of this method can be used to identify many more members of the growing family of CNCs in higher plants. © Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013.

  14. Role of Aquaporins in Determining Carbon and Nitrogen Status in Higher Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Limin Gao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Aquaporins (AQPs are integral membrane proteins facilitating the transport of water and some small neutral molecules across cell membranes. In past years, much effort has been made to reveal the location of AQPs as well as their function in water transport, photosynthetic processes, and stress responses in higher plants. In the present review, we paid attention to the character of AQPs in determining carbon and nitrogen status. The role of AQPs during photosynthesis is characterized as its function in transporting water and CO2 across the membrane of chloroplast and thylakoid; recalculated results from published studies showed that over-expression of AQPs contributed to 25% and 50% increases in stomatal conductance (gs and mesophyll conductance (gm, respectively. The nitrogen status in plants is regulated by AQPs through their effect on water flow as well as urea and NH4+ uptake, and the potential role of AQPs in alleviating ammonium toxicity is discussed. At the same time, root and/or shoot AQP expression is quite dependent on both N supply amounts and forms. Future research directions concerning the function of AQPs in regulating plant carbon and nitrogen status as well as C/N balance are also highlighted.

  15. Water Deficit Enhances C Export to the Roots in Arabidopsis thaliana Plants with Contribution of Sucrose Transporters in Both Shoot and Roots1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Mickaël; Porcheron, Benoît; Maurousset, Laurence; Lemoine, Rémi; Pourtau, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Root high plasticity is an adaptation to its changing environment. Water deficit impairs growth, leading to sugar accumulation in leaves, part of which could be available to roots via sucrose (Suc) phloem transport. Phloem loading is widely described in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), while unloading in roots is less understood. To gain information on leaf-to-root transport, a soil-based culture system was developed to monitor root system architecture in two dimensions. Under water deficit (50% of soil water-holding capacity), total root length was strongly reduced but the depth of root foraging and the shape of the root system were less affected, likely to improve water uptake. 14CO2 pulse-chase experiments confirmed that water deficit enhanced carbon (C) export to the roots, as suggested by the increased root-to-shoot ratio. The transcript levels of AtSWEET11 (for sugar will eventually be exported transporter), AtSWEET12, and AtSUC2 (for Suc carrier) genes, all three involved in Suc phloem loading, were significantly up-regulated in leaves of water deficit plants, in accordance with the increase in C export from the leaves to the roots. Interestingly, the transcript levels of AtSUC2 and AtSWEET11 to AtSWEET15 were also significantly higher in stressed roots, underlying the importance of Suc apoplastic unloading in Arabidopsis roots and a putative role for these Suc transporters in Suc unloading. These data demonstrate that, during water deficit, plants respond to growth limitation by allocating relatively more C to the roots to maintain an efficient root system and that a subset of Suc transporters is potentially involved in the flux of C to and in the roots. PMID:26802041

  16. Predicting molybdenum toxicity to higher plants: Influence of soil properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGrath, S.P., E-mail: steve.mcgrath@bbsrc.ac.u [Soil Science Department, Centre for Soils and Ecosystems Functions, Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, Hertfordshire AL5 2JQ (United Kingdom); Mico, C. [Soil Science Department, Centre for Soils and Ecosystems Functions, Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, Hertfordshire AL5 2JQ (United Kingdom); Curdy, R. [Laboratory for Environmental Biotechnology (LBE), Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne (EPFL) Station 6 CH, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Zhao, F.J. [Soil Science Department, Centre for Soils and Ecosystems Functions, Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, Hertfordshire AL5 2JQ (United Kingdom)

    2010-10-15

    The effect of soil properties on the toxicity of molybdenum (Mo) to four plant species was investigated. Soil organic carbon or ammonium-oxalate extractable Fe oxides were found to be the best predictors of the 50% effective dose (ED{sub 50}) of Mo in different soils, explaining > 65% of the variance in ED{sub 50} for four species except for ryegrass (26-38%). Molybdenum concentrations in soil solution and consequently plant uptake were increased when soil pH was artificially raised because sorption of Mo to amorphous oxides is greatly reduced at high pH. The addition of sulphate significantly decreased Mo uptake by oilseed rape. For risk assessment, we suggest that Mo toxicity values for plants should be normalised using soil amorphous iron oxide concentrations. - Amorphous iron oxides or organic carbon were found to be the best predictors of the toxicity threshold values of Mo to higher plants on different soils.

  17. Shoot growth and heterophylly in ginko biloba

    Science.gov (United States)

    William B. Critchfield

    1970-01-01

    Ginkgo biloba resembles other woody plants with long and short shoots in having variable leaves, and this variability in shape and other characteristics is closely related to the specialization of the shoots. The unlobed or bilobed early leaves of short shoots are preformed in the winter bud, and their nearly synchronous expansion in the spring is not accompanied by...

  18. 50 CFR 20.23 - Shooting hours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Shooting hours. 20.23 Section 20.23... PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING Taking § 20.23 Shooting hours. No person shall take migratory game birds except during the hours open to shooting as prescribed in subpart K of this part and subpart...

  19. Transcriptome profiling of low temperature-treated cassava apical shoots showed dynamic responses of tropical plant to cold stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Dong; Yang, Jun; Zhang, Peng

    2012-02-10

    Cassava is an important tropical root crop adapted to a wide range of environmental stimuli such as drought and acid soils. Nevertheless, it is an extremely cold-sensitive tropical species. Thus far, there is limited information about gene regulation and signalling pathways related to the cold stress response in cassava. The development of microarray technology has accelerated the study of global transcription profiling under certain conditions. A 60-mer oligonucleotide microarray representing 20,840 genes was used to perform transcriptome profiling in apical shoots of cassava subjected to cold at 7°C for 0, 4 and 9 h. A total of 508 transcripts were identified as early cold-responsive genes in which 319 sequences had functional descriptions when aligned with Arabidopsis proteins. Gene ontology annotation analysis identified many cold-relevant categories, including 'Response to abiotic and biotic stimulus', 'Response to stress', 'Transcription factor activity', and 'Chloroplast'. Various stress-associated genes with a wide range of biological functions were found, such as signal transduction components (e.g., MAP kinase 4), transcription factors (TFs, e.g., RAP2.11), and reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging enzymes (e.g., catalase 2), as well as photosynthesis-related genes (e.g., PsaL). Seventeen major TF families including many well-studied members (e.g., AP2-EREBP) were also involved in the early response to cold stress. Meanwhile, KEGG pathway analysis uncovered many important pathways, such as 'Plant hormone signal transduction' and 'Starch and sucrose metabolism'. Furthermore, the expression changes of 32 genes under cold and other abiotic stress conditions were validated by real-time RT-PCR. Importantly, most of the tested stress-responsive genes were primarily expressed in mature leaves, stem cambia, and fibrous roots rather than apical buds and young leaves. As a response to cold stress in cassava, an increase in transcripts and enzyme activities of

  20. Transcriptome profiling of low temperature-treated cassava apical shoots showed dynamic responses of tropical plant to cold stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An Dong

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cassava is an important tropical root crop adapted to a wide range of environmental stimuli such as drought and acid soils. Nevertheless, it is an extremely cold-sensitive tropical species. Thus far, there is limited information about gene regulation and signalling pathways related to the cold stress response in cassava. The development of microarray technology has accelerated the study of global transcription profiling under certain conditions. Results A 60-mer oligonucleotide microarray representing 20,840 genes was used to perform transcriptome profiling in apical shoots of cassava subjected to cold at 7°C for 0, 4 and 9 h. A total of 508 transcripts were identified as early cold-responsive genes in which 319 sequences had functional descriptions when aligned with Arabidopsis proteins. Gene ontology annotation analysis identified many cold-relevant categories, including 'Response to abiotic and biotic stimulus', 'Response to stress', 'Transcription factor activity', and 'Chloroplast'. Various stress-associated genes with a wide range of biological functions were found, such as signal transduction components (e.g., MAP kinase 4, transcription factors (TFs, e.g., RAP2.11, and reactive oxygen species (ROS scavenging enzymes (e.g., catalase 2, as well as photosynthesis-related genes (e.g., PsaL. Seventeen major TF families including many well-studied members (e.g., AP2-EREBP were also involved in the early response to cold stress. Meanwhile, KEGG pathway analysis uncovered many important pathways, such as 'Plant hormone signal transduction' and 'Starch and sucrose metabolism'. Furthermore, the expression changes of 32 genes under cold and other abiotic stress conditions were validated by real-time RT-PCR. Importantly, most of the tested stress-responsive genes were primarily expressed in mature leaves, stem cambia, and fibrous roots rather than apical buds and young leaves. As a response to cold stress in cassava, an increase

  1. Higher plant vegetation changes during Pliocene sapropel formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Menzel, D.; Schouten, S.; Bergen, P.F. van

    2004-01-01

    The 13C values of higher plant wax C27 33 n-alkanes were determined in three, time-equivalent Pliocene (2.943 Ma) sapropels and homogeneous calcareous ooze from three different sites forming an east-west transect in the eastern Mediterranean Basin in order to study the composition of the vegetation

  2. Functional architecture of higher plant photosystem II supercomplexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caffarri, Stefano; Kouril, Roman; Kereiche, Sami; Boekema, Egbert J.; Croce, Roberta; Kereïche, Sami

    2009-01-01

    Photosystem II ( PSII) is a large multiprotein complex, which catalyses water splitting and plastoquinone reduction necessary to transform sunlight into chemical energy. Detailed functional and structural studies of the complex from higher plants have been hampered by the impossibility to purify it

  3. Shoot growth of Merlot and Cabernet Sauvignon grapevine varieties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Borghezan

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate shoot growth of the grapevine varieties Merlot and Cabernet Sauvignon, during 2006/2007, and Cabernet Sauvignon, during 2008/2009, in São Joaquim, SC, Brazil. The experiment was carried out in a commercial vineyard trained on a vertical trellis system. The shoots of the central part of the plants were selected, and the lengths from the base to the apex of 20 shoots per cultivar were evaluated. In 2006/2007, monitoring began at pruning, on 9/15/2006, and ended on 2/6/2007, totalizing 144 days of evaluation. During the 2008/2009 cycle, phenology and shoot growth for 'Cabernet Sauvignon' were assessed from grape development (1/13/2009 (pea-sized grapes until shoot vegetative growth had ceased. Budburst occurred in the second half of September, and shoot-growth cessation occurred during ripening. Higher growth rates (about 4 cm per day were observed in pre- and post-flowering, followed by reduction due to the competition for photosynthates for the formation of flowers and bunches. Temperature and photoperiod induce grapevine shoots to cease growth in the highland regions of Santa Catarina State, Brazil.

  4. Effects of ion pairing with calcium and magnesium on selenate availability to higher plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, D.R.; Tice, K.R.; Thomason, D.N. [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States). Dept. of Soil and Environmental Sciences

    1997-03-01

    The effects of solution speciation on the bioavailability of trace metals are well documented, but the role of speciation in the bioavailability of oxyanionic trace elements that may form significant ion pairs with Ca and Mg in saline media has not been investigated. The authors assessed the effects of such ion pairing on the availability of selenate to representative monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous higher plants. Formation constants for the CaSO{sub 4}{sup 0} formation was confirmed, but the value of 10{sup 2.7} for CaSeO{sub 4}{sup 0} was found to be in error; a value of 10{sup 2.0} is proposed here as the correct formation constant. Five solution culture experiments were conducted using alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) or tall wheatgrass (Elytrigia pontica [Podp.] Holub) with treatments consisting of NaSeO{sub 4} levels in combination with various levels of MgCl{sub 2} or CaCl{sub 2}. Both shoot Se concentrations and whole-plant Se contents were highly correlated with the free SeO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} activity but were poorly correlated with the sum of the free ion plus Ca and Mg ion pair species. Thus, the authors have shown, for the first time, that the free ion model of trace metal bioavailability is also valid for oxyanions that form complexes with Ca and Mg in saline media but that this conclusion hinges critically on the accuracy of the pertinent formation constants.

  5. Chlorine-containing natural compounds in higher plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engvild, Kjeld Christensen

    1986-01-01

    More than 130 chlorine-containing compounds have been isolated from higher plants and ferns; about half are polyacetylenes, thiophenes and sesquiterpene lactones from the Asteraceae. A chlorinated chlorophyll may be an important part of photosystem 1. High biological activity is found in 4-chloro......-chloroindoleacetic acid from pea and in the cancerostatic maytansinoids. Many compounds are chlorohydrins isolated along with the related epoxides. Some compounds, like gibberellin A6 hydrochloride from bean, are perhaps artefacts....

  6. In vitro conservation of two plant species (Prunus cerasifera Ehrh. and Rubus fruticosus L. shoot tips by encapsulation dehydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ružić Đurđina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In vitro grown shoot tips of cherry plum (Prunus cerasifera Ehrh. and blackberry ‘Cacanska Bestrna’ (Rubus fruticosus L. were tested for regrowth after cryopreservation using encapsulation dehydration method. Apical, 2-3 mm long shoot tips, were encapsulated in alginate beads composed of 3, 5 and 10% (w/v alginic acid sodium salt in calcium-free liquid Murashige and Skoog (MS medium containing 1.0 mg l-1 benzyladenine, 0.1 mg l-1 indole-3-butyric acid and 0.1 mg l-1 gibberellic acid. Polymerization was done in liquid MS medium with 100 mM CaCl2 for 30 min at room temperature. Encapsulated shoot tips were pre-treated in liquid MS medium with 0.75 or 1 M sucrose for 24 h in growth room and dehydrated for 4 and 8 h (29% and 20% moisture content respectively before rapid immersion in liquid nitrogen. Upon thawing which involved placing the cryovials in the air current of the laminar airflow cabinet for 2 min, the beads were directly transferred to regrowth medium. In cherry plum, osmotic dehydration in 0.75 M sucrose followed by 8-hour desiccation gave the highest regrowth (60% of explants encapsulated in 3% and 5% alginate beads. However, in comparison with cherry plum, blackberry displayed significantly lower capacity for regrowth after cryopreservation under described experimental conditions. In this genotype, osmotic dehydration in 1 M sucrose followed by 8-hour desiccation resulted in the highest regrowth (16.7% of explants encapsulated in 5% alginate beads. Cryopreserved shoot tips of both genotypes multiplied in the three subcultures had normal morphology and similar multiplication capacity in comparison with non-cryopreserved shoots. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR-20013 i br. TR-31064

  7. Establishment of an efficient and rapid method of multiple shoot regeneration and a comparative phenolics profile in in vitro and greenhouse-grown plants of psophocarpus tetragonolobus (L.) DC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vinayak; Chauhan, Namita Singh; Singh, Mohit; Idris, Asif; Madanala, Raju; Pande, Veena; Mohanty, Chandra Sekhar

    2014-01-01

    An in vitro method of multiple shoot induction and plant regeneration in Psophocarpus tetragonolobus (L.) DC was developed. Cotyledons, hypocotyls, epicotyls, internodal and young seedling leaves were used as explants. MS media supplemented with various concentrations of either thidiazuron (TDZ) or N6-benzylaminopurine (BAP) along with NAA or IAA combinations were used to determine their influence on multiple shoot induction. MS media supplemented with TDZ induced direct shoot regeneration when epicotyls and internodal segments were used as explants. TDZ at 3 mg L−1 induced highest rate (89.2 ± 3.28%) of regeneration with (13.4 ± 2.04) shoots per explant. MS media supplemented with BAP in combination with NAA or IAA induced callus mediated regeneration when cotyledons and hypocotyls were used as explants. BAP (2.5 mg L−1) and IAA (0.2 mg L−1) induced highest rate (100 ± 2.66%) of regeneration with (23.2 ± 2.66) shoots per explant. Mature plants produced from regenerated shoots were transferred successfully to the greenhouse. In a comparative study, the phenolics contents of various parts of greenhouse-grown plants with that of in vitro-raised plants showed significant variations. PMID:25482808

  8. Consideration of higher seismic loads at existing plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liebig, J.; Pellissetti, M.

    2015-07-01

    Because of advancement of methods in probabilistic seismic hazard analysis, plenty of existing plants face higher seismic loads as an obligation from the national authorities. In case of such obligations safety related structures and equipment have to be reevaluated or requalified for the increased seismic loads. The paper provides solutions for different kinds of structures and equipment inside the plant, avoiding cost intensive hardware exchange. Due to higher seismic loads different kinds of structures and equipment inside a plant have to be reevaluated. For civil structures, primary components, mechanical components, distribution lines and electrical and I&C equipment different innovative concepts will be applied to keep structures and equipment qualified for the higher seismic loads. Detailed analysis, including the modeling of non-linear phenomena, or minor structural upgrades are cost competitive, compared to cost intensive hardware exchanges. Several case studies regarding the re-evaluation and requalification of structures and equipment due to higher seismic loads are presented. It is shown how the creation of coupled finite element models and the consistent propagation of acceleration time histories through the soil, building and primary circuit lead to a significant load reduction Electrical and I&C equipment is reinforced by smart upgrades which increase the natural equipment frequencies. Therefore for all devices inside the cabinets the local acceleration will not increase and the seismic qualification will be maintained. The case studies cover both classical deterministic and probabilistic re-evaluations (fragility analysis). Furthermore, the substantial benefits of non-linear limit load evaluation, such as push-over analysis of buildings and limit load analysis of fuel assemblies, are demonstrated. (Author)

  9. Low Agrobacterium tumefaciens inoculum levels and a long co-culture period lead to reduced plant defense responses and increase transgenic shoot production of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhifen; Finer, John J

    2016-01-01

    Agrobacterium-mediated plant transformation is typically conducted by inoculating plant tissues with an Agrobacterium suspension containing approximately 108-109 bacteria mL-1, followed by a 2-3-d co-culture period. Use of longer co-culture periods could potentially increase transformation efficiencies by allowing more time for Agrobacterium to interact with plant cells, but bacterial overgrowth is likely to occur, leading to severe tissue browning and reduced transformation and regeneration. Low bacterial inoculum levels were therefore evaluated as a means to reduce the negative outcomes associated with long co-culture. The use of low inoculum bacterial suspensions (approximately 6 × 102 bacteria mL-1) followed by long co-culture (15 d) led to the production of an average of three transformed sunflower shoots per explant while the use of high inoculum (approximately 6 × 108 bacteria mL-1) followed by short co-culture (3 d) led to no transformed shoots. Low inoculum and long co-culture acted synergistically, and both were required for the improvement of sunflower transformation. Gene expression analysis via qRT-PCR showed that genes related to plant defense response were generally expressed at lower levels in the explants treated with low inoculum than those treated with high inoculum during 15 d of co-culture, suggesting that low inoculum reduced the induction of plant defense responses. The use of low inoculum with long co-culture (LI/LC) led to large increases in sunflower transformation efficiency. This method has great potential for improving transformation efficiencies and expanding the types of target tissues amenable for transformation of different plant species.

  10. Lead stress effects on physiobiochemical activities of higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengar, Rakesh Singh; Gautam, Madhu; Sengar, Rajesh Singh; Garg, Sanjay Kumar; Sengar, Kalpana; Chaudhary, Reshu

    2008-01-01

    Lead is a metallic pollutant emanating from various environmental sources including industrial wastes, combustion of fossil fuels, and use of agrochemicals. Lead may exist in the atmosphere as dusts, fumes, mists, and vapors, and in soil as a mineral. Soils along roadsides are rich in lead because vehicles burn leaded gasoline, which contributes to environmental lead pollution. Other important sources of lead pollution are geological weathering, industrial processing of ores and minerals, leaching of lead from solid wastes, and animal and human excreta. Lead is nondegradable, readily enters the food chain, and can subsequently endanger human and animal health. Lead is one of the most important environment pollutants and deserves the increasing attention it has received in recent decades. The present effort was undertaken to review lead stress effects on the physiobiochemical activity of higher plants. Lead has gained considerable attention as a potent heavy metal pollutant because of growing anthropogenic pressure on the environment. Lead-contaminated soils show a sharp decline in crop productivity. Lead is absorbed by plants mainly through the root system and in minor amounts through the leaves. Within the plants, lead accumulates primarily in roots, but some is translocated to aerial plant parts. Soil pH, soil particle size, cation-exchange capacity, as well as root surface area, root exudation, and mycorrhizal transpiration rate affect the availability and uptake of lead by plants. Only a limited amount of lead is translocated from roots to other organs because there are natural plant barriers in the root endodermis. At lethal concentrations, this barrier is broken and lead may enter vascular tissues. Lead in plants may form deposits of various sizes, present mainly in intercellular spaces, cell walls, and vacuoles. Small deposits of this metal are also seen in the endoplasmic reticulum, dictyosome, and dictyosome-derived vesicles. After entering the cells, lead

  11. Chlordecone Transfer and Distribution in Maize Shoots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascal-Lorber, Sophie; Létondor, Clarisse; Liber, Yohan; Jamin, Emilien L; Laurent, François

    2016-01-20

    Chlordecone (CLD) is a persistent organic pollutant (POP) that was mainly used as an insecticide against banana weevils in the French West Indies (1972-1993). Transfer of CLD via the food chain is now the major mechanism for exposure of the population to CLD. The uptake and the transfer of CLD were investigated in shoots of maize, a C4 model plant growing under tropical climates, to estimate the exposure of livestock via feed. Maize plants were grown on soils contaminated with [(14)C]CLD under controlled conditions. The greatest part of the radioactivity was associated with roots, nearly 95%, but CLD was detected in whole shoots, concentrations in old leaves being higher than those in young ones. CLD was thus transferred from the base toward the plant top, forming an acropetal gradient of contaminant. In contrast, results evidenced the existence of a basipetal gradient of CLD concentration within leaves whose extremities accumulated larger amounts of CLD because of evapotranspiration localization. Extractable residues accounted for two-thirds of total residues both in roots and in shoots. This study highlighted the fact that the distribution of CLD contamination within grasses resulted from a conjunction between the age and evapotranspiration rate of tissues. CLD accumulation in fodder may be the main route of exposure for livestock.

  12. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Cascade MKK7-MPK6 Plays Important Roles in Plant Development and Regulates Shoot Branching by Phosphorylating PIN1 in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiyan Jia

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Emerging evidences exhibit that mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK/MPK signaling pathways are connected with many aspects of plant development. The complexity of MAPK cascades raises challenges not only to identify the MAPK module in planta but also to define the specific role of an individual module. So far, our knowledge of MAPK signaling has been largely restricted to a small subset of MAPK cascades. Our previous study has characterized an Arabidopsis bushy and dwarf1 (bud1 mutant, in which the MAP Kinase Kinase 7 (MKK7 was constitutively activated, resulting in multiple phenotypic alterations. In this study, we found that MPK3 and MPK6 are the substrates for phosphorylation by MKK7 in planta. Genetic analysis showed that MKK7-MPK6 cascade is specifically responsible for the regulation of shoot branching, hypocotyl gravitropism, filament elongation, and lateral root formation, while MKK7-MPK3 cascade is mainly involved in leaf morphology. We further demonstrated that the MKK7-MPK6 cascade controls shoot branching by phosphorylating Ser 337 on PIN1, which affects the basal localization of PIN1 in xylem parenchyma cells and polar auxin transport in the primary stem. Our results not only specify the functions of the MKK7-MPK6 cascade but also reveal a novel mechanism for PIN1 phosphorylation, establishing a molecular link between the MAPK cascade and auxin-regulated plant development.

  13. Metabolic engineering of higher plants and algae for isoprenoid production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempinski, Chase; Jiang, Zuodong; Bell, Stephen; Chappell, Joe

    2015-01-01

    Isoprenoids are a class of compounds derived from the five carbon precursors, dimethylallyl diphosphate, and isopentenyl diphosphate. These molecules present incredible natural chemical diversity, which can be valuable for humans in many aspects such as cosmetics, agriculture, and medicine. However, many terpenoids are only produced in small quantities by their natural hosts and can be difficult to generate synthetically. Therefore, much interest and effort has been directed toward capturing the genetic blueprint for their biochemistry and engineering it into alternative hosts such as plants and algae. These autotrophic organisms are attractive when compared to traditional microbial platforms because of their ability to utilize atmospheric CO2 as a carbon substrate instead of supplied carbon sources like glucose. This chapter will summarize important techniques and strategies for engineering the accumulation of isoprenoid metabolites into higher plants and algae by choosing the correct host, avoiding endogenous regulatory mechanisms, and optimizing potential flux into the target compound. Future endeavors will build on these efforts by fine-tuning product accumulation levels via the vast amount of available "-omic" data and devising metabolic engineering schemes that integrate this into a whole-organism approach. With the development of high-throughput transformation protocols and synthetic biology molecular tools, we have only begun to harness the power and utility of plant and algae metabolic engineering.

  14. Artemisinin production by shoot regeneration of Artemisia annua L. using thidiazuron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lualon, Wanwimon; De-Eknamkul, Wanchai; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Shoyama, Yukihiro; Putalun, Waraporn

    2008-01-01

    An efficient in vitro method for multiple shoot bud induction and regeneration has been developed in Artemisia annua L. using leaf and stem explants in various concentrations and combinations of plant growth regulators to evaluate the frequency of regeneration. The sources of explants as well as plant growth regulators in the medium were found to influence the multiple shoot induction. The result shows that the stem segment cultured on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium supplemented with 0.1 mg/l thidiazuron (TDZ) gave a perfect shoot formation (100%) and good shoot multiplication (57 shoots/explant) after 2 weeks of culture. Healthy regenerated shoots were elongated and rooted in MS medium without hormones. The artemisinin content in plants regenerated from stem explants using 0.1 mg/l TDZ was (3.36 +/- 0.36) microg/mg dry weight and two-fold higher than that of in vitro grown plants of the same age [(1.73 -/+ 0.23) microg/mg DW]. This system exhibited a potential for a rapid propagation of shoots from the stem explant and makes it possible to develop a clonal propagation of A. annua.

  15. Identification of microRNAs and target genes in the fruit and shoot tip of Lycium chinense: a traditional Chinese medicinal plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaldun, A B M; Huang, Wenjun; Liao, Sihong; Lv, Haiyan; Wang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Although Lycium chinense (goji berry) is an important traditional Chinese medicinal plant, little genome information is available for this plant, particularly at the small-RNA level. Recent findings indicate that the evolutionary role of miRNAs is very important for a better understanding of gene regulation in different plant species. To elucidate small RNAs and their potential target genes in fruit and shoot tissues, high-throughput RNA sequencing technology was used followed by qRT-PCR and RLM 5'-RACE experiments. A total of 60 conserved miRNAs belonging to 31 families and 30 putative novel miRNAs were identified. A total of 62 significantly differentially expressed miRNAs were identified, of which 15 (14 known and 1 novel) were shoot-specific, and 12 (7 known and 5 novel) were fruit-specific. Additionally, 28 differentially expressed miRNAs were recorded as up-regulated in fruit tissues. The predicted potential targets were involved in a wide range of metabolic and regulatory pathways. GO (Gene Ontology) enrichment analysis and the KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) database revealed that "metabolic pathways" is the most significant pathway with respect to the rich factor and gene numbers. Moreover, five miRNAs were related to fruit maturation, lycopene biosynthesis and signaling pathways, which might be important for the further study of fruit molecular biology. This study is the first, to detect known and novel miRNAs, and their potential targets, of L. chinense. The data and findings that are presented here might be a good source for the functional genomic study of medicinal plants and for understanding the links among diversified biological pathways.

  16. Identification of microRNAs and target genes in the fruit and shoot tip of Lycium chinense: a traditional Chinese medicinal plant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A B M Khaldun

    Full Text Available Although Lycium chinense (goji berry is an important traditional Chinese medicinal plant, little genome information is available for this plant, particularly at the small-RNA level. Recent findings indicate that the evolutionary role of miRNAs is very important for a better understanding of gene regulation in different plant species. To elucidate small RNAs and their potential target genes in fruit and shoot tissues, high-throughput RNA sequencing technology was used followed by qRT-PCR and RLM 5'-RACE experiments. A total of 60 conserved miRNAs belonging to 31 families and 30 putative novel miRNAs were identified. A total of 62 significantly differentially expressed miRNAs were identified, of which 15 (14 known and 1 novel were shoot-specific, and 12 (7 known and 5 novel were fruit-specific. Additionally, 28 differentially expressed miRNAs were recorded as up-regulated in fruit tissues. The predicted potential targets were involved in a wide range of metabolic and regulatory pathways. GO (Gene Ontology enrichment analysis and the KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes database revealed that "metabolic pathways" is the most significant pathway with respect to the rich factor and gene numbers. Moreover, five miRNAs were related to fruit maturation, lycopene biosynthesis and signaling pathways, which might be important for the further study of fruit molecular biology. This study is the first, to detect known and novel miRNAs, and their potential targets, of L. chinense. The data and findings that are presented here might be a good source for the functional genomic study of medicinal plants and for understanding the links among diversified biological pathways.

  17. Cytokinin-Deficient Transgenic Arabidopsis Plants Show Multiple Developmental Alterations Indicating Opposite Functions of Cytokinins in the Regulation of Shoot and Root Meristem Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Tomáš; Motyka, Václav; Laucou, Valérie; Smets, Rafaël; Van Onckelen, Harry; Schmülling, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    Cytokinins are hormones that regulate cell division and development. As a result of a lack of specific mutants and biochemical tools, it has not been possible to study the consequences of cytokinin deficiency. Cytokinin-deficient plants are expected to yield information about processes in which cytokinins are limiting and that, therefore, they might regulate. We have engineered transgenic Arabidopsis plants that overexpress individually six different members of the cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase (AtCKX) gene family and have undertaken a detailed phenotypic analysis. Transgenic plants had increased cytokinin breakdown (30 to 45% of wild-type cytokinin content) and reduced expression of the cytokinin reporter gene ARR5:GUS (β-glucuronidase). Cytokinin deficiency resulted in diminished activity of the vegetative and floral shoot apical meristems and leaf primordia, indicating an absolute requirement for the hormone. By contrast, cytokinins are negative regulators of root growth and lateral root formation. We show that the increased growth of the primary root is linked to an enhanced meristematic cell number, suggesting that cytokinins control the exit of cells from the root meristem. Different AtCKX-green fluorescent protein fusion proteins were localized to the vacuoles or the endoplasmic reticulum and possibly to the extracellular space, indicating that subcellular compartmentation plays an important role in cytokinin biology. Analyses of promoter:GUS fusion genes showed differential expression of AtCKX genes during plant development, the activity being confined predominantly to zones of active growth. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that cytokinins have central, but opposite, regulatory functions in root and shoot meristems and indicate that a fine-tuned control of catabolism plays an important role in ensuring the proper regulation of cytokinin functions. PMID:14555694

  18. Plant invasion is associated with higher plant-soil nutrient concentrations in nutrient-poor environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardans, Jordi; Bartrons, Mireia; Margalef, Olga; Gargallo-Garriga, Albert; Janssens, Ivan A; Ciais, Phillipe; Obersteiner, Michael; Sigurdsson, Bjarni D; Chen, Han Y H; Peñuelas, Josep

    2017-03-01

    Plant invasion is an emerging driver of global change worldwide. We aimed to disentangle its impacts on plant-soil nutrient concentrations. We conducted a meta-analysis of 215 peer-reviewed articles and 1233 observations. Invasive plant species had globally higher N and P concentrations in photosynthetic tissues but not in foliar litter, in comparison with their native competitors. Invasive plants were also associated with higher soil C and N stocks and N, P, and K availabilities. The differences in N and P concentrations in photosynthetic tissues and in soil total C and N, soil N, P, and K availabilities between invasive and native species decreased when the environment was richer in nutrient resources. The results thus suggested higher nutrient resorption efficiencies in invasive than in native species in nutrient-poor environments. There were differences in soil total N concentrations but not in total P concentrations, indicating that the differences associated to invasive plants were related with biological processes, not with geochemical processes. The results suggest that invasiveness is not only a driver of changes in ecosystem species composition but that it is also associated with significant changes in plant-soil elemental composition and stoichiometry. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. A greater foraging scale, not a higher foraging precision, may facilitate invasion by exotic plants in nutrient-heterogeneous conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bao-Ming; Su, Jin-Quan; Liao, Hui-Xuan; Peng, Shao-Lin

    2017-12-22

    Soil nutrient heterogeneity has been proposed to influence competitive outcomes among different plant species. Thus, it is crucial to understand the effects of environmental heterogeneity on competition between exotic invasive and native species. However, the effects of soil nutrient heterogeneity on the competition between invasive and native plants have rarely been linked to root foraging behaviour. In this study, a competition experiment was performed with two invasive-native species pairs (BP-VC, Bidens pilosa vs. Vernonia cinerea; MM-PS, Mikania micrantha vs. Paederia scandens) grown under homogeneous and heterogeneous conditions in a common greenhouse environment. Root activity was assessed by determining the amount of strontium (Sr) taken up by the shoot of each species. The invasive species exhibited a greater foraging scale, whereas the native species exhibited a higher foraging precision. A trade-off between foraging scale and precision was observed within each pair of invasive-native species. Compared with soil homogeneity, soil heterogeneity significantly increased the biomass of the two invasive species, B. pilosa and M. micrantha, under competitive conditions. Within each pair, the invasive species exhibited greater relative competitive ability with respect to shoot mass, and considerably more Sr taken up by the invasive species compared with the native species. The Sr acquisition results indicate that nutrient-poor conditions may facilitate the competitive ability of the native species V. cinerea, whereas M. micrantha may possess a stronger competitive ability regardless of soil nutrient conditions. Soil nutrient heterogeneity has the potential to promote the invasion of these two exotic species due to their larger foraging scale, stronger competitive ability and greater root activity relative to their counterpart native species. The present work highlights the importance of soil heterogeneity in plant invasion, particularly with regards to root

  20. Functional architecture of higher plant photosystem II supercomplexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffarri, Stefano; Kouril, Roman; Kereïche, Sami; Boekema, Egbert J; Croce, Roberta

    2009-10-07

    Photosystem II (PSII) is a large multiprotein complex, which catalyses water splitting and plastoquinone reduction necessary to transform sunlight into chemical energy. Detailed functional and structural studies of the complex from higher plants have been hampered by the impossibility to purify it to homogeneity. In this work, homogeneous preparations ranging from a newly identified particle composed by a monomeric core and antenna proteins to the largest C(2)S(2)M(2) supercomplex were isolated. Characterization by biochemical methods and single particle electron microscopy allowed to relate for the first time the supramolecular organization to the protein content. A projection map of C(2)S(2)M(2) at 12 A resolution was obtained, which allowed determining the location and the orientation of the antenna proteins. Comparison of the supercomplexes obtained from WT and Lhcb-deficient plants reveals the importance of the individual subunits for the supramolecular organization. The functional implications of these findings are discussed and allow redefining previous suggestions on PSII energy transfer, assembly, photoinhibition, state transition and non-photochemical quenching.

  1. Water-Wisteria as an ideal plant to study heterophylly in higher aquatic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gaojie; Hu, Shiqi; Yang, Jingjing; Schultz, Elizabeth A; Clarke, Kurtis; Hou, Hongwei

    2017-08-01

    The semi-aquatic plant Water-Wisteria is suggested as a new model to study heterophylly due to its many advantages and typical leaf phenotypic plasticity in response to environmental factors and phytohormones. Water-Wisteria, Hygrophila difformis (Acanthaceae), is a fast growing semi-aquatic plant that exhibits a variety of leaf shapes, from simple leaves to highly branched compound leaves, depending on the environment. The phenomenon by which leaves change their morphology in response to environmental conditions is called heterophylly. In order to investigate the characteristics of heterophylly, we assessed the morphology and anatomy of Hygrophila difformis in different conditions. Subsequently, we verified that phytohormones and environmental factors can induce heterophylly and found that Hygrophila difformis is easily propagated vegetatively through either leaf cuttings or callus induction, and the callus can be easily transformed by Agrobacterium tumefaciens. These results suggested that Hygrophila difformis is a good model plant to study heterophylly in higher aquatic plants.

  2. Enhanced in vitro multiple shoot induction in elite Pakistani guava ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Elite guava (Psidium guajava L.) strains of cv. Safeda were explored in vitro for multiple shoot induction. Shoot induction was enhanced up to 83% with 3.5 to 4.25 shoots per single node cutting and shoot tip explants, respectively, using higher levels of benzyl amino purine (BAP) in Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium.

  3. Multiple pathways regulate shoot branching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine eRameau

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Shoot branching patterns result from the spatio-temporal regulation of axillary bud outgrowth. Numerous endogenous, developmental and environmental factors are integrated at the bud and plant levels to determine numbers of growing shoots. Multiple pathways that converge to common integrators are most probably involved. We propose several pathways involving not only the classical hormones auxin, cytokinins and strigolactones, but also other signals with a strong influence on shoot branching such as gibberellins, sugars or molecular actors of plant phase transition. We also deal with recent findings about the molecular mechanisms and the pathway involved in the response to shade as an example of an environmental signal controlling branching. We propose the TCP transcription factor TB1/BRC1 and the polar auxin transport stream in the stem as possible integrators of these pathways. We finally discuss how modeling can help to represent this highly dynamic system by articulating knowledges and hypothesis and calculating the phenotype properties they imply.

  4. Effect of light on contents of coumarin compounds in shoots of Ruta graveolens L. cultivated in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halina Ekiert

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Shoots of Ruta graveolens L. (Rutaceae were cultivated in stationary liquid culture under different light conditions: constant artificial light (900 lx, darkness, constant artificial light (900 ix following irradiation with UV-C light. The contents of five furanocoumarins: psoralen, bergapten, xanthotoxin, isopimpinellin and imperatorin, as well as biogenetic precursor of these metabolites, umbelliferone, were determined by HPLC method in shoots cultivated in vitro and in overground parts of plants growing in open air. It was shown that light conditions, tested in these experiments, significantly influenced contents of the metabolites in shoots cultivated in in vitro culture. Total content of the coumarin compounds in shoots cultivated under constant artificial light (900 lx was equal or higher than in plants growing under natural conditions. Therefore, it is suggested that stationary liquid shoot culture of R. graveolens. can be an alternative source for obtaining biologically active furanocoumarins.

  5. Expression and occurrence of uracil-DNA glycosylase in higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bones, Atle M

    1993-08-01

    Uracil-DNA glycosylase (UDG) is the first enzyme in the base excision repair pathway for removal of uracil in DNA. DNA repair capacity is likely to be a critical factor in mutagenesis and thereby in the capacity to prevent genetic damage and unwanted variation. We have studied expression of UDG in 9 higher plant species. The highest expression of UDG was measured in Solanum tuberosum. A comparison of 6 Solanum tuberosum cultivars showed that the specific activity ranged from 30 pmol mg1 protein min-1 in the cultivar Laila to 80 pmol mg-1 protein min-1 in the cultivar Ostara. Measurement of UDG in Begonia X cheimantha gave no indications of enzyme activity. The possible effects of no or low UDG activity is discussed. In vitro cultures of Solanum tuberosum and Thymus vulgaris were used to examine the effect of auxin and cytokinin on the UDG activity. Axillary shoots of Solanum tuberosum were cultured on medium including 20 variations in hormone concentration. Auxin (1-naphtaleneacetic acid) increased the expression of UDG. Plants cultured on medium supplemented with 3 mg 1-1 1-naphtaleneacetic acid showed a specific UDG activity which was approximately 3-fold higher than the activity in controls. The cytokinin benzyladenine reduced the specific UDG activity at concentrations in the range 0.25-10 mg 1-1 . In vitro cultured Saintpaulia ionantha was used to examine UDG activity during initiation, conditioning and multiplication cycles. In general, highest expression of UDG was measured in the conditioning cycle on hormone free medium. Measurement of UDG expression during single subculture periods, clearly showed that UDG expression may vary over one culture period. Expression of UDG was in general highest three weeks after transfer to fresh medium. Of different seedling organs from 0- to 15-day-old Brassica napus L., roots and hypocotyls showed the highest UDG activities. In cotyledons a very low and nearly constant specific activity was observed. In 12-day

  6. Higher Plants in life support systems: design of a model and plant experimental compartment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hezard, Pauline; Farges, Berangere; Sasidharan L, Swathy; Dussap, Claude-Gilles

    The development of closed ecological life support systems (CELSS) requires full control and efficient engineering for fulfilling the common objectives of water and oxygen regeneration, CO2 elimination and food production. Most of the proposed CELSS contain higher plants, for which a growth chamber and a control system are needed. Inside the compartment the development of higher plants must be understood and modeled in order to be able to design and control the compartment as a function of operating variables. The plant behavior must be analyzed at different sub-process scales : (i) architecture and morphology describe the plant shape and lead to calculate the morphological parameters (leaf area, stem length, number of meristems. . . ) characteristic of life cycle stages; (ii) physiology and metabolism of the different organs permit to assess the plant composition depending on the plant input and output rates (oxygen, carbon dioxide, water and nutrients); (iii) finally, the physical processes are light interception, gas exchange, sap conduction and root uptake: they control the available energy from photosynthesis and the input and output rates. These three different sub-processes are modeled as a system of equations using environmental and plant parameters such as light intensity, temperature, pressure, humidity, CO2 and oxygen partial pressures, nutrient solution composition, total leaf surface and leaf area index, chlorophyll content, stomatal conductance, water potential, organ biomass distribution and composition, etc. The most challenging issue is to develop a comprehensive and operative mathematical model that assembles these different sub-processes in a unique framework. In order to assess the parameters for testing a model, a polyvalent growth chamber is necessary. It should permit a controlled environment in order to test and understand the physiological response and determine the control strategy. The final aim of this model is to have an envi

  7. Salinity and Alkaline pH of Irrigation Water Affect Marigold Plants: I. Growth and Shoot Dry Weight Partitioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marigold, is one of the most popular annual ornamental plants. Both the short-statured cultivars (Tagetes patula L.) and the taller cultivars (T. erecta L.) are used as container plants, in landscape and garden settings. Tagetes erecta varieties make excellent cut and dried flowers for the florist...

  8. Shooting mechanisms in Nature : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sakes, A.; van der Wiel, M.; Henselmans, P.W.J.; van Leeuwen, J.L.; Dodou, D.; Breedveld, P.

    2016-01-01

    Background
    In nature, shooting mechanisms are used for a variety of purposes, including prey capture, defense, and reproduction. This review offers insight into the working principles of shooting mechanisms in fungi, plants, and animals in the light of the specific functional demands that these

  9. Shooting Mechanisms in Nature : A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sakes, A.; van der Wiel, M.; Henselmans, P.W.J.; van Leeuwen, J.L.; Dodou, D.; Breedveld, P.

    2016-01-01

    Background
    In nature, shooting mechanisms are used for a variety of purposes, including prey capture, defense, and reproduction. This review offers insight into the working principles of shooting mechanisms in fungi, plants, and animals in the light of the specific functional demands that these

  10. Reconciling functions and evolution of isoprene emission in higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loreto, Francesco; Fineschi, Silvia

    2015-04-01

    Compilation and analysis of existing inventories reveal that isoprene is emitted by c. 20% of the perennial vegetation of tropical and temperate regions of the world. Isoprene emitters are found across different plant families without any clear phylogenetic thread. However, by critically appraising information in inventories, several ecological patterns of isoprene emission can be highlighted, including absence of emission from C4 and annual plants, and widespread emission from perennial and deciduous plants of temperate environments. Based on this analysis, and on available information on biochemistry, ecology and functional roles of isoprene, it is suggested that isoprene may not have evolved to help plants face heavy or prolonged stresses, but rather assists C3 plants to run efficient photosynthesis and to overcome transient and mild stresses, especially during periods of active plant growth in warm seasons. When the stress status persists, or when evergreen leaves cope with multiple and repeated stresses, isoprene biosynthesis is replaced by the synthesis of less volatile secondary compounds, in part produced by the same biochemical pathway, thus indicating causal determinism in the evolution of isoprene-emitting plants in response to the environment. © 2014 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  11. Radiocesium distribution in bamboo shoots after the Fukushima nuclear accident.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takumi Higaki

    Full Text Available The distribution of radiocesium was examined in bamboo shoots, Phyllostachys pubescens, collected from 10 sites located some 41 to 1140 km from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, Japan, in the Spring of 2012, 1 year after the Fukushima nuclear accident. Maximum activity concentrations for radiocesium ¹³⁴Cs and ¹³⁷Cs in the edible bamboo shoot parts, 41 km away from the Fukushima Daiichi plant, were in excess of 15.3 and 21.8 kBq/kg (dry weight basis; 1.34 and 1.92 kBq/kg, fresh weight, respectively. In the radiocesium-contaminated samples, the radiocesium activities were higher in the inner tip parts, including the upper edible parts and the apical culm sheath, than in the hardened culm sheath and underground basal parts. The radiocesium/potassium ratios also tended to be higher in the inner tip parts. The radiocesium activities increased with bamboo shoot length in another bamboo species, Phyllostachys bambusoides, suggesting that radiocesium accumulated in the inner tip parts during growth of the shoots.

  12. Shoot the Message, Not the Messenger—Combating Pathogenic Virulence in Plants by Inhibiting Quorum Sensing Mediated Signaling Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganesh Alagarasan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Immunity, virulence, biofilm formation, and survival in the host environment are regulated by the versatile nature of density dependent microbial cell signaling, also called quorum sensing (QS. The QS molecules can associate with host plant tissues and, at times, cause a change in its gene expression at the downstream level through inter-kingdom cross talking. Progress in controlling QS through fungicide/bactericide in pathogenic microscopic organisms has lead to a rise of antibiotic resistance pathogens. Here, we review the application of selective quorum quenching (QQ endophytes to control phytopathogens that are shared by most, if not all, terrestrial plant species as well as aquatic plants. Allowing the plants to posses endophytic colonies through biotization will be an additional and a sustainable encompassing methodology resulting in attenuated virulence rather than killing the pathogens. Furthermore, the introduced endophytes could serve as a potential biofertilizer and bioprotection agent, which in turn increases the PAMP- triggered immunity and hormonal systemic acquired resistance (SAR in plants through SA-JA-ET signaling systems. This paper discusses major challenges imposed by QS and QQ application in biotechnology.

  13. Shoot the Message, Not the Messenger-Combating Pathogenic Virulence in Plants by Inhibiting Quorum Sensing Mediated Signaling Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alagarasan, Ganesh; Aswathy, Kumar S

    2017-01-01

    Immunity, virulence, biofilm formation, and survival in the host environment are regulated by the versatile nature of density dependent microbial cell signaling, also called quorum sensing (QS). The QS molecules can associate with host plant tissues and, at times, cause a change in its gene expression at the downstream level through inter-kingdom cross talking. Progress in controlling QS through fungicide/bactericide in pathogenic microscopic organisms has lead to a rise of antibiotic resistance pathogens. Here, we review the application of selective quorum quenching (QQ) endophytes to control phytopathogens that are shared by most, if not all, terrestrial plant species as well as aquatic plants. Allowing the plants to posses endophytic colonies through biotization will be an additional and a sustainable encompassing methodology resulting in attenuated virulence rather than killing the pathogens. Furthermore, the introduced endophytes could serve as a potential biofertilizer and bioprotection agent, which in turn increases the PAMP- triggered immunity and hormonal systemic acquired resistance (SAR) in plants through SA-JA-ET signaling systems. This paper discusses major challenges imposed by QS and QQ application in biotechnology.

  14. Design and performance of the Phyto-Nutri-Tron: a system for controlling the root and shoot environment for whole-plant ecophysiological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzen, B; Brix, H; Schierup, H H; Madsen, T V

    1998-04-01

    A controlled environment system, termed the Phyto-Nutri-Tron (PNT), has been established to study whole plant ecophysiological responses to multiple environmental factors. The PNT is a computer-controlled highly flexible growth facility with independent control of the shoot and the root environment. The facility consists of two growth cabinets each containing four separate hydroponic growth systems. The growth cabinets can be used as assimilation chambers with individual control of temperature, humidity, light, CO2 and monitoring of O2. The hydroponic growth systems are connected to nutrient supply units with disinfection systems and individual control of temperature, pH and oxygen. The ionic composition of the solutions has automated feedback control through a PO4 autoanalyzer and a flow injection analyzer which also analyzes NH4+, NO2- and NO3-. Other ions are automatically monitored by ICP-AES. The system has automated calibration procedures of the analytical equipment and prolonged studies of plant growth can be performed under constant environmental conditions. This paper describes the design and construction of the PNT, the results of a number of tests showing the degree of control of environmental factors and the results of a comparative study on NH4+ and NO3- uptake kinetics by Juncus effusus conducted in the PNT demonstrate the use of the PNT in ecophysiological studies.

  15. Morphological study of the formation and development of basal shoots in roses.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marcelis-van Acker, C.A.M.

    1993-01-01

    Basal shoots are the vigorous shoots at the base of the plant. In roses, basal shoots determine the potential flower production of the plant. Although many attempts have been made to promote the formation of basal shoots for commercial production, little attention has been paid to the origin and

  16. Screening for in vitro shoot-forming capacity of seedling explants in bell pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) genotypes and efficient plant regeneration using thidiazuron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szász, A; Nervo, G; Fári, M

    1995-07-01

    In vitro shoot regeneration ability of 17 (7 Italian and 10 Hungarian) bell pepper genotypes was investigated using excised cotyledons and rooted hypocotyls as explants. Most of the Italian genotypes and two of the Hungarian genotypes responded well, producing shoots from rooted hypocotyls. Only two genotypes (one Italian and one Hungarian) gave a weak response using cotyledons. For direct shoot induction in these explants, in addition to the methods cited in the relevant papers, a new method was applied using thidiazuron as a cytokinin. Shoots were successfully regenerated from cotyledons of two Italian and two Hungarian genotypes using thidiazuron which were considered to be non responsive to the usual methods.

  17. Biochemical Hydrogen Isotope Fractionation during Lipid Biosynthesis in Higher Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahmen, A.; Gamarra, B.; Cormier, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Although hydrogen isotopes (δ2H) of leaf wax lipids are increasingly being applied as (paleo-) hydrological proxies, we still do not understand some of the basic processes that shape the δ2H values of these compounds. In general, it is believed that three variables shape the δ2H values of leaf wax lipids: source water δ2H values, evaporative deuterium (2H) enrichment of leaf water and the biosynthetic fractionation (ɛbio) during the synthesis of organic compounds. While the influences of source water δ2H values and leaf water evaporative 2H enrichment have been well documented, very little is known how ɛbio shapes the δ2H values of plant-derived lipids. I will present the results from recent experiments, where we show that the magnitude of ɛbio, and thus the δ2H value of plant-derived lipids, strongly depends on the carbon (C) metabolism of a plant. Specifically, I will show that plants that rely for their tissue formation on recently assimilated C have δ2H values in their n-alkanes that are up to 60‰ more negative than plants that depend for their tissue formation on stored carbohydrates. Our findings can be explained by the fact that NADPH is the primary source of hydrogen in plant lipids and that the δ2H value of NADPH differs whether NADPH was generated directly in the light reaction of photosynthesis or whether it was generated by processing stored carbohydrates. As such, the δ2H values of plant-derived lipids will directly depend on whether the tissue containing these lipids was synthesized using recent assimilates, e.g. in a C autonomous state or, if it was synthesized from stored or otherwise aquired C sources, e.g. in a not C autonomous state. Given the magnidude of this effect, our results have important implications for interpretation of plant-derived lipid δ2H values when used as (paleo-) hydrological proxies. In addition, our results suggest, that δ2H values of plant-derived lipids could be employed as a new tools to assess the C

  18. Penetration and Toxicity of Nanomaterials in Higher Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Chichiriccò

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials (NMs comprise either inorganic particles consisting of metals, oxides, and salts that exist in nature and may be also produced in the laboratory, or organic particles originating only from the laboratory, having at least one dimension between 1 and 100 nm in size. According to shape, size, surface area, and charge, NMs have different mechanical, chemical, electrical, and optical properties that make them suitable for technological and biomedical applications and thus they are being increasingly produced and modified. Despite their beneficial potential, their use may be hazardous to health owing to the capacity to enter the animal and plant body and interact with cells. Studies on NMs involve technologists, biologists, physicists, chemists, and ecologists, so there are numerous reports that are significantly raising the level of knowledge, especially in the field of nanotechnology; however, many aspects concerning nanobiology remain undiscovered, including the interactions with plant biomolecules. In this review we examine current knowledge on the ways in which NMs penetrate plant organs and interact with cells, with the aim of shedding light on the reactivity of NMs and toxicity to plants. These points are discussed critically to adjust the balance with regard to the risk to the health of the plants as well as providing some suggestions for new studies on this topic.

  19. High-frequency shoot regeneration of nodal explants from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper describes the shoot regeneration of nodal segments from a medicinal plant, Tetrastigma hemsleyanum Diels et Gilg (Vitaceae). The highest number of shoots (7.27 shoots per explant) was observed in MS medium supplemented with 4 mg/l BA after six weeks of inoculation. 2 mg/l BA in combination with 0.1 mg/l ...

  20. Inheritance of Resistance to Sorghum Shoot Fly, Atherigona soccata in Sorghum, Sorghum bicolor (L. Moench

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed eRiyazaddin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Host plant resistance is one of the major components to control sorghum shoot fly, Atherigona soccata. To understand the nature of gene action for inheritance of shoot fly resistance, we evaluated 10 parents, 45 F1’s and their reciprocals in replicated trials during the rainy and postrainy seasons. Genotypes ICSV 700, Phule Anuradha, ICSV 25019, PS 35805, IS 2123, IS 2146 and IS 18551 exhibited resistance to shoot fly damage across seasons. Crosses between susceptible parents were preferred for egg laying by the shoot fly females, resulting in a susceptible reaction. ICSV 700, ICSV 25019, PS 35805, IS 2123, IS 2146 and IS 18551 exhibited significant and negative general combining ability (gca effects for oviposition, deadheart incidence, and overall resistance score. The plant morphological traits associated with expression of resistance/ susceptibility to shoot fly damage such as leaf glossiness, plant vigor, and leafsheath pigmentation also showed significant gca effects by these genotypes, suggesting the potential for use as a selection criterion to breed for resistance to shoot fly, A. soccata. ICSV 700, Phule Anuradha, IS 2146 and IS 18551 with significant positive gca effects for trichome density can also be utilised in improving sorghums for shoot fly resistance. The parents involved in hybrids with negative specific combining ability (sca effects for shoot fly resistance traits can be used in developing sorghum hybrids with adaptation to postrainy season. The significant reciprocal effects of combining abilities for oviposition, leaf glossy score and trichome density suggested the influence of cytoplasmic factors in inheritance of shoot fly resistance. Higher values of variance due to sca (σ2s, dominance variance (σ2d, and lower predictability ratios than the variance due to gca (σ2g and additive variance (σ2a for shoot fly resistance traits indicated the predominance of dominance type of gene action, whereas trichome density, leaf

  1. Mixture screening and mixture-amount designs to determine plant growth regulator effects on shoot regeneration from grapefruit (Citrus paradisi macf.) epicotyls

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to improve shoot regeneration from grapefruit epicotyl explants since some important in vitro applications in citrus, such as Agrobacterium-mediated transformation, commonly use epicotyl segments from in vitro seedlings; adequate adventitious shoot production is thus...

  2. Ecological Risk Assessment of Genetically Modified Higher Plants (GMHP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, C.; Damgaard, C.; Kjellsson, G.

    altered management of the fields, e.g. possible changes in for example leaching of pesticides or nitrogen, etc. Furthermore, we have abstained from suggesting number of species to test for specific issues because different risk assessment procedures have been developed which add a safety factor accounting...... for uncertainties in the extrapolation from limited laboratory studies to the species rich field environment. The relationship between the size of the safety factor and the number of species is therefore an issue of the risk assessment. Some of the issues raised in this report overlap with data needs...... of the project Biotechnology: elements in environmental risk assessment of genetically modified plants. December 1999 Christian Kjær Introduction In ecological risk assessment of transgenic plants, information on a wide range of subjects is needed for an effective and reliable assessment procedure...

  3. Molecular biology of gibberellins signaling in higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Hironori; Ueguchi-Tanaka, Miyako; Matsuoka, Makoto

    2008-01-01

    Gibberellins (GAs), a large family of tetracyclic, diterpenoid plant hormones, play an important role in regulating diverse processes throughout plant development. In recent years, significant advances have been made in the isolation of GA signaling components and GA-responsive genes. All available data have indicated that DELLA proteins are an essential negative regulator in the GA signaling pathway and GA derepresses DELLA-mediated growth suppression by inducing degradation of DELLA proteins through the ubiquitin-26S proteasome proteolytic pathway. Identification of GID1, a gene encoding an unknown protein with similarity to hormone-sensitive lipases, has revealed that GID1 acts as a functional GA receptor with a reasonable binding affinity to biologically active GAs. Furthermore, the GID1 receptor interacts with DELLA proteins in a GA-dependent manner. These results suggest that formation of a GID1-GA-DELLA protein complex targets DELLA protein into the ubiquitin-26S proteasome pathway for degradation.

  4. Emission of NO from several higher plant species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildt, J.; Kley, D.; Rockel, A.; Rockel, P.; Segschneider, H. J.

    1997-03-01

    Emission of nitric oxide (NO) from a variety of plant species was observed in a continuously stirred tank reactor. During daytime and at NO concentrations below 1 ppb in the chamber air, NO emissions were observed for all studied nitrate-nourished plant species. A relation was found between the NO emission rates during daytime and the uptake rates of CO2. The ratio of the NO emission rate to the CO2 uptake was similar for all plants. Changes of the net rate of photosynthesis induced by variations of light intensity or changes of CO2 concentrations changed the NO emission rates correspondingly. The link between NO emissions and CO2 uptake during daytime allowed estimation of the potential of the vegetation to evolve NO on a global scale as 0.23 Tg N yr-1. Strong NO emissions during nights were observed when the nitrate concentration in the nutrient solution was enhanced. Then NO emissions were observed with flux densities comparable to the highest emission rates found from soils.

  5. Final Report for Regulation of Embryonic Development in Higher Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harada, John J. [University of California, Davis

    2013-10-22

    The overall goal of the project was to define the cellular processes that underlie embryo development in plants at a mechanistic level. Our studies focused on a critical transcriptional regulator, Arabidopsis LEAFY COTYLEDON (LEC1), that is necessary and sufficient to induce processes required for embryo development. Because LEC1 regulates lipid accumulation during the maturation phase of embryo development, information about LEC1 may be useful in designing approaches to enhance biofuel production in plants. During the tenure of this project, we determined the molecular mechanisms by which LEC1 acts as a transcription factor in embryos. We also identified genes directly regulated by LEC1 and showed that many of these genes are involved in maturation processes. This information has been useful in dissecting the gene regulatory networks controlling embryo development. Finally, LEC1 is a novel isoform of a transcription factor that is conserved among eukaryotes, and LEC1 is active primarily in seeds. Therefore, we determined that the LEC1-type transcription factors first appeared in lycophytes during land plant evolution. Together, this study provides basic information that has implications for biofuel production.

  6. Regulation of cell division in higher plants. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, Thomas W.

    2000-02-29

    Research in the latter part of the grant period was divided into two parts: (1) expansion of the macromolecular tool kit for studying plant cell division; (2) experiments in which the roles played by plant cell cycle regulators were to be cast in the light of the emerging yeast and animal cell paradigm for molecular control of the mitotic cycle. The first objectives were accomplished to a very satisfactory degree. With regard to the second part of the project, we were driven to change our objectives for two reasons. First, the families of cell cycle control genes that we cloned encoded such closely related members that the prospects for success at raising distinguishing antisera against each were sufficiently dubious as to be impractical. Epitope tagging is not feasible in Pisum sativum, our experimental system, as this species is not realistically transformable. Therefore, differentiating the roles of diverse cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases was problematic. Secondly, our procedure for generating mitotically synchronized pea root meristems for biochemical studies was far too labor intensive for the proposed experiments. We therefore shifted our objectives to identifying connections between the conserved proteins of the cell cycle engine and factors that interface it with plant physiology and development. In this, we have obtained some very exciting results.

  7. A systematic search for positive selection in higher plants (Embryophytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roth Christian

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previously, a database characterizing examples of Embryophyte gene family lineages showing evidence of positive selection was reported. Of the gene family trees, 138 Embryophyte branches showed Ka/Ks>>1 and are candidates for functional adaptation. The database and these examples have now been studied in further detail to better understand the molecular basis for plant genome evolution. Results Neutral modeling showed an excess of positive and/or negative selection in the database over a neutral expectation centered on the mean Ka/Ks ratio. Out of 673 families with assigned structures, 490 have at least one branch with Ka/Ks >>1 in a region of the protein, enabling a picture of selective pressures delineated by protein structure. Most gene families allowed reconstruction back to the last common ancestor of flowering plants (Magnoliophytes without saturation of 4- fold degenerate codon position. Positive selection occurred in a wide variety of gene families with different functions, including in the self incompatibility locus, in defense against pathogens, in embryogenesis, in cold acclimation, and in electrontransport. Structurally, selective pressures were similar between alpha-helices and beta- sheets, but were less negative and more variant on the surface and away from the hydrophobic core. Conclusion Positive selection was detected statistically significantly in a small and nonrandom minority of gene families in a systematic analysis of embryophyte gene families. More sensitive methods increased the level of positive selection that was detected and presented a structural basis for the role of positive selection in plant genomes.

  8. Conserved upstream open reading frames in higher plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schultz Carolyn J

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Upstream open reading frames (uORFs can down-regulate the translation of the main open reading frame (mORF through two broad mechanisms: ribosomal stalling and reducing reinitiation efficiency. In distantly related plants, such as rice and Arabidopsis, it has been found that conserved uORFs are rare in these transcriptomes with approximately 100 loci. It is unclear how prevalent conserved uORFs are in closely related plants. Results We used a homology-based approach to identify conserved uORFs in five cereals (monocots that could potentially regulate translation. Our approach used a modified reciprocal best hit method to identify putative orthologous sequences that were then analysed by a comparative R-nomics program called uORFSCAN to find conserved uORFs. Conclusion This research identified new genes that may be controlled at the level of translation by conserved uORFs. We report that conserved uORFs are rare (

  9. CBL-CIPK network for calcium signaling in higher plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Sheng

    Plants sense their environment by signaling mechanisms involving calcium. Calcium signals are encoded by a complex set of parameters and decoded by a large number of proteins including the more recently discovered CBL-CIPK network. The calcium-binding CBL proteins specifi-cally interact with a family of protein kinases CIPKs and regulate the activity and subcellular localization of these kinases, leading to the modification of kinase substrates. This represents a paradigm shift as compared to a calcium signaling mechanism from yeast and animals. One example of CBL-CIPK signaling pathways is the low-potassium response of Arabidopsis roots. When grown in low-K medium, plants develop stronger K-uptake capacity adapting to the low-K condition. Recent studies show that the increased K-uptake is caused by activation of a specific K-channel by the CBL-CIPK network. A working model for this regulatory pathway will be discussed in the context of calcium coding and decoding processes.

  10. Transgenic tobacco plants having a higher level of methionine are more sensitive to oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacham, Yael; Matityahu, Ifat; Amir, Rachel

    2017-07-01

    Methionine is an essential amino acid the low level of which limits the nutritional quality of plants. We formerly produced transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants overexpressing CYSTATHIONE γ-SYNTHASE (CGS) (FA plants), methionine's main regulatory enzyme. These plants accumulate significantly higher levels of methionine compared with wild-type (WT) plants. The aim of this study was to gain more knowledge about the effect of higher methionine content on the metabolic profile of vegetative tissue and on the morphological and physiological phenotypes. FA plants exhibit slightly reduced growth, and metabolic profiling analysis shows that they have higher contents of stress-related metabolites. Despite this, FA plants were more sensitive to short- and long-term oxidative stresses. In addition, compared with WT plants and transgenic plants expressing an empty vector, the primary metabolic profile of FA was altered less during oxidative stress. Based on morphological and metabolic phenotypes, we strongly proposed that FA plants having higher levels of methionine suffer from stress under non-stress conditions. This might be one of the reasons for their lesser ability to cope with oxidative stress when it appeared. The observation that their metabolic profiling is much less responsive to stress compared with control plants indicates that the delta changes in metabolite contents between non-stress and stress conditions is important for enabling the plants to cope with stress conditions. © 2017 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  11. Light intensity-dependent retrograde signalling in higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szechyńska-Hebda, Magdalena; Karpiński, Stanisław

    2013-11-15

    Plants are able to acclimate to highly fluctuating light environment and evolved a short- and long-term light acclimatory responses, that are dependent on chloroplasts retrograde signalling. In this review we summarise recent evidences suggesting that the chloroplasts act as key sensors of light intensity changes in a wide range (low, high and excess light conditions) as well as sensors of darkness. They also participate in transduction and synchronisation of systemic retrograde signalling in response to differential light exposure of distinct leaves. Regulation of intra- and inter-cellular chloroplast retrograde signalling is dependent on the developmental and functional stage of the plastids. Therefore, it is discussed in following subsections: firstly, chloroplast biogenic control of nuclear genes, for example, signals related to photosystems and pigment biogenesis during early plastid development; secondly, signals in the mature chloroplast induced by changes in photosynthetic electron transport, reactive oxygen species, hormones and metabolite biosynthesis; thirdly, chloroplast signalling during leaf senescence. Moreover, with a help of meta-analysis of multiple microarray experiments, we showed that the expression of the same set of genes is regulated specifically in particular types of signals and types of light conditions. Furthermore, we also highlight the alternative scenarios of the chloroplast retrograde signals transduction and coordination linked to the role of photo-electrochemical signalling. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Molecular insights into Zeaxanthin-dependent quenching in higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Pengqi; Tian, Lijin; Kloz, Miroslav; Croce, Roberta

    2015-09-01

    Photosynthetic organisms protect themselves from high-light stress by dissipating excess absorbed energy as heat in a process called non-photochemical quenching (NPQ). Zeaxanthin is essential for the full development of NPQ, but its role remains debated. The main discussion revolves around two points: where does zeaxanthin bind and does it quench? To answer these questions we have followed the zeaxanthin-dependent quenching from leaves to individual complexes, including supercomplexes. We show that small amounts of zeaxanthin are associated with the complexes, but in contrast to what is generally believed, zeaxanthin binding per se does not cause conformational changes in the complexes and does not induce quenching, not even at low pH. We show that in NPQ conditions zeaxanthin does not exchange for violaxanthin in the internal binding sites of the antennas but is located at the periphery of the complexes. These results together with the observation that the zeaxanthin-dependent quenching is active in isolated membranes, but not in functional supercomplexes, suggests that zeaxanthin is acting in between the complexes, helping to create/participating in a variety of quenching sites. This can explain why none of the antennas appears to be essential for NPQ and the multiple quenching mechanisms that have been observed in plants.

  13. Changes in the structural indices of annual shoots of Quercus rubra under anthropogenic impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Bessonova

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Air pollution is one of the important problems of large cities. In connection with this, comprehensive study of the mechanisms of the corresponding reactions of tree species, introduced in the process of landscaping, to various environmen tal factors is required. The aim of this study is to analyze the influence of urban technogenic environmental pollution on the anatomical characteristics of Quercus rubra Linnaeus, 1753 annual shoots. The object of research was 35-year-old plants of Q. rubra, which grew in a non-polluted site (conditionally clean zone, the Botanical Garden of DNU (plot 1, and in a polluted site (roadside planting (plot 2 of Dnipro City. Industrial emissions of the city’s western, northeastern and northwest industrial complexes also have an effect on plants, depending on the wind direction. For anatomical research, the annual shoots were taken at the tips of the vegetation from the south-eastern side of the model trees at a height of 2 m and fixed in 70% alcohol. Cross sections were made at a distance of 1 cm from the beginning of growth. Phloroglucine was used to dye the cells. The influence of industrial and automobile emissions on the structural parameters of Q. rubra shoots was investigated. We established that the membrane thickened evenly in both control and experimental plants. Cork thickness of Q. rubra shoots growing in the roadside plantation was higher than in plants of the Botanical Garden by 57.5%. Increasing its thickness in plants exposed to atmospheric air pollution has an adaptive value. Q. rubra shoots have a tabulate type of collenchyma, the tangent walls of whose cells thicken. The collenchyma cells of the control variant of shoots are larger. This tissue was thicker in Q. rubra shoots from the polluted site by 26.8% compared to those from the non-polluted zone. The parenchyma cells of the primary cortex were large and contained chloroplasts. The thickness of this histological element on the shoot

  14. Effects of the Extraterrestrial Environment on Plants: Recommendations for Future Space Experiments for the MELiSSA Higher Plant Compartment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silje A. Wolff

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Due to logistical challenges, long-term human space exploration missions require a life support system capable of regenerating all the essentials for survival. Higher plants can be utilized to provide a continuous supply of fresh food, atmosphere revitalization, and clean water for humans. Plants can adapt to extreme environments on Earth, and model plants have been shown to grow and develop through a full life cycle in microgravity. However, more knowledge about the long term effects of the extraterrestrial environment on plant growth and development is necessary. The European Space Agency (ESA has developed the Micro-Ecological Life Support System Alternative (MELiSSA program to develop a closed regenerative life support system, based on micro-organisms and higher plant processes, with continuous recycling of resources. In this context, a literature review to analyze the impact of the space environments on higher plants, with focus on gravity levels, magnetic fields and radiation, has been performed. This communication presents a roadmap giving directions for future scientific activities within space plant cultivation. The roadmap aims to identify the research activities required before higher plants can be included in regenerative life support systems in space.

  15. Effects of the Extraterrestrial Environment on Plants: Recommendations for Future Space Experiments for the MELiSSA Higher Plant Compartment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Silje A; Coelho, Liz H; Karoliussen, Irene; Jost, Ann-Iren Kittang

    2014-05-05

    Due to logistical challenges, long-term human space exploration missions require a life support system capable of regenerating all the essentials for survival. Higher plants can be utilized to provide a continuous supply of fresh food, atmosphere revitalization, and clean water for humans. Plants can adapt to extreme environments on Earth, and model plants have been shown to grow and develop through a full life cycle in microgravity. However, more knowledge about the long term effects of the extraterrestrial environment on plant growth and development is necessary. The European Space Agency (ESA) has developed the Micro-Ecological Life Support System Alternative (MELiSSA) program to develop a closed regenerative life support system, based on micro-organisms and higher plant processes, with continuous recycling of resources. In this context, a literature review to analyze the impact of the space environments on higher plants, with focus on gravity levels, magnetic fields and radiation, has been performed. This communication presents a roadmap giving directions for future scientific activities within space plant cultivation. The roadmap aims to identify the research activities required before higher plants can be included in regenerative life support systems in space.

  16. Effect of gelling agents on shoot growth and multiple shoot formation of mangosteen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sompong Te-chato

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Apomict seeds of mangosteen were cultured as a whole or half seed on MS medium supplemented with 5 mg/l 6-benzyladenine (BA. The medium was solidified with various gelling agents. After culture for 2 months, multiple shoot formation, morphological and physiological characters of the shoot were investigated. The results revealed that 1.5% agarose gave the highest seed forming shoot (98% and number of shoots per culture seed (20.7. Wounding the seed by sectioning into half promoted higher callus formation (47-88% in all gelling agents. Phytagel (0.17% resulted in the highest callus formation (100% and hyperhydric shoots (11-31%. Those shoots produced translucent, thin and brittle leaves and stems, and malformed stoma. Those leaves had the lowest content of chlorophyll a, b and total chlorophyll.

  17. Thidiazuron promotes high frequency regeneration of peanut (Arachis hypogaea) plants in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanyand, M; Dessai, A P; Prakash, C S

    1994-11-01

    Multiple shoots were induced on Valenciatype peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) explants cultured in vitro on a nutrient medium supplemented with thidiazuron. Zygotic embryos excised from mature seeds were germinated on Murashige-Skoog nutrient medium, and the resulting plantlets (8 days-old) were used as a source of explants. When cultured on a nutrient medium with increasing levels of thidiazuron (0.5 to 30 mg/l), expiants from various parts of the peanut plant (except the root) produced multiple shoot primordia which subsequently developed into individual shoots. Hypocotyl and cotyledon explants produced shoots in higher numbers than other explants (20 shoots per hypocotyl explant at all thidiazuron concentrations and 15 shoots per cotyledon explant at 30 mg/l). Shoots rooted normally on a basal Murashige-Skoog medium containing charcoal and developed into healthy and fertile plants when planted in soil.

  18. UV-A radiation effects on higher plants: Exploring the known unknown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdaguer, Dolors; Jansen, Marcel A K; Llorens, Laura; Morales, Luis O; Neugart, Susanne

    2017-02-01

    Ultraviolet-A radiation (UV-A: 315-400nm) is a component of solar radiation that exerts a wide range of physiological responses in plants. Currently, field attenuation experiments are the most reliable source of information on the effects of UV-A. Common plant responses to UV-A include both inhibitory and stimulatory effects on biomass accumulation and morphology. UV-A effects on biomass accumulation can differ from those on root: shoot ratio, and distinct responses are described for different leaf tissues. Inhibitory and enhancing effects of UV-A on photosynthesis are also analysed, as well as activation of photoprotective responses, including UV-absorbing pigments. UV-A-induced leaf flavonoids are highly compound-specific and species-dependent. Many of the effects on growth and development exerted by UV-A are distinct to those triggered by UV-B and vary considerably in terms of the direction the response takes. Such differences may reflect diverse UV-perception mechanisms with multiple photoreceptors operating in the UV-A range and/or variations in the experimental approaches used. This review highlights a role that various photoreceptors (UVR8, phototropins, phytochromes and cryptochromes) may play in plant responses to UV-A when dose, wavelength and other conditions are taken into account. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Adventitious shoot regeneration from in vitro stem explants of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An efficient in vitro plant regeneration system from stem explants was established in Phellodendron amurense. Factors influencing shoot regeneration from stems including culture medium type, combinations of plant growth regulators and carbon source in the medium were investigated. Adventitious shoot regeneration was ...

  20. Biochemical hydrogen isotope fractionation during biosynthesis in higher plants reflects carbon metabolism of the plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormier, Marc-André; Kahmen, Ansgar

    2015-04-01

    Compound-specific isotope analyses of plant material are frequently applied to understand the response of plants to the environmental changes. As it is generally assume that the main factors controlling δ2H values in plants are the plant's source water and evaporative deuterium enrichment of leaf water, hydrogen isotope analyses of plant material are mainly applied regarding hydrological conditions at different time scales. However, only few studies have directly addressed the variability of the biochemical hydrogen isotope fractionation occurring during biosynthesis of organic compounds (ɛbio), accounting also for a large part in the δ2H values of plants but generally assumed to be constant. Here we present the results from a climate-controlled growth chambers experiment where tested the sensitivity of ɛbio to different light treatments. The different light treatments were applied to induce different metabolic status (autotrophic vs. heterotrophic) in 9 different plant species that we grew from large storage organs (e.g. tubers or roots). The results show a systematic ɛbio shift (up to 80 ) between the different light treatments for different compounds (i.e. long chain n-alkanes and cellulose). We suggest that this shift is due to the different NADPH pools used by the plants to build up the compounds from stored carbohydrates in heterotrophic or autotrophic conditions. Our results have important implications for the calibration and interpretation of sedimentary and tree rings records in geological studies. In addition, as the δ2H values reflect also strongly the carbon metabolism of the plant, our findings support the idea of δ2H values as an interesting proxy for plant physiological studies.

  1. Thidiazuron induces shoot organogenesis at low concentrations and somatic embryogenesis at high concentrations on leaf and petiole explants of African violet (Saintpaulia ionantha Wendl).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mithila, J; Hall, J C; Victor, J M R; Saxena, P K

    2003-01-01

    Regeneration via shoot organogenesis and somatic embryogenesis was observed from thidiazuron (TDZ)-treated leaf and petiole explants of greenhouse- and in vitro-grown African violet plants. The response of cultures to other growth regulators over a range of 0.5 microM to 10 microM was 50% less than that observed with TDZ. A comparative study among several cultivars of African violet indicated that "Benjamin" and "William" had the highest regeneration potential. In "Benjamin", higher frequencies of shoot organogenesis (twofold) and somatic embryogenesis (a 50% increase) were observed from in vitro- and greenhouse-grown plants, respectively. At concentrations lower than 2.5 microM, TDZ induced shoot organogenesis, whereas at higher doses (5-10 microM) somatic embryos were formed. These findings provide the first report of simultaneous shoot organogenesis and somatic embryogenesis of African violet explants in response to TDZ.

  2. In vitro culture of higher plants as a tool in the propagation of horticultural crops.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pierik, R.L.M.

    1988-01-01

    In vitro culture of higher plants is the culture, under sterile conditions, of plants, seeds, embryos, organs, explants, tissues, cells and protoplasts on nutrient media. This type of culture has shown spectacular development since 1975, resulting in the production and regeneration of viable

  3. Root and shoot phenologies differ on an arctic elevation gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blume-Werry, G.; Milbau, A.; Kreyling, J.; Wilson, S. D.

    2012-12-01

    The length of the growing season is usually determined from aboveground phenology, but our understanding of seasonal root growth and its coupling to shoot growth remains rudimentary. In many ecosystems the majority of plant biomass is belowground, and insights into belowground growth patterns are important for predicting arctic ecosystem responses to global change. We measured root and shoot phenology, with minirhizotrons and digital photography, over the growing season in three common vegetation types along an altitude gradient in northern Sweden. In addition, soil temperature and soil moisture were measured to assess the influence of abiotic factors. The growing season belowground was 35% longer than aboveground, with shoot growth ending 2 weeks prior to root growth. The largest time lag between the end of the growing season below and above the ground (25 days) occurred in birch forest at the lowest elevation. Fine root production was more evenly distributed throughout the season in the forest compared with the higher elevations. The importance of soil temperature and photoperiod in governing root growth increased with increasing elevation. Our results show that the overall growing season length at high latitudes is severely underestimated if aboveground phenology is used as the single indicator for seasonal plant productivity. This has important implications for modeling responses of tundra ecosystems to global change, in which roots are the main source of carbon in the soil, and which play a key role in global carbon storage.

  4. The comet assay in higher terrestrial plant model: Review and evolutionary trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanier, Caroline; Manier, Nicolas; Cuny, Damien; Deram, Annabelle

    2015-12-01

    The comet assay is a sensitive technique for the measurement of DNA damage in individual cells. Although it has been primarily applied to animal cells, its adaptation to higher plant tissues significantly extends the utility of plants for environmental genotoxicity research. The present review focuses on 101 key publications and discusses protocols and evolutionary trends specific to higher plants. General consensus validates the use of the percentage of DNA found in the tail, the alkaline version of the test and root study. The comet protocol has proved its effectiveness and its adaptability for cultivated plant models. Its transposition in wild plants thus appears as a logical evolution. However, certain aspects of the protocol can be improved, namely through the systematic use of positive controls and increasing the number of nuclei read. These optimizations will permit the increase in the performance of this test, namely when interpreting mechanistic and physiological phenomena. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Mechanisms of silicon-mediated alleviation of abiotic stresses in higher plants: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yongchao; Sun, Wanchun; Zhu, Yong-Guan; Christie, Peter

    2007-05-01

    Although silicon (Si) is the second most abundant element both on the surface of the Earth's crust and in soils, it has not yet been listed among the essential elements for higher plants. However, the beneficial role of Si in stimulating the growth and development of many plant species has been generally recognized. Silicon is known to effectively mitigate various abiotic stresses such as manganese, aluminum and heavy metal toxicities, and salinity, drought, chilling and freezing stresses. However, mechanisms of Si-mediated alleviation of abiotic stresses remain poorly understood. The key mechanisms of Si-mediated alleviation of abiotic stresses in higher plants include: (1) stimulation of antioxidant systems in plants, (2) complexation or co-precipitation of toxic metal ions with Si, (3) immobilization of toxic metal ions in growth media, (4) uptake processes, and (5) compartmentation of metal ions within plants. Future research needs for Si-mediated alleviation of abiotic stresses are also discussed.

  6. Violence and school shootings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flannery, Daniel J; Modzeleski, William; Kretschmar, Jeff M

    2013-01-01

    Multiple-homicide school shootings are rare events, but when they happen they significantly impact individuals, the school and the community. We focus on multiple-homicide incidents and identified mental health issues of shooters. To date, studies of school shootings have concluded that no reliable profile of a shooter exists, so risk should be assessed using comprehensive threat assessment protocols. Existing studies primarily utilize retrospective case histories or media accounts. The field requires more empirical and systematic research on all types of school shootings including single victim incidents, those that result in injury but not death and those that are successfully averted. We discuss current policies and practices related to school shootings and the role of mental health professionals in assessing risk and supporting surviving victims.

  7. Bacteria in combination with fertilizers promote root and shoot growth of maize in saline-sodic soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Zafar-ul-Hye

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Salinity is the leading abiotic stress hampering maize (Zea maysL. growth throughout the world, especially in Pakistan. During salinity stress, the endogenous ethylene level in plants increases, which retards proper root growth and consequent shoot growth of the plants. However, certain bacteria contain the enzyme 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC deaminase, which converts 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (an immediate precursor of ethylene biosynthesis in higher plants into ammonia and α-ketobutyrate instead of ethylene. In the present study, two Pseudomonas bacterial strains containing ACC-deaminase were tested separately and in combinations with mineral fertilizers to determine their potential to minimize/undo the effects of salinity on maize plants grown under saline-sodic field conditions. The data recorded at 30, 50 and 70 days after sowing revealed that both the Pseudomonas bacterial strains improved root and shoot length, root and shoot fresh weight, and root and shoot dry weight up to 34, 43, 35, 71, 55 and 68%, respectively, when applied without chemical fertilizers: these parameter were enhanced up to 108, 95, 100, 131, 100 and 198%, respectively, when the strains were applied along with chemical fertilizers. It can be concluded that ACC-deaminase Pseudomonas bacterial strains applied alone and in conjunction with mineral fertilizers improved the root and shoot growth of maize seedlings grown in saline-sodic soil.

  8. Bacteria in combination with fertilizers promote root and shoot growth of maize in saline-sodic soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar-Ul-Hye, Muhammad; Farooq, Hafiz Muhammad; Hussain, Mubshar

    2015-03-01

    Salinity is the leading abiotic stress hampering maize ( Zea mays L.) growth throughout the world, especially in Pakistan. During salinity stress, the endogenous ethylene level in plants increases, which retards proper root growth and consequent shoot growth of the plants. However, certain bacteria contain the enzyme 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase, which converts 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (an immediate precursor of ethylene biosynthesis in higher plants) into ammonia and α-ketobutyrate instead of ethylene. In the present study, two Pseudomonas bacterial strains containing ACC-deaminase were tested separately and in combinations with mineral fertilizers to determine their potential to minimize/undo the effects of salinity on maize plants grown under saline-sodic field conditions. The data recorded at 30, 50 and 70 days after sowing revealed that both the Pseudomonas bacterial strains improved root and shoot length, root and shoot fresh weight, and root and shoot dry weight up to 34, 43, 35, 71, 55 and 68%, respectively, when applied without chemical fertilizers: these parameter were enhanced up to 108, 95, 100, 131, 100 and 198%, respectively, when the strains were applied along with chemical fertilizers. It can be concluded that ACC-deaminase Pseudomonas bacterial strains applied alone and in conjunction with mineral fertilizers improved the root and shoot growth of maize seedlings grown in saline-sodic soil.

  9. Changes of Root Hydraulic Conductivity and Root/Shoot Ratio of Durum Wheat and Barley in Relation to Nitrogen Availability and Mercury Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Angelino

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to verify, on whole plant level and during all the plant cycle, the hypothesis that nitrogen deficiency reduces root hydraulic conductivity through the water channels (aquaporins activity, and that the plant reacts by changing root/shoot ratio. Root hydraulic conductivity, plant growth, root/shoot ratio and plant water status were assessed for durum wheat (Triticum durum Desf. and barley (Hordeum vulgare L., as influenced by nitrogen availability and HgCl2 treatment. On both species during the plant cycle, nitrogen deficiency induced lower root hydraulic conductivity (-49 and -66% respectively for barley and wheat and lower plant growth. On wheat was also observed cycle delay, lower plant nitrogen content, but not lower leaf turgor pressure and epidermic cell dimension. The lower plant growth was due to lower plant dimension and lower tillering. Root /shoot ratio was always higher for nitrogen stressed plants, whether on dry matter or on surface basis. This was due to lower effect of nitrogen stress on root growth than on shoot growth. On wheat HgCl2 treatment determined lower plant growth, and more than nitrogen stress, cycle delay and higher root/shoot ratio. The mercury, also, induced leaf rolling, lower turgor pressure, lower NAR, higher root cell wall lignification and lower epidermic cell number per surface unity. In nitrogen fertilized plants root hydraulic conductivity was always reduced by HgCl2 treatment (-61 and 38%, respectively for wheat and barley, but in nitrogen unfertilized plants this effect was observed only during the first plant stages. This effect was higher during shooting and caryopsis formation, lower during tillering. It is concluded that barley and durum wheat react to nitrogen deficiency and HgCl2 treatment by increasing the root/shoot ratio, to compensate water stress due to lower water root conductivity probably induced by lower aquaporin synthesis or inactivation. However, this

  10. Root : Shoot Ratios, Optimization and Nitrogen Productivity

    OpenAIRE

    ÅGREN, GÖRAN I.; FRANKLIN, OSKAR

    2003-01-01

    Plants respond to nitrogen availability by changing their root : shoot ratios. One hypothesis used to explain this allocation is that plants optimize their behaviour by maximizing their relative growth rate. The consequences of this hypothesis were investigated by formulating two models for root : shoot allocation, with and without explicit inclusion of maintenance respiration. The models also took into account that relative growth rate is a linear function of plant nitrogen concentration. Th...

  11. Effect of cytokinins on shoot apical meristem in Nicotiana tabacum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uzelac Branka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytokinins are involved in plant cell proliferation leading to plant growth and morphogenesis. The size, activity and maintenance of the shoot apical meristem (SAM are defined by a balanced rate of mitotic cell divisions and functional cell differentiation that are controlled by cytokinins. In order to investigate the effect of exogenous cytokinin on SAM, morpho-anatomical changes in the shoot apices of tobacco treated with benzyladenine (BA were compared to those of untreated control plants.

  12. In vitro shoot multiplication and conservation of Caralluma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-03-30

    Mar 30, 2011 ... cool white fluorescent lamp for a photoperiod of 16 h at 25 ± 2°C. Shoot initiation and multiplication. For shoot induction, the nodal explants were cultured on MS medium supplemented with various plant growth regulators like 6- benzyladenine (BA), Kinetin (Kn), 2-Isopentenyl adenine (2iP) and. Zeatin (Zn) ...

  13. Highly efficient in vitro adventitious shoot regeneration of Adenosma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adenosma glutinosum (Linn.) Druce is an important aromatic plant, but no information is available regarding its regeneration, callus induction and proliferation from leaf explants. In this study, an in vitro shoot regeneration procedure was developed for native A. glutinosum using leaf explants. Callus induction and shoots ...

  14. Factors influencing in vitro shoot regeneration of Macadamia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    study was carried out to investigate the effect of culture medium factors that influence the shoot regenerative potential of Macadamia nodal segments in vitro. Explants were obtained from shoots of current growth flush of Macadamia integrifolia and inoculated onto different test media. Woody plant medium (WPM) gave ...

  15. Leaf anatomy of Crambe abyssinica Hochst. during in vitro shoot ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Leaf anatomy of Crambe abyssinica Hochst. during in vitro shoot induction. ... to characterize and evaluate possible modifications in the leaf anatomy of crambe during the process of shoot induction based on micropropagation protocol. ... Key words: Oilseeds, micropropagation, mesophyll, histology, plant morphology.

  16. High-frequency shoot regeneration of nodal explants from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-06-29

    Jun 29, 2011 ... develop a rapid and efficient in vitro multiplication and regeneration system using nodal explants. MATERIALS AND METHODS. Plant material and initiation of in vitro shoot cultures. Young in vivo shoots with six to eight nodes of T. hemsleyanum were collected from wild population in Zhejiang Province, ...

  17. Evaluation of the shoot regeneration response in tissue culture of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-03-04

    Mar 4, 2008 ... wide range of environments across eastern and southern Africa were evaluated for their shoot ... However, all the tested varieties produced healthy rooted plants in vitro that could be .... Figure 1. The stages of regeneration of pigeonpeas adapted to Africa: (a) Cotyledon explants of ICEAP 00554 with shoot.

  18. Cryopreservation of in vitro -grown shoot tips of apricot ( Prunus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In vitro grown apricot (Prunus armeniaca L.) cv. El-Hamawey shoot tips were successfully cryopreserved using an encapsulation-dehydration procedure. Shoot tips were encapsulated in calcium-alginate beads before preculture on woody plant (WP) medium supplemented with different sucrose concentrations; 0.1, 0.3, 0.5, ...

  19. Phylogenetic variation in the silicon composition of plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodson, M J; White, P J; Mead, A; Broadley, M R

    2005-11-01

    Silicon (Si) in plants provides structural support and improves tolerance to diseases, drought and metal toxicity. Shoot Si concentrations are generally considered to be greater in monocotyledonous than in non-monocot plant species. The phylogenetic variation in the shoot Si concentration of plants reported in the primary literature has been quantified. Studies were identified which reported Si concentrations in leaf or non-woody shoot tissues from at least two plant species growing in the same environment. Each study contained at least one species in common with another study. Meta-analysis of the data revealed that, in general, ferns, gymnosperms and angiosperms accumulated less Si in their shoots than non-vascular plant species and horsetails. Within angiosperms and ferns, differences in shoot Si concentration between species grouped by their higher-level phylogenetic position were identified. Within the angiosperms, species from the commelinoid monocot orders Poales and Arecales accumulated substantially more Si in their shoots than species from other monocot clades. A high shoot Si concentration is not a general feature of monocot species. Information on the phylogenetic variation in shoot Si concentration may provide useful palaeoecological and archaeological information, and inform studies of the biogeochemical cycling of Si and those of the molecular genetics of Si uptake and transport in plants.

  20. Tomato yield heterosis is triggered by a dosage sensitivity of the florigen pathway that fine-tunes shoot architecture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Jiang

    Full Text Available The superiority of hybrids has long been exploited in agriculture, and although many models explaining "heterosis" have been put forth, direct empirical support is limited. Particularly elusive have been cases of heterozygosity for single gene mutations causing heterosis under a genetic model known as overdominance. In tomato (Solanum lycopersicum, plants carrying mutations in SINGLE FLOWER TRUSS (SFT encoding the flowering hormone florigen are severely delayed in flowering, become extremely large, and produce few flowers and fruits, but when heterozygous, yields are dramatically increased. Curiously, this overdominance is evident only in the background of "determinate" plants, in which the continuous production of side shoots and inflorescences gradually halts due to a defect in the flowering repressor SELF PRUNING (SP. How sp facilitates sft overdominance is unclear, but is thought to relate to the opposing functions these genes have on flowering time and shoot architecture. We show that sft mutant heterozygosity (sft/+ causes weak semi-dominant delays in flowering of both primary and side shoots. Using transcriptome sequencing of shoot meristems, we demonstrate that this delay begins before seedling meristems become reproductive, followed by delays in subsequent side shoot meristems that, in turn, postpone the arrest of shoot and inflorescence production. Reducing SFT levels in sp plants by artificial microRNAs recapitulates the dose-dependent modification of shoot and inflorescence production of sft/+ heterozygotes, confirming that fine-tuning levels of functional SFT transcripts provides a foundation for higher yields. Finally, we show that although flowering delays by florigen mutant heterozygosity are conserved in Arabidopsis, increased yield is not, likely because cyclical flowering is absent. We suggest sft heterozygosity triggers a yield improvement by optimizing plant architecture via its dosage response in the florigen pathway

  1. A strategy for characterization of persistent heteroduplex DNA in higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chun-Bo; Mao, Jian-Feng; Suo, Yu-Jing; Shi, Le; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Ping-Dong; Kang, Xiang-Yang

    2014-10-01

    Heteroduplex DNA (hDNA) generated during homologous recombination (HR) is an important component that shapes genetic diversity in sexually reproducing organisms. However, studies of this process in higher plants are limited. This is because hDNAs are difficult to capture in higher plants as their reproductive developmental model only produces normal gametes and does not preserve the mitotic products of the post-meiotic segregation (PMS) process which is crucial for studying hDNAs. In this study, using the model system for tree and woody perennial plant biology (Populus), we propose a strategy for characterizing hDNAs in higher plants. We captured hDNAs by constructing triploid hybrids originating from a cross between unreduced 2n eggs (containing hDNA information as a result of inhibition chromosome segregation at the PMS stage) with normal male gametes. These triploid hybrids allowed us to detect the frequency and location of persistent hDNAs resulting from HR at the molecular level. We found that the frequency of persistent hDNAs, which ranged from 5.3 to 76.6%, was related to locations of the simple sequence repeat markers at the chromosomes, such as the locus-centromere distance, the surrounding DNA sequence and epigenetic information, and the richness of protein-coding transcripts at these loci. In summary, this study provides a method for characterizing persistent hDNAs in higher plants. When high-throughput sequencing techniques can be incorporated, genome-wide persistent hDNA assays for higher plants can be easily carried out using the strategy presented in this study. © 2014 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Shoot regeneration and micropropagation of Panax vietnamensis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The methods for leaf-derived callus induction, callus proliferation, adventitious shoot induction and plant regeneration of Vietnamese ginseng (Panax vietnamensis Ha et Grushv.) were examined. In this study, callus induction was formed on both medium containing 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) alone or in ...

  3. Physiological Disorders of Pear Shoot Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Physiological disorders are some of the most difficult challenges in micropropagation. Little is known of the causes of plant growth disorders which include callus formation, hyperhydricity, shoot tip necrosis, leaf lesions, epinasty, fasciation and hypertrophy. During our study of mineral nutritio...

  4. Shoot regeneration and micropropagation of Panax vietnamensis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-12-26

    Dec 26, 2011 ... Tay Nguyen Institute of Biology, 116 Xo Viet Nghe Tinh, Dalat, Lam Dong, Vietnam. Accepted 23 November, 2011. The methods for leaf-derived callus induction, callus proliferation, adventitious shoot induction and plant regeneration of Vietnamese ginseng (Panax vietnamensis Ha et Grushv.) ...

  5. Aquatic food production modules in bioregenerative life support systems based on higher plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluem, V.; Paris, F.

    Most bioregenerative life support systems (BLSS) are based on gravitropic higher plants which exhibit growth and seed generation disturbances in microgravity. Even when used for a lunar or martian base the reduced gravity may induce a decreased productivity in comparison to Earth. Therefore, the implementation of aquatic biomass production modules in higher plant and/or hybrid BLSS may compensate for this and offer, in addition, the possibility to produce animal protein for human nutrition. It was shown on the SLS-89 and SLS-90 space shuttle missions with the C.E.B.A.S.-MINI MODULE that the edible non gravitropic rootless higher aquatic plant Ceratophyllum demeresum exhibits an undisturbed high biomass production rate in space and that the teleost fish species, Xiphophorus helleri, adapts rapidly to space conditions without loss of its normal reproductive functions. Based on these findings a series of ground-based aquatic food production systems were developed which are disposed for utilization in space. These are plant production bioreactors for the species mentioned above and another suitable candidate, the lemnacean (duckweed) species, Wolffia arrhiza. Moreover, combined intensive aquaculture systems with a closed food loop between herbivorous fishes and aquatic and land plants are being developed which may be suitable for integration into a BLSS of higher complexity.

  6. Root : shoot ratios, optimization and nitrogen productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agren, Göran I; Franklin, Oskar

    2003-12-01

    Plants respond to nitrogen availability by changing their root : shoot ratios. One hypothesis used to explain this allocation is that plants optimize their behaviour by maximizing their relative growth rate. The consequences of this hypothesis were investigated by formulating two models for root : shoot allocation, with and without explicit inclusion of maintenance respiration. The models also took into account that relative growth rate is a linear function of plant nitrogen concentration. The model without respiration gave qualitatively reasonable results when predictions were compared with observed results from growth experiments with birch and tomato. The explicit inclusion of maintenance respiration improved considerably the agreement between prediction and observation, and for birch was within the experimental accuracy. Further improvements will require additional details in the description of respiratory processes and the nitrogen uptake function. Plants growing under extreme nutrient stress may also optimize their behaviour with respect to other variables in addition to relative growth rate.

  7. Shoot inversion-induced ethylene in Pharbitis nil induces the release of apical dominance by restricting shoot elongation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, T. K.; Cline, M. G.

    1985-01-01

    Shoot inversion induces outgrowth of the highest lateral bud (HLB) adjacent to the bend in the stem in Pharbitis nil. In order to determine whether or not ethylene produced by shoot inversion plays a direct role in promoting or inhibiting bud outgrowth, comparisons were made of endogenous levels of ethylene in the HLB and HLB node of plants with and without inverted shoots. That no changes were found suggests that the control of apical dominance does not involve the direction action of ethylene. This conclusion is further supported by evidence that the direct application of ethylene inhibitors or ethrel to inactive or induced lateral buds has no significant effect on bud outgrowth. The hypothesis that ethylene evolved during shoot inversion indirectly promotes the outgrowth of the highest lateral bud (HLB) in restricting terminal bud (TB) growth is found to be supported by the following observations: (1) the restriction of TB growth appears to occur before the beginning of HLB outgrowth; (2) the treatment of the inverted portion of the shoot with AgNO3, an inhibitor of ethylene action, dramatically eliminates both the restriction of TB growth and the promotion of HLB outgrowth which usually accompany shoot inversion; and (3) the treatment of the upper shoot of an upright plant with ethrel mimics shoot inversion by retarding upper shoot growth and inducing outgrowth of the lateral bud basipetal to the treated region.

  8. Morphogenesis of a higher plant from cultured cells and embryos in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krikorian, A. D.; Dutcher, F. R.; Quinn, C. E.; Steward, F. C.

    1982-01-01

    Reference is made to the Cosmos 782 experiment, which showed that cultured totipotent cells of carrot can give rise to embryos with well-developed roots but minimally developed shoots at near-zero g. The problem of whether the development of leafy shoots is sensitive to near-zero g conditions is considered. A test system that would allow this problem to be resolved in a future space flight is described.

  9. Somatic embryogenesis and enhanced shoot organogenesis in Metabriggsia ovalifolia W. T. Wang

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Yao; Chen, Yulu; Lü, Jinfeng; Teixeira da Silva, Jaime A.; Zhang, Xinhua; Ma, Guohua

    2016-01-01

    An efficient protocol providing a dual regeneration pathway via direct shoot organogenesis and somatic embryogenesis for an endangered species, Metabriggsia ovalifolia W. T. Wang, was established from leaf explants. When applied at 2.5 μM, the cytokinins 6-benzyladenine (BA) or thidiazuron (TDZ) and the auxins indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), α-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) could induce shoots when on basal Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium. BA and TDZ could induce more adventitious shoots (19.1 and 31.2/explant, respectively) than NAA (4.6/explant), IBA (5.7/explant) or IAA (6.4/explant). BA and TDZ at 5–10 μM could induce both shoots and somatic embryos. A higher concentration of TDZ (25 μM) induced only somatic embryos (39.8/explant). The same concentration of BA induced both adventitious shoots (23.6/explant) and somatic embryos (9.7/explant). Thus, somatic embryogenesis in this plant needs a high cytokinin concentration (BA; TDZ), as evidenced by histology. Somatic embryos germinated easily when left on the same media, but formed adventitious roots in two weeks on MS supplemented with 0.5 μM NAA, 0.5 μM IBA and 0.1% activated charcoal. Over 93% of plantlets survived following acclimatization and transfer to a mixture of sand and vermiculite (1:1, v/v) in trays. PMID:27090564

  10. REVIEW: The Early Application of Electrophoresis of Protein in Higher Plant Taxonomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SURANTO

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this research are firstly, to study the advantages of electrophoretic techniques. Secondly, to look at the usefulness of a few mediums support of electrophoretic proteins especially the acrylamide gel. Thirdly, to examine the number of plant organs which could be used as the sources of plant proteins, and how these plants protein should be applied in the medium support that has been selected. Besides, the staining and detection procedures would be described, while the application of electrophoretic approach in higher plant taxonomy will also be evaluated. In this study we recorded that a number of taxonomic problems usually caused by morphological complexity within species can be solved using this experimental approach of electrophoresis. This method has been considered very useful in helping taxonomists making decisions.

  11. Gene expression and regulation of higher plants under soil water stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Fu-Tai; Chu, Li-Ye; Shao, Hong-Bo; Liu, Zeng-Hui

    2009-06-01

    Higher plants not only provide human beings renewable food, building materials and energy, but also play the most important role in keeping a stable environment on earth. Plants differ from animals in many aspects, but the important is that plants are more easily influenced by environment than animals. Plants have a series of fine mechanisms for responding to environmental changes, which has been established during their long-period evolution and artificial domestication. The machinery related to molecular biology is the most important basis. The elucidation of it will extremely and purposefully promote the sustainable utilization of plant resources and make the best use of its current potential under different scales. This molecular mechanism at least includes drought signal recognition (input), signal transduction (many cascade biochemical reactions are involved in this process), signal output, signal responses and phenotype realization, which is a multi-dimension network system and contains many levels of gene expression and regulation. We will focus on the physiological and molecular adaptive machinery of plants under soil water stress and draw a possible blueprint for it. Meanwhile, the issues and perspectives are also discussed. We conclude that biological measures is the basic solution to solving various types of issues in relation to sustainable development and the plant measures is the eventual way.

  12. In vitro shoot multiplication and rooting from seedling explants of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BAP at 5 mg/l gave higher shoot multiplication compared with 0 – 2 mg/l BAP. Although axillary buds opened on cuttings treated with 0.1 to 2 mg/l TDZ, no elongation occurred. Shoots placed on 0.5 – 5 mg/l 2-iP produced roots but no axillary shoots. Indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) were tested for ...

  13. Design and optimization of an experimental bioregenerative life support system with higher plants and silkworms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Enzhu; Bartsev, Sergey I.; Zhao, Ming; Liu, Professor Hong

    The conceptual scheme of an experimental bioregenerative life support system (BLSS) for planetary exploration was designed, which consisted of four elements - human metabolism, higher plants, silkworms and waste treatment. 15 kinds of higher plants, such as wheat, rice, soybean, lettuce, mulberry, et al., were selected as regenerative component of BLSS providing the crew with air, water, and vegetable food. Silkworms, which producing animal nutrition for crews, were fed by mulberry-leaves during the first three instars, and lettuce leaves last two instars. The inedible biomass of higher plants, human wastes and silkworm feces were composted into soil like substrate, which can be reused by higher plants cultivation. Salt, sugar and some household material such as soap, shampoo would be provided from outside. To support the steady state of BLSS the same amount and elementary composition of dehydrated wastes were removed periodically. The balance of matter flows between BLSS components was described by the system of algebraic equations. The mass flows between the components were optimized by EXCEL spreadsheets and using Solver. The numerical method used in this study was Newton's method.

  14. Physiological aspects of the production and conversion of DMSP in marine algae and higher plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stefels, J

    Dimethylsulphoniopropionate (DMSP) is a compound produced in several classes of algae and higher plants that live in the marine environment. Considering its generally high intracellular concentrations, DMSP has a function in the osmotic protection of algal cells. Due to the relatively slow

  15. Diurnal adjustment in ultraviolet sunscreen protection is widespread among higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Paul W; Flint, Stephan D; Tobler, Mark A; Ryel, Ronald J

    2016-05-01

    The accumulation of ultraviolet (UV)-absorbing compounds (flavonoids and related phenylpropanoids) in the epidermis of higher plants reduces the penetration of solar UV radiation to underlying tissues and is a primary mechanism of acclimation to changing UV conditions resulting from ozone depletion and climate change. Previously we reported that several herbaceous plant species were capable of rapid, diurnal adjustments in epidermal UV transmittance (T UV), but how widespread this phenomenon is among plants has been unknown. In the present study, we tested the generality of this response by screening 37 species of various cultivated and wild plants growing in four locations spanning a gradient of ambient solar UV and climate (Hawaii, Utah, Idaho and Louisiana). Non-destructive measurements of adaxial T UV indicated that statistically significant midday decreases in T UV occurred in 49 % of the species tested, including both herbaceous and woody growth forms, and there was substantial interspecific variation in the magnitude of these changes. In general, plants in Louisiana exhibited larger diurnal changes in T UV than those in the other locations. Moreover, across all taxa, the magnitude of these changes was positively correlated with minimum daily air temperatures but not daily UV irradiances. Results indicate that diurnal changes in UV shielding are widespread among higher plants, vary both within and among species and tend to be greatest in herbaceous plants growing in warm environments. These findings suggest that plant species differ in their UV protection "strategies" though the functional and ecological significance of this variation in UV sunscreen protection remains unclear at present.

  16. Effect of Drying Methods on the Steroidal Alkaloid Content of Potato Peels, Shoots and Berries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Mohammad B; Brunton, Nigel P; Rai, Dilip K

    2016-03-25

    The present study has found that dried potato samples yielded significantly higher levels of steroidal alkaloids such as α-solanine and α-chaconine than the corresponding fresh samples, as determined by the UPLC-MS/MS technique. Among the drying techniques used, air drying had the highest effect on steroidal alkaloid contents, followed by freeze drying and vacuum oven drying. There was no significant difference between the freeze dried and vacuum oven dried samples in their α-chaconine contents. However, freeze dried potato shoots and berries had significantly higher α-solanine contents (825 µg/g dry weight (DW) in shoots and 2453 µg/g DW in berries) than the vacuum oven dried ones (325 µg/g dry weight (DW) in shoots and 2080 µg/g DW in berries). The kinetics of steroidal alkaloid contents of potato shoots during air drying were monitored over a period of 21 days. Both α-solanine and α-chaconine content increased to their maximum values, 875 µg/g DW and 3385 µg/g DW, respectively, after 7 days of drying. The steroidal alkaloid contents of the shoots decreased significantly at day 9, and then remained unchanged until day 21. In line with the potato shoots, air dried potato tuber peels also had higher steroidal alkaloid content than the freeze dried and vacuum oven dried samples. However, a significant decrease of steroidal alkaloid content was observed in air dried potato berries, possibly due to degradation during slicing of the whole berries prior to air drying. Remarkable variation in steroidal alkaloid contents among different tissue types of potato plants was observed with the potato flowers having the highest content.

  17. Effect of Drying Methods on the Steroidal Alkaloid Content of Potato Peels, Shoots and Berries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad B. Hossain

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study has found that dried potato samples yielded significantly higher levels of steroidal alkaloids such as α-solanine and α-chaconine than the corresponding fresh samples, as determined by the UPLC-MS/MS technique. Among the drying techniques used, air drying had the highest effect on steroidal alkaloid contents, followed by freeze drying and vacuum oven drying. There was no significant difference between the freeze dried and vacuum oven dried samples in their α-chaconine contents. However, freeze dried potato shoots and berries had significantly higher α-solanine contents (825 µg/g dry weight (DW in shoots and 2453 µg/g DW in berries than the vacuum oven dried ones (325 µg/g dry weight (DW in shoots and 2080 µg/g DW in berries. The kinetics of steroidal alkaloid contents of potato shoots during air drying were monitored over a period of 21 days. Both α-solanine and α-chaconine content increased to their maximum values, 875 µg/g DW and 3385 µg/g DW, respectively, after 7 days of drying. The steroidal alkaloid contents of the shoots decreased significantly at day 9, and then remained unchanged until day 21. In line with the potato shoots, air dried potato tuber peels also had higher steroidal alkaloid content than the freeze dried and vacuum oven dried samples. However, a significant decrease of steroidal alkaloid content was observed in air dried potato berries, possibly due to degradation during slicing of the whole berries prior to air drying. Remarkable variation in steroidal alkaloid contents among different tissue types of potato plants was observed with the potato flowers having the highest content.

  18. Phototolerance of lichens, mosses and higher plants in an alpine environment: analysis of photoreactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heber, U; Bilger, W; Bligny, R; Lange, O L

    2000-11-01

    Adaptation to excessive light is one of the requirements of survival in an alpine environment particularly for poikilohydric organisms which in contrast to the leaves of higher plants tolerate full dehydration. Changes in modulated chlorophyll fluorescence and 820-nm absorption were investigated in the lichens Xanthoria elegans (Link) Th. Fr. and Rhizocarpon geographicum (L.) DC, in the moss Grimmia alpestris Limpr. and the higher plants Geum montanum L., Gentiana lutea L. and Pisum sativum L., all collected at altitudes higher than 2000 m above sea level. In the dehydrated state, chlorophyll fluorescence was very low in the lichens and the moss, but high in the higher plants. It increased on rehydration in the lichens and the moss, but decreased in the higher plants. Light-induced charge separation in photosystem II was indicated by pulse-induced fluorescence increases only in dried leaves, not in the dry moss and dry lichens. Strong illumination caused photodamage in the dried leaves, but not in the dry moss and dry lichens. Light-dependent increases in 820-nm absorption revealed formation of potential quenchers of chlorophyll fluorescence in all dehydrated plants, but energy transfer to quenchers decreased chlorophyll fluorescence only in the moss and the lichens, not in the higher plants. In hydrated systems, coupled cyclic electron transport is suggested to occur concurrently with linear electron transport under strong actinic illumination particularly in the lichens because far more electrons became available after actinic illumination for the reduction of photo-oxidized P700 than were available in the pool of electron carriers between photosystems II and I. In the moss Grimmia, but not in the lichens or in leaves, light-dependent quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence was extensive even under nitrogen, indicating anaerobic thylakoid acidification by persistent cyclic electron transport. In the absence of actinic illumination, acidification by ca. 8% CO2 in

  19. Ferns: the missing link in shoot evolution and development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Robert George Plackett

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Shoot development in land plants is a remarkably complex process that gives rise to an extreme diversity of forms. Our current understanding of shoot developmental mechanisms comes almost entirely from studies of angiosperms (flowering plants, the most recently diverged plant lineage. Shoot development in angiosperms is based around a layered multicellular apical meristem that produces lateral organs and/or secondary meristems from populations of founder cells at its periphery. In contrast, non-seed plant shoots develop from either single apical initials or from a small population of morphologically distinct apical cells. Although developmental and molecular information is becoming available for non-flowering plants, such as the model moss Physcomitrella patens, making valid comparisons between highly divergent lineages is extremely challenging. As sister group to the seed plants, the monilophytes (ferns and relatives represent an excellent phylogenetic midpoint of comparison for unlocking the evolution of shoot developmental mechanisms, and recent technical advances have finally made transgenic analysis possible in the emerging model fern Ceratopteris richardii. This review compares and contrasts our current understanding of shoot development in different land plant lineages with the aim of highlighting the potential role that the fern C. richardii could play in shedding light on the evolution of underlying genetic regulatory mechanisms.

  20. Ferns: the missing link in shoot evolution and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plackett, Andrew R G; Di Stilio, Verónica S; Langdale, Jane A

    2015-01-01

    Shoot development in land plants is a remarkably complex process that gives rise to an extreme diversity of forms. Our current understanding of shoot developmental mechanisms comes almost entirely from studies of angiosperms (flowering plants), the most recently diverged plant lineage. Shoot development in angiosperms is based around a layered multicellular apical meristem that produces lateral organs and/or secondary meristems from populations of founder cells at its periphery. In contrast, non-seed plant shoots develop from either single apical initials or from a small population of morphologically distinct apical cells. Although developmental and molecular information is becoming available for non-flowering plants, such as the model moss Physcomitrella patens, making valid comparisons between highly divergent lineages is extremely challenging. As sister group to the seed plants, the monilophytes (ferns and relatives) represent an excellent phylogenetic midpoint of comparison for unlocking the evolution of shoot developmental mechanisms, and recent technical advances have finally made transgenic analysis possible in the emerging model fern Ceratopteris richardii. This review compares and contrasts our current understanding of shoot development in different land plant lineages with the aim of highlighting the potential role that the fern C. richardii could play in shedding light on the evolution of underlying genetic regulatory mechanisms.

  1. School Shootings Stun Reservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borja, Rhea R.; Cavanagh, Sean

    2005-01-01

    This article deals with the impact brought by the school shootings at Red Lake Indian Reservation in Minnesota to the school community. A deeply troubled 16-year-old student shot and killed seven other people and himself at a high school. The nation's deadliest school attack since the 1999 slayings at Colorado's suburban Columbine High School took…

  2. Red Pine Shoot Moth

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Hainze; David Hall

    The red pine shoot moth recently caused significant damage to red pine plantations in Minnesota, Wisconsin and Michigan. Trees of all ages have been attacked, but the most severe damage has occurred in 20-40 year old plantations growing on sandy soils.

  3. Distributed trouble-shooting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, W.M.; Bogaard, S.A.A. van den; Rasker, P.C.

    2004-01-01

    When knowledge, required for trouble-shooting at sea, can be supplied real-time but from a distance, problems, such as with the limited availability of specialists, and the high costs of maintenance, may be tackled. Unclear is, however, how this redistribution of knowledge will work in practice. We

  4. Regulation of cation transporter genes by the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis in rice plants subjected to salinity suggests improved salt tolerance due to reduced Na(+) root-to-shoot distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcel, Rosa; Aroca, Ricardo; Azcon, Rosario; Ruiz-Lozano, Juan Manuel

    2016-10-01

    Rice is a salt-sensitive crop whose productivity is strongly reduced by salinity around the world. Plants growing in saline soils are subjected to the toxicity of specific ions such as sodium, which damage cell organelles and disrupt metabolism. Plants have evolved biochemical and molecular mechanisms to cope with the negative effects of salinity. These include the regulation of genes with a role in the uptake, transport or compartmentation of Na(+) and/or K(+). Studies have shown that the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis alleviates salt stress in several host plant species. However, despite the abundant literature showing mitigation of ionic imbalance by the AM symbiosis, the molecular mechanisms involved are barely explored. The objective of this study was to elucidate the effects of the AM symbiosis on the expression of several well-known rice transporters involved in Na(+)/K(+) homeostasis and measure Na(+) and K(+) contents and their ratios in different plant tissues. Results showed that OsNHX3, OsSOS1, OsHKT2;1 and OsHKT1;5 genes were considerably upregulated in AM plants under saline conditions as compared to non-AM plants. Results suggest that the AM symbiosis favours Na(+) extrusion from the cytoplasm, its sequestration into the vacuole, the unloading of Na(+) from the xylem and its recirculation from photosynthetic organs to roots. As a result, there is a decrease of Na(+) root-to-shoot distribution and an increase of Na(+) accumulation in rice roots which seems to enhance the plant tolerance to salinity and allows AM rice plants to maintain their growing processes under salt conditions.

  5. Plant species richness sustains higher trophic levels of soil nematode communities after consecutive environmental perturbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesarz, Simone; Ciobanu, Marcel; Wright, Alexandra J; Ebeling, Anne; Vogel, Anja; Weisser, Wolfgang W; Eisenhauer, Nico

    2017-07-01

    The magnitude and frequency of extreme weather events are predicted to increase in the future due to ongoing climate change. In particular, floods and droughts resulting from climate change are thought to alter the ecosystem functions and stability. However, knowledge of the effects of these weather events on soil fauna is scarce, although they are key towards functioning of terrestrial ecosystems. Plant species richness has been shown to affect the stability of ecosystem functions and food webs. Here, we used the occurrence of a natural flood in a biodiversity grassland experiment that was followed by a simulated summer drought experiment, to investigate the interactive effects of plant species richness, a natural flood, and a subsequent summer drought on nematode communities. Three and five months after the natural flooding, effects of flooding severity were still detectable in the belowground system. We found that flooding severity decreased soil nematode food-web structure (loss of K-strategists) and the abundance of plant feeding nematodes. However, high plant species richness maintained higher diversity and abundance of higher trophic levels compared to monocultures throughout the flood. The subsequent summer drought seemed to be of lower importance but reversed negative flooding effects in some cases. This probably occurred because the studied grassland system is well adapted to drought, or because drought conditions alleviated the negative impact of long-term soil waterlogging. Using soil nematodes as indicator taxa, this study suggests that high plant species richness can maintain soil food web complexity after consecutive environmental perturbations.

  6. The Binomial Distribution in Shooting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalikias, Miltiadis S.

    2009-01-01

    The binomial distribution is used to predict the winner of the 49th International Shooting Sport Federation World Championship in double trap shooting held in 2006 in Zagreb, Croatia. The outcome of the competition was definitely unexpected.

  7. Accuracy of Skill Performance in the Basketball Free Throw Shooting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igawa Shoji

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study were to investigates how timing of shot of skilled player and assess performance accuracy of free throw shooting. Ten college students participated in this study (5 skilled players, and 5 naïve participants aged 18-23 years. They performed free throw shooting at 10 times. Shooting seen was recorded three cameras and analyzed shooting successful rate, off-target distance (the distance between the basketball through point and the center of the goal and shot timing. Shot timing was not significant difference. Shooting successful rate of skilled players was higher than unskilled players. Offtarget distance of skilled players was significant smaller than naive player. Consequently, skilled player is possible to aim at the center of the goal and shooting near the center of goal.

  8. Species-specific effects of live roots and shoot litter on soil decomposer abundances do not forecast plant litter-nitrogen uptake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saj, Stéphane; Mikola, Juha; Ekelund, Flemming

    2009-01-01

    Plant species produce litter of varying quality and differ in the quality and quantity of compounds they release from live roots, which both can induce different decomposer growth in the soil. To test whether differences in decomposer growth can forecast the amount of N species acquire from plant...... microbes and their protozoan and nematode feeders, and to link decomposer growth and plant nutrient uptake, we measured the amount of N taken up by plants from the added litter. We hypothesised that those species that induce the highest growth of microbes, and especially that of microbial feeders......-specific ability of plants to induce decomposer growth....

  9. A Real Shooting Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for movie of A Real Shooting Star This artist's animation illustrates a star flying through our galaxy at supersonic speeds, leaving a 13-light-year-long trail of glowing material in its wake. The star, named Mira (pronounced my-rah) after the latin word for 'wonderful,' sheds material that will be recycled into new stars, planets and possibly even life. NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer discovered the long trail of material behind Mira during its survey of the entire sky in ultraviolet light. The animation begins by showing a close-up of Mira -- a red-giant star near the end of its life. Red giants are red in color and extremely bloated; for example, if a red giant were to replace our sun, it would engulf everything out to the orbit of Mars. They constantly blow off gas and dust in the form of stellar winds, supplying the galaxy with molecules, such as oxygen and carbon, that will make their way into new solar systems. Our sun will mature into a red giant in about 5 billion years. As the animation pulls out, we can see the enormous trail of material deposited behind Mira as it hurls along between the stars. Like a boat traveling through water, a bow shock, or build up of gas, forms ahead of the star in the direction of its motion. Gas in the bow shock is heated and then mixes with the cool hydrogen gas in the wind that is blowing off Mira. This heated hydrogen gas then flows around behind the star, forming a turbulent wake. Why does the trailing hydrogen gas glow in ultraviolet light? When it is heated, it transitions into a higher-energy state, which then loses energy by emitting ultraviolet light - a process known as fluorescence. Finally, the artist's rendering gives way to the actual ultraviolet image taken by the Galaxy Evolution Explorer Mira is located 350 light-years from Earth in the constellation Cetus, otherwise known as the whale. Coincidentally, Mira and its 'whale of a tail' can be

  10. Higher plant modelling for life support applications: first results of a simple mechanistic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hezard, Pauline; Dussap, Claude-Gilles; Sasidharan L, Swathy

    2012-07-01

    In the case of closed ecological life support systems, the air and water regeneration and food production are performed using microorganisms and higher plants. Wheat, rice, soybean, lettuce, tomato or other types of eatable annual plants produce fresh food while recycling CO2 into breathable oxygen. Additionally, they evaporate a large quantity of water, which can be condensed and used as potable water. This shows that recycling functions of air revitalization and food production are completely linked. Consequently, the control of a growth chamber for higher plant production has to be performed with efficient mechanistic models, in order to ensure a realistic prediction of plant behaviour, water and gas recycling whatever the environmental conditions. Purely mechanistic models of plant production in controlled environments are not available yet. This is the reason why new models must be developed and validated. This work concerns the design and test of a simplified version of a mathematical model coupling plant architecture and mass balance purposes in order to compare its results with available data of lettuce grown in closed and controlled chambers. The carbon exchange rate, water absorption and evaporation rate, biomass fresh weight as well as leaf surface are modelled and compared with available data. The model consists of four modules. The first one evaluates plant architecture, like total leaf surface, leaf area index and stem length data. The second one calculates the rate of matter and energy exchange depending on architectural and environmental data: light absorption in the canopy, CO2 uptake or release, water uptake and evapotranspiration. The third module evaluates which of the previous rates is limiting overall biomass growth; and the last one calculates biomass growth rate depending on matter exchange rates, using a global stoichiometric equation. All these rates are a set of differential equations, which are integrated with time in order to provide

  11. Shooting under cardiovascular load: Electroencephalographic activity in preparation for biathlon shooting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallicchio, Germano; Finkenzeller, Thomas; Sattlecker, Gerold; Lindinger, Stefan; Hoedlmoser, Kerstin

    2016-11-01

    This study explored the influence of sub-maximal cardiovascular load on electroencephalographic (EEG) activity preceding biathlon shooting. Frontal-midline theta and alpha power were examined to assess monitoring processes and cortical inhibition, respectively. Thirteen experienced biathletes (mean age: 17years; 5 males, 8 females) fired sets of five consecutive shots from the standing position at a 50-meter-distant target, under two fixed-order conditions: (i) at rest and (ii) immediately after 3-minute exercise on a bicycle ergometer at 90% of maximum heart rate (HR). HR and rate of physical exertion (RPE) were measured as manipulation checks. Shooting accuracy was assessed in target rings for each shot. Frontal-midline theta and alpha power were computed in the last second preceding each shot from average-reference 61-channel EEG and inter-individual differences were minimized through a median-scaled log transformation (Appendix). HR and RPE increased under cardiovascular load, however, shooting accuracy did not change. Pre-shooting frontal-midline theta power decreased, whereas alpha power increased over temporal and occipital - but not central - regions. These changes were larger for greater HR values. Additionally, higher frontal-midline theta, lower left-central alpha, and higher left-temporal alpha power were associated with more accurate shooting. These findings suggest that monitoring processes are beneficial to shooting performance but can be impaired by sub-maximal cardiovascular load. Greater inhibition of movement-irrelevant regions (temporal, occipital) and concomitant activation of movement-related regions (central) indicate that greater neural efficiency is beneficial to shooting performance and can allow trained biathletes to shoot accurately despite physically demanding conditions. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparative analysis of microsatellites in chloroplast genomes of lower and higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Biju; Bhatt, Bhavin S; Awasthi, Mayur; George, Binu; Singh, Achuit K

    2015-11-01

    Microsatellites, or simple sequence repeats (SSRs), contain repetitive DNA sequence where tandem repeats of one to six base pairs are present number of times. Chloroplast genome sequences have been  shown to possess extensive variations in the length, number and distribution of SSRs. However, a comparative analysis of chloroplast microsatellites is not available. Considering their potential importance in generating genomic diversity, we have systematically analysed the abundance and distribution of simple and compound microsatellites in 164 sequenced chloroplast genomes from wide range of plants. The key findings of these studies are (1) a large number of mononucleotide repeats as compared to SSR(2-6)(di-, tri-, tetra-, penta-, hexanucleotide repeats) are present in all chloroplast genomes investigated, (2) lower plants such as algae show wide variation in relative abundance, density and distribution of microsatellite repeats as compared to flowering plants, (3) longer SSRs are excluded from coding regions of most chloroplast genomes, (4) GC content has a weak influence on number, relative abundance and relative density of mononucleotide as well as SSR(2-6). However, GC content strongly showed negative correlation with relative density (R (2) = 0.5, P plants possesses relatively more genomic diversity compared to higher plants.

  13. Evolutionary history and stress regulation of the lectin superfamily in higher plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandran Srinivasan

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lectins are a class of carbohydrate-binding proteins. They play roles in various biological processes. However, little is known about their evolutionary history and their functions in plant stress regulation. The availability of full genome sequences from various plant species makes it possible to perform a whole-genome exploration for further understanding their biological functions. Results Higher plant genomes encode large numbers of lectin proteins. Based on their domain structures and phylogenetic analyses, a new classification system has been proposed. In this system, 12 different families have been classified and four of them consist of recently identified plant lectin members. Further analyses show that some of lectin families exhibit species-specific expansion and rapid birth-and-death evolution. Tandem and segmental duplications have been regarded as the major mechanisms to drive lectin expansion although retrogenes also significantly contributed to the birth of new lectin genes in soybean and rice. Evidence shows that lectin genes have been involved in biotic/abiotic stress regulations and tandem/segmental duplications may be regarded as drivers for plants to adapt various environmental stresses through duplication followed by expression divergence. Each member of this gene superfamily may play specialized roles in a specific stress condition and function as a regulator of various environmental factors such as cold, drought and high salinity as well as biotic stresses. Conclusions Our studies provide a new outline of the plant lectin gene superfamily and advance the understanding of plant lectin genes in lineage-specific expansion and their functions in biotic/abiotic stress-related developmental processes.

  14. Shooting Star Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The Shooting Star Experiment (SSE) is designed to develop and demonstrate the technology required to focus the sun's energy and use the energy for inexpensive space Propulsion Research. Pictured is an engineering model (Pathfinder III) of the Shooting Star Experiment (SSE). This model was used to test and characterize the motion and deformation of the structure caused by thermal effects. In this photograph, alignment targets are being placed on the engineering model so that a theodolite (alignment telescope) could be used to accurately measure the deformation and deflections of the engineering model under extreme conditions, such as the coldness of deep space and the hotness of the sun as well as vacuum. This thermal vacuum test was performed at the X-Ray Calibration Facility because of the size of the test article and the capabilities of the facility to simulate in-orbit conditions

  15. The CW domain, a structural module shared amongst vertebrates, vertebrate-infecting parasites and higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Jason; Zhao, Yunde

    2003-11-01

    A previously undetected domain, named CW for its conserved cysteine and tryptophan residues, appears to be a four-cysteine zinc-finger motif found exclusively in vertebrates, vertebrate-infecting parasites and higher plants. Of the twelve distinct nuclear protein families that comprise the CW domain-containing superfamily, only the microrchida (MORC) family has begun to be characterized. However, several families contain other domains suggesting a relationship between the CW domain and either chromatin methylation status or early embryonic development.

  16. Altered allocation to roots and shoots in the endophyte-infected seedlings of Puccinellia distans (Poaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnoleski, M; Olejniczak, P; Górzyńska, K; Kozłowski, J; Lembicz, M

    2013-03-01

    Endophytes play an important role in ecological and evolutionary processes in plants and have marked economic value. Seed-transmitted fungal endophytes are conventionally regarded as mutualistic symbionts, but their fitness consequences for the offspring of the host are not clear. Puccinellia distans infected with the fungus Epichloë typhina (E+) produces seeds that are several times smaller than normal (E-). This observation suggests that the E+ seedlings face a developmental disadvantage. Our growth chamber experiments compared the germination rates of the small E+ and large E- seeds of P. distans and examined the biomass allocation of seedlings to roots and shoots. The E+ seedlings germinated more slowly and maintained shorter shoots and a smaller root biomass for 30-50 days after sowing. Despite this disadvantage, the E+ plants more quickly increased their total size, attaining a larger shoot and whole-plant biomass. The shoot:root biomass ratio increased more rapidly through time in the E+ seedlings, attaining a value nine times higher in the E+ than the E- group 50 days after sowing. Such differences between the E+ and E- seedlings were not explained by the growth allometry between shoots and roots. The seedlings of P. distans infected with the Epichloë endophyte were initially handicapped by their postponed emergence, but this disadvantage was quickly overcome by their superior growth capacity. The decrease in the relative allocation to roots may indicate that endophytes increase the performance of roots as resource-acquiring organs and/or reduce the role of roots in protection against herbivores. © 2012 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  17. Chemostratigraphic evidence of higher-plant evolution in the Taranaki Basin, New Zealand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Killops, S.D.; Raine, J.I.; Woolhouse, A.D.; Weston, R.J. [Institute of Geology and Nuclear Science, Lower Hutt (New Zealand)

    1995-05-01

    Correlation between palynological and biomarker records of higher-plant development during the Cretaceous and Paleogene in Taranaki Basin, New Zealand is good. Gymnosperms, particularly podocarps, were the chief members of coastal plain swamp flora during the Late Cretaceous, and contributed significant quantities of diterpanes, often dominated by isopimarane, to organic-rich sediments. Angiosperms increased in relative abundance through the Paleocene and became the dominant higher plants in the Eocene; their contributions to coaly sediments are characterized by various triterpanes, particularly 18 alpha(H)-oleanane and its C-24 A-ring degraded counterpart. This change in dominance of higher-land groups can be followed by the use of an angiosperm/gymnosperm index (AGI) based on the relative concentrations of selected triterpanes and diterpanes in m/z 191 and m/z 123 mass chromatograms. Plant biomarker distributions do not provide as precise age indications as do pollen assemblages, but they may be more representative of the vegetation growing in a particular area of a peat swamp.

  18. Shoot tip culture and thermotherapy for recovering virus-free plants of garlic Cultura de ápices caulinares e termoterapia na recuperação de plantas livres de vírus de alho

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Carlos Torres

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available Garlic shoot tip culture associated with dry heat thermotherapy (cloves exposed to 37°C for 35 days were essential for recovering virus free plants of the cv Amarante. In this condition 70% of the explants developed in vitro and produced plants. A total of 77% of those plants was virus free when indexed by ISEM, which resulted in a final index of 54% of virus free plants from treated cloves. The percentage of regeneration decreased to 20% as the temperature increased up to 40°C. However 90% of those plants were virus free, leading to a final index of 18% virus free plants out of treated cloves.A cultura de ápices caulinares de alho, associada à termoterapia a seco (exposição dos bulbilhos a temperatura de 37°C, por um período de 35 dias foi essencial para recuperação de plantas livres de vírus das cultivar de alho Amarante. Nestas condições, 70% dos explantes inoculados se desenvolveram in vitro e produziram plantas, das quais 77% não apresentaram partículas virais quando indexadas por ISEM. Isto resulta em um índice de aproveitamento de 54% dos bulbilhos submetidos à termoterapia. O aumento da temperatura na termoterapia para 40°C reduziu a regeneração in vitro para 20%, e 90% dessas plantas estavam livres de vírus, com um índice final de aproveitamento de 18%.

  19. Contagion in Mass Killings and School Shootings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherry Towers

    Full Text Available Several past studies have found that media reports of suicides and homicides appear to subsequently increase the incidence of similar events in the community, apparently due to the coverage planting the seeds of ideation in at-risk individuals to commit similar acts.Here we explore whether or not contagion is evident in more high-profile incidents, such as school shootings and mass killings (incidents with four or more people killed. We fit a contagion model to recent data sets related to such incidents in the US, with terms that take into account the fact that a school shooting or mass murder may temporarily increase the probability of a similar event in the immediate future, by assuming an exponential decay in contagiousness after an event.We find significant evidence that mass killings involving firearms are incented by similar events in the immediate past. On average, this temporary increase in probability lasts 13 days, and each incident incites at least 0.30 new incidents (p = 0.0015. We also find significant evidence of contagion in school shootings, for which an incident is contagious for an average of 13 days, and incites an average of at least 0.22 new incidents (p = 0.0001. All p-values are assessed based on a likelihood ratio test comparing the likelihood of a contagion model to that of a null model with no contagion. On average, mass killings involving firearms occur approximately every two weeks in the US, while school shootings occur on average monthly. We find that state prevalence of firearm ownership is significantly associated with the state incidence of mass killings with firearms, school shootings, and mass shootings.

  20. Contagion in Mass Killings and School Shootings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towers, Sherry; Gomez-Lievano, Andres; Khan, Maryam; Mubayi, Anuj; Castillo-Chavez, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Several past studies have found that media reports of suicides and homicides appear to subsequently increase the incidence of similar events in the community, apparently due to the coverage planting the seeds of ideation in at-risk individuals to commit similar acts. Here we explore whether or not contagion is evident in more high-profile incidents, such as school shootings and mass killings (incidents with four or more people killed). We fit a contagion model to recent data sets related to such incidents in the US, with terms that take into account the fact that a school shooting or mass murder may temporarily increase the probability of a similar event in the immediate future, by assuming an exponential decay in contagiousness after an event. We find significant evidence that mass killings involving firearms are incented by similar events in the immediate past. On average, this temporary increase in probability lasts 13 days, and each incident incites at least 0.30 new incidents (p = 0.0015). We also find significant evidence of contagion in school shootings, for which an incident is contagious for an average of 13 days, and incites an average of at least 0.22 new incidents (p = 0.0001). All p-values are assessed based on a likelihood ratio test comparing the likelihood of a contagion model to that of a null model with no contagion. On average, mass killings involving firearms occur approximately every two weeks in the US, while school shootings occur on average monthly. We find that state prevalence of firearm ownership is significantly associated with the state incidence of mass killings with firearms, school shootings, and mass shootings.

  1. The main goals of experiments with the higher plants in the project MARS - 500.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sychev, Vladimir; Levinskikh, Margarita; Podolsky, Igor; Gushin, Vadim; Bingham, Gail; Bates, Scott

    At the present step of development of manned flight to Mars there is a current opinion that including a greenhouse in the composition of Life Support Systems (LSS) of Martian expedition would essentially improve a spacecraft habitat conditions and also would have impact to preventing of a number of possible consequences of continuous presence of human in artificial environment. Development of design objectives of future space greenhouses applicable for conditions of Martian expedition should be based, in our opinion, not only on the results of real space experiments, conducted onboard of orbital stations, but also on the results of ground-based experiments. In connection with above considerations there is a number of technological, biological and psychological experiments is planned to be conducted in the frame of MARS-500 project to resolve questions related to incorporation of higher plants in LSS of inter-planetary flights. The questions include: testing of developed elements of the greenhouse construction and methods for cultivation of vegetables under conditions of imitation of the flight of Martian expedition; selection of breeds and species of vegetables, characterized by high speed of biomass accumulation, attractive taste and appearance; investigation of growth, development and metabolism of plants under long-term continuous cultivation in manned pressurized object; comparison of the productivity of the plants as a function of utilization of different light source; determination of maximum amount of planted biomass of the plants and number of possible vegetation under conditions of long-term utilization of vegetation chamber of the greenhouse without substrate replacement; investigation of crops dietetic preferences of crew members; estimation of quality of plant biomass using seeding of the plants by microorganisms and nitrates and vitamins content as markers; development and approbation of methodical approaches to estimation of psychological factors of

  2. From plants to birds: higher avian predation rates in trees responding to insect herbivory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elina Mäntylä

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: An understanding of the evolution of potential signals from plants to the predators of their herbivores may provide exciting examples of co-evolution among multiple trophic levels. Understanding the mechanism behind the attraction of predators to plants is crucial to conclusions about co-evolution. For example, insectivorous birds are attracted to herbivore-damaged trees without seeing the herbivores or the defoliated parts, but it is not known whether birds use cues from herbivore-damaged plants with a specific adaptation of plants for this purpose. METHODOLOGY: We examined whether signals from damaged trees attract avian predators in the wild and whether birds could use volatile organic compound (VOC emissions or net photosynthesis of leaves as cues to detect herbivore-rich trees. We conducted a field experiment with mountain birches (Betula pubescens ssp. czerepanovii, their main herbivore (Epirrita autumnata and insectivorous birds. Half of the trees had herbivore larvae defoliating trees hidden inside branch bags and half had empty bags as controls. We measured predation rate of birds towards artificial larvae on tree branches, and VOC emissions and net photosynthesis of leaves. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS AND SIGNIFICANCE: The predation rate was higher in the herbivore trees than in the control trees. This confirms that birds use cues from trees to locate insect-rich trees in the wild. The herbivore trees had decreased photosynthesis and elevated emissions of many VOCs, which suggests that birds could use either one, or both, as cues. There was, however, large variation in how the VOC emission correlated with predation rate. Emissions of (E-DMNT [(E-4,8-dimethyl-1,3,7-nonatriene], beta-ocimene and linalool were positively correlated with predation rate, while those of highly inducible green leaf volatiles were not. These three VOCs are also involved in the attraction of insect parasitoids and predatory mites to herbivore-damaged plants

  3. Effect of lanthanum on rooting of in vitro regenerated shoots of Saussurea involucrata Kar. et Kir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Bin; Xu, Ling-Ling; Guan, Zhen-Jun; Wei, Ya-Hui

    2012-06-01

    In present study, the effect of lanthanum (La) on the rooting of regenerated shoots of Saussurea involucrata Kar. et Kir was analyzed. Rooting occurred from regenerated shoots inoculated on a medium supplemented with La, the plant rooting hormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), or both La and IAA together. The highest rooting efficiency (96%), root number/shoot (8.5), and root length (63 mm) were recorded in shoots cultured on medium containing 2.5 μM IAA combined with 100 μM La(3+). In order to elucidate the mechanism of rooting enhancement by La, we examined dynamic changes in antioxidant enzyme activities in plant tissue over time in culture. We found that the activities of peroxidase (POX) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were significantly higher in plant tissue cultured in IAA plus La than in La or IAA alone. At the same time, the highest H(2)O(2) content was detected in plant tissue in the presence of 2.5 μM IAA plus 100 μM La(3+). In light of these data and previous results, we speculate that La enhanced IAA-induced rooting by acting as a mild abiotic stress to stimulate POX and SOD activities in plant cells. Then, IAA reacted with oxygen and POX to form the ternary complex enzyme-IAA-O(2) that dissociated into IAA radicals and O(2)(-). Subsequently, IAA-induced O(2)(-) readily converted to hydroxyl radical (HO·) via SOD-catalyzed dismutation. Finally, cell wall loosening and cell elongation occurred as a consequence of HO-dependent scission of wall components, leading to root growth. The treatment of IAA combined with La resulted in the highest plantlet survival (80%) compared to single treatments with IAA or La alone. These data suggest that rare earth elements enhance root morphogenesis and the growth of S. involucrata.

  4. Regeneration and growth rates of allofragments in four common stream plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Tenna; Madsen, Tom Vindbæk; Sennels, R. S. H.

    2009-01-01

    Colonisation by stream plants occurs to a large extent from simple stem fragments. Allofragments are stem fragments formed by mechanical breakage. We studied regeneration, colonisation, and growth rates in four common stream plants: Elodea canadensis Michx., Myriophyllum spicatum L., Potamogeton...... perfoliatus L. and Ranunculus baudotii x pseudofluitans. The objectives of this study were to determine (1) if shoots with an apical tip have higher regeneration (growth of new shoots and rhizomes from allofragments) and colonisation (root attachment in sediment) abilities and higher relative growth rates...... (RGR) than shoots without an apical tip, and (2) if fragment size correlates with regeneration and colonisation abilities and with RGR of fragments. For all species, over 60% of fragments regenerated new shoots and colonised. Apical shoots and larger fragments generally had higher regeneration...

  5. Plasticity of shoot and needle morphology and photosynthesis of two Picea species with different site preferences in northern Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Hiroaki; Kitaoka, Satoshi; Fujisaki, Taiji; Maruyama, Yutaka; Koike, Takayoshi

    2007-11-01

    We compared shoot and needle morphology and photosynthesis in Picea glehnii (Friedr. Schmidt) M.T. Mast. and Picea jezoensis (Sieb. et Zucc.) Carr. trees planted on immature volcanic ash and well-developed brown forest soils to investigate whether species differences in morphological and physiological plasticity affected tree growth on different soil types. Height growth of P. glehnii was reduced by about 10% on volcanic ash compared with forest soil, whereas that of P. jezoensis was reduced by more than 60%. Needle morphology of P. glehnii was unaffected by soil type. In contrast, needles of P. jezoensis trees growing on volcanic ash were shorter, narrower and thicker, with less dry mass and area, than those of trees growing on forest soil, and specific needle area was lower, indicating lower foliar light-interception efficiency. In both species, changes in needle morphology with increasing irradiance were similar in trees growing on both soil types, indicating that plasticity of needle morphology was unaffected by soil type. In both species, shoot mass and shoot silhouette area were lower and needle mass per unit shoot mass was higher in trees growing on volcanic ash than in trees growing on forest soil. Trees of both species had more needles per unit shoot length, lower shoot silhouette to projected needle area ratios and lower shoot silhouette areas per unit shoot mass (SAM) on volcanic ash than on forest soil, indicating lower shoot-level light-interception efficiency. For P. glehnii, the response of shoot morphology to increasing irradiance was similar on both soil types, with the exception of SAM, which showed lower plasticity in trees growing on volcanic ash. In contrast, shoot-level morphological plasticity of P. jezoensis was reduced in trees growing on volcanic ash. Light-saturated maximum photosynthetic rate (P(max)) of P. glehnii was unaffected by soil type, whereas mass-based P(max) of P. jezoensis was lower in trees growing on volcanic ash than in

  6. Roles of Organic Acid Anion Secretion in Aluminium Tolerance of Higher Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lin-Tong; Qi, Yi-Ping; Jiang, Huan-Xin; Chen, Li-Song

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 30% of the world's total land area and over 50% of the world's potential arable lands are acidic. Furthermore, the acidity of the soils is gradually increasing as a result of the environmental problems including some farming practices and acid rain. At mildly acidic or neutral soils, aluminium(Al) occurs primarily as insoluble deposits and is essentially biologically inactive. However, in many acidic soils throughout the tropics and subtropics, Al toxicity is a major factor limiting crop productivity. The Al-induced secretion of organic acid (OA) anions, mainly citrate, oxalate, and malate, from roots is the best documented mechanism of Al tolerance in higher plants. Increasing evidence shows that the Al-induced secretion of OA anions may be related to the following several factors, including (a) anion channels or transporters, (b) internal concentrations of OA anions in plant tissues, (d) temperature, (e) root plasma membrane (PM) H+-ATPase, (f) magnesium (Mg), and (e) phosphorus (P). Genetically modified plants and cells with higher Al tolerance by overexpressing genes for the secretion and the biosynthesis of OA anions have been obtained. In addition, some aspects needed to be further studied are also discussed. PMID:23509687

  7. Roles of Organic Acid Anion Secretion in Aluminium Tolerance of Higher Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin-Tong Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 30% of the world’s total land area and over 50% of the world’s potential arable lands are acidic. Furthermore, the acidity of the soils is gradually increasing as a result of the environmental problems including some farming practices and acid rain. At mildly acidic or neutral soils, aluminium(Al occurs primarily as insoluble deposits and is essentially biologically inactive. However, in many acidic soils throughout the tropics and subtropics, Al toxicity is a major factor limiting crop productivity. The Al-induced secretion of organic acid (OA anions, mainly citrate, oxalate, and malate, from roots is the best documented mechanism of Al tolerance in higher plants. Increasing evidence shows that the Al-induced secretion of OA anions may be related to the following several factors, including (a anion channels or transporters, (b internal concentrations of OA anions in plant tissues, (d temperature, (e root plasma membrane (PM H+-ATPase, (f magnesium (Mg, and (e phosphorus (P. Genetically modified plants and cells with higher Al tolerance by overexpressing genes for the secretion and the biosynthesis of OA anions have been obtained. In addition, some aspects needed to be further studied are also discussed.

  8. Formation of higher plant component microbial community in closed ecological system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirranen, L. S.

    2001-07-01

    Closed ecological systems (CES) place at the disposal of a researcher unique possibilities to study the role of microbial communities in individual components and of the entire system. The microbial community of the higher plant component has been found to form depending on specific conditions of the closed ecosystem: length of time the solution is reused, introduction of intrasystem waste water into the nutrient medium, effect of other component of the system, and system closure in terms of gas exchange. The higher plant component formed its own microbial complex different from that formed prior to closure. The microbial complex of vegetable polyculture is more diverse and stable than the monoculture of wheat. The composition of the components' microflora changed, species diversity decreased, individual species of bacteria and fungi whose numbers were not so great before the closure prevailed. Special attention should be paid to phytopathogenic and conditionally pathogenic species of microorganisms potentially hazardous to man or plants and the least controlled in CES. This situation can endanger creation of CES and make conjectural existence of preplanned components, man, specifically, and consequently, of CES as it is.

  9. Regulation of photosynthesis by ion channels in cyanobacteria and higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checchetto, Vanessa; Teardo, Enrico; Carraretto, Luca; Formentin, Elide; Bergantino, Elisabetta; Giacometti, Giorgio Mario; Szabo, Ildiko

    2013-12-01

    Photosynthesis converts light energy into chemical energy, and supplies ATP and NADPH for CO2 fixation into carbohydrates and for the synthesis of several compounds which are essential for autotrophic growth. Oxygenic photosynthesis takes place in thylakoid membranes of chloroplasts and photosynthetic prokaryote cyanobacteria. An ancestral photoautotrophic prokaryote related to cyanobacteria has been proposed to give rise to chloroplasts of plants and algae through an endosymbiotic event. Indeed, photosynthetic complexes involved in the electron transport coupled to H(+) translocation and ATP synthesis are similar in higher plants and cyanobacteria. Furthermore, some of the protein and solute/ion conducting machineries also share common structure and function. Electrophysiological and biochemical evidence support the existence of ion channels in the thylakoid membrane in both types of organisms. By allowing specific ion fluxes across thylakoid membranes, ion channels have been hypothesized to either directly or indirectly regulate photosynthesis, by modulating the proton motive force. Recent molecular identification of some of the thylakoid-located channels allowed to obtain genetic proof in favor of such hypothesis. Furthermore, some ion channels of the envelope membrane in chloroplasts have also been shown to impact on this light-driven process. Here we give an overview of thylakoid/chloroplast located ion channels of higher plants and of cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. We focus on channels shown to be implicated in the regulation of photosynthesis and discuss the possible mechanisms of action. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Composition, architecture and dynamics of the photosynthetic apparatus in higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevo, Reinat; Charuvi, Dana; Tsabari, Onie; Reich, Ziv

    2012-04-01

    The process of oxygenic photosynthesis enabled and still sustains aerobic life on Earth. The most elaborate form of the apparatus that carries out the primary steps of this vital process is the one present in higher plants. Here, we review the overall composition and supramolecular organization of this apparatus, as well as the complex architecture of the lamellar system within which it is harbored. Along the way, we refer to the genetic, biochemical, spectroscopic and, in particular, microscopic studies that have been employed to elucidate the structure and working of this remarkable molecular energy conversion device. As an example of the highly dynamic nature of the apparatus, we discuss the molecular and structural events that enable it to maintain high photosynthetic yields under fluctuating light conditions. We conclude the review with a summary of the hypotheses made over the years about the driving forces that underlie the partition of the lamellar system of higher plants and certain green algae into appressed and non-appressed membrane domains and the segregation of the photosynthetic protein complexes within these domains. © 2012 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Improved recovery of cryotherapy-treated shoot tips following thermotherapy of in vitro-grown stock shoots of raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiaochun; Valkonen, Jari P T

    2009-01-01

    Raspberry bushy dwarf virus (RBDV) can be efficiently eradicated from raspberry plants (Rubus idaeus) by a procedure combining thermotherapy and cryotherapy. However, the bottleneck of this procedure is that, following thermotherapy, cryopreserved shoot tips become chlorotic during regrowth and eventually die after several subcultures. In addition, survival of heat-treated stock shoots and recovery of cryopreserved shoot tips following thermotherapy are low. The present study focused towards improving regrowth of cryopreserved raspberry shoot tips following thermotherapy. Results showed that preconditioning stock shoots with salicylic acid (SA; 0.01-0.1 mM) markedly increased survival of stock shoots after 4 weeks of thermotherapy. Regrowth of cryopreserved shoot tips following thermotherapy was also significantly enhanced when SA (0.05-0.1 mM) was used for preconditioning stock shoots. Addition of either Fe-ethylenediaminetetracetic acid (Fe-EDTA, 50 mg per L) or Fe-ethylenediaminedi(o)hydroxyphenylacetic acid (Fe-EDDHA, 50 mg per L) to post-culture medium strongly promoted regrowth and totally prevented chlorosis of shoots regenerated from cryopreserved shoot tips following thermotherapy. Using the parameters optimized in the present study, about 80 percent survival of heat-treated stock shoots and about 33 percent regrowth of cryopreserved shoot tips following thermotherapy were obtained. Morphology of plants regenerated from cryopreserved shoot tips following thermotherapy was identical to that of control plants, based on observations of leaf shape and size, internode length and plant height. Optimization of the thermotherapy procedure followed by cryotherapy will facilitate the wider application of this technique to eliminate viruses which can invade meristems.

  12. Pathological modifications of plant stem cell destiny

    Science.gov (United States)

    In higher plants, the shoot apex contains undifferentiated stem cells that give rise to various tissues and organs. The fate of these stem cells determines the pattern of plant growth as well as reproduction; and such fate is genetically preprogrammed. We found that a bacterial infection can derai...

  13. Regulation of chloroplast number and DNA synthesis in higher plants. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullet, J.E.

    1995-11-10

    The long term objective of this research is to understand the process of chloroplast development and its coordination with leaf development in higher plants. This is important because the photosynthetic capacity of plants is directly related to leaf and chloroplast development. This research focuses on obtaining a detailed description of leaf development and the early steps in chloroplast development including activation of plastid DNA synthesis, changes in plastid DNA copy number, activation of chloroplast transcription and increases in plastid number per cell. The grant will also begin analysis of specific biochemical mechanisms by isolation of the plastid DNA polymerase, and identification of genetic mutants which are altered in their accumulation of plastid DNA and plastid number per cell.

  14. Regulation of chloroplast number and DNA synthesis in higher plants. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullet, J.E.

    1995-11-10

    The long term objective of this research is to understand the process of chloroplast development and its coordination with leaf development in higher plants. This is important because the photosynthetic capacity of plants is directly related to leaf and chloroplast development. This research focuses on obtaining a detailing description of leaf development and the early steps in chloroplast development including activation of plastid DNA synthesis, changes in plastid DNA copy number, activation of chloroplast transcription and increases in plastid number per cell. The grant will also begin analysis of specific biochemical mechanisms by isolation of the plastid DNA polymerase, and identification of genetic mutants which are altered in their accumulation of plastid DNA and plastid number per cell.

  15. Initiation of somatic embryos and regeneration of plants from primordial shoots of 10-year-old somatic white spruce and expression profiles of 11 genes followed during the tissue culture process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimaszewska, Krystyna; Overton, Catherine; Stewart, Don; Rutledge, Robert G

    2011-03-01

    Adult conifers are notoriously recalcitrant in vegetative propagation and micropropagation that would result in the regeneration of juvenile propagules through somatic embryogenesis (SE) has not been demonstrated to date. Because SE-derived material is more amenable in subsequent tissue culture experiments compared with seed-derived material, a multi-year study was conducted to investigate induction of SE from primordial shoot (PS) explants that were excised from shoot buds of somatic embryo-derived white spruce. The SE induction experiments were carried out first with greenhouse-grown and later with field-grown trees each year from 2002 (2-year-old) to 2010 (10-year-old). Of the four genotypes tested, 893-2 and 893-12 never responded, 893-1 responded up to year 4 and 893-6 consistently responded every year. In 2010, for the first time, three of the 17 893-6 clonal trees produced male strobili as well as SE from cultured PS explants. SE induction was associated with formation of a nodule on the surface of an elongated needle primordium or in callus. Early somatic embryos were detectable after about 3 weeks of culture. Of 11 genes whose expression profiles were followed during the PS cultures, CHAP3A, VP1, WOX2 and SAP2C were expressed exclusively in the early stages of SE, and could potentially be used as markers of embryogenecity. Mature somatic embryos and plants were produced from the explants of responding genotype. Implication of these results for future research on adult conifer recalcitrance in micropropagation is discussed.

  16. Differences in proleptic and epicormic shoot structures in relation to water deficit and growth rate in almond trees (Prunus dulcis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrón, Claudia; Contador, Loreto; Lampinen, Bruce D; Metcalf, Samuel G; Guédon, Yann; Costes, Evelyne; DeJong, Theodore M

    2014-02-01

    Shoot characteristics differ depending on the meristem tissue that they originate from and environmental conditions during their development. This study focused on the effects of plant water status on axillary meristem fate and flowering patterns along proleptic and epicormic shoots, as well as on shoot growth rates on 'Nonpareil' almond trees (Prunus dulcis). The aims were (1) to characterize the structural differences between proleptic and epicormic shoots, (2) to determine whether water deficits modify shoot structures differently depending on shoot type, and (3) to determine whether shoot structures are related to shoot growth rates. A hidden semi-Markov model of the axillary meristem fate and number of flower buds per node was built for two shoot types growing on trees exposed to three plant water status treatments. The models segmented observed shoots into successive homogeneous zones, which were compared between treatments. Shoot growth rates were calculated from shoot extension measurements made during the growing season. Proleptic shoots had seven successive homogeneous zones while epicormic shoots had five zones. Shoot structures were associated with changes in growth rate over the season. Water deficit (1) affected the occurrence and lengths of the first zones of proleptic shoots, but only the occurrence of the third zone was reduced in epicormic shoots; (2) had a minor effect on zone flowering patterns and did not modify shoot or zone composition of axillary meristem fates; and (3) reduced growth rates, although patterns over the season were similar among treatments. Two meristem types, with different latency durations, produced shoots with different growth rates and distinct structures. Differences between shoot type structure responses to water deficit appeared to reflect their ontogenetic characteristics and/or resource availability for their development. Tree water deficit appeared to stimulate a more rapid progression through ontogenetic states.

  17. Effects of elevated temperature and CO2 on aboveground-belowground systems: a case study with plants, their mutualistic bacteria and root / shoot herbivores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Michael William Ryalls

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Interactions between above- and belowground herbivores have been prominent in the field of aboveground-belowground ecology from the outset, although little is known about how climate change affects these organisms when they share the same plant. Additionally, the interactive effects of multiple factors associated with climate change such as elevated temperature (eT and elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide (eCO2 are untested. We investigated how eT and eCO2 affected larval development of the lucerne weevil (Sitona discoideus and colonisation by the pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum, on three cultivars of a common host plant, lucerne (Medicago sativa. Sitona discoideus larvae feed on root nodules housing N2-fixing rhizobial bacteria, allowing us to test the effects of eT and eCO2 on three trophic levels. Moreover, we assessed the influence of these factors on plant growth. eT increased plant growth rate initially (6, 8 and 10 weeks after sowing, with cultivar ‘Sequel’ achieving the greatest height. Inoculation with aphids, however, reduced plant growth at week 14. eT severely reduced root nodulation by 43%, whereas eCO2 promoted nodulation by 56%, but only at ambient temperatures. Weevil presence increased net root biomass and nodulation, by 31 and 45%, respectively, showing an overcompensatory plant growth response. Effects of eT and eCO2 on root nodulation were mirrored by weevil larval development; eT and eCO2 reduced and increased larval development, respectively. Contrary to expectations, aphid colonisation was unaffected by eT or eCO2, but there was a near-significant 10% reduction in colonisation rates on plants with weevils present belowground. The contrasting effects of eT and eCO2 on weevils potentially occurred through changes in root nodulation patterns.

  18. Three ancient hormonal cues co-ordinate shoot branching in a moss

    OpenAIRE

    Coudert, Yoan; Palubicki, Wojtek; Ljung, Karin; Novak, Ondrej; Leyser, Ottoline; Harrison, C Jill

    2015-01-01

    eLife digest Most land plants have shoots that form branches and plants can regulate when and where they grow these branches to best exploit their environment. Plants with flowers and the more ancient mosses both have branching shoots, but these two groups of plants evolved to grow in this way independently of each other. Most studies on shoot branching have focused on flowering plants and so it is less clear how branching works in mosses. Three plant hormones?called auxin, cytokinin and stri...

  19. Shoot necrosis caused by Phoma incompta, a new disease of olive in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario IVIC

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Reddish-brown lesions on young shoots, withering of leaves, cankers on older shoots and shoot necrosis were observed on some olive trees in southern Croatia. The fungus Phoma incompta was identifed as the causal agent of the disease. Pathogenicity of P. incompta isolates was confrmed by inoculating young olive plants in a greenhouse; these plants developed symptoms similar to those observed in the field.

  20. Rapid plant regeneration of chrysanthemum ( Chrysanthemum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Shoot multiplication of chrysanthemum was achieved from shoot tip explant, using MS media supplemented with different concentrations and combinations of plant growth regulators. Different parameters including shoot initiation percentage, average number of shoots per explant, length of shoots (cm), number of leaves per ...

  1. Rapid plant regeneration of chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-05-04

    May 4, 2009 ... Shoot multiplication of chrysanthemum was achieved from shoot tip explant, using MS media supplemented with different concentrations and combinations of plant growth regulators. Different parameters including shoot initiation percentage, average number of shoots per explant, length of shoots (cm) ...

  2. Studies on the chalcone synthase gene of two higher plants: petroselinum hortense and matthiola incana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemleben, V.; Frey, M.; Rall, S.; Koch, M.; Kittel, M.; Kreuzaler, F.; Ragg, H.; Fautz, E.; Hahlbrock, K.

    1982-01-01

    Two higher plant systems are presented which allow to study coordinated gene expression of the light-induced metabolic pathway of flavonoid biosynthesis: tissue culture cells of Petroselinum hortense (Apiaceae) and different developmental stages of various genotypes of Matthiola incana (Brassicaceae). The gene structure of the chalcone synthase is mainly studied. A cDNA clone (pLF56) of parsley has been constructed and characterized conferring the chalcone synthase gene sequence. Strong cross hybridization between the parsley cDNA and Matthiola DNA allowed to identify a HindIII fragment (6000 bp) identical in size for parsley and different Matthiola wild type lines and a mutant line.

  3. Interference of Cd2+ in functioning of the photosynthetic apparatus of higher plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadeusz Baszyński

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The actual opinions concerning the role of Cd2+ in inhibition of photosynthesis have been reviewed. The light phase of photosynthesis, particularly the site of Cd2+ action in the photosynthetic transport chain has been given the greatest attention. Cd2+-induced inhibition of Photosystem II activity as the result of thylakoid membrane degradation has been discussed. The present studies on Cd2+-inhibited dark reactions occurring in stroma has been analysed. Attention has been drawn to the fact that the results of studies in vitro are not always compatible with the changes found in the photosynthetic apparatus of higher plants growing in a Cd2 containing medium.

  4. Seed sprout production: Consumables and a foundation for higher plant growth in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Michelle; Thomas, Terri; Johnson, Steve; Luttges, Marvin

    1990-01-01

    Seed sprouts can be produced as a source of fresh vegetable materials and as higher plant seedlings in space. Sprout production was undertaken to evaluate the mass accumulations possible, the technologies needed, and the reliability of the overall process. Baseline experiments corroborated the utility of sprout production protocols for a variety of seed types. The automated delivery of saturated humidity effectively supplants labor intensive manual soaking techniques. Automated humidification also lend itself to modest centrifugal sprout growth environments. A small amount of ultraviolet radiation effectively suppressed bacterial and fungal contamination, and the sprouts were suitable for consumption.

  5. Studies on the chalcone synthase gene of two higher plants: petroselinum hortense and matthiola incana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemleben, V; Frey, M; Rall, S; Koch, M; Kittel, M; Kreuzaler, F; Ragg, H; Fautz, E; Hahlbrock, K

    1982-01-01

    Two higher plant systems are presented which allow to study coordinated gene expression of the light-induced metabolic pathway of flavonoid biosynthesis: tissue culture cells of Petroselinum hortense (Apiaceae) and different developmental stages of various genotypes of Matthiola incana (Brassicaceae). The gene structure of the chalcone synthase is mainly studied. A cDNA clone (pLF56) of parsley has been constructed and characterized conferring the chalcone synthase gene sequence. Strong cross hybridization between the parsley cDNA and Matthiola DNA allowed to identify a HindIII fragment (6000 bp) identical in size for parsley and different Matthiola wild type lines and a mutant line.

  6. Interaction of light quality and fertility on biomass, shoot pigmentation and xanthophyll cycle flux in Chinese kale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopsell, Dean A; Sams, Carl E; Morrow, Robert C

    2017-02-01

    Nutritionally important carotenoids in 21-day-old brassica microgreens increase following short and long-term exposure to narrow-band wavelengths from light-emitting diodes (LED). The present study aimed to measure the impact of: (1) fluorescent/incandescent light and different percentages of blue/red LED light and (2) different levels of nutrient fertility on biomass and pigment concentrations in 30-day-old 'Green Lance' Chinese kale (Brassica oleracea var. alboglabra). Kale plants were exposed to four light treatments and two fertility levels and were harvested 30 days after seeding and analyzed for nutritionally important shoot pigments. Kale under the fluorescent/incandescent light treatment had a significantly higher shoot fresh and dry mass. The shoot tissue concentrations of most pigment were significantly higher under blue/red LED light treatments. The higher fertility level resulted in higher concentrations for most pigments. Interestingly, the pool of xanthophyll cycle pigments and de-epoxidized xanthophylls was higher under all LED treatments. The results obtained in the present study support previous data demonstrating the stimulation of nutritionally important shoot tissue pigment concentrations following exposure to sole source blue/red LEDs compared to traditional lighting. Xanthophyll cycle flux was impacted by LEDs and this may support the role of zeaxanthin in blue light perception in leafy specialty crops. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  7. 24 Dragomir B Bukur shooting method works well up to Hmf = 1-5 m ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    concentration and the conversion are still very close to the exact values. For higher. Hmf values the shooting method produces meaningless results. The concentration profiles obtained from the analytical solution and the forward shooting method are shown in figure 2 for Hmf = 18 m. It can be seen that the shooting method ...

  8. Light Inhibition of Shoot Regeneration Is Regulated by Endogenous Abscisic Acid Level in Calli Derived from Immature Barley Embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rikiishi, Kazuhide; Matsuura, Takakazu; Ikeda, Yoko; Maekawa, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    Shoot regeneration in calli derived from immature barley embryos is regulated by light conditions during the callus-induction period. Barley cultivars Kanto Nijo-5 (KN5) and K-3 (K3) showed lower efficiency of shoot regeneration in a 16-h photoperiod during callus-induction than those in continuous darkness, whereas shoot regeneration was enhanced in cultures under a 16-h photoperiod in Golden Promise (GP) and Lenins (LN). These cultivars were classified as photo-inhibition type (KN5 and K3) or photo-induction type (GP and LN) according to their response to light. Contents of endogenous plant hormones were determined in calli cultured under a 16-h photoperiod and continuous darkness. In photo-inhibition type, higher accumulation of abscisic acid (ABA) was detected in calli cultured under a 16-h photoperiod, whereas calli showed lower levels of endogenous ABA in continuous darkness. However, cultivars of photo-induction type showed lower levels of ABA in calli cultured under both light conditions, similarly to photo-inhibition type in continuous darkness. Exogenous ABA inhibited the callus growth and shoot regeneration independent of light conditions in all cultivars. In photo-inhibition type, lower levels of endogenous ABA induced by ABA biosynthesis inhibitor, fluridone, reduced the photo-inhibition of shoot regeneration. Expression of ABA biosynthesis gene, HvNCED1, in calli was regulated by the light conditions. Higher expression was observed in calli cultured under a 16-h photoperiod. These results indicate that ABA biosynthesis could be activated through the higher expression of HvNCED1 in a 16-h photoperiod and that the higher accumulations of ABA inhibit shoot regeneration in the photo-inhibition type cultivars. PMID:26670930

  9. Influence of gaseous contaminants in the atmosphere of ISS on growth and development of higher plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levinskikh, Margarita; Sychev, Vladimir; Podolsky, Igor; Moukhamedieva, Lana; Gostimskiy, Sergey; Bingham, Gail

    Continues exploitation of pressurized manned objects revealed that artificial gaseous atmosphere is a multi-component mixture containing adverse micro-dirt consisted of 14 classes of chemical compounds (Moukhamedieva, 2003). Dynamics of descendant process depend on duration of pressurized object utilization, resources of life support (e.g. level of closeness), parameters of microclimate and experimental tasks conducted by a crew. Previously it was shown that composition of gas environment of the space station remarkably altered growth and development of higher plants (Levinskikh et al., 2000). Specifically, it was found that the main changes in productivity and morphometric characteristics of the spaceflight plants of superdwarf wheat were caused by phytotoxic effect of ethylene (1,1-2,0 mg/m3) in the atmosphere of MIR orbital station. From 2003 to April, 2007 we have conducted 7 experiments focused on cultivation of dwarf peas in space greenhouse LADA onboard International Space Station (ISS-6-10, 12, 14). Results of the first 5 experiments showed that characteristics of growth and development of the peas planted in the space greenhouse had no differences if compared with ground control variants. In the similar experiments with peas during ISS-12 and ISS-14 it was found that total and seed productions of the plants were lower than ones of the previous experiments and ones of the ground controls. Cytological analysis of roots of the space seeds for the first time revealed significant increase of chromosomal aberrations in comparison with laboratory controls Analysis of total contamination of the atmosphere of the ISS by gaseous dirt showed consistent (starting from ISS-11) increasing of the toxicity coefficient (Kt). W e suppose that the accumulation of pollutant in the atmosphere of ISS is the main reason causing general decreasing of productivity and increasing of the number of chromosomal aberrations in the peas cultivated in space greenhouse LADA at the stage

  10. Shoot meristem: an ideal explant for Zea mays L. transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sairam, R V; Parani, M; Franklin, G; Lifeng, Z; Smith, B; MacDougall, J; Wilber, C; Sheikhi, H; Kashikar, N; Meeker, K; Al-Abed, D; Berry, K; Vierling, R; Goldman, S L

    2003-04-01

    We report on a rapid high-frequency somatic embryogenesis and plant regeneration protocol for Zea mays. Maize plants were regenerated from complete shoot meristem (3-4 mm) explants via organogenesis and somatic embryogenesis. In organogenesis, the shoot meristems were directly cultured on a high-cytokinin medium comprising 5-10 mg x L(-1) 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP). The number of multiple shoots produced per meristem varied from six to eight Plantlet regeneration through organogenesis resulted in just four weeks. Callus was induced in five days of incubation on an auxin-modified Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium. Prolific callus, with numerous somatic embryos, developed within 3-4 weeks when cultured on an auxin medium containing 5 mg 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid x L(-1). The number of multiple shoots varied from three to six per callus. Using R23 (Pioneer, Hi-Bred, Johnston, Iowa), the frequency of callus induction was consistently in excess of 80% and plant regeneration ranged between 47 and 64%. All regenerated plantlets survived in the greenhouse and produced normal plants. Each transgenic plant produced leaves, glumes, and anthers that uniformly expressed green fluorescent protein (GFP). The GFP gene segregated in the pollen. Based on this data it is concluded that the transgenics arose from single-cell somatic embryos. The rate of transfer DNA (T-DNA) transfer to complete shoot meristems of Zea mays was high on the auxin medium and was independent of using super-virulent strains of Agrobacterium.

  11. Direct shoot regeneration via organogenesis in chieh- qua ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl6

    2013-11-27

    Nov 27, 2013 ... In vitro micropropagation of a Cucurbita interspecific hybrid cultivar-a root stock plant. Plant Cell. Tiss. Org. Cult. 75: 179-. 182. Selvaraj N, Vasudevan A, Manickavasagam M, Kasthurirengan S,. Ganapthi A (2007). High frequency shoot regeneration from cotyledon explants of cucumber via organogenesis.

  12. Developmental stages during the rooting of in-vitro-cultured Quercus robur shoots from material of juvenile and mature origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, N; Arellano, G; San-José, M C; Vieitez, A M; Ballester, A

    2003-12-01

    In-vitro-cultured shoots of clones initiated from shoots of the basal parts (BS) and the crown (C) of two mature Quercus robur L. trees were subjected to rooting experiments to relate rooting with shoot topophysical origin. The BS shoots exhibited morphologically juvenile characteristics and rooted more easily after indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) treatment than C shoots. When naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) was applied to BS shoots, rooting capacity decreased and root emergence was delayed at least 2 days compared with shoots treated with IBA only. During the first days of the rooting process, endogenous indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) concentration was higher in C shoots than in BS shoots, regardless of whether the shoots were treated with NPA. Mitotic figures were observed in cells from the basal part of both BS and C shoots 24 h after IBA treatment. After 4 days of IBA treatment, the occurrence of histological events differed between BS shoots and C shoots. Cells of BS shoots became meristematic, giving rise to meristemoids and root primordia, whereas no differentiation of root meristemoids occurred in cells of C shoots. Thus, although adult oak material (C shoots) is capable of responding to the initial stimulus of auxin during the adventitious rooting process, the endogenous IAA concentration is not the factor limiting rooting in adult material.

  13. The effect of mycorrhiza on the growth and elemental composition of Ni-hyperaccumulating plant Berkheya coddii Roessler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orłowska, Elżbieta; Przybyłowicz, Wojciech; Orlowski, Dariusz; Turnau, Katarzyna; Mesjasz-Przybyłowicz, Jolanta

    2011-12-01

    The effect of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) on growth and element uptake by Ni-hyperaccumulating plant, Berkheya coddii, was studied. Plants were grown under laboratory conditions on ultramafic soil without or with the AM fungi of different origin. The AM colonization, especially with the indigenous strain, significantly enhanced plants growth and their survival. AMF affected also the elemental concentrations that were studied with Particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE). AMF (i) increased K and Fe in shoots, Zn and Mn in roots, P and Ca both, in roots and shoots; (ii) decreased Mn in shoots, Co and Ni both, in shoots and roots. Due to higher biomass of mycorrhizal plants, total Ni content was up to 20 times higher in mycorrhizal plants compared to the non-mycorrhizal ones. The AMF enhancement of Ni uptake may therefore provide an improvement of a presently used technique of nickel phytomining. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Development and Fecundity Performance of Oriental Fruit Moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) Reared on Shoots and Fruits of Peach and Pear in Different Seasons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Juan; Li, Guangwei; Xu, Xiangli; Wu, Junxiang

    2015-12-01

    The oriental fruit moth Grapholita molesta (Busck) is a globally important insect pest. In some parts of its geographic range, the oriental fruit moth shifts its attack from peach orchards to pear orchards late in the growing season. The phenological effects of host plants on the performance of the moth were evaluated by examining the development and fecundity of the moth reared on peach (Prunus persica variety "Shahong") and pear (Pyrus bretshneideri variety "Dangshan Su") collected at various times of the growing season under laboratory conditions. Results showed that the moth developed faster on shoots and fruits of peach than on those of pear. The preimaginal survival rate was the highest on peach shoots, and the moth could not survive on pear fruit collected on May 10. For both peach and pear, the boring rates of neonatal larvae were significantly higher on shoots than on fruits, and the pupal mass of females was significantly higher on fruits than on shoots. The boring rate increased with pear fruits growing during later days. Fecundity was significantly less on pear shoots than on the other plant materials. The results of this study suggest a possible host adaptation process in oriental fruit moth. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. A School Shooting Plot Foiled

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swezey, James A.; Thorp, Kimberly A.

    2010-01-01

    Dinkes, Cataldi, and Lin-Kelly (2007) claims that 78% of public schools reported one or more violent incidents during the 2005/2006 school year. School shootings are a rare but real threat on school campuses. Shootings at private schools are even less frequent with only a few recorded examples in the United States. This case study examines how a…

  16. Potential application of urea-derived herbicides as cytokinins in plant tissue culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Malathi; Nachiappan, Vasanthi; Rajasekharan, Ram

    2006-12-01

    Various urea-derived herbicides and different cytokinin analogues were used to determine their effects on callusing response and shoot regenerating capacity of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) and Coleus (Coleus forskohlii Briq.). The herbicides monuron and diuron evoked profuse callusing response from Coleus leaf segments and alfalfa petiole explants on Murashige and Skoog medium. Shoot regeneration by monuron (2.0 mg/l) showed a maximum of 3 multiple shoots both in alfalfa and Coleus with a frequency of 92% and 75%, respectively. Whereas diuron (0.5 mg/l) showed a high frequency of shoot regeneration (89%)with a mean number of 5 shoots in alfalfa, in C.forskohlii, the frequency of regeneration was 90%with a mean number of 6 shoots. Diuron with two chloride groups in the phenyl ring showed significantly higher cytokinin-like activity than single chloride substitution monuron. This study demonstrates the potential use of monuron and diuron as cytokinins in plant tissue culture.

  17. A critical assessment of soil amendments (slaked lime/acidic fertilizer) for the phytomanagement of moderately contaminated shooting range soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conesa, Hector M.; Gonzalez-Alcaraz, Maria N. [Universidad Politecnica de Cartagena (Spain). Dept. de Ciencia y Tecnologia Agraria; Wieser, Mirjam; Studer, Bjoern; Schulin, Rainer [ETH Zuerich (Switzerland). Inst. of Terrestrial Ecosystems

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: The effects of the addition of an acidic fertilizer solution and/or slaked lime (5.5 g Ca(OH){sub 2}kg{sup -1}) on a slightly acidic shooting range soil (pH 6.1, % organic carbon 5.4) with moderate metal (e.g., 620 mg kg{sup -1} Pb) and metalloid (17 mg kg{sup -1} Sb) concentrations on metal and Sb solubility and plant accumulation were investigated. Materials and methods: In a pot experiment, we grew Plantago lanceolata, Lolium perenne and Triticum aestivum. The pH, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and metal and Sb concentrations in the leachate were monitored. Results and discussion: The addition of slaked lime increased the soil pH from 6.1 to 7.2 and the DOC from 100 to 300 mg l{sup -1}. In contrast to Sb, we found a correlation between DOC and soluble Cu concentrations. The addition of the acidic fertilizer significantly increased Mn- and Pb-NaNO{sub 3} extractable concentrations. Slaked lime decreased at first, Pb-, Mn- Ni- and Zn-NaNO{sub 3} extractable concentrations, but with time, these concentrations increased. Metal accumulation in shoots was in general low. The highest concentrations were obtained in shoots of L. perenne for Mn (135 mg kg{sup -1} DW). Spikes of T. aestivum accumulated more Cu, Mn, Ni and Zn than shoots. Grains of T. aestivum had higher Zn concentrations (up to 37 mg kg{sup -1}) than spikes and shoots (up to 22 and 19 mg kg{sup -1}, respectively). Antimony concentrations were always below 2 mg kg{sup -1} for the three species studied. Conclusions: Under these growing conditions, these three plant species showed to be suitable for the phytomanagement of moderately contaminated shooting range areas. (orig.)

  18. Contribution of PsbS Function and Stomatal Conductance to Foliar Temperature in Higher Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulasek, Milena; Bernacki, Maciej Jerzy; Ciszak, Kamil; Witoń, Damian; Karpiński, Stanisław

    2016-07-01

    Natural capacity has evolved in higher plants to absorb and harness excessive light energy. In basic models, the majority of absorbed photon energy is radiated back as fluorescence and heat. For years the proton sensor protein PsbS was considered to play a critical role in non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) of light absorbed by PSII antennae and in its dissipation as heat. However, the significance of PsbS in regulating heat emission from a whole leaf has never been verified before by direct measurement of foliar temperature under changing light intensity. To test its validity, we here investigated the foliar temperature changes on increasing and decreasing light intensity conditions (foliar temperature dynamics) using a high resolution thermal camera and a powerful adjustable light-emitting diode (LED) light source. First, we showed that light-dependent foliar temperature dynamics is correlated with Chl content in leaves of various plant species. Secondly, we compared the foliar temperature dynamics in Arabidopsis thaliana wild type, the PsbS null mutant npq4-1 and a PsbS-overexpressing transgenic line under different transpiration conditions with or without a photosynthesis inhibitor. We found no direct correlations between the NPQ level and the foliar temperature dynamics. Rather, differences in foliar temperature dynamics are primarily affected by stomatal aperture, and rapid foliar temperature increase during irradiation depends on the water status of the leaf. We conclude that PsbS is not directly involved in regulation of foliar temperature dynamics during excessive light energy episodes. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists.

  19. Functional differences between galactolipids and glucolipids revealed in photosynthesis of higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hölzl, Georg; Witt, Sandra; Kelly, Amélie A; Zähringer, Ulrich; Warnecke, Dirk; Dörmann, Peter; Heinz, Ernst

    2006-05-09

    Galactolipids represent the most abundant lipid class in thylakoid membranes, where oxygenic photosynthesis is performed. The identification of galactolipids at specific sites within photosynthetic complexes by x-ray crystallography implies specific roles for galactolipids during photosynthetic electron transport. The preference for galactose and not for the more abundant sugar glucose in thylakoid lipids and their specific roles in photosynthesis are not understood. Introduction of a bacterial glucosyltransferase from Chloroflexus aurantiacus into the galactolipid-deficient dgd1 mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana resulted in the accumulation of a glucose-containing lipid in the thylakoids. At the same time, the growth defect of the dgd1 mutant was complemented. However, the degree of trimerization of light-harvesting complex II and the photosynthetic quantum yield of transformed dgd1 plants were only partially restored. These results indicate that specific interactions of the galactolipid head group with photosynthetic protein complexes might explain the preference for galactose in thylakoid lipids of higher plants. Therefore, galactose in thylakoid lipids can be exchanged with glucose without severe effects on growth, but the presence of galactose is crucial to maintain maximal photosynthetic efficiency.

  20. Growth and development in higher plants under simulated microgravity conditions on a 3-dimensional clinostat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimazu, T.; Yuda, T.; Miyamoto, K.; Yamashita, M.; Ueda, J.

    Growth and development of etiolated pea (Pisum sativum L. cv. Alaska) and maize (Zea mays L. cv. Golden Cross Bantam) seedlings grown under simulated microgravity conditions were intensively studied using a 3-dimensional clinostat as a simulator of weightlessness. Epicotyls of etiolated pea seedlings grown on the clinostat were the most oriented toward the direction far from cotyledons. Mesocotyls of etiolated maize seedlings grew at random and coleoptiles curved slightly during clinostat rotation. Clinostat rotation promoted the emergence of the 3rd internodes in etiolated pea seedlings, while it significantly inhibited the growth of the 1st internodes. In maize seedlings, the growth of coleoptiles was little affected by clinostat rotation, but that of mesocotyls was suppressed, and therefore, the emergence of the leaf out of coleoptile was promoted. Clinostat rotation reduced the osmotic concentration in the 1st internodes of pea seedlings, although it has little effect on the 2nd and the 3rd internodes. Clinostat rotation also reduced the osmotic concentrations in both coleoptiles and mesocotyls of maize seedlings. Cell-wall extensibilities of the 1st and the 3rd internodes of pea seedlings grown on the clinostat were significantly lower and higher as compared with those on 1 g conditions, respectively. Cell-wall extensibility of mesocotyls in seedlings grown on the clinostat also decreased. Changes in cell wall properties seem to be well correlated to the growth of each organ in pea and maize seedlings. These results suggest that the growth and development of plants is controlled under gravity on earth, and that the growth responses of higher plants to microgravity conditions are regulated by both cell-wall mechanical properties and osmotic properties of stem cells.

  1. Structure-function relationships in highly modified shoots of cactaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauseth, James D

    2006-11-01

    Cacti are extremely diverse structurally and ecologically, and so modified as to be intimidating to many biologists. Yet all have the same organization as most dicots, none differs fundamentally from Arabidopsis or other model plants. This review explains cactus shoot structure, discusses relationships between structure, ecology, development and evolution, and indicates areas where research on cacti is necessary to test general theories of morphogenesis. Cactus leaves are diverse; all cacti have foliage leaves; many intermediate stages in evolutionary reduction of leaves are still present; floral shoots often have large, complex leaves whereas vegetative shoots have microscopic leaves. Spines are modified bud scales, some secrete sugar as extra-floral nectaries. Many cacti have juvenile/adult phases in which the flowering adult phase (a cephalium) differs greatly from the juvenile; in some, one side of a shoot becomes adult, all other sides continue to grow as the juvenile phase. Flowers are inverted: the exterior of a cactus 'flower' is a hollow vegetative shoot with internodes, nodes, leaves and spines, whereas floral organs occur inside, with petals physically above stamens. Many cacti have cortical bundles vascularizing the cortex, however broad it evolves to be, thus keeping surface tissues alive. Great width results in great weight of weak parenchymatous shoots, correlated with reduced branching. Reduced numbers of shoot apices is compensated by great increases in number of meristematic cells within individual SAMs. Ribs and tubercles allow shoots to swell without tearing during wet seasons. Shoot epidermis and cortex cells live and function for decades then convert to cork cambium. Many modifications permit water storage within cactus wood itself, adjacent to vessels.

  2. Factors affecting proliferation and elongation of shoots of Phak Liang (Gnetum gnemon Linn. through tissue culture technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Te-chato, S.

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available The tissue culture of Phak Liang (Gnetum gnemon Linn. was investigated for micropropagation. The types of explant, culture media, types and concentrations of plant growth regulators, orientation of explant and section of explant were tested for their efficacy in inducing and proliferating shoot buds. The elongation of shoots and root induction was also studied. Young leaves gave the highest number of shoot buds when they were cultured in Murashige and Skoog (MS medium supplemented with 0.25 mg/l IBA and 1.53 mg/l BA. The medium supplemented with 0.25 mg/l thidiazuron (TDZ alone provided the best result on multiple shoot bud induction both in percentage of explant forming shoots and number of shoot buds per explant. The percentage of explant forming shoot buds and number of shoot buds obtained from leaves were 90% and 26.50 shoot buds, while those from stems were 96.25% and 23.00 shoot buds, respectively. One hundred percent friable callus was induced from stem explant in the same medium supplemented with 1.0 mg/l 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D after 2 months of culture. Culturing whole leaf in the position of dorsal contact with medium gave the best multiple shoot bud formation of 92% and 23.00 shoot buds/explant. Cutting stem into half and culturing in horizontal position gave the best multiple shoot bud formation of 96% and 23.00 shoot buds/explant after culture for 2 months. The best elongation of shoot buds (2.54 shoots derived from cultured leaves was induced in the liquid medium. While stem-derived shoot buds (3.45 shoots was induced in the solid medium of the same medium components. However, root could not be induced from elongated shoots.

  3. Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) shoot saponins: identification and bio-activity by the assessment of aphid feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazahery-Laghab, H; Yazdi-Samadi, B; Bagheri, M; Bagheri, A R

    2011-01-01

    Biochemical components in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), such as saponins, can act as protecting factors against bio-stresses. Saponins are also antifeedants and show oral toxicity towards higher and lower animals. Changes in saponins, such as variation in the carbon skeleton, or hydrolysis of saponin glycosides and other conjugates, may change their biological effects. The aims of this research were to study saponin variation in different growth stages of alfalfa and to investigate the biological role of saponins in the spotted alfalfa aphid, Therioaphis maculata. Saponins from alfalfa shoots in different growth stages were extracted, chemically purified and analysed by TLC. Specific saponins such as soyasaponin1 from root and shoot and two bisdesmosides of medicagenic acid, one from shoot and another from root tissues, were identified using reference compounds allowing changes in saponin composition during plant development in different shoot tissues of alfalfa to be assessed. The response of the alfalfa aphid to feeding on alfalfa in different growth stages was studied. No significant difference in the survival of aphids, from neonate to adult, was observed, but due to the antibiotic effects of saponins, two differences were found in the onset of nymph production and cumulative nymph production. The results show that the saponin composition in alfalfa changes with plant development and this, in turn, can often negatively affect the development of specific insect pests such as the spotted alfalfa aphid, suggesting a possible biological role of alfalfa saponins.

  4. The effect of bullet removal and vegetation on mobility of Pb in shooting range soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayiga, Abioye O; Saha, Uttam

    2016-10-01

    Lead (Pb) contamination at shooting ranges is a public health concern because Pb is a toxic metal. An experiment was conducted to determine the effect of two best management practices; bullet removal and vegetation, on bioavailability and leachability of Pb in three shooting range (SR) soils. St. Augustine grass was grown in sieved (2 mm) and un-sieved SR soils for 8 weeks after which leachates, soil and plant samples were analyzed. Bullet removal reduced total soil Pb, increased Mehlich-3 Pb in unvegetated soils and increased dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in all soils. Bullet removal increased leaching in two SR soils while grasses reduced leaching but increased water soluble Pb in two SR soils. The roots of the grasses were able to accumulate more Pb in the root (1893-5021 mg kg(-1)) than the aboveground biomass (252-880 mg kg(-1)) due to mobilization of Pb in the rhizosphere. Grasses had a higher plant biomass in unsieved soils suggesting tolerance to the presence of bullets in the unsieved soils. Results suggest that bullet removal probably increased microbial activity and Pb bioavailability in the soil. The leaching and bioavailability of Pb in shooting range soils depends on biological activities and chemical processes in the soil. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The role of gravity in apical dominance: effects of clinostating on shoot inversion-induced ethylene production, shoot elongation and lateral bud growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, T. K.; Cline, M. G.

    1987-01-01

    Shoot inversion-induced release of apical dominance in Pharbitis nil is inhibited by rotating the plant at 0.42 revolutions per minute in a vertical plane perpendicular to the axis of rotation of a horizontal clinostat. Clinostating prevented lateral bud outgrowth, apparently by negating the restriction of the shoot elongation via reduction of ethylene production in the inverted shoot. Radial stem expansion was also decreased. Data from experiments with intact tissue and isolated segments indicated that shoot-inversion stimulates ethylene production by increasing the activity of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid synthase. The results support the hypothesis that shoot inversion-induced release of apical dominance in Pharbitis nil is due to gravity stress and is mediated by ethylene-induced retardation of the elongation of the inverted shoot.

  6. Xylem structure and connectivity in grapevine (Vitis vinifera) shoots provides a passive mechanism for the spread of bacteria in grape plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatelet, David S; Matthews, Mark A; Rost, Thomas L

    2006-09-01

    Bacterial leaf scorch occurring in a number of economically important plants is caused by the xylem-limited bacterium Xylella fastidiosa (Xf). In grapevine, Xf systemic infection causes Pierce's disease and is lethal. Traditional dogma is that Xf movement between vessels requires the digestion of inter-vessel pit membranes. However, Yersinia enterocolitica (Ye) (a bacterium found in animals) and fluorescent beads moved rapidly within grapevine xylem from stem into leaf lamina, suggesting open conduits consisting of long, branched xylem vessels for passive movement. This study builds on and expands previous observations on the nature of these conduits and how they affect Xf movement. Air, latex paint and green fluorescence protein (GFP)-Xf were loaded into leaves and followed to confirm and identify these conduits. Leaf xylem anatomy was studied to determine the basis for the free and sometimes restricted movement of Ye, beads, air, paint and GFP-Xf into the lamina. Reverse loading experiments demonstrated that long, branched xylem vessels occurred exclusively in primary xylem. They were observed in the stem for three internodes before diverging into mature leaves. However, this stem-leaf connection was an age-dependent character and was absent for the first 10-12 leaves basal to the apical meristem. Free movement in leaf blade xylem was cell-type specific with vessels facilitating movement in the body of the blade and tracheids near the leaf margin. Air, latex paint and GFP-Xf all moved about 50-60% of the leaf length. GFP-Xf was never observed close to the leaf margin. The open vessels of the primary xylem offered unimpeded long distance pathways bridging stem to leaves, possibly facilitating the spread of bacterial pathogens in planta. GFP-Xf never reached the leaf margins where scorching appeared, suggesting a signal targeting specific cells or a toxic build-up at hydathodes.

  7. Localization of small heat shock proteins to the higher plant endomembrane system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helm, K W; LaFayette, P R; Nagao, R T; Key, J L; Vierling, E

    1993-01-01

    Three related gene families of low-molecular-weight (LMW) heat shock proteins (HSPs) have been characterized in plants. We describe a fourth LMW HSP family, represented by PsHSP22.7 from Pisum sativum and GmHSP22.0 from Glycine max, and demonstrate that this family of proteins is endomembrane localized. PsHSP22.7 and GmHSP22.0 are 76.7% identical at the amino acid level. Both proteins have amino-terminal signal peptides and carboxyl-terminal sequences characteristic of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention signals. The two proteins closely resemble class I cytoplasmic LMW HSPs, suggesting that they evolved from the cytoplasmic proteins through the addition of the signal peptide and ER retention motif. The endomembrane localization of these proteins was confirmed by cell fractionation. The polypeptide product of PsHSP22.7 mRNA was processed to a smaller-M(r) form by canine pancreatic microsomes; in vivo, GmHSP22.0 polysomal mRNA was found to be predominantly membrane bound. In vitro-processed PsHSP22.7 corresponded in mass and pI to one of two proteins detected in ER fractions from heat-stressed plants by using anti-PsHSP22.7 antibodies. Like other LMW HSPs, PsHSP22.7 was observed in higher-molecular-weight structures with apparent masses of between 80 and 240 kDa. The results reported here indicate that members of this new class of LMW HSPs are most likely resident ER proteins and may be similar in function to related LMW HSPs in the cytoplasm. Along with the HSP90 and HSP70 classes of HSPs, this is the third category of HSPs localized to the ER.

  8. Optimization of animal manure vermicomposting based on biomass production of earthworms and higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Yan V; Alves, Luciano; Bianchi, Ivan; Espíndola, Jonas C; Oliveira, Juahil M De; Radetski, Claudemir M; Somensi, Cleder A

    2017-11-02

    The goal of this study was to optimize the mixture of swine manure (SM) and cattle manure (CM) used in the vermicomposting process, seeking to increase the manure biodegradation rate and enhance the biomass production of both earthworms and higher plants. To achieve this goal, physico-chemical parameters were determined to assess the final compost quality after 50 days of vermicomposting. The different manure ratios used to produce the composts (C) were as follows (SM:CM, % m/m basis): C1 100:0, C2 (75:25), C3 (50:50), C4 (25:75), and C5 (0:100). In addition, the earthworm biomass and the phytoproductivity of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) plants grown in mixtures (1:1) of natural soil and the most viable vermicomposts were investigated. The C1 and C2 compost compositions were associated with high earthworm mortality rates. The C3 compost provided the highest mineral concentrations and C5 showed the highest lettuce yield (wet biomass). The results verify that stabilized cattle manure is an excellent substrate for the vermicomposting process and that fresh swine manure must be mixed with pre-stabilized cattle manure to ensure an optimized vermicomposting process, which must be controlled in terms of temperature and ammonia levels. It is concluded that small livestock farmers could add value to swine manure by applying the vermicomposting process, without the need for high investments and with a minimal requirement for management of the biodegradation process. These are important technical aspects to be considered when circular economy principles are applied to small farms.

  9. Synergistic effects of altered salinity and temperature on estuarine eelgrass (Zostera marina) seedlings and clonal shoots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salo, Tiina Elina; Pedersen, Morten Foldager

    2014-01-01

    Salinity and temperature are among the most important factors determining eelgrass distribution and performance. Plants in estuarine environments experience large variations in both on a seasonal basis and exceptionally warm summers have caused massive die-backs of eelgrass in many areas. We...... investigated experimentally how different combinations of salinity and temperature affect the physiological performance of adult eelgrass (Zostera marina) shoots and seedlings. Plants were exposed to different combinations of salinity (salinity 5, 12.5 and 20) and temperature (15, 20 and 25 °C) in a 5-week...... aquarium experiment. Plants responded in general negatively to decreasing salinity and increasing temperature and the combination of high temperature and low salinity resulted in markedly higher mortality rates and lower leaf production when compared to plants held at more optimal combinations of salinity...

  10. Influence of cytokinins in combination with GA₃ on shoot multiplication and elongation of tea clone Iran 100 (Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonbad, Reza Azadi; Rani Sinniah, Uma; Aziz, Maheran Abdul; Mohamad, Rosfarizan

    2014-01-01

    The use of in vitro culture has been accepted as an efficient technique for clonal propagation of many woody plants. In the present research, we report the results of a number of experiments aimed at optimizing micropropagation protocol for tea (Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze) (clone Iran 100) using nodal segments as the explant. The effect of different combinations and concentrations of plant growth regulators (PGR) (BAP, TDZ, GA₃) on shoot multiplication and elongation was assessed. The influence of exposure to IBA in liquid form prior to transfer to solid media on rooting of tea microshoots was investigated. The results of this study showed that the best treatment for nodal segment multiplication in terms of the number of shoot per explant and shoot elongation was obtained using 3 mg/L BAP in combination with 0.5 mg/L GA₃. TDZ was found to be inappropriate for multiplication of tea clone Iran 100 as it resulted in hyperhydricity especially at concentrations higher than 0.05 mg/L. Healthy shoots treated with 300 mg/L IBA for 30 min followed by transfer to 1/2 strength MS medium devoid of PGR resulted in 72.3% of shoots producing roots and upon transferring them to acclimatization chamber 65% survival was obtained prior to field transfer.

  11. Influence of Cytokinins in Combination with GA3 on Shoot Multiplication and Elongation of Tea Clone Iran 100 (Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonbad, Reza Azadi; Mohamad, Rosfarizan

    2014-01-01

    The use of in vitro culture has been accepted as an efficient technique for clonal propagation of many woody plants. In the present research, we report the results of a number of experiments aimed at optimizing micropropagation protocol for tea (Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze) (clone Iran 100) using nodal segments as the explant. The effect of different combinations and concentrations of plant growth regulators (PGR) (BAP, TDZ, GA3) on shoot multiplication and elongation was assessed. The influence of exposure to IBA in liquid form prior to transfer to solid media on rooting of tea microshoots was investigated. The results of this study showed that the best treatment for nodal segment multiplication in terms of the number of shoot per explant and shoot elongation was obtained using 3 mg/L BAP in combination with 0.5 mg/L GA3. TDZ was found to be inappropriate for multiplication of tea clone Iran 100 as it resulted in hyperhydricity especially at concentrations higher than 0.05 mg/L. Healthy shoots treated with 300 mg/L IBA for 30 min followed by transfer to 1/2 strength MS medium devoid of PGR resulted in 72.3% of shoots producing roots and upon transferring them to acclimatization chamber 65% survival was obtained prior to field transfer. PMID:24605069

  12. Variable Levels of Glutathione S-Transferases Are Responsible for the Differential Tolerance to Metolachlor between Maize (Zea mays) Shoots and Roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongzhi; Xu, Li; Pang, Sen; Liu, Zhiqian; Wang, Kai; Wang, Chengju

    2017-01-11

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) play important roles in herbicide tolerance. However, studies on GST function in herbicide tolerance among plant tissues are still lacking. To explore the mechanism of metolachlor tolerance difference between maize shoots and roots, the effects of metolachlor on growth, GST activity, and the expression of the entire GST gene family were investigated. It was found that this differential tolerance to metolachlor was correlated with contrasting GST activity between the two tissues and can be eliminated by a GST inhibitor. An in vitro metolachlor-glutathione conjugation assay confirmed that the transformation of metolachlor is 2-fold faster in roots than in shoots. The expression analysis of the GST gene family revealed that most GST genes are expressed much higher in roots than shoots, both in control and in metolachlor-treated plants. Taken together, higher level expression of most GST genes, leading to higher GST activity and faster herbicide transformation, appears to be responsible for the higher tolerance to metolachlor of maize roots than shoots.

  13. Neurophysiological responses to gun-shooting errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaowen; Inzlicht, Michael

    2015-03-01

    The present study investigated the neural responses to errors in a shooting game - and how these neural responses may relate to behavioral performance - by examining the ERP components related to error detection (error-related negativity; ERN) and error awareness (error-related positivity; Pe). The participants completed a Shooter go/no-go task, which required them to shoot at armed targets using a gaming gun, and avoid shooting innocent non-targets. The amplitude of the ERN and Pe was greater for shooting errors than correct shooting responses. The ERN and Pe amplitudes elicited by incorrect shooting appeared to have good internal reliability. The ERN and Pe amplitudes elicited by shooting behaviors also predicted better behavioral sensitivity towards shoot/don't-shoot stimuli. These results suggest that it is possible to obtain online brain response measures to shooting responses and that neural responses to shooting are predictive of behavioral responses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Seasonal patterns of 13C partitioning between shoots and nodulated roots of N2- or nitrate-fed Pisum sativum L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voisin, A S; Salon, C; Jeudy, C; Warembourg, F R

    2003-04-01

    The effect of nitrogen source (N(2) or nitrate) on carbon assimilation by photosynthesis and on carbon partitioning between shoots and roots was investigated in pea (Pisum sativum L. 'Baccara') plants at different growth stages using (13)C labelling. Plants were grown in the greenhouse on different occasions in 1999 and 2000. Atmospheric [CO(2)] and growth conditions were varied to alter the rate of photosynthesis. Carbon allocation to nodulated roots was unaffected by N source. At the beginning of the vegetative period, nodulated roots had priority for assimilates over shoots; this priority decreased during later stages and became identical to that of the shoot during seed filling. Carbon allocation to nodulated roots was always limited by competition with shoots, and could be predicted for each phenological stage: during vegetative and flowering stages a single, negative exponential relationship was established between sink intensity (percentage of C allocated to the nodulated root per unit biomass) and net photosynthesis. At seed filling, the amount of carbon allocated to the nodulated root was directly related to net photosynthesis. Respiration of nodulated roots accounted for more than 60 % of carbon allocated to them during growth. Only at flowering was respiration affected by N supply: it was significantly higher for strictly N(2)-fixing plants (83 %) than for plants fed with nitrate (71 %). At the vegetative stage, the increase in carbon in nodulated root biomass was probably limited by respiration losses.

  15. Psychological preparation in sport shooting

    OpenAIRE

    Ledecká, Kateřina

    2013-01-01

    Title: Psychological preparation in sport shooting Objectives: The objective of this thesis is usage of psychological preparation by sport shooting representation team in Czech Republic. How they are informed about psychological preparation. What it means to them. Which types of regulation they use and how they behave before and after a competition. Methods: A Questionnaire was used as a method for data obtaining. The questionnaire was compiled for the purposes of this Thesis. The researched ...

  16. Effect of two culture media on Pinus taeda shoots elongation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Paula Imbrogno

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Pinus taeda L. is a forest species of great international importance and in Argentina. Biotechnological techniques can provide an alternative to propagate this species, as well as for obtaining mother plants. The aim of this study was to achieve adequate elongation of in vitro shoots before transfer to the rooting stage. The shoots were obtained from acclimatized mother plants. It was disinfected for in vitro establishment. Two types of basal culture media: WV5 and DCR were studied. The best results were achieved with the combination of the WV5 salts supplement with 0.5% activated carbon, 0.01 mg l-1 ANA to obtain vigorous and longer than 40.0 mm in length shoots. Key words: forest, micropropagation, pine

  17. A hydraulic signal in root-to-shoot signalling of water shortage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christmann, Alexander; Weiler, Elmar W; Steudle, Ernst; Grill, Erwin

    2007-10-01

    Photosynthesis and biomass production of plants are controlled by the water status of the soil. Upon soil drying, plants can reduce water consumption by minimizing transpiration through stomata, the closable pores of the leaf. The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) mediates stomatal closure, and is the assigned signal for communicating water deficit from the root to the shoot. However, our study does not support ABA as the proposed long-distance signal. The shoot response to limited soil water supply is not affected by the capacity to generate ABA in the root; however, the response does require ABA biosynthesis and signalling in the shoot. Soil water stress elicits a hydraulic response in the shoot, which precedes ABA signalling and stomatal closure. Attenuation of the hydraulic response in various plants prevented long-distance signalling of water stress, consistent with root-to-shoot communication by a hydraulic signal.

  18. Unexpected Genome Variability at Multiple Loci Suggests Cacao Swollen Shoot Virus Comprises Multiple, Divergent Molecular Variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacao swollen shoot virus (CSSV) [Badnavirus, Caulimoviridae] causes swollen shoot disease of Theobroma cacao L. in West Africa. Since ~2000, various diagnostic tests have failed to detect CSSV in ~50-70% of symptomatic cacao plants, suggesting the possible emergence of new, previously uncharacteriz...

  19. Adventitious shoot regeneration from leaf explants of southern highbush blueberry cultivars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protocols were developed to optimize adventitious shoot regeneration from four southern highbush blueberry cultivars. Leaf explants from six-week-old shoots of the four cultivars were excised and cultured on ten WPM (woody plant medium)-based regeneration media each containing thidiazuron (TDZ) (4.5...

  20. Root and shoot jasmonic acid applications differentially affect leaf chemistry and herbivore growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dam, N.M.; Oomen, M.W.A.T.

    2008-01-01

    Many induced responses in plants are systemic. Therefore, root-induced responses may alter leaf quality for shoot herbivores. Previously, we found that root and shoot application of jasmonic acid (JA) to feral Brassica oleracea both induced glucosinolates in the leaves. However, the types of

  1. Research on the effects of altered gravity and other factors on the growth and development of higher plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, A. H.

    1973-01-01

    The establishment, maintenance and use of the NASA-UCSC Botanical Centrifuge is discussed. The broad goals of this project were: (1) to establish facilities for conducting experiments under conditions of sustained centrifugation; (2) to pursue research on the gravitational physiology of higher plants; (3) to develop experimental hardware suitable for studies of plant development in the weightless condition; and (4) to accommodate visiting investigators whose researches are of interest to the NASA Biomedical Program and who may require for some limited time, the use of a medium size centrifuge with associated facilities appropriate for plant physiological studies.

  2. Production characteristics of the "higher plants-soil-like substrate" system as an element of the bioregenerative life support system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velichko, V. V.; Tikhomirov, A. A.; Ushakova, S. A.; Tikhomirova, N. A.; Shihov, V. N.; Tirranen, L. S.; Gribovskaya, I. A.

    2013-01-01

    The study addresses the possibility of long-duration operation of a higher plant conveyor, using a soil-like substrate (SLS) as the root zone. Chufa (Cyperus esculentus L.), radish (Raphanus sativus L.), and lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) were used as study material. A chufa community consisting of 4 age groups and radish and lettuce communities consisting of 2 age groups were irrigated with a nutrient solution, which contained mineral elements extracted from the SLS. After each harvest, inedible biomass of the harvested plants and inedible biomasses of wheat and saltwort were added to the SLS. The amounts of the inedible biomasses of wheat and saltwort to be added to the SLS were determined based on the nitrogen content of the edible mass of harvested plants. CO2 concentration in the growth chamber was maintained within the range of 1100-1700 ppm. The results of the study show that higher plants can be grown quite successfully using the proposed process of plant waste utilization in the SLS. The addition of chufa inedible biomass to the SLS resulted in species-specific inhibition of growth of both cultivated crops and microorganisms in the "higher plants - SLS" system. There were certain differences between the amounts of some mineral elements removed from the SLS with the harvested edible biomass and those added to it with the inedible biomasses of wheat and saltwort.

  3. EMF1, a novel protein involved in the control of shoot architecture and flowering in Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aubert, D.; Chen, L.; Moon, Y.-H.

    2001-01-01

    Shoot architecture and flowering time in angiosperms depend on the balanced expression of a large number of flowering time and flower meristem identity genes. Loss-of-function mutations in the Arabidopsis EMBRYONIC FLOWER (EMF) genes cause Arabidopsis to eliminate rosette shoot growth and transform...... shares common motifs that include nuclear localization signals, P-loop, and LXXLL elements. Alteration of EMF1 expression in transgenic plants caused progressive changes in flowering time, shoot determinacy, and inflorescence architecture. EMF1 and its related sequence may belong to a new class...... of proteins that function as transcriptional regulators of phase transition during shoot development....

  4. Establishment of callus, cell suspension and shoot cultures of Leonurus cardiaca L. and diterpene analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knöss, W

    1995-10-01

    Callus cultures, cell suspension cultures and shoot cultures of Leonurus cardiaca L. (Motherwort) were established and growth conditions optimized. Shoot cultures showed constant growth whether in the dark or under continuous light, accumulating varying amounts of the furanic labdane diterpenes leosibiricin, preleosibirin, leosibirin and isoballotenol acetate, which are also present in the soil-grown plants. Only traces of leosibiricin were detected in callus cultures, while cell suspension cultures did not produce any furanic diterpenes. A small amount of furanic labdane diterpenes was found in the medium of shoot cultures. Callus and shoot culture induction of several other Lamiaceae species is also described.

  5. Aluminum, a Friend or Foe of Higher Plants in Acid Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojórquez-Quintal, Emanuel; Escalante-Magaña, Camilo; Echevarría-Machado, Ileana; Martínez-Estévez, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Aluminum (Al) is the most abundant metal in the earth’s crust, but its availability depends on soil pH. Despite this abundance, Al is not considered an essential element and so far no experimental evidence has been put forward for a biological role. In plants and other organisms, Al can have a beneficial or toxic effect, depending on factors such as, metal concentration, the chemical form of Al, growth conditions and plant species. Here we review recent advances in the study of Al in plants at physiological, biochemical and molecular levels, focusing mainly on the beneficial effect of Al in plants (stimulation of root growth, increased nutrient uptake, the increase in enzyme activity, and others). In addition, we discuss the possible mechanisms involved in improving the growth of plants cultivated in soils with acid pH, as well as mechanisms of tolerance to the toxic effect of Al. PMID:29075280

  6. Status of cocoa swollen shoot virus disease in Nigeria | Dongo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cocoa Swollen Shoot Virus Disease (CSSVD) is one of the major diseases affecting cocoa production in West Africa, especially Ghana. The lack of any published article on the continued presence or absence of this viral disease has necessitated this investigation. Cocoa leaf samples from plants showing symptoms of leaf ...

  7. Multiple shoot regeneration of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) via ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2011-03-14

    Mar 14, 2011 ... The percentage of regenerated plants was determined for each cultivar. The elongated shoots (3 – 4 cm) were transferred to culture tubes containing the ..... Planta, 137: 113-. 117. McCabe DE, Martinell BJ (1993). Transformation of elit cotton cultivars via particle bombardment of meristems. Biotechnology ...

  8. Relative performance of root and shoot development in enset and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results obtained in Uganda indicate that enset had a significantly (P<0.05) shorter and thicker pseudostem compared to banana. In addition, enset had a larger root system with thicker cord roots. Results further showed that young enset plants had a significantly lower shoot-root ratio compared to the bananas.

  9. Status of cocoa swollen shoot virus disease in Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-09-05

    Sep 5, 2007 ... Cocoa Swollen Shoot Virus Disease (CSSVD) is one of the major diseases affecting cocoa production in. West Africa, especially Ghana. The lack of any published article on the continued presence or absence of this viral disease has necessitated this investigation. Cocoa leaf samples from plants showing.

  10. Effect of Collar Diameter and Lifting Period on Shoot Biomass ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of collar diameter and lifting period on shoot biomass production of Teak (Tectona grandis Linn. F) stumps were investigated during the 2006 dry season on the research farm of Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana. The lifting period is time when planting of stumps is delayed.

  11. proliferation and shoot recovery among the east african highland ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Adipala Ekwamu

    Uptake and metabolism of 6- benzyladenine in shoot proliferation of Musa and Rhododendron. Plant Cell, Tissue and. Organ Culture 25:69-74. Damasco, O.P., Smith, M.K. and Adkins, S.W.. 1996. Gibberellic acid detection of dwarf offtypes in micropropagated Cavendish bananas. Australian Journal of Experimental.

  12. Thidiazuron-induced shoot organogenesis of Cleome viscosa (L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A reproducible protocol for direct shoot organogenesis of Cleome viscosa, an important medicinal weed herb was developed. The seed explants were collected primarily from field grown mature plants for in vitro germination on different strength of MS basal medium with or without selection of GA3 at various concentration ...

  13. Enhanced in vitro multiple shoot induction in elite Pakistani guava ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr. DINESH

    2012-05-31

    May 31, 2012 ... Full Length Research Paper. Enhanced in vitro multiple shoot induction in elite. Pakistani guava cultivars for efficient clonal plant multiplication. Muhammad Usman*, Madiha Butt and Bilquees Fatima. Institute of Horticultural Sciences, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Pakistan. Accepted 30 April, 2012.

  14. Factors influencing in vitro shoot regeneration of Macadamia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-11-19

    Nov 19, 2008 ... Micropropagation of chestnut (Castanea sativa Mill). Symposium on In vitro Problems Related to Mass Propagation of. Horticultural. Plants. Acta. Hortic. 212. :http://www.actahort.org/books/212/212_80.htm. Mulwa RMS, Bhalla PL (2000). In vitro shoot multiplication of. Macadamia tetraphylla L. Johnson.

  15. Shoot apical meristem arrest in brassica and tomato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonge, de J.

    2013-01-01

    A pool of cells known as stem cells located in the center of the shoot apical meristem (SAM) are responsible to maintain meristematic activity throughout a plants life in order to produce organs. The maintenance of these stem cells is tightly controlled by a complex genetic and hormonal network. Any

  16. Adventitious shoot regeneration from cultured leaf explants of Petunia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DIRECTOR

    2012-06-26

    Jun 26, 2012 ... trend of average number of shoots produced was observed. Key words: Cytokinins, petunia, regeneration, thidiazuron. INTRODUCTION. Petunia hybrida is an important floriculture ornamental crop of high commercial interest. It is considered to be the first bedding plant; in addition Petunia is the most.

  17. Shoot multiplication of Paphiopedilum orchid through in vitro cutting ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Paphiopedilum orchids are generally propagated through the division of axillary buds from mother plant, which limits commercial production due to its unproductive proliferation and time consuming. In this study, the effect of in vitro cutting methods and medium composition on efficient shoot multiplication of Paphiopedilum ...

  18. Thidiazuron-induced shoot organogenesis of Cleome viscosa (L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MBA

    2014-02-26

    Feb 26, 2014 ... A reproducible protocol for direct shoot organogenesis of Cleome viscosa, an important medicinal weed herb was developed. The seed explants were collected primarily from field grown mature plants for in vitro germination on different strength of MS basal medium with or without selection of GA3 at ...

  19. Proliferation and Shoot Recovery among the East African Highland ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study demonstrates the potential of in vitro approach for production of banana planting materials. In vitro proliferation ability and in particualr efficiency to produce recoverable shoots of the different EA-AAA banana cultivars could be improved by varying the culture conditions during the subsequent subculture cycles.

  20. Adventitious shoot regeneration from cultured leaf explants of Petunia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DIRECTOR

    2012-06-26

    Jun 26, 2012 ... the first bedding plant; in addition Petunia is the most ... leaf explants of Petunia using MS medium containing. 2 mgL .... suggested that differences in BA uptake and metabolism ... cation might have an inhibitory effect on shoot.

  1. Adventitious shoots induction and plant regeneration from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aghomotsegin

    2015-07-08

    Jul 8, 2015 ... cultivars were placed on MB5 media supplemented with different concentrations and combinations of growth regulators (1.0 ... Key words: Watermelon (Citrullus lanatus), cotyledon, growth regulator, kanamycin, regeneration. ..... expression of Saccharomyces cerevisiae HAL1 gene increases salt tolerance ...

  2. The influence of growth regulators on shoot proliferation and rooting of in vitro propagated caper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caglar, G; Caglar, S; Ergin, O; Yarim, M

    2005-07-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine the effect of TDZ and BAP on shoot proliferation and to develop a satisfactory rooting procedure for in vitro propagation of caper (Capparis spinosa L). TDZ was found to be more effective than BAP in shoot production. The highest shoot number per explant (45.7) was achieved on the media that contained 4.54 microM TDZ in the absence of IAA. TDZ at 4.54 microM alone or in combination with 0.57 microM IAA did not inhibit shoot elongation, although they produced the most shoots. Dipping the caper shoots in the solution of IBA at 24.6 microM for 10 minutes before planting on MS media, improved the rooting percentage up to 80.5% under a 16 hr photoperiod.

  3. Arabidopsis ABCG14 is essential for the root-to-shoot translocation of cytokinin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Donghwi; Kang, Joohyun; Kiba, Takatoshi; Park, Jiyoung; Kojima, Mikiko; Do, Jihye; Kim, Kyung Yoon; Kwon, Mi; Endler, Anne; Song, Won-Yong; Martinoia, Enrico; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Lee, Youngsook

    2014-01-01

    Cytokinins are phytohormones that induce cytokinesis and are essential for diverse developmental and physiological processes in plants. Cytokinins of the trans-zeatin type are mainly synthesized in root vasculature and transported to the shoot, where they regulate shoot growth. However, the mechanism of long-distance transport of cytokinin was hitherto unknown. Here, we report that the Arabidopsis ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter subfamily G14 (AtABCG14) is mainly expressed in roots and plays a major role in delivering cytokinins to the shoot. Loss of AtABCG14 expression resulted in severe shoot growth retardation, which was rescued by exogenous trans-zeatin application. Cytokinin content was decreased in the shoots of atabcg14 plants and increased in the roots, with consistent changes in the expression of cytokinin-responsive genes. Grafting of atabcg14 scions onto wild-type rootstocks restored shoot growth, whereas wild-type scions grafted onto atabcg14 rootstocks exhibited shoot growth retardation similar to that of atabcg14. Cytokinin concentrations in the xylem are reduced by ∼90% in the atabcg14 mutant. These results indicate that AtABCG14 is crucial for the translocation of cytokinin to the shoot. Our results provide molecular evidence for the long-distance transport of cytokinin and show that this transport is necessary for normal shoot development. PMID:24778257

  4. Arabidopsis ABCG14 is essential for the root-to-shoot translocation of cytokinin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Donghwi; Kang, Joohyun; Kiba, Takatoshi; Park, Jiyoung; Kojima, Mikiko; Do, Jihye; Kim, Kyung Yoon; Kwon, Mi; Endler, Anne; Song, Won-Yong; Martinoia, Enrico; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Lee, Youngsook

    2014-05-13

    Cytokinins are phytohormones that induce cytokinesis and are essential for diverse developmental and physiological processes in plants. Cytokinins of the trans-zeatin type are mainly synthesized in root vasculature and transported to the shoot, where they regulate shoot growth. However, the mechanism of long-distance transport of cytokinin was hitherto unknown. Here, we report that the Arabidopsis ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter subfamily G14 (AtABCG14) is mainly expressed in roots and plays a major role in delivering cytokinins to the shoot. Loss of AtABCG14 expression resulted in severe shoot growth retardation, which was rescued by exogenous trans-zeatin application. Cytokinin content was decreased in the shoots of atabcg14 plants and increased in the roots, with consistent changes in the expression of cytokinin-responsive genes. Grafting of atabcg14 scions onto wild-type rootstocks restored shoot growth, whereas wild-type scions grafted onto atabcg14 rootstocks exhibited shoot growth retardation similar to that of atabcg14. Cytokinin concentrations in the xylem are reduced by ∼90% in the atabcg14 mutant. These results indicate that AtABCG14 is crucial for the translocation of cytokinin to the shoot. Our results provide molecular evidence for the long-distance transport of cytokinin and show that this transport is necessary for normal shoot development.

  5. Fruit production and branching density affect shoot and whole-tree wood to leaf biomass ratio in olive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosati, Adolfo; Paoletti, Andrea; Al Hariri, Raeed; Famiani, Franco

    2018-02-14

    The amount of shoot stem (i.e., woody part of the shoot) dry matter per unit shoot leaf dry matter (i.e., the shoot wood to leaf biomass ratio) has been reported to be lower in short shoots than in long ones, and this is related to the greater and earlier ability of short shoots to export carbon. This is important in fruit trees, since the greater and earlier carbon export ability of shoots with a lower wood to leaf biomass ratio improves fruit production. This ratio may vary with cultivars, training systems or plant age, but no study has previously investigated the possible effect of fruit production. In this study on two olive cultivars (i.e., Arbequina, with low growth rate, and Frantoio, with high growth rate) subject to different fruit production treatments, we found that at increasing fruit production, shoot length and shoot wood to leaf biomass ratio were proportionally reduced in the new shoots growing at the same time as the fruit. Specifically, fruit production proportionally reduced total new-shoot biomass, length, leaf area and average shoot length. With decreasing shoot length, shoot diameter, stem mass, internode length, individual leaf area and shoot wood to leaf biomass ratio also decreased. This may be viewed as a plant strategy to better support fruit growth in the current year, given the greater and earlier ability of short shoots to export carbon. Moreover, at the whole-tree level, the percentage of total tree biomass production invested in leaves was closely correlated with branching density, which differed significantly across cultivars. By branching more, Arbequina concentrates more shoots (thus leaves) per unit of wood (trunk, branches and root) mass, decreasing wood to leaf biomass ratio at the whole-tree level. Therefore, while, at the shoot level, shoot length determines shoot wood to leaf biomass ratio, at the canopy level branching density is also an important determinant of whole-tree wood to leaf biomass ratio. Whole-tree wood to leaf

  6. Light signaling and the phytohormonal regulation of shoot growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurepin, Leonid V; Pharis, Richard P

    2014-12-01

    Shoot growth of dicot plants is rigorously controlled by the interactions of environmental cues with several groups of phytohormones. The signaling effects of light on shoot growth are of special interest, as both light irradiance and light quality change rapidly throughout the day, causing profound changes in stem elongation and leaf area growth. Among the several dicot species examined, we have focused on sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) because its shoots are robust and their growth is highly plastic. Sunflower shoots thus constitute an ideal tissue for assessing responses to both light irradiance and light quality signals. Herein, we discuss the possible roles of gibberellins, auxin, ethylene, cytokinins and brassinosteroids in mediating the stem elongation and leaf area growth that is induced by shade light. To do this we uncoupled the plant's responses to changes in the red to far-red [R/FR] light ratio from its responses to changes in irradiance of photosynthetically active radiation [PAR]. Reducing each of R/FR light ratio and PAR irradiance results in increased sunflower stem elongation. However, the plant's response for leaf area growth differs considerably, with a low R/FR ratio generally promoting leaf area growth, whereas low irradiance PAR inhibits it. The increased stem elongation that occurs in response to lowering R/FR ratio and PAR irradiance is accomplished at the expense of leaf area growth. In effect, the low PAR irradiance signal overrides the low R/FR ratio signal in shade light's control of leaf growth and development. Three hormone groups, gibberellins, auxin and ethylene are directly involved in regulating these light-mediated shoot growth changes. Gibberellins and auxin function as growth promoters, with auxin likely acting as an up-regulator of gibberellin biosynthesis. Ethylene functions as a growth-inhibitor and probably interacts with gibberellins in regulating both stem and leaf growth of the sunflower shoot. Copyright © 2014

  7. Carotenoids in certain higher plants from various ecological niches of Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Czeczuga

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The carotenoids content in Posidonia oceanica, Nelumbium nuciferum, Opuntia ficus-indica and Zygophyllum album from different ecological niches in Egypt was studied. Considerable differences, both qualitative and quantitative among four investigated plant species were found.

  8. Zinc oxide and silver nanoparticles influence the antioxidative status in a higher aquatic plant, Spirodela punctata

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Thwala, Melusi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available during the 14-d exposure. The biochemical anti-oxidative status of the plant specimens were investigated using quantitative analysis of total antioxidant capacity, peroxidase and activity of catalase and superoxide dismutase. The anti-oxidative defence...

  9. Elemental composition of native wetland plants in constructed mesocosm treatment wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Beverly S; Sharitz, Rebecca R; Coughlin, Daniel P

    2005-05-01

    Plants that accumulate a small percentage of metals in constructed treatment wetlands can contribute to remediation of acidic, metal contaminated runoff waters from coal mines or processing areas. We examined root and shoot concentrations of elements in four perennial wetland species over two seasons in mesocosm wetland systems designed to remediate water from a coal pile runoff basin. Deep wetlands in each system contained Myriophyllum aquaticum and Nymphaea odorata; shallow wetlands contained Juncus effusus and Pontederia cordata. Shoot elemental concentrations differed between plants of deep and shallow wetlands, with higher Zn, Al, and Fe concentrations in plants in shallow wetlands and higher Na, Mn, and P concentrations in plants in deep wetlands. Root and shoot concentrations of most elements differed between species in each wetland type. Over two seasons, these four common wetland plants did help remediate acidic, metal-contaminated runoff from a coal storage pile.

  10. Enhanced shoot multiplication in Ficus religiosa L. in the presence of adenine sulphate, glutamine and phloroglucinol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siwach, Priyanka; Gill, Anita Rani

    2011-07-01

    Ficus religiosa (Pipal) is a long-lived valuable multipurpose forest tree. The tree is exploited because of its religious, ornamental and medicinal value and the regeneration rate in natural habitat is low. An in vitro propagation protocol has been developed from nodal segments obtained from a 45-50-year old tree. The highest bud break frequency (100 %) followed by maximum number of multiple shoots (13.9) as well as length (2.47 cm) were obtained on Woody Plant medium (WPM) supplemented with 1.0 mg/l BAP along with 0.5 mg/l IAA. Two modifications in this medium resulted in enhanced shoot regeneration-one with 200 mg/l glutamine + 150 mg/l ADS (called as MM-1) giving 32.5 shoots per nodal explant while another modification-with 200 mg/l glutamine + 150 mg/l ADS + 100 mg/l phloroglucinol (called as MM-2) giving 35.65 shoots per explant. These two media were used for sub-culturing of shoots for 4 months. The rate of shoot multiplication was same during the first three sub-cultures on MM-1 and the shoots regenerated were healthy, afterwards shoot multiplication declined. While on MM-2, shoot multiplication declined after first sub-culture and shoots underwent the problem of early leaf fall. Rooting was best induced in micro-shoots excised from proliferated shoot cultures on semi-solid as well as liquid WPM modified with 2.0 mg/l IBA and 0.5 mg/l IAA. The in vitro-raised plantlets were potted and acclimatized under culture room conditions for 25-30 days before transfer to soil conditions, where the established plants showed more than 90 % survival.

  11. Molecular Properties and Functional Divergence of the Dehydroascorbate Reductase Gene Family in Lower and Higher Plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Jie Zhang

    Full Text Available Dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR, which reduces oxidized ascorbate, is important for maintaining an appropriate ascorbate redox state in plant cells. To date, genome-wide molecular characterization of DHARs has only been conducted in bryophytes (Physcomitrella patens and eudicots (e.g. Arabidopsis thaliana. In this study, to gain a general understanding of the molecular properties and functional divergence of the DHARs in land plants, we further conducted a comprehensive analysis of DHARs from the lycophyte Selaginella moellendorffii, gymnosperm Picea abies and monocot Zea mays. DHARs were present as a small gene family in all of the land plants we examined, with gene numbers ranging from two to four. All the plants contained cytosolic and chloroplastic DHARs, indicating dehydroascorbate (DHA can be directly reduced in the cytoplasm and chloroplast by DHARs in all the plants. A novel vacuolar DHAR was found in Z. mays, indicating DHA may also be reduced in the vacuole by DHARs in Z. mays. The DHARs within each species showed extensive functional divergence in their gene structures, subcellular localizations, and enzymatic characteristics. This study provides new insights into the molecular characteristics and functional divergence of DHARs in land plants.

  12. A complete mitochondrial genome of wheat (Triticum aestivum cv. Chinese Yumai), and fast evolving mitochondrial genes in higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Peng; Liu, Huitao; Lin, Qiang; Ding, Feng; Zhuo, Guoyin; Hu, Songnian; Liu, Dongcheng; Yang, Wenlong; Zhan, Kehui; Zhang, Aimin; Yu, Jun

    2009-12-01

    Plant mitochondrial genomes, encoding necessary proteins involved in the system of energy production, play an important role in the development and reproduction of the plant. They occupy a specific evolutionary pattern relative to their nuclear counterparts. Here, we determined the winter wheat (Triticum aestivum cv. Chinese Yumai) mitochondrial genome in a length of 452 and 526 bp by shotgun sequencing its BAC library. It contains 202 genes, including 35 known protein-coding genes, three rRNA and 17 tRNA genes, as well as 149 open reading frames (ORFs; greater than 300 bp in length). The sequence is almost identical to the previously reported sequence of the spring wheat (T. aestivum cv. Chinese Spring); we only identified seven SNPs (three transitions and four transversions) and 10 indels (insertions and deletions) between the two independently acquired sequences, and all variations were found in non-coding regions. This result confirmed the accuracy of the previously reported mitochondrial sequence of the Chinese Spring wheat. The nucleotide frequency and codon usage of wheat are common among the lineage of higher plant with a high AT-content of 58%. Molecular evolutionary analysis demonstrated that plant mitochondrial genomes evolved at different rates, which may correlate with substantial variations in metabolic rate and generation time among plant lineages. In addition, through the estimation of the ratio of non-synonymous to synonymous substitution rates between orthologous mitochondrion-encoded genes of higher plants, we found an accelerated evolutionary rate that seems to be the result of relaxed selection.

  13. Production characteristics of lettuce Lactuca sativa L. in the frame of the first crop tests in the Higher Plant Chamber integrated into the MELiSSA Pilot Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhomirova, Natalia; Lawson, Jamie; Stasiak, Michael; Dixon, Mike; Paille, Christel; Peiro, Enrique; Fossen, Arnaud; Godia, Francesc

    Micro-Ecological Life Support System Alternative (MELiSSA) is an artificial closed ecosystem that is considered a tool for the development of a bioregenerative life support system for manned space missions. One of the five compartments of MELiSSA loop -Higher Plant Chamber was recently integrated into the MELiSSA Pilot Plant facility at Universitat Aut`noma deo Barcelona. The main contributions expected by integration of this photosynthetic compartment are oxygen, water, vegetable food production and CO2 consumption. Production characteristics of Lactuca sativa L., as a MELiSSA candidate crop, were investigated in this work in the first crop experiments in the MELiSSA Pilot Plant facility. The plants were grown in batch culture and totaled 100 plants with a growing area 5 m long and 1 m wide in a sealed controlled environment. Several replicates of the experiments were carried out with varying duration. It was shown that after 46 days of lettuce cultivation dry edible biomass averaged 27, 2 g per plant. However accumulation of oxygen in the chamber, which required purging of the chamber, and decrease in the food value of the plants was observed. Reducing the duration of the tests allowed uninterrupted test without opening the system and also allowed estimation of the crop's carbon balance. Results of productivity, tissue composition, nutrient uptake and canopy photosynthesis of lettuce regardless of test duration are discussed in the paper.

  14. 3D Sorghum Reconstructions from Depth Images Identify QTL Regulating Shoot Architecture1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Dissecting the genetic basis of complex traits is aided by frequent and nondestructive measurements. Advances in range imaging technologies enable the rapid acquisition of three-dimensional (3D) data from an imaged scene. A depth camera was used to acquire images of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), an important grain, forage, and bioenergy crop, at multiple developmental time points from a greenhouse-grown recombinant inbred line population. A semiautomated software pipeline was developed and used to generate segmented, 3D plant reconstructions from the images. Automated measurements made from 3D plant reconstructions identified quantitative trait loci for standard measures of shoot architecture, such as shoot height, leaf angle, and leaf length, and for novel composite traits, such as shoot compactness. The phenotypic variability associated with some of the quantitative trait loci displayed differences in temporal prevalence; for example, alleles closely linked with the sorghum Dwarf3 gene, an auxin transporter and pleiotropic regulator of both leaf inclination angle and shoot height, influence leaf angle prior to an effect on shoot height. Furthermore, variability in composite phenotypes that measure overall shoot architecture, such as shoot compactness, is regulated by loci underlying component phenotypes like leaf angle. As such, depth imaging is an economical and rapid method to acquire shoot architecture phenotypes in agriculturally important plants like sorghum to study the genetic basis of complex traits. PMID:27528244

  15. Improved plant nitrogen nutrition contributes to higher water use efficiency in tomatoes under alternate partial root-zone irrigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Yaosheng; Liu, Fulai; Andersen, Mathias Neumann

    2010-01-01

    carbon isotope composition (δ13C), indicating that the improvement of WUE might have been a result of long-term optimisation of stomatal control over gas exchange. The constantly higher xylem sap ABA concentration in PRI compared with DI plants was seemingly responsible for the greater control over......Comparative effects of partial root-zone irrigation (PRI) and deficit irrigation (DI) on stomatal conductance (gs), nitrogen accumulation and distribution in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.) plants were investigated in a split-root pot experiment. Results showed that both PRI and DI saved 25...... nutrition and distribution in the canopy may indicate that PRI plants have a greater photosynthetic capacity than DI plants; this is confirmed by the observed positive linear relationship between specific leaf N content and δ13C. It is concluded that PRI improves N nutrition and optimises N distribution...

  16. The evolutionary reality of species and higher taxa in plants: a survey of post-modern opinion and evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barraclough, Timothy G; Humphreys, Aelys M

    2015-07-01

    Species are normally considered to be the fundamental unit for understanding the evolution of biodiversity. Yet, in a survey of botanists in 1940, twice as many felt that plant genera were more natural units than plant species. Revisiting the survey, we found more people now regarded species as a more evolutionarily real unit, but a sizeable number still felt that genera were more evolutionarily real than species. Definitions of 'evolutionarily real' split into those based on shared evolutionary history and those based on shared evolutionary fate via ongoing evolutionary processes. We discuss recent work testing for shared evolutionary fate at the species and higher levels and present preliminary evidence for evolutionarily significant higher taxa in plants. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  17. Action of humic acid on promotion of cucumber shoot growth involves nitrate-related changes associated with the root-to-shoot distribution of cytokinins, polyamines and mineral nutrients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Verónica; Bacaicoa, Eva; Zamarreño, Angel-Maria; Aguirre, Elena; Garnica, Maria; Fuentes, Marta; García-Mina, José-Maria

    2010-05-15

    Numerous studies have reported the ability of humic substances to increase shoot growth in different plant species cultivated under diverse growth conditions. However, the mechanism responsible for this effect of humic substances is poorly understood. It is possible that the shoot promoting effect of humic substances involves a primary effect on root H(+)-ATPase activity and nitrate root-shoot distribution that, in turn, causes changes in the root-shoot distribution of certain cytokinins, polyamines and abscisic acid, thus affecting shoot growth. We investigated this hypothesis in the present study. The results showed that the root application of a purified humic acid causes a significant increase in shoot growth that is associated with an enhancement in root H(+)-ATPase activity, an increase in nitrate shoot concentration, and a decrease in roots. These effects were associated with significant increases in the shoot concentration of several cytokinins and polyamines (principally putrescine), concomitant with decreases in roots. Likewise, these changes in the root-shoot distribution of diverse active cytokinins correlated well to significant changes in the root-shoot distribution of several mineral nutrients. These results, taken together, indicate that the beneficial effects of humic substances on shoot development in cucumber could be directly associated with nitrate-related effects on the shoot concentration of several active cytokinins and polyamines (principally putrescine). (c) 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. Some remarks on the methods of assessing the population density of higher plants in cases of aggregated spatial structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Justyna Kwiatkowska

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comparative analysis of the methods used for. assessing the density of higher plants. The analysis was carried out on natural population (Vaccinium myrtillus L. characterized by aggregated spatial structure. Attention has been paid to the surface methods with high (0.25 m2 and low

  19. Effects of BAP and TIBA on Shoot Proliferation of Rosa hybrida L. cv. Full House in in vitro Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Hajian

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Micropropagation is a proper approach to rapid and large-scale propagation of rootstocks and rose cultivars for huge demand of flower market. Proliferation rate of shoot is decreased drastically following several subcultures. Growth regulators have remarkable effects on the key phase of proliferation in micropropagation of this popular crop. In this research the effects of BAP and antiauxin of TIBA on quality and quantity of developed shoots in Rosa hybrida cv. Full House were studied. BAP and TIBA were applied at three concentrations of 0, 2.2 and 8.8 µmol in proliferation phase of micropropagation. The experiment was conducted based on factorial and completely randomized design with four replications. After two months, the percentage of proliferated explants, survived main and lateral shoot number, length of the main and lateral shoots, number of green leaves on the shoots, the average number of shoots with chlorotic and necrotic leaves, the average axillary shoot base diameter, fresh weight of shoots and number of shoots with necrotic tip were recorded. Analysis of variance indicated that BAP was ineffective on the number of the main shoot green leaves and decreasing number of shoots with necrotic tip, but enhanced other traits. The concentration of 8.8 µmol of BAP had greater effect than 2.2 µmol of this growth regulator on mentioned traits. The higher concentration of TIBA resulted to more shoot with necrotic tip. This antiauxin had anegative impact on shoot fresh weight, but the other parameters were not significantly affected.

  20. Shoot- and root-borne cytokinin influences arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosme, Marco; Ramireddy, Eswarayya; Franken, Philipp; Schmülling, Thomas; Wurst, Susanne

    2016-10-01

    The arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis is functionally important for the nutrition and growth of most terrestrial plants. Nearly all phytohormones are employed by plants to regulate the symbiosis with AM fungi, but the regulatory role of cytokinin (CK) is not well understood. Here, we used transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) with a root-specific or constitutive expression of CK-degrading CKX genes and the corresponding wild-type to investigate whether a lowered content of CK in roots or in both roots and shoots influences the interaction with the AM fungus Rhizophagus irregularis. Our data indicates that shoot CK has a positive impact on AM fungal development in roots and on the root transcript level of an AM-responsive phosphate transporter gene (NtPT4). A reduced CK content in roots caused shoot and root growth depression following AM colonization, while neither the uptake of phosphorus or nitrogen nor the root transcript levels of NtPT4 were significantly affected. This suggests that root CK may restrict the C availability from the roots to the fungus thus averting parasitism by AM fungi. Taken together, our study indicates that shoot- and root-borne CK have distinct roles in AM symbiosis. We propose a model illustrating how plants may employ CK to regulate nutrient exchange with the ubiquitous AM fungi.

  1. Differentiating moss from higher plants is critical in studying the carbon cycle of the boreal biome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Wenping; Liu, Shuguang; Dong, Wenjie; Liang, Shunlin; Zhao, Shuqing; Chen, Jingming; Xu, Wenfang; Li, Xianglan; Barr, Alan; Andrew Black, T; Yan, Wende; Goulden, Mike L; Kulmala, Liisa; Lindroth, Anders; Margolis, Hank A; Matsuura, Yojiro; Moors, Eddy; van der Molen, Michiel; Ohta, Takeshi; Pilegaard, Kim; Varlagin, Andrej; Vesala, Timo

    2014-06-26

    The satellite-derived normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), which is used for estimating gross primary production (GPP), often includes contributions from both mosses and vascular plants in boreal ecosystems. For the same NDVI, moss can generate only about one-third of the GPP that vascular plants can because of its much lower photosynthetic capacity. Here, based on eddy covariance measurements, we show that the difference in photosynthetic capacity between these two plant functional types has never been explicitly included when estimating regional GPP in the boreal region, resulting in a substantial overestimation. The magnitude of this overestimation could have important implications regarding a change from a current carbon sink to a carbon source in the boreal region. Moss abundance, associated with ecosystem disturbances, needs to be mapped and incorporated into GPP estimates in order to adequately assess the role of the boreal region in the global carbon cycle.

  2. Congruence and Diversity of Butterfly-Host Plant Associations at Higher Taxonomic Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer-Paris, José R.; Sánchez-Mercado, Ada; Viloria, Ángel L.; Donaldson, John

    2013-01-01

    We aggregated data on butterfly-host plant associations from existing sources in order to address the following questions: (1) is there a general correlation between host diversity and butterfly species richness?, (2) has the evolution of host plant use followed consistent patterns across butterfly lineages?, (3) what is the common ancestral host plant for all butterfly lineages? The compilation included 44,148 records from 5,152 butterfly species (28.6% of worldwide species of Papilionoidea) and 1,193 genera (66.3%). The overwhelming majority of butterflies use angiosperms as host plants. Fabales is used by most species (1,007 spp.) from all seven butterfly families and most subfamilies, Poales is the second most frequently used order, but is mostly restricted to two species-rich subfamilies: Hesperiinae (56.5% of all Hesperiidae), and Satyrinae (42.6% of all Nymphalidae). We found a significant and strong correlation between host plant diversity and butterfly species richness. A global test for congruence (Parafit test) was sensitive to uncertainty in the butterfly cladogram, and suggests a mixed system with congruent associations between Papilionidae and magnoliids, Hesperiidae and monocots, and the remaining subfamilies with the eudicots (fabids and malvids), but also numerous random associations. The congruent associations are also recovered as the most probable ancestral states in each node using maximum likelihood methods. The shift from basal groups to eudicots appears to be more likely than the other way around, with the only exception being a Satyrine-clade within the Nymphalidae that feed on monocots. Our analysis contributes to the visualization of the complex pattern of interactions at superfamily level and provides a context to discuss the timing of changes in host plant utilization that might have promoted diversification in some butterfly lineages. PMID:23717448

  3. Congruence and diversity of butterfly-host plant associations at higher taxonomic levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José R Ferrer-Paris

    Full Text Available We aggregated data on butterfly-host plant associations from existing sources in order to address the following questions: (1 is there a general correlation between host diversity and butterfly species richness?, (2 has the evolution of host plant use followed consistent patterns across butterfly lineages?, (3 what is the common ancestral host plant for all butterfly lineages? The compilation included 44,148 records from 5,152 butterfly species (28.6% of worldwide species of Papilionoidea and 1,193 genera (66.3%. The overwhelming majority of butterflies use angiosperms as host plants. Fabales is used by most species (1,007 spp. from all seven butterfly families and most subfamilies, Poales is the second most frequently used order, but is mostly restricted to two species-rich subfamilies: Hesperiinae (56.5% of all Hesperiidae, and Satyrinae (42.6% of all Nymphalidae. We found a significant and strong correlation between host plant diversity and butterfly species richness. A global test for congruence (Parafit test was sensitive to uncertainty in the butterfly cladogram, and suggests a mixed system with congruent associations between Papilionidae and magnoliids, Hesperiidae and monocots, and the remaining subfamilies with the eudicots (fabids and malvids, but also numerous random associations. The congruent associations are also recovered as the most probable ancestral states in each node using maximum likelihood methods. The shift from basal groups to eudicots appears to be more likely than the other way around, with the only exception being a Satyrine-clade within the Nymphalidae that feed on monocots. Our analysis contributes to the visualization of the complex pattern of interactions at superfamily level and provides a context to discuss the timing of changes in host plant utilization that might have promoted diversification in some butterfly lineages.

  4. Engineering plastid fatty acid biosynthesis to improve food quality and biofuel production in higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogalski, Marcelo; Carrer, Helaine

    2011-06-01

    The ability to manipulate plant fatty acid biosynthesis by using new biotechnological approaches has allowed the production of transgenic plants with unusual fatty acid profile and increased oil content. This review focuses on the production of very long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (VLCPUFAs) and the increase in oil content in plants using molecular biology tools. Evidences suggest that regular consumption of food rich in VLCPUFAs has multiple positive health benefits. Alternative sources of these nutritional fatty acids are found in cold-water fishes. However, fish stocks are in severe decline because of decades of overfishing, and also fish oils can be contaminated by the accumulation of toxic compounds. Recently, there is also an increase in oilseed use for the production of biofuels. This tendency is partly associated with the rapidly rising costs of petroleum, increased concern about the environmental impact of fossil oil and the attractive need to develop renewable sources of fuel. In contrast to this scenario, oil derived from crop plants is normally contaminant free and less environmentally aggressive. Genetic engineering of the plastid genome (plastome) offers a number of attractive advantages, including high-level foreign protein expression, marker-gene excision and transgene containment because of maternal inheritance of plastid genome in most crops. Here, we describe the possibility to improve fatty acid biosynthesis in plastids, production of new fatty acids and increase their content in plants by genetic engineering of plastid fatty acid biosynthesis via plastid transformation. © 2011 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal © 2011 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Effects of shooting percentage on the outcome of basketball games

    OpenAIRE

    八板, 昭仁; 野寺, 和彦

    2007-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the relationship between shooting percentages and the outcome of basketball games. The shooting ability of WJBL teams and their shooting percentages in each game were compared, and the relationship between shooting percentages and outcome were analyzed. The following definitions were used: * Good shooting: shooting percentage in game>average shooting percentage * Poor shooting: shooting percentage in gamepoint differential against opponent * Games in whic...

  6. Micropropagation of Vaccinium sp. by in vitro axillary shoot proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litwińczuk, Wojciech

    2013-01-01

    The Vaccinium genus contains several valuable fruit and ornamental species, among others: highbush blueberry (Vaccinium × corymbosum L.), cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.), and lingonberry (Vaccinium vitis-idaea L.). In some most popular and valuable cultivars, the conventional propagation methods, exploiting hard or soft wood cuttings, are inefficient. The demand for nursery plants could be fulfilled only by micropropagation. In principle cultivars are propagated in vitro through similar three-stage method, based on subculture of shoot explants on different culture media supplemented with IAA (0-4 mg/L) and 2iP (5-10 mg/L), and rooting shoots in vivo. The obtained plantlets are transferred to peat substrate and grown in the glasshouse until the end of growing period. The development of adventitious shoots should be monitored and controlled during in vitro stages. Many clones have specific requirements for growing conditions and/or are recalcitrant.

  7. Transcript profiling of cytokinin action in Arabidopsis roots and shoots discovers largely similar but also organ-specific responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenner Wolfram G

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The plant hormone cytokinin regulates growth and development of roots and shoots in opposite ways. In shoots it is a positive growth regulator whereas it inhibits growth in roots. It may be assumed that organ-specific regulation of gene expression is involved in these differential activities, but little is known about it. To get more insight into the transcriptional events triggered by cytokinin in roots and shoots, we studied genome-wide gene expression in cytokinin-treated and cytokinin-deficient roots and shoots. Results It was found by principal component analysis of the transcriptomic data that the immediate-early response to a cytokinin stimulus differs from the later response, and that the transcriptome of cytokinin-deficient plants is different from both the early and the late cytokinin induction response. A higher cytokinin status in the roots activated the expression of numerous genes normally expressed predominantly in the shoot, while a lower cytokinin status in the shoot reduced the expression of genes normally more active in the shoot to a more root-like level. This shift predominantly affected nuclear genes encoding plastid proteins. An organ-specific regulation was assigned to a number of genes previously known to react to a cytokinin signal, including root-specificity for the cytokinin hydroxylase gene CYP735A2 and shoot specificity for the cell cycle regulator gene CDKA;1. Numerous cytokinin-regulated genes were newly discovered or confirmed, including the meristem regulator genes SHEPHERD and CLAVATA1, auxin-related genes (IAA7, IAA13, AXR1, PIN2, PID, several genes involved in brassinosteroid (CYP710A1, CYP710A2, DIM/DWF and flavonol (MYB12, CHS, FLS1 synthesis, various transporter genes (e.g. HKT1, numerous members of the AP2/ERF transcription factor gene family, genes involved in light signalling (PhyA, COP1, SPA1, and more than 80 ribosomal genes. However, contrasting with the fundamental difference of

  8. Transcript profiling of cytokinin action in Arabidopsis roots and shoots discovers largely similar but also organ-specific responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The plant hormone cytokinin regulates growth and development of roots and shoots in opposite ways. In shoots it is a positive growth regulator whereas it inhibits growth in roots. It may be assumed that organ-specific regulation of gene expression is involved in these differential activities, but little is known about it. To get more insight into the transcriptional events triggered by cytokinin in roots and shoots, we studied genome-wide gene expression in cytokinin-treated and cytokinin-deficient roots and shoots. Results It was found by principal component analysis of the transcriptomic data that the immediate-early response to a cytokinin stimulus differs from the later response, and that the transcriptome of cytokinin-deficient plants is different from both the early and the late cytokinin induction response. A higher cytokinin status in the roots activated the expression of numerous genes normally expressed predominantly in the shoot, while a lower cytokinin status in the shoot reduced the expression of genes normally more active in the shoot to a more root-like level. This shift predominantly affected nuclear genes encoding plastid proteins. An organ-specific regulation was assigned to a number of genes previously known to react to a cytokinin signal, including root-specificity for the cytokinin hydroxylase gene CYP735A2 and shoot specificity for the cell cycle regulator gene CDKA;1. Numerous cytokinin-regulated genes were newly discovered or confirmed, including the meristem regulator genes SHEPHERD and CLAVATA1, auxin-related genes (IAA7, IAA13, AXR1, PIN2, PID), several genes involved in brassinosteroid (CYP710A1, CYP710A2, DIM/DWF) and flavonol (MYB12, CHS, FLS1) synthesis, various transporter genes (e.g. HKT1), numerous members of the AP2/ERF transcription factor gene family, genes involved in light signalling (PhyA, COP1, SPA1), and more than 80 ribosomal genes. However, contrasting with the fundamental difference of the growth response of

  9. Zinc oxide and silver nanoparticles influence the antioxidative status in a higher aquatic plant, Spirodela punctata

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Thwala, Melusi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The authors present evidence of free radical activity and resultant anti-oxidative defence in Spirodela plants after exposure to 0.01-1000 mg/L of ZnO and Ag nanoparticles (NPs) over 96-h and 14-d. The quantification of reactive nitrogen...

  10. Differentiating moss from higher plants is critical in studying the carbon cycle of the boreal biome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Wenping; Liu, Shuguang; Dong, Wenjie

    2014-01-01

    The satellite-derived normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), which is used for estimating gross primary production (GPP), often includes contributions from both mosses and vascular plants in boreal ecosystems. For the same NDVI, moss can generate only about one-third of the GPP that vascu...

  11. Predicting molybdenum toxicity to higher plants: Estimation of toxicity threshold values

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGrath, S.P., E-mail: steve.mcgrath@bbsrc.ac.u [Soil Science Department, Centre for Soils and Ecosystems Function, Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, Hertfordshire AL5 2JQ (United Kingdom); Mico, C.; Zhao, F.J.; Stroud, J.L. [Soil Science Department, Centre for Soils and Ecosystems Function, Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, Hertfordshire AL5 2JQ (United Kingdom); Zhang, H.; Fozard, S. [Division of Environmental Science, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YQ (United Kingdom)

    2010-10-15

    Four plant species (oilseed rape, Brassica napus L.; red clover, Trifolium pratense L.; ryegrass, Lolium perenne L.; and tomato, Lycopersicon esculentum L.) were tested on ten soils varying widely in soil properties to assess molybdenum (Mo) toxicity. A larger range (66-fold-609-fold) of added Mo concentrations resulting in 50% inhibition of yield (ED{sub 50}) was found among soils than among plant species (2-fold-38-fold), which illustrated that the soils differed widely in the expression of Mo toxicity. Toxicity thresholds based on soil solution Mo narrowed the variation among soils compared to thresholds based on added Mo concentrations. We conclude that plant bioavailability of Mo in soil depends on Mo solubility, but this alone did not decrease the variability in observed toxicity enough to be used in risk assessment and that other soil properties influencing Mo toxicity to plants need to be considered. - Mo toxicity thresholds varied widely in different soils and therefore soil properties need to be taken into account in order to assess the risk of Mo exposure.

  12. Utilization of respiratory energy in higher plants : requirements for 'maintenance' and transport processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouma, T.J.

    1995-01-01

    Quantitative knowledge of both photosynthesis and respiration is required to understand plant growth and resulting crop yield. However, especially the nature of the energy demanding processes that are dependent on dark respiration in full-grown tissues is largely unknown. The main objective

  13. Shootings Revive Debates on Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Nirvi

    2013-01-01

    By nearly all accounts, the staff and students at Sandy Hook Elementary School did everything right on Dec. 14--and with the security measures they took before that day--when a young man armed with powerful weapons blasted his way into the school. But the deadliest K-12 school shooting in American history, a day that President Barack Obama has…

  14. School Shootings and Critical Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Juliet

    2013-01-01

    What has been left out of studying school violence and shootings is a comprehensive look at the culture that creates violence and the lack of support for those deemed "different" in an educational setting that promotes and rewards competition. If parents, teachers, and other adults associated with children were teaching the values of…

  15. Shoot or don't shoot? Why police officers are more inclined to shoot when they're anxious

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuys, A.; Savelsbergh, G.J.P.; Oudejans, R.R.D.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the effect of anxiety on police officers' shooting decisions. Thirty-six police officers participated and executed a lowand high-anxiety video-based test that required them to shoot or not shoot at rapidly appearing suspects that either had a gun and "shot," or had no gun and

  16. Shoot or Don't Shoot? Why Police Officers Are More Inclined to Shoot When They Are Anxious

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuys, A.; Savelsbergh, G.J.P.; Oudejans, R.R.D.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the effect of anxiety on police officers' shooting decisions. Thirty-six police officers participated and executed a low- and high-anxiety video-based test that required them to shoot or not shoot at rapidly appearing suspects that either had a gun and “shot,” or had no gun and

  17. Epigenetic regulation and functional exaptation of transposable elements in higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xiekui; Cao, Xiaofeng

    2014-10-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) are mobile genetic elements that can proliferate in their host genomes. Because of their robust amplification, TEs have long been considered 'selfish DNA', harmful insertions that can threaten host genome integrity. The idea of TEs as junk DNA comes from analysis of epigenetic silencing of their mobility in plants and animals. This idea contrasts with McClintock's characterization of TEs as 'controlling elements'. Emerging studies on the regulatory functions of TEs in plant genomes have updated McClintock's characterization, indicating exaptation of TEs for genetic regulation. In this review, we summarize recent progress in TE silencing, particularly in Arabidopsis and rice, and show that TEs provide an abundant, natural source of regulation for the host genome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Inherent and environmental patterns in biomass allocation and allometry among higher plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorter, Hendrik

    2017-04-01

    It is well-known that plants may adjust the distribution of biomass over leaves, stems and roots depending on environmental conditions. It is also clear that size is an important factor as well. However, good quantitative insights are lacking. In this talk I analyse biomass allocation patterns to leaves, stems and roots of herbs and woody species. A database was compiled with 11.000 records of leaf, stem and root biomass for 1200 species. First, I'll derive general dose-response curves that describe the relationship between biomass allocation and the 12 most important a-biotic environmental factors and compare them with the changes in leaf, stem and root morphology. Second, I'll focus on allometric relationships between the various organs and test to what extent they comply with models like that for Metabolic Scaling Theory, where the slope of the log-log relationship between leaf and root biomass is expected to have a value of ¾. Third, I analyse how leaf, stem and root mass fractions change as a function of total plant size. This offers a great opportunity to test to what extent there are systematic differences in allocation patterns related to phylogeny (e.g. Gymnosperms vs. Angiosperms, grasses vs. herbaceous dicots) and functional group (e.g. deciduous vs. evergreens). Poorter et al. (2012) Biomass allocation to leaves, stems and roots: meta-analyses of interspecific variation and environmental control. New Phytol. 193: 30-50. Poorter & Sack (2012) Pitfalls and possibilities in the analysis of biomass allocation patterns in plants. Front. Plant Sci. 3: 259. Poorter et al. (2015) How does biomass distribution change with size and differ among species? New Phytol. 208: 736-749

  19. Metabolism of ibuprofen in higher plants: A model Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension culture system

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Maršík, Petr; Šíša, Miroslav; Lacina, O.; Moťková, Kateřina; Langhansová, Lenka; Rezek, Jan; Vaněk, Tomáš

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 220, JAN (2017), s. 383-392 ISSN 0269-7491 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-22593S Grant - others:European Regional Development Fund(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/24014 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Arabidopsis thaliana * Ibuprofen * Metabolism * Plant cells * Sequestration Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 5.099, year: 2016

  20. Unravelling the regulatory mechanisms that modulate the MEP pathway in higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordoba, Elizabeth; Salmi, Mari; León, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    The methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate pathway is responsible for the biosynthesis of a substantial number of natural compounds of biological and biotechnological importance. In recent years, this pathway has become an obvious target to develop new herbicides and antimicrobial drugs. In addition, the production of a variety of compounds of medical and agricultural interest may be possible through the genetic manipulation of this pathway. To this end, a complete understanding of the molecular mechanisms that regulate this pathway is of tremendous importance. Recent data have accumulated that show some of the multiple mechanisms that regulate the methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate pathway in plants. In this review we will describe some of these and discuss their implications. It has been demonstrated that 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate synthase (DXS), the first enzyme of this route, plays a major role in the overall regulation of the pathway. A small gene family codes for this enzyme in most of the plants which have been analysed so far, and the members of these gene families belong to different phylogenetic groups. Each of these genes exhibits a distinct expression pattern, suggesting unique functions. One of the most interesting regulatory mechanisms recently described for this pathway is the post-transcriptional regulation of the level of DXS and DXR proteins. In the case of DXS, this regulation appears conserved among plants, supporting its importance. The evidence accumulated suggests that this regulation might link the activity of this pathway with the plant's physiological conditions and the metabolic demand for the final products of this route.

  1. Proteomics of terpenoid biosynthesis and secretion in trichomes of higher plant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champagne, Antoine; Boutry, Marc

    2016-08-01

    Among the specialized (secondary) plant metabolites, terpenoids represent the most diverse family and are often involved in the defense against pathogens and herbivores. Terpenoids can be produced both constitutively and in response to the environment. At the front line of this defense strategy are the glandular trichomes, which are organs dedicated primarily to the production of specialized metabolites. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics is a powerful tool, which is very useful to investigate enzymes involved in metabolic pathways, such as the synthesis and secretion of terpenoids in glandular trichomes. Here we review the strategies used to investigate the specific roles of these particular organs from non-model plant species, mainly belonging to the Lamiaceae, Solanaceae, and Cannabaceae families. We discuss how proteomics helps to accurately pinpoint candidate proteins to be functionally characterized, and how technological progresses create opportunities for studying low-abundance proteins, such as the ones related to the synthesis and transport of specialized metabolites. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Proteomics--a bridge between fundamental processes and crop production, edited by Dr. Hans-Peter Mock. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of long-term radiation exposure on the higher aquatic plants in the Chernobyl exclusion zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shevtsova, N.; Gudkov, D. [Institute of Hydrobiology (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-01

    germinated seeds) and pinnacle deviations was registered in plants from the most radioactive contaminated water bodies. Also the decreasing of parasitic stability of one of aquatic plant communities' dominant species - the common reed is observed. The data of the mite Steneotarsonemus phragmitidis and the parasitic fungus Claviceps purpurea hitting of the common reed, correlated with radiation dose rate. It was determined the positive correlation between absorbed dose rate and chromosome aberration rate in roots of the twelve aquatic plants' species from sampling water bodies. The highest rate of chromosome aberrations (up to 17 %) were registered in plants with high level of morphological deviations in seeds germs, but not panicles. The data obtained from the complex analysis of natural aquatic plant communities from the radioactive contaminated water bodies testify about rather high level of genetic efficiency of low doses of long-term exposure. For higher aquatic plants from ChEZ there is observed a realization of radiobiological reactions on morphological and reproductive levels on the background of genetic instability induced by low doses. Document available in abstract form only. (authors)

  3. Integration of a Higher Plant Chamber into the European Space Agency's MELiSSA Pilot Plant: The Canadian Role in Advanced Life Support Test-Bed Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Geoffrey; Lawson, Jamie; Gidzinski, Danuta; Stasiak, Michael; Dixon, Mike; Peiro, Enrique; Godia, Francesc; Paille, Christel; Fossen, Arnaud; Lamaze, Brigitte; Lasseur, Christophe

    The European Space Agency's Micro-Ecological Life Support System Alternative (MELiSSA) project has been conceived as a tool for developing the technology of future biological life support systems required for long-term human space exploration missions to the Moon or Mars. The main life support functions of MELiSSA are the recycling of waste (inedible plant biomass, human excrement), carbon dioxide and minerals and the production of food, fresh water and air revitalization. Based on the principle of an aquatic ecosystem, MELiSSA is comprised of four microbial compartments and a higher plant compartment integrated in a closed loop. Each compartment is studied, designed and demonstrated at laboratory scale before being scaled-up for subsequent integration into the MELISSA Pilot Plant (MPP) at the Universitat Aut`noma de Barcelona. Work related to higher plant cultivation systems, o which have been historically focussed at the University of Guelph's Controlled Environment Systems Research Facility (CESRF), has included design of the HPC for the MPP, the metabolic characterization of MELiSSA candidate crops and the validation of theoretical gas exchange and nutrient dynamic models, The presented paper will review some of the recent data and HPC design work of CESRF conducted as part of Canada's involvement in the MELiSSA program and its partnership in the development of the MPP terrestrial demonstration test-bed.

  4. Phytoplasma associated with shoot proliferation in begonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ribeiro Luiz Fernando Caldeira

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Begonia is a very appreciated genus of ornamental plants, of economic relevancy, having species of flowers and foliage. In commercial croppings, plants exhibiting characteristic symptoms of phytoplasma infection have been observed, such as shoot proliferation, reduced plant, size small leaves and flowers, and phyllody. Leaves were sampled and total DNA was extracted to be used in nested Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR, in order to detect and identify an expected phytoplasma. The results confirmed consistently the presence of a phytoplasma associated with symptomatic plants through the amplification of a typical genomic fragment of 1.2 kb by using the universal primers R16mF2/mR1 and R16F2n/R2. The use of specific primers R16(IIIF2/R1 allowed to identify the phytoplasma detected as a representative of the group 16SrIII. This information is very expressive, because different diseases caused by fungus, bacteria, virus and nematodes have been reported for begonia, however, reports have not been found for begonia diseases associated with phytoplasmas.

  5. Training Visual Control in Wheelchair Basketball Shooting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudejans, Raoul R. D.; Heubers, Sjoerd; Ruitenbeek, Jean-Rene J. A. C.; Janssen, Thomas W. J.

    2012-01-01

    We examined the effects of visual control training on expert wheelchair basketball shooting, a skill more difficult than in regular basketball, as players shoot from a seated position to the same rim height. The training consisted of shooting with a visual constraint that forced participants to use target information as late as possible.…

  6. Training visual control in wheelchair basketball shooting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudejans, R.R.D.; Heubers, S.; Ruitenbeek, J-R.J.A.C.; Janssen, T.W.J.

    2012-01-01

    We examined the effects of visual control training on expert wheelchair basketball shooting, a skill more difficult than in regular basketball, as players shoot from a seated position to the same rim height. The training consisted of shooting with a visual constraint that forced participants to use

  7. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of Eucalyptus globulus using explants with shoot apex with introduction of bacterial choline oxidase gene to enhance salt tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Etsuko; Nanto, Kazuya; Oishi, Masatoshi; Ebinuma, Hiroyasu; Morishita, Yoshihiko; Sakurai, Nozomu; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Shibata, Daisuke; Shimada, Teruhisa

    2012-01-01

    Eucalyptus globulus is one of the most economically important plantation hardwoods for paper making. However, its low transformation frequency has prevented genetic engineering of this species with useful genes. We found the hypocotyl section with a shoot apex has the highest regeneration ability among another hypocotyl sections, and have developed an efficient Agrobacterium-mediated transformation method using these materials. We then introduced a salt tolerance gene, namely a bacterial choline oxidase gene (codA) with a GUS reporter gene, into E. globulus. The highest frequency of transgenic shoot regeneration from hypocotyls with shoot apex was 7.4% and the average frequency in four experiments was 4.0%, 12-fold higher than that from hypocotyls without shoot apex. Using about 10,000 explants, over 250 regenerated buds were confirmed as transformants by GUS analysis. Southern blot analysis of 100 elongated shoots confirmed successful generation of stable transformants. Accumulation of glycinebetaine was investigated in 44 selected transgenic lines, which showed 1- to 12-fold higher glycinebetaine levels than non-transgenic controls. Rooting of 16 transgenic lines was successful using a photoautotrophic method under enrichment with 1,000 ppm CO(2). The transgenic whole plantlets were transplanted into potting soil and grown normally in a growth room. They showed salt tolerance to 300 mM NaCl. The points of our system are using explants with shoot apex as materials, inhibiting the elongation of the apex on the selection medium, and regenerating transgenic buds from the side opposite to the apex. This approach may also solve transformation problems in other important plants.

  8. Comparative survival rates of oriental fruit moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) larvae on shoots and fruit of apple and peach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Clayton T; Hull, Larry A; Krawczyk, Grzegorz

    2006-08-01

    Studies were designed to examine the effects of host plants on oriental fruit moth, Grapholita molesta (Busck) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), survival. G. molesta larval survival in the orchard was comparable between apple (Malus spp.) and peach (Prunus spp.) shoots, indicating that both host species can harbor large larval populations during the early season. G. molesta larvae used multiple shoots for feeding and development on peaches but usually only damaged single shoots in apple. Survival differences were present between peach and apple fruit, but this survival was affected by fruit maturity level. Generally, larval survival higher was in ripening peach fruit than in green, immature apple fruit. Larval survival varied among several apple cultivars, indicating that cultivar-level variability needs to be considered. These host-associated effects may impact efforts to predictively model G. molesta populations in commercial orchards where multiple host plant species, or different cultivars of the same species are often grown in proximity. Thus, host-associated dynamics should be included into future population models that underlie management programs.

  9. INDIRECT SHOOT ORGANOGENESIS OF EGGPLANT (SOLANUM MELONGENA L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ely ZAYOVA

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A protocol for indirect shoot organogenesis of Solanum melongena ‘Larga Negra’ and ‘Black Beauty’ was established using hypocotyl and cotyledon derived calluses. The maximum morphogenic callus induction was observed from cultured cotyledons of 30-days old seedlings on Murashige and Skoog (MS medium containing 2.0 mg/l α-naphthalene acetic acid and 0.5 mg/l 6-benzylaminopurine. The highest percentage of shoot regeneration and the highest mean number of shoots/callus were obtained on hormone-free MS medium. In terms of callus induction and subsequent plant regeneration, cotyledon explants were more responsive than hypocotyl explants. Regenerated shoots (2-3 cm were rooted on MS hormone-free medium or medium containing 0.1 mg/l indole-3-butyric acid. About 90% of regenerated plantlets survived under field conditions after hardening in the glasshouse. Several somaclones exhibiting useful variation would to be proposed as initial plant material for eggplant breeding programs.

  10. Localization of small heat shock proteins to the higher plant endomembrane system.

    OpenAIRE

    Helm, K W; LaFayette, P R; Nagao, R T; Key, J L; Vierling, E

    1993-01-01

    Three related gene families of low-molecular-weight (LMW) heat shock proteins (HSPs) have been characterized in plants. We describe a fourth LMW HSP family, represented by PsHSP22.7 from Pisum sativum and GmHSP22.0 from Glycine max, and demonstrate that this family of proteins is endomembrane localized. PsHSP22.7 and GmHSP22.0 are 76.7% identical at the amino acid level. Both proteins have amino-terminal signal peptides and carboxyl-terminal sequences characteristic of endoplasmic reticulum (...

  11. Evaluation of the Effects of Different Basal Medium and Plant Growth Regulators on in Vitro Growth of Hazelnut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parisa Daryani

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this research, the effects of different basal medium and plant growth regulators on in vitro establishment and growth of hazelnut were investigated. For this, the spring apical and auxiliary buds of cv. Fertile were sterilized and cultured on NRM, MS and 1/2MS basal media containing 0.01 mg/l IBA and different levels of BAP. The results indicated that percentage of explant growth (shooting, number of leaves per explant and shoot length influenced significantly by basal media and concentration of plant growth regulator. Based on orthogonal contrasts analysis, although the highest percentage of shooting was obtained on MS medium, shoot length of explants cultured on NRM basal medium were significantly higher than those of MS and 1/2MS. The best growth response of explants in establishment stage (50% shooting, 5.33 leaves per shoot and 1.6 cm shoot length were obtained with NRM medium supplemented with 0.01 mg/l IBA and 1 mg/l BAP. Shoots derived from establishment stage were cut to single-node explants and transferred on NRM medium supplemented with 0.05 mg/l IBA and different levels of BAP and TDZ. The highest percentage of explants growth with lowest callgenesis and explnt browning were obtained on NRM medium containing 0.05 mg/l IBA and 5 mg/l BAP.

  12. Characteristics of fatty acid composition of lipids in higher plant vacuolar membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarenko, S P; Konenkina, T A; Salyaev, R K

    2000-01-01

    The fatty acid composition of vacuolar membrane lipids from plant storage tissues and their genesis have been studied. A high content of unsaturated fatty acids (up to 77%) was observed in lipids of these membranes. Linoleic acid prevailed in vacuolar lipids of carrot and red beet (54.2 and 44.2%, respectively). Linolenic acid prevailed in vacuolar lipids of garden radish and turnip (39.7 and 33.9%, respectively). Regarding saturated fatty acids, vacuolar lipids of garden radish, carrot, and red beet contained predominantly palmitic acid (up to 20-24%). Unsaturated fatty acids, petroselinic (C18: 1omega12), cis-vaccenic (C18: 1omega7), hexatrien-7,-10,-13-oic (C16:3omega3) and others, were observed in vacuolar lipids of roots. These acids are usually synthesized in chloroplasts, and their presence in vacuolar lipids can be associated either with the transport of metabolites to the vacuole, or with endocytosis during vacuolar formation in the plant cell. The specific features of fatty acid composition of tonoplast lipids apparently are closely related to the tonoplast unique fluidity and mobility required for running osmotic processes in the cell and for forming transport protein assemblies.

  13. Size, Shape, and Arrangement of Cellulose Microfibril in Higher Plant Cell Walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, S. Y.

    2013-01-01

    Plant cell walls from maize (Zea mays L.) are imaged using atomic force microscopy (AFM) at the sub-nanometer resolution. We found that the size and shape of fundamental cellulose elementary fibril (CEF) is essentially identical in different cell wall types, i.e., primary wall (PW), parenchyma secondary wall (pSW), and sclerenchyma secondary wall (sSW), which is consistent with previously proposed 36-chain model (Ding et al., 2006, J. Agric. Food Chem.). The arrangement of individual CEFs in these wall types exhibits two orientations. In PW, CEFs are horizontally associated through their hydrophilic faces, and the planar faces are exposed, forming ribbon-like macrofibrils. In pSW and sSW, CEFs are vertically oriented, forming layers, in which hemicelluloses are interacted with the hydrophobic faces of the CEF and serve as spacers between CEFs. Lignification occurs between CEF-hemicelluloses layers in secondary walls. Furthermore, we demonstrated quantitative analysis of plant cell wall accessibility to and digestibility by different cellulase systems at real-time using chemical imaging (e.g., stimulated Raman scattering) and fluorescence microscopy of labeled cellulases (Ding et al., 2012, Science, in press).

  14. Impact of defoliation intensities on plant biomass, nutrient uptake and arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis in Lotus tenuis growing in a saline-sodic soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, I; Mendoza, R

    2012-11-01

    The impact of different defoliation intensities on the ability of Lotus tenuis plants to regrowth, mobilise nutrients and to associate with native AM fungi and Rhizobium in a saline-sodic soil was investigated. After 70 days, plants were subjected to 0, 25, 50, 75 and 100% defoliation and shoot regrowth was assessed at the end of subsequent 35 days. Compared to non-defoliated plants, low or moderate defoliation up to 75% did not affect shoot regrowth. However, 100% treatment affected shoot regrowth and the clipped plants were not able to compensate the growth attained by non-defoliated plants. Root growth was more affected by defoliation than shoot growth. P and N concentrations in shoots and roots increased with increasing defoliation while Na(+) concentration in shoots of non-defoliated and moderately defoliated plants was similar. Non-defoliated and moderately defoliated plants prevented increases of Na(+) concentration in shoots through both reducing Na(+) uptake and Na(+) transport to shoots by accumulating Na(+) in roots. At high defoliation, the salinity tolerance mechanism is altered and Na(+) concentration in shoots was higher than in roots. Reduction in the photosynthetic capacity induced by defoliation neither changed the root length colonised by AM fungi nor arbuscular colonisation but decreased the vesicular colonisation. Spore density did not change, but hyphal density and Rhizobium nodules increased with defoliation. The strategy of the AM symbiont consists in investing most of the C resources to preferentially retain arbuscular colonisation as well as inoculum density in the soil. © 2012 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  15. Roles of DgD14 in regulation of shoot branching in chrysanthemum (Dendranthema grandiflorum 'Jinba').

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Chao; Xi, Lin; Gao, Bin; Wang, Keyong; Lv, Suhui; Kou, Yaping; Ma, Nan; Zhao, Liangjun

    2015-11-01

    Shoot branching plays an important role in determining plant architecture. Strigolactones (SLs) negatively regulate shoot branching, and can respond to conditions of low or absent phosphate or nitrogen. The D14 gene is a probable candidate as an SL receptor in rice, petunia, and Arabidopsis. To investigate the roles of D14 in shoot branching of chrysanthemum, we isolated the D14 homolog DgD14. Functional analysis showed that DgD14 was a nuclear-localized protein, and restored the phenotype of Arabidopsis d14-1. Exogenous SL (GR24) could down-regulate DgD14 expression, but this effect could be overridden by apical auxin application. Decapitation could down-regulate DgD14 expression, but this effect could be restored by exogenous auxin. In addition, DgD14 transcripts produced rapid responses in shoot and root under conditions of phosphate absence, but only a mild variation in bud and stem with low nitrogen treatment. Indistinct reductions of P levels in shoot were observed in plants grown under low nitrogen conditions. The absence of phosphate and low levels of nitrogen negatively affected plant growth. These results demonstrate that P levels in shoot had a close relationship with phosphate, whereas nitrogen did not directly regulate DgD14 expression in shoot. Taken together, these results demonstrated that DgD14 was the functional strigolactone signaling component in chrysanthemum. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Exposure to lead in South African shooting ranges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathee, Angela; de Jager, Pieter; Naidoo, Shan; Naicker, Nisha

    2017-02-01

    Lead exposure in shooting ranges has been under scrutiny for decades, but no information in this regard is available in respect of African settings, and in South Africa specifically. The aim of this study was to determine the blood lead levels in the users of randomly selected private shooting ranges in South Africa's Gauteng province. An analytical cross sectional study was conducted, with participants recruited from four randomly selected shooting ranges and three archery ranges as a comparator group. A total of 118 (87 shooters and 31 archers) were included in the analysis. Shooters had significantly higher blood lead levels (BLL) compared to archers with 36/85 (42.4%) of shooters versus 2/34 (5.9%) of archers found to have a BLL ≥10μg/dl (pShooting ranges may constitute an import site of elevated exposure to lead. Improved ventilation, low levels of awareness of lead hazards, poor housekeeping, and inadequate personal hygiene facilities and practices at South African shooting ranges need urgent attention. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Identification of a dispersed MboI repeat family in five higher plant genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranade, S A; Lagu, M D; Patankar, S M; Dabak, M M; Dhar, M S; Gupta, V S; Ranjekar, P K

    1988-10-01

    Digestion of nuclear DNAs of five plants, namely Cucurbita maxima (red gourd), Trichosanthes anguina (snake gourd), Cucumis sativus (cucumber), Cajanus cajan (pigeon pea) and Phaseolus vulgaris (french bean) with the restriction endonuclease MboI yielded discrete size classes with molecular weights in the range of 0.5 to 5 kbp. The MboI digestion pattern of Cot 0.1 DNA in french bean is comparable with that of total DNA, indicating that these bands represented highly repeated DNA sequences. Cleavage of the DNAs with varying amounts of MboI indicated the dispersed nature of the repeat families. Southern hybridization studies using french bean highly repetitive DNA as a probe indicated more homology with repeats of pigeon pea and less homology with red gourd, snake gourd and cucumber repeats.

  18. Root uptake of uranium by a higher plant model (Phaseolus vulgaris) bioavailability from soil solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laroche, L.; Henner, P.; Camilleri, V.; Garnier-Laplace, J. [CEA Cadarache (DEI/SECRE/LRE), Laboratory of Radioecology and Ecotoxicology, Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2004-07-01

    Uranium behaviour in soils is controlled by actions and interactions between physicochemical and biological processes that also determine its bioavailability. In soil solution, uranium(+VI) aqueous speciation undergoes tremendous changes mainly depending on pH, carbonates, phosphates and organic matter. In a first approach to identify bioavailable species of U to plants, cultures were performed using hydroponics, to allow an easy control of the composition of the exposure media. The latter, here an artificial soil solution, was designed to control the uranium species in solution. The geochemical speciation code JCHESS using a database compiled from the OECD/NEA thermochemical database project and verified was used to perform the solution speciation calculations. On this theoretical basis, three domains were defined for short-duration well-defined laboratory experiments in simplified conditions: pH 4.9, 5.8 and 7 where predicted dominant species are uranyl ions, hydroxyl complexes and carbonates respectively. For these domains, biokinetics and characterization of transmembrane transport according to a classical Michaelis Menten approach were investigated. The Free Ion Model (or its derived Biotic Ligand Model) was tested to determine if U uptake is governed by the free uranyl species or if other metal complexes can be assimilated. The effect of different variables on root assimilation efficiency and phyto-toxicity was explored: presence of ligands such as phosphates or carbonates and competitive ions such as Ca{sup 2+} at the 3 pH. According to previous experiments, uranium was principally located in roots whatever the pH and no difference in uranium uptake was evidenced between the main growth stages of the plant. Within the 3 studied chemical domains, results from short-term kinetics evidenced a linear correlation between total uranium concentration in bean roots and that in exposure media, suggesting that total uranium in soil solution could be a good predictor

  19. Regulation of sucrose metabolism in higher plants: localization and regulation of activity of key enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, H.; Huber, S. C.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Sucrose (Suc) plays a central role in plant growth and development. It is a major end product of photosynthesis and functions as a primary transport sugar and in some cases as a direct or indirect regulator of gene expression. Research during the last 2 decades has identified the pathways involved and which enzymes contribute to the control of flux. Availability of metabolites for Suc synthesis and 'demand' for products of sucrose degradation are important factors, but this review specifically focuses on the biosynthetic enzyme sucrose-phosphate synthase (SPS), and the degradative enzymes, sucrose synthase (SuSy), and the invertases. Recent progress has included the cloning of genes encoding these enzymes and the elucidation of posttranslational regulatory mechanisms. Protein phosphorylation is emerging as an important mechanism controlling SPS activity in response to various environmental and endogenous signals. In terms of Suc degradation, invertase-catalyzed hydrolysis generally has been associated with cell expansion, whereas SuSy-catalyzed metabolism has been linked with biosynthetic processes (e.g., cell wall or storage products). Recent results indicate that SuSy may be localized in multiple cellular compartments: (1) as a soluble enzyme in the cytosol (as traditionally assumed); (2) associated with the plasma membrane; and (3) associated with the actin cytoskeleton. Phosphorylation of SuSy has been shown to occur and may be one of the factors controlling localization of the enzyme. The purpose of this review is to summarize some of the recent developments relating to regulation of activity and localization of key enzymes involved in sucrose metabolism in plants.

  20. Transcriptional Regulation of Aluminum-Tolerance Genes in Higher Plants: Clarifying the Underlying Molecular Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhijit A. Daspute

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum (Al rhizotoxicity is one of the major environmental stresses that decrease global food production. Clarifying the molecular mechanisms underlying Al tolerance may contribute to the breeding of Al-tolerant crops. Recent studies identified various Al-tolerance genes. The expression of these genes is inducible by Al. Studies of the major Arabidopsis thaliana Al-tolerance gene, ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA ALUMINUM-ACTIVATED MALATE TRANSPORTER 1 (AtALMT1, which encodes an Al-activated malate transporter, revealed that the Al-inducible expression is regulated by a SENSITIVE TO PROTON RHIXOTOXICITY 1 (STOP1 zinc-finger transcription factor. This system, which involves STOP1 and organic acid transporters, is conserved in diverse plant species. The expression of AtALMT1 is also upregulated by several phytohormones and hydrogen peroxide, suggesting there is crosstalk among the signals involved in the transcriptional regulation of AtALMT1. Additionally, phytohormones and reactive oxygen species (ROS activate various transcriptional responses, including the expression of genes related to increased Al tolerance or the suppression of root growth under Al stress conditions. For example, Al suppressed root growth due to abnormal accumulation of auxin and cytokinin. It activates transcription of TRYPTOPHAN AMINOTRANSFERASE OF ARABIDOPSIS 1 and other phytohormone responsive genes in distal transition zone, which causes suppression of root elongation. On the other hand, overexpression of Al inducible genes for ROS-detoxifying enzymes such as GLUTATHIONE–S-TRANSFERASE, PEROXIDASE, SUPEROXIDE DISMUTASE enhances Al resistance in several plant species. We herein summarize the complex transcriptional regulation of an Al-inducible genes affected by STOP1, phytohormones, and ROS.

  1. Connective Auxin Transport in the Shoot Facilitates Communication between Shoot Apices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Tom; Hines, Geneviève; van Rongen, Martin; Sawchuk, Megan G.; Scarpella, Enrico; Ljung, Karin

    2016-01-01

    The bulk polar movement of the plant signaling molecule auxin through the stem is a long-recognized but poorly understood phenomenon. Here we show that the highly polar, high conductance polar auxin transport stream (PATS) is only part of a multimodal auxin transport network in the stem. The dynamics of auxin movement through stems are inconsistent with a single polar transport regime and instead suggest widespread low conductance, less polar auxin transport in the stem, which we term connective auxin transport (CAT). The bidirectional movement of auxin between the PATS and the surrounding tissues, mediated by CAT, can explain the complex auxin transport kinetics we observe. We show that the auxin efflux carriers PIN3, PIN4, and PIN7 are major contributors to this auxin transport connectivity and that their activity is important for communication between shoot apices in the regulation of shoot branching. We propose that the PATS provides a long-range, consolidated stream of information throughout the plant, while CAT acts locally, allowing tissues to modulate and be modulated by information in the PATS. PMID:27119525

  2. Tolerance of chufa (Cyperus esculentus L.) plants, representing the higher plant compartment in bioregenerative life support systems, to super-optimal air temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shklavtsova, E. S.; Ushakova, S. A.; Shikhov, V. N.; Anishchenko, O. V.

    2013-01-01

    Plants intended to be included in the photosynthesizing compartment of the bioregenerative life support system (BLSS) need to be studied in terms of both their production parameters under optimal conditions and their tolerance to stress factors that might be caused by emergency situations. The purpose of this study was to investigate tolerance of chufa (Cyperus esculentus L.) plants to the super-optimal air temperature of 45 ± 1 °C as dependent upon PAR (photosynthetically active radiation) intensity and the duration of the exposure to the stress factor. Chufa plants were grown hydroponically, on expanded clay, under artificial light. The nutrient solution was Knop's mineral medium. Until the plants were 30 days old, they had been grown at 690 μmol m-2 s-1 PAR and air temperature 25 °C. Thirty-day-old plants were exposed to the temperature 45 °C for 6 h, 20 h, and 44 h at PAR intensities 690 μmol m-2 s-1 and 1150 μmol m-2 s-1. The exposure to the damaging air temperature for 44 h at 690 μmol m-2 s-1 PAR caused irreversible damage to PSA, resulting in leaf mortality. In chufa plants exposed to heat shock treatment at 690 μmol m-2 s-1 PAR for 6 h and 20 h, respiration exceeded photosynthesis, and CO2 release in the light was recorded. Functional activity of photosynthetic apparatus, estimated from parameters of pulse-modulated chlorophyll fluorescence in Photosystem 2 (PS 2), decreased 40% to 50%. After the exposure to the stress factor was finished, functional activity of PSA recovered its initial values, and apparent photosynthesis (Papparent) rate after a 20-h exposure to the stress factor was 2.6 times lower than before the elevation of the temperature. During the first hours of plant exposure to the temperature 45 °C at 1150 μmol m-2 s-1 PAR, respiration rate was higher than photosynthesis rate, but after 3-4 h of the exposure, photosynthetic processes exceeded oxidative ones and CO2 absorption in the light was recorded. At the end of the 6-h exposure

  3. Higher β-diversity observed for herbs over woody plants is driven by stronger habitat filtering in a tropical understory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Stephen J; Salpeter, Kara; Comita, Liza S

    2016-08-01

    Herbaceous plants are a key component of tropical forests. Previous work indicates that herbs contribute substantially to the species richness of tropical plant communities. However, the processes structuring tropical herb diversity, and how they contrast with woody communities, have been underexplored. Within the understory of a 50-ha forest dynamics plot in central Panama, we compared the diversity, distribution, and abundance of vascular herbaceous plants with woody seedlings (i.e., tree and lianas woody seedlings, indicating higher spatial variation in this stratum. We observed no correlation between local richness or compositional uniqueness of herbs and woody seedlings across sites, indicating that different processes control the spatial patterns of woody and herbaceous diversity and composition. Habitat associations were strongest for herbs, as indicated by greater compositional dissimilarity among habitat types. Likewise, environmental variables explained a larger proportion of the variation in species richness and composition for herbs than for woody seedlings (richness = 25%, 14%, 12%; composition = 25%, 9%, 6%, for herbs, trees, and lianas, respectively). These differences between strata did not appear to be due to differences in lifespan alone, based on data from adult trees. Our results point to contrasting assembly mechanisms for herbaceous and woody communities, with herbs showing stronger niche-derived structure. Future research on tropical herbaceous communities is likely to yield new insights into the many processes structuring diverse plant communities. © 2016 by the Ecological Society of America.

  4. Association mapping for phenology and plant architecture in maize shows higher power for developmental traits compared with growth influenced traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchet, S; Bertin, P; Presterl, T; Jamin, P; Coubriche, D; Gouesnard, B; Laborde, J; Charcosset, A

    2017-03-01

    Plant architecture, phenology and yield components of cultivated plants have repeatedly been shaped by selection to meet human needs and adaptation to different environments. Here we assessed the genetic architecture of 24 correlated maize traits that interact during plant cycle. Overall, 336 lines were phenotyped in a network of 9 trials and genotyped with 50K single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Phenology was the main factor of differentiation between genetic groups. Then yield components distinguished dents from lower yielding genetic groups. However, most of trait variation occurred within group and we observed similar overall and within group correlations, suggesting a major effect of pleiotropy and/or linkage. We found 34 quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for individual traits and six for trait combinations corresponding to PCA coordinates. Among them, only five were pleiotropic. We found a cluster of QTLs in a 5 Mb region around Tb1 associated with tiller number, ear row number and the first PCA axis, the latter being positively correlated to flowering time and negatively correlated to yield. Kn1 and ZmNIP1 were candidate genes for tillering, ZCN8 for leaf number and Rubisco Activase 1 for kernel weight. Experimental repeatabilities, numbers of QTLs and proportion of explained variation were higher for traits related to plant development such as tillering, leaf number and flowering time, than for traits affected by growth such as yield components. This suggests a simpler genetic determinism with larger individual QTL effects for the first category.

  5. Red mud a byproduct of aluminum production contains soluble vanadium that causes genotoxic and cytotoxic effects in higher plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mišík, Miroslav [Institute of Cancer Research, Department of Medicine I, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Burke, Ian T. [Earth Surface Science Institute, School of Earth and Environment, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Reismüller, Matthias; Pichler, Clemens; Rainer, Bernhard [Institute of Cancer Research, Department of Medicine I, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Mišíková, Katarina [Department of Botany, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Comenius University, Bratislava (Slovakia); Mayes, William M. [Centre for Environmental and Marine Sciences, University of Hull, Scarborough YO11 3AZ (United Kingdom); Knasmueller, Siegfried, E-mail: siegfried.knasmueller@meduniwien.ac.at [Institute of Cancer Research, Department of Medicine I, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2014-09-15

    Red mud (RM) is a byproduct of aluminum production; worldwide between 70 and 120 million tons is produced annually. We analyzed RM which was released in the course of the Kolontar disaster in Hungary into the environment in acute and genotoxicity experiments with plants which are widely used for environmental monitoring. We detected induction of micronuclei which reflect chromosomal damage in tetrads of Tradescantia and in root cells of Allium as well as retardation of root growth with contaminated soils and leachates. Chemical analyses showed that RM contains metals, in particular high concentrations of vanadium. Follow-up experiments indicated that vanadate causes the effects in the plants. This compound causes also in humans DNA damage and positive results were obtained in carcinogenicity studies. Since it was found also in RM from other production sites our findings indicate that its release in the environment is a global problem which should be studied in more detail. Capsule abstract: Our findings indicate that the red mud causes genotoxic effect in plants probably due to the presence of vanadate which is contained at high concentrations in the residue. - Highlights: • Red mud, a by-product of aluminum production, causes DNA-damage in higher plants. • We showed that this effect is caused by vanadate a known carcinogenic genotoxin. • Vanadate is contained in high concentrations in the residue. • Release of red mud may cause adverse effects in ecosystems and affect human health.

  6. Plantlets from encapsulated shoot buds of Catalpa ovata G. Don

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halina Wysokińska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Shoot buds isolated from in vitro shoot cultures of Catalpa ovata G. Don were encapsulated using 3% sodium alginate with sucrose (3% and 50 mM calcium chloride. The morphogenic response of encapsulated buds was affected by such factors, like composition of the media and the presence of growth regulators. The highest frequency of plantlet germination from encapsulated buds (70% within 4 weeks was obtained on Woody Plant medium (WP (Lloyd and McCown 1980 containing indole-3-butyric acid (IBA (1 mg/l. The process was substantially inhibited by cold-storage (4oC of encapsulated buds. In this case, the frequency response ranged from 3% to 22% dependent on storage period (28 or 42 days and the presence of the paraffin coat covering the alginate capsules. The plantlets developed from both unstored and stored encapsulated buds of C. ovata were transplanted to soil and grew in pots to phenotypically normal plants.

  7. Effects of carbon ion beam irradiation on the shoot regeneration from in vitro axillary bud explants of the Impatiens hawkeri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Libin; Zhou, Libin; Li, Wenjian; Li, Ping; Dong, Xicun; Qu, Ying; Ma, Shuang; Li, Qiang

    Accelerated ion beams is an excellent mutagen in plant breeding which can induce higher mutation frequencies and wider mutation spectrum than those of low linear energy transfer (LET) irradiations, such as X-rays (Okamura et al. 2003, Yamaguchi et al. 2003). Mutation breeding operation of two Saintpaulia ionahta cultivars using the method combining plant tissue culture technique and carbon ion beam irradiations were set out at Institute of Modern Physics from 2005 (Zhou et al. 2006). The effects of 960 MeV carbon ion beam and 8 MeV X-ray irradiations on regenerated shoots of Impatiens hawkeri from another kind of explants named in vitro axillary buds explants were studied recently. The biology endpoints in this study included relative number of roots (RNR), relative length of roots (RLR), relative height of shoots (RHS), relative number of nodes (RNN), survival fraction (SF) and morphology changes in the regenerated shoots. The experimental results showed that carbon ion beams inhibited the root and stem developments of axillary bud explants more severely than X-rays did. And the 50% lethal dose (LD50 ) is about 23.3 Gy for the carbon ion beam and 49.1 Gy for the X-rays, respectively. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of Impatiens hawkeri with respect to X-rays according to 50% SF was about two. Secondly, the percentage of shoots regenerated with malformed shoots including curliness, carnification, nicks in all Impatiens hawkeri axillary bud explants irradiated with carbon ion beam at 20 Gy accounted for 55.6%, while the highest number for the 40 Gy X-ray irradiation was 40%. Last, many regenerated shoots whose vascular bundle fused together were obtained only from explants irradiated with carbon ion beams. Based on the results above, it can be concluded that the effect of mutation induction by carbon ion beam irradiation on the axillary explants of Impatiens hawkeri is better than that by X-ray irradiation; and the optimal mutagenic dose varies from 20 Gy

  8. The Nutritional Facts of Bamboo Shoots and Their Usage as Important Traditional Foods of Northeast India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nongdam, P; Tikendra, Leimapokpam

    2014-01-01

    Bamboo shoots are considered as one of the useful health foods because of their rich contents of proteins, carbohydrates, vitamins, fibres, and minerals and very low fat. Though bamboo shoots provide lots of health benefits, their consumption is confined mostly to Southeast Asian and East Asian countries. The acceptability of bamboo shoots as popular vegetable crop is very less due to their high pungent smell and bitter acidic taste. The use of bamboo as food in India is mainly restricted to Northeastern part of the country where they form an indispensable part of several traditional speciality dishes. The different ethnic communities take fresh or fermented bamboo shoot as one of most preferred traditional food items. Some of the important bamboo based traditional foods are ushoi, soibum, rep, mesu, eup, ekhung, hirring, and so forth. Bamboo shoots should be properly processed before they are consumed as freshly harvested shoots have high content of toxic cyanogenic glycosides which may pose serious health problems. The prospect of bamboo shoot industry in Northeast India is bright due to its rich genetic resources of bamboos. However, habitat destruction and extensive use of bamboos for food, handicraft, and construction purposes have resulted in severe depletion of natural bamboo resources. This review stresses upon the high nutritive values and health benefits of bamboo shoots and their usage as important traditional foods in Northeast India. The bamboo market potential of the region and use of in vitro plant micropropagation methods as effective means of bamboo conservation are also emphasized in this paper.

  9. Higher plant and vertebrate species richness in Spanish and some mediterranean mountains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez-Rica, J. P.

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the biodiversity of the Spanish and some other Mediterranean mountains. These have some of the richest areas for vascular plants recorded apart from some areas in the tropics. The number of endemic species is substantial. Six areas in Spain and four other Mediterranean areas are described in detail. A special plea is made for a comprehensive detailed vegetation map for European mountains to include the Spanish and Mediterranean mountains.

    [fr] Ce travail porte sur la biodiversité de quelques montagnes méditerranéennes, notamment celle de l'Espagne. Ces dernières montrent une flore vasculaire des plus riches au monde, si l'on excepte les pays tropicaux. Aussi le nombre d'espèces endémiques est très important. Six systèmes montagneux d'Espagne et quatre autres sur le pourtour méditerranéen sont étudiés en détail. Dans une section spéciale on étudie la carte de végétation synthétique des montagnes européennes, de façon à inclure les montagnes de l'Espagne et de la Méditerranée. [es] Se estudia la biodiversidad de las montañas españolas y de otras mediterráneas. Si se exceptúan algunas áreas tropicales, se trata de una de las áreas más ricas en plantas vasculares. El número de especies endémicas resulta sustancial. Se estudian con mayor detalle seis áreas montañosas de España y cuatro áreas más del Mediterráneo. De un modo particular se estudia un mapa sintético de vegetación de las montañas de Europa en relación con las montañas de España y del Mediterráneo.

  10. ROS-mediated vascular homeostatic control of root-to-shoot soil Na delivery in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Caifu; Belfield, Eric J; Mithani, Aziz; Visscher, Anne; Ragoussis, Jiannis; Mott, Richard; Smith, J Andrew C; Harberd, Nicholas P

    2012-11-14

    Sodium (Na) is ubiquitous in soils, and is transported to plant shoots via transpiration through xylem elements in the vascular tissue. However, excess Na is damaging. Accordingly, control of xylem-sap Na concentration is important for maintenance of shoot Na homeostasis, especially under Na stress conditions. Here we report that shoot Na homeostasis of Arabidopsis thaliana plants grown in saline soils is conferred by reactive oxygen species (ROS) regulation of xylem-sap Na concentrations. We show that lack of A. thaliana respiratory burst oxidase protein F (AtrbohF; an NADPH oxidase catalysing ROS production) causes hypersensitivity of shoots to soil salinity. Lack of AtrbohF-dependent salinity-induced vascular ROS accumulation leads to increased Na concentrations in root vasculature cells and in xylem sap, thus causing delivery of damaging amounts of Na to the shoot. We also show that the excess shoot Na delivery caused by lack of AtrbohF is dependent upon transpiration. We conclude that AtrbohF increases ROS levels in wild-type root vasculature in response to raised soil salinity, thereby limiting Na concentrations in xylem sap, and in turn protecting shoot cells from transpiration-dependent delivery of excess Na.

  11. Variation in shoot tolerance mechanisms not related to ion toxicity in barley

    KAUST Repository

    Tilbrook, Joanne

    2017-09-27

    Soil salinity can severely reduce crop growth and yield. Many studies have investigated salinity tolerance mechanisms in cereals using phenotypes that are relatively easy to measure. The majority of these studies measured the accumulation of shoot Na+ and the effect this has on plant growth. However, plant growth is reduced immediately after exposure to NaCl before Na+ accumulates to toxic concentrations in the shoot. In this study, nondestructive and destructive measurements are used to evaluate the responses of 24 predominately Australian barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) lines at 0, 150 and 250mMNaCl. Considerable variation for shoot tolerance mechanisms not related to ion toxicity (shoot ion-independent tolerance) was found, withsome lines being able to maintain substantial growth rates under salt stress, whereas others stopped growing. Hordeum vulgare spp. spontaneum accessions and barley landraces predominantly had the best shoot ion independent tolerance, although two commercial cultivars, Fathom and Skiff, also had high tolerance. The tolerance of cv. Fathom may be caused by a recent introgression from H. vulgare L. spp. spontaneum. This study shows that the most salt-tolerant barley lines are those that contain both shoot ion-independent tolerance and the ability to exclude Na+ from the shoot (and thus maintain high K+: Na+ ratios).

  12. Gravitropism of cut shoots is mediated by oxidative processes: A physiological and molecular study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philosoph-Hadas, Sonia; Friedman, Haya; Meir, Shimon

    2012-07-01

    The signal transduction events occurring during shoot gravitropism are mediated through amyloplasts sedimentation, reorientation of actin filaments in the endodermis, and differential changes in level and action of auxin, associated with differential growth leading to shoot curvature. Since increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) was shown to be associated with growth, we examined the possible use of antioxidants in controlling the gravitropic response, via their interaction with events preceding shoot bending. Reoriented snapdragon (Antirrhinum majus L.) spikes and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum cv. MicroTom) shoots showed a visual upward bending after a lag period of 3 or 5 h, respectively, which was inhibited by the antioxidants N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) and reduced glutathione (GSH). This suggests the involvement of oxidative reactions in the process. The two antioxidants prevented the sedimentation of amyloplasts to the bottom of the endodermis cells following 0.5-5 h of snapdragon shoot reorientation, suggesting that oxidative reactions are involved already at a very early signal perception stage prior to the visual bending. In addition, a differential distribution in favor of the lower shoot side of various oxidative elements, including H2O2 concentrations and activity of the NADPH-oxidase enzyme, was observed during reorientation of snapdragon spikes. Application of the two antioxidants reduced the levels of these elements and abolished their differential distribution across the shoot. On the other hand, the activity of the antioxidative enzyme, superoxide dismutase (SOD), which was not differentially distributed across the shoot, increased significantly following application of the two antioxidants. The auxin redistribution in reoriented shoots was analyzed using transgenic tomato plants expressing the GUS reporter gene under the Aux/IAA4 promoter (a generous gift of M. Bouzayen, France). GUS response, detected in control shoots 4 h after their reorientation

  13. [School shooting in statu nascendi].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knecht, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    In the last few years, amok-like killings and especially so-called "school shootings" have received a great deal of public attention both in the Old and the New world. Meanwhile, criminal psychological research has gained a thorough insight into this dangerous development in young people. Thus, the possibility to assess the concrete threat of such a multiple killing before it is carried out has been considerably improved, as many prognostic criteria have been worked out in the meantime. The case report presented shows that it is possible to exercise a favourable influence on this critical negative trend.

  14. A database of PCR primers for the chloroplast genomes of higher plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heinze Berthold

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chloroplast genomes evolve slowly and many primers for PCR amplification and analysis of chloroplast sequences can be used across a wide array of genera. In some cases 'universal' primers have been designed for the purpose of working across species boundaries. However, the essential information on these primer sequences is scattered throughout the literature. Results A database is presented here which assembles published primer information for chloroplast DNA. Additional primers were designed to fill gaps where little or no primer information could be found. Amplicons are either the genes themselves (typically useful in studies of sequence variation in higher-order phylogeny or they are spacers, introns, and intergenic regions (for studies of phylogeographic patterns within and among species. The current list of 'generic' primers consists of more than 700 sequences. Wherever possible, we give the locations of the primers in the thirteen fully sequenced chloroplast genomes (Nicotiana tabacum, Atropa belladonna, Spinacia oleracea, Arabidopsis thaliana, Populus trichocarpa, Oryza sativa, Pinus thunbergii, Marchantia polymorpha, Zea mays, Oenothera elata, Acorus calamus, Eucalyptus globulus, Medicago trunculata. Conclusion The database described here is designed to serve as a resource for researchers who are venturing into the study of poorly described chloroplast genomes, whether for large- or small-scale DNA sequencing projects, to study molecular variation or to investigate chloroplast evolution.

  15. Amino acids implicated in plant defense are higher in Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus-tolerant citrus varieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killiny, Nabil; Hijaz, Faraj

    2016-01-01

    Citrus Huanglongbing (HLB), also known as citrus greening, has been threatening the citrus industry since the early 1900's and up to this date there are no effective cures for this disease. Field observations and greenhouse controlled studies demonstrated that some citrus genotypes are more tolerant to Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas) pathogen than others. However, the mechanisms underpinning tolerance has not been determined yet. The phloem sap composition of CLas-tolerant and sensitive citrus varieties was studied to identify metabolites that could be responsible for their tolerance to CLas. The citrus phloem sap was collected by centrifugation and was analyzed with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry after methyl chloroformate derivatization. Thirty-three metabolites were detected in the phloem sap of the studied varieties: twenty 20 amino acids, eight 8 organic acids, and five 5 fatty acids. Interestingly, the levels of most amino acids, especially those implicated in plantdefense to pathogens such as phenylalanine, tyrosine, tryptophan, lysine, and asparagine were higher in tolerant varieties. Although the level of organic acids varied between cultivars, this variation was not correlated with citrus resistance to CLas and could be cultivar specific. The fatty acids were found in trace amounts and in most cases their levels were not significantly different among varieties. Better understanding of the mechanisms underpinning citrus tolerance to CLas will help in developing economically tolerant varieties.

  16. Zeaxanthin Radical Cation Formation in Minor Light-Harvesting Complexes of Higher Plant Antenna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avenson, Thomas H.; Ahn, Tae Kyu; Zigmantas, Donatas; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Li, Zhirong; Ballottari, Matteo; Bassi, Roberto; Fleming, Graham R.

    2008-01-31

    Previous work on intact thylakoid membranes showed that transient formation of a zeaxanthin radical cation was correlated with regulation of photosynthetic light-harvesting via energy-dependent quenching. A molecular mechanism for such quenching was proposed to involve charge transfer within a chlorophyll-zeaxanthin heterodimer. Using near infrared (880-1100 nm) transient absorption spectroscopy, we demonstrate that carotenoid (mainly zeaxanthin) radical cation generation occurs solely in isolated minor light-harvesting complexes that bind zeaxanthin, consistent with the engagement of charge transfer quenching therein. We estimated that less than 0.5percent of the isolated minor complexes undergo charge transfer quenching in vitro, whereas the fraction of minor complexes estimated to be engaged in charge transfer quenching in isolated thylakoids was more than 80 times higher. We conclude that minor complexes which bind zeaxanthin are sites of charge transfer quenching in vivo and that they can assume Non-quenching and Quenching conformations, the equilibrium LHC(N)<--> LHC(Q) of which is modulated by the transthylakoid pH gradient, the PsbS protein, and protein-protein interactions.

  17. Mechanisms of waterlogging tolerance in wheat - a review of root and shoot physiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herzog, Max; Striker, Gustavo G; Colmer, Timothy D

    2016-01-01

    :shoot ratio. Genotypes differ in seminal root anoxia tolerance, but mechanisms remain to be established; ethanol production rates do not explain anoxia tolerance. Root tip survival is short-term, and thereafter, seminal root re-growth upon re-aeration is limited. Genotypes differ in adventitious root numbers....... Although photosynthesis declines, sugars typically accumulate in shoots of waterlogged plants. Mn or Fe toxicity might occur in shoots of wheat on strongly acidic soils, but probably not more widely. Future breeding for waterlogging tolerance should focus on root internal aeration and better N...

  18. Embryonic development in Arabidopsis thaliana: from the zygote division to the shoot meristem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia eBoscá

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Postembryonic organ formation of plants is fueled with cells from the stem cell niches in the shoot and root meristems. During the last two decades considerable progress has been made in identifying factors that regulate stem cell maintenance. With these factors in hand, the mechanisms establishing stem cell niches during embryo development can be addressed. Here we discuss current models of how the shoot meristem stem cell niche arises during embryonic pattern formation.

  19. Organic Acids: The Pools of Fixed Carbon Involved in Redox Regulation and Energy Balance in Higher Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abir U Igamberdiev

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Organic acids are synthesized in plants as a result of the incomplete oxidation of photosynthetic products and represent the stored pools of fixed carbon accumulated due to different transient times of conversion of carbon compounds in metabolic pathways. When redox level in the cell increases, e.g., in conditions of active photosynthesis, the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle in mitochondria is transformed to a partial cycle supplying citrate for the synthesis of 2-oxoglutarate and glutamate (citrate valve, while malate is accumulated and participates in the redox balance in different cell compartments (via malate valve. This results in malate and citrate frequently being the most accumulated acids in plants. However, the intensity of reactions linked to the conversion of these compounds can cause preferential accumulation of other organic acids, e.g., fumarate or isocitrate, in higher concentrations than malate and citrate. The secondary reactions, associated with the central metabolic pathways, in particularly with the TCA cycle, result in accumulation of other organic acids that are derived from the intermediates of the cycle. They form the additional pools of fixed carbon and stabilize the TCA cycle. Trans-aconitate is formed from citrate or cis-aconitate, accumulation of hydroxycitrate can be linked to metabolism of 2-oxoglutarate, while 4-hydroxy-2-oxoglutarate can be formed from pyruvate and glyoxylate. Glyoxylate, a product of either glycolate oxidase or isocitrate lyase, can be converted to oxalate. Malonate is accumulated at high concentrations in legume plants. Organic acids play a role in plants in providing redox equilibrium, supporting ionic gradients on membranes, and acidification of the extracellular medium.

  20. Response of Syngonium podophyllum L. ‘White Butterfly’ shoot cultures to alternative media additives and gelling agents, and flow cytometric analysis of regenerants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JAIME A. TEIXEIRA DA SILVA

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Teixeira da Silva JA. 2015. Response of Syngonium podophyllum L. ‘White Butterfly’ shoot cultures to alternative media additives and gelling agents, and flow cytometric analysis of regenerants. Nusantara Bioscience 7: 26-32. Syngonium podophyllum L. (arrowhead vine is a popular leafy indoor pot plant whose tissue culture has been established, primarily through in vitro shoot culture, but several interesting aspects have not yet been explored. In this study, cv. ‘White Butterfly’ was used to investigate the response of shoot formation to alternative gelling agents and media additives. Gellan gum (Gelrite® at 2 g/L resulted in greater leaf production, plantlet fresh weight and higher chlorophyll content (SPAD value than all other gelling agents tested, including agar, Bacto agar, phytagel, oatmeal agar, potato dextrose agar, barley starch and corn starch, when on a basal Hyponex® (NPK = 6.5: 6: 19; 3 g/L medium. Several alternative liquid medium additives tested (low and full fat milk, Coca-Cola®, coffee, Japanese green, Oolong and Darjeeling teas negatively impacted plant growth, stunted roots and decreased chlorophyll content (SPAD value of leaves. Plant growth on medium with refined sucrose or table sugar responded similarly. Poor growth was observed when crude extract from a high rebaudioside-containing stevia (Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni line - an artificial sweetener - was used. Leaf tissue from the control did not show any endopolyploidy but low levels of endopolyploidy (8C were detected in some treatments.

  1. Disentangling the intertwined genetic bases of root and shoot growth in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Bouteillé

    Full Text Available Root growth and architecture are major components of plant nutrient and water use efficiencies and these traits are the matter of extensive genetic analysis in several crop species. Because root growth relies on exported assimilate from the shoot, and changes in assimilate supply are known to alter root architecture, we hypothesized (i that the genetic bases of root growth could be intertwined with the genetic bases of shoot growth and (ii that the link could be either positive, with alleles favouring shoot growth also favouring root growth, or negative, because of competition for assimilates. We tested these hypotheses using a quantitative genetics approach in the model species Arabidopsis thaliana and the Bay-0 × Shahdara recombinant inbred lines population. In accordance with our hypothesis, root and shoot growth traits were strongly correlated and most root growth quantitative trait loci (QTLs colocalized with shoot growth QTLs with positive alleles originating from either the same or the opposite parent. In order to identify regions that could be responsible for root growth independently of the shoot, we generated new variables either based on root to shoot ratios, residuals of root to shoot correlations or coordinates of principal component analysis. These variables showed high heritability allowing genetic analysis. They essentially all yielded similar results pointing towards two regions involved in the root--shoot balance. Using Heterogeneous Inbred Families (a kind of near-isogenic lines, we validated part of the QTLs present in these two regions for different traits. Our study thus highlights the difficulty of disentangling intertwined genetic bases of root and shoot growth and shows that this difficulty can be overcome by using simple statistical tools.

  2. The Brassicaceae family displays divergent, shoot-skewed NLR resistance gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch, David; Gupta, Vikas; Bachmann, Asger

    2018-01-01

    ,235 NLRs from 9 plant species. We found stable NLR root/shoot expression ratios within species, suggesting organ-specific hardwiring of NLR expression patterns in anticipation of distinct challenges. Most monocot and dicot plant species preferentially expressed NLRs in roots. In contrast, Brassicaceae...... species, including oilseed rape and the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, were unique in showing NLR expression skewed towards the shoot across multiple phylogenetically distinct groups of NLRs. The Brassicaceae are also outliers in the sense that they have lost the common symbiosis signaling pathway...

  3. Mitigation of Cu stress by legume-Rhizobium symbiosis in white lupin and soybean plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Pardo, Beatriz; Zornoza, Pilar

    2014-04-01

    The effect of Bradyrhizobium-legume symbiosis on plant growth, toxicological variables and Cu bioaccumulation was studied in white lupin and soybean plants treated with 1.6, 48, 96 and 192 μM Cu. In both species, those plants grown in the presence of root nodule-forming symbiotic Bradyrhizobium showed less root and shoot growth reduction, plus greater translocation of Cu to the shoot, than those grown without symbiotic Bradyrhizobium. The effective added concentrations of Cu that reduced shoot and root dry weight by 50% (EC50), and the critical toxic concentration that caused a 10% reduction in plant growth (CTC10%), were higher in plants grown with symbiotic Bradyrhizobium, and were in general higher in the roots whether the plants were grown with or without these bacteria. The production of malondialdehyde and total thiols was stimulated by Cu excess in the shoots and roots of white lupin grown with or without symbiotic Bradyrhizobium, but mainly in those without the symbionts. In contrast, in soybean, the increases in malondialdehyde and total thiols associated with rising Cu concentration were a little higher (1.2-5.0 and 1.0-1.6 times respectively) in plants grown with symbiotic Bradyrhizobium than without. Finally, the organ most sensitive to Cu excess was generally the shoot, both in white lupin and soybean grown with or without symbiotic Bradyrhizobium. Further, Bradyrhizobium-legume symbiosis appears to increase the tolerance to Cu excess in both legumes, but mainly in white lupin; plant growth was less reduced and CTC10% and EC50 values increased compared to plants grown without symbiotic Bradyrhizobium. Bradyrhizobium N2 fixation in both legumes would therefore seem to increase the phytoremediation potential of these plants when growing on Cu-contaminated sites. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The effect of mycorrhiza on the growth and elemental composition of Ni-hyperaccumulating plant Berkheya coddii Roessler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlowska, Elzbieta, E-mail: elo@mb.au.dk [Materials Research Department, iThemba LABS, PO Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Przybylowicz, Wojciech; Orlowski, Dariusz [Materials Research Department, iThemba LABS, PO Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Turnau, Katarzyna [Institute of Environmental Sciences, Jagiellonian University, Gronostajowa 7, 30-387 Krakow (Poland); Mesjasz-Przybylowicz, Jolanta [Materials Research Department, iThemba LABS, PO Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa)

    2011-12-15

    The effect of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) on growth and element uptake by Ni-hyperaccumulating plant, Berkheya coddii, was studied. Plants were grown under laboratory conditions on ultramafic soil without or with the AM fungi of different origin. The AM colonization, especially with the indigenous strain, significantly enhanced plants growth and their survival. AMF affected also the elemental concentrations that were studied with Particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE). AMF (i) increased K and Fe in shoots, Zn and Mn in roots, P and Ca both, in roots and shoots; (ii) decreased Mn in shoots, Co and Ni both, in shoots and roots. Due to higher biomass of mycorrhizal plants, total Ni content was up to 20 times higher in mycorrhizal plants compared to the non-mycorrhizal ones. The AMF enhancement of Ni uptake may therefore provide an improvement of a presently used technique of nickel phytomining. - Highlights: > The role of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in Ni-hyperaccumulating plant was studied. > Growth of Berkheya coddii was significantly enhanced by mycorrhizal inoculation. > Mycorrhizal symbiosis increased Ni uptake to aboveground part of the plants. > Mycorrhizal colonization affected concentration and uptake of other elements. > Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi could improve the techniques of nickel phytomining. - Inoculation of Ni-hyperaccumulating plant Berkheya coddii with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi significantly enhanced plant growth and increased Ni uptake.

  5. Medium optimization for leaf numbers and shoot multiplication of lidah buaya (Aloe vera by BAP and adenine supplement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LAELA SARI

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Aloe vera of the Aloeaceae is originated from Canary Island (West Africa. This plant is commonly know in Indonesia and cultivated in large fields or in the house yard for many purposes, such as ornamental and medicine plant. The industries using it as the principle raw material has became more important due to the significant benefits of this plant. This study is purposed to obtain the medium optimization for leaf numbers and shoot multiplication of Aloe vera by BAP and adenine supplement. The shoot of Aloe vera was taken from green house of Biotechnology-LIPI. Shoots sterilized by clorox (sodium hypochlorite solution 35% and 20% for 30 and 15 min. until get aseptic shoot (in vitro plants. The shoot isolated from in vitro plant into MS (Murashige and Skoog medium in different concentration of BAP and adenine. The research used factorial Completely Randomized Design with two factors (BAP concentration: 0; 0.5; 1; 1.5; 2 mg/L and adenine concentration 0; 10; 20 mg/L with 5 replicates. The results obtained have showed that addition 20 mg/L adenine to MS raise the numbers of leaf. The shoot multiplication has been augmented by addition of BAP 1 mg/L and adenine 20 mg/L. The results showed that BAP has a positive role in increasing shoot multiplication rate and that adenine has a synergic effect when added together with BAP.

  6. Volatile metabolites of higher plants cenoses as photosynthesizing LSS component under optimum conditions and temperature stress at different light intensities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitelson, J.; Tikhomirov, A.; Parshina, O.; Ushakova, S.; Kalacheva, G.

    One of major yet still poorly known functions of the photosynthesizing component in life support system (LSS) is to improve the quality of air through volatile emissions (VE) of plants capable of accumulating in closed volumes, interacting between themselves and having favorable or adverse impact on humans. In all likelihood, the effect of stress changing the functional condition of plants is to be accompanied with alteration in composition and quantity of VE. There are practically no works dealing with effect of such environmental factors as light intensity and elevated air temperature on qualitative and quantitative composition of VE by higher plants' cenoses. Meanwhile experimental modeling and investigation of stability of man-made human life support systems make this problem of very important. The aim of this work is to experimentally evaluate relationship between qualitative and quantitative composition of VE and the functional condition of wheat cenoses as the basic culture of LSS photosynthesizing component under normal conditions and under temperature stress against light of different intensity. Effect of elevated temperature 35 and 45°C (with the light intensity of 70, 150 or 240 W/m2 PAR) on photosynthesis, respiration, qualitative and quantitative composition of VE of wheat (Triticum aestuvi L., variety 232) cenoses was studied in the atmosphere of growth chambers. More than 20 volatile compounds (terpenoids - a pinene, +3 carene, limonene, benzene, a - and trans-caryophylene, a - and ?-terpinene, their derivatives, aromatic hydrocarbons, etc.) were qualitatively and quantitatively estimated by chromatomassspectroscopy (GC-MS). The light intensity of 240 W/m2 PAR at 35° increase, and at 45° - decrease of thermal stability of photosynthesis and respiration. Elevated temperatures resulted in non- uniform variation of the rate and direction of VE synthesis. VE was highest at irradiance 70 W/m 2 and lowest at 240 W/m2 and 35° . During the reparation

  7. Quiet eye training improves accuracy in basketball field goal shooting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, Joan N; Vandervies, Ben; Kohut, Christie; Ryley, Brendan

    2017-01-01

    University students (N = 240) were randomly assigned to a quiet eye training (QET) or technical training (TT) group, and their shooting accuracy (%) determined during a pre-, post-, and transfer test in basketball field shooting. Both groups first received lectures on visuomotor processing and the quiet eye (QE), followed by a laboratory in which participants in the QET group were taught how to adopt the QE characteristics of elite free-throw shooters, which stresses optimal gaze control and focus relative to a single target location, while the TT participants were taught elite biomechanics which stresses optimal control of the shooting stance, arms, and hands. Overall, the QET group's accuracy was significantly higher than the TT group, but differences were found due to skill level and defensive pressure. From pre to post, the accuracy of the QET novices increased significantly compared to the TT novices, but declined during transfer. Both the QET and TT intermediates had relatively high accuracy scores during the pre- and posttests, which then declined, as expected, during the transfer test against defensive pressure. However, during transfer the QET group's accuracy remained higher than the TT group and was surprisingly similar to that found in elite competition. It is recommended that novice and intermediate basketball players be taught how to adopt the QE of elite players, rather than learning only the technical/mechanical aspects of shooting. Theoretically, the study is placed within the context of top-down "cognitive control," as proposed by Cavanagh and Frank (2014), and QET studies which show that when learners are taught how to adopt the QE of elite performers, this appears to contribute to a more optimal organization of the neural networks underlying control of the task which, in turn, leads to improved shooting performance. © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The Huperzia selago Shoot Tip Transcriptome Sheds New Light on the Evolution of Leaves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evkaikina, Anastasiia I.; Berke, Lidija; Romanova, Marina A.; Proux-Wéra, Estelle; Ivanova, Alexandra N.; Rydin, Catarina; Pawlowski, Katharina; Voitsekhovskaja, Olga V.

    2017-01-01

    Lycopodiophyta—consisting of three orders, Lycopodiales, Isoetales and Selaginellales, with different types of shoot apical meristems (SAMs)—form the earliest branch among the extant vascular plants. They represent a sister group to all other vascular plants, from which they differ in that their

  9. Higher photosynthesis, nutrient- and energy-use efficiencies contribute to invasiveness of exotic plants in a nutrient poor habitat in northeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming-Chao; Kong, De-Liang; Lu, Xiu-Rong; Huang, Kai; Wang, Shuo; Wang, Wei-Bin; Qu, Bo; Feng, Yu-Long

    2017-08-01

    The roles of photosynthesis-related traits in invasiveness of introduced plant species are still not well elucidated, especially in nutrient-poor habitats. In addition, little effort has been made to determine the physiological causes and consequences of the difference in these traits between invasive and native plants. To address these problems, we compared the differences in 16 leaf functional traits related to light-saturated photosynthetic rate (P max ) between 22 invasive and native plants in a nutrient-poor habitat in northeast China. The invasive plants had significantly higher P max , photosynthetic nitrogen- (PNUE), phosphorus- (PPUE), potassium- (PKUE) and energy-use efficiencies (PEUE) than the co-occurring natives, while leaf nutrient concentrations, construction cost (CC) and specific leaf area were not significantly different between the invasive and native plants. The higher PNUE contributed to higher P max for the invasive plants, which in turn contributed to higher PPUE, PKUE and PEUE. CC changed independently with other traits such as P max , PNUE, PPUE, PKUE and PEUE, showing two trait dimensions, which may facilitate acclimation to multifarious niche dimensions. Our results indicate that the invasive plants have a superior resource-use strategy, i.e. higher photosynthesis under similar resource investments, contributing to invasion success in the barren habitat. © 2017 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  10. Granal stacking of thylakoid membranes in higher plant chloroplasts: the physicochemical forces at work and the functional consequences that ensue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Wah Soon; Kim, Eun-Ha; Horton, Peter; Anderson, Jan M

    2005-12-01

    The formation of grana in chloroplasts of higher plants is examined in terms of the subtle interplay of physicochemical forces of attraction and repulsion. The attractive forces between two adjacent membranes comprise (1) van der Waals attraction that depends on the abundance and type of atoms in each membrane, on the distance between the membranes and on the dielectric constant, (2) depletion attraction that generates local order by granal stacking at the expense of greater disorder (i.e. entropy) in the stroma, and (3) an electrostatic attraction of opposite charges located on adjacent membranes. The repulsive forces comprise (1) electrostatic repulsion due to the net negative charge on the outer surface of thylakoid membranes, (2) hydration repulsion that operates at small separations between thylakoid membranes due to layers of bound water molecules, and (3) steric hindrance due to bulky protrusions of Photosystem I (PSI) and ATP synthase into the stroma. In addition, specific interactions may occur, but they await experimental demonstration. Although grana are not essential for photosynthesis, they are ubiquitous in higher plants. Grana may have been selected during evolution for the functional advantages that they confer on higher plants. The functional consequences of grana stacking include (1) enhancement of light capture through a vastly increased area-to-volume ratio and connectivity of several PSIIs with large functional antenna size, (2) the ability to control the lateral separation of PSI from PSII and, therefore, the balanced distribution of excitation energy between two photosystems working in series, (3) the reversible fine-tuning of energy distribution between the photosystems by State 1-State 2 transitions, (4) the ability to regulate light-harvesting via controlled thermal dissipation of excess excitation energy, detected as non-photochemical quenching, (5) dynamic flexibility in the light reactions mediated by a granal structure in response to

  11. Training, Drills Pivotal in Mounting Response to Orlando Shooting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Eric; Bullard, Timothy

    2016-08-01

    Emergency providers at Orlando Regional Medical Center in Orlando. FL, faced multiple challenges in responding to the worst mass shooting in U.S. history. As the scene of the shooting was only three blocks away from the hospital, there was little time to prepare when notified that victims would begin arriving shortly after 2 a.m. on June 12. Also, fears of a gunman near the hospital briefly put the ED on lock down. However, using the incident command system, the hospital was able to mobilize quickly, receiving 44 patients, nine of whom died shortly after arrival. Administrators note that recent training exercises geared toward a mass shooting event facilitated the response and probably saved lives. Patients arrived at the hospital in two waves, with the initial surge occurring right after the hooting took place around 2 a.m., and the second surge occurring about three hours later. At one point, more than 90 patients were in the ED, more than half for reasons unrelated to the shooting. Clinicians contended with a much higher than usual noise level while treating patients, making it hard to hear reports from EMS personnel. Also, treatment had to commence prior to identification for some patients who arrived unconscious or unable to speak. While surgeons and other key specialists were called into the hospital to address identified needs, administrators actually called hospital personnel to tell them not to come in unless they were notified. This prevented added management hurdles.

  12. Gel-free/label-free proteomic analysis of wheat shoot in stress tolerant varieties under iron nanoparticles exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasmeen, Farhat; Raja, Naveed Iqbal; Razzaq, Abdul; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2016-11-01

    Iron nanoparticles (Fe NPs) have stimulatory effects on the germination ratio and plant growth of wheat. To elucidate the effects of Fe NPs on shoot of drought tolerant Pakistan-13 and salt tolerant NARC-11, a gel-free/label-free proteomic technique was used. The weights/lengths of seedling, shoot, and root of wheat varieties were increased on 5ppm Fe NPs exposure. The number of proteins related to photosynthesis and protein metabolism was decreased and increased in drought tolerant variety and salt tolerant variety, respectively, treated with Fe NPs compared to untreated plants. Differentially changed proteins in drought tolerant variety and salt tolerant variety were mainly related to photosynthesis. Out of photosynthesis related proteins, light reaction was enhanced in salt tolerant variety compared to drought tolerant variety on Fe NPs exposure. The abundance of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase small chain in drought tolerant variety was higher than that in salt tolerant variety; however, in salt tolerant variety, it was increased 3 fold by Fe NPs exposure compared to untreated plant. These results suggest that Fe NPs improve the growth of wheat seedling, which might be associated with the increase of protein abundance in photosynthesis in salt tolerant variety. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A Neogene Higher Plant N-Alkane Carbon and Hydrogen Isotope Record From the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipple, B. J.; Pagani, M.

    2006-12-01

    Water availability and a plant's capacity to cope with water stress are expressed in carbon and hydrogen isotopic compositions of leaf waxes. Therefore, coupled sedimentary n-alkane δ13C and δD isotope records provide unique continental-scale information about the paleo-hydrological cycle and its influence on biology over long time scales. In this study, we assess the relationship between Neogene North American climate and floral change, particularly C4 grass expansion, by establishing δ13C and δD records of higher-plant leaf wax n-alkanes from Gulf of Mexico sediments (DSDP site 94). Changes in the hydrogen isotope composition of leaf water can be driven by changes in evaporation/evapotranspiration or changes in the evaporative source from which precipitation derives. However, for this study changes in moisture source are unlikely because these sediments located in Gulf of Mexico likely received the majority of precipitation from the Gulf of Mexico itself over the time interval studied. In general, δ13C and δD values shift in concert, with the most positive δ13C and δD values occurring near the Epoch boundaries. N-alkane δ13C values reflect factors other than water stress alone, including the isotopic composition of atmospheric CO2, plant community, and atmospheric pCO2. Notably, 13C enrichment occurring near the Oligocene/Miocene boundary potentially reflects the rapid decrease in pCO2 at this time. In addition, between 4.5 and 5.5 Ma, n-alkane δ13C values trend more negative as δD becomes increasingly D-enriched, indicative of increased evaporation. Given that contemporaneous North American terrestrial isotope (Passey et al., 2002) and equatorial Atlantic marine (Wagner, 2002) records show similar trends, it appears that major changes in the hydrological cycle took place at this time.

  14. Over-expression of AtPAP2 in Camelina sativa leads to faster plant growth and higher seed yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Youjun; Yu, Laura; Yung, Ka-Fu; Leung, Dennis Yc; Sun, Feng; Lim, Boon L

    2012-04-02

    Lipids extracted from seeds of Camelina sativa have been successfully used as a reliable source of aviation biofuels. This biofuel is environmentally friendly because the drought resistance, frost tolerance and low fertilizer requirement of Camelina sativa allow it to grow on marginal lands. Improving the species growth and seed yield by genetic engineering is therefore a target for the biofuels industry. In Arabidopsis, overexpression of purple acid phosphatase 2 encoded by Arabidopsis (AtPAP2) promotes plant growth by modulating carbon metabolism. Overexpression lines bolt earlier and produce 50% more seeds per plant than wild type. In this study, we explored the effects of overexpressing AtPAP2 in Camelina sativa. Under controlled environmental conditions, overexpression of AtPAP2 in Camelina sativa resulted in longer hypocotyls, earlier flowering, faster growth rate, higher photosynthetic rate and stomatal conductance, increased seed yield and seed size in comparison with the wild-type line and null-lines. Similar to transgenic Arabidopsis, activity of sucrose phosphate synthase in leaves of transgenic Camelina was also significantly up-regulated. Sucrose produced in photosynthetic tissues supplies the building blocks for cellulose, starch and lipids for growth and fuel for anabolic metabolism. Changes in carbon flow and sink/source activities in transgenic lines may affect floral, architectural, and reproductive traits of plants. Lipids extracted from the seeds of Camelina sativa have been used as a major constituent of aviation biofuels. The improved growth rate and seed yield of transgenic Camelina under controlled environmental conditions have the potential to boost oil yield on an area basis in field conditions and thus make Camelina-based biofuels more environmentally friendly and economically attractive.

  15. Over-expression of AtPAP2 in Camelina sativa leads to faster plant growth and higher seed yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Youjun

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lipids extracted from seeds of Camelina sativa have been successfully used as a reliable source of aviation biofuels. This biofuel is environmentally friendly because the drought resistance, frost tolerance and low fertilizer requirement of Camelina sativa allow it to grow on marginal lands. Improving the species growth and seed yield by genetic engineering is therefore a target for the biofuels industry. In Arabidopsis, overexpression of purple acid phosphatase 2 encoded by Arabidopsis (AtPAP2 promotes plant growth by modulating carbon metabolism. Overexpression lines bolt earlier and produce 50% more seeds per plant than wild type. In this study, we explored the effects of overexpressing AtPAP2 in Camelina sativa. Results Under controlled environmental conditions, overexpression of AtPAP2 in Camelina sativa resulted in longer hypocotyls, earlier flowering, faster growth rate, higher photosynthetic rate and stomatal conductance, increased seed yield and seed size in comparison with the wild-type line and null-lines. Similar to transgenic Arabidopsis, activity of sucrose phosphate synthase in leaves of transgenic Camelina was also significantly up-regulated. Sucrose produced in photosynthetic tissues supplies the building blocks for cellulose, starch and lipids for growth and fuel for anabolic metabolism. Changes in carbon flow and sink/source activities in transgenic lines may affect floral, architectural, and reproductive traits of plants. Conclusions Lipids extracted from the seeds of Camelina sativa have been used as a major constituent of aviation biofuels. The improved growth rate and seed yield of transgenic Camelina under controlled environmental conditions have the potential to boost oil yield on an area basis in field conditions and thus make Camelina-based biofuels more environmentally friendly and economically attractive.

  16. shoot water content and reference evapotranspiration for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    is the slope of saturation vapour pressure curve at air temperature T (kPa °C-1), T is air temperature (°C). Crop coefficient. Shoot water content was assumed to be crop coefficient, as crop evapotranspiration is always determined under unlimited water supply (Pereira et al., 2015), and hence the shoot water content reflects ...

  17. The micropropagation of chrysanthemums via axillary shoot ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-03-15

    Mar 15, 2012 ... Protocols for axillary shoot proliferation and somatic embryogenesis were developed for Dendranthema × grandiflora (Ramat.) Kitamura cv. Palisade White. Shoot tips were cultured on a modified Murashige and Skoog. (MS) media supplemented with benzyl aminopurine (BA) and gibberellic acid (GA3) or ...

  18. A shooting approach to suboptimal control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, David G.; Sheen, Jyh-Jong

    1991-01-01

    The shooting method is used to solve the suboptimal control problem where the control history is assumed to be piecewise linear. Suboptimal solutions can be obtained without difficulty and can lead to accurate approximate controls and good starting multipliers for the regular shooting method by increasing the number of nodes. Optimal planar launch trajectories are presented for the advanced launch system.

  19. The micropropagation of chrysanthemums via axillary shoot ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Protocols for axillary shoot proliferation and somatic embryogenesis were developed for Dendranthema × grandiflora (Ramat.) Kitamura cv. Palisade White. Shoot tips were cultured on a modified Murashige and Skoog (MS) media supplemented with benzyl aminopurine (BA) and gibberellic acid (GA3) or BA, kinetin (Kin) ...

  20. Glyphosate (Ab)sorption by Shoots and Rhizomes of Native versus Hybrid Cattail (Typha).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Tianye; Sutton, Nora B; de Jager, Pim; Grosshans, Richard; Munira, Sirajum; Farenhorst, Annemieke

    2017-11-01

    Wetlands in the Prairie Pothole Region of North America are integrated with farmland and contain mixtures of herbicide contaminants. Passive nonfacilitated diffusion is how most herbicides can move across plant membranes, making this perhaps an important process by which herbicide contaminants are absorbed by wetland vegetation. Prairie wetlands are dominated by native cattail (Typha latifolia) and hybrid cattail (Typha x glauca). The objective of this batch equilibrium study was to compare glyphosate absorption by the shoots and rhizomes of native versus hybrid cattails. Although it has been previously reported for some pesticides that passive diffusion is greater for rhizome than shoot components, this is the first study to demonstrate that the absorption capacity of rhizomes is species dependent, with the glyphosate absorption being significantly greater for rhizomes than shoots in case of native cattails, but with no significant differences in glyphosate absorption between rhizomes and shoots in case of hybrid cattails. Most importantly, glyphosate absorption by native rhizomes far exceeded that of the absorption occurring for hybrid rhizomes, native shoots and hybrid shoots. Glyphosate has long been used to manage invasive hybrid cattails in wetlands in North America, but hybrid cattail expansions continue to occur. Since our results showed limited glyphosate absorption by hybrid shoots and rhizomes, this lack of sorption may partially explain the poorer ability of glyphosate to control hybrid cattails in wetlands.

  1. Foliar abscisic acid-to-ethylene accumulation and response regulate shoot growth sensitivity to mild drought in wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi eValluru

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Although plant hormones play an important role in adjusting growth in response to environmental perturbation, the relative contributions of abscisic acid (ABA and ethylene remain elusive. Using six spring wheat genotypes differing for stress tolerance, we show that young seedlings of the drought-tolerant (DT group maintained or increased shoot dry weight (SDW while the drought-susceptible (DS group decreased SDW in response to mild drought. Both the DT and DS groups increased endogenous ABA and ethylene concentrations under mild drought compared to control. The DT and DS groups exhibited different SDW response trends, whereby the DS group decreased while the DT group increased SDW, to increased concentrations of ABA and ethylene under mild drought, although both groups decreased ABA/ethylene ratio under mild drought albeit at different levels. We concluded that SDW of the DT and DS groups might be distinctly regulated by specific ABA:ethylene ratio. Further, a foliar-spray of low concentrations (0.1 μM of ABA increased shoot relative growth rate (RGR in the DS group while ACC (1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid, ethylene precursor spray increased RGR in both groups compared to control. Furthermore, the DT group accumulated a significantly higher galactose while a significantly lower maltose in the shoot compared to the DS group. Taken all together, these results suggest an impact of ABA, ethylene and ABA:ethylene ratio on SDW of wheat seedlings that may partly underlie a genotypic variability of different shoot growth sensitivities to drought among crop species under field conditions. We propose that phenotyping based on hormone accumulation, response and hormonal ratio would be a viable, rapid, and an early–stage selection tool aiding genotype selection for stress tolerance.

  2. Genotoxicity Assessment of Volatile Organic Compounds in Landfill Gas Emission Using Comet Assay in Higher Terrestrial Plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na Roi-Et, Veerapas; Chiemchaisri, Wilai; Chiemchaisri, Chart

    2017-02-01

    Genotoxicity model is developed to assess the individual subacute toxicity of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) at very low levels as in a landfill gas. Golden Pothos (Epipremnum aureum), a higher plant, was tested under variation of benzene 54-5656 ng/L, toluene 10-4362 ng/L, ethylbenzene 28-4997 ng/L, xylene 53-4845 ng/L, for 96 h. DNA fragmentation in plant leaves were investigated via comet assay. The results show that DNA migration ratio increased with the BTEX concentrations, but at different rates. The 50% effective concentration (EC50) of DNA fragmentation from the dose-response relationships indicated toluene has the highest EC50 value and followed by benzene, xylene and ethylbenzene. Alternatively, ethylbenzene has the highest toxicity unit and followed by xylene, benzene and toluene as described by toxicity unit (TU). In conclusion, comet assay of Pothos can be used in differentiating DNA fragmentation against very low levels of BTEX in the atmosphere. Pothos is recommended for genotoxicity assessment of a low BTEX contaminated atmosphere.

  3. ANTIOXIDANT ACTIVITY OF TISSUE CULTURE-RAISED BALLOTA NIGRA L. PLANTS GROWN EX VITRO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowczyńska, Joanna; Grzegorczyk-KAROLAK, Izabela; Wysokińska, Halina

    2015-01-01

    Antioxidant properties and total phenolic and flavonoid contents were evaluated in methanolic extracts of shoots from Ballota nigra plants initiated in vitro (from nodal explants) and in vivo (from seeds). The plants were grown in greenhouse and in the field, and were analyzed at the vegetative and flowering stages. The shoot extract of wild-grown plants of B. nigra was also investigated. The results indicate that antioxidant potential of the B. nigra extracts seems to be due to their scavenging of free radicals (DPPH assay) and metal reducing (FRAP test), while they were less effective at the prevention of linoleic acid peroxidation (LPO test). The extracts from shoots of in vitro derived plants were found to exhibit the greatest antioxidant properties. The extracts were also characterized by the highest content of phenolic compounds and their level was affected by plant developmental stage. The extracts of shoots collected at the flowering period exhibited higher amounts of phenolics and flavonoids than in the extracts of immature plants. A close correlation between the total phenolic content and flavonoid content and antioxidant activity using the DPPH and FRAP assays was obtained. The results of the present study suggest the use in vitro-derived plants of B. nigra instead of using wild plants for pharmaceutical purposes.

  4. Differential growth response to arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and plant density in two wild plants belonging to contrasting functional types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Marisela; Urcelay, Carlos

    2009-10-01

    The effect of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) on plant growth was examined in two wild plant species belonging to contrasting functional types: an annual forb (Bidens pilosa, Asteraceae) and a deciduous shrub (Acacia caven, Fabaceae) at three contrasting plant densities (one, two, and three individuals per pot). AMF had a slightly negative effect on B. pilosa when the species grew in isolation while they positively affected A. caven. Positive effects of AMF on shoot mass of A. caven decreased at higher plant densities, while shoot mass of individuals of B. pilosa showed less marked differences between plant densities. When considering total biomass per pot, AMF positively affected A. caven growth while negatively affecting B. pilosa, at all three plant densities. Root/shoot ratio per pot was negatively affected by AMF but not plant density in both species. These findings highlight the importance of including plants belonging to different life forms and/or traits in research regarding the interaction between AMF and intraspecific plant competition.

  5. Foliar uptake of nitrogen from ant fecal droplets: an overlooked service to ant plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinkalski, Christian Alexander Stidsen; Jensen, Karl-Martin Vagn; Damgaard, Christian Frølund

    2017-01-01

    through the coffee leaves and, subsequently, translocated within the plants and possibly leading to the observed higher shoot/root (wet weight) ratios observed on ant plants compared to controls. 3. Synthesis: These results reveal an hitherto undescribed foliar uptake of ant provided nutrients......-recognised but probably more fluctuating benefit from herbivore protection. Given the worldwide abundance of plant canopies foraged by ants, this nutrient pathway may be of high ecological significance....

  6. Aluminium alleviates manganese toxicity to rice by decreasing root symplastic Mn uptake and reducing availability to shoots of Mn stored in roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Zhao, Xue Qiang; Hu, Zhen Min; Shao, Ji Feng; Che, Jing; Chen, Rong Fu; Dong, Xiao Ying; Shen, Ren Fang

    2015-08-01

    Manganese (Mn) and aluminium (Al) phytotoxicities occur mainly in acid soils. In some plant species, Al alleviates Mn toxicity, but the mechanisms underlying this effect are obscure. Rice (Oryza sativa) seedlings (11 d old) were grown in nutrient solution containing different concentrations of Mn(2+) and Al(3+) in short-term (24 h) and long-term (3 weeks) treatments. Measurements were taken of root symplastic sap, root Mn plaques, cell membrane electrical surface potential and Mn activity, root morphology and plant growth. In the 3-week treatment, addition of Al resulted in increased root and shoot dry weight for plants under toxic levels of Mn. This was associated with decreased Mn concentration in the shoots and increased Mn concentration in the roots. In the 24-h treatment, addition of Al resulted in decreased Mn accumulation in the root symplasts and in the shoots. This was attributed to higher cell membrane surface electrical potential and lower Mn(2+) activity at the cell membrane surface. The increased Mn accumulation in roots from the 3-week treatment was attributed to the formation of Mn plaques, which were probably related to the Al-induced increase in root aerenchyma. The results show that Al alleviated Mn toxicity in rice, and this could be attributed to decreased shoot Mn accumulation resulting from an Al-induced decrease in root symplastic Mn uptake. The decrease in root symplastic Mn uptake resulted from an Al-induced change in cell membrane potential. In addition, Al increased Mn plaques in the roots and changed the binding properties of the cell wall, resulting in accumulation of non-available Mn in roots. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Adventitious Shoot Regeneration from Leaf Explant of Dwarf Hygro (Hygrophila polysperma (Roxb. T. Anderson

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Karataş

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dwarf hygro (Hygrophila polysperma is an ornamental aquatic plant that changes its leaf colours to pinkish in high light. It is listed as a medicinal plant in medicinal plant lists of Indian states of West Bengal and Karnataka. It is also used as a screening tool for toxicities and a bioindicator to detect and control algae. The study reported in vitro adventitious shoot regeneration from leaf explants cultured on MS medium containing 0.10–1.60 mg/L Kin/TDZ with or without 0.10 mg/L IBA and 500 mg/L Amoklavin to eradicate endogenic bacterial contamination. Direct adventitious shoot regeneration started within one week from both culture mediums followed by late callus induction which was more prominent on TDZ containing media compared to Kin containing media. Addition of 0.10 mg/L IBA with both Kin and TDZ increased shoot regeneration frequency, mean number of shoots per explant, and mean shoot length. Maximum number of 16.33 and 20.55 shoots per explant was obtained on MS medium containing 0.80+0.10 mg/L Kin-IBA and 0.10+0.10 mg/L TDZ-IBA, respectively. Regenerated shoots were rooted on MS medium containing 0.20–1.00 mg/L IBA followed by successfull acclimatization in aquariums. Regenerated plantlets were also tested in jars containing distilled water that showed the pH 6–9 for the best plant growth and development.

  8. Functional components of the bacterial CzcCBA efflux system reduce cadmium uptake and accumulation in transgenic tobacco plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesler, Andrea; DalCorso, Giovanni; Fasani, Elisa; Manara, Anna; Di Sansebastiano, Gian Pietro; Argese, Emanuele; Furini, Antonella

    2017-03-25

    Cadmium (Cd) is a toxic trace element released into the environment by industrial and agricultural practices, threatening the health of plants and contaminating the food/feed chain. Biotechnology can be used to develop plant varieties with a higher capacity for Cd accumulation (for use in phytoremediation programs) or a lower capacity for Cd accumulation (to reduce Cd levels in food and feed). Here we generated transgenic tobacco plants expressing components of the Pseudomonas putida CzcCBA efflux system. Plants were transformed with combinations of the CzcC, CzcB and CzcA genes, and the impact on Cd mobilization was analysed. Plants expressing PpCzcC showed no differences in Cd accumulation, whereas those expressing PpCzcB or PpCzcA accumulated less Cd in the shoots, but more Cd in the roots. Plants expressing both PpCzcB and PpCzcA accumulated less Cd in the shoots and roots compared to controls, whereas plants expressing all three genes showed a significant reduction in Cd levels only in shoots. These results show that components of the CzcCBA system can be expressed in plants and may be useful for developing plants with a reduced capacity to accumulate Cd in the shoots, potentially reducing the toxicity of food/feed crops cultivated in Cd-contaminated soils. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Callus induction and regeneration via shoot tips of Dendrocalamus hamiltonii

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zang, Qiaolu; Zhou, Ling; Zhuge, Fei; Yang, Haiyun; Wang, Xiaoqin; Lin, Xinchun

    2016-01-01

    By using shoot tips as explants, various media and culture conditions for callus induction and proliferation, shoot differentiation, root induction and plantlet transplantation to develop an efficient...

  10. Slow molecular evolution in 18S rDNA, rbcL and nad5 genes of mosses compared with higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenøien, H K

    2008-03-01

    The evolutionary potential of bryophytes (mosses, liverworts and hornworts) has been debated for decades. Fossil record and biogeographical distribution patterns suggest very slow morphological evolution and the retainment of several ancient traits since the split with vascular plants some 450 million years ago. Many have argued that bryophytes may evolve as rapidly as higher plants on the molecular level, but this hypothesis has not been tested so far. Here, it is shown that mosses have experienced significantly lower rates of molecular evolution than higher plants within 18S rDNA (nuclear), rbcL (chloroplast) and nad5 (mitochondrial) genes. Mosses are on an average evolving 2-3 times slower than ferns, gymnosperms and angiosperms; and also green algae seem to be evolving faster than nonvascular plants. These results support the observation of a general correlation between morphological and molecular evolutionary rates in plants and also show that mosses are 'evolutionary sphinxes' regarding both morphological and molecular evolutionary potential.

  11. Multiple impacts of the plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium Variovorax paradoxus 5C-2 on nutrient and ABA relations of Pisum sativum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Fan; Chen, Lin; Belimov, Andrey A; Shaposhnikov, Alexander I; Gong, Fan; Meng, Xu; Hartung, Wolfram; Jeschke, Dieter W; Davies, William J; Dodd, Ian C

    2012-11-01

    Resolving the physiological mechanisms by which rhizobacteria enhance plant growth is difficult, since many such bacteria contain multiple plant growth-promoting properties. To understand further how the 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase (ACCd)-containing rhizobacterium Variovorax paradoxus 5C-2 affects plant growth, the flows and partitioning of mineral nutrients and abscisic acid (ABA) and ABA metabolism were studied in pea (Pisum sativum) plants following rhizosphere bacterial inoculation. Although root architecture was not affected, inoculation increased root and shoot biomass, and stomatal conductance, by 20, 15, and 24%, respectively, and increased N, P, K, Ca, and Mg uptake by 16, 81, 50, 46, and 58%, respectively. P deposition in inoculated plant roots was 4.9 times higher than that in uninoculated controls. Rhizobacterial inoculation increased root to shoot xylem flows and shoot to root phloem flows of K by 1.8- and 2.1-fold, respectively. In control plants, major sinks for K deposition were the roots and upper shoot (43% and 49% of total uptake, respectively), while rhizobacterial inoculation increased K distribution to the lower shoot at the expense of other compartments (xylem, phloem, and upper shoot). Despite being unable to metabolize ABA in vitro, V. paradoxus 5C-2 decreased root ABA concentrations and accumulation by 40-60%. Although inoculation decreased xylem ABA flows, phloem ABA flows increased. Whether bacterial ACCd attenuates root to shoot ABA signalling requires further investigation, since ABA is critical to maintain growth of droughted plants, and ACCd-containing organisms have been advocated as a means of minimizing growth inhibition of plants in drying soil.

  12. Interactions of metal-based engineered nanoparticles with aquatic higher plants: A review of state of current knowledge

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Thwala, Melusi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available . Dissolution appears to be a key mechanism driving bioaccumulation of ENPs, whereas nanoparticulates often adsorb to plant surfaces with minimal internalisation. However, few reports document the internalisation of ENPs by plants, thus the role...

  13. THE EFFECTIVENESS OF BASKETBALL SHOOTING TRAINING MODEL ON IMPROVING SHOOTING CAPABILITIES OF BASKETBALL PLAYERS IN PASURUAN REGENCY

    OpenAIRE

    Mashuri, Hendra

    2017-01-01

    AbstractShooting in a basketball game plays an important role in achieving the goal of the basketball game. Given that the basketball game tip is to insert the ball into the opponent's basket, therefore a good shooting technique is owned by every bolabasket player. Efforts to improve basketball shooting skills by using a basketball shooting practice model through a combination approach. The model combines shooting and physical engineering components supporting shooting techniques and using di...

  14. Dynamics of gibberellin-like substances in the development of buds, newly formed shoots and adventitious roots of willow cuttings(Salix viminalis L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Michniewicz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It was stated that adventitious roots as well as shoots formed from the buds of willow cuttings contained two GA-like substances. One of them was different in roots and in shoots. The amount of Ga-like substance in roots was much higher than in shoots. The level of these substances increased very intensively in roots while in shoots rather slightly and only in the earlier stages of their growth. The results of later experiments and of others presented here shown that adventitious roots of willow cuttings are the sites of gibberellin biosynthesis. Possible explanation of existing of different gibberellins in roots and in shoots is also discussed.

  15. Competence of oat ( Avena sativa L.) shoot apical meristems for integrative transformation, inherited expression, and osmotic tolerance of transgenic lines containing hva1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqbool, B.; Zhong, H.; El-Maghraby, Y.; Ahmad, A.; Chai, B.; Wang, W.; Sabzikar, R.; Sticklen, B.

    2002-08-01

    Three oat ( Avena sativa L.) cultivars have been successfully transformed using an efficient and reproducible in vitro culture system for differentiation of multiple shoots from shoot apical meristems. The transformation was performed using microprojectile bombardment with two plasmids (pBY520 and pAct1-D) containing linked ( hva1-bar) and non-linked ( gus) genes. The hva1 and bar genes cointegrated with a frequency of 100% as expected, and 61.6% of the transgenic plants carried all three genes. Molecular and biochemical analyses in R0, R1 and R2 progenies confirmed stable integration and expression of all transgenes. Localization of the GUS protein in R0 and R1 plants revealed that high-expression of gus occurred in vascular tissues and in the pollen grains of mature flowers. The constitutive expression of HVA1 protein was observed at all developmental stages of transgenic plants, and was particularly stronger during the early seedling stages. R2 progeny of five independent transgenic lines was tested in vitro for tolerance to osmotic (salt and mannitol) stresses. As compared to non-transgenic control plants, transgenic plants maintained a higher growth and showed significantly ( P oats against salinity and possible water-deficiency stress conditions.

  16. Strigolactone regulates shoot development through a core signalling pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Bennett

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Strigolactones are a recently identified class of hormone that regulate multiple aspects of plant development. The DWARF14 (D14 α/β fold protein has been identified as a strigolactone receptor, which can act through the SCFMAX2 ubiquitin ligase, but the universality of this mechanism is not clear. Multiple proteins have been suggested as targets for strigolactone signalling, including both direct proteolytic targets of SCFMAX2, and downstream targets. However, the relevance and importance of these proteins to strigolactone signalling in many cases has not been fully established. Here we assess the contribution of these targets to strigolactone signalling in adult shoot developmental responses. We find that all examined strigolactone responses are regulated by SCFMAX2 and D14, and not by other D14-like proteins. We further show that all examined strigolactone responses likely depend on degradation of SMXL proteins in the SMXL6 clade, and not on the other proposed proteolytic targets BES1 or DELLAs. Taken together, our results suggest that in the adult shoot, the dominant mode of strigolactone signalling is D14-initiated, MAX2-mediated degradation of SMXL6-related proteins. We confirm that the BRANCHED1 transcription factor and the PIN-FORMED1 auxin efflux carrier are plausible downstream targets of this pathway in the regulation of shoot branching, and show that BRC1 likely acts in parallel to PIN1.

  17. Effect of canker size on availability of cassava planting materials in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These cultivars had low resistance to anthracnose. In all the trials, TMS 4(2)1425, and TMS 30211, had the smallest canker size (1.80 and 6.3 mm2, respectively) on whole plant, young stems, shoots and maturing stems. TMS 4(2)1425 and TMS 30211 had higher resistance to anthracnose and can be recommended for ...

  18. Soil pollution at outdoor shooting ranges: Health effects, bioavailability and best management practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayiga, A O; Saha, U K

    2016-09-01

    The total lead (Pb) concentrations of the surface soil, sub surface soil, vegetation and surface waters of outdoor shooting ranges are extremely high and above regulatory limits. Lead is dangerous at high concentrations and can cause a variety of serious health problems. Shooters and range workers are exposed to lead dust and can even take Pb dust home to their families while some animals around the shooting range can ingest the Pb bullets. The toxicity of Pb depends on its bioavailability which has been determined to be influenced greatly by the geochemical properties of each site. The bioavailability of Pb in shooting ranges has been found to be higher than other metal contaminated soils probably because of its very low residual Pb (shooting ranges and offsite has been reported in literature. Best management practices to reduce mobility of Pb in shooting ranges involve an integrated Pb management program which has been described in the paper. The adoption of the non-toxic "green bullet" which has been developed to replace Pb bullets may reduce or prevent environmental pollution at shooting ranges. However, the contaminated soil resulting from decades of operation of several shooting ranges still needs to be restored to its natural state. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Direct shoot regeneration from intact leaves of Arnebia euchroma (Royle) Johnston using thidiazuron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Sonia; Sharma, Shveta; Sharma, Madhu; Ahuja, Paramvir Singh

    2010-04-08

    The present study highlights the importance of preculture time and concentration of TDZ (thidiazuron) for direct regeneration from in vitro leaves (attached to shoots) in Arnebia euchroma. Shoot buds proliferated to form multiple shoots on MS medium (Murashige and Skoog medium) with 5.0 microM Kn. Different additives viz. ascorbic acid, PVP (polyvinylpyrrolidone), PVPP (polyvinylpolypyrrolidone) or activated charcoal (50, 100 and 250 mg/l each) were used to check the phenolic exudations. Direct shoot regeneration was obtained when shoots were initially precultured for 40 days on medium with a higher concentration of TDZ (20.0 muM) and then transferred to a lower concentration (5.0 microM TDZ). The identity of shoot buds was confirmed by histological studies. Regenerated shoots were cultured for 30 days on medium containing Kn (5.0 microM) for proliferation and then transferred to IBA (0.25 microM)-containing medium for rooting. Rooted plantlets were transferred to greenhouse with 45-50% survival.

  20. Results of the first stage (2002-2009) of investigation of higher plants onboard RS ISS, as an element of future closed Life Support Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sychev, Vladimir; Levinskikh, Margarita; Podolsky, Igor; Bingham, Gail; Novikova, Nataliya; Sugimoto, Manabu

    A key task for biomedical human support in long-term manned space expeditions is the develop-ment of the Life Support System (LSS). It is expected that in the first continuous interplanetary expeditions LSS of only a few biological elements of the LSS, such as higher plants will be in-cluded. Therefore, investigations of growth and development of higher plants for consideration in the LSS are of high importance. In a period from October, 2002 to December 2009, 15 ex-periments on cultivation of different plants, including two genetically marked species of dwarf peas, a leaf vegetable strain of Mizuna, radish, barley and wheat were conducted in space greenhouse "LADA" onboard Russian Segment (RS) of International Space Station (ISS). The experiments resulted in the conclusion that the properties of growth and development of plants grown in space greenhouse "LADA" were unaffected by spaceflight conditions. In experiments conducted in a period from 2003 to 2005, it was shown for the first time that pea plants pre-serve reproductive functions, forming viable seeds during at least four continuous full cycles of ontogenesis ("seed to seed") under spaceflight conditions. No changes were found in the genetic apparatus of the pea plants in the four "space" generations. Since 2005, there have been routine collections of microbiological samples from the surfaces of the plants grown on-board in "LADA" greenhouse. Analysis has shown that the properties of contamination of the plants grown aboard by microorganism contain no abnormal patterns. Since 2008, the plants cultivated in "LADA" greenhouse have been frozen onboard RS ISS in the MELFI refrigerator and transferred to the Earth for further investigations. Investigations of Mizuna plants grown and frozen onboard of ISS, showed no differences between "ground control" and "space" plants in chemical and biochemical properties. There also no stress-response was found in kashinriki strain barley planted and frozen onboard ISS.

  1. Bioconcentration of atrazine and chlorophenols into roots and shoots of rice seedlings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su Yuhong [Research Center for Eco-environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 18 Shuangqing Road, Beijing 100085 (China); Chemistry Department, Xinjiang University, Urumqi 830046 (China); Zhu Yongguan [Research Center for Eco-environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 18 Shuangqing Road, Beijing 100085 (China)]. E-mail: ygzhu@mail.rcees.ac.cn

    2006-01-15

    Accumulation of o-chlorophenol (CP), 2,4-dichlorophenol (DCP), and atrazine (ATR), as single and mixed contaminants, from hydroponic solutions into roots and shoots of rice seedlings was studied following 48-h exposure of the plant roots. As single contaminants at low levels, the observed bioconcentration factors (BCFs) of CP and DCP with roots approximated the equilibrium values according to the partition-limited model. The BCF of atrazine with roots was about half the partition limit for unknown reasons. The BCFs of CP and ATR with shoots also approximated the partition limits, while the BCF for more lipophilic DCP with shoots was about half the estimated limit, due to insufficient water transport into plants for DCP. As mixed contaminants at low levels, the BCFs with both roots and shoots were comparable with those for the single contaminants; at high levels, the BCFs generally decreased because of the enhanced mixed-contaminant phytotoxicity, as manifested by the greatly reduced plant transpiration rate. - Uptakes of o-chlorophenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol, and atrazine at various levels from nutrient solution by roots and shoots of rice seedlings were investigated using a partition-limited model.

  2. Plant regeneration and ploidy variation in culture derived plants of Asclepias curassavica L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramanik, T K; Datta, S K

    1986-06-01

    Clonal propagation of medicinal milkweed, Asclepias curassavica L. (Asclepiadaceae) was achieved by culturing excised nodes on MS medium (Murashige and Skoog, 1962) supplemented with different hormone combinations. Both BAP and Kn were found equally effective for shoot initiation. IAA and NAA were found suitable for root induction. Combinations of Kn and NAA induced both roots and shoots after 30 days of culture. Chromosomal variation was observed in the roots of in vitro regenerated plants. Regenerants with higher chromosome number (33; 2n=22) obtained on MS medium in response to 9.2 μM Kn+10.7 μM NAA showed vigorous growth and higher propagation rates in culture than the plants possessing less than the diploid chromosome number (2n-2=20, 2n-4=18). Such variations are more likely due to genetic fitness of different aneuploids grown on a particular nutrient medium.

  3. A Proteomic Analysis of the Upper and Lower Flanks of the Base of Rice Shoot in the Gravitropism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Liwei; Chen, Haiying; Dou, Xianying; Jin, Jing; Sun, Weining; Cai, Weiming

    2015-11-01

    Due to gravitational stimulation, the lower part of a shoot base grows faster than the upper part, leading the shoot to curve upward. Though much research has been done on the mechanism of plant gravitropism, it still requires extensive elucidation. Recently, functional genomic strategies have been applied to study this mechanism in plants. The present study carried out a proteomic analysis to gain a better understanding of gravity stimulation in rice. Three-week-old rice seedlings were gravitropically stimulated and samples were harvested at 4 different time points: 0.5, 3, 6, and 9 h. Then, the total crude proteins were extracted from the lower and upper parts of the shoot base, separated by 2-DE, and silver stained. At each time point, proteins in the lower and upper parts were compared, and the differently expressed proteins were identified using MALDI TOF or ESI-MS/MS. After gravity stimulation, proteins involved in nine different functional categories were either up-regulated or down-regulated. Sugar metabolism, glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid (TCA/citric) cycle, pyruvate metabolism, and transcription regulation-related proteins were regulated. Although the initiation of defense reactions mainly occurred in roots, some different defense mechanisms were also evoked in the aerial tissues. Interestingly, the abundance of some proteins changed drastically at only 0.5 h after reorientation: inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (up to 6.49-fold higher in lower flanks at 0.5 h), ATP synthase D (4.25-fold), and ribulose-1,5 -bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase (3.62-fold). These findings may aid in understanding the mechanism of the gravitropism.

  4. Evidence for a universal pathway of abscisic acid biosynthesis in higher plants from sup 18 O incorporation patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeevaart, J.A.D.; Heath, T.G.; Gage, D.A. (Michigan State University, East Lansing (USA))

    1989-12-01

    Previous labeling studies of abscisic acid (ABA) with {sup 18}O{sub 2} have been mainly conducted with water-stressed leaves. In this study, {sup 18}O incorporation into ABA of stressed leaves of various species was compared with {sup 18}O labeling of ABA of turgid leaves and of fruit tissue in different stages of ripening. In stressed leaves of all six species investigated, avocado (Persea americana), barley (Hordeum vulgare), bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), cocklebur (Xanthium strumarium), spinach (Spinacia oleracea), and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), {sup 18}O was most abundant in the carboxyl group, whereas incorporation of a second and third {sup 18}O in the oxygen atoms on the ring of ABA was much less prominent after 24 h in {sup 18}O{sub 2}. ABA from turgid bean leaves showed significant {sup 18}O incorporation, again with highest {sup 18}O enrichment in the carboxyl group. On the basis of {sup 18}O-labeling patterns observed in ABA from different tissues it is concluded that, despite variations in precusor pool sizes and intermediate turnover rates, there is a universal pathway of ABA biosynthesis in higher plants which involves cleavage of a larger precursor molecule, presumably an oxygenated carotenoid.

  5. Responses of barley root and shoot proteomes to long‐term nitrogen deficiency, short‐term nitrogen starvation and ammonium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurell Blom Møller, Anders; Pedas, Pai; Andersen, Birgit

    2011-01-01

    Cereals are major crops worldwide, and improvement of their nitrogen use efficiency is a crucial challenge. In this study proteins responding to N supply in barley roots and shoots were analysed using a proteomics approach, to provide insight into mechanisms of N uptake and assimilation. Control...... in shoots and roots. N starvation altered proteins of amino acid metabolism in roots. Both treatments caused proteome changes in roots that could affect growth. Shoots of plants grown with ammonium as N source (28 d with 5 mm nitrate followed by 5 d with 5 mm ammonium) showed responses similar to N...... deficient shoots, characterized by turnover of ribulose 1·5‐bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) and increases in proteins of the chloroplastic transcription and translation machinery. Identified proteins in 67 and 49 varying spots in roots and shoots respectively, corresponded to 62 functions...

  6. Cold pretreatment amplifies the responses of in vitro Eucalyptus grandis shoots to cryopreparative drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Chao-Hsuan; Mycock, David J; Padayachee, Kershree

    2014-01-01

    Eucalyptus grandis is an important commercial forestry species in South Africa. Little is known about its response (which is both drought and cold sensitive) to cold exposure and subsequent drying. The study was to investigate the responses of E. grandis in vitro shoots to cold pretreatment. E. grandis in vitro shoots were subjected to cold pretreatment (5, 10 and 15 degrees C at different exposure periods of 1 or 3 days), different drying times (20, 40, 60 and 80 min over activated silica gel), and the combination of the selected cold pretreatment regime and subsequent drying. Cold pretreatment alone did not cause detrimental effects but elicited the accumulation of phenolic acids. Shoots exposed to 5 degrees C for 3 days had significantly higher levels of reactive oxygen species as well. The accumulation of ROS and phenolic acids was also noted in unacclimated, dried shoots, especially after 80 min of drying. In addition, these shoots had significantly higher levels of total soluble sugars, lower levels of starch and elevated proline levels. This osmotic adjustment strategy was amplified in cold acclimated, dried shoots (10 degrees C, 3 days; 80 min drying), which also had significantly lower levels of ROS, increased levels of phenolic acid, and higher water content and viability.

  7. Indução de superbrotamento e regeneração de plantas in vitro, nas cultivares de algodão colorido Induction of multiple shoots and regeneration of plants in vitro, in coloured cotton cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria do S. Rocha

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available A micropropagação in vitro tem-se apresentado como técnica que possibilita várias metodologias que, por sua vez, contribuem com a redução no tempo, para a obtenção de novas cultivares. Objetivou-se com esse trabalho avaliar o comportamento dos genótipos BRS-Verde, BRS-200-Marrom, 6M-Mocó-Branco e BRs(-187 8H Branco na indução do superbrotamento em diferentes combinações de reguladores de crescimento. As sementes, para obtenção do material de partida, foram desinfectadas em solução de hipoclorito de sódio a 1% de cloro ativo por 20 min. Os brotos foram induzidos, a partir de explante de nós cotiledonares em meio básico MS, suplementado com 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP, Cinetina ( KIN e Tiadiazuron (TDZ, isolados ou associados em diferentes concentrações. O material foi mantido por 40 dias em sala de crescimento, sob condições ambientais controladas. Utilizou-se 10 tubos de ensaio por tratamento com um explante por frasco, em um delineamento inteiramente casualizado, com arranjo fatorial de 4 x 17 (quatro genótipos x dezessete meios. Observou-se que o meio MS suplementado com BAP (2,0 mg L-1 isolado ou associado com KIN (1,0 mg L-1, promoveu maior capacidade de regeneração e altura de brotos; o meio MS suplementado com BAP (2,5 mg L-1 estimulou maior altura de brotos e o meio MS suplementado com TDZ (1,0, 0,50 e 0,25 mg L-1 afetou a capacidade de regeneração de brotos, observando-se maior formação de calos.The micropropagation in vitro has been presented as a technique that allows various methodologies which, for in turn, contribute to a reduction in the time to obtain new cultivares. The objective of this work was to evaluate the behavior of the genotypes BRS-Verde, BRS-200-Marrom, 6M-Mocó-white and BRs(-187-8H- white, in the induction of the multiple shoots in different combinations of growth regulators. The seeds, to obtain the initial material, were placed in a solution of 1% sodium hypochlorite of active chlorine

  8. shoot water content and reference evapotranspiration for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    Penmann-Monteith equation and finally calculation of crop evapotranspiration. The objective of this study was to establish crop coefficients and evapotranspiration of different soybean varieties using shoot water content and reference evapotranspiration (ET0). MATERIALS AND METHODS. Reference evapotranspiration.

  9. Direct shoot regeneration via organogenesis in chiehqua ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    qua (Benincasa hispida Cogn. var. Chieh-qua How). To obtain optimal conditions of adventitious shoot induction, the cotyledon explants were excised from seedlings of different genotypes as well as seed germination conditions, and then ...

  10. Morphological abnormality among regenerated shoots of banana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-11-02

    AAA), 'Rastali',. 'Nangka' (AAB) and 'Baka Baling' (ABB) were chosen to compare the effect of benzylaminopurine (BAP) and thidiazuron (TDZ) on multiplication efficiency in relation with frequency of abnormal shoot.

  11. Identification of a Stelar-Localized Transport Protein That Facilitates Root-to-Shoot Transfer of Chloride in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Bo

    2015-12-11

    Under saline conditions, higher plants restrict the accumulation of chloride ions (Cl–) in the shoot by regulating their transfer from the root symplast into the xylem-associated apoplast. To identify molecular mechanisms underpinning this phenomenon, we undertook a transcriptional screen of salt stressed Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) roots. Microarrays, quantitative RT-PCR, and promoter-GUS fusions identified a candidate gene involved in Cl– xylem loading from the Nitrate transporter 1/Peptide Transporter family (NPF2.4). This gene was highly expressed in the root stele compared to the cortex, and its expression decreased after exposure to NaCl or abscisic acid. NPF2.4 fused to fluorescent proteins, expressed either transiently or stably, was targeted to the plasma membrane. Electrophysiological analysis of NPF2.4 in Xenopus laevis oocytes suggested that NPF2.4 catalyzed passive Cl– efflux out of cells and was much less permeable to NO3−. Shoot Cl– accumulation was decreased following NPF2.4 artificial microRNA knockdown, whereas it was increased by overexpression of NPF2.4. Taken together, these results suggest that NPF2.4 is involved in long-distance transport of Cl– in plants, playing a role in the loading and the regulation of Cl– loading into the xylem of Arabidopsis roots during salinity stress.

  12. Cookies of Bamboo Shoots as Functional Food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rika Wulandari

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The research of cookies of bamboo shoots was as functional food carried out to increase the utilization of bamboo shoots that were very potential in West Kalimantan as functional food. The bamboo soot cookies was made from dry processing of luxuriant bamboo shoots to mamboo shoots flour, and the production of bamboo shoots cookies. Results of analysis showed luxuriant bamboo shoots contained thewater 94.4 %, ash 0.28 %, protein 1.6 % fat 4.78%, carbohydrate 0.637 %, rough fibre 2.03%, vitamin C 0,003 %, phosphor 0.120 %, calcium 114 mg/kg, and sodium 27,4 mg/kg. Dry bamboo shoots were produced through the process bleaching with the solution to salt 3% and produced bamboo shoots flour with results efficiency 6,25 % and had the content of the level of water 5,66%, the level of ash 6,44 %, protein 20.9 %, fat 3.64 %, the carbohydrate 17.9 %, rough fibre 3.97%, and vitamin C 0.0021 %. Best bamboo shoots cookies that is to the C treatment variable that was produced from the mixture of bamboo shoots flour: wheat flour: maize flour = 20:60:20. Results of the analysis were based on the standard of the quality of the biscuit (SNI-0-2973-1992 showed that the product that was produced contained the water 4,14%, ash 3.22%, protein 8.95%, fat 16.5%, carbohydrate 37,01%, rough fibre 0.379%, calorie 332,34 cal, and the Executive Board’s metal < 0,040 mg/kg, Cu 1,92 mg/kg, Hg<0,004 mg/kg, as well as Zn 27,1 mg/kg. Bamboo shoots cookies that were produced were categorised as functional food that could help the process of the digestion so as to be estimated could reduce the risk of colon cancer.

  13. Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis elicits shoot proteome changes that are modified during cadmium stress alleviation in Medicago truncatula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloui, Achref; Recorbet, Ghislaine; Robert, Franck; Schoefs, Benoît; Bertrand, Martine; Henry, Céline; Gianinazzi-Pearson, Vivienne; Dumas-Gaudot, Eliane; Aschi-Smiti, Samira

    2011-05-05

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, which engage a mutualistic symbiosis with the roots of most plant species, have received much attention for their ability to alleviate heavy metal stress in plants, including cadmium (Cd). While the molecular bases of Cd tolerance displayed by mycorrhizal plants have been extensively analysed in roots, very little is known regarding the mechanisms by which legume aboveground organs can escape metal toxicity upon AM symbiosis. As a model system to address this question, we used Glomus irregulare-colonised Medicago truncatula plants, which were previously shown to accumulate and tolerate heavy metal in their shoots when grown in a substrate spiked with 2 mg Cd kg(-1). The measurement of three indicators for metal phytoextraction showed that shoots of mycorrhizal M. truncatula plants have a capacity for extracting Cd that is not related to an increase in root-to-shoot translocation rate, but to a high level of allocation plasticity. When analysing the photosynthetic performance in metal-treated mycorrhizal plants relative to those only Cd-supplied, it turned out that the presence of G. irregulare partially alleviated the negative effects of Cd on photosynthesis. To test the mechanisms by which shoots of Cd-treated mycorrhizal plants avoid metal toxicity, we performed a 2-DE/MALDI/TOF-based comparative proteomic analysis of the M. truncatula shoot responses upon mycorrhization and Cd exposure. Whereas the metal-responsive shoot proteins currently identified in non-mycorrhizal M. truncatula indicated that Cd impaired CO2 assimilation, the mycorrhiza-responsive shoot proteome was characterised by an increase in photosynthesis-related proteins coupled to a reduction in glugoneogenesis/glycolysis and antioxidant processes. By contrast, Cd was found to trigger the opposite response coupled the up-accumulation of molecular chaperones in shoot of mycorrhizal plants relative to those metal-free. Besides drawing a first picture of shoot

  14. Mass shooting and mass media : does media coverage of mass shootings inspire copycat crimes?

    OpenAIRE

    Mesoudi, A.

    2013-01-01

    In December 2012, twenty elementary school children and six adult staff members were shot and killed by a single individual at a school in Connecticut. Although this horrific event was met with widespread shock, Americans are sadly all too familiar with such mass shootings. From Columbine in 1999, to Virginia Tech in 2007, to the Colorado cinema shootings earlier in 2012, mass shootings seem to occur with alarming regularity. And although they appear to afflict the United States more than mos...

  15. [A feasibility study on the highly-efficient electronic fluorescent lamp used as a lighting source for cultivation of higher plant in space].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, S S; Xu, B

    1999-08-01

    To testify that the Highly-efficient Electronic Fluorescent Lamp (HEFL) can be used as a sole lighting source for the cultivation of higher plants in space. The HEFL was utilized as the lighting source for the culture of three varieties of Luctuca sativa L in the lately-constructed Space Higher Plant Cultivation Ground-based Experimental Facility(SHPCGEF). Other culturing conditions were: temperature 20 +/- 0.2 degrees C, relative humidity (75 +/- 1)%, average photosynthetic active radiation (PAR) 70 micromol m-2 s-1 PPF, average wind velocity 0.45 m/s, photoperiod 24 h light/0 h dark, peat + vermiculite substrate culture, useful growing area 1.2 m2, growing period 28 d, one variety was cultured at every batch. Following plant maturing and being harvested, observations of external morphology of above-ground parts of the plants, measurements and calculations of edible biomass output and photosynthetic efficiency, analysis of nutrient compositions such as proteins, fats, carbohydrates, amino acids, vitamins and elemental compositions of lettuce leaves, and comparisons with formerly-related experiments were made. All of the above-mentioned targets met our demands, some of them were superior to the results of other similar experiments. The HEFL can completely meet the needs for the growth and development of some higher plants planned to be grown in space, its physical characters basically accord with the demands, so it can be utilized as the only lighting source for higher plant growth in space environmental conditions.

  16. High dose alcohol consumption predicts less reduction in post-traumatic stress symptoms after a campus mass shooting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzman, Jacob B; Valentiner, David P; Hannan, Susan M; Wallace, Douglas G; Orcutt, Holly K

    2017-11-01

    Recognizing that alcohol might affect subsequent processing of trauma-related information, this study examined whether high dose alcohol consumption (HDAC) following a campus mass shooting affected the relation between shooting exposure and post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTSS). Female participants (N = 691) recorded levels of physical exposure to the shooting event, alcohol use, and PTSS 1 month following the shooting event and 8 months later. No evidence was found to suggest that pre-shooting HDAC moderated the relationship between trauma exposure and PTSS 1 month following the shooting. HDAC in the month following the shooting predicted less resolution of PTSS 8 months later. Specifically, at higher (but not lower) levels of HDAC, shooting exposure was associated with less reduction in PTSS from 1 to 8 months post-trauma. Several alternate explanations were ruled out. Less reduction in PTSS seems to occur at high levels of both shooting exposure and HDAC. Theoretical implications and directions for future research are discussed.

  17. Adventitious shoot regeneration from leaf explants of eastern cottonwood (Populus deltoides) cultured under photoautotrophic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingozzi, Marco; Montello, Paul; Merkle, Scott

    2009-03-01

    Effects of photoautotrophic and photomixotrophic growth conditions on adventitious shoot regeneration from leaf explants of eastern cottonwood (Populus deltoides Bartr. ex Marsh.) were investigated. Rooting and proliferating shoot cultures (Stage I) were grown in either an elevated (1500 ppm) CO(2) concentration ([CO(2)]) at high photosynthetic photon flux (PPF; ~ 150 micromol m(-2) s(-1)) (photoautotrophic condition) with 0, 10 or 30 g l(-1) sucrose or under standard conditions (ambient (360 ppm) [CO(2)] at low PPF (~ 60 micromol m(-2) s(-1)) with 30 g l(-1) sucrose). Leaves harvested from these cultures were analyzed for soluble sugars and were used as explants for adventitious shoot regeneration (Stage II), which was also carried out under photoautotrophic and standard conditions. Photoautotrophic conditions during Stage I promoted growth of rooting shoots but inhibited axillary shoot proliferation. Photoautotrophic conditions during Stage II suppressed callus and adventitious bud production from leaf explants compared with standard conditions. The regeneration environment appeared to be more important in controlling bud formation than the conditions under which the donor shoots were grown. Regardless of Stage I treatment, bud production was up to 100-fold higher for leaves cultured under standard conditions than under photoautotrophic conditions. Once adventitious buds were differentiated from the leaf tissues, however, their elongation was faster under photoautotrophic conditions than that under standard conditions, with some shoots reaching 10 mm in length on leaf explants cultured under photoautotrophic conditions. Because total leaf soluble sugar concentration was always lowest in shoots under standard conditions, which also yielded the highest bud production, the results suggest that endogenous starvation enhanced shoot production.

  18. Easy transition path sampling methods: flexible-length aimless shooting and permutation shooting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Ryan Gotchy; Shea, Joan-Emma; Peters, Baron

    2015-06-09

    We present new algorithms for conducting transition path sampling (TPS). Permutation shooting rigorously preserves the total energy and momentum of the initial trajectory and is simple to implement even for rigid water molecules. Versions of aimless shooting and permutation shooting that use flexible-length trajectories have simple acceptance criteria and are more computationally efficient than fixed-length versions. Flexible-length permutation shooting and inertial likelihood maximization are used to identify the reaction coordinate for vacancy migration in a two-dimensional trigonal crystal of Lennard-Jones particles. The optimized reaction coordinate eliminates nearly all recrossing of the transition state dividing surface.

  19. Shoot and root branch growth angle control-the wonderfulness of lateralness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roychoudhry, Suruchi; Kepinski, Stefan

    2015-02-01

    The overall shape of plants, the space they occupy above and below ground, is determined principally by the number, length, and angle of their lateral branches. The function of these shoot and root branches is to hold leaves and other organs to the sun, and below ground, to provide anchorage and facilitate the uptake of water and nutrients. While in some respects lateral roots and shoots can be considered mere iterations of the primary root-shoot axis, in others there are fundamental differences in their biology, perhaps most conspicuously in the regulation their angle of growth. Here we discuss recent advances in the understanding of the control of branch growth angle, one of the most important but least understood components of the wonderful diversity of plant form observed throughout nature. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. High-frequency shoot multiplication in Curcuma longa L using thidiazuron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prathanturarug, S; Soonthornchareonnon, N; Chuakul, W; Phaidee, Y; Saralamp, P

    2003-07-01

    The effects of plant growth regulators, explant types, and culture regimens were investigated on in vitro shoot proliferation from terminal bud explants of Curcuma longa. Each bud was longitudinally divided into four equal pieces, each 1 cm in length, and used as explants. These were then cultured on MS medium supplemented with 18.17 microM thidiazuron for 4 weeks prior to transfer to MS medium without growth regulator for 8 weeks. Under these conditions, a shoot induction rate of 18.22+/-0.62 shoots/explant was obtained after 12 weeks of cultures. Spontaneous rooting was achieved. The regenerated plants were transferred to soil under greenhouse conditions and subsequently grown successfully in the field.

  1. Vegetative propagation of Cinnamomum camphora L. Presl by shoot ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was carried out to determine shoot physiological age of the camphor tree that would promote root initiation and cuttings performance. Hundred shoot cuttings of similar diameter (0.9 cm) were selected for each shoot physiological age. The first 10 cm from the apex of the shoot was considered softwood, 10 cm from ...

  2. In vitro shoot regeneration from preconditioned explants of chickpea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2011-03-14

    Mar 14, 2011 ... cultivated edible legumes used as vegetable. Chickpeas are grown in the .... the culture medium had negative effect on shoot length and resulted in smaller shoots on both ... Effect of pre-conditioning on number of shoots and shoot length of mature embryo and embryonic axis explant of chickpea cv. Gokce.

  3. PHOSPHORYLATION/DEPHOSPHORYLATION OF MITOCHONDRIAL PROTEINS IN REDOX-SIGNALLING OF HIGHER PLANTS UNDER ABIOTIC STRESS CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subota I.Yu.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We studied an impact of the widely spread intra-cellular signals Ca2+ and сAMP on activity of the protein phosphorylation in maize mitochondria. The use of the isolated mitochondria is a convenient model system for investigation of the different physiological processes, for example for simulation of the different stress conditions. The treatment of maize mitochondria with high concentration of calcium ions which mimics the initial stage of apoptosis led to an increase of the phosphorylation level of some proteins and to an additional phosphorylation of the 59 and 66 kDa proteins. The treatment of the mitoplasts, i.e., the mitochondria devoid of the outer membrane with calcium ions insignificantly induced the activity of protein phosphorylation. It is assumed that the outer membrane is essential for Ca2+ signal transduction to plant mitochondria. We also identified a 94 kDa protein involved in phosphorylation of the mitochondrial proteins. This protein might be a single-subunit protein kinase or one of the subunits of the protein kinase complex. Antimycin A and KCN which are the inhibitors of mitochondria respiration increased the phosphorylation activity of the mitochondrial polypeptides. The effect of this inhibitors was similar both in in organello system and at the level of the whole plant. It should be noticed that at the level of the whole plant the effect of KCN on activity of the mitochondrial protein phosphorylation was more essential. Some considerable differences were found both at the level of protein phosphorylation and in electrophoresis patterns representing the intact mitochondria, the mitoplasts and the outer membrane fraction. The activity of protein phosphorylation in mitoplasts and the outer membrane fraction was extremely high compared to the phosphorylation activity of the mitochondrial proteins. This could be explained by the higher level of “substrate phosphoprotein phosphatase” in the outer membrane of mitochondria

  4. Multiplication and growth of hybrid poplar (Populus alba × P. tremula) shoots on a hormone-free medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziauka, J; Kuusienė, Sigutė

    2014-09-01

    The present study explored an alternative approach for poplar micropropagation, based on the restriction of gas exchange between inside and outside environments of culture vessel, rather than on the application of exogenous hormones. Apical and nodal stem segments (explants) excised from in vitro-developed shoots of hybrid white poplar (Populus alba L. × P. tremula L.) were incubated in either sealed (with Parafilm) or unsealed capped glass culture tubes (150 × 20 mm) on a hormone-free Woody Plant Medium. Shoot proliferation on apical explants was observed in sealed culture tubes but not in the unsealed ones; the difference between these two samples in respect of shoot number increased in the course of time and became threefold after three months of culture, with 3.2 ± 0.4 (mean ± SE) shoots per explant in the sealed tubes versus 1.1 ± 0.1 in the unsealed ones (for comparison, the mean shoot numbers on nodal explants were 2.4 ± 0.3 and 3.4 ± 0.4 in the unsealed and sealed culture tubes, respectively). Moreover, the shoots taken from the sealed culture tubes could be distinguished by superior shoot length, if compared to the shoots from the unsealed tubes, during the subsequent culture stage under uniform conditions.

  5. Prolific shoot regeneration from immature embryo explants of sainfoin (Onobrychis viciifolia Scop.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, S; Sevimay, C S; Yildiz, M; Sancak, C; Ozgen, M

    1996-12-01

    Immature cotyledons and embryo axes of sainfoin were cultured on Murashige and Skoog (MS) media supplemented with various concentrations of 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP) and a-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) to induce adventitious shoot regeneration. The highest frequency of shoot regeneration occurred following an initial callus growth on a MS medium containing 0.5 mg/l BAP and 2 mg/l NAA. Immature embryo axes showed higher regeneration capacity than immature cotyledons, however, shoot elongation was best achieved on immature cotyledons. Regenerated shoots were excised and rooted in half strength MS medium with 1 mg/l indole-butyric acid (IBA) or 1 mg/l NAA. The rooted plantlets were finally transferred to compost.

  6. Shooting mechanics related to player classification and free throw success in wheelchair basketball.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Laurie A; Gervais, Pierre L; Steadward, Robert D

    2002-01-01

    To determine what factors are associated with successful free throw (FT) shooting in wheelchair basketball and to examine the relationship between shooting mechanics and player classification, a biomechanical analysis of clean shots was undertaken. Significant differences were observed between the player classes in FT shooting mechanics employed for a clean shot. Players from Classes 1 and 2 tended to release the ball from a lower height, with greater velocity and release angle. They demonstrated a smaller shoulder flexion angle at release and a greater maximum velocity at the shoulder and elbow. The clean shots of Classes 1 and 2 demanded greater accuracy with respect to release velocity and angle, yet the resulting ball trajectory displayed a greater margin for error than the shots observed in the upper classes. However, based on overall shooting percentage, the upper classes did not appear to take advantage of the predicted benefits provided by a higher ball release height.

  7. Transport and compartmentation of phosphite in higher plant cells - kinetic and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Danova-Alt, R.; Dijkema, C.; Waard, de P.; Köck, M.

    2008-01-01

    Phosphite (Phi, H(2)PO(3)(-)), being the active part of several fungicides, has been shown to influence not only the fungal metabolism but also the development of phosphate-deficient plants. However, the mechanism of phosphite effects on plants is still widely unknown. In this paper we analysed

  8. Shoot organogenesis in leaf explants of Hydrangea macrophylla ‘Hyd1’ and assessing genetic stability of regenerants using ISSR markers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, F.; Huang, L.L.; Reinhoud, P.; Jongsma, M.A.; Wang, C.

    2011-01-01

    For the first time, an in vitro regeneration protocol of Hydrangea macrophylla 'Hyd1' was developed. Effects of different plant growth regulators (PGRs) on shoot regeneration were investigated jointly with selecting optimal basal media and cefotaxime concentrations. The highest frequency of shoot

  9. Metabolic adaptations of white lupin roots and shoots under phosphorus deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia eMüller

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available White lupin (Lupinus albus L. is highly adapted to phosphorus-diminished soils. P-deficient white lupin plants modify their root architecture and physiology to acquire sparingly available soil phosphorus. We employed gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC MS for metabolic profiling of P-deficient white lupins, to investigate biochemical pathways involved in the P-acquiring strategy. After 14 days of P-deficiency, plants showed reduced levels of fructose, glucose and sucrose in shoots. Phosphorylated metabolites such as glucose-6-phosphate, fructose-6-phosphate, myo-inositol-phosphate and glycerol-3-phosphate were reduced in both shoots and roots. After 22 days of P-deficiency, no effect on shoot or root sugar metabolite levels was found, but the levels of phosphorylated metabolites were further reduced. Organic acids, amino acids and several shikimate pathway products showed enhanced levels in 22-day-old P-deficient roots and shoots. These results indicate that P-deficient white lupins adapt their carbohydrate partitioning between shoot and root in order to supply their growing root system as an early response to P-deficiency. Organic acids are released into the rhizosphere to mobilize phosphorus from soil particles. A longer period of P-deficiency leads to scavenging of Pi from P-containing metabolites and reduced protein anabolism, but enhanced formation of secondary metabolites. The latter can serve as stress protection molecules or actively acquire phosphorus from the soil.

  10. Metabolic Adaptations of White Lupin Roots and Shoots under Phosphorus Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Julia; Gödde, Victoria; Niehaus, Karsten; Zörb, Christian

    2015-01-01

    White lupin (Lupinus albus L.) is highly adapted to phosphorus-diminished soils. P-deficient white lupin plants modify their root architecture and physiology to acquire sparingly available soil phosphorus. We employed gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for metabolic profiling of P-deficient white lupins, to investigate biochemical pathways involved in the P-acquiring strategy. After 14 days of P-deficiency, plants showed reduced levels of fructose, glucose, and sucrose in shoots. Phosphorylated metabolites such as glucose-6-phosphate, fructose-6-phosphate, myo-inositol-phosphate and glycerol-3-phosphate were reduced in both shoots and roots. After 22 days of P-deficiency, no effect on shoot or root sugar metabolite levels was found, but the levels of phosphorylated metabolites were further reduced. Organic acids, amino acids and several shikimate pathway products showed enhanced levels in 22-day-old P-deficient roots and shoots. These results indicate that P-deficient white lupins adapt their carbohydrate partitioning between shoot and root in order to supply their growing root system as an early response to P-deficiency. Organic acids are released into the rhizosphere to mobilize phosphorus from soil particles. A longer period of P-deficiency leads to scavenging of Pi from P-containing metabolites and reduced protein anabolism, but enhanced formation of secondary metabolites. The latter can serve as stress protection molecules or actively acquire phosphorus from the soil.

  11. Understanding water deficit stress-induced changes in the basic metabolism of higher plants - biotechnologically and sustainably improving agriculture and the ecoenvironment in arid regions of the globe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Hong-Bo; Chu, Li-Ye; Jaleel, C Abdul; Manivannan, P; Panneerselvam, R; Shao, Ming-An

    2009-01-01

    Water is vital for plant growth, development and productivity. Permanent or temporary water deficit stress limits the growth and distribution of natural and artificial vegetation and the performance of cultivated plants (crops) more than any other environmental factor. Productive and sustainable agriculture necessitates growing plants (crops) in arid and semiarid regions with less input of precious resources such as fresh water. For a better understanding and rapid improvement of soil-water stress tolerance in these regions, especially in the water-wind eroded crossing region, it is very important to link physiological and biochemical studies to molecular work in genetically tractable model plants and important native plants, and further extending them to practical ecological restoration and efficient crop production. Although basic studies and practices aimed at improving soil water stress resistance and plant water use efficiency have been carried out for many years, the mechanisms involved at different scales are still not clear. Further understanding and manipulating soil-plant water relationships and soil-water stress tolerance at the scales of ecology, physiology and molecular biology can significantly improve plant productivity and environmental quality. Currently, post-genomics and metabolomics are very important in exploring anti-drought gene resources in various life forms, but modern agriculturally sustainable development must be combined with plant physiological measures in the field, on the basis of which post-genomics and metabolomics have further practical prospects. In this review, we discuss physiological and molecular insights and effects in basic plant metabolism, drought tolerance strategies under drought conditions in higher plants for sustainable agriculture and ecoenvironments in arid and semiarid areas of the world. We conclude that biological measures are the bases for the solutions to the issues relating to the different types of

  12. Snf2 family gene distribution in higher plant genomes reveals DRD1 expansion and diversification in the tomato genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim W Bargsten

    Full Text Available As part of large protein complexes, Snf2 family ATPases are responsible for energy supply during chromatin remodeling, but the precise mechanism of action of many of these proteins is largely unknown. They influence many processes in plants, such as the response to environmental stress. This analysis is the first comprehensive study of Snf2 family ATPases in plants. We here present a comparative analysis of 1159 candidate plant Snf2 genes in 33 complete and annotated plant genomes, including two green algae. The number of Snf2 ATPases shows considerable variation across plant genomes (17-63 genes. The DRD1, Rad5/16 and Snf2 subfamily members occur most often. Detailed analysis of the plant-specific DRD1 subfamily in related plant genomes shows the occurrence of a complex series of evolutionary events. Notably tomato carries unexpected gene expansions of DRD1 gene members. Most of these genes are expressed in tomato, although at low levels and with distinct tissue or organ specificity. In contrast, the Snf2 subfamily genes tend to be expressed constitutively in tomato. The results underpin and extend the Snf2 subfamily classification, which could help to determine the various functional roles of Snf2 ATPases and to target environmental stress tolerance and yield in future breeding.

  13. In vitro shoot multiplication of Ziziphus spina-christi by shoot tip culture

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sulaiman, MN Barakat. Abstract. In vitro shoot multiplications were obtained successfully from shoot tips of Ziziphus spina-christi by placing explants into solidified medium (MS medium) supplemented with 0.01 mg/l NAA and 0.1 mg/l BA or 0.1 ...

  14. Differentiating Arabidopsis Shoots from Leaves by Combined YABBY Activities[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarojam, Rajani; Sappl, Pia G.; Goldshmidt, Alexander; Efroni, Idan; Floyd, Sandra K.; Eshed, Yuval; Bowman, John L.

    2010-01-01

    In seed plants, leaves are born on radial shoots, but unlike shoots, they are determinate dorsiventral organs made of flat lamina. YABBY genes are found only in seed plants and in all cases studied are expressed primarily in lateral organs and in a polar manner. Despite their simple expression, Arabidopsis thaliana plants lacking all YABBY gene activities have a wide range of morphological defects in all lateral organs as well as the shoot apical meristem (SAM). Here, we show that leaves lacking all YABBY activities are initiated as dorsiventral appendages but fail to properly activate lamina programs. In particular, the activation of most CINCINNATA-class TCP genes does not commence, SAM-specific programs are reactivated, and a marginal leaf domain is not established. Altered distribution of auxin signaling and the auxin efflux carrier PIN1, highly reduced venation, initiation of multiple cotyledons, and gradual loss of the SAM accompany these defects. We suggest that YABBY functions were recruited to mold modified shoot systems into flat plant appendages by translating organ polarity into lamina-specific programs that include marginal auxin flow and activation of a maturation schedule directing determinate growth. PMID:20628155

  15. Water deficit stress effects on corn (Zea mays, L.) root: shoot ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    A study was conducted at Akron, CO, USA, on a Weld silt loam in 2004 to quantify the effects of water deficit stress on corn (Zea mays, L.) root and shoot biomass. Corn plants were grown under a range of soil bulk density and water conditions caused by previous tillage, crop rotation, and irrigation...

  16. Somatic embryogenesis and shoot regeneration from excised adventitious roots of the rootstock Rosa hybrida L. 'Moneyway'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salm, van der T.P.M.; Toorn, van der C.J.G.; Hänisch ten Cate, C.H.; Dons, J.J.M.

    1996-01-01

    Plants were regenerated from excised adventitious roots of the rose rootstock 'Moneyway' via a three step procedure: callus induction, induction of somatic embryos and shoot development. Callus was induced on excised roots after incubation for 4 weeks in the dark on SH-medium (Schenk and

  17. Effects of carbon levels on shoot growth and root characteristics of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of carbon levels on shoot growth and root characteristics of five kenaf varieties were assessed in a shade house experiment. The kenaf plants were grown in pots containing sandy beach ridges interspersed with swales (BRIS) soil. Organic carbons at levels of 0, 10, 20 and 30 t ha-1 were applied to pots using ...

  18. A DHHC-type zinc finger protein gene regulates shoot branching in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Formation of plant architecture is a complicated biological phenomenon and is influenced by a variety of factors such as genotype, hormone, environment and nutrition. In this study, an activation-tagging mutant, scc10-D (suppressor of cry1cry2) grown in long-day (16-h light/8-h dark) condition showed enhanced shoot ...

  19. Development of frost tolerance in winter wheat as modulated by differential root and shoot temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Windt, C.W.; van Hasselt, P.R

    Winter wheat plants (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Urban), grown in nutrient solution, were exposed to differential shoot/root temperatures (i.e., 4/4, 4/20, 20/4 and 20/20 degrees C) for six weeks. Leaves grown at 4 degrees C showed an increase in frost tolerance from - 4 degrees C down to -11 degrees

  20. In vitro establishment of Vasconcellea x helbornii (Badillo Badillo shoots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Jadán Guerrero

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Babaco [Vasconcellea x helbornii (Badillo Badillo] is a specie of commercial importance in Ecuador. The present work aimed to establish in vitro shoots of axillary buds from mother plants of babaco kept in greenhouse. Carbendazim and the biostimulant (GERMO-TB01 were applied to the plants. For the disinfection of the explants, three concentrations of Sodium Hypochlorite (1, 1.5 and 2% were evaluated during two times (5 and 10 minutes. In addition, the effect of the use of Gentamicin 50 mg l-1 and Streptomycin 25 mg l-1 in the culture medium was determined. The best results were achieved by using 1.5% Sodium Hypochlorite for 10 minutes and immersion in a solution with both antibiotics for 3 hours. A 68.5% in vitro establishment of the shoots was achieved at 21 days of culture. The results will contribute to in vitro mass propagation of this hybrid.   Key words: antibiotic mixture, babaco, disinfection, micropropagation